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Sample records for active nuclear import

  1. Active Nuclear Import of Membrane Proteins Revisited.

    PubMed

    Laba, Justyna K; Steen, Anton; Popken, Petra; Chernova, Alina; Poolman, Bert; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M

    2015-01-01

    It is poorly understood how membrane proteins destined for the inner nuclear membrane pass the crowded environment of the Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC). For the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Src1/Heh1 and Heh2, a transport mechanism was proposed where the transmembrane domains diffuse through the membrane while the extralumenal domains encoding a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and intrinsically disordered linker (L) are accompanied by transport factors and travel through the NPC. Here, we validate the proposed mechanism and explore and discuss alternative interpretations of the data. First, to disprove an interpretation where the membrane proteins become membrane embedded only after nuclear import, we present biochemical and localization data to support that the previously used, as well as newly designed reporter proteins are membrane-embedded irrespective of the presence of the sorting signals, the specific transmembrane domain (multipass or tail anchored), independent of GET, and also under conditions that the proteins are trapped in the NPC. Second, using the recently established size limit for passive diffusion of membrane proteins in yeast, and using an improved assay, we confirm active import of polytopic membrane protein with extralumenal soluble domains larger than those that can pass by diffusion on similar timescales. This reinforces that NLS-L dependent active transport is distinct from passive diffusion. Thirdly, we revisit the proposed route through the center of the NPC and conclude that the previously used trapping assay is, unfortunately, poorly suited to address the route through the NPC, and the route thus remains unresolved. Apart from the uncertainty about the route through the NPC, the data confirm active, transport factor dependent, nuclear transport of membrane-embedded mono- and polytopic membrane proteins in baker's yeast. PMID:26473931

  2. Active Nuclear Import of Membrane Proteins Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Laba, Justyna K.; Steen, Anton; Popken, Petra; Chernova, Alina; Poolman, Bert; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.

    2015-01-01

    It is poorly understood how membrane proteins destined for the inner nuclear membrane pass the crowded environment of the Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC). For the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Src1/Heh1 and Heh2, a transport mechanism was proposed where the transmembrane domains diffuse through the membrane while the extralumenal domains encoding a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and intrinsically disordered linker (L) are accompanied by transport factors and travel through the NPC. Here, we validate the proposed mechanism and explore and discuss alternative interpretations of the data. First, to disprove an interpretation where the membrane proteins become membrane embedded only after nuclear import, we present biochemical and localization data to support that the previously used, as well as newly designed reporter proteins are membrane-embedded irrespective of the presence of the sorting signals, the specific transmembrane domain (multipass or tail anchored), independent of GET, and also under conditions that the proteins are trapped in the NPC. Second, using the recently established size limit for passive diffusion of membrane proteins in yeast, and using an improved assay, we confirm active import of polytopic membrane protein with extralumenal soluble domains larger than those that can pass by diffusion on similar timescales. This reinforces that NLS-L dependent active transport is distinct from passive diffusion. Thirdly, we revisit the proposed route through the center of the NPC and conclude that the previously used trapping assay is, unfortunately, poorly suited to address the route through the NPC, and the route thus remains unresolved. Apart from the uncertainty about the route through the NPC, the data confirm active, transport factor dependent, nuclear transport of membrane-embedded mono- and polytopic membrane proteins in baker’s yeast. PMID:26473931

  3. Heat-shock stress activates a novel nuclear import pathway mediated by Hikeshi

    PubMed Central

    Imamoto, Naoko; Kose, Shingo

    2012-01-01

    Cellular stresses significantly affect nuclear transport systems. Nuclear transport pathways mediated by importin β-family members, which are active under normal conditions, are downregulated. During thermal stress, a nuclear import pathway mediated by a novel carrier, which we named Hikeshi, becomes active. Hikeshi is not a member of the importin β family and mediates the nuclear import of Hsp70s. Unlike importin β family-mediated nuclear transport, the Hikeshi-mediated nuclear import of Hsp70s is not coupled to the GTPase cycle of the small GTPase Ran but rather is coupled with the ATPase cycle of Hsp70s. Hikeshi-mediated nuclear import is essential for the attenuation and reversal of the thermal stress response in human cells. The mechanism and functions of this newly identified nuclear import pathway will be discussed. PMID:22895094

  4. Mapping neural circuits with activity-dependent nuclear import of a transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Masuyama, Kaoru; Zhang, Yi; Rao, Yi; Wang, Jing W

    2012-03-01

    Abstract: Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) is a calcium-responsive transcription factor. We describe here an NFAT-based neural tracing method-CaLexA (calcium-dependent nuclear import of LexA)-for labeling active neurons in behaving animals. In this system, sustained neural activity induces nuclear import of the chimeric transcription factor LexA-VP16-NFAT, which in turn drives green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter expression only in active neurons. We tested this system in Drosophila and found that volatile sex pheromones excite specific neurons in the olfactory circuit. Furthermore, complex courtship behavior associated with multi-modal sensory inputs activated neurons in the ventral nerve cord. This method harnessing the mechanism of activity-dependent nuclear import of a transcription factor can be used to identify active neurons in specific neuronal population in behaving animals. PMID:22236090

  5. The nucleotide-binding domain of NLRC5 is critical for nuclear import and transactivation activity

    SciTech Connect

    Meissner, Torsten B.; Li, Amy; Liu, Yuen-Joyce; Gagnon, Etienne; Kobayashi, Koichi S.

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NLRC5 requires an intact NLS for its function as MHC class I transactivator. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear presence of NLRC5 is required for MHC class I induction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nucleotide-binding controls nuclear import and transactivation activity of NLRC5. -- Abstract: Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II are crucial for the function of the human adaptive immune system. A member of the NLR (nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat) protein family, NLRC5, has recently been identified as a transcriptional regulator of MHC class I and related genes. While a 'master regulator' of MHC class II genes, CIITA, has long been known, NLRC5 specifically associates with and transactivates the proximal promoters of MHC class I genes. In this study, we analyzed the molecular requirements of NLRC5 nuclear import and transactivation activity. We show that NLRC5-mediated MHC class I gene induction requires an intact nuclear localization signal and nuclear distribution of NLRC5. In addition, we find that the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) of NLRC5 is critical not only for nuclear translocation but also for the transactivation of MHC class I genes. Changing the cellular localization of NLRC5 is likely to immediately impact MHC class I expression as well as MHC class I-mediated antigen presentation. NLRC5 may thus provide a promising target for the modulation of MHC class I antigen presentation, especially in the setting of transplant medicine.

  6. Modulation of histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) nuclear import and tubulin deacetylase activity through acetylation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanjing; Peng, Lirong; Seto, Edward; Huang, Suming; Qiu, Yi

    2012-08-17

    The reversible acetylation of histones and non-histone proteins by histone acetyltransferases and deacetylases (HDACs) plays a critical role in many cellular processes in eukaryotic cells. HDAC6 is a unique histone deacetylase with two deacetylase domains and a C-terminal zinc finger domain. HDAC6 resides mainly in the cytoplasm and regulates many important biological processes, including cell migration and degradation of misfold proteins. HDAC6 has also been shown to localize in the nucleus to regulate transcription. However, how HDAC6 shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm is largely unknown. In addition, it is not clear how HDAC6 enzymatic activity is modulated. Here, we show that HDAC6 can be acetylated by p300 on five clusters of lysine residues. One cluster (site B) of acetylated lysine is in the N-terminal nuclear localization signal region. These lysine residues in site B were converted to glutamine to mimic acetylated lysines. The mutations significantly reduced HDAC6 tubulin deacetylase activity and further impaired cell motility, but had no effect on histone deacetylase activity. More interestingly, these mutations retained HDAC6 in the cytoplasm by blocking the interaction with the nuclear import protein importin-α. The retention of HDAC6 in the cytoplasm by acetylation eventually affects histone deacetylation. Thus, we conclude that acetylation is an important post-translational modification that regulates HDAC6 tubulin deacetylase activity and nuclear import.

  7. Active nuclear import and export pathways regulate E2F-5 subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Apostolova, Margarita D; Ivanova, Iordanka A; Dagnino, Carla; D'Souza, Sudhir J A; Dagnino, Lina

    2002-09-13

    Epidermal keratinocyte differentiation is accompanied by differential regulation of E2F genes, including up-regulation of E2F-5 and its concomitant association with the retinoblastoma family protein p130. This complex appears to play a role in irreversible withdrawal from the cell cycle in differentiating keratinocytes. We now report that keratinocyte differentiation is also accompanied by changes in E2F-5 subcellular localization, from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. To define the molecular determinants of E2F-5 nuclear import, we tested its ability to enter the nucleus in import assays in vitro using digitonin-permeabilized cells. We found that E2F-5 enters the nucleus through mediated transport processes that involve formation of nuclear pore complexes. It has been proposed that E2F-4 and E2F-5, which lack defined nuclear localization signal (NLS) consensus sequences, enter the nucleus in association with NLS-containing DP-2 or pRB family proteins. However, we show that nuclear import of E2F-5 only requires the first N-terminal 56 amino acid residues and is not dependent on interaction with DP or pRB family proteins. Because E2F-5 is predominantly cytoplasmic in undifferentiated keratinocytes and in other intact cells, we also examined whether this protein is subjected to active nuclear export. Indeed, E2F-5 is exported from the nucleus through leptomycin B-sensitive, CRM1-mediated transport, through a region corresponding to amino acid residues 130-154. This region excludes the DNA- and the p130-binding domains. Thus, the subcellular distribution of E2F-5 is tightly regulated in intact cells, through multiple functional domains that direct nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of this protein.

  8. Nuclear Import of Yeast Proteasomes

    PubMed Central

    Burcoglu, Julianne; Zhao, Liang; Enenkel, Cordula

    2015-01-01

    Proteasomes are highly conserved protease complexes responsible for the degradation of aberrant and short-lived proteins. In highly proliferating yeast and mammalian cells, proteasomes are predominantly nuclear. During quiescence and cell cycle arrest, proteasomes accumulate in granules in close proximity to the nuclear envelope/ER. With prolonged quiescence in yeast, these proteasome granules pinch off as membraneless organelles, and migrate as stable entities through the cytoplasm. Upon exit from quiescence, the proteasome granules clear and the proteasomes are rapidly transported into the nucleus, a process reflecting the dynamic nature of these multisubunit complexes. Due to the scarcity of studies on the nuclear transport of mammalian proteasomes, we summarised the current knowledge on the nuclear import of yeast proteasomes. This pathway uses canonical nuclear localisation signals within proteasomal subunits and Srp1/Kap95, and the canonical import receptor, named importin/karyopherin αβ. Blm10, a conserved 240 kDa protein, which is structurally related to Kap95, provides an alternative import pathway. Two models exist upon which either inactive precursor complexes or active holo-enzymes serve as the import cargo. Here, we reconcile both models and suggest that the import of inactive precursor complexes predominates in dividing cells, while the import of mature enzymes mainly occurs upon exit from quiescence. PMID:26262643

  9. Import and nuclear size

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Fix, Orna

    2012-01-01

    The size of a cell’s nucleus is usually proportional to the size of the cell itself. How are the two linked? The answer lies, at least in part, in the import of one or more cytoplasmic cargoes into the nucleus. PMID:21107417

  10. Nucleoporin 62-Like Protein Activates Canonical Wnt Signaling through Facilitating the Nuclear Import of β-Catenin in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaojie; Gu, Qilin; Lin, Li; Li, Shaoyang; Zhong, Shan

    2015-01-01

    Nucleoporin p62 (Nup62) localizes in the central channel of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and regulates nuclear pore permeability and nucleocytoplasmic transport. However, the developmental roles of Nup62 in vertebrates remain largely unclear. Zebrafish Nup62-like protein (Nup62l) is a homolog of mammalian Nup62. The nup62l gene is maternally expressed, but its transcripts are ubiquitously distributed during early embryogenesis and enriched in the head, pharynx, and intestine of developing embryos. Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway positively modulates nup62l transcription, while Bmp signaling acts downstream of Wnt/β-catenin signaling to negatively regulate nup62l expression. Overexpression of nup62l dorsalized embryos and enhanced gastrula convergence and extension (CE) movements. In contrast, knockdown of Nup62l led to ventralized embryos, an impediment to CE movements, and defects in specification of midline organ progenitors. Mechanistically, Nup62l acts as an activator of Wnt/β-catenin signaling through interaction with and facilitation of nuclear import of β-catenin-1/2 in zebrafish. Thus, Nup62l regulates dorsoventral patterning, gastrula CE movements, and proper specification of midline organ precursors through mediating the nuclear import of β-catenins in zebrafish. PMID:25605329

  11. Sterol-dependent nuclear import of ORP1S promotes LXR regulated trans-activation of apoE

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sungsoo; Wang, Ping-Yuan; Jeong, Yangsik; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Anderson, Richard G.W.; Michaely, Peter

    2012-10-01

    Oxysterol binding protein related protein 1S (ORP1S) is a member of a family of sterol transport proteins. Here we present evidence that ORP1S translocates from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in response to sterol binding. The sterols that best promote nuclear import of ORP1S also activate the liver X receptor (LXR) transcription factors and we show that ORP1S binds to LXRs, promotes binding of LXRs to LXR response elements (LXREs) and specifically enhances LXR-dependent transcription via the ME.1 and ME.2 enhancer elements of the apoE gene. We propose that ORP1S is a cytoplasmic sterol sensor, which transports sterols to the nucleus and promotes LXR-dependent gene transcription through select enhancer elements. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ORP1S translocates to the nucleus in response to sterol binding. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sterols that best promote nuclear import of ORP1S are LXR agonists. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ORP1S binds to LXRs, enhances binding of LXRs to LXREs and promotes LXR-dependent transcription of apoE.

  12. Sterol-Dependent Nuclear Import of ORP1S Promotes LXR Regulated Trans-Activation of APOE

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sungsoo; Wang, Ping-Yuan; Jeong, Yangsik; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Anderson, Richard G. W.; Michaely, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Oxysterol binding protein related protein 1S (ORP1S) is a member of a family of sterol transport proteins. Here we present evidence that ORP1S translocates from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in response to sterol binding. The sterols that best promote nuclear import of ORP1S also activate the liver X receptor (LXR) transcription factors and we show that ORP1S binds to LXRs, promotes binding of LXRs to LXR response elements (LXREs) and specifically enhances LXR-dependent transcription via the ME.1 and ME.2 enhancer elements of the apoE gene. We propose that ORP1S is a cytoplasmic sterol sensor, which transports sterols to the nucleus and promotes LXR-dependent gene transcription through select enhancer elements. PMID:22728266

  13. IPO3-mediated Nonclassical Nuclear Import of NF-κB Essential Modulator (NEMO) Drives DNA Damage-dependent NF-κB Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Byounghoon; McCool, Kevin; Wan, Jun; Wuerzberger-Davis, Shelly M.; Young, Edmond W. K.; Choi, Eun Young; Cingolani, Gino; Weaver, Beth A.; Miyamoto, Shigeki

    2015-01-01

    Activation of IκB kinase (IKK) and NF-κB by genotoxic stresses modulates apoptotic responses and production of inflammatory mediators, thereby contributing to therapy resistance and premature aging. We previously reported that genotoxic agents induce nuclear localization of NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO) via an undefined mechanism to arbitrate subsequent DNA damage-dependent IKK/NF-κB signaling. Here we show that a nonclassical nuclear import pathway via IPO3 (importin 3, transportin 2) mediates stress-induced NEMO nuclear translocation. We found putative nuclear localization signals in NEMO whose mutations disrupted stress-inducible nuclear translocation of NEMO and IKK/NF-κB activation in stably reconstituted NEMO-deficient cells. RNAi screening of both importin α and β family members, as well as co-immunoprecipitation analyses, revealed that a nonclassical importin β family member, IPO3, was the only importin that was able to associate with NEMO and whose reduced expression prevented genotoxic stress-induced NEMO nuclear translocation, IKK/NF-κB activation, and inflammatory cytokine transcription. Recombinant IPO3 interacted with recombinant NEMO but not the nuclear localization signal mutant version and induced nuclear import of NEMO in digitonin-permeabilized cells. We also provide evidence that NEMO is disengaged from IKK complex following genotoxic stress induction. Thus, the IPO3 nuclear import pathway is an early and crucial determinant of the IKK/NF-κB signaling arm of the mammalian DNA damage response. PMID:26060253

  14. IPO3-mediated Nonclassical Nuclear Import of NF-κB Essential Modulator (NEMO) Drives DNA Damage-dependent NF-κB Activation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Byounghoon; McCool, Kevin; Wan, Jun; Wuerzberger-Davis, Shelly M; Young, Edmond W K; Choi, Eun Young; Cingolani, Gino; Weaver, Beth A; Miyamoto, Shigeki

    2015-07-17

    Activation of IκB kinase (IKK) and NF-κB by genotoxic stresses modulates apoptotic responses and production of inflammatory mediators, thereby contributing to therapy resistance and premature aging. We previously reported that genotoxic agents induce nuclear localization of NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO) via an undefined mechanism to arbitrate subsequent DNA damage-dependent IKK/NF-κB signaling. Here we show that a nonclassical nuclear import pathway via IPO3 (importin 3, transportin 2) mediates stress-induced NEMO nuclear translocation. We found putative nuclear localization signals in NEMO whose mutations disrupted stress-inducible nuclear translocation of NEMO and IKK/NF-κB activation in stably reconstituted NEMO-deficient cells. RNAi screening of both importin α and β family members, as well as co-immunoprecipitation analyses, revealed that a nonclassical importin β family member, IPO3, was the only importin that was able to associate with NEMO and whose reduced expression prevented genotoxic stress-induced NEMO nuclear translocation, IKK/NF-κB activation, and inflammatory cytokine transcription. Recombinant IPO3 interacted with recombinant NEMO but not the nuclear localization signal mutant version and induced nuclear import of NEMO in digitonin-permeabilized cells. We also provide evidence that NEMO is disengaged from IKK complex following genotoxic stress induction. Thus, the IPO3 nuclear import pathway is an early and crucial determinant of the IKK/NF-κB signaling arm of the mammalian DNA damage response.

  15. The Importance of Establishing and Maintaining Continuity of Knowledge during 21st Century Nuclear Fuel Cycle Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, Chris A; Rowe, Nathan C; Younkin, James R; Wishard, Bernard; Bean, Robert; Blair, Dianna; Lawson, Ray; Weeks, George; Tolk, Keith

    2012-01-01

    During this century, the entire nuclear fuel cycle will expand and become increasingly more global, taxing both the resources and capabilities of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to maintain an effective Continuity of Knowledge (CoK) and its ability to provide timely detection of diversion. Uranium that currently is mined and milled in one country will be converted, enriched, and fabricated into fuel for reactors in an expanding set of new countries. This expansion will make it harder to guarantee that regional activities stay regional and that diversion detection is timely unless new and sustainable tools are developed to improve inspector effectiveness. To deal with this emerging reality, the IAEA must increase its use of unattended monitoring and employ new tools and methods that enhance CoK during all phases of the fuel cycle. This approach will help provide useful information to aid in detecting undeclared activities and create opportunities for timely and appropriate responses to events well before they enter phases of greater concern (e.g., enrichment). The systems that maintain CoK of safeguarded assets rely on containment and surveillance (C/S) technologies. The 21st century fuel cycle will require increased use of these technologies and systems, plus greater implementation of unattended systems that can securely collect data when inspectors are not present.

  16. Histone deacetylase 4 possesses intrinsic nuclear import and export signals.

    PubMed

    Wang, A H; Yang, X J

    2001-09-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) plays an important role in regulating its function, and binding of 14-3-3 proteins is necessary for its cytoplasmic retention. Here, we report the identification of nuclear import and export sequences of HDAC4. While its N-terminal 118 residues modulate the nuclear localization, residues 244 to 279 constitute an authentic, strong nuclear localization signal. Mutational analysis of this signal revealed that three arginine-lysine clusters are necessary for its nuclear import activity. As for nuclear export, leucine-rich sequences located in the middle part of HDAC4 do not function as nuclear export signals. By contrast, a hydrophobic motif (MXXLXVXV) located at the C-terminal end serves as a nuclear export signal that is necessary for cytoplasmic retention of HDAC4. This motif is required for CRM1-mediated nuclear export of HDAC4. Furthermore, binding of 14-3-3 proteins promotes cytoplasmic localization of HDAC4 by both inhibiting its nuclear import and stimulating its nuclear export. Unlike wild-type HDAC4, a point mutant with abrogated MEF2-binding ability remains cytoplasmic upon exogenous expression of MEF2C, supporting the notion that direct MEF2 binding targets HDAC4 to the nucleus. Therefore, HDAC4 possesses intrinsic nuclear import and export signals for its dynamic nucleocytoplasmic shuttling, and association with 14-3-3 and MEF2 proteins affects such shuttling and thus directs HDAC4 to the cytoplasm and the nucleus, respectively.

  17. Ciliary Entry of the Hedgehog Transcriptional Activator Gli2 Is Mediated by the Nuclear Import Machinery but Differs from Nuclear Transport in Being Imp-α/β1-Independent.

    PubMed

    Torrado, Belén; Graña, Martín; Badano, José L; Irigoín, Florencia

    2016-01-01

    Gli2 is the primary transcriptional activator of Hedgehog signalling in mammals. Upon stimulation of the pathway, Gli2 moves into the cilium before reaching the nucleus. However, the mechanisms underlying its entry into the cilium are not completely understood. Since several similarities have been reported between nuclear and ciliary import, we investigated if the nuclear import machinery participates in Gli2 ciliary entry. Here we show that while two conserved classical nuclear localization signals mediate Gli2 nuclear localization via importin (Imp)-α/β1, these sequences are not required for Gli2 ciliary import. However, blocking Imp-mediated transport through overexpression of GTP-locked Ran reduced the percentage of Gli2 positive cilia, an effect that was not explained by increased CRM1-dependent export of Gli2 from the cilium. We explored the participation of Imp-β2 in Gli2 ciliary traffic and observed that this transporter is involved in moving Gli2 into the cilium, as has been described for other ciliary proteins. In addition, our data indicate that Imp-β2 might also collaborate in Gli2 nuclear entry. How does Imp-β2 determine the final destination of a protein that can localize to two distinct subcellular compartments remains an open question. Therefore, our data shows that the nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling machinery plays a critical role mediating the subcellular distribution of Gli2 and the activation of the pathway, but distinct importins likely play a differential role mediating its ciliary and nuclear translocation.

  18. Ciliary Entry of the Hedgehog Transcriptional Activator Gli2 Is Mediated by the Nuclear Import Machinery but Differs from Nuclear Transport in Being Imp-α/β1-Independent

    PubMed Central

    Torrado, Belén; Graña, Martín; Badano, José L.; Irigoín, Florencia

    2016-01-01

    Gli2 is the primary transcriptional activator of Hedgehog signalling in mammals. Upon stimulation of the pathway, Gli2 moves into the cilium before reaching the nucleus. However, the mechanisms underlying its entry into the cilium are not completely understood. Since several similarities have been reported between nuclear and ciliary import, we investigated if the nuclear import machinery participates in Gli2 ciliary entry. Here we show that while two conserved classical nuclear localization signals mediate Gli2 nuclear localization via importin (Imp)-α/β1, these sequences are not required for Gli2 ciliary import. However, blocking Imp-mediated transport through overexpression of GTP-locked Ran reduced the percentage of Gli2 positive cilia, an effect that was not explained by increased CRM1-dependent export of Gli2 from the cilium. We explored the participation of Imp-β2 in Gli2 ciliary traffic and observed that this transporter is involved in moving Gli2 into the cilium, as has been described for other ciliary proteins. In addition, our data indicate that Imp-β2 might also collaborate in Gli2 nuclear entry. How does Imp-β2 determine the final destination of a protein that can localize to two distinct subcellular compartments remains an open question. Therefore, our data shows that the nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling machinery plays a critical role mediating the subcellular distribution of Gli2 and the activation of the pathway, but distinct importins likely play a differential role mediating its ciliary and nuclear translocation. PMID:27579771

  19. Ciliary Entry of the Hedgehog Transcriptional Activator Gli2 Is Mediated by the Nuclear Import Machinery but Differs from Nuclear Transport in Being Imp-α/β1-Independent.

    PubMed

    Torrado, Belén; Graña, Martín; Badano, José L; Irigoín, Florencia

    2016-01-01

    Gli2 is the primary transcriptional activator of Hedgehog signalling in mammals. Upon stimulation of the pathway, Gli2 moves into the cilium before reaching the nucleus. However, the mechanisms underlying its entry into the cilium are not completely understood. Since several similarities have been reported between nuclear and ciliary import, we investigated if the nuclear import machinery participates in Gli2 ciliary entry. Here we show that while two conserved classical nuclear localization signals mediate Gli2 nuclear localization via importin (Imp)-α/β1, these sequences are not required for Gli2 ciliary import. However, blocking Imp-mediated transport through overexpression of GTP-locked Ran reduced the percentage of Gli2 positive cilia, an effect that was not explained by increased CRM1-dependent export of Gli2 from the cilium. We explored the participation of Imp-β2 in Gli2 ciliary traffic and observed that this transporter is involved in moving Gli2 into the cilium, as has been described for other ciliary proteins. In addition, our data indicate that Imp-β2 might also collaborate in Gli2 nuclear entry. How does Imp-β2 determine the final destination of a protein that can localize to two distinct subcellular compartments remains an open question. Therefore, our data shows that the nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling machinery plays a critical role mediating the subcellular distribution of Gli2 and the activation of the pathway, but distinct importins likely play a differential role mediating its ciliary and nuclear translocation. PMID:27579771

  20. Ongoing Space Nuclear Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.

    2007-01-01

    Most ongoing US activities related to space nuclear power and propulsion are sponsored by NASA. NASA-spons0red space nuclear work is currently focused on evaluating potential fission surface power (FSP) systems and on radioisotope power systems (RPS). In addition, significant efforts related to nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems have been completed and will provide a starting point for potential future NTP work.

  1. Computational identification of post-translational modification-based nuclear import regulations by characterizing nuclear localization signal-import receptor interaction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jhih-Rong; Liu, Zhonghao; Hu, Jianjun

    2014-10-01

    The binding affinity between a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and its import receptor is closely related to corresponding nuclear import activity. PTM-based modulation of the NLS binding affinity to the import receptor is one of the most understood mechanisms to regulate nuclear import of proteins. However, identification of such regulation mechanisms is challenging due to the difficulty of assessing the impact of PTM on corresponding nuclear import activities. In this study we proposed NIpredict, an effective algorithm to predict nuclear import activity given its NLS, in which molecular interaction energy components (MIECs) were used to characterize the NLS-import receptor interaction, and the support vector regression machine (SVR) was used to learn the relationship between the characterized NLS-import receptor interaction and the corresponding nuclear import activity. Our experiments showed that nuclear import activity change due to NLS change could be accurately predicted by the NIpredict algorithm. Based on NIpredict, we developed a systematic framework to identify potential PTM-based nuclear import regulations for human and yeast nuclear proteins. Application of this approach has identified the potential nuclear import regulation mechanisms by phosphorylation of two nuclear proteins including SF1 and ORC6.

  2. Monitoring international nuclear activity

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, R.B.

    2006-05-19

    The LBNL Table of Isotopes website provides primary nuclearinformation to>150,000 different users annually. We have developedthe covert technology to identify users by IP address and country todetermine the kinds of nuclear information they are retrieving. Wepropose to develop pattern recognition software to provide an earlywarning system to identify Unusual nuclear activity by country or regionSpecific nuclear/radioactive material interests We have monitored nuclearinformation for over two years and provide this information to the FBIand LLNL. Intelligence is gleaned from the website log files. Thisproposal would expand our reporting capabilities.

  3. Blm10 facilitates nuclear import of proteasome core particles

    PubMed Central

    Weberruss, Marion H; Savulescu, Anca F; Jando, Julia; Bissinger, Thomas; Harel, Amnon; Glickman, Michael H; Enenkel, Cordula

    2013-01-01

    Short-lived proteins are degraded by proteasome complexes, which contain a proteolytic core particle (CP) but differ in the number of regulatory particles (RPs) and activators. A recently described member of conserved proteasome activators is Blm10. Blm10 contains 32 HEAT-like modules and is structurally related to the nuclear import receptor importin/karyopherin β. In proliferating yeast, RP-CP assemblies are primarily nuclear and promote cell division. During quiescence, RP-CP assemblies dissociate and CP and RP are sequestered into motile cytosolic proteasome storage granuli (PSG). Here, we show that CP sequestration into PSG depends on Blm10, whereas RP sequestration into PSG is independent of Blm10. PSG rapidly clear upon the resumption of cell proliferation and proteasomes are relocated into the nucleus. Thereby, Blm10 facilitates nuclear import of CP. Blm10-bound CP serves as an import receptor–cargo complex, as Blm10 mediates the interaction with FG-rich nucleoporins and is dissociated from the CP by Ran-GTP. Thus, Blm10 represents the first CP-dedicated nuclear import receptor in yeast. PMID:23982732

  4. The nuclear protein GmbZIP110 has transcription activation activity and plays important roles in the response to salinity stress in soybean

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhaolong; Ali, Zulfiqar; Xu, Ling; He, Xiaolan; Huang, Yihong; Yi, Jinxin; Shao, Hongbo; Ma, Hongxiang; Zhang, Dayong

    2016-01-01

    Plant basic-leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors play important roles in many biological processes and are involved in the regulation of salt stress tolerance. Previously, our lab generated digital gene expression profiling (DGEP) data to identify differentially expressed genes in a salt-tolerant genotype of Glycine soja (STGoGS) and a salt-sensitive genotype of Glycine max (SSGoGM). This DGEP data revealed that the expression (log2 ratio) of GmbZIP110 was up-regulated 2.76-fold and 3.38-fold in SSGoGM and STGoGS, respectively. In the present study, the salt inducible gene GmbZIP110 was cloned and characterized through phylogenetic analysis, subcellular localization and in silico transcript abundance analysis in different tissues. The functional role of this gene in salt tolerance was studied through transactivation analysis, DNA binding ability, expression in soybean composite seedlings and transgenic Arabidopsis, and the effect of GmbZIP110 on the expression of stress-related genes in transgenic Arabidopsis was investigated. We found that GmbZIP110 could bind to the ACGT motif, impact the expression of many stress-related genes and the accumulation of proline, Na+ and K+, and enhanced the salt tolerance of composite seedlings and transgenic Arabidopsis. Integrating all these results, we propose that GmbZIP110 plays a critical role in the response to salinity stress in soybean and has high potential usefulness in crop improvement. PMID:26837841

  5. Histone chaperones link histone nuclear import and chromatin assembly.

    PubMed

    Keck, Kristin M; Pemberton, Lucy F

    2013-01-01

    Histone chaperones are proteins that shield histones from nonspecific interactions until they are assembled into chromatin. After their synthesis in the cytoplasm, histones are bound by different histone chaperones, subjected to a series of posttranslational modifications and imported into the nucleus. These evolutionarily conserved modifications, including acetylation and methylation, can occur in the cytoplasm, but their role in regulating import is not well understood. As part of histone import complexes, histone chaperones may serve to protect the histones during transport, or they may be using histones to promote their own nuclear localization. In addition, there is evidence that histone chaperones can play an active role in the import of histones. Histone chaperones have also been shown to regulate the localization of important chromatin modifying enzymes. This review is focused on the role histone chaperones play in the early biogenesis of histones, the distinct cytoplasmic subcomplexes in which histone chaperones have been found in both yeast and mammalian cells and the importins/karyopherins and nuclear localization signals that mediate the nuclear import of histones. We also address the role that histone chaperone localization plays in human disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Histone chaperones and chromatin assembly.

  6. Nuclear physics reactions of astrophysical importance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Malley, Patrick D.

    2012-05-01

    Understanding the origin of elements in the universe is one of the main goals of nuclear science and astrophysics today. Achieving this goal involves determining how the elements and their isotopes formed and being able to predict their abundances. At the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), an experimental program has been established to use transfer reactions (such as (p,d) or (d,p)) to study the properties of many nuclei important to understanding the origins of various elements. Three measurements were done to aid in the determination of the origins of different light isotopes. Big Bang Nucleosynthesis calculations, constrained by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe results, produce primordial 7Li abundances almost a factor of four larger than those extrapolated from observations. Since primordial 7Li is believed to be mostly produced by the beta decay of 7Be, one proposed solution to this discrepancy is a resonant enhancement of the 7Be(d, p)2α reaction rate through the 5/2+ 16.7-MeV state in 9B. The 2H(7Be,d) 7Be reaction was used to search for such a resonance; none was observed. An upper limit on the width of the proposed resonance was deduced. 19F is believed to have formed in Asymptotic Giant Branch stars, but current models cannot reproduce the observed abundances of this nucleus. One of the key reactions responsible for the creation of 19F is 15N(α,γ). Therefore, it is important to understand reactions that might destroy 15N, such as 15N(n,γ). The magnitude of the 15N( n,γ) reaction rate depends directly on the neutron spectroscopic factors of low-lying 16N levels. Currently the measured spectroscopic factors differ from those expected from theory by a factor of 2. A study has been done to resolve this discrepancy using the d( 15N,p) reaction. The spectroscopic factors were all found to be

  7. Rapid nuclear import of short nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Mai; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2016-10-01

    Exogenous short-chain nucleic acids undergo rapid import into the nucleus. Fluorescence-labeled dT1-13 DNA microinjected into the cytoplasm domain of a HeLa cell was rapidly imported into the nucleus domain within 1min. This is much more rapid than what has been observed for intracellular diffusion of small molecules. In contrast, import of longer nucleic acids with a length of over 30nt into the nucleus was suppressed.

  8. Rapid nuclear import of short nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Mai; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2016-10-01

    Exogenous short-chain nucleic acids undergo rapid import into the nucleus. Fluorescence-labeled dT1-13 DNA microinjected into the cytoplasm domain of a HeLa cell was rapidly imported into the nucleus domain within 1min. This is much more rapid than what has been observed for intracellular diffusion of small molecules. In contrast, import of longer nucleic acids with a length of over 30nt into the nucleus was suppressed. PMID:27597250

  9. Importance of osteoprotegrin and receptor activator of nuclear factor κB in breast cancer response to hepatocyte growth factor and the bone microenvironment in vitro.

    PubMed

    Owen, Sioned; Sanders, Andrew J; Mason, Malcolm D; Jiang, Wen G

    2016-03-01

    Osteoprotegrin (OPG), receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANK) and RANK ligand (RANKL) are signal transducers which have pleiotropic actions. Each tumour necrosis factor receptor superfamily member has unique structural attributes which directly couples them to signalling pathways involved in cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. Previous studies have clinically linked OPG, RANK and RANKL to increasing tumour burden, metastatic bone involvement and estrogen status. This study aimed to establish the potential implications of targeting endogenously produced OPG and RANK in the osteotropic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB‑231 in vitro. Subsequently this study also aimed to explore the potential links between these molecules with regards to hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) signalling and extracted bone proteins (BME). OPG and RANK expression was successfully suppressed using hammerhead ribozyme technology. Subsequently effects were explored in MDA-MB‑231 cell proliferation, matrix adhesion, migration and invasion in vitro function assays. Reduced OPG expression resulted in increased breast cancer cell migration and invasion. These increases, particularly invasion, appeared to however be reduced under the influence of the exogenous stimuli (HGF and BME). In contrast, suppression of RANK in MDA-MB‑231 breast cancer cells resulted in decreased cancer cell proliferation, matrix-adhesion, motility and invasion with little cumulative effect being noted after the addition of exogenous stimuli. The complexity of the bone environment underpins the vast number of soluble factors and signalling pathways which can influence osteotropic cancer behaviour and progression. Further work into elucidating all the pathways affected could potentially lead to better identification of those patients most at risk. PMID:26781475

  10. Intracellular calcium levels can regulate Importin-dependent nuclear import

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Ly-Huynh, Jennifer D.; Jans, David A.

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • High intracellular calcium inhibits Impα/β1- or Impβ1-dependent nuclear protein import. • The effect of Ca{sup 2+} on nuclear import does not relate to changes in the nuclear pore. • High intracellular calcium can result in mislocalisation of Impβ1, Ran and RCC1. - Abstract: We previously showed that increased intracellular calcium can modulate Importin (Imp)β1-dependent nuclear import of SRY-related chromatin remodeling proteins. Here we extend this work to show for the first time that high intracellular calcium inhibits Impα/β1- or Impβ1-dependent nuclear protein import generally. The basis of this relates to the mislocalisation of the transport factors Impβ1 and Ran, which show significantly higher nuclear localization in contrast to various other factors, and RCC1, which shows altered subnuclear localisation. The results here establish for the first time that intracellular calcium modulates conventional nuclear import through direct effects on the nuclear transport machinery.

  11. RNA export factor Ddx19 is required for nuclear import of the SRF coactivator MKL1

    PubMed Central

    Rajakylä, Eeva Kaisa; Viita, Tiina; Kyheröinen, Salla; Huet, Guillaume; Treisman, Richard; Vartiainen, Maria K.

    2015-01-01

    Controlled transport of macromolecules between the cytoplasm and nucleus is essential for homeostatic regulation of cellular functions. For instance, gene expression entails coordinated nuclear import of transcriptional regulators to activate transcription and nuclear export of the resulting messenger RNAs for cytoplasmic translation. Here we link these two processes by reporting a novel role for the mRNA export factor Ddx19/Dbp5 in nuclear import of MKL1, the signal-responsive transcriptional activator of SRF. We show that Ddx19 is not a general nuclear import factor, and that its specific effect on MKL1 nuclear import is separate from its role in mRNA export. Both helicase and nuclear pore-binding activities of Ddx19 are dispensable for MKL1 nuclear import, but RNA binding is required. Mechanistically, Ddx19 operates by modulating the conformation of MKL1, which affects its interaction with Importin-β for efficient nuclear import. Thus, Ddx19 participates in mRNA export, translation and nuclear import of a key transcriptional regulator. PMID:25585691

  12. Importance of Nuclear Physics to NASA's Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    We show that nuclear physics is extremely important for accurate risk assessments for space missions. Due to paucity of experimental input radiation interaction information it is imperative to develop reliable accurate models for the interaction of radiation with matter. State-of-the-art nuclear cross sections models have been developed at the NASA Langley Research center and are discussed.

  13. The importance of nuclear power in emissions avoidance

    SciTech Connect

    South, D.W.

    1999-11-01

    Most people knowledgeable about the nuclear power industry are aware that nuclear power plants do not emit air pollutants or greenhouse gases in the generation of electricity. What is commonly not known, however, is that these avoided emissions have become important for compliance with increasingly stringent limitations on air pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions required by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments and the Kyoto Protocol. This article is intended to heighten the awareness of this important environmental service and how its valuation can have an impact on the future operation of existing nuclear power plants

  14. Teaching Activities on Horizontal Nuclear Proliferation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zola, John

    1990-01-01

    Provides learning activities concerning the horizontal proliferation of nuclear weapons. Includes step-by-step directions for four activities: (1) the life cycle of nuclear weapons; (2) nuclear nonproliferation: pros and cons; (3) the nuclear power/nuclear weapons connection; and (4) managing nuclear proliferation. (NL)

  15. Nuclear protein import is reduced in cells expressing nuclear envelopathy-causing lamin A mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, Albert; Kiel, Tilman; Heupel, Wolfgang-M.; Wehnert, Manfred; Huebner, Stefan

    2009-08-15

    Lamins, which form the nuclear lamina, not only constitute an important determinant of nuclear architecture, but additionally play essential roles in many nuclear functions. Mutations in A-type lamins cause a wide range of human genetic disorders (laminopathies). The importance of lamin A (LaA) in the spatial arrangement of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) prompted us to study the role of LaA mutants in nuclear protein transport. Two mutants, causing prenatal skin disease restrictive dermopathy (RD) and the premature aging disease Hutchinson Gilford progeria syndrome, were used for expression in HeLa cells to investigate their impact on the subcellular localization of NPC-associated proteins and nuclear protein import. Furthermore, dynamics of the LaA mutants within the nuclear lamina were studied. We observed affected localization of NPC-associated proteins, diminished lamina dynamics for both LaA mutants and reduced nuclear import of representative cargo molecules. Intriguingly, both LaA mutants displayed similar effects on nuclear morphology and functions, despite their differences in disease severity. Reduced nuclear protein import was also seen in RD fibroblasts and impaired lamina dynamics for the nucleoporin Nup153. Our data thus represent the first study of a direct link between LaA mutant expression and reduced nuclear protein import.

  16. The yeast nuclear import receptor is required for mitosis.

    PubMed Central

    Loeb, J D; Schlenstedt, G; Pellman, D; Kornitzer, D; Silver, P A; Fink, G R

    1995-01-01

    The nuclear import system is highly conserved among eukaryotes. Here we report the effects of a conditional mutation in SRP1, which encodes a Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog of the vertebrate nuclear import receptor importin. Importin was isolated as a factor required for the initial targeting step of a nuclear import substrate to the nuclear envelope in a mammalian in vitro assay. We show that yeast Srp1 is similarly required for protein import. In addition, Srp1 is also required for the execution of mitosis: we demonstrate that cells containing a conditional mutation of SRP1 arrest with a G2/M phenotype in a manner analogous to classic cdc mutants. This defect may be due to the failure of the mutant to degrade the mitotic cyclin Clb2 and other proteins required for mitosis. The requirement of a nuclear import receptor for cell cycle-regulated proteolysis implies that import of cell cycle regulators into the nucleus is critical for cell cycle progression. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7644471

  17. Importin α1 Mediates Yorkie Nuclear Import via an N-terminal Non-canonical Nuclear Localization Signal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shimin; Lu, Yi; Yin, Meng-Xin; Wang, Chao; Wu, Wei; Li, Jinhui; Wu, Wenqing; Ge, Ling; Hu, Lianxin; Zhao, Yun; Zhang, Lei

    2016-04-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway controls organ size by orchestrating cell proliferation and apoptosis. When the Hippo pathway was inactivated, the transcriptional co-activator Yorkie translocates into the nucleus and forms a complex with transcription factor Scalloped to promote the expression of Hippo pathway target genes. Therefore, the nuclear translocation of Yorkie is a critical step in Hippo signaling. Here, we provide evidence that the N-terminal 1-55 amino acids of Yorkie, especially Arg-15, were essential for its nuclear localization. By mass spectrometry and biochemical analyses, we found that Importin α1 can directly interact with the Yorkie N terminus and drive Yorkie into the nucleus. Further experiments show that the upstream component Hippo can inhibit Importin α1-mediated Yorkie nuclear import. Taken together, we identified a potential nuclear localization signal at the N-terminal end of Yorkie as well as a critical role for Importin α1 in Yorkie nuclear import. PMID:26887950

  18. Importin α1 Mediates Yorkie Nuclear Import via an N-terminal Non-canonical Nuclear Localization Signal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shimin; Lu, Yi; Yin, Meng-Xin; Wang, Chao; Wu, Wei; Li, Jinhui; Wu, Wenqing; Ge, Ling; Hu, Lianxin; Zhao, Yun; Zhang, Lei

    2016-04-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway controls organ size by orchestrating cell proliferation and apoptosis. When the Hippo pathway was inactivated, the transcriptional co-activator Yorkie translocates into the nucleus and forms a complex with transcription factor Scalloped to promote the expression of Hippo pathway target genes. Therefore, the nuclear translocation of Yorkie is a critical step in Hippo signaling. Here, we provide evidence that the N-terminal 1-55 amino acids of Yorkie, especially Arg-15, were essential for its nuclear localization. By mass spectrometry and biochemical analyses, we found that Importin α1 can directly interact with the Yorkie N terminus and drive Yorkie into the nucleus. Further experiments show that the upstream component Hippo can inhibit Importin α1-mediated Yorkie nuclear import. Taken together, we identified a potential nuclear localization signal at the N-terminal end of Yorkie as well as a critical role for Importin α1 in Yorkie nuclear import.

  19. Importance of risk communication during and after a nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Perko, Tanja

    2011-07-01

    Past nuclear accidents highlight communication as one of the most important challenges in emergency management. In the early phase, communication increases awareness and understanding of protective actions and improves the population response. In the medium and long term, risk communication can facilitate the remediation process and the return to normal life. Mass media play a central role in risk communication. The recent nuclear accident in Japan, as expected, induced massive media coverage. Media were employed to communicate with the public during the contamination phase, and they will play the same important role in the clean-up and recovery phases. However, media also have to fulfill the economic aspects of publishing or broadcasting, with the "bad news is good news" slogan that is a well-known phenomenon in journalism. This article addresses the main communication challenges and suggests possible risk communication approaches to adopt in the case of a nuclear accident. PMID:21612010

  20. Importance of risk communication during and after a nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Perko, Tanja

    2011-07-01

    Past nuclear accidents highlight communication as one of the most important challenges in emergency management. In the early phase, communication increases awareness and understanding of protective actions and improves the population response. In the medium and long term, risk communication can facilitate the remediation process and the return to normal life. Mass media play a central role in risk communication. The recent nuclear accident in Japan, as expected, induced massive media coverage. Media were employed to communicate with the public during the contamination phase, and they will play the same important role in the clean-up and recovery phases. However, media also have to fulfill the economic aspects of publishing or broadcasting, with the "bad news is good news" slogan that is a well-known phenomenon in journalism. This article addresses the main communication challenges and suggests possible risk communication approaches to adopt in the case of a nuclear accident.

  1. Interaction with plant transcription factors can mediate nuclear import of phytochrome B.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Anne; Nagel, Marie-Kristin; Popp, Claudia; Wüst, Florian; Bindics, János; Viczián, András; Hiltbrunner, Andreas; Nagy, Ferenc; Kunkel, Tim; Schäfer, Eberhard

    2012-04-10

    Phytochromes (phy) are red/far-red-absorbing photoreceptors that regulate the adaption of plant growth and development to changes in ambient light conditions. The nuclear transport of the phytochromes upon light activation is regarded as a key step in phytochrome signaling. Although nuclear import of phyA is regulated by the transport facilitators far red elongated hypocotyl 1 (FHY1) and fhy1-like, an intrinsic nuclear localization signal was proposed to be involved in the nuclear accumulation of phyB. We recently showed that nuclear import of phytochromes can be analyzed in a cell-free system consisting of isolated nuclei of the unicellular green algae Acetabularia acetabulum. We now show that this system is also versatile to elucidate the mechanism of the nuclear transport of phyB. We tested the nuclear transport characteristics of full-length phyB as well as N- and C-terminal phyB fragments in vitro and showed that the nuclear import of phyB can be facilitated by phytochrome-interacting factor 3 (PIF3). In vivo measurements of phyB nuclear accumulation in the absence of PIF1, -3, -4, and -5 indicate that these PIFs are the major transport facilitators during the first hours of deetiolation. Under prolonged irradiations additional factors might be responsible for phyB nuclear transport in the plant.

  2. 14-3-3 regulates the nuclear import of class IIa histone deacetylases

    SciTech Connect

    Nishino, Tomonori G.; Miyazaki, Masaya; Hoshino, Hideto; Miwa, Yoshihiro; Horinouchi, Sueharu; Yoshida, Minoru

    2008-12-19

    Class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs) form complexes with a class of transcriptional repressors in the nucleus. While screening for compounds that could block the association of HDAC4 with the BTB domain-containing transcriptional repressor Bach2, we discovered that phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) induced the cytoplasmic retention of HDAC4 mutants lacking a nuclear export signal (NES). Although PMA treatment and PKD overexpression has been proposed to facilitate the nuclear export of class IIa HDACs by creating 14-3-3 binding sites containing phosphoserines, our experiments using HDAC mutants demonstrated that PMA greatly reduces nuclear import. PMA treatment repressed the NLS activity in a manner dependent on 14-3-3 binding. These results suggest that nuclear HDAC4 is not tethered in the nucleus, but instead shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Phosphorylation-induced 14-3-3 binding biases the balance of nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling toward the cytoplasm by inhibiting nuclear import.

  3. The Importance of International Technical Nuclear Forensics to Deter Illicit Trafficking

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D K

    2007-01-30

    Illicit trafficking of nuclear materials is a transboundary problem that requires a cooperative approach involving international nuclear forensics to ensure all states understand the threat posed by nuclear smuggling as well as a means to best deter the movement of nuclear contraband. To achieve the objectives, all cases involving illicit trafficking of nuclear and radiological materials must be vigorously pursued and prosecuted when appropriate. The importance of outreach and formal government-to-government relationships with partner nations affected by nuclear trafficking cannot be under-estimated. States that are situated on smuggling routes may be well motivated to counter nuclear crimes to bolster their own border and transportation security as well as strengthen their economic and political viability. National law enforcement and atomic energy agencies in these states are aggressively pursuing a comprehensive strategy to counter nuclear smuggling through increasing reliance on technical nuclear forensics. As part of these activities, it is essential that these organizations be given adequate orientation to the best practices in this emerging discipline including the categorization of interdicted nuclear material, collection of traditional and nuclear forensic evidence, data analysis using optimized analytical protocols, and how to best fuse forensics information with reliable case input to best develop a law enforcement or national security response. The purpose of formalized USG relationship is to establish an institutional framework for collaboration in international forensics, improve standards of forensics practice, conduct joint exercises, and pursue case-work that benefits international security objectives. Just as outreach and formalized relationships are important to cultivate international nuclear forensics, linking nuclear forensics to ongoing national assistance in border and transpiration security, including port of entry of entry monitoring

  4. Importance of Nuclear Data Uncertainties in Criticality Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceresio, C.; Cabellos, O.; Martínez, J. S.; Diez, C. J.

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the importance of nuclear data uncertainties in the prediction of the uncertainties in keff for LWR (Light Water Reactor) unit-cells. The first part of this work is focused on the comparison of different sensitivity/uncertainty propagation methodologies based on TSUNAMI and MCNP codes; this study is undertaken for a fresh-fuel at different operational conditions. The second part of this work studies the burnup effect where the indirect contribution due to the uncertainty of the isotopic evolution is also analyzed.

  5. Evolving Important Role of Lutetium-177 for Therapeutic Nuclear Medicine.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Ambikalmajan M R; Knapp, Furn F Russ

    2015-01-01

    Lutetium-177 ((177)Lu) is a late entrant into the nuclear medicine therapy arena but is expected to become one of the most widely used therapeutic radionuclides. This paper analyses the reason for the increasing preference of (177)Lu as a therapeutic radionuclide. While the radionuclidic properties favor its use for several therapeutic applications, the potential for large scale production of (177)Lu is also an important aspect for its acceptability as a therapeutic radionuclide. This introductory discussion also summarizes some developing clinical uses and suggested future directions for applications of (177)Lu.

  6. Nuclear localization signals for four distinct karyopherin-β nuclear import systems.

    PubMed

    Soniat, Michael; Chook, Yuh Min

    2015-06-15

    The Karyopherin-β family of proteins mediates nuclear transport of macromolecules. Nuclear versus cytoplasmic localization of proteins is often suggested by the presence of NLSs (nuclear localization signals) or NESs (nuclear export signals). Import-Karyopherin-βs or Importins bind to NLSs in their protein cargos to transport them through nuclear pore complexes into the nucleus. Until recently, only two classes of NLS had been biochemically and structurally characterized: the classical NLS, which is recognized by the Importin-α/β heterodimer and the PY-NLS (proline-tyrosine NLS), which is recognized by Karyopherin-β2 or Transportin-1. Structures of two other Karyopherin-βs, Kap121 and Transportin-SR2, in complex with their respective cargos were reported for the first time recently, revealing two new distinct classes of NLSs. The present paper briefly describes the classical NLS, reviews recent literature on the PY-NLS and provides in-depth reviews of the two newly discovered classes of NLSs that bind Kap121p and Transportin-SR respectively.

  7. Screening in Low Energy Nuclear Reactions of Importance to Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George H.; Hora, Heinz; Luo, Nie

    2004-05-01

    Recent experiments in the LUNAR (Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics) project have shown anonymously high electron screening may occur during acceleration driven low energy (<400 kV) ion bombardment of solid targets [1]. These effects become particularly important for E/ Ue < 100 (here E= ion energy and Ue = electron-screening potential energy). Thus these effects become significant for the understanding of reactions involved in nucleosynthesis of the elements and the interpretation of astrophysical data [1]. Another example of the behavior is the surprising threshold behavior near 18 keV for deuterons stopping in 3He gas at energies below the Bragg peak [2]. As pointed out in ref [1], the theoretical explanation for these effects is still under debate. Several researchers have proposed variations of the Trojan Horse Method (THM) to explain these effects [3]. In this paper, we propose an alternate mechanism associated with electron charge accumulation around the target atoms arising from the solid-state structure of the host. This concept will be explained in terms of density functional calculations of charge density profiles in a target undergoing ion dynamic effects [4]. REFERENCES [1] F. Strieder, et al., Naturwissenschaften (2000)88:461-467 [2] A. Formicola, et al., (2000) Eur Phys J. A 8:443-446 [3] S. Typel and H H Wolter, (2000) Few-Body System 29:75-93 [4] G. Miley and H. Hora, (2000) Nuclear Reactions in Solids, APS mtg. Lansing, MI [5] G. Miley, A. Lipson, N. Luo, and H. Hora, (2003) IEEE NSS/MIC Conf., Portland, OR

  8. Ab initio calculations of nuclear reactions important for astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navratil, Petr; Dohet-Eraly, Jeremy; Calci, Angelo; Horiuchi, Wataru; Hupin, Guillaume; Quaglioni, Sofia

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, significant progress has been made in ab initio nuclear structure and reaction calculations based on input from QCD employing Hamiltonians constructed within chiral effective field theory. One of the newly developed approaches is the No-Core Shell Model with Continuum (NCSMC), capable of describing both bound and scattering states in light nuclei simultaneously. We will present NCSMC results for reactions important for astrophysics that are difficult to measure at relevant low energies, such as 3He(α,γ)7Be and 3H(α,γ)7Li and 11C(p,γ)12N radiative capture, as well as the 3H(d,n)4He fusion. We will also address prospects of calculating the 2H(α,γ)6Li capture reaction within the NCSMC formalism. Prepared in part by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Supported by the U.S. DOE, OS, NP, under Work Proposal No. SCW1158, and by the NSERC Grant No. SAPIN-2016-00033. TRIUMF receives funding from the NRC Canada.

  9. Importance of Bladder Radioactivity for Radiation Safety in Nuclear Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Gültekin, Salih Sinan; Şahmaran, Turan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Most of the radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine are excreted via the urinary system. This study evaluated the importance of a reduction in bladder radioactivity for radiation safety. Methods: The study group of 135 patients underwent several organ scintigraphies [40/135; thyroid scintigraphy (TS), 30/135; whole body bone scintigraphy (WBS), 35/135; myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) and 30/135; renal scintigraphy (RS)] by a technologist within 1 month. In full and empty conditions, static bladder images and external dose rate measurements at 0.25, 0.50, 1, 1.5 and 2 m distances were obtained and decline ratios were calculated from these two data sets. Results: External radiation dose rates were highest in patients undergoing MPS. External dose rates at 0.25 m distance for TS, TKS, MPS and BS were measured to be 56, 106, 191 and 72 μSv h-1 for full bladder and 29, 55, 103 and 37 μSv h-1 for empty bladder, respectively. For TS, WBS, MPS and RS, respectively, average decline ratios were calculated to be 52%, 55%, 53% and 54% in the scintigraphic assessment and 49%, 51%, 49%, 50% and 50% in the assessment with Geiger counter. Conclusion: Decline in bladder radioactivity is important in terms of radiation safety. Patients should be encouraged for micturition after each scintigraphic test. Spending time together with radioactive patients at distances less than 1 m should be kept to a minimum where possible. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:24416625

  10. Deterring Nuclear Proliferation: The Importance of IAEA Safeguards: A TEXTBOOK

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, M.D.; Fishbone, L.G.; Gallini, L.; Krass, A.; Kratzer, M.; Sanborn, J.; Ward, B.; Wulf, N. A.

    2012-03-13

    Nuclear terrorism and nuclear proliferation are among the most pressing challenges to international peace and security that we face today. Iran and Syria remain in non-compliance with the safeguards requirements of the NPT, and the nuclear ambitions of North Korea remain unchecked. Despite these challenges, the NPT remains a cornerstone of the nuclear non-proliferation regime, and the safeguards implemented by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) under the NPT play a critical role in deterring nuclear proliferation.How do they work? Where did they come from? And what is their future? This book answers these questions. Anyone studying the field of nuclear non-proliferation will benefit from reading this book, and for anyone entering the field, the book will enable them to get a running start. Part I describes the foundations of the international safeguards system: its origins in the 1930s - when new discoveries in physics made it clear immediately that nuclear energy held both peril and promise - through the entry into force in 1970 of the NPT, which codified the role of IAEA safeguards as a means to verify states NPT commitments not to acquire nuclear weapons. Part II describes the NPT safeguards system, which is based on a model safeguards agreement developed specifically for the NPT, The Structure and Content of Agreements between the Agency and States required in connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, which has been published by the IAEA as INFCIRC/153. Part III describes events, especially in South Africa, the DPRK, and Iraq in the early 1990s, that triggered a transformation in the way in which safeguards were conceptualized and implemented.

  11. Important technology considerations for space nuclear power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kuspa, J.P.; Wahlquist, E.J.; Bitz, D.A.

    1988-03-01

    This paper discusses the technology considerations that guide the development of space nuclear power sources (NPS) by the Department of Energy (DOE) to meet a wide variety of applications. The Department and its predecessor agencies have been developing NPS since the 1950s and producing NPS for spacecraft for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Defense (DOD) since the early 1960s. No one nuclear power type, isotope or reactor, will suffice over the entire range of mission power required. Nor is one type of power conversion system, be it static or dynamic, the optimum choice of all space nuclear power system applications. There is a need for DOE, in partnership with its users, NASA and DOD, to develop a variety of types of space nuclear power sources -- isotope-static, isotope-dynamic, reactor-static, and reactor-dynamic -- to meet mission requirements well into the next century. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Flavonoids as dietary regulators of nuclear receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    Avior, Yishai; Bomze, David; Ramon, Ory

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic diseases such as obesity, type II diabetes, and dyslipidemia are a rising cause of mortality worldwide. The progression of many metabolic diseases is fundamentally regulated on the transcriptional level by a family of ligand-activated transcription factors, called nuclear receptors, which detect and respond to metabolic changes. Their role in maintaining metabolic homeostasis makes nuclear receptors an important pharmaceutical and dietary target. This review will present the growing evidence that flavonoids, natural secondary plant metabolites, are important regulators of nuclear receptor activity. Structural similarities between flavonoids and cholesterol derivatives combined with the promiscuous nature of most nuclear receptors provide a wealth of possibilities for pharmaceutical and dietary modulation of metabolism. While the challenges of bringing flavonoid-derived therapeutics to the market are significant, we consider this rapidly growing field to be an essential aspect of the functional food initiative and an important mine for pharmaceutical compounds. PMID:23598551

  13. Active genes at the nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Taddei, Angela

    2007-06-01

    The nucleus is spatially and functionally organized and its architecture is now seen as a key contributor to genome functions. A central component of this architecture is the nuclear envelope, which is studded with nuclear pore complexes that serve as gateways for communication between the nucleoplasm and cytoplasm. Although the nuclear periphery has traditionally been described as a repressive compartment and repository for gene-poor chromosome regions, several recent studies in yeast have demonstrated that repressive and activating domains can both be positioned at the periphery of the nucleus. Moreover, association with the nuclear envelope favors the expression of particular genes, demonstrating that nuclear organization can play an active role in gene regulation. PMID:17467257

  14. Using Nuclear Receptor Activity to Stratify Hepatocarcinogens

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Imran; Houck, Keith; Judson, Richard S.; Kavlock, Robert J.; Martin, Matthew T.; Reif, David M.; Wambaugh, John; Dix, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Nuclear receptors (NR) are a superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors that control a range of cellular processes. Persistent stimulation of some NR is a non-genotoxic mechanism of rodent liver cancer with unclear relevance to humans. Here we report on a systematic analysis of new in vitro human NR activity data on 309 environmental chemicals in relationship to their liver cancer-related chronic outcomes in rodents. Results The effects of 309 environmental chemicals on human constitutive androstane receptors (CAR/NR1I3), pregnane X receptor (PXR/NR1I2), aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR/NR1C), liver X receptors (LXR/NR1H), retinoic X receptors (RXR/NR2B) and steroid receptors (SR/NR3) were determined using in vitro data. Hepatic histopathology, observed in rodents after two years of chronic treatment for 171 of the 309 chemicals, was summarized by a cancer lesion progression grade. Chemicals that caused proliferative liver lesions in both rat and mouse were generally more active for the human receptors, relative to the compounds that only affected one rodent species, and these changes were significant for PPAR (p0.001), PXR (p0.01) and CAR (p0.05). Though most chemicals exhibited receptor promiscuity, multivariate analysis clustered them into relatively few NR activity combinations. The human NR activity pattern of chemicals weakly associated with the severity of rodent liver cancer lesion progression (p0.05). Conclusions The rodent carcinogens had higher in vitro potency for human NR relative to non-carcinogens. Structurally diverse chemicals with similar NR promiscuity patterns weakly associated with the severity of rodent liver cancer progression. While these results do not prove the role of NR activation in human liver cancer, they do have implications for nuclear receptor chemical biology and provide insights into putative toxicity pathways. More importantly, these findings suggest the

  15. Determining Important Nuclear Fragmentation Processes for Human Space Explorations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei

    2005-01-01

    Space radiation from cosmic ray particles is a major risk for astronauts in long-term human space explorations such as a permanent moon base or a trip to Mars. Radiation shielding is needed to reduce the radiation hazard to astronauts, and models have been developed in order to evaluate the effectiveness of different shielding materials. In this talk we determine the nuclear fragmentation cross sections which will most affect the radiation risk behind typical radiation shielding materials. As a result, these cross sections need more theoretical studies and accurate experimental measurements in order for us to more precisely predict the radiation risk in human space explorations.

  16. An Important Issue: Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, Doc

    2001-03-01

    Historic Facts and Philosophy: In August, 1947, I participated in a secret meeting concerning the validity and use of a hydrogen bomb. I vigorously supported a ``Super Manhattan Project" to build an ``H" bomb. My philosophy at the time was `bigger and better,' to ensure that no nation attacked the U.S. Our retaliation with ``H" bombs vs. ``A" bombs would be too overwhelming for any nation to risk attacking us should they obtain their own ``A" bombs. Thus, all nations would be forced to use diplomacy. I am older and wiser, and am now convinced that World Test Ban Treaties, non-proliferation of nuclear weapons, and space free of any military weapons is the best policy for all nations and humanity. With current nuclear testing at nearby Yucca Flats, Nevada, Vandenberg AF/Missile site, Cal Tech, etc., I therefore propose that our new APS California Division form a three-person committee to tabulate all pertinent data and submit it to a qualified expert for review and further action. Comments and suggestions are invited.

  17. An Apicoplast Localized Ubiquitylation System Is Required for the Import of Nuclear-encoded Plastid Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ponts, Nadia; van Dooren, Giel G.; Prudhomme, Jacques; Brooks, Carrie F.; Rodrigues, Elisadra M.; Tan, John C.; Ferdig, Michael T.; Striepen, Boris; Le Roch, Karine G.

    2013-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites are responsible for numerous important human diseases including toxoplasmosis, cryptosporidiosis, and most importantly malaria. There is a constant need for new antimalarials, and one of most keenly pursued drug targets is an ancient algal endosymbiont, the apicoplast. The apicoplast is essential for parasite survival, and several aspects of its metabolism and maintenance have been validated as targets of anti-parasitic drug treatment. Most apicoplast proteins are nuclear encoded and have to be imported into the organelle. Recently, a protein translocon typically required for endoplasmic reticulum associated protein degradation (ERAD) has been proposed to act in apicoplast protein import. Here, we show ubiquitylation to be a conserved and essential component of this process. We identify apicoplast localized ubiquitin activating, conjugating and ligating enzymes in Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum and observe biochemical activity by in vitro reconstitution. Using conditional gene ablation and complementation analysis we link this activity to apicoplast protein import and parasite survival. Our studies suggest ubiquitylation to be a mechanistic requirement of apicoplast protein import independent to the proteasomal degradation pathway. PMID:23785288

  18. Calmodulin-dependent nuclear import of HMG-box family nuclear factors: importance of the role of SRY in sex reversal

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Delluc-Clavieres, Aurelie; Poon, Ivan K. H.; Forwood, Jade K.; Glover, Dominic J.; Jans, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The HMG (high-mobility group)-box-containing chromatin-remodelling factor SRY (sex-determining region on the Y chromosome) plays a key role in sex determination. Its role in the nucleus is critically dependent on two NLSs (nuclear localization signals) that flank its HMG domain: the C-terminally located ‘β-NLS’ that mediates nuclear transport through Impβ1 (importin β1) and the N-terminally located ‘CaM-NLS’ which is known to recognize the calcium-binding protein CaM (calmodulin). In the present study, we examined a number of missense mutations in the SRY CaM-NLS from human XY sex-reversed females for the first time, showing that they result in significantly reduced nuclear localization of GFP (green fluorescent protein)–SRY fusion proteins in transfected cells compared with wild-type. The CaM antagonist CDZ (calmidazolium chloride) was found to significantly reduce wild-type SRY nuclear accumulation, indicating dependence of SRY nuclear import on CaM. Intriguingly, the CaM-NLS mutants were all resistant to CDZ's effects, implying a loss of interaction with CaM, which was confirmed by direct binding experiments. CaM-binding/resultant nuclear accumulation was the only property of SRY found to be impaired by two of the CaM-NLS mutations, implying that inhibition of CaM-dependent nuclear import is the basis of sex reversal in these cases. Importantly, the CaM-NLS is conserved in other HMG-box-domain-containing proteins such as SOX-2, -9, -10 and HMGN1, all of which were found for the first time to rely on CaM for optimal nuclear localization. CaM-dependent nuclear translocation is thus a common mechanism for this family of important transcription factors. PMID:20528776

  19. Importance of loss-of-benefits considerations in nuclear regulatory decision-making

    SciTech Connect

    Buehring, W.A.; Peerenboom, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    This paper identifies and discusses some of the important consequences of nuclear power plant unavailability, and quantifies a number of technical measures of loss of benefits that may help the Nuclear Regulatory Commission make decisions involving nuclear power plant licensing and operation. The loss-of-benefits analysis presented here is based on the results of a series of case studies developed by Argonne National Laboratory in cooperation with four electric utilities on hypothetical nuclear plant shutdowns.

  20. A proline-tyrosine nuclear localization signal (PY-NLS) is required for the nuclear import of fission yeast PAB2, but not of human PABPN1.

    PubMed

    Mallet, Pierre-Luc; Bachand, François

    2013-03-01

    Nuclear poly(A)-binding proteins (PABPs) are evolutionarily conserved proteins that play key roles in eukaryotic gene expression. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the major nuclear PABP, Pab2, functions in the maturation of small nucleolar RNAs as well as in nuclear RNA decay. Despite knowledge about its nuclear functions, nothing is known about how Pab2 is imported into the nucleus. Here, we show that Pab2 contains a proline-tyrosine nuclear localization signal (PY-NLS) that is necessary and sufficient for its nuclear localization and function. Consistent with the role of karyopherin β2 (Kapβ2)-type receptors in the import of PY-NLS cargoes, we show that the fission yeast ortholog of human Kapβ2, Kap104, binds to recombinant Pab2 and is required for Pab2 nuclear localization. The absence of arginine methylation in a basic region N-terminal to the PY-core motif of Pab2 did not affect its nuclear localization. However, in the context of a sub-optimal PY-NLS, we found that Pab2 was more efficiently targeted to the nucleus in the absence of arginine methylation, suggesting that this modification can affect the import kinetics of a PY-NLS cargo. Although a sequence resembling a PY-NLS motif can be found in the human Pab2 ortholog, PABPN1, our results indicate that neither a functional PY-NLS nor Kapβ2 activity are required to promote entry of PABPN1 into the nucleus of human cells. Our findings describe the mechanism by which Pab2 is imported into the nucleus, providing the first example of a PY-NLS import system in fission yeast. In addition, this study suggests the existence of alternative or redundant nuclear import pathways for human PABPN1.

  1. Radionuclide contamination of foods imported into Iraq following the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident.

    PubMed

    Marouf, B A; al-Hadad, A K; Toma, N A; Tawfiq, N F; Mahmood, J A; Hasoon, M A

    1991-07-15

    Since early 1986, a monitoring program for radionuclides in imported foods has been carried out by the Iraqi Atomic Energy Commission. After the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident in the Soviet Union, the program was expanded; our laboratory was officially designated by the Iraqi Government to measure radionuclide activity concentrations in foodstuff imported from countries known to be severely contaminated by Chernobyl radioactive fallout. Gamma-spectrometric analysis was used. Food items such as powdered milk, lamb meat, poultry, cereals and grains imported into Iraq before the Chernobyl accident did not contain any detectable fission products. However, all lamb meat, 81% of the lentil, 44% of the powdered milk and chick-pea, and 17% of the roast beef samples were contaminated with 137Cs or 134Cs and 137Cs. The highest 137Cs contamination levels found were 82, 147, 420, 6 and 4 Bq kg-1, respectively. Contamination by 134Cs was approximately 50% of the values given above.

  2. Model calculations of nuclear data for biologically-important elements

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, M.B.; Blann, M.; Reffo, G.; Young, P.G.

    1994-05-01

    We describe calculations of neutron-induced reactions on carbon and oxygen for incident energies up to 70 MeV, the relevant clinical energy in radiation neutron therapy. Our calculations using the FKK-GNASH, GNASH, and ALICE codes are compared with experimental measurements, and their usefulness for modeling reactions on biologically-important elements is assessed.

  3. Nuclear Import of Transcription Factor BR-C Is Mediated by Its Interaction with RACK1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yonghu; Meng, Meng; Wei, Ling; Li, Zhiqing; Kang, Lixia; Peng, Jian; Xia, Qingyou

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor Broad Complex (BR-C) is an early ecdysone response gene in insects and contains two types of domains: two zinc finger domains for the activation of gene transcription and a Bric-a-brac/Tramtrack/Broad complex (BTB) domain for protein-protein interaction. Although the mechanism of zinc finger-mediated gene transcription is well studied, the partners interacting with the BTB domain of BR-C has not been elucidated until now. Here, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen using the BTB domain of silkworm BR-C as bait and identified the receptor for activated C-kinase 1 (RACK1), a scaffolding/anchoring protein, as the novel partner capable of interacting with BR-C. The interaction between BR-C and RACK1 was further confirmed by far-western blotting and pull-down assays. Importantly, the disruption of this interaction, via RNAi against the endogenous RACK1 gene or deletion of the BTB domain, abolished the nuclear import of BR-C in BmN4 cells. In addition, RNAi against the endogenous PKC gene as well as phosphorylation-deficient mutation of the predicted PKC phosphorylation sites at either Ser373 or Thr406 in BR-C phenocopied RACK1 RNAi and altered the nuclear localization of BR-C. However, when BTB domain was deleted, phosphorylation mimics of either Ser373 or Thr406 had no effect on the nuclear import of BR-C. Moreover, mutating the PKC phosphorylation sites at Ser373 and Thr406 or deleting the BTB domain significantly decreased the transcriptional activation of a BR-C target gene. Given that RACK1 is necessary for recruiting PKC to close and phosphorylate target proteins, we suggest that the PKC-mediated phosphorylation and nuclear import of BR-C is determined by its interaction with RACK1. This novel finding will be helpful for further deciphering the mechanism underlying the role of BR-C proteins during insect development. PMID:25280016

  4. Strategies to inhibit viral protein nuclear import: HIV-1 as a target.

    PubMed

    Levin, Aviad; Loyter, Abraham; Bukrinsky, Michael

    2011-09-01

    Nuclear import is a critical step in the life cycle of HIV-1. During the early (preintegration) stages of infection, HIV-1 has to transport its preintegration complex into the nucleus for integration into the host cell chromatin, while at the later (postintegration) stages viral regulatory proteins Tat and Rev need to get into the nucleus to stimulate transcription and regulate splicing and nuclear export of subgenomic and genomic RNAs. Given such important role of nuclear import in HIV-1 life cycle, this step presents an attractive target for antiviral therapeutic intervention. In this review, we describe the current state of our understanding of the interactions regulating nuclear import of the HIV-1 preintegration complex and describe current approaches to inhibit it. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Regulation of Signaling and Cellular Fate through Modulation of Nuclear Protein Import.

  5. Importin alpha from Arabidopsis thaliana is a nuclear import receptor that recognizes three classes of import signals.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, H M; Hicks, G R; Raikhel, N V

    1997-01-01

    Protein import into the nucleus is a two-step process. In vitro import systems from vertebrate cell extracts have shown several soluble factors are required. One of these factors is the receptor importin alpha, which binds to nuclear localization signals (NLS) in vitro. We previously cloned an importin alpha homolog from Arabidopsis thaliana (At-IMP alpha) and demonstrated that this protein was not depleted from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) protoplasts after permeabilization of the plasma membrane, (Hicks et al., 1996). To determine if At-IMP alpha is functional, we used an in vitro NLS-binding assay. We found that At-IMP alpha is specific, and the receptor is able to recognize three classes of NLS identified in plants. Purified antibodies to At-IMP alpha were used to determine the in vivo location of importin alpha in tobacco protoplasts. Importin alpha is found in the cytoplasm and nucleus, and it is most highly concentrated at the nuclear envelope. The biochemical properties of nuclear importin alpha and localization studies using purified nuclei demonstrate that importin alpha is tightly associated with the plant nucleus. Moreover, these results suggest that a fraction of nuclear importin alpha interacts with the nuclear pore complex. PMID:9193081

  6. Sensing actin dynamics: Structural basis for G-actin-sensitive nuclear import of MAL

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Hidemi; Matsuura, Yoshiyuki

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} MAL has a bipartite NLS that binds to Imp{alpha} in an extended conformation. {yields} Mutational analyses verified the functional significance of MAL-Imp{alpha} interactions. {yields} Induced folding and NLS-masking by G-actins inhibit nuclear import of MAL. -- Abstract: The coordination of cytoskeletal actin dynamics with gene expression reprogramming is emerging as a crucial mechanism to control diverse cellular processes, including cell migration, differentiation and neuronal circuit assembly. The actin-binding transcriptional coactivator MAL (also known as MRTF-A/MKL1/BSAC) senses G-actin concentration and transduces Rho GTPase signals to serum response factor (SRF). MAL rapidly shuttles between the cytoplasm and the nucleus in unstimulated cells but Rho-induced depletion of G-actin leads to MAL nuclear accumulation and activation of transcription of SRF:MAL-target genes. Although the molecular and structural basis of actin-regulated nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of MAL is not understood fully, it is proposed that nuclear import of MAL is mediated by importin {alpha}/{beta} heterodimer, and that G-actin competes with importin {alpha}/{beta} for the binding to MAL. Here we present structural, biochemical and cell biological evidence that MAL has a classical bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the N-terminal 'RPEL' domain containing Arg-Pro-X-X-X-Glu-Leu (RPEL) motifs. The NLS residues of MAL adopt an extended conformation and bind along the surface groove of importin-{alpha}, interacting with the major- and minor-NLS binding sites. We also present a crystal structure of wild-type MAL RPEL domain in complex with five G-actins. Comparison of the importin-{alpha}- and actin-complexes revealed that the binding of G-actins to MAL is associated with folding of NLS residues into a helical conformation that is inappropriate for importin-{alpha} recognition.

  7. Structural basis of nuclear import of flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1).

    PubMed

    de Barros, Andrea C; Takeda, Agnes A S; Chang, Chiung Wen; Kobe, Boštjan; Fontes, Marcos R M

    2012-07-01

    Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) is a member of the nuclease family and is structurally conserved from bacteriophages to humans. This protein is involved in multiple DNA-processing pathways, including Okazaki fragment maturation, stalled replication-fork rescue, telomere maintenance, long-patch base-excision repair and apoptotic DNA fragmentation. FEN1 has three functional motifs that are responsible for its nuclease, PCNA-interaction and nuclear localization activities, respectively. It has been shown that the C-terminal nuclear localization sequence (NLS) facilitates nuclear localization of the enzyme during the S phase of the cell cycle and in response to DNA damage. To determine the structural basis of the recognition of FEN1 by the nuclear import receptor importin α, the crystal structure of the complex of importin α with a peptide corresponding to the FEN1 NLS was solved. Structural studies confirmed the binding of the FEN1 NLS as a classical bipartite NLS; however, in contrast to the previously proposed (354)KRKX(8)KKK(367) sequence, it is the (354)KRX(10)KKAK(369) sequence that binds to importin α. This result explains the incomplete inhibition of localization that was observed on mutating residues (365)KKK(367). Acidic and polar residues in the X(10) linker region close to the basic clusters play an important role in binding to importin α. These results suggest that the basic residues in the N-terminal basic cluster of bipartite NLSs may play roles that are more critical than those of the many basic residues in the C-terminal basic cluster.

  8. Nuclear import can be separated into distinct steps in vitro: nuclear pore binding and translocation.

    PubMed

    Newmeyer, D D; Forbes, D J

    1988-03-11

    Large nuclear proteins must possess a signal sequence to pass through the nuclear pores. Using an in vitro system, we have been able experimentally to dissect nuclear protein transport into two distinct steps: binding and translocation. In the absence of ATP, we observe a binding of nuclear proteins to the pore that is signal sequence-dependent. Translocation through the pore, on the other hand, strictly requires ATP. These steps, visualized in the fluorescence and electron microscopes, were observed both with a natural nuclear protein, nucleoplasmin, and a synthetic nuclear protein, composed of the signal sequence of SV40 T antigen coupled to HSA. When a mutant signal sequence was coupled to HSA, neither transport nor binding were observed, indicating that both result from the presence of a functional signal sequence. An inhibitor of transport, the lectin WGA, also arrested nuclear proteins in a bound state at the cytoplasmic face of the pore. Therefore, only the translocation step is sensitive to the inhibitor WGA, which is known to bind specifically to proteins of the nuclear pore.

  9. Examination of psychological variables related to nuclear attitudes and nuclear activism

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    It was hypothesized that knowledge about nuclear arms developments would not be correlated with nuclear attitudes, that sense of efficacy would be positively correlated with magnitude of nuclear activism, and that death anxiety would be correlated with high level of nuclear knowledge and anti-nuclear attitudes, but not with sense of power. It was also hypothesized that positive correlations would be found between nuclear activism and political activism, knowledge of nuclear facts, and degree of adherence to anti-nuclear attitudes. One hundred and forty three women and 90 men participated in this questionnaire study. Major findings are as follows. In general, the more people knew about nuclear developments, the more anti-nuclear were their attitudes. Also, regardless of nuclear attitudes, a positive correlation was found between knowledge of nuclear facts and nuclear activism. Death anxiety and powerlessness were not correlated. There was a positive correlation between anxiety and both nuclear knowledge and anti-nuclear attitudes. A strong positive correlation was found between nuclear activism and anti-nuclear attitudes, and between political activism and nuclear activism. Internal locus of control did not correlate significantly with high sense of power or with high degree of nuclear activism.

  10. The molecular structure of agrobacterium VirE2-single stranded DNA complexes involved in nuclear import.

    PubMed

    Citovsky, V; Guralnick, B; Simon, M N; Wall, J S

    1997-09-01

    Nuclear import of DNA is a central event in genetic transformation of plant cells by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Agrobacterium elicits tumors on plant hosts by transporting a single-stranded (ss) copy of the bacterial transferred DNA (T-DNA) from its Ti (tumor-inducing) plasmid into the plant cell nucleus. Presumably, the process of T-DNA nuclear import is mediated by two agrobacterium proteins, VirD2 and VirE2, which are thought to directly associate with the transported T-DNA. Both proteins have been shown to contain functional nuclear localizations signals (NLS). Recently, VirE2 alone has been shown to actively transport ssDNA into the plant cell nucleus. To understand the process of DNA nuclear import, it is important to know the structure of the transport intermediate. To this end, complexes of VirE2 and ssDNA were analyzed by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). This analysis suggests that VirE2 packages ssDNA into semi-rigid, hollow cylindrical filaments with a telephone cord-like coiled structure. The outer diameter of these complexes is too large to enter the nucleus by diffusion but is within the size exclusion limits of the active nuclear import. Detailed mass analysis of VirE2-ssDNA filaments is presented and a structural model is proposed. PMID:9299322

  11. Identification of the nuclear localisation signal of O-GlcNAc transferase and its nuclear import regulation

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyeon Gyu; Kim, Han Byeol; Kang, Min Jueng; Ryum, Joo Hwan; Yi, Eugene C.; Cho, Jin Won

    2016-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) attaches a single GlcNAc to hydroxyl groups of serine and threonine residues. Although the cellular localisation of OGT is important to regulate a variety of cellular processes, the molecular mechanisms regulating the nuclear localisation of OGT is unclear. Here, we characterised three amino acids (DFP; residues 451–453) as the nuclear localisation signal of OGT and demonstrated that this motif mediated the nuclear import of non-diffusible β-galactosidase. OGT bound the importin α5 protein, and this association was abolished when the DFP motif of OGT was mutated or deleted. We also revealed that O-GlcNAcylation of Ser389, which resides in the tetratricopeptide repeats, plays an important role in the nuclear localisation of OGT. Our findings may explain how OGT, which possesses a NLS, exists in the nucleus and cytosol simultaneously. PMID:27713473

  12. Defective nuclear import of Tpr in Progeria reflects the Ran sensitivity of large cargo transport.

    PubMed

    Snow, Chelsi J; Dar, Ashraf; Dutta, Anindya; Kehlenbach, Ralph H; Paschal, Bryce M

    2013-05-13

    The RanGTPase acts as a master regulator of nucleocytoplasmic transport by controlling assembly and disassembly of nuclear transport complexes. RanGTP is required in the nucleus to release nuclear localization signal (NLS)-containing cargo from import receptors, and, under steady-state conditions, Ran is highly concentrated in the nucleus. We previously showed the nuclear/cytoplasmic Ran distribution is disrupted in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGPS) fibroblasts that express the Progerin form of lamin A, causing a major defect in nuclear import of the protein, translocated promoter region (Tpr). In this paper, we show that Tpr import was mediated by the most abundant import receptor, KPNA2, which binds the bipartite NLS in Tpr with nanomolar affinity. Analyses including NLS swapping revealed Progerin did not cause global inhibition of nuclear import. Rather, Progerin inhibited Tpr import because transport of large protein cargoes was sensitive to changes in the Ran nuclear/cytoplasmic distribution that occurred in HGPS. We propose that defective import of large protein complexes with important roles in nuclear function may contribute to disease-associated phenotypes in Progeria.

  13. Nuclear Science Teaching Aids and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodburn, John H.

    This publication is a sourcebook for science teachers. It provides guides for basic laboratory work in nuclear energy, suggesting various teacher and student demonstrations. Ideas for science clubs, science fairs, and project research seminars are presented. Problem-solving activities for both science and mathematics classes are included, as well…

  14. Using Nuclear Receptor Activity to Stratify Hepatocarcinogens

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear receptors (NR) are a superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors that control a range of cellular processes. Persistent stimulation of some NR is a non-genotoxic mechanism of rodent liver cancer with unclear relevance to humans. Here we report on a systematic an...

  15. Structural and Calorimetric Studies Demonstrate that Xeroderma Pigmentosum Type G (XPG) Can Be Imported to the Nucleus by a Classical Nuclear Import Pathway via a Monopartite NLS Sequence.

    PubMed

    Barros, Andrea C de; Takeda, Agnes A S; Dreyer, Thiago R; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian; Kobe, Bostjan; Fontes, Marcos R M

    2016-05-22

    Xeroderma pigmentosum type G (XPG) proteins are involved in DNA lesion recognition and promotion of nucleotide excision repair. Specific mutations in these proteins may lead to Cockayne syndrome, in which the patients may display severe developmental retardation and neurological abnormalities. No structural information is available for their spacer region or the C-terminal domain, which are important, respectively, for specific nucleotide excision repair activity and substrate specificity, as well as nuclear translocation. Immunofluorescence studies suggested two specific regions of the XPG C-terminus as potential bipartite nuclear localization sequences, which would be responsible for its translocation to the nucleus by the classical nuclear import pathway mediated by the importin-α (Impα). Thus, in order to test these hypotheses and gain insight into the structural basis for the nuclear import process for the XPG protein, we solved the crystal structures of complexes formed by the Impα and peptides corresponding to both putative nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences (XPG1 and XPG2) and performed isothermal titration calorimetry assays to determine their binding affinities. Structural experiments confirm the binding of both NLS peptides to Impα but, unexpectedly, they bind to the receptor as monopartite NLSs. The isothermal titration calorimetry assays demonstrated that XPG1 and XPG2 peptides bind to two separate binding sites, but with high affinity to the major NLS-binding site of the Impα, resembling classical monopartite SV40 TAg NLS. The results lead to insights about what distinguishes monopartite and bipartite NLSs, as well as the differential roles of XPG1 and XPG2 NLSs in the nuclear localization of XPG.

  16. Calculation of Monte Carlo importance functions for use in nuclear-well logging calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Soran, P.D.; McKeon, D.C.; Booth, T.E.; Schlumberger Well Services, Houston, TX; Los Alamos National Lab., NM )

    1989-07-01

    Importance sampling is essential to the timely solution of Monte Carlo nuclear-logging computer simulations. Achieving minimum variance (maximum precision) of a response in minimum computation time is one criteria for the choice of an importance function. Various methods for calculating importance functions will be presented, new methods investigated, and comparisons with porosity and density tools will be shown. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  17. Identification of different roles for RanGDP and RanGTP in nuclear protein import.

    PubMed Central

    Görlich, D; Panté, N; Kutay, U; Aebi, U; Bischoff, F R

    1996-01-01

    The importin-alpha/beta heterodimer and the GTPase Ran play key roles in nuclear protein import. Importin binds the nuclear localization signal (NLS). Translocation of the resulting import ligand complex through the nuclear pore complex (NPC) requires Ran and is terminated at the nucleoplasmic side by its disassembly. The principal GTP exchange factor for Ran is the nuclear protein RCC1, whereas the major RanGAP is cytoplasmic, predicting that nuclear Ran is mainly in the GTP form and cytoplasmic Ran is in the GDP-bound form. Here, we show that nuclear import depends on cytoplasmic RanGDP and free GTP, and that RanGDP binds to the NPC. Therefore, import might involve nucleotide exchange and GTP hydrolysis on NPC-bound Ran. RanGDP binding to the NPC is not mediated by the Ran binding sites of importin-beta, suggesting that translocation is not driven from these sites. Consistently, a mutant importin-beta deficient in Ran binding can deliver its cargo up to the nucleoplasmic side of the NPC. However, the mutant is unable to release the import substrate into the nucleoplasm. Thus, binding of nucleoplasmic RanGTP to importin-beta probably triggers termination, i.e. the dissociation of importin-alpha from importin-beta and the subsequent release of the import substrate into the nucleoplasm. Images PMID:8896452

  18. The Orphan Nuclear Receptor TR4 Is a Vitamin A-activated Nuclear Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X. Edward; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Xu, Yong; Chan, Cee-Wah; Tanabe, Osamu; Kruse, Schoen W.; Reynolds, Ross; Engel, James Douglas; Xu, H. Eric

    2015-11-30

    Testicular receptors 2 and 4 (TR2/4) constitute a subgroup of orphan nuclear receptors that play important roles in spermatogenesis, lipid and lipoprotein regulation, and the development of the central nervous system. Currently, little is known about the structural features and the ligand regulation of these receptors. Here we report the crystal structure of the ligand-free TR4 ligand binding domain, which reveals an autorepressed conformation. The ligand binding pocket of TR4 is filled by the C-terminal half of helix 10, and the cofactor binding site is occupied by the AF-2 helix, thus preventing ligand-independent activation of the receptor. However, TR4 exhibits constitutive transcriptional activity on multiple promoters, which can be further potentiated by nuclear receptor coactivators. Mutations designed to disrupt cofactor binding, dimerization, or ligand binding substantially reduce the transcriptional activity of this receptor. Importantly, both retinol and retinoic acid are able to promote TR4 to recruit coactivators and to activate a TR4-regulated reporter. These findings demonstrate that TR4 is a ligand-regulated nuclear receptor and suggest that retinoids might have a much wider regulatory role via activation of orphan receptors such as TR4.

  19. Galaxy interactions and strength of nuclear activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simkin, S. M.

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of data in the literature for differential velocities and projected separations of nearby Seyfert galaxies with possible companions shows a clear difference in projected separations between type 1's and type 2's. This kinematic difference between the two activity classes reinforces other independent evidence that their different nuclear characteristics are related to a non-nuclear physical distinction between the two classes. The differential velocities and projected separations of the galaxy pairs in this sample yield mean galaxy masses, sizes, and mass to light ratios which are consistent with those found by the statistical methods of Karachentsev. Although the galaxy sample discussed here is too small and too poorly defined to provide robust support for these conclusions, the results strongly suggest that nuclear activity in Seyfert galaxies is associated with gravitational perturbations from companion galaxies, and that there are physical distinctions between the host companions of Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 nuclei which may depend both on the environment and the structure of the host galaxy itself.

  20. Release of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Nuclear Import Block Enhances Host Transcription in Human Lung Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tilton, Susan C.; Menachery, Vineet D.; Gralinski, Lisa E.; Schäfer, Alexandra; Matzke, Melissa M.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Chang, Jean; Luna, Maria L.; Long, Casey E.; Shukla, Anil K.; Bankhead, Armand R.; Burkett, Susan E.; Zornetzer, Gregory; Tseng, Chien-Te Kent; Metz, Thomas O.; Pickles, Raymond; McWeeney, Shannon; Smith, Richard D.; Katze, Michael G.; Waters, Katrina M.; Baric, Ralph S.

    2013-01-01

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus accessory protein ORF6 antagonizes interferon signaling by blocking karyopherin-mediated nuclear import processes. Viral nuclear import antagonists, expressed by several highly pathogenic RNA viruses, likely mediate pleiotropic effects on host gene expression, presumably interfering with transcription factors, cytokines, hormones, and/or signaling cascades that occur in response to infection. By bioinformatic and systems biology approaches, we evaluated the impact of nuclear import antagonism on host expression networks by using human lung epithelial cells infected with either wild-type virus or a mutant that does not express ORF6 protein. Microarray analysis revealed significant changes in differential gene expression, with approximately twice as many upregulated genes in the mutant virus samples by 48 h postinfection, despite identical viral titers. Our data demonstrated that ORF6 protein expression attenuates the activity of numerous karyopherin-dependent host transcription factors (VDR, CREB1, SMAD4, p53, EpasI, and Oct3/4) that are critical for establishing antiviral responses and regulating key host responses during virus infection. Results were confirmed by proteomic and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay analyses and in parallel microarray studies using infected primary human airway epithelial cell cultures. The data strongly support the hypothesis that viral antagonists of nuclear import actively manipulate host responses in specific hierarchical patterns, contributing to the viral pathogenic potential in vivo. Importantly, these studies and modeling approaches not only provide templates for evaluating virus antagonism of nuclear import processes but also can reveal candidate cellular genes and pathways that may significantly influence disease outcomes following severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection in vivo. PMID:23365422

  1. A GTPase distinct from Ran is involved in nuclear protein import

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Signal-dependent transport of proteins into the nucleus is a multi-step process mediated by nuclear pore complexes and cytosolic transport factors. One of the cytosolic factors, Ran, is the only GTPase that has a characterized role in the nuclear import pathway. We have used a mutant form of Ran with altered nucleotide binding specificity to investigate whether any other GTPases are involved in nuclear protein import. D125N Ran (XTP-Ran) binds specifically to xanthosine triphosphate (XTP) and has a greatly reduced affinity for GTP, so it is no longer sensitive to inhibition by nonhydrolyzable analogues of GTP such as guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP gamma S). using in vitro transport assays, we have found that nuclear import supported by XTP-Ran is nevertheless inhibited by the addition of non-hydrolyzable GTP analogues. This in conjunction with the properties of the inhibitory effect indicates that at least one additional GTPase is involved in the import process. Initial characterization suggests that the inhibited GTPase plays a direct role in protein import and could be a component of the nuclear pore complex. PMID:8655588

  2. LANSCE nuclear science facilities and activities

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Ronald O

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear science activities at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) encompass measurements spanning the neutron energy range from thermal to 600 MeV. The neutron sources use spallation of the LANSCE 800 MeV pulsed proton beam with the time-of-flight technique to measure properties of neutron-induced reactions as a function of energy over this large energy range. Current experiments are conducted at the Lujan Center moderated neutron source, the unmoderated WNR target, and with a lead-slowing-down spectrometer. Instruments in use include the DANCE array of BaF{sub 2} scintillators for neutron capture studies, the FIGARO array of liquid scintillator neutron detectors, the GEANIE array of high-resolution HPGe x-ray and gamma-ray detectors, and a number of fission chambers, and other detectors. The LANL capabilities for production and handling of radioactive materials coupled with the neutron sources and detectors at LANSCE are enabling new and challenging measurements for a variety of applications including nuclear energy and nuclear astrophysics. An overview of recent research and examples of results is presented.

  3. Optogenetic Control of Nuclear Protein Import in Living Cells Using Light-Inducible Nuclear Localization Signals (LINuS).

    PubMed

    Wehler, Pierre; Niopek, Dominik; Eils, Roland; Di Ventura, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Many biological processes are regulated by the timely import of specific proteins into the nucleus. The ability to spatiotemporally control the nuclear import of proteins of interest therefore allows study of their role in a given biological process as well as controlling this process in space and time. The light-inducible nuclear localization signal (LINuS) was developed based on a natural plant photoreceptor that reversibly triggers the import of proteins of interest into the nucleus with blue light. Each LINuS is a small, genetically encoded domain that is fused to the protein of interest at the N or C terminus. These protocols describe how to carry out initial microscopy-based screening to assess which LINuS variant works best with a protein of interest. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27258691

  4. Functional conservation of the transportin nuclear import pathway in divergent organisms.

    PubMed

    Siomi, M C; Fromont, M; Rain, J C; Wan, L; Wang, F; Legrain, P; Dreyfuss, G

    1998-07-01

    Human transportin1 (hTRN1) is the nuclear import receptor for a group of pre-mRNA/mRNA-binding proteins (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins [hnRNP]) represented by hnRNP A1, which shuttle continuously between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. hTRN1 interacts with the M9 region of hnRNP A1, a 38-amino-acid domain rich in Gly, Ser, and Asn, and mediates the nuclear import of M9-bearing proteins in vitro. Saccharomyces cerevisiae transportin (yTRN; also known as YBR017c or Kap104p) has been identified and cloned. To understanding the nuclear import mediated by yTRN, we searched with a yeast two-hybrid system for proteins that interact with it. In an exhaustive screen of the S. cerevisiae genome, the most frequently selected open reading frame was the nuclear mRNA-binding protein, Nab2p. We delineated a ca.-50-amino-acid region in Nab2p, termed NAB35, which specifically binds yTRN and is similar to the M9 motif. NAB35 also interacts with hTRN1 and functions as a nuclear localization signal in mammalian cells. Interestingly, yTRN can also mediate the import of NAB35-bearing proteins into mammalian nuclei in vitro. We also report on additional substrates for TRN as well as sequences of Drosophila melanogaster, Xenopus laevis, and Schizosaccharomyces pombe TRNs. Together, these findings demonstrate that both the M9 signal and the nuclear import machinery utilized by the transportin pathway are conserved in evolution.

  5. Nuclear import of the pre-integration complex (PIC): the Achilles heel of HIV?

    PubMed

    Piller, S C; Caly, L; Jans, D A

    2003-07-01

    Current treatments against the Aquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) are reasonably effective in reducing the amount of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) present in infected patients, but their side-effects, and the emergence of drug-resistant HIV strains have intensified the renewed search for novel anti-HIV therapies. An essential step in HIV infection is the integration of the viral genome into the host cell chromosomes within the nucleus. Unlike other retroviruses, HIV can transport its genetic material, in the form of the large nucleoprotein pre-integration complex (PIC), into the nucleus through the intact nuclear envelope (NE). This enables HIV to infect non-dividing cells such as macrophages and microglial cells. Detailed knowledge of the signal-dependent pathways by which cellular proteins and RNAs cross the NE has accumulated in the past decade, but although several different components of the PIC have been implicated in its nuclear import, the mechanism of nuclear entry remains unclear. Since specifically inhibiting PIC nuclear import would undoubtedly block HIV infection in non-dividing cells, this critical step of HIV replication is of great interest as a drug target. This review examines the complex and controversial literature regarding three PIC components--the HIV proteins matrix, integrase and Vpr--proposed to facilitate PIC nuclear import, and existing models of HIV PIC nuclear import. It also suggests approaches to move towards a better understanding of PIC nuclear import, through examining the role of individual PIC components in the context of the intact PIC by direct visualisation, in order to develop new anti-HIV therapeutics.

  6. Arginine methylation next to the PY-NLS modulates Transportin binding and nuclear import of FUS

    PubMed Central

    Dormann, Dorothee; Madl, Tobias; Valori, Chiara F; Bentmann, Eva; Tahirovic, Sabina; Abou-Ajram, Claudia; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Ansorge, Olaf; Mackenzie, Ian R A; Neumann, Manuela; Haass, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Fused in sarcoma (FUS) is a nuclear protein that carries a proline-tyrosine nuclear localization signal (PY-NLS) and is imported into the nucleus via Transportin (TRN). Defects in nuclear import of FUS have been implicated in neurodegeneration, since mutations in the PY-NLS of FUS cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Moreover, FUS is deposited in the cytosol in a subset of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) patients. Here, we show that arginine methylation modulates nuclear import of FUS via a novel TRN-binding epitope. Chemical or genetic inhibition of arginine methylation restores TRN-mediated nuclear import of ALS-associated FUS mutants. The unmethylated arginine–glycine–glycine domain preceding the PY-NLS interacts with TRN and arginine methylation in this domain reduces TRN binding. Inclusions in ALS-FUS patients contain methylated FUS, while inclusions in FTLD-FUS patients are not methylated. Together with recent findings that FUS co-aggregates with two related proteins of the FET family and TRN in FTLD-FUS but not in ALS-FUS, our study provides evidence that these two diseases may be initiated by distinct pathomechanisms and implicates alterations in arginine methylation in pathogenesis. PMID:22968170

  7. Nuclear import strategies of high-risk HPV18 L2 minor capsid protein

    SciTech Connect

    Klucevsek, K.; Daley, J.; Darshan, M.S.; Bordeaux, J.; Moroianu, J. . E-mail: moroianu@bc.edu

    2006-08-15

    We have investigated the nuclear import strategies of high-risk HPV18 L2 minor capsid protein. HPV18 L2 interacts with Kap {alpha}{sub 2} adapter, and Kap {beta}{sub 2} and Kap {beta}{sub 3} nuclear import receptors. Moreover, binding of RanGTP to either Kap {beta}{sub 2} or Kap {beta}{sub 3} inhibits their interaction with L2, suggesting that these Kap {beta}/L2 complexes are import competent. Mapping studies show that HPV18 L2 contains two NLSs: in the N-terminus (nNLS) and in the C-terminus (cNLS), both of which can independently mediate nuclear import. Both nNLS and cNLS form a complex with Kap {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 1} heterodimer and mediate nuclear import via a classical pathway. The nNLS is also essential for the interaction of HPV18 L2 with Kap {beta}{sub 2} and Kap {beta}{sub 3}. Interestingly, both nNLS and cNLS interact with the viral DNA and this DNA binding occurs without nucleotide sequence specificity. Together, the data suggest that HPV18 L2 can interact via its NLSs with several Kaps and the viral DNA and may enter the nucleus via multiple import pathways mediated by Kap {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 1} heterodimers, Kap {beta}{sub 2} and Kap {beta}{sub 3}.

  8. Impaired nuclear import of mammalian Dlx4 proteins as a consequence of rapid sequence divergence

    SciTech Connect

    Coubrough, Melissa L.; Bendall, Andrew J. . E-mail: abendall@uoguelph.ca

    2006-11-15

    Dlx genes encode a developmentally important family of transcription factors with a variety of functions and sites of action during vertebrate embryogenesis. The murine Dlx4 gene is an enigmatic member of the family; little is known about the normal developmental function(s) of Dlx4. Here, we show that Dlx4 is expressed in the murine placenta and in a trophoblast cell line where the protein localizes to both the nucleus and cytoplasm. Despite the presence of several leucine/valine-rich motifs that match known nuclear export sequences, cytoplasmic Dlx4 is not due to CRM-1-mediated nuclear export. Rather, nuclear import of Dlx4 is compromised by specific residues that flank the nuclear localization signal. One of these residues represents a novel conserved feature of the Dlx4 protein in placental mammals, and the second represents novel variation within mouse Dlx4 isoforms. Comparison of orthologous protein sequences reveals a particularly high rate of non-synonymous change in the coding regions of mammalian Dlx4 genes. Since impaired nuclear localization is unlikely to enhance the function of a nuclear transcription factor, these data point to reduced selection pressure as the basis for the rapid divergence of the Dlx4 gene within the mammalian clade.

  9. Piperlongumine selectively suppresses ABC-DLBCL through inhibition of NF-κB p65 subunit nuclear import

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Mingshan; Shen, Yangling; Xu, Xiaoyu; Yao, Yao; Fu, Chunling; Yan, Zhiling; Wu, Qingyun; Cao, Jiang; Sang, Wei; Zeng, Lingyu; Li, Zhenyu; Liu, Xuejiao; and others

    2015-07-10

    Constitutive NF-κB activation is required for survival of activated B cell-like subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (ABC-DLBCL). However, current NF-κB targeting strategies lack cancer cell specificity. Here, we identified a novel inhibitor, piperlongumine, features direct binding to NF-κB p65 subunit and suppression of p65 nuclear import. This was accompanied by NF-κB reporter activity suppression and NF-κB target gene downregulation. Moreover, mutation of Cys{sup 38} to Ser in p65 abolished this effect of piperlongumine on inhibition of p65 nuclear import. Furthermore, we show that piperlongumine selectively inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis of ABC-DLBCL cells. Most notably, it has been reported that piperlongumine did not affect normal cells even at high doses and was nontoxic to animals. Hence, our current study provides new insight into piperlongumine's mechanism of action and novel approach to ABC-DLBCL target therapy. - Highlights: • Current NF-κB targeting strategies lack cancer cell specificity. • Piperlongumine inhibits NF-κB p65 subunit nuclear import via directly binding to p65. • Piperlongumine selectively inhibits proliferation of ABC-DLBCL cells. • This study provides a novel approach to ABC-DLBCL target therapy.

  10. 10 CFR 50.49 - Environmental qualification of electric equipment important to safety for nuclear power plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... important to safety for nuclear power plants. 50.49 Section 50.49 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION... nuclear power plants. (a) Each holder of or an applicant for an operating license issued under this part... nuclear power plant for which the certifications required under § 50.82(a)(1) or § 52.110(a)(1) of...

  11. 10 CFR 50.49 - Environmental qualification of electric equipment important to safety for nuclear power plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... important to safety for nuclear power plants. 50.49 Section 50.49 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION... nuclear power plants. (a) Each holder of or an applicant for an operating license issued under this part... nuclear power plant for which the certifications required under § 50.82(a)(1) or § 52.110(a)(1) of...

  12. 10 CFR 50.49 - Environmental qualification of electric equipment important to safety for nuclear power plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... important to safety for nuclear power plants. 50.49 Section 50.49 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION... nuclear power plants. (a) Each holder of or an applicant for an operating license issued under this part... nuclear power plant for which the certifications required under § 50.82(a)(1) or § 52.110(a)(1) of...

  13. 10 CFR 50.49 - Environmental qualification of electric equipment important to safety for nuclear power plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... important to safety for nuclear power plants. 50.49 Section 50.49 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION... nuclear power plants. (a) Each holder of or an applicant for an operating license issued under this part... nuclear power plant for which the certifications required under § 50.82(a)(1) or § 52.110(a)(1) of...

  14. 10 CFR 50.49 - Environmental qualification of electric equipment important to safety for nuclear power plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... important to safety for nuclear power plants. 50.49 Section 50.49 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION... nuclear power plants. (a) Each holder of or an applicant for an operating license issued under this part... nuclear power plant for which the certifications required under § 50.82(a)(1) or § 52.110(a)(1) of...

  15. Summary of nuclear fuel reprocessing activities around the world

    SciTech Connect

    Mellinger, P.J.; Harmon, K.M.; Lakey, L.T.

    1984-11-01

    This review of international practices for nuclear fuel reprocessing was prepared to provide a nontechnical summary of the current status of nuclear fuel reprocessing activities around the world. The sources of information are widely varied.

  16. Ideas Exchange: "How Important Is Activity in Young Children (Preschool) to a Lifetime of Physical Activity?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hushman, GLenn; Morrison, Jaime; Mally, Kristi; McCall, Renee; Corso, Marjorie; Kamla, Jim; Magnotta, John; Chase, Melissa A.; Garrahy, Deborah A.; Lorenzi, David G.; Barnd, Sue

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the opinions of several professionals who were asked: "How important is activity in young children (preschool) to a lifetime of physical activity?" These professionals point out the importance of physical activity to young children.

  17. In vitro import of a nuclearly encoded tRNA into mitochondria of Solanum tuberosum.

    PubMed

    Delage, Ludovic; Dietrich, André; Cosset, Anne; Maréchal-Drouard, Laurence

    2003-06-01

    Some of the mitochondrial tRNAs of higher plants are nuclearly encoded and imported into mitochondria. The import of tRNAs encoded in the nucleus has been shown to be essential for proper protein translation within mitochondria of a variety of organisms. Here, we report the development of an in vitro assay for import of nuclearly encoded tRNAs into plant mitochondria. This in vitro system utilizes isolated mitochondria from Solanum tuberosum and synthetic tRNAs transcribed from cloned nuclear tRNA genes. Although incubation of radioactively labeled in vitro-transcribed tRNA(Ala), tRNA(Phe), and tRNA(Met-e) with isolated potato mitochondria resulted in importation, as measured by nuclease protection, the amount of tRNA transcripts protected at saturation was at least five times higher for tRNA(Ala) than for the two other tRNAs. This difference in in vitro saturation levels of import is consistent with the in vivo localization of these tRNAs, since cytosolic tRNA(Ala) is naturally imported into potato mitochondria whereas tRNA(Phe) and tRNA(Met-e) are not. Characterization of in vitro tRNA import requirements indicates that mitochondrial tRNA import proceeds in the absence of any added cytosolic protein fraction, involves at least one protein component on the surface of mitochondria, and requires ATP-dependent step(s) and a membrane potential.

  18. Characterization of the nuclear protein import mechanism using Ran mutants with altered nucleotide binding specificities.

    PubMed Central

    Weis, K; Dingwall, C; Lamond, A I

    1996-01-01

    The small nuclear GTP binding protein Ran is required for transport of nuclear proteins through the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Although it is known that GTP hydrolysis by Ran is essential for this reaction, it has been unclear whether additional energy-consuming steps are also required. To uncouple the energy requirements for Ran from other nucleoside triphosphatases, we constructed a mutant derivative of Ran that has an altered nucleotide specificity from GTP to xanthosine 5' triphosphate. Using this Ran mutant, we demonstrate that nucleotide hydrolysis by Ran is sufficient to promote efficient nuclear protein import in vitro. Under these conditions, protein import could no longer be inhibited with non-hydrolysable nucleotide analogues, indicating that no Ran-independent energy-requiring steps are essential for the protein translocation reaction through the NPC. We further provide evidence that nuclear protein import requires Ran in the GDP form in the cytoplasm. This suggests that a coordinated exchange reaction from Ran-GDP to Ran-GTP at the pore is necessary for translocation into the nucleus. Images PMID:9003787

  19. Structural basis for cell-cycle-dependent nuclear import mediated by the karyopherin Kap121p.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Junya; Matsuura, Yoshiyuki

    2013-06-12

    Kap121p (also known as Pse1p) is an essential karyopherin that mediates nuclear import of a plethora of cargoes including cell cycle regulators, transcription factors, and ribosomal proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It has been proposed that the spindle assembly checkpoint signaling triggers molecular rearrangements of nuclear pore complexes and thereby arrests Kap121p-mediated nuclear import at metaphase, while leaving import mediated by other karyopherins unaffected. The Kap121p-specific import inhibition is required for normal progression through mitosis. To understand the structural basis for Kap121p-mediated nuclear import and its unique regulatory mechanism during mitosis, we determined crystal structures of Kap121p in isolation and also in complex with either its import cargoes or nucleoporin Nup53p or RanGTP. Kap121p has a superhelical structure composed of 24 HEAT repeats. The structures of Kap121p-cargo complexes define a non-conventional nuclear localization signal (NLS) that has a consensus sequence of KV/IxKx1-2K/H/R. The structure of Kap121p-Nup53p complex shows that cargo and Nup53p compete for the same high-affinity binding site, explaining how Nup53p binding forces cargo release when the Kap121p-binding site of Nup53p is exposed during mitosis. Comparison of the NLS and RanGTP complexes reveals that RanGTP binding not only occludes the cargo-binding site but also forces Kap121p into a conformation that is incompatible with NLS recognition.

  20. 75 FR 44072 - Export and Import of Nuclear Equipment and Material; Updates and Clarifications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-28

    ... changes to 10 CFR part 110, Export and Import of Nuclear Equipment and Material (74 FR 29614). This final... licensee. (70 FR 72128; December 1, 2005) These security orders specifically address the security of... Category 1 or 2 quantities of radioactive material (72 FR 70901; December 13, 2007) to...

  1. Restoration of nuclear-import failure caused by triple A syndrome and oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Kiriyama, Takao; Hirano, Makito Asai, Hirohide; Ikeda, Masanori; Furiya, Yoshiko; Ueno, Satoshi

    2008-10-03

    Triple A syndrome is an autosomal recessive neurological disease, mimicking motor neuron disease, and is caused by mutant ALADIN, a nuclear-pore complex component. We recently discovered that the pathogenesis involved impaired nuclear import of DNA repair proteins, including DNA ligase I and the cerebellar ataxia causative protein aprataxin. Such impairment was overcome by fusing classical nuclear localization signal (NLS) and 137-aa downstream sequence of XRCC1, designated stretched NLS (stNLS). We report here that the minimum essential sequence of stNLS (mstNLS) is residues 239-276, downsized by more than 100 aa. mstNLS enabled efficient nuclear import of DNA repair proteins in patient fibroblasts, functioned under oxidative stress, and reduced oxidative-stress-induced cell death, more effectively than stNLS. The stress-tolerability of mstNLS was also exerted in control fibroblasts and neuroblastoma cells. These findings may help develop treatments for currently intractable triple A syndrome and other oxidative-stress-related neurological diseases, and contribute to nuclear compartmentalization study.

  2. A cell-free system for light-dependent nuclear import of phytochrome.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Anne; Kunkel, Tim; Hiltbrunner, Andreas; Neuhaus, Gunther; Wolf, Iris; Speth, Volker; Adam, Eva; Nagy, Ferenc; Schäfer, Eberhard

    2009-02-01

    Translocation from the cytosol to the nucleus is an essential step in phytochrome (phy) signal transduction. In the case of phytochrome A (phyA), this step occurs with the help of FHY1 (far-red-elongated hypocotyl 1), a specific transport protein. To investigate the components involved in phyA transport, we used a cell-free system that facilitates the controlled addition of transport factors. For this purpose, we isolated nuclei from the unicellular green algae Acetabularia acetabulum. These nuclei are up to 100 mum in diameter and allow easy detection of imported proteins. Experiments with isolated nuclei of Acetabularia showed that FHY1 is sufficient for phyA transport. The reconstituted system demonstrates all the characteristics of phytochrome transport in Arabidopsis thaliana. In addition, FHY1 was also actively exported from the nucleus, consistent with its role as a shuttle protein in plants. Therefore, we believe that isolated Acetabularia nuclei may be used as a general tool to study nuclear transport of plant proteins.

  3. Seasonal Pacing - Match Importance Affects Activity in Professional Soccer

    PubMed Central

    Link, Daniel; de Lorenzo, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    This research explores the influence of match importance on player activity in professional soccer. Therefore, we used an observational approach and analyzed 1,211 matches of German Bundesliga and 2nd Bundesliga. The importance measurement employed is based on post season consequences of teams involved in a match. This means, if a match result could potentially influence the final rank, and this rank would lead to different consequences for a team, such as qualification for Champions League opposed to qualification for Europe League, then this match is classified as important; otherwise not. Activity was quantified by TOTAL DISTANCE COVERED, SPRINTS, FAST RUNS, DUELS, FOULS and ATTEMPTS. Running parameters were recorded using a semi-automatic optical tracking system, while technical variables were collected by professional data loggers. Based on our importance classification, low important matches occurred at the beginning of round 29. A two-way ANOVA indicates significantly increased FAST RUNS (+4%, d = 0.3), DUELS (+16%, d = 1.0) and FOULS (+36%, d = 1.2) in important matches compared to low important ones. For FAST RUNS and FOULS, this effect only exists in Bundesliga. A comparison of the two leagues show that TOTAL DISTANCE COVERED (+3%, d = 0.9), SPRINTS (+25%, d = 1.4) and FAST RUNS (+15%, d = 1.4) are higher compared to 2nd Bundesliga, whilst FOULS is less in Bundesliga (-7%, d = 0.3). No difference in player activity was found between matches at the beginning of a season (round 1–6) and at the end of a season (round 29–34). We conclude that match importance influences player activity in German professional soccer. The most reasonable explanation is a conscious or unconscious pacing strategy, motivated by preserving abilities or preventing injury. Since this tendency mainly exists in Bundesliga, this may suggest that more skilled players show a higher awareness for the need of pacing. PMID:27281051

  4. Seasonal Pacing - Match Importance Affects Activity in Professional Soccer.

    PubMed

    Link, Daniel; de Lorenzo, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    This research explores the influence of match importance on player activity in professional soccer. Therefore, we used an observational approach and analyzed 1,211 matches of German Bundesliga and 2nd Bundesliga. The importance measurement employed is based on post season consequences of teams involved in a match. This means, if a match result could potentially influence the final rank, and this rank would lead to different consequences for a team, such as qualification for Champions League opposed to qualification for Europe League, then this match is classified as important; otherwise not. Activity was quantified by TOTAL DISTANCE COVERED, SPRINTS, FAST RUNS, DUELS, FOULS and ATTEMPTS. Running parameters were recorded using a semi-automatic optical tracking system, while technical variables were collected by professional data loggers. Based on our importance classification, low important matches occurred at the beginning of round 29. A two-way ANOVA indicates significantly increased FAST RUNS (+4%, d = 0.3), DUELS (+16%, d = 1.0) and FOULS (+36%, d = 1.2) in important matches compared to low important ones. For FAST RUNS and FOULS, this effect only exists in Bundesliga. A comparison of the two leagues show that TOTAL DISTANCE COVERED (+3%, d = 0.9), SPRINTS (+25%, d = 1.4) and FAST RUNS (+15%, d = 1.4) are higher compared to 2nd Bundesliga, whilst FOULS is less in Bundesliga (-7%, d = 0.3). No difference in player activity was found between matches at the beginning of a season (round 1-6) and at the end of a season (round 29-34). We conclude that match importance influences player activity in German professional soccer. The most reasonable explanation is a conscious or unconscious pacing strategy, motivated by preserving abilities or preventing injury. Since this tendency mainly exists in Bundesliga, this may suggest that more skilled players show a higher awareness for the need of pacing.

  5. Seasonal Pacing - Match Importance Affects Activity in Professional Soccer.

    PubMed

    Link, Daniel; de Lorenzo, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    This research explores the influence of match importance on player activity in professional soccer. Therefore, we used an observational approach and analyzed 1,211 matches of German Bundesliga and 2nd Bundesliga. The importance measurement employed is based on post season consequences of teams involved in a match. This means, if a match result could potentially influence the final rank, and this rank would lead to different consequences for a team, such as qualification for Champions League opposed to qualification for Europe League, then this match is classified as important; otherwise not. Activity was quantified by TOTAL DISTANCE COVERED, SPRINTS, FAST RUNS, DUELS, FOULS and ATTEMPTS. Running parameters were recorded using a semi-automatic optical tracking system, while technical variables were collected by professional data loggers. Based on our importance classification, low important matches occurred at the beginning of round 29. A two-way ANOVA indicates significantly increased FAST RUNS (+4%, d = 0.3), DUELS (+16%, d = 1.0) and FOULS (+36%, d = 1.2) in important matches compared to low important ones. For FAST RUNS and FOULS, this effect only exists in Bundesliga. A comparison of the two leagues show that TOTAL DISTANCE COVERED (+3%, d = 0.9), SPRINTS (+25%, d = 1.4) and FAST RUNS (+15%, d = 1.4) are higher compared to 2nd Bundesliga, whilst FOULS is less in Bundesliga (-7%, d = 0.3). No difference in player activity was found between matches at the beginning of a season (round 1-6) and at the end of a season (round 29-34). We conclude that match importance influences player activity in German professional soccer. The most reasonable explanation is a conscious or unconscious pacing strategy, motivated by preserving abilities or preventing injury. Since this tendency mainly exists in Bundesliga, this may suggest that more skilled players show a higher awareness for the need of pacing. PMID:27281051

  6. MKP-1 Is Essential for Canonical Vitamin D-Induced Signaling through Nuclear Import and Regulates RANKL Expression and Function

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Alfred C.; Kern, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D3, and its most active form, 1,25(OH)2D3, are well known to stimulate osteoclastogenesis through stromal cell induction of the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL). MAPK phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) is a phosphatase classically known to negatively regulate the innate immune response through dephosphorylation of p38, ERK, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase activity. This paper describes a new function of MKP-1 in permitting genomic 1,25(OH)2D3 signaling and downstream osteoclastogenesis through RANKL. Initially, quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and immunoblot analysis comparing bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) revealed that 1,25(OH)2D3-induced vitamin D receptor (VDR), cytochrome P 45024a1, and RANKL mRNA expression and protein were significantly attenuated or absent in MKP-1−/− BMSC. Immunoblot analysis from cellular fractions of wild type and MKP-1−/− BMSC stimulated with 10−7 m 1,25(OH)2D3 revealed retinoid X receptor (RXR)α nuclear import was impaired in MKP-1−/− BMSC, whereas VDR import was not. Proximity ligation assays revealed that baseline VDR-RXRα heterodimer translocation was unchanged, yet 1,25(OH)2D3-induced nuclear translocation of VDR-RXRα heterodimers was reduced in MKP-1−/− BMSC. A functional consequence was observed as BMSC from MKP-1−/− mice treated with 1,25(OH)2D3 and cocultured with RAW 264.7 cells had a 91% decrease in osteoclastogenesis and a 94.5% decrease in mineralized matrix resorption compared with wild-type cocultures (P < 0.01). These results reveal an unexpected, permissive role for MKP-1 in canonical 1,25(OH)2D3 signaling via VDR-RXRα heterodimer nuclear import and downstream osteoclastogenesis through stromal cell RANKL expression. PMID:22899855

  7. The nuclear question: rethinking species importance in multi-species animal groups.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Umesh; Raza, Rashid Hasnain; Quader, Suhel

    2010-09-01

    1. Animals group for various benefits, and may form either simple single-species groups, or more complex multi-species associations. Multi-species groups are thought to provide anti-predator and foraging benefits to participant individuals. 2. Despite detailed studies on multi-species animal groups, the importance of species in group initiation and maintenance is still rated qualitatively as 'nuclear' (maintaining groups) or 'attendant' (species following nuclear species) based on species-specific traits. This overly simplifies and limits understanding of inherently complex associations, and is biologically unrealistic, because species roles in multi-species groups are: (i) likely to be context-specific and not simply a fixed species property, and (ii) much more variable than this dichotomy indicates. 3. We propose a new view of species importance (measured as number of inter-species associations), along a continuum from 'most nuclear' to 'least nuclear'. Using mixed-species bird flocks from a tropical rainforest in India as an example, we derive inter-species association measures from randomizations on bird species abundance data (which takes into account species 'availability') and data on 86 mixed-species flocks from two different flock types. Our results show that the number and average strength of inter-species associations covary positively, and we argue that species with many, strong associations are the most nuclear. 4. From our data, group size and foraging method are ecological and behavioural traits of species that best explain nuclearity in mixed-species bird flocks. Parallels have been observed in multi-species fish shoals, in which group size and foraging method, as well as diet, have been shown to correlate with nuclearity. Further, the context in which multi-species groups occur, in conjunction with species-specific traits, influences the role played by a species in a multi-species group, and this highlights the importance of extrinsic factors in

  8. Low-Dose Paclitaxel Reduces S100A4 Nuclear Import to Inhibit Invasion and Hematogenous Metastasis of Cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cadamuro, Massimiliano; Spagnuolo, Gaia; Sambado, Luisa; Indraccolo, Stefano; Nardo, Giorgia; Rosato, Antonio; Brivio, Simone; Caslini, Chiara; Stecca, Tommaso; Massani, Marco; Bassi, Nicolò; Novelli, Eugenio; Spirli, Carlo; Fabris, Luca; Strazzabosco, Mario

    2016-08-15

    Nuclear expression of the calcium-binding protein S100A4 is a biomarker of increased invasiveness in cholangiocarcinoma, a primary liver cancer with scarce treatment opportunities and dismal prognosis. In this study, we provide evidence that targeting S100A4 nuclear import by low-dose paclitaxel, a microtubule-stabilizing agent, inhibits cholangiocarcinoma invasiveness and metastatic spread. Administration of low-dose paclitaxel to established (EGI-1) and primary (CCA-TV3) cholangiocarcinoma cell lines expressing nuclear S100A4 triggered a marked reduction in nuclear expression of S100A4 without modifying its cytoplasmic levels, an effect associated with a significant decrease in cell migration and invasiveness. While low-dose paclitaxel did not affect cellular proliferation, apoptosis, or cytoskeletal integrity, it significantly reduced SUMOylation of S100A4, a critical posttranslational modification that directs its trafficking to the nucleus. This effect of low-dose paclitaxel was reproduced by ginkolic acid, a specific SUMOylation inhibitor. Downregulation of nuclear S100A4 by low-dose paclitaxel was associated with a strong reduction in RhoA and Cdc42 GTPase activity, MT1-MMP expression, and MMP-9 secretion. In an SCID mouse xenograft model, low-dose metronomic paclitaxel treatment decreased lung dissemination of EGI-1 cells without significantly affecting their local tumor growth. In the tumor mass, nuclear S100A4 expression by cholangiocarcinoma cells was significantly reduced, whereas rates of proliferation and apoptosis were unchanged. Overall, our findings highlight nuclear S100A4 as a candidate therapeutic target in cholangiocarcinoma and establish a mechanistic rationale for the use of low-dose paclitaxel in blocking metastatic progression of cholangiocarcinoma. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4775-84. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27328733

  9. Occupational Employment in Nuclear-Related Activities, 1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Joe G.; Olsen, Kathryn

    Employment in nuclear- and nuclear energy-related activities in 1981 was examined and compared to that in previous years. Survey instruments were returned by 784 establishments. Total 1981 nuclear-related employment was estimated to be 249,500--a growth of 22,600 (10%) workers over the 1977 total. Government-owned, contractor-operated (GOCO)…

  10. Deciphering the nuclear import pathway for the cytoskeletal red cell protein 4.1R.

    PubMed

    Gascard, P; Nunomura, W; Lee, G; Walensky, L D; Krauss, S W; Takakuwa, Y; Chasis, J A; Mohandas, N; Conboy, J G

    1999-06-01

    The erythroid membrane cytoskeletal protein 4.1 is the prototypical member of a genetically and topologically complex family that is generated by combinatorial alternative splicing pathways and is localized at diverse intracellular sites including the nucleus. To explore the molecular determinants for nuclear localization, we transfected COS-7 cells with epitope-tagged versions of natural red cell protein 4.1 (4.1R) isoforms as well as mutagenized and truncated derivatives. Two distant topological sorting signals were required for efficient nuclear import of the 4.1R80 isoform: a basic peptide, KKKRER, encoded by alternative exon 16 and acting as a weak core nuclear localization signal (4.1R NLS), and an acidic peptide, EED, encoded by alternative exon 5. 4.1R80 isoforms lacking either of these two exons showed decreased nuclear import. Fusion of various 4.1R80 constructs to the cytoplasmic reporter protein pyruvate kinase confirmed a requirement for both motifs for full NLS function. 4.1R80 was efficiently imported in the nuclei of digitonin-permeabilized COS-7 cells in the presence of recombinant Rch1 (human importin alpha2), importin beta, and GTPase Ran. Quantitative analysis of protein-protein interactions using a resonant mirror detection technique showed that 4.1R80 bound to Rch1 in vitro with high affinity (KD = 30 nM). The affinity decreased at least 7- and 20-fold, respectively, if the EED motif in exon 5 or if 4.1R NLS in exon 16 was lacking or mutated, confirming that both motifs were required for efficient importin-mediated nuclear import of 4.1R80.

  11. Establishment of Korean Nuclear Ombudsman System Importing Compensation and Insurance Concept for Residents

    SciTech Connect

    Hyun Seok Ko; Yong Min Kim; Young Wook Lee; Dong Hoon Shin; Young Ho Cho; Chang Sun Kang

    2006-07-01

    not established a firm phase as right relief body to be believed by public with lack of independence, authority and specialty. Therefore the establishment of organization that can be the role as special ombudsman organization about sensitive and special matter like nuclear matter is necessary. Definite establishment element of ombudsman system is to introduce of congress type ombudsman element, to be permanent standing system ombudsman, to limit jurisdiction extent and have strong authority, to be able to access easily, to be composed of legal and nuclear specialist. One of important requirements of resident is compensation. So, based on the resident compensation theory about aversion equipment, ombudsman system should be established introducing the insurance theory through risk management as functional background for appropriate compensation. (authors)

  12. Fhit Nuclear Import Following EGF Stimulation Sustains Proliferation of Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Francesca; Sasso, Marianna; Turdo, Federica; Beretta, Giovanni L; Casalini, Patrizia; Ghirelli, Cristina; Sfondrini, Lucia; Ménard, Sylvie; Tagliabue, Elda; Campiglio, Manuela

    2015-11-01

    The tumor-suppressor protein fragile histidine triad (Fhit) exerts its functions in the cytoplasm, although some reports suggest that it may also act in the nucleus. We previously showed that cytosolic Fhit protein levels in cancer cell lines stimulated to proliferate were reduced by proteasomal degradation. Here, we demonstrate that Fhit is physiologically present in the nucleus of breast cancer cell lines and tissues at a low level and that proliferative stimulation increases nuclear levels. Breast cancer cells expressing the FhitY114F mutant, which do not undergo proteasomal degradation, contained mutated Fhit in the nucleus, while cells treated with a proteasome inhibitor accumulated nuclear Fhit during proliferation. Thus, Fhit nuclear shuttling and proteasome degradation phenomena occur independently. When Fhit was coupled to a nuclear localization sequence, the proliferation rate of the transfected cells increased together with levels of proliferation pathway mediators cyclin D1, phospho-MAPK, and phospho-STAT3. Fhit nuclear translocation upon mitogenic stimulation may represent a new regulatory mechanism that allows rapid restoration of Fhit cytoplasmic levels and promotes the proliferation cascade activated by mitogenic stimulation.

  13. KIF5B and Nup358 Cooperatively Mediate the Nuclear Import of HIV-1 during Infection.

    PubMed

    Dharan, Adarsh; Talley, Sarah; Tripathi, Abhishek; Mamede, João I; Majetschak, Matthias; Hope, Thomas J; Campbell, Edward M

    2016-06-01

    Following envelope mediated fusion, the HIV-1 core is released into the cytoplasm of the target cell and undergoes a series of trafficking and replicative steps that result in the nuclear import of the viral genome, which ultimately leads to the integration of the proviral DNA into the host cell genome. Previous studies have found that disruption of microtubules, or depletion of dynein or kinesin motors, perturb the normal uncoating and trafficking of the viral genome. Here, we show that the Kinesin-1 motor, KIF5B, induces a relocalization of the nuclear pore component Nup358 into the cytoplasm during HIV-1 infection. This relocalization of NUP358 is dependent on HIV-1 capsid, and NUP358 directly associates with viral cores following cytoplasmic translocation. This interaction between NUP358 and the HIV-1 core is dependent on multiple capsid binding surfaces, as this association is not observed following infection with capsid mutants in which a conserved hydrophobic binding pocket (N74D) or the cyclophilin A binding loop (P90A) is disrupted. KIF5B knockdown also prevents the nuclear entry and infection by HIV-1, but does not exert a similar effect on the N74D or P90A capsid mutants which do not rely on Nup358 for nuclear import. Finally, we observe that the relocalization of Nup358 in response to CA is dependent on cleavage protein and polyadenylation factor 6 (CPSF6), but independent of cyclophilin A. Collectively, these observations identify a previously unappreciated role for KIF5B in mediating the Nup358 dependent nuclear import of the viral genome during infection.

  14. KIF5B and Nup358 Cooperatively Mediate the Nuclear Import of HIV-1 during Infection.

    PubMed

    Dharan, Adarsh; Talley, Sarah; Tripathi, Abhishek; Mamede, João I; Majetschak, Matthias; Hope, Thomas J; Campbell, Edward M

    2016-06-01

    Following envelope mediated fusion, the HIV-1 core is released into the cytoplasm of the target cell and undergoes a series of trafficking and replicative steps that result in the nuclear import of the viral genome, which ultimately leads to the integration of the proviral DNA into the host cell genome. Previous studies have found that disruption of microtubules, or depletion of dynein or kinesin motors, perturb the normal uncoating and trafficking of the viral genome. Here, we show that the Kinesin-1 motor, KIF5B, induces a relocalization of the nuclear pore component Nup358 into the cytoplasm during HIV-1 infection. This relocalization of NUP358 is dependent on HIV-1 capsid, and NUP358 directly associates with viral cores following cytoplasmic translocation. This interaction between NUP358 and the HIV-1 core is dependent on multiple capsid binding surfaces, as this association is not observed following infection with capsid mutants in which a conserved hydrophobic binding pocket (N74D) or the cyclophilin A binding loop (P90A) is disrupted. KIF5B knockdown also prevents the nuclear entry and infection by HIV-1, but does not exert a similar effect on the N74D or P90A capsid mutants which do not rely on Nup358 for nuclear import. Finally, we observe that the relocalization of Nup358 in response to CA is dependent on cleavage protein and polyadenylation factor 6 (CPSF6), but independent of cyclophilin A. Collectively, these observations identify a previously unappreciated role for KIF5B in mediating the Nup358 dependent nuclear import of the viral genome during infection. PMID:27327622

  15. KIF5B and Nup358 Cooperatively Mediate the Nuclear Import of HIV-1 during Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dharan, Adarsh; Talley, Sarah; Tripathi, Abhishek; Mamede, João I.; Majetschak, Matthias; Campbell, Edward M.

    2016-01-01

    Following envelope mediated fusion, the HIV-1 core is released into the cytoplasm of the target cell and undergoes a series of trafficking and replicative steps that result in the nuclear import of the viral genome, which ultimately leads to the integration of the proviral DNA into the host cell genome. Previous studies have found that disruption of microtubules, or depletion of dynein or kinesin motors, perturb the normal uncoating and trafficking of the viral genome. Here, we show that the Kinesin-1 motor, KIF5B, induces a relocalization of the nuclear pore component Nup358 into the cytoplasm during HIV-1 infection. This relocalization of NUP358 is dependent on HIV-1 capsid, and NUP358 directly associates with viral cores following cytoplasmic translocation. This interaction between NUP358 and the HIV-1 core is dependent on multiple capsid binding surfaces, as this association is not observed following infection with capsid mutants in which a conserved hydrophobic binding pocket (N74D) or the cyclophilin A binding loop (P90A) is disrupted. KIF5B knockdown also prevents the nuclear entry and infection by HIV-1, but does not exert a similar effect on the N74D or P90A capsid mutants which do not rely on Nup358 for nuclear import. Finally, we observe that the relocalization of Nup358 in response to CA is dependent on cleavage protein and polyadenylation factor 6 (CPSF6), but independent of cyclophilin A. Collectively, these observations identify a previously unappreciated role for KIF5B in mediating the Nup358 dependent nuclear import of the viral genome during infection. PMID:27327622

  16. Light quality-dependent nuclear import of the plant photoreceptors phytochrome A and B

    PubMed Central

    Kircher, S; Kozma-Bognar, L; Kim, L; Adam, E; Harter, K; Schafer, E; Nagy, F

    1999-01-01

    The phytochrome (phy) family of plant photoreceptors controls various aspects of photomorphogenesis. Overexpression of rice phyA-green fluorescent protein (GFP) and tobacco phyB-GFP fusion proteins in tobacco results in functional photoreceptors. phyA-GFP and phyB-GFP are localized in the cytosol of dark-adapted plants. In our experiments, red light treatment led to nuclear translocation of phyA-GFP and phyB-GFP, albeit with different kinetics. Red light-induced nuclear import of phyB-GFP, but not that of phyA-GFP, was inhibited by far-red light. Far-red light alone only induced nuclear translocation of phyA-GFP. These observations indicate that nuclear import of phyA-GFP is controlled by a very low fluence response, whereas translocation of phyB-GFP is regulated by a low fluence response of phytochrome. Thus, light-regulated nucleocytoplasmic partitioning of phyA and phyB is a major step in phytochrome signaling. PMID:10449579

  17. Importin-β facilitates nuclear import of human GW proteins and balances cytoplasmic gene silencing protein levels.

    PubMed

    Schraivogel, Daniel; Schindler, Susann G; Danner, Johannes; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Pfaff, Janina; Hannus, Stefan; Depping, Reinhard; Meister, Gunter

    2015-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) guide Argonaute (Ago) proteins to distinct target mRNAs leading to translational repression and mRNA decay. Ago proteins interact with a member of the GW protein family, referred to as TNRC6A-C in mammals, which coordinate downstream gene-silencing processes. The cytoplasmic functions of TNRC6 and Ago proteins are reasonably well established. Both protein families are found in the nucleus as well. Their detailed nuclear functions, however, remain elusive. Furthermore, it is not clear which import routes Ago and TNRC6 proteins take into the nucleus. Using different nuclear transport assays, we find that Ago as well as TNRC6 proteins shuttle between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. While import receptors might function redundantly to transport Ago2, we demonstrate that TNRC6 proteins are imported by the Importin-β pathway. Finally, we show that nuclear localization of both Ago2 and TNRC6 proteins can depend on each other suggesting actively balanced cytoplasmic Ago - TNRC6 levels.

  18. The SV40 T antigen nuclear localization sequence enhances nuclear import of vector DNA in embryos of a crustacean (Litopenaeus schmitti).

    PubMed

    Arenal, Amilcar; Pimentel, Rafael; García, Carmen; Pimentel, Eulogio; Aleström, Peter

    2004-08-01

    A genetic transformation system for penaeid shrimp could provide a powerful technique for the improvement of different production traits of importance for a sustainable aquaculture. The development of a successful transformation system depends on the ability to efficiently introduce exogenous DNA into the target species. The ability of the nuclear localization signal (NLS) peptide of the SV40 T antigen to facilitate nuclear import and transient gene expression is known from vertebrate systems and for the first time, is shown here to be efficient in a crustacean species, i.e. the shrimp Litopenaeus schmitti. Electroporation was used to introduce the pCMV-lacZ plasmid that contains the human cytomegalovirus promoter/enhancer (CMV) fused to the beta-galactosidase (lacZ) coding region, into L. schmitti zygotes. Supercoiled DNA was used at 50 or 500 ng/microl naked or bound to NLS peptide. The hatching rate of electroporated zygotes was around 60% for all groups, except from the pCMV-lacZ:NLS group at 500 ng/microl (43%). Based on Southern blot analyses of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products the gene transfer frequency was 2-fold higher using DNA:NLS complexes than with naked DNA (23.8% vs. 11.5%, with 50 ng/microl of plasmid DNA, 44.3% vs. 28.8% with 500 ng/microl). The beta-galactosidase activity assay indicated that nuclear uptake is faster for the DNA:NLS complexes than for naked DNA. The beta-galactosidase activity was always higher in the DNA:NLS groups than in the naked DNA groups. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the use of an NLS peptide to improve gene transfer and nuclear uptake in crustaceans. PMID:15276203

  19. In Vivo Islet Protection by a Nuclear Import Inhibitor in a Mouse Model of Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Daniel J.; Zienkiewicz, Jozef; Kendall, Peggy L.; Liu, Danya; Liu, Xueyan; Veach, Ruth Ann; Collins, Robert D.; Hawiger, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    Background Insulin-dependent Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a devastating autoimmune disease that destroys beta cells within the pancreatic islets and afflicts over 10 million people worldwide. These patients face life-long risks for blindness, cardiovascular and renal diseases, and complications of insulin treatment. New therapies that protect islets from autoimmune destruction and allow continuing insulin production are needed. Increasing evidence regarding the pathomechanism of T1D indicates that islets are destroyed by the relentless attack by autoreactive immune cells evolving from an aberrant action of the innate, in addition to adaptive, immune system that produces islet-toxic cytokines, chemokines, and other effectors of islet inflammation. We tested the hypothesis that targeting nuclear import of stress-responsive transcription factors evoked by agonist-stimulated innate and adaptive immunity receptors would protect islets from autoimmune destruction. Principal Findings Here we show that a first-in-class inhibitor of nuclear import, cSN50 peptide, affords in vivo islet protection following a 2-day course of intense treatment in NOD mice, which resulted in a diabetes-free state for one year without apparent toxicity. This nuclear import inhibitor precipitously reduces the accumulation of islet-destructive autoreactive lymphocytes while enhancing activation-induced cell death of T and B lymphocytes derived from autoimmune diabetes-prone, non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice that develop T1D. Moreover, in this widely used model of human T1D we noted attenuation of pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production in immune cells. Conclusions These results indicate that a novel form of immunotherapy that targets nuclear import can arrest inflammation-driven destruction of insulin-producing beta cells at the site of autoimmune attack within pancreatic islets during the progression of T1D. PMID:20949090

  20. 10 CFR 73.74 - Requirement for advance notice and protection of import shipments of nuclear material from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Requirement for advance notice and protection of import shipments of nuclear material from countries that are not party to the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material. 73.74 Section 73.74 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF PLANTS AND MATERIALS...

  1. 10 CFR 73.74 - Requirement for advance notice and protection of import shipments of nuclear material from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirement for advance notice and protection of import shipments of nuclear material from countries that are not party to the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material. 73.74 Section 73.74 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF PLANTS AND MATERIALS...

  2. Galaxy interactions and the stimulation of nuclear activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckman, Timothy M.

    1990-01-01

    The author discusses the idea that interactions between galaxies can lead to enhanced galactic activity. He discusses whether, apart from the observational evidence, there is a strong theoretical or heuristic motivation for investigating galaxy interactions as stimulators of nuclear activity in galaxies. Galactic interactions as mechanisms for triggering nuclear starbursts are covered.

  3. Nuclear fear and children: the impact of parental nuclear activism, responsivity, and fear

    SciTech Connect

    LaGuardia, M.R.

    1986-01-01

    This study examines the extent to which parental nuclear fear, parental activism, and parental responsivity is associated with children's (age 10) nuclear fear. Other associated variables investigated include: nuclear denial, general anxiety and fear, and the personal characteristics of sex, socio-economic status, and academic aptitude. Findings indicate that children attend to nuclear issues when their parents attend to a significant degree. Children's hopelessness about the arms race is increased as parents' worry about nuclear war increases. Children's fear about not surviving a nuclear war increases as parents' worry about survivability decreases. Children who have more general fears also indicated that they have a high level of hopelessness, pervasive worry, and much concern about being able to survive a nuclear war. Children with a high degree of general anxiety did not indicate high degrees of nuclear fears. Children with high academic aptitude were more knowledgeable about nuclear issues and expressed more fears about the nuclear threat. Boys demonstrated more knowledge about nuclear issues than girls, and girls expressed much more frequent fear and worry about the nuclear threat than boys. Parents of lower socio-economic statues (SES) expressed more denial about the nuclear threat and were more pro-military than the higher SES parents.

  4. Bending-Twisting Motions and Main Interactions in Nucleoplasmin Nuclear Import.

    PubMed

    Geraldo, Marcos Tadeu; Takeda, Agnes Alessandra Sekijima; Braz, Antônio Sérgio Kimus; Lemke, Ney

    2016-01-01

    Alpha solenoid proteins play a key role in regulating the classical nuclear import pathway, recognizing a target protein and transporting it into the nucleus. Importin-α (Impα) is the solenoid responsible for cargo protein recognition, and it has been extensively studied by X-ray crystallography to understand the binding specificity. To comprehend the main motions of Impα and to extend the information about the critical interactions during carrier-cargo recognition, we surveyed different conformational states based on molecular dynamics (MD) and normal mode (NM) analyses. Our model of study was a crystallographic structure of Impα complexed with the classical nuclear localization sequence (cNLS) from nucleoplasmin (Npl), which was submitted to multiple 100 ns of MD simulations. Representative conformations were selected for calculating the 87 lowest frequencies NMs of vibration, and a displacement approach was applied along each NM. Based on geometric criteria, using the radius of curvature and inter-repeat angles as the reference metrics, the main motions of Impα were described. Moreover, we determined the salt bridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions in the Impα-NplNLS interface. Our results show the bending and twisting motions participating in the recognition of nuclear proteins, allowing the accommodation and adjustment of a classical bipartite NLS sequence. The essential contacts for the nuclear import were also described and were mostly in agreement with previous studies, suggesting that the residues in the cNLS linker region establish important contacts with Impα adjusting the cNLS backbone. The MD simulations combined with NM analysis can be applied to the Impα-NLS system to help understand interactions between Impα and cNLSs and the analysis of non-classic NLSs.

  5. Bending-Twisting Motions and Main Interactions in Nucleoplasmin Nuclear Import.

    PubMed

    Geraldo, Marcos Tadeu; Takeda, Agnes Alessandra Sekijima; Braz, Antônio Sérgio Kimus; Lemke, Ney

    2016-01-01

    Alpha solenoid proteins play a key role in regulating the classical nuclear import pathway, recognizing a target protein and transporting it into the nucleus. Importin-α (Impα) is the solenoid responsible for cargo protein recognition, and it has been extensively studied by X-ray crystallography to understand the binding specificity. To comprehend the main motions of Impα and to extend the information about the critical interactions during carrier-cargo recognition, we surveyed different conformational states based on molecular dynamics (MD) and normal mode (NM) analyses. Our model of study was a crystallographic structure of Impα complexed with the classical nuclear localization sequence (cNLS) from nucleoplasmin (Npl), which was submitted to multiple 100 ns of MD simulations. Representative conformations were selected for calculating the 87 lowest frequencies NMs of vibration, and a displacement approach was applied along each NM. Based on geometric criteria, using the radius of curvature and inter-repeat angles as the reference metrics, the main motions of Impα were described. Moreover, we determined the salt bridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions in the Impα-NplNLS interface. Our results show the bending and twisting motions participating in the recognition of nuclear proteins, allowing the accommodation and adjustment of a classical bipartite NLS sequence. The essential contacts for the nuclear import were also described and were mostly in agreement with previous studies, suggesting that the residues in the cNLS linker region establish important contacts with Impα adjusting the cNLS backbone. The MD simulations combined with NM analysis can be applied to the Impα-NLS system to help understand interactions between Impα and cNLSs and the analysis of non-classic NLSs. PMID:27258022

  6. Bending-Twisting Motions and Main Interactions in Nucleoplasmin Nuclear Import

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Agnes Alessandra Sekijima; Braz, Antônio Sérgio Kimus; Lemke, Ney

    2016-01-01

    Alpha solenoid proteins play a key role in regulating the classical nuclear import pathway, recognizing a target protein and transporting it into the nucleus. Importin-α (Impα) is the solenoid responsible for cargo protein recognition, and it has been extensively studied by X-ray crystallography to understand the binding specificity. To comprehend the main motions of Impα and to extend the information about the critical interactions during carrier-cargo recognition, we surveyed different conformational states based on molecular dynamics (MD) and normal mode (NM) analyses. Our model of study was a crystallographic structure of Impα complexed with the classical nuclear localization sequence (cNLS) from nucleoplasmin (Npl), which was submitted to multiple 100 ns of MD simulations. Representative conformations were selected for calculating the 87 lowest frequencies NMs of vibration, and a displacement approach was applied along each NM. Based on geometric criteria, using the radius of curvature and inter-repeat angles as the reference metrics, the main motions of Impα were described. Moreover, we determined the salt bridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions in the Impα-NplNLS interface. Our results show the bending and twisting motions participating in the recognition of nuclear proteins, allowing the accommodation and adjustment of a classical bipartite NLS sequence. The essential contacts for the nuclear import were also described and were mostly in agreement with previous studies, suggesting that the residues in the cNLS linker region establish important contacts with Impα adjusting the cNLS backbone. The MD simulations combined with NM analysis can be applied to the Impα-NLS system to help understand interactions between Impα and cNLSs and the analysis of non-classic NLSs. PMID:27258022

  7. NPP financial and regulatory risks-Importance of a balanced and comprehensive nuclear law for a newcomer country considering nuclear power programme

    SciTech Connect

    Manan, J. A. N. Abd Mostafa, N. A.; Salim, M. F.

    2015-04-29

    understanding of various requirements of public, regulators, investors, financial institutions, international community, operator and other important stakeholders. Ambiguities and uncertainties, especially with regards to certain conditions and requirements should be minimised by emulating good practices of experienced nuclear regulators. The imposition of various financial requirements such as funds for decommissioning, radioactive waste management, financial security, nuclear liabilities and licensing fees are necessary, but at the same time the quantum needs to be clearly defined. Concerns on absolute liability of the operators need to be addressed through a creation of necessary and proper nuclear insurance legislations to mitigate operator S nuclear liability obligations and other financial risks. Another major risk to investors is the possibility of public resistance which will not only can hinder the construction but can also stop operation of the nuclear power plant which will contribute to huge losses to investors and countries. This may require a provision in the legislation that provide proper compensation for these situations and at the same time to allow operators to engage in nuclear promotional activities, such as community benefit and public consultation as voluntary initiatives. Through proper planning, research, consultation and execution, the proposed nuclear law shall be able to promote good regulatory practices for public and investors’ confidence and benefit. Early involvement of various stakeholders is essential as a platform for regular communications between regulators and interested parties. Stakeholders’ participation in the NPP programme and law developments will also promote transparency of the projects while upholding the independency of the regulators.

  8. NPP financial and regulatory risks-Importance of a balanced and comprehensive nuclear law for a newcomer country considering nuclear power programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manan, J. A. N. Abd; Mostafa, N. A.; Salim, M. F.

    2015-04-01

    understanding of various requirements of public, regulators, investors, financial institutions, international community, operator and other important stakeholders. Ambiguities and uncertainties, especially with regards to certain conditions and requirements should be minimised by emulating good practices of experienced nuclear regulators. The imposition of various financial requirements such as funds for decommissioning, radioactive waste management, financial security, nuclear liabilities and licensing fees are necessary, but at the same time the quantum needs to be clearly defined. Concerns on absolute liability of the operators need to be addressed through a creation of necessary and proper nuclear insurance legislations to mitigate operator S nuclear liability obligations and other financial risks. Another major risk to investors is the possibility of public resistance which will not only can hinder the construction but can also stop operation of the nuclear power plant which will contribute to huge losses to investors and countries. This may require a provision in the legislation that provide proper compensation for these situations and at the same time to allow operators to engage in nuclear promotional activities, such as community benefit and public consultation as voluntary initiatives. Through proper planning, research, consultation and execution, the proposed nuclear law shall be able to promote good regulatory practices for public and investors' confidence and benefit. Early involvement of various stakeholders is essential as a platform for regular communications between regulators and interested parties. Stakeholders' participation in the NPP programme and law developments will also promote transparency of the projects while upholding the independency of the regulators.

  9. Import and export of nuclear proteins: focus on the nucleocytoplasmic movements of two different species of mammalian estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Thomas; Sreeja, S; Thampan, Raghava Varman

    2004-05-01

    There is a wealth of information regarding the import and export of nuclear proteins in general. Nevertheless, the available data that deals with the nucleocytoplasmic movement of steroid hormone receptors remains highly limited. Some research findings reported during the past five years have succeeded in identifying proteins related to the movement of estrogen receptor alpha from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. What is striking in these findings is the facilitatory role of estradiol in the transport process. A similar conclusion has been drawn from the studies on the plasma membrane-to nucleus movement of the alternative form of estrogen receptor, the non-activated estrogen receptor (naER). The internalization of naER from the plasma membrane takes place only in the presence of estradiol. While the gene regulatory functions of ER alpha appear to get terminated following its ubiquitinization within the nucleus, the naER, through its deglycosylated form, the nuclear estrogen receptor II (nER II) continues to remain functional even beyond its existence within the nucleus. Recent studies have indicated the possibility that the estrogen receptor that regulates the nucleo cytoplasmic transport of m RNP is the nERII. This appears to be the result of the interaction between nERII and three proteins belonging to a group of small nuclear ribonucleo proteins (snRNP). The interaction of nERII with two of this protein appears to activate the inherent Mg2+ ATPase activity of the complex, which leads to the exit of the RNP through the nuclear pore complex. PMID:15228090

  10. The Hypoxic Regulator of Sterol Synthesis Nro1 Is a Nuclear Import Adaptor

    SciTech Connect

    T Yeh; C Lee; L Amzel; P Espenshade; M Bianchet

    2011-12-31

    Fission yeast protein Sre1, the homolog of the mammalian sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP), is a hypoxic transcription factor required for sterol homeostasis and low-oxygen growth. Nro1 regulates the stability of the N-terminal transcription factor domain of Sre1 (Sre1N) by inhibiting the action of the prolyl 4-hydroxylase-like Ofd1 in an oxygen-dependent manner. The crystal structure of Nro1 determined at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution shows an all-{alpha}-helical fold that can be divided into two domains: a small N-terminal domain, and a larger C-terminal HEAT-repeat domain. Follow-up studies showed that Nro1 defines a new class of nuclear import adaptor that functions both in Ofd1 nuclear localization and in the oxygen-dependent inhibition of Ofd1 to control the hypoxic response.

  11. A Meloidogyne incognita effector is imported into the nucleus and exhibits transcriptional activation activity in planta.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Davies, Laura J; Elling, Axel A

    2015-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes are sedentary biotrophic endoparasites that maintain a complex interaction with their host plants. Nematode effector proteins are synthesized in the oesophageal glands of nematodes and secreted into plant tissue through a needle-like stylet. Effectors characterized to date have been shown to mediate processes essential for nematode pathogenesis. To gain an insight into their site of action and putative function, the subcellular localization of 13 previously isolated Meloidogyne incognita effectors was determined. Translational fusions were created between effectors and EGFP-GUS (enhanced green fluorescent protein-β-glucuronidase) reporter genes, which were transiently expressed in tobacco leaf cells. The majority of effectors localized to the cytoplasm, with one effector, 7H08, imported into the nuclei of plant cells. Deletion analysis revealed that the nuclear localization of 7H08 was mediated by two novel independent nuclear localization domains. As a result of the nuclear localization of the effector, 7H08 was tested for the ability to activate gene transcription. 7H08 was found to activate the expression of reporter genes in both yeast and plant systems. This is the first report of a plant-parasitic nematode effector with transcriptional activation activity.

  12. Nap1 and Chz1 have separate Htz1-nuclear import and assembly functions

    PubMed Central

    Straube, Korinna; Blackwell, Jeffrey S.; Pemberton, Lucy F.

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the nuclear import and regulation of the yeast histone variant Htz1 (H2A.Z), and the role of histone chaperones Nap1 and Chz1 in this process. Co-purification suggested that Htz1 and H2B dimerized in the cytoplasm prior to import. Like H2B, Htz1 contained an NLS in its N-terminus that is recognized by multiple karyopherins (also called importins), indicating multiple transport pathways into the nucleus. However, Kap114 and Kap123 appeared to play the major role in Htz1 import. We also identified a role for Nap1 in the import of Htz1/H2B heterodimers, and Nap1 formed a Ran-GTP insensitive import complex with Htz1/H2B and Kap114. Nap1 was necessary for maintaining a soluble pool of Htz1, indicating that its chaperone function may be important for the dynamic exchange of histones within nucleosomes. In contrast, Chz1 was imported by a distinct import pathway, and Chz1 did not appear to interact with Htz1 the cytoplasm. Genetic analysis indicated that NAP1 has a function in the absence of HTZ1 that is not shared with CHZ1. This provides further evidence that the histone chaperones Nap1 and Chz1 have separate Htz1-dependent and -independent functions. PMID:19929865

  13. 10 CFR 110.9a - List of nuclear equipment and material under NRC import licensing authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false List of nuclear equipment and material under NRC import licensing authority. 110.9a Section 110.9a Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) EXPORT AND... material under NRC import licensing authority. (a) Production and utilization facilities. (b)...

  14. Super-resolution imaging of nuclear import of adeno-associated virus in live cells

    PubMed Central

    Kelich, Joseph M; Ma, Jiong; Dong, Biao; Wang, Qizhao; Chin, Mario; Magura, Connor M; Xiao, Weidong; Yang, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has been developed as a promising human gene therapy vector. Particularly, recombinant AAV vector (rAAV) achieves its transduction of host cells by crossing at least three physiological barriers including plasma membrane, endosomal membrane, and nuclear envelope (NE). So far, the AAV transduction mechanism has not been explored thoroughly at the single viral particle level. In this study, we employed high-speed super-resolution single-point edge-excitation sub-diffraction (SPEED) microscopy to map the events of single rAAV2 particles infecting live human cells with an unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution of 9–12 nm and 2–20 ms. Data reveal that rAAV2 particles are imported through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) rather than nuclear membrane budding into the nucleus. Moreover, approximately 17% of the rAAV2 molecules starting from the cytoplasm successfully transverse the NPCs to reach the nucleoplasm, revealing that the NPCs act as a strict selective step for AAV delivery. This study lastly suggests a new pathway to improve AAV vectors for human gene therapy. PMID:26665132

  15. Super-resolution imaging of nuclear import of adeno-associated virus in live cells.

    PubMed

    Kelich, Joseph M; Ma, Jiong; Dong, Biao; Wang, Qizhao; Chin, Mario; Magura, Connor M; Xiao, Weidong; Yang, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has been developed as a promising human gene therapy vector. Particularly, recombinant AAV vector (rAAV) achieves its transduction of host cells by crossing at least three physiological barriers including plasma membrane, endosomal membrane, and nuclear envelope (NE). So far, the AAV transduction mechanism has not been explored thoroughly at the single viral particle level. In this study, we employed high-speed super-resolution single-point edge-excitation sub-diffraction (SPEED) microscopy to map the events of single rAAV2 particles infecting live human cells with an unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution of 9-12 nm and 2-20 ms. Data reveal that rAAV2 particles are imported through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) rather than nuclear membrane budding into the nucleus. Moreover, approximately 17% of the rAAV2 molecules starting from the cytoplasm successfully transverse the NPCs to reach the nucleoplasm, revealing that the NPCs act as a strict selective step for AAV delivery. This study lastly suggests a new pathway to improve AAV vectors for human gene therapy. PMID:26665132

  16. Parent participation plays an important part in promoting physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Lindqvist, Anna-Karin; Kostenius, Catrine; Gard, Gunvor; Rutberg, Stina

    2015-01-01

    Although physical activity (PA) is an important and modifiable determinant of health, in Sweden only 15% of boys and 10% of girls aged 15 years old achieve the recommended levels of PA 7 days per week. Adolescents’ PA levels are associated with social influence exerted by parents, friends, and teachers. The purpose of this study was to describe parents’ experiences of being a part of their adolescents’ empowerment-inspired PA intervention. A qualitative interview study was performed at a school in the northern part of Sweden. A total of 10 parents were interviewed, and the collected data were analyzed with qualitative content analysis. Three subthemes were combined into one main theme, demonstrating that parents are one important part of a successful PA intervention. The life of an adolescent has many options and demands that make it difficult to prioritize PA. Although parents felt that they were important in supporting their adolescent, a successful PA intervention must have multiple components. Moreover, the parents noted that the intervention had a positive effect upon not only their adolescents’, but also their own PA. Interventions aimed at promoting PA among adolescents should include measures to stimulate parent participation, have an empowerment approach, and preferably be school-based. PMID:26282870

  17. Stellar Activity and CMEs: Important Factors of Planetary Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodachenko, Maxim L.

    CME activity of the Sun is known to be an important impacting factor for the magnetospheres, atmospheres, and surfaces of solar system planets. Following an idea of a solar-stellar analogy, CME phenomena are expected on other stars as well. The main planetary impact factors of the stellar CMEs include the associated interplanetary shocks, plasma density and velocity disturbances, energetic particles accelerated in the shock regions, as well as distortions of the magnetic field direction and modulus. All these factors should be properly taken into account during the study of evolutionary processes on exoplanets and their atmospheric and plasma environments. The planetary impact of the stellar CME activity may vary depending on stellar age, stellar spectral type and the orbital distance of a planet. Because of the relatively short range of propagation of the majority of CMEs, they affect most strongly the magnetospheres and atmospheres of close-orbit ( < 0.1 AU) exoplanets. In this chapter we discuss an issue of the stellar CME activity in the context of several actual problems of modern exoplanetology, including planetary atmosphere mass loss, planet survival at close orbits, and definition of a criterion for habitability.

  18. Effect of the interactions and environment on nuclear activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabater, J.; Best, P. N.; Argudo-Fernández, M.

    2013-03-01

    We present a study of the prevalence of optical and radio nuclear activity with respect to the environment and interactions in a sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies. The aim is to determine the independent effects of distinct aspects of source environment on the triggering of different types of nuclear activity. We defined a local density parameter and a tidal force estimator and used a cluster richness estimator from the literature to trace different aspects of environment and interaction. The possible correlations between the environmental parameters were removed using a principal component analysis. By far, the strongest trend found for the active galactic nuclei (AGN) fractions, of all AGN types, is with galaxy mass. We therefore applied a stratified statistical method that takes into account the effect of possible confounding factors like the galaxy mass. We found that (at fixed mass) the prevalence of optical AGN is a factor of 2-3 lower in the densest environments, but increases by a factor of ˜2 in the presence of strong one-on-one interactions. These effects are even more pronounced for star-forming nuclei. The importance of galaxy interactions decreases from star-forming nuclei to Seyferts to low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions to passive galaxies, in accordance with previous suggestions of an evolutionary time-sequence. The fraction of radio AGN increases very strongly (by nearly an order of magnitude) towards denser environments, and is also enhanced by galaxy interactions. Overall, the results agree with a scenario in which the mechanisms of accretion into the black hole are determined by the presence and nature of a supply of gas, which in turn is controlled by the local density of galaxies and their interactions. A plentiful cold gas supply is required to trigger star formation, optical AGN and radiatively efficient radio AGN. This is less common in the cold-gas-poor environments of groups and clusters, but is enhanced by

  19. The Nuclear Activities of Nearby S0 Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Meng-Yuan; Gu, Qiu-Sheng; Chen, Yan-Mei; Zhou, Luwenjia

    2016-11-01

    We present a study of nuclear activities in nearby S0 galaxies. After cross-matching the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 with the Third Reference Catalog of Bright Galaxies (RC3) and visually checking the SDSS images, we derive a sample of 583 S0 galaxies with the central spectrophotometric information. In order to separate nebular emission lines from the underlying stellar contribution, we fit the stellar population model to the SDSS spectra of these S0 galaxies. According to the BPT diagram, we find that 8% of S0 galaxies show central star-forming activity, while the fractions of Seyfert, Composite, and low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs) are 2%, 8%, and 21.4%, respectively. We also find that star-forming S0s have the lowest stellar masses, over one magnitude lower than the others, and that the active S0s are mainly located in the sparse environment, while the normal S0s are located in the dense environment, which might suggest that the environment plays an important role in quenching star formation and/or AGN activity in S0 galaxies. By performing bulge-disk decomposition of 45 star-forming S0s in g- and r-bands with the 2D fitting software Galfit, as well as exploiting the catalog of 2D photometric decompositions of Meert et al., we find that the bulges of approximately one-third of star-forming S0 galaxies (16/45) are bluer than their disks, while for other types of S0s the bulge and disk components show similar color distributions. Besides, the Sérsic index of most star-forming S0s bulges is less than two, while for normal S0s, it is between two and six.

  20. PARP activation promotes nuclear AID accumulation in lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tepper, Sandra; Jeschke, Julia; Böttcher, Katrin; Schmidt, Angelika; Davari, Kathrin; Müller, Peter; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Hemmerich, Peter; Pfeil, Ines; Jungnickel, Berit

    2016-03-15

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates immunoglobulin diversification in germinal center B cells by targeted introduction of DNA damage. As aberrant nuclear AID action contributes to the generation of B cell lymphoma, the protein's activity is tightly regulated, e.g. by nuclear/cytoplasmic shuttling and nuclear degradation. In the present study, we asked whether DNA damage may affect regulation of the AID protein. We show that exogenous DNA damage that mainly activates base excision repair leads to prevention of proteasomal degradation of AID and hence its nuclear accumulation. Inhibitor as well as knockout studies indicate that activation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) by DNA damaging agents promotes both phenomena. These findings suggest that PARP inhibitors influence DNA damage dependent AID regulation, with interesting implications for the regulation of AID function and chemotherapy of lymphoma.

  1. PARP activation promotes nuclear AID accumulation in lymphoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Böttcher, Katrin; Schmidt, Angelika; Davari, Kathrin; Müller, Peter; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Hemmerich, Peter; Pfeil, Ines; Jungnickel, Berit

    2016-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates immunoglobulin diversification in germinal center B cells by targeted introduction of DNA damage. As aberrant nuclear AID action contributes to the generation of B cell lymphoma, the protein's activity is tightly regulated, e.g. by nuclear/cytoplasmic shuttling and nuclear degradation. In the present study, we asked whether DNA damage may affect regulation of the AID protein. We show that exogenous DNA damage that mainly activates base excision repair leads to prevention of proteasomal degradation of AID and hence its nuclear accumulation. Inhibitor as well as knockout studies indicate that activation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) by DNA damaging agents promotes both phenomena. These findings suggest that PARP inhibitors influence DNA damage dependent AID regulation, with interesting implications for the regulation of AID function and chemotherapy of lymphoma. PMID:26921193

  2. Inhibition of the Nuclear Import of Cubitus Interruptus by Roadkill in the Presence of Strong Hedgehog Signal

    PubMed Central

    Seong, Ki-Hyeon; Akimaru, Hiroshi; Dai, Ping; Nomura, Teruaki; Okada, Masahiro; Ishii, Shunsuke

    2010-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signalling plays an important role in various developmental processes by activating the Cubitus interruptus (Ci)/Glioblastoma (Gli) family of transcription factors. In the process of proper pattern formation, Ci activity is regulated by multiple mechanisms, including processing, trafficking, and degradation. However, it remains elusive how Ci distinctly recognizes the strong and moderate Hh signals. Roadkill (Rdx) induces Ci degradation in the anterior region of the Drosophila wing disc. Here, we report that Rdx inhibited Ci activity by two different mechanisms. In the region abutting the anterior/posterior boundary, which receives strong Hh signal, Rdx inhibited the nuclear import of Ci by releasing importin α3 from Ci. In this region, Rdx negatively regulated the expression of transcription factor Knot/Collier. In farther anterior regions receiving moderate levels of Hh signal, Rdx induced Ci degradation, as reported previously. Thus, two different mechanisms by which Rdx negatively regulates Ci may play an important role in the fine-tuning of Hh responses. PMID:21179535

  3. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William

    2008-01-15

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites.

  4. Important biological activities induced by Thalassophryne maculosa fish venom.

    PubMed

    Sosa-Rosales, Josefina Ines; Piran-Soares, Ana Amélia; Farsky, Sandra H P; Takehara, Harumi Ando; Lima, Carla; Lopes-Ferreira, Mônica

    2005-02-01

    The accidents caused by Thalassophryne maculosa fish venoms are frequent and represent a public health problem in some regions of Venezuela. Most accidents occur in the fishing communities and tourists. The clinical picture is characterized by severe pain, dizziness, fever, edema, and necrosis. Due to the lack of efficient therapy it may take weeks, or even months for complete recovery of the victims. The investigations presented here were undertaken to assess the eletrophoretical profile and principal biological properties of the T. maculosa venom. Venom obtained from fresh captured specimens of this fish was tested in vitro or in animal models for a better characterization of its toxic activities. In contrast to other fish venoms, T. maculosa venom showed relative low LD50. The injection of venom in the footpad of mice reproduced a local inflammatory lesion similar to that described in humans. Significant increase of the nociceptive and edematogenic responses was observed followed within 48 h by necrosis. Pronounced alterations on microvascular hemodynamics were visualized after venom application. These alterations were represented by fibrin depots and thrombus formation followed by complete venular stasis and transient arteriolar contraction. T. maculosa venom is devoid of phospholipase A2 activity, but the venom showed proteolytic and myotoxic activities. SDS-Page analysis of the crude venom showed important bands: one band located above 97 M(w), one band between 68 and 97 M(w), one major band between 29 and 43 M(w) and the last one located below 18.4 M(w) Then, the results presented here support that T. maculosa venom present a mixture of bioactive toxins involved in a local inflammatory lesion. PMID:15626364

  5. Active Faults and Nuclear Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Neil; Berryman, Kelvin; Villamor, Pilar; Epstein, Woody; Cluff, Lloyd; Kawamura, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    The destruction of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) following the March 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami brought into sharp focus the susceptibility of NPPs to natural hazards. This is not a new issue—seismic hazard has affected the development of plants in the United States, and volcanic hazard was among the reasons for not commissioning the Bataan NPP in the Philippines [Connor et al., 2009].

  6. Yes-Associated Protein (YAP) Promotes the Nuclear Import of p73

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Heng; Wu, Shengnan

    2011-01-01

    p73 has been identified as a structural and functional homolog of the tumor suppressor p53. However, mechanisms that regulate the localization of p73 have not been fully clarified. The Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a transcriptional coactivator. As a transcriptional coactivator, YAP needs to bind transcription factors to stimulate gene expression. p73 is a reported YAP target transcription factors and YAP has been shown to positively regulate p73 in promoting apoptosis. Previous studies show that p73 interacts with YAP through its PPPY motif, and increases p73 transactivation of apoptotic genes. In this study, we focused on YAP's regulation of the localization of p73. After transient transfection into Rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells and Human embryonic kidney 293T cells with GFP-YAP and/or YFP-p73, and incubated for 24 hours expression. p73 was fused to YFP to allow the examination of its subcellular localization. When expressed alone, YFP-p73 was distributed throughout the cell. When coexpressed with YAP, nuclear accumulation of YFP-p73 became evident. We quantitated the effect of YAP on the redistribution of YFP-p73 by counting cells with nuclear-only YFP signal. We found that YAP can influence the subcellular distribution of p73. Altogether, coexpression with YAP affected the subcellular distribution of the p73 protein. Our studies attribute a central role to YAP in regulating p73 accumulation and YAP, at least in part, might promote the nuclear import of p73.

  7. Nuclear import of RNA polymerase II is coupled with nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of the RNA polymerase II-associated protein 2.

    PubMed

    Forget, Diane; Lacombe, Andrée-Anne; Cloutier, Philippe; Lavallée-Adam, Mathieu; Blanchette, Mathieu; Coulombe, Benoit

    2013-08-01

    The RNA polymerase II (RNAP II)-associated protein (RPAP) 2 has been discovered through its association with various subunits of RNAP II in affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry experiments. Here, we show that RPAP2 is a mainly cytoplasmic protein that shuttles between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. RPAP2 shuttling is tightly coupled with nuclear import of RNAP II, as RPAP2 silencing provokes abnormal accumulation of RNAP II in the cytoplasmic space. Most notably, RPAP4/GPN1 silencing provokes the retention of RPAP2 in the nucleus. Our results support a model in which RPAP2 enters the nucleus in association with RNAP II and returns to the cytoplasm in association with the GTPase GPN1/RPAP4. Although binding of RNAP II to RPAP2 is mediated by an N-terminal domain (amino acids 1-170) that contains a nuclear retention domain, and binding of RPAP4/GPN1 to RPAP2 occurs through a C-terminal domain (amino acids 156-612) that has a dominant cytoplasmic localization domain. In conjunction with previously published data, our results have important implications, as they indicate that RPAP2 controls gene expression by two distinct mechanisms, one that targets RNAP II activity during transcription and the other that controls availability of RNAP II in the nucleus.

  8. Phylogeny and PCR Identification of Clinically Important Zygomycetes Based on Nuclear Ribosomal-DNA Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Kerstin; Cigelnik, Elizabeth; O'donnell, Kerry

    1999-01-01

    A molecular database for all clinically important Zygomycetes was constructed from nucleotide sequences from the nuclear small-subunit (18S) ribosomal DNA and domains D1 and D2 of the nuclear large-subunit (28S) ribosomal DNA. Parsimony analysis of the aligned 18S and 28S DNA sequences was used to investigate phylogenetic relationships among 42 isolates representing species of Zygomycetes reported to cause infections in humans and other animals, together with commonly cultured contaminants, with emphasis on members of the Mucorales. The molecular phylogeny provided strong support for the monophyly of the Mucorales, exclusive of Echinosporangium transversale and Mortierella spp., which are currently misclassified within the Mucorales. Micromucor ramannianus, traditionally classified within Mortierella, and Syncephalastrum racemosum represent the basal divergences within the Mucorales. Based on the 18S gene tree topology, Absidia corymbifera and Rhizomucor variabilis appear to be misplaced taxonomically. A. corymbifera is strongly supported as a sister group of the Rhizomucor miehei-Rhizomucor pusillus clade, while R. variabilis is nested within Mucor. The aligned 28S sequences were used to design 13 taxon-specific PCR primer pairs for those taxa most commonly implicated in infections. All of the primers specifically amplified DNA of the size predicted based on the DNA sequence data from the target taxa; however, they did not cross-react with phylogenetically related species. These primers have the potential to be used in a PCR assay for the rapid and accurate identification of the etiological agents of mucormycoses and entomophthoromycoses. PMID:10565914

  9. Sensor Fusion for Nuclear Proliferation Activity Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Adel Ghanem, Ph D

    2007-03-30

    The objective of Phase 1 of this STTR project is to demonstrate a Proof-of-Concept (PoC) of the Geo-Rad system that integrates a location-aware SmartTag (made by ZonTrak) and a radiation detector (developed by LLNL). It also includes the ability to transmit the collected radiation data and location information to the ZonTrak server (ZonService). The collected data is further transmitted to a central server at LLNL (the Fusion Server) to be processed in conjunction with overhead imagery to generate location estimates of nuclear proliferation and radiation sources.

  10. Recent Nuclear Astrophysics Data Activities at ORNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael S.; Bardayan, Daniel W.; Blackmon, Jeffery C.; Meyer, Richard A.; Chae, Kyungyuk; Guidry, Michael W.; Hix, W. Raphael; Lingerfelt, Eric J.; Ma, Zhanwen; Scott, Jason P.; Kozub, Raymond L.

    2005-12-01

    Recent measurements with radioactive beams at ORNL's Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) have prompted the evaluation of a number of reactions involving unstable nuclei needed for stellar explosion studies. We discuss these evaluations, as well as the development of a new computational infrastructure to enable the rapid incorporation of the latest nuclear physics results in astrophysics models. This infrastructure includes programs that simplify the generation of reaction rates, manage rate databases, and visualize reaction rates, all hosted at a new website .

  11. Importance of mammalian nuclear-envelope nucleoside triphosphatase in nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of ribonucleoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Agutter, P S; McCaldin, B; McArdle, H J

    1979-01-01

    The nucleoside triphosphate-stimulated efflux of RNA from isolated nuclei was studied under a range of conditions, and the effects of these conditions on the process were compared with the properties of the nucleoside triphosphatase located in the pore complex. A marked similarity between the rate of efflux and the rate of nucleoside triphosphate hydrolysis was apparent, in terms of substrate specificity, sensitivity to treatment with insolubilized trypsin, kinetics and the effects of increased ionic strength and of many inhibitors. These results are taken, in view of earlier evidence, to suggest that the activity of the nucleoside triphosphatase is a prerequisite for nucleo-cytoplasmic RNA transport in vivo. There are some indications that the nuclear-envelope lipid is also involved in regulating the efflux process. PMID:229828

  12. Importance of mammalian nuclear-envelope nucleoside triphosphatase in nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of ribonucleoproteins.

    PubMed

    Agutter, P S; McCaldin, B; McArdle, H J

    1979-09-15

    The nucleoside triphosphate-stimulated efflux of RNA from isolated nuclei was studied under a range of conditions, and the effects of these conditions on the process were compared with the properties of the nucleoside triphosphatase located in the pore complex. A marked similarity between the rate of efflux and the rate of nucleoside triphosphate hydrolysis was apparent, in terms of substrate specificity, sensitivity to treatment with insolubilized trypsin, kinetics and the effects of increased ionic strength and of many inhibitors. These results are taken, in view of earlier evidence, to suggest that the activity of the nucleoside triphosphatase is a prerequisite for nucleo-cytoplasmic RNA transport in vivo. There are some indications that the nuclear-envelope lipid is also involved in regulating the efflux process.

  13. Summary of aerospace and nuclear engineering activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The Texas A&M Nuclear and Aerospace engineering departments have worked on five different projects for the NASA/USRA Advanced Design Program during the 1987/88 year. The aerospace department worked on two types of lunar tunnelers that would create habitable space. The first design used a heated cone to melt the lunar regolith, and the second used a conventional drill to bore its way through the crust. Both used a dump truck to get rid of waste heat from the reactor as well as excess regolith from the tunneling operation. The nuclear engineering department worked on three separate projects. The NEPTUNE system is a manned, outer-planetary explorer designed with Jupiter exploration as the baseline mission. The lifetime requirement for both reactor and power-conversion systems was twenty years. The second project undertaken for the power supply was a Mars Sample Return Mission power supply. This was designed to produce 2 kW of electrical power for seven years. The design consisted of a General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) utilizing a Stirling engine as the power conversion unit. A mass optimization was performed to aid in overall design. The last design was a reactor to provide power for propulsion to Mars and power on the surface. The requirements of 300 kW of electrical power output and a mass of less than 10,000 Rg were set. This allowed the reactor and power conversion unit to fit within the Space Shuttle cargo bay.

  14. The nuclear localization of low risk HPV11 E7 protein mediated by its zinc binding domain is independent of nuclear import receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Piccioli, Zachary; McKee, Courtney H.; Leszczynski, Anna; Onder, Zeynep; Hannah, Erin C.; Mamoor, Shahan; Crosby, Lauren; Moroianu, Junona

    2010-11-10

    We investigated the nuclear import of low risk HPV11 E7 protein using 1) transfection assays in HeLa cells with EGFP fusion plasmids containing 11E7 and its domains and 2) nuclear import assays in digitonin-permeabilized HeLa cells with GST fusion proteins containing 11E7 and its domains. The EGFP-11E7 and EGFP-11cE7{sub 39-98} localized mostly to the nucleus. The GST-11E7 and GST-11cE7{sub 39-98} were imported into the nuclei in the presence of either Ran-GDP or RanG19V-GTP mutant and in the absence of nuclear import receptors. This suggests that 11E7 enters the nucleus via a Ran-dependent pathway, independent of nuclear import receptors, mediated by a nuclear localization signal located in its C-terminal domain (cNLS). This cNLS contains the zinc binding domain consisting of two copies of Cys-X-X-Cys motif. Mutagenesis of Cys residues in these motifs changed the localization of the EGFP-11cE7/-11E7 mutants to cytoplasmic, suggesting that the zinc binding domain is essential for nuclear localization of 11E7.

  15. Dike propagation in active volcanoes: importance, evidence, models and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acocella, V.

    2011-12-01

    Most eruptions are fed by dikes; therefore, better knowledge of dike propagation is crucial to improve our understanding of how magma is transferred and extruded at volcanoes. Dike pattern data from a few tens of active volcanic edifices show how dike propagation in a volcano is not a random process; rather, it depends from the following factors (listed in order of importance): the presence of relief, the shape of the edifice, the proximity to the surface, and regional tectonic control. Relief enhances the development of radial dikes, which may also cluster following volcano elongation or regional patterns. Dikes approaching the surface of volcanic edifices, regardless of their initial orientation, reorient to become radial (parallel to the maximum gravitational stress); in presence of scarps, dikes reorient subparallel to the scarp (perpendicular to the minimum gravitational stress). These relationships have been also observed or inferred during eruptions at Etna, Stromboli, Vesuvio (Italy), Erta Ale (Afar) and Faial (Azores). While numerical modelling of dike propagation remains challenging, analogue models of dike emplacement have been performed over a few decades, also supporting part of the above-described evidence. Analogue models have been mostly conducted injecting air or water within gelatine and, recently, injecting vegetable oil within sand. More sophisticated analogue modelling is foreseen for the future, using a more appropriate scaling, a larger sensitivity and providing a more quantitative approach in capturing relationships. More in general, future research on dikes should be devoted towards identifying dike propagation paths, dike arrest mechanisms, and likely locations of vent formation at specific volcanoes, to better aid hazards assessment.

  16. Active Learning: The Importance of Developing a Comprehensive Measure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Rodney; Palmer, Stuart; Hagel, Pauline

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on an investigation into the validity of a widely used scale for measuring the extent to which higher education students employ active learning strategies. The scale is the active learning scale in the Australasian Survey of Student Engagement. This scale is based on the Active and Collaborative Learning scale of the National…

  17. 75 FR 50772 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Importation Bond Structure

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-17

    ... Structure AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ] ACTION: 60-Day... concerning the: Importation Bond Structure. This request for comment is being made pursuant to the Paperwork...: Title: Importation Bond Structure. OMB Number: 1651-0050. Form Numbers: 301 and 5297. Abstract:...

  18. Nuclear factor RIP140 modulates transcriptional activation by the estrogen receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Cavaillès, V; Dauvois, S; L'Horset, F; Lopez, G; Hoare, S; Kushner, P J; Parker, M G

    1995-01-01

    A conserved region in the hormone-dependent activation domain AF2 of nuclear receptors plays an important role in transcriptional activation. We have characterized a novel nuclear protein, RIP140, that specifically interacts in vitro with this domain of the estrogen receptor. This interaction was increased by estrogen, but not by anti-estrogens and the in vitro binding capacity of mutant receptors correlates with their ability to stimulate transcription. RIP140 also interacts with estrogen receptor in intact cells and modulates its transcriptional activity in the presence of estrogen, but not the anti-estrogen 4-hydroxytamoxifen. In view of its widespread expression in mammalian cells, RIP140 may interact with other members of the superfamily of nuclear receptors and thereby act as a potential co-activator of hormone-regulated gene transcription. Images PMID:7641693

  19. {beta}-Catenin can act as a nuclear import receptor for its partner transcription factor, lymphocyte enhancer factor-1 (lef-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Asally, Munehiro; Yoneda, Yoshihiro . E-mail: yyoneda@anat3.med.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2005-08-15

    Nuclear accumulation of {beta}-catenin plays an important role in the Wnt signaling pathway. In the nucleus, {beta}-catenin acts as a transcriptional co-activator for TCF/LEF family of transcription factors. It has been shown that lef-1 contains a typical basic type nuclear localization signal (NLS) and is transported into the nucleus by the conventional import pathway. In this study, we found that a mutant lef-1 lacking the classical NLS accumulated in the nucleus of living cells, when {beta}-catenin was co-expressed. In addition, in a cell-free import assay, lef-1 migrated into the nucleus in the presence of {beta}-catenin alone without any other soluble factors. In contrast, another mutant lef-1 lacking the {beta}-catenin binding domain failed to migrate into the nucleus, even in the presence of {beta}-catenin. These findings indicate that {beta}-catenin alone can mediate the nuclear import of lef-1 through the direct binding. Collectively, we propose that there are two distinct pathways for the nuclear import of lef-1: importin {alpha}/{beta}-mediated and {beta}-catenin-mediated one, which provides a novel paradigm for Wnt signaling pathway.

  20. Nuclear factor Y regulates ancient budgerigar hepadnavirus core promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhongliang; Liu, Yanfeng; Luo, Mengjun; Wang, Wei; Liu, Jing; Liu, Wei; Pan, Shaokun; Xie, Youhua

    2016-09-16

    Endogenous viral elements (EVE) in animal genomes are the fossil records of ancient viruses and provide invaluable information on the origin and evolution of extant viruses. Extant hepadnaviruses include avihepadnaviruses of birds and orthohepadnaviruses of mammals. The core promoter (Cp) of hepadnaviruses is vital for viral gene expression and replication. We previously identified in the budgerigar genome two EVEs that contain the full-length genome of an ancient budgerigar hepadnavirus (eBHBV1 and eBHBV2). Here, we found eBHBV1 Cp and eBHBV2 Cp were active in several human and chicken cell lines. A region from nt -85 to -11 in eBHBV1 Cp was critical for the promoter activity. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a putative binding site of nuclear factor Y (NF-Y), a ubiquitous transcription factor, at nt -64 to -50 in eBHBV1 Cp. The NF-Y core binding site (ATTGG, nt -58 to -54) was essential for eBHBV1 Cp activity. The same results were obtained with eBHBV2 Cp and duck hepatitis B virus Cp. The subunit A of NF-Y (NF-YA) was recruited via the NF-Y core binding site to eBHBV1 Cp and upregulated the promoter activity. Finally, the NF-Y core binding site is conserved in the Cps of all the extant avihepadnaviruses but not of orthohepadnaviruses. Interestingly, a putative and functionally important NF-Y core binding site is located at nt -21 to -17 in the Cp of human hepatitis B virus. In conclusion, our findings have pinpointed an evolutionary conserved and functionally critical NF-Y binding element in the Cps of avihepadnaviruses.

  1. Nuclear factor Y regulates ancient budgerigar hepadnavirus core promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhongliang; Liu, Yanfeng; Luo, Mengjun; Wang, Wei; Liu, Jing; Liu, Wei; Pan, Shaokun; Xie, Youhua

    2016-09-16

    Endogenous viral elements (EVE) in animal genomes are the fossil records of ancient viruses and provide invaluable information on the origin and evolution of extant viruses. Extant hepadnaviruses include avihepadnaviruses of birds and orthohepadnaviruses of mammals. The core promoter (Cp) of hepadnaviruses is vital for viral gene expression and replication. We previously identified in the budgerigar genome two EVEs that contain the full-length genome of an ancient budgerigar hepadnavirus (eBHBV1 and eBHBV2). Here, we found eBHBV1 Cp and eBHBV2 Cp were active in several human and chicken cell lines. A region from nt -85 to -11 in eBHBV1 Cp was critical for the promoter activity. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a putative binding site of nuclear factor Y (NF-Y), a ubiquitous transcription factor, at nt -64 to -50 in eBHBV1 Cp. The NF-Y core binding site (ATTGG, nt -58 to -54) was essential for eBHBV1 Cp activity. The same results were obtained with eBHBV2 Cp and duck hepatitis B virus Cp. The subunit A of NF-Y (NF-YA) was recruited via the NF-Y core binding site to eBHBV1 Cp and upregulated the promoter activity. Finally, the NF-Y core binding site is conserved in the Cps of all the extant avihepadnaviruses but not of orthohepadnaviruses. Interestingly, a putative and functionally important NF-Y core binding site is located at nt -21 to -17 in the Cp of human hepatitis B virus. In conclusion, our findings have pinpointed an evolutionary conserved and functionally critical NF-Y binding element in the Cps of avihepadnaviruses. PMID:27501758

  2. Educational Activities At The Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tipping, Tracy N.

    2011-06-01

    The Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory (NETL) at the University of Texas at Austin performs a wide variety of educational activities for students at various levels. Regular on-site courses in the areas of health physics, radiochemistry, and reactor operations are offered for university credit. Along with on-site courses, access to the reactor facility via a remote console connection allows students in an off-site classroom to conduct experiments via a "virtual" control console. In addition to the regularly scheduled courses, other programs, such as the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Summer Nuclear Engineering Institute and Office of Naval Research partnerships with Historically Black Colleges and Universities, provide access to the facility for students from other universities both domestic and foreign. And NETL hosts professional development programs such as training programs for Nuclear Regulatory Commission personnel and International Atomic Energy Agency fellowships.

  3. The RGD integrin binding site in human L1-CAM is important for nuclear signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Gast, Daniela; Riedle, Svenja; Kiefel, Helena; Mueerkoester, Susanne Sebens; Schaefer, Heiner; Schaefer, Michael K.E.; Altevogt, Peter

    2008-08-01

    L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1-CAM) is a transmembrane cell adhesion molecule initially defined as a promigratory molecule in the developing nervous system. L1 is also overexpressed in a variety of human carcinomas and is associated with bad prognosis. In carcinoma cell lines L1 augments cell motility and metastasis, tumor growth in nude mice and induces expression of L1-dependent genes. It is not known whether L1-signaling requires ligand binding. The RGD motif in the sixth Ig domain of L1 is a binding site for integrins. In the present study we analyzed the role of RGDs in L1-signaling using site-directed mutagenesis combined with antibody blocking studies. We observed that L1-RGE expressing HEK293 cells showed reduced cell-cell binding, cell motility, invasiveness and tumor growth in NOD/SCID mice. The RGE-mutation impaired L1-dependent gene regulation and antibodies to {alpha}v{beta}5 integrin had similar effects. Mutant L1 was unable to translocate to the nucleus. Our findings highlight the importance of the RGD site in L1 for human tumors and suggest that nuclear signaling of L1 is dependent on integrins.

  4. Structure and Activities of Nuclear Medicine in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Elgazzar, Abdelhamid H; Owunwanne, Azuwuike; Alenezi, Saud

    2016-07-01

    The practice of nuclear medicine in Kuwait began in 1965 as a clinic for treating thyroid diseases. The practice developed gradually and until 1981 when the Faculty of Medicine established the Division of Nuclear Medicine in the Department of Radiology, which later became a separate department responsible for establishing and managing the practice in all hospitals of Kuwait. In 1987, a nuclear medicine residency program was begun and it is administered by Kuwait Institute for Medical Specializations originally as a 4-year but currently as a 5-year program. Currently there are 11 departments in the ministry of health hospitals staffed by 49 qualified attending physicians, mostly the diplomats of the Kuwait Institute for Medical Specializations nuclear medicine residency program, 4 academic physicians, 2 radiopharmacists, 2 physicists, and 130 technologists. These departments are equipped with 33 dual-head gamma cameras, 10 SPET/CT, 5 PET/CT, 2 cyclotrons, 1 breast-specific gamma imaging, 1 positron-emitting mammography, 10 thyroid uptake units, 8 technegas machines, 7 PET infusion systems, and 8 treadmills. Activities of nuclear medicine in Kuwait include education and training, clinical service, and research. Education includes nuclear medicine technology program in the Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, the 5-year residency program, medical school teaching distributed among different modules of the integrated curriculum with 14 didactic lecture, and other teaching sessions in nuclear medicine MSc program, which run concurrently with the first part of the residency program. The team of Nuclear Medicine in Kuwait has been active in research and has published more than 300 paper, 11 review articles, 12 book chapters, and 17 books in addition to 36 grants and 2 patents. A PhD program approved by Kuwait University Council would begin in 2016. PMID:27237444

  5. Structure and Activities of Nuclear Medicine in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Elgazzar, Abdelhamid H; Owunwanne, Azuwuike; Alenezi, Saud

    2016-07-01

    The practice of nuclear medicine in Kuwait began in 1965 as a clinic for treating thyroid diseases. The practice developed gradually and until 1981 when the Faculty of Medicine established the Division of Nuclear Medicine in the Department of Radiology, which later became a separate department responsible for establishing and managing the practice in all hospitals of Kuwait. In 1987, a nuclear medicine residency program was begun and it is administered by Kuwait Institute for Medical Specializations originally as a 4-year but currently as a 5-year program. Currently there are 11 departments in the ministry of health hospitals staffed by 49 qualified attending physicians, mostly the diplomats of the Kuwait Institute for Medical Specializations nuclear medicine residency program, 4 academic physicians, 2 radiopharmacists, 2 physicists, and 130 technologists. These departments are equipped with 33 dual-head gamma cameras, 10 SPET/CT, 5 PET/CT, 2 cyclotrons, 1 breast-specific gamma imaging, 1 positron-emitting mammography, 10 thyroid uptake units, 8 technegas machines, 7 PET infusion systems, and 8 treadmills. Activities of nuclear medicine in Kuwait include education and training, clinical service, and research. Education includes nuclear medicine technology program in the Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, the 5-year residency program, medical school teaching distributed among different modules of the integrated curriculum with 14 didactic lecture, and other teaching sessions in nuclear medicine MSc program, which run concurrently with the first part of the residency program. The team of Nuclear Medicine in Kuwait has been active in research and has published more than 300 paper, 11 review articles, 12 book chapters, and 17 books in addition to 36 grants and 2 patents. A PhD program approved by Kuwait University Council would begin in 2016.

  6. NLS copy-number variation governs efficiency of nuclear import--case study on dUTPases.

    PubMed

    Róna, Gergely; Pálinkás, Hajnalka L; Borsos, Máté; Horváth, András; Scheer, Ildikó; Benedek, András; Nagy, Gergely N; Zagyva, Imre; Vértessy, Beáta G

    2014-12-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of large macromolecules requires an active transport machinery. In many cases, this is initiated by binding of the nuclear localization signal (NLS) peptide of cargo proteins to importin-α molecules. Fine orchestration of nucleocytoplasmic trafficking is of particularly high importance for proteins involved in maintenance of genome integrity, such as dUTPases, which are responsible for prevention of uracil incorporation into the genome. In most eukaryotes, dUTPases have two homotrimeric isoforms: one of these contains three NLSs and is present in the cell nucleus, while the other is located in the cytoplasm or the mitochondria. Here we focus on the unusual occurrence of a pseudo-heterotrimeric dUTPase in Drosophila virilis that contains one NLS, and investigate its localization pattern compared to the homotrimeric dUTPase isoforms of Drosophila melanogaster. Although the interaction of individual NLSs with importin-α has been well characterized, the question of how multiple NLSs of oligomeric cargo proteins affect their trafficking has been less frequently addressed in adequate detail. Using the D. virilis dUTPase as a fully relevant physiologically occurring model protein, we show that NLS copy number influences the efficiency of nuclear import in both insect and mammalian cell lines, as well as in D. melanogaster and D. virilis tissues. Biophysical data indicate that NLS copy number determines the stoichiometry of complexation between importin-α and dUTPases. The main conclusion of our study is that, in D. virilis, a single dUTPase isoform efficiently reproduces the cellular dUTPase distribution pattern that requires two isoforms in D. melanogaster.

  7. Alanine Expansions Associated with Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome Impair PHOX2B Homeodomain-mediated Dimerization and Nuclear Import*

    PubMed Central

    Di Lascio, Simona; Belperio, Debora

    2016-01-01

    Heterozygous mutations of the human PHOX2B gene, a key regulator of autonomic nervous system development, lead to congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS), a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a failure in the autonomic control of breathing. Polyalanine expansions in the 20-residues region of the C terminus of PHOX2B are the major mutations responsible for CCHS. Elongation of the alanine stretch in PHOX2B leads to a protein with altered DNA binding, transcriptional activity, and nuclear localization and the possible formation of cytoplasmic aggregates; furthermore, the findings of various studies support the idea that CCHS is not due to a pure loss of function mechanism but also involves a dominant negative effect and/or toxic gain of function for PHOX2B mutations. Because PHOX2B forms homodimers and heterodimers with its paralogue PHOX2A in vitro, we tested the hypothesis that the dominant negative effects of the mutated proteins are due to non-functional interactions with the wild-type protein or PHOX2A using a co-immunoprecipitation assay and the mammalian two-hybrid system. Our findings show that PHOX2B forms homodimers and heterodimerizes weakly with mutated proteins, exclude the direct involvement of the polyalanine tract in dimer formation, and indicate that mutated proteins retain partial ability to form heterodimers with PHOX2A. Moreover, in this study, we investigated the effects of the longest polyalanine expansions on the homeodomain-mediated nuclear import, and our data clearly show that the expanded C terminus interferes with this process. These results provide novel insights into the effects of the alanine tract expansion on PHOX2B folding and activity. PMID:27129232

  8. Active Interrogation Using Electronic Neutron Generators for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chichester, D. L.; Seabury, E. H.

    2009-03-10

    Active interrogation, a measurement technique which uses a radiation source to probe materials and generate unique signatures useful for characterizing those materials, is a powerful tool for assaying special nuclear material. The most commonly used technique for performing active interrogation is to use an electronic neutron generator as the probe radiation source. Exploiting the unique operating characteristics of these devices, including their monoenergetic neutron emissions and their ability to operate in pulsed modes, presents a number of options for performing prompt and delayed signature analyses using both photon and neutron sensors. A review of literature in this area shows multiple applications of the active neutron interrogation technique for performing nuclear nonproliferation measurements. Some examples include measuring the plutonium content of spent fuel, assaying plutonium residue in spent fuel hull claddings, assaying plutonium in aqueous fuel reprocessing process streams, and assaying nuclear fuel reprocessing facility waste streams to detect and quantify fissile material. This paper discusses the historical use of this technique and examines its context within the scope and challenges of next-generation nuclear fuel cycles and advanced concept nuclear fuel cycle facilities.

  9. Active Interrogation Using Electronic Neutron Generators for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect

    David L. Chichester; Edward H. Seabury

    2008-08-01

    Active interrogation, a measurement technique which uses a radiation source to probe materials and generate unique signatures useful for characterizing those materials, is a powerful tool for assaying special nuclear material. The most commonly used technique for performing active interrogation is to use an electronic neutron generator as the probe radiation source. Exploiting the unique operating characteristics of these devices, including their monoenergetic neutron emissions and their ability to operate in pulsed modes, presents a number of options for performing prompt and delayed signature analyses using both photon and neutron sensors. A review of literature in this area shows multiple applications of the active neutron interrogation technique for performing nuclear nonproliferation measurements. Some examples include measuring the plutonium content of spent fuel, assaying plutonium residue in spent fuel hull claddings, assaying plutonium in aqueous fuel reprocessing process streams, and assaying nuclear fuel reprocessing facility waste streams to detect and quantify fissile material. This paper discusses the historical use of this technique and examines its context within the scope and challenges of next-generation nuclear fuel cycles and advanced concept nuclear fuel cycle facilities.

  10. Rac1 augments Wnt signaling by stimulating β-catenin–lymphoid enhancer factor-1 complex assembly independent of β-catenin nuclear import

    PubMed Central

    Jamieson, Cara; Lui, Christina; Brocardo, Mariana G.; Martino-Echarri, Estefania; Henderson, Beric R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT β-Catenin transduces the Wnt signaling pathway and its nuclear accumulation leads to gene transactivation and cancer. Rac1 GTPase is known to stimulate β-catenin-dependent transcription of Wnt target genes and we confirmed this activity. Here we tested the recent hypothesis that Rac1 augments Wnt signaling by enhancing β-catenin nuclear import; however, we found that silencing/inhibition or up-regulation of Rac1 had no influence on nuclear accumulation of β-catenin. To better define the role of Rac1, we employed proximity ligation assays (PLA) and discovered that a significant pool of Rac1–β-catenin protein complexes redistribute from the plasma membrane to the nucleus upon Wnt or Rac1 activation. More importantly, active Rac1 was shown to stimulate the formation of nuclear β-catenin–lymphoid enhancer factor 1 (LEF-1) complexes. This regulation required Rac1-dependent phosphorylation of β-catenin at specific serines, which when mutated (S191A and S605A) reduced β-catenin binding to LEF-1 by up to 50%, as revealed by PLA and immunoprecipitation experiments. We propose that Rac1-mediated phosphorylation of β-catenin stimulates Wnt-dependent gene transactivation by enhancing β-catenin–LEF-1 complex assembly, providing new insight into the mechanism of cross-talk between Rac1 and canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:26403202

  11. Mapping of nuclear import signal and importin {alpha}3 binding regions of 52K protein of bovine adenovirus-3

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, Carolyn P.; Ayalew, Lisanework E.; Tikoo, Suresh K.

    2012-10-10

    The L1 region of bovine adenovirus (BAdV)-3 encodes a non-structural protein designated 52K. Anti-52K serum detected a protein of 40 kDa, which localized to the nucleus but not to the nucleolus in BAdV-3-infected or transfected cells. Analysis of mutant 52K proteins suggested that three basic residues ({sup 105}RKR{sup 107}) of the identified domain (amino acids {sup 102}GMPRKRVLT{sup 110}) are essential for nuclear localization of 52K. The nuclear import of a GST-52K fusion protein utilizes the classical importin {alpha}/{beta}-dependent nuclear transport pathway. The 52K protein is preferentially bound to the cellular nuclear import receptor importin {alpha}3. Although deletion of amino acid 102-110 is sufficient to abrogate the nuclear localization of 52K, amino acid 90-133 are required for interaction with importin-{alpha}3 and localizing a cytoplasmic protein to the nucleus. These results suggest that 52K contains a bipartite NLS, which preferentially utilize an importin {alpha}3 nuclear import receptor-mediated pathway to transport 52K to the nucleus.

  12. Karyopherin α 3 and karyopherin α 4 proteins mediate the nuclear import of methyl-CpG binding protein 2.

    PubMed

    Baker, Steven Andrew; Lombardi, Laura Marie; Zoghbi, Huda Yahya

    2015-09-11

    Methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is a nuclear protein with important roles in regulating chromatin structure and gene expression, and mutations in MECP2 cause Rett syndrome (RTT). Within the MeCP2 protein sequence, the nuclear localization signal (NLS) is reported to reside between amino acids 255-271, and certain RTT-causing mutations overlap with the MeCP2 NLS, suggesting that they may alter nuclear localization. One such mutation, R270X, is predicted to interfere with the localization of MeCP2, but recent in vivo studies have demonstrated that this mutant remains entirely nuclear. To clarify the mechanism of MeCP2 nuclear import, we isolated proteins that interact with the NLS and identified karyopherin α 3 (KPNA3 or Kap-α3) and karyopherin α 4 (KPNA4 or Kap-α4) as key binding partners of MeCP2. MeCP2-R270X did not interact with KPNA4, consistent with a requirement for an intact NLS in this interaction. However, this mutant retains binding to KPNA3, accounting for the normal localization of MeCP2-R270X to the nucleus. These data provide a mechanism for MeCP2 nuclear import and have implications for the design of therapeutics aimed at modulating the function of MeCP2 in RTT patients.

  13. 78 FR 75576 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Importation Bond Structure

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-12

    ... Structure AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: 60-day... Importation Bond Structure. This request for comment is being made pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act of... Structure. OMB Number: 1651-0050. Form Number: CBP Forms 301 and 5297. Abstract: Bonds are used to...

  14. 75 FR 68809 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Importation Bond Structure

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-09

    ... information collection was previously published in the Federal Register (75 FR 50772) on August 17, 2010... Structure AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: 30-day notice... review and approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act: Importation Bond Structure. This is...

  15. How Important Is the Phosphatase Activity of Sensor Kinases?

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, Linda J.

    2010-01-01

    In two-component signaling systems, phosphorylated response regulators (RRs) are often dephosphorylated by their partner kinases in order to control the in vivo concentration of phospho-RR (RR~P). This activity is easily demonstrated in vitro, but these experiments have typically used very high concentrations of the histidine kinase (HK) compared to the RR~P. Many two-component systems exhibit exquisite control over the ratio of HK to RR in vivo. The question thus arises as to whether the phosphatase activity of HKs is significant in vivo. This topic will be explored in the present review. PMID:20223700

  16. Vesicle-Like Biomechanics Governs Important Aspects of Nuclear Geometry in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Lim H. W., Gerald; Huber, Greg; Torii, Yoshihiro; Hirata, Aiko; Miller, Jonathan; Sazer, Shelley

    2007-01-01

    It has long been known that during the closed mitosis of many unicellular eukaryotes, including the fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe), the nuclear envelope remains intact while the nucleus undergoes a remarkable sequence of shape transformations driven by elongation of an intranuclear mitotic spindle whose ends are capped by spindle pole bodies embedded in the nuclear envelope. However, the mechanical basis of these normal cell cycle transformations, and abnormal nuclear shapes caused by intranuclear elongation of microtubules lacking spindle pole bodies, remain unknown. Although there are models describing the shapes of lipid vesicles deformed by elongation of microtubule bundles, there are no models describing normal or abnormal shape changes in the nucleus. We describe here a novel biophysical model of interphase nuclear geometry in fission yeast that accounts for critical aspects of the mechanics of the fission yeast nucleus, including the biophysical properties of lipid bilayers, forces exerted on the nuclear envelope by elongating microtubules, and access to a lipid reservoir, essential for the large increase in nuclear surface area during the cell cycle. We present experimental confirmation of the novel and non-trivial geometries predicted by our model, which has no free parameters. We also use the model to provide insight into the mechanical basis of previously described defects in nuclear division, including abnormal nuclear shapes and loss of nuclear envelope integrity. The model predicts that (i) despite differences in structure and composition, fission yeast nuclei and vesicles with fluid lipid bilayers have common mechanical properties; (ii) the S. pombe nucleus is not lined with any structure with shear resistance, comparable to the nuclear lamina of higher eukaryotes. We validate the model and its predictions by analyzing wild type cells in which ned1 gene overexpression causes elongation of an intranuclear microtubule bundle that deforms the

  17. TDP-43 Inhibits NF-κB Activity by Blocking p65 Nuclear Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jingyan; Cynader, Max S.; Jia, William

    2015-01-01

    TDP-43 (TAR DNA binding protein 43) is a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) that has been found to play an important role in neurodegenerative diseases. TDP-43’s involvement in nuclear factor-kappaB pathways has been reported in both neurons and microglial cells. The NF-κB pathway targets hundreds of genes, many of which are involved in inflammation, immunity and cancer. p50/p65 (p50/RelA) heterodimers, as the major Rel complex in the NF-κB family, are induced by diverse external physiological stimuli and modulate transcriptional activity in almost all cell types. Both p65 and TDP-43 translocation occur through the classic nuclear transportation system. In this study, we report that TDP-43 overexpression prevents TNF-α induced p65 nuclear translocation in a dose dependent manner, and that this further inhibits p65 transactivation activity. The inhibition by TDP-43 does not occur through preventing IκB degradation but probably by competing for the nuclear transporter-importin α3 (KPNA4). This competition is dependent on the presence of the nuclear localization signal (NLS) in TDP-43. Silencing TDP-43 using a specific siRNA also increased p65 nuclear localization upon TNF-α stimulation, suggesting that endogenous TDP-43 may be a default suppressor of the NF-κB pathway. Our results indicate that TDP-43 may play an important role in regulating the levels of NF-κB activity by controlling the nuclear translocation of p65. PMID:26571498

  18. TDP-43 Inhibits NF-κB Activity by Blocking p65 Nuclear Translocation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jingyan; Cynader, Max S; Jia, William

    2015-01-01

    TDP-43 (TAR DNA binding protein 43) is a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) that has been found to play an important role in neurodegenerative diseases. TDP-43's involvement in nuclear factor-kappaB pathways has been reported in both neurons and microglial cells. The NF-κB pathway targets hundreds of genes, many of which are involved in inflammation, immunity and cancer. p50/p65 (p50/RelA) heterodimers, as the major Rel complex in the NF-κB family, are induced by diverse external physiological stimuli and modulate transcriptional activity in almost all cell types. Both p65 and TDP-43 translocation occur through the classic nuclear transportation system. In this study, we report that TDP-43 overexpression prevents TNF-α induced p65 nuclear translocation in a dose dependent manner, and that this further inhibits p65 transactivation activity. The inhibition by TDP-43 does not occur through preventing IκB degradation but probably by competing for the nuclear transporter-importin α3 (KPNA4). This competition is dependent on the presence of the nuclear localization signal (NLS) in TDP-43. Silencing TDP-43 using a specific siRNA also increased p65 nuclear localization upon TNF-α stimulation, suggesting that endogenous TDP-43 may be a default suppressor of the NF-κB pathway. Our results indicate that TDP-43 may play an important role in regulating the levels of NF-κB activity by controlling the nuclear translocation of p65. PMID:26571498

  19. The Importance of Engaging Pupils Actively in Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suomela, Liisa; Juuti, Kalle; Ahtee, Maija

    2013-01-01

    Demonstrating is a traditional method in teaching science that can raise interest and encourage pupils to think about a topic. While demonstrating, the teacher can focus the pupils' attention on the relevant facts and introduce scientific principles and concepts. Through discussion and actively making observations and inferences, rather than…

  20. The conserved amino-terminal domain of hSRP1 alpha is essential for nuclear protein import.

    PubMed Central

    Weis, K; Ryder, U; Lamond, A I

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear proteins are targeted through the nuclear pore complex (NPC) in an energy-dependent reaction. The import reaction is mediated by nuclear localization sequences (NLS) in the substrate which are recognized by heterodimeric cytoplasmic receptors. hSRP1 alpha is an NLS-binding subunit of the human NLS receptor complex and is complexed in vivo with a second subunit of 97 kDa (p97). We show here that a short amino-terminal domain in hSRP1 alpha is necessary and sufficient for its interaction with p97. This domain is conserved in other SRP1-like proteins and its fusion to a cytoplasmic reporter protein is sufficient to promote complete nuclear import, circumventing the usual requirement for an NLS receptor interaction. The same amino-terminal domain inhibits import of NLS-containing proteins when added to an in vitro nuclear transport assay. While full-length hSRP alpha is able to leave the nucleus, the amino-terminal domain alone is not sufficient to promote exit. We conclude that hSRP1 alpha functions as an adaptor to tether NLS-containing substrates to the protein import machinery. Images PMID:8617227

  1. Nuclear Receptor Activity and Liver Cancer Lesion Progression

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-activated transcription factors that control diverse cellular processes. Chronic stimulation of some NRs is a non-genotoxic mechanism of rodent liver cancer with unclear relevance to humans. We explored this question using human CAR, PXR, PPARα,...

  2. Compounds active against cell walls of medically important fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Hector, R F

    1993-01-01

    A number of substances that directly or indirectly affect the cell walls of fungi have been identified. Those that actively interfere with the synthesis or degradation of polysaccharide components share the property of being produced by soil microbes as secondary metabolites. Compounds specifically interfering with chitin or beta-glucan synthesis have proven effective in studies of preclinical models of mycoses, though they appear to have a restricted spectrum of coverage. Semisynthetic derivatives of some of the natural products have offered improvements in activity, toxicology, or pharmacokinetic behavior. Compounds which act on the cell wall indirectly or by a secondary mechanism of action, such as the azoles, act against diverse fungi but are usually fungistatic in nature. Overall, these compounds are attractive candidates for further development. PMID:8457977

  3. [Current views on the importance of physical activity].

    PubMed

    Berg, A; Deibert, P; Berg, A; König, D; Dickhuth, H H

    2004-07-01

    To improve the individual health profile and to solve the growing overweight problem, a long-term change in the lifestyle to one which includes an energetically balanced combination of diet and activity is essential. Physical activity and the muscles involved are the primary means by which body composition and energy turnover are regulated. A state of imbalance has decisive consequences on the development of atherogenic and inflammatory risk factors. Additionally, the aging process is significantly influenced by the long-term retention or loss of muscle mass. The Deutsche Gesellschaft für Sportmedizin und Prävention (German Society for Sports Medicine and Prevention, a registered association) offers within the concept of a therapeutic lifestyle change, an educational program for overweight adults (M.O.B.I.L.I.S.). PMID:15526658

  4. Importance of active case detection in a malaria elimination programme

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background With the aim of eliminating malaria from Sri Lanka by 2014, the Anti-Malaria Campaign of Sri Lanka (AMC) sought the support of Tropical and Environmental Disease and Health Associates Private Limited (TEDHA), a private sector organization. In 2009, TEDHA was assigned 43 government hospitals in the district of Mannar in the Northern Province and in districts of Trincomalee, Batticaloa and Ampara in the Eastern Province to carry out malaria surveillance to complement the surveillance activities of the AMC. Passive case detection (PCD), activated passive case detection (APCD) and active case detection (ACD) for malaria have been routinely carried out in Sri Lanka. Methods The active case detection programme of TEDHA involves screening of populations irrespective of the presence of fever or any other signs or symptoms of malaria to detect infections and residual parasite carriers. ACD is done by TEDHA in a) high risk populations through mobile malaria clinics including armed forces personnel and b) pregnant females who visit antenatal clinics for asymptomatic malaria infections during the first trimester of pregnancy. Populations are selected in consultation with the Regional Malaria Officer of the AMC thus avoiding any overlap with the population screened by the government. Results TEDHA screened 387,309 individuals in the four districts for malaria by ACD including high risk groups and pregnant women between January 2010 and December 2012. During this period seven individuals were diagnosed with Plasmodium vivax infections and one individual was detected with a mixed infection of P. vivax and Plasmodium falciparum. All eight cases were detected by ACD carried out by mobile malaria clinics among high risk groups in the Mannar district. Conclusion The progress made by Sri Lanka in the malaria elimination drive is largely due to increased surveillance and judicious use of control methods which has resulted in zero indigenous malaria cases being reported since

  5. A nuclear fraction of turnip crinkle virus capsid protein is important for elicitation of the host resistance response.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung-Hwan; Qu, Feng; Morris, T Jack

    2015-12-01

    The N-terminal 25 amino acids (AAs) of turnip crinkle virus (TCV) capsid protein (CP) are recognized by the resistance protein HRT to trigger a hypersensitive response (HR) and systemic resistance to TCV infection. This same region of TCV CP also contains a motif that interacts with the transcription factor TIP, as well as a nuclear localization signal (NLS). However, it is not yet known whether nuclear localization of TCV CP is needed for the induction of HRT-mediated HR and resistance. Here we present new evidence suggesting a tight correlation between nuclear inclusions formed by CP and the manifestation of HR. We show that a fraction of TCV CP localized to cell nuclei to form discrete inclusion-like structures, and a mutated CP (R6A) known to abolish HR failed to form nuclear inclusions. Notably, TIP-CP interaction augments the inclusion-forming activity of CP by tethering inclusions to the nuclear membrane. This TIP-mediated augmentation is also critical for HR resistance, as another CP mutant (R8A) known to elicit a less restrictive HR, though still self-associated into nuclear inclusions, failed to direct inclusions to the nuclear membrane due to its inability to interact with TIP. Finally, exclusion of CP from cell nuclei abolished induction of HR. Together, these results uncovered a strong correlation between nuclear localization and nuclear inclusion formation by TCV CP and induction of HR, and suggest that CP nuclear inclusions could be the key trigger of the HRT-dependent, yet TIP-reinforced, resistance to TCV.

  6. A nuclear fraction of turnip crinkle virus capsid protein is important for elicitation of the host resistance response.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung-Hwan; Qu, Feng; Morris, T Jack

    2015-12-01

    The N-terminal 25 amino acids (AAs) of turnip crinkle virus (TCV) capsid protein (CP) are recognized by the resistance protein HRT to trigger a hypersensitive response (HR) and systemic resistance to TCV infection. This same region of TCV CP also contains a motif that interacts with the transcription factor TIP, as well as a nuclear localization signal (NLS). However, it is not yet known whether nuclear localization of TCV CP is needed for the induction of HRT-mediated HR and resistance. Here we present new evidence suggesting a tight correlation between nuclear inclusions formed by CP and the manifestation of HR. We show that a fraction of TCV CP localized to cell nuclei to form discrete inclusion-like structures, and a mutated CP (R6A) known to abolish HR failed to form nuclear inclusions. Notably, TIP-CP interaction augments the inclusion-forming activity of CP by tethering inclusions to the nuclear membrane. This TIP-mediated augmentation is also critical for HR resistance, as another CP mutant (R8A) known to elicit a less restrictive HR, though still self-associated into nuclear inclusions, failed to direct inclusions to the nuclear membrane due to its inability to interact with TIP. Finally, exclusion of CP from cell nuclei abolished induction of HR. Together, these results uncovered a strong correlation between nuclear localization and nuclear inclusion formation by TCV CP and induction of HR, and suggest that CP nuclear inclusions could be the key trigger of the HRT-dependent, yet TIP-reinforced, resistance to TCV. PMID:26299399

  7. Nuclear Import of the Parsley bZIP Transcription Factor CPRF2 Is Regulated by Phytochrome Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Kircher, Stefan; Wellmer, Frank; Nick, Peter; Rügner, Alexander; Schäfer, Eberhard; Harter, Klaus

    1999-01-01

    In plants, light perception by photoreceptors leads to differential expression of an enormous number of genes. An important step for differential gene expression is the regulation of transcription factor activities. To understand these processes in light signal transduction we analyzed the three well-known members of the common plant regulatory factor (CPRF) family from parsley (Petroselinum crispum). Here, we demonstrate that these CPRFs, which belong to the basic- region leucine-zipper (bZIP) domain-containing transcription factors, are differentially distributed within parsley cells, indicating different regulatory functions within the regulatory networks of the plant cell. In particular, we show by cell fractionation and immunolocalization approaches that CPRF2 is transported from the cytosol into the nucleus upon irradiation due to action of phytochrome photoreceptors. Two NH2-terminal domains responsible for cytoplasmic localization of CPRF2 in the dark were characterized by deletion analysis using a set of CPRF2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene fusion constructs transiently expressed in parsley protoplasts. We suggest that light-induced nuclear import of CPRF2 is an essential step in phytochrome signal transduction. PMID:9922448

  8. Nuclear pore ion channel activity in live syncytial nuclei.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Jose Omar

    2002-05-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are important nanochannels for the control of gene activity and expression. Most of our knowledge of NPC function has been derived from isolated nuclei and permeabilized cells in cell lysates/extracts. Since recent patch-clamp work has challenged the dogma that NPCs are freely permeable to small particles, a preparation of isolated living nuclei in their native liquid environment was sought and found: the syncytial nuclei in the water of the coconut Cocos nucifera. These nuclei have all properties of NPC-mediated macromolecular transport (MMT) and express foreign green fluorescent protein (GFP) plasmids. They display chromatin movement, are created by particle aggregation or by division, can grow by throwing filaments to catch material, etc. This study shows, for the first time, that living NPCs engaged in MMT do not transport physiological ions - a phenomenon that explains observations of nucleocytoplasmic ion gradients. Since coconuts are inexpensive (less than US$1/nut per litre), this robust preparation may contribute to our understanding of NPCs and cell nucleus and to the development of biotechnologies for the production of DNA, RNA and proteins.

  9. Applying activity-based costing to the nuclear medicine unit.

    PubMed

    Suthummanon, Sakesun; Omachonu, Vincent K; Akcin, Mehmet

    2005-08-01

    Previous studies have shown the feasibility of using activity-based costing (ABC) in hospital environments. However, many of these studies discuss the general applications of ABC in health-care organizations. This research explores the potential application of ABC to the nuclear medicine unit (NMU) at a teaching hospital. The finding indicates that the current cost averages 236.11 US dollars for all procedures, which is quite different from the costs computed by using ABC. The difference is most significant with positron emission tomography scan, 463 US dollars (an increase of 96%), as well as bone scan and thyroid scan, 114 US dollars (a decrease of 52%). The result of ABC analysis demonstrates that the operational time (machine time and direct labour time) and the cost of drugs have the most influence on cost per procedure. Clearly, to reduce the cost per procedure for the NMU, the reduction in operational time and cost of drugs should be analysed. The result also indicates that ABC can be used to improve resource allocation and management. It can be an important aid in making management decisions, particularly for improving pricing practices by making costing more accurate. It also facilitates the identification of underutilized resources and related costs, leading to cost reduction. The ABC system will also help hospitals control costs, improve the quality and efficiency of the care they provide, and manage their resources better. PMID:16102243

  10. Applying activity-based costing to the nuclear medicine unit.

    PubMed

    Suthummanon, Sakesun; Omachonu, Vincent K; Akcin, Mehmet

    2005-08-01

    Previous studies have shown the feasibility of using activity-based costing (ABC) in hospital environments. However, many of these studies discuss the general applications of ABC in health-care organizations. This research explores the potential application of ABC to the nuclear medicine unit (NMU) at a teaching hospital. The finding indicates that the current cost averages 236.11 US dollars for all procedures, which is quite different from the costs computed by using ABC. The difference is most significant with positron emission tomography scan, 463 US dollars (an increase of 96%), as well as bone scan and thyroid scan, 114 US dollars (a decrease of 52%). The result of ABC analysis demonstrates that the operational time (machine time and direct labour time) and the cost of drugs have the most influence on cost per procedure. Clearly, to reduce the cost per procedure for the NMU, the reduction in operational time and cost of drugs should be analysed. The result also indicates that ABC can be used to improve resource allocation and management. It can be an important aid in making management decisions, particularly for improving pricing practices by making costing more accurate. It also facilitates the identification of underutilized resources and related costs, leading to cost reduction. The ABC system will also help hospitals control costs, improve the quality and efficiency of the care they provide, and manage their resources better.

  11. Techniques to evaluate the importance of common cause degradation on reliability and safety of nuclear weapons.

    SciTech Connect

    Darby, John L.

    2011-05-01

    As the nuclear weapon stockpile ages, there is increased concern about common degradation ultimately leading to common cause failure of multiple weapons that could significantly impact reliability or safety. Current acceptable limits for the reliability and safety of a weapon are based on upper limits on the probability of failure of an individual item, assuming that failures among items are independent. We expanded the current acceptable limits to apply to situations with common cause failure. Then, we developed a simple screening process to quickly assess the importance of observed common degradation for both reliability and safety to determine if further action is necessary. The screening process conservatively assumes that common degradation is common cause failure. For a population with between 100 and 5000 items we applied the screening process and conclude the following. In general, for a reliability requirement specified in the Military Characteristics (MCs) for a specific weapon system, common degradation is of concern if more than 100(1-x)% of the weapons are susceptible to common degradation, where x is the required reliability expressed as a fraction. Common degradation is of concern for the safety of a weapon subsystem if more than 0.1% of the population is susceptible to common degradation. Common degradation is of concern for the safety of a weapon component or overall weapon system if two or more components/weapons in the population are susceptible to degradation. Finally, we developed a technique for detailed evaluation of common degradation leading to common cause failure for situations that are determined to be of concern using the screening process. The detailed evaluation requires that best estimates of common cause and independent failure probabilities be produced. Using these techniques, observed common degradation can be evaluated for effects on reliability and safety.

  12. The bovine immunodeficiency virus Rev protein: identification of a novel nuclear import pathway and nuclear export signal among retroviral Rev/Rev-like proteins.

    PubMed

    Gomez Corredor, Andrea; Archambault, Denis

    2012-05-01

    The Rev protein is essential for the replication of lentiviruses. Rev is a shuttling protein that transports unspliced and partially spliced lentiviral RNAs from the nucleus to the cytoplasm via the nucleopore. To transport these RNAs, the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Rev uses the karyopherin β family importin β and CRM1 proteins that interact with the Rev nuclear localization signal (NLS) and nuclear exportation signal (NES), respectively. Recently, we reported the presence of new types of bipartite NLS and nucleolar localization signal (NoLS) in the bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) Rev protein. Here we report the characterization of the nuclear import and export pathways of BIV Rev. By using an in vitro nuclear import assay, we showed that BIV Rev is transported into the nucleus by a cytosolic and energy-dependent importin α/β classical pathway. Results from glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown assays that showed the binding of BIV Rev with importins α3 and α5 were in agreement with those from the nuclear import assay. We also identified a leptomycin B-sensitive NES in BIV Rev, which indicates that the protein is exported via CRM1 like HIV-1 Rev. Mutagenesis experiments showed that the BIV Rev NES maps between amino acids 109 to 121 of the protein. Remarkably, the BIV Rev NES was found to be of the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase inhibitor (PKI) type instead of the HIV-1 Rev type. In summary, our data showed that the nuclear import mechanism of BIV Rev is novel among Rev proteins characterized so far in lentiviruses.

  13. Importance of the pharmacological profile of the bound ligand in enrichment on nuclear receptors: toward the use of experimentally validated decoy ligands.

    PubMed

    Lagarde, Nathalie; Zagury, Jean-François; Montes, Matthieu

    2014-10-27

    The evaluation of virtual ligand screening methods is of major importance to ensure their reliability. Taking into account the agonist/antagonist pharmacological profile should improve the quality of the benchmarking data sets since ligand binding can induce conformational changes in the nuclear receptor structure and such changes may vary according to the agonist/antagonist ligand profile. We indeed found that splitting the agonist and antagonist ligands into two separate data sets for a given nuclear receptor target significantly enhances the quality of the evaluation. The pharmacological profile of the ligand bound in the binding site of the target structure was also found to be an additional critical parameter. We also illustrate that active compound data sets for a given pharmacological activity can be used as a set of experimentally validated decoy ligands for another pharmacological activity to ensure a reliable and challenging evaluation of virtual screening methods.

  14. Induced starburst and nuclear activity: Faith, facts, and theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlosman, Isaac

    1990-01-01

    The problem of the origin of starburst and nuclear (nonstellar) activity in galaxies is reviewed. A physical understanding of the mechanism(s) that induce both types of activity requires one to address the following issues: (1) what is the source of fuel that powers starbursts and active galactic nuclei; and (2) how is it channeled towards the central regions of host galaxies? As a possible clue, the author examines the role of non-axisymmetric perturbations of galactic disks and analyzes their potential triggers. Global gravitational instabilities in the gas on scales approx. 100 pc appear to be crucial for fueling the active galactic nuclei.

  15. Science Is Important, but Politics Drives the Siting of Nuclear Waste Repositories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, George H.

    2014-02-01

    In 1982, I worked on the Nuclear Waste Policy Act as an AGU Congressional Science Fellow tasked with assisting a member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee. When I recently read the suggestion that clay-rich strata (shales) could be a viable medium for high-level nuclear waste (HLW) disposal [Neuzil, 2013], I could not help but remember the insights I gained more than 30 years ago from my time on the Hill.

  16. Nuclear waste: Status of DOE`s nuclear waste site characterization activities

    SciTech Connect

    1987-12-31

    Three potential nuclear waste repository sites have been selected to carry out characterization activities-the detailed geological testing to determine the suitability of each site as a repository. The sites are Hanford in south-central Washington State, Yucca Mountain in southern Nevada, and Deaf Smith in the Texas Panhandle. Two key issues affecting the total program are the estimations of the site characterization completion data and costs and DOE`s relationship with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission which has been limited and its relations with affected states and Indian tribes which continue to be difficult.

  17. Fission Activities of the Nuclear Reactions Group in Uppsala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Adili, A.; Alhassan, E.; Gustavsson, C.; Helgesson, P.; Jansson, K.; Koning, A.; Lantz, M.; Mattera, A.; Prokofiev, A. V.; Rakopoulos, V.; Sjöstrand, H.; Solders, A.; Tarrío, D.; Österlund, M.; Pomp, S.

    This paper highlights some of the main activities related to fission of the nuclear reactions group at Uppsala University. The group is involved for instance in fission yield experiments at the IGISOL facility, cross-section measurements at the NFS facility, as well as fission dynamics studies at the IRMM JRC-EC. Moreover, work is ongoing on the Total Monte Carlo (TMC) methodology and on including the GEF fission code into the TALYS nuclear reaction code. Selected results from these projects are discussed.

  18. Nuclear import of influenza B virus nucleoprotein: Involvement of an N-terminal nuclear localization signal and a cleavage-protection motif

    SciTech Connect

    Wanitchang, Asawin; Narkpuk, Jaraspim; Jongkaewwattana, Anan

    2013-08-15

    The nucleoprotein of influenza B virus (BNP) shares several characteristics with its influenza A virus counterpart (ANP), including localization in the host's nucleus. However, while the nuclear localization signal(s) (NLS) of ANP are well characterized, little is known about those of BNP. In this study, we showed that the fusion protein bearing the BNP N-terminus fused with GFP (N70–GFP) is exclusively nuclear, and identified a highly conserved KRXR motif spanning residues 44–47 as a putative NLS. In addition, we demonstrated that residues 3–15 of BNP, though not an NLS, are also crucial for nuclear import. Results from mutational analyses of N70–GFP and the full-length BNP suggest that this region may be required for protection of the N-terminus from proteolytic cleavage. Altogether, we propose that the N-terminal region of BNP contains the NLS and cleavage-protection motif, which together drive its nuclear localization. - Highlights: • The N-terminal region of BNP is required for nuclear accumulation. • The conserved motif at position 44–47 is a putative nuclear localization signal. • The first 15 amino acids of BNP may function as a cleavage-protection motif. • BNP may get access to the nucleus via a mechanism distinct from ANP.

  19. Nuclear structure studies in JUSTIPEN and EFES activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itagaki, Naoyuki

    2009-10-01

    JUSTIPEN: Japan-US Theory Institute for Physics with Exotic Nuclei was launched in June 2006. JUSTIPEN has been established in order to facilitate collaborations between U.S. and Japanese scientists whose main research thrust is in the area of the physics of exotic nuclei. More than 40 nuclear scientists in U.S. have visited Japan in three years, and the many collaborations are established. I briefly summarize the JUSTIPEN activity from the Japanese side. There is counterpart program for the Japanese scientists. International Research Network for Exotic Femto Systems (EFES) was selected as one of the Core-to-Core Programs of Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS). This is the program to send Japanese nuclear scientists to U.S., Germany, France, Italy, Norway, and Finland and to promote the international collaborations in the field of nuclear study. Many joint workshops were held with partner countries. To operate these international programs, University of Tokyo and RIKEN agreed to corporate with each other and established Todai-RIKEN Joint International Program for Nuclear Physics (TORIJIN) in June 2006. I summarize the activities in three years, and I also mention about the relation between these activities and my personal research -- many-body correlations in light nuclei.

  20. Nuclear cardiology in the UK 1994: activity relative to Europe, USA, and British Cardiac Society targets

    PubMed Central

    Pennell, D; Prvulovich, E; Tweddel, A; Caplin, J

    1998-01-01

    Objective—To survey practice in nuclear cardiology in the UK in 1994.
Design—A questionnaire was sent to 219 centres performing nuclear imaging asking for details of current practice in nuclear cardiology. Replies were received from 192 centres (88%).
Main outcome measures—Activity in performance of myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and radionuclide ventriculography (RNV), anticipated changes in activity, differences between regional and district hospitals, technical imaging parameters, and referral sources. 
Results—Of the responding centres, 125 (65%) performed nuclear cardiology procedures. More regional than district hospitals performed nuclear cardiology procedures (85% v 55%, p < 0.0003) and regional centres performed a higher proportion (62% v 24%, p < 0.001) of nuclear cardiology activity. Nuclear cardiology activity was 0.82 scans per 1000 population per year (MPI 0.56, RNV 0.26). There has been a significant increase (24%) in nuclear cardiology since 1988. There has been a pronounced rise in MPI (350%) while RNV has fallen by 47%. Myocardial perfusion activity in the UK remains very low (25% and 5% in regional and district hospitals, respectively) compared with the 1994 figures of 2.2/1000/year for Europe or 10.8/1000/year for the USA.
Conclusions—MPI has increased on average by 23%/annum (compound rate) since 1988, but in 1994 was still only 32% of the British Cardiac Society target of 2.6/1000/year. Proper resources for capital expenditure on new equipment and new staff will be important to maintain momentum in closing the gap. Also important is improved clinical understanding, as already implemented by including nuclear cardiology in guidelines for specialist cardiology training.

 Keywords: survey;  nuclear cardiology;  myocardial perfusion imaging;  radionuclide ventriculography;  guidelines;  British Cardiac Society PMID:9875092

  1. Nuclear design of a very-low-activation fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, E.T.; Hopkins, G.R.

    1983-06-01

    An investigation was conducted to study the nuclear design aspects of using very-low-activation materials, such as SiC, MgO, and aluminum for fusion-reactor first wall, blanket, and shield applications. In addition to the advantage of very-low radioactive inventory, it was found that the very-low-activation fusion reactor can also offer an adequate tritium-breeding ratio and substantial amount of blanket nuclear heating as a conventional-material-structured reactor does. The most-stringent design constraint found in a very-low-activation fusion reactor is the limited space available in the inboard region of a tokamak concept for shielding to protect the superconducting toroidal field coil. A reference design was developed which mitigates the constraint by adopting a removable tungsten shield design that retains the inboard dimensions and gives the same shield performance as the reference STARFIRE tokamak reactor design.

  2. The active liquid Earth - importance of temporal and spatial variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arheimer, Berit

    2016-04-01

    The Planet Earth is indeed liquid and active - 71 percent of its surface is water-covered and this water never rests. Thanks to the water cycle, our planet's water supply is constantly moving from one place to another and from one form to another. Only 2.5% of the water is freshwater and it exists in the air as water vapor; it hits the ground as rain and snow; it flows on the surface from higher to lower altitudes in rivers, lakes, and glaciers; and it flows in the ground in soil, aquifers, and in all living organisms until it reaches the sea. On its way over the Earth's crust, some returns quickly to vapor again, while some is trapped and exposed to many "fill and spill" situations for a long journey. The variability in the water balance is crucial for hydrological understanding and modelling. The water cycle may appear simple, but magnitudes and rates in fluxes are very different from one place to another, resulting from variable drivers such as solar energy, precipitation and gravity in co-evolution with geology, soil, vegetation and fauna. The historical evolution, the temporal fluxes and diversity in space continue to fascinate hydrological scientists. Specific physical processes may be well known, but their boundary conditions, interactions and rate often remain unknown at a specific site and are difficult to monitor in nature. This results in mysterious features where trends in drivers do not match runoff, like the Sahelian Paradox or discharge to the Arctic Ocean. Humans have always interfered with the water cycle and engineering is fundamental for water regulation and re-allocation. Some 80% of the river flow from the northern part of the Earth is affected by fragmentation of the river channels by dams. In water management, there is always a tradeoff between upstream and downstream activities, not only regarding total water quantities but also for temporal patterns and water quality aspects. Sharing a water resource can generate conflicts but geopolitical

  3. Rattling Nucleons: New Developments in Active Interrogation of Special Nuclear Material

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Runkle; David L. Chichester; Scott J. Thompson

    2012-01-01

    Active interrogation is a vigorous area of research and development due to its promise of offering detection and characterization capabilities of special nuclear material in environments where passive detection fails. The primary value added by active methods is the capability to penetrate shielding - special nuclear material itself, incidental materials, or intentional shielding - and advocates hope that active interrogation will provide a solution to the problem of detecting shielded uranium, which is at present the greatest obstacle to interdiction efforts. The technique also provides a unique benefit for quantifying nuclear material in high background-radiation environments, an area important for nuclear material safeguards and material accountancy. Progress has been made in the field of active interrogation on several fronts, most notably in the arenas of source development, systems integration, and the integration and exploitation of multiple fission and non-fission signatures. But penetration of interrogating radiation often comes at a cost, not only in terms of finance and dose but also in terms of induced backgrounds, system complexity, and extended measurement times (including set up and acquisition). These costs make the calculus for deciding to implement active interrogation more subtle than may be apparent. The purpose of this review is thus to examine existing interrogation methods, compare and contrast their attributes and limitations, and identify missions where active interrogation may hold the most promise.

  4. The importance of non-nuclear AR signaling in prostate cancer progression and therapeutic resistance.

    PubMed

    Zarif, Jelani C; Miranti, Cindy K

    2016-05-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) remains the major oncogenic driver of prostate cancer, as evidenced by the efficacy of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in naïve patients, and the continued effectiveness of second generation ADTs in castration resistant disease. However, current ADTs are limited to interfering with AR ligand binding, either through suppression of androgen production or the use of competitive antagonists. Recent studies demonstrate 1) the expression of constitutively active AR splice variants that no longer depend on androgen, and 2) the ability of AR to signal in the cytoplasm independently of its transcriptional activity (non-genomic); thus highlighting the need to consider other ways to target AR. Herein, we review canonical AR signaling, but focus on AR non-genomic signaling, some of its downstream targets and how these effectors contribute to prostate cancer cell behavior. The goals of this review are to 1) re-highlight the continued importance of AR in prostate cancer as the primary driver, 2) discuss the limitations in continuing to use ligand binding as the sole targeting mechanism, 3) discuss the implications of AR non-genomic signaling in cancer progression and therapeutic resistance, and 4) address the need to consider non-genomic AR signaling mechanisms and pathways as a viable targeting strategy in combination with current therapies.

  5. The importance of warm, AGN-driven outflows in the nuclear regions of nearby ULIRGs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez Zaurín, J.; Tadhunter, C. N.; Rose, M.; Holt, J.

    2013-06-01

    We present an optical spectroscopic study of a 90 per cent complete sample of nearby ULIRGs (z < 0.175) with optical Seyfert nuclei, with the aim of investigating the nature of the near-nuclear (r ≲ 3.5 kpc) warm gas outflows. A high proportion (94 per cent) of our sample show disturbed emission line kinematics in the form of broad (FWHM > 500 km s-1) and/or strongly blueshifted (ΔV < -150 km s-1) emission line components. This proportion is significantly higher than found in a comparison sample of nearby ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) that lack optical Seyfert nuclei (19 per cent). We also find evidence that the emission line kinematics of the Sy-ULIRGs are more highly disturbed than those of samples of non-ULIRG Seyferts and Palomar-Green quasars in the sense that, on average, their [O III] λλ5007, 4959 emission lines are broader and more asymmetric. The Sy-ULIRG sample encompasses a wide diversity of emission line profiles. In most individual objects, we are able to fit the profiles of all the emission lines of different ionization with a kinematic model derived from the strong [O III] λλ4959, 5007 lines, using between two and five Gaussian components. From these fits, we derive diagnostic line ratios that are used to investigate the ionization mechanisms for the different kinematic components. We show that, in general, the line ratios are consistent with gas of supersolar abundance photoionized by a combination of AGN and starburst activity, with an increasing contribution from the AGN with increasing FWHM of the individual kinematic components, and the AGN contribution dominating for the broadest components. However, shock ionization cannot be ruled out in some cases. Our derived upper limits on the mass outflows rates and kinetic powers of the emission line outflows show that they can be as energetically significant as the neutral and molecular outflows in ULIRGs - consistent with the requirements of the hydrodynamic simulations that include

  6. Nuclear import of prototype foamy virus transactivator Bel1 is mediated by KPNA1, KPNA6 and KPNA7

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jihui; Tang, Zhiqin; Mu, Hong; Zhang, Guojun

    2016-01-01

    Bel1, a transactivator of the prototype foamy virus (PFV), plays pivotal roles in the replication of PFV. Previous studies have demonstrated that Bel1 bears a nuclear localization signal (NLS); however, its amino acid sequence remains unclear and the corresponding adaptor importins have not yet been identified. In this study, we inserted various fragments of Bel1 into an EGFP-GST fusion protein and investigated their subcellular localization by fluorescence microscopy. We found that the 215PRQKRPR221 fragment, which accords with the consensus sequence K(K/R)X(K/R) of the monopartite NLS, directed the nuclear translocation of Bel1. Point mutation experiments revealed that K218, R219 and R221 were essential for the nuclear localization of Bel1. The results of GST pull-down assay revealed that the Bel1 peptide 215-221, which bears the NLS, interacted with the nucleocytoplasmic transport receptors, karyopherin alpha 1 (importin alpha 5) (KPNA1), karyopherin alpha 6 (importin alpha 7) (KPNA6) and karyopherin alpha 7 (importin alpha 8) (KPNA7). Finally, in vitro nuclear import assays demonstrated that KPNA1, KPNA6 or KPNA7, along with other necessary nuclear factors, caused Bel1 to localize to the nucleus. Thus, the findings of our study indicate that KPNA1, KPNA6 and KPNA7 are involved in Bel1 nuclear distribution. PMID:27277550

  7. TMEM120A and B: Nuclear Envelope Transmembrane Proteins Important for Adipocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Batrakou, Dzmitry G.; de las Heras, Jose I.; Czapiewski, Rafal; Mouras, Rabah; Schirmer, Eric C.

    2015-01-01

    Recent work indicates that the nuclear envelope is a major signaling node for the cell that can influence tissue differentiation processes. Here we present two nuclear envelope trans-membrane proteins TMEM120A and TMEM120B that are paralogs encoded by the Tmem120A and Tmem120B genes. The TMEM120 proteins are expressed preferentially in fat and both are induced during 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation. Knockdown of one or the other protein altered expression of several genes required for adipocyte differentiation, Gata3, Fasn, Glut4, while knockdown of both together additionally affected Pparg and Adipoq. The double knockdown also increased the strength of effects, reducing for example Glut4 levels by 95% compared to control 3T3-L1 cells upon pharmacologically induced differentiation. Accordingly, TMEM120A and B knockdown individually and together impacted on adipocyte differentiation/metabolism as measured by lipid accumulation through binding of Oil Red O and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy (CARS). The nuclear envelope is linked to several lipodystrophies through mutations in lamin A; however, lamin A is widely expressed. Thus it is possible that the TMEM120A and B fat-specific nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins may play a contributory role in the tissue-specific pathology of this disorder or in the wider problem of obesity. PMID:26024229

  8. Determination of important nuclear fragmentation processes for human space radiation protection

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Ziwei

    2007-03-15

    We present a semianalytical method to determine which partial cross sections of nuclear fragmentations most affect the shielded dose equivalent due to exposure to galactic cosmic rays. The cross sections thus determined will require more theoretical and/or experimental studies for us to better predict, reduce, and mitigate the radiation exposure in human space explorations.

  9. Determination of Important Nuclear Fragmentation Processes for Human Space Radiation Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei

    2007-01-01

    We present a semi-analytical method to determine which partial cross sections of nuclear fragmentations most affect the shielded dose equivalent due to exposure to galactic cosmic rays. The cross sections thus determined will require more theoretical and/or experimental studies in order for us to better predict, reduce and mitigate the radiation exposure in human space explorations.

  10. Promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies associate with transcriptionally active genomic regions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jayson; Shiels, Carol; Sasieni, Peter; Wu, Pei Jun; Islam, Suhail A.; Freemont, Paul S.; Sheer, Denise

    2004-01-01

    The promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein is aggregated into nuclear bodies that are associated with diverse nuclear processes. Here, we report that the distance between a locus and its nearest PML body correlates with the transcriptional activity and gene density around the locus. Genes on the active X chromosome are more significantly associated with PML bodies than their silenced homologues on the inactive X chromosome. We also found that a histone-encoding gene cluster, which is transcribed only in S-phase, is more strongly associated with PML bodies in S-phase than in G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. However, visualization of specific RNA transcripts for several genes showed that PML bodies were not themselves sites of transcription for these genes. Furthermore, knock-down of PML bodies by RNA interference did not preferentially change the expression of genes closely associated with PML bodies. We propose that PML bodies form in nuclear compartments of high transcriptional activity, but they do not directly regulate transcription of genes in these compartments. PMID:14970191

  11. Charged fusion product loss measurements using nuclear activation

    SciTech Connect

    Bonheure, G.; Hult, M.; Gonzalez de Orduna, R.; Wieslander, E.; Arnold, D.; Dombrowski, H.; Laubenstein, M.; Murari, A.; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2010-10-15

    In ITER, {alpha} particle loss measurements will be required in order to understand the alpha particle physics. Techniques capable of operating in a fusion reactor environment need further development. Recent experimental studies on JET demonstrated the potential of nuclear activation to measure the flux of escaping MeV ions. New results from MeV ion induced activation of metallic, ceramic, and crystal samples placed near the plasma edge are reported. Activation products were measured as function of orientation with respect to the magnetic field as well as function of the distance to the plasma. Sample activity was measured using ultralow-level gamma-ray spectrometry. Distribution of 14.68 MeV fusion proton induced activation products is strongly anisotropic in agreement with simulations and falls off sharply with increasing distance to the plasma. Prospects for using the technique in ITER are discussed.

  12. Intracellular Trafficking of Plasmids for Gene Therapy: Mechanisms of Cytoplasmic Movement and Nuclear Import

    PubMed Central

    Dean, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Under physiologically relevant conditions, the levels of non-viral gene transfer are low at best. The reason for this is that many barriers exist for the efficient transfer of genes to cells, even before any gene expression can occur. While many transfection strategies focus on DNA condensation and overcoming the plasma membrane, events associated with the intracellular trafficking of the DNA complexes have not been as extensively studied. Once internalized, plasmids must travel potentially long distances through the cytoplasm to reach their next barrier, the nuclear envelope. This review summarizes the current progress on the cytoplasmic trafficking and nuclear transport of plasmids used for gene therapy applications. Both of these processes utilize specific and defined mechanisms to facilitate movement of DNA complexes through the cell. The continued elucidation and exploitation of these mechanisms will lead to improved strategies for transfection and successful gene therapy. PMID:17168698

  13. Nuclear import of cutaneous beta genus HPV8 E7 oncoprotein is mediated by hydrophobic interactions between its zinc-binding domain and FG nucleoporins

    SciTech Connect

    Onder, Zeynep; Moroianu, Junona

    2014-01-20

    We have previously discovered and characterized the nuclear import pathways for the E7 oncoproteins of mucosal alpha genus HPVs, type 16 and 11. Here we investigated the nuclear import of cutaneous beta genus HPV8 E7 protein using confocal microscopy after transfections of HeLa cells with EGFP-8E7 and mutant plasmids and nuclear import assays in digitonin-permeabilized HeLa cells. We determined that HPV8 E7 contains a nuclear localization signal (NLS) within its zinc-binding domain that mediates its nuclear import. Furthermore, we discovered that a mostly hydrophobic patch {sub 65}LRLFV{sub 69} within the zinc-binding domain is essential for the nuclear import and localization of HPV8 E7 via hydrophobic interactions with the FG nucleoporins Nup62 and Nup153. Substitution of the hydrophobic residues within the {sub 65}LRLFV{sub 69} patch to alanines, and not R66A mutation, disrupt the interactions between the 8E7 zinc-binding domain and Nup62 and Nup153 and consequently inhibit nuclear import of HPV8 E7. - Highlights: • HPV8 E7 has a cNLS within its zinc-binding domain that mediates its nuclear import. • Discovery of a hydrophobic patch that is critical for the nuclear import of HPV8 E7. • HPV8 E7 nuclear import is mediated by hydrophobic interactions with FG-Nups, Nup62 and Nup153.

  14. A combined nuclear and nucleolar localization motif in activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) controls immunoglobulin class switching.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yi; Ericsson, Ida; Torseth, Kathrin; Methot, Stephen P; Sundheim, Ottar; Liabakk, Nina B; Slupphaug, Geir; Di Noia, Javier M; Krokan, Hans E; Kavli, Bodil

    2013-01-23

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is a DNA mutator enzyme essential for adaptive immunity. AID initiates somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination (CSR) by deaminating cytosine to uracil in specific immunoglobulin (Ig) gene regions. However, other loci, including cancer-related genes, are also targeted. Thus, tight regulation of AID is crucial to balance immunity versus disease such as cancer. AID is regulated by several mechanisms including nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. Here we have studied nuclear import kinetics and subnuclear trafficking of AID in live cells and characterized in detail its nuclear localization signal. Importantly, we find that the nuclear localization signal motif also directs AID to nucleoli where it colocalizes with its interaction partner, catenin-β-like 1 (CTNNBL1), and physically associates with nucleolin and nucleophosmin. Moreover, we demonstrate that release of AID from nucleoli is dependent on its C-terminal motif. Finally, we find that CSR efficiency correlates strongly with the arithmetic product of AID nuclear import rate and DNA deamination activity. Our findings suggest that directional nucleolar transit is important for the physiological function of AID and demonstrate that nuclear/nucleolar import and DNA cytosine deamination together define the biological activity of AID. This is the first study on subnuclear trafficking of AID and demonstrates a new level in its complex regulation. In addition, our results resolve the problem related to dissociation of deamination activity and CSR activity of AID mutants.

  15. Biological significance of nuclear localization of mitogen-activated protein kinase Pmk1 in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Mir, Laura; Franco, Alejandro; Madrid, Marisa; Vicente-Soler, Jero; Villar-Tajadura, M Antonia; Soto, Teresa; Pérez, Pilar; Gacto, Mariano; Cansado, José

    2012-07-27

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways play a fundamental role in the response of eukaryotic cells to environmental changes. Also, much evidence shows that the stimulus-dependent nuclear targeting of this class of regulatory kinases is crucial for adequate regulation of distinct cellular events. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the cell integrity MAPK pathway, whose central element is the MAPK Pmk1, regulates multiple processes such as cell wall integrity, vacuole fusion, cytokinesis, and ionic homeostasis. In non-stressed cells Pmk1 is constitutively localized in both cytoplasm and nucleus, and its localization pattern appears unaffected by its activation status or in response to stress, thus questioning the biological significance of the presence of this MAPK into the nucleus. We have addressed this issue by characterizing mutants expressing Pmk1 versions excluded from the cell nucleus and anchored to the plasma membrane in different genetic backgrounds. Although nuclear Pmk1 partially regulates cell wall integrity at a transcriptional level, membrane-tethered Pmk1 performs many of the biological functions assigned to wild type MAPK like regulation of chloride homeostasis, vacuole fusion, and cellular separation. However, we found that down-regulation of nuclear Pmk1 by MAPK phosphatases induced by the stress activated protein kinase pathway is important for the fine modulation of extranuclear Pmk1 activity. These results highlight the importance of the control of MAPK activity at subcellular level.

  16. Determination of Importance Evaluation for Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Subsurface Testing Activities

    SciTech Connect

    C.J. Byrne

    2001-02-20

    This Determination of Importance Evaluation (DIE) applies to the Subsurface Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), encompassing the Topopah Spring (TS) Loop from Station 0+00 meters (m) at the North Portal to breakthrough at the South Portal (approximately 78+77 m), and ancillary test and operation support areas including the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) Cross Drift. This evaluation applies specifically to site characterization testing activities ongoing and planned in the Subsurface ESF. ESF site characterization activities are being performed to obtain the information necessary to determine whether the Yucca Mountain Site is suitable as a geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. A more detailed description of these testing activities is provided in Section 6 of this DIE. Generally, the construction and operation of excavations associated with these testing activities are evaluated in the DIE for the Subsurface ESF (CRWMS M&O 1999a) and the DIE for the ESF ECRB Cross Drift (CRWMS M&O 2000a). The scope of this DIE also entails the proposed Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Transport Test at Busted Butte. Although, not a part of the TS Loop or ECRB Cross Drift, the associated testing activities are Subsurface testing activities. Busted Butte is located to the south south-east of the TS Loop and is outside the Conceptual Controlled Area Boundary (CCAB). These activities provide access to the Calico Hills (CH) geologic structure. In the case of Busted Butte, construction and operation of excavations are evaluated herein (since this activity was not previously evaluated in CRWMS M&O 1999a). The objectives of this DIE are to determine whether Subsurface ESF testing, and associated activities, could potentially impact site characterization testing and/or the waste isolation capabilities of the site. Controls needed to limit any potential impacts are identified in Section 13. The validity and veracity of the individual

  17. Determine Important Nuclear Fragmentation Processes for Space Radiation Protection in Human Space Explorations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei

    2004-01-01

    Space radiation from cosmic ray particles is one of the main challenges for long-term human space explorations such as a permanent moon base or a trip to Mars. Material shielding may provide significant radiation protection to astronauts, and models have been developed in order to evaluate the effectiveness of different shielding materials and to predict radiation environment inside the spacecraft. In this study we determine the nuclear fragmentation cross sections which will most affect the radiation risk behind typical radiation shielding materials. These cross sections thus need more theoretical studies and accurate experimental measurements in order for us to more precisely predict the radiation risk in human space exploration.

  18. Determine Important Nuclear Fragmentation Processes for Space Radiation Protection in Human Space Explorations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei

    2004-01-01

    Space radiation from cosmic ray particles is one of the main challenges for long-term human space explorations such as a permanent moon base or a trip to Mars. Material shielding may provide significant radiation protection to astronauts, and models have been developed in order to evaluate the effectiveness of different shielding materials and to predict radiation environment inside the spacecraft. In this study we determine the nuclear fragmentation cross sections which will most affect the radiation risk behind typical radiation shielding materials. These cross sections thus need more theoretical studies and accurate experimental measurements in order for us to more precisely predict the radiation risk in human space explorations.

  19. Determine Important Nuclear Fragmentation Processes for Space Radiation Protection in Human Space Explorations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-wei

    2004-01-01

    Space radiation from cosmic ray particles is one of the main challenges for long-term human space explorations such as a permanent moon base or a trip to Mars. Material shielding may provide significant radiation protection to astronauts, and models have been developed in order to evaluate the effectiveness of different shielding materials and to predict radiation environment inside the spacecraft. In this study we determine the nuclear fragmentation cross sections which will most effect the radiation risk behind typical radiation shielding materials. These cross sections thus need more theoretical studies and accurate experimental measurements in order for us to more precisely predict the radiation risk in human space explorations.

  20. Determination of Importance Evaluation for Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Subsurface Testing Activities

    SciTech Connect

    S. Goodin

    2002-07-22

    This Determination of Importance Evaluation (DIE) applies to the Subsurface Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), encompassing the Topopah Spring (TS) Loop from Station 0+00 meters (m) at the North Portal to breakthrough at the South Portal (approximately 78+77 m), and ancillary test and operation support areas including the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) Cross Drift. This evaluation applies specifically to site characterization testing activities ongoing and planned in the Subsurface ESF. ESF site characterization activities are being performed to obtain the information necessary to determine whether the Yucca Mountain Site is suitable as a geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. A more detailed description of these testing activities is provided in Section 6 of this DIE. Generally, the construction and operation of excavations associated with these testing activities are evaluated in the DIE for the Subsurface ESF (CRWMS M&O 1999a) and the DIE for the ESF ECRB Cross Drift (CRWMS M&O 2000a). The scope of this DIE also entails the proposed Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Transport Test at Busted Butte. Although, not a part of the TS Loop or ECRB Cross Drift, the associated testing activities are Subsurface testing activities. Busted Butte is located to the south south-east of the TS Loop and is outside the Conceptual Controlled Area Boundary (CCAB). These activities provide access to the Calico Hills (CH) geologic structure. In the case of Busted Butte, construction and operation of excavations are evaluated herein (since this activity was not previously evaluated in CRWMS M&O 1999a). The objectives of this DIE are to determine whether Subsurface ESF testing, and associated activities, could potentially impact site characterization testing and/or the waste isolation capabilities of the site. Controls needed to limit any potential impacts are identified in Section 13. The validity and veracity of the individual

  1. Binding site requirements and differential representation of TGF factors in nuclear ASF-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Lam, E; Lam, Y K

    1995-09-25

    Activating sequence factor 1 (ASF-1) is a nuclear DNA-binding activity that is found in monocots and dicots. It interacts with several TGACG-containing elements that have been characterized from viral and T-DNA genes, the prototypes of which are the as-1 element of the CaMV 35S promoter and the ocs element from the octopine synthase promoter. This class of cis-acting elements can respond to auxin and salicylic acid treatments. Consistent with these observations, we have shown that ASF-1 can interact with promoter elements of an auxin-inducible tobacco gene GNT35, encoding a glutathione S-transferase. Characterization of the nuclear factors that make up ASF-1 activity in vivo will be an important step toward understanding this induction phenomenon. The TGA family of basic-leucine-zipper (bZIP) proteins are good candidates for the ASF-1 nuclear factor. However, there may be as many as seven distinct TGA genes in Arabidopsis, five of which have now been reported. In this study, we expressed the cDNAs that encode four of these five Arabidopsis TGA factors in vitro and compared their DNA-binding behavior using two types of TGACG-containing elements. With specific antisera prepared against three of the five known Arabidopsis TGA factors, we also investigated the relative abundance of these three proteins within the ASF-1 activities of root and leaf nuclear extracts. Our results indicate that these TGA factors bind to DNA with different degrees of cooperativity and their relative affinity toward as-1 also can differ significantly. The results of a supershift assay suggested that only one of the three TGA factors represented a significant component of nuclear ASF-1 activity. Arabidopsis TGA2 comprises approximately 33 and 50% of the ASF-1 activity detected in root and leaf nuclear extracts respectively. These results suggest that each member of the TGA factor family may be differentially regulated and that they may play different roles by virtue of their distinct DNA

  2. Nuclear import of prototype foamy virus transactivator Bel1 is mediated by KPNA1, KPNA6 and KPNA7.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jihui; Tang, Zhiqin; Mu, Hong; Zhang, Guojun

    2016-08-01

    Bel1, a transactivator of the prototype foamy virus (PFV), plays pivotal roles in the replication of PFV. Previous studies have demonstrated that Bel1 bears a nuclear localization signal (NLS); however, its amino acid sequence remains unclear and the corresponding adaptor importins have not yet been identified. In this study, we inserted various fragments of Bel1 into an EGFP-GST fusion protein and investigated their subcellular localization by fluorescence microscopy. We found that the 215PRQKRPR221 fragment, which accords with the consensus sequence K(K/R)X(K/R) of the monopartite NLS, directed the nuclear translocation of Bel1. Point mutation experiments revealed that K218, R219 and R221 were essential for the nuclear localization of Bel1. The results of GST pull-down assay revealed that the Bel1 peptide 215-221, which bears the NLS, interacted with the nucleocytoplasmic transport receptors, karyopherin alpha 1 (importin alpha 5) (KPNA1), karyopherin alpha 6 (importin alpha 7) (KPNA6) and karyopherin alpha 7 (importin alpha 8) (KPNA7). Finally, in vitro nuclear import assays demonstrated that KPNA1, KPNA6 or KPNA7, along with other necessary nuclear factors, caused Bel1 to localize to the nucleus. Thus, the findings of our study indicate that KPNA1, KPNA6 and KPNA7 are involved in Bel1 nuclear distribution. PMID:27277550

  3. Determining importance and grading of items and activities for the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    DeKlever, R.; Verna, B.

    1993-12-31

    Raytheon Services Nevada (RSN), in support of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Yucca Mountain Project, has been responsible for the Title 2 designs of the initial structures, systems, and components for the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), and the creation of the design output documents for the Surface-Based Testing (SBT) programs. The ESF and SBT programs are major scientific contributors to the overall site characterization program which will determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain to contain a proposed High Level Nuclear Waste (HLNW) repository. Accurate, traceable and objective characterization and testing documentation that is germane to the protection of public health and safety, and the environment, and that satisfies all the requirements of 10 CFR Part 60(1), must be established, evaluated and accepted. To assure that these requirements are satisfied, specific design functions and products, including items and activities depicted within respective design output documents, are subjected to the requirements of an NRC and DOE-approved Quality Assurance (QA) program. An evaluation (classification) is applied to these items and activities to determine their importance to radiological safety (ITS) and waste isolation (ITWI). Subsequently, QA program controls are selected (grading) for the items and activities. RSN has developed a DOE-approved classification process that is based on probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) techniques and that uses accident/impact scenarios. Results from respective performance assessment and test interference evaluations are also integrated into the classification analyses for various items. The methodology and results of the RSN classification and grading processes, presented herein, relative to ESF and SBT design products, demonstrates a solid, defensible methodological basis for classification and grading.

  4. Department of Energy interest and involvement in nuclear plant license renewal activities

    SciTech Connect

    Bustard, L.D. ); Harrison, D.L. . Office of LWR Safety and Technology)

    1991-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of nuclear license renewal to the nation's energy strategy, the Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a plant lifetime improvement program during 1985 to determine the feasibility of the license renewal option for US nuclear plants. Initial activities of the DOE program focused on determining whether there were technical and economic obstacles that might preclude or limit the successful implementation of the license renewal option. To make this determination, DOE cosponsored with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) pilot-plant efforts by Virginia Electric Power and Northern States Power. Both pilot-plant efforts concluded that life extension is technically and economically feasible. In parallel with the pilot-plant activities, DOE performed national economic studies that demonstrated the economic desirability of life extension. Having demonstrated the feasibility of life extension, DOE, in conjunction with EPRI, selected two lead plants to demonstrate the license renewal process. These lead plants are Yankee Atomic's Yankee Rowe facility and Northern States Power's Monticello facility. DOE also initiated activities to develop the technical and regulatory bases to support the license renewal process in the United States. DOE has recently identified nuclear plant license renewal to be an important element of its National Energy Strategy. This paper summarizes the significant results, conclusions, and ongoing activities of the DOE effort. 18 refs.

  5. Nucleus-Specific Importin Alpha Proteins and Nucleoporins Regulate Protein Import and Nuclear Division in the Binucleate Tetrahymena thermophila▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Colin D.; Falkowska, Katarzyna A.; Li, Alanna Y.; Galanti, Sarah E.; Kanuru, Reshi C.; LaMont, Elizabeth G.; Mazzarella, Kate C.; Micev, Alan J.; Osman, Morwan M.; Piotrowski, Nicholas K.; Suszko, Jason W.; Timm, Adam C.; Xu, Ming-Ming; Liu, Lucy; Chalker, Douglas L.

    2008-01-01

    The ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila, having both germ line micronuclei and somatic macronuclei, must possess a specialized nucleocytoplasmic transport system to import proteins into the correct nucleus. To understand how Tetrahymena can target proteins to distinct nuclei, we first characterized FG repeat-containing nucleoporins and found that micro- and macronuclei utilize unique subsets of these proteins. This finding implicates these proteins in the differential permeability of the two nuclei and implies that nuclear pores with discrete specificities are assembled within a single cell. To identify the import machineries that interact with these different pores, we characterized the large families of karyopherin homologs encoded within the genome. Localization studies of 13 putative importin (imp) α- and 11 imp β-like proteins revealed that imp α-like proteins are nucleus specific—nine localized to the germ line micronucleus—but that most imp β-like proteins localized to both types of nuclei. These data suggest that micronucleus-specific proteins are transported by specific imp α adapters. The different imp α proteins exhibit substantial sequence divergence and do not appear to be simply redundant in function. Disruption of the IMA10 gene encoding an imp α-like protein that accumulates in dividing micronuclei results in nuclear division defects and lethality. Thus, nucleus-specific protein import and nuclear function in Tetrahymena are regulated by diverse, specialized karyopherins. PMID:18676955

  6. 15 CFR Supplement No. 3 to Part 783 - List of Specified Equipment and Non-Nuclear Material for the Reporting of Imports

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... COMMERCE ADDITIONAL PROTOCOL REGULATIONS CIVIL NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE-RELATED ACTIVITIES NOT INVOLVING NUCLEAR... mode of supply is considered unlikely. 1.3. Reactor fuel charging and discharging machines Manipulative equipment specially designed or prepared for inserting or removing fuel in a nuclear reactor, as defined...

  7. 15 CFR Supplement No. 3 to Part 783 - List of Specified Equipment and Non-Nuclear Material for the Reporting of Imports

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... COMMERCE ADDITIONAL PROTOCOL REGULATIONS CIVIL NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE-RELATED ACTIVITIES NOT INVOLVING NUCLEAR... mode of supply is considered unlikely. 1.3. Reactor fuel charging and discharging machines Manipulative equipment specially designed or prepared for inserting or removing fuel in a nuclear reactor, as defined...

  8. 15 CFR Supplement No. 3 to Part 783 - List of Specified Equipment and Non-Nuclear Material for the Reporting of Imports

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... COMMERCE ADDITIONAL PROTOCOL REGULATIONS CIVIL NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE-RELATED ACTIVITIES NOT INVOLVING NUCLEAR... mode of supply is considered unlikely. 1.3. Reactor fuel charging and discharging machines Manipulative equipment specially designed or prepared for inserting or removing fuel in a nuclear reactor, as defined...

  9. 15 CFR Supplement No. 3 to Part 783 - List of Specified Equipment and Non-Nuclear Material for the Reporting of Imports

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... COMMERCE ADDITIONAL PROTOCOL REGULATIONS CIVIL NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE-RELATED ACTIVITIES NOT INVOLVING NUCLEAR... mode of supply is considered unlikely. 1.3. Reactor fuel charging and discharging machines Manipulative equipment specially designed or prepared for inserting or removing fuel in a nuclear reactor, as defined...

  10. 15 CFR Supplement No. 3 to Part 783 - List of Specified Equipment and Non-Nuclear Material for the Reporting of Imports

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... COMMERCE ADDITIONAL PROTOCOL REGULATIONS CIVIL NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE-RELATED ACTIVITIES NOT INVOLVING NUCLEAR... mode of supply is considered unlikely. 1.3. Reactor fuel charging and discharging machines Manipulative equipment specially designed or prepared for inserting or removing fuel in a nuclear reactor, as defined...

  11. The Nuclear Accident at Three Mile Island a Practical Lesson in the Fundamental Importance of Effective Communications

    SciTech Connect

    DeVine Jr, J.C.

    2008-07-01

    The Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident in March 1979 had a profound effect on the course of commercial nuclear generation in the United States and around the world. And while the central elements of the accident were matters of nuclear engineering, design and operations, its consequences were compounded, and in some respects superseded, by extraordinarily ineffective communications by all parties at all levels. Communications failures during the accident and its aftermath caused misunderstanding, distrust, and incorrect emergency response - and seeded or reinforced public opposition to nuclear power that persists to this day. There are communications lessons from TMI that have not yet been fully learned, and some that once were learned but are now gradually being forgotten. The more glaring TMI communications problems were in the arena of external interactions and communications among the plant owner, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the media, and the public. Confusing, fragmented, and contradictory public statements early in the accident, regardless of cause, undermined all possibility for reasonable discourse thereafter. And because the TMI accident was playing out on a world stage, the breakdown in public trust had long term and widespread implications. At the plant site, both TMI-2 cleanup and restart of the undamaged TMI-1 unit met with years of public and political criticism, and attendant regulatory pressure. Across the nation, public trust in nuclear power and those who operate it plummeted, unquestionably contributing to the 25+ year hiatus in new plant orders. There were other, less visible but equally important, consequences of ineffective communications at TMI. The unplanned 'precautionary' evacuation urged by the governor two days after the accident - a life changing, traumatic event for thousands of residents - was prompted primarily by misunderstandings and miscommunications regarding the condition of the plant. And today, nearly 30

  12. Comparison of Different Internal Dosimetry Systems for Selected Radionuclides Important to Nuclear Power Production

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, Richard Wayne; Eckerman, Keith F; Manger, Ryan P

    2013-08-01

    This report compares three different radiation dosimetry systems currently applied by various U.S. Federal agencies and dose estimates based on these three dosimetry systems for a set of radionuclides often identified in power reactor effluents. These dosimetry systems were developed and applied by the International Commission on Radiological Protection at different times over the past six decades. Two primary modes of intake of radionuclides are addressed: ingestion in drinking water and inhalation. Estimated doses to individual organs and to the whole body based on each dosimetry system are compared for each of four age groups: infant, child, teenager, and adult. Substantial differences between dosimetry systems in estimated dose per unit intake are found for some individual radionuclides, but differences in estimated dose per unit intake generally are modest for mixtures of radionuclides typically found in nuclear power plant effluents.

  13. Nuclear Physics Activities in Asia and ANPhA

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, H.

    2011-05-06

    On 18 July 2009 the Asian Nuclear Physics Association (ANPhA) has been officially launched in Beijing by the representatives from China, Korea, Japan and Vietnam. Since then Australia, India, Mongolia and Taiwan have joined to ANPhA and now the member country/region has increased to eight. Some activities and features on ANPhA are introduced. In addition, pleasant collaboration with Professor Arima by the author in regard to the Gamow-Teller quenching problem is also briefly mentioned.

  14. The hydro nuclear services dry active waste processing system

    SciTech Connect

    Bunker, A.S.

    1985-04-01

    There is a real need for a dry active waste processing system that can separate clean trash and recoverable items from radwaste safely and efficiently. This paper reports that Hydro Nuclear Services has produced just such a system and is marketing it as a DAW Segregation/Volume Reduction Process. The system is a unique, semi-automated package of sensitive monitoring instruments of volume reduction equipment that separates clean trash from contaminated and recoverable items in the waste stream and prepares the clean trash for unrestricted release. What makes the HNS system truly unique is its end product - clean trash.

  15. Identification of COUP-TFII Orphan Nuclear Receptor as a Retinoic Acid-Activated Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kruse, Schoen W; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Zhou, X Edward; Kretschman, Jennifer E; Reynolds, Ross; Vonrhein, Clemens; Xu, Yong; Wang, Liliang; Tsai, Sophia Y; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Xu, H Eric

    2010-01-12

    The chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factors (COUP-TFI and II) make up the most conserved subfamily of nuclear receptors that play key roles in angiogenesis, neuronal development, organogenesis, cell fate determination, and metabolic homeostasis. Although the biological functions of COUP-TFs have been studied extensively, little is known of their structural features or aspects of ligand regulation. Here we report the ligand-free 1.48 {angstrom} crystal structure of the human COUP-TFII ligand-binding domain. The structure reveals an autorepressed conformation of the receptor, where helix {alpha}10 is bent into the ligand-binding pocket and the activation function-2 helix is folded into the cofactor binding site, thus preventing the recruitment of coactivators. In contrast, in multiple cell lines, COUP-TFII exhibits constitutive transcriptional activity, which can be further potentiated by nuclear receptor coactivators. Mutations designed to disrupt cofactor binding, dimerization, and ligand binding, substantially reduce the COUP-TFII transcriptional activity. Importantly, retinoid acids are able to promote COUP-TFII to recruit coactivators and activate a COUP-TF reporter construct. Although the concentration needed is higher than the physiological levels of retinoic acids, these findings demonstrate that COUP-TFII is a ligand-regulated nuclear receptor, in which ligands activate the receptor by releasing it from the autorepressed conformation.

  16. 70-kDa Heat Shock Cognate Protein hsc70 Mediates Calmodulin-dependent Nuclear Import of the Sex-determining Factor SRY*

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Lieu, Kim G.; Jans, David A.

    2013-01-01

    We recently showed that the developmentally important family of SOX (SRY (sex determining region on the Y chromosome)-related high mobility group (HMG) box) proteins require the calcium-binding protein calmodulin (CaM) for optimal nuclear accumulation, with clinical mutations in SRY that specifically impair nuclear accumulation via this pathway resulting in XY sex reversal. However, the mechanism by which CaM facilitates nuclear accumulation is unknown. Here, we show, for the first time, that the 70-kDa heat shock cognate protein hsc70 plays a key role in CaM-dependent nuclear import of SRY. Using a reconstituted nuclear import assay, we show that antibodies to hsc70 significantly reduce nuclear accumulation of wild type SRY and mutant derivatives thereof that retain CaM-dependent nuclear import, with an increased rate of nuclear accumulation upon addition of both CaM and hsc70, in contrast to an SRY mutant derivative with impaired CaM binding. siRNA knockdown of hsc70 in intact cells showed similar results, indicating clear dependence upon hsc70 for CaM-dependent nuclear import. Analysis using the technique of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching indicated that hsc70 is required for the maximal rate of SRY nuclear import in living cells but has no impact upon SRY nuclear retention/nuclear dynamics. Finally, we demonstrate direct binding of hsc70 to the SRY·CaM complex, with immunoprecipitation experiments from cell extracts showing association of hsc70 with wild type SRY, but not with a mutant derivative with impaired CaM binding, dependent on Ca2+. Our novel findings strongly implicate hsc70 in CaM-dependent nuclear import of SRY. PMID:23235156

  17. Sycamore amyloplasts can import and process precursors of nuclear encoded chloroplast proteins.

    PubMed

    Strzalka, K; Ngernprasirtsiri, J; Watanabe, A; Akazawa, T

    1987-12-16

    Amyloplasts isolated from white-wild suspension-cultured cells of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) are found to import and process the precursor of the small subunit (pS) of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase of spinach, but they lack the ability to form its holoenzyme due to the absence of both the large subunit and its binding-protein. They also import the precursor of the 33-kDa extrinsic protein (p33-kDa) of the O2-evolving complex of Photosystem II from spinach, but process is only to an intermediate form (i33-kDa). Chloroplasts from green-mutant cells of sycamore process p33-kDa to its mature form in this heterologous system. These results suggest that the thylakoid-associated protease responsible for the second processing step of p33-kDa is missing in amyloplasts, possibly due to the absence of thylakoid-membranes. In contrast, the apparent import of the precursor of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-binding apoprotein (pLHCP) from spinach was not detected. Sycamore amyloplasts may lack the ability to import this particular thylakoid-protein, or rapidly degrade the imported molecules in the absence of thylakoid-membranes for their proper insertion.

  18. JEM spotlight: Nuclear desalination--environmental impacts and implications for planning and monitoring activities.

    PubMed

    Anastasov, Vladimir; Khamis, Ibrahim

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear desalination has been identified as an option since the 1960s, but only recently, as climate change intensifies, has it gained interest again. Although environmental impacts of nuclear desalination have not been paid a lot of attention in the few implemented projects, now more than ever, it is essential to provide an overview of their nature and magnitude. The gathered information and basic analysis allow for a general comparison of a 200,000 m(3)/d nuclear desalination facility using a once-through cooling system as a reference case, with alternative co-location options. Results of the review indicate that the potential for marine impacts requires careful planning and monitoring. They also reveal that adverse coastal, atmospheric and socio-economic impacts are minor in comparison with other co-location alternatives. The issues regarding public health are discussed and experiences presented. Nuclear desalination facilities are expected to show a better environmental performance than other co-located power/desalination options. Environmental planning and monitoring activities are thus much simpler and their scope smaller, with the most important monitoring parameters listed. In conclusion, the application of nuclear desalination is recommended as a less environmentally harmful option.

  19. Photon Production through Multi-step Processes Important in Nuclear Fluorescence Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmann, C; Pruet, J

    2006-10-26

    The authors present calculations describing the production of photons through multi-step processes occurring when a beam of gamma rays interacts with a macroscopic material. These processes involve the creation of energetic electrons through Compton scattering, photo-absorption and pair production, the subsequent scattering of these electrons, and the creation of energetic photons occurring as these electrons are slowed through Bremsstrahlung emission. Unlike single Compton collisions, during which an energetic photon that is scattered through a large angle loses most of its energy, these multi-step processes result in a sizable flux of energetic photons traveling at large angles relative to an incident photon beam. These multi-step processes are also a key background in experiments that measure nuclear resonance fluorescence by shining photons on a thin foil and observing the spectrum of back-scattered photons. Effective cross sections describing the production of backscattered photons are presented in a tabular form that allows simple estimates of backgrounds expected in a variety of experiments. Incident photons with energies between 0.5 MeV and 8 MeV are considered. These calculations of effective cross sections may be useful for those designing NRF experiments or systems that detect specific isotopes in well-shielded environments through observation of resonance fluorescence.

  20. Nuclear Translocation Sequence and Region in Autographa californica Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus ME53 That Are Important for Optimal Baculovirus Production

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; de Jong, Jondavid; Nagy, Éva; Theilmann, David A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) is in the family Baculoviridae, genus Alphabaculovirus. AcMNPV me53 is a highly conserved immediate early gene in all lepidopteran baculoviruses that have been sequenced and is transcribed up to late times postinfection. Although me53 is not essential for viral DNA synthesis, infectious budded virus (BV) production is greatly attenuated when it is deleted. ME53 associates with the nucleocapsid on both budded virus and occlusion-derived virus, but not with the virus envelope. ME53 colocalizes in plasma membrane foci with the envelope glycoprotein GP64 in a GP64-dependent manner. ME53 localizes in the cytoplasm early postinfection, and despite the lack of a reported nuclear localization signal (NLS), ME53 translocates to the nucleus at late times postinfection. To map determinants of ME53 that facilitate its nuclear translocation, recombinant AcMNPV bacmids containing a series of ME53 truncations, internal deletions, and peptides fused with hemagglutinin (HA) or green fluorescent protein (GFP) tags were constructed. Intracellular-localization studies identified residues within amino acids 109 to 137 at the N terminus of ME53 that acted as the nuclear translocation sequence (NTS), facilitating its nuclear transport at late times postinfection. The first 100 N-terminal amino acids and the last 50 C-terminal amino acids of ME53 are dispensable for high levels of budded virus production. The region within amino acids 101 to 398, which also contains the NTS, is critical for optimal levels of budded virus production. IMPORTANCE Baculovirus me53 is a conserved immediate early gene found in all sequenced lepidopteran alpha- and betabaculoviruses. We first identified residues within amino acids 109 to 137 at the N terminus that act as the ME53 nuclear translocation sequence (NTS) to facilitate its nuclear translocation and defined an internal region within amino acids 101 to 398, which includes the NTS, as

  1. Phytochrome activation of two nuclear genes requires cytoplasmic protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Lam, E; Green, P J; Wong, M; Chua, N H

    1989-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of protein synthesis inhibitors on light-induced expression of two plant nuclear genes, Cab and rbcS, in wheat, pea and transgenic tobacco. Light activation of these two genes is very sensitive to cycloheximide, an inhibitor of cytoplasmic protein synthesis but not to chloramphenicol, an inhibitor of organellar protein synthesis. Studies with chimeric gene constructs in transgenic tobacco seedlings show that cycloheximide exerts its effect at the transcriptional level. As a control, we show that the expression of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter is enhanced by cycloheximide treatment, irrespective of the coding sequence used. Escape-time analyses with green wheat seedlings show that the cycloheximide block for Cab gene expression is after the primary signal transduction step linked to phytochrome photoconversion. Our results suggest that phytochrome activation of Cab and rbcS is mediated by a labile protein factor(s) synthesized on cytoplasmic ribosomes. Images PMID:2583082

  2. Influenza A viruses escape from MxA restriction at the expense of efficient nuclear vRNP import.

    PubMed

    Götz, Veronika; Magar, Linda; Dornfeld, Dominik; Giese, Sebastian; Pohlmann, Anne; Höper, Dirk; Kong, Byung-Whi; Jans, David A; Beer, Martin; Haller, Otto; Schwemmle, Martin

    2016-01-01

    To establish a new lineage in the human population, avian influenza A viruses (AIV) must overcome the intracellular restriction factor MxA. Partial escape from MxA restriction can be achieved when the viral nucleoprotein (NP) acquires the critical human-adaptive amino acid residues 100I/V, 283P, and 313Y. Here, we show that introduction of these three residues into the NP of an avian H5N1 virus renders it genetically unstable, resulting in viruses harboring additional single mutations, including G16D. These substitutions restored genetic stability yet again yielded viruses with varying degrees of attenuation in mammalian and avian cells. Additionally, most of the mutant viruses lost the capacity to escape MxA restriction, with the exception of the G16D virus. We show that MxA escape is linked to attenuation by demonstrating that the three substitutions promoting MxA escape disturbed intracellular trafficking of incoming viral ribonucleoprotein complexes (vRNPs), thereby resulting in impaired nuclear import, and that the additional acquired mutations only partially compensate for this import block. We conclude that for adaptation to the human host, AIV must not only overcome MxA restriction but also an associated block in nuclear vRNP import. This inherent difficulty may partially explain the frequent failure of AIV to become pandemic. PMID:26988202

  3. Influenza A viruses escape from MxA restriction at the expense of efficient nuclear vRNP import

    PubMed Central

    Götz, Veronika; Magar, Linda; Dornfeld, Dominik; Giese, Sebastian; Pohlmann, Anne; Höper, Dirk; Kong, Byung-Whi; Jans, David A.; Beer, Martin; Haller, Otto; Schwemmle, Martin

    2016-01-01

    To establish a new lineage in the human population, avian influenza A viruses (AIV) must overcome the intracellular restriction factor MxA. Partial escape from MxA restriction can be achieved when the viral nucleoprotein (NP) acquires the critical human-adaptive amino acid residues 100I/V, 283P, and 313Y. Here, we show that introduction of these three residues into the NP of an avian H5N1 virus renders it genetically unstable, resulting in viruses harboring additional single mutations, including G16D. These substitutions restored genetic stability yet again yielded viruses with varying degrees of attenuation in mammalian and avian cells. Additionally, most of the mutant viruses lost the capacity to escape MxA restriction, with the exception of the G16D virus. We show that MxA escape is linked to attenuation by demonstrating that the three substitutions promoting MxA escape disturbed intracellular trafficking of incoming viral ribonucleoprotein complexes (vRNPs), thereby resulting in impaired nuclear import, and that the additional acquired mutations only partially compensate for this import block. We conclude that for adaptation to the human host, AIV must not only overcome MxA restriction but also an associated block in nuclear vRNP import. This inherent difficulty may partially explain the frequent failure of AIV to become pandemic. PMID:26988202

  4. Adaptive mutation PB2 D701N promotes nuclear import of influenza vRNPs in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Sediri, Hanna; Schwalm, Folker; Gabriel, Gülsah; Klenk, Hans-Dieter

    2015-01-01

    The segmented genome of influenza viruses is translocated into the nucleus to initiate transcription and replication. The gene segments are present as viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP) particles composed of RNA, multiple copies of the nucleoprotein (NP), and the polymerase subunits PB1, PB2 and PA. The PB2 subunit and each NP monomer contain a nuclear localisation signal (NLS) that binds to importin-α. To throw light on the role of the NLSs of NP and PB2 in nuclear transport, we have analysed the effect of mutation D701N, responsible for the exposure of the NLS domain of PB2, on the intracellular localisation of vRNPs. We show that exposure of PB2 NLS significantly enhances the amount of vRNPs present in the nucleus. These observations suggest that entry of vRNPs into the nucleus depends on controlled interplay of the NLSs of PB2 and NP with the nuclear import machinery. PMID:26074198

  5. Physical activities and their importance to the health of people with severe mental illness in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Erdner, Anette; Magnusson, Annabella

    2012-10-01

    It is well known that people with severe mental illness often suffer from constant fatigue, insomnia, and somatic complaints that are too often overlooked. In addition, these persons die earlier in life than others in the population. The purpose of this study was to investigate patients' descriptions of activities and the importance of these activities for their health. Eight persons living in their own home were interviewed about both their views about exercise and their exercising activities. Two themes emerged: Getting Control over One's Life and The Need for Contact with Family & Friends. All of the informants were aware of the importance of physical activity to feel good. The informants described three different forms of activities: daily activities in the home, activities in a rehabilitation centre, and various forms of jogging. These different forms of activity were important to the informants since they reduced their anxiety and stress. PMID:23017044

  6. Measurements and analysis of alpha-induced reactions of importance for nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Messieres, Genevieve Escande

    2011-11-01

    Reactions during stellar helium burning are of primary importance for understanding nucleosynthesis. A detailed understanding of the critical reaction chain 4He(2alpha, gamma)12C( alpha, gamma)16O(alpha, gamma) 20Ne is necessary both because it is the primary energy source and because it determines the ratio of 12C to 16O produced, which in turn significantly effects subsequent nucleosynthesis. Also during Helium burning, the reactions 22Ne(alpha, n)25Mg and 22Ne(alpha, gamma )26Mg are crucial in determining the amount of neutrons available for the astrophysical s-process. This thesis presents new experimental results concerning the 16O(alpha, gamma) 20Ne, 22Ne(alpha, n)25Mg, and 22Ne(alpha, gamma)26Mg reaction rates. These results are then applied to the calculation of the associated stellar reaction rates in order to achieve better accuracy.

  7. 77 FR 37696 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Importer ID Input Record

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Importer ID Input... other Federal agencies to comment on an information collection requirement concerning the Importer ID... concerning the following information collection: Title: Importer ID Input Record. OMB Number: 1651-0064....

  8. 78 FR 67383 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Importer ID Input Record

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities; Importer ID Input... other Federal agencies to comment on an information collection requirement concerning the Importer ID... concerning the following information collection: Title: Importer ID Input Record. OMB Number: 1651-0064....

  9. Hyperfine interactions and nuclear probes in chemistry: The active interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herber, R. H.

    1990-08-01

    A symposium entitled “Hyperfine Interaction and Nuclear Probes in Chemistry” was held in conjunction with the 198 th. National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in Miami Beach, Florida, 12 and 13 September 1989. The four half-day sessions consisted of 15 invited and 4 contributed papers, and allowed numerous opportunities for spirited discussion and information exchange, especially at the informal luncheons and pre-dinner periods, and Miami Beach proved to be a most effective venue for these activities. In the pages to follow are collected a number of the scientific reports presented at this symposium; other contributions will be published elsewhere at the discretion of the author(s).

  10. Importin β-dependent nuclear import of TopBP1 in ATR-Chk1 checkpoint in Xenopus egg extracts

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Liping; Michael, W. Matthew; Yan, Shan

    2014-01-01

    TopBP1, a multiple-BRCT-containing protein, plays diverse functions in DNA metabolism including DNA replication, DNA damage response and transcriptional regulation. The cytoplasmic localization of TopBP1 has been found associated with breast cancer susceptibility in clinical studies, suggesting the biological significance of TopBP1’s sub-cellular localization. However, it remains elusive how TopBP1 is shuttled into nucleus and recruited to chromatin under normal or stressful conditions. Taking advantage of Xenopus egg extract, we identified Importin β as a new interacting protein of the TopBP1 C-terminus. We verified the TopBP1-Importin β association via GST pulldown and coimmunoprecipitation assays. We then demonstrated that TopBP1’s C-terminal motif (designated as CTM, 23 amino acids) containing a putative NLS (Nuclear Localization Signal) was required for Importin β interaction and that CT100 of Importin β (100 amino acids of extreme C-terminus of Importin β) was required for TopBP1 interaction. Further structure-function analysis reveals that the CTM of TopBP1 is essential for TopBP1’s nuclear import and subsequent chromatin recruitment, thereby playing important roles in DNA replication and mitomycin C (MMC)-induced Chk1 phosphorylation. In addition, Importin β-specific inhibitor importazole inhibits TopBP1’s nuclear import and the MMC-induced Chk1 phosphorylation. With ongoing DNA replication, the Importin β-dependent nuclear import of TopBP1 was indeed required for the MMC-induced Chk1 phosphorylation. Our data also suggest that checkpoint activation requires more TopBP1 than DNA replication does. The requirement of TopBP1’s CTM motif for ATR-Chk1 checkpoint can be bypassed in a nucleus-free AT70 system. Taken together, our findings suggest the CTM motif-mediated TopBP1 shuttling into nucleus via Importin β plays an important role in the ATR-Chk1 checkpoint signaling in Xenopus egg extracts. PMID:24440306

  11. Nuclear Gln3 Import Is Regulated by Nitrogen Catabolite Repression Whereas Export Is Specifically Regulated by Glutamine.

    PubMed

    Rai, Rajendra; Tate, Jennifer J; Shanmuganatham, Karthik; Howe, Martha M; Nelson, David; Cooper, Terrance G

    2015-11-01

    Gln3, a transcription activator mediating nitrogen-responsive gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is sequestered in the cytoplasm, thereby minimizing nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR)-sensitive transcription when cells are grown in nitrogen-rich environments. In the face of adverse nitrogen supplies, Gln3 relocates to the nucleus and activates transcription of the NCR-sensitive regulon whose products transport and degrade a variety of poorly used nitrogen sources, thus expanding the cell's nitrogen-acquisition capability. Rapamycin also elicits nuclear Gln3 localization, implicating Target-of-rapamycin Complex 1 (TorC1) in nitrogen-responsive Gln3 regulation. However, we long ago established that TorC1 was not the sole regulatory system through which nitrogen-responsive regulation is achieved. Here we demonstrate two different ways in which intracellular Gln3 localization is regulated. Nuclear Gln3 entry is regulated by the cell's overall nitrogen supply, i.e., by NCR, as long accepted. However, once within the nucleus, Gln3 can follow one of two courses depending on the glutamine levels themselves or a metabolite directly related to glutamine. When glutamine levels are high, e.g., glutamine or ammonia as the sole nitrogen source or addition of glutamine analogues, Gln3 can exit from the nucleus without binding to DNA. In contrast, when glutamine levels are lowered, e.g., adding additional nitrogen sources to glutamine-grown cells or providing repressive nonglutamine nitrogen sources, Gln3 export does not occur in the absence of DNA binding. We also demonstrate that Gln3 residues 64-73 are required for nuclear Gln3 export.

  12. Retinoic Acid-mediated Nuclear Receptor Activation and Hepatocyte Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bushue, Nathan; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Due to their well-known differentiation and apoptosis-inducing abilities, retinoic acid (RA) and its analogs have strong anti-cancer efficacy in human cancers. However, in vivo RA is a liver mitogen. While speculation has persisted that RA-mediated signaling is likely involved in hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration, direct evidence is still required. Findings in support of this proposition include observations that a release of retinyl palmitate (the precursor of RA) occurs in liver stellate cells following liver injury. Nevertheless, the biological action of this released vitamin A is virtually unknown. More likely is that the released vitamin A is converted to RA, the biological form, and then bound to a specific receptor (retinoid x receptor; RXRα), which is most abundantly expressed in the liver. Considering the mitogenic effects of RA, the RA-activated RXRα would likely then influence hepatocyte proliferation and liver tissue repair. At present, the mechanism by which RA stimulates hepatocyte proliferation is largely unknown. This review summarizes the activation of nuclear receptors (peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α, pregnane x receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, and farnesoid x receptor) in an RXRα dependent manner to induce hepatocyte proliferation, providing a link between RA and its proliferative role.

  13. Nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) plays a role in SV40 infection

    SciTech Connect

    Manley, Kate; O'Hara, Bethany A.; Atwood, Walter J.

    2008-03-01

    Recent evidence highlighted a role for the transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT), in the transcription of the human polyomavirus JCV. Here we show that NFAT is also important in the transcriptional control of the related polyomavirus, Simian Virus 40 (SV40). Inhibition of NFAT activity reduced SV40 infection of Vero, 293A, and HeLa cells, and this block occurred at the stage of viral transcription. Both NFAT3 and NFAT4 bound to the SV40 promoter through {kappa}B sites located within the 72 bp repeated enhancer region. In Vero cells, NFAT was involved in late transcription, but in HeLa and 293A cells both early and late viral transcription required NFAT activity. SV40 large T-Ag was found to increase NFAT activity and provided a positive feedback loop to transactivate the SV40 promoter.

  14. [Amino acids 395-416 in DNA binding domain of STAT4 is involved in IL-12-induced nuclear import of STAT4].

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Mei; Wen, Ya-Ping; Li, Xuan-An; Yuan, Yuan; Luo, Qi-Zhi; Li, Ming

    2012-08-25

    The purpose of the present study is to explore the mechanism of IL-12-induced nuclear import of signal transducer and activator of transcription 4 (STAT4). Assayed by analyses of homology alignment of STATs, amino acids 395-416 in DNA binding domain was found to be a potential dimer-specific nuclear localization signal (dsNLS) of STAT4. Therefore, several plasmids were constructed. Wild-type STAT4 was inserted into the SalI and BamHI sites of pEGFP-C1 for the construction of plasmid pEGFP-STAT4. The DNA fragment of STAT4 with the deletion of amino acids 395-416 was amplified by RCR and introduced into the SalI and BamHI sites of pEGFP-C1 which was named pEGFP-STAT4-Del. Classic NLS DNA sequence of SV40 T antigen was inserted into the XhoI and HindIII sites of pEGFP-C1. This plasmid was named as pEGFP-NLS and used as a positive control. Plasmid pEGFP-NLS-STAT4-Del was constructed by inserting STAT4-Del into SalI and BamHI sites of pEGFP-NLS. These plasmids were transiently transfected into Caski cells, respectively. The results showed that, after these transfected cells were stimulated by IL-12, wild type STAT4 existed in the cytoplasm at 0 min, and was predominantly localized to the nucleus at 45 min, and distributed in both cytoplasm and nucleus at 60 min, suggesting that STAT4 translocates from cytoplasm into nucleus and finally re-entries into the cytoplasm during the stimulation of IL-12. However, deletion mutant of STAT4 was arrested in cytoplasm during the IL-12 stimulation. Leptomycin B, which specifically blocks protein export from nucleus into cytoplasm, was used to further demonstrate whether STAT4-Del is transferred into nucleus even with stimulation of IL-12. After the transfected cells were pre-treated by leptomycin B, the wild type STAT4 was mainly localized in nucleus after the IL-12 stimulation, suggesting that STAT4 was translocated from cytoplasm into nucleus by the stimulation of IL-12. On the other hand, the deletion mutant of STAT4 distributed

  15. Nuclear localization of platelet-activating factor receptor controls retinal neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    K Bhosle, Vikrant; Rivera, José Carlos; Zhou, Tianwei (Ellen); Omri, Samy; Sanchez, Melanie; Hamel, David; Zhu, Tang; Rouget, Raphael; Rabea, Areej Al; Hou, Xin; Lahaie, Isabelle; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo; Chemtob, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a pleiotropic phospholipid with proinflammatory, procoagulant and angiogenic actions on the vasculature. We and others have reported the presence of PAF receptor (Ptafr) at intracellular sites such as the nucleus. However, mechanisms of localization and physiologic functions of intracellular Ptafr remain poorly understood. We hereby identify the importance of C-terminal motif of the receptor and uncover novel roles of Rab11a GTPase and importin-5 in nuclear translocation of Ptafr in primary human retinal microvascular endothelial cells. Nuclear localization of Ptafr is independent of exogenous PAF stimulation as well as intracellular PAF biosynthesis. Moreover, nuclear Ptafr is responsible for the upregulation of unique set of growth factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor, in vitro and ex vivo. We further corroborate the intracrine PAF signaling, resulting in angiogenesis in vivo, using Ptafr antagonists with distinct plasma membrane permeability. Collectively, our findings show that nuclear Ptafr translocates in an agonist-independent manner, and distinctive functions of Ptafr based on its cellular localization point to another dimension needed for pharmacologic selectivity of drugs. PMID:27462464

  16. Identification of Gene Markers for Activation of the Nuclear Receptor Pregnane X Receptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many environmentally-relevant chemicals and drugs activate the nuclear receptor pregnane X receptor (PXR). Activation of PXR in the mouse liver can lead to increases in liver weight in part through increased hepatocyte replication similar to chemicals that activate other nuclear ...

  17. The Activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, U.; Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.; Cabellos, O.; Kodeli, I.; Koning, A.; Konobeyev, A.Yu.; Leeb, H.; Rochman, D.; Pereslavtsev, P.; Sauvan, P.; Sublet, J.-C.; Dupont, E.; Leichtle, D.; Izquierdo, J.

    2014-06-15

    This paper presents an overview of the activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion. The Consortium combines available European expertise to provide services for the generation, maintenance, and validation of nuclear data evaluations and data files relevant for ITER, IFMIF and DEMO, as well as codes and software tools required for related nuclear calculations.

  18. The importance of space policy teaching in communicating space activities to society [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reibaldi, G. G.

    2003-12-01

    The governments' priority and budgets for space activities are steadily decreasing and the importance of space activities is not any longer reaching the front pages of the newspaper, as in the 1960s. On the other hand in Europe the people, at large, have shown an important interest and support for space activities. A contribution to bridge the gap between decreasing funding and important support of citizen can come from teaching space policy in universities as well as in special workshops for government, industrial and military circles. The paper will outline a course that fulfils this goal.

  19. Nuclear versus cytosolic activity of the yeast Hog1 MAP kinase in response to osmotic and tunicamycin-induced ER stress.

    PubMed

    García-Marqués, Sara; Randez-Gil, Francisca; Prieto, Jose A

    2015-07-22

    We examined the physiological significance of the nuclear versus cytosolic localization of the MAPK Hog1p in the ability of yeast cells to cope with osmotic and ER (endoplasmic reticulum) stress. Our results indicate that nuclear import of Hog1p is not critical for osmoadaptation. Plasma membrane-anchored Hog1p is still able to induce increased expression of GPD1 and glycerol accumulation. This is a key osmoregulatory event, although a small production of the osmolyte coupled with the nuclear import of Hog1p is sufficient to provide osmoresistance. On the contrary, the nuclear activity of Hog1p is dispensable for ER stress adaptation.

  20. Auxin responsiveness of the MONOPTEROS-BODENLOS module in primary root initiation critically depends on the nuclear import kinetics of the Aux/IAA inhibitor BODENLOS.

    PubMed

    Herud, Ole; Weijers, Dolf; Lau, Steffen; Jürgens, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Primary root formation in early embryogenesis of Arabidopsis thaliana is initiated with the specification of a single cell called hypophysis. This initial step requires the auxin-dependent release of the transcription factor MONOPTEROS (MP, also known as ARF5) from its inhibition by the Aux/IAA protein BODENLOS (BDL, also known as IAA12). Auxin-insensitive bdl mutant embryos and mp loss-of-function embryos fail to specify the hypophysis, giving rise to rootless seedlings. A suppressor screen of rootless bdl mutant seedlings yielded a mutation in the nuclear import receptor IMPORTIN-ALPHA 6 (IMPα6) that promoted primary root formation through rescue of the embryonic hypophysis defects, without causing additional phenotypic changes. Aux/IAA proteins are continually synthesized and degraded, which is essential for rapid transcriptional responses to changing auxin concentrations. Nuclear translocation of bdl:3×GFP was slowed down in impα6 mutants as measured by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis, which correlated with the reduced inhibition of MP by bdl in transient expression assays in impα6 knock-down protoplasts. The MP-BDL module acts like an auxin-triggered genetic switch because MP activates its own expression as well as the expression of its inhibitor BDL. Using an established simulation model, we determined that the reduced nuclear translocation rate of BDL in impα6 mutant embryos rendered the auxin-triggered switch unstable, impairing the fast response to changes in auxin concentration. Our results suggest that the instability of the inhibitor BDL necessitates a fast nuclear uptake in order to reach the critical threshold level required for auxin responsiveness of the MP-BDL module in primary root initiation.

  1. Recent Nuclear Astrophysics Data Activities in the US

    SciTech Connect

    Bardayan, D.W.; Blackmon, J.C.; Browne, E.; Firestone, R.B.; Hale, G.M.; Hoffman, R.D.; Ma, Z.; McLane, V.; Norman, E.B.; Shu, N.; Smith, D.L.; Smith, M.S.; Van Wormer, L.A.; Woosley, S.E.; Wu, S.-C.

    1999-08-30

    Measurements in nuclear physics laboratories form the empirical foundation for new, realistic, sophisticated theoretical models of a wide variety of astrophysical systems. The predictive power of these models has, in many instances, a strong dependence on the input nuclear data, and more extensive and accurate nuclear data is required for these models than ever before. Progress in astrophysics can be aided by providing scientists with more usable, accurate, and significant amounts of nuclear data in a timely fashion in formats that can be easily incorporated into their models. A number of recent data compilations, evaluations, calculations, and disseminations that address nuclear astrophysics data needs will be described.

  2. Human Heat shock protein 40 (Hsp40/DnaJB1) promotes influenza A virus replication by assisting nuclear import of viral ribonucleoproteins.

    PubMed

    Batra, Jyoti; Tripathi, Shashank; Kumar, Amrita; Katz, Jacqueline M; Cox, Nancy J; Lal, Renu B; Sambhara, Suryaprakash; Lal, Sunil K

    2016-01-01

    A unique feature of influenza A virus (IAV) life cycle is replication of the viral genome in the host cell nucleus. The nuclear import of IAV genome is an indispensable step in establishing virus infection. IAV nucleoprotein (NP) is known to mediate the nuclear import of viral genome via its nuclear localization signals. Here, we demonstrate that cellular heat shock protein 40 (Hsp40/DnaJB1) facilitates the nuclear import of incoming IAV viral ribonucleoproteins (vRNPs) and is important for efficient IAV replication. Hsp40 was found to interact with NP component of IAV RNPs during early stages of infection. This interaction is mediated by the J domain of Hsp40 and N-terminal region of NP. Drug or RNAi mediated inhibition of Hsp40 resulted in reduced nuclear import of IAV RNPs, diminished viral polymerase function and attenuates overall viral replication. Hsp40 was also found to be required for efficient association between NP and importin alpha, which is crucial for IAV RNP nuclear translocation. These studies demonstrate an important role for cellular chaperone Hsp40/DnaJB1 in influenza A virus life cycle by assisting nuclear trafficking of viral ribonucleoproteins. PMID:26750153

  3. Human Heat shock protein 40 (Hsp40/DnaJB1) promotes influenza A virus replication by assisting nuclear import of viral ribonucleoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Batra, Jyoti; Tripathi, Shashank; Kumar, Amrita; Katz, Jacqueline M.; Cox, Nancy J.; Lal, Renu B.; Sambhara, Suryaprakash; Lal, Sunil K.

    2016-01-01

    A unique feature of influenza A virus (IAV) life cycle is replication of the viral genome in the host cell nucleus. The nuclear import of IAV genome is an indispensable step in establishing virus infection. IAV nucleoprotein (NP) is known to mediate the nuclear import of viral genome via its nuclear localization signals. Here, we demonstrate that cellular heat shock protein 40 (Hsp40/DnaJB1) facilitates the nuclear import of incoming IAV viral ribonucleoproteins (vRNPs) and is important for efficient IAV replication. Hsp40 was found to interact with NP component of IAV RNPs during early stages of infection. This interaction is mediated by the J domain of Hsp40 and N-terminal region of NP. Drug or RNAi mediated inhibition of Hsp40 resulted in reduced nuclear import of IAV RNPs, diminished viral polymerase function and attenuates overall viral replication. Hsp40 was also found to be required for efficient association between NP and importin alpha, which is crucial for IAV RNP nuclear translocation. These studies demonstrate an important role for cellular chaperone Hsp40/DnaJB1 in influenza A virus life cycle by assisting nuclear trafficking of viral ribonucleoproteins. PMID:26750153

  4. Parvoviruses Cause Nuclear Envelope Breakdown by Activating Key Enzymes of Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Porwal, Manvi; Cohen, Sarah; Snoussi, Kenza; Popa-Wagner, Ruth; Anderson, Fenja; Dugot-Senant, Nathalie; Wodrich, Harald; Dinsart, Christiane; Kleinschmidt, Jürgen A.; Panté, Nelly; Kann, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Disassembly of the nuclear lamina is essential in mitosis and apoptosis requiring multiple coordinated enzymatic activities in nucleus and cytoplasm. Activation and coordination of the different activities is poorly understood and moreover complicated as some factors translocate between cytoplasm and nucleus in preparatory phases. Here we used the ability of parvoviruses to induce nuclear membrane breakdown to understand the triggers of key mitotic enzymes. Nuclear envelope disintegration was shown upon infection, microinjection but also upon their application to permeabilized cells. The latter technique also showed that nuclear envelope disintegration was independent upon soluble cytoplasmic factors. Using time-lapse microscopy, we observed that nuclear disassembly exhibited mitosis-like kinetics and occurred suddenly, implying a catastrophic event irrespective of cell- or type of parvovirus used. Analyzing the order of the processes allowed us to propose a model starting with direct binding of parvoviruses to distinct proteins of the nuclear pore causing structural rearrangement of the parvoviruses. The resulting exposure of domains comprising amphipathic helices was required for nuclear envelope disintegration, which comprised disruption of inner and outer nuclear membrane as shown by electron microscopy. Consistent with Ca++ efflux from the lumen between inner and outer nuclear membrane we found that Ca++ was essential for nuclear disassembly by activating PKC. PKC activation then triggered activation of cdk-2, which became further activated by caspase-3. Collectively our study shows a unique interaction of a virus with the nuclear envelope, provides evidence that a nuclear pool of executing enzymes is sufficient for nuclear disassembly in quiescent cells, and demonstrates that nuclear disassembly can be uncoupled from initial phases of mitosis. PMID:24204256

  5. Importance of Broken Gauge Symmetry in Addressing Three, Key, Unanswered Questions Posed by Low Nuclear Reactions (LENR's)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubb, Scott

    2003-03-01

    Three, Key, Unanswered Questions posed by LENR's are: 1. How do we explain the lack of high energy particles (HEP's)? 2. Can we understand and prioritize the way coupling can occur between nuclear- and atomic- lengthscales, and 3. What are the roles of Surface-Like (SL), as opposed to Bulk-Like (BL), processes in triggering nuclear phenomena. One important source of confusion associated with each of these questions is the common perception that the quantum mechanical phases of different particles are not correlated with each other. When the momenta p of interacting particles is large, and reactions occur rapidly (between HEP's, for example), this is a valid assumption. But when the relative difference in p becomes vanishingly small, between one charge, and many others, as a result of implicit electromagnetic coupling, each charge can share a common phase, relative to the others, modulo 2nπ, where n is an integer, even when outside forces are introduced. The associated forms of broken gauge symmetry, distinguish BL from SL phenomena, at room temperature, also explain super- and normal- conductivity in solids, and can be used to address the Three, Key, Unanswered Questions posed by LENR's.

  6. Homocysteine-induced apoptosis in endothelial cells coincides with nuclear NOX2 and peri-nuclear NOX4 activity.

    PubMed

    Sipkens, Jessica A; Hahn, Nynke; van den Brand, Carlien S; Meischl, Christof; Cillessen, Saskia A G M; Smith, Desirée E C; Juffermans, Lynda J M; Musters, René J P; Roos, Dirk; Jakobs, Cornelis; Blom, Henk J; Smulders, Yvo M; Krijnen, Paul A J; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Rauwerda, Jan A; van Hinsbergh, Victor W M; Niessen, Hans W M

    2013-11-01

    Apoptosis of endothelial cells related to homocysteine (Hcy) has been reported in several studies. In this study, we evaluated whether reactive oxygen species (ROS)-producing signaling pathways contribute to Hcy-induced apoptosis induction, with specific emphasis on NADPH oxidases. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were incubated with 0.01-2.5 mM Hcy. We determined the effect of Hcy on caspase-3 activity, annexin V positivity, intracellular NOX1, NOX2, NOX4, and p47(phox) expression and localization, nuclear nitrotyrosine accumulation, and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ m). Hcy induced caspase-3 activity and apoptosis; this effect was concentration dependent and maximal after 6-h exposure to 2.5 mM Hcy. It was accompanied by a significant increase in ΔΨ m. Cysteine was inactive on these parameters excluding a reactive thiol group effect. Hcy induced an increase in cellular NOX2, p47(phox), and NOX4, but not that of NOX1. 3D digital imaging microscopy followed by image deconvolution analysis showed nuclear accumulation of NOX2 and p47(phox) in endothelial cells exposed to Hcy, but not in control cells, which coincided with accumulation of nuclear nitrotyrosine residues. Furthermore, Hcy enhanced peri-nuclear localization of NOX4 coinciding with accumulation of peri-nuclear nitrotyrosine residues, a reflection of local ROS production. p47(phox) was also increased in the peri-nuclear region. The Hcy-induced increase in caspase-3 activity was prevented by DPI and apocynin, suggesting involvement of NOX activity. The data presented in this article reveal accumulation of nuclear NOX2 and peri-nuclear NOX4 accumulation as potential source of ROS production in Hcy-induced apoptosis in endothelial cells.

  7. Nuclear localization of Lyn tyrosine kinase mediated by inhibition of its kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Kikuko; Nakayama, Yuji; Togashi, Yuuki; Obata, Yuuki; Kuga, Takahisa; Kasahara, Kousuke; Fukumoto, Yasunori; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2008-11-01

    Src-family kinases, cytoplasmic enzymes that participate in various signaling events, are found at not only the plasma membrane but also subcellular compartments, such as the nucleus, the Golgi apparatus and late endosomes/lysosomes. Lyn, a member of the Src-family kinases, is known to play a role in DNA damage response and cell cycle control in the nucleus. However, it is still unclear how the localization of Lyn to the nucleus is regulated. Here, we investigated the mechanism of the distribution of Lyn between the cytoplasm and the nucleus in epitheloid HeLa cells and hematopoietic THP-1 cells. Lyn was definitely detected in purified nuclei by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting analyses. Nuclear accumulation of Lyn was enhanced upon treatment of cells with leptomycin B (LMB), an inhibitor of Crm1-mediated nuclear export. Moreover, Lyn mutants lacking the sites for lipid modification were highly accumulated in the nucleus upon LMB treatment. Intriguingly, inhibition of the kinase activity of Lyn by SU6656, Csk overexpression, or point mutation in the ATP-binding site induced an increase in nuclear Lyn levels. These results suggest that Lyn being imported into and rapidly exported from the nucleus preferentially accumulates in the nucleus by inhibition of the kinase activity and lipid modification.

  8. Contractile activity-induced adaptations in the mitochondrial protein import system.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, M; Chesley, A; Freyssenet, D; Hood, D A

    1998-05-01

    We previously demonstrated that subsarcolemmal (SS) and intermyofibrillar (IMF) mitochondrial subfractions import proteins at different rates. This study was undertaken to investigate 1) whether protein import is altered by chronic contractile activity, which induces mitochondrial biogenesis, and 2) whether these two subfractions adapt similarly. Using electrical stimulation (10 Hz, 3 h/day for 7 and 14 days) to induce contractile activity, we observed that malate dehydrogenase import into the matrix of the SS and IMF mitochondia isolated from stimulated muscle was significantly increased by 1.4-to 1.7-fold, although the pattern of increase differed for each subfraction. This acceleration of import may be mitochondrial compartment specific, since the import of Bcl-2 into the outer membrane was not affected. Contractile activity also modified the mitochondrial content of proteins comprising the import machinery, as evident from increases in the levels of the intramitochondrial chaperone mtHSP70 as well as the outer membrane import receptor Tom20 in SS and IMF mitochondria. Addition of cytosol isolated from stimulated or control muscles to the import reaction resulted in similar twofold increases in the ability of mitochondria to import malate dehydrogenase, despite elevations in the concentration of mitochondrial import-stimulating factor within the cytosol of chronically stimulated muscle. These results suggest that chronic contractile activity modifies the extra- and intramitochondrial environments in a fashion that favors the acceleration of precursor protein import into the matrix of the organelle. This increase in protein import is likely an important adaptation in the overall process of mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:9612226

  9. Nuclear import of high risk HPV16 E7 oncoprotein is mediated by its zinc-binding domain via hydrophobic interactions with Nup62

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhard, Jeremy; Onder, Zeynep; Moroianu, Junona

    2013-11-15

    We previously discovered that nuclear import of high risk HPV16 E7 is mediated by a cNLS located within the zinc-binding domain via a pathway that is independent of karyopherins/importins (Angeline et al., 2003; Knapp et al., 2009). In this study we continued our characterization of the cNLS and nuclear import pathway of HPV16 E7. We find that an intact zinc-binding domain is essential for the cNLS function in mediating nuclear import of HPV16 E7. Mutagenesis of cysteine residues to alanine in each of the two CysXXCys motifs involved in zinc-binding changes the nuclear localization of the EGFP-16E7 and 2xEGFP-16E7 mutants. We further discover that a patch of hydrophobic residues, {sub 65}LRLCV{sub 69}, within the zinc-binding domain of HPV16 E7 mediates its nuclear import via hydrophobic interactions with the FG domain of the central channel nucleoporin Nup62. - Highlights: • An intact zinc-binding domain is essential for the nuclear localization of HPV16 E7. • Identification of a hydrophobic patch that is critical for the nuclear import of HPV16 E7. • HPV16 E7 interacts via its zinc-binding domain with the FG domain of Nup62.

  10. RECENT ACTIVITIES AT THE CENTER FOR SPACE NUCLEAR RESEARCH FOR DEVELOPING NUCLEAR THERMAL ROCKETS

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. O'Brien

    2001-09-01

    Nuclear power has been considered for space applications since the 1960s. Between 1955 and 1972 the US built and tested over twenty nuclear reactors/ rocket-engines in the Rover/NERVA programs. However, changes in environmental laws may make the redevelopment of the nuclear rocket more difficult. Recent advances in fuel fabrication and testing options indicate that a nuclear rocket with a fuel form significantly different from NERVA may be needed to ensure public support. The Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) is pursuing development of tungsten based fuels for use in a NTR, for a surface power reactor, and to encapsulate radioisotope power sources. The CSNR Summer Fellows program has investigated the feasibility of several missions enabled by the NTR. The potential mission benefits of a nuclear rocket, historical achievements of the previous programs, and recent investigations into alternatives in design and materials for future systems will be discussed.

  11. Physical Activity in the Heat: Important Considerations to Keep Your Students Safe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roetert, E. Paul; Richardson, Cheryl L.; Bergeron, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Although July and August tend to be the warmest months of the year, the months leading up to summer as well as the months just following summer can also be quite warm or even very hot. In this article, the authors share some important information to help prepare physical educators for overseeing activities in the heat and, just as importantly, to…

  12. Transcriptional Regulation of BK Virus by Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Joslynn A.; Manley, Kate; Dugan, Aisling S.; O'Hara, Bethany A.; Atwood, Walter J.

    2010-01-01

    The human polyomavirus BK virus (BKV) is a common virus for which 80 to 90% of the adult population is seropositive. BKV reactivation in immunosuppressed patients or renal transplant patients is the primary cause of polyomavirus-associated nephropathy (PVN). Using the Dunlop strain of BKV, we found that nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) plays an important regulatory role in BKV infection. Luciferase reporter assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that NFAT4 bound to the viral promoter and regulated viral transcription and infection. The mutational analysis of the NFAT binding sites demonstrated complex functional interactions between NFAT, c-fos, c-jun, and the p65 subunit of NF-κB that together influence promoter activity and viral growth. These data indicate that NFAT is required for BKV infection and is involved in a complex regulatory network that both positively and negatively influences promoter activity and viral infection. PMID:19955309

  13. Alanine-Scanning Mutational Analysis of Durancin GL Reveals Residues Important for Its Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Ju, Xingrong; Chen, Xinquan; Du, Lihui; Wu, Xueyou; Liu, Fang; Yuan, Jian

    2015-07-22

    Durancin GL is a novel class IIa bacteriocin with 43 residues produced by Enterococcus durans 41D. This bacteriocin demonstrates narrow inhibition spectrum and potent antimicrobial activity against several Listeria monocytogenes strains, including nisin-resistant L. monocytogenes NR30. A systematic alanine-scanning mutational analysis with site-directed mutagenesis was performed to analyze durancin GL residues important for antimicrobial activity and specificity. Results showed that three mutations lost their antimicrobial activity, ten mutations demonstrated a decreased effect on the activity, and seven mutations exhibited relatively high activity. With regard to inhibitory spectrum, four mutants demonstrated a narrower antimicrobial spectrum than wild-type durancin GL. Another four mutants displayed a broader target cell spectrum and increased potency relative to wild-type durancin GL. These findings broaden our understanding of durancin GL residues important for its antimicrobial activity and contribute to future rational design of variants with increased potency.

  14. Alanine-Scanning Mutational Analysis of Durancin GL Reveals Residues Important for Its Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Ju, Xingrong; Chen, Xinquan; Du, Lihui; Wu, Xueyou; Liu, Fang; Yuan, Jian

    2015-07-22

    Durancin GL is a novel class IIa bacteriocin with 43 residues produced by Enterococcus durans 41D. This bacteriocin demonstrates narrow inhibition spectrum and potent antimicrobial activity against several Listeria monocytogenes strains, including nisin-resistant L. monocytogenes NR30. A systematic alanine-scanning mutational analysis with site-directed mutagenesis was performed to analyze durancin GL residues important for antimicrobial activity and specificity. Results showed that three mutations lost their antimicrobial activity, ten mutations demonstrated a decreased effect on the activity, and seven mutations exhibited relatively high activity. With regard to inhibitory spectrum, four mutants demonstrated a narrower antimicrobial spectrum than wild-type durancin GL. Another four mutants displayed a broader target cell spectrum and increased potency relative to wild-type durancin GL. These findings broaden our understanding of durancin GL residues important for its antimicrobial activity and contribute to future rational design of variants with increased potency. PMID:26168032

  15. Importance of Endosomal Cathelicidin Degradation To Enhance DNA-Induced Chicken Macrophage Activation.

    PubMed

    Coorens, Maarten; van Dijk, Albert; Bikker, Floris; Veldhuizen, Edwin J A; Haagsman, Henk P

    2015-10-15

    Cathelicidins are essential in the protection against invading pathogens through both their direct antimicrobial activity and their immunomodulatory functions. Although cathelicidins are known to modulate activation by several TLR ligands, little is known about their influence on DNA-induced macrophage activation. In this study, we explored the effects of cathelicidins on DNA-induced activation of chicken macrophages and elucidated the intracellular processes underlying these effects. Our results show that chicken cathelicidin (CATH)-2 strongly enhances DNA-induced activation of both chicken and mammalian macrophages because of enhanced endocytosis of DNA-CATH-2 complexes. After endocytosis, DNA is liberated from the complex because of proteolytic breakdown of CATH-2, after which TLR21 is activated. This leads to increased cytokine expression and NO production. Through the interaction with DNA, CATH-2 can play an important role in modulating the immune response at sites of infection. These observations underline the importance of cathelicidins in sensing bacterial products and regulating immune responses.

  16. Distinct activation properties of the nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) isoforms NFATc3 and NFATc4 in neurons.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Jason D; Kim, Man-Su; Houlihan, Patrick R; Shutov, Leonid P; Mohapatra, Durga P; Strack, Stefan; Usachev, Yuriy M

    2012-11-01

    The Ca(2+)/calcineurin-dependent transcription factor NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T-cells) is implicated in regulating dendritic and axonal development, synaptogenesis, and neuronal survival. Despite the increasing appreciation for the importance of NFAT-dependent transcription in the nervous system, the regulation and function of specific NFAT isoforms in neurons are poorly understood. Here, we compare the activation of NFATc3 and NFATc4 in hippocampal and dorsal root ganglion neurons following electrically evoked elevations of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)). We find that NFATc3 undergoes rapid dephosphorylation and nuclear translocation that are essentially complete within 20 min, although NFATc4 remains phosphorylated and localized to the cytosol, only exhibiting nuclear localization following prolonged (1-3 h) depolarization. Knocking down NFATc3, but not NFATc4, strongly diminished NFAT-mediated transcription induced by mild depolarization in neurons. By analyzing NFATc3/NFATc4 chimeras, we find that the region containing the serine-rich region-1 (SRR1) mildly affects initial NFAT translocation, although the region containing the serine-proline repeats is critical for determining the magnitude of NFAT activation and nuclear localization upon depolarization. Knockdown of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) significantly increased the depolarization-induced nuclear localization of NFATc4. In contrast, inhibition of p38 or mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinases had no significant effect on nuclear import of NFATc4. Thus, electrically evoked [Ca(2+)](i) elevation in neurons rapidly and strongly activates NFATc3, whereas activation of NFATc4 requires a coincident increase in [Ca(2+)](i) and suppression of GSK3β, with differences in the serine-proline-containing region giving rise to these distinct activation properties of NFATc3 and NFATc4.

  17. Finerenone Impedes Aldosterone-dependent Nuclear Import of the Mineralocorticoid Receptor and Prevents Genomic Recruitment of Steroid Receptor Coactivator-1*

    PubMed Central

    Amazit, Larbi; Le Billan, Florian; Kolkhof, Peter; Lamribet, Khadija; Viengchareun, Say; Fay, Michel R.; Khan, Junaid A.; Hillisch, Alexander; Lombès, Marc; Rafestin-Oblin, Marie-Edith; Fagart, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Aldosterone regulates sodium homeostasis by activating the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Hyperaldosteronism leads todeleterious effects on the kidney, blood vessels, and heart. Although steroidal antagonists such as spironolactone and eplerenone are clinically useful for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, they are associated with several side effects. Finerenone, a novel nonsteroidal MR antagonist, is presently being evaluated in two clinical phase IIb trials. Here, we characterized the molecular mechanisms of action of finerenone and spironolactone at several key steps of the MR signaling pathway. Molecular modeling and mutagenesis approaches allowed identification of Ser-810 and Ala-773 as key residues for the high MR selectivity of finerenone. Moreover, we showed that, in contrast to spironolactone, which activates the S810L mutant MR responsible for a severe form of early onset hypertension, finerenone displays strict antagonistic properties. Aldosterone-dependent phosphorylation and degradation of MR are inhibited by both finerenone and spironolactone. However, automated quantification of MR subcellular distribution demonstrated that finerenone delays aldosterone-induced nuclear accumulation of MR more efficiently than spironolactone. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that, as opposed to spironolactone, finerenone inhibits MR, steroid receptor coactivator-1, and RNA polymerase II binding at the regulatory sequence of the SCNN1A gene and also remarkably reduces basal MR and steroid receptor coactivator-1 recruitment, unraveling a specific and unrecognized inactivating mechanism on MR signaling. Overall, our data demonstrate that the highly potent and selective MR antagonist finerenone specifically impairs several critical steps of the MR signaling pathway and therefore represents a promising new generation MR antagonist. PMID:26203193

  18. Morphology, star formation, and nuclear activity in void galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedmann, Sophia; Miller, Brendan; Gallo, Elena; Pazar, Beni; Alfvin, Erik

    2015-01-01

    We report on new Chandra observations of six early-type galaxies located within cosmic voids, from a program examining the influence of Mpc-scale environment upon star formation and low-level supermassive black hole activity. Simple feedback prescriptions are predicted to operate independently of the surrounding density once outside the dark matter halo, and further link star formation quenching to black hole activity. Alternatively, mediation of the cold gas supply by the large-scale environment, for example through increased cold-stream accretion and reduced harassment or stripping within more isolated regions, could mutually enhance star formation and (perhaps indirectly) low-level supermassive black hole activity. The six targeted early-type galaxies have comparable stellar masses of 6-9e10 solar, chosen to be near the predicted "critical value" for efficient feedback, but span a wide range of star-formation rates. Specifically, they have SFRs of 6.5, 1.4, 0.45, 0.10, 0.04, and 0.03 solar masses per year. All galaxies are detected in the Chandra ACIS-S observations with 0.3-8 keV X-ray luminosities ranging from 2e39 to 1e41 erg/s. Specifically, they have log Lx values of 40.4, 41.1, 41.1, 39.3, 39.2, and 39.2, again ordered by decreasing SFR. The three galaxies with moderate-to-high star formation rates have nuclear X-ray luminosities that are significantly greater than those of the three galaxies with low star formation rates. This result is more consistent with a symbiotic relationship between current low-level star formation and supermassive black hole activity than with simple feedback quenching models. We additionally situate these galaxies in the context of void and cluster galaxies in the local universe, model their optical surface brightness profiles and color gradients, discuss caveats including the possibility of X-ray binary contamination, and consider other supermassive black hole activity indicators.

  19. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Upgrade Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past year the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) has been undergoing a significant upgrade beyond its initial configuration. The NTREES facility is designed to perform realistic non-nuclear testing of nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) fuel elements and fuel materials. Although the NTREES facility cannot mimic the neutron and gamma environment of an operating NTR, it can simulate the thermal hydraulic environment within an NTR fuel element to provide critical information on material performance and compatibility. The first phase of the upgrade activities which was completed in 2012 in part consisted of an extensive modification to the hydrogen system to permit computer controlled operations outside the building through the use of pneumatically operated variable position valves. This setup also allows the hydrogen flow rate to be increased to over 200 g/sec and reduced the operation complexity of the system. The second stage of modifications to NTREES which has just been completed expands the capabilities of the facility significantly. In particular, the previous 50 kW induction power supply has been replaced with a 1.2 MW unit which should allow more prototypical fuel element temperatures to be reached. The water cooling system was also upgraded to so as to be capable of removing 100% of the heat generated during. This new setup required that the NTREES vessel be raised onto a platform along with most of its associated gas and vent lines. In this arrangement, the induction heater and water systems are now located underneath the platform. In this new configuration, the 1.2 MW NTREES induction heater will be capable of testing fuel elements and fuel materials in flowing hydrogen at pressures up to 1000 psi at temperatures up to and beyond 3000 K and at near-prototypic reactor channel power densities. NTREES is also capable of testing potential fuel elements with a variety of propellants, including hydrogen with additives to inhibit

  20. Mobile fission and activation products in nuclear waste disposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grambow, Bernd

    2008-12-01

    When disposing nuclear waste in clay formations it is expected that the most radiotoxic elements like Pu, Np or Am move only a few centimetres to meters before they decay. Only a few radionuclides are able to reach the biosphere and contribute to their long-term exposure risks, mainly anionic species like I129, Cl36, Se79 and in some cases C14 and Tc99, whatever the scenario considered. The recent OECD/NEA cosponsored international MOFAP workshop focussed on transport and chemical behaviour of these less toxic radionuclides. New research themes have been addressed, such as how to make use of molecular level information for the understanding of the problem of migration at large distances. Diffusion studies need to face mineralogical heterogeneities over tens to hundreds of meters. Diffusion rates are very low since the clay rock pores are so small (few nm) that electrostatic repulsion limits the space available for anion diffusion (anion exclusion). The large volume of traversed rock will provide so many retention sites that despite weak retention, even certain of these "mobile" nuclides may show significant retardation. However, the question how to measure reliably very low retention parameters has been posed. An important issue is whether redox states or organic/inorganic speciation change from their initial state at the moment of release from the waste during long term contact with surfaces, hydrogen saturated environments, etc.

  1. Mobile fission and activation products in nuclear waste disposal.

    PubMed

    Grambow, Bernd

    2008-12-12

    When disposing nuclear waste in clay formations it is expected that the most radiotoxic elements like Pu, Np or Am move only a few centimetres to meters before they decay. Only a few radionuclides are able to reach the biosphere and contribute to their long-term exposure risks, mainly anionic species like I129, Cl36, Se79 and in some cases C14 and Tc99, whatever the scenario considered. The recent OECD/NEA cosponsored international MOFAP workshop focussed on transport and chemical behaviour of these less toxic radionuclides. New research themes have been addressed, such as how to make use of molecular level information for the understanding of the problem of migration at large distances. Diffusion studies need to face mineralogical heterogeneities over tens to hundreds of meters. Diffusion rates are very low since the clay rock pores are so small (few nm) that electrostatic repulsion limits the space available for anion diffusion (anion exclusion). The large volume of traversed rock will provide so many retention sites that despite weak retention, even certain of these "mobile" nuclides may show significant retardation. However, the question how to measure reliably very low retention parameters has been posed. An important issue is whether redox states or organic/inorganic speciation change from their initial state at the moment of release from the waste during long term contact with surfaces, hydrogen saturated environments, etc.

  2. Proton Reaction Data Library for Nuclear Activation (Medium Energy Nuclear Data Library.)

    2002-03-01

    Version 00 GROUPXS does file handling and processing of the double-differential continuum-emission cross sections stored in the new MF6 format of ENDF/VI. It treats the energy-angle data that are supposed to be represented by a Legendre-polynomial expansion in the center-of-mass system and can do the following: (1) Conversion of MF6 data from center-of-mass system to the laboratory system, with the possibility to continue the calculation with the options (2), (3), and (4). (2) Conversion ofmore » Legendre-polynomial representation into point-wise angular data, in MF6 format. (3) Conversion of data from MF6 into MF4 + MF5 (ENDF-V). (4) Calculation of group constants, scattering matrices and transfer matrices for arbitrary group structures with a fusion micro-flux weighting spectrum (PN-approximation). The code treats only continuum reaction types that are stored in the MF6 format with the restrictions as specified for the European Fusion File (EFF1). These restrictions are not inconvenient for the purpose of fusion neutronics calculations and they facilitate relatively simple processing . This neutron reaction data library can be used for nuclear activation and transmutation applications at energies up to 100 MeV.« less

  3. Preliminary investigations of active pixel sensors in Nuclear Medicine imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Robert; Evans, Noel; Evans, Phil; Osmond, J.; Clark, A.; Turchetta, R.

    2009-06-01

    Three CMOS active pixel sensors have been investigated for their application to Nuclear Medicine imaging. Startracker with 525×525 25 μm square pixels has been coupled via a fibre optic stud to a 2 mm thick segmented CsI(Tl) crystal. Imaging tests were performed using 99mTc sources, which emit 140 keV gamma rays. The system was interfaced to a PC via FPGA-based DAQ and optical link enabling imaging rates of 10 f/s. System noise was measured to be >100e and it was shown that the majority of this noise was fixed pattern in nature. The intrinsic spatial resolution was measured to be ˜80 μm and the system spatial resolution measured with a slit was ˜450 μm. The second sensor, On Pixel Intelligent CMOS (OPIC), had 64×72 40 μm pixels and was used to evaluate noise characteristics and to develop a method of differentiation between fixed pattern and statistical noise. The third sensor, Vanilla, had 520×520 25 μm pixels and a measured system noise of ˜25e. This sensor was coupled directly to the segmented phosphor. Imaging results show that even at this lower level of noise the signal from 140 keV gamma rays is small as the light from the phosphor is spread over a large number of pixels. Suggestions for the 'ideal' sensor are made.

  4. NUCLEAR ACTIVITY IS MORE PREVALENT IN STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Rosario, D. J.; Lutz, D.; Berta, S.; Popesso, P.; Genzel, R.; Saintonge, A.; Tacconi, L.; Wuyts, S. E-mail: lutz@mpe.mpg.de E-mail: popesso@mpe.mpg.de E-mail: amelie@mpe.mpg.de E-mail: swuyts@mpe.mpg.de; and others

    2013-07-01

    We explore the question of whether low and moderate luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are preferentially found in galaxies that are undergoing a transition from active star formation (SF) to quiescence. This notion has been suggested by studies of the UV-optical colors of AGN hosts, which find them to be common among galaxies in the so-called Green Valley, a region of galaxy color space believed to be composed mostly of galaxies undergoing SF quenching. Combining the deepest current X-ray and Herschel/PACS far-infrared (FIR) observations of the two Chandra Deep Fields with redshifts, stellar masses, and rest-frame photometry derived from the extensive and uniform multi-wavelength data in these fields, we compare the rest-frame U - V color distributions and star formation rate distributions of AGNs and carefully constructed samples of inactive control galaxies. The UV-to-optical colors of AGNs are consistent with equally massive inactive galaxies at redshifts out to z {approx} 2, but we show that such colors are poor tracers of SF. While the FIR distributions of both star-forming AGNs and star-forming inactive galaxies are statistically similar, we show that AGNs are preferentially found in star-forming host galaxies, or, in other words, AGNs are less likely to be found in weakly star-forming or quenched galaxies. We postulate that, among X-ray-selected AGNs of low and moderate accretion luminosities, the supply of cold gas primarily determines the accretion rate distribution of the nuclear black holes.

  5. Research activities in nuclear astrophysics and related areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA/GRO grant NAG 5-2081, at the University of Chicago, has provided support for a broad program of theoretical research in nuclear astrophysics and related areas, with regard to gamma-ray and hard X-ray emission from classical nova explosions. This research emphasized the possible detection of 22Na gamma-ray line emission from nearby novae involving ONeMg white dwarfs, the detailed examination of 26Al production in novae, and the possible detection of the predicted early gamma ray emission from novae that arises from the decay of the short lived, positron emitting isotopes of CNO elements. Studies of nova related problems have consumed an increasing fraction of the Principal Investigator's research efforts over the past decade. Current research addresses problems associated with the standard model for the outbursts of the classical novae: the occurrence of thermonuclear runaways (TNR) in the accreted hydrogen rich envelopes on white dwarfs in close binary systems (see, e.g., the reviews by Truran 1982; and Shara 1989). Research in progress and planned for the next three years has three main objectives: (1) to gain an improved understanding of the early evolution of the light curves of, particularly, the fastest novae; (2) to gain an improved understanding of the relative importance of the various possible mechanisms of envelope hydrogen depletion (e.g. winds, common envelope driven mass loss, and nuclear burning) to the long term evolution of novae in outburst; and (3) to seek to provide a somewhat more definitive statement of the role of classical novae in nucleosynthesis. Our proposed 2-D studies of convection during the early phases of the TNR and our systematic attempt to incorporate an improved treatment of radiation hydrodynamics into the hydrodynamic code utilized in our calculations, are particularly relevant to the first of these objectives. Further 2-D studies of the effects of common envelope evolution are intended to provide more realistic constraints

  6. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Upgrade Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William J. Jr.; Moran, Robert P.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2012-01-01

    To support the on-going nuclear thermal propulsion effort, a state-of-the-art non nuclear experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The facility to perform this testing is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator (NTREES). This device can simulate the environmental conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel components will be subjected during reactor operation. Test articles mounted in the simulator are inductively heated in such a manner so as to accurately reproduce the temperatures and heat fluxes which would normally occur as a result of nuclear fission and would be exposed to flowing hydrogen. Initial testing of a somewhat prototypical fuel element has been successfully performed in NTREES and the facility has now been shutdown to allow for an extensive reconfiguration of the facility which will result in a significant upgrade in its capabilities

  7. The importance of active efflux systems in the quinolone resistance of clinical isolates of Salmonella spp.

    PubMed

    Escribano, Isabel; Rodríguez, Juan Carlos; Cebrian, Laura; Royo, Gloria

    2004-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the importance of the active elimination of antibiotics by active efflux systems, in the decrease in fluoroquinolone sensitivity of clinical isolates of Salmonella spp. as well as the intrinsic antibiotic activity of certain active efflux system inhibitors. The effect of the active efflux system on the decrease in sensitivity to nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin and sparfloxacin was studied by investigating the variation in the in vitro activity of these compounds when assayed in association with reserpine and MC 207.110. The active efflux systems inhibited by reserpine displayed low activity in the elimination of these compounds, whereas those inhibited by MC 207.110 showed high activity in the elimination of nalidixic acid and sparfloxacin, but were less effective in the elimination of ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin. These two compounds did not exhibit intrinsic inhibitory activity against Salmonella spp. at the concentrations assayed. These mechanisms of resistance to antibiotics are complex and vary depending on the chemical composition of the antibiotics used, and perhaps the inhibitors of these systems, although they do not exhibit any intrinsic antibiotic activity, may be used as adjuvants to increase the activity of certain antibiotics. These mechanisms complement the mutations in the gyrA gene and this supports the thesis that it is necessary to lower the breakpoint established by the NCCLS for ciprofloxacin, since the strains studied have resistance mechanisms that reduce the activity of this drug and may favour the emergence of resistant mutants during treatment.

  8. Caspase-like activity in programmed nuclear death during conjugation of Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Endoh, H

    2003-06-01

    Apoptosis, or programmed cell death, is common in a variety of eucaryotes, from unicellular protozoa to vertebrates. The ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila has a unique apoptosis-like nuclear death during conjugation, called programmed nuclear death. This death program involves nuclear condensation (pyknosis) and oligonucleosomal DNA fragmentation in the parental macronucleus. Subsequently, the condensed nucleus is entirely resorbed in the autophagosome. Here we demonstrate that caspase-8- and -9-like activity was detected, but no caspase-3-like activity, by in vitro assay during the nuclear resorption process, suggesting that caspase-like activity is associated with both programmed cell death and apoptosis-like nuclear death in Tetrahymena. The use of indicator dye to detect the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential suggested the uptake of mitochondria and the degenerating macronucleus by the autophagosome. An involvement of mitochondria in the programmed nuclear death is discussed.

  9. Identification of a region within the ubiquitin-activating enzyme required for nuclear targeting and phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Stephen, A G; Trausch-Azar, J S; Handley-Gearhart, P M; Ciechanover, A; Schwartz, A L

    1997-04-18

    The ubiquitin-activating enzyme exists as two isoforms: E1a, localized predominantly in the nucleus, and E1b, localized in the cytoplasm. Previously we generated hemagglutinin (HA) epitope-tagged cDNA constructs, HA1-E1 (epitope tag placed after the first methionine) and HA2-E1 (epitope tag placed after the second methionine) (Handley-Gearhart, P. M., Stephen, A. G., Trausch-Azar, J. S., Ciechanover, A., and Schwartz, A. L. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 33171-33178), which represent the native isoforms. HA1-E1 is exclusively nuclear, whereas HA2-E1 is found predominantly in the cytoplasm. Using high resolution isoelectric focusing and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we confirm that these epitope-tagged constructs HA1-E1 and HA2-E1 represent the two isoforms E1a and E1b. HA1-E1/E1a exists as one non-phosphorylated and four phosphorylated forms, and HA2-E1/E1b exists as one predominant non-phosphorylated form and two minor phosphorylated forms. We demonstrate that the first 11 amino acids are essential for phosphorylation and exclusive nuclear localization of HA1-E1. Within this region are four serine residues and a putative nuclear localization sequence (NLS; 5PLSKKRR). Removal of these four serine residues reduced phosphorylation levels by 60% but had no effect on nuclear localization of HA1-E1. Each serine residue was independently mutated to an alanine and analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis; only serine 4 was phosphorylated. Disruption of the basic amino acids within the NLS resulted in loss of exclusive nuclear localization and a 90-95% decrease in the phosphorylation of HA1-E1. This putative NLS was able to confer nuclear import on a non-nuclear protein in digitonin-permeabilized cells in a temperature- and ATP-dependent manner. Thus the predominant requirement for efficient phosphorylation of HA1-E1/E1a is a functional NLS, suggesting that E1a may be phosphorylated within the nucleus. PMID:9099746

  10. Balanced nuclear and cytoplasmic activities of EDS1 are required for a complete plant innate immune response.

    PubMed

    García, Ana V; Blanvillain-Baufumé, Servane; Huibers, Robin P; Wiermer, Marcel; Li, Guangyong; Gobbato, Enrico; Rietz, Steffen; Parker, Jane E

    2010-07-01

    An important layer of plant innate immunity to host-adapted pathogens is conferred by intracellular nucleotide-binding/oligomerization domain-leucine rich repeat (NB-LRR) receptors recognizing specific microbial effectors. Signaling from activated receptors of the TIR (Toll/Interleukin-1 Receptor)-NB-LRR class converges on the nucleo-cytoplasmic immune regulator EDS1 (Enhanced Disease Susceptibility1). In this report we show that a receptor-stimulated increase in accumulation of nuclear EDS1 precedes or coincides with the EDS1-dependent induction and repression of defense-related genes. EDS1 is capable of nuclear transport receptor-mediated shuttling between the cytoplasm and nucleus. By enhancing EDS1 export from inside nuclei (through attachment of an additional nuclear export sequence (NES)) or conditionally releasing EDS1 to the nucleus (by fusion to a glucocorticoid receptor (GR)) in transgenic Arabidopsis we establish that the EDS1 nuclear pool is essential for resistance to biotrophic and hemi-biotrophic pathogens and for transcriptional reprogramming. Evidence points to post-transcriptional processes regulating receptor-triggered accumulation of EDS1 in nuclei. Changes in nuclear EDS1 levels become equilibrated with the cytoplasmic EDS1 pool and cytoplasmic EDS1 is needed for complete resistance and restriction of host cell death at infection sites. We propose that coordinated nuclear and cytoplasmic activities of EDS1 enable the plant to mount an appropriately balanced immune response to pathogen attack.

  11. Balanced Nuclear and Cytoplasmic Activities of EDS1 Are Required for a Complete Plant Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    García, Ana V.; Blanvillain-Baufumé, Servane; Huibers, Robin P.; Wiermer, Marcel; Li, Guangyong; Gobbato, Enrico; Rietz, Steffen; Parker, Jane E.

    2010-01-01

    An important layer of plant innate immunity to host-adapted pathogens is conferred by intracellular nucleotide-binding/oligomerization domain-leucine rich repeat (NB-LRR) receptors recognizing specific microbial effectors. Signaling from activated receptors of the TIR (Toll/Interleukin-1 Receptor)-NB-LRR class converges on the nucleo-cytoplasmic immune regulator EDS1 (Enhanced Disease Susceptibility1). In this report we show that a receptor-stimulated increase in accumulation of nuclear EDS1 precedes or coincides with the EDS1-dependent induction and repression of defense-related genes. EDS1 is capable of nuclear transport receptor-mediated shuttling between the cytoplasm and nucleus. By enhancing EDS1 export from inside nuclei (through attachment of an additional nuclear export sequence (NES)) or conditionally releasing EDS1 to the nucleus (by fusion to a glucocorticoid receptor (GR)) in transgenic Arabidopsis we establish that the EDS1 nuclear pool is essential for resistance to biotrophic and hemi-biotrophic pathogens and for transcriptional reprogramming. Evidence points to post-transcriptional processes regulating receptor-triggered accumulation of EDS1 in nuclei. Changes in nuclear EDS1 levels become equilibrated with the cytoplasmic EDS1 pool and cytoplasmic EDS1 is needed for complete resistance and restriction of host cell death at infection sites. We propose that coordinated nuclear and cytoplasmic activities of EDS1 enable the plant to mount an appropriately balanced immune response to pathogen attack. PMID:20617163

  12. Structural and calorimetric studies demonstrate that the hepatocyte nuclear factor 1β (HNF1β) transcription factor is imported into the nucleus via a monopartite NLS sequence.

    PubMed

    Wiedmann, Mareike M; Aibara, Shintaro; Spring, David R; Stewart, Murray; Brenton, James D

    2016-09-01

    The transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor 1β (HNF1β) is ubiquitously overexpressed in ovarian clear cell carcinoma (CCC) and is a potential therapeutic target. To explore potential approaches that block HNF1β transcription we have identified and characterised extensively the nuclear localisation signal (NLS) for HNF1β and its interactions with the nuclear protein import receptor, Importin-α. Pull-down assays demonstrated that the DNA binding domain of HNF1β interacted with a spectrum of Importin-α isoforms and deletion constructs tagged with eGFP confirmed that the HNF1β (229)KKMRRNR(235) sequence was essential for nuclear localisation. We further characterised the interaction between the NLS and Importin-α using complementary biophysical techniques and have determined the 2.4Å resolution crystal structure of the HNF1β NLS peptide bound to Importin-α. The functional, biochemical, and structural characterisation of the nuclear localisation signal present on HNF1β and its interaction with the nuclear import protein Importin-α provide the basis for the development of compounds targeting transcription factor HNF1β via its nuclear import pathway.

  13. Controlling nuclear JAKs and STATs for specific gene activation by IFN{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Noon-Song, Ezra N.; Ahmed, Chulbul M.; Dabelic, Rea; Canton, Johnathan; Johnson, Howard M.

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Gamma interferon (IFN{gamma}) and its receptor subunit, IFNGR1, interact with the promoter region of IFN{gamma}-associated genes along with transcription factor STAT1{alpha}. {yields} We show that activated Janus kinases pJAK2 and pJAK1 also associate with IFNGR1 in the nucleus. {yields} The activated Janus kinases are responsible for phosphorylation of tyrosine 41 on histone H3, an important epigenetic event for specific gene activation. -- Abstract: We previously showed that gamma interferon (IFN{gamma}) and its receptor subunit, IFNGR1, interacted with the promoter region of IFN{gamma}-activated genes along with transcription factor STAT1{alpha}. Recent studies have suggested that activated Janus kinases pJAK2 and pJAK1 also played a role in gene activation by phosphorylation of histone H3 on tyrosine 41. This study addresses the question of the role of activated JAKs in specific gene activation by IFN{gamma}. We carried out chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by PCR in IFN{gamma} treated WISH cells and showed association of pJAK1, pJAK2, IFNGR1, and STAT1 on the same DNA sequence of the IRF-1 gene promoter. The {beta}-actin gene, which is not activated by IFN{gamma}, did not show this association. The movement of activated JAK to the nucleus and the IRF-1 promoter was confirmed by the combination of nuclear fractionation, confocal microscopy and DNA precipitation analysis using the biotinylated GAS promoter. Activated JAKs in the nucleus was associated with phosphorylated tyrosine 41 on histone H3 in the region of the GAS promoter. Unphosphorylated JAK2 was found to be constitutively present in the nucleus and was capable of undergoing activation in IFN{gamma} treated cells, most likely via nuclear IFNGR1. Association of pJAK2 and IFNGR1 with histone H3 in IFN{gamma} treated cells was demonstrated by histone H3 immunoprecipitation. Unphosphorylated STAT1 protein was associated with histone H3 of untreated cells. IFN

  14. Computer programs for absolute neutron activation analysis on the nuclear data 6620 data acquisition system

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, J.W.; Emery, J.F.

    1982-03-01

    Five computer programs that provide multielement neutron activation analysis are discussed. The software package was designed for use on the Nuclear Data 6620 Data Acquisition System and interacts with existing Nuclear Data Corporation software. The programs were developed to make use of the capabilities of the 6620 system to analyze large numbers of samples and assist in a large sample workload that had begun in the neutron activation analysis facility of the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. Nuclear Data neutron activation software is unable to perform absolute activation analysis and therefore was inefficient and inadequate for our applications.

  15. The Active Field of Nuclear and Radiochemistry: Not Just Nuclear Power.

    PubMed

    Walther, Clemens

    2016-08-01

    " … The number of universities teaching nuclear and radiochemistry has decreased, not least as radiochemistry is erroneously linked to the use of nuclear power … Radiochemistry is essential for a variety of fields, including radiopharmaceuticals, as well as the management of radioactive waste … we are facing a lack of specialists in the area of radiation protection …" Read more in the Editorial by Clemens Walther.

  16. Cdk1 Activates Pre-mitotic Nuclear Envelope Dynein Recruitment and Apical Nuclear Migration in Neural Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Baffet, Alexandre D; Hu, Daniel J; Vallee, Richard B

    2015-06-22

    Dynein recruitment to the nuclear envelope is required for pre-mitotic nucleus-centrosome interactions in nonneuronal cells and for apical nuclear migration in neural stem cells. In each case, dynein is recruited to the nuclear envelope (NE) specifically during G2 via two nuclear pore-mediated mechanisms involving RanBP2-BicD2 and Nup133-CENP-F. The mechanisms responsible for cell-cycle control of this behavior are unknown. We now find that Cdk1 serves as a direct master controller for NE dynein recruitment in neural stem cells and HeLa cells. Cdk1 phosphorylates conserved sites within RanBP2 and activates BicD2 binding and early dynein recruitment. Late recruitment is triggered by a Cdk1-induced export of CENP-F from the nucleus. Forced NE targeting of BicD2 overrides Cdk1 inhibition, fully rescuing dynein recruitment and nuclear migration in neural stem cells. These results reveal how NE dynein recruitment is cell-cycle regulated and identify the trigger mechanism for apical nuclear migration in the brain.

  17. PIASy, a nuclear matrix–associated SUMO E3 ligase, represses LEF1 activity by sequestration into nuclear bodies

    PubMed Central

    Sachdev, Shrikesh; Bruhn, Laurakay; Sieber, Heidemarie; Pichler, Andrea; Melchior, Frauke; Grosschedl, Rudolf

    2001-01-01

    The Wnt-responsive transcription factor LEF1 can activate transcription in association with β-catenin and repress transcription in association with Groucho. In search of additional regulatory mechanisms of LEF1 function, we identified the protein inhibitor of activated STAT, PIASy, as a novel interaction partner of LEF1. Coexpression of PIASy with LEF1 results in potent repression of LEF1 activity and in covalent modification of LEF1 with SUMO. PIASy markedly stimulates the sumoylation of LEF1 and multiple other proteins in vivo and functions as a SUMO E3 ligase for LEF1 in a reconstituted system in vitro. Moreover, PIASy binds to nuclear matrix–associated DNA sequences and targets LEF1 to nuclear bodies, suggesting that PIASy-mediated subnuclear sequestration accounts for the repression of LEF1 activity. PMID:11731474

  18. Fluctuations in nuclear envelope's potential mediate synchronization of early neural activity

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, Masayuki

    2011-03-04

    Research highlights: {yields} Nuclear envelope's potential changes with a release of Ca{sup 2+}. {yields} Changes in nuclear envelope's potential underlie synchronous burst discharges. {yields} Nuclear envelope's potential generates periodic bursts of fluctuations. {yields} Fluctuations in nuclear envelope's potential function as a current noise generator. -- Abstract: Neural progenitor cells and developing neurons show periodic, synchronous Ca{sup 2+} rises even before synapse formation, and the origin of the synchronous activity remains unknown. Here, fluorescence measurement revealed that the membrane potential of the nuclear envelope, which forms an intracellular Ca{sup 2+} store, changed with a release of Ca{sup 2+} and generated spontaneous, periodic bursts of fluctuations in potential. Furthermore, changes in the nuclear envelope's potential underlay spike burst generations. These results support the model that voltage fluctuations of the nuclear envelope synchronize Ca{sup 2+} release between cells and also function as a current noise generator to cause synchronous burst discharges.

  19. Molecular phylogeny of commercially important lobster species from Indian coast inferred from mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Jeena, N S; Gopalakrishnan, A; Radhakrishnan, E V; Kizhakudan, Joe K; Basheer, V S; Asokan, P K; Jena, J K

    2016-07-01

    Lobsters constitute low-volume high-value crustacean fishery resource along Indian coast. For the conservation and management of this declining resource, accurate identification of species and larvae is essential. The objectives of this work were to generate species-specific molecular signatures of 11 commercially important species of lobsters of families Palinuridae and Scyllaridae and to reconstruct a phylogeny to clarify the evolutionary relationships among genera and species included in this study. Partial sequences were generated for all the candidate species from sampling sites along the Indian coast using markers like Cytochrome oxidase I (COI), 16SrRNA, 12SrRNA, and 18SrRNA genes, and analyzed. The genetic identities of widely distributed Thenus species along the Indian coast to be Thenus unimaculatus and the sub-species of Panulirus homarus to be P. homarus homarus were confirmed. Phylogeny reconstruction using the individual gene and concatenated mtDNA data set were carried out. The overall results suggested independent monophyly of Scyllaridae and Stridentes of Palinuridae. The interspecific divergence was found to be highest for the 12SrRNA compared with other genes. Significant incongruence between mtDNA and nuclear 18SrRNA gene tree topologies was observed. The results hinted an earlier origin for Palinuridae compared with Scyllaridae. The DNA sequence data generated from this study will aid in the correct identification of lobster larvae and will find application in research related to larval transport and distribution.

  20. The methylation of the C-terminal region of hnRNPQ (NSAP1) is important for its nuclear localization

    SciTech Connect

    Passos, Dario O.; Quaresma, Alexandre J.C.; Kobarg, Joerg . E-mail: jkobarg@lnls.br

    2006-07-28

    Protein arginine methylation is an irreversible post-translational protein modification catalyzed by a family of at least nine different enzymes entitled PRMTs (protein arginine methyl transferases). Although PRMT1 is responsible for 85% of the protein methylation in human cells, its substrate spectrum has not yet been fully characterized nor are the functional consequences of methylation for the protein substrates well understood. Therefore, we set out to employ the yeast two-hybrid system in order to identify new substrate proteins for human PRMT1. We were able to identify nine different PRMT1 interacting proteins involved in different aspects of RNA metabolism, five of which had been previously described either as substrates for PRMT1 or as functionally associated with PRMT1. Among the four new identified possible protein substrates was hnRNPQ3 (NSAP1), a protein whose function has been implicated in diverse steps of mRNA maturation, including splicing, editing, and degradation. By in vitro methylation assays we were able to show that hnRNPQ3 is a substrate for PRMT1 and that its C-terminal RGG box domain is the sole target for methylation. By further studies with the inhibitor of methylation Adox we provide evidence that hnRNPQ1-3 are methylated in vivo. Finally, we demonstrate by immunofluorescence analysis of HeLa cells that the methylation of hnRNPQ is important for its nuclear localization, since Adox treatment causes its re-distribution from the nucleus to the cytoplasm.

  1. Molecular phylogeny of commercially important lobster species from Indian coast inferred from mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Jeena, N S; Gopalakrishnan, A; Radhakrishnan, E V; Kizhakudan, Joe K; Basheer, V S; Asokan, P K; Jena, J K

    2016-07-01

    Lobsters constitute low-volume high-value crustacean fishery resource along Indian coast. For the conservation and management of this declining resource, accurate identification of species and larvae is essential. The objectives of this work were to generate species-specific molecular signatures of 11 commercially important species of lobsters of families Palinuridae and Scyllaridae and to reconstruct a phylogeny to clarify the evolutionary relationships among genera and species included in this study. Partial sequences were generated for all the candidate species from sampling sites along the Indian coast using markers like Cytochrome oxidase I (COI), 16SrRNA, 12SrRNA, and 18SrRNA genes, and analyzed. The genetic identities of widely distributed Thenus species along the Indian coast to be Thenus unimaculatus and the sub-species of Panulirus homarus to be P. homarus homarus were confirmed. Phylogeny reconstruction using the individual gene and concatenated mtDNA data set were carried out. The overall results suggested independent monophyly of Scyllaridae and Stridentes of Palinuridae. The interspecific divergence was found to be highest for the 12SrRNA compared with other genes. Significant incongruence between mtDNA and nuclear 18SrRNA gene tree topologies was observed. The results hinted an earlier origin for Palinuridae compared with Scyllaridae. The DNA sequence data generated from this study will aid in the correct identification of lobster larvae and will find application in research related to larval transport and distribution. PMID:26065848

  2. Hypoxic preconditioning decreases nuclear factor κB activity via Disrupted in Schizophrenia-1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia-Ren; Liu, Qian; Khoury, Joseph; Li, Yue-Jin; Han, Xiao-Hui; Li, Jing; Ibla, Juan C

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear factor κB is a key mediator of inflammation during conditions of hypoxia. Here, we used models of hypoxic pre-conditioning as mechanism to decrease nuclear factor κB activity induced by hypoxia. Our initial studies suggested that Disrupted in Schizophrenia-1 may be induced by hypoxic pre-conditioning and possibly involved in the regulation of nuclear factor κB. In this study we used Disrupted in Schizophrenia-1 exogenous over-expression and knock-down to determine its effect on ataxia telangiectasia mutated--nuclear factor κB activation cascade. Our results demonstrated that hypoxic pre-conditioning significantly increased the expression of Disrupted in Schizophrenia-1 at mRNA and protein levels both in vitro and in vivo. Over-expression of Disrupted in Schizophrenia-1 significantly attenuated the hypoxia-mediated ataxia telangiectasia mutated phosphorylation and prevented its cytoplasm translocation where it functions to activate nuclear factor κB. We further determined that Disrupted in Schizophrenia-1 activated the protein phosphatase 2A, preventing the phosphorylation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated serine-1981, the main regulatory site of ataxia telangiectasia mutated activity. Cellular levels of Disrupted in Schizophrenia-1 protein significantly decreased nuclear factor κB activation profiles and pro-inflammatory gene expression. Taken together, these results demonstrate that hypoxic pre-conditioning decreases the activation of nuclear factor κB through the transcriptional induction of Disrupted in Schizophrenia-1.

  3. 77 FR 55486 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Importer ID Input Record

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-10

    ... collection techniques or the use of other forms of information technology; and (e) the annual costs burden to... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Importer ID Input... and request for comments; Extension of an existing collection of information. SUMMARY: U.S....

  4. How My Daughter Taught Me to Teach: The Importance of Active Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt-Gierut, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author shares how her daughter, who was diagnosed with a profound hearing loss when she was a year old, taught her to teach, and demonstrates the importance of active communication. Teaching her daughter English as her second language has posed many challenges, but has also revealed successful strategies that the author has…

  5. 78 FR 44572 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Pre-Launch Activities Importation Requests; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Pre-Launch Activities Importation Requests; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a draft guidance for...

  6. Host Protein Moloney Leukemia Virus 10 (MOV10) Acts as a Restriction Factor of Influenza A Virus by Inhibiting the Nuclear Import of the Viral Nucleoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junsong; Huang, Feng; Tan, Likai; Bai, Chuan; Chen, Bing; Liu, Jun; Liang, Juanran; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Shaoying; Lu, Gen; Chen, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP) complex of influenza A viruses (IAVs) contains an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase complex (RdRp) and nucleoprotein (NP) and is the functional unit for viral RNA transcription and replication. The vRNP complex is an important determinant of virus pathogenicity and host adaptation, implying that its function can be affected by host factors. In our study, we identified host protein Moloney leukemia virus 10 (MOV10) as an inhibitor of IAV replication, since depletion of MOV10 resulted in a significant increase in virus yield. MOV10 inhibited the polymerase activity in a minigenome system through RNA-mediated interaction with the NP subunit of vRNP complex. Importantly, we found that the interaction between MOV10 and NP prevented the binding of NP to importin-α, resulting in the retention of NP in the cytoplasm. Both the binding of MOV10 to NP and its inhibitory effect on polymerase activity were independent of its helicase activity. These results suggest that MOV10 acts as an anti-influenza virus factor through specifically inhibiting the nuclear transportation of NP and subsequently inhibiting the function of the vRNP complex. IMPORTANCE The interaction between the influenza virus vRNP complex and host factors is a major determinant of viral tropism and pathogenicity. Our study identified MOV10 as a novel host restriction factor for the influenza virus life cycle since it inhibited the viral growth rate. Conversely, importin-α has been shown as a determinant for influenza tropism and a positive regulator for viral polymerase activity in mammalian cells but not in avian cells. MOV10 disrupted the interaction between NP and importin-α, suggesting that MOV10 could also be an important host factor for influenza virus transmission and pathogenicity. Importantly, as an interferon (IFN)-inducible protein, MOV10 exerted a novel mechanism for IFNs to inhibit the replication of influenza viruses. Furthermore, our study potentially

  7. Sphingosine kinase 1 dependent protein kinase C-δ activation plays an important role in acute liver failure in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Yan-Chang; Yang, Ling-Ling; Li, Wen; Luo, Pan

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of protein kinase C (PKC)-δ activation in the pathogenesis of acute liver failure (ALF) in a well-characterized mouse model of D-galactosamine (D-GalN)/lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALF. METHODS: BALB/c mice were randomly assigned to five groups, and ALF was induced in mice by intraperitoneal injection of D-GaIN (600 mg/kg) and LPS (10 μg/kg). Kaplan-Meier method was used for survival analysis. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels at different time points within one week were determined using a multiparameteric analyzer. Serum levels of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-10 as well as nuclear factor (NF)-κB activity were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Hepatic morphological changes at 36 h after ALF induction were assessed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Expression of PKC-δ in liver tissue and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was analyzed by Western blot. RESULTS: The expression and activation of PKC-δ were up-regulated in liver tissue and PBMCs of mice with D-GalN/LPS-induced ALF. Inhibition of PKC-δ activation with rottlerin significantly increased the survival rates and decreased serum ALT/AST levels at 6, 12 and 24 h compared with the control group (P < 0.001). Rottlerin treatment also significantly decreased serum levels of HMGB1 at 6, 12, and 24 h, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1 β at 12 h compared with the control group (P < 0.01). The inflammatory cell infiltration and necrosis in liver tissue were also decreased in the rottlerin treatment group. Furthermore, sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) dependent PKC-δ activation played an important role in promoting NF-κB activation and inflammatory cytokine production in ALF. CONCLUSION: SphK1 dependent PKC-δ activation plays an important role in promoting NF-κB activation and inflammatory response in ALF, and inhibition of PKC-δ activation might be

  8. Nuclear activity and stellar population of a sample of interacting galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastoriza, M. G.; Donzelli, C. J.; Bonatto, C.

    1999-07-01

    In this paper we investigate the nuclear activity and stellar population in a sample of 27 physical galaxy pairs. Equivalent widths of absorption features are used to characterise the nuclear stellar population according to templates: most galaxies of the sample have important flux contributions from stars younger than 10(8) years. According to classical diagnostic-diagrams the galaxies in our sample are either classified as H II regions or have emission line ratios near the transition zone between H II regions and LINERs. Based on the observed spectra, only 4 galaxies show LINER properties and 1 nucleus is a Seyfert 2. We found that the spectrum of a transition object (38% of the sample) can be described by a combination of an AGN with an H II region. As a result, 20 galaxies of the present sample may host a low-luminosity active nucleus. Based on observations made at CASLEO and CTIO. Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO) is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient\\'\\i ficas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba and San Juan.

  9. Nuclear removal during terminal lens fiber cell differentiation requires CDK1 activity: appropriating mitosis-related nuclear disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Chaffee, Blake R.; Shang, Fu; Chang, Min-Lee; Clement, Tracy M.; Eddy, Edward M.; Wagner, Brad D.; Nakahara, Masaki; Nagata, Shigekazu; Robinson, Michael L.; Taylor, Allen

    2014-01-01

    Lens epithelial cells and early lens fiber cells contain the typical complement of intracellular organelles. However, as lens fiber cells mature they must destroy their organelles, including nuclei, in a process that has remained enigmatic for over a century, but which is crucial for the formation of the organelle-free zone in the center of the lens that assures clarity and function to transmit light. Nuclear degradation in lens fiber cells requires the nuclease DNase IIβ (DLAD) but the mechanism by which DLAD gains access to nuclear DNA remains unknown. In eukaryotic cells, cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), in combination with either activator cyclins A or B, stimulates mitotic entry, in part, by phosphorylating the nuclear lamin proteins leading to the disassembly of the nuclear lamina and subsequent nuclear envelope breakdown. Although most post-mitotic cells lack CDK1 and cyclins, lens fiber cells maintain these proteins. Here, we show that loss of CDK1 from the lens inhibited the phosphorylation of nuclear lamins A and C, prevented the entry of DLAD into the nucleus, and resulted in abnormal retention of nuclei. In the presence of CDK1, a single focus of the phosphonuclear mitotic apparatus is observed, but it is not focused in CDK1-deficient lenses. CDK1 deficiency inhibited mitosis, but did not prevent DNA replication, resulting in an overall reduction of lens epithelial cells, with the remaining cells possessing an abnormally large nucleus. These observations suggest that CDK1-dependent phosphorylations required for the initiation of nuclear membrane disassembly during mitosis are adapted for removal of nuclei during fiber cell differentiation. PMID:25139855

  10. Strontium-90 activity concentration in soil samples from the exclusion zone of the Fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Sarata Kumar; Kavasi, Norbert; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Arae, Hideki; Tokonami, Shinji; Mietelski, Jerzy Wojciech; Łokas, Edyta; Yoshida, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The radioactive fission product 90Sr has a long biological half-life (˜18 y) in the human body. Due to its chemical similarity to calcium it accumulates in bones and irradiates the bone marrow, causing its high radio-toxicity. Assessing 90Sr is therefore extremely important in case of a nuclear disaster. In this work 16 soil samples were collected from the exclusion zone (<30 km) of the earthquake-damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, to measure 90Sr activity concentration using liquid scintillation counting. 137Cs activity concentration was also measured with gamma-spectroscopy in order to investigate correlation with 90Sr. The 90Sr activity concentrations ranged from 3.0 ± 0.3 to 23.3 ± 1.5 Bq kg−1 while the 137Cs from 0.7 ± 0.1 to 110.8 ± 0.3 kBq kg−1. The fact that radioactive contamination originated from the Fukushima nuclear accident was obvious due to the presence of 134Cs. However, 90Sr contamination was not confirmed in all samples although detectable amounts of 90Sr can be expected in Japanese soils, as a background, stemming from global fallout due to the atmospheric nuclear weapon tests. Correlation analysis between 90Sr and 137Cs activity concentrations provides a potentially powerful tool to discriminate background 90Sr level from its Fukushima contribution. PMID:27048779

  11. Strontium-90 activity concentration in soil samples from the exclusion zone of the Fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Sarata Kumar; Kavasi, Norbert; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Arae, Hideki; Tokonami, Shinji; Mietelski, Jerzy Wojciech; Łokas, Edyta; Yoshida, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    The radioactive fission product 90Sr has a long biological half-life (˜18 y) in the human body. Due to its chemical similarity to calcium it accumulates in bones and irradiates the bone marrow, causing its high radio-toxicity. Assessing 90Sr is therefore extremely important in case of a nuclear disaster. In this work 16 soil samples were collected from the exclusion zone (<30 km) of the earthquake-damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, to measure 90Sr activity concentration using liquid scintillation counting. 137Cs activity concentration was also measured with gamma-spectroscopy in order to investigate correlation with 90Sr. The 90Sr activity concentrations ranged from 3.0 ± 0.3 to 23.3 ± 1.5 Bq kg‑1 while the 137Cs from 0.7 ± 0.1 to 110.8 ± 0.3 kBq kg‑1. The fact that radioactive contamination originated from the Fukushima nuclear accident was obvious due to the presence of 134Cs. However, 90Sr contamination was not confirmed in all samples although detectable amounts of 90Sr can be expected in Japanese soils, as a background, stemming from global fallout due to the atmospheric nuclear weapon tests. Correlation analysis between 90Sr and 137Cs activity concentrations provides a potentially powerful tool to discriminate background 90Sr level from its Fukushima contribution.

  12. Strontium-90 activity concentration in soil samples from the exclusion zone of the Fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Sarata Kumar; Kavasi, Norbert; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Arae, Hideki; Tokonami, Shinji; Mietelski, Jerzy Wojciech; Łokas, Edyta; Yoshida, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The radioactive fission product (90)Sr has a long biological half-life (˜18 y) in the human body. Due to its chemical similarity to calcium it accumulates in bones and irradiates the bone marrow, causing its high radio-toxicity. Assessing (90)Sr is therefore extremely important in case of a nuclear disaster. In this work 16 soil samples were collected from the exclusion zone (<30 km) of the earthquake-damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, to measure (90)Sr activity concentration using liquid scintillation counting. (137)Cs activity concentration was also measured with gamma-spectroscopy in order to investigate correlation with (90)Sr. The (90)Sr activity concentrations ranged from 3.0 ± 0.3 to 23.3 ± 1.5 Bq kg(-1) while the (137)Cs from 0.7 ± 0.1 to 110.8 ± 0.3 kBq kg(-1). The fact that radioactive contamination originated from the Fukushima nuclear accident was obvious due to the presence of (134)Cs. However, (90)Sr contamination was not confirmed in all samples although detectable amounts of (90)Sr can be expected in Japanese soils, as a background, stemming from global fallout due to the atmospheric nuclear weapon tests. Correlation analysis between (90)Sr and (137)Cs activity concentrations provides a potentially powerful tool to discriminate background (90)Sr level from its Fukushima contribution. PMID:27048779

  13. Strontium-90 activity concentration in soil samples from the exclusion zone of the Fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Sarata Kumar; Kavasi, Norbert; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Arae, Hideki; Tokonami, Shinji; Mietelski, Jerzy Wojciech; Łokas, Edyta; Yoshida, Satoshi

    2016-04-06

    The radioactive fission product (90)Sr has a long biological half-life (˜18 y) in the human body. Due to its chemical similarity to calcium it accumulates in bones and irradiates the bone marrow, causing its high radio-toxicity. Assessing (90)Sr is therefore extremely important in case of a nuclear disaster. In this work 16 soil samples were collected from the exclusion zone (<30 km) of the earthquake-damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, to measure (90)Sr activity concentration using liquid scintillation counting. (137)Cs activity concentration was also measured with gamma-spectroscopy in order to investigate correlation with (90)Sr. The (90)Sr activity concentrations ranged from 3.0 ± 0.3 to 23.3 ± 1.5 Bq kg(-1) while the (137)Cs from 0.7 ± 0.1 to 110.8 ± 0.3 kBq kg(-1). The fact that radioactive contamination originated from the Fukushima nuclear accident was obvious due to the presence of (134)Cs. However, (90)Sr contamination was not confirmed in all samples although detectable amounts of (90)Sr can be expected in Japanese soils, as a background, stemming from global fallout due to the atmospheric nuclear weapon tests. Correlation analysis between (90)Sr and (137)Cs activity concentrations provides a potentially powerful tool to discriminate background (90)Sr level from its Fukushima contribution.

  14. The importance of domain closure for the auto-activation of ERK2

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Daniel; Oashi, Taiji; Burkhard, Kimberly; Lucius, Sarah; Samadani, Ramin; Zhang, Jun; Shapiro, Paul; MacKerell, Alexander D.; van der Vaart, Arjan

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1 and 2 (ERK1/2) play a critical role in regulating cell division and have been implicated in cancer. In addition to activation by the MAPK/ERK kinases 1 and 2 (MEK1/2), certain mutants of ERK2 can be activated by auto-phosphorylation. To identify the mechanism of auto-activation, we have performed a series of molecular dynamics simulations of ERK1/2 in various stages of activation as well as the constitutively active Q103A, I84A, L73P and R65S ERK2 mutants. Our simulations indicate the importance of domain closure for auto-activation and activity regulation, with that event occurring prior to folding of the activation lip and of loop L16. Results indicate that the second phosphorylation event to T183 disrupts hydrogen bonding involving D334 thereby allowing the kinase to lock into the active conformation. Based on the simulations, three predictions were made: G83A was suggested to impede activation, K162M was suggested to perturb the interface between the N and C-domain leading to activation, and Q64C was hypothesized to stop folding of loop L16 thereby perturbing the homodimerization interface. Functional analysis of the mutants validated the predictions concerning the G83A and Q64C mutants. The K162M mutant did not autoactivate as predicted however, which may be due to the location of the residue on the protein surface near the ED substrate docking domain. PMID:21842857

  15. Importance of structural and chemical heterogeneity of activated carbon surfaces for adsorption of dibenzothiophene

    SciTech Connect

    Ania, C.O.; Bandosz, T.J.

    2005-08-16

    The performance of various activated carbons obtained from different carbon precursors (i.e., plastic waste, coal, and wood) as adsorbents for the desulfurization of liquid hydrocarbon fuels was evaluated. To increase surface heterogeneity, the carbon surface was modified by oxidation with ammonium persulfate. The results showed the importance of activated carbon pore sizes and surface chemistry for the adsorption of dibenzothiophene (DBT) from liquid phase. Adsorption of DBT on activated carbons is governed by two types of contributions: physical and chemical interactions. The former include dispersive interactions in the microporous network of the carbons. While the volume of micropores governs the amount physisorbed, mesopores control the kinetics of the process. On the other hand, introduction of surface functional groups enhances the performance of the activated carbons as a result of specific interactions between the acidic centers of the carbon and the basic structure of DBT molecule as well as sulfur-sulfur interactions.

  16. Nuclear Site Security in the Event of Terrorist Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, M.L.; Sims, J.

    2008-07-01

    This paper, presented as a poster, identifies why ballistic protection should now be considered at nuclear sites to counter terrorist threats. A proven and flexible form of multi purpose protection is described in detail with identification of trial results that show its suitability for this role. (authors)

  17. Nuclear import of the thyroid hormone receptor α1 is mediated by importin 7, importin β1, and adaptor importin α1.

    PubMed

    Roggero, Vincent R; Zhang, Jibo; Parente, Laura E; Doshi, Yazdi; Dziedzic, Rose C; McGregor, Emma L; Varjabedian, Arev D; Schad, Sara E; Bondzi, Cornelius; Allison, Lizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    The thyroid hormone receptor α1 (TRα1) is a nuclear receptor for thyroid hormone that shuttles rapidly between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Our prior studies showed that nuclear import of TRα1 is directed by two nuclear localization signals, one in the N-terminal A/B domain and the other in the hinge domain. Here, we showed using in vitro nuclear import assays that TRα1 nuclear localization is temperature and energy-dependent and can be reconstituted by the addition of cytosol. In HeLa cells expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged TRα1, knockdown of importin 7, importin β1 and importin α1 by RNA interference, or treatment with an importin β1-specific inhibitor, significantly reduced nuclear localization of TRα1, while knockdown of other importins had no effect. Coimmunoprecipitation assays confirmed that TRα1 interacts with importin 7, as well as importin β1 and the adapter importin α1, suggesting that TRα1 trafficking into the nucleus is mediated by two distinct pathways.

  18. On the importance of nuclear quantum motions in near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy of molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Craig P.; Uejio, Janel S.; Saykally, Richard J.; Prendergast, David

    2009-02-26

    We report the effects of sampling nuclear quantum motion with path integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) on calculations of the nitrogen K-edge spectra of two isolated organic molecules. S-triazine, a prototypical aromatic molecule occupying primarily its vibrational ground state at room temperature, exhibits substantially improved spectral agreement when nuclear quantum effects are included via PIMD, as compared to the spectra obtained from either a single fixed-nuclei based calculation or from a series of configurations extracted from a classical molecular dynamics trajectory. Nuclear quantum dynamics can accurately explain the intrinsic broadening of certain features. Glycine, the simplest amino acid, is problematic due to large spectral variations associated with multiple energetically accessible conformations at the experimental temperature. This work highlights the sensitivity of NEXAFS to quantum nuclear motions in molecules, and the necessity of accurately sampling such quantum motion when simulating their NEXAFS spectra.

  19. Covalent Inhibition of Ubc13 Affects Ubiquitin Signaling and Reveals Active Site Elements Important for Targeting.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Curtis D; Edwards, Ross A; Markin, Craig J; McDonald, Darin; Pulvino, Mary; Huen, Michael S Y; Zhao, Jiyong; Spyracopoulos, Leo; Hendzel, Michael J; Glover, J N Mark

    2015-07-17

    Ubc13 is an E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzyme that functions in nuclear DNA damage signaling and cytoplasmic NF-κB signaling. Here, we present the structures of complexes of Ubc13 with two inhibitors, NSC697923 and BAY 11-7082, which inhibit DNA damage and NF-κB signaling in human cells. NSC697923 and BAY 11-7082 both inhibit Ubc13 by covalent adduct formation through a Michael addition at the Ubc13 active site cysteine. The resulting adducts of both compounds exploit a binding groove unique to Ubc13. We developed a Ubc13 mutant which resists NSC697923 inhibition and, using this mutant, we show that the inhibition of cellular DNA damage and NF-κB signaling by NSC697923 is largely due to specific Ubc13 inhibition. We propose that unique structural features near the Ubc13 active site could provide a basis for the rational development and design of specific Ubc13 inhibitors. PMID:25909880

  20. Covalent Inhibition of Ubc13 Affects Ubiquitin Signaling and Reveals Active Site Elements Important for Targeting.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Curtis D; Edwards, Ross A; Markin, Craig J; McDonald, Darin; Pulvino, Mary; Huen, Michael S Y; Zhao, Jiyong; Spyracopoulos, Leo; Hendzel, Michael J; Glover, J N Mark

    2015-07-17

    Ubc13 is an E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzyme that functions in nuclear DNA damage signaling and cytoplasmic NF-κB signaling. Here, we present the structures of complexes of Ubc13 with two inhibitors, NSC697923 and BAY 11-7082, which inhibit DNA damage and NF-κB signaling in human cells. NSC697923 and BAY 11-7082 both inhibit Ubc13 by covalent adduct formation through a Michael addition at the Ubc13 active site cysteine. The resulting adducts of both compounds exploit a binding groove unique to Ubc13. We developed a Ubc13 mutant which resists NSC697923 inhibition and, using this mutant, we show that the inhibition of cellular DNA damage and NF-κB signaling by NSC697923 is largely due to specific Ubc13 inhibition. We propose that unique structural features near the Ubc13 active site could provide a basis for the rational development and design of specific Ubc13 inhibitors.

  1. Covalent Inhibition of Ubc13 Affects Ubiquitin Signaling and Reveals Active Site Elements Important for Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Hodge, Curtis D.; Edwards, Ross A.; Markin, Craig J.; McDonald, Darin; Pulvino, Mary; Huen, Michael S. Y.; Zhao, Jiyong; Spyracopoulos, Leo; Hendzel, Michael J.; Glover, J.N. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Ubc13 is an E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzyme that functions in nuclear DNA damage signaling and cytoplasmic NF-κB signaling. Here we present the structures of complexes of Ubc13 with two inhibitors, NSC697923 and BAY 11-7082, which inhibit DNA damage and NF-κB signaling in human cells. NSC697923 and BAY 11-7082 both inhibit Ubc13 by covalent adduct formation through a Michael addition at the Ubc13 active site cysteine. The resulting adducts of both compounds exploit a binding groove unique to Ubc13. We developed a Ubc13 mutant which resists NSC697923 inhibition and, using this mutant, we show that the inhibition of cellular DNA damage and NF-κB signaling by NSC697923 is largely due to specific Ubc13 inhibition. We propose that unique structural features near the Ubc13 active site could provide a basis for the rational development and design of specific Ubc13 inhibitors. PMID:25909880

  2. Nuclear translocation of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) as a quantitative pharmacodynamic parameter for tacrolimus.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Orla; Tornatore, Kathleen M; O'Loughlin, Kieran L; Venuto, Rocco C; Minderman, Hans

    2013-12-01

    Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) is a family of transcription factors involved in regulating the immune response. The canonical NFAT pathway is calcium-dependent and upon activation, NFAT is dephosphorylated by the phosphatase, calcineurin. This results in its translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and transcription of downstream target genes that include the cytokines IL-2, IL-10, and IFNγ. Calcineurin inhibitors including tacrolimus inhibit the NFAT pathway and are used as immunosuppressants in transplant settings to prevent graft rejection. There is, as yet, no direct means to monitor tacrolimus pharmacodynamics. In this study, a rapid, quantitative, image cytometry-based measurement of nuclear translocation of NFAT1 is used to evaluate NFAT activation in T cells and its tacrolimus-induced inhibition. A strong dose-dependent correlation between NFAT1 inhibition and tacrolimus dose is demonstrated in vitro. Time kinetic analysis of NFAT1 inhibition in plasma from stable renal transplant recipients before and after an in vivo dose with tacrolimus correlated with the expected pharmacokinetic profile of tacrolimus. This was further corroborated by analysis of patients' autologous CD4 and CD8 T cells. This is the first report to show that the measurement of NFAT1 activation potential by nuclear translocation can be used as a direct, sensitive, reproducible and quantitative pharmacodynamic readout for tacrolimus action. These results, and the rapid turnaround time for this assay, warrant its evaluation in a larger clinical setting to assess its role in therapeutic drug monitoring of calcineurin inhibitors.

  3. The nuclear factor SPBP contains different functional domains and stimulates the activity of various transcriptional activators.

    PubMed

    Rekdal, C; Sjøttem, E; Johansen, T

    2000-12-22

    SPBP (stromelysin-1 platelet-derived growth factor-responsive element binding protein) was originally cloned from a cDNA expression library by virtue of its ability to bind to a platelet-derived growth factor-responsive element in the human stromelysin-1 promoter. A 937-amino acid-long protein was deduced from a 3995-nucleotide murine cDNA sequence. By analyses of both human and murine cDNAs, we now show that SPBP is twice as large as originally found. The human SPBP gene contains six exons and is located on chromosome 22q13.1-13.3. Two isoforms differing in their C termini are expressed due to alternative splicing. PCR analyses of multitissue cDNA panels showed that SPBP is expressed in most tissues except for ovary and prostate. Functional mapping revealed that SPBP is a nuclear, multidomain protein containing an N-terminal region with transactivating ability, a novel type of DNA-binding domain containing an AT hook motif, and a bipartite nuclear localization signal as well as a C-terminal zinc finger domain. This type of zinc finger domain is also found in the trithorax family of chromatin-based transcriptional regulator proteins. Using cotransfection experiments, we find that SPBP enhances the transcriptional activity of various transcription factors such as c-Jun, Ets1, Sp1, and Pax6. Hence, SPBP seems to act as a transcriptional coactivator. PMID:10995766

  4. OECD/NEA Ongoing activities related to the nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Cornet, S.M.; McCarthy, K.; Chauvin, N.

    2013-07-01

    As part of its role in encouraging international collaboration, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency is coordinating a series of projects related to the Nuclear Fuel Cycle. The Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) Working Party on Scientific Issues of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (WPFC) comprises five different expert groups covering all aspects of the fuel cycle from front to back-end. Activities related to fuels, materials, physics, separation chemistry, and fuel cycles scenarios are being undertaken. By publishing state-of-the-art reports and organizing workshops, the groups are able to disseminate recent research advancements to the international community. Current activities mainly focus on advanced nuclear systems, and experts are working on analyzing results and establishing challenges associated to the adoption of new materials and fuels. By comparing different codes, the Expert Group on Advanced Fuel Cycle Scenarios is aiming at gaining further understanding of the scientific issues and specific national needs associated with the implementation of advanced fuel cycles. At the back end of the fuel cycle, separation technologies (aqueous and pyrochemical processing) are being assessed. Current and future activities comprise studies on minor actinides separation and post Fukushima studies. Regular workshops are also organized to discuss recent developments on Partitioning and Transmutation. In addition, the Nuclear Development Committee (NDC) focuses on the analysis of the economics of nuclear power across the fuel cycle in the context of changes of electricity markets, social acceptance and technological advances and assesses the availability of the nuclear fuel and infrastructure required for the deployment of existing and future nuclear power. The Expert Group on the Economics of the Back End of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (EBENFC), in particular, is looking at assessing economic and financial issues related to the long term management of spent nuclear fuel. (authors)

  5. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling enhances nuclear localization and transcriptional activity of BRCA1

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, Cimona V.; Fitzgerald, Latricia D.; Thompson, Marilyn E. . E-mail: methompson@mmc.edu

    2007-05-15

    Signaling pathways involved in regulating nuclear-cytoplasmic distribution of BRCA1 have not been previously reported. Here, we provide evidence that heregulin {beta}1-induced activation of the Akt pathway increases the nuclear content of BRCA1. First, treatment of T47D breast cancer cells with heregulin {beta}1 results in a two-fold increase in nuclear BRCA1 as assessed by FACS analysis, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence. This heregulin-induced increase in nuclear BRCA1 is blocked by siRNA-mediated down-regulation of Akt. Second, mutation of threonine 509 in BRCA1, the site of Akt phosphorylation, to an alanine, attenuates the ability of heregulin to induce BRCA1 nuclear accumulation. These data suggest that Akt-catalyzed phosphorylation of BRCA1 is required for the heregulin-regulated nuclear concentration of BRCA1. Because most functions ascribed to BRCA1 occur within the nucleus, we postulated that phosphorylation-dependent nuclear accumulation of BRCA1 would result in enhanced nuclear activity, specifically transcriptional activity, of BRCA1. This postulate is affirmed by our observation that the ability of BRCA1 to transactivate GADD45 promoter constructs was enhanced in T47D cells treated with heregulin {beta}1. Furthermore, the heterologous expression of BRCA1 in HCC1937 human breast cancer cells, which have constitutively active Akt, also induces GADD45 promoter activity, whereas the expression of BRCA1 in which threonine 509 has been mutated to an alanine is able to only minimally induce promoter activity. These findings implicate Akt in upstream events leading to BRCA1 nuclear localization and function.

  6. RNA Helicase Important for Listeria monocytogenes Hemolytic Activity and Virulence Factor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Netterling, Sakura; Bäreclev, Caroline; Vaitkevicius, Karolis

    2015-01-01

    RNA helicases have been shown to be important for the function of RNA molecules at several levels, although their putative involvement in microbial pathogenesis has remained elusive. We have previously shown that Listeria monocytogenes DExD-box RNA helicases are important for bacterial growth, motility, ribosomal maturation, and rRNA processing. We assessed the importance of the RNA helicase Lmo0866 (here named CshA) for expression of virulence traits. We observed a reduction in hemolytic activity in a strain lacking CshA compared to the wild type. This phenomenon was less evident in strains lacking other RNA helicases. The reduced hemolysis was accompanied by lower expression of major listerial virulence factors in the ΔcshA strain, mainly listeriolysin O, but also to some degree the actin polymerizing factor ActA. Reduced expression of these virulence factors in the strain lacking CshA did not, however, correlate with a decreased level of the virulence regulator PrfA. When combining the ΔcshA knockout with a mutation creating a constitutively active PrfA protein (PrfA*), the effect of the ΔcshA knockout on LLO expression was negated. These data suggest a role for the RNA helicase CshA in posttranslational activation of PrfA. Surprisingly, although the expression of several virulence factors was reduced, the ΔcshA strain did not demonstrate any reduced ability to infect nonphagocytic cells compared to the wild-type strain. PMID:26483402

  7. The Importance of Landscape Elements for Bat Activity and Species Richness in Agricultural Areas

    PubMed Central

    Heim, Olga; Treitler, Julia T.; Tschapka, Marco; Knörnschild, Mirjam; Jung, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Landscape heterogeneity is regarded as a key factor for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function in production landscapes. We investigated whether grassland sites at close vicinity to forested areas are more frequently used by bats. Considering that bats are important consumers of herbivorous insects, including agricultural pest, this is important for sustainable land management. Bat activity and species richness were assessed using repeated monitoring from May to September in 2010 with acoustic monitoring surveys on 50 grassland sites in the Biosphere Reserve Schorfheide-Chorin (North-East Germany). Using spatial analysis (GIS), we measured the closest distance of each grassland site to potentially connecting landscape elements (e.g., trees, linear vegetation, groves, running and standing water). In addition, we assessed the distance to and the percent land cover of forest remnants and urban areas in a 200 m buffer around the recording sites to address differences in the local landscape setting. Species richness and bat activity increased significantly with higher forest land cover in the 200 m buffer and at smaller distance to forested areas. Moreover, species richness increased in proximity to tree groves. Larger amount of forest land cover and smaller distance to forest also resulted in a higher activity of bats on grassland sites in the beginning of the year during May, June and July. Landscape elements near grassland sites also influenced species composition of bats and species richness of functional groups (open, edge and narrow space foragers). Our results highlight the importance of forested areas, and suggest that agricultural grasslands that are closer to forest remnants might be better buffered against outbreaks of agricultural pest insects due to higher species richness and higher bat activity. Furthermore, our data reveals that even for highly mobile species such as bats, a very dense network of connecting elements within the landscape is

  8. The Importance of Landscape Elements for Bat Activity and Species Richness in Agricultural Areas.

    PubMed

    Heim, Olga; Treitler, Julia T; Tschapka, Marco; Knörnschild, Mirjam; Jung, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Landscape heterogeneity is regarded as a key factor for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function in production landscapes. We investigated whether grassland sites at close vicinity to forested areas are more frequently used by bats. Considering that bats are important consumers of herbivorous insects, including agricultural pest, this is important for sustainable land management. Bat activity and species richness were assessed using repeated monitoring from May to September in 2010 with acoustic monitoring surveys on 50 grassland sites in the Biosphere Reserve Schorfheide-Chorin (North-East Germany). Using spatial analysis (GIS), we measured the closest distance of each grassland site to potentially connecting landscape elements (e.g., trees, linear vegetation, groves, running and standing water). In addition, we assessed the distance to and the percent land cover of forest remnants and urban areas in a 200 m buffer around the recording sites to address differences in the local landscape setting. Species richness and bat activity increased significantly with higher forest land cover in the 200 m buffer and at smaller distance to forested areas. Moreover, species richness increased in proximity to tree groves. Larger amount of forest land cover and smaller distance to forest also resulted in a higher activity of bats on grassland sites in the beginning of the year during May, June and July. Landscape elements near grassland sites also influenced species composition of bats and species richness of functional groups (open, edge and narrow space foragers). Our results highlight the importance of forested areas, and suggest that agricultural grasslands that are closer to forest remnants might be better buffered against outbreaks of agricultural pest insects due to higher species richness and higher bat activity. Furthermore, our data reveals that even for highly mobile species such as bats, a very dense network of connecting elements within the landscape is

  9. The Importance of Landscape Elements for Bat Activity and Species Richness in Agricultural Areas.

    PubMed

    Heim, Olga; Treitler, Julia T; Tschapka, Marco; Knörnschild, Mirjam; Jung, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Landscape heterogeneity is regarded as a key factor for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function in production landscapes. We investigated whether grassland sites at close vicinity to forested areas are more frequently used by bats. Considering that bats are important consumers of herbivorous insects, including agricultural pest, this is important for sustainable land management. Bat activity and species richness were assessed using repeated monitoring from May to September in 2010 with acoustic monitoring surveys on 50 grassland sites in the Biosphere Reserve Schorfheide-Chorin (North-East Germany). Using spatial analysis (GIS), we measured the closest distance of each grassland site to potentially connecting landscape elements (e.g., trees, linear vegetation, groves, running and standing water). In addition, we assessed the distance to and the percent land cover of forest remnants and urban areas in a 200 m buffer around the recording sites to address differences in the local landscape setting. Species richness and bat activity increased significantly with higher forest land cover in the 200 m buffer and at smaller distance to forested areas. Moreover, species richness increased in proximity to tree groves. Larger amount of forest land cover and smaller distance to forest also resulted in a higher activity of bats on grassland sites in the beginning of the year during May, June and July. Landscape elements near grassland sites also influenced species composition of bats and species richness of functional groups (open, edge and narrow space foragers). Our results highlight the importance of forested areas, and suggest that agricultural grasslands that are closer to forest remnants might be better buffered against outbreaks of agricultural pest insects due to higher species richness and higher bat activity. Furthermore, our data reveals that even for highly mobile species such as bats, a very dense network of connecting elements within the landscape is

  10. Arachnids of medical importance in Brazil: main active compounds present in scorpion and spider venoms and tick saliva.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Francielle A; Amorim, Fernanda G; Anjolette, Fernando A P; Arantes, Eliane C

    2015-01-01

    Arachnida is the largest class among the arthropods, constituting over 60,000 described species (spiders, mites, ticks, scorpions, palpigrades, pseudoscorpions, solpugids and harvestmen). Many accidents are caused by arachnids, especially spiders and scorpions, while some diseases can be transmitted by mites and ticks. These animals are widely dispersed in urban centers due to the large availability of shelter and food, increasing the incidence of accidents. Several protein and non-protein compounds present in the venom and saliva of these animals are responsible for symptoms observed in envenoming, exhibiting neurotoxic, dermonecrotic and hemorrhagic activities. The phylogenomic analysis from the complementary DNA of single-copy nuclear protein-coding genes shows that these animals share some common protein families known as neurotoxins, defensins, hyaluronidase, antimicrobial peptides, phospholipases and proteinases. This indicates that the venoms from these animals may present components with functional and structural similarities. Therefore, we described in this review the main components present in spider and scorpion venom as well as in tick saliva, since they have similar components. These three arachnids are responsible for many accidents of medical relevance in Brazil. Additionally, this study shows potential biotechnological applications of some components with important biological activities, which may motivate the conducting of further research studies on their action mechanisms.

  11. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Upgrade Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William

    2013-01-01

    A key technology element in Nuclear Thermal Propulsion is the development of fuel materials and components which can withstand extremely high temperatures while being exposed to flowing hydrogen. NTREES provides a cost effective method for rapidly screening of candidate fuel components with regard to their viability for use in NTR systems. The NTREES is designed to mimic the conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel elements and other components would be subjected to during reactor operation. The NTREES consists of a water cooled ASME code stamped pressure vessel and its associated control hardware and instrumentation coupled with inductive heaters to simulate the heat provided by the fission process. The NTREES has been designed to safely allow hydrogen gas to be injected into internal flow passages of an inductively heated test article mounted in the chamber.

  12. Comparison of the activity measurements in nuclear medicine services in the Brazilian northeast region.

    PubMed

    de Farias Fragoso, Maria da Conceição; de Albuquerque, Antônio Morais; de Oliveira, Mércia L; de Lima, Fabiana Farias; Barreto, Flávio Chiappetta Paes; de Andrade Lima, Ricardo

    2013-12-01

    The Northeastern Regional Centre for Nuclear Sciences (CRCN-NE), National Nuclear Energy Commission, has organized for the first time in nuclear medicine services (NMSs) in the Brazilian northeast region a comparison of activity measurements for (99m)Tc, (131)I, (67)Ga, (201)Tl and (57)Co. This tool is widely utilized to evaluate not only the accuracy of radionuclide calibrators, but also the competence of NMSs to measure the activity of the radiopharmaceuticals and the performance of the personnel involved in these measurements. The comparison results showed that 90% of the results received from participants are within the ±10% limit established by the Brazilian Norm.

  13. [Social support and physical activity in adolescents from public schools: the importance of family and friends].

    PubMed

    Prado, Crisley Vanessa; Lima, Alex Vieira; Fermino, Rogério César; Añez, Ciro Romelio Rodriguez; Reis, Rodrigo Siqueira

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the association between different types and sources of social support and physical activity among adolescents from Curitiba, Paraná State, Brazil. A school-based survey was conducted with a representative sample of adolescents from public schools (n = 1,469). Multiple regression models were used to test the association between weekly frequency and sources of social support from family and friends and weekly frequency of physical activity. Among boys, frequent company of family (PR: 2.88; 95%CI: 2.00-4.13) and friends (PR: 5.46; 95%CI: 2.33-12.78) and positive reinforcement from friends (PR: 1.81; 95%CI: 1.18-2.77) were positively associated with physical activity. Sporadic invitation by the family was negatively associated with physical activity (PR: 0.66; 95%CI: 0.46-1.14). For girls, frequent company of family (PR: 3.39; 95%CI: 1.49-7.69) and friends (PR: 4.06; 95%CI: 2.22-7.45) increased the likelihood of physical activity. Company of friends was the most important type of social support for physical activity among these adolescents.

  14. Halophilic Bacteria of Lunsu Produce an Array of Industrially Important Enzymes with Salt Tolerant Activity

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sonika; Sharma, Parul; Dev, Kamal; Sourirajan, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    The halophilic bacterial isolates SS1, SS2, SS3, SS5, and SS8 were characterized for production of industrially important enzymes like amylase, protease, lipase, and glutaminase. Halophilic bacterial isolates SS1 and SS3 exhibited salt dependent extracellular amylase and protease activities. Both the halophilic isolates SS1 and SS3 exhibited maximum amylase and protease activities in the presence of 1.5 and 1.0 M NaCl, respectively, with the optimum pH 8 and temperature 40°C. SS2 showed maximum extracellular protease and lipase activities in the presence of 0.75 M NaCl, at optimum pH of 7, and temperature 37°C. The glutaminase activity of SS3 increased with increase in concentration of NaCl up to 2.5 M. The optimum pH and temperature for L-glutaminase activity of SS3 was 8 and 40°C, respectively. The combined hydrolytic activities of these halophilic bacterial isolates can be used for bioconversion of organic materials to useful products. PMID:26885394

  15. [Social support and physical activity in adolescents from public schools: the importance of family and friends].

    PubMed

    Prado, Crisley Vanessa; Lima, Alex Vieira; Fermino, Rogério César; Añez, Ciro Romelio Rodriguez; Reis, Rodrigo Siqueira

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the association between different types and sources of social support and physical activity among adolescents from Curitiba, Paraná State, Brazil. A school-based survey was conducted with a representative sample of adolescents from public schools (n = 1,469). Multiple regression models were used to test the association between weekly frequency and sources of social support from family and friends and weekly frequency of physical activity. Among boys, frequent company of family (PR: 2.88; 95%CI: 2.00-4.13) and friends (PR: 5.46; 95%CI: 2.33-12.78) and positive reinforcement from friends (PR: 1.81; 95%CI: 1.18-2.77) were positively associated with physical activity. Sporadic invitation by the family was negatively associated with physical activity (PR: 0.66; 95%CI: 0.46-1.14). For girls, frequent company of family (PR: 3.39; 95%CI: 1.49-7.69) and friends (PR: 4.06; 95%CI: 2.22-7.45) increased the likelihood of physical activity. Company of friends was the most important type of social support for physical activity among these adolescents. PMID:24896057

  16. Macrophage activation: role of toll-like receptors, nitric oxide, and nuclear factor kappa B.

    PubMed

    Billack, Blase

    2006-10-15

    Macrophages play an important role in host-defense and inflammation. In response to an immune challenge, macrophages become activated and produce proinflammatory mediators that contribute to nonspecific immunity. The mediators released by activated macrophages include: superoxide anion; reactive nitrogen intermediates, such as nitric oxide and peroxynitrite; bioactive lipids; and cytokines. Although essential to the immune response, overproduction of certain macrophage-derived mediators during an immune challenge or inflammatory response can result in tissue injury and cellular death. The present report is focused on understanding some of the molecular mechanisms used by macrophages to produce reactive nitrogen intermediates in response to immunostimulatory agents such as heat shock protein 60 and bacterial lipopolysaccharide. The role of Toll-like receptors and transcription factors such as nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB) in the innate immune response is also described. A basic understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for macrophage activation should serve as a foundation for novel drug development aimed at modulating macrophage activity.

  17. Rhinosporidium seeberi Nuclear Cycle Activities Using Confocal Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Delfino, Darly; Mendoza, Leonel; Vilela, Raquel

    2016-02-01

    Rhinosporidium seeberi is an uncultivated Ichthyosporean infecting animals, including humans. Recent studies suggested R. seeberi undergoes synchronized nuclear division without cytokinesis. We used confocal microscopy to investigate R. seeberi nuclear division cycles in formalin-fixed tissues stained with DAPI and phalloidin. We report that R. seeberi nuclei in juvenile and intermediary sporangia synchronously divided without cytokinesis. Intermediary sporangia display numerous 3-4 μm nuclei at different mitotic stages as well as a thick inner layer with strong affinity for phalloidin. Mature sporangia showed numerous 5-12 μm cell-walled endospores, each containing a 2-4 μm in diameter nucleus. Phalloidin did not bind to the inner layers of mature sporangia or endospores. The development of a "germinative zone" in the inner layer of mature sporangia containing hundreds of nuclei was also confirmed. This study establishes that during the R. seeberi life cycle synchronous nuclear divisions without cytokinesis takes place, resulting in the formation of thousands of nuclei. Cytokinesis, on the other hand, is a 1-time event and occurs in the latest stages of intermediate sporangia, after the formation of thousands of nuclei and just before mature sporangia development. PMID:26461427

  18. Nuclear Science Division: 1993 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, W.D.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division for the 1993 calendar year. This was another significant year in the history of the Division with many interesting and important accomplishments. Activities for the following programs are covered here: (1) nuclear structure and reactions program; (2) the Institute for Nuclear and Particle Astrophysics; (3) relativistic nuclear collisions program; (4) nuclear theory program; (5) nuclear data evaluation program, isotope project; and (6) 88-inch cyclotron operations.

  19. Theory for cross effect dynamic nuclear polarization under magic-angle spinning in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance: the importance of level crossings.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Kent R; Tycko, Robert

    2012-08-28

    We present theoretical calculations of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) due to the cross effect in nuclear magnetic resonance under magic-angle spinning (MAS). Using a three-spin model (two electrons and one nucleus), cross effect DNP with MAS for electron spins with a large g-anisotropy can be seen as a series of spin transitions at avoided crossings of the energy levels, with varying degrees of adiabaticity. If the electron spin-lattice relaxation time T(1e) is large relative to the MAS rotation period, the cross effect can happen as two separate events: (i) partial saturation of one electron spin by the applied microwaves as one electron spin resonance (ESR) frequency crosses the microwave frequency and (ii) flip of all three spins, when the difference of the two ESR frequencies crosses the nuclear frequency, which transfers polarization to the nuclear spin if the two electron spins have different polarizations. In addition, adiabatic level crossings at which the two ESR frequencies become equal serve to maintain non-uniform saturation across the ESR line. We present analytical results based on the Landau-Zener theory of adiabatic transitions, as well as numerical quantum mechanical calculations for the evolution of the time-dependent three-spin system. These calculations provide insight into the dependence of cross effect DNP on various experimental parameters, including MAS frequency, microwave field strength, spin relaxation rates, hyperfine and electron-electron dipole coupling strengths, and the nature of the biradical dopants.

  20. Theory for cross effect dynamic nuclear polarization under magic-angle spinning in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance: The importance of level crossings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurber, Kent R.; Tycko, Robert

    2012-08-01

    We present theoretical calculations of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) due to the cross effect in nuclear magnetic resonance under magic-angle spinning (MAS). Using a three-spin model (two electrons and one nucleus), cross effect DNP with MAS for electron spins with a large g-anisotropy can be seen as a series of spin transitions at avoided crossings of the energy levels, with varying degrees of adiabaticity. If the electron spin-lattice relaxation time T1e is large relative to the MAS rotation period, the cross effect can happen as two separate events: (i) partial saturation of one electron spin by the applied microwaves as one electron spin resonance (ESR) frequency crosses the microwave frequency and (ii) flip of all three spins, when the difference of the two ESR frequencies crosses the nuclear frequency, which transfers polarization to the nuclear spin if the two electron spins have different polarizations. In addition, adiabatic level crossings at which the two ESR frequencies become equal serve to maintain non-uniform saturation across the ESR line. We present analytical results based on the Landau-Zener theory of adiabatic transitions, as well as numerical quantum mechanical calculations for the evolution of the time-dependent three-spin system. These calculations provide insight into the dependence of cross effect DNP on various experimental parameters, including MAS frequency, microwave field strength, spin relaxation rates, hyperfine and electron-electron dipole coupling strengths, and the nature of the biradical dopants.

  1. Theory for cross effect dynamic nuclear polarization under magic-angle spinning in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance: the importance of level crossings.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Kent R; Tycko, Robert

    2012-08-28

    We present theoretical calculations of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) due to the cross effect in nuclear magnetic resonance under magic-angle spinning (MAS). Using a three-spin model (two electrons and one nucleus), cross effect DNP with MAS for electron spins with a large g-anisotropy can be seen as a series of spin transitions at avoided crossings of the energy levels, with varying degrees of adiabaticity. If the electron spin-lattice relaxation time T(1e) is large relative to the MAS rotation period, the cross effect can happen as two separate events: (i) partial saturation of one electron spin by the applied microwaves as one electron spin resonance (ESR) frequency crosses the microwave frequency and (ii) flip of all three spins, when the difference of the two ESR frequencies crosses the nuclear frequency, which transfers polarization to the nuclear spin if the two electron spins have different polarizations. In addition, adiabatic level crossings at which the two ESR frequencies become equal serve to maintain non-uniform saturation across the ESR line. We present analytical results based on the Landau-Zener theory of adiabatic transitions, as well as numerical quantum mechanical calculations for the evolution of the time-dependent three-spin system. These calculations provide insight into the dependence of cross effect DNP on various experimental parameters, including MAS frequency, microwave field strength, spin relaxation rates, hyperfine and electron-electron dipole coupling strengths, and the nature of the biradical dopants. PMID:22938251

  2. Theory for cross effect dynamic nuclear polarization under magic-angle spinning in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance: The importance of level crossings

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Kent R.; Tycko, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We present theoretical calculations of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) due to the cross effect in nuclear magnetic resonance under magic-angle spinning (MAS). Using a three-spin model (two electrons and one nucleus), cross effect DNP with MAS for electron spins with a large g-anisotropy can be seen as a series of spin transitions at avoided crossings of the energy levels, with varying degrees of adiabaticity. If the electron spin-lattice relaxation time T1e is large relative to the MAS rotation period, the cross effect can happen as two separate events: (i) partial saturation of one electron spin by the applied microwaves as one electron spin resonance (ESR) frequency crosses the microwave frequency and (ii) flip of all three spins, when the difference of the two ESR frequencies crosses the nuclear frequency, which transfers polarization to the nuclear spin if the two electron spins have different polarizations. In addition, adiabatic level crossings at which the two ESR frequencies become equal serve to maintain non-uniform saturation across the ESR line. We present analytical results based on the Landau-Zener theory of adiabatic transitions, as well as numerical quantum mechanical calculations for the evolution of the time-dependent three-spin system. These calculations provide insight into the dependence of cross effect DNP on various experimental parameters, including MAS frequency, microwave field strength, spin relaxation rates, hyperfine and electron-electron dipole coupling strengths, and the nature of the biradical dopants. PMID:22938251

  3. An Important Natural Genetic Resource of Oreochromis niloticus (Linnaeus, 1758) Threatened by Aquaculture Activities in Loboi Drainage, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Ndiwa, Titus Chemandwa; Nyingi, Dorothy Wanja; Agnese, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    The need to improve food security in Africa through culture of tilapias has led to transfer of different species from their natural ranges causing negative impacts on wild fish genetic resources. Loboi swamp in Kenya is fed by three hot springs: Lake Bogoria Hotel, Chelaba and Turtle Springs, hosting natural populations of Oreochromis niloticus. The present study aimed at better genetic characterization of these threatened populations. Partial mtDNA sequences of the D-loop region and variations at 16 microsatellite loci were assessed in the three hot spring populations and compared with three other natural populations of O. niloticus in the region. Results obtained indicated that the hot spring populations had mitochondrial and nuclear genetic variability similar to or higher than the large closely related populations. This may be attributed to the perennial nature of the hot springs, which do not depend on rainfall but rather receive permanent water supply from deep aquifers. The study also revealed that gene flow between the three different hot spring populations was sufficiently low thus allowing their differentiation. This differentiation was unexpected considering the very close proximity of the springs to each other. It is possible that the swamp creates a barrier to free movement of fish from one spring to the other thereby diminishing gene flow. Finally, the most surprising and worrying results were that the three hot spring populations are introgressed by mtDNA genes of O. leucostictus, while microsatellite analysis suggested that some nuclear genes may also have crossed the species barrier. It is very likely that the recent intensification of aquaculture activities in the Loboi drainage may be responsible for these introgressions. Taking into account the importance of these new genetic resources, protection and management actions of the Loboi swamp should be accorded top priority to prevent the loss of these spring populations. PMID:25222491

  4. An important natural genetic resource of Oreochromis niloticus (Linnaeus, 1758) threatened by aquaculture activities in Loboi drainage, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Ndiwa, Titus Chemandwa; Nyingi, Dorothy Wanja; Agnese, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    The need to improve food security in Africa through culture of tilapias has led to transfer of different species from their natural ranges causing negative impacts on wild fish genetic resources. Loboi swamp in Kenya is fed by three hot springs: Lake Bogoria Hotel, Chelaba and Turtle Springs, hosting natural populations of Oreochromis niloticus. The present study aimed at better genetic characterization of these threatened populations. Partial mtDNA sequences of the D-loop region and variations at 16 microsatellite loci were assessed in the three hot spring populations and compared with three other natural populations of O. niloticus in the region. Results obtained indicated that the hot spring populations had mitochondrial and nuclear genetic variability similar to or higher than the large closely related populations. This may be attributed to the perennial nature of the hot springs, which do not depend on rainfall but rather receive permanent water supply from deep aquifers. The study also revealed that gene flow between the three different hot spring populations was sufficiently low thus allowing their differentiation. This differentiation was unexpected considering the very close proximity of the springs to each other. It is possible that the swamp creates a barrier to free movement of fish from one spring to the other thereby diminishing gene flow. Finally, the most surprising and worrying results were that the three hot spring populations are introgressed by mtDNA genes of O. leucostictus, while microsatellite analysis suggested that some nuclear genes may also have crossed the species barrier. It is very likely that the recent intensification of aquaculture activities in the Loboi drainage may be responsible for these introgressions. Taking into account the importance of these new genetic resources, protection and management actions of the Loboi swamp should be accorded top priority to prevent the loss of these spring populations.

  5. Importance of the redox state of cytochrome c during caspase activation in cytosolic extracts.

    PubMed Central

    Hampton, M B; Zhivotovsky, B; Slater, A F; Burgess, D H; Orrenius, S

    1998-01-01

    The export of cytochrome c from mitochondria to the cytoplasm has been detected during apoptosis. Addition of cytochrome c to cytosolic extracts can activate the caspases, suggesting that this export could be an important intracellular signal for initiating the apoptotic programme. We have investigated the mechanism of caspase activation by cytochrome c. Mitochondrial cytochrome c normally shuttles electrons between complexes III and IV of the electron transport chain. Interaction with these complexes is dependent on electrostatic interactions via a polylysine binding pocket. Cytosolic caspase activation was only observed with intact holocytochrome c, and increasing the ionic composition of the extracts prevented activation, suggesting that stringent allosteric interactions between cytochrome c and other cytoplasmic factors are necessary. Cytochrome c was fully reduced within 5 min of addition to the cytosolic extracts. Potassium ferricyanide could maintain cytochrome c in an oxidized state, but care was taken to use ferricyanide at concentrations where its polyanion effect did not cause interference. The oxidized form of cytochrome c was able to activate the caspases. We conclude that reduced cytochrome c will function in the cytoplasm; however, its reduction is not a critical step, and electron transfer from cytochrome c to its cytoplasmic-binding partner(s) is not necessary in the pathway leading to apoptosis. PMID:9405280

  6. Active transporters as enzymes: an energetic framework applied to major facilitator superfamily and ABC importer systems.

    PubMed

    Shilton, Brian H

    2015-04-15

    Active membrane transporters are dynamic molecular machines that catalyse transport across a membrane by coupling solute movement to a source of energy such as ATP or a secondary ion gradient. A central question for many active transporters concerns the mechanism by which transport is coupled to a source of energy. The transport process and associated energetic coupling involve conformational changes in the transporter. For efficient transport, the conformational changes must be tightly regulated and they must link energy use to movement of the substrate across the membrane. The present review discusses active transport using the well-established energetic framework for enzyme-mediated catalysis. In particular, membrane transport systems can be viewed as ensembles consisting of low-energy and high-energy conformations. The transport process involves binding interactions that selectively stabilize the higher energy conformations, and in this way promote conformational changes in the system that are coupled to decreases in free energy and substrate translocation. The major facilitator superfamily of secondary active transporters is used to illustrate these ideas, which are then be expanded to primary active transport mediated by ABC (ATP-binding cassette) import systems, with a focus on the well-studied maltose transporter.

  7. Technosocial Modeling for Determining the Status and Nature of a State’s Nuclear Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Gastelum, Zoe N.; Harvey, Julia B.

    2009-09-25

    The International Atomic Energy Agency State Evaluation Process: The Role of Information Analysis in Reaching Safeguards Conclusions (Mathews et al. 2008), several examples of nonproliferation models using analytical software were developed that may assist the IAEA with collecting, visualizing, analyzing, and reporting information in support of the State Evaluation Process. This paper focuses on one of the examples a set of models developed in the Proactive Scenario Production, Evidence Collection, and Testing (ProSPECT) software that evaluates the status and nature of a state’s nuclear activities. The models use three distinct subject areas to perform this assessment: the presence of nuclear activities, the consistency of those nuclear activities with national nuclear energy goals, and the geopolitical context in which those nuclear activities are taking place. As a proof-of-concept for the models, a crude case study was performed. The study, which attempted to evaluate the nuclear activities taking place in Syria prior to September 2007, yielded illustrative, yet inconclusive, results. Due to the inconclusive nature of the case study results, changes that may improve the model’s efficiency and accuracy are proposed.

  8. Isoleucine 61 is important for the hemolytic activity of pyolysin of Trueperella pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Yan, Minghui; Hu, Yunhao; Bao, Jun; Xiao, Ya; Zhang, Yue; Yang, Lingxiao; Wang, Junwei; Zhang, Wenlong

    2016-01-15

    Pyolysin (PLO) is a hemolysin secreted by Trueperella pyogenes (T. pyogenes) and is important for the pathogenicity of T. pyogenes. Oligomerization of PLO monomers is a critical step in the process of hemolysis. However, the mechanisms of intermolecular interaction of PLO monomers are still not clearly illuminated. In this study, two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against PLO, named AP-1A3 and AP-4F12, respectively, were generated firstly, of which AP-1A3 showed no or undetectable hemolysis inhibition activity against recombinant PLO (rPLO), whereas AP-4F12 could markedly inhibit the hemolytic activity of rPLO. Epitope mapping revealed that AP-1A3 recognized amino acid residues ranging from 64 to 79 of mature PLO (91-106 including the signal peptide), whereas AP-4F12 recognized amino acid residues ranging from 58 to 75 (85-102 including the signal peptide). Comparison of the amino acid sequence of two epitopes revealed that six amino acid residues ranging from 58 to 63 of PLO were associated with the hemolytic activity of PLO. Alanine scan showed that substitution of each amino acid ranging from 58 to 62 with alanine had apparent impact on the hemolytic activity of rPLO, especially for the substitution of isoleucine 61 which caused almost complete loss of hemolytic activity of rPLO. Our findings identified a region in PLO and an amino acid in that region might play important role in the process of oligomerization of PLO monomers. PMID:26711048

  9. (129)I record of nuclear activities in marine sediment core from Jiaozhou Bay in China.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yukun; Hou, Xiaolin; Zhou, Weijian; Liu, Guangshan

    2016-04-01

    Iodine-129 has been used as a powerful tool for environmental tracing of human nuclear activities. In this work, a sediment core collected from Jiaozhou Bay, the east coast of China, in 2002 was analyzed for (129)I to investigate the influence of human nuclear activities in this region. Significantly enhanced (129)I level was observed in upper 70 cm of the sediment core, with peak values in the layer corresponding to 1957, 1964, 1974, 1986, and after 1990. The sources of (129)I and corresponding transport processes in this region are discussed, including nuclear weapons testing at the Pacific Proving Grounds, global fallout from a large numbers of nuclear weapon tests in 1963, the climax of Chinese nuclear weapons testing in the early 1970s, the Chernobyl accident in 1986, and long-distance dispersion of European reprocessing derived (129)I. The very well (129)I records of different human nuclear activities in the sediment core illustrate the potential application of (129)I in constraining ages and sedimentation rates of the recent sediment. The releases of (129)I from the European nuclear fuel reprocessing plants at La Hague (France) and Sellafield (UK) were found to dominate the inventory of (129)I in the Chinese sediments after 1990, not only the directly atmospheric releases of these reprocessing plants, but also re-emission of marine discharged (129)I of these reprocessing plants in the highly contaminated European seas. PMID:26821329

  10. (129)I record of nuclear activities in marine sediment core from Jiaozhou Bay in China.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yukun; Hou, Xiaolin; Zhou, Weijian; Liu, Guangshan

    2016-04-01

    Iodine-129 has been used as a powerful tool for environmental tracing of human nuclear activities. In this work, a sediment core collected from Jiaozhou Bay, the east coast of China, in 2002 was analyzed for (129)I to investigate the influence of human nuclear activities in this region. Significantly enhanced (129)I level was observed in upper 70 cm of the sediment core, with peak values in the layer corresponding to 1957, 1964, 1974, 1986, and after 1990. The sources of (129)I and corresponding transport processes in this region are discussed, including nuclear weapons testing at the Pacific Proving Grounds, global fallout from a large numbers of nuclear weapon tests in 1963, the climax of Chinese nuclear weapons testing in the early 1970s, the Chernobyl accident in 1986, and long-distance dispersion of European reprocessing derived (129)I. The very well (129)I records of different human nuclear activities in the sediment core illustrate the potential application of (129)I in constraining ages and sedimentation rates of the recent sediment. The releases of (129)I from the European nuclear fuel reprocessing plants at La Hague (France) and Sellafield (UK) were found to dominate the inventory of (129)I in the Chinese sediments after 1990, not only the directly atmospheric releases of these reprocessing plants, but also re-emission of marine discharged (129)I of these reprocessing plants in the highly contaminated European seas.

  11. The GLFG repetitive region of the nucleoporin Nup116p interacts with Kap95p, an essential yeast nuclear import factor

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Nup116p is a member of a family of five yeast nuclear pore complex (NPC) proteins that share an amino terminal region of repetitive tetrapeptide "GLFG" motifs. Previous experiments characterized the unique morphological perturbations that occur in a nup116 null mutant: temperature-sensitive formation of nuclear envelope seals over the cytoplasmic face of the NPC (Wente, S. R., and G. Blobel. 1993. J. Cell Biol. 123:275-284). Three approaches have been taken to dissect the structural basis for Nup116p's role in NPC function. First, deletion mutagenesis analysis of NUP116 revealed that the GLFG region was required for NPC function. This was not true for the other four yeast GLFG family members (Nup49p, Nup57p, Nup100p, and Nup145p). Moreover, deletion of either half of Nup116p's GLFG repeats or replacement of Nup116p's GLFG region with either Nup100p's GLFG region or Nsp1p's FXFG repetitive region abolishes the function of Nup116p. At a semipermissive growth temperature, the cells lacking Nup116p's GLFG region displayed a diminished capacity for nuclear import. Second, overexpression of Nup116p's GLFG region severely inhibited cell growth, rapidly blocked polyadenylated-RNA export, and fragmented the nucleolus. Although it inhibited nuclear export, the overexpressed GLFG region appeared predominantly localized in the cytoplasm and NPC/nuclear envelope structure was not perturbed in thin section electron micrographs. Finally, using biochemical and two-hybrid analysis, an interaction was characterized between Nup116p's GLFG region and Kap95p, an essential yeast homologue of the vertebrate nuclear import factor p97/Imp90/karopherin beta. These data show that Nup116p's GLFG region has an essential role in mediating nuclear transport. PMID:8557738

  12. PEGylated ofloxacin nanoparticles render strong antibacterial activity against many clinically important human pathogens.

    PubMed

    Marslin, Gregory; Revina, Ann Mary; Khandelwal, Vinoth Kumar Megraj; Balakumar, Krishnamoorthy; Sheeba, Caroline J; Franklin, Gregory

    2015-08-01

    The rise of bacterial resistance against important drugs threatens their clinical utility. Fluoroquinones, one of the most important classes of contemporary antibiotics has also reported to suffer bacterial resistance. Since the general mechanism of bacterial resistance against fluoroquinone antibiotics (e.g. ofloxacin) consists of target mutations resulting in reduced membrane permeability and increased efflux by the bacteria, strategies that could increase bacterial uptake and reduce efflux of the drug would provide effective treatment. In the present study, we have compared the efficiencies of ofloxacin delivered in the form of free drug (OFX) and as nanoparticles on bacterial uptake and antibacterial activity. Although both poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (OFX-PLGA) and methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (OFX-mPEG-PLGA) nanoformulations presented improved bacterial uptake and antibacterial activity against all the tested human bacterial pathogens, namely, Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Salmonella typhimurium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus, OFX-mPEG-PLGA showed significantly higher bacterial uptake and antibacterial activity compared to OFX-PLGA. We have also found that mPEG-PLGA nanoencapsulation could significantly inhibit Bacillus subtilis resistance development against OFX.

  13. Dietary regulation of adiponectin by direct and indirect lipid activators of nuclear hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Rühl, R; Landrier, J F

    2016-01-01

    Adiponectin is an adipokine mainly secreted by adipocytes that presents antidiabetic, anti-inflammatory, and antiatherogenic functions. Therefore, modulation of adiponectin expression represents a promising target for prevention or treatment of several diseases including insulin resistance and type II diabetes. Pharmacological agents such as the nuclear hormone receptor synthetic agonists like peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ agonists are of particular interest in therapeutic strategies due to their ability to increase the plasma adiponectin concentration. Nutritional approaches are also of particular interest, especially in primary prevention, since some active compounds of our diet (notably vitamins, carotenoids, or other essential nutrients) are direct or indirect lipid-activators of nuclear hormone receptors and are modifiers of adiponectin expression and secretion. The aim of the present review is to summarize current knowledge about the nutritional regulation of adiponectin by derivatives of active compounds naturally present in the diet acting as indirect or direct activators of nuclear hormone receptors.

  14. 10 CFR 73.74 - Requirement for advance notice and protection of import shipments of nuclear material from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., Division of Security Policy, Office of Nuclear Security and Incident Response, using any appropriate method listed in § 73.4; (2) Assure that the notification will be received at least 10 days before transport of... significance, or irradiated reactor fuel shall assure that during transport outside the United States...

  15. Cooperative effects of hepatitis B virus and TNF may play important roles in the activation of metabolic pathways through the activation of NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shuang; Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamoto, Shingo; Jiang, Xia; Nakamura, Masato; Sasaki, Reina; Haga, Yuki; Shirasawa, Hiroshi; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-1β are often observed in the sera of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected patients. It is well known that these cytokines activate nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)-signaling, and are associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. We investigated whether HBV or HBV X protein (HBx) enhanced the activation of NF-κB in the presence of TNF and/or IL-1β, and their effects on the expression of metabolic pathway-associated genes. We examined whether HBV or HBx enhanced cytokine-induced activation of NF-κB in hepatocytes, using a reporter assay, in the presence or absence of TNF and/or IL-1β. The expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 (IGFBP1), one of the NF-κB target genes was also examined. The expression of metabolic pathway-associated genes in HepG2 and HepG2.2.15 cells in the presence or absence of TNF was evaluated by RT-qPCR. Human hepatocytes expressed TNF receptors and IL-1 receptors. NF-κB was activated by cooperation between HBx and TNF in human hepatocytes. We observed IGFBP1 expression in HBV infection and that a number of metabolic pathway-associated genes were upregulated in HepG2.2.15 cells, compared with HepG2 cells with or without TNF treatment. We observed the cooperative effects of HBV and TNF which enhanced the activation of NF-κB as well as upregulated the expression of metabolic pathway-associated genes in hepatocytes. These effects may be important in the development of HBV-associated metabolic syndrome. PMID:27315566

  16. Nuclear Speckles

    PubMed Central

    Spector, David L.; Lamond, Angus I.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear speckles, also known as interchromatin granule clusters, are nuclear domains enriched in pre-mRNA splicing factors, located in the interchromatin regions of the nucleoplasm of mammalian cells. When observed by immunofluorescence microscopy, they usually appear as 20–50 irregularly shaped structures that vary in size. Speckles are dynamic structures, and their constituents can exchange continuously with the nucleoplasm and other nuclear locations, including active transcription sites. Studies on the composition, structure, and dynamics of speckles have provided an important paradigm for understanding the functional organization of the nucleus and the dynamics of the gene expression machinery. PMID:20926517

  17. Activities in support of continuing the service of nuclear power plant concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, Dan J

    2012-01-01

    In general, nuclear power plant concrete structure s performance has been very good; however, aging of concrete structures occurs with the passage of time that can potentially result in degradation if is effects are not controlled. Safety-related nuclear power plant concrete structures are described. In-service inspection and testing requirements in the U.S. are summarized. The interaction of the license renewal process and concrete structures is noted. A summary of operating experience related to aging of nuclear power plant concrete structures is provided. Several candidate areas are identified where additional research would be beneficial for aging management of nuclear power plant concrete structures. Finally, an update on recent activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory related to aging management of nuclear power plant concrete structures is provided.

  18. Genome sequence of Wickerhamomyces anomalus DSM 6766 reveals genetic basis of biotechnologically important antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jessica; Rupp, Oliver; Trost, Eva; Jaenicke, Sebastian; Passoth, Volkmar; Goesmann, Alexander; Tauch, Andreas; Brinkrolf, Karina

    2012-05-01

    The ascomycetous yeast Wickerhamomyces anomalus (formerly Pichia anomala and Hansenula anomala) exhibits antimicrobial activities and flavoring features that are responsible for its frequent association with food, beverage and feed products. However, limited information on the genetic background of this yeast and its multiple capabilities are currently available. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of the neotype strain W. anomalus DSM 6766. On the basis of pyrosequencing, a de novo assembly of this strain resulted in a draft genome sequence with a total size of 25.47 Mbp. An automatic annotation using RAPYD generated 11 512 protein-coding sequences. This annotation provided the basis to analyse metabolic capabilities, phylogenetic relationships, as well as biotechnologically important features and yielded novel candidate genes of W. anomalus DSM 6766 coding for proteins participating in antimicrobial activities. PMID:22292503

  19. The tumor suppressor p53 is subject to both nuclear import and export, and both are fast, energy-dependent and lectin-inhibited.

    PubMed

    Middeler, G; Zerf, K; Jenovai, S; Thulig, A; Tschödrich-Rotter, M; Kubitscheck, U; Peters, R

    1997-03-27

    Human p53 was expressed in E. coli, purified, labeled with fluorescein iodoacetamide (IAF) and characterized for sequence-specific DNA binding and epitope disposition. Injected into the cytoplasm or nuclei of 3T3 cells IAF-p53 was imported into or exported from nuclei within minutes. Import was inhibited by coinjection of the lectin wheat germ agglutinine (WGA). In contrast, the peptide-protein conjugate NLS-HSA carrying the nuclear localization sequence (NLS) of the SV40 T antigen was only imported but not exported. 3T3 polykaryons were injected with IAF-p53 and photo-bleached by Scanning Microphotolysis in such a manner that only a single nucleus per polykaryon remained non-bleached. IAF-p53 was found to migrate rapidly (halftime 10 min) from non-bleached into bleached nuclei, while NLS-HSA did not. In digitonin permeabilized cells IAF-p53 was imported into nuclei. When removed from the medium after nuclear accumulation IAF-p53 was exported from the nuclei. Nuclear import and export of IAF-p53 both were rapid (halftimes of a few minutes, 22 C) and strongly inhibited by WGA or incubation on ice. NLS-HSA was only imported but not exported. We conclude that the nucleocytoplasmic transport of p53, in contrast to that of NLS-HSA, is bidirectional and that transport in both directions is carrier mediated and energy dependent. These results suggest that p53 contains nuclear export signals (NES) in addition to import signals (NLS) and thus open new views on the potential regulation of p53 cellular fractions. PMID:9136984

  20. Transcriptional activation of nuclear estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor and its regulation.

    PubMed

    Xin, Qi-Liang; Qiu, Jing-Tao; Cui, Sheng; Xia, Guo-Liang; Wang, Hai-Bin

    2016-08-25

    Estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) are two important members of steroid receptors family, an evolutionarily conserved family of transcription factors. Upon binding to their ligands, ER and PR enter cell nucleus to interact with specific DNA element in the context of chromatin to initiate the transcription of diverse target genes, which largely depends on the timely recruitment of a wide range of cofactors. Moreover, the interactions between steroid hormones and their respective receptors also trigger post-translational modifications on these receptors to fine-tune their transcriptional activities. Besides the well-known phosphorylation modifications on tyrosine and serine/threonine residues, recent studies have identified several other covalent modifications, such as ubiquitylation and sumoylation. These post-translational modifications of steroid receptors affect its stability, subcellular localization, and/or cofactor recruitment; eventually influence the duration and extent of transcriptional activation. This review is to focus on the recent research progress on the transcriptional activation of nuclear ER and PR as well as their physiological functions in early pregnancy, which may help us to better understand related female reproductive diseases. PMID:27546504

  1. The multidrug resistance protein 1: a functionally important activation marker for murine Th1 cells.

    PubMed

    Prechtl, S; Roellinghoff, M; Scheper, R; Cole, S P; Deeley, R G; Lohoff, M

    2000-01-15

    Previously, we described the expression of an energy-dependent pump in resting murine Th2 (but not resting Th1) cells which extruded the fluorescent dye Fluo-3. After stimulation with Ag and APCs, Th1 cells also expressed this pump. Furthermore, expression of the murine multidrug resistance protein 1 (mrp1) correlated with the presence of the pump. In this study, we report that Fluo-3 is indeed transported by murine mrp1 or its human ortholog MRP1, as revealed by transfection of HEK 293 cells with mrp1 or MRP1 cDNA. Like antigenic activation, IL-2 dose-dependently enhanced the Fluo-3-extruding activity in murine Th1 cells. Although TNF-alpha and IL-12 by themselves only weakly enhanced Fluo-3 extrusion, each of them did so in strong synergism with IL-2. An Ab directed against mrp1 was used to quantify the expression of mrp1 protein in T cells at the single-cell level. Like the Fluo-3 pump, mrp1 protein expression was enhanced by IL-2. Immunohistochemical studies using confocal laser microscopy indicated that mrp1 is localized mainly at the plasma membrane. In addition, protein expression of mrp1 was induced in Vbeta8+CD4+ T cells 12 h after in vivo application of Staphylococcal enterotoxin B. Finally, mrp1 was functionally relevant during the activation process of Th1 cells, because T cell activation could be suppressed by exposure of cells to the mrp1 inhibitor MK571. Thus, we present mrp1 as a novel, functionally important activation marker for Th1 cells and short-term in vivo activated CD4+ T cells, whereas its expression seems to be constitutive in Th2 cells.

  2. Down-regulation of PTEN by HCV core protein through activating nuclear factor-κB

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Rong-Qing; Feng, Xu-Dong; Zhang, Yan-Hua; Wang, Li

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is an important causative agent in HCV related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Tumor suppressor gene PTEN appears to act in the liver at the crossroad of processes controlling cell proliferation. In this study we investigated the effect of the HCV core protein on the PTEN pathway in hepatocarcinogenesis. The HCV core was transfected stably into HepG2 cell. The effect of HCV core on cell proliferation and viability were detected by 3-(4, 5)-dimethylthiahiazo-(-z-y1)-3, 5-di-phenytetrazoliumromide (MTT) assay, clonogenic survival assay and Fluorescence Activating Cell Sorter (FACS) analysis. The expressions of PTEN were detected by real time RT-PCR and/or Western blot analysis, also the mechanism of down-regulation of PTEN was explored by western blot, luciferase assay and RNA interference. We found the HCV core promoted cell proliferation, survival and G2/M phase accumulation. It downregulated PTEN at mRNA and protein level and activated PTEN downstream gene Akt accompanied with NF-κB activation. Furthermore, the inhibition of HCV core by its specific shRNAs decreased the effect of growth promotion and G2/M phase arrest, inhibited the expression of nuclear p65 and increased PTEN expression. The activity of PTEN was restored when treated with NF-κB inhibitor PDTC. By luciferase assay we found that NF-κB inhibited PTEN promoter transcription activity directly in HCV core cells, while PDTC was contrary. Our study suggests that HCV proteins could modulate PTEN by activating NF-κB. Furthermore strategies designed to restore the expression of PTEN may be promising therapies for preventing HCV dependent hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:25550771

  3. Activity and biological effects of neem products against arthropods of medical and veterinary importance.

    PubMed

    Mulla, M S; Su, T

    1999-06-01

    Botanical insecticides are relatively safe and degradable, and are readily available sources of biopesticides. The most prominent phytochemical pesticides in recent years are those derived from neem trees, which have been studied extensively in the fields of entomology and phytochemistry, and have uses for medicinal and cosmetic purposes. The neem products have been obtained from several species of neem trees in the family Meliaceae. Six species in this family have been the subject of botanical pesticide research. They are Azadirachta indica A. Juss, Azadirachta excelsa Jack, Azadirachta siamens Valeton, Melia azedarach L., Melia toosendan Sieb. and Zucc., and Melia volkensii Gürke. The Meliaceae, especially A. indica (Indian neem tree), contains at least 35 biologically active principles. Azadirachtin is the predominant insecticidal active ingredient in the seed, leaves, and other parts of the neem tree. Azadirachtin and other compounds in neem products exhibit various modes of action against insects such as antifeedancy, growth regulation, fecundity suppression and sterilization, oviposition repellency or attractancy, changes in biological fitness, and blocking development of vector-borne pathogens. Some of these bioactivity parameters of neem products have been investigated at least in some species of insects of medical and veterinary importance, such as mosquitoes, flies, triatomines, cockroaches, fleas, lice, and others. Here we review, synthesize, and analyze published information on the activity, modes of action, and other biological effects of neem products against arthropods of medical and veterinary importance. The amount of information on the activity, use, and application of neem products for the control of disease vectors and human and animal pests is limited. Additional research is needed to determine the potential usefulness of neem products in vector control programs. PMID:10412110

  4. The ß-importin KAP8 (Pse1/Kap121) is required for nuclear import of the cellulase transcriptional regulator XYR1, asexual sporulation and stress resistance in Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Ghassemi, Sara; Lichius, Alexander; Bidard, Fréderique; Lemoine, Sophie; Rossignol, Marie-Noëlle; Herold, Silvia; Seidl-Seiboth, Verena; Seiboth, Bernhard; Espeso, Eduardo A; Margeot, Antoine; Kubicek, Christian P

    2015-04-01

    The ascomycete Trichoderma reesei is an industrial producer of cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic enzymes, and serves as a prime model for their genetic regulation. Most of its (hemi-)cellulolytic enzymes are obligatorily dependent on the transcriptional activator XYR1. Here, we investigated the nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling mechanism that transports XYR1 across the nuclear pore complex. We identified 14 karyopherins in T. reesei, of which eight were predicted to be involved in nuclear import, and produced single gene-deletion mutants of all. We found KAP8, an ortholog of Aspergillus nidulans KapI, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Kap121/Pse1, to be essential for nuclear recruitment of GFP-XYR1 and cellulase gene expression. Transformation with the native gene rescued this effect. Transcriptomic analyses of Δkap8 revealed that under cellulase-inducing conditions 42 CAZymes, including all cellulases and hemicellulases known to be under XYR1 control, were significantly down-regulated. Δkap8 strains were capable of forming fertile fruiting bodies but exhibited strongly reduced conidiation both in light and darkness, and showed enhanced sensitivity towards abiotic stress, including high osmotic pressure, low pH and high temperature. Together, these data underscore the significance of nuclear import of XYR1 in cellulase and hemicellulase gene regulation in T. reesei, and identify KAP8 as the major karyopherin required for this process.

  5. The ß-importin KAP8 (Pse1/Kap121) is required for nuclear import of the cellulase transcriptional regulator XYR1, asexual sporulation and stress resistance in Trichoderma reesei

    PubMed Central

    Ghassemi, Sara; Lichius, Alexander; Bidard, Fréderique; Lemoine, Sophie; Rossignol, Marie-Noëlle; Herold, Silvia; Seidl-Seiboth, Verena; Seiboth, Bernhard; Espeso, Eduardo A; Margeot, Antoine; Kubicek, Christian P

    2015-01-01

    The ascomycete Trichoderma reesei is an industrial producer of cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic enzymes, and serves as a prime model for their genetic regulation. Most of its (hemi-)cellulolytic enzymes are obligatorily dependent on the transcriptional activator XYR1. Here, we investigated the nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling mechanism that transports XYR1 across the nuclear pore complex. We identified 14 karyopherins in T. reesei, of which eight were predicted to be involved in nuclear import, and produced single gene-deletion mutants of all. We found KAP8, an ortholog of Aspergillus nidulans KapI, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Kap121/Pse1, to be essential for nuclear recruitment of GFP-XYR1 and cellulase gene expression. Transformation with the native gene rescued this effect. Transcriptomic analyses of Δkap8 revealed that under cellulase-inducing conditions 42 CAZymes, including all cellulases and hemicellulases known to be under XYR1 control, were significantly down-regulated. Δkap8 strains were capable of forming fertile fruiting bodies but exhibited strongly reduced conidiation both in light and darkness, and showed enhanced sensitivity towards abiotic stress, including high osmotic pressure, low pH and high temperature. Together, these data underscore the significance of nuclear import of XYR1 in cellulase and hemicellulase gene regulation in T. reesei, and identify KAP8 as the major karyopherin required for this process. PMID:25626518

  6. MST1 activation by curcumin mediates JNK activation, Foxo3a nuclear translocation and apoptosis in melanoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Teng; Ji, Jiang; Guo, Yong-li

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •Curcumin activates MST1 in melanoma cells. •MST1 mediates curcumin-induced apoptosis of melanoma cells. •ROS production is involved in curcumin-induced MST1 activation. •MST1 mediates curcumin-induced JNK activation in melanoma cells. •MST1 mediates curcumin-induced Foxo3a nuclear translocation and Bim expression. -- Abstract: Different groups including ours have shown that curcumin induces melanoma cell apoptosis, here we focused the role of mammalian Sterile 20-like kinase 1 (MST1) in it. We observed that curcumin activated MST1-dependent apoptosis in cultured melanoma cells. MST1 silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) suppressed curcumin-induced cell apoptosis, while MST1 over-expressing increased curcumin sensitivity. Meanwhile, curcumin induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in melanoma cells, and the ROS scavenger, N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), almost blocked MST1 activation to suggest that ROS might be required for MST1 activation by curcumin. c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) activation by curcumin was dependent on MST1, since MST1 inhibition by RNAi or NAC largely inhibited curcumin-induced JNK activation. Further, curcumin induced Foxo3 nuclear translocation and Bim-1 (Foxo3 target gene) expression in melanoma cells, such an effect by curcumin was inhibited by MST1 RNAi. In conclusion, we suggested that MST1 activation by curcumin mediates JNK activation, Foxo3a nuclear translocation and apoptosis in melanoma cells.

  7. Nuclear cereblon modulates transcriptional activity of Ikaros and regulates its downstream target, enkephalin, in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wada, Takeyoshi; Asahi, Toru; Sawamura, Naoya

    2016-08-26

    The gene coding cereblon (CRBN) was originally identified in genetic linkage analysis of mild autosomal recessive nonsyndromic intellectual disability. CRBN has broad localization in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. However, the significance of nuclear CRBN remains unknown. In the present study, we aimed to elucidate the role of CRBN in the nucleus. First, we generated a series of CRBN deletion mutants and determined the regions responsible for the nuclear localization. Only CRBN protein lacking the N-terminal region was localized outside of the nucleus, suggesting that the N-terminal region is important for its nuclear localization. CRBN was also identified as a thalidomide-binding protein and component of the cullin-4-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Thalidomide has been reported to be involved in the regulation of the transcription factor Ikaros by CRBN-mediated degradation. To investigate the nuclear functions of CRBN, we performed co-immunoprecipitation experiments and evaluated the binding of CRBN to Ikaros. As a result, we found that CRBN was associated with Ikaros protein, and the N-terminal region of CRBN was required for Ikaros binding. In luciferase reporter gene experiments, CRBN modulated transcriptional activity of Ikaros. Furthermore, we found that CRBN modulated Ikaros-mediated transcriptional repression of the proenkephalin gene by binding to its promoter region. These results suggest that CRBN binds to Ikaros via its N-terminal region and regulates transcriptional activities of Ikaros and its downstream target, enkephalin. PMID:27329811

  8. Classical Nuclear Hormone Receptor Activity as a Mediator of Complex Concentration Response Relationships for Endocrine Active Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Cookman, Clifford J.; Belcher, Scott M.

    2014-01-01

    Nonmonotonic concentration response relationships are frequently observed for endocrine active ligands that act via nuclear receptors. The curve of best fit for nonmonotonic concentration response relationships are often inverted U-shaped with effects at intermediate concentrations that are different from effects at higher or lower concentrations. Cytotoxicity is a major mode of action responsible for inverted U-shaped concentration response relationships. However, evidence suggests that ligand selectivity, activation of multiple molecular targets, concerted regulation of multiple opposing endpoints, and multiple ligand binding sites within nuclear receptors also contribute to nonmonotonic concentration response relationships of endocrine active ligands. This review reports the current understanding of mechanisms involved in classical nuclear receptor mediated nonmonotonic concentration response relationships with a focus on studies published between 2012 and 2014. PMID:25299165

  9. Common toad Rhinella arenarum (Hensel, 1867) and its importance in assessing environmental health: test of micronuclei and nuclear abnormalities in erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Pollo, Favio E; Bionda, Clarisa L; Salinas, Zulma A; Salas, Nancy E; Martino, Adolfo L

    2015-09-01

    Anthropogenic activities may generate significant changes in the integrity of aquatic ecosystems, so long-term monitoring of populations that inhabit them is crucial. Counting micronucleated erythrocytes (MN) and erythrocytic nuclear abnormalities (ENA) in peripheral blood is a widely used method for detecting chromosomal damage due to chemical agents in the water. We analyzed MN and ENA frequency in blood obtained from the common toad Rhinella arenarum populations in sites with different degrees of environmental degradation. The results of this study indicate that there is an association between the frequency of micronuclei and nuclear abnormalities and the degree of environmental alteration recorded for the sites studied.

  10. H2O2 Activates the Nuclear Localization of Msn2 and Maf1 through Thioredoxins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae▿

    PubMed Central

    Boisnard, Stéphanie; Lagniel, Gilles; Garmendia-Torres, Cecilia; Molin, Mikael; Boy-Marcotte, Emmanuelle; Jacquet, Michel; Toledano, Michel B.; Labarre, Jean; Chédin, Stéphane

    2009-01-01

    The cellular response to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is characterized by a repression of growth-related processes and an enhanced expression of genes important for cell defense. In budding yeast, this response requires the activation of a set of transcriptional effectors. Some of them, such as the transcriptional activator Yap1, are specific to oxidative stress, and others, such as the transcriptional activators Msn2/4 and the negative regulator Maf1, are activated by a wide spectrum of stress conditions. How these general effectors are activated in response to oxidative stress remains an open question. In this study, we demonstrate that the two cytoplasmic thioredoxins, Trx1 and Trx2, are essential to trigger the nuclear accumulation of Msn2/4 and Maf1, specifically under H2O2 treatment. Contrary to the case with many stress conditions previously described for yeast, the H2O2-induced nuclear accumulation of Msn2 and Maf1 does not correlate with the downregulation of PKA kinase activity. Nevertheless, we show that PP2A phosphatase activity is essential for driving Maf1 dephosphorylation and its subsequent nuclear accumulation in response to H2O2 treatment. Interestingly, under this condition, the lack of PP2A activity has no impact on the subcellular localization of Msn2, demonstrating that the H2O2 signaling pathways share a common route through the thioredoxin system and then diverge to activate Msn2 and Maf1, the final integrators of these pathways. PMID:19581440

  11. Evaluation of the functional involvement of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase in nuclear import of viral cDNA during acute infection.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Tamako; Nishitsuji, Hironori; Zhou, Xin; Nara, Nobuo; Ohashi, Takashi; Kannagi, Mari; Masuda, Takao

    2004-11-01

    Nuclear import of viral cDNA is a critical step for establishing the proviral state of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The contribution of HIV-1 integrase (IN) to the nuclear import of viral cDNA is controversial, partly due to a lack of identification of its bona fide nuclear localization signal. In this study, to address this putative function of HIV-1 IN, the effects of mutations at key residues for viral cDNA recognition (PYNP at positions 142 to 145, K156, K159, and K160) were evaluated in the context of viral replication. During acute infection, some mutations (N144Q, PYNP>KL, and KKK>AAA) severely reduced viral gene expression to less than 1% the wild-type (WT) level. None of the mutations affected the synthesis of viral cDNA. Meanwhile, the levels of integrated viral cDNA produced by N144Q, PYNP>KL, and KKK>AAA mutants were severely reduced to less than 1% the WT level. Quantitative PCR analysis of viral cDNA in nuclei and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis showed that these mutations significantly reduced the level of viral cDNA accumulation in nuclei. Further analysis revealed that IN proteins carrying the N144Q, PYNP>KL, and KKK>AAA mutations showed severely reduced binding to viral cDNA but kept their karyophilic properties. Taken together, these results indicate that mutations that reduced the binding of IN to viral cDNA resulted in severe impairment of virus infectivity, most likely by affecting the nuclear import of viral cDNA that proceeds integration. These results suggest that HIV-1 IN may be one of the critical constituents for the efficient nuclear import of viral cDNA.

  12. Discrimination of Nuclear Explosions against Civilian Sources Based on Atmospheric Radioiodine Isotopic Activity Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinowski, Martin B.; Liao, Yen-Yo; Pistner, Christoph

    2014-03-01

    A global monitoring system for atmospheric radioactivity is being established as part of the International Monitoring System that will verify compliance with the comprehensive nuclear-test-ban treaty (CTBT) once the treaty has entered into force. This paper studies isotopic activity ratios to support the interpretation of observed atmospheric concentrations of 135I, 133I and 131I. The goal is to distinguish nuclear explosion sources from civilian releases. Simulated nuclear explosion releases along with observational data of radioiodine releases from historic nuclear explosions at the Nevada Test Site are compared to simulated light water reactor releases in order to provide a proof of concept for source discrimination based on radioiodine isotopic activity ratios.

  13. Protein kinase A activation enhances β-catenin transcriptional activity through nuclear localization to PML bodies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mei; Mahoney, Emilia; Zuo, Tao; Manchanda, Parmeet K; Davuluri, Ramana V; Kirschner, Lawrence S

    2014-01-01

    The Protein Kinase A (PKA) and Wnt signaling cascades are fundamental pathways involved in cellular development and maintenance. In the osteoblast lineage, these pathways have been demonstrated functionally to be essential for the production of mineralized bone. Evidence for PKA-Wnt crosstalk has been reported both during tumorigenesis and during organogenesis, and the nature of the interaction is thought to rely on tissue and cell context. In this manuscript, we analyzed bone tumors arising from mice with activated PKA caused by mutation of the PKA regulatory subunit Prkar1a. In primary cells from these tumors, we observed relocalization of β-catenin to intranuclear punctuate structures, which were identified as PML bodies. Cellular redistribution of β-catenin could be recapitulated by pharmacologic activation of PKA. Using 3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts as a model system, we found that PKA phosphorylation sites on β-catenin were required for nuclear re-localization. Further, β-catenin's transport to the nucleus was accompanied by an increase in canonical Wnt-dependent transcription, which also required the PKA sites. PKA-Wnt crosstalk in the cells was bi-directional, including enhanced interactions between β-catenin and the cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) and transcriptional crosstalk between the Wnt and PKA signaling pathways. Increases in canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling were associated with a decrease in the activity of the non-canonical Wnt/Ror2 pathway, which has been shown to antagonize canonical Wnt signaling. Taken together, this study provides a new understanding of the complex regulation of the subcellular distribution of β-catenin and its differential protein-protein interaction that can be modulated by PKA signaling. PMID:25299576

  14. THE AIMS AND ACTIVITIES OF THE INTERNATIONAL NETWORK OF NUCLEAR STRUCTURE AND DECAY DATA EVALUATORS.

    SciTech Connect

    NICHOLS,A.L.; TULI, J.K.

    2007-04-22

    International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Evaluators consists of a number of evaluation groups and data service centers in several countries that appreciate the merits of working together to maintain and ensure the quality and comprehensive content of the ENSDF database (Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File). Biennial meetings of the network are held under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to assign evaluation responsibilities, monitor progress, discuss improvements and emerging difficulties, and agree on actions to be undertaken by individual members. The evaluated data and bibliographic details are made available to users via various media, such as the journals ''Nuclear Physics A'' and ''Nuclear Data Sheets'', the World Wide Web, on CD-ROM, wall charts of the nuclides and ''Nuclear Wallet Cards''. While the ENSDF master database is maintained by the US National Nuclear Data Center at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, these data are also available from other nuclear data centers including the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy, in cooperation with the IAEA, organizes workshops on NSDD at regular intervals. The primary aims of these particular workshops are to provide hands-on training in the data evaluation processes, and to encourage new evaluators to participate in NSDD activities. The technical contents of these NSDD workshops are described, along with the rationale for the inclusion of various topics.

  15. Antimicrobial activity of some important Adiantum species used traditionally in indigenous systems of medicine.

    PubMed

    Singh, Meenakshi; Singh, Neha; Khare, P B; Rawat, A K S

    2008-01-17

    Adiantum Linn. of Adiantaceae family is one of the most common and widely distributed species. Ethnomedicinally, the genus is important and popularly known as "Hansraj" in Ayurvedic System of Medicine. It has been used in cold, tumors of spleen, liver and other viscera, skin diseases, bronchitis and inflammatory diseases. It is also considered as tonic and diuretic. In the present study its four important species, i.e. Adiantum capillus-veneris, Adiantum peruvianum, Adiantum venustum and Adiantum caudatum were collected and extracted with methanol. These extracts were tested for their antimicrobial agents against five gram positive, six gram negative (including multiresistant bacteria Staphylococcus aureus) and eight fungal strains using standard microdilution assay. The maximum activity was exhibited by the methanolic extract of Adiantum venustum followed by Adiantum capillus-veneris, Adiantum peruvianum and Adiantum caudatum. The methanolic extract of Adiantum capillus-veneris had very low MIC value (0.48 microg/ml) against Escherichia coli whereas, Adiantum venustum extract against Aspergillus terreus with MIC of 0.97 microg/ml. Total phenolic constituents of Adiantum species viz. Adiantum venustum, Adiantum capillus-veneris, Adiantum peruvianum and Adiantum caudatum were 0.81% (w/w), 0.83% (w/w), 0.71% (w/w) and 0.52% (w/w), respectively (as gallic acid equivalent); implying that the observed activity could be related to the amount of phenolics. PMID:17997240

  16. Nucleotides of the tRNA D-stem that play an important role in nuclear-tRNA export in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Cleary, J D; Mangroo, D

    2000-04-01

    Nuclear export of tRNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves Los1p and Arc1p. Los1p facilitates tRNA translocation across the nuclear pore complex whereas Arc1p plays a role in delivering some species of tRNA exiting the nucleus to their cognate aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. Here, we show that mutations of C11 and G24 of the D-stem of the yeast tyrosine amber-suppressor tRNA have different effects on nuclear export of the tRNA. Changing G24 had no effect on export of the tRNA to the cytoplasm. In contrast, mutating C11 resulted in nuclear retention of the tRNA. Nuclear retention of the tRNA mutants was not due to lack of processing, since only the mature forms of the tRNA mutants were found. The fact that mutations of G24 did not affect export of the tRNA also indicates that the effect of mutating C11 is not due to gross alteration of the tertiary structure resulting from disruption of the C11/G24 base pair. Expression of Los1p and the mammalian tRNA export receptor exportin-t rescued nuclear export of the tRNA with changes at position 11. The export-defective mutations of the tRNA mutants were suppressed by introducing the complementary nucleotides at position 24. Taken together, these findings suggest that C11 is important for binding of the tRNA to the export receptor, and that this binding is influenced by the conformation of the base. Finally, the export-defective tRNA mutants described can be used as reporters to identify eukaryotic proteins involved in the nuclear-tRNA export process, and characterize the molecular interactions between known receptors and the tRNA substrate.

  17. Importance of being Nernst: Synaptic activity and functional relevance in stem cell-derived neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, Aaron B; McNutt, Patrick M

    2015-01-01

    Functional synaptogenesis and network emergence are signature endpoints of neurogenesis. These behaviors provide higher-order confirmation that biochemical and cellular processes necessary for neurotransmitter release, post-synaptic detection and network propagation of neuronal activity have been properly expressed and coordinated among cells. The development of synaptic neurotransmission can therefore be considered a defining property of neurons. Although dissociated primary neuron cultures readily form functioning synapses and network behaviors in vitro, continuously cultured neurogenic cell lines have historically failed to meet these criteria. Therefore, in vitro-derived neuron models that develop synaptic transmission are critically needed for a wide array of studies, including molecular neuroscience, developmental neurogenesis, disease research and neurotoxicology. Over the last decade, neurons derived from various stem cell lines have shown varying ability to develop into functionally mature neurons. In this review, we will discuss the neurogenic potential of various stem cells populations, addressing strengths and weaknesses of each, with particular attention to the emergence of functional behaviors. We will propose methods to functionally characterize new stem cell-derived neuron (SCN) platforms to improve their reliability as physiological relevant models. Finally, we will review how synaptically active SCNs can be applied to accelerate research in a variety of areas. Ultimately, emphasizing the critical importance of synaptic activity and network responses as a marker of neuronal maturation is anticipated to result in in vitro findings that better translate to efficacious clinical treatments. PMID:26240679

  18. Natural compounds regulate energy metabolism by the modulating the activity of lipid-sensing nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kim, Young-Il; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo

    2013-01-01

    Obesity causes excess fat accumulation in various tissues, most notoriously in the adipose tissue, along with other insulin-responsive organs such as skeletal muscle and the liver, which predisposes an individual to the development of metabolic abnormalities. The molecular mechanisms underlying obesity-induced metabolic abnormalities have not been completely elucidated; however, in recent years, the search for therapies to prevent the development of obesity and obesity-associated metabolic disorders has increased. It is known that several nuclear receptors, when activated by specific ligands, regulate carbohydrate and lipid metabolism at the transcriptional level. The expression of lipid metabolism-related enzymes is directly regulated by the activity of various nuclear receptors via their interaction with specific response elements in promoters of those genes. Many natural compounds act as ligands of nuclear receptors and regulate carbohydrate and lipid metabolism by regulating the activities of these nuclear receptors. In this review, we describe our current knowledge of obesity, the role of lipid-sensing nuclear receptors in energy metabolism, and several examples of food factors that act as agonists or antagonists of nuclear receptors, which may be useful for the management of obesity and the accompanying energy metabolism abnormalities.

  19. Comparison of Antioxidant Activities of Hydrolysates of Domestic and Imported Skim Milk Powders Treated with Papain

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Go Eun; Chang, Oun Ki; Han, Gi Sung; Ham, Jun Sang; Park, Beom-Young; Jeong, Seok-Geun

    2015-01-01

    Milk proteins have many potential sequences within their primary structure, each with a specific biological activity. In this study, we compared and investigated the bioactivities of hydrolysates of the domestic (A, B) and imported (C, D) skim milk powders generated using papain digestion. MALDI-TOF analysis revealed that all milk powder proteins were intact, indicating no autolysis. Electrophoretic analysis of hydrolysates showed papain treatment caused degradation of milk proteins into peptides of various size. The antioxidant activity of the hydrolysates, determined using 2,2-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) and total phenolic contents (TPC) assays, increased with incubation times. In all skim milk powders, the antioxidant activities of hydrolysates were highest following 24 h papain treatment (TPC: A, 196.48 μM GE/L; B, 194.52 μM GE/L; C, 194.76 μM GE/L; D, 163.75 μM GE/L; ABTS: A, 75%; B, 72%; C, 72%; D, 57%). The number of peptide derived from skim milk powders, as determined by LC-MS/MS, was 308 for A, 283 for B, 208 for C, and 135 for D. Hydrolysate A had the highest antioxidant activity and the most potential antioxidant peptides amongst the four skim milk powder hydrolysates. A total of 4 β-lactoglobulin, 4 αs1-casein, and 56 β-casein peptide fragments were identified as potential antioxidant peptides in hydrolysate A by LC-MS/MS. These results suggest that domestic skim milk could have applications in various industries, i.e., in the development of functional foods. PMID:26761850

  20. Development of nuclear analysis capabilities for DOE waste management activities

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, C.V.; DeHart, M.D.; Broadhead, B.L.; Hopper, C.M.; Petrie, L.M.

    1998-05-01

    The objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate prototypic analysis capabilities that can be used by the nuclear safety analysis practitioners to: (1) demonstrate a more thorough understanding of the underlying physics phenomena that can lead to improved reliability and defensibility of safety evaluations; and (2) optimize operations related to the handling, storage, transportation, and disposal of fissile material and DOE spent fuel. To address these problems, the project will investigate the implementation of sensitivity and uncertainty methods within existing Monte Carlo codes used for criticality safety analyses, as well as within a new deterministic code that allows specification of arbitrary grids to accurately model the geometry details required in a criticality safety analysis. This capability can facilitate improved estimations of the required subcritical margin and potentially enable the use of a broader range of experiments in the validation process. The new arbitrary-grid radiation transport code will also enable detailed geometric modeling valuable for improved accuracy in application to a myriad of other problems related to waste characterization. Application to these problems will also be explored.

  1. Increasing ocean temperatures reduce activity patterns of a large commercially important coral reef fish.

    PubMed

    Johansen, J L; Messmer, V; Coker, D J; Hoey, A S; Pratchett, M S

    2014-04-01

    Large-bodied fish are critical for sustaining coral reef fisheries, but little is known about the vulnerability of these fish to global warming. This study examined the effects of elevated temperatures on the movement and activity patterns of the common coral trout Plectropomus leopardus (Serranidae), which is an important fishery species in tropical Australia and throughout the Indo West-Pacific. Adult fish were collected from two locations on Australia's Great Barrier Reef (23°S and 14°S) and maintained at one of four temperatures (24, 27, 30, 33 °C). Following >4 weeks acclimation, the spontaneous swimming speeds and activity patterns of individuals were recorded over a period of 12 days. At 24-27 °C, spontaneous swimming speeds of common coral trout were 0.43-0.45 body lengths per second (bls(-1)), but dropped sharply to 0.29 bls(-1) at 30 °C and 0.25 bls(-1) at 33 °C. Concurrently, individuals spent 9.3-10.6% of their time resting motionless on the bottom at 24-27 °C, but this behaviour increased to 14.0% at 30 °C and 20.0% of the time at 33 °C (mean ± SE). The impact of temperature was greatest for smaller individuals (<45 cm TL), showing significant changes to swimming speeds across every temperature tested, while medium (45-55 cm TL) and large individuals (>55 cm TL) were first affected by 30 °C and 33 °C, respectively. Importantly, there was some indication that populations can adapt to elevated temperature if presented with adequate time, as the high-latitude population decreased significantly in swimming speeds at both 30 °C and 33 °C, while the low-latitude population only showed significant reductions at 33 °C. Given that movement and activity patterns of large mobile species are directly related to prey encounter rates, ability to capture prey and avoid predators, any reductions in activity patterns are likely to reduce overall foraging and energy intake, limit the energy available for growth and reproduction, and affect the fitness and

  2. The p95-100 kDa ligand of the T cell-specific adaptor (TSAd) protein Src-homology-2 (SH2) domain implicated in TSAd nuclear import is p97 Valosin-containing protein (VCP).

    PubMed

    Marti, Francesc; King, Philip D

    2005-03-15

    T cell-specific adapter protein (TSAd) is required for normal T cell antigen receptor (TCR)-induced transcription of cytokine genes in T cells. How TSAd controls cytokine transcription is unknown. Previously, we have shown that TSAd is actively transported to the nucleus of T cells suggesting that this adapter may in part function within this cellular compartment. Nuclear translocation of TSAd is dependent upon an intact Src-homology-2 (SH2) domain and a p95-100 kDa ligand of the SH2 domain has been implicated in nuclear import. Here, using microchemical techniques, we identify p95-100 as p97 Valosin-containing protein (VCP) whose homolog in yeast is the cell division control protein, CDC48. Physical interaction between TSAd and VCP can be demonstrated between endogenous proteins in T cells. Interaction is direct and is dependent upon phosphorylation of tyrosine residue 805 of VCP that has been previously recognized as a major target of tyrosine kinase(s) involved in TCR signaling. Significantly, with the use of CDC48 mutant yeast, we demonstrate that VCP/CDC48 is required for transport of TSAd into the eukaryotic nucleus. These findings provide important insights into the mechanism of TSAd nuclear import and the role of TSAd in T cell signal transduction.

  3. Broad-spectrum therapeutic suppression of metastatic melanoma through nuclear hormone receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Pencheva, Nora; Buss, Colin G; Posada, Jessica; Merghoub, Taha; Tavazoie, Sohail F

    2014-02-27

    Melanoma metastasis is a devastating outcome lacking an effective preventative therapeutic. We provide pharmacologic, molecular, and genetic evidence establishing the liver-X nuclear hormone receptor (LXR) as a therapeutic target in melanoma. Oral administration of multiple LXR agonists suppressed melanoma invasion, angiogenesis, tumor progression, and metastasis. Molecular and genetic experiments revealed these effects to be mediated by LXRβ, which elicits these outcomes through transcriptional induction of tumoral and stromal apolipoprotein-E (ApoE). LXRβ agonism robustly suppressed tumor growth and metastasis across a diverse mutational spectrum of melanoma lines. LXRβ targeting significantly prolonged animal survival, suppressed the progression of established metastases, and inhibited brain metastatic colonization. Importantly, LXRβ activation displayed melanoma-suppressive cooperativity with the frontline regimens dacarbazine, B-Raf inhibition, and the anti-CTLA-4 antibody and robustly inhibited melanomas that had acquired resistance to B-Raf inhibition or dacarbazine. We present a promising therapeutic approach that uniquely acts by transcriptionally activating a metastasis suppressor gene.

  4. Importance of neutron energy distribution in borehole activation analysis in relatively dry, low-porosity rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Moxham, R.M.; Tanner, A.B.; Philbin, P.W.; Boynton, G.R.; Wager, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    To evaluate the importance of variations in the neutron energy distribution in borehole activation analysis, capture gamma-ray measurements were made in relatively dry, low-porosity gabbro of the Duluth Complex. Although sections of over a meter of solid rock were encountered in the borehole, there was significant fracturing with interstitial water leading to a substantial variation of water with depth in the borehole. The linear-correlation coefficients calculated for the peak intensities of several elements compared to the chemical core analyses were generally poor throughout the depth investigated. The data suggest and arguments are given which indicate that the variation of the thermal-to-intermediate-to-fast neutron flux density as a function of borehole depth is a serious source of error and is a major cause of the changes observed in the capture gamma-ray peak intensities. These variations in neutron energy may also cause a shift in the observed capture gamma-ray energy.

  5. Activities of the OECD/NEA Expert Group on Assay Data for Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Gauld, Ian C; Rugama, Yolanda

    2009-01-01

    Management of spent nuclear fuel is a key issue for many NEA member countries. In nuclear criticality safety, the decision of many countries to advance burnup credit as part of their licensing strategy has heightened recent interest in experimental data needed to validate computer codes used in burnup credit calculations. This paper discusses recent activities of an Expert Group on assay data, formed under the OECD/NEA/NSC/WPNCS (Working Party on Nuclear Criticality Safety) to help coordinate isotopic assay data activities and facilitate international collaboration between NEA member countries developing or implementing burnup credit methodologies. Recent activities of the Expert Group are described, focusing on the planned expansion of the Spent Fuel Isotopic Composition Database (SFCOMPO), and preparation of a state-of-the-art report on assay data that includes sections on recommended radiochemical analysis methods, techniques, and lessons learned from previous experiments.

  6. Preferential nuclear location of a transgene does not depend on its transcriptional activity during early mouse development.

    PubMed

    Thompson, E M; Renard, J P

    1998-11-01

    Changes in chromatin structure play an important role in regulation of the HSP70.1 gene during mouse preimplantation development. Using in situ PCR we have now examined whether the spatial organization of an HSP70.1 luciferase transgene within the nucleus is also a factor in regulating its expression. The transgene showed a preferential localization towards the nuclear periphery throughout preimplantation development. This preferential location was independent of the level of constitutive activity of the transgene and did not change when transgene expression was induced through core histone hyperacetylation at the eight-cell stage or by heat shock in blastocysts. In contrast, at the two-cell stage, when embryos are unable to continue development after heat shock, thermal stress provoked a significant disruption of the nuclear location of the transgene. These results do not agree with a recent model of embryonic genome activation in mice which hypothesizes that directed, active movement of DNA within the nucleus is a determinant factor in establishing early patterns of gene expression. Instead, they are consistent with models proposing that chromatin segments are restricted to nuclear subregions, but that they remain free to undergo substantial Brownian motion.

  7. The importance of input variables to a neural network fault-diagnostic system for nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Lanc, T.L.

    1992-01-01

    This thesis explores safety enhancement for nuclear power plants. Emergency response systems currently in use depend mainly on automatic systems engaging when certain parameters go beyond a pre-specified safety limit. Often times the operator has little or no opportunity to react since a fast scram signal shuts down the reactor smoothly and efficiently. These accidents are of interest to technical support personnel since examining the conditions that gave rise to these situations help determine causality. In many other cases an automated fault-diagnostic advisor would be a valuable tool in assisting the technicians and operators to determine what just happened and why.

  8. The importance of input variables to a neural network fault-diagnostic system for nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Lanc, T.L.

    1992-12-31

    This thesis explores safety enhancement for nuclear power plants. Emergency response systems currently in use depend mainly on automatic systems engaging when certain parameters go beyond a pre-specified safety limit. Often times the operator has little or no opportunity to react since a fast scram signal shuts down the reactor smoothly and efficiently. These accidents are of interest to technical support personnel since examining the conditions that gave rise to these situations help determine causality. In many other cases an automated fault-diagnostic advisor would be a valuable tool in assisting the technicians and operators to determine what just happened and why.

  9. Hydrothermal activity at slow-spreading ridges: variability and importance of magmatic controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escartin, Javier

    2016-04-01

    less studied, similar hydrothermal systems are found elsewhere associated to other central volcanoes along the ridge axis (e.g., Menez Gwenn at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and Soria Mornia or Troll Wall at the Arctic Ridges). Long-lived hydrothermal activity plays an important role in controlling the thermal structure of the lithosphere and its accretion at and near-axis, and also determining the distribution and biogeography of vent communities. Along slow-spreading segments, long-lived hydrothermal activity can be provided both by volcanic systems (e.g., Lucky Strike) and tectonic systems (oceanic detachment faults). While magmatic and hydrothermal activity is relatively well understood now in volcanic systems (e.g., Lucky Strike), tectonic systems (oceanic detachment faults) require further integrated studies to constrain the links between long-lived localization of deformation along oceanic detachment faults, hydrothermal activity, and origin and nature of off-axis heat sources animating hydrothermal circulation.

  10. 24th WRSM panel discussion: {open_quotes}The role of research in nuclear regulation: The case of qualified importers{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, A.

    1997-01-01

    Scientific knowledge and technological maturity are needed to establish regulatory requirements, what also needs talent and skills. Scientists are rarely interested in regulation and regulators not always are closely connected to scientific research. This has created gaps in regulations, mainly within qualified importers. A qualified importer, in the sense of this presentation, is a country who has acquired nuclear power plants from more technologically advanced exporters but with an increasing participation of its own industry and institutions in the design, construction, component manufacture and assembly of such nuclear power plants and is fully responsible for the operation of the nuclear units and the corresponding fuel cycle. These countries have also a long standing and independent nuclear regulatory organization and the corresponding technical body. Spain is a qualified importer. In the case of Spain, it originally adopted the codes and regulations of the UE which it was a member of, as well as the codes and standards of the country from which their reactors were produced. Since Spain added KWU plants they even went to German regulations. Plant operation rested with Spain. As problems began to appear in operating plants, local research projects were funded to study the problems, aimed at immediate solutions, but also providing training for local personnel in addition to information of use for regulators. Spain has participated in many joint research projects, which have trained people, and given confidence to Spaniards involved in science and regulations. Qualified importers, like Spain, participate in research, even though it may not translate itself into regulation. Such participation will always serve to give self-confidence and independence to regulators and licensees, to better understand the adopted regulations of the most advanced countries and to solve specific problems.

  11. Tritium activities in Canada supporting CANDU{sup R} nuclear power reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J. M.

    2008-07-15

    An overview of the various Canadian tritium research and operational activities supporting the development, refurbishment and operation of CANDU{sup R} nuclear power reactors is presented. These activities encompass tritium health and safety, tritium in the environment, tritium interaction with materials, and tritium processing, and relate to both supporting R and D advances as well as operational best practices. The collective results of these activities contribute to our goals of improving worker and public safety, and operational efficiency. (authors)

  12. Activation of hippocampal nuclear factor-kappa B by retrieval is required for memory reconsolidation.

    PubMed

    Boccia, Mariano; Freudenthal, Ramiro; Blake, Mariano; de la Fuente, Veronica; Acosta, Gabriela; Baratti, Carlos; Romano, Arturo

    2007-12-01

    Initially, memory is labile and requires consolidation to become stable. However, several studies support that consolidated memories can undergo a new period of lability after retrieval. The mechanistic differences of this process, termed reconsolidation, with the consolidation process are under debate, including the participation of hippocampus. Up to this point, few reports describe molecular changes and, in particular, transcription factor (TF) involvement in memory restabilization. Increasing evidence supports the participation of the TF nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) in memory consolidation. Here, we demonstrate that the inhibition of NF-kappaB after memory reactivation impairs retention of a hippocampal-dependent inhibitory avoidance task in mice. We used two independent disruptive strategies to reach this conclusion. First, we administered intracerebroventricular or intrahippocampal sulfasalazine, an inhibitor of IKK (IkappaB kinase), the kinase that activates NF-kappaB. Second, we infused intracerebroventricular or intrahippocampal kappaB decoy, a direct inhibitor of NF-kappaB consisting of a double-stranded DNA oligonucleotide that contains the kappaB consensus sequence. When injected immediately after memory retrieval, sulfasalazine or kappaB decoy (Decoy) impaired long-term retention. In contrast, a one base mutated kappaB decoy (mDecoy) had no effect. Furthermore, we also found NF-kappaB activation in the hippocampus, with a peak 15 min after memory retrieval. This activation was earlier than that found during consolidation. Together, these results indicate that NF-kappaB is an important transcriptional regulator in memory consolidation and reconsolidation in hippocampus, although the temporal kinetics of activation differs between the two processes.

  13. Identification of a protein with antioxidant activity that is important for the protection against beer ageing.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming J; Clarke, Frank M; Rogers, Peter J; Young, Paul; Sales, Narelle; O'Doherty, Patrick J; Higgins, Vincent J

    2011-01-01

    This study was carried out with fresh Australian lager beer which was sampled directly off the production line, the same samples aged for 12 weeks at 30 °C, and the vintage beer which was kept at 20 °C for 5 years. Characteristic Australian lager flavour was maintained in the fresh and vintage beers but was lost in the aged beer. Sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and free thiol group labelling analyses of beer proteins found that this flavour stability correlated with the presence of an unknown 10 kilodaltons (kDa) protein with a higher level of free thiols. The protein was purified by size-exclusion chromatography, then peptide sequencing and database matching identified it as the barley lipid transfer protein (LTP1). Further characterisation using diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging and a Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based antioxidant screening assay demonstrated that the LTP1 protein was active in DPPH reduction and antioxidant activity. The absence of free thiol in the aged beer indicates that the thiol functional groups within the LTP1 protein were saturated and suggests that it is important in the flavour stability of beer by maintaining reduction capacity during the ageing process.

  14. Identification of a Protein with Antioxidant Activity that is Important for the Protection against Beer Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ming J.; Clarke, Frank M.; Rogers, Peter J.; Young, Paul; Sales, Narelle; O’Doherty, Patrick J.; Higgins, Vincent J.

    2011-01-01

    This study was carried out with fresh Australian lager beer which was sampled directly off the production line, the same samples aged for 12 weeks at 30 °C, and the vintage beer which was kept at 20 °C for 5 years. Characteristic Australian lager flavour was maintained in the fresh and vintage beers but was lost in the aged beer. Sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and free thiol group labelling analyses of beer proteins found that this flavour stability correlated with the presence of an unknown 10 kilodaltons (kDa) protein with a higher level of free thiols. The protein was purified by size-exclusion chromatography, then peptide sequencing and database matching identified it as the barley lipid transfer protein (LTP1). Further characterisation using diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging and a Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based antioxidant screening assay demonstrated that the LTP1 protein was active in DPPH reduction and antioxidant activity. The absence of free thiol in the aged beer indicates that the thiol functional groups within the LTP1 protein were saturated and suggests that it is important in the flavour stability of beer by maintaining reduction capacity during the ageing process. PMID:22016646

  15. Mineralization of naphtenic acids with thermally-activated persulfate: The important role of oxygen.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiyan; Pliego, Gema; Zazo, Juan A; Casas, Jose A; Rodriguez, Juan J

    2016-11-15

    This study reports on the mineralization of model naphtenic acids (NAs) in aqueous solution by catalyst-free thermally-activated persulfate (PS) oxidation. These species are found to be pollutants in oil sands process-affected waters. The NAs tested include saturated-ring (cyclohexanecarboxylic and cyclohexanebutyric acids) and aromatic (2-naphthoic and 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-2-naphthoic acids) structures, at 50mgL(-1)starting concentration. The effect of PS dose within a wide range (10-100% of the theoretical stoichiometric) and working temperature (40-97°C) was investigated. At 80°C and intitial pH=8 complete mineralization of the four NAs was achieved with 40-60% of the stoichiometric PS dose. This is explained because of the important contribution of oxygen, which was experimentally verified and was found to be more effective toward the NAs with a single cyclohexane ring than for the bicyclic aromatic-ring-bearing ones. The effect of chloride and bicarbonate was also checked. The former showed negative effect on the degradation rate of NAs whereas it was negligible or even positive for bicarbonate. The rate of mineralization was well described by simple pseudo-first order kinetics with values of the rate constants normalized to the PS dose within the range of 0.062-0.099h(-1). Apparent activation energy values between 93.7-105.3kJmol(-1) were obtained. PMID:27442986

  16. NASA safety program activities in support of the Space Exploration Initiatives Nuclear Propulsion program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, J. C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The activities of the joint NASA/DOE/DOD Nuclear Propulsion Program Technical Panels have been used as the basis for the current development of safety policies and requirements for the Space Exploration Initiatives (SEI) Nuclear Propulsion Technology development program. The Safety Division of the NASA Office of Safety and Mission Quality has initiated efforts to develop policies for the safe use of nuclear propulsion in space through involvement in the joint agency Nuclear Safety Policy Working Group (NSPWG), encouraged expansion of the initial policy development into proposed programmatic requirements, and suggested further expansion into the overall risk assessment and risk management process for the NASA Exploration Program. Similar efforts are underway within the Department of Energy to ensure the safe development and testing of nuclear propulsion systems on Earth. This paper describes the NASA safety policy related to requirements for the design of systems that may operate where Earth re-entry is a possibility. The expected plan of action is to support and oversee activities related to the technology development of nuclear propulsion in space, and support the overall safety and risk management program being developed for the NASA Exploration Program.

  17. The functional importance of blood group-active molecules in human red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Anstee, D J

    2011-01-01

    Antigens of 23 of the 30 human blood group systems are defined by the amino acid sequence of red cell membrane proteins. The antigens of DI, RH, RHAG, MNS, GE and CO systems are carried on blood group-active proteins (Band 3, D and CE polypeptides, RhAG, Glycophorins A and B, Glycophorins C and D and Aquaporin 1, respectively) which are expressed at high levels (>200,000 copies/red cell). These major proteins contribute to essential red cell functions either directly as membrane transporters and by providing linkage to the underlying red cell skeleton or by facilitating the membrane assembly of the protein complexes involved in these processes. The proteins expressing antigens of the remaining 17 blood group systems are much less abundant (<20,000 copies/red cell) and their functional importance for the circulating red cell is largely unknown. Human gene knock-outs (null phenotypes) have been described for many of these minor blood group-active proteins, but only absence of Kx glycoprotein has been clearly linked with pathology directly related to the function of circulating red cells. Recent evidence suggesting the normal quality control system for glycoprotein synthesis is altered during the latter stages of red cell production raises the possibility that many of these low abundance blood group-active proteins are vestigial. In sickle cell disease and polycythaemia vera, elevated Lutheran glycoprotein expression may contribute to pathology. Dyserythropoiesis with reduced antigen expression can result from mutations in the erythroid transcription factors GATA-1 and EKLF.

  18. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nuclear import via Vpr-Importin {alpha} interactions as a novel HIV-1 therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Tatsunori; Yamamoto, Norio; Nonaka, Mizuho; Hashimoto, Yoshie; Matsuda, Go; Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Matsuyama, Megumi; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Miura, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Rie; Kato, Shingo; Aida, Yoko

    2009-03-20

    The development of multidrug-resistant viruses compromises the efficacy of anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) therapy and limits treatment options. Therefore, new targets that can be used to develop novel antiviral agents need to be identified. One such target is the interaction between Vpr, one of the accessory gene products of HIV-1 and Importin {alpha}, which is crucial, not only for the nuclear import of Vpr, but also for HIV-1 replication in macrophages. We have identified a potential parent compound, hematoxylin, which suppresses Vpr-Importin {alpha} interaction, thereby inhibiting HIV-1 replication in a Vpr-dependent manner. Analysis by real-time PCR demonstrated that hematoxylin specifically inhibited nuclear import step of pre-integration complex. Thus, hematoxylin is a new anti-HIV-1 inhibitor that targets the nuclear import of HIV-1 via the Vpr-Importin {alpha} interaction, suggesting that a specific inhibitor of the interaction between viral protein and the cellular factor may provide a new strategy for HIV-1 therapy.

  19. Signal transduction triggered by iron to induce the nuclear importation of a Myb3 transcription factor in the parasitic protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hong-Ming; Lee, Yu; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Liu, Hsing-Wei; Chu, Chien-Hsin; Chou, Ya-Wen; Chen, Yet-Ran; Chen, Shu-Hui; Tai, Jung-Hsiang

    2014-10-17

    Iron was previously shown to induce rapid nuclear translocation of a Myb3 transcription factor in the protozoan parasite, Trichomonas vaginalis. In the present study, iron was found to induce a transient increase in cellular cAMP, followed by the nuclear influx of Myb3, whereas the latter was also induced by 8-bromo-cyclic AMP. Iron-inducible cAMP production and nuclear influx of Myb3 were inhibited by suramin and SQ22536, respective inhibitors of the Gα subunit of heterotrimeric G proteins and adenylyl cyclases. In contrast, the nuclear influx of Myb3 induced by iron or 8-bromo-cAMP was delayed or inhibited, respectively, by H89, the inhibitor of protein kinase A. Using liquid chromatography-coupled tandem mass spectrometry, Thr(156) and Lys(143) in Myb3 were found to be phosphorylated and ubiquitinated, respectively. These modifications were induced by iron and inhibited by H89, as shown by immunoprecipitation-coupled Western blotting. Iron-inducible ubiquitination and nuclear influx were aborted in T156A and K143R, but T156D was constitutively ubiquitinated and persistently localized to the nucleus. Myb3 was phosphorylated in vitro by the catalytic subunit of a T. vaginalis protein kinase A, TvPKAc. A transient interaction between TvPKAc and Myb3 and the phosphorylation of both proteins were induced in the parasite shortly after iron or 8-bromo-cAMP treatment. Together, these observations suggest that iron may induce production of cAMP and activation of TvPKAc, which then induces the phosphorylation of Myb3 and subsequent ubiquitination for accelerated nuclear influx. It is conceivable that iron probably exerts a much broader impact on the physiology of the parasite than previously thought to encounter environmental changes.

  20. 77 FR 70846 - Regulatory Guide 1.182, “Assessing and Managing Risk Before Maintenance Activities at Nuclear...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-27

    ... Power Plants'' AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of withdrawal. SUMMARY: The U.S... (Rev.) 0, ``Assessing and Managing Risk Before Maintenance Activities at Nuclear Power Plants... 1.160, ``Monitoring the Effectiveness of Maintenance at Nuclear Power Plants.'' ADDRESSES:...

  1. Nuclear PKM2 contributes to gefitinib resistance via upregulation of STAT3 activation in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiong; Zhang, Daoxiang; Chen, Xiaoying; He, Lei; Li, Tianming; Xu, Xiaoping; Li, Min

    2015-01-01

    Gefitinib (Iressa, ZD-1839), a small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway, is currently under investigation in clinical trials for the treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, as known, some patients develop resistance to TKIs, and the mechanisms mediating intrinsic resistance to EGFR-TKIs in CRC have not been fully characterized. Resistance to EGFR inhibitors reportedly involves activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in glioma and lung cancer. Here, we demonstrated that the nuclear pyruvate kinase isoform M2 (PKM2) levels were positively correlated with gefitinib resistance in CRC cells. The overexpression of nuclear PKM2 in HT29 cells decreased the effect of gefitinib therapy, whereas PKM2 knockdown increased gefitinib efficacy. Furthermore, the activation of STAT3 by nuclear PKM2 was associated with gefitinib resistance. Inhibition of STAT3 by Stattic, a STAT3-specific inhibitor, or STAT3-specific siRNA sensitized resistant cells to gefitinib. These results suggest that nuclear PKM2 modulates the sensitivity of CRC cells to gefitinib and indicate that small molecule pharmacological disruption of nuclear PKM2 association with STAT3 is a potential avenue for overcoming EGFR-TKI resistance in CRC patients. PMID:26542452

  2. Nuclear activity and the environments of nearby radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dey, Arjun; Vanbreugel, Wil

    1993-01-01

    Much of our present understanding of galaxy evolution over a large redshift range is based on the study of samples selected on the basis of non-thermal radio emission. It is therefore necessary to understand the relationship between radio source activity and the host galaxy. Recent observations suggest that there is a connection between radio galaxy (RG) activity and radio galaxy evolution. For example, high-redshift RGs (z approx. greater than 0.7) show evidence for significant populations of young stars, and have optical continuum morphologies nearly always aligned with the radio axis (McCarthy et al. 1987; Chambers et al. 1987). This phenomenon is generally attributed to radio jet induced star formation (DeYoung 1989), but the lack of high S/N spectra of the galaxy continua, and recent detections of polarized light in a few objects make it hard to rule out other processes such as scattering or synchrotron radiation. A detailed study of the continuum light in the distant RGs is difficult as they are optically very faint. However, nearby RGs (z approx. less than 0.1) have bluer B-V colors than radio-quiet ellipticals, presumably due to the presence of young stellar populations (Smith and Heckman 1989) and several have extended UV continuum emitting regions along their radio axes (van Bruegel et al. 1985a, b, di Serego Alighieri et al. 1989), reminiscent of the alignment effect seen in the high redshift RGs. We have almost completed a continuum imaging survey of nearby (and therefore optically brighter), powerful RGs to study any possible relationships between the optical continuum light and radio source activity. In particular we are interested in (1) whether these lower redshift RGs shown any evidence of the alignment effect (in their rest-frame UV light) that is seen in the distant RGs, and (2) the effects that the radio source has on the environment of the host galaxy.

  3. Fermi bubbles: the explosive nuclear activity of the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2015-08-01

    The Galaxy's supermassive black hole (Sgr A*) is a hundred times closer than any other massive singularity. It is surrounded by a highly unstable gas disk so why is the black hole so peaceful at the present time? This mystery has led to a flurry of models in order to explain why Sgr A* is radiating far below (1 part in 10^8) the Eddington accretion limit. But has this always been so? Evidence is gathering that Sgr A* has been far more active in the recent past, on timescales of thousands of years and longer. The bipolar wind discovered by MSX, the gamma-ray bubbles discovered by Fermi-LAT, the WMAP haze, the positronium flash confirmed by INTEGRAL, are suggestive of something truly spectacular in the recent past. We present exciting new evidence that the Galactic Centre was a full blown "active galaxy" just two million years ago. The echo of this incredible event can be seen today imprinted across the Galaxy.

  4. Multiple phosphorylation sites at the C-terminus regulate nuclear import of HCMV DNA polymerase processivity factor ppUL44

    SciTech Connect

    Alvisi, Gualtiero; Marin, Oriano; Pari, Gregory; Mancini, Manuela; Avanzi, Simone; Loregian, Arianna; Jans, David A.; Ripalti, Alessandro

    2011-09-01

    The processivity factor of human cytomegalovirus DNA polymerase, phosphoprotein ppUL44, is essential for viral replication. During viral infection ppUL44 is phosphorylated by the viral kinase pUL97, but neither the target residues on ppUL44 nor the effect of phosphorylation on ppUL44's activity are known. We report here that ppUL44 is phosphorylated when transiently expressed in mammalian cells and coimmunoprecipitates with cellular kinases. Of three potential phosphorylation sites (S413, S415, S418) located upstream of ppUL44's nuclear localization signal (NLS) and one (T427) within the NLS itself, protein kinase CK2 (CK2) specifically phosphorylates S413, to trigger a cascade of phosphorylation of S418 and S415 by CK1 and CK2, respectively. Negative charge at the CK2/CK1 target serine residues facilitates optimal nuclear accumulation of ppUL44, whereas negative charge on T427, a potential cyclin-dependent 1 phosphorylation site, strongly decreases nuclear accumulation. Thus, nuclear transport of ppUL44 is finely tuned during viral infection through complex phosphorylation events.

  5. Resistance to Degradation and Cellular Distribution are Important Features for the Antitumor Activity of Gomesin

    PubMed Central

    Buri, Marcus V.; Domingues, Tatiana M.; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J.; Casaes-Rodrigues, Rafael L.; Rodrigues, Elaine Guadelupe; Miranda, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Many reports have shown that antimicrobial peptides exhibit anticancer abilities. Gomesin (Gm) exhibits potent cytotoxic activity against cancer cells by a membrane pore formation induced after well-orchestrated intracellular mechanisms. In this report, the replacements of the Cys by Ser or Thr, and the use D-amino acids in the Gm structure were done to investigate the importance of the resistance to degradation of the molecule with its cytotoxicity. [Thr2,6,11,15]-Gm, and [Ser2,6,11,15]-Gm exhibits low cytotoxicity, and low resistance to degradation, and after 24 h are present in localized area near to the membrane. Conversely, the use of D-amino acids in the analogue [D-Thr2,6,11,15]-D-Gm confers resistance to degradation, increases its potency, and maintained this peptide spread in the cytosol similarly to what happens with Gm. Replacements of Cys by Thr and Gln by L- or D-Pro ([D-Thr2,6,11,15, Pro9]-D-Gm, and [Thr2,6,11,15, D-Pro9]-Gm), which induced a similar β-hairpin conformation, also increase their resistance to degradation, and cytotoxicity, but after 24 h they are not present spread in the cytosol, exhibiting lower cytotoxicity in comparison to Gm. Additionally, chloroquine, a lysosomal enzyme inhibitor potentiated the effect of the peptides. Furthermore, the binding and internalization of peptides was determined, but a direct correlation among these factors was not observed. However, cholesterol ablation, which increase fluidity of cellular membrane, also increase cytotoxicity and internalization of peptides. β-hairpin spatial conformation, and intracellular localization/target, and the capability of entry are important properties of gomesin cytotoxicity. PMID:24312251

  6. Activated protein C resistance among postmenopausal women using transdermal estrogens: importance of progestogen

    PubMed Central

    Canonico, Marianne; Alhenc-Gelas, Martine; Plu-Bureau, Geneviève; Olié, Valérie; Scarabin, Pierre-Yves

    2010-01-01

    Introduction While the route of estrogen administration is known to be an important determinant of the thrombotic risk among postmenopausal women using hormone therapy, recent data have shown that norpregnane derivatives but not micronized progesterone would increase venous thromboembolism risk among transdermal estrogens users. However, differential effects of progesterone and norpregnanes on haemostasis have not yet been investigated. Methods We set up a cross-sectional study among healthy postmenopausal women aged 45 to 70 years. The impact of Activated Protein C (APC) on endogenous thrombin potential was investigated in plasma samples of 108 women who did not use any hormone therapy (n=40) or who were treated by transdermal estrogens combined with micronized progesterone (n=30) or norpregnane derivatives (n=38). Results After exclusion of women with factor V Leiden and/or G20210A prothrombin gene mutations, there was no significant change in APC sensitivity among women who used transdermal estrogens combined with micronized progesterone compared to non-users. Women using transdermal estrogens combined with norpregnanes were less sensitive to APC than were non-users (p=0.003) or users of transdermal estrogens combined with micronized progesterone (p=0.004). In addition, prothrombin fragment 1+2 concentration was higher in users of transdermal estrogens plus norpregnanes than in non-users (p=0.004). Other haemostatic parameters did not vary significantly across the different subgroups. Conclusion Transdermal estrogens combined with norpregnanes may induce an APC resistance and activate blood coagulation. These results provide a biological support to epidemiological data regarding the potential thrombogenic effects of norpregnanes. However, these findings need to be confirmed in a randomized trial. PMID:20613675

  7. Active nondestructive assay of nuclear materials: principles and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gozani, Tsahi

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to present, coherently and comprehensively, the wealth of available but scattered information on the principles and applications of active nondestructive analysis (ANDA). Chapters are devoted to the following: background and overview; interactions of neutrons with matter; interactions of ..gamma..-rays with matter; neutron production and sources; ..gamma..-ray production and sources; effects of neutron and ..gamma..-ray transport in bulk media; signatures of neutron- and photon-induced fissions; neutron and photon detection systems and electronics; representative ANDA systems; and instrument analysis, calibration, and measurement control for ANDA. Each chapter has an introductory section describing the relationship of the topic of that chapter to ANDA. Each chapter ends with a section that summarizes the main results and conclusions of the chapter, and a reference list.

  8. Test-Retest Reliability and descriptive analyses of the Modified Important People and Activities (MIPA) Interview

    PubMed Central

    Zywiak, William H.; Stout, Robert L.; Braciszewski, Jordan M.; Wray, Tyler B.; Longabaugh, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background The Important People and Activities (IPA) instrument assesses network characteristics and social support for drinking and abstinence. The IPA has garnered widespread use in the alcohol treatment field. We modified the IPA to assess HIV status, drug of choice, and IV drug use among social network members. Further, we queried frequency of unprotected sex, between the participant and network members. Aim Since this measure was modified, and the test-retest reliability of the IPA has only rarely been examined, we conducted a small substudy (n=26) to examine 1-week test-retest reliability of this measure. Methods Participants were individuals in a day treatment program with an SUD and/or AUD diagnosis. Results Drug of choice for the participants represented roughly equal thirds of heroin, cocaine, and alcohol. The sample was 62% female and 39% Latino/a. At pretest 198 persons were named on the MIPA (M=7.6 network members per subject). It was determined that 152 of the people were overlapping between the test and retest. Conclusions Percent agreement, ICCs, and kappas for the items ranged from acceptable to excellent across the two time periods. Classification of network members as positive, negative, or neutral influences on sobriety also demonstrated good to excellent kappas. PMID:27429606

  9. Fast and accurate dating of nuclear events using La-140/Ba-140 isotopic activity ratio.

    PubMed

    Yamba, Kassoum; Sanogo, Oumar; Kalinowski, Martin B; Nikkinen, Mika; Koulidiati, Jean

    2016-06-01

    This study reports on a fast and accurate assessment of zero time of certain nuclear events using La-140/Ba-140 isotopic activity ratio. For a non-steady nuclear fission reaction, the dating is not possible. For the hypothesis of a nuclear explosion and for a release from a steady state nuclear fission reaction the zero-times will differ. This assessment is fast, because we propose some constants that can be used directly for the calculation of zero time and its upper and lower age limits. The assessment is accurate because of the calculation of zero time using a mathematical method, namely the weighted least-squares method, to evaluate an average value of the age of a nuclear event. This was done using two databases that exhibit differences between the values of some nuclear parameters. As an example, the calculation method is applied for the detection of radionuclides La-140 and Ba-140 in May 2010 at the radionuclides station JPP37 (Okinawa Island, Japan).

  10. Comparative importance of fatty acid beta-oxidation to nuclear maturation, gene expression, and glucose metabolism in mouse, bovine, and porcine cumulus oocyte complexes.

    PubMed

    Paczkowski, Melissa; Silva, Elena; Schoolcraft, William B; Krisher, Rebecca L

    2013-05-01

    The objective of these experiments was to evaluate the importance of fatty acid beta-oxidation (FAO) in the cumulus oocyte complex (COC) during in vitro maturation (IVM) to oocyte nuclear maturation and gene expression in both the oocyte and cumulus cells in three species with differing amounts of oocyte intracellular lipids (mouse, low; bovine, moderate; porcine, high). We inhibited FAO using etomoxir at 0, 10, 25, 100, or 250 μM. Completion of oocyte nuclear maturation was inhibited after COC exposure to 250 μM etomoxir in mouse oocytes, 100 μM etomoxir in bovine oocytes, and as little as 10 μM etomoxir in porcine oocytes (P < 0.05). When FAO was inhibited in mouse and porcine COCs resulting in inhibition of meiosis, the abundance of FAO, glycolytic, and oxidative stress gene transcripts were decreased in oocytes and cumulus cells (P < 0.05), although to a much greater extent in the pig. In bovine oocytes and cumulus cells, FAO gene transcripts were increased and glycolytic gene expression altered following meiotic inhibition due to etomoxir. Etomoxir, at doses that did not inhibit nuclear maturation in bovine and murine COCs, increased glucose consumption (P < 0.05), suggesting glucose metabolism is increased to meet the metabolic demands of the COCs when fatty acid metabolism is compromised. Our data demonstrates that FAO is essential to oocyte nuclear maturation in all three species. Sensitivity of nuclear maturation to FAO inhibition reflects the amount of lipid present in the ooplasm and may suggest a relative reliance on this metabolic pathway.

  11. AIM2 inflammasome is activated by pharmacological disruption of nuclear envelope integrity

    PubMed Central

    Di Micco, Antonia; Frera, Gianluca; Lugrin, Jérôme; Jamilloux, Yvan; Hsu, Erh-Ting; Tardivel, Aubry; De Gassart, Aude; Zaffalon, Léa; Bujisic, Bojan; Siegert, Stefanie; Quadroni, Manfredo; Broz, Petr; Henry, Thomas; Hrycyna, Christine A.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are critical sensors that convey cellular stress and pathogen presence to the immune system by activating inflammatory caspases and cytokines such as IL-1β. The nature of endogenous stress signals that activate inflammasomes remains unclear. Here we show that an inhibitor of the HIV aspartyl protease, Nelfinavir, triggers inflammasome formation and elicits an IL-1R–dependent inflammation in mice. We found that Nelfinavir impaired the maturation of lamin A, a structural component of the nuclear envelope, thereby promoting the release of DNA in the cytosol. Moreover, deficiency of the cytosolic DNA-sensor AIM2 impaired Nelfinavir-mediated inflammasome activation. These findings identify a pharmacologic activator of inflammasome and demonstrate the role of AIM2 in detecting endogenous DNA release upon perturbation of nuclear envelope integrity. PMID:27462105

  12. Nucleolin is important for Epstein–Barr virus nuclear antigen 1-mediated episome binding, maintenance, and transcription

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ya-Lin; Liu, Cheng-Der; Cheng, Chi-Ping; Zhao, Bo; Hsu, Hao-Jen; Shen, Chih-Long; Chiu, Shu-Jun; Kieff, Elliott; Peng, Chih-wen

    2014-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) is essential for EBV episome maintenance, replication, and transcription. These effects are mediated by EBNA1 binding to cognate oriP DNA, which comprise 20 imperfect copies of a 30-bp dyad symmetry enhancer and an origin for DNA replication. To identify cell proteins essential for these EBNA1 functions, EBNA1 associated cell proteins were immune precipitated and analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Nucleolin (NCL) was identified to be EBNA1 associated. EBNA1's N-terminal 100 aa and NCL's RNA-binding domains were critical for EBNA1/NCL interaction. Lentivirus shRNA-mediated NCL depletion substantially reduced EBNA1 recruitment to oriP DNA, EBNA1-dependent transcription of an EBV oriP luciferase reporter, and EBV genome maintenance in lymphoblastoid cell lines. NCL RNA-binding domain K429 was critical for ATP and EBNA1 binding. NCL overexpression increased EBNA1 binding to oriP and transcription, whereas NCL K429A was deficient. Moreover, NCL silencing impaired lymphoblastoid cell line growth. These experiments reveal a surprisingly critical role for NCL K429 in EBNA1 episome maintenance and transcription, which may be a target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24344309

  13. Ribonucleotide reductase activity is coupled to DNA synthesis via proliferating cell nuclear antigen.

    PubMed

    Salguero, Israel; Guarino, Estrella; Shepherd, Marianne E A; Deegan, Tom D; Havens, Courtney G; MacNeill, Stuart A; Walter, Johannes C; Kearsey, Stephen E

    2012-04-24

    Synthesis of deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) is required for both DNA replication and DNA repair and is catalyzed by ribonucleotide reductases (RNR), which convert ribonucleotides to their deoxy forms [1, 2]. Maintaining the correct levels of dNTPs for DNA synthesis is important for minimizing the mutation rate [3-7], and this is achieved by tight regulation of RNR [2, 8, 9]. In fission yeast, RNR is regulated in part by a small protein inhibitor, Spd1, which is degraded in S phase and after DNA damage to allow upregulation of dNTP supply [10-12]. Spd1 degradation is mediated by the activity of the CRL4(Cdt2) ubiquitin ligase complex [5, 13, 14]. This has been reported to be dependent on modulation of Cdt2 levels, which are cell cycle regulated, peaking in S phase, and which also increase after DNA damage in a checkpoint-dependent manner [7, 13]. We show here that Cdt2 level fluctuations are not sufficient to regulate Spd1 proteolysis and that the key step in this event is the interaction of Spd1 with the polymerase processivity factor proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), complexed onto DNA. This mechanism thus provides a direct link between DNA synthesis and RNR regulation. PMID:22464192

  14. Nuclear disarmament verification

    SciTech Connect

    DeVolpi, A.

    1993-12-31

    Arms control treaties, unilateral actions, and cooperative activities -- reflecting the defusing of East-West tensions -- are causing nuclear weapons to be disarmed and dismantled worldwide. In order to provide for future reductions and to build confidence in the permanency of this disarmament, verification procedures and technologies would play an important role. This paper outlines arms-control objectives, treaty organization, and actions that could be undertaken. For the purposes of this Workshop on Verification, nuclear disarmament has been divided into five topical subareas: Converting nuclear-weapons production complexes, Eliminating and monitoring nuclear-weapons delivery systems, Disabling and destroying nuclear warheads, Demilitarizing or non-military utilization of special nuclear materials, and Inhibiting nuclear arms in non-nuclear-weapons states. This paper concludes with an overview of potential methods for verification.

  15. Overview of the International R&D Recycling Activities of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Patricia Paviet-Hartmann

    2012-10-01

    Nuclear power has demonstrated over the last 30 years its capacity to produce base-load electricity at a low, predictable and stable cost due to the very low economic dependence on the price of uranium. However the management of used nuclear fuel remains the “Achilles’ Heel” of this energy source since the storage of used nuclear fuel is increasing as evidenced by the following number with 2,000 tons of UNF produced each year by the 104 US nuclear reactor units which equates to a total of 62,000 spent fuel assemblies stored in dry cask and 88,000 stored in pools. Two options adopted by several countries will be presented. The first one adopted by Europe, Japan and Russia consists of recycling the used nuclear fuel after irradiation in a nuclear reactor. Ninety six percent of uranium and plutonium contained in the spent fuel could be reused to produce electricity and are worth recycling. The separation of uranium and plutonium from the wastes is realized through the industrial PUREX process so that they can be recycled for re-use in a nuclear reactor as a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. The second option undertaken by Finland, Sweden and the United States implies the direct disposal of used nuclear fuel into a geologic formation. One has to remind that only 30% of the worldwide used nuclear fuel are currently recycled, the larger part being stored (90% in pool) waiting for scientific or political decisions. A third option is emerging with a closed fuel cycle which will improve the global sustainability of nuclear energy. This option will not only decrease the volume amount of nuclear waste but also the long-term radiotoxicity of the final waste, as well as improving the long-term safety and the heat-loading of the final repository. At the present time, numerous countries are focusing on the R&D recycling activities of the ultimate waste composed of fission products and minor actinides (americium and curium). Several new chemical extraction processes, such as TRUSPEAK

  16. Evidence for the importance of 5'-deoxy-5-fluorouridine catabolism in humans from 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Malet-Martino, M C; Armand, J P; Lopez, A; Bernadou, J; Béteille, J P; Bon, M; Martino, R

    1986-04-01

    The use of a new methodology, 19F nuclear magnetic resonance, has allowed detection of all the fluorinated metabolites in the biofluids of patients treated with 5'-deoxy-5-fluorouridine (5'-dFUrd) injected i.v. at a dose of 10 g/m2 over 6 h. This technique, which requires no labeled drug, allows a direct study of the biological sample with no need for extraction or derivatization and a simultaneous identification and quantitation of all the different fluorinated metabolites. As well as the already known metabolites, unmetabolized 5'-dFUrd, 5-fluorouracil, and 5,6-dihydro-5-fluorouracil, the presence of alpha-fluoro-beta-ureidopropionic acid, alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine (FBAL), N-carboxy-alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine, and the fluoride anion F- is reported. The catabolic pathway proposed for 5'-dFUrd is analogous to that of 5-fluorouracil, completed with FBAL----F- step, and the plasmatic equilibrium of FBAL with N-carboxy-alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine, its N-carboxy derivative. The quantitative analysis of the different metabolites found in plasma and urine emphasizes the significance of the catabolic pathway. High concentrations of alpha-fluoro-beta ureidopropionic acid and FBAL are recovered in plasma from 3 h after the beginning of the perfusion to 1 h after its end. The global urinary excretion results show that there is a high excretion of 5'-dFUrd and metabolites. Unchanged 5'-dFUrd and FBAL are by far the major excretory products and are at nearly equal rates. The protocol followed in this study produces relatively low but persistent plasmatic concentrations of 5-fluorouracil throughout the perfusion. PMID:2936452

  17. Transcriptional integration of metabolism by the nuclear sterol-activated receptors LXR and FXR

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are integrators of hormonal and nutritional signals, mediating changes to metabolic pathways within the body. Given that modulation of lipid and glucose metabolism has been linked to diseases including type 2 diabetes, obesity and atherosclerosis, a greater understanding of pathways that regulate metabolism in physiology and disease is crucial. The liver X receptors (LXRs) and the farnesoid X receptors (FXRs) are activated by oxysterols and bile acids, respectively. Mounting evidence indicates that these nuclear receptors have essential roles, not only in the regulation of cholesterol and bile acid metabolism but also in the integration of sterol, fatty acid and glucose metabolism. PMID:22414897

  18. Transcriptional integration of metabolism by the nuclear sterol-activated receptors LXR and FXR.

    PubMed

    Calkin, Anna C; Tontonoz, Peter

    2012-03-14

    Nuclear receptors are integrators of hormonal and nutritional signals, mediating changes to metabolic pathways within the body. Given that modulation of lipid and glucose metabolism has been linked to diseases including type 2 diabetes, obesity and atherosclerosis, a greater understanding of pathways that regulate metabolism in physiology and disease is crucial. The liver X receptors (LXRs) and the farnesoid X receptors (FXRs) are activated by oxysterols and bile acids, respectively. Mounting evidence indicates that these nuclear receptors have essential roles, not only in the regulation of cholesterol and bile acid metabolism but also in the integration of sterol, fatty acid and glucose metabolism.

  19. Escherichia coli Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Is an Important Component of CXCL10-Mediated Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Schutte, Kirsten M.; Fisher, Debra J.; Burdick, Marie D.; Mehrad, Borna; Mathers, Amy J.; Mann, Barbara J.; Nakamoto, Robert K.

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are best recognized for their role within the innate immune system as chemotactic cytokines, signaling and recruiting host immune cells to sites of infection. Certain chemokines, such as CXCL10, have been found to play an additional role in innate immunity, mediating CXCR3-independent killing of a diverse array of pathogenic microorganisms. While this is still not clearly understood, elucidating the mechanisms underlying chemokine-mediated antimicrobial activity may facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies effective against antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative pathogens. Here, we show that CXCL10 exerts antibacterial effects on clinical and laboratory strains of Escherichia coli and report that disruption of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc), which converts pyruvate to acetyl coenzyme A, enables E. coli to resist these antimicrobial effects. Through generation and screening of a transposon mutant library, we identified two mutants with increased resistance to CXCL10, both with unique disruptions of the gene encoding the E1 subunit of PDHc, aceE. Resistance to CXCL10 also occurred following deletion of either aceF or lpdA, genes that encode the remaining two subunits of PDHc. Although PDHc resides within the bacterial cytosol, electron microscopy revealed localization of immunogold-labeled CXCL10 to the bacterial cell surface in both the E. coli parent and aceE deletion mutant strains. Taken together, our findings suggest that while CXCL10 interacts with an as-yet-unidentified component on the cell surface, PDHc is an important mediator of killing by CXCL10. To our knowledge, this is the first description of PDHc as a key bacterial component involved in the antibacterial effect of a chemokine. PMID:26553462

  20. Escherichia coli Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Is an Important Component of CXCL10-Mediated Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Schutte, Kirsten M; Fisher, Debra J; Burdick, Marie D; Mehrad, Borna; Mathers, Amy J; Mann, Barbara J; Nakamoto, Robert K; Hughes, Molly A

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines are best recognized for their role within the innate immune system as chemotactic cytokines, signaling and recruiting host immune cells to sites of infection. Certain chemokines, such as CXCL10, have been found to play an additional role in innate immunity, mediating CXCR3-independent killing of a diverse array of pathogenic microorganisms. While this is still not clearly understood, elucidating the mechanisms underlying chemokine-mediated antimicrobial activity may facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies effective against antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative pathogens. Here, we show that CXCL10 exerts antibacterial effects on clinical and laboratory strains of Escherichia coli and report that disruption of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc), which converts pyruvate to acetyl coenzyme A, enables E. coli to resist these antimicrobial effects. Through generation and screening of a transposon mutant library, we identified two mutants with increased resistance to CXCL10, both with unique disruptions of the gene encoding the E1 subunit of PDHc, aceE. Resistance to CXCL10 also occurred following deletion of either aceF or lpdA, genes that encode the remaining two subunits of PDHc. Although PDHc resides within the bacterial cytosol, electron microscopy revealed localization of immunogold-labeled CXCL10 to the bacterial cell surface in both the E. coli parent and aceE deletion mutant strains. Taken together, our findings suggest that while CXCL10 interacts with an as-yet-unidentified component on the cell surface, PDHc is an important mediator of killing by CXCL10. To our knowledge, this is the first description of PDHc as a key bacterial component involved in the antibacterial effect of a chemokine.

  1. Sound Perception: Rhythmic Brain Activity Really Is Important for Auditory Segregation.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Joel S

    2015-12-21

    A new study suggests that rhythmic brain activity plays a causal role in the perceptual segregation of sound patterns, rather than such activity simply being a non-functional by-product of sensory processing.

  2. Microtubule integrity regulates src-like and extracellular signal-regulated kinase activities in human pro-monocytic cells. Importance for interleukin-1 production.

    PubMed

    Schmid-Alliana, A; Menou, L; Manié, S; Schmid-Antomarchi, H; Millet, M A; Giuriato, S; Ferrua, B; Rossi, B

    1998-02-01

    We have demonstrated previously that microtubule depolymerization by colchicine in human monocytes induces selective production of interleukin-1 (IL-1) (Manié, S., Schmid-Alliana, A., Kubar, J., Ferrua, B., and Rossi, B. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 13675-13681). Here, we provide evidence that disruption of the microtubule structure rapidly triggers extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation, whereas it was without effect on SAPK2 activity, which is commonly acknowledged to control pro-inflammatory cytokine production. This process involves the activation of the entire cascade including Ras, Raf-1, MEK1/2, ERK1, and ERK2. Activation of ERKs is followed by their nuclear translocation. Although other SAPK congeners might be activated upon microtubule depolymerization, the activation of ERK1 and ERK2 is mandatory for IL-1 production as shown by the blocking effect of PD 98059, a specific MEK1/2 inhibitor. Additionally, we provide evidence that microtubule disruption also induces the activation of c-Src and Hck activities. The importance of Src kinases in the mediation of the colchicine effect is underscored by the fact that CP 118556, a specific inhibitor of Src-like kinase, abrogates both the colchicine-induced ERK activation and IL-1 production. This is the first evidence that ERK activation is an absolute prerequisite for induction of this cytokine. Altogether, our data lend support to a model where the status of microtubule integrity controls the level of Src activities that subsequently activate the ERK kinase cascade, thus leading to IL-1 production.

  3. Riverine Particulate Organic Carbon From a Pristine, Active Mountain Belt: The Importance of Vegetation and Landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, R. G.; Hovius, N.; Galy, A.

    2005-12-01

    The erosion and transfer of terrestrial organic carbon is an important component in the carbon cycle. The sequestration of this material in sedimentary basins may influence global climate. Mountain rivers play a crucial role in the routing of Particulate Organic Carbon (POC) because they have high sediment production rates, small storage potential and tendency to discharge sediment to the oceans at very high concentrations. We present new constraints on the sourcing and transfer of POC in the tectonically active Southern Alps of New Zealand, where anthropogenic disturbance is minimal. Riverine POC can be derived from bedrock (in the form of sedimentary kerogen), standing biomass and soils. In active mountain belts, landsliding dominates sediment production and transfer of POC from hillslopes to river channels. Landslide debris fans, river suspended load and bedload, and bedrock were sampled in catchments draining the rapidly eroding western Southern Alps, in order to assess the sourcing and transfer of POC. Samples were analyzed for percent organic carbon (Corg), percent nitrogen (N_ {org) and δ13C. Using C/N and δ13C as source proxies, we have determined the main sources of the POC. Landslide debris has Corg ~ 0.15% to 2.77%. The sand, silt and clay fractions of this material all have C/N ~ 10 to 40 and δ13C ~ -20‰ to -28‰. This indicates that POC in landslide debris is dominated by soil carbon (C/N ~ 16 to 25) mixed with hillslope vegetation (C/N ~ 40+) and diluted by bedrock (Corg = 0.01%, C/N = 4.7). Variations in the vegetation type of the pre-slide hillslopes and the depth of failure (i.e. volume of bedrock) give rise to variability of carbon concentration and source signature between landslides. In river suspended load, Corg ~ 0.5%, C/N ~ 15.6 and δ13C ~ - 23.5‰ at mean flow. These values are relatively uniform along the mountain belt. C_ {org} decreases with increasing suspended sediment concentration. We conclude that the bulk of the suspended

  4. 78 FR 57668 - U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Planned for Monitoring Activities for the Saltstone Disposal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-19

    ... COMMISSION U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Planned for Monitoring Activities for the Saltstone Disposal... availability of ``U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Plan for Monitoring Disposal Actions Taken by the U.S... responsibilities for monitoring DOE's waste disposal activities at the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) at...

  5. Porcine circovirus type 2 induces the activation of nuclear factor kappa B by I{kappa}B{alpha} degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Li; Kwang, Jimmy; Wang Jin; Shi Lei; Yang Bing; Li Yongqing; Liu Jue

    2008-08-15

    The transcription factor NF-{kappa}B is commonly activated upon virus infection and a key player in the induction and regulation of the host immune response. The present study demonstrated for the first time that porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), which is the primary causative agent of an emerging swine disease, postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome, can activate NF-{kappa}B in PCV2-infected PK15 cells. In PCV2-infected cells, NF-{kappa}B was activated concomitantly with viral replication, which was characterized by increased DNA binding activity, translocation of NF-{kappa}B p65 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, as well as degradation and phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha} protein. We further demonstrated PCV2-induced activation of NF-{kappa}B and colocalization of p65 nuclear translocation with virus replication in cultured cells. Treatment of cells with CAPE, a selective inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B activation, reduced virus protein expression and progeny production followed by decreasing PCV2-induced apoptotic caspase activity, indicating the involvement of this transcription factor in induction of cell death. Taken together, these data suggest that NF-{kappa}B activation is important for PCV2 replication and contributes to virus-mediated changes in host cells. The results presented here provide a basis for understanding molecular mechanism of PCV2 infection.

  6. Tissue transglutaminase constitutively activates HIF-1α promoter and nuclear factor-κB via a non-canonical pathway.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santosh; Mehta, Kapil

    2012-01-01

    Constitutive activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) has been linked with carcinogenesis and cancer progression, including metastasis, chemoresistance, and radiation resistance. However, the molecular mechanisms that result in constitutive activation of NF-κB are poorly understood. Here we show that chronic expression of the pro-inflammatory protein tissue transglutaminase (TG2) reprograms the transcription regulatory network in epithelial cells via constitutive activation of NF-κB. TG2-induced NF-κB binds the functional NF-κB binding site in hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1α) promoter and results in its increased expression at transcription and protein levels even under normoxic conditions. TG2/NF-κB-induced HIF-1 was deemed essential for increased expression of some transcription repressors, like Zeb1, Zeb2, Snail, and Twist. Unlike tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα), TG2 did not require IκB kinase (IKK) for NF-κB activation. Our data suggest that TG2 binds with IκBα and results in its rapid degradation via a non-proteasomal pathway. Importantly, the catalytically inactive (C277S) mutant form of TG2 was as effective as was wild-type TG2 in activating NF-κB and inducing HIF-1 expression. We also found that TG2 interacted with p65/RelA protein, both in the cytosolic and the nuclear compartment. The TG2/p65(NF-κB) complex binds to the HIF-1 promoter and induced its transcriptional regulation. Inhibition of TG2 or p65/RelA also inhibited the HIF-1α expression and attenuated Zeb1, Zeb2, and Twist expression. To our knowledge, these findings show for the first time a direct link between TG2, NF-κB, and HIF-1α, demonstrating TG2's important role in cancer progression. PMID:23185316

  7. In vitro activity of premafloxacin, a new extended-spectrum fluoroquinolone, against pathogens of veterinary importance.

    PubMed Central

    Watts, J L; Salmon, S A; Sanchez, M S; Yancey, R J

    1997-01-01

    The in vitro activity of premafloxacin against 673 veterinary pathogens was evaluated. Premafloxacin was equivalent to ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, and danofloxacin in activity against the gram-negative bacilli but was much more active (MIC for 90% of the strains tested [MIC90], 0.015 to 0.25 microg/ml) than the comparison antimicrobial agents (MIC90, 0.13 to 16.0 microg/ml) against the staphylococci, streptococci, and anaerobes tested. PMID:9145899

  8. Esterase in imported fire ants, Solenopsis invicata and S. richteri (Hymenoptera: Formicidae): activity, kinetics and variation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Black imported fire ant, Solenopsis richteri, is closely related to the notorious red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta. Despite being very similar in biology and behavior, S. invicta is a much more successful invader. In contrast to S. invicta that has invaded numberous countries and regions,...

  9. Importin-7 mediates memory consolidation through regulation of nuclear translocation of training-activated MAPK in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Zhang, Xuchen; Hu, Wantong; Liang, Xitong; Zhang, Fang; Wang, Lianzhang; Liu, Zhong-Jian; Zhong, Yi

    2016-03-15

    Translocation of signaling molecules, MAPK in particular, from the cytosol to nucleus represents a universal key element in initiating the gene program that determines memory consolidation. Translocation mechanisms and their behavioral impact, however, remain to be determined. Here, we report that a highly conserved nuclear transporter, Drosophila importin-7 (DIM-7), regulates import of training-activated MAPK for consolidation of long-term memory (LTM). We show that silencing DIM-7 functions results in impaired LTM, whereas overexpression of DIM-7 enhances LTM. This DIM-7-dependent regulation of LTM is confined to a consolidation time window and in mushroom body neurons. Image data show that bidirectional alteration in DIM-7 expression results in proportional changes in the intensity of training-activated MAPK accumulated within the nuclei of mushroom body neurons during LTM consolidation. Such DIM-7-regulated nuclear accumulation of activated MAPK is observed only in the training specified for LTM induction and determines the amplitude, but not the time course, of memory consolidation. PMID:26929354

  10. Importin-7 mediates memory consolidation through regulation of nuclear translocation of training-activated MAPK in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Zhang, Xuchen; Liang, Xitong; Zhang, Fang; Wang, Lianzhang; Zhong, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Translocation of signaling molecules, MAPK in particular, from the cytosol to nucleus represents a universal key element in initiating the gene program that determines memory consolidation. Translocation mechanisms and their behavioral impact, however, remain to be determined. Here, we report that a highly conserved nuclear transporter, Drosophila importin-7 (DIM-7), regulates import of training-activated MAPK for consolidation of long-term memory (LTM). We show that silencing DIM-7 functions results in impaired LTM, whereas overexpression of DIM-7 enhances LTM. This DIM-7–dependent regulation of LTM is confined to a consolidation time window and in mushroom body neurons. Image data show that bidirectional alteration in DIM-7 expression results in proportional changes in the intensity of training-activated MAPK accumulated within the nuclei of mushroom body neurons during LTM consolidation. Such DIM-7–regulated nuclear accumulation of activated MAPK is observed only in the training specified for LTM induction and determines the amplitude, but not the time course, of memory consolidation. PMID:26929354

  11. Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) in pearl oyster Pinctada fucata: molecular cloning and functional characterization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xian-De; Wei, Guo-jian; Zhang, Hua; He, Mao-Xian

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) plays an important role in nonimmune cells and also in T cells and many other cells of the immune system, by regulating the expression of a variety of genes involved in the immune response, organ development, developmental apoptosis and angiogenesis. In the present study, the NFAT homology gene, PfNFAT, from the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata was cloned and its genomic structure and promoter were analyzed. PfNFAT encodes a putative protein of 1226 amino acids, and contains a highly conserved Rel homology region (RHR) with DNA-binding specificity, and a regulatory domain (NFAT homology region, NHR) containing a potent transactivation domain (TAD). The PfNFAT gene consists of 12 exons and 11 introns, and its promoter contains potential binding sites for transcription factors such as NF-κB (Nuclear factor κB), STATx (signal transducer and activator of transcription), AP-1 (activator protein-1) and Sox-5/9 (SRY type HMG box-5/9), MyoD (Myogenic Differentiation Antigen) and IRF (Interferon regulatory factor). Comparison and phylogenetic analysis revealed that PfNFAT shows high identity with other invertebrate NFAT, and clusters with the NFAT5 subgroup. Furthermore, gene expression analysis revealed that PfNFAT is involved in the immune response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and Polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) stimulation and in the nucleus inserting operation. The study of PfNFAT may increase understanding of molluscan innate immunity.

  12. The 4'-hydroxyl group of resveratrol is functionally important for direct activation of PPARα.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Yoshie; Nakata, Rieko; Fukuhara, Kiyoshi; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Kubodera, Hideo; Inoue, Hiroyasu

    2015-01-01

    Long-term moderate consumption of red wine is associated with a reduced risk of developing lifestyle-related diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. Therefore, resveratrol, a constituent of grapes and various other plants, has attracted substantial interest. This study focused on one molecular target of resveratrol, the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα). Our previous study in mice showed that resveratrol-mediated protection of the brain against stroke requires activation of PPARα; however, the molecular mechanisms involved in this process remain unknown. Here, we evaluated the chemical basis of the resveratrol-mediated activation of PPARα by performing a docking mode simulation and examining the structure-activity relationships of various polyphenols. The results of experiments using the crystal structure of the PPARα ligand-binding domain and an analysis of the activation of PPARα by a resveratrol analog 4-phenylazophenol (4-PAP) in vivo indicate that the 4'-hydroxyl group of resveratrol is critical for the direct activation of PPARα. Activation of PPARα by 5 μM resveratrol was enhanced by rolipram, an inhibitor of phosphodiesterase (PDE) and forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase. We also found that resveratrol has a higher PDE inhibitory activity (IC50 = 19 μM) than resveratrol analogs trans-4-hydroxystilbene and 4-PAP (IC50 = 27-28 μM), both of which has only 4'-hydroxyl group, indicating that this 4'-hydroxyl group of resveratrol is not sufficient for the inhibition of PDE. This result is consistent with that 10 μM resveratrol has a higher agonistic activity of PPARα than these analogs, suggesting that there is a feedforward activation loop of PPARα by resveratrol, which may be involved in the long-term effects of resveratrol in vivo. PMID:25798826

  13. INVESTIGATING THE NUCLEAR ACTIVITY OF BARRED SPIRAL GALAXIES: THE CASE OF NGC 1672

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, L. P.; Brandt, W. N.; Colbert, E. J. M.; Kuntz, K. D.; Koribalski, B.; Levan, A. J.; Ojha, R.; Zezas, A.

    2011-06-10

    We have performed an X-ray study of the nearby barred spiral galaxy NGC 1672, primarily to ascertain the effect of the bar on its nuclear activity. We use both Chandra and XMM-Newton observations to investigate its X-ray properties, together with supporting high-resolution optical imaging data from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), infrared imaging from the Spitzer Space Telescope, and Australia Telescope Compact Array ground-based radio data. We detect 28 X-ray sources within the D{sub 25} area of the galaxy; many are spatially correlated with star formation in the bar and spiral arms, and two are identified as background galaxies in the HST images. Nine of the X-ray sources are ultraluminous X-ray sources, with the three brightest (L{sub X} > 5 x 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1}) located at the ends of the bar. With the spatial resolution of Chandra, we are able to show for the first time that NGC 1672 possesses a hard ({Gamma} {approx} 1.5) nuclear X-ray source with a 2-10 keV luminosity of 4 x 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1}. This is surrounded by an X-ray-bright circumnuclear star-forming ring, comprised of point sources and hot gas, which dominates the 2-10 keV emission in the central region of the galaxy. The spatially resolved multiwavelength photometry indicates that the nuclear source is a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (LLAGN), but with star formation activity close to the central black hole. A high-resolution multiwavelength survey is required to fully assess the impact of both large-scale bars and smaller-scale phenomena such as nuclear bars, rings, and nuclear spirals on the fueling of LLAGN.

  14. Investigating the Nuclear Activity of Barred Spiral Galaxies: The Case of NGC 1672

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, L. P.; Brandt, W. N.; Colbert, E. J.; Koribalski, B.; Kuntz, K. D.; Levan, A. J.; Ojha, R.; Roberts, T. P.; Ward, M. J.; Zezas, A.

    2011-01-01

    We have performed an X-ray study of the nearby barred spiral galaxy NGC 1672, primarily to ascertain the effect of the bar on its nuclear activity. We use both Chandra and XMM-Newton observations to investigate its X-ray properties, together with supporting high-resolution optical imaging data from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) infrared imaging from the Spitzer Space Telescope, and Australia Telescope Compact Array ground-based radio data. We detect 28 X-ray sources within the D25 area of the galaxy; many are spatially correlated with star formation in the bar and spiral arms, and two are identified as background galaxies in the HST images. Nine of the X-ray sources are ultraluminous X-ray sources, with the three brightest (LX 5 * 10(exp 39) erg s(exp -1)) located at the ends of the bar. With the spatial resolution of Chandra, we are able to show for the first time that NGC 1672 possesses a hard (1.5) nuclear X-ray source with a 2-10 keV luminosity of 4 * 10(exp 38) erg s(exp -1). This is surrounded by an X-ray-bright circumnuclear star-forming ring, comprised of point sources and hot gas, which dominates the 2-10 keV emission in the central region of the galaxy. The spatially resolved multiwavelength photometry indicates that the nuclear source is a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (LLAGN), but with star formation activity close to the central black hole. A high-resolution multiwavelength survey is required to fully assess the impact of both large-scale bars and smaller-scale phenomena such as nuclear bars, rings, and nuclear spirals on the fueling of LLAGN.

  15. Modeling meiotic chromosome pairing: nuclear envelope attachment, telomere-led active random motion, and anomalous diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Wallace F.; Fung, Jennifer C.

    2016-04-01

    The recognition and pairing of homologous chromosomes during meiosis is a complex physical and molecular process involving a combination of polymer dynamics and molecular recognition events. Two highly conserved features of meiotic chromosome behavior are the attachment of telomeres to the nuclear envelope and the active random motion of telomeres driven by their interaction with cytoskeletal motor proteins. Both of these features have been proposed to facilitate the process of homolog pairing, but exactly what role these features play in meiosis remains poorly understood. Here we investigate the roles of active motion and nuclear envelope tethering using a Brownian dynamics simulation in which meiotic chromosomes are represented by a Rouse polymer model subjected to tethering and active forces at the telomeres. We find that tethering telomeres to the nuclear envelope slows down pairing relative to the rates achieved by unattached chromosomes, but that randomly directed active forces applied to the telomeres speed up pairing dramatically in a manner that depends on the statistical properties of the telomere force fluctuations. The increased rate of initial pairing cannot be explained by stretching out of the chromosome conformation but instead seems to correlate with anomalous diffusion of sub-telomeric regions.

  16. 75 FR 79342 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Navy Training Activities Conducted Within the Northwest...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... preamble to the final rule (75 FR 69296, November 10, 2010), that the taking resulting from the activities... findings, described in the preamble to the final rule (75 FR 45527, August 3, 2010), that the taking... Training Activities Conducted Within the Northwest Training Range Complex (NWTRC) and Military...

  17. IMPORTANCE OF ACTIVATED CARBON'S OXYGEN SURFACE FUNCTIONAL GROUPS ON ELEMENTAL MERCURY ADSORPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of varying physical and chemical properties of activated carbons on adsorption of elemental mercury [Hg(0)] was studied by treating two activated carbons to modify their surface functional groups and pore structures. Heat treatment (1200 K) in nitrogen (N2), air oxidat...

  18. UNCOVERING THE DEEPLY EMBEDDED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY IN THE NUCLEAR REGIONS OF THE INTERACTING GALAXY Arp 299

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-Herrero, A.; Roche, P. F.; Esquej, P.; Colina, L.; González-Martín, O.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Rodríguez Espinosa, J. M.; Alvarez, C.; Pereira-Santaella, M.; Levenson, N. A.; Packham, C.; Mason, R. E.; Aretxaga, I.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Perlman, E.; Telesco, C. M.

    2013-12-10

    We present mid-infrared (MIR) 8-13 μm spectroscopy of the nuclear regions of the interacting galaxy Arp 299 (IC 694+NGC 3690) obtained with CanariCam (CC) on the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). The high angular resolution (∼0.''3-0.''6) of the data allows us to probe nuclear physical scales between 60 and 120 pc, which is a factor of 10 improvement over previous MIR spectroscopic observations of this system. The GTC/CC spectroscopy displays evidence of deeply embedded active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in both nuclei. The GTC/CC nuclear spectrum of NGC 3690/Arp 299-B1 can be explained as emission from AGN-heated dust in a clumpy torus with both a high covering factor and high extinction along the line of sight. The estimated bolometric luminosity of the AGN in NGC 3690 is 3.2 ± 0.6 × 10{sup 44} erg s{sup –1}. The nuclear GTC/CC spectrum of IC 694/Arp 299-A shows 11.3 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission stemming from a deeply embedded (A{sub V} ∼ 24 mag) region of less than 120 pc in size. There is also a continuum-emitting dust component. If associated with the putative AGN in IC 694, we estimate that it would be approximately five times less luminous than the AGN in NGC 3690. The presence of dual AGN activity makes Arp 299 a good example to study such phenomena in the early coalescence phase of interacting galaxies.

  19. Functional Mapping of Protein Kinase A Reveals Its Importance in Adult Schistosoma mansoni Motor Activity

    PubMed Central

    de Saram, Paulu S. R.; Ressurreição, Margarida; Davies, Angela J.; Rollinson, David; Emery, Aidan M.; Walker, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase/protein kinase A (PKA) is the major transducer of cAMP signalling in eukaryotic cells. Here, using laser scanning confocal microscopy and ‘smart’ anti-phospho PKA antibodies that exclusively detect activated PKA, we provide a detailed in situ analysis of PKA signalling in intact adult Schistosoma mansoni, a causative agent of debilitating human intestinal schistosomiasis. In both adult male and female worms, activated PKA was consistently found associated with the tegument, oral and ventral suckers, oesophagus and somatic musculature. In addition, the seminal vesicle and gynaecophoric canal muscles of the male displayed activated PKA whereas in female worms activated PKA localized to the ootype wall, the ovary, and the uterus particularly around eggs during expulsion. Exposure of live worms to the PKA activator forskolin (50 µM) resulted in striking PKA activation in the central and peripheral nervous system including at nerve endings at/near the tegument surface. Such neuronal PKA activation was also observed without forskolin treatment, but only in a single batch of worms. In addition, PKA activation within the central and peripheral nervous systems visibly increased within 15 min of worm-pair separation when compared to that observed in closely coupled worm pairs. Finally, exposure of adult worms to forskolin induced hyperkinesias in a time and dose dependent manner with 100 µM forskolin significantly increasing the frequency of gross worm movements to 5.3 times that of control worms (P≤0.001). Collectively these data are consistent with PKA playing a central part in motor activity and neuronal communication, and possibly interplay between these two systems in S. mansoni. This study, the first to localize a protein kinase when exclusively in an activated state in adult S. mansoni, provides valuable insight into the intricacies of functional protein kinase signalling in the context of whole schistosome physiology

  20. Functional mapping of protein kinase A reveals its importance in adult Schistosoma mansoni motor activity.

    PubMed

    de Saram, Paulu S R; Ressurreição, Margarida; Davies, Angela J; Rollinson, David; Emery, Aidan M; Walker, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase/protein kinase A (PKA) is the major transducer of cAMP signalling in eukaryotic cells. Here, using laser scanning confocal microscopy and 'smart' anti-phospho PKA antibodies that exclusively detect activated PKA, we provide a detailed in situ analysis of PKA signalling in intact adult Schistosoma mansoni, a causative agent of debilitating human intestinal schistosomiasis. In both adult male and female worms, activated PKA was consistently found associated with the tegument, oral and ventral suckers, oesophagus and somatic musculature. In addition, the seminal vesicle and gynaecophoric canal muscles of the male displayed activated PKA whereas in female worms activated PKA localized to the ootype wall, the ovary, and the uterus particularly around eggs during expulsion. Exposure of live worms to the PKA activator forskolin (50 µM) resulted in striking PKA activation in the central and peripheral nervous system including at nerve endings at/near the tegument surface. Such neuronal PKA activation was also observed without forskolin treatment, but only in a single batch of worms. In addition, PKA activation within the central and peripheral nervous systems visibly increased within 15 min of worm-pair separation when compared to that observed in closely coupled worm pairs. Finally, exposure of adult worms to forskolin induced hyperkinesias in a time and dose dependent manner with 100 µM forskolin significantly increasing the frequency of gross worm movements to 5.3 times that of control worms (P≤0.001). Collectively these data are consistent with PKA playing a central part in motor activity and neuronal communication, and possibly interplay between these two systems in S. mansoni. This study, the first to localize a protein kinase when exclusively in an activated state in adult S. mansoni, provides valuable insight into the intricacies of functional protein kinase signalling in the context of whole schistosome physiology.

  1. Studies of neutron and proton nuclear activation in low-Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, C. E.

    1982-01-01

    The expected induced radioactivity of experimental material in low Earth orbit was studied for characteristics of activating particles such as cosmic rays, high energy Earth albedo neutrons, trapped protons, and secondary protons and neutrons. The activation cross sections for the production of long lived radioisotopes and other existing nuclear data appropriate to the study of these reactions were compiled. Computer codes which are required to calculate the expected activation of orbited materials were developed. The decreased computer code used to predict the activation of trapped protons of materials placed in the expected orbits of LDEF and Spacelab II. Techniques for unfolding the fluxes of activating particles from the measured activation of orbited materials are examined.

  2. 31 CFR 560.505 - Importation of certain Iranian-origin services authorized; activities related to certain visa...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... services authorized; activities related to certain visa categories authorized. 560.505 Section 560.505...; activities related to certain visa categories authorized. (a) The importation of Iranian-origin services into... with that purpose. (b) Persons otherwise qualified for a non-immigrant visa under categories A-3 and...

  3. Effects of primary metabolites of organophosphate flame retardants on transcriptional activity via human nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Shinji; Van den Eede, Nele; Covaci, Adrian

    2016-03-14

    Organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) have been used in a wide variety of applications and detected in several environmental matrices, including indoor air and dust. Continuous human exposure to these chemicals is of growing concern. In this study, the agonistic and/or antagonistic activities of 12 primary OPFR-metabolites against ten human nuclear receptors were examined using cell-based transcriptional assays, and compared to those of their parent compounds. As a result, 3-hydroxylphenyl diphenyl phosphate and 4-hydroxylphenyl diphenyl phosphate showed more potent estrogen receptor α (ERα) and ERβ agonistic activity than did their parent, triphenyl phosphate (TPHP). In addition, these hydroxylated TPHP-metabolites also showed ERβ antagonistic activity at higher concentrations and exhibited pregnane X receptor (PXR) agonistic activity as well as androgen receptor (AR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonistic activities at similar levels to those of TPHP. Bis(2-butoxyethyl) 3'-hydroxy-2-butoxyethyl phosphate and 2-hydroxyethyl bis(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate act as PXR agonists at similar levels to their parent, tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate. On the other hand, seven diester OPFR-metabolites and 1-hydroxy-2-propyl bis(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate did not show any receptor activity. Taken together, these results suggest that hydroxylated TPHP-metabolites show increased estrogenicity compared to the parent compound, whereas the diester OPFR-metabolites may have limited nuclear receptor activity compared to their parent triester OPFRs.

  4. 78 FR 36580 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Import/Export...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... previously published in the Federal Register at Volume 78 FR 19312, March 29, 2013, allowing for a 60 day... chemicals ephedrine, pseudoephedrine, and phenylpropanolamine, importers must report all information...

  5. In vitro antifungal activity of pneumocandin L-743,872 against a variety of clinically important molds.

    PubMed Central

    Del Poeta, M; Schell, W A; Perfect, J R

    1997-01-01

    The in vitro activity of the new antifungal drug pneumocandin L-743,872 against 55 isolates of clinically important molds was examined by an adapted macrobroth dilution method for yeasts. Pneumocandin L-743,872 exhibited in vitro antifungal activity against Alternaria sp., Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Curvularia lunata, Exophiala jeanselmei, Fonsecaea pedrosoi, Paecilomyces variotii, and Scedosporium apiospermum. The drug appeared to lack significant in vitro inhibitory activity against Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium solani, Rhizopus arrhizus, Paecilomyces lilacinus, and Scedosporium prolificans. PMID:9257774

  6. [Importance of estrogens and estrogen-active compounds for udder health in cattle. A review].

    PubMed

    Zdunczyk, S; Zerbe, H; Hoedemaker, M

    2003-11-01

    High oestrogen concentrations in blood or high intake of oestrogen-active compounds with forage can be associated with an enhanced occurrence of udder diseases. Mean somatic cell count (MSCC) can increase and milk yield can decrease. Subclinically infected udder quarters can develop clinical mastitis and the rate of new infections can be high. This review describes concentrations of oestrogens in peripheral blood plasma in cattle and occurrence of oestrogen-active compounds in forage. Relationships between oestrogens or oestrogen-active compounds and udder health are presented. The possible mechanisms of enhanced susceptibility of the udder to infection under the influence of oestrogens are discussed. PMID:14679840

  7. Standardization of Administered Activities in Pediatric Nuclear Medicine: A Report of the First Nuclear Medicine Global Initiative Project, Part 2-Current Standards and the Path Toward Global Standardization.

    PubMed

    Fahey, Frederic H; Bom, Henry Hee-Seung; Chiti, Arturo; Choi, Yun Young; Huang, Gang; Lassmann, Michael; Laurin, Norman; Mut, Fernando; Nuñez-Miller, Rodolfo; O'Keeffe, Darin; Pradhan, Prasanta; Scott, Andrew M; Song, Shaoli; Soni, Nischal; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Vargas, Luis

    2016-07-01

    The Nuclear Medicine Global Initiative (NMGI) was formed in 2012 and consists of 13 international organizations with direct involvement in nuclear medicine. The underlying objectives of the NMGI are to promote human health by advancing the field of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging, encourage global collaboration in education, and harmonize procedure guidelines and other policies that ultimately lead to improvements in quality and safety in the field throughout the world. For its first project, the NMGI decided to consider the issues involved in the standardization of administered activities in pediatric nuclear medicine. It was decided to divide the final report of this project into 2 parts. Part 1 was published in this journal in the spring of 2015. This article presents part 2 of the final report. It discusses current standards for administered activities in children and adolescents that have been developed by various professional organizations. It also presents an evaluation of the current practice of pediatric nuclear medicine specifically with regard to administered activities as determined by an international survey of 313 nuclear medicine clinics and centers from 29 countries. Lastly, it provides recommendations for a path toward global standardization of the administration of radiopharmaceuticals in children.

  8. Nuclear IKK activity leads to dysregulated notch-dependent gene expression in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Majada, V; Aguilera, C; Villanueva, A; Vilardell, F; Robert-Moreno, A; Aytés, A; Real, F X; Capella, G; Mayo, M W; Espinosa, L; Bigas, A

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear functions for IkappaB kinase (IKK), including phosphorylation of histone H3 and nuclear corepressors, have been recently described. Here, we show that IKK is activated in colorectal tumors concomitant with the presence of phosphorylated SMRT (silencing mediator of retinoic acid and thyroid hormone receptor) corepressor that is aberrantly localized in the cytoplasm. In these tumors, IKKalpha associates to the chromatin of specific Notch targets, leading to the release of SMRT. Abrogation of IKK activity by BAY11-7082 or by expressing dominant negative IKKalpha restores the association of SMRT with Notch target genes, resulting in specific gene repression. Finally, BAY11-7082 significantly reduces tumor size in colorectal cancer xenografts (CRC-Xs) implanted in nude mice.

  9. Dry, portable calorimeter for nondestructive measurement of the activity of nuclear fuel

    DOEpatents

    Beyer, Norman S.; Lewis, Robert N.; Perry, Ronald B.

    1976-01-01

    The activity of a quantity of heat-producing nuclear fuel is measured rapidly, accurately and nondestructively by a portable dry calorimeter comprising a preheater, an array of temperature-controlled structures comprising a thermally guarded temperature-controlled oven, and a calculation and control unit. The difference between the amounts of electric power required to maintain the oven temperature with and without nuclear fuel in the oven is measured to determine the power produced by radioactive disintegration and hence the activity of the fuel. A portion of the electronic control system is designed to terminate a continuing sequence of measurements when the standard deviation of the variations of the amount of electric power required to maintain oven temperature is within a predetermined value.

  10. Structural transitions during prothrombin activation: On the importance of fragment 2

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Ty E.; Huntington, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Prothrombin is activated to thrombin by the prothrombinase complex through sequential cleavage at two distinct sites. This occurs at sites of vascular injury in a highly regulated cascade of serine protease and cofactor activation, where activated platelets provide a suitable surface for protease/cofactor/substrate assembly. The precise structural and conformational changes undergone during the transition from prothrombin to thrombin have been studied for decades, and several structures of prothrombin fragments along the activation pathway have been solved. Here we present a new structure analyzed in context of other recent structures and biochemical studies. What emerges is an unexpected mechanism that involves a change in the mode of binding of the F2 domain (fragment 2) on the catalytic domain after cleavage at Arg320, and a subsequent reorientation of the linker between the F2 and catalytic domain to present the Arg271 site for cleavage. PMID:26365066

  11. The importance of behavior theory in control system modeling of physical activity sensor data.

    PubMed

    Riley, William T; Martin, Cesar A; Rivera, Daniel E

    2014-01-01

    Among health behaviors, physical activity has the most extensive record of research using passive sensors. Control systems and other system dynamic approaches have long been considered applicable for understanding human behavior, but only recently has the technology provided the precise and intensive longitudinal data required for these analytic approaches. Although sensors provide intensive data on the patterns and variations of physical activity over time, the influences of these variations are often unmeasured. Health behavior theories provide an explanatory framework of the putative mediators of physical activity changes. Incorporating the intensive longitudinal measurement of these theoretical constructs is critical to improving the fit of control system model of physical activity and for advancing behavioral theory. Theory-based control models also provide guidance on the nature of the controllers which serve as the basis for just-in-time adaptive interventions based on these control system models.

  12. Activity of Bifenthrin, Chlorfenapyr, Fipronil, and Thiamethoxam against Red Imported Fire Ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bifenthrin, chlorfenapyr, fipronil, and thiamethoxam were evaluated for activity against the Argentine ant, Linepithema humile (Mayr). Mobility impairment and lethal times were determined following topical treatments. Ants were immobilized most quickly by bifenthrin, followed by chlorfenapyr and thi...

  13. The importance of behavior theory in control system modeling of physical activity sensor data.

    PubMed

    Riley, William T; Martin, Cesar A; Rivera, Daniel E

    2014-01-01

    Among health behaviors, physical activity has the most extensive record of research using passive sensors. Control systems and other system dynamic approaches have long been considered applicable for understanding human behavior, but only recently has the technology provided the precise and intensive longitudinal data required for these analytic approaches. Although sensors provide intensive data on the patterns and variations of physical activity over time, the influences of these variations are often unmeasured. Health behavior theories provide an explanatory framework of the putative mediators of physical activity changes. Incorporating the intensive longitudinal measurement of these theoretical constructs is critical to improving the fit of control system model of physical activity and for advancing behavioral theory. Theory-based control models also provide guidance on the nature of the controllers which serve as the basis for just-in-time adaptive interventions based on these control system models. PMID:25571577

  14. Chemical and biological mechanisms of phytochemical activation of Nrf2 and importance in disease prevention

    PubMed Central

    Eggler, Aimee L.; Savinov, Sergey N.

    2016-01-01

    Plants are an incredibly rich source of compounds that activate the Nrf2 transcription factor, leading to upregulation of a battery of cytoprotective genes. This perspective surveys established and proposed molecular mechanisms of Nrf2 activation by phytochemicals with a special emphasis on a common chemical property of Nrf2 activators: the ability as “soft” electrophiles to modify cellular thiols, either directly or as oxidized biotransformants. In addition, the role of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species as secondary messengers in Nrf2 activation is discussed. While the uniquely reactive C151 of Keap1, an Nrf2 repressor protein, is highlighted as a key target of cytoprotective phytochemicals, also reviewed are other stress-responsive proteins, including kinases, which play non-redundant roles in the activation of Nrf2 by plant-derived agents. Finally, the perspective presents two key factors accounting for the enhanced therapeutic windows of effective phytochemical activators of the Keap1–Nrf2 axis: enhanced selectivity toward sensor cysteines and reversibility of addition to thiolate molecules. PMID:26855455

  15. Affinity Is an Important Determinant of the Anti-Trypanosome Activity of Nanobodies

    PubMed Central

    Caljon, Guy; Stijlemans, Benoît; Saerens, Dirk; Van Den Abbeele, Jan; Muyldermans, Serge; Magez, Stefan; De Baetselier, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Background The discovery of Nanobodies (Nbs) with a direct toxic activity against African trypanosomes is a recent advancement towards a new strategy against these extracellular parasites. The anti-trypanosomal activity relies on perturbing the highly active recycling of the Variant-specific Surface Glycoprotein (VSG) that occurs in the parasite's flagellar pocket. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we expand the existing panel of Nbs with anti-Trypanosoma brucei potential and identify four categories based on their epitope specificity. We modified the binding properties of previously identified Nanobodies Nb_An05 and Nb_An33 by site-directed mutagenesis in the paratope and found this to strongly affect trypanotoxicity despite retention of antigen-targeting properties. Affinity measurements for all identified anti-trypanosomal Nbs reveal a strong correlation between trypanotoxicity and affinity (KD), suggesting that it is a crucial determinant for this activity. Half maximal effective (50%) affinity of 57 nM was calculated from the non-linear dose-response curves. In line with these observations, Nb humanizing mutations only preserved the trypanotoxic activity if the KD remained unaffected. Conclusions/Significance This study reveals that the binding properties of Nanobodies need to be compatible with achieving an occupancy of >95% saturation of the parasite surface VSG in order to exert an anti-trypanosomal activity. As such, Nb-based approaches directed against the VSG target would require binding to an accessible, conserved epitope with high affinity. PMID:23166849

  16. P38 activation is more important than ERK activation in lung injury induced by prolonged hyperbaric oxygen.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Fang, Yi-Qun; Gu, Ai-Mei; Wang, Fang-Fang; Zhang, Shi; Li, Kai-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to hyperbaric oxygen can cause pulmonary and nerve system toxicity. Although hyperbaric oxygen treatment has been used for a broad spectrum of ailments, the mechanisms of prolonged hyperbaric oxygen-induced lung injury are not fully understood. The purpose of the present work was to investigate the roles of ERK, p38, and caspase-3 in rat lung tissue exposed to hyperbaric oxygen at 2.3 atmospheres absolute (atm abs) for two, six and 10 hours. The results showed that the ERK and p38 were phosphorylated at two hours and reached a peak at six hours into exposure to hyperbaric oxygen. While the phosphorylation level of ERK decreased, p38 remained at a high level of activation at 10 hours. The activation of ERK and p38 was down-regulated when rats were exposed to normoxic hyperbaric nitrogen for 10 hours. However, caspase-3 was activated at six hours and 10 hours into exposure to hyperbaric oxygen. These results demonstrated different changes of activation of ERK and p38 during lung injury induced by prolonged exposure to hyperbaric oxygen. The time course changes of activated caspase-3 were similar to the process of p38 activation upon exposure to hyperbaric oxygen. In this way, activation of p38, not ERK, seems to be a mechanism associated with prolonged hyperbaric oxygen-induced lung injury.

  17. Controlling nuclear JAKs and STATs for specific gene activation by IFNγ

    PubMed Central

    Noon-Song, Ezra N.; Ahmed, Chulbul M.; Dabelic, Rea; Canton, Johnathan; Johnson, Howard M.

    2011-01-01

    We previously showed that gamma interferon (IFNγ) and its receptor subunit, IFNGR1, interacted with the promoter region of IFNγ-activated genes along with transcription factor STAT1α. Recent studies have suggested that activated Janus kinases pJAK2 and pJAK1 also played a role in gene activation by phosphorylation of histone H3 on tyrosine 41. This study addresses the question of the role of activated JAKs in specific gene activation by IFNγ. We carried out chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by PCR in IFNγ treated WISH cells and showed association of pJAK1, pJAK2, IFNGR1, and STAT1 on the same DNA sequence of the IRF-1 gene promoter. The β-actin gene, which is not activated by IFNγ, did not show this association. The movement of activated JAK to the nucleus and the IRF-1 promoter was confirmed by the combination of nuclear fractionation, confocal microscopy and DNA precipitation analysis using the biotinylated GAS promoter. Activated JAKs in the nucleus was associated with phosphorylated tyrosine 41 on histone H3 in the region of the GAS promoter. Unphosphorylated JAK2 was found to be constitutively present in the nucleus and was capable of undergoing activation in IFNγ treated cells, most likely via nuclear IFNGR1. Association of pJAK2 and IFNGR1 with histone H3 in IFNγ treated cells was demonstrated by histone H3 immunoprecipitation. Unphosphorylated STAT1 protein was associated with histone H3 of untreated cells. IFNγ treatment resulted in its disassociation and then re-association as pSTAT1. The results suggest a novel role for activated JAKs in epigenetic events for specific gene activation. PMID:21689637

  18. Overview of a FPGA-based nuclear instrumentation dedicated to primary activity measurements.

    PubMed

    Bobin, C; Bouchard, J; Pierre, S; Thiam, C

    2012-09-01

    In National Metrology Institutes like LNE-LNHB, renewal and improvement of the instrumentation is an important task. Nowadays, the current trend is to adopt digital boards, which present numerous advantages over the standard electronics. The feasibility of an on-line fulfillment of nuclear-instrumentation functionalities using a commercial FPGA-based (Field-Programmable Gate Array) board has been validated in the case of TDCR primary measurements (Triple to Double Coincidence Ratio method based on liquid scintillation). The new applications presented in this paper have been included to allow either an on-line processing of the information or a raw-data acquisition for an off-line treatment. Developed as a complementary tool for TDCR counting, a time-to-digital converter specifically designed for this technique has been added. In addition, the description is given of a spectrometry channel based on the connection between conventional shaping amplifiers and the analog-to-digital converter (ADC) input available on the same digital board. First results are presented in the case of α- and γ-counting related to, respectively, the defined solid angle and well-type NaI(Tl) primary activity techniques. The combination of two different channels (liquid scintillation and γ-spectrometry) implementing the live-time anticoincidence processing is also described for the application of the 4πβ-γ coincidence method. The need for an optimized coupling between the analog chain and the ADC stage is emphasized. The straight processing of the signals delivered by the preamplifier connected to a HPGe detector is also presented along with the first development of digital filtering.

  19. Activation analysis study on Li-ion batteries for nuclear forensic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Erik B.; Whitney, Chad; Holbert, Keith E.; Zhang, Taipeng; Stannard, Tyler; Christie, Anthony; Harper, Peter; Anderson, Blake; Christian, James F.

    2015-06-01

    The nuclear materials environment has been increasing significantly in complexity over the past couple of decades. The prevention of attacks from nuclear weapons is becoming more difficult, and nuclear forensics is a deterrent by providing detailed information on any type of nuclear event for proper attribution. One component of the nuclear forensic analysis is a measurement of the neutron spectrum. As an example, the neutron component provides information on the composition of the weapons, whether boosting is involved or the mechanisms used in creating a supercritical state. As 6Li has a large cross-section for thermal neutrons, the lithium battery is a primary candidate for assessing the neutron spectrum after detonation. The absorption process for 6Li yields tritium, which can be measured at a later point after the nuclear event, as long as the battery can be processed in a manner to successfully extract the tritium content. In addition, measuring the activated constituents after exposure provides a means to reconstruct the incident neutron spectrum. The battery consists of a spiral or folded layers of material that have unique, energy dependent interactions associated with the incident neutron flux. A detailed analysis on the batteries included a pre-irradiated mass spectrometry analysis to be used as input for neutron spectrum reconstruction. A set of batteries were exposed to a hard neutron spectrum delivered by the University of Massachusetts, Lowell research reactor Fast Neutron Irradiator (FNI). The gamma spectra were measured from the batteries within a few days and within a week after the exposure to obtain sufficient data on the activated materials in the batteries. The activity was calculated for a number of select isotopes, indicating the number of associated neutron interactions. The results from tritium extraction are marginal. A measurable increase in detected particles (gammas and betas) below 50 keV not self-attenuated by the battery was observed

  20. Active faults crossing trunk pipeline routes: some important steps to avoid the disaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besstrashnov, Vladimir; Strom, Alexander

    2010-05-01

    Trunk pipelines that pass through tectonically active areas connecting oil and gas reservoirs with terminals and refineries cross active faults that can produce large earthquakes. Besides strong motion affecting vast areas, these earthquakes are often associated with surface faulting that provides additional hazard to pipelines. To avoid significant economic losses and environmental pollution, pipelines should be designed to sustain both effects (shaking and direct rupturing) without pipe damage and spill. Special studies aimed to provide necessary input data for the designers should be performed in the course of engineering survey. However, our experience on conducting and review of such studies for several oil and gas trunk pipelines in Russia show urgent need of more strict definition of basic conceptions and approaches used for identification and localization of these potentially hazardous tectonic features. Identification of active faults (fault zones) considered as causative faults - sources of strong motion caused by seismic waves that affect dozens kilometers of pipeline route can be done by use of both direct and indirect evidence of Late Pleistocene - Holocene activity of faults and fault zones. Since strong motion parameters can be considered as constant within the near-field zone, which width in case of large earthquake is up to dozens kilometers, accuracy of active fault location is not so critical and ±1-2 km precision provided by use of indirect evidence is acceptable. In contrast, if one have to identify and characterize zones of potential surface rupturing that require special design of the endangered pipeline section, only direct evidence of such activity can provide reliable input data for crossing design with relevant accuracy of fault location, amount and direction of displacement. Only traces of surface faults displacing Late Pleistocene - Holocene sediments and/or geomorphic features are considered as direct evidence of fault activity. Just

  1. The Arabidopsis Nuclear Pore and Nuclear Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Iris; Brkljacic, Jelena

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear envelope is a double membrane structure that separates the eukaryotic cytoplasm from the nucleoplasm. The nuclear pores embedded in the nuclear envelope are the sole gateways for macromolecular trafficking in and out of the nucleus. The nuclear pore complexes assembled at the nuclear pores are large protein conglomerates composed of multiple units of about 30 different nucleoporins. Proteins and RNAs traffic through the nuclear pore complexes, enabled by the interacting activities of nuclear transport receptors, nucleoporins, and elements of the Ran GTPase cycle. In addition to directional and possibly selective protein and RNA nuclear import and export, the nuclear pore gains increasing prominence as a spatial organizer of cellular processes, such as sumoylation and desumoylation. Individual nucleoporins and whole nuclear pore subcomplexes traffic to specific mitotic locations and have mitotic functions, for example at the kinetochores, in spindle assembly, and in conjunction with the checkpoints. Mutants of nucleoporin genes and genes of nuclear transport components lead to a wide array of defects from human diseases to compromised plant defense responses. The nuclear envelope acts as a repository of calcium, and its inner membrane is populated by functionally unique proteins connected to both chromatin and—through the nuclear envelope lumen—the cytoplasmic cytoskeleton. Plant nuclear pore and nuclear envelope research—predominantly focusing on Arabidopsis as a model—is discovering both similarities and surprisingly unique aspects compared to the more mature model systems. This chapter gives an overview of our current knowledge in the field and of exciting areas awaiting further exploration. PMID:22303264

  2. Thermodynamics of nuclear transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ching-Hao; Mehta, Pankaj; Elbaum, Michael

    Molecular transport across the nuclear envelope is important for eukaryotes for gene expression and signaling. Experimental studies have revealed that nuclear transport is inherently a nonequilibrium process and actively consumes energy. In this work we present a thermodynamics theory of nuclear transport for a major class of nuclear transporters that are mediated by the small GTPase Ran. We identify the molecular elements responsible for powering nuclear transport, which we term the ``Ran battery'' and find that the efficiency of transport, measured by the cargo nuclear localization ratio, is limited by competition between cargo molecules and RanGTP to bind transport receptors, as well as the amount of NTF2 (i.e. RanGDP carrier) available to circulate the energy flow. This picture complements our current understanding of nuclear transport by providing a comprehensive thermodynamics framework to decipher the underlying biochemical machinery. Pm and CHW were supported by a Simons Investigator in the Mathematical Modeling in Living Systems grant (to PM).

  3. A Qualitative Study of Environmental Factors Important for Physical Activity in Rural Adults

    PubMed Central

    Cleland, Verity; Hughes, Clarissa; Thornton, Lukar; Venn, Alison; Squibb, Kathryn; Ball, Kylie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Despite increasing evidence that the physical environment impacts on physical activity among urban-dwellers, little attention has been devoted to understanding this relationship in rural populations. Work in this area is further hindered by a lack of environmental measures specifically designed for rural settings. This qualitative study aimed to explore the salience of urban physical activity environment constructs among rural adults. Methods In 2011, 49 rural men and women from three distinct areas (coastal, animal-based farming, forestry/plant-based farming) of rural Tasmania, Australia, were purposively recruited to participate in semi-structured interviews. Interviews explored features of the built and social environment commonly examined in studies of urban adults, including functional characteristics (eg, lighting, footpaths, roads/verges), road and personal safety, availability and accessibility of places to be active, destinations, and aesthetics. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using a content-thematic approach using QSR NVivo software. Findings While some urban environmental constructs were salient to these rural adults, such as availability of and accessibility to places to be active, some constructs were operationalised differently, such as road safety (where large trucks and winding roads rather than traffic density was of concern), or were not considered relevant (eg, personal safety related to crime, availability of walkable destinations, aesthetics). Conclusions The measurement of the physical environment in rural populations may require reconsideration and/or modification to ensure salience and appropriate quantification of associations with physical activity in future studies. PMID:26554376

  4. High Sulfation and a High Molecular Weight Are Important for Anti-hepcidin Activity of Heparin.

    PubMed

    Asperti, Michela; Naggi, Annamaria; Esposito, Emiliano; Ruzzenenti, Paola; Di Somma, Margherita; Gryzik, Magdalena; Arosio, Paolo; Poli, Maura

    2015-01-01

    Heparins are efficient inhibitors of hepcidin expression even in vivo, where they induce an increase of systemic iron availability. Heparins seem to act by interfering with BMP6 signaling pathways that control the expression of liver hepcidin, causing the suppression of SMAD1/5/8 phosphorylation. The anti-hepcidin activity persists also when the heparin anticoagulant property is abolished or reduced by chemical reactions of oxidation/reduction (glycol-split, Gs-Heparins) or by high sulfation (SS-Heparins), but the structural characteristics needed to optimize this inhibitory activity have not been studied in detail. To this aim we analyzed three different heparins (Mucosal Heparin, the Glycol split RO-82, the partially desulfated glycol-split RO-68 and the oversulfated SSLMWH) and separated them in fractions of molecular weight in the range 4-16 kD. Since the distribution of the negative charges in heparins contributes to the activity, we produced 2-O- and 6-O-desulfated heparins. These derivatives were analyzed for the capacity to inhibit hepcidin expression in hepatic HepG2 cells and in mice. The two approaches produced consistent results and showed that the anti-hepcidin activity strongly decreases with molecular weight below 7 kD, with high N-acetylation and after 2-O and 6-O desulfation. The high sulfation and high molecular weight properties for efficient anti-hepcidin activity suggest that heparin is involved in multiple binding sites. PMID:26955355

  5. The human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 oncoproteins promotes nuclear localization of active caspase 8

    SciTech Connect

    Manzo-Merino, Joaquin; Lizano, Marcela

    2014-02-15

    The HPV-16 E6 and E6{sup ⁎} proteins have been shown previously to be capable of regulating caspase 8 activity. We now show that the capacity of E6 to interact with caspase 8 is common to diverse HPV types, being also seen with HPV-11 E6, HPV-18 E6 and HPV-18 E6{sup ⁎}. Unlike most E6-interacting partners, caspase 8 does not appear to be a major proteasomal target of E6, but instead E6 appears able to stimulate caspase 8 activation, without affecting the overall apoptotic activity. This would appear to be mediated in part by the ability of the HPV E6 oncoproteins to recruit active caspase 8 to the nucleus. - Highlights: • Multiple HPV E6 oncoproteins interact with the caspase 8 DED domain. • HPV E6 stimulates activation of caspase 8. • HPV E6 promotes nuclear accumulation of caspase 8.

  6. TALE1 from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis acts as a transcriptional activator in plant cells and is important for pathogenicity in cassava plants.

    PubMed

    Castiblanco, Luisa F; Gil, Juliana; Rojas, Alejandro; Osorio, Daniela; Gutiérrez, Sonia; Muñoz-Bodnar, Alejandra; Perez-Quintero, Alvaro L; Koebnik, Ralf; Szurek, Boris; López, Camilo; Restrepo, Silvia; Verdier, Valérie; Bernal, Adriana J

    2013-01-01

    Many plant-pathogenic bacteria suppress pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity by injecting effector proteins into the host cytoplasm during infection through the type III secretion system (TTSS). This type III secretome plays an important role in bacterial pathogenicity in susceptible hosts. Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis (Xam), the causal agent of cassava bacterial blight, injects several effector proteins into the host cell, including TALE1(Xam) . This protein is a member of the Transcriptional Activator-Like effector (TALE) protein family, formerly known as the AvrBs3/PthA family. TALE1(Xam) has 13.5 tandem repeats of 34 amino acids each, as well as two nuclear localization signals and an acidic activation domain at the C-terminus. In this work, we demonstrate the importance of TALE1(Xam) in the pathogenicity of Xam. We use versions of the gene that lack different domains in the protein in structure-function studies to show that the eukaryotic domains at the 3' end are critical for pathogenicity. In addition, we demonstrate that, similar to the characterized TALE proteins from other Xanthomonas species, TALE1(Xam) acts as a transcriptional activator in plant cells. This is the first report of the identification of a TALE in Xam, and contributes to our understanding of the pathogenicity mechanisms employed by this bacterium to colonize and cause disease in cassava. PMID:22947214

  7. Pomegranate juice and prostate cancer: importance of the characterisation of the active principle.

    PubMed

    Chrubasik-Hausmann, Sigrun; Vlachojannis, Christian; Zimmermann, Benno

    2014-11-01

    Two exploratory clinical studies investigating proprietary pomegranate products showed a trend of effectiveness in increasing prostate-specific antigen doubling time in patients with prostate cancer. A recent clinical study did not support these results. We therefore analysed a lot of the marketed pomegranate blend for co-active pomegranate compounds. The high-performance liquid chromatography method was used to detect punicalagin, ellagic acid and anthocyanins. Total polyphenoles were determined by the Folin-Ciocalteu method using gallic acid as reference. The results show that the co-active compounds in the daily dose of the pomegranate blend were far below those previously tested and that the photometric assessment is not reliable for the standardisation of study medications. Not pomegranate but the low amount of co-active compounds in the proprietary pomegranate blend was responsible for its clinical ineffectiveness.

  8. Nuclear F-actin enhances the transcriptional activity of β-catenin by increasing its nuclear localization and binding to chromatin.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shota; Yamamoto, Koji; de Lanerolle, Primal; Harata, Masahiko

    2016-04-01

    Actin plays multiple roles both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Cytoplasmic actin, in addition to its structural role in the cytoskeleton, also contributes to the subcellular localization of transcription factors by interacting with them or their partners. The transcriptional cofactor β-catenin, which acts as an intracellular transducer of canonical Wnt signaling, indirectly associates with the cytoplasmic filamentous actin (F-actin). Recently, it has been observed that F-actin is transiently formed within the nucleus in response to serum stimulation and integrin signaling, and also during gene reprogramming. Despite these earlier observations, information about the function of nuclear F-actin is poorly defined. Here, by facilitating the accumulation of nuclear actin artificially, we demonstrate that polymerizing nuclear actin enhanced the nuclear accumulation and transcriptional function of β-catenin. Our results also show that the nuclear F-actin colocalizes with β-catenin and enhances the binding of β-catenin to the downstream target genes of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, including the genes for the cell cycle regulators c-myc and cyclin D, and the OCT4 gene. Nuclear F-actin itself also associated with these genes. Since Wnt/β-catenin signaling has important roles in cell differentiation and pluripotency, our observations suggest that nuclear F-actin formed during these biological processes is involved in regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:26900020

  9. Nuclear F-actin enhances the transcriptional activity of β-catenin by increasing its nuclear localization and binding to chromatin.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shota; Yamamoto, Koji; de Lanerolle, Primal; Harata, Masahiko

    2016-04-01

    Actin plays multiple roles both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Cytoplasmic actin, in addition to its structural role in the cytoskeleton, also contributes to the subcellular localization of transcription factors by interacting with them or their partners. The transcriptional cofactor β-catenin, which acts as an intracellular transducer of canonical Wnt signaling, indirectly associates with the cytoplasmic filamentous actin (F-actin). Recently, it has been observed that F-actin is transiently formed within the nucleus in response to serum stimulation and integrin signaling, and also during gene reprogramming. Despite these earlier observations, information about the function of nuclear F-actin is poorly defined. Here, by facilitating the accumulation of nuclear actin artificially, we demonstrate that polymerizing nuclear actin enhanced the nuclear accumulation and transcriptional function of β-catenin. Our results also show that the nuclear F-actin colocalizes with β-catenin and enhances the binding of β-catenin to the downstream target genes of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, including the genes for the cell cycle regulators c-myc and cyclin D, and the OCT4 gene. Nuclear F-actin itself also associated with these genes. Since Wnt/β-catenin signaling has important roles in cell differentiation and pluripotency, our observations suggest that nuclear F-actin formed during these biological processes is involved in regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  10. The importance of physical activity in osteoporosis. From the molecular pathways to the clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Castrogiovanni, Paola; Trovato, Francesca Maria; Szychlinska, Marta Anna; Nsir, Houda; Imbesi, Rosa; Musumeci, Giuseppe

    2016-11-01

    Osteoporosis is a very common bone disorder characterized by low bone mass and signs of deterioration, responsible for bone fragility typical in this pathology. The risk factors for the onset of osteoporosis are many and different from each other. Some of them cannot be modified, such as age, hereditary diseases and endocrine diseases. Others are modifiable, so that prevention is an advisable tool to reduce the incidence of osteoporosis. Among preventive tools, physical activity is certainly a valid instrument of prevention, in fact physical activity contributes to a healthy energy balance and increases muscle mass and bone mass. In the present narrative review, we wanted to pay attention to the possible influence of physical activity on the pathophysiological molecular pathways of osteoporosis and to the use of different exercise training in treatment of osteoporosis. From the literature analyzed, in relation to the effects of physical activity on bone metabolism, it is shown that exercise acts on molecular pathways of bone remodeling involving all cellular types of bone tissue. In relation to clinical trials adopted in patients with osteoporosis, it is evident that a multi-component training, including aerobic activity and other types of training (resistance and/or strength exercises), is the best kind of exercise in improving bone mass and bone metabolism in older adults and especially osteopoenic and osteoporotic women. With regard to whole-body-vibration training, it seems to be a valid alternative to current methods due to its greater adaptability to patients. In conclusion, physical activity, whatever the adopted training, always has beneficial effects on patients suffering from osteoporosis, and not only on bone homeostasis but on the whole skeletal muscle system.

  11. Physiological community ecology: variation in metabolic activity of ecologically important rocky intertidal invertebrates along environmental gradients.

    PubMed

    Dahlhoff, Elizabeth P; Stillman, Jonathon H; Menge, Bruce A

    2002-08-01

    Rocky intertidal invertebrates live in heterogeneous habitats characterized by steep gradients in wave activity, tidal flux, temperature, food quality and food availability. These environmental factors impact metabolic activity via changes in energy input and stress-induced alteration of energetic demands. For keystone species, small environmentally induced shifts in metabolic activity may lead to disproportionately large impacts on community structure via changes in growth or survival of these key species. Here we use biochemical indicators to assess how natural differences in wave exposure, temperature and food availability may affect metabolic activity of mussels, barnacles, whelks and sea stars living at rocky intertidal sites with different physical and oceanographic characteristics. We show that oxygen consumption rate is correlated with the activity of key metabolic enzymes (e.g., citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase) for some intertidal species, and concentrations of these enzymes in certain tissues are lower for starved individuals than for those that are well fed. We also show that the ratio of RNA to DNA (an index of protein synthetic capacity) is highly variable in nature and correlates with short-term changes in food availability. We also observed striking patterns in enzyme activity and RNA/DNA in nature, which are related to differences in rocky intertidal community structure. Differences among species and habitats are most pronounced in summer and are linked to high nearshore productivity at sites favored by suspension feeders and to exposure to stressful low-tide air temperatures in areas of low wave splash. These studies illustrate the great promise of using biochemical indicators to test ecological models, which predict changes in community structure along environmental gradients. Our results also suggest that biochemical indices must be carefully validated with laboratory studies, so that the indicator selected is likely to respond to the

  12. Physiological community ecology: variation in metabolic activity of ecologically important rocky intertidal invertebrates along environmental gradients.

    PubMed

    Dahlhoff, Elizabeth P; Stillman, Jonathon H; Menge, Bruce A

    2002-08-01

    Rocky intertidal invertebrates live in heterogeneous habitats characterized by steep gradients in wave activity, tidal flux, temperature, food quality and food availability. These environmental factors impact metabolic activity via changes in energy input and stress-induced alteration of energetic demands. For keystone species, small environmentally induced shifts in metabolic activity may lead to disproportionately large impacts on community structure via changes in growth or survival of these key species. Here we use biochemical indicators to assess how natural differences in wave exposure, temperature and food availability may affect metabolic activity of mussels, barnacles, whelks and sea stars living at rocky intertidal sites with different physical and oceanographic characteristics. We show that oxygen consumption rate is correlated with the activity of key metabolic enzymes (e.g., citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase) for some intertidal species, and concentrations of these enzymes in certain tissues are lower for starved individuals than for those that are well fed. We also show that the ratio of RNA to DNA (an index of protein synthetic capacity) is highly variable in nature and correlates with short-term changes in food availability. We also observed striking patterns in enzyme activity and RNA/DNA in nature, which are related to differences in rocky intertidal community structure. Differences among species and habitats are most pronounced in summer and are linked to high nearshore productivity at sites favored by suspension feeders and to exposure to stressful low-tide air temperatures in areas of low wave splash. These studies illustrate the great promise of using biochemical indicators to test ecological models, which predict changes in community structure along environmental gradients. Our results also suggest that biochemical indices must be carefully validated with laboratory studies, so that the indicator selected is likely to respond to the

  13. The Relative Importance of Academic Activities: Autonomous Values from the Canadian Professoriate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osakwe, Carlton; Keavey, Kalen; Uzoka, Faith-Michael; Fedoruk, Alan; Osuji, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report findings on the contemporary idea of a university as defined by the relative importance of teaching, research, service, and collegiality in teaching-intensive universities. We also investigate Boyer's model of scholarship relative to the research--teaching--service nexus. Our findings show that while research is embraced…

  14. 75 FR 67981 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Importer's Entry...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... this collection of information expands the universe of respondents being regulated under the FD&C Act... origin FDA regulated foods, drugs, cosmetics, medical devices, radiological health, and tobacco products..., landport, and airport) where foreign-origin FDA-regulated products are offered for import, FDA is...

  15. Importance of Health-Related Fitness Knowledge to Increasing Physical Activity and Physical Fitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferkel, Rick C.; Judge, Lawrence W.; Stodden, David F.; Griffin, Kent

    2014-01-01

    Physical inactivity is expanding across all ages in the United States. Research has documented a deficiency in health-related fitness knowledge (HRFK) among elementary- through college-aged students. The need for a credible and reliable resource that provides research-based information regarding the importance of HRFK is significant. The purpose…

  16. 78 FR 19312 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Import/Export...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ...: Import/Export Declaration for List I and List II Chemicals, DEA Forms 486 and 486A ACTION: 60-Day Notice. The Department of Justice (DOJ), Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), will be submitting the... the Department of Justice sponsoring the collection: Form Number: DEA Forms 486 and 486A....

  17. 77 FR 62532 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Import/Export...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-15

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  18. 77 FR 47666 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Import/Export...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ...: Import/Export Declaration for List I and List II Chemicals; DEA Forms 486 and 486A ACTION: 60-Day Notice... Administration (DEA), will be submitting the following information collection request to the Office of Management... component of the Department of Justice sponsoring the collection: Form Number: DEA Forms 486 and...

  19. What is the importance of abnormal "background" activity in seizure generation?

    PubMed

    Staba, Richard J; Worrell, Gregory A

    2014-01-01

    Investigations of interictal epileptiform spikes and seizures have played a central role in the study of epilepsy. The background EEG activity, however, has received less attention. In this chapter we discuss the characteristic features of the background activity of the brain when individuals are at rest and awake (resting wake) and during sleep. The characteristic rhythms of the background EEG are presented, and the presence of 1/f (β) behavior of the EEG power spectral density is discussed and its possible origin and functional significance. The interictal EEG findings of focal epilepsy and the impact of interictal epileptiform spikes on cognition are also discussed. PMID:25012365

  20. Biological and chemical study of fused tri- and tetracyclic indazoles and analogues with important antiparasitic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Urrutia, Christian A.; Olea-Azar, Claudio A.; Zapata, Gerald A.; Lapier, Michel; Mura, Francisco; Aguilera-Venegas, Benjamín; Arán, Vicente J.; López-Múñoz, Rodrigo A.; Maya, Juan D.

    A series of fused tri- and tetracyclic indazoles and analogues compounds (NID) with potential antiparasitic effects were studied using voltamperometric and spectroscopic techniques. Nitroanion radicals generated by cyclic voltammetry were characterized by electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) and their spectral lines were explained and analyzed using simulated spectra. In addition, we examined the interaction between radical species generated from nitroindazole derivatives and glutathione (GSH). Biological assays such as activity against Trypanosoma cruzi and cytotoxicity against macrophages were carried out. Finally, spin trapping and molecular modeling studies were also done in order to elucidate the potentials action mechanisms involved in the trypanocidal activity.

  1. Biological and chemical study of fused tri- and tetracyclic indazoles and analogues with important antiparasitic activity.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Urrutia, Christian A; Olea-Azar, Claudio A; Zapata, Gerald A; Lapier, Michel; Mura, Francisco; Aguilera-Venegas, Benjamín; Arán, Vicente J; López-Múñoz, Rodrigo A; Maya, Juan D

    2012-09-01

    A series of fused tri- and tetracyclic indazoles and analogues compounds (NID) with potential antiparasitic effects were studied using voltamperometric and spectroscopic techniques. Nitroanion radicals generated by cyclic voltammetry were characterized by electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) and their spectral lines were explained and analyzed using simulated spectra. In addition, we examined the interaction between radical species generated from nitroindazole derivatives and glutathione (GSH). Biological assays such as activity against Trypanosoma cruzi and cytotoxicity against macrophages were carried out. Finally, spin trapping and molecular modeling studies were also done in order to elucidate the potentials action mechanisms involved in the trypanocidal activity.

  2. Overview of the international R&D recycling activities of the nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Patricia Paviet-Hartmann

    2012-12-01

    Nuclear power has demonstrated over the last thirty years its capacity to produce base-load electricity at a low, predictable and stable cost due to the very low economic dependence of the price of uranium. However the management of used nuclear fuel (UNF) remains the “Achilles’ heel of this energy source since the storage of UNF is increasing as evidenced by the following number with 2,000 to 2,300 of UNF produced each year by the 104 US nuclear reactor units which equates to a total of 62,000 UNF assemblies stored in dry cask storage and 88,000 stored in pools. Alarmingly, more than half of US commercial reactor sites have filled their pools to capacity and have had to add dry cask storage facilities. Two options adopted by several countries will be discussed. The first one adopted by Europe, Japan and Russia consists of recycling the used nuclear fuel after irradiation in a nuclear reactor. Ninety six percent of uranium and plutonium contained in the spent fuel could be reused to produce electricity and are worth recycling. The separation of uranium and plutonium from the wastes is realized through the industrial PUREX process so that they can be recycled for re-use in a nuclear reactor as a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. The second option undertaken by Finland, Sweden and the United States implies the direct disposal of UNF into a geologic formation. One has to remind that only 30% of the worldwide UNF are currently recycled, the larger part being stored (90% in pool) waiting for scientific or political decisions. A third option is emerging with a closed fuel cycle which will improve the global sustainability of nuclear energy. This option will not only decrease the volume amount of nuclear waste but also the long-term radiotoxicity of the final waste, as well as improving the long-term safety and the heat-loading of the final repository. At the present time, numerous countries are focusing on the R&D recycling activities of the ultimate waste composed of fission

  3. Calmodulin Involvement in Stress-Activated Nuclear Localization of Albumin in JB6 Epithelial Cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Thomas J.; Negash, Sewite; Smallwood, Heather S.; Ramos, Kenneth S.; Thrall, Brian D.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2004-06-15

    We report that in response to oxidative stress, albumin is translocated to the nucleus where it binds in concert with known transcription factors to an antioxidant response element (ARE), which controls the expression of glutathione-S-transferase and other antioxidant enzymes, functioning to mediate adaptive cellular responses. To investigate the mechanisms underlying this adaptive cell response, we have identified linkages between calcium signaling and the nuclear translocation of albumin in JB6 epithelial cells. Under resting conditions, albumin and the calcium regulatory protein, calmodulin (CaM), co-immunoprecipitate using antibodies against either protein, indicating a tight association. Calcium activation of CaM disrupts the association between CaM and albumin, suggesting that transient increases in cytosolic calcium levels function to mobilize intracellular albumin to facilitate its translocation into the nucleus. Likewise, nuclear translocation of albumin is induced by exposure of cells to hydrogen peroxide or a phorbol ester, indicating a functional linkage between reactive oxygen species, calcium, and PKC-signaling pathways. Inclusion of an antioxidant enzyme (i.e., superoxide dismutase) blocks nuclear translocation, suggesting that the oxidation of sensitive proteins functions to coordinate the adaptive cellular response. These results suggest that elevated calcium transients, and associated increases in reactive oxygen species, contribute to adaptive cellular responses through the mobilization and nuclear translocation of cellular albumin to mediate the transcriptional regulation of antioxidant responsive elements.

  4. O-GlcNAc-glycosylation of {beta}-catenin regulates its nuclear localization and transcriptional activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sayat, Ria; Leber, Brian; Grubac, Vanja; Wiltshire, Lesley; Persad, Sujata

    2008-09-10

    {beta}-catenin plays a role in intracellular adhesion and regulating gene expression. The latter role is associated with its oncogenic properties. Phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin controls its intracellular expression but mechanism/s that regulates the nuclear localization of {beta}-catenin is unknown. We demonstrate that O-GlcNAc glycosylation (O-GlcNAcylation) of {beta}-catenin negatively regulates its levels in the nucleus. We show that normal prostate cells (PNT1A) have significantly higher amounts of O-GlcNAcylated {beta}-catenin compared to prostate cancer (CaP) cells. The total nuclear levels of {beta}-catenin are higher in the CaP cells than PNT1A but only a minimal fraction of the nuclear {beta}-catenin in the CaP cells are O-GlcNAcylated. Increasing the levels of O-GlcNAcylated {beta}-catenin in the CaP cells with PUGNAc (O- (2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-gluco-pyranosylidene) amino-N-phenylcarbamate) treatment is associated with a progressive decrease in the levels of {beta}-catenin in the nucleus. TOPFlash reporter assay and mRNA expressions of {beta}-catenin's target genes indicate that O-GlcNAcylation of {beta}-catenin results in a decrease in its transcriptional activity. We define a novel modification of {beta}-catenin that regulates its nuclear localization and transcriptional function.

  5. Mutations in Mtr4 Structural Domains Reveal Their Important Role in Regulating tRNAiMet Turnover in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Mtr4p Enzymatic Activities In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Burclaff, Joseph; Anderson, James T

    2016-01-01

    RNA processing and turnover play important roles in the maturation, metabolism and quality control of a large variety of RNAs thereby contributing to gene expression and cellular health. The TRAMP complex, composed of Air2p, Trf4p and Mtr4p, stimulates nuclear exosome-dependent RNA processing and degradation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The Mtr4 protein structure is composed of a helicase core and a novel so-called arch domain, which protrudes from the core. The helicase core contains highly conserved helicase domains RecA-1 and 2, and two structural domains of unclear functions, winged helix domain (WH) and ratchet domain. How the structural domains (arch, WH and ratchet domain) coordinate with the helicase domains and what roles they are playing in regulating Mtr4p helicase activity are unknown. We created a library of Mtr4p structural domain mutants for the first time and screened for those defective in the turnover of TRAMP and exosome substrate, hypomodified tRNAiMet. We found these domains regulate Mtr4p enzymatic activities differently through characterizing the arch domain mutants K700N and P731S, WH mutant K904N, and ratchet domain mutant R1030G. Arch domain mutants greatly reduced Mtr4p RNA binding, which surprisingly did not lead to significant defects on either in vivo tRNAiMet turnover, or in vitro unwinding activities. WH mutant K904N and Ratchet domain mutant R1030G showed decreased tRNAiMet turnover in vivo, as well as reduced RNA binding, ATPase and unwinding activities of Mtr4p in vitro. Particularly, K904 was found to be very important for steady protein levels in vivo. Overall, we conclude that arch domain plays a role in RNA binding but is largely dispensable for Mtr4p enzymatic activities, however the structural domains in the helicase core significantly contribute to Mtr4p ATPase and unwinding activities.

  6. Chlamydial Protease-Like Activity Factor and Type III Secreted Effectors Cooperate in Inhibition of p65 Nuclear Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Patton, Michael John; McCorrister, Stuart; Grant, Chris; Westmacott, Garrett; Fariss, Robert; Hu, Pingzhao; Zhao, Kaiqiong; Blake, Mary; Whitmire, Bill; Yang, Chunfu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The chlamydial protease-like activity factor (CPAF) is hypothesized to be an important secreted virulence factor; however, challenges in denaturing its proteolytic activity have hampered attempts to identify its legitimate targets. Here, we use a genetic and proteomic approach to identify authentic CPAF targets. Human epithelial cells infected with CPAF-sufficient and CPAF-deficient chlamydiae were lysed using known CPAF-denaturing conditions. Their protein profiles were analyzed using isobaric mass tags and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Comparative analysis of CPAF-sufficient and CPAF-deficient infections identified a limited number of CPAF host and chlamydial protein targets. Host targets were primarily interferon-stimulated gene products, whereas chlamydial targets were type III secreted proteins. We provide evidence supporting a cooperative role for CPAF and type III secreted effectors in blocking NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation, resulting in decreased beta interferon and proinflammatory cytokine synthesis. Genetic complementation of null organisms with CPAF restored p65 nuclear translocation inhibition and proteolysis of chlamydial type III secreted effector proteins (T3SEs). We propose that CPAF and T3SEs cooperate in the inhibition of host innate immunity. PMID:27677792

  7. Resisting Rote: The Importance of Active Learning for All Course Learning Objectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fata-Hartley, Cori

    2011-01-01

    Many college science educators have moved away from the traditional lecture format and toward learner-centered classroom environments. Yet many of us struggle to cover large content loads, reverting at times to rote memorization. This paper suggests rote memorization simply does not work and students must be actively engaged to learn. (Contains 1…

  8. The importance of physical activity and sleep for affect on stressful days: Two intensive longitudinal studies.

    PubMed

    Flueckiger, Lavinia; Lieb, Roselind; Meyer, Andrea H; Witthauer, Cornelia; Mata, Jutta

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the potential stress-buffering effect of 3 health behaviors-physical activity, sleep quality, and snacking-on affect in the context of everyday life in young adults. In 2 intensive longitudinal studies with up to 65 assessment days over an entire academic year, students (Study 1, N = 292; Study 2, N = 304) reported stress intensity, sleep quality, physical activity, snacking, and positive and negative affect. Data were analyzed using multilevel regression analyses. Stress and positive affect were negatively associated; stress and negative affect were positively associated. The more physically active than usual a person was on a given day, the weaker the association between stress and positive affect (Study 1) and negative affect (Studies 1 and 2). The better than usual a person's sleep quality had been during the previous night, the weaker the association between stress and positive affect (Studies 1 and 2) and negative affect (Study 2). The association between daily stress and positive or negative affect did not differ as a function of daily snacking (Studies 1 and 2). On stressful days, increasing physical activity or ensuring high sleep quality may buffer adverse effects of stress on affect in young adults. These findings suggest potential targets for health-promotion and stress-prevention programs, which could help reduce the negative impact of stress in young adults. (PsycINFO Database Record

  9. Apoptosome activation, an important molecular instigator in 6-mercaptopurine induced Leydig cell death

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Jessica A.; Lynch, John; Panetta, John C.; Wang, Yao; Frase, Sharon; Bao, Ju; Zheng, Jie; Opferman, Joseph T.; Janke, Laura; Green, Daniel M.; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Schuetz, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Leydig cells are crucial to the production of testosterone in males. It is unknown if the cancer chemotherapeutic drug, 6-mercaptopurine (6 MP), produces Leydig cell failure among adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Moreover, it is not known whether Leydig cell failure is due to either a loss of cells or an impairment in their function. Herein, we show, in a subset of childhood cancer survivors, that Leydig cell failure is related to the dose of 6 MP. This was extended, in a murine model, to demonstrate that 6 MP exposure induced caspase 3 activation, and the loss of Leydig cells was independent of Bak and Bax activation. The death of these non-proliferating cells was triggered by 6 MP metabolism, requiring formation of both cytosolic reactive oxygen species and thiopurine nucleotide triphosphates. The thiopurine nucleotide triphosphates (with physiological amounts of dATP) uniquely activated the apoptosome. An ABC transporter (Abcc4/Mrp4) reduced the amount of thiopurines, thereby providing protection for Leydig cells. The studies reported here demonstrate that the apoptosome is uniquely activated by thiopurine nucleotides and suggest that 6 MP induced Leydig cell death is likely a cause of Leydig cell failure in some survivors of childhood cancer. PMID:26576726

  10. Ambulatory Activity of Children with Cerebral Palsy: Which Characteristics Are Important?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Wely, Leontien; Becher, Jules G.; Balemans, Astrid C. J.; Dallmeijer, Annet J.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To assess ambulatory activity of children with cerebral palsy (CP), aged 7 to 13 years, and identify associated characteristics. Method: Sixty-two children with spastic CP (39 males, 23 females; mean age 10y 1mo, SD 1y 8mo; age range 7-13y), classified as Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels I to III, participated.…

  11. Antiausterity activity of arctigenin enantiomers: importance of (2R,3R)-absolute configuration.

    PubMed

    Awale, Suresh; Kato, Mamoru; Dibwe, Dya Fita; Li, Feng; Miyoshi, Chika; Esumi, Hiroyasu; Kadota, Shigetoshi; Tezuka, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    From a MeOH extract of powdered roots of Wikstroemia indica, six dibenzyl-gamma-butyrolactone-type lignans with (2S,3S)-absolute configuration [(+)-arctigenin (1), (+)-matairesinol (2), (+)-trachelogenin (3), (+)-nortrachelogenin (4), (+)-hinokinin (5), and (+)-kusunokinin (6)] were isolated, whereas three dibenzyl-gamma-butyrolactone-type lignans with (2R,3R)-absolute configuration [(-)-arctigenin (1*), (-)-matairesinol (2*), (-)-trachelogenin (3*)] were isolated from Trachelospermum asiaticum. The in vitro preferential cytotoxic activity of the nine compounds was evaluated against human pancreatic PANC-1 cancer cells in nutrient-deprived medium (NDM), but none of the six lignans (1-6) with (2S,3S)-absolute configuration showed preferential cytotoxicity. On the other hand, three lignans (1*-3*) with (2R,3R)-absolute configuration exhibited preferential cytotoxicity in a concentration-dependent manner with PC50 values of 0.54, 6.82, and 5.85 microM, respectively. Furthermore, the effect of (-)- and (+)-arctigenin was evaluated against the activation of Akt, which is a key process in the tolerance to nutrition starvation. Interestingly, only (-)-arctigenin (1*) strongly suppressed the activation of Akt. These results indicate that the (2R,3R)-absolute configuration of (-)-enantiomers should be required for the preferential cytotoxicity through the inhibition of Akt activation.

  12. Adolescents Online: The Importance of Internet Activity Choices to Salient Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blais, Julie J.; Craig, Wendy M.; Pepler, Debra; Connolly, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether using the Internet for different activities affects the quality of close adolescent relationships (i.e., best friendships and romantic relationships). In a one-year longitudinal study of 884 adolescents (Mean age = 15, 46% male), we examined whether visiting chat rooms, using ICQ, using the…

  13. 75 FR 45527 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Military Training Activities and Research, Development...