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Sample records for active normal modes

  1. Normal Modes Expose Active Sites in Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Glantz-Gashai, Yitav; Samson, Abraham O.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of active sites is an important tool in bioinformatics. Here we present an improved structure based technique to expose active sites that is based on large changes of solvent accessibility accompanying normal mode dynamics. The technique which detects EXPOsure of active SITes through normal modEs is named EXPOSITE. The technique is trained using a small 133 enzyme dataset and tested using a large 845 enzyme dataset, both with known active site residues. EXPOSITE is also tested in a benchmark protein ligand dataset (PLD) comprising 48 proteins with and without bound ligands. EXPOSITE is shown to successfully locate the active site in most instances, and is found to be more accurate than other structure-based techniques. Interestingly, in several instances, the active site does not correspond to the largest pocket. EXPOSITE is advantageous due to its high precision and paves the way for structure based prediction of active site in enzymes. PMID:28002427

  2. Terahertz normal mode relaxation in pentaerythritol tetranitrate.

    PubMed

    Pereverzev, Andrey; Sewell, Thomas D

    2011-01-07

    Normal vibrational modes for a three-dimensional defect-free crystal of the high explosive pentaerythritol tetranitrate were obtained in the framework of classical mechanics using a previously published unreactive potential-energy surface [J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 734 (2008)]. Using these results the vibrational density of states was obtained for the entire vibrational frequency range. Relaxation of selectively excited terahertz-active modes was studied using isochoric-isoergic (NVE) molecular dynamics simulations for energy and density conditions corresponding to room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Dependence of the relaxation time on the initial modal excitation was considered for five excitation energies between 10 and 500 kT and shown to be relatively weak. The terahertz absorption spectrum was constructed directly using linewidths obtained from the relaxation times of the excited modes for the case of 10 kT excitation. The spectrum shows reasonably good agreement with experimental results. Dynamics of redistribution of the excited mode energy among the other normal modes was also studied. The results indicate that, for the four terahertz-active initially excited modes considered, there is a small subset of zero wave vector (k = 0) modes that preferentially absorb the energy on a few-picosecond time scale. The majority of the excitation energy, however, is transferred nonspecifically to the bath modes of the system.

  3. Anomalous normal mode oscillations in semiconductor microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Hou, H.Q.; Hammons, B.E.

    1997-04-01

    Semiconductor microcavities as a composite exciton-cavity system can be characterized by two normal modes. Under an impulsive excitation by a short laser pulse, optical polarizations associated with the two normal modes have a {pi} phase difference. The total induced optical polarization is then expected to exhibit a sin{sup 2}({Omega}t)-like oscillation where 2{Omega} is the normal mode splitting, reflecting a coherent energy exchange between the exciton and cavity. In this paper the authors present experimental studies of normal mode oscillations using three-pulse transient four wave mixing (FWM). The result reveals surprisingly that when the cavity is tuned far below the exciton resonance, normal mode oscillation in the polarization is cos{sup 2}({Omega}t)-like, in contrast to what is expected form the simple normal mode model. This anomalous normal mode oscillation reflects the important role of virtual excitation of electronic states in semiconductor microcavities.

  4. Normal modes of a small gamelan gong.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Robert; Elford, Daniel P; Chalmers, Luke; Swallowe, Gerry M; Moore, Thomas R; Hamdan, Sinin; Halkon, Benjamin J

    2014-10-01

    Studies have been made of the normal modes of a 20.7 cm diameter steel gamelan gong. A finite-element model has been constructed and its predictions for normal modes compared with experimental results obtained using electronic speckle pattern interferometry. Agreement was reasonable in view of the lack of precision in the manufacture of the instrument. The results agree with expectations for an axially symmetric system subject to small symmetry breaking. The extent to which the results obey Chladni's law is discussed. Comparison with vibrational and acoustical spectra enabled the identification of the small number of modes responsible for the sound output when played normally. Evidence of non-linear behavior was found, mainly in the form of subharmonics of true modes. Experiments using scanning laser Doppler vibrometry gave satisfactory agreement with the other methods.

  5. Normal Modes of Black Hole Accretion Disks

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega-Rodriguez, Manuel; Silbergleit, Alexander S.; Wagoner, Robert V.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-11-07

    This paper studies the hydrodynamical problem of normal modes of small adiabatic oscillations of relativistic barotropic thin accretion disks around black holes (and compact weakly magnetic neutron stars). Employing WKB techniques, we obtain the eigen frequencies and eigenfunctions of the modes for different values of the mass and angular momentum of the central black hole. We discuss the properties of the various types of modes and examine the role of viscosity, as it appears to render some of the modes unstable to rapid growth.

  6. Normal modes of confined cold ionic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, J.P.; Dubin, D.H.

    1995-08-01

    The normal modes of a cloud of confined ions forming a strongly-correlated plasma were investigated. The results of molecular-dynamics simulations were compared to predictions of a cold fluid mode. Mode frequencies are observed to shift slightly compared to the cold fluid predictions, and the modes are also observed to damp in time. Simulations also reveal a set of torsional oscillations which have no counterpart in cold fluid theory. The frequency shift, damping, and torsional effects are compared to a model that treats trapped plasmas as a visco-elastic spheroid. It may be possible to measure high-frequency bulk and shear moduli of a strongly-correlated plasma from mode excitation experiments on trapped non-neutral plasmas. An example of the results of the calculation is presented.

  7. Normal modes and mode transformation of pure electron vortex beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirunavukkarasu, G.; Mousley, M.; Babiker, M.; Yuan, J.

    2017-02-01

    Electron vortex beams constitute the first class of matter vortex beams which are currently routinely produced in the laboratory. Here, we briefly review the progress of this nascent field and put forward a natural quantum basis set which we show is suitable for the description of electron vortex beams. The normal modes are truncated Bessel beams (TBBs) defined in the aperture plane or the Fourier transform of the transverse structure of the TBBs (FT-TBBs) in the focal plane of a lens with the said aperture. As these modes are eigenfunctions of the axial orbital angular momentum operator, they can provide a complete description of the two-dimensional transverse distribution of the wave function of any electron vortex beam in such a system, in analogy with the prominent role Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beams played in the description of optical vortex beams. The characteristics of the normal modes of TBBs and FT-TBBs are described, including the quantized orbital angular momentum (in terms of the winding number l) and the radial index p>0. We present the experimental realization of such beams using computer-generated holograms. The mode analysis can be carried out using astigmatic transformation optics, demonstrating close analogy with the astigmatic mode transformation between LG and Hermite-Gaussian beams. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  8. Global normal mode planetary wave activity: a study using TIMED/SABER observations from the stratosphere to the mesosphere-lower thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Sherine Rachel; Kumar, Karanam Kishore

    2016-12-01

    A comprehensive study of three normal mode travelling planetary waves, namely the quasi-16, -10 and -5 day waves, is carried out globally using 5 years (2003-2007) of TIMED/SABER temperature measurements from the stratosphere to the mesosphere-lower thermosphere (MLT) by employing the two dimensional Fourier decomposition technique. From preliminary analysis, it is found that significant amplitudes of normal modes are confined to wave numbers-2 (westward propagating modes) to 2 (eastward propagating modes). The westward propagating quasi 16-day waves with zonal wave number 1 (W1; W1 refers to westward propagating wave with zonal wave number 1) peaks over winter-hemispheric high latitudes with northern hemisphere (NH) having higher amplitudes as compared to their southern hemispheric (SH) counterpart. The W1 quasi 16-day waves exhibit a double peak structure in altitude over winter hemispheric high latitudes. The eastward propagating quasi 16-day waves with wave number 1 (E1; E1 refers to eastward propagating wave with zonal wave number 1) exhibits similar features as that of W1 waves in the NH. In contrast, the E1 quasi 16-day waves in the SH show larger amplitudes as compared to the W1 waves and they do not exhibit double peak structure in altitude. Similar to the quasi 16-day waves, the quasi 10- and 5-day wave amplitudes with respect to their wavenumbers are delineated. Unlike quasi-16 and -10 day waves, quasi-5 day waves peak during vernal equinox both in the SH and NH. The peak activity of the W1 quasi-5 day wave is centered around 40°N and 40°S exhibiting symmetry with respect to the equator. A detailed discussion on the height-latitude structure, interannual variability and inter-hemispheric propagation of quasi 16-, 10- and 5-day waves are discussed. The significance of the present study lies in establishing the 5-year climatology of normal mode planetary waves from the stratosphere to the MLT region including their spatial-temporal evolution, which are

  9. Modeling seismic noise by normal mode summation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualtieri, L.; Stutzmann, E.; Capdeville, Y.; Ardhuin, F.; Schimmel, M.; Mangeney, A.; Morelli, A.

    2012-12-01

    Cross-correlation of ambient seismic noise plays a fundamental role to extract and better understand seismic properties of the Earth. The knowledge of the distribution of noise sources and the theory behind the seismic noise generation turns out to be of fundamental importance in the study of seismic noise cross-correlation. To improve these knowledge, we model the secondary microseismic noise, i.e. the period band 5-12 s, using normal mode summation and focus our attention on the noise sources distribution varying both in space and in time. Longuet-Higgins (1950) showed that the sources of the secondary microseismic noise are due to the pressure fluctuations that are generated by the interaction of ocean waves either in deep ocean or close by the coast and due to coastal reflection. Considering a recent ocean wave model (Ardhuin et al., 2011) that takes into account coastal reflection, we compute the vertical force due to the pressure fluctuation that has to be applied at the surface of the ocean. Noise sources are discretized in a spherical grid with constant resolution of 50 km and they are used to compute synthetic seismograms and spectra by normal mode summation. We show that we retrieve the maximum force amplitude for periods of 6-7 s which is consistent with the position of the maximum peak in the spectra and that, for long period in the secondary microseismic band, i.e. around 12 s, mostly the sources generated by coastal reflection have a strong influence on the microseism generation. We also show that the displacement of the ground is amplified in relation with the ocean bathymetry in agreement with Longuet-Higgins' theory and that the ocean site amplification can be computed using normal modes. We investigate also the role of the attenuation considering sources at regional scale. We are able to reproduce seasonal variations and to identify the noise sources having the main contribution in the spectra. We obtain a good agreement between synthetic and real

  10. Normal mode study of the earth's rigid body motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. F.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper it is shown that the earth's rigid body (rb) motions can be represented by an analytical set of eigensolutions to the equation of motion for elastic-gravitational free oscillations. Thus each degree of freedom in the rb motion is associated with a rb normal mode. Cases of both nonrotating and rotating earth models are studied, and it is shown that the rb modes do incorporate neatly into the earth's system of normal modes of free oscillation. The excitation formula for the rb modes are also obtained, based on normal mode theory. Physical implications of the results are summarized and the fundamental differences between rb modes and seismic modes are emphasized. In particular, it is ascertained that the Chandler wobble, being one of the rb modes belonging to the rotating earth, can be studied using the established theory of normal modes.

  11. Modeling seismic noise by normal mode summation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualtieri, L.; Stutzmann, E.; Capdeville, Y.; Ardhuin, F.; Schimmel, M.; Mangeney, A.; Morelli, A.

    2012-04-01

    Microseismic noise is the continuous oscillation of the ground in the period band 5-20 s. We observe seasonal variations of this noise that are stable over the last 20 years. Microseism spectra display 2 peaks, and the strongest peak, in the period band 5-12 s, correspond to the so called secondary microseism. Longuet-Higgins (1950) showed that the corresponding sources are pressure fluctuations that are generated by the interaction of ocean waves either in deep ocean or due to coastal reflection. Considering an ocean wave model that takes into account coastal reflection, we compute the pressure fluctuation as a vertical force applied at the surface of the ocean. The sources are discretized in a spherical grid with constant grid spacing of 50 km. We then compute the synthetic spectra by normal mode summation in a realistic Earth model. We show that the maximum force amplitude is for periods 6-7 s which is consistent with the period of the seismic spectra maximum peak and that, for periods around 12 s, only the sources generated by coastal reflection have a strong influence for the microseism generation. We also show that the displacement of the ground is amplified in relation with the ocean bathymetry in agreement with Longuet-Higgins' theory. We obtain a good agreement between synthetic and real seismic spectra in the period band 5-12sec. Modeling seismic noise is a useful tool for selecting particular noise data such as the strongest peaks and further investigating the corresponding sources. These noise sources may then be used for tomography.

  12. Normal mode sound field of a directional radiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R.; Zhu, B.

    1987-12-01

    In this paper, the sound field of a general type of directional radiator in a stratified medium is treated, and the concept of directivity is applied to calculation of the normal modes. The result shows that the normal mode field of a directional radiator can be obtained by supplementing the normal mode expression of an omnidirectional point source with the directional excitation function, which is dependent on the position and directivity of the radiator. In addition, the normal mode fields of radiators with vertical-symmetrical, vertical-antisymmetrical, single-sided and sharp directivities are calculated, respectively. For a vertical line array in a homogeneous water layer, if the source distribution is proportional to the eigenfunction of some normal mode, the zeros of the directional excitation function correspond precisely to the directions of the eigenrays of other normal modes.

  13. Atmospheric Excitation of Planetary Normal Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanimoto, Toshiro

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to: (1) understand the phenomenon of continuous free oscillations of the Earth and (2) examine the idea of using this phenomenon for planetary seismology. We first describe the results on (1) and present our evaluations of the idea (2) in the final section. In 1997, after almost forty years since the initial attempt by Benioff et al, continuous free oscillations of the Earth were discovered. Spheroidal fundamental modes between 2 and 7 millihertz are excited continuously with acceleration amplitudes of about 0.3-0.5 nanogals. The signal is now commonly found in virtually all data recorded by STS-1 type broadband seismometers at quiet sites. Seasonal variation in amplitude and the existence of two coupled modes between the atmosphere and the solid Earth support that these oscillations are excited by the atmosphere. Stochastic excitation due to atmospheric turbulence is a favored mechanism, providing a good match between theory and data. The atmosphere has ample energy to support this theory because excitation of these modes require only 500-10000 W whereas the atmosphere contains about 117 W of kinetic energy. An application of this phenomenon includes planetary seismology, because other planets may be oscillating due to atmospheric excitation. The interior structure of planets could be learned by determining the eigenfrequencies in the continuous free oscillations. It is especially attractive to pursue this idea for tectonically quiet planets, since quakes may be too infrequent to be recorded by seismic instruments.

  14. A normal-mode approach to Jovian atmospheric dynamic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achterberg, Richard K.; Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    1989-01-01

    A nonlinear, quasi-geostrophic, baroclinic model of Jovian atmospheric dynamics is proposed, in which vertical variations of velocity are represented by a truncated sum over a complete set of orthogonal functions obtained by a separation of variables of the linearized quasi-geostrophic potential vorticity equation. A set of equations for the time variation of the mode amplitudes in the nonlinear case is then derived. It is shown that, for a planet with a neutrally stable, fluid interior instead of a solid lower boundary, the barotropic mode represents motions in the interior, and is not affected by the baroclinic modes. One consequence of this is that a normal-mode model with one baroclinic mode is dynamically equivalent to a one-layer model with solid lower topography. It is also shown that, for motions in Jupiter's cloudy lower troposphere, the stratosphere behaves nearly as a rigid lid, so that the normal-mode is applicable to Jupiter. The accuracy of the normal-mode model for Jupiter is tested using the following simple problems: (1) forced, vertically propagating Rossby waves, using two and three baroclinic modes, and (2) baroclinic instability, using two baroclinic modes. It is found that the normal-mode model provides qualitatively correct results, even with only a very limited number of vertical degrees of freedom.

  15. Instantaneous Normal Modes and the Protein Glass Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Roland; Krishnan, Marimuthu; Daidone, Isabella; Smith, Jeremy C

    2009-01-01

    In the instantaneous normal mode method, normal mode analysis is performed at instantaneous configurations of a condensed-phase system, leading to modes with negative eigenvalues. These negative modes provide a means of characterizing local anharmonicities of the potential energy surface. Here, we apply instantaneous normal mode to analyze temperature-dependent diffusive dynamics in molecular dynamics simulations of a small protein (a scorpion toxin). Those characteristics of the negative modes are determined that correlate with the dynamical (or glass) transition behavior of the protein, as manifested as an increase in the gradient with T of the average atomic mean-square displacement at 220 K. The number of negative eigenvalues shows no transition with temperature. Further, although filtering the negative modes to retain only those with eigenvectors corresponding to double-well potentials does reveal a transition in the hydration water, again, no transition in the protein is seen. However, additional filtering of the protein double-well modes, so as to retain only those that, on energy minimization, escape to different regions of configurational space, finally leads to clear protein dynamical transition behavior. Partial minimization of instantaneous configurations is also found to remove nondiffusive imaginary modes. In summary, examination of the form of negative instantaneous normal modes is shown to furnish a physical picture of local diffusive dynamics accompanying the protein glass transition.

  16. Normal-Mode Force APPROPRIATION—THEORY and Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, J. R.; Cooper, J. E.; Desforges, M. J.

    1999-03-01

    Normal-mode force appropriation is a method of physically exciting and measuring the undamped natural frequencies and normal-mode shapes of a structure which is distinct from the more common phase separation approaches. In this paper, the theory of normal modes and force appropriation is reviewed and a comparison made of a number of common force appropriation techniques. Both simulated and experimental data are used to highlight the relative merits of the different approaches, and comparisons to phase separation results are presented. Further advancements and applications of normal-mode testing—to non-proportionally damped structures, non-linear structures and consideration of the optimal exciter placement problem—are also discussed.

  17. Relating normal vibrational modes to local vibrational modes with the help of an adiabatic connection scheme.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wenli; Kalescky, Robert; Kraka, Elfi; Cremer, Dieter

    2012-08-28

    Information on the electronic structure of a molecule and its chemical bonds is encoded in the molecular normal vibrational modes. However, normal vibrational modes result from a coupling of local vibrational modes, which means that only the latter can provide detailed insight into bonding and other structural features. In this work, it is proven that the adiabatic internal coordinate vibrational modes of Konkoli and Cremer [Int. J. Quantum Chem. 67, 29 (1998)] represent a unique set of local modes that is directly related to the normal vibrational modes. The missing link between these two sets of modes are the compliance constants of Decius, which turn out to be the reciprocals of the local mode force constants of Konkoli and Cremer. Using the compliance constants matrix, the local mode frequencies of any molecule can be converted into its normal mode frequencies with the help of an adiabatic connection scheme that defines the coupling of the local modes in terms of coupling frequencies and reveals how avoided crossings between the local modes lead to changes in the character of the normal modes.

  18. High-Frequency Normal Mode Propagation in Aluminum Cylinders

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.; Waite, William F.

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic measurements made using compressional-wave (P-wave) and shear-wave (S-wave) transducers in aluminum cylinders reveal waveform features with high amplitudes and with velocities that depend on the feature's dominant frequency. In a given waveform, high-frequency features generally arrive earlier than low-frequency features, typical for normal mode propagation. To analyze these waveforms, the elastic equation is solved in a cylindrical coordinate system for the high-frequency case in which the acoustic wavelength is small compared to the cylinder geometry, and the surrounding medium is air. Dispersive P- and S-wave normal mode propagations are predicted to exist, but owing to complex interference patterns inside a cylinder, the phase and group velocities are not smooth functions of frequency. To assess the normal mode group velocities and relative amplitudes, approximate dispersion relations are derived using Bessel functions. The utility of the normal mode theory and approximations from a theoretical and experimental standpoint are demonstrated by showing how the sequence of P- and S-wave normal mode arrivals can vary between samples of different size, and how fundamental normal modes can be mistaken for the faster, but significantly smaller amplitude, P- and S-body waves from which P- and S-wave speeds are calculated.

  19. Universal spectrum of normal modes in low-temperature glasses

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Silvio; Parisi, Giorgio; Urbani, Pierfrancesco; Zamponi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    We report an analytical study of the vibrational spectrum of the simplest model of jamming, the soft perceptron. We identify two distinct classes of soft modes. The first kind of modes are related to isostaticity and appear only in the close vicinity of the jamming transition. The second kind of modes instead are present everywhere in the glass phase and are related to the hierarchical structure of the potential energy landscape. Our results highlight the universality of the spectrum of normal modes in disordered systems, and open the way toward a detailed analytical understanding of the vibrational spectrum of low-temperature glasses. PMID:26561585

  20. Normal mode Rossby waves observed in the upper stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirooka, T.; Hirota, I.

    1985-01-01

    In recent years, observational evidence has been obtained for westward traveling planetary waves in the middle atmosphere with the aid of global data from satellites. There is no doubt that the fair portion of the observed traveling waves can be understood as the manifestation of the normal mode Rossby waves which are theoretically derived from the tidal theory. Some observational aspects of the structure and behavior of the normal model Rossby waves in the upper stratosphere are reported. The data used are the global stratospheric geopotential thickness and height analyses which are derived mainly from the Stratospheric Sounding Units (SSUs) on board TIROS-N and NOAA satellites. A clear example of the influence of the normal mode Rossby wave on the mean flow is reported. The mechanism considered is interference between the normal mode Rossby wave and the quasi-stationary wave.

  1. Quasi-Normal Modes of Stars and Black Holes.

    PubMed

    Kokkotas, Kostas D; Schmidt, Bernd G

    1999-01-01

    Perturbations of stars and black holes have been one of the main topics of relativistic astrophysics for the last few decades. They are of particular importance today, because of their relevance to gravitational wave astronomy. In this review we present the theory of quasi-normal modes of compact objects from both the mathematical and astrophysical points of view. The discussion includes perturbations of black holes (Schwarzschild, Reissner-Nordström, Kerr and Kerr-Newman) and relativistic stars (non-rotating and slowly-rotating). The properties of the various families of quasi-normal modes are described, and numerical techniques for calculating quasi-normal modes reviewed. The successes, as well as the limits, of perturbation theory are presented, and its role in the emerging era of numerical relativity and supercomputers is discussed.

  2. Mean flow generation mechanism by inertial waves and normal modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, Andreas; Ghasemi, Abouzar

    2016-04-01

    The mean flow generation mechanism by nonlinearity of the inertial normal modes and inertial wave beams in a rotating annular cavity with longitudinally librating walls in stable regime is discussed. Inertial normal modes (standing waves) are excited when libration frequency matches eigenfrequencies of the system. Inertial wave beams are produced by Ekman pumping and suction in a rotating cylinder and form periodic orbits or periodic ray trajectories at selected frequencies. Inertial wave beams emerge as concentrated shear layers in a librating annular cavity, while normal modes appear as global recirculation cells. Both (inertial wave beam and mode) are helical and thus intrinsically non-linear flow structures. No second mode or wave is necessary for non-linearity. We considered the low order normal modes (1,1), (2,1) and (2,2) which are expected to be excited in the planetary objects and investigate the mean flow generation mechanism using two independent solutions: 1) analytical solution (Borcia 2012) and 2) the wave component of the flow (ω0 component) obtained from the direct numerical simulation (DNS). It is well known that a retrograde bulk mean flow is generated by the Ekman boundary layer and E1/4-Stewartson layer close to the outer cylinder side wall due to libration. At and around the normal mode resonant frequencies we found additionally a prograde azimuthal mean flow (Inertial Normal Mode Mean Flow: INMMF) in the bulk of the fluid. The fluid in the bulk is in geostrophic balance in the absence of the inertial normal modes. However, when INMMF is excited, we found that the geostrophic balance does not hold in the region occupied by INMMF. We hypothesize that INMMF is generated by the nonlinearity of the normal modes or by second order effects. Expanding the velocity {V}(u_r,u_θ,u_z) and pressure (p) in a power series in ɛ (libration amplitude), the Navier-Stokes equations are segregated into the linear and nonlinear parts at orders ɛ1 and ɛ^2

  3. Nonlinear normal modes modal interactions and isolated resonance curves

    SciTech Connect

    Kuether, Robert J.; Renson, L.; Detroux, T.; Grappasonni, C.; Kerschen, G.; Allen, M. S.

    2015-05-21

    The objective of the present study is to explore the connection between the nonlinear normal modes of an undamped and unforced nonlinear system and the isolated resonance curves that may appear in the damped response of the forced system. To this end, an energy balance technique is used to predict the amplitude of the harmonic forcing that is necessary to excite a specific nonlinear normal mode. A cantilever beam with a nonlinear spring at its tip serves to illustrate the developments. Furthermore, the practical implications of isolated resonance curves are also discussed by computing the beam response to sine sweep excitations of increasing amplitudes.

  4. Nonlinear normal modes modal interactions and isolated resonance curves

    DOE PAGES

    Kuether, Robert J.; Renson, L.; Detroux, T.; ...

    2015-05-21

    The objective of the present study is to explore the connection between the nonlinear normal modes of an undamped and unforced nonlinear system and the isolated resonance curves that may appear in the damped response of the forced system. To this end, an energy balance technique is used to predict the amplitude of the harmonic forcing that is necessary to excite a specific nonlinear normal mode. A cantilever beam with a nonlinear spring at its tip serves to illustrate the developments. Furthermore, the practical implications of isolated resonance curves are also discussed by computing the beam response to sine sweepmore » excitations of increasing amplitudes.« less

  5. Instantaneous normal mode analysis of melting of finite dust clusters.

    PubMed

    Melzer, André; Schella, André; Schablinski, Jan; Block, Dietmar; Piel, Alexander

    2012-06-01

    The experimental melting transition of finite two-dimensional dust clusters in a dusty plasma is analyzed using the method of instantaneous normal modes. In the experiment, dust clusters are heated in a thermodynamic equilibrium from a solid to a liquid state using a four-axis laser manipulation system. The fluid properties of the dust cluster, such as the diffusion constant, are measured from the instantaneous normal mode analysis. Thereby, the phase transition of these finite clusters is approached from the liquid phase. From the diffusion constants, unique melting temperatures have been assigned to dust clusters of various sizes that very well reflect their dynamical stability properties.

  6. Modelling secondary microseismic noise by normal mode summation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualtieri, L.; Stutzmann, E.; Capdeville, Y.; Ardhuin, F.; Schimmel, M.; Mangeney, A.; Morelli, A.

    2013-06-01

    Secondary microseisms recorded by seismic stations are generated in the ocean by the interaction of ocean gravity waves. We present here the theory for modelling secondary microseismic noise by normal mode summation. We show that the noise sources can be modelled by vertical forces and how to derive them from a realistic ocean wave model. We then show how to compute bathymetry excitation effect in a realistic earth model by using normal modes and a comparison with Longuet-Higgins approach. The strongest excitation areas in the oceans depends on the bathymetry and period and are different for each seismic mode. Seismic noise is then modelled by normal mode summation considering varying bathymetry. We derive an attenuation model that enables to fit well the vertical component spectra whatever the station location. We show that the fundamental mode of Rayleigh waves is the dominant signal in seismic noise. There is a discrepancy between real and synthetic spectra on the horizontal components that enables to estimate the amount of Love waves for which a different source mechanism is needed. Finally, we investigate noise generated in all the oceans around Africa and show that most of noise recorded in Algeria (TAM station) is generated in the Northern Atlantic and that there is a seasonal variability of the contribution of each ocean and sea.

  7. Numerical computation of nonlinear normal modes in mechanical engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renson, L.; Kerschen, G.; Cochelin, B.

    2016-03-01

    This paper reviews the recent advances in computational methods for nonlinear normal modes (NNMs). Different algorithms for the computation of undamped and damped NNMs are presented, and their respective advantages and limitations are discussed. The methods are illustrated using various applications ranging from low-dimensional weakly nonlinear systems to strongly nonlinear industrial structures.

  8. User's manual for the coupled mode version of the normal modes rotor aeroelastic analysis computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergquist, R. R.; Carlson, R. G.; Landgrebe, A. J.; Egolf, T. A.

    1974-01-01

    This User's Manual was prepared to provide the engineer with the information required to run the coupled mode version of the Normal Modes Rotor Aeroelastic Analysis Computer Program. The manual provides a full set of instructions for running the program, including calculation of blade modes, calculations of variable induced velocity distribution and the calculation of the time history of the response for either a single blade or a complete rotor with an airframe (the latter with constant inflow).

  9. Resolving nanophotonic spectra with quasi-normal modes (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, David A.

    2016-09-01

    Many nanophotonic systems are strongly coupled to radiating waves, or suffer significant dissipative losses. Furthermore, they may have complex shapes which are not amenable to closed form calculations. This makes it challenging to determine their modes without resorting to quasi-static or point dipole approximations. To solve this problem, the quasi-normal modes (QNMs) are found from an integral equation model of the particle. These give complex frequencies where excitation can be supported without any incident field. The corresponding eigenvectors yield the modal distributions, which are non-orthogonal due to the non-Hermitian nature of the system. The model based on quasi-normal modes is applied to plasmonic and dielectric particles, and compared with a spherical multipole decomposition. Only with the QNMs is it possible to resolve all features of the extinction spectrum, as each peak in the spectrum can be attributed to a particular mode. In contrast, many of the multipole coefficient have multiple peaks and dips. Furthermore, by performing a multipolar decomposition of each QNM, the spectrum of multipole coefficients is explained in terms of destructive interference between modes of the same multipole order.

  10. Relationships between nonlinear normal modes and response to random inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoneman, Joseph D.; Allen, Matthew S.; Kuether, Robert J.

    2017-02-01

    The ability to model nonlinear structures subject to random excitation is of key importance in designing hypersonic aircraft and other advanced aerospace vehicles. When a structure is linear, superposition can be used to construct its response to a known spectrum in terms of its linear modes. Superposition does not hold for a nonlinear system, but several works have shown that a system's dynamics can still be understood qualitatively in terms of its nonlinear normal modes (NNMs). This work investigates the connection between a structure's undamped nonlinear normal modes and the spectrum of its response to high amplitude random forcing. Two examples are investigated: a spring-mass system and a clamped-clamped beam modeled within a geometrically nonlinear finite element package. In both cases, an intimate connection is observed between the smeared peaks in the response spectrum and the frequency-energy dependence of the nonlinear normal modes. In order to understand the role of coupling between the underlying linear modes, reduced order models with and without modal coupling terms are used to separate the effect of each NNM's backbone from the nonlinear couplings that give rise to internal resonances. In the cases shown here, uncoupled, single-degree-of-freedom nonlinear models are found to predict major features in the response with reasonable accuracy; a highly inexpensive approximation such as this could be useful in design and optimization studies. More importantly, the results show that a reduced order model can be expected to give accurate results only if it is also capable of accurately predicting the frequency-energy dependence of the nonlinear modes that are excited.

  11. Relationships between nonlinear normal modes and response to random inputs

    DOE PAGES

    Schoneman, Joseph D.; Allen, Matthew S.; Kuether, Robert J.

    2016-07-25

    The ability to model nonlinear structures subject to random excitation is of key importance in designing hypersonic aircraft and other advanced aerospace vehicles. When a structure is linear, superposition can be used to construct its response to a known spectrum in terms of its linear modes. Superposition does not hold for a nonlinear system, but several works have shown that a system's dynamics can still be understood qualitatively in terms of its nonlinear normal modes (NNMs). Here, this work investigates the connection between a structure's undamped nonlinear normal modes and the spectrum of its response to high amplitude random forcing.more » Two examples are investigated: a spring-mass system and a clamped-clamped beam modeled within a geometrically nonlinear finite element package. In both cases, an intimate connection is observed between the smeared peaks in the response spectrum and the frequency-energy dependence of the nonlinear normal modes. In order to understand the role of coupling between the underlying linear modes, reduced order models with and without modal coupling terms are used to separate the effect of each NNM's backbone from the nonlinear couplings that give rise to internal resonances. In the cases shown here, uncoupled, single-degree-of-freedom nonlinear models are found to predict major features in the response with reasonable accuracy; a highly inexpensive approximation such as this could be useful in design and optimization studies. More importantly, the results show that a reduced order model can be expected to give accurate results only if it is also capable of accurately predicting the frequency-energy dependence of the nonlinear modes that are excited.« less

  12. Relationships between nonlinear normal modes and response to random inputs

    SciTech Connect

    Schoneman, Joseph D.; Allen, Matthew S.; Kuether, Robert J.

    2016-07-25

    The ability to model nonlinear structures subject to random excitation is of key importance in designing hypersonic aircraft and other advanced aerospace vehicles. When a structure is linear, superposition can be used to construct its response to a known spectrum in terms of its linear modes. Superposition does not hold for a nonlinear system, but several works have shown that a system's dynamics can still be understood qualitatively in terms of its nonlinear normal modes (NNMs). Here, this work investigates the connection between a structure's undamped nonlinear normal modes and the spectrum of its response to high amplitude random forcing. Two examples are investigated: a spring-mass system and a clamped-clamped beam modeled within a geometrically nonlinear finite element package. In both cases, an intimate connection is observed between the smeared peaks in the response spectrum and the frequency-energy dependence of the nonlinear normal modes. In order to understand the role of coupling between the underlying linear modes, reduced order models with and without modal coupling terms are used to separate the effect of each NNM's backbone from the nonlinear couplings that give rise to internal resonances. In the cases shown here, uncoupled, single-degree-of-freedom nonlinear models are found to predict major features in the response with reasonable accuracy; a highly inexpensive approximation such as this could be useful in design and optimization studies. More importantly, the results show that a reduced order model can be expected to give accurate results only if it is also capable of accurately predicting the frequency-energy dependence of the nonlinear modes that are excited.

  13. "Good Vibrations": A workshop on oscillations and normal modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Sara; Carpineti, Marina; Giliberti, Marco; Rigon, Enrico; Stellato, Marco; Tamborini, Marina

    2016-05-01

    We describe some theatrical strategies adopted in a two hour workshop in order to show some meaningful experiments and the underlying useful ideas to describe a secondary school path on oscillations, that develops from harmonic motion to normal modes of oscillations, and makes extensive use of video analysis, data logging, slow motions and applet simulations. Theatre is an extremely useful tool to stimulate motivation starting from positive emotions. That is the reason why the theatrical approach to the presentation of physical themes has been explored by the group "Lo spettacolo della Fisica" (http://spettacolo.fisica.unimi.it) of the Physics Department of University of Milano for the last ten years (Carpineti et al., JCOM, 10 (2011) 1; Nuovo Cimento B, 121 (2006) 901) and has been inserted also in the European FP7 Project TEMI (Teaching Enquiry with Mysteries Incorporated, see http://teachingmysteries.eu/en) which involves 13 different partners coming from 11 European countries, among which the Italian (Milan) group. According to the TEMI guidelines, this workshop has a written script based on emotionally engaging activities of presenting mysteries to be solved while participants have been involved in nice experiments following the developed path.

  14. Elastic Pekeris waveguide normal mode solution comparisons against laboratory data.

    PubMed

    Schneiderwind, Joseph D; Collis, Jon M; Simpson, Harry J

    2012-09-01

    Following the derivation presented by Press and Ewing [Geophysics 15, 426-446 (1950)], a normal mode solution for the Pekeris waveguide problem with an elastic bottom is outlined. The analytic solution is benchmarked against data collected in an experiment performed at the Naval Research Laboratory [Collis et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 122, 1987-1993 (2007)]. Comparisons reveal a close match between the analytic solution and experimental data. Results are strongly dependent on the accuracy of the horizontal wavenumbers for the modes, and horizontal wavenumber spectra are compared against those from the experimental data.

  15. S-Wave Normal Mode Propagation in Aluminum Cylinders

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.; Waite, William F.

    2010-01-01

    Large amplitude waveform features have been identified in pulse-transmission shear-wave measurements through cylinders that are long relative to the acoustic wavelength. The arrival times and amplitudes of these features do not follow the predicted behavior of well-known bar waves, but instead they appear to propagate with group velocities that increase as the waveform feature's dominant frequency increases. To identify these anomalous features, the wave equation is solved in a cylindrical coordinate system using an infinitely long cylinder with a free surface boundary condition. The solution indicates that large amplitude normal-mode propagations exist. Using the high-frequency approximation of the Bessel function, an approximate dispersion relation is derived. The predicted amplitude and group velocities using the approximate dispersion relation qualitatively agree with measured values at high frequencies, but the exact dispersion relation should be used to analyze normal modes for full ranges of frequency of interest, particularly at lower frequencies.

  16. NOLB : Non-linear rigid block normal mode analysis method.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Alexandre; Grudinin, Sergei

    2017-04-05

    We present a new conceptually simple and computationally efficient method for non-linear normal mode analysis called NOLB. It relies on the rotations-translations of blocks (RTB) theoretical basis developed by Y.-H. Sanejouand and colleagues. We demonstrate how to physically interpret the eigenvalues computed in the RTB basis in terms of angular and linear velocities applied to the rigid blocks and how to construct a non-linear extrapolation of motion out of these velocities. The key observation of our method is that the angular velocity of a rigid block can be interpreted as the result of an implicit force, such that the motion of the rigid block can be considered as a pure rotation about a certain center. We demonstrate the motions produced with the NOLB method on three different molecular systems and show that some of the lowest frequency normal modes correspond to the biologically relevant motions. For example, NOLB detects the spiral sliding motion of the TALE protein, which is capable of rapid diffusion along its target DNA. Overall, our method produces better structures compared to the standard approach, especially at large deformation amplitudes, as we demonstrate by visual inspection, energy and topology analyses, and also by the MolProbity service validation. Finally, our method is scalable and can be applied to very large molecular systems, such as ribosomes. Standalone executables of the NOLB normal mode analysis method are available at https://team.inria.fr/nano-d/software/nolb-normal-modes. A graphical user interfaces created for the SAMSON software platform will be made available at https: //www.samson-connect.net.

  17. Normal Modes of Magnetized Finite Two-Dimensional Yukawa Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marleau, Gabriel-Dominique; Kaehlert, Hanno; Bonitz, Michael

    2009-11-01

    The normal modes of a finite two-dimensional dusty plasma in an isotropic parabolic confinement, including the simultaneous effects of friction and an external magnetic field, are studied. The ground states are found from molecular dynamics simulations with simulated annealing, and the influence of screening, friction, and magnetic field on the mode frequencies is investigated in detail. The two-particle problem is solved analytically and the limiting cases of weak and strong magnetic fields are discussed.[4pt] [1] C. Henning, H. K"ahlert, P. Ludwig, A. Melzer, and M.Bonitz. J. Phys. A 42, 214023 (2009)[2] B. Farokhi, M. Shahmansouri, and P. K. Shukla. Phys.Plasmas 16, 063703 (2009)[3] L. Cândido, J.-P. Rino, N. Studart, and F. M. Peeters. J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 10, 11627--11644 (1998)

  18. Modeling secondary microseismic noise by normal mode summation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualtieri, Lucia; Stutzmann, Eleonore; Capdeville, Yann; Ardhuin, Fabrice; Schimmel, Martin; Mangenay, Anne; Morelli, Andrea

    2013-04-01

    Seismic noise is the continuous oscillation of the ground recorded by seismic stations in the period band 5-20s. In particular, secondary microseisms occur in the period band 5-12s and are generated in the ocean by the interaction of ocean gravity waves. We present the theory for modeling secondary microseismic noise by normal mode summation. We show that the noise sources can be modeled by vertical forces and how to derive them from a realistic ocean wave model. During the computation we take into account the bathymetry. We show how to compute bathymetry excitation effect in a realistic Earth model using normal modes and a comparison with Longuet-Higgins (1950) approach. The strongest excitation areas in the oceans depends on the bathymetry and period and are different for each seismic mode. We derive an attenuation model than enables to fit well the vertical component spectra whatever the station location. We show that the fundamental mode of Rayleigh wave is the dominant signal in seismic noise and it is sufficient to reproduce the main features of noise spectra amplitude. We also model horizontal components. There is a discrepancy between real and synthetic spectra on the horizontal components that enables to estimate the amount of Love waves for which a different source mechanism is needed. Finally, we investigate noise generated in all the oceans around Africa and show that most of noise recorded in Algeria (TAM station) is generated in the Northern Atlantic and that there is a seasonal variability of the contribution of each ocean and sea. Moreover, we also show that the Mediterranean Sea contributes significantly to the short period noise in winter.

  19. The normal modes of lattice vibrations of ice XI

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Wang, Zhe; Lu, Ying-Bo; Ding, Zheng-Wen

    2016-01-01

    The vibrational spectrum of ice XI at thermal wavelengths using the CASTEP code, a first-principles simulation method, is investigated. A dual-track approach is constructed to verify the validity for the computational phonon spectrum: collate the simulated spectrum with inelastic neutron scattering experiments and assign the photon scattering peaks according to the calculated normal vibration frequencies. The 33 optical normal vibrations at the Brillouin center are illustrated definitely from the ab initio outcomes. The depolarizing field effect of the hydrogen bond vibrations at frequencies of 229 cm−1 and 310 cm−1 is found to agree well with the LST relationship. It is a convincing evidence to manifest the LO-TO splitting of hydrogen bonds in ice crystal. We attribute the two hydrogen bond peaks to the depolarization effect and apply this viewpoint to ordinary ice phase, ice Ih, which is difficult to analyse their vibration modes due to proton disorder. PMID:27375199

  20. Relating normal vibrational modes to local vibrational modes: benzene and naphthalene.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wenli; Kalescky, Robert; Kraka, Elfi; Cremer, Dieter

    2013-07-01

    Local vibrational modes can be directly derived from normal vibrational modes using the method of Konkoli and Cremer (Int J Quant Chem 67:29, 1998). This implies the calculation of the harmonic force constant matrix F (q) (expressed in internal coordinates q) from the corresponding Cartesian force constant matrix f (x) with the help of the transformation matrix U = WB (†)(BWB (†))(-1) (B: Wilson's B-matrix). It is proven that the local vibrational modes are independent of the choice of the matrix W. However, the choice W = M (-1) (M: mass matrix) has numerical advantages with regard to the choice W = I (I: identity matrix), where the latter is frequently used in spectroscopy. The local vibrational modes can be related to the normal vibrational modes in the form of an adiabatic connection scheme (ACS) after rewriting the Wilson equation with the help of the compliance matrix. The ACSs of benzene and naphthalene based on experimental vibrational frequencies are discussed as nontrivial examples. It is demonstrated that the local-mode stretching force constants provide a quantitative measure for the C-H and C-C bond strength.

  1. Kelvin waves in ECMWF analysis: normal-mode diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaauw, Marten; Zagar, Nedjeljka

    2013-04-01

    Equatorial Kelvin waves show a large spread in spatial and temporal variability similar to their source of tropical convective forcing. Once decoupled from their source, Kelvin waves are modulated during their ascent by changes in the background wind and stability. In this presentation, we focus on the seasonal and interannual variability of Kelvin waves in relation with variability of (i) tropical convection and (ii) background zonal wind and static stability. Global data is extracted from ECMWF operational analysis from January 2007 till May 2011 on 91 model levels (top level at 0.01 hPa) and ~ 25 km horizontal resolution. Using three-dimensional orthogonal normal-mode expansions, we project input mass and wind data simultaneously onto balanced rotational modes and unbalanced inertia-gravity modes including Kelvin modes. Next, an inverse transformation of Kelvin modes to physical space is performed under the linearity assumption, allowing a study on the spatial and temporal variability of Kelvin wave zonal wind and temperature. Results show an annual cycle in KW zonal wind in agreement with other studies. Minima resp. maxima in zonal wind amplitudes are found in the Indian ocean resp. Western Pacific and are most pronounced in the tropical tropopause at 150 hPa in January and 100 hPa in July. The annual cycle is enhanced (reduced) through interaction with a descending westerly QBO phase and enhanced (reduced) convective forcing. We also note a gradual eastward shift of KW zonal wind maxima till January 2010 in correspondence with an eastward shift of tropical convection.

  2. Nonlinear normal modes and localization in two bubble oscillators.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Naohiro; Sugiura, Toshihiko

    2017-02-01

    We investigated a bifurcation structure of coupled nonlinear oscillation of two spherical gas bubbles subject to a stationary sound field by means of nonlinear modal analysis. The goal of this paper is to describe an energy localization phenomenon of coupled two-bubble oscillators, resulting from symmetry-breaking bifurcation of the steady-state oscillation. Approximate asymptotic solutions of nonlinear normal modes (NNMs) and steady state oscillation are obtained based on the method of multiple scales. It is found that localized oscillation arises in a neighborhood of the localized normal modes. The analytical solutions of the amplitude and the phase shift of the steady-state oscillation are compared to numerical results and found to be in good agreement within the limit of small-amplitude oscillation. For larger amplitude oscillation, a bifurcation diagram of the localized solution as a function of the driving frequency and the separation distance between the bubbles is provided in the presence of the thermal damping. The numerical results show that the localized oscillation can occur for a fairly typical parameter range used in practical experiments and simulations in the early literatures.

  3. [Raman, FTIR spectra and normal mode analysis of acetanilide].

    PubMed

    Liang, Hui-Qin; Tao, Ya-Ping; Han, Li-Gang; Han, Yun-Xia; Mo, Yu-Jun

    2012-10-01

    The Raman and FTIR spectra of acetanilide (ACN) were measured experimentally in the regions of 3 500-50 and 3 500-600 cm(-1) respectively. The equilibrium geometry and vibration frequencies of ACN were calculated based on density functional theory (DFT) method (B3LYP/6-311G(d, p)). The results showed that the theoretical calculation of molecular structure parameters are in good agreement with previous report and better than the ones calculated based on 6-31G(d), and the calculated frequencies agree well with the experimental ones. Potential energy distribution of each frequency was worked out by normal mode analysis, and based on this, a detailed and accurate vibration frequency assignment of ACN was obtained.

  4. iMODS: internal coordinates normal mode analysis server

    PubMed Central

    López-Blanco, José Ramón; Aliaga, José I.; Quintana-Ortí, Enrique S.; Chacón, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Normal mode analysis (NMA) in internal (dihedral) coordinates naturally reproduces the collective functional motions of biological macromolecules. iMODS facilitates the exploration of such modes and generates feasible transition pathways between two homologous structures, even with large macromolecules. The distinctive internal coordinate formulation improves the efficiency of NMA and extends its applicability while implicitly maintaining stereochemistry. Vibrational analysis, motion animations and morphing trajectories can be easily carried out at different resolution scales almost interactively. The server is versatile; non-specialists can rapidly characterize potential conformational changes, whereas advanced users can customize the model resolution with multiple coarse-grained atomic representations and elastic network potentials. iMODS supports advanced visualization capabilities for illustrating collective motions, including an improved affine-model-based arrow representation of domain dynamics. The generated all-heavy-atoms conformations can be used to introduce flexibility for more advanced modeling or sampling strategies. The server is free and open to all users with no login requirement at http://imods.chaconlab.org. PMID:24771341

  5. Normal mode calculations of icosahedral viruses with full dihedral flexibility by use of molecular symmetry.

    PubMed

    van Vlijmen, Herman W T; Karplus, Martin

    2005-07-15

    The study of the dynamics and thermodynamics of small icosahedral virus capsids is an active field of research. Normal mode analysis is one of the computational tools that can provide important insights into the conformational changes of the virus associated with cell entry or caused by changing of the physicochemical environment. Normal mode analysis of virus capsids has been limited due to the size of these systems, which often exceed 50,000 residues. Here we present the first normal mode calculation with full dihedral flexibility of several virus capsids, including poliovirus, rhinovirus, and cowpea chlorotic mottle virus. The calculations were made possible by applying group theoretical methods, which greatly simplified the calculations without any approximation beyond the all-atom force field representations in general use for smaller protein systems. Since a full Cartesian basis set was too large to be handled by the available computer memory, we used a basis set that includes all internal dihedral angles of the system with the exception of the peptide bonds, which were assumed rigid. The fluctuations of the normal modes are shown to correlate well with crystallographic temperature factors. The motions of the first several normal modes of each symmetry type are described. A hinge bending motion in poliovirus was found that may be involved in the mechanism by which bound small molecules inhibit conformational changes of the capsid. Fully flexible normal mode calculations of virus capsids are expected to increase our understanding of virus dynamics and thermodynamics, and can be useful in the refinement of cryo-electron microscopy structures of viruses.

  6. Photoelectron spectra of dihalomethyl anions: Testing the limits of normal mode analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelhuber, Kristen M.; Wren, Scott W.; McCoy, Anne B.; Ervin, Kent M.; Lineberger, W. Carl

    2011-05-01

    We report the 364-nm negative ion photoelectron spectra of CHX2- and CDX2-, where X = Cl, Br, and I. The pyramidal dihalomethyl anions undergo a large geometry change upon electron photodetachment to become nearly planar, resulting in multiple extended vibrational progressions in the photoelectron spectra. The normal mode analysis that successfully models photoelectron spectra when geometry changes are modest is unable to reproduce qualitatively the experimental data using physically reasonable parameters. Specifically, the harmonic normal mode analysis using Cartesian displacement coordinates results in much more C-H stretch excitation than is observed, leading to a simulated photoelectron spectrum that is much broader than that which is seen experimentally. A (2 + 1)-dimensional anharmonic coupled-mode analysis much better reproduces the observed vibrational structure. We obtain an estimate of the adiabatic electron affinity of each dihalomethyl radical studied. The electron affinity of CHCl2 and CDCl2 is 1.3(2) eV, of CHBr2 and CDBr2 is 1.9(2) eV, and of CHI2 and CDI2 is 1.9(2) eV. Analysis of the experimental spectra illustrates the limits of the conventional normal mode approach and shows the type of analysis required for substantial geometry changes when multiple modes are active upon photodetachment.

  7. Approach to calculate normal modes by decomposing the dyadic Green's function.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenhai; Yue, Wencheng; Yao, Peijun; Lu, Yonghua; Liu, Wen

    2014-11-03

    Normal mode is a very fundamental notion in quantum and classical optics. In this paper, we present a method to calculate normal modes by decomposing dyadic Green's function, where the modes are excited by dipoles. The modes obtained by our method can be directly normalized and their degeneracies can be easily removed. This method can be applied to many theoretical descriptions of cavity electrodynamics and is of interest to nanophotonics.

  8. On the nonlinear normal modes of free vibration of piecewise linear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uspensky, B. V.; Avramov, K. V.

    2014-07-01

    A modification of the Shaw-Pierre nonlinear normal modes is suggested in order to analyze the vibrations of a piecewise linear mechanical systems with finite degrees of freedom. The use of this approach allows one to reduce to twice the dimension of the nonlinear algebraic equations system for nonlinear normal modes calculations in comparison with systems obtained by previous researchers. Two degrees of freedom and fifteen degrees of freedom nonlinear dynamical systems are investigated numerically by using nonlinear normal modes.

  9. Normal modes of a defected linear system of beaded springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghamohammadi, Amir; Foulaadvand, M. Ebrahim; Yaghoubi, Mohammad Hassan; Mousavi, Amir Hossein

    2017-03-01

    A model of a one-dimensional mass-spring chain with mass or spring defects is investigated. With a mass defect, all oscillators except the central one have the same mass, and with a spring defect, all the springs except those connected to the central oscillator have the same stiffness constant. The motion is assumed to be one-dimensional and frictionless, and both ends of the chain are assumed to be fixed. The system vibrational modes are obtained analytically, and it is shown that if the defective mass is lighter than the others, then a high frequency mode appears in which the amplitudes decrease exponentially with the distance from the defect. In this sense, the mode is localized in space. If the defect mass is greater than the others, then there will be no localized mode and all modes are extended throughout the system. Analogously, for some values of the defective spring constant, there may be one or two localized modes. If the two defected spring constants are less than that of the others, there is no localized mode.

  10. Comparative Investigation of Normal Modes and Molecular Dynamics of Hepatitis C NS5B Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asafi, M. S.; Yildirim, A.; Tekpinar, M.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding dynamics of proteins has many practical implications in terms of finding a cure for many protein related diseases. Normal mode analysis and molecular dynamics methods are widely used physics-based computational methods for investigating dynamics of proteins. In this work, we studied dynamics of Hepatitis C NS5B protein with molecular dynamics and normal mode analysis. Principal components obtained from a 100 nanoseconds molecular dynamics simulation show good overlaps with normal modes calculated with a coarse-grained elastic network model. Coarse-grained normal mode analysis takes at least an order of magnitude shorter time. Encouraged by this good overlaps and short computation times, we analyzed further low frequency normal modes of Hepatitis C NS5B. Motion directions and average spatial fluctuations have been analyzed in detail. Finally, biological implications of these motions in drug design efforts against Hepatitis C infections have been elaborated.

  11. Empirical orthogonal functions and normal modes. [for atmospheric data studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    North, G. R.

    1984-01-01

    An attempt to provide physical insight into the empirical orthogonal function (EOF) representation of data fields by the study of fields generated by linear stochastic models is presented in this paper. In a large class of these models, the EOFs at individual Fourier frequencies coincide with the orthogonal mechanical modes of the system - provided they exist. The precise mathematical criteria for this coincidence are derived and a physical interpretation is provided. A scheme possibly useful in forecasting is formally constructed for representing any stochastic field by a linear Hermitian model forced by noise.

  12. Comparison of Non-Neutral Plasma Normal Modes with Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobler, Samuel K.; Peterson, Bryan G.; Hart, Grant W.; Spencer, Ross L.

    2004-10-01

    We have measured the diocotron and Trivelpiece-Gould mode frequencies, radial density profile and central temperature in a long (0.6 m), cylindrical Malmberg-Penning electron trap at four different magnetic field strengths. The total particle count varied by a factor of 10 and the magnetic field varied by a factor of 3.5. The temperatures were fairly constant. Using an equilibrium code (EQUILSOR), a 2-D particle-in-cell code (RATTLE), and a 3-D particle-in-cell code (INFERNO) we have calculated the frequencies corresponding to the experimental conditions. We will discuss the limitations of the codes and the conditions in which they agree with experimental results.

  13. A new technique in demodulation of normal modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawab, Ramin; L´, Philippe

    1994-07-01

    Lateral heterogeneities of the Earth produce amplitude modulations of the so-called unresolved multiplets. A spectral fitting technique based on the polynomial interpolation of Hermite allows the retrieval of these slowly varying modulation functions. No restrictive hypothesis on coupling among multiplets is necessary. Modulation functions are constrained in time within a Q-cycle for data with typical signal-to-noise ratios. Sensitivity to noise is reduced by the introduction of cosine tapers and by a priori information on the modulation functions. The method then damps rapid oscillations caused by noise and becomes stable. These amplitude modulations can be used in a first stage for inversions where both phase and amplitude are necessary, and generalize basic mode observables such as the local frequency.

  14. Synthetic Tsunami Waveform and Character of Tsunami Sources in Japan Sea, a Normal Mode Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Satake, K.

    2015-12-01

    Normal mode method is widely used in seismology. Although some possibilities of applying normal mode to tsunami researches are already pointed out, the potential power of this method still remains. One advantage of normal mode method is that, once the mode solution is obtained and stored in the computer, we can synthesize tsunami waveforms as superposition of normal modes (Satake and Shimazaki, 1987). Although this theory is scientifically sound and there are some simple numerical tests, it has never been applied to a real case, due to computational difficulty. Recently, Wu and Satake (2014) developed a faster method to calculate normal mode based on Loomis (1975) method, and then obtained high resolution normal mode solution of Japan Sea, which contains 4000 modes (down to period of about 10 min). This makes it possible to verify the theory using real earthquake source parameter. With the source parameter of the Mw 7.7 1983 Japan Sea earthquake, we succeeded to synthesize tsunami waveforms by normal mode method for the first time. Comparisons with computed waveform based on finite different method (FDM) show good fit, thus proved the goodness of this idea. Unlike FDM, the calculation time does not depend on the duration for computation. Another merit of normal mode method is that the weight of excited tsunami due to an earthquake source may give us some direct information about the feature of tsunami generated by that source. In this study, we also calculated the excitation weight of 60 potential submarine faults in Japan Sea proposed by MLIT (2014). From these obtained weights, we can clearly see, for example, that when the source is located at shallower part or with larger magnitude, the generated weight will usually be larger.

  15. Electromagnetic fluctuations and normal modes of a drifting relativistic plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ruyer, C.; Gremillet, L.; Bénisti, D.; Bonnaud, G.

    2013-11-15

    We present an exact calculation of the power spectrum of the electromagnetic fluctuations in a relativistic equilibrium plasma described by Maxwell-Jüttner distribution functions. We consider the cases of wave vectors parallel or normal to the plasma mean velocity. The relative contributions of the subluminal and supraluminal fluctuations are evaluated. Analytical expressions of the spatial fluctuation spectra are derived in each case. These theoretical results are compared to particle-in-cell simulations, showing a good reproduction of the subluminal fluctuation spectra.

  16. Normal force for static and steady shear mode in magnetorheological fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuhui; Ye, Dun; Gao, Xiaoli; Li, Fang; Sun, Meng; Zhang, Hui; Tu, Tiangang; Yu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the normal force phenomena for static and steady shear mode in magnetorheological (MR) fluid. The results of the study show that, in the static mode, with the magnetic flux density increasing, the normal force will increase until the maximum, and then reduce to a steady value, and during the increasing stage, it can be expressed as FN=4667*B2.48 approximately; however, in the steady shear mode, only when the magnetic flux density achieves a certain value, the normal force phenomena will be observed clearly, and with the increasing of magnetic field, the normal force reaches the maximum, and then also decreases to a steady value. Besides, by defining the time parameters of dynamic response, the dynamic response of normal force is studied. If the shear plate is stationary, from the magnetic field on to a stable normal force produced, the response time is about 25.11 ms.

  17. Active control of multiple resistive wall modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Yadikin, D.; Gregoratto, D.; Paccagnella, R.; Liu, Y. Q.; Bolzonella, T.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.; Kuldkepp, M.; Manduchi, G.; Marchiori, G.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, P.; Menmuir, S.; Ortolani, S.; Rachlew, E.; Spizzo, G.; Zanca, P.

    2005-12-01

    A two-dimensional array of saddle coils at Mc poloidal and Nc toroidal positions is used on the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch (Brunsell P R et al 2001 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43 1457) to study active control of resistive wall modes (RWMs). Spontaneous growth of several RWMs with poloidal mode number m = 1 and different toroidal mode number n is observed experimentally, in agreement with linear MHD modelling. The measured plasma response to a controlled coil field and the plasma response computed using the linear circular cylinder MHD model are in quantitive agreement. Feedback control introduces a linear coupling of modes with toroidal mode numbers n, n' that fulfil the condition |n - n'| = Nc. Pairs of coupled unstable RWMs are present in feedback experiments with an array of Mc × Nc = 4 × 16 coils. Using intelligent shell feedback, the coupled modes are generally not controlled even though the field is suppressed at the active coils. A better suppression of coupled modes may be achieved in the case of rotating modes by using the mode control feedback scheme with individually set complex gains. In feedback with a larger array of Mc × Nc = 4 × 32 coils, the coupling effect largely disappears, and with this array, the main internal RWMs n = -11, -10, +5, +6 are all simultaneously suppressed throughout the discharge (7 8 wall times). With feedback there is a two-fold extension of the pulse length, compared to discharges without feedback.

  18. Energetics analysis of the observed and simulated general circulation using three-dimensional normal mode expansions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Kung, Ernest C.; Baker, Wayman E.

    1986-01-01

    The energetics characteristics of the observed and simulated general circulation are analyzed using three-dimensional normal mode expansions. The data sets involved are the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres (GLA) analysis and simulation data and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) analysis data. The spectral energy properties of the Rossby and gravity modes and energy transformations are presented. Significant influences of model characteristics and the assimilation techniques are observed in the barotropic energy spectrum, particularly for the gravity mode. Energy transformations of the zonal mean field in the GLA analysis and simulation are similar, but distinctly different from that in the GFDL analysis. However, overall, the energy generation in the baroclinic mode is largely balanced by the sink in the barotropic mode. The present study may demonstrate utilities of the three-dimensional normal mode energetics in the analysis of the general circulation.

  19. Characterization of Non-Linearized Spacecraft Relative Motion using Nonlinear Normal Modes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-20

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2015-0182 TR-2015-0182 CHARACTERIZATION OF NON-LINEARIZED SPACECRAFT RELATIVE MOTION USING NONLINEAR NORMAL MODES Eric...Non-Linearized Spacecraft Relative Motion using Nonlinear Normal Modes 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62601F...public release; distribution is unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Characterize the nonlinear dynamics for large amplitude relative motion

  20. Investigation and Analysis of Current Writing Teaching Mode among English Majors in Normal Universities in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeng, Hang-li

    2010-01-01

    This paper has made an investigation on the current writing teaching mode among English majors in normal universities in China, by means of questionnaire, interview and class observation. The study finds out that the current writing teaching mode is not purely product approach or process approach. In fact, the two approaches to writing co-exist in…

  1. Computational aspects of the nonlinear normal mode initialization of the GLAS 4th order GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navon, I. M.; Bloom, S. C.; Takacs, L.

    1984-01-01

    Using the normal modes of the GLAS 4th Order Model, a Machenhauer nonlinear normal mode initialization (NLNMI) was carried out for the external vertical mode using the GLAS 4th Order shallow water equations model for an equivalent depth corresponding to that associated with the external vertical mode. A simple procedure was devised which was directed at identifying computational modes by following the rate of increase of BAL sub M, the partial (with respect to the zonal wavenumber m) sum of squares of the time change of the normal mode coefficients (for fixed vertical mode index) varying over the latitude index L of symmetric or antisymmetric gravity waves. A working algorithm is presented which speeds up the convergence of the iterative Machenhauer NLNMI. A 24 h integration using the NLNMI state was carried out using both Matsuno and leap-frog time-integration schemes; these runs were then compared to a 24 h integration starting from a non-initialized state. The maximal impact of the nonlinear normal mode initialization was found to occur 6-10 hours after the initial time.

  2. Normal forms for linear mode conversion and Landau-Zener transitions in one dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, W.G.; Littlejohn, R.G.

    1994-09-01

    Standard eikonal methods for the asymptotic analysis of coupled linear wave equations may fail when two eigenvalues of a matrix (the dispersion matrix) associated with the wave operator are both small in the same region of wave phase space. In this region the two eikonal modes associated with the two small eigenvalues are coupled, leading to a process called linear mode conversion or Landau-Zener coupling. A theory of linear mode conversion is presented in which geometric structure is emphasized. This theory is then used to identify the most generic type of mode conversion which occurs in one dimension. Finally, a general solution for this generic mode conversion problem is derived by transforming an arbitrary equation exhibiting generic mode conversion into an easily solvable normal form. This solution is given as a connection rule, with which one may continue standard eikonal wave solutions through mode conversion regions. 51 refs., 13 figs.

  3. A Study of Saturn's Normal Mode Oscillations and Their Forcing of Density Waves in the Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedson, Andrew James; Cao, Lyra

    2016-10-01

    Analysis of Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) ring occultation profiles has revealed the presence of spiral density waves in Saturn's C ring that are consistent with being driven by gravitational perturbations associated with normal-mode oscillations of the planet [1]. These waves allow the C ring to serve as a sort of seismometer, since their pattern speeds (i.e., azimuthal phase speeds) can in principle be mapped onto the frequencies of the predominant normal oscillations of the planet. The resonant mode frequencies in turn are sensitive to Saturn's internal structure and rotational state. Characterization of the normal modes responsible for the forcing holds the potential to supply important new constraints on Saturn's internal structure and rotation. We perform numerical calculations to determine the resonant frequencies of the normal modes of a uniformly rotating planet for various assumptions regarding its internal stratification and compare the implied pattern speeds to those of density waves observed in the C ring. A question of particular interest that we address is whether quasi-toroidal modes are responsible for exciting a mysterious class of slowly propagating density waves in the ring. We also explore the implications of avoided crossings between modes for explaining observed fine splitting in the pattern speeds of spiral density waves having the same number of spiral arms, and weigh the role that convective overstability may play in exciting large-scale quasi-toroidal modes in Saturn. [1] Hedman, M.M. and Nicholson, P.D. 2014. MNRAS 444, 1369.

  4. Normal modes of the world's oceans: A numerical investigation using Proudman functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, Braulio V.; Morrow, Dennis

    1993-01-01

    The numerical modeling of the normal modes of the global oceans is addressed. The results of such modeling could be expected to serve as a guide in the analysis of observations and measurements intended to detect these modes. The numerical computation of normal modes of the global oceans is a field in which several investigations have obtained results during the past 15 years. The results seem to be model-dependent to an unsatisfactory extent. Some modeling areas, such as higher resolution of the bathymetry, inclusion of self-attraction and loading, the role of the Arctic Ocean, and systematic testing by means of diagnostic models are addressed. The results show that the present state of the art is such that a final solution to the normal mode problem still lies in the future. The numerical experiments show where some of the difficulties are and give some insight as to how to proceed in the future.

  5. Rossby normal modes in nonuniform background configurations. I Simple fields. II - Equinox and solstice conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salby, M. L.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation is conducted regarding the influence of mean field variations on the realization of planetary normal modes, taking into account the mode response and structure in the presence of simple background nonuniformities. It is found that mean field variations have the combined effect of depressing, shifting, and broadening the characteristic response of Rossby normal modes. While nonuniformities in both the mean wind and temperature fields contribute to the reduction in peak response, the former are primarily responsible for translation and spectral broadening. An investigation is conducted to determine which modes may be realized in actual atmospheric configurations and which may be identified. For both the equinox and solstice configurations, response peaks corresponding to all of the first four modes of wavenumbers 1, 2, and 3 are readily visible above the noise.

  6. Instantaneous normal mode analysis of the vibrational relaxation of the amide I mode of alanine dipeptide in water.

    PubMed

    Farag, Marwa H; Zúñiga, José; Requena, Alberto; Bastida, Adolfo

    2013-05-28

    Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations coupled to instantaneous normal modes (INMs) analysis are used to study the vibrational relaxation of the acetyl and amino-end amide I modes of the alanine dipeptide (AlaD) molecule dissolved in water (D2O). The INMs are assigned in terms of the equilibrium normal modes using the Effective Atomic Min-Cost algorithm as adapted to make use of the outputs of standard MD packages, a method which is well suited for the description of flexible molecules. The relaxation energy curves of both amide I modes show multiexponential decays, in good agreement with the experimental findings. It is found that ~85%-90% of the energy relaxes through intramolecular vibrational redistribution. The main relaxation pathways are also identified. The rate at which energy is transferred into the solvent is similar for the acetyl-end and amino-end amide I modes. The conformational changes occurring during relaxation are investigated, showing that the populations of the alpha and beta region conformers are altered by energy transfer in such a way that it takes 15 ps for the equilibrium conformational populations to be recovered after the initial excitation of the AlaD molecule.

  7. Isotope effect in normal-to-local transition of acetylene bending modes

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Jianyi; Xu, Dingguo; Guo, Hua; Tyng, Vivian; Kellman, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    The normal-to-local transition for the bending modes of acetylene is considered a prelude to its isomerization to vinylidene. Here, such a transition in fully deuterated acetylene is investigated using a full-dimensional quantum model. It is found that the local benders emerge at much lower energies and bending quantum numbers than in the hydrogen isotopomer HCCH. This is accompanied by a transition to a second kind of bending mode called counter-rotator, again at lower energies and quantum numbers than in HCCH. These transitions are also investigated using bifurcation analysis of two empirical spectroscopic fitting Hamiltonians for pure bending modes, which helps to understand the origin of the transitions semiclassically as branchings or bifurcations out of the trans and normal bend modes when the latter become dynamically unstable. The results of the quantum model and the empirical bifurcation analysis are in very good agreement.

  8. Isotope effect in normal-to-local transition of acetylene bending modes

    DOE PAGES

    Ma, Jianyi; Xu, Dingguo; Guo, Hua; ...

    2012-01-01

    The normal-to-local transition for the bending modes of acetylene is considered a prelude to its isomerization to vinylidene. Here, such a transition in fully deuterated acetylene is investigated using a full-dimensional quantum model. It is found that the local benders emerge at much lower energies and bending quantum numbers than in the hydrogen isotopomer HCCH. This is accompanied by a transition to a second kind of bending mode called counter-rotator, again at lower energies and quantum numbers than in HCCH. These transitions are also investigated using bifurcation analysis of two empirical spectroscopic fitting Hamiltonians for pure bending modes, which helpsmore » to understand the origin of the transitions semiclassically as branchings or bifurcations out of the trans and normal bend modes when the latter become dynamically unstable. The results of the quantum model and the empirical bifurcation analysis are in very good agreement.« less

  9. Normal Mode Splitting and Mechanical Effects of an Optical Lattice in a Ring Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinner, Julian; Lindholdt, Malik; Nagorny, Boris; Hemmerich, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    A novel regime of atom-cavity physics is explored, arising when large atom samples dispersively interact with high-finesse optical cavities. A stable far-detuned optical lattice of several million rubidium atoms is formed inside an optical ring resonator by coupling equal amounts of laser light to each propagation direction of a longitudinal cavity mode. An adjacent longitudinal mode, detuned by about 3 GHz, is used to perform probe transmission spectroscopy of the system. The atom-cavity coupling for the lattice beams and the probe is dispersive and dissipation results only from the finite photon-storage time. The observation of two well-resolved normal modes demonstrates the regime of strong cooperative coupling. The details of the normal mode spectrum reveal mechanical effects associated with the retroaction of the probe upon the optical lattice.

  10. Normal mode splitting and mechanical effects of an optical lattice in a ring cavity.

    PubMed

    Klinner, Julian; Lindholdt, Malik; Nagorny, Boris; Hemmerich, Andreas

    2006-01-20

    A novel regime of atom-cavity physics is explored, arising when large atom samples dispersively interact with high-finesse optical cavities. A stable far-detuned optical lattice of several million rubidium atoms is formed inside an optical ring resonator by coupling equal amounts of laser light to each propagation direction of a longitudinal cavity mode. An adjacent longitudinal mode, detuned by about 3 GHz, is used to perform probe transmission spectroscopy of the system. The atom-cavity coupling for the lattice beams and the probe is dispersive and dissipation results only from the finite photon-storage time. The observation of two well-resolved normal modes demonstrates the regime of strong cooperative coupling. The details of the normal mode spectrum reveal mechanical effects associated with the retroaction of the probe upon the optical lattice.

  11. Isotope effect in normal-to-local transition of acetylene bending modes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianyi; Xu, Dingguo; Guo, Hua; Tyng, Vivian; Kellman, Michael E

    2012-01-07

    The normal-to-local transition for the bending modes of acetylene is considered a prelude to its isomerization to vinylidene. Here, such a transition in fully deuterated acetylene is investigated using a full-dimensional quantum model. It is found that the local benders emerge at much lower energies and bending quantum numbers than in the hydrogen isotopomer HCCH. This is accompanied by a transition to a second kind of bending mode called counter-rotator, again at lower energies and quantum numbers than in HCCH. These transitions are also investigated using bifurcation analysis of two empirical spectroscopic fitting Hamiltonians for pure bending modes, which helps to understand the origin of the transitions semiclassically as branchings or bifurcations out of the trans- and cis-normal bend modes when the latter become dynamically unstable. The results of the quantum model and the empirical bifurcation analysis are in very good agreement.

  12. Extended Majorana zero modes in a topological superconducting-normal T-junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spånslätt, Christian; Ardonne, Eddy

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the sub gap properties of a three terminal Josephson T-junction composed of topologically superconducting wires connected by a normal metal region. This system naturally hosts zero energy Andreev bound states which are of self-conjugate Majorana nature and we show that they are, in contrast to ordinary Majorana zero modes, spatially extended in the normal metal region. If the T-junction respects time-reversal symmetry, we show that a zero mode is distributed only in two out of three arms in the junction and tuning the superconducting phases allows for transfer of the mode between the junction arms. We further provide tunneling conductance calculations showing that these features can be detected in experiments. Our findings suggest an experimental platform for studying the nature of spatially extended Majorana zero modes.

  13. Normal Mode Splitting and Mechanical Effects of an Optical Lattice in a Ring Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Klinner, Julian; Lindholdt, Malik; Nagorny, Boris; Hemmerich, Andreas

    2006-01-20

    A novel regime of atom-cavity physics is explored, arising when large atom samples dispersively interact with high-finesse optical cavities. A stable far-detuned optical lattice of several million rubidium atoms is formed inside an optical ring resonator by coupling equal amounts of laser light to each propagation direction of a longitudinal cavity mode. An adjacent longitudinal mode, detuned by about 3 GHz, is used to perform probe transmission spectroscopy of the system. The atom-cavity coupling for the lattice beams and the probe is dispersive and dissipation results only from the finite photon-storage time. The observation of two well-resolved normal modes demonstrates the regime of strong cooperative coupling. The details of the normal mode spectrum reveal mechanical effects associated with the retroaction of the probe upon the optical lattice.

  14. a Normal Mode Expansion Method for the Undamped Forced Vibration of Linear Piezoelectric Solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LIU, D.-C.

    2000-06-01

    A normal mode expansion method for the vibrational responses of non-homogeneous linear piezoelectric materials without damping is presented. It can be applied directly to arbitrary piezoelectric composites, which are widely used in vibrational and acoustic sensor/actuator/transmitter applications. In the present article it is shown that if the normal modes are given, the displacement field can be expanded as the linear superposition of normal modes, while the modal coefficients can be represented in terms of surface and volume integrals directly over the six types of distributed excitations without solving the quasi-static solution explicitly. The present treatment is a modification of an earlier work by Liu [11] using a different definition of the so-called quasi-static solution, and the damping effect has been neglected for simplicity. A simple example is given to exemplify the application of the present formulation.

  15. Controllable Bistability and Normal Mode Splitting in an Optomechanical System Assisted by an Atomic Ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qin; Hu, Yao-Hua; Ma, Peng-Cheng

    2017-02-01

    We consider a system consisting of a standard optomechanical cavity and a trapped atomic ensemble. In such a system, we mainly focus on the features of optomechanical bistability and normal mode splitting with the presence of atomic ensemble. The results show that the energy of laser directly coupling the atomic ensemble can be enhanced effectively, and using this laser is more convenient and easier to realize the bistability and normal mode splitting than the traditional means. Besides, we find that atom-cavity field detuning also has a significant impact on optomechanical bistability, which offers us an important method to adjust and control the cavity mean photon number. At last, the numerical results show that atom-cavity field detuning and atom-cavity field coupling strength have an opposite effect on the normal mode splitting because they have different contributions to the effective cavity field decay rate.

  16. Large-scale Rossby Normal Modes during Some Recent Northern Hemisphere Winters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    prescribed climatological background winds and temperatures typical of solstice and equinox. Salby (1981a) also showed that inhomogeneities in the...relatively undisturbed and eastward. The amplitude of the normal modes is substantially biased toward the winter hemisphere near solstice when...modes in nonuniform background configurations. Part II: Equinox and solstice conditions. J. Atmos. Sci., 38, 1827-1840. Salby, M.L., 1984. Transient

  17. Evaluation of Geometrically Nonlinear Reduced Order Models with Nonlinear Normal Modes

    DOE PAGES

    Kuether, Robert J.; Deaner, Brandon J.; Hollkamp, Joseph J.; ...

    2015-09-15

    Several reduced-order modeling strategies have been developed to create low-order models of geometrically nonlinear structures from detailed finite element models, allowing one to compute the dynamic response of the structure at a dramatically reduced cost. But, the parameters of these reduced-order models are estimated by applying a series of static loads to the finite element model, and the quality of the reduced-order model can be highly sensitive to the amplitudes of the static load cases used and to the type/number of modes used in the basis. Our paper proposes to combine reduced-order modeling and numerical continuation to estimate the nonlinearmore » normal modes of geometrically nonlinear finite element models. Not only does this make it possible to compute the nonlinear normal modes far more quickly than existing approaches, but the nonlinear normal modes are also shown to be an excellent metric by which the quality of the reduced-order model can be assessed. Hence, the second contribution of this work is to demonstrate how nonlinear normal modes can be used as a metric by which nonlinear reduced-order models can be compared. Moreover, various reduced-order models with hardening nonlinearities are compared for two different structures to demonstrate these concepts: a clamped–clamped beam model, and a more complicated finite element model of an exhaust panel cover.« less

  18. Evaluation of Geometrically Nonlinear Reduced Order Models with Nonlinear Normal Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Kuether, Robert J.; Deaner, Brandon J.; Hollkamp, Joseph J.; Allen, Matthew S.

    2015-09-15

    Several reduced-order modeling strategies have been developed to create low-order models of geometrically nonlinear structures from detailed finite element models, allowing one to compute the dynamic response of the structure at a dramatically reduced cost. But, the parameters of these reduced-order models are estimated by applying a series of static loads to the finite element model, and the quality of the reduced-order model can be highly sensitive to the amplitudes of the static load cases used and to the type/number of modes used in the basis. Our paper proposes to combine reduced-order modeling and numerical continuation to estimate the nonlinear normal modes of geometrically nonlinear finite element models. Not only does this make it possible to compute the nonlinear normal modes far more quickly than existing approaches, but the nonlinear normal modes are also shown to be an excellent metric by which the quality of the reduced-order model can be assessed. Hence, the second contribution of this work is to demonstrate how nonlinear normal modes can be used as a metric by which nonlinear reduced-order models can be compared. Moreover, various reduced-order models with hardening nonlinearities are compared for two different structures to demonstrate these concepts: a clamped–clamped beam model, and a more complicated finite element model of an exhaust panel cover.

  19. NORM2L: An Interactive Computer Program for Acoustic Normal Mode Calculations for the Pekeris Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    Points concerning the solution of the Schrodinger Equation ", J.Comp.Phys. 1 382-396 (1967) 3. D.D. Ellis and B. Leverman, DREA, work in progress. 4. R...although the formulae for the normal mode equations are scattered throughout the book. Chapter 9 of the newer book by Clay and Medwin [6] contains a...fairly clear introduction to normal mode theory. Only the essential equations are presented here. Note that the formulation ’s in terms of the

  20. Comparative estimation of vibrational entropy changes in proteins through normal modes analysis.

    PubMed

    Carrington, Benjamin J; Mancera, Ricardo L

    2004-10-01

    We compare the vibrational entropy changes of proteins calculated using a full and a number of approximate normal modes analysis methods. The vibrational entropy differences for three conformational changes and three protein binding interactions were computed. In general, the approximate methods yield good estimates of the vibrational entropy change in a fraction of the time required by full normal modes analysis. The absolute entropies are either overestimated or greatly underestimated, but the difference is sufficiently accurate for some methods. This indicates that some of the approximate methods can give reasonable estimates of the associated vibrational entropy changes, making them suitable for inclusion in free energy calculations.

  1. Large-amplitude nonlinear normal modes of the discrete sine lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Valeri V.; Manevitch, Leonid I.

    2017-02-01

    We present an analytical description of the large-amplitude stationary oscillations of the finite discrete system of harmonically coupled pendulums without any restrictions on their amplitudes (excluding a vicinity of π ). Although this model has numerous applications in different fields of physics, it was studied earlier in the infinite limit only. The discrete chain with a finite length can be considered as a well analytical analog of the coarse-grain models of flexible polymers in the molecular dynamics simulations. The developed approach allows to find the dispersion relations for arbitrary amplitudes of the nonlinear normal modes. We emphasize that the long-wavelength approximation, which is described by well-known sine-Gordon equation, leads to an inadequate zone structure for the amplitudes of about π /2 even if the chain is long enough. An extremely complex zone structure at the large amplitudes corresponds to multiple resonances between nonlinear normal modes even with strongly different wave numbers. Due to the complexity of the dispersion relations the modes with shorter wavelengths may have smaller frequencies. The stability of the nonlinear normal modes under condition of the resonant interaction are discussed. It is shown that this interaction of the modes in the vicinity of the long wavelength edge of the spectrum leads to the localization of the oscillations. The thresholds of instability and localization are determined explicitly. The numerical simulation of the dynamics of a finite-length chain is in a good agreement with obtained analytical predictions.

  2. A phylogenetic analysis of normal modes evolution in enzymes and its relationship to enzyme function.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jason; Jin, Jing; Kubelka, Jan; Liberles, David A

    2012-09-21

    Since the dynamic nature of protein structures is essential for enzymatic function, it is expected that functional evolution can be inferred from the changes in protein dynamics. However, dynamics can also diverge neutrally with sequence substitution between enzymes without changes of function. In this study, a phylogenetic approach is implemented to explore the relationship between enzyme dynamics and function through evolutionary history. Protein dynamics are described by normal mode analysis based on a simplified harmonic potential force field applied to the reduced C(α) representation of the protein structure while enzymatic function is described by Enzyme Commission numbers. Similarity of the binding pocket dynamics at each branch of the protein family's phylogeny was analyzed in two ways: (1) explicitly by quantifying the normal mode overlap calculated for the reconstructed ancestral proteins at each end and (2) implicitly using a diffusion model to obtain the reconstructed lineage-specific changes in the normal modes. Both explicit and implicit ancestral reconstruction identified generally faster rates of change in dynamics compared with the expected change from neutral evolution at the branches of potential functional divergences for the α-amylase, D-isomer-specific 2-hydroxyacid dehydrogenase, and copper-containing amine oxidase protein families. Normal mode analysis added additional information over just comparing the RMSD of static structures. However, the branch-specific changes were not statistically significant compared to background function-independent neutral rates of change of dynamic properties and blind application of the analysis would not enable prediction of changes in enzyme specificity.

  3. Enhancing backbone sampling in Monte Carlo simulations using internal coordinates normal mode analysis.

    PubMed

    Gil, Victor A; Lecina, Daniel; Grebner, Christoph; Guallar, Victor

    2016-10-15

    Normal mode methods are becoming a popular alternative to sample the conformational landscape of proteins. In this study, we describe the implementation of an internal coordinate normal mode analysis method and its application in exploring protein flexibility by using the Monte Carlo method PELE. This new method alternates two different stages, a perturbation of the backbone through the application of torsional normal modes, and a resampling of the side chains. We have evaluated the new approach using two test systems, ubiquitin and c-Src kinase, and the differences to the original ANM method are assessed by comparing both results to reference molecular dynamics simulations. The results suggest that the sampled phase space in the internal coordinate approach is closer to the molecular dynamics phase space than the one coming from a Cartesian coordinate anisotropic network model. In addition, the new method shows a great speedup (∼5-7×), making it a good candidate for future normal mode implementations in Monte Carlo methods.

  4. Quasi-normal modes of extremal BTZ black holes in TMG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshar, Hamid R.; Alishahiha, Mohsen; Mosaffa, Amir E.

    2010-08-01

    We study the spectrum of tensor perturbations on extremal BTZ black holes in topologically massive gravity for arbitrary values of the coefficient of the Chern-Simons term, μ. Imposing proper boundary conditions at the boundary of the space and at the horizon, we find that the spectrum contains quasi-normal modes.

  5. Global normal-mode Rossby waves observed in stratospheric ozone data

    SciTech Connect

    Randel, W.J. )

    1993-02-01

    Westward-propagating Rossby normal-mode planetary waves are documented in stratospheric ozone data using Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) satellite measurements. These modes are evidenced by enhanced spectral power and near-global coherence for westward-traveling zonal wave 1 oscillations with periods of 5-10 days. The ozone waves have maxima in high latitudes of the middle stratosphere (due to transport) and over midlatitudes in the upper stratosphere (due to photochemistry). These modes are nearly continuous throughout the eight years of SBUV observations, with maximum global coherence during the equinoxes. The upper-stratospheric waves are symmetric (in phase) between hemispheres, even for modes previously identified as antisymmetric in geopotential height. This behavior is due to differing wave vertical structure in each hemisphere: the planetary temperature waves are nearly in phase in the upper stratosphere, even though the height waves are out of phase. The observed ozone waves are furthermore compared to calculations based on linear wave transport and photochemistry, incorporating derived wind and temperature fields. Good agreement is found, showing that normal modes provide an idealized context to study the linear wave behavior of trace constituents in the real atmosphere. 23 refs., 17 figs.

  6. Unstable normal modes of low T /W dynamical instabilities in differentially rotating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saijo, Motoyuki; Yoshida, Shin'ichirou

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the nature of low T /W dynamical instabilities in differentially rotating stars by means of linear perturbation. Here, T and W represent rotational kinetic energy and the gravitational binding energy of the star. This is the first attempt to investigate low T /W dynamical instabilities as a complete set of the eigenvalue problem. Our equilibrium configuration has "constant" specific angular momentum distribution, which potentially contains a singular solution in the perturbed enthalpy at a corotation radius in linear perturbation. We find the unstable normal modes of differentially rotating stars by solving the eigenvalue problem along the equatorial plane of the star, imposing the regularity condition on the center and the vanished enthalpy at the oscillating equatorial surface. We find that the existing pulsation modes become unstable due to the existence of the corotation radius inside the star. The feature of the unstable mode eigenfrequency and its eigenfunction in the linear analysis roughly agrees with that in three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations in Newtonian gravity. Therefore, our normal mode analysis in the equatorial motion proves valid to find the unstable equilibrium stars efficiently. Moreover, the nature of the eigenfunction that oscillates between corotation and the surface radius for unstable stars requires reinterpretation of the pulsation modes in differentially rotating stars.

  7. Free and forced Rossby normal modes in a rectangular gulf of arbitrary orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graef, Federico

    2016-09-01

    A free Rossby normal mode in a rectangular gulf of arbitrary orientation is constructed by considering the reflection of a Rossby mode in a channel at the head of the gulf. Therefore, it is the superposition of four Rossby waves in an otherwise unbounded ocean with the same frequency and wavenumbers perpendicular to the gulf axis whose difference is equal to 2mπ/W, where m is a positive integer and W the gulf's width. The lower (or higher) modes with small m (or large m) are oscillatory (evanescent) in the coordinate along the gulf; these are elucidated geometrically. However for oceanographically realistic parameter values, most of the modes are evanescent. When the gulf is forced at the mouth with a single Fourier component, the response is in general an infinite sum of modes that are needed to match the value of the streamfunction at the gulf's entrance. The dominant mode of the response is the resonant one, which corresponds to forcing with a frequency ω and wavenumber normal to the gulf axis η appropriate to a gulf mode: η =- β sin α/(2ω) ± Mπ/W, where α is the angle between the gulf's axis and the eastern direction (+ve clockwise) and M the resonant's mode number. For zonal gulfs ω drops out of the resonance condition. For the special cases η = 0 in which the free surface goes up and down at the mouth with no flow through it, or a flow with a sinusoidal profile, resonant modes can get excited for very specific frequencies (only for non-zonal gulfs in the η = 0 case). The resonant mode is around the annual frequency for a wide range of gulf orientations α ∈ [40°, 130°] or α ∈ [220°, 310°] and gulf widths between 150 and 200 km; these include the Gulf of California and the Adriatic Sea. If η is imaginary, i.e. a flow with an exponential profile, there is no resonance. In general less modes get excited if the gulf is zonally oriented.

  8. Normal incidence filters using symmetry-protected modes in dielectric subwavelength gratings

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xuan; Tian, Hao; Du, Yan; Shi, Guang; Zhou, Zhongxiang

    2016-01-01

    We investigate narrowband transmission filters based on subwavelength-grating reflectors at normal incidence. Computational results show that the filtering is realized through symmetry-protected mode coupling. The guided mode resonances introduced by the slab layer allow flexible control of the filter frequencies. The quality factor of the filters could exceed 106. Dielectric gratings can be used over the entire range of electromagnetic waves, owing to their scale-invariant operations. Owing to the high refraction index and low index dispersion of semiconductors in the infrared range, these filters can be applied over a broad range from near infrared to terahertz frequencies. PMID:27824049

  9. Kinematic indicators on active normal faults in Western Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, P. L.; Barka, A. A.

    Quaternary normal fault zones in western Turkey comprise multiple slip planes and zone-parallel layers of fault breccia. They also contain several little-known kinematic indicators that are probably typical of many formed at shallow levels in extending terrains. The recent exhumation by contractors of about 2000 m 2 of slip planes in a SSE-dipping fault zone separating Quaternary colluvium from bedrock carbonates at Yavansu (7 km SE of Kuşadasi) permits an unusually complete inventory of the indicators to be compiled. The most spectacular indicators are metre-scale 69°W-pitching corrugations in slip planes and recemented breccia sheets underlying them. Corrugations, characterized by sinusoidal profiles normal to their long axes and, less commonly, culminations and depression along their axes possibly developed as a result of upwards-propagating slip planes seeking undemanding pathways through heterogeneous fault-precursor breccias that formed in advance of tip lines. Parallel to corrugation long axes are those of gutters, flat-floored, sleep-sided channels a few centimetres wide, probably related to the abrasion of subslip-plane breccia sheets. Centimetre-scale tool tracks scored in the uppermost subslip-plane breccia sheet by resistant colluvial clasts are irregular at their proximal ends but distally they swing into alignment with corrugation axes. Frictional-wear striae, centimetres long but only a few millimetres wide and pitching 78°W, are superimposed on the other slip-parallel lineations. Comb fractures nearly perpendicular to slip planes define an intersection lineation which is normal to corrugation axes. Fault-plane solutions of earthquakes on SSE-dipping active faults in the West Anatolian extensional province indicate that mainly normal, combined with minor dextral slip is the dominant mode, a conclusion in accord with the sense of slip inferred from the indicators exposed on the Yavansu slip planes.

  10. Actively mode-locked Raman fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuezong; Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Huawei; Fan, Tingwei; Feng, Yan

    2015-07-27

    Active mode-locking of Raman fiber laser is experimentally investigated for the first time. An all fiber connected and polarization maintaining loop cavity of ~500 m long is pumped by a linearly polarized 1120 nm Yb fiber laser and modulated by an acousto-optic modulator. Stable 2 ns width pulse train at 1178 nm is obtained with modulator opening time of > 50 ns. At higher power, pulses become longer, and second order Raman Stokes could take place, which however can be suppressed by adjusting the open time and modulation frequency. Transient pulse evolution measurement confirms the absence of relaxation oscillation in Raman fiber laser. Tuning of repetition rate from 392 kHz to 31.37 MHz is obtained with harmonic mode locking.

  11. High-frequency Born synthetic seismograms based on coupled normal modes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.

    2011-01-01

    High-frequency and full waveform synthetic seismograms on a 3-D laterally heterogeneous earth model are simulated using the theory of coupled normal modes. The set of coupled integral equations that describe the 3-D response are simplified into a set of uncoupled integral equations by using the Born approximation to calculate scattered wavefields and the pure-path approximation to modulate the phase of incident and scattered wavefields. This depends upon a decomposition of the aspherical structure into smooth and rough components. The uncoupled integral equations are discretized and solved in the frequency domain, and time domain results are obtained by inverse Fourier transform. Examples show the utility of the normal mode approach to synthesize the seismic wavefields resulting from interaction with a combination of rough and smooth structural heterogeneities. This approach is applied to an ~4 Hz shallow crustal wave propagation around the site of the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD). ?? The Author Geophysical Journal International ?? 2011 RAS.

  12. High-frequency Born synthetic seismograms based on coupled normal modes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, Fred F.

    2011-01-01

    High-frequency and full waveform synthetic seismograms on a 3-D laterally heterogeneous earth model are simulated using the theory of coupled normal modes. The set of coupled integral equations that describe the 3-D response are simplified into a set of uncoupled integral equations by using the Born approximation to calculate scattered wavefields and the pure-path approximation to modulate the phase of incident and scattered wavefields. This depends upon a decomposition of the aspherical structure into smooth and rough components. The uncoupled integral equations are discretized and solved in the frequency domain, and time domain results are obtained by inverse Fourier transform. Examples show the utility of the normal mode approach to synthesize the seismic wavefields resulting from interaction with a combination of rough and smooth structural heterogeneities. This approach is applied to an ∼4 Hz shallow crustal wave propagation around the site of the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD).

  13. Finite-time normal mode disturbances and error growth during Southern Hemisphere blocking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Mozheng; Frederiksen, Jorgen S.

    2005-01-01

    The structural organization of initially random errors evolving in a barotropic tangent linear model, with time-dependent basic states taken from analyses, is examined for cases of block development, maturation and decay in the Southern Hemisphere atmosphere during April, November, and December 1989. The statistics of 100 evolved errors are studied for six-day periods and compared with the growth and structures of fast growing normal modes and finite-time normal modes (FTNMs). The amplification factors of most initially random errors are slightly less than those of the fastest growing FTNM for the same time interval. During their evolution, the standard deviations of the error fields become concentrated in the regions of rapid dynamical development, particularly associated with developing and decaying blocks. We have calculated probability distributions and the mean and standard deviations of pattern correlations between each of the 100 evolved error fields and the five fastest growing FTNMs for the same time interval. The mean of the largest pattern correlation, taken over the five fastest growing FTNMs, increases with increasing time interval to a value close to 0.6 or larger after six days. FTNM 1 generally, but not always, gives the largest mean pattern correlation with error fields. Corresponding pattern correlations with the fast growing normal modes of the instantaneous basic state flow are significant but lower than with FTNMs. Mean pattern correlations with fast growing FTNMs increase further when the time interval is increased beyond six days.

  14. Skin pigmentation and texture changes after hair removal with the normal-mode ruby laser.

    PubMed

    Haedersdal, M; Egekvist, H; Efsen, J; Bjerring, P

    1999-11-01

    Promising clinical results have been obtained with the normal mode ruby laser for removal of unwanted hair. Melanin within the hair follicles is thought to act as target for the ruby laser pulses, whereas epidermal melanin is thought to be a competitive chromophore, responsible for potential side effects. This study aimed (i) to objectify postoperative changes in skin pigmentation and texture and (ii) to evaluate the importance of variations in preoperative skin pigmentation for the development of side effects 12 weeks after 1 treatment with the normal-mode ruby laser. A total of 17 volunteers (skin types I-IV) were laser-treated in the hairy pubic region (n = 51 test areas). A shaved test area served as control. Skin reflectance spectroscopical measurements, 3-dimensional surface contour analysis and ultrasonography objectified postoperative changes in skin pigmentation and texture. Blinded clinical assessments revealed postoperative hyperpigmentation (2% of test areas) and hypopigmentation (10%), whereas no textural changes were seen. Reflectance spectroscopically-determined pigmentary changes depended on the degree of preoperative skin pigmentation, fairly pigmented skin types experiencing subclinical hyperpigmentation and darkly pigmented skin types experiencing subclinical hypopigmentation. Three-dimensional surface profilometry documented similar pre- and postoperative surface contour parameters, indicating that the skin surface texture is preserved after laser exposure. Ultrasonography revealed similar skin thicknesses in laser-exposed and untreated control areas. It is concluded that normal-mode ruby laser treatment is safe for hair removal in skin types I-IV.

  15. Terahertz spectra and normal mode analysis of the crystalline VA class dipeptide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hailiang; Siegrist, Karen; Plusquellic, David F; Gregurick, Susan K

    2008-12-31

    Terahertz (THz) vibrational modes are characterized by nonlocal, collective molecular motions which are relevant to conformational changes and molecular functions in biological systems. We have investigated the THz spectra of a set of small bionanotubes which can serve as very simple models of membrane pores, and have examined the character of the THz modes which can impact transport processes. In this work, THz spectra of the crystalline VA class dipeptide nanotubes were calculated at both the harmonic and vibrational self-consistent field (VSCF) level using the CHARMM22 force field with periodic boundary conditions. Comparison of the calculated THz spectra against the experimental spectra revealed that the VSCF corrections generally improved the predictions in the low-frequency region. The improvements were especially manifested in the overall blue-shifts of the VSCF frequencies relative to the harmonic values, and blue shifts were attributed to the overall positive coupling strengths in all systems. Closer examination of the motions in the most significantly coupled normal mode pairs leads us to propose that, when two similar side-chain squeezing modes are coupled, the rapidly increased van der Waals interactions can lead to a stiffening of the effective potential, which in turn leads to the observed blue-shifts. However, we also noted that when the side-chain atoms become unphysically proximate and the van der Waals repulsion becomes too large, the VSCF calculations tend to deviate in the high frequency region and for the system of l-isoleucyl-l-valine. In addition, normal-mode analysis revealed a series of channel-breathing motions in all systems except l-valyl-l-alanine. We show that the inner products of the backbone vibrations between these channel-breathing motions divided the remaining VA class dipeptide systems into two subgroups. It is suggested that these modes may facilitate a pathway for the guest molecule absorption, substitution and removal in the

  16. PROMINENCE ACTIVATION BY CORONAL FAST MODE SHOCK

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Takuya; Asai, Ayumi; Shibata, Kazunari

    2015-03-01

    An X5.4 class flare occurred in active region NOAA11429 on 2012 March 7. The flare was associated with a very fast coronal mass ejection (CME) with a velocity of over 2500 km s{sup −1}. In the images taken with the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory-B/COR1, a dome-like disturbance was seen to detach from an expanding CME bubble and propagated further. A Type-II radio burst was also observed at the same time. On the other hand, in extreme ultraviolet images obtained by the Solar Dynamic Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), the expanding dome-like structure and its footprint propagating to the north were observed. The footprint propagated with an average speed of about 670 km s{sup −1} and hit a prominence located at the north pole and activated it. During the activation, the prominence was strongly brightened. On the basis of some observational evidence, we concluded that the footprint in AIA images and the ones in COR1 images are the same, that is, the MHD fast mode shock front. With the help of a linear theory, the fast mode Mach number of the coronal shock is estimated to be between 1.11 and 1.29 using the initial velocity of the activated prominence. Also, the plasma compression ratio of the shock is enhanced to be between 1.18 and 2.11 in the prominence material, which we consider to be the reason for the strong brightening of the activated prominence. The applicability of linear theory to the shock problem is tested with a nonlinear MHD simulation.

  17. Oscillatory reaction cross sections caused by normal mode sampling in quasiclassical trajectory calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Tibor; Vikár, Anna; Lendvay, György

    2016-01-07

    The quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) method is an efficient and important tool for studying the dynamics of bimolecular reactions. In this method, the motion of the atoms is simulated classically, and the only quantum effect considered is that the initial vibrational states of reactant molecules are semiclassically quantized. A sensible expectation is that the initial ensemble of classical molecular states generated this way should be stationary, similarly to the quantum state it is supposed to represent. The most widely used method for sampling the vibrational phase space of polyatomic molecules is based on the normal mode approximation. In the present work, it is demonstrated that normal mode sampling provides a nonstationary ensemble even for a simple molecule like methane, because real potential energy surfaces are anharmonic in the reactant domain. The consequences were investigated for reaction CH{sub 4} + H → CH{sub 3} + H{sub 2} and its various isotopologs and were found to be dramatic. Reaction probabilities and cross sections obtained from QCT calculations oscillate periodically as a function of the initial distance of the colliding partners and the excitation functions are erratic. The reason is that in the nonstationary ensemble of initial states, the mean bond length of the breaking C–H bond oscillates in time with the frequency of the symmetric stretch mode. We propose a simple method, one-period averaging, in which reactivity parameters are calculated by averaging over an entire period of the mean C–H bond length oscillation, which removes the observed artifacts and provides the physically most reasonable reaction probabilities and cross sections when the initial conditions for QCT calculations are generated by normal mode sampling.

  18. A global shear velocity model of the mantle from normal modes and surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    durand, S.; Debayle, E.; Ricard, Y. R.; Lambotte, S.

    2013-12-01

    We present a new global shear wave velocity model of the mantle based on the inversion of all published normal mode splitting functions and the large surface wave dataset measured by Debayle & Ricard (2012). Normal mode splitting functions and surface wave phase velocity maps are sensitive to lateral heterogeneities of elastic parameters (Vs, Vp, xi, phi, eta) and density. We first only consider spheroidal modes and Rayleigh waves and restrict the inversion to Vs, Vp and the density. Although it is well known that Vs is the best resolved parameter, we also investigate whether our dataset allows to extract additional information on density and/or Vp. We check whether the determination of the shear wave velocity is affected by the a priori choice of the crustal model (CRUST2.0 or 3SMAC) or by neglecting/coupling poorly resolved parameters. We include the major discontinuities, at 400 and 670 km. Vertical smoothing is imposed through an a priori gaussian covariance matrix on the model and we discuss the effect of coupling/decoupling the inverted structure above and below the discontinuities. We finally discuss the large scale structure of our model and its geodynamical implications regarding the amount of mass exchange between the upper and lower mantle.

  19. Accretion onto magnetized neutron stars - Normal mode analysis of the interchange instability at the magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arons, J.; Lea, S. M.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported for a linearized hydromagnetic stability analysis of the magnetopause of an accreting neutron star. The magnetosphere is assumed to be slowly rotating, and the plasma just outside the magnetopause is assumed to be weakly magnetized. The plasma layer is assumed to be bounded above by a shock wave and to be thin compared with the radius of the magnetosphere. Under these circumstances, the growing modes are shown to be localized in the direction parallel to the zero-order magnetic field, but the structure of the modes is still similar to the flute mode. An expression for the growth rate at each magnetic latitude is obtained in terms of the magnitude of the gravitational acceleration normal to the surface, the azimuthal mode number, the radius of the magnetosphere, the height of the shock above the magnetopause, and the effective Atwood number which embodies the stabilizing effects of favorable curvature and magnetic tension. The effective Atwood number is calculated, and the stabilizing effects of viscosity and aligned flow parallel to the magnetopause are discussed.

  20. Coupling the normal incident light into waveguide modes of DBR mirrors via a diffraction grating

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wenhong; Sun, Shang; Zhang, Chen; Li, Jiankai; Duan, Zonghui; Song, Qinghai; Xiao, Shumin

    2016-01-01

    Here we numerically and experimentally demonstrate the conversion of normally incident light into the guiding modes of distributed Bragg reflector (DBRs) mirror. By fabricating a gold grating onto a 7.5 pairs TiO2/SiO2 DBR mirror, a series of asymmetrical resonances have been formed at the bandgap range of the DBR mirror. The detailed numerical calculations show that these Fano resonances are attributed to the coupling of incident waves into guiding modes of the DBR mirror. Compared with the other resonances, this coupling mechanism can be simply realized and it has also been revealed to be quite robust to the environmental changes, making the conversion between propagating waves and guiding waves to be practically interesting for many applications. PMID:27958336

  1. Coupling the normal incident light into waveguide modes of DBR mirrors via a diffraction grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenhong; Sun, Shang; Zhang, Chen; Li, Jiankai; Duan, Zonghui; Song, Qinghai; Xiao, Shumin

    2016-12-01

    Here we numerically and experimentally demonstrate the conversion of normally incident light into the guiding modes of distributed Bragg reflector (DBRs) mirror. By fabricating a gold grating onto a 7.5 pairs TiO2/SiO2 DBR mirror, a series of asymmetrical resonances have been formed at the bandgap range of the DBR mirror. The detailed numerical calculations show that these Fano resonances are attributed to the coupling of incident waves into guiding modes of the DBR mirror. Compared with the other resonances, this coupling mechanism can be simply realized and it has also been revealed to be quite robust to the environmental changes, making the conversion between propagating waves and guiding waves to be practically interesting for many applications.

  2. Measurement of Quasi Normal Modes for a population of Binary Black Hole Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva Costa, Carlos Filipe; Klimenko, Sergey; Tiwari, Shubhanshu

    2017-01-01

    Perturbed solutions of the Kerr Black Hole (BH) are superimposition of damped sinusoids, named Quasi Normal Modes (QNM). These modes are completely defined by the final black hole parameters, mass and spin. Numerical simulations support that Binary BHs (BBH), after merging, produce a final BH emitting gravitational waves as described by the QNMs. This signal is very weak and hence the extraction of a QNM is quite challenging for the current generation of the ground based detectors. I will present a method for extraction of superimposed QNMs from future multiple observations of BBH merger signals in the advanced interferometers. We show that we can coherently sum up QNMs from the different signals and measure QNM parameters to prove the Kerr nature of a detected BHs population. NSF grant PHY 1505308.

  3. Twisted Gaussian Schell-model beams. I. Symmetry structure and normal-mode spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, R.; Sundar, K. ); Mukunda, N. )

    1993-09-01

    The authors present a comprehensive normal-mode decomposition analysis for the recently introduced class of twisted Gaussian Schell-model fields in partially coherent beam optics. The formal analogies to quantum mechanics in two dimensions are exploited. The authors also make effective use of a dynamical SU(2) symmetry of these fields to achieve the mode decomposition and to determine the spectrum. The twist phase is nonseparable in nature, rendering it nontrivially two dimensional. The consequences of this, resulting in the need to use Laguerre-Gaussian functions rather than products of Hermite-Gaussians, are carefully analyzed. An important identity involving these sets of special functions is established and is used in deriving the spectrum. 10 refs.

  4. On Quasi-Normal Modes, Area Quantization and Bohr Correspondence Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corda, Christian

    2015-10-01

    In (Int. Journ. Mod. Phys. D 14, 181 2005), the author Khriplovich verbatim claims that "the correspondence principle does not dictate any relation between the asymptotics of quasinormal modes and the spectrum of quantized black holes" and that "this belief is in conflict with simple physical arguments". In this paper we analyze Khriplovich's criticisms and realize that they work only for the original proposal by Hod, while they do not work for the improvements suggested by Maggiore and recently finalized by the author and collaborators through a connection between Hawking radiation and black hole (BH) quasi-normal modes (QNMs). This is a model of quantum BH somewhat similar to the historical semi-classical model of the structure of a hydrogen atom introduced by Bohr in 1913. Thus, QNMs can be really interpreted as BH quantum levels (the "electrons" of the "Bohr-like BH model").Our results have also important implications on the BH information puzzle.

  5. An instrument for direct observations of seismic and normal-mode rotational oscillations of the Earth.

    PubMed

    Cowsik, R

    2007-04-24

    The rotations around the vertical axis associated with the normal mode oscillations of the Earth and those induced by the seismic and other disturbances have been very difficult to observe directly. Such observations will provide additional information for 3D modeling of the Earth and for understanding earthquakes and other underground explosions. In this paper, we describe the design of an instrument capable of measuring the rotational motions associated with the seismic oscillations of the Earth, including the lowest frequency normal mode at nu approximately 3.7 x 10(-4) Hz. The instrument consists of a torsion balance with a natural frequency of nu(0) approximately 1.6 x 10(-4) Hz, which is observed by an autocollimating optical lever of high angular resolution and dynamic range. Thermal noise limits the sensitivity of the apparatus to amplitudes of approximately 1.5 x 10(-9) rad at the lowest frequency normal mode and the sensitivity improves as nu(-3/2) with increasing frequency. Further improvements in sensitivity by about two orders of magnitude may be achieved by operating the balance at cryogenic temperatures. Alternatively, the instrument can be made more robust with a reduced sensitivity by increasing nu(0) to approximately 10(-2) Hz. This instrument thus complements the ongoing effort by Igel and others to study rotational motions using ring laser gyroscopes and constitutes a positive response to the clarion call for developments in rotation seismology by Igel, Lee, and Todorovska [H. Igel, W.H.K. Lee and M.I. Todorovska, AGU Fall Meeting 2006, Rotational Seismology Sessions: S22A,S23B, Inauguration of the International Working Group on Rotational Seismology (IWGoRS)].

  6. The relationship between periodic dinucleotides and the nucleosomal DNA deformation revealed by normal mode analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Debby D.; Yan, Hong

    2011-12-01

    Nucleosomes, which contain DNA and proteins, are the basic unit of eukaryotic chromatins. Polymers such as DNA and proteins are dynamic, and their conformational changes can lead to functional changes. Periodic dinucleotide patterns exist in nucleosomal DNA chains and play an important role in the nucleosome structure. In this paper, we use normal mode analysis to detect significant structural deformations of nucleosomal DNA and investigate the relationship between periodic dinucleotides and DNA motions. We have found that periodic dinucleotides are usually located at the peaks or valleys of DNA and protein motions, revealing that they dominate the nucleosome dynamics. Also, a specific dinucleotide pattern CA/TG appears most frequently.

  7. Normal mode solutions for seismo-acoustic propagation resulting from shear and combined wave point sources.

    PubMed

    Nealy, Jennifer L; Collis, Jon M; Frank, Scott D

    2016-04-01

    Normal mode solutions to range-independent seismo-acoustic problems are benchmarked against elastic parabolic equation solutions and then used to benchmark the shear elastic parabolic equation self-starter [Frank, Odom, and Collis, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133, 1358-1367 (2013)]. The Pekeris waveguide with an elastic seafloor is considered for a point source located in the ocean emitting compressional waves, or in the seafloor, emitting both compressional and shear waves. Accurate solutions are obtained when the source is in the seafloor, and when the source is at the interface between the fluid and elastic layers.

  8. Supercontinuum generation by noise-like pulses transmitted through normally dispersive standard single-mode fibers.

    PubMed

    Zaytsev, Alexey; Lin, Chih-Hsuan; You, Yi-Jing; Chung, Chia-Chun; Wang, Chi-Luen; Pan, Ci-Ling

    2013-07-01

    We report generation of broadband supercontinuum (SC) by noise-like pulses (NLPs) with a central wavelength of 1070 nm propagating through a long piece of standard single-mode fibers (~100 meters) in normal dispersion region far from the zero-dispersion point. Theoretical simulations indicate that the physical mechanism of SC generation is due to nonlinear effects in fibers. The cascaded Raman scattering is responsible for significant spectral broadening in the longer wavelength regions whereas the Kerr effect results in smoothing of SC generated spectrum. The SC exhibits low threshold (43 nJ) and a flat spectrum over 1050-1250 nm.

  9. High-Latitude Filtering in a Global Grid-Point Model Using Model Normal Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takacs, L. L.; Navon, I. M.; Kalnay, E.

    1985-01-01

    The aim of high-latitude filtering in the vicinity of the poles is to avoid the excessively short time steps imposed on an explicit time-differencing scheme by linear stability due to fast moving inertia-gravity waves near the poles. The model normal mode expansion toward the problem of high-latitude filtering in a global shallow water model using the same philosophy as that used by Daley for the problem for large timesteps in P.E. models with explicit time integration schemes was applied.

  10. Normal-mode analysis of lateral diffusion on a bounded membrane surface.

    PubMed Central

    Koppel, D E

    1985-01-01

    The normal-mode analysis of fluorescence redistribution after photobleaching, introduced for the characterization of lateral diffusion on spherical membrane surfaces, has been generalized and extended to other surface geometries. Theoretical expressions are derived for the characteristic values and orthogonal characteristic functions of the diffusion equations for cylindrical surfaces, ellipsoids of revolution and dimpled discoidal surfaces. On the basis of these results, a simple analytical function is proposed as an empirical solution for the analysis of photobleaching data on a variety of discoidal surfaces. Special experimental and computational methods for determining the surface-diffusion coefficient are described, and demonstrated with data for lipid diffusion in erythrocyte membranes. PMID:3978205

  11. Deviation from the Normal Mode Expansion in a Coupled Graphene-Nanomechanical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Cornelia; Pigeau, Benjamin; Mercier de Lépinay, Laure; Kuhn, Aurélien G.; Kalita, Dipankar; Bendiab, Nedjma; Marty, Laëtitia; Bouchiat, Vincent; Arcizet, Olivier

    2016-12-01

    A significant deviation from the normal mode expansion is observed in the optomechanically measured thermal noise of a graphene membrane suspended on a silicon nitride nanoresonator. This deviation is due to the heterogeneous character of mechanical dissipation over the spatial extent of coupled eigenmodes, which is tuned through an avoided anticrossing. We demonstrate that the fluctuation-dissipation theorem permits a proper evaluation of the thermal noise of the coupled nanomechanical system. Since a good spatial homogeneity is delicate to ensure at the nanoscale, this approach is fundamental to correctly describing the thermal noise of nanomechanical systems which ultimately impact their sensing capacity.

  12. Experimental and numerical studies of mode-locked fiber laser with large normal and anomalous dispersion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; El-Damak, A R; Feng, Yan; Gu, Xijia

    2013-05-20

    An ytterbium-doped mode-locked fiber laser was demonstrated with a chirped fiber Bragg grating for dispersion management. The cavity net dispersion could be changed from large normal dispersion (2.4 ps(2)) to large anomalous dispersion (-2.0 ps(2)), depending on the direction of the chirped Bragg grating in laser cavity. The proposed fiber lasers with large normal dispersion generated stable pulses with a pulse width of <1.1 ns and a pulse energy of 1.5 nJ. The laser with large anomalous dispersion generated wavelength-tunable soliton with a pulse width of 2.7 ps and pulse energy of 0.13 nJ. A theoretical model was established and used to verify the experimental observations.

  13. Numerical investigations with a hybrid isentropic-sigma model. I - Normal-mode characteristics. II - The inclusion of moist processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, R. B.; Johnson, Donald R.; Reames, Fred M.; Zapotocny, Tom H.; Wolf, Bart J.

    1991-01-01

    The normal-mode characteristics of baroclinically amplifying disturbances were numerically investigated in a series of adiabatic simulations by a hybrid isentropic-sigma model, demonstrating the effect of coupling an isentropic-coordinate free atmospheric domain with a sigma-coordinate PBL on the normal-mode characteristics. Next, the normal-mode model was modified by including a transport equation for water vapor and adiabatic heating by condensation. Simulations with and without a hydrological component showed that the overall effect of latent heat release is to markedly enhance cyclogenesis and frontogenesis.

  14. Normal modes of symmetric protein assemblies. Application to the tobacco mosaic virus protein disk.

    PubMed Central

    Simonson, T; Perahia, D

    1992-01-01

    We use group theoretical methods to study the molecular dynamics of symmetric protein multimers in the harmonic or quasiharmonic approximation. The method explicitly includes the long-range correlations between protein subunits. It can thus address collective dynamic effects, such as cooperativity between subunits. The n lowest-frequency normal modes of each individual subunit are combined into symmetry coordinates for the entire multimer. The Hessian of the potential energy is thereby reduced to a series of blocks of order n or 2n. In the quasiharmonic approximation, the covariance matrix of the atomic oscillations is reduced to the same block structure by an analogous set of symmetry coordinates. The method is applied to one layer of the tobacco mosaic virus protein disk in vacuo, to gain insight into the role of conformational fluctuations and electrostatics in tobacco mosaic virus assembly. The system has 78,000 classical, positional, degrees of freedom, yet the calculation is reduced by symmetry to a problem of order 4,600. Normal modes in the 0-100 cm-1 range were calculated. The calculated correlations extend mainly from each subunit to its nearest neighbors. The network of core helices has weak correlations with the rest of the structure. Similarly, the inner loops 90-108 are uncorrelated with the rest of the structure. Thus, the model predicts that the dielectric response in the RNA-binding region is mainly due to the loops alone. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 PMID:1547329

  15. Application of Normal Mode Expansion to AE Waves in Finite Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorman, M. R.; Prosser, W. H.

    1997-01-01

    Breckenridge et al. (1975), Hsu (1985) and Pao (1978) adapted approaches from seismology to calculate the response at the surface of an infinite half-space and an infinite plate. These approaches have found use in calibrating acoustic emission (AE) transducers. However, it is difficult to extend this theoretical approach to AE testing of practical structures. Weaver and Pao (1982) considered a normal mode solution to the Lamb equations. Hutchinson (1983) pointed out the potential relevance of Mindlin's plate theory (1951) to AE. Pao (1982) reviewed Medick s (1961) classical plate theory for a point source, but rejected it as useful for AE and no one seems to have investigated its relevance to AE any further. Herein, a normal mode solution to the classical plate bending equation was investigated for its applicability to AE. The same source-time function chosen by Weaver and Pao is considered. However, arbitrary source and receiver positions are chosen relative to the boundaries of the plate. This is another advantage of the plate theory treatment in addition to its simplicity. The source does not have to be at the center of the plate as in the axisymmetric treatment. The plate is allowed to remain finite and reflections are predicted. The importance of this theory to AE is that it can handle finite plates, realistic boundary conditions, and can be extended to composite materials.

  16. Stress-dependent normal-mode frequencies from the effective mass of granular matter.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanqing; Johnson, David L; Valenza, John J; Santibanez, Francisco; Makse, Hernán A

    2014-06-01

    A zero-temperature critical point has been invoked to control the anomalous behavior of granular matter as it approaches jamming or mechanical arrest. Criticality manifests itself in an anomalous spectrum of low-frequency normal modes and scaling behavior near the jamming transition. The critical point may explain the peculiar mechanical properties of dissimilar systems such as glasses and granular materials. Here we study the critical scenario via an experimental measurement of the normal modes frequencies of granular matter under stress from a pole decomposition analysis of the effective mass. We extract a complex-valued characteristic frequency which displays scaling |ω (σ)| ∼ σΩ' with vanishing stress σ for a variety of granular systems. The critical exponent is smaller than that predicted by mean-field theory opening new challenges to explain the exponent for frictional and dissipative granular matter. Our results shed light on the anomalous behavior of stress-dependent acoustics and attenuation in granular materials near the jamming transition.

  17. The normal mode analysis shape detection method for automated shape determination of lung nodules.

    PubMed

    Stember, Joseph N

    2015-04-01

    Surface morphology and shape in general are important predictors for the behavior of solid-type lung nodules detected on CT. More broadly, shape analysis is useful in many areas of computer-aided diagnosis and essentially all scientific and engineering disciplines. Automated methods for shape detection have all previously, to the author's knowledge, relied on some sort of geometric measure. I introduce Normal Mode Analysis Shape Detection (NMA-SD), an approach that measures shape indirectly via the motion it would undergo if one imagined the shape to be a pseudomolecule. NMA-SD allows users to visualize internal movements in the imaging object and thereby develop an intuition for which motions are important, and which geometric features give rise to them. This can guide the identification of appropriate classification features to distinguish among classes of interest. I employ normal mode analysis (NMA) to animate pseudomolecules representing simulated lung nodules. Doing so, I am able to assign a testing set of nodules into the classes circular, elliptical, and irregular with roughly 97 % accuracy. This represents a proof-of-principle that one can obtain shape information by treating voxels as pseudoatoms in a pseudomolecule, and analyzing the pseudomolecule's predicted motion.

  18. Modeling the effect of anisotropic pressure on tokamak plasmas normal modes and continuum using fluid approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Z. S.; Hole, M. J.; Fitzgerald, M.

    2015-09-01

    Extending the ideal MHD stability code MISHKA, a new code, MISHKA-A, is developed to study the impact of pressure anisotropy on plasma stability. Based on full anisotropic equilibrium and geometry, the code can provide normal mode analysis with three fluid closure models: the single adiabatic model (SA), the double adiabatic model (CGL) and the incompressible model. A study on the plasma continuous spectrum shows that in low beta, large aspect ratio plasma, the main impact of anisotropy lies in the modification of the BAE gap and the sound frequency, if the q profile is conserved. The SA model preserves the BAE gap structure as ideal MHD, while in CGL the lowest frequency branch does not touch zero frequency at the resonant flux surface where m   +   nq   =   0, inducing a gap at very low frequency. Also, the BAE gap frequency with bi-Maxwellian distribution in both model becomes higher if {{p}\\bot} \\gt {{p}\\parallel} with a q profile dependency. As a benchmark of the code, we study the m/n   =   1/1 internal kink mode. Numerical calculation of the marginal stability boundary with bi-Maxwellian distribution shows a good agreement with the generalized incompressible Bussac criterion (Mikhailovskii 1983 Sov. J. Plasma Phys. 9 190): the mode is stabilized(destabilized) if {{p}\\parallel}\\lt {{p}\\bot} ({{p}\\parallel}\\gt{{p}\\bot} ).

  19. Analytical description of quasi-normal mode in resonant plasmonic nano cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Liu, Haitao; Jia, Hongwei; Zhong, Ying

    2016-03-01

    We propose an analytical model of quasi-normal mode (QNM) for resonant plasmonic nano cavities formed by sub wavelength grooves in metallic substrate. The QNM has shown great advantages in understanding and calculating the frequency response of resonant nano-structures. With our model we show that the QNM originates from a resonance of the fundamental mode in every individual groove and its interaction via surface waves. Analytical expression for the complex eigenfrequency as well as the field distribution of the QNM can be derived from the model. With the analytical model and a few assumptions on the scattered field, the legitimacy of the expansion of scattered field with QNMs under external illuminations is justified with the Mittag-Leffler's theorem of meromorphic function. The expansion coefficients of QNMs are analytically expressed with a finite set of elementary scattering coefficients, which avoids the calculation of the mode volume of QNMs that have a spatial divergence at infinity. The model clarifies the physical origin of QNMs and drastically reduces the computational load of QNMs, especially for a large ensemble of grooves for which brute-force numerical tools are not available. The validity of the proposed model is tested against fully vectorial numerical results.

  20. An approach to detect afterslips in giant earthquakes in the normal-mode frequency band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Toshiro; Ji, Chen; Igarashi, Mitsutsugu

    2012-08-01

    An approach to detect afterslips in the source process of giant earthquakes is presented in the normal-mode frequency band (0.3-2.0 mHz). The method is designed to avoid a potential systematic bias problem in the determination of earthquake moment by a typical normal-mode approach. The source of bias is the uncertainties in Q (modal attenuation parameter) which varies by up to about ±10 per cent among published studies. A choice of Q values within this range affects amplitudes in synthetic seismograms significantly if a long time-series of about 5-7 d is used for analysis. We present an alternative time-domain approach that can reduce this problem by focusing on a shorter time span with a length of about 1 d. Application of this technique to four recent giant earthquakes is presented: (1) the Tohoku, Japan, earthquake of 2011 March 11, (2) the 2010 Maule, Chile earthquake, (3) the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake and (4) the Solomon earthquake of 2007 April 1. The Global Centroid Moment Tensor (GCMT) solution for the Tohoku earthquake explains the normal-mode frequency band quite well. The analysis for the 2010 Chile earthquake indicates that the moment is about 7-10 per cent higher than the moment determined by its GCMT solution but further analysis shows that there is little evidence of afterslip; the deviation in moment can be explained by an increase of the dip angle from 18° in the GCMT solution to 19°. This may be a simple trade-off problem between the moment and dip angle but it may also be due to a deeper centroid in the normal-mode frequency band data, as a deeper source could have steeper dip angle due to changes in geometry of the Benioff zone. For the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, the five point-source solution by Tsai et al. explains most of the signals but a sixth point-source with long duration improves the fit to the normal-mode frequency band data. The 2007 Solomon earthquake shows that the high-frequency part of our analysis (above 1 mHz) is

  1. Broadband radiation modes: estimation and active control.

    PubMed

    Berkhoff, Arthur P

    2002-03-01

    In this paper we give a formulation of the most efficiently radiating vibration patterns of a vibrating body, the radiation modes, in the time domain. The radiation modes can be used to arrive at efficient weighting schemes for an array of sensors in order to reduce the controller dimensionality. Because these particular radiation modes are optimum in a broadband sense, they are termed broadband radiation modes. Methods are given to obtain these modes from measured data. The broadband radiation modes are used for the design of an actuator array in a feedback control system to reduce the sound power radiated from a plate. Three methods for the design of the actuator are compared, taking into account the reduction of radiated sound power in the controlled frequency range, but also the possible increase of radiated sound power in the uncontrolled frequency range.

  2. Source models of great earthquakes from ultra low-frequency normal mode data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentas, Konstantinos; Ferreira, Ana; Clévédé, Eric

    2014-05-01

    We present a new earthquake source inversion technique based on normal mode data for the simultaneous determination of the rupture duration, length and moment tensor of large earthquakes with unilateral rupture. We use ultra low-frequency (f < 1 mHz) normal mode spheroidal multiplets and the phases of split free oscillations, which are modelled using Higher Order Perturbation Theory (HOPT), taking into account the Earth's rotation, ellipticity and lateral heterogeneities. A Monte Carlo exploration of the model space is carried out, enabling the assessment of source parameter tradeoffs and uncertainties. We carry out synthetic tests for four different realistic artificial earthquakes with different faulting mechanisms and magnitudes (Mw 8.1-9.3) to investigate errors in the source inversions due to: (i) unmodelled 3-D Earth structure; (ii) noise in the data; (iii) uncertainties in spatio-temporal earthquake location; and, (iv) neglecting the source finiteness in point source moment tensor inversions. We find that unmodelled 3-D structure is the most serious source of errors for rupture duration and length determinations especially for the lowest magnitude artificial events. The errors in moment magnitude and fault mechanism are generally small, with the rake angle showing systematically larger errors (up to 20 degrees). We then carry out source inversions of five giant thrust earthquakes (Mw ≥ 8.5): (i) the 26 December 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake; (ii) the 28 March 2005 Nias, Sumatra earthquake; (iii) the 12 September 2007 Bengkulu earthquake; (iv) the Tohoku, Japan earthquake of 11 March 2011; (v) the Maule, Chile earthquake of 27 February 2010; and (vi) the recent 24 May 2013 Mw 8.3 Okhotsk Sea, Russia, deep (607 km) earthquake. While finite source inversions for rupture length, duration, magnitude and fault mechanism are possible for the Sumatra-Andaman and Tohoku events, for all the other events their lower magnitudes do not allow stable inversions of mode

  3. Possibility of observation of polaron normal modes at the far-infrared spectrum of acetanilide and related organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalosakas, G.; Aubry, S.; Tsironis, G. P.

    1998-10-01

    We use a stationary and normal mode analysis of the semiclassical Holstein model in order to connect the low-frequency linear polaron modes to low-lying far-infrared lines of the acetanilide spectrum and through parameter fitting we comment on the validity of the polaron results in this system.

  4. Normal mode energetics and error analysis of GLA GCM simulations with different horizontal resolutions during a winter month

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, H. L.; Kung, E. C.; Baker, W. E.

    1989-01-01

    Comparative energetics is presented for a series of four general circulation model simulations for January 1979 conducted by the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres. The simulations include cases of coarse and fine horizontal model resolutions with two slightly different initial conditions. Using a three-dimensional normal mode expansion, it is found that the gravity-mode energy levels are significantly reduced in the higher wavenumbers and in the higher-order internal vertical modes by the increase of horizontal model resolution.

  5. Source models of great earthquakes from ultra low-frequency normal mode data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentas, K.; Ferreira, A. M. G.; Clévédé, E.; Roch, J.

    2014-08-01

    We present a new earthquake source inversion technique based on normal mode data for the simultaneous determination of the rupture duration, length and moment tensor of large earthquakes with unilateral rupture. We use ultra low-frequency (f <1 mHz) mode singlets and multiplets which are modelled using Higher Order Perturbation Theory (HOPT), taking into account the Earth’s rotation, ellipticity and lateral heterogeneities. A Monte Carlo exploration of the model space is carried out, enabling the assessment of source parameter tradeoffs and uncertainties. We carry out synthetic tests to investigate errors in the source inversions due to: (i) unmodelled 3-D Earth structure; (ii) noise in the data; (iii) uncertainties in spatio-temporal earthquake location; and, (iv) neglecting the source finiteness in point source inversions. We find that unmodelled 3-D structure is the most serious source of errors for rupture duration and length determinations especially for the lowest magnitude events. The errors in moment magnitude and fault mechanism are generally small, with the rake angle showing systematically larger errors (up to 20°). We then investigate five real thrust earthquakes (Mw⩾8.5): (i) Sumatra-Andaman (26th December 2004); (ii) Nias, Sumatra (28th March 2005); (iii) Bengkulu (12th September 2007); (iv) Tohoku, Japan (11th March 2011); (v) Maule, Chile (27th February 2010); and, (vi) the 24 May 2013 Mw 8.3 Okhotsk Sea, Russia, deep (607 km) event. While finite source inversions for rupture length, duration, magnitude and fault mechanism are possible for the Sumatra-Andaman and Tohoku events, for all the other events their lower magnitudes only allow stable point source inversions of mode multiplets. We obtain the first normal mode finite source model for the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, which yields a fault length of 461 km, a rupture duration of 151 s, and hence an average rupture velocity of 3.05 km/s, giving an independent confirmation of the compact nature of

  6. Computational modes and the Machenauer N.L.N.M.I. of the GLAS 4th order model. [NonLinear Normal Mode Initialization in numerical weather forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navon, I. M.; Bloom, S.; Takacs, L. L.

    1985-01-01

    An attempt was made to use the GLAS global 4th order shallow water equations to perform a Machenhauer nonlinear normal mode initialization (NLNMI) for the external vertical mode. A new algorithm was defined for identifying and filtering out computational modes which affect the convergence of the Machenhauer iterative procedure. The computational modes and zonal waves were linearly initialized and gravitational modes were nonlinearly initialized. The Machenhauer NLNMI was insensitive to the absence of high zonal wave numbers. The effects of the Machenhauer scheme were evaluated by performing 24 hr integrations with nondissipative and dissipative explicit time integration models. The NLNMI was found to be inferior to the Rasch (1984) pseudo-secant technique for obtaining convergence when the time scales of nonlinear forcing were much smaller than the time scales expected from the natural frequency of the mode.

  7. Normal vibrational modes of phospholipid bilayers observed by low-frequency Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surovtsev, N. V.; Dmitriev, A. A.; Dzuba, S. A.

    2017-03-01

    Low-frequency Raman spectra of multilamellar vesicles made either of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-s n -glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) or 1,2-dipalmitoyl-s n -glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) have been studied in a wide temperature range. Below 0 ∘C two peaks are found at frequencies around 8-9 and 14 -17 c m -1 and attributed to the normal vibrational modes of the phospholipid bilayer, which are determined by the bilayer thickness and stiffness (elastic modulus). The spectral positions of the peaks depend on the temperature and the bilayer composition. It is suggested that the ratio of the intensities of the first and second peaks can serve as a measure of the interleaflet elastic coupling. The addition of cholesterol to the phospholipid bilayer leads to peak shift and broadening, which may be assigned to the composition heterogeneities commonly attributed to the lipid raft formation.

  8. Normal modes of a superconducting transmission-line resonator with embedded lumped element circuit components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, Henrik Lund; Mølmer, Klaus; Andersen, Christian Kraglund

    2016-11-01

    We present a method to identify the coupled, normal modes of a superconducting transmission line with an embedded lumped element circuit. We evaluate the effective transmission-line nonlinearities in the case of Kerr-like Josephson interactions in the circuit and in the case where the embedded circuit constitutes a qubit degree of freedom, which is Rabi coupled to the field in the transmission line. Our theory quantitatively accounts for the very high and positive Kerr nonlinearities observed in a recent experiment [M. Rehák, P. Neilinger, M. Grajcar, G. Oelsner, U. Hübner, E. Il'ichev, and H.-G. Meyer, Appl. Phys. Lett. 104, 162604 (2014), 10.1063/1.4873719], and we can evaluate the accomplishments of modified versions of the experimental circuit.

  9. Superconducting Gravimeter Data for the IRIS Seismology Database: Application to Normal Modes from the Sumatra Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crossley, D.; Rivera, L.; Hinderer, J.; Rosat, S.

    2009-04-01

    For several years, it has been the goal of the Global Geodynamics Project (GGP) to convert high rate acceleration data recorded on superconducting gravimeters (SG) to a format compatible with the seismic data archived at IRIS. The problem for the GGP community has been to properly establish the metadata for characterizing the response of the instrument, particularly its phase characteristics. Although SG data exists at IRIS from the Membach GGP station in Belgium, up to now most of the data from the GGP network has been on hold until the response problem was solved. This we have now been able to do, and we hope to show that data from the Strasbourg SG station will be at IRIS and available. We will also upload all the data from the SGs from after the Sumatra earthquake and show some results on normal mode analysis that demonstrates the benefit of the good amplitude calibration feature and high precision of the SG instruments.

  10. Polaritonic normal-mode splitting and light localization in a one-dimensional nanoguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haakh, Harald R.; Faez, Sanli; Sandoghdar, Vahid

    2016-11-01

    We theoretically investigate the interaction of light and a collection of emitters in a subwavelength one-dimensional medium (nanoguide), where enhanced emitter-photon coupling leads to efficient multiple scattering of photons. We show that the spectrum of the transmitted light undergoes normal-mode splitting even though no external cavity resonance is employed. By considering densities much higher than those encountered in cold atom experiments, we study the influence of the near-field dipole coupling and disorder on the resulting complex super-radiant and subradiant polaritonic states. In particular, we provide evidence for the longitudinal localization of light in a one-dimensional open system and provide a polaritonic phase diagram. Our results motivate a number of experiments, where new coherent superposition states of light and matter can be realized in the solid state.

  11. Rotational normal modes of triaxial two-layered anelastic Earth model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhuo; Shen, WenBin

    2016-04-01

    This study focuses on providing rotational normal modes of a triaxial two-layered anelastic Earth model with considering the electromagnetic coupling. We formulate the rotation equation of the triaxial two-layered anelastic Earth model and then provide solution of that equation. We obtain four mathematically possible solutions which might exist in reality. Based on present choice of the conventional reference systems, only two of these four solutions correspond to the real existing prograde Chandler wobble (CW) and the retrograde free core nutation (FCN). We provide the periods of CW and FCN as well as their quality factors based on various experiments and observations. This study is supported by National 973 Project China (grant No. 2013CB733305) and NSFC (grant Nos. 41174011, 41210006, 41429401).

  12. Normal Mode Flexible Fitting of High-Resolution Structures of Biological Molecules Toward SAXS Data

    PubMed Central

    Gorba, Christian; Tama, Florence

    2010-01-01

    We present a method to reconstruct a three-dimensional protein structure from an atomic pair distribution function derived from the scattering intensity profile from SAXS data by flexibly fitting known x-ray structures. This method uses a linear combination of low-frequency normal modes from an elastic network description of the molecule in an iterative manner to deform the structure to conform optimally to the target pair distribution function derived from SAXS data. For computational efficiency, the protein and water molecules included in the protein first hydration shell are coarse-grained. In this paper, we demonstrate the validity of our coarse-graining approach to study SAXS data. Illustrative results of our flexible fitting studies on simulated SAXS data from five different proteins are presented. PMID:20634984

  13. Regional variation of inner core anisotropy from seismic normal mode observations.

    PubMed

    Deuss, Arwen; Irving, Jessica C E; Woodhouse, John H

    2010-05-21

    Earth's solid inner core is surrounded by a convecting liquid outer core, creating the geodynamo driving the planet's magnetic field. Seismic studies using compressional body waves suggest hemispherical variation in the anisotropic structure of the inner core, but are poorly constrained because of limited earthquake and receiver distribution. Here, using normal mode splitting function measurements from large earthquakes, based on extended cross-coupling theory, we observe both regional variations and eastern versus western hemispherical anisotropy in the inner core. The similarity of this pattern with Earth's magnetic field suggests freezing-in of crystal alignment during solidification or texturing by Maxwell stress as origins of the anisotropy. These observations limit the amount of inner core super rotation, but would be consistent with oscillation.

  14. Notch strengthening or weakening governed by transition of shear failure to normal mode fracture

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Xianqi; Li, Congling; Shi, Xinghua; Xu, Xianghong; Wei, Yujie

    2015-01-01

    It is generally observed that the existence of geometrical discontinuity like notches in materials will lead to strength weakening, as a resultant of local stress concentration. By comparing the influence of notches to the strength of three typical materials, aluminum alloys with intermediate tensile ductility, metallic glasses with no tensile ductility, and brittle ceramics, we observed strengthening in aluminum alloys and metallic glasses: Tensile strength of the net section in circumferentially notched cylinders increases with the constraint quantified by the ratio of notch depth over notch root radius; in contrast, the ceramic exhibit notch weakening. The strengthening in the former two is due to resultant deformation transition: Shear failure occurs in intact samples while samples with deep notches break in normal mode fracture. No such deformation transition was observed in the ceramic, and stress concentration leads to its notch weakening. The experimental results are confirmed by theoretical analyses and numerical simulation. The results reported here suggest that the conventional criterion to use brittleness and/or ductility to differentiate notch strengthening or weakening is not physically sound. Notch strengthening or weakening relies on the existence of failure mode transition and materials exhibiting shear failure while subjected to tension will notch strengthen. PMID:26022892

  15. Normal modes from the 2013 Sea of Okhotsk earthquake, the largest deep event ever recorded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okal, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    With a moment of 4.1 10**28 dyn*cm, the Sea of Okhotsk earthquake of 24 May 2013 is the largest deep event ever recorded. This provides a unique opportunity to study the excitation of low-frequency normal modes, including overtone and radial ones. The principal questions addressed will be the possible existence of a slow component to the source, which is not warranted by preliminary results; and the possible presence of an isotropic component to the moment tensor of its source. The latter was strongly debated in the case of the 1970 Colombian event (Gilbert and Dziewonski, 1973; Okal and Geller, 1979), and clearly found absent from the source of the 1994 Bolivian one (Kikuchi and Kanamori, 1994; Okal, 1996). Critical in this respect will be the investigation of the relative excitation of the the radial modes, and in particular, the fundamental 0s0, for which a sufficiently long (90 days) time series was not available by the submission deadline.

  16. A theory for protein dynamics: Global anisotropy and a normal mode approach to local complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copperman, Jeremy; Romano, Pablo; Guenza, Marina

    2014-03-01

    We propose a novel Langevin equation description for the dynamics of biological macromolecules by projecting the solvent and all atomic degrees of freedom onto a set of coarse-grained sites at the single residue level. We utilize a multi-scale approach where molecular dynamic simulations are performed to obtain equilibrium structural correlations input to a modified Rouse-Zimm description which can be solved analytically. The normal mode solution provides a minimal basis set to account for important properties of biological polymers such as the anisotropic global structure, and internal motion on a complex free-energy surface. This multi-scale modeling method predicts the dynamics of both global rotational diffusion and constrained internal motion from the picosecond to the nanosecond regime, and is quantitative when compared to both simulation trajectory and NMR relaxation times. Utilizing non-equilibrium sampling techniques and an explicit treatment of the free-energy barriers in the mode coordinates, the model is extended to include biologically important fluctuations in the microsecond regime, such as bubble and fork formation in nucleic acids, and protein domain motion. This work supported by the NSF under the Graduate STEM Fellows in K-12 Education (GK-12) program, grant DGE-0742540 and NSF grant DMR-0804145, computational support from XSEDE and ACISS.

  17. Notch strengthening or weakening governed by transition of shear failure to normal mode fracture.

    PubMed

    Lei, Xianqi; Li, Congling; Shi, Xinghua; Xu, Xianghong; Wei, Yujie

    2015-05-29

    It is generally observed that the existence of geometrical discontinuity like notches in materials will lead to strength weakening, as a resultant of local stress concentration. By comparing the influence of notches to the strength of three typical materials, aluminum alloys with intermediate tensile ductility, metallic glasses with no tensile ductility, and brittle ceramics, we observed strengthening in aluminum alloys and metallic glasses: Tensile strength of the net section in circumferentially notched cylinders increases with the constraint quantified by the ratio of notch depth over notch root radius; in contrast, the ceramic exhibit notch weakening. The strengthening in the former two is due to resultant deformation transition: Shear failure occurs in intact samples while samples with deep notches break in normal mode fracture. No such deformation transition was observed in the ceramic, and stress concentration leads to its notch weakening. The experimental results are confirmed by theoretical analyses and numerical simulation. The results reported here suggest that the conventional criterion to use brittleness and/or ductility to differentiate notch strengthening or weakening is not physically sound. Notch strengthening or weakening relies on the existence of failure mode transition and materials exhibiting shear failure while subjected to tension will notch strengthen.

  18. Modes of active deformation in Eastern Hispaniola

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Senz, J.; Pérez-Estaún, A.

    2012-04-01

    active fault at surface, the Yabón fault, as a trans pop-up strike-slip fault. 3) The contractive faults and folds that form the Oriental Cordillera disappear to the east replaced by a field of NW-SE to WNW-ESE trending normal faults with fresh scarps up to 75 m high depressing the Late Neogene reef (Punta Cana extended area). In plan form, the faults show multiple relays and transverse ramps at the overlaps. A NE-SW section coast to coast across the Punta Cana area show the Late Neogene reef gently arched and cut by normal faults bounding half-grabens, with the main throw directed to the NE. The amount of extension exceeds 3 km (5% of stretching). A very similar system of normal faults has been documented in seismic lines across the Mona Passage (eg. van Gestel et al., 1998, Mondziel, 2007, Chaytor and ten Brink, 2010) and onshore western Puerto Rico (Hippolyte et al., 2005), which are interpreted by a pinning extension model (Dolan et al., 1998, Mann et al., 2002) or by oblique extension (Chaytor and ten Brink, 2010). Whatever the tectonic model may be, our data places an onshore boundary between transpressional and extensional domains. 4) The retrowedge at the southern margin of Hispaniola form an imbricate of E-W segmented thrusts overriding the Muertos trough (ten Brink et al., 2010). These authors suggest that the transport direction within the Muertos thrust system is southward perpendicular to the regional trend of the belt.

  19. Lysyl oxidase activity in human normal skins and postburn scars.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, T; Hino, N; Fuyamada, H; Nagatsu, T; Aoyama, H

    1976-09-06

    Lysyl oxidase activity of human normal skins derived from the frontal thighs of 33 subjects showed large variations and the mean value was 11 455 +/- 7 172 (S.D.) cpm/g of wet weight tissue. The age of lesion affected the lysyl oxidase activity in postburn scars. Granulation tissues showed a fairly low activity; however, the activity increased sharply within 2--3 months, and reached a significantly higher value than that of normal skin. The high level of activity continued for up to 2--3 years, then gradually decreased to normal range after 5 years or so. Lysyl oxidase activity was detected only after 4 M urea treatment of tissues. Benzylamine oxidase activity also showed large variations in both normal skins and postburn scars, with mean values of: 0.128 +/- 0.077 (S.D.) and 0.145 +/- 0.090 (S.D.) mmol/g of wet weight/h, respectively. No correlation was observed between lysyl oxidase and benzylamine oxidase activities. The granulation tissues showed significantly high values of benzylamine oxidase activity in contrast to the low values of lysyl oxidase activity.

  20. High-energy square pulses and burst-mode pulses in an all-normal dispersion double-clad mode-locked fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Zhi; Wang, Xiaochao; Wang, Chao; Jing, Yuanyuan; Fan, Wei; Lin, Zunqi

    2016-05-01

    A double-clad Yb-doped mode-locked fiber laser that can operate in burst-mode and square-pulse states is experimentally investigated. In the burst-mode state, a burst train with 55 pulses of 500 ps duration is obtained. In the square-pulse state, which is similar to noiselike pulses, the maximum pulse energy is 820 nJ and the duration can be tuned from 15.8 to 546 ns. The square pulses have a narrow and multipeak spectrum, which is quite different from that of normal noiselike pulses. The fiber laser promises an alternative formation mechanism for burst-mode and square-pulse mode-locked fiber lasers.

  1. Normal mode analysis of Pyrococcus furiosus rubredoxin via nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) and resonance raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yuming; Wang, Hongxin; George, Simon J; Smith, Matt C; Adams, Michael W W; Jenney, Francis E; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Alp, Ercan E; Zhao, Jiyong; Yoda, Y; Dey, Abishek; Solomon, Edward I; Cramer, Stephen P

    2005-10-26

    We have used (57)Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) to study the Fe(S(cys))(4) site in reduced and oxidized rubredoxin (Rd) from Pyrococcus furiosus (Pf). The oxidized form has also been investigated by resonance Raman spectroscopy. In the oxidized Rd NRVS, strong asymmetric Fe-S stretching modes are observed between 355 and 375 cm(-1); upon reduction these modes shift to 300-320 cm(-1). This is the first observation of Fe-S stretching modes in a reduced Rd. The peak in S-Fe-S bend mode intensity is at approximately 150 cm(-1) for the oxidized protein and only slightly lower in the reduced case. A third band occurs near 70 cm(-1) for both samples; this is assigned primarily as a collective motion of entire cysteine residues with respect to the central Fe. The (57)Fe partial vibrational density of states (PVDOS) were interpreted by normal mode analysis with optimization of Urey-Bradley force fields. The three main bands were qualitatively reproduced using a D(2)(d) Fe(SC)(4) model. A C(1) Fe(SCC)(4) model based on crystallographic coordinates was then used to simulate the splitting of the asymmetric stretching band into at least 3 components. Finally, a model employing complete cysteines and 2 additional neighboring atoms was used to reproduce the detailed structure of the PVDOS in the Fe-S stretch region. These results confirm the delocalization of the dynamic properties of the redox-active Fe site. Depending on the molecular model employed, the force constant K(Fe-S) for Fe-S stretching modes ranged from 1.24 to 1.32 mdyn/A. K(Fe-S) is clearly diminished in reduced Rd; values from approximately 0.89 to 1.00 mdyn/A were derived from different models. In contrast, in the final models the force constants for S-Fe-S bending motion, H(S-Fe-S), were 0.18 mdyn/A for oxidized Rd and 0.15 mdyn/A for reduced Rd. The NRVS technique demonstrates great promise for the observation and quantitative interpretation of the dynamical properties of Fe-S proteins.

  2. Observation of self-mode-locked noise-like pulses from a net normal dispersion erbium-doped fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kexuan; Tian, Jinrong; Guoyu, Heyang; Xu, Runqin; Song, Yanrong

    2017-04-01

    Self-mode-locked noise-like pulses (NLPs) were experimentally investigated from a normal dispersion erbium-doped fiber laser. Different from noise-like pulses with a broadband spectrum, the self-mode-locked NLPs have a narrow optical spectrum of 1–2 nm and hundreds of nanoseconds duration. However, the intra-cavity maximum energy of NLPs is up to 560 nJ without pulse breaking. The higher pulse energy output is promising in the proposed fiber laser. To confirm whether self-mode-locked NLPs are caused by an invisible nonlinear polarization rotation (NPR) mechanism owing to slight residual polarization asymmetry of the fiber and components used, we compared the output characteristics between self-mode-locked NLPs and NPR mode-locked pulses in the same cavity. The experimental results show that the formation mechanism of such self-mode-locked NLPs could be related to a weak NPR effect.

  3. Dynamic elastic moduli in magnetic gels: Normal modes and linear response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pessot, Giorgio; Löwen, Hartmut; Menzel, Andreas M.

    2016-09-01

    In the perspective of developing smart hybrid materials with customized features, ferrogels and magnetorheological elastomers allow a synergy of elasticity and magnetism. The interplay between elastic and magnetic properties gives rise to a unique reversible control of the material behavior by applying an external magnetic field. Albeit few works have been performed on the time-dependent properties so far, understanding the dynamic behavior is the key to model many practical situations, e.g., applications as vibration absorbers. Here we present a way to calculate the frequency-dependent elastic moduli based on the decomposition of the linear response to an external stress in normal modes. We use a minimal three-dimensional dipole-spring model to theoretically describe the magnetic and elastic interactions on the mesoscopic level. Specifically, the magnetic particles carry permanent magnetic dipole moments and are spatially arranged in a prescribed way, before they are linked by elastic springs. An external magnetic field aligns the magnetic moments. On the one hand, we study regular lattice-like particle arrangements to compare with previous results in the literature. On the other hand, we calculate the dynamic elastic moduli for irregular, more realistic particle distributions. Our approach measures the tunability of the linear dynamic response as a function of the particle arrangement, the system orientation with respect to the external magnetic field, as well as the magnitude of the magnetic interaction between the particles. The strength of the present approach is that it explicitly connects the relaxational modes of the system with the rheological properties as well as with the internal rearrangement of the particles in the sample, providing new insight into the dynamics of these remarkable materials.

  4. Wave normal angles of whistler mode chorus rising and falling tones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taubenschuss, Ulrich; Khotyaintsev, Yuri V.; Santolík, Ondrej; Vaivads, Andris; Cully, Christopher M.; Contel, Olivier Le; Angelopoulos, Vassilis

    2014-12-01

    We present a study of wave normal angles (θk) of whistler mode chorus emission as observed by Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) during the year 2008. The three inner THEMIS satellites THA, THD, and THE usually orbit Earth close to the dipole magnetic equator (±20°), covering a large range of L shells from the plasmasphere out to the magnetopause. Waveform measurements of electric and magnetic fields enable a detailed polarization analysis of chorus below 4 kHz. When displayed in a frequency-θk histogram, four characteristic regions of occurrence are evident. They are separated by gaps at f/fc,e≈0.5 (f is the chorus frequency, fc,e is the local electron cyclotron frequency) and at θk˜40°. Below θk˜40°, the average value for θk is predominantly field aligned, but slightly increasing with frequency toward half of fc,e (θk up to 20°). Above half of fc,e, the average θk is again decreasing with frequency. Above θk˜40°, wave normal angles are usually close to the resonance cone angle. Furthermore, we present a detailed comparison of electric and magnetic fields of chorus rising and falling tones. Falling tones exhibit peaks in occurrence solely for θk>40° and are propagating close to the resonance cone angle. Nevertheless, when comparing rising tones to falling tones at θk>40°, the ratio of magnetic to electric field shows no significant differences. Thus, we conclude that falling tones are generated under similar conditions as rising tones, with common source regions close to the magnetic equatorial plane.

  5. Eye-specific retinogeniculate segregation independent of normal neuronal activity.

    PubMed

    Huberman, Andrew D; Wang, Guo-Yong; Liets, Lauren C; Collins, Odell A; Chapman, Barbara; Chalupa, Leo M

    2003-05-09

    The segregation of initially intermingled left and right eye inputs to the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (DLGN) during development is thought to be in response to precise spatial and temporal patterns of spontaneous ganglion cell activity. To test this hypothesis, we disrupted the correlated activity of neighboring ganglion cells in the developing ferret retina through immunotoxin depletion of starburst amacrine cells. Despite the absence of this type of correlated activity, left and right eye inputs segregated normally in the DLGN. By contrast, when all spontaneous activity was blocked, the projections from the two eyes remained intermingled. Thus, certain features of normal neural activity patterns are not required for the formation of eye-specific projections to the DLGN.

  6. Terahertz spectrum and normal-mode relaxation in pentaerythritol tetranitrate: effect of changes in bond-stretching force-field terms.

    PubMed

    Pereverzev, Andrey; Sewell, Thomas D

    2011-06-28

    Terahertz (THz) active normal-mode relaxation in crystalline pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) was studied using classical molecular dynamics simulations for energy and density conditions corresponding to room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Two modifications to the fully flexible non-reactive force field due to Borodin et al. [J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 734 (2008)] used in a previous study of THz-active normal-mode relaxation in PETN [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 014513 (2011)] were considered to assess the sensitivity of the earlier predictions to details of the covalent bond-stretching terms in the force field. In the first modification the harmonic bond-stretching potential was replaced with the Morse potential to study the effect of bond anharmonicity on the THz-region mode relaxation. In the second modification the C-H and nitro-group N-O bond lengths were constrained to constant values to mimic lower quantum occupation numbers for those high-frequency modes. The results for relaxation times of the initially excited modes were found to be insensitive to either force-field modification. Overall time scales for energy transfer to other modes in the system were essentially unaffected by the force-field modifications, whereas the detailed pathways by which the energy transfer occurs are more complicated for the Morse potential than for the harmonic-bond and fixed-bond cases. Terahertz infrared absorption spectra constructed using calculated normal-mode frequencies, transition dipoles, and relaxation times for THz-active modes were compared to the spectra obtained from the Fourier transform of the dipole-dipole time autocorrelation function (DDACF). Results from the two approaches are in near agreement with each other and with experimental results in terms of main peak positions. Both theoretical methods yield narrower peaks than observed experimentally and in addition predict a weaker peak at ω ∼ 50 cm(-1) that is weak or absent experimentally. Peaks obtained using

  7. Comparative Normal Mode Analysis of the Dynamics of DENV and ZIKV Capsids

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yin-Chen; Poitevin, Frédéric; Delarue, Marc; Koehl, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    Key steps in the life cycle of a virus, such as the fusion event as the virus infects a host cell and its maturation process, relate to an intricate interplay between the structure and the dynamics of its constituent proteins, especially those that define its capsid, much akin to an envelope that protects its genomic material. We present a comprehensive, comparative analysis of such interplay for the capsids of two viruses from the flaviviridae family, Dengue (DENV) and Zika (ZIKV). We use for that purpose our own software suite, DD-NMA, which is based on normal mode analysis. We describe the elements of DD-NMA that are relevant to the analysis of large systems, such as virus capsids. In particular, we introduce our implementation of simplified elastic networks and justify their parametrization. Using DD-NMA, we illustrate the importance of packing interactions within the virus capsids on the dynamics of the E proteins of DENV and ZIKV. We identify differences between the computed atomic fluctuations of the E proteins in DENV and ZIKV and relate those differences to changes observed in their high resolution structures. We conclude with a discussion on additional analyses that are needed to fully characterize the dynamics of the two viruses. PMID:28083537

  8. Elastic network normal modes provide a basis for protein structure refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gniewek, Pawel; Kolinski, Andrzej; Jernigan, Robert L.; Kloczkowski, Andrzej

    2012-05-01

    It is well recognized that thermal motions of atoms in the protein native state, the fluctuations about the minimum of the global free energy, are well reproduced by the simple elastic network models (ENMs) such as the anisotropic network model (ANM). Elastic network models represent protein dynamics as vibrations of a network of nodes (usually represented by positions of the heavy atoms or by the Cα atoms only for coarse-grained representations) in which the spatially close nodes are connected by harmonic springs. These models provide a reliable representation of the fluctuational dynamics of proteins and RNA, and explain various conformational changes in protein structures including those important for ligand binding. In the present paper, we study the problem of protein structure refinement by analyzing thermal motions of proteins in non-native states. We represent the conformational space close to the native state by a set of decoys generated by the I-TASSER protein structure prediction server utilizing template-free modeling. The protein substates are selected by hierarchical structure clustering. The main finding is that thermal motions for some substates, overlap significantly with the deformations necessary to reach the native state. Additionally, more mobile residues yield higher overlaps with the required deformations than do the less mobile ones. These findings suggest that structural refinement of poorly resolved protein models can be significantly enhanced by reduction of the conformational space to the motions imposed by the dominant normal modes.

  9. Spherical harmonic stacking for the singlets of Earth's normal modes of free oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.; Ding, Hao

    2014-08-01

    We extend the spherical harmonic stacking (SHS) method of Buland et al. (1979) for the radial (vertical) component in the seismogram to the transverse (horizontal) components of the displacement field. Taking advantage of the orthogonality of the spherical harmonic functions (scalar and vectorial), SHS isolates and accentuates the signals of individual singlets of the Earth's normal modes of free oscillation. We apply the SHS on the broadband Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) seismograms from up to 97 IRIS seismic stations for the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, in experiments targeted to spheroidal as well as toroidal modes—2S1, 0S3, 2S2, 3S1, 1S3, 0T2, and 0T3. We report the complete resolution of the singlet frequencies of these multiplets, some for the first time, and estimate the singlets' complex frequencies using the frequency domain autoregressive method of Chao and Gilbert (1980). The latter contain useful information to be used in inversions for the 3-D structure of the Earth's interior.

  10. The Theoretical Foundation of 3D Alfvén Resonances: Normal Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Andrew N.; Elsden, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    We consider the resonant coupling of fast and Alfvén magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves in a 3D equilibrium. Numerical solutions to normal modes (\\propto \\exp (-iω t)) are presented, along with a theoretical framework to interpret them. The solutions we find are fundamentally different from those in 1D and 2D. In 3D there exists an infinite number of possible resonant solutions within a “Resonant Zone,” and we show how boundary conditions and locally 2D regions can favor particular solutions. A unique feature of the resonance in 3D is switching between different permissible solutions when the boundary of the Resonant Zone is encountered. The theoretical foundation that we develop relies upon recognizing that, in 3D, the orientation of the resonant surface will not align in a simple fashion with an equilibrium coordinate. We present a method for generating the Alfvén wave natural frequencies for an arbitrarily oriented Alfvén wave, which requires a careful treatment of scale factors describing the background magnetic field geometry.

  11. A Comparison of the Bounded Derivative and the Normal Mode Initialization Methods Using Real Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semazzi, F. H. M.; Navon, I. M.

    1985-01-01

    Browning et al. (1980) proposed an initialization method called the bounded derivative method (BDI). They used analytical data to test the new method. Kasahara (1982) theoretically demonstrated the equivalence between BDI and the well known nonlinear normal mode initialization method (NMI). The purposes of this study are the extension of the application of BDI to real data and comparison with NMI. The unbalanced initial state (UBD) is data of January, 1979 OOZ which were interpolated from the adjacent sigma levels of the GLAS GCM to the 300 mb surface. The global barotropic model described by Takacs and Balgovind (1983) is used. Orographic forcing is explicitly included in the model. Many comparisons are performed between various quantities. However, we only present a comparison of the time evolution at two grid points A(50 S, 90 E) and B(10 S, 20 E) which represent low and middle latitude locations. To facilitate a more complete comparison an initialization experiment based on the classical balance equation (CBE) was also included.

  12. Normal Modes for Dynamic Motions of a Topoisomerase II enzyme upon DNA-Binding and Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentes, Ahmet

    We have used Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation methods and two analytical approaches (the Gaussian Network Model (GNM) and Anisotropic Network Model (ANM)) to investigate the internal dynamic motions of the S. cerevisiae Topoisomerase (TopoII) during the first step of its catalytic cycle. At the initial state of the first step of its catalytic cycle, the protein and a 34 bp straight-DNA structure have no interaction. At the final state of the cycle, we have the bended-DNA/TopoII complex where the protein binds to DNA and, at this stage, the protein binds and bends the DNA, just before the DNA cleavage by TopoII. Normal mode analysis is used to characterize the functional flexibility of the protein, especially the C-gate domain closing/opening during the DNA binding/bending process and before DNA cleavage. Because of its clinical importance, our study might be helpful to better understand the next steps of its catalytic cycle and may provide new insight into the dynamics and structure of other TopoII-DNA complexes.

  13. Nonradiating normal modes in a classical many-body model of matter-radiation interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carati, A.; Galgani, L.

    2003-08-01

    We consider a classical model of matter-radiation interaction, in which the matter is represented by a system of infinitely many dipoles on a one-dimensional lattice, and the system is dealt with in the so-called dipole ( linearized) approximation. We prove that there exist normal-mode solutions of the complete system, so that in particular the dipoles, though performing accelerated motions, do not radiate energy. This comes about in virtue of an exact compensation which we prove to occur, for each dipole, between the “radiation reaction force” and a part of the retarded forces due to all the other dipoles. This fact corresponds to a certain identity which we name after Oseen, since it occurs that this researcher did actually propose it, already in the year 1916. We finally make a connection with a paper of Wheeler and Feynman on the foundations of electrodynamics. It turns out indeed that the Oseen identity, which we prove here in a particular model, is in fact a weak form of a general identity that such authors were assuming as an independent postulate.

  14. An Experiential Learning Activity Demonstrating Normal and Phobic Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canu, Will H.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an activity for an undergraduate abnormal psychology course that used student-generated data to illustrate normal versus clinically significant anxiety responses related to specific phobias. Students (N = 37) viewed 14 images of low- or high-anxiety valence and rated their subjective response to each. Discussion in a…

  15. Brillouin light scattering study of magnetic-element normal modes in a square artificial spin ice geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Gubbiotti, G.; Casoli, F.; Gonçalves, F. J. T.; Morley, S. A.; Rosamond, M. C.; Linfield, E. H.; Marrows, C. H.; McVitie, S.; Stamps, R. L.

    2017-01-01

    We report the results, from experimental and micromagnetic studies, of the magnetic normal modes in artificial square spin ice systems consisting of ferromagnetic-monodomain islands. Spin-wave properties are measured by Brillouin light scattering. The mode spectra contain several branches whose frequencies are sensitive to the magnitude and in-plane orientation of an applied magnetic field. We also identify soft modes that exhibit different behaviours depending on the direction of the applied magnetic field. The obtained results are well described with micromagnetic simulations of independent magnetic elements arranged along two sublattices.

  16. Configuration of three distributed lines for reducing noise due to the coupling of the common and normal modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinno, Souma; Toki, Hiroshi; Abe, Masayoshi

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the coupling between the common and normal modes in distributed lines and the resulting electromagnetic noise were considered. The telegraph equations of three distributed lines with the boundary conditions of a lumped circuit reveal the presence of mode-coupling noise. To reduce the coupling noise, the geometrically and electrically symmetric configuration of the three distributed lines is proposed. The simulation results show that the proposed configuration can decrease the mode-coupling noise by a factor of 1 ×10-8 in comparison with that of asymmetric configurations.

  17. Thickness mode EMIS of constrained proof-mass piezoelectric wafer active sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamas, Tuncay; Giurgiutiu, Victor; Lin, Bin

    2015-11-01

    This paper addresses theoretical and experimental work on thickness-mode electromechanical (E/M) impedance spectroscopy (EMIS) of proof-mass piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PMPWAS). The proof-mass (PM) concept was used to develop a new method for tuning the ultrasonic wave modes and for relatively high frequency local modal sensing by the PM affixed on PWAS. In order to develop the theoretical basis of the PMPWAS tuning concept, analytical analyses were conducted by applying the resonator theory to derive the EMIS of a PWAS constrained on one and both surfaces by isotropic elastic materials. The normalized thickness-mode shapes were obtained for the normal mode expansion (NME) method to eventually predict the thickness-mode EMIS using the correlation between PMPWAS and the structural dynamic properties of the substrate. Proof-masses of different sizes and materials were used to tune the system resonance towards an optimal frequency point. The results were verified by coupled-field finite element analyses (CF-FEA) and experimental results. An application of the tuning effect of PM on the standing wave modes was discussed as the increase in PM thickness shifts the excitation frequency of the wave mode toward the surface acoustic wave (SAW) mode.

  18. Normal and hyperspherical mode analysis of NO-doped Kr crystals upon Rydberg excitation of the impurity.

    PubMed

    Castro Palacio, J C; Velazquez Abad, L; Lombardi, A; Aquilanti, V; Rubayo Soneíra, J

    2007-05-07

    Molecular dynamics simulations and both normal mode and hyperspherical mode analyses of NO-doped Kr solid are carried out in order to get insights into the structural relaxation of the medium upon electronic excitation of the NO molecule. A combined study is reported on the time evolution of the cage radius and on the density of vibrational states, according to the hyperspherical and normal mode analyses. For the hyperspherical modes, hyper-radial and grand angular contributions are considered. For the normal modes, radial and tangential contributions are examined. Results show that the first shell radius dynamics is driven by modes with frequencies at approximately 47 and approximately 15 cm-1. The first one is related to the ultrafast regime where a large part of the energy is transmitted to the lattice and the second one to relaxation and slow redistribution of the energy. The density of vibrational states gamma(omega) is characterized by a broad distribution of bands peaking around the frequencies of approximately 13, approximately 19, approximately 25, approximately 31, approximately 37, approximately 47, and approximately 103 cm-1 (very small band). The dominant modes in the relaxation process were at 14.89, 23.49, and 53.78 cm-1; they present the largest amplitudes and the greatest energy contributions. The mode at 14.89 cm-1 is present in both the fit of the first shell radius and in the hyper-radial kinetic energy spectrum and resulted the one with the largest amplitude, although could not be revealed by the total kinetic energy power spectrum.

  19. Muscle activity and inactivity periods during normal daily life.

    PubMed

    Tikkanen, Olli; Haakana, Piia; Pesola, Arto J; Häkkinen, Keijo; Rantalainen, Timo; Havu, Marko; Pullinen, Teemu; Finni, Taija

    2013-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that not only the lack of physical activity, but also prolonged times of sedentary behaviour where major locomotor muscles are inactive, significantly increase the risk of chronic diseases. The purpose of this study was to provide details of quadriceps and hamstring muscle inactivity and activity during normal daily life of ordinary people. Eighty-four volunteers (44 females, 40 males, 44.1±17.3 years, 172.3±6.1 cm, 70.1±10.2 kg) were measured during normal daily life using shorts measuring muscle electromyographic (EMG) activity (recording time 11.3±2.0 hours). EMG was normalized to isometric MVC (EMG(MVC)) during knee flexion and extension, and inactivity threshold of each muscle group was defined as 90% of EMG activity during standing (2.5±1.7% of EMG(MVC)). During normal daily life the average EMG amplitude was 4.0±2.6% and average activity burst amplitude was 5.8±3.4% of EMG(MVC) (mean duration of 1.4±1.4 s) which is below the EMG level required for walking (5 km/h corresponding to EMG level of about 10% of EMG(MVC)). Using the proposed individual inactivity threshold, thigh muscles were inactive 67.5±11.9% of the total recording time and the longest inactivity periods lasted for 13.9±7.3 min (2.5-38.3 min). Women had more activity bursts and spent more time at intensities above 40% EMG(MVC) than men (p<0.05). In conclusion, during normal daily life the locomotor muscles are inactive about 7.5 hours, and only a small fraction of muscle's maximal voluntary activation capacity is used averaging only 4% of the maximal recruitment of the thigh muscles. Some daily non-exercise activities such as stair climbing produce much higher muscle activity levels than brisk walking, and replacing sitting by standing can considerably increase cumulative daily muscle activity.

  20. Normal mode analysis of macromolecular systems with the mobile block Hessian method

    SciTech Connect

    Ghysels, An; Van Speybroeck, Veronique; Van Neck, Dimitri; Waroquier, Michel; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2015-01-22

    Until recently, normal mode analysis (NMA) was limited to small proteins, not only because the required energy minimization is a computationally exhausting task, but also because NMA requires the expensive diagonalization of a 3N{sub a}×3N{sub a} matrix with N{sub a} the number of atoms. A series of simplified models has been proposed, in particular the Rotation-Translation Blocks (RTB) method by Tama et al. for the simulation of proteins. It makes use of the concept that a peptide chain or protein can be seen as a subsequent set of rigid components, i.e. the peptide units. A peptide chain is thus divided into rigid blocks with six degrees of freedom each. Recently we developed the Mobile Block Hessian (MBH) method, which in a sense has similar features as the RTB method. The main difference is that MBH was developed to deal with partially optimized systems. The position/orientation of each block is optimized while the internal geometry is kept fixed at a plausible - but not necessarily optimized - geometry. This reduces the computational cost of the energy minimization. Applying the standard NMA on a partially optimized structure however results in spurious imaginary frequencies and unwanted coordinate dependence. The MBH avoids these unphysical effects by taking into account energy gradient corrections. Moreover the number of variables is reduced, which facilitates the diagonalization of the Hessian. In the original implementation of MBH, atoms could only be part of one rigid block. The MBH is now extended to the case where atoms can be part of two or more blocks. Two basic linkages can be realized: (1) blocks connected by one link atom, or (2) by two link atoms, where the latter is referred to as the hinge type connection. In this work we present the MBH concept and illustrate its performance with the crambin protein as an example.

  1. Normal mode analysis of macromolecular systems with the mobile block Hessian method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghysels, An; Van Speybroeck, Veronique; Van Neck, Dimitri; Brooks, Bernard R.; Waroquier, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, normal mode analysis (NMA) was limited to small proteins, not only because the required energy minimization is a computationally exhausting task, but also because NMA requires the expensive diagonalization of a 3Na×3Na matrix with Na the number of atoms. A series of simplified models has been proposed, in particular the Rotation-Translation Blocks (RTB) method by Tama et al. for the simulation of proteins. It makes use of the concept that a peptide chain or protein can be seen as a subsequent set of rigid components, i.e. the peptide units. A peptide chain is thus divided into rigid blocks with six degrees of freedom each. Recently we developed the Mobile Block Hessian (MBH) method, which in a sense has similar features as the RTB method. The main difference is that MBH was developed to deal with partially optimized systems. The position/orientation of each block is optimized while the internal geometry is kept fixed at a plausible - but not necessarily optimized - geometry. This reduces the computational cost of the energy minimization. Applying the standard NMA on a partially optimized structure however results in spurious imaginary frequencies and unwanted coordinate dependence. The MBH avoids these unphysical effects by taking into account energy gradient corrections. Moreover the number of variables is reduced, which facilitates the diagonalization of the Hessian. In the original implementation of MBH, atoms could only be part of one rigid block. The MBH is now extended to the case where atoms can be part of two or more blocks. Two basic linkages can be realized: (1) blocks connected by one link atom, or (2) by two link atoms, where the latter is referred to as the hinge type connection. In this work we present the MBH concept and illustrate its performance with the crambin protein as an example.

  2. Instantaneous normal modes, resonances, and decay channels in the vibrational relaxation of the amide I mode of N-methylacetamide-D in liquid deuterated water.

    PubMed

    Bastida, Adolfo; Soler, Miguel Angel; Zúñiga, José; Requena, Alberto; Kalstein, Adrián; Fernández-Alberti, Sebastián

    2010-06-14

    A nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) study of the vibrational relaxation of the amide I mode of deuterated N-methylacetamide (NMAD) in aqueous (D(2)O) solution is carried out using instantaneous normal modes (INMs). The identification of the INMs as they evolve over time, which is necessary to analyze the energy fluxes, is made by using a novel algorithm which allows us to assign unequivocally each INM to an individual equilibrium normal mode (ENM) or to a group of ENMs during the MD simulations. The time evolution of the energy stored in each INM is monitored and the occurrence of resonances during the relaxation process is then investigated. The decay of the amide I mode, initially excited with one vibrational quantum, is confirmed to fit well to a biexponential function, implying that the relaxation process involves at least two mechanisms with different rate constants. By freezing the internal motions of the solvent, it is shown that the intermolecular vibration-vibration channel to the bending modes of the solvent is closed. The INM analysis reveals then the existence of a major and faster decay channel, which corresponds to an intramolecular vibrational redistribution process and a minor, and slower, decay channel which involves the participation of the librational motions of the solvent. The faster relaxation pathway can be rationalized in turn using a sequential kinetic mechanism of the type P-->M+L-->L, where P (parent) is the initially excited amide I mode, and M (medium) and L (low) are specific midrange and lower-frequency NMAD vibrational modes, respectively.

  3. On the possibility of representing an acoustic field in shallow water as the sum of normal modes and quasimodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigor'ev, V. A.; Petnikov, V. G.

    2016-11-01

    Using the example of a shallow-water acoustic waveguide with a homogeneous water layer of constant thickness H lying on a homogeneous fluid absorbing half-space (bottom), we obtain estimates of distance r from a source, for which it is possible to ignore the continuous spectrum for the mode description of the depth dependence of the intensity of a low-frequency sound field in the bottom layer. We have compared two discrete representations of the field using (1) the total set of normal modes and (2) the total set of normal modes and quasimodes. It is shown that in the case when there is at least one normal mode in the channel, additional allowance for quasimodes makes it possible by an order of magnitude to approximate the boundary of applicability of mode theory and on average establish it at a level of r H or less. We explain the functional dependences of the contribution of the continuous spectrum to the total field on the waveguide parameters and find the conditions of its minimization. We present examples of description of the field in the bottom, where the advantage of using quasimodes at short distances is also demonstrated.

  4. Effects of surface water on protein dynamics studied by a novel coarse-grained normal mode approach.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lei; Siegelbaum, Steven A

    2008-05-01

    Normal mode analysis (NMA) has received much attention as a direct approach to extract the collective motions of macromolecules. However, the stringent requirement of computational resources by classical all-atom NMA limits the size of the macromolecules to which the method is normally applied. We implemented a novel coarse-grained normal mode approach based on partitioning the all-atom Hessian matrix into relevant and nonrelevant parts. It is interesting to note that, using classical all-atom NMA results as a reference, we found that this method generates more accurate results than do other coarse-grained approaches, including elastic network model and block normal mode approaches. Moreover, this new method is effective in incorporating the energetic contributions from the nonrelevant atoms, including surface water molecules, into the coarse-grained protein motions. The importance of such improvements is demonstrated by the effect of surface water to shift vibrational modes to higher frequencies and by an increase in overlap of the coarse-grained eigenvector space (the motion directions) with that obtained from molecular dynamics simulations of solvated protein in a water box. These results not only confirm the quality of our method but also point out the importance of incorporating surface structural water in studying protein dynamics.

  5. Normal mode gating motions of a ligand-gated ion channel persist in a fully hydrated lipid bilayer model.

    PubMed

    Bertaccini, Edward J; Trudell, James R; Lindahl, Erik

    2010-08-18

    We have previously used molecular modeling and normal-mode analyses combined with experimental data to visualize a plausible model of a transmembrane ligand-gated ion channel. We also postulated how the gating motion of the channel may be affected by the presence of various ligands, especially anesthetics. As is typical for normal-mode analyses, those studies were performed in vacuo to reduce the computational complexity of the problem. While such calculations constitute an efficient way to model the large scale structural flexibility of transmembrane proteins, they can be criticized for neglecting the effects of an explicit phospholipid bilayer or hydrated environment. Here, we show the successful calculation of normal-mode motions for our model of a glycine α-1 receptor, now suspended in a fully hydrated lipid bilayer. Despite the almost uniform atomic density, the introduction of water and lipid does not grossly distort the overall gating motion. Normal-mode analysis revealed that even a fully immersed glycine α-1 receptor continues to demonstrate an iris-like channel gating motion as a low-frequency, high-amplitude natural harmonic vibration consistent with channel gating. Furthermore, the introduction of periodic boundary conditions allows the examination of simultaneous harmonic vibrations of lipid in synchrony with the protein gating motions that are compatible with reasonable lipid bilayer perturbations. While these perturbations tend to influence the overall protein motion, this work provides continued support for the iris-like motion model that characterizes gating within the family of ligand-gated ion channels.

  6. Effect of temperature on the mixed-mode impact behavior of a normalized 1050 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Manoharan, M.; Seow, H.P.

    1997-10-01

    A considerable amount of work on mixed mode I/III fracture toughness of materials is available using proportional loading methods and all the work using such a loading method has recently been summarized. The superposition of mode III loading results in drastic reduction in fracture toughness in some materials whereas in other materials it has little effect or even results in an increase in the fracture toughness. Fracture mechanism maps delineating regions of susceptibility to tensile and shear loads have been proposed to explain such differences. In the mixed mode fracture toughness tests outlined above, the use of a modified compact tension specimen has enabled the testing of materials under a variety of combinations of mode I and mode III loadings. By using appropriately defined mixed-mode versions of the stress intensity factor K and the J integral, the susceptibility of these materials to mixed-mode fracture can be quantified. In addition to compact tension specimens, three point bend specimens with an inclined crack can also be used to determine the mixed-mode fracture behavior of materials. The aim of the present study was to study the feasibility of extending the mixed mode fracture concept to impact testing using a charpy type test specimen.

  7. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Activity in Normal and Deficient Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Kwan-Fu Rex; Hu, Chii-Whei C.; Utter, Merton F.

    1981-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) activity in human skin fibroblasts appears to be regulated by a phosphorylation-dephosphorylation mechanism, as is the case with other animal cells. The enzyme can be activated by pretreating the cells with dichloroacetate (DCA), an inhibitor of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, before they are disrupted for measurement of PDC activity. With such treatment, the activity reaches 5-6 nmol/min per mg of protein at 37°C with fibroblasts from infants. Such values represent an activation of about 5-20-fold over those observed with untreated cells. That this assay, based on [1-14C]pyruvate decarboxylation, represents a valid measurement of the overall PDC reaction is shown by the dependence of 14CO2 production on the presence of thiamin-PP, coenzyme A (CoA), Mg++, and NAD+. Also, it has been shown that acetyl-CoA and 14CO2 are formed in a 1:1 ratio. A similar degree of activation of PDC can also be achieved by adding purified pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase and high concentrations of Mg++ and Ca++, or in some cases by adding the metal ions alone to the cell homogenate after disruption. These results strongly suggest that activation is due to dephosphorylation. Addition of NaF, which inhibits dephosphorylation, leads to almost complete loss of PDC activity. Assays of completely activated PDC were performed on two cell lines originating from patients reported to be deficient in this enzyme (Blass, J. P., J. Avigan, and B. W. Ublendorf. 1970. J. Clin. Invest. 49: 423-432; Blass, J. P., J. D. Schuman, D. S. Young, and E. Ham. 1972. J. Clin. Invest. 51: 1545-1551). Even after activation with DCA, fibroblasts from the patients showed values of only 0.1 and 0.3 nmol/min per mg of protein. A familial study of one of these patients showed that both parents exhibited activity in fully activated cells about half that of normal values, whereas cells from a sibling appeared normal. These results demonstrate the inheritance nature of PDC deficiency

  8. Super Normal Vector for Human Activity Recognition with Depth Cameras.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaodong; Tian, YingLi

    2017-05-01

    The advent of cost-effectiveness and easy-operation depth cameras has facilitated a variety of visual recognition tasks including human activity recognition. This paper presents a novel framework for recognizing human activities from video sequences captured by depth cameras. We extend the surface normal to polynormal by assembling local neighboring hypersurface normals from a depth sequence to jointly characterize local motion and shape information. We then propose a general scheme of super normal vector (SNV) to aggregate the low-level polynormals into a discriminative representation, which can be viewed as a simplified version of the Fisher kernel representation. In order to globally capture the spatial layout and temporal order, an adaptive spatio-temporal pyramid is introduced to subdivide a depth video into a set of space-time cells. In the extensive experiments, the proposed approach achieves superior performance to the state-of-the-art methods on the four public benchmark datasets, i.e., MSRAction3D, MSRDailyActivity3D, MSRGesture3D, and MSRActionPairs3D.

  9. Re-analysis of the Normal Mode Spectra of the 1960 Chile Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watada, S.

    2015-12-01

    After the great 1960 Chile earthquake, Press et al. (1961) created a unilateral source rupture model with a length of 1000 km at a speed of 3- 4km/s. Kanamori and Cipar (1974), looked at long-period motion before the main shock in the strain-meter record at ISA and hinted the existence of a slow precursor. Kanamori and Anderson (1975) interpreted that the anomalous decrease of the Fourier spectral amplitude near 1.8 and 3.0mHz of the UCLA gravimeter record and the Press-Ewing seismometer record at PAS are caused by the interference between the main-shock and an un-modeled precursor. Cifuentes and Silver (1989) collected IGY seismographic data and confirmed the existence of the spectral holes at 4 stations all situated in the continental U.S. and modeled the holes with a large precursor or a post-cursor with magnitude comparable to the main shock. CS89 reported no such normal mode spectral holes outside North America. If the spectrum holes are due to destructive interference of a large pre- or post-cursor, the spectrum pattern will be a global feature. Seismograms outside North America are well explained by the unilateral rupture model. KA75 and CS89 synthetic spectra did not consider the spheroidal-toroidal modal coupling effect. We compared the amplitude spectra computed for earthquake models of a line source and a point source, and for the PREM and a rotating elliptic Earth model with laterally heterogeneity inside. The spectra are computed for the same time series presented in CS89 and directly compared with their amplitude pattern. The observed amplitude spectrum patterns are re-produced at 8 globally distributed stations including the amplitude holes at 4 stations in the U.S by a 920km-long line source (same to the CS89 source) for a rotating elliptic earth model with lateral heterogeneity inside. The synthetic spectrum tests indicate that the long-period precursor or post-cursor proposed by Cifuentes and Silver (1989) and Kanamori and Anderson (1975) is

  10. Brain cholinesterase activity of apparently normal wild birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, E.F.

    1988-01-01

    Organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides are potent anticholinesterase substances that have killed large numbers of wild birds of various species. Cause of death is diagnosed by demonstration of depressed brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity in combination with chemical detection of anticholinesterase residue in the affected specimen. ChE depression is determined by comparison of the affected specimen to normal ChE activity for a sample of control specimens of the same species, but timely procurement of controls is not always possible. Therefore, a reference file of normal whole brain ChE activity is provided for 48 species of wild birds from North America representing 11 orders and 23 families for use as emergency substitutes in diagnosis of anticholinesterase poisoning. The ChE values, based on 83 sets of wild control specimens from across the United States, are reproducible provided the described procedures are duplicated. Overall, whole brain ChE activity varied nearly three-fold among the 48 species represented, but it was usually similar for closely related species. However, some species were statistically separable in most families and some species of the same genus differed as much as 50%.

  11. Sustained activity within the default mode network during an implicit memory task

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiongjiong; Weng, Xuchu; Zang, Yufeng; Xu, Mingwei; Xu, Xiaohong

    2009-01-01

    Recent neuroimaging studies have shown that several brain regions -- namely, the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), and the bilateral angular gyrus -- are more active during resting states than during cognitive tasks (i.e., default mode network). Although there is evidence showing that the default mode network is associated with unconscious state, it is unclear whether this network is associated with unconscious processing when normal human subjects perform tasks without awareness. We manipulated the level of conscious processing in normal subjects by asking them to perform an implicit and an explicit memory task, and analyzed signal changes in the default mode network for the stimuli versus baseline in both tasks. The fMRI analysis showed that the level of activation in regions within this network during the implicit task was not significantly different from that during the baseline, except in the left angular gyrus and the insula. There was strong deactivation for the explicit task when compared with the implicit task in the default mode regions, except in the left angular gyrus and the left middle temporal gyrus. These data suggest that the activity in the default network is sustained and less disrupted when an implicit memory task is performed, but is suspended when explicit retrieval is required. These results provide evidence that the default mode network is associated with unconscious processing when human subjects perform an implicit memory task. PMID:19552900

  12. Active Control of Linear Periodic System with Two Unstable Modes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    tV;;;.~II.~9 - B ~ZV ~- p1 . ,,~ >. ~ ACTIVE CONTROL OF LINEAR PERIODIC SYSTEM WITH TWO UNSTABLE MODES THESIS by Gregory E. Myers, B.S.E. 2nd Lt...PERIODIC SYSTEM WITH TWO UNSTABLE MODES THESIS Presented to the Faculty of the School of Engineering of the Air Force Institute of Technology Air University...December 1982 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited -ow PREFACE This thesis is a continuation of the work done by Yeakel in the control of

  13. The Thermal Activity of Normal and Malignant Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Li-Yao

    1998-01-01

    The usefulness of metabolic heat measurements in quantifying the response of a solid tumour to anticancer treatment was evaluated. The heat production characteristic of malignant tissues, as measured from human stomach, breast and liver cancer samples, was observed to be inconsistent, and its value could be higher or lower than that of its normal tissue of origin. The various thermal activity responses of an experimental rat hepatoma to hepatic artery ligation, cryotherapy, intra-arterial (i.a) Adriamycin (2.4 mg/ kg), i.a. Norcantharidin (0.5 mg/kg) were next studied. The tumour/liver (T/L) ratio of untreated tumour-bearing rats was 0.83 but this fell to a minimum at 24 h in both the hepatic artery ligation and the cryosurgery groups. In these two groups marked fluctuations in the heat production of normal liver occurred with poor recovery of the T/ L ratio even at 2--3 weeks. In the Adriamycin group, the T/L ratio dropped to a minimum at 5 days, and in the Norcantharidin group, at 3 days. Minimal disturbances in the thermal activity of liver tissue occured in these two chemotherapy groups and the T/L ratio recovered by 3 weeks. Norcantharidin appeared as efficacious as Adriamycin in the treatment of hepatoma when evaluated in terms of thermal activity. PMID:9893237

  14. Dynamic activity dependence of in vivo normal knee kinematics.

    PubMed

    Moro-oka, Taka-aki; Hamai, Satoshi; Miura, Hiromasa; Shimoto, Takeshi; Higaki, Hidehiko; Fregly, Benjamin J; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Banks, Scott A

    2008-04-01

    Dynamic knee kinematics were analyzed for normal knees in three activities, including two different types of maximum knee flexion. Continuous X-ray images of kneel, squat, and stair climb motions were taken using a large flat panel detector. CT-derived bone models were used for model registration-based 3D kinematic measurement. Three-dimensional joint kinematics and contact locations were determined using three methods: bone-fixed coordinate systems, interrogation of CT-based bone model surfaces, and interrogation of MR-based articular cartilage model surfaces. The femur exhibited gradual external rotation throughout the flexion range. Tibiofemoral contact exhibited external rotation, with contact locations translating posterior while maintaining 15 degrees to 20 degrees external rotation from 20 degrees to 80 degrees of flexion. From 80 degrees to maximum flexion, contact locations showed a medial pivot pattern. Kinematics based on bone-fixed coordinate systems differed from kinematics based on interrogation of CT and MR surfaces. Knee kinematics varied significantly by activity, especially in deep flexion. No posterior subluxation occurred for either femoral condyle in maximum knee flexion. Normal knees accommodate a range of motions during various activities while maintaining geometric joint congruency.

  15. Coarse grained normal mode analysis vs. refined Gaussian Network Model for protein residue-level structural fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun-Koo; Jernigan, Robert; Wu, Zhijun

    2013-01-01

    We investigate several approaches to coarse grained normal mode analysis on protein residual-level structural fluctuations by choosing different ways of representing the residues and the forces among them. Single-atom representations using the backbone atoms C(α), C, N, and C(β) are considered. Combinations of some of these atoms are also tested. The force constants between the representative atoms are extracted from the Hessian matrix of the energy function and served as the force constants between the corresponding residues. The residue mean-square-fluctuations and their correlations with the experimental B-factors are calculated for a large set of proteins. The results are compared with all-atom normal mode analysis and the residue-level Gaussian Network Model. The coarse-grained methods perform more efficiently than all-atom normal mode analysis, while their B-factor correlations are also higher. Their B-factor correlations are comparable with those estimated by the Gaussian Network Model and in many cases better. The extracted force constants are surveyed for different pairs of residues with different numbers of separation residues in sequence. The statistical averages are used to build a refined Gaussian Network Model, which is able to predict residue-level structural fluctuations significantly better than the conventional Gaussian Network Model in many test cases.

  16. Active mode locking of lasers by piezoelectrically induced diffraction modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krausz, F.; Turi, L.; Kuti, Cs.; Schmidt, A. J.

    1990-04-01

    A new amplitude-modulation mode-locking technique is presented. Acoustic waves are generated directly on the faces of a resonant photoelastic medium. The created standing waves cause a highly efficient diffraction modulation of light. The modulation depth of standing-wave mode lockers is related to material and drive parameters and a figure of merit is introduced. With a lithium niobate crystal modulation depths over 10 are achieved at 1.054 μm and 1 W of radio frequency power. Using this device for the active mode locking of a continuous-wave Nd:glass laser pulses as short as 3.8 ps are produced at a repetition rate of 66 MHz. Limitations of amplitude-modulation mode locking by standing acoustic waves are discussed.

  17. Active mode-locked lasers and other photonic devices using electro-optic whispering gallery mode resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsko, Andrey B. (Inventor); Ilchenko, Vladimir (Inventor); Savchenkov, Anatoliy (Inventor); Maleki, Lutfollah (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Techniques and devices using whispering gallery mode (WGM) optical resonators, where the optical materials of the WGM resonators exhibit an electro-optical effect to perform optical modulation. Examples of actively mode-locked lasers and other devices are described.

  18. Drive Train Normal Modes Analysis for the ERDA/NASA 100-Kilowatt Wind Turbine Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. L.; Miller, D. R.; Spera, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    Natural frequencies, as a function of power were determined using a finite element model. Operating conditions investigated were operation with a resistive electrical load and operation synchronized to an electrical utility grid. The influence of certain drive train components on frequencies and mode shapes is shown. An approximate method for obtaining drive train natural frequencies is presented.

  19. Normal modes of magnetic domain wall motion in a confined stripe domain lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Spreen, J.H.; Argyle, B.E.

    1982-06-01

    We report the observation of standing wave modes in an array of stripe domains confined by a pair of parallel cracks in a Gd, Ga:YIG film. These modes appear in the response spectrum of the confined lattice as shallow minima or maxima at frequencies lower than that of the usual domain wall resonance peak. A simple model, analogous to the forced response of a membrane clamped at the edges, fits the spatial patterns of wall motion observed at the frequencies of the maxima and minima. Experimental frequency-wave vector values, interpreted with guidance from this analogy, provide the first experimental dispersion curve for a stripe domain lattice. We compare this result with recent theoretical calculations. The experimental value of the uniform mode frequency is 41.5 +- 0.2 MHz, with a long wavelength group velocity of 330 +- 50 m/sec. A surprising conclusion from the observed extrema of the spatial patterns is that the damping of the waves is an order of magnitude less than expected from the damping of the uniform mode. The estimated decay length for a propagating wave is 400 ..mu...

  20. A Pictorial Visualization of Normal Mode Vibrations of the Fullerene (C[subscript 60]) Molecule in Terms of Vibrations of a Hollow Sphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Janette L.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the normal mode vibrations of a molecule is important in the analysis of vibrational spectra. However, the complicated 3D motion of large molecules can be difficult to interpret. We show how images of normal modes of the fullerene molecule C[subscript 60] can be made easier to understand by superimposing them on images of the normal…

  1. Characterization of mode-locking in an all-fiber, all normal dispersion ytterbium based fiber oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cserteg, András.; Sági, Veronika; Drozdy, András.; Varallyay, Zoltán.; Gajdátsy, Gábor

    2015-03-01

    An ytterbium based all fiber, all normal dispersion fiber oscillator with integrated SESAM can have several operation modes like mode-locked, Q-switched and noise-like. To know and to control the quality of the mode-locking is essential for the application of such laser oscillators, otherwise the whole laser setup can be damaged or the expected operation characteristics of the oscillator driven systems cannot be achieved. Usually the two-photon signal generated by the short pulses is used to indicate the mode locked operation, however such detection can be misleading in certain cases and not always able to predict the forthcoming degradation or vanishing of mode locking. The characterization method that we propose uses only the radio frequency spectrum of the oscillator output and can identify the different operation regimes of our laser setup. The optical spectra measured simultaneously with the RF signals proves the reliability of our method. With this kind of characterization stable mode locking can be initiated and maintained during the laser operation. The method combined with the ability to align the polarization states automatically in the laser cavity leads to the possibility to record a polarization map where the stability domains can be identified and classified. With such map the region where the mode locking is self starting and maintainable with minimal polarization alignment can be selected. The developed oscillator reported here with its compact setup and self alignment ability can be a reliable source with long term error free operation without the need of expensive monitoring tools.

  2. Part of evanescent modes in the normally incident gravity surface wave's energy layout around a submerged obstacle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charland, J.; Rey, V.; Touboul, J.

    2012-04-01

    Part of evanescent modes in the normally incident gravity surface wave's energy layout around a submerged obstacle Jenna Charland *1, Vincent Rey *2, Julien Touboul *2 *1 Mediterraneen Institute of Oceanography. Institut des Sciences de l'Ingénieur Toulon-Var. Avenue Georges Pompidou, BP 56, 83162 La Valette du Var Cedex, France. Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Délégation Normandie. Projet soutenu financièrement par la Délégation Générale de l'Armement. *2 Mediterraneen Institute of Oceanography. Institut des Sciences de l'Ingénieur Toulon-Var. Avenue Georges Pompidou, BP 56, 83162 La Valette du Var Cedex, France. During the last decades various studies have been performed to understand the wave propagation over varying bathymetries. Few answers related to this non linear problem were given by the Patarapanich's studies which described the reflection coefficient of a submerged plate as a function of the wavelength. Later Le-Thi-Minh [2] demonstrated the necessity of taking into account the evanescent modes to better describe the propagation of waves over a varying bathymetry. However, all these studies stare at pseudo-stationary state that allows neither the comprehension of the transient behaviour of propagative modes nor the role of the evanescent modes in this unstationnary process. Our study deals with the wave establishment over a submerged plate or step and focuses on the evanescent modes establishment. Rey [3] described the propagation of a normally incident surface gravity wave over a varying topography on the behaviour of the fluid using a linearized potential theory solved by a numerical model using an integral method. This model has a large field of application and has been adapted to our case. This code still solves a stationary problem but allows us to calculate the contribution of the evanescent modes in the energy layout around a submerged plate or a submerged step. The results will show the importance of the trapped energy

  3. QUANTUM MODE-COUPLING THEORY: Formulation and Applications to Normal and Supercooled Quantum Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabani, Eran; Reichman, David R.

    2005-05-01

    We review our recent efforts to formulate and study a mode-coupling approach to real-time dynamic fluctuations in quantum liquids. Comparison is made between the theory and recent neutron scattering experiments performed on liquid ortho-deuterium and para-hydrogen. We discuss extensions of the theory to supercooled and glassy states where quantum fluctuations compete with thermal fluctuations. Experimental scenarios for quantum glassy liquids are briefly discussed.

  4. A Simple Reduction Process for the Normal Vibrational Modes Occurring in Linear Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInerny, William

    2005-01-01

    The students in molecular spectroscopy courses are often required to determine the permitted normal vibrations for linear molecules that belong to particular groups. The reducible group representations generated by the use of Cartesian coordinates can be reduced by the use of a simple algebraic process applied to the group representations. The…

  5. Black phosphorus as a saturable absorber for generating mode-locked fiber laser in normal dispersion regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latiff, A. A.; Rusdi, M. F. M.; Hisyam, M. B.; Ahmad, H.; Harun, S. W.

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports a few-layer black phosphorus (BP) as a saturable absorber (SA) or phase-locker in generating modelocked pulses from a double-clad ytterbium-doped fiber laser (YDFL). We mechanically exfoliated the BP flakes from BP crystal through a scotch tape, and repeatedly press until the flakes thin and spread homogenously. Then, a piece of BP tape was inserted in the cavity between two fiber connectors end facet. Under 810 mW to 1320 mW pump power, stable mode-locked operation at 1085 nm with a repetition rate of 13.4 MHz is successfully achieved in normal dispersion regime. Before mode-locked operation disappears above maximum pump, the output power and pulse energy is about 80 mW and 6 nJ, respectively. This mode-locked laser produces peak power of 0.74 kW. Our work may validates BP SA as a phase-locker related to two-dimensional nanomaterials and pulsed generation in normal dispersion regime.

  6. An analysis of nearfield normal mode amplitude anomalies of the Landers earthquake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watada, Shingo; Kanamori, Hiroo; Anderson, Don L.

    1993-01-01

    The 1992 Landers earthquake (M(sub w) = 7.3) occurred in the middle of the TERRAscope network. Long-period Rayleigh waves recorded at the TERRAscope stations (delta less than or = 3 deg) after traveling around the Earth show large amplitude anomalies, one order of magnitude larger than spherical Earth predictions up to a period of about 600 s. The ground motions over the epicentral region at and after the arrival of R4-5 are in phase at all stations. These observations are inconsistent with the nearly vertical strike slip mechanism of the Landers earthquake. Synthetic seismograms for a rotating, elliptic, and laterally heterogeneous Earth model calculated by the variational method agree well with the observed waveforms. Calculations for various 3D Earth models demonstrate that the amplitudes are very sensitive to the large scale aspherical structure in the crust and the mantle. The anomalies for modes shorter than 300 s period can be explained by lateral heterogeneity shallower than the upper mantle. Rotation of the Earth and lower mantle heterogeneity are required to explain mode amplitudes at longer periods. Current whole mantle seismic tomographic models can fully explain the observed amplitudes longer than 300 s. To assess the effect of the high order lateral heterogeneity in the mantle more precise estimate of the crustal correction is required.

  7. A comparison of the bounded derivative and the normal mode initialization methods using real data. [in numerical weather forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semazzi, F. H. M.; Navon, I. M.

    1985-01-01

    A bounded derivative initialization method (BDI) formerly used only in theoretical studies to balance gravitational wave influences is extended to a real world data set and the results are compared with those from a normal mode initialization (NMI). BDI proceeds by defining the characteristic scales of motion of interest and then constraining the time derivatives to match motions on a slow scale. A global barotropic model which considers orographic forcing is initialized by the scaled balance equations of the BDI scheme, which uses vorticity alone to achieve an initial balanced state. An external mode projector is employed to realize the NMI scheme, and five Machenhauer iterations reduce the total balance by four orders of magnitude. The initial states generated with both schemes are essentially equivalent, including the time evolution of a height field and divergence behavior being centered around regions of high orographic elevation.

  8. Actively mode-locked diode laser with a mode spacing stability of ∼6 × 10{sup -14}

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharyash, V F; Kashirsky, A V; Klementyev, V M

    2015-10-31

    We have studied mode spacing stability in an actively mode-locked external-cavity semiconductor laser. It has been shown that, in the case of mode spacing pulling to the frequency of a highly stable external microwave signal produced by a hydrogen standard (stability of 4 × 10{sup -14} over an averaging period τ = 10 s), this configuration ensures a mode spacing stability of 5.92 × 10{sup -14} (τ = 10 s). (control of radiation parameters)

  9. Phase transitions in normal mode spectra of two-dimensional clusters in an anisotropic power-law confining potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessaa, Assia; Djebli, Mourad

    2017-02-01

    We present a numerical analysis of several phase transitions which take place in the eigenmode spectrum of a two-dimensional (2D) logarithmic cluster subjected to an anisotropic power law confinement. Varying the anisotropy in a non-parabolic soft confinement drives the system to undergo structural phase transitions of first order, while for a hard wall confinement this variation affects strongly the eigenmode spectrum and breaks the symmetry of the system due to the removal of degeneracy and the coupling between some normal modes.

  10. Mode-locked femtosecond all-normal all-PM Yb-doped fiber laser at 1060 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, Patrick; Singh, Harman; Runge, Antoine; Provo, Richard; Broderick, Neil G. R.

    2016-04-01

    We report an all-normal-dispersion, all-fibre, all-PM, laser operating at a central wavelength of 1060 nm. The laser is mode-locked using a nonlinear amplifying loop mirror and generates linearly polarised pulses that can be compressed to 360 fs. The laser is based on our earlier scheme operating at 1030 nm [1] and we discuss the similarities and differences between the two configurations. We also present amplification up to an output power of 1 W using a commercially built amplifier and show through numerical methods that this pulse may be recompressible to 1.65 ps.

  11. Motions in the interiors and atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn. II - Barotropic instabilities and normal modes of an adiabatic planet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingersoll, A. P.; Miller, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    A rotating and adiabatic inviscid fluid planet possesses low frequency motions that are barotropic, quasi-geostrophic and quasi-columnar. The limiting curvature at which flow becomes unstable upon projection onto the planetary surface is negative, with an amplitude that is 3-4 times that for thin atmospheres, in planets in which density linearly decreases to zero at the surface. This result is shown to hold for all quasi-columnar perturbations. Both the phase speed of the normal mode oscillations and the barotropic stability criterion have features in common with Saturn and Jupiter oscillations.

  12. A Finite Element Method for Computation of Structural Intensity by the Normal Mode Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrić, L.; Pavić, G.

    1993-06-01

    A method for numerical computation of structural intensity in thin-walled structures is presented. The method is based on structural finite elements (beam, plate and shell type) enabling computation of real eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the undamped structure which then serve in evaluation of complex response. The distributed structural damping is taken into account by using the modal damping concept, while any localized damping is treated as an external loading, determined by use of impedance matching conditions and eigenproperties of the structure. Emphasis is given to aspects of accuracy of the results and efficiency of the numerical procedures used. High requirements on accuracy of the structural response (displacements and stresses) needed in intensity applications are satisfied by employing the "swept static solution", which effectively takes into account the influence of higher modes otherwise inaccessible to numerical computation. A comparison is made between the results obtained by using analytical methods and the proposed numerical procedure to demonstrate the validity of the method presented.

  13. Meditation leads to reduced default mode network activity beyond an active task.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Kathleen A; Zeffiro, Thomas A; Scheinost, Dustin; Constable, R Todd; Brewer, Judson A

    2015-09-01

    Meditation has been associated with relatively reduced activity in the default mode network, a brain network implicated in self-related thinking and mind wandering. However, previous imaging studies have typically compared meditation to rest, despite other studies having reported differences in brain activation patterns between meditators and controls at rest. Moreover, rest is associated with a range of brain activation patterns across individuals that has only recently begun to be better characterized. Therefore, in this study we compared meditation to another active cognitive task, both to replicate the findings that meditation is associated with relatively reduced default mode network activity and to extend these findings by testing whether default mode activity was reduced during meditation, beyond the typical reductions observed during effortful tasks. In addition, prior studies had used small groups, whereas in the present study we tested these hypotheses in a larger group. The results indicated that meditation is associated with reduced activations in the default mode network, relative to an active task, for meditators as compared to controls. Regions of the default mode network showing a Group × Task interaction included the posterior cingulate/precuneus and anterior cingulate cortex. These findings replicate and extend prior work indicating that the suppression of default mode processing may represent a central neural process in long-term meditation, and they suggest that meditation leads to relatively reduced default mode processing beyond that observed during another active cognitive task.

  14. Fourier transform infrared spectra and normal mode analysis of drug molecules: Zidovudine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Nivedita; Prabhakar, Santosh; Singh, R. A.

    2013-03-01

    The FTIR spectra of zidovudine molecule have been recorded in the range 4000-400 cm-1. The title compound is used as a drug against AIDS or HIV. The molecular structure, fundamental vibrational frequencies and intensities of vibrational bands are evaluated using density functional theory (DFT) using BLYP, B3LYP, B3PW91 and MPW1PW91 methods with 6-31+G(d,p) standard basis set. Comparison of simulated spectra with the experimental spectrum provides important informations and the ability of the computational method to describe the vibrational modes. These calculations have allowed finding most stable conformational structure of AZT. Calculated results of the title compound indicate that the drug molecule has syn orientation. The glycosidic bond in AZT and a minimum-energy structure in which the glycosy torsion angle χ and torsion angle γ values are consistent with those in the conformation of AZT in the AZT5-triphosphate bound to HIV RT is determined.

  15. Multiple-Component Crystal Fabric Measurements from Acoustically-Generated Normal Modes in Borehole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluskiewicz, D. J.; Waddington, E. D.; McCarthy, M.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Voigt, D.; Matsuoka, K.

    2014-12-01

    Sound wave velocities in ice are a proxy of crystal orientation fabric. Because p- and s-waves respectively travel faster and slower in the direction of an ice crystal c-axis, the velocities of these waves in a fabric are related to the clustering of ice crystal c-axes in the direction of wave propagation. Previous sonic logs at Dome C, NGRIP, WAIS, and NEEM have inferred a single component fabric description from the velocities of vertically-propagating p-waves around each ice core borehole. These records supplement thin-section measurements of crystal fabric by sampling larger numbers of crystals in a depth-continuous log. Observations of azimuthally anisotropic vertical-girdle fabrics at ice-core sites such as WAIS, NGRIP, and EDML underly a benefit for logging methods that are sensitive to such fabrics. We present a theoretical framework for using borehole flexural modes to measure azimuthal crystal-fabric anisotropy, and describe ongoing efforts to develop a sonic logging tool for this purpose. We also present data from p-wave logs and thin section measurements at the WAIS Divide, and describe how a flexural wave log could supplement the existing measurements.

  16. Comparison of different active polarimetric imaging modes for target detection in outdoor environment.

    PubMed

    Vannier, Nicolas; Goudail, François; Plassart, Corentin; Boffety, Matthieu; Feneyrou, Patrick; Leviandier, Luc; Galland, Frédéric; Bertaux, Nicolas

    2016-04-10

    We address the detection of manufactured objects in different types of environments with active polarimetric imaging. Using an original, fully adaptive imager, we compare several imaging modes having different numbers of polarimetric degrees of freedom. We demonstrate the efficiency of active polarimetric imaging for decamouflage and hazardous object detection, and underline the characteristics that a polarimetric imager aimed at this type of application should possess. We show that in most encountered scenarios the Mueller matrices are nearly diagonal, and sufficient detection performance can be obtained with simple polarimetric imaging systems having reduced degrees of freedom. Moreover, intensity normalization of images is of paramount importance to better reveal polarimetric contrast.

  17. Normal-mode function representation of global 3-D data sets: open-access software for the atmospheric research community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žagar, N.; Kasahara, A.; Terasaki, K.; Tribbia, J.; Tanaka, H.

    2015-04-01

    This article presents new software for the analysis of global dynamical fields in (re)analyses, weather forecasts and climate models. A new diagnostic tool, developed within the MODES project, allows one to diagnose properties of balanced and inertio-gravity (IG) circulations across many scales. In particular, the IG spectrum, which has only recently become observable, can be studied simultaneously in the mass and wind fields while considering the whole model depth in contrast to the majority of studies. The paper includes the theory of normal-mode function (NMF) expansion, technical details of the Fortran 90 code, examples of namelists which control the software execution and outputs of the software application on the ERA Interim reanalysis data set. The applied libraries and default compiler are from the open-source domain. A limited understanding of Fortran suffices for the successful implementation of the software. The presented application of the software to the ERA Interim data set reveals several aspects of the large-scale circulation after it has been partitioned into the linearly balanced and IG components. The global energy distribution is dominated by the balanced energy while the IG modes contribute around 10% of the total wave energy. However, on sub-synoptic scales, IG energy dominates and it is associated with the main features of tropical variability on all scales. The presented energy distribution and features of the zonally averaged and equatorial circulation provide a reference for the validation of climate models.

  18. Changes in structural style of normal faults due to failure mode transition: First results from excavated scale models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettermann, Michael; Urai, Janos L.

    2015-05-01

    The effects of failure mode transition from tensile to shear on structural style and fault zone architecture have long been recognized but are not well studied in 3D, although the two modes are both common in the upper crust of Earth and terrestrial planets, and are associated with large differences in transport properties. We present a simple method to study this in physical scale models of normal faults, using a cohesive powder embedded in cohesionless sand. By varying the overburden thickness, the failure mode changes from tensile to hybrid and finally to shear. Hardening and excavating the cohesive layer allows post mortem investigation of 3D structures at high resolution. We recognize two end member structural domains that differ strongly in their attributes. In the tensile domain faults are strongly dilatant with steep open fissures and sharp changes in strike at segment boundaries and branch points. In the shear domain fault dips are shallower and fault planes develop striations; map-view fault traces undulate with smaller changes in strike at branches. These attributes may be recognized in subsurface fault maps and could provide a way to better predict fault zone structure in the subsurface.

  19. Nonlinear normal mode interactions in the SF6 molecule studied with the aid of density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chechin, G.; Ryabov, D.; Shcherbinin, S.

    2015-07-01

    Some exact interactions between vibrational modes in systems with discrete symmetry can be described by the theory of the bushes of nonlinear normal modes (NNMs) [G. M. Chechin and V. P. Sakhnenko, Phys. D (Amsterdam, Neth.) 117, 43 (1998), 10.1016/S0167-2789(98)80012-2]. Each bush represents a dynamical object conserving the energy of the initial excitation. The existence of bushes of NNMs is ensured by some group-theoretical selection rules. In G. M. Chechin et al. [Int. J. Nonlinear Mech. 38, 1451 (2003), 10.1016/S0020-7462(02)00081-1], existence and stability of the bushes of vibrational modes in the simple octahedral model of mass points interacting via Lennard-Jones potential were investigated. In the present paper, we study these dynamical objects by the density functional theory in the SF6 molecule, which possesses the same symmetry and structure. We have fully confirmed the results previously obtained in the framework of the group-theoretical approach and have found some properties of the bushes of NNMs.

  20. All-Atom Calculation of the Normal Modes of Bacteriorhodopsin Using a Sliding Block Iterative Diagonalization Method.

    PubMed

    Kaledin, Alexey L; Kaledin, Martina; Bowman, Joel M

    2006-01-01

    Conventional normal-mode analysis of molecular vibrations requires computation and storage of the Hessian matrix. For a typical biological system such storage can reach several gigabytes posing difficulties for straightforward implementation. In this work we discuss an iterative block method to carry out full diagonalization of the Hessian while only storing a few vectors in memory. The iterative approach is based on the conjugate gradient formulation of the Davidson algorithm for simultaneous optimization of L roots, where in our case 10 < L < 300. The procedure is modified further by automatically adding a new vector into the search space for each locked (converged) root and keeping the new vector orthogonal to the eigenvectors previously determined. The higher excited states are then converged with the orthonormality constraint to the locked roots by applying a projector which is carried out using a read-rewind step done once per iteration. This allows for convergence of as many roots as desired without increasing the computer memory. The required Hessian-vector products are calculated on the fly as follows, Kp = dgp/dt, where K is the mass weighted Hessian, and gp is the gradient along p. The method has been implemented into the TINKER suite of molecular design codes. Preliminary results are presented for the normal modes of bacteriorhodopsin (bR) up to 300 cm(-)(1) and for the high frequency range between 2840 and 3680 cm(-)(1). There is evidence of a highly localized, noncollective mode at ∼1.4 cm(-)(1), caused by long-range interactions acting between the cytoplasmic and extracellular domains of bR.

  1. NI-23BRAIN BREAST METASTASES RESPOND TO ANTI-ANGIOGENIC THERAPY BY MODES OF VASCULAR NORMALIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Emblem, Kyrre; Pinho, Marco; Chandra, Vyshak; Gerstner, Elizabeth; Stufflebeam, Steve; Sorenson, Greg; Harris, Gordon; Freedman, Rachel; Sohl, Jessica; Younger, Jerry; Krop, Ian; Winer, Eric; Lin, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: As systemic therapy improves, brain metastases are increasingly common in patients with breast cancer. Unfortunately, effective therapy with durable control has remained elusive [1]. Combining bevacizumab and cyototoxic chemotherapy is an appealing approach as the anti-angiogenic effect of bevicizumab may improve delivery of cytotoxic drugs to brain tumors. METHODS: We conducted a Phase II study of patients with parenchymal brain metastasis treated with bevacizumab and carboplatin [2]. Patients could have any hormone receptor status or any number of prior therapies. Patients with HER2+ breast cancer also received trastuzamab. Correlative perfusion MRI scans to look at tumor perfusion, blood volume, vessel calibers and relative oxygen saturation (ΔSO2) levels were performed at baseline, day 1, and after 2 months of therapy [3, 4]. For consistency, the largest contrast-enhancing lesion in each patient visible on all three MR visits was selected for analysis. RESULTS: Thirty-eight patients were enrolled in the study of which 32 had, paired evaluable imaging datasets. Compared to baseline, 12/32 patients were identified as responders by a durable increase in ΔSO2 levels at day 1 and at 2 months above a 5% measurement error threshold. The remaining patients were identified by stable (15/32) or reduced (5/32) ΔSO2 levels. Patients responding to therapy showed increased tumor perfusion (Mann-Whitney; P<0.01) and prolonged survival (625 versus 400 days, Cox regression; P<0.05) Fig. 1B). A collective and selective pruning of macroscopic tumor vessels (>10 µm) were seen across all patients. CONCLUSIONS: Similar to primary brain tumors [2, 3], perfusion MRI demonstrates that anti-angiogenic therapy can induce vascular normalization in a subset of patients with metastatic breast cancer to the brain. Our data indicate that the vascular response may also be associated with improved survival. [1] Lin NU, Lancet Oncol 2013 [2] Sorensen AG, Cancer Res 2012 [3

  2. Frequencies and Normal Modes of Vibration of Benz[a]anthracene Radical Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubba, Rehab M.; Al-ani, Raghida I.; Shanshal, Muthana

    2005-03-01

    MINDO/3-FORCES calculations were carried out for the radical ions of benz[a]anthracene. Both ions exhibit Cs symmetry with C-C bond alternation in all four rings. The obtained equilibrium geometry was applied for the calculation of all 3N - 6 vibration frequencies of each ion, and for the analysis of their normal coordinates. The so calculated frequencies of the radical cation were close to the experimental frequencies and those of the ab initio calculations. They fall in the ranges νCHstr. (3034 - 3087 cm-1), νCCstr. (1237 - 1609 cm-1), δCH (1142 - 1216 cm-1). Interesting correlations could be obtained for the frequencies of similar vibrations, e. g. νsymCHstr. >νasymCHstr. Exception is the frequency of vibration of CHα in ring A for the radical cation and the same bond in ring D for the radical anion. The vibration frequencies for the CH bonds depend on the σ -electron densities of the corresponding carbon atoms, i. e. νCH.+str. >νCHstr. >νCH.-str., where σ -ρĊ+ >σ -ρC >σ -ρĊ- . For the C-C stretching vibrations the relation ν(C-C)str. >ν(C-C).-str. >ν(C-C).+str. holds, with the exception of the Cβ -Cβ bond, for which the relation ν(C-C)str. >ν(C-C).+str. >ν(C-C).-str. is found. As for the in-plane and out of-plane deformations, the following general correlations δ (CH) >δ (CH).- >δ (CH).+ and γ (CC) >γ (CC).- >γ (CC).+.

  3. Reduced hippocampal activity during encoding in cognitively normal adults carrying the APOE ε4 allele

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Maheen M.; Hutchinson, J. Benjamin; Shelton, Amy; Wagner, Anthony D.; Taylor, Joy L.

    2011-01-01

    Apolipoprotein (APOE) ε4-related differences in memory performance have been detected before age 65. The hippocampus and the surrounding medial temporal lobe (MTL) structures are the first site affected by Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and the MTL is the seat of episodic memory, including visuo-spatial memory. While reports of APOE ε4-related differences in these brain structures are not consistent in either cross-sectional or longitudinal structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies, there is increasing evidence that brain activity at baseline (defined as activity during fixation or rest) may differ in APOE ε4 carriers compared to non-carriers. In this fMRI study, cognitively normal APOE ε4 carriers and non-carriers engaged in a perspective-dependent spatial learning task (Shelton and Gabrieli, 2002) previously shown to activate MTL structures in older participants (Borghesani et al., 2008). A low-level, visually engaging dot-control task was used for comparison, in addition to fixation. APOE ε4 carriers showed less activation than non-carriers in the hippocampus proper during encoding. Specifically, when spatial encoding was contrasted against the dot-control task, encoding-related activation was significantly lower in carriers than non-carriers. By contrast, no ε4-related differences in the hippocampus were found when spatial encoding was compared with fixation. Lower activation, however, was not global since encoding-related activation in early visual cortex (left lingual gyrus) was not different between APOE ε4 carriers and non-carriers. The present data document APOE ε4-related differences in the hippocampus proper during encoding and underscore the role of low-level control contrasts for complex encoding tasks. These results have implications for fMRI studies that investigate the default-mode network (DMN) in middle -aged to older APOE ε4 carriers to help evaluate AD risk in this otherwise cognitively normal population. PMID

  4. Active/passive mode-locked laser oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Fountain, William D.; Johnson, Bertram C.

    1977-01-01

    A Q-switched/mode-locked Nd:YAG laser oscillator employing simultaneous active (electro-optic) and passive (saturable absorber) loss modulation within the optical cavity is described. This "dual modulation" oscillator can produce transform-limited pulses of duration ranging from about 30 psec to about 5 nsec with greatly improved stability compared to other mode-locked systems. The pulses produced by this system lack intrapulse frequency or amplitude modulation, and hence are idealy suited for amplification to high energies and for other applications where well-defined pulses are required. Also, the pulses of this system have excellent interpulse characteristics, wherein the optical noise between the individual pulses of the pulse train has a power level well below the power of the peak pulse of the train.

  5. Active flat optics using a guided mode resonance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Jin; Brongersma, Mark L

    2017-01-01

    Dynamically-controlled flat optics relies on achieving active and effective control over light-matter interaction in ultrathin layers. A variety of metasurface designs have achieved efficient amplitude and phase modulation. Particularly, noteworthy progress has been made with the incorporation of newly emerging electro-optical materials into such metasurfaces, including graphene, phase change materials, and transparent conductive oxides. In this Letter, we demonstrate dynamic light-matter interaction in a silicon-based subwavelength grating that supports a guided mode resonance. By overcoating the grating with indium tin oxide as an electrically tunable material, its reflectance can be tuned from 4% to 86%. Guided mode resonances naturally afford higher optical quality factors than the optical antennas used in the construction of metasurfaces. As such, they facilitate more effective control over the flow of light within the same layer thickness.

  6. Semianalytical quasi-normal mode theory for the local density of states in coupled photonic crystal cavity-waveguide structures.

    PubMed

    de Lasson, Jakob Rosenkrantz; Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Mørk, Jesper; Gregersen, Niels

    2015-12-15

    We present and validate a semianalytical quasi-normal mode (QNM) theory for the local density of states (LDOS) in coupled photonic crystal (PhC) cavity-waveguide structures. By means of an expansion of the Green's function on one or a few QNMs, a closed-form expression for the LDOS is obtained, and for two types of two-dimensional PhCs, with one and two cavities side-coupled to an extended waveguide, the theory is validated against numerically exact computations. For the single cavity, a slightly asymmetric spectrum is found, which the QNM theory reproduces, and for two cavities, a nontrivial spectrum with a peak and a dip is found, which is reproduced only when including both the two relevant QNMs in the theory. In both cases, we find relative errors below 1% in the bandwidth of interest.

  7. Ultra-broadband dissipative soliton and noise-like pulse generation from a normal dispersion mode-locked Tm-doped all-fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Sobon, Grzegorz; Sotor, Jaroslaw; Martynkien, Tadeusz; Abramski, Krzysztof M

    2016-03-21

    We report generation of ultra-broadband dissipative solitons and noise-like pulses from a simple, fully fiberized mode-locked Tm-doped fiber laser. The oscillator operates in the normal net dispersion regime and is mode-locked via nonlinear polarization evolution. Depending on the cavity dispersion, the laser was capable of generating 60 nm or 100 nm broad dissipative solitons. These are the broadest spectra generated from a normal dispersion mode-locked Tm-doped fiber laser so far. The same oscillator might also operate in the noise-like pulse regime with extremely broad emission spectra (over 300 nm), which also significantly outperforms the previous reports.

  8. Elastic parabolic equation and normal mode solutions for seismo-acoustic propagation in underwater environments with ice covers.

    PubMed

    Collis, Jon M; Frank, Scott D; Metzler, Adam M; Preston, Kimberly S

    2016-05-01

    Sound propagation predictions for ice-covered ocean acoustic environments do not match observational data: received levels in nature are less than expected, suggesting that the effects of the ice are substantial. Effects due to elasticity in overlying ice can be significant enough that low-shear approximations, such as effective complex density treatments, may not be appropriate. Building on recent elastic seafloor modeling developments, a range-dependent parabolic equation solution that treats the ice as an elastic medium is presented. The solution is benchmarked against a derived elastic normal mode solution for range-independent underwater acoustic propagation. Results from both solutions accurately predict plate flexural modes that propagate in the ice layer, as well as Scholte interface waves that propagate at the boundary between the water and the seafloor. The parabolic equation solution is used to model a scenario with range-dependent ice thickness and a water sound speed profile similar to those observed during the 2009 Ice Exercise (ICEX) in the Beaufort Sea.

  9. Putative model for heat shock protein 70 complexation with receptor of advanced glycation end products through fluorescence proximity assays and normal mode analyses.

    PubMed

    Grunwald, Marcelo Sartori; Ligabue-Braun, Rodrigo; Souza, Cristiane Santos; Heimfarth, Luana; Verli, Hugo; Gelain, Daniel Pens; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is recognized by receptors on the plasma membrane, such as Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), TLR2, CD14, and CD40. This leads to activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, enhancement of the phagocytic activity of innate immune cells, and stimulation of antigen-specific responses. However, the specific characteristics of HSP70 binding are still unknown, and all HSP70 receptors have not yet been described. Putative models for HSP70 complexation to the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGEs), considering both ADP- and ATP-bound states of HSP70, were obtained through molecular docking and interaction energy calculations. This interaction was detected and visualized by a proximity fluorescence-based assay in A549 cells and further analyzed by normal mode analyses of the docking complexes. The interacting energy of the complexes showed that the most favored docking situation occurs between HSP70 ATP-bound and RAGE in its monomeric state. The fluorescence proximity assay presented a higher number of detected spots in the HSP70 ATP treatment, corroborating with the computational result. Normal-mode analyses showed no conformational deformability in the interacting interface of the complexes. Results were compared with previous findings in which oxidized HSP70 was shown to be responsible for the differential modulation of macrophage activation, which could result from a signaling pathway triggered by RAGE binding. Our data provide important insights into the characteristics of HSP70 binding and receptor interactions, as well as putative models with conserved residues on the interface area, which could be useful for future site-directed mutagenesis studies.

  10. EEG Alpha and Beta Activity in Normal and Deaf Subjects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldron, Manjula; And Others

    Electroencephalogram and task performance data were collected from three groups of young adult males: profoundly deaf Ss who signed from an early age, profoundly deaf Ss who only used oral (speech and speedreading) methods of communication, and normal hearing Ss. Alpha and Beta brain wave patterns over the Wernicke's area were compared across…

  11. Active Resistive Wall Mode Stabilization in Low Rotation, High Beta NSTX Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbagh, S. A.

    2006-10-01

    An active feedback system to stabilize the resistive wall mode (RWM) in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is used to maintain plasma stability for greater than 90 RWM growth times. These experiments are the first to demonstrate RWM active stabilization in high beta, low aspect ratio tokamak plasmas with toroidal plasma rotation significantly below the critical rotation profile for passive stability and in the range predicted for ITER. Actively stabilized, low rotation plasmas reached normalized beta of 5.6, and the ratio of normalized beta to the toroidal mode number, n = 1 and 2 ideal no-wall stability limits reached 1.2 and 1.15 respectively, determined by DCON stability analysis of the time-evolving reconstructed experimental equilibria. The significant, controlled reduction of the plasma rotation to less than one percent of the Alfven speed was produced by non-resonant magnetic braking by an applied n = 3 field. The observed plasma rotation damping is in quantitative agreement with neoclassical toroidal viscosity theory including trapped particle effects [1]. The active stabilization system employs a mode control algorithm using RWM sensor input analyzed to distinguish the amplitude and phase of the n = 1 mode. During n = 1 stabilization, the n = 2 mode amplitude increases and surpasses the n = 1 amplitude, but the mode remains stable. By varying the system gain, and relative phase between the measured n = 1 RWM phase and the applied control field, both positive and negative feedback were demonstrated. Contrary to past experience in moderate aspect ratio tokamaks with poloidally continuous stabilizing structure, the RWM can become unstable in certain cases by deforming poloidally, an important consideration for feedback system sensor and control coil design in future devices such as ITER and KSTAR. **In collaboration with R.E. Bell, J.E. Menard, D.A. Gates, A.C. Sontag, J.M. Bialek, B.P. LeBlanc, F.M. Levinton, K. Tritz, H. Yuh. [1] W. Zhu, S

  12. High-latitude filtering in a global grid-point model using model normal modes. [Fourier filters for synoptic weather forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takacs, L. L.; Kalnay, E.; Navon, I. M.

    1985-01-01

    A normal modes expansion technique is applied to perform high latitude filtering in the GLAS fourth order global shallow water model with orography. The maximum permissible time step in the solution code is controlled by the frequency of the fastest propagating mode, which can be a gravity wave. Numerical methods are defined for filtering the data to identify the number of gravity modes to be included in the computations in order to obtain the appropriate zonal wavenumbers. The performances of the model with and without the filter, and with a time tendency and a prognostic field filter are tested with simulations of the Northern Hemisphere winter. The normal modes expansion technique is shown to leave the Rossby modes intact and permit 3-5 day predictions, a range not possible with the other high-latitude filters.

  13. Environmental stability of actively mode locked fibre lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Calum H.; Lee, Stephen T.; Reid, Derryck T.; Baili, Ghaya; Davies, John

    2016-10-01

    Lasers developed for defence related applications typically encounter issues with reliability and meeting desired specification when taken from the lab to the product line. In particular the harsh environmental conditions a laser has to endure can lead to difficulties. This paper examines a specific class of laser, namely actively mode-locked fibre lasers (AMLFLs), and discusses the impact of environmental perturbations. Theoretical and experimental results have assisted in developing techniques to improve the stability of a mode-locked pulse train for continuous operation. Many of the lessons learned in this research are applicable to a much broader category of lasers. The AMLFL consists of a fibre ring cavity containing a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA), an isolator, an output coupler, a circulator, a bandpass filter and a modulator. The laser produces a train of 6-ps pulses at 800 nm with a repetition rate in the GHz regime and a low-noise profile. This performance is realisable in a laboratory environment. However, even small changes in temperature on the order of 0.1 °C can cause a collapse of mode-locked dynamics such that the required stability cannot be achieved without suitable feedback. Investigations into the root causes of this failure were performed by changing the temperature of components that constitute the laser resonator and observing their properties. Several different feedback mechanisms have been investigated to improve laser stability in an environment with dynamic temperature changes. Active cavity length control will be discussed along with DC bias control of the Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM).

  14. Automatic Differentiation of Normal and Continuous Adventitious Respiratory Sounds Using Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition and Instantaneous Frequency.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Manuel; Fiz, José Antonio; Jané, Raimon

    2016-03-01

    Differentiating normal from adventitious respiratory sounds (RS) is a major challenge in the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases. Particularly, continuous adventitious sounds (CAS) are of clinical interest because they reflect the severity of certain diseases. This study presents a new classifier that automatically distinguishes normal sounds from CAS. It is based on the multiscale analysis of instantaneous frequency (IF) and envelope (IE) calculated after ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD). These techniques have two major advantages over previous techniques: high temporal resolution is achieved by calculating IF-IE and a priori knowledge of signal characteristics is not required for EEMD. The classifier is based on the fact that the IF dispersion of RS signals markedly decreases when CAS appear in respiratory cycles. Therefore, CAS were detected by using a moving window to calculate the dispersion of IF sequences. The study dataset contained 1494 RS segments extracted from 870 inspiratory cycles recorded from 30 patients with asthma. All cycles and their RS segments were previously classified as containing normal sounds or CAS by a highly experienced physician to obtain a gold standard classification. A support vector machine classifier was trained and tested using an iterative procedure in which the dataset was randomly divided into training (65%) and testing (35%) sets inside a loop. The SVM classifier was also tested on 4592 simulated CAS cycles. High total accuracy was obtained with both recorded (94.6% ± 0.3%) and simulated (92.8% ± 3.6%) signals. We conclude that the proposed method is promising for RS analysis and classification.

  15. The salience network causally influences default mode network activity during moral reasoning

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Stephen M.; D’Esposito, Mark; Kayser, Andrew S.; Grossman, Scott N.; Poorzand, Pardis; Seeley, William W.; Miller, Bruce L.; Rankin, Katherine P.

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale brain networks are integral to the coordination of human behaviour, and their anatomy provides insights into the clinical presentation and progression of neurodegenerative illnesses such as Alzheimer’s disease, which targets the default mode network, and behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, which targets a more anterior salience network. Although the default mode network is recruited when healthy subjects deliberate about ‘personal’ moral dilemmas, patients with Alzheimer’s disease give normal responses to these dilemmas whereas patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia give abnormal responses to these dilemmas. We hypothesized that this apparent discrepancy between activation- and patient-based studies of moral reasoning might reflect a modulatory role for the salience network in regulating default mode network activation. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging to characterize network activity of patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia and healthy control subjects, we present four converging lines of evidence supporting a causal influence from the salience network to the default mode network during moral reasoning. First, as previously reported, the default mode network is recruited when healthy subjects deliberate about ‘personal’ moral dilemmas, but patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia producing atrophy in the salience network give abnormally utilitarian responses to these dilemmas. Second, patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia have reduced recruitment of the default mode network compared with healthy control subjects when deliberating about these dilemmas. Third, a Granger causality analysis of functional neuroimaging data from healthy control subjects demonstrates directed functional connectivity from nodes of the salience network to nodes of the default mode network during moral reasoning. Fourth, this Granger causal influence is diminished in

  16. Platelet Serotonin Transporter Function Predicts Default-Mode Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kasess, Christian H.; Meyer, Bernhard M.; Hofmaier, Tina; Diers, Kersten; Bartova, Lucie; Pail, Gerald; Huf, Wolfgang; Uzelac, Zeljko; Hartinger, Beate; Kalcher, Klaudius; Perkmann, Thomas; Haslacher, Helmuth; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Kasper, Siegfried; Freissmuth, Michael; Windischberger, Christian; Willeit, Matthäus; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Esterbauer, Harald; Brocke, Burkhard; Moser, Ewald; Sitte, Harald H.; Pezawas, Lukas

    2014-01-01

    Background The serotonin transporter (5-HTT) is abundantly expressed in humans by the serotonin transporter gene SLC6A4 and removes serotonin (5-HT) from extracellular space. A blood-brain relationship between platelet and synaptosomal 5-HT reuptake has been suggested, but it is unknown today, if platelet 5-HT uptake can predict neural activation of human brain networks that are known to be under serotonergic influence. Methods A functional magnetic resonance study was performed in 48 healthy subjects and maximal 5-HT uptake velocity (Vmax) was assessed in blood platelets. We used a mixed-effects multilevel analysis technique (MEMA) to test for linear relationships between whole-brain, blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) activity and platelet Vmax. Results The present study demonstrates that increases in platelet Vmax significantly predict default-mode network (DMN) suppression in healthy subjects independent of genetic variation within SLC6A4. Furthermore, functional connectivity analyses indicate that platelet Vmax is related to global DMN activation and not intrinsic DMN connectivity. Conclusion This study provides evidence that platelet Vmax predicts global DMN activation changes in healthy subjects. Given previous reports on platelet-synaptosomal Vmax coupling, results further suggest an important role of neuronal 5-HT reuptake in DMN regulation. PMID:24667541

  17. cNMA: a framework of encounter complex-based normal mode analysis to model conformational changes in protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Oliwa, Tomasz; Shen, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: It remains both a fundamental and practical challenge to understand and anticipate motions and conformational changes of proteins during their associations. Conventional normal mode analysis (NMA) based on anisotropic network model (ANM) addresses the challenge by generating normal modes reflecting intrinsic flexibility of proteins, which follows a conformational selection model for protein–protein interactions. But earlier studies have also found cases where conformational selection alone could not adequately explain conformational changes and other models have been proposed. Moreover, there is a pressing demand of constructing a much reduced but still relevant subset of protein conformational space to improve computational efficiency and accuracy in protein docking, especially for the difficult cases with significant conformational changes. Method and results: With both conformational selection and induced fit models considered, we extend ANM to include concurrent but differentiated intra- and inter-molecular interactions and develop an encounter complex-based NMA (cNMA) framework. Theoretical analysis and empirical results over a large data set of significant conformational changes indicate that cNMA is capable of generating conformational vectors considerably better at approximating conformational changes with contributions from both intrinsic flexibility and inter-molecular interactions than conventional NMA only considering intrinsic flexibility does. The empirical results also indicate that a straightforward application of conventional NMA to an encounter complex often does not improve upon NMA for an individual protein under study and intra- and inter-molecular interactions need to be differentiated properly. Moreover, in addition to induced motions of a protein under study, the induced motions of its binding partner and the coupling between the two sets of protein motions present in a near-native encounter complex lead to the improved

  18. Role of loop dynamics in thermal stability of mesophilic and thermophilic adenylosuccinate synthetase: a molecular dynamics and normal mode analysis study.

    PubMed

    Vemparala, Satyavani; Mehrotra, Sonali; Balaram, Hemalatha

    2011-05-01

    Enzymes from thermophiles are poorly active at temperatures at which their mesophilic homologs exhibit high activity and attain corresponding active states at high temperatures. In this study, comparative molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, supplemented by normal mode analysis, have been performed on an enzyme Adenylosuccinate synthetase (AdSS) from E. coli (mesophilic) and P. horikoshii (thermophilic) systems to understand the effects of loop dynamics on thermal stability of AdSS. In mesophilic AdSS, both ligand binding and catalysis are facilitated through the coordinated movement of five loops on the protein. The simulation results suggest that thermophilic P. horikoshii preserves structure and catalytic function at high temperatures by using the movement of only a subset of loops (two out of five) for ligand binding and catalysis unlike its mesophilic counterpart in E. coli. The pre-arrangement of the catalytic residues in P. horikoshii is well-preserved and salt bridges remain stable at high temperature (363K). The simulations suggest a general mechanism (including pre-arrangement of catalytic residues, increased polar residue content, stable salt bridges, increased rigidity, and fewer loop movements) used by thermophilic enzymes to preserve structure and be catalytically active at elevated temperatures.

  19. Diagnostic for two-mode variable valve activation device

    SciTech Connect

    Fedewa, Andrew M

    2014-01-07

    A method is provided for diagnosing a multi-mode valve train device which selectively provides high lift and low lift to a combustion valve of an internal combustion engine having a camshaft phaser actuated by an electric motor. The method includes applying a variable electric current to the electric motor to achieve a desired camshaft phaser operational mode and commanding the multi-mode valve train device to a desired valve train device operational mode selected from a high lift mode and a low lift mode. The method also includes monitoring the variable electric current and calculating a first characteristic of the parameter. The method also includes comparing the calculated first characteristic against a predetermined value of the first characteristic measured when the multi-mode valve train device is known to be in the desired valve train device operational mode.

  20. Default-mode-like network activation in awake rodents.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Jaymin; Baker, Scott J; Chandran, Prasant; Miller, Loan; Lee, Younglim; Marek, Gerard J; Sakoglu, Unal; Chin, Chih-Liang; Luo, Feng; Fox, Gerard B; Day, Mark

    2011-01-01

    During wakefulness and in absence of performing tasks or sensory processing, the default-mode network (DMN), an intrinsic central nervous system (CNS) network, is in an active state. Non-human primate and human CNS imaging studies have identified the DMN in these two species. Clinical imaging studies have shown that the pattern of activity within the DMN is often modulated in various disease states (e.g., Alzheimer's, schizophrenia or chronic pain). However, whether the DMN exists in awake rodents has not been characterized. The current data provides evidence that awake rodents also possess 'DMN-like' functional connectivity, but only subsequent to habituation to what is initially a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environment as well as physical restraint. Specifically, the habituation process spanned across four separate scanning sessions (Day 2, 4, 6 and 8). At Day 8, significant (p<0.05) functional connectivity was observed amongst structures such as the anterior cingulate (seed region), retrosplenial, parietal, and hippocampal cortices. Prior to habituation (Day 2), functional connectivity was only detected (p<0.05) amongst CNS structures known to mediate anxiety (i.e., anterior cingulate (seed region), posterior hypothalamic area, amygdala and parabracial nucleus). In relating functional connectivity between cingulate-default-mode and cingulate-anxiety structures across Days 2-8, a significant inverse relationship (r = -0.65, p = 0.0004) was observed between these two functional interactions such that increased cingulate-DMN connectivity corresponded to decreased cingulate anxiety network connectivity. This investigation demonstrates that the cingulate is an important component of both the rodent DMN-like and anxiety networks.

  1. Phosphatase inhibitors activate normal and defective CFTR chloride channels.

    PubMed Central

    Becq, F; Jensen, T J; Chang, X B; Savoia, A; Rommens, J M; Tsui, L C; Buchwald, M; Riordan, J R; Hanrahan, J W

    1994-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation at multiple sites. Although activation by protein kinases has been studied in some detail, the dephosphorylation step has received little attention. This report examines the mechanisms responsible for the dephosphorylation and spontaneous deactivation ("rundown") of CFTR chloride channels excised from transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and human airway epithelial cells. We report that the alkaline phosphatase inhibitors bromotetramisole, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, theophylline, and vanadate slow the rundown of CFTR channel activity in excised membrane patches and reduce dephosphorylation of CFTR protein in isolated membranes. It was also found that in unstimulated cells, CFTR channels can be activated by exposure to phosphatase inhibitors alone. Most importantly, exposure of mammalian cells to phosphatase inhibitors alone activates CFTR channels that have disease-causing mutations, provided the mutant channels are present in the plasma membrane (R117H, G551D, and delta F508 after cooling). These results suggest that CFTR dephosphorylation is dynamic and that membrane-associated phosphatase activity may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cystic fibrosis. Images PMID:7522329

  2. Acoustic normal modes using the propagator matrix technique for a stratified ocean overlaying an inhomogeneous anisotropic porous bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badiey, M.; Yamamoto, T.

    1986-01-01

    Propogation of acoustic normal modes at excitation frequencies of 50 to 50000 Hz in a shallow stratified ocean overlaying a transverse isotropic poro-elastic sediment bed is modeled. The Biot-Willis stiffness matrix of the poro-elastic anisotropy is defined in terms of physical properties of sediments to model the bed. Propagator matrix method is used to solve the differential equations for the motion stress vectors in both layered sediment and water. The effects of sediment properties on the dispersion and attenuation of acoustic waves are examined numerically. Using the relaxation principle it is observed that the energy loss is maximum at frequency referred to as relaxation frequency of the porous media given by f sub ri = (beta)(nu)/3 pi k (sub si), where beta is the porosity, nu is the kinematic viscosity of the pore fluid and k (sub si) is the anisotropic permeability coefficient. The phase speed of compressional and shear waves in the sediment becomes highly dispersive around this frequency. The sandy bottom's relaxation frequency is the range of several hundred hertz to several kilo hertz. This report presents the derivation of the mathematical expressions used in the model and a complete description of the computer program. Four examples of numerical calculations are provided.

  3. Aligning Experimental and Theoretical Anisotropic B-Factors: Water Models, Normal-Mode Analysis Methods, and Metrics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The strength of X-ray crystallography in providing the information for protein dynamics has been under appreciated. The anisotropic B-factors (ADPs) from high-resolution structures are invaluable in studying the relationship among structure, dynamics, and function. Here, starting from an in-depth evaluation of the metrics used for comparing the overlap between two ellipsoids, we applied normal-mode analysis (NMA) to predict the theoretical ADPs and then align them with experimental results. Adding an extra layer of explicitly treated water on protein surface significantly improved the energy minimization results and better reproduced the anisotropy of experimental ADPs. In comparing experimental and theoretical ADPs, we focused on the overlap in shape, the alignment of dominant directions, and the similarity in magnitude. The choices of water molecules, NMA methods, and the metrics for evaluating the overlap of ADPs determined final results. This study provides useful information for exploring the physical basis and the application potential of experimental ADPs. PMID:24673391

  4. Active noise control using a distributed mode flat panel loudspeaker.

    PubMed

    Zhu, H; Rajamani, R; Dudney, J; Stelson, K A

    2003-07-01

    A flat panel distributed mode loudspeaker (DML) has many advantages over traditional cone speakers in terms of its weight, size, and durability. However, its frequency response is uneven and complex, thus bringing its suitability for active noise control (ANC) under question. This paper presents experimental results demonstrating the effective use of panel DML speakers in an ANC application. Both feedback and feedforward control techniques are considered. Effective feedback control with a flat panel speaker could open up a whole range of new noise control applications and has many advantages over feedforward control. The paper develops a new control algorithm to attenuate tonal noise of a known frequency by feedback control. However, due to the uneven response of the speakers, feedback control is found to be only moderately effective even for this narrow-band application. Feedforward control proves to be most capable for the flat panel speaker. Using feedforward control, the sound pressure level can be significantly reduced in close proximity to an error microphone. The paper demonstrates an interesting application of the flat panel in which the panel is placed in the path of sound and effectively used to block sound transmission using feedforward control. This is a new approach to active noise control enabled by the use of flat panels and can be used to prevent sound from entering into an enclosure in the first place rather than the traditional approach of attempting to cancel sound after it enters the enclosure.

  5. Mode of antibacterial activity of Eclalbasaponin isolated from Eclipta alba.

    PubMed

    Ray, A; Bharali, P; Konwar, B K

    2013-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the mode of antibacterial activity of Eclalbasaponin isolated from Eclipta alba, against selected Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The probable chemical structure was determined by using various spectroscopic techniques such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and mass spectroscopy. The antibacterial activity was evaluated by well diffusion technique, pH sensitivity, chemotaxis, and crystal violet assays. Eclalbasaponin showed clear zone of inhibition against both Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and exhibited growth inhibition at the pH range of 5.5-9.0. The isolated saponin exhibited its positive chemoattractant property for both bacterial strains. Results of crystal violet assay and the presence of UV-sensitive materials in the cell-free supernatant confirmed the cellular damages caused by the treatment of Eclalbasaponin. The release of intracellular proteins due to the membrane damage was determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Changes in the cell surface structure and membrane disruption were further revealed by FTIR and scanning electron microscopy analysis. The present study suggests that the isolated saponin from E. alba causes the disruption of the bacterial cell membrane which leads to the loss of bacterial cell viability.

  6. Anatomy of a microearthquake sequence on an active normal fault

    PubMed Central

    Stabile, T. A.; Satriano, C.; Orefice, A.; Festa, G.; Zollo, A.

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of similar earthquakes, such as events in a seismic sequence, is an effective tool with which to monitor and study source processes and to understand the mechanical and dynamic states of active fault systems. We are observing seismicity that is primarily concentrated in very limited regions along the 1980 Irpinia earthquake fault zone in Southern Italy, which is a complex system characterised by extensional stress regime. These zones of weakness produce repeated earthquakes and swarm-like microearthquake sequences, which are concentrated in a few specific zones of the fault system. In this study, we focused on a sequence that occurred along the main fault segment of the 1980 Irpinia earthquake to understand its characteristics and its relation to the loading-unloading mechanisms of the fault system. PMID:22606366

  7. Acoustic waves generated from seismic surface waves: propagation properties determined from Doppler sounding observations and normal-mode modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artru, Juliette; Farges, Thomas; Lognonné, Philippe

    2004-09-01

    Since 1960, experiments have shown that perturbations of the ionosphere can occur after earthquakes, by way of dynamic coupling between seismic surface waves and the atmosphere. The atmospheric wave is amplified exponentially while propagating upwards due to the decrease of density, and interaction with the ionospheric plasma leads to clearly identified signals on both ground-based or satellite ionospheric measurements. In 1999 and 2000, after an upgrade of the HF Doppler sounder, the Commisariat à l'Énergie Atomique systematically recorded these effects in the ionosphere with the Francourville (France) network, by measuring vertical oscillations of ionospheric layers with the Doppler technique. Normal-mode theory extended to a solid Earth with an atmosphere allows successful modelling of such signals, even if this 1-D approach is probably too crude, especially in the solid Earth, where 20 s surface waves see large lateral variations in the crust. The combination of observations and simulations provides a new tool to determine acoustic gravity wave propagation characteristics from the ground to ionospheric height. Observed velocity and amplification of the atmospheric waves show good agreement from the ground up to moderate sounding altitudes (140-150 km); however, at higher altitudes the propagation speed is found to be much smaller than predicted and attenuation is underestimated. This shows that the standard formalism of acoustic gravity waves in the atmosphere cannot efficiently describe propagation in the ionized atmosphere. Further work is needed to characterize the propagation of acoustic waves in this altitude range: we believe that seismic waves can provide a well-constrained source for such study.

  8. Cat hindlimb motoneurons during locomotion. II. Normal activity patterns.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, J A; Sugano, N; Loeb, G E; Marks, W B; O'Donovan, M J; Pratt, C A

    1987-02-01

    Activity patterns were recorded from 51 motoneurons in the fifth lumbar ventral root of cats walking on a motorized treadmill at a range of speeds between 0.1 and 1.3 m/s. The muscle of destination of recorded motoneurons was identified by spike-triggered averaging of EMG recordings from each of the anterior thigh muscles. Forty-three motoneurons projected to one of the quadriceps (vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, vastus intermedius, or rectus femoris) or sartorius (anterior or medial) muscles of the anterior thigh. Anterior thigh motoneurons always discharged a single burst of action potentials per step cycle, even in multifunctional muscles (e.g., sartorius anterior) that exhibited more than one burst of EMG activity per step cycle. The instantaneous firing rates of most motoneurons were lowest upon recruitment and increased progressively during a burst, as long as the EMG was still increasing. Firing rates peaked midway through each burst and tended to decline toward the end of the burst. The initial, mean, and peak firing rates of single motoneurons typically increased for faster walking speeds. At any given walking speed, early recruited motoneurons typically reached higher firing rates than late recruited motoneurons. In contrast to decerebrated cats, initial doublets at the beginning of bursts were seen only rarely. In the 4/51 motoneurons that showed initial doublets, both the instantaneous frequency of the doublet and the probability of starting a burst with a doublet decreased for faster walking speeds. The modulations in firing rate of every motoneuron were found to be closely correlated to the smoothed electromyogram of its target muscle. For 32 identified motoneurons, the unit's instantaneous frequencygram was scaled linearly by computer to the rectified smoothed EMG recorded from each of the anterior thigh muscles. The covariance between unitary frequencygram and muscle EMG was computed for each muscle. Typically, the EMG profile of the target

  9. The mass normalization of the displacement and strain mode shapes in a strain experimental modal analysis using the mass-change strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kranjc, Tadej; Slavič, Janko; Boltežar, Miha

    2013-12-01

    The classic experimental modal analysis (EMA) is a well-known procedure for determining the modal parameters. The less frequently used strain EMA is based on a response measurement using strain sensors. The results of a strain EMA are the modal parameters, where in addition to the displacement mode shapes the strain mode shapes are also identified. The strain EMA can be used for an experimental investigation of a stress-strain distribution without the need to build a dynamical model. It can also be used to determine the modal parameters when, during modal testing, a motion sensor cannot be used and so a strain sensor is used instead. The displacement and strain mode shapes that are determined with the strain EMA are not mass normalized (scaled with respect to the orthogonality properties of the mass-normalized modal matrix), and therefore some dynamical properties of the system cannot be obtained. The mass normalization can be made with the classic EMA, which requires the use of a motion sensor. In this research a new approach to the mass normalization in the strain EMA, without using a motion sensor, is presented. It is based on the recently introduced mass-change structural modification method, which is used for the mass normalization in an operational modal analysis. This method was modified in such a way that it can be used for the mass normalization in the strain EMA. The mass-normalized displacement and strain mode shapes were obtained using a combination of the proposed approach and the strain EMA. The proposed approach was validated on real structures (beam and plate).

  10. Transform-limited pulse generation in normal cavity dispersion erbium doped single-walled carbon nanotubes mode-locked fiber ring laser.

    PubMed

    Chernysheva, M A; Krylov, A A; Ogleznev, A A; Arutyunyan, N R; Pozharov, A S; Obraztsova, E D; Dianov, E M

    2012-10-08

    We demonstrate an erbium doped fiber ring laser mode-locked with a carboxymetylcellulose high-optical quality film with dispersed single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). The laser with large normal net cavity dispersion generates near bandwidth-limited picosecond inverse modified soliton pulses at 1.56 µm.

  11. Batch Mode Active Learning for Regression With Expected Model Change.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wenbin; Zhang, Muhan; Zhang, Ya

    2016-04-20

    While active learning (AL) has been widely studied for classification problems, limited efforts have been done on AL for regression. In this paper, we introduce a new AL framework for regression, expected model change maximization (EMCM), which aims at choosing the unlabeled data instances that result in the maximum change of the current model once labeled. The model change is quantified as the difference between the current model parameters and the updated parameters after the inclusion of the newly selected examples. In light of the stochastic gradient descent learning rule, we approximate the change as the gradient of the loss function with respect to each single candidate instance. Under the EMCM framework, we propose novel AL algorithms for the linear and nonlinear regression models. In addition, by simulating the behavior of the sequential AL policy when applied for k iterations, we further extend the algorithms to batch mode AL to simultaneously choose a set of k most informative instances at each query time. Extensive experimental results on both UCI and StatLib benchmark data sets have demonstrated that the proposed algorithms are highly effective and efficient.

  12. Low-frequency broadband sound source localization using an adaptive normal mode back-propagation approach in a shallow-water ocean.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying-Tsong; Newhall, Arthur E; Lynch, James F

    2012-02-01

    A variety of localization methods with normal mode theory have been established for localizing low frequency (below a few hundred Hz), broadband signals in a shallow water environment. Gauss-Markov inverse theory is employed in this paper to derive an adaptive normal mode back-propagation approach. Joining with the maximum a posteriori mode filter, this approach is capable of separating signals from noisy data so that the back-propagation will not have significant influence from the noise. Numerical simulations are presented to demonstrate the robustness and accuracy of the approach, along with comparisons to other methods. Applications to real data collected at the edge of the continental shelf off New Jersey, USA are presented, and the effects of water column fluctuations caused by nonlinear internal waves and shelfbreak front variability are discussed.

  13. Risk of COPD with obstruction in active smokers with normal spirometry and reduced diffusion capacity.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Ben-Gary; Strulovici-Barel, Yael; Kaner, Robert J; Sanders, Abraham; Vincent, Thomas L; Mezey, Jason G; Crystal, Ronald G

    2015-12-01

    Smokers are assessed for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) using spirometry, with COPD defined by the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) as airflow limitation that is not fully reversible with bronchodilators. There is a subset of smokers with normal spirometry (by GOLD criteria), who have a low diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO), a parameter linked to emphysema and small airway disease. The natural history of these "normal spirometry/low DLCO" smokers is unknown.From a cohort of 1570 smokers in the New York City metropolitian area, all of whom had normal spirometry, two groups were randomly selected for lung function follow-up: smokers with normal spirometry/normal DLCO (n=59) and smokers with normal spirometry/low DLCO (n=46). All had normal history, physical examination, complete blood count, urinalysis, HIV status, α1-antitrypsin level, chest radiography, forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), FEV1/FVC ratio and total lung capacity. Throughout the study, all continued to be active smokers.In the normal spirometry/normal DLCO group assessed over 45±20 months, 3% developed GOLD-defined COPD. In contrast, in the normal spirometry/low DLCO group, followed over 41±31 months, 22% developed GOLD-defined COPD.Despite appearing "normal" according to GOLD, smokers with normal spirometry but low DLCO are at significant risk of developing COPD with obstruction to airflow.

  14. [Ecological demonstration activity and eco-civilization construction mode: review and prospects].

    PubMed

    Mao, Hui-ping; He, Xuan; He, Jia; Niu, Dong-jie; Bao, Cun-kuan

    2013-04-01

    Ecological civilization is to normalize human development behaviors to harmonize the relationships between social and ecological development and eco-environment protection. In this paper, a comparative analysis was made on the ecological demonstration activities of ecological demonstration areas led by the Ministry of Environmental Protection, exemplar cities of national environmental protection, and ecological provinces, cities, and counties. It was considered that all the ecological demonstration activities had the problems of lacking pertinence of construction goals, disordered construction subjects, inefficient construction processes, and lacking continuous incentive mechanisms of assessment. In the meantime, through the analysis of the connotations of eco-civilization, the relationships between eco-civilization and eco-demonstration constructions were approached, and the eco-civilization construction mode was put forward in terms of construction goal, construction subject, and construction processes and assessment. The construction mode included the construction goal based on regional characteristics; the synergistic cooperation of construction subjects, the expanding ways of public participation, and the establishment of evaluation system for comprehensively measuring the 'actions and results'.

  15. On Shape Normalization for Non-Uniformly Active Catalyst Pellets. III.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    ON SHAPE NORMALIZATION FOR NON-UNIFORMLY ACTIVE CATALYST PELLET--ETC(U) OCT Al M4 MORBIDELLI . A VARMA DAA629 RI C 001 UNCLASSIFIED MRC-TSR-2289 NL 7...RESEARCH CENTRR ON SHAPE NORMALIZATION FOR NON-UNIFORMLY ACTIVE CATALYST PELLETS - III M. Morbidelli and A. Varma Technical Summary Report #2289 October...lies with N4RC, and not with the authors of this report. ON SHAPE NORMALIZATION FOR NON-UNIFORMLY ACTIVE CATALYST PELLETS - III M. Morbidelli and A

  16. Angular dependence of source-target-detector in active mode standoff infrared detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco-Londoño, Leonardo C.; Castro-Suarez, John R.; Aparicio-Bolaños, Joaquín. A.; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2013-06-01

    Active mode standoff measurement using infrared spectroscopy were carried out in which the angle between target and the source was varied from 0-70° with respect to the surface normal of substrates containing traces of highly energetic materials (explosives). The experiments were made using three infrared sources: a modulated source (Mod-FTIR), an unmodulated source (UnMod-FTIR) and a scanning quantum cascade laser (QCL), part of a dispersive mid infrared (MIR) spectrometer. The targets consisted of PENT 200 μg/cm2 deposited on aluminum plates placed at 1 m from the sources. The evaluation of the three modalities was aimed at verifying the influence of the highly collimated laser beam in the detection in comparison with the other sources. The Mod-FTIR performed better than QCL source in terms of the MIR signal intensity decrease with increasing angle.

  17. High frequency normal mode statistics in a shallow water waveguide: the effect of random linear internal waves.

    PubMed

    Raghukumar, Kaustubha; Colosi, John A

    2014-07-01

    Using transport theory and Monte Carlo numerical simulation, the statistical properties of mode propagation at a frequency of 1 kHz are studied in a shallow water environment with random sound-speed perturbations from linear internal waves. The environment is typical of summer conditions in the mid-Atlantic bight during the Shallow Water 2006 experiment. Observables of interest include the second and fourth moments of the mode amplitudes, which are relevant to full-field mean intensity and scintillation index. It is found that mode phase randomization has a strong adiabatic component while at the same time mode coupling rates are significant. As a consequence, a computationally efficient transport theory is presented, which models cross-mode correlation adiabatically, but accounts for mode coupling using the mode energy equations of Creamer [(1996). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 99, 2825-2838]. The theory also has closed-form expressions for the internal wave scattering matrix and a correction for an edge effect. The hybrid transport theory is shown to accurately reproduce many statistical quantities from the Monte Carlo simulations.

  18. Steady-state entanglement and normal-mode splitting in an atom-assisted optomechanical system with intensity-dependent coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Barzanjeh, Sh.; Naderi, M. H.; Soltanolkotabi, M.

    2011-12-15

    In this paper, we study theoretically bipartite and tripartite continuous variable entanglement as well as normal-mode splitting in a single-atom cavity optomechanical system with intensity-dependent coupling. The system under consideration is formed by a Fabry-Perot cavity with a thin vibrating end mirror and a two-level atom in the Gaussian standing wave of the cavity mode. We first derive the general form of the Hamiltonian describing the tripartite intensity-dependent atom-field-mirror coupling due to the presence of the cavity mode structure. We then restrict our treatment to the first vibrational sideband of the mechanical resonator and derive a tripartite atom-field-mirror Hamiltonian. We show that when the optical cavity is intensely driven, one can generate bipartite entanglement between any pair in the tripartite system and that, due to entanglement sharing, atom-mirror entanglement is efficiently generated at the expense of optical-mechanical and optical-atom entanglement. We also find that in such a system, when the Lamb-Dicke parameter is large enough, one can simultaneously observe the normal mode splitting into three modes.

  19. Effect of damping on excitability of high-order normal modes. [for a large space telescope spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merchant, D. H.; Gates, R. M.; Straayer, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of localized structural damping on the excitability of higher-order large space telescope spacecraft modes is investigated. A preprocessor computer program is developed to incorporate Voigt structural joint damping models in a finite-element dynamic model. A postprocessor computer program is developed to select critical modes for low-frequency attitude control problems and for higher-frequency fine-stabilization problems. The selection is accomplished by ranking the flexible modes based on coefficients for rate gyro, position gyro, and optical sensor, and on image-plane motions due to sinusoidal or random PSD force and torque inputs.

  20. Differential Lipid Profiles of Normal Human Brain Matter and Gliomas by Positive and Negative Mode Desorption Electrospray Ionization – Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pirro, Valentina; Hattab, Eyas M.; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A.; Cooks, R. Graham

    2016-01-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization—mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) imaging was used to analyze unmodified human brain tissue sections from 39 subjects sequentially in the positive and negative ionization modes. Acquisition of both MS polarities allowed more complete analysis of the human brain tumor lipidome as some phospholipids ionize preferentially in the positive and others in the negative ion mode. Normal brain parenchyma, comprised of grey matter and white matter, was differentiated from glioma using positive and negative ion mode DESI-MS lipid profiles with the aid of principal component analysis along with linear discriminant analysis. Principal component–linear discriminant analyses of the positive mode lipid profiles was able to distinguish grey matter, white matter, and glioma with an average sensitivity of 93.2% and specificity of 96.6%, while the negative mode lipid profiles had an average sensitivity of 94.1% and specificity of 97.4%. The positive and negative mode lipid profiles provided complementary information. Principal component–linear discriminant analysis of the combined positive and negative mode lipid profiles, via data fusion, resulted in approximately the same average sensitivity (94.7%) and specificity (97.6%) of the positive and negative modes when used individually. However, they complemented each other by improving the sensitivity and specificity of all classes (grey matter, white matter, and glioma) beyond 90% when used in combination. Further principal component analysis using the fused data resulted in the subgrouping of glioma into two groups associated with grey and white matter, respectively, a separation not apparent in the principal component analysis scores plots of the separate positive and negative mode data. The interrelationship of tumor cell percentage and the lipid profiles is discussed, and how such a measure could be used to measure residual tumor at surgical margins. PMID:27658243

  1. High-frequency normal-mode statistics in shallow water: the combined effect of random surface and internal waves.

    PubMed

    Raghukumar, Kaustubha; Colosi, John A

    2015-05-01

    In an earlier article, the statistical properties of mode propagation were studied at a frequency of 1 kHz in a shallow water environment with random sound-speed perturbations from linear internal waves, using a hybrid transport theory and Monte Carlo numerical simulations. Here, the analysis is extended to include the effects of random linear surface waves, in isolation and in combination with internal waves. Mode coupling rates for both surface and internal waves are found to be significant, but strongly dependent on mode number. Mode phase randomization by surface waves is found to be dominated by coupling effects, and therefore a full transport theory treatment of the range evolution of the cross mode coherence matrix is needed. The second-moment of mode amplitudes is calculated using transport theory, thereby providing the mean intensity while the fourth-moment is calculated using Monte Carlo simulations, which provides the scintillation index. The transport theory results for second-moment statistics are shown to closely reproduce Monte Carlo simulations. Both surface waves and internal waves strongly influence the acoustic field fluctuations.

  2. High energy pulses generation with giant spectrum bandwidth and submegahertz repetition rate from a passively mode-locked Yb-doped fiber laser in all normal dispersion cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.-H.; Wang, D.; Lin, K.-H.

    2011-01-01

    Robust passively mode-locked pulse generation with low pulse repetition rate and giant spectrum bandwidth in an all-fiber, all-normal-dispersion ytterbium-doped fiber laser has been experimentally demonstrated using nonlinear polarization evolution technique. The highest pulse energy over 20 nJ with spectrum bandwidth over 50 nm can be experimentally obtained at 175 mW pump power. The mode-locked pulses reveal broadened 3-dB pulsewidth about several nanosecond and widened pedestal in time trace that is resulted from enormous dispersion in laser cavity and gain dynamics. At certain mode-locking state, a spectrum gap around 1056 nm are observed between the three and four energy levels of Yb-doped fiber laser. By properly rotating the polarization controller, the gap can be eliminated due to four-wave mixing to produce more flattened spectrum output.

  3. Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy from Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics and Static Normal Mode Analysis: The C-H Region of DMSO as a Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Sean A.; Ueltschi, Tyler W.; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Mifflin, Amanda L.; Hess, Wayne P.; Wang, Hongfei; Cramer, Christopher J.; Govind, Niranjan

    2016-03-03

    Carbon-hydrogen (C-H) vibration modes serve as key probes in the chemical iden- tication of hydrocarbons and in vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) spec- *troscopy of hydrocarbons at the liquid/gas interface. Their assignments pose a chal- lenge from a theoretical viewpoint. In this work, we present a detailed study of the C-H stretching region of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) using a new Gaussian basis set- based ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) module that we have implemented in the NWChem computational chemistry program. By combining AIMD simulations and static normal mode analysis, we interpret experimental infrared and Raman spectra and explore the role of anharmonic effects in this system. Our anharmonic normal mode analysis of the in-phase and out-of-phase symmetric C-H stretching modes chal- lenges the previous experimental assignment of the shoulder in the symmetric C-H stretching peak as an overtone or Fermi resonance. In addition, our AIMD simulations also show signicant broadening of the in-phase symmetric C-H stretching resonance, which suggests that the experimentally observed shoulder is due to thermal broadening of the symmetric stretching resonance.

  4. Surface enhanced Raman scattering, natural bond orbitals and Mulliken atomic charge distribution in the normal modes of diethyldithiocarbamate cadmium (II) complex, [Cd(DDTC)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Téllez Soto, C. A.; Costa, A. C.; Versiane, O.; Lemma, T.; Machado, N. C. F.; Mondragón, M. A.; Martin, A. A.

    2015-07-01

    Theoretical and experimental bands have been assigned to the Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) and FT-Raman spectra of the bis(diethyldithiocarbamate)Cd(II) complex, abbreviated as ([Cd(DDTC)2]). The calculations and spectral interpretation have been based on the DFT/B3LYP method, infrared and Raman second derivative spectra, and band deconvolution analysis to assist in the assignment of observed fundamentals. This study validated the unusual pseudo tetrahedral molecular structure formed around the Cd(II) cation. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was used to determine the interactions of the normal-modes of the diethyldithiocarbamate cadmium (II) complex on nano-structured silver surfaces. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis was also carried out to study the Cd(II) hybridization causing the pseudo tetrahedral geometry of the framework of the [Cd(DDTC)2] complex, and to confirm the charge transfer mechanisms through second order perturbation theory analysis of the Fox Matrix. In order to find out the electronic dispersion of the Mulliken atomic charges (MAC) in the normal modes, we calculated the MAC for each normal mode and correlated these values with the SERS effect. Experimental UV-Vis spectra were obtained and charge transfer bands were assigned. Good agreement between the calculated and experimental values for the vibrational and UV-Vis spectra was obtained.

  5. Ras activation in normal white blood cells and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    von Lintig, F C; Huvar, I; Law, P; Diccianni, M B; Yu, A L; Boss, G R

    2000-05-01

    Ras is an important cellular switch, relaying growth-promoting signals from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. In cultured cells, Ras is activated by various hematopoietic cytokines and growth factors, but the activation state of Ras in peripheral WBCs and bone marrow cells has not been studied nor has Ras activation been assessed in cells from patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Using an enzyme-based method, we assessed Ras activation in peripheral WBCs, lymphocytes, and bone marrow cells from normal subjects and from children with T-cell ALL (T-ALL) and B-lineage ALL (B-ALL). In normal subjects, we found mean Ras activations of 14.3, 12.5, and 17.2% for peripheral blood WBCs, lymphocytes, and bone marrow cells, respectively. All three of these values are higher than we have found in other normal human cells, compatible with constitutive activation of Ras by cytokines and growth factors present in serum and bone marrow. In 9 of 18 children with T-ALL, Ras activation exceeded two SDs above the mean of the corresponding cells from normal subjects, whereas in none of 11 patients with B-ALL did Ras show increased activation; activating genetic mutations in ras occur in less than 10% of ALL patients. Thus, Ras is relatively activated in peripheral blood WBCs, lymphocytes, and bone marrow cells compared with other normal human cells, and Ras is activated frequently in T-ALL but not in B-ALL. Increased Ras activation in T-ALL compared with B-ALL may contribute to the more aggressive nature of the former disease.

  6. MID-INFRARED SPECTRAL INDICATORS OF STAR FORMATION AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY IN NORMAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Treyer, Marie; Martin, Christopher D.; Wyder, Ted; Schiminovich, David; O'Dowd, Matt; Johnson, Benjamin D.; Charlot, Stephane; Heckman, Timothy; Martins, Lucimara; Seibert, Mark; Van der Hulst, J. M.

    2010-08-20

    We investigate the use of mid-infrared (MIR) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) bands, the continuum, and emission lines as probes of star formation (SF) and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in a sample of 100 'normal' and local (z {approx} 0.1) emission-line galaxies. The MIR spectra were obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph as part of the Spitzer-SDSS-GALEX Spectroscopic Survey, which includes multi-wavelength photometry from the ultraviolet to the far-infrared and optical spectroscopy. The continuum and features were extracted using PAHFIT, a decomposition code which we find to yield PAH equivalent widths (EWs) up to {approx}30 times larger than the commonly used spline methods. Despite the lack of extreme objects in our sample (such as strong AGNs, low-metallicity galaxies, or ULIRGs), we find significant variations in PAH, continuum, and emission-line properties, and systematic trends between these MIR properties and optically derived physical properties, such as age, metallicity, and radiation field hardness. We revisit the diagnostic diagram relating PAH EWs and [Ne II]12.8 {mu}m/[O IV]25.9 {mu}m line ratios and find it to be in much better agreement with the standard optical SF/AGN classification than when spline decompositions are used, while also potentially revealing obscured AGNs. The luminosity of individual PAH components, of the continuum, and, with poorer statistics, of the neon emission lines and molecular hydrogen lines are found to be tightly correlated to the total infrared (TIR) luminosity, making individual MIR components good gauges of the total dust emission in SF galaxies. Like the TIR luminosity, these individual components can be used to estimate dust attenuation in the UV and in H{alpha} lines based on energy balance arguments. We also propose average scaling relations between these components and dust-corrected, H{alpha}-derived SF rates.

  7. Hybrid sliding mode control of semi-active suspension systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assadsangabi, Babak; Eghtesad, Mohammad; Daneshmand, Farhang; Vahdati, Nader

    2009-12-01

    In order to design a controller which can take both ride comfort and road holding into consideration, a hybrid model reference sliding mode controller (HMRSMC) is proposed. The controller includes two separate model reference sliding mode controllers (MRSMC). One of the controllers is designed so as to force the plant to follow the ideal Sky-hook model and the other is to force the plant to follow the ideal Ground-hook model; then the outputs of these two controllers are linearly combined and applied to the plant as the input. Also, since the designed controller requires a knowledge of the terrain input, this input is approximated by the unsprung mass displacement. Finally, in the simulation section of this study, the effect of the relative ratio between the two MRSMCs and the knowledge of the terrain on the performance of the controller is numerically investigated for both steady-state and transient cases.

  8. 29 CFR 778.332 - Awards for activities not normally part of employee's job.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Awards for activities not normally part of employee's job. 778.332 Section 778.332 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION... of employee's job. (a) Where the prize is awarded for activities outside the customary working...

  9. 29 CFR 778.332 - Awards for activities not normally part of employee's job.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Awards for activities not normally part of employee's job. 778.332 Section 778.332 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION... of employee's job. (a) Where the prize is awarded for activities outside the customary working...

  10. 29 CFR 778.332 - Awards for activities not normally part of employee's job.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Awards for activities not normally part of employee's job. 778.332 Section 778.332 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION... of employee's job. (a) Where the prize is awarded for activities outside the customary working...

  11. New improved reconstruction of solar activity over 3 millennia: Evidence for distinct solar dynamo modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usoskin, Ilya; Kovaltsov, Gennady; Hulot, Gauthier.; Gallet, Yves; Roth, Raphael; Licht, Alexis; Joos, Fortunat; Th, E.; Khokhlov, A.; Kovaltsov, Gennady A.

    The solar magnetic dynamo can operate in distinct modes - a main general mode, a Grand minimum mode corresponding to an inactive Sun, and a possible Grand maximum mode corresponding to an unusually active Sun, as e.g., observed recently. The reality of such mode separation has recently been the subject of much debate, with different theoretical speculations discussed. Here we present the first adjustment-free physical reconstruction of solar activity over the past three millennia, using the latest carbon cycle, (14) C production and archeomagnetic field models. This new improved reconstruction shows that the solar dynamo process indeed switches between different modes, either corresponding to different regimes of the dynamo or to changes in the driving parameters. These results provide important constraints for both dynamo models of Sun-like stars and investigations of possible solar influence on Earth’s climate.

  12. External kink modes as a model for MHD activity associated with ELMs

    SciTech Connect

    Manickam, J.

    1992-01-01

    Tokamak plasmas in the high confinement mode of operation are known to exhibit edge localized activity referred to as ELMs. A model is proposed for the underlying cause in terms of the external kink mode. The build up of the current density near the plasma edge is shown to decrease the shear in the safety-factor, q, profile and lead to destabilization of the kink mode. The role of the plasma geometry and equilibrium profiles is discussed.

  13. The Properties of Large Amplitude Whistler Mode Waves in the Magnetosphere: Propagation and Relationship with Geomagnetic Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L. B., III; Cattell, C. A.; Kellogg, P. J.; Wygant, J. R.; Goetz, K.; Breneman, A.; Kersten, K.

    2011-01-01

    Wepresent resultsof a studyof the characteristicsof very large amplitude whistler mode waves inside the terrestrial magnetosphere at radial distances of less than 15 RE using waveform capture data from the Wind spacecraft. We observed 247 whistler mode waves with at least one electric field component (105/247 had !80 mV/m peak!to!peak amplitudes) and 66 whistler mode waves with at least one search coil magnetic field component (38/66 had !0.8 nT peak!to!peak amplitudes). Wave vectors determined from events with three magnetic field components indicate that 30/46 propagate within 20 of the ambient magnetic field, though some are more oblique (up to "50 ). No relationship was observed between wave normal angle and GSM latitude. 162/247 of the large amplitude whistler mode waves were observed during magnetically active periods (AE > 200 nT). 217 out of 247 total whistler mode waves examined were observed inside the radiation belts. We present a waveform capture with the largest whistler wave magnetic field amplitude (^8 nT peak!to!peak) ever reported in the radiation belts. The estimated Poynting flux magnitude associated with this wave is ^300 mW/m2, roughly four orders of magnitude above estimates from previous satellite measurements. Such large Poynting flux values are consistent with rapid energization of electrons.

  14. Effects of penicillinase on bactericidal and complement activities in normal human serum.

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, W H; Wunderlich, A C; Corbeil, L C; Davis, C E; Curd, J G

    1983-01-01

    During routine addition of penicillinase (beta-lactamase) to patients sera, we found that the capacity of some of these sera to kill serum-sensitive gram-negative organisms was significantly decreased. Further controlled studies showed that penicillinase decreased both the bactericidal activity of normal human sera and the total hemolytic activity (CH50) of complement in these sera. The decreased bactericidal activity correlated significantly (r = 0.57, P less than 0.05) with the reduction of CH50 in eight normal sera. These effects of penicillinase were time and temperature dependent. Measurement of individual complement component activities showed that penicillinase decreased the activity of C2, C4, and C3-C9, suggesting that the penicillinase preparation activated the classical pathway. These results cast doubts on the validity of bactericidal determinations when sera are pretreated with penicillinase. PMID:6603195

  15. Spatial variability of muscle activity during human walking: the effects of different EMG normalization approaches.

    PubMed

    Cronin, N J; Kumpulainen, S; Joutjärvi, T; Finni, T; Piitulainen, H

    2015-08-06

    Human leg muscles are often activated inhomogeneously, e.g. in standing. This may also occur in complex tasks like walking. Thus, bipolar surface electromyography (sEMG) may not accurately represent whole muscle activity. This study used 64-electrode high-density sEMG (HD-sEMG) to examine spatial variability of lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscle activity during the stance phase of walking, maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) and maximal M-waves, and determined the effects of different normalization approaches on spatial and inter-participant variability. Plantar flexion MVC, maximal electrically elicited M-waves and walking at self-selected speed were recorded in eight healthy males aged 24-34. sEMG signals were assessed in four ways: unnormalized, and normalized to MVC, M-wave or peak sEMG during the stance phase of walking. During walking, LG activity varied spatially, and was largest in the distal and lateral regions. Spatial variability fluctuated throughout the stance phase. Normalizing walking EMG signals to the peak value during stance reduced spatial variability within LG on average by 70%, and inter-participant variability by 67%. Normalizing to MVC reduced spatial variability by 17% but increased inter-participant variability by 230%. Normalizing to M-wave produced the greatest spatial variability (45% greater than unnormalized EMG) and increased inter-participant variability by 70%. Unnormalized bipolar LG sEMG may provide misleading results about representative muscle activity in walking due to spatial variability. For the peak value and MVC approaches, different electrode locations likely have minor effects on normalized results, whereas electrode location should be carefully considered when normalizing walking sEMG data to maximal M-waves.

  16. Disturbance observer based sliding mode control of active suspension systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Vaijayanti S.; Mohan, B.; Shendge, P. D.; Phadke, S. B.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, a novel scheme to reduce the acceleration of the sprung mass, used in combination with sliding mode control, is proposed. The proposed scheme estimates the effects of the uncertain, nonlinear spring and damper, load variation and the unknown road disturbance. The controller needs the states of sprung mass only, obviating the need to measure the states of the unsprung mass. The ultimate boundedness of the overall suspension system is proved. The efficacy of the method is verified through simulations for three different types of road profiles and load variation and the scheme is validated on an experimental setup. The results are compared with passive suspension system.

  17. Multi-scaled normal mode analysis method for dynamics simulation of protein-membrane complexes: A case study of potassium channel gating motion correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xiaokun; Han, Min; Ming, Dengming

    2015-10-07

    Membrane proteins play critically important roles in many cellular activities such as ions and small molecule transportation, signal recognition, and transduction. In order to fulfill their functions, these proteins must be placed in different membrane environments and a variety of protein-lipid interactions may affect the behavior of these proteins. One of the key effects of protein-lipid interactions is their ability to change the dynamics status of membrane proteins, thus adjusting their functions. Here, we present a multi-scaled normal mode analysis (mNMA) method to study the dynamics perturbation to the membrane proteins imposed by lipid bi-layer membrane fluctuations. In mNMA, channel proteins are simulated at all-atom level while the membrane is described with a coarse-grained model. mNMA calculations clearly show that channel gating motion can tightly couple with a variety of membrane deformations, including bending and twisting. We then examined bi-channel systems where two channels were separated with different distances. From mNMA calculations, we observed both positive and negative gating correlations between two neighboring channels, and the correlation has a maximum as the channel center-to-center distance is close to 2.5 times of their diameter. This distance is larger than recently found maximum attraction distance between two proteins embedded in membrane which is 1.5 times of the protein size, indicating that membrane fluctuation might impose collective motions among proteins within a larger area. The hybrid resolution feature in mNMA provides atomic dynamics information for key components in the system without costing much computer resource. We expect it to be a conventional simulation tool for ordinary laboratories to study the dynamics of very complicated biological assemblies. The source code is available upon request to the authors.

  18. Multi-scaled normal mode analysis method for dynamics simulation of protein-membrane complexes: A case study of potassium channel gating motion correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaokun; Han, Min; Ming, Dengming

    2015-10-01

    Membrane proteins play critically important roles in many cellular activities such as ions and small molecule transportation, signal recognition, and transduction. In order to fulfill their functions, these proteins must be placed in different membrane environments and a variety of protein-lipid interactions may affect the behavior of these proteins. One of the key effects of protein-lipid interactions is their ability to change the dynamics status of membrane proteins, thus adjusting their functions. Here, we present a multi-scaled normal mode analysis (mNMA) method to study the dynamics perturbation to the membrane proteins imposed by lipid bi-layer membrane fluctuations. In mNMA, channel proteins are simulated at all-atom level while the membrane is described with a coarse-grained model. mNMA calculations clearly show that channel gating motion can tightly couple with a variety of membrane deformations, including bending and twisting. We then examined bi-channel systems where two channels were separated with different distances. From mNMA calculations, we observed both positive and negative gating correlations between two neighboring channels, and the correlation has a maximum as the channel center-to-center distance is close to 2.5 times of their diameter. This distance is larger than recently found maximum attraction distance between two proteins embedded in membrane which is 1.5 times of the protein size, indicating that membrane fluctuation might impose collective motions among proteins within a larger area. The hybrid resolution feature in mNMA provides atomic dynamics information for key components in the system without costing much computer resource. We expect it to be a conventional simulation tool for ordinary laboratories to study the dynamics of very complicated biological assemblies. The source code is available upon request to the authors.

  19. Wilsonville SRC-I pilot plant: I. Fractionation area corrosion studies; II. Hot vs. normal separation mode of operation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.M.

    1981-04-01

    Extensive corrosion studies in solvent recovery columns have been done with different coals (mainly Kentucky number 9 Lafayette, Dotiki and Fies). Sodium carbonate (0.1 to 1.1% of coal) was added as neutralizer to control corrosion rate. Chloride balance runs were made for isolation of corrosive streams with high chlorine content. A caustic wash program of inlet streams has been developed for selective treatment of corrosive streams as an alternative means for possible replacement of sodium carbonate addition. High chlorine content coals such as Kentucky number 9 Lafayette and Dotiki (0.2 to 0.3%) were very corrosive, compared to low chlorine content coal, Kentucky number 9 Fies (< 0.1%). Sodium carbonate addition (0.6 to 0.7% of coal) reduced corrosion rate from 500 MPY to an insignificant level of less than 5 MPY. Caustic wash of solvents could reduce corrosion rate by 50%, removing most corrosive compounds present in the 440 to 480/sup 0/F boiling fraction. Extensive studies for the hot separator mode of operation have been done as a means of saving substantial energy by elimination of dissolver slurry cooling (0.3 MM Btu/hr) and reheating for solvent recovery (1 MM Btu/h). Impacts of the hot separator mode on plant operability, product quality and Kerr-McGee CSD Unit recovery have been studied. The hot separator mode of operation was carried out by controlling the V103 temperature to 740/sup 0/F. It was observed that preasphaltene contents increased in the SRC products such as V110 L/F SRC and CSD feed; CSD unit recovery was not affected significantly; solvent quality was not affected significantly.

  20. Reduction of timing jitter and intensity noise in normal-dispersion passively mode-locked fiber lasers by narrow band-pass filtering.

    PubMed

    Qin, Peng; Song, Youjian; Kim, Hyoji; Shin, Junho; Kwon, Dohyeon; Hu, Minglie; Wang, Chingyue; Kim, Jungwon

    2014-11-17

    Fiber lasers mode-locked with normal cavity dispersion have recently attracted great attention due to large output pulse energy and femtosecond pulse duration. Here we accurately characterized the timing jitter of normal-dispersion fiber lasers using a balanced cross-correlation method. The timing jitter characterization experiments show that the timing jitter of normal-dispersion mode-locked fiber lasers can be significantly reduced by using narrow band-pass filtering (e.g., 7-nm bandwidth filtering in this work). We further identify that the timing jitter of the fiber laser is confined in a limited range, which is almost independent of cavity dispersion map due to the amplifier-similariton formation by insertion of the narrow bandpass filter. The lowest observed timing jitter reaches 0.57 fs (rms) integrated from 10 kHz to 10 MHz Fourier frequency. The rms relative intensity noise (RIN) is also reduced from 0.37% to 0.02% (integrated from 1 kHz to 5 MHz Fourier frequency) by the insertion of narrow band-pass filter.

  1. Fuzzy-logic-based hybrid locomotion mode classification for an active pelvis orthosis: Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kebin; Parri, Andrea; Yan, Tingfang; Wang, Long; Munih, Marko; Vitiello, Nicola; Wang, Qining

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a fuzzy-logic-based hybrid locomotion mode classification method for an active pelvis orthosis. Locomotion information measured by the onboard hip joint angle sensors and the pressure insoles is used to classify five locomotion modes, including two static modes (sitting, standing still), and three dynamic modes (level-ground walking, ascending stairs, and descending stairs). The proposed method classifies these two kinds of modes first by monitoring the variation of the relative hip joint angle between the two legs within a specific period. Static states are then classified by the time-based absolute hip joint angle. As for dynamic modes, a fuzzy-logic based method is proposed for the classification. Preliminary experimental results with three able-bodied subjects achieve an off-line classification accuracy higher than 99.49%.

  2. Analysis of EMG Signals in Aggressive and Normal Activities by Using Higher-Order Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Sezgin, Necmettin

    2012-01-01

    The analysis and classification of electromyography (EMG) signals are very important in order to detect some symptoms of diseases, prosthetic arm/leg control, and so on. In this study, an EMG signal was analyzed using bispectrum, which belongs to a family of higher-order spectra. An EMG signal is the electrical potential difference of muscle cells. The EMG signals used in the present study are aggressive or normal actions. The EMG dataset was obtained from the machine learning repository. First, the aggressive and normal EMG activities were analyzed using bispectrum and the quadratic phase coupling of each EMG episode was determined. Next, the features of the analyzed EMG signals were fed into learning machines to separate the aggressive and normal actions. The best classification result was 99.75%, which is sufficient to significantly classify the aggressive and normal actions. PMID:23193379

  3. Immunosuppressive activity of human amniotic fluid of normal and abnormal pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Shohat, B; Faktor, J M

    1988-01-01

    Twenty specimens of amniotic fluid (AF) obtained between week 16 and 18 of gestation from normal pregnant women and six specimens from pregnant women in which trisomia of chromosome 21 was found were tested for immunosuppressive activity. Incubation of normal human donor lymphocytes with 0.2-1 mL of AF from normal pregnant women for one hour at 37 degrees C was sufficient for induction of significant inhibition of the ability of these cells to induce a local xenogeneic graft-versus-host reaction (GVHR) as well as inhibition of E and E-active rosette formation, the GVHR being the most sensitive test. On the other hand, amniotic fluid obtained from the six pregnant women in which trisomia of chromosome 21 was found showed no inhibitory activity in either the E or E-active rosette formation, nor in the local xenogeneic graft-versus-host reaction. AF from all the women tested was found to have no effect on phenotype expression of the lymphocytes, as tested by the monoclonal antibodies OKT4+ and OKT8+, nor on B-lymphocytes, as tested by surface immunoglobulins. No correlation was found between the alpha-fetoprotein levels in the sera of those women and the immunosuppressive activity. These findings indicate that genetic defects of the conceptus are not limited to the embryo but may affect the composition of immunosuppressive components present in normal amniotic fluid.

  4. Passively Q-switched mode-locking Erbium-doped fiber laser with net-normal dispersion using nonlinear polarization rotation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L. Y.; Xu, W. C.; Luo, Z. C.; Cao, W. J.; Luo, A. P.; Dong, J. L.; Wang, H. Y.

    2011-10-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a passively Q-switched mode-locking (QML) operation in an Erbium-doped fiber ring laser with net normal dispersion by using nonlinear polarization rotation technique. A 2 m long section of dispersion compensating fiber (DCF) with extra large positive dispersion was inserted into the cavity to ensure the fiber laser working in the region of net positive dispersion. By carefully adjusting the polarization controller, both uniform dissipative mode-locking pulses with fundamental repetition rate and QML pulse trains with tunable repetition rate from 71.58 to 98.83 kHz are achieved. It is found that the QML operation is caused by the interaction between the polarization state of the pulse and the intracavity polarizer.

  5. Application of normal mode theory to seismic source and structure problems: Seismic investigations of upper mantle lateral heterogeneity. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okal, E. A.

    1978-01-01

    The theory of the normal modes of the earth is investigated and used to build synthetic seismograms in order to solve source and structural problems. A study is made of the physical properties of spheroidal modes leading to a rational classification. Two problems addressed are the observability of deep isotropic seismic sources and the investigation of the physical properties of the earth in the neighborhood of the Core-Mantle boundary, using SH waves diffracted at the core's surface. Data sets of seismic body and surface waves are used in a search for possible deep lateral heterogeneities in the mantle. In both cases, it is found that seismic data do not require structural differences between oceans and continents to extend deeper than 250 km. In general, differences between oceans and continents are found to be on the same order of magnitude as the intrinsic lateral heterogeneity in the oceanic plate brought about by the aging of the oceanic lithosphere.

  6. Impact of physical activity on ovarian reserve markers in normal, overweight and obese reproductive age women.

    PubMed

    Surekha, T; Himabindu, Y; Sriharibabu, M; Pandey, Anil Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a leading risk factor for overweight and obesity in the society. Prevalence of overweight and obesity in the reproductive age group women not only affects maternal health but also the health of the off spring. Infertility is a common problem in India affecting 13-19 million people at any given time. Even though it is not life threatening, infertility causes intense mental agony and trauma that can only be best described by infertile couples themselves. Infertility is more common in overweight and obese individuals compared to normal weight individuals. Decreasing ovarian reserve is an important factor for infertility in women. This study examined the impact of physical activity on ovarian reserve markers in normal, overweight and obese reproductive age women. The observations made in this study reveal that physical activity improves ovarian reserve markers in all reproductive age women but this improvement is more distinct and statistically significant in overweight and obese women compared to normal weight women.

  7. Cruciate Retaining Implant With Biomimetic Articular Surface to Reproduce Activity Dependent Kinematics of the Normal Knee.

    PubMed

    Varadarajan, Kartik Mangudi M; Zumbrunn, Thomas; Rubash, Harry E; Malchau, Henrik; Li, Guoan; Muratoglu, Orhun K

    2015-12-01

    Alterations in normal knee kinematics following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) arise in part from the non-anatomic articular geometry of contemporary implants. In this study, the kinematics of a novel posterior cruciate-retaining (CR) implant with anatomic (biomimetic) articular surface, were compared to that of contemporary CR implants during various simulated activities. Across different simulated activities the biomimetic-CR mimicked normal kinematic patterns more closely than contemporary CR implants. In particular, during deep knee bend and chair-sit, the biomimetic-CR showed medial pivot motion, while other CR implants showed abnormal motion including lateral pivot or no pivot, and paradoxical anterior sliding. Further in vivo and clinical studies are needed to determine whether such biomimetic implants can truly help to achieve a more normal feeling knee and improved patient satisfaction.

  8. Normal mode analysis of a rotating group of lashed turbine blades by substructures. [calculations for blades at rest and at operating speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filstrup, A. W.

    1973-01-01

    A group of 5 lashed identical stream turbine blades is studied through the use of single level substructuring using NASTRAN level 15.1. An altered version, similar to DMAP Program Number 3 of the NASTRAN Newsletter, of Rigid Format 13.0 was used. Steady-state displacements and stresses due to centrifugal loads are obtained both without and with consideration of differential stiffness. The normal mode calculations were performed for blades at rest and at operating speed. Substructuring lowered the computation costs of the analysis by a factor of four.

  9. 2.6 W diode-pumped actively mode-locked Tm:YLF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mužík, J.; Jelínek, M., Jr.; Vyhlídal, D.; Kubeček, V.

    2015-03-01

    We have experimentally demonstrated an actively mode-locked laser with a Tm3+-doped yttrium lithium fluoride crystal (YLF). A continuous mode-locked regime was achieved using an acousto-optic modulator and a stable train of pulses with 149.3 MHz repetition rate, 170 ps pulse width and 2.6 W average output power at 1.91 µm in a nearly diffraction-limited beam was obtained. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on a diode-pumped actively mode-locked bulk thulium laser with a stable output.

  10. 29 CFR 778.332 - Awards for activities not normally part of employee's job.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY OR INTERPRETATION NOT DIRECTLY RELATED TO REGULATIONS OVERTIME COMPENSATION Special Problems Prizes As Bonuses § 778.332 Awards for activities not normally part... question of whether the compensation is remuneration for employment will depend on such factors as...

  11. Physical Activity Patterns in Normal-Weight and Overweight/Obese Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Bacchi, Elisabetta; Bonin, Cecilia; Zanolin, Maria Elisabetta; Zambotti, Francesca; Livornese, Dario; Donà, Silvia; Tosi, Flavia; Baldisser, Giulia; Ihnatava, Tatsiana; Di Sarra, Daniela; Bonora, Enzo; Moghetti, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to assess the volume of physical activity (PA) throughout pregnancy in normal-weight vs overweight/obese women, and to investigate which factors may predict compliance to PA recommendations in these women throughout gestation. In 236 pregnant women, 177 normal-weight and 59 overweight/obese (median[IQR] BMI 21.2[19.9–22.8] vs 26.5[25.5–29.0] kg/m2, respectively), medical history, anthropometry and clinical data, including glucose tolerance, were recorded. In addition, pre-pregnancy PA was estimated by the Kaiser questionnaire, while total, walking and fitness/sport PA during pregnancy were assessed by the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE) modified questionnaire, at 14–16, 24–28 and 30–32 weeks of gestation. PA volume was very low in the first trimester of pregnancy in both groups of women. However, it increased in the second and third trimester in normal-weight, but not in overweight/obese subjects. Higher pre-pregnancy PA was a statistically significant predictor of being physically active (>150 minutes of PA per week) during all trimesters of gestation. In conclusion, physical activity volume is low in pregnant women, especially in overweight/obese subjects. PA volume increases during pregnancy only in normal-weight women. Pre-pregnancy PA is an independent predictor of achieving a PA volume of at least 150 min per week during pregnancy. PMID:27829017

  12. 29 CFR 778.332 - Awards for activities not normally part of employee's job.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Awards for activities not normally part of employee's job. 778.332 Section 778.332 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY OR INTERPRETATION NOT DIRECTLY RELATED TO REGULATIONS OVERTIME COMPENSATION Special Problems Prizes...

  13. Intramolecular vibrations in low-frequency normal modes of amino acids: L-alanine in the neat solid state.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Wang, Houng-Wei; Tominaga, Keisuke; Hayashi, Michitoshi

    2015-03-26

    This paper presents a theoretical analysis of the low-frequency phonons of L-alanine by using the solid-state density functional theory at the Γ point. We are particularly interested in the intramolecular vibrations accessing low-frequency phonons via harmonic coupling with intermolecular vibrations. A new mode-analysis method is introduced to quantify the vibrational characteristics of such intramolecular vibrations. We find that the torsional motions of COO(-) are involved in low-frequency phonons, although COO(-) is conventionally assumed to undergo localized torsion. We also find the broad distributions of intramolecular vibrations relevant to important functional groups of amino acids, e.g., the COO(-) and NH3(+) torsions, in the low-frequency phonons. The latter finding is illustrated by the concept of frequency distribution of vibrations. These findings may lead to immediate implications in other amino acid systems.

  14. Simple all-PM-fiber laser system seeded by an all-normal-dispersion oscillator mode-locked with a nonlinear optical loop mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczepanek, Jan; Kardaś, Tomasz; Nejbauer, Michał; Radzewicz, Czesław; Stepanenko, Yuriy

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we report an all-PM-fiber laser amplifier system seeded by an all-normal-dispersion oscillator mode-locked with a Nonlinear Optical Loop Mirror (NOLM). The presented all-normal-dispersion cavity works in a dissipative soliton regime and delivers highly-chirped, high energy pulses above 2.5 nJ with full width at half maximum below 200 fs. The ultrafast oscillator followed by the all-PM-fiber amplifying stage delivered pulses with the energy of 42.5 nJ and time duration below 190 fs. The electrical field of optical pulses from the system was reconstructed using the SPIDER technique. The influence of nonlinear processes on the pulse temporal envelope was investigated.

  15. Plasminogen activation in synovial tissues: differences between normal, osteoarthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis joints

    PubMed Central

    Busso, N.; Peclat, V.; So, A.; Sappino, A.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To analyse the functional activity of the plasminogen activators urokinase (uPA) and tissue type plasminogen activator (tPA) in human synovial membrane, and to compare the pattern of expression between normal, osteoarthritic, and rheumatoid synovium. The molecular mechanisms underlying differences in PA activities between normal and pathological synovial tissues have been further examined.
METHODS—Synovial membranes from seven normal (N) subjects, 14 osteoarthritis (OA), and 10 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients were analysed for plasminogen activator activity by conventional zymography and in situ zymography on tissue sections. The tissue distribution of uPA, tPA, uPA receptor (uPAR), and plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) was studied by immunohistochemistry. uPA, tPA, uPAR, and PAI-1 mRNA values and mRNA distribution were assessed by northern blot and in situ hybridisations respectively.
RESULTS—All normal and most OA synovial tissues expressed predominantly tPA catalysed proteolytic activity mainly associated to the synovial vasculature. In some OA, tPA activity was expressed together with variable amounts of uPA mediated activity. By contrast, most RA synovial tissues exhibited considerably increased uPA activity over the proliferative lining areas, while tPA activity was reduced when compared with N and OA synovial tissues. This increase in uPA activity was associated with increased levels of uPA antigen and its corresponding mRNA, which were localised over the synovial proliferative lining areas. In addition, in RA tissues, expression of the specific uPA receptor (uPAR) and of the plasminogen activator inhibitor-type 1 (PAI-1) were also increased.
CONCLUSION—Taken together, these results show an alteration of the PA/plasmin system in RA synovial tissues, resulting in increased uPA catalytic activity that may play a part in tissue destruction in RA.

 PMID:9370880

  16. Tempo and Mode of Transposable Element Activity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kofler, Robert; Nolte, Viola; Schlötterer, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary dynamics of transposable element (TE) insertions have been of continued interest since TE activity has important implications for genome evolution and adaptation. Here, we infer the transposition dynamics of TEs by comparing their abundance in natural D. melanogaster and D. simulans populations. Sequencing pools of more than 550 South African flies to at least 320-fold coverage, we determined the genome wide TE insertion frequencies in both species. We suggest that the predominance of low frequency insertions in the two species (>80% of the insertions have a frequency <0.2) is probably due to a high activity of more than 58 families in both species. We provide evidence for 50% of the TE families having temporally heterogenous transposition rates with different TE families being affected in the two species. While in D. melanogaster retrotransposons were more active, DNA transposons showed higher activity levels in D. simulans. Moreover, we suggest that LTR insertions are mostly of recent origin in both species, while DNA and non-LTR insertions are older and more frequently vertically transmitted since the split of D. melanogaster and D. simulans. We propose that the high TE activity is of recent origin in both species and a consequence of the demographic history, with habitat expansion triggering a period of rapid evolution. PMID:26186437

  17. Doubly active Q switching and mode locking of an all-fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Cuadrado-Laborde, Christian; Díez, Antonio; Cruz, Jose L; Andrés, Miguel V

    2009-09-15

    Simultaneous and independent active Q switching and active mode locking of an erbium-doped fiber laser is demonstrated using all-fiber modulation techniques. A magnetostrictive rod attached to the output fiber Bragg grating modulates the Q factor of the Fabry-Perot cavity, whereas active mode locking is achieved by amplitude modulation with a Bragg-grating-based acousto-optic device. Fully modulated Q-switched mode-locked trains of optical pulses were obtained for a wide range of pump powers and repetition rates. For a Q-switched repetition rate of 500 Hz and a pump power of 100 mW, the laser generates trains of 12-14 mode-locked pulses of about 1 ns each, within an envelope of 550 ns, an overall energy of 0.65 microJ, and a peak power higher than 250 W for the central pulses of the train.

  18. Immunostimulant, cerebroprotective & nootropic activities of Andrographis paniculata leaves extract in normal & type 2 diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Radhika, P.; Annapurna, A.; Rao, S. Nageswara

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: A large number of plants have been recognized to be effective in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Persistent hyperglycaemia is associated with decreased function of immune system and cerebral ischaemia mainly due to increased oxidative stress and inflammatory response. Andrographis paniculata is a medicinal plant widely used in folk medicine for various purposes. In this study the effect of chronic administration (7 days) of methanolic extract of A. paniculata leaves was studied in rats with experimentally induced diabetes, nootropic and immunostimulant activities were evaluated. The effect of acute administration of methanolic extract of A. paniculata leaves was also studied for cerebroprotective activity. Methods: Type 2 diabetes was induced in rats by streptozotocin (STZ) (65 mg/kg) + nicotinamide (150 mg/kg). Various biochemical parameters were estimated using standard methods. Results: A significant (P<0.05) increase in cognitive function was observed in both normal and type 2 diabetic rats. Nootropic activity in terms of per cent reduction in latency period was more in type 2 diabetic rats. A significant increase in blood lymphocyte count, splenic lymphocyte count and peritoneal macrophage count was observed in both normal and type 2 diabetic rats. Immunostimulant activity was observed more in type 2 diabetic rats. The per cent decrease in cerebral infarction was more in type 2 diabetic rats when compared to normal rats. The per cent increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels was more in type 2 diabetic rats. Interpretation & conclusions: The antioxidant activity of the methanolic extract of A. paniculata leaves was evident by decreased tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and increased SOD levels. These properties may be responsible for the observed cerebroprotective activity. The methanolic leaf extract of A. paniculata showed significant immunostimulant, cerebroprotective and nootropic activities in normal and type 2 diabetic

  19. PCSK6-mediated corin activation is essential for normal blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shenghan; Cao, Pengxiu; Dong, Ningzheng; Peng, Jianhao; Zhang, Chunyi; Wang, Hao; Zhou, Tiantian; Yang, Junhua; Zhang, Yue; Martelli, Elizabeth E; Naga Prasad, Sathyamangla V; Miller, Rachel E; Malfait, Anne-Marie; Zhou, Yiqing; Wu, Qingyu

    2015-09-01

    Hypertension is the most common cardiovascular disease, afflicting >30% of adults. The cause of hypertension in most individuals remains unknown, suggesting that additional contributing factors have yet to be discovered. Corin is a serine protease that activates the natriuretic peptides, thereby regulating blood pressure. It is synthesized as a zymogen that is activated by proteolytic cleavage. CORIN variants and mutations impairing corin activation have been identified in people with hypertension and pre-eclampsia. To date, however, the identity of the protease that activates corin remains elusive. Here we show that proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin-6 (PCSK6, also named PACE4; ref. 10) cleaves and activates corin. In cultured cells, we found that corin activation was inhibited by inhibitors of PCSK family proteases and by small interfering RNAs blocking PCSK6 expression. Conversely, PCSK6 overexpression enhanced corin activation. In addition, purified PCSK6 cleaved wild-type corin but not the R801A variant that lacks the conserved activation site. Pcsk6-knockout mice developed salt-sensitive hypertension, and corin activation and pro-atrial natriuretic peptide processing activity were undetectable in these mice. Moreover, we found that CORIN variants in individuals with hypertension and pre-eclampsia were defective in PCSK6-mediated activation. We also identified a PCSK6 mutation that impaired corin activation activity in a hypertensive patient. Our results indicate that PCSK6 is the long-sought corin activator and is important for sodium homeostasis and normal blood pressure.

  20. Characteristic fault zone architectures as result of different failure modes: first results from scale models of normal faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettermann, Michael; Urai, Janos L.

    2014-05-01

    It is known that fault zone architecture and structural style vary distinctly between tensile and shear failure modes, with strong effects on the associated fluid flow properties. A systematically comparative study in 3D has not been done so far, though. Inferring transport properties in sub-seismic scale from fault network geometries would have important applications in brittle lithologies such as carbonates or basalts. We present a method to investigate the structural properties of fault networks in 3D using cohesive hemihydrate powder (CaSO4 * 1/2H2O) embedded in two layers of dry fine grained sand. The material properties of the sand and powder are well known from previous studies. By increasing the overburden stress the failure mode of the powder can be changed from tensile to shear failure. Using hemihydrate powder allows us to harden and excavate the layer after the deformation by wetting the model slowly and brushing off the overburden sand. Visual investigation of the 3D structures is then possible in very high resolution. Analyses using photographs and 3D models from photogrammetry include qualitative observations as well as measurements of e.g. strike of fault segments, fault dip or graben width. We show a total of eight experiments that produce graben faults at four different overburden stresses (0, 1.5, 3, 6 cm overburden thickness) and at two increasing stages of strain (3 and 5 mm). In this set of models we describe two structural domains that show characteristic differences in their defining attributes. The tensile domain at small overburden stress (0 and 1.5 cm overburden) shows strongly dilatant faults with open fissures, vertical faults and large changes in strike at segment boundaries. The shear domain, formed by larger overburden stress (6 cm overburden), shows shallower fault dips around 65° with striations, numerous undulating fault branches and splays with low-angle fault intersections. Models with 3 cm overburden show a hybrid failure type

  1. Design and control of a prosthetic leg for above-knee amputees operated in semi-active and active modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jinhyuk; Yoon, Gun-Ha; Kang, Je-Won; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2016-08-01

    This paper proposes a new prosthesis operated in two different modes; the semi-active and active modes. The semi-active mode is achieved from a flow mode magneto-rheological (MR) damper, while the active mode is obtained from an electronically commutated (EC) motor. The knee joint part of the above knee prosthesis is equipped with the MR damper and EC motor. The MR damper generates reaction force by controlling the field-dependent yield stress of the MR fluid, while the EC motor actively controls the knee joint angle during gait cycle. In this work, the MR damper is designed as a two-end type flow mode mechanism without air chamber for compact size. On other hand, in order to predict desired knee joint angle to be controlled by EC motor, a polynomial prediction function using a statistical method is used. A nonlinear proportional-derivative controller integrated with the computed torque method is then designed and applied to both MR damper and EC motor to control the knee joint angle. It is demonstrated that the desired knee joint angle is well achieved in different walking velocities on the ground ground.

  2. Active mode locking of quantum cascade lasers in an external ring cavity

    PubMed Central

    Revin, D. G.; Hemingway, M.; Wang, Y.; Cockburn, J. W.; Belyanin, A.

    2016-01-01

    Stable ultrashort light pulses and frequency combs generated by mode-locked lasers have many important applications including high-resolution spectroscopy, fast chemical detection and identification, studies of ultrafast processes, and laser metrology. While compact mode-locked lasers emitting in the visible and near infrared range have revolutionized photonic technologies, the systems operating in the mid-infrared range where most gases have their strong absorption lines, are bulky and expensive and rely on nonlinear frequency down-conversion. Quantum cascade lasers are the most powerful and versatile compact light sources in the mid-infrared range, yet achieving their mode-locked operation remains a challenge, despite dedicated effort. Here we report the demonstration of active mode locking of an external-cavity quantum cascade laser. The laser operates in the mode-locked regime at room temperature and over the full dynamic range of injection currents. PMID:27147409

  3. Using the normal-mode method of probing the infrasonic propagation for purposes of the comprehensive nuclear-test-ban treaty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, E. A.; Rudenko, G. V.; Sorokin, A. G.; Dmitrienko, I. S.; Lobycheva, I. Yu.; Baryshnikov, A. K.

    2006-03-01

    We examine the problem of assessing the state of Atmospheric Acoustic Channels, that is, of the possible propagation paths of acoustic signals, based on using a priori information about atmospheric conditions. It is concluded that this can only be best accomplished through the use of global atmospheric models. Based on the normal-mode method, an analysis is made of the generalized characteristics of atmospheric waveguide such as the location of the waveguide boundaries, the mode composition, and the transmissivity of the waveguide upper and lower boundaries. The method can be used to analyze the particular paths as well as the overall situation around a given point. Furthermore, all the surrounding space (extending as far as the whole of the geosphere) is divided into regions that are accessible and inaccessible for a given mode. To determine the particular height distributions of physical characteristics over the entire path, the NRLMSISE-2000 atmosphere model and the HWM-93 wind model are used. Some of the calculated paths are compared with the known source and receiver positions and with observational results. It is concluded that the method can be used in a general assessment of the accessibility of a given region for acoustic monitoring; however, it is not sufficiently reliable to permit real-time predictions.

  4. Dynamical response of the Galileo Galilei on the ground rotor to test the equivalence principle: Theory, simulation, and experiment. I. The normal modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comandi, G. L.; Chiofalo, M. L.; Toncelli, R.; Bramanti, D.; Polacco, E.; Nobili, A. M.

    2006-03-01

    Recent theoretical work suggests that violation of the equivalence principle might be revealed in a measurement of the fractional differential acceleration η between two test bodies—of different compositions, falling in the gravitational field of a source mass—if the measurement is made to the level of η ≃10-13 or better. This being within the reach of ground based experiments gives them a new impetus. However, while slowly rotating torsion balances in ground laboratories are close to reaching this level, only an experiment performed in a low orbit around the Earth is likely to provide a much better accuracy. We report on the progress made with the "Galileo Galilei on the ground" (GGG) experiment, which aims to compete with torsion balances using an instrument design also capable of being converted into a much higher sensitivity space test. In the present and following articles (Part I and Part II), we demonstrate that the dynamical response of the GGG differential accelerometer set into supercritical rotation—in particular, its normal modes (Part I) and rejection of common mode effects (Part II)—can be predicted by means of a simple but effective model that embodies all the relevant physics. Analytical solutions are obtained under special limits, which provide the theoretical understanding. A simulation environment is set up, obtaining a quantitative agreement with the available experimental data on the frequencies of the normal modes and on the whirling behavior. This is a needed and reliable tool for controlling and separating perturbative effects from the expected signal, as well as for planning the optimization of the apparatus.

  5. Dynamical response of the Galileo Galilei on the ground rotor to test the equivalence principle: Theory, simulation, and experiment. I. The normal modes

    SciTech Connect

    Comandi, G.L.; Chiofalo, M.L.; Toncelli, R.; Bramanti, D.; Polacco, E.; Nobili, A.M.

    2006-03-15

    Recent theoretical work suggests that violation of the equivalence principle might be revealed in a measurement of the fractional differential acceleration {eta} between two test bodies-of different compositions, falling in the gravitational field of a source mass--if the measurement is made to the level of {eta}{approx_equal}10{sup -13} or better. This being within the reach of ground based experiments gives them a new impetus. However, while slowly rotating torsion balances in ground laboratories are close to reaching this level, only an experiment performed in a low orbit around the Earth is likely to provide a much better accuracy. We report on the progress made with the 'Galileo Galilei on the ground' (GGG) experiment, which aims to compete with torsion balances using an instrument design also capable of being converted into a much higher sensitivity space test. In the present and following articles (Part I and Part II), we demonstrate that the dynamical response of the GGG differential accelerometer set into supercritical rotation-in particular, its normal modes (Part I) and rejection of common mode effects (Part II)-can be predicted by means of a simple but effective model that embodies all the relevant physics. Analytical solutions are obtained under special limits, which provide the theoretical understanding. A simulation environment is set up, obtaining a quantitative agreement with the available experimental data on the frequencies of the normal modes and on the whirling behavior. This is a needed and reliable tool for controlling and separating perturbative effects from the expected signal, as well as for planning the optimization of the apparatus.

  6. Normal mode sensitivity to Earth's D″ layer and topography on the core-mantle boundary: what we can and cannot see

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koelemeijer, P. J.; Deuss, A.; Trampert, J.

    2012-07-01

    The core-mantle boundary (CMB) is Earth's most profound internal boundary separating the liquid iron outer core and the solid silicate mantle. The detailed structure near the CMB has a major influence on mantle convection and the evolution of the core. Seismic observations, such as topography on the CMB, thin ultra-low velocity zones (ULVZs), seismic anisotropy and the anticorrelation between shear wave and bulk sound velocity heterogeneities have mainly been made using body waves and are still poorly constrained. We investigate the sensitivity of Earth's free oscillations to these features and specifically show how large individual anomalies must be for them to be observable. In addition, we discuss the possible trade-offs between these different lowermost mantle structures. Although modes have strong sensitivity to all the structures inserted, the results illustrate the limits of what normal modes can resolve. Our tests show that: (i) Even small scale features, such as ULVZs, with a thickness larger than 19 km can be observed as long as their distribution contains a long wavelength component. (ii) The peak-to-peak amplitude of CMB topography has a larger influence than its pattern and has to be smaller than 5 km to fit the data. (iii) The effect of scaling between shear wave velocity and density anomalies is less constrained, but a laterally varying pattern is implied by a simple test, suggesting the presence of chemical variations. (iv) A strong trade-off exists between anisotropy in compressional wave velocity and incidence angle whereas shear wave anisotropy is less observable. These findings provide valuable information for future normal mode studies on structures in Earth's lowermost mantle and their trade-offs.

  7. Normal Weight with Central Obesity, Physical Activity, and Functional Decline: Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Batsis, John A.; Zbehlik, Alicia J.; Scherer, Emily A.; Barre, Laura K.; Bartels, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To identify the risks of the combination of normal body mass index (BMI) and central obesity (normal weight and central obesity (NWCO)) on physical activity and function. DESIGN Longitudinal Osteoarthritis Initiative Study. SETTING Community based. PARTICIPANTS Adults aged 60 and older at risk of osteoarthritis (N= 2,210; mean age 68, range 67.1–69.0) were grouped according to BMI (normal 18.5–24.9 kg/m2, overweight 25.0–29.9 kg/m2, obese ≥30.0 kg/m2). High waist circumference (WC) was defined as greater than 88 cm for women and greater than 102 cm for men. Subjects were subcategorized according to WC (five categories). Subjects with normal BMI and a large WC were considered to have NWCO (n=280, 12.7%). MEASUREMENTS Six-year changes in the Physical Component Summary of the Medical Outcomes Study 12-item Short Form Survey (PCS), Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE), and Late-Life Function and Disability Index (LL-FDI) were examined. The association between BMI and WC over 6 years was assessed (reference normal BMI, normal WC). Stratified analyses were performed according to age (60–69; ≥70). RESULTS Physical component scores, PASE, and LL-FDI declined with time. Mean PASE scores at 6 years differed between the NWCO group and the group with normal BMI and WC (117.7 vs 141.5), but rate of change from baseline to 6 years was not significantly different (p=.35). In adjusted models, those with NWCO had greater decline in PCS over time, particularly those aged 70 and older than those with normal BMI and WC (time interaction β=–0.37, 95% confidence interval=–0.68 to –0.06). CONCLUSION NWCO in older adults at risk of osteoarthritis may be a risk factor for declining function and physical activity, particularly in those aged 70 and older, suggesting the value of targeting those with NWCO who would otherwise be labeled as low risk. PMID:26173812

  8. Imaging the complexity of an active normal fault system: The 1997 Colfiorito (central Italy) case study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chiaraluce, L.; Ellsworth, W.L.; Chiarabba, C.; Cocco, M.

    2003-01-01

    Six moderate magnitude earthquakes (5 < Mw < 6) ruptured normal fault segments of the southern sector of the North Apennine belt (central Italy) in the 1997 Colfiorito earthquake sequence. We study the progressive activation of adjacent and nearby parallel faults of this complex normal fault system using ???1650 earthquake locations obtained by applying a double-difference location method, using travel time picks and waveform cross-correlation measurements. The lateral extent of the fault segments range from 5 to 10 km and make up a broad, ???45 km long, NW trending fault system. The geometry of each segment is quite simple and consists of planar faults gently dipping toward SW with an average dip of 40??-45??. The fault planes are not listric but maintain a constant dip through the entire seismogenic volume, down to 8 km depth. We observe the activation of faults on the hanging wall and the absence of seismicity in the footwall of the structure. The observed fault segmentation appears to be due to the lateral heterogeneity of the upper crust: preexisting thrusts inherited from Neogene's compressional tectonic intersect the active normal faults and control their maximum length. The stress tensor obtained by inverting the six main shock focal mechanisms of the sequence is in agreement with the tectonic stress active in the inner chain of the Apennine, revealing a clear NE trending extension direction. Aftershock focal mechanisms show a consistent extensional kinematics, 70% of which are mechanically consistent with the main shock stress field.

  9. Actively mode-locked fiber ring laser by intermodal acousto-optic modulation.

    PubMed

    Bello-Jiménez, M; Cuadrado-Laborde, C; Sáez-Rodríguez, D; Diez, A; Cruz, J L; Andrés, M V

    2010-11-15

    We report an actively mode-locked fiber ring laser. A simple and low-insertion-loss acousto-optic modulator driven by standing flexural waves, which couples core-to-cladding modes in a standard single-mode optical fiber, is used as an active mechanism for mode locking. Among the remarkable features of the modulator, we mention its high modulation depth (72%), broad bandwidth (187 GHz), easy tunability in the optical wavelength, and low insertion losses (0.7 dB). The narrowest optical pulses obtained were of 95 ps time width, 21 mW peak power, repetition rate of 4.758 MHz, and 110 mW of pump power.

  10. Preserved hippocampus activation in normal aging as revealed by fMRI.

    PubMed

    Persson, Jonas; Kalpouzos, Grégoria; Nilsson, Lars-Göran; Ryberg, Mats; Nyberg, Lars

    2011-07-01

    The hippocampus is deteriorated in various pathologies such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and such deterioration has been linked to memory impairment. By contrast, the structural and functional effects of normal aging on the hippocampus is a matter of debate, with some findings suggesting deterioration and others providing evidence of preservation. This constitutes a crucial question since many investigations on AD are based on the assumption that the deterioration of the hippocampus is the breaking point between normal and pathological aging. A growing number of fMRI studies specifically aimed at investigating hippocampal engagement in various cognitive tasks, notably memory tasks, but the results have been inconclusive. Here, we optimized the episodic face-name paired-associates task in order to test the functioning of the hippocampus in normal aging. Critically, we found no difference in the activation of the hippocampus between the young and a group of older participants. Analysis of individual patterns of activation substantiated this impression. Collectively, these findings provide evidence of preserved hippocampal functioning in normal aging.

  11. Cholesterol and triglycerides lowering activities of caraway fruits in normal and streptozotocin diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Lemhadri, A; Hajji, L; Michel, J-B; Eddouks, M

    2006-07-19

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of single and repeated oral administration of the aqueous extract of Carum carvi L. fruits at a dose of (20mg/kg) on lipid metabolism in normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ). After a single oral administration, Carum carvi extract produced a significant decrease on triglycerides levels in normal rats (p<0.05). In STZ diabetic rats, cholesterol levels were decreased significantly 6h after Carum carvi treatment (p<0.05). On the other hand, repeated oral administration of Carum carvi extract exhibited a significant hypotriglyceridemic and hypocholesterolemic activities in both normal (p<0.01 and <0.001 respectively) and STZ diabetic rats (p<0.001) 15 days after Carum carvi treatment. We conclude that the aqueous extract of Carum carvi (20mg/kg) exhibits a potent lipid lowering activity in both normal and severe hyperglycemic rats after repeated oral administration of Carum carvi aqueous extract.

  12. 4-Alkynylphenylsilatranes: Insecticidal activity, mammalian toxicity, and mode of action

    SciTech Connect

    Horsham, M.A.; Palmer, C.J.; Cole, L.M.; Casida, J.E. )

    1990-08-01

    4-Ethynyl- and 4-(prop-1-ynyl)phenylsilatranes (N(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O){sub 3}SiR, R = C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-4-C{triple bond}CH or C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-4-C{triple bond}CCH{sub 3}) are highly toxic to houseflies (pretreated with piperonyl butoxide) and milkweed bugs (topical LD{sub 50}s 3-14 {mu}g/g) and to mice (intraperitoneal LD{sub 50}s 0.4-0.9 mg/kg), and they are moderately potent inhibitors of the ({sup 35}S)-tert-butylbicyclophosphorothionate or TBPS binding site (GABA-gated chloride channel) of mouse brain membranes. Scatchard analysis indicates noncompetitive interaction of 4-ethynylphenylsilatrane with the TBPS binding site. Phenylsilatrane analogues with 4-substituents of H, CH{sub 3}, Cl, Br, and C{triple bond}CSi(CH{sub 3}){sub 3} are highly toxic to mice but have little or no activity in the insect and receptor assays. Radioligand binding studies with (4-{sup 3}H)phenylsilatrane failed to reveal a specific binding site in mouse brain. Silatranes with R = H, CH{sub 3}, CH{sub 2}Cl, CH{double bond}CH{sub 2}, OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}, and C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-4-CH{sub 2}CH{sub 3} are of little or no activity in the insect and mouse toxicity and TBPS binding site assays as are the trithia and monocyclic analogues of phenylsilatrane. 4-Alkynylphenylsilatranes are new probes to examine the GABA receptor-ionophore complex of insects and mammals.

  13. Unravelling the competing influence of regional uplift and active normal faulting in SW Calabria, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, Alex; Roda Boluda, Duna; Boulton, Sarah; Erhardt, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    The Neogene geological and geomorphological evolution of Southern Italy is complex and is fundamentally controlled by the subduction of the Ionian slab along the Apennine belt from the Calabrian Arc, and back-arc extension driven by trench rollback. In the area of Calabria and the Straits of Messina the presence of (i) uplifted, deformed and dissected basin sediments and marine terraces, ranging in age from the early to mid-Pleistocene and (ii) seismicity associated with NE-SW normal faults that have well-developed footwall topography and triangular facets have led workers to suggest that both significant regional uplift and extensional faulting in SW Calabria have played a role in generating relief in the area since the mid Pleistocene. However, there is considerable uncertainty in the rates of total surface uplift relative to sea level in both time and space, and the relative partitioning of this uplift between a mantle-driven regional signal, potentially related to a slab tear, and the active extensional structures. Additionally, despite the widespread recognition of normal faults in Calabria to which historical earthquakes are often linked, there is much less agreement on (i) which ones are active and for what length of time; (ii) how the faults interact; and (iii) what their throw and throw rates are. In particular, the ability to resolve both regional uplift and normal faulting in SW Calabria is essential in order to fully understand the tectonic history of the region, while an understanding of location and slip rate of active faults, in an area where the population numbers more than two million people, is essential to assess regional seismic hazards. Here we address these important questions using a combination of tectonic geomorphology and structural geology. We critically examine existing constraints on the rates and distribution of active normal faulting and regional uplift in the area, and we derive new constraints on the along-strike variation in throw

  14. Low-degree p-mode parameters evolution with solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lochard, J.; Boumier, P.

    We present updated results on the low-degree p-mode parameters changes with solar activity: frequency, spectral width, rotational splittings and spectral asymmetry. A particular attention is devoted to the l=2 splitting asymmetry. Comparaisons of our frequency shifts (derived from the GOLF observations) with predictions of Pr.Dziembowski (based on an extrapolation from intermediate degree modes observations from MDI), are discussed.

  15. Phosphatidic acid phosphatase activity in subcellular fractions of normal and dystrophic human muscle.

    PubMed

    Kunze, D; Rüstow, B; Olthoff, D; Jung, K

    1985-03-15

    Biopsy samples from normal and dystrophic human muscle (Duchenne type) were fractionated by differential centrifugation and microsomes, mitochondria and cytosol were assayed for phosphatidic acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.4) and marker enzymes of mitochondria and cytosol. The activity of phosphatidic acid phosphatase was significantly lower in microsomes and higher in cytosol and mitochondria of dystrophic muscle than in the corresponding subcellular fractions of normal muscle. The results support an explanation of earlier findings that there is reduced G3P incorporation into diglycerides and phosphatidylcholine and a qualitative and quantitative change in the amount of phosphatidylcholine in dystrophic microsomes. The possible reasons for the reduction in the activity of only microsomal PA-P-ase were discussed.

  16. Influence of Activity Mode on Feeling States of High School Physical Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannon, James C.; Pellet, Tracey L.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if changes in positive well-being, psychological distress, fatigue, and enjoyment vary as a function of physical activity mode. Fifty-five senior high school students participated in one of four fitness activities including two defined as traditional (running and step-aerobics) and two defined as…

  17. [Sensitivity of different morphological variants of Leptospira to the leptospirocidal activity of normal animal sera].

    PubMed

    Anan'ina, Iu V; Chernukha, Iu G

    1984-10-01

    The leptospirocidal activity of normal animal sera with respect to 23 Leptospira strains was experimentally studied in vitro. 91.3% of the strains under study proved to be sensitive to the lytic action of cattle serum and 86.9%, to sheep serum. The uncinate variants of the pathogenic strains showed resistance to the action of the above sera, and their nonuncinate analogs were subject to agglutination with subsequent lysis, similarly to saprophytes.

  18. TAE modes and MHD activity in TFTR DT plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, E.; Batha, S.; Bell, M.

    1995-03-01

    The high power deuterium and tritium experiments on TFTR have produced fusion a parameters similar to those expected on ITER. The achieved {beta}{sub {alpha}}/{beta} and the R{triangledown}{beta}{sub {alpha}} in TFRR D-T shots are 1/2 to 1/3 those predicted in the ITER EDA. Studies of the initial TFTR D-T plasmas find no evidence that the presence of the fast fusion {alpha} population has affected the stability of MHD, with the possible exception of Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE`s). The initial TFTR DT plasmas had MHD activity similar to that commonly seen in deuterium plasmas. Operation of TFTR at plasma currents of 2.0--2.5 MA has greatly reduced the deleterious effects of MHD commonly observed at lower currents. Even at these higher currents, the performance of TFTR is limited by {beta}-limit disruptions. The effects of MHD on D-T fusion {alpha}`s was similar to effects observed on other fusion products in D only plasmas.

  19. Mosquitocidal Activity and Mode of Action of the Isoxazoline Fluralaner

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shiyao; Tsikolia, Maia; Bernier, Ulrich R.; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R.

    2017-01-01

    Mosquitoes, such as Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae, are important vectors of human diseases. Fluralaner, a recently introduced parasiticide, was evaluated as a mosquitocide in this study. On Ae. aegypti and An. gambiae fourth-instar larvae, fluralaner had 24-h LC50 (lethal concentration for 50% mortality) values of 1.8 ppb and 0.4 ppb, respectively. Following topical application to adult Ae. aegypti, fluralaner toxicity reached a plateau in about 3 days, with 1- and 3-day LD50 (lethal dose for 50% mortality) values of 1.3 ng/mg and 0.26 ng/mg, suggesting a slowly developing toxicity. Fipronil outperformed fluralaner by up to 100-fold in adult topical, glass contact, and feeding assays on Ae. aegypti. These data show that fluralaner does not have exceptional toxicity to mosquitoes in typical exposure paradigms. In electrophysiological recordings on Drosophila melanogaster larval central nervous system, the effectiveness of fluralaner for restoring nerve firing after gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) treatment, a measure of GABA antagonism, was similar in susceptible Oregon-R and cyclodiene-resistant rdl-1675 strains, with EC50 (half maximal effective concentration) values of 0.34 µM and 0.29 µM. Although this finding suggests low cross resistance in the presence of rdl, the moderate potency, low contact activity, and slow action of fluralaner argue against its use as an adult mosquitocide for vector control. PMID:28178191

  20. High normalized beta plasmas exceeding the ideal stability limit and projected RWM active stabilization performance using newly installed feedback sensors in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y. S.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Berkery, J. W.; Bialek, J. M.; Yoon, S. W.; Jeon, Y. M.; Bak, J. G.; Ko, W. H.; Hahn, S. H.; Bae, C.; Bae, Y. S.; in, Y. K.; Kim, J.; Lee, S. G.; Kwak, J. G.; Oh, Y. K.; Park, H. K.; Choi, M. J.; Yun, G. S.

    2015-11-01

    H-mode plasma operation of KSTAR has been expanded to significantly surpass the ideal MHD no-wall beta limit by achieving normalized beta up to 4.3 while reducing plasma internal inductance to near 0.7 exceeding the computed n = 1 ideal no-wall limit by a factor of 1.6. These high normalized beta values have been achieved in discharges having BT in the range 0.9-1.1 T after the plasma reached flattop current of 0.35-0.4 MA, with the highest neutral beam heating power of 4 MW. A significant conclusion of the analysis of these plasmas is that low- n global kink/ballooning or RWMs were not detected, and therefore were not the cause of the plasma termination. Advances from the 2015 run campaign aiming to achieve prolonged pulse duration at maximum normalized beta and to subsequently investigate the MHD stability of these plasmas will be reported. As KSTAR H-mode operation can now routinely surpass the ideal no-wall stability limit, n = 1 RWM active control is planned for the device. RWM active feedback using a newly installed set of poloidal magnetic field sensors mounted on the passive stabilizer plates and designed for optimal performance is analyzed using the VALEN-3D code. The advantages of the new sensors over other device sensors for RWM active control are discussed. Supported by U.S. DOE grant DE-FG02-99ER54524.

  1. An anisotropic shear velocity model of the Earth's mantle using normal modes, body waves, surface waves and long-period waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulik, P.; Ekström, G.

    2014-12-01

    We use normal-mode splitting functions in addition to surface wave phase anomalies, body wave traveltimes and long-period waveforms to construct a 3-D model of anisotropic shear wave velocity in the Earth's mantle. Our modelling approach inverts for mantle velocity and anisotropy as well as transition-zone discontinuity topographies, and incorporates new crustal corrections for the splitting functions that are consistent with the non-linear corrections we employ for the waveforms. Our preferred anisotropic model, S362ANI+M, is an update to the earlier model S362ANI, which did not include normal-mode splitting functions in its derivation. The new model has stronger isotropic velocity anomalies in the transition zone and slightly smaller anomalies in the lowermost mantle, as compared with S362ANI. The differences in the mid- to lowermost mantle are primarily restricted to features in the Southern Hemisphere. We compare the isotropic part of S362ANI+M with other recent global tomographic models and show that the level of agreement is higher now than in the earlier generation of models, especially in the transition zone and the lower mantle. The anisotropic part of S362ANI+M is restricted to the upper 300 km in the mantle and is similar to S362ANI. When radial anisotropy is allowed throughout the mantle, large-scale anisotropic patterns are observed in the lowermost mantle with vSV > vSH beneath Africa and South Pacific and vSH > vSV beneath several circum-Pacific regions. The transition zone exhibits localized anisotropic anomalies of ˜3 per cent vSH > vSV beneath North America and the Northwest Pacific and ˜2 per cent vSV > vSH beneath South America. However, small improvements in fits to the data on adding anisotropy at depth leave the question open on whether large-scale radial anisotropy is required in the transition zone and in the lower mantle. We demonstrate the potential of mode-splitting data in reducing the trade-offs between isotropic velocity and

  2. Normal and Mutant Rhodopsin Activation Measured with the Early Receptor Current in a Unicellular Expression System

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Pragati; Sullivan, Jack M.

    1999-01-01

    The early receptor current (ERC) represents molecular charge movement during rhodopsin conformational dynamics. To determine whether this time-resolved assay can probe various aspects of structure–function relationships in rhodopsin, we first measured properties of expressed normal human rhodopsin with ERC recordings. These studies were conducted in single fused giant cells containing on the order of a picogram of regenerated pigment. The action spectrum of the ERC of normal human opsin regenerated with 11-cis-retinal was fit by the human rhodopsin absorbance spectrum. Successive flashes extinguished ERC signals consistent with bleaching of a rhodopsin photopigment with a normal range of photosensitivity. ERC signals followed the univariance principle since millisecond-order relaxation kinetics were independent of the wavelength of the flash stimulus. After signal extinction, dark adaptation without added 11-cis-retinal resulted in spontaneous pigment regeneration from an intracellular store of chromophore remaining from earlier loading. After the ERC was extinguished, 350-nm flashes overlapping metarhodopsin-II absorption promoted immediate recovery of ERC charge motions identified by subsequent 500-nm flashes. Small inverted R2 signals were seen in response to some 350-nm flashes. These results indicate that the ERC can be photoregenerated from the metarhodopsin-II state. Regeneration with 9-cis-retinal permits recording of ERC signals consistent with flash activation of isorhodopsin. We initiated structure–function studies by measuring ERC signals in cells expressing the D83N and E134Q mutant human rhodopsin pigments. D83N ERCs were simplified in comparison with normal rhodopsin, while E134Q ERCs had only the early phase of charge motion. This study demonstrates that properties of normal rhodopsin can be accurately measured with the ERC assay and that a structure–function investigation of rapid activation processes in analogue and mutant visual pigments is

  3. Functional Modularity of Background Activities in Normal and Epileptic Brain Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, M.; Valencia, M.; Navarro, V.; Latora, V.; Martinerie, J.

    2010-03-01

    We analyze the connectivity structure of weighted brain networks extracted from spontaneous magnetoencephalographic signals of healthy subjects and epileptic patients (suffering from absence seizures) recorded at rest. We find that, for the activities in the 5-14 Hz range, healthy brains exhibit a sparse connectivity, whereas the brain networks of patients display a rich connectivity with a clear modular structure. Our results suggest that modularity plays a key role in the functional organization of brain areas during normal and pathological neural activities at rest.

  4. The chaperone activity and toxicity of ambroxol on Gaucher cells and normal mice.

    PubMed

    Luan, Zhuo; Li, Linjing; Higaki, Katsumi; Nanba, Eiji; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Ohno, Kousaku

    2013-04-01

    Gaucher disease (GD), caused by a defect of acid β-glucosidase (β-Glu), is one of the most common sphingolipidoses. Recently, ambroxol, an FDA-approved drug used to treat airway mucus hypersecretion and hyaline membrane disease in newborns, was identified as a chemical chaperone for GD. In the present study, we investigated the chaperone activity and toxicity of ambroxol on both cultured GD patient cells and normal mice. We found that ambroxol treatment significantly increased N370S, F213I, N188S/G193W and R120W mutant β-Glu activities in GD fibroblasts with low cytotoxicity. Additionally, we measured the β-Glu activity in the tissues of normal mice which received water containing increasing concentrations of ambroxol ad libitum for one week. No serious adverse effect was observed during this experiment. Ambroxol significantly increased the β-Glu activity in the spleen, heart and cerebellum of the mice. This result showed its oral availability and wide distribution and chaperone activity in the tissues, including the brain, and its lack of acute toxicity. These characteristics of ambroxol would make it a potential therapeutic chaperone in the treatment of GD with neurological manifestations.

  5. Changes in levels of plasminogen activator activity in normal and germ-cell-depleted testes during development.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, M; Smith, F E; Fritz, I B

    1982-05-01

    Levels of plasminogen activator activity were determined in testes obtained from normal and irradiated rats in various ages. During normal development, plasminogen activator activity per g testis increased rapidly between 40 and 60 days of age, but a comparable rise did not occur in germ-cell depleted testes of irradiated rats. Levels of enzyme in various populations of testicular cells were highest in Sertoli (varying between 1800 and 6300 units/mg protein in cell maintained under different culture conditions), and lowest in peritubular myoid cells (about 1 unit/mg protein), with intermediate levels in germinal cells (ranging between 147 and 560 units/Mg protein in residual bodies, spermatocytes and spermatids). No protease inhibitor could be detected in germ-cell extracts. The addition to the medium in which Sertoli cells were in culture of particles which can be phagocytosed (autoclaved E. coli) resulted in an increased formation of plasminogen activator activity by Sertoli cells. A synergistic enhancement of enzyme production resulted following the addition of submaximal quantities of dibutyryl cyclic AMP and autoclaved bacteria to sertoli cells in culture. On the basis of these data, we suggest that the presence of advanced germinal cells during gonadal development may stimulate the synthesis of plasminogen activator by Sertoli cells, mediated in part by the phagocytosis of residual bodies by sertoli cells which occurs prior to spermiation.

  6. Moderate physical activity correlates with elevated leptin in physically active 10-12-year-old boys with normal BMI.

    PubMed

    Cicchella, Antonio; Stefanelli, Claudio; Jürimäe, Toivo; Saar, Meeli; Purge, Priit

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the relations between physical activity of differing intensity and duration with body energy-balance hormone leptin in 10-12-year-old boys (N = 94) who participated in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity at least four to five times per week. The boys reported their physical activity using a questionnaire. They had normal body mass index (BMI, kg/ m2), and were at Tanner Stage 2 of development. Boys were divided into three subgroups by leptin levels: normal serum leptin (M +/- .5 SD, n = 44, 1.2-3.9 ng/ml), low leptin (< or = M - .5 SD; n = 31, < 1.2 ng/ml), and high leptin (> or = M + .5 SD; n = 19, > 3.9 ng/ml). There were significant differences between subgroups in anthropometric parameters and serum leptin levels, but not in physical activity. A significant correlation was found between leptin and moderate physical activity of at least five times per week for at least 30 minutes each time in the high leptin group (r = .61). In conclusion, the correlations between physical activity and leptin are weak; only moderate physical activity was correlated with leptin levels in the high leptin

  7. PCSK6-mediated corin activation is essential for normal blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shenghan; Cao, Pengxiu; Dong, Ningzheng; Peng, Jianhao; Zhang, Chunyi; Wang, Hao; Zhou, Tiantian; Yang, Junhua; Zhang, Yue; Martelli, Elizabeth E; Prasad, Sathyamangla V Naga; Miller, Rachel E; Malfait, Anne-Marie; Zhou, Yiqing; Wu, Qingyu

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is the most common cardiovascular disease, afflicting >30% of adults1. The cause of hypertension in most individuals remains unknown2,3, suggesting that additional contributing factors have yet to be discovered. Corin is a serine protease that activates the natriuretic peptides, thereby regulating blood pressure4. It is synthesized as a zymogen that is activated by proteolytic cleavage. CORIN variants and mutations impairing corin activation have been identified in people with hypertension and pre-eclampsia5–9. To date, however, the identity of the protease that activates corin remains elusive. Here we show that proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin-6 (PCSK6, also named PACE4; ref. 10) cleaves and activates corin. In cultured cells, we found that corin activation was inhibited by inhibitors of PCSK family proteases and by small interfering RNAs blocking PCSK6 expression. Conversely, PCSK6 overexpression enhanced corin activation. In addition, purified PCSK6 cleaved wild-type corin but not the R801A variant that lacks the conserved activation site. Pcsk6-knockout mice developed salt-sensitive hypertension, and corin activation and pro-atrial natriuretic peptide processing activity were undetectable in these mice. Moreover, we found that CORIN variants in individuals with hypertension and pre-eclampsia were defective in PCSK6-mediated activation. We also identified a PCSK6 mutation that impaired corin activation activity in a hypertensive patient. Our results indicate that PCSK6 is the long-sought corin activator and is important for sodium homeostasis and normal blood pressure. PMID:26259032

  8. A multi-mode sensing system for corrosion detection using piezoelectric wafer active sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lingyu; Giurgiutiu, Victor; Pollock, Patrick

    2008-03-01

    As an emerging technology for in-situ damage detection and nondestructive evaluation, structural health monitoring with active sensors (active SHM) plays as a promising candidate for the pipeline inspection and diagnosis. Piezoelectric wafer active sensor (PWAS), as an active sensing device, can be permanently attached to the structure to interrogate it at will and can operate in propagating wave mode or electromechanical impedance mode. Its small size and low cost (about $10 each) make itself a potential and unique technology for in-situ SHM application. The objective of the research in this paper is to develop a permanently installed in-situ "multi-mode" sensing system for the corrosion monitoring and prediction of critical pipeline systems. Such a system is used during in-service period, recording and monitoring the changes of the pipelines over time, such as corrosion, wall thickness, etc. Having the real-time data available, maintenance strategies based on these data can then be developed to ensure a safe and less expensive operation of the pipeline systems. After a detailed review of PWAS SHM methods, including ultrasonic, impedance, and thickness measurement, we introduce the concept of PWAS-based multi-mode sensing approach for corrosion detection in pipelines. Particularly, we investigate the potential for using PWAS waves for in thickness mode experimentally. Finally, experiments are conducted to verify the corrosion detection ability of the PWAS network in both metallic plate and pipe in a laboratory setting. Results show successful corrosion localization in both tests.

  9. Subthalamic, not striatal, activity correlates with basal ganglia downstream activity in normal and parkinsonian monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Deffains, Marc; Iskhakova, Liliya; Katabi, Shiran; Haber, Suzanne N; Israel, Zvi; Bergman, Hagai

    2016-01-01

    The striatum and the subthalamic nucleus (STN) constitute the input stage of the basal ganglia (BG) network and together innervate BG downstream structures using GABA and glutamate, respectively. Comparison of the neuronal activity in BG input and downstream structures reveals that subthalamic, not striatal, activity fluctuations correlate with modulations in the increase/decrease discharge balance of BG downstream neurons during temporal discounting classical condition task. After induction of parkinsonism with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), abnormal low beta (8-15 Hz) spiking and local field potential (LFP) oscillations resonate across the BG network. Nevertheless, LFP beta oscillations entrain spiking activity of STN, striatal cholinergic interneurons and BG downstream structures, but do not entrain spiking activity of striatal projection neurons. Our results highlight the pivotal role of STN divergent projections in BG physiology and pathophysiology and may explain why STN is such an effective site for invasive treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease and other BG-related disorders. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16443.001 PMID:27552049

  10. Significantly different coagulation factor activities underlying the variability of 'normal' activated partial thromboplastin time.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoung-Jin; Kwon, Eui-Hoon; Ma, Youngeun; Park, In-Ae; Kim, Seon-Woo; Kim, Sun-Hee; Kim, Hee-Jin

    2012-01-01

    The activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) is a widely used coagulation screening test in routine laboratories. The aPTT level in the control population varies and is reflected by the reference interval. However, there have been no studies to investigate the coagulation status determining the variability of the aPTT. The aim of this study was to investigate the coagulation factor activities underlying the variability of aPTT in the population. The study participants were reference individuals with prothrombin time and aPTT within reference intervals. The aPTT was determined using STA-PTT Automate (Diagnostica Stago, Asnieres, France; local reference interval, 29.1-41.9 s). Those with aPTT within the marginal ranges of reference interval were selected for factor assays. We defined the lower marginal group as the lowest 10 percentile of reference interval (29.1-30.9 s) and the upper marginal group as the highest 10 percentile (38.0-41.9 s). Activities of factor II, V, VIII, IX, X, XI, and XII were determined in both groups. The lower marginal and upper marginal groups consisted of 220 and 209 individuals, respectively. All coagulation factors were significantly higher in the lower marginal than in the upper marginal group (P = 0.0127 for factor II and P < 0.0001 for the others). Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed factor XII and VIII were two strongest contributors determining the aPTT level, whereas factor XI was not significantly different between the groups (P = 0.095). This study firstly demonstrated significantly different coagulation factor activities underlying the variability of aPTT in reference individuals. The results suggested the possibility of disease association or phenotypic contribution of variable coagulation activities in the population.

  11. State distributions in two-dimensional parameter spaces of a nonlinear optical loop mirror-based, mode-locked, all-normal-dispersion fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jun-Hao; Chen, He; Chen, Sheng-Ping; Hou, Jing

    2017-02-20

    We present the results of numerical simulations of dissipative soliton generation using nonlinear Schrödinger equations in an all-normal-dispersion (ANDi) mode-locked fiber laser based on a nonlinear optical loop mirror (NOLM). Firstly, systematic and computationally intensive analysis of the pulse state distributions in two-dimensional parameter spaces of an ANDi fiber laser was conducted. In addition, we determined that unstable non-vanishing regions including pulsation and noise-like pulses are directly related to the saturable absorptions of NOLMs and that two critical filter bandwidths separate those regions from stable ones. Finally, we found that the multi-pulsing power threshold can be maximized by using an optimal optical filter bandwidth.

  12. Molecular structure, natural bond analysis, vibrational and electronic spectra, surface enhanced Raman scattering and Mulliken atomic charges of the normal modes of [Mn(DDTC)2] complex.

    PubMed

    Téllez S, Claudio A; Costa, Anilton C; Mondragón, M A; Ferreira, Glaucio B; Versiane, O; Rangel, J L; Lima, G Müller; Martin, A A

    2016-12-05

    Theoretical and experimental bands have been assigned for the Fourier Transform Infrared and Raman spectra of the bis(diethyldithiocarbamate)Mn(II) complex, [Mn(DDTC)2]. The calculations have been based on the DFT/B3LYP method, second derivative spectra and band deconvolution analysis. The UV-vis experimental spectra were measured in acetonitrile solution, and the calculated electronic spectrum was obtained using the TD/B3LYP method with 6-311G(d, p) basis set for all atoms. Charge transfer bands and those d-d spin forbidden were assigned in the UV-vis spectrum. The natural bond orbital analysis was carried out using the DFT/B3LYP method and the Mn(II) hybridization leading to the planar geometry of the framework was discussed. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was also performed. Mulliken charges of the normal modes were obtained and related to the SERS enhanced bands.

  13. Molecular structure, natural bond analysis, vibrational and electronic spectra, surface enhanced Raman scattering and Mulliken atomic charges of the normal modes of [Mn(DDTC)2] complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Téllez S., Claudio A.; Costa, Anilton C.; Mondragón, M. A.; Ferreira, Glaucio B.; Versiane, O.; Rangel, J. L.; Lima, G. Müller; Martin, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    Theoretical and experimental bands have been assigned for the Fourier Transform Infrared and Raman spectra of the bis(diethyldithiocarbamate)Mn(II) complex, [Mn(DDTC)2]. The calculations have been based on the DFT/B3LYP method, second derivative spectra and band deconvolution analysis. The UV-vis experimental spectra were measured in acetonitrile solution, and the calculated electronic spectrum was obtained using the TD/B3LYP method with 6-311G(d, p) basis set for all atoms. Charge transfer bands and those d-d spin forbidden were assigned in the UV-vis spectrum. The natural bond orbital analysis was carried out using the DFT/B3LYP method and the Mn(II) hybridization leading to the planar geometry of the framework was discussed. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was also performed. Mulliken charges of the normal modes were obtained and related to the SERS enhanced bands.

  14. Neuroprotective pathways: lifestyle activity, brain pathology, and cognition in cognitively normal older adults.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Miranka; Haase, Claudia M; Villeneuve, Sylvia; Vogel, Jacob; Jagust, William J

    2014-08-01

    This study used path analysis to examine effects of cognitive activity and physical activity on cognitive functioning in older adults, through pathways involving beta-amyloid (Aβ) burden, cerebrovascular lesions, and neural injury within the brain regions affected in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Ninety-two cognitively normal older adults (75.2 ± 5.6 years) reported lifetime cognitive activity and current physical activity using validated questionnaires. For each participant, we evaluated cortical Aβ burden (using [(11)C] labeled Pittsburgh-Compound-B positron emission tomography), cerebrovascular lesions (using magnetic resonance imaging-defined white matter lesion [WML]), and neural integrity within AD regions (using a multimodal neuroimaging biomarker). Path models (adjusted for age, gender, and education) indicated that higher lifetime cognitive activity and higher current physical activity was associated with fewer WMLs. Lower WML volumes were in turn related to higher neural integrity and higher global cognitive functioning. As shown previously, higher lifetime cognitive activity was associated with lower [(11)C] labeled Pittsburgh-Compound-B retention, which itself moderated the impact of neural integrity on cognitive functioning. Lifestyle activity may thus promote cognitive health in aging by protecting against cerebrovascular pathology and Aβ pathology thought to be relevant to AD development.

  15. Neuroprotective Pathways: Lifestyle activity, brain pathology and cognition in cognitively normal older adults

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Miranka; Haase, Claudia M.; Villeneuve, Sylvia; Vogel, Jacob; Jagust, William J.

    2014-01-01

    This study used path analysis to examine effects of cognitive activity and physical activity on cognitive functioning in older adults, through pathways involving beta-amyloid (Aβ) burden, cerebrovascular lesions, and neural injury within brain regions affected in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Ninety-two cognitively normal older adults (75.2±5.6 years) reported lifetime cognitive activity and current physical activity using validated questionnaires. For each participant, we evaluated cortical Aβ burden (using PIB-PET), cerebrovascular lesions (using MRI-defined white matter lesion (WML)), and neural integrity within AD regions (using a multimodal biomarker). Path models (adjusted for age, gender, and education) indicated that higher lifetime cognitive activity and higher current physical activity was associated with fewer WMLs. Lower WML volumes were in turn related to higher neural integrity and higher global cognitive functioning. As shown previously, higher lifetime cognitive activity was associated with lower PIB retention, which itself moderated the impact of neural integrity on cognitive functioning. Lifestyle activity may thus promote cognitive health in aging by protecting against cerebrovascular pathology and Aβ pathology thought to be relevant to AD development. PMID:24656834

  16. Active simultaneous uplift and margin-normal extension in a forearc high, Crete, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallen, S. F.; Wegmann, K. W.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Pazzaglia, F. J.; Brandon, M. T.; Fassoulas, C.

    2014-07-01

    The island of Crete occupies a forearc high in the central Hellenic subduction zone and is characterized by sustained exhumation, surface uplift and extension. The processes governing orogenesis and topographic development here remain poorly understood. Dramatic topographic relief (2-6 km) astride the southern coastline of Crete is associated with large margin-parallel faults responsible for deep bathymetric depressions known as the Hellenic troughs. These structures have been interpreted as both active and inactive with either contractional, strike-slip, or extensional movement histories. Distinguishing between these different structural styles and kinematic histories here allows us to explore more general models for improving our global understanding of the tectonic and geodynamic processes of syn-convergent extension. We present new observations from the south-central coastline of Crete that clarifies the role of these faults in the late Cenozoic evolution of the central Hellenic margin and the processes controlling Quaternary surface uplift. Pleistocene marine terraces are used in conjunction with optically stimulated luminesce dating and correlation to the Quaternary eustatic curve to document coastal uplift and identify active faults. Two south-dipping normal faults are observed, which extend offshore, offset these marine terrace deposits and indicate active N-S (margin-normal) extension. Further, marine terraces preserved in the footwall and hanging wall of both faults demonstrate that regional net uplift of Crete is occurring despite active extension. Field mapping and geometric reconstructions of an active onshore normal fault reveal that the subaqueous range-front fault of south-central Crete is synthetic to the south-dipping normal faults on shore. These findings are inconsistent with models of active horizontal shortening in the upper crust of the Hellenic forearc. Rather, they are consistent with topographic growth of the forearc in a viscous orogenic

  17. Low-Frequency Mode Activity of Heme: Femtosecond Coherence Spectroscopy of Iron Porphine Halides and Nitrophorin

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Minoru; Gruia, Flaviu; Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Barabanschikov, Alexander; Montfort, William R.; Maes, Estelle M.; Champion, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    The low-frequency mode activity of metalloporphyrins has been studied for iron porphine-halides (Fe(P)(X), X = Cl, Br) and nitrophorin 4 (NP4) using femtosecond coherence spectroscopy (FCS) in combination with polarized resonance Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT). It is confirmed that the mode symmetry selection rules for FCS are the same as for Raman scattering and that both Franck-Condon and Jahn-Teller mode activities are observed for Fe(P)(X) under Soret resonance conditions. The DFT-calculated low-frequency (20-400 cm-1) modes, and their frequency shifts upon halide substitution, are in good agreement with experimental Raman and coherence data, so that mode assignments can be made. The doming mode is located at ~80 cm-1 for Fe(P)(Cl) and at ~60 cm-1 for Fe(P)(Br). NP4 is also studied with coherence techniques, and the NO-bound species of ferric and ferrous NP4 display a mode at ~30-40 cm-1 that is associated with transient heme doming motion following NO photolysis. The coherence spectra of three ferric derivatives of NP4 with different degrees of heme ruffling distortion are also investigated. We find a mode at ~60 cm-1 whose relative intensity in the coherence spectra depends quadratically on the magnitude of the ruffling distortion. To quantitatively account for this correlation, a new “distortion-induced” Raman enhancement mechanism is presented. This mechanism is unique to low-frequency “soft modes” of the molecular framework that can be distorted by environmental forces. These results demonstrate the potential of FCS as a sensitive probe of dynamic and functionally important nonplanar heme vibrational excitations that are induced by the protein environmental forces or by the chemical reactions in the aqueous phase. PMID:18597456

  18. Differentially active origins of DNA replication in tumor versus normal cells.

    PubMed

    Di Paola, Domenic; Price, Gerald B; Zannis-Hadjopoulos, Maria

    2006-05-15

    Previously, a degenerate 36 bp human consensus sequence was identified as a determinant of autonomous replication in eukaryotic cells. Random mutagenesis analyses further identified an internal 20 bp of the 36 bp consensus sequence as sufficient for acting as a core origin element. Here, we have located six versions of the 20 bp consensus sequence (20mer) on human chromosome 19q13 over a region spanning approximately 211 kb and tested them for ectopic and in situ replication activity by transient episomal replication assays and nascent DNA strand abundance analyses, respectively. The six versions of the 20mer alone were capable of supporting autonomous replication of their respective plasmids, unlike random genomic sequence of the same length. Furthermore, comparative analyses of the endogenous replication activity of these 20mers at their respective chromosomal sites, in five tumor/transformed and two normal cell lines, done by in situ chromosomal DNA replication assays, involving preparation of nascent DNA by the lambda exonuclease method and quantification by real-time PCR, showed that these sites coincided with chromosomal origins of DNA replication in all cell lines. Moreover, a 2- to 3-fold higher origin activity in the tumor/transformed cells by comparison to the normal cells was observed, suggesting a higher activation of these origins in tumor/transformed cell lines.

  19. In-vitro activity of solithromycin against anaerobic bacteria from the normal intestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Weintraub, Andrej; Rashid, Mamun-Ur; Nord, Carl Erik

    2016-12-01

    Solithromycin is a novel fluoroketolide with high activity against bacteria associated with community-acquired respiratory tract infections as well as gonorrhea. However, data on the activity of solithromycin against anaerobic bacteria from the normal intestinal microbiota are scarce. In this study, 1024 Gram-positive and Gram-negative anaerobic isolates from the normal intestinal microbiota were analyzed for in-vitro susceptibility against solithromycin and compared to azithromycin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ceftriaxone, metronidazole and levofloxacin by determining the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Solithromycin was active against Bifidobacteria (MIC50, 0.008 mg/L) and Lactobacilli (MIC50, 0.008 mg/L). The MIC50 for Clostridia, Bacteroides, Prevotella and Veillonella were 0.5, 0.5, 0.125 and 0.016 mg/L, respectively. Gram-positive anaerobes were more susceptible to solithromycin as compared to the other antimicrobials tested. The activity of solithromycin against Gram-negative anaerobes was equal or higher as compared to other tested agents.

  20. Experimental Investigation of Wavelength-Tunable All-Normal-Dispersion Yb-Doped Mode-Locked Fiber Lasers: Compression and Amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xiao-Sheng; Hua, Yi

    2015-02-01

    Wavelength-tunable ultrashort pulse source with high energy is highly desired for a lot of applications. The wavelength-tunable all-normal-dispersion (ANDi) mode-locked fiber laser, which can be compressed easily and amplified by an all-fiber structure, is a promising seed of such a source with compact structures. The pulse compression and amplification at different center wavelengths (from 1026 to 1058 nm) of the tunable ANDi Ybdoped mode-locked fiber lasers that we previously proposed are experimentally investigated in this work. It is found that, for different wavelengths, the duration and chirp of the direct output pulse from the oscillator vary considerably, however, the duration of compressed pulse fluctuates less. For the amplification process, due to the unflat gain spectrum of Yb-doped fiber, the gain at a short wavelength is larger than that at a long wavelength. Consequently, the trends of spectrum distortions induced by the amplification process are different for different wavelengths. These results and analyses will be helpful for the design of a high-energy and wavelength-tunable ultrashort pulse source based on an ANDi seed.

  1. Supercontinuum generation based on all-normal-dispersion Yb-doped fiber laser mode-locked by nonlinear polarization rotation: Influence of seed's output port

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xiaosheng; Hua, Yi

    2016-10-01

    All-normal-dispersion (ANDi) mode-locked Yb-doped fiber laser is a promising seed source for supercontinuum (SC) generation, due to its compact structure and broadband output. The influences of output ports of the ANDi laser mode-locked by nonlinear polarization rotation (NPR), on the generated SC are investigated. Two output ports of ANDi laser are considered, one of which is the conventional nonlinear polarization rotation (NPR) port and the other is extracted from a coupler after the NPR port. It is found that, the SC originated from the coupler port is much broader than that from the NPR port, which is validated by lots of experiments with different output parameters. Furthermore, the conclusion is verified and generalized to general ANDi lasers by numerical simulations, because the output pulse from coupler port could be cleaner than that from NPR port. Besides, there are no significant differences in the phase coherence and temporal stability between the SCs generated from both ports. Hence for the SC generation based on ANDi laser, it is preferred to use the pulse of coupler port (i.e. pulse after NPR port) serving as the seed source.

  2. Globoid cell leukodystrophy (Krabbe disease): normal umbilical cord blood galactocerebrosidase activity and polymorphic mutations.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, S; Zeng, B; Torres, P A; Pastores, G M; Kolodny, E H; Kurtzberg, J; Krivit, W

    2005-01-01

    Globoid cell leukodystrophy is an inherited metabolic disorder of the central nervous system caused by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme galactocerebrosidase. Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the only available effective treatment. The engraftment from normal donors provides competent cells able to correct the metabolic defect. Umbilical cord blood cells have proved to significantly decrease complications and improve engraftment rate compared to adult marrow cells in haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Umbilical cord blood cells must be of sufficient activity to provide central nervous system recovery after engraftment is obtained. Galactocerebrosidase activity is known to be affected by two polymorphic alleles found at nucleotides 502 and 1637 of the cDNA for this gene. This enzyme activity and the polymorphic alleles noted above were analysed in 83 random samples of umbilical cord blood. The activity, assayed with the fluorogenic substrate 6-hexadecanoylamino-4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-galactopyranoside, in those with neither polymorphic allele was 4.6 +/- 1.7 units (nmol/h per mg protein). This optimal choice of cord blood was found in only 24% of specimens. Homozygotes for 1637T > C with activity of only 1.5 +/- 0.4 units represented 16% of the samples. Those heterozygous for 1637T > C with slightly better activity (2.3 +/- 0.7 units) represented 52% of the samples. Choice of umbilical cord blood for haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, therefore, requires consideration not only of cell quantity and HLA compatibility but also selection for normal alleles to obtain maximal enzymatic activity for central nervous system correction.

  3. The Presynaptic Active Zone Protein RIM1α Is Critical for Normal Learning and Memory

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Craig M.; Schoch, Susanne; Monteggia, Lisa; Barrot, Michel; Matos, Maria F.; Feldmann, Nicole; Südhof, Thomas C.; Nestler, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The active zone protein RIM1α is required both for maintaining normal probability of neurotransmitter release and for long-term presynaptic potentiation at brain synapses. We now demonstrate that RIM1α−/− mice exhibit normal coordination and anxiety-related behaviors but display severely impaired learning and memory. Mice with a synaptotagmin 1 mutation, which selectively lowers release probability, and mice with Rab3A deletion, which selectively abolishes presynaptic long-term potentiation, do not exhibit this abnormality. Our data suggest that a decrease in release probability or a loss of presynaptic LTP alone is not sufficient to cause major behavioral alterations, but the combination of presynaptic abnormalities in RIM1α−/− mice severely alters learning and memory. PMID:15066271

  4. Hypoglycemic activity of Ailanthus excelsa leaves in normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, W; Genta, S; Said, A; Farag, A; Rashed, K; Sánchez, S

    2008-03-01

    The hypoglycemic activity of a 70% methanol extract from the leaves of Ailanthus excelsa Roxb. (Simaroubaceae) was studied in normal, transiently hyperglycemic and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Oral administration of the extract at doses of 14, 70 and 350 mg/kg body weight caused no significant changes in fasting blood glucose levels of normal rats. In an oral glucose tolerance test, the extract produced a significant decrease in glycemia 90 min after the glucose pulse. Daily administration of A. excelsa extract for 60 days produced a significant hypoglycemic effect in diabetic animals. In addition, this treatment improved the altered renal function observed in diabetic control rats. This study suggests that Ailanthus leaf extract could be potentially useful for post-prandial hyperglycemia treatment.

  5. High-wavenumber solar f-mode strengthening prior to active region formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nishant; Raichur, Harsha; Brandenburg, Axel

    2016-05-01

    We report a systematic strengthening of the local solar surface mode, i.e. the f-mode, 1-2 days prior to the emergence of an active region (AR) in the same (corotating) location while no indication can yet be seen in the magnetograms. Our study is motivated by earlier numerical findings of Singh et al. (2014) which showed that, in the presence of a nonuniform magnetic field that is concentrated a few scale heights below the surface, the f-mode fans out in the diagnostic kΩ diagram at high wavenumbers. Here we explore this possibility using data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, and show for four ARs 11130, 11158, 11768, and 12051, that at large latitudinal wavenumbers (corresponding to horizontal scales of around 3000 km), the f-mode displays strengthening about two days prior to AR formation and thus provides a new precursor for AR formation. The idea that the f-mode is perturbed days before any visible magnetic activity occurs on the surface can be important in constraining dynamo models aimed at understanding the global magnetic activity of the Sun.

  6. Numerical simulation of coastal flooding after potential reactivation of an active normal fault in northern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Yu-Chang; Kuo, Chih-Yu; Chang, Kuo-Jen; Chen, Rou-Fei; Hsieh, Yu-Chung

    2016-04-01

    Rapid coastal flooding from seawards may be resulted from storm surge, tsunamis, and sudden land subsidence due to fault activities. Many observations and numerical modeling of flooding have been made for cases resulted from storm surge and tsunami events; however, coastal flooding caused by a potential normal faulting event nearby coastal areas is rarely reported. In addition to the earthquake hazards from fault rupturing and ground shaking, the accompanied hazards of earthquake-induced flooding is also important to be investigated. The Jinshan area in northern Taiwan was reported to have been flooded by a tsunami event in the year of 1867 possibly resulted from the reactivation of the Shanchiao normal fault offshore. Historical records have shown that the Shanchiao Fault that extends from Shulin along the western edge of the Taipei Basin to the town of Jinshan may have also ruptured in the year of 1694. The rupturing event has created a depression on the western side of the Taipei Basin that was later filled by sea water called the Taipei Lake. The geological conditions in northern Taiwan provide an opportunity for numerically simulating the dynamic processes of sea water flooding nearby the coastal area immediately after an earthquake-induced normal faulting event. In this study, we focused on the potential active normal faulting that may occur and result in an expected catastrophic flooding in lowland area of Jinshan in northern Taiwan. We applied the continuum shallow water equation to evaluate the unknown inundation processes including location, extent, velocity and water depths after the flooding initiated and the final state of the flooding event. The modeling results were well compared with borehole observations of the extent of previous flooding events possibly due to tsunami events. In addition, the modeling results may provide a future basis for safety evaluation of the two nuclear power plants nearby the region.

  7. Sarcoplasmic reticulum-associated cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate phosphodiesterase activity in normal and failing human hearts.

    PubMed Central

    Movsesian, M A; Smith, C J; Krall, J; Bristow, M R; Manganiello, V C

    1991-01-01

    Sarcoplasmic reticulum-associated cAMP phosphodiesterase activity was examined in microsomes prepared from the left ventricular myocardium of eight heart transplant recipients with end-stage idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and six unmatched organ donors with normal cardiac function. At cAMP concentrations less than or equal to 1.0 microM, sarcoplasmic reticulum-associated cAMP phosphodiesterase activity was functionally homogeneous. cAMP phosphodiesterase activity was inhibited competitively by cGMP (Ki = 0.031 +/- 0.008 microM) and the cilostamide derivative OPC 3911 (Ki = 0.018 +/- 0.004 microM), but was essentially insensitive to rolipram. Vmax and Km were 781.7 +/- 109.2 nmol/mg per min and 0.188 +/- 0.031 microM, respectively, in microsomes prepared from nonfailing hearts and 793.9 +/- 68.9 nmol/mg per min and 0.150 +/- 0.027 microM in microsomes prepared from failing hearts. Microsomes prepared from nonfailing and failing hearts did not differ with respect to either the ratio of cAMP phosphodiesterase activity to ATP-dependent Ca2+ accumulation activity or the sensitivity of cAMP phosphodiesterase activity to inhibition by OPC 3911. These data suggest that the diminished inotropic efficacy of phosphodiesterase inhibitors in failing human hearts does not result from changes in the level, kinetic properties, or pharmacologic sensitivity of sarcoplasmic reticulum-associated cAMP phosphodiesterase activity. PMID:1647414

  8. Activation of mechanosensitive ion channel TRPV4 normalizes tumor vasculature and improves cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Adapala, Ravi K.; Thoppil, Roslin J.; Ghosh, Kaustabh; Cappelli, Holly; Dudley, Andrew C.; Paruchuri, Sailaja; Keshamouni, Venkateshwar; Klagsbrun, Michael; Meszaros, J. Gary; Chilian, William M.; Ingber, Donald E.; Thodeti, Charles K.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor vessels are characterized by abnormal morphology and hyper-permeability that together cause inefficient delivery of chemotherapeutic agents. Although VEGF has been established as a critical regulator of tumor angiogenesis, the role of mechanical signaling in the regulation of tumor vasculature or tumor endothelial cell (TEC) function is not known. Here, we show that the mechanosensitive ion channel TRPV4 regulates tumor angiogenesis and tumor vessel maturation via modulation of TEC mechanosensitivity. We found that TEC exhibit reduced TRPV4 expression and function, which is correlated with aberrant mechanosensitivity towards ECM stiffness, increased migration and abnormal angiogenesis by TEC. Further, syngeneic tumor experiments revealed that the absence of TRPV4 induced increased vascular density, vessel diameter and reduced pericyte coverage resulting in enhanced tumor growth in TRPV4 KO mice. Importantly, overexpression or pharmacological activation of TRPV4 restored aberrant TEC mechanosensitivity, migration and normalized abnormal angiogenesis in vitro by modulating Rho activity. Finally, a small molecule activator of TRPV4, GSK1016790A, in combination with anti-cancer drug Cisplatin, significantly reduced tumor growth in WT mice by inducing vessel maturation. Our findings demonstrate TRPV4 channels to be critical regulators of tumor angiogenesis and represent a novel target for anti-angiogenic and vascular normalization therapies. PMID:25867067

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Star formation in active and normal galaxies (Tsai+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, M.; Hwang, C.-Y.

    2015-11-01

    We selected 104 active galaxies from the lists of Melendez et al. (2010MNRAS.406..493M), Condon et al. 1991 (cat. J/ApJ/378/65), and Ho & Ulvestad 2001 (cat. J/ApJS/133/77). Most of the sources are identified as Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs), and a few of them are classified as Luminous InfraRed Galaxies (LIRGs). We obtained 3.6 and 8μm infrared images of these galaxies from the Spitzer Archive (http://sha.ipac.caltech.edu/applications/Spitzer/SHA/) and 8GHz images from the VLA archive (http://archive.nrao.edu/archive/archiveimage.html). We also selected a nearby AGN sub-sample containing 21 radio-selected AGNs for further spatial analysis. We selected 25 nearby AGNs exhibiting no detected radio emission in order to compare with the results of the radio-selected sources. For comparison, we also selected normal galaxies with distances less than 15Mpc from the catalog of Tully 1994 (see cat. VII/145). We only selected the galaxies that have Spitzer archive data and are not identified as AGNs in either the Veron-Cetty & Veron 2006 (see cat. VII/258) AGN catalog or in the NED database (http://ned.ipac.caltech.edu/). Our results for the radio-selected and the non-radio-selected active galaxies are listed in Table1, and those for the normal galaxies are listed in Table2. (2 data files).

  10. Abnormal endothelial tight junctions in active lesions and normal-appearing white matter in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Plumb, Jonnie; McQuaid, Stephen; Mirakhur, Meenakshi; Kirk, John

    2002-04-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, demonstrable in vivo by enhanced MRI is characteristic of new and expanding inflammatory lesions in relapsing-remitting and chronic progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). Subtle leakage may also occur in primary progressive MS. However, the anatomical route(s) of BBB leakage have not been demonstrated. We investigated the possible involvement of interendothelial tight junctions (TJ) by examining the expression of TJ proteins (occludin and ZO-1 ) in blood vessels in active MS lesions from 8 cases of MS and in normal-appearing white (NAWM) matter from 6 cases. Blood vessels (10-50 per frozen section) were scanned using confocal laser scanning microscopy to acquire datasets for analysis. TJ abnormalities manifested as beading, interruption, absence or diffuse cytoplasmic localization of fluorescence, or separation of junctions (putative opening) were frequent (affecting 40% of vessels) in oil-red-O-positive active plaques but less frequent in NAWM (15%), and in normal (< 2%) and neurological controls (6%). Putatively "open" junctions were seen in vessels in active lesions and in microscopically inflamed vessels in NAWM. Dual fluorescence revealed abnormal TJs in vessels with pre-mortem serum protein leakage. Abnormal or open TJs, associated with inflammation may contribute to BBB leakage in enhancing MRI lesions and may also be involved in subtle leakage in non-enhancing focal and diffuse lesions in NAWM. BBB disruption due to tight junctional pathology should be regarded as a significant form of tissue injury in MS, alongside demyelination and axonopathy.

  11. Active lower order mode damping for the four rod LHC crab cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dexter, A. C.; Burt, G.; Apsimon, R.

    2017-02-01

    The high luminosity upgrade planned for the LHC requires crab cavities to rotate bunches into alignment at the interaction points. They compensate for a crossing angle near 500 μ r ad . It is anticipated that four crab cavities in succession will be utilized to achieve this rotation on either side of each IP in a local crossing scheme. A crab cavity operates in a dipole mode but always has an accelerating mode that may be above or below the frequency of the operating mode. Crab cavities are given couplers to ensure that unwanted acceleration modes are strongly damped however employing standard practice these unwanted modes will always have some level of excitation. Where this excitation has a random phase it might promote bunch growth and limit beam lifetime. This paper sets out a method for active control of the phase and amplitude of the unwanted lowest accelerating mode in the crab cavities. The paper investigates the level of suppression that can be achieved as a function cavity quality factor and proximity to resonance.

  12. X-ray photographs of a solar active region with a multilayer telescope at normal incidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, J. H.; Bruner, M. E.; Haisch, B. M.; Brown, W. A.; Acton, L. W.

    1987-01-01

    An astronomical photograph was obtained with a multilayer X-ray telescope. A 4-cm tungsten-carbon multilayer mirror was flown as part of an experimental solar rocket payload, and successful images were taken of the sun at normal incidence at a wavelength of 44 A. Coronal Si XII emission from an active region was recorded on film; as expected, the structure is very similar to that observed at O VIII wavelengths by the Solar Maximum Mission flat-crystal spectrometer at the same time. The small, simple optical system used in this experiment appears to have achieved a resolution of 5 to 10 arcsec.

  13. Independent component model of the default-mode brain function: Assessing the impact of active thinking.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Fabrizio; Bertolino, Alessandro; Scarabino, Tommaso; Latorre, Valeria; Blasi, Giuseppe; Popolizio, Teresa; Tedeschi, Gioacchino; Cirillo, Sossio; Goebel, Rainer; Di Salle, Francesco

    2006-10-16

    The "default-mode" network is an ensemble of cortical regions, which are typically deactivated during demanding cognitive tasks in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies. Using functional connectivity, this network can be conceptualized and studied as a "stand-alone" function or system. Regardless of the task, independent component analysis (ICA) produces a picture of the "default-mode" function even when the subject is performing a simple sensori-motor task or just resting in the scanner. This has boosted the use of default-mode fMRI for non-invasive research in brain disorders. Here, we studied the effect of cognitive load modulation of fMRI responses on the ICA-based pictures of the default-mode function. In a standard graded working memory study based on the n-back task, we used group-level ICA to explore the variability of the default-mode network related to the engagement in the task, in 10 healthy volunteers. The analysis of the default-mode components highlighted similarities and differences in the layout under three different cognitive loads. We found a load-related general increase of deactivation in the cortical network. Nonetheless, a variable recruitment of the cingulate regions was evident, with greater extension of the anterior and lesser extension of the posterior clusters when switching from lower to higher working memory loads. A co-activation of the hippocampus was only found under no working memory load. As a generalization of our results, the variability of the default-mode pattern may link the default-mode system as a whole to cognition and may more directly support use of the ICA model for evaluating cognitive decline in brain disorders.

  14. Modes of Engagement in Foreign Language Writing: An Activity Theoretical Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haneda, Mari

    2007-01-01

    This article makes the case for using activity theory to explore the learning and teaching of writing in a foreign language. I illustrate my argument by bringing this theory to bear on a re-examination of the different modes of engagement in writing by university-level students of Japanese as a foreign language that I identified in an earlier…

  15. Active mode locking of a p-Ge hot hole laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hovenier, J.N.; Muravjov, A.V.; Pavlov, S.G.; Shastin, V.N.; Strijbos, R.C.; Wenckebach, W.T.

    1997-07-01

    The generation of 200 picosecond pulses of far-infrared radiation from a p-Ge hot hole laser (50{endash}140 cm{sup {minus}1}) was achieved due to active mode locking by electrical intracavity modulation of the gain. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. X-mode reflectometry for magnetohydrodynamic activity associated with q=1 surface measurements on Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect

    Vermare, L.; Clairet, F.; Gabillet, F.; Sabot, R.; Sirinelli, A.; Heuraux, S.; Leclert, G.

    2004-10-01

    Tore Supra is equipped with two 20 {mu}s fast sweep X-mode reflectometers operating between 50-110 GHz dedicated to density profile determination and an X-mode fixed frequency reflectometer operating between 105-155 GHz for density fluctuation measurements. Heterodyne and sine-cosine detection provide measurements of the reflected signal with high sensitivity. Operating profile reflectometer in burst mode (5 {mu}s dead time between two consecutive sweeps) allows quasi-simultaneous measurements at fixed frequency over a broad frequency band. Thus, information on plasma fluctuations, such as magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity, up to 20 kHz as well as a radial localization of the modes is accessible. The temporal evolution of the q=1 rational surface during sawtooth crash activity has been recorded in the plasma center with high spatial resolution. In addition, a direct comparison between signals associated with a central MHD mode from both profile and fluctuation reflectometers, positioned at different toroidal angles, allows one to determine the plasma toroidal velocity.

  17. Different pulse pattern generation by frequency detuning in pulse modulated actively mode-locked ytterbium doped fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, He; Chen, Sheng-Ping; Si, Lei; Zhang, Bin; Jiang, Zong-Fu

    2015-10-01

    We report the results of our recent experimental investigation of the modulation frequency detuning effect on the output pulse dynamics in a pulse modulated actively mode-locked ytterbium doped fiber laser. The experimental study shows the existence of five different mode-locking states that mainly depend on the modulation frequency detuning, which are: (a) amplitude-even harmonic/fundamental mode-locking, (b) Q-switched harmonic/fundamental mode-locking, (c) sinusoidal wave modulation mode, (d) pulses bundle state, and (e) noise-like state. A detailed experimental characterization of the output pulses dynamics in each operating mode is presented.

  18. Blink-related momentary activation of the default mode network while viewing videos.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Tamami; Kato, Makoto; Morito, Yusuke; Itoi, Seishi; Kitazawa, Shigeru

    2013-01-08

    It remains unknown why we generate spontaneous eyeblinks every few seconds, more often than necessary for ocular lubrication. Because eyeblinks tend to occur at implicit breakpoints while viewing videos, we hypothesized that eyeblinks are actively involved in the release of attention. We show that while viewing videos, cortical activity momentarily decreases in the dorsal attention network after blink onset but increases in the default-mode network implicated in internal processing. In contrast, physical blackouts of the video do not elicit such reciprocal changes in brain networks. The results suggest that eyeblinks are actively involved in the process of attentional disengagement during a cognitive behavior by momentarily activating the default-mode network while deactivating the dorsal attention network.

  19. Activated vibrational modes and Fermi resonance in tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mengtao; Fang, Yurui; Zhang, Zhenyu; Xu, Hongxing

    2013-02-01

    Using p-aminothiophenol (PATP) molecules on a gold substrate and high-vacuum tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (HV-TERS), we show that the vibrational spectra of these molecules are distinctly different from those in typical surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Detailed first-principles calculations help to assign the Raman peaks in the TERS measurements as Raman-active and IR-active vibrational modes of dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB), providing strong spectroscopic evidence for the dimerization of PATP molecules to DMAB under the TERS setup. The activation of the IR-active modes is due to enhanced electromagnetic field gradient effects within the gap region of the highly asymmetric tip-surface geometry. Fermi resonances are also observed in HV-TERS. These findings help to broaden the versatility of TERS as a promising technique for ultrasensitive molecular spectroscopy.

  20. Effect of norfloxacin and moxifloxacin on melanin synthesis and antioxidant enzymes activity in normal human melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Beberok, Artur; Wrześniok, Dorota; Otręba, Michał; Miliński, Maciej; Rok, Jakub; Buszman, Ewa

    2015-03-01

    Fluoroquinolone antibiotics provide broad-spectrum coverage for a number of infectious diseases, including respiratory as well as urinary tract infections. One of the important adverse effects of these drugs is phototoxicity which introduces a serious limitation to their use. To gain insight the molecular mechanisms underlying the fluoroquinolones-induced phototoxic side effects, the impact of two fluoroquinolone derivatives with different phototoxic potential, norfloxacin and moxifloxacin, on melanogenesis and antioxidant enzymes activity in normal human melanocytes HEMa-LP was determined. Both drugs induced concentration-dependent loss in melanocytes viability. The value of EC50 for these drugs was found to be 0.5 mM. Norfloxacin and moxifloxacin suppressed melanin biosynthesis; antibiotics were shown to inhibit cellular tyrosinase activity and to reduce melanin content in melanocytes. When comparing the both analyzed fluoroquinolones, it was observed that norfloxacin possesses greater inhibitory effect on tyrosinase activity in melanocytes than moxifloxacin. The extent of oxidative stress in cells was assessed by measuring the activity of antioxidant enzymes: SOD, CAT, and GPx. It was observed that norfloxacin caused higher depletion of antioxidant status in melanocytes when compared with moxifloxacin. The obtained results give a new insight into the mechanisms of fluoroquinolones toxicity directed to pigmented tissues. Moreover, the presented differences in modulation of biochemical processes in melanocytes may be an explanation for various phototoxic activities of the analyzed fluoroquinolone derivatives in vivo.

  1. Beta activity in the premotor cortex is increased during stabilized as compared to normal walking

    PubMed Central

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Van Dieën, Jaap H.; Daffertshofer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Walking on two legs is inherently unstable. Still, we humans perform remarkable well at it, mostly without falling. To gain more understanding of the role of the brain in controlling gait stability we measured brain activity using electro-encephalography (EEG) during stabilized and normal walking. Subjects walked on a treadmill in two conditions, each lasting 10 min; normal, and while being laterally stabilized by elastic cords. Kinematics of trunk and feet, electro-myography (EMG) of neck muscles, as well as 64-channel EEG were recorded. To assess gait stability the local divergence exponent, step width, and trunk range of motion were calculated from the kinematic data. We used independent component (IC) analysis to remove movement, EMG, and eyeblink artifacts from the EEG, after which dynamic imaging of coherent sources beamformers were determined to identify cortical sources that showed a significant difference between conditions. Stabilized walking led to a significant increase in gait stability, i.e., lower local divergence exponents. Beamforming analysis of the beta band activity revealed significant sources in bilateral pre-motor cortices. Projection of sensor data on these sources showed a significant difference only in the left premotor area, with higher beta power during stabilized walking, specifically around push-off, although only significant around contralateral push-off. It appears that even during steady gait the cortex is involved in the control of stability. PMID:26578937

  2. Can activities of daily living contribute to EMG normalization for gait analysis?

    PubMed Central

    Ghazwan, Aseel; Forrest, Sarah M.; Holt, Cathy A.; Whatling, Gemma M.

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to examine alternative methods of normalization that effectively reflect muscle activity as compared to Maximal Voluntary Contraction (MVC). EMG data recorded from knee flexion-extension muscles in 10 control subjects during the stance phase of the gait cycle were examined by adopting different approaches of normalization: MVC, Mean and Peak Dynamic during gait cycles, (MDM and PDM, respectively), Peak Dynamic during activities of daily living (ADLs), (*PDM), and a combination of ADLs and MVC(**PDM). Intra- and inter-individual variability were calculated to determine reliability and similarity to MCV. **PDM showed excellent reliability across subjects in comparison to MVC, where variance ratio ranged from 0.43–0.99 for **PDM and 0.79–1.08 for MVC. Coefficient of variability showed a similar trend to Variance Ratio, ranging from 0.60–1.25 for **PDM and 1.97–3.92 for MVC. Both MVC and **PDM, and to some extent *PDM, demonstrated good-to-excellent relative amplitude’s matching; i.e. root mean square difference and absolute difference were both around 0.08 for Vastus medialis to about 4 for Medial gastrocnemius. It was concluded that **PDM and *PDM were reliable, **PDM mirrored MVC and thus could be used as an alternative to MVC for subjects who are unable to provide the required effort for MVC testing. Where MVC testing is not possible, *PDM is the next preferred option. PMID:28369104

  3. Can activities of daily living contribute to EMG normalization for gait analysis?

    PubMed

    Ghazwan, Aseel; Forrest, Sarah M; Holt, Cathy A; Whatling, Gemma M

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to examine alternative methods of normalization that effectively reflect muscle activity as compared to Maximal Voluntary Contraction (MVC). EMG data recorded from knee flexion-extension muscles in 10 control subjects during the stance phase of the gait cycle were examined by adopting different approaches of normalization: MVC, Mean and Peak Dynamic during gait cycles, (MDM and PDM, respectively), Peak Dynamic during activities of daily living (ADLs), (*PDM), and a combination of ADLs and MVC(**PDM). Intra- and inter-individual variability were calculated to determine reliability and similarity to MCV. **PDM showed excellent reliability across subjects in comparison to MVC, where variance ratio ranged from 0.43-0.99 for **PDM and 0.79-1.08 for MVC. Coefficient of variability showed a similar trend to Variance Ratio, ranging from 0.60-1.25 for **PDM and 1.97-3.92 for MVC. Both MVC and **PDM, and to some extent *PDM, demonstrated good-to-excellent relative amplitude's matching; i.e. root mean square difference and absolute difference were both around 0.08 for Vastus medialis to about 4 for Medial gastrocnemius. It was concluded that **PDM and *PDM were reliable, **PDM mirrored MVC and thus could be used as an alternative to MVC for subjects who are unable to provide the required effort for MVC testing. Where MVC testing is not possible, *PDM is the next preferred option.

  4. Actively mode-locked fiber laser using acousto-optic modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikodem, Michal P.; Sergeant, Hendrik; Kaczmarek, Pawel; Abramski, Krzysztof M.

    2008-12-01

    In recent years we have observed growing interest in mode-locked fiber lasers. Development of erbium doped fiber (EDF) amplifiers and WDM technique made 3rd telecommunication window extremely interesting region for ultrafast optics. The main advantages of fiber lasers i.e. narrow linewidth and wide gain bandwidth make them very attractive sources in various applications. In this paper we present an actively mode-locked erbium doped fiber ring laser. Modelocking is obtained using an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) coupled into the laser cavity. The impact of different parameters (e.g. light polarization, modulation frequency) is investigated. We study mechanisms of controlling the wavelength of the laser.

  5. Active Noise Control of Low Speed Fan Rotor-Stator Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Hu, Ziqiang; Pla, Frederic G.; Heidelberg, Laurence J.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the Active Noise Cancellation System designed by General Electric and tested in the NASA Lewis Research Center's 48 inch Active Noise Control Fan. The goal of this study was to assess the feasibility of using wall mounted secondary acoustic sources and sensors within the duct of a high bypass turbofan aircraft engine for active noise cancellation of fan tones. The control system is based on a modal control approach. A known acoustic mode propagating in the fan duct is cancelled using an array of flush-mounted compact sound sources. Controller inputs are signals from a shaft encoder and a microphone array which senses the residual acoustic mode in the duct. The canceling modal signal is generated by a modal controller. The key results are that the (6,0) mode was completely eliminated at 920 Hz and substantially reduced elsewhere. The total tone power was reduced 9.4 dB. Farfield 2BPF SPL reductions of 13 dB were obtained. The (4,0) and (4,1) modes were reduced simultaneously yielding a 15 dB modal PWL decrease. Global attenuation of PWL was obtained using an actuator and sensor system totally contained within the duct.

  6. Wavelength-tunable actively mode-locked erbium-doped fiber ring laser using a distributed feedback semiconductor laser as mode locker and tunable filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shenping; Chan, K. T.

    1999-07-01

    A wavelength-tunable actively mode-locked erbium fiber ring laser was demonstrated using a distributed feedback semiconductor laser as an intensity mode locker and a tunable optical filter. Very stable optical pulse trains at gigabit repetition rates were generated using harmonica mode locking. The supermode noise was suppressed to 60 dB below the signal level and the root-mean-square timing jitter (0.45 kHz-1 MHz) was found to be about 1% of the pulse duration. A continuous wavelength tuning range of 1.8 nm was achieved by changing the semiconductor laser temperature from 11.4 to 30 °C.

  7. Return to normal activities and work after living donor laparoscopic nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Larson, Dawn B; Jacobs, Cheryl; Berglund, Danielle; Wiseman, Jennifer; Garvey, Catherine; Gillingham, Kristen; Ibrahim, Hassan N; Matas, Arthur J

    2017-01-01

    Transplant programs inform potential donors that they should be able to return to normal activities within ~2 weeks and to work by 6 weeks after laparoscopic nephrectomy. We studied actual time. Between 10/2004 and 9/2014, 911 donors having laparoscopic nephrectomy were surveyed 6 months post-donation. Surveys asked questions specific to their recovery experience, including time to return to normal activities and work and a description of their recovery time relative to pre-donation expectations. Of the 911, 646 (71%) responded: mean age at donation was 43.5±10.6 years; 65% were female, 95% were white, 51% were biologically related to their recipient, and 83% reported education beyond high school. Of the 646 respondents, a total of 35% returned to normal activities by 2 weeks post-donation; 79% by 4 weeks post-donation; 94% by 5-6 weeks; however, 6% took >6 weeks. Of the 646, 551 (85%) were working for pay; of these, mean time to return to work was 5.3±2.8 weeks; median, 5 weeks. Of the 551, a total of 14% returned to work in 1-2 weeks, 46% by 3-4 weeks, and 76% by 5-6 weeks. Importantly, 24% required >6 weeks before returning to work with the highest rates for donors in manual labor or a skilled trade. Significantly longer return to work was reported by females (vs males; P=.01), those without (vs those with) post-high school education (P=.010, those with longer hospital stay (P=.01), and those with a postoperative complication (P=.02). Of respondents, 37% described their recovery time as longer than expected. During the donor informed consent process, additional emphasis on realistic expectations around recovery to baseline activities and return to work is warranted.

  8. Modes of hurricane activity variability in the eastern Pacific: Implications for the 2016 season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucharel, Julien; Jin, Fei-Fei; England, Matthew H.; Lin, I. I.

    2016-11-01

    A gridded product of accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) in the eastern Pacific is constructed to assess the dominant mode of tropical cyclone (TC) activity variability. Results of an empirical orthogonal function decomposition and regression analysis of environmental variables indicate that the two dominant modes of ACE variability (40% of the total variance) are related to different flavors of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The first mode, more active during the later part of the hurricane season (September-November), is linked to the eastern Pacific El Niño through the delayed oceanic control associated with the recharge-discharge mechanism. The second mode, dominant in the early months of the hurricane season, is related to the central Pacific El Niño mode and the associated changes in atmospheric variability. A multilinear regression forecast model of the dominant principal components of ACE variability is then constructed. The wintertime subsurface state of the eastern equatorial Pacific (characterizing ENSO heat discharge), the east-west tilt of the thermocline (describing ENSO phase transition), the anomalous ocean surface conditions in the TC region in spring (portraying atmospheric changes induced by persistence of local surface anomalies), and the intraseasonal atmospheric variability in the western Pacific are found to be good predictors of TC activity. Results complement NOAA's official forecast by providing additional spatial and temporal information. They indicate a more active 2016 season ( 2 times the ACE mean) with a spatial expansion into the central Pacific associated with the heat discharge from the 2015/2016 El Niño.

  9. Molecular Structures, Vibrational Spectroscopy, and Normal-Mode Analysis of M(2)(C&tbd1;CR)(4)(PMe(3))(4) Dimetallatetraynes. Observation of Strongly Mixed Metal-Metal and Metal-Ligand Vibrational Modes.

    PubMed

    John, Kevin D.; Miskowski, Vincent M.; Vance, Michael A.; Dallinger, Richard F.; Wang, Louis C.; Geib, Steven J.; Hopkins, Michael D.

    1998-12-28

    The nature of the skeletal vibrational modes of complexes of the type M(2)(C&tbd1;CR)(4)(PMe(3))(4) (M = Mo, W; R = H, Me, Bu(t)(), SiMe(3)) has been deduced. Metrical data from X-ray crystallographic studies of Mo(2)(C&tbd1;CR)(4)(PMe(3))(4) (R = Me, Bu(t)(), SiMe(3)) and W(2)(C&tbd1;CMe)(4)(PMe(3))(4) reveal that the core bond distances and angles are within normal ranges and do not differ in a statistically significant way as a function of the alkynyl substituent, indicating that their associated force constants should be similarly invariant among these compounds. The crystal structures of Mo(2)(C&tbd1;CSiMe(3))(4)(PMe(3))(4) and Mo(2)(C&tbd1;CBu(t)())(4)(PMe(3))(4) are complicated by 3-fold disorder of the Mo(2) unit within apparently ordered ligand arrays. Resonance-Raman spectra ((1)(delta-->delta) excitation, THF solution) of Mo(2)(C&tbd1;CSiMe(3))(4)(PMe(3))(4) and its isotopomers (PMe(3)-d(9), C&tbd1;CSiMe(3)-d(9), (13)C&tbd1;(13)CSiMe(3)) exhibit resonance-enhanced bands due to a(1)-symmetry fundamentals (nu(a) = 362, nu(b) = 397, nu(c) = 254 cm(-)(1) for the natural-abundance complex) and their overtones and combinations. The frequencies and relative intensities of the fundamentals are highly sensitive to isotopic substitution of the C&tbd1;CSiMe(3) ligands, but are insensitive to deuteration of the PMe(3) ligands. Nonresonance-Raman spectra (FT-Raman, 1064 nm excitation, crystalline samples) for the Mo(2)(C&tbd1;CSiMe(3))(4)(PMe(3))(4) compounds and for Mo(2)(C&tbd1;CR)(4)(PMe(3))(4) (R = H, D, Me, Bu(t)(), SiMe(3)) and W(2)(C&tbd1;CMe)(4)(PMe(3))(4) exhibit nu(a), nu(b), and nu(c) and numerous bands due to alkynyl- and phosphine-localized modes, the latter of which are assigned by comparisons to FT-Raman spectra of Mo(2)X(4)L(4) (X = Cl, Br, I; L = PMe(3), PMe(3)-d(9))(4) and Mo(2)Cl(4)(AsMe(3))(4). Valence force-field normal-coordinate calculations on the model compound Mo(2)(C&tbd1;CH)(4)P(4), using core force constants transferred from a calculation

  10. Impacts of human activity modes and climate on heavy metal "spread" in groundwater are biased.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Qin, Xiaosheng; Zeng, Guangming; Li, Jian

    2016-06-01

    Groundwater quality deterioration has attracted world-wide concerns due to its importance for human water supply. Although more and more studies have shown that human activities and climate are changing the groundwater status, an investigation on how different groundwater heavy metals respond to human activity modes (e.g. mining, waste disposal, agriculture, sewage effluent and complex activity) in a varying climate has been lacking. Here, for each of six heavy metals (i.e. Fe, Zn, Mn, Pb, Cd and Cu) in groundwater, we use >330 data points together with mixed-effect models to indicate that (i) human activity modes significantly influence the Cu and Mn but not Zn, Fe, Pb and Cd levels, and (ii) annual mean temperature (AMT) only significantly influences Cu and Pb levels, while annual precipitation (AP) only significantly affects Fe, Cu and Mn levels. Given these differences, we suggest that the impacts of human activity modes and climate on heavy metal "spread" in groundwater are biased.

  11. New First Order Raman-active Modes in Few Layered Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    PubMed Central

    Terrones, H.; Corro, E. Del; Feng, S.; Poumirol, J. M.; Rhodes, D.; Smirnov, D.; Pradhan, N. R.; Lin, Z.; Nguyen, M. A. T.; Elías, A. L.; Mallouk, T. E.; Balicas, L.; Pimenta, M. A.; Terrones, M.

    2014-01-01

    Although the main Raman features of semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides are well known for the monolayer and bulk, there are important differences exhibited by few layered systems which have not been fully addressed. WSe2 samples were synthesized and ab-initio calculations carried out. We calculated phonon dispersions and Raman-active modes in layered systems: WSe2, MoSe2, WS2 and MoS2 ranging from monolayers to five-layers and the bulk. First, we confirmed that as the number of layers increase, the E′, E″ and E2g modes shift to lower frequencies, and the A′1 and A1g modes shift to higher frequencies. Second, new high frequency first order A′1 and A1g modes appear, explaining recently reported experimental data for WSe2, MoSe2 and MoS2. Third, splitting of modes around A′1 and A1g is found which explains those observed in MoSe2. Finally, exterior and interior layers possess different vibrational frequencies. Therefore, it is now possible to precisely identify few-layered STMD. PMID:24572993

  12. Objective Quantification of Physical Activity in Bariatric Surgery Candidates and Normal-Weight Controls

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Dale S.; Jakicic, John M.; Vithiananthan, Sivamainthan; Thomas, J. Graham; Leahey, Tricia M.; Sax, Harry C.; Pohl, Dieter; Roye, G.D.; Ryder, Beth A.; Wing, Rena R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Physical activity (PA) is an important component of weight loss programs and may be encouraged for severely obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. However, few studies have determined the amount and intensity of activities undertaken preoperatively by bariatric surgery patients using objective measures. Methods Using RT3 tri-axial accelerometers, this study compared 38 bariatric surgery candidates and 20 normal-weight controls on: 1) activity counts/hour; 2) minutes/day spent in moderate-to-vigorous intensity PA (MVPA) and vigorous intensity PA (VPA); and 3) level of compliance with national recommendations to accumulate 150 minutes/week of MVPA in bouts ≥ 10 minutes. Results Surgery candidates, compared to controls, recorded significantly (Ps < 0.01) fewer activity counts/hour (13799 ± 3758 vs 19462 ± 4259) and spent fewer minutes/day engaged in MVPA (26.4 ± 23.0 vs 52.4 ± 24.7) and VPA (1.2 ± 3.4 vs 11.8 ± 9.0). More than two-thirds (68%) of surgery candidates versus 13% of NW did not accumulate any MVPA in bouts ≥ 10 minutes and only 4.5% of Ob met the weekly MVPA recommendation compared to 40% of NW. Conclusion Bariatric surgery candidates have low PA levels and rarely engage in PA bouts of sufficient duration and intensity to maintain and improve health. Additional research is needed to determine how best to increase PA in bariatric surgery candidates. PMID:19837009

  13. Astrocyte activation is suppressed in both normal and injured brain by FGF signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Wenfei; Balordi, Francesca; Su, Nan; Chen, Lin; Fishell, Gordon; Hébert, Jean M.

    2014-01-01

    In the brain, astrocytes are multifunctional cells that react to insults and contain damage. However, excessive or sustained reactive astrocytes can be deleterious to functional recovery or contribute to chronic inflammation and neuronal dysfunction. Therefore, astrocyte activation in response to damage is likely to be tightly regulated. Although factors that activate astrocytes have been identified, whether factors also exist that maintain astrocytes as nonreactive or reestablish their nonreactive state after containing damage remains unclear. By using loss- and gain-of-function genetic approaches, we show that, in the unperturbed adult neocortex, FGF signaling is required in astrocytes to maintain their nonreactive state. Similarly, after injury, FGF signaling delays the response of astrocytes and accelerates their deactivation. In addition, disrupting astrocytic FGF receptors results in reduced scar size without affecting neuronal survival. Overall, this study reveals that the activation of astrocytes in the normal and injured neocortex is not only regulated by proinflammatory factors, but also by factors such as FGFs that suppress activation, providing alternative therapeutic targets. PMID:25002516

  14. Uridine diphosphoglucose dehydrogenase activity in normal and rheumatoid synovium: the description of a specialized synovial lining cell.

    PubMed

    Pitsillides, A A; Wilkinson, L S; Mehdizadeh, S; Bayliss, M T; Edwards, J C

    1993-02-01

    Although synovial lining cells (SLC) have been implicated in the production of hyaluronan (HA), which is found at particularly high concentrations in synovial fluid, the degree to which individual cells within the synovium are adapted to this particular function remains to be elucidated. Uridine diphosphoglucose dehydrogenase (UDPGD) activity is the irreversible, rate-limiting step in the production of UDP-glucuronate, an essential monosaccharide in the synthesis of HA. We have assessed the UDPGD activity, microdensitometrically, in individual lining cells of normal and rheumatoid (RA) synovium, using a modified quantitative cytochemical method. In normal synovium, high activity was confined to the cells of the lining with negligible activity in the deeper subintima. The mean UDPGD activity/cell in lining cells of rheumatoid synovium was significantly lower than the activity in normal SLC. In some samples of RA and normal synovium, a bimodal distribution of cells was evident in the lining on the basis of UDPGD activity, a zone of cells in the basal layers with high UDPGD activity and a separate population of cells in more superficial layers with relatively low UDPGD activity. The results suggest that a particular population of cells is present, consistently in normal and more variably in RA synovial lining, which have high UDPGD activity/cell and may be involved in the production of HA. Furthermore, in RA synovium both the UDPGD activity/cell and the relative proportion of these cells within the lining appear to be decreased.

  15. Dual-frequency plasmon lasing modes in active three-layered bimetallic Ag/Au nanoshells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, DaJian; Wu, XueWei; Cheng, Ying; Jin, BiaoBing; Liu, XiaoJun

    2015-11-01

    The optical properties of three-layered silver-gold-silica (SGS) nanoshells with gain have been investigated theoretically by using Mie theory. Surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (spaser) phenomena can be observed at two plasmon modes of the active SGS nanoshell in the visible region. It is found with the decrease in the radius of the inner Ag core that the critical value of ɛg″(ωg ) for the super-resonance of the low-energy mode increases first and then decreases while that for the high-energy mode decreases. An interesting overlap between the two curves for the critical value of ɛg″(ωg ) can be found at a special core radius. At this point, two super-resonances can be achieved concurrently at the low- and high-energy modes of the active SGS nanoshell with the same gain coefficient. This dual-frequency spaser based on the bimetallic Ag/Au nanoshell may be an efficient candidate for designing the nanolaser.

  16. A Multi-Mode Blade Damping Control using Shunted Piezoelectric Transducers with Active Feedback Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Benjamin; Morrison, Carlos; Min, James

    2009-01-01

    The Structural Dynamics and. Mechanics branch (RXS) is developing smart adaptive structures to improve fan blade damping at resonances using piezoelectric (PE) transducers. In this presentation, only one shunted PE transducer was used to demonstrate active control of multi-mode blade resonance damping on a titanium alloy (Ti-6A1-4V) flat plate model, regardless of bending, torsion, and 2-stripe modes. This work would have a significant impact on the conventional passive shunt damping world because the standard feedback control design tools can now be used to design and implement electric shunt for vibration control. In other words, the passive shunt circuit components using massive inductors and. resistors for multi-mode resonance control can be replaced with digital codes. Furthermore, this active approach with multi patches can simultaneously control several modes in the engine operating range. Dr. Benjamin Choi presented the analytical and experimental results from this work at the Propulsion-Safety and. Affordable Readiness (P-SAR) Conference in March, 2009.

  17. Active and passive kink mode studies in a tokamak with a movable ferromagnetic wall

    SciTech Connect

    Levesque, J. P.; Hughes, P. E.; Bialek, J.; Byrne, P. J.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.; Peng, Q.; Rhodes, D. J.; Stoafer, C. C.

    2015-05-15

    High-resolution active and passive kink mode studies are conducted in a tokamak with an adjustable ferromagnetic wall near the plasma surface. Ferritic tiles made from 5.6 mm thick Hiperco{sup ®} 50 alloy have been mounted on the plasma-facing side of half of the in-vessel movable wall segments in the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse device [D. A. Maurer et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 53, 074016 (2011)] in order to explore ferritic resistive wall mode stability. Low-activation ferritic steels are a candidate for structural components of a fusion reactor, and these experiments examine MHD stability of plasmas with nearby ferromagnetic material. Plasma-wall separation for alternating ferritic and non-ferritic wall segments is adjusted between discharges without opening the vacuum vessel. Amplification of applied resonant magnetic perturbations and plasma disruptivity are observed to increase when the ferromagnetic wall is close to plasma surface instead of the standard stainless steel wall. Rapidly rotating m/n=3/1 external kink modes have higher growth rates with the nearby ferritic wall. Feedback suppression of kinks is still as effective as before the installation of ferritic material in vessel, in spite of increased mode growth rates.

  18. MODE IDENTIFICATION OF MHD WAVES IN AN ACTIVE REGION OBSERVED WITH HINODE/EIS

    SciTech Connect

    Kitagawa, N.; Yokoyama, T.; Imada, S.; Hara, H.

    2010-09-20

    In order to better understand the possibility of coronal heating by MHD waves, we analyze Fe XII 195.12A data observed with the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode. We performed a Fourier analysis of EUV intensity and Doppler velocity time series data in the active region corona. Notable intensity and Doppler velocity oscillations were found for two moss regions out of the five studied, while only small oscillations were found for five apexes of loops. The amplitudes of the oscillations were 0.4%-5.7% for intensity and 0.2-1.2 km s{sup -1} for Doppler velocity. In addition, oscillations of only the Doppler velocity were seen relatively less often in the data. We compared the amplitudes of intensity and those of Doppler velocity in order to identify MHD wave modes and calculated the phase delays between Fourier components of intensity and those of Doppler velocity. The results are interpreted in terms of MHD waves as follows: (1) few kink modes or torsional Alfven mode waves were seen in both moss regions and the apexes of loops, (2) upwardly propagating and standing slow mode waves were found in moss regions, and (3) consistent with previous studies, estimated values of energy flux of the waves were several orders of magnitude lower than that required for heating active regions.

  19. Induction of plasminogen activator by UV light in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Miskin, R.; Ben-Ishai, R.

    1981-10-01

    Normal and DNA repair-deficient human fibroblasts have been used to study induction of plasminogen activator (PA) by DNA damage. UV light induced the synthesis of PA in skin fibroblasts of all types of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) in XP heterozygotes and in human amniotic cells. Enzyme induction was, however, not observed in fibroblasts of normal adults. In classical XP, which are deficient in excision repair, PA synthesis occurred in a narrow range of low-UV fluences. In such strains, the level of enzyme produced was correlated with the extent of repair deficiency. UV fluences required for PA induction in XP variants and XP heteozygotes were at least 10 times those inducing enzyme synthesis in excision-deficient XP. Maximum enzyme induction occurred 48 hr after irradiation, and the highest levels of enzyme produced were 15-20 times those of PA baseline levels. Electrophoretic analysis showed that UV irradiation enhances the synthesis of the M/sub r/ 60,000 human urokinase-type PA, which is present in low amounts in untreated cells. Our results suggest that PA induction in human cells is caused by unrepaired DNA damage and represents a eukaryotic SOS-like function. In addition, PA induction may provide a sensitive assay for detection of cellular DNA repair deficiencies and identification of XP heterozygotes.

  20. Effects of potassium chloride on plasma renin activity during sodium restriction in normal man.

    PubMed

    Bauer, J H; Gauntner, W C; Nolph, K D; Van Stone, J C

    1977-08-01

    Previous studies have suggested that large intakes of potassium (K) will suppress plasma renin activity (PRA) in normal man. The effect of more modest intakes of K on PRA is unclear. The present study was designed to compare the PRA in 11 normal volunteers maintained on an electrolyte-free diet (7000 J), with and without the addition of 50 mEq/day of potassium chloride (7000 J + KCl), well within the limits of usual dietary consumption. Control recumbent and 2 hr of upright PRA determinations were made by radioimmunoassay prior to the initiation of either the 7000 J diet or the 7000 J + KCl diet and on the fourth day of the diet, at a time when urinary sodium, K, and chloride excretions were near intakes. Mean (+/- S.E.M.) PRA's are indicated in Table II. There are significant (p less than 0.01) differences between (1) all respective recumbent and upright posture positions and (2) before and after the administration of 7000 J and 7000 J + KCl. However, there are no significant differences between (1) control periods or (2) before and after the addition of KCl to the electrolyte-free diet. We conclude from these studies that K, given in modest amounts, has no inhibiting effect on PRA.

  1. Activity of lipoplatin in tumor and in normal cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Arienti, Chiara; Tesei, Anna; Ravaioli, Alberto; Ratta, Marina; Carloni, Silvia; Mangianti, Serena; Ulivi, Paola; Nicoletti, Stefania; Amadori, Dino; Zoli, Wainer

    2008-11-01

    Lipoplatin is a novel liposomal cisplatin formulation with reduced adverse side effects compared with its parental compound, cisplatin. The aims of this preclinical study were to compare lipoplatin and cisplatin cytotoxicity in vitro in established cell lines derived from non-small cell lung cancer, renal cell carcinoma, and in normal hematopoietic cell precursors, and to identify biological markers associated with sensitivity and resistance. Our results showed a superior cytotoxicity in all tumor cell models and a much lower toxicity in normal cells for lipoplatin compared with cisplatin, suggesting a higher therapeutic index for the liposomal compound. Moreover, RT-PCR analysis of molecular markers known to be related to cisplatin resistance showed a direct correlation between cisplatin and lipoplatin resistance and ERCC1 and LRP expression. In conclusion, lipoplatin showed a higher antitumor activity in both tumor histotypes investigated and was found to be safer than the parent compound, cisplatin. Moreover, ERCC1 and LRP expression levels would seem to be valid predictors of sensitivity or resistance to these drugs.

  2. Pharmacodynamic study on acute hypotensive activities of Carissa carandas extract in normal rats.

    PubMed

    Shamim, Sumbul; Ahmad, Syed Iqbal

    2012-07-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of Carissa carandas extract on cardiovascular function of normal rats. Intravenous bolus injection of this extract in the doses of 5 mg kg(-1)_-45 mg kg(-1), produced dose dependent reduction in arterial blood pressure (p<0.001). The 45mg/kg dose caused a 50.75% ± 2.71 decrease in MABP which was highly significant with P value < 0.0005 when compared with its controls. Significant reduction in heart rate frequency was observed after CC injection at a dose of 45 mg kg-1 (p<0.001). The results were comparable with Acetylcholine 10(-4) M. The receptor activity performed for which Atropine 10(-4)M was administered I.V. and then the extract (45mg/kg) was administered. A highly Non Significant fall in Mean Arterial Blood pressure was observed 1.51% ± 0.22 (P>0.05). It was concluded that the Carissa carandas Ethanol extract possess potent acute hypotensive effect in normal rats. It stimulates the muscarinic receptors located on the endothelial cells of the vasculature. This stimulation results in the release of endothelial-derived relaxing factors (EDRFs) or nitric oxide that diffuses to vasculature smooth muscles and causes their relaxation.

  3. Physical activity during soccer and its contribution to physical activity recommendations in normal weight and overweight children.

    PubMed

    Sacheck, Jennifer M; Nelson, Tara; Ficker, Laura; Kafka, Tamar; Kuder, Julia; Economos, Christina D

    2011-05-01

    Amid the childhood obesity epidemic, understanding how organized sports participation contributes to meeting physical activity recommendations in children is important. Anthropometrics were measured in children (n = 111; 68% female, 9.1 ± 0.8 yr) before one 50-min soccer match. Time spent at different physical activity intensity levels was examined using Actigraph accelerometers. 49% of the match time was spent in sedentary activity (25.4 ± 5.7 min), while 33% of the match (16.9 ± 4.7 min) was spent in moderate-to-vigorous activity (MVPA; p < .001). 22.5% of the children were overweight/obese and spent more time in sedentary activity (+3.2 ± 1.2 min; p < .05) and less time in MVPA (-3.0 ± 1.0 min; p < .01) compared with the normal weight children. These data demonstrate that playing an organized sport such as soccer only meets a portion (~25%) of the 60 min of MVPA recommended and even less of this recommendation is met by overweight/obese children.

  4. Vibrational normal modes calculation in the crystalline state of methylated monosaccharides: Anomers of the methyl-D-glucopyranoside and methyl-D-xylopyranoside molecules.

    PubMed

    Taleb-Mokhtari, Ilham Naoual; Lazreg, Abbassia; Sekkal-Rahal, Majda; Bestaoui, Noreya

    2016-01-15

    A structural investigation of the organic molecules is being carried out using vibrational spectroscopy. In this study, normal co-ordinate calculations of anomers of the methyl-D-glucopyranoside and methyl-β-D-xylopyranoside in the crystalline state have been performed using the modified Urey-Bradley-Shimanouchi force field (mUBSFF) combined with an intermolecular potential energy function. The latter includes Van der Waals interactions, electrostatic terms, and explicit hydrogen bond functions. The vibrational spectra of the compounds recorded in the crystalline state, in the 4000-500 cm(-1) spectral region for the IR spectra, and in the 4000-20 cm(-1) spectral range for the Raman spectra are presented. After their careful examination, several differences in the intensities and frequency shifts have been observed. The theoretical spectra have been obtained after a tedious refinement of the force constants. Thus, on the basis of the obtained potential distribution, each observed band in IR and in Raman has been assigned to a vibrational mode. The obtained results are indeed in agreement with those observed experimentally and thus confirm the previous assignments made for the methyl-α and β-D-glucopyranoside, as well as for the methyl-β-D-xylopyranoside.

  5. Mode-locking pulse generation with MoS2-PVA saturable absorber in both anomalous and ultra-long normal dispersion regimes.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, M H M; Latiff, A A; Arof, H; Harun, S W

    2016-05-20

    We experimentally demonstrate a stable and simple mode locked erbium doped fiber laser (EDFL) utilizing passive few-layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) as a saturable absorber. The MoS2 is obtained by liquid phase exfoliation before it is embedded in a polymer composite film and then inserted in the laser cavity. A stable soliton pulse train started at a low threshold pump power of 20 mW in the anomalous dispersion regime after fine-tuning the rotation of the polarization controller. The central wavelength, 3 dB bandwidth, pulse width, and repetition rate of the soliton pulses are 1574.6 nm, 9.5 nm, 790 fs, and 29.5 MHz, respectively. By inserting a 850 m long dispersion shifted fiber (DSF) in the cavity, a dissipative soliton with square pulse train is obtained in the normal dispersion regime where the operating wavelength is centered at 1567.44 nm with a 3 dB bandwidth of 19.68 nm. The dissipative soliton pulse has a pulse width of 90 ns at a low repetition rate of 231.5 kHz due to the long DSF used. These results are a contribution to the pool of knowledge in nonlinear optical properties of two-dimensional nanomaterials especially for ultrafast photonic applications.

  6. A normal-mode formula for the derivative of a waveguide pressure field with respect to an arbitrary three-dimensional sound speed perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thode, Aaron

    2003-10-01

    Semi-analytic expressions are derived for the first order derivative of a pressure field in a laterally homogeneous depth waveguide, with respect to an arbitrary three-dimensional refractive index perturbation in either the water column or ocean bottom. These expressions for the environmental derivative, derived using an adjoint method, require a three-dimensional spatial correlation between two Greens functions, weighted by an environmental parameter basis function, with the Greens functions expressed in terms of normal modes. When a particular set of orthogonal spatial basis functions is chosen, the three-dimensional spatial integral can be converted into a set of one-dimensional integrations over depth and azimuth. The use of the orthogonal basis permits environmental derivatives to be computed for any arbitrary sound-speed perturbation. To illustrate the formulas, a sensitivity study is presented that explores the impact of three-dimensional plane wave and cylindrical perturbations on the environmental derivative. Under certain circumstances it is found that perturbation components outside the vertical plane connecting the source and receiver have non-negligible effects on the pressure derivative. Potential applications of these formulas include benchmarking three-dimensional propagation codes, computing Cramer-Rao bounds for three-dimensional environmental parameter estimates, and potentially inverting for small three-dimensional refractive index distributions.

  7. Computational modeling of the Fc αRI receptor binding in the Fc α domain of the human antibody IgA: Normal Modes Analysis (NMA) study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayasinghe, Manori; Posgai, Monica; Tonddast-Navaei, Sam; Ibrahim, George; Stan, George; Herr, Andrew; George Stan Group Collaboration; Herr's Group Team

    2014-03-01

    Fc αRI receptor binding in the Fc α domain of the antibody IgA triggers immune effector responses such as phagocytosis and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity in eukaryotic cells. Fc α is a dimer of heavy chains of the IgA antibody and each Fc α heavy chain which consisted of two immunoglobulin constant domains, CH2 and CH3, can bind one Fc αRI molecule at the CH2-CH3 interface forming a 2:1 stoichiometry. Experimental evidences confirmed that Fc αRI binding to the Fc α CH2-CH3 junction altered the kinetics of HAA lectin binding at the distant IgA1 hinge. Our focus in this research was to understand the conformational changes and the network of residues which co-ordinate the receptor binding dynamics of the Fc α dimer complex. Structure-based elastic network modeling was used to compute normal modes of distinct Fc α configurations. Asymmetric and un-liganded Fc α configurations were obtained from the high resolution crystal structure of Fc α-Fc αRI 2:1 symmetric complex of PDB ID 1OW0. Our findings confirmed that Fc αRI binding, either in asymmetric or symmetric complex with Fc α, propagated long-range conformational changes across the Fc domains, potentially also impacting the distant IgA1 hinge.

  8. Vibrational normal modes calculation in the crystalline state of methylated monosaccharides: Anomers of the methyl-D-glucopyranoside and methyl-D-xylopyranoside molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taleb-Mokhtari, Ilham Naoual; Lazreg, Abbassia; Sekkal-Rahal, Majda; Bestaoui, Noreya

    2016-01-01

    A structural investigation of the organic molecules is being carried out using vibrational spectroscopy. In this study, normal co-ordinate calculations of anomers of the methyl-D-glucopyranoside and methyl-β-D-xylopyranoside in the crystalline state have been performed using the modified Urey-Bradley-Shimanouchi force field (mUBSFF) combined with an intermolecular potential energy function. The latter includes Van der Waals interactions, electrostatic terms, and explicit hydrogen bond functions. The vibrational spectra of the compounds recorded in the crystalline state, in the 4000-500 cm- 1 spectral region for the IR spectra, and in the 4000-20 cm- 1 spectral range for the Raman spectra are presented. After their careful examination, several differences in the intensities and frequency shifts have been observed. The theoretical spectra have been obtained after a tedious refinement of the force constants. Thus, on the basis of the obtained potential distribution, each observed band in IR and in Raman has been assigned to a vibrational mode. The obtained results are indeed in agreement with those observed experimentally and thus confirm the previous assignments made for the methyl-α and β-D-glucopyranoside, as well as for the methyl-β-D-xylopyranoside.

  9. Detection of short-term activity avalanches in human brain default mode network with ultrafast MR encephalography.

    PubMed

    Rajna, Zalán; Kananen, Janne; Keskinarkaus, Anja; Seppänen, Tapio; Kiviniemi, Vesa

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies pinpoint visually cued networks of avalanches with MEG/EEG data. Co-activation pattern (CAP) analysis can be used to detect single brain volume activity profiles and hemodynamic fingerprints of neuronal avalanches as sudden high signal activity peaks in classical fMRI data. In this study, we aimed to detect dynamic patterns of brain activity spreads with the use of ultrafast MR encephalography (MREG). MREG achieves 10 Hz whole brain sampling, allowing the estimation of spatial spread of an avalanche, even with the inherent hemodynamic delay of the BOLD signal. We developed a novel computational method to separate avalanche type fast activity spreads from motion artifacts, vasomotor fluctuations, and cardio-respiratory noise in human brain default mode network (DMN). Reproducible and classical DMN sources were identified using spatial ICA prior to advanced noise removal in order to assure that ICA converges to reproducible networks. Brain activity peaks were identified from parts of the DMN, and normalized MREG data around each peak were extracted individually to show dynamic avalanche type spreads as video clips within the DMN. Individual activity spread video clips of specific parts of the DMN were then averaged over the group of subjects. The experiments show that the high BOLD values around the peaks are mostly spreading along the spatial pattern of the particular DMN segment detected with ICA. With also the spread size and lifetime resembling the expected power law distributions, this indicates that the detected peaks are parts of activity avalanches, starting from (or crossing) the DMN. Furthermore, the split, one-sided sub-networks of the DMN show different spread directions within the same DMN framework. The results open possibilities to follow up brain activity avalanches in the hope to understand more about the system wide properties of diseases related to DMN dysfunction.

  10. Defective Dendrite Elongation but Normal Fertility in Mice Lacking the Rho-Like GTPase Activator Dbl

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Emilio; Pozzato, Michela; Vercelli, Alessandro; Barberis, Laura; Azzolino, Ornella; Russo, Chiara; Vanni, Cristina; Silengo, Lorenzo; Eva, Alessandra; Altruda, Fiorella

    2002-01-01

    Dbl is the prototype of a large family of GDP-GTP exchange factors for small GTPases of the Rho family. In vitro, Dbl is known to activate Rho and Cdc42 and to induce a transformed phenotype. Dbl is specifically expressed in brain and gonads, but its in vivo functions are largely unknown. To assess its role in neurogenesis and gametogenesis, targeted deletion of the murine Dbl gene was accomplished in embryonic stem cells. Dbl-null mice are viable and did not show either decreased reproductive performances or obvious neurological defects. Histological analysis of mutant testis showed normal morphology and unaltered proliferation and survival of spermatogonia. Dbl-null brains indicated a correct disposition of the major neural structures. Analysis of cortical stratification indicated that Dbl is not crucial for neuronal migration. However, in distinct populations of Dbl-null cortical pyramidal neurons, the length of dendrites was significantly reduced, suggesting a role for Dbl in dendrite elongation. PMID:11940671

  11. Effects of active music therapy on the normal brain: fMRI based evidence.

    PubMed

    Raglio, Alfredo; Galandra, Caterina; Sibilla, Luisella; Esposito, Fabrizio; Gaeta, Francesca; Di Salle, Francesco; Moro, Luca; Carne, Irene; Bastianello, Stefano; Baldi, Maurizia; Imbriani, Marcello

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the neurophysiological bases of Active Music Therapy (AMT) and its effects on the normal brain. Twelve right-handed, healthy, non-musician volunteers were recruited. The subjects underwent 2 AMT sessions based on the free sonorous-music improvisation using rhythmic and melodic instruments. After these sessions, each subject underwent 2 fMRI scan acquisitions while listening to a Syntonic (SP) and an A-Syntonic (AP) Production from the AMT sessions. A 3 T Discovery MR750 scanner with a 16-channel phased array head coil was used, and the image analysis was performed with Brain Voyager QX 2.8. The listening to SP vs AP excerpts mainly activated: (1) the right middle temporal gyrus and right superior temporal sulcus, (2) the right middle frontal gyrus and in particular the right precentral gyrus, (3) the bilateral precuneus, (4) the left superior temporal sulcus and (5) the left middle temporal gyrus. These results are consistent with the psychological bases of the AMT approach and with the activation of brain areas involved in memory and autobiographical processes, and also in personal or interpersonal significant experiences. Further studies are required to confirm these findings and to explain possible effects of AMT in clinical settings.

  12. PPARdelta activation normalizes cardiac substrate metabolism and reduces right ventricular hypertrophy in congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Jucker, Beat M; Doe, Christopher P; Schnackenberg, Christine G; Olzinski, Alan R; Maniscalco, Kristeen; Williams, Carolyn; Hu, Tom C-C; Lenhard, Stephen C; Costell, Melissa; Bernard, Roberta; Sarov-Blat, Lea; Steplewski, Klaudia; Willette, Robert N

    2007-07-01

    Previously, it was shown that selective deletion of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor delta (PPARdelta) in the heart resulted in a cardiac lipotoxicity, hypertrophy, and heart failure. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of chronic and selective pharmacological activation of PPARdelta in a model of congestive heart failure. PPARdelta-specific agonist treatment (GW610742X at 30 and 100 mg/kg/day for 6-9 weeks) was initiated immediately postmyocardial infarction (MI) in Sprague-Dawley rats. Magnetic resonance imaging/spectroscopy was used to assess cardiac function and energetics. A 1-(13)C glucose clamp was performed to assess relative cardiac carbohydrate versus fat oxidation. Additionally, cardiac hemodynamics and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction gene expression analysis was performed. MI rats had significantly reduced left ventricle (LV) ejection fractions and whole heart phosphocreatine/adenosine triphosphate ratio compared with Sham animals (reduction of 43% and 14%, respectively). However, GW610742X treatment had no effect on either parameter. In contrast, the decrease in relative fat oxidation rate observed in both LV and right ventricle (RV) following MI (decrease of 58% and 54%, respectively) was normalized in a dose-dependent manner following treatment with GW610742X. These metabolic changes were associated with an increase in lipid transport/metabolism target gene expression (eg, CD36, CPT1, UCP3). Although there was no difference between groups in LV weight or infarct size measured upon necropsy, there was a dramatic reduction in RV hypertrophy and lung congestion (decrease of 22-48%, P<0.01) with treatment which was associated with a >7-fold decrease (P<0.05) in aterial natriuretic peptide gene expression in RV. Diuretic effects were not observed with GW610742X. In conclusion, chronic treatment with a selective PPARdelta agonist normalizes cardiac substrate metabolism and reduces RV hypertrophy and pulmonary

  13. Expression, localisation and functional activation of NFAT-2 in normal human skin, psoriasis, and cultured keratocytes

    PubMed Central

    Al-Daraji, Wael I; Malak, Tamer T.; Prescott, Richard J.; Abdellaoui, Adel; Ali, Mahmud M.; Dabash, Tarek; Zelger, Bettina G.; Zelger, Bernhard

    2009-01-01

    Ciclosporin A (CsA) is widely utilized for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases such as psoriasis. The therapeutic effects of CsA are thought to be mediated via its immunosuppressive action on infiltrating lymphocytes in skin lesions. CsA and tacrolimus block T cell activation by inhibiting the phosphatase calcineurin and preventing translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus of the transcription factor Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT). As calcineurin and NFAT 1 have been shown to be functionally active in cultured human keratocytes, expression of other NFAT family members such as NFAT-2 and possible functional activation was investigated in human keratocytes. RT-PCR and Western Analysis were used to investigate the presence of NFAT-2 mRNA and protein in human keratocytes. Tissue culture of human keratocytes and immunostaining of cells on coverslips and confocal microscopy were used to assess the degree of nuclear localisation of NFAT-2 in cultured cells. Keratome biopsies were taken from patients with psoriasis (lesional and non-lesional skin) and normal skin and immunohistochemistry was used to assess the NFAT-2 localisation in these biopsies using a well characterized anti-NFAT-2 antibody. The NFAT-2 mRNA and protein expression was demonstrated using RT-PCR and Western blotting. Moreover, the expression of NFAT-2 in normal skin, non-lesional and lesional psoriasis showed a striking basal staining suggesting a role for NFAT-2 in keratocytes proliferation. A range of cell types in the skin express NFAT-2. The expression of NFAT-2 in human keratocytes and response to different agonists provides perhaps a unique opportunity to examine the regulation, subcellular localization and kinetics of translocation of different NFATs in primary cultured human cells. In these experiments the author assessed the expression, localization of NFAT-2 in cultured human keratocytes and measured the degree of nuclear localisaion of NFAT-2 using immunofluorescence

  14. Cysteine Proteases: Modes of Activation and Future Prospects as Pharmacological Targets

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Sonia; Dixit, Rajnikant; Pandey, Kailash C.

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes are crucial for a variety of biological processes in organisms ranging from lower (virus, bacteria, and parasite) to the higher organisms (mammals). Proteases cleave proteins into smaller fragments by catalyzing peptide bonds hydrolysis. Proteases are classified according to their catalytic site, and distributed into four major classes: cysteine proteases, serine proteases, aspartic proteases, and metalloproteases. This review will cover only cysteine proteases, papain family enzymes which are involved in multiple functions such as extracellular matrix turnover, antigen presentation, processing events, digestion, immune invasion, hemoglobin hydrolysis, parasite invasion, parasite egress, and processing surface proteins. Therefore, they are promising drug targets for various diseases. For preventing unwanted digestion, cysteine proteases are synthesized as zymogens, and contain a prodomain (regulatory) and a mature domain (catalytic). The prodomain acts as an endogenous inhibitor of the mature enzyme. For activation of the mature enzyme, removal of the prodomain is necessary and achieved by different modes. The pro-mature domain interaction can be categorized as protein–protein interactions (PPIs) and may be targeted in a range of diseases. Cysteine protease inhibitors are available that can block the active site but no such inhibitor available yet that can be targeted to block the pro-mature domain interactions and prevent it activation. This review specifically highlights the modes of activation (processing) of papain family enzymes, which involve auto-activation, trans-activation and also clarifies the future aspects of targeting PPIs to prevent the activation of cysteine proteases. PMID:27199750

  15. Third-order voltage-mode active-C band pass filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Ashish; Ghosh, Mourina; Paul, Sajal K.

    2015-05-01

    In this research article, a new third-order voltage-mode active-C asymmetrical band pass filter is proposed. It uses three numbers of current-controlled current conveyors and three numbers of equal-valued capacitors. The topology has the following important features: uses only three active elements, uses three capacitors, uses all grounded capacitors and no resistor is suitable for integrated circuit design, there is no matching constraint, high input impedance, low output impedance, central frequency can easily be electronically controlled by bias current, and frequency response is asymmetrical in nature. The application of the proposed topology in the realisation of a voltage-mode sixth-order symmetrical band pass filter has been demonstrated. The workability of the proposed topology and sixth-order filter has been confirmed by simulation results using 0.35-µm Austria Micro Systems complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology.

  16. Infra red active modes due to coupling of cyclotron excitation and LO phonons in polar semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Ratna; Dubey, Swati; Ghosh, S.

    2013-06-01

    Effects of free carrier concentration, external magnetic field and Callen effective charge on infra red active modes in a polar semiconductor have been analytically investigated using simple harmonic oscillator model. Callen effective charge considerably enhances reflectivity and shifts minima towards lower values of energy. Presence of magnetic field leads towards the coupling of collective cyclotron excitations with LO phonon giving rise to maximum reflectivity whereas cyclotron resonance absorption results into minimum reflectivity.

  17. Passive feedback control of actively mode-locked pulsed Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchvarov, Ivan C.; Saltiel, Solomon M.

    1992-11-01

    A passive feedback control in an actively mode-locked pulsed Nd:YAG laser was used to shorten the pulse duration or obtain millisecond trains of ultra-short light pulses. The intracavity second harmonic generation in a crystal situated at proper distance from the output mirror served as a positive or negative feedback. When negative feedback was used, the length of the train was limited by the length of the flash lamp pumping pulse.

  18. The 2013 earthquake swarm in Helike, Greece: seismic activity at the root of old normal faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapetanidis, V.; Deschamps, A.; Papadimitriou, P.; Matrullo, E.; Karakonstantis, A.; Bozionelos, G.; Kaviris, G.; Serpetsidaki, A.; Lyon-Caen, H.; Voulgaris, N.; Bernard, P.; Sokos, E.; Makropoulos, K.

    2015-09-01

    The Corinth Rift in Central Greece has been studied extensively during the past decades, as it is one of the most seismically active regions in Europe. It is characterized by normal faulting and extension rates between 6 and 15 mm yr-1 in an approximately N10E° direction. On 2013 May 21, an earthquake swarm was initiated with a series of small events 4 km southeast of Aigion city. In the next days, the seismic activity became more intense, with outbursts of several stronger events of magnitude between 3.3 and 3.7. The seismicity migrated towards the east during June, followed by a sudden activation of the western part of the swarm on July 15th. More than 1500 events have been detected and manually analysed during the period between 2013 May 21 and August 31, using over 15 local stations in epicentral distances up to 30 km and a local velocity model determined by an error minimization method. Waveform similarity-based analysis was performed, revealing several distinct multiplets within the earthquake swarm. High-resolution relocation was applied using the double-difference algorithm HypoDD, incorporating both catalogue and cross-correlation differential traveltime data, which managed to separate the initial seismic cloud into several smaller, densely concentrated spatial clusters of strongly correlated events. Focal mechanism solutions for over 170 events were determined using P-wave first motion polarities, while regional waveform modelling was applied for the calculation of moment tensors for the 18 largest events of the sequence. Selected events belonging to common spatial groups were considered for the calculation of composite mechanisms to characterize different parts of the swarm. The solutions are mainly in agreement with the regional NNE-SSW extension, representing typical normal faulting on 30-50° north-dipping planes, while a few exhibit slip in an NNE-SSW direction, on a roughly subhorizontal plane. Moment magnitudes were calculated by spectral analysis

  19. Diuretic activity of the aqueous extracts of Carum carvi and Tanacetum vulgare in normal rats.

    PubMed

    Lahlou, Sanaa; Tahraoui, Adil; Israili, Zafar; Lyoussi, Badiaâ

    2007-04-04

    In the Moroccan traditional medicine, the ripe fruits of Carum carvi L. (Apiaceae) and the leaves of Tanacetum vulgare L. (Asteraceae/Compositae), two widely available plant materials, are used as diuretics. Since, the diuretic activity of these substances has not been investigated in scientifically controlled studies, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the diuretic potential of aqueous extracts of Carum carvi fruit (caraway) and the leaves of Tanacetum vulgare (tansy) in normal rats after acute and sub-chronic oral administration. Water extracts of Carum carvi and Tanacetum vulgare (100 mg/kg) or the reference drug, furosemide (10 mg/kg) were administrated orally to male Wistar rats and their urine output was quantitated at several intervals of time after the dose. After single doses of the extracts of both caraway seeds and tansy leaves, urine output was significantly increased at all time points, and at 24 h after the dose, the total volume of urine excreted was similar for the plant extracts and furosemide. Both extracts increased urinary levels of Na(+) and K(+), to about the same extent, while furosemide increased urinary levels of only Na(+) and decreased urinary K(+). Despite changes in urinary excretion of the electrolytes, plasma Na(+) and K(+) levels were not affected by any of the three substances. In the 8-day sub-chronic study, all three substances induced significant diuresis and natriuresis; only tansy increased urinary potassium excretion. The plant extracts did not appear to have renal toxicity or any other adverse effects during the study period. In conclusion, water extracts of both Carum carvi and Tanacetum vulgare have strong diuretic action confirming their ethnopharmacological use. From the pattern of excretion of water, sodium and potassium, it may be deduced that there are atleast two types of active principals present in these extracts, one having a furosemide-like activity and the other a thiazide-like activity.

  20. Mode of Action of Lactoperoxidase as Related to Its Antimicrobial Activity: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Bafort, F.; Parisi, O.; Perraudin, J.-P.; Jijakli, M. H.

    2014-01-01

    Lactoperoxidase is a member of the family of the mammalian heme peroxidases which have a broad spectrum of activity. Their best known effect is their antimicrobial activity that arouses much interest in in vivo and in vitro applications. In this context, the proper use of lactoperoxidase needs a good understanding of its mode of action, of the factors that favor or limit its activity, and of the features and properties of the active molecules. The first part of this review describes briefly the classification of mammalian peroxidases and their role in the human immune system and in host cell damage. The second part summarizes present knowledge on the mode of action of lactoperoxidase, with special focus on the characteristics to be taken into account for in vitro or in vivo antimicrobial use. The last part looks upon the characteristics of the active molecule produced by lactoperoxidase in the presence of thiocyanate and/or iodide with implication(s) on its antimicrobial activity. PMID:25309750

  1. Prestimulus default mode activity influences depth of processing and recognition in an emotional memory task.

    PubMed

    Soravia, Leila M; Witmer, Joëlle S; Schwab, Simon; Nakataki, Masahito; Dierks, Thomas; Wiest, Roland; Henke, Katharina; Federspiel, Andrea; Jann, Kay

    2016-03-01

    Low self-referential thoughts are associated with better concentration, which leads to deeper encoding and increases learning and subsequent retrieval. There is evidence that being engaged in externally rather than internally focused tasks is related to low neural activity in the default mode network (DMN) promoting open mind and the deep elaboration of new information. Thus, reduced DMN activity should lead to enhanced concentration, comprehensive stimulus evaluation including emotional categorization, deeper stimulus processing, and better long-term retention over one whole week. In this fMRI study, we investigated brain activation preceding and during incidental encoding of emotional pictures and on subsequent recognition performance. During fMRI, 24 subjects were exposed to 80 pictures of different emotional valence and subsequently asked to complete an online recognition task one week later. Results indicate that neural activity within the medial temporal lobes during encoding predicts subsequent memory performance. Moreover, a low activity of the default mode network preceding incidental encoding leads to slightly better recognition performance independent of the emotional perception of a picture. The findings indicate that the suppression of internally-oriented thoughts leads to a more comprehensive and thorough evaluation of a stimulus and its emotional valence. Reduced activation of the DMN prior to stimulus onset is associated with deeper encoding and enhanced consolidation and retrieval performance even one week later. Even small prestimulus lapses of attention influence consolidation and subsequent recognition performance.

  2. PTK6/BRK is expressed in the normal mammary gland and activated at the plasma membrane in breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Peng, Maoyu; Emmadi, Rajyasree; Wang, Zebin; Wiley, Elizabeth L; Gann, Peter H; Khan, Seema A; Banerji, Nilanjana; McDonald, William; Asztalos, Szilard; Pham, Thao N D; Tonetti, Debra A; Tyner, Angela L

    2014-08-15

    Protein Tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6/BRK) is overexpressed in the majority of human breast tumors and breast tumor cell lines. It is also expressed in normal epithelial linings of the gastrointestinal tract, skin, and prostate. To date, expression of PTK6 has not been extensively examined in the normal human mammary gland. We detected PTK6 mRNA and protein expression in the immortalized normal MCF-10A human mammary gland epithelial cell line, and examined PTK6 expression and activation in a normal human breast tissue microarray, as well as in human breast tumors. Phosphorylation of tyrosine residue 342 in the PTK6 activation loop corresponds with its activation. Similar to findings in the prostate, we detect nuclear and cytoplasmic PTK6 in normal mammary gland epithelial cells, but no phosphorylation of tyrosine residue 342. However, in human breast tumors, striking PTK6 expression and phosphorylation of tyrosine 342 is observed at the plasma membrane. PTK6 is expressed in the normal human mammary gland, but does not appear to be active and may have kinase-independent functions that are distinct from its cancer promoting activities at the membrane. Understanding consequences of PTK6 activation at the plasma membrane may have implications for developing novel targeted therapies against this kinase.

  3. Characterization of wavelength-swept active mode locking fiber laser based on reflective semiconductor optical amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hwi Don; Lee, Ju Han; Yung Jeong, Myung; Kim, Chang-Seok

    2011-07-01

    The static and dynamic characteristics of a wavelength-swept active mode locking (AML) fiber laser are presented in both the time-region and wavelength-region. This paper shows experimentally that the linewidth of a laser spectrum and the bandwidth of the sweeping wavelength are dependent directly on the length and dispersion of the fiber cavity as well as the modulation frequency and sweeping rate under the mode-locking condition. To achieve a narrower linewidth, a longer length and higher dispersion of the fiber cavity as well as a higher order mode locking condition are required simultaneously. For a broader bandwidth, a lower order of the mode locking condition is required using a lower modulation frequency. The dynamic sweeping performance is also analyzed experimentally to determine its applicability to optical coherence tomography imaging. It is shown that the maximum sweeping rate can be improved by the increased free spectral range from the shorter length of the fiber cavity. A reflective semiconductor optical amplifier (RSOA) was used to enhance the modulation and dispersion efficiency. Overall a triangular electrical signal can be used instead of the sinusoidal signal to sweep the lasing wavelength at a high sweeping rate due to the lack of mechanical restrictions in the wavelength sweeping mechanism.

  4. Differential activation of the default mode network in jet lagged individuals.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Joana Fernandes; Gonçalves, Oscar Filipe; Maia, Liliana; Fernandes Vasconcelos, Cristiana; Perrone-McGovern, Kristin; Simon-Dack, Stephanie; Hernandez, Kristina; Oliveira-Silva, Patricia; Mesquita, Ana Raquel; Sampaio, Adriana

    2015-02-01

    Long-term exposure to transmeridian flights has been shown to impact cognitive functioning. Nevertheless, the immediate effects of jet lag in the activation of specific brain networks have not been investigated. We analyzed the impact of short-term jet lag on the activation of the default mode network (DMN). A group of individuals who were on a transmeridian flight and a control group went through a functional magnetic resonance imaging acquisition. Statistical analysis was performed to test for differences in the DMN activation between groups. Participants from the jet lag group presented decreased activation in the anterior nodes of the DMN, specifically in bilateral medial prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortex. No areas of increased activation were observed for the jet lag group. These results may be suggestive of a negative impact of jet lag on important cognitive functions such as introspection, emotional regulation and decision making in a few days after individuals arrive at their destination.

  5. Normal human oral keratinocytes demonstrate abnormal DNA end joining activity during replicative senescence.

    PubMed

    Kang, Mo K; Shin, Ki-Hyuk; Yip, Felix K; Park, No-Hee

    2005-04-01

    Repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is critical for the maintenance of cellular genetic integrity. DSBs are repaired by cellular end joining activity, which could proceed with varying degrees of accuracy. Abnormal end joining may lead to an accumulation of mutations and contribute to genetic instability and cellular aging. In the present study, we compared the efficiency and accuracy of end joining activities in exponentially replicating and senescing normal human oral keratinocytes (NHOK). We developed an in vitro end joining assay utilizing a plasmid linearized with a unique EcoR I or EcoR V restriction site. The efficiency of end joining was determined by PCR with primers that could amplify the fragment containing the end joining site. The accuracy of end joining was assessed by determining whether the original EcoR I site was restored after end joining. Both replicating and senescing cultures of NHOK yielded a similar level of end joining efficiency, which was noted by the similar intensity of PCR amplification. However, the frequency of end joining errors was significantly elevated in NHOK during replicative senescence. Senescing NHOK could thus accumulate abnormal end joining products, which might contribute to cellular aging and cancer.

  6. MOOD STATES, SYMPATHETIC ACTIVITY, AND IN VIVO β-ADRENERGIC RECEPTOR FUNCTION IN A NORMAL POPULATION

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bum-Hee; Kang, Eun-Ho; Ziegler, Michael G.; Mills, Paul J.; Dimsdale, Joel E.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between mood states and β-adrenergic receptor function in a normal population. We also examined if sympathetic nervous system activity is related to mood states or β-adrenergic receptor function. Sixty-two participants aged 25–50 years were enrolled in this study. Mood states were assessed using the Profile of Mood States (POMS). β-adrenergic receptor function was determined using the chronotropic 25 dose isoproterenol infusion test. Level of sympathetic nervous system activity was estimated from 24-hr urine norepinephrine excretion. Higher tension-anxiety, depression-dejection, and anger-hostility were related to decreased β-adrenergic receptor sensitivity (i.e., higher chronotropic 25 dose values), but tension-anxiety was the only remaining independent predictor of β-adrenergic receptor function after controlling for age, gender, ethnicity, and body mass index (BMI). Urinary norepinephrine excretion was unrelated to either mood states or β-adrenergic receptor function. These findings replicate previous reports that anxiety is related to decreased (i.e., desensitized) β-adrenergic receptor sensitivity, even after controlling for age, gender, ethnicity, and body mass index. PMID:17583588

  7. Redistribution of granulophysin and SRC protein in normal and gray platelets after activation.

    PubMed

    Rendu, F; Cramer, E M; Tenza, D; Fischer, S

    1993-01-01

    In this study, two mAbs that recognize specifically the src protein pp60(c-src) in a wide variety of cells (mAb 327 and GD11) have been used to vizualize the src protein expression on human platelets by immunogold electron microscopy. The mAb D545 directed against the dense granule membrane p40 protein granulophysin was used as a control. Almost no pp60(c-src) could be detected on the plasma membrane from resting platelets. However, it appeared on the platelet surface after thrombin stimulation and was found preferentially on the pseudopods. The distribution of the src protein on thrombin-activated platelets was similar to that of granulophysin, the dense granule protein, although in a much lesser extent. In platelets from patients with the gray-platelet syndrome, devoid of alpha-granules, pp60(c-src) was absent on resting platelet surface but after thrombin activation expressed at the membrane surface to a normal extent. The results suggest that the src protein is indeed located in an intraplatelet component which is liberated during platelet stimulation, this finding being compatible with its dense granule localization.

  8. High-wavenumber Solar f-mode Strengthening Prior to Active Region Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nishant K.; Raichur, Harsha; Brandenburg, Axel

    2016-12-01

    We report a systematic strengthening of the local solar surface or fundamental f-mode one to two days prior to the emergence of an active region (AR) in the same (corotating) location. Except for a possibly related increase in the kurtosis of the magnetic field, no indication can be seen in the magnetograms at that time. Our study is motivated by earlier numerical findings of Singh et al., which showed that, in the presence of a nonuniform magnetic field that is concentrated a few scale heights below the surface, the f-mode fans out in the diagnostic kω diagram at high wavenumbers. Here we explore this possibility using data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory and show for six isolated ARs, 11130, 11158, 11242, 11105, 11072, and 11768, that at large latitudinal wavenumbers (corresponding to horizontal scales of around 3000 {km}), the f-mode displays strengthening about two days prior to AR formation and thus provides a new precursor for AR formation. Furthermore, we study two ARs, 12051 and 11678, apart from a magnetically quiet patch lying next to AR 12529, to demonstrate the challenges in extracting such a precursor signal when a newly forming AR emerges in a patch that lies in close proximity to one or several already existing ARs, which are expected to pollute neighboring patches. We then discuss plausible procedures for extracting precursor signals from regions with crowded environments. The idea that the f-mode is perturbed days before any visible magnetic activity occurs at the surface can be important in constraining dynamo models aimed at understanding the global magnetic activity of the Sun.

  9. YANA – a software tool for analyzing flux modes, gene-expression and enzyme activities

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Roland; Musch, Patrick; von Kamp, Axel; Engels, Bernd; Schirmer, Heiner; Schuster, Stefan; Dandekar, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Background A number of algorithms for steady state analysis of metabolic networks have been developed over the years. Of these, Elementary Mode Analysis (EMA) has proven especially useful. Despite its low user-friendliness, METATOOL as a reliable high-performance implementation of the algorithm has been the instrument of choice up to now. As reported here, the analysis of metabolic networks has been improved by an editor and analyzer of metabolic flux modes. Analysis routines for expression levels and the most central, well connected metabolites and their metabolic connections are of particular interest. Results YANA features a platform-independent, dedicated toolbox for metabolic networks with a graphical user interface to calculate (integrating METATOOL), edit (including support for the SBML format), visualize, centralize, and compare elementary flux modes. Further, YANA calculates expected flux distributions for a given Elementary Mode (EM) activity pattern and vice versa. Moreover, a dissection algorithm, a centralization algorithm, and an average diameter routine can be used to simplify and analyze complex networks. Proteomics or gene expression data give a rough indication of some individual enzyme activities, whereas the complete flux distribution in the network is often not known. As such data are noisy, YANA features a fast evolutionary algorithm (EA) for the prediction of EM activities with minimum error, including alerts for inconsistent experimental data. We offer the possibility to include further known constraints (e.g. growth constraints) in the EA calculation process. The redox metabolism around glutathione reductase serves as an illustration example. All software and documentation are available for download at . Conclusion A graphical toolbox and an editor for METATOOL as well as a series of additional routines for metabolic network analyses constitute a new user-friendly software for such efforts. PMID:15929789

  10. Playing in parallel: the effects of multiplayer modes in active video game on motivation and physical exertion.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wei; Crouse, Julia

    2013-06-01

    Although multiplayer modes are common among contemporary video games, the bulk of game research focuses on the single-player mode. To fill the gap in the literature, the current study investigated the effects of different multiplayer modes on enjoyment, future play motivation, and the actual physical activity intensity in an active video game. One hundred sixty-two participants participated in a one-factor between-subject laboratory experiment with three conditions: (a) single player: play against self pretest score; (b) cooperation with another player in the same physical space; (c) parallel competition with another player in separated physical spaces. We found that parallel competition in separate physical spaces was the optimal mode, since it resulted in both high enjoyment and future play motivation and high physical intensity. Implications for future research on multiplayer mode and play space as well as active video game-based physical activity interventions are discussed.

  11. Normal-mode frequency band view of the Off-the-West-Coast of Northern Sumatra Earthquake of April 11, 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igarashi, M.; Tanimoto, T.

    2012-12-01

    Many studies with body-wave and long-period surface wave analyses on the Off-the-West-coast of Northern Sumatra Earthquake of April 11, 2012, have already pointed out complexities of this event (e.g., Meng et al., 2012). A sequence of events with fairly wide spatial and temporal extent are clearly needed to explain many facets of seismic data. In this study, we attempt to summarize a few distinct features from the normal-mode frequency band (0.3-2.0 mHz) which are obviously much simpler by their long wavelength and long periods. We analyzed long-period seismic data from STS1 and KS54000 sensors for the first 12 hours of the main event using the time-domain waveform fitting technique (Tanimoto, et al., 2012). Adoption of this short time series is partly to avoid uncertain Q parameters on amplitudes but also to avoid the effects from two earthquakes in Oregon (Mw6.0) and Mexico (Mw6.7) that occurred about 23rd hour on the same day. These events are much smaller but their effects cannot be ignored in seismic stations in North America. Two major events reported by the Global CMT project, the Mw8.6 main shock and the Mw8.2 aftershock that occurred two hours later, are clearly not sufficient to explain the amplitude data at about 1 mHz (0.6-1.5 mHz). Synthetic seismograms for the two events under-predicts data by about 30 percent. Amplitudes also show two-theta azimuthal variation that indicates a necessity of at least one hidden event (if not rupture propagation). This necessity has already been pointed out by various groups (e.g., Duputel et al., 2012, Shao et al., 2012). Duputel et al. (2012), for example, reports that the Mw8.6 main event by GCMT should be split up by two large events, the Mw8.5 main event and Mw8.3 event that occurred 70 seconds later. Our analysis shows that their three-source solution, including the Mw8.2 event two hours later, satisfies overall amplitude data in the normal-mode frequency band. However, their solution still shows two

  12. Exploring transition pathway and free-energy profile of large-scale protein conformational change by combining normal mode analysis and umbrella sampling molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinan; Shao, Qiang; Xu, Zhijian; Liu, Yingtao; Yang, Zhuo; Cossins, Benjamin P; Jiang, Hualiang; Chen, Kaixian; Shi, Jiye; Zhu, Weiliang

    2014-01-09

    Large-scale conformational changes of proteins are usually associated with the binding of ligands. Because the conformational changes are often related to the biological functions of proteins, understanding the molecular mechanisms of these motions and the effects of ligand binding becomes very necessary. In the present study, we use the combination of normal-mode analysis and umbrella sampling molecular dynamics simulation to delineate the atomically detailed conformational transition pathways and the associated free-energy landscapes for three well-known protein systems, viz., adenylate kinase (AdK), calmodulin (CaM), and p38α kinase in the absence and presence of respective ligands. For each protein under study, the transient conformations along the conformational transition pathway and thermodynamic observables are in agreement with experimentally and computationally determined ones. The calculated free-energy profiles reveal that AdK and CaM are intrinsically flexible in structures without obvious energy barrier, and their ligand binding shifts the equilibrium from the ligand-free to ligand-bound conformation (population shift mechanism). In contrast, the ligand binding to p38α leads to a large change in free-energy barrier (ΔΔG ≈ 7 kcal/mol), promoting the transition from DFG-in to DFG-out conformation (induced fit mechanism). Moreover, the effect of the protonation of D168 on the conformational change of p38α is also studied, which reduces the free-energy difference between the two functional states of p38α and thus further facilitates the conformational interconversion. Therefore, the present study suggests that the detailed mechanism of ligand binding and the associated conformational transition is not uniform for all kinds of proteins but correlated to their respective biological functions.

  13. Tree-ring Oxygen Isotope Records of Climate Modes Influencing North Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, C. I.; Miller, D. L.; Grissino-Mayer, H. D.; Kocis, W. N.; Lewis, D. B.

    2006-12-01

    The relatively short instrumental record hinders our ability to discern the linkages between low frequency modes of climate variability and tropical cyclone activity and to differentiate natural versus anthropogenic components of these trends. The development of biological proxies for tropical cyclone activity and climate provides a basis for evaluation of these linkages over much longer time frames. The oxygen isotope composition of tree-ring cellulose, sampled at high resolution (seasonal or better), provides a new proxy for tropical cyclone activity that preserves a concurrent isotope time series reflecting the influence of climate variability. This proxy archive potentially extends many centuries beyond the instrumental and historical (documentary) record of climate and tropical cyclone activity. Isotope time series for longleaf pines (Pinus palustris Mill.) in southern Georgia and South Carolina preserve distinct tropical cyclone histories, yet similar, long term trends in cellulose δ 18O compositions. The isotope time series correlate to various climate modes proposed to impact hurricane formation and frequency. Tree-ring cellulose δ 18O values at the Georgia study site show a significant negative correlation with AMO indices from 1875 to about 1950, and a weaker, positive correlation from about 1965 to 1990. The "crossover" parallels a change in the predominant ontogeny of North Atlantic tropical cyclones from tropical-only to baroclinically-enhanced hurricanes. The intervening 1950s is marked by greater correspondence to ENSO indices. Reduced seasonality in the isotope record (i.e., the difference between earlywood and latewood δ 18O values) corresponds to warm phases of the PDO. An isotope series for 1580 to 1650 suggests little tropical cyclone activity coinciding with a period (1560-1625) of severe drought in the African Sahel. Although preliminary, these results suggest that tree-ring oxygen isotope compositions are sensitive to changes in climate

  14. Nd:YAG laser with passive-active mode-locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weijiang; Chen, Zhenlei; Ren, Deming; Qu, Yanchen; Mo, Shuang; Huang, Jinjer; Andreev, Yury M.; Gorobets, Vadim A.; Petukhov, Vladimir O.; Zemlyanov, Aleksei A.

    2008-03-01

    All solid-state flash-lamp pumped passive-active mode-locked Nd3+:YAG laser is designed and experimentally studded. Saturation absorber Cr4+:YAG with initial transparency 25 and 47% are used as a passive Q-switcher and acousto-optical fused quartz modulator as an active mode-locker. Efficient length of the laser cavity with fixed mirror positions (1.45 m spaced) is droved by changes of 100% flat mirror for concave mirrors with different focus lengths. Changeable output mirrors with transparencies of 15 and 50% are used. Driving of the cavity parameters, laser and acousto-optical modulator power supply voltages let us to control output pulse train and single pulse parameters. As it goes from the analyses of oscillograms fixed with pyroelectric detector (τ=0.5 ns) and 1 GHz oscilloscope, over 95% of pulse output energy has been mode-locked. Average duration of the pulse train envelope of 5 to 50 single pulses at FWHM has been droved within 50 to 600 ns. When this single pulse duration is controlled but did not exceed 2 ns.

  15. Corporate colonization of health activism? Irish health advocacy organizations' modes of engagement with pharmaceutical corporations.

    PubMed

    O'Donovan, Orla

    2007-01-01

    This article is based on a study that aimed to shed light on the "cultures of action" of Irish health advocacy organizations, and particularly their modes of engagement with pharmaceutical corporations. Debates about what some interpret as the "corporate colonization" of health activism provide the backdrop for the analysis. The empirical dimension of the study involved a survey of 112 organizations and in-depth study of a small number of organizations that manifest diverse modes of engagement with the pharmaceutical industry. The varying modes of interaction are plotted along a continuum and characterized as corporatist, cautious cooperation, and confrontational. Evidence is presented of a strong and growing cultural tendency in Irish health advocacy organizations to frame pharmaceutical corporations as allies in their quests for better health. The analysis of four constitutive dimensions of organizations' cultures of action can reveal the legitimating logics underlying their diverging positions around pharmaceutical industry sponsorship. While the research shows that pharmaceutical corporations have largely succeeded in defining themselves as a philanthropic force and rightful players in Irish health activism, it cautions against a simplistic conclusion that this is evidence of corporate colonization.

  16. Use of active extracts of poplar buds against Penicillium italicum and possible modes of action.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuzhen; Liu, Limei; Li, Dongmei; Xia, Huan; Su, Xiaojun; Peng, Litao; Pan, Siyi

    2016-04-01

    Antifungal components, from poplar buds active fraction (PBAF) against Penicillium italicum, the causal agent of blue mold in citrus fruits, were identified and possible action modes were investigated. Pinocembrin, chrysin and galangin were determined as active components in PBAF, using HPLC and HPLC-MS analysis. The antifungal activity is stable at temperatures ranging from 4 °C to 100 °C and pH levels ranging from 4 to 8. In the presence of PBAF, the hyphae become shriveled, wrinkled and the cell membrane became seriously disrupted. Further investigation on cell permeability, nucleic acid content and alkaline phosphatase suggest that the cell membrane might be the target. Mycelial oxygen consumption and the respiration-related enzymatic activity of succinate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase and ATPase were all inhibited by PBAF. We propose that PBAF is a potentially useful alternative for blue mold control and may act against P. italicum by interfering with respiration and disrupting the cell membrane.

  17. Active mode calibration of the combined thermal epithermal neutron (CTEN) system

    SciTech Connect

    Veilleux, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    The Combined Thermal Epithermal Neutron (CTEN) system was developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory to perform active and passive neutron interrogation of waste. The higher energy epithermal neutrons are able to penetrate further into the matrix and active material, thus reducing matrix attenuation and self-shielding effects compared to a thermal neutron pulse alone. The developmental unit was installed in 2001 at the Los Alamos Non-Destructive Assay (NDA) facility to characterize waste for the TRU Waste Characterization Project (TWCP). This paper summarizes the active mode certification results. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) traceable standards were used to determine the system response as a function of mass. Finally, NIST-traceable verification standards were used to verify the calibration in the range 30 milligrams to 25 g of weapons grade plutonium although self-shielding limits the upper active interrogation to 10 g.

  18. CMOS common-mode rejection filter with floating active transformer operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Daisuke; Ikebe, Masayuki; Motohisa, Junichi; Sano, Eiichi; Kondou, Akira

    2014-01-01

    We propose an inductorless common-mode rejection filter with a gyrator-C network for common-mode-noise reduction. By adopting a gyrator-C network and ladder structure, high-order and small filter circuits with active transformer operation were fabricated. The filter was designed and fabricated in a Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) 0.18 µm CMOS process. This filter exhibited a CMRR of 80 dB, output noise voltage of 103 nV/Hz1/2, third-order input intercept point of 8.8 dBm at 1 MHz operation, and cutoff frequency of under 6 MHz. The total power consumption was 14.8 mW with a 2.5 V supply, and the chip area was 0.7 × 0.4 mm2.

  19. Promotion of protein crystal growth by actively switching crystal growth mode via femtosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominaga, Yusuke; Maruyama, Mihoko; Yoshimura, Masashi; Koizumi, Haruhiko; Tachibana, Masaru; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Adachi, Hiroaki; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Takano, Kazufumi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y.; Mori, Yusuke

    2016-11-01

    Large single crystals with desirable shapes are essential for various scientific and industrial fields, such as X-ray/neutron crystallography and crystalline devices. However, in the case of proteins the production of such crystals is particularly challenging, despite the efforts devoted to optimization of the environmental, chemical and physical parameters. Here we report an innovative approach for promoting the growth of protein crystals by directly modifying the local crystal structure via femtosecond laser ablation. We demonstrate that protein crystals with surfaces that are locally etched (several micrometers in diameter) by femtosecond laser ablation show enhanced growth rates without losing crystal quality. Optical phase-sensitive microscopy and X-ray topography imaging techniques reveal that the local etching induces spiral growth, which is energetically advantageous compared with the spontaneous two-dimensional nucleation growth mode. These findings prove that femtosecond laser ablation can actively switch the crystal growth mode, offering flexible control over the size and shape of protein crystals.

  20. Piezo activated mode tracking system for widely tunable mode-hop-free external cavity mid-IR semiconductor lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wysocki, Gerard (Inventor); Tittel, Frank K. (Inventor); Curl, Robert F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A widely tunable, mode-hop-free semiconductor laser operating in the mid-IR comprises a QCL laser chip having an effective QCL cavity length, a diffraction grating defining a grating angle and an external cavity length with respect to said chip, and means for controlling the QCL cavity length, the external cavity length, and the grating angle. The laser of claim 1 wherein said chip may be tuned over a range of frequencies even in the absence of an anti-reflective coating. The diffraction grating is controllably pivotable and translatable relative to said chip and the effective QCL cavity length can be adjusted by varying the injection current to the chip. The laser can be used for high resolution spectroscopic applications and multi species trace-gas detection. Mode-hopping is avoided by controlling the effective QCL cavity length, the external cavity length, and the grating angle so as to replicate a virtual pivot point.

  1. Estrogen effects on thyroid iodide uptake and thyroperoxidase activity in normal and ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Lima, Lívia P; Barros, Inês A; Lisbôa, Patrícia C; Araújo, Renata L; Silva, Alba C M; Rosenthal, Doris; Ferreira, Andrea C F; Carvalho, Denise P

    2006-08-01

    Sex steroids interfere with the pituitary-thyroid axis function, although the reports have been controversial and no conclusive data is available. Some previous reports indicate that estradiol might also regulate thyroid function through a direct action on the thyrocytes. In this report, we examined the effects of low and high doses of estradiol administered to control and ovariectomized adult female rats and to pre-pubertal females. We demonstrate that estradiol administration to both intact adult and pre-pubertal females causes a significant increase in the relative thyroid weight. Serum T3 is significantly decreased in ovariectomized rats, and is normalized by estrogen replacement. Neither doses of estrogen produced a significant change in serum TSH and total T4 in ovariectomized, adult intact and pre-pubertal rats. The highest, supraphysiological, estradiol dose produced a significant increase in thyroid iodide uptake in ovariectomized and in pre-pubertal rats, but not in control adult females. Thyroperoxidase activity was significantly higher in intact adult rats treated with both estradiol doses and in ovariectomized rats treated with the highest estradiol dose. Since serum TSH levels were not significantly changed, we suggest a direct action of estradiol on the thyroid gland, which depends on the age and on the previous gonad status of the animal.

  2. Anti-amyloidogenic Activity of IgGs Contained in Normal Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Angela D.; McWilliams-Koeppen, Helen P.; Acero, Luis; Weber, Alfred; Ehrlich, Hartmut; Schwarz, Hans P.; Solomon, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Introduction We have previously shown that a subpopulation of naturally occurring human IgGs has therapeutic potential for the amyloid-associated disorders. These molecules cross-react with conformational epitopes on amyloidogenic assemblies, including amyloid beta (Aβ) protein fibrils that are a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease. Materials and Methods Using our europium-linked immunosorbant assay, we established that ∼95% of 260 screened donor plasma samples had amyloid fibril-reactive IgGs and Aβ conformer-reactive IgGs with minimal binding to Aβ monomers. Anti-amyloidogenic reactivity was diverse and attributed to Aβ targeting multiple fibril-related binding sites and/or variations in multidentate binding. Results and Discussion There was no correlation between anti-fibril and anti-oligomer reactivity and donor age (19 to 60 years old) or gender. These findings demonstrate the inherent but diverse anti-amyloidogenic activity of natural IgGs contained in normal plasma. Conclusion Our studies provide support for investigating the clinical significance and physiological function of this novel class of antibodies. PMID:20405179

  3. Observations of the azimuthal dependence of normal mode coupling below 4 mHz at the South Pole and its nearby stations: Insights into the anisotropy beneath the Transantarctic Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiao Gang

    2016-08-01

    Normal mode coupling pair 0S26-0T26 and 0S27-0T27 are significantly present at the South Pole station QSPA after the 2011/03/11 Mw9.1 Tohoku earthquake. In an attempt to determine the mechanisms responsible for the coupling pairs, I first investigate mode observations at 43 stations distributed along the polar great-circle path for the earthquake and observations at 32 Antarctic stations. I rule out the effect of Earth's rotation as well as the effect of global large-scale lateral heterogeneity, but argue instead for the effect of small-scale local azimuthal anisotropy in a depth extent about 300 km. The presence of quasi-Love waveform in 2-5 mHz at QSPA and its nearby stations confirms the predication. Secondly, I analyze normal mode observations at the South Pole location after 28 large earthquakes from 1998 to 2015. The result indicates that the presence of the mode coupling is azimuthal dependent, which is related to event azimuths in -46° to -18°. I also make a comparison between the shear-wave splitting measurements of previous studies and the mode coupling observations of this study, suggesting that their difference can be explained by a case that the anisotropy responsible for the mode coupling is not just below the South Pole location but located below region close to the Transantarctic Mountains (TAM). Furthermore, more signals of local azimuthal anisotropy in normal-mode observations at QSPA and SBA, such as coupling of 0S12-0T11 and vertical polarization anomaly for 0T10, confirms the existence of deep anisotropy close to TAM, which may be caused by asthenospheric mantle flow and edge convection around cratonic keel of TAM.

  4. Flow cytometric assessment of activation of peripheral blood platelets in dogs with normal platelet count and asymptomatic thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Żmigrodzka, M; Guzera, M; Winnicka, A

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play a crucial role in hemostasis. Their activation has not yet been evaluated in healthy dogs with a normal and low platelet count. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of activators on platelet activation in dogs with a normal platelet count and asymptomatic thrombocytopenia. 72 clinically healthy dogs were enrolled. Patients were allocated into three groups. Group 1 consisted of 30 dogs with a normal platelet count, group 2 included 22 dogs with a platelet count between 100 and 200×109/l and group 3 consisted of 20 dogs with a platelet count lower than 100×109/l. Platelet rich-plasma (PRP) was obtained from peripheral blood samples using tripotassium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (K3-EDTA) as anticoagulant. Next, platelets were stimulated using phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate or thrombin, stabilized using procaine or left unstimulated. The expression of CD51 and CD41/CD61 was evaluated. Co-expression of CD41/CD61 and Annexin V served as a marker of platelet activation. The expression of CD41/CD61 and CD51 did not differ between the 3 groups. Thrombin-stimulated platelets had a significantly higher activity in dogs with a normal platelet count than in dogs with asymptomatic thrombocytopenia. Procaine inhibited platelet activity in all groups. In conclusion, activation of platelets of healthy dogs in vitro varied depending on the platelet count and platelet activator.

  5. FMRI Brain Activation in a Finnish Family with Specific Language Impairment Compared with a Normal Control Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hugdahl, Kenneth; Gundersen, Hilde; Brekke, Cecilie; Thomsen, Tormod; Rimol, Lars Morten; Ersland, Lars; Niemi, Jussi

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate differences in brain activation in a family with SLI as compared to intact individuals with normally developed language during processing of language stimuli. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to monitor changes in neuronal activation in temporal and frontal lobe areas in 5…

  6. Learning about Modes in Atomic Force Microscopy by Means of Hands-On Activities Based on a Simple Apparatus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phuapaiboon, Unchada; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Osotchan, Tanakorn

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the results of using a low-cost hands-on setup in combination with accompanying activities to promote understanding of the contact mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM). This contact mode setup enabled learners to study how AFM works by hand scanning using probing cantilevers with different characteristics on…

  7. Synthesis, structure-activity relationship, and mode-of-action studies of antimalarial reversed chloroquine compounds.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Steven J; Kelly, Jane X; Shomloo, Shawheen; Wittlin, Sergio; Brun, Reto; Liebmann, Katherine; Peyton, David H

    2010-09-09

    We have previously shown that a "reversed chloroquine (RCQ)" molecule, composed of a chloroquine-like moiety and a resistance reversal-like moiety, can overcome chloroquine resistance in P. falciparum ( Burgess , S. J. ; Selzer , A. ; Kelly , J. X. ; Smilkstein , M. J. ; Riscoe , M. K. ; Peyton , D. H. J. Med. Chem. 2006 , 49 , 5623 . Andrews , S. ; Burgess , S. J. ; Skaalrud , D. ; Kelly , J. X. ; Peyton , D. H. J. Med. Chem. 2010 , 53 , 916 ). Here, we present an investigation into the structure-activity relationship of the RCQ structures, resulting in an orally active molecule with good in vitro and in vivo antimalarial activity. We also present evidence of the mode of action, indicating that the RCQ molecules inhibit hemozoin formation in the parasite's digestive vacuole in a manner similar to that of chloroquine.

  8. Psychophysiological mechanisms of interindividual differences in goal activation modes during action cascading.

    PubMed

    Mückschel, Moritz; Stock, Ann-Kathrin; Beste, Christian

    2014-08-01

    Our daily life is characterized by multiple response options that need to be cascaded in order to avoid overstrain of restricted response selection resources. While response selection and goal activation in action cascading are likely driven by a process varying from serial to parallel processing, little is known about the underlying neural mechanisms that may underlie interindividual differences in these modes of response selection. To investigate these mechanisms, we used a stop-change paradigm for the recording of event-related potentials and standardized low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography source localizations in healthy subjects. Systematically varying the stimulus onset asynchrony (the temporal spacing of "stop" and "change" signals), we applied mathematical constraints to classify subjects in more parallel or more serial goal activators during action cascading. On that basis, the electrophysiological data show that processes linking stimulus processing and response execution, but not attentional processes, underlie interindividual differences in either serial or parallel response selection modes during action cascading. On a systems level, these processes were mediated via a distributed fronto-parietal network, including the anterior cingulate cortex (Brodman area 32, BA32) and the temporo-parietal junction (BA40). There was a linear relation between the individual degree of overlap in activated task goals and electrophysiological processes.

  9. Elevated adenosine signaling via adenosine A2B receptor induces normal and sickle erythrocyte sphingosine kinase 1 activity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kaiqi; Zhang, Yujin; Bogdanov, Mikhail V; Wu, Hongyu; Song, Anren; Li, Jessica; Dowhan, William; Idowu, Modupe; Juneja, Harinder S; Molina, Jose G; Blackburn, Michael R; Kellems, Rodney E; Xia, Yang

    2015-03-05

    Erythrocyte possesses high sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) activity and is the major cell type supplying plasma sphingosine-1-phosphate, a signaling lipid regulating multiple physiological and pathological functions. Recent studies revealed that erythrocyte SphK1 activity is upregulated in sickle cell disease (SCD) and contributes to sickling and disease progression. However, how erythrocyte SphK1 activity is regulated remains unknown. Here we report that adenosine induces SphK1 activity in human and mouse sickle and normal erythrocytes in vitro. Next, using 4 adenosine receptor-deficient mice and pharmacological approaches, we determined that the A2B adenosine receptor (ADORA2B) is essential for adenosine-induced SphK1 activity in human and mouse normal and sickle erythrocytes in vitro. Subsequently, we provide in vivo genetic evidence that adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency leads to excess plasma adenosine and elevated erythrocyte SphK1 activity. Lowering adenosine by ADA enzyme therapy or genetic deletion of ADORA2B significantly reduced excess adenosine-induced erythrocyte SphK1 activity in ADA-deficient mice. Finally, we revealed that protein kinase A-mediated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation functioning downstream of ADORA2B underlies adenosine-induced erythrocyte SphK1 activity. Overall, our findings reveal a novel signaling network regulating erythrocyte SphK1 and highlight innovative mechanisms regulating SphK1 activity in normal and SCD.

  10. Short cavity active mode locking fiber laser for optical sensing and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hwi Don; Han, Ga Hee; Jeong, Syung Won; Jeong, Myung Yung; Kim, Chang-Seok; Shin, Jun Geun; Lee, Byeong Ha; Eom, Tae Joong

    2014-05-01

    We demonstrate a highly linear wavenumber- swept active mode locking (AML) fiber laser for optical sensing and imaging without any wavenumber-space resampling process. In this all-electric AML wavenumber-swept mechanism, a conventional wavelength selection filter is eliminated and, instead, the suitable programmed electric modulation signal is directly applied to the gain medium. Various types of wavenumber (or wavelength) tunings can be implemented because of the filter-less cavity configuration. Therefore, we successfully demonstrate a linearly wavenumber-swept AML fiber laser with 26.5 mW of output power to obtain an in-vivo OCT image at the 100 kHz swept rate.

  11. Spontaneous activity in default-mode network predicts ascription of self-relatedness to stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Simone; Duncan, Niall W.; Fan, Yan; Huang, Zirui; Lane, Timothy; Weng, Xuchu; Bajbouj, Malek; Northoff, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous activity levels prior to stimulus presentation can determine how that stimulus will be perceived. It has also been proposed that such spontaneous activity, particularly in the default-mode network (DMN), is involved in self-related processing. We therefore hypothesised that pre-stimulus activity levels in the DMN predict whether a stimulus is judged as self-related or not. Participants were presented in the MRI scanner with a white noise stimulus that they were instructed contained their name or another. They then had to respond with which name they thought they heard. Regions where there was an activity level difference between self and other response trials 2 s prior to the stimulus being presented were identified. Pre-stimulus activity levels were higher in the right temporoparietal junction, the right temporal pole and the left superior temporal gyrus in trials where the participant responded that they heard their own name than trials where they responded that they heard another. Pre-stimulus spontaneous activity levels in particular brain regions, largely overlapping with the DMN, predict the subsequent judgement of stimuli as self-related. This extends our current knowledge of self-related processing and its apparent relationship with intrinsic brain activity in what can be termed a rest-self overlap. PMID:26796968

  12. Spontaneous activity in default-mode network predicts ascription of self-relatedness to stimuli.

    PubMed

    Qin, Pengmin; Grimm, Simone; Duncan, Niall W; Fan, Yan; Huang, Zirui; Lane, Timothy; Weng, Xuchu; Bajbouj, Malek; Northoff, Georg

    2016-04-01

    Spontaneous activity levels prior to stimulus presentation can determine how that stimulus will be perceived. It has also been proposed that such spontaneous activity, particularly in the default-mode network (DMN), is involved in self-related processing. We therefore hypothesised that pre-stimulus activity levels in the DMN predict whether a stimulus is judged as self-related or not. Participants were presented in the MRI scanner with a white noise stimulus that they were instructed contained their name or another. They then had to respond with which name they thought they heard. Regions where there was an activity level difference between self and other response trials 2 s prior to the stimulus being presented were identified. Pre-stimulus activity levels were higher in the right temporoparietal junction, the right temporal pole and the left superior temporal gyrus in trials where the participant responded that they heard their own name than trials where they responded that they heard another. Pre-stimulus spontaneous activity levels in particular brain regions, largely overlapping with the DMN, predict the subsequent judgement of stimuli as self-related. This extends our current knowledge of self-related processing and its apparent relationship with intrinsic brain activity in what can be termed a rest-self overlap.

  13. Theory of psychological adaptive modes.

    PubMed

    Lehti, Juha

    2016-05-01

    When an individual is facing a stressor and normal stress-response mechanism cannot guarantee sufficient adaptation, special emotional states, adaptive modes, are activated (for example a depressive reaction). Adaptive modes are involuntary states of mind, they are of comprehensive nature, they interfere with normal functioning, and they cannot be repressed or controlled the same way as many emotions. Their transformational nature differentiates them from other emotional states. The object of the adaptive mode is to optimize the problem-solving abilities according to the situation that has provoked the mode. Cognitions and emotions during the adaptive mode are different than in a normal mental state. These altered cognitions and emotional reactions guide the individual to use the correct coping skills in order to deal with the stressor. Successful adaptation will cause the adaptive mode to fade off since the adaptive mode is no longer necessary, and the process as a whole will lead to raised well-being. However, if the adaptation process is inadequate, then the transformation period is prolonged, and the adaptive mode will turn into a dysfunctional state. Many psychiatric disorders are such maladaptive processes. The maladaptive processes can be turned into functional ones by using adaptive skills that are used in functional adaptive processes.

  14. Bioluminescence Imaging of β Cells and Intrahepatic Insulin Gene Activity under Normal and Pathological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Yukari; Nagasaki, Haruka; Daassi, Dhouha; Tai, Pei-Han; Ema, Masatsugu; Kudo, Takashi; Takahashi, Satoru

    2013-01-01

    In diabetes research, bioluminescence imaging (BLI) has been applied in studies of β-cell impairment, development, and islet transplantation. To develop a mouse model that enables noninvasive imaging of β cells, we generated a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenic mouse in which a mouse 200-kbp genomic fragment comprising the insulin I gene drives luciferase expression (Ins1-luc BAC transgenic mouse). BLI of mice was performed using the IVIS Spectrum system after intraperitoneal injection of luciferin, and the bioluminescence signal from the pancreatic region analyzed. When compared with MIP-Luc-VU mice [FVB/N-Tg(Ins1-luc)VUPwrs/J] expressing luciferase under the control of the 9.2-kbp mouse insulin I promoter (MIP), the bioluminescence emission from Ins1-luc BAC transgenic mice was enhanced approximately 4-fold. Streptozotocin-treated Ins1-luc BAC transgenic mice developed severe diabetes concomitant with a sharp decline in the BLI signal intensity in the pancreas. Conversely, mice fed a high-fat diet for 8 weeks showed an increase in the signal, reflecting a decrease or increase in the β-cell mass. Although the bioluminescence intensity of the islets correlated well with the number of isolated islets in vitro, the intensity obtained from a living mouse in vivo did not necessarily reflect an absolute quantification of the β-cell mass under pathological conditions. On the other hand, adenovirus-mediated gene transduction of β-cell-related transcription factors in Ins1-luc BAC transgenic mice generated luminescence from the hepatic region for more than 1 week. These results demonstrate that BLI in Ins1-luc BAC transgenic mice provides a noninvasive method of imaging islet β cells and extrapancreatic activity of the insulin gene in the liver under normal and pathological conditions. PMID:23593212

  15. Comparative HPLC methods for β-blockers separation using different types of chiral stationary phases in normal phase and polar organic phase elution modes. Analysis of propranolol enantiomers in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Morante-Zarcero, Sonia; Sierra, Isabel

    2012-03-25

    The enantioselectivities of β-blockers (propranolol, metoprolol, atenolol and pindolol) on four different types of chiral stationary phases (CSPs): Chiralpak AD-H, Lux Cellulose-1, Chirobiotic T and Sumichiral OA-4900 were compared using polar organic (PO) elution mode and normal phase (NP) elution mode. Method optimizations were demonstrated by modifying parameters such as organic modifier composition (ethanol, 2-propanol and acetonitrile) and basic mobile phase additives (triethylamine, diethylamine, ethanolamine, and buthylamine). In normal phase elution mode with Lux Cellulose-1, the four pairs of enantiomers can be separated in the same run in gradient elution mode. Additionally, a simple chiral HPLC-DAD method using a newly commercialized polysaccharide-based CSP by Phenomenex (Lux Cellulose-1) in NP elution mode for enantioselective determination of propranolol in water samples by highly selective molecularly imprinted polymers extraction was validated. The optimized conditions were a mobile phase composed by n-hexane/ethanol/DEA (70/30/0.3, v/v/v) at a flow rate of 1.0 mL min(-1) and 25 °C. The method is selective, precise and accurate and was found to be linear in the range of 0.125-50 μg mL(-1) (R(2)>0.999) with a method detection limit (MLD) of 0.4 μg mL(-1) for both enantiomers. Recoveries achieved with both enantiomers ranged from 97 to 109%.

  16. Antimicrobial activity of amine oxides: mode of action and structure-activity correlation.

    PubMed

    Subík, J; Takácsová, G; Psenák, M; Devínsky, F

    1977-08-01

    The effect of N-alkyl derivatives of saturated heterocyclic amine oxides on the growth and metabolism of microorganisms has been studied. 4-Dodecylmorpholine-N-oxide inhibited the differentiation and growth of Bacillus cereus, of different species of filamentous fungi, and of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. For vegetative cells, the effect of 4-dodecylmorpholine-N-oxide was lethal. Cells of S. cerevisiae, after interaction with 4-dodecylmorpholine-N-oxide, released intracellular K(+) and were unable to oxidize or ferment glucose. The functions of isolated yeast mitochondria were also impaired. 4-Dodecylmorpholine-N-oxide at growth-inhibiting concentrations induced rapid lysis of osmotically stabilized yeast protoplasts, with the rate of lysis a function of temperature and of amine oxide concentration. A study of the relationships between structure, antimicrobial activity, and cytolytic activity was made with a group of structurally different amine oxides involving a series of homologous 4-alkylmorpholine-N-oxides, 1-alkylpiperidine-N-oxides, 1-dodecylpyrrolidine-N-oxide, 1-dodecylperhydroasepine-N-oxide, and N,N-dimethyldodecylamine oxide. Disorganization of the membrane structure after interaction of cells with the tested amine oxides was primarily responsible for the antimicrobial activity of the amine oxides. This activity was found to be dependent on the chain length of the hydrophobic alkyl group and was only moderately influenced by other substituents of the polarized N-oxide group.

  17. Assessment of Fetal Autonomic Nervous System Activity by Fetal Magnetocardiography: Comparison of Normal Pregnancy and Intrauterine Growth Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Akimune; Nakai, Kenji; Kanasugi, Tomonobu; Terata, Miyuki; Sugiyama, Toru

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To clarify the developmental activity of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) of the normal fetus and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) cases using fetal magnetocardiography (FMCG). Subjects and Methods. Normal pregnancy (n = 35) and IUGR (n = 12) cases at 28–39 and 32–37 weeks of gestation, respectively, were included in this study. The R-R interval variability was used to calculate the coefficient of variance (CVRR) and low frequency/high frequency (LF/HF) ratio. Results. The value of CVRR in the normal pregnancy group displayed a slight increasing trend with gestational age. However, no such trend was observed in the IUGR group. In contrast, the LF/HF ratio in both the normal pregnancy group and the IUGR group clearly increased over the gestational period; the normal group showing statistical significance. Conclusion. The development of fetal ANS activity in IUGR cases might differ from that observed in the normal pregnancy group, and this may facilitate early detection of IUGR. PMID:21547087

  18. Semi-active sliding mode control of vehicle suspension with magneto-rheological damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hailong; Wang, Enrong; Zhang, Ning; Min, Fuhong; Subash, Rakheja; Su, Chunyi

    2015-01-01

    The vehicle semi-active suspension with magneto-rheological damper(MRD) has been a hot topic since this decade, in which the robust control synthesis considering load variation is a challenging task. In this paper, a new semi-active controller based upon the inverse model and sliding mode control (SMC) strategies is proposed for the quarter-vehicle suspension with the magneto-rheological (MR) damper, wherein an ideal skyhook suspension is employed as the control reference model and the vehicle sprung mass is considered as an uncertain parameter. According to the asymptotical stability of SMC, the dynamic errors between the plant and reference systems are used to derive the control damping force acquired by the MR quarter-vehicle suspension system. The proposed modified Bouc-wen hysteretic force-velocity ( F- v) model and its inverse model of MR damper, as well as the proposed continuous modulation (CM) filtering algorithm without phase shift are employed to convert the control damping force into the direct drive current of the MR damper. Moreover, the proposed semi-active sliding mode controller (SSMC)-based MR quarter-vehicle suspension is systematically evaluated through comparing the time and frequency domain responses of the sprung and unsprung mass displacement accelerations, suspension travel and the tire dynamic force with those of the passive quarter-vehicle suspension, under three kinds of varied amplitude harmonic, rounded pulse and real-road measured random excitations. The evaluation results illustrate that the proposed SSMC can greatly suppress the vehicle suspension vibration due to uncertainty of the load, and thus improve the ride comfort and handling safety. The study establishes a solid theoretical foundation as the universal control scheme for the adaptive semi-active control of the MR full-vehicle suspension decoupled into four MR quarter-vehicle sub-suspension systems.

  19. Rotation in a reversed field pinch with active feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconello, M.; Menmuir, S.; Brunsell, P. R.; Kuldkepp, M.

    2006-09-01

    Active feedback stabilization of multiple resistive wall modes (RWMs) has been successfully proven in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch. One of the features of plasma discharges operated with active feedback stabilization, in addition to the prolongation of the plasma discharge, is the sustainment of the plasma rotation. Sustained rotation is observed both for the internally resonant tearing modes (TMs) and the intrinsic impurity oxygen ions. Good quantitative agreement between the toroidal rotation velocities of both is found: the toroidal rotation is characterized by an acceleration phase followed, after one wall time, by a deceleration phase that is slower than in standard discharges. The TMs and the impurity ions rotate in the same poloidal direction with also similar velocities. Poloidal and toroidal velocities have comparable amplitudes and a simple model of their radial profile reproduces the main features of the helical angular phase velocity. RWMs feedback does not qualitatively change the TMs behaviour and typical phenomena such as the dynamo and the 'slinky' are still observed. The improved sustainment of the plasma and TMs rotation occurs also when feedback only acts on internally non-resonant RWMs. This may be due to an indirect positive effect, through non-linear coupling between TMs and RWMs, of feedback on the TMs or to a reduced plasma-wall interaction affecting the plasma flow rotation. Electromagnetic torque calculations show that with active feedback stabilization the TMs amplitude remains well below the locking threshold condition for a thick shell. Finally, it is suggested that active feedback stabilization of RWMs and current profile control techniques can be employed simultaneously thus improving both the plasma duration and its confinement properties.

  20. Estimated likelihood of observing a large earthquake on a continental low-angle normal fault and implications for low-angle normal fault activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Styron, Richard H.; Hetland, Eric A.

    2014-04-01

    The lack of observed continental earthquakes that clearly occurred on low-angle normal faults (LANFs) may indicate that these structures are not seismically active or that these earthquakes are simply rare events. To address this, we compile all potentially active continental LANFs (24 in total) and calculate the likelihood of observing a significant earthquake on them over periods of 1-100 years. This probability depends on several factors including the frequency-magnitude distribution. For either a characteristic or Gutenberg-Richter distribution, we calculate a probability of about 0.5 that an earthquake greater than M6.5 (large enough to avoid ambiguity in dip angle) will be observed on any LANF in a period of 35 years, which is the current length of the global centroid moment tensor catalog. We then use Bayes' Theorem to illustrate how the absence of observed significant LANF seismicity over the catalog period moderately decreases the likelihood that the structures generate large earthquakes.

  1. The brain on art: intense aesthetic experience activates the default mode network

    PubMed Central

    Vessel, Edward A.; Starr, G. Gabrielle; Rubin, Nava

    2012-01-01

    Aesthetic responses to visual art comprise multiple types of experiences, from sensation and perception to emotion and self-reflection. Moreover, aesthetic experience is highly individual, with observers varying significantly in their responses to the same artwork. Combining fMRI and behavioral analysis of individual differences in aesthetic response, we identify two distinct patterns of neural activity exhibited by different sub-networks. Activity increased linearly with observers' ratings (4-level scale) in sensory (occipito-temporal) regions. Activity in the striatum (STR) also varied linearly with ratings, with below-baseline activations for low-rated artworks. In contrast, a network of frontal regions showed a step-like increase only for the most moving artworks (“4” ratings) and non-differential activity for all others. This included several regions belonging to the “default mode network” (DMN) previously associated with self-referential mentation. Our results suggest that aesthetic experience involves the integration of sensory and emotional reactions in a manner linked with their personal relevance. PMID:22529785

  2. The Psychedelic State Induced by Ayahuasca Modulates the Activity and Connectivity of the Default Mode Network

    PubMed Central

    Palhano-Fontes, Fernanda; Andrade, Katia C.; Tofoli, Luis F.; Santos, Antonio C.; Crippa, Jose Alexandre S.; Hallak, Jaime E. C.; Ribeiro, Sidarta; de Araujo, Draulio B.

    2015-01-01

    The experiences induced by psychedelics share a wide variety of subjective features, related to the complex changes in perception and cognition induced by this class of drugs. A remarkable increase in introspection is at the core of these altered states of consciousness. Self-oriented mental activity has been consistently linked to the Default Mode Network (DMN), a set of brain regions more active during rest than during the execution of a goal-directed task. Here we used fMRI technique to inspect the DMN during the psychedelic state induced by Ayahuasca in ten experienced subjects. Ayahuasca is a potion traditionally used by Amazonian Amerindians composed by a mixture of compounds that increase monoaminergic transmission. In particular, we examined whether Ayahuasca changes the activity and connectivity of the DMN and the connection between the DMN and the task-positive network (TPN). Ayahuasca caused a significant decrease in activity through most parts of the DMN, including its most consistent hubs: the Posterior Cingulate Cortex (PCC)/Precuneus and the medial Prefrontal Cortex (mPFC). Functional connectivity within the PCC/Precuneus decreased after Ayahuasca intake. No significant change was observed in the DMN-TPN orthogonality. Altogether, our results support the notion that the altered state of consciousness induced by Ayahuasca, like those induced by psilocybin (another serotonergic psychedelic), meditation and sleep, is linked to the modulation of the activity and the connectivity of the DMN. PMID:25693169

  3. Default mode network activation and Transcendental Meditation practice: Focused Attention or Automatic Self-transcending?

    PubMed

    Travis, Frederick; Parim, Niyazi

    2017-02-01

    This study used subjective reports and eLORETA analysis to assess to what extent Transcendental Meditation (TM) might involve focused attention-voluntary control of mental content. Eighty-seven TM subjects with one month to five years TM experience participated in this study. Regression analysis of years TM practice and self-reported transcendental experiences (lack of time, space and body sense) during meditation practice was flat (r=.07). Those practicing Transcendental Meditation for 1month reported as much transcending as those with 5years of practice. The eLORETA comparison of eyes-closed rest/task and TM practice/task identified similar areas of activation: theta and alpha activation during rest and TM in the posterior cingulate and precuneus, part of the default mode network, and beta2 and beta3 activation during the task in anterior cingulate, ventral lateral and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices, part of the central executive network. In addition, eLORETA comparison of rest and TM identified higher beta temporal activation during rest and higher theta orbitofrontal activation during TM. Thus, it does not seem accurate to include TM practice with meditations in the catgory of Focused Attention, which are characterized by gamma EEG and DMN deactivation. Mixing meditations with different procedures into a single study confounds exploration of meditation effects and confounds application of meditation practices to different subject populations.

  4. The psychedelic state induced by ayahuasca modulates the activity and connectivity of the default mode network.

    PubMed

    Palhano-Fontes, Fernanda; Andrade, Katia C; Tofoli, Luis F; Santos, Antonio C; Crippa, Jose Alexandre S; Hallak, Jaime E C; Ribeiro, Sidarta; de Araujo, Draulio B

    2015-01-01

    The experiences induced by psychedelics share a wide variety of subjective features, related to the complex changes in perception and cognition induced by this class of drugs. A remarkable increase in introspection is at the core of these altered states of consciousness. Self-oriented mental activity has been consistently linked to the Default Mode Network (DMN), a set of brain regions more active during rest than during the execution of a goal-directed task. Here we used fMRI technique to inspect the DMN during the psychedelic state induced by Ayahuasca in ten experienced subjects. Ayahuasca is a potion traditionally used by Amazonian Amerindians composed by a mixture of compounds that increase monoaminergic transmission. In particular, we examined whether Ayahuasca changes the activity and connectivity of the DMN and the connection between the DMN and the task-positive network (TPN). Ayahuasca caused a significant decrease in activity through most parts of the DMN, including its most consistent hubs: the Posterior Cingulate Cortex (PCC)/Precuneus and the medial Prefrontal Cortex (mPFC). Functional connectivity within the PCC/Precuneus decreased after Ayahuasca intake. No significant change was observed in the DMN-TPN orthogonality. Altogether, our results support the notion that the altered state of consciousness induced by Ayahuasca, like those induced by psilocybin (another serotonergic psychedelic), meditation and sleep, is linked to the modulation of the activity and the connectivity of the DMN.

  5. Antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic activity of plectranthus amboinicus on normal and alloxan-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Viswanathaswamy, A H M; Koti, B C; Gore, Aparna; Thippeswamy, A H M; Kulkarni, R V

    2011-03-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic effects of ethanol extract of Plectranthus amboinicus in normal and alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced in Wistar rats by single intraperitoneal administration of alloxan monohydrate (150 mg/kg). Normal as well as diabetic rats were divided into groups (n=6) receiving different treatments. Graded doses (200 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg) of ethanol extract of Plectranthus amboinicus were studied in both normal and alloxan-induced diabetic rats for a period of 15 days. Glibenclamide (600 μg/kg) was used as a reference drug. Oral administration with graded doses of ethanol extract of Plectranthus amboinicus exhibited hypoglycemic effect in normal rats and significantly reduced the peak glucose levels after 120 min of glucose loading. In alloxan-induced diabetic rats, the daily oral treatment with ethanol extract of Plectranthus amboinicus showed a significant reduction in blood glucose. Besides, administration of ethanol extract of Plectranthus amboinicus for 15 days significantly decreased serum contents of total cholesterol, triglycerides whereas HDL-cholesterol, total proteins and calcium were effectively increased. Furthermore, effect of ethanol extract of Plectranthus amboinicus showed profound elevation of serum amylase and reduction of serum lipase. Histology examination showed ethanol extract of Plectranthus amboinicus exhibited almost normalization of damaged pancreatic architecture in rats with diabetes mellitus. Studies clearly demonstrated that ethanol extract of Plectranthus amboinicus leaves possesses hypoglycemic and antihyperlipidemic effects mediated through the restoration of the functions of pancreatic tissues and insulinotropic effect.

  6. Antihyperglycemic and Antihyperlipidemic Activity of Plectranthus Amboinicus on Normal and Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathaswamy, A. H. M.; Koti, B. C.; Gore, Aparna; Thippeswamy, A. H. M.; Kulkarni, R. V.

    2011-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic effects of ethanol extract of Plectranthus amboinicus in normal and alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced in Wistar rats by single intraperitoneal administration of alloxan monohydrate (150 mg/kg). Normal as well as diabetic rats were divided into groups (n=6) receiving different treatments. Graded doses (200 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg) of ethanol extract of Plectranthus amboinicus were studied in both normal and alloxan-induced diabetic rats for a period of 15 days. Glibenclamide (600 μg/kg) was used as a reference drug. Oral administration with graded doses of ethanol extract of Plectranthus amboinicus exhibited hypoglycemic effect in normal rats and significantly reduced the peak glucose levels after 120 min of glucose loading. In alloxan-induced diabetic rats, the daily oral treatment with ethanol extract of Plectranthus amboinicus showed a significant reduction in blood glucose. Besides, administration of ethanol extract of Plectranthus amboinicus for 15 days significantly decreased serum contents of total cholesterol, triglycerides whereas HDL-cholesterol, total proteins and calcium were effectively increased. Furthermore, effect of ethanol extract of Plectranthus amboinicus showed profound elevation of serum amylase and reduction of serum lipase. Histology examination showed ethanol extract of Plectranthus amboinicus exhibited almost normalization of damaged pancreatic architecture in rats with diabetes mellitus. Studies clearly demonstrated that ethanol extract of Plectranthus amboinicus leaves possesses hypoglycemic and antihyperlipidemic effects mediated through the restoration of the functions of pancreatic tissues and insulinotropic effect. PMID:22303055

  7. Respiratory burst activity of intestinal macrophages in normal and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mahida, Y R; Wu, K C; Jewell, D P

    1989-01-01

    Macrophages isolated from normal mucosa (greater than 5 cm from tumour) and inflamed mucosa (from patients with inflammatory bowel disease) of colon and ileum were studied for their ability to undergo a respiratory burst as assessed by reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium to formazan. Using phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and opsonised zymosan as triggers, only a minority (median: 8% for zymosan and 9% for PMA) of macrophages isolated from normal colonic mucosa demonstrated release of oxygen radicals. In contrast, a significantly greater (median: 17% for zymosan and 45% for PMA) proportion of macrophages isolated from inflamed colonic mucosa were able to undergo respiratory burst. Studies with normal and inflamed ileum showed similar results. Stimulation of macrophages isolated from normal colon with interferon-gamma produced only a small increase in the proportion of cells showing release of oxygen radicals. We conclude that the respiratory burst capacity of majority of macrophages isolated from normal colon and ileum is downregulated and a greater proportion of macrophages isolated from inflamed colon and ileum are able to undergo a respiratory burst. Images Fig. 2 PMID:2511088

  8. Tuning sensitivity of CAR to EGFR density limits recognition of normal tissue while maintaining potent anti-tumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Hillary G.; Hurton, Lenka V.; Najjar, Amer; Rushworth, David; Ang, Sonny; Olivares, Simon; Mi, Tiejuan; Switzer, Kirsten; Singh, Harjeet; Huls, Helen; Lee, Dean A.; Heimberger, Amy B.; Champlin, Richard E.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2015-01-01

    Many tumors over express tumor-associated antigens relative to normal tissue, such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). This limits targeting by human T cells modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) due to potential for deleterious recognition of normal cells. We sought to generate CAR+ T cells capable of distinguishing malignant from normal cells based on the disparate density of EGFR expression by generating two CARs from monoclonal antibodies which differ in affinity. T cells with low affinity Nimo-CAR selectively targeted cells over-expressing EGFR, but exhibited diminished effector function as the density of EGFR decreased. In contrast, the activation of T cells bearing high affinity Cetux-CAR was not impacted by the density of EGFR. In summary, we describe the generation of CARs able to tune T-cell activity to the level of EGFR expression in which a CAR with reduced affinity enabled T cells to distinguish malignant from non-malignant cells. PMID:26330164

  9. New triazoles and echinocandins: mode of action, in vitro activity and mechanisms of resistance.

    PubMed

    Fera, Maria Teresa; La Camera, Erminia; De Sarro, Angelina

    2009-10-01

    against important basidiomycetes, including Cryptococcus, Rhodotorula and Trichosporon. This review attempts to deliver the most up-to-date knowledge on the mode of action and mechanisms of resistance to triazoles and echinocandins in fungal pathogens. In addition, the in vitro activity data available on triazoles and echinocandins are reported.

  10. Reduced salience and default mode network activity in women with anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, Kristina L.; Tregellas, Jason R.; Shott, Megan E.; Frank, Guido K.W.

    2014-01-01

    Background The neurobiology of anorexia nervosa is poorly understood. Neuronal networks contributing to action selection, self-regulation and interoception could contribute to pathologic eating and body perception in people with anorexia nervosa. We tested the hypothesis that the salience network (SN) and default mode network (DMN) would show decreased intrinsic activity in women with anorexia nervosa and those who had recovered from the disease compared to controls. The basal ganglia (BGN) and sensorimotor networks (SMN) were also investigated. Methods Between January 2008 and January 2012, women with restricting-type anorexia nervosa, women who recovered from the disease and healthy control women completed functional magnetic resonance imaging during a conditioned stimulus task. Network activity was studied using independent component analysis. Results We studied 20 women with anorexia nervosa, 24 recovered women and 24 controls. Salience network activity in the anterior cingulate cortex was reduced in women with anorexia nervosa (p = 0.030; all results false-discovery rate–corrected) and recovered women (p = 0.039) compared to controls. Default mode network activity in the precuneus was reduced in women with anorexia compared to controls (p = 0.023). Sensorimotor network activity in the supplementary motor area (SMA; p = 0.008), and the left (p = 0.028) and right (p = 0.002) postcentral gyrus was reduced in women with anorexia compared to controls; SMN activity in the SMA (p = 0.019) and the right postcentral gyrus (p = 0.008) was reduced in women with anorexia compared to recovered women. There were no group differences in the BGN. Limitations Differences between patient and control populations (e.g., depression, anxiety, medication) are potential confounds, but were included as covariates. Conclusion Reduced SN activity in women with anorexia nervosa and recovered women could be a trait-related biomarker or illness remnant, altering the drive to approach

  11. Enzyme activation and catalysis: characterisation of the vibrational modes of substrate and product in protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Sytina, Olga A; Alexandre, Maxime T; Heyes, Derren J; Hunter, C Neil; Robert, Bruno; van Grondelle, Rienk; Groot, Marie Louise

    2011-02-14

    The light-dependent reduction of protochlorophyllide, a key step in the synthesis of chlorophyll, is catalyzed by the enzyme protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR) and requires two photons (O. A. Sytina et al., Nature, 2008, 456, 1001-1008). The first photon activates the enzyme-substrate complex, a subsequent second photon initiates the photochemistry by triggering the formation of a catalytic intermediate. These two events are characterized by different spectral changes in the infra-red spectral region. Here, we investigate the vibrational frequencies of the POR-bound and unbound substrate, and product, and thus provide a detailed assignment of the spectral changes in the 1800-1250 cm(-1) region associated with the catalytic conversion of PChlide:NADPH:TyrOH into Chlide:NADP(+):TyrO(-). Fluorescence line narrowed spectra of the POR-bound Pchlide reveal a C=O keto group downshifted by more than 20 cm(-1) to a relatively low vibrational frequency of 1653 cm(-1), as compared to the unbound Pchlide, indicating that binding of the chromophore to the protein occurs via strong hydrogen bond(s). The frequencies of the C=C vibrational modes are consistent with a six-coordinated state of the POR-bound Pchlide, suggesting that there are two coordination interactions between the central Mg atom of the chromophore and protein residues, and/or a water molecule. The frequencies of the C=C vibrational modes of Chlide are consistent with a five-coordinated state, indicating a single interaction between the central Mg atom of the chromophore and a water molecule. Rapid-scan FTIR measurements on the Pchlide:POR:NADPH complex at 4 cm(-1) spectral resolution reveal a new band in the 1670 cm(-1) region. The FTIR spectra of the enzyme activation phase indicate involvement of a nucleotide-binding structural motif, and an increased exposure of the protein to solvent after activation.

  12. Reconstituted B cell receptor signaling reveals carbohydrate-dependent mode of activation

    PubMed Central

    Villar, Rina F.; Patel, Jinal; Weaver, Grant C.; Kanekiyo, Masaru; Wheatley, Adam K.; Yassine, Hadi M.; Costello, Catherine E.; Chandler, Kevin B.; McTamney, Patrick. M.; Nabel, Gary J.; McDermott, Adrian B.; Mascola, John R.; Carr, Steven A.; Lingwood, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Activation of immune cells (but not B cells) with lectins is widely known. We used the structurally defined interaction between influenza hemagglutinin (HA) and its cell surface receptor sialic acid (SA) to identify a B cell receptor (BCR) activation modality that proceeded through non-cognate interactions with antigen. Using a new approach to reconstitute antigen-receptor interactions in a human reporter B cell line, we found that sequence-defined BCRs from the human germline repertoire could be triggered by both complementarity to influenza HA and a separate mode of signaling that relied on multivalent ligation of BCR sialyl-oligosaccharide. The latter suggested a new mechanism for priming naïve B cell responses and manifested as the induction of SA-dependent pan-activation by peripheral blood B cells. BCR crosslinking in the absence of complementarity is a superantigen effect induced by some microbial products to subvert production of antigen-specific immune responses. B cell superantigen activity through affinity for BCR carbohydrate is discussed. PMID:27796362

  13. Antiviral activity and mode of action of propolis extracts and selected compounds.

    PubMed

    Schnitzler, Paul; Neuner, Annett; Nolkemper, Silke; Zundel, Christine; Nowack, Hans; Sensch, Karl Heinz; Reichling, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Aqueous and ethanol extracts of propolis were analysed phytochemically and examined for their antiviral activity in vitro. Different polyphenols, flavonoids and phenylcarboxylic acids were identified as major constituents. The antiviral effect of propolis extracts and selected constituents, e.g. caffeic acid (1), p-coumaric acid (2), benzoic acid (3), galangin (4), pinocembrin (5) and chrysin (6) against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was analysed in cell culture. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of aqueous and ethanol propolis extracts for HSV-1 plaque formation was determined at 0.0004% and 0.000035%, respectively. Both propolis extracts exhibited high levels of antiviral activity against HSV-1 in viral suspension tests, plaque formation was significantly reduced by >98%. In order to determine the mode of antiviral action of propolis, the extracts were added at different times during the viral infection cycle. Both propolis extracts exhibited high anti-HSV-1 activity when the viruses were pretreated with these drugs prior to infection. Among the analysed compounds, only galangin and chrysin displayed some antiviral activity. However, the extracts containing many different components exhibited significantly higher antiherpetic effects as well as higher selectivity indices than single isolated constituents. Propolis extracts might be suitable for topical application against herpes infection.

  14. Duration of activity and mode of action of modafinil: Studies on sleep and wakefulness in humans.

    PubMed

    Turner, C; Belyavin, A J; Nicholson, A N

    2014-07-01

    The duration of activity of modafinil was investigated in healthy male volunteers in two double-blind crossover studies. Mode of action was explored using a statistical model concerned with the relationship between total sleep duration and that of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Nocturnal sleep (23:00-07:00) followed by next-day performance (09:00-17:00) was studied in 12 subjects administered 100, 200, 300 mg modafinil and placebo, 0.5 h before bedtime. Performance overnight (19:00-08:45) followed by sleep (09:15-15:15) was studied in nine subjects administered 100, 200, 300, 400 mg modafinil, 300 mg caffeine and placebo at 22:15. Modafinil dose-dependently reduced sleep duration (nocturnal: 200 mg, p<0.05; 300 mg, p<0.001; morning: 300 and 400 mg, p<0.05) and REM sleep (nocturnal: 300 mg; morning: 400 mg; p<0.05). The statistical model revealed that reduced REM sleep was due to alerting activity, with no evidence of direct suppression of REM sleep, suggesting dopaminergic activity. Enhanced performance with modafinil during overnight work varied with dose (200 mg>100 mg; 300, 400 mg>200, 100 mg, caffeine). However, in the study of next-day performance, the enhancement was attenuated at the highest dose (300 mg) by the greater disturbance of prior sleep. These findings indicate that modafinil has a long duration of action, with alerting properties arising predominantly from dopaminergic activity.

  15. Active and passive mode calibration of the Combined Thermal Epithermal Neutron (CTEN) system

    SciTech Connect

    Veilleux, J. M.

    2002-06-01

    The Combined Thermal/Epithermal Neutron (CTEN) non-destructive assay (NDA) system was designed to assay transuranic waste by employing an induced active neutron interrogation and/or a spontaneous passive neutron measurement. This is the second of two papers, and focuses on the passive mode, relating the net double neutron coincidence measurement to the plutonium mass via the calibration constant. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) calibration standards were used and the results verified with NIST-traceable verification standards. Performance demonstration program (PDP) 'empty' 208-L matrix drum was used for the calibration. The experimentally derived calibration constant was found to be 0.0735 {+-} 0.0059 g {sup 240}Pu effective per unit response. Using this calibration constant, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) criteria was satisfied with five minute waste assays in the range from 3 to 177g Pu. CTEN also participated in the PDP Cycle 8A blind assay with organic sludge and metal matrices and passed the criteria for accuracy and precision in both assay modes. The WIPP and EPA audit was completed March 1, 2002 and full certification is awaiting the closeout of one finding during the audit. With the successful closeout of the audit, the CTEN system will have shown that it can provide very fast assays (five minutes or less) of waste in the range from the minimum detection limit (about 2 mg Pu) to 177 g Pu.

  16. Total body calcium by neutron activation analysis in normals and osteoporotic populations: a discriminator of significant bone mass loss

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, S.M.; Murano, R.; Lewellen, T.K.; Nelp, W.B.; Chesnut, C.M.

    1983-10-01

    Measurements of total body calcium by neutron activation (TBC) in 94 normal individuals and 86 osteoporotic patients are reported. The ability of TBC to discriminate normal from osteoporotic females was evaluated with decision analysis. Bone mineral content (BMC) by single-photon absorptiometry was also measured. TBC was higher in males (range 826 to 1363 gm vs 537 to 1054 in females) and correlated with height in all normals. In females over age 55 there was a negative correlation with age. Thus, for normals an algorithm was derived to allow comparison between measured TBC and that predicted by sex, age, and height (TBCp). In the 28 normal females over age 55, the TBC was 764 +/- 115 gm vs. 616 +/- 90 in the osteoporotics. In 63 of the osteoporotic females an estimated height, from tibial length, was used to predict TBC. In normals the TBC/TBCp ratio was 1.00 +/- 0.12, whereas in osteoporotic females it was 0.80 +/- 0.12. A receiver operating characteristic curve showed better discrimination of osteoporosis with TBC/TBCp than with wrist BMC. By using Bayes' theorem, with a 25% prevalence of osteoporosis (estimate for postmenopausal women), the posttest probability of disease was 90% when the TBC/TBCp ratio was less than 0.84. The authors conclude that a low TBC/TBCp ratio is very helpful in determining osteoporosis.

  17. Developmental Component in Brain Electrical Activity of Normal and Learning Disabled Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naour, Paul J.; Martin, Daniel J.

    The study examined the electrophysiologic organization of cognitive function in 12 normally achieving righthanded boys and 12 reading disabled third and sixth grade boys. Ss were administered reading comprehension and spelling recognition subtests from the Peabody Individual Achievement Test. Electroencephalography (EEG) scores were recorded for…

  18. Substorm recurrence during steady and variable solar wind driving: Evidence for a normal mode in the unloading dynamics of the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimas, A. J.; Baker, D. N.; Vassiliadis, D.; Roberts, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    Farrugia et al (1993) have recently studied substorm activity driven by the passage of an interplanetary magnetic cloud during which the interplanetary magnetic field turned southward for approximately 18 hours. It was shown that both the epsilon and the VB(sub s) parameters varied slowly on the timescale of a substorm but changed considerably over the interval as a whole. The substorm occurrence rate did not reflect the variation in magnetospheric energy loading rate as measured by these parameters but, rather, remained roughly constant with a 50-min average period. Klimas et al. (1992) showed that the Faraday loop analog model of geomagnetic activity predicts this single unloading rate under various constant loading rates. However, various model parameters were adjusted to yield a 1-hour unloading period in agreement with the Bargatze et al. (1985) linear prediction filters and in approximate agreement with the Farrugia et al. (1993) results. It has since been found necessary to add a slow relaxation mechanism to the Faraday loop model to allow for its approach to a ground state during long periods of inactivity. It is proposed that the relaxation mechanism is provided by slow convection of magnetic flux out of the magnetotail to the dayside magnetosphere. In addition, a rudimentary representation of magnetotail-ionosphere coupling has been added to enable comparison of model output to measured AL. The present study is of the modified Faraday loop model response to solar wind input from the Bargatze et al. data set with comparison of its output to concurrent AL. This study has removed the degree of freedom in parameter choice that had earlier allowed adjustments toward the 1-hour unloading period and has, instead, yielded the 1-hour unloading period under various constant loading rates. It is demonstrated that the second peak of the bimodal Bargatze et al. linear prediction filters at approximately equal 1-hour lag and the approximately constant substorm

  19. Rapid loss of factor XII and XI activity in ellagic acid-activated normal plasma: role of plasma inhibitors and implications for automated activated partial thromboplastin time recording.

    PubMed

    Joist, J H; Cowan, J F; Khan, M

    1977-12-01

    Rapid prolongation of the aPTT of normal plasma upon incubation with ellagic acid containing aPTT reagents was observed. The aPTT prolongation was not due to time-dependent changes in pH in the incubation mixture or loss of activity of the labile coagulation factors VIII and V but occurred as a result of rapid progressive inactivation of ellagic acid-activated factors XII and XI. Prolongation of the aPTT and loss of contact factor activities was not observed in plasma incubated with particulate activator reagents. This finding seemed to indicate that adsorption of factors XII and XI to larger particles during the activation process might protect these factors from inactivation by naturally occurring plasma inhibitors. Evidence is presented which supports previous findings that C1-INH, alpha1-AT, and antithrombin (in the presence of heparin) contribute to factor XIIa and XI a inactivation in ellagic acid-activated plasma and that plasma albumin may compete with factor XII for ellagic acid binding. The data indicate that ellagic acid-containing aPTT reagents have unfavorable properties which seriously limit their usefulness in the clinical laboratory, particularly in respect to recording of the aPTT with certain fully automated clot timers.

  20. Sliding-mode control for semi-active suspension with actuator dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bo-Chiuan; Shiu, Yu-Hua; Hsieh, Feng-Chi

    2011-02-01

    A sliding-mode controller (SMC) is proposed for semi-active suspensions to achieve ride comfort and handling performance simultaneously. First, a nonlinear quarter-car model of Macpherson strut suspension is established in Matlab/Simulink. Constrained damper force and actuator dynamics are considered for the damper model. System identification is applied to the nonlinear model for obtaining the linear model parameters. Kalman filter is designed based on the linear model and the actuator dynamics to estimate the state responses required for SMC. The sliding surface consists of tyre deflection and sprung mass acceleration. The proposed SMC is evaluated using the nonlinear model for both time and frequency domain responses. Robustness due to the increased sprung mass and deteriorated suspension is also investigated in this paper. Preliminary simulation results show improved ride comfort without sacrificing the road holding performance.

  1. Shh pathway activation is present and required within the vertebrate limb bud apical ectodermal ridge for normal autopod patterning.

    PubMed

    Bouldin, Cortney M; Gritli-Linde, Amel; Ahn, Sohyun; Harfe, Brian D

    2010-03-23

    Expression of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) in the posterior mesenchyme of the developing limb bud regulates patterning and growth of the developing limb by activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway. Through the analysis of Shh and Hh signaling target genes, it has been shown that activation in the limb bud mesoderm is required for normal limb development to occur. In contrast, it has been stated that Hh signaling in the limb bud ectoderm cannot occur because components of the Hh signaling pathway and Hh target genes have not been found in this tissue. However, recent array-based data identified both the components necessary to activate the Hh signaling pathway and targets of this pathway in the limb bud ectoderm. Using immunohistochemistry and various methods of detection for targets of Hh signaling, we found that SHH protein and targets of Hh signaling are present in the limb bud ectoderm including the apex of the bud. To directly test whether ectodermal Hh signaling was required for normal limb patterning, we removed Smo, an essential component of the Hh signaling pathway, from the apical ectodermal ridge (AER). Loss of functional Hh signaling in the AER resulted in disruption of the normal digit pattern and formation of additional postaxial cartilaginous condensations. These data indicate that contrary to previous accounts, the Hh signaling pathway is present and required in the developing limb AER for normal autopod development.

  2. Catecholamine secretion and adrenal nerve activity in response to movements of normal and inflamed knee joints in cats.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, A; Sato, Y; Schmidt, R F

    1986-01-01

    The effects of articular stimulation on adrenal catecholamine secretion and adrenal sympathetic nerve activity were studied using halothane anaesthetized cats. Various natural passive movements were applied to the normal and inflamed knee joints. Rhythmic flexions and extensions as well as rhythmic inward and outward rotation of normal knee joints within their physiological range of motion did not change nerve activity or the secretion of adrenal catecholamines. Static outward rotation in the normal working range was also ineffective. However, as soon as this static rotation was extended into the noxious range, significant increases in both of these variables were elicited. In the acutely inflamed knee joint, various passive movements produced increases in both adrenal sympathetic and catecholamine secretion. Especially noteworthy was the finding that movements of the inflamed knee joint that were within the normal range of motion produced increases in all variables. Articularly induced increases in adrenal sympathetic nerve activity were diminished by severing various hind-limb somatic afferent nerves and abolished by complete denervation of the knee joint. Additionally, section of the adrenal sympathetic nerves eliminated the catecholamine secretion response. From these data it was concluded that the responses observed in these experiments were reflexes having an afferent limb in hind-limb nerves and an efferent limb in the adrenal sympathetic nerves. A contribution of supraspinal structures was suggested for the reflex responses of sympatho-adrenal medullary function evoked by knee joint stimulations, since spinal transection at the C2 level completely abolished the responses. PMID:3795070

  3. Bumblebees minimize control challenges by combining active and passive modes in unsteady winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi, Sridhar; Kolomenskiy, Dmitry; Engels, Thomas; Schneider, Kai; Wang, Chun; Sesterhenn, Jörn; Liu, Hao

    2016-10-01

    The natural wind environment that volant insects encounter is unsteady and highly complex, posing significant flight-control and stability challenges. It is critical to understand the strategies insects employ to safely navigate in natural environments. We combined experiments on free flying bumblebees with high-fidelity numerical simulations and lower-order modeling to identify the mechanics that mediate insect flight in unsteady winds. We trained bumblebees to fly upwind towards an artificial flower in a wind tunnel under steady wind and in a von Kármán street formed in the wake of a cylinder. Analysis revealed that at lower frequencies in both steady and unsteady winds the bees mediated lateral movement with body roll - typical casting motion. Numerical simulations of a bumblebee in similar conditions permitted the separation of the passive and active components of the flight trajectories. Consequently, we derived simple mathematical models that describe these two motion components. Comparison between the free-flying live and modeled bees revealed a novel mechanism that enables bees to passively ride out high-frequency perturbations while performing active maneuvers at lower frequencies. The capacity of maintaining stability by combining passive and active modes at different timescales provides a viable means for animals and machines to tackle the challenges posed by complex airflows.

  4. Bumblebees minimize control challenges by combining active and passive modes in unsteady winds

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Sridhar; Kolomenskiy, Dmitry; Engels, Thomas; Schneider, Kai; Wang, Chun; Sesterhenn, Jörn; Liu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    The natural wind environment that volant insects encounter is unsteady and highly complex, posing significant flight-control and stability challenges. It is critical to understand the strategies insects employ to safely navigate in natural environments. We combined experiments on free flying bumblebees with high-fidelity numerical simulations and lower-order modeling to identify the mechanics that mediate insect flight in unsteady winds. We trained bumblebees to fly upwind towards an artificial flower in a wind tunnel under steady wind and in a von Kármán street formed in the wake of a cylinder. Analysis revealed that at lower frequencies in both steady and unsteady winds the bees mediated lateral movement with body roll - typical casting motion. Numerical simulations of a bumblebee in similar conditions permitted the separation of the passive and active components of the flight trajectories. Consequently, we derived simple mathematical models that describe these two motion components. Comparison between the free-flying live and modeled bees revealed a novel mechanism that enables bees to passively ride out high-frequency perturbations while performing active maneuvers at lower frequencies. The capacity of maintaining stability by combining passive and active modes at different timescales provides a viable means for animals and machines to tackle the challenges posed by complex airflows. PMID:27752047

  5. Modulation of western North Pacific tropical cyclone activity by the Atlantic Meridional Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Vecchi, Gabriel A.; Villarini, Gabriele; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Rosati, Anthony; Yang, Xiaosong; Jia, Liwei; Zeng, Fanrong

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the year-to-year modulation of the western North Pacific (WNP) tropical cyclones (TC) activity by the Atlantic Meridional Mode (AMM) using both observations and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Forecast-oriented Low Ocean Resolution Version of CM2.5 (FLOR) global coupled model. 1. The positive (negative) AMM phase suppresses (enhances) WNP TC activity in observations. The anomalous occurrence of WNP TCs results mainly from changes in TC genesis in the southeastern part of the WNP. 2. The observed responses of WNP TC activity to the AMM are connected to the anomalous zonal vertical wind shear (ZVWS) caused by AMM-induced changes to the Walker circulation. During the positive AMM phase, the warming in the North Atlantic induces strong descending flow in the tropical eastern and central Pacific, which intensifies the Walker cell in the WNP. The intensified Walker cell is responsible for the suppressed (enhanced) TC genesis in the eastern (western) part of the WNP by strengthening (weakening) ZVWS. 3. The observed WNPTC-AMM linkage is examined by the long-term control and idealized perturbations experiment with FLOR-FA. A suite of sensitivity experiments strongly corroborate the observed WNPTC-AMM linkage and underlying physical mechanisms.

  6. Structural basis of constitutive activity and a unique nucleotide binding mode of human Pim-1 kinase.

    PubMed

    Qian, Kevin C; Wang, Lian; Hickey, Eugene R; Studts, Joey; Barringer, Kevin; Peng, Charline; Kronkaitis, Anthony; Li, Jun; White, Andre; Mische, Sheenah; Farmer, Bennett

    2005-02-18

    Pim-1 kinase is a member of a distinct class of serine/threonine kinases consisting of Pim-1, Pim-2, and Pim-3. Pim kinases are highly homologous to one another and share a unique consensus hinge region sequence, ER-PXPX, with its two proline residues separated by a non-conserved residue, but they (Pim kinases) have <30% sequence identity with other kinases. Pim-1 has been implicated in both cytokine-induced signal transduction and the development of lymphoid malignancies. We have determined the crystal structures of apo Pim-1 kinase and its AMP-PNP (5'-adenylyl-beta,gamma-imidodiphosphate) complex to 2.1-angstroms resolutions. The structures reveal the following. 1) The kinase adopts a constitutively active conformation, and extensive hydrophobic and hydrogen bond interactions between the activation loop and the catalytic loop might be the structural basis for maintaining such a conformation. 2) The hinge region has a novel architecture and hydrogen-bonding pattern, which not only expand the ATP pocket but also serve to establish unambiguously the alignment of the Pim-1 hinge region with that of other kinases. 3) The binding mode of AMP-PNP to Pim-1 kinase is unique and does not involve a critical hinge region hydrogen bond interaction. Analysis of the reported Pim-1 kinase-domain structures leads to a hypothesis as to how Pim kinase activity might be regulated in vivo.

  7. Hypoglycemic and antihyperglycemic activity of Aegle marmelos seed extract in normal and diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kesari, Achyut Narayan; Gupta, Rajesh Kumar; Singh, Santosh Kumar; Diwakar, Sandhya; Watal, Geeta

    2006-10-11

    Aegle marmelos Corr. (Rutaceae) is widely used in Indian Ayurvedic medicine for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. The aqueous extract of Aegle marmelos seeds was administered orally at different doses (100, 250 and 500 mg/kg) to normal as well as sub (fasting blood glucose (FBG) normal; glucose tolerance abnormal) and mild (FBG 120-250 mg/dl) diabetic rats. The dose of 250 mg/kg was found to be most effective dose and it decreases blood glucose level (BGL) by 35.1% in normal healthy rats after 6h of administration. The same dose also showed a marked reduction in BGL of 41.2% in sub and 33.2% in mild diabetic rats in glucose tolerance test (GTT) after 2 h. Treatment of severely (FBG >250 mg/dl) diabetic rats for 14 days with a dose of 250 mg/kg reduces the fasting blood glucose by 60.84% and urine sugar by 75% than their pretreatment levels. It brought about fall in level of total cholesterol (TC) by 25.49% with increase of 33.43% in high density lipoprotein (HDL) and decrease of 53.97 and 45.77% in low density lipoprotein (LDL) and triglyceride (TG), respectively. These results clearly indicate that aqueous seed extract of Aegle marmelos possess antidiabetic and hypolipidemic effects in diabetic rats.

  8. Bone speed of sound and physical activity levels of overweight and normal-weight girls and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Yao, Mathew; Ludwa, Izabella; Corbett, Lauren; Klentrou, Panagiota; Bonsu, Peter; Gammage, Kimberley; Falk, Bareket

    2011-02-01

    Bone properties, reflected by speed of sound (SOS), and physical activity levels were examined in overweight (OW) girls (n = 19) and adolescents (n = 22), in comparison with normal-weight (NW) girls (n = 21) and adolescents (n = 13). Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was higher in NW than in OW in both age groups. Tibial SOS was lower in OW compared with NW in both age groups. MVPA correlated with tibial SOS, once age was partialed out. The results suggest that overweight girls and adolescents are characterized by low tibial SOS, which may be partially attributed to lower physical activity levels.

  9. Hyperglycemia-conditioned increase in alpha-2-macroglobulin in healthy normal subjects: a phenomenon correlated with deficient antithrombin III activity.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A; Quatraro, A; Dello Russo, P; Marchi, E; Barbanti, M; Giugliano, D

    1989-01-01

    Induced hyperglycemia in normal subjects increases alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) activity and alpha 2M concentration and reduces antithrombin III (ATIII) activity, while it does not affect ATIII plasma concentration. Hyperglycemia-determined variations in ATIII activity and alpha 2M molecules are correlated in an inverse and parallel fashion. A compensatory role for the increase in alpha 2M in the regulation of the coagulation system may be hypothesized. Moreover, these data provide evidence that hyperglycemia may decrease, directly, the biological function of some proteins and may influence the levels of some risk factors for the development of complications in diabetes.

  10. Unusual Initial Manifestation of Acquired Hemophilia A: A Normal Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time, Intramuscular Hematoma and Cerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tsuyama, Nobuaki; Ichiba, Toshihisa; Naito, Hiroshi

    We herein present a case of acquired hemophilia A with a normal activated partial thromboplastin (aPTT), intramuscular hematoma and cerebral hemorrhage occurring in a 73-year-old man. The patient visited our emergency department with gait disturbance, pain and swelling in his right leg. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed intramuscular hematoma and intracranial hemorrhage. The results of initial coagulation studies were normal, but repeated coagulation studies revealed an isolated prolongation of the aPTT. Additional laboratory tests confirmed the diagnosis of acquired hemophilia A. If the initial aPTT is normal, we should therefore repeat the aPTT and also perform other coagulation studies including a mixing study, factor VIII level and inhibitor, to investigate the underlying diseases in elderly patients with spontaneous hemorrhaging of unknown etiology.

  11. Plasma mineral profiles and hormonal activities of normal cycling and repeat breeding crossbred cows: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Barui, Abhijit; Batabyal, Subhasis; Ghosh, Sarbaswarup; Saha, Debjani; Chattopadhyay, Saibal

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study was carried out to compare the associated role of micro minerals and hormones in repeat breeding animals with the normal crossbred cows. Materials and Methods: Blood samples were collected from 10 normal cycling and 10 repeat breeding crossbred cows of Ramakrishna Mission Ashram, Narendrapur to study the plasma mineral profile and hormonal activities. Results: Zn was found to be highly significant (p<0.01) between the two groups. Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and progesterone showed significant (p<0.05) difference in repeat breeding animal from the normal cyclic animal, whereas no significant differences were observed in Ca, P, Cu, Se, Co, luteinizing hormone and estradiol level. Conclusion: It may conclude that repeat breeding condition of crossbred cows in farm condition is mainly due to the low level of progesterone, FSH and zinc. PMID:27046994

  12. Fractional activation of accumulation-mode particles in warm continental stratiform clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Gillani, N.V.; Daum, P.H.; Schwartz, S.E.; Leaitch, W.R.; Strapp, J.W.; Isaac, G.A.

    1991-07-01

    The degree of activation of accumulation-mode particles (AMP) in clouds has been studied using continuous (1 second average) aircraft measurements of the number concentrations of cloud droplets (N{sub cd}, 2 to 35 {mu}m diameter) and of unactivated AMP (N{sub amp}, 0.17 to 2.07 {mu}m diameter) in cloud interstitial air. The magnitude and spatial variation of the activated fraction (F) of all measured particles (defined as F {triple_bond} N{sub cd}/N{sub tot}, where N{sub tot} = N{sub cd} + N{sub amp}) are investigated, based on measurements made during ten aircraft flights in non-precipitating warm continental stratiform clouds near Syracuse NY in the fall of 1984. Based on instantaneous observations throughout the clouds, the spatial distribution of F was found to be quite nonuniform. In general, F was low in cloud edges and where total particle loading was high and/or cloud convective activity was low. In the interior of clouds, the value of F exceeded 0.9 for 36% of the data, but was below 0.6 for 28%. Factors influencing F the most were the total particle loading (N{sub tot}) and the thermal stability of the cloud layer. The dependence of F on N{sub tot} in cloud interior was characterized by two distinct regimes. For N{sub tot} < 600 cm{sup {minus}3}, F was generally close to unity and relatively insensitive to N{sub tot}. For N{sub tot} > 800 cm{sup {minus}3}, F tended to decrease with increasing N{sub tot}. This decrease was greatest in a stable stratus deck embedded in a warm moist airmass. The results suggest that, in warm continental stratiform clouds, the process of particle activation becomes nonlinear and self-limiting at high particle loading. The degree of this nonlinearity depends on cloud convective activity (thermal instability).

  13. Fractional activation of accumulation-mode particles in warm continental stratiform clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Gillani, N.V. Associates, Inc., St. Louis, MO ); Daum, P.H.; Schwartz, S.E. ); Leaitch, W.R.; Strapp, J.W.; Isaac, G.A. . Cloud Physics Research Div.)

    1991-07-01

    The degree of activation of accumulation-mode particles (AMP) in clouds has been studied using continuous (1 second average) aircraft measurements of the number concentrations of cloud droplets (N[sub cd], 2 to 35 [mu]m diameter) and of unactivated AMP (N[sub amp], 0.17 to 2.07 [mu]m diameter) in cloud interstitial air. The magnitude and spatial variation of the activated fraction (F) of all measured particles (defined as F [triple bond] N[sub cd]/N[sub tot], where N[sub tot] = N[sub cd] + N[sub amp]) are investigated, based on measurements made during ten aircraft flights in non-precipitating warm continental stratiform clouds near Syracuse NY in the fall of 1984. Based on instantaneous observations throughout the clouds, the spatial distribution of F was found to be quite nonuniform. In general, F was low in cloud edges and where total particle loading was high and/or cloud convective activity was low. In the interior of clouds, the value of F exceeded 0.9 for 36% of the data, but was below 0.6 for 28%. Factors influencing F the most were the total particle loading (N[sub tot]) and the thermal stability of the cloud layer. The dependence of F on N[sub tot] in cloud interior was characterized by two distinct regimes. For N[sub tot] < 600 cm[sup [minus]3], F was generally close to unity and relatively insensitive to N[sub tot]. For N[sub tot] > 800 cm[sup [minus]3], F tended to decrease with increasing N[sub tot]. This decrease was greatest in a stable stratus deck embedded in a warm moist airmass. The results suggest that, in warm continental stratiform clouds, the process of particle activation becomes nonlinear and self-limiting at high particle loading. The degree of this nonlinearity depends on cloud convective activity (thermal instability).

  14. Effect of activation mode on shear bond strength of metallic brackets.

    PubMed

    Correr, Américo Bortolazzo; Costa, Ana Rosa; Lucato, Adriana Simoni; Vedovello, Silvia Amélia; Valdrighi, Heloísa Cristina; Vedovello Filho, Mário; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of metallic orthodontic brackets bonded to bovine teeth using light-activated or chemically activated composite resins. One hundred and twenty bovine mandibular incisors were divided into 6 groups (n=20), according to the bonding materials: Transbond XT (T); Enforce Dual (ED); Enforce chemical (EC); Enforce Light-activated (EL); Concise Orthodontic (C); and RelyX Unicem Capsule (UN). Metallic brackets were positioned and firmly bonded to the teeth. Light-activation for T, ED, EL and UN was carried out with four exposures on each side of the bracket with 20 s total exposure times using XL2500 (3M ESPE). EC and C were chemically cured. Next, all specimens were stored in deionized water at 37 °C for 24 h. The shear bond strength was carried out at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Data were subjected to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was evaluated at 8× magnification. C (17.72 ± 4.45) presented significantly higher SBS means (in MPa) than the other groups (p<0.05), followed by EC (11.97 ± 5.77) and ED (10.57 ± 1.32). EL (5.39 ± 1.06) and UN (4.32 ± 1.98) showed the lowest SBS means, while T (9.09 ± 2.56) showed intermediate values. For ARI, there was a predominance of score 0 for EC, C and UN, and score 3 for T, ED and EL. In conclusion, the activation mode influenced the SBS.

  15. Comparison of the activation time effects and the internal energy distributions for the CID, PQD and HCD excitation modes.

    PubMed

    Ichou, Farid; Schwarzenberg, Adrian; Lesage, Denis; Alves, Sandra; Junot, Christophe; Machuron-Mandard, Xavier; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2014-06-01

    Reproducibility among different types of excitation modes is a major bottleneck in the field of tandem mass spectrometry library development in metabolomics. In this study, we specifically evaluated the influence of collision voltage and activation time parameters on tandem mass spectrometry spectra for various excitation modes [collision-induced dissociation (CID), pulsed Q dissociation (PQD) and higher-energy collision dissociation (HCD)] of Orbitrap-based instruments. For this purpose, internal energy deposition was probed using an approach based on Rice-Rampserger-Kassel-Marcus modeling with three thermometer compounds of different degree of freedom (69, 228 and 420) and a thermal model. This model treats consecutively the activation and decomposition steps, and the survival precursor ion populations are characterized by truncated Maxwell-Boltzmann internal energy distributions. This study demonstrates that the activation time has a significant impact on MS/MS spectra using the CID and PQD modes. The proposed model seems suitable to describe the multiple collision regime in the PQD and HCD modes. Linear relationships between mean internal energy and collision voltage are shown for the latter modes and the three thermometer molecules. These results suggest that a calibration based on the collision voltage should provide reproducible for PQD, HCD to be compared with CID in tandem in space instruments. However, an important signal loss is observed in PQD excitation mode whatever the mass of the studied compounds, which may affect not only parent ions but also fragment ions depending on the fragmentation parameters. A calibration approach for the CID mode based on the variation of activation time parameter is more appropriate than one based on collision voltage. In fact, the activation time parameter in CID induces a modification of the collisional regime and thus helps control the orientation of the fragmentation pathways (competitive or consecutive dissociations).

  16. Broad spectrum antibacterial and antifungal polymeric paint materials: synthesis, structure-activity relationship, and membrane-active mode of action.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Jiaul; Akkapeddi, Padma; Yadav, Vikas; Manjunath, Goutham B; Uppu, Divakara S S M; Konai, Mohini M; Yarlagadda, Venkateswarlu; Sanyal, Kaustuv; Haldar, Jayanta

    2015-01-28

    Microbial attachment and subsequent colonization onto surfaces lead to the spread of deadly community-acquired and hospital-acquired (nosocomial) infections. Noncovalent immobilization of water insoluble and organo-soluble cationic polymers onto a surface is a facile approach to prevent microbial contamination. In the present study, we described the synthesis of water insoluble and organo-soluble polymeric materials and demonstrated their structure-activity relationship against various human pathogenic bacteria including drug-resistant strains such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), and beta lactam-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae as well as pathogenic fungi such as Candida spp. and Cryptococcus spp. The polymer coated surfaces completely inactivated both bacteria and fungi upon contact (5 log reduction with respect to control). Linear polymers were more active and found to have a higher killing rate than the branched polymers. The polymer coated surfaces also exhibited significant activity in various complex mammalian fluids such as serum, plasma, and blood and showed negligible hemolysis at an amount much higher than minimum inhibitory amounts (MIAs). These polymers were found to have excellent compatibility with other medically relevant polymers (polylactic acid, PLA) and commercial paint. The cationic hydrophobic polymer coatings disrupted the lipid membrane of both bacteria and fungi and thus showed a membrane-active mode of action. Further, bacteria did not develop resistance against these membrane-active polymers in sharp contrast to conventional antibiotics and lipopeptides, thus the polymers hold great promise to be used as coating materials for developing permanent antimicrobial paint.

  17. Using online computer tailoring to promote physical activity: a randomized trial of text, video, and combined intervention delivery modes.

    PubMed

    Soetens, Katja C M; Vandelanotte, Corneel; de Vries, Hein; Mummery, Kerry W

    2014-12-01

    Website-delivered interventions are increasingly used to deliver physical activity interventions, yet problems with engagement and retention result in reduced effectiveness. Hence, alternative modes of online intervention delivery need to be explored. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the acceptability and effectiveness of a computer-tailored physical activity intervention delivered on the Internet in 3 delivery modes: video, text, or both. Australian adults (N = 803), recruited through e-mail, were randomized into the three delivery modes and received personal physical activity advice. Intervention content was identical across groups. Repeated measures analyses of variance were used to compare the three groups regarding acceptability, website usability, and physical activity. Participants in the video group accepted the content of the physical activity advice significantly better (F = 5.59; p < .01), and spent significantly more time on the website (F = 21.19; p < .001) compared with the text and combination groups. Total physical activity improved significantly over time in all groups (F = 3.95; p < .01). Although the combination group increased physical activity the most, few significant differences between groups were observed. Providing video-tailored feedback has advantages over the conventional text-tailored interventions; however, this study revealed few behavioral differences. More studies, examining alternative delivery modes, that can overcome the limitations of the present study, are needed.

  18. Diatom-Derived Polyunsaturated Aldehydes Activate Cell Death in Human Cancer Cell Lines but Not Normal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, Clementina; Braca, Alessandra; Ercolesi, Elena; Romano, Giovanna; Palumbo, Anna; Casotti, Raffaella; Francone, Maria; Ianora, Adrianna

    2014-01-01

    Diatoms are an important class of unicellular algae that produce bioactive polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs) that induce abortions or malformations in the offspring of invertebrates exposed to them during gestation. Here we compare the effects of the PUAs 2-trans,4-trans-decadienal (DD), 2-trans,4-trans-octadienal (OD) and 2-trans,4-trans-heptadienal (HD) on the adenocarcinoma cell lines lung A549 and colon COLO 205, and the normal lung/brunch epithelial BEAS-2B cell line. Using the viability MTT/Trypan blue assays, we show that PUAs have a toxic effect on both A549 and COLO 205 tumor cells but not BEAS-2B normal cells. DD was the strongest of the three PUAs tested, at all time-intervals considered, but HD was as strong as DD after 48 h. OD was the least active of the three PUAs. The effect of the three PUAs was somewhat stronger for A549 cells. We therefore studied the death signaling pathway activated in A549 showing that cells treated with DD activated Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 1 (TNFR1) and Fas Associated Death Domain (FADD) leading to necroptosis via caspase-3 without activating the survival pathway Receptor-Interacting Protein (RIP). The TNFR1/FADD/caspase pathway was also observed with OD, but only after 48 h. This was the only PUA that activated RIP, consistent with the finding that OD causes less damage to the cell compared to DD and HD. In contrast, cells treated with HD activated the Fas/FADD/caspase pathway. This is the first report that PUAs activate an extrinsic apoptotic machinery in contrast to other anticancer drugs that promote an intrinsic death pathway, without affecting the viability of normal cells from the same tissue type. These findings have interesting implications also from the ecological viewpoint considering that HD is one of the most common PUAs produced by diatoms. PMID:24992192

  19. Diatom-derived polyunsaturated aldehydes activate cell death in human cancer cell lines but not normal cells.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Clementina; Braca, Alessandra; Ercolesi, Elena; Romano, Giovanna; Palumbo, Anna; Casotti, Raffaella; Francone, Maria; Ianora, Adrianna

    2014-01-01

    Diatoms are an important class of unicellular algae that produce bioactive polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs) that induce abortions or malformations in the offspring of invertebrates exposed to them during gestation. Here we compare the effects of the PUAs 2-trans,4-trans-decadienal (DD), 2-trans,4-trans-octadienal (OD) and 2-trans,4-trans-heptadienal (HD) on the adenocarcinoma cell lines lung A549 and colon COLO 205, and the normal lung/brunch epithelial BEAS-2B cell line. Using the viability MTT/Trypan blue assays, we show that PUAs have a toxic effect on both A549 and COLO 205 tumor cells but not BEAS-2B normal cells. DD was the strongest of the three PUAs tested, at all time-intervals considered, but HD was as strong as DD after 48 h. OD was the least active of the three PUAs. The effect of the three PUAs was somewhat stronger for A549 cells. We therefore studied the death signaling pathway activated in A549 showing that cells treated with DD activated Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 1 (TNFR1) and Fas Associated Death Domain (FADD) leading to necroptosis via caspase-3 without activating the survival pathway Receptor-Interacting Protein (RIP). The TNFR1/FADD/caspase pathway was also observed with OD, but only after 48 h. This was the only PUA that activated RIP, consistent with the finding that OD causes less damage to the cell compared to DD and HD. In contrast, cells treated with HD activated the Fas/FADD/caspase pathway. This is the first report that PUAs activate an extrinsic apoptotic machinery in contrast to other anticancer drugs that promote an intrinsic death pathway, without affecting the viability of normal cells from the same tissue type. These findings have interesting implications also from the ecological viewpoint considering that HD is one of the most common PUAs produced by diatoms.

  20. The three-dimensional pattern of crustal deformation associated with active normal fault systems observed using continuous GPS geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, R. A.; Hreinsdottir, S.

    2009-12-01

    Geological examples of shallow dipping normal faults with large displacements are exposed at numerous locations throughout the world and it is widely recognized that extensional deformation at brittle crustal levels is most efficiently accomplished by slip across such structures. It has previously been shown that lower dip angles reduce the regional stresses required to drive large horizontal displacements. Nevertheless, the traditional theory of fault mechanics—based on Anderson’s classification of stress regimes, the Coulomb failure criterion, and Byerlee’s friction law—precludes such faults from slipping at low angle. Observational support for this traditional theory includes the absence of large unequivocally low-angle normal fault earthquakes in the global catalog; all well-determined normal fault earthquakes appear to have occurred on moderate to steeply dipping planes. However, precise measurements of 3D crustal motions based on continuous GPS in central Italy and Utah reveal deformation patterns across active normal fault systems that are inconsistent with active slip across steeply dipping planes. Instead, the combination of observed horizontal and vertical surface motions are consistent with slip across low angle surfaces independently imaged in the subsurface by seismic reflection and other geophysical data. For the Alto Tiberina fault in central Italy, active aseismic creep occurs at shallow crustal levels, most likely within the brittle-frictional regime at which Andersonian-Byerlee fault mechanics should be applicable. The actively creeping portion of the fault inferred using GPS geodesy correlates well with the observed pattern of micro-seismicity, which concentrates along the inferred subsurface fault plane. GPS measurements across the greater Wasatch fault zone in the vicinity of Salt Lake City, Utah, reveal crustal motions consistent with aseismic displacement across a shallow dipping fault or sub-horizontal shear zone at mid

  1. Heat Transfer Measurements with Surface Mounted Foil-Sensors in an Active Mode: A Comprehensive Review and a New Design

    PubMed Central

    Mocikat, Horst; Herwig, Heinz

    2009-01-01

    A comprehensive review of film-sensors shows that they are primarily operated in a passive mode, i.e. without being actively heated to an extent, whereby they create a heat transfer situation on their own. Only when these sensors are used for wall shear stress measurements, the detection of laminar/turbulent transition, or the measurement of certain flow velocities, they are operated in an active mode, i.e. heated by an electrical current (after an appropriate calibration). In our study we demonstrate how these R(T)-based sensors (temperature dependence of the electrical resistance R) can also be applied in an active mode for heat transfer measurements. These measurements can be made on cold, unheated bodies, provided certain requirements with respect to the flow field are fulfilled. Our new sensors are laminated nickel- and polyimide-foils manufactured with a special technology, which is also described in detail. PMID:22574060

  2. Exploring the DNA binding mode of transition metal based biologically active compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, N.; Sobha, S.

    2012-01-01

    Few novel 4-aminoantipyrine derived Schiff bases and their metal complexes were synthesized and characterized. Their structural features and other properties were deduced from the elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility and molar conductivity as well as from mass, IR, UV-vis, 1H NMR and EPR spectral studies. The binding of the complexes with CT-DNA was analyzed by electronic absorption spectroscopy, viscosity measurement, and cyclic voltammetry. The interaction of the metal complexes with DNA was also studied by molecular modeling with special reference to docking. The experimental and docking results revealed that the complexes have the ability of interaction with DNA of minor groove binding mode. The intrinsic binding constants ( Kb) of the complexes with CT-DNA were found out which show that they are minor groove binders. Gel electrophoresis assay demonstrated the ability of the complexes to cleave the pUC19 DNA in the presence of AH 2 (ascorbic acid). Moreover, the oxidative cleavage studies using distamycin revealed the minor groove binding for the newly synthesized 4-aminoantipyrine derived Schiff bases and their metal complexes. Evaluation of antibacterial activity of the complexes against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Klebsiella pneumoniae exhibited that the complexes have potent biocidal activity than the free ligands.

  3. State observer-based sliding mode control for semi-active hydro-pneumatic suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hongbin; Chen, Sizhong; Zhao, Yuzhuang; Liu, Gang; Yang, Lin

    2016-02-01

    This paper proposes an improved virtual reference model for semi-active suspension to coordinate the vehicle ride comfort and handling stability. The reference model combines the virtues of sky-hook with ground-hook control logic, and the hybrid coefficient is tuned according to the longitudinal and lateral acceleration so as to improve the vehicle stability especially in high-speed condition. Suspension state observer based on unscented Kalman filter is designed. A sliding mode controller (SMC) is developed to track the states of the reference model. The stability of the SMC strategy is proven by means of Lyapunov function taking into account the nonlinear damper characteristics and sprung mass variation of the vehicle. Finally, the performance of the controller is demonstrated under three typical working conditions: the random road excitation, speed bump road and sharp acceleration and braking. The simulation results indicated that, compared with the traditional passive suspension, the proposed control algorithm can offer a better coordination between vehicle ride comfort and handling stability. This approach provides a viable alternative to costlier active suspension control systems for commercial vehicles.

  4. Gamma-radiation-induced degradation of actively pumped single-mode ytterbium-doped optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singleton, B.; Petrosky, J.; Pochet, M.; Usechak, N. G.; Francis, S. A.

    2014-03-01

    The integration of optical components into the digital processing units of satellite subsystems has the potential to remove interconnect bottlenecks inherent to the volume, mass, complexity, reliability and crosstalk issues of copper-based interconnects. Assuming on-board high-bandwidth communications will utilize passive optical fibers as a communication channel, this work investigates the impact of gamma irradiation from a Co-60 source on both passive optical fibers and ytterbium-doped single-mode fibers operated as amplifiers for a 1060-nm light source. Standard optical patch cables were evaluated along with active Yb-doped double-clad fibers. Varied exposure times and signal transmission wavelengths were used to investigate the degradation of the fibers exposed to total doses above 100 krad (Si). The effect on the amplified signal gain was studied for the Yb-doped fibers. The increased attenuation in the fibers across a broad wavelength range in response to multiple levels of gamma radiation exposure along with the effect that the increased attenuation has on the actively pumped Yb-doped fiber amplifier performance, is discussed.

  5. Mapping inhibitor binding modes on an active cysteine protease via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gregory M; Balouch, Eaman; Goetz, David H; Lazic, Ana; McKerrow, James H; Craik, Charles S

    2012-12-18

    Cruzain is a member of the papain/cathepsin L family of cysteine proteases, and the major cysteine protease of the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. We report an autoinduction methodology that provides soluble cruzain in high yields (>30 mg/L in minimal medium). These increased yields provide sufficient quantities of active enzyme for use in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based ligand mapping. Using circular dichroism and NMR spectroscopy, we also examined the solution-state structural dynamics of the enzyme in complex with a covalently bound vinyl sulfone inhibitor (K777). We report the backbone amide and side chain carbon chemical shift assignments of cruzain in complex with K777. These resonance assignments were used to identify and map residues located in the substrate binding pocket, including the catalytic Cys25 and His162. Selective [(15)N]Cys, [(15)N]His, and [(13)C]Met labeling was performed to quickly assess cruzain-ligand interactions for a set of eight low-molecular weight compounds exhibiting micromolar binding or inhibition. Chemical shift perturbation mapping verified that six of the eight compounds bind to cruzain at the active site. Three different binding modes were delineated for the compounds, namely, covalent, noncovalent, and noninteracting. These results provide examples of how NMR spectroscopy can be used to screen compounds for fast evaluation of enzyme-inhibitor interactions to facilitate lead compound identification and subsequent structural studies.

  6. Resting spontaneous activity in the default mode network predicts performance decline during prolonged attention workload.

    PubMed

    Gui, Danyang; Xu, Sihua; Zhu, Senhua; Fang, Zhuo; Spaeth, Andrea M; Xin, Yuanyuan; Feng, Tingyong; Rao, Hengyi

    2015-10-15

    After continuous and prolonged cognitive workload, people typically show reduced behavioral performance and increased feelings of fatigue, which are known as "time-on-task (TOT) effects". Although TOT effects are pervasive in modern life, their underlying neural mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we induced TOT effects by administering a 20-min continuous psychomotor vigilance test (PVT) to a group of 16 healthy adults and used resting-state blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine spontaneous brain activity changes associated with fatigue and performance. Behaviorally, subjects displayed robust TOT effects, as reflected by increasingly slower reaction times as the test progressed and higher self-reported mental fatigue ratings after the 20-min PVT. Compared to pre-test measurements, subjects exhibited reduced amplitudes of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) in the default mode network (DMN) and increased ALFF in the thalamus after the test. Subjects also exhibited reduced anti-correlations between the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and right middle prefrontal cortex after the test. Moreover, pre-test resting ALFF in the PCC and medial prefrontal cortex (MePFC) predicted subjects' subsequent performance decline; individuals with higher ALFF in these regions exhibited more stable reaction times throughout the 20-min PVT. These results support the important role of both task-positive and task-negative networks in mediating TOT effects and suggest that spontaneous activity measured by resting-state BOLD fMRI may be a marker of mental fatigue.

  7. The MODE family of on-orbit experiments: The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Miller, David W.; Deluis, Javier; Waldman, Mel; Bicos, Andy

    1990-01-01

    A flight experiment entitled the Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE), proposed by the Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is described. This is the second in a family of flight experiments being developed at MIT. The first is the Middeck 0-Gravity Dynamics Experiment (MODE) which investigates the nonlinear behavior of contained fluids and truss structures in zero gravity. The objective of the MACE program is to investigate and validate the modeling of the dynamics of an actively controlled flexible, articulating, multibody platform free floating in zero gravity. A rationale and experimental approach for the program are presented. The rationale shows that on-orbit testing, coupled with ground testing and a strong analytical program, is necessary in order to fully understand both how flexibility of the platform affects the pointing problem, as well as how gravity perturbs this structural flexibility causing deviations between 1- and 0-gravity behavior. The experimental approach captures the essential physics of multibody platforms, by identifying the appropriate attributes, tests, and performance metrics of the test article and defines the tests required to successfully validate the analytical framework.

  8. PCB bioavailability control in Lumbriculus variegatus through different modes of activated carbon addition to sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Xueli Sun; Upal Ghosh

    2007-07-01

    PCB bioavailability to a freshwater oligochaete (Lumbriculus variegatus) was studied using sediments from a PCB-impacted river that was treated with different modes of granular activated carbon (GAC) addition. The GAC used was bituminous coal-based type TOP. For sediment treated with 2.6% GAC and mixed for 2 min prior to L. variegatus addition, the reduction in total PCB biouptake was 70% for 75-300 {mu}m size carbon, and 92% for the 45-180 {mu}m size carbon. For the case where the GAC was placed as a thin layer on top of the sediments without mixing, the reduction in total PCB uptake was 70%. PCB biouptake kinetics study using treated and untreated sediment showed that the maximum PCB uptake in tissue was achieved at 28 days and decreased after that time. Although the absolute uptake of PCB changed over time, the percent reduction in total PCB uptake upon GAC amendment remained constant after the first few days. Our results indicated that PCB bioavailability was reduced upon the addition and little or no mixing of GAC into sediments. PCB aqueous equilibrium concentration and desorption rates were greatly reduced after GAC amendment, indicating reductions in the two primary mechanisms of PCB bioavailability in sediments: chemical activity and chemical accessibility. 29 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. PCB bioavailability control in Lumbriculus variegatus through different modes of activated carbon addition to sediments.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xueli; Ghosh, Upal

    2007-07-01

    PCB bioavailability to a freshwater oligochaete (Lumbriculus variegatus) was studied using sediments from a PCB-impacted river that was treated with different modes of granular activated carbon (GAC) addition. For sedimenttreated with 2.6% GAC and mixed for 2 min prior to L. variegatus addition, the reduction in total PCB biouptake was 70% for 75-300 microm size carbon, and 92% for the 45-180 microm size carbon. For the case where the GAC was placed as a thin layer on top of the sediments without mixing, the reduction in total PCB uptake was 70%. PCB biouptake kinetics study using treated and untreated sediment showed that the maximum PCB uptake in tissue was achieved at 28 days and decreased after that time. Although the absolute uptake of PCB changed over time, the percent reduction in total PCB uptake upon GAC amendment remained constant after the first few days. Our results indicated that PCB bioavailability was reduced upon the addition and little or no mixing of GAC into sediments. PCB aqueous equilibrium concentration and desorption rates were greatly reduced after GAC amendment, indicating reductions in the two primary mechanisms of PCB bioavailability in sediments: chemical activity and chemical accessibility.

  10. The unrested resting brain: sleep deprivation alters activity within the default-mode network.

    PubMed

    Gujar, Ninad; Yoo, Seung-Schik; Hu, Peter; Walker, Matthew P

    2010-08-01

    The sleep-deprived brain has principally been characterized by examining dysfunction during cognitive task performance. However, far less attention has been afforded the possibility that sleep deprivation may be as, if not more, accurately characterized on the basis of abnormal resting-state brain activity. Here we report that one night of sleep deprivation significantly disrupts the canonical signature of task-related deactivation, resulting in a double dissociation within anterior as well as posterior midline regions of the default network. Indeed, deactivation within these regions alone discriminated sleep-deprived from sleep-control subjects with a 93% degree of sensitivity and 92% specificity. In addition, the relative balance of deactivation within these default nodes significantly correlated with the amount of prior sleep in the control group (and not extended time awake in the deprivation group). Therefore, the stability and the balance of task-related deactivation in key default-mode regions may be dependent on prior sleep, such that a lack thereof disrupts this signature pattern of brain activity, findings that may offer explanatory insights into conditions associated with sleep loss at both a clinical as well as societal level.

  11. Exploring the DNA binding mode of transition metal based biologically active compounds.

    PubMed

    Raman, N; Sobha, S

    2012-01-01

    Few novel 4-aminoantipyrine derived Schiff bases and their metal complexes were synthesized and characterized. Their structural features and other properties were deduced from the elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility and molar conductivity as well as from mass, IR, UV-vis, (1)H NMR and EPR spectral studies. The binding of the complexes with CT-DNA was analyzed by electronic absorption spectroscopy, viscosity measurement, and cyclic voltammetry. The interaction of the metal complexes with DNA was also studied by molecular modeling with special reference to docking. The experimental and docking results revealed that the complexes have the ability of interaction with DNA of minor groove binding mode. The intrinsic binding constants (K(b)) of the complexes with CT-DNA were found out which show that they are minor groove binders. Gel electrophoresis assay demonstrated the ability of the complexes to cleave the pUC19 DNA in the presence of AH(2) (ascorbic acid). Moreover, the oxidative cleavage studies using distamycin revealed the minor groove binding for the newly synthesized 4-aminoantipyrine derived Schiff bases and their metal complexes. Evaluation of antibacterial activity of the complexes against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Klebsiella pneumoniae exhibited that the complexes have potent biocidal activity than the free ligands.

  12. The MODE family of on-orbit experiments: The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Miller, David W.; Deluis, Javier; Waldman, Mel; Bicos, Andy

    1990-12-01

    A flight experiment entitled the Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE), proposed by the Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is described. This is the second in a family of flight experiments being developed at MIT. The first is the Middeck 0-Gravity Dynamics Experiment (MODE) which investigates the nonlinear behavior of contained fluids and truss structures in zero gravity. The objective of the MACE program is to investigate and validate the modeling of the dynamics of an actively controlled flexible, articulating, multibody platform free floating in zero gravity. A rationale and experimental approach for the program are presented. The rationale shows that on-orbit testing, coupled with ground testing and a strong analytical program, is necessary in order to fully understand both how flexibility of the platform affects the pointing problem, as well as how gravity perturbs this structural flexibility causing deviations between 1- and 0-gravity behavior. The experimental approach captures the essential physics of multibody platforms, by identifying the appropriate attributes, tests, and performance metrics of the test article and defines the tests required to successfully validate the analytical framework.

  13. Localization and activity of tissue bound cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase in normal and lack of changes in psoriatic human skin.

    PubMed

    Mahrle, G; Organos, C E

    1976-12-01

    This study has been undertaken to elucidate the localization and the activity of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) in psoriatic epidermis compared to normal. The results showed that the evaluation of cytochemical methods may be difficult because of the various factors which interfere with the reaction and the considerable amount of background staining. Additionally, only the tissue bound particulate enzyme fraction may be demonstrated by cytochemical means. Nevertheless, the method did reveal that the activity of PDE, if any, is localized on the cytoplasmic membranes of the cells, independent of their origin, and not on the cell surface. Moreover, no differences were found between normal and psoriatic skin. It seems, therefore, that the intracellular degradation of cAMP remains unaltered in psoriasis.

  14. Expression and activity of L-Myc in normal mouse development.

    PubMed Central

    Hatton, K S; Mahon, K; Chin, L; Chiu, F C; Lee, H W; Peng, D; Morgenbesser, S D; Horner, J; DePinho, R A

    1996-01-01

    To determine the role of L-Myc in normal mammalian development and its functional relationship to other members of the Myc family, we determined the normal patterns of L-myc gene expression in the developing mouse by RNA in situ hybridization and assessed the phenotypic impact of L-Myc deficiency produced through standard gene targeting methodology. L-myc transcripts were detected in the developing kidney and lung as well as in both the proliferative and the differentiative zones of the brain and neural tube. Despite significant expression of L-myc in developing mouse tissue, homozygous null L-myc mice were found to be viable, reproductively competent, and represented in expected frequencies from heterozygous matings. A detailed histological survey of embryonic and adult tissues, characterization of an embryonic neuronal marker, and measurement of cellular proliferation in situ did not reveal any congenital abnormalities. The lack of an apparent phenotype associated with L-Myc deficiency indicates that L-Myc is dispensable for gross morphological development and argues against a unique role for L-Myc in early central nervous system development as had been previously suggested. Although overlapping expression patterns among myc family members raise the possibility of complementation of L-Myc deficiency by other Myc oncoproteins, compensatory changes in the levels of c- and/or N-myc transcripts were not detected in homozygous null L-myc mice. PMID:8657155

  15. CDK5 and Its Activator P35 in Normal Pituitary and in Pituitary Adenomas: Relationship to VEGF Expression

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Weiyan; Wang, Hongyun; He, Yue; Li, Dan; Gong, Lei; Zhang, Yazhuo

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary tumors are monoclonal adenomas that account for about 10-15% of intracranial tumors. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) regulates the activities of various proteins and cellular processes in the nervous system, but its potential roles in pituitary adenomas are poorly understood. The kinase activity of CDK5 requires association with an activating protein, p35 (also known as CDK5 activator 1, p35). Here, we show that functional CDK5, associated with p35, is present in normal human pituitary and in pituitary tumors. Furthermore, p35 mRNA and protein levels were higher in pituitary adenomas than in the normal glands, suggesting that CDK5 activity might be upregulated in pituitary tumors. Inhibition of CDK5 activity in rat pituitary cells, reduced the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a protein that regulates vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. Our results suggest that increased CDK5-mediated VEGF expression might play a crucial role in the development of pituitary adenomas, and that roscovitine and other CDK5 inhibitors could be useful as anticancer agents. PMID:24550687

  16. An elevated level of physical activity is associated with normal lipoprotein(a) levels in individuals from Maracaibo, Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez, Valmore; Aparicio, Daniel; Rojas, Edward; Peñaranda, Lianny; Finol, Freddy; Acosta, Luis; Mengual, Edgardo; Rojas, Joselyn; Arráiz, Nailet; Toledo, Alexandra; Colmenares, Carlos; Urribarí, Jesica; Sanchez, Wireynis; Pineda, Carlos; Rodriguez, Dalia; Faria, Judith; Añez, Roberto; Cano, Raquel; Cano, Clímaco; Sorell, Luis; Velasco, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is the main cause of death worldwide. Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)], is an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease in which concentrations are genetically regulated. Contradictory results have been published about physical activity influence on Lp(a) concentration. This research aimed to determine associations between different physical activity levels and Lp(a) concentration. A descriptive and cross-sectional study was made in 1340 randomly selected subjects (males = 598; females = 712) to whom a complete clinical history, the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, and Lp(a) level determination were made. Statistical analysis was carried out to assess qualitative variables relationship by chi2 and differences between means by one-way analysis of variance considering a P value <0.05 as statistically significant. Results are shown as absolute frequencies, percentages, and mean +/- standard deviation according to case. Physical activity levels were ordinal classified as follows: low activity with 24.3% (n = 318), moderate activity with 35.0% (n = 458), and high physical activity with 40.8% (n = 534). Lp(a) concentration in the studied sample was 26.28 +/- 12.64 (IC: 25.59-26.96) mg/dL. Lp(a) concentration according to low, moderate, and high physical activity levels were 29.22 +/- 13.74, 26.27 +/- 12.91, and 24.53 +/- 11.35 mg/dL, respectively, observing statistically significant differences between low and moderate level (P = 0.004) and low and high level (P < 0.001). A strong association (chi2 = 9.771; P = 0.002) was observed among a high physical activity level and a normal concentration of Lp(a) (less than 30 mg/dL). A lifestyle characterized by high physical activity is associated with normal Lp(a) levels.

  17. Elevated blood active ghrelin and normal total ghrelin and obestatin concentrations in uterine leiomyoma.

    PubMed

    Markowska, A; Ziolkowska, A; Nowinka, K; Malendowicz, L K

    2009-01-01

    Ghrelin and obestatin originate from the same peptide precursor, preproghrelin. Both peptides are secreted in the blood. We investigated serum active and total ghrelin and obestatin concentrations in women with uterine myomatosis. Serum concentrations of active ghrelin in uterine leiomyoma were significantly higher compared to women in the control group (86 +/- 3 vs 56 +/- 9 pg/ml, respectively; p < 0.02). On the other hand, serum concentrations of total ghrelin and obestatin in uterine leiomyoma did not differ from those in the control group. In the control group the ratio of active to total ghrelin concentrations amounted to 0.62, while in women with uterine myoma it was 0.95, pointing to a prevalence of the active form of ghrelin in women with uterine myoma. Also the ratio of active ghrelin concentration to obestatin concentration was higher in the latter group while the ratio of total circulating ghrelin to obestatin concentrations was similar in the two groups. The data may suggest a role of active ghrelin in the development of a myoma. Moreover, the results indicate that increased blood ratios of active to total ghrelin and to obestatin concentrations are not specific for cachexia.

  18. Impact of major and minor mode on EEG frequency range activities of music processing as a function of expertise.

    PubMed

    Jenni, Raoul; Oechslin, Mathias S; James, Clara E

    2017-04-24

    Processing western tonal music may yield distinct brain responses depending on the mode of the musical compositions. Although subjective feelings in response to major and minor mode are well described, the underlying brain mechanisms and their development with increasing expertise have not been thoroughly examined. Using high-density electroencephalography, the present study investigated neuronal activities in the frequency domain in response to polyphone musical compositions in major and minor mode in non-musicians, amateurs and experts. During active listening decrease of theta- and gamma-frequency range activities occurred with increasing expertise in right posterior regions, possibly reflecting enhanced processing efficiency. Moreover, minor and major compositions distinctively modulated synchronization of neuronal activities in high frequency ranges (beta and gamma) in frontal regions, with increased activity in response to minor compositions in musicians and in experts in particular. These results suggest that high-frequency electroencephalographic (EEG) activities carry information about musical mode, showing gradual increase of processing efficiency and sensitivity with musical expertise.

  19. Effects of methylphenidate on resting-state brain activity in normal adults: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yihong; Gao, Bin; Hua, Jianming; Liu, Weibo; Deng, Yichao; Zhang, Lijie; Jiang, Biao; Zang, Yufeng

    2013-02-01

    Methylphenidate (MPH) is one of the most commonly used stimulants for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Although several studies have evaluated the effects of MPH on human brain activation during specific cognitive tasks using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), few studies have focused on spontaneous brain activity. In the current study, we investigated the effect of MPH on the intra-regional synchronization of spontaneous brain activity during the resting state in 18 normal adult males. A handedness questionnaire and the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale were applied before medication, and a resting-state fMRI scan was obtained 1 h after medication (20 mg MPH or placebo, order counterbalanced between participants). We demonstrated that: (1) there were no significant differences in the performance of behavioral tasks between the MPH and placebo groups; (2) the left middle and superior temporal gyri had stronger MPHrelated regional homogeneity (ReHo); and (3) the left lingual gyrus had weaker MPH-related ReHo. Our findings showed that the ReHo in some brain areas changes with MPH compared to placebo in normal adults, even though there are no behavioral differences. This method can be applied to patients with mental illness who may be treated with MPH, and be used to compare the difference between patients taking MPH and normal participants, to help reveal the mechanism of how MPH works.

  20. Modeling notch signaling in normal and neoplastic hematopoiesis: global gene expression profiling in response to activated notch expression.

    PubMed

    Ganapati, Uma; Tan, Hongying Tina; Lynch, Maureen; Dolezal, Milana; de Vos, Sven; Gasson, Judith C

    2007-08-01

    In normal hematopoiesis, proliferation is tightly linked to differentiation in ways that involve cell-cell interaction with stromal elements in the bone marrow stem cell niche. Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies strongly support a role for Notch signaling in the regulation of stem cell renewal and hematopoiesis. Not surprisingly, mutations in the Notch gene have been linked to a number of types of malignancies. To better define the function of Notch in both normal and neoplastic hematopoiesis, a tetracycline-inducible system regulating expression of a ligand-independent, constitutively active form of Notch1 was introduced into murine E14Tg2a embryonic stem cells. During coculture, OP9 stromal cells induce the embryonic stem cells to differentiate first to hemangioblasts and subsequently to hematopoietic stem cells. Our studies indicate that activation of Notch signaling in flk+ hemangioblasts dramatically reduces their survival and proliferative capacity and lowers the levels of hematopoietic stem cell markers CD34 and c-Kit and the myeloid marker CD11b. Global gene expression profiling of day 8 hematopoietic progenitors in the absence and presence of activated Notch yield candidate genes required for normal hematopoietic differentiation, as well as putative downstream targets of oncogenic forms of Notch including the noncanonical Wnts Wnt4 and 5A. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

  1. Physical activity, aerobic fitness, self-perception, and dietary intake in at risk of overweight and normal weight children.

    PubMed

    Ball, Geoff D C; Marshall, J Dru; McCargar, Linda J

    2005-01-01

    Differences in physical activity, aerobic fitness, self-perception, and dietary intake were examined in a sample of six- to ten-year-olds at risk of overweight, and in normal weight boys and girls. Participants (n=20 at risk of overweight [BMI > or =85th percentile]; n=115 normal weight [BMI <85th percentile]; n=68 boys; n=67 girls) had anthropometric, physical activity, aerobic fitness, self-perception, and dietary intake measurements at zero, three, six, and 12 months. Over the 12-month period, normal weight children were more physically active (F=4.1, p<0.05) and aerobically fit (F=14.3, p<0.001), and possessed higher self-perceptions of social acceptance (F=7.3, p<0.01) than their at risk of overweight peers. Fitness differences between the sexes were not apparent at baseline, but emerged over the long term (F=7.9, p<0.01). Overall, boys consumed more total energy, fat, carbohydrate, and protein than did girls, while the entire sample consumed diets low in vegetables and fruits and meat and alternatives, and high in "other" foods. These observations highlight key disparities in lifestyle-related behaviours and perceptions between groups of children according to overweight status and sex. The findings underscore the importance of longitudinal studies in youth because cross-sectional studies may reflect transient differences.

  2. Colorimetry and SERS dual-mode detection of telomerase activity: combining rapid screening with high sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Shenfei; Wang, Zhuyuan; Chen, Hui; Hu, Guohua; Liu, Min; Chen, Peng; Cui, Yiping

    2014-01-01

    As an important biomarker and therapeutic target, telomerase has attracted considerable attention concerning its detection and monitoring. Here, we present a colorimetry and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) dual-mode telomerase activity detection method, which has several distinctive advantages. First, colorimetric functionality allows rapid preliminary discrimination of telomerase activity by the naked eye. Second, the employment of SERS technique results in greatly improved detection sensitivity. Third, the combination of colorimetry and SERS into one detection system can ensure highly efficacious and sensitive screening of numerous samples. Besides, the avoidance of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) procedures further guarantees fine reliability and simplicity. Generally, the presented method is realized by an ``elongate and capture'' procedure. To be specific, gold nanoparticles modified with Raman molecules and telomeric repeat complementary oligonucleotide are employed as the colorimetric-SERS bifunctional reporting nanotag, while magnetic nanoparticles functionalized with telomerase substrate oligonucleotide are used as the capturing substrate. Telomerase can synthesize and elongate telomeric repeats onto the capturing substrate. The elongated telomeric repeats subsequently facilitate capturing of the reporting nanotag via hybridization between telomeric repeat and its complementary strand. The captured nanotags can cause a significant difference in the color and SERS intensity of the magnetically separated sediments. Thus both the color and SERS can be used as indicators of the telomerase activity. With fast screening ability and outstanding sensitivity, we anticipate that this method would greatly promote practical application of telomerase-based early-stage cancer diagnosis.As an important biomarker and therapeutic target, telomerase has attracted considerable attention concerning its detection and monitoring. Here, we present a colorimetry and

  3. The effects of diet and physical activity on plasma homovanillic acid in normal human subjects.

    PubMed

    Kendler, K S; Mohs, R C; Davis, K L

    1983-03-01

    This study examines the effect of diet and moderate physical activity on plasma levels of the dopamine metabolite homovanillic acid (HVA) in healthy young males. At weekly intervals, subjects were fed four isocaloric meals: polycose (pure carbohydrate), sustecal, low monoamine, and high monoamine. Moderate physical activity consisted of 30 minutes of exercise on a bicycle ergometer. The effect of diet on plasma HVA (pHVA) was highly significant. Compared to the polycose meal, the high monoamine meal significantly increased pHVA. Moderate physical activity also significantly increased pHVA. Future clinical studies using pHVA in man as an index of brain dopamine function should control for the effects of both diet and physical activity.

  4. The Self-Pleasantness Judgment Modulates the Encoding Performance and the Default Mode Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Perrone-Bertolotti, Marcela; Cerles, Melanie; Ramdeen, Kylee T.; Boudiaf, Naila; Pichat, Cedric; Hot, Pascal; Baciu, Monica

    2016-01-01

    In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we evaluated the effect of self-relevance on cerebral activity and behavioral performance during an incidental encoding task. Recent findings suggest that pleasantness judgments reliably induce self-oriented (internal) thoughts and increase default mode network (DMN) activity. We hypothesized that this increase in DMN activity would relate to increased memory recognition for pleasantly-judged stimuli (which depend on internally-oriented attention) but decreased recognition for unpleasantly-judged items (which depend on externally-oriented attention). To test this hypothesis, brain activity was recorded from 21 healthy participants while they performed a pleasantness judgment requiring them to rate visual stimuli as pleasant or unpleasant. One hour later, participants performed a surprise memory recognition test outside of the scanner. Thus, we were able to evaluate the effects of pleasant and unpleasant judgments on cerebral activity and incidental encoding. The behavioral results showed that memory recognition was better for items rated as pleasant than items rated as unpleasant. The whole brain analysis indicated that successful encoding (SE) activates the inferior frontal and lateral temporal cortices, whereas unsuccessful encoding (UE) recruits two key medial posterior DMN regions, the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and precuneus (PCU). A region of interest (ROI) analysis including classic DMN areas, revealed significan