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Sample records for active nutation damping

  1. Solar sail attitude control including active nutation damping in a fixed-momentum wheel satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azor, Ruth

    1992-01-01

    In geostationary cruise of a momentum biased satellite, it is necessary to stabilize the roll/yaw attitude due to disturbances, caused mainly by solar radiation pressure. This work presents a roll/yaw control which is obtained by the use of solar arrays and fixed flaps as actuators, with a horizon sensor for roll measurement. The design also includes an active nutation damping.

  2. Damping Rotor Nutation Oscillations in a Gyroscope with Magnetic Suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komarov, Valentine N.

    1996-01-01

    A possibility of an effective damping of rotor nutations by modulating the field of the moment transducers in synchronism with the nutation frequency is considered. The algorithms for forming the control moments are proposed and their application is discussed.

  3. Variable structure controller design for spacecraft nutation damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sira-Ramirez, Hebertt; Dwyer, Thomas A. W., III

    1987-01-01

    Variable structure systems theory is used to design an automatic controller for active nutation damping in momentum biased stabilized spacecraft. Robust feedback stabilization of roll and yaw angular dynamics is achieved with prescribed qualitative characteristics which are totally independent of the spacecraft defining parameters.

  4. Nutation damping in viscoelastic tumbling rotators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frouard, Julien; Efroimsky, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Presently, 138 asteroids show signs of being in non-principal spin states (Warner et al. 2009, updated September 2015). Such spin is often called `tumble' or `wobble'. The instantaneous rotation axis of a wobbling body performs nutation about the direction of the (conserved) angular-momentum vector. Incited by collisions and YORP, wobble is mitigated by internal dissipation due to the nutation-caused alternating stresses inside the asteroid.The knowledge of the timescale related to the damping of the nutation angle is complementary to the knowledge of the timescales associated with collisions and YORP. Previous evaluations of the nutation relaxation rate were based on an inherently inconsistent approach that may be called "Q-model". First, the elastic energy in a periodically deforming rotator was calculated in assumption of the deformation being elastic. Therefrom, the energy dissipation rate was determined by introducing an ad hoc quality factor Q. This ignored the fact that friction (and the ensuing existence of Q) is due to deviation from elasticity.We use the viscoelastic Maxwell model which naturally implies dissipation (as any other viscoelastic model would). In this approach, we compute the power and damping time for an oblate ellipsoid and a prism. Now, the viscosity assumes the role of the product μQ in the empirical Q-model, with μ being the rigidity. Contrarily to the Q-model, our model naturally gives a null dissipation for a shape tending to a sphere. We also explore when the constant part of the stress can be ignored in the derivation of the damping time. The neglect of prestressing turns out to be legitimate for the mean viscosity exceeding a certain threshold value.

  5. Residual nutational activity of the sunflower hypocotyl in simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, D. K.; Brown, A. H.

    1979-01-01

    The gravity dependence of circumnutational activity in the sunflower hypocotyl is investigated under conditions of simulated weightlessness. Seedling cultures of the sunflower Helianthus annuus were placed four days after planting in clinostats rotating at a rate of 1.0 rpm in the horizontal or somersaulting configurations, and plant movements around their growth axes were recorded in infrared light by a time-lapse closed-circuit video system. The amplitudes and mean cycle durations of the plant nutations in the horizontal and tumbling clinostats are observed to be 20% and 72%, and 32% and 74%, respectively, of the values observed in stationary plants; extrapolations to a state of zero g by the imposition of small centripetal forces on horizontally clinostated plants also indicate some nutational motion in the absence of gravity. It is concluded that the results are incompatible with the model of Israelsson and Johnsson (1967) of geotropic response with overshoot for sunflower circumnutation; however, results of the Spacelab 1 mission experiment are needed to unambiguously define the role of gravitation.

  6. RMS active damping augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Michael G.; Scott, Michael A.; Demeo, Martha E.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include: RMS active damping augmentation; potential space station assembly benefits to CSI; LaRC/JSC bridge program; control law design process; draper RMS simulator; MIMO acceleration control laws improve damping; potential load reduction benefit; DRS modified to model distributed accelerations; accelerometer location; Space Shuttle aft cockpit simulator; simulated shuttle video displays; SES test goals and objectives; and SES modifications to support RMS active damping augmentation.

  7. Nutation Damper System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sevilla, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    The Nutation Damper System is a three function mechanism designed for the Galileo Spacecraft, a spin stabilized deep-space probe to Jupiter. By damping the movement of a large deployable science boom acting as an outboard pendulum, the nutation damper rapidly stabilizes the spacecraft from dynamic irregularities. The system includes the boom deployment device and the ultra-low friction boom hinge. This paper describes the mechanism, the degree to which friction, stiction and lost motion have been eliminated, and the unique test methods that allow its performance to be measured.

  8. Nutation damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A nutation damper for use on a spinning body is disclosed. The damper is positioned parallel to the spin axis of the body and radially displaced therefrom. The damper is partially filled with a fluid and contains a porous media to impede the flow of the fluid induced by nutation.

  9. High precision active nutation control for a flexible momentum biased spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laskin, R. A.; Kopf, E. H.

    1984-01-01

    The controller design for the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) is presented. SDO is a momentum biased spacecraft with three flexible appendages. Its primary scientific instrument, the solar oscillations imager (SOI), is rigidly attached to the spacecraft bus and has arc-second pointing requirements. Meeting these requirements necessitates the use of an active nutation controller (ANC) which is here mechanized with a small reaction wheel oriented along a bus transverse axis. The ANC does its job by orchestrating the transfer of angular momentum out of the bus transverse axes and into the momentum wheel. A simulation study verifies that the controller provides quick, stable, and accurate response.

  10. ALMA high performance nutating subreflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasho, Victor L.; Radford, Simon J. E.; Kingsley, Jeffrey S.

    2003-02-01

    For the international ALMA project"s prototype antennas, we have developed a high performance, reactionless nutating subreflector (chopping secondary mirror). This single axis mechanism can switch the antenna"s optical axis by +/-1.5" within 10 ms or +/-5" within 20 ms and maintains pointing stability within the antenna"s 0.6" error budget. The light weight 75 cm diameter subreflector is made of carbon fiber composite to achieve a low moment of inertia, <0.25 kg m2. Its reflecting surface was formed in a compression mold. Carbon fiber is also used together with Invar in the supporting structure for thermal stability. Both the subreflector and the moving coil motors are mounted on flex pivots and the motor magnets counter rotate to absorb the nutation reaction force. Auxiliary motors provide active damping of external disturbances, such as wind gusts. Non contacting optical sensors measure the positions of the subreflector and the motor rocker. The principle mechanical resonance around 20 Hz is compensated with a digital PID servo loop that provides a closed loop bandwidth near 100 Hz. Shaped transitions are used to avoid overstressing mechanical links.

  11. Status report of RMS active damping augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Mike; Demeo, Martha E.

    1993-01-01

    A status report of Remote Manipulator System (RMS) active damping augmentation is presented. Topics covered include: active damping augmentation; benefits of RMS ADA; simulated payload definition; sensor and actuator definition; ADA control law design; Shuttle Engineering Simulator (SES) real-time simulation; and astronaut evaluation.

  12. Active damping and compensation of satellite appendages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charon, W.; Baier, H.

    1993-10-01

    Future space missions will employ large and, for lightweight reasons, extremely flexible structures with very high performance requirements such as high pointing accuracy and stability, and high shape precision. This requires actively damping out vibrations induced by spacecraft maneuvers. The damping of the solar array vibrations is a characteristic task for such active interface devices. The example of an active interface for damping the bending vibrations of large conventional solar arrays is addressed. Other typical active components are active tube sections for damping the vibrations of large booms, and interfaces between satellite and vibrating large masts carrying high precision reflectors or measurement systems. The mechanical properties of the interfaces and the technological requirements related to their development are determined. New 'smart' materials are prominent among current concerns. Piezoelectric polymer foils bonded to structural shell surfaces, embedded thin piezoceramics plates, and embedded fiber optics sensors, as well as the implementation of materials such as memory alloys, are here addressed.

  13. Nutations of sunflower seedlings on tilted clinostats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, A. H.; Chapman, D. K.

    1977-01-01

    The kinetics of hypocotyl nutations in Helianthus annuus L. were measured on plants which were rotated on clinostats with axes of rotation inclined at various angles, alpha, away from the vertical. The g-force component acting in the direction of the plant axis was taken as g cos alpha. The average period and average amplitude of nutation were constant for all such axially directed g-forces between 1.0 and 0.2 g (vertical to about 80 inclination). On the horizontal clinostat (90 inclination) nutation was neither initiated nor sustained. The g-force just sufficient fully to activate nutational oscillations should be sought for g-force parameter values ranging from 0 to 0.2.

  14. Clipped viscous damping with negative stiffness for semi-active cable damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, F.; Boston, C.

    2011-04-01

    This paper investigates numerically and experimentally clipped viscous damping with negative stiffness for semi-active cable damping. From simulations it is concluded that unclipped and clipped viscous damping with negative stiffness is equivalent to unclipped and clipped LQR. It is shown that optimized unclipped viscous damping with negative stiffness generates critical cable damping by an anti-node at the actuator position. The resulting curvature at the actuator position is larger than the curvature close to the anchors due to the disturbance forces which may lead to premature cable fatigue at the actuator position. Optimized clipped viscous damping with negative stiffness does not show this drawback, can be implemented using a semi-active damper and produces twice as much cable damping as optimal viscous damping. Close to the optimal tuning, it leads to approximately the same control force as optimal semi-active friction damping with negative stiffness, which explains the superior cable damping. The superior damping results from the negative stiffness that increases the damper motion. Clipped viscous damping with negative stiffness is validated on a strand cable with a magneto-rheological damper. The measured cable damping is twice that achieved by emulated viscous damping, which confirms the numerical results. A tuning rule for clipped viscous damping with negative stiffness of real cables with flexural rigidity is given.

  15. Active Damping Using Distributed Anisotropic Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Cabell, Randolph H.; Quinones, Juan D.; Wier, Nathan C.

    2010-01-01

    A helicopter structure experiences substantial high-frequency mechanical excitation from powertrain components such as gearboxes and drive shafts. The resulting structure-borne vibration excites the windows which then radiate sound into the passenger cabin. In many cases the radiated sound power can be reduced by adding damping. This can be accomplished using passive or active approaches. Passive treatments such as constrained layer damping tend to reduce window transparency. Therefore this paper focuses on an active approach utilizing compact decentralized control units distributed around the perimeter of the window. Each control unit consists of a triangularly shaped piezoelectric actuator, a miniature accelerometer, and analog electronics. Earlier work has shown that this type of system can increase damping up to approximately 1 kHz. However at higher frequencies the mismatch between the distributed actuator and the point sensor caused control spillover. This paper describes new anisotropic actuators that can be used to improve the bandwidth of the control system. The anisotropic actuators are composed of piezoelectric material sandwiched between interdigitated electrodes, which enables the application of the electric field in a preferred in-plane direction. When shaped correctly the anisotropic actuators outperform traditional isotropic actuators by reducing the mismatch between the distributed actuator and point sensor at high frequencies. Testing performed on a Plexiglas panel, representative of a helicopter window, shows that the control units can increase damping at low frequencies. However high frequency performance was still limited due to the flexible boundary conditions present on the test structure.

  16. Active Compliance And Damping In Telemanipulator Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Won S.; Bejczy, Antal K.; Hannaford, Blake

    1991-01-01

    Experimental telemanipulator system of force-reflecting-hand-controller type provides for active compliance and damping in remote, robotic manipulator hand. Distributed-computing and -control system for research in various combinations of force-reflecting and active-compliance control regimes. Shared compliance control implemented by low-pass-filtered force/torque feedback. Variable simulated springs and shock absorbers soften collisions and increase dexterity.

  17. Active damping of spacecraft structural appendage vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedor, Joseph V. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An active vibration damper system, for bending in two orthogonal directions and torsion, in each of three mutually perpendicular axes is located at the extremities of the flexible appendages of a space platform. The system components for each axis includes: an accelerometer, filtering and signal processing apparatus, and a DC motor-inertia wheel torquer. The motor torquer, when driven by a voltage proportional to the relative vibration tip velocity, produces a reaction torque for opposing and therefore damping a specific modal velocity of vibration. The relative tip velocity is obtained by integrating the difference between the signal output from the accelerometer located at the end of the appendage with the output of a usually carried accelerometer located on a relatively rigid body portion of the space platform. A selector switch, with sequential stepping logic or highest modal vibration energy logic, steps to another modal tip velocity channel and receives a signal voltage to damp another vibration mode. In this manner, several vibration modes can be damped with a single sensor/actuator pair. When a three axis damper is located on each of the major appendages of the platform, then all of the system vibration modes can be effectively damped.

  18. Effectiveness of large booms as nutation dampers for spin stabilized spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eke, F. O.

    1991-01-01

    The issue of using long slender booms as pendulous nutation damping devices on spinning aircraft is discussed. Motivation comes from experience with the Galileo Spacecraft, whose magnetometer boom also serves as a passive nutation damper for the spacecraft. Performance analysis of a spacecraft system equipped with such systems are relatively insensitive to changes in the damping constant of the device. However, the size and arrangement of such a damper raises important questions concerning spacecraft stability in general.

  19. Active Vibration Damping of Solar Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinicke, Gunar; Baier, Horst; Grillebeck, Anton; Scharfeld, Frank; Hunger, Joseph; Abou-El-Ela, A.; Lohberg, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    Current generations of large solar array panels are lightweight and flexible constructions to reduce net masses. They undergo strong vibrations during launch. The active vibration damping is one convenient option to reduce vibration responses and limit stresses in facesheets. In this study, two actuator concepts are used for vibration damping. A stack interface actuator replaces a panel hold down and is decoupled from bending moments and shear forces. Piezoelectric patch actuators are used as an alternative, where the number, position and size of actuators are mainly driven by controllability analyses. Linear Quadratic Gaussian control is used to attenuate vibrations of selected mode shapes with both actuators. Simulations as well as modal and acoustic tests show the feasibility of selected actuator concepts.

  20. Introduction to passive nutation dampers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzl, G. C.

    1971-01-01

    Coning motion can prevent photographic and TV cameras and other oriented spacecraft experiments from maintaining a steady scan, and it can introduce a ripple in the high-gain communication system. Nutation dampers are used to remove this type of spacecraft instability. The first nutation damper flown in a missile for the stabilization of the gyroscope consisted of a hollow ring that was partially filled with mercury, and the sloshing of the mercury dissipated the nutational energy. A similar mercury-ring damper was used in the Pioneer 1 lunar probe in 1958 and became the first nutation damper to be used in space. Since then many types of nutation dampers have been designed for spin-stabilized spacecraft ranging in size from small scientific satellites to large space stations.

  1. Vibration damping with active carbon fiber structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugebauer, Reimund; Kunze, Holger; Riedel, Mathias; Roscher, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents a mechatronic strategy for active reduction of vibrations on machine tool struts or car shafts. The active structure is built from a carbon fiber composite with embedded piezofiber actuators that are composed of piezopatches based on the Macro Fiber Composite (MFC) technology, licensed by NASA and produced by Smart Material GmbH in Dresden, Germany. The structure of these actuators allows separate or selectively combined bending and torsion, meaning that both bending and torsion vibrations can be actively absorbed. Initial simulation work was done with a finite element model (ANSYS). This paper describes how state space models are generated out of a structure based on the finite element model and how controller codes are integrated into finite element models for transient analysis and the model-based control design. Finally, it showcases initial experimental findings and provides an outlook for damping multi-mode resonances with a parallel combination of resonant controllers.

  2. The SAS-D nutation control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    A control law is developed for the SAS-D nutation control system. Nutation is removed in a sub-optimal manner with respect to fuel consumed, but attitude errors are minimized. The research performed consist of an investigation of nutation theory and nutation due to energy dissipation, nutation detection analysis, nutation control analysis, and error analysis. The resulting nutation control system uses an accelerometer or rate gyro to sense the nutation angle theta which varies sinusoidally at the nutation frequency omega. The sensed nutation angle is compared with a threshold theta sub tau. If the sensed nutation is greater, a thrust pulse of duration equal to the period of one spin cycle is initiated. Since the threshold theta sub tau is set equal to the amount of nutation that can be removed by one thrust pulse of duration equal to one spin cycle, the spacecraft nutation is reduced to near zero. Error analysis indicates that the nutation sensed, the threshold, the amount of nutation that can be removed during one thrust pulse, and the time duration of one thrust pulse are all sensitive to the spacecraft spin frequency imparted by the Delta rocket. Thus, the nutation control system was designed to be adaptive to the possible variations in imparted spin frequency.

  3. Active vibration damping using smart material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baras, John S.; Yan, Zhuang

    1994-01-01

    We consider the modeling and active damping of an elastic beam using distributed actuators and sensors. The piezoelectric ceramic material (PZT) is used to build the actuator. The sensor is made of the piezoelectric polymer polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF). These materials are glued on both sides of the beam. For the simple clamped beam, the closed loop controller has been shown to be able to extract energy from the beam. The shape of the actuator and its influence on the closed loop system performance are discussed. It is shown that it is possible to suppress the selected mode by choosing the appropriate actuator layout. It is also shown that by properly installing the sensor and determining the sensor shape we can further extract and manipulate the sensor signal for our control need.

  4. On observability of the free core nutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, L.

    2008-04-01

    Neither astronomical technique, including VLBI, can measure nutation directly. Esti- mates of parameters of the nutation model are produced by solving the LSQ problem of adjusting millions parameters using estimates of group delay. The choice of the mathematical model for nutation used in the estimation process of analysis of group delays affects our ability to interpret the results. Ignoring these subtleties and using parameters of the nutation model either in the form of time series, or in the form of empirical expansion as ”VLBI measurement of nutation”, opens a room for misinterpretation and mistakes. Detailed analysis of the problem reveals that the separation of forced nutations, atmospheric nutations, ocean nutations, and the retrograde free core nutation requires invoking some hypotheses, and beyond a specific level becomes uncertain. This sets a limit of our ability to make an inference about the free core nutation.

  5. A current-type PWM rectifier with active damping function

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Yukihiko; Kataoka, Teruo

    1996-05-01

    A new control method for current-type pulse-width modulation (PWM) rectifiers which can provide active damping function is presented. This damping function is effective only on the harmonic components of ac input current selectively. Thus steady-state waveform distortion and transient oscillation of the input current are reduced by the active damping effects. The active damping function can be realized by feedback control of an LC filter connected to the ac side of the rectifier, and it does not require any additional components in the main circuits, permitting a simple circuit configuration. The control system of the proposed PWM rectifier is analyzed by using a simple block diagram developed in the present paper. From the analytical results, the influence of the circuit parameters and control delay on the active damping effects and the stability of the operation are clarified to establish the design method. To confirm the effectiveness of the active damping function, some results of basic experiments are included. As an example of application of the active damping function, the proposed rectifier is applied to reduce the harmonic currents generated by conventional rectifiers operating in parallel with the proposed rectifier. Some experimental results in this application are also included.

  6. Active damping of modal vibrations by force apportioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallauer, W. L., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Force apportioning, a method of active structural damping based on that used in modal vibration testing of isolating modes by multiple shaker excitation, was analyzed and numerically simulated. A distribution of as few forces as possible on the structure is chosen so as to maximally affect selected vibration modes while minimally exciting all other modes. The accuracy of numerical simulations of active damping, active damping of higher-frequency modes, and studies of imperfection sensitivity are discussed. The computer programs developed are described and possible refinements of the research are examined.

  7. An Active Damping at Blade Resonances Using Piezoelectric Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Benjamin; Morrison, Carlos; Duffy, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is developing an active damping at blade resonances using piezoelectric structure to reduce excessive vibratory stresses that lead to high cycle fatigue (HCF) failures in aircraft engine turbomachinery. Conventional passive damping work was shown first on a nonrotating beam made by Ti-6A1-4V with a pair of identical piezoelectric patches, and then active feedback control law was derived in terms of inductor, resister, and capacitor to control resonant frequency only. Passive electronic circuit components and adaptive feature could be easily programmable into control algorithm. Experimental active damping was demonstrated on two test specimens achieving significant damping on tip displacement and patch location. Also a multimode control technique was shown to control several modes.

  8. Active versus passive damping in large flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, Gary L.; Mclaren, Mark D.

    1991-01-01

    Optimal passive and active damping control can be considered in the context of a general control/structure optimization problem. Using a mean square output response approach, it is shown that the weight sensitivity of the active and passive controllers can be used to determine an optimal mix of active and passive elements in a flexible structure.

  9. Active damping performance of the KAGRA seismic attenuation system prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yoshinori; Sekiguchi, Takanori; Takahashi, Ryutaro; Aso, Yoichi; Barton, Mark; Erasmo Peña Arellano, Fabián; Shoda, Ayaka; Akutsu, Tomotada; Miyakawa, Osamu; Kamiizumi, Masahiro; Ishizaki, Hideharu; Tatsumi, Daisuke; Hirata, Naoatsu; Hayama, Kazuhiro; Okutomi, Koki; Miyamoto, Takahiro; Ishizuka, Hideki; DeSalvo, Riccardo; Flaminio, Raffaele

    2016-05-01

    The Large-scale Cryogenic Gravitational wave Telescope (formerly LCGT now KAGRA) is presently under construction in Japan. This May we assembled a prototype of the seismic attenuation system (SAS) for the beam splitter and the signal recycling mirrors of KAGRA, which we call Type-B SAS, and evaluated its performance at NAOJ (Mitaka, Toyko). We investigated its frequency response, active damping performance, vibration isolation performance and long-term stability both in and out of vacuum. From the frequency response test and the active damping performance test, we confirmed that the SAS worked as we designed and that all mechanical resonances which could disturb lock acquisition and observation are damped within 1 minute, which is required for KAGRA, by the active controls.

  10. Low nutation-rate dampers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tossman, B. E.

    1971-01-01

    Mission requirements plus spacecraft weight and power constraints often reduce the excitation frequency of a nutation damper below 1 cpm. Since attitude stability is determined by damper performance, maximum effectiveness at low rates is demanded. Presented are design considerations that low-frequency dampers require, along with descriptions of two low-frequency systems: the Direct Measurement Explorer 1 and the Small Astronomy Satellite A (SAS-A).

  11. An a priori model for the reduction of nutation observations: KSV(1994.3) nutation series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, T. A.

    1995-01-01

    We discuss the formulation of a new nutation series to be used in the reduction of modern space geodetic data. The motivation for developing such a series is to develop a nutation series that has smaller short period errors than the IAU 1980 nutation series and to provide a series that can be used with techniques such as the Global Positioning System (GPS) that have sensitivity to nutations but can directly separate the effects of nutations from errors in the dynamical force models that effect the satellite orbits. A modern nutation series should allow the errors in the force models for GPS to be better understood. The series is constructed by convolving the Kinoshita and Souchay rigid Earth nutation series with an Earth response function whose parameters are partly based on geophysical models of the Earth and partly estimated from a long series (1979-1993) of very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) estimates of nutation angles. Secular rates of change of the nutation angles to represent corrections to the precession constant and a secular change of the obliquity of the ecliptic are included in the theory. Time dependent amplitudes of the Free Core Nutation (FCN) that is most likely excited by variations in atmospheric pressure are included when the geophysical parameters are estimated. The complex components of the prograde annual nutation are estimated simultaneously with the geophysical parameters because of the large contribution to the nutation from the S(sub 1) atmospheric tide. The weighted root mean square (WRMS) scatter of the nutation angle estimates about this new model are 0.32 mas and the largest correction to the series when the amplitudes of the ten largest nutations are estimated is 0.18 +/- 0.03 mas for the in phase component of the prograde 18. 6 year nutation.

  12. Six degree of freedom active vibration damping for space application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, Leonard S.

    1993-01-01

    Work performed during the period 1 Jan. - 31 Mar. 1993 on six degree of freedom active vibration damping for space application is presented. A performance and cost report is included. Topics covered include: actuator testing; mechanical amplifier design; and neural network control system development and experimental evaluation.

  13. Optimal semi-active damping of cables with bending stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boston, C.; Weber, F.; Guzzella, L.

    2011-05-01

    The problem of optimal semi-active damping of cables with bending stiffness is investigated with an evolutionary algorithm. The developed damping strategy is validated on a single strand cable with a linear motor attached close to the anchor position. The motor is operated in force feedback mode during free decay of cable vibrations, during which time the decay ratios of the cable modes are measured. It is shown from these experiments that the damping ratios predicted in simulation are close to those measured. The semi-active damping strategy found by the evolutionary algorithm is very similar in character to that for a cable without bending stiffness, being the superposition of an amplitude-dependent friction and negative stiffness element. However, due to the bending stiffness of the cable, the tuning of the above elements as a function of the relevant cable parameters is greatly altered, especially for damper positions close to a fixed end anchor, where the mode shape depends strongly on bending stiffness. It is furthermore demonstrated that a semi-active damper is able to dissipate significantly more energy for a cable with simply supported ends compared to fixed ends due to larger damper strokes and thereby increased energy dissipation in the device.

  14. Active vibration damping of the Space Shuttle remote manipulator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Michael A.; Gilbert, Michael G.; Demeo, Martha E.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of providing active damping augmentation of the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (RMS) following normal payload handling operations is investigated. The approach used in the analysis is described, and the results for both linear and nonlinear performance analysis of candidate laws are presented, demonstrating that significant improvement in the RMS dynamic response can be achieved through active control using measured RMS tip acceleration data for feedback.

  15. Satellite Dynamic Damping via Active Force Control Augmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varatharajoo, Renuganth

    2012-07-01

    An approach that incorporates the Active Force Control (AFC) technique into a conventional Proportional-Derivative (PD) controller is proposed for a satellite active dynamic damping towards a full attitude control. The AFC method has been established to facilitate a robust motion control of dynamical systems in the presence of disturbances, parametric uncertainties and changes that are commonly prevalent in the real-world environment. The usefulness of the method can be extended by introducing intelligent mechanisms to approximate the mass or inertia matrix of the dynamic system to trigger the compensation effect of the controller. AFC is a technique that relies on the appropriate estimation of the inertial or mass parameters of the dynamic system and the measurements of the acceleration and force signals induced by the system if practical implementation is ever considered. In AFC, it is shown that the system subjected to a number of disturbances remains stable and robust via the compensating action of the control strategy. We demonstrate that it is possible to design a spacecraft attitude feedback controller that will ensure the system dynamics set point remains unchanged even in the presence of the disturbances provided that the actual disturbances can be modeled effectively. In order to further facilitate this analysis, a combined energy and attitude control system (CEACS) is proposed as a model satellite attitude control actuator. All the governing equations are established and the proposed satellite attitude control architecture is made amenable to numerical treatments. The results show that the PD-AFC attitude damping performances are superiorly better than that of the solely PD type. It is also shown that the tunings of the AFC system gains are crucial to ensure a better attitude damping performance and this process is mandatory for AFC systems. Finally, the results demonstrate an important satellite dynamic damping enhancement capability using the AFC

  16. Vibration control of cylindrical shells using active constrained layer damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Manas C.; Chen, Tung-Huei; Baz, Amr M.

    1997-05-01

    The fundamentals of controlling the structural vibration of cylindrical shells treated with active constrained layer damping (ACLD) treatments are presented. The effectiveness of the ACLD treatments in enhancing the damping characteristics of thin cylindrical shells is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally. A finite element model (FEM) is developed to describe the dynamic interaction between the shells and the ACLD treatments. The FEM is used to predict the natural frequencies and the modal loss factors of shells which are partially treated with patches of the ACLD treatments. The predictions of the FEM are validated experimentally using stainless steel cylinders which are 20.32 cm in diameter, 30.4 cm in length and 0.05 cm in thickness. The cylinders are treated with ACLD patches of different configurations in order to target single or multi-modes of lobar vibrations. The ACLD patches used are made of DYAD 606 visco-elastic layer which is sandwiched between two layers of PVDF piezo-electric films. Vibration attenuations of 85% are obtained with maximum control voltage of 40 volts. Such attenuations are attributed to the effectiveness of the ACLD treatment in increasing the modal damping ratios by about a factor of four over those of conventional passive constrained layer damping (PCLD) treatments. The obtained results suggest the potential of the ACLD treatments in controlling the vibration of cylindrical shells which constitute the major building block of many critical structures such as cabins of aircrafts, hulls of submarines and bodies of rockets and missiles.

  17. Robustness of active modal damping of large flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Michael

    1987-01-01

    The method of active modal damping (AMD) is reviewed, and the pinhole/occulter facility (P/OF) is presented as a design example. This system is a large space system composed of a flexible beam, a gimbal-pointing system, and an optical alignment system mounted in the Shuttle cargo bay and excited by typical Shuttle disturbances. The AMD system performance is compared with that of a series-compensated control system.

  18. Damping SOFIA: passive and active damping for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maly, Joseph R.; Keas, Paul J.; Glaese, Roger M.

    2001-07-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy, SOFIA is being developed by NASA and the German space agency, Deutschen Zentrum fur Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), with an international contractor team. The 2.5-meter reflecting telescope of SOFIA will be the world's largest airborne telescope. Flying in an open cavity on a modified 747 aircraft, SOFIA will perform infrared astronomy while cruising at 41,000 feet and while being buffeted by a 550- mile-per-hour slipstream. A primary system requirement of SOFIA is tracking stability of 0.2 arc-seconds, and a 3-axis pointing control model has been used to evaluate the feasibility of achieving this kind of stability. The pointing control model shows that increased levels of damping in certain elastic modes of the telescope assembly will help achieve the tracking stability goal and also expand the bandwidth of the attitude controller. This paper describes the preliminary work that has been done to approximate the reduction in image motion yielded by various structure configurations that use reaction masses to attenuate the flexible motions of the telescope structure. Three approaches are considered: passive tuned-mass dampers, active-mass dampers, and attitude control with reaction-mass actuators. Expected performance improvements for each approach, and practical advantages and disadvantages associated with each are presented.

  19. VLBI Observations of the Free Core Nutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smylie, D. E.

    2012-12-01

    At core scale lengths with periods from a few hours to days, the Coriolis acceleration dominates the Lorentz force density and core modes can be considered as purely mechanical. One of the most interesting core modes is the spin-over mode, which reflects the ability of the outer core to rotate about an axis different from that of either the inner core or the shell. It has a nearly diurnal period. In the Earth frame of reference, this mode produces the nearly diurnal retrograde wobble. In the space frame of reference it is accompanied by the free core nutations. When the flattening of the boundaries of the fluid outer core and the figure-figure gravitational coupling are taken into account, as well as the deformability of the boundaries, both a retrograde free core nutation and a prograde free core nutation are found. The retrograde free core nutation was first predicted by Poincare (1910) for a completly fluid, incompressible core bounded by a rigid shell. In a variational calculation of wobble-nutation modes in realistic Earth models, Jiang (1993) found the classical retrograde free core nutation (RFCN) but discovered a prograde free core nutation (PFCN) as well. VLBI residuals in longitude and obliquity compared to the 1980 IAU nutation series, and their standard errors, were downloaded from the Goddard Space Flight Center website, for the period August 3, 1979 to March 6, 2003, giving 3343 points over a span of 8617 days. In an overlapping segment analysis, the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) for each segment was found for the corresponding series of unequally spaced nutation residuals by singular value decomposition (SVD), with the number of singular values eliminated determined by the satisfaction of Parseval's theorem. Both the RFCN and the PFCN resonances were found in the resulting power spectrum. The nutation resonances were found to be in free decay, the half-life of the PFCN at 2620 days and that of the RFCN at 2229 days, with Ekman boundary layer

  20. Sensitivity of actively damped structures to imperfections and modeling errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, Raphael T.; Kapania, Rakesh K.

    1989-01-01

    The sensitivity of actively damped response of structures with respect to errors in the structural modeling is studied. Two ways of representing errors are considered. The first approach assumes errors in the form of spatial variations (or imperfections) in the assumed mass and stiffness properties of the structures. The second approach assumes errors due to such factors as unknown joint stiffnesses, discretization errors, and nonlinearities. These errors are represented here as discrepancies between experimental and analytical mode shapes and frequencies. The actively damped system considered here is a direct-rate feedback regulator based on a number of colocated velocity sensors and force actuators. The response of the controlled structure is characterized by the eigenvalues of the closed-loop system. The effects of the modeling errors are thus presented as the sensitivity of the eigenvalues of the closed-loop system. Results are presented for two examples: (1) a three-span simply supported beam controlled by three sensors and actuators, and (2) a laboratory structure consisting of a cruciform beam supported by cables.

  1. Fedorov's attempt to solve the nutation problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatskiv, Ya. S.

    First of all a brief history of the investigation of nutation carried out before Fedorov's first studies of this problem is presented. Afterwards the main attention is paid to the Fedorov's determination of corrections to nutation coefficients from latitude observations and to the Fedorov's theory of nutation of a perfectly elastic Earth. Fedorov showed that elastic deformations do not virtually affect the motion of the axis of angular momentum in space, i.e. the nutation of this axis. At the same time they diminish the coefficients of the expression of forced nearly diurnal motion of the pole, the so-called Oppolzer terms. Therefore Fedorov compared the expression of these terms for a perfectly elastic Earth with observations and stated: - the Earth as a whole is not a perfectly elastic body: - the theory of nutation of the Earth consisting of an elastic mantle and a fluid core has not been developed to a degree such that it is possible to test this theory by observations.

  2. Effects of the motions of a platform-mounted payload on the nutational stability of a dual-spin spacecraft - A Galileo case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Man, G. K.; Eke, F. O.

    1984-01-01

    In the presence of spacecraft nutation, tracking of an inertially fixed target by the Galileo scan platform requires the use of two control loops to move the scan platform and the stator in such a way as to compensate for spacecraft motion. The effect of these control loops on spacecraft nutational stability is examined using an eigenvalue analysis approach as well as several computer analysis packages. It was found that the actions of these control loops tend to drive nutation to the point of neutralizing, and even overpowering the damping actions of the spacecraft nutation damper, for pointing directions close to the spacecraft's poles. Stable and unstable zones are mapped out for two sets of spacecraft mass properties, and contributions of rotor asymmetry and stator flexibility are also discussed.

  3. Active interlock for the NSLS-II damping wiggler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.; Willeke, F.

    2012-07-01

    The NSLS-II is a 3rd generation light source with ultra-low beam emittance that is currently under construction at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Because the power of the synchrotron radiation from the damping wiggler (DW) is about 64 kW, a slight mis-steer can result in severe damage to the vacuum chamber. To avoid such problems, an active interlock system is being considered. The system dumps the beam when it departs from the predefined safe window in the phase space. In this paper, we present simple geometric arguments from which we define the safe window on the basis of betatron amplitudes. This window can be applied to any DW around the ring. For the entrance of the wiggler, we obtained window of Δx=±8.4 mm, Δx'=±429 μrad and Δy=±2.1 mm, Δy'=±449 μrad.

  4. Improved Nutation Damper for a Spin-Stabilized Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Mark A.

    2004-01-01

    A document proposes an improved liquid- ring nutation damper for a spin-stabilized spacecraft. The improvement addresses the problem of accommodating thermal expansion of the damping liquid. Heretofore, the problem has been solved by either (1) filling the ring completely with liquid and accommodating expansion by attaching a bellows or (2) partially filling the ring and accepting the formation of bubbles. The disadvantage of (1) is that a bellows is expensive and may not be reliable; the disadvantage of (2) is that bubbles can cause fluid lockup and consequent loss of damping. In the improved damper, the ring would be nearly completely filled with liquid, and expansion would be accommodated, but not by a bellows. Instead, an escape tube would be attached to the ring. The escape tube would be positioned and oriented so that the artificial gravitation and the associated buoyant force generated by the spin of the spacecraft would cause the bubbles to migrate toward the tip of the tube. In addition, when the spacecraft was on the launch pad, the escape tube would be at the top of the ring, so that bubbles would rise into the tube.

  5. Variable stiffness and damping semi-active vibration control technology based on magnetorheological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shiyu; Deng, Huaxia; Zhang, Jin; Sun, ShuaiShuai; Li, Weihua; Wang, Lei

    2013-10-01

    Vibration is a source to induce uncertainty for the measurement. The traditional passive vibration control method has low efficiency and limited working conditions. The active vibration control method is not practical for its power demanding, complexity and instability. In this paper, a novel semi-active vibration control technology based on magnetorheological (MR) fluid is presented with dual variable stiffness and damping capability. Because of the rheological behavior depending on the magnetic field intensity, MR fluid is used in many damping semi-active vibration control systems. The paper proposed a structure to allow the both overall damping and stiffness variable. The equivalent damping and stiffness of the structure are analyzed and the influences of the parameters on the stiffness and damping changing are further discussed.

  6. Real-time RMS active damping augmentation: Heavy and very light payload evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demeo, Martha E.; Gilbert, Michael G.; Lepanto, Janet A.; Flueckiger, Karl W.; Bains, Elizabeth M.; Jensen, Mary C.

    1994-01-01

    Controls-Structures Integration Technology has been applied to the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (RMS) to improve on-orbit performance. The objective was to actively damp undesired oscillatory motions of the RMS following routine payload maneuvering and Shuttle attitude control thruster firings. Simulation of active damping was conducted in the real-time, man-in-the-loop Systems Engineering Simulator at NASA's Johnson Space Center. The simulator was used to obtain qualitative and quantitative data on active damping performance from astronaut operators. Using a simulated three-axis accelerometer mounted on the RMS, 'sensed' vibration motions were used to generate joint motor commands that reduced the unwanted oscillations. Active damping of the RMS with heavy and light attached payloads was demonstrated in this study. Five astronaut operators examined the performance of active damping following operator commanded RMS maneuvers and Shuttle thruster firings. Noticeable improvements in the damping response of the RMS with the heavy, Hubble Space Telescope payload and the very light, astronaut in Manipulator Foot Restraint payload were observed. The potential of active damping to aid in precisely maneuvering payloads was deemed significant.

  7. Design analysis for a nutating plate drive 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, S. H.; Townsend, D. P.

    1972-01-01

    A simplified design analysis was conducted on a nutating plate type drive system for a 2500 horsepower helicopter main rotor gear box. A drive system that split the output torque evenly between two nutating plates for the purpose of reducing the load on each nutating plate was analyzed. Needle bearings were used on the nutating plate pins. The results of the analysis indicate that the required load capacity of the pin bearings and the speed of the nutating plate bearings were beyond the state-of-the-art capacity of rolling-element bearings. The analysis further indicates that the nutating plate drive is less efficient, and results in a higher weight per horsepower than a conventional planetary helicopter transmission with similar design specifications.

  8. Precession, Nutation and Wobble of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehant, V.; Mathews, P. M.

    2015-04-01

    Covering both astronomical and geophysical perspectives, this book describes changes in the Earth's orientation, specifically precession and nutation, and how they are observed and computed in terms of tidal forcing and models of the Earth's interior. Following an introduction to key concepts and elementary geodetic theory, the book describes how precise measurements of the Earth's orientation are made using observations of extra-galactic radio-sources by Very Long Baseline Interferometry techniques. It demonstrates how models are used to accurately pinpoint the location and orientation of the Earth with reference to the stars and how to determine variations in its rotation speed. A theoretical framework is also presented that describes the role played by the structure and properties of the Earth's deep interior. Incorporating suggestions for future developments in nutation theory for the next generation models, this book is ideal for advanced-level students and researche! rs in solid Earth geophysics, planetary science and astronomy.

  9. Rabi nutations in a ferromagnetic film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capua, Amir; Rettner, Charles; Parkin, Stuart

    When electromagnetic radiation interacts with a two-level system, energy is transferred back and forth between the quantum system and the electromagnetic radiation at a rate defined by the Rabi frequency. This process takes place as long as coherence prevails, until steady state is reached. Rabi nutations have been observed in a variety of quantum systems (atomic vapors, semiconductors, superconducting qubits, etc.). Here, we observe Rabi nutations in an ultrathin ~10 Å perpendicularly magnetized CoFeB film. A hybrid ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) - time resolved magneto optical Kerr effect (TRMOKE) system is used for this observation. Namely, a strong optical pump pulse perturbs the precessing spin system after which a weak optical probe pulse is sent at different times to map its recovery until steady precessional motion is reached again. The responses at the different detunings of magnetic field away from resonance conditions readily indicate the occurrence of the Rabi nutations which are initiated by the pump arriving at t =0. Excellent agreement with the prediction given by the Rabi formula is found. The method we report presents a new approach to study dynamical phenomena in magnetic materials.

  10. Nutation of Helianthus Annuus in a microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    An experiment to gather evidence to decide between the Darwinian concept of endogenously motivated nutation and the more mechanistic concept of gravity dependent nutation is described. If nutation persists in weightlessness, parameters describing the motion will be measured by recording in time lapse mode the video images of a population of seedlings that were grown at 1-g, but which will be observed at virtual zero gravity. Later, the plant images will be displayed on a video monitor in a laboratory, photographed on 16 millimeter film, and analyzed frame by frame to determine the kinetics of nutation for each specimen tested.

  11. Human-in-the-loop evaluation of RMS Active Damping Augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demeo, Martha E.; Gilbert, Michael G.; Scott, Michael A.; Lepanto, Janet A.; Bains, Elizabeth M.; Jensen, Mary C.

    1993-01-01

    Active Damping Augmentation is the insertion of Controls-Structures Integration Technology to benefit the on-orbit performance of the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System. The goal is to reduce the vibration decay time of the Remote Manipulator System following normal payload maneuvers and operations. Simulation of Active Damping Augmentation was conducted in the realtime human-in-the-loop Systems Engineering Simulator at the NASA Johnson Space Center. The objective of this study was to obtain a qualitative measure of operational performance improvement from astronaut operators and to obtain supporting quantitative performance data. Sensing of vibratory motions was simulated using a three-axis accelerometer mounted at the end of the lower boom of the Remote Manipulator System. The sensed motions were used in a feedback control law to generate commands to the joint servo mechanisms which reduced the unwanted oscillations. Active damping of the Remote Manipulator System with an attached 3990 lb. payload was successfully demonstrated. Six astronaut operators examined the performance of an Active Damping Augmentation control law following single-joint and coordinated six-joint translational and rotational maneuvers. Active Damping Augmentation disturbance rejection of Orbiter thruster firings was also evaluated. Significant reductions in the dynamic response of the 3990 lb. payload were observed. Astronaut operators recommended investigation of Active Damping Augmentation benefits to heavier payloads where oscillations are a bigger problem (e.g. Space Station Freedom assembly operators).

  12. A semi-active magnetorheological fluid mechanism with variable stiffness and damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner-Petter, Christoph; Suryadi Tan, Aditya; Sattel, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    In this paper a semi-active fluid-mechanism is presented, which offers a variable stiffness and damping by utilizing two magnetorheological fluid valves and two springs. The study incorporates the attributes of variable damping and stiffness into one compact device. A model for the magnetical, rheological, fluidical and mechanical behaviour of the whole system is derived. An experimental setup of the proposed system and an appropriate test bench are built in order to study the variable mechanical impedance behaviour with the corresponding simulations. The results proof that the stiffness of the system can be varied among three different values, while its damping is continuously variable.

  13. An active feedback system to control synchrotron oscillations in the SLC Damping Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Corredoura, P.L.; Pellegrin, J.L.; Schwarz, H.D.; Sheppard, J.C.

    1989-03-01

    Initially the SLC Damping Rings accomplished Robinson instability damping by operating the RF accelerating cavities slightly detuned. In order to be able to run the cavities tuned and achieve damping for Robinson instability and synchrotron oscillations at injection an active feedback system has been developed. This paper describes the theoretical basis for the feedback system and the development of the hardware. Extensive measurements of the loop response including stored beam were performed. Overall performance of the system is also reported. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Semi-active damping strategy for beams system with pneumatically controlled granular structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajkowski, Jacek M.; Dyniewicz, Bartłomiej; Bajer, Czesław I.

    2016-03-01

    The paper deals with a control method for semi-active damping of a double beam system with a smart granular structure placed in a thin silicone envelope. The damping properties of the system are controlled pneumatically, by subjecting the granular material to underpressure at particular moments. A mathematical model of the layered beam with a granular damping structure is represented by the two degrees of freedom, modified Kelvin-Voigt model of two masses, a spring with controllable stiffness, and a viscous damper with a variable damping coefficient. The optimal control problem is posed, using the concept of switching of the parameters to increase the efficiency of suppressing the displacement's amplitude. The resulting control strategy was verified experimentally for free vibrations of a cantilever system. The research proved that the appropriate, periodic switching of the properties of the considered structure enables reducing the vibration more effectively than if the material is treated passively.

  15. Active damping of oscillations in a long compliant manipulator link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, C. P.; Evans, M. S.; Trudnowski, D. J.; Magee, D. P.

    1993-07-01

    A flexible manipulator test bed consisting of a fifteen foot long fixed-free compliant beam (representing a compliant manipulator link) with a Shilling Titan II dextrous manipulator mounted on its free end has been constructed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). A comprehensive dynamic model which includes flexible body effects has been developed at PNL using a commercially available multibody dynamics code. A linearized version of the model is used to develop control strategies which use inertial forces generated by movements of the dextrous manipulator to damp out induced oscillations in the beam. These control strategies are tested on the model and shown to be feasible, and then implemented in the flexible manipulator testbed. Results from the hardware experiments are analyzed and compared with the model results.

  16. Spectral damping scaling factors for shallow crustal earthquakes in active tectonic regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rezaeian, Sanaz; Bozorgnia, Yousef; Idriss, I.M.; Campbell, Kenneth; Abrahamson, Norman; Silva, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) for elastic response spectra, including the Next Generation Attenuation (NGA) models, are typically developed at a 5% viscous damping ratio. In reality, however, structural and non-structural systems can have damping ratios other than 5%, depending on various factors such as structural types, construction materials, level of ground motion excitations, among others. This report provides the findings of a comprehensive study to develop a new model for a Damping Scaling Factor (DSF) that can be used to adjust the 5% damped spectral ordinates predicted by a GMPE to spectral ordinates with damping ratios between 0.5 to 30%. Using the updated, 2011 version of the NGA database of ground motions recorded in worldwide shallow crustal earthquakes in active tectonic regions (i.e., the NGA-West2 database), dependencies of the DSF on variables including damping ratio, spectral period, moment magnitude, source-to-site distance, duration, and local site conditions are examined. The strong influence of duration is captured by inclusion of both magnitude and distance in the DSF model. Site conditions are found to have less significant influence on DSF and are not included in the model. The proposed model for DSF provides functional forms for the median value and the logarithmic standard deviation of DSF. This model is heteroscedastic, where the variance is a function of the damping ratio. Damping Scaling Factor models are developed for the “average” horizontal ground motion components, i.e., RotD50 and GMRotI50, as well as the vertical component of ground motion.

  17. ALMA nutator design and preliminary performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Cocher, Pierre; Ford, John; Koch, Patrick M.; Ni, Chih-Wen; Chen, Wei-Long; Chen, Ming-Tang; Raffin, Philippe; Ong, Ching-Long; Ho, Paul T. P.; Symmes, Arthur H.

    2012-09-01

    We report the past two years of collaboration between the different actors on the ALMA nutator. Building on previous developments, the nutator has seen changes in much of the design. A high-modulus carbon fiber structure has been added on the back of the mirror in order to transfer the voice coils forces with less deformation, thus reducing delay problems due to flexing. The controller is now an off-the-shelf National Instrument NI-cRIO, and the amplifier a class D servo drive from Advanced Motion Controls, with high peak power able to drive the coils at 300 Volts DC. The stow mechanism has been totally redesigned to improve on the repeatability and precision of the stow position, which is also the reference for the 26 bits Heidenhain encoders. This also improves on the accuracy of the stow position with wind loading. Finally, the software, written largely with National Instrument's LabView, has been developed. We will discuss these changes and the preliminary performance achieved to date.

  18. Active/Passive Control of Sound Radiation from Panels using Constrained Layer Damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, Gary P.; Cabell, Randolph H.

    2003-01-01

    A hybrid passive/active noise control system utilizing constrained layer damping and model predictive feedback control is presented. This system is used to control the sound radiation of panels due to broadband disturbances. To facilitate the hybrid system design, a methodology for placement of constrained layer damping which targets selected modes based on their relative radiated sound power is developed. The placement methodology is utilized to determine two constrained layer damping configurations for experimental evaluation of a hybrid system. The first configuration targets the (4,1) panel mode which is not controllable by the piezoelectric control actuator, and the (2,3) and (5,2) panel modes. The second configuration targets the (1,1) and (3,1) modes. The experimental results demonstrate the improved reduction of radiated sound power using the hybrid passive/active control system as compared to the active control system alone.

  19. Errors in the J3 Part of Nutation Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Torsten; Williams, James G.; Soffel, Michael

    1996-03-01

    This paper points out that the nutation terms of Zhu & Groten [AJ, 98, 1104 (1989)] due to the tidal potential of degree 3 are erroneous. Correct values are deduced here and they coincide very well with those given in Kinoshita & Souchay [Celest. Mech., 48, 187 (1990)]. These errors explain the discrepancies between the evaluation of the theories of Zhu & Groten (1989) and Kinoshita & Souchay (1990), which can reach values up to 165 μas. Also the two leading nutation terms due to the tidal potential of degree 4 are given. Finally, some of the computer programs (NUTC.F, KSV_1994.F) for evaluating the J3 nutation terms are also erroneous.

  20. Geophysical excitation of nutation and geomagnetic jerks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondrák, Jan; Ron, Cyril

    2014-05-01

    Recently Zinovy Malkin (2013) proposed that the observed changes of Free Core Nutation parameters (phase, amplitude) might be related to geomagnetic jerks (rapid changes of the secular variations of geomagnetic field). We tested this hypothesis and found that if the numerical integration of Brzezinski broad-band Liouville equations of atmospheric/oceanic excitations is re-initialized at the epochs of geomagnetic jerks, the agreement between the integrated and observed celestial pole offsets is improved significantly. This approach however tacitly assumes that the influence of geomagnetic jerks has a stepwise character, which is physically not acceptable. The present study continues in this effort by introducing a simple continuous excitation function (hypothetically due to geomagnetic jerks). The results of numerical integration of atmospheric/oceanic excitations plus this newly introduced excitation are then compared with the observed celestial pole offsets.

  1. Experimental investigation and CFD simulation of active damping mechanism for propellant slosh in spacecraft launch systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuva, Dhawal

    2011-07-01

    Motion of propellant in the liquid propellant tanks due to inertial forces transferred from actions like stage separation and trajectory correction of the launch vehicle is known as propellant slosh. If unchecked, propellant slosh can reach resonance and lead to complete loss of the spacecraft stability, it can change the trajectory of the vehicle or increase consumption of propellant from the calculated requirements, thereby causing starvation of the latter stages of the vehicle. Predicting the magnitude of such slosh events is not trivial. Several passive mechanisms with limited operating range are currently used to mitigate the effects of slosh. An active damping mechanism concept developed here can operate over a large range of slosh frequencies and is much more effective than passive damping devices. Spherical and cylindrical tanks modeled using the ANSYS CFX software package considers the free surface of liquid propellant exposed to atmospheric pressure. Hydrazine is a common liquid propellant and since it is toxic, it cannot be used in experiment. But properties of hydrazine are similar to the properties of water; therefore water is substituted as propellant for experimental study. For close comparison of the data, water is substituted as propellant in CFD simulation. The research is done in three phases. The first phase includes modeling free surface slosh using CFD and validation of the model by comparison to previous experimental results. The second phase includes developing an active damping mechanism and simulating the behavior using a CFD model. The third phase includes experimental development of damping mechanism and comparing the CFD simulation to the experimental results. This research provides an excellent tool for low cost analysis of damping mechanisms for propellant slosh as well as proves that the concept of an active damping mechanism developed here, functions as expected.

  2. Active Damping of the E-P Instability at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, R.J.; Assadi, S.; Byrd, J.M.; Deibele, C.E.; Henderson, S.D.; Lee, S.Y.; McCrady, R.C.; Pivi, M.F.T.; Plum, M.A.; Walbridge, S.B.; Zaugg, T.J.; /Los Alamos

    2008-03-17

    A prototype of an analog, transverse (vertical) feedback system for active damping of the two-stream (e-p) instability has been developed and successfully tested at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR). This system was able to improve the instability threshold by approximately 30% (as measured by the change in RF buncher voltage at instability threshold). The feedback system configuration, setup procedures, and optimization of performance are described. Results of several experimental tests of system performance are presented including observations of instability threshold improvement and grow-damp experiments, which yield estimates of instability growth and damping rates. A major effort was undertaken to identify and study several factors limiting system performance. Evidence obtained from these tests suggests that performance of the prototype was limited by higher instability growth rates arising from beam leakage into the gap at lower RF buncher voltage and the onset of instability in the horizontal plane, which had no feedback.

  3. Active damping of the e-p instability at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, R. J.; Assadi, S.; Byrd, J. M.; Deibele, C. E.; Henderson, S. D.; Lee, S. Y.; McCrady, R. C.; Pivi, M. F. T.; Plum, M. A.; Walbridge, S. B.; Zaugg, T. J.

    2007-12-15

    A prototype of an analog, transverse (vertical) feedback system for active damping of the two-stream (e-p) instability has been developed and successfully tested at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR). This system was able to improve the instability threshold by approximately 30% (as measured by the change in RF buncher voltage at instability threshold). The feedback system configuration, setup procedures, and optimization of performance are described. Results of several experimental tests of system performance are presented including observations of instability threshold improvement and grow-damp experiments, which yield estimates of instability growth and damping rates. A major effort was undertaken to identify and study several factors limiting system performance. Evidence obtained from these tests suggests that performance of the prototype was limited by higher instability growth rates arising from beam leakage into the gap at lower RF buncher voltage and the onset of instability in the horizontal plane, which had no feedback.

  4. Effects of Active Sting Damping on Common Research Model Data Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acheson, Michael J.; Balakrishna, S.

    2011-01-01

    Recent tests using the Common Research Model (CRM) at the Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF) and the Ames 11-foot Transonic Wind Tunnel (11' TWT) produced large sets of data that have been used to examine the effects of active damping on transonic tunnel aerodynamic data quality. In particular, large statistically significant sets of repeat data demonstrate that the active damping system had no apparent effect on drag, lift and pitching moment repeatability during warm testing conditions, while simultaneously enabling aerodynamic data to be obtained post stall. A small set of cryogenic (high Reynolds number) repeat data was obtained at the NTF and again showed a negligible effect on data repeatability. However, due to a degradation of control power in the active damping system cryogenically, the ability to obtain test data post-stall was not achieved during cryogenic testing. Additionally, comparisons of data repeatability between NTF and 11-ft TWT CRM data led to further (warm) testing at the NTF which demonstrated that for a modest increase in data sampling time, a 2-3 factor improvement in drag, and pitching moment repeatability was readily achieved not related with the active damping system.

  5. DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF AN FPGA-BASED ACTIVE FEEDBACK DAMPING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Zaipeng; Schulte, Mike; Deibele, Craig Edmond

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a high-intensity proton-based accelerator that produces neutron beams for neutronscattering research. As the most powerful pulsed neutron source in the world, the SNS accelerator has experienced an unprecedented beam instability that has a wide bandwidth (0 to 300MHz) and fast growth time (10 to100 s). In this paper, we propose and analyze several FPGA-based designs for an active feedback damping system. This signal processing system is the first FPGA-based design for active feedback damping of wideband instabilities in high intensity accelerators. It can effectively mitigate instabilities in highintensity protons beams, reduce radiation, and boost the accelerator s luminosity performance. Unlike existing systems, which are designed using analog components, our FPGA-based active feedback damping system offers programmability while maintaining high performance. To meet the system throughput and latency requirements, our proposed designs are guided by detailed analysis of resource and performance tradeoffs. These designs are mapped onto a reconfigurable platform that includes Xilinx Virtex-II Pro FPGAs and high-speed analog-to-digital and digital-toanalog converters. Our results show that our FPGA-based active feedback damping system can provide increased flexibility and improved signal processing performance that are not feasible with existing analog systems.

  6. Influence of electrolytes on growth, phototropism, nutation and surface potential in etiolated cucumber seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalding, E. P.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    A variety of electrolytes (10-30 mol m-3) increased the relative growth rate of etiolated cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. cv. Burpee's Pickler) hypocotyls by 20-50% relative to water-only controls. The nonelectrolyte mannitol inhibited growth by 10%. All salts tested were effective, regardless of chemical composition or valence. Measurements of cell-sap osmolality ruled out an osmotic mechanism for the growth stimulation by electrolytes. This, and the nonspecificity of the response, indicate that an electrical property of the solutions was responsible for their growth-stimulating activity. Measurements of surface electrical potential supported this reasoning. Treatment with electrolytes also enhanced nutation and altered the pattern of phototropic curvature development. A novel analytical method for quantitating these effects on growth was developed. The evidence indicates that electrolytes influence an electrophysiological parameter that is involved in the control of cell expansion and the coordination of growth underlying tropisms and nutations.

  7. Nutation and precession control of the High Energy Solar Physics (HESP) satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayaraman, C. P.; Robertson, B. P.

    1993-01-01

    The High Energy Solar Physics (HESP) spacecraft is an intermediate class satellite proposed by NASA to study solar high-energy phenomena during the next cycle of high solar activity in the 1998 to 2005 time frame. The HESP spacecraft is a spinning satellite which points to the sun with stringent pointing requirements. The natural dynamics of a spinning satellite includes an undesirable effect: nutation, which is due to the presence of disturbances and offsets of the spin axis from the angular momentum vector. The proposed Attitude Control System (ACS) attenuates nutation with reaction wheels. Precessing the spacecraft to track the sun in the north-south and east-west directions is accomplished with the use of torques from magnetic torquer bars. In this paper, the basic dynamics of a spinning spacecraft are derived, control algorithms to meet HESP science requirements are discussed and simulation results to demonstrate feasibility of the ACS concept are presented.

  8. Considerations concerning the non-rigid Earth nutation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehant, V.; Arias, F.; Bizouard, Ch.; Bretagnon, P.; Brzezinski, A.; Buffett, B.; Capitaine, N.; Defraigne, P.; de Viron, O.; Feissel, M.; Fliegel, H.; Forte, A.; Gambis, D.; Getino, J.; Gross, R.; Herring, T.; Kinoshita, H.; Klioner, S.; Mathews, P. M.; McCarthy, D.; Moisson, X.; Petrov, S.; Ponte, R. M.; Roosbeek, F.; Salstein, D.; Schuh, H.; Seidelmann, K.; Soffel, M.; Souchay, J.; Vondrak, J.; Wahr, J. M.; Wallace, P.; Weber, R.; Williams, J.; Yatskiv, Y.; Zharov, V.; Zhu, S. Y.

    This paper presents the reflections of the Working Group of which the tasks were to examine the non-rigid Earth nutation theory. To this aim, six different levels have been identified: Level 1 concerns the input model (giving profiles of the Earth's density and theological properties) for the calculation of the Earth's transfer function of Level 2; Level 2 concerns the integration inside the Earth in order to obtain the Earth's transfer function for the nutations at different frequencies; Level 3 concerns the rigid Earth nutations; Level 4 examines the convolution (products in the frequency domain) between the Earth's nutation transfer function obtained in Level 2, and the rigid Earth nutation (obtained in Level 3). This is for an Earth without ocean and atmosphere; Level 5 concerns the effects of the atmosphere and the oceans on the precession, obliquity rate, and nutations; Level 6 concerns the comparison with the VLBI observations, of the theoretical results obtained in Level 4, corrected for the effects obtained in Level 5. Each level is discussed at the state of the art of the developments.

  9. Effects of increased gravity force on nutations of sunflower hypocotyls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, A. H.; Chapman, D. K.

    1977-01-01

    A centrifuge was used to provide sustained acceleration in order to study the hypocotyl nutation of 6-day-old Helianthus annuus L. over a range of g-forces, up to 20 times normal g. At the upper end of this g-range, nutation was impeded and at times was erratic evidently because the weight of the cotyledons exceeded the supportive abilities of the hypocotyls. Over the range 1 to 9 g, the period of nutation was independent of the resultant force vector. Over the same g-range, the amplitude of nutation was nearly independent of the chronic g-force. If nutation in sunflower seedlings is an oscillation caused by a succession of geotropic responses which continue to overshoot the equilibrium position (plumb line), its amplitude might be expected to be more sensitive to changes in magnitude of the sustained g-force. In order to preserve the geotropic model, in which nutation is considered to be a sustained oscillation driven by geotropic reactions, it is necessary to assume that geotropic response must increase with increasing g most rapidly in the region of the g-parameter below the terrestrial value of 1 g.

  10. Interaction of light and gravitropism with nutation of hypocotyls of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orbovic, V.; Poff, K. L.

    1997-01-01

    Etiolated seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana nutated under conditions of physiological darkness while about ten percent of monitored individuals exhibited regular elliptical nutation, circumnutation. Pre-irradiation with red light prevented occurrence of circumnutation without having an effect on the average rate of the nutational movement. Phototropic response of seedlings to unilateral blue light appeared to be superimposed over nutation. Throughout gravitropism, some seedlings continued to exhibit nutation suggesting that these two processes are independently controlled. Based on these results, we suggest that nutation in Arabidopsis probably is not controlled by the mechanism predicted by the theory of gravitropic overshoots.

  11. Damping Control of Liquid Container by Swing-type Active Vibration Reducer on Mobile Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Masafumi; Taniguchi, Takao

    This paper proposes a damping control of sloshing in a cylindrical container with a swing-type active vibration reducer on a wheeled mobile robot (WMR). The WMR runs along a straight path on a horizontal plane. The container is mounted on the active vibration reducer. A laser displacement sensor is used to observe the liquid level in the container. The container can be tilted in the running direction by the active vibration reducer. A sloshing model is obtained from a spherical pendulum-type sloshing model, which approximately expresses (1, 1)-mode sloshing. The sloshing model is used to design a damping control system. The control system of the active vibration reducer is designed with an inverse model of sloshing and an optimal regulator with a Kalman filter. The WMR is driven by an acceleration pattern designed with an input shaping method. The usefulness of the proposed method is demonstrated through simulation and experimental results.

  12. Rotation of rigid Venus: a complete precession-nutation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottereau, L.; Souchay, J.

    2009-12-01

    Context: With the increasing knowledge of the terrestrial planets due to recent space probes it is possible to model their rotation with increasing accuracy. Despite that fact, an accurate determination of Venus precession and nutation is lacking Aims: Although Venus rotation has been studied in several aspects, a full and precise analytical model of its precession-nutation motion remains to be constructed. We propose to determine this motion with up-to-date physical parameters of the planet Methods: We adopt a theoritical framework already used for a precise precession-nutation model of the Earth, based on a Hamiltonian formulation, canonical equations and an accurate development of the perturbing function due to the Sun. Results: After integrating the disturbing function and applying the canonical equations, we can evaluate the precession constant dot{Psi} and the coefficients of nutation, both in longitude and in obliquity. We get dot{Psi} = 4474farcs35/Jcy ± 66.5 , corresponding to a precession period of 28 965.10±437 years. This result, based on recent estimations of the Venus moment of inertia is significantly different from previous estimations. The largest nutation coefficient in longitude with an argument 2 LS (where LS is the longitude of the Sun) has a 2''19 amplitude and a 112.35 d period. We show that the coefficients of nutation of Venus due to its triaxiality are of the same order of amplitude as these values due to its dynamical flattening, unlike of the Earth, for which they are negligible. Conclusions: We have constucted a complete theory of the rotation of a rigid body applied to Venus, with up-to-date determinations of its physical and rotational parameters. This allowed us to set up a new and better constrained value of the Venus precession constant and to calculate its nutation coefficients for the first time.

  13. (abstract) ARGOS: a System to Monitor Ulysses Nutation and Thruster Firings from Variations of the Spacecraft Radio Signal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McElrath, T. P.; Cangahuala, L. A.; Miller, K. J.; Stravert, L. R.; Garcia-Perez, Raul

    1995-01-01

    Ulysses is a spin-stabilized spacecraft that experienced significant nutation after its launch in October 1990. This was due to the Sun-spacecraft-Earth geometry, and a study of the phenomenon predicted that the nutation would again be a problem during 1994-95. The difficulty of obtaining nutation estimates in real time from the spacecraft telemetry forced the ESA/NASA Ulysses Team to explore alternative information sources. The work performed by the ESA Operations Team provided a model for a system that uses the radio signal strength measurements to monitor the spacecraft dynamics. These measurements (referred to as AGC) are provided once per second by the tracking stations of the DSN. The system was named ARGOS (Attitude Reckoning from Ground Observable Signals) after the ever-vigilant, hundred-eyed giant of Greek Mythology. The ARGOS design also included Doppler processing, because Doppler shifts indicate thruster firings commanded by the active nutation control carried out onboard the spacecraft. While there is some visibility into thruster activity from telemetry, careful processing of the high-sample-rate Doppler data provides an accurate means of detecting the presence and time of thruster firings. DSN Doppler measurements are available at a ten-per-second rate in the same tracking data block as the AGC data.

  14. Governance of the Nutation Line Contour in Nuclear-Magnetic Flowmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydov, V. V.; Dudkin, V. I.; Karseev, A. Yu.

    2015-06-01

    A new method of nutation line shaping under conditions of modulation of the permanent magnetic field В0 by an alternating magnetic field is considered. The dependence is investigated of the amplitude and width of the nutation line on the parameters of the modulation field and of the magnetic field in the region where the nutation coil is located.

  15. P03-based precession-nutation matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, P.; Capitaine, N.

    2006-10-01

    The IAU WG on precession and the ecliptic has recommended the adoption of the P03 models of Capitaine et al. (2003). We discuss methods for generating the rotation matrices that transform celestial to terrestrial coordinates, taking into account frame bias (B), P03 precession (P), P03-adjusted IAU 2000A nutation (N) and Earth rotation. The NPB portion can refer either to the equinox or the celestial intermediate origin (CIO), requiring either the Greenwich sidereal time (GST) or the Earth rotation angle (ERA) as the measure of Earth rotation. The equinox based NPB transformation can be formed using various sequences of rotations, while the CIO based transformation can be formed using series for the X, Y coordinates of the celestial intermediate pole (CIP) and for the CIO locator s; also, either matrix can be computing using series for the x, y, z components of the "rotation vector". Common to both methods is the CIP, which forms the bottom row of the transformation matrix. In the case of the CIO based transformation, the CIO is the top row of the NPB matrix, whereas in the equinox based case it enters via the GST formulation in the form of the equation of the origins (EO). The EO is the difference between ERA and GST and equivalently the distance between the CIO and equinox. The choice of method is dictated by considerations of internal consistency, flexibility and ease of use; the different ways agree at the level of a few microarcseconds over several centuries, and consume similar computing resources.

  16. Vibration Control of a Microactuator for Servo Application by Active Damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Toshiki

    2003-03-01

    When using a microactuator for servo applications that require high position accuracy and fast response, one of the typical issues is the microactuator’s large amplitude resonance. This resonance occurs because most microactuators use springs to support their moving masses, combined with little damping effects that are due mainly to the viscosity of the air. To solve this problem, we propose the use of a capacitive position sensing method, combined with a high aspect ratio, highly area-efficient, and high structural-height microactuator that can obtain a large capacitance change for a given stroke. This combination does not require a very complex or difficult implementation such as an on-chip preamplifier or a sophisticated filter. A microactuator was manufactured and combined with a relatively simple capacitive sensing circuit made of discrete components such as a spectrum analyzer and amplifier. Even with this relatively crude setup, we were able to obtain a high quality capacitive position signal. The controller was designed and the active damping control loop was successfully closed. The performance was measured by experiment, and demonstrated that the active damping was extremely effective in suppressing oscillations caused by external force disturbances, and in settling to the new position for a step input.

  17. A Multi-Mode Blade Damping Control using Shunted Piezoelectric Transducers with Active Feedback Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Benjamin; Morrison, Carlos; Min, James

    2009-01-01

    The Structural Dynamics and. Mechanics branch (RXS) is developing smart adaptive structures to improve fan blade damping at resonances using piezoelectric (PE) transducers. In this presentation, only one shunted PE transducer was used to demonstrate active control of multi-mode blade resonance damping on a titanium alloy (Ti-6A1-4V) flat plate model, regardless of bending, torsion, and 2-stripe modes. This work would have a significant impact on the conventional passive shunt damping world because the standard feedback control design tools can now be used to design and implement electric shunt for vibration control. In other words, the passive shunt circuit components using massive inductors and. resistors for multi-mode resonance control can be replaced with digital codes. Furthermore, this active approach with multi patches can simultaneously control several modes in the engine operating range. Dr. Benjamin Choi presented the analytical and experimental results from this work at the Propulsion-Safety and. Affordable Readiness (P-SAR) Conference in March, 2009.

  18. Spin nutation effects in molecular nanomagnet-superconductor tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Abouie, J; Abdollahipour, B; Rostami, A A

    2013-11-20

    We study the spin nutation effects of a molecular nanomagnet on the Josephson current through a superconductor|molecular nanomagnet|superconductor tunnel junction. We explicitly demonstrate that, due to the spin nutation of the molecular nanomagnet, two oscillatory terms emerge in the ac Josephson current in addition to the conventional ac Josephson current. Some resonances occur in the junction due to the interactions of the transported quasiparticles with the bias voltage and molecular nanomagnet spin dynamics. Their appearance indicates that the energy exchanged during these interactions is in the range of the superconducting energy gap. We also show that the spin nutation is able to convert the ac Josephson current to a dc current, which is interesting for applications. PMID:24129308

  19. Chandler wobble and free core nutation of single pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, A.

    2011-10-01

    PSR B1828-11 has long-term, highly periodic and correlated variations pulse shape and of the rate of slow-down with period variations approximately 1000, 500 and 250 days (Stairs et al., 2000). There are three potential explanations of pulses time-of-arrival from pulsar concerned with the interior of the neutron star, planetary bodies, free precession and nutation. We use the Hamiltonian canonical method of Getino et al. (1999) for the dynamically symmetrical pulsar consisting of the rigid crust, elliptical liquid outer core and solid inner core of PSR B1828-11. Correctly extending theory of differential rotation of a pulsar, we investigated dependence on Chandler wobble period, Inner Chandler Wobble, retrograde Free Core Nutation and prograde Free Inner Core Nutation from ellipticity of inner crystal core, outer liquid core and total pulsar.

  20. Multilayer Active Control For Structural Damping And Optical-Path Regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Zahidul H.; Spanos, John T.; Fanson, James L.

    1995-01-01

    Two active-control concepts incorporated into system for suppression of vibrations in truss structure and regulation of length of optical path on structure to nanometer level. Optical-path-length-control subsystem contains two feedback control loops to obtain active damping in wide amplitude-and-frequency range. Concept described in more detail in number of previous articles, including "Stabilizing Optical-Path Length on a Vibrating Structure" (NPO-19040), "Controllable Optical Delay Line for Stellar Interferometry" (NPO-18686), "Test Bed for Control of Optical-Path Lengths" (NPO-18487).

  1. Damping scaling factors for elastic response spectra for shallow crustal earthquakes in active tectonic regions: "average" horizontal component

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rezaeian, Sanaz; Bozorgnia, Yousef; Idriss, I.M.; Abrahamson, Norman; Campbell, Kenneth; Silva, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) for elastic response spectra are typically developed at a 5% viscous damping ratio. In reality, however, structural and nonstructural systems can have other damping ratios. This paper develops a new model for a damping scaling factor (DSF) that can be used to adjust the 5% damped spectral ordinates predicted by a GMPE for damping ratios between 0.5% to 30%. The model is developed based on empirical data from worldwide shallow crustal earthquakes in active tectonic regions. Dependencies of the DSF on potential predictor variables, such as the damping ratio, spectral period, ground motion duration, moment magnitude, source-to-site distance, and site conditions, are examined. The strong influence of duration is captured by the inclusion of both magnitude and distance in the DSF model. Site conditions show weak influence on the DSF. The proposed damping scaling model provides functional forms for the median and logarithmic standard deviation of DSF, and is developed for both RotD50 and GMRotI50 horizontal components. A follow-up paper develops a DSF model for vertical ground motion.

  2. Refinements on precession, nutation, and wobble of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehant, V. Folgueira M.; Puica, M.; Van Hoolst, T.

    2015-08-01

    Most of the essential elements of the theory of nutation of the nonrigid Earth have been presented in the IAU adopted model MHB2000 (Mathews et al., 2002) considering an ellipsoidal rotating Earth, with a solid inner core, a liquid outer core, and an ellipsoidal inelastic mantle, and with a magnetic field. However in the meantime, the observed nutation amplitudes have been redetermined with a better precision. A number of relatively small significant effects have to be taken into account before one can expect to have a theoretical framework that can yield numerical results matching the precession and nutation observations. The adopted model already accounts for the existence of a geomagnetic field passing through the mantle and the fluid core regions and beyond. The model MHB2000 considers an electromagnetic torque generated by this field when the core and the mantle are moving relative to each other, which can in turn affect some nutation amplitudes (both in phase and out-of-phase) to the extent of a few hundreds of microarcsecond (μas), playing thus a significant role. The paper revisits the last adopted model in order to incorporate potential additional coupling effects at the core-mantle boundary, that can be at an observable level, such as the existence of a non-hydrostatic core-mantle boundary topography, the viscosity of the liquid core, the existence of stratification in the core, the existence of boundary layers at both sides of the core-mantle boundary.

  3. Fluid logic control circuit operates nutator actuator motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Fluid logic control circuit operates a pneumatic nutator actuator motor. It has no moving parts and consists of connected fluid interaction devices. The operation of this circuit demonstrates the ability of fluid interaction devices to operate in a complex combination of series and parallel logic sequence.

  4. Self-sustained nutations of a free gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuravlev, V. F.

    1992-12-01

    A model is derived for simulating the generation of intense self-sustained oscillations with nutation frequencies in a free gyroscope. The cause of these oscillations is the loss of the stability of steady rotor revolutions due to the presence of nonconservative forces in its support. An example is considered, involving ball bearing supports.

  5. Semi-active damping of large space truss structures using friction joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaul, Lothar; Albrecht, Hans; Wirnitzer, Jan

    2002-11-01

    The low structural damping of large space structures and the stringent positioning requirements in missions demand effective vibration suppression. The semi-active approach at hand is based on friction damping due to interfacial slip in semi-active joints which can be controlled by varying the normal pressure in the contact area using a piezo-stack actuator. This paper focuses on the modeling, identification and model reduction of a large space structure with semi-active joints. For the purpose of model identification and model reduction, the nonlinear friction forces transmitted in the joints are considered as external forces acting on the linear tress structure. Experimental Modal Analysis results are used to update the FE model of the truss structure and the parameters of the nonlinear friction model are identified from measured responses of an isolated joint. The model of the linear subsystem is reduced by a combination of balanced reduction and matching moments method. The modal truncation is based on controllability and observability gramians. To improve the fidelity locations conventional connections are replaced by adaptive joints, each with a local feedback controller for the adaptation of the normal force. Simulation results of a 10-bay truss structure with semi-active joints show the potential of the present approach.

  6. Implementation of an active vibration damping system for the SOFIA telescope assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janzen, Paul C.; Keas, Paul J.

    2014-07-01

    The NASA/DLR Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) employs a 2.5-meter reflector telescope in a Boeing 747SP. The image stability goal for SOFIA is 0.2 arc-seconds. An active damping control system is being developed for SOFIA to reduce image jitter and degradation due to resonance of the telescope assembly. We describe the vibration control system design and implementation in hardware and software. The system's unique features enabling system testing, control system design, and online health monitoring will also be presented.

  7. Testing of an actively damped boring bar featuring structurally integrated PZT stack actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond, J.; Barney, P.

    1998-06-01

    This paper summarizes the results of cutting tests performed using an actively damped boring bar to minimize chatter in metal cutting. A commercially available 2 inch diameter boring bar was modified to incorporate PZT stack actuators for controlling tool bending vibrations encountered during metal removal. The extensional motion of the actuators induce bending moments in the host structure through a two-point preloaded mounting scheme. Cutting tests performed at various speeds and depths of cuts on a hardened steel workpiece illustrate the bar`s effectiveness toward eliminating chatter vibrations and improving workpiece surface finish.

  8. Active tower damping and pitch balancing - design, simulation and field test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duckwitz, Daniel; Shan, Martin

    2014-12-01

    The tower is one of the major components in wind turbines with a contribution to the cost of energy of 8 to 12% [1]. In this overview the load situation of the tower will be described in terms of sources of loads, load components and fatigue contribution. Then two load reduction control schemes are described along with simulation and field test results. Pitch Balancing is described as a method to reduce aerodynamic asymmetry and the resulting fatigue loads. Active Tower Damping is reducing the tower oscillations by applying appropiate pitch angle changes. A field test was conducted on an Areva M5000 wind turbine.

  9. Semi-active damping with negative stiffness for multi-mode cable vibration mitigation: approximate collocated control solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, F.; Distl, H.

    2015-11-01

    This paper derives an approximate collocated control solution for the mitigation of multi-mode cable vibration by semi-active damping with negative stiffness based on the control force characteristics of clipped linear quadratic regulator (LQR). The control parameters are derived from optimal modal viscous damping and corrected in order to guarantee that both the equivalent viscous damping coefficient and the equivalent stiffness coefficient of the semi-active cable damper force are equal to their desired counterparts. The collocated control solution with corrected control parameters is numerically validated by free decay tests of the first four cable modes and combinations of these modes. The results of the single-harmonic tests demonstrate that the novel approach yields 1.86 times more cable damping than optimal modal viscous damping and 1.87 to 2.33 times more damping compared to a passive oil damper whose viscous damper coefficient is optimally tuned to the targeted mode range of the first four modes. The improvement in case of the multi-harmonic vibration tests, i.e. when modes 1 and 3 and modes 2 and 4 are vibrating at the same time, is between 1.55 and 3.81. The results also show that these improvements are obtained almost independent of the cable anti-node amplitude. Thus, the proposed approximate real-time applicable collocated semi-active control solution which can be realized by magnetorheological dampers represents a promising tool for the efficient mitigation of stay cable vibrations.

  10. Semi-active control of helicopter vibration using controllable stiffness and damping devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anusonti-Inthra, Phuriwat

    Semi-active concepts for helicopter vibration reduction are developed and evaluated in this dissertation. Semi-active devices, controllable stiffness devices or controllable orifice dampers, are introduced; (i) in the blade root region (rotor-based concept) and (ii) between the rotor and the fuselage as semi-active isolators (in the non-rotating frame). Corresponding semi-active controllers for helicopter vibration reduction are also developed. The effectiveness of the rotor-based semi-active vibration reduction concept (using stiffness and damping variation) is demonstrated for a 4-bladed hingeless rotor helicopter in moderate- to high-speed forward flight. A sensitivity study shows that the stiffness variation of root element can reduce hub vibrations when proper amplitude and phase are used. Furthermore, the optimal semi-active control scheme can determine the combination of stiffness variations that produce significant vibration reduction in all components of vibratory hub loads simultaneously. It is demonstrated that desired cyclic variations in properties of the blade root region can be practically achieved using discrete controllable stiffness devices and controllable dampers, especially in the flap and lag directions. These discrete controllable devices can produce 35--50% reduction in a composite vibration index representing all components of vibratory hub loads. No detrimental increases are observed in the lower harmonics of blade loads and blade response (which contribute to the dynamic stresses) and controllable device internal loads, when the optimal stiffness and damping variations are introduced. The effectiveness of optimal stiffness and damping variations in reducing hub vibration is retained over a range of cruise speeds and for variations in fundamental rotor properties. The effectiveness of the semi-active isolator is demonstrated for a simplified single degree of freedom system representing the semi-active isolation system. The rotor

  11. Experimental Comparison of two Active Vibration Control Approaches: Velocity Feedback and Negative Capacitance Shunt Damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Benjamin; Schiller, Noah

    2013-01-01

    This paper outlines a direct, experimental comparison between two established active vibration control techniques. Active vibration control methods, many of which rely upon piezoelectric patches as actuators and/or sensors, have been widely studied, showing many advantages over passive techniques. However, few direct comparisons between different active vibration control methods have been made to determine the performance benefit of one method over another. For the comparison here, the first control method, velocity feedback, is implemented using four accelerometers that act as sensors along with an analog control circuit which drives a piezoelectric actuator. The second method, negative capacitance shunt damping, consists of a basic analog circuit which utilizes a single piezoelectric patch as both a sensor and actuator. Both of these control methods are implemented individually using the same piezoelectric actuator attached to a clamped Plexiglas window. To assess the performance of each control method, the spatially averaged velocity of the window is compared to an uncontrolled response.

  12. An active damping control of robot manipulators with oscillatory bases by singular perturbation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.; Huang, Z. Z.; Huang, P. H.

    2007-07-01

    This paper deals with active damping control problems of robot manipulators with oscillatory bases. A first investigation of two-time scale fuzzy logic controller with vibration stabilizer for such structures has been proposed, where the dynamics of a robotic system is strongly affected by disturbances due to the base oscillation. Under the assumption of two-time scale, its stability and design procedures are presented for a multiple link manipulator with multiple dimension oscillation. The fast-subsystem controller will damp out the vibration of the oscillatory bases using a PD control method. Hence, the slow-subsystem fuzzy logic controller dominates the trajectory tracking. It can be guaranteed the stability of the internal dynamics by adding a boundary-layer correction based on singular perturbations approach. Experimental results have shown that the proposed control model offers several implementation advantages such as reduced effect of overshoot and chattering, smaller steady state error, and a fast convergent rate. The results of this study can be feasible to various mechanical systems, such as mobile robot, gantry cranes, underwater robot, and other dynamic systems mounted on oscillatory bases.

  13. Active sensor/actuator assemblies for vibration damping, compensation, measurement, and testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryaboy, Vyacheslav M.; Kasturi, Prakash S.

    2010-04-01

    The vibration control module known as IQ damper had been developed as part of active vibration damping system for optical tables and other precision vibration isolated platforms. The present work describes steps to expand the application of these units to other tasks, namely, (1) dynamic testing of structures and (2) compensation of forced vibration in local areas. The sensor-actuator assembly, including signal conditioning circuits, is designed as a compact dynamically symmetric module with mechanical interface to an optical table. The test data show that the vibration control modules can be used to measure dynamic compliance characteristics of optical tables with precision comparable to that of dedicated vibration measurement systems. Stable concerted work of active vibration control modules compensating forced harmonic vibration is demonstrated experimentally.

  14. Spin nutation induced by atomic motion in a magnetic lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Y.; Shiraishi, Y.; Hatakeyama, A.

    2010-12-15

    An atom moving in a spatially periodic field experiences a temporally periodic perturbation and undergoes a resonance transition between atomic internal states when the transition frequency is equal to the atomic velocity divided by the field period. We demonstrated that spin nutation was induced by this resonant transition in a polarized rubidium (Rb) atomic beam passing through a magnetic lattice. The lattice was produced by current flowing through an array of parallel wires crossing the beam. This array structure, reminiscent of a multiwire chamber for particle detection, allowed the Rb beam to pass through the lattice at a variety of incident angles. The dephasing of spin nutation was reduced by varying the incident angle.

  15. Possible detection of the earth's free-core nutation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, D. S.; Carter, W. E.; Wahr, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    The 5.5 years of VLBI observations primarily collected under project IRIS are used to search for evidence of the free-core nutation (FCN). The observations are consistent with an irregular excitation process, and a model which assumes a step excitation in the FCN amplitude to about 2.0 milliseconds of arc in late 1985 fits the data well. Theoretical analysis appears to rule out the strong Mexican earthquake of September 19, 1985, as a cause of the excitation.

  16. The Global S_1 Tide in Earth's Nutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindelegger, Michael; Einšpigel, David; Salstein, David; Böhm, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    Diurnal S_1 tidal oscillations in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system induce small perturbations of Earth's prograde annual nutation, but matching geophysical model estimates of this Sun-synchronous rotation signal with the observed effect in geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) data has thus far been elusive. The present study assesses the problem from a geophysical model perspective, using four modern-day atmospheric assimilation systems and a consistently forced barotropic ocean model that dissipates its energy excess in the global abyssal ocean through a parameterized tidal conversion scheme. The use of contemporary meteorological data does, however, not guarantee accurate nutation estimates per se; two of the probed datasets produce atmosphere-ocean-driven S_1 terms that deviate by more than 30 μ as (microarcseconds) from the VLBI-observed harmonic of -16.2+i113.4 μ as. Partial deficiencies of these models in the diurnal band are also borne out by a validation of the air pressure tide against barometric in situ estimates as well as comparisons of simulated sea surface elevations with a global network of S_1 tide gauge determinations. Credence is lent to the global S_1 tide derived from the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) and the operational model of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). When averaged over a temporal range of 2004 to 2013, their nutation contributions are estimated to be -8.0+i106.0 μ as (MERRA) and -9.4+i121.8 μ as (ECMWF operational), thus being virtually equivalent with the VLBI estimate. This remarkably close agreement will likely aid forthcoming nutation theories in their unambiguous a priori account of Earth's prograde annual celestial motion.

  17. Next step in Earth interior modeling for nutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehant, V.; Folgueira, M.; Puica, M.; Koot, L.; Van Hoolst, T.; Trinh, A.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate reference systems are important for many geophysical applications and satellite observations. It is therefore necessary to know the Earth rotation and orientation with high precision. Interactions between the solid Earth and its fluid layers (liquid core, atmosphere, ocean) induce variations in the Earth's speed of rotation. In addition, because the Earth is not a perfect sphere, but rather an ellipsoid flattened at its poles, the combined gravitational forces acting upon it produce changes in the orientation of its spin axis. Precession describes the long-term trend in the orientation of the Earth, while nutation refers to shorter-term periodic variations. The nutations of the Earth are the prime focus of the present paper. Models are used to predict the real-time Earth rotation and orientation, based on past observations and theoretical considerations of geophysical processes. In particular, the coupling mechanisms at the internal boundaries have been shown to be important for rotation. We here address the coupling mechanisms at the core boundaries such as the topographic, electromagnetic and viscous couplings, and discuss improvements in their computation and observation. The study uses and compares numerical and semi-analytical approaches, with the objective of both improving the nutation model and the rotation, and better understanding the interior of the Earth.

  18. GIOTTO-Halley encounter - When was the large nutation generated?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paetzold, M.; Bird, M. K.; Volland, H.

    1991-04-01

    It is generally believed that a very large dust particle with mass greater than 100 mg hit the GIOTTO spacecraft 7.6 sec before encounter, induced the switchover from the primary X-band amplifier (TWT) the redundant unit, generated the observable post-encounter nutation of about 1 deg and was responsible for the 22 sec telemetry loss during the phase of closest approach to Comet Halley. Using the data of the GIOTTO Radio-Science Experiment (GRE), it is shown that the signal loss was caused by an off-pointing of the antenna dish. The drop in signal level, however, is not consistent with the spacecraft having a nutation of 1 deg at this time. It is concluded that the off-pointing of the antenna dish is most likely due to an error in the High Gain Antenna (HGA) Design Control System resulting from an electrical discharge at t(0) - 8 sec and that the large nutation was generated during the telemetry blackout by the impacts of several large dust particles in the interval from 2 sec before to 18 sec after encounter.

  19. Passive damping to enhance active positioning of a prototype lithography platen

    SciTech Connect

    Segalman, D.J.; Kipp, R.L.; Gregory, D.L.

    1994-12-31

    A viscoelastic tuned-mass damper was used to suppress specific structural modes of a prototype lithography platen. The platen is magnetically levitated and it is repositioned and held in position by a closed-loop feedback control system. Important capabilities of the platen control system are precise positioning and rapid repositioning, which tend to require high frequency bandwidth. The high bandwidth excites structural vibration modes which are disruptive to the control system. The present work was to develop and demonstrate a means to suppress these modes using passive vibration damping techniques. The motivation is to increase the robustness of the platen positioning and control system by reducing unwanted modal accelerations excited by high control system bandwidth. Activities performed and discussed in this paper include the analytical design of viscoelastic tuned-mass dampers and the demonstration/testing of their effectiveness on the platen while levitated and controlled.

  20. Active Damping of the E-P Instability at the LANL PSR

    SciTech Connect

    McCrady, R.; Macek, R.J.; Zaugg, T.; Assadi, S.; Deibele, C.; Henderson, S.; Plum, M.; Lee, S.V.; Walbridge, S.; Byrd, J.M.; Pivi, M.; /SLAC

    2007-11-14

    A prototype of an analog, transverse (vertical) feedback system for active damping of the two-stream (e-p) instability has been developed and successfully tested at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Proton Storage Ring (PSR). This system was able to improve the instability threshold by approximately 30% (as measured by the change in RF buncher voltage at instability threshold). Evidence obtained from these tests suggests that further improvement in performance is limited by beam leakage into the gap at lower RF buncher voltage and the onset of instability in the horizontal plane, which had no feedback. Here we describe the present system configuration, system optimization, results of several recent experimental tests, and results from studies of factors limiting its performance.

  1. Non-symmetrical semi-active vibration control based on synchronized switching damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Hongli; Qiu, Jinhao; Zhang, Jin; Nie, Hong; Cheng, Li

    2014-04-01

    An unsymmetrical switch circuit is designed for semi-active control method based on synchronized switching damping principle of piezoelectric actuators. A bypass capacitor and an additional switch are used to realize unsymmetrical bipolar voltage. The control logic of the switches is introduced in detail and the switched voltages, which directly influence the control performance, are derived as functions of the vibration amplitude and the outputs of the voltage sources. Simulations were carried out to verify the design circuit and the theoretical results of the switched voltage. The voltage ratio increases with increasing bypass capacitance, but its increasing rate decreases. The results show that large bypass capacitor is needed to realize a voltage ratio of 3, which is common in some piezoelectric actuator such as MFC.

  2. Photon damping in cosmic-ray acceleration in active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.

    1983-04-07

    The usual assumption of the acceleration of ultra high energy cosmic rays, greater than or equal to 10/sup 18/ eV in quasars, Seyfert galaxies and other active galactic nuclei is challenged on the basis of the photon interactions with the accelerated nucleons. This is similar to the effect of the black body radiation on particles > 10/sup 20/ eV for times of the age of the universe except that the photon spectrum is harder and the energy density greater by approx. = 10/sup 15/. Hence, a single traversal, radial or circumferential, of radiation whose energy density is no greater than the emitted flux will damp an ultra high energy. Hence, it is unlikely that any reasonable configuration of acceleration can void disastrous photon energy loss. A different site for ultra high energy cosmic ray acceleration must be found.

  3. NASA Common Research Model Test Envelope Extension With Active Sting Damping at NTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, Melissa B.; Balakrishna, S.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Common Research Model (CRM) high Reynolds number transonic wind tunnel testing program was established to generate an experimental database for applied Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) validation studies. During transonic wind tunnel tests, the CRM encounters large sting vibrations when the angle of attack approaches the second pitching moment break, which can sometimes become divergent. CRM transonic test data analysis suggests that sting divergent oscillations are related to negative net sting damping episodes associated with flow separation instability. The National Transonic Facility (NTF) has been addressing remedies to extend polar testing up to and beyond the second pitching moment break point of the test articles using an active piezoceramic damper system for both ambient and cryogenic temperatures. This paper reviews CRM test results to gain understanding of sting dynamics with a simple model describing the mechanics of a sting-model system and presents the performance of the damper under cryogenic conditions.

  4. Quadratic Damping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2012-01-01

    Quadratic friction involves a discontinuous damping term in equations of motion in order that the frictional force always opposes the direction of the motion. Perhaps for this reason this topic is usually omitted from beginning texts in differential equations and physics. However, quadratic damping is more realistic than viscous damping in many…

  5. Acoustic radiation from the submerged circular cylindrical shell treated with active constrained layer damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Li-Yun; Xiang, Yu; Lu, Jing; Jiang, Hong-Hua

    2015-12-01

    Based on the transfer matrix method of exploring the circular cylindrical shell treated with active constrained layer damping (i.e., ACLD), combined with the analytical solution of the Helmholtz equation for a point source, a multi-point multipole virtual source simulation method is for the first time proposed for solving the acoustic radiation problem of a submerged ACLD shell. This approach, wherein some virtual point sources are assumed to be evenly distributed on the axial line of the cylindrical shell, and the sound pressure could be written in the form of the sum of the wave functions series with the undetermined coefficients, is demonstrated to be accurate to achieve the radiation acoustic pressure of the pulsating and oscillating spheres respectively. Meanwhile, this approach is proved to be accurate to obtain the radiation acoustic pressure for a stiffened cylindrical shell. Then, the chosen number of the virtual distributed point sources and truncated number of the wave functions series are discussed to achieve the approximate radiation acoustic pressure of an ACLD cylindrical shell. Applying this method, different radiation acoustic pressures of a submerged ACLD cylindrical shell with different boundary conditions, different thickness values of viscoelastic and piezoelectric layer, different feedback gains for the piezoelectric layer and coverage of ACLD are discussed in detail. Results show that a thicker thickness and larger velocity gain for the piezoelectric layer and larger coverage of the ACLD layer can obtain a better damping effect for the whole structure in general. Whereas, laying a thicker viscoelastic layer is not always a better treatment to achieve a better acoustic characteristic. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11162001, 11502056, and 51105083), the Natural Science Foundation of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China (Grant No. 2012GXNSFAA053207), the Doctor Foundation of Guangxi

  6. An enhanced nonlinear damping approach accounting for system constraints in active mass dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venanzi, Ilaria; Ierimonti, Laura; Ubertini, Filippo

    2015-11-01

    Active mass dampers are a viable solution for mitigating wind-induced vibrations in high-rise buildings and improve occupants' comfort. Such devices suffer particularly when they reach force saturation of the actuators and maximum extension of their stroke, which may occur in case of severe loading conditions (e.g. wind gust and earthquake). Exceeding actuators' physical limits can impair the control performance of the system or even lead to devices damage, with consequent need for repair or substitution of part of the control system. Controllers for active mass dampers should account for their technological limits. Prior work of the authors was devoted to stroke issues and led to the definition of a nonlinear damping approach, very easy to implement in practice. It consisted of a modified skyhook algorithm complemented with a nonlinear braking force to reverse the direction of the mass before reaching the stroke limit. This paper presents an enhanced version of this approach, also accounting for force saturation of the actuator and keeping the simplicity of implementation. This is achieved by modulating the control force by a nonlinear smooth function depending on the ratio between actuator's force and saturation limit. Results of a numerical investigation show that the proposed approach provides similar results to the method of the State Dependent Riccati Equation, a well-established technique for designing optimal controllers for constrained systems, yet very difficult to apply in practice.

  7. Testing a satellite automatic nutation control system. [on synchronous meteorological satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrasiar, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    Testing of a particular nutation control system for the synchronous meteorological satellite (SMS) is described. The test method and principles are applicable to nutation angle control for other satellites with similar requirements. During its ascent to synchronous orbit, a spacecraft like the SMS spins about its minimum-moment-of-inertia axis. An uncontrolled spacecraft in this state is unstable because torques due to fuel motion increase the nutation angle. However, the SMS is equipped with an automatic nutation control (ANC) system which will keep the nutation angle close to zero. Because correct operation of this system is critical to mission success, it was tested on an air-bearing table. The ANC system was mounted on the three-axis air-bearing table which was scaled to the SMS and equipped with appropriate sensors and thrusters. The table was spun up in an altitude chamber and nutation induced so that table motion simulated spacecraft motion. The ANC system was used to reduce the nutation angle. This dynamic test of the ANC system met all its objectives and provided confidence that the ANC system will control the SMS nutation angle.

  8. Analysis of the dynamics of a nutating body. [numerical analysis of displacement, velocity, and acceleration of point on mechanical drives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    The equations for the displacement, velocity, and acceleration of a point in a nutating body are developed. These are used to derive equations for the inertial moment developed by a nutating body of arbitrary shape. Calculations made for a previously designed nutating plate transmission indicate that that device is severely speed limited because of the very high magnitude inertial moment.

  9. Testing a new Free Core Nutation empirical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belda, Santiago; Ferrándiz, José M.; Heinkelmann, Robert; Nilsson, Tobias; Schuh, Harald

    2016-03-01

    The Free Core Nutation (FCN) is a free mode of the Earth's rotation caused by the different material characteristics of the Earth's core and mantle. This causes the rotational axes of those layers to slightly diverge from each other, resulting in a wobble of the Earth's rotation axis comparable to nutations. In this paper we focus on estimating empirical FCN models using the observed nutations derived from the VLBI sessions between 1993 and 2013. Assuming a fixed value for the oscillation period, the time-variable amplitudes and phases are estimated by means of multiple sliding window analyses. The effects of using different a priori Earth Rotation Parameters (ERP) in the derivation of models are also addressed. The optimal choice of the fundamental parameters of the model, namely the window width and step-size of its shift, is searched by performing a thorough experimental analysis using real data. The former analyses lead to the derivation of a model with a temporal resolution higher than the one used in the models currently available, with a sliding window reduced to 400 days and a day-by-day shift. It is shown that this new model increases the accuracy of the modeling of the observed Earth's rotation. Besides, empirical models determined from USNO Finals as a priori ERP present a slightly lower Weighted Root Mean Square (WRMS) of residuals than IERS 08 C04 along the whole period of VLBI observations, according to our computations. The model is also validated through comparisons with other recognized models. The level of agreement among them is satisfactory. Let us remark that our estimates give rise to the lowest residuals and seem to reproduce the FCN signal in more detail.

  10. Proton decoupling and recoupling under double-nutation irradiation in solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Kazuyuki Wakisaka, Asato; Takegoshi, K.

    2014-12-14

    The effect of {sup 1}H decoupling in magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR is studied under radiofrequency irradiation causing simultaneous nutations around a pair of orthogonal axes. Double-nutation with an arbitrary pair of nutation frequencies is implemented through modulation of the amplitude, phase, and frequency of the transmitting pulses. Similarity and difference of double-nutation decoupling and two-pulse phase-modulation decoupling schemes [A. E. Bennett, C. M. Rienstra, M. Auger, K. V. Lakshmi, and R. G. Griffin, J. Chem. Phys. 103, 6951–6958 (1995) and I. Scholz, P. Hodgkinson, B. H. Meier, and M. Ernst, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 114510 (2009)] are discussed. The structure of recoupling bands caused by interference of the {sup 1}H spin nutation with sample spinning is studied by both experiments and numerical simulations.

  11. Proton decoupling and recoupling under double-nutation irradiation in solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Kazuyuki; Wakisaka, Asato; Takegoshi, K.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of 1H decoupling in magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR is studied under radiofrequency irradiation causing simultaneous nutations around a pair of orthogonal axes. Double-nutation with an arbitrary pair of nutation frequencies is implemented through modulation of the amplitude, phase, and frequency of the transmitting pulses. Similarity and difference of double-nutation decoupling and two-pulse phase-modulation decoupling schemes [A. E. Bennett, C. M. Rienstra, M. Auger, K. V. Lakshmi, and R. G. Griffin, J. Chem. Phys. 103, 6951-6958 (1995) and I. Scholz, P. Hodgkinson, B. H. Meier, and M. Ernst, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 114510 (2009)] are discussed. The structure of recoupling bands caused by interference of the 1H spin nutation with sample spinning is studied by both experiments and numerical simulations.

  12. Landau damping

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    Section 2.5.8 of the Handbook of Accelerator Physics and Engineering on Landau damping is rewritten. An solvable example is first given to demonstrate the interplay between Landau damping and decoherence. This example is an actual one when the beam oscillatory motion is driven by a wake force. The dispersion relation is derived and its implication on Landau damping is illustrated. The rest of the article touches on the Landau damping of transverse and longitudinal beam oscillations. The stability criteria are given for a bunched beam and the changes of the criteria when the beam is lengthened and becomes unbunched.

  13. Coulomb Damping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2012-01-01

    Viscous damping is commonly discussed in beginning differential equations and physics texts but dry friction or Coulomb friction is not despite dry friction being encountered in many physical applications. One reason for avoiding this topic is that the equations involve a jump discontinuity in the damping term. In this article, we adopt an energy…

  14. Thermal activation at moderate-to-high and high damping: finite barrier effects and force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mazo, J J; Fajardo, O Y; Zueco, D

    2013-03-14

    We study the thermal escape problem in the moderate-to-high and high damping regime of a system with a parabolic barrier. We present a formula that matches our numerical results accounting for finite barrier effects, and compare it with previous works. We also show results for the full damping range. We quantitatively study some aspects on the relation between mean first passage time and the definition of an escape rate. To finish, we apply our results and considerations in the framework of force spectroscopy problems. We study the differences on the predictions using the different theories and discuss the role of γF[over dot] as the relevant parameter at high damping. PMID:23514463

  15. Thermal activation at moderate-to-high and high damping: Finite barrier effects and force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazo, J. J.; Fajardo, O. Y.; Zueco, D.

    2013-03-01

    We study the thermal escape problem in the moderate-to-high and high damping regime of a system with a parabolic barrier. We present a formula that matches our numerical results accounting for finite barrier effects, and compare it with previous works. We also show results for the full damping range. We quantitatively study some aspects on the relation between mean first passage time and the definition of an escape rate. To finish, we apply our results and considerations in the framework of force spectroscopy problems. We study the differences on the predictions using the different theories and discuss the role of γ dot{F} as the relevant parameter at high damping.

  16. An optimal approach to active damping of nonlinear vibrations in composite plates using piezoelectric patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saviz, M. R.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper a nonlinear approach to studying the vibration characteristic of laminated composite plate with surface-bonded piezoelectric layer/patch is formulated, based on the Green Lagrange type of strain-displacements relations, by incorporating higher-order terms arising from nonlinear relations of kinematics into mathematical formulations. The equations of motion are obtained through the energy method, based on Lagrange equations and by using higher-order shear deformation theories with von Karman-type nonlinearities, so that transverse shear strains vanish at the top and bottom surfaces of the plate. An isoparametric finite element model is provided to model the nonlinear dynamics of the smart plate with piezoelectric layer/ patch. Different boundary conditions are investigated. Optimal locations of piezoelectric patches are found using a genetic algorithm to maximize spatial controllability/observability and considering the effect of residual modes to reduce spillover effect. Active attenuation of vibration of laminated composite plate is achieved through an optimal control law with inequality constraint, which is related to the maximum and minimum values of allowable voltage in the piezoelectric elements. To keep the voltages of actuator pairs in an allowable limit, the Pontryagin’s minimum principle is implemented in a system with multi-inequality constraint of control inputs. The results are compared with similar ones, proving the accuracy of the model especially for the structures undergoing large deformations. The convergence is studied and nonlinear frequencies are obtained for different thickness ratios. The structural coupling between plate and piezoelectric actuators is analyzed. Some examples with new features are presented, indicating that the piezo-patches significantly improve the damping characteristics of the plate for suppressing the geometrically nonlinear transient vibrations.

  17. An updated set of nutations derived from the reanalysis of 3.5 decades VLBI observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ping; Koot, Laurence; Rivoldini, Attilio; Dehant, Veronique

    2016-04-01

    The global VLBI observation started in the 1979. After that the qualities of the measurements are continuously improving by taking into account various instrumental and environmental effects. The MHB2000 models was introduced in 2002 (Mathews, et.al. 2002, [1]) and it has a good agreement (5 μas) on the short period nutation series (<400 days) with the values derived from 2 decades (1979-2000) VLBI data while a higher uncertainties up to 56 μas for those longer periods (>400 days) nutation series (Herring et.al. 2002). In MHB2000, the forcing frequencies of the nutation series are solved by least-squares fitting to the VLBI data in frequency domain. Koot et al. (2008), have processed another similar set of nutation series by inversing the time series of VLBI data (1984-2005) using a Bayesian approach. In the present work, we will repeat both approaches using the up-to-date 3.5 decades VLBI observations (1980-2014) meanwhile paying more attention on the results of longer period (>400 days). Finally some features of Earth's interior structure will be discussed based on the determined nutation series. [1] Mathews, P.M., Herring, T.A. & Buffett, B.A., 2002. Modeling of nutation and precession: new nutation series for nonrigid Earth and insights into the Earth's interior, J. Geophys. Res., 107, 2068, doi: 10.1029/2001JB000390. [2] Herring, T. A., P. M. Mathews, and B. A. Buffett, Modeling of nutation and precession: Very long baseline interferometry results, J. Geophys. Res., 107, B4, 2069, doi: 10.1029/2001JB000165, 2002 [3] Koot, L., Rivoldini, A., de Viron, O. & Dehant, V., 2008. Estimation of Earth interior parameters from a Bayesian inversion of very long baseline interferometry nutation time series, J. Geophys. Res., 113, 8414, doi: 10.1029/2007JB005409.

  18. Errors in the J(sub 3) Part of Nutation Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Torsten; Williams, James G.; Soffel, Michael

    1996-01-01

    This paper points out that the nutation terms of Zhu & Groten due to the tidal potential of degree 3 are erroneous. Correct values are deduced here and they coincide very well with those given in Kinoshita & Souchay. These errors explain the discrepancies between the evaluation of the theories of Zhu & Groten and Kinoshita & Souchay, which can reach values up to 165 micro arc second. Also the two leading nutation terms due to the tidal potential of degree 4 are given. Finally, some of the computer programs (NUTC.F, KSV_1994.F) for evaluating the,13 nutation terms are also erroneous.

  19. Precession-nutation procedures consistent with IAU 2006 resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, P. T.; Capitaine, N.

    2006-12-01

    Context: .The 2006 IAU General Assembly has adopted the P03 model of Capitaine et al. (2003a) recommended by the WG on precession and the ecliptic (Hilton et al. 2006) to replace the IAU 2000 model, which comprised the Lieske et al. (1977) model with adjusted rates. Practical implementations of this new "IAU 2006" model are therefore required, involving choices of procedures and algorithms. Aims: .The purpose of this paper is to recommend IAU 2006 based precession-nutation computing procedures, suitable for different classes of application and achieving high standards of consistency. Methods: .We discuss IAU 2006 based procedures and algorithms for generating the rotation matrices that transform celestial to terrestrial coordinates, taking into account frame bias (B), P03 precession (P), P03-adjusted IAU 2000A nutation (N) and Earth rotation. The NPB portion can refer either to the equinox or to the celestial intermediate origin (CIO), requiring either the Greenwich sidereal time (GST) or the Earth rotation angle (ERA) as the measure of Earth rotation. Where GST is used, it is derived from ERA and the equation of the origins (EO) rather than through an explicit formula as in the past, and the EO itself is derived from the CIO locator. Results: .We provide precession-nutation procedures for two different classes of full-accuracy application, namely (i) the construction of algorithm collections such as the Standards Of Fundamental Astronomy (SOFA) library and (ii) IERS Conventions, and in addition some concise procedures for applications where the highest accuracy is not a requirement. The appendix contains a fully worked numerical example, to aid implementors and to illustrate the consistency of the two full-accuracy procedures which, for the test date, agree to better than 1 μas. Conclusions: .The paper recommends, for case (i), procedures based on angles to represent the PB and N components and, for case (ii), procedures based on series for the CIP X,Y. The two

  20. Numerical solution for a spinning, nutating, fluid-filled cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughn, H.R.; Oberkampf, W.L.; Wolfe, W.P.

    1983-12-01

    The incompressible, three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically for a fluid filled cylindrical cannister that is spinning and nutating. The motion of the cannister is characteristic of that experienced by spin stabilized artillery projectiles. Equations for the internal fluid motion are derived in a noninertial, aeroballistic coordinate system. Steady state numerical solutions are obtained by an iterative finite difference procedure. Flow fields and liquid induced moments have been calculated for viscosities in the range of 0.9 x 10/sup 4/ to 1 x 10/sup 9/ centistokes. The calculated moments agree favorably with experimental measurements. These results have direct application to analyzing the flight stability of spinning flight vehicles having highly viscous liquid payloads.

  1. Semi-active vibration control based on unsymmetrical synchronized switch damping: Analysis and experimental validation of control performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Hongli; Qiu, Jinhao; Cheng, Li; Nie, Hong

    2016-05-01

    In semi-active synchronized switch damping (SSD) approaches for structural vibration control, the damping effect is achieved by properly switching the voltage on the piezoelectric actuators. Unsymmetrical SSD switch circuit has been designed in the previous paper to increase the effective voltage range on the PZT actuator for improvement of the control performance. In this study, analysis and experimental validation of control performance of a synchronized switch damping system based on the unsymmetrical switch circuit are carried out. First the model of an unsymmetrical SSD system is presented and the working principle is introduced. The general expression of the switched voltage on the piezoelectric actuator is derived. Based on its periodicity in steady-state control, the harmonic components of the actuator voltage are derived using Fourier series expansion. Next, the displacement response of the system is derived under combined actions of the excitation and switched voltage. Finally, a setup of a flexible beam with unsymmetrical switch circuit is used to demonstrate the control performance under different voltage sources and to verify the theoretical results. The results show that the control performance mainly depends on the voltage range on the PZT. A higher effective voltage range can be generated in unsymmetrical SSDV than in symmetrical SSDV and better control performance can be achieved at the same negative actuator voltage. The unsymmetrical SSDV makes better utilization of the actuator capability.

  2. Effects of increased G-force on the nutations of sunflower seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, A. H.; Chapman, D. K.; Dahl, A. O.

    1975-01-01

    A centrifuge was used to provide chronic acceleration in order to study the nutation of six-day old sunflower hypocotyls at 1 to 20 times normal gravity (g). At the upper end of the g-range nutational movement was impeded and at times erratic evidently because the weight of the cotyledons exceeded the supportive abilities of the hypocotyls. Over the range from 1 to 9 g the period of nutation was independent of the resultant g-force. That finding is interpreted as evidence that the geotropic response time -- i.e., the time needed for growth hormone transport from the region of g-sensing to the region of bending response --was not influenced significantly by substantial increments of the g-level, since geotropic response time is related to the period of nutation.

  3. Integration of Thermal Energy Harvesting in Semi-Active Piezoelectric Shunt-Damping Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubieniecki, Michał; Uhl, Tadeusz

    2015-01-01

    The opportunities to energize a broad range of devices by use of energy available almost anywhere and in many forms are almost unlimited. A major advantage of energy harvesting is the manufacture of small autonomous electronic devices with no need for power supply and maintenance. Shunt damping circuits, although unfavorably affected by the size and mass of bulky coil inductors, started to base on synthetic inductors losing their passivity. In this paper we report a study of the feasibility of powering shunt damping circuits by use of thermal energy otherwise irrevocably lost from a bearing. The heat generated in the bearing is converted thermoelectrically into electric energy which is then used to power synthetic inductance circuitry. We show that the power demand of such circuit can be satisfied by use of a thermoelectric generator paired with a moderately loaded bearing.

  4. DAMPs-activated neutrophil extracellular trap exacerbates sterile inflammatory liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hai; Tohme, Samer; Al-Khafaji, Ahmed B; Tai, Sheng; Loughran, Patricia; Chen, Li; Wang, Shu; Kim, Jiyun; Billiar, Timothy; Wang, Yanming; Tsung, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Innate immunity plays a crucial role in the response to sterile inflammation such as liver ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. The initiation of liver I/R injury results in the release of damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), which trigger innate immune and inflammatory cascade via pattern recognition receptors. Neutrophils are recruited to the liver after I/R and contribute to the organ damage, innate immune and inflammatory responses. Formation of neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) has been recently found in response to various stimuli. However, the role of NETs during liver I/R injury remains unknown. We show that NETs form in the sinusoids of ischemic liver lobes in vivo. This was associated with increased NET markers, serum level of myeloperoxidase (MPO)-DNA complexes and tissue level of citrullinated-histone H3 compared to control mice. Treatment with peptidyl-arginine-deiminase (PAD) 4 inhibitor or DNase I significantly protected hepatocytes and reduced inflammation after liver I/R as evidenced by inhibition of NET formation, indicating the pathophysiological role of NETs in liver I/R injury. In vitro, NETs increase hepatocyte death and induce Kupffer cells to release proinflammatory cytokines. DAMPs, such as HMGB1 and histones, released by injured hepatocytes stimulate NET formation through Toll-like receptor (TLR4)- and TLR9-MyD88 signaling pathways. After neutrophil depletion in mice, the adoptive transfer of TLR4 knockout (KO) or TLR9 KO neutrophils confers significant protection from liver I/R injury with significant decrease in NET formation. In addition, we found inhibition of NET formation by PAD4 inhibitor or DNase I reduces HMGB1 and histone-mediated liver I/R injury. Conclusion DAMPs released during liver I/R promotes NET formation through TLRs signaling pathway. Development of NETs subsequently exacerbates organ damage and initiates inflammatory responses during liver I/R. PMID:25855125

  5. Attenuation of empennage buffet response through active control of damping using piezoelectric material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Miller, Jonathan M.; Doggett, Robert V., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Dynamic response and damping data obtained from buffet studies conducted in a low-speed wind tunnel by using a simple, rigid model attached to spring supports are presented. The two parallel leaf spring supports provided a means for the model to respond in a vertical translation mode, thus simulating response in an elastic first bending mode. Wake-induced buffeting flow was created by placing an airfoil upstream of the model of that the wake of the airfoil impinged on the model. Model response was sensed by a strain gage mounted on one of the springs. The output signal from the strain gage was fed back through a control law implemented on a desktop computer. The processed signals were used to 'actuate' a piezoelectric bending actuator bonded to the other spring in such a way as to add damping as the model responded. The results of this 'proof-of-concept' study show that the piezoelectric actuator was effective in attenuating the wake-induced buffet response over the range of parameters investigated.

  6. Experimental validation and testing of components for active damping control for micromachined mechanical vibration isolation filters using electrostatic actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Robert; Flowers, George; Sanders, Nicole; Horvath, Roland; Johnson, Wayne; Kranz, Michael; Whitley, Michael

    2006-03-01

    Missiles, rockets and certain types of industrial machinery are exposed extreme vibration environments, with high frequency/amplitude mechanical vibrations which may be detrimental to components that are sensitive to these high frequency mechanical vibrations, such as MEMS gyroscopes and resonators, oscillators and some micro optics. Exposure to high frequency mechanical vibrations can lead to a variety of problems, from reduced sensitivity and an increased noise floor to the outright mechanical failure of the device. One approach to mitigate such effects is to package the sensitive device on a micromachined vibration isolator tuned to the frequency range of concern. In this regard, passive micromachined silicon lowpass filter structures (spring-mass-damper) have been developed and demonstrated. However, low damping (especially if operated in near-vacuum environments) and a lack of tunability after fabrication has limited the effectiveness and general applicability of such systems. Through the integration of a electrostatic actuator, a relative velocity sensor and the passive filter structure, an active micromachined mechanical lowpass vibration isolation filter can be realized where the damping and resonant frequency can be tuned. This paper presents the development and validation of a key component of the micromachined active filter, a sensor for measuring the relative velocity between micromachined structures.

  7. Mitochondrial DAMPs from femoral reamings activate neutrophils via formyl peptide receptors and P44/42 MAP Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Carl J.; Sursal, Tolga; Rodriguez, Edward K.; Appleton, Paul T.; Zhang, Qin; Itagaki, Kiyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Hypothesis Fractures and femoral reaming are associated with lung injury. The mechanisms linking fractures and inflammation are unclear; but tissue disruption might release mitochondria. Mitochondria are evolutionarily derived from bacteria and contain “Damage Associated Molecular Patterns” (DAMPs) like formylated peptides that can activate immunocytes. We therefore studied whether fracture reaming releases mitochondrial DAMPs (MTD) and how MTD act on immune cells. Methods Femur fracture reamings (FFx) from 10 patients were spun to remove bone particulates. Supernatants were assayed for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Mitochondria were isolated from the residual reaming slurry, sonicated and spun at 12,000g. The resultant MTD were assayed for their ability to cause neutrophil (PMN) Ca2+ transient production, p44/42 MAPK phosphorylation, IL-8 release and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) release with and without formyl peptide receptor-1 (FPR1) blockade. Rats were injected with MTD and whole lung assayed for p44/42 activation. Results mtDNA appears at many thousand fold normal plasma levels in FFx and at intermediate levels in patients’ plasma, suggesting release from fracture to plasma. FFx MTD caused brisk PMN Ca2+ flux, activated PMN p44/42 MAPK and caused PMN release of IL-8 and MMP9. Responses to MTD were inhibited by FPR1 blockade using Cyclosporin H and anti-FPR1. MTD injection caused P44/42 phosphorylation in rat lung. Conclusions FFx reaming releases mitochondria into the wound and circulation. MTD then activates PMN. Release of damage signals like MTD from FFx may underlie activation of the cytokine cascades known to be associated with facture fixation and lung injury. PMID:20736789

  8. A Forced Damped Oscillation Framework for Undulatory Swimming Provides New Insights into How Propulsion Arises in Active and Passive Swimming

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; Griffith, Boyce E.; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental issue in locomotion is to understand how muscle forcing produces apparently complex deformation kinematics leading to movement of animals like undulatory swimmers. The question of whether complicated muscle forcing is required to create the observed deformation kinematics is central to the understanding of how animals control movement. In this work, a forced damped oscillation framework is applied to a chain-link model for undulatory swimming to understand how forcing leads to deformation and movement. A unified understanding of swimming, caused by muscle contractions (“active” swimming) or by forces imparted by the surrounding fluid (“passive” swimming), is obtained. We show that the forcing triggers the first few deformation modes of the body, which in turn cause the translational motion. We show that relatively simple forcing patterns can trigger seemingly complex deformation kinematics that lead to movement. For given muscle activation, the forcing frequency relative to the natural frequency of the damped oscillator is important for the emergent deformation characteristics of the body. The proposed approach also leads to a qualitative understanding of optimal deformation kinematics for fast swimming. These results, based on a chain-link model of swimming, are confirmed by fully resolved computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Prior results from the literature on the optimal value of stiffness for maximum speed are explained. PMID:23785272

  9. The analysis of PIP and BLZ latitude data and the free diurnal nutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damljanovic, Goran; et al.

    The values of the period (0.61 years from PIP and 0.58 years from BLZ data), the amplitude (0.012 arcseconds from PIP, 0.014 arcseconds from BLZ) and the phase (300 degrees from PIP, 320 degrees from BLZ; epoch: 1900.0) of the free diurnal nutation were computed using 13 years of Punta Indio (PIP data in the Hipparcos reference frame) and 37 years of the Belgrade (BLZ data in FK5 reference frame) homogenized latitude data. Both reductions are in line with MERIT Standards, with the standard IAU 1976 precession and IAU 1980 nutation. Direct Fourier transform analysis was applied to the data, and the results presented here (compared with each other and with the others) can be used to make some remarks concerning the IAU 1980 nutation model and polar motion. Co-Author: Maria Silvina De Biasi/UNLP, Argentina.

  10. Off-resonance effects on 2D NMR nutation spectra of I = 3/2 quadrupolar nuclei in static samples.

    PubMed

    Xia, Y; Deng, F; Ye, C

    1995-12-01

    The off-resonance effects on 2D NMR nutation of I = 3/2 quadrupolar nuclei are demonstrated with perturbation theory and numerical calculation in static samples. The off-resonant (delta omega) rf field (omega 1) enlarges a nutation frequency and consequently increases the measurement range of nuclear quadrupolar interaction parameters. When omega e > omega Qmax, and arctg(omega 1/delta omega) = +/- 54.7 degrees (magic angle), the satellite lines (produced by coherence transfers) in a nutation spectrum are superimposed with the line of central transition, and hence the nutation spectrum is simplified and its sensitivity is enhanced. The nuclear quadrupolar interaction parameters of 23Na nuclei in Na omega molecular sieve are obtained using 2D NMR nutation. PMID:9053113

  11. Estimation of Nutation Time Constant Model Parameters for On-Axis Spinning Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlee, Keith; Sudermann, James

    2008-01-01

    Calculating an accurate nutation time constant for a spinning spacecraft is an important step for ensuring mission success. Spacecraft nutation is caused by energy dissipation about the spin axis. Propellant slosh in the spacecraft fuel tanks is the primary source for this dissipation and can be simulated using a forced motion spin table. Mechanical analogs, such as pendulums and rotors, are typically used to simulate propellant slosh. A strong desire exists for an automated method to determine these analog parameters. The method presented accomplishes this task by using a MATLAB Simulink/SimMechanics based simulation that utilizes the Parameter Estimation Tool.

  12. Nutation model (IAU 1980) and the corrections of its main terms from BLZ and PIP data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damljanović, G.; de Biasi, M. S.

    The star observations of the Belgrade visual zenith telescope (in the list of Bureau International de l'Heure (BIH) series denoted by BLZ) for the period 1960 - 1985 (about 26 years of latitude data) and the Punta Indio photographic zenith tube (denoted by PIP) for the period 1971 - 1984 (about 14 years of latitude data) were used to obtain the correction (ΔN) to the amplitude of long periodic 18.6 years nutation obliquity term. The least-square method (LSQ) was applied. The reduction of both BLZ and PIP data was in line with the IAU 1980 Nutation Model.

  13. Interactions between SAS-C spacecraft nutations and spin control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tossman, B. E.; Thayer, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    The SAS-C spacecraft is stabilized by a momentum biased reaction wheel and passive nutation damper. A closed-loop low-speed spacecraft spin rate control system is included which uses a single-axis gyro and a variable speed range on the reaction wheel. Dynamic instability can result from interactions among the gyro, damper, and spacecraft dynamic unbalance. This instability may be aggravated by gyro angular misalignment, gyro error signals, and spacecraft nutations. Analytic eigenvector, and digital computer analyses of the coupled systems are presented. Mechanisms for instability are described as well as the effects that gyro error signal, tilt, and spacecraft dynamic unbalance produce on control system performance.

  14. The Nutating Engine-Prototype Engine Progress Report and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meitner, Peter L.; Boruta, Mike

    2006-01-01

    A prototype of a new, internal combustion (IC) engine concept has been completed. The Nutating Engine features an internal disk nutating (wobbling) on a Z-shaped power shaft. The engine is exceedingly compact, and several times more power dense than any conventional (reciprocating or rotary) IC engine. This paper discusses lessons learned during the prototype engine's development and provides details of its construction. In addition, results of the initial performance tests of the various components, as well as the complete engine, are summarized.

  15. Evaluation of soil microorganisms with inhibitory activity against Rhizoctonia solani causal agent of the damping-off of canola.

    PubMed

    Ciampi, L; Tewari, J P

    1990-10-01

    Pre- and post-emergence damping-off of canola seedlings caused by Rhizoctonia solani is a serious disease in Western Canada. Other fungi such as Fusarium spp. and Pythium spp. are also related to seedling damping-off. To-day, the search of soil bacteria is becoming a tool to use microorganisms as potential biocontrol agents for several plant diseases. The purpose of this research was to detect bacteria to biologically control R. solani, Pythium spp., and Fusarium spp. Soil samples were collected throughout Alberta during 1987 to isolate bacteria. Canola seedlings were also used to obtain bacteria from the same samples. Plant pathogenic fungi were tested to detect the antagonistic activity of the isolates. Tests were made with coated canola seeds, amendments and fresh of freeze-dried cells. Three hundred forty-one bacterial cultures were isolated. Only 16 inhibited fungal growth: 7 showed the same effects against R. solani and 9 showed uneven effects. Some isolates showed a weak action to Pythium spp. and Fusarium spp. Three isolates showed inhibitory effect on R. solani and Pythium spp. Isolate F1 improved by about 50% the germination of canola seeds in inoculated pots when compared with the inoculated control. Coated seeds had low germination and emergence was below the inoculated control. The emergence of canola seedlings was very much improved when isolate 147 was delivered as an amendment in inoculated pots. Identification showed that 3 bacterial belonged to Bacillus spp., 4 to green fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. and 2 were Streptomyces spp. PMID:2133515

  16. Hybrid Damping System for an Electronic Equipment Mounting Shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voracek, David; Kolkailah, Faysal A.; Cavalli, J. R.; Elghandour, Eltahry

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study was to design and construct a vibration control system for an electronic equipment shelf to be evaluated in the NASA Dryden FTF-11. The vibration control system was a hybrid system which included passive and active damping techniques. Passive damping was fabricated into the equipment shelf using ScothDamp(trademark) damping film and aluminum constraining layers. Active damping was achieved using a two channel active control circuit employing QuickPack(trademark) sensors and actuators. Preliminary Chirp test results indicated passive damping smoothed the frequency response while active damping reduced amplitudes of the frequency response for most frequencies below 500Hz.

  17. Hybrid Damping System for an Electronic Equipment Mounting Shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voracek, David; Kolkailah, Faysal A.; Cavalli, J. R.; Elghandour, Eltahry

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study was to design and construct a vibration control system for an electronic equipment shelf to be evaluated in the NASA Dryden FTF-II. The vibration control system was a hybrid system which included passive and active damping techniques. Passive damping was fabricated into the equipment shelf using ScothDamp(trademark) damping film and aluminum constraining layers. Active damping was achieved using a two channel active control circuit employing QuickPack(trademark) sensors and actuators. Preliminary Chirp test results indicated passive damping smoothed the frequency response while active damping reduced amplitudes of the frequency response for most frequencies below 500Hz.

  18. On estimation of the free core nutation parameters from analysis of the VLBI celestial pole offsets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzezinski, A.

    2013-12-01

    The free core nutation (FCN) resonance influences Earth rotation in two different ways: 1) through resonant enhancement of the amplitudes of those forced nutation components which are close to the FCN frequency (indirect effect); 2) it gives rise to the free oscillation of the pole in response to the irregular nearly-diurnal geophysical forcing (direct effect). It is commonly believed that the best estimate of the FCN parameters, the space-referred period T and the quality factor Q, is that from the VLBI determination of the nutation amplitudes. The estimated values corresponding to the MHB2000 precession-nutatin model are T=-430 days and Q=20 000 with quite narrow uncertainty limits (429.93,430.48) and (18 870,21 280), respectively. Here we focus attention on determination of T and Q from analysis of the FCN signal observed by VLBI since 1984. The underlying stochastic model is similar to that applied since decades for analysis of the Chandler wobble, the so-called "pea-shooter" model proposed by Jeffreys (1940). We discuss here different ways of implementation of such model based on the methods of time series analysis. We also show and compare the FCN parameters derived from various available VLBI nutation data sets.

  19. Automated Method for Estimating Nutation Time Constant Model Parameters for Spacecraft Spinning on Axis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Calculating an accurate nutation time constant (NTC), or nutation rate of growth, for a spinning upper stage is important for ensuring mission success. Spacecraft nutation, or wobble, is caused by energy dissipation anywhere in the system. Propellant slosh in the spacecraft fuel tanks is the primary source for this dissipation and, if it is in a state of resonance, the NTC can become short enough to violate mission constraints. The Spinning Slosh Test Rig (SSTR) is a forced-motion spin table where fluid dynamic effects in full-scale fuel tanks can be tested in order to obtain key parameters used to calculate the NTC. We accomplish this by independently varying nutation frequency versus the spin rate and measuring force and torque responses on the tank. This method was used to predict parameters for the Genesis, Contour, and Stereo missions, whose tanks were mounted outboard from the spin axis. These parameters are incorporated into a mathematical model that uses mechanical analogs, such as pendulums and rotors, to simulate the force and torque resonances associated with fluid slosh.

  20. Polar motions equivalent to high frequency nutations for a nonrigid Earth with anelastic mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, P. M.; Bretagnon, P.

    2003-03-01

    The coefficients of polar motions of the rigid/nonrigid Earth in frequency bands other than the retrograde diurnal one are systematically computed using general expressions, derived here for the first time, for the prograde and retrograde torques exerted on the Earth by lunisolar potentials of arbitrary spherical harmonic type. Taken together with the already known coefficients of low frequency nutations and UT1 variations, they provide a complete characterization, with high precision, of the motions of the pole of the terrestrial reference frame in space; this is needed for high precision studies in astronomy and space geodesy. The inputs used for our computations are a table of tidal amplitudes, and values of the geopotential coefficients of degrees up to 4 and of other relevant basic Earth parameters. General relations which connect the coefficients of high frequency nutations to those of the equivalent polar motions are established and used for deducing the former. The Chandler resonance plays a significant role in low frequency polar motions. In this context, the role of mantle anelasticity and the nature of the Earth's deformational response to zero frequency forcing are given special consideration. The free core nutation (FCN) resonance of low frequency nutations is shown to affect the prograde semidiurnal nutations through the coupling produced between the nutations in the two frequency bands by triaxiality terms in the angular momenta of the whole Earth and of its fluid core. It is shown in a transparent fashion that the effect of the core triaxiality arises almost exclusively from the huge FCN-related resonance in the wobble of the core. The magnitude of the effect is found to be a few times smaller than reported in a recent paper; it is also found, unlike in that paper, that the changes in the eigenfrequencies due to trixiality are only of the second order in the triaxiality parameter. Numerical results for the polar motions of the nonrigid Earth in

  1. Targeting damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs) and DAMP receptors in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Boone, Brian A; Lotze, Michael T

    2014-01-01

    Damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs) are proteins released from cells under stress due to nutrient deprivation, hypoxia, trauma, or treatment with chemotherapy, among a variety of other causes. When released, DAMPs activate innate immunity, providing a pathway to a systemic inflammatory response in the absence of infection. By regulating inflammation in the tumor microenvironment, promoting angiogenesis, and increasing autophagy with evasion of apoptosis, DAMPs facilitate cancer growth. DAMPs and DAMP receptors have a key role in melanoma pathogenesis. Due to their crucial role in the development of melanoma and chemoresistance, DAMPs represent intriguing targets at a time when novel treatments are desperately needed. PMID:24258998

  2. Application of Semi Active Control Techniques to the Damping Suppression Problem of Solar Sail Booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adetona, O.; Keel, L. H.; Whorton, M. S.

    2007-01-01

    Solar sails provide a propellant free form for space propulsion. These are large flat surfaces that generate thrust when they are impacted by light. When attached to a space vehicle, the thrust generated can propel the space vehicle to great distances at significant speeds. For optimal performance the sail must be kept from excessive vibration. Active control techniques can provide the best performance. However, they require an external power-source that may create significant parasitic mass to the solar sail. However, solar sails require low mass for optimal performance. Secondly, active control techniques typically require a good system model to ensure stability and performance. However, the accuracy of solar sail models validated on earth for a space environment is questionable. An alternative approach is passive vibration techniques. These do not require an external power supply, and do not destabilize the system. A third alternative is referred to as semi-active control. This approach tries to get the best of both active and passive control, while avoiding their pitfalls. In semi-active control, an active control law is designed for the system, and passive control techniques are used to implement it. As a result, no external power supply is needed so the system is not destabilize-able. Though it typically underperforms active control techniques, it has been shown to out-perform passive control approaches and can be unobtrusively installed on a solar sail boom. Motivated by this, the objective of this research is to study the suitability of a Piezoelectric (PZT) patch actuator/sensor based semi-active control system for the vibration suppression problem of solar sail booms. Accordingly, we develop a suitable mathematical and computer model for such studies and demonstrate the capabilities of the proposed approach with computer simulations.

  3. Vibration damping method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Redmond, James M.; Barney, Patrick S.; Parker, Gordon G.; Smith, David A.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides vibration damping method and apparatus that can damp vibration in more than one direction without requiring disassembly, that can accommodate varying tool dimensions without requiring re-tuning, and that does not interfere with tool tip operations and cooling. The present invention provides active dampening by generating bending moments internal to a structure such as a boring bar to dampen vibration thereof.

  4. Vibration damping method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Redmond, J.M.; Barney, P.S.; Parker, G.G.; Smith, D.A.

    1999-06-22

    The present invention provides vibration damping method and apparatus that can damp vibration in more than one direction without requiring disassembly, that can accommodate varying tool dimensions without requiring re-tuning, and that does not interfere with tool tip operations and cooling. The present invention provides active dampening by generating bending moments internal to a structure such as a boring bar to dampen vibration thereof. 38 figs.

  5. A rotor unbalance response based approach to the identification of the closed-loop stiffness and damping coefficients of active magnetic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jin; Di, Long; Cheng, Changli; Xu, Yuanping; Lin, Zongli

    2016-01-01

    The stiffness and damping coefficients of active magnetic bearings (AMBs) have direct influence on the dynamic response of a rotor bearing system, including the bending critical speeds, modes of vibrations and stability. Rotor unbalance response is informative in the identification of these bearing support parameters. In this paper, we propose a method for identifying closed-loop AMB stiffness and damping coefficients based on the rotor unbalance response. We will use a flexible rotor-AMB test rig to help describe the proposed method as well as to validate the identification results. First, based on a rigid body model of the rotor, a formula is derived that computes the nominal values of the bearing stiffness and damping coefficients at a given rotating speed from the experimentally measured rotor unbalance response at the given speed. Then, based on a finite element model of the rotor, an error response surface is constructed for each parameter to estimate the identification errors induced by the rotor flexibility. The final identified values of the stiffness and damping coefficients equal the sums of the nominal values initially computed from the unbalance response and the identification errors determined by the error response surfaces. The proposed identification method is carried out on the rotor-AMB test rig. In order to validate the identification results, the identified values of the closed-loop AMB stiffness and damping coefficients are combined with the finite element model of the rotor to form a full model of the rotor-AMB test rig, from which the model unbalance responses at various rotating speeds are determined through simulation and compared with the experimental measurements. The close agreements between the simulation results and the measurements validate the proposed identification method.

  6. Application of simultaneous active and reactive power modulation of superconducting magnetic energy storage unit to damp turbine-generator subsynchronous oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chijui; Lee, Yuangshung )

    1993-03-01

    An active and reactive power (P-Q) simultaneous control scheme which is based on a superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) unit is designed to damp out the subsynchronous resonant (SSR) oscillations of a turbine-generator unit. In order to suppress unstable torsional mode oscillations, a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller is employed to modulate the active and reactive power input/output of the SMES unit according to speed deviation of the generator shaft. The gains of the proposed PID controller are determined by pole assignment approach based on modal control theory. Eigenvalue analysis of the studied system shows that the PID controller is quite effective over a wide range of operating conditions. Dynamic simulations using the nonlinear system model are also performed to demonstrate the damping effect of the proposed control scheme under disturbance conditions.

  7. Analysis of the partially filled viscous ring damper. [application as nutation damper for spinning satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfriend, K. T.

    1973-01-01

    A ring partially filled with a viscous fluid has been analyzed as a nutation damper for a spinning satellite. The fluid has been modelled as a rigid slug of finite length moving in a tube and resisted by a linear viscous force. It is shown that there are two distinct modes of motion, called the spin synchronous mode and the nutation synchronous mode. Time constants for each mode are obtained for both the symmetric and asymmetric satellite. The effects of a stop in the tube and an offset of the ring from the spin axis are also investigated. An analysis of test results is also given including a determination of the effect of gravity on the time constants in the two modes.

  8. Effects of the observed J2 variations on the Earth's precession and nutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrándiz, José M.; Baenas, Tomás; Belda, Santiago

    2016-04-01

    The Earth's oblateness parameter J2 is closely related to the dynamical ellipticity H, which factorizes the main components of the precession and the different nutation terms. In most theoretical approaches to the Earth's rotation, with IAU2000 nutation theory among them, H is assumed to be constant. The precession model IAU2006 supposes H to have a conventional linear variation, based on the J2 time series derived mainly from satellite laser ranging (SLR) data for decades, which gives rise to an additional quadratic term of the precession in longitude and some corrections of the nutation terms. The time evolution of J2 is, however, too complex to be well approximated by a simple linear model. The effect of more general models including periodic terms and closer to the observed time series, although still unable to reproduce a significant part of the signal, has been seldom investigated. In this work we address the problem of deriving the effect of the observed J2 variations without resorting to such simplified models. The Hamiltonian approach to the Earth rotation is extended to allow the McCullagh's term of the potential to depend on a time-varying oblateness. An analytical solution is derived by means of a suitable perturbation method in the case of the time series provided by the Center for Space Research (CSR) of the University of Texas, which results in non-negligible contributions to the precession-nutation angles. The presentation focuses on the main effects on the longitude of the equator; a noticeable non-linear trend is superimposed to the linear main precession term, along with some periodic and decadal variations.

  9. Solution Accounts for Structural Damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussos, L. A.; Hyer, M. W.; Thornton, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    New analytical technique determines dynamic response of damped structures dominated by internal structural damping mechanisms. Though structural damping is often negligible compared with damping due to air friction and friction in joints, structural damping can be of major importance in structures having heavy damping treatments or in outer-space structures. Finite-element model includes nonlinear, nonviscous internal damping.

  10. Spin rotation, Chandler wobble and free core nutation of isolated multi-layer pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, Alexander; Kitiashvili, Irina

    2013-03-01

    At present time there are investigations of precession and nutation for very different celestial multi-layer bodies: the Earth (Getino 1995), Moon (Gusev 2010), planets of Solar system (Gusev 2010) and pulsars (Link et al. 2007). The long-periodic precession phenomenon was detected for few pulsars: PSR B1828-11, PSR B1557-50, PSR 2217+47, PSR 0531+21, PSR B0833-45, and PSR B1642-03. Stairs, Lyne & Shemar (2000) have found that the arrival-time residuals from PSR B1828-11 vary periodically with a different periods. According to our model, the neutron star has the rigid crust (RC), the fluid outer core (FOC) and the solid inner core (SIC). The model explains generation of four modes in the rotation of the pulsar: two modes of Chandler wobble (CW, ICW) and two modes connecting with free core nutation (FCN, FICN) (Gusev & Kitiashvili 2008). We are propose the explanation for all harmonics of Time of Arrival (TOA) pulses variations as precession of a neutron star owing to differential rotation of RC, FOC and crystal SIC of the pulsar PSR B1828-11: 250, 500, 1000 days. We used canonical method for interpretation TOA variations by Chandler Wobble (CW) and Free Core Nutation (FCN) of pulsar.

  11. Inner core wobble and free core nutation of pulsar PSR B1828-11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitiashvili, I.; Gusev, A.

    2008-10-01

    PSR B1828-11 has long-term, highly periodic and correlated variations in pulse shape and a slow-down rate with period variations of approximately 1000, 500 and 250 days [Stairs, I.H., Lyne, A.G., Shemar, S.L. Evidence for free precession in a pulsar. Nature 406, 484-486, 2000]. There are three potential explanations of pulses time-of-arrival from a pulsar. These are related to the interior of the neutron star, planetary bodies, free precession and nutation. We use the Hamiltonian canonical method of Getino (1995) for analyzing the dynamically symmetric pulsar PSR B1828-11, consisting of a rigid crust, elliptical liquid outer core and solid inner core. Using the theory of differential rotation of a pulsar, we investigate the dependence on Chandler wobble period, inner core wobble, retrograde free core nutation and prograde free inner core nutation from ellipticity of the inner crystal core, outer liquid core and total pulsar.

  12. Hybrid Active/Passive Control of Sound Radiation from Panels with Constrained Layer Damping and Model Predictive Feedback Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Randolph H.; Gibbs, Gary P.

    2000-01-01

    make the controller adaptive. For example, a mathematical model of the plant could be periodically updated as the plant changes, and the feedback gains recomputed from the updated model. To be practical, this approach requires a simple plant model that can be updated quickly with reasonable computational requirements. A recent paper by the authors discussed one way to simplify a feedback controller, by reducing the number of actuators and sensors needed for good performance. The work was done on a tensioned aircraft-style panel excited on one side by TBL flow in a low speed wind tunnel. Actuation was provided by a piezoelectric (PZT) actuator mounted on the center of the panel. For sensing, the responses of four accelerometers, positioned to approximate the response of the first radiation mode of the panel, were summed and fed back through the controller. This single input-single output topology was found to have nearly the same noise reduction performance as a controller with fifteen accelerometers and three PZT patches. This paper extends the previous results by looking at how constrained layer damping (CLD) on a panel can be used to enhance the performance of the feedback controller thus providing a more robust and efficient hybrid active/passive system. The eventual goal is to use the CLD to reduce sound radiation at high frequencies, then implement a very simple, reduced order, low sample rate adaptive controller to attenuate sound radiation at low frequencies. Additionally this added damping smoothes phase transitions over the bandwidth which promotes robustness to natural frequency shifts. Experiments were conducted in a transmission loss facility on a clamped-clamped aluminum panel driven on one side by a loudspeaker. A generalized predictive control (GPC) algorithm, which is suited to online adaptation of its parameters, was used in single input-single output and multiple input-single output configurations. Because this was a preliminary look at the potential

  13. Magnetic Damping For Maglev

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhu, S.; Cai, Y.; Rote, D. M.; Chen, S. S.

    1998-01-01

    Magnetic damping is one of the important parameters that control the response and stability of maglev systems. An experimental study to measure magnetic damping directly is presented. A plate attached to a permanent magnet levitated on a rotating drum was tested to investigate the effect of various parameters, such as conductivity, gap, excitation frequency, and oscillation amplitude, on magnetic damping. The experimental technique is capable of measuring all of the magnetic damping coefficients, some of which cannot be measured indirectly.

  14. Damped leaf flexure hinge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhong; Chen, Guisheng; Zhang, Xianmin

    2015-05-01

    Flexure-based mechanism like compliant actuation system embeds complex dynamics that will reduce the control bandwidth and limits their dynamic positioning precision. This paper presents a theoretical model of a leaf flexure hinge with damping layers using strain energy method and Kelvin damping model. The modified loss factor of the damped leaf flexure hinge is derived, and the equivalent viscous damping coefficient of the damped leaf hinge is obtained, which could be used to improve the pseudo-rigid-model. The free vibration signals of the hinge in three different damping configurations are measured. The experimental modal analysis also is performed on the three kinds of damped leaf flexure hinges in order to evaluate their 1st order bending natural frequency and vibration-suppressing effects. The evaluation of modified loss factor model also is performed. The experimental results indicate that the constrained layer damping can enhance the structure damping of the hinge even if only single damping layer each side, the modified loss factor model can get good predicts of a damped leaf flexure hinge in the frequency range below 1st order natural frequency, and it is necessary that the dimensional parameters of the damping layers and basic layer of the hinge should be optimized for simplification at the mechanism's design stage.

  15. Damped leaf flexure hinge.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong; Chen, Guisheng; Zhang, Xianmin

    2015-05-01

    Flexure-based mechanism like compliant actuation system embeds complex dynamics that will reduce the control bandwidth and limits their dynamic positioning precision. This paper presents a theoretical model of a leaf flexure hinge with damping layers using strain energy method and Kelvin damping model. The modified loss factor of the damped leaf flexure hinge is derived, and the equivalent viscous damping coefficient of the damped leaf hinge is obtained, which could be used to improve the pseudo-rigid-model. The free vibration signals of the hinge in three different damping configurations are measured. The experimental modal analysis also is performed on the three kinds of damped leaf flexure hinges in order to evaluate their 1st order bending natural frequency and vibration-suppressing effects. The evaluation of modified loss factor model also is performed. The experimental results indicate that the constrained layer damping can enhance the structure damping of the hinge even if only single damping layer each side, the modified loss factor model can get good predicts of a damped leaf flexure hinge in the frequency range below 1st order natural frequency, and it is necessary that the dimensional parameters of the damping layers and basic layer of the hinge should be optimized for simplification at the mechanism's design stage. PMID:26026549

  16. Observation of Infrared Free-Induction Decay and Optical Nutation Signals from Nitrous Oxide Using a Current Modulated Quantum Cascade Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Duxbury, Geoffrey; Kelly, James F.; Blake, Thomas A.; Langford, Nigel

    2012-05-07

    Free induction decay (FID), optical nutation and rapid passage induced (RP) signals in nitrous oxide, under both optically thin and optically thick conditions, have been observed using a rapid current pulse modulation, or chirp, applied to the slow current ramp of a quantum cascade (QC) laser. The variation in optical depth was achieved by increasing the pressure of nitrous oxide in a long pathlength multipass absorption cell. This allows the variation of optical depth to be achieved over a range of low gas pressures. Since, even at the highest gas pressure used in the cell, the chirp rate of the QC laser is faster than the collisional reorientation time of the molecules, there is minimal collisional damping, allowing a large macroscopic polarization of the molecular dipoles to develop. This is referred to as rapid passage induced gain. The resultant FID signals are enhanced due to the constructive interference between the field within the gas generated by the slow ramp of the laser (pump), and the fast chirp of the laser (probe) signal generated by pulse modulation of the continuously operating QC laser. The FID signals obtained at large 2 optical depth have not been observed previously in the mid-infrared regions, and unusual oscillatory signals have been observed at the highest gas pressures used.

  17. Observation of infrared free-induction decay and optical nutation signals from nitrous oxide using a current modulated quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Duxbury, Geoffrey; Kelly, James F; Blake, Thomas A; Langford, Nigel

    2012-05-01

    Free induction decay (FID), optical nutation, and rapid passage induced signals in nitrous oxide, under both optically thin and optically thick conditions, have been observed using a rapid current pulse modulation, or chirp, applied to the slow current ramp of a quantum cascade (QC) laser. The variation in optical depth was achieved by increasing the pressure of nitrous oxide in a long path length multipass absorption cell. This allows the variation of optical depth to be achieved over a range of low gas pressures. Since, even at the highest gas pressure used in the cell, the chirp rate of the QC laser is faster than the collisional reorientation time of the molecules, there is minimal collisional damping, allowing a large macroscopic polarization of the molecular dipoles to develop. This is referred to as rapid passage induced polarization. The resultant FID signals are enhanced due to the constructive interference between the field within the gas generated by the slow ramp of the laser (pump), and that of the fast chirp of the laser (probe) signal generated by pulse modulation of the continuously operating QC laser. The FID signals obtained at large optical depth have not been observed previously in the mid-infrared regions, and unusual oscillatory signals have been observed at the highest gas pressures used. PMID:22583240

  18. Reactive thrust cruise for a geosynchronous satellite with minimum fuel consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidi, Marcel

    1993-02-01

    A simple control concept utilizing product of inertia is used to provide active nutation control of a reactive thrust control system of a geosynchronous momentum-based satellite. The reactive thrust control system itself is immune to sensor noise and thus prevents unnecessary thrust firings. Any nutation excitation is damped in a small number of nutational periods, with no fuel consumption.

  19. Red cell DAMPs and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Rafaela; Silveira, Angélica A A; Conran, Nicola

    2016-09-01

    Intravascular hemolysis, or the destruction of red blood cells in the circulation, can occur in numerous diseases, including the acquired hemolytic anemias, sickle cell disease and β-thalassemia, as well as during some transfusion reactions, preeclampsia and infections, such as those caused by malaria or Clostridium perfringens. Hemolysis results in the release of large quantities of red cell damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) into the circulation, which, if not neutralized by innate protective mechanisms, have the potential to activate multiple inflammatory pathways. One of the major red cell DAMPs, heme, is able to activate converging inflammatory pathways, such as toll-like receptor signaling, neutrophil extracellular trap formation and inflammasome formation, suggesting that this DAMP both activates and amplifies inflammation. Other potent DAMPs that may be released by the erythrocytes upon their rupture include heat shock proteins (Hsp), such as Hsp70, interleukin-33 and Adenosine 5' triphosphate. As such, hemolysis represents a major inflammatory mechanism that potentially contributes to the clinical manifestations that have been associated with the hemolytic diseases, such as pulmonary hypertension and leg ulcers, and likely plays a role in specific complications of sickle cell disease such as endothelial activation, vaso-occlusive processes and tissue injury. PMID:27251171

  20. The DAMPE mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian; Guo, Jianhua; Chang, Jin; Cai, Mingsheng

    2016-07-01

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) was launched into space on Dec.17, 2015 to a 500km dawn-to-dusk sun-synchronous orbit aiming at detecting high energy electron(gamma) as well as cosmic heavy ions up to 10TeV and 1PeV respectively to try to understand the mechanisms of particle acceleration in celestial sources and the propagation of cosmic rays in the Galaxy, to probe the nature of dark matter, a form of matter necessary to account for gravitational effects observed in very large scale structures such as anomalies in the rotation of galaxies and the gravitational lensing of light by galaxy clusters that cannot be accounted for by the quantity of observed matter , and to study the high-energy behavior of gamma-ray bursts, pulsars, Active Galaxy Nuclei and other transients,etc. After months' commissioning, DAMPE has been in the observational mode. This paper reports the status of its detectors and latest results collected so far.

  1. Damping of the wrist joint during voluntary movement.

    PubMed

    Milner, T E; Cloutier, C

    1998-10-01

    Damping characteristics of the musculoskeletal system were investigated during rapid voluntary wrist flexion movements. Oscillations about the final position were induced by introducing a load with the characteristics of negative damping, which artificially reduced the damping of the wrist. Subjects responded to increases in the negatively damped load by stronger cocontraction of wrist flexor and extensor muscles during the stabilization phase of the movement. However, their ability to counteract the effects of the negatively damped load diminished as the negative damping increased. Consequently, the number and frequency of oscillations increased. The oscillations were accompanied by phase-locked muscle activity superimposed on underlying tonic muscle activation. The wrist stiffness and damping coefficient increased with the increased cocontraction that accompanied more negatively damped loads, although changes in the damping coefficient were less systematic than the stiffness. Analysis of successive half-cycles of the oscillation revealed that the wrist stiffness and damping coefficient increased, despite decreasing muscle activation, as oscillation amplitude and velocity declined. This indicates that the inverse dependence of the damping coefficient on oscillation velocity contributes significantly to damping of joint motion. It is suggested that this property helps to offset a negative contribution to damping from the stretch reflex. PMID:9808304

  2. A diurnal resonance in the ocean tide and in the earth's load response due to the resonant free 'core nutation'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahr, J. M.; Sasao, T.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of the oceans, which are subject to a resonance due to a free rotational eigenmode of an elliptical, rotating earth with a fluid outer core having an eigenfrequency of (1 + 1/460) cycle/day, on the body tide and nutational response of the earth to the diurnal luni-tidal force are computed. The response of an elastic, rotating, elliptical, oceanless earth with a fluid outer core to a given load distribution on its surface is first considered, and the tidal sea level height for equilibrium and nonequilibrium oceans is examined. Computations of the effects of equilibrium and nonequilibrium oceans on the nutational and deformational responses of the earth are then presented which show small but significant perturbations to the retrograde 18.6-year and prograde six-month nutations, and more important effects on the earth body tide, which is also resonant at the free core notation eigenfrequency.

  3. Influence of Elastic Deformations Within the Inner Core on the Free Nutations of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumberry, M.

    2008-12-01

    Two of Earth's free modes of nutation, the prograde free core nutation (PFCN) and the inner core wobble (ICW), owe their existence to the presence of the inner core. Their dynamics are controlled by coupling at the inner-core boundary (ICB) and by the torque exerted by the rest of the Earth on a tilted inner core. Previous theoretical estimates of the periods of these two modes were based on models that did not properly take into account elastic deformations taking place within the inner core when the latter is in a tilted position. In this work, I present theoretical estimates of the periods of the ICW and PFCN when such elastic deformations are included. Based on an oceanless, dissipationless, elastic Earth model, elastic deformations within the inner core contribute to a lengthening of the period of the ICW from 2410 to 2713 Solar days, in agreement with recent results obtained by Rochester and Crossley. The period of the PFCN is found to increase by a similar factor, from 476 to 536 days, when given with respect to a space-fixed reference frame. Although this new estimate for the PFCN is still about a factor 2 shorter than its period of ~ 1000 days that is inferred through the resonance of this mode with the forced nutations, the amplitude of the coupling from surface tractions that is commonly invoked to account for the difference is now reduced. If this coupling is interpreted solely in terms of electromagnetic forces, the RMS amplitude of the magnetic field at the ICB is reduced from 7.1~mT to approximately 5~mT.

  4. The effects of the solid inner core and nonhydrostatic structure on the earth's forced nutations and earth tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Vries, Dan; Wahr, John M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper computes the effects of the solid inner core (IC) on the forced nutations and earth tides, and on certain of the earth's rotational normal modes. The theoretical results are extended to include the effects of a solid IC and of nonhydrostatic structure. The presence of the IC is responsible for a new, almost diurnal, prograde normal mode which involves a relative rotation between the IC and fluid outer core about an equatorial axis. It is shown that the small size of the IC's effects on both nutations and tides is a consequence of the fact that the IC's moments of inertia are less than 1/1000 of the entire earth's.

  5. Passive damping in EDS maglev systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Rote, D. M.

    2002-05-03

    There continues to be strong interest in the subjects of damping and drag forces associated with electrodynamic suspension (EDS) systems. While electromagnetic drag forces resist the forward motion of a vehicle and therefore consume energy, damping forces control, at least in part, the response of the vehicle to disturbances. Ideally, one would like to reduce the drag forces as much as possible while retaining adequate damping forces to insure dynamic stability and satisfactory ride quality. These two goals turn out to be difficult to achieve in practice. It is well known that maglev systems tend to be intrinsically under damped. Consequently it is often necessary in a practical system design to enhance the damping passively or actively. For reasons of cost and simplicity, it is desirable to rely as much as possible on passive damping mechanisms. In this paper, rough estimates are made of the passive damping and drag forces caused by various mechanisms in EDS systems. No attention will be given to active control systems or secondary suspension systems which are obvious ways to augment passive damping mechanisms if the latter prove to be inadequate.

  6. Magnetic damping for maglev

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.; Zhu, S.; Cai, Y.; Rote, D.M.

    1994-12-31

    Magnetic damping is one of the important parameters to control the response and stability of maglev systems. An experimental study is presented to measure the magnetic damping using a direct method. A plate attached to a permanent magnet levitated on a rotating drum was tested to investigate the effect of various parameters on magnetic damping such as conductivity, gap, excitation frequency, and oscillation amplitude. The experimental technique is capable of measuring all magnetic damping coefficients, some of which can not be measured by an indirect method.

  7. Precession, nutation, and variation of UT1 due to the Sun's post-Newtonian torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Toshio

    We derived the post-Newtonian transformation laws of the coordinate velocity and the coordinate acceleration between a global and a body-centric coordinate system, which is related to each other by a kinematically non-rotating coordinate transformation. Next, by using the latter transformation, we obtained an explicit expression of the post-Newtonian tidal acceleration. Then, by conducting a special volume integral of torque element on an equal body-centric coordinate time hypersurface, we computed the post-Newtonian form of the gravitational torque. Finally, by integrating the Poisson approximation of the post-Newtonian extension of the Eulerian equation of rotational motion of the Earth moving along an elliptic orbit around the Sun and suffering the Sun's torque only, we evaluated post-Newtonian corrections to the precession, the nutation, and the variation of UT1. Except the geodesic precession and the geodesic nutation (Fukushima 1991), the largest effects are those related to the rotation angle of the Earth, UT1, as much as ΔUT1 = 10.50 sin l' + 0.09 sin 2l' where the unit is millisecond and l' denotes the mean anomaly of the Sun. The associated variation of the angular velocity of the Earth rotation becomes ΔΩ = 2.4 cos l' in the unit of 10-14rad/s. These are comparable with the tidal effects due to the nonrigidity of the Earth.

  8. Signature analysis of ballistic missile warhead with micro-nutation in terahertz band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Jiang, Yue-song

    2013-08-01

    In recent years, the micro-Doppler effect has been proposed as a new technique for signature analysis and extraction of radar targets. The ballistic missile is known as a typical radar target and has been paid many attentions for the complexities of its motions in current researches. The trajectory of a ballistic missile can be generally divided into three stages: boost phase, midcourse phase and terminal phase. The midcourse phase is the most important phase for radar target recognition and interception. In this stage, the warhead forms a typical micro-motion called micro-nutation which consists of three basic micro-motions: spinning, coning and wiggle. This paper addresses the issue of signature analysis of ballistic missile warhead in terahertz band via discussing the micro-Doppler effect. We establish a simplified model (cone-shaped) for the missile warhead followed by the micro-motion models including of spinning, coning and wiggle. Based on the basic formulas of these typical micro-motions, we first derive the theoretical formula of micro-nutation which is the main micro-motion of the missile warhead. Then, we calculate the micro-Doppler frequency in both X band and terahertz band via these micro-Doppler formulas. The simulations are given to show the superiority of our proposed method for the recognition and detection of radar micro targets in terahertz band.

  9. A Resonant Damping Study Using Piezoelectric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Duffy, K. P.; Choi, B. B.; Morrison, C. R.; Jansen, R. H.; Provenza, A. J.

    2008-01-01

    Excessive vibration of turbomachinery blades causes high cycle fatigue (HCF) problems requiring damping treatments to mitigate vibration levels. Based on the technical challenges and requirements learned from previous turbomachinery blade research, a feasibility study of resonant damping control using shunted piezoelectric patches with passive and active control techniques has been conducted on cantilever beam specimens. Test results for the passive damping circuit show that the optimum resistive shunt circuit reduces the third bending resonant vibration by almost 50%, and the optimum inductive circuit reduces the vibration by 90%. In a separate test, active control reduced vibration by approximately 98%.

  10. Decoherence and Landau-Damping

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-12-01

    The terminologies, decoherence and Landau damping, are often used concerning the damping of a collective instability. This article revisits the difference and relation between decoherence and Landau damping. A model is given to demonstrate how Landau damping affects the rate of damping coming from decoherence.

  11. Turbine blade damping study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominic, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Research results and progress on the performance of bladed systems is reported the different topics discussed include: the study of turbine blade damping; forced vibrations of friction damped beam moistures in two dimensions; and a users manual for a computer program for dynamic analysis of bladed systems.

  12. Damped acceleration cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.

    1988-07-01

    Structures with slots to strongly damp higher order longitudinal and transverse modes should allow the use, in linear colliders, of multiple bunches, and thus attain luminosities of over 10/sup 34/cm/sup /minus/2/sec/sup /minus/1/. Preliminary measurements on model structures suggest that such damping can be achieved. 10 refs., 9 figs.

  13. Method for evaluating gravity effects in the testing of nutation dampers. [on single or dual spin satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfriend, K. T.

    1975-01-01

    A method is developed for determining the effect of gravity in the testing of nutation dampers on symmetric single or dual spin satellites. The basic theory is developed and then applied to the partially filled viscous ring damper and the spring-mass-dashpot damper. A comparison with test results for the viscous ring damper is also given.-

  14. Turbojet engine blade damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, A. V.; Cutts, D. G.; Sridhar, S.

    1981-01-01

    The potentials of various sources of nonaerodynamic damping in engine blading are evaluated through a combination of advanced analysis and testing. The sources studied include material hysteresis, dry friction at shroud and root disk interfaces as well as at platform type external dampers. A limited seris of tests was conducted to evaluate damping capacities of composite materials (B/AL, B/AL/Ti) and thermal barrier coatings. Further, basic experiments were performed on titanium specimens to establish the characteristics of sliding friction and to determine material damping constants J and n. All the tests were conducted on single blades. Mathematical models were develthe several mechanisms of damping. Procedures to apply this data to predict damping levels in an assembly of blades are developed and discussed.

  15. Damping models in elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGarry, Matthew D. J.; Berger, Hans-Uwe; Van Houten, Elijah E. W.

    2007-03-01

    Current optimization based Elastography reconstruction algorithms encounter difficulties when the motion approaches resonant conditions, where the model does a poor job of approximating the real behavior of the material. Model accuracy can be improved through the addition of damping effects. These effects occur in-vivo due to the complex interaction between microstructural elements of the tissue; however reconstruction models are typically formulated at larger scales where the structure can be treated as a continuum. Attenuation behavior in an elastic continuum can be described as a mixture of inertial and viscoelastic damping effects. In order to develop a continuum damping model appropriate for human tissue, the behavior of each aspect of this proportional, or Rayleigh damping needs to be characterized. In this paper we investigate the nature of these various damping representations with a goal of best describing in-vivo behavior of actual tissue in order to improve the accuracy and performance of optimization based elastographic reconstruction. Inertial damping effects are modelled using a complex density, where the imaginary part is equivalent to a damping coefficient, and the effects of viscoelasticity are modelled through the use of complex shear moduli, where the real and imaginary parts represent the storage and loss moduli respectively. The investigation is carried out through a combination of theoretical analysis, numerical experiment, investigation of gelatine phantoms and comparison with other continua such as porous media models.

  16. Spatial cyclotron damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, C. L.

    1970-01-01

    To examine spatial electron cyclotron damping in a uniform Vlasov plasma, it is noted that the plasma response to a steady-state transverse excitation consists of several terms (dielectric-pole, free-streaming, and branch-cut), but that the cyclotron-damped pole term is the dominant term for z l = c/w sub ce provided (w sub pe/w sub ce) squared (c/a) is much greater than 1. If the latter inequality does not hold, then the free-streaming and branch-cut terms persist well past z = c/w sub ce as w sub 1 approaches w sub ce, making experimental measurement of cyclotron damping essentially impossible. Considering only (w sub pe/w sub ce) squared (c/a) is much greater than 1, it is shown how collisional effects should be estimated and how a finite-width excitation usually has little effect on the cyclotron-damped part of the response. Criteria is established concerning collisional damping, measurable damping length sizes, and allowed uncertainty in the magnetic field Beta. Results of numerical calculations, showing the regions in the appropriate parameter spaces that meet these criteria, are presented. From these results, one can determine the feasibility of, or propose parameter values for, an experiment designed to measure spatial cyclotron damping. It is concluded that the electron temperature T sub e should be at least 1 ev., and preferably 10 ev. or higher, for a successful experiment.

  17. Effects of adopting new precession, nutation and equinox corrections on the terrestrial reference frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, S. Y.; Mueller, I. I.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of adopting definitive precession and equinox corrections on the terrestrial reference frame was investigated. It is noted that the effect on polar motion is a diurnal periodic term with an amplitude increasing linearly in time whole on UT1 it is a linear term: general principles are given to determine the effects of small rotations of the frame of a conventional inertial reference system (CIS) on the frame of the conventional terrestrial reference system (CTS); seven CTS options are presented, one of which is necessary to accommodate such rotation. Accommodating possible future changes in the astronomical nutation is discussed. The effects of differences which may exist between the various CTS's and CIS's on Earth rotation parameters (ERP) and how these differences can be determined are examined. It is shown that the CTS differences can be determined from observations made at the same site. The CIS differences by comparing the ERP's are determined by the different techniques during the same time period.

  18. Diurnal and subdiurnal terms of nutation: a simple theoretical model for a nonrigid Earth.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzeziński, A.

    This paper presents a simple theoretical description of the high frequency nutation. First we derive the equation describing the lunisolar excitation of polar motion. The underlying model of the Earth consists of the rotationally symmetrical elastic mantle and the liquid core, with no coupling between these two. Then, we give a systematic review of various components of the equatorial lunisolar torque and of the corresponding perturbation in Earth rotation. Our purpose is to find explicit analytical expressions involving both the parameters of geopotential and the tidal parameters, which gives us insight into the physical mechanism generating this minor, but not negligible, component of the lunisolar perturbation in Earth rotation and makes clear its geometry.

  19. A study of the earth's free core nutation using international deployment of accelerometers gravity data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummins, Phil R.; Wahr, John M.

    1993-01-01

    In this study we consider the influence of the earth's free core nutation (FCN) on diurnal tidal admittance estimates for 11 stations of the globally distributed International Deployment of Accelerometers network. The FCN causes a resonant enhancement of the diurnal admittances which can be used to estimate some properties of the FCN. Estimations of the parameters describing the FCN (period, Q, and resonance strength) are made using data from individual stations and many stations simultaneously. These yield a result for the period of 423-452 sidereal days, which is shorter than theory predicts but is in agreement with many previous studies and suggests that the dynamical ellipticity of the core may be greater than its hydrostatic value.

  20. Nutational stability of a dual-spin satellite under the influence of applied reaction torques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bainum, P. M.

    1971-01-01

    It is assumed that since the solar paddle attachments to the hub of the spacecraft are not rigidly locked, the effect of the solar panels can be replaced by a constant reaction torque acting on the hub of the spacecraft. This could result in the satellite having an equilibrium motion about an axis displaced from the nominal axis of symmetry. The variational equations of motion are developed about such an equilibrium position using the SAS-A spacecraft as a model. Energy dissipation on the rotor as well as the main body is included. This nonautonomous set of differential equations are linearized and transformed to an autonomous set using the Liapunov reducibility theorem. The stability of the kinematically similar system is examined numerically using representative SAS-A parameters for the case when either pair of solar panels is assumed to be loosely attached. Stability is verified for small system nutation angles (0.1 degree).

  1. Introduction to the scientific application system of DAMPE (On behalf of DAMPE collaboration)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Jingjing

    2016-07-01

    The Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is a high energy particle physics experiment satellite, launched on 17 Dec 2015. The science data processing and payload operation maintenance for DAMPE will be provided by the DAMPE Scientific Application System (SAS) at the Purple Mountain Observatory (PMO) of Chinese Academy of Sciences. SAS is consisted of three subsystems - scientific operation subsystem, science data and user management subsystem and science data processing subsystem. In cooperation with the Ground Support System (Beijing), the scientific operation subsystem is responsible for proposing observation plans, monitoring the health of satellite, generating payload control commands and participating in all activities related to payload operation. Several databases developed by the science data and user management subsystem of DAMPE methodically manage all collected and reconstructed science data, down linked housekeeping data, payload configuration and calibration data. Under the leadership of DAMPE Scientific Committee, this subsystem is also responsible for publication of high level science data and supporting all science activities of the DAMPE collaboration. The science data processing subsystem of DAMPE has already developed a series of physics analysis software to reconstruct basic information about detected cosmic ray particle. This subsystem also maintains the high performance computing system of SAS to processing all down linked science data and automatically monitors the qualities of all produced data. In this talk, we will describe all functionalities of whole DAMPE SAS system and show you main performances of data processing ability.

  2. Excitation and Damping of Low-Degree Solar p-Modes during Activity Cycle 23: Analysis of GOLF and VIRGO Sun Photometer Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Reyes, S. J.; García, R. A.; Jiménez, A.; Chaplin, W. J.

    2003-09-01

    We have used observations made by the Global Oscillations at Low Frequency (GOLF) and the Variability of Irradiance and Gravity Oscillations Sun Photometer (VIRGO/SPM) instruments on board the ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory satellite to study variations in the excitation and damping of low angular degree (low-l) solar p-modes on the rising phase of activity cycle 23. Our analysis includes a correction procedure that for the first time allows GOLF data to be ``treated'' as a single homogeneous set, thereby compensating for the change of operational configuration partway through the mission. Over the range 2.5<=ν<=3.5mHz, we uncover an increase in damping and decrease in mode power that is consistent with previous findings. Furthermore, an excellent level of agreement is found between the variations extracted from the GOLF and VIRGO/SPM data. We find no net long-term changes to the modal energy supply rate. However, an analysis of the residuals uncovers the presence of a quasi-periodic signature of period ~1.5 yr (most pronounced for SPM). While it is true that several workers claim to have uncovered similar periodicities in other phenomena related to the near-surface layers of the Sun here, we are at present more inclined to attribute our finding to an artifact of the mode-fitting procedure. We also uncover a significant change in the asymmetry of mode peaks in the GOLF data, as found in previous studies of much longer data sets. These assumed that the dominant contribution to this arose from the switch in operating configuration partway through the mission (which altered the depth in the solar atmosphere sampled by the instrument). However, our preliminary analysis of data collected over the 100 day period beginning 2002 November 19-when the instrument switched back to its original configuration-suggests that this change may have a solar cycle component.

  3. STREAK damping. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.; Peyton, S.; Freiberg, H.

    1989-12-01

    This report documents a study aimed at improving the damping in STREAK. A form and value for an artificial viscosity is recommended which appears to control ringing and overshoots without overdamping.

  4. DAMPs, ageing, and cancer: The 'DAMP Hypothesis'.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jin; Xie, Yangchun; Sun, Xiaofang; Zeh, Herbert J; Kang, Rui; Lotze, Michael T; Tang, Daolin

    2015-11-01

    Ageing is a complex and multifactorial process characterized by the accumulation of many forms of damage at the molecular, cellular, and tissue level with advancing age. Ageing increases the risk of the onset of chronic inflammation-associated diseases such as cancer, diabetes, stroke, and neurodegenerative disease. In particular, ageing and cancer share some common origins and hallmarks such as genomic instability, epigenetic alteration, aberrant telomeres, inflammation and immune injury, reprogrammed metabolism, and degradation system impairment (including within the ubiquitin-proteasome system and the autophagic machinery). Recent advances indicate that damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs) such as high mobility group box 1, histones, S100, and heat shock proteins play location-dependent roles inside and outside the cell. These provide interaction platforms at molecular levels linked to common hallmarks of ageing and cancer. They can act as inducers, sensors, and mediators of stress through individual plasma membrane receptors, intracellular recognition receptors (e.g., advanced glycosylation end product-specific receptors, AIM2-like receptors, RIG-I-like receptors, and NOD1-like receptors, and toll-like receptors), or following endocytic uptake. Thus, the DAMP Hypothesis is novel and complements other theories that explain the features of ageing. DAMPs represent ideal biomarkers of ageing and provide an attractive target for interventions in ageing and age-associated diseases. PMID:25446804

  5. Forced nutations of the earth: Influence of inner core dynamics. I - Theory. II - Numerical results and comparisons. III - Very long interferometry data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathews, P. M.; Buffett, Bruce A.; Herring, Thomas A.; Shapiro, Irwin I.

    1991-01-01

    A treatment is presented of the nutation problem for an oceanless, elastic, spheroidally stratified earth, with the dynamical role of the inner core explicitly included in the formulation. Solving the enlarged system of equations shows that a new almost diurnal eigenfrequency emerges. A rough estimate places it not far from the prograde annual tidal excitation frequency, so that possible resonance effects on nutation amplitudes need careful consideration. Tables are provided that exhibit the sensitivities of various relevant quantities, the eigenfrequencies and the coefficients which appear in the resonance expansion, as well as the nutation amplitudes at important tidal frequencies, to possible errors in the earth parameters which enter the theory set forth. Finally, the analysis of 798 VLBI experiments performed between July 1980 and February 1989 and the determination from this analysis of corrections to selected coefficients in the International Astronomical Union 1980 theory of the nutations of the earth are discussed.

  6. Damping of nanomechanical resonators.

    PubMed

    Unterreithmeier, Quirin P; Faust, Thomas; Kotthaus, Jörg P

    2010-07-01

    We study the transverse oscillatory modes of nanomechanical silicon nitride strings under high tensile stress as a function of geometry and mode index m≤9. Reproducing all observed resonance frequencies with classical elastic theory we extract the relevant elastic constants. Based on the oscillatory local strain we successfully predict the observed mode-dependent damping with a single frequency-independent fit parameter. Our model clarifies the role of tensile stress on damping and hints at the underlying microscopic mechanisms. PMID:20867737

  7. Effects of radiation damping for biomolecular NMR experiments in solution: a hemisphere concept for water suppression

    PubMed Central

    Ishima, Rieko

    2016-01-01

    Abundant solvent nuclear spins, such as water protons in aqueous solution, cause radiation damping in NMR experiments. It is important to know how the effect of radiation damping appears in high-resolution protein NMR because macromolecular studies always require very high magnetic field strengths with a highly sensitive NMR probe that can easily cause radiation damping. Here, we show the behavior of water magnetization after a pulsed-field gradient (PFG) using nutation experiments at 900 MHz with a cryogenic probe: when water magnetization is located in the upper hemisphere (having +Z component, parallel to the external magnetic field), dephasing of the magnetization by a PFG effectively suppresses residual water magnetization in the transverse plane. In contrast, when magnetization is located in the lower hemisphere (having −Z component), the small residual transverse component remaining after a PFG is still sufficient to induce radiation damping. Based on this observation, we designed 1H-15N HSQC experiments in which water magnetization is maintained in the upper hemisphere, but not necessarily along Z, and compared them with the conventional experiments, in which water magnetization is inverted during the t1 period. The result demonstrates moderate gain of signal-to-noise ratio, 0–28%. Designing the experiments such that water magnetization is maintained in the upper hemisphere allows shorter pulses to be used compared to the complete water flip-back and, thereby, is useful as a building block of protein NMR pulse programs in solution. PMID:27524944

  8. Damping modeling in Timoshenko beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Wang, Y.

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical results of damping model studies for composite material beams using the Timoshenko theory is presented. Based on the damping models developed for Euler-Bernoulli beams, the authors develop damping methods for both bending and shear in investigation of Timoshenko beams. A computational method for the estimation of the damping parameters is given. Experimental data with high-frequency excitation were used to test Timoshenko beam equations with different types of damping models for bending and shear in various combinations.

  9. Acoustic transducer with damping means

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard W.; Adamson, Gerald E.

    1976-11-02

    An ultrasonic transducer specifically suited to high temperature sodium applications is described. A piezoelectric active element is joined to the transducer faceplate by coating the faceplate and juxtaposed active element face with wetting agents specifically compatible with the bonding procedure employed to achieve the joint. The opposite face of the active element is fitted with a backing member designed to assure continued electrical continuity during adverse operating conditions which can result in the fracturing of the active element. The fit is achieved employing a spring-loaded electrode operably arranged to electrically couple the internal transducer components, enclosed in a hermetically sealed housing, to accessory components normally employed in transducer applications. Two alternative backing members are taught for assuring electrical continuity. The first employs a resilient, discrete multipoint contact electrode in electrical communication with the active element face. The second employs a resilient, elastomeric, electrically conductive, damped member in electrical communication with the active element face in a manner to effect ring-down of the transducer. Each embodiment provides continued electrical continuity within the transducer in the event the active element fractures, while the second provides the added benefit of damping.

  10. A comparison between the precession-nutation variations in right ascension referred to the CIO and the equinox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husar, Ladislav

    2013-01-01

    The article analyzes the precession-nutation variations in right ascension of stars after the introduction Celestial Intermediate Origin (CIO) as a new origin of the right ascensions. It points out that changes in right ascension depend not only on the motion of the origin, but also on the changes of the pole and hour circles, depending on the position of stars. This explains the apparent paradox that, for certain groups of stars, despite the almost complete elimination of the precession and nutation motion of the CIO on the equator, the magnitude of the variations in right ascension related to the CIO can exceed the magnitude of the classic variations referred to the equinox.

  11. Forced nutations of the Earth: Contributions from the effects of ellipticity and rotation on the elastic deformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffett, B. A.; Mathews, P. M.; Herring, T. A.; Shapiro, I. I.

    1993-01-01

    We determine the deformation produced by the lunisolar tidal potential in a rotating, spheroidal model Earth. We proceed by decomposing the equations of motion into separate, though coupled, equations for the nutational and deformational parts of the Earth's response. Using this scheme, we derive a simpler set of equations for the deformational displacements, where the driving forces include not only the tidal terms but also inertial forces and gravitational perturbations associated with the nutational motions. We show that the deformations are affected only to a very small extent by the Earth's asphericity and rotation. This fact is exploited to set up a perturbative procedure, whereby the equation governing the deformation is separated into equations of zeroth and first orders in the perturbation.

  12. Consistency Problems in the Improvement of the IAU Precession-Nutation Theories: Effects of the Dynamical Ellipticity Differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escapa, Alberto; Ferrándiz, José M.; Baenas, Tomás; Getino, Juan; Navarro, Juan F.; Belda-Palazón, Santiago

    2016-03-01

    The complexity of the modeling of the rotational motion of the Earth in space has produced that no single theory has been adopted to describe it in full. Hence, it is customary using at least a theory for precession and another one for nutation. The classic approach proceeds by deriving some of the fundamental parameters from the precession theory, like, e.g., the dynamical ellipticity Hd, and then using those values in the nutation theory. The former IAU 1976 precession and IAU 1980 nutation theories followed that scheme. Along with the improvement of the accuracy of the determination of Earth orientation parameters, IAU 1980 was superseded by IAU2000, based on the application of the MHB2000 transfer function to the previous rigid Earth analytical theory REN2000. The latter was derived while the precession model IAU 1976 was still in force, therefore it used the corresponding values for some of the fundamental parameters, as the precession rate, associated to the dynamical ellipticity. The new precession model P03 was adopted as IAU 2006. That change introduced some inconsistency since P03 used different values for some of the fundamental parameters that MHB2000 inherited from REN2000. Besides, the derivation of the basic Earth parameters of MHB2000 itself comprised a fitted variation of the dynamical ellipticity adopted in the background rigid theory. Due to the strict requirements of accuracy of the present and coming times, the magnitude of the inconsistencies originated by this twofold approach is no longer negligible as earlier, hence the need of discussing the effects of considering slightly different values for H_d in precession and nutation theories.

  13. Experiments with particle damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollkamp, Joseph J.; Gordon, Robert W.

    1998-06-01

    High cycle fatigue in jet engines is a current military concern. The vibratory stresses that cause fatigue can be reduced by adding damping. However, the high temperatures that occur in the gas turbine greatly hinder the application of mature damping technologies. One technology which may perform in the harsh environment is particle damping. Particle damping involves placing metallic or ceramic particles inside structural cavities. As the cavity vibrates, energy is dissipated through particle collisions. Performance is influenced by many parameters including the type, shape, and size of the particles; the amount of free volume for the particles to move in; density of the particles; and the level of vibration. This paper presents results from a series of experiments designed to gain an appreciation of the important parameters. The experimental setup consists of a cantilever beam with drilled holes. These holes are partially filled with particles. The types of particles, location of the particles, fill level, and other parameters are varied. Damping is estimated for each configuration. Trends in the results are studied to determine the influence of the varied parameter.

  14. Damped flexible seal

    DOEpatents

    DuBois, Neil J.; Amaral, Antonio M.

    1992-10-27

    A damped flexible seal assembly for a torpedo isolates the tailcone thereof rom vibrational energy present in the drive shaft assembly. A pair of outside flanges, each of which include an inwardly facing groove and an O-ring constrained therein, provide a watertight seal against the outer non-rotating surface of the drive shaft assembly. An inside flange includes an outwardly-facing groove and an O-ring constrained therein, and provides a watertight seal against the inner surface of the tail cone. Two cast-in-place elastomeric seals provide a watertight seal between the flanges and further provide a damping barrier between the outside flanges and the inside flanges for damping vibrational energy present in the drive shaft assembly before the energy can reach the tailcone through the seal assembly.

  15. DAMPs and autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiuhong; Kang, Rui; Zeh, III, Herbert J.; Lotze, Michael T.; Tang, Daolin

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a lysosome-mediated catabolic process involving the degradation of intracellular contents (e.g., proteins and organelles) as well as invading microbes (e.g., parasites, bacteria and viruses). Multiple forms of cellular stress can stimulate this pathway, including nutritional imbalances, oxygen deprivation, immunological response, genetic defects, chromosomal anomalies and cytotoxic stress. Damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs) are released by stressed cells undergoing autophagy or injury, and act as endogenous danger signals to regulate the subsequent inflammatory and immune response. A complex relationship exists between DAMPs and autophagy in cellular adaption to injury and unscheduled cell death. Since both autophagy and DAMPs are important for pathogenesis of human disease, it is crucial to understand how they interplay to sustain homeostasis in stressful or dangerous environments. PMID:23388380

  16. Process Damping Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Sam

    2011-12-01

    The phenomenon of process damping as a stabilising effect in milling has been encountered by machinists since milling and turning began. It is of great importance when milling aerospace alloys where maximum surface speed is limited by excessive tool wear and high speed stability lobes cannot be attained. Much of the established research into regenerative chatter and chatter avoidance has focussed on stability lobe theory with different analytical and time domain models developed to expand on the theory first developed by Trusty and Tobias. Process damping is a stabilising effect that occurs when the surface speed is low relative to the dominant natural frequency of the system and has been less successfully modelled and understood. Process damping is believed to be influenced by the interference of the relief face of the cutting tool with the waveform traced on the cut surface, with material properties and the relief geometry of the tool believed to be key factors governing performance. This study combines experimental trials with Finite Element (FE) simulation in an attempt to identify and understand the key factors influencing process damping performance in titanium milling. Rake angle, relief angle and chip thickness are the variables considered experimentally with the FE study looking at average radial and tangential forces and surface compressive stress. For the experimental study a technique is developed to identify the critical process damping wavelength as a means of measuring process damping performance. For the range of parameters studied, chip thickness is found to be the dominant factor with maximum stable parameters increased by a factor of 17 in the best case. Within the range studied, relief angle was found to have a lesser effect than expected whilst rake angle had an influence.

  17. Note: Tesla transformer damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, J. L.

    2012-07-01

    Unexpected heavy damping in the two winding Tesla pulse transformer is shown to be due to small primary inductances. A small primary inductance is a necessary condition of operability, but is also a refractory inefficiency. A 30% performance loss is demonstrated using a typical "spiral strip" transformer. The loss is investigated by examining damping terms added to the transformer's governing equations. A significant alteration of the transformer's architecture is suggested to mitigate these losses. Experimental and simulated data comparing the 2 and 3 winding transformers are cited to support the suggestion.

  18. Damping seals for turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonpragenau, G. L.

    1985-01-01

    Rotor whirl stabilization of high performance turbomachinery which operates at supercritical speed is discussed. Basic whirl driving forces are reviewed. Stabilization and criteria are discussed. Damping seals are offered as a solution to whirl and high vibration problems. Concept, advantages, retrofitting, and limits of damping seals are explained. Dynamic and leakage properties are shown to require a rough stator surface for stability and efficiency. Typical seal characteristics are given for the case of the high pressure oxidizer turbopump of the Space Shuttle. Ways of implementation and bearing load effects are discussed.

  19. Damping seal for turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonpragenau, G. L. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A damping seal between a high speed rotor member and stator member that separates pressurized fluid compartments is described. It is characterized by the rotor member having a smooth outer surface and the stator member having its bore surface roughened by a plurality of pockets or depressions.

  20. Exotic damping ring lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.

    1987-05-01

    This paper looks at, and compares three types of damping ring lattices: conventional, wiggler lattice with finite ..cap alpha.., wiggler lattice with ..cap alpha.. = 0, and observes the attainable equilibrium emittances for the three cases assuming a constraint on the attainable longitudinal impedance of 0.2 ohms. The emittance obtained are roughly in the ratio 4:2:1 for these cases.

  1. Detumbling and nutation canceling maneuvers with complete analytic reduction for axially symmetric spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Marcello

    2010-04-01

    A new method is introduced to control and analyze the rotational motion of an axially symmetric rigid-body spacecraft. In particular, this motion is seen as the combination of the rotation of a virtual sphere with respect to the inertial frame, and the rotation of the body, about its symmetry axis, with respect to this sphere. Two new exact solutions are introduced for the motion of axially symmetric rigid bodies subjected to a constant external torque in the following cases: (1) torque parallel to the angular momentum and (2) torque parallel to the vectorial component of the angular momentum on the plane perpendicular to the symmetry axis. By building upon these results, two rotational maneuvers are proposed for axially symmetric spacecraft: a detumbling maneuver and a nutation canceling maneuver. The two maneuvers are the minimum time maneuvers for spherically constrained maximum torque. These maneuvers are simple and elegant, as they reduce the control of the three degrees-of-freedom nonlinear rotational motion to a single degree-of-freedom linear problem. Furthermore, the complete (both for the dynamics and for the kinematics) and exact analytic solutions are found for the two maneuvers. An extended survey is reported in the introduction of the paper of the few cases where the rotation of a rigid body is fully reduced to an exact analytic solution in closed form.

  2. Triaxial Earth's rotation: Chandler wobble, free core nutation and diurnal polar motion (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, R.; Shen, W.-B.

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we formulate two-layered triaxial Earth rotation theory, focusing on the influence of the triaxiality on the Chandler wobble (CW), free core nutation (FCN) and diurnal polar motion. We estimate the frequencies of the normal modes CW and FCN, and results show that though the influence of two-layer triaxiality on the CW and FCN frequencies are very small, there appear some new natures. The response of the Earth's polar motion to the excitation consists of two parts. One is in response to the same frequency excitation and the other is in response to the opposite frequency excitation. For an Earth model with triaxial mantle and core, both of these two parts have four resonant frequencies rather than two that are suggested by rotational symmetric Earth model. However, due to the small strength of these new resonances, the effects of these resonances are only significant when the excitation frequencies are very near to these resonance frequencies. In addition, compared to the biaxial case, the influences of the triaxiality on the prograde and retrograde diurnal polar motions excited by ocean tide component K1 are estimated as - 1.4 μas and - 0.9 μas respectively, which should be taken into account in theory. This study is supported by National 973 Project China (grant No. 2013CB733305), NSFC (grant Nos. 41174011, 41210006, 41128003, 41021061).

  3. Effects of adopting new precession, nutation and equinox corrections on the terrestrial reference frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, S. Y.; Mueller, I. I.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of adopting new definitive precession and equinox corrections on the terrestrial reference frame was investigated. It is noted that: (1) the effect on polar motion is a diurnal periodic term with an amplitude increasing linearly in time whole on UT1 it is a linear term; (2) general principles are given to determine the effects of small rotations of the frame of a conventional inertial reference system (CIS) on the frame of the conventional terrestrial reference system (CTS); (3) seven CTS options are presented, one of which is necessary to accommodate such rotation. Accommodating possible future changes in the astronomical nutation is discussed. The effects of differences which may exist between the various CTS's and CIS's on Earth rotation parameters (ERP) and how these differences can be determined are examined. It is shown that the CTS differences can be determined from observations made at the same site, while the CIS differences by comparing the ERP's determined by the different techniques during the same time period.

  4. Nonlinear and detuning effects of the nutation angle in precessionally forced rotating cylinder flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Juan M.; Marques, Francisco

    2016-06-01

    The flow in a rapidly rotating cylinder forced to precess through a nutation angle α is investigated numerically, keeping all parameters constant except α , and tuned to a triadic resonance at α =1∘ . When increasing α , the flow undergoes a sequence of well-characterized bifurcations associated with triadic resonance, involving heteroclinic and homoclinic cycles, for α up to about 4∘. For larger α , we identify two chaotic regimes. In the first regime, with α between about 4∘ and 27∘, the bulk flow retains remnants of the helical structures associated with the triadic resonance, but there are strong nonlinear interactions between the various azimuthal Fourier components of the flow. For the larger α regime, large detuning effects lead to the triadic resonance dynamics being completely swamped by boundary layer eruptions. The azimuthal mean flow at large angles results in a large mean deviation from solid-body rotation and the flow is characterized by strong shear at the boundary layers with temporally chaotic eruptions.

  5. Precession and nutation dynamics of nonlinearly coupled non-coaxial three-dimensional matter wave vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driben, R.; Konotop, V. V.; Meier, T.

    2016-03-01

    Nonlinearity is the driving force for numerous important effects in nature typically showing transitions between different regimes, regular, chaotic or catastrophic behavior. Localized nonlinear modes have been the focus of intense research in areas such as fluid and gas dynamics, photonics, atomic and solid state physics etc. Due to the richness of the behavior of nonlinear systems and due to the severe numerical demands of accurate three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations presently only little knowledge is available on the dynamics of complex nonlinear modes in 3D. Here, we investigate the dynamics of 3D non-coaxial matter wave vortices that are trapped in a parabolic potential and interact via a repulsive nonlinearity. Our numerical simulations demonstrate the existence of an unexpected and fascinating nonlinear regime that starts immediately when the nonlinearity is switched-on and is characterized by a smooth dynamics representing torque-free precession with nutations. The reported motion is proven to be robust regarding various effects such as the number of particles, dissipation and trap deformations and thus should be observable in suitably designed experiments. Since our theoretical approach, i.e., coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations, is quite generic, we expect that the obtained novel dynamical behavior should also exist in other nonlinear systems.

  6. Precession and nutation dynamics of nonlinearly coupled non-coaxial three-dimensional matter wave vortices

    PubMed Central

    Driben, R.; Konotop, V. V.; Meier, T.

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinearity is the driving force for numerous important effects in nature typically showing transitions between different regimes, regular, chaotic or catastrophic behavior. Localized nonlinear modes have been the focus of intense research in areas such as fluid and gas dynamics, photonics, atomic and solid state physics etc. Due to the richness of the behavior of nonlinear systems and due to the severe numerical demands of accurate three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations presently only little knowledge is available on the dynamics of complex nonlinear modes in 3D. Here, we investigate the dynamics of 3D non-coaxial matter wave vortices that are trapped in a parabolic potential and interact via a repulsive nonlinearity. Our numerical simulations demonstrate the existence of an unexpected and fascinating nonlinear regime that starts immediately when the nonlinearity is switched-on and is characterized by a smooth dynamics representing torque-free precession with nutations. The reported motion is proven to be robust regarding various effects such as the number of particles, dissipation and trap deformations and thus should be observable in suitably designed experiments. Since our theoretical approach, i.e., coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations, is quite generic, we expect that the obtained novel dynamical behavior should also exist in other nonlinear systems. PMID:26964759

  7. Damping formulas and experimental values of damping in flutter models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, Robert P

    1940-01-01

    The problem of determining values of structural damping for use in flutter calculations is discussed. The concept of equivalent viscous damping is reviewed and its relation to the structural damping coefficient g introduced in NACA Technical Report No. 685 is shown. The theory of normal modes is reviewed and a number of methods are described for separating the motions associated with different modes. Equations are developed for use in evaluating the damping parameters from experimental data. Experimental results of measurements of damping in several flutter models are presented.

  8. Cobalt Alloy Implant Debris Induces Inflammation and Bone Loss Primarily through Danger Signaling, Not TLR4 Activation: Implications for DAMP-ening Implant Related Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Samelko, Lauryn; Landgraeber, Stefan; McAllister, Kyron; Jacobs, Joshua; Hallab, Nadim James

    2016-01-01

    Cobalt alloy debris has been implicated as causative in the early failure of some designs of current total joint implants. The ability of implant debris to cause excessive inflammation via danger signaling (NLRP3 inflammasome) vs. pathogen associated pattern recognition receptors (e.g. Toll-like receptors; TLRs) remains controversial. Recently, specific non-conserved histidines on human TLR4 have been shown activated by cobalt and nickel ions in solution. However, whether this TLR activation is directly or indirectly an effect of metals or secondary endogenous alarmins (danger-associated molecular patterns, DAMPs) elicited by danger signaling, remains unknown and contentious. Our study indicates that in both a human macrophage cell line (THP-1) and primary human macrophages, as well as an in vivo murine model of inflammatory osteolysis, that Cobalt-alloy particle induced NLRP3 inflammasome danger signaling inflammatory responses were highly dominant relative to TLR4 activation, as measured respectively by IL-1β or TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10, tissue histology and quantitative bone loss measurement. Despite the lack of metal binding histidines H456 and H458 in murine TLR4, murine calvaria challenge with Cobalt alloy particles induced significant macrophage driven in vivo inflammation and bone loss inflammatory osteolysis, whereas LPS calvaria challenge alone did not. Additionally, no significant increase (p<0.05) in inflammation and inflammatory bone loss by LPS co-challenge with Cobalt vs. Cobalt alone was evident, even at high levels of LPS (i.e. levels commiserate with hematogenous levels in fatal sepsis, >500pg/mL). Therefore, not only do the results of this investigation support Cobalt alloy danger signaling induced inflammation, but under normal homeostasis low levels of hematogenous PAMPs (<2pg/mL) from Gram-negative bacteria, seem to have negligible contribution to the danger signaling responses elicited by Cobalt alloy metal implant debris. This suggests the

  9. A MINI X-RAY SURVEY OF SUB-DAMPED LYMAN-ALPHA ABSORPTION SYSTEMS: SEARCHING FOR ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI FORMED IN PROTOGALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Chartas, G.; Asper, A.; Kulkarni, V. P. E-mail: kulkarni@sc.edu

    2013-10-01

    A significant fraction of the sub-damped Lyman-alpha (sub-DLA) absorption systems in quasar spectra appear to be metal-rich, including many with even super-solar element abundances. This raises the question whether some sub-DLAs may harbor active galactic nuclei (AGNs), since supersolar metallicities are observed in AGNs. Here, we investigate this question based on a mini-survey of 21 quasars known to contain sub-DLAs in their spectra. The X-ray observations were performed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. In cases of no detection, we estimated upper limits for the X-ray luminosities of possible AGNs at the redshifts of the sub-DLAs. In six cases, we find possible X-ray emission within ∼1'' of the background quasar, which is consistent with the presence of a nearby X-ray source. If these nearby X-ray sources are at the redshifts of the sub-DLAs, then their estimated 0.2-10 keV luminosities range between 0.8 × 10{sup 44} h {sup –2} and 4.2 × 10{sup 44} h {sup –2} erg s{sup –1}, thus ruling out a normal late-type galaxy origin, and suggesting that the emission originates in a galactic nucleus near the center of a protogalaxy. The projected distances of these possible nearby X-ray sources from the background quasars lie in the range of 3-7 h {sup –1} kpc, which is consistent with our hypothesis that they represent AGNs centered on the sub-DLAs. Deeper follow-up X-ray and optical observations are required to confirm the marginal detections of X-rays from these sub-DLA galaxies.

  10. Damping seals for turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonpragenau, G. L.

    1982-01-01

    A rotor seal is proposed that restricts leakage like a labyrinth seal, but extends the stabilizing speed range beyond twice the first critical speed. The dynamic parameters were derived from bulk flow equations without requiring a dominant axial flow. The flow is considered incompressible and turbulent. Damping seals are shown to be feasible for extending the speed range of high performance turbomachinery beyond the limit imposed by conventional seals.

  11. Inertia-Wheel Vibration-Damping System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedor, Joseph V.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed electromechanical system would damp vibrations in large, flexible structure. In active vibration-damping system motors and reaction wheels at tips of appendages apply reaction torques in response to signals from accelerometers. Velocity signal for vibrations about one axis processes into control signal to oppose each of n vibrational modes. Various modes suppressed one at a time. Intended primarily for use in spacecraft that has large, flexible solar panels and science-instrument truss assembly, embodies principle of control interesting in its own right and adaptable to terrestrial structures, vehicles, and instrument platforms.

  12. Delay of Transition Using Forced Damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Exton, Reginald J.

    2014-01-01

    Several experiments which have reported a delay of transition are analyzed in terms of the frequencies of the induced disturbances generated by different flow control elements. Two of the experiments employed passive stabilizers in the boundary layer, one leading-edge bluntness, and one employed an active spark discharge in the boundary layer. It is found that the frequencies generated by the various elements lie in the damping region of the associated stability curve. It is concluded that the creation of strong disturbances in the damping region stabilizes the boundary-layer and delays the transition from laminar to turbulent flow.

  13. Uniform broadband excitation of crystallites in rotating solids using interleaved sequences of delays alternating with nutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitzthum, Veronika; Caporini, Marc A.; Ulzega, Simone; Trébosc, Julien; Lafon, Olivier; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2012-10-01

    In solids that are spinning about the magic angle, trains of short pulses in the manner of Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation (DANTE) allow one to improve the efficiency of the excitation of magnetization compared to rectangular pulses. By interleaving N pulse trains with N > 1, one obtains 'DANTE-N' sequences comprising N pulses per rotor period that extend over K rotor periods. Optimized interleaved DANTE schemes with N > 1 are shorter than basic DANTE-1 sequences with N = 1. Therefore, they are less affected by coherent or incoherent decays, thus leading to higher signal intensities than can be obtained with basic DANTE-1 or with rectangular pulses. Furthermore, the shorter length of DANTE-N with N > 1 increases the width of the spikelets in the excitation profile, allowing one to cover the range of isotropic chemical shifts and second-order quadrupolar effects typical for side-chain and backbone amide 14N sites in peptides at B0 = 18.8 T. In DANTE-N, spinning sidebands only appear at multiples of the spinning frequency νrot, as if the samples were rotating at Nνrot. We show applications to direct detection of nitrogen-14 nuclei with spin I = 1 subject to large quadrupole interactions, using fast magic angle spinning (typically νrot ⩾ 60 kHz), backed up by simulations that provide insight into the properties of basic and interleaved DANTE sequences. When used for indirect detection, we show by numerical simulations that even basic DANTE-1 sequences can lead to a four-fold boost of efficiency compared to standard rectangular pulses.

  14. Methods for improving damping. Part 3: Damping material data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-12-01

    ESDU 92001 presents modulus and loss factor for 27 damping materials in the form of reduced temperature nomograms which allow the effects of frequency and temperature on those properties to be considered simultaneously. The data were supplied by 5 manufacturers, and their addresses in the UK and US are provided. The information is a necessary input in computational procedures, described in ESDU 91013, dealing with the application of layered damping treatments to beam- and plate-like structures. Notes are included on the measurement and reliability of the damping quantities that affect the variability allowances to be made when assessing a damping treatment for a particular application. Factors to be considered when selecting a damping material are discussed. Approximate relationships between the elastic properties of damping materials are given.

  15. Vibrational modes and damping in the cochlear partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Maoiléidigh, Dáibhid; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    It has been assumed in models of cochlear mechanics that the primary role of the cochlear active process is to counteract the damping of the basilar membrane, the vibration of which is much larger in a living animal than post mortem. Recent measurements of the relative motion between the reticular lamina and basilar membrane imply that this assumption is incorrect. We propose that damping is distributed throughout the cochlear partition rather than being concentrated in the basilar membrane. In the absence of significant damping, the cochlear partition possesses three modes of vibration, each associated with its own locus of Hopf bifurcations. Hair-cell activity can amplify any of these modes if the system's operating point lies near the corresponding bifurcation. The distribution of damping determines which mode of vibration predominates. For physiological levels of damping, only one mode produces a vibration pattern consistent with experimental measurements of relative motion and basilar-membrane motion.

  16. On damping mechanisms in beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Inman, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    A partial differential equation model of a cantilevered beam with a tip mass at its free end is used to study damping in a composite. Four separate damping mechanisms consisting of air damping, strain rate damping, spatial hysteresis and time hysteresis are considered experimentally. Dynamic tests were performed to produce time histories. The time history data is then used along with an approximate model to form a sequence of least squares problems. The solution of the least squares problem yields the estimated damping coefficients. The resulting experimentally determined analytical model is compared with the time histories via numerical simulation of the dynamic response. The procedure suggested here is compared with a standard modal damping ratio model commonly used in experimental modal analysis.

  17. Damping measurements in flowing water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutu, A.; Seeley, C.; Monette, C.; Nennemann, B.; Marmont, H.

    2012-11-01

    Fluid-structure interaction (FSI), in the form of mass loading and damping, governs the dynamic response of water turbines, such as Francis turbines. Water added mass and damping are both critical quantities in evaluating the dynamic response of the turbine component. Although the effect of fluid added mass is well documented, fluid damping, a critical quantity to limit vibration amplitudes during service, and therefore to help avoiding possible failure of the turbines, has received much less attention in the literature. This paper presents an experimental investigation of damping due to FSI. The experimental setup, designed to create dynamic characteristics similar to the ones of Francis turbine blades is discussed, together with the experimental protocol and examples of measurements obtained. The paper concludes with the calculated damping values and a discussion on the impact of the observed damping behaviour on the response of hydraulic turbine blades to FSI.

  18. Magnetically Damped Furnace (MDF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Magnetically Damped Furnace (MDF) breadboard is being developed in response to NASA's mission and goals to advance the scientific knowledge of microgravity research, materials science, and related technologies. The objective of the MDF is to dampen the fluid flows due to density gradients and surface tension gradients in conductive melts by introducing a magnetic field during the sample processing. The MDF breadboard will serve as a proof of concept that the MDF performance requirements can be attained within the International Space Station resource constraints.

  19. Estimation of the free core nutation period by the sliding-window complex least-squares fit method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yonghong; Zhu, Qiang; Salstein, David A.; Xu, Xueqing; Shi, Si; Liao, Xinhao

    2016-05-01

    Estimation of the free core nutation (FCN) period is a challenging prospect. Mostly, two methods, one direct and one indirect, have been applied in the past to address the problem by analyzing the Earth orientation parameters observed by the very long baseline interferometry. The indirect method estimates the FCN period from resonance effects of the FCN on forced nutation terms, whereas the direct method estimates the FCN period using the Fourier Transform (FT) approach. However, the FCN period estimated by the direct FT technique suffers from the non-stationary characteristics of celestial pole offsets (CPO). In this study, the FCN period is estimated by another direct method, i.e., the sliding-window complex least-squares fit method (SCLF). The estimated values of the FCN period for the full set of 1984.0-2014.0 and four subsets (1984.0-2000.0, 2000.0-2014.0, 1984.0-1990.0, 1990.0-2014.0) range from -428.8 to -434.3 mean solar days. From the FT to the SCLF method, the estimate uncertainty of the FCN period falls from several tens of days to several days. Thus, the SCLF method may serve as an independent direct way to estimate the FCN period, complementing and validating the indirect resonance method that has been frequently used before.

  20. The Joint Damping Experiment (JDX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkman, Steven L.; Bingham, Jeff G.; Crookston, Jess R.; Dutson, Joseph D.; Ferney, Brook D.; Ferney, Greg D.; Rowsell, Edwin A.

    1997-01-01

    The Joint Damping Experiment (JDX), flown on the Shuttle STS-69 Mission, is designed to measure the influence of gravity on the structural damping of a high precision three bay truss. Principal objectives are: (1) Measure vibration damping of a small-scale, pinjointed truss to determine how pin gaps give rise to gravity-dependent damping rates; (2) Evaluate the applicability of ground and low-g aircraft tests for predicting on-orbit behavior; and (3) Evaluate the ability of current nonlinear finite element codes to model the dynamic behavior of the truss. Damping of the truss was inferred from 'Twang' tests that involve plucking the truss structure and recording the decay of the oscillations. Results are summarized as follows. (1) Damping, rates can change by a factor of 3 to 8 through changing the truss orientation; (2) The addition of a few pinned joints to a truss structure can increase the damping by a factor as high as 30; (3) Damping is amplitude dependent; (4) As gravity induced preloads become large (truss long axis perpendicular to gravity vector) the damping is similar to non-pinjointed truss; (5) Impacting in joints drives higher modes in structure; (6) The torsion mode disappears if gravity induced preloads are low.

  1. New concepts for damping rings

    SciTech Connect

    Raimondi, P.; Wolski, A.

    2002-05-30

    The requirements for very low emittance and short damping time in the damping rings of future linear colliders, naturally lead to very small beta functions and dispersion in the ring arcs. This makes it difficult to make chromatic correction while maintaining good dynamics. We have therefore developed a lattice with very simple arcs (designed to give the best product of emittance and damping time), and with separate chromatic correction in a dedicated section. The chromatic correction is achieved using a series of non-interleaved sextupole pairs. The performance of such a solution is comparable to that of current damping ring designs, while there are a number of potential advantages.

  2. Nonlinear damping model for flexible structures. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, Weijian

    1990-01-01

    The study of nonlinear damping problem of flexible structures is addressed. Both passive and active damping, both finite dimensional and infinite dimensional models are studied. In the first part, the spectral density and the correlation function of a single DOF nonlinear damping model is investigated. A formula for the spectral density is established with O(Gamma(sub 2)) accuracy based upon Fokker-Planck technique and perturbation. The spectral density depends upon certain first order statistics which could be obtained if the stationary density is known. A method is proposed to find the approximate stationary density explicitly. In the second part, the spectral density of a multi-DOF nonlinear damping model is investigated. In the third part, energy type nonlinear damping model in an infinite dimensional setting is studied.

  3. A quantum description of radiation damping and the free induction signal in magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Tropp, James

    2013-07-07

    We apply the methods of cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED), to obtain a microscopic and fully quantum-mechanical picture of radiation damping in magnetic resonance, and the nascent formation of the free induction signal. Numerical solution of the Tavis-Cummings model - i.e., multiple spins 1/2 coupled to a lossless single-mode cavity - shows in fine detail the transfer of Zeeman energy, via spin coherence, to excite the cavity - represented here by a quantized LC resonator. The case of a single spin is also solved analytically. Although the motion of the Bloch vector is non-classical, we nonetheless show that the quantum mechanical Rabi nutation frequency (as enhanced by cavity coupling and stimulated emission) gives realistic estimates of macroscopic signal strength and the radiation damping constant in nuclear magnetic resonance. We also show how to introduce dissipation: cavity losses by means of a master equation, and relaxation by the phenomenological method of Bloch. The failure to obtain the full Bloch equations (unless semi-classical conditions are imposed on the cavity) is discussed in light of similar issues arising in CQED (and in earlier work in magnetic resonance as well), as are certain problems relative to quantization of the electromagnetic near-field.

  4. DAMP signaling in fungal infections and diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Cristina; Carvalho, Agostinho; Esposito, Antonella; Bistoni, Francesco; Romani, Luigina

    2012-01-01

    Fungal infections and diseases predominantly affect patients with deregulated immunity. Compelling experimental and clinical evidence indicate that severe fungal diseases belong to the spectrum of fungus-related inflammatory diseases. Some degree of inflammation is required for protection during the transitional response occurring temporally between the rapid innate and slower adaptive response. However, progressive inflammation worsens disease and ultimately prevents pathogen eradication. The challenge now is to elucidate cellular and molecular pathways distinguishing protective vs. pathogenic inflammation to fungi. In addition to fungal ligands of pattern recognition receptors (pathogen-associated molecular patterns, PAMPs), several host-encoded proteins, the damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), are released during tissue injury and activate innate recognition receptors. DAMPs have been shown to regulate inflammation in fungal diseases. The DAMP/receptor for advanced glycation end-products axis integrated with the PAMP/Toll-like receptors axis in the generation of the inflammatory response in experimental and clinical fungal pneumonia. These emerging themes better accommodate fungal pathogenesis in the face of high-level inflammation seen in several clinical settings and point to DAMP targeting as a novel immunomodulatory strategy in fungal diseases. PMID:22973279

  5. Vibration damping for the Segmented Mirror Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maly, Joseph R.; Yingling, Adam J.; Griffin, Steven F.; Agrawal, Brij N.; Cobb, Richard G.; Chambers, Trevor S.

    2012-09-01

    The Segmented Mirror Telescope (SMT) at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) in Monterey is a next-generation deployable telescope, featuring a 3-meter 6-segment primary mirror and advanced wavefront sensing and correction capabilities. In its stowed configuration, the SMT primary mirror segments collapse into a small volume; once on location, these segments open to the full 3-meter diameter. The segments must be very accurately aligned after deployment and the segment surfaces are actively controlled using numerous small, embedded actuators. The SMT employs a passive damping system to complement the actuators and mitigate the effects of low-frequency (<40 Hz) vibration modes of the primary mirror segments. Each of the six segments has three or more modes in this bandwidth, and resonant vibration excited by acoustics or small disturbances on the structure can result in phase mismatches between adjacent segments thereby degrading image quality. The damping system consists of two tuned mass dampers (TMDs) for each of the mirror segments. An adjustable TMD with passive magnetic damping was selected to minimize sensitivity to changes in temperature; both frequency and damping characteristics can be tuned for optimal vibration mitigation. Modal testing was performed with a laser vibrometry system to characterize the SMT segments with and without the TMDs. Objectives of this test were to determine operating deflection shapes of the mirror and to quantify segment edge displacements; relative alignment of λ/4 or better was desired. The TMDs attenuated the vibration amplitudes by 80% and reduced adjacent segment phase mismatches to acceptable levels.

  6. Utilising HVDC to damp power oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Smed, T.; Andersson, G. . Dept. of Electric Power Systems)

    1993-04-01

    In this paper, damping of slow oscillations with active and reactive power modulation of HVDC-links is analyzed with the aim of gaining a physical insight into the problem. The analysis shows that active power modulation is efficient when applied to a short mass-scaled electrical distance from one of the swinging machines, and reactive power modulation is most efficient when there exists a well-defined power flow direction and the modulation is made at a point close to the electrical midpoint between the swinging machines. It is shown that the intuitively appealing feedback signals frequency and derivative of the voltage are appropriate for active and reactive power modulation, respectively. The impact of the constraints imposed by the HVDC equations are analyzed, and it is determined when the implicit reactive power modulation resulting from constant [gamma] control may be detrimental for the damping.

  7. Damping Vibration at an Impeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, J. A.; Rowan, B. F.

    1982-01-01

    Vibration of pump shaft is damped at impeller--where vibration-induced deflections are greatest--by shroud and seal. Damping reduces vibrational motion of shaft at bearings and load shaft places on them. Flow through clearance channel absorbs vibration energy.

  8. The Latest Results from DAMPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jin

    2016-07-01

    DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) successfully launched on Dec.17, 2015 is the first Chinese astronomical satellite that can measure 2 GeV-10 TeV electrons and gamma-rays with unprecedented energy resolution. In this talk I will introduce the design, the beam-test, the on-orbit calibration and some preliminary results of DAMPE.

  9. Surge-damping vacuum valve

    DOEpatents

    Bullock, Jack C.; Kelly, Benjamin E.

    1980-01-01

    A valve having a mechanism for damping out flow surges in a vacuum system which utilizes a slotted spring-loaded disk positioned adjacent the valve's vacuum port. Under flow surge conditions, the differential pressure forces the disk into sealing engagement with the vacuum port, thereby restricting the flow path to the slots in the disk damping out the flow surge.

  10. Damping seal verification setup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cappel, K. L.

    1985-01-01

    The heart of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) is a set of turbopumps that propel cryogenic fluids at very high pressures and flow rates, at rotor speeds up to 37,000 rpm. Bushing seals that cause the flow in the fluid film to become turbulent, by means of a multiplicity of pockets, were shown theoretically not only to inhibit subsynchronous whirl, but to reduce leakage as well. However, experimental data that relate these two desirable characteristics to such parameters as pocket depth, Reynolds number (based on clearance and axial flow rate), and rotating speed are limited. To obtain the required data, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) commissioned Wyle Laboratories to design, build and operate a test rig in which the damping efficacy and leakage reduction of typical candidate seals are to be evaluated.

  11. Damping measurements using operational data

    SciTech Connect

    James, G.H.; Carne, T.G.; Veers, P.S.

    1996-08-01

    The authors have measured modal damping using strain-gauge data from an operating wind turbine. This new technique for measuring modal damping is easier and less expensive than previously used methods. Auto-correlation and cross-correlation functions of the strain-gauge data have been shown to consist of decaying sinusoids which correspond to the modal frequencies and damping ratios of the wind turbine. The authors have verified the method by extracting damping values from an analytically generated data set. Actual operating response data from the DOE/Sandia 34-m Test Bed has been used to calculate modal damping ratios as a function of rotor rotation rate. This capability will allow more accurate fatigue life prediction and control.

  12. Damping Bearings In High-Speed Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Pragenau, George L.

    1994-01-01

    Paper presents comparison of damping bearings with traditional ball, roller, and hydrostatic bearings in high-speed cryogenic turbopumps. Concept of damping bearings described in "Damping Seals and Bearings for a Turbomachine" (MFS-28345).

  13. Self-Damping Sprung Wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1993-01-01

    Self-damping sprung wheel provides shock-absorbing suspension for wheelchair, reducing user's discomfort when traversing rough terrain or obstacles. Pair of self-damping sprung wheels installed in place of conventional large rear wheels of standard wheelchair, which user operates in conventional manner. Rim deflects in vicinity of contact with ground or floor. Includes inner and outer hoops bending when obstacle encountered. Shear deformation of elastomeric hoop between them absorbs energy. Thus, three hoops act together as damping spring. Alternative version of wheel designed for bicycle.

  14. Gravity field and solar component of the precession rate and nutation coefficients of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhotka, C.; Reimond, S.; Souchay, J.; Baur, O.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is first to determine the gravity field of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and second to derive the solar component of the precession rate and nutation coefficients of the spin-axis of the comet nucleus, i.e. without the direct, usually larger, effect of outgassing. The gravity field and related moments of inertia are obtained from two polyhedra, which are provided by the Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System (OSIRIS) and NAVigation CAMera (NAVCAM) experiments on Rosetta, and are based on the assumption of uniform density for the comet nucleus. We also calculate the forced precession rate as well as the nutation coefficients on the basis of Kinoshita's theory of rotation of the rigid Earth and adapted it to be able to indirectly include the effect of outgassing on the rotational parameters. The second degree denormalized Stokes coefficients of comet 67P/C-G turn out to be (bracketed numbers refer to second shape model) C20 ≃ -6.74 [-7.93] × 10-2, C22 ≃ 2.60 [2.71] × 10-2, consistent with normalized principal moments of inertia A/MR2 ≃ 0.13 [0.11], B/MR2 ≃ 0.23 [0.22], with polar moment c = C/MR2 ≃ 0.25, depending on the choice of the polyhedron model. The obliquity between the rotation axis and the mean orbit normal is ε ≃ 52°, and the precession rate only due to solar torques becomes dot{ψ }in [20,30] arcsec yr^{-1}. Oscillations in longitude caused by the gravitational pull of the Sun turn out to be of the order of Δψ ≃ 1 arcmin, and oscillations in obliquity can be estimated to be of the order of Δε ≃ 0.5 arcmin.

  15. Design, analysis, and testing of high frequency passively damped struts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yiu, Y. C.; Davis, L. Porter; Napolitano, Kevin; Ninneman, R. Rory

    1993-01-01

    Objectives of the research are: (1) to develop design requirements for damped struts to stabilize control system in the high frequency cross-over and spill-over range; (2) to design, fabricate and test viscously damped strut and viscoelastically damped strut; (3) to verify accuracy of design and analysis methodology of damped struts; and (4) to design and build test apparatus, and develop data reduction algorithm to measure strut complex stiffness. In order to meet the stringent performance requirements of the SPICE experiment, the active control system is used to suppress the dynamic responses of the low order structural modes. However, the control system also inadvertently drives some of the higher order modes unstable in the cross-over and spill-over frequency range. Passive damping is a reliable and effective way to provide damping to stabilize the control system. It also improves the robustness of the control system. Damping is designed into the SPICE testbed as an integral part of the control-structure technology.

  16. Gilbert damping in noncollinear ferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhe; Hals, Kjetil M D; Liu, Yi; Starikov, Anton A; Brataas, Arne; Kelly, Paul J

    2014-12-31

    The precession and damping of a collinear magnetization displaced from its equilibrium are well described by the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. The theoretical and experimental complexity of noncollinear magnetizations is such that it is not known how the damping is modified by the noncollinearity. We use first-principles scattering theory to investigate transverse domain walls (DWs) of the important ferromagnetic alloy Ni80Fe20 and show that the damping depends not only on the magnetization texture but also on the specific dynamic modes of Bloch and Néel DWs in ways that were not theoretically predicted. Even in the highly disordered Ni80Fe20 alloy, the damping is found to be remarkably nonlocal. PMID:25615368

  17. Damping measurements using operational data

    SciTech Connect

    James, G.H.; Carne, T.G.; Veers, P.S.

    1991-01-01

    We have measured modal damping using strain-gauge data from an operating wind turbine. Previously, such measurements were difficult and expensive. Auto-correlation and cross-correlation functions of the strain-gauge data have been shown to consist of decaying sinusoids which correspond to the modal frequencies and damping ratios of the wind turbine. We have verified the method by extracting damping values from an analytically generated data set. Actual operating response data from the DOE/Sandia 34-meter Test Bed has been used to calculate modal damping ratios as a function of rotor rotation rate. This capability will allow more accurate fatigue life prediction and control. 16 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Transverse damping systems in modern synchrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhabitsky, V. M.

    2006-12-01

    Transverse feedback systems for suppression of transverse coherent beam oscillations are used in modern synchrotrons for preventing the development of transverse instabilities and damping residual beam oscillations after injection. Information on damper systems for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC; CERN, Geneva) and the accelerator complex FAIR (GSI, Darmstadt) is presented. The project for the LHC is being performed at the Laboratory of Particle Physics of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in collaboration with CERN. The information concerning the state of the project and the plans of its completion at the LHC is given. The results of the first design activity on transverse damping systems at the SIS100 and SIS300 synchrotrons, to be created in the framework of the new international project FAIR, are presented.

  19. The effects of the space environment on damping materials and damping designs on flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kluesener, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of space environments on damping materials and damping designs on flexible structures were investigated. The following items were examined: damping of flexible spacecraft appendages; composite loss factor (n sub s) vs. time in high vacuum for damped test beams and damping of flexible structures. The STEP experiments show inherent damping of flexible structures in space effective possible damping design configurations for space structures, effects of passively damped components on the system loss factor of flexible structures and the effect of space environment on properties of damping materials.

  20. Liquid culture production of microsclerotia and submerged conidia by Trichoderma harzianum active against damping-off disease caused by Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Kobori, Nilce N; Mascarin, Gabriel M; Jackson, Mark A; Schisler, David A

    2015-04-01

    Media and culturing protocols were identified that supported the formation of submerged conidia and microsclerotia (MS) by Trichoderma harzianum Rifai strain T-22 using liquid culture fermentation. Liquid media with a higher carbon concentration (36 g L(-1)) promoted MS formation at all C:N ratios tested. Hyphae aggregated to form MS after 2 d growth and after 7 d MS were fully melanized. This is the first report of MS formation by T. harzianum or any species of Trichoderma. Furthermore, submerged conidia formation was induced by liquid culture media, but yields, desiccation tolerance, and storage stability varied with C:N ratio and carbon rate. Air-dried MS granules (<4% moisture) retained excellent shelf life under cool and unrefrigerated storage conditions with no loss in conidial production. A low-cost complex nitrogen source based on cottonseed flour effectively supported high MS yields. Amending potting mix with dried MS formulations reduced or eliminated damping-off of melon seedlings caused by Rhizoctonia solani. Together, the results provide insights into the liquid culture production, stabilization process, and bioefficacy of the hitherto unreported MS of T. harzianum as a potential biofungicide for use in integrated management programs against soilborne diseases. PMID:25813507

  1. Characterising the interaction of individual-wheel drives with traction by linear parameter-varying model: a method for analysing the role of traction in torsional vibrations in wheel drives and active damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhun Yeap, Khang; Müller, Steffen

    2016-02-01

    A model-based approach for characterising the interaction of individual-wheel drives with traction is contributed in this article. The primary aim is to investigate the influence of traction on torsional vibration behaviour in the drive train. The essence of this approach lies in reformulating the nonlinear traction behaviour into its differential form, which enables an analytical description of this interaction in its linear parameter-varying model equivalence. Analytical statements on the vibration behaviour for different driving scenarios are inferred from this model and validated with measurement samples from a high-performance electric road vehicle. Subsequent influences of traction on the performance of active damping of torsional vibrations are derived from this model.

  2. A comparative experimental study on structural and interface damping approaches for vibration suppression purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Sanchez, Alberto; Zogg, Markus; Ermanni, Paolo

    2010-04-01

    Dynamic loadings in automotive structures may lead to reduction of driving comfort and even to failure of the components. Damping treatments are applied in order to attenuate the vibrations and improve the long term fatigue behavior of the structures. This experimental study is targeting applications in floor panels that are mounted to the loadcarrying primary structure of the vehicle. The objective is to reach outstanding damping performance considering the stringent weight and cost requirement in the automotive industry. An experimental setup has been developed and validated for the determination of the damping properties of structural specimens also considering interface damping effects. This contribution is structured in three main parts: test rig design, experimental results and discussion. Reliable and easy-to-use devices for the characterization of the damping properties of specimens between 200×40 mm2 and 400×400 mm2 are not available "on the shelf". In this context, we present a flexible experimental set-up which has been realized to (1) support the development of novel damping solutions for multi-functional composite structures; (2) characterize the loss-factor of the different damping concepts, including boundary effects. A variety of novel passive and active damping treatments have been investigated including viscoelastic, coulomb, magnetorheological (MR), particle, magnetic and eddy current damping. The particle, interface as well as active damping systems show promising performance in comparison to the classical viscoelastic treatments.

  3. Damping filter method for obtaining spatially localized solutions.

    PubMed

    Teramura, Toshiki; Toh, Sadayoshi

    2014-05-01

    Spatially localized structures are key components of turbulence and other spatiotemporally chaotic systems. From a dynamical systems viewpoint, it is desirable to obtain corresponding exact solutions, though their existence is not guaranteed. A damping filter method is introduced to obtain variously localized solutions and adapted in two typical cases. This method introduces a spatially selective damping effect to make a good guess at the exact solution, and we can obtain an exact solution through a continuation with the damping amplitude. The first target is a steady solution to the Swift-Hohenberg equation, which is a representative of bistable systems in which localized solutions coexist and a model for spanwise-localized cases. Not only solutions belonging to the well-known snaking branches but also those belonging to isolated branches known as "isolas" are found with continuation paths between them in phase space extended with the damping amplitude. This indicates that this spatially selective excitation mechanism has an advantage in searching spatially localized solutions. The second target is a spatially localized traveling-wave solution to the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation, which is a model for streamwise-localized cases. Since the spatially selective damping effect breaks Galilean and translational invariances, the propagation velocity cannot be determined uniquely while the damping is active, and a singularity arises when these invariances are recovered. We demonstrate that this singularity can be avoided by imposing a simple condition, and a localized traveling-wave solution is obtained with a specific propagation speed. PMID:25353864

  4. Timoshenko systems with indefinite damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz Rivera, Jaime E.; Racke, Reinhard

    2008-05-01

    We consider the Timoshenko system in a bounded domain . The system has an indefinite damping mechanism, i.e. with a damping function a=a(x) possibly changing sign, present only in the equation for the rotation angle. We shall prove that the system is still exponentially stable under the same conditions as in the positive constant damping case, and provided and , for [epsilon] small enough. The decay rate will be described explicitly. In the arguments, we shall also give a new proof of exponential stability for the constant case . Moreover, we give a precise description of the decay rate and demonstrate that the system has the spectrum determined growth (SDG) property, i.e. the type of the induced semigroup coincides with the spectral bound for its generator.

  5. Landau damping of auroral hiss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, D. D.; Gurnett, D. A.; Menietti, J. D.; Winningham, J. D.; Burch, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    Auroral hiss is observed to propagate over distances comparable to an Earth radius from its source in the auroral oval. The role of Landau damping is investigated for upward propagating auroral hiss. By using a ray tracing code and a simplified model of the distribution function, the effect of Landau damping is calculated for auroral hiss propagation through the environment around the auroral oval. Landau damping is found to be the likely mechanism for explaining some of the one-sided auroral hiss funnels observed by Dynamics Explorer 1. It is also found that Landau damping puts a lower limit on the wavelength of auroral hiss. Poleward of the auroral oval, Landau damping is found in a typical case to limit omega/k(sub parallel) to values of 3.4 x 10(exp 4) km/s or greater, corresponding to resonance energies of 3.2 keV or greater and wavelengths of 2 km or greater. For equatorward propagation, omega/k(sub parallel) is limited to values greater than 6.8 x 10(exp 4) km/s, corresponding to resonance energies greater than 13 keV and wavelengths greater than 3 km. Independent estimates based on measured ratios of the magnetic to electric field intensity also show that omega/k(sub parallel) corresponds to resonance energies greater than 1 keV and wavelengths greater than 1 km. These results lead to the difficulty that upgoing electron beams sufficiently energetic to directly generate auroral hiss of the inferred wavelength are not usually observed. A partial transmission mechanism utilizing density discontinuities oblique to the magnetic field is proposed for converting auroral hiss to wavelengths long enough to avoid damping of the wave over long distances. Numerous reflections of the wave in an upwardly flared density cavity could convert waves to significantly increased wavelengths and resonance velocities.

  6. Landau damping of auroral hiss

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, D.D.; Gurnett, D.A.; Menietti, J.D.; Winningham, J.D.; Burch, J.L.

    1994-02-01

    Auroral hiss is observed to propagate over distances comparable to an Earth radius from its source in the auroral oval. The role of Landau damping is investigated for upward propagating auroral hiss. By using a ray tracing code and a simplified model of the distribution function, the effect of Landau damping is calculated for auroral hiss propagation through the environment around the auroral oval. Landau damping is found to be the likely mechanism for explaining some of the one-sided auroral hiss funnels observed by Dynamics Explorer 1. It is also found that Landau damping puts a lower limit on the wavelength of auroral hiss. Poleward of the auroral oval, Landau damping is found in a typical case to limit {omega}/k{parallel} to values of 3.4 x 10{sup 4} km/s or greater, corresponding to resonance energies of 3.2 keV or greater and wavelengths of 2 km or greater. For equatorward propagation, {omega}/k{parallel} is limited to values greater than 6.8 x 10{sup 4} km/s, corresponding to resonance energies greater than 13 keV and wavelengths greater than 3 km. Independent estimates based on measured ratios of the magnetic to electric field intensity also show that {omega}/k{parallel} corresponds to resonance energies greater than 1 keV and wavelengths greater than 1 km. These results lead to the difficulty that upgoing electron beams sufficiently energetic to directly generate auroral hiss of the inferred wavelength are not usually observed. A partial transmission mechanism utilizing density discontinuities oblique to the magnetic field is proposed for converting auroral hiss to wavelengths long enough to avoid damping of the wave over long distances. Numerous reflections of the wave in an upwardly flared density cavity could convert waves to significantly increased wavelengths and resonance velocities. 36 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Damped vacuum states of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philbin, T. G.

    2016-09-01

    We consider one-dimensional propagation of quantum light in the presence of a block of material, with a full account of dispersion and absorption. The electromagnetic zero-point energy for some frequencies is damped (suppressed) by the block below the free-space value, while for other frequencies it is increased. We also calculate the regularized (Casimir) zero-point energy at each frequency and find that it too is damped below the free-space value (zero) for some frequencies. The total Casimir energy is positive.

  8. Structural damping studies at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Clarence P., Jr.; Buehrle, Ralph D.

    1994-01-01

    Results of an engineering study to measure changes in structural damping properties of two cryogenic wind tunnel model systems and two metallic test specimens at cryogenic temperatures are presented. Data are presented which indicate overall, a trend toward reduced structural damping at cryogenic temperatures (-250 degrees F) when compared with room temperature damping properties. The study was focused on structures and materials used for model systems tested in the National Transonic Facility (NTF). The study suggests that the significant reductions in damping at extremely cold temperatures are most likely associated with changes in mechanical joint compliance damping rather than changes in material (solid) damping.

  9. Pulsed electron spin nutation spectroscopy of weakly exchange-coupled biradicals: a general theoretical approach and determination of the spin dipolar interaction.

    PubMed

    Ayabe, Kazuki; Sato, Kazunobu; Nishida, Shinsuke; Ise, Tomoaki; Nakazawa, Shigeaki; Sugisaki, Kenji; Morita, Yasushi; Toyota, Kazuo; Shiomi, Daisuke; Kitagawa, Masahiro; Takui, Takeji

    2012-07-01

    Weakly exchange-coupled biradicals have attracted much attention in terms of their DNP application in NMR spectroscopy for biological systems or the use of synthetic electron-spin qubits. Pulse-ESR based electron spin nutation (ESN) spectroscopy applied to biradicals is generally treated as transition moment spectroscopy from the theoretical side, illustrating that it is a powerful and facile tool to determine relatively short distances between weakly exchange-coupled electron spins. The nutation frequency as a function of the microwave irradiation strength ω(1) (angular frequency) for any cases of weakly exchange-coupled systems can be classified into three categories; D(12) (spin dipolar interaction)-driven, Δg-driven and ω(1)-driven nutation behaviour with the increasing strength of ω(1). For hetero-spin biradicals, Δg effects can be a dominating characteristic in the biradical nutation spectroscopy. Two-dimensional pulse-based electron spin nutation (2D-ESN) spectroscopy operating at the X-band can afford to determine small values of D(12) in weakly exchange-coupled biradicals in rigid glasses. The analytical expressions derived here for ω(1)-dependent nutation frequencies are based on only four electronic spin states relevant to the biradicals, while real biradical systems often have sizable hyperfine interactions. Thus, we have evaluated nuclear hyperfine effects on the nutation frequencies to check the validity of the present theoretical treatment. The experimental spin dipolar coupling of a typical TEMPO-based biradical 1, (2,2,6,6-tetra[((2)H(3))methyl]-[3,3-(2)H(2),4-(2)H(1),5,5-(2)H(2)]piperidin-N-oxyl-4-yl)(2,2,6,6-tetra[((2)H(3))methyl]-[3,3-(2)H(2),4-(2)H(1),5,5-(2)H(2),(15)N]piperidin-(15)N-oxyl-4-yl) terephthalate in a toluene glass, with a distance of 1.69 nm between the two spin sites is D(12) = -32 MHz (the effect of the exchange coupling J(12) is vanishing due to the homo-spin sites of 1, i.e.Δg = 0), while 0 < |J(12)|≦ 1.0 MHz as

  10. Broadband excitation and indirect detection of nitrogen-14 in rotating solids using Delays Alternating with Nutation (DANTE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitzthum, Veronika; Caporini, Marc A.; Ulzega, Simone; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2011-09-01

    A train of short rotor-synchronized pulses in the manner of Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation (DANTE) applied to nitrogen-14 nuclei ( I = 1) in samples spinning at the magic angle at high frequencies (typically νrot = 62.5 kHz so that τrot = 16 μs) allows one to achieve uniform excitation of a great number of spinning sidebands that arise from large first-order quadrupole interactions, as occur for aromatic nitrogen-14 nuclei in histidine. With routine rf amplitudes ω1( 14N)/(2 π) = 60 kHz and very short pulses of a typical duration 0.5 < τp < 2 μs, efficient excitation can be achieved with 13 rotor-synchronized pulses in 13 τrot = 208 μs. Alternatively, with 'overtone' DANTE sequences using 2, 4, or 8 pulses per rotor period one can achieve efficient broadband excitation in fewer rotor periods, typically 2-4 τrot. These principles can be combined with the indirect detection of 14N nuclei via spy nuclei with S = ½ such as 1H or 13C in the manner of Dipolar Heteronuclear Multiple-Quantum Correlation (D-HMQC).

  11. Dealing with damping-off

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Damping-off is a common disease that rots and kills both seeds and recently germinated seedlings. The disease is caused by number of different soilborne pathogens, including true fungi (Botrytis, Fusarium, and Rhizoctonia species) and oomycetes (Phytophthora and Pythium species). The seedlings of mo...

  12. Damped Oscillator with Delta-Kicked Frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manko, O. V.

    1996-01-01

    Exact solutions of the Schrodinger equation for quantum damped oscillator subject to frequency delta-kick describing squeezed states are obtained. The cases of strong, intermediate, and weak damping are investigated.

  13. Prognostic and Predictive Value of DAMPs and DAMP-Associated Processes in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fucikova, Jitka; Moserova, Irena; Urbanova, Linda; Bezu, Lucillia; Kepp, Oliver; Cremer, Isabelle; Salek, Cyril; Strnad, Pavel; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Spisek, Radek

    2015-01-01

    It is now clear that human neoplasms form, progress, and respond to therapy in the context of an intimate crosstalk with the host immune system. In particular, accumulating evidence demonstrates that the efficacy of most, if not all, chemo- and radiotherapeutic agents commonly employed in the clinic critically depends on the (re)activation of tumor-targeting immune responses. One of the mechanisms whereby conventional chemotherapeutics, targeted anticancer agents, and radiotherapy can provoke a therapeutically relevant, adaptive immune response against malignant cells is commonly known as “immunogenic cell death.” Importantly, dying cancer cells are perceived as immunogenic only when they emit a set of immunostimulatory signals upon the activation of intracellular stress response pathways. The emission of these signals, which are generally referred to as “damage-associated molecular patterns” (DAMPs), may therefore predict whether patients will respond to chemotherapy or not, at least in some settings. Here, we review clinical data indicating that DAMPs and DAMP-associated stress responses might have prognostic or predictive value for cancer patients. PMID:26300886

  14. Squeezed states of damped oscillator chain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manko, O. V.

    1993-01-01

    The Caldirola-Kanai model of one-dimensional damped oscillator is extended to the chain of coupled parametric oscillators with damping. The correlated and squeezed states for the chain of coupled parametric oscillators with damping are constructed. Based on the concept of the integrals of motion, it is demonstrated how squeezing phenomenon arises due to parametric excitation.

  15. Passive damping for space truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Gun-Shing; Wada, Ben K.

    1988-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies of passive damping techniques in truss-type structures are presented, with emphasis on the use of viscoelastic damping in the parallel load path. The constraining member length is shown to be a convenient design variable for enhancing damping performance. Results are presented for integral damping members made of thin-wall aluminum tubes, concentric constraining members, and viscoelastic materials in a six-bay truss structure at low frequency and low dynamic strain conditions. Integral members with graphite/epoxy constraining members exhibited relatively low damping values due to the possible polymer interaction during the cocure stage.

  16. Forced oscillations with linear and nonlinear damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Aijun; Ma, Li; Keene, David; Klingel, Joshua; Payne, Marvin; Wang, Xiao-jun

    2016-01-01

    A general solution is derived for the differential equations of forced oscillatory motion with both linear damping ( ˜v ) and nonlinear damping ( ˜v2 ). Experiments with forced oscillators are performed using a flat metal plate with a drag force due to eddy currents and a flat piece of stiffened cardboard with a drag force due to air resistance serving as the linear and nonlinear damping, respectively. Resonance of forced oscillations for different damping forces and quality factors is demonstrated. The experimental measurements and theoretical calculations are in good agreement, and damping constants are determined.

  17. Pre-emergence Damping Off of Beta vulgaris by Rhizopus stolonifer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizopus stolonifer (Rs), a cool temperature zygomycete that can cause a post-harvest rot on sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris), also causes pre-emergence damping off in other crops. We are interested in its potential pre-emergence damping off activity in sugarbeet. Sugarbeets are quite susceptible to seedli...

  18. The Earth's free core nutation: Formulation of dynamics and estimation of eigenperiod from the very-long-baseline interferometry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, B. F.; Hsieh, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The free-core nutation (FCN) is a rotational normal mode of the Earth's outer core. We derive the equations of motion for FCN w.r.t. both the inertia space F0 and the uniformly rotating frame FΩ, and show that the two sets of equations are invariant in form under the reference frame transformation, as required by physics. The frequency-domain formulation describes the FCN resonance (to nearby tidal signals), which has been exploited to estimate the complex eigenfrequency of FCN, or its eigenperiod P and quality factor Q. On the other hand, our time-domain formulation in terms of temporal convolution describes the response of the free FCN under a (continual) excitation. The convolution well explains the dynamic behaviors of FCN in the observed very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) data (in F0), including the undulation of the FCN amplitude and the apparent fluctuations in the period and phase over time, as well as the temporal concurrence of a large phase jump with the near-zero amplitude during ∼ 1998- 2000, in complete analogy to the observed behavior of the Chandler wobble (in FΩ). The reverse, deconvolution process is further exploited to yield optimal estimates for FCN's eigenfrequency using the VLBI data, following the approach of Furuya and Chao (1996) of locating minimum excitation power. While this method is found to be insensitive to Q owing to the short timespan of the data, we obtain the estimate of P = 441 ± 4.5 sidereal days (sd) where the 1-sigma uncertainty is assessed via extensive Monte Carlo simulations. This value is closer to the theoretical value of ∼460 sd predicted by Earth models assuming hydrostatic equilibrium than do the prior estimates (425-435 sd) by the resonance method. The deconvolution process also yields the excitation function as a by-product, the physical sources of which await further studies.

  19. Spin-Damping in an RF atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alem, Orang; Romalis, Michael V.; Sauer, Karen L.

    2009-05-01

    Optically pumped atomic magnetometers have demonstrated an improved sensitivity over standard tuned coils for frequencies less than 50 MHz, making these radio-frequency (RF) magnetometers attractive for low-field NMR (for example, Budker and Romalis, Nature Physics 3, April 2007). Such magnetometers are often plagued by transient effects resulting in decreased sensitivity. The decay time of these transients, or ringing, can last for milliseconds, which is particularly detrimental for rapidly decaying NMR signals. We have found that actively damping the ringing of the atomic spins can significantly reduce such dead time. This spin-damping of the atomic transients is achieved through a negative feedback mechanism in which part of the optical signal during ringing is used to apply an RF field forcing the realignment of the atomic spins with the static magnetic field. We have successfully implemented spin-damping in 100 μs and recovered our femto-Tesla signal previously obscured by the ringing.

  20. Broadband excitation in solid-state NMR of paramagnetic samples using Delays Alternating with Nutation for Tailored Excitation ('Para-DANTE')

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnevale, Diego; Vitzthum, Veronika; Lafon, Olivier; Trébosc, Julien; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2012-11-01

    This Letter shows that interleaved sequences of short pulses in the manner of 'Delays Alternating with Nutation for Tailored Excitation' (DANTE) with N = 1, 2, 3 … equidistant pulses per rotor period extending over K rotor periods can be used to excite, invert or refocus a large number of spinning sidebands of spin-1/2 nuclei in paramagnetic samples where hyperfine couplings lead to very broad spectra that extend over more than 1 MHz. The breadth of the response is maintained for rf-field amplitudes as low as 30 kHz since it results from cumulative effects of individual pulses with very short durations.

  1. A comparison of vibration damping methods for ground based telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Eric H.; Glaese, Roger M.; Neill, Douglas

    2008-07-01

    Vibration is becoming a more important element in design of telescope structures as these structures become larger and more compliant and include higher bandwidth actuation systems. This paper describes vibration damping methods available for current and future implementation and compares their effectiveness for a model of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), a structure that is actually stiffer than most large telescopes. Although facility and mount design, structural stiffening and occasionally vibration isolation have been adequate in telescopes built to date, vibration damping offers a mass-efficient means of reducing vibration response, whether the vibration results from external wind disturbances, telescope slewing, or other internal disturbances from translating or rotating components. The paper presents several damping techniques including constrained layer viscoelastics, viscous and magnetorheological (MR) fluid devices, passive and active piezoelectric dampers, tuned mass dampers (vibration absorbers) and active resonant dampers. Basic architectures and practical implementation considerations are discussed and expected performance is assessed using a finite element model of the LSST. With a goal of reducing settling time during the telescope's surveys, and considering practicalities of integration with the telescope structure, two damping methods were identified as most appropriate: passive tuned mass dampers and active electromagnetic resonant dampers.

  2. Introduction to DAMPE event reconstruction (On behalf of DAMPE collaboration)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Jingjing

    2016-07-01

    The Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is a high energy particle physics experiment satellite, launched on 17 Dec 2015. To measure basic attributes of cosmic ray particles, DAMPE is equipped with four sub-detectors, BGO calorimeter (BGO), plastic scintillator detector (PSD), silicon tungsten tracker (STK) and neutron detector (NUD). On orbit, the high energy particle data are acquired and recorded by well-designed Data Acquisition system. After that, a series of elaborate event reconstruction algorithms are implemented to determine the energy, direction and particle ID of each event. The energy reconstruction algorithm firstly treats the sum of the BGO crystal energy as the overall energy estimator and various corrections are performed to calculate energy leakage from side and back of the calorimeter. The track reconstruction starts with cluster finding in STK, then shower axis of BGO and barycentre of clusters are used to extract seed of tracks. These seeds will be projected on the next layer by Kalman Filter method which will finally give location and direction of particle tracks. Based on shower development in BGO and tracks reconstructed by STK, we also combine data from PSD and NUD and developed a series of algorithms to evaluate particle's charge and identification. In this talk, we will describe technical strategies of event reconstruction and provide their basic performance.

  3. ICAN/DAMP-integrated composite analyzer with damping analysis capabilities: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, Dimitrious A.; Sanfeliz, Jose G.

    1992-01-01

    This manual describes the use of the computer code ICAN/DAMP (Integrated Composite Analyzer with Damping Analysis Capabilities) for the prediction of damping in polymer-matrix composites. The code is written in FORTRAN 77 and is a version of the ICAN (Integrated Composite ANalyzer) computer program. The code incorporates a new module for synthesizing the material damping from micromechanics to laminate level. Explicit micromechanics equations based on hysteretic damping are programmed relating the on-axis damping capacities to the fiber and matrix properties and fiber volume ratio. The damping capacities of unidirectional composites subjected to off-axis loading are synthesized from on-axis damping values. The hygrothermal effect on the damping performance of unidirectional composites caused by temperature and moisture variation is modeled along with the damping contributions from interfacial friction between broken fibers and matrix. The temperature rise is continuously vibrating composite plies and composite laminates is also estimated. The ICAN/DAMP user's manual provides descriptions of the damping analysis module's functions, structure, input requirements, output interpretation, and execution requirements. It only addresses the changes required to conduct the damping analysis and is used in conjunction with the 'Second Generation Integrated Composite Analyzer (ICAN) Computer Code' user's manual (NASA TP-3290).

  4. Viscous damping for base isolated structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.; Hussain, S.; Retamal, E.

    1995-12-01

    Seismic Base Isolation can use elastomeric pads, sliding plates or inverted pendulums. Each method can include an energy dissipation means, but only as some kind of hysteretic damping. Hysteretic damping has limitations in terms of energy absorption and may tend to excite higher modes in some cases. It`s possible to avoid these problems with viscous dampers. Viscous damping adds energy dissipation through loads that are 900 out of phase with bending and shear loads so even with damping levels as high as 40% of critical adverse side effects tend to be minimal. This paper presents basic theory of viscous damping, and also describes a sample project. Viscous dampers being built for the new San Bernardino Medical Center reduce both deflections and loads by 50% compared with high damping elastomer base isolation bearings by themselves.

  5. CHARACTERIZATION OF DAMPING IN BOLTED LAP JOINTS

    SciTech Connect

    C. MALONEY; D. PEAIRS; ET AL

    2000-08-01

    The dynamic response of a jointed beam was measured in laboratory experiments. The data were analyzed and the system was mathematically modeled to establish plausible representations of joint damping behavior. Damping is examined in an approximate, local linear framework using log decrement and half power bandwidth approaches. in addition, damping is modeled in a nonlinear framework using a hybrid surface irregularities model that employs a bristles-construct. Experimental and analytical results are presented.

  6. Understanding the damped SHM without ODEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Chiu-king

    2016-03-01

    Instead of solving ordinary differential equations (ODEs), the damped simple harmonic motion (SHM) is surveyed qualitatively from basic mechanics and quantitatively by the instrumentality of a graph of velocity against displacement. In this way, the condition b≥slant \\sqrt{4mk}~ for the occurrence of the non-oscillating critical damping and heavy-damping is derived. Besides, we prove in the under-damping, the oscillation is isochronous and the diminishing amplitude satisfies a rule of ‘constant ratio’. All are done on a non-ODE basis.

  7. Damping constant estimation in magnetoresistive readers

    SciTech Connect

    Stankiewicz, Andrzej Hernandez, Stephanie

    2015-05-07

    The damping constant is a key design parameter in magnetic reader design. Its value can be derived from bulk or sheet film ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) line width. However, dynamics of nanodevices is usually defined by presence of non-uniform modes. It triggers new damping mechanisms and produces stronger damping than expected from traditional FMR. This work proposes a device-level technique for damping evaluation, based on time-domain analysis of thermally excited stochastic oscillations. The signal is collected using a high bandwidth oscilloscope, by direct probing of a biased reader. Recorded waveforms may contain different noise signals, but free layer FMR is usually a dominating one. The autocorrelation function is a reflection of the damped oscillation curve, averaging out stochastic contributions. The damped oscillator formula is fitted to autocorrelation data, producing resonance frequency and damping constant values. Restricting lag range allows for mitigation of the impact of other phenomena (e.g., reader instability) on the damping constant. For a micromagnetically modeled reader, the technique proves to be much more accurate than the stochastic FMR line width approach. Application to actual reader waveforms yields a damping constant of ∼0.03.

  8. The next linear collider damping ring lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Wolski, Andrzej; Corlett, John N.

    2001-06-20

    We report on the lattice design of the Next Linear Collider (NLC) damping rings. The damping rings are required to provide low emittance electron and positron bunch trains to the NLC linacs, at a rate of 120 Hz. We present an optical design, based on a theoretical minimum emittance (TME) lattice, to produce the required normalized extracted beam emittances gex = 3 mm-mrad and gey = 0.02 mm mrad. An assessment of dynamic aperture and non-linear effects is given. The positron pre-damping ring, required to reduce the emittance of the positron beam such that it may be accepted by a main damping ring, is also described.

  9. Viscous damped space structure for reduced jitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, James F.; Davis, L. Porter

    1987-01-01

    A technique to provide modal vibration damping in high performance space structures was developed which uses less than one once of incompressible fluid. Up to 50 percent damping can be achieved which can reduce the settling times of the lowest structural mode by as much as 50 to 1. This concept allows the designers to reduce the weight of the structure while improving its dynamic performance. Damping by this technique is purely viscous and has been shown by test to be linear over 5 orders of input magnitude. Amplitudes as low as 0.2 microinch were demonstrated. Damping in the system is independent of stiffness and relatively insensitive to temperature.

  10. Phenomenology of chiral damping in noncentrosymmetric magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akosa, Collins Ashu; Miron, Ioan Mihai; Gaudin, Gilles; Manchon, Aurélien

    2016-06-01

    A phenomenology of magnetic chiral damping is proposed in the context of magnetic materials lacking inversion symmetry. We show that the magnetic damping tensor acquires a component linear in magnetization gradient in the form of Lifshitz invariants. We propose different microscopic mechanisms that can produce such a damping in ferromagnetic metals, among which local spin pumping in the presence of an anomalous Hall effect and an effective "s-d" Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya antisymmetric exchange. The implication of this chiral damping in terms of domain-wall motion is investigated in the flow and creep regimes.

  11. Damping constant estimation in magnetoresistive readers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankiewicz, Andrzej; Hernandez, Stephanie

    2015-05-01

    The damping constant is a key design parameter in magnetic reader design. Its value can be derived from bulk or sheet film ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) line width. However, dynamics of nanodevices is usually defined by presence of non-uniform modes. It triggers new damping mechanisms and produces stronger damping than expected from traditional FMR. This work proposes a device-level technique for damping evaluation, based on time-domain analysis of thermally excited stochastic oscillations. The signal is collected using a high bandwidth oscilloscope, by direct probing of a biased reader. Recorded waveforms may contain different noise signals, but free layer FMR is usually a dominating one. The autocorrelation function is a reflection of the damped oscillation curve, averaging out stochastic contributions. The damped oscillator formula is fitted to autocorrelation data, producing resonance frequency and damping constant values. Restricting lag range allows for mitigation of the impact of other phenomena (e.g., reader instability) on the damping constant. For a micromagnetically modeled reader, the technique proves to be much more accurate than the stochastic FMR line width approach. Application to actual reader waveforms yields a damping constant of ˜0.03.

  12. Relaxation damping in oscillating contacts

    PubMed Central

    Popov, M.; Popov, V.L.; Pohrt, R.

    2015-01-01

    If a contact of two purely elastic bodies with no sliding (infinite coefficient of friction) is subjected to superimposed oscillations in the normal and tangential directions, then a specific damping appears, that is not dependent on friction or dissipation in the material. We call this effect “relaxation damping”. The rate of energy dissipation due to relaxation damping is calculated in a closed analytic form for arbitrary axially-symmetric contacts. In the case of equal frequency of normal and tangential oscillations, the dissipated energy per cycle is proportional to the square of the amplitude of tangential oscillation and to the absolute value of the amplitude of normal oscillation, and is dependent on the phase shift between both oscillations. In the case of low frequency tangential oscillations with superimposed high frequency normal oscillations, the dissipation is proportional to the ratio of the frequencies. Generalization of the results for macroscopically planar, randomly rough surfaces as well as for the case of finite friction is discussed. PMID:26549011

  13. Relaxation damping in oscillating contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, M.; Popov, V. L.; Pohrt, R.

    2015-11-01

    If a contact of two purely elastic bodies with no sliding (infinite coefficient of friction) is subjected to superimposed oscillations in the normal and tangential directions, then a specific damping appears, that is not dependent on friction or dissipation in the material. We call this effect “relaxation damping”. The rate of energy dissipation due to relaxation damping is calculated in a closed analytic form for arbitrary axially-symmetric contacts. In the case of equal frequency of normal and tangential oscillations, the dissipated energy per cycle is proportional to the square of the amplitude of tangential oscillation and to the absolute value of the amplitude of normal oscillation, and is dependent on the phase shift between both oscillations. In the case of low frequency tangential oscillations with superimposed high frequency normal oscillations, the dissipation is proportional to the ratio of the frequencies. Generalization of the results for macroscopically planar, randomly rough surfaces as well as for the case of finite friction is discussed.

  14. Superconductive material and magnetic field for damping and levitation support and damping of cryogenic instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolgin, Benjamin P. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A superconductive load bearing support without a mechanical contact and vibration damping for cryogenic instruments in space is presented. The levitation support and vibration damping is accomplished by the use of superconducting magnets and the 'Meissner' effect. The assembly allows for transfer of vibration energy away from the cryogenic instrument which then can be damped by the use of either an electronic circuit or conventional vibration damping mean.

  15. Tuned vibration absorbers with nonlinear viscous damping for damped structures under random load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shum, K. M.

    2015-06-01

    The classical problem for the application of a tuned vibration absorber is to minimize the response of a structural system, such as displacement, velocity, acceleration or to maximize the energy dissipated by tuned vibration absorber. The development of explicit optimal absorber parameters is challenging for a damped structural system since the fixed points no longer exist in the frequency response curve. This paper aims at deriving a set of simple design formula of tuned vibration absorber with nonlinear viscous damping based on the frequency tuning for harmonic load for a damped structural system under white noise excitation. The vibration absorbers being considered include tuned mass damper (TMD) and liquid column vibration absorber (LCVA). Simple approximate expression for the standard deviation velocity response of tuned vibration absorber for damped primary structure is also derived in this study to facilitate the estimation of the damping coefficient of TMD with nonlinear viscous damping and the head loss coefficient of LCVA. The derived results indicate that the higher the structural inherent damping the smaller the supplementary damping provided by a tuned vibration absorber. Furthermore, the optimal damping of tuned vibration absorber is shown to be independent of structural damping when it is tuned using the frequency tuning for harmonic load. Finally, the derived closed-form expressions are demonstrated to be capable of predicting the optimal parameters of tuned vibration absorbers with sufficient accuracy for preliminary design of tuned vibration absorbers with nonlinear viscous damping for a damped primary structure.

  16. Flexural self-damping in overhead electrical transmission conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawlins, Charles B.

    2009-06-01

    Internal damping of tensioned cables during flexure by transverse vibration is analyzed. The flexure causes relative movements between the wires or strands of the cable, movements which are constrained by friction between them. Under conditions common to vibration of overhead transmission line conductors the friction is great enough to prevent gross sliding. However, there is microslip at the edges of the interstrand contacts, so there is frictional dissipation. In addition, the frictional forces cause shear strains at the contacts with resulting material damping. An analysis is presented that connects the bodily flexure of the conductor with the internal interstrand movements and forces, and with the amounts of dissipation that occur—self-damping. Comparison of estimates based on the analysis with measured data on self-damping reveals reasonable agreement, for a limited range. Cases lying outside that range appear to be associated with treatments applied to cable samples involved in the measurements prior to testing. Possible mechanisms activated by these treatments are discussed.

  17. Damping device for a stationary labyrinth seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Aini, Yehia M. (Inventor); Mitchell, William S. (Inventor); Roberts, Lawrence P. (Inventor); Montgomery, Stuart K. (Inventor); Davis, Gary A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A stationary labyrinth seal system includes a seal housing having an annular cavity, a plurality of damping devices, and a retaining ring. The damping devices are positioned within the annular cavity and are maintained within the annular cavity by the retaining ring.

  18. HOME DAMPNESS AND RESPIRATORY MORBIDITY IN CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examined the relationship between measures of home dampness and respiratory illness and symptoms in a cohort of 4,625 eight- to 12-year old children in six U.S. cities. ome dampness was characterized from questionnaire reports of mold or mildew damage inside the home, ...

  19. Study for ILC Damping Ring at KEKB

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, J.W.; Fukuma, H.; Kanazawa, K.I.; Koiso, H.; Masuzawa, M.; Ohmi, Kazuhito; Ohnishi, Y.; Oide, Katsunobu; Suetsugu, Y.; Tobiyama, M.; Pivi, M.; /SLAC

    2011-11-04

    ILC damping ring consists of very low emittance electron and positron storage rings. It is necessary for ILC damping ring to study electron cloud effects in such low emittance positron ring. We propose a low emittance operation of KEKB to study the effects.

  20. Understanding the Damped SHM without ODEs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Chiu-king

    2016-01-01

    Instead of solving ordinary differential equations (ODEs), the damped simple harmonic motion (SHM) is surveyed qualitatively from basic mechanics and quantitatively by the instrumentality of a graph of velocity against displacement. In this way, the condition b ? [square root]4mk for the occurrence of the non-oscillating critical damping and…

  1. Large space structure damping design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilkey, W. D.; Haviland, J. K.

    1983-01-01

    Several FORTRAN subroutines and programs were developed which compute complex eigenvalues of a damped system using different approaches, and which rescale mode shapes to unit generalized mass and make rigid bodies orthogonal to each other. An analytical proof of a Minimum Constrained Frequency Criterion (MCFC) for a single damper is presented. A method to minimize the effect of control spill-over for large space structures is proposed. The characteristic equation of an undamped system with a generalized control law is derived using reanalysis theory. This equation can be implemented in computer programs for efficient eigenvalue analysis or control quasi synthesis. Methods to control vibrations in large space structure are reviewed and analyzed. The resulting prototype, using electromagnetic actuator, is described.

  2. VIBRATION DAMPING AND SHOCK MOUNT

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, D.J.; Forman, G.W.

    1963-12-10

    A shock absorbing mount in which vibrations are damped by an interference fit between relatively movable parts of the mount is described. A pair of generally cup-shaped parts or members have skirt portions disposed in an oppositely facing nesting relationship with the skirt of one member frictionally engaging the skirt of the other. The outermost skirt may be slotted to provide spring-like segments which embrace the inner skirt for effecting the interference fit. Belleville washers between the members provide yieldable support for a load carried by the mount. When a resonant frequency of vibration forces acting upon the moumt attains a certain level the kinetic energy of these forces is absorbed by sliding friction between the parts. (AEC)

  3. Landau damping in a turbulent setting

    SciTech Connect

    Plunk, G. G.

    2013-03-15

    To address the problem of Landau damping in kinetic turbulence, we consider the forcing of the linearized Vlasov equation by a stationary random source. It is found that the time-asymptotic density response is dominated by resonant particle interactions that are synchronized with the source. The energy consumption of this response is calculated, implying an effective damping rate, which is the main result of this paper. Evaluating several cases, it is found that the effective damping rate can differ from the Landau damping rate in magnitude and also, remarkably, in sign. A limit is demonstrated in which the density and current become phase-locked, which causes the effective damping to be negligible; this result offers a fresh perspective from which to reconsider recent observations of kinetic turbulence satisfying critical balance.

  4. Damping characteristics of damaged fiber composite components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberle, K.

    1986-01-01

    Defects in fiber composite components produce changes with respect to the vibrational characteristics of the material. These changes can be recognized in the form of a frequency shift or an alteration of the damping process. The present investigation is concerned with questions regarding the possibility of a utilization of the changes in suitable defect-detecting inspection procedures. A description is given of a method for measuring the damping characteristics of a specimen. This method provides a spectrum of the damping coefficients of the sample as a basis for a comprehensive evaluation of the damping behavior. The correlation between defects and change in the damping characteristics is demonstrated with the aid of results obtained in measurements involving specimens of carbon-fiber composites and a component consisting of glass-fiber-reinforced plastics.

  5. Experimental Investigation of the Damping Behavior of the Particle Damping in the Transient Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavan, Shrirang Pandurang; Kale, Arvind Kamalakar; Mulla, Faiz Abdulkadar

    2016-01-01

    Particle damping is a non linear type of damping in which energy of the vibratory system is dissipated by the impact and the frictional losses made by the particles used for the damping purposes. The particle damping technique is useful over other types of damping as it is temperature independent. So it is reliable over wide temperature range and hence is essentially used in the cryogenic and the gas turbine related applications. For experimentation, cantilever beam with particle enclosure attached to its free end has been extensively used and the effect of the particle material, particle size, mass ratio and enclosure height on the damping performance has been studied [1]. For a small weight penalty, rather large amounts of damping can be achieved [2].

  6. Vibration analysis of constrained layered beams with multiple damping layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Min

    2005-07-01

    With an increasing demand for light, continuous, and high strength structures, multi-layered systems with viscoelastic materials have gained major importance over the years. Viscoelastic layered systems provide a simple and flexible solution for damping vibration of sheet metal panels. They also help to effectively eliminate noise from resonant structures and surfaces. There has been a lot of work done on active and passive layered sandwich beams based on the theoretical models proposed by Kerwin (1959) and extended by Ditaranto (1965), Mead and Markus (1969), and other researchers. This work presents an analytical formulation to predict the stiffness and damping of constrained layered beams that have multiple viscoelastic damping layers. The model was derived for symmetrical setups using variational methods. The equations to evaluate the stiffness and damping were derived in closed form and can be evaluated for different boundary conditions. The complex modulus approach was used to model the elastic and shear modulus of the viscoelastic material. The equations of motion for multi-layer system in this research were compared with Mead's three layer beam model. Equations derived in this dissertation match well with Mead's equation for symmetric system. A parametric analysis has been conducted to study the effects of different parameters on the damping and stiffness of the system under simply supported boundary conditions. In addition, another analytical model was developed for the unsymmetrical setups with two different viscoelastic materials adjacent to each other. Experiments were conducted on simply supported three-layered beams at different temperatures to validate theoretical results. The experimental results show good agreement with the modal frequencies estimated by theory. The first four modes were considered in the computation and experiment validation. The multi-objective optimization procedure to obtain optimum structural and material parameters

  7. Shunted Piezoelectric Vibration Damping Analysis Including Centrifugal Loading Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Provenza, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Excessive vibration of turbomachinery blades causes high cycle fatigue problems which require damping treatments to mitigate vibration levels. One method is the use of piezoelectric materials as passive or active dampers. Based on the technical challenges and requirements learned from previous turbomachinery rotor blades research, an effort has been made to investigate the effectiveness of a shunted piezoelectric for the turbomachinery rotor blades vibration control, specifically for a condition with centrifugal rotation. While ample research has been performed on the use of a piezoelectric material with electric circuits to attempt to control the structural vibration damping, very little study has been done regarding rotational effects. The present study attempts to fill this void. Specifically, the objectives of this study are: (a) to create and analyze finite element models for harmonic forced response vibration analysis coupled with shunted piezoelectric circuits for engine blade operational conditions, (b) to validate the experimental test approaches with numerical results and vice versa, and (c) to establish a numerical modeling capability for vibration control using shunted piezoelectric circuits under rotation. Study has focused on a resonant damping control using shunted piezoelectric patches on plate specimens. Tests and analyses were performed for both non-spinning and spinning conditions. The finite element (FE) shunted piezoelectric circuit damping simulations were performed using the ANSYS Multiphysics code for the resistive and inductive circuit piezoelectric simulations of both conditions. The FE results showed a good correlation with experimental test results. Tests and analyses of shunted piezoelectric damping control, demonstrating with plate specimens, show a great potential to reduce blade vibrations under centrifugal loading.

  8. Evaluation of Nanomaterial Approaches to Damping in Epoxy Resin and Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composite Structures by Dynamic Mechanical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, G.; Heimann, Paula J.; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Johnston, J. Chris; Roberts, Gary D.

    2013-01-01

    Vibration mitigation in composite structures has been demonstrated through widely varying methods which include both active and passive damping. Recently, nanomaterials have been investigated as a viable approach to composite vibration damping due to the large surface available to generate energy dissipation through friction. This work evaluates the influence of dispersed nanoparticles on the damping ratio of an epoxy matrix. Limited benefit was observed through dispersion methods, however nanoparticle application as a coating resulting in up to a three-fold increase in damping.

  9. Micromechanical analysis of damping performance of piezoelectric structural fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Qingli; Ng, Kenny

    2010-04-01

    Recent studies showed that the active piezoelectric structural fiber (PSF) composites may achieve significant and simultaneous improvements in sensing/actuating, stiffness, fracture toughness and vibration damping. These characteristics can be of particular importance in various civil, mechanical and aerospace structures. This study firstly conducted the micromechanical finite element analysis to predict the elastic properties and piezoelectrical coupling parameters of a special type of an active PSF composite laminate. The PSF composite laminates are made of longitudinally poled PSFs that are unidirectionally deployed in the polymer binding matrix. The passive damping performance of these active composites was studied under the cyclic force loadings with different frequencies. It was found that the passive electric-mechanical coupling behavior can absorb limited dynamic energy and delay the structure responses with minimum viscoelastic damping. The actuating function of piezoelectric materials was then applied to reduce the dynamic mechanical deformation. The step voltage inputs were imposed to the interdigital electrodes of PSF laminate transducer along the poled direction. The cyclic pressure loading was applied transversely to the composite laminate. The electromechnical interaction with the 1-3 coupling parameter generated the transverse expansion, which can reduce the cyclic deformation evenly by shifting the response waves. This study shows the promise in using this type of active composites as actuators to improve stability of the structure dynamic.

  10. Simulation Study of Electronic Damping of Microphonic Vibrations in Superconducting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Alicia Hofler; Jean Delayen

    2005-05-01

    Electronic damping of microphonic vibrations in superconducting rf cavities involves an active modulation of the cavity field amplitude in order to induce ponderomotive forces that counteract the effect of ambient vibrations on the cavity frequency. In lightly beam loaded cavities, a reduction of the microphonics-induced frequency excursions leads directly to a reduction of the rf power required for phase and amplitude stabilization. Jefferson Lab is investigating such an electronic damping scheme that could be applied to the JLab 12 GeV upgrade, the RIA driver, and possibly to energy-recovering superconducting linacs. This paper discusses a model and presents simulation results for electronic damping of microphonic vibrations.

  11. On application of the complex demodulation for monitoring Earth rotation: Analysis of the nutation and long periodic UT1 data estimated by VieVS CD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzeziński, A.; Wielgosz, A.; Bóhm, S.

    2015-08-01

    In the recent work (Bóhm et al., J. Geodynamics, 62(2012), 56-68) we demonstrated the application of the complex demodulation (CD) technique for VLBI estimation of the Earth orientation parameters (EOP). This technique enables simultaneous determination of the long period components of polar motion (x,y), universal time (dUT1=UT1 UTC) and nutation (celestial pole offsets dX,dY) as well as the high frequency (diurnal, semidiurnal, ...) components of polar motion and dUT1. In this work we perform analysis of the retrograde diurnal component of polar motion and the low frequency component of dUT1 estimated by the VieVS CD software. By comparison to the results based on the celestial pole offsets and dUT1 series from the combined solutions IVS and IERS we demonstrate consistency of the CD parametrization with the standard approach.

  12. Validation Of Equivalent Viscous Damping Methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaquer Araujo, Xavier; Fransen, S. H. J. A.; Germes, S.; Thiry, N.

    2012-07-01

    An important step in the design and verification process of spacecraft structures is the coupled dynamic analysis with the launch vehicle in the low-frequency domain. To obtain accurate predictions of the satellite’s dynamic environment it is essential that the damping of the system is correctly defined and taken into account within the resolution methodologies for the Coupled Loads Analysis (CLA). When working with finite element models, the materials’ damping is characterized by structural damping ratios. In addition, most of the load cases present in the CLA are transient excitations so the resolution of the equations of motion must be done in the time domain. Unfortunately, transient analyses cannot be carried out using structural damping models. Thus, a transformation from a structural to a viscous damping characterization is necessary. Nevertheless, this transformation is not trivial. There exist many methodologies aiming at computing an equivalent viscous damping matrix of the system so it can be used in transient analyses. This paper describes the results obtained in the validation of equivalent viscous damping methodologies used in the European Space Agency. This work permitted to identify the limitations of these methodologies and to come up with an enhanced methodology that predicts more reliable results.

  13. Bounce harmonic Landau damping of plasma waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderegg, F.; Affolter, M.; Kabantsev, A. A.; Dubin, D. H. E.; Ashourvan, A.; Driscoll, C. F.

    2016-05-01

    We present measurements of bounce harmonic Landau damping due to z-variations in the plasma potential, created by an azimuthally symmetric "squeeze" voltage Vs applied to the cylindrical wall. Traditional Landau damping on spatially uniform plasma is weak in regimes where the wave phase velocity vp h≡ω/k is large compared to the thermal velocity. However, z-variations in plasma density and potential create higher spatial harmonics, which enable resonant wave damping by particles with bounce-averaged velocities vp h/n , where n is an integer. In our geometry, the applied squeeze predominantly generates a resonance at vp h/3 . Wave-coherent laser induced fluorescence measurements of particle velocities show a distinctive Landau damping signature at vp h/3 , with amplitude proportional to the applied Vs. The measured (small amplitude) wave damping is then proportional to Vs2 , in quantitative agreement with theory over a range of 20 in temperature. Significant questions remain regarding "background" bounce harmonic damping due to ubiquitous confinement fields and regarding the saturation of this damping at large wave amplitudes.

  14. Electromagnetic induction and damping: Quantitative experiments using a PC interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Avinash; Mohapatra, Y. N.; Kumar, Satyendra

    2002-04-01

    A bar magnet, attached to an oscillating system, passes through a coil periodically, generating a series of electromotive force pulses. A novel method for the quantitative verification of Faraday's law is described which eliminates all errors associated with angular measurements, thereby revealing subtle features of the underlying mechanics. When electromagnetic damping is activated by short-circuiting the coil, a distinctly linear decay of the oscillation amplitude is observed. A quantitative analysis reveals an interesting interplay of the electromagnetic and mechanical time scales.

  15. Continuum damping of ideal toroidal Alfven eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.D.; Zhang, Y.Z.; Mahajan, S.M.

    1993-08-01

    A perturbation theory based on the two dimensional (2D) ballooning transform is systematically developed for ideal toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAEs). A formula, similar to the Fermi golden rule for decaying systems in quantum mechanics, is derived for the continuum damping rate of the TAE; the decay (damping) rate is expressed explicitly in terms of the coupling of the TAE to the continuum spectrum. Numerical results are compared with previous calculations. It is found that in some narrow intervals of the parameter m{cflx {epsilon}} the damping rate varies very rapidly. These regions correspond precisely to the root missing intervals of the numerical solution by Rosenbluth et al.

  16. Saturation of Gyrokinetic Turbulence through Damped Eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, D. R.; Terry, P. W.; Jenko, F.; Merz, F.; Nevins, W. M.

    2011-03-18

    In the context of toroidal gyrokinetic simulations, it is shown that a hierarchy of damped modes is excited in the nonlinear turbulent state. These modes exist at the same spatial scales as the unstable eigenmodes that drive the turbulence. The larger amplitude subdominant modes are weakly damped and exhibit smooth, large-scale structure in velocity space and in the direction parallel to the magnetic field. Modes with increasingly fine-scale structure are excited to decreasing amplitudes. In aggregate, damped modes define a potent energy sink. This leads to an overlap of the spatial scales of energy injection and peak dissipation, a feature that is in contrast with more traditional turbulent systems.

  17. Oscillation damped movement of suspended objects

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.F.; Petterson, B.J.

    1988-01-01

    Transportation of objects using overhead cranes or manipulators can induce pendulum motion of the object. Residual oscillation from transportation typically must be damped or allowed to decay before the next process can take place. By properly programming the acceleration of the transporting device (e.g., crane) an oscillation damped transport and swing free stop is obtainable. This paper reviews the theory associated with oscillation damped trajectories for simply suspended objects and describes a particular implementation using a CIMCORP XR 6100 gantry robot. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury: The Work of DAMPs*

    PubMed Central

    Land, Walter G.

    2013-01-01

    Current notions in immunology hold that not only pathogen-mediated tissue injury but any injury activates the innate immune system. In principle, this evolutionarily highly conserved, rapid first-line defense system responds to pathogen-induced injury with the creation of infectious inflammation, and non-pathogen-induced tissue injury with ‘sterile’ tissue inflammation. In this review, evidence has been collected in support of the notion that the transfusion-related acute lung injury induces a ‘sterile’ inflammation in the lung of transfused patients in terms of an acute innate inflammatory disease. The inflammatory response is mediated by the patient's innate immune cells including lung-passing neutrophils and pulmonary endothelial cells, which are equipped with pattern recognition receptors. These receptors are able to sense injury-induced, damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) generated during collection, processing, and storage of blood/blood components. The recognition process leads to activation of these innate cells. A critical role for a protein complex known as the NLRP3 inflammasome has been suggested to be at the center of such a scenario. This complex undergoes an initial ‘priming’ step mediated by 1 class of DAMPs and then an ‘activating’ step mediated by another class of DAMPs to activate interleukin-1beta and interleukin-18. These 2 cytokines then promote, via transactivation, the formation of lung inflammation. PMID:23637644

  19. Swept sine testing of rotor-bearing system for damping estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, N. Harish; Sekhar, A. S.

    2014-01-01

    Many types of rotating components commonly operate above the first or second critical speed and they are subjected to run-ups and shutdowns frequently. The present study focuses on developing FRF of rotor bearing systems for damping estimation from swept-sine excitation. The principle of active vibration control states that with increase in angular acceleration, the amplitude of vibration due to unbalance will reduce and the FRF envelope will shift towards the right (or higher frequency). The frequency response function (FRF) estimated by tracking filters or Co-Quad analyzers was proved to induce an error into the FRF estimate. Using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) algorithm and stationary wavelet transform (SWT) decomposition FRF distortion can be reduced. To obtain a theoretical clarity, the shifting of FRF envelope phenomenon is incorporated into conventional FRF expressions and validation is performed with the FRF estimated using the Fourier Transform approach. The half-power bandwidth method is employed to extract damping ratios from the FRF estimates. While deriving half-power points for both types of responses (acceleration and displacement), damping ratio (ζ) is estimated with different approximations like classical definition (neglecting damping ratio of order higher than 2), third order (neglecting damping ratios with order higher than 4) and exact (no assumptions on damping ratio). The use of stationary wavelet transform to denoise the noise corrupted FRF data is explained. Finally, experiments are performed on a test rotor excited with different sweep rates to estimate the damping ratio.

  20. Turbine blade friction damping study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominic, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    A lumped parameter method, implemented on a VAX 11/780 computer shows that the primary parameters affecting the performance of the friction damper of the first stage turbine of the SSME high pressure fuel pump are: the damper-blade coefficient of friction; the normal force applied to the friction interface; the amplitude of the periodic forcing function; the relative phase angle of the forcing functions for adjacent blades bridged by a damper (effectively, the engine order of the forcing function); and the amount of hysteretic damping that acts to limit the vibration amplitude of the blade in its resonance modes. The low order flexural resonance vibration modes of HPFTP blades without dampers, with production dampers, and with two types of lightweight experimental dampers were evaluated in high speed spin pit tests. Results agree with those of the analytical study in that blades fitted with production friction dampers experienced the airfoil-alone flexural resonance mode, while those without dampers or with lighter weight dampers did not. No blades fitted with dampers experienced the whole blade flexural resonance mode during high speed tests, while those without dampers did.

  1. Artificial Compressibility with Entropic Damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, Jonathan; Roberts, Scott

    2012-11-01

    Artificial Compressibility (AC) methods relax the strict incompressibility constraint associated with the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Instead, they rely on an artificial equation of state relating pressure and density fluctuations through a numerical Mach number. Such methods are not new: the first AC methods date back to Chorin (1967). More recent applications can be found in the lattice-Boltzmann method, which is a kinetic/mesoscopic method that converges to an AC form of the Navier-Stokes equations. With computing hardware trending towards massively parallel architectures in order to achieve high computational throughput, AC style methods have become attractive due to their local information propagation and concomitant parallelizable algorithms. In this work, we examine a damped form of AC in the context of finite-difference and finite-element methods, with a focus on achieving time-accurate simulations. Also, we comment on the scalability of the various algorithms. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. Turbulent Damping without Eddy Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalabard, Simon

    2015-11-01

    The intrinsic Non-Gaussianity of turbulence may explain why the standard Quasi-Normal cumulant discard closures can fail dramatically, an example being the development of negative energy spectra in Millionshtchikov's 1941 Quasi-Normal (QN) theory. While Orszag's 1977 EDQNM provides an ingenious patch to the issue, the reason why QN fails so badly is not so clear. Is it because of the Gaussian Ansatz itself? Or rather its inconsistent use? The purpose of the talk is to argue in favor of the latter option, using the lights of a new ``optimal closure'' recently exposed by [Turkington,2013], which allows Gaussians to be used consistently with an intrinsic damping. The key to this apparent paradox lies in a clear distinction between the ensemble averages and their proxies, most easily grasped provided one uses the Liouville equation rather than the cumulant hierarchy as a starting point. Schematically said, closure is achieved by minimizing a lack-of-fit residual, that retains the intrinsic features of the dynamics. For the sake of clarity, I will discuss the optimal closure on a problem where it can be entirely implemented and compared to DNS: the relaxation of an arbitrarily far from equilibrium energy shell towards the Gibbs equilibrium for truncated Euler dynamics.

  3. Eigensolutions of non-proportionally damped systems based on continuous damping sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lázaro, Mario

    2016-02-01

    The viscous damping model has been widely used to represent dissipative forces in structures under mechanical vibrations. In multiple degree of freedom systems, such behavior is mathematically modeled by a damping matrix, which in general presents non-proportionality, that is, it does not become diagonal in the modal space of the undamped problem. Eigensolutions of non-proportional systems are usually estimated assuming that the modal damping matrix is diagonally dominant (neglecting the off-diagonal terms) or, in the general case, using the state-space approach. In this paper, a new closed-form expression for the complex eigenvalues of non-proportionally damped system is proposed. The approach is derived assuming small damping and involves not only the diagonal terms of the modal damping matrix, but also the off-diagonal terms, which appear under higher order. The validity of the proposed approach is illustrated through a numerical example.

  4. Linear collisionless Landau damping in Hilbert space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zocco, Alessandro

    2015-08-01

    The equivalence between the Laplace transform (Landau, J. Phys. USSR 10 (1946), 25) and Hermite transform (Zocco and Schekochihin, Phys. Plasmas 18, 102309 (2011)) solutions of the linear collisionless Landau damping problem is proven.

  5. Nucleon exchange in damped nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Randrup, J.

    1986-04-01

    Starting from the general context of one-body nuclear dynamics, the nucleon-exchange mechanism in damped nuclear reactions is discussed. Some of its characteristic effects on various dinuclear observables are highlighted and a few recent advances are described.

  6. Magnetic Damping in Ferromagnetic Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oogane, Mikihiko; Wakitani, Takeshi; Yakata, Satoshi; Yilgin, Resul; Ando, Yasuo; Sakuma, Akimasa; Miyazaki, Terunobu

    2006-05-01

    We determined the Gilbert damping constants of Fe-Co-Ni and Co-Fe-B alloys with various compositions and half-metallic Co2MnAl Heusler alloy films prepared by magnetron sputtering. The ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) technique was used to determine the damping constants of the prepared films. The out-of-plane angular dependences of the resonance field (HR) and line width (Δ Hpp) of FMR spectra were measured and fitted using the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation. The experimental results fitted well, considering the inhomogeneities of the films in the fitting. The damping constants of the metallic films were much larger than those of bulk ferrimagnetic insulators and were roughly proportional to (g-2)2, where g is the Lande g factor. We discuss the origin of magnetic damping, considering spin-orbit and s-d interactions.

  7. Damping Wiggler Study at KEK-ATF

    SciTech Connect

    Naito, T.; Hayano, H.; Honda, Y.; Kubo, K.; Kuriki, M.; Kuroda, S.; Muto, T.; Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J.; Sakai, H.; Nakamura, N.; Korostelev, M.; Zimmermann, F.; Ross, Marc; /SLAC

    2006-02-07

    The effects of damping wiggler magnets have been studied at KEK-ATF damping ring, which is a 1.3 GeV storage ring capable of producing ultra-low emittance electron beams. The fast beam damping is a significant issue for the damping ring. The tuning method with 4 sets of wiggler magnets was investigated for the ultra-low emittance beam. The effect on the beam quality, which is related to the transverse (x and y) and the longitudinal (z and {Delta}p/p), has been measured by the wire scanner, SR monitor, the laser wire, streak camera and the energy spread monitor. We report on the operational condition and the measurement results.

  8. Concepts and effects of damping in isolators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerley, J.

    1984-01-01

    A series of innovative designs and inventions which led to the solution of many aerospace vibration and shock problems through damping techniques is presented. The design of damped airborne structures has presented a need for such creative innovation. The primary concern was to discover what concepts were necessary for good structural damping. Once these concepts are determined and converted into basic principles, the design of hardware follows. The following hardware and techniques were developed in support of aerospace program requirements: shipping containers, alignment cables for precision mechanisms, isolation of small components such as relays and flight instruments, isolation for heavy flight equipment, coupling devices, universal joints, use of wire mesh to replace cable, isolation of 16-dB, 5000 lb horn, and compound damping devices to get better isolation from shock and vibration in a high steady environment.

  9. Simplified Model of Nonlinear Landau Damping

    SciTech Connect

    N. A. Yampolsky and N. J. Fisch

    2009-07-16

    The nonlinear interaction of a plasma wave with resonant electrons results in a plateau in the electron distribution function close to the phase velocity of the plasma wave. As a result, Landau damping of the plasma wave vanishes and the resonant frequency of the plasma wave downshifts. However, this simple picture is invalid when the external driving force changes the plasma wave fast enough so that the plateau cannot be fully developed. A new model to describe amplification of the plasma wave including the saturation of Landau damping and the nonlinear frequency shift is proposed. The proposed model takes into account the change of the plasma wave amplitude and describes saturation of the Landau damping rate in terms of a single fluid equation, which simplifies the description of the inherently kinetic nature of Landau damping. A proposed fluid model, incorporating these simplifications, is verified numerically using a kinetic Vlasov code.

  10. Coarse-graining Landau-Lifshitz damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xuebing; Visscher, P. B.

    2001-06-01

    High speed switching in magnetic materials is usually studied with the Landau-Lifshitz (LL) equation, which describes damping through a phenomenological coefficient. The results of micromagnetic calculations based on the LL equation have been observed to depend strongly on the cell size. We take a coarse-graining or renormalization-group approach to this cell size dependence: from a simulation using cell size L, we look at the dynamics of a cell of size 2L and determine an effective damping coefficient that describes the larger-scale dynamics. This can be thought of as a Green-Kubo calculation of the effective damping coefficient. In principle, this makes it possible to coarse grain from the atomic scale to determine the micromagnetic damping coefficient.

  11. Oscillation damping means for magnetically levitated systems

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    2009-01-20

    The present invention presents a novel system and method of damping rolling, pitching, or yawing motions, or longitudinal oscillations superposed on their normal forward or backward velocity of a moving levitated system.

  12. Random vibrations of quadratic damping systems. [optimum damping analysis for automobile suspension system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sireteanu, T.

    1974-01-01

    An oscillating system with quadratic damping subjected to white noise excitation is replaced by a nonlinear, statistically equivalent system for which the associated Fokker-Planck equation can be exactly solved. The mean square responses are calculated and the optimum damping coefficient is determined with respect to the minimum mean square acceleration criteria. An application of these results to the optimization of automobile suspension damping is given.

  13. Mechanical loading, damping, and load-driven bone formation in mouse tibiae.

    PubMed

    Dodge, Todd; Wanis, Mina; Ayoub, Ramez; Zhao, Liming; Watts, Nelson B; Bhattacharya, Amit; Akkus, Ozan; Robling, Alexander; Yokota, Hiroki

    2012-10-01

    Mechanical loads play a pivotal role in the growth and maintenance of bone and joints. Although loading can activate anabolic genes and induce bone remodeling, damping is essential for preventing traumatic bone injury and fracture. In this study we investigated the damping capacity of bone, joint tissue, muscle, and skin using a mouse hindlimb model of enhanced loading in conjunction with finite element modeling to model bone curvature. Our hypothesis was that loads were primarily absorbed by the joints and muscle tissue, but that bone also contributed to damping through its compression and natural bending. To test this hypothesis, fresh mouse distal lower limb segments were cyclically loaded in axial compression in sequential bouts, with each subsequent bout having less surrounding tissue. A finite element model was generated to model effects of bone curvature in silico. Two damping-related parameters (phase shift angle and energy loss) were determined from the output of the loading experiments. Interestingly, the experimental results revealed that the knee joint contributed to the largest portion of the damping capacity of the limb, and bone itself accounted for approximately 38% of the total phase shift angle. Computational results showed that normal bone curvature enhanced the damping capacity of the bone by approximately 40%, and the damping effect grew at an accelerated pace as curvature was increased. Although structural curvature reduces critical loads for buckling in beam theory, evolution apparently favors maintaining curvature in the tibia. Histomorphometric analysis of the tibia revealed that in response to axial loading, bone formation was significantly enhanced in the regions that were predicted to receive a curvature-induced bending moment. These results suggest that in addition to bone's compressive damping capacity, surrounding tissues, as well as naturally-occurring bone curvature, also contribute to mechanical damping, which may ultimately affect

  14. Quantum damped oscillator I: Dissipation and resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Chruscinski, Dariusz

    2006-04-15

    Quantization of a damped harmonic oscillator leads to so called Bateman's dual system. The corresponding Bateman's Hamiltonian, being a self-adjoint operator, displays the discrete family of complex eigenvalues. We show that they correspond to the poles of energy eigenvectors and the corresponding resolvent operator when continued to the complex energy plane. Therefore, the corresponding generalized eigenvectors may be interpreted as resonant states which are responsible for the irreversible quantum dynamics of a damped harmonic oscillator.

  15. Effect of material damping on bone remodelling.

    PubMed

    Misra, J C; Samanta, S

    1987-01-01

    This paper considers the effect of internal material damping on the stresses, strains, and surface and internal remodelling behaviour in a section of axisymmetrical bone with a force-fitted axially oriented medullary pin. The bone response to several loading situations is modelled using visco-elastic equations. An approximate method is developed to analyse the proposed mathematical model. By considering a numerical example, the effect of material damping on the remodelling stresses is quantified. PMID:3584150

  16. Spatial versus time hysteresis in damping mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Fabiano, R. H.; Wang, Y.; Inman, D. J.; Cudney, H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A description is given of continuing investigations on the task of estimating internal damping mechanisms in flexible structures. Specifically, two models for internal damping in Euler-Bernoulli beams are considered: spatial hysteresis and time hysteresis. A theoretically sound computational algorithm for estimation is described, and experimental results are discussed. It is concluded that both models perform well in the sense that they accurately predict response for the experiments conducted.

  17. Turbine blade with tuned damping structure

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Christian X.; Messmann, Stephen J.

    2015-09-01

    A turbine blade is provided comprising: a root; an airfoil comprising an external wall extending radially from the root and having a radially outermost portion; and a damping structure. The external wall may comprise first and second side walls joined together to define an inner cavity of the airfoil. The damping structure may be positioned within the airfoil inner cavity and coupled to the airfoil so as to define a tuned mass damper.

  18. Embedded absorbers for helicopter rotor lag damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byers, Lynn; Gandhi, Farhan

    2009-09-01

    Radial and chordwise damped vibration absorbers embedded in the rotor blade are compared for rotor lag damping augmentation. Results show that the radial absorber is more effective in transferring damping to the rotor blade lag mode. The chordwise absorber needs to be at a more outboard location and have a larger mass to introduce levels of lag damping comparable to that introduced by the radial absorber. The 1/rev amplitude of a chordwise absorber at the blade tip, per degree of blade lead-lag motion in forward flight, is of the order of 35% of the blade chord, and such a stroke might be difficult to accommodate. The 1/rev amplitude of a radial absorber at 70% span (having significantly lower mass than the chordwise absorber and producing comparable lag damping) is of the order of 4% of the rotor blade span. The static displacement of the radial absorber under centrifugal load needs to be limited using a frequency-dependent (high static stiffness, low dynamic stiffness) or nonlinear spring. The chordwise absorber can also undergo a large static displacement under the chordwise component of the centrifugal load if there is an offset from the feather axis, and this would again have to be limited using a strategy such as a frequency-dependent spring. Significant advantages of the radial absorber are—higher lag damping, lower absorber mass, space for absorber mass travel, and no chordwise travel of blade center of gravity reducing susceptibility to aeroelastic instability and dynamic pitch-link loads.

  19. Damping of Sound Waves in Strong Centrifugal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Kislov, V. A.; Tronin, I. V.

    A method for numerical calculation of the sound wave damping and dispersion law in a strong centrifugal field of the order of 106 g is considered. The damping is defined from the width of the resonance peak for different wave vectors. In the strong centrifugal field damping of the sound waves essentially exceeds the damping in the quiescent gas.

  20. Landau damping in relativistic plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Brent

    2016-02-01

    We examine the phenomenon of Landau damping in relativistic plasmas via a study of the relativistic Vlasov-Poisson (rVP) system on the torus for initial data sufficiently close to a spatially uniform steady state. We find that if the steady state is regular enough (essentially in a Gevrey class of degree in a specified range) and if the deviation of the initial data from this steady state is small enough in a certain norm, the evolution of the system is such that its spatial density approaches a uniform constant value quasi-exponentially fast (i.e., like exp ( - C |" separators=" t | ν ¯ ) for ν ¯ ∈ ( 0 , 1 ) ). We take as a priori assumptions that solutions launched by such initial data exist for all times (by no means guaranteed with rVP, but a reasonable assumption since we are close to a spatially uniform state) and that the various norms in question are continuous in time (which should be a consequence of an abstract version of the Cauchy-Kovalevskaya theorem). In addition, we must assume a kind of "reverse Poincaré inequality" on the Fourier transform of the solution. In spirit, this assumption amounts to the requirement that there exists 0 < ϰ < 1 so that the mass in the annulus ϰ ≤ |" separators=" v | < 1 for the solution launched by the initial data is uniformly small for all t. Typical velocity bounds for solutions to rVP launched by small initial data (at least on ℝ6) imply this bound. We note that none of our results require spherical symmetry (a crucial assumption for many current results on rVP).

  1. Damping in flapping flight and its implications for manoeuvring, scaling and evolution.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, Tyson L

    2011-12-15

    Flying animals exhibit remarkable degrees of both stability and manoeuvrability. Our understanding of these capabilities has recently been improved by the identification of a source of passive damping specific to flapping flight. Examining how this damping effect scales among different species and how it affects active manoeuvres as well as recovery from perturbations provides general insights into the flight of insects, birds and bats. These new damping models offer a means to predict manoeuvrability and stability for a wide variety of flying animals using prior reports of the morphology and flapping motions of these species. Furthermore, the presence of passive damping is likely to have facilitated the evolution of powered flight in animals by providing a stability benefit associated with flapping. PMID:22116750

  2. Robust time-domain identification of mass stiffness, and damping matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roemer, Michael J.; Mook, D. Joseph

    1990-01-01

    Accurate estimates of the mass, stiffness, and damping characteristics of a structure is necessary for determining the control laws best suited for active control methodologies. There are several modal identification techniques available for determining the frequencies, damping ratios, and mode shapes of a structure. However, modal identification methods in both the frequency and time domains have difficulties for certain circumstances. Frequency domain techniques which utilize the steady-state response from various harmonic inputs often encounter difficulties when the frequencies are closely distributed, the structure exhibits a high degree of damping, or the steady-state condition is hard to establish. Time domain techniques have produced successful results, but lack robustness with respect to measurement noise. In this paper, two identification techniques and an estimation method are combined to form a time-domain technique to accurately identify the mass, stiffness, and damping matrices from noisy measurements.

  3. Circulating Mitochondrial DAMPs Are Not Effective Inducers of Proteinuria and Kidney Injury in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Hong; Liang, Yaojun; Wang, Xiao; Bao, Wenduona; Yun, Shifeng; Ye, Yuting; Zheng, Chunxia; Liu, Zhihong; Shi, Shaolin

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria in eukaryotic cells are derived from bacteria in evolution. Like bacteria, mitochondria contain DNA with unmethylated CpG motifs and formyl peptides, both of which have recently been shown to be damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and induce immune response and cell injury. Based on the facts that circulating mitochondrial DAMPs (mtDAMPs) are increased in the patients of trauma or burn injury who also have proteinuria, that mtDAMPs can activate immune cells which in turn secrete glomerular permeability factors, that renal intrinsic cells express a variety of DAMP receptors, and that mtDAMPs can directly increase endothelial cell permeability in vitro, we hypothesized that mtDAMPs may be novel circulating factors inducing proteinuria and kidney injury. We tested this hypothesis by directly injecting mtDAMPs into rodents and examining urinary protein and kidney histology. We prepared mtDAMP samples, including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and mitochondrial debris (MTD), from rodent liver. In mice, injection of mtDNA for 20 μg/ml initial concentration in circulation (much higher than the clinical range), did not cause any renal manifestations. However, an increased dose leading to 45 μg/ml initial concentration in circulation resulted in a transient, slight increase in urinary albumin. In rats, MTD injection resulting in 450 μg/ml initial concentration of MTD protein in circulation, which was much higher than the clinical range, caused mild, transient proteinuria and lung lesions. Multiple injections of such large amount of either mtDNA or MTD into rodents on 3 consecutive days also failed in inducing proteinuria and kidney injury. In summary, clinical levels of circulating mtDAMPs do not induce proteinuria and clinically irrelevant high levels of mtDAMPs cause only a transient and slight increase in urinary protein in rodents, suggesting that circulating mtDAMPs may not be responsible for the proteinuria and kidney injury in patients with trauma

  4. Spin-orbit damping in transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, Keith

    2008-03-01

    Magnetization dynamics are routinely described with the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation. However, it is expected that the LLG equation fails to properly describe the large amplitude dynamics that occur during magnetization reversal. Improving switching speeds in nanoscale devices by tailoring materials requires both a qualitative understanding of the relaxation processes that contribute to damping and the ability to quantitatively calculate the resulting damping rates. We consider small amplitude LLG damping in transition metals as a prelude to approaching the more complicated mechanisms expected in complete reversal events. LLG damping rates in pure transition metal systems have non-monotonic temperature dependencies that have been empirically shown by Heinrich et al. [1] to have one part proportional to the conductivity and one part proportional to the resistivity. Kambersky [2] postulated that both contributions result from a torque between the spin and orbital moments. We have conducted first-principles calculations that validate this claim for single element systems [3]. Our calculations for Fe, Co, and Ni both qualitatively match the two trends observed in measurements and quantitatively agree with the observed damping rates. We will discuss how the spin-orbit interaction produces two contributions to damping with nearly opposite temperature dependencies and compare calculations of the damping rate versus resistivity with experimental results. [1] B. Heinrich, D.J. Meredith, and J.F. Cochran, J. Appl. Phys., 50(11), 7726 (1979). [2] V. Kambersky, Czech. J. Phys. B, 26, 1366 (1976). [3] K. Gilmore, Y.U. Idzerda, and M.D. Stiles, Phys. Rev. Lett., 99, 027204 (2007).

  5. High order mode damping in the NSLS accelerating RF cavities by the use of damping antennae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fewell, N.; Wen, Z.

    High order modes were successfully damped in the existing NSLS accelerating cavities by the insertion of damping antennae. The location of the antennae was aided by cavity field plots using superfish and their lengths determined experimentally. A description of their construction is presented together with the results of their insertion upon higher order cavity modes and beam stability.

  6. Collisional damping of the geodesic acoustic mode with toroidal rotation. I. Viscous damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xueyu; Xie, Baoyi; Guo, Wenfeng; Chen, You; Yu, Jiangmei; Yu, Jun

    2016-03-01

    With the dispersion relation derived for the geodesic acoustic mode in toroidally rotating tokamak plasmas using the fluid model, the effect of the toroidal rotation on the collisional viscous damping of the geodesic acoustic mode is investigated. It is found that the collisional viscous damping of the geodesic acoustic mode has weak increase with respect to the toroidal Mach number.

  7. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the entanglement sudden death under amplitude damping and phase damping

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Jiehui; Zhu Shiyao

    2007-12-15

    By using principal minor method, which is developed from the Peres-Horodecki criterion for the separability of a quantum state, we derive the necessary and sufficient conditions for the entanglement sudden death of a two-qubit state under amplitude damping and phase damping.

  8. Experimental and analytical estimation of damping in beams and plates with damping treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wanbo

    The research presented in this dissertation is devoted to the problem of damping estimation in engineering structures, especially beams and plates with passive damping treatments. In structural design and/or optimization, knowledge about damping is essential. However, due to the complexity of the dynamic interaction of system components, the determination of damping, by either analysis or experiments, has never been straightforward. In this research, currently-used methods are reviewed and gaps are identified first. Then both analytical and experimental studies on the damping estimation are conducted and possibilities of improvement are explored. Various passive damping treatments using ViscoElastic Materials (VEMs) are designed, manufactured and then added to aluminum and composite beams and plates. Experiments on these damped structures are conducted. Currently used experimental methods, namely, the free-decay method, the modal curve-fitting method and the Power Input Method (PIM), are used to process the experimental data and investigate the damping characteristics. Especially, (1) experimental procedures of the power input method are carefully identified and investigated; (2) the power input method is applied to non-uniformly damped structures; (3) the power input method is applied in an extended frequency range (from 0 to 5000 Hz) to meet emerging needs of the transportation industries. A new analytical power input method is proposed for evaluating the loss factor of builtup structures, based on the finite element model with assigned properties of the constituents. Finite Element (FE) models of beams and plates with various damping configurations are developed so a frequency response solution suffices to provide mobility and energy results needed by the new analytical power input method. The analytical power input method is evaluated by comparison with the commonly used Modal Strain Energy (MSE) method. Instead of making an approximate correction of the

  9. Damping and spectral formation of upstream whistlers

    SciTech Connect

    Orlowski, D.S.; Russell, C.T.; Krauss-Varban, D.

    1995-09-01

    Previous studies have indicated that damping rates of upstream whistlers strongly depend on the details of the electron distribution function. Moreover, detailed analysis of Doppler shift and the whistler dispersion relation indicate that upstream whistlers propagate obliquely in a finite band of frequencies. In this paper we present results of a kinetic calculation of damping lengths of wideband whistlers using the sum of seven drifting bi-Maxwellian electron distributions as a best fit to the ISEE 1 electron data. For two cases, when upstream whistlers are observed, convective damping lengths derived from ISEE magnetic field and ephemeris data are compared with theoretical results. We find that the calculated convective damping lengths are consistent with the data and that upstream whistlers remain marginally stable. We also show that the slope of plasma frame spectra of upstream whistlers, obtained by direct fitting of the observed spectra, is between 5 and 7. The overall spectral, wave, and particle characteristics, proximity to the shock, as well as propagation and damping properties indicated that these waves cannot be generated locally. Instead, the observed upstream whistlers arise in the shock ramp, most likely by a variety of cross-field drift and/or anisotropy driven instabilities. 57 refs., 11 figs.

  10. Noise Transmission Characteristics of Damped Plexiglas Windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, Gary P.; Buehrle, Ralph D.; Klos, Jacob; Brown, Sherilyn A.

    2002-01-01

    Most general aviation aircraft utilize single layer plexiglas material for the windshield and side windows. Adding noise control treatments to transparent panels is a challenging problem. In this paper, damped plexiglas windows are evaluated for replacement of conventional windows in general aviation aircraft to reduce the structure-borne and airborne noise transmitted into the interior. In contrast to conventional solid windows, the damped plexiglas window panels are fabricated using two or three layers of plexiglas with transparent viscoelastic damping material sandwiched between the layers. Results from acoustic tests conducted in the NASA Langley Structural Acoustic Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility are used to compare different designs of the damped plexiglas panels with solid windows of the same nominal thickness. Comparisons of the solid and damped plexiglas panels show reductions in the radiated sound power of up to 8 dB at low frequency resonances and as large as 4.5 dB over a 4000 Hz bandwidth. The weight of the viscoelastic treatment was approximately 1% of the panel mass. Preliminary FEM/BEM modeling shows good agreement with experimental results for radiated sound power.

  11. Damped Windows for Aircraft Interior Noise Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehrle, Ralph D.; Klos, Jacob; Gibbs, Gary P.

    2004-01-01

    Windows are a significant path for structure-borne and air-borne noise transmission into aircraft. To improve the acoustical performance, damped windows were fabricated using two or three layers of plexiglas with transparent viscoelastic damping material sandwiched between the layers. In this paper, numerical and experimental results are used to evaluate the acoustic benefits of damped windows. Tests were performed in the Structural Acoustic Loads and Transmission Facility at NASA Langley Research Center to measure the transmission loss for diffuse acoustic excitation and radiated sound power for point force excitation. Comparisons between uniform and damped plexiglas windows showed increased transmission loss of 6 dB at the first natural frequency, 6 dB at coincidence, and 4.5 dB over a 50 to 4k Hz range. Radiated sound power was reduced up to 7 dB at the lower natural frequencies and 3.7 dB over a 1000 Hz bandwidth. Numerical models are presented for the prediction of radiated sound power for point force excitation and transmission loss for diffuse acoustic excitation. Radiated sound power and transmission loss predictions are in good agreement with experimental data. A parametric study is presented that evaluates the optimum configuration of the damped plexiglas windows for reducing the radiated sound power.

  12. Passive damping concepts for slender columns in space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Razzaq, Z.; Ekhelikar, R. K.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study of three different passive damping concepts is conducted for a slender member with partial rotational end restraints. Over a hundred full-scale natural vibration experiments were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of mass-string, polyethylene tubing, and chain damping concepts. The damping properties obtained from the experiments were used in the approximate analyses based on the partial differential equation of motion for the problem. The comparison of the experimental and the theoretical deflection-time relations shows that the velocity-dependent damping model used in the theory is adequate. From the experimental results, the effect of end connection friction and induced axial forces on damping is identified. The definition of an efficiency index is proposed based on the damping ratio and the mass of a given passive damping device. Using this definition, the efficiencies of the three damping devices are compared. The polyethylene tubing concept resulted into a low damping efficiency.

  13. Frequency Regulation and Oscillation Damping Contributions of Variable-Speed Wind Generators in the U.S. Eastern Interconnection (EI)

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yong; Gracia, Jose R,; King, Jr, Thomas J.; Liu, Yilu

    2014-05-16

    The U.S. Eastern Interconnection (EI) is one of the largest electric power grids in the world and is expected to have difficulties in dealing with frequency regulation and oscillation damping issues caused by the increasing wind power. On the other side, variable-speed wind generators can actively engage in frequency regulation or oscillation damping with supplementary control loops. This paper creates a 5% wind power penetration simulation scenario based on the 16 000-bus EI system dynamic model and developed the user-defined wind electrical control model in PSS (R) E that incorporates additional frequency regulation and oscillation damping control loops. We evaluated the potential contributions of variable-speed wind generations to the EI system frequency regulation and oscillation damping, and simulation results demonstrate that current and future penetrations of wind power are promising in the EI system frequency regulation and oscillation damping.

  14. Frequency Regulation and Oscillation Damping Contributions of Variable-Speed Wind Generators in the U.S. Eastern Interconnection (EI)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Yong; Gracia, Jose R,; King, Jr, Thomas J.; Liu, Yilu

    2014-05-16

    The U.S. Eastern Interconnection (EI) is one of the largest electric power grids in the world and is expected to have difficulties in dealing with frequency regulation and oscillation damping issues caused by the increasing wind power. On the other side, variable-speed wind generators can actively engage in frequency regulation or oscillation damping with supplementary control loops. This paper creates a 5% wind power penetration simulation scenario based on the 16 000-bus EI system dynamic model and developed the user-defined wind electrical control model in PSS (R) E that incorporates additional frequency regulation and oscillation damping control loops. We evaluatedmore » the potential contributions of variable-speed wind generations to the EI system frequency regulation and oscillation damping, and simulation results demonstrate that current and future penetrations of wind power are promising in the EI system frequency regulation and oscillation damping.« less

  15. Radiative Damping and Functional Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Suvrat; Raju, C. K.

    We propose a general technique to solve the classical many-body problem with radiative damping. We modify the short-distance structure of Maxwell electrodynamics. This allows us to avoid runaway solutions as if we had a covariant model of extended particles. The resulting equations of motion are functional differential equations (FDEs) rather than ordinary differential equations (ODEs). Using recently developed numerical techniques for stiff, retarded FDEs, we solve these equations for the one-body central force problem with radiative damping. Our results indicate that locally the magnitude of radiation damping may be well approximated by the standard third-order expression but the global properties of our solutions are dramatically different. We comment on the two-body problem and applications to quantum field theory and quantum mechanics.

  16. Resolving photons from cosmic ray in DAMPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zunlei; Chang, Jin; Li, Xiang; Dong, TieKuang; Zang, Jingjing

    2016-07-01

    The Dark Matter Particle Explorer(DAMPE), which took to the skies on 17 December, is designed for high energy cosmic ray ion detection. The proportion of photons in the cosmic ray is very small, so it's difficult to distinguish between photons and 'background', but necessary for any DAMPE gamma-ray science goals.The paper present a algorithm to identify photons from 'background' mainly by the tracker/converter, which promote pair conversion and measure the directions of incident particles, and an anticoincidence detector,featuring an array of plastic scintillator to detect the charged particles.The method has been studied by simulating using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation code and adjusted by the BeamTest at CERN in December,2014.In addition,DAMPE photon detection capabilities can be checked using the flight data.

  17. Highly damped kinematic coupling for precision instruments

    DOEpatents

    Hale, Layton C.; Jensen, Steven A.

    2001-01-01

    A highly damped kinematic coupling for precision instruments. The kinematic coupling provides support while causing essentially no influence to its nature shape, with such influences coming, for example, from manufacturing tolerances, temperature changes, or ground motion. The coupling uses three ball-cone constraints, each combined with a released flexural degree of freedom. This arrangement enables a gain of higher load capacity and stiffness, but can also significantly reduce the friction level in proportion to the ball radius divided by the distance between the ball and the hinge axis. The blade flexures reduces somewhat the stiffness of the coupling and provides an ideal location to apply constrained-layer damping which is accomplished by attaching a viscoelastic layer and a constraining layer on opposite sides of each of the blade flexures. The three identical ball-cone flexures provide a damped coupling mechanism to kinematically support the projection optics system of the extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) system, or other load-sensitive apparatus.

  18. Passively damped vibration welding system and method

    DOEpatents

    Tan, Chin-An; Kang, Bongsu; Cai, Wayne W.; Wu, Tao

    2013-04-02

    A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an anvil, and a passive damping mechanism (PDM). The controller generates an input signal having a calibrated frequency. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction at the calibrated frequency in response to the input signal to form a weld in a work piece. The PDM is positioned with respect to the system, and substantially damps or attenuates vibration in an undesirable second direction. A method includes connecting the PDM having calibrated properties and a natural frequency to an anvil of an ultrasonic welding system. Then, an input signal is generated using a weld controller. The method includes vibrating a welding horn in a desirable direction in response to the input signal, and passively damping vibration in an undesirable direction using the PDM.

  19. Turbine blade damping device with controlled loading

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, John J.

    2015-09-29

    A damping structure for a turbomachine rotor. The damping structure including an elongated snubber element including a first snubber end rigidly attached to a first blade and extending toward an adjacent second blade, and an opposite second snubber end positioned adjacent to a cooperating surface associated with the second blade. The snubber element has a centerline extending radially inwardly in a direction from the first blade toward the second blade along at least a portion of the snubber element between the first and second snubber ends. Rotational movement of the rotor effects relative movement between the second snubber end and the cooperating surface to position the second snubber end in frictional engagement with the cooperating surface with a predetermined damping force determined by a centrifugal force on the snubber element.

  20. Fluid damping of cylindrical liquid storage tanks.

    PubMed

    Habenberger, Joerg

    2015-01-01

    A method is proposed in order to calculate the damping effects of viscous fluids in liquid storage tanks subjected to earthquakes. The potential equation of an ideal fluid can satisfy only the boundary conditions normal to the surface of the liquid. To satisfy also the tangential interaction conditions between liquid and tank wall and tank bottom, the potential flow is superimposed by a one-dimensional shear flow. The shear flow in this boundary layer yields to a decrease of the mechanical energy of the shell-liquid-system. A damping factor is derived from the mean value of the energy dissipation in time. Depending on shell geometry and fluid viscosity, modal damping ratios are calculated for the convective component. PMID:26405635

  1. Saturation of gyrokinetic turbulence through damped eigenmodes.

    PubMed

    Hatch, D R; Terry, P W; Jenko, F; Merz, F; Nevins, W M

    2011-03-18

    In the context of toroidal gyrokinetic simulations, it is shown that a hierarchy of damped modes is excited in the nonlinear turbulent state. These modes exist at the same spatial scales as the unstable eigenmodes that drive the turbulence. The larger amplitude subdominant modes are weakly damped and exhibit smooth, large-scale structure in velocity space and in the direction parallel to the magnetic field. Modes with increasingly fine-scale structure are excited to decreasing amplitudes. In aggregate, damped modes define a potent energy sink. This leads to an overlap of the spatial scales of energy injection and peak dissipation, a feature that is in contrast with more traditional turbulent systems. PMID:21469869

  2. Viscous damping of perforated planar micromechanical structures

    PubMed Central

    Homentcovschi, D.; Miles, R.N.

    2008-01-01

    The paper gives an analytical approximation to the viscous damping coefficient due to the motion of a gas between a pair of closely spaced fluctuating plates in which one of the plates contains a regular system of circular holes. These types of structures are important parts of many microelectromechanical devices realized in MEMS technology as microphones, microaccelerometers, resonators, etc. The pressure satisfies a Reynolds’ type equation with coefficients accounting for all the important effects: compressibility of the gas, inertia and possibly slip of the gas on the plates. An analytical expression for the optimum number of circular holes which assure a minimum value of the total damping coefficient is given. This value realizes an equilibrium between the squeeze-film damping and the viscous resistance of the holes. The paper also provides analytical design formulas to be used in the case of regular circular perforated plates. PMID:19365579

  3. Biomimetic Gradient Polymers with Enhanced Damping Capacities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Zhang, Huan; Guo, Jing; Cheng, Beichen; Cao, Yuan; Lu, Shengjun; Zhao, Ning; Xu, Jian

    2016-04-01

    Designing gradient structures, mimicking biological materials, such as pummelo peels and tendon, is a promising strategy for developing advanced materials with superior energy damping capacities. Here a facile and effective approach for fabricating polymers with composition gradients at millimeter length scale is presented. The gradient thiol-ene polymers (TEPs) are created by the use of density difference of ternary thiol-ene-ene precursors and the subsequent photo-crosslinking via thiol-ene reaction. The compositional gradients are analyzed via differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), compressive modulus testing, atomic force microscopy (AFM) indentation, and swelling measurements. In contrast to homogeneous TEPs networks, the resultant gradient polymer shows a broader effective damping temperature range combining with good mechanical properties. The present result provides an effective route toward high damping materials by the fabrication of gradient structures. PMID:26776353

  4. Turbine blade damping device with controlled loading

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, John J

    2013-09-24

    A damping structure for a turbomachine rotor. The damping structure including an elongated snubber element including a first snubber end rigidly attached to a first blade and extending toward an adjacent second blade, and an opposite second snubber end positioned adjacent to a cooperating surface associated with the second blade. The snubber element has a centerline extending radially inwardly in a direction from the first blade toward the second blade along at least a portion of the snubber element between the first and second snubber ends. Rotational movement of the rotor effects relative movement between the second snubber end and the cooperating surface to position the second snubber end in frictional engagement with the cooperating surface with a predetermined damping force determined by a centrifugal force on the snubber element.

  5. Measurement of damping of graphite epoxy materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crocker, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    The design of an experiment to measure the damping of a cylindrical graphite-epoxy specimen with a three point support and a knife edge support is described as well as equipment used in tests conducted to determine the influence of the support at the two ends of the specimen and to simulate an idealized free-free boundary condition at the two edges. A curve fitting technique is being used to process the frequency response data obtained. Experiments conducted on the thin plate specimen also reveal the influence of the end support condition on the damping ratio of the specimen. The damping ratio values measured for both specimens appear to be strongly influenced by the shape of the specimen and appear to depend on length and fiber orientation as well as the presence of discontinuities such as sharp bends, corners, and notches.

  6. Identification of civil structures with nonproportional damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jann N.; Lei, Ying

    2000-04-01

    Recently, the method of Hilbert transform has been used successfully by the authors to identify parameters of linear structures with real eigenvalues and eigenvectors, e.g., structures with proportional damping. Frequently, linear structures may not have proportional damping so that normal modes do not exist. In this case, all the eigenvalues, eigenvectors and modeshapes are complex. In this paper, the Hilbert transform and the method of Empirical Mode Decomposition are used to identify the parameters of structures with nonproportional damping using the impulse response data. Measured impulse response signals are first decomposed into Intrinsic Mode Functions using the method of Empirical Mode Decomposition with intermittency criteria. An Intrinsic Mode Function (IMF) contains only one characteristic time scale (frequency), which may involve the contribution of a complex conjugate pair of modes with a unique frequency and a damping ratio, referred to as the modal response. It is shown that all the modal responses can be obtained from IMFs. Then, each modal response is decomposed in the frequency-time domain to yield instantaneous phase angle and amplitude as functions of time using the Hilbert transform. Based on only a single measurement of the impulse response time history at one location, the complex eigenvalues of the linear structure can be identified using a simple analysis procedure. When the response time histories are measured at all locations, the proposed methodology is capable of identifying the complex modeshapes as well as the mass, damping and stiffness matrices of the structure. The effectiveness and accuracy of the methodology presented are demonstrated through numerical simulations. It is shown that complete dynamic characteristics of linear structures with nonproportional damping can be identified effectively using the Hilbert transform and the Empirical Mode Decomposition method.

  7. Particle systems and nonlinear Landau damping

    SciTech Connect

    Villani, Cédric

    2014-03-15

    Some works dealing with the long-time behavior of interacting particle systems are reviewed and put into perspective, with focus on the classical Kolmogorov–Arnold–Moser theory and recent results of Landau damping in the nonlinear perturbative regime, obtained in collaboration with Clément Mouhot. Analogies are discussed, as well as new qualitative insights in the theory. Finally, the connection with a more recent work on the inviscid Landau damping near the Couette shear flow, by Bedrossian and Masmoudi, is briefly discussed.

  8. Damping of Bogoliubov excitations at finite temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastukhov, Volodymyr

    2015-10-01

    We present a simple and efficient method to calculate the damping for the excitation spectrum of a uniform D-dimensional Bose gas. Starting from the original Popov’s hydrodynamic description and integrating out phase variables, we obtained the effective action of amplitude fluctuations. Within this approach, the lifetime of quasi-particles with a finite momentum is calculated at a wide temperature range. It is shown that the correct use of the hydrodynamic approach leads to the damping rate, which coincides with results obtained by means of the perturbation theory.

  9. Minimal energy damping in an axisymmetric flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachs, Alexander

    2008-05-01

    The method of Lagrange's undetermined multipliers is used to find the velocity field which minimizes the energy damping for a viscous incompressible fluid described by the Navier- Stoke equation. The vorticity of this velocity field obeys a Helmholtz equation with an undetermined parameter. This Helmholtz equation is used to determine the axisymmetric velocity field in a cylinder. This velocity field is slightly different from the Poiseuille velocity field. The rate of energy damping per unit energy is calculated as a function of the parameter. It is a minimum when the parameter is equal to the root of a Bessel function.

  10. Damping Goes the Distance in Golf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In the late 1980s, Dr. Benjamin Dolgin of NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed a concept for a high-damping graphite/viscoelastic material for the Strategic Defense Initiative (popularly referred to as "Star Wars"), as part of a space-based laser anti-missile program called "Asterix." Dolgin drummed up this concept with the intention of stabilizing weapons launch platforms in space, where there is no solid ground to firmly support these structures. Without the inclusion of high-damping material, the orbital platforms were said to vibrate for 20 minutes after force was applied - a rate deemed "unacceptable" by leaders of the Strategic Defense Initiative.

  11. Assessing Equivalent Viscous Damping Using Piping System test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, J.; Morante, R.

    2010-07-18

    The specification of damping for nuclear piping systems subject to seismic-induced motions has been the subject of many studies and much controversy. Damping estimation based on test data can be influenced by numerous factors, consequently leading to considerable scatter in damping estimates in the literature. At present, nuclear industry recommendations and nuclear regulatory guidance are not consistent on the treatment of damping for analysis of nuclear piping systems. Therefore, there is still a need to develop a more complete and consistent technical basis for specification of appropriate damping values for use in design and analysis. This paper summarizes the results of recent damping studies conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  12. Arrangement for damping the resonance in a laser diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J.; Yariv, A.; Margalit, S. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An arrangement for damping the resonance in a laser diode is described. This arrangement includes an additional layer which together with the conventional laser diode form a structure (35) of a bipolar transistor. Therein, the additional layer serves as the collector, the cladding layer next to it as the base, and the active region and the other cladding layer as the emitter. A capacitor is connected across the base and the collector. It is chosen so that at any frequency above a certain selected frequency which is far below the resonance frequency the capacitor impedance is very low, effectively shorting the base to the collector.

  13. Stimulation of dendritic cells by DAMPs in ALA-PDT treated SCC tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiyan; Fan, Zhixia; Zhang, Linglin; Shi, Lei; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Wang, Hongwei; Wang, Xiuli

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) not only kills tumor cells directly but also rapidly recruits and activates immune cells favoring the development of antitumor adaptive immunity. It is believed that Topical 5-aminolevulinic acid mediated photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) can induce anti-tumor immune responses through dangerous signals damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). In this study, we investigated the effect of ALA-PDT induced DAMPs on immune cells. We focused on the stimulation of dendritic cells by major DAMPs, enhanced the expression of calreticulin (CRT), heat shock proteins 70 (HSP70), and high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), either individually or in combination. We evaluated in vitro and in vivo expressions of DAMPs induced by ALA-PDT using immunohistochemistry, western blot, and ELISA in a squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) mouse model. The role of DAMPs in the maturation of DCs potentiated by ALA-PDT-treated tumor cells was detected by FACS and ELISA. Our results showed that ALA-PDT enhanced the expression of CRT, HSP70, and HMGB1. These induced DAMPs played an important part in activating DCs by PDT-treated tumor cells, including phenotypic maturation (increase of surface expression of MHC-II, CD80, and CD86) and functional maturation (enhanced capability to secrete IFN-γ and IL-12). Furthermore, injecting ALA-PDT-treated tumor cells into naïve mice resulted in complete protection against cancer cells of the same origin. Our findings indicate that ALA-PDT can increase DAMPs and enhance tumor immunogenicity, providing a promising strategy for inducing a systemic anticancer immune response. PMID:26625309

  14. Some approaches to substructure coupling with damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, R. R., Jr.; Bachmeyer, R. C.; Howsman, T. G.

    1986-01-01

    Time-domain and frequency-domain methods for coupling substructures with general linear damping are discussed. A time-domain method is presented which employs a state variable representation of each substructure. Also presented is a method which employs frequency-domain coupling together with DFT and FFT transformations to obtain transient response solutions.

  15. Bunch lengthening in the SLC damping ring

    SciTech Connect

    Rivkin, L.; Bane, K.; Chen, P.; Gabella, W.; Higo, T.; Hofmann, A.; Linebarger, W.; Kheifets, S.; Knight, T.; Morton, P.

    1988-05-01

    In this paper we present the results of measurements of bunch length and bunch shape as a function of current in the SLC e/sup /minus//damping ring. After extraction, the SLC bunch is compressed by means of an RF compressor and a subsequent high dispersion section. By inserting a video screen at a point of large dispersion and by using the correlation between bunch length and energy spread induced by the compressor, we have measured not only the bunch length but also the longitudinal charge distribution of the bunch in the damping ring as a function of beam intensity. At 3 /times/ 10/sup 10/ particles per bunch with a peak ring RF voltage of 800 KV, the FWHM of the bunch length in the ring doubles over the nominal value. To measure the energy spread of the bunch in the damping ring, the optics of the extraction lines was modified to produce a large dispersion but small horizontal ..beta.. function at the video screen. At 3 /times/ 10/sup 10/ particles per bunch, the relative energy spread in the rings is increased by about 30%. Finally, these data are compared with calculations of bunch lengthening in the SLC damping rings. 8 refs., 6 figs.,

  16. Chiral damping of magnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Jué, Emilie; Safeer, C K; Drouard, Marc; Lopez, Alexandre; Balint, Paul; Buda-Prejbeanu, Liliana; Boulle, Olivier; Auffret, Stephane; Schuhl, Alain; Manchon, Aurelien; Miron, Ioan Mihai; Gaudin, Gilles

    2016-03-01

    Structural symmetry breaking in magnetic materials is responsible for the existence of multiferroics, current-induced spin-orbit torques and some topological magnetic structures. In this Letter we report that the structural inversion asymmetry (SIA) gives rise to a chiral damping mechanism, which is evidenced by measuring the field-driven domain-wall (DW) motion in perpendicularly magnetized asymmetric Pt/Co/Pt trilayers. The DW dynamics associated with the chiral damping and those with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) exhibit identical spatial symmetry. However, both scenarios are differentiated by their time reversal properties: whereas DMI is a conservative effect that can be modelled by an effective field, the chiral damping is purely dissipative and has no influence on the equilibrium magnetic texture. When the DW motion is modulated by an in-plane magnetic field, it reveals the structure of the internal fields experienced by the DWs, allowing one to distinguish the physical mechanism. The chiral damping enriches the spectrum of physical phenomena engendered by the SIA, and is essential for conceiving DW and skyrmion devices owing to its coexistence with DMI (ref. ). PMID:26689141

  17. Sampling considerations for modal analysis with damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae Young; Wakin, Michael B.; Gilbert, Anna C.

    2015-03-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) systems are critical for monitoring aging infrastructure (such as buildings or bridges) in a cost-effective manner. Wireless sensor networks that sample vibration data over time are particularly appealing for SHM applications due to their flexibility and low cost. However, in order to extend the battery life of wireless sensor nodes, it is essential to minimize the amount of vibration data these sensors must collect and transmit. In recent work, we have studied the performance of the Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) applied to the collection of data and provided new finite sample analysis characterizing conditions under which this simple technique{also known as the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD){can correctly estimate the mode shapes of the structure. Specifically, we provided theoretical guarantees on the number and duration of samples required in order to estimate a structure's mode shapes to a desired level of accuracy. In that previous work, however, we considered simplified Multiple-Degree-Of-Freedom (MDOF) systems with no damping. In this paper we consider MDOF systems with proportional damping and show that, with sufficiently light damping, the POD can continue to provide accurate estimates of a structure's mode shapes. We support our discussion with new analytical insight and experimental demonstrations. In particular, we study the tradeoffs between the level of damping, the sampling rate and duration, and the accuracy to which the structure's mode shapes can be estimated.

  18. Chiral damping of magnetic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jué, Emilie; Safeer, C. K.; Drouard, Marc; Lopez, Alexandre; Balint, Paul; Buda-Prejbeanu, Liliana; Boulle, Olivier; Auffret, Stephane; Schuhl, Alain; Manchon, Aurelien; Miron, Ioan Mihai; Gaudin, Gilles

    2016-03-01

    Structural symmetry breaking in magnetic materials is responsible for the existence of multiferroics, current-induced spin-orbit torques and some topological magnetic structures. In this Letter we report that the structural inversion asymmetry (SIA) gives rise to a chiral damping mechanism, which is evidenced by measuring the field-driven domain-wall (DW) motion in perpendicularly magnetized asymmetric Pt/Co/Pt trilayers. The DW dynamics associated with the chiral damping and those with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) exhibit identical spatial symmetry. However, both scenarios are differentiated by their time reversal properties: whereas DMI is a conservative effect that can be modelled by an effective field, the chiral damping is purely dissipative and has no influence on the equilibrium magnetic texture. When the DW motion is modulated by an in-plane magnetic field, it reveals the structure of the internal fields experienced by the DWs, allowing one to distinguish the physical mechanism. The chiral damping enriches the spectrum of physical phenomena engendered by the SIA, and is essential for conceiving DW and skyrmion devices owing to its coexistence with DMI (ref. ).

  19. Damping of liquid sloshing by foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauret, A.; Boulogne, F.; Cappello, J.; Dressaire, E.; Stone, H. A.

    2015-02-01

    When a container is set in motion, the free surface of the liquid starts to oscillate or slosh. Such effects can be observed when a glass of water is handled carelessly and the fluid sloshes or even spills over the rims of the container. However, beer does not slosh as readily as water, which suggests that foam could be used to damp sloshing. In this work, we study experimentally the effect on sloshing of a liquid foam placed on top of a liquid bath. We generate a monodisperse two-dimensional liquid foam in a rectangular container and track the motion of the foam. The influence of the foam on the sloshing dynamics is experimentally characterized: only a few layers of bubbles are sufficient to significantly damp the oscillations. We rationalize our experimental findings with a model that describes the foam contribution to the damping coefficient through viscous dissipation on the walls of the container. Then we extend our study to confined three-dimensional liquid foam and observe that the behavior of 2D and confined 3D systems are very similar. Thus, we conclude that only the bubbles close to the walls have a significant impact on the dissipation of energy. The possibility to damp liquid sloshing using foam is promising in numerous industrial applications such as the transport of liquefied gas in tankers or for propellants in rocket engines.

  20. Measurement of damping of graphite expoxy materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crocker, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    During this period damping measurements were made on the cylindrical graphite epoxy specimen using the forced-vibration test method. The specimen was carefully mounted directly on the shaker through the supporting ring and the impedance head. This was done to simulate an idealized free-free boundary condition at the two edges. The damping ratio value and the natural frequency (first mode) obtained in this experiment were 0.13% and 508.75 Hz respectively. In order to check the damping induced by the supporting ring, measurements were made with the top half of the ring removed. The specimen then was supported only by the bottom half of the ring (half ring). It was observed that the natural frequency of the specimen (first mode) increased of a value of 552.5 Hz due to the influence of the reduced mass of the supporting ring. But the damping ratio value obtained was the same as that obtained with full supporting ring, namely 0.13%.

  1. Experimental study on the damping of FAST cabin suspension system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Sun, Jing-hai; Zhang, Xin-yu; Zhu, Wen-bai; Pan, Gao-feng; Yang, Qing-ge

    2012-09-01

    The focus cabin suspension of the FAST telescope has structurally weak-stiffness dynamics with low damping performance, which makes it quite sensitive to wind-induced vibrations. A reasonable estimation about the damping is very important for the control performance evaluation of the prototype. It is a quite difficult task as the telescope is no at available yet. In the paper, a preliminary analysis is first made on the aerodynamic damping. Then a series of experimental models are tested for measuring the total damping. The scales of these models range from 10m to 50m in diameter while 6 test parameters are specially designed to check the damping sensitivity. The Ibrahim time domain (ITD) method is employed to identify the damping from the measured cabin response. The identification results indicate that the lowest damping ratio of the models is about 0.2%~0.4%. Friction-type cabin-cable joint seems to have main influence on the system damping.

  2. Vibration damping composition has flush-away feature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fellin, J. F.

    1967-01-01

    Vibration damping compound nullifies resonant frequencies in structures that support critical components undergoing vibration testing. The main feature of this damping composition is the ability to remove it with a flush of plain tap water.

  3. Apparatus and method of preloading vibration-damping bellows

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, Ronald W.

    1988-01-01

    An improved vibration damping bellows mount or interconnection is disclosed. In one aspect, the bellows is compressively prestressed along its length to offset vacuum-generated tensile loads and thereby improve vibration damping characteristics.

  4. Damping Parameters for flow-induced vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandiver, J. Kim

    2012-11-01

    A dimensionless damping parameter, c*=2cω/ρU, is defined for cylinders experiencing flow-induced vibration. It overcomes the limitations of "mass-damping" parameters, which first came into use in 1955. A review of the history of mass-damping parameters reveals that they have been used in three principal variations, commonly expressed as Sc, SG and α. For spring-mounted rigid cylinders all three forms reduce to a constant times the following dimensionless group, 2c/πρDωn, where 'c' is the structural damping constant per unit length of cylinder and ωnis the natural frequency of the oscillator, including, when so specified, the fluid added mass. All have been used to predict A*max=Amax/D, the peak response amplitude for VIV. None are useful at organizing response at reduced velocities away from the peak in response. The proposed alternative, c*, may be used to characterize VIV at all reduced velocities in the lock-in range. The simple product of A* and c* is shown to equal CL, the lift coefficient, thus providing a simple method for compiling CL data from free response measurements. Mass-damping parameters are not well-suited to the organization of the response of flexible cylinders in sheared flows or for cylinders equipped with strakes or fairings. c* is well-suited for use with sheared flows or for cylinders with partial coverage of strakes or fairings. Data from three independent sources are used to illustrate the applications of c*. It is shown that the method of modal analysis may be used to generalize the application of c* to flexible risers. An example for a riser with partial fairing coverage is presented.

  5. Nonlinear damping and quasi-linear modelling.

    PubMed

    Elliott, S J; Ghandchi Tehrani, M; Langley, R S

    2015-09-28

    The mechanism of energy dissipation in mechanical systems is often nonlinear. Even though there may be other forms of nonlinearity in the dynamics, nonlinear damping is the dominant source of nonlinearity in a number of practical systems. The analysis of such systems is simplified by the fact that they show no jump or bifurcation behaviour, and indeed can often be well represented by an equivalent linear system, whose damping parameters depend on the form and amplitude of the excitation, in a 'quasi-linear' model. The diverse sources of nonlinear damping are first reviewed in this paper, before some example systems are analysed, initially for sinusoidal and then for random excitation. For simplicity, it is assumed that the system is stable and that the nonlinear damping force depends on the nth power of the velocity. For sinusoidal excitation, it is shown that the response is often also almost sinusoidal, and methods for calculating the amplitude are described based on the harmonic balance method, which is closely related to the describing function method used in control engineering. For random excitation, several methods of analysis are shown to be equivalent. In general, iterative methods need to be used to calculate the equivalent linear damper, since its value depends on the system's response, which itself depends on the value of the equivalent linear damper. The power dissipation of the equivalent linear damper, for both sinusoidal and random cases, matches that dissipated by the nonlinear damper, providing both a firm theoretical basis for this modelling approach and clear physical insight. Finally, practical examples of nonlinear damping are discussed: in microspeakers, vibration isolation, energy harvesting and the mechanical response of the cochlea. PMID:26303921

  6. Propagation and damping of broadband upstream whistlers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlowski, D. S.; Russell, C. T.; Krauss-Varban, D.; Omidi, N.; Thomsen, M. F.

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that damping rates of upstream whistlers strongly depend on the details of the electron distribution function. Moreover, detailed analysis of Doppler-shift and whistler dispersion relation indicated that upstream whistlers propagate obliquely in a broad band. In this paper we present results of a kinetic calculation of damping lengths of wide-band whistlers using the sum of 7-drifting bi-Maxwellian electron distributions as a best fit to the International Sun Earth Explorer (ISEE) 1 electron data. For 2 cases, when upstream whistlers are observed, convective damping lengths derived from ISEE magnetic field and ephemeris data are compared with theoretical results. We find that the calculated convective damping lengths are consistent with the data and that upstream whistlers remain marginally stable. We also show that the slope of plasma frame spectra of upstream whistlers, obtained by direct fitting of the observed spectra is between 5 and 7 with a sharp lower frequency cutoff corresponding to a wavelength of about one ion inertial length. When the solar wind velocity is directed largely along the wave normal of the upstream whistlers the polariztion of the right hand waves becomes reversed and low frequencies are switched to high resulting in a peaked spectrum with a strong high frequency cutoff. The overall spectral, wave and particle characteristics, proximity to the shock as well as propagation and damping properties indicate that these waves cannot be generated locally. Instead the observed upstream whistlers arise in the shock ramp most likely by a variety of cross-field drift and/or anisotropy driven instabilities.

  7. A Research Agenda on Assessing and Remediating Home Dampness and Mold to Reduce Dampness-Related Health Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Mendell, Mark J.

    2015-05-28

    This report briefly summarizes, based on recent review articles and selected more recent research reports, current scientific knowledge on two topics: assessing unhealthy levels of indoor D/M in homes and remediating home dampness-related problems to protect health. Based on a comparison of current scientific knowledge to that required to support effective, evidence-based, health-protective policies on home D/M, gaps in knowledge are highlighted, prior questions and research questions specified, and necessary research activities and approaches recommended.

  8. A Research Agenda on Assessing and Remediating Home Dampness and Mold to Reduce Dampness-Related Health Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Mendell, Mark J.

    2015-06-01

    This report briefly summarizes, based on recent review articles and selected more recent research reports, current scientific knowledge on two topics: assessing unhealthy levels of indoor D/M in homes and remediating home dampness-related problems to protect health. Based on a comparison of current scientific knowledge to that required to support effective, evidence-based, health-protective policies on home D/M, gaps in knowledge are highlighted, prior questions and research questions specified, and necessary research activities and approaches recommended.

  9. Damped and zero-damped quasinormal modes of charged, nearly extremal black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Aaron; Mark, Zachary

    2016-02-01

    Despite recent progress, the complete understanding of the perturbations of charged, rotating black holes as described by the Kerr-Newman metric remains an open and fundamental problem in relativity. In this study, we explore the existence of families of quasinormal modes of Kerr-Newman black holes whose decay rates limit to zero at extremality, called zero-damped modes in past studies. We review the nearly extremal and WKB approximation methods for spin-weighted scalar fields (governed by the Dudley-Finley equation) and give an accounting of the regimes where scalar zero-damped and damped modes exist. Using Leaver's continued fraction method, we verify that these approximations give accurate predictions for the frequencies in their regimes of validity. In the nonrotating limit, we argue that gravito-electromagnetic perturbations of nearly extremal Reissner-Nordström black holes have zero-damped modes in addition to the well-known spectrum of damped modes. We provide an analytic formula for the frequencies of these modes, verify their existence using a numerical search, and demonstrate the accuracy of our formula. These results, along with recent numerical studies, point to the existence of a simple universal equation for the frequencies of zero-damped gravito-electromagnetic modes of Kerr-Newman black holes, whose precise form remains an open question.

  10. Enhanced damping for bridge cables using a self-sensing MR damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z. H.; Lam, K. H.; Ni, Y. Q.

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates enhanced damping for protecting bridge stay cables from excessive vibration using a newly developed self-sensing magnetorheological (MR) damper. The semi-active control strategy for effectively operating the self-sensing MR damper is formulated based on the linear-quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) control by further considering a collocated control configuration, limited measurements and nonlinear damper dynamics. Due to its attractive feature of sensing-while-damping, the self-sensing MR damper facilitates the collocated control. On the other hand, only the sensor measurements from the self-sensing device are employed in the feedback control. The nonlinear dynamics of the self-sensing MR damper, represented by a validated Bayesian NARX network technique, are further accommodated in the control formulation to compensate for its nonlinearities. Numerical and experimental investigations are conducted on stay cables equipped with the self-sensing MR damper operated in passive and semi-active control modes. The results verify that the collocated self-sensing MR damper facilitates smart damping for inclined cables employing energy-dissipative LQG control with only force and displacement measurements at the damper. It is also demonstrated that the synthesis of nonlinear damper dynamics in the LQG control enhances damping force tracking efficiently, explores the features of the self-sensing MR damper, and achieves better control performance over the passive MR damping control and the Heaviside step function-based LQG control that ignores the damper dynamics.

  11. Identification and evaluation of linear damping models in beam vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boers, B. L.; Rosenberg, G. S.; Wambsganss, M. W., Jr.

    1969-01-01

    Sensitive method, identifying effective damping mechanisms, involves comparing experimentally determined ratio of first to second mode magnification factors related to common point on beam. Cluster size has little effect on frequencies of elements, magnification factor decreases with cluster size, and viscous and stress damping are dominant damping mechanisms.

  12. Passive damping concepts for slender columns in space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Razzaq, Z.

    1985-01-01

    Research into the identification of potential passive damping concepts for use in very slender structural members was continued. The following damping concepts are under investigation: mass-string dampers; bright zinc chain; polyethylene tubing; external viscoelastic tape; brushes for electrostatic and frictional damping; suspended chambers with oil and discs; and hybrid concepts. Each of these concepts are briefly discussed.

  13. Effects of damping on mode shapes, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    Displacement, velocity, and acceleration admittances were calculated for a realistic NASTRAN structural model of space shuttle for three conditions: liftoff, maximum dynamic pressure and end of solid rocket booster burn. The realistic model of the orbiter, external tank, and solid rocket motors included the representation of structural joint transmissibilities by finite stiffness and damping elements. Methods developed to incorporate structural joints and their damping characteristics into a finite element model of the space shuttle, to determine the point damping parameters required to produce realistic damping in the primary modes, and to calculate the effect of distributed damping on structural resonances through the calculation of admittances.

  14. Damping behavior of Discontinuous Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastic Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldar, Amit Kumar; Aggarwal, Ishan; Batra, N. K.

    2010-11-01

    Discontinuous fiber reinforced composites are being used in many antivibration applications due to their time and temperature dependent specific mechanical properties. For utilization of this material to specific engineering applications there is a need to understand the damping behavior of composites under dynamic loading. For this work, unreinforced and 20% long and short reinforced glass fiber polypropylene composite materials were tested for free transverse vibration damping characteristics under static as well as fatigue loading conditions. The damping characteristics are quantified by decay pattern and natural frequency. Presence of reinforced fibers increases the damping capacity. Among reinforcements, short fiber reinforced polypropylene shows increased damping capacity then long glass fiber reinforced polypropylene.

  15. Relativity damps OPEP in nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, M.K.

    1998-06-01

    Using a relativistic Dirac-Brueckner analysis the OPEP contribution to the ground state energy of nuclear matter is studied. In the study the pion is derivative-coupled. The author finds that the role of the tensor force in the saturation mechanism is substantially reduced compared to its dominant role in a usual nonrelativistic treatment. He shows that the damping of derivative-coupled OPEP is actually due to the decrease of M{sup *}/M with increasing density. He points out that if derivative-coupled OPEP is the preferred form of nuclear effective lagrangian nonrelativistic treatment of nuclear matter is in trouble. Lacking the notion of M{sup *} it cannot replicate the damping. He suggests an examination of the feasibility of using pseudoscalar coupled {pi}N interaction before reaching a final conclusion about nonrelativistic treatment of nuclear matter.

  16. On the uncontrollable damped triple inverted pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, H.; Woodham, C. A.

    2003-02-01

    In this paper, the controllability of the damped triple inverted pendulum is investigated. The work is concerned with the form of the cancelling pole and zero which appear in the transfer functions of an uncontrollable system, and follows on from earlier work on the damped double inverted pendulum. The investigation considers first the cases where only one of the three arm frictions is non-zero, and then explores the cases when two of the three arm frictions are non-zero. Due to the complexity of this problem, and the difficulties with the symbolic manipulation software, exploratory numerical investigations have been carried out to facilitate the symbolic investigations, all of which are reported here.

  17. Wakefield Damping for the CLIC Crab Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Ambattu, P.K.; Burt, G.; Dexter, A.C.; Carter, R.G.; Khan, V.; Jones, R.M.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC

    2011-12-01

    A crab cavity is required in the CLIC to allow effective head-on collision of bunches at the IP. A high operating frequency is preferred as the deflection voltage required for a given rotation angle and the RF phase tolerance for a crab cavity are inversely proportional to the operating frequency. The short bunch spacing of the CLIC scheme and the high sensitivity of the crab cavity to dipole kicks demand very high damping of the inter-bunch wakes, the major contributor to the luminosity loss of colliding bunches. This paper investigates the nature of the wakefields in the CLIC crab cavity and the possibility of using various damping schemes to suppress them effectively.

  18. Formation and damping of relativistic strong shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anile, A. M.; Miller, J. C.; Motta, S.

    1983-06-01

    Results are presented from a detailed study of the formation of strong relativistic shocks from simple waves and their subsequent damping. Basic results in relativistic hydrodynamics are first reviewed, and the transport equation for the shock amplitude is derived which permits the exact calculation of the characteristic damping time for an arbitrary initial shock profile. A basic formalism for the numerical treatment of the problem is set up using a Lagrangian formulation with the rest mass as a distance coordinate. Some results derived directly from the Rankine-Hugoniot relations are presented, and numerical results are given for the case of a purely compressive initial sine pulse propagating into a static uniform medium. The calculations confirm the qualitative nature of the effect fund by Liang and Baker (1977).

  19. Enthalpy damping for the steady Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jespersen, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    For inviscid steady flow problems where the enthalpy is constant at steady state, it was previously proposed to use the difference between the local enthalpy and the steady state enthalpy as a driving term to accelerate convergence of iterative schemes. This idea is analyzed, both on the level of the partial differential equation and on the level of a particular finite difference scheme. It is shown that for the two-dimensional unsteady Euler equations, a hyperbolic system with eigenvalues on the imaginary axis, there is no enthalpy damping strategy which moves all the eigenvalues into the open left half plane. For the numerical scheme, however, the analysis shows and examples verify that enthalpy damping is potentially effective in accelerating convergence to steady state.

  20. Enthalpy damping for the steady Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jespersen, D. C.

    1984-01-01

    For inviscid steady flow problems where the enthalpy is constant at steady state, it was previously proposed to use the difference between the local enthalpy and the steady state enthalpy as a driving term to accelerate convergence of iterative schemes. This idea is analyzed, both on the level of the partial differential equation and on the level of a particular finite difference scheme. It is shown that for the two-dimensional unsteady Euler equations, a hyperbolic system with eigenvalues on the imaginary axis, there is no enthalpy damping strategy which moves all the eigenvalues into the open left half plane. For the numerical scheme, however, the analysis shows and examples verify that enthalpy damping is potentially effective in accelerating convergence to steady state.

  1. Nonlinear Landau damping in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiwamoto, Y.; Benson, R. F.

    1978-01-01

    A model is presented to explain the non-resonant waves which give rise to the diffuse resonance observed near 3/2 f sub H by the Alouette and ISIS topside sounders, where f sub H is the ambient electron cyclotron frequency. In a strictly linear analysis, these instability driven waves will decay due to Landau damping on a time scale much shorter than the observed time duration of the diffuse resonance. Calculations of the nonlinear wave particle coupling coefficients, however, indicate that the diffuse resonance wave can be maintained by the nonlinear Landau damping of the sounder stimulated 2f sub H wave. The time duration of the diffuse resonance is determined by the transit time of the instability generated and nonlinearly maintained diffuse resonance wave from the remote short lived hot region back to the antenna. The model is consistent with the Alouette/ISIS observations, and clearly demonstrates the existence of nonlinear wave-particle interactions in the ionosphere.

  2. Development of Transverse Modes Damped DLA Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A.; Schoessow, P.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.; Conde, M.

    2009-01-22

    As the dimensions of accelerating structures become smaller and beam intensities higher, the transverse wakefields driven by the beam become quite large with even a slight misalignment of the beam from the geometric axis. These deflection modes can cause inter-bunch beam breakup and intra-bunch head-tail instabilities along the beam path, and thus BBU control becomes a critical issue. All new metal based accelerating structures, like the accelerating structures developed at SLAC or power extractors at CLIC, have designs in which the transverse modes are heavily damped. Similarly, minimizing the transverse wakefield modes (here the HEMmn hybrid modes in Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating (DLA) structures) is also very critical for developing dielectric based high energy accelerators. In this paper, we present the design of a 7.8 GHz transverse mode damped DLA structure currently under construction, along with plans for the experimental program.

  3. Damping control of 'smart' piezoelectric shell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzou, H. S.

    Advanced 'smart' structures with self-sensation and control capabilities have attracted much attention in recent years. 'Smart' piezoelectric structures (conventional structures integrated with piezoelectric sensor and actuator elements) possessing self-monitoring and adaptive static and/or dynamic characteristics are very promising in many applications. This paper presents a study on 'smart' piezoelectric shell structures. A generic piezoelastic vibration theory for a thin piezoelectric shell continuum made of a hexagonal piezoelectric material is first derived. Piezoelastic system equation and electrostatic charge equation are formulated using Hamilton's principle and Kirchhoff-Love thin shell assumptions. Dynamic adaptivity, damping control, of a simply supported cylindrical shell structure is demonstrated in a case study. It shows that the system damping increases with the increase of feedback voltage for odd modes. The control scheme is ineffective for all even modes because of the symmetrical boundary conditions.

  4. Joint entropy of quantum damped harmonic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, V.; Guedes, I.

    2014-05-01

    We use the dynamical invariant method and a unitary transformation to obtain the exact Schrödinger wave function, ψn(x,t), and calculate for n=0 the time-dependent joint entropy (Leipnik’s entropy) for two classes of quantum damped harmonic oscillators. We observe that the joint entropy does not vary in time for the Caldirola-Kanai oscillator, while it decreases and tends to a constant value (ln({e}/{2})) for asymptotic times for the Lane-Emden ones. This is due to the fact that for the latter, the damping factor decreases as time increases. The results show that the time dependence of the joint entropy is quite complex and does not obey a general trend of monotonously increase with time.

  5. Plasmon damping in graphene out of equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhiyuan; Basov, Dimitri; Fogler, Michael

    Motivated by recent experiments with graphene under high photoexcitation, we study theoretically plasmons of graphene in the two-temperature regime, i.e., the regime where electrons are much hotter than the lattice. We calculate the plasmon damping due to scattering of electrons by acoustic phonons, which is the dominant intrinsic contribution in clean graphene. As the system relaxes to equilibrium, the plasmon frequency adiabatically changes with time. We show that this causes a partial compensation of the plasmon damping. A similar mechanism may apply to another collective mode (the energy wave) predicted to exist in graphene in the low-frequency hydrodynamic regime. Implications for infrared and THz pump-probe experiments are discussed.

  6. The role of DAMPS in ALA-PDT for skin squamous cell carcinoma (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiuli; Wang, Xiaojie; Ji, Jie; Zhang, Haiyan; Shi, Lei

    2016-03-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid mediated photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) is an established local approach for skin squamous cell carcinoma. It is believed that dangerous signals damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) play an important role in ALA-PDT. In this study, we evaluated in vitro and in vivo expressions of major DAMPs, calreticulin (CRT), heat shock proteins 70 (HSP70), and high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), induced by ALA-PDT using immunohistochemistry, western blot, and ELISA in a squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) mouse model. The role of DAMPs in the maturation of DCs potentiated by ALA-PDT-treated tumor cells was detected by FACS and ELISA. Our results showed that ALA-PDT enhanced the expression of CRT, HSP70, and HMGB1. These induced DAMPs played an important role in activating DCs by PDT-treated tumor cells, including phenotypic maturation (upregulation of surface expression of MHC-II, CD80, and CD86) and functional maturation (enhanced capability to secrete IFN-γ and IL-12). Furthermore, injecting ALA-PDT-treated tumor cells into naïve mice resulted in complete protection against cancer cells of the same origin. Our findings indicate that ALA-PDT can upregulate DAMPs and enhance tumor immunogenicity, providing a promising strategy for inducing a systemic anticancer immune response.

  7. The Role of Damage-Associated Molecular Patterns (DAMPs) in Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Land, Walter G.

    2015-01-01

    This article is the second part of a review that addresses the role of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) in human diseases by presenting examples of traumatic (systemic inflammatory response syndrome), cardiovascular (myocardial infarction), metabolic (type 2 diabetes mellitus), neurodegenerative (Alzheimer’s disease), malignant and infectious diseases. Various DAMPs are involved in the pathogenesis of all these diseases as they activate innate immune machineries including the unfolded protein response and inflammasomes. These subsequently promote sterile autoinflammation accompanied, at least in part, by subsequent adaptive autoimmune processes. This review article discusses the future role of DAMPs in routine practical medicine by highlighting the possibility of harnessing and deploying DAMPs either as biomarkers for the appropriate diagnosis and prognosis of diseases, as therapeutics in the treatment of tumours or as vaccine adjuncts for the prophylaxis of infections. In addition, this article examines the potential for developing strategies aimed at mitigating DAMPs-mediated hyperinflammatory responses, such as those seen in systemic inflammatory response syndrome associated with multiple organ failure. PMID:26052447

  8. Unified micromechanics of damping for unidirectional fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    An integrated micromechanics methodology for the prediction of damping capacity in fiber-reinforced polymer matrix unidirectional composites has been developed. Explicit micromechanics equations based on hysteretic damping are presented relating the on-axis damping capacities to the fiber and matrix properties and volume fraction. The damping capacities of unidirectional composites subjected to off-axis loading are synthesized from thermal effect on the damping performance of unidirectional composites due to temperature and moisture variations is also modeled. The damping contributions from interfacial friction between broken fibers and matrix are incorporated. Finally, the temperature rise in continuously vibrating composite plies is estimated. Application examples illustrate the significance of various parameters on the damping performance of unidirectional and off-axis fiber reinforced composites.

  9. The impact damped harmonic oscillator in free decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.; North, C. M.

    1987-01-01

    The impact-damped oscillator in free decay is studied by using time history solutions. A large range of oscillator amplitude is covered. The amount of damping is correlated with the behavior of the impacting mass. There are three behavior regimes: (1) a low amplitude range with less than one impact per cycle and very low damping, (2) a useful middle amplitude range with a finite number of impacts per cycle, and (3) a high amplitude range with an infinite number of impacts per cycle and progressively decreasing damping. For light damping the impact damping in the middle range is: (1) proportional to impactor mass, (2) additive to proportional damping, (3) a unique function of vibration amplitude, (4) proportional to 1-epsilon, where epsilon is the coefficient of restitution, and (5) very roughly inversely proportional to amplitude. The system exhibits jump phenomena and period doublings. An impactor with 2 percent of the oscillator's mass can produce a loss factor near 0.1.

  10. Damped kink oscillations of flowing prominence threads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, R.; Ruderman, M. S.; Goossens, M.

    2012-10-01

    Transverse oscillations of thin threads in solar prominences are frequently reported in high-resolution observations. Two typical features of the observations are that the oscillations are damped in time and that simultaneous mass flows along the threads are detected. Flows cause the dense threads to move along the prominence magnetic structure while the threads are oscillating. The oscillations have been interpreted in terms of standing magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) kink waves of the magnetic flux tubes, which support the threads. The damping is most likely due to resonant absorption caused by plasma inhomogeneity. The technique of seismology uses the observations combined with MHD wave theory to estimate prominence physical parameters. This paper presents a theoretical study of the joint effect of flow and resonant absorption on the amplitude of standing kink waves in prominence threads. We find that flow and resonant absorption can either be competing effects on the amplitude or both can contribute to damp the oscillations depending on the instantaneous position of the thread within the prominence magnetic structure. The amplitude profile deviates from the classic exponential profile of resonantly damped kink waves in static flux tubes. Flow also introduces a progressive shift of the oscillation period compared to the static case, although this effect is in general of minor importance. We test the robustness of seismological estimates by using synthetic data aiming to mimic real observations. The effect of the thread flow can significantly affect the estimation of the transverse inhomogeneity length scale. The presence of random background noise adds uncertainty to this estimation. Caution needs to be paid to the seismological estimates that do not take the influence of flow into account.

  11. Lagrangian description of the radiation damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, P. M. V. B.; Mendes, A. C. R.

    2007-05-01

    We present a Lagrangian formalism to the dissipative system of a charge interacting with its own radiation field, which gives rise to the radiation damping [W. Heitler, The Quantum Theory of Radiation, third ed., Dover, New York, 1970; J.D. Jackson, Classical Electrodynamics, second ed., Wiley, New York, 1975 (Chapters 14, 17); G.N. Plass, Rev. Mod. Phys. 33 (1961) 37], by the indirect representation doubling the phase-space dimensions.

  12. Driven drops with contact line damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yi; Chang, Chun-Ti; Steen, Paul

    2015-11-01

    A water droplet placed on a hydrophobic plate is driven by plate-normal oscillations. Resulting droplet motions are largely inviscid, having Reynolds number >100 (Ohnesorge 0.002). We are interested in isolating the effective damping, sometimes called Davis dissipation, owing to a moving contact line that is not completely mobile. In this talk, we report energy budgets as influenced by contact angle - contact line speed relationships for variously prepared surfaces.

  13. Random Response of Linear Hysteretic Damping

    SciTech Connect

    Floris, Claudio

    2008-07-08

    The probabilistic characterization of the response of a single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) oscillator with linear hysteretic damping excited by ground motion described by zero mean stationary Gaussian processes is achieved by profiting from a steady-state solution of the motion equation, valid when the excitation is given by the superposition of harmonics. The model of linear hysteretic damping has been introduced to fit damping mechanisms in which the dissipation rate is independent of frequency, and mathematically it is described by the Hilbert transform of the response. Though this model is debated since it violates the principle of causality, its intrinsic simplicity makes it preferable to other models. The steady-state solution of the motion equation proposed in this paper allows a closed form evaluation of the respone mean square value. However, the numerical examples show that this quantity is affected by the mechanism of energy dissipation only when this is large. On the contrary, for a low capacity of dissipation the response mean square value is rather insensitive to the dissipation mechanism.

  14. Collisional damping rates for plasma waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tigik, S. F.; Ziebell, L. F.; Yoon, P. H.

    2016-06-01

    The distinction between the plasma dynamics dominated by collisional transport versus collective processes has never been rigorously addressed until recently. A recent paper [P. H. Yoon et al., Phys. Rev. E 93, 033203 (2016)] formulates for the first time, a unified kinetic theory in which collective processes and collisional dynamics are systematically incorporated from first principles. One of the outcomes of such a formalism is the rigorous derivation of collisional damping rates for Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves, which can be contrasted to the heuristic customary approach. However, the results are given only in formal mathematical expressions. The present brief communication numerically evaluates the rigorous collisional damping rates by considering the case of plasma particles with Maxwellian velocity distribution function so as to assess the consequence of the rigorous formalism in a quantitative manner. Comparison with the heuristic ("Spitzer") formula shows that the accurate damping rates are much lower in magnitude than the conventional expression, which implies that the traditional approach over-estimates the importance of attenuation of plasma waves by collisional relaxation process. Such a finding may have a wide applicability ranging from laboratory to space and astrophysical plasmas.

  15. A comparison of viscoelastic damping models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, Joseph C.; Belvin, W. Keith; Inman, Daniel J.

    1993-01-01

    Modern finite element methods (FEM's) enable the precise modeling of mass and stiffness properties in what were in the past overwhelmingly large and complex structures. These models allow the accurate determination of natural frequencies and mode shapes. However, adequate methods for modeling highly damped and high frequency dependent structures did not exist until recently. The most commonly used method, Modal Strain Energy, does not correctly predict complex mode shapes since it is based on the assumption that the mode shapes of a structure are real. Recently, many techniques have been developed which allow the modeling of frequency dependent damping properties of materials in a finite element compatible form. Two of these methods, the Golla-Hughes-McTavish method and the Lesieutre-Mingori method, model the frequency dependent effects by adding coordinates to the existing system thus maintaining the linearity of the model. The third model, proposed by Bagley and Torvik, is based on the Fractional Calculus method and requires fewer empirical parameters to model the frequency dependence at the expense of linearity of the governing equations. This work examines the Modal Strain Energy, Golla-Hughes-McTavish and Bagley and Torvik models and compares them to determine the plausibility of using them for modeling viscoelastic damping in large structures.

  16. Viscoelastic damping in crystalline composites and alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranganathan, Raghavan; Ozisik, Rahmi; Keblinski, Pawel

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study viscoelastic behavior of model Lennard-Jones (LJ) crystalline composites subject to an oscillatory shear deformation. The two crystals, namely a soft and a stiff phase, individually show highly elastic behavior and a very small loss modulus. On the other hand, when the stiff phase is included within the soft matrix as a sphere, the composite exhibits significant viscoelastic damping and a large phase shift between stress and strain. In fact, the maximum loss modulus in these model composites was found to be about 20 times greater than that given by the theoretical Hashin-Shtrikman upper bound. We attribute this behavior to the fact that in composites shear strain is highly inhomogeneous and mostly accommodated by the soft phase, corroborated by frequency-dependent Grüneisen parameter analysis. Interestingly, the frequency at which the damping is greatest scales with the microstructural length scale of the composite. Finally, a critical comparison between damping properties of these composites with ordered and disordered alloys and superlattice structures is made.

  17. Vibration Analysis and Control of Flexible Beam by Using Smart Damping Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Q.; Levy, C.

    1999-01-01

    The temperature effects on frequency, loss factor and control of a flexible beam with a constrained viscoelastic layer and shape memory alloy layer (SMA) are discussed. It is shown that the temperature in the SMA (actuation) layer is very important in the determination of frequency and loss factor of such a structure. The effects of damping layer shear modulus and damping layer height as affected by the temperature are also discussed. As temperature plays such an important role, it is, therefore, imperative to evaluate temperature effects on the control of the system as well. Results with and without active control are discussed.

  18. Use of a Rayleigh damping model in elastography.

    PubMed

    McGarry, Matthew D J; Van Houten, Elijah E W

    2008-08-01

    A Rayleigh damping model applied to magnetic resonance elastography incorporates attenuation behavior proportionally related to both elastic and inertial forces, and allows two damping parameters to be extracted from an MRI motion dataset. Under time-harmonic conditions, the model can be implemented by the use of complex shear modulus and density, whereas viscoelastic damping models commonly used in elastography consist of only a complex shear modulus, and model only a single damping effect. Simulation studies reveal that the differences between damped elastic behavior resulting from a purely complex shear modulus (CSM damping) and from a purely complex density (CD damping) become larger as the overall level of damping present (indicated by the damping ratio) increases. A plot of results generated from the finite element (FE) model indicate the relative motion differences estimated for a range of damping ratios and CSM/CD damping combinations increase with damping ratio, and can be up to 15% at a damping ratio of 50% and therefore using the correct model for a Rayleigh damped material becomes increasingly important as damping levels increase. Resonance-related effects cause values from this plot to vary by as much as 3% as parameters such as wave speed, frequency, and problem size are altered. These motion differences can be compared to expected noise levels to estimate the parameter resolution achievable by a reconstruction algorithm. An optimization-based global property reconstruction algorithm was developed, and used for testing Rayleigh damping parameter reconstructions with gaussian noise added to the simulated motion input data. The coherent motion errors resulting from altering the combination of the two damping parameters are large enough to allow accurate determination of both of the Rayleigh damping parameters with incoherent noise levels comparable to MR measurements. The accuracy achieved by the global reconstructions was significantly better than

  19. Numerical determination of the transmissibility characteristics of a squeeze film damped forced vibration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, M. A.; Davis, P. K.

    1976-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the governing equations of motion of a liquid squeeze film damped forced vibration system were carried out to examine the feasibility of using a liquid squeeze film to cushion and protect large structures, such as buildings, located in areas of high seismic activity. The mathematical model used was that for a single degree of freedom squeeze film damped spring mass system. The input disturbance was simulated by curve fitting actual seismic data with an eleventh order Lagranging polynomial technique. Only the normal component of the seismic input was considered. The nonlinear, nonhomogeneous governing differential equation of motion was solved numerically to determine the transmissibility over a wide range of physical parameters using a fourth-order Runge-Kutta technique. It is determined that a liquid squeeze film used as a damping agent in a spring-mass system can significantly reduce the response amplitude for a seismic input disturbance.

  20. Controllable damping of high-Q violin modes in fused silica suspension fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, A. V.; Mescheriakov, S. D.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Mitrofanov, V. P.

    2010-01-01

    Fused silica fiber suspension of the test masses will be used in the interferometric gravitational wave detectors of the next generation. This allows a significant reduction of losses in the suspension and thermal noise associated with the suspension. Unfortunately, unwanted violin modes may be accidentally excited in the suspension fibers. The Q-factor of the violin modes also exceeds 108. They have a ring-down time that is too long and may complicate the stable control of the interferometer. Results of the investigation of a violin mode active damping system are described. An original sensor and actuator were especially developed to realize the effective coupling of a thin, optically transparent, non-conducting fused silica fiber with an electric circuit. The damping system allowed the changing of the violin mode's damping rate over a wide range.

  1. Paris Observatory Analysis Center (OPAR): Report on Activities, January - December 2012

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Sebastien; Barache, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    We report on activities of the Paris Observatory VLBI Analysis Center (OPAR) for calendar year 2012 concerning the development of operational tasks, the development of our Web site, and various other activities: monitoring of the Earth's free core nutation, measuring of the post-seismic displacements of some stations, and the analysis of the recent IVS R&D sessions, including observations of quasars close to the Sun.

  2. DAMP production by human islets under low oxygen and nutrients in the presence or absence of an immunoisolating-capsule and necrostatin-1

    PubMed Central

    Paredes-Juarez, Genaro A.; Sahasrabudhe, Neha M.; Tjoelker, Reina S.; de Haan, Bart J.; Engelse, Marten A.; de Koning, Eelco J. P.; Faas, Marijke M.; de Vos, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In between the period of transplantation and revascularization, pancreatic islets are exposed to low-oxygen and low-nutrient conditions. In the present study we mimicked those conditions in vitro to study the involvement of different cell death processes, release of danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMP), and associated in vitro immune activation. Under low-oxygen and low-nutrient conditions, apoptosis, autophagy and necroptosis occur in human islets. Necroptosis is responsible for DAMP-release such as dsDNA, uric acid, and HMGB1. The sensors of the innate immune system able to recognize these DAMPs are mainly TLR, NOD receptors, and C-type lectins. By using cell-lines with a non-functional adaptor molecule MyD88, we were able to show that the islet-derived DAMPs signal mainly via TLR. Immunoisolation in immunoprotective membranes reduced DAMP release and immune activation via retention of the relative large DAMPs in the capsules. Another effective strategy was suppressing necroptosis using the inhibitor nec-1. Although the effect on cell-survival was minor, nec-1 was able to reduce the release of HMGB1 and its associated immune activation. Our data demonstrate that in the immediate post-transplant period islets release DAMPs that in vitro enhance responses of innate immune cells. DAMP release can be reduced in vitro by immunoisolation or intervention with nec-1. PMID:26419792

  3. Interaction of multiple actuators for synchronized switching damping control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzulani, Gabriele; Braghin, Francesco; Mazzocchi, Fabrizio

    2016-04-01

    The semi-active Synchronized Switching Damping (SSD) family is based on a nonlinear shunting circuit applied to piezoelectric actuators, where the circuit characteristics are switched along the vibration cycles of the structure. SSD offers many advantages with respect to other vibration suppression techniques using piezoelectric actuators. Indeed, multiple modes can be suppressed with a relatively simple system and with very low power consumption. This allows the realization of self-powered control systems, without the need of wiring and external power supply. Moreover, the characteristics of this control strategy make it very robust to the variation of the dynamic characteristics of the structure, outperforming the classic passive linear shunts. Different SSD techniques have been developed, varying the circuit characteristics and the switching logic. Although this control family has been studied for many years, all the works are limited to the single actuator case, losing in generality with respect to many practical cases. For this reason, the aim of this work is to apply SSD control with multiple actuators and to study the interaction of the actuators and their shunting circuits in order to optimize the damping performance. The study will be performed numerically and then an experimental setup will be realized to test the proposed solutions.

  4. Piezoelectric Vibration Damping Study for Rotating Composite Fan Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Choi, Benjamin B.; Provenza, Andrew J.; Kray, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Resonant vibrations of aircraft engine blades cause blade fatigue problems in engines, which can lead to thicker and aerodynamically lower performing blade designs, increasing engine weight, fuel burn, and maintenance costs. In order to mitigate undesirable blade vibration levels, active piezoelectric vibration control has been investigated, potentially enabling thinner blade designs for higher performing blades and minimizing blade fatigue problems. While the piezoelectric damping idea has been investigated by other researchers over the years, very little study has been done including rotational effects. The present study attempts to fill this void. The particular objectives of this study were: (a) to develop and analyze a multiphysics piezoelectric finite element composite blade model for harmonic forced vibration response analysis coupled with a tuned RLC circuit for rotating engine blade conditions, (b) to validate a numerical model with experimental test data, and (c) to achieve a cost-effective numerical modeling capability which enables simulation of rotating blades within the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) Dynamic Spin Rig Facility. A numerical and experimental study for rotating piezoelectric composite subscale fan blades was performed. It was also proved that the proposed numerical method is feasible and effective when applied to the rotating blade base excitation model. The experimental test and multiphysics finite element modeling technique described in this paper show that piezoelectric vibration damping can significantly reduce vibrations of aircraft engine composite fan blades.

  5. Damped Rabi wavepacket oscillations and damping time in correlated random ladders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caetano, R. A.; Lyra, M. L.; Schulz, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we follow the time evolution of an initially localized one-electron wavepacket in a random ladder model with correlated diagonal disorder. Weak localization of the eigenstates is anticipated for antisymmetric cross-correlations with every base pair having the same average energy. We show that the wavepacket width develops damped Rabi-like oscillations after reaching the ladder's borders. The Rabi-like oscillations are shown to originate from the interference between neighboring energy eigenstates, while its damping is associated with a destructive interference due to the random scattering in the underlying random potential. The typical damping time td is estimated as a function of the ladder size N and shown to increase as td∝Nz with z=0.62(4). The strong localization in the absence of antisymmetric cross-correlations suppresses the oscillations.

  6. Non-Linear Slosh Damping Model Development and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, H. Q.; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Propellant tank slosh dynamics are typically represented by a mechanical model of spring mass damper. This mechanical model is then included in the equation of motion of the entire vehicle for Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) analysis. For a partially-filled smooth wall propellant tank, the critical damping based on classical empirical correlation is as low as 0.05%. Due to this low value of damping, propellant slosh is potential sources of disturbance critical to the stability of launch and space vehicles. It is postulated that the commonly quoted slosh damping is valid only under the linear regime where the slosh amplitude is small. With the increase of slosh amplitude, the critical damping value should also increase. If this nonlinearity can be verified and validated, the slosh stability margin can be significantly improved, and the level of conservatism maintained in the GN&C analysis can be lessened. The purpose of this study is to explore and to quantify the dependence of slosh damping with slosh amplitude. Accurately predicting the extremely low damping value of a smooth wall tank is very challenging for any Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tool. One must resolve thin boundary layers near the wall and limit numerical damping to minimum. This computational study demonstrates that with proper grid resolution, CFD can indeed accurately predict the low damping physics from smooth walls under the linear regime. Comparisons of extracted damping values with experimental data for different tank sizes show very good agreements. Numerical simulations confirm that slosh damping is indeed a function of slosh amplitude. When slosh amplitude is low, the damping ratio is essentially constant, which is consistent with the empirical correlation. Once the amplitude reaches a critical value, the damping ratio becomes a linearly increasing function of the slosh amplitude. A follow-on experiment validated the developed nonlinear damping relationship. This discovery can

  7. Damping in high-temperature superconducting levitation systems

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    2009-12-15

    Methods and apparatuses for improved damping in high-temperature superconducting levitation systems are disclosed. A superconducting element (e.g., a stator) generating a magnetic field and a magnet (e.g. a rotor) supported by the magnetic field are provided such that the superconducting element is supported relative to a ground state with damped motion substantially perpendicular to the support of the magnetic field on the magnet. Applying this, a cryostat housing the superconducting bearing may be coupled to the ground state with high damping but low radial stiffness, such that its resonant frequency is less than that of the superconducting bearing. The damping of the cryostat may be substantially transferred to the levitated magnetic rotor, thus, providing damping without affecting the rotational loss, as can be derived applying coupled harmonic oscillator theory in rotor dynamics. Thus, damping can be provided to a levitated object, without substantially affecting the rotational loss.

  8. Air damping effect on the air-based CMUT operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Bu-Sang; Kanashima, Takeshi; Lee, Seung-Mok; Okuyama, Masanori

    2015-08-01

    The vibration amplitude, damping ratio and viscous damping force in capacitive micromachinedultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) with a perforated membrane have been calculated theoretically and compared with the experimental data on its vibration behavior. The electrical bias of the DC and the AC voltages and the operation frequency conditions influence the damping effect because leads to variations in the gap height and the vibration velocity of the membrane. We propose a new estimation method to determine the damping ratio by the decay rate of the vibration amplitudes of the perforated membrane plate are measured using a laser vibrometer at each frequency, and the damping ratios were calculated from those results. The influences of the vibration frequency and the electrostatic force on the damping effect under the various operation conditions have been studied.

  9. Special class of nonlinear damping models in flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Anren; Singh, Ramendra P.; Taylor, Lawrence W.

    1991-01-01

    A special class of nonlinear damping models is investigated in which the damping force is proportional to the product of positive integer or the fractional power of the absolute values of displacement and velocity. For a one-degree-of-freedom system, the classical Krylov-Bogoliubov 'averaging' method is used, whereas for a distributed system, both an ad hoc perturbation technique and the finite difference method are employed to study the effects of nonlinear damping. The results are compared with linear viscous damping models. The amplitude decrement of free vibration for a single mode system with nonlinear models depends not only on the damping ratio but also on the initial amplitude, the time to measure the response, the frequency of the system, and the powers of displacement and velocity. For the distributed system, the action of nonlinear damping is found to reduce the energy of the system and to pass energy to lower modes.

  10. Higher order mode damping in an ALS test cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, A.F.; Lamberston, G.R. ); Barry, W. )

    1990-06-01

    The higher order mode attenuation scheme proposed for the Advanced Light Source accelerating cavities consists of two broad-band dampers placed 90{degrees} apart on the outer edge. In order to assess the damping efficiency a test assembly was built. The HOM damping was obtained by comparing the peak values of the transmission through the cavity for both the damped and the undamped case. Because of the high number of modes and frequency shifts due to the damping gear, the damping was assessed statistically, by averaging over several modes. In the frequency range from 1.5 to 5.5 GHz, average damping greater than 100 was obtained. 1 ref., 6 figs.

  11. Synthesis of shuttle vehicle damping using substructure test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kana, D. D.; Huzar, S.

    1972-01-01

    An empirical method is developed for predicting the modal damping of a combined parallel-stage shuttle model by means of damping measurements performed on the individual substructures. Correlations are first determined for each component in terms of damping energy as a function of peak kinetic energy and modal amplitude. The results are then used to predict component damping energies corresponding to the respective kinetic energies and amplitudes that occur for the new modes of the combined system. Modal characteristics for the system, other than damping, are obtained by a real eigenvalue solution of dynamic equations developed by Hurty's procedure of substructures. System equations, which include component modal damping, are also solved by a complex eigenvalue approach for comparison with results of the empirical method.

  12. Observations of TCRVβ Gene Expression in Rats with Dampness Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Sun, Bao-Guo; Zhang, Shi-Jun; Chen, Ze-Xiong; Hardi, Carlini Fan; Xiang, Ting

    2014-01-01

    Environmental dampness is one factor which can cause human diseases. The effects of exposure to humidity on human immune function are diverse and numerous. In the theory of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), dampness is defined as one of the major pathogenic factors in the human body. It is divided into “external dampness” and “internal dampness.” However the molecular mechanism leading to humidity-induced immunosuppression is obscure. In the present study, we investigated the expression of the T-cell antigen receptor variable β (TCRVβ) subfamilies in rats which were fed in different humid environment. And the expression levels of the TCRVβ subfamilies were detected using FQ-PCR. We found that the dampness might reduce the immunological recognition function of rats. And the obstruction of the immunological recognition function might be caused by internal dampness rather than external dampness. PMID:24976850

  13. Landau damping in a collisionless dipolar Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natu, Stefan S.; Wilson, Ryan M.

    2013-12-01

    We present a theory for the Landau damping of low-energy quasiparticles in a collisionless, quasi-two-dimensional dipolar Bose gas and produce expressions for the damping rate in uniform and nonuniform systems. Using simple energy-momentum conservation arguments, we show that in the homogeneous system, the nature of the low-energy dispersion in a dipolar Bose gas severely inhibits Landau damping of long wavelength excitations. For a gas with contact and dipolar interactions, the damping rate for phonons tends to decrease with increasing dipolar interactions; for strong dipole-dipole interactions, phonons are virtually undamped over a broad range of temperature. The damping rate for maxon-roton excitations is found to be significantly larger than the damping rate for phonons.

  14. Transport description of damped nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Randrup, J.

    1983-04-01

    Part I is an elementary introduction to the general transport theory of nuclear dynamics. It can be read without any special knowledge of the field, although basic quantum mechanics is required for the formal derivation of the general expression for the transport coefficients. The results can also be used in a wider context than the present one. Part II gives the student an up-to-date orientation about recent progress in the understanding of the angular-momentum variables in damped reactions. The emphasis is here on the qualitative understanding of the physics rather than the, at times somewhat tedious, formal derivations. (WHK)

  15. Nearby Galaxies as Damped Lyman alpha Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Sandhya

    1993-12-01

    The evolution of the neutral hydrogen content of galaxies as a function of time is an important constraint on processes in galactic evolution. We present a comprehensive, statistical description of the HI content and distribution within galaxies at the present epoch and compare these statistics with the properties of HI associated with ``damped Lyman alpha '' absorption systems at high redshift that are observed in the spectra of QSOs. Omega_ {HI}(z=0), the HI mass density at the present epoch relative to the present critical mass density, is found to be (2.3 +/- 0.6) times 10(-4) h75(-1) , consistent with the decreasing trend of the HI content with time deduced from QSO absorption line statistics for redshifts from about 4 to 0.5 (Lanzetta 1993). Spiral galaxies contain an overwhelming 94% of this neutral hydrogen mass. The rest is contained in irregulars (3%), and S0s plus ellipticals (3%). Spirals also offer the largest cross-section to line-of-sight absorption of light from QSOs. By considering nearby spirals as potential absorbers, the interception probability as a function of the HI column density, N(HI), is derived for comparison with the cross-sections inferred from observations of damped Lyman alpha systems. Consistent with previous studies, the comparison shows that the damped Ly alpha lines are created by absorbers that subtend larger cross-sections than present-day spirals by a factor of 5 implying that galaxies were either larger or more numerous at z ~ 2.5. We are also investigating the statistics of damped Lyman alpha absorbers in the redshift range 0.2 1.5.

  16. Mode damping rates in a protein chromophore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, David M.

    2012-03-01

    A variety of optical studies reveal coherent low-frequency oscillations during photochemical reactions in proteins. We recently argued [New J. Phys. 12, Art. No. 085004 (2010)] that the vibrational eigenstates of an isolated chromophore may be localized, which can give rise to long-lived low-frequency vibrational modes when the chromophore is embedded in a protein. Here we show that, even if vibrational eigenstates are not localized, bottlenecks to vibrational energy flow that are absent in much larger molecules give rise to slow damping of low-frequency modes in many protein chromophores. Examples including rhodopsin, photoactive yellow protein and green fluorescent protein are discussed.

  17. Status of the SLC damping rings

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, A.M.; Davies-White, W.A.; Delahaye, J.P.; Fieguth, T.H.; Hofmann, A.; Jager, J.; Kloeppel, P.K.; Lee, M.J.; Linebarger, W.A.; Rivkin, L.

    1985-06-01

    Electron beams of full design energy 1.21 GeV and nearly full design intensity 4 x 10/sup 10/ particles/pulse (design 5 x 10/sup 10/) have been extracted from the Stanford Linac and successfully stored in the electron damping ring. Beams of less intensity have been extracted from the ring and reinjected into the Linac. The present intensity limits are not thought to be fundamental. The operating experience with the electron ring and the status of the construction of the positron ring will be discussed. 11 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  18. System for damping vibrations in a turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, III, Herbert Chidsey; Johnson, Curtis Alan; Taxacher, Glenn Curtis

    2015-11-24

    A system for damping vibrations in a turbine includes a first rotating blade having a first ceramic airfoil, a first ceramic platform connected to the first ceramic airfoil, and a first root connected to the first ceramic platform. A second rotating blade adjacent to the first rotating blade includes a second ceramic airfoil, a second ceramic platform connected to the second ceramic airfoil, and a second root connected to the second ceramic platform. A non-metallic platform damper has a first position in simultaneous contact with the first and second ceramic platforms.

  19. Shear deformation damping of a double-beam structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmidt, Tomasz

    2016-05-01

    The dynamics of twin cantilever beams connected at their free ends by a viscoelastic member is investigated. A series of experiments with damping members made of various materials was conducted. A dynamic model of the structure is proposed. It fits the experimental data well, and allows estimating the Kirchhoff modulus and shear damping coefficient of the member. The influence of geometry of the damping element on oscillatory characteristics of the system is investigated.

  20. Measurement of Damping of Composite Materials for Turbomachinery Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, D. L.

    1998-01-01

    The scientific community has felt that ceramic matrix composite (CMC) materials possess more material damping than the superalloys used in the production of rocket engine turbomachinery turbine-end components. The purpose of this NASA/MFSC study is to quantify the damping in CMC's as compared to a typical super-alloy, Inconel 718. It was observed through testing of beam coupons and disk specimens that the CMC's do indeed possess more material damping than the baselined alloy Inconel 718.

  1. Design of passive piezoelectric damping for space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagood, Nesbitt W., IV; Aldrich, Jack B.; Vonflotow, Andreas H.

    1994-09-01

    Passive damping of structural dynamics using piezoceramic electromechanical energy conversion and passive electrical networks is a relatively recent concept with little implementation experience base. This report describes an implementation case study, starting from conceptual design and technique selection, through detailed component design and testing to simulation on the structure to be damped. About 0.5kg. of piezoelectric material was employed to damp the ASTREX testbed, a 500kg structure. Emphasis was placed upon designing the damping to enable high bandwidth robust feedback control. Resistive piezoelectric shunting provided the necessary broadband damping. The piezoelectric element was incorporated into a mechanically-tuned vibration absorber in order to concentrate damping into the 30 to 40 Hz frequency modes at the rolloff region of the proposed compensator. A prototype of a steel flex-tensional motion amplification device was built and tested. The effective stiffness and damping of the flex-tensional device was experimentally verified. When six of these effective springs are placed in an orthogonal configuration, strain energy is absorbed from all six degrees of freedom of a 90kg. mass. A NASTRAN finite element model of the testbed was modified to include the six-spring damping system. An analytical model was developed for the spring in order to see how the flex-tensional device and piezoelectric dimensions effect the critical stress and strain energy distribution throughout the component. Simulation of the testbed demonstrated the damping levels achievable in the completed system.

  2. NLSE for quantum plasmas with the radiation damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Pavel A.

    2016-05-01

    We consider contribution of the radiation damping in the quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) equations for spinless particles. We discuss possibility of obtaining corresponding nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) for the macroscopic wave function. We compare contribution of the radiation damping with weakly (or semi-) relativistic effects appearing in the second-order on v/c. The radiation damping appears in the third-order on v/c. So it might be smaller than weakly relativistic effects, but it gives damping of the Langmuir waves which can be considerable.

  3. Dynamic apeerture in damping rings with realistic wigglers

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yunhai; /SLAC

    2005-05-04

    The International Linear Collider based on superconducting RF cavities requires the damping rings to have extremely small equilibrium emittance, huge circumference, fast damping time, and large acceptance. To achieve all of these requirements is a very challenging task. In this paper, we will present a systematic approach to designing the damping rings using simple cells and non-interlaced sextupoles. The designs of the damping rings with various circumferences and shapes, including dogbone, are presented. To model realistic wigglers, we have developed a new hybrid symplectic integrator for faster and accurate evaluation of dynamic aperture of the lattices.

  4. Damping factor estimation using spin wave attenuation in permalloy film

    SciTech Connect

    Manago, Takashi; Yamanoi, Kazuto; Kasai, Shinya; Mitani, Seiji

    2015-05-07

    Damping factor of a Permalloy (Py) thin film is estimated by using the magnetostatic spin wave propagation. The attenuation lengths are obtained by the dependence of the transmission intensity on the antenna distance, and decrease with increasing magnetic fields. The relationship between the attenuation length, damping factor, and external magnetic field is derived theoretically, and the damping factor was determined to be 0.0063 by fitting the magnetic field dependence of the attenuation length, using the derived equation. The obtained value is in good agreement with the general value of Py. Thus, this estimation method of the damping factor using spin waves attenuation can be useful tool for ferromagnetic thin films.

  5. Dependence of Kambersky damping on Fermi level and spin orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, T.; Victora, R. H.

    2014-05-07

    Kambersky damping represents the loss of magnetic energy from the electrons to the lattice through the spin orbit interaction. It is demonstrated that, for bcc Fe-based transition metal alloys, the logarithm of the energy loss is proportional to the density of states at the Fermi level. Both inter and intraband damping are calculated for spins at arbitrary angle to the previously examined [001] direction. Although the easy axis 〈100〉 shows isotropic relaxation and achieves the minimum damping value of 0.002, other directions, such as 〈110〉, show substantial anisotropic damping.

  6. Damping element for reducing the vibration of an airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Christian X; Marra, John J

    2013-11-12

    An airfoil (10) is provided with a tip (12) having an opening (14) to a center channel (24). A damping element (16) is inserted within the opening of the center channel, to reduce an induced vibration of the airfoil. The mass of the damping element, a spring constant of the damping element within the center channel, and/or a mounting location (58) of the damping element within the center channel may be adjustably varied, to shift a resonance frequency of the airfoil outside a natural operating frequency of the airfoil.

  7. Cu-Al-Ni-SMA-Based High-Damping Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Gabriel A.; Barrado, Mariano; San Juan, Jose; Nó, María Luisa

    2009-08-01

    Recently, absorption of vibration energy by mechanical damping has attracted much attention in several fields such as vibration reduction in aircraft and automotive industries, nanoscale vibration isolations in high-precision electronics, building protection in civil engineering, etc. Typically, the most used high-damping materials are based on polymers due to their viscoelastic behavior. However, polymeric materials usually show a low elastic modulus and are not stable at relatively low temperatures (≈323 K). Therefore, alternative materials for damping applications are needed. In particular, shape memory alloys (SMAs), which intrinsically present high-damping capacity thanks to the dissipative hysteretic movement of interfaces under external stresses, are very good candidates for high-damping applications. A completely new approach was applied to produce high-damping composites with relatively high stiffness. Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloy powders were embedded with metallic matrices of pure In, a In-10wt.%Sn alloy and In-Sn eutectic alloy. The production methodology is described. The composite microstructures and damping properties were characterized. A good particle distribution of the Cu-Al-Ni particles in the matrices was observed. The composites exhibit very high damping capacities in relatively wide temperature ranges. The methodology introduced provides versatility to control the temperature of maximum damping by adjusting the shape memory alloy composition.

  8. Coulomb-damped resonant generators using piezoelectric transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L. M.; Mitcheson, P. D.; Halvorsen, E.; Wright, P. K.

    2012-06-01

    Switching interface circuits employed with piezoelectric energy harvesters can increase the electrical damping considerably over that achievable with passive rectifiers. We show that a piezoelectric harvester coupled to certain types of switching circuits becomes a Coulomb-damped resonant generator. This allows analysis of such harvester systems within a well-known framework and, subject to practical constraints, allows the optimal electrical damping to be achieved. In the piezoelectric pre-biasing technique, the Coulomb damping is set by a pre-bias voltage whose optimal value is derived as a function of piezoelectric harvester parameters.

  9. Significance of modeling internal damping in the control of structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Inman, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Several simple systems are examined to illustrate the importance of the estimation of damping parameters in closed-loop system performance and stability. The negative effects of unmodeled damping are particularly pronounced in systems that do not use collocated sensors and actuators. An example is considered for which even the actuators (a tip jet nozzle and flexible hose) for a simple beam produce significant damping which, if ignored, results in a model that cannot yield a reasonable time response using physically meaningful parameter values. It is concluded that correct damping modeling is essential in structure control.

  10. Modeling vibration response and damping of cables and cabled structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spak, Kaitlin S.; Agnes, Gregory S.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2015-02-01

    In an effort to model the vibration response of cabled structures, the distributed transfer function method is developed to model cables and a simple cabled structure. The model includes shear effects, tension, and hysteretic damping for modeling of helical stranded cables, and includes a method for modeling cable attachment points using both linear and rotational damping and stiffness. The damped cable model shows agreement with experimental data for four types of stranded cables, and the damped cabled beam model shows agreement with experimental data for the cables attached to a beam structure, as well as improvement over the distributed mass method for cabled structure modeling.

  11. Damping mechanisms in chemically vapor deposited SiC fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, James A.; Goldsby, Jon C.

    1993-01-01

    Evaluating the damping of reinforcement fibers is important for understanding their microstructures and the vibrational response of their structural composites. In this study the damping capacities of two types of chemically vapor deposited silicon carbide fibers were measured from -200 C to as high as 800 C. Measurements were made at frequencies in the range 50 to 15000 Hz on single cantilevered fibers. At least four sources were identified which contribute to fiber damping, the most significant being thermoelastic damping and grain boundary sliding. The mechanisms controlling all sources and their potential influence on fiber and composite performance are discussed.

  12. Damping of long-wavelength kinetic alfven fluctuations: linear theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gary, S Peter; Borovsky, Joseph E

    2008-01-01

    The full electromagnetic linear dispersion equation for kinetic Alfven fluctuations in a homogeneous, isotropic, Maxwellian electron-proton plasma is solved numerically in the long wavelength limit. The solutions are summarized by an analytic expression for the damping rate of such modes at propagation sufficiently oblique to the background magnetic field B{sub o} which scales as k{sub {perpendicular}}{sup 2} k{sub {parallel}} where the subscripts denote directions relative to B{sub o}. This damping progressively (although not monotonically) increases with increasing electron {beta}, corresponding to four distinct damping regimes: nonresonant, electron Landau, proton Landau, and proton transit-time damping.

  13. Damping and power spectra of quasi-periodic intensity disturbances above a solar polar coronal hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Fang-Ran; Xia, Li-Dong; Huang, Zheng-Hua; Li, Bo; Fu, Hui; Yuan, Ding; Chandrashekhar, Kalugodu

    2016-06-01

    We study intensity disturbances above a solar polar coronal hole that can be seen in the AIA 171 Å and 193 Å passbands, aiming to provide more insights into their physical nature. The damping and power spectra of the intensity disturbances with frequencies from 0.07 mHz to 10.5 mHz are investigated. The damping of the intensity disturbances tends to be stronger at lower frequencies, and their damping behavior below 980″ (for comparison, the limb is at 945″) is different from what happens above. No significant difference is found between the damping of the intensity disturbances in the AIA 171 Å and that in the AIA 193 Å. The indices of the power spectra of the intensity disturbances are found to be slightly smaller in the AIA 171 Å than in the AIA 193 Å, but the difference is within one standard deviation. An additional enhanced component is present in the power spectra in a period range of 8–40 min at lower heights. The power spectra of a spicule is highly correlated with its associated intensity disturbance, which suggests that the power spectra of the intensity disturbances might be a mixture of spicules and wave activities. We suggest that each intensity disturbance in the polar coronal hole is possibly a series of independent slow magnetoacoustic waves triggered by spicular activities.

  14. Characterization of damping in microfibrous material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soobramaney, Pregassen; Flowers, George T.; Dean, Robert N.

    2012-04-01

    MEMS gyroscopes are used in many applications including harsh environments such as high-power, high-frequency acoustic noise. If the latter is at the natural frequency of the gyroscope, the proof mass will be overexcited giving rise to a corrupted gyroscope output. To mitigate the effect of the high-power, high-frequency acoustic noise, it is proposed to use nickel microfibrous sheets as an acoustic damper. For this purpose, the characterization of vibration damping in Nickel microfibrous sheets was examined in the present research effort. The sheets were made from nickel fibers with cellulose as a binding agent using a wet-lay papermaking technique. Sintering was done at 1000 °C to remove all the cellulose giving rise to a porous material. Square sheets of 20 cm were made from three diameters of nickel fibers namely 4, 8, and 12 microns. The sheets were cut into smaller pieces to fit the requirements of a fixture specially designed for this study. The fixture was attached to a LDS V408 shaker with a mass resting on a stack of the microfibrous sheets to simulate transmitted vibration by base motion with the sheet stack acting as a damper. A series of experiments was conducted using these 3 fiber diameters, different number of layers of microfibrous sheets and varying the vibration amplitude. From the collected vibration data, the stiffness and damping ratio of the microfibrous material was characterized.

  15. Fisher information of quantum damped harmonic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, V.; Guedes, I.

    2015-04-01

    We calculate the time-dependent Fisher information in position ({{F}x}) and momentum ({{F}p}) for the lowest lying state ≤ft( n=0 \\right) of two classes of quantum damped (Lane-Emden (LE) and Caldirola-Kanai (CK)) harmonic oscillators. The expressions of {{F}x} and {{F}p} are written in terms of ρ , a c-number quantity satisfying a nonlinear differential equation. Analytical solutions of ρ were obtained. For the LE and CK oscillators, we observe that {{F}x} increases while {{F}p} decreases with increasing time. The product {{F}x}{{F}p} increases and tends to a constant value in the limit t\\to ∞ for the LE oscillator, while it is time-independent for the CK oscillator. Moreover, for the CK oscillator the product {{F}x}{{F}p} decreases as the damping ≤ft( γ \\right) increases. Relations among the Fisher information, Leipnik and Shannon entropies, and the Stam and Cramer-Rao inequalities are given. A discussion on the squeezing phenomenon in position for the oscillators is presented.

  16. Radiation damping in Einstein-aether theory

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, Brendan Z.

    2006-05-15

    This work concerns the loss of energy of a material system due to gravitational radiation in Einstein-aether theory - an alternative theory of gravity in which the metric couples to a dynamical, timelike, unit-norm vector field. Derived to lowest post-Newtonian order are wave forms for the metric and vector fields far from a nearly Newtonian system and the rate of energy radiated by the system. The expressions depend on the quadrupole moment of the source, as in standard general relativity, but also contain monopolar and dipolar terms. There exists a one-parameter family of Einstein-aether theories for which only the quadrupolar contribution is present, and for which the expression for the damping rate is identical to that of general relativity to the order worked to here. This family cannot yet be declared observationally viable, since effects due to the strong internal fields of bodies in the actual systems used to test the damping rate have not yet been determined.

  17. Intrinsic Josephson Junctions with Intermediate Damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warburton, Paul A.; Saleem, Sajid; Fenton, Jon C.; Speller, Susie; Grovenor, Chris R. M.

    2011-03-01

    In cuprate superconductors, adjacent cuprate double-planes are intrinsically Josephson-coupled. For bias currents perpendicular to the planes, the current-voltage characteristics correspond to those of an array of underdamped Josephson junctions. We will discuss our experiments on sub-micron Tl-2212 intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJs). The dynamics of the IJJs at the plasma frequency are moderately damped (Q ~ 8). This results in a number of counter-intuitive observations, including both a suppression of the effect of thermal fluctuations and a shift of the skewness of the switching current distributions from negative to positive as the temperature is increased. Simulations confirm that these phenomena result from repeated phase slips as the IJJ switches from the zero-voltage to the running state. We further show that increased dissipation counter-intuitively increases the maximum supercurrent in the intermediate damping regime (PRL vol. 103, art. no. 217002). We discuss the role of environmental dissipation on the dynamics and describe experiments with on-chip lumped-element passive components in order control the environment seen by the IJJs. Work supported by EPSRC.

  18. Suppression of Seedling Damping-Off Caused by Pythium ultimum, P. irregulare, and Rhizoctonia solani in Container Media Amended with a Diverse Range of Pacific Northwest Compost Sources.

    PubMed

    Scheuerell, Steven J; Sullivan, Dan M; Mahaffee, Walter F

    2005-03-01

    ABSTRACT Suppression of seedling damping-off disease caused by Pythium spp. and Rhizoctonia solani is a potential benefit of formulating soilless container media with compost. Thirty-six compost samples from Pacific Northwest commercial composting facilities were analyzed for a number of physical, chemical, and biological properties, including suppression of damping-off caused by Pythium ultimum, P. irregulare, and R. solani. The samples were produced from diverse feedstocks and composting technol ogies; this was reflected in a large degree of variability in the measured properties. When mixed with sphagnum peat moss and inorganic aggregates, 67% of the compost samples significantly suppressed P. irregulare damping-off of cucumber, 64% suppressed P. ultimum damping-off of cucumber, and 17% suppressed damping-off of cabbage caused by R. solani. Suppression of Pythium damping-off was related to the potential of compost to support microbial activity and a qualitative index of ammonia volatilization. Suppression of Rhizoctonia damping-off was not related to any one compost factor. Currently available compost products potentially could provide commercially acceptable control of damping-off caused by Pythium spp., but it is necessary to fortify composts with microbial antagonists for the control of R. solani. PMID:18943125

  19. Bounce-harmonic Landau Damping of Plasma Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderegg, Francois

    2015-11-01

    We present measurement of plasma wave damping, spanning the temperature regimes of direct Landau damping, bounce-harmonic Landau damping, inter-species drag damping, and viscous damping. Direct Landau damping is dominant at high temperatures, but becomes negligible as v damping, controlled by an applied ``squeeze'' potential, which generates harmonics in the wave potential and in the particle dynamics. A particle moving in z experiences a non-sinusoidal mode potential caused by the squeeze, producing high spatial harmonics with lower phase velocity. These harmonics are Landau damped even when the mode phase velocity vph is large compared to the thermal velocity v , since the nth harmonic is resonant with a particle bouncing at velocity vb =vph / n . Here we increase the bounce harmonics through applied squeeze potential; but some harmonics are always present in finite length systems. For our centered squeeze geometry, theory shows that only odd harmonics are generated, and predicts the Landau damping rate from vph / n . Experimentally, the squeeze potential increases the wave damping and reduces its frequency. The frequency shift occurs because the squeeze potential reduces the number of particle where the mode velocity is the largest, therefore reducing the mode frequency. We observe an increase in the damping proportional to Vs2,and a frequency reduction proportional to Vs , in quantitative agreement with theory. Wave-coherent laser induced fluorescence allows direct observation of bounce resonances on the particle distribution, here predominantly at vph / 3 . A clear increase of the bounce harmonics is visible on the particle distribution when the squeeze potential is applied. Supported by NSF Grant PHY-1414570, and DOE Grants DE-SC0002451 and DE-SC0008693.

  20. Highly damped exactly constrained mounting of an x-ray telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilke, Paul S.; Decker, Todd A.; Hale, Layton C.

    1995-05-01

    Instruments and machines requiring very high stability should be isolated from their normally less stable environment. Exact constraint mounting using six, single-constraint flexures provides a stiff connection between the instrument and its environment while isolating the instrument from low frequency deformations of the environment, such as thermal expansion. Higher frequency disturbances, however, transfer through the flexures and excite vibration modes of the instrument. Traditionally, passive or active vibration isolation is employed to attenuate environmental disturbances reaching the instrument. However, strict alignment requirements for the instrument preclude the use of low-frequency isolation, unless active methods are used. Therefore, the solution is to provide damping in parallel with the flexures to reduce the vibration amplitudes of the instrument. Flexures concentrate strain energy in blades making them excellent candidates for damping treatments. A properly designed damping treatment across the flexures can provide as much as 8% to 10% viscous damping to the isolation modes and will also help attenuate the instrument vibration modes. Thus, through the use of six damped single-constraint flexures the instrument's requirements for stability, alignment, stress, and vibration may be met. An application of this approach will be employed on the Reflection Grating Array (RGA) for the X-ray Multi-mirror Mission for the European Space Agency. The RGA is an array of 200 diffraction gratings aligned to sub-micron and sub-arc-second tolerances relative to each other. This produces a coherent wavefront for spectrum analysis. The launch vehicle will be an Ariane 5 scheduled for 1998.

  1. Biomolecular ligands screening using radiation damping difference WaterLOGSY spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peng; Jiang, Xianwang; Jiang, Bin; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Maili

    2013-07-01

    Water-ligand observed via gradient spectroscopy (WaterLOGSY) is a widely used nuclear magnetic resonance method for ligand screening. The crucial procedure for the effectiveness of WaterLOGSY is selective excitation of the water resonance. The selective excitation is conventionally achieved by using long selective pulse, which causes partial saturation of the water magnetization leading to reduction of sensitivity, in addition to time consuming and error prone. Therefore, many improvements have been made to enhance the sensitivity and robustness of the method. Here we propose an alternative selective excitation scheme for WaterLOGSY by utilizing radiation damping effect. The pulse scheme starts simply with a hard inversion pulse, instead of selective pulse or pulse train, followed by a pulse field gradient to control the radiation damping effect. The rest parts of the pulse scheme are similar to conventional WaterLOGSY. When the gradient pulse is applied immediately after the inversion pulse, the radiation damping effect is suppressed, and all of the magnetization is inversed. When the gradient pulse and the inversion pulse are about 10-20 ms apart, the radiation damping effect remains active and drives the water magnetization toward +z-axis, resulting in selective non-inversion of the water magnetization. By taking the differences of the spectra obtained under these two conditions, one should get the result of WaterLOGSY. The method is demonstrated to be simple, robust and sensitive for ligand screening. PMID:23740293

  2. Design of the magnetorheological mount with high damping force for medium speed diesel generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, O.-H.; Kim, W.-H.; Joo, W. H.; Park, J.-H.

    2013-04-01

    This paper investigates the controllable magnetorheological (MR) mount for the marine diesel-generator (D/G) sets. Sometimes, significant vibrations over the allowable limit are observed on the D/G sets due to their huge excitation forces. Because the severe vibration can lead to structural damages to the D/G sets, it should be reduced to below the limit. Although passive mounts with rubber isolators are usually used, the vibration reduction performance is not always sufficient. In addition, expecting that the vibration levels required by customers will get more severe, semi-active vibration isolation system needs to be developed. To the aim, the valve (flow) mode type of MR mount has been designed. Especially, the annular-radial configuration was adopted to enhance the damping force within the restricted space. The geometry of the mount has been optimized to obtain the required damping force and the magnetic field analysis has been carried out using ANSYS APDL. To verify the performance of the developed MR mount, excitation test was conducted and the dynamic characteristics were identified. Since damping property of the MR fluid is changed by the applied magnetic field strength and excitation frequency, responses to changing applied currents and frequencies were obtained. From the results, damping performance of the MR mount was evaluated.

  3. The role of magnetic damping in the r-mode evolution of accreting neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, GuoJie; Zhou, Xia; Wang, Na

    2015-03-01

    The magnetic damping rate was introduced in the evolution equations of r-modes, which shows that r-modes can generate strong toroidal magnetic fields in the core of accreting millisecond pulsars inducing by differential rotation. With consideration of the coupling evolution of r-modes, spin and thermal evolution, we investigated the influence of the magnetic damping on the differential rotation of nonlinear r-modes of accreting neutron stars. We derived the coupling evolution equations of the star involving the magnetic damping rate in the framework of second-order r-mode theory. The numerical results show that the magnetic damping suppressed the nonlinear evolution of r-modes since the saturation amplitude is reduced to a great extent. In particular, because of the presence of the generated toroidal magnetic field, the spin-down of the stars is terminated and the viscous heating effects are also weakened. Moreover, we could obtain a stronger generated toroidal magnetic field in the second-order r-mode theory. The gravitational radiation may be detected by the advanced laser interferometer detector LIGO if the amount of differential rotation is small when the r-mode instability becomes active and the accretion rate is not very high.

  4. Turbulence excited frequency domain damping measurement and truncation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soovere, J.

    1976-01-01

    Existing frequency domain modal frequency and damping analysis methods are discussed. The effects of truncation in the Laplace and Fourier transform data analysis methods are described. Methods for eliminating truncation errors from measured damping are presented. Implications of truncation effects in fast Fourier transform analysis are discussed. Limited comparison with test data is presented.

  5. Surface contamination and changes of mechanical damping in Berea sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Will Marlin

    Small changes in the pore fluid chemistry of Berea sandstone cause significant changes in mechanical damping. A method of detecting contaminants in porous rocks is under ongoing development. Here I report several laboratory measurements done in support of this development, including that of a large difference in mechanical damping between clean and chemically treated Berea sandstone. I develop a model of a surface-chemistry related damping mechanism, and qualitatively compare results from calculations to experimental results. I rule out other damping mechanisms, and conclude that the observed damping is due to surface chemistry effects (contact angle hysteresis). To help verify experimental results, an anelastic structure with calculable damping properties was built. Damping of this structure was measured by the same method used for damping measurements on Berea sandstone. Results from these measurements show good agreement to the calculated response of the structure in the frequency range 0.03--1 Hz.* *This dissertation includes a CD that is compound (contains both a paper copy and a D as part of the dissertation. The CD requires the following applications: Adobe Acrobat.

  6. Dependence of kink oscillation damping on the amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, C. R.; Nakariakov, V. M.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Kink oscillations of coronal loops are one of the most intensively studied oscillatory phenomena in the solar corona. In the large-amplitude rapidly damped regime, these oscillations are observed to have a low quality factor with only a few cycles of oscillation detected before they are damped. The specific mechanism responsible for rapid damping is commonly accepted to be associated with the linear coupling between collective kink oscillations and localised torsional oscillations, the phenomenon of resonant absorption of the kink mode. The role of finite amplitude effects, however, is still not clear. Aims: We investigated the empirical dependence of the kink oscillation damping time and its quality factor, which is defined as the ratio of damping time to oscillation period, on the oscillation amplitude. Methods: We analysed decaying kink oscillation events detected previously with TRACE, SDO/AIA and and STEREO/EUVI in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) 171 Å band. Results: We found that the ratio of the kink oscillation damping time to the oscillation period systematically decreases with the oscillation amplitude. We approximated the quality factor dependence on the oscillation displacement amplitude via the power-law dependence with the exponent of -1/2, however we stress that this is a by-eye estimate, and a more rigorous estimation of the scaling law requires more accurate measurements and increased statistics. We conclude that damping of kink oscillations of coronal loops depends on the oscillation amplitude, indicating the possible role of non-linear mechanisms for damping.

  7. Experimental Spin Testing of Integrally Damped Composite Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmatka, John

    1998-01-01

    The experimental behavior of spinning laminated composite pretwisted plates (turbo-fan blade-like) with small (less than 10% by volume) integral viscoelastic damping patches was investigated at NASA-Lewis Research Center. Ten different plate sets were experimentally spin tested and the resulting data was analyzed. The first-four plate sets investigated tailoring patch locations and definitions to damp specific modes on spinning flat graphite/epoxy plates as a function of rotational speed. The remaining six plate sets investigated damping patch size and location on specific modes of pretwisted (30 degrees) graphite/epoxy plates. The results reveal that: (1) significant amount of damping can be added using a small amount of damping material, (2) the damped plates experienced no failures up to the tested 28,000 g's and 750,000 cycles, (3) centrifugal loads caused an increase in bending frequencies and corresponding reductions in bending damping levels that are proportional to the bending stiffness increase, and (4) the centrifugal loads caused a decrease in torsion natural frequency and increase in damping levels of pretwisted composite plates.

  8. The Dynamics of a Parametrically Driven Damped Pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, A.; Kumar, K.

    2015-05-01

    Ordered and chaotic states of a parametrically driven planar pendulum with viscous damping are numerically investigated. The damping makes the number of chaotic windows fewer but with larger width. Stroboscopic maps of the chaotic motion of the pendulum, driven either subharmonically or harmonically, show strange attractors with inversion symmetry in the phase plane.

  9. Design of the SLC damping ring to linac transport lines

    SciTech Connect

    Fieguth, T.H.; Murray, J.J.

    1983-07-01

    The first and second order optics for the damping ring to linac transport line are designed to preserve the damped transverse emittance while simultaneously compressing the bunch length of the beam to that length required for reinjection into the linac. This design, including provisions for future control of beam polarization, is described.

  10. Rhizoctonia damping-off stem canker and root rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia solani has been reported to cause damping-off and root rot of rhododendrons and azaleas. Damping-off often includes groups of dying and dead seedlings. Decline of rooted plants in containers results from both root rot and stem necrosis below or above the soil line. Root rot is usually no...

  11. Flux-driven algebraic damping of m = 1 diocotron mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chim, Chi Yung; O'Neil, Thomas M.

    2016-07-01

    Recent experiments with pure electron plasmas in a Malmberg-Penning trap have observed the algebraic damping of m = 1 diocotron modes. Transport due to small field asymmetries produces a low density halo of electrons moving radially outward from the plasma core, and the mode damping begins when the halo reaches the resonant radius r = Rw at the wall of the trap. The damping rate is proportional to the flux of halo particles through the resonant layer. The damping is related to, but distinct from, spatial Landau damping, in which a linear wave-particle resonance produces exponential damping. This paper explains with analytic theory the new algebraic damping due to particle transport by both mobility and diffusion. As electrons are swept around the "cat's eye" orbits of the resonant wave-particle interaction, they form a dipole (m = 1) density distribution. From this distribution, the electric field component perpendicular to the core displacement produces E × B-drift of the core back to the axis, that is, damps the m = 1 mode. The parallel component produces drift in the azimuthal direction, that is, causes a shift in the mode frequency.

  12. Flux-driven algebraic damping of m = 1 diocotron mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chim, Chi Yung; O'Neil, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Recent experiments with pure electron plasmas in a Malmberg-Penning trap have observed the algebraic damping of m = 1 diocotron modes. Transport due to small field asymmetries produce a low density halo of electrons moving radially outward from the plasma core, and the mode damping begins when the halo reaches the resonant radius rres, where f = mfE × B (rres) . The damping rate is proportional to the flux of halo particles through the resonant layer. The damping is related to, but distinct from spatial Landau damping, in which a linear wave-particle resonance produces exponential damping. This poster explains with analytic theory and simulations the new algebraic damping due to both mobility and diffusive fluxes. As electrons are swept around the ``cat's eye'' orbits of resonant wave-particle interaction, they form a dipole (m = 1) density distribution, and the electric field from this distribution produces an E × B drift of the core back to the axis, i.e. damps the m = 1 mode. Supported by National Science Foundation Grant PHY-1414570.

  13. Process Damping and Cutting Tool Geometry in Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, C. M.; Sims, N. D.; Turner, S.

    2011-12-01

    Regenerative vibration, or chatter, limits the performance of machining processes. Consequences of chatter include tool wear and poor machined surface finish. Process damping by tool-workpiece contact can reduce chatter effects and improve productivity. Process damping occurs when the flank (also known as the relief face) of the cutting tool makes contact with waves on the workpiece surface, created by chatter motion. Tool edge features can act to increase the damping effect. This paper examines how a tool's edge condition combines with the relief angle to affect process damping. An analytical model of cutting with chatter leads to a two-section curve describing how process damped vibration amplitude changes with surface speed for radiussed tools. The tool edge dominates the process damping effect at the lowest surface speeds, with the flank dominating at higher speeds. A similar curve is then proposed regarding tools with worn edges. Experimental data supports the notion of the two-section curve. A rule of thumb is proposed which could be useful to machine operators, regarding tool wear and process damping. The question is addressed, should a tool of a given geometry, used for a given application, be considered as sharp, radiussed or worn regarding process damping.

  14. The Study of Damped Harmonic Oscillations Using an Electronic Counter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadhwa, Ajay

    2009-01-01

    We study damped harmonic oscillations in mechanical systems like the loaded spring and simple pendulum with the help of an oscillation measuring electronic counter. The experimental data are used in a software program that solves the differential equation for damped vibrations of any system and determines its position, velocity and acceleration as…

  15. Photonic tuning of Beliaev damping in a superfluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kónya, G.; Szirmai, G.; Nagy, D.; Domokos, P.

    2014-05-01

    We show that the Beliaev damping of elementary excitations in a homogeneous Bose-Einstein condensate can undergo resonant enhancement by several orders of magnitude when the superfluid is interacting with a far-detuned radiation field of an optical resonator. The photonic tuning of the quasiparticle damping can be controlled by an external laser drive.

  16. Vortex-induced vibration and damping of thermowells

    SciTech Connect

    Blevins, R.D.; Tilden, B.W.; Martens, D.H.

    1996-12-01

    Thermowells that protect temperature measuring instrumentation are cantilevered into process piping. The thermowells are subject to vortex-induced vibrations by the process fluid. The resonant response is limited by damping. Damping measurements of thermowells were made and used to establish criteria for acceptable design under vortex-induced vibration.

  17. Eddy-current-damped microelectromechanical switch

    DOEpatents

    Christenson, Todd R.; Polosky, Marc A.

    2007-10-30

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) device is disclosed that includes a shuttle suspended for movement above a substrate. A plurality of permanent magnets in the shuttle of the MEM device interact with a metal plate which forms the substrate or a metal portion thereof to provide an eddy-current damping of the shuttle, thereby making the shuttle responsive to changes in acceleration or velocity of the MEM device. Alternately, the permanent magnets can be located in the substrate, and the metal portion can form the shuttle. An electrical switch closure in the MEM device can occur in response to a predetermined acceleration-time event. The MEM device, which can be fabricated either by micromachining or LIGA, can be used for sensing an acceleration or deceleration event (e.g. in automotive applications such as airbag deployment or seat belt retraction).

  18. Eddy-current-damped microelectromechanical switch

    DOEpatents

    Christenson, Todd R.; Polosky, Marc A.

    2009-12-15

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) device is disclosed that includes a shuttle suspended for movement above a substrate. A plurality of permanent magnets in the shuttle of the MEM device interact with a metal plate which forms the substrate or a metal portion thereof to provide an eddy-current damping of the shuttle, thereby making the shuttle responsive to changes in acceleration or velocity of the MEM device. Alternately, the permanent magnets can be located in the substrate, and the metal portion can form the shuttle. An electrical switch closure in the MEM device can occur in response to a predetermined acceleration-time event. The MEM device, which can be fabricated either by micromachining or LIGA, can be used for sensing an acceleration or deceleration event (e.g. in automotive applications such as airbag deployment or seat belt retraction).

  19. Magnetomechanical damping in cryogenic TbDy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dooley, J.; Good, N.; White, C.; Leland, S.; Fultz, B.

    2002-01-01

    Vibration damping in polycrystalline TbDy alloys was studied at cryogenic temperatures. The material was prepared by cold-rolling to induce crystallographic texture, and was then heat-treated to relieve internal stress. Mechanical hysteretic losses were measured at various strains, frequencies, and loading configurations at 77 K. Some textured TbDy materials demonstrated 22.6% energy dissipation in mechanical measurements at low frequency (0.01 Hz) and a mean logarithmic decrement of 0.23 at a higher frequency (25 kHz). Ultrasonic velocities of longitudinal and shear elastic waves were measured on single and polycrystalline TbDy; little variation in ultrasonic velocities was found evenfor samples with large variation in crystallographic texture and magnetomechanical properties.

  20. Vibration damping using four-layer sandwich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Binod P.

    2008-11-01

    This paper discusses vibration damping using four-layer sandwich beam. The present work deals with the analysis of vibration of the primary system having a mass and rubber spring mounted on a four-layer viscoelastic simply supported symmetrically arranged sandwich beam. The equation of motion of a general four-layer with alternate elastic layer and viscoelastic layer simply supported sandwich beam is first derived using the method of equilibrium of forces and beam theory. The above differential equation has been solved for harmonically force excited sandwich beam by applying suitable boundary conditions to get the impedance of the sandwich beam. This impedance is then combined with the impedance of the primary system to obtain the expression for the response of harmonically excited mass and then the expression for transmissibility is obtained. The effectiveness of geometrical and physical parameters in minimizing response and transmissibility for central mounting of the primary system is evaluated.

  1. OBSERVED DAMPING OF THE SLOW MAGNETOACOUSTIC MODE

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, M. S.; Walsh, R. W.; De Moortel, I. E-mail: mmarsh@uclan.ac.uk

    2011-06-20

    Spectroscopic and stereoscopic imaging observations of slow magnetoacoustic wave propagation within a coronal loop are investigated to determine the decay length scale of the slow magnetoacoustic mode in three dimensions and the density profile within the loop system. The slow wave is found to have an e-folding decay length scale of 20,000{sup +4000}{sub -3000} km with a uniform density profile along the loop base. These observations place quantitative constraints on the modeling of wave propagation within coronal loops. Theoretical forward modeling suggests that magnetic field line divergence is the dominant damping factor and thermal conduction is insufficient, given the observed parameters of the coronal loop temperature, density, and wave mode period.

  2. Passive damping augmentation for flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sesak, J. R.; Gronet, M. J.; Marinos, G. M.

    1986-01-01

    The present work concentrates on the application and extension of absorber design and optimization techniques to a multimode, multi-DOF, large space structure, namely the NASA space station. The principal issue addressed is the optimal tuning of several absorbers for the transient response of a multi-DOF system, including the effects of modal coupling, existing structural damping, absorber placement, and adsorber mass. The space station is subject to many transient disturbances such as docking, orbit reboost, crew motion, and payload slewing. A notable steady-state excitation source is the Science Research Centrifuge, which rotates at a frequency in the bandwidth of the primary structural modes. Because of the relatively advanced state of development of steady-state absorber design techniques, only the transient cases are considered in this study.

  3. State protection under collective damping and diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ponte, M. A. de; Mizrahi, S. S.; Moussa, M. H. Y.

    2011-07-15

    In this paper we provide a recipe for state protection in a network of oscillators under collective damping and diffusion. Our strategy is to manipulate the network topology, i.e., the way the oscillators are coupled together, the strength of their couplings, and their natural frequencies, in order to create a relaxation-diffusion-free channel. This protected channel defines a decoherence-free subspace (DFS) for nonzero-temperature reservoirs. Our development also furnishes an alternative approach to build up DFSs that offers two advantages over the conventional method: it enables the derivation of all the network-protected states at once, and also reveals, through the network normal modes, the mechanism behind the emergence of these protected domains.

  4. Effects of nonlinear damping in flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Anren; Taylor, Lawrence W.

    1988-01-01

    The classical Krylov-Bogoliubov "averaging" technique is used to study a class of nonlinear damping models, for which the damping force is proportional to the product of positive integer or fractional power of absolute values of displacement and that of velocity. The results are compared with linear viscous damping models. The amplitude decrement of free vibration for a single mode system with nonlinear models depends not only on damping ratio, but also on the initial amplitude, the time to measure the response, frequency of the system, and the powers of displacement and velocity. For the distributed system, the action of nonlinear damping is found to reduce energy of the system as well as to pass energy to higher modes. Experimental evidence such as in Spacecraft Control Laboratory Experiment seems to support the need for nonlinear models.

  5. Magnetic fields in damped Ly-alpha systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, A. M.; Lanzetta, K. M.; Oren, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    The probability of Faraday rotation in various types of metal-line absorbers is computed by combining the incidence of Faraday rotation in a sample of radio-selected QSOs with the incidence of foreground metal-line absorption. The sample is divided into subsets with and without damped Ly-alpha absorption. The probability of Faraday rotation is significantly higher in the damped subset. The probability is higher in the damped subset than in nondamped subsets selected on the basis of Mg II or C IV absorption. From evidence linking damped systems to the progenitors of galactic disks and the Mg II systems to the progenitors of galactic halos, it is concluded that magnetic fields were significantly higher in protogalactic disks than in protogalactic halos. It is estimated that the B fields in two damped Ly-alpha systems with z of about 2 are a few micro-Gauss.

  6. Passively Shunted Piezoelectric Damping of Centrifugally-Loaded Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Kirsten P.; Provenza, Andrew J.; Trudell, Jeffrey J.; Min, James B.

    2009-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Glenn Research Center have been investigating shunted piezoelectric circuits as potential damping treatments for turbomachinery rotor blades. This effort seeks to determine the effects of centrifugal loading on passively-shunted piezoelectric - damped plates. Passive shunt circuit parameters are optimized for the plate's third bending mode. Tests are performed both non-spinning and in the Dynamic Spin Facility to verify the analysis, and to determine the effectiveness of the damping under centrifugal loading. Results show that a resistive shunt circuit will reduce resonant vibration for this configuration. However, a tuned shunt circuit will be required to achieve the desired damping level. The analysis and testing address several issues with passive shunt circuit implementation in a rotating system, including piezoelectric material integrity under centrifugal loading, shunt circuit implementation, and tip mode damping.

  7. Flow damping due to stochastization of the magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Ida, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Tsuchiya, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Suzuki, C.; Yokoyama, M.; Shimizu, A.; Nagaoka, K.; Inagaki, S.; Itoh, K.; Akiyama, T.; Emoto, M.; Evans, T.; Dinklage, A.; Du, X.; Fujii, K.; Goto, M.; Goto, T.; Hasuo, M.; Hidalgo, C.; Ichiguchi, K.; Ishizawa, A.; Jakubowski, M.; Kamiya, K.; Kasahara, H.; Kawamura, G.; Kato, D.; Kobayashi, M.; Morita, S.; Mukai, K.; Murakami, I.; Murakami, S.; Narushima, Y.; Nunami, M.; Ohdach, S.; Ohno, N.; Osakabe, M.; Pablant, N.; Sakakibara, S.; Seki, T.; Shimozuma, T.; Shoji, M.; Sudo, S.; Tanaka, K.; Tokuzawa, T.; Todo, Y.; Wang, H.; Yamada, H.; Takeiri, Y.; Mutoh, T.; Imagawa, S.; Mito, T.; Nagayama, Y.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Ashikawa, N.; Chikaraishi, H.; Ejiri, A.; Furukawa, M.; Fujita, T.; Hamaguchi, S.; Igami, H.; Isobe, M.; Masuzaki, S.; Morisaki, T.; Motojima, G.; Nagasaki, K.; Nakano, H.; Oya, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Sakamoto, R.; Sakamoto, M.; Sanpei, A.; Takahashi, H.; Tokitani, M.; Ueda, Y.; Yoshimura, Y.; Yamamoto, S.; Nishimura, K.; Sugama, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Idei, H.; Isayama, A.; Kitajima, S.; Masamune, S.; Shinohara, K.; Bawankar, P. S.; Bernard, E.; von Berkel, M.; Funaba, H.; Huang, X. L.; Ii, T.; Ido, T.; Ikeda, K.; Kamio, S.; Kumazawa, R.; Moon, C.; Muto, S.; Miyazawa, J.; Ming, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Nishimura, S.; Ogawa, K.; Ozaki, T.; Oishi, T.; Ohno, M.; Pandya, S.; Seki, R.; Sano, R.; Saito, K.; Sakaue, H.; Takemura, Y.; Tsumori, K.; Tamura, N.; Tanaka, H.; Toi, K.; Wieland, B.; Yamada, I.; Yasuhara, R.; Zhang, H.; Kaneko, O.; Komori, A.

    2015-01-01

    The driving and damping mechanism of plasma flow is an important issue because flow shear has a significant impact on turbulence in a plasma, which determines the transport in the magnetized plasma. Here we report clear evidence of the flow damping due to stochastization of the magnetic field. Abrupt damping of the toroidal flow associated with a transition from a nested magnetic flux surface to a stochastic magnetic field is observed when the magnetic shear at the rational surface decreases to 0.5 in the large helical device. This flow damping and resulting profile flattening are much stronger than expected from the Rechester–Rosenbluth model. The toroidal flow shear shows a linear decay, while the ion temperature gradient shows an exponential decay. This observation suggests that the flow damping is due to the change in the non-diffusive term of momentum transport. PMID:25569268

  8. Passively Damped Laminated Piezoelectric Shell Structures with Integrated Electric Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, Dimitris A.

    1999-01-01

    Multi-field mechanics are presented for curvilinear piezoelectric laminates interfaced with distributed passive electric components. The equations of motion for laminated piezoelectric shell structures with embedded passive electric networks are directly formulated and solved using a finite element methodology. The modal damping and frequencies of the piezoelectric shell are calculated from the poles of the system. Experimental and numerical results are presented for the modal damping and frequency of composite beams with a resistively shunted piezoceramic patch. The modal damping and frequency of plates, cylindrical shells and cylindrical composite blades with piezoelectric-resistor layers are predicted. Both analytical and experimental studies illustrate a unique dependence of modal damping and frequencies on the shunting resistance and show the effect of structural shape and curvature on piezoelectric damping.

  9. Impact of Damping Uncertainty on SEA Model Response Variance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah; Cabell, Randolph; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2010-01-01

    Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) is commonly used to predict high-frequency vibroacoustic levels. This statistical approach provides the mean response over an ensemble of random subsystems that share the same gross system properties such as density, size, and damping. Recently, techniques have been developed to predict the ensemble variance as well as the mean response. However these techniques do not account for uncertainties in the system properties. In the present paper uncertainty in the damping loss factor is propagated through SEA to obtain more realistic prediction bounds that account for both ensemble and damping variance. The analysis is performed on a floor-equipped cylindrical test article that resembles an aircraft fuselage. Realistic bounds on the damping loss factor are determined from measurements acquired on the sidewall of the test article. The analysis demonstrates that uncertainties in damping have the potential to significantly impact the mean and variance of the predicted response.

  10. Comparison of damping treatments for gas turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Robert W.; Hollkamp, Joseph J.

    1996-05-01

    High frequency vibration of gas turbine fan blades is a high cycle fatigue concern. Friction damping devices are ineffective in suppressing high frequency vibration modes and external damping treatments are plagued by creep concerns. An alternative approach is to apply viscoelastic material internally in the blades. In this paper, an analytical comparison of internal damping treatments for fan blades is presented. The fan blade is modeled as a solid, flat, cantilevered titanium plate. Internal portions are removed producing cavities that are filled with viscoelastic material. Configurations with one, two, and three cavities are modeled using the modal strain energy method in conjunction with finite element analysis to estimate damping. Results show that appreciable damping levels for high frequency modes are possible with stiff viscoelastic material. Other design criteria are also considered. Results indicate that the hydrostatic load from the viscoelastic material on the cavity walls may be a concern.

  11. Magnetic Damping of Solid Solution Semiconductor Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szofran, Frank R.; Benz, K. W.; Croell, Arne; Dold, Peter; Cobb, Sharon D.; Volz, Martin P.; Motakef, Shariar

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study is to: (1) experimentally test the validity of the modeling predictions applicable to the magnetic damping of convective flows in electrically conductive melts as this applies to the bulk growth of solid solution semiconducting materials; and (2) assess the effectiveness of steady magnetic fields in reducing the fluid flows occurring in these materials during processing. To achieve the objectives of this investigation, we are carrying out a comprehensive program in the Bridgman and floating-zone configurations using the solid solution alloy system Ge-Si. This alloy system has been studied extensively in environments that have not simultaneously included both low gravity and an applied magnetic field. Also, all compositions have a high electrical conductivity, and the materials parameters permit reasonable growth rates. An important supporting investigation is determining the role, if any, that thermoelectromagnetic convection (TEMC) plays during growth of these materials in a magnetic field. TEMC has significant implications for the deployment of a Magnetic Damping Furnace in space. This effect will be especially important in solid solutions where the growth interface is, in general, neither isothermal nor isoconcentrational. It could be important in single melting point materials, also, if faceting takes place producing a non-isothermal interface. In conclusion, magnetic fields up to 5 Tesla are sufficient to eliminate time-dependent convection in silicon floating zones and possibly Bridgman growth of Ge-Si alloys. In both cases, steady convection appears to be more significant for mass transport than diffusion, even at 5 Tesla in the geometries used here. These results are corroborated in both growth configurations by calculations.

  12. Experimental Observations on Material Damping at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Chia-Yen; Levine, Marie; Shido, Lillian; Leland, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a unique experimental facility designed to measure damping of materials at cryogenic temperatures for the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) mission at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The test facility removes other sources of damping in the measurement by avoiding frictional interfaces, decoupling the test specimen from the support system, and by using a non-contacting measurement device. Damping data reported herein are obtained for materials (Aluminum, Aluminum/Terbium/Dysprosium, Titanium, Composites) vibrating in free-free bending modes with low strain levels (< 10(exp -6) ppm). The fundamental frequencies of material samples are ranged from 14 to 202 Hz. To provide the most beneficial data relevant to TPF-like precision optical space missions, the damping data are collected from room temperatures (around 293 K) to cryogenic temperatures (below 40 K) at unevenly-spaced intervals. More data points are collected over any region of interest. The test data shows a significant decrease in viscous damping at cryogenic temperatures. The cryogenic damping can be as low as 10(exp -4) %, but the amount of the damping decrease is a function of frequency and material. However, Titanium 15-3-3-3 shows a remarkable increase in damping at cryogenic temperatures. It demonstrates over one order of magnitude increase in damping in comparison to Aluminum 6061-T6. Given its other properties (e.g., good stiffness and low conductivity) this may prove itself to be a good candidate for the application on TPF. At room temperatures, the test data are correlated well with the damping predicted by the Zener theory. However, large discrepancies at cryogenic temperatures between the Zener theory and the test data are observed.

  13. Damping identification of lightly damped linear dynamic systems using common-base proper orthogonal decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianne, T.; Dimitriadis, G.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a new technique to identify the damping of linear systems. It is developed from the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) of the free response of the system and extended to the recently proposed Common-base POD (CPOD). The present application of CPOD considers simultaneously several free responses of the system to different initial conditions. The Eigen-decomposition of the co-variance matrix leads to a unique vector basis which is likely to contain more information about the dynamics of the system than a vector basis obtained by the classic POD technique. The ability of the technique to estimate the mode shapes and the modal damping is demonstrated on a simulated mass-spring-damper system. Two different distributions of masses are considered in order to confront the CPOD analysis to the intrinsic limitation of POD, i.e. that the mode shapes are identified exactly only if the mass matrix is proportional to the identity matrix. It is shown that the identification of the damping is still possible when the modes are not orthonormal. The robustness of the technique is demonstrated in the presence of noise in the responses of the system and through an experimental application with comparison with other identifications techniques.

  14. Evaluation of the Contribution of Multiple DAMPs and DAMP Receptors in Cell Death-Induced Sterile Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Zubin; Rock, Kenneth L.

    2014-01-01

    When cells die by necrosis in vivo they stimulate an inflammatory response. It is thought that this response is triggered when the injured cells expose proinflammatory molecules, collectively referred to as damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), which are recognized by cells or soluble molecules of the innate or adaptive immune system. Several putative DAMPs and/or their receptors have been identified, but whether and how much they participate in responses in vivo is incompletely understood, and they have not previously been compared side-by-side in the same models. This study focuses on evaluating the contribution of multiple mechanisms that have been proposed to or potentially could participate in cell death-induced inflammation: The third component of complement (C3), ATP (and its receptor P2X7), antibodies, the C-type lectin receptor Mincle (Clec4e), and protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2). We investigate the role of these factors in cell death-induced inflammation to dead cells in the peritoneum and acetaminophen-induced liver damage. We find that mice deficient in antibody, C3 or PAR2 have impaired inflammatory responses to dying cells. In contrast there was no reduction in inflammation to cell death in the peritoneum or liver of mice that genetically lack Mincle, the P2X7 receptor or that were treated with apyrase to deplete ATP. These results indicate that antibody, complement and PAR2 contribute to cell death-induced inflammation but that Mincle and ATP- P2X7 receptor are not required for this response in at least 2 different in vivo models. PMID:25127469

  15. Application of the Steady-State Variable Nutation Angle Method for Faster Determinations of Long T1s—An Approach Useful for the Design of Hyperpolarized MR Molecular Probes

    PubMed Central

    Jupin, Marc; Gamliel, Ayelet; Hovav, Yonatan; Sosna, Jacob; Gomori, J Moshe; Katz-Brull, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    In the dissolution-dynamic nuclear polarization technique, molecular probes with long T1s are preferred. 13C nuclei of small molecules with no directly bonded protons or sp3 13C nuclei with proton positions substituted by deuterons may fulfill this requirement. The T1 determination of such new molecular probes is crucial for the success of the hyperpolarized observation. Although the inversion-recovery approach remained by and large the standard for T1 measurements, we show here that the steady-state variable nutation angle approach is faster and may be better suited for the determination of relatively long T1s in thermal equilibrium. Specifically, the T1 of a new molecular probe, [uniformly labeled (UL)-13C6, UL-2H8]2-deoxy-d-glucose, is determined here and compared to that of [UL-13C6, UL-2H7]d-glucose. PMID:26560856

  16. Damped Modes in Plasma Microturbulence: Saturation, Regulation, and Energy Partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makwana, Kiritkumar D.

    Plasma microturbulence at the scale of the ion gyroradius and smaller is considered to be the primary cause of heat loss in tokamaks. Damped modes are stable roots of the plasma dispersion relation and form an inseparable part of the microturbulent spectrum. We study several microturbulence models that describe vastly different fusion plasmas. All of them show saturation by damped modes that dissipate energy at almost the same rate as the energy injection rate of the unstable modes. Dissipation by damped modes peaks at low wavenumbers where the instability also peaks, distinguishing it from the traditional viscous dissipation mechanism at large wavenumbers. Damped modes are typically found to be important in saturation when their damping rate is not much larger than the instability growth rate. Until now, the regulation of ion temperature gradient driven (ITG) turbulence by zonal flows has been explained using the zonal flow-drift wave shearing paradigm: zonal flow shearing enhances energy transfer from large scale drift waves to smaller, dissipative scales. However, we show, in both fluid and gyrokinetic simulations, that the zonal flows help transfer a majority of the energy injected by the unstable modes to the damped modes, leading to saturation. Although the transfer to damped modes simultaneously excites smaller scales, a significant fraction of the injected energy is dissipated by damped modes in the large-scale, unstable region. This transfer occurs via three-wave interactions that include a zonal flow, an unstable mode and a damped mode. Such interactions dominate due to their coupling coefficients, the strong zonal flow amplitude and their minimum frequency sum that leads to the largest correlation time and enhanced energy transfer. The slew of damped modes in gyrokinetic simulations is analyzed using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) modes and linear eigenmodes. Spectra of energy and amplitude attenuation rates of damped modes are calculated, showing

  17. Cell death and inflammation: the case for IL-1 family cytokines as the canonical DAMPs of the immune system.

    PubMed

    Martin, Seamus J

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that necrotic cells are capable of promoting inflammation through releasing so-called endogenous 'danger signals' that can promote activation of macrophages, dendritic cells, and other sentinel cells of the innate immune system. However, the identity of these endogenous proinflammatory molecules, also called damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), has been debated since the 'danger model' was first advanced 20 years ago. While a relatively large number of molecules have been proposed to act as DAMPs, little consensus has emerged concerning which of these represent the key activators of sterile inflammation. Here I argue that the canonical DAMPs have long been hiding in plain sight, in the form of members of the extended IL-1 cytokine family (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-18, IL-33, IL-36α, IL-36β, and IL-36γ). The latter cytokines possess all of the characteristics expected of endogenous DAMPs and initiate inflammation in a manner strikingly similar to that utilized by the other major category of inflammatory triggers, pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Furthermore, many PAMPs upregulate the expression of IL-1 family DAMPs, enabling robust synergy between these distinct classes of inflammatory triggers. Thus, multiple lines of evidence now suggest that IL-1 family cytokines represent the key initiators of necrosis-initiated sterile inflammation, as well as amplifiers of inflammation in response to infection-associated tissue injury. PMID:27273805

  18. The effects of interply damping layers on the dynamic response of composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    Integrated damping mechanics for composite laminates with constrained interlaminar layers of polymer damping materials are developed. Discrete layer damping mechanics are presented for composite materials with damping layers, in connection with a semi-analytical method for predicting the modal damping in simply-supported specialty composite plates. Several application cases are used to demonstrate the advantages of the method. Damping predictions for graphite-epoxy composite plates of various laminations demonstrate the potential for higher damping than geometrically equivalent aluminum plates. The effects of aspect ratio, damping layer thickness, and fiber volume ratio on static and dynamic characteristics of the composite plate are also investigated.

  19. The effects of interply damping layers on the dynamic response of composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    Integrated damping mechanics for composite laminates with interlaminar constrained layers of damping polymer materials are developed. Discrete layer damping mechanics for composite laminates with damping layers, in connection with a semi-analytical method for predicting the modal damping in simply-supported specialty composite plates are presented. Application cases demonstrate the advantages of the method. Damping predictions for graphite/epoxy composite plates of various laminations demonstrate the potential for higher damping than geometrically equivalent aluminum plates. The effects of aspect ratio, damping layer thickness, and fiber volume ratio on static and dynamic characteristics of the composite plate are also investigated.

  20. Flux-driven algebraic damping of diocotron modes

    SciTech Connect

    Chim, Chi Yung; O’Neil, Thomas M.

    2015-06-29

    Recent experiments with pure electron plasmas in a Malmberg-Penning trap have observed the algebraic damping of m = 1 and m = 2 diocotron modes. Transport due to small field asymmetries produces a low density halo of electrons moving radially outward from the plasma core, and the mode damping begins when the halo reaches the resonant radius R{sub m}, where there is a matching of ω{sub m} = mω{sub E} (R{sub m}) for the mode frequency ω{sub m} and E × B-drift rotation frequency ω{sub E}. The damping rate is proportional to the flux of halo particles through the resonant layer. The damping is related to, but distinct from, spatial Landau damping, in which a linear wave-particle resonance produces exponential damping. This new mechanism of damping is due to transfer of canonical angular momentum from the mode to halo particles, as they are swept around the “cat’s eye” orbits of the resonant wave-particle interaction. This paper provides a simple derivation of the time dependence of the mode amplitudes.

  1. Damping capacity measurements for characterization of degradation in advanced materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mantena, R.; Gibson, R.F.; Place, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the application of damping capacity measurements for characterization of degradation in advanced materials. A recently developed impulse-frequency response technique was used to obtain damping capacity measurements on crossplied E-glass/epoxy laminates which had been subjected to four-point bending and cantilever bending to produce matrix cracking in the transverse plies. The size and location of the damage zone were correlated with changes in damping. With the expected introduction of Rapidly Solidified Alloys (RSA) as effective alternatives to conventional materials, the applicability of damping capacity measurements as a nondestructive means of evaluating degradation in these materials was also studied. A conventional A710 structural steel having three different microstructures was used for developing the methodology to be used later on RSA specimens. It is shown that damping is more sensitive to matrix cracking than stiffness is in E-glass/epoxy composite specimens. In the case of A710 steel, the damping changes at low strain, though significant, do not correlate with the mechanical property data. Damping data at high strains does correlate with the mechanical property data, however.

  2. Material damping in aluminum and metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Van Schoor, Marthinus C.

    1987-01-01

    The material damping in beam-like specimens of aluminum and metal matrix composites was measured. A unique apparatus to determine damping by free decay while the specimens are in free fall in a vacuum was used. The specimens tested include 2024-T3 and 6061-T4 aluminum, and unidirectional graphite/metal matrix specimens with P55 and P100 fibers and 6061 Aluminum and AZ91C Magnesium as matrix materials. Tests were conducted to determine the dependence of damping on frequency and stress level. For the aluminum specimens, the material damping followed the Zener model at very low stress levels. Below the Zener relaxation frequency, a strong dependence of damping on stress was found for even moderate stress levels. Damping for the aluminum matrix materials was slightly above that predicted by the Zener model for a homogeneous bar of the matrix aluminum. For the magnesium matrix specimens, damping significantly above the Zener prediction for the homogeneous matrix material was observed.

  3. Flux-driven algebraic damping of diocotron modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chim, Chi Yung; O'Neil, Thomas M.

    2015-06-01

    Recent experiments with pure electron plasmas in a Malmberg-Penning trap have observed the algebraic damping of m = 1 and m = 2 diocotron modes. Transport due to small field asymmetries produces a low density halo of electrons moving radially outward from the plasma core, and the mode damping begins when the halo reaches the resonant radius Rm, where there is a matching of ωm = mωE (Rm) for the mode frequency ωm and E × B-drift rotation frequency ωE. The damping rate is proportional to the flux of halo particles through the resonant layer. The damping is related to, but distinct from, spatial Landau damping, in which a linear wave-particle resonance produces exponential damping. This new mechanism of damping is due to transfer of canonical angular momentum from the mode to halo particles, as they are swept around the "cat's eye" orbits of the resonant wave-particle interaction. This paper provides a simple derivation of the time dependence of the mode amplitudes.

  4. Modal damping estimates of MOS-1 solar array paddle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimori, Yoshinori; Kato, Junichi; Toda, Susumu

    The modal damping coefficients of MOS-1 solar array paddle have been estimated, based on experimental results of the paddle substrate—a prime load carrying component of the paddle structure—and on theoretical extrapolation. The damping coefficient values of 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th substrate modes are 0.69% (14.5 Hz), 0.07% (49.7 Hz), 0.27% (61.2 Hz) and 0.07% (96.7 Hz) respectively. Also this substrate experiment reveals that the effect of the air vanishes at the level of 0.01 Torr and that the relative alignment of fibers in CFRP skin vs the lines of principal stresses in the deformed state is strongly correlated with the damping level. Zener theory of thermo-elasticity coupling model has been applied to derive the damping coefficients of the plate. Then the modal damping coefficients of MOS-1 solar array paddle whose resonances lie in the range of 0.2-2 Hz are estimated by making use of the fitted curves to the experimental data. Next, the estimate is improved by considering the additional contribution from the solar cells and adhesive. Supplementing the foregoing estimates, quantitative assessment on the damping effect due to interface friction somewhere in the structure is made leading to the final estimate that the modal damping coefficients of MOS-1 solar array paddle would not be lower than 0.003.

  5. The Influence of Damping on Waves and Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaul, L.

    1999-01-01

    SummaryThis paper provides a unified approach for conventional and generalised linear models of viscoelastic constitutive behaviour. Creep, relaxation and hysteresis effects of materials and structures are described consistently. Advantages of the fractional derivative concept are outlined. Mathematical consequences resulting from operator non-locality in time domain and uniqueness questions arising in frequency domain are addressed. The elastic-viscoelastic correspondence principle serves as a tool to obtain as well analytical and numerical BEM and FEM solutions of wave propagation and vibration problems by transform methods. Characteristics of viscoelastic waves and vibrations are discussed. The paper focusses on material damping but includes aspects of radiation damping description by discretisation methods as well. Important aspects of damping description are beyond the scope of selected topics of this survey paper. This is why additional reading is recommended on the following subjects: Thermo-viscoelasticity and non-linear viscoelasticity [3, 4, 21], determination of mechanical properties by experimental methods [2, 4, 38, 43], damping devices and surface damping treatment [31, 38, 43], material damping data [3, 31] and structural damping [45] including the nonlinear dissipation in mechanical joints such as bolted or riveted connections [46-48]. A list which is by far not complete.

  6. Cellular Magnesium Matrix Foam Composites for Mechanical Damping Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shunmugasamy, Vasanth Chakravarthy; Mansoor, Bilal; Gupta, Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    The damping characteristics of metal alloys and metal matrix composites are relevant to the automotive, aerospace, and marine structures. Use of lightweight materials can help in increasing payload capacity and in decreasing fuel consumption. Lightweight composite materials possessing high damping capabilities that can be designed as structural members can greatly benefit in addressing these needs. In this context, the damping properties of lightweight metals such as aluminum and magnesium and their respective composites have been studied in the existing literature. This review focuses on analyzing the damping properties of aluminum and magnesium alloys and their cellular composites. The damping properties of various lightweight alloys and composites are compared on the basis of their density to understand the potential for weight saving in structural applications. Magnesium alloys are observed to possess better damping properties in comparison to aluminum. However, aluminum matrix syntactic foams reinforced with silicon carbide hollow particles possess a damping capacity and density comparable to magnesium alloy. By using the data presented in the study, composites with specific compositions and properties can be selected for a given application. In addition, the comparison of the results helps in identifying the areas where attention needs to be focused to address the future needs.

  7. Structural dynamics and vibrations of damped, aircraft-type structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Maurice I.

    1992-01-01

    Engineering preliminary design methods for approximating and predicting the effects of viscous or equivalent viscous-type damping treatments on the free and forced vibration of lightly damped aircraft-type structures are developed. Similar developments are presented for dynamic hysteresis viscoelastic-type damping treatments. It is shown by both engineering analysis and numerical illustrations that the intermodal coupling of the undamped modes arising from the introduction of damping may be neglected in applying these preliminary design methods, except when dissimilar modes of these lightly damped, complex aircraft-type structures have identical or nearly identical natural frequencies. In such cases, it is shown that a relatively simple, additional interaction calculation between pairs of modes exhibiting this 'modal response' phenomenon suffices in the prediction of interacting modal damping fractions. The accuracy of the methods is shown to be very good to excellent, depending on the normal natural frequency separation of the system modes, thereby permitting a relatively simple preliminary design approach. This approach is shown to be a natural precursor to elaborate finite element, digital computer design computations in evaluating the type, quantity, and location of damping treatment.

  8. Nonlinear damping calculation in cylindrical gear dynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilbault, Raynald; Lalonde, Sébastien; Thomas, Marc

    2012-04-01

    The nonlinear dynamic problem posed by cylindrical gear systems has been extensively covered in the literature. Nonetheless, a significant proportion of the mechanisms involved in damping generation remains to be investigated and described. The main objective of this study is to contribute to this task. Overall, damping is assumed to consist of three sources: surrounding element contribution, hysteresis of the teeth, and oil squeeze damping. The first two contributions are considered to be commensurate with the supported load; for its part however, squeeze damping is formulated using expressions developed from the Reynolds equation. A lubricated impact analysis between the teeth is introduced in this study for the minimum film thickness calculation during contact losses. The dynamic transmission error (DTE) obtained from the final model showed close agreement with experimental measurements available in the literature. The nonlinear damping ratio calculated at different mesh frequencies and torque amplitudes presented average values between 5.3 percent and 8 percent, which is comparable to the constant 8 percent ratio used in published numerical simulations of an equivalent gear pair. A close analysis of the oil squeeze damping evidenced the inverse relationship between this damping effect and the applied load.

  9. Perceptual studies of violin body damping and vibrato.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Claudia; Woodhouse, Jim; Cheng, Felicia P-H; Cross, Ian; Blackwell, Alan F; Moore, Brian C J

    2010-01-01

    This work explored how the perception of violin notes is influenced by the magnitude of the applied vibrato and by the level of damping of the violin resonance modes. Damping influences the "peakiness" of the frequency response, and vibrato interacts with this peakiness by producing fluctuations in spectral content as well as in frequency and amplitude. Initially, it was shown that thresholds for detecting a change in vibrato amplitude were independent of body damping, and thresholds for detecting a change in body damping were independent of vibrato amplitude. A study of perceptual similarity using triadic comparison showed that vibrato amplitude and damping were largely perceived as independent dimensions. A series of listening tests was conducted employing synthesized, recorded, or live performance to probe perceptual responses in terms of "liveliness" and preference. The results do not support the conclusion that liveliness results from the combination of the use of vibrato and a "peaky" violin response. Judgments based on listening to single notes showed inconsistent patterns for liveliness, while preferences were highest for damping that was slightly less than for a reference (real) violin. In contrast, judgments by players based on many notes showed preference for damping close to the reference value. PMID:20058996

  10. Beliaev damping in quasi-two-dimensional dipolar condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Ryan M.; Natu, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    We study the effects of quasiparticle interactions in a quasi-two-dimensional (quasi-2D), zero-temperature Bose-Einstein condensate of dipolar atoms, which can exhibit a roton-maxon feature in its quasiparticle spectrum. Our focus is the Beliaev damping process, in which a quasiparticle collides with the condensate and resonantly decays into a pair of quasiparticles. Remarkably, the rate for this process exhibits a highly nontrivial dependence on the quasiparticle momentum and the dipolar interaction strength. For weak interactions, low-energy phonons experience no damping, and higher-energy quasiparticles undergo anomalously weak damping. In contrast, the Beliaev damping rates become anomalously large for stronger dipolar interactions, as rotons become energetically accessible as final states. When the dipoles are tilted off the axis of symmetry, the damping rates acquire an anisotropic character. Surprisingly, this anisotropy does not simply track the anisotropy of the dipolar interactions, rather, the mechanisms for damping are qualitatively modified in the anisotropic case. Our study reveals the unconventional nature of Beliaev damping in dipolar condensates, and has important implications for ongoing studies of equilibrium and nonequilibrium dynamics in these systems. Further, our results are relevant for other 2D superfluids with roton excitations, including spin-orbit-coupled Bose gases, magnon condensates, and 4He films.

  11. Resistively shunted piezocomposites for passive damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarlagadda, Shridhar

    The goal of this work was to theoretically model, fabricate and characterize 3-3 coupled piezocomposite structures, using shunted piezoelectric fibers with integrated resistive shunting. Advantages and disadvantages of the different shunted piezocomposite configurations were examined from both modeling and fabrication points of view. Two configurations of practical interest were chosen for detailed study: (1) piezoelectric whiskers in a resistive matrix, and (2) piezoelectric whiskers in a layer of epoxy and shunted with a thin film resistive coating. Two different models were developed: a "smeared" dynamic model and a finite element model. Composite beam theory was modified to include shunted piezoelectric behavior and governing equations and boundary conditions were formulated. For the finite element model, a shunted piezoelectric element was formulated and the discretized governing equations were converted to state-space form. Modeling results demonstrated the possibility of modal loss factors as high as 10% in a single mode, for an effective piezoelectric volume fraction of 25%, as well the ability to tailor achievable levels of damping. Non-linear potential variation and local effects were successfully modeled. The critical parameters affecting modal damping were piezoelectric whisker volume fraction, shunt resistance, structural geometry and the location of whiskers. Experimental efforts involved fabrication of shunted piezocomposites for both configurations. Using chopped continuous poled PZT-5H fibers; a whisker/resistive matrix composite was successfully fabricated. For the resistive matrix case, matrix conductivity was a function of filler volume fraction and showed the percolation effect. However, the dielectric constant of the matrix also increased significantly (factor of 1000) at the design filler volume fraction, which drastically altered the electrical behavior of the piezocomposite from the designed case. The change in dielectric constant appeared

  12. A new global approach using a network of piezoelectric elements and energy redistribution for enhanced vibration damping of smart structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dan; Guyomar, Daniel; Richard, Claude

    2013-04-01

    A new global approach for improved vibration damping of smart structure, based on global energy redistribution by means of a network of piezoelectric elements is proposed. It is basically using semi-active Synchronized Switch Damping technique. SSD technique relies on a cumulative build-up of the voltage resulting from the continuous switching and it was shown that the performance is strongly related to this voltage. The increase of the piezoelectric voltage results in improvement of the damping performance. External voltage sources or improved switching sequences were previously designed to increase this voltage in the case of single piezoelectric element structure configurations. This paper deals with extended structure with many embedded piezoelectric elements. The proposed strategy consist of using an electric network made with non-linear component and switches in order to set up and control a low-loss energy transfer from source piezoelements extracting the vibration energy of the structure and oriented toward a given piezoelement in order to increase its operative energy for improving a given mode damping. This paper presents simulation of a clamped plate with four piezoelectric elements implemented in the Matlab/SimulinkTM environment and SimscapeTM library. The various simulation cases show the relationship between the damping performance on a given targeted mode and the established power flow. SSDD and SSDT are two proposed original networks. Performances are compared to the SSDI baseline. A damping increase of 18dB can be obtained even with a weakly coupled piezoelectric element in the multi-sine excitation case. This result proves the importance of new global non-linear multi-actuator strategies for improved vibration damping of extended smart structure.

  13. Phase speed and frequency-dependent damping of longitudinal intensity oscillations in coronal loop structures observed with AIA/SDO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedini, A.

    2016-04-01

    Longitudinal intensity oscillations along coronal loops that are interpreted as signatures of magneto-acoustic waves are observed frequently in different coronal structures. The aim of this paper is to estimate the physical parameters of the slow waves and the quantitative dependence of these parameters on their frequencies in the solar corona loops that are situated above active regions with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). The observed data on 2012-Feb-12, consisting of 300 images with an interval of 24 seconds in the 171 Å and 193 Å passbands is analyzed for evidence of propagating features as slow waves along the loop structures. Signatures of longitudinal intensity oscillations that are damped rapidly as they travel along the loop structures were found, with periods in the range of a few minutes to few tens of minutes. Also, the projected (apparent) phase speeds, projected damping lengths, damping times and damping qualities of filtered intensities centred on the dominant frequencies are measured in the range of Cs ≃38-79 km s^{-1}, Ld≃ 23-68 Mm, τd≃7-21 min and τ_{d/P}≃0.34-0.77, respectively. The theoretical and observational results of this study indicate that the damping times and damping lengths increase with increasing the oscillation periods, and are highly sensitive function of oscillation period, but the projected speeds and the damping qualities are not very sensitive to the oscillation periods. Furthermore, the magnitude values of physical parameters are in good agreement with the prediction of the theoretical dispersion relations of high-frequency MHD waves (>1.1 mHz) in a coronal plasma with electron number density in the range of ne≃107-10^{12} cm^{-3}.

  14. Direct structural damping identification method using complex FRFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Vikas

    2015-03-01

    Most of the identification methods are based only on the viscous damping model and uses modal data. In this paper, a new FRF-based direct structural damping identification method is proposed. The proposed method is a direct method and identifies structural damping matrix explicitly. As the new method is a FRF-based method, it overcomes the problem of closely spaced modes for damping identification. The accuracy of identified structural damping matrix depends upon the accuracy of finite element model. In this paper, FRF-based model updating method is used to obtain accurate mass and stiffness matrices. Thus, the procedure to obtain accurate structural damping matrix is a two-step procedure. In the first step, mass and stiffness matrices are updated and in the second step, structural damping matrix is identified using updated mass and stiffness matrices, which are obtained in the previous step. The effectiveness of the new method is demonstrated by three numerical examples and one experimental example. The numerical studies of lumped mass system, fixed-fixed beam and L-shaped frame structure are carried out. The effects of coordinate incompleteness, ill-conditioning and robustness of method under presence of noise are investigated. The proposed method is able to predict FRFs accurately for the frequency range covering the modes considered. However, beyond the considered modes, the predicted FRFs do not match the experimental FRFs. It is suggested in this work that ill-conditioning problem should be dealt by considering all the modes in the frequency range of interest. The performance of the proposed method is investigated for cases of light, medium and heavily damped structures. The numerical studies are followed by experimental case study of cantilever beam structure. The effectiveness of the proposed method is evaluated by comparing the predicted and the experimental FRFs. The results have shown that the proposed method is able to predict accurately the

  15. Public health and economic impact of dampness and mold

    SciTech Connect

    Mudarri, David; Fisk, William J.

    2007-06-01

    The public health risk and economic impact of dampness and mold exposures was assessed using current asthma as a health endpoint. Individual risk of current asthma from exposure to dampness and mold in homes from Fisk et al. (2007), and asthma risks calculated from additional studies that reported the prevalence of dampness and mold in homes were used to estimate the proportion of U.S. current asthma cases that are attributable to dampness and mold exposure at 21% (95% confidence internal 12-29%). An examination of the literature covering dampness and mold in schools, offices, and institutional buildings, which is summarized in the appendix, suggests that risks from exposure in these buildings are similar to risks from exposures in homes. Of the 21.8 million people reported to have asthma in the U.S., approximately 4.6 (2.7-6.3) million cases are estimated to be attributable to dampness and mold exposure in the home. Estimates of the national cost of asthma from two prior studies were updated to 2004 and used to estimate the economic impact of dampness and mold exposures. By applying the attributable fraction to the updated national annual cost of asthma, the national annual cost of asthma that is attributable to dampness and mold exposure in the home is estimated to be $3.5 billion ($2.1-4.8 billion). Analysis indicates that exposure to dampness and mold in buildings poses significant public health and economic risks in the U.S. These findings are compatible with public policies and programs that help control moisture and mold in buildings.

  16. Investigation of empirical damping laws for the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, E. L.

    1973-01-01

    An analysis of dynamic test data from vibration testing of a number of aerospace vehicles was made to develop an empirical structural damping law. A systematic attempt was made to fit dissipated energy/cycle to combinations of all dynamic variables. The best-fit laws for bending, torsion, and longitudinal motion are given, with error bounds. A discussion and estimate are made of error sources. Programs are developed for predicting equivalent linear structural damping coefficients and finding the response of nonlinearly damped structures.

  17. Damping and support in high-temperature superconducting levitation systems

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.; McIver, Carl R.; Mittleider, John A.

    2009-12-15

    Methods and apparatuses to provide improved auxiliary damping for superconducting bearings in superconducting levitation systems are disclosed. In a superconducting bearing, a cryostat housing the superconductors is connected to a ground state with a combination of a damping strip of material, a set of linkage arms to provide vertical support, and spring washers to provide stiffness. Alternately, the superconducting bearing may be supported by a cryostat connected to a ground state by posts constructed from a mesh of fibers, with the damping and stiffness controlled by the fiber composition, size, and mesh geometry.

  18. Damping in coupled bending and torsion - An experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umland, Jeffrey W.; Inman, Daniel J.; Banks, H. T.

    1991-01-01

    Traditional experimental modal testing methods are used to determine the damping properties of a Euler-Bernoulli beam with offset inertial tip mass. Both viscous and strain rate damping models are considered in bending and in torsion. A partial differential equation model of the coupled system is used. Eigenfunctions are derived for the coupled system by using a Green's function approach to derive the approximate uncoupled eigenfunctions. These eigenfunctions are used in a decoupled fashion with experimental modal data to estimate the damping parameters of the coupled system. The experimental modal data were obtained from both free and impulse responses using a combined translational and rotational accelerometer.

  19. Nonlinear Landau damping of transverse electromagnetic waves in dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tsintsadze, N. L.; Chaudhary, Rozina; Shah, H. A.; Murtaza, G.

    2009-04-15

    High-frequency transverse electromagnetic waves in a collisionless isotropic dusty plasma damp via nonlinear Landau damping. Taking into account the latter we have obtained a generalized set of Zakharov equations with local and nonlocal terms. Then from this coupled set of Zakharov equations a kinetic nonlinear Schroedinger equation with local and nonlocal nonlinearities is derived for special cases. It is shown that the modulation of the amplitude of the electromagnetic waves leads to the modulation instability through the nonlinear Landau damping term. The maximum growth rate is obtained for the special case when the group velocity of electromagnetic waves is close to the dust acoustic velocity.

  20. Contaminant-induced mechanical damping in partially saturated Berea sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, W. M.; Spetzler, H. A.

    2002-08-01

    We have measured mechanical damping in partially saturated Berea sandstone that is strongly dependent on the presence of a small amount of oil. This effect is observed as a function of water saturation and average strain amplitude. These observations are presented as evidence of a damping mechanism previously observed and characterized in artificial cracks. We conclude that this damping effect is due to surface chemistry changes in the rock, and infer that seismic attenuation can be used to monitor small changes in pore fluid chemistry under certain conditions.