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Sample records for active nutrient uptake

  1. Microbial Enzyme Activity, Nutrient Uptake, and Nutrient Limitation in Forested Streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    We measured NH4 + and PO4 -3 uptake length (Sw), uptake velocity (Vf), uptake rate (U), biofilm enzyme activity (BEA), and channel geomorphology in streams draining forested catchments in the Northwestern (Northern California Coast Range and Cascade Mountains) and Southeastern (A...

  2. Effects of ammonium and nitrate on nutrient uptake and activity of nitrogen assimilating enzymes in western hemlock

    SciTech Connect

    Knoepp, J.D.; Turner, D.P.; Tingey, D.T.

    1993-01-01

    Western hemlock seedlings were grown in nutrient solutions with ammonium, nitrate or ammonium plus nitrate as nitrogen sources. The objectives were to examine (1) possible selectivity for ammonium or nitrate as an N source, (2) the maintenance of charge balance during ammonium and nitrate uptake, and (3) the activity of the nitrogen assimilating enzymes, nitrate reductase, glutamine synthetase, and glutamine dehydrogenase, in relation to the uptake of different nitrogen sources. The uptake studies revealed that western hemlock takes up ammonium faster than nitrate and that ammonium partially inhibits nitrate uptake. Nitrate reductase activity varied with nitrate availability in root tissue, but showed no response in needles, indicating that most nitrate is reduced in the roots. Results indicate that western hemlock may be adapted to sites where NH(4+) is the predominate N source.

  3. Estimation of stream nutrient uptake from nutrient addition experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Payn, Robert

    2005-09-01

    Nutrient uptake in streams is often quantified by determining nutrient uptake length. However, current methods for measuring nutrient uptake length are often impractical, expensive, or demonstrably incorrect. We have developed a new method to estimate ambient nutrient uptake lengths using field experiments involving several levels of nutrient addition. Data analysis involves plotting nutrient addition uptake lengths versus added concentration and extrapolating to the negative ambient concentration. This method is relatively easy, inexpensive, and based on sound theoretical development. It is more accurate than the commonly used method involving a single nutrient addition. The utility of the method is supported by field studies directly comparing our new method with isotopic tracer methods for determining uptake lengths of phosphorus, ammonium, and nitrate. Our method also provides parameters for comparing potential nutrient limitation among streams.

  4. Effects of nitrogen fertilization on soil nutrient concentration and phosphatase activity and forage nutrient uptake from a grazed pasture system.

    PubMed

    Dillard, Sandra Leanne; Wood, Charles Wesley; Wood, Brenda Hall; Feng, Yucheng; Owsley, Walter Frank; Muntifering, Russell Brian

    2015-05-01

    Over a 3-year period, the effect of differing N-application regimes on soil extractable-P concentration, soil phosphatase activity, and forage P uptake in a P-enriched grazed-pasture system was investigated. In the fall of each year, six 0.28-ha plots were overseeded with triticale ( × Triticosecale rimpaui Wittm.) and crimson clover (Trifolium incarnatum) into a tall fescue (Lolium arundinacea)/bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon) sod and assigned to 1 of 3 N-fertilizer treatments (n = 2): 100% of N recommendation in a split application (100N), 50% in a single application (50N), and 0% of N recommendation (0N) for triticale. Cattle commenced grazing the following spring and grazed until May. In the summer, plots were overseeded with cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), fertilized at the same rates by reference to N recommendations for bermudagrass, and grazed by cattle until September. There were no effects of N fertilization on soil phosphatase activity, electrical conductivity, or concentrations of water-soluble P. Concentrations of extractable P decreased in plots receiving 50N, but increasing N fertilization to 100N resulted in no further reduction in extractable P. Forage biomass, foliar P concentrations, and forage P mass were not affected by N fertilization rates at the plant-community level, but responses were observed within individual forage species. Results are interpreted to mean that N fertilization at 50% of the agronomic recommendation for the grass component can increase forage P mass of specific forages and decrease soil extractable P, thus providing opportunity for decreasing P losses from grazed pasture. PMID:25728918

  5. NUTRIENT-UPTAKE MODEL IN MARSH ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mechanistic models of nutrient dynamics in natural wetlands were developed and applied in a study of Kissimmee River (Florida) flood-plain marshes. The models describe hydrodynamics and transport diffusion in wetland basins and the ecological processes of nutrient uptake, convers...

  6. Does cluster-root activity benefit nutrient uptake and growth of co-existing species?

    PubMed

    Muler, Ana L; Oliveira, Rafael S; Lambers, Hans; Veneklaas, Erik J

    2014-01-01

    Species that inhabit phosphorus- (P) and micronutrient-impoverished soils typically have adaptations to enhance the acquisition of these nutrients, for example cluster roots in Proteaceae. However, there are several species co-occurring in the same environment that do not produce similar specialised roots. This study aims to investigate whether one of these species (Scholtzia involucrata) can benefit from the mobilisation of P or micronutrients by the cluster roots of co-occurring Banksia attenuata, and also to examine the response of B. attenuata to the presence of S. involucrata. We conducted a greenhouse experiment, using a replacement series design, where B. attenuata and S. involucrata shared a pot at proportions of 2:0, 1:2 and 0:4. S. involucrata plants grew more in length, were heavier and had higher manganese (Mn) concentrations in their young leaves when grown next to one individual of B. attenuata and one individual of S. involucrata than when grown with three conspecifics. All S. involucrata individuals were colonised by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, and possibly Rhizoctonia. Additionally, P concentration was higher in the young leaves of B. attenuata when grown with another B. attenuata than when grown with two individuals of S. involucrata, despite the smaller size of the S. involucrata individuals. Our results demonstrate that intraspecific competition was stronger than interspecific competition for S. involucrata, but not for B. attenuata. We conclude that cluster roots of B. attenuata facilitate the acquisition of nutrients by neighbouring shrubs by making P and Mn more available for their neighbours. PMID:23934064

  7. Effects of cerium oxide nanoparticles on soil enzymatic activities and wheat grass nutrients uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Biting; Chen, Yirui; Bai, Lingyun; Jacobson, Astrid; Darnault, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    The US National Science Foundation estimated that the use of nanomaterials and nanotechnology would reach a global market value of 1 million this year. Concomitant with the wide applications of nanoparticles is an increasing risk of adverse effects to the environment and human health. As a common nanomaterial used as a fuel catalyst and polish material, cerium (IV) oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NP) were tested for their potential impact on soil health and plant growth. Through exposure by air, water, and solid deposition, nanoparticles may accumulate in soils and impact agricultural systems. The objectives of this research were to determine whether CeO2 NPs affect the growth of wheat grass and selected soil enzyme activities chose as indicators of soil health. Wheat grass was grown in plant boxes containing CeO2 NPs mixed with agricultural soil at different concentrations. Two control groups were included: one consisting of soil with plants but no CeO2 NPs, and one containing only soil, i.e., no NP or wheat plants added. The plants were grown for 10 weeks and harvested every two weeks in a laboratory under sodium growth lights. At the end of the each growing period, two weeks, soils were assayed for phosphatase, β-glucosidase, and urease activities, and NPK values. Spectrophotometer analyses were used to assess enzyme activities, and NPK values were tested by Clemson Agricultural Center. Wheat yields were estimated by shoot and root lengths and weights.

  8. OXYGEN UPTAKE AND NUTRIENT REGENERATION IN THE PECONIC ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: OXYGEN UPTAKE AND NUTRIENT REGENERATION IN THE PECONIC ESTUARY Rates of oxygen consumption and nutrient regeneration were measured annually throughout the Peconic Estuarine System. Sediment and water column oxygen uptake were measured to determine the potential...

  9. Through form to function: root hair development and nutrient uptake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilroy, S.; Jones, D. L.

    2000-01-01

    Root hairs project from the surface of the root to aid nutrient and water uptake and to anchor the plant in the soil. Their formation involves the precise control of cell fate and localized cell growth. We are now beginning to unravel the complexities of the molecular interactions that underlie this developmental regulation. In addition, after years of speculation, nutrient transport by root hairs has been demonstrated clearly at the physiological and molecular level, with evidence for root hairs being intense sites of H(+)-ATPase activity and involved in the uptake of Ca(2+), K(+), NH(4)(+), NO(3)(-), Mn(2+), Zn(2+), Cl(-) and H(2)PO(4)(-).

  10. The Effect of Catchment Urbanization on Nutrient Uptake and Biofilm Enzyme Activity in Lake Superior (USA) Tributary Streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used landscape, habitat, and chemistry variables, along with nutrient spiraling metrics and biofilm extracellular enzyme activity (EEA), to assess the response of streams to the level of urbanization within their catchments. For this study nine streams of similar catchment are...

  11. Endocytotic uptake of nutrients in carnivorous plants.

    PubMed

    Adlassnig, Wolfram; Koller-Peroutka, Marianne; Bauer, Sonja; Koshkin, Edith; Lendl, Thomas; Lichtscheidl, Irene K

    2012-07-01

    Carnivorous plants trap, digest and absorb animals in order to supplement their mineral nutrition. Nutrients absorbed by the plant include different nitrogen species, phosphate, potassium, trace elements and small organic compounds. Uptake is usually thought to be performed via specific channels, but this study provides evidence that endocytosis is involved as well. Traps of the carnivorous plants Nepenthes coccinea, Nepenthes ventrata, Cephalotus follicularis, Drosophyllum lusitanicum, Drosera capensis, Dionaea muscipula, Aldrovanda vesiculosa, Genlisea violacea × lobata, Sarracenia psittacina and Sarracenia purpurea were stained with methylene blue in order to identify possible sites of uptake. The permeable parts of the traps were incubated with fluorescein isothiocyanate labelled bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) and other fluorescent endocytosis markers, combined with the soluble protein BSA or respiratory inhibitors. Uptake was studied by confocal microscopy. In Nepenthes, small fluorescent vesicles became visible 1 h after incubation with FITC-BSA. These vesicles fused to larger compartments within 30 h. A similar behaviour was found in the related genera Drosera, Dionaea, Aldrovanda and Drosophyllum but also in Cephalotus with glands of different evolutionary origin. In Genlisea and Sarracenia, no evidence for endocytosis was found. We propose that in many carnivorous plants, nutrient uptake by carriers is supplemented by endocytosis, which enables absorption and intracellular digestion of whole proteins. The advantage for the plant of reducing secretion of enzymes for extracellular digestion is evident. PMID:22417315

  12. NUTRIENT UPTAKE: A Microcomputer Program to Predict Nutrient Absorption from Soil by Roots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oates, Kenneth; Barber, S. A.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the use of a computer program designed to solve the mathematical model associated with soil nutrient uptake by plant roots and to predict the nutrient uptake. Describes a user-friendly personal computer version of this program. (TW)

  13. Mineral nutrient uptake from prey and glandular phosphatase activity as a dual test of carnivory in semi-desert plants with glandular leaves suspected of carnivory

    PubMed Central

    Płachno, Bartosz Jan; Adamec, Lubomír; Huet, Hervé

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Ibicella lutea and Proboscidea parviflora are two American semi-desert species of glandular sticky plants that are suspected of carnivory as they can catch small insects. The same characteristics might also hold for two semi-desert plants with glandular sticky leaves from Israel, namely Cleome droserifolia and Hyoscyamus desertorum. The presence of proteases on foliar hairs, either secreted by the plant or commensals, detected using a simple test, has long been considered proof of carnivory. However, this test does not prove whether nutrients are really absorbed from insects by the plant. To determine the extent to which these four species are potentially carnivorous, hair secretion of phosphatases and uptake of N, P, K and Mg from fruit flies as model prey were studied in these species and in Roridula gorgonias and Drosophyllum lusitanicum for comparison. All species examined possess morphological and anatomical adaptations (hairs or emergences secreting sticky substances) to catch and kill small insects. Methods The presence of phosphatases on foliar hairs was tested using the enzyme-labelled fluorescence method. Dead fruit flies were applied to glandular sticky leaves of experimental plants and, after 10–15 d, mineral nutrient content in their spent carcasses was compared with initial values in intact flies after mineralization. Key Results Phosphatase activity was totally absent on Hyoscyamus foliar hairs, a certain level of activity was usually found in Ibicella, Proboscidea and Cleome, and a strong response was found in Drosophyllum. Roridula exhibited only epidermal activity. However, only Roridula and Drosophyllum took up nutrients (N, P, K and Mg) from applied fruit flies. Conclusions Digestion of prey and absorption of their nutrients are the major features of carnivory in plants. Accordingly, Roridula and Drosophyllum appeared to be fully carnivorous; by contrast, all other species examined are non-carnivorous as they did not meet

  14. Nutrient uptake of peanut genotypes under different water regimes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drought is a serious environmental stress limiting growth and productivity in peanut and other crops. Nutrient uptake of peanut is reduced under drought conditions, which reduces yield. The objectives of this study were to investigate nutrient uptake of peanut genotypes in response to drought and ...

  15. EFFECTS OF AMMONIUM AND NITRATE ON NUTRIENT UPTAKE AND ACTIVITY OF NITROGEN ASSIMILATING ENZYMES IN WESTERN HEMLOCK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Western hemlock seedlings were grown in nutrient solutions with ammonium, nitrate or ammonium plus nitrate as nitrogen sources. he objectives were to examine (1) possible selectivity for ammonium or nitrate as an N source, (2) the maintenance of charge balance during ammonium and...

  16. Adaptability of growth and nutrient uptake potential of Chlorella sorokiniana with variable nutrient loading.

    PubMed

    Shriwastav, Amritanshu; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Ansari, Faiz Ahmad; Rawat, Ismail; Bux, Faizal

    2014-12-01

    Chlorella sorokiniana can sustain growth in conditions hostile to other species, and possesses good nutrient removal and lipid accumulation potentials. However, the effects of variable nutrient levels (N and P) in wastewaters on growth, productivity, and nutrient uptake by C. sorokiniana have not been studied in detail. This study demonstrates the ability of this alga to sustain uniform growth and productivity, while regulating the relative nutrient uptake in accordance to their availability in the bulk medium. These results highlight the potential of C. sorokiniana as a suitable candidate for fulfilling the coupled objectives of nutrient removal and biomass production for bio-fuel with wastewaters having great variability in nutrient levels. PMID:25463782

  17. Nutrient Uptake Changes in Ascorbate Free Radical-Stimulated Onion Roots.

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Reyes, J. A.; Hidalgo, A.; Caler, J. A.; Palos, R.; Navas, P.

    1994-01-01

    Long-term treatments with ascorbate free radical-stimulated glucose, fucose, sucrose, and nitrate uptake in Allium cepa roots. Glucose and fucose showed saturation kinetics in untreated roots, but after treatment with the ascorbate free radical, uptake was linear with time. Although the rates of nitrate and sucrose uptake increased after treatment with ascorbate free radical, the kinetics were similar to those observed in the controls. Ascorbate and dehydroascorbate inhibited nutrient uptake. The uptake rates for all nutrients increased throughout the 48-h period of pretreatment with ascorbate free radical. During the treatment an increase in the vacuole volume and tonoplast surface area also occurred. These results show the relationship between an increase in vacuolar volume and stimulated nutrient uptake from ascorbate-free radical, resulting in enhanced root elongation. These results suggest that activation of a transplasma membrane redox system by ascorbate-free radical is involved in these responses. PMID:12232078

  18. Nutrient uptake dynamics across a gradient of nutrient concentrations and ratios at the landscape scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Catherine A.; O'Reilly, Catherine M.; Conine, Andrea L.; Lipshutz, Sondra M.

    2015-02-01

    Understanding interactions between nutrient cycles is essential for recognizing and remediating human impacts on water quality, yet multielemental approaches to studying nutrient cycling in streams are currently rare. Here we utilized a relatively new approach (tracer additions for spiraling curve characterization) to examine uptake dynamics for three essential nutrients across a landscape that varied in absolute and relative nutrient availability. We measured nutrient uptake for soluble reactive phosphorous, ammonium-nitrogen, and nitrate-nitrogen in 16 headwater streams in the Catskill Mountains, New York. Across the landscape, ammonium-nitrogen and soluble reactive phosphorus had shorter uptake lengths and higher uptake velocities than nitrate-nitrogen. Ammonium-nitrogen and soluble reactive phosphorus uptake velocities were tightly correlated, and the slope of the relationship did not differ from one, suggesting strong demand for both nutrients despite the high ambient water column dissolved inorganic nitrogen: soluble reactive phosphorus ratios. Ammonium-nitrogen appeared to be the preferred form of nitrogen despite much higher nitrate-nitrogen concentrations. The uptake rate of nitrate-nitrogen was positively correlated with ambient soluble reactive phosphorus concentration and soluble reactive phosphorus areal uptake rate, suggesting that higher soluble reactive phosphorus concentrations alleviate phosphorus limitation and facilitate nitrate-nitrogen uptake. In addition, these streams retained a large proportion of soluble reactive phosphorus, ammonium-nitrogen, and nitrate-nitrogen supplied by the watershed, demonstrating that these streams are important landscape filters for nutrients. Together, these results (1) indicated phosphorus limitation across the landscape but similarly high demand for ammonium-nitrogen and (2) suggested that nitrate-nitrogen uptake was influenced by variability in soluble reactive phosphorus availability and preference for

  19. Efficient solution techniques for simulation nutrient uptake by plant roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abesha, Betiglu; Vanderborght, Jan; Javaux, Mathieu; Schnepf, Andrea; Vereecken, Harry

    2015-04-01

    Water and nutrient transfer to plant roots is determined by processes occurring from the single root to the entire root system. A mechanistic spatially distributed description of these processes would require a sub mm discretization which is computationally not feasible. In this contribution, we present efficient solution techniques to represent accurate nutrient uptake by plant roots. The first solution technique describes nutrient transport towards a single root segment using a 1-D radially axisymmetric model (Barber and Cushman 1981). Transport to the entire root system is represented by a network of connected cylindrical models around the roots. This network of cylinders was coupled to a 3-D regular grid that was used to solve the flow and transport equations in the soil at the root system scale (Javaux et al. 2008). The second technique was a modified time compression approximation (TCA), which can be a simple and reasonably accurate semi-analytical method for predicting cumulative nutrient uptake when the convection flux and diffusion coefficient change over time due to for instance soil drying. The analytical approach presented by Roose et al. (2001) to calculate solute cumulative uptake provides means to analyze cumulative nutrient uptake at a changing diffusive-convective flux over time but with constant convection and diffusion coefficient. This analytical solution was used in TCA framework to predict uptake when convection and diffusion coefficient change over time. We compared cumulative nutrient uptake by the 1D / 3D coupled model with results obtained by spatially highly resolved 3-D model and the approximate analytical solution of Roose et al. (2001). The good agreement between both model approaches allows the use of the 1D/3D coupling approach to simulate water and nutrient transport at the a root system scale with minimal computational cost and good accuracy. This approach also accounts for the effect of transpiration and soil drying on nutrient

  20. Mathematical modelling of plant water and nutrient uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roose, Tiina

    2010-05-01

    In this presentation I will describe a model of plant water and nutrient uptake and how to translate this model and experimental data from the single root scale to the root branching structure scale. The model starts at the single root scale and describes the water and nutrient movement in the soil using Richards' equation (water uptake) and diffusion-convection equation (nutrient uptake). The water and nutrient uptake in the single root scale model is represented by boundary conditions. In the case of nutrient uptake this has the form of a non-linear Michaelis-Menten uptake law and in the case of water this is given by a soil-xylem pressure difference boundary condition. The flow of water in the xylem is modeled as Poiseuille flow. We solve the single root scale models using the analytic approximate technique of asymptotic expansions similar to Oseen expansions known from fluid dynamics. We will then discuss how to use the analytic expression to estimate the water and nutrient uptake by growing root branching systems. We model the growth of the root system using a dynamic population model to describe the branching and elongation of roots in the branching system. This root branching population model results in a hyperbolic equation similar to age dependent population models and it can be solved fully analytically using the method of characteristics. Thus we have a fully analytic description of the root branching system evolution. We use this branching model to estimate the nutrient uptake in a scenario when the competition between subbranches is small, i.e., as it is in the case of phosphate, potassium and arsenic. We compare our approximate analytic model to a full 3d simulation of the root system phosphate uptake and find that the analytic model almost perfectly reproduces the 3d numerical model. In addition the analytic model can be included in larger field/catchment/climate scale models something which is not practically possible with the numerical simulations

  1. Optimizing Nutrient Uptake in Biological Transport Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronellenfitsch, Henrik; Katifori, Eleni

    2013-03-01

    Many biological systems employ complex networks of vascular tubes to facilitate transport of solute nutrients, examples include the vascular system of plants (phloem), some fungi, and the slime-mold Physarum. It is believed that such networks are optimized through evolution for carrying out their designated task. We propose a set of hydrodynamic governing equations for solute transport in a complex network, and obtain the optimal network architecture for various classes of optimizing functionals. We finally discuss the topological properties and statistical mechanics of the resulting complex networks, and examine correspondence of the obtained networks to those found in actual biological systems.

  2. The role of carbon in fungal nutrient uptake and transport

    PubMed Central

    Fellbaum, Carl R.; Mensah, Jerry A.; Pfeffer, Philip E.; Kiers, E. Toby; Bücking, Heike

    2012-01-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, which forms between plant hosts and ubiquitous soil fungi of the phylum Glomeromycota, plays a key role for the nutrient uptake of the majority of land plants, including many economically important crop species. AM fungi take up nutrients from the soil and exchange them for photosynthetically fixed carbon from the host. While our understanding of the exact mechanisms controlling carbon and nutrient exchange is still limited, we recently demonstrated that (i) carbon acts as an important trigger for fungal N uptake and transport, (ii) the fungus changes its strategy in response to an exogenous supply of carbon, and that (iii) both plants and fungi reciprocally reward resources to those partners providing more benefit. Here, we summarize recent research findings and discuss the implications of these results for fungal and plant control of resource exchange in the AM symbiosis. PMID:22990447

  3. Evaluating a 'biotic ligand model' applied to chloride-enhanced Cd uptake by Brassica juncea from nutrient solution at constant Cd2+ activity.

    PubMed

    López-Chuken, Ulrico J; Young, Scott D; Guzmán-Mar, Jorge L

    2010-03-01

    Evidence of chloride-enhanced cadmium uptake by plants in soil experiments has been reported. However, it is still unclear whether this finding is due to increased rates of Cd2+ diffusion to plant roots or the direct uptake of complexes such as CdC1+. A controlled hydroponic experiment was undertaken to distinguish and quantify the uptake rates of free and inorganic-complexed cadmium and to model the uptake of cadmium by Indian mustard plants with a 'biotic ligand model'. Plants were treated with NaCl (0 to 200 mM) including equivalent Na2SO4 treatments. Cadmium speciation in solution was calculated using the WHAM-VI model. Results of the current trials showed that higher Cl-concentrations in solution generally resulted in greater cadmium accumulation by plants than predicted by the Cd2+ activity. Activities of Cd-chloro complexes showed the best correlations with the cadmium concentrations in the plants compared with the activity of Cd2+. The biotic ligand model showed a reasonable good fit for the plants when assuming competition by Cd2+ and CdCl+ for sorption sites at root level. The relative values of the two reaction constants suggest that root affinity for Cd2+ is 3.4 times greater than for CdCl+. Nevertheless this clearly indicates a substantial role for chloro-complexed cadmium accumulation. PMID:20426272

  4. Solution culture method for studying nutrient uptake and stress

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, L.E.; Gutschick, V.P.

    1984-01-01

    In order to study the uptake of two (or more) different mineral nutrients at very low concentrations, a solution culture system with new capabilities was developed. It allows tight control of nutrient concentrations of very low levels, accurate uptake rate measurements, and frequent non-destructive measurements of plant mass and dimensions. The hydroponic system includes (1) a water-deionizing system, (2) an automated mixing system that can provide up to 3000 liters/day of the base solution containing the non-varied nutrients; (3) seven separate reciprocating syringe pumps, each of which mixes base solution and concentrates of the two varied nutrients and supplies an entire set of plants for one nutritional treatment; (4) growth pots, consisting of 2-liter plastic beakers divided internally into three separate compartments, each provided with a separate nutrient inflow, drain, and aerator/mixer. This once-through (non-recirculating) flow system is constructed entirely of plastics and lesser amounts of other materials in order to minimize chemical contamination. Numerous other advantages are discussed. 3 references, 1 table.

  5. Nutrient uptake by protocells: a liposome model system.

    PubMed

    Monnard, P A; Deamer, D W

    2001-01-01

    Over the past decade, several liposome-based models for protocells have been developed. For example, liposome systems composed of polymerase enzymes encapsulated with their substrates have demonstrated that complex compartmentalized reactions can be carried out under conditions in which polymeric products are protected from degradation by hydrolytic enzymes present in the external medium. However, such systems do not have nutrient uptake mechanisms, which would be essential for primitive cells lacking the highly evolved nutrient transport processes present in all contemporary cells. In this report, we explore passive diffusion of solutes across lipid bilayers as one possible uptake mechanism. We have established conditions under which ionic substrates as large as ATP can permeate bilayers at rates capable of supplying an encapsulated template-dependent RNA polymerase. Furthermore, while allowing the permeation of monomer substrates such as ATP, bilayer vesicles selectively retained polymerization products as small as dimers and as large as a transfer RNA. These observations demonstrate that passive diffusion could be used by the earliest forms of cellular life for transport of important nutrients such as amino acids, phosphate, and phosphorylated organic solutes. PMID:11296517

  6. Nutrient Uptake by Protocells: A Liposome Model System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnard, Pierre-Alain; Deamer, David W.

    2001-02-01

    Over the past decade, several liposome-based models for protocells have been developed. For example, liposome systems composed of polymerase enzymes encapsulated with their substrates have demonstrated that complex compartmentalized reactions can be carried out under conditions in which polymeric products are protected from degradation by hydrolytic enzymes present in the external medium. However, such systems do not have nutrient uptake mechanisms, which would be essential for primitive cells lacking the highly evolved nutrient transport processes present in all contemporary cells. In this report, we explore passive diffusion of solutes across lipid bilayers as one possible uptake mechanism. We have established conditions under which ionic substrates as large as ATP can permeate bilayers at rates capable of supplying an encapsulated template-dependent RNA polymerase. Furthermore, while allowing the permeation of monomer substrates such as ATP, bilayer vesicles selectively retained polymerization products as small as dimers and as large as a transfer RNA. These observations demonstrate that passive diffusion could be used by the earliest forms of cellular life for transport of important nutrients such as amino acids, phosphate, and phosphorylated organic solutes.

  7. Uptake of perfluorinated compounds by plants grown in nutrient solution.

    PubMed

    García-Valcárcel, A I; Molero, E; Escorial, M C; Chueca, M C; Tadeo, J L

    2014-02-15

    The uptake rates of three perfluorinated carboxylates and three perfluorinated sufonates by a grass (B diandrus) grown in nutrient solution at two different perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) concentrations were assessed. Grass can be ingested by grazing animals causing the PFCs to enter the food chain, which is a pathway of human exposure to these compounds. A rapid and miniaturized method was developed to determine PFCs in plants, based on a matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) extraction procedure followed by quantitation by HPLC-MS/MS with an MQL in the range from 1 to 9 ng/g. An increase of PFCs levels in plant was observed along the exposure time. Differences in uptake for studied perfluorinated carboxylates were found, showing a decrease with carbon chain length (from 3027 to 1,167 ng/g at the end of assay), whereas no significant differences in absorption were obtained between perfluorinated sulfonates (about 1,700 ng/g). Initially, higher PFC transfer factors (ratio between concentration in plant and concentration in initial nutrient solution) were obtained for plants growing in the nutrient solution at the highest PFC concentration, but these factors became similar with time to plants exposed to the lowest concentration. PMID:24291554

  8. Transporters involved in mineral nutrient uptake in rice.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Akimasa; Yamaji, Naoki; Ma, Jian Feng

    2016-06-01

    One of the most important roles of plant roots is to take up essential mineral nutrients from the soil for use in plant growth and development. The uptake of mineral elements is mediated by various transporters belonging to different transporter families. Here we reviewed transporters for the uptake of macronutrients and micronutrients identified in rice, an important staple food for half of the world's population. Rice roots are characterized by having two Casparian strips on the exodermis and endodermis and by the formation of aerenchyma in the mature root zone. This distinct anatomical structure dictates that a pair of influx and efflux transporters at both the exodermis and endodermis is required for the radial transport of a mineral element from the soil solution to the stele. Some transporters showing polar localization at the distal and proximal sides of the exodermis and endodermis have been identified for silicon and manganese, forming an efficient uptake system. However, transporters for the uptake of most mineral elements remain to be identified. PMID:26931170

  9. The relationship between light intensity and nutrient uptake kinetics in six freshwater diatoms.

    PubMed

    Shi, Pengling; Shen, Hong; Wang, Wenjing; Chen, Wenjie; Xie, Ping

    2015-08-01

    In order to find effective measures to control diatom blooms, a better understanding of the physiological characteristics of nutrient uptake in diatoms is needed. A study of P and Si-uptake kinetics for diatom species from two light regimes was conducted at low (LL), moderate (ML) and high light intensities (HL) (2, 25 and 80 μmol photons/(m(2)·sec)), respectively. The results showed that P uptake of diatoms was heavily influenced by historic light regimes. P affinity changed with growth and photosynthetic activity. The lowest half saturation constant for P uptake (Km(P)) was under HL for high-light adapted diatoms while the lowest half-saturation constant for low-light adapted diatoms was observed under LL. The Si half-saturation constant (Km(Si)) increased with increasing light intensities for pennate diatoms but decreased for centric diatoms. Diatom volumes were correlated with the maximum Si uptake rates (Vm(Si)) at HL and Km(Si) at ML and HL for six diatom species. Our results imply that when we assess the development of diatom blooms we should consider light intensity and cell volume in addition to ambient Si or P concentration. The relationship between light intensity and P-uptake suggests that we can find suitable methods to control diatom blooms on the basis of reducing phytoplankton activity of P-uptake and photosynthesis simultaneously. PMID:26257343

  10. Hydrologic and biologic influences on stream network nutrient concentrations: Interactions of hydrologic turnover and concentration-dependent nutrient uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallard, John; McGlynn, Brian; Covino, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Stream networks lie in a crucial landscape position between terrestrial ecosystems and downstream water bodies. As such, whether inferring terrestrial watershed processes from watershed outlet nutrient signals or predicting the effect of observed terrestrial processes on stream nutrient signals, it is requisite to understand how stream networks can modulate terrestrial nutrient inputs. To date integrated understanding and modeling of physical and biological influences on nutrient concentrations at the stream network scale have been limited. However, watershed scale groundwater ‑ surface water exchange (hydrologic turnover), concentration-variable biological uptake, and the interaction between the two can strongly modify stream water nutrient concentrations. Stream water and associated nutrients are lost to and replaced from groundwater with distinct nutrient concentrations while in-stream nutrients can also be retained by biological processes at rates that vary with concentration. We developed an empirically based network scale model to simulate the interaction between hydrologic turnover and concentration-dependent nutrient uptake across stream networks. Exchange and uptake parameters were measured using conservative and nutrient tracer addition experiments in the Bull Trout Watershed, central Idaho. We found that the interaction of hydrologic turnover and concentration-dependent uptake combined to modify and subsequently stabilize in-stream concentrations, with specific concentrations dependent on the magnitude of hydrologic turnover, groundwater concentrations, and the shape of nutrient uptake kinetic curves. We additionally found that by varying these physical and biological parameters within measured ranges we were able to generate a spectrum of stream network concentration distributions representing a continuum of shifting magnitudes of physical and biological influences on in-stream concentrations. These findings elucidate the important and variable role

  11. Hydrologic and biologic influences on stream network nutrient concentrations: Interactions of hydrologic turnover and concentration-dependent nutrient uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallard, J. M.; McGlynn, B. L.; Covino, T. P.; Bergstrom, A.

    2012-12-01

    Stream networks lie in a crucial landscape position between terrestrial ecosystems and downstream water bodies. As such, whether inferring terrestrial watershed processes from watershed outlet nutrient signals or predicting the effect of observed terrestrial processes on stream nutrient signals, it is requisite to understand how stream networks can modulate terrestrial nutrient inputs. To date integrated understanding and modeling of physical and biological influences on nutrient concentrations at the stream network scale have been limited. However, watershed scale groundwater - surface water exchange (hydrologic turnover), concentration-variable biological uptake, and the interaction between the two can strongly modify stream water nutrient concentrations. Stream water and associated nutrients are lost to and replaced from groundwater with a distinct nutrient concentrations while in-stream nutrients can also be retained by biological processes at rates that vary with concentration. We developed an empirically based network scale model to simulate the interaction between hydrologic turnover and concentration-dependent nutrient uptake across stream networks. Exchange and uptake parameters were measured using conservative and nutrient tracer addition experiments in the Bull Trout Watershed, central Idaho. We found that the interaction of hydrologic turnover and concentration-dependent uptake combined to modify and subsequently stabilize in-stream concentrations, with specific concentrations dependent on the magnitude of hydrologic turnover, groundwater concentrations, and the shape of nutrient uptake kinetic curves. We additionally found that by varying these physical and biological parameters within measured ranges we were able to generate a spectrum of stream network concentration distributions representing a continuum of shifting magnitudes of physical and biological influences on in-stream concentrations. These findings elucidate the important and variable role

  12. Genetic variation for root architecture, nutrient uptake and mycorrhizal colonisation in Medicago truncatula accessions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sustainable agriculture strives for healthy, high yielding plants with minimal agronomic inputs. Genetic solutions to increase nutrient uptake are desirable because they provide ongoing improvements. To achieve this it is necessary to identify genes involved in uptake and translocation of nutrients....

  13. Influence of cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide on nutrient uptake and cell responses of Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhijie; Ge, Fei; Zeng, Hui; Xu, Yin; Peng, Fang; Wong, Minghung

    2013-08-15

    The removal of nutrients by algae is regarded as a vital process in wastewater treatment, however algal cell activity can be inhibited by some toxic chemicals during the biological process. This study investigated the uptake of ammonia nitrogen (NH₄⁺) and total phosphorus (TP) by a green alga (Chlorella vulgaris) and algal cell responses under the stress of cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), a representative for quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs, cationic surfactants). When the concentration of CTAB increased from 0 to 0.6 mg/L, the uptake efficiencies of NH₄⁺ and TP decreased from 88% to 18% and from 96% to 15%, respectively. Algal cell responses showed a decline in photosynthesis activity as indicated by the increase of chlorophyll autofluorescence from 2.9 a.u. to 25.3 a.u.; and a decrease of cell viability from 88% to 51%; and also a drop in esterase activity as indicated by the decrease in fluorescence of fluorescein diacetate stained cells from 71.5 a.u. to 4.7 a.u. Additionally, a transcription and translation response was confirmed by an enhancement of PO peak and amide II peak in algal cellular macromolecular composition stimulated by CTAB. The results suggest that QACs in wastewater may inhibit nutrient uptake by algae significantly through declining algal cell activities. PMID:23721850

  14. One-time tillage of no-till: Effects on nutrients, mycorrhizae, and phosphorus uptake

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stratification of nutrient availability, especially of P, that develops with continuous no-till (NT) can affect runoff nutrient concentration and possibly nutrient uptake. The effects of composted manure application and one-time tillage of NT on the distribution of soil chemical properties, root co...

  15. A novel nanoparticle approach for imaging nutrient uptake by soil bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, S. L.; Whiteside, M. D.; Sholto-Douglas, D.; Antonopoulos, D. A.; Boyanov, M.; Durall, D. M.; Jones, M. D.; Lai, B.; O'Loughlin, E. J.; Kemner, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    The metabolic activities of soil microbes are the primary drivers of biogeochemical processes controlling the terrestrial carbon cycle, nutrient availability to plants, contaminant remediation, water quality, and other ecosystem services. However, we have a limited understanding of microbial metabolic processes such as nutrient uptake rates, substrate preferences, or how microbes and microbial metabolism are distributed throughout their habitat. Here we use a novel imaging technique with quantum dots (QDs, engineered semiconductor nanoparticles that produce size or composition-dependent fluorescence) to measure bacterial uptake of substrates of varying complexity. Cultures of two organisms differing in cell wall structure — Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas fluorescens — were grown in one of four ecologically relevant experimental conditions: nitrogen (N) limitation, phosphorus (P) limitation, N and P limitation, or no nutrient limitation. The cultures were then exposed to QDs with and without organic nutrients attached. X-ray fluorescence imaging was performed at 2ID-D at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) to determine the elemental distributions within both planktonic and surface-adhered (i.e, biofilms) cells. Uptake of unconjugated QDs was neglibible, and QDs conjugated to organic substrates varied depending on growth conditions and substrate, suggesting that they are a useful indicator of bacterial ecology. Cellular uptake was similar for the two bacterial species (2212 ± 273 nanoparticles per cm3 of cell volume for B. subtilis and 1682 ± 264 for P. fluorescens). On average, QD assimilation was six times greater when N or P was limiting, and cells took up about twice as much phosphoserine compared to other substrates, likely because it was the only compound providing both N and P. These results showed that regardless of their cell wall structure, bacteria can selectively take up quantifiable levels of QDs based on substrate and environmental conditions. APS

  16. Nutrient cycling in a tropical seasonal rain forest of Xishuangbanna, Southwest China. Part 1: tree species: nutrient distribution and uptake.

    PubMed

    Shanmughavel, P; Sha, L; Zheng, Z; Cao, M

    2001-12-01

    Tropical rain forests are characterized by large numbers of the species with diverse growth habits. The objective of the present study was to determine the distribution of nutrient content in the major trees of the tropical rain forests in Xishuangbanna. This will improve the understanding of the nutrient losses from such sites that result from harvesting and flow of nutrients within the ecosystem and lead to the development of effective and rational forest management strategies. Based on the results in this study, the distribution of nutrients among biomass components of trees varied: The ordering of major elements concentrations was K > N > Mg > Ca > P in branch, stem and root tissues but was N > K > Mg > Ca > P in leaves. The maximum amount of all nutrients per ha occurred in the stems followed by branches, roots and leaves. Of the total uptake of 6167.7 kg ha(-1) of all nutrients, the contribution of various nutrients was found to be N (2010.6 t ha(-1)), P (196.3 t ha(-1)), K (2123.8 kg ha(-1)), Ca (832 kg ha(-1)) and Mg (1005 kg ha(-1)). However, comparing the nutrient uptake of other tropical and sub tropical forests, the results indicated that rates for the Xishuangbanna forests were 20-35% lower than previously reported values. PMID:11601539

  17. Phytoplankton productivity, respiration, and nutrient uptake and regeneration in the Potomac River, August 1977 - August 1978

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, B.E.; Harmon, D.D.

    1981-01-01

    Rates of phytoplankton productivity, respiration, and nutrient uptake and regeneration are presented. These observations were made on the Potomac River estuary (POTE) during four cruises between August 1977 and August 1978. Four experimental methods were used: carbon uptake using carbon-14, carbon uptake and respiration by a pH method, productivity and respiration by the dissolved oxygen method, and nutrient (NH4+, NO3-, NO2-, PO4=, and SiO2=) uptake and regeneration by colorimetry. The experiments were made at sites representative of conditions in four principal reaches of the tidal Potomac River estuary: near the mouth, seaward of the summer nutrient and phytoplankton maximum, near the region of maximum phytoplankton standing stock , and near the maximum anthropogenic nutrient source. (USGS)

  18. Effect of Nutrient/Carbon Supplements on Biological Phosphate and Nitrate Uptake by Protozoan Isolates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akpor, O. B.; Momba, M. N. B.; Okonkwo, J.

    This study was aimed at investigating the effect of nine different nutrient/carbon supplements in mixed liquor on nutrient uptake ability of three wastewater protozoan isolates, which have previously been screened for phosphate and nitrate uptake efficiency. The results revealed that over 50% of phosphate was removed in the presence of sodium acetate, glucose or sucrose. Similarly, nitrate uptake of over 60% was observed in the presence of sodium acetate, sodium succinate, glucose or sucrose. These trends were common in all the isolates. Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) removal in the mixed liquor was only found to be significantly removed in mixed liquors that were supplemented with glucose, sucrose or sodium succinate. In the presence of sodium acetate, COD was observed to increase. The findings of this investigation have revealed that nutrient uptake and COD removal by the test protozoan isolates may be dependent primarily on the initial nutrient supplement in mixed liquor.

  19. Diversification and conservation of the extraembryonic tissues in mediating nutrient uptake during amniote development

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Guojun; Foley, Ann C

    2012-01-01

    The transfer of nutrients from the mother through the chorioallantoic placenta meets the nutritional needs of the embryo during human prenatal development. Although all amniotes start with a similar “tool kit” of extraembryonic tissues, an enormous diversity of extraembryonic tissue formation has evolved to accommodate embryological and physiological constraints unique to their developmental programs. A comparative knowledge of these extraembryonic tissues and their role in nutrient uptake during development is required to fully appreciate the adaptive changes in placental mammals. Here, we offer a comparative embryological perspective and propose that there are three conserved nutrient transfer routes among the amniotes. We highlight the importance of the yolk sac endoderm, thought to be a vestigial remnant of our amniote lineage, in mediating nutrient uptake during early human development. We also draw attention to the similarity between yolk sac endoderm-mediated and trophectoderm-mediated nutrient uptake. PMID:23050970

  20. Nematodes enhance plant growth and nutrient uptake under C and N-rich conditions.

    PubMed

    Gebremikael, Mesfin T; Steel, Hanne; Buchan, David; Bert, Wim; De Neve, Stefaan

    2016-01-01

    The role of soil fauna in crucial ecosystem services such as nutrient cycling remains poorly quantified, mainly because of the overly reductionistic approach adopted in most experimental studies. Given that increasing nitrogen inputs in various ecosystems influence the structure and functioning of soil microbes and the activity of fauna, we aimed to quantify the role of the entire soil nematode community in nutrient mineralization in an experimental set-up emulating nutrient-rich field conditions and accounting for crucial interactions amongst the soil microbial communities and plants. To this end, we reconstructed a complex soil foodweb in mesocosms that comprised largely undisturbed native microflora and the entire nematode community added into defaunated soil, planted with Lolium perenne as a model plant, and amended with fresh grass-clover residues. We determined N and P availability and plant uptake, plant biomass and abundance and structure of the microbial and nematode communities during a three-month incubation. The presence of nematodes significantly increased plant biomass production (+9%), net N (+25%) and net P (+23%) availability compared to their absence, demonstrating that nematodes link below- and above-ground processes, primarily through increasing nutrient availability. The experimental set-up presented allows to realistically quantify the crucial ecosystem services provided by the soil biota. PMID:27605154

  1. Nematodes enhance plant growth and nutrient uptake under C and N-rich conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gebremikael, Mesfin T.; Steel, Hanne; Buchan, David; Bert, Wim; De Neve, Stefaan

    2016-01-01

    The role of soil fauna in crucial ecosystem services such as nutrient cycling remains poorly quantified, mainly because of the overly reductionistic approach adopted in most experimental studies. Given that increasing nitrogen inputs in various ecosystems influence the structure and functioning of soil microbes and the activity of fauna, we aimed to quantify the role of the entire soil nematode community in nutrient mineralization in an experimental set-up emulating nutrient-rich field conditions and accounting for crucial interactions amongst the soil microbial communities and plants. To this end, we reconstructed a complex soil foodweb in mesocosms that comprised largely undisturbed native microflora and the entire nematode community added into defaunated soil, planted with Lolium perenne as a model plant, and amended with fresh grass-clover residues. We determined N and P availability and plant uptake, plant biomass and abundance and structure of the microbial and nematode communities during a three-month incubation. The presence of nematodes significantly increased plant biomass production (+9%), net N (+25%) and net P (+23%) availability compared to their absence, demonstrating that nematodes link below- and above-ground processes, primarily through increasing nutrient availability. The experimental set-up presented allows to realistically quantify the crucial ecosystem services provided by the soil biota. PMID:27605154

  2. Uptake of Pharmaceuticals Influences Plant Development and Affects Nutrient and Hormone Homeostases.

    PubMed

    Carter, Laura J; Williams, Mike; Böttcher, Christine; Kookana, Rai S

    2015-10-20

    The detection of a range of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) in the soil environment has led to a number of publications demonstrating uptake by crops, however very few studies have explored the potential for impacts on plant development as a result of API uptake. This study investigated the effect of carbamazepine and verapamil (0.005-10 mg/kg) on a range of plant responses in zucchini (Cucurbita pepo). Uptake increased in a dose-dependent manner, with maximum leaf concentrations of 821.9 and 2.2 mg/kg for carbamazepine and verapamil, respectively. Increased carbamazepine uptake by zucchini resulted in a decrease in above (<60%) and below (<30%) ground biomass compared to the controls (p < 0.05). At soil concentrations >4 mg/kg the mature leaves suffered from burnt edges and white spots as well as a reduction in photosynthetic pigments but no such effects were seen for verapamil. For both APIs, further investigations revealed significant differences in the concentrations of selected plant hormones (auxins, cytokinins, abscisic acid and jasmonates), and in the nutrient composition of the leaves in comparison to the controls (p < 0.05). This is some of the first research to demonstrate that the exposure of plants to APIs is likely to cause impacts on plant development with unknown implications. PMID:26418514

  3. N/P ratio of nutrient uptake in the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Z.; Jonasson, L.; Bi, H.

    2011-06-01

    The N/P ratio of nutrient uptake, i.e., the ratio of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) to dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) taken by primary producers, varies in different basins and in different seasons in the Baltic Sea. The N/P ratio of nutrient alteration fore and after spring blooms is not same as the N/P ratio of nutrient uptake, but the former can be regarded as an indicator for the later in the Baltic Sea. Based on the observed N/P ratio of nutrient alteration, we hypothesize a non-Redfield N/P ratio of nutrient uptake. The 3D-ecosystem model ERGOM coupled with the circulation model DMI-BSHcmod was used to test the hypothesis. When the Redfield ratio was used in the model, the DIP surplus after spring blooms was too high and resulted in the overly growth of cyanobacteria and too much nitrogen fixation. When the non-Redfield ratio was used in the model, the corresponding problem tended to disappear. In summary, we show that: (1) the Redfield N/P ratio of nutrient uptake in the Baltic Sea tends to be too high; (2) a lower N/P ratio 10:1 appears to work better than the Redfield value; and (3) the N/P ratio of nutrient uptake in the Baltic Proper during spring blooms is around 6:1.

  4. INTERREGIONAL COMPARISON OF NUTRIENT UPTAKE RATES IN MANAGED AND OLD-GROWTH WATERSHEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compared nutrient uptake rates to examine the effect of timber harvest on streams. From 1999-2002, nutrient additions were conducted in 50 stream reaches in 4 ecoregions (southern Blue Ridge, NC, Ouachita Mountains, AR, Cascade Mountains, OR, and the redwood forests of the Co...

  5. Nitrogen Availability Alters Nutrient Uptake and Demand in Deciduous and Evergreen Container-Grown Rhododendron

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One-year-old rhododendron (Rhododendron 'H-1 P.J.M.') and azalea (Rhododendron 'Cannon's Double') were grown with (+N) or without (N-deficient) N from May to September to determine the effects of N-availability on uptake, demand, and allocation of other nutrients. A 7-fold increase in N uptake by rh...

  6. NPKS uptake, sensing, and signaling and miRNAs in plant nutrient stress.

    PubMed

    Nath, Manoj; Tuteja, Narendra

    2016-05-01

    Sessile nature of higher plants consequently makes it highly adaptable for nutrient absorption and acquisition from soil. Plants require 17 essential elements for their growth and development which include 14 minerals (macronutrients: N, P, K, Mg, Ca, S; micronutrients: Cl, Fe, B, Mn, Zn, Cu, Ni, Mo) and 3 non-mineral (C, H, O) elements. The roots of higher plants must acquire these macronutrients and micronutrients from rhizosphere and further allocate to other plant parts for completing their life cycle. Plants evolved an intricate series of signaling and sensing cascades to maintain nutrient homeostasis and to cope with nutrient stress/availability. The specific receptors for nutrients in root, root system architecture, and internal signaling pathways help to develop plasticity in response to the nutrient starvation. Nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), potassium (K), and sulfur (S) are essential for various metabolic processes, and their deficiency negatively effects the plant growth and yield. Genes coding for transporters and receptors for nutrients as well as some small non-coding RNAs have been implicated in nutrient uptake and signaling. This review summarizes the N, P, K, and S uptake, sensing and signaling events in nutrient stress condition especially in model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and involvement of microRNAs in nutrient deficiency. This article also provides a framework of uptake, sensing, signaling and to highlight the microRNA as an emerging major players in nutrient stress condition. Nutrient-plant-miRNA cross talk may help plant to cope up nutrient stress, and understanding their precise mechanism(s) will be necessary to develop high yielding smart crop with low nutrient input. PMID:26085375

  7. Calcification generates protons for nutrient and bicarbonate uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnaughey, T. A.; Whelan, J. F.

    1997-03-01

    The biosphere's great carbonate deposits, from caliche soils to deep-sea carbonate oozes, precipitate largely as by-products of autotrophic nutrient acquisition physiologies. Protons constitute the critical link: Calcification generates protons, which plants and photosynthetic symbioses use to assimilate bicarbonate and nutrients. A calcium ATPase-based "trans" mechanism underlies most biological calcification. This permits high calcium carbonate supersaturations and rapid carbonate precipitation. The competitive advantages of calcification become especially apparent in light and nutrient-deficient alkaline environments. Calcareous plants often dominate the lower euphotic zone in both the benthos and the plankton. Geographically and seasonally, massive calcification concentrates in nutrient-deficient environments including alkaline soils, coral reefs, cyanobacterial mats and coccolithophorid blooms. Structural and defensive uses for calcareous skeletons are sometimes overrated.

  8. Astrocytic Insulin Signaling Couples Brain Glucose Uptake with Nutrient Availability.

    PubMed

    García-Cáceres, Cristina; Quarta, Carmelo; Varela, Luis; Gao, Yuanqing; Gruber, Tim; Legutko, Beata; Jastroch, Martin; Johansson, Pia; Ninkovic, Jovica; Yi, Chun-Xia; Le Thuc, Ophelia; Szigeti-Buck, Klara; Cai, Weikang; Meyer, Carola W; Pfluger, Paul T; Fernandez, Ana M; Luquet, Serge; Woods, Stephen C; Torres-Alemán, Ignacio; Kahn, C Ronald; Götz, Magdalena; Horvath, Tamas L; Tschöp, Matthias H

    2016-08-11

    We report that astrocytic insulin signaling co-regulates hypothalamic glucose sensing and systemic glucose metabolism. Postnatal ablation of insulin receptors (IRs) in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-expressing cells affects hypothalamic astrocyte morphology, mitochondrial function, and circuit connectivity. Accordingly, astrocytic IR ablation reduces glucose-induced activation of hypothalamic pro-opio-melanocortin (POMC) neurons and impairs physiological responses to changes in glucose availability. Hypothalamus-specific knockout of astrocytic IRs, as well as postnatal ablation by targeting glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST)-expressing cells, replicates such alterations. A normal response to altering directly CNS glucose levels in mice lacking astrocytic IRs indicates a role in glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). This was confirmed in vivo in GFAP-IR KO mice by using positron emission tomography and glucose monitoring in cerebral spinal fluid. We conclude that insulin signaling in hypothalamic astrocytes co-controls CNS glucose sensing and systemic glucose metabolism via regulation of glucose uptake across the BBB. PMID:27518562

  9. Cation uptake and allocation by red pine seedlings under cation-nutrient stress in a column growth experiment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background and aims: Plant nutrient uptake is affected by environmental stress, but how plants respond to cation nutrient stress is poorly understood. We assessed the impact of varying degrees of cation-nutrient stress on cation uptake in an experimental plant-mineral system. Methods: Column experim...

  10. Strategies for optimization of mineral nutrient transport in plants: multilevel regulation of nutrient-dependent dynamics of root architecture and transporter activity.

    PubMed

    Aibara, Izumi; Miwa, Kyoko

    2014-12-01

    How do sessile plants cope with irregularities in soil nutrient availability? The uptake of essential minerals from the soil influences plant growth and development. However, most environments do not provide sufficient nutrients; rather nutrient distribution in the soil can be uneven and change temporally according to environmental factors. To maintain mineral nutrient homeostasis in their tissues, plants have evolved sophisticated systems for coping with spatial and temporal variability in soil nutrient concentrations. Among these are mechanisms for modulating root system architecture in response to nutrient availability. This review discusses recent advances in knowledge of the two important strategies for optimizing nutrient uptake and translocation in plants: root architecture modification and transporter expression control in response to nutrient availability. Recent studies have determined (i) nutrient-specific root patterns; (ii) their physiological consequences; and (iii) the molecular mechanisms underlying these modulation systems that operate to facilitate efficient nutrient acquisition. Another mechanism employed by plants in nutrient-heterogeneous soils involves modification of nutrient transport activities in a nutrient concentration-dependent manner. In recent years, considerable progress has been made in characterizing the diverse functions of transporters for specific nutrients; it is now clear that the expression and activities of nutrient transporters are finely regulated in multiple steps at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels for adaptation to a wide range of nutrient conditions. PMID:25378690

  11. Effect of flexor sheath integrity on nutrient uptake by chicken flexor tendons

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, W.W.; Manske, P.R.; Lesker, P.A.

    1985-12-01

    The effect of varying degrees of flexor sheath integrity (sheath excised, incised, or incised and repaired) on the uptake of /sub 2/H-proline by chicken flexor tendons in Zone II was studied. The tendons were either: normal and uninjured, lacerated and repaired, or uninjured except for vinculum longum ligation. Different degrees of sheath integrity did not influence the uptake of /sub 2/H-proline by the tendons. The tendon does not appear to be dependent on a synovial environment for nutrients and is capable of obtaining these nutrients by diffusion from the surrounding extracellular tissue fluid. Diffusion is the primary nutrient pathway to the flexor tendon in this area, because removing its major vascular attachment (i.e., the vinculum longum) did not effect proline uptake. Careful closure of the sheath with restoration of a synovial environment does not appear to be necessary for tendon nutrition.

  12. Discontinuities in stream nutrient uptake below lakes in mountain drainage networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arp, C.D.; Baker, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    In many watersheds, lakes and streams are hydrologically linked in spatial patterns that influence material transport and retention. We hypothesized that lakes affect stream nutrient cycling via modifications to stream hydrogeomorphology, source-waters, and biological communities. We tested this hypothesis in a lake district of the Sawtooth Mountains, Idaho. Uptake of NO3- and PO4-3 was compared among 25 reaches representing the following landscape positions: lake inlets and outlets, reaches >1-km downstream from lakes, and reference reaches with no nearby lakes. We quantified landscape-scale hydrographic and reach-scale hydrogeomorphic, source-water, and biological variables to characterize these landscape positions and analyze relationships to nutrient uptake. Nitrate uptake was undetectable at most lake outlets, whereas PO4-3 uptake was higher at outlets as compared to reference and lake inlet reaches. Patterns in nutrient demand farther downstream were similar to lake outlets with a gradual shift toward reference-reach functionality. Nitrate uptake was most correlated to sediment mobility and channel morphology, whereas PO 4-3 uptake was most correlated to source-water characteristics. The best integrated predictor of these patterns in nutrient demand was % contributing area (the proportion of watershed area not routing through a lake). We estimate that NO3- and PO 4-3 demand returned to 50% of pre-lake conditions within 1-4-km downstream of a small headwater lake and resetting of nutrient demand was slower downstream of a larger lake set lower in a watershed. Full resetting of these nutrient cycling processes was not reached within 20-km downstream, indicating that lakes can alter stream ecosystem functioning at large spatial scales throughout mountain watersheds. ?? 2007, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

  13. Dissolved inorganic carbon enhanced growth, nutrient uptake, and lipid accumulation in wastewater grown microalgal biofilms.

    PubMed

    Kesaano, Maureen; Gardner, Robert D; Moll, Karen; Lauchnor, Ellen; Gerlach, Robin; Peyton, Brent M; Sims, Ronald C

    2015-03-01

    Microalgal biofilms grown to evaluate potential nutrient removal options for wastewaters and feedstock for biofuels production were studied to determine the influence of bicarbonate amendment on their growth, nutrient uptake capacity, and lipid accumulation after nitrogen starvation. No significant differences in growth rates, nutrient removal, or lipid accumulation were observed in the algal biofilms with or without bicarbonate amendment. The biofilms possibly did not experience carbon-limited conditions because of the large reservoir of dissolved inorganic carbon in the medium. However, an increase in photosynthetic rates was observed in algal biofilms amended with bicarbonate. The influence of bicarbonate on photosynthetic and respiration rates was especially noticeable in biofilms that experienced nitrogen stress. Medium nitrogen depletion was not a suitable stimulant for lipid production in the algal biofilms and as such, focus should be directed toward optimizing growth and biomass productivities to compensate for the low lipid yields and increase nutrient uptake. PMID:25585252

  14. Manipulating stomatal density enhances drought tolerance without deleterious effect on nutrient uptake.

    PubMed

    Hepworth, Christopher; Doheny-Adams, Timothy; Hunt, Lee; Cameron, Duncan D; Gray, Julie E

    2015-10-01

    Manipulation of stomatal density was investigated as a potential tool for enhancing drought tolerance or nutrient uptake. Drought tolerance and soil water retention were assessed using Arabidopsis epidermal patterning factor mutants manipulated to have increased or decreased stomatal density. Root nutrient uptake via mass flow was monitored under differing plant watering regimes using nitrogen-15 ((15) N) isotope and mass spectrometry. Plants with less than half of their normal complement of stomata, and correspondingly reduced levels of transpiration, conserve soil moisture and are highly drought tolerant but show little or no reduction in shoot nitrogen concentrations especially when water availability is restricted. By contrast, plants with over twice the normal density of stomata have a greater capacity for nitrogen uptake, except when water availability is restricted. We demonstrate the possibility of producing plants with reduced transpiration which have increased drought tolerance, with little or no loss of nutrient uptake. We demonstrate that increasing transpiration can enhance nutrient uptake when water is plentiful. PMID:26268722

  15. Effects of light intensity and temperature on Cryptomonas ovata (Cryptophyceae) growth and nutrient uptake rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloern, James E.

    1977-01-01

    Specific growth rate of Cryptomonas ovata var. palustris Pringsheim was measured in batch culture at 14 light-temperature combinations. Both the maximum growth rate (μm) and optimum light intensity (Iopt) fit an empirical function that increases exponentially with temperature up to an optimum (Topt), then declines rapidly as temperature exceeds Topt. Incorporation of these functions into Steele's growth equation gives a good estimate of specific growth rate over a wide range of temperature and light intensity. Rates of phosphate, ammonium and nitrate uptake were measured separately at 16 combinations of irradiance and temperature and following a spike addition of all starved cells initially took up nutrient at a rapid rate. This transitory surge was followed by a period of steady, substrate-saturated uptake that persisted until external nutrient concentration fell. Substrate-saturated NO3−-uptake proceeded at very slow rates in the dark and was stimulated by both increased temperature and irradiance; NH4+-uptake apparently proceeded at a basal rate at 8 and l4 C and was also stimulated by increased temperature and irradiance. Rates of NH4−-uptake were much higher than NO3−-uptake at all light-temperature combinations. Below 20 C, PO4−3-uptake was more rapid in dark than in light, but was light enhanced at 26 C.

  16. Low transient storage and uptake efficiencies in seven agricultural streams: implications for nutrient demand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheibley, Rich W.; Duff, John H.; Tesoriero, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    We used mass load budgets, transient storage modeling, and nutrient spiraling metrics to characterize nitrate (NO3−), ammonium (NH4+), and inorganic phosphorus (SRP) demand in seven agricultural streams across the United States and to identify in-stream services that may control these conditions. Retention of one or all nutrients was observed in all but one stream, but demand for all nutrients was low relative to the mass in transport. Transient storage metrics (As/A, Fmed200, Tstr, and qs) correlated with NO3− retention but not NH4+ or SRP retention, suggesting in-stream services associated with transient storage and stream water residence time could influence reach-scale NO3− demand. However, because the fraction of median reach-scale travel time due to transient storage (Fmed200) was ≤1.2% across the sites, only a relatively small demand for NO3− could be generated by transient storage. In contrast, net uptake of nutrients from the water column calculated from nutrient spiraling metrics were not significant at any site because uptake lengths calculated from background nutrient concentrations were statistically insignificant and therefore much longer than the study reaches. These results suggest that low transient storage coupled with high surface water NO3− inputs have resulted in uptake efficiencies that are not sufficient to offset groundwater inputs of N. Nutrient retention has been linked to physical and hydrogeologic elements that drive flow through transient storage areas where residence time and biotic contact are maximized; however, our findings indicate that similar mechanisms are unable to generate a significant nutrient demand in these streams relative to the loads.

  17. Nutrient uptake and loss by container-grown deciduous and evergreen Rhododendron nursery plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of N fertilizer application on plant uptake and demand for other nutrients was evaluated from May 2005 to February 2006 in container-grown evergreen Rhododendron ‘P.J.M. Compact’ (PJM) and ‘English Roseum’ (ER) and deciduous Rhododendron ‘Gibraltar’ (AZ). Increased N-availability incre...

  18. Nutrient uptake and use in young ‘Pinot noir’ grapevines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrient uptake and allocation patterns were determined in four-year-old grapevines (‘Pinot noir’ clone 115 on 3309C rootstock) by destructively harvesting entire vines at major phenological stages over two years. In addition, half of the vines were irrigated less frequently between veraison and fru...

  19. Nutrient uptake, biomass yield and quantitative analysis of aliphatic aldehydes in cilantro plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the nutrient uptake, biomass production and yield of the major compounds in the essential oil of five genotypes of Coriandrum sativum L. The treatments were four accessions donated by the National Genetic Resources Advisory Council (NGRAC), U.S. Department...

  20. Predictive modeling of transient storage and nutrient uptake: Implications for stream restoration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Connor, Ben L.; Hondzo, Miki; Harvey, Judson

    2010-01-01

    This study examined two key aspects of reactive transport modeling for stream restoration purposes: the accuracy of the nutrient spiraling and transient storage models for quantifying reach-scale nutrient uptake, and the ability to quantify transport parameters using measurements and scaling techniques in order to improve upon traditional conservative tracer fitting methods. Nitrate (NO3–) uptake rates inferred using the nutrient spiraling model underestimated the total NO3– mass loss by 82%, which was attributed to the exclusion of dispersion and transient storage. The transient storage model was more accurate with respect to the NO3– mass loss (±20%) and also demonstrated that uptake in the main channel was more significant than in storage zones. Conservative tracer fitting was unable to produce transport parameter estimates for a riffle-pool transition of the study reach, while forward modeling of solute transport using measured/scaled transport parameters matched conservative tracer breakthrough curves for all reaches. Additionally, solute exchange between the main channel and embayment surface storage zones was quantified using first-order theory. These results demonstrate that it is vital to account for transient storage in quantifying nutrient uptake, and the continued development of measurement/scaling techniques is needed for reactive transport modeling of streams with complex hydraulic and geomorphic conditions.

  1. Corn grain yield and nutrient uptake from application of enhanced-efficiency nitrogen fertilizers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing demand for food and agricultural products directly impact the use of chemical fertilizers particularly nitrogen (N). This study examined corn grain yield and nutrient uptake resulting from applications of different N fertilizer sources, urea (U), urea-ammonium nitrate (UAN), ammonium nitr...

  2. Scaling plant nitrogen use and uptake efficiencies in response to nutrient addition in peatlands

    SciTech Connect

    Iversen, Colleen M; Bridgham, Scott; Kellogg, Laurie E.

    2010-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is the primary growth-limiting nutrient in many terrestrial ecosystems, and therefore plant production per unit N taken up (i.e., N use efficiency, NUE) is a fundamentally important component of ecosystem function. Nitrogen use efficiency comprises two components: N productivity (AN, plant production per peak biomass N content) and the mean residence time of N in plant biomass (MRTN). We utilized a five-year fertilization experiment to examine the manner in which increases in N and phosphorus (P) availability affected plant NUE at multiple biological scales (i.e., from leaf to community level). We fertilized a natural gradient of nutrient-limited peatland ecosystems in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, USA, with 6 g Nm2yr1, 2 g Pm2yr1, or a combination of N and P. Our objectives were to determine how changes in carbon and N allocation within a plant to leaf and woody tissue and changes in species composition within a community, both above- and belowground, would affect (1) NUE; (2) the adaptive trade-off between the components of NUE; (3) the efficiency with which plants acquired N from the soil (N uptake efficiency); and (4) plant community production per unit soil N availability (N response efficiency, NRE). As expected, N and P addition generally increased aboveground production and N uptake. In particular, P availability strongly affected the way in which plants took up and used N. Nitrogen use efficiency response to nutrient addition was not straightforward. Nitrogen use efficiency differed between leaf and woody tissue, among species, and across the ombrotrophic minerotrophic gradient because plants and communities were adapted to maximize either AN or MRTN, but not both concurrently. Increased N availability strongly decreased plant and community N uptake efficiency, while increased P availability increased N uptake efficiency, particularly in a nitrogen-fixing shrub. Nitrogen uptake efficiency was more important in controlling overall plant

  3. The Role of Diatom Nanostructures in Biasing Diffusion to Improve Uptake in a Patchy Nutrient Environment

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, James G.; Seuront, Laurent; Doubell, Mark J.; Losic, Dusan; Voelcker, Nicolas H.; Seymour, Justin; Lal, Ratnesh

    2013-01-01

    Background Diatoms are important single-celled autotrophs that dominate most lit aquatic environments and are distinguished by surficial frustules with intricate designs of unknown function. Principal Findings We show that some frustule designs constrain diffusion to positively alter nutrient uptake. In nutrient gradients of 4 to 160 times over <5 cm, the screened-chambered morphology of Coscincodiscus sp. biases the nutrient diffusion towards the cell by at least 3.8 times the diffusion to the seawater. In contrast, the open-chambers of Thalassiosira eccentrica produce at least a 1.3 times diffusion advantage to the membrane over Coscincodiscus sp. when nutrients are homogeneous. Significance Diffusion constraint explains the success of particular diatom species at given times and the overall success of diatoms. The results help answer the unresolved question of how adjacent microplankton compete. Furthermore, diffusion constraint by supramembrane nanostructures to alter molecular diffusion suggests that microbes compete via supramembrane topology, a competitive mechanism not considered by the standard smooth-surface equations used for nutrient uptake nor in microbial ecology and cell physiology. PMID:23667421

  4. Model selection for microbial nutrient uptake using a cost-benefit approach.

    PubMed

    Müller, J; Hense, B A; Marozava, S; Kuttler, Ch; Meckenstock, R U

    2014-09-01

    We consider the uptake of various carbon sources by microorganisms based on four fundamental assumptions: (1) the uptake of nutrient follows a saturation characteristics (2) substrate processing has a benefit but comes at costs of maintaining the process chain (3) substrate uptake is controlled and (4) evolution optimized the control of substrate uptake. These assumptions result in relatively simple mathematical models. In case of two substrates, our main finding is the following: Depending on the overall topology of the metabolic pathway, three different behavioral patterns can be identified. (1) both substrates are consumed at a time, (2) one substrate is preferred and represses the uptake of the other (catabolite repression), or (3) a cell feeds exclusively on one or the other substrate, possibly leading to a population that splits in two sub-populations, each of them specialized on one substrate only. Batch-culture and retentostat data of toluene, benzoate, and acetate uptake by Geobacter metallireducens are used to demonstrate that the model structure is suited for a quantitative description of uptake dynamics. PMID:24977929

  5. Ingestion of crude oil: effects on digesta retention times and nutrient uptake in captive river otters.

    PubMed

    Ormseth, O A; Ben-David, M

    2000-09-01

    Studies following the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Prince William Sound, Alaska indicated that river otters (Lontra canadensis) from oiled regions displayed symptoms of degraded health, including reduced body weight. We examined the fate of ingested oil in the digestive tract and its effects on gut function in captive river otters. Fifteen wild-caught males were assigned to three groups, two of which were given weathered crude oil in food (i.e., control, 5 ppm day(-1), and 50 ppm day(-1)) under controlled conditions at the Alaska Sealife Center. Using glass beads as non-specific digesta markers and stable isotope analysis, we determined the effects of ingested oil on retention time and nutrient uptake. Our data indicated that oil ingestion reduced marker retention time when we controlled for activity and meal size. Fecal isotope ratios suggested that absorption of lipids in the oiled otters might have been affected by reduced retention time of food. In addition, a dilution model indicated that as much as 80% of ingested oil was not absorbed in high-dose animals. Thus, while the ingestion of large quantities of weathered crude oil appears to reduce absorption of oil hydrocarbons and may alleviate systemic effects, it may concurrently affect body condition by impacting digestive function. PMID:11083525

  6. Improving Lowland Rice (O. sativa L. cv. MR219) Plant Growth Variables, Nutrients Uptake, and Nutrients Recovery Using Crude Humic Substances.

    PubMed

    Palanivell, Perumal; Ahmed, Osumanu Haruna; Ab Majid, Nik Muhamad; Jalloh, Mohamadu Boyie; Susilawati, Kasim

    2015-01-01

    High cation exchange capacity and organic matter content of crude humic substances from compost could be exploited to reduce ammonia loss from urea and to as well improve rice growth and soil chemical properties for efficient nutrients utilization in lowland rice cultivation. Close-dynamic air flow system was used to determine the effects of crude humic substances on ammonia volatilization. A pot experiment was conducted to determine the effects of crude humic substances on rice plant growth, nutrients uptake, nutrients recovery, and soil chemical properties using an acid soil mixed with three rates of crude humic substances (20, 40, and 60 g pot(-1)). Standard procedures were used to evaluate rice plant dry matter production, nutrients uptake, nutrients recovery, and soil chemical properties. Application of crude humic substances increased ammonia volatilization. However, the lowest rate of crude humic substances (20 g pot(-1)) significantly improved total dry matter, nutrients uptake, nutrients recovery, and soil nutrients availability compared with crude humic substances (40 and 60 g pot(-1)) and the normal fertilization. Apart from improving growth of rice plants, crude humic substances can be used to ameliorate acid soils in rice cultivation. The findings of this study are being validated in our ongoing field trials. PMID:25977938

  7. Improving Lowland Rice (O. sativa L. cv. MR219) Plant Growth Variables, Nutrients Uptake, and Nutrients Recovery Using Crude Humic Substances

    PubMed Central

    Palanivell, Perumal; Ahmed, Osumanu Haruna; Ab Majid, Nik Muhamad; Jalloh, Mohamadu Boyie; Susilawati, Kasim

    2015-01-01

    High cation exchange capacity and organic matter content of crude humic substances from compost could be exploited to reduce ammonia loss from urea and to as well improve rice growth and soil chemical properties for efficient nutrients utilization in lowland rice cultivation. Close-dynamic air flow system was used to determine the effects of crude humic substances on ammonia volatilization. A pot experiment was conducted to determine the effects of crude humic substances on rice plant growth, nutrients uptake, nutrients recovery, and soil chemical properties using an acid soil mixed with three rates of crude humic substances (20, 40, and 60 g pot−1). Standard procedures were used to evaluate rice plant dry matter production, nutrients uptake, nutrients recovery, and soil chemical properties. Application of crude humic substances increased ammonia volatilization. However, the lowest rate of crude humic substances (20 g pot−1) significantly improved total dry matter, nutrients uptake, nutrients recovery, and soil nutrients availability compared with crude humic substances (40 and 60 g pot−1) and the normal fertilization. Apart from improving growth of rice plants, crude humic substances can be used to ameliorate acid soils in rice cultivation. The findings of this study are being validated in our ongoing field trials. PMID:25977938

  8. AN INTERREGIONAL COMPARISON OF CHANNEL STRUCTURE, TRANSIENT STORAGE AND NUTRIENT UPTAKE IN STREAMS DRAINING MANAGED AND OLD GROWTH WATERSHEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compared stream channel structure (width, depth, substrate composition) and riparian canopy with transient storage and nutrient uptake in 32 streams draining old-growth and managed watersheds in the Appalachian Mountains (North Carolina), Ouachita Mountains (Arkansas), Cascade...

  9. Nonrecirculating hydroponic systems suitable for uptake studies at very low nutrient concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Gutschick, V.P.; Kay, L.E. )

    1991-04-01

    The authors describe the mechanical, electronic, hydraulic, and structural design of a nonrecirculating hydroponic system. The system is particularly suited to sutides at very low nutrient concentratons, for which on-line concentration monitoring methods either do not exist or are costly and limited to monitoring relatively few indivitual plants. Solutions are mised automatically to chosen concentrations, which can be set differently for every pump fed from a master supply of deionized water and nutrient concentrates. Pumping rates can be varied over a 50-fold range, up to 400 liters per day, which suffices to maintain a number of large, post-seedling plants in rapid growth at (sub)micromolar levels of N and P. The outflow of each pump is divided among as many as 12 separate root chambers. In each changer one may monitor uptake by individual plant roots or segments thereof, by measuring nutrient depletion in batch samples of solution. The system is constructed from nontoxic materials that do not adsorb nutrient ions; no transient shifts of nitrate and phosphate concentrations are observable at the submicromolar level. Nonrecirculaton of solution limits porblems of pH shifts, microbial contamination, and cumulative imbalances in unmonitored nutrients. They note several disadvantages, principally related to high consumption of deionized water and solutes. The reciprocating pumps can be constructed inexpensively, particularly by the researcher. They also report previously unattainable control of passive temperature rise of chambers exposed to full sunlight, by use of white epoxy paint.

  10. The Thermodynamic Flow-Force Interpretation of Root Nutrient Uptake Kinetics: A Powerful Formalism for Agronomic and Phytoplanktonic Models

    PubMed Central

    Le Deunff, Erwan; Tournier, Pierre-Henri; Malagoli, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The ion influx isotherms obtained by measuring unidirectional influx across root membranes with radioactive or stable tracers are mostly interpreted by enzyme-substrate-like modeling. However, recent analyses from ion transporter mutants clearly demonstrate the inadequacy of the conventional interpretation of ion isotherms. Many genetically distinct carriers are involved in the root catalytic function. Parameters Vmax and Km deduced from this interpretation cannot therefore be regarded as microscopic parameters of a single transporter, but are instead macroscopic parameters (Vmapp and Kmapp, apparent maximum velocity and affinity constant) that depend on weighted activities of multiple transporters along the root. The flow-force interpretation based on the thermodynamic principle of irreversible processes is an alternative macroscopic modeling approach for ion influx isotherms in which macroscopic parameters Lj (overall conductance of the root system for the substrate j) and πj (thermodynamic parameter when Jj = 0) have a straightforward meaning with respect to the biological sample studied. They characterize the efficiency of the entire root catalytic structure without deducing molecular characteristics. Here we present the basic principles of this theory and how its use can be tested and improved by changing root pre- and post-wash procedures before influx measurements in order to come as close as possible to equilibrium conditions. In addition, the constant values of Vm and Km in the Michaelis-Menten (MM) formalism of enzyme-substrate interpretation do not reflect variations in response to temperature, nutrient status or nutrient regimes. The linear formalism of the flow-force approach, which integrates temperature effect on nutrient uptake, could usefully replace MM formalism in the 1-3-dimension models of plants and phytoplankton. This formalism offers a simplification of parametrization to help find more realistic analytical expressions and numerical

  11. Golgi N-glycan branching N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases I, V and VI promote nutrient uptake and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Abdel Rahman, Anas M; Ryczko, Michael; Nakano, Miyako; Pawling, Judy; Rodrigues, Tania; Johswich, Anita; Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Dennis, James W

    2015-02-01

    Nutrient transporters are critical gate-keepers of extracellular metabolite entry into the cell. As integral membrane proteins, most transporters are N-glycosylated, and the N-glycans are remodeled in the Golgi apparatus. The Golgi branching enzymes N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases I, II, IV, V and avian VI (encoded by Mgat1, Mgat2, Mgat4a/b/c Mgat5 and Mgat6), each catalyze the addition of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) in N-glycans. Here, we asked whether N-glycan branching promotes nutrient transport and metabolism in immortal human HeLa carcinoma and non-malignant HEK293 embryonic kidney cells. Mgat6 is absent in mammals, but ectopic expression can be expected to add an additional β1,4-linked branch to N-glycans, and may provide evidence for functional redundancy of the N-glycan branches. Tetracycline (tet)-induced overexpression of Mgat1, Mgat5 and Mgat6 resulted in increased enzyme activity and increased N-glycan branching concordant with the known specificities of these enzymes. Tet-induced Mgat1, Mgat5 and Mgat6 combined with stimulation of hexosamine biosynthesis pathway (HBP) to UDP-GlcNAc, increased cellular metabolite levels, lactate and oxidative metabolism in an additive manner. We then tested the hypothesis that N-glycan branching alone might promote nutrient uptake when glucose (Glc) and glutamine are limiting. In low glutamine and Glc medium, tet-induced Mgat5 alone increased amino acids uptake, intracellular levels of glycolytic and TCA intermediates, as well as HEK293 cell growth. More specifically, tet-induced Mgat5 and HBP elevated the import rate of glutamine, although transport of other metabolites may be regulated in parallel. Our results suggest that N-glycan branching cooperates with HBP to regulate metabolite import in a cell autonomous manner, and can enhance cell growth in low-nutrient environments. PMID:25395405

  12. The Thermodynamic Flow-Force Interpretation of Root Nutrient Uptake Kinetics: A Powerful Formalism for Agronomic and Phytoplanktonic Models.

    PubMed

    Le Deunff, Erwan; Tournier, Pierre-Henri; Malagoli, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The ion influx isotherms obtained by measuring unidirectional influx across root membranes with radioactive or stable tracers are mostly interpreted by enzyme-substrate-like modeling. However, recent analyses from ion transporter mutants clearly demonstrate the inadequacy of the conventional interpretation of ion isotherms. Many genetically distinct carriers are involved in the root catalytic function. Parameters Vmax and Km deduced from this interpretation cannot therefore be regarded as microscopic parameters of a single transporter, but are instead macroscopic parameters (V[Formula: see text] and K[Formula: see text], apparent maximum velocity and affinity constant) that depend on weighted activities of multiple transporters along the root. The flow-force interpretation based on the thermodynamic principle of irreversible processes is an alternative macroscopic modeling approach for ion influx isotherms in which macroscopic parameters Lj (overall conductance of the root system for the substrate j) and πj (thermodynamic parameter when Jj = 0) have a straightforward meaning with respect to the biological sample studied. They characterize the efficiency of the entire root catalytic structure without deducing molecular characteristics. Here we present the basic principles of this theory and how its use can be tested and improved by changing root pre- and post-wash procedures before influx measurements in order to come as close as possible to equilibrium conditions. In addition, the constant values of Vm and Km in the Michaelis-Menten (MM) formalism of enzyme-substrate interpretation do not reflect variations in response to temperature, nutrient status or nutrient regimes. The linear formalism of the flow-force approach, which integrates temperature effect on nutrient uptake, could usefully replace MM formalism in the 1-3-dimension models of plants and phytoplankton. This formalism offers a simplification of parametrization to help find more realistic analytical

  13. Polyethylene mulch stimulates early root growth and nutrient uptake of transplanted tomatoes

    SciTech Connect

    Wien, H.C.; Minotti, P.L.; Grubinger, V.P. . Dept. of Fruit and Vegetable Science)

    1993-03-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) plants grown on polyethylene (PE) mulch in New York State frequently have more branches and increased mineral nutrient uptake and yield than plants not mulched. In four field experiments conducted on a silt loam soil, clear PE mulch stimulated root extension shortly after transplanting. One week after transplanting, roots were significantly longer for mulched than for unmulched plants in all four experiments, whereas above ground dry matter differences did not become significant until 14 days after transplanting in two of four trials. Mulching increased branching, hastened flowering on basal branches, and increased concentration of major nutrients in the above ground parts. In the field, stimulation of above ground growth due to mulch might be brought about by warming of the stem by air escaping from the planting hole in the mulch. However, an experiment with black, white, or clear mulch, in which the planting hole was either left uncovered or covered with soil, showed no effect of hole closure on branching even though air temperature near the stem was increased when holes were left uncovered. The results taken together imply that the increased above ground growth observed with mulching is a consequence of enhanced root growth and nutrient uptake.

  14. Mycorrhiza and heavy metal resistant bacteria enhance growth, nutrient uptake and alter metabolic profile of sorghum grown in marginal soil.

    PubMed

    Dhawi, Faten; Datta, Rupali; Ramakrishna, Wusirika

    2016-08-01

    The main challenge for plants growing in nutrient poor, contaminated soil is biomass reduction, nutrient deficiency and presence of heavy metals. Our aim is to overcome these challenges using different microbial combinations in mining-impacted soil and focus on their physiological and biochemical impacts on a model plant system, which has multiple applications. In the current study, sorghum BTx623 seedlings grown in mining-impacted soil in greenhouse were subjected to plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB or B) alone, PGPB with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (My), My alone and control group with no treatment. Root biomass and uptake of most of the elements showed significant increase in all treatment groups in comparison with control. Mycorrhiza group showed the best effect followed by My + B and B groups for uptake of majority of the elements by roots. On the contrary, biomass of both shoot and root was more influenced by B treatment than My + B and My treatments. Metabolomics identified compounds whose levels changed in roots of treatment groups significantly in comparison to control. Upregulation of stearic acid, sorbitol, sebacic acid and ferulic acid correlated positively with biomass and uptake of almost all elements. Two biochemical pathways, fatty acid biosynthesis and galactose metabolism, were regulated in all treatment groups. Three common pathways were upregulated only in My and My + B groups. Our results suggest that PGPB enhanced metabolic activities which resulted in increase in element uptake and sorghum root biomass whether accompanied with mycorrhiza or used solely. PMID:27208643

  15. Cation Uptake and Allocation by Red Pine Seedlings under Cation-Nutrient Stress in a Column Growth Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Zhenqing; Balogh-Brunstad, Zsuzsanna; Grant, Michael R.; Harsh, James B.; Gill, Richard; Thomashow, Linda; Dohnalkova, Alice; Stacks, Daryl; Letourneau, Melissa; Keller, Chester K.

    2014-01-10

    Background and Aims Plant nutrient uptake is affected by environmental stress, but how plants respond to cation-nutrient stress is poorly understood. We assessed the impact of varying degrees of cation-nutrient limitation on cation uptake in an experimental plant-mineral system. Methods Column experiments, with red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) seedlings growing in sand/mineral mixtures, were conducted for up to nine months under a range of Ca- and K-limited conditions. The Ca and K were supplied from both minerals and nutrient solutions with varying Ca and K concentrations. Results Cation nutrient stress had little impact on carbon allocation after nine months of plant growth and K was the limiting nutrient for biomass production. The Ca/Sr and K/Rb ratio results allowed independent estimation of dissolution incongruency and discrimination against Sr and Rb during cation uptake processes. The fraction of K in biomass from biotite increased with decreasing K supply from nutrient solutions. The mineral anorthite was consistently the major source of Ca, regardless of nutrient treatment. Conclusions Red pine seedlings exploited more mineral K in response to more severe K deficiency. This did not occur for Ca. Plant discrimination factors must be carefully considered to accurately identify nutrient sources using cation tracers.

  16. Approaches in the determination of plant nutrient uptake and distribution in space flight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyenga, A. G.; Forsman, A.; Stodieck, L. S.; Hoehn, A.; Kliss, M.

    2000-01-01

    The effective growth and development of vascular plants rely on the adequate availability of water and nutrients. Inefficiency in either the initial absorption, transportation, or distribution of these elements are factors which impinge on plant structure and metabolic integrity. The potential effect of space flight and microgravity conditions on the efficiency of these processes is unclear. Limitations in the available quantity of space-grown plant material and the sensitivity of routine analytical techniques have made an evaluation of these processes impractical. However, the recent introduction of new plant cultivating methodologies supporting the application of radionuclide elements and subsequent autoradiography techniques provides a highly sensitive investigative approach amenable to space flight studies. Experiments involving the use of gel based 'nutrient packs' and the radionuclides calcium-45 and iron-59 were conducted on the Shuttle mission STS-94. Uptake rates of the radionuclides between ground and flight plant material appeared comparable.

  17. Approaches in the Determination of Plant Nutrient Uptake and Distribution in Space Flight Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyenga, A. G.; Forsman, A.; Stodieck, L. S.; Hoehn, A.; Kliss, Mark

    1998-01-01

    The effective growth and development of vascular plants rely on the adequate availability of water and nutrients. Inefficiency in either the initial absorption, transportation, or distribution of these elements are factors which may impinge on plant structure and metabolic integrity. The potential effect of space flight and microgravity conditions on the efficiency of these processes is unclear. Limitations in the available quantity of space-grown plant material and the sensitivity of routine analytical techniques have made an evaluation of these processes impractical. However, the recent introduction of new plant cultivating methodologies supporting the application of radionuclide elements and subsequent autoradiography techniques provides a highly sensitive investigative approach amenable to space flight studies. Experiments involving the use of gel based 'nutrient packs' and the nuclides Ca45 and Fe59 were conducted on the Shuttle mission STS-94. Uptake rates of the radionuclides between ground and flight plant material appeared comparable.

  18. Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration on the nutrient uptake characteristics of Japanese larch (Larix kaempferi).

    PubMed

    Shinano, Takuro; Yamamoto, Takuya; Tawaraya, Keitaro; Tadokoro, Masaru; Koike, Takayoshi; Osaki, Mitsuru

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated the response of Japanese larch (Larix kaempferi Sieb. & Zucc.) to elevated atmospheric CO(2) concentration ([CO(2)]) (689 +/- 75 ppm in 2002 and 697 +/- 90 ppm in 2003) over 2 years in a field experiment with open-top chambers. Root activity was assessed as nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium uptake rates estimated from successive measurements of absorbed amounts. Dry matter production of whole plants was unaffected by elevated [CO(2)] in the first year of treatment, but increased significantly in response to elevated [CO(2)] in the second year. In contrast, elevated [CO(2)] increased the root to shoot ratio and fine root dry mass in the first year, but not in the second year. Elevated [CO(2)] had no effect on tissue N, P and K concentrations. Uptake rates of N, P and K correlated with whole-plant relative growth rates, but were unaffected by growth [CO(2)], as was ectomycorrhizal colonization, a factor assumed to be important for nutrient uptake in trees. We conclude that improved growth of Larix kaempferi in response to elevated [CO(2)] is accompanied by increased root biomass, but not by increased root activity. PMID:17169911

  19. Summer cover crops and soil amendments to improve growth and nutrient uptake of okra

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Q.R.; Li, Y.C.; Klassen, W.

    2006-04-15

    A pot experiment with summer cover crops and soil amendments was conducted in two consecutive years to elucidate the effects of these cover crops and soil amendments on 'Clemson Spineless 80' okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) yields and biomass production, and the uptake and distribution of soil nutrients and trace elements. The cover crops were sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea), cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), velvetbean (Mucuna deeringiana), and sorghum sudan-grass (Sorghum bicolor x S. bicolor var. sudanense) with fallow as the control. The organic soil amendments were biosolids (sediment from wastewater plants), N-Viro Soil (a mixture of biosolids and coal ash), coal ash (a combustion by-product from power plants), co-compost (a mixture of 3 biosolids: 7 yard waste), and yard waste compost (mainly from leaves and branches of trees and shrubs, and grass clippings) with a soil-incorporated cover crop as the control. As a subsequent vegetable crop, okra was grown after the cover crops, alone or together with the organic soil amendments, had been incorporated. All of the cover crops, except sorghum sudangrass in 2002-03, significantly improved okra fruit yields and the total biomass production. Both cover crops and soil amendments can substantially improve nutrient uptake and distribution. The results suggest that cover crops and appropriate amounts of soil amendments can be used to improve soil fertility and okra yield without adverse environmental effects or risk of contamination of the fruit. Further field studies will be required to confirm these findings.

  20. Biomass production and nutrient uptake by Neochloris oleoabundans in an open trough system.

    PubMed

    Murray, Kyle E; Healy, Frank G; McCord, Rebecca S; Shields, Jeremy A

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present biomass and nutrient uptake data from Neochloris oleoabundans production in an open trough system. The growth medium used was BG11, temperature ranged from 16.7 °C to 25.3 °C, and pH ranged from 5.52 to 9.94 because the customary pH increase during algal biomass production was moderated by incoming CO(2) gas streams (atmospheric, 2%, 4%, and 6% CO(2)). Peak concentrations of algal biomass ranged from 643 to 970 mg L(-1), specific growth rates ranged from 0.15 to 0.37 day(-1), and doubling times ranged from 4.8 to 1.9 days. Carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus were incorporated into the biomass at 0.05%, 8.3%, and 54% of supplied amounts. Open growth systems supplemented with CO(2) should be designed to regulate medium pH within the range of 6.3 to 7.1. Future research should examine various media and alternative carbon sources to decrease doubling times, increase peak concentrations, and optimize nutrient uptake. PMID:21184060

  1. Nitrogen and phosphorus uptake rates of different species from a coral reef community after a nutrient pulse

    PubMed Central

    den Haan, Joost; Huisman, Jef; Brocke, Hannah J.; Goehlich, Henry; Latijnhouwers, Kelly R. W.; van Heeringen, Seth; Honcoop, Saskia A. S.; Bleyenberg, Tanja E.; Schouten, Stefan; Cerli, Chiara; Hoitinga, Leo; Vermeij, Mark J. A.; Visser, Petra M.

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial runoff after heavy rainfall can increase nutrient concentrations in waters overlying coral reefs that otherwise experience low nutrient levels. Field measurements during a runoff event showed a sharp increase in nitrate (75-fold), phosphate (31-fold) and ammonium concentrations (3-fold) in waters overlying a fringing reef at the island of Curaçao (Southern Caribbean). To understand how benthic reef organisms make use of such nutrient pulses, we determined ammonium, nitrate and phosphate uptake rates for one abundant coral species, turf algae, six macroalgal and two benthic cyanobacterial species in a series of laboratory experiments. Nutrient uptake rates differed among benthic functional groups. The filamentous macroalga Cladophora spp., turf algae and the benthic cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula had the highest uptake rates per unit biomass, whereas the coral Madracis mirabilis had the lowest. Combining nutrient uptake rates with the standing biomass of each functional group on the reef, we estimated that the ammonium and phosphate delivered during runoff events is mostly taken up by turf algae and the two macroalgae Lobophora variegata and Dictyota pulchella. Our results support the often proposed, but rarely tested, assumption that turf algae and opportunistic macroalgae primarily benefit from episodic inputs of nutrients to coral reefs. PMID:27353576

  2. Nitrogen and phosphorus uptake rates of different species from a coral reef community after a nutrient pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Haan, Joost; Huisman, Jef; Brocke, Hannah J.; Goehlich, Henry; Latijnhouwers, Kelly R. W.; van Heeringen, Seth; Honcoop, Saskia A. S.; Bleyenberg, Tanja E.; Schouten, Stefan; Cerli, Chiara; Hoitinga, Leo; Vermeij, Mark J. A.; Visser, Petra M.

    2016-06-01

    Terrestrial runoff after heavy rainfall can increase nutrient concentrations in waters overlying coral reefs that otherwise experience low nutrient levels. Field measurements during a runoff event showed a sharp increase in nitrate (75-fold), phosphate (31-fold) and ammonium concentrations (3-fold) in waters overlying a fringing reef at the island of Curaçao (Southern Caribbean). To understand how benthic reef organisms make use of such nutrient pulses, we determined ammonium, nitrate and phosphate uptake rates for one abundant coral species, turf algae, six macroalgal and two benthic cyanobacterial species in a series of laboratory experiments. Nutrient uptake rates differed among benthic functional groups. The filamentous macroalga Cladophora spp., turf algae and the benthic cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula had the highest uptake rates per unit biomass, whereas the coral Madracis mirabilis had the lowest. Combining nutrient uptake rates with the standing biomass of each functional group on the reef, we estimated that the ammonium and phosphate delivered during runoff events is mostly taken up by turf algae and the two macroalgae Lobophora variegata and Dictyota pulchella. Our results support the often proposed, but rarely tested, assumption that turf algae and opportunistic macroalgae primarily benefit from episodic inputs of nutrients to coral reefs.

  3. Nitrogen and phosphorus uptake rates of different species from a coral reef community after a nutrient pulse.

    PubMed

    den Haan, Joost; Huisman, Jef; Brocke, Hannah J; Goehlich, Henry; Latijnhouwers, Kelly R W; van Heeringen, Seth; Honcoop, Saskia A S; Bleyenberg, Tanja E; Schouten, Stefan; Cerli, Chiara; Hoitinga, Leo; Vermeij, Mark J A; Visser, Petra M

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial runoff after heavy rainfall can increase nutrient concentrations in waters overlying coral reefs that otherwise experience low nutrient levels. Field measurements during a runoff event showed a sharp increase in nitrate (75-fold), phosphate (31-fold) and ammonium concentrations (3-fold) in waters overlying a fringing reef at the island of Curaçao (Southern Caribbean). To understand how benthic reef organisms make use of such nutrient pulses, we determined ammonium, nitrate and phosphate uptake rates for one abundant coral species, turf algae, six macroalgal and two benthic cyanobacterial species in a series of laboratory experiments. Nutrient uptake rates differed among benthic functional groups. The filamentous macroalga Cladophora spp., turf algae and the benthic cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula had the highest uptake rates per unit biomass, whereas the coral Madracis mirabilis had the lowest. Combining nutrient uptake rates with the standing biomass of each functional group on the reef, we estimated that the ammonium and phosphate delivered during runoff events is mostly taken up by turf algae and the two macroalgae Lobophora variegata and Dictyota pulchella. Our results support the often proposed, but rarely tested, assumption that turf algae and opportunistic macroalgae primarily benefit from episodic inputs of nutrients to coral reefs. PMID:27353576

  4. Elemental uptake and distribution of nutrients in avocado mesocarp and the impact of soil quality.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Mageshni; Moodley, Roshila; Jonnalagadda, Sreekanth B

    2014-07-01

    The distribution of 14 elements (both essential and non-essential) in the Hass and Fuerte cultivars of avocados grown at six different sites in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, was investigated. Soils from the different sites were concurrently analysed for elemental concentration (both total and exchangeable), pH, organic matter and cation exchange capacity. In both varieties of the fruit, concentrations of the elements Cd, Co, Cr, Pb and Se were extremely low with the other elements being in decreasing order of Mg > Ca > Fe > Al > Zn > Mn > Cu > Ni > As. Nutritionally, avocados were found to be a good dietary source of the micronutrients Cu and Mn. In soil, Pb concentrations indicated enrichment (positive geoaccumuluation indices) but this did not influence uptake of the metal by the plant. Statistical analysis was done to evaluate the impact of soil quality parameters on the nutrient composition of the fruits. This analysis indicated the prevalence of complex metal interactions at the soil-plant interface that influenced their uptake by the plant. However, the plant invariably controlled metal uptake according to metabolic needs as evidenced by their accumulation and exclusion. PMID:24671616

  5. Effects of cadmium on uptake and translocation of nutrient elements in different welsh onion (Allium fistulosum L.) cultivars.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuhui; Zhou, Qixing; Sun, Xiaoyin; Ren, Wenjie

    2016-03-01

    The concentration of nutrient elements is an important quality characteristic of vegetables, and the variation in accumulation among cultivars can provide clues about the mechanism of low accumulation of heavy metals. Pot-culture experiments were arranged under four cadmium (Cd) treatments (CK, 1.0, 2.5 and 5.0mg/kg) to explore influences of Cd on the accumulation of nutrient elements in 25 welsh onion cultivars. There were significant positive correlations (p<0.05) between Cd and nutrient elements in the pseudostems and leaves. There were also significant positive correlations in nutrient elements (p<0.05) among cultivars, which might be disturbed under high Cd treatments, especially for P, Fe and Mn. Our results suggested that there is a synergistic effect on the accumulation between Cd and nutrient elements, and within nutrient elements among cultivars. In addition the uptake and translocation process of Cd was closely related to Mn in welsh onion. PMID:26471532

  6. Role of the Novel OprD Family of Porins in Nutrient Uptake in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Tamber, Sandeep; Ochs, Martina M.; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2006-01-01

    To circumvent the permeability barrier of its outer membrane, Pseudomonas aeruginosa has evolved a series of specific porins. These channels have binding sites for related classes of molecules that facilitate uptake under nutrient-limited conditions. Here, we report on the identification of a 19-member family of porins similar to the basic-amino-acid-specific porin OprD. The members of this family fell into one of two phylogenetically distinct clusters, one bearing high similarity to OprD and the other bearing most similarity to the putative phenylacetic acid uptake porin PhaK of Pseudomonas putida. Analysis of the genome context, operon arrangement, and regulation of the PhaK-like porin OpdK indicated that it might be involved in vanillate uptake. This result was confirmed by demonstrating that an opdK mutant had a deficiency in the ability to grow on vanillate as a carbon source. To extrapolate these data to other paralogues within this family, the substrate specificities of 6 of the 17 remaining OprD homologues were inferred using an approach similar to that used with opdK. The specificities determined were as follows: OpdP, glycine-glutamate; OpdC, histidine; OpdB, proline; OpdT, tyrosine; OpdH, cis-aconitate; and OpdO, pyroglutamate. Thus, members of the OprD subfamily took up amino acids and related molecules, and those characterized members most similar to PhaK were responsible for the uptake of a diverse array of organic acids. These results imply that there is a functional basis for the phylogenetic clustering of these proteins and provide a framework for studying OprD homologues in other organisms. PMID:16352820

  7. Design of nutrient removal activated sludge systems.

    PubMed

    Manga, J; Ferrer, J; Seco, A; Garcia-Usach, F

    2003-01-01

    A mechanistic mathematical model for nutrient and organic matter removal was used to describe the behavior of a nitrification denitrification enhanced biological phosphorus removal (NDEBPR) system. This model was implemented in a user-friendly software DESASS (design and simulation of activated sludge systems). A 484-L pilot plant was operated to verify the model results. The pilot plant was operated for three years over three different sludge ages. The validity of the model was confirmed with data from the pilot plant. Also, the utility of DESASS as a valuable tool for designing NDEBPR systems was confirmed. PMID:12906279

  8. The role of plant uptake on the removal of organic matter and nutrients in subsurface flow constructed wetlands: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Langergraber, G

    2005-01-01

    Plants in constructed wetlands have several functions related to the treatment processes. It is generally agreed that nutrient uptake is a minor factor in constructed wetlands treating wastewater compared to the loadings applied. For low loaded systems plant uptake can contribute a significant amount to nutrient removal. The contribution of plant uptake is simulated for different qualities of water to be treated using the multi-component reactive transport module CW2D. CW2D is able to describe the biochemical elimination and transformation processes for organic matter, nitrogen and phosphorus in subsurface flow constructed wetlands. The model for plant uptake implemented describes nutrient uptake coupled to water uptake. Literature values are used to calculate potential water and nutrient uptake rates. For a constructed wetland treating municipal wastewater a potential nutrient uptake of about 1.9% of the influent nitrogen and phosphorus load can be expected. For lower loaded systems the potential uptake is significantly higher, e.g. 46% of the nitrogen load for treatment of greywater. The potential uptake rates could only be simulated for high loaded systems i.e. constructed wetlands treating wastewater. For low loaded systems the nutrient concentrations in the liquid phase were too low to simulate the potential uptake rates using the implemented model for plant uptake. PMID:16042261

  9. High resolution modeling of water and nutrient uptake by plant roots: at a scale from single root to root system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abesha, Betiglu; Vanderborght, Jan; Javaux, Mathieu; Schnepf, Andrea; Vereecken, Harry

    2014-05-01

    The uptake of nutrients by plant roots is a multiscale problem. At the small scale, nutrient fluxes towards single roots lead to strong gradients in nutrient concentrations around single roots. At the scale of the root system and soil profile, nutrient fluxes are generated by water fluxes and variations in nutrient uptake due to spatially varying root density, nutrient concentrations and water contents. In this contribution, we present a numerical simulation model that describes the processes at the scale of a single root and the scale of the entire root system simultaneously. Water flow and nutrient transport in the soil are described by the 3-D Richards and advection-dispersion equations, respectively. Water uptake by a root segment is simulated based on the difference between the soil water potential at the soil root interface and in the xylem tissue. The xylem water potential is derived from solving a set of flow equations that describe flow in the root network (Javaux et al., 2008). Nutrient uptake by a segment is simulated as a function of the nutrient concentration at the soil-root interface using a nonlinear Michaelis-Menten equation. An accurate description of the nutrient concentrations gradients around single roots requires a spatial resolution in the sub mm scale and is therefore not feasible for simulations of the entire root system or soil profile. In order to address this problem, a 1-D axisymmetric model (Barber and Cushman, 1981) was used to describe nutrient transport towards a single root segment. The network of connected cylindrical models was coupled to a 3-D regular grid that was used to solve the flow and transport equations at the root system scale. The coupling was done by matching the fluxes across the interfaces of the voxels of the 3-D grid that contain root segments with the fluxes at the outer boundaries of the cylindrical domains and by matching the sink terms in these voxels with uptake by the root segments. To demonstrate the

  10. Inhibition of nitrification in municipal wastewater-treating photobioreactors: Effect on algal growth and nutrient uptake.

    PubMed

    Krustok, I; Odlare, M; Truu, J; Nehrenheim, E

    2016-02-01

    The effect of inhibiting nitrification on algal growth and nutrient uptake was studied in photobioreactors treating municipal wastewater. As previous studies have indicated that algae prefer certain nitrogen species to others, and because nitrifying bacteria are inhibited by microalgae, it is important to shed more light on these interactions. In this study allylthiourea (ATU) was used to inhibit nitrification in wastewater-treating photobioreactors. The nitrification-inhibited reactors were compared to control reactors with no ATU added. Microalgae had higher growth in the inhibited reactors, resulting in a higher chlorophyll a concentration. The species mix also differed, with Chlorella and Scenedesmus being the dominant genera in the control reactors and Cryptomonas and Chlorella dominating in the inhibited reactors. The nitrogen speciation in the reactors after 8 days incubation was also different in the two setups, with N existing mostly as NH4-N in the inhibited reactors and as NO3-N in the control reactors. PMID:26716890

  11. Efficacies of designer biochars in improving biomass and nutrient uptake of winter wheat grown in a hard setting subsoil layer.

    PubMed

    Sigua, G C; Novak, J M; Watts, D W; Johnson, M G; Spokas, K

    2016-01-01

    In the Coastal Plains region of the United States, the hard setting subsoil layer of Norfolk soils results in low water holding capacity and nutrient retention, which often limits root development. In this region, the Norfolk soils are under intensive crop production that further depletes nutrients and reduces organic carbon (C). Incorporation of pyrolyzed organic residues or "biochars" can provide an alternative recalcitrant C source. However, biochar quality and effect can be inconsistent and different biochars react differently in soils. We hypothesized that addition of different designer biochars will have variable effects on biomass and nutrient uptake of winter wheat. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of designer biochars on biomass productivity and nutrient uptake of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in a Norfolk's hard setting subsoil layer. Biochars were added to Norfolk's hard setting subsoil layer at the rate of 40 Mg ha(-1). The different sources of biochars were: plant-based (pine chips, PC); animal-based (poultry litter, PL); 50:50 blend (50% PC:50% PL); 80:20 blend (80% PC:20% PL); and hardwood (HW). Aboveground and belowground biomass and nutrient uptake of winter wheat varied significantly (p⩽0.0001) with the different designer biochar applications. The greatest increase in the belowground biomass of winter wheat over the control was from 80:20 blend of PC:PL (81%) followed by HW (76%), PC (59%) and 50:50 blend of PC:PL (9%). However, application of PL resulted in significant reduction of belowground biomass by about 82% when compared to the control plants. The average uptake of P, K, Ca, Mg, Na, Al, Fe, Cu and Zn in both the aboveground and belowground biomass of winter wheat varied remarkably with biochar treatments. Overall, our results showed promising significance for the treatment of a Norfolk's hard setting subsoil layer since designer biochars did improve both aboveground/belowground biomass and nutrient uptake

  12. Separating physical and biological nutrient retention and quantifying uptake kinetics from ambient to saturation in successive mountain stream reaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covino, Timothy; McGlynn, Brian; Baker, Michelle

    2010-12-01

    Hydrological and biogeochemical processes in stream reaches impact the downstream transport of nutrients. The output from one stream reach becomes the input for the next, leading to serial processing along stream networks. The shape of the uptake-concentration curve for each reach indicates in-stream biological uptake of nutrient. Combined with physical retention due to hydrologic turnover, both biological and physical retention will control nutrient export downstream. We performed an instantaneous addition of conservative (chloride, Cl) and nonconservative nutrient (nitrate-nitrogen, NO3-N) tracers to ascertain the relative roles of physical and biological retention across four adjacent reaches along a 3744 m stream network in the Sawtooth Mountains, ID. Physical retention dominated total retention ranging from 15% to 58% across individual reaches and totaling 81% across the entire stream length. Within each reach, biological uptake was strongly controlled by nutrient concentration. We quantified continuous Michaelis-Menten (M-M) kinetic curves for each reach and determined that ambient uptake (Uamb) ranged from 19 to 58 μg m-2 min-1, maximum uptake (Umax) from 65 to 240 μg m-2 min-1, and half-saturation constants (Km) from 4.2 to 14.4 μg l-1 NO3-N. Biological retention capacity indicated by Umax decreased in a downstream direction. Although biological retention capacity decreased moving downstream, it did not decrease as much as physical retention, which led to biological retention comprising a larger portion of total retention at downstream reaches. We suggest that accurate assessment of total retention across stream reaches and stream networks requires quantification of physical retention and the concentration-dependent nature of biological uptake.

  13. Application of microbial inoculants promote plant growth, increased nutrient uptake and improve root morphology of corn plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reducing fertilizers impacts from agriculture is a world-wide concern, both from an environmental and human health perspective. One way to reduce impacts of fertilizers is by enhancing plant uptake which improves nutrient use efficiency and also potentially reduce the amounts of fertilizer needed. ...

  14. Irrigation frequency alters nutrient uptake in container-grown Rhododendron plants grown with different rates of nitrogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of irrigation frequency (same amount of water per day given at different times) on nutrient uptake of container-grown evergreen Rhododendron ‘P.J.M. Compact’ (PJM) and ‘English Roseum’ (ER) and deciduous Rhododendron ‘Gibraltar’ (AZ) grown with different rates of nitrogen (N) fertilize...

  15. Irrigation frequency during container production alters Rhodendron growth, nutrient uptake, and flowering after transplanting into a landscape

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of irrigation frequency (same amount of water per day given at different times) and nitrogen (N) fertilizer application rate during container on nutrient uptake, growth (biomass) and flowering of evergreen Rhododendron ‘P.J.M. Compact’ (PJM) and ‘English Roseum’ (ER) and deciduous Rhod...

  16. The effects of weed-crop competition on nutrient uptake as affected by crop rotation and fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Mohammaddoust-E-Chamanabad, Hamid Reza; Asghari, Ali; Tulikov, Aleksander Mikhailovic

    2007-11-15

    A field study at the Agricultural University of Timiriazev, Moscow, was conducted to determine the effect of crop rotation and Long-term fertilizer application on differences in the competitive ability of spring barley and weeds to nutrient uptake in 2004 and 2005. Spring barley was cultivated in continuous and in crop rotation with winter rye, potato, clover, flax and fallow, with and without NPK application since 1912. Spring barley, especially in no fertilizer plots grown in crop rotation has greater dry mass than spring barley grown in continuous. While dry weed mass markedly decreased in crop rotation. Decrease dry weeds mass was greater when NPK had applied. The statistical analyses show that when spring barley grew in competition with weeds in the no fertilizer plots, crop rotation significantly increased nutrient content in spring barley, but when fertilizer applied the content of N, P2O5 and K2O in barley did not change. Lowest weeds nutrient content observed where soil fertility was increased by crop rotation and NPK application. Crop rotation significantly increased total nutrient uptake of soils by spring barley, but decreased total nutrient uptake by weeds. PMID:19090292

  17. Therapeutic perspectives of epigenetically active nutrients.

    PubMed

    Remely, M; Lovrecic, L; de la Garza, A L; Migliore, L; Peterlin, B; Milagro, F I; Martinez, A J; Haslberger, A G

    2015-06-01

    Many nutrients are known for a wide range of activities in prevention and alleviation of various diseases. Recently, their potential role in regulating human health through effects on epigenetics has become evident, although specific mechanisms are still unclear. Thus, nutriepigenetics/nutriepigenomics has emerged as a new and promising field in current epigenetics research in the past few years. In particular, polyphenols, as part of the central dynamic interaction between the genome and the environment with specificity at physiological concentrations, are well known to affect mechanisms underlying human health. This review summarizes the effects of dietary compounds on epigenetic mechanisms in the regulation of gene expression including expression of enzymes and other molecules responsible for drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion in cancer, metabolic syndrome, neurodegenerative disorders and hormonal dysfunction. PMID:25046997

  18. Therapeutic perspectives of epigenetically active nutrients

    PubMed Central

    Remely, M; Lovrecic, L; de la Garza, A L; Migliore, L; Peterlin, B; Milagro, F I; Martinez, A J; Haslberger, A G

    2015-01-01

    Many nutrients are known for a wide range of activities in prevention and alleviation of various diseases. Recently, their potential role in regulating human health through effects on epigenetics has become evident, although specific mechanisms are still unclear. Thus, nutriepigenetics/nutriepigenomics has emerged as a new and promising field in current epigenetics research in the past few years. In particular, polyphenols, as part of the central dynamic interaction between the genome and the environment with specificity at physiological concentrations, are well known to affect mechanisms underlying human health. This review summarizes the effects of dietary compounds on epigenetic mechanisms in the regulation of gene expression including expression of enzymes and other molecules responsible for drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion in cancer, metabolic syndrome, neurodegenerative disorders and hormonal dysfunction. PMID:25046997

  19. Plant uptake of cations under nutrient limitation: An environmental tracer study using Ca/Sr and K/Rb ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Z.; Keller, C. K.; Stacks, D.; Grant, M.; Harsh, J. B.; Letourneau, M.; Gill, R. A.; Balogh-Brunstad, Z.; Thomashow, L.; Dohnalkova, A.

    2012-12-01

    Vascular plant growth builds soils and ecosystem nutrient capital by sequestering and partitioning atmospheric CO2 into organic matter and continental runoff and driving terrestrial water and energy balances. Plant root-system functions, e.g. nutrient mobilization and uptake, are altered by environmental stress. However, the stress-response relationships are poorly understood. Chemical tracers have potential for assessing contributions of nutrients from various nutrient pools. Our objective is to quantitatively study how varying degrees of nutrient limitation (and corresponding needs to extract base cations from mineral sources) influence Ca and K uptake functions in a plant-root-mineral system. We are studying plant-driven mineral weathering in column experiments with red pine (Pinus resinosa) seedlings. The columns contain quartz sand amended with anorthite and biotite that constitute the sole mineral sources of Ca and K. These minerals also contain known amounts of Sr and Rb, which exhibit chemical behavior similar to Ca and K, respectively. The solution source of Ca and K was varied by adding 0% (no dissolved Ca and K), 10%, 30%, or 100% of a full strength Ca and K nutrient solution through irrigation water in which both Sr and Rb concentrations were negligible. Selected columns were destructively sampled at 3, 6 and 9 months to harvest biomass and measure plant uptake of cations. We used Ca/Sr and K/Rb ratio results to estimate the contributions of Ca and K from mineral and solution sources. For the 0% nutrient treatment, the Ca/Sr and K/Rb ratios in total biomass at 3 months, compared with those in the mineral phases, suggested preferential uptake of Ca and K over Sr and Rb, respectively, and allowed us to determine uptake discrimination factors for both cations. The K/Rb ratios in total biomass increased with greater K availability in the solution source, as expected, but Ca/Sr ratios did not show any dependence on Ca availability in the solution source

  20. The role of carbon in fungal nutrient uptake and transport: implications for resource exchange in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Fellbaum, Carl R; Mensah, Jerry A; Pfeffer, Philip E; Kiers, E Toby; Bücking, Heike

    2012-11-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, which forms between plant hosts and ubiquitous soil fungi of the phylum Glomeromycota, plays a key role for the nutrient uptake of the majority of land plants, including many economically important crop species. AM fungi take up nutrients from the soil and exchange them for photosynthetically fixed carbon from the host. While our understanding of the exact mechanisms controlling carbon and nutrient exchange is still limited, we recently demonstrated that (i) carbon acts as an important trigger for fungal N uptake and transport, (ii) the fungus changes its strategy in response to an exogenous supply of carbon, and that (iii) both plants and fungi reciprocally reward resources to those partners providing more benefit. Here, we summarize recent research findings and discuss the implications of these results for fungal and plant control of resource exchange in the AM symbiosis. PMID:22990447

  1. Sensitivity of the rate of nutrient uptake by chemotactic bacteria to physical and biological parameters in a turbulent environment.

    PubMed

    Watteaux, Romain; Stocker, Roman; Taylor, John R

    2015-12-21

    In this study, we use direct numerical simulations (DNS) to investigate the response of chemotactic bacteria to an isolated patch of chemoattractant in a turbulent environment. Previous work has shown that by stirring nutrients that are chemoattractants into a network of thin, elongated filaments, turbulence directly influences the rate at which chemotactic bacteria consume nutrients. However, the quantitative outcome of this process is influenced by a host of physical and biological factors, and many of these remain unexplored. Here, we analyse the sensitivity of nutrient uptake by chemotactic bacteria on a wide range of physical and biological parameters using a series of controlled DNS. Starting with uniformly distributed populations of motile and non-motile bacteria in a fully developed homogeneous, isotropic turbulent flow, we inject a patch of dissolved nutrients. We then assess the chemotactic advantage, defined as the difference between the nutrients consumed by motile and non-motile bacteria over the lifetime of the patch. We find that the chemotaxis can enhance the total uptake rate by a factor of 1.6 and allows the population of chemotactic bacteria to absorb nutrients 2.2 times faster than non-motile bacteria Results show that chemotactic bacteria are subject to a trade-off between swimming to leave regions devoid of nutrients and, once a nutrient gradient is detected, staying in regions of large nutrient concentration. These findings could help explain how the physical characteristics of turbulent marine ecosystems influence the optimal biological traits of bacteria through the competition for limited resources. PMID:26392215

  2. Modulation of the uptake of critical nutrients by breast cancer cells by lactate: Impact on cell survival, proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Marta; Araújo, João R; Correia-Branco, Ana; Gregório, Inês; Martel, Fátima; Keating, Elisa

    2016-02-15

    This work aimed to characterize the uptake of folate and glucose by breast cancer cells and to study the effect of lactate upon the transport of these nutrients and upon cell viability, proliferation and migration capacity. Data obtained showed that: a) MCF7 cells uptake (3)H-folic acid ((3)H-FA) at physiological but not at acidic pH; b) T47D cells accumulate (3)H-FA and (14)C-5-methyltetrahydrofolate ((14)C-5-MTHF) more efficiently at acidic than at physiological pH; c) (3)H-deoxyglucose ((3)H-DG) uptake by T47D cells is sodium-independent, inhibited by cytochalasin B (CYT B) and stimulated by insulin. Regarding the effect of lactate, in T47D cells, acute (26 min) and chronic (24 h) exposure to lactic acid (LA) stimulated (3)H-FA uptake. Acute exposure to LA also stimulated (3)H-DG uptake and chronic exposure to LA significantly stimulated T47D cell migratory capacity. In conclusion, the transport of folates is strikingly different in two phenotypically similar breast cancer cell lines: MCF7 and T47D cells. Additionally, lactate seems to act as a signaling molecule which increases the uptake of nutrients and promotes the migration capacity of T47D cells. PMID:26794902

  3. Similarity of nutrient uptake and root dimensions of Engelmann spruce and subalpine fir at two contrasting sites in Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Yanai, R; McFarlane, K; Lucash, M; Kulpa, S; Wood, D

    2009-10-09

    Nutrient uptake capacity is an important parameter in modeling nutrient uptake by plants. Researchers commonly assume that uptake capacity measured for a species can be used across sites. We tested this assumption by measuring the nutrient uptake capacity of intact roots of Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmanni Parry) and subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa (Hook.) Nutt.) at Loch Vale Watershed and Fraser Experimental Forest in the Rocky Mountains of central Colorado. Roots still attached to the tree were exposed to one of three concentrations of nutrient solutions for time periods ranging from 1 to 96 hours, and solutions were analyzed for ammonium, nitrate, calcium, magnesium, and potassium. Surprisingly, the two species were indistinguishable in nutrient uptake within site for all nutrients (P > 0.25), but uptake rates differed by site. In general, nutrient uptake was higher at Fraser (P = 0.01, 0.15, 0.03, 0.18 for NH{sub 4}{sup +}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, Ca{sup 2+}, and K{sup +}, respectively), which is west of the Continental Divide and has lower atmospheric deposition of N than Loch Vale. Mean uptake rates by site for ambient solution concentrations were 0.12 {micro}mol NH{sub 4}{sup +} g{sub fwt}{sup -1} h{sup -1}, 0.02 {micro}mol NO{sub 3}{sup -} g{sub fwt}{sup -1}, 0.21 {micro}mol Ca{sup 2+} g{sub fwt}{sup -1} h{sup -1}, and 0.01 {micro}mol Mg{sup 2+} g{sub fwt}{sup -1} h{sup -1} at Loch Vale, and 0.21 {micro}mol NH{sub 4}{sup +} f{sub fwt}{sup -1}h{sup -1}, 0.04 {micro}mol NO{sub 3}{sup -} g{sub fwt}{sup -1} h{sup -1}, 0.51 {micro}mol Ca{sup 2+}g{sub fwt}{sup -1}h{sup -1}, and 0.07 {micro}mol Mg{sup 2+} f{sub fwt}{sup -1}h{sup -1} at Fraser. The importance of site conditions in determining uptake capacity should not be overlooked when parameterizing nutrient uptake models. We also characterized the root morphology of these two species and compared them to other tree species we have measured at various sites in the northeastern USA. Engelman spruce and subalpine fir

  4. Ion Uptake Determination of Dendrochronologically-Dated Trees Using Neutron Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kenan Unlu; P.I. Kuniholm; D.K.H. Schwarz; N.O. Cetiner; J.J. Chiment

    2009-03-30

    Uptake of metal ions by plan roots is a function of the type and concentration of metal in the soil, the nutrient biochemistry of the plant, and the immediate environment of the root. Uptake of gold (Au) is known to be sensitive to soil pH for many species. Soil acidification due to acid precipitation following volcanic eruptions can dramatically increase Au uptake by trees. Identification of high Au content in tree rings in dendrochronologically-dated, overlapping sequences of trees allows the identification of temporally-conscribed, volcanically-influenced periods of environmental change. Ion uptake, specifically determination of trace amounts of gold, was performed for dendrochronologically-dated tree samples utilizing Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) technique. The concentration of gold was correlated with known enviironmental changes, e.g. volcanic activities, during historic periods.

  5. Characterization of the dissolved phosphorus uptake kinetics for the effluents from advanced nutrient removal processes.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Brett, Michael T

    2015-11-01

    Given the importance of the watershed protection plans, direct determination of phosphorus (P) mineralization rates in advanced wastewater treatment facility effluents is crucial for developing the most protective strategies minimiz eutrophication in receiving surface waters. In this study, algal bioassays were used to determine the uptake rate of dissolved P in effluents from a broad range of advanced nutrient removal technologies (e.g., membrane biological reactor, traditional biological, tertiary membrane, Blue PRO™, etc.). Dissolved P uptake kinetics were fit to a gamma model and three first-order decay models. A traditional one-pool model correlated poorly with the experimental data (i.e., r(2) = 0.73 ± 0.09), whereas two-pool model and three-pool models performed much better (i.e., r(2) > 0.9). These models also provided strong evidence for the existence of recalcitrant P in the effluents from these tertiary facilities. The Gamma model showed the mineralization of organic P followed a reactive continuum and further suggested the partitioning of P loads with different bioavailability levels should be accounted for the future modeling practices. From a modeling perspective, the Gamma model should be considered to be the theoretically best model as it gave the most parsimonious fit to the data using the fewest terms. Our study suggested that the current Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) model could be easily modified with the updated mineralization kinetics, which should lead to both ecological and economic benefits. PMID:26233657

  6. Land application of domestic effluent onto four soil types: plant uptake and nutrient leaching.

    PubMed

    Barton, L; Schipper, L A; Barkle, G F; McLeod, M; Speir, T W; Taylor, M D; McGill, A C; van Schaik, A P; Fitzgerald, N B; Pandey, S P

    2005-01-01

    Land application has become a widely applied method for treating wastewater. However, it is not always clear which soil-plant systems should be used, or why. The objectives of our study were to determine if four contrasting soils, from which the pasture is regularly cut and removed, varied in their ability to assimilate nutrients from secondary-treated domestic effluent under high hydraulic loadings, in comparison with unirrigated, fertilized pasture. Grassed intact soil cores (500 mm in diameter by 700 mm in depth) were irrigated (50 mm wk(-1)) with secondary-treated domestic effluent for two years. Soils included a well-drained Allophanic Soil (Typic Hapludand), a poorly drained Gley Soil (Typic Endoaquept), a well-drained Pumice Soil formed from rhyolitic tephra (Typic Udivitrand), and a well-drained Recent Soil formed in a sand dune (Typic Udipsamment). Effluent-irrigated soils received between 746 and 815 kg N ha(-1) and 283 and 331 kg P ha(-1) over two years of irrigation, and unirrigated treatments received 200 kg N ha(-1) and 100 kg P ha(-1) of dissolved inorganic fertilizer over the same period. Applying effluent significantly increased plant uptake of N and P from all soil types. For the effluent-irrigated soils plant N uptake ranged from 186 to 437 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1), while plant P uptake ranged from 40 to 88 kg P ha(-1) yr(-1) for the effluent-irrigated soils. Applying effluent significantly increased N leaching losses from Gley and Recent Soils, and after two years ranged from 17 to 184 kg N ha(-1) depending on soil type. Effluent irrigation only increased P leaching from the Gley Soil. All P leaching losses were less than 49 kg P ha(-1) after two years. The N and P leached from effluent treatments were mainly in organic form (69-87% organic N and 35-65% unreactive P). Greater N and P leaching losses from the irrigated Gley Soil were attributed to preferential flow that reduced contact between the effluent and the soil matrix. Increased N leaching from

  7. Impacts of industrial waste resources on maize (Zea mays L.) growth, yield, nutrients uptake and soil properties.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satnam; Young, Li-Sen; Shen, Fo-Ting; Young, Chiu-Chung

    2014-10-01

    Discharging untreated highly acidic (pH<4.0), organic and nutrients rich monosodium glutamate wastewater (MW), and highly alkaline (pH>10.0) paper-mill wastewater (PW) causes environmental pollution. When acidity of MW neutralized (pH 6.5±0.1) with PW and lime (treatments represented as MW+PW and MW+Lime), then MW may be utilized as a potential source of nutrients and organic carbon for sustainable food production. Objectives of this study were to compare the effects of PW and lime neutralized MW and chemical fertilizers on maize (Zea mays L. cv. Snow Jean) plant growth, yield, nutrients uptake, soil organic matter and humic substances. The field experiment was carried out on maize using MW at 6000 L ha(-1). Impacts of the MW application on maize crop and soil properties were evaluated at different stages. At harvest, plant height, and plant N and K uptake were higher in MW treatment. Leaf area index at 60 days after sowing, plant dry matter accumulation at harvest, and kernels ear(-1) and 100-kernel weight were higher in MW+Lime treatment. Kernel N, P, K, Mn, Fe and Zn, and plant Zn uptake were highest in MW+Lime. Plant Fe uptake, and soil organic matter and humic substances were highest in MW+PW. The MW+PW and MW+Lime treatments exhibited comparable results with chemically fertilized treatment. The MW acidity neutralized with lime showed positive impacts on growth, yield and nutrients uptake; nevertheless, when MW pH neutralized with PW has an additional benefit on increase in soil organic matter and humic substances. PMID:24507456

  8. Effects of cadmium on the placental uptake and transport to the fetus of nutrients.

    PubMed

    Danielsson, B R; Dencker, L

    1984-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is known to produce malformations, growth inhibition of the fetus, and placental necrosis in rodents at higher doses (3-4 mg/kg body wt). We studied the influence of Cd in various doses (0.5-4 mg/kg body wt) and at different survival intervals on the placental uptake and transfer to the fetus of vitamin B12 (vit. B12), zinc (Zn), alpha-aminobutyric acid (AIB), and deoxyglucose (DOX). These were chosen to represent various mechanisms of membrane transport. We show that vit. B12, which is accumulated in the placenta by a presumed receptor-mediated mechanism, is most easily disturbed by Cd. Thus, a significant decrease in transfer to the fetus was seen already 1 h after a high dose (4 mg/kg body wt) of Cd, and also at longer intervals (24 h) after low doses (0.5 mg/kg body wt). The transport of Zn (chemically similar to Cd) was also disturbed, but its inhibition was probably due in part to a decreased maternal serum concentration. The transport of AIB and DOX was largely unaffected. We conclude that inhibition of nutrient transfer to the fetus may be the underlying mechanism of growth retardation and possibly of the malformations produced by Cd. Vitamin B12 may be a sensitive indicator of early and subtle disturbances of placental function, not only for Cd but also for other chemicals suspected of causing placental disturbances. PMID:6478011

  9. Structure of the trypanosome haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor and implications for nutrient uptake and innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Matthew K; Tkachenko, Olga; Brown, Alan; Reed, Jenny; Raper, Jayne; Carrington, Mark

    2013-01-29

    African trypanosomes are protected by a densely packed surface monolayer of variant surface glycoprotein (VSG). A haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor (HpHbR) within this VSG coat mediates heme acquisition. HpHbR is also exploited by the human host to mediate endocytosis of trypanolytic factor (TLF)1 from serum, contributing to innate immunity. Here, the crystal structure of HpHbR from Trypanosoma congolense has been solved, revealing an elongated three α-helical bundle with a small membrane distal head. To understand the receptor in the context of the VSG layer, the dimensions of Trypanosoma brucei HpHbR and VSG have been determined by small-angle X-ray scattering, revealing the receptor to be more elongated than VSG. It is, therefore, likely that the receptor protrudes above the VSG layer and unlikely that the VSG coat can prevent immunoglobulin binding to the receptor. The HpHb-binding site has been mapped by single-residue mutagenesis and surface plasmon resonance. This site is located where it is readily accessible above the VSG layer. A single HbHpR polymorphism unique to human infective T. brucei gambiense has been shown to be sufficient to reduce binding of both HpHb and TLF1, modulating ligand affinity in a delicate balancing act that allows nutrient acquisition but avoids TLF1 uptake. PMID:23319650

  10. Effect of iron stress on Withania somnifera L.: antioxidant enzyme response and nutrient elemental uptake of in vitro grown plants.

    PubMed

    Rout, Jyoti Ranjan; Behera, Sadhana; Keshari, Nitin; Ram, Shidharth Sankar; Bhar, Subhajit; Chakraborty, Anindita; Sudarshan, Mathummal; Sahoo, Santi Lata

    2015-03-01

    In the present study the response of antioxidant enzyme activities and the level of expression of their corresponding genes on bioaccumulation of iron (Fe) were investigated. In vitro germinated Withania somnifera L. were grown in Murashige and Skoog's liquid medium with increasing concentrations (0, 25, 50, 100 and 200 µM) of FeSO4 for 7 and 14 days. Root and leaf tissues analyzed for catalase (CAT, EC 1.11.1.6), superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1) and guaiacol peroxidase (GPX, EC 1.11.1.7), have shown an increase in content with respect to exposure time. Isoforms of CAT, SOD and GPX were separated using non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and observed that the isoenzymes were greatly affected by higher concentrations of Fe. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis performed by taking three pairs of genes of CAT (RsCat, Catalase1, Cat1) and SOD (SodCp, TaSOD1.2, MnSOD) to find out the differential expression of antioxidant genes under Fe excess. RsCat from CAT and MnSOD from SOD have exhibited high levels of gene expression under Fe stress, which was consistent with the changes of the activity assayed in solution after 7 days of treatment. Analysis by proton induced X-ray emission exhibited an increasing uptake of Fe in plants by suppressing and expressing of other nutrient elements. The results of the present study suggest that higher concentration of Fe causes disturbance in nutrient balance and induces oxidative stress in plant. PMID:25480472

  11. Summer nutrient dynamics and biological carbon uptake rate in the Changjiang River plume inferred using a three end-member mixing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kui; Chen, Jianfang; Jin, Haiyan; Li, Hongliang; Gao, Shengquan; Xu, Jie; Lu, Yong; Huang, Daji; Hao, Qiang; Weng, Huanxin

    2014-12-01

    A three end-member (Changjiang River Plume, CRP; Outer-shelf Surface Water, OSW; and Outer-shelf Deep Water, ODW) mixing model based on quasi-conservative temperature and salinity was adopted to identify the relative contribution of different water masses to nutrient inventory and to estimate biological nutrient uptake in the plume-impacted area by considering the difference between the model-predicted and ambient concentration of nutrients up to a depth of PZD10 (photic zone depth to 10% of surface photosynthetically active radiance (PAR)). The end-member composite suggested that the mixing of CRP and OSW was the main process regulating nutrient dynamics and phytoplankton growth, while the correlation of ODW with ΔP indicated that the outcropped upwelling water contributed to the replenishment of P leading to Chl a accumulation to some extent. The ratio ΔDIN:ΔP:ΔSi:excess O2 in the euphotic zone where excess O2>10 μmol L-1 was estimated to be 28±9:1:33±13:145±71. A simple box model was used to evaluate biological carbon uptake rate in the euphotic zone based on nutrient deviation, Redfield ratio (6.6 C:1 DIN), and residence time of nutrients, assuming that the Changjiang River was the unique source of nutrients in the quasi-static box. The biological carbon uptake rates derived from the DIN, P and Si deviation were 465, 344, and 626 mg C m-2 d-1, respectively; these values were comparable to the POC flux (486±275 mg C m-2 d-1) derived from sediment trap. This finding suggested that the Changjiang River Plume was responsible for phytoplankton growth and subsequent high POC flux out of the euphotic zone. Furthermore, the community respiration rate was estimated to be 634 mg C m-2 d-1 based on the integrated 14C-based gross primary production of 1260 mg C m-2 d-1 and the net community production of 626 mg C m-2 d-1 in the euphotic zone of the region.

  12. Ammonium and nitrate uptake lengths in a small forested stream determined by {sup 15}N tracer and short-term nutrient enrichment experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, P.J.; Tank, J.L.; Sanzone, D.M.; Webster, J.R.; Wollheim, W.; Peterson, B.J.; Meyer, J.L.

    1998-11-01

    Nutrient cycling is an important characteristic of all ecosystems, including streams. Nutrients often limit the growth rates of stream algae and heterotrophic microbes and the decomposition rate of allochthonous organic matter. Nutrient uptake (S{sub W}), defined as the mean distance traveled by a nutrient atom dissolved in stream water before uptake by biota is often used as an index of nutrient cycling in streams. It is often overlooked, however, that S{sub W} is not a measure of nutrient uptake rate per se, but rather a measure of the efficiency with which a stream utilizes the available nutrient supply. The ideal method for measuring S{sub W} involves short-term addition of a nutrient tracer. Regulatory constraints often preclude use of nutrient radiotracers in field studies and methodological difficulties and high analytical costs have previously hindered the use of stable isotope nutrient tracers (e.g., {sup 15}N). Short-term nutrient enrichments are an alternative to nutrient tracer additions for measuring S{sub W}.

  13. Effect of elicitation on growth, respiration, and nutrient uptake of root and cell suspension cultures of Hyoscyamus muticus.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Edgard B; Curtis, Wayne R

    2002-01-01

    The elicitation of Hyoscyamus muticus root and cell suspension cultures by fungal elicitor from Rhizoctonia solani causes dramatic changes in respiration, nutrient yields, and growth. Cells and mature root tissues have similar specific oxygen uptake rates (SOUR) before and after the onset of the elicitation process. Cell suspension SOUR were 11 and 18 micromol O2/g FW x h for non-elicited control and elicited cultures, respectively. Mature root SOUR were 11 and 24 micromol O2/g FW x h for control and elicited tissue, respectively. Tissue growth is significantly reduced upon the addition of elicitor to these cultures. Inorganic yield remains fairly constant, whereas yield on sugar is reduced from 0.532 to 0.352 g dry biomass per g sugar for roots and 0.614 to 0.440 g dry biomass per g sugar for cells. This reduction in yield results from increased energy requirements for the defense response. Growth reduction is reflected in a reduction in root meristem (tip) SOUR, which decreased from 189 to 70 micromol O2/g FW x h upon elicitation. Therefore, despite the increase in total respiration, the maximum local oxygen fluxes are reduced as a result of the reduction in metabolic activity at the meristem. This distribution of oxygen uptake throughout the mature tissue could reduce mass transfer requirements during elicited production. However, this was not found to be the case for sesquiterpene elicitation, where production of lubimin and solavetivone were found to increase linearly up to oxygen partial pressures of 40% O2 in air. SOUR is shown to similarly increase in both bubble column and tubular reactors despite severe mass transfer limitations, suggesting the possibility of metabolically induced increases in tissue convective transport during elicitation. PMID:11934297

  14. Impact of variable bed morphology on transient storage, hyporhic exchange and nutrient uptake in a field-scale flume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, C. H.; Clark, J. J.; Wilcock, P. R.; Finlay, J. C.; Doyle, M. W.

    2006-12-01

    As part of an ongoing, multidisciplinary experimental effort coordinated by the National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics we investigated reach-scale interactions between, bed morphology, transient storage, nutrient cycling in a field-scale flume supplied with water from the Mississippi River. A combination of conservative salt tracer and soluble reactive phosphorous and nitrate additions was used to study the effects on these parameters of two bed morphologies (plane bed and alternate bar) and two sediment mixtures (clean gravel and sandy gravel) to determine how differences in sediment size and between plane-bed and laterally variable morphologies influence spatial heterogeneity in transport and uptake of nutrients. The goal was to partitioning reach-scale transient storage values between surface storage and hyporheic flow, determine how these values and their relative importance changed as we varied bed texture (or permeability) and added or removed surface features, and to then measure uptake of biologically available nitrogen and phosphorus individually and together along these surface and subsurface flow paths. In a final phase of the experiment, lights were added to the flume to determine how benthic algal abundance may change bed permeability and solute exchange with the bed as well as nutrient uptake rates. Initial results show that while mean water residence time varied by a factor of 2 across treatments (14 - 30 min) phosphorus uptake rates varied widely (5.5-2500 μg * m-2 * min-1 and the addition of light had a stronger impact on uptake rates than changes in geomorphic form.

  15. Complementary nutrient effects of separately collected human faeces and urine on the yield and nutrient uptake of spinach (Spinacia oleracea).

    PubMed

    Kutu, Funso R; Muchaonyerwa, Pardon; Mnkeni, Pearson N S

    2011-05-01

    A glasshouse experiment was conducted to evaluate the combined use of separately collected human faeces and urine as fertilizer for spinach (Spinacia oleracea) production. Seven human faeces N : urine N combinations (1 : 7 to 7 : 1) each supplying 200 kg N ha(-1) were evaluated along with sole human faeces, sole urine, inorganic fertilizer and an unamended control. Complementary application of the two resources, human faeces and urine, increased fresh and dry matter yields only in treatments having high proportions of urine. Nitrogen uptake followed the same trend but the opposite trend occurred for P uptake indicating that urine was a better source of N whereas human faeces were the better source of P. Potassium uptake was not influenced by the two resources. The minimal improvement observed in the fertilizer value of human faeces when co-applied with urine suggested that co-application of the two resources may not give an added yield advantage when compared with sole human faeces. PMID:20601403

  16. Nutrient uptake by rat enterocytes during diabetes mellitus; evidence for an increased sodium electrochemical gradient.

    PubMed Central

    Debnam, E S; Karasov, W H; Thompson, C S

    1988-01-01

    1. The effect of streptozotocin-induced diabetes (7 day duration) in rats on D-glucose uptake in vivo, the unidirectional uptake of D-glucose and L-proline in vitro, the passive uptake of L-glucose in vitro and the potential difference across the brush-border membrane has been studied. 2. Diabetes resulted in an increased carrier-mediated glucose uptake both in vivo and in vitro and a stimulation of L-proline uptake at a concentration of the amino acid (0.025 mM) at which uptake was largely Na+ dependent. Diabetes was without effect on uptake using a proline concentration of 50 mM at which transport was predominantly Na+ independent. 3. A marked hyperpolarization of the brush-border membrane and an enhanced passive glucose uptake were also evident during diabetes. 4. We conclude that the stimulation of glucose uptake in vivo in diabetic intestine involves events at the brush-border membrane. The mechanisms include an increased surface area for uptake and an enhanced transmembrane electrical gradient. The latter will have a major effect on the transport of other substrates when the uptake pathway is primarily Na+ dependent. PMID:3411516

  17. Chromium phytotoxicity in radish (Raphanus sativus): effects on metabolism and nutrient uptake.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, K K; Singh, N K; Rai, U N

    2013-09-01

    In the present investigation, chromium (VI) induced toxicity on metabolic activity and translocations of nutrients in radish were evaluated under controlled glass house conditions. Chromium was found to induce toxicity and significantly affect plant growth and metabolic activity. Excess of chromium (0.4 mM) caused a decrease in the concentration of iron in leaves (from 134.3 to 71.9 μg g(-1) dw) and significant translocation of sulphur, phosphorus and zinc. Translocation of manganese, copper and boron were less affected from root to stem. After 15 days of Cr exposure, maximum accumulation of Cr was found in roots (327.6 μg g(-1) dw) followed by stems (186.8 μg g(-1) dw) and leaves (116.7 μg g(-1) dw) at 0.4 mM Cr concentration. Therefore, Cr may affect negatively not only production, but also the nutritive quality of the radish; likewise, higher Cr content may cause health hazards for humans. PMID:23818061

  18. Effects of acidic deposition on nutrient uptake, nutrient cycling and growth processes of vegetation in the spruce-fir ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, S.B.; Garten, C.T.; Wullschleger, S.D.

    1996-10-16

    This report summarizes progress in three years of field research designed to evaluate biological and chemical indicators of the current and future health of the Southern Appalachian spruce-fir ecosystem. The emphasis of this research has been on the identification and understanding of mechanisms through which current levels of acidic deposition are impacting ecosystem processes. The identification of these principal mechanisms and key biological indicators of change was designed to improve our capabilities to detect, monitor, and assess the effects of air quality regulations and attendant future air quality changes on ecosystem response. Individual research tasks focused on the following research areas: (1) the significance of foliar uptake of atmospheric sources of nitrogen in relationship to plant utilization of N from available soil reserves; (2) linkages between atmospheric inputs to the soil surface, solution chemistry, and decomposition in the upper organic soil horizons; (3) effects of soil solution chemistry on uptake of cations and aluminum by fine roots; and (4) the effects of varying rates of calcium supply on carbon metabolism of Fraser fir and red spruce, and the relationship between calcium levels in wood cells and integrity of wood formed in bole and branches. Each of the individual tasks was designed to focus upon a mechanism or process that we consider critical to understanding chemical and biological linkages. These linkages will be important determinants in understanding the basis of past and potential future responses of the high elevation Southern Appalachian Forest to acidic deposition and other co-occurring environmental stresses. This report contains (1) background and rationale for the research undertaken in 1992-94; (2) a summary of principal research findings; (3) publications from this research; and (4) characterization of data sets produced by this research which will be the basis of future research, analyses and/or publications.

  19. Wnt signaling activation in adipose progenitors promotes insulin-independent muscle glucose uptake

    PubMed Central

    Zeve, Daniel; Seo, Jin; Suh, Jae Myoung; Stenesen, Drew; Tang, Wei; Berglund, Eric D.; Wan, Yihong; Williams, Linda J.; Lim, Ajin; Martinez, Myrna J.; McKay, Renée M.; Millay, Douglas P.; Olson, Eric N.; Graff, Jonathan M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Adipose tissues provide circulating nutrients and hormones. We present in vivo mouse studies highlighting roles for Wnt signals in both aspects of metabolism. β-catenin activation in PPARγ–expressing fat progenitors (PBCA) decreased fat mass and induced fibrotic replacement of subcutaneous fat specifically. In spite of lipodystrophy, PBCA mice did not develop the expected diabetes and hepatosteatosis, but rather exhibited improved glucose metabolism and normal insulin sensitivity. Glucose uptake was increased in muscle independently of insulin, associated with cell surface translocation of glucose transporters and AMPK activation. Ex vivo assays showed these effects were likely secondary to blood-borne signals since PBCA sera or conditioned media from PBCA fat progenitors enhanced glucose uptake and activated AMPK in muscle cultures. Thus, adipose progenitor Wnt activation dissociates lipodystrophy from dysfunctional metabolism and highlights a fat-muscle endocrine axis, which may represent a potential therapy to lower blood glucose and improve metabolism. PMID:22482731

  20. Compost and Crude Humic Substances Produced from Selected Wastes and Their Effects on Zea mays L. Nutrient Uptake and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Palanivell, Perumal; Susilawati, Kasim; Ahmed, Osumanu Haruna; Majid, Nik Muhamad

    2013-01-01

    Production of agriculture and timber commodities leads generation of enormous quantity of wastes. Improper disposal of these agroindustrial wastes pollutes the environment. This problem could be reduced by adding value to them. Therefore, a study was carried out to analyse and compare the nutrients content of RS, RH, SD, and EFB of composts and crude humic substances; furthermore, their effect on growth, dry matter production, and nutrient uptake for Zea mays L., and selected soil chemical properties were evaluated. Standard procedures were used to analyze humic acids (HA), crude fulvic acids (CFA), crude humin (CH), soil, dry matter production and nutrient uptake. Sawdust and RS compost matured at 42 and 47 days, respectively, while RH and EFB composts were less matured at 49th day of composting. Rice straw compost had higher ash, N, P, CEC, HA, K, and Fe contents with lower organic matter, total organic carbon, and C/N and C/P ratios. The HA of sawdust compost showed higher carbon, carboxylic, K, and Ca contents compared to those of RS, RH, and EFB. Crude FA of RS compost showed highest pH, total K, Ca, Mg, and Na contents. Crude humin from RS compost had higher contents of ash, N, P, and CEC. Rice straw was superior in compost, CFA, and CH, while sawdust compost was superior in HA. Application of sawdust compost significantly increased maize plants' diameter, height, dry matter production, N, P, and cations uptake. It also reduced N, P, and K based chemical fertilizer use by 90%. Application of CH and the composts evaluated in this study could be used as an alternative for chemical fertilizers in maize cultivation. PMID:24319353

  1. Compost and crude humic substances produced from selected wastes and their effects on Zea mays L. nutrient uptake and growth.

    PubMed

    Palanivell, Perumal; Susilawati, Kasim; Ahmed, Osumanu Haruna; Majid, Nik Muhamad

    2013-01-01

    Production of agriculture and timber commodities leads generation of enormous quantity of wastes. Improper disposal of these agroindustrial wastes pollutes the environment. This problem could be reduced by adding value to them. Therefore, a study was carried out to analyse and compare the nutrients content of RS, RH, SD, and EFB of composts and crude humic substances; furthermore, their effect on growth, dry matter production, and nutrient uptake for Zea mays L., and selected soil chemical properties were evaluated. Standard procedures were used to analyze humic acids (HA), crude fulvic acids (CFA), crude humin (CH), soil, dry matter production and nutrient uptake. Sawdust and RS compost matured at 42 and 47 days, respectively, while RH and EFB composts were less matured at 49th day of composting. Rice straw compost had higher ash, N, P, CEC, HA, K, and Fe contents with lower organic matter, total organic carbon, and C/N and C/P ratios. The HA of sawdust compost showed higher carbon, carboxylic, K, and Ca contents compared to those of RS, RH, and EFB. Crude FA of RS compost showed highest pH, total K, Ca, Mg, and Na contents. Crude humin from RS compost had higher contents of ash, N, P, and CEC. Rice straw was superior in compost, CFA, and CH, while sawdust compost was superior in HA. Application of sawdust compost significantly increased maize plants' diameter, height, dry matter production, N, P, and cations uptake. It also reduced N, P, and K based chemical fertilizer use by 90%. Application of CH and the composts evaluated in this study could be used as an alternative for chemical fertilizers in maize cultivation. PMID:24319353

  2. Mycorrhizal mediated feedbacks influence net carbon gain and nutrient uptake in Andropogon gerardii.

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R. M.; Miller, S. P.; Jastrow, J. D.; Rivetta, C. B.; Environmental Research

    2002-07-01

    The carbon sink strength of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) was investigated by comparing the growth dynamics of mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal Andropogon gerardii plants over a wide range of equivalent tissue phosphorus : nitrogen (P : N) ratios. Host growth, apparent photosynthesis (A{sub net}), net C gain (C{sub n}) and P and N uptake were evaluated in sequential harvests of mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal A. gerardii plants. Response curves were used to assess the effect of assimilate supply on the mycorrhizal symbiosis in relation to the association of C with N and P. Mycorrhizal plants had higher C{sub n} than nonmycorrhizal plants at equivalent shoot P : N ratios even though colonization did not affect plant dry mass. The higher C{sub n} in mycorrhizal plants was related to both an increase in specific leaf area and enhanced photosynthesis. The additional carbon gain associated with the mycorrhizal condition was not allocated to root biomass. The C{sub n} in the mycorrhizal plants was positively related to the proportion of active colonization in the roots. The calculated difference between C{sub n} values in mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal plants, C{sub diff}, appeared to correspond to the sink strength of the AMF and was not an indirect result of enhanced nutrition in mycorrhizal plants.

  3. Adaptations of mammary uptake and nutrient use to once-daily milking and feed restriction in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Guinard-Flament, J; Delamaire, E; Lamberton, P; Peyraud, J L

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to gain a clearer understanding of the different levels of regulation involved in the reduction in milk yield in response to once-daily milking and feed restriction. The treatments were designed as a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of 2 milking frequencies (once- or twice-daily milking) and 2 feeding levels (70 or 98% of requirements determined 1 wk before the trial). The cows were surgically prepared to study the net mammary balance of the nutrients that are precursors of milk components. Mammary efficiency in synthesizing milk components was estimated using a milk output:mammary uptake ratio. No interaction was observed between the effects of milking frequency and feeding level on milk and blood parameters except for milk protein yield, milk fatty acid profile, and nonesterified fatty acids metabolism. Once-daily milking and feed restriction reduced milk yield by 5.1 and 2.9 kg/d and fat-corrected milk yield by 4.2 and 4.1 kg/d, respectively. Both treatments induced a decrease in mammary blood flow. Once-daily milking led to a reduction in the extraction rate of glucose but no changes to the lactose output:glucose uptake ratio. Feed restriction did not change the glucose extraction rate but tended to improve the lactose output:glucose uptake ratio. Under once-daily milking, the slight increase in milk fat content (0.34 percentage units) was linked to a depressed uptake of glucose and acetate but without any variations in the uptake of beta-hydroxybutyrate and total glycerol and in the efficiency of acetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate conversion to short- and medium-chain fatty acids in milk. The decline in milk fat and protein contents (-0.43 and -0.23 percentage units, respectively) under feed restriction was associated with relatively similar reductions in the mammary uptake of all nutrients and with enhanced conversion of the glucose taken up by the mammary gland and used for lactose synthesis. As a result, once-daily milking and feed

  4. Comparing Measures of Fine Root Uptake by Mature Trees: Applications for Determining the Potential Impacts of Climate Change-Induced Soil Freezing on Nutrient Uptake by Sugar Maple and Red Spruce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socci, A. M.; Templer, P. H.

    2008-12-01

    Forests of the northeastern United States are predicted to experience a decrease in the depth and duration of snow pack due to global climate change. Even when coupled with milder winter temperatures, the loss of forest floor insulation can increase soil freezing depth and duration during the winter months. Soil frost leads to increased root mortality and soil nitrate leaching in stands dominated by sugar maple, a dominant tree species of northern hardwood forests. Greater nitrogen losses may be due to reduced nitrogen uptake by plant roots. As nitrogen is an essential nutrient for trees, changes in nitrogen uptake by fine roots may have implications for forest productivity and carbon storage. To test the impact of increased soil freezing on fine root uptake of nutrients from the soil, we established a snow removal experiment in sugar maple and red spruce dominated forests at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in New Hampshire, USA. In the first year of this study, we measured uptake of ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3-) by fine roots of sugar maple and red spruce during the early (May), peak (July), and late (September) growing season. Individuals of sugar maple were located on paired plots (n=4 reference and snow-removal plots, n= 3 individuals per plot) and sampled for rates of nutrient uptake prior to snow removal. We used both an in situ intact root uptake measurement known as "nitrogen depletion", and an ex situ excised root measurement. Individuals of red spruce (n=1 reference and snow-removal plot, n=3 individuals per plot) were sampled after one winter of snow removal, also using one in situ and one ex situ method of measuring fine root uptake of nutrients. Individuals of sugar maple took up significantly more NH4+ than NO3- during the early growing season, but there was no significant difference between forms of nitrogen taken up during the peak growing season. Individuals of red spruce took up significantly more NH4+ than NO3- during both the early

  5. Enhancement of growth and nutrient uptake of rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) by applying mineral nutrients and biofertilizers.

    PubMed

    Yasari, Esmaeil; Azadgoleh, M A Esmaeili; Mozafari, Saedeh; Alashti, Mahsa Rafati

    2009-01-15

    For investigating the effect of chemical fertilizer as well as biofertilizers on seed yield and quality i.e. oil, protein and nutrients concentration of rapeseed (Brassica napus L.), a split-plot fertilizers application experimental design in 4 replications was carried out during the 2005-2006 growing season, at the Gharakheil Agricultural Research Station in the Mazandaran province of Iran. Rapeseed was grown as a second crop in rotation after rice. Biofertilizers treatments were two different levels: control (no seed inoculation) and seeds inoculation with a combination of Azotobacter chroococcum and Azosprillum brasilense and Azosprillum lipoferum, as main plot and chemical fertilizers comprised N, P, K and their combinations, NPKS and NPK Zn as sub plots. The maximum value of seed yield obtained at (BF+NPK Zn) 3421.2 kg h(-1) corresponding to 244.5 pods per plant and maximum concentration of Zn in leaves as well as seeds. The highest weight of 1000 seeds (4.45 g) happened to obtain at (BF+NPK S) which coinciding with the maximum K levels in leaves. The highest number of branches was obtained at (BF+NPK Zn) with 4.43 branches per plant i.e., 46.2% increase over the control. The maximum value of rapeseed oil content 47.73% obtained at T16 (BF+NK) but maximum protein concentration of seed obtained at T12 (BF+N). Overall the results indicated that inoculation resulted in increase in seeds yield (21.17%), number of pods per plant (16.05%), number of branches (11.78%), weight of 1000 grain (2.92%), oil content of seeds (1.73%) and protein (3.91%) but decrease (-0.24%) in number of seeds per pods comparing to non-Biofertilizers treatments. Irrespective to the treatments, results showed that application of Biofertilizers coincided with 3.86, 0.82, 2.25, 0.75 and 0.91% increase in concentrations of N, P, K, S and Zn in the seeds over the non-Biofertilizers treatments. PMID:19579932

  6. The midgut ultrastructure of the endoparasite Xenos vesparum (Rossi) (Insecta, Strepsiptera) during post-embryonic development and stable carbon isotopic analyses of the nutrient uptake.

    PubMed

    Giusti, Fabiola; Dallai, Luigi; Beani, Laura; Manfredini, Fabio; Dallai, Romano

    2007-06-01

    Females of the endoparasite Xenos vesparum (Strepsiptera, Stylopidae) may survive for months inside the host Polistes dominulus (Hymenoptera, Vespidae). The midgut structure and function in larval instars and neotenic females has been studied by light and electron microscope and by stable carbon isotopic technique. The 1st instar larva utilizes the yolk material contained in the gut lumen, whereas the subsequent larval instars are actively involved in nutrient uptake from the wasp hemolymph and storage in the adipocytes. At the end of the 4th instar, the neotenic female extrudes with its anterior region from the host; the midgut progressively degenerates following an autophagic cell death program. First the midgut epithelial cells accumulate lamellar bodies and then expel their nuclei into the gut lumen; the remnant gut consists of a thin epithelium devoid of nuclei but still provided with intercellular junctions. We fed the parasitized wasps with sugar from different sources (beet or cane), characterized by their distinctive carbon isotope compositions, and measured the bulk (13)C/(12)C ratios of both wasps and parasites. Female parasites developing inside the wasp hemocoel are able to absorb nutrients from the host but, after their extrusion, they stop incorporating nutrients and survive thanks to the adipocytes content. PMID:18089098

  7. Growth of Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin ex. Steudel in mine water treatment wetlands: effects of metal and nutrient uptake.

    PubMed

    Batty, Lesley C; Younger, Paul L

    2004-11-01

    The abandoned mine of Shilbottle Colliery, Northumberland, UK is an example of acidic spoil heap discharge that contains elevated levels of many metals. Aerobic wetlands planted with the common reed, Phragmites australis, were constructed at the site to treat surface runoff from the spoil heap. The presence of a perched water table within the spoil heap resulted in the lower wetlands receiving acidic metal contaminated water from within the spoil heap while the upper wetland receives alkaline, uncontaminated surface runoff from the revegetated spoil. This unique situation enabled the comparison of metal uptake and growth of plants used in treatment schemes in two cognate wetlands. Results indicated a significant difference in plant growth between the two wetlands in terms of shoot height and seed production. Analyses of metal and nutrient concentrations within plant tissues provided the basis for three hypotheses to explain these differences: (i) the toxic effects of high levels of metals in shoot tissues, (ii) the inhibition of Ca (an essential nutrient) uptake by the presence of metals and H+ ions, and (iii) low concentrations of bioavailable nitrogen sources resulting in nitrogen deficiency. This has important implications for the engineering of constructed wetlands in terms of the potential success of plant establishment and vegetation development. PMID:15276276

  8. Vigorous Root Growth Is a Better Indicator of Early Nutrient Uptake than Root Hair Traits in Spring Wheat Grown under Low Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaosheng; Thorup-Kristensen, Kristian; Jensen, Lars Stoumann; Magid, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    A number of root and root hair traits have been proposed as important for nutrient acquisition. However, there is still a need for knowledge on which traits are most important in determining macro- and micronutrient uptake at low soil fertility. This study investigated the variations in root growth vigor and root hair length (RHL) and density (RHD) among spring wheat genotypes and their relationship to nutrient concentrations and uptake during early growth. Six spring wheat genotypes were grown in a soil with low nutrient availability. The root and root hair traits as well as the concentration and content of macro- and micronutrients were identified. A significant genetic variability in root and root hair traits as well as nutrient uptake was found. Fast and early root proliferation and long and dense root hairs enhanced uptake of macro- and micronutrients under low soil nutrient availability. Vigorous root growth, however, was a better indicator of early nutrient acquisition than RHL and RHD. Vigorous root growth and long and dense root hairs ensured efficient acquisition of macro- and micronutrients during early growth and a high root length to shoot dry matter ratio favored high macronutrient concentrations in the shoots, which is assumed to be important for later plant development. PMID:27379145

  9. Landspreading MSW compost in Wisconsin: Effect on corn yield, nutrient and metal uptake, and soil nitrate-N

    SciTech Connect

    Wolkowski, R.P.

    1995-12-31

    Studies were conducted at several Wisconsin locations from 1991-1994 to determine the effect of municipal solid waste (MSW) compost on corn (Zea mays L.) growth, nutrient and metal uptake, and soil nitrate-N content. Composts of varying maturities were applied at rates ranging between 0 and 56 t/a (dry matter basis), depending on year and location. Commercial fertilizers were applied to separate plots to determine the extent of nutrient availability from the compost. All treatments were applied in the spring and incorporated prior to planting corn. Mature compost always increased growth and yield above the untreated control, but the highest yields were found where recommended fertilizer was applied. Immature compost suppressed growth and reduced yield. Compost generally increased the levels of plant nutrients in the whole-plant tissue and grain. While compost did increase the concentration of some metals in the whole-plant tissue, these levels were found to be within the range expected for corn. Compost did not affect metal concentration in the grain. Soil nitrate-N was higher throughout most of the growing season in treatments receiving recommended N fertilizer.

  10. Microbial dynamics and enzyme activities in tropical Andosols depending on land use and nutrient inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mganga, Kevin; Razavi, Bahar; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    Microbial decomposition of soil organic matter is mediated by enzymes and is a key source of terrestrial CO2 emissions. Microbial and enzyme activities are necessary to understand soil biochemical functioning and identify changes in soil quality. However, little is known about land use and nutrients availability effects on enzyme activities and microbial processes, especially in tropical soils of Africa. This study was conducted to examine how microbial and enzyme activities differ between different land uses and nutrient availability. As Andosols of Mt. Kilimanjaro are limited by nutrient concentrations, we hypothesize that N and P additions will stimulate enzyme activity. N and P were added to soil samples (0-20 cm) representing common land use types in East Africa: (1) savannah, (2) maize fields, (3) lower montane forest, (4) coffee plantation, (5) grasslands and (6) traditional Chagga homegardens. Total CO2 efflux from soil, microbial biomass and activities of β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, chitinase and phosphatase involved in C, N and P cycling, respectively was monitored for 60 days. Total CO2 production, microbial biomass and enzyme activities varied in the order forest soils > grassland soils > arable soils. Increased β-glucosidase and cellobiohydrolase activities after N addition of grassland soils suggest that microorganisms increased N uptake and utilization to produce C-acquiring enzymes. Low N concentration in all soils inhibited chitinase activity. Depending on land use, N and P addition had an inhibitory or neutral effect on phosphatase activity. We attribute this to the high P retention of Andosols and low impact of N and P on the labile P fractions. Enhanced CO2 production after P addition suggests that increased P availability could stimulate soil organic matter biodegradation in Andosols. In conclusion, land use and nutrients influenced soil enzyme activities and microbial dynamics and demonstrated the decline in soil quality after landuse

  11. Remote Sensing of Cover Crop Nutrient Uptake on Maryland's Eastern Shore

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover cropping is recognized as an important agricultural best management practice with great promise for reducing nutrient inputs to the Chesapeake Bay. Accordingly, state-run cost share programs have been established to promote cover cropping on farms throughout Maryland. However, current estimate...

  12. Nitrogen source and application method impact on corn yield and nutrient uptake

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Farmers are looking for better management practices to enhance production and reduce negative environmental impact from nitrogen (N) fertilizer application since N is one of the most important and costly nutrient inputs for crop production. In this field experiment pre-plant swine effluent applicati...

  13. Corn grain and nutrient uptake response to different swine manure application methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Farmers are looking for better management practices to enhance production and reduce negative environmental impact from nitrogen (N) fertilizer application since N is one of the most important and costly nutrient inputs for crop production. In this field experiment pre-plant swine effluent applicati...

  14. NUTRIENT UPTAKE AND COMMUNITY METABOLISM IN STREAMS DRAINING HARVESTED AND OLD GROWTH WATERSHEDS: A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of timber harvesting on streams is assessed using two measures of ecosystem function: nutrient ad community metabolism. This research is being conducted in streams of the southern Appalachian Mountains of North Carolina, the Ouachita Mountains of Arkansas, the Cascad...

  15. Nutrient uptake of 'Jesup MaxQ' tall fescue fertilized with broiler litter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nutrients derived from organic or inorganic sources can affect tall fescue(Festuca arundinacea Schreb.)forage in various ways, including seasonal availability of macronutrients, and interaction with endophyte-produced metabolites, alkaloids, that can reduce animal performance. The cultivar, Jesu...

  16. Salinity limits to shoot and root growth and nutrient uptake in ‘Honeoye’ strawberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was done to identify salinity thresholds that limit shoot and root development and lead to leaf tissue necrosis in strawberry. Plants were exposed to five levels of salinity from CaCl2 mixed with nutrient solution. Electrical conductivity (EC) of the solutions ranged from 0.3-3.7 dS/m initia...

  17. Extracellular enzyme activities and nutrient availability during artificial groundwater recharge.

    PubMed

    Kolehmainen, Reija E; Korpela, Jaana P; Münster, Uwe; Puhakka, Jaakko A; Tuovinen, Olli H

    2009-02-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) removal is the main objective of artificial groundwater recharge (AGR) for drinking water production and biodegradation plays a substantial role in this process. This study focused on the biodegradation of NOM and nutrient availability for microorganisms in AGR by the determination of extracellular enzyme activities (EEAs) and nutrient concentrations along a flow path in an AGR aquifer (Tuusula Water Works, Finland). Natural groundwater in the same area but outside the influence of recharge was used as a reference. Determination of the specific alpha-d-glucosidase (alpha-Glu), beta-d-glucosidase (beta-Glu), phosphomonoesterase (PME), leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) and acetate esterase (AEST) activities by fluorogenic model substrates revealed major increases in the enzymatic hydrolysis rates in the aquifer within a 10m distance from the basin. The changes in the EEAs along the flow path occurred simultaneously with decreases in nutrient concentrations. The results support the assumption that the synthesis of extracellular enzymes in aquatic environments is up and down regulated by nutrient availability. The EEAs in the basin sediment and pore water samples (down to 10cm) were in the same order of magnitude as in the basin water, suggesting similar nutritional conditions. Phosphorus was likely to be the limiting nutrient at this particular AGR site. Furthermore, the extracellular enzymes functioned in a synergistic and cooperative way. PMID:19028394

  18. Water uptake and nutrient concentrations under a floodplain oak savanna during a non-flood period, lower Cedar River, Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, K.E.; Jacobson, P.

    2009-01-01

    Floodplains during non-flood periods are less well documented than when flooding occurs, but non-flood periods offer opportunities to investigate vegetation controls on water and nutrient cycling. In this study, we characterized water uptake and nutrient concentration patterns from 2005 to 2007 under an oak savanna located on the floodplain of the Cedar River in Muscatine County, Iowa. The water table ranged from 0.5 to 2.5 m below ground surface and fluctuated in response to stream stage, plant water demand and rainfall inputs. Applying the White method to diurnal water table fluctuations, daily ET from groundwater averaged more than 3.5 mm/day in June and July and approximately 2 mm/day in May and August. Total annual ET averaged 404 mm for a growing season from mid-May to mid-October. Savanna groundwater concentrations of nitrate-N, ammonium-N, and phosphate-P were very low (mean <0.18, <0.14, <0.08 mg/l, respectively), whereas DOC concentrations were high (7.1 mg/l). Low concentrations of N and P were in contrast to high nutrient concentrations in the nearby Cedar River, where N and P averaged 7.5 mg/ l and 0.13, respectively. In regions dominated by intensive agriculture, study results document valuable ecosystem services for native floodplain ecosystems in reducing watershed-scale nutrient losses and providing an oasis for biological complexity. Improved understanding of the environmental conditions of regionally significant habitats, including major controls on water table elevations and water quality, offers promise for better management aimed at preserving the ecology of these important habitats. Copyright ?? 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Biotite weathering and nutrient uptake by ectomycorrhizal fungus, Suillus tomentosus, in liquid-culture experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogh-Brunstad, Zsuzsanna; Kent Keller, C.; Thomas Dickinson, J.; Stevens, Forrest; Li, C. Y.; Bormann, Bernard T.

    2008-06-01

    Ectomycorrhiza-forming fungi (EMF) alter the nutrient-acquisition capabilities of vascular plants, and may play an important role in mineral weathering and the partitioning of products of weathering in soils under nutrient-limited conditions. In this study, we isolated the weathering function of Suillus tomentosus in liquid-cultures with biotite micas incubated at room temperature. We hypothesized that the fungus would accelerate weathering by hyphal attachment to biotite surfaces and transmission of nutrient cations via direct exchange into the fungal biomass. We combined a mass-balance approach with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to estimate weathering rates and study dissolution features on biotite surfaces. Weathering of biotite flakes was about 2-3 orders of magnitude faster in shaken liquid-cultures with fungus compared to shaken controls without fungus, but with added inorganic acids. Adding fungus in nonshaken cultures caused a higher dissolution rate than in inorganic pH controls without fungus, but it was not significantly faster than organic pH controls without fungus. The K +, Mg 2+ and Fe 2+ from biotite were preferentially partitioned into fungal biomass in the shaken cultures, while in the nonshaken cultures, K + and Mg 2+ was lost from biomass and Fe 2+ bioaccumulated much less. Fungal hyphae attached to biotite surfaces, but no significant surface changes were detected by SEM. When cultures were shaken, the AFM images of basal planes appeared to be rougher and had abundant dissolution channels, but such channel development was minor in nonshaken conditions. Even under shaken conditions the channels only accounted for only 1/100 of the total dissolution rate of 2.7 × 10 -10 mol of biotite m -2 s -1. The results suggest that fungal weathering predominantly occurred not by attachment and direct transfer of nutrients via hyphae, but because of the acidification of the bulk liquid by organic acids, fungal

  20. Influence of nutrient levels on uptake and effects of mercury, cadmium, and lead in water spinach.

    PubMed

    Göthberg, Agneta; Greger, Maria; Holm, Karin; Bengtsson, Bengt-Erik

    2004-01-01

    In Southeast Asia the aquatic macrophyte water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.) is a popular vegetable that is cultivated in freshwater courses. These often serve as recipients for domestic and other sorts of wastewater that often contain a variety of pollutants, such as heavy metals. In addition, fertilizers are frequently used where water spinach is cultivated commercially for the food market. To estimate the importance of ambient nutrient concentrations for accumulation of mercury (Hg), cadmium (Cd), and lead (Pb) in water spinach, plants were exposed to nutrient solutions of different strength and with varying metal concentrations. Metal-induced toxic effects, which might possibly affect the yield of the plants, were also studied. The lower the nutrient strength in the medium was, the higher the metal concentrations that accumulated in the different plant parts and the lower the metal concentration in the medium at which metal-induced toxic effects occurred. Accordingly, internal metal concentrations in the plants were correlated to toxic effects. Plants exposed to metals retained a major proportion of the metals in the roots, which had a higher tolerance than shoots for high internal metal concentrations. PMID:15254106

  1. Development of real-time radioisotope imaging systems for plant nutrient uptake studies

    PubMed Central

    Kanno, Satomi; Yamawaki, Masato; Ishibashi, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Natsuko I.; Hirose, Atsushi; Tanoi, Keitaro; Nussaume, Laurent; Nakanishi, Tomoko M.

    2012-01-01

    Ionic nutrition is essential for plant development. Many techniques have been developed to image and (or) measure ionic movement in plants. Nevertheless, most of them are destructive and limit the analysis. Here, we present the development of radioisotope imaging techniques that overcome such restrictions and allow for real-time imaging of ionic movement. The first system, called macroimaging, was developed to visualize and measure ion uptake and translocation between organs at a whole-plant scale. Such a device is fully compatible with illumination of the sample. We also modified fluorescent microscopes to set up various solutions for ion uptake analysis at the microscopic level. Both systems allow numerical analysis of images and possess a wide dynamic range of detection because they are based on radioactivity. PMID:22527392

  2. High intraspecific ability to adjust both carbon uptake and allocation under light and nutrient reduction in Halimium halimifolium L.

    PubMed Central

    Wegener, Frederik; Beyschlag, Wolfram; Werner, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    The allocation of recently assimilated carbon (C) by plants depends on developmental stage and on environmental factors, but the underlying mechanisms are still a matter of debate. In the present study, we investigated the regulation of C uptake and allocation and their adjustments during plant growth. We induced different allocation strategies in the Mediterranean shrub Halimium halimifolium L. by a reduction of light (Low L treatment) and nutrient availability (Low N treatment) and analyzed allocation parameters as well as morphological and physiological traits for 15 months. Further, we conducted a 13CO2 pulse-labeling and followed the way of recently assimilated carbon to eight different tissue classes and respiration for 13 days. The plant responses were remarkably distinct in our study, with mainly morphological/physiological adaptions in case of light reduction and adjustment of C allocation in case of nutrient reduction. The transport of recently assimilated C to the root system was enhanced in amount (c. 200%) and velocity under nutrient limited conditions compared to control plants. Despite the 57% light reduction the total biomass production was not affected in the Low L treatment. The plants probably compensated light reduction by an improvement of their ability to fix C. Thus, our results support the concept that photosynthesis is, at least in a medium term perspective, influenced by the C demand of the plant and not exclusively by environmental factors. Finally, our results indicate that growing heterotrophic tissues strongly reduce the C reflux from storage and structural C pools and therefore enhance the fraction of recent assimilates allocated to respiration. We propose that this interruption of the C reflux from storage and structural C pools could be a regulation mechanism for C translocation in plants. PMID:26300906

  3. Foraging decisions underlying restricted space use: effects of fire and forage maturation on large herbivore nutrient uptake.

    PubMed

    Raynor, Edward J; Joern, Anthony; Nippert, Jesse B; Briggs, John M

    2016-08-01

    Recent models suggest that herbivores optimize nutrient intake by selecting patches of low to intermediate vegetation biomass. We assessed the application of this hypothesis to plains bison (Bison bison) in an experimental grassland managed with fire by estimating daily rates of nutrient intake in relation to grass biomass and by measuring patch selection in experimental watersheds in which grass biomass was manipulated by prescribed burning. Digestible crude protein content of grass declined linearly with increasing biomass, and the mean digestible protein content relative to grass biomass was greater in burned watersheds than watersheds not burned that spring (intercept; F 1,251 = 50.57, P < 0.0001). Linking these values to published functional response parameters, ad libitum protein intake, and protein expenditure parameters, Fryxell's (Am. Nat., 1991, 138, 478) model predicted that the daily rate of protein intake should be highest when bison feed in grasslands with 400-600 kg/ha. In burned grassland sites, where bison spend most of their time, availability of grass biomass ranged between 40 and 3650 kg/ha, bison selected foraging areas of roughly 690 kg/ha, close to the value for protein intake maximization predicted by the model. The seasonal net protein intake predicted for large grazers in this study suggest feeding in burned grassland can be more beneficial for nutrient uptake relative to unburned grassland as long as grass regrowth is possible. Foraging site selection for grass patches of low to intermediate biomass help explain patterns of uniform space use reported previously for large grazers in fire-prone systems. PMID:27547359

  4. Olivine Weathering in Soil, and Its Effects on Growth and Nutrient Uptake in Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.): A Pot Experiment

    PubMed Central

    ten Berge, Hein F. M.; van der Meer, Hugo G.; Steenhuizen, Johan W.; Goedhart, Paul W.; Knops, Pol; Verhagen, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Mineral carbonation of basic silicate minerals regulates atmospheric CO2 on geological time scales by locking up carbon. Mining and spreading onto the earth's surface of fast-weathering silicates, such as olivine, has been proposed to speed up this natural CO2 sequestration (‘enhanced weathering’). While agriculture may offer an existing infrastructure, weathering rate and impacts on soil and plant are largely unknown. Our objectives were to assess weathering of olivine in soil, and its effects on plant growth and nutrient uptake. In a pot experiment with perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), weathering during 32 weeks was inferred from bioavailability of magnesium (Mg) in soil and plant. Olivine doses were equivalent to 1630 (OLIV1), 8150, 40700 and 204000 (OLIV4) kg ha−1. Alternatively, the soluble Mg salt kieserite was applied for reference. Olivine increased plant growth (+15.6%) and plant K concentration (+16.5%) in OLIV4. At all doses, olivine increased bioavailability of Mg and Ni in soil, as well as uptake of Mg, Si and Ni in plants. Olivine suppressed Ca uptake. Weathering estimated from a Mg balance was equivalent to 240 kg ha−1 (14.8% of dose, OLIV1) to 2240 kg ha−1 (1.1%, OLIV4). This corresponds to gross CO2 sequestration of 290 to 2690 kg ha−1 (29 103 to 269 103 kg km−2.) Alternatively, weathering estimated from similarity with kieserite treatments ranged from 13% to 58% for OLIV1. The Olsen model for olivine carbonation predicted 4.0% to 9.0% weathering for our case, independent of olivine dose. Our % values observed at high doses were smaller than this, suggesting negative feedbacks in soil. Yet, weathering appears fast enough to support the ‘enhanced weathering’ concept. In agriculture, olivine doses must remain within limits to avoid imbalances in plant nutrition, notably at low Ca availability; and to avoid Ni accumulation in soil and crop. PMID:22912685

  5. Nutrient uptake by agricultural crops from biochar-amended soils: results from two field experiments in Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karer, Jasmin; Zehetner, Franz; Kloss, Stefanie; Wimmer, Bernhard; Soja, Gerhard

    2013-04-01

    The use of biochar as soil amendment is considered as a promising agricultural soil management technique, combining carbon sequestration and soil fertility improvements. These expectations are largely founded on positive experiences with biochar applications to impoverished or degraded tropical soils. The validity of these results for soils in temperate climates needs confirmation from field experiments with typical soils representative for intensive agricultural production areas. Frequently biochar is mixed with other organic additives like compost. As these two materials interact with each other and each one may vary considerably in its basic characteristics, it is difficult to attribute the effects of the combined additive to one of its components and to a specific physico-chemical parameter. Therefore investigations of the amendment efficacy require the study of the pure components to characterize their specific behavior in soil. This is especially important for adsorption behavior of biochar for macro- and micronutrients because in soil there are multiple nutrient sinks that compete with plant roots for vital elements. Therefore this contribution presents results from a field amendment study with pure biochar that had the objective to characterize the macro- and microelement uptake of crops from different soils in two typical Austrian areas of agricultural production. At two locations in North and South-East Austria, two identical field experiments on different soils (Chernozem and Cambisol) were installed in 2011 with varying biochar additions (0, 30 and 90 t/ha) and two nitrogen levels. The biochar was a product from slow pyrolysis of wood (SC Romchar SRL). During the installation of the experiments, the biochar fraction of <2 mm was mixed with surface soil to a depth of 15 cm in plots of 33 m2 each (n=4). Barley (at the Chernozem soil) and maize (at the Cambisol) were cultivated according to standard agricultural practices. The highest crop yields at both

  6. Effect of fouling organisms on food uptake and nutrient release of scallop ( Chlamys nobilis, Reeve) cultured in Daya Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Zhenxia; Xiao, Hui; Yan, Yan; Huang, Liangmin

    2008-02-01

    Biofouling is an important factor that affects the bivalve farming industry. Fouling organisms may reduce growth and survival rate of the cultured species. Fouler are often filter feeders, so they are potential competitors for food resource with the cultured species. The present study was conducted to measure the impact of fouling on food uptake and nutrient release in April and June, 2006 in Daya Bay near Guangzhou, China. Results showed that fouling organisms had significant effect on food uptake and nutrient release. The chlorophyll a uptake rate of fouled scallops was 7.53Lh-1±1.416Lh-1 and 11.94Lh-1±2.497Lh-1 in April and June, respectively, significantly higher than those of cleaned scallops, i.e., 4.23Lh-1±2.744Lh-1 and 2.57Lh-1±1.832Lh-1 respectively. The consumption of total particulate matter by fouled scallops in April and June was 5.52Lh-1±0.818Lh-1 and 3.07Lh-1±0.971Lh-1, respectively; the corresponding results for cleaned scallops are 2.49Lh-1±0.614Lh-1 and 2.37±1.214Lh-1, respectively. Fouling increased ammonia release significantly. The ammonia release rate of fouled scallops was 33.81Lh-1±7.699Lh-1 and 76.39Lh-1±9.251Lh-1 in April and June, while cleaned scallops released 2.46Lh-1±0.511Lh-1 and 7.23Lh-1±1.026Lh-1 ammonia, respectively. Phosphate release of fouled scallops was 22.72Lh-1±9.978Lh-1 in June and cleaned scallops released phosphate 6.01Lh-1±0.876Lh-1 in April. Therefore, fouling contributed much to food reduction and concentration increase of ammonia and phosphate in water.

  7. Active Sulforhodamine 101 Uptake into Hippocampal Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Christian; Hagos, Yohannes; Hülsmann, Swen

    2012-01-01

    Sulforhodamine 101 (SR101) is widely used as a marker of astrocytes. In this study we investigated labeling of astrocytes by SR101 in acute slices from the ventrolateral medulla and the hippocampus of transgenic mice expressing EGFP under the control of the astrocyte-specific human GFAP promoter. While SR101 efficiently and specifically labeled EGFP-expressing astrocytes in hippocampus, we found that the same staining procedure failed to label astrocytes efficiently in the ventrolateral medulla. Although carbenoxolone is able to decrease the SR101-labeling of astrocytes in the hippocampus, it is unlikely that SR101 is taken up via gap-junction hemichannels because mefloquine, a blocker for pannexin and connexin hemichannels, was unable to prevent SR101-labeling of hippocampal astrocytes. However, SR101-labeling of the hippocampal astrocytes was significantly reduced by substrates of organic anion transport polypeptides, including estron-3-sulfate and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, suggesting that SR101 is actively transported into hippocampal astrocytes. PMID:23189143

  8. Characteristics of wood ash and influence on soil properties and nutrient uptake: an overview.

    PubMed

    Demeyer, A; Voundi Nkana, J C; Verloo, M G

    2001-05-01

    Wood industries and power plants generate enormous quantities of wood ash. Disposal in landfills has been for long a common method for removal. New regulations for conserving the environment have raised the costs of landfill disposal and added to the difficulties for acquiring new sites for disposal. Over a few decades a number of studies have been carried out on the utilization of wood ashes in agriculture and forestry as an alternative method for disposal. Because of their properties and their influence on soil chemistry the utilization of wood ashes is particularly suited for the fertility management of tropical acid soils and forest soils. This review principally focuses on ash from the wood industry and power plants and considers its physical, chemical and mineralogical characteristics, its effect on soil properties, on the availability of nutrient elements and on the growth and chemical composition of crops and trees, as well as its impact on the environment. PMID:11272014

  9. Berseem clover seeding rate and harvest management effects on forage yields and nutrient uptake in a swine-effluent spray field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research on how berseem clover (Trifolium alexandrium L.) seed rate (SR) affects winter and summer forage yields in swine-effluent spray fields is lacking for the southeastern USA. This 3-yr study determined optimum berseem SR for dry matter (DM) yield and nutrient uptake in the winter cover crop an...

  10. Effects of Native and Nonnative Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi on Growth and Nutrient Uptake of 'Pinot Noir' (Vitis vinifera L.) in Two Soils with Contrasting Levels of Phosporus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on growth and nutrient uptake by ‘Pinot noir’ was studied in an alluvial valley soil (Chehalis series, Mollisol) and a red hill soil (Jory series, Ultisol) to better understand the role AMF play in vineyards planted in valley versus hillside sites ...

  11. Effect of residue combinations on plant uptake of nutrients and potentially toxic elements.

    PubMed

    Brännvall, Evelina; Nilsson, Malin; Sjöblom, Rolf; Skoglund, Nils; Kumpiene, Jurate

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the plant pot experiment was to evaluate potential environmental impacts of combined industrial residues to be used as soil fertilisers by analysing i) element availability in fly ash and biosolids mixed with soil both individual and in combination, ii) changes in element phytoavailability in soil fertilised with these materials and iii) impact of the fertilisers on plant growth and element uptake. Plant pot experiments were carried out, using soil to which fresh residue mixtures had been added. The results showed that element availability did not correlate with plant growth in the fertilised soil with. The largest concentrations of K (3534 mg/l), Mg (184 mg/l), P (1.8 mg/l), S (760 mg/l), Cu (0.39 mg/l) and Zn (0.58 mg/l) in soil pore water were found in the soil mixture with biosolids and MSWI fly ashes; however plants did not grow at all in mixtures containing the latter, most likely due to the high concentration of chlorides (82 g/kg in the leachate) in this ash. It is known that high salinity of soil can reduce germination by e.g. limiting water absorption by the seeds. The concentrations of As, Cd and Pb in grown plants were negligible in most of the soils and were below the instrument detection limit values. The proportions of biofuel fly ash and biosolids can be adjusted in order to balance the amount and availability of macronutrients, while the possible increase of potentially toxic elements in biomass is negligible seeing as the plant uptake of such elements was low. PMID:24321288

  12. Colonisation of a Zn, Cd and Pb hyperaccumulator Thlaspi praecox Wulfen with indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal mixture induces changes in heavy metal and nutrient uptake.

    PubMed

    Vogel-Mikus, Katarina; Pongrac, Paula; Kump, Peter; Necemer, Marijan; Regvar, Marjana

    2006-01-01

    Plants of the Zn, Cd and Pb hyperaccumulator Thlaspi praecox Wulfen (Brassicaceae) inoculated or not with indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal mixture were grown in a highly Cd, Zn and Pb contaminated substrate in order to evaluate the functionality of symbiosis and assess the possible impact of AM colonisation on heavy metal uptake and tolerance. The results suggest AM development in the metal hyperaccumulating T. praecox is favoured at elevated nutrient demands, e.g. during the reproductive period. AM colonisation parameters positively correlated with total soil Cd and Pb. Colonised plants showed significantly improved nutrient and a decreased Cd and Zn uptake as revealed by TRXRF, thus confirming the functionality of the symbiosis. Reduced heavy metal uptake, especially at higher soil metal contents, indicates a changed metal tolerance strategy in colonised T. praecox plants. This is to our knowledge the first report on AM colonisation of the Zn, Cd and Pb hyperaccumulator T. praecox in a greenhouse experiment. PMID:15998561

  13. Regulation of active and passive nitrogen uptake in response to C02 and nitrogen application rate.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Active and passive uptake mechanisms are important for nitrogen uptake in plants. Active uptake includes nitrogen entering a plant via a diffusive flow process in the roots. This process is believed to be controlled by the plant and depends on plant demand for nitrogen. Passive uptake includes nitro...

  14. Influence of Mount St. Helens volcanic ash on alfalfa growth and nutrient uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Mahler, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    Concern has been expressed that large amounts of volcanic ash from the May 18, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens may have created potential nutritional problems associated with forage production in northern Idaho and eastern Washington to the extent that adjustments need to be made in soil test correlation data. The objectives of this greenhouse study were to : (1) determine the effect of varying amounts of volcanic ash mixed into soils of northern Idaho on total alfalfa biomass production, and (2) to determine the effect of various soil/ash mixtures on the nutrient concentrations of P, K, S, Ca, Mg, Mn and Zn in alfalfa. Alfalfa was grown in eight different northern Idaho soils amended with differing levels of volcanic ash (0, 20, 35, 50 and 75%) in the greenhouse. The alfalfa seeds were inoculated and fertilizer P and S were added to all treatments. Total plant biomass and P, K, S, Ca, Mg, Mn and Zn plant concentrations were measured. The eight were pooled for analysis and it was found that increasing amounts of volcanic ash increased alfalfa biomass production. Plant P, S, Ca, Mg and Zn concentrations also increased with increasing levels of ash. Conversely, increasing levels of ash resulted in lower alfalfa tissue K and Mn concentrations. 13 references, 7 figures.

  15. Prospective Zinc Solubilising Bacteria for Enhanced Nutrient Uptake and Growth Promotion in Maize (Zea mays L.)

    PubMed Central

    Goteti, Praveen Kumar; Emmanuel, Leo Daniel Amalraj; Desai, Suseelendra; Shaik, Mir Hassan Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) is one of the essential micronutrients required for optimum plant growth. Substantial quantity of applied inorganic zinc in soil is converted into unavailable form. Zinc solubilising bacteria are potential alternates for zinc supplement. Among 10 strains screened for Zn solubilisation, P29, P33, and B40 produced 22.0 mm clear haloes on solid medium amended with ZnCO3. Similarly, P17 and B40 showed 31.0 mm zone in ZnO incorporated medium. P29 and B40 showed significant release of Zn in broth amended with ZnCO3 (17 and 16.8 ppm) and ZnO (18 and 17 ppm), respectively. The pH of the broth was almost acidic in all the cases ranging from 3.9 to 6.1 in ZnCO3 and from 4.1 to 6.4 in ZnO added medium. Short term pot culture experiment with maize revealed that seed bacterization with P29 @ 10 g·kg−1 significantly enhanced total dry mass (12.96 g) and uptake of N (2.268%), K (2.0%), Mn (60 ppm), and Zn (278.8 ppm). PMID:24489550

  16. Elemental ratios and the uptake and release of nutrients by phytoplankton and bacteria in three lakes of the Canadian shield.

    PubMed

    Elser, J J; Chrzanowski, T H; Sterner, R W; Schampel, J H; Foster, D K

    1995-03-01

    The dynamics of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P), elemental ratios, and dark uptake/release of N and P in bacterial and phytoplankton size fractions were studied during summer 1992 in three lakes of contrasting food web structure and trophic status (L240, L110, L227). We wished to determine if phytoplankton and bacteria differed in their elemental characteristics and to evaluate whether the functional role of bacteria in nutrient cycling (i.e., as sink or source) depended on bacterial elemental characteristics. Bacterial contributions to total suspended particulate material and to fluxes of nutrients in the dark were substantial and varied for different elements. This indicated that some techniques for assaying phytoplankton physiological condition are compromised by bacterial contributions. C/N ratios were generally less variable than C/P and N/P ratios. Both elemental ratios and biomass-normalized N and P flux indicated that phytoplankton growth in each lake was predominantly P-limited, although in L227 these data reflect the dominance of N-fixing cyanobacteria, and N was likely limiting early in the sampling season. In L227, phytoplankton N/P ratio and biomass-normalized N flux were negatively correlated, indicating that flux data were likely a reasonable measure of the N status of the phytoplankton. However, for L227 phytoplankton, P-flux per unit biomass was a hyperbolic function of N/P, suggesting that the dominant L227 cyanobacteria have a limited uptake and storage capacity and that P-flux per unit biomass may not be a good gauge of the P-limitation status of phytoplankton in this situation. Examination of N-flux data in the bacterial size fraction relative to the N/P ratio of the bacteria revealed a threshold N/P ratio (∼22:1 N/P, by atoms), below which, bacteria took up and sequestered added N, and above which, N was released. Thus, the functional role of bacteria in N cycling in these ecosystems depended on their N/P stoichiometry. PMID

  17. Contrary seasonal changes of rates of nutrient uptake, organ mass, and voluntary food intake in red deer (Cervus elaphus).

    PubMed

    Arnold, Walter; Beiglböck, Christoph; Burmester, Marion; Guschlbauer, Maria; Lengauer, Astrid; Schröder, Bernd; Wilkens, Mirja; Breves, Gerhard

    2015-08-01

    Northern ungulates acclimatize to winter conditions with restricted food supply and unfavorable weather conditions by reducing energy expenditure and voluntary food intake. We investigated in a study on red deer whether rates of peptide and glucose transport in the small intestines are also reduced during winter as part of the thrifty phenotype of winter-acclimatized animals, or whether transport rates are increased during winter in order to exploit poor forage more efficiently. Our results support the latter hypothesis. We found in a feeding experiment that total energy intake was considerably lower during winter despite ad libitum feeding. Together with reduced food intake, mass of visceral organs was significantly lower and body fat reserves were used as metabolic fuel in addition to food. However, efficacy of nutrient absorption seemed to be increased simultaneously. Extraction of crude protein from forage was higher in winter animals, at any level of crude protein intake, as indicated by the lower concentration of crude protein in feces. In line with these in vivo results, Ussing chamber experiments revealed greater electrogenic responses to both peptides and glucose in the small intestines of winter-acclimatized animals, and peptide uptake into jejunal brush-border membrane vesicles was increased. We conclude that reduced appetite of red deer during winter avoids energy expenditure for unproductive search of scarcely available food and further renders the energetically costly maintenance of a large gut and visceral organs unnecessary. Nevertheless, extraction of nutrients from forage is more efficient in the winter to attenuate an inevitably negative energy balance. PMID:26017492

  18. Contrary seasonal changes of rates of nutrient uptake, organ mass, and voluntary food intake in red deer (Cervus elaphus)

    PubMed Central

    Beiglböck, Christoph; Burmester, Marion; Guschlbauer, Maria; Lengauer, Astrid; Schröder, Bernd; Wilkens, Mirja; Breves, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Northern ungulates acclimatize to winter conditions with restricted food supply and unfavorable weather conditions by reducing energy expenditure and voluntary food intake. We investigated in a study on red deer whether rates of peptide and glucose transport in the small intestines are also reduced during winter as part of the thrifty phenotype of winter-acclimatized animals, or whether transport rates are increased during winter in order to exploit poor forage more efficiently. Our results support the latter hypothesis. We found in a feeding experiment that total energy intake was considerably lower during winter despite ad libitum feeding. Together with reduced food intake, mass of visceral organs was significantly lower and body fat reserves were used as metabolic fuel in addition to food. However, efficacy of nutrient absorption seemed to be increased simultaneously. Extraction of crude protein from forage was higher in winter animals, at any level of crude protein intake, as indicated by the lower concentration of crude protein in feces. In line with these in vivo results, Ussing chamber experiments revealed greater electrogenic responses to both peptides and glucose in the small intestines of winter-acclimatized animals, and peptide uptake into jejunal brush-border membrane vesicles was increased. We conclude that reduced appetite of red deer during winter avoids energy expenditure for unproductive search of scarcely available food and further renders the energetically costly maintenance of a large gut and visceral organs unnecessary. Nevertheless, extraction of nutrients from forage is more efficient in the winter to attenuate an inevitably negative energy balance. PMID:26017492

  19. Effects of Harvesting Intensity and Herbivory by White-tailed Deer on Vegetation and Nutrient Uptake in a Northern Hardwood Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorks, T. E.; Leopold, D. J.; Raynal, D. J.; Murdoch, P. S.; Burns, D. A.

    2003-12-01

    We quantified the response of vegetation and nutrient uptake in a northern hardwood forest in southeastern New York for three to four years after three intensities of harvesting: clearcutting, heavy timber stand improvement (TSI), light TSI (97, 29, and 10% basal area reductions, respectively). We also quantified effects of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) herbivory on nutrient retention by vegetation. Total biomass and nutrient accumulation in vegetation was higher after TSI than clearcutting in the first two years but was highest in the fenced clearcut in subsequent years, indicating that TSI or partial harvesting is a viable management tool for harvesting timber while consistently maintaining high rates of nutrient retention. After clearcutting, biomass and nutrient retention were initially dominated by woody stems <1.4 m tall and herbaceous vegetation, but saplings 0.1-5.0 cm DBH became the most important contributors to biomass and nutrient accumulation within four years. However, after both intensities of TSI, trees >5.0 cm DBH continued to account for most biomass and nutrient accumulation whereas understory vegetation accumulated little biomass or nutrients. Heavy TSI resulted in increased regeneration of only two tree species (Acer pensylvanicum, Fagus grandifolia), but clearcutting allowed these two species, mature forest species (A. saccharum, Betula alleghaniensis), and the early successional Prunus pensylvanica to regenerate. Several early successional shrub and herbaceous species were also important to nutrient retention after clearcutting, including Polygonum cilinode, Rubus spp., and Sambucus racemosa. Herbivory by white-tailed deer dramatically reduced biomass and nutrient accumulation by woody stems <5 cm DBH after clearcutting (5.5 vs. 0.7 Mg biomass/ha and 30.4 vs. 6.3 kg N/ha on fenced and unfenced clearcut sites, respectively, after four years), indicating the important influence this herbivore can have on nutrient retention in

  20. Prion Protein Promotes Kidney Iron Uptake via Its Ferrireductase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Swati; Tripathi, Ajai; Qian, Juan; Beserra, Amber; Suda, Srinivas; McElwee, Matthew; Turner, Jerrold; Hopfer, Ulrich; Singh, Neena

    2015-01-01

    Brain iron-dyshomeostasis is an important cause of neurotoxicity in prion disorders, a group of neurodegenerative conditions associated with the conversion of prion protein (PrPC) from its normal conformation to an aggregated, PrP-scrapie (PrPSc) isoform. Alteration of iron homeostasis is believed to result from impaired function of PrPC in neuronal iron uptake via its ferrireductase activity. However, unequivocal evidence supporting the ferrireductase activity of PrPC is lacking. Kidney provides a relevant model for this evaluation because PrPC is expressed in the kidney, and ∼370 μg of iron are reabsorbed daily from the glomerular filtrate by kidney proximal tubule cells (PT), requiring ferrireductase activity. Here, we report that PrPC promotes the uptake of transferrin (Tf) and non-Tf-bound iron (NTBI) by the kidney in vivo and mainly NTBI by PT cells in vitro. Thus, uptake of 59Fe administered by gastric gavage, intravenously, or intraperitoneally was significantly lower in PrP-knock-out (PrP−/−) mouse kidney relative to PrP+/+ controls. Selective in vivo radiolabeling of plasma NTBI with 59Fe revealed similar results. Expression of exogenous PrPC in immortalized PT cells showed localization on the plasma membrane and intracellular vesicles and increased transepithelial transport of 59Fe-NTBI and to a smaller extent 59Fe-Tf from the apical to the basolateral domain. Notably, the ferrireductase-deficient mutant of PrP (PrPΔ51–89) lacked this activity. Furthermore, excess NTBI and hemin caused aggregation of PrPC to a detergent-insoluble form, limiting iron uptake. Together, these observations suggest that PrPC promotes retrieval of iron from the glomerular filtrate via its ferrireductase activity and modulates kidney iron metabolism. PMID:25572394

  1. Prion protein promotes kidney iron uptake via its ferrireductase activity.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Swati; Tripathi, Ajai; Qian, Juan; Beserra, Amber; Suda, Srinivas; McElwee, Matthew; Turner, Jerrold; Hopfer, Ulrich; Singh, Neena

    2015-02-27

    Brain iron-dyshomeostasis is an important cause of neurotoxicity in prion disorders, a group of neurodegenerative conditions associated with the conversion of prion protein (PrP(C)) from its normal conformation to an aggregated, PrP-scrapie (PrP(Sc)) isoform. Alteration of iron homeostasis is believed to result from impaired function of PrP(C) in neuronal iron uptake via its ferrireductase activity. However, unequivocal evidence supporting the ferrireductase activity of PrP(C) is lacking. Kidney provides a relevant model for this evaluation because PrP(C) is expressed in the kidney, and ∼370 μg of iron are reabsorbed daily from the glomerular filtrate by kidney proximal tubule cells (PT), requiring ferrireductase activity. Here, we report that PrP(C) promotes the uptake of transferrin (Tf) and non-Tf-bound iron (NTBI) by the kidney in vivo and mainly NTBI by PT cells in vitro. Thus, uptake of (59)Fe administered by gastric gavage, intravenously, or intraperitoneally was significantly lower in PrP-knock-out (PrP(-/-)) mouse kidney relative to PrP(+/+) controls. Selective in vivo radiolabeling of plasma NTBI with (59)Fe revealed similar results. Expression of exogenous PrP(C) in immortalized PT cells showed localization on the plasma membrane and intracellular vesicles and increased transepithelial transport of (59)Fe-NTBI and to a smaller extent (59)Fe-Tf from the apical to the basolateral domain. Notably, the ferrireductase-deficient mutant of PrP (PrP(Δ51-89)) lacked this activity. Furthermore, excess NTBI and hemin caused aggregation of PrP(C) to a detergent-insoluble form, limiting iron uptake. Together, these observations suggest that PrP(C) promotes retrieval of iron from the glomerular filtrate via its ferrireductase activity and modulates kidney iron metabolism. PMID:25572394

  2. Assessing winter cover crop nutrient uptake efficiency using a water quality simulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, I.-Y.; Lee, S.; Sadeghi, A. M.; Beeson, P. C.; Hively, W. D.; McCarty, G. W.; Lang, M. W.

    2014-12-01

    Winter cover crops are an effective conservation management practice with potential to improve water quality. Throughout the Chesapeake Bay watershed (CBW), which is located in the mid-Atlantic US, winter cover crop use has been emphasized, and federal and state cost-share programs are available to farmers to subsidize the cost of cover crop establishment. The objective of this study was to assess the long-term effect of planting winter cover crops to improve water quality at the watershed scale (~ 50 km2) and to identify critical source areas of high nitrate export. A physically based watershed simulation model, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), was calibrated and validated using water quality monitoring data to simulate hydrological processes and agricultural nutrient cycling over the period of 1990-2000. To accurately simulate winter cover crop biomass in relation to growing conditions, a new approach was developed to further calibrate plant growth parameters that control the leaf area development curve using multitemporal satellite-based measurements of species-specific winter cover crop performance. Multiple SWAT scenarios were developed to obtain baseline information on nitrate loading without winter cover crops and to investigate how nitrate loading could change under different winter cover crop planting scenarios, including different species, planting dates, and implementation areas. The simulation results indicate that winter cover crops have a negligible impact on the water budget but significantly reduce nitrate leaching to groundwater and delivery to the waterways. Without winter cover crops, annual nitrate loading from agricultural lands was approximately 14 kg ha-1, but decreased to 4.6-10.1 kg ha-1 with cover crops resulting in a reduction rate of 27-67% at the watershed scale. Rye was the most effective species, with a potential to reduce nitrate leaching by up to 93% with early planting at the field scale. Early planting of cover crops (~ 30

  3. Assessing winter cover crop nutrient uptake efficiency using a water quality simulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, I.-Y.; Lee, S.; Sadeghi, A. M.; Beeson, P. C.; Hively, W. D.; McCarty, G. W.; Lang, M. W.

    2013-11-01

    Winter cover crops are an effective conservation management practice with potential to improve water quality. Throughout the Chesapeake Bay Watershed (CBW), which is located in the Mid-Atlantic US, winter cover crop use has been emphasized and federal and state cost-share programs are available to farmers to subsidize the cost of winter cover crop establishment. The objective of this study was to assess the long-term effect of planting winter cover crops at the watershed scale and to identify critical source areas of high nitrate export. A physically-based watershed simulation model, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), was calibrated and validated using water quality monitoring data and satellite-based estimates of winter cover crop species performance to simulate hydrological processes and nutrient cycling over the period of 1991-2000. Multiple scenarios were developed to obtain baseline information on nitrate loading without winter cover crops planted and to investigate how nitrate loading could change with different winter cover crop planting scenarios, including different species, planting times, and implementation areas. The results indicate that winter cover crops had a negligible impact on water budget, but significantly reduced nitrate leaching to groundwater and delivery to the waterways. Without winter cover crops, annual nitrate loading was approximately 14 kg ha-1, but it decreased to 4.6-10.1 kg ha-1 with winter cover crops resulting in a reduction rate of 27-67% at the watershed scale. Rye was most effective, with a potential to reduce nitrate leaching by up to 93% with early planting at the field scale. Early planting of winter cover crops (~30 days of additional growing days) was crucial, as it lowered nitrate export by an additional ~2 kg ha-1 when compared to late planting scenarios. The effectiveness of cover cropping increased with increasing extent of winter cover crop implementation. Agricultural fields with well-drained soils and those

  4. Assessing winter cover crop nutrient uptake efficiency using a water quality simulation model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yeo, In-Young; Lee, Sangchui; Sadeghi, Ali M.; Beeson, Peter C.; Hively, W. Dean; McCarty, Greg W.; Lang, Megan W.

    2013-01-01

    Winter cover crops are an effective conservation management practice with potential to improve water quality. Throughout the Chesapeake Bay Watershed (CBW), which is located in the Mid-Atlantic US, winter cover crop use has been emphasized and federal and state cost-share programs are available to farmers to subsidize the cost of winter cover crop establishment. The objective of this study was to assess the long-term effect of planting winter cover crops at the watershed scale and to identify critical source areas of high nitrate export. A physically-based watershed simulation model, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), was calibrated and validated using water quality monitoring data and satellite-based estimates of winter cover crop species performance to simulate hydrological processes and nutrient cycling over the period of 1991–2000. Multiple scenarios were developed to obtain baseline information on nitrate loading without winter cover crops planted and to investigate how nitrate loading could change with different winter cover crop planting scenarios, including different species, planting times, and implementation areas. The results indicate that winter cover crops had a negligible impact on water budget, but significantly reduced nitrate leaching to groundwater and delivery to the waterways. Without winter cover crops, annual nitrate loading was approximately 14 kg ha−1, but it decreased to 4.6–10.1 kg ha−1 with winter cover crops resulting in a reduction rate of 27–67% at the watershed scale. Rye was most effective, with a potential to reduce nitrate leaching by up to 93% with early planting at the field scale. Early planting of winter cover crops (~30 days of additional growing days) was crucial, as it lowered nitrate export by an additional ~2 kg ha−1 when compared to late planting scenarios. The effectiveness of cover cropping increased with increasing extent of winter cover crop implementation. Agricultural fields with well-drained soils

  5. Atypical Hydrogen Uptake on Chemically Activated, Ultramicroporous Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Vinay V; Contescu, Cristian I; Gallego, Nidia C; Baker, Frederick S

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen adsorption at near-ambient temperatures on ultramicroporous carbon (UMC), derived through secondary chemical activation from a wood-based activated carbon was studied using volumetric and gravimetric methods. The results showed that physisorption is accompanied by a process of different nature that causes slow uptake at high pressures and hysteresis on desorption. In combination, this results in unusually high levels of hydrogen uptake at near-ambient temperatures and pressures (e.g. up to 0.8 wt % at 25 oC and 2 MPa). The heat of adsorption corresponding to the slow process leading to high uptake (17 20 kJ/mol) is higher than usually reported for carbon materials, but the adsorption kinetics is slow, and the isotherms exhibit pronounced hysteresis. These unusual properties were attributed to contributions from polarization-enhanced physisorption caused by traces of alkali metals residual from chemical activation. The results support the hypothesis that polarization-induced physisorption in high surface area carbons modified with traces of alkali metal ions is an alternate route for increasing the hydrogen storage capacity of carbon adsorbents.

  6. Cloning and Characterization of the CSF1 Gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Which Is Required for Nutrient Uptake at Low Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Tokai, Masaya; Kawasaki, Hideki; Kikuchi, Yasuhiro; Ouchi, Kozo

    2000-01-01

    We have isolated cold-sensitive fermentation mutants (Csf mutants) of a commercial baker's yeast that have practically no fermentation capacity at 5°C and return to their normal capacity at 25 to 40°C. CSF1 was cloned by functional complementation of the Csf phenotype. CSF1 contain an open reading frame of 8,874 nucleotides, encoding a protein of 2,958 amino acids. The nucleotide sequence was identical to that of the YLR087C gene in the Saccharomyces genome database, but there was no information about the function of the predicted CSF1 (YLR087C) protein. Gene disruption shows that CSF1 is required for growth and fermentation only at low temperatures. Permeabilized cells of the disruptant showed nearly the same ethanol production rate as those of the parent strain, even at 10°C. The disruptant cells had the same glucose uptake rates as the parental cells at 30°C, but three- to fivefold-lower rates than the parental cells at 10°C. These findings suggest that CSF1 associates with a new nutrient transport system which exists on the plasma membrane and is required only at low temperature. PMID:10781556

  7. Effects of Posidonia Oceanica Beach-Cast on Germination, Growth and Nutrient Uptake of Coastal Dune Plants

    PubMed Central

    Del Vecchio, Silvia; Marbà, Núria; Acosta, Alicia; Vignolo, Clara; Traveset, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Seagrass meadows play an important role in marine ecosystems. A part of seagrass production is also exported to adjacent coastal terrestrial systems, possibly influencing their functioning. In this work we experimentally analyzed the effect of Posidonia oceanica beach-cast on plant germination, growth, and nutrient uptake of two plant species (Cakile maritima and Elymus farctus) that grow on upper beaches and fore dunes along the Mediterranean coasts. We compared plants growing in simple sand (control) with those growing in a substrate enriched with P. oceanica wrack (treatment) in laboratory. P. oceanica wrack doubled the N substrate pool and kept the substrate humid. Plants growing in the treated substrate grew faster, were twice as large as those growing in the control substrate, while tissues were enriched in N and P (Cakile by the 1.3 fold in N and 2.5 fold in P; Elymus by 1.5 fold in N and 2 fold in P). Our results suggest a positive effect of seagrass litter for the enhancing of dune species, highlighting its role for the conservation of coastal dune ecosystems. PMID:23894678

  8. Determinants of uptake and maintenance of active commuting to school.

    PubMed

    Murtagh, Elaine M; Dempster, Martin; Murphy, Marie H

    2016-07-01

    The objective was to identify determinants of uptake and maintenance of active school travel (AST) over 4 years in children aged 9 at baseline. Data from wave 1 (n=8502) and 2 (n=7479) of the Growing Up in Ireland study were analysed. At 9- and 13-years 25% and 20% engaged in AST. Children were more likely to maintain or take-up AST if they lived in an urban area. Change in distance to school influenced both maintenance and adoption of AST, with a negative impact seen for increased distance between 9 and 13 years and a positive impact seen for decreased distance. Some factors which predict uptake and maintenance of AST are modifiable and can inform intervention development. PMID:27160529

  9. Effects of enhanced soil P on photosynthesis, root respiration and nutrient uptake of Artemisia tridentata in different photosynthetic photon flux densities and CO[sub 2] conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, M.; Caldwell, M.M. )

    1994-06-01

    Responses of leaf photosynthesis, root respiration and P uptake by Artemisia tridentata seedlings to study root physiological adjustments to utilize available nutrient resources in a changing soil environment. Root respiration was measured for intact root systems in split-root chambers. Increasing P in 0.2 [times] Hoagland's solution from 0.04 mmol to 2.0 mmol increased leaf photosynthesis by 6% in 3 days, increased nighttime leaf respiration rate by 8% and root respiration by 18%. After PPFD was reduced from 800 to 200 [mu]mol m[sup [minus]2]s[sup [minus]1] leaf photosynthesis deceased by 67%, and root respiration by 26% in the following day but then decreased by 35% over the next three days. Shading may limit root growth and nutrient uptake by lowering the carbohydrate supply to root systems.

  10. Uptake of radioiodide by Paenibacillus sp., Pseudomonas sp., Burkholderia sp. and Rhodococcus sp. isolated from a boreal nutrient-poor bog.

    PubMed

    Lusa, Merja; Lehto, Jukka; Aromaa, Hanna; Knuutinen, Jenna; Bomberg, Malin

    2016-06-01

    Radionuclides, like radioiodine ((129)I), may escape deep geological nuclear waste repositories and migrate to the surface ecosystems. In surface ecosystems, microorganisms can affect their movement. Iodide uptake of six bacterial strains belonging to the genera Paenibacillus, Pseudomonas, Burkholderia and Rhodococcus isolated from an acidic boreal nutrient-poor bog was tested. The tests were run in four different growth media at three temperatures. All bacterial strains removed iodide from the solution with the highest efficiency shown by one of the Paenibacillus strains with >99% of iodide removed from the solution in one of the used growth media. Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus and one of the two Paenibacillus strains showed highest iodide uptake in 1% yeast extract with maximum values for the distribution coefficient (Kd) ranging from 90 to 270L/kg DW. The Burkholderia strain showed highest uptake in 1% Tryptone (maximum Kd 170L/kg DW). The Paenibacillus strain V0-1-LW showed exceptionally high uptake in 0.5% peptone +0.25% yeast extract broth (maximum Kd>1,000,000L/kg DW). Addition of 0.1% glucose to the 0.5% peptone +0.25% yeast extract broth reduced iodide uptake at 4°C and 20°C and enhanced iodide uptake at 37°C compared to the uptake without glucose. This indicates that the uptake of glucose and iodide may be competing processes in these bacteria. We estimated that in in situ conditions of the bog, the bacterial uptake of iodide accounts for approximately 0.1%-0.3% of the total sorption of iodide in the surface, subsurface peat, gyttja and clay layers. PMID:27266299

  11. Basalt Weathering, Nutrient Uptake, And Carbon Release By An Exotic And A Native Arizona Grass Species Under Different Temperature Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallas, G.; Dontsova, K.; Chorover, J.; Hunt, E.; Ravi, S.

    2010-12-01

    basalt weathering. All of the leachate samples showed higher pH than the input water, and the pH was elevated in treatments that contained grass. This indicated that in the presence of vegetation there was more proton absorption. The trends in total nitrogen concentrations indicate a dependence on temperature; the same can be said of anion concentrations. Anion leaching is lower at higher temperatures possibly due to greater plant uptake. Both organic and inorganic carbon concentrations were found to be higher in grass treatments than in control treatments. Because both dissolved CO2 and soluble organic exudates encourage mineral dissolution, this could be causative of the weathering enhancements observed. Denudation of nutrient elements differed between plant species and between temperatures, possibly relating to plant uptake and secondary mineral formation. This study gives unique insight into plant-mineral interactions as a function of plant species and temperature that is essential for understanding Earth systems under changing climate.

  12. Nutrient depletion modifies cell wall adsorption activity of wine yeast.

    PubMed

    Sidari, R; Caridi, A

    2016-06-01

    Yeast cell wall is a structure that helps yeasts to manage and respond to many environmental stresses. The mannosylphosphorylation is a modification in response to stress that provides the cell wall with negative charges able to bind compounds present in the environment. Phenotypes related to the cell wall modification such as the filamentous growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are affected by nutrient depletion. The present work aimed at describing the effect of carbon and/or nitrogen limitation on the aptitude of S. cerevisiae strains to bind coloured polyphenols. Carbon- and nitrogen-rich or deficient media supplemented with grape polyphenols were used to simulate different grape juice conditions-early, mid, 'adjusted' for nitrogen, and late fermentations. In early fermentation condition, the R+G+B values range from 106 (high adsorption, strain Sc1128) to 192 (low adsorption, strain Σ1278b), in mid-fermentation the values range from 111 (high adsorption, strain Sc1321) to 258 (low adsorption, strain Sc2306), in 'adjusted' for nitrogen conditions the values range from 105 (high adsorption, strain Sc1321) to 194 (low adsorption, strain Sc2306) while in late fermentation conditions the values range from 101 (high adsorption, strain Sc384) to 293 (low adsorption, strain Sc2306). The effect of nutrient availability is not univocal for all the strains and the different media tested modified the strains behaviour. In all the media the strains show significant differences. Results demonstrate that wine yeasts decrease/increase their parietal adsorption activity according to the nutrient availability. The wide range of strain variability observed could be useful in selecting wine starters. PMID:27116955

  13. Mycorrhizal phosphate uptake pathway in maize: vital for growth and cob development on nutrient poor agricultural and greenhouse soils

    PubMed Central

    Willmann, Martin; Gerlach, Nina; Buer, Benjamin; Polatajko, Aleksandra; Nagy, Réka; Koebke, Eva; Jansa, Jan; Flisch, René; Bucher, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) form a mutually beneficial symbiosis with plant roots providing predominantly phosphorus in the form of orthophosphate (Pi) in exchange for plant carbohydrates on low P soils. The goal of this work was to generate molecular-genetic evidence in support of a major impact of the mycorrhizal Pi uptake (MPU) pathway on the productivity of the major crop plant maize under field and controlled conditions. Here we show, that a loss-of-function mutation in the mycorrhiza-specific Pi transporter gene Pht1;6 correlates with a dramatic reduction of above-ground biomass and cob production in agro-ecosystems with low P soils. In parallel mutant pht1;6 plants exhibited an altered fingerprint of chemical elements in shoots dependent on soil P availability. In controlled environments mycorrhiza development was impaired in mutant plants when grown alone. The presence of neighboring mycorrhizal nurse plants enhanced the reduced mycorrhiza formation in pht1;6 roots. Uptake of 33P-labeled orthophosphate via the MPU pathway was strongly impaired in colonized mutant plants. Moreover, repression of the MPU pathway resulted in a redirection of Pi to neighboring plants. In line with previous results, our data highlight the relevance of the MPU pathway in Pi allocation within plant communities and in particular the role of Pht1;6 for the establishment of symbiotic Pi uptake and for maize productivity and nutritional value in low-input agricultural systems. In a first attempt to identify cellular pathways which are affected by Pht1;6 activity, gene expression profiling via RNA-Seq was performed and revealed a set of maize genes involved in cellular signaling which exhibited differential regulation in mycorrhizal pht1;6 and control plants. The RNA data provided support for the hypothesis that fungal supply of Pi and/or Pi transport across Pht1;6 affects cell wall biosynthesis and hormone metabolism in colonized root cells. PMID:24409191

  14. Plant root-driven hydraulic redistribution, root nutrient uptake and carbon exudation interact with soil properties to generate rhizosphere resource hotspots that vary in space and time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espeleta, J. F.; Neumann, R. B.; Cardon, Z. G.; Mayer, K. U.; Rastetter, E. B.

    2014-12-01

    Hydraulic redistribution (HR) of soil water by plants occurs in seasonally dry ecosystems worldwide. During drought, water flows from deep moist soil, through plant roots, into dry (often litter-rich) upper soil layers. Using modeling, we explored how physical transport processes driven by transpiration and hydraulic redistribution interact with root physiology (nutrient uptake and carbon exudation) and soil properties (soil texture and cation exchange) to influence nitrogen and carbon concentrations in the rhizosphere. At the single root scale, we modeled a 10-cm radial soil domain, and simulated solute transport, soil cation exchange, and root exudation and nutrient uptake under two water flow patterns: daytime transpiration without nighttime HR, and daytime transpiration with nighttime HR. During HR, water efflux flushed solutes away from the root, diluting the concentrations of key nutrients like nitrate. The transport of cations by transpiration in the day and their accumulation near the root led to competitive desorption of ammonium from soil further from the root and generation of hotspots of ammonium availability at night. HR influenced the spatial and temporal patterns of these hotspots and their intensity. They were also influenced by soil properties of texture and cation exchange capacity. This dynamic resource landscape caused by diel cycling between transpiration and hydraulic redistribution presents a stage for greater complexity of microbial interactions. We are currently embedding a microbial community and small food web into this rhizosphere model in order to explore how organisms responsible for nutrient and soil carbon cycling respond to these fluctuating resource regimes.

  15. Studies on nutrient uptake of rice and characteristics of soil microorganisms in a long-term fertilization experiments for irrigated rice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi-chun; Wang, Guang-huo

    2005-02-01

    The ecosystem characteristics of soil microorganism and the nutrient uptake of irrigated rice were investigated in a split-block experiment with different fertilization treatments, including control (no fertilizer application), PK, NK, NP, NPK fertilization, in the main block, and conventional rice and hybrid rice comparison, in the sub block. Average data of five treatments in five years indicated that the indigenous N supply (INS) capacity ranged from 32.72 to 93.21 kg/ha; that indigenous P supply (IPS) capacity ranged from 7.42 to 32.25 kg/ha; and that indigenous K supply (IKS) capacity ranged from 16.24 to 140.51 kg/ha, which showed that soil available nutrient pool depletion might occur very fast and that P, K deficiency has become a constraint to increasing yields of consecutive crops grown without fertilizer application. It was found that soil nutrient deficiency and unbalanced fertilization to rice crop had negative effect on the diversity of the microbial community and total microbial biomass in the soil. The long-term fertilizer experiment (LTFE) also showed that balanced application of N, P and K promoted microbial biomass growth and improvement of community composition. Unbalanced fertilization reduced microbial N and increased C/N ratio of the microbial biomass. Compared with inbred rice, hybrid rice behavior is characterized by physiological advantage in nutrient uptake and lower internal K use efficiency. PMID:15633252

  16. A mechanistic soil biogeochemistry model with explicit representation of microbial and macrofaunal activities and nutrient cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatichi, Simone; Manzoni, Stefano; Or, Dani; Paschalis, Athanasios

    2016-04-01

    The potential of a given ecosystem to store and release carbon is inherently linked to soil biogeochemical processes. These processes are deeply connected to the water, energy, and vegetation dynamics above and belowground. Recently, it has been advocated that a mechanistic representation of soil biogeochemistry require: (i) partitioning of soil organic carbon (SOC) pools according to their functional role; (ii) an explicit representation of microbial dynamics; (iii) coupling of carbon and nutrient cycles. While some of these components have been introduced in specialized models, they have been rarely implemented in terrestrial biosphere models and tested in real cases. In this study, we combine a new soil biogeochemistry model with an existing model of land-surface hydrology and vegetation dynamics (T&C). Specifically the soil biogeochemistry component explicitly separates different litter pools and distinguishes SOC in particulate, dissolved and mineral associated fractions. Extracellular enzymes and microbial pools are explicitly represented differentiating the functional roles of bacteria, saprotrophic and mycorrhizal fungi. Microbial activity depends on temperature, soil moisture and litter or SOC stoichiometry. The activity of macrofauna is also modeled. Nutrient dynamics include the cycles of nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium. The model accounts for feedbacks between nutrient limitations and plant growth as well as for plant stoichiometric flexibility. In turn, litter input is a function of the simulated vegetation dynamics. Root exudation and export to mycorrhiza are computed based on a nutrient uptake cost function. The combined model is tested to reproduce respiration dynamics and nitrogen cycle in few sites where data were available to test plausibility of results across a range of different metrics. For instance in a Swiss grassland ecosystem, fine root, bacteria, fungal and macrofaunal respiration account for 40%, 23%, 33% and 4% of total belowground

  17. Is nutrient uptake by plant roots sensitive to the rate of mass flow? Reappraisal of an old chestnut for spatially distributed root systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurtrie, R. E.; Näsholm, T.

    2015-12-01

    Numerous modelling papers have considered the contribution of mass flow to nutrient uptake by a single plant root, but few have evaluated its contribution at the scale of an entire root system. We derive equations for nitrogen (N) influx per unit root surface area (J) and N uptake by a single root (U) as functions of soil nitrogen supply, root-length density (RLD) and the velocity of water at the root surface (vo). This model of N uptake by a single root can be used to evaluate N uptake by an entire root system if spatial distributions are known for soil N supply, root biomass and water-uptake velocity. In this paper we show that spatial distributions of RLD and vo can be estimated simultaneously under an optimisation hypothesis (MaxNup, McMurtrie et al. 2012), according to which total root mass and total water uptake are distributed vertically in order to maximise total N uptake. The MaxNup hypothesis leads to equations for optimal vertical profiles of RLD, vo, J and U, maximum rooting depth and the fraction of total available soil nitrogen taken up by the root system. Predicted values of vo are enhanced at depths where nitrogen influx per unit root surface area (J) is more sensitive to vo and diminished at depths where J is less sensitive to vo. Predicted vo is largest at the base of the root system where RLD is lowest, and is smallest in upper soil layers where RLD is highest. MaxNup thus predicts that water uptake will be distributed preferentially to soil depths where it will enhance nitrogen uptake U; this tendency will amplify the sensitivity of total N uptake to total water uptake, compared with strategies where vo is the same for all roots, or where vo is elevated for roots in upper soil layers. Reference McMurtrie RE, Iversen CM, Dewar RC, Medlyn BE, Näsholm T, Pepper DA, Norby RJ. 2012. Plant root distributions and nitrogen uptake predicted by a hypothesis of optimal root foraging. Ecology and Evolution 2: 1235-1250.

  18. Calcium sensor kinase activates potassium uptake systems in gland cells of Venus flytraps.

    PubMed

    Scherzer, Sönke; Böhm, Jennifer; Krol, Elzbieta; Shabala, Lana; Kreuzer, Ines; Larisch, Christina; Bemm, Felix; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S; Shabala, Sergey; Rennenberg, Heinz; Neher, Erwin; Hedrich, Rainer

    2015-06-01

    The Darwin plant Dionaea muscipula is able to grow on mineral-poor soil, because it gains essential nutrients from captured animal prey. Given that no nutrients remain in the trap when it opens after the consumption of an animal meal, we here asked the question of how Dionaea sequesters prey-derived potassium. We show that prey capture triggers expression of a K(+) uptake system in the Venus flytrap. In search of K(+) transporters endowed with adequate properties for this role, we screened a Dionaea expressed sequence tag (EST) database and identified DmKT1 and DmHAK5 as candidates. On insect and touch hormone stimulation, the number of transcripts of these transporters increased in flytraps. After cRNA injection of K(+)-transporter genes into Xenopus oocytes, however, both putative K(+) transporters remained silent. Assuming that calcium sensor kinases are regulating Arabidopsis K(+) transporter 1 (AKT1), we coexpressed the putative K(+) transporters with a large set of kinases and identified the CBL9-CIPK23 pair as the major activating complex for both transporters in Dionaea K(+) uptake. DmKT1 was found to be a K(+)-selective channel of voltage-dependent high capacity and low affinity, whereas DmHAK5 was identified as the first, to our knowledge, proton-driven, high-affinity potassium transporter with weak selectivity. When the Venus flytrap is processing its prey, the gland cell membrane potential is maintained around -120 mV, and the apoplast is acidified to pH 3. These conditions in the green stomach formed by the closed flytrap allow DmKT1 and DmHAK5 to acquire prey-derived K(+), reducing its concentration from millimolar levels down to trace levels. PMID:25997445

  19. Calcium sensor kinase activates potassium uptake systems in gland cells of Venus flytraps

    PubMed Central

    Scherzer, Sönke; Böhm, Jennifer; Krol, Elzbieta; Shabala, Lana; Kreuzer, Ines; Larisch, Christina; Bemm, Felix; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A. S.; Shabala, Sergey; Rennenberg, Heinz; Neher, Erwin; Hedrich, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    The Darwin plant Dionaea muscipula is able to grow on mineral-poor soil, because it gains essential nutrients from captured animal prey. Given that no nutrients remain in the trap when it opens after the consumption of an animal meal, we here asked the question of how Dionaea sequesters prey-derived potassium. We show that prey capture triggers expression of a K+ uptake system in the Venus flytrap. In search of K+ transporters endowed with adequate properties for this role, we screened a Dionaea expressed sequence tag (EST) database and identified DmKT1 and DmHAK5 as candidates. On insect and touch hormone stimulation, the number of transcripts of these transporters increased in flytraps. After cRNA injection of K+-transporter genes into Xenopus oocytes, however, both putative K+ transporters remained silent. Assuming that calcium sensor kinases are regulating Arabidopsis K+ transporter 1 (AKT1), we coexpressed the putative K+ transporters with a large set of kinases and identified the CBL9-CIPK23 pair as the major activating complex for both transporters in Dionaea K+ uptake. DmKT1 was found to be a K+-selective channel of voltage-dependent high capacity and low affinity, whereas DmHAK5 was identified as the first, to our knowledge, proton-driven, high-affinity potassium transporter with weak selectivity. When the Venus flytrap is processing its prey, the gland cell membrane potential is maintained around −120 mV, and the apoplast is acidified to pH 3. These conditions in the green stomach formed by the closed flytrap allow DmKT1 and DmHAK5 to acquire prey-derived K+, reducing its concentration from millimolar levels down to trace levels. PMID:25997445

  20. Uptake and antifungal activity of oligonucleotides in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Disney, Matthew D.; Haidaris, Constantine G.; Turner, Douglas H.

    2003-01-01

    Candida albicans is a significant cause of disease in immunocompromised humans. Because the number of people infected by fungal pathogens is increasing, strategies are being developed to target RNAs in fungi. This work shows that oligonucleotides can serve as therapeutics against C. albicans. In particular, oligonucleotides are taken up from cell culture medium in an energy-dependent process. After uptake, oligonucleotides, including RNA, remain mostly intact after 12 h in culture. For culture conditions designed for mammalian cells, intracellular concentrations of oligonucleotides in C. albicans exceed those in COS-7 mammalian cells, suggesting that uptake can provide selective targeting of fungi over human cells. A 19-mer 2′OMe (oligonucleotide with a 2′-O-methyl backbone) hairpin is described that inhibits growth of a C. albicans strain at pH < 4.0. This pH is easily tolerated in some parts of the body subject to C. albicans infections. In vivo dimethyl sulfate modification of ribosomal RNA and the decreased rate of protein synthesis suggest that this hairpin's activity may be due to targeting the ribosome in a way that does not depend on base pairing. Addition of anti-C. albicans oligonucleotides to COS-7 mammalian cells has no effect on cell growth. Evidently, oligonucleotides can selectively serve as therapeutics toward C. albicans and, presumably, other pathogens. Information from genome sequencing and functional genomics studies on C. albicans and other pathogens should allow rapid design and testing of other approaches for oligonucleotide therapies. PMID:12552085

  1. Cellular uptake and anticancer activity of carboxylated gallium corroles.

    PubMed

    Pribisko, Melanie; Palmer, Joshua; Grubbs, Robert H; Gray, Harry B; Termini, John; Lim, Punnajit

    2016-04-19

    We report derivatives of gallium(III) tris(pentafluorophenyl)corrole, 1 [Ga(tpfc)], with either sulfonic (2) or carboxylic acids (3, 4) as macrocyclic ring substituents: the aminocaproate derivative, 3 [Ga(ACtpfc)], demonstrated high cytotoxic activity against all NCI60 cell lines derived from nine tumor types and confirmed very high toxicity against melanoma cells, specifically the LOX IMVI and SK-MEL-28 cell lines. The toxicities of 1, 2, 3, and 4 [Ga(3-ctpfc)] toward prostate (DU-145), melanoma (SK-MEL-28), breast (MDA-MB-231), and ovarian (OVCAR-3) cancer cells revealed a dependence on the ring substituent: IC50values ranged from 4.8 to >200 µM; and they correlated with the rates of uptake, extent of intracellular accumulation, and lipophilicity. Carboxylated corroles 3 and 4, which exhibited about 10-fold lower IC50values (<20 µM) relative to previous analogs against all four cancer cell lines, displayed high efficacy (Emax= 0). Confocal fluorescence imaging revealed facile uptake of functionalized gallium corroles by all human cancer cells that followed the order: 4 > 3 > 2 > 1 (intracellular accumulation of gallium corroles was fastest in melanoma cells). We conclude that carboxylated gallium corroles are promising chemotherapeutics with the advantage that they also can be used for tumor imaging. PMID:27044076

  2. Effect of nutrient availability on the uptake of PCB congener 2,2',6,6'-tetrachlorobiphenyl by a diatom (Stephanodiscus minutulus) and transfer to a zooplankton (Daphnia pulicaria).

    PubMed

    Lynn, Scott G; Price, David J; Birge, Wesley J; Kilham, Susan S

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the importance of nutrient status of a diatom (Stephanodiscus minutulus) to the uptake of PCB congener #54 (2,2',6,6'-tetrachlorobiphenyl) and the subsequent transfer of PCB to a pelagic grazing zooplankton (Daphnia pulicaria). The algae, which were grown under different nutrient treatments, were then fed to a zooplankton to examine the subsequent food chain transfer of PCB. Algal cultures were grown for at least 2 weeks in a steady state condition in (1) non-limiting, (2) low-Si, (3) low-N or (4) low-P media. Steady state algal cultures were dosed with 0.2 microg L(-1) PCB and were sampled for PCB uptake after 24h. D. pulicaria were allowed to graze on these same cultures for 48 h before being analyzed for PCB body burdens. Low-Si (68% or 0.135 microg L(-1) of PCB) and low-P cultures (62%) had significantly higher percentage uptake of total PCB than the non-limiting (55%) or low-N (52%) treatments. When these values were divided by biochemical or elemental parameters, PCB per lipids (microg microg(-1)) had one of the lowest coefficients of variation (CV) across the four treatments, indicating their importance in PCB uptake. When equal biovolumes of the four different treatment cultures were fed to zooplankton, both the low-N (13.9 ng PCB mg wet weight(-1)) and the low-P (9.6 ng PCB mg wet weight(-1)) grazing D. pulicaria had significantly higher PCB per wet weight than the low-Si (5.6 ng PCB mg wet weight(-1)) and non-limited (2.6 ng PCB mg wet weight(-1)) grazing D. pulicaria. There were no significant differences between algal nutrient treatments in PCB per wet weight of zooplankton grazing on clean algal food in PCB contaminated media. This study indicates that uptake of PCB by phytoplankton can be significantly altered by nutrient availability which subsequently affects transfer to zooplankton, potentially through such responses as grazing rate and lipid assimilation. PMID:17452056

  3. Effect on pCO2 by phytoplankton uptake of dissolved organic nutrients in the Central and Northern Baltic Sea, a model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edman, Moa K.; Anderson, Leif G.

    2014-11-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) has been added to an existing biogeochemical model and the phytoplankton were allowed to utilize the dissolved organic nutrients for primary production. The results show typical vertical structures for dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and improved or maintained model skill for both mean vertical profiles and mean seasonal variation of biogeochemical variables, evaluated by objective skill metrics. Due to scarce DOM measurements in the Baltic Sea it was hard to validate the new variables, but the model can recreate the general magnitude and distribution of terrestrial and in situ produced DOC, DON, and DOP, as far as we know them. The improvements are especially clear for the total nutrient levels and in recreating the biological drawdown of CO2 in the Eastern Gotland basin. Without phytoplankton uptake of dissolved organic nitrogen and phosphate, CO2 assimilation is lower during the summer months and the partial pressure of CO2 increases by about 200 μatm in the Eastern Gotland Basin, while in the Bothnian Bay, both the duration and magnitude of CO2 assimilation are halved. Thus the phytoplankton uptake of dissolved organic nutrients lowers pCO2 in both basins. Variations in the river transported DOM concentration mainly affect the magnitude of the summer cyanobacteria bloom.

  4. Phorbol ester stimulates secretory activity while inhibiting receptor-activated aminopyrine uptake by gastric glands

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.R.; Chew, C.S.

    1986-03-05

    Both cyclic AMP-dependent and -independent secretagogues stimulate pepsinogen release, respiration and H/sup +/ secretory activity (AP uptake) in rabbit gastric glands. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (T), a diacyglycerol analog, activates protein kinase C (PKC) and stimulates secretion in many systems. T stimulated respiration and pepsinogen release by glands and increased AP uptake by both glands and purified parietal cells. However, T reduced AP uptake by glands stimulated with carbachol (C) or histamine (H) with an apparent IC/sub 50/ of 1 nM. Preincubation with T for 30 min produced maximum inhibition which was not reversed by removal of T. T accelerated the decline of the transient C peak while the late steady state response to H was most inhibited. H-stimulated AP uptake was also inhibited by 50 ..mu..g/ml 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-glycerol, a reported PKC activator, but not by the inactive phorbol, 4..cap alpha..-phorbol-12,13-didecanoate. In contrast, T potentiated AP uptake by glands stimulated with submaximal doses of dibutyryl cyclic AMP. These results suggest inhibition by T is a specific effect of PKC activators. The differing effects of T on secretion indicators may result from a dual action of T on receptor and post-receptor intracellular events.

  5. Transcriptomic Analysis of Compromise Between Air-Breathing and Nutrient Uptake of Posterior Intestine in Loach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus), an Air-Breathing Fish.

    PubMed

    Huang, Songqian; Cao, Xiaojuan; Tian, Xianchang

    2016-08-01

    Dojo loach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus) is an air-breathing fish species by using its posterior intestine to breathe on water surface. So far, the molecular mechanism about accessory air-breathing in fish is seldom addressed. Five cDNA libraries were constructed here for loach posterior intestines form T01 (the initial stage group), T02 (mid-stage of normal group), T03 (end stage of normal group), T04 (mid-stage of air-breathing inhibited group), and T05 (the end stage of air-breathing inhibited group) and subjected to perform RNA-seq to compare their transcriptomic profilings. A total of 92,962 unigenes were assembled, while 37,905 (40.77 %) unigenes were successfully annotated. 2298, 1091, and 3275 differentially expressed genes (fn1, ACE, EGFR, Pxdn, SDF, HIF, VEGF, SLC2A1, SLC5A8 etc.) were observed in T04/T02, T05/T03, and T05/T04, respectively. Expression levels of many genes associated with air-breathing and nutrient uptake varied significantly between normal and intestinal air-breathing inhibited group. Intraepithelial capillaries in posterior intestines of loaches from T05 were broken, while red blood cells were enriched at the surface of intestinal epithelial lining with 241 ± 39 cells per millimeter. There were periodic acid-schiff (PAS)-positive epithelial mucous cells in posterior intestines from both normal and air-breathing inhibited groups. Results obtained here suggested an overlap of air-breathing and nutrient uptake function of posterior intestine in loach. Intestinal air-breathing inhibition in loach would influence the posterior intestine's nutrient uptake ability and endothelial capillary structure stability. This study will contribute to our understanding on the molecular regulatory mechanisms of intestinal air-breathing in loach. PMID:27457889

  6. Interaction of Eu(III) with mammalian cells: Cytotoxicity, uptake, and speciation as a function of Eu(III) concentration and nutrient composition.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Susanne; Heller, Anne; Weiss, Stephan; Bok, Frank; Bernhard, Gert

    2015-10-01

    In case of the release of lanthanides and actinides into the environment, knowledge about their behavior in biological systems is necessary to assess and prevent adverse health effects for humans. We investigated the interaction of europium with FaDu cells (human squamous cell carcinoma cell line) combining analytical methods, spectroscopy, and thermodynamic modeling with in-vitro cell experiments under defined conditions. Both the cytotoxicity of Eu(III) onto FaDu cells and its cellular uptake are mainly concentration-dependent. Moreover, they are governed by its chemical speciation in the nutrient medium. In complete cell culture medium, i.e., in the presence of fetal bovine serum, Eu(III) is stabilized in solution in a wide concentration range by complexation with serum proteins resulting in low cytotoxicity and cellular Eu(III) uptake. In serum-free medium, Eu(III) precipitates as hardly soluble phosphate species, exhibiting a significantly higher cytotoxicity and slightly higher cellular uptake. The presence of a tenfold excess of citrate in serum-free medium causes the formation of Eu(HCit)2(3-) complexes in addition to the dominating Eu(III) phosphate species, resulting in a decreased Eu(III) cytotoxicity and cellular uptake. The results of this study underline the crucial role of a metal ion's speciation for its toxicity and bioavailability. PMID:26055652

  7. Combined effect of ultraviolet-B radiation and cadmium contamination on nutrient uptake and photosynthetic pigments in Brassica campestris L. seedlings.

    PubMed

    Shukla, U C; Murthy, R C; Kakkar, P

    2008-12-01

    Environmental and industrial pollution along with increase in ground level UV-B radiation, because of stratospheric ozone depletion, present multiple stresses, which may affect crop photosynthesis and productivity. The present study was undertaken to see interactive effects of heavy metal contamination (Cd(2+)) and UV-B exposure on essential nutrient (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), K(+)) uptake, biomass, and chlorophyll content in mustard (Brassica campestris L.) seedlings. Plants grown in 0.5, 1.0, 2.5, and 5.0 mg L(-1) Cd(2+) supplemented medium were exposed to UV-B for 30 min (0.4 mW cm(-2)) per day. The interactive effect of two stresses measured after 5 and 10 days showed an overall decline in biomass. Under dual stress (5 mg Cd(2+) L(-1)) significant (P < 0.001) decrease in chlorophyll a (43%), chlorophyll b (23%), and carotenoid (53%) was observed. Ca(2+) uptake was reduced by 51% in roots under high doses of Cd(2+) (5 mg L(-1)) and simultaneous exposure to 0.4 mW cm(-2) UV-B for 10 days. Mg(2+) content was reduced by 48% and K(+) by 62% under similar exposure conditions. Decline in nutrient uptake in Brassica campestris L. seedlings was observed both in root and shoot leaf in the initial growth period under controlled lab conditions. Cadmium ion (Cd(2+)) uptake was significantly enhanced by 33% (P < 0.001) in the presence of UV-B. The findings are significant as multiple stress conditions prevalent in the environment play an important role during the early growth period, a period critical for crop yield. PMID:18348293

  8. Active Layer Soil Carbon and Nutrient Mineralization, Barrow, Alaska, 2012

    DOE Data Explorer

    Stan D. Wullschleger; Holly M. Vander Stel; Colleen Iversen; Victoria L. Sloan; Richard J. Norby; Mallory P. Ladd; Jason K. Keller; Ariane Jong; Joanne Childs; Deanne J. Brice

    2015-10-29

    This data set consists of bulk soil characteristics as well as carbon and nutrient mineralization rates of active layer soils manually collected from the field in August, 2012, frozen, and then thawed and incubated across a range of temperatures in the laboratory for 28 day periods in 2013-2015. The soils were collected from four replicate polygons in each of the four Areas (A, B, C, and D) of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Soil samples were coincident with the established Vegetation Plots that are located in center, edge, and trough microtopography in each polygon. Data included are 1) bulk soil characteristics including carbon, nitrogen, gravimetric water content, bulk density, and pH in 5-cm depth increments and also by soil horizon, 2) carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus mineralization rates for soil horizons incubated aerobically (and in one case both aerobically and anaerobically) for 28 days at temperatures that included 2, 4, 8, and 12 degrees C. Additional soil and incubation data are forthcoming. They will be available when published as part of another paper that includes additional replicate analyses.

  9. Dynamics of plant nutrients, utilization and uptake, and soil microbial community in crops under ambient and elevated carbon dioxide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In natural settings such as under field conditions, the plant available soil nutrients in conjunction with other environmental factors such as, solar radiation, temperature, precipitation, and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration determine crop adaptation and productivity. Therefore, crop...

  10. Prospects for optimizing soil microbial functioning to improve plant nutrient uptake and soil carbon sequestration under elevated CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, M.; Pendall, E. G.

    2013-12-01

    Potential to mitigate climate change through increasing plant productivity and its carbon (C) input to soil may be limited by soil nitrogen (N) availability. Using a novel 13C-CO2 and 15N-soil dual labeling method, we investigated whether plant growth-promoting bacteria would interact with atmospheric CO2 concentration to alter plant productivity and soil C storage. We grew Bouteloua gracilis under ambient (380 ppm) or elevated CO2 (700 ppm) in climate-controlled chambers, and plant individuals were grown with or without Pseudomonas fluorescens inoculum, which can produce N catabolic enzymes. We observed that both eCO2 and P. fluorescens increased plant productivity and its C allocation to soil. P. fluorescens relative to eCO2 enhanced plant N uptake from soil organic matter, which highly correlated with soil N enzyme activities and rhizosphere exudate C. More importantly, P. fluorescens increased microbial biomass and deceased specific microbial respiration in comparison with eCO2. These results indicate that application of plant growth-promoting bacteria can increase microbial C utilization efficiency with subsequent N mineralization from soil organic matter, and may improve plant N availability and soil C sequestration. Together, our findings highlight the potential of plant growth-promoting bacteria for global change mitigation by terrestrial ecosystems.

  11. Fragilariopsis kerguelensis response to iron enrichment regarding its growth, uptake of nutrients and trace metals, and changes in CO2, CH4, and N2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Young Shin; Rhee, Tae Siek; Kim, Sun Young; Kim, Mi Seon; Choi, Man Sik; Yang, Eun Jin; Kim, Young-Nam

    2014-12-01

    We performed laboratory experiments to investigate the response of Fragilariopsis kerguelensis, a predominant diatom species in the Southern Ocean, to different concentrations of dissolved iron in the culture medium to assess changes in nutrients, trace metals, and greenhouse gases-CO2, CH4, and N2O-during growth. F. kerguelensis was cultured in standard f/2+Si media contained in closed chambers at 2℃, which is a typical surface temperature of the Southern Ocean in summer, under continuous irradiation with ~44 μmol photons m-2 s-1 for 8 days. The media contained 2.2 nM, 7.0 nM, and 10.6 nM of dissolved iron at inoculation. F. kerguelensis grew faster if the initial dissolved iron concentration was higher. Its production rate was ~40 cells mL-1 d-1 with an increase of 10-18 molar dissolved iron on a single cell basis. Fe and Mo were consumed faster than the growth rate at higher dissolved iron concentrations while Mn and Zn were consumed more slowly taking the mean values into account. Nitrate consumption by single cells increased with an increase of dissolved iron in the media, but phosphate and silicate showed a tendency to decrease. Hence, dissolved iron enhanced uptake of nitrate, but not the other nutrients, on a single cell basis. The carbon uptake per cell decreased with an increase in dissolved iron, which is opposite to the growth rate, suggesting that carbon content in single cells could not keep up with the cell growth. The iron efficacy of carbon uptake by single cells, defined as the ratio of the carbon uptake to the iron uptake, also showed a significant reduction with an increase in dissolved iron. This implies the inefficient usage of iron to absorb carbon at a high dissolved iron concentration. CH4 uptake by F. kerguelensis occurred in our experiments, but it was trivial in relation to the overall impact. N2O was consumed at a lower concentration of dissolved iron, but was emitted at a higher dissolved iron concentration, suggesting a facultative

  12. Magnetic field effect on growth, arsenic uptake, and total amylolytic activity on mesquite (Prosopis juliflora x P. velutina) seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Tavizón, Edith; Mokgalaka-Matlala, Ntebogeng S.; Elizalde Galindo, José T.; Castillo-Michelle, Hiram; Peralta-Videa, Jose R.; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L.

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic field is closely related to the cell metabolism of plants [N. A. Belyavskaya, Adv. Space Res. 34, 1566 (2004)]. In order to see the effect of magnetic field on the plant growth, arsenic uptake, and total amylolytic activity of mesquite (Prosopis juliflora x P. velutina) seeds, ten sets of 80 seeds were selected to be oriented with the long axis parallel or randomly oriented to an external magnetic field. The external magnetic field magnitude was 1 T, and the exposition time t = 30 min. Then, the seeds were stored for three days in a plastic bag and then sown on paper towels in a modified Hoagland's nutrient solution. After three days of germination in the dark and three days in light, seedlings were grown hydroponically in modified Hoagland's nutrient solution (high PO42-) containing 0, 10, or 20 ppm of arsenic as As (III) and (V). The results show that the germination ratios, growth, elongation, arsenic uptake, and total amylolytic activity of the long axis oriented mesquite seeds were much higher than those of the randomly oriented seeds. Also, these two sets of seeds showed higher properties than the ones that were not exposed to external magnetic field.

  13. Growth and nitrogen uptake by Salicornia europaea and Aster tripolium in nutrient conditions typical of aquaculture wastewater.

    PubMed

    Quintã, R; Santos, R; Thomas, D N; Le Vay, L

    2015-02-01

    The increasing need for environmentally sound aquaculture development can, in part, be addressed by using halophytic plants in integrated multitrophic aquaculture systems (IMTA) to remove waste dissolved nitrogen (N). However, knowledge of plant ability to take up nitrogen is of foremost importance to predict plants performance in such systems. Two species, Salicornia europaea and Aster tripolium, have been identified as potential candidates for IMTA due to their salt tolerance, potential N removal capabilities and their high commercial value as an additional crop. This study investigated the growth and N uptake rates of these two species under different N supply (NH4(+), NO3(-), NH4NO3). S. europaea plants produced a lower biomass when grown in NH4(+) compared to NO3(-) or NH4NO3, while A. tripolium biomass was not affected by the form in which N was supplied. N uptake in plants incubated at different concentrations of (15)N enriched solution (up to 2 mmol l(-1)) fitted the Michaelis-Menten model. While S. europaea NH4-N maximum uptake did not differ between starved and non-starved plants, A. tripolium NH4-N uptake was higher in starved plants when supplied alone. When NO3(-) was supplied alone, NO3-N maximum uptake was lower, for both species, when the plants were not starved. Comparison of starved and non-starved plants N uptake demonstrates the need for cautious interpretation of N uptake rates across different conditions. According to the observed results, both S. europaea and A. tripolium are capable of significantly high biomass production and N removal making them potential species for inclusion in efficient IMTA. PMID:25216470

  14. Effects of anaerobic growth conditions on biomass accumulation, root morphology, and efficiencies of nutrient uptake and utilization in seedlings of some southern coastal plain

    SciTech Connect

    Topa, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    Seedlings of pond, and loblolly pines were grown in a non-circulating, continuously-flowing solution culture under anaerobic (0.75 mg/1 O/sub 2/) conditions to determine the effects of anaerobiosis on overall growth, root morphology and efficiencies of nutrient uptake and utilization. Although shoot growth of the 11-week old loblolly and pond was not affected by anaerobic treatment, it did significantly reduce root biomass. Sand pine suffered the largest biomass reduction. Flooding tolerance was positively correlated with morphological changes which enhanced root internal aeration. Oxygen transport from shoot to the root was demonstrated via rhizosphere oxidation experiments using indigo-carmine dye solutions and polarography. Stem and root collar lenticels were found to be the major sites of atmospheric O/sub 2/ entry for submerged roots. Longitudinal and radial pathways for gas diffusion via intercellular spaces in the pericycle and ray parenchyma, respectively, were elucidated histologically. Lenticel and aerenchyma development, and rhizosphere oxidation in roots of anaerobically-grown sand pine seedlings were minimal. Elemental analyses showed that anaerobic conditions interfered with nutrient absorption and utilization. Short-term /sup 32/P uptake experiments with intact seedlings indicated that net absorption decreased because of the reduction in root biomass. Phosphorus absorption rates were negatively correlated with internal tissue phosphorus concentrations, and root and shoot biomass. 315 refs., 25 figs., 14 tabs.

  15. Ocean nutrients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Philip W.; Hurd, Catriona L.

    Nutrients provide the chemical life-support system for phytoplankton in the ocean. Together with the carbon fixed during photosynthesis, nutrients provide the other elements, such as N and P, needed to synthesize macromolecules to build cellular constituents such as ribosomes. The makeup of these various biochemicals, such as proteins, pigments, and nucleic acids, together determine the elemental stoichiometry of an individual phytoplankton cell. The stoichiometry of different phytoplankton species or groups will vary depending on the proportions of distinct cellular machinery, such as for growth or resource acquisition, they require for their life strategies. The uptake of nutrients by phytoplankton helps to set the primary productivity, and drives the biological pump, of the global ocean. In the case of nitrogen, the supply of nutrients is categorized as either new or regenerated. The supply of new nitrogen, such as nitrate upwelled from the ocean' interior or biological nitrogen fixation, is equal to the vertical export of particular organic matter from the upper ocean on a timescale of years. Nutrients such as silica can also play a structural role in some phytoplankton groups, such as diatoms, where they are used to synthesize a siliceous frustule that offers some mechanical protection from grazers. In this chapter, we also explore nutrient uptake kinetics, patterns in nutrient distributions in space and time, the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen, the atmospheric supply of nutrients, departures from the Redfield ratio, and whether nutrient distributions and cycling will be altered in the future

  16. Fertilizer and soil management practices for improving the efficiency of nutrient uptake and use in northern highbush blueberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Highbush blueberry is a long-lived perennial crop well-adapted to acidic soils. Plants acquire primarily NH4-N and tolerate relatively low concentrations of P and cations in the soil and high concentrations of plant available metals such as Al and Mn. Recently, we found that optimal leaf nutrient co...

  17. Effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization and two levels of compost supply on nutrient uptake and flowering of pelargonium plants.

    PubMed

    Perner, Henrike; Schwarz, Dietmar; Bruns, Christian; Mäder, Paul; George, Eckhard

    2007-07-01

    Two challenges frequently encountered in the production of ornamental plants in organic horticulture are: (1) the rate of mineralization of phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) from organic fertilizers can be too slow to meet the high nutrient demand of young plants, and (2) the exclusive use of peat as a substrate for pot-based plant culture is discouraged in organic production systems. In this situation, the use of beneficial soil microorganisms in combination with high quality compost substrates can contribute to adequate plant growth and flower development. In this study, we examined possible alternatives to highly soluble fertilizers and pure peat substrates using pelargonium (Pelargonium peltatum L'Her.) as a test plant. Plants were grown on a peat-based substrate with two rates of compost addition and with and without arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Inoculation with three different commercial AM inocula resulted in colonization rates of up to 36% of the total root length, whereas non-inoculated plants remained free of root colonization. Increasing the rate of compost addition increased shoot dry weight and shoot nutrient concentrations, but the supply of compost did not always completely meet plant nutrient demand. Mycorrhizal colonization increased the number of buds and flowers, as well as shoot P and potassium (K) concentrations, but did not significantly affect shoot dry matter or shoot N concentration. We conclude that addition of compost in combination with mycorrhizal inoculation can improve nutrient status and flower development of plants grown on peat-based substrates. PMID:17318595

  18. Silicate mineral impacts on the uptake and storage of arsenic and plant nutrients in rice ( Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Seyfferth, Angelia L; Fendorf, Scott

    2012-12-18

    Arsenic-contaminated rice grain may threaten human health globally. Since H₃AsO₃⁰ is the predominant As species found in paddy pore-waters, and H₄SiO₄⁰ and H₃AsO₃⁰ share an uptake pathway, silica amendments have been proposed to decrease As uptake and consequent As concentrations in grains. Here, we evaluated the impact of two silicate mineral additions differing in solubility (+Si(L), diatomaceous earth, 0.29 mM Si; +Si(H), Si-gel, 1.1 mM Si) to soils differing in mineralogy on arsenic concentration in rice. The +Si(L) addition either did not change or decreased As concentration in pore-water but did not change or increased grain-As levels relative to the (+As--Si) control. The +Si(H) addition increased As in pore-water, but it significantly decreased grain-As relative to the (+As--Si) control. Only the +Si(H) addition resulted in significant increases in straw- and husk-Si. Total grain- and straw-As was negatively correlated with pore-water Si, and the relationship differed between two soils exhibiting different mineralogy. These differing results are a consequence of competition between H₄SiO₄⁰ and H₃AsO₃⁰ for adsorption sites on soil solids and subsequent plant-uptake, and illustrate the importance of Si mineralogy on arsenic uptake. PMID:23153302

  19. [Determination of the biological activity of aminoglycoside antibiotics on a dry nutrient medium of Soviet manufacture].

    PubMed

    Grigor'eva, V M; Andreeva, Z M; Astanina, L N; Shiriaeva, V L; Gridneva, N I

    1981-06-01

    Possible use of the dry nutrient medium manufactured in the USSR for the assay of aminoglycoside antibiotic activity with the agar diffusion method was studied. The optimal conditions for the antibiotic activity assay on this medium were developed. The dry nutrient medium may be used for the activity assay of the aminoglycoside antibiotics, i. e. streptomycin sulfate, dihydrostreptomycin sulfate, neomycin sulfate, monomycin and gentamicin sulfate. PMID:7271256

  20. Osthole enhances glucose uptake through activation of AMP-activated protein kinase in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wei-Hwa; Lin, Ren-Jye; Lin, Shyr-Yi; Chen, Yu-Chien; Lin, Hsiu-Ming; Liang, Yu-Chih

    2011-12-28

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an energy sensor that regulates cellular metabolism. Activation of AMPK in skeletal muscles, the liver, and adipose tissues results in a favorable metabolic milieu for preventing and treating type 2 diabetes, i.e., decreased levels of circulating glucose, plasma lipids, and ectopic fat accumulation and enhanced insulin sensitivity. Osthole was extracted from a Chinese herbal medicine, and we found that it had glucose lowering activity in our previous study. However, the detailed glucose lowering mechanisms of osthole are still unclear. In this study, we used skeletal muscle cells to examine the underlying molecular mechanisms of osthole's glucose lowering activity. A Western blot analysis revealed that osthole significantly induced phosphorylation of AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). Next, we found that osthole significantly increased the level of translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) to plasma membranes and glucose uptake in a dose-dependent manner. Osthole-induced glucose uptake was reversed by treatment with Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, suggesting that osthole-induced glucose uptake was mediated in an AMPK-dependent manner. The increase in the AMP:ATP ratio was involved in osthole's activation of AMPK. Finally, we found that osthole counteracted hyperglycemia in mice with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. These results suggest that the increase in the AMP:ATP ratio by osthole triggered activation of the AMPK signaling pathway and led to increases in plasma membrane GLUT4 content and glucose uptake level. Therefore, osthole might have potential as an antidiabetic agent for treating diabetes. PMID:22098542

  1. Effects of pH Limitation on Population Growth,Nutrient Uptake and Photosynthesis Physiological Processes of Karenia mikimotoi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, W.

    2014-12-01

    with the acidification and increased pH caused by the outbreak of red tides in coastal water, the effects of pH on the marine algae physiological and ecological impact have caused human's concern gradually. In this experiment,the East China Sea common algae- Karenia mikimotoi as research object,different pH effects on the physiological state have been studied. The results showed that pH significantly affect the growth of algae Karenia mikimotoi, nutrient absorption, chlorophyll, photosynthetic rate and affinity for inorganic carbon. When pH = 6.2, the cell growth was inhibited.Growth rate, nutrient absorption, maximum photosynthetic rate and affinity for inorganic carbon are the lowest; When pH = 8.2, the growth of cells ,absorption of nutrients and highest maximum photosynthetic rate are the fastest; pH = 7.2 and 9.2, the algal cells can still maintain higher growth and higher affinity for inorganic carbon is larger than those in pH = 8.2. In short, high or low pH stress can cause adverse changes in the physiological state of the algae Karenia mikimotoi, especially when the pH is too low.

  2. Functional traits and structural controls on the relationship between photosynthetic CO2 uptake and sun-induced fluorescence in a Mediterranean grassland under different nutrient availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliavacca, Mirco

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies have shown how human induced nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P) imbalances affect essential ecosystem processes, and might be particularly important in water-limited ecosystems. Hyperspectral information can be used to directly infer nutrient-induced variation in structural and functional changes of vegetation under different nutrient availability. However, several uncertainties still hamper the direct link between photosynthetic CO2 uptake (gross primary productivity, GPP) and hyperspectral reflectance. Sun-induced fluorescence (SIF) provides a new non-invasive measurement approach that has the potential to quantify dynamic changes in light use efficiency and photosynthetic CO2 uptake. In this contribution we will present an experiment conducted in a Mediterranean grassland, where 16 plots of 8x8 meters were manipulated by adding nutrient (N, P, and NP). Almost simultaneous estimates of canopy scale GPP and SIF were conducted with transparent transient-state canopy chambers and high resolution spectrometers, respectively. We investigated the response of GPP and SIF to different nutrient availability and plant stoichiometry. The second objective was to identify how structural (LAI, leaf angle distribution, and biodiversity) and canopy biochemical properties (e.g. N and chlorophyll content - Chl) control the functional relationship between GPP and SIF. To test the different hypotheses the SCOPE radiative transfer model was used. We ran a factorial experiment with SCOPE to disentangle the main drivers (structure vs biochemistry) of the relationship GPP-SIF. The results showed significant differences in GPP values between N and without N addition plots. We also found that vegetation indices sensitive to pigment variations and physiology (such as photochemical reflectance index PRI) and SIF showed differences between different treatments. SCOPE showed very good agreement with the observed data (R2=0.71). The observed variability in SIF was mainly related

  3. Isodihydrocapsiate stimulates plasma glucose uptake by activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Seung-Lark; Yang, Byung-Keun; Lee, Jai-Youl; Kim, Jeong-Han; Kim, Byung-Dong; Kim, Byung-Hong; Suh, Ki-Hyoung; Kim, Dae Young; Kim, Dae-Yong; Kim, Moon Sung; Song, Hebok; Park, Byeoung-Soo; Huh, Tae-Lin

    2008-06-27

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an energy-sensing enzyme that is implicated as a key factor in controlling whole body homeostasis, including fatty acid oxidation and glucose uptake. We report that a synthetic structural isomer of dihydrocapsiate, isodihydrocapsiate (8-methylnonanoic acid 3-hydroxy-4-methoxy benzyl ester) improves type 2 diabetes by activating AMPK through the LKB1 pathway. In L6 myotube cells, phosphorylation of AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and glucose uptake were significantly increased, whereas these effects were attenuated by an AMPK inhibitor, compound C. In addition, increased phosphorylation of AMPK and ACC by isodihydrocapsiate was significantly reduced by radicicol, an LKB1 destabilizer, suggesting that increased glucose uptake in L6 cells with isodihydrocapsiate treatment is predominantly accomplished by a LKB1-mediated AMPK activation pathway. Oral administration of isodihydrocapsiate to diabetic (db/db) mice reduced blood glucose levels by 40% after a 4-week treatment period. Our results support the development of isodihydrocapsiate as a potential therapeutic agent to target AMPK in type 2 diabetes. PMID:18435912

  4. Ultrasonic waste activated sludge disintegration for recovering multiple nutrients for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guo-Jun; Liu, Bing-Feng; Wang, Qilin; Ding, Jie; Ren, Nan-Qi

    2016-04-15

    Waste activated sludge is a valuable resource containing multiple nutrients, but is currently treated and disposed of as an important source of pollution. In this work, waste activated sludge after ultrasound pretreatment was reused as multiple nutrients for biofuel production. The nutrients trapped in sludge floc were transferred into liquid medium by ultrasonic disintegration during first 30 min, while further increase of pretreatment time only resulted in slight increase of nutrients release. Hydrogen production by Ethanoligenens harbinense B49 from glucose significantly increased with the concentration of ultrasonic sludge, and reached maximum yield of 1.97 mol H2/mol glucose at sludge concentration of 7.75 g volatile suspended solids/l. Without addition of any other chemicals, waste molasses rich in carbohydrate was efficiently turned into hydrogen with yield of 189.34 ml H2/g total sugar by E. harbinense B49 using ultrasonic sludge as nutrients. The results also showed that hydrogen production using pretreated sludge as multiple nutrients was higher than those using standard nutrients. Acetic acid produced by E. harbinense B49 together with the residual nutrients in the liquid medium were further converted into hydrogen (271.36 ml H2/g total sugar) by Rhodopseudomonas faecalis RLD-53 through photo fermentation, while ethanol was the sole end product with yield of 220.26 mg/g total sugar. Thus, pretreated sludge was an efficient nutrients source for biofuel production, which could replace the standard nutrients. This research provided a novel strategy to achieve environmental friendly sludge disposal and simultaneous efficient biofuel recovery from organic waste. PMID:26896823

  5. Interactive effects of aluminum, phosphorus and mycorrhizae on growth and nutrient uptake of Panicum virgatum L. (Poaceae).

    PubMed

    Koslowsky, S D; Boener, R E

    1989-01-01

    The effects of Al on Panicum virgatum (switchgrass), a widespread perennial grass, were determined in relation to factors which might interact with Al in the soil. Plants were grown for 8 weeks in sand culture and were treated with 3 Al levels (0.5, 2.0, 5.0 mM), 2 P levels (0.065, 0.161 mM), 2 inoculum types (vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) inoculum or VAM-free soil inoculum) and 2 inoculum sources (a high Al forest in NY or a low Al forest in Ohio) in a factorial design. Plant growth decreased with increasing Al and increased with increasing P, but the Al effect was less at high P than low P. VAM-inoculated plants outgrew non-VAM plants, especially at low and medium Al levels. Total P and Ca uptake decreased with increasing Al concentration, especially at low P levels. VAM inoculation did not result in increased P uptake at any Al level though VAM plants took up significantly more Ca than non-VAM plants at any Al level. VAM plants had lower tissue Al concentrations and took up less Al than non-VAM plants; Al uptake increased with increasing soil Al in non-VAM plants but not in VAM plants. Plants given inoculum from the high Al site had significantly lower tissue Al than plants given the low Al site inoculum, regardless of VAM status. We conclude that the presence of a VAM infection, moderate levels of soil P, and the source of the inoculum can reduce the effects of soluble Al. We discuss potential physiological and edaphic mechanisms by which Al may be immobilized and Ca availability increased in the presence of VAM fungi and other soil microflora. PMID:15092367

  6. Increased physical activity decreases hepatic free fatty acid uptake: a study in human monozygotic twins.

    PubMed

    Hannukainen, Jarna C; Nuutila, Pirjo; Borra, Ronald; Ronald, Borra; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kujala, Urho M; Janatuinen, Tuula; Heinonen, Olli J; Kapanen, Jukka; Viljanen, Tapio; Haaparanta, Merja; Rönnemaa, Tapani; Parkkola, Riitta; Knuuti, Juhani; Kalliokoski, Kari K

    2007-01-01

    Exercise is considered to be beneficial for free fatty acid (FFA) metabolism, although reports of the effects of increased physical activity on FFA uptake and oxidation in different tissues in vivo in humans have been inconsistent. To investigate the heredity-independent effects of physical activity and fitness on FFA uptake in skeletal muscle, the myocardium, and liver we used positron emission tomography (PET) in nine healthy young male monozygotic twin pairs discordant for physical activity and fitness. The cotwins with higher physical activity constituting the more active group had a similar body mass index but less body fat and 18 +/- 10% higher (P < 0.001) compared to the less active brothers with lower physical activity. Low-intensity knee-extension exercise increased skeletal muscle FFA and oxygen uptake six to 10 times compared to resting values but no differences were observed between the groups at rest or during exercise. At rest the more active group had lower hepatic FFA uptake compared to the less active group (5.5 +/- 4.3 versus 9.0 +/- 6.1 micromol (100 ml)(-1) min(-1), P = 0.04). Hepatic FFA uptake associated significantly with body fat percentage (P = 0.05). Myocardial FFA uptake was similar between the groups. In conclusion, in the absence of the confounding effects of genetic factors, moderately increased physical activity and aerobic fitness decrease body adiposity even in normal-weighted healthy young adult men. Further, increased physical activity together with decreased intra-abdominal adiposity seems to decrease hepatic FFA uptake but has no effects on skeletal muscle or myocardial FFA uptake. PMID:17053033

  7. Accumulation of phenanthrene by roots of intact wheat (Triticum acstivnm L.) seedlings: passive or active uptake?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are of particular concern due to their hydrophobic, recalcitrant, persistent, potentially carcinogenic, mutagenic and toxic properties, and their ubiquitous occurrence in the environment. Most of the PAHs in the environment are present in surface soil. Plants grown in PAH-contaminated soils or water can become contaminated with PAHs because of their uptake. Therefore, they may threaten human and animal health. However, the mechanism for PAHs uptake by crop roots is little understood. It is important to understand exactly how PAHs are transported into the plant root system and into the human food chain, since it is beneficial in governing crop contamination by PAHs, remedying soils or waters polluted by PAHs with plants, and modeling potential uptake for risk assessment. Results The possibility that plant roots may take up phenanthrene (PHE), a representative of PAHs, via active process was investigated using intact wheat (Triticum acstivnm L.) seedlings in a series of hydroponic experiments. The time course for PHE uptake into wheat roots grown in Hoagland solution containing 5.62 μM PHE for 36 h could be separated into two periods: a fast uptake process during the initial 2 h and a slow uptake component thereafter. Concentration-dependent PHE uptake was characterized by a smooth, saturable curve with an apparent Km of 23.7 μM and a Vmax of 208 nmol g-1 fresh weight h-1, suggesting a carrier-mediated uptake system. Competition between PHE and naphthalene for their uptake by the roots further supported the carrier-mediated uptake system. Low temperature and 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) could inhibit PHE uptake equally, indicating that metabolism plays a role in PHE uptake. The inhibitions by low temperature and DNP were strengthened with increasing concentration of PHE in external solution within PHE water solubility (7.3 μM). The contribution of active uptake to total absorption was almost 40% within PHE water

  8. How do Soil Microbial Enzyme Activities Respond to Changes in Temperature, Carbon, and Nutrient Additions across Gradients in Mineralogy and Nutrient Availability?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCleery, T.; Cusack, D. F.; Reed, S.; Wieder, W. R.; Taylor, P.; Cleveland, C. C.; Chadwick, O.; Vitousek, P.

    2013-12-01

    Microbial enzyme activities are the direct agents of organic matter decomposition, and thus play a crucial role in global carbon (C) cycling. Global change factors like warming and nutrient inputs to soils have the potential to alter the activities of these enzymes, with background site conditions likely driving responses. We hypothesized that enzyme activities in sites with high background nutrient and/or carbon availability would be less sensitive to nutrient additions than nutrient-poor sites. We also hypothesized that sites poor in background nutrients and/or carbon would show greater sensitivity to changes in temperature because of a less robust microbial community. To test our hypothesis we used laboratory temperature incubations combined with long- and short-term nutrient additions to assess changes in enzyme activities for 8 common soil enzymes that acquire nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and C from organic matter. We collected mineral soils (0-10 cm depth) from 8 Hawaiian sites that provided maximum variation in nutrient availability and background soil C. Soils were sieved, pooled by site, and homogenized prior to a laboratory addition of a simple C (sucrose) plus N and/or P in full factorial design. The 8 soils were also incubated at 7 different temperatures from 4 - 40 degrees C. We found that temperature sensitivities varied significantly among the sites, and that the laboratory fertilizations altered enzyme activities. Across the 8 sites, laboratory sucrose+N additions nearly doubled P-acquisition enzyme activity (p < 0.05), with the strongest effect in a younger forest soil that was naturally low in N. Similarly, laboratory sucrose+N and sucrose+NP additions significantly increased N-acquiring enzyme activity (p < 0.05), with the strongest effect in a drier, nutrient poor and carbon poor soil. Carbon-acquiring enzyme activities were less responsive, but also increased significantly with additions of sucrose+N and sucrose+NP across sites, with the

  9. Influence of different acid and alkaline cleaning agents on the effects of irrigation of synthetic dairy factory effluent on soil quality, ryegrass growth and nutrient uptake.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y-Y; Haynes, R J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of replacement of phosphoric acid with nitric or acetic acid, and replacement of NaOH with KOH, as cleaning agents in dairy factories, on the effects that irrigation of dairy factory effluent (DFE) has on the soil-plant system. A 16-week greenhouse study was carried out in which the effects of addition of synthetic dairy factory effluent containing (a) milk residues alone or milk residues plus (b) H(3)PO(4)/NaOH, (c) H(3)PO(4)/HNO(3)/NaOH or (d) CH(3)COOH/KOH, on soil's chemical, physical and microbial properties and perennial ryegrass growth and nutrient uptake were investigated. The cumulative effect of DFE addition was to increase exchangeable Na, K, Ca, Mg, exchangeable sodium percentage, microbial biomass C and N and basal respiration in the soil. Dry matter yields of ryegrass were increased by additions of DFE other than that containing CH(3)COOH. Plant uptake of P, Ca and Mg was in the same order as their inputs in DFE but for Na; inputs were an order of magnitude greater than plant uptake. Replacement of NaOH by KOH resulted in increased accumulation of exchangeable K. The effects of added NaOH and KOH on promoting breakdown of soil aggregates during wet sieving (and formation of a < 0.25 mm size class) were similar. Replacement of H(2)PO(4) by HNO(3) is a viable but CH(3)COOH appears to have detrimental effects on plant growth. Replacement of NaOH by KOH lowers the likelihood of phytotoxic effects of Na, but K and Na have similar effects on disaggregation. PMID:22707204

  10. Rate of Nitrogen Application during the Growing Season and Spraying Plants with Urea in the Autumn Alters Uptake of other Nutrients by Deciduous and Evergreen Container-Grown Rhododendron

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of N rate during the growing season and spraying plants with urea in the autumn on the uptake of other nutrients was assessed using container-grown rhododendron (Rhododendron 'H-1 P.J.M') and azalea (Rhododendron 'Cannon’s Double'). Plants were grown with a complete fertilizer containi...

  11. Active exchange of water and nutrients between seawater and shallow pore water in intertidal sandflats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Dong-Woon; Kim, Guebuem; Yang, Han Soeb

    2008-12-01

    In order to determine the temporal and spatial variations of nutrient profiles in the shallow pore water columns (upper 30 cm depth) of intertidal sandflats, we measured the salinity and nutrient concentrations in pore water and seawater at various coastal environments along the southern coast of Korea. In the intertidal zone, salinity and nutrient concentrations in pore water showed marked vertical changes with depth, owing to the active exchange between the pore water and overlying seawater, while they are temporally more stable and vertically constant in the sublittoral zone. In some cases, the advective flow of fresh groundwater caused strong vertical gradients of salinity and nutrients in the upper 10 cm depth of surface sediments, indicating the active mixing of the fresher groundwater with overlying seawater. Such upper pore water column profiles clearly signified the temporal fluctuation of lower-salinity and higher-Si seawater intrusion into pore water in an intertidal sandflat near the mouth of an estuary. We also observed a semimonthly fluctuation of pore water nutrients due to spring-neap tide associated recirculation of seawater through the upper sediments. Our study shows that the exchange of water and nutrients between shallow pore water and overlying seawater is most active in the upper 20 cm layer of intertidal sandflats, due to physical forces such as tides, wave set-up, and density-thermal gradient.

  12. Cadmium uptake and xylem loading are active processes in the hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ling-li; Tian, Sheng-ke; Yang, Xiao-e; Li, Ting-qiang; He, Zhen-li

    2009-04-01

    Sedum alfredii is a well known cadmium (Cd) hyperaccumulator native to China; however, the mechanism behind its hyperaccumulation of Cd is not fully understood. Through several hydroponic experiments, characteristics of Cd uptake and translocation were investigated in the hyperaccumulating ecotype (HE) of S. alfredii in comparison with its non-hyperaccumulating ecotype (NHE). The results showed that at Cd level of 10 microM measured Cd uptake in HE was 3-4 times higher than the implied Cd uptake calculated from transpiration rate. Furthermore, inhibition of transpiration rate in the HE has no essential effect on Cd accumulation in shoots of the plants. Low temperature treatment (4 degrees C) significantly inhibited Cd uptake and reduced upward translocation of Cd to shoots for 9 times in HE plants, whereas no such effect was observed in NHE. Cadmium concentration was 3-4-fold higher in xylem sap of HE, as compared with that in external uptake solution, whereas opposite results were obtained for NHE. Cadmium concentration in xylem sap of HE was significantly reduced by the addition of metabolic inhibitors, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) and 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), in the uptake solutions, whereas no such effect was noted in NHE. These results suggest that Cd uptake and translocation is an active process in plants of HE S. alfredii, symplastic pathway rather than apoplastic bypass contributes greatly to root uptake, xylem loading and translocation of Cd to the shoots of HE, in comparison with the NHE plants. PMID:18937997

  13. Effect of calcium carbonate on cadmium and nutrients uptake in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) planted on contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wei-Ai; Li, Fan; Zhou, Hang; Qin, Xiao-Li; Zou, Zi-Jin; Tian, Tao; Zeng, Min; Liao, Bo-Han

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, calcium carbonate (CaCO3) was applied to Cd-contaminated soil at rates of 0, 0.5 and 1.0 g kg(-1). The effect of CaCO3 on soil pH, organic matter, available Cd, exchangeable Cd and level of major nutrients in a tobacco field and on accumulation of various elements in tobacco plants was determined. The results showed that CaCO3 application significantly increased the pH level, available P and exchangeable Ca but decreased organic matter, available Cd, exchangeable Cd, available heavy metals (Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu) and available K in soil. Additionally, CaCO3 application substantially reduced Cd accumulation in tobacco roots, stems, upper leaves, middle leaves and lower leaves, with maximum decrease of 22.3%, 32.1%, 24.5%, 22.0% and 18.2%, respectively. There were large increase in total Ca and slight increases in total N and K but decrease to varying degrees in total Fe, Cu and Zn due to CaCO3 application. CaCO3 had little effect on total P and Mn levels in tobacco leaves. PMID:26930875

  14. Impact of open-ocean convection on nutrients, phytoplankton biomass and activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severin, T.; Conan, P.; Durrieu de Madron, X.; Houpert, L.; Oliver, M. J.; Oriol, L.; Caparros, J.; Ghiglione, J. F.; Pujo-Pay, M.

    2014-12-01

    We describe the impact of an open-ocean convection event on nutrient budgets, carbon budget, elemental stoichiometry, phytoplankton biomass and activity in the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea (NWM). In the convective episode examined here we estimated an input of nutrients to the surface layer of 7.0, 8.0 and 0.4×108 mol of silicate, nitrate and phosphate, respectively. These quantities correspond to the annual nutrient input by river discharges and atmospheric depositions in the Gulf of Lion. Such nutrient input is sufficient to sustain new primary production from 46 to 63 g C m-2 y-1, which is the same order of magnitude found in the NWM open waters. Our results together with satellite data analysis, propose new scenarios that explain the origin of the spring phytoplankton bloom occurring in NWM.

  15. [Dynamics of soil enzyme activity and nutrient content in intercropped cotton rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere].

    PubMed

    Meng, Yali; Wang, Liguo; Zhou, Zhiguo; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Lizhen; Bian, Haiyun; Zhang, Siping; Chen, Binglin

    2005-11-01

    The study with high yield cotton-wheat double cropping system showed that soil urease, invertase, protease and catalase activities in intercropped cotton field had the same changing trends with those in mono-cultured cotton field, but were significantly higher in intercropped than in mono-cultured cotton rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere at all development stages of cotton. During the intergrowth period of wheat and cotton, soil nutrient contents in intercropped cotton rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere were lower than or had little difference with those in mono-cultured cotton rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere, but became significantly higher after wheat harvested. The changing trends of soil nutrient contents in intercropped cotton field had little difference from those in mono-cultured cotton field, but the nutrient absorption peak appeared late. The soil enzyme activities and nutrient contents were generally higher in rhizosphere than in non-rhizosphere of both intercropped and mono-cultured cotton. Soil nutrient contents had significant (P < 0.05, n = 32) or very significant (P < 0.01, n = 32) correlation with the activities of soil urease, invertase and protease, but had little correlation with soil catalase activity. PMID:16471342

  16. Low Discretionary Time as a Barrier to Physical Activity and Intervention Uptake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolin, Kathleen Y.; Bennett, Gary G.; McNeill, Lorna H.; Sorensen, Glorian; Emmons, Karen M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether self-reported discretionary time was associated with physical activity and uptake of a physical activity promotion intervention in a multi-ethnic urban sample. Methods: We examined the association of self-reported discretionary time with hours/week of leisure-time physical activity at baseline and physical activity…

  17. Ceruloplasmin ferroxidase activity stimulates cellular iron uptake by a trivalent cation-specific transport mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attieh, Z. K.; Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Seshadri, V.; Tripoulas, N. A.; Fox, P. L.

    1999-01-01

    The balance required to maintain appropriate cellular and tissue iron levels has led to the evolution of multiple mechanisms to precisely regulate iron uptake from transferrin and low molecular weight iron chelates. A role for ceruloplasmin (Cp) in vertebrate iron metabolism is suggested by its potent ferroxidase activity catalyzing conversion of Fe2+ to Fe3+, by identification of yeast copper oxidases homologous to Cp that facilitate high affinity iron uptake, and by studies of "aceruloplasminemic" patients who have extensive iron deposits in multiple tissues. We have recently shown that Cp increases iron uptake by cultured HepG2 cells. In this report, we investigated the mechanism by which Cp stimulates cellular iron uptake. Cp stimulated the rate of non-transferrin 55Fe uptake by iron-deficient K562 cells by 2-3-fold, using a transferrin receptor-independent pathway. Induction of Cp-stimulated iron uptake by iron deficiency was blocked by actinomycin D and cycloheximide, consistent with a transcriptionally induced or regulated transporter. Cp-stimulated iron uptake was completely blocked by unlabeled Fe3+ and by other trivalent cations including Al3+, Ga3+, and Cr3+, but not by divalent cations. These results indicate that Cp utilizes a trivalent cation-specific transporter. Cp ferroxidase activity was required for iron uptake as shown by the ineffectiveness of two ferroxidase-deficient Cp preparations, copper-deficient Cp and thiomolybdate-treated Cp. We propose a model in which iron reduction and subsequent re-oxidation by Cp are essential for an iron uptake pathway with high ion specificity.

  18. Effectiveness of native and exotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on nutrient uptake and ion homeostasis in salt-stressed Cajanus cajan L. (Millsp.) genotypes.

    PubMed

    Garg, Neera; Pandey, Rekha

    2015-04-01

    Soil salinity is an increasing problem worldwide, restricting plant growth and production. Research findings show that arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi have the potential to reduce negative effects of salinity. However, plant growth responses to AM fungi vary as a result of genetic variation in mycorrhizal colonization and plant growth responsiveness. Thus, profitable use of AM requires selection of a suitable combination of host plant and fungal partner. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to compare effectiveness of a native AM fungal inoculum sourced from saline soil and two single exotic isolates, Funneliformis mossseae and Rhizophagus irregularis (single or dual mix), on Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp. genotypes (Paras and Pusa 2002) under salt stress (0-100 mM NaCl). While salinity reduced plant biomass and disturbed ionic status in both genotypes, Pusa 2002 was more salt tolerant and ensured higher AM fungal colonization, plant biomass and nutrient content with favourable ion status under salinity. Although all AM fungi reduced negative effects of salt stress, R. irregularis (alone or in combination with F. mosseae) displayed highest efficiency under salinity, resulting in highest biomass, yield, nutrient uptake and improved membrane stability with favourable K(+)/Na(+) and Ca(2+)/Na(+) ratios in the host plant. Higher effectiveness of R. irregularis correlated with higher root colonization, indicating that the symbiosis formed by R. irregularis had more stable viability and efficiency under salt stress. These findings enhance understanding of the functional diversity of AM fungi in ameliorating plant salt stress tolerance and suggest the potential use of R. irregularis for increasing Cajanus cajan productivity in saline soils. PMID:25155616

  19. Predominant enhancement of glucose uptake in astrocytes versus neurons during activation of the somatosensory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Chuquet, Julien; Quilichini, Pascale; Nimchinsky, Esther A.; Buzsáki, György

    2010-01-01

    Glucose is the primary energetic substrate of the brain and measurements of its metabolism are the basis of major functional cerebral imaging methods. Contrary to the general view that neurons are fueled solely by glucose in proportion to their energetic needs, recent in vitro and ex vivo analyses suggest that glucose preferentially feeds astrocytes. However, the cellular fate of glucose in the intact brain has not yet been directly observed. We have used a real-time method for measuring glucose uptake in astrocytes and neurons in vivo in male rats by imaging the trafficking of the non-metabolizable glucose analog 6-NBDG using two-photon microscopy. During resting conditions we found that astrocytes and neurons both uptake 6-NBDG at the same rate in the barrel cortex of the rat. However, during intense neuronal activity triggered by whisker stimulation, astrocytes rapidly accelerated their uptake whereas neuronal uptake remained almost unchanged. Following the stimulation period, astrocytes returned to their pre-activation rates of uptake paralleling the neuronal rate of uptake. These observations suggest that glucose is primarily taken-up by astrocytes, supporting the view that functional imaging experiments based on glucose analogs extraction may predominantly reflect the metabolic activity of the astrocytic network. PMID:21068334

  20. P21-activated kinase 2 (PAK2) regulates glucose uptake and insulin sensitivity in neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Pallavi; Dey, Chinmoy Sankar

    2016-07-01

    P21-activated kinases (PAKs) are recently reported as important players of insulin signaling and glucose homeostasis in tissues like muscle, pancreas and liver. However, their role in neuronal insulin signaling is still unknown. Present study reports the involvement of PAK2 in neuronal insulin signaling, glucose uptake and insulin resistance. Irrespective of insulin sensitivity, insulin stimulation decreased PAK2 activity. PAK2 downregulation displayed marked enhancement of GLUT4 translocation with increase in glucose uptake whereas PAK2 over-expression showed its reduction. Treatment with Akti-1/2 and wortmannin suggested that Akt and PI3K are mediators of insulin effect on PAK2 and glucose uptake. Rac1 inhibition demonstrated decreased PAK2 activity while inhibition of PP2A resulted in increased PAK2 activity, with corresponding changes in glucose uptake. Taken together, present study demonstrates an inhibitory role of insulin signaling (via PI3K-Akt) and PP2A on PAK2 activity and establishes PAK2 as a Rac1-dependent negative regulator of neuronal glucose uptake and insulin sensitivity. PMID:27040307

  1. Synergistic Effects of Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria and Chitosan on In Vitro Seeds Germination, Greenhouse Growth, and Nutrient Uptake of Maize (Zea mays L.)

    PubMed Central

    Agbodjato, Nadège A.; Noumavo, Pacôme A.; Adjanohoun, Adolphe; Agbessi, Léonce; Baba-Moussa, Lamine

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the effects of three plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) and chitosan either singly or in combination on maize seeds germination and growth and nutrient uptake. Maize seeds were treated with chitosan and bacterial solution. The germination and growth tests were carried out in square Petri dishes and plastic pots. The combination chitosan-A. lipoferum-P. fluorescens has increased the seeds vigor index up to 36.44% compared to the control. In comparison to the control, P. putida has significantly improved root weight (44.84%) and germinated seed weight (31.39%) whereas chitosan-P. putida has increased the shoot weight (65.67%). For the growth test, the maximal heights (17.66%) were obtained by plants treated with the combination A. lipoferum-P. fluorescens-P. putida. Chitosan-P. fluorescens induced the highest increases of leaves per plant (50.09%), aerial (84.66%), and underground biomass (108.77%) production. The plants inoculated with A. lipoferum had the large leaf areas with an increase of 54.08%, while combinations P. fluorescens-P. putida and chitosan-A. lipoferum improved the aerial and underground dry matter of plants to 26.35% and 18.18%. The nitrogen content of the plants was increased by chitosan-A. lipoferum-P. fluorescens-P. putida with an increasing of 41.61%. The combination of chitosan and PGPR can be used as biological fertilizers to increase maize production. PMID:26904295

  2. Impact of defoliation intensities on plant biomass, nutrient uptake and arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in Lotus tenuis growing in a saline-sodic soil.

    PubMed

    García, I; Mendoza, R

    2012-11-01

    The impact of different defoliation intensities on the ability of Lotus tenuis plants to regrowth, mobilise nutrients and to associate with native AM fungi and Rhizobium in a saline-sodic soil was investigated. After 70 days, plants were subjected to 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100% defoliation and shoot regrowth was assessed at the end of subsequent 35 days. Compared to non-defoliated plants, low or moderate defoliation up to 75% did not affect shoot regrowth. However, 100% treatment affected shoot regrowth and the clipped plants were not able to compensate the growth attained by non-defoliated plants. Root growth was more affected by defoliation than shoot growth. P and N concentrations in shoots and roots increased with increasing defoliation while Na(+) concentration in shoots of non-defoliated and moderately defoliated plants was similar. Non-defoliated and moderately defoliated plants prevented increases of Na(+) concentration in shoots through both reducing Na(+) uptake and Na(+) transport to shoots by accumulating Na(+) in roots. At high defoliation, the salinity tolerance mechanism is altered and Na(+) concentration in shoots was higher than in roots. Reduction in the photosynthetic capacity induced by defoliation neither changed the root length colonised by AM fungi nor arbuscular colonisation but decreased the vesicular colonisation. Spore density did not change, but hyphal density and Rhizobium nodules increased with defoliation. The strategy of the AM symbiont consists in investing most of the C resources to preferentially retain arbuscular colonisation as well as inoculum density in the soil. PMID:22512871

  3. Synergistic Effects of Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria and Chitosan on In Vitro Seeds Germination, Greenhouse Growth, and Nutrient Uptake of Maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Agbodjato, Nadège A; Noumavo, Pacôme A; Adjanohoun, Adolphe; Agbessi, Léonce; Baba-Moussa, Lamine

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the effects of three plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) and chitosan either singly or in combination on maize seeds germination and growth and nutrient uptake. Maize seeds were treated with chitosan and bacterial solution. The germination and growth tests were carried out in square Petri dishes and plastic pots. The combination chitosan-A. lipoferum-P. fluorescens has increased the seeds vigor index up to 36.44% compared to the control. In comparison to the control, P. putida has significantly improved root weight (44.84%) and germinated seed weight (31.39%) whereas chitosan-P. putida has increased the shoot weight (65.67%). For the growth test, the maximal heights (17.66%) were obtained by plants treated with the combination A. lipoferum-P. fluorescens-P. putida. Chitosan-P. fluorescens induced the highest increases of leaves per plant (50.09%), aerial (84.66%), and underground biomass (108.77%) production. The plants inoculated with A. lipoferum had the large leaf areas with an increase of 54.08%, while combinations P. fluorescens-P. putida and chitosan-A. lipoferum improved the aerial and underground dry matter of plants to 26.35% and 18.18%. The nitrogen content of the plants was increased by chitosan-A. lipoferum-P. fluorescens-P. putida with an increasing of 41.61%. The combination of chitosan and PGPR can be used as biological fertilizers to increase maize production. PMID:26904295

  4. Coupling between Nutrient Availability and Thyroid Hormone Activation.

    PubMed

    Lartey, Lattoya J; Werneck-de-Castro, João Pedro; O-Sullivan, InSug; Unterman, Terry G; Bianco, Antonio C

    2015-12-18

    The activity of the thyroid gland is stimulated by food availability via leptin-induced thyrotropin-releasing hormone/thyroid-stimulating hormone expression. Here we show that food availability also stimulates thyroid hormone activation by accelerating the conversion of thyroxine to triiodothyronine via type 2 deiodinase in mouse skeletal muscle and in a cell model transitioning from 0.1 to 10% FBS. The underlying mechanism is transcriptional derepression of DIO2 through the mTORC2 pathway as defined in rictor knockdown cells. In cells kept in 0.1% FBS, there is DIO2 inhibition via FOXO1 binding to the DIO2 promoter. Repression of DIO2 by FOXO1 was confirmed using its specific inhibitor AS1842856 or adenoviral infection of constitutively active FOXO1. ChIP studies indicate that 4 h after 10% FBS-containing medium, FOXO1 binding markedly decreases, and the DIO2 promoter is activated. Studies in the insulin receptor FOXO1 KO mouse indicate that insulin is a key signaling molecule in this process. We conclude that FOXO1 represses DIO2 during fasting and that derepression occurs via nutritional activation of the PI3K-mTORC2-Akt pathway. PMID:26499800

  5. Effects of Selected Surfactants on Nutrient Uptake and Soil Microbial Activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surfactants are adjuvants that facilitate and accentuate the emulsifying, dispersing, spreading, wetting, or other surface modifying properties of liquids. Many pesticides require the addition of a surfactant to improve pesticide performance in spray solution. Soils are one of the direct recipients ...

  6. NFAT-133 increases glucose uptake in L6 myotubes by activating AMPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Chandni S; Kate, Abhijeet S; Desai, Dattatraya C; Ghosh, Asit Ranjan; Kulkarni-Almeida, Asha A

    2015-12-15

    NFAT-133 is an aromatic compound with cinammyl alcohol moiety, isolated from streptomycetes strain PM0324667. We have earlier reported that NFAT-133 increases insulin stimulated glucose uptake in L6 myotubes using a PPARγ independent mechanism and reduces plasma or blood glucose levels in diabetic mice. Here we investigated the effects of NFAT-133 on cellular signaling pathways leading to glucose uptake in L6 myotubes. Our studies demonstrate that NFAT-133 increases glucose uptake in a dose- and time-dependent manner independent of the effects of insulin. Treatment with Akti-1/2, wortmannin and increasing concentrations of insulin had no effect on NFAT-133 mediated glucose uptake. NFAT-133 induced glucose uptake is completely mitigated by Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor. Further, the kinases upstream of AMPK activation namely; LKB-1 and CAMKKβ are not involved in NFAT-133 mediated AMPK activation nor does the compound NFAT-133 have any effect on AMPK enzyme activity. Further analysis confirmed that NFAT-133 indirectly activates AMPK by reducing the mitochondrial membrane potential and increasing the ratio of AMP:ATP. PMID:26546724

  7. Development of amino acid uptake activity in Neurospora.

    PubMed

    Railey, R M; Kinsey, J A

    1976-02-01

    During the germination and growth of Neurospora conidia, amino acid permease systems I (neutral) and II (general) increase in specific activity. System III (basic) decreases in specific activity with the onset of germination. System I shows two peaks of activity during the logarithmic phase of growth. One peak occurs at 6 h, the other at 12 h of growth. Both peaks are abolished in the mtr mutant. Both peaks have a Km for phenylalanine of 40 muM. The peaks of system I activity appear to correlate with morphological changes. PMID:4208

  8. Increased skeletal muscle glucose uptake by rosemary extract through AMPK activation.

    PubMed

    Naimi, Madina; Tsakiridis, Theodoros; Stamatatos, Theocharis C; Alexandropoulos, Dimitris I; Tsiani, Evangelia

    2015-04-01

    Stimulation of the energy sensor AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) has been viewed as a targeted approach to increase glucose uptake by skeletal muscle and control blood glucose homeostasis. Rosemary extract (RE) has been reported to activate AMPK in hepatocytes and reduce blood glucose levels in vivo but its effects on skeletal muscle are not known. In the present study, we examined the effects of RE and the mechanism of regulation of glucose uptake in muscle cells. RE stimulated glucose uptake in L6 myotubes in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Maximum stimulation was seen with 5 μg/mL of RE for 4 h (184% ± 5.07% of control, p < 0.001), a response comparable to maximum insulin (207% ± 5.26%, p < 0.001) and metformin (216% ± 8.77%, p < 0.001) stimulation. RE did not affect insulin receptor substrate 1 and Akt phosphorylation but significantly increased AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase phosphorylation. Furthermore, the RE-stimulated glucose uptake was significantly reduced by the AMPK inhibitor compound C, but remained unchanged by the PI3K inhibitor, wortmannin. RE did not affect GLUT4 or GLUT1 glucose transporter translocation in contrast with a significant translocation of both transporters seen with insulin or metformin treatment. Our study is the first to show a direct effect of RE on muscle cell glucose uptake by a mechanism that involves AMPK activation. PMID:25794239

  9. Inflammatory T cell responses rely on amino acid transporter ASCT2 facilitation of glutamine uptake and mTORC1 kinase activation

    PubMed Central

    Nakaya, Mako; Xiao, Yichuan; Zhou, Xiaofei; Chang, Jae-Hoon; Chang, Mikyoung; Cheng, Xuhong; Blonska, Marzenna; Lin, Xin; Sun, Shao-Cong

    2014-01-01

    Glutamine has been implicated as an immunomodulatory nutrient, but how glutamine uptake is mediated during T-cell activation is poorly understood. We have shown that naïve T-cell activation is coupled with rapid glutamine uptake, which depended on the amino acid transporter ASCT2. ASCT2 deficiency impaired the induction of T helper-1 (Th1) and Th17 cells and attenuated inflammatory T-cell responses in mouse models of immunity and autoimmunity. Mechanistically, ASCT2 was required for T cell receptor (TCR)-stimulated activation of the metabolic kinase mTORC1. We have further shown that TCR-stimulated glutamine uptake and mTORC1 activation also required a TCR signaling complex composed of the scaffold protein CARMA1, the adaptor molecule BCL10, and the paracaspase MALT1. This function was independent of IKK kinase, a major downstream target of the CARMA1 complex. These findings highlight a mechanism of T-cell activation involving ASCT2-dependent integration of the TCR signal and a metabolic signaling pathway. PMID:24792914

  10. Interspecific root interactions and rhizosphere effects on salt ions and nutrient uptake between mixed grown peanut/maize and peanut/barley in original saline-sodic-boron toxic soil.

    PubMed

    Inal, Ali; Gunes, Aydin

    2008-01-01

    Two glasshouse studies were conducted to investigate the effect of interspecific complementary and competitive root interactions and rhizosphere effects on the concentration and uptake of Na, Cl and B, and N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn and Mn nutrition of mixed cropped peanut with maize (Experiment I), and barley (Experiment II) grown in nutrient-poor saline-sodic and B toxic soil. Mixed cropped plants were grown in either higher density or lower density. The results of the experiment revealed that dry shoot weight decreased in peanut but increased in maize and barley with associated plant species compared to their monoculture. Shoot Na and Cl concentrations of peanut decreased significantly in both experiments, regardless of higher or lower density. The concentrations of Na also decreased in the shoots of mixed cropped maize and barley, but Cl concentrations increased slightly. The concentration of B significantly decreased in mixed cropping in all plant species regardless of higher or lower density. Rhizosphere chemistry was strongly and differentially modified by the roots of peanut, maize and barley, and mixed growing. There were significant correlations between the root-secreted acid phosphatases (S-APase), acid phosphatase in rhizosphere (RS-APase) and rhizosphere P concentration (RS-P) in the both experiments. The Fe-solubilizing activity (Fe-SA) and ferric reducing (FR) capacity of the roots were generally higher in mixed culture relative to their monoculture, which improved Fe, Zn and Mn nutrition of peanut. Further, there were also significant correlations among FR, Fe-SA and RS-Fe concentrations. Peanut facilitated P nutrition of maize and barley, while maize and barley improved K, Fe, Zn and Mn nutrition of peanut grown in nutrient-poor saline-sodic and B toxic soil. PMID:17698244

  11. Direct neuronal glucose uptake heralds activity-dependent increases in cerebral metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lundgaard, Iben; Li, Baoman; Xie, Lulu; Kang, Hongyi; Sanggaard, Simon; Haswell, John Douglas R; Sun, Wei; Goldman, Siri; Blekot, Solomiya; Nielsen, Michael; Takano, Takahiro; Deane, Rashid; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2015-01-01

    Metabolically, the brain is a highly active organ that relies almost exclusively on glucose as its energy source. According to the astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttle hypothesis, glucose is taken up by astrocytes and converted to lactate, which is then oxidized by neurons. Here we show, using 2-photon imaging of a near-infrared 2-deoxyglucose analogue (2DG-IR), that glucose is taken up preferentially by neurons in awake behaving mice. Anesthesia suppressed neuronal 2DG-IR uptake and sensory stimulation was associated with a sharp increase in neuronal, but not astrocytic, 2DG-IR uptake. Moreover, hexokinase, which catalyze the first enzymatic steps in glycolysis, was highly enriched in neurons compared with astrocytes, in mouse as well as in human cortex. These observations suggest that brain activity and neuronal glucose metabolism are directly linked, and identifies the neuron as the principal locus of glucose uptake as visualized by functional brain imaging. PMID:25904018

  12. [Effects of two controlled-release fertilizers with different proportions of N, P and K on the nutrient uptake and growth of Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li-Xiang; Wang, Jian-Hua; Sun, Yin-Shi; Li, Yu-Peng; Sun, Li-Wen; Zhang, Chun-Ling

    2009-07-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of two controlled-release fertilizers CRFA (4% resin-coated, N: P2O5: K2O = 14: 14: 14) and CRFB (4% resin-coated, N: P2O5: K2O = 20: 8:10) on the nutrient uptake and growth of Chrysanthemum morifolium, with common compound fertilizer CCF (N: P2O5: K2O = 15: 15: 15) as the control. Six treatments were installed, i. e., CCF1 (CCF, 6 g N x pot(-1)), CCF2 (CCF, 3 g N x pot(-1)), CRFA1 (CRFA, 6 g x pot(-1)), CRFA2 (CRFA, 3 g x pot(-1)), CRFB1 (CRFB, 6 g x pot(-1)), and CRFB (CRFB, 3 g x pot(-1)). On the 30th day of applying common compound fertilizer CCF1 and CCF2, soil available N, P and K contents were 163.29 and 145.26 mg x kg(-1), 180.39 and 163.13 mg x kg(-1), and 300.08 and 213.15 mg x kg(-1), respectively, and decreased rapidly since then. In treatments CRFA1, CRFB1, CRFA2, and CRFB, soil available N content increased slowly, and reached the peak on the 60th day after fertilizing, being 129.51, 138.65, 118.36, and 126.31 mg x kg(-1), respectively. Soil available P content had the same variation trend. Its maximum concentration was 169.54 and 133.46 mg x kg(-1) in treatments CRFA1 and CRFA2 on the 30th day after fertilizing, and 137.13 and 84.68 mg x kg(-1) in treatments CRFB1 and CRFB2 on the 60th day after fertilizing, and decreased slowly then. The agronomic traits such as leaf area, leaf area index, branch number, flowering rate, flower number, and flower diameter, etc., in treatments CRFA and CRFB were obviously better than those of the control, and CRFB was better than CRFA, suggesting that CRFB more matched the nutrient demand of C. morifolium. Under the conditions of present experiment, applying CRFB2 obtained the highest yield. PMID:19899469

  13. Effects of nutrient enrichment on the decomposition of wood and associated microbial activity in streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gulis, V.; Rosemond, A.D.; Suberkropp, K.; Weyers, H.S.; Benstead, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    1. We determined the effects of nutrient enrichment on wood decomposition rates and microbial activity during a 3-year study in two headwater streams at Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory, NC, U.S.A. After a 1-year pretreatment period, one of the streams was continuously enriched with inorganic nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) for 2 years while the other stream served as a reference. We determined the effects of enrichment on both wood veneers and sticks, which have similar carbon quality but differ in physical characteristics (e.g. surface area to volume ratios, presence of bark) that potentially affect microbial colonisation and activity. 2. Oak wood veneers (0.5 mm thick) were placed in streams monthly and allowed to decompose for approximately 90 days. Nutrient addition stimulated ash-free dry mass loss and increased mean nitrogen content, fungal biomass and microbial respiration on veneers in the treatment stream compared with the reference. The magnitude of the response to enrichment was great, with mass loss 6.1 times, and per cent N, fungal biomass and microbial respiration approximately four times greater in the treatment versus reference stream. 3. Decomposition rate and nitrogen content of maple sticks (ca. 1-2 cm diameter) also increased; however, the effect was less pronounced than for veneers. Wood response overall was greater than that determined for leaves in a comparable study, supporting the hypothesis that response to enrichment may be greater for lower quality organic matter (high C:N) than for higher quality (low C:N) substrates. 4. Our results show that moderate nutrient enrichment can profoundly affect decomposition rate and microbial activity on wood in streams. Thus, the timing and availability of wood that provides retention, structure, attachment sites and food in stream ecosystems may be affected by nutrient concentrations raised by human activities.

  14. Seed treatment with 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol-producing pseudomonads improves crop health in low-pH soils by altering patterns of nutrient uptake.

    PubMed

    Raudales, Rosa E; Stone, Erica; McSpadden Gardener, Brian B

    2009-05-01

    Seed treatment with a 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG)-producing Pseudomonas strain ameliorated abiotic stress disorder in corn caused by growth in a low-pH soil. In two consecutive growing seasons, Wood1R-treated seed gave rise to plants that grew taller (Pnutrient uptake (i.e., generally increasing P and Mg while reducing Al) were observed to occur as a result of Wood1R seed treatment under both sets of growing conditions. In contrast, suppression of seedling damping-off disease was not indicated in this low-pH soil, because no difference in crop stand was observed for any experiment. Additionally, Wood1R-mediated growth inhibition of seedling pathogens was reduced in vitro at pH<5.0, indicating that secretion of antifungal metabolites may not occur in low-pH soils. This is the first report of an abiotic stress amelioration of acid soil stress-related symptoms by a DAPG-producing pseudomonad. PMID:19351246

  15. Adsorption uptake of synthetic organic chemicals by carbon nanotubes and activated carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, A. J.; Lim, Hyung-nam; Kilduff, James E.

    2012-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown great promise as high performance materials for adsorbing priority pollutants from water and wastewater. This study compared uptake of two contaminants of interest in drinking water treatment (atrazine and trichloroethylene) by nine different types of carbonaceous adsorbents: three different types of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), three different sized multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs), two granular activated carbons (GACs) and a powdered activated carbon (PAC). On a mass basis, the activated carbons exhibited the highest uptake, followed by SWNTs and MWNTs. However, metallic impurities in SWNTs and multiple walls in MWNTs contribute to adsorbent mass but do not contribute commensurate adsorption sites. Therefore, when uptake was normalized by purity (carbon content) and surface area (instead of mass), the isotherms collapsed and much of the CNT data was comparable to the activated carbons, indicating that these two characteristics drive much of the observed differences between activated carbons and CNT materials. For the limited data set here, the Raman D:G ratio as a measure of disordered non-nanotube graphitic components was not a good predictor of adsorption from solution. Uptake of atrazine by MWNTs having a range of lengths and diameters was comparable and their Freundlich isotherms were statistically similar, and we found no impact of solution pH on the adsorption of either atrazine or trichloroethylene in the range of naturally occurring surface water (pH = 5.7-8.3). Experiments were performed using a suite of model aromatic compounds having a range of π-electron energy to investigate the role of π-π electron donor-acceptor interactions on organic compound uptake by SWNTs. For the compounds studied, hydrophobic interactions were the dominant mechanism in the uptake by both SWNTs and activated carbon. However, comparing the uptake of naphthalene and phenanthrene by activated carbon and SWNTs, size exclusion effects

  16. Adsorption uptake of synthetic organic chemicals by carbon nanotubes and activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Brooks, A J; Lim, Hyung-nam; Kilduff, James E

    2012-07-27

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown great promise as high performance materials for adsorbing priority pollutants from water and wastewater. This study compared uptake of two contaminants of interest in drinking water treatment (atrazine and trichloroethylene) by nine different types of carbonaceous adsorbents: three different types of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), three different sized multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs), two granular activated carbons (GACs) and a powdered activated carbon (PAC). On a mass basis, the activated carbons exhibited the highest uptake, followed by SWNTs and MWNTs. However, metallic impurities in SWNTs and multiple walls in MWNTs contribute to adsorbent mass but do not contribute commensurate adsorption sites. Therefore, when uptake was normalized by purity (carbon content) and surface area (instead of mass), the isotherms collapsed and much of the CNT data was comparable to the activated carbons, indicating that these two characteristics drive much of the observed differences between activated carbons and CNT materials. For the limited data set here, the Raman D:G ratio as a measure of disordered non-nanotube graphitic components was not a good predictor of adsorption from solution. Uptake of atrazine by MWNTs having a range of lengths and diameters was comparable and their Freundlich isotherms were statistically similar, and we found no impact of solution pH on the adsorption of either atrazine or trichloroethylene in the range of naturally occurring surface water (pH = 5.7-8.3). Experiments were performed using a suite of model aromatic compounds having a range of π-electron energy to investigate the role of π-π electron donor-acceptor interactions on organic compound uptake by SWNTs. For the compounds studied, hydrophobic interactions were the dominant mechanism in the uptake by both SWNTs and activated carbon. However, comparing the uptake of naphthalene and phenanthrene by activated carbon and SWNTs, size exclusion effects

  17. Glutamine synthetase activity and glutamate uptake in hippocampus and frontal cortex in portal hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Gabriela Beatriz; Fernández, María Alejandra; Roselló, Diego Martín; Tomaro, María Luján; Balestrasse, Karina; Lemberg, Abraham

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To study glutamine synthetase (GS) activity and glutamate uptake in the hippocampus and frontal cortex (FC) from rats with prehepatic portal vein hypertension. METHODS: Male Wistar rats were divided into sham-operated group and a portal hypertension (PH) group with a regulated stricture of the portal vein. Animals were sacrificed by decapitation 14 d after portal vein stricture. GS activity was determined in the hippocampus and FC. Specific uptake of radiolabeled L-glutamate was studied using synaptosome-enriched fractions that were freshly prepared from both brain areas. RESULTS: We observed that the activity of GS increased in the hippocampus of PH rats, as compared to control animals, and decreased in the FC. A significant decrease in glutamate uptake was found in both brain areas, and was more marked in the hippocampus. The decrease in glutamate uptake might have been caused by a deficient transport function, significantly and persistent increase in this excitatory neurotransmitter activity. CONCLUSION: The presence of moderate ammonia blood levels may add to the toxicity of excitotoxic glutamate in the brain, which causes alterations in brain function. Portal vein stricture that causes portal hypertension modifies the normal function in some brain regions. PMID:19533812

  18. Assessment of glutamine synthetase activity by [13N]ammonia uptake in living rat brain.

    PubMed

    Momosaki, Sotaro; Ito, Miwa; Tonomura, Misato; Abe, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) plays an important role in glutamate neurotransmission or neurological disorder in the brain. [(13) N]Ammonia blood flow tracer has been reported to be metabolically trapped in the brain via the glutamate-glutamine pathway. The present study investigated the effect of an inhibitor of GS on [(13) N]ammonia uptake in order to clarify the feasibility of measuring GS activity in the living brain. l-Methionine sulfoximine (MSO), a selective GS inhibitor was microinjected into the ipsilateral striatum in rats. [(13) N]Ammonia uptake was quantified by autoradiography method as well as small animal positron emission tomography (PET) scans. The GS activity of the brain homogenate was assayed from the γ-glutamyl transferase reaction. Autoradiograms showed a decrease of [(13) N]ammonia radioactivity on the MSO-injected side compared with the saline-injected side of the striatum. This reduction could be detected with a small animal PET scanner. MSO had no effect on cerebral blood flow measured by uptake of [(15) O]H2 O. The reduction of [(13) N]ammonia uptake was closely related to the results of GS activity assay. These results indicated that [(13) N]ammonia may enable measurement of GS activity in the living brain. PMID:25196365

  19. Modelling orange tree root water uptake active area by minimally invasive ERT data and transpiration measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanella, Daniela; Boaga, Jacopo; Perri, Maria Teresa; Consoli, Simona; Cassiani, Giorgio

    2015-04-01

    The comprehension of the hydrological processes involving plant root dynamics is crucial for implementing water saving measures in agriculture. This is particular urgent in areas, like those Mediterranean, characterized by scarce water availability. The study of root water dynamics should not be separated from a more general analysis of the mass and energy fluxes transferred in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. In our study, in order to carry this inclusive approach, minimal invasive 3D time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) for soil moisture estimation was combined with plant transpiration fluxes directly measured with Sap Flow (SF) techniques and Eddy Covariance methods, and volumetric soil moisture measurements by TDR probes. The main objective of this inclusive approach was to accurately define root-zone water dynamics and individuate the root-area effectively active for water and nutrient uptake process. The monitoring was carried out in Eastern Sicily (south Italy) in summers 2013 and 2014, within an experimental orange orchard farm. During the first year of experiment (October 2013), ERT measurements were carried out around the pertinent volume of one fully irrigated tree, characterized by a vegetation ground cover of 70%; in the second year (June 2014), ERT monitoring was conducted considering a cutting plant, thus to evaluate soil water dynamics without the significant plant transpiration contribution. In order to explore the hydrological dynamics of the root zone volume surrounded by the monitored tree, the resistivity data acquired during the ERT monitoring were converted into soil moisture content distribution by a laboratory calibration based on the soil electrical properties as a function of moisture content and pore water electrical conductivity. By using ERT data in conjunction with the agro-meteorological information (i.e. irrigation rates, rainfall, evapotranspiration by Eddy Covariance, transpiration by Sap Flow and soil moisture

  20. Relationship between uptake of mercury vapor by mushrooms and its catalase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ogata, M.; Kenmotsu, K.; Hirota, N.; Naito, M.

    1981-12-01

    The uptake of mercury vapor by mushrooms (Shiitake) artifically grown on an oak tree and the uptake in vitro by catalase extracts prepared from mushroom Hay Bacillus and spinach are reported. Mushrooms were exposed to 1.4 mg/Hg/cu m for 11 days. Measurement of total mercury was as previously described (Ogata et al. 1978, 1979). Levels in mushrooms ranged from 0.4 +/- 0.1 ..mu..g/g at 0.5 days to 4.6 +/- 0.2 ..mu..g/g at 10.5 days and steady-state thereafter. In in vitro studies Hy uptake by mushroom catalase extract was estimated by the perborate method. Uptake was found to parallel catalase activity and was inhibited by potassium cyanide, sodium azide, and 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole. Similar results were obtained with Hay Bacillus and spinach catalase extracts. Results suggest that the level of mercury in the mushroom can be used as an indicator of mercury pollution in the environment. It is also suggested that catalase has an important role in uptake of mercury vapor in the plant. 2 tables (JMT)

  1. Hazardous ions uptake behavior of thermally activated steel-making slag.

    PubMed

    Jha, V K; Kameshima, Y; Nakajima, A; Okada, K

    2004-10-18

    This study concerns the utilization of waste steel-making slag, a by-product that contains mainly CaO, Fe(2)O(3) and SiO(2). The as-received slag was ground and thermally activated by temperature treatment from 110 to 1000 degrees C for 24 h. Although the as-received slag was amorphous, it became partially crystallized during grinding. These crystalline phases were larnite and iron oxide but other crystalline phases also appeared in addition to larnite after calcination. The uptake of Ni(2+), PO(4)(3-) and NH(4)(+) by the samples was investigated from solutions with initial concentrations of 10 mmol/l. The sample calcined at 800 degrees C showed the highest Ni(2+) uptake (4.85 mmol/g) whereas the highest simultaneous uptake of PO(4)(3-) (2.75 mmol/g) and NH(4)(+) (0.25 mmol/g) was achieved by calcining the material at 700 degrees C. The principal mechanism of Ni(2+) uptake is thought to involve replacement of Ca(2+) by Ni(2+). The mechanism of PO(4)(3-) uptake is mainly by formation of calcium phosphate while that of NH(4)(+) involves sorption by the porous silica surface of the samples. PMID:15511584

  2. Quantitative structure-activity relationships for cellular uptake of surface-modified nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong; Rallo, Robert; Bilal, Muhammad; Cohen, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) were developed, for cellular uptake of nanoparticles (NPs) of the same iron oxide core but with different surface-modifying organic molecules, based on linear and non-linear (epsilon support vector regression (ε-SVR)). A linear QSAR provided high prediction accuracy of R2=0.751 (coefficient of determination) using 11 descriptors selected from an initial pool of 184 descriptors calculated for the NP surfacemodifying molecules, while a ε-SVR based QSAR with only 6 descriptors improved prediction accuracy to R2=0.806. The linear and ε-SVR based QSARs both demonstrated good robustness and well spanned applicability domains. It is suggested that the approach of evaluating pertinent descriptors and their significance, via QSAR analysis, to cellular NP uptake could support planning and interpretation of toxicity studies as well as provide guidance for the tailor-design NPs with respect to targeted cellular uptake for various applications. PMID:25747434

  3. Anorectic activities of serotonin uptake inhibitors: correlation with their potencies at inhibiting serotonin uptake in vivo and /sup 3/H-mazindol binding in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, I.; Taranger, M.A.; Claustre, Y.; Scatton, B.; Langer, S.Z.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism of anorectic action of several serotonin uptake inhibitors was investigated by comparing their anorectic potencies with several biochemical and pharmacological properties and in reference to the novel compound SL 81.0385. The anorectic effect of the potent serotonin uptake inhibitor SL 81.0385 was potentiated by pretreatment with 5-hydroxytryptophan and blocked by the serotonin receptor antagonist metergoline. A good correlation was obtained between the ED/sub 50/ values of anorectic action and the ED/sub 50/ values of serotonin uptake inhibition in vivo (but not in vitro) for several specific serotonin uptake inhibitors. Most of the drugs tested displaced (/sup 3/H)-mazindol from its binding to the anorectic recognition site in the hypothalamus, except the pro-drug zimelidine which was inactive. Excluding zimelidine, a good correlation was obtained between the affinities of these drugs for (/sup 3/H)-mazindol binding and their anorectic action indicating that their anorectic activity may be associated with an effect mediated through this site. Taken together these results suggest that the anorectic action of serotonin uptake inhibitors is directly associated to their ability to inhibit serotonin uptake and thus increasing the synaptic levels of serotonin. The interactions of these drugs with the anorectic recognition site labelled with (/sup 3/H)-mazindol is discussed in connection with the serotonergic regulation of carbohydrate intake.

  4. Characterization of the In Situ Ecophysiology of Novel Phylotypes in Nutrient Removal Activated Sludge Treatment Plants

    PubMed Central

    McIlroy, Simon Jon; Awata, Takanori; Nierychlo, Marta; Albertsen, Mads; Kindaichi, Tomonori; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    2015-01-01

    An in depth understanding of the ecology of activated sludge nutrient removal wastewater treatment systems requires detailed knowledge of the community composition and metabolic activities of individual members. Recent 16S rRNA gene amplicon surveys of activated sludge wastewater treatment plants with nutrient removal indicate the presence of a core set of bacterial genera. These organisms are likely responsible for the bulk of nutrient transformations underpinning the functions of these plants. While the basic activities of some of these genera in situ are known, there is little to no information for the majority. This study applied microautoradiography coupled with fluorescence in situ hybridization (MAR-FISH) for the in situ characterization of selected genus-level-phylotypes for which limited physiological information is available. These included Sulfuritalea and A21b, both within the class Betaproteobacteria, as well as Kaga01, within sub-group 10 of the phylum Acidobacteria. While the Sulfuritalea spp. were observed to be metabolically versatile, the A21b and Kaga01 phylotypes appeared to be highly specialized. PMID:26340564

  5. Biochar as carrier for plant nutrients and microorganisms - techniques of agro-activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, H.-P.

    2012-04-01

    The soil enhancing qualities of biochar are strongly linked to its influence on nutrient cycling dynamics, sorption dynamics and to changing habitat condition for soil fauna. But as shown in multiple studies, the addition of pure biochar to agricultural soils may provoke reduced plant growth caused by the immobilisation of plant nutrients. The very potent sorption dynamics of biochar makes it an effective carrier for plant nutrients and plant-root symbiotic microorganisms. At the Delinat-Institute, we tried sundry methods of charging biochars with organic and mineral plant nutrients as well as with microorganisms. This includes the use of biochar as bulk agent in aerobic composting, in malolactic fermentation and as treatment for liquid manure, but also formulations of mineral carbon-fertilizers. Those biochar products are tested in pot and also large scale field trials. Results and experiences of these trials as well as different activation methods will be explained. A short overview of industrial designing of biochar based products will be given.

  6. Tetrodotoxin-insensitive Na+ channel activator palytoxin inhibits tyrosine uptake into cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, K.; Teraoka, K.; Azuma, M.; Oka, M.; Hamano, S. )

    1991-07-01

    The effects of the tetrodotoxin-insensitive Na+ channel activator palytoxin on both the secretion of endogenous catecholamines and the formation of 14C-catecholamines from (14C)tyrosine were examined using cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. Palytoxin was shown to cause the stimulation of catecholamine secretion in a concentration-dependent manner. However, this toxin caused the reduction rather than the stimulation of 14C-catecholamine formation at the same concentrations. Palytoxin failed to cause any alteration in the activity of tyrosine hydroxylase prepared from bovine adrenal medulla. Furthermore, the uptake of (14C)tyrosine into the cells was shown to be inhibited by this toxin under the conditions in which the suppression of 14C-catecholamine formation was observed, and this inhibitory action on tyrosine uptake was closely correlated with that on catecholamine formation. The inhibitory action of palytoxin on tyrosine uptake into the cells was observed to be noncompetitive, and this effect was not altered by the removal of Na+ from the incubation mixture. These results suggest that palytoxin may be able to inhibit the uptake of (14C)tyrosine into the cells, resulting in the suppression of 14C-catecholamine formation, probably through its direct action on the plasma membranes of bovine adrenal chromaffin cells.

  7. Antiproliferative Activity and Cellular Uptake of Evodiamine and Rutaecarpine Based on 3D Tumor Models.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hui; Liu, Dongmei; Gao, Bin; Zhang, Xiaohui; You, Minli; Ren, Hui; Zhang, Hongbo; Santos, Hélder A; Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Evodiamine (EVO) and rutaecarpine (RUT) are promising anti-tumor drug candidates. The evaluation of the anti-proliferative activity and cellular uptake of EVO and RUT in 3D multicellular spheroids of cancer cells would better recapitulate the native situation and thus better reflect an in vivo response to the treatment. Herein, we employed the 3D culture of MCF-7 and SMMC-7721 cells based on hanging drop method and evaluated the anti-proliferative activity and cellular uptake of EVO and RUT in 3D multicellular spheroids, and compared the results with those obtained from 2D monolayers. The drugs' IC50 values were significantly increased from the range of 6.4-44.1 μM in 2D monolayers to 21.8-138.0 μM in 3D multicellular spheroids, which may be due to enhanced mass barrier and reduced drug penetration in 3D models. The fluorescence of EVO and RUT was measured via fluorescence spectroscopy and the cellular uptake of both drugs was characterized in 2D tumor models. The results showed that the cellular uptake concentrations of RUT increased with increasing drug concentrations. However, the EVO concentrations uptaken by the cells showed only a small change with increasing drug concentrations, which may be due to the different solubility of EVO and Rut in solvents. Overall, this study provided a new vision of the anti-tumor activity of EVO and RUT via 3D multicellular spheroids and cellular uptake through the fluorescence of compounds. PMID:27455219

  8. The Interactions of Aquaporins and Mineral Nutrients in Higher Plants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Ding, Lei; Gao, Limin; Li, Yingrui; Shen, Qirong; Guo, Shiwei

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporins, major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) present in the plasma and intracellular membranes, facilitate the transport of small neutral molecules across cell membranes in higher plants. Recently, progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms of aquaporin subcellular localization, transport selectivity, and gating properties. Although the role of aquaporins in maintaining the plant water status has been addressed, the interactions between plant aquaporins and mineral nutrients remain largely unknown. This review highlights the roles of various aquaporin orthologues in mineral nutrient uptake and transport, as well as the regulatory effects of mineral nutrients on aquaporin expression and activity, and an integrated link between aquaporins and mineral nutrient metabolism was identified. PMID:27483251

  9. The Interactions of Aquaporins and Mineral Nutrients in Higher Plants

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Ding, Lei; Gao, Limin; Li, Yingrui; Shen, Qirong; Guo, Shiwei

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporins, major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) present in the plasma and intracellular membranes, facilitate the transport of small neutral molecules across cell membranes in higher plants. Recently, progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms of aquaporin subcellular localization, transport selectivity, and gating properties. Although the role of aquaporins in maintaining the plant water status has been addressed, the interactions between plant aquaporins and mineral nutrients remain largely unknown. This review highlights the roles of various aquaporin orthologues in mineral nutrient uptake and transport, as well as the regulatory effects of mineral nutrients on aquaporin expression and activity, and an integrated link between aquaporins and mineral nutrient metabolism was identified. PMID:27483251

  10. Effect of acclimation and nutrient supply on 5-tolyltriazole biodegradation with activated sludge communities.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Bastian; Yuan, Heyang; Lemmer, Hilde; Horn, Harald; Müller, Elisabeth

    2014-07-01

    The corrosion inhibitor 5-tolyltriazole (5-TTri) can have a detrimental impact on aquatic systems thus implying an acute need to reduce the effluent concentrations of 5-TTri. In this study, 5-TTri biodegradation was enhanced through acclimation and nutrient supply. Activated sludge communities (ASC) were setup in nine subsequent ASC generations. While generation two showed a lag phase of five days without biodegradation, generations four to nine utilized 5-TTri right after inoculation, with biodegradation rates from 3.3 to 5.2 mg L(-1)d(-1). Additionally, centrifuged AS supernatant was used to simulate the nutrient conditions in wastewater. This sludge supernatant (SS) significantly enhanced biodegradation, resulting in removal rates ranging from 3.2 to 5.0 mg L(-1)d(-1) without acclimation while the control groups without SS observed lower rates of ⩽ 2.2 mg L(-1)d(-1). PMID:24841493

  11. Carbon-Degrading Enzyme Activities Stimulated by Increased Nutrient Availability in Arctic Tundra Soils

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Akihiro; Wallenstein, Matthew D.; Simpson, Rodney T.; Moore, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Climate-induced warming of the Arctic tundra is expected to increase nutrient availability to soil microbes, which in turn may accelerate soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition. We increased nutrient availability via fertilization to investigate the microbial response via soil enzyme activities. Specifically, we measured potential activities of seven enzymes at four temperatures in three soil profiles (organic, organic/mineral interface, and mineral) from untreated native soils and from soils which had been fertilized with nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) since 1989 (23 years) and 2006 (six years). Fertilized plots within the 1989 site received annual additions of 10 g N⋅m-2⋅year-1 and 5 g P⋅m-2⋅year-1. Within the 2006 site, two fertilizer regimes were established – one in which plots received 5 g N⋅m-2⋅year-1 and 2.5 g P⋅m-2⋅year-1 and one in which plots received 10 g N⋅m-2⋅year-1 and 5 g P⋅m-2⋅year-1. The fertilization treatments increased activities of enzymes hydrolyzing carbon (C)-rich compounds but decreased phosphatase activities, especially in the organic soils. Activities of two enzymes that degrade N-rich compounds were not affected by the fertilization treatments. The fertilization treatments increased ratios of enzyme activities degrading C-rich compounds to those for N-rich compounds or phosphate, which could lead to changes in SOM chemistry over the long term and to losses of soil C. Accelerated SOM decomposition caused by increased nutrient availability could significantly offset predicted increased C fixation via stimulated net primary productivity in Arctic tundra ecosystems. PMID:24204773

  12. Carbon-degrading enzyme activities stimulated by increased nutrient availability in Arctic tundra soils.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Akihiro; Wallenstein, Matthew D; Simpson, Rodney T; Moore, John C

    2013-01-01

    Climate-induced warming of the Arctic tundra is expected to increase nutrient availability to soil microbes, which in turn may accelerate soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition. We increased nutrient availability via fertilization to investigate the microbial response via soil enzyme activities. Specifically, we measured potential activities of seven enzymes at four temperatures in three soil profiles (organic, organic/mineral interface, and mineral) from untreated native soils and from soils which had been fertilized with nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) since 1989 (23 years) and 2006 (six years). Fertilized plots within the 1989 site received annual additions of 10 g N · m(-2) · year(-1) and 5 g P · m(-2) · year(-1). Within the 2006 site, two fertilizer regimes were established--one in which plots received 5 g N · m(-2) · year(-1) and 2.5 g P · m(-2) · year(-1) and one in which plots received 10 g N · m(-2) · year(-1) and 5 g P · m(-2) · year(-1). The fertilization treatments increased activities of enzymes hydrolyzing carbon (C)-rich compounds but decreased phosphatase activities, especially in the organic soils. Activities of two enzymes that degrade N-rich compounds were not affected by the fertilization treatments. The fertilization treatments increased ratios of enzyme activities degrading C-rich compounds to those for N-rich compounds or phosphate, which could lead to changes in SOM chemistry over the long term and to losses of soil C. Accelerated SOM decomposition caused by increased nutrient availability could significantly offset predicted increased C fixation via stimulated net primary productivity in Arctic tundra ecosystems. PMID:24204773

  13. Dibenzoylmethane Exerts Metabolic Activity through Regulation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK)-Mediated Glucose Uptake and Adipogenesis Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nami; Kim, Hong Min; Lee, Eun Soo; Lee, Jung Ok; Lee, Hye Jeong; Lee, Soo Kyung; Moon, Ji Wook; Kim, Ji Hae; Kim, Joong Kwan; Kim, Su Jin; Park, Sun Hwa; Chung, Choon Hee; Kim, Hyeon Soo

    2015-01-01

    Dibenzoylmethane (DBM) has been shown to exert a variety of beneficial effects on human health. However, the mechanism of action is poorly understood. In this study, DBM increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and stimulated glucose uptake in a skeletal muscle cell line. Both knockdown of AMPK with siRNA and inhibition with AMPK inhibitor blocked DBM-induced glucose uptake. DBM increased the concentration of intracellular calcium and glucose uptake due to DBM was abolished by STO-609 (a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase inhibitor). DBM stimulated phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), which was blocked by pretreatment with compound C, an AMPK inhibitor. The expression of glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) was increased by DBM. The translocation of GLUT4 to the plasma membrane was also increased by DBM in AMPK dependently. In addition, DBM suppressed weight gain and prevented fat accumulation in the liver and abdomen in mice fed a high-fat diet. In pre-adipocyte cells, DBM decreased the activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), the rate-limiting enzyme of fatty acid synthesis. Expression of the adipogenic gene, fatty acid synthase (FAS), was suppressed by DBM in an AMPK-dependent manner. These results showed that the beneficial metabolic effects of DBM might be due to regulation of glucose uptake via AMPK in skeletal muscle and inhibition of adipogenesis in pre-adipocytes. PMID:25756788

  14. Dibenzoylmethane exerts metabolic activity through regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-mediated glucose uptake and adipogenesis pathways.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nami; Kim, Hong Min; Lee, Eun Soo; Lee, Jung Ok; Lee, Hye Jeong; Lee, Soo Kyung; Moon, Ji Wook; Kim, Ji Hae; Kim, Joong Kwan; Kim, Su Jin; Park, Sun Hwa; Chung, Choon Hee; Kim, Hyeon Soo

    2015-01-01

    Dibenzoylmethane (DBM) has been shown to exert a variety of beneficial effects on human health. However, the mechanism of action is poorly understood. In this study, DBM increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and stimulated glucose uptake in a skeletal muscle cell line. Both knockdown of AMPK with siRNA and inhibition with AMPK inhibitor blocked DBM-induced glucose uptake. DBM increased the concentration of intracellular calcium and glucose uptake due to DBM was abolished by STO-609 (a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase inhibitor). DBM stimulated phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), which was blocked by pretreatment with compound C, an AMPK inhibitor. The expression of glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) was increased by DBM. The translocation of GLUT4 to the plasma membrane was also increased by DBM in AMPK dependently. In addition, DBM suppressed weight gain and prevented fat accumulation in the liver and abdomen in mice fed a high-fat diet. In pre-adipocyte cells, DBM decreased the activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), the rate-limiting enzyme of fatty acid synthesis. Expression of the adipogenic gene, fatty acid synthase (FAS), was suppressed by DBM in an AMPK-dependent manner. These results showed that the beneficial metabolic effects of DBM might be due to regulation of glucose uptake via AMPK in skeletal muscle and inhibition of adipogenesis in pre-adipocytes. PMID:25756788

  15. Deuterated carbohydrate probes as ‘label-free’ substrates for probing nutrient uptake in mycobacteria by nuclear reaction analysis† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4cc09588j Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Lowery, R.; Gibson, M. I.; Thompson, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding and probing small molecule uptake in cells is challenging, requiring sterically large chemical labels, or radioactive isotopes. Here, the uptake of deuterated sugars by Mycobacterium smegmatis, a non-pathogenic model of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, has been investigated using ion-beam (nuclear reaction) analysis demonstrating a new technique for label-free nutrient acquisition measurement. PMID:25695462

  16. Polyamines Confer Salt Tolerance in Mung Bean (Vigna radiata L.) by Reducing Sodium Uptake, Improving Nutrient Homeostasis, Antioxidant Defense, and Methylglyoxal Detoxification Systems

    PubMed Central

    Nahar, Kamrun; Hasanuzzaman, Mirza; Rahman, Anisur; Alam, Md. Mahabub; Mahmud, Jubayer-Al; Suzuki, Toshisada; Fujita, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    The physiological roles of PAs (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine) were investigated for their ability to confer salt tolerance (200 mM NaCl, 48 h) in mung bean seedlings (Vigna radiata L. cv. BARI Mung-2). Salt stress resulted in Na toxicity, decreased K, Ca, Mg, and Zn contents in roots and shoots, and disrupted antioxidant defense system which caused oxidative damage as indicated by increased lipid peroxidation, H2O2 content, O2•- generation rate, and lipoxygenase activity. Salinity-induced methylglyoxal (MG) toxicity was also clearly evident. Salinity decreased leaf chlorophyll (chl) and relative water content (RWC). Supplementation of salt affected seedlings with exogenous PAs enhanced the contents of glutathione and ascorbate, increased activities of antioxidant enzymes (dehydroascorbate reductase, glutathione reductase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase) and glyoxalase enzyme (glyoxalase II), which reduced salt-induced oxidative stress and MG toxicity, respectively. Exogenous PAs reduced cellular Na content and maintained nutrient homeostasis and modulated endogenous PAs levels in salt affected mung bean seedlings. The overall salt tolerance was reflected through improved tissue water and chl content, and better seedling growth. PMID:27516763

  17. Polyamines Confer Salt Tolerance in Mung Bean (Vigna radiata L.) by Reducing Sodium Uptake, Improving Nutrient Homeostasis, Antioxidant Defense, and Methylglyoxal Detoxification Systems.

    PubMed

    Nahar, Kamrun; Hasanuzzaman, Mirza; Rahman, Anisur; Alam, Md Mahabub; Mahmud, Jubayer-Al; Suzuki, Toshisada; Fujita, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    The physiological roles of PAs (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine) were investigated for their ability to confer salt tolerance (200 mM NaCl, 48 h) in mung bean seedlings (Vigna radiata L. cv. BARI Mung-2). Salt stress resulted in Na toxicity, decreased K, Ca, Mg, and Zn contents in roots and shoots, and disrupted antioxidant defense system which caused oxidative damage as indicated by increased lipid peroxidation, H2O2 content, [Formula: see text] generation rate, and lipoxygenase activity. Salinity-induced methylglyoxal (MG) toxicity was also clearly evident. Salinity decreased leaf chlorophyll (chl) and relative water content (RWC). Supplementation of salt affected seedlings with exogenous PAs enhanced the contents of glutathione and ascorbate, increased activities of antioxidant enzymes (dehydroascorbate reductase, glutathione reductase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase) and glyoxalase enzyme (glyoxalase II), which reduced salt-induced oxidative stress and MG toxicity, respectively. Exogenous PAs reduced cellular Na content and maintained nutrient homeostasis and modulated endogenous PAs levels in salt affected mung bean seedlings. The overall salt tolerance was reflected through improved tissue water and chl content, and better seedling growth. PMID:27516763

  18. Virus activated filopodia promote human papillomavirus type 31 uptake from the extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jessica L.; Lidke, Diane S.; Ozbun, Michelle A.

    2011-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs), etiological agents of epithelial tumors and cancers, initiate infection of basal human keratinocytes (HKs) facilitated by wounding. Virions bind to HKs and their secreted extracellular matrix (ECM), but molecular roles for wounding or ECM binding during infection are unclear. Herein we demonstrate HPV31 activates signals promoting cytoskeletal rearrangements and virion transport required for internalization and infection. Activation of tyrosine and PI3 kinases precedes induction of filopodia whereon virions are transported toward the cell body. Coupled with loss of ECM bound virions this supports a model whereby virus activated filopodial transport contributes to increased and protracted virion uptake into susceptible cells. PMID:18834609

  19. Tracking SERS-active nanoprobe intracellular uptake for chemical and biological sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregas, Molly K.; Yan, Fei; Scaffidi, Jonathan; Wang, Hsin-Neng; Khoury, Christopher; Zhang, Yan; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2007-09-01

    A critical aspect of the use of nanoprobes for intracellular studies in chemical and biological sensing involves a fundamental understanding of their uptake and trajectory in cells. In this study, we describe experiments using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy and mapping to track cellular uptake of plasmonics-active labeled nanoparticles. Three different Raman-active labels with positive, negative, and neutral charges were conjugated to silver colloidal nanoparticles with the aim of spatially and temporally profiling intracellular delivery and tracking of nanoprobes during uptake in single mammalian cells. 1-D Raman spectra and 2-D Raman mapping are used to identify and locate the probes via their SERS signal intensities. Because Raman spectroscopy is very specific for identification of chemical and molecular signatures, the development of functionalized plasmonics-active nanoprobes capable of exploring intracellular spaces and processes has the ability to provide specific information on the effects of biological and chemical pollutants in the intracellular environment. The results indicate that this technique will allow study of when, where, and how these substances affect cells and living organisms.

  20. Biological uptake of polychlorinated biphenyls by Macoma balthica from sediment amended with activated carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLeod, Pamela B.; van den Heuvel-Greve, Martine J.; Luoma, S.N.; Luthy, R.G.

    2007-01-01

    This work characterizes the efficacy of activated carbon amendment in reducing polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) bioavailability to clams (Macoma balthica) from field-contaminated sediment (Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay, CA, USA) Test methods were developed for the use of clams to investigate the effects of sediment amendment on biological uptake. Sediment was mixed with activated carbon for one month. Bioaccumulation tests (28 d) were employed to assess the relationships between carbon dose and carbon particle size on observed reductions in clam biological uptake of PCBs. Extraction and cleanup protocols were developed for the clam tissue. Efficacy of activated carbon treatment was found to increase with both increasing carbon dose and decreasing carbon particle size. Average reductions in bioaccumulation of 22, 64, and 84% relative to untreated Hunters Point sediment were observed for carbon amendments of 0.34, 1.7, and 3.4%, respectively. Average bioaccumulation reductions of 41, 73, and 89% were observed for amendments (dose = 1.7% dry wt) with carbon particles of 180 to 250, 75 to 180, and 25 to 75 ??m, respectively, in diameter, indicating kinetic phenomena in these tests. Additionally, a biodynamic model quantifying clam PCB uptake from water and sediment as well as loss through elimination provided a good fit of experimental data. Model predictions suggest that the sediment ingestion route contributed 80 to 95% of the PCB burdens in the clams. ?? 2007 SETAC.

  1. Nutrient removal using biosorption activated media: preliminary biogeochemical assessment of an innovative stormwater infiltration basin.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Andrew M; Wanielista, Martin P; Chang, Ni-Bin; Xuan, Zhemin; Harris, Willie G

    2012-08-15

    Soil beneath a stormwater infiltration basin receiving runoff from a 23 ha predominantly residential watershed in north-central Florida, USA, was amended using biosorption activated media (BAM) to study the effectiveness of this technology in reducing inputs of nitrogen and phosphorus to groundwater. The functionalized soil amendment BAM consists of a 1.0:1.9:4.1 mixture (by volume) of tire crumb (to increase sorption capacity), silt and clay (to increase soil moisture retention), and sand (to promote sufficient infiltration), which was applied to develop an innovative stormwater infiltration basin utilizing nutrient reduction and flood control sub-basins. Comparison of nitrate/chloride (NO(3)(-)/Cl(-)) ratios for the shallow groundwater indicates that prior to using BAM, NO(3)(-) concentrations were substantially influenced by nitrification or variations in NO(3)(-) input. In contrast, for the new basin utilizing BAM, NO(3)(-)/Cl(-) ratios indicate minor nitrification and NO(3)(-) losses with the exception of one summer sample that indicated a 45% loss. Biogeochemical indicators (denitrifier activity derived from real-time polymerase chain reaction and variations in major ions, nutrients, dissolved and soil gases, and stable isotopes) suggest that NO(3)(-) losses are primarily attributable to denitrification, whereas dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium is a minor process. Denitrification was likely occurring intermittently in anoxic microsites in the unsaturated zone, which was enhanced by the increased soil moisture within the BAM layer and resultant reductions in surface/subsurface oxygen exchange that produced conditions conducive to increased denitrifier activity. Concentrations of total dissolved phosphorus and orthophosphate (PO(4)(3-)) were reduced by more than 70% in unsaturated zone soil water, with the largest decreases in the BAM layer where sorption was the most likely mechanism for removal. Post-BAM PO(4)(3-)/Cl(-) ratios for shallow

  2. Nutrient removal using biosorption activated media: preliminary biogeochemical assessment of an innovative stormwater infiltration basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Reilly, Andrew M.; Wanielista, Martin P.; Chang, Ni-Bin; Xuan, Zhemin; Harris, Willie G.

    2012-01-01

    Soil beneath a stormwater infiltration basin receiving runoff from a 22.7 ha predominantly residential watershed in central Florida, USA, was amended using biosorption activated media (BAM) to study the effectiveness of this technology in reducing inputs of nitrogen and phosphorus to groundwater. The functionalized soil amendment BAM consists of a 1.0:1.9:4.1 mixture (by volume) of tire crumb (to increase sorption capacity), silt and clay (to increase soil moisture retention), and sand (to promote sufficient infiltration), which was applied to develop a prototype stormwater infiltration basin utilizing nutrient reduction and flood control sub-basins. Comparison of nitrate/chloride (NO3-/Cl-) ratios for the shallow groundwater indicate that prior to using BAM, NO3- concentrations were substantially influenced by nitrification or variations in NO3- input. In contrast, for the prototype basin utilizing BAM, NO3-/Cl- ratios indicate minor nitrification and NO3- losses with the exception of one summer sample that indicated a 45% loss. Biogeochemical indicators (denitrifier activity derived from real-time polymerase chain reaction and variations in major ions, nutrients, dissolved and soil gases, and stable isotopes) suggest NO3- losses are primarily attributable to denitrification, whereas dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium is a minor process. Denitrification was likely occurring intermittently in anoxic microsites in the unsaturated zone, which was enhanced by increased soil moisture within the BAM layer and resultant reductions in surface/subsurface oxygen exchange that produced conditions conducive to increased denitrifier activity. Concentrations of total dissolved phosphorus and orthophosphate (PO43-) were reduced by more than 70% in unsaturated zone soil water, with the largest decreases in the BAM layer where sorption was the most likely mechanism for removal. Post-BAM PO43-/Cl- ratios for shallow groundwater indicate predominantly minor increases and

  3. External carbonic anhydrase in three Caribbean corals: quantification of activity and role in CO2 uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tansik, Anna L.; Fitt, William K.; Hopkinson, Brian M.

    2015-09-01

    Scleractinian corals have complicated inorganic carbon ( C i) transport pathways to support both photosynthesis, by their symbiotic dinoflagellates, and calcification. The first step in C i acquisition, uptake into the coral, is critical as the diffusive boundary layer limits the supply of CO2 to the surface and HCO3 - uptake is energy intensive. An external carbonic anhydrase (eCA) on the oral surface of corals is thought to facilitate CO2 uptake by converting HCO3 - into CO2, helping to overcome the limitation imposed by the boundary layer. However, this enzyme has not yet been identified or detected in corals, nor has its activity been quantified. We have developed a method to quantify eCA activity using a reaction-diffusion model to analyze data on 18O removal from labeled C i. Applying this technique to three species of Caribbean corals ( Orbicella faveolata, Porites astreoides, and Siderastrea radians) showed that all species have eCA and that the potential rates of CO2 generation by eCA greatly exceed photosynthetic rates. This demonstrates that eCA activity is sufficient to support its hypothesized role in CO2 supply. Inhibition of eCA severely reduces net photosynthesis in all species (on average by 46 ± 27 %), implying that CO2 generated by eCA is a major carbon source for photosynthesis. Because of the high permeability of membranes to CO2, CO2 uptake is likely driven by a concentration gradient across the cytoplasmic membrane. The ubiquity of eCA in corals from diverse genera and environments suggests that it is fundamental for photosynthetic CO2 supply.

  4. Antioxidant activity and nutrient release from polyphenol-enriched cheese in a simulated gastrointestinal environment.

    PubMed

    Lamothe, Sophie; Langlois, Ariane; Bazinet, Laurent; Couillard, Charles; Britten, Michel

    2016-03-01

    Green tea polyphenols are recognized for their antioxidant properties and their effects on lipid digestion kinetics. Polyphenols are sensitive to degradation in the intestinal environment. Interactions with dairy proteins could modulate the stability and biological activity of polyphenols during digestion. The objective of this study was to evaluate the release of nutrients (polyphenols, fatty acids and peptides) and the antioxidant activity in polyphenol-enriched cheese containing different levels of calcium in a simulated gastrointestinal environment. The relationship between cheese matrix texture, matrix degradation and nutrient release during digestion was also studied. Green tea extract was added to milk at 0% or 0.1%, and cheeses were produced on a laboratory scale. The level of available calcium was adjusted to low (Ca(low)), regular (Ca(reg)) or high (Ca(high)) during the salting step of the cheese-making process. Cheeses were subjected to simulated digestion. The rate and extent of fatty acid release were 21% lower for Ca(low) cheese than for Ca(reg) and Ca(high) cheeses. The greater adhesiveness of Ca(low) cheese, which resulted in lower rates of matrix degradation and proteolysis, contributed to the reduced rate of lipolysis. The presence of green tea extract in cheese reduced the release of free fatty acids at the end of digestion by 7%. The addition of green tea extract increased cheese hardness but did not influence matrix degradation or proteolysis profiles. The formation of complexes between tea polyphenols and proteins within the cheese matrix resulted in a more than twofold increase in polyphenol recovery in the intestinal phase compared with the control (tea polyphenol extract incubated with polyphenol-free cheese). Antioxidant activity was 14% higher in the digest from polyphenol-enriched cheese than in the control. These results suggest that cheese is an effective matrix for the controlled release of nutrients and for the protection of green

  5. Effect of geographical distributions on the nutrient composition, phytochemical profile and antioxidant activity of Morus nigra.

    PubMed

    Khattak, Khanzadi Fatima; Rahman, Tajur Rahman

    2015-09-01

    Recent worldwide inclination for the consumption of natural compounds has extremely augmented the significance of persistent quality of plant materials. Consequently, there is an escalating scientific concern in the impact of geographical distributions of the plants on their chemical constituents, physical characteristics and biological activities. The current study was carried out to see the effect of geographical locations on the nutrient composition, mineral contents, phytochemical profile and free radical scavenging activity of Morus nigra fruit. The samples were collected from five different locations of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, which included districts of D. I. Khan, Karak, Peshawar, Swabi and Swat. The results revealed the considerable impact of geographical locations on the levels of proximate nutrient and selected minerals. Likewise, the concentrations of phenolic, flavonoid, anthocyanin and alkaloidal contents varied significantly (p<0.05) with respect to their geographical distributions. The physicochemical characteristic, extraction yields and DPPH scavenging activity of the samples also showed strong link with the sites of their cultivation. The data suggest that geographical distributions affect the levels of phytochemicals and conversely their biological activities. These variations must be taken into consideration while utilizing raw plant materials for industrial applications and traditional therapies. PMID:26408872

  6. Carbon Monoxide Fumigation Improved the Quality, Nutrients, and Antioxidant Activities of Postharvest Peach

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Pei, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Peaches (Prunus persica cv. Yanhong) were fumigated with carbon monoxide (CO) at 0, 0.5, 5, 10, and 20 μmol/L for 2 hours. The result showed that low concentration CO (0.5–10 μmol/L) might delay the decrease of firmness and titrable acid content, restrain the increase of decay incidence, and postpone the variation of soluble solids content, but treating peaches with high concentration CO (20 μmol/L) demonstrated adverse effects. Further research exhibited that exogenous CO could induce the phenylalnine ammonialyase activity, maintain nutrient contents such as Vitamin C, total flavonoid, and polyphenol, and enhance antioxidant activity according to reducing power and 2,2-diphenyl-1-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl) hydrazyl radical scavenging activity. Treating peaches with appropriate concentration CO was beneficial to the quality, nutrients, and antioxidant activity of postharvest peaches during storage time. Therefore, CO fumigation might probably become a novel method to preserve postharvest peach and other fruits in the future. PMID:26904651

  7. Moisture-uptake by the positive active material from the casting solvent and the ambient environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saharan, Vijay; Roberts, Jeffrey; Manev, Vesselin; Chia, Yee Ho; MacLean, Greg; McMullen, Steven R.

    It is widely recognized that the presence of residual moisture has significant detrimental effects on the performance of lithium ion batteries. Studies have shown that the positive active material can be a major source of moisture contributors to the overall cell moisture. The aim of the present study is to understand the factors affecting moisture uptake by the doped-lithium nickel cobalt oxide material from the casting solvent, acetone, and the ambient environment. As-is and the air-dried powders under various conditions (300 °C for 24 h, 500 °C for 8 h, and 500 °C for 24 h) were exposed to ambient and humid air for various lengths of time. Similarly, all these powders were exposed to extra dry (47 ppm) and wet (5789 ppm) acetone. Karl Fisher measurements at 160 °C and 290 °C show that humidity levels (80-85% relative humidity versus 20-25%) and the exposure times are the critical factors. Acetone wetness and the length of exposure in it do not contribute significantly to the moisture uptake by the active material. Cathode powder drying helps in minimizing the amount of moisture uptake from the environment.

  8. WRKY6 Transcription Factor Restricts Arsenate Uptake and Transposon Activation in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Castrillo, Gabriel; Sánchez-Bermejo, Eduardo; de Lorenzo, Laura; Crevillén, Pedro; Fraile-Escanciano, Ana; TC, Mohan; Mouriz, Alfonso; Catarecha, Pablo; Sobrino-Plata, Juan; Olsson, Sanna; Leo del Puerto, Yolanda; Mateos, Isabel; Rojo, Enrique; Hernández, Luis E.; Jarillo, Jose A.; Piñeiro, Manuel; Paz-Ares, Javier; Leyva, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Stress constantly challenges plant adaptation to the environment. Of all stress types, arsenic was a major threat during the early evolution of plants. The most prevalent chemical form of arsenic is arsenate, whose similarity to phosphate renders it easily incorporated into cells via the phosphate transporters. Here, we found that arsenate stress provokes a notable transposon burst in plants, in coordination with arsenate/phosphate transporter repression, which immediately restricts arsenate uptake. This repression was accompanied by delocalization of the phosphate transporter from the plasma membrane. When arsenate was removed, the system rapidly restored transcriptional expression and membrane localization of the transporter. We identify WRKY6 as an arsenate-responsive transcription factor that mediates arsenate/phosphate transporter gene expression and restricts arsenate-induced transposon activation. Plants therefore have a dual WRKY-dependent signaling mechanism that modulates arsenate uptake and transposon expression, providing a coordinated strategy for arsenate tolerance and transposon gene silencing. PMID:23922208

  9. Artocarpin Induces Apoptosis in Human Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma HSC-1 Cells and Its Cytotoxic Activity Is Dependent on Protein-Nutrient Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chi-Ling; Chen, Gwo-Shing; Lee, Chiang-Wen; Yen, Feng-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Artocarpin, a natural prenylated flavonoid, has been shown to have various biological properties. However, its effects on human cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) have not been previously investigated. We set out to determine whether artocarpin has cytotoxic effects on SCC cells and whether its pharmacological activity is dependent on protein-nutrient concentration. Our results showed that treatment of HSC-1 cells (a human cutaneous SCC cell line) with artocarpin decreased cell viability and induced cell apoptosis by increasing caspase 3/7 activity. These effects were more pronounced at low fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentrations. Artocarpin induced an increase in the level of phospho-p38 and a decrease in the levels of phospho-ERK, phospho-JNK, phospho-Akt, phospho-mTOR, and phospho-S6K. High FBS concentrations in the culture media inhibited and delayed the uptake of artocarpin from the extracellular compartment (culture media) into the intracellular compartment, as determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. In conclusion, artocarpin induces apoptosis in HSC-1 cells through modulation of MAPK and Akt/mTOR pathways. Binding of artocarpin to proteins in the FBS may inhibit cellular uptake and reduce the cytotoxic activity of artocarpin on HSC-1 cells. Therefore, artocarpin may have potential use in the future as a form of treatment for cutaneous SCC. PMID:25648333

  10. Pannexin 1 is required for full activation of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Samantha E.; Meher, Akshaya K.; Chiu, Yu-hsin; Sandilos, Joanna K.; Oberholtzer, Nathaniel P.; Walker, Natalie N.; Hargett, Stefan R.; Seaman, Scott A.; Peirce-Cottler, Shayn M.; Isakson, Brant E.; McNamara, Coleen A.; Keller, Susanna R.; Harris, Thurl E.; Bayliss, Douglas A.; Leitinger, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Objective Defective glucose uptake in adipocytes leads to impaired metabolic homeostasis and insulin resistance, hallmarks of type 2 diabetes. Extracellular ATP-derived nucleotides and nucleosides are important regulators of adipocyte function, but the pathway for controlled ATP release from adipocytes is unknown. Here, we investigated whether Pannexin 1 (Panx1) channels control ATP release from adipocytes and contribute to metabolic homeostasis. Methods We assessed Panx1 functionality in cultured 3T3-L1 adipocytes and in adipocytes isolated from murine white adipose tissue by measuring ATP release in response to known activators of Panx1 channels. Glucose uptake in cultured 3T3-L1 adipocytes was measured in the presence of Panx1 pharmacologic inhibitors and in adipocytes isolated from white adipose tissue from wildtype (WT) or adipocyte-specific Panx1 knockout (AdipPanx1 KO) mice generated in our laboratory. We performed in vivo glucose uptake studies in chow fed WT and AdipPanx1 KO mice and assessed insulin resistance in WT and AdipPanx1 KO mice fed a high fat diet for 12 weeks. Panx1 channel function was assessed in response to insulin by performing electrophysiologic recordings in a heterologous expression system. Finally, we measured Panx1 mRNA in human visceral adipose tissue samples by qRT-PCR and compared expression levels with glucose levels and HOMA-IR measurements in patients. Results Our data show that adipocytes express functional Pannexin 1 (Panx1) channels that can be activated to release ATP. Pharmacologic inhibition or selective genetic deletion of Panx1 from adipocytes decreased insulin-induced glucose uptake in vitro and in vivo and exacerbated diet-induced insulin resistance in mice. Further, we identify insulin as a novel activator of Panx1 channels. In obese humans Panx1 expression in adipose tissue is increased and correlates with the degree of insulin resistance. Conclusions We show that Panx1 channel activity regulates insulin

  11. Soil Properties, Nutrient Dynamics, and Soil Enzyme Activities Associated with Garlic Stalk Decomposition under Various Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xu; Cheng, Zhihui; Meng, Huanwen

    2012-01-01

    The garlic stalk is a byproduct of garlic production and normally abandoned or burned, both of which cause environmental pollution. It is therefore appropriate to determine the conditions of efficient decomposition, and equally appropriate to determine the impact of this decomposition on soil properties. In this study, the soil properties, enzyme activities and nutrient dynamics associated with the decomposition of garlic stalk at different temperatures, concentrations and durations were investigated. Stalk decomposition significantly increased the values of soil pH and electrical conductivity. In addition, total nitrogen and organic carbon concentration were significantly increased by decomposing stalks at 40°C, with a 5∶100 ratio and for 10 or 60 days. The highest activities of sucrase, urease and alkaline phosphatase in soil were detected when stalk decomposition was performed at the lowest temperature (10°C), highest concentration (5∶100), and shortest duration (10 or 20 days). The evidence presented here suggests that garlic stalk decomposition improves the quality of soil by altering the value of soil pH and electrical conductivity and by changing nutrient dynamics and soil enzyme activity, compared to the soil decomposition without garlic stalks. PMID:23226411

  12. Brain lactate kinetics: Modeling evidence for neuronal lactate uptake upon activation.

    PubMed

    Aubert, Agnès; Costalat, Robert; Magistretti, Pierre J; Pellerin, Luc

    2005-11-01

    A critical issue in brain energy metabolism is whether lactate produced within the brain by astrocytes is taken up and metabolized by neurons upon activation. Although there is ample evidence that neurons can efficiently use lactate as an energy substrate, at least in vitro, few experimental data exist to indicate that it is indeed the case in vivo. To address this question, we used a modeling approach to determine which mechanisms are necessary to explain typical brain lactate kinetics observed upon activation. On the basis of a previously validated model that takes into account the compartmentalization of energy metabolism, we developed a mathematical model of brain lactate kinetics, which was applied to published data describing the changes in extracellular lactate levels upon activation. Results show that the initial dip in the extracellular lactate concentration observed at the onset of stimulation can only be satisfactorily explained by a rapid uptake within an intraparenchymal cellular compartment. In contrast, neither blood flow increase, nor extracellular pH variation can be major causes of the lactate initial dip, whereas tissue lactate diffusion only tends to reduce its amplitude. The kinetic properties of monocarboxylate transporter isoforms strongly suggest that neurons represent the most likely compartment for activation-induced lactate uptake and that neuronal lactate utilization occurring early after activation onset is responsible for the initial dip in brain lactate levels observed in both animals and humans. PMID:16260743

  13. Submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics, functional mobility, and physical activity in older adults with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, Scott L; Herald, John; Alpert, Craig; Gretebeck, Kimberlee A; Champoux, Wendy S; Dengel, Donald R; Vaitkevicius, Peter V; Alexander, Neil B

    2016-01-01

    Background Submaximal oxygen uptake measures are more feasible and may better predict clinical cardiac outcomes than maximal tests in older adults with heart failure (HF). We examined relationships between maximal oxygen uptake, submaximal oxygen kinetics, functional mobility, and physical activity in older adults with HF and reduced ejection fraction. Methods Older adults with HF and reduced ejection fraction (n = 25, age 75 ± 7 years) were compared to 25 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. Assessments included a maximal treadmill test for peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), oxygen uptake kinetics at onset of and on recovery from a submaximal treadmill test, functional mobility testing [Get Up and Go (GUG), Comfortable Gait Speed (CGS), Unipedal Stance (US)], and self-reported physical activity (PA). Results Compared to controls, HF had worse performance on GUG, CGS, and US, greater delays in submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics, and lower PA. In controls, VO2peak was more strongly associated with functional mobility and PA than submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics. In HF patients, submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics were similarly associated with GUG and CGS as VO2peak, but weakly associated with PA. Conclusions Based on their mobility performance, older HF patients with reduced ejection fraction are at risk for adverse functional outcomes. In this population, submaximal oxygen uptake measures may be equivalent to VO2 peak in predicting functional mobility, and in addition to being more feasible, may provide better insight into how aerobic function relates to mobility in older adults with HF. PMID:27594875

  14. Metaproteogenomics reveals the soil microbial communities active in nutrient cycling processes under different tree species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiblinger, Katharina Maria; Masse, Jacynthe; Zühlke, Daniela; Riedel, Katharina; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Prescott, Cindy E.; Grayston, Sue

    2016-04-01

    Tree species exert strong effects on microbial communities in litter and soil and may alter rates of soil processes fundamental to nutrient cycling and carbon fluxes (Prescott and Grayston 2013). However, the influence of tree species on decomposition processes are still contradictory and poorly understood. An understanding of the mechanisms underlying plant influences on soil processes is important for our ability to predict ecosystem response to altered global/environmental conditions. In order to link microbial community structure and function to forest-floor nutrient cycling processes, we sampled forest floors under western redcedar (Thuja plicata), Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) grown in nutrient-poor sites in common garden experiments on Vancouver island (Canada). We measured forest-floor total N, total C, initial NH4+ and NO3‑ concentrations, DOC, Cmic and Nmic. Gross rates of ammonification and NH4+ consumption were measured using the 15N pool-dilution method. Organic carbon quality was assessed through FTIR analyses. Microbial community structure was analysed by a metaproteogenomic approach using 16S and ITS amplification and sequencing with MiSeq platform. Proteins were extracted and peptides characterized via LC-MS/MS on a Velos Orbitrap to assess the active microbial community. Different microbial communities were active under the three tree species and variation in process rates were observed and will be discussed. This research provides new insights on microbial processes during organic matter decomposition. The metaproteogenomic approach enables us to investigate these changes with respect to possible effects on soil C-storage at even finer taxonomic resolution.

  15. An updated model for nitrate uptake modelling in plants. II. Assessment of active root involvement in nitrate uptake based on integrated root system age: measured versus modelled outputs

    PubMed Central

    Malagoli, Philippe; Le Deunff, Erwan

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims An updated version of a mechanistic structural–functional model was developed to predict nitrogen (N) uptake throughout the growth cycle by a crop of winter oilseed rape, Brassica napus, grown under field conditions. Methods The functional component of the model derives from a revisited conceptual framework that combines the thermodynamic Flow–Force interpretation of nitrate uptake isotherms and environmental and in planta effects on nitrate influx. Estimation of the root biomass (structural component) is based upon a combination of root mapping along the soil depth profile in the field and a relationship between the specific root length and external nitrate concentration. The root biomass contributing actively to N uptake was determined by introduction of an integrated root system age that allows assignment of a root absorption capacity at a specific age of the root. Key Results Simulations were well matched to measured data of N taken up under field conditions for three levels of N fertilization. The model outputs indicated that the two topsoil layers (0–30 and 30–60 cm) contained 75–88 % of the total root length and biomass, and accounted for 90–95 % of N taken up at harvest. Conclusions This conceptual framework provides a model of nitrate uptake that is able to respond to external nitrate fluctuations at both functional and structural levels. PMID:24709791

  16. An updated model for nitrate uptake modelling in plants. II. Assessment of active root involvement in nitrate uptake based on integrated root system age: measured versus modelled outputs.

    PubMed

    Malagoli, Philippe; Le Deunff, Erwan

    2014-05-01

    Background and Aims An updated version of a mechanistic structural-functional model was developed to predict nitrogen (N) uptake throughout the growth cycle by a crop of winter oilseed rape, Brassica napus, grown under field conditions. Methods The functional component of the model derives from a revisited conceptual framework that combines the thermodynamic Flow-Force interpretation of nitrate uptake isotherms and environmental and in planta effects on nitrate influx. Estimation of the root biomass (structural component) is based upon a combination of root mapping along the soil depth profile in the field and a relationship between the specific root length and external nitrate concentration. The root biomass contributing actively to N uptake was determined by introduction of an integrated root system age that allows assignment of a root absorption capacity at a specific age of the root. Key Results Simulations were well matched to measured data of N taken up under field conditions for three levels of N fertilization. The model outputs indicated that the two topsoil layers (0-30 and 30-60 cm) contained 75-88 % of the total root length and biomass, and accounted for 90-95 % of N taken up at harvest. Conclusions This conceptual framework provides a model of nitrate uptake that is able to respond to external nitrate fluctuations at both functional and structural levels. PMID:24709791

  17. Simultaneous monitoring of electrical capacitance and water uptake activity of plant root system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cseresnyés, Imre; Takács, Tünde; Füzy, Anna; Rajkai, Kálmán

    2014-10-01

    Pot experiments were designed to test the applicability of root electrical capacitance measurement for in situ monitoring of root water uptake activity by growing cucumber and bean cultivars in a growth chamber. Half of the plants were inoculated with Funneliformis mosseae arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, while the other half served as non-infected controls. Root electrical capacitance and daily transpiration were monitored during the whole plant ontogeny. Phenology-dependent changes of daily transpiration (related to root water uptake) and root electrical capacitance proved to be similar as they showed upward trends from seedling emergence to the beginning of flowering stage, and thereafter decreased continuously during fruit setting. A few days after arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi-colonization, daily transpiration and root electrical capacitance of infected plants became significantly higher than those of non-infected counterparts, and the relative increment of the measured parameters was greater for the more highly mycorrhizal-dependent bean cultivar compared to that of cucumber. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi colonization caused 29 and 69% relative increment in shoot dry mass for cucumbers and beans, respectively. Mycorrhization resulted in 37% increase in root dry mass for beans, but no significant difference was observed for cucumbers. Results indicate the potential of root electrical capacitance measurements for monitoring the changes and differences of root water uptake rate.

  18. The influence of hydrologic connectivity on ecosystem metabolism and nitrate uptake in an active beaver meadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegener, P.; Covino, T. P.; Wohl, E.; Kampf, S. K.; Lacy, S.

    2015-12-01

    Wetlands have been widely demonstrated to provide important watershed services, such as the sequestration of carbon (C) and removal of nitrate (NO3-) from through-flowing water. Hydrologic connectivity (degree of water and associated material exchange) between floodplain water bodies (e.g., side channels, ponds) and the main channel influence rates of C accumulation and NO3- uptake, and the degree to which wetlands contribute to enhanced water quality at the catchment scale. However, environmental engineers have largely ignored the role of hydrologic connectivity in providing essential ecosystem services, and constructed wetlands are commonly built using compacted clay and berms that result in less groundwater and surface water exchange than observed in natural wetlands. In a study of an active beaver meadow (multithreaded, riparian wetland) in Rocky Mountain National Park, CO, we show how shifts in hydrology (connectivity, residence times, flow paths) from late spring snowmelt (high connectivity) to autumn/winter baseflow (low connectivity) influence ecosystem metabolism metrics (e.g., gross primary production, ecosystem respiration, and net ecosystem productivity) and NO3- uptake rates. We use a combination of mixing analyses, tracer tests, and hydrometric methods to evaluate shifts in surface and subsurface hydrologic connections between floodplain water bodies from snowmelt to baseflow. In the main channel and three floodplain water bodies, we quantify metabolism metrics and NO3- uptake kinetics across shifting flow regimes. Results from our research indicate that NO3- uptake and metabolism dynamics respond to changing levels of hydrologic connectivity to the main channel, emphasizing the importance of incorporating connectivity in wetland mitigation practices that seek to enhance water quality at the catchment scale.

  19. Structure, activity and uptake mechanism of siRNA-lipid nanoparticles with an asymmetric ionizable lipid.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuta; Ishihara, Hiroshi

    2016-08-20

    Lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) represent the most advanced platform for the systemic delivery of siRNA. We have previously reported the discovery of novel ionizable lipids with asymmetric lipid tails, enabling potent gene-silencing activity in hepatocytes in vivo; however, the structure and delivery mechanism had not been elucidated. Here, we report the structure, activity and uptake mechanism of LNPs with an asymmetric ionizable lipid. Zeta potential and hemolytic activity of LNPs showed that LNPs were neutral at the pH of the blood compartment but become increasingly charged and fusogenic in the acidic endosomal compartment. (31)P NMR experiments indicated that the siRNA was less mobile inside particles, presumably because of an electrostatic interaction with an ionizable lipid. The role of Apolipoprotein E (apoE) was studied using recombinant human apoE both in vitro and in vivo. A comparative study in wild-type and apoE-deficient mice revealed that apoE significantly influenced the in vivo biodistribution of LNPs and enhanced the cellular uptake. Pretreatment of mice with siRNA targeting low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) impaired gene-silencing of the following siRNA treatment, demonstrating that in vivo activity of LNPs is dependent on LDLR. Our studies on the detailed mechanism should lead to the creation of more sophisticated LNP-based RNAi therapeutics. PMID:27374199

  20. Survival analysis of time to uptake of modern contraceptives among sexually active women of reproductive age in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Adebowale, Ayo Stephen; Morhason-Bello, ImranOludare

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the timing of modern contraceptive uptake among married and never-married women in Nigeria. Design A retrospective cross-sectional study. Data and method We used nationally representative 2013 Demographic and Health Survey data in Nigeria. Modern contraceptive uptake time was measured as the period between first sexual intercourse and first use of a modern contraceptive. Non-users of modern contraceptives were censored on the date of the survey. Kaplan–Meier survival curves were used to determine the rate of uptake. A Cox proportional-hazards model was used to determine variables influencing the uptake at 5% significance level. Participants A total of 33 223 sexually active women of reproductive age. Outcome measure Time of uptake of a modern contraceptive after first sexual intercourse. Results The median modern contraceptive uptake time was 4 years in never-married and 14 years among ever-married women. Significant differences in modern contraceptive uptake existed in respondents’ age, location, education and wealth status. Never-married women were about three times more likely to use a modern contraceptive than ever-married women (aHR=3.24 (95% CI 2.82 to 3.65)). Women with higher education were six times more likely to use a modern contraceptive than those without education (aHR=6.18 (95% CI 5.15 to 7.42)). Conclusions The rate of modern contraceptive uptake is low, and timing of contraceptive uptake during or after first sexual intercourse differed according to marital status. Age and number of children ever born influenced modern contraceptive uptake among the never-married women, but religion and place of residence were associated with the probability of modern contraceptive uptake among ever-married women. PMID:26671948

  1. Astrocytes Modulate Neural Network Activity by Ca2+-Dependent Uptake of Extracellular K+

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fushun; Smith, Nathan A.; Xu, Qiwu; Fujita, Takumi; Baba, Akemichi; Matsuda, Toshio; Takano, Takahiro; Bekar, Lane; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes are electrically nonexcitable cells that display increases in cytosolic calcium ion (Ca2+) in response to various neurotransmitters and neuromodulators. However, the physiological role of astrocytic Ca2+ signaling remains controversial. We show here that astrocytic Ca2+ signaling ex vivo and in vivo stimulated the Na+,K+-ATPase (Na+- and K+-dependent adenosine triphosphatase), leading to a transient decrease in the extracellular potassium ion (K+) concentration. This in turn led to neuronal hyperpolarization and suppressed baseline excitatory synaptic activity, detected as a reduced frequency of excitatory postsynaptic currents. Synaptic failures decreased in parallel, leading to an increase in synaptic fidelity. The net result was that astrocytes, through active uptake of K+, improved the signal-to-noise ratio of synaptic transmission. Active control of the extracellular K+ concentration thus provides astrocytes with a simple yet powerful mechanism to rapidly modulate network activity. PMID:22472648

  2. Water and nutrient acquisition by roots and canopies

    SciTech Connect

    Oren, R.; Sheriff, D.W.

    1995-07-01

    Water and nutrient supply rates, as well as internal (plant) and external (soil) deficits, can have major effects on physiological activity and growth. Effects of water or nutrient deficits on growth can be demonstrated separately, but they often interact, as shown for several Pinus species, and by Turner (1982) for Pinus radiata. Moist soil and wet canopy surfaces facilitate nutrient uptake through roots and foliage, respectively. Water uptake is affected by the number and distribution of roots in relation to the distribution of soil moisture, and by the wetness and hydraulic permeability of foliage. Nutrient uptake is similarly affected by tissue characteristics and nutrient concentration, but also depends on the moisture regime in the bulk soil and in the vicinity of absorbing surfaces. In this chapter, we discuss generalities based on results from observational studies of unmanipulated plants and of stands. We also consider information from experimental manipulation of nutrient and water availability. A more thorough treatment of the effects of mycorrhizae and anthropogenic pollution on water and nutrient acquisition is given, respectively.

  3. Nitrogenase activity in Trifolium subterraneum L. in relation to the uptake of nitrate ions. [Rhizobium trifolii

    SciTech Connect

    Silsbury, J.H.

    1987-07-01

    An experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that, when nitrogenase and nitrate reductase both contribute to the nitrogen nutrition of a nodulated legume, nitrogenase activity is inversely proportional to the rate of accumulation of organic nitrogen derived from the reduction of nitrate. Trifolium subterraneum L. plants, inoculated with Rhizobium trifolii and sown as small swards, were allowed to establish a closed canopy and steady rates of growth, dinitrogen fixation, and nitrogen accumulation. Swards were then supplied with nutrient solutions of 0, 0.5, 1.0, or 2.5 mM NO/sub 3//sup -/ with a 29.69% enrichment of /sup 15/N and allowed to grow for a further 33 days. Harvests were made to measure dry weight, nitrogen accumulation, /sup 15/N accumulation, NO/sub 3//sup -/ content and nitrogenase activity by acetylene reduction assay. Since the /sup 15/N of the plant organic matter could have been derived only from the NO/sub 3//sup -/ of the nutrient solution, its rate of accumulation provided a measure of the rate of NO/sub 3//sup -/ reduction. It was found that as this rate increased in response to external NO/sub 3//sup -/ concentration the rate of nitrogenase activity decreased proportionately. It is concluded that the reduction of nitrate and the reduction of dinitrogen act in a complementary manner to supply a plant with organic nitrogen for growth.

  4. The Influence of Shredder Feeding on Fungal Activity in a Nutrient-Enriched Stream and an Unaltered Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, N.; Suberkopp, K.

    2005-05-01

    The effect of shredder feeding on aquatic hyphomycete communities associated with submerged leaves was studied in two southern Appalachian headwater streams in North Carolina. Coarse and fine mesh litter bags containing red maple (Acer rubrum) leaves were placed in the nutrient-enriched stream and in the reference stream and were retrieved monthly. Both shredder feeding and nutrient enrichment enhanced breakdown rates. The breakdown rates of leaves in coarse mesh bags in the reference stream (k = 0.0275) and fine mesh bags in the nutrient enriched stream (k = 0.0272) were not significantly different, suggesting that the shredding effect on litter breakdown was offset by higher fungal activity as a result of nutrient enrichment. Fungal sporulation rates and biomass (based on ergosterol concentrations) were higher in the nutrient enriched than in the reference stream, but neither fungal biomass nor sporulation rate was affected by shredder feeding. Species richness was higher in the nutrient-enriched than in the reference stream. The enrichment with nutrients altered fungal community composition more than shredder feeding.

  5. Relationship between complement activation, cellular uptake and surface physicochemical aspects of novel PEG-modified nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Mosqueira, V C; Legrand, P; Gulik, A; Bourdon, O; Gref, R; Labarre, D; Barratt, G

    2001-11-01

    The aim of our work was to examine the relationship between modifications of the surface of nanocapsules (NC) by adsorption or covalent grafting of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEG), and changes in their phospholipid (PL) content on complement activation (C3 cleavage) and on uptake by macrophages. The physicochemical characterization of the NC included an investigation of their properties, such as surface charge, size, hydrophilicity, morphology and homogeneity. This is the first time that such properties have been correlated with biological interactions for NC, a novel carrier system with a structure more complex than nanospheres. C3 crossed immunoelectrophoresis revealed the reduced activation for NC with longer PEG chain and higher density, although all formulations induced C3 cleavage to a lesser or greater extent. NC bearing PEG covalently bound to the surface were weaker activators of complement than plain PLA [poly(D,L-lactide)] NC or nanospheres (NS). Furthermore, the fluorescent/confocal microscopy of J774A1 cells in contact with NC reveal a dramatically reduced interaction with PEG-bearing NC. However, the way in which PEG was attached (covalent or adsorbed) seemed to affect the mechanism of uptake. Taken together, these results suggest that the low level of protein binding to NC covered with a high density of 20kDa PEG chains is likely to be due to the steric barriers surrounding these particles, which prevents protein adsorption and reduces their interaction with macrophages. PMID:11575471

  6. Nutrient regulation of post-heparin lipoprotein lipase activity in obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Ranganath, L R; Beety, J M; Wright, J; Morgan, L M

    2001-01-01

    This study examines the immediate effect of ingestion of oral carbohydrate and fat on lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity post-heparin in six lean and six obese age-matched women. Subjects were given, on two separate occasions, 340 kcal carbohydrate or an equicaloric amount of fat, both in 300 ml of water. Post-heparin LPL activity (10,000 U) was measured on each occasion 120 minutes after ingestion of the meal. Following oral carbohydrate postprandial plasma insulin levels were significantly higher in obese subjects than in lean (p < 0.01). Impaired glucose tolerance was seen in the obese group. GIP secretion was similar in lean and obese subjects both during oral fat and carbohydrate ingestion. GLP-1 secretion post-carbohydrate was lower in obese subjects. Total LPL activity unadjusted for body weight was similar in the two groups after carbohydrate administration but was significantly lower when adjusted per kg body weight. Total LPL activity was lower in the lean group at 130 minutes after fat administration (p < 0.02). Fasting serum triglycerides were higher in the obese group and were inversely related to the post-carbohydrate LPL activity (r = - 0.65, p < 0.02). Intraluminal lipoprotein lipase activity is not increased in established obesity. Fat and carbohydrate nutrients may affect LPL activity differently in lean and obese subjects. PMID:11280717

  7. Effects of Nutrient Addition on Belowground Stoichiometry and Microbial Activity in an Ombrotrophic Bog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsonneault, A. J.; Moore, T. R.; Roulet, N. T.

    2015-12-01

    Ombrotrophic bogs are both nutrient-poor systems and important carbon (C) sinks yet there remains a dearth of information on the stoichiometry of C, nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K), an important determinant of substrate quality for microorganisms, in these systems. In this study, we quantified the C, N, P, and K concentrations and stoichiometric ratios of both soil organic matter (SOM) and dissolved organic matter (DOM) as well as microbial extracellular enzyme activity from 0 - 10cm depth in a long-term fertilization experiment at Mer Bleue bog, Ontario, Canada. Though trends in C:N, C:P, and C:K between SOM and DOM seem to follow one another, preliminary results indicate that the stoichiometric ratios of DOM were at least an order of magnitude smaller than those of DOM suggesting that nutrient fertilization impacts the quality of DOM as a microbial substrate to a greater degree than SOM. C:N decreased with greater nitrogen addition but C:P and C:K increased; the magnitude of that increase being smaller in NPK treatments relative to N-only treatments suggesting co-limitation by P and/or K. This is further supported by the increase in activity of both the C-cycling enzyme, β-D-glucosidase (bdG), and the P-cycling enzyme, phosphatase (Phos), with greater nitrogen addition; particularly in NPK-treatments for bdG and N-only treatments for Phos. The activity of the N-cycling enzyme, N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase, and the C-cycling enzyme, phenol oxidase, with greater N-addition suggests a decreased need to breakdown organic nitrogen to meet microbial N-requirements in the former and N-inhibition in the latter consistent with findings in the literature. Taken together, these results suggest that higher levels of nutrients impact both microbial substrate quality as well as the activity of microbial enzymes that are key in the decomposition process which may ultimately decrease the ability of peatlands to sequester carbon.

  8. A new dye uptake assay to test the activity of antibiotics against intracellular Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Sutera, Vivien; Caspar, Yvan; Boisset, Sandrine; Maurin, Max

    2014-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, a facultative intracellular bacterium, is the aetiological agent of tularaemia. Antibiotic treatment of this zoonosis is based on the administration of a fluoroquinolone or a tetracycline for cases with mild to moderate severity, whereas an aminoglycoside (streptomycin or gentamicin) is advocated for severe cases. However, treatment failures and relapses remain frequent, especially in patients suffering from chronic lymph node suppuration. Therefore, new treatment alternatives are needed. We have developed a dye uptake assay for determination of minimal inhibitory extracellular concentrations (MIECs) of antibiotics against intracellular F. tularensis, and validated the method by comparing the results obtained using a CFU-enumerating method. We also compared MIECs with MICs of the same compounds determined using a CLSI broth microdilution method. We tested the activity of 11 antibiotics against two clinical strains of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica isolated in France. Both strains displayed low MICs (≤1 μg/mL) to fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin), gentamicin, doxycycline and rifampicin. Higher MICs (≥8 μg/mL) were found for carbapenems (imipenem and meropenem), daptomycin and linezolid. Erythromycin MICs were 4.0 and 16.0 μg/mL, respectively, for the two clinical strains. MIECs were almost the same with the two methods used. They were concordant with MICs, except for erythromycin and linezolid (respectively, four and eight times more active against intracellular F. tularensis) and gentamicin (four to eight times less active against intracellular F. tularensis). This study validated the dye uptake assay as a new tool for determination of the activity of a large panel of antibiotics against intracellular F. tularensis. This test confirmed the intracellular activity of first-line antibiotics used for tularaemia treatment, but also revealed significant activity of linezolid against intracellular F. tularensis

  9. Nitrogen uptake and utilization by intact plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raper, C. D., Jr.; Tolley-Henry, L. C.

    1986-01-01

    The results of experiments support the proposed conceptual model that relates nitrogen uptake activity by plants as a balanced interdependence between the carbon-supplying function of the shoot and the nitrogen-supplying function of the roots. The data are being used to modify a dynamic simulation of plant growth, which presently describes carbon flows through the plant, to describe nitrogen uptake and assimilation within the plant system. Although several models have been proposed to predict nitrogen uptake and partitioning, they emphasize root characteristics affecting nutrient uptake and relay on empirical methods to describe the relationship between nitrogen and carbon flows within the plant. Researchers, on the other hand, propose to continue to attempt a mechanistic solution in which the effects of environment on nitrogen (as well as carbon) assimilation are incorporated through their direct effects on photosynthesis, respiration, and aging processes.

  10. Characterization of the Golgi Complex Cleared of Proteins in Transit and Examination of Calcium Uptake Activities

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Randall S.; Jones, Steven M.; Dahl, Rolf H.; Nordeen, Mark H.; Howell, Kathryn E.

    1997-01-01

    To characterize endogenous molecules and activities of the Golgi complex, proteins in transit were >99% cleared from rat hepatocytes by using cycloheximide (CHX) treatment. The loss of proteins in transit resulted in condensation of the Golgi cisternae and stacks. Isolation of a stacked Golgi fraction is equally efficient with or without proteins in transit [control (CTL SGF1) and cycloheximide (CHX SGF1)]. Electron microscopy and morphometric analysis showed that >90% of the elements could be positively identified as Golgi stacks or cisternae. Biochemical analysis showed that the cis-, medial-, trans-, and TGN Golgi markers were enriched over the postnuclear supernatant 200- to 400-fold with and 400- to 700-fold without proteins in transit. To provide information on a mechanism for import of calcium required at the later stages of the secretory pathway, calcium uptake into CTL SGF1 and CHX SGF1 was examined. All calcium uptake into CTL SGF1 was dependent on a thapsigargin-resistant pump not resident to the Golgi complex and a thapsigargin-sensitive pump resident to the Golgi. Experiments using CHX SGF1 showed that the thapsigargin-resistant activity was a plasma membrane calcium ATPase isoform in transit to the plasma membrane and the thapsigargin-sensitive pump was a sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase isoform. In vivo both of these calcium ATPases function to maintain millimolar levels of calcium within the Golgi lumen. PMID:9348533

  11. Enhancement and inhibition of microbial activity in hydrocarbon- contaminated arctic soils: Implications for nutrient-amended bioremediation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Braddock, J.F.; Ruth, M.L.; Catterall, P.H.; Walworth, J.L.; McCarthy, K.A.

    1997-01-01

    Bioremediation is being used or proposed as a treatment option at many hydrocarbon-contaminated sites. One such site is a former bulk-fuel storage facility near Barrow, AK, where contamination persists after approximately 380 m3 of JP-5 was spilled in 1970. The soil at the site is primarily coarse sand with low organic carbon (<1%) end low moisture (1-3%) contents. We examined the effects of nutrient additions on microorganisms in contaminated soil from this site in laboratory microcosms and in mesocosms incubated for 6 weeks in the field. Nitrogen was the major limiting nutrient in this system, but microbial populations and activity were maximally enhanced by additions of both nitrogen and phosphorus. When nutrients were added to soil in the field at three levels of N:P (100:45, 200:90, and 300:135 mg/kg soil), the greatest stimulation in microbial activity occurred at the lowest, rather than the highest, level of nutrient addition. The total soil-water potentials ranged from -2 to -15 bar with increasing levels of fertilizer. Semivolatile hydrocarbon concentrations declined significantly only in the soils treated at the low fertilizer level. These results indicate that an understanding of nutrient effects at a specific site is essential for successful bioremediation.Bioremediation is being used or proposed as a treatment option at many hydrocarbon-contaminated sites. One such site is a former bulk-fuel storage facility near Barrow, AK, where contamination persists after approximately 380 m3 of JP-5 was spilled in 1970. The soil at the site is primarily coarse sand with low organic carbon (<1%) and low moisture (1-3%) contents. We examined the effects of nutrient additions on microorganisms in contaminated soil from this site in laboratory microcosms and in mesocosms incubated for 6 weeks in the field. Nitrogen was the major limiting nutrient in this system, but microbial populations and activity were maximally enhanced by additions of both nitrogen and phosphorus

  12. Glucose uptake-stimulatory activity of Tinospora cordifolia stem extracts in Ehrlich ascites tumor cell model system.

    PubMed

    Joladarashi, Darukeshwara; Chilkunda, Nandini D; Salimath, Paramahans Veerayya

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a multifunctional disorder with several causes and multiple consequences. Nutraceuticals play a vital role in ameliorating diabetic condition. The stems of the plant, Tinospora cordifolia (T. cordifolia) are often used in Ayurvedic medicine for the management of diabetes. Earlier studies have shown that T. cordifolia to be a potent antidiabetic plant material by virtue of being rich in nutraceuticals. In the present study we were interested to know if, T. cordifolia stem extracts are able to promote glucose uptake through glucose transporters, 1 (GLUT1) and 3 (GLUT3), which are responsible for basal glucose uptake. Hence, Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) cells were chosen as a model which harbours both GLUT1 and GLUT3 and glucose uptake was measured using a fluorescent analog 2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]-2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-NBDG). Serially, solvent extracted T. cordifolia stems, especially water, ethanol and methanol extracts showed glucose uptake activity. Uptake was stimulated in a dose dependent manner at dosages of 1-100 μg. Glucose-stimulating activity does not seem to be solely due to polyphenol content since methanol extract, with high amount of polyphenol content (9.5 ± 0.1 g kg(-1)), did not stimulate higher glucose uptake activity when compared to water extract. PMID:24426067

  13. Measurement of 224Ra uptake in a fern actively accumulating radium.

    PubMed

    Chao, J H; Lee, H P; Chiu, C Y

    2006-03-01

    A method is proposed for determining the level of 224Ra in plant samples by measuring its descendant nuclide 212Pb at 239 keV by gamma-ray spectrometry. Variations of 224Ra and 212Pb over time during sample preparation and counting were delineated prior to gamma-ray measurement. The 224Ra concentrations in plant samples were measured by their direct uptake from soil, which could be determined and distinguished from that resulting from decay of 228Th inside the plants. We propose that a field-growing Dicranopteris linearis, which actively accumulates radium, can be used as an indicator of the nutritional transportation and metabolic rate of radium and other alkaline earth elements. We investigated the influence of rainfall on 224Ra concentrations in fronds of D. linearis and the corresponding uptake rates. 224Ra could serve as a natural tracer of growth in plants over a several days. Its presence and content in plants implies a temporal mineral metabolic rate, which can provide useful information for plant physiological and environmental investigations. PMID:16087212

  14. Effects of Nitrite, Chlorate, and Chlorite on Nitrate Uptake and Nitrate Reductase Activity 1

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqi, M. Yaeesh; King, Bryan J.; Glass, Anthony D. M.

    1992-01-01

    Effects of NO2−, ClO3−, and ClO2− on the induction of nitrate transport and nitrate reductase activity (NRA) as well as their effects on NO3− influx into roots of intact barley (Hordeum vulgare cv Klondike) seedlings were investigated. A 24-h pretreatment with 0.1 mol m−3 NO2− fully induced NO3− transport but failed to induce NRA. Similar pretreatments with ClO3− and ClO2− induced neither NO3− transport nor NRA. Net ClO3− uptake was induced by NO3− but not by ClO3− itself, indicating that NO3− and ClO3− transport occur via the NO3− carrier. At the uptake step, NO2− and ClO2− strongly inhibited NO3− influx; the former exhibited classical competitive kinetics, whereas the latter exhibited complex mixed-type kinetics. ClO3− proved to be a weak inhibitor of NO3− influx (Ki = 16 mol m−3) in a noncompetitive manner. The implications of these findings are discussed in the context of the suitability of these NO3− analogs as screening agents for the isolation of mutants defective in NO3− transport. PMID:16653041

  15. Cationic triblock copolymer micelles enhance antioxidant activity, intracellular uptake and cytotoxicity of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Yoncheva, Krassimira; Kamenova, Katya; Perperieva, Teodora; Hadjimitova, Vera; Donchev, Petar; Kaloyanov, Kaloyan; Konstantinov, Spiro; Kondeva-Burdina, Magdalena; Tzankova, Virginia; Petrov, Petar

    2015-07-25

    The aim of the present study was to develop curcumin loaded cationic polymeric micelles and to evaluate their loading, preservation of curcumin antioxidant activity and intracellular uptake ability. The micelles were prepared from a triblock copolymer consisting of poly(ϵ-caprolactone) and very short poly(2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate) segments (PDMAEMA9-PCL70-PDMAEMA9). The micelles showed monomodal size distribution, mean diameter of 145 nm, positive charge (+72 mV), critical micellar concentration around 0.05 g/l and encapsulation efficiency of 87%. The ability of the micellar curcumin to scavenge the ABTS radical and hypochlorite ions was higher than that of the free curcumin. Confocal microscopy revealed that the uptake of curcumin by chronic myeloid leukemia derived K-562 cells and human multiple myeloma cells U-266 was more intensive when curcumin was loaded into the micelles. These results correlated with the higher cytotoxicity of the micellar curcumin compared to free curcumin. Intraperitoneal treatment of Wistar rats indicated that PDMAEMA-PCL-PDMAEMA copolymer, comprising very short cationic chains, did not change the levels of malondialdehyde and glutathione in livers indicating an absence of oxidative stress. Thus, PDMAEMA-PCL-PDMAEMA triblock micelles could be considered efficient and safe platform for curcumin delivery. PMID:26026253

  16. Evaluating the uptake of Canada's new physical activity and sedentary behavior guidelines on service organizations' websites.

    PubMed

    Gainforth, Heather L; Berry, Tanya; Faulkner, Guy; Rhodes, Ryan E; Spence, John C; Tremblay, Mark S; Latimer-Cheung, Amy E

    2013-06-01

    New evidence-based physical activity and sedentary behavior guidelines for Canadians were launched in 2011. As a consequence, service organizations that promote physical activity directly to the public needed to change their promotion materials to reflect the new guidelines. Little is known about the rate at which service organizations adopt and integrate new evidence-based guidelines and determinants of guideline adoption. In this natural observational study, we evaluated the rate of online adoption of the new guidelines among key service organizations that promote physical activity and examined participation in a booster webinar as a supplemental dissemination strategy. One hundred fifty nine service organization websites were coded by one of six raters prior to the release of the new guidelines as well as at 3, 6, and 9 months after the release. Online adoption of the guidelines increased during the coding period with 51 % of organizations posting the guidelines or related information on their websites. Organizations' engagement in a webinar was associated with their adoption of the guidelines. The release of new Canadian Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines led to increased guideline adoption on service organizations' websites. However, adoption was not universal. In order for the uptake of the new guidelines to be successful, further efforts need to be taken to ensure that service organizations present physical activity guidelines on their websites. Comprehensive, active dissemination strategies tailored to address organizational barriers are needed to ensure online guideline adoption. PMID:24073168

  17. The interrelationship between muscle oxygenation, muscle activation, and pulmonary oxygen uptake to incremental ramp exercise: influence of aerobic fitness.

    PubMed

    Boone, Jan; Barstow, Thomas J; Celie, Bert; Prieur, Fabrice; Bourgois, Jan

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether muscle and ventilatory responses to incremental ramp exercise would be influenced by aerobic fitness status by means of a cross-sectional study with a large subject population. Sixty-four male students (age: 21.2 ± 3.2 years) with a heterogeneous peak oxygen uptake (51.9 ± 6.3 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1), range 39.7-66.2 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1)) performed an incremental ramp cycle test (20-35 W·min(-1)) to exhaustion. Breath-by-breath gas exchange was recorded, and muscle activation and oxygenation were measured with surface electromyography and near-infrared spectroscopy, respectively. The integrated electromyography (iEMG), mean power frequency (MPF), deoxygenated [hemoglobin and myoglobin] (deoxy[Hb+Mb]), and total[Hb+Mb] responses were set out as functions of work rate and fitted with a double linear function. The respiratory compensation point (RCP) was compared and correlated with the breakpoints (BPs) (as percentage of peak oxygen uptake) in muscle activation and oxygenation. The BP in total[Hb+Mb] (83.2% ± 3.0% peak oxygen uptake) preceded (P < 0.001) the BP in iEMG (86.7% ± 4.0% peak oxygen uptake) and MPF (86.3% ± 4.1% peak oxygen uptake), which in turn preceded (P < 0.01) the BP in deoxy[Hb+Mb] (88.2% ± 4.5% peak oxygen uptake) and RCP (87.4% ± 4.5% peak oxygen uptake). Furthermore, the peak oxygen uptake was significantly (P < 0.001) positively correlated to the BPs and RCP, indicating that the BPs in total[Hb+Mb] (r = 0.66; P < 0.001), deoxy[Hb+Mb] (r = 0.76; P < 0.001), iEMG (r = 0.61; P < 0.001), MPF (r = 0.63; P < 0.001), and RCP (r = 0.75; P < 0.001) occurred at a higher percentage of peak oxygen uptake in subjects with a higher peak oxygen uptake. In this study a close relationship between muscle oxygenation, activation, and pulmonary oxygen uptake was found, occurring in a cascade of events. In subjects with a higher aerobic fitness level this cascade occurred at a higher relative intensity. PMID:26701120

  18. On the Water Uptake and CCN Activation of Tropospheric Organic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastak, Narges; Pajunoja, Aki; Acosta Navarro, Juan-Camilo; Leong, Yu Jun; Cerully, Kate M.; Nenes, Athanasios; Kirkevåg, Alf; Topping, David; Virtanen, Annele; Riipinen, Ilona

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol particles introduce high uncertainties to radiative climate forcing. If exposed to a given relative humidity (RH), aerosol particles containing soluble material can absorb water and grow in size (hygroscopic growth). If RH is increased further beyond supersaturation (RH >100%) the particles can act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Aerosol particles interactions with water vapour determine to a large extent their influence on climate. Organic aerosols (OA) contribute a large fraction (20-90%) of atmospheric submicron particulate mass, on the other hand they often consist of thousands of compounds with different properties. One of these properties is solubility, which affects the hygroscopic growth and cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) activation of the organic particles. We investigate the hygroscopic behaviour of complex organic aerosols accounting for the distribution of solubilities present in these mixtures. We use the SPARC method to estimate the solubility distributions of isoprene (IP) and monoterpene (MT) SOA based on their chemical composition, as predicted by the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM). Combining these solubility distributions with the adsorption theory along with the non-ideal behaviour of organic mixtures, we predict the expected hygroscopic growth factors (HGFs), CCN activation behaviour and the related hygroscopicity parameters kappa for these mixtures. The predictions are compared to laboratory measurements as well as field data from MT- and IP-dominated measurement sites. The predicted solubility distributions do a good job in explaining the water uptake of these two mixture types at high relative humidities (RH around 90%), as well as their CCN activation - including the potential differences between the kappa values derived from HGF vs. CCN data. At lower relative humidities, however, the observed water uptake is higher than predicted on solubility alone, particularly for the MT-derived SOA. The data from the low RHs are further

  19. Defective active silicon uptake affects some components of rice resistance to brown spot.

    PubMed

    Dallagnol, Leandro J; Rodrigues, Fabrício A; Mielli, Mateus V B; Ma, Jian F; Datnoff, Lawrence E

    2009-01-01

    Rice is known to accumulate high amounts of silicon (Si) in plant tissue, which helps to decrease the intensity of many economically important rice diseases. Among these diseases, brown spot, caused by the fungus Bipolaris oryzae, is one of the most devastating because it negatively affects yield and grain quality. This study aimed to evaluate the importance of active root Si uptake in rice for controlling brown spot development. Some components of host resistance were evaluated in a rice mutant, low silicon 1 (lsi1), defective in active Si uptake, and its wild-type counterpart (cv. Oochikara). Plants were inoculated with B. oryzae after growing for 35 days in a hydroponic culture amended with 0 or 2 mMol Si. The components of host resistance evaluated were incubation period (IP), relative infection efficiency (RIE), area under brown spot progress curve (AUBSPC), final lesion size (FLS), rate of lesion expansion (r), and area under lesion expansion progress curve (AULEPC). Si content from both Oochikara and lsi1 in the +Si treatment increased in leaf tissue by 219 and 178%, respectively, over the nonamended controls. Plants from Oochikara had 112% more Si in leaf tissue than plants from lsi1. The IP of brown spot from Oochikara increased approximately 6 h in the presence of Si and the RIE, AUBSPC, FLS, r, and AULEPC were significantly reduced by 65, 75, 33, 36, and 35%, respectively. In the presence of Si, the IP increased 3 h for lsi1 but the RIE, AUBSPC, FLS, r, and AULEPC were reduced by only 40, 50, 12, 21, and 12%, respectively. The correlation between Si leaf content and IP was significantly positive but Si content was negatively correlated with RIE, AUBSPC, FLS, r, and AULEPC. Single degree-of-freedom contrasts showed that Oochikara and lsi1 supplied with Si were significantly different from those not supplied with Si for all components of resistance evaluated. This result showed that a reduced Si content in tissues of plants from lsi1 dramatically affected

  20. Apolipoprotein D Transgenic Mice Develop Hepatic Steatosis through Activation of PPARγ and Fatty Acid Uptake.

    PubMed

    Labrie, Marilyne; Lalonde, Simon; Najyb, Ouafa; Thiery, Maxime; Daneault, Caroline; Des Rosiers, Chrisitne; Rassart, Eric; Mounier, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic mice (Tg) overexpressing human apolipoprotein D (H-apoD) in the brain are resistant to neurodegeneration. Despite the use of a neuron-specific promoter to generate the Tg mice, they expressed significant levels of H-apoD in both plasma and liver and they slowly develop hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance. We show here that hepatic PPARγ expression in Tg mice is increased by 2-fold compared to wild type (WT) mice. Consequently, PPARγ target genes Plin2 and Cide A/C are overexpressed, leading to increased lipid droplets formation. Expression of the fatty acid transporter CD36, another PPARgamma target, is also increased in Tg mice associated with elevated fatty acid uptake as measured in primary hepatocytes. Elevated expression of AMPK in the liver of Tg leads to phosphorylation of acetyl CoA carboxylase, indicating a decreased activity of the enzyme. Fatty acid synthase expression is also induced but the hepatic lipogenesis measured in vivo is not significantly different between WT and Tg mice. In addition, expression of carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1, the rate-limiting enzyme of beta-oxidation, is slightly upregulated. Finally, we show that overexpressing H-apoD in HepG2 cells in presence of arachidonic acid (AA), the main apoD ligand, increases the transcriptional activity of PPARγ. Supporting the role of apoD in AA transport, we observed enrichment in hepatic AA and a decrease in plasmatic AA concentration. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the hepatic steatosis observed in apoD Tg mice is a consequence of increased PPARγ transcriptional activity by AA leading to increased fatty acid uptake by the liver. PMID:26083030

  1. Acetylation of MnSOD directs enzymatic activity responding to cellular nutrient status or oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ozden, Ozkan; Park, Seong-Hoon; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Jiang, Haiyan; Coleman, Mitchell C; Spitz, Douglas R; Gius, David

    2011-02-01

    A fundamental observation in biology is that mitochondrial function, as measured by increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), changes significantly with age, suggesting a potential mechanistic link between the cellular processes governing longevity and mitochondrial metabolism homeostasis. In addition, it is well established that altered ROS levels are observed in multiple age-related illnesses including carcinogenesis, neurodegenerative, fatty liver, insulin resistance, and cardiac disease, to name just a few. Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is the primary mitochondrial ROS scavenging enzyme that converts superoxide to hydrogen peroxide, which is subsequently converted to water by catalase and other peroxidases. It has recently been shown that MnSOD enzymatic activity is regulated by the reversible acetylation of specific, evolutionarily conserved lysine(s) in the protein. These results, suggest for the first time, that the mitochondria contain bidirectional post-translational signaling networks, similar to that observed in the cytoplasm and nucleus, and that changes in lysine acetylation alter MnSOD enzymatic activity. In addition, these new results demonstrate that the mitochondrial anti-aging or fidelity / sensing protein, SIRT3, responds to changes in mitochondrial nutrient and/or redox status to alter the enzymatic activity of specific downstream targets, including MnSOD that adjusts and/or maintains ROS levels as well as metabolic homeostatic poise. PMID:21386137

  2. Alcohol dehydrogenase activity in Lactococcus chungangensis: application in cream cheese to moderate alcohol uptake.

    PubMed

    Konkit, Maytiya; Choi, Woo Jin; Kim, Wonyong

    2015-09-01

    Many human gastrointestinal facultative anaerobic and aerobic bacteria possess alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity and are therefore capable of oxidizing ethanol to acetaldehyde. However, the ADH activity of Lactococcus spp., except Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis, has not been widely determined, though they play an important role as the starter for most cheesemaking technologies. Cheese is a functional food recognized as an aid to digestion. In the current study, the ADH activity of Lactococcus chungangensis CAU 28(T) and 11 reference strains from the genus Lactococcus was determined. Only 5 strains, 3 of dairy origin, L. lactis ssp. lactis KCTC 3769(T), L. lactis ssp. cremoris KCCM 40699(T), and Lactococcus raffinolactis DSM 20443(T), and 2 of nondairy origin, Lactococcus fujiensis NJ317(T) and Lactococcus chungangensis CAU 28(T) KCTC 13185(T), showed ADH activity and possessed the ADH gene. All these strains were capable of making cheese, but the highest level of ADH activity was found in L. chungangensis, with 45.9nmol/min per gram in tryptic soy broth and 65.8nmol/min per gram in cream cheese. The extent that consumption of cheese, following imbibing alcohol, reduced alcohol uptake was observed by following the level of alcohol in the serum of mice. The results show a potential novel benefit of cheese as a dairy functional food. PMID:26142864

  3. Inorganic nutrients, bacteria, and the microbial loop.

    PubMed

    Caron, D A

    1994-09-01

    The realization that natural assemblages of planktonic bacteria may acquire a significant fraction of their nitrogen and phosphorus via the uptake of dissolved inorganic nutrients has modified our traditional view of these microorganisms as nutrient remineralizers in plankton communities. Bacterial uptake of inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus may place bacteria and phytoplankton in competition for growth-limiting nutrients, rather than in their traditional roles as the respective "source" and "sink" for these nutrients in the plankton. Bacterial nutrient uptake also implies that bacterivorous protozoa may play a pivotal role in the remineralization of these elements in the microbial loop. The overall contribution of bacterial utilization of inorganic nutrients to total nutrient uptake in the ocean is still poorly understood, but some generalizations are emerging with respect to the geographical areas and community physiological conditions that might elicit this behavior. PMID:24186457

  4. Inhibition of Nitrate Transporter 1.1-Controlled Nitrate Uptake Reduces Cadmium Uptake in Arabidopsis1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Qian Qian; Guan, Mei Yan; Lu, Kai Xing; Du, Shao Ting; Fan, Shi Kai; Ye, Yi-Quan; Lin, Xian Yong; Jin, Chong Wei

    2014-01-01

    Identification of mechanisms that decrease cadmium accumulation in plants is a prerequisite for minimizing dietary uptake of cadmium from contaminated crops. Here, we show that cadmium inhibits nitrate transporter 1.1 (NRT1.1)-mediated nitrate (NO3−) uptake in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and impairs NO3− homeostasis in roots. In NO3−-containing medium, loss of NRT1.1 function in nrt1.1 mutants leads to decreased levels of cadmium and several other metals in both roots and shoots and results in better biomass production in the presence of cadmium, whereas in NO3−-free medium, no difference is seen between nrt1.1 mutants and wild-type plants. These results suggest that inhibition of NRT1.1 activity reduces cadmium uptake, thus enhancing cadmium tolerance in an NO3− uptake-dependent manner. Furthermore, using a treatment rotation system allowing synchronous uptake of NO3− and nutrient cations and asynchronous uptake of cadmium, the nrt1.1 mutants had similar cadmium levels to wild-type plants but lower levels of nutrient metals, whereas the opposite effect was seen using treatment rotation allowing synchronous uptake of NO3− and cadmium and asynchronous uptake of nutrient cations. We conclude that, although inhibition of NRT1.1-mediated NO3− uptake by cadmium might have negative effects on nitrogen nutrition in plants, it has a positive effect on cadmium detoxification by reducing cadmium entry into roots. NRT1.1 may regulate the uptake of cadmium and other cations by a common mechanism. PMID:25106820

  5. Measuring the activities of higher organisms in activated sludge by means of mechanical shearing pretreatment and oxygen uptake rate.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiaodi; Wang, Qilin; Cao, Yali; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2010-07-01

    A pretreatment method was developed to assess the activities of higher organisms. The method is based on mechanical shearing to damage the large cells of the protozoan and metazoan community in activated sludge. The procedure was confirmed through experimentation to be effective in determining the activities of higher organisms by comparing oxygen uptake rates (OURs) before and after the higher organisms were eradicated. Shearing led to disintegration of flocs, which could be effectively reconstituted by centrifugation. The reconstitution of the sludge flocs was essential since otherwise the activity of the floc mass would be too high due to lack of diffusion limitation. Mechanical shearing had no influence on the morphology, quantity and specific activity of yeasts, and it was inferred that bacteria smaller than yeasts in size would also not be influenced by the applied shearing procedure. Moreover, the effect of filamentous organisms on the measured activities of higher organisms was experimentally demonstrated and analyzed, and determined to be so weak that it could be ignored. Based on these tests, five typical activated sludge processes were selected to measure the contribution of higher organisms to the original OUR. The measured activities of higher organisms ranged from 9.4 to 25.0% of the original OURs. PMID:20605188

  6. Critical zinc[sup +2] activities for sour orange determined with chelator-buffered nutrient solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Swietlik, D.; Zhang, L. )

    1994-07-01

    Chelator-buffered nutrient solutions were used to study the effect of different levels of Zn activity in the rhizosphere on growth and nutritive responses of various tissues of sour orange seedlings. The seedlings were grown for 3 months in a growth chamber in a hydroponic culture containing from 5 to 69 [mu]m and 5 to 101 [mu]m total Zn in Expts. 1 and 2, respectively. Zn[sup +2] activities were calculated with a computerized chemical equilibrium model, and buffered by inclusion of a chelator, diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (DTPA), at 74 and 44 [mu]m in excess of the sum of Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Ni, and Co in Expts. 1 and 2, respectively. The use of DTPA-buffered solutions proved successful in imposing varying degrees of Zn deficiency. The deficiency was confirmed by leaf symptomatology, leaf chemical analyses, i.e., <16 mg[center dot]kg[sup [minus]1] Zn, and responses to foliar sprays and application of Zn to the roots. Growth parameters varied in their sensitivity to Zn deficiency, i.e., root dry weight < leaf number and white root growth < stem dry weight < leaf dry weight < shoot elongation and leaf area. The critical activities, expressed as pZn = [minus]log(Zn[sup +2]), were [approximately]10.2 [+-] 0.2 for root dry weight, 10.1 [+-] 0.2 for leaf number and white root growth, 10.0 [+-] 0.2 for stem dry weight, 9.9 [+-] 0.2 for leaf dry weight, and 9.8 [+-] 0.2 for shoot growth and leaf area. Increases in growth were observed in response to Zn applications even in the absence of visible Zn-deficiency symptoms. Seedlings containing > 23 mg[center dot]kg[sup [minus]1] Zn in leaves did not respond to further additions of Zn to the nutrient solution. Zinc foliar sprays were less effective than Zn applications to the roots in alleviating severe Zn deficiency because foliar-absorbed Zn was not translocated from the top of the roots and thus could not correct Zn deficiency in the roots.

  7. Thymidine uptake, thymidine incorporation, and thymidine kinase activity in marine bacterium isolates

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey, W.H.; Paul, J.H. )

    1990-05-01

    One assumption made in bacterial production estimates from ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation is that all heterotrophic bacteria can incorporate exogenous thymidine into DNA. Heterotrophic marine bacterium isolates from Tampa Bay, Fla., Chesapeake Bay, Md., and a coral surface microlayer were examined for thymidine uptake (transport), thymidine incorporation, the presence of thymidine kinase genes, and thymidine kinase enzyme activity. Of the 41 isolates tested, 37 were capable of thymidine incorporation into DNA. The four organisms that could not incorporate thymidine also transported the thymidine poorly and lacked thymidine kinase activity. Attempts to detect thymidine kinase genes in the marine isolates by molecular probing with gene probes made from Escherichia coli and herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase genes proved unsuccessful. To determine if the inability to incorporate thymidine was due to the lack of thymidine kinase, one organism, Vibro sp. strain DI9, was transformed with a plasmid (pGQ3) that contained an E. coli thymidine kinase gene. Although enzyme assays indicated high levels of thymidine kinase activity in transformants, these cells still failed to incorporate exogenous thymidine into DNA or to transport thymidine into cells. These results indicate that the inability of certain marine bacteria to incorporate thymidine may not be solely due to the lack of thymidine kinase activity but may also be due to the absence of thymidine transport systems.

  8. Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator Regulates the Neuronal Uptake of Glucose in the Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fang; Wu, Jialing; Nicholson, Andrew D.; Echeverry, Ramiro; Haile, Woldeab B.; Catano, Marcela; An, Jie; Lee, Andrew K.; Duong, Duc; Dammer, Eric B.; Seyfried, Nicholas T.; Tong, Frank C.; Votaw, John R.; Medcalf, Robert; Yepes, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The ability to sense and adapt to hypoxic conditions plays a pivotal role in neuronal survival. Hypoxia induces the release of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) from cerebral cortical neurons. We found that the release of neuronal tPA or treatment with recombinant tPA (rtPA) promotes cell survival in cerebral cortical neurons previously exposed to hypoxic conditions in vitro or experimental cerebral ischemia in vivo. Our studies using liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry revealed that tPA activates the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway which adapts cellular processes to the availability of energy and metabolic resources. We found that mTOR activation leads to accumulation of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and induction and recruitment to the cell membrane of the HIF-1α-regulated neuronal transporter of glucose GLUT3. Accordingly, in vivo positron emission tomography studies with 18-fluorodeoxyglucose in mice overexpressing tPA in neurons show that neuronal tPA induces the uptake of glucose in the ischemic brain and that this effect is associated with decrease in the volume of the ischemic lesion and improved neurological outcome following the induction of ischemic stroke. Our data indicate that tPA activates a cell signaling pathway that allows neurons to sense and adapt to oxygen and glucose deprivation. PMID:22815500

  9. Nutrient scavenging activity and antagonistic factors of non-photobiont lichen-associated bacteria: a review.

    PubMed

    Sigurbjörnsdóttir, M Auður; Andrésson, Ólafur S; Vilhelmsson, Oddur

    2016-04-01

    Lichens are defined as the specific symbiotic structure comprising a fungus and a green alga and/or cyanobacterium. Up until recently, non-photobiont endothallic bacteria, while known to be present in large numbers, have generally been dismissed as functionally irrelevant cohabitants of the lichen thallus, or even environmental contaminants. Recent analyses of lichen metagenomes and innovative co-culture experiments have uncovered a functionally complex community that appears to contribute to a healthy lichen thallus in several ways. Lichen-associated bacteriomes are typically dominated by several lineages of Proteobacteria, some of which may be specific for lichen species. Recent work has implicated members of these lineages in several important ecophysiological roles. These include nutrient scavenging, including mobilization of iron and phosphate, nitrogen fixation, cellulase, xylanase and amylase activities, and oxidation of recalcitrant compounds, e.g. aromatics and aliphatics. Production of volatile organic compounds, conferring antibacterial and antifungal activity, has also been demonstrated for several lichen-associated isolates. In the present paper we review the nature of non-phototrophic endolichenic bacteria associated with lichens, and give insight into the current state of knowledge on their importance the lichen symbiotic association. PMID:26931608

  10. Impacts of land-applying class B municipal biosolids on soil microbial activity and soil nutrient and metal concentrations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Impacts of land-applying Class B biosolids on microbial activities and nutrient and metal concentrations in surface soils (0-10 cm) of coastal bermudagrass fields were measured during a 112-day incubation. Application rates were: control, 22, 45, and 67 dry Mg biosolids ha-1 y-1 for 8 years and 22 ...

  11. Vibrational imaging of glucose uptake activity in live cells and tissues by stimulated Raman scattering microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Fanghao; Chen, Zhixing; Zhang, Luyuan; Shen, Yihui; Wei, Lu; Min, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Glucose is consumed as an energy source by virtually all living organisms, from bacteria to humans. Its uptake activity closely reflects the cellular metabolic status in various pathophysiological transformations, such as diabetes and cancer. Extensive efforts such as positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and fluorescence microscopy have been made to specifically image glucose uptake activity but all with technical limitations. Here, we report a new platform to visualize glucose uptake activity in live cells and tissues with subcellular resolution and minimal perturbation. A novel glucose analogue with a small alkyne tag (carbon-carbon triple bond) is developed to mimic natural glucose for cellular uptake, which can be imaged with high sensitivity and specificity by targeting the strong and characteristic alkyne vibration on stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscope to generate a quantitative three dimensional concentration map. Cancer cells with differing metabolic characteristics can be distinguished. Heterogeneous uptake patterns are observed in tumor xenograft tissues, neuronal culture and mouse brain tissues with clear cell-cell variations. Therefore, by offering the distinct advantage of optical resolution but without the undesirable influence of bulky fluorophores, our method of coupling SRS with alkyne labeled glucose will be an attractive tool to study energy demands of living systems at the single cell level.

  12. Iodomethylnorcholesterol uptake in an aldosteronoma shown by dexamethasone-suppression scintigraphy: Relationship to adenoma size and functional activity

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, K.; Kusakabe, K.; Maki, M.; Ito, Y.; Aiba, M.; Demura, H. )

    1990-10-01

    Dexamethasone-suppression (DS) adrenal scintigraphy localizes an aldosteronoma, but with false-negative results, i.e. 2 of 19 cases in our study. Our aim was to clarify the clinical meaningfulness of this test. Adrenal iodomethyl-norcholesterol (NP-59) uptake on the adenoma side correlated with the estimated adenoma volume (n = 15, r = 0.843, P less than 0.001). Accordingly, the uptake ratio on the adenoma side to that on the opposite side depended on the adenoma volume (r = 0.683, P less than 0.01). This explains the false-negative results (uptake ratio less than 2) in two cases with small adenomas. The NP-59 uptake correlated weakly with the plasma aldosterone level (r = 0.516, P less than 0.05). This result indicates the low correlation between NP-59 uptake and the ability to secrete aldosterone. NP-59 accumulation in the surgically removed gland was analyzed by autoradiography in six cases where DS scintigraphy was done just before surgery. The density was higher in the adenoma cells than in the adjacent cortical cells in five cases, but the difference was rather small, i.e., within a 2-fold difference in four cases. In one case, almost the same density was observed in both types of cells. Thus, the laterality of NP-59 uptake primarily depends on the adenoma volume although NP-59 uptake somewhat reflects the adenoma's ability to secrete aldosterone or the adenoma cell's activity in accumulating NP-59. Care must be taken in interpreting the findings from DS scintigraphy where the adenoma is small or adrenal uptake is low.

  13. Contrasting effects of diclofenac and ibuprofen on active imatinib uptake into leukaemic cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J; Hughes, T P; Kok, C H; Saunders, V A; Frede, A; Groot-Obbink, K; Osborn, M; Somogyi, A A; D'Andrea, R J; White, D L

    2012-01-01

    Background: The human organic cation transporter-1 (OCT-1) is the primary active protein for imatinib uptake into target BCR-ABL-positive cells. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are frequently used by chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) patients on imatinib to manage musculoskeletal complaints. Methods: Here we investigated the impact of NSAIDs on functional activity of the OCT-1 (OCT-1 activity; OA) in CML cells. Results: Although ten of twelve NSAIDs tested had no significant impact on OA (P>0.05), we observed increased OA (27% increase in K562; 22% increase in KU812 cells, P<0.05) and reduced IC50imatinib when treated with diclofenac. Co-incubation with imatinib and diclofenac resulted in a significantly lower viable cell number compared with imatinib alone. In contrast, ibuprofen led to a significant decrease in OA, an increase in IC50imatinib and thus reduced the cytotoxicity of imatinib. In primary CML samples, diclofenac significantly increased OA, particularly in patients with low OA (<4 ng per 200 000 cells), and significantly decreased IC50imatinib. Ibuprofen induced significant decreases in OA in CML samples and healthy donors. Conclusion: On the basis of the expected impact of these two drugs on OA, ibuprofen should be avoided in combination with imatinib. Further studies are warranted regarding the potential benefit of diclofenac to improve OA in a clinical setting. PMID:22531634

  14. The effect of pH on phosphorus availability and speciation in an aquaponics nutrient solution.

    PubMed

    Cerozi, Brunno da Silva; Fitzsimmons, Kevin

    2016-11-01

    The interaction between the main ions in aquaponics nutrient solutions affects chemical composition and availability of nutrients, and nutrient uptake by plant roots. This study determined the effect of pH on phosphorus (P) speciation and availability in an aquaponics nutrient solution and used Visual MINTEQ to simulate P species and P activity. In both experimental and simulated results, P availability decreased with increase in pH of aquaponics nutrient solutions. According to simulations, P binds to several cations leaving less free phosphate ions available in solution. High pH values resulted in the formation of insoluble calcium phosphate species. The study also demonstrated the importance of organic matter and alkalinity in keeping free phosphate ions in solution at high pH ranges. It is recommended though that pH in aquaponics systems is maintained at a 5.5-7.2 range for optimal availability and uptake by plants. PMID:27575336

  15. Effects of nutrient enrichment derived from fish farming activities on macroinvertebrate assemblages in a subtropical region of Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qin-Feng; Cheung, Kwok-Leung; Cheung, Siu-Gin; Shin, Paul K S

    2005-01-01

    To study the correlation between nutrient enrichment derived from fish farming activities and changes in macrobenthic assemblages, a one-year field study was conducted in Kau Sai Bay marine fish culture zone of Hong Kong. Bimonthly sediment samples were collected at six stations: two at the fish cages, two near the boundary of the fish culture area, and two reference sites further away from the culture area. Sediment physico-chemical characteristics in terms of silt/clay fraction, moisture content, total organic carbon (TOC), total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) and total phosphorus (TP) were analyzed. The macrobenthos (>0.5 mm) present in the sediment were sorted, identified and enumerated. On average, TOC, TKN and TP levels at the fish cage stations were 82.8%, 128.5% and 1315.7% higher than those at the reference stations, respectively. As a result, the N:P molar ratio was greatly reduced from 8.75 at the reference stations to 1.83 at the fish cage stations. Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that diversity of macrofauna was significantly reduced and community structure differed at the fish cage stations relative to the reference sites. The intermediary stations near the fish culture area showed a transitional state of disturbance. Faunal diversity was negatively correlated with nutrient level, reflecting the adverse impacts of nutrient enrichment derived from fish farming activities on the benthic assemblages. Whilst in subtropical Asia-Pacific trash fish is the major feed for fish culture resulting in a higher nutrient loading and nutrient ratio accumulated in the sediment beneath the fish rafts, the effects of nutrient enrichment on macrobenthic assemblages are comparable to that in temperate waters owing to relatively high sediment metabolism rate and smaller fish culture scale in Hong Kong. PMID:16291200

  16. Interfacing carbon nanotubes (CNT) with plants: enhancement of growth, water and ionic nutrient uptake in maize ( Zea mays) and implications for nanoagriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, D. K.; Dasgupta-Schubert, N.; Villaseñor Cendejas, L. M.; Villegas, J.; Carreto Montoya, L.; Borjas García, S. E.

    2014-06-01

    The application of nano-biotechnology to crop-science/agriculture (`nanoagriculture') is a recent development. While carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been shown to dramatically improve germination of some comestible plants, deficiencies in consistency of behavior and reproducibility arise, partially from the variability of the CNTs used. In this work, factory-synthesized multi-walled-CNTs (MWCNTs) of quality-controlled specifications were seen to enhance the germinative growth of maize seedlings at low concentrations but depress it at higher concentrations. Growth enhancement principally arose through improved water delivery by the MWCNT. Polarized EDXRF spectrometry showed that MWCNTs affect mineral nutrient supply to the seedling through the action of the mutually opposing forces of inflow with water and retention in the medium by the ion-CNT transient-dipole interaction. The effect varied with ion type and MWCNT concentration. The differences of the Fe tissue concentrations when relatively high equimolar Fe2+ or Fe3+ was introduced, implied that the ion-CNT interaction might induce redox changes to the ion. The tissue Ca2+ concentration manifested as the antipode of the Fe2+ concentration indicating a possible cationic exchange in the cell wall matrix. SEM images showed that MWCNTs perforated the black-layer seed-coat that could explain the enhanced water delivery. The absence of perforations with the introduction of FeCl2/FeCl3 reinforces the idea of the modification of MWCNT functionality by the ion-CNT interaction. Overall, in normal media, low dose MWCNTs were seen to be beneficial, improving water absorption, plant biomass and the concentrations of the essential Ca, Fe nutrients, opening a potential for possible future commercial agricultural applications.

  17. Biotransformation of trace organic compounds by activated sludge from a biological nutrient removal treatment system.

    PubMed

    Inyang, Mandu; Flowers, Riley; McAvoy, Drew; Dickenson, Eric

    2016-09-01

    The removal of trace organic compounds (TOrCs) and their biotransformation rates, kb (LgSS(-)(1)h(-)(1)) was investigated across different redox zones in a biological nutrient removal (BNR) system using an OECD batch test. Biodegradation kinetics of fourteen TOrCs with initial concentration of 1-36μgL(-)(1) in activated sludge were monitored over the course of 24h. Degradation kinetic behavior for the TOrCs fell into four groupings: Group 1 (atenolol) was biotransformed (0.018-0.22LgSS(-)(1)h(-)(1)) under anaerobic, anoxic, and aerobic conditions. Group 2 (meprobamate and trimethoprim) biotransformed (0.01-0.21LgSS(-)(1)h(-)(1)) under anoxic and aerobic conditions, Group 3 (DEET, gemfibrozil and triclosan) only biotransformed (0.034-0.26LgSS(-)(1)h(-)(1)) under aerobic conditions, and Group 4 (carbamazepine, primidone, sucralose and TCEP) exhibited little to no biotransformation (<0.001LgSS(-)(1)h(-)(1)) under any redox conditions. BNR treatment did not provide a barrier against Group 4 compounds. PMID:27309772

  18. Comparative study of wastewater treatment and nutrient recycle via activated sludge, microalgae and combination systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Liu, Jinli; Zhao, Quanyu; Wei, Wei; Sun, Yuhan

    2016-07-01

    Algal-bacterial synergistic cultivation could be an optional wastewater treatment technology in temperate areas. In this study, a locally screened vigorous Chlorella strain was characterized and then it was used in a comparative study of wastewater treatment and nutrient recycle assessment via activated sludge (AS), microalgae and their combination systems. Chlorella sp. cultured with AS in light showed the best performance, in which case the removal efficiencies of COD, NH3-N and TP were 87.3%, 99.2% and 83.9%, respectively, within a short period of 1day. Algal-bacterial combination in light had the best settleability. Chlorella sp. contained biomass, could be processed to feed, fertilizer or fuel due to the improved quality (higher C/H/N) compared with sludge. PCR-DGGE analysis shows that two types of rhizobacteria, namely, Pseudomonas putida and Flavobacterium hauense were enriched in sludge when cultured with algae in light, serving as the basics for artificial consortium construction for improved wastewater treatment. PMID:26995615

  19. Nutrient and nonnutrient components of legumes, and its chemopreventive activity: a review.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Chino, Xariss; Jiménez-Martínez, Cristian; Dávila-Ortiz, Gloria; Álvarez-González, Isela; Madrigal-Bujaidar, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Legumes in combination with other products are the staple food for a large part of the world population, especially the low-income fragment, because their seeds provide valuable amounts of carbohydrates, fiber, and proteins, and have an important composition of essential amino acids, the sulphured amino acids being the limiting ones. Furthermore, legumes also have nonnutritional compounds that may decrease the absorption of nutrients or produce toxic effects; however, it has been reported that depending on the dose, these nonnutritional compounds also have different bioactivities as antioxidant, hypolipidemic, hypoglycemic, and anticarcinogenic agents, which have been proven in scientific studies. It has been observed that in countries with a high consumption of legumes, the incidence of colorectal cancer is lower. Some studies have shown that legume seeds are an alternative chemopreventive therapy against various cancers especially colon; this was verified in various animal models of induced by azoxymethane, a colon specific carcinogenic compound, in which a diet was supplemented with different concentrations of beans, lentils, chickpeas, or soybeans, mostly. These studies have proven the anticancer activity of legumes in early stages of carcinogenesis. Therefore, it is important to review the information available to elucidate the chemopreventive mechanisms of action of legume compounds. PMID:25710272

  20. Enhancing cellular uptake of activable cell-penetrating peptide-doxorubicin conjugate by enzymatic cleavage.

    PubMed

    Shi, Nian-Qiu; Gao, Wei; Xiang, Bai; Qi, Xian-Rong

    2012-01-01

    The use of activable cell-penetrating peptides (ACPPs) as molecular imaging probes is a promising new approach for the visualization of enzymes. The cell-penetrating function of a polycationic cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) is efficiently blocked by intramolecular electrostatic interactions with a polyanionic peptide. Proteolysis of a proteinase-sensitive substrate present between the CPP and polyanionic peptide affords dissociation of both domains and enables the activated CPP to enter cells. This ACPP strategy could also be used to modify antitumor agents for tumor-targeting therapy. Here, we aimed to develop a conjugate of ACPP with antitumor drug doxorubicin (DOX) sensitive to matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 (MMP-2/9) for tumor-targeting therapy purposes. The ACPP-DOX conjugate was successfully synthesized. Enzymatic cleavage of ACPP-DOX conjugate by matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2/9 indicated that the activation of ACPP-DOX occurred in an enzyme concentration-dependent manner. Flow cytometry and laser confocal microscope studies revealed that the cellular uptake of ACPP-DOX was enhanced after enzymatic-triggered activation and was higher in HT-1080 cells (overexpressed MMPs) than in MCF-7 cells (under-expressed MMPs). The antiproliferative assay showed that ACPP had little toxicity and that ACPP-DOX effectively inhibited HT-1080 cell proliferation. These experiments revealed that the ACPP-DOX conjugate could be triggered by MMP-2/9, which enabled the activated CPP-DOX to enter cells. ACPP-DOX conjugate may be a potential prodrug delivery system used to carry antitumor drugs for MMP-related tumor therapy. PMID:22619516

  1. Oxygen uptake and energy expenditure for children during rock climbing activity.

    PubMed

    Watts, Phillip Baxter; Ostrowski, Megan L

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure oxygen uptake and energy expenditure in children during rock climbing activity. 29 children (age = 10.9 ± 1.7 yr) participated in the study. A commercially available rock climbing structure with ample features for submaximal effort climbing provided continuous terrain. Participants were instructed to climb at a comfortable pace. Following an initial 5-min rest, each child climbed one sustained 5-min bout followed by 5-min sitting recovery for a total of 10 min (SUS). This was immediately followed by five 1-min climbing + 1-min recovery intervals for a second total of 10 min (INT). Expired air was analyzed continuously. Energy expenditure (EE) was determined via the Weir method for 10-s intervals throughout the full protocol. The total energy expenditure in kilocalories during the 10-min SUS period was 34.3 ± 11.3 kcal. Energy expenditure during the 10-min INT period averaged 39.3 ± 13.1 kcal and was significantly higher than during SUS (p < .05). The mean total EE for SUS + INT was 73.7 ± 24.2 kcal. EE was correlated with body mass; r = .86. The rock climbing tasks employed in this study produced EE levels similar to what have been reported in children for stair climbing, sports/games activities, and easy jogging. PMID:24018310

  2. Active loading into extracellular vesicles significantly improves the cellular uptake and photodynamic effect of porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Fuhrmann, Gregor; Serio, Andrea; Mazo, Manuel; Nair, Rekha; Stevens, Molly M

    2015-05-10

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are phospholipid-based particles endogenously produced by cells. Their natural composition and selective cell interactions make them promising drug carriers. However, in order to harness their properties, efficient exogenous drug encapsulation methods need to be investigated. Here, EVs from various cellular origins (endothelial, cancer and stem cells) were produced and characterised for size and composition. Porphyrins of different hydrophobicities were employed as model drugs and encapsulated into EVs using various passive and active methods (electroporation, saponin, extrusion and dialysis). Hydrophobic compounds loaded very efficiently into EVs and at significantly higher amounts than into standard liposomes composed of phosphocholine and cholesterol using passive incubation. Moreover, loading into EVs significantly increased the cellular uptake by >60% and the photodynamic effect of hydrophobic porphyrins in vitro compared to free or liposome encapsulated drug. The active encapsulation techniques, with the saponin-assisted method in particular, allowed an up to 11 fold higher drug loading of hydrophilic porphyrins compared to passive methods. EVs loaded with hydrophilic porphyrins induced a stronger phototoxic effect than free drug in a cancer cell model. Our findings create a firm basis for the development of EVs as smart drug carriers based on straightforward and transferable methods. PMID:25483424

  3. The activity of SnRK1 is increased in Phaseolus vulgaris seeds in response to a reduced nutrient supply

    PubMed Central

    Coello, Patricia; Martínez-Barajas, Eleazar

    2014-01-01

    Phaseolus vulgaris seeds can grow and develop at the expense of the pod reserves after the fruits have been removed from the plant (Fountain etal., 1989). Because this process involves sensing the reduction of nutrients and the remobilisation of pod reserves, we investigated the effect on sucrose non-fermenting related kinase 1 (SnRK1) activity during this process. Bean fruits removed from the plant at 20 days after flowering (DAF) demonstrated active remobilisation of nutrients from the pod to the seeds. After 5 days, the pod dry weight was reduced by 50%. The process was characterized by a rapid degradation of starch, with the greatest decrease observed on day 1 after the fruits were removed. The pod nutrients were insufficient for the needs of all the seeds, and only some seeds continued their development. Those seeds exhibited a transient reduction in sucrose levels on day 1 after the fruits were removed. However, the normal level of sucrose was recovered, and the rate of starch synthesis was identical to that of a seed developed under normal conditions. Removing the fruits from the plant had no effect on the activity of SnRK1 in the pods, whereas in the seeds, the activity was increased by 35%. Simultaneously, a large reduction in seed sucrose levels was observed. The increase in SnRK1 activity was observed in both the cotyledon and embryo axes, but it was higher in the cotyledon. At 20–25 DAF, cotyledons actively accumulate storage materials. It is possible that the increase in SnRK1 activity observed in seeds developed in fruits that have been removed from the plant is part of the mechanism required for nutrient remobilisation under conditions of stress. PMID:24860586

  4. Active uptake of sodium in the gills of the hyperregulating shore crab Carcinus maenas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebers, D.; Lucu, Č.; Winkler, A.; Dalla Venezia, L.; Wille, H.

    1986-03-01

    Isolated posterior gills of shore crabs, Carcinus maenas, previously acclimated for at least 1 month to brackish water of 10 ‰ S, were connected with an artificial hemolymph circulation by means of thin polyethylene tubings. Gills were symmetrically perfused and bathed with 50 % sea water. Transepithelial potential differences (PDs) and fluxes of sodium between medium and blood were measured under control conditions and following reductions of PDs by means of 5 mM internal (blood side) ouabain, 0.5 mM internal and external (bathing medium) NaCN or by exhaustion of energy reserves along with a prolonged perfusion period of more than 9 h. In these experiments22Na was used as tracer. Each of the three modes of reducing transepithelial potential differences resulted in a decrease in sodium influxes from 500 1000 µmoles g-1 h-1 to 250 400 µmoles g-1 h-1. The findings suggest that sodium influx, which normally greatly exceeds efflux, was diminished by its active component. The remaining non-inhibitable influx equals efflux values. Our findings thus indicate that efflux is completely passive, while influx has — beside a passive component of efflux magnitudes — an additional active portion which is much larger than the passive component. Since ouabain is a specific inhibitor of the Na-K-ATPase, our results confirm previous findings (Siebers et al., 1985) that the basolaterally located Na-K-ATPase generates the transepithelial potential difference in the gills, which is inside negative by about 6 12 mV. Inhibition of the active portion of sodium influx by internal ouabain along with reduced PDs suggests that transepithelial PDs generated by the branchial sodium pump are the driving force for active sodium uptake in hyperregulating brackish water crabs.

  5. The uptake and bioaccumulation of heavy metals by food plants, their effects on plants nutrients, and associated health risk: a review.

    PubMed

    Khan, Anwarzeb; Khan, Sardar; Khan, Muhammad Amjad; Qamar, Zahir; Waqas, Muhammad

    2015-09-01

    Heavy metal contamination is a globally recognized environmental issue, threatening human life very seriously. Increasing population and high demand for food resulted in release of various contaminants into environment that finally contaminate the food chain. Edible plants are the major source of diet, and their contamination with toxic metals may result in catastrophic health hazards. Heavy metals affect the human health directly and/or indirectly; one of the indirect effects is the change in plant nutritional values. Previously, a number of review papers have been published on different aspects of heavy metal contamination. However, no related information is available about the effects of heavy metals on the nutritional status of food plants. This review paper is focused upon heavy metal sources, accumulation, transfer, health risk, and effects on protein, amino acids, carbohydrates, fats, and vitamins in plants. The literature about heavy metals in food plants shows that both leafy and nonleafy vegetables are good accumulators of heavy metals. In nonleafy vegetables, the bioaccumulation pattern was leaf > root ≈ stem > tuber. Heavy metals have strong influence on nutritional values; therefore, plants grown on metal-contaminated soil were nutrient deficient and consumption of such vegetables may lead to nutritional deficiency in the population particularly living in developing countries which are already facing the malnutrition problems. PMID:26194234

  6. Activation of AMPK in rat hypothalamus participates in cold-induced resistance to nutrient-dependent anorexigenic signals

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Erika A; Cesquini, Maristela; Stoppa, Graziela R; Carvalheira, José B; Torsoni, Márcio A; Velloso, Lício A

    2005-01-01

    The exposure of homeothermic animals to a cold environment leads to a powerful activation of orexigenic signalling which is accompanied by molecular and functional resistance to insulin-induced inhibition of feeding. Recent evidence suggests that AMPK participates in nutrient-dependent control of satiety and adiposity. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of cold exposure upon the molecular activation of AMPK signalling in the hypothalamus of rats. Immunoblotting demonstrated that cold exposure per se is sufficient for inducing, on a time-dependent basis, the molecular activation of the serine/threonine kinase AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and inactivation of the acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). These molecular phenomena were accompanied by resistance to nutrient-induced inactivation of AMPK and activation of ACC. Moreover, cold-exposure led to a partial inhibition of a feeding-induced anorexigenic response, which was paralleled by resistance to insulin-induced suppression of feeding. Finally, cold exposure significantly impaired insulin-induced inhibition of AMPK through a mechanism dependent on the molecular cross-talk between phosphatidylinositol-3(PI3)-kinase/Akt and AMPK. In conclusion, increased feeding during cold exposure results, at least in part, from resistance to insulin- and nutrient-dependent anorexigenic signalling in the hypothalamus. PMID:16141267

  7. Superposition of Individual Activities: Urea-Mediated Suppression of Nitrate Uptake in the Dinoflagellate Prorocentrum minimum Revealed at the Population and Single-Cell Levels.

    PubMed

    Matantseva, Olga; Skarlato, Sergei; Vogts, Angela; Pozdnyakov, Ilya; Liskow, Iris; Schubert, Hendrik; Voss, Maren

    2016-01-01

    Dinoflagellates readily use diverse inorganic and organic compounds as nitrogen sources, which is advantageous in eutrophied coastal areas exposed to high loads of anthropogenic nutrients, e.g., urea, one of the most abundant organic nitrogen substrates in seawater. Cell-to-cell variability in nutritional physiology can further enhance the diversity of metabolic strategies among dinoflagellates of the same species, but it has not been studied in free-living microalgae. We applied stable isotope tracers, isotope ratio mass spectrometry and nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) to investigate the response of cultured nitrate-acclimated dinoflagellates Prorocentrum minimum to a sudden input of urea and the effect of urea on the concurrent nitrate uptake at the population and single-cell levels. We demonstrate that inputs of urea lead to suppression of nitrate uptake by P. minimum, and urea uptake exceeds the concurrent uptake of nitrate. Individual dinoflagellate cells within a population display significant heterogeneity in the rates of nutrient uptake and extent of the urea-mediated inhibition of the nitrate uptake, thus forming several groups characterized by different modes of nutrition. We conclude that urea originating from sporadic sources is rapidly utilized by dinoflagellates and can be used in biosynthesis or stored intracellularly depending on the nutrient status; therefore, sudden urea inputs can represent one of the factors triggering or supporting harmful algal blooms. Significant physiological heterogeneity revealed at the single-cell level is likely to play a role in alleviation of intra-population competition for resources and can affect the dynamics of phytoplankton populations and their maintenance in natural environments. PMID:27610101

  8. Superposition of Individual Activities: Urea-Mediated Suppression of Nitrate Uptake in the Dinoflagellate Prorocentrum minimum Revealed at the Population and Single-Cell Levels

    PubMed Central

    Matantseva, Olga; Skarlato, Sergei; Vogts, Angela; Pozdnyakov, Ilya; Liskow, Iris; Schubert, Hendrik; Voss, Maren

    2016-01-01

    Dinoflagellates readily use diverse inorganic and organic compounds as nitrogen sources, which is advantageous in eutrophied coastal areas exposed to high loads of anthropogenic nutrients, e.g., urea, one of the most abundant organic nitrogen substrates in seawater. Cell-to-cell variability in nutritional physiology can further enhance the diversity of metabolic strategies among dinoflagellates of the same species, but it has not been studied in free-living microalgae. We applied stable isotope tracers, isotope ratio mass spectrometry and nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) to investigate the response of cultured nitrate-acclimated dinoflagellates Prorocentrum minimum to a sudden input of urea and the effect of urea on the concurrent nitrate uptake at the population and single-cell levels. We demonstrate that inputs of urea lead to suppression of nitrate uptake by P. minimum, and urea uptake exceeds the concurrent uptake of nitrate. Individual dinoflagellate cells within a population display significant heterogeneity in the rates of nutrient uptake and extent of the urea-mediated inhibition of the nitrate uptake, thus forming several groups characterized by different modes of nutrition. We conclude that urea originating from sporadic sources is rapidly utilized by dinoflagellates and can be used in biosynthesis or stored intracellularly depending on the nutrient status; therefore, sudden urea inputs can represent one of the factors triggering or supporting harmful algal blooms. Significant physiological heterogeneity revealed at the single-cell level is likely to play a role in alleviation of intra-population competition for resources and can affect the dynamics of phytoplankton populations and their maintenance in natural environments. PMID:27610101

  9. Biodynamic modeling of PCB uptake by Macoma balthica and Corbicula fluminea from sediment amended with activated carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLeod, Pamela B.; Luoma, S.N.; Luthy, R.G.

    2008-01-01

    Activated carbon amendment was assessed in the laboratory as a remediation strategy for freshwater sediment contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from the Grasse River (near Massena, NY). Three end points were evaluated: aqueous equilibrium PCB concentration, uptake into semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs), and 28-day bioaccumulation in the clam Corbicula fluminea. PCB uptake by water, SPMDs, and clams followed similar trends, with reductions increasing as a function of carbon dose. Average percent reductions in clam tissue PCBs were 67, 86, and 95% for activated carbon doses of 0.7, 1.3, and 2.5% dry wt, respectively. A biodynamic model that incorporates sediment geochemistry and dietary and aqueous uptake routes was found to agree well with observed uptake by C. fluminea in our laboratory test systems. Results from this study were compared to 28-day bioaccumulation experiments involving PCB-contaminated sediment from Hunters Point Naval Shipyard (San Francisco Bay, CA) and the clam Macoma balthica. Due to differences in feeding strategy, M. balthica deposit-feeds whereas C. fluminea filter-feeds, the relative importance of the aqueous uptake route is predicted to be much higher for C. fluminea than for M. balthica. Whereas M. balthica takes up approximately 90% of its body burden through sediment ingestion, C. fluminea only accumulates approximately 45% via this route. In both cases, results strongly suggest that it is the mass transfer of PCBs from native sediment to added carbon particles, not merely reductions in aqueous PCB concentrations, that effectively reduces PCB bioavailability and uptake by sediment-dwelling organisms. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  10. Relationship between Nitrite Reduction and Active Phosphate Uptake in the Phosphate-Accumulating Denitrifier Pseudomonas sp. Strain JR 12

    PubMed Central

    Barak, Yoram; van Rijn, Jaap

    2000-01-01

    Phosphate uptake by the phosphate-accumulating denitrifier Pseudomonas sp. JR12 was examined with different combinations of electron and carbon donors and electron acceptors. Phosphate uptake in acetate-supplemented cells took place with either oxygen or nitrate but did not take place when nitrite served as the final electron acceptor. Furthermore, nitrite reduction rates by this denitrifier were shown to be significantly reduced in the presence of phosphate. Phosphate uptake assays in the presence of the H+-ATPase inhibitor N,N′-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD), in the presence of the uncoupler carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), or with osmotic shock-treated cells indicated that phosphate transport over the cytoplasmic membrane of this bacterium was mediated by primary and secondary transport systems. By examining the redox transitions of whole cells at 553 nm we found that phosphate addition caused a significant oxidation of a c-type cytochrome. Based on these findings, we propose that this c-type cytochrome serves as an intermediate in the electron transfer to both nitrite reductase and the site responsible for active phosphate transport. In previous studies with this bacterium we found that the oxidation state of this c-type cytochrome was significantly higher in acetate-supplemented, nitrite-respiring cells (incapable of phosphate uptake) than in phosphate-accumulating cells incubated with different combinations of electron donors and acceptors. Based on the latter finding and results obtained in the present study it is suggested that phosphate uptake in this bacterium is subjected to a redox control of the active phosphate transport site. By means of this mechanism an explanation is provided for the observed absence of phosphate uptake in the presence of nitrite and inhibition of nitrite reduction by phosphate in this organism. The implications of these findings regarding denitrifying, phosphate removal wastewater plants is discussed. PMID

  11. Biodynamic modeling of PCB uptake by Macoma balthica and Corbicula fluminea from sediment amended with activated carbon.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Pamela B; Luoma, Samuel N; Luthy, Richard G

    2008-01-15

    Activated carbon amendment was assessed in the laboratory as a remediation strategy for freshwater sediment contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from the Grasse River (near Massena, NY). Three end points were evaluated: aqueous equilibrium PCB concentration, uptake into semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs), and 28-day bioaccumulation in the clam Corbicula fluminea. PCB uptake by water, SPMDs, and clams followed similar trends, with reductions increasing as a function of carbon dose. Average percent reductions in clam tissue PCBs were 67, 86, and 95% for activated carbon doses of 0.7, 1.3, and 2.5% dry wt, respectively. A biodynamic model that incorporates sediment geochemistry and dietary and aqueous uptake routes was found to agree well with observed uptake by C. fluminea in our laboratory test systems. Results from this study were compared to 28-day bioaccumulation experiments involving PCB-contaminated sediment from Hunters Point Naval Shipyard (San Francisco Bay, CA) and the clam Macoma balthica. Due to differences in feeding strategy, M. balthica deposit-feeds whereas C. fluminea filter-feeds, the relative importance of the aqueous uptake route is predicted to be much higher for C. fluminea than for M. balthica. Whereas M. balthica takes up approximately 90% of its body burden through sediment ingestion, C. fluminea only accumulates approximately 45% via this route. In both cases, results strongly suggest that it is the mass transfer of PCBs from native sediment to added carbon particles, not merely reductions in aqueous PCB concentrations, that effectively reduces PCB bioavailability and uptake by sediment-dwelling organisms. PMID:18284151

  12. Mechanistic insights into metal ion activation and operator recognition by the ferric uptake regulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zengqin; Wang, Qing; Liu, Zhao; Zhang, Manfeng; Machado, Ana Carolina Dantas; Chiu, Tsu-Pei; Feng, Chong; Zhang, Qi; Yu, Lin; Qi, Lei; Zheng, Jiangge; Wang, Xu; Huo, Xinmei; Qi, Xiaoxuan; Li, Xiaorong; Wu, Wei; Rohs, Remo; Li, Ying; Chen, Zhongzhou

    2015-07-01

    Ferric uptake regulator (Fur) plays a key role in the iron homeostasis of prokaryotes, such as bacterial pathogens, but the molecular mechanisms and structural basis of Fur-DNA binding remain incompletely understood. Here, we report high-resolution structures of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1 Fur in four different states: apo-Fur, holo-Fur, the Fur-feoAB1 operator complex and the Fur-Pseudomonas aeruginosa Fur box complex. Apo-Fur is a transition metal ion-independent dimer whose binding induces profound conformational changes and confers DNA-binding ability. Structural characterization, mutagenesis, biochemistry and in vivo data reveal that Fur recognizes DNA by using a combination of base readout through direct contacts in the major groove and shape readout through recognition of the minor-groove electrostatic potential by lysine. The resulting conformational plasticity enables Fur binding to diverse substrates. Our results provide insights into metal ion activation and substrate recognition by Fur that suggest pathways to engineer magnetotactic bacteria and antipathogenic drugs.

  13. Mechanistic insights into metal ion activation and operator recognition by the ferric uptake regulator

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zengqin; Wang, Qing; Liu, Zhao; Zhang, Manfeng; Machado, Ana Carolina Dantas; Chiu, Tsu-Pei; Feng, Chong; Zhang, Qi; Yu, Lin; Qi, Lei; Zheng, Jiangge; Wang, Xu; Huo, XinMei; Qi, Xiaoxuan; Li, Xiaorong; Wu, Wei; Rohs, Remo; Li, Ying; Chen, Zhongzhou

    2015-01-01

    Ferric uptake regulator (Fur) plays a key role in the iron homeostasis of prokaryotes, such as bacterial pathogens, but the molecular mechanisms and structural basis of Fur–DNA binding remain incompletely understood. Here, we report high-resolution structures of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1 Fur in four different states: apo-Fur, holo-Fur, the Fur–feoAB1 operator complex and the Fur–Pseudomonas aeruginosa Fur box complex. Apo-Fur is a transition metal ion-independent dimer whose binding induces profound conformational changes and confers DNA-binding ability. Structural characterization, mutagenesis, biochemistry and in vivo data reveal that Fur recognizes DNA by using a combination of base readout through direct contacts in the major groove and shape readout through recognition of the minor-groove electrostatic potential by lysine. The resulting conformational plasticity enables Fur binding to diverse substrates. Our results provide insights into metal ion activation and substrate recognition by Fur that suggest pathways to engineer magnetotactic bacteria and antipathogenic drugs. PMID:26134419

  14. Nutrient addition modifies phosphatase activities along an altitudinal gradient in a tropical montane forest in Southern Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Karla; Spoeri, Elena; Oelmann, Yvonne

    2016-02-01

    Atmospheric nutrient deposition and climate change are expected to endanger the diversity of tropical forest ecosystems. Nitrogen (N) deposition might influence nutrient fluxes beyond the N cycle by a concomitant increased demand for other nutritional elements such as phosphorus (P). Organisms might respond to the increased P demand by enhanced activity of enzymes involved in releasing inorganic P from organic matter (OM). Our aims were to assess the effect of i) climate shifts (approximated by an altitudinal gradient), and ii) nutrient addition (N, P, N+P) on phosphatase activity (PA) in organic layer and mineral soil of a tropical montane rainforest in Southern Ecuador. A nutrient manipulation experiment (NUMEX) was set up along an altitudinal gradient (1000, 2000, and 3000 m a.s.l.). We determined PA and inorganic and total P concentrations. PA at 1000 m was significantly lower (mean ± standard error: 48 ± 20 µmol p-NP g-1 dm h-1) as compared to 2000 m and 3000 m (119 ± 11 and 137 ± 19, respectively). One explanation might be that very rapid decomposition of OM at 1000 m results in very thin organic layers reducing the stabilization of enzymes and thus, resulting in leaching loss of enzymes under the humid tropical climate. We found no effect of N addition on PA neither in the organic layer nor in mineral soil, probably because of the low nutrient addition rates that showed ambiguous results so far on productivity measures as a proxy for P demand. In the organic layers of P and N+P treatments, we found decreased PA and increased concentrations of inorganic P. This indicates that the surplus of inorganic P reduced the biosynthesis of phosphatase enzymes. PA in megadiverse montane rainforests is likely to be unaffected by increased atmospheric N deposition but reduced upon atmospheric P deposition.

  15. Temperature and pH effects on plant uptake of benzotriazoles by sunflowers in hydroponic culture.

    PubMed

    Castro, Sigifredo; Davis, Lawrence C; Erickson, Larry E

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a systematic approach to understanding the effect of environmental variables on plant uptake (phyto-uptake) of organic contaminants. Uptake (and possibly phytotransformation) of xenobiotics is a complex process that may differ from nutrient uptake. A specific group of xenobiotics (benzotriazoles) were studied using sunflowers grown hydroponically with changes of environmental conditions including solution volume, temperature, pH, and mixing. The response of plants to these stimuli was evaluated and compared using physiological changes (biomass production and water uptake) and estimated uptake rates (influx into plants), which define the uptake characteristics for the xenobiotic. Stirring of the hydroponic solution had a significant impact on plant growth and water uptake. Plants were healthier, probably because of a combination of factors such as improved aeration and increase in temperature. Uptake and possibly phytotransformation of benzotriazoles was increased accordingly. Experiments at different temperatures allowed us to estimate an activation energy for the reaction leading to triazole disappearance from the solution. The estimated activation energy was 43 kJ/mol, which indicates that the uptake process is kinetically limited. Culturing plants in triazole-amended hydroponic solutions at different pH values did not strongly affect the biomass production, water uptake, and benzotriazole uptake characteristics. The sunflowers showed an unexpected capacity to buffer the solution pH. PMID:15554474

  16. Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizae on tomato yield, nutrient uptake, water relations, and soil carbon dynamics under deficit irrigation in field conditions.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Timothy M; Barrios-Masias, Felipe H; Carlisle, Eli A; Cavagnaro, Timothy R; Jackson, Louise E

    2016-10-01

    Plant strategies to cope with future droughts may be enhanced by associations between roots and soil microorganisms, including arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. But how AM fungi affect crop growth and yield, together with plant physiology and soil carbon (C) dynamics, under water stress in actual field conditions is not well understood. The well-characterized mycorrhizal tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) genotype 76R (referred to as MYC+) and the mutant nonmycorrhizal tomato genotype rmc were grown in an organic farm with a deficit irrigation regime and control regime that replaced evapotranspiration. AM increased marketable tomato yields by ~25% in both irrigation regimes but did not affect shoot biomass. In both irrigation regimes, MYC+ plants had higher plant nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentrations (e.g. 5 and 24% higher N and P concentrations in leaves at fruit set, respectively), 8% higher stomatal conductance (gs), 7% higher photosynthetic rates (Pn), and greater fruit set. Stem water potential and leaf relative water content were similar in both genotypes within each irrigation regime. Three-fold higher rates of root sap exudation in detopped MYC+ plants suggest greater capacity for water uptake through osmotic driven flow, especially in the deficit irrigation regime in which root sap exudation in rmc was nearly absent. Soil with MYC+ plants also had slightly higher soil extractable organic C and microbial biomass C at anthesis but no changes in soil CO2 emissions, although the latter were 23% lower under deficit irrigation. This study provides novel, field-based evidence for how indigenous AM fungi increase crop yield and crop water use efficiency during a season-long deficit irrigation and thus play an important role in coping with increasingly limited water availability in the future. PMID:27266519

  17. Methane Uptake in a Semi-Arid Grassland Affected by Elevated CO2 and Warming: Role of Methanotroph Activity and Gas Diffusion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Semiarid rangelands represent a significant global sink for methane (CH4) where methane uptake is controlled by methanotroph activity and the diffusivity of CH4 into the soil. Because increasing soil moisture causes diffusivity to fall but methanotroph activity to rise, methane uptake rates show a h...

  18. gamma-Aminobutyric acid uptake inhibition and anticonvulsant activity of nipecotic acid esters.

    PubMed

    Crider, A M; Wood, J D; Tschappat, K D; Hinko, C N; Seibert, K

    1984-11-01

    n-Alkyl esters of nipecotic acid were prepared by Fischer esterification, and the esters were evaluated against bicuculline-induced seizures in mice. Evaluation of the alkyl esters for inhibition of gamma-aminobutyric acid uptake into mouse whole brain mini-slices revealed that the order of potency was proportional to chain length. The octyl ester inhibited gamma-aminobutyric acid and beta-alanine uptakes by apparently nonspecific mechanisms. A variety of phenyl esters of nipecotic acid were also synthesized utilizing either dicyclohexylcarbodiimide or 1,1'-carbonyldiimidazole as the condensing agent. Most of the phenyl esters were potent inhibitors of gamma-aminobutyric acid uptake. The uptake inhibition appeared to involve specific and nonspecific (detergent-like) mechanisms. The m-nitrophenyl and p-nitrophenyl esters were particularly potent against bicuculline-induced seizures in mice. PMID:6520765

  19. The Sum of Its Parts—Effects of Gastric Distention, Nutrient Content and Sensory Stimulation on Brain Activation

    PubMed Central

    Spetter, Maartje S.; de Graaf, Cees; Mars, Monica; Viergever, Max A.; Smeets, Paul A. M.

    2014-01-01

    During food consumption the brain integrates multiple interrelated neural and hormonal signals involved in the regulation of food intake. Factors influencing the decision to stop eating include the foods' sensory properties, macronutrient content, and volume, which in turn affect gastric distention and appetite hormone responses. So far, the contributions of gastric distention and oral stimulation by food on brain activation have not been studied. The primary objective of this study was to assess the effect of gastric distention with an intra-gastric load and the additional effect of oral stimulation on brain activity after food administration. Our secondary objective was to study the correlations between hormone responses and appetite-related ratings and brain activation. Fourteen men completed three functional magnetic resonance imaging sessions during which they either received a naso-gastric infusion of water (stomach distention), naso-gastric infusion of chocolate milk (stomach distention + nutrients), or ingested chocolate-milk (stomach distention + nutrients + oral exposure). Appetite ratings and blood parameters were measured at several time points. During gastric infusion, brain activation was observed in the midbrain, amygdala, hypothalamus, and hippocampus for both chocolate milk and water, i.e., irrespective of nutrient content. The thalamus, amygdala, putamen and precuneus were activated more after ingestion than after gastric infusion of chocolate milk, whereas infusion evoked greater activation in the hippocampus and anterior cingulate. Moreover, areas involved in gustation and reward were activated more after oral stimulation. Only insulin responses following naso-gastric infusion of chocolate milk correlated with brain activation, namely in the putamen and insula. In conclusion, we show that normal (oral) food ingestion evokes greater activation than gastric infusion in stomach distention and food intake-related brain areas. This provides neural

  20. Active uptake and extravesicular storage of m-iodobenzylguanidine in human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smets, L.A.; Loesberg, C.; Janssen, M.; Metwally, E.A.; Huiskamp, R.

    1989-06-01

    Radioiodinated m-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), an analogue of the neurotransmitter norepinephrine (NE), is increasingly used in the diagnosis and treatment of neural crest tumors. Active uptake and subsequent retention of MIBG and NE was studied in human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells. Neuron-specific uptake of (125I)MIBG and (3H)NE saturated at extracellular concentration of 10(-6) M and exceeded by 20-30-fold that by passive diffusion alone. A minimum of 50% of accumulated MIBG remained permanently stored but the SK-N-SH cells were incapable of retaining recaptured (3H)NE. (125I)MIBG was displaced from intracellular binding sites by unlabeled MIBG with 10-fold higher potency than by unlabeled NE. MIBG stored in SK-N-SH cells was insensitive to depletion by the inhibitor of granular uptake reserpine (RSP) and was not precipitated in a granular fraction by differential centrifugation. Only few electron-dense granules were found in these cells by electron microscopy. In contrast, MIBG storage in PC-12 pheochromocytoma cells which contained many storage granules, was sensitive to RSP and part of accumulated drug was recovered in a granular fraction. Accordingly, storage of MIBG in the SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells is predominantly extravesicular and thus essentially different from that of biogenic amines in normal adrenomedullary tissue or in pheochromocytoma tumors, while sharing with these tissues a common mechanism of active uptake.

  1. Effects of xylitol on carbohydrate digesting enzymes activity, intestinal glucose absorption and muscle glucose uptake: a multi-mode study.

    PubMed

    Chukwuma, Chika Ifeanyi; Islam, Md Shahidul

    2015-03-01

    The present study investigated the possible mechanism(s) behind the effects of xylitol on carbohydrate digesting enzymes activity, muscle glucose uptake and intestinal glucose absorption using in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo experimental models. The effects of increasing concentrations of xylitol (2.5%-40% or 164.31 mM-2628.99 mM) on alpha amylase and alpha glucosidase activity in vitro and intestinal glucose absorption and muscle glucose uptake were investigated under ex vivo conditions. Additionally, the effects of an oral bolus dose of xylitol (1 g per kg BW) on gastric emptying and intestinal glucose absorption and digesta transit in the different segments of the intestinal tract were investigated in normal and type 2 diabetic rats at 1 hour after dose administration, when phenol red was used as a recovery marker. Xylitol exhibited concentration-dependent inhibition of alpha amylase (IC₅₀ = 1364.04 mM) and alpha glucosidase (IC₅₀ = 1127.52 mM) activity in vitro and small intestinal glucose absorption under ex vivo condition. Xylitol also increased dose dependent muscle glucose uptake with and without insulin, although the uptake was not significantly affected by the addition of insulin. Oral single bolus dose of xylitol significantly delayed gastric emptying, inhibited intestinal glucose absorption but increased the intestinal digesta transit rate in both normal and diabetic rats compared to their respective controls. The data of this study suggest that xylitol reduces intestinal glucose absorption via inhibiting major carbohydrate digesting enzymes, slowing gastric emptying and fastening the intestinal transit rate, but increases muscle glucose uptake in normal and type 2 diabetic rats. PMID:25656339

  2. Chasing Nutrients with an Arctic Sedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iverson, S. L.; Schimel, J.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change has put the Arctic into a state of flux. Understanding the effects an altered climate will have on vegetation and nutrient cycling requires more knowledge of the key plant and soil functions of major arctic ecosystems. One of these ecosystems, moist acidic tussock tundra, is dominated by a single plant species, the tussock-forming sedge Eriophorum vaginatum. This plant has unusual underground biomass: long, fast-growing, non-branching, non-mycorrhizal roots. In contrast to many other plants in nutrient-limiting environments, this sedge is highly successful without maximizing its root surface area to volume ratio. The benefits of this growth strategy to the plants and its effects on the accompanying soil-microbe-plant relationships are not fully understood. One possibility is that the roots may help the plant take advantage of nutrients released into the active layer of soil as it thaws in the spring. The roots may also stimulate microbial activity, increasing nutrient turnover and availability. A study was undertaken to explore the nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) dynamics in these plants, as well as the microbial populations associated with active E. vaginatum roots. Intact tussock microcosms (plant and accompanying soil) were removed from the tundra and cultivated in transparent boxes. Half the plants were kept in light to encourage photosynthesis (and thus greater plant activity), while the other half was kept in the dark to inhibit it. Using a 15N isotopic tracer injected at the extremity of root penetration into the soil, the N uptake capacity of E. vaginatum roots at depth was explored. This uptake capacity is compared to measures of plant activity, microbial activity, and soil solution chemistry in order to paint a clearer picture of the role of E. vaginatum in the soil ecosystem.

  3. Manganese-Enhanced MRI Reflects Both Activity-Independent and Activity-Dependent Uptake within the Rat Habenulomesencephalic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Brown, P. Leon; Rea, William; Vaupel, Bruce; Yang, Yihong; Stein, Elliot; Shepard, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) is a powerful technique for assessing the functional connectivity of neurons within the central nervous system. Despite the widely held proposition that MEMRI signal is dependent on neuronal activity, few studies have directly tested this implicit hypothesis. In the present series of experiments, MnCl2 was injected into the habenula of urethane-anesthetized rats alone or in combination with drugs known to alter neuronal activity by modulating specific voltage- and/or ligand-gated ion channels. Continuous quantitative T1 mapping was used to measure Mn2+ accumulation in the interpeduncular nucleus, a midline structure in which efferents from the medial habenula terminate. Microinjection of MnCl2 into the habenular complex using a protocol that maintained spontaneous neuronal activity resulted in a time-dependent increase in MEMRI signal intensity in the interpeduncular nucleus consistent with fast axonal transport of Mn2+ between these structures. Co-injection of the excitatory amino-acid agonist AMPA, increased the Mn2+-enhanced signal intensity within the interpeduncular nucleus. AMPA-induced increases in MEMRI signal were attenuated by co-injection of either the sodium channel blocker, TTX, or broad-spectrum Ca2+ channel blocker, Ni2+, and were occluded in the presence of both channel blockers. However, neither Ni2+ nor TTX, alone or in combination, attenuated the increase in signal intensity following injection of Mn2+ into the habenula. These results support the premise that changes in neuronal excitability are reflected by corresponding changes in MEMRI signal intensity. However, they also suggest that basal rates of Mn2+ uptake by neurons in the medial habenula may also occur via activity-independent mechanisms. PMID:26009889

  4. Ovine maternal nutrient restriction from mid to late gestation decreases heptic progesterone inactivating enzyme activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previously we have shown increased concentrations of progesterone and decreased liver weight in mid to late pregnant ewes provided a nutrient restricted vs. adequate diet. This alteration in peripheral progesterone could be due to increased synthesis and/or decreased clearance of progesterone. There...

  5. Nutrient Chemistry and Microbial Activity in the Upper Mississippi River Basin: Stoichiometry and Downstream Patterns

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nutrients, carbon, and silica have been used to track changes in water quality in the major rivers of the world. Most studies focus on the mouths of rivers and adjacent coastal waters. Studies on the Mississippi River have concluded that N enrichment and stable or declining Si co...

  6. Estrogenic activity and nutrient losses in surface runoff after winter manure application to small watersheds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Confined Animal Feeding Operations generate large amounts of wastes that are land-applied to provide nutrients for crop production and return organic matter to the soil. Production practices and storage limitations often necessitate that wastes be applied to frozen and snow-covered soil. Under these...

  7. Effects of watershed densities of animal feeding operations on nutrient concentrations and estrogenic activity in agricultural streams.

    PubMed

    Ciparis, Serena; Iwanowicz, Luke R; Voshell, J Reese

    2012-01-01

    Application of manures from animal feeding operations (AFOs) as fertilizer on agricultural land can introduce nutrients and hormones (e.g. estrogens) to streams. A landscape-scale study was conducted in the Shenandoah River watershed (Virginia, USA) in order to assess the relationship between densities of AFOs in watersheds of agricultural streams and in-stream nutrient concentrations and estrogenic activity. The effect of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) on nutrients and estrogenic activity was also evaluated. During periods of high and low flow, dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and orthophosphate (PO(4)-P) concentrations were analyzed and estrogens/estrogenic compounds were extracted and quantified as17β-estradiol equivalents (E2Eq) using a bioluminescent yeast estrogen screen. Estrogenic activity was measurable in the majority of collected samples, and 20% had E2Eq concentrations >1 ng/L. Relatively high concentrations of DIN (>1000 μg/L) were also frequently detected. During all sampling periods, there were strong relationships between watershed densities of AFOs and in-stream concentrations of DIN (R(2) = 0.56-0.81) and E2Eq (R(2) = 0.39-0.75). Relationships between watershed densities of AFOs and PO(4)-P were weaker, but were also significant (R(2) = 0.27-0.57). When combined with the effect of watershed AFO density, streams receiving WWTP effluent had higher concentrations of PO(4)-P than streams without WWTP discharges, and PO(4)-P was the only analyte with a consistent relationship to WWTPs. The results of this study suggest that as the watershed density of AFOs increases, there is a proportional increase in the potential for nonpoint source pollution of agricultural streams and their receiving waters by nutrients, particularly DIN, and compounds that can cause endocrine disruption in aquatic organisms. PMID:22088420

  8. Effects of watershed densities of animal feeding operations on nutrient concentrations and estrogenic activity in agricultural streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ciparis, S.; Iwanowicz, L.R.; Voshell, J.R.

    2012-01-01

    Application of manures from animal feeding operations (AFOs) as fertilizer on agricultural land can introduce nutrients and hormones (e.g. estrogens) to streams. A landscape-scale study was conducted in the Shenandoah River watershed (Virginia, USA) in order to assess the relationship between densities of AFOs in watersheds of agricultural streams and in-stream nutrient concentrations and estrogenic activity. The effect of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) on nutrients and estrogenic activity was also evaluated. During periods of high and low flow, dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and orthophosphate (PO 4-P) concentrations were analyzed and estrogens/estrogenic compounds were extracted and quantified as17??-estradiol equivalents (E2Eq) using a bioluminescent yeast estrogen screen. Estrogenic activity was measurable in the majority of collected samples, and 20% had E2Eq concentrations >1ng/L. Relatively high concentrations of DIN (>1000??g/L) were also frequently detected. During all sampling periods, there were strong relationships between watershed densities of AFOs and in-stream concentrations of DIN (R 2=0.56-0.81) and E2Eq (R 2=0.39-0.75). Relationships between watershed densities of AFOs and PO 4-P were weaker, but were also significant (R 2=0.27-0.57). When combined with the effect of watershed AFO density, streams receiving WWTP effluent had higher concentrations of PO 4-P than streams without WWTP discharges, and PO 4-P was the only analyte with a consistent relationship to WWTPs. The results of this study suggest that as the watershed density of AFOs increases, there is a proportional increase in the potential for nonpoint source pollution of agricultural streams and their receiving waters by nutrients, particularly DIN, and compounds that can cause endocrine disruption in aquatic organisms. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  9. Effects of watershed densities of animal feeding operations on nutrient concentrations and estrogenic activity in agricultural streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ciparis, Serena; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Voshell, J. Reese

    2012-01-01

    Application of manures from animal feeding operations (AFOs) as fertilizer on agricultural land can introduce nutrients and hormones (e.g. estrogens) to streams. A landscape-scale study was conducted in the Shenandoah River watershed (Virginia, USA) in order to assess the relationship between densities of AFOs in watersheds of agricultural streams and in-stream nutrient concentrations and estrogenic activity. The effect of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) on nutrients and estrogenic activity was also evaluated. During periods of high and low flow, dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and orthophosphate (PO4-P) concentrations were analyzed and estrogens/estrogenic compounds were extracted and quantified as17β-estradiol equivalents (E2Eq) using a bioluminescent yeast estrogen screen. Estrogenic activity was measurable in the majority of collected samples, and 20% had E2Eq concentrations > 1 ng/L. Relatively high concentrations of DIN (> 1000 μg/L) were also frequently detected. During all sampling periods, there were strong relationships between watershed densities of AFOs and in-stream concentrations of DIN (R2 = 0.56–0.81) and E2Eq (R2 = 0.39–0.75). Relationships between watershed densities of AFOs and PO4-P were weaker, but were also significant (R2 = 0.27–0.57). When combined with the effect of watershed AFO density, streams receiving WWTP effluent had higher concentrations of PO4-P than streams without WWTP discharges, and PO4-P was the only analyte with a consistent relationship to WWTPs. The results of this study suggest that as the watershed density of AFOs increases, there is a proportional increase in the potential for nonpoint source pollution of agricultural streams and their receiving waters by nutrients, particularly DIN, and compounds that can cause endocrine disruption in aquatic organisms.

  10. Isolating the effects of storm events on arctic aquatic bacteria: temperature, nutrients, and community composition as controls on bacterial productivity

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Heather E.; Crump, Byron C.; Kling, George W.

    2015-01-01

    Storm events can pulse nutrients and carbon from soils and provide an important subsidy to food webs in oligotrophic streams and lakes. Bacterial nutrient limitation and the potential response of stream aquatic bacteria to storm events was investigated in arctic tundra environments by manipulating both water temperature and inorganic nutrient concentrations in short (up to 4 days) and long duration (up to 2 weeks) laboratory mesocosm experiments. Inorganic N and P additions increased bacterial production (14C-labeled leucine uptake) up to seven times over controls, and warmer incubation temperatures increased the speed of this response to added nutrients. Bacterial cell numbers also increased in response to temperature and nutrient additions with cell-specific carbon uptake initially increasing and then declining after 2 days. Bacterial community composition (BCC; determined by means of 16S denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting) shifted rapidly in response to changes in incubation temperature and the addition of nutrients, within 2 days in some cases. While the bacteria in these habitats responded to nutrient additions with rapid changes in productivity and community composition, water temperature controlled the speed of the metabolic response and affected the resultant change in bacterial community structure, constraining the potential responses to pulsed nutrient subsidies associated with storm events. In all cases, at higher nutrient levels and temperatures the effect of initial BCC on bacterial activity was muted, suggesting a consistent, robust interaction of temperature, and nutrients controlling activity in these aquatic systems. PMID:25873916

  11. Rates of total oxygen uptake of sediments and benthic nutrient fluxes measured using an in situ autonomous benthic chamber in the sediment of the slope off the southwestern part of Ulleung Basin, East Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Seong; An, Sung-Uk; Park, Young-Gyu; Kim, Eunsoo; Kim, Dongseon; Kwon, Jung No; Kang, Dong-Jin; Noh, Jae-Hoon

    2015-09-01

    We have developed a new autonomous benthic lander for deep-sea research, the Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology (KIOST) Belc II and Belp II. The benthic lander was successfully tested at 950 and 1450 m water depths on the slope off the southwestern part of the Ulleung Basin in the East Sea of Korea. The ex situ measurements of the total oxygen uptake (TOU) rates at all the stations exceeded the in situ measurement values, and may indicate artificial effects from onboard incubation. The TOU rates were estimated to be 5.80 mmol m-2 d-1 and 3.77 mmol m-2 d-1 at water depths of 950 m and 1450 m, respectively. The benthic nutrient fluxes were also higher at water depths of 950 m, which indicates a partitioning of organic degradation with water depth. In addition, the negative phosphate and nitrogen benthic flux ratios and the higher nitrate removal flux via the sediment-water interface at the slope imply that the nitrogen in the bottom water may be preferentially removed via microbial respiration processes in the sediments, and may be coupled with the low nitrogen-to-phosphate ratio found in the deep water. Although our measurements comprised just two experiments in the slope sediment, the robust in situ measurement of the benthic fluxes in the slope sediment is a forerunner for new research into the biogeochemical cycles across the shelf edge-slope-basin system in the East Sea.

  12. Expanding the menu for carnivorous plants: uptake of potassium, iron and manganese by carnivorous pitcher plants.

    PubMed

    Adlassnig, Wolfram; Steinhauser, Georg; Peroutka, Marianne; Musilek, Andreas; Sterba, Johannes H; Lichtscheidl, Irene K; Bichler, Max

    2009-12-01

    Carnivorous plants use animals as fertiliser substitutes which allow them to survive on nutrient deficient soils. Most research concentrated on the uptake of the prey's nitrogen and phosphorus; only little is known on the utilisation of other elements. We studied the uptake of three essential nutrients, potassium, iron and manganese, in three species of carnivorous pitcher plants (Cephalotus follicularis LaBilladiere, Sarracenia purpureaL., Heliamphora nutans Bentham). Using relatively short-lived and gamma-emitting radiotracers, we significantly improved the sensitivity compared to conventional protocols and gained the following results. We demonstrated the uptake of trace elements like iron and manganese. In addition, we found direct evidence for the uptake of potassium into the pitcher tissue. Potassium and manganese were absorbed to virtually 100% if offered in physiological concentrations or below in Cephalotus. Analysis of pitcher fluid collected in the natural habitat showed that uptake was performed here as efficiently as in the laboratory. The absorption of nutrients is an active process depending on living glandular cells in the pitcher epidermis and can be inhibited by azide. Unphysiologically high amounts of nutrients were taken up for a short time, but after a few hours the absorbing cells were damaged, and uptake stopped. Absorption rates of pitcher leaves from plants under controlled conditions varied highly, indicating that each trap is functionally independent. The comparison of minerals in typical prey with the plants' tissues showed that a complete coverage of the plants' needs by prey capture is improbable. PMID:19428263

  13. Chemical carcinogenesis in feral fish: uptake, activation, and detoxication of organic xenobiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Varanasi, U; Stein, J E; Nishimoto, M; Reichert, W L; Collier, T K

    1987-01-01

    The high prevalence of liver neoplasms in English sole (Parophrys vetulus) and substantially lower prevalence of neoplasms in a closely related species, starry flounder (Platichthys stellatus) captured from industrialized waterways, provide a unique opportunity to compare biochemical processes involved in chemical carcinogenesis in feral fish species. Because levels of aromatic hydrocarbons (AHs) in urban sediments are correlated with prevalences of liver neoplasms in English sole, we have initiated detailed studies to evaluate the effects of endogenous and exogenous factors on uptake, activation and detoxication of carcinogenic AHs, such as benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), using spectroscopic, chromatographic, and radiometric techniques. The results obtained thus far show that sole readily takes up AHs associated with sediment from urban areas and that the presence of other xenobiotics, such as PCBs, in sediment increases tissue concentrations of BaP metabolites. Extensive metabolism of BaP occurred whether sole was exposed to this AH via sediment, per os, or intraperitoneally. Substantial modification of hepatic DNA occurred and persisted for a period of 2-4 weeks after a single exposure to BaP. The level of covalent binding of BaP intermediates to hepatic DNA was 10-fold higher in juvenile than adult sole and 90-fold higher in juvenile sole than in Sprague-Dawley rat, a species which is resistant to BaP-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. The level of chemical modification of hepatic DNA in juvenile flounder was 2-4 fold lower than that for juvenile sole and concentration of BaP 7,8-diol glucuronide in bile of sole was significantly higher than that in flounder bile, although the rate of formation of BaP 7,8-diol by hepatic microsomes was comparable for both species. Moreover, liver microsomes from both species, in the presence of exogenous DNA, metabolized BaP into essentially a single adduct, identified as (+)anti-7,8-diol-9,10-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydroBaP-dG. These results

  14. Calorie restriction leads to greater Akt2 activity and glucose uptake by insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle from old rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiyan; Arias, Edward B; Cartee, Gregory D

    2016-03-01

    Skeletal muscle insulin resistance is associated with many common age-related diseases, but moderate calorie restriction (CR) can substantially elevate glucose uptake by insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle from both young and old rats. The current study evaluated the isolated epitrochlearis muscle from ∼24.5-mo-old rats that were either fed ad libitum (AL) or subjected to CR (consuming ∼65% of ad libitum, AL, intake beginning at ∼22.5 mo old). Some muscles were also incubated with MK-2206, a potent and selective Akt inhibitor. The most important results were that in isolated muscles, CR vs. AL resulted in 1) greater insulin-stimulated glucose uptake 2) that was accompanied by significantly increased insulin-mediated activation of Akt2, as indicated by greater phosphorylation on both Thr(309) and Ser(474) along with greater Akt2 activity, 3) concomitant with enhanced phosphorylation of several Akt substrates, including an Akt substrate of 160 kDa on Thr(642) and Ser(588), filamin C on Ser(2213) and proline-rich Akt substrate of 40 kDa on Thr(246), but not TBC1D1 on Thr(596); and 4) each of the CR effects was eliminated by MK-2206. These data provide compelling new evidence linking greater Akt2 activation to the CR-induced elevation of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by muscle from old animals. PMID:26739650

  15. [18F]FluorThanatrace uptake as a marker of PARP1 expression and activity in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Edmonds, Christine E; Makvandi, Mehran; Lieberman, Brian P; Xu, Kuiying; Zeng, Chenbo; Li, Shihong; Hou, Catherine; Lee, Hsiaoju; Greenberg, Roger A; Mankoff, David A; Mach, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear enzyme PARP1 plays a central role in sensing DNA damage and facilitating repair. Tumors with BRCA1/2 mutations are highly dependent on PARP1 as an alternative mechanism for DNA repair, and PARP inhibitors generate synthetic lethality in tumors with BRCA mutations, resulting in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Zhou et al. recently synthesized an 18F-labeled PARP1 inhibitor ([18F]FluorThanatrace) for PET, and demonstrated high specific tracer uptake in a xenograft model of breast cancer [1]. In the current study, we characterize the level of baseline PARP expression and activity across multiple human breast cancer cell lines, including a BRCA1 mutant line. PARP expression and activity, as measured by levels of PAR and PARP1, is correlated with in vitro [18F]FluorThanatrace binding as well as tracer uptake on PET in a xenograft model of breast cancer. Radiotracer uptake in genetically-engineered mouse fibroblasts indicates [18F]FluorThanatrace is selective for PARP1 versus other PARP enzymes. This motivates further studies of [18F]FluorThanatrace as an in vivo measure of PARP1 expression and activity in patients who would benefit from PARP inhibitor therapy. PMID:27069769

  16. Synthesis, cellular uptake and HIV-1 Tat-dependent trans-activation inhibition activity of oligonucleotide analogues disulphide-conjugated to cell-penetrating peptides

    PubMed Central

    Turner, John J.; Arzumanov, Andrey A.; Gait, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    Oligonucleotides composed of 2′-O-methyl and locked nucleic acid residues complementary to HIV-1 trans-activation responsive element TAR block Tat-dependent trans-activation in a HeLa cell assay when delivered by cationic lipids. We describe an improved procedure for synthesis and purification under highly denaturing conditions of 5′-disulphide-linked conjugates of 3′-fluorescein labelled oligonucleotides with a range of cell-penetrating peptides and investigate their abilities to enter HeLa cells and block trans-activation. Free uptake of 12mer OMe/LNA oligonucleotide conjugates to Tat (48–58), Penetratin and R9F2 was observed in cytosolic compartments of HeLa cells. Uptake of the Tat conjugate was enhanced by N-terminal addition of four Lys or Arg residues or a second Tat peptide. None of the conjugates entered the nucleus or inhibited trans-activation when freely delivered, but inhibition was obtained in the presence of cationic lipids. Nuclear exclusion was seen for free delivery of Tat (48–58), Penetratin and R9 conjugates of 16mer phosphorothioate OMe oligonucleotide. Uptake into human fibroblast cytosolic compartments was seen for Tat, Penetratin, R9F2 and Transportan conjugates. Large enhancements of HeLa cell uptake into cytosolic compartments were seen when free Tat peptide was added to Tat conjugate of 12mer OMe/LNA oligonucleotide or Penetratin peptide to Penetratin conjugate of the same oligonucleotide. PMID:15640444

  17. Impacts of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes on Nutrient Removal from Wastewater and Bacterial Community Structure in Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Hai, Reti; Wang, Yulin; Wang, Xiaohui; Du, Zhize; Li, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Background The increasing use of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) will inevitably lead to the exposure of wastewater treatment facilities. However, knowledge of the impacts of MWCNTs on wastewater nutrient removal and bacterial community structure in the activated sludge process is sparse. Aims To investigate the effects of MWCNTs on wastewater nutrient removal, and bacterial community structure in activated sludge. Methods Three triplicate sequencing batch reactors (SBR) were exposed to wastewater which contained 0, 1, and 20 mg/L MWCNTs. MiSeq sequencing was used to investigate the bacterial community structures in activated sludge samples which were exposed to different concentrations of MWCNTs. Results Exposure to 1 and 20 mg/L MWCNTs had no acute (1 day) impact on nutrient removal from wastewater. After long-term (180 days) exposure to 1 mg/L MWCNTs, the average total nitrogen (TN) removal efficiency was not significantly affected. TN removal efficiency decreased from 84.0% to 71.9% after long-term effects of 20 mg/L MWCNTs. After long-term exposure to 1 and 20 mg/L MWCNTs, the total phosphorus removal efficiencies decreased from 96.8% to 52.3% and from 98.2% to 34.0% respectively. Further study revealed that long-term exposure to 20 mg/L MWCNTs inhibited activities of ammonia monooxygenase and nitrite oxidoreductase. Long-term exposure to 1 and 20 mg/L MWCNTs both inhibited activities of exopolyphosphatase and polyphosphate kinase. MiSeq sequencing data indicated that 20 mg/L MWCNTs significantly decreased the diversity of bacterial community in activated sludge. Long-term exposure to 1 and 20 mg/L MWCNTs differentially decreased the abundance of nitrifying bacteria, especially ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. The abundance of PAOs was decreased after long-term exposure to 20 mg/L MWCNTs. The abundance of glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) was increased after long-term exposure to 1 mg/L MWCNTs. Conclusion MWCNTs have adverse effects on biological

  18. Physiological and biochemical responses of Suaeda fruticosa to cadmium and copper stresses: growth, nutrient uptake, antioxidant enzymes, phytochelatin, and glutathione levels.

    PubMed

    Bankaji, I; Caçador, I; Sleimi, N

    2015-09-01

    Environmental pollution by trace metal elements (TMEs) is a serious problem worldwide, increasing in parallel with the development of human technology. The present research aimed to examine the response of halophytic species Suaeda fruticosa to oxidative stress posed by combined abiotic stresses. Plants have been grown for 1 month with an irrigation solution supplemented with 200 mM NaCl and 400 μM Cd(2+) or 400 μM Cu(2+). The level of glutathione (GSH), phytochelatins (PCs), and antioxidant enzyme activities [ascorbate peroxidase (APX), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX), and catalase (CAT)] as well as lipid peroxidation was studied to see the stress exerted by the TME and the level of tolerance and detoxification strategy adopted by S. fruticosa. Relative growth rate (RGR) decreased under Cd(2+) stress in this species, whereas Cu(2+) did not have any impact on S. fruticosa performance. Cd(2+) or Cu(2+) enhanced malondialdehyde, suggesting reactive oxygen species-induced disruption of membrane integrity and oxidative stress in S. fruticosa. On the other hand, the activities of the antioxidant enzymes CAT, APX, and GPX diminished and mineral nutrition was disturbed by metal stress. S. fruticosa was able to synthesize PCs in response to TME toxicity. However, data indicate that GSH levels underwent a significant decrease in roots and leaves of S. fruticosa stressed by Cd(2+) or Cu(2+). The GSH depletion accompanied by the increase of phytochelatin concentration suggests the involvement of GSH in the synthesis of phytochelatins. PMID:25925143

  19. Relationships of biomass, nutrient pools and anthropogenic activities in Amazonian forests

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, J.B.; Cummings, D.L.; Rabbitt, R.E.; Ward, D.E. Forest Service, Missoula, MT )

    1993-06-01

    There are two general patterns associated with deforestation in Amazonia: shifting cultivation where forests are felled and burned every 4-10 years; and pasture conversion where burning occurs every 1-3 years. The former results in a more rapid rate of nutrient loss due to fire frequency and the greater susceptibility of aboveground nutrient pools to volatilization. Along the gradient from primary forest to burned degraded pasture or third-growth forest, aboveground biomass decreased from 434 Mg ha[sup [minus]1] to <8 Mg ha[sup [minus]1]. However, tremendous variability exists in the biomass, nutrient pools, and fire effects in Terra Firme forests, second-growth forests (Capoiera) and pastures. For example, N losses from primary forests ranged from 500 to 1380 kg ha[sup [minus]1], losses from Capoiera ranged from 300 to 400 kg ha[sup [minus]1] and losses from pastures were 200 to >500 kg ha[sup [minus]1]. Clearly these land use practices result in a significant transfer of C to the atmosphere, are not sustainable for human uses and may exacerbate difficulties in forest restoration.

  20. The Design, Synthesis and Structure-Activity Relationship of Mixed Serotonin, Norepinephrine and Dopamine Uptake Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhengming; Yang, Ji; Skolnick, Phil

    The evolution of antidepressants over the past four decades has involved the replacement of drugs with a multiplicity of effects (e.g., TCAs) by those with selective actions (i.e., SSRIs). This strategy was employed to reduce the adverse effects of TCAs, largely by eliminating interactions with certain neurotransmitters or receptors. Although these more selective compounds may be better tolerated by patients, selective drugs, specifically SSRIs, are not superior to older drugs in treating depressed patients as measured by response and remission rates. It may be an advantage to increase synaptic levels of both serotonin and norepinephrine, as in the case of dual uptake inhibitors like duloxetine and venlafaxine. An important recent development has been the emergence of the triple-uptake inhibitors (TUIs/SNDRIs), which inhibit the uptake of the three neurotransmitters most closely linked to depression: serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine. Preclinical studies and clinical trials indicate that a drug inhibiting the reuptake of all three of these neurotransmitters could produce more rapid onset of action and greater efficacy than traditional antidepressants. This review will detail the medicinal chemistry involved in the design, synthesis and discovery of mixed serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine transporter uptake inhibitors.

  1. Retrofitting conventional primary clarifiers to activated primary clarifiers to enhance nutrient removal and energy conservation in WWTPs in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-wei; Zhang, Tian-zhu; Chen, Ji-ning; Hu, Zhi-rong

    2011-01-01

    Biological nutrient removal requires sufficient carbon source. Meanwhile, the removal of organic matter in wastewater requires energy consumption in the aeration tank. Carbon source for nutrient removal in most wastewater treatment plants with conventional primary clarifier (CPC) is generally insufficient in China. In order to increase carbon source and to save energy, a part of the CPC may be retrofitted as an activated primary clarifier (APC). In this paper, a pilot scale experiment was conducted to examine the performance of primary sludge fermentation and its effect on nitrogen and phosphorus removal. Results show that the primary sludge fermentation in APC has produced a similar VFA/TP ratio but a higher BOD5/TN ratio compared with those in the CPC effluent, and the TN concentrations in the secondary effluent are at 8.0, 10.8, and 17.4 mg/L, while TP is at 0.45, 1.10, and 2.28 mg/L when the pilot test system was fed with (1) the APC effluent, (2) 50% from the APC effluent and 50% from the CPC effluent, and (3) the CPC effluent, respectively. Results also indicate that the BOD5/TN ratio is a more sensitive factor than the VFA/TP ratio for nutrient removal and energy conservation for the APC fermentation. PMID:21508549

  2. Gut Commensal E. coli Proteins Activate Host Satiety Pathways following Nutrient-Induced Bacterial Growth.

    PubMed

    Breton, Jonathan; Tennoune, Naouel; Lucas, Nicolas; Francois, Marie; Legrand, Romain; Jacquemot, Justine; Goichon, Alexis; Guérin, Charlène; Peltier, Johann; Pestel-Caron, Martine; Chan, Philippe; Vaudry, David; do Rego, Jean-Claude; Liénard, Fabienne; Pénicaud, Luc; Fioramonti, Xavier; Ebenezer, Ivor S; Hökfelt, Tomas; Déchelotte, Pierre; Fetissov, Sergueï O

    2016-02-01

    The composition of gut microbiota has been associated with host metabolic phenotypes, but it is not known if gut bacteria may influence host appetite. Here we show that regular nutrient provision stabilizes exponential growth of E. coli, with the stationary phase occurring 20 min after nutrient supply accompanied by bacterial proteome changes, suggesting involvement of bacterial proteins in host satiety. Indeed, intestinal infusions of E. coli stationary phase proteins increased plasma PYY and their intraperitoneal injections suppressed acutely food intake and activated c-Fos in hypothalamic POMC neurons, while their repeated administrations reduced meal size. ClpB, a bacterial protein mimetic of α-MSH, was upregulated in the E. coli stationary phase, was detected in plasma proportional to ClpB DNA in feces, and stimulated firing rate of hypothalamic POMC neurons. Thus, these data show that bacterial proteins produced after nutrient-induced E. coli growth may signal meal termination. Furthermore, continuous exposure to E. coli proteins may influence long-term meal pattern. PMID:26621107

  3. Enhanced Plant Nutrient use Efficiency with PGPR and AMF in an Integrated Nutrient Management System

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A three-year field study was conducted with field corn from 2005 to 2007 to test the hypothesis that microbial inoculants that increase plant growth and yield will enhance nutrient uptake, and thereby remove more nutrients, especially N, P, and K from the field as part of an integrated nutrient mana...

  4. Contrasting macrophage activation by fine and ultrafine titanium dioxide particles is associated with different uptake mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Inhalation of (nano)particles may lead to pulmonary inflammation. However, the precise mechanisms of particle uptake and generation of inflammatory mediators by alveolar macrophages (AM) are still poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the interactions between particles and AM and their associated pro-inflammatory effects in relation to particle size and physico-chemical properties. NR8383 rat lung AM were treated with ultrafine (uf), fine (f) TiO2 or fine crystalline silica (DQ12 quartz). Physico-chemical particle properties were investigated by transmission electron microscopy, elemental analysis and thermogravimetry. Aggregation and agglomeration tendency of the particles were determined in assay-specific suspensions by means of dynamic light scattering. All three particle types were rapidly taken up by AM. DQ12 and ufTiO2 , but not fTiO2 , caused increased extracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) mRNA expression and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α release. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA expression was increased most strongly by ufTiO2 , while DQ12 exclusively triggered interleukin (IL) 1β release. However, oscillations of intracellular calcium concentration and increased intracellular ROS were observed with all three samples. Uptake inhibition experiments with cytochalasin D, chlorpromazine and a Fcγ receptor II (FcγRII) antibody revealed that the endocytosis of fTiO2 by the macrophages involves actin-dependent phagocytosis and macropinocytosis as well as clathrin-coated pit formation, whereas the uptake of ufTiO2 was dominated by FcγIIR. The uptake of DQ12 was found to be significantly reduced by all three inhibitors. Our findings suggest that the contrasting AM responses to fTiO2 , ufTiO2 and DQ12 relate to differences in the involvement of specific uptake mechanisms. PMID:21995556

  5. Relationship between nitrate reductase and nitrate uptake in phytoplankton in the Peru upwelling region

    SciTech Connect

    Blasco, D.; MacIsaac, J.J.; Packard, T.T.; Dugdale, R.C.

    1984-03-01

    Nitrate reductase (NR) activity and /sup 15/NO/sub 3//sup -/ uptake in phytoplankton were compared under different environmental conditions on two cruises in the upwelling region off Peru. The NR activity and NO/sub 3//sup -/ uptake rates responded differently to light and nutrients and the differences led to variations in the uptake: reductase ratio. Analysis of these variations suggests that the re-equilibration time of the two processes in response to environmental perturbation is an important source of variability. The nitrate uptake system responds faster than the nitrate reductase system. Considering these differences in response time the basic differences in the two processes, and the differences in their measurement, the authors conclude that the Nr activity measures the current nitrate-reducing potential, which reflects NO/sub 3//sup -/ assimilation before the sampling time, while /sup 15/NO/sub 3//sup -/ uptake measures NO/sub 3//sup -/ assimilation in the 6-h period following sampling.

  6. Precise quantification of cellular uptake of cell-penetrating peptides using fluorescence-activated cell sorting and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rezgui, Rachid; Blumer, Katy; Yeoh-Tan, Gilbert; Trexler, Adam J; Magzoub, Mazin

    2016-07-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have emerged as a potentially powerful tool for drug delivery due to their ability to efficiently transport a whole host of biologically active cargoes into cells. Although concerted efforts have shed some light on the cellular internalization pathways of CPPs, quantification of CPP uptake has proved problematic. Here we describe an experimental approach that combines two powerful biophysical techniques, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), to directly, accurately and precisely measure the cellular uptake of fluorescently-labeled molecules. This rapid and technically simple approach is highly versatile and can readily be applied to characterize all major CPP properties that normally require multiple assays, including amount taken up by cells (in moles/cell), uptake efficiency, internalization pathways, intracellular distribution, intracellular degradation and toxicity threshold. The FACS-FCS approach provides a means for quantifying any intracellular biochemical entity, whether expressed in the cell or introduced exogenously and transported across the plasma membrane. PMID:27033412

  7. Ethanolic extract of Allium cepa stimulates glucose transporter typ 4-mediated glucose uptake by the activation of insulin signaling.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Sudeep; Pal, Savita; Maurya, Rakesh; Srivastava, Arvind K

    2015-02-01

    The present work was undertaken to investigate the effects and the molecular mechanism of the standardized ethanolic extract of Allium cepa (onion) on the glucose transport for controlling diabetes mellitus. A. cepa stimulates glucose uptake by the rat skeletal muscle cells (L6 myotubes) in both time- and dose-dependent manners. This effect was shown to be mediated by the increased translocation of glucose transporter typ 4 protein from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane as well as the synthesis of glucose transporter typ 4 protein. The effect of A. cepa extract on glucose transport was stymied by wortmannin, genistein, and AI½. In vitro phosphorylation analysis revealed that, like insulin, A. cepa extract also enhances the tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor-β, insulin receptor substrate-1, and the serine phosphorylation of Akt under both basal and insulin-stimulated conditions without affecting the total amount of these proteins. Furthermore, it is also shown that the activation of Akt is indispensable for the A. cepa-induced glucose uptake in L6 myotubes. Taken together, these findings provide ample evidence that the ethanolic extract of A. cepa stimulates glucose transporter typ 4 translocation-mediated glucose uptake by the activation of the phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase/Akt dependent pathway. PMID:25654406

  8. Growth kinetics, nutrient uptake, and expression of the Alcaligenes eutrophus poly(beta-hydroxybutyrate) synthesis pathway in transgenic maize cell suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Hahn, J J; Eschenlauer, A C; Narrol, M H; Somers, D A; Srienc, F

    1997-01-01

    Transgenic suspension cultures of Black Mexican Sweet maize (Zea mays L.) expressing the Alcaligenes eutrophus genes encoding enzymes of the pathway for biosynthesis of the biodegradable polymer poly(beta-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) were established as a tool for investigating metabolic regulation of the PHB pathway in plant cells. Cultures were grown in a 2 L modified mammalian cell bioreactor and in shake flasks. Biomass doubling times for transgenic bioreactor cultures (3.42 +/- 0.76 days) were significantly higher than those for untransformed cultures (2.01 +/- 0.33 days). Transgenic expression of the bacterial enzymes beta-ketothiolase (0.140 units/mg protein) and acetoacetyl-CoA reductase (0.636 units/mg protein) was detected by enzyme assays and immunoblots. However, over the first 2 years of cultivation, reductase activity decreased to 0.120 units/mg proteins. Furthermore, the PHB synthase gene, although initially present, was not detectable after 1.5 years of cultivation in suspension culture. These facts suggest that transgenic expression of PHB pathway genes in plant cells may not be stable. A hydroxybutyrate derivative was detected via gas chromatography even after 4 years of cultivation. Although the method used to prepare samples for gas chromatography cannot directly distinguish among PHB polymer, hydroxybutyryl-CoA (HB-CoA), and hydroxybutyric acid, solvent washing experiments indicated that most or all of the signal was non-polymeric, presumably H-CoA. The synthesis of HB-CoA appeared to be linked to substrate growth limitation, with HB-CoA accumulation increasing dramatically and cell growth ceasing upon depletion of ammonium. This suggests that the PHB synthesis pathway in plants is subject to regulatory mechanisms similar to those in prokaryotic cells. PMID:9265773

  9. Active auxin uptake by zucchini membrane vesicles: quantitation using ESR volume and delta pH determinations

    SciTech Connect

    Lomax, T.L.; Mehlhorn, R.J.; Briggs, W.R.

    1985-10-01

    Closed and pH-tight membrane vesicles prepared from hypocotyls of 5-day-old dark-grown seedlings of Cucurbita pepo accumulate the plant growth hormone indole-3-acetic acid along an imposed proton gradient (pH low outside, high inside). The use of electron paramagnetic spin probes permitted quantitation both of apparent vesicle volume and magnitude of the pH gradient. Under the experimental conditions used, hormone accumulation was at minimum 20-fold, a value 4 times larger than what one would predict if accumulation reflected only diffusional equilibrium at the measured pH gradient. It is concluded that hormone uptake is an active process, with each protonated molecule of hormone accompanied by an additional proton. Experiments with ionophores confirm that it is the pH gradient itself which drives the uptake.

  10. Mechanism of nutrient sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The term nutrient sensing has emerged to describe the molecular mechanisms by which nutrients and their metabolites interact with various cell surface receptors, intracellular signaling proteins, and nuclear receptors, and modulate the activity of a complex network of signaling pathways that regulat...

  11. Abnormalities of AMPK Activation and Glucose Uptake in Cultured Skeletal Muscle Cells from Individuals with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Audrey E.; Jones, David E.; Walker, Mark; Newton, Julia L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Post exertional muscle fatigue is a key feature in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS). Abnormalities of skeletal muscle function have been identified in some but not all patients with CFS. To try to limit potential confounders that might contribute to this clinical heterogeneity, we developed a novel in vitro system that allows comparison of AMP kinase (AMPK) activation and metabolic responses to exercise in cultured skeletal muscle cells from CFS patients and control subjects. Methods Skeletal muscle cell cultures were established from 10 subjects with CFS and 7 age-matched controls, subjected to electrical pulse stimulation (EPS) for up to 24h and examined for changes associated with exercise. Results In the basal state, CFS cultures showed increased myogenin expression but decreased IL6 secretion during differentiation compared with control cultures. Control cultures subjected to 16h EPS showed a significant increase in both AMPK phosphorylation and glucose uptake compared with unstimulated cells. In contrast, CFS cultures showed no increase in AMPK phosphorylation or glucose uptake after 16h EPS. However, glucose uptake remained responsive to insulin in the CFS cells pointing to an exercise-related defect. IL6 secretion in response to EPS was significantly reduced in CFS compared with control cultures at all time points measured. Conclusion EPS is an effective model for eliciting muscle contraction and the metabolic changes associated with exercise in cultured skeletal muscle cells. We found four main differences in cultured skeletal muscle cells from subjects with CFS; increased myogenin expression in the basal state, impaired activation of AMPK, impaired stimulation of glucose uptake and diminished release of IL6. The retention of these differences in cultured muscle cells from CFS subjects points to a genetic/epigenetic mechanism, and provides a system to identify novel therapeutic targets. PMID:25836975

  12. Facilitating Mitochondrial Calcium Uptake Improves Activation-Induced Cerebral Blood Flow and Behavior after mTBI

    PubMed Central

    Murugan, Madhuvika; Santhakumar, Vijayalakshmi; Kannurpatti, Sridhar S.

    2016-01-01

    Mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (mTBI) leads to secondary neuronal loss via excitotoxic mechanisms, including mitochondrial Ca2+ overload. However, in the surviving cellular population, mitochondrial Ca2+ influx, and oxidative metabolism are diminished leading to suboptimal neuronal circuit activity and poor prognosis. Hence we tested the impact of boosting neuronal electrical activity and oxidative metabolism by facilitating mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in a rat model of mTBI. In developing rats (P25-P26) sustaining an mTBI, we demonstrate post-traumatic changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the sensorimotor cortex in response to whisker stimulation compared to sham using functional Laser Doppler Imaging (fLDI) at adulthood (P67-P73). Compared to sham, whisker stimulation-evoked positive CBF responses decreased while negative CBF responses increased in the mTBI animals. The spatiotemporal CBF changes representing underlying neuronal activity suggested profound changes to neurovascular activity after mTBI. Behavioral assessment of the same cohort of animals prior to fLDI showed that mTBI resulted in persistent contralateral sensorimotor behavioral deficit along with ipsilateral neuronal loss compared to sham. Treating mTBI rats with Kaempferol, a dietary flavonol compound that enhanced mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, eliminated the inter-hemispheric asymmetry in the whisker stimulation-induced positive CBF responses and the ipsilateral negative CBF responses otherwise observed in the untreated and vehicle-treated mTBI animals in adulthood. Kaempferol also improved somatosensory behavioral measures compared to untreated and vehicle treated mTBI animals without augmenting post-injury neuronal loss. The results indicate that reduced mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in the surviving populations affect post-traumatic neural activation leading to persistent behavioral deficits. Improvement in sensorimotor behavior and spatiotemporal neurovascular activity following kaempferol

  13. Nanotoxicity of silver nanoparticles to red blood cells: size dependent adsorption, uptake, and hemolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li Qiang; Fang, Li; Ling, Jian; Ding, Cheng Zhi; Kang, Bin; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2015-03-16

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are increasingly being used as antimicrobial agents and drug carriers in biomedical fields. However, toxicological information on their effects on red blood cells (RBCs) and the mechanisms involved remain sparse. In this article, we examined the size dependent nanotoxicity of AgNPs using three different characteristic sizes of 15 nm (AgNPs15), 50 nm (AgNPs50), and 100 nm (AgNPs100) against fish RBCs. Optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy observations showed that AgNPs exhibited a size effect on their adsorption and uptake by RBCs. The middle sized AgNPs50, compared with the smaller or bigger ones, showed the highest level of adsorption and uptake by the RBCs, suggesting an optimal size of ∼50 nm for passive uptake by RBCs. The toxic effects determined based on the hemolysis, membrane injury, lipid peroxidation, and antioxidant enzyme production were fairly size and dose dependent. In particular, the smallest sized AgNPs15 displayed a greater ability to induce hemolysis and membrane damage than AgNPs50 and AgNPs100. Such cytotoxicity induced by AgNPs should be attributed to the direct interaction of the nanoparticle with the RBCs, resulting in the production of oxidative stress, membrane injury, and subsequently hemolysis. Overall, the results suggest that particle size is a critical factor influencing the interaction between AgNPs and the RBCs. PMID:25602487

  14. Constituents from Cistus salvifolius (Cistaceae) activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ but not -δ and stimulate glucose uptake by adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Claudia; Arapogianni, Niki Eliza; Halabalaki, Maria; Hempel, Jana; Hunger, Nicole; Wober, Jannette; Skaltsounis, Alexios Leandros; Vollmer, Günter

    2011-03-01

    A number of medicinal/culinary herbs have been reported to improve glucose metabolism and to yield hypoglycemic effects in patients with diabetes. Since stimulation of insulin sensitivity appears to be a potential mechanism, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ is a likely target molecule for small lipophilic compounds derived from endogenous metabolism and nutrition. Functionally, PPAR γ integrates the control of energy, lipid, and glucose homeostasis. In addition, PPAR δ activity is involved in energy expenditure. Therefore the aim of this study was to investigate whether PPAR γ and PPAR δ as well as the stimulation of glucose uptake is activated by botanical products. CISTUS SALVIFOLIUS (Cistaceae) has been identified as a candidate botanical in a preliminary screening of extracts from medicinal plants of Greek flora. In a bioguided approach, crude extracts, fractions and in the end purified compounds have been evaluated for PPAR γ and PPAR δ specific activities using cell-based transactivation assays. Glucose uptake was measured by nonradioactive 2-[ N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]-2-deoxyglucose (2-NBDG) uptake. Concerning PPAR γ several extracts induced reporter gene activity, and clear dose-response patterns (0.1-100 µg/mL) could be established in the case of the cyclohexane and dichloromethane extracts. Isolation of individual compounds from the cyclohexane extract revealed that at least 6 out of 7 compounds isolated were active with TRANS-cinnamic acid showing a clear dose-response pattern. In contrast, they were found to be inactive on PPAR δ. The same compounds, however, were also active in stimulating glucose uptake into 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In summary, the bioguided fractionation of CISTUS SALVIFOLIUS yields PPAR γ stimulating metabolites with differing chemical natures. In conclusion, PPAR γ represents a candidate molecule for the mediation of improvement of glucose metabolism by botanical/nutritional products

  15. Natural competence and the evolution of DNA uptake specificity.

    PubMed

    Mell, Joshua Chang; Redfield, Rosemary J

    2014-04-01

    Many bacteria are naturally competent, able to actively transport environmental DNA fragments across their cell envelope and into their cytoplasm. Because incoming DNA fragments can recombine with and replace homologous segments of the chromosome, competence provides cells with a potent mechanism of horizontal gene transfer as well as access to the nutrients in extracellular DNA. This review starts with an introductory overview of competence and continues with a detailed consideration of the DNA uptake specificity of competent proteobacteria in the Pasteurellaceae and Neisseriaceae. Species in these distantly related families exhibit strong preferences for genomic DNA from close relatives, a self-specificity arising from the combined effects of biases in the uptake machinery and genomic overrepresentation of the sequences this machinery prefers. Other competent species tested lack obvious uptake bias or uptake sequences, suggesting that strong convergent evolutionary forces have acted on these two families. Recent results show that uptake sequences have multiple "dialects," with clades within each family preferring distinct sequence variants and having corresponding variants enriched in their genomes. Although the genomic consensus uptake sequences are 12 and 29 to 34 bp, uptake assays have found that only central cores of 3 to 4 bp, conserved across dialects, are crucial for uptake. The other bases, which differ between dialects, make weaker individual contributions but have important cooperative interactions. Together, these results make predictions about the mechanism of DNA uptake across the outer membrane, supporting a model for the evolutionary accumulation and stability of uptake sequences and suggesting that uptake biases may be more widespread than currently thought. PMID:24488316

  16. Relative activities on and uptake by human blood platelets of 5-hydroxytryptamine and several analogues

    PubMed Central

    Born, G. V. R.; Juengjaroen, Kanchana; Michal, F.

    1972-01-01

    1. The specificity of platelet receptor sites for 5-HT uptake and for the rapid morphological change and aggregation was investigated with 5-hydroxy-tryptamine (5-HT) and seventeen analogues as well as with some antagonists of 5-HT. 2. The analogues, with the exception of 5-hydroxy-N'N'-dibutyltryptamine, caused the rapid morphological change in platelets. In concentrations below those needed to produce the agonistic action (viz. 0.05-2.0 μM), these analogues themselves inhibited competitively the shape change caused by 5-HT. 3. The velocity of change in shape caused by 5-HT was reduced in low Na media. 4. Ten analogues produced platelet aggregation; three of these, viz. 5-methoxy-α-methyltryptamine, 5-hydroxy-α-methyltryptamine and 5-hydroxy-N'N'-diisopropyltryptamine), were approximately equipotent with 5-HT. Six analogues did not induce platelet aggregation. 5. All the analogues which prevented the initial change in shape of platelets caused by 5-HT also inhibited its aggregating effect, apparently competitively with low Ki values (0.02-1.6 μM). 6. As with the inhibition of shape change, the inhibition of aggregation shows relatively low structural specificity of the receptor site. 7. Methysergide was a potent inhibitor of shape change and aggregation (Ki∼0.03 μM); imipramine was much less inhibitory (Ki∼5-10 μM). 8. Only one analogue (5-hydroxy-α-methyltryptamine) was taken up like 5-HT by platelets. All the other analogues inhibited the uptake of 5-HT by platelets (Ki=0.2-2.7 μM). 9. Methysergide was a weak inhibitor of 5-HT uptake (Ki∼125 μM) whereas imipramine was very effective (Ki∼0.3 μM). 10. Our results show that the initial change in shape of platelets is required for and precedes aggregation. The structural specificity of the platelet receptor concerned with shape change and aggregation caused by 5-HT appears low whereas the uptake mechanism is a highly specific one. The uptake probably proceeds through more than one step, the

  17. Relative activities on and uptake by human blood platelets of 5-hydroxytryptamine and several analogues.

    PubMed

    Born, G V; Juengjaroen, K; Michal, F

    1972-01-01

    1. The specificity of platelet receptor sites for 5-HT uptake and for the rapid morphological change and aggregation was investigated with 5-hydroxy-tryptamine (5-HT) and seventeen analogues as well as with some antagonists of 5-HT.2. The analogues, with the exception of 5-hydroxy-N'N'-dibutyltryptamine, caused the rapid morphological change in platelets. In concentrations below those needed to produce the agonistic action (viz. 0.05-2.0 muM), these analogues themselves inhibited competitively the shape change caused by 5-HT.3. The velocity of change in shape caused by 5-HT was reduced in low Na media.4. Ten analogues produced platelet aggregation; three of these, viz. 5-methoxy-alpha-methyltryptamine, 5-hydroxy-alpha-methyltryptamine and 5-hydroxy-N'N'-diisopropyltryptamine), were approximately equipotent with 5-HT. Six analogues did not induce platelet aggregation.5. All the analogues which prevented the initial change in shape of platelets caused by 5-HT also inhibited its aggregating effect, apparently competitively with low K(i) values (0.02-1.6 muM).6. As with the inhibition of shape change, the inhibition of aggregation shows relatively low structural specificity of the receptor site.7. Methysergide was a potent inhibitor of shape change and aggregation (K(i) approximately 0.03 muM); imipramine was much less inhibitory (K(i) approximately 5-10 muM).8. Only one analogue (5-hydroxy-alpha-methyltryptamine) was taken up like 5-HT by platelets. All the other analogues inhibited the uptake of 5-HT by platelets (K(i)=0.2-2.7 muM).9. Methysergide was a weak inhibitor of 5-HT uptake (K(i) approximately 125 muM) whereas imipramine was very effective (K(i) approximately 0.3 muM).10. Our results show that the initial change in shape of platelets is required for and precedes aggregation. The structural specificity of the platelet receptor concerned with shape change and aggregation caused by 5-HT appears low whereas the uptake mechanism is a highly specific one. The

  18. Identification and Functions of Amino Acid Residues in PotB and PotC Involved in Spermidine Uptake Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Higashi, Kyohei; Sakamaki, Yoshiharu; Herai, Emiko; Demizu, Risa; Uemura, Takeshi; Saroj, Sunil D.; Zenda, Risa; Terui, Yusuke; Nishimura, Kazuhiro; Toida, Toshihiko; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Igarashi, Kazuei

    2010-01-01

    Amino acid residues on PotB and PotC involved in spermidine uptake were identified by random and site-directed mutagenesis. It was found that Trp8, Tyr43, Trp100, Leu110, and Tyr261 in PotB and Trp46, Asp108, Glu169, Ser196, Asp198, and Asp199 in PotC were strongly involved in spermidine uptake and that Tyr160, Glu172, and Leu274 in PotB and Tyr19, Tyr88, Tyr148, Glu160, Leu195, and Tyr211 in PotC were moderately involved in spermidine uptake. Among 11 amino acid residues that were strongly involved in spermidine uptake, Trp8 in PotB was important for insertion of PotB and PotC into membranes. Tyr43, Trp100, and Leu110 in PotB and Trp46, Asp108, Ser196, and Asp198 in PotC were found to be involved in the interaction with PotD. Leu110 and Tyr261 in PotB and Asp108, Asp198, and Asp199 in PotC were involved in the recognition of spermidine, and Trp100 and Tyr261 in PotB and Asp108, Glu169, and Asp198 in PotC were involved in ATPase activity of PotA. Accordingly, Trp100 in PotB was involved in both PotD recognition and ATPase activity, Leu110 in PotB was involved in both PotD and spermidine recognition, and Tyr261 in PotB was involved in both spermidine recognition and ATPase activity. Asp108 and Asp198 in PotC were involved in PotD and spermidine recognition as well as ATPase activity. These results suggest that spermidine passage from PotD to the cytoplasm is coupled to the ATPase activity of PotA through a structural change of PotA by its ATPase activity. PMID:20937813

  19. Esterification of Ginsenoside Rh2 Enhanced Its Cellular Uptake and Antitumor Activity in Human HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fang; Deng, Ze-Yuan; Zhang, Bing; Xiong, Zeng-Xing; Zheng, Shi-Lian; Tan, Chao-Li; Hu, Jiang-Ning

    2016-01-13

    Our previous research had indicated that the octyl ester derivative of ginsenoside Rh2 (Rh2-O) might have a higher bioavailability than Rh2 in the Caco-2 cell line. The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular uptake and antitumor effects of Rh2-O in human HepG2 cells as well as its underlying mechanism compared with Rh2. Results showed that Rh2-O exhibited a higher cellular uptake (63.24%) than Rh2 (36.76%) when incubated with HepG2 cells for 24 h. Rh2-O possessed a dose- and time-dependent inhibitory effect against the proliferation of HepG2 cells. The IC50 value of Rh2-O for inhibition of HepG2 cell proliferation was 20.15 μM, which was roughly half the value of Rh2. Rh2-O induced apoptosis of HepG2 cells through a mitochondrial-mediated intrinsic pathway. In addition, the accumulation of ROS was detected in Rh2-O-treated HepG2 cells, which participated in the apoptosis of HepG2 cells. Conclusively, the findings above all suggested that Rh2-O as well as Rh2 inducing HepG2 cells apoptosis might involve similar mechanisms; however, Rh2-O had better antitumor activities than Rh2, probably due to its higher cellular uptake. PMID:26672619

  20. Uptake and diverse effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on the metabolic activity of Elliptio complanata measured by calorespirometry.

    PubMed

    Cheney, M A; Birdsall, K; Kukor, J J

    2001-05-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are important contaminants of world water resources, with effects on aquatic life. Metabolic responses to short-term acute toxicities of naphthalene, anthracene, and chrysene were investigated in the freshwater bivalve mollusk Elliptio complanata using differential scanning calorespirometry coupled with uptake and scanning electron microscopy. Comparing the uptakes of naphthalene, anthracene, and chrysene with that of inulin, which is known to occupy only extracellular space, showed that all compounds studied were taken up. The PAHs studied had diverse effects on the metabolic activity of E. complanata. Naphthalene and, to a lesser degree, chrysene caused stimulation of heat rates, possibly due to uncoupling of oxidative metabolism. Differential scanning calorespirometry coupled with studies of rates of oxygen consumption by the gill tissue exposed to the PAHs showed similar diverse patterns of respiratory rate stimulation and inhibition. Analysis of results of scanning electron microscopy suggested that irreversible damage to the gill tissue occurred in the presence of anthracene but not in the presence on naphthalene or chrysene. The batch calorespirometric method coupled with uptake and spectroscopy proved to be a useful technique to assess the toxicity of PAHs on the control of energy flux in gills of a freshwater bivalve mollusk. PMID:11337865

  1. RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) depletes nutrients, inducing phosphorylation of AMP-activated kinase in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chengcheng; Hao, Chuncheng; Shao, RuPing; Fang, Bingliang; Correa, Arlene M; Hofstetter, Wayne L; Roth, Jack A; Behrens, Carmen; Kalhor, Neda; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Swisher, Stephen G; Pataer, Apar

    2015-05-10

    We have demonstrated that RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) and its downstream protein p-eIF2α are independent prognostic markers for overall survival in lung cancer. In the current study, we further investigate the interaction between PKR and AMPK in lung tumor tissue and cancer cell lines. We examined PKR protein expression in 55 frozen primary lung tumor tissues by Western blotting and analyzed the association between PKR expression and expression of 139 proteins on tissue samples examined previously by Reverse Phase Protein Array (RPPA) from the same 55 patients. We observed that biomarkers were either positively (phosphorylated AMP-activated kinase(T172) [p-AMPK]) or negatively (insulin receptor substrate 1, meiotic recombination 11, ATR interacting protein, telomerase, checkpoint kinase 1, and cyclin E1) correlated with PKR. We further confirmed that induction of PKR with expression vectors in lung cancer cells causes activation of the AMPK protein independent of the LKB1, TAK1, and CaMKKβ pathway. We found that PKR causes nutrient depletion, which increases AMP levels and decreases ATP levels, causing AMPK phosphorylation. We further demonstrated that inhibiting AMPK expression with compound C or siRNA enhanced PKR-mediated cell death. We next explored the combination of PKR and p-AMPK expression in NSCLC patients and observed that expression of p-AMPK predicted a poor outcome for adenocarcinoma patients with high PKR expression and a better prognosis for those with low PKR expression. These findings were consistent with our in vitro results. AMPK might rescue cells facing metabolic stresses, such as ATP depletion caused by PKR. Our data indicate that PKR causes nutrient depletion, which induces the phosphorylation of AMPK. AMPK might act as a protective response to metabolic stresses, such as nutrient deprivation. PMID:25798539

  2. Endogenous Nitric Oxide Contributes to Bradykinin-Stimulated Glucose Uptake but Attenuates Vascular Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator Release

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Nancy J.

    2010-01-01

    Bradykinin causes vasodilation, stimulates tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) release and, in rodents, increases muscle glucose uptake. Although bradykinin causes vasodilation partly by activating nitric-oxide synthase (NOS), the role of nitric oxide in regulating bradykinin-stimulated t-PA release is uncertain. This study examined the effect of high-dose NOS inhibition on bradykinin-stimulated t-PA release and glucose uptake in humans. We studied 24 healthy (12 women and 12 men), overweight and obese (body mass index >25 kg/m2), normotensive, nondiabetic subjects with normal cholesterol. We measured the effect of intra-arterial Nω-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA, 12 μmol/min) on forearm blood flow (FBF), net t-PA release, and glucose uptake at baseline and in response to intra-arterial bradykinin (50–200 ng/min) in subjects pretreated with the cyclooxygenase inhibitor aspirin. Measurements were repeated after isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN; 5 mg) or sildenafil (50 mg). l-NMMA decreased baseline FBF (P < 0.001), increased baseline forearm vascular resistance (P < 0.001), and increased the t-PA arterial-venous gradient (P = 0.04) without affecting baseline net t-PA release or glucose uptake. During l-NMMA, ISDN tended to decrease baseline net t-PA release (P = 0.06). l-NMMA blunted bradykinin-stimulated vasodilation (P < 0.001 for FBF and FVR). Bradykinin increased net glucose extraction (from −80 ± 23 to −320 ± 97 μg/min/100 ml at 200 ng/min bradykinin, P = 0.02), and l-NMMA (−143 ± 50 μg/min/100 ml at 200 ng/min, P = 0.045) attenuated this effect. In contrast, l-NMMA enhanced bradykinin-stimulated t-PA release (39.9 ± 7.0 ng/min/100 ml versus 30.0 ± 4.2 ng/min/100 ml at 200 ng/min, P = 0.04 for l-NMMA). In gender-stratified analyses, l-NMMA significantly increased bradykinin-stimulated t-PA release in women (F = 6.7, P = 0.02) but not in men. Endogenous NO contributes to bradykinin-stimulated vasodilation and glucose uptake but attenuates the

  3. Effect of Solanum surattense on mitochondrial enzymes in diabetic rats and in vitro glucose uptake activity in L6 myotubes

    PubMed Central

    Sridevi, Muruhan; Kalaiarasi, Pannerselvam; Pugalendi, Kodukkur Viswanathan

    2015-01-01

    Background: S. surattense is widely used in Siddha medicine for various ailments. Objective: The aim was to evaluate the impact of alcoholic leaf-extract of S. surattense on mitochondrial enzymes in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats and to study the in vitro muscle glucose uptake activity on L6 myotubes. Materials and Methods: The male albino Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups of six animals each. Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of STZ (40 mg/kg body weight). After being confirmed the diabetic rats were treated with alcoholic leaf-extract of S. surattense (100 mg/kg body weight) for 45 days. The biochemical estimations (liver mitochondrial enzymes, antioxidants, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances [TBARS]) and histopathological studies were performed. Further, the in vitro muscle glucose uptake activity in L6 myotubes and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4) was performed. Results: In diabetic rats, the activities of liver mitochondrial enzymes were found to be significantly lowered. The mitochondrial TBARS level increased, whereas the activities/level of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants decreased in diabetic rats. Administration of S. surattense to diabetic rats significantly reversed the above parameters toward normalcy. Furthermore in diabetic rats, the histopathological studies showed growth of adipose tissue and shrinkage of islets in the pancreas, liver showed fatty change with mild inflammation of portal triad, and kidney showed messangial capillary proliferation of glomeruli and fatty infiltration of tubules. Treatment with S. surattense brought back these changes to near normalcy. The extract was analyzed for in vitro muscle glucose uptake activity in L6 myotubes and mRNA expression of GLUT-4 by semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. One nano gram per millilitre of S. surattense leaf-extract gave 115% glucose uptake on L6 myotubes. It also showed

  4. Effects of Atrazine, Metolachlor, Carbaryl and Chlorothalonil on Benthic Microbes and Their Nutrient Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Daniel; Bernot, Melody J.

    2014-01-01

    Atrazine, metolachlor, carbaryl, and chlorothalonil are detected in streams throughout the U.S. at concentrations that may have adverse effects on benthic microbes. Sediment samples were exposed to these pesticides to quantify responses of ammonium, nitrate, and phosphate uptake by the benthic microbial community. Control uptake rates of sediments had net remineralization of nitrate (−1.58 NO3 µg gdm−1 h−1), and net assimilation of phosphate (1.34 PO4 µg gdm−1 h−1) and ammonium (0.03 NH4 µg gdm−1 h−1). Metolachlor decreased ammonium and phosphate uptake. Chlorothalonil decreased nitrate remineralization and phosphate uptake. Nitrate, ammonium, and phosphate uptake rates are more pronounced in the presence of these pesticides due to microbial adaptations to toxicants. Our interpretation of pesticide availability based on their water/solid affinities supports no effects for atrazine and carbaryl, decreasing nitrate remineralization, and phosphate assimilation in response to chlorothalonil. Further, decreased ammonium and phosphate uptake in response to metolachlor is likely due to affinity. Because atrazine target autotrophs, and carbaryl synaptic activity, effects on benthic microbes were not hypothesized, consistent with results. Metolachlor and chlorothalonil (non-specific modes of action) had significant effects on sediment microbial nutrient dynamics. Thus, pesticides with a higher affinity to sediments and/or broad modes of action are likely to affect sediment microbes' nutrient dynamics than pesticides dissolved in water or specific modes of action. Predicted nutrient uptake rates were calculated at mean and peak concentrations of metolachlor and chlorothalonil in freshwaters using polynomial equations generated in this experiment. We concluded that in natural ecosystems, peak chlorothalonil and metolachlor concentrations could affect phosphate and ammonium by decreasing net assimilation, and nitrate uptake rates by decreasing remineralization

  5. Bulk chlorine uptake by polyamide active layers of thin-film composite membranes upon exposure to free chlorine-kinetics, mechanisms, and modeling.

    PubMed

    Powell, Joshua; Luh, Jeanne; Coronell, Orlando

    2014-01-01

    We studied the volume-averaged chlorine (Cl) uptake into the bulk region of the aromatic polyamide active layer of a reverse osmosis membrane upon exposure to free chlorine. Volume-averaged measurements were obtained using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry with samples prepared at a range of free chlorine concentrations, exposure times, and mixing, rinsing, and pH conditions. Our volume-averaged measurements complement previous studies that have quantified Cl uptake at the active layer surface (top ≈ 7 nm) and advance the mechanistic understanding of Cl uptake by aromatic polyamide active layers. Our results show that surface Cl uptake is representative of and underestimates volume-averaged Cl uptake under acidic conditions and alkaline conditions, respectively. Our results also support that (i) under acidic conditions, N-chlorination followed by Orton rearrangement is the dominant Cl uptake mechanism with N-chlorination as the rate-limiting step; (ii) under alkaline conditions, N-chlorination and dechlorination of N-chlorinated amide links by hydroxyl ion are the two dominant processes; and (iii) under neutral pH conditions, the rates of N-chlorination and Orton rearrangement are comparable. We propose a kinetic model that satisfactorily describes Cl uptake under acidic and alkaline conditions, with the largest discrepancies between model and experiment occurring under alkaline conditions at relatively high chlorine exposures. PMID:24506252

  6. Genome-wide analysis of SREBP1 activity around the clock reveals its combined dependency on nutrient and circadian signals.

    PubMed

    Gilardi, Federica; Migliavacca, Eugenia; Naldi, Aurélien; Baruchet, Michaël; Canella, Donatella; Le Martelot, Gwendal; Guex, Nicolas; Desvergne, Béatrice

    2014-03-01

    In mammals, the circadian clock allows them to anticipate and adapt physiology around the 24 hours. Conversely, metabolism and food consumption regulate the internal clock, pointing the existence of an intricate relationship between nutrient state and circadian homeostasis that is far from being understood. The Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein 1 (SREBP1) is a key regulator of lipid homeostasis. Hepatic SREBP1 function is influenced by the nutrient-response cycle, but also by the circadian machinery. To systematically understand how the interplay of circadian clock and nutrient-driven rhythm regulates SREBP1 activity, we evaluated the genome-wide binding of SREBP1 to its targets throughout the day in C57BL/6 mice. The recruitment of SREBP1 to the DNA showed a highly circadian behaviour, with a maximum during the fed status. However, the temporal expression of SREBP1 targets was not always synchronized with its binding pattern. In particular, different expression phases were observed for SREBP1 target genes depending on their function, suggesting the involvement of other transcription factors in their regulation. Binding sites for Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4 (HNF4) were specifically enriched in the close proximity of SREBP1 peaks of genes, whose expression was shifted by about 8 hours with respect to SREBP1 binding. Thus, the cross-talk between hepatic HNF4 and SREBP1 may underlie the expression timing of this subgroup of SREBP1 targets. Interestingly, the proper temporal expression profile of these genes was dramatically changed in Bmal1-/- mice upon time-restricted feeding, for which a rhythmic, but slightly delayed, binding of SREBP1 was maintained. Collectively, our results show that besides the nutrient-driven regulation of SREBP1 nuclear translocation, a second layer of modulation of SREBP1 transcriptional activity, strongly dependent from the circadian clock, exists. This system allows us to fine tune the expression timing of SREBP1 target genes, thus

  7. In-stream biotic control on nutrient biogeochemistry in a forested sheadwater tream, West Fork of Walker Branch

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Brian J; Mulholland, Patrick J

    2007-01-01

    A growing body of evidence demonstrates the importance of in-stream processing in regulating nutrient export, yet the influence of temporal variability in stream metabolism on net nutrient uptake has not been explicitly addressed. Streamwater DIN and SRP concentrations in Walker Branch, a first-order deciduous forest stream in eastern Tennessee, show a repeated pattern of annual maxima in summer and biannual minima in spring and autumn. Temporal variations in catchment hydrologic flowpaths result in lower winter and higher summer nutrient concentrations, but do not explain the spring and autumn nutrient minima. Ambient nutrient uptake rates were measured 2-3 times per week over an 18-mo period and compared to daily rates of gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (ER) to examine the influence of in-stream biotic activity on nutrient export. GPP and ER rates explained 85% of the variation in net DIN retention with high net NO3- uptake (and lower net NH4+ release) rates occurring during spring and autumn and net DIN release in summer. Diel nutrient concentration patterns were examined several times throughout the year to determine the relative importance of autotrophic and heterotrophic activity on net nutrient uptake. High spring GPP corresponded to daily decreases in NO3- over the illuminated hours resulting in high diel NO3- amplitude which dampened as the canopy closed. GPP explained 91% of the variance in diel NO3- amplitude. In contrast, the autumn nutrient minima was largely explained by heterotrophic respiration since GPP remained low and little diel NO3- variation was observed during the autumn.

  8. Effects of wheat straw incorporation on the availability of soil nutrients and enzyme activities in semiarid areas.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ting; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Ke; Ding, Ruixia; Yang, Baoping; Nie, Junfeng; Jia, Zhikuan; Han, Qingfang

    2015-01-01

    Soil infertility is the main barrier to dryland agricultural production in China. To provide a basis for the establishment of a soil amelioration technical system for rainfed fields in the semiarid area of northwest China, we conducted a four-year (2007-2011) field experiment to determine the effects of wheat straw incorporation on the arid soil nutrient levels of cropland cultivated with winter wheat after different straw incorporation levels. Three wheat straw incorporation levels were tested (H: 9000 kg hm(-2), M: 6000 kg hm(-2), and L: 3000 kg hm(-2)) and no straw incorporation was used as the control (CK). The levels of soil nutrients, soil organic carbon (SOC), soil labile organic carbon (LOC), and enzyme activities were analyzed each year after the wheat harvest. After straw incorporation for four years, the results showed that variable straw amounts had different effects on the soil fertility indices, where treatment H had the greatest effect. Compared with CK, the average soil available N, available P, available K, SOC, and LOC levels were higher in the 0-40 cm soil layers after straw incorporation treatments, i.e., 9.1-30.5%, 9.8-69.5%, 10.3-27.3%, 0.7-23.4%, and 44.4-49.4% higher, respectively. On average, the urease, phosphatase, and invertase levels in the 0-40 cm soil layers were 24.4-31.3%, 9.9-36.4%, and 42.9-65.3% higher, respectively. Higher yields coupled with higher nutrient contents were achieved with H, M and L compared with CK, where these treatments increased the crop yields by 26.75%, 21.51%, and 7.15%, respectively. PMID:25880452

  9. Effects of Wheat Straw Incorporation on the Availability of Soil Nutrients and Enzyme Activities in Semiarid Areas

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ting; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Ke; Ding, Ruixia; Yang, Baoping; Nie, Junfeng; Jia, Zhikuan; Han, Qingfang

    2015-01-01

    Soil infertility is the main barrier to dryland agricultural production in China. To provide a basis for the establishment of a soil amelioration technical system for rainfed fields in the semiarid area of northwest China, we conducted a four—year (2007–2011) field experiment to determine the effects of wheat straw incorporation on the arid soil nutrient levels of cropland cultivated with winter wheat after different straw incorporation levels. Three wheat straw incorporation levels were tested (H: 9000 kg hm-2, M: 6000 kg hm-2, and L: 3000 kg hm-2) and no straw incorporation was used as the control (CK). The levels of soil nutrients, soil organic carbon (SOC), soil labile organic carbon (LOC), and enzyme activities were analyzed each year after the wheat harvest. After straw incorporation for four years, the results showed that variable straw amounts had different effects on the soil fertility indices, where treatment H had the greatest effect. Compared with CK, the average soil available N, available P, available K, SOC, and LOC levels were higher in the 0–40 cm soil layers after straw incorporation treatments, i.e., 9.1–30.5%, 9.8–69.5%, 10.3–27.3%, 0.7–23.4%, and 44.4–49.4% higher, respectively. On average, the urease, phosphatase, and invertase levels in the 0–40 cm soil layers were 24.4–31.3%, 9.9–36.4%, and 42.9–65.3% higher, respectively. Higher yields coupled with higher nutrient contents were achieved with H, M and L compared with CK, where these treatments increased the crop yields by 26.75%, 21.51%, and 7.15%, respectively. PMID:25880452

  10. Effects of elevated CO2 on the photosynthesis and nitrate reductase activity of Pyropia haitanensis (Bangiales, Rhodophyta) grown at different nutrient levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunxiang; Zou, Dinghui

    2015-03-01

    Pyropia haitanensis, a commercially important species, was cultured at two CO2 concentrations (390×10-6 and 700×10-6 (parts per million)) and at low and high nutrient levels, to explore the effect of elevated CO2 on the species under nutrient enrichment. Results show that in CO2-enriched thalli, relative growth rate (RGR) was enhanced under nutrient enrichment. Elevated CO2 decreased phycobiliprotein (PB) contents, but increased the contents of soluble carbohydrates. Nutrient enrichment increased the contents of chlorophyll a (Chl a) and PB, while soluble carbohydrate content decreased. CO2 enrichment enhanced the relative maximum electronic transport rate and light saturation point. In nutrient-enriched thalli the activity of nitrate reductase (NRA) increased under elevated CO2. An instantaneous pH change in seawater (from 8.1 to 9.6) resulted in reduction of NRA, and the thalli grown under both elevated CO2 and nutrient enrichment exhibited less pronounced reduction than in algae grown at the ambient CO2. The thermal optima of NRA under elevated CO2 and/or nutrient enrichment shifted to a lower temperature (10-15°C) compared to that in ambient conditions (20°C). We propose that accelerated photosynthesis could result in growth increment. N assimilation remained high in acidified seawater and reflected increased temperature sensitivity in response to elevated CO2 and eutrophication.

  11. Methylglyoxal and carboxyethyllysine reduce glutamate uptake and S100B secretion in the hippocampus independently of RAGE activation.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Fernanda; Battú, Cíntia Eickhoff; Dutra, Márcio Ferreira; Galland, Fabiana; Lirio, Franciane; Broetto, Núbia; Nardin, Patrícia; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes is a metabolic disease characterized by high fasting-glucose levels. Diabetic complications have been associated with hyperglycemia and high levels of reactive compounds, such as methylglyoxal (MG) and advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) formation derived from glucose. Diabetic patients have a higher risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease. Herein, we examined the effect of high glucose, MG and carboxyethyllysine (CEL), a MG-derived AGE of lysine, on oxidative, metabolic and astrocyte-specific parameters in acute hippocampal slices, and investigated some of the mechanisms that could mediate these effects. Glucose, MG and CEL did not alter reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, glucose uptake or glutamine synthetase activity. However, glutamate uptake and S100B secretion were decreased after MG and CEL exposure. RAGE activation and glycation reactions, examined by aminoguanidine and L-lysine co-incubation, did not mediate these changes. Acute MG and CEL exposure, but not glucose, were able to induce similar effects on hippocampal slices, suggesting that conditions of high glucose concentrations are primarily toxic by elevating the rates of these glycation compounds, such as MG, and by generation of protein cross-links. Alterations in the secretion of S100B and the glutamatergic activity mediated by MG and AGEs can contribute to the brain dysfunction observed in diabetic patients. PMID:26347375

  12. Glyphosate-based herbicides reduce the activity and reproduction of earthworms and lead to increased soil nutrient concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Gaupp-Berghausen, Mailin; Hofer, Martin; Rewald, Boris; Zaller, Johann G.

    2015-01-01

    Herbicide use is increasing worldwide both in agriculture and private gardens. However, our knowledge of potential side-effects on non-target soil organisms, even on such eminent ones as earthworms, is still very scarce. In a greenhouse experiment, we assessed the impact of the most widely used glyphosate-based herbicide Roundup on two earthworm species with different feeding strategies. We demonstrate, that the surface casting activity of vertically burrowing earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris) almost ceased three weeks after herbicide application, while the activity of soil dwelling earthworms (Aporrectodea caliginosa) was not affected. Reproduction of the soil dwellers was reduced by 56% within three months after herbicide application. Herbicide application led to increased soil concentrations of nitrate by 1592% and phosphate by 127%, pointing to potential risks for nutrient leaching into streams, lakes, or groundwater aquifers. These sizeable herbicide-induced impacts on agroecosystems are particularly worrisome because these herbicides have been globally used for decades. PMID:26243044

  13. Glyphosate-based herbicides reduce the activity and reproduction of earthworms and lead to increased soil nutrient concentrations.

    PubMed

    Gaupp-Berghausen, Mailin; Hofer, Martin; Rewald, Boris; Zaller, Johann G

    2015-01-01

    Herbicide use is increasing worldwide both in agriculture and private gardens. However, our knowledge of potential side-effects on non-target soil organisms, even on such eminent ones as earthworms, is still very scarce. In a greenhouse experiment, we assessed the impact of the most widely used glyphosate-based herbicide Roundup on two earthworm species with different feeding strategies. We demonstrate, that the surface casting activity of vertically burrowing earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris) almost ceased three weeks after herbicide application, while the activity of soil dwelling earthworms (Aporrectodea caliginosa) was not affected. Reproduction of the soil dwellers was reduced by 56% within three months after herbicide application. Herbicide application led to increased soil concentrations of nitrate by 1592% and phosphate by 127%, pointing to potential risks for nutrient leaching into streams, lakes, or groundwater aquifers. These sizeable herbicide-induced impacts on agroecosystems are particularly worrisome because these herbicides have been globally used for decades. PMID:26243044

  14. Influence of biologically-active substances on {sup 137}Cs and heavy metals uptake by Barley plant

    SciTech Connect

    Kruglov, Stanislav; Filipas, Alexander

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: When solving the problem of contaminated agricultural lands rehabilitation, most of attention is concentrated on the effective means which allow the obtaining of ecologically safe production. The minimization of radionuclides and heavy metals (HM) content in farm products on the basis of their migration characteristics in agro-landscapes and with the regard for different factors influencing contaminants behavior in the soil-plant system is of great significance. Our investigation has shown that the effect of biologically active substances (BAS) using for seeds treatment on {sup 137}Cs transfer to barley grown on Cd contaminated soil was dependent on their properties and dosage, characteristics of soil contamination and biological peculiarities of plants, including stage of plants development. Seeds treatment by plant growth regulator Zircon resulted in a significant increase in {sup 137}Cs activity in harvest (40- 50%), increase in K concentration and significant reduction in Ca concentration. Increased Cd content in soil reduced {sup 137}Cs transfer to barley plants by 30-60% (p<0,05) and Zircon application further reduced its concentration. Ambiol and El also reduced {sup 137}Cs uptake by roots and Cd and Pb phyto-toxicity. The experimental data do not make it possible to link the BAS effect on inhibition of {sup 137}Cs absorption by plants directly with their influence on HM phyto-toxicity. The dependence of Concentration Ratio of {sup 137}Cs on the Ambiol and El dose was not proportional and the most significant decrease in the radionuclide uptake by plants was reported with the use of dose showing the most pronounced stimulating effect on the barley growth and development. The pre-sowing seed treatment with Ambiol increased Pb absorption by 35-50% and, on the contrary, decreased Cd uptake by plants by 30-40%. (authors)

  15. Unraveling characteristics of nutrient removal and microbial community in a novel aerated landscape - Activated sludge ecological system.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jun-Ming; Hu, Miao-Miao; Sun, Rong; Chen, Bor-Yann

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a novel landscape-activated sludge ecological system (LASeM) was constructed with the advantages of promising treatment, less land need and significant landscape services. Compared to literature, this study provided promising integrated wastewater treatment and landscape for wastewater treatment. This first-attempt study clearly deciphered interactive effect of aeration rate (AR) on nutrient removal and microbial community structure in LASeM. When AR was 0.016m(3)h(-1), the most appropriate removal of COD, NH4(+)-N and TP were 96%, 97% and 74% with the effluent of 14.3, 1.7 and 0.7mgL(-1), respectively, which showed satisfactory capabilities for rural domestic wastewater treatment. According to clone library analysis, Proteobacteria (71%), Bacteroidetes (17%) were found to be the dominant bacterial phylums present in LASeM for biodegradation. In particular, the incorporation of plants altered the microbial community and strengthened capability for the nutrients removal likely due to synergistic interactions among species in the ecosystem. PMID:27111873

  16. [Vertical distribution and relationship between 210Pb(ex) activities and nutrients in sediment cores of two different eutrophication level lakes].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Lei; Yang, Hao; Gu, Zhu-Jun; Zhang, Ming-Li

    2014-07-01

    The 210Pb(ex) activities and nutrient (TOC, TN and TP) contents in sediment cores of Fuxian Lake and Dianchi Lake were measured by traditional methods, as well as their vertical distribution and relationship were also comparatively analyzed in this paper. The study results indicated that the vertical distributions of 210Pb(ex) and nutrients were significantly different between Fuxian Lake and Dianchi Lake. The variation amplitude of 210Pb(ex) activities in Dianchi Lake was higher than that in Fuxian Lake. The disordered distribution characteristics of 210Pb(ex) in Dianchi Lake surface sediments were closely related to physicochemical migration of lead caused by human activities. The variation trends of nutrients in sediment cores were corresponded to local natural evolution and human activities in different historical periods. Relationship between 210Pb(ex) activities and nutrients were mainly affected by the nutrition level of lakes. The greater the lake eutrophication level was, the stronger the correlation was found. To the individual nutrient indicators, similar characteristics were shown in the two lakes, and the order was TOC > TP > TN. PMID:25244838

  17. Nutrient Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrient management has been defined as “the science and art directed to link soil, crop, weather and hydrologic factors with cultural, irrigation and soil and water conservation practices to achieve the goals of optimizing nutrient use efficiency, yields, crop quality, and economic returns, while r...

  18. Nutrient management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrient management has been defined as “the science and art directed to link soil, crop, weather and hydrologic factors with cultural, irrigation and soil and water conservation practices to achieve the goals of optimizing nutrient use efficiency, yields, crop quality, and economic returns, while r...

  19. Nutrient cycling.

    PubMed

    Bormann, F H; Likens, G E

    1967-01-27

    The small-watershed approach to problems of nutrient cycling has these advantages. (i) The small watershed is a natural unit of suitable size for intensive study of nutrient cycling at the ecosystem level. (ii) It provides a means of reducing to a minimum, or virtually eliminating, the effect of the difficult-to-measure variables of geologic input and nutrient losses in deep seepage. Control of these variables makes possible accurate measurement of nutrient input and output (erosion) and therefore establishes the relationship of the smaller ecosystem to the larger biospheric cycles. (iii) The small-watershed approach provides a method whereby such important parameters as nutrient release from minerals (weathering) and annual nutrient budgets may be calculated. (iv) It provides a means of studying the interrelationships between the biota and the hydrologic cycle, various nutrient cycles, and energy flow in a single system. (v) Finally, with the small-watershed system we can test the effect of various land-management practices or environmental pollutants on nutrient cycling in natural systems. PMID:17737551

  20. Activation of the Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway alone is not sufficient to induce glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed Central

    van den Berghe, N; Ouwens, D M; Maassen, J A; van Mackelenbergh, M G; Sips, H C; Krans, H M

    1994-01-01

    The signal transduction pathway by which insulin stimulates glucose transport is largely unknown, but a role for tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases has been proposed. Since mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase is activated by insulin through phosphorylation on both tyrosine and threonine residues, we investigated whether MAP kinase and its upstream regulator, p21ras, are involved in insulin-mediated glucose transport. We did this by examining the time- and dose-dependent stimulation of glucose uptake in relation to the activation of Ras-GTP formation and MAP kinase by thrombin, epidermal growth factor (EGF), and insulin in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Ras-GTP formation was stimulated transiently by all three agonists, with a peak at 5 to 10 min. Thrombin induced a second peak at approximately 30 min. The activation of p21ras was paralleled by both the phosphorylation and the activation of MAP kinase: transient for insulin and EGF and biphasic for thrombin. However, despite the strong activation of Ras-GTP formation and MAP kinase by EGF and thrombin, glucose uptake was not stimulated by these agonists, in contrast to the eightfold stimulation of 2-deoxy-D-[14C]glucose uptake by insulin. In addition, insulin-mediated glucose transport was not potentiated by thrombin or EGF. Although these results cannot exclude the possibility that p21ras and/or MAP kinase is needed in conjunction with other signaling molecules that are activated by insulin and not by thrombin or EGF, they show that the Ras/MAP kinase signaling pathway alone is not sufficient to induce insulin-mediated glucose transport. Images PMID:7511205

  1. Structure-activity relations of leucine derivatives reveal critical moieties for cellular uptake and activation of mTORC1-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Nagamori, Shushi; Wiriyasermkul, Pattama; Okuda, Suguru; Kojima, Naoto; Hari, Yoshiyuki; Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Mori, Yasuo; Tominaga, Hideyuki; Ohgaki, Ryuichi; Kanai, Yoshikatsu

    2016-04-01

    Among amino acids, leucine is a potential signaling molecule to regulate cell growth and metabolism by activating mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). To reveal the critical structures of leucine molecule to activate mTORC1, we examined the structure-activity relationships of leucine derivatives in HeLa S3 cells for cellular uptake and for the induction of phosphorylation of p70 ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (p70S6K), a downstream effector of mTORC1. The activation of mTORC1 by leucine and its derivatives was the consequence of two successive events: the cellular uptake by L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) responsible for leucine uptake in HeLa S3 cells and the activation of mTORC1 following the transport. The structural requirement for the recognition by LAT1 was to have carbonyl oxygen, alkoxy oxygen of carboxyl group, amino group and hydrophobic side chain. In contrast, the requirement for mTORC1 activation was more rigorous. It additionally required fixed distance between carbonyl oxygen and alkoxy oxygen of carboxyl group, and amino group positioned at α-carbon. L-Configuration in chirality and appropriate length of side chain with a terminal isopropyl group were also important. This confirmed that LAT1 itself is not a leucine sensor. Some specialized leucine sensing mechanism with rigorous requirement for agonistic structures should exist inside the cells because leucine derivatives not transported by LAT1 did not activate mTORC1. Because LAT1-mTOR axis is involved in the regulation of cell growth and cancer progression, the results from this study may provide a new insight into therapeutics targeting both LAT1 and leucine sensor. PMID:26724922

  2. Noscapine chemosensitization enhances docetaxel anticancer activity and nanocarrier uptake in triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Doddapaneni, Ravi; Patel, Ketan; Chowdhury, Nusrat; Singh, Mandip

    2016-08-01

    Chemosensitization and enhanced delivery to solid tumor are widely explored strategies to augment the anticancer efficacy of existing chemotherapeutics agents. The aim of current research was to investigate the role of low dose Noscapine (Nos) in potentiating docetaxel cytotoxicity and enhancing tumor penetration of nanocarriers. The objectives are; (1) To evaluate the chemo-sensitizing effect of Nos in combination with docetaxel (DTX), and to elucidate the possible mechanism (2) To investigate the effect of low dose Nos on tumor stroma and enhancing nanocarrier uptake in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) bearing nude mice. Cytotoxicity and flow cytometry analysis of DTX in Nos (4µM) pre-treated MDA-MB-231 cells showed 3.0-fold increase in cell killing and 30% increase in number of late apoptotic cells, respectively. Stress transducer p38 phosphorylation was significantly upregulated with Nos exposure. DTX showed remarkable downregulation in expression of bcl-2, survivin and pAKT in Nos pre-treated MDA-MB-231 cells. Nos pre-sensitization significantly (p<0.02) enhanced the anti-migration effect of DTX. In vivo studies in orthotopic TNBC tumor bearing mice showed marked reduction in tumor collagen-I levels and significantly (p<0.03) higher intra-tumoral uptake of coumarin-6 loaded PEGylated liposomes (7-fold) in Nos treated group. Chemo-sensitization and anti-fibrotic effect of Nos could be a promising approach to increase anticancer efficacy of DTX which can be used for other nanomedicinal products. PMID:27177833

  3. Uncoupling of attenuated myo-(3H)inositol uptake and dysfunction in Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase pumping activity in hypergalactosemic cultured bovine lens epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cammarata, P.R.; Tse, D.; Yorio, T. )

    1991-06-01

    Attenuation of both the active transport of myo-inositol and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase pumping activity has been implicated in the onset of sugar cataract and other diabetic complications in cell culture and animal models of the disease. Cultured bovine lens epithelial cells (BLECs) maintained in galactose-free Eagle's minimal essential medium (MEM) or 40 mM galactose with and without sorbinil for up to 5 days were examined to determine the temporal effects of hypergalactosemia on Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase and myo-inositol uptake. The Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase pumping activity after 5 days of continuous exposure to galactose did not change, as demonstrated by 86Rb uptake. The uptake of myo-(3H)inositol was lowered after 20 h of incubation in galactose and remained below that of the control throughout the 5-day exposure period. The coadministration of sorbinil to the galactose medium normalized the myo-(3H)inositol uptake. No significant difference in the rates of passive efflux of myo-(3H)inositol or 86Rb from preloaded galactose-treated and control cultures was observed. Culture-media reversal studies were also carried out to determine whether the galactose-induced dysfunction in myo-inositol uptake could be corrected. BLECs were incubated in galactose for 5 days, then changed to galactose-free physiological medium with and without sorbinil for a 1-day recovery period. myo-Inositol uptake was reduced to 34% of control after 6 days of continuous exposure to galactose. Within 24 h of media reversal, myo-inositol uptake returned to or exceeded control values in BLECs switched to either MEM or MEM with sorbinil.2+ reversible and occurred independently of changes in Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase pumping activity in cultured lens epithelium, indicating that the two parameters are not strictly associated and that the deficit in myo-inositol uptake occurs rapidly during hypergalactosemia.

  4. Where do the Nutrients go in Tropical Estuaries?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, R., VI

    2015-12-01

    Anthropogenic inputs of nutrients to the estuaries have rapidly increased during last couple of decades, resulting in deterioration of coastal water quality at regional scales. It is imperative to assess and quantify the ability of coastal systems to utilize, transport, and transform the 'excess' dissolved nutrients that enter the coast via land based activities. A LOICZ biogeochemical mass budget model was applied to the largest Indian estuary - the Ganges (Hooghly). Model studies indicate that despite high nutrient concentrations, the estuary remained net heterotrophic throughout the year. However if suspended particulate matter (SPM) was considered while estimating net metabolism, the system was net autotrophic. This model clearly highlights the influence of adsorption and desorption of nutrient and buffering action of SPM on nutrient dynamics under varying environmental conditions. Case studies from estuaries (e.g. Godavari and Tapi) and lagoon systems(Chilika and Vembanad) of India with differing levels of discharge and pollution were studied to determine the role of SPM on the trophic shift of these systems. Biogeochemical mass budget for all the systems suggested that in spite of high nutrient availability, high load of SPM (>100 mg L-1) controlled the trophic state and nutrient dynamics of a system. Indian estuaries and lagoons are predominantly heterotrophic, due to increasing anthrpogenic pressures from land based nutrient loading. The lagoon systems such as Chilika and Vembanad were predominantly heterotrophic and are a major source of phosphorus to the coastal waters. Overall, the source/sink characteristics of a system with respect to the adjacent coastal ocean were dependent on the in-situ biogeochemical processes (release, uptake and burial) and the residence time. The results further suggest that Hooghly estuary acts as a conduit of land-derived nutrients to the coastal ocean.

  5. Cellular Uptake and Ultrastructural Localization Underlie the Pro-apoptotic Activity of a Hydrocarbon-stapled BIM BH3 Peptide.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Amanda L; Wachter, Franziska; Lammert, Margaret; Huhn, Annissa J; Luccarelli, James; Bird, Gregory H; Walensky, Loren D

    2015-09-18

    Hydrocarbon stapling has been applied to restore and stabilize the α-helical structure of bioactive peptides for biochemical, structural, cellular, and in vivo studies. The peptide sequence, in addition to the composition and location of the installed staple, can dramatically influence the properties of stapled peptides. As a result, constructs that appear similar can have distinct functions and utilities. Here, we perform a side-by-side comparison of stapled peptides modeled after the pro-apoptotic BIM BH3 helix to highlight these principles. We confirm that replacing a salt-bridge with an i, i + 4 hydrocarbon staple does not impair target binding affinity and instead can yield a biologically and pharmacologically enhanced α-helical peptide ligand. Importantly, we demonstrate by electron microscopy that the pro-apoptotic activity of a stapled BIM BH3 helix correlates with its capacity to achieve cellular uptake without membrane disruption and accumulate at the organellar site of mechanistic activity. PMID:26151238

  6. The relationship between skeletal muscle mitochondrial citrate synthase activity and whole body oxygen uptake adaptations in response to exercise training

    PubMed Central

    Vigelsø, Andreas; Andersen, Nynne B; Dela, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    Citrate synthase (CS) activity is a validated biomarker for mitochondrial density in skeletal muscle. CS activity is also used as a biochemical marker of the skeletal muscle oxidative adaptation to a training intervention, and a relationship between changes in whole body aerobic capacity and changes in CS activity is often assumed. However, this relationship and absolute values of CS and maximal oxygen uptake (V.O2max) has never been assessed across different studies. A systematic PubMed search on literature published from 1983 to 2013 was performed. The search profile included: citrate, synthase, human, skeletal, muscle, training, not electrical stimulation, not in-vitro, not rats. Studies that reported changes in CS activity and V.O2max were included. Different training types and subject populations were analyzed independently to assess correlation between relative changes in V.O2max and CS activity. 70 publications with 97 intervention groups were included. There was a positive (r = 0.45) correlation (P < 0.001) between the relative change in V.O2max and the relative change in CS activity. All reported absolute values of CS and V.O2max did not correlate (r =- 0.07, n = 148, P = 0.4). Training induced changes in whole body oxidative capacity is matched by changes in muscle CS activity in a nearly 1:1 relationship. Absolute values of CS across different studies cannot be compared unless a standardized analytical method is used by all laboratories. PMID:25057335

  7. Uptake of poly-dispersed single-walled carbon nanotubes and decline of functions in mouse NK cells undergoing activation.

    PubMed

    Alam, Anwar; Puri, Niti; Saxena, Rajiv K

    2016-09-01

    The interaction of poly-dispersed acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (AF-SWCNT) with NK cells undergoing activation was examined. Exposure to AF-SWCNT during NK activation in vitro by interleukin (IL)-2, and in vivo by Poly(I:C) significantly lowered cytotoxic activity generated against YAC-1 tumor cells. Recoveries of spleen NK1.1(+) cells as well as the activated subset of NK cells (NK1.1(+)CD69(+) cells) were significantly reduced by the AF-SWCNT exposure. The proportion of apoptotic NK cells (NK1.1(+) phosphatidylserine(+)) in the spleen cell preparations activated in vitro was also significantly elevated. Expression levels of CD107a [for assessing NK cell degranulation] as well as of FasL marker [mediating non-secretory pathway of NK cell killing] were significantly lower in cells exposed to AF-SWCNT during the activation phase. Intracellular levels of interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in the cells were also significantly reduced. Fluorescent AF-SWCNT (FAF-SWCNT) were internalized by the NK cells and uptake was significantly greater in activated cells. Confocal microscopy indicated the internalized FAF-SWCNT were localized to the cytoplasm of the NK cells. These results indicated that AF-SWCNT were internalized by NK cells and caused a general down-regulation of a variety of parameters associated with NK cell cytotoxicity and other cellular functions. PMID:27416475

  8. Histamine H3 receptor activation inhibits dopamine synthesis but not release or uptake in rat nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Aquino-Miranda, Guillermo; Escamilla-Sánchez, Juan; González-Pantoja, Raúl; Bueno-Nava, Antonio; Arias-Montaño, José-Antonio

    2016-07-01

    We studied the effect of activating histamine H3 receptors (H3Rs) on rat nucleus accumbens (rNAcc) dopaminergic transmission by analyzing [(3)H]-dopamine uptake by synaptosomes, and dopamine synthesis and depolarization-evoked [(3)H]-dopamine release in slices. The uptake of [(3)H]-dopamine by rNAcc synaptosomes was not affected by the H3R agonist RAMH (10(-10)-10(-6) M). In rNAcc slices perfusion with RAMH (1 μM) had no significant effect on [(3)H]-dopamine release evoked by depolarization with 30 mM K(+) (91.4 ± 4.5% of controls). The blockade of dopamine D2 autoreceptors with sulpiride (1 μM) enhanced K(+)-evoked [(3)H]-dopamine release (168.8 ± 15.5% of controls), but under this condition RAMH (1 μM) also failed to affect [(3)H]-dopamine release. Dopamine synthesis was evaluated in rNAcc slices incubated with the l-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) decarboxylase inhibitor NSD-1015 (1 mM). Forskolin-induced DOPA accumulation (220.1 ± 10.4% of controls) was significantly reduced by RAMH (41.1 ± 6.5% and 43.5 ± 9.1% inhibition at 100 nM and 1 μM, respectively), and this effect was prevented by the H3R antagonist ciproxifan (10 μM). DOPA accumulation induced by preventing cAMP degradation with IBMX (iso-butyl-methylxantine, 1 mM) or by activating receptors for the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)/pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) with PACAP-27 (1 μM) was reduced (IBMX) or prevented (PACAP-27) by RAMH (100 nM). In contrast, DOPA accumulation induced by 8-Bromo-cAMP (1 mM) was not affected by RAMH (100 nM). These results indicate that in rNAcc H3Rs do not modulate dopamine uptake or release, but regulate dopamine synthesis by inhibiting cAMP formation and thus PKA activation. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Histamine Receptors'. PMID:26169221

  9. Environmental impacts of anthropogenic activities on the mineral uptake in Oreochromis mossambicus from Indus River in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Jabeen, Farhat; Chaudhry, Abdul Shakoor

    2010-07-01

    We examined the extent of mineral uptake in different tissues of Oreochromis mossambicus from Indus River which is claimed to be polluted by human activities. Samples of water and fish tissues were analysed from two sites (SK = upstream and CH = downstream) of Indus River. Whilst the water quality appeared to be suitable for aquatic life, significant differences between fish tissues and sampling sites were observed for different mineral concentrations. Fins generally had the highest metal load followed by muscles, gills, scales and skin. Na, Mg, Mn and Zn concentrations in different fish tissues were greater for CH than SK, whereas K, Ca, Pb, Cu, Fe, Hg and Cr were higher at SK than CH (P < 0.001). This variation in metal profiles of different locations of the Indus River was a reflection of relevant mineral pollutions at these sites. It appeared that the pattern of metal uptake in fish tissues can be utilised as an indicator of environmental contamination of river water systems. These studies may help us plan strategies to alleviate the ecotoxicological impacts of heavy metals in freshwaters on fish and human populations. PMID:19533396

  10. Fructose Promotes Uptake and Activity of Oligonucleotides With Different Chemistries in a Context-dependent Manner in mdx Mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, Limin; Han, Gang; Lin, Caorui; Gu, Ben; Gao, Xianjun; Moulton, Hong M; Seow, Yiqi; Yin, HaiFang

    2016-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotide (AO)-mediated exon-skipping therapeutics shows great promise in correcting frame-disrupting mutations in the DMD gene for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. However, insufficient systemic delivery limits clinical adoption. Previously, we showed that a glucose/fructose mixture augmented AO delivery to muscle in mdx mice. Here, we evaluated if fructose alone could enhance the activities of AOs with different chemistries in mdx mice. The results demonstrated that fructose improved the potency of AOs tested with the greatest effect on phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO), resulted in a 4.25-fold increase in the number of dystrophin-positive fibres, compared to PMO in saline in mdx mice. Systemic injection of lissamine-labeled PMO with fructose at 25 mg/kg led to increased uptake and elevated dystrophin expression in peripheral muscles, compared to PMO in saline, suggesting that fructose potentiates PMO by enhancing uptake. Repeated intravenous administration of PMO in fructose at 50 mg/kg/week for 3 weeks and 50 mg/kg/month for 5 months restored up to 20% of wild-type dystrophin levels in skeletal muscles with improved functions without detectable toxicity, compared to untreated mdx controls. Collectively, we show that fructose can potentiate AOs of different chemistries in vivo although the effect diminished over repeated administration. PMID:27351681

  11. Measurement of gas/water uptake coefficients for trace gases active in the marine environment

    SciTech Connect

    Davidovits, P. . Dept. of Chemistry); Worsnop, D.W.; Zahniser, M.S.; Kolb, C.E. . Center for Chemical and Environmental Physics)

    1992-02-01

    Ocean produced reduced sulfur compounds including dimethylsulfide (DMS), hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}), methyl mercaptan (CH{sub 3}CH) and carbonyl sulfide (OCS) deliver a sulfur burden to the atmosphere which is roughly equal to sulfur oxides produced by fossil fuel combustion. These species and their oxidation products dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl sulfone (DMSO{sub 2}) and methane sulfonic acid (MSA) dominate aerosol and CCN production in clean marine air. Furthermore, oxidation of reduced sulfur species will be strongly influenced by NO{sub x}/O{sub 3} chemistry in marine atmospheres. The multiphase chemical processes for these species must be understood in order to study the evolving role of combustion produced sulfur oxides over the oceans. We have measured the chemical and physical parameters affecting the uptake of reduced sulfur compounds, their oxidation products, ozone, and nitrogen oxides by the ocean's surface, and marine clouds, fogs, and aerosols. These parameters include: gas/surface mass accommodation coefficients; physical and chemically modified (effective) Henry's law constants; and surface and liquid phase reaction constants. These parameters are critical to understanding both the interaction of gaseous trace species with cloud and fog droplets and the deposition of trace gaseous species to dew covered, fresh water and marine surfaces.

  12. Uptake of Optional Activities Leads to Improved Performance in a Biomedical Sciences Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verkade, Heather; Lim, Saw Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Optional (non-assessed) learning activities are a learning tool that may help students achieve their desired grade, or help students with lower levels of previous experience in the topic. This study examines the implementation of, and outcomes from, two optional activities, one online and one paper-based. The activities complemented the lectures…

  13. Substrate uptake tests and quantitative FISH show differences in kinetic growth of bulking and non-bulking activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Lou, Inchio; de Los Reyes, Francis L

    2005-12-20

    The competition between filaments and floc formers in activated sludge has been historically described using kinetic selection. However, recent studies have suggested that bacterial storage may also be an important factor in microbial selection, since the dynamic nature of substrate flows into wastewater treatment plants elicit transient responses from microorganisms. Respirometry-based kinetic selection should thus be reevaluated by considering cell storage, and a more reliable method should be developed to include bacterial storage in the analysis of growth of filaments and floc formers in activated sludge. In this study, we applied substrate uptake tests combined with metabolic modeling to determine the growth rates, yields and maintenance coefficients of bulking and non-bulking activated sludge developed in lab scale reactors under feast and famine conditions. The results of quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) showed that the filaments Eikelboom Type 1851, Type 021N, and Thiothrix nivea were dominant in bulking sludge, comprising 42.0 % of mixed liquor volatile suspended solids (MLVSS), with 61.6% of the total filament length extending from flocs into bulk solution. Only low levels of Type 1851 filament length (4.9% of MLVSS) occurred in non-bulking sludge, 83.0% of which grew inside the flocs. The kinetic parameters determined from the substrate uptake tests were consistent with those from respirometry and showed that filamentous bulking sludge had lower growth rates and maintenance coefficients than non-bulking sludge. These results provide support for growth kinetic differences in explaining the competitive strategy of filamentous bacteria. PMID:16155949

  14. Multifunctional Hyaluronic Acid and Chondroitin Sulfate Nanoparticles: Impact of Glycosaminoglycan Presentation on Receptor Mediated Cellular Uptake and Immune Activation.

    PubMed

    Oommen, Oommen P; Duehrkop, Claudia; Nilsson, Bo; Hilborn, Jöns; Varghese, Oommen P

    2016-08-17

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) polymers are extensively used for various biomedical applications, such as for tissue engineering, drug delivery, and gene delivery. Although both these biopolymers are known to target cell surface CD44 receptors, their relative cellular targeting properties and immune activation potential have never been evaluated. In this article, we present the synthesis and characterization of novel self-assembled supramolecular HA and CS nanoparticles (NPs). These NPs were developed using fluorescein as a hydrophobic component that induced amphiphilicity in biopolymers and also efficiently stabilized anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) promoting a near zero-order drug release. The cellular uptake and cytotoxicity studies of these NPs in different human cancer lines, namely, human colorectal carcinoma cell line HCT116 and human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 demonstrated dose dependent cytotoxicity. Interestingly, both NPs showed CD44 dependent cellular uptake with the CS-DOX NP displaying higher dose-dependent cytotoxicity than the HA-DOX NP in different mammalian cells tested. Immunological evaluation of these nanocarriers in an ex vivo human whole blood model revealed that unlike unmodified polymers, the HA NP and CS NP surprisingly showed platelet aggregation and thrombin-antithrombin complex formation at high concentrations (0.8 mg/mL). We also observed a clear difference in early- and late-stage complement activation (C3a and sC5b-9) with CS and CS NP triggering significant complement activation at high concentrations (0.08-0.8 mg/mL), unlike HA and HA NP. These results offer new insight into designing glycosaminoglycan-based NPs and understanding their hematological responses and targeting ability. PMID:27468113

  15. Mice expressing markedly reduced striatal dopamine transporters exhibit increased locomotor activity, dopamine uptake turnover rate, and cocaine responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Rao, Anjali; Sorkin, Alexander; Zahniser, Nancy R

    2013-10-01

    Variations in the expression levels of the dopamine transporter (DAT) can influence responsiveness to psychostimulant drugs like cocaine. To better understand this relationship, we studied a new DAT-low expresser (DAT-LE) mouse model and performed behavioral and biochemical studies with it. Immunoblotting and [(3) H]WIN 35,428 binding analyses revealed that these mice express ∼35% of wildtype (WT) mouse striatal DAT levels. Compared to WT mice, DAT-LE mice were hyperactive in a novel open-field environment. Despite their higher basal locomotor activity, cocaine (10 or 20 mg/kg, i.p.) induced greater locomotor activation in DAT-LE mice than in WT mice. The maximal velocity (Vmax ) of DAT-mediated [(3) H]DA uptake into striatal synaptosomes was reduced by 46% in DAT-LE mice, as compared to WT. Overall, considering the reduced number of DAT binding sites (Bmax ) along with the reduced Vmax in DAT-LE mice, a 2-fold increase in DA uptake turnover rate (Vmax /Bmax ) was found, relative to WT mice. This suggests that neuroadaptive changes have occurred in the DAT-LE mice that would help to compensate for their low DAT numbers. Interestingly, these changes do not include a reduction in tyrosine hydroxylase levels, as was previously reported in DAT knockout homozygous and heterozygous animals. Further, these changes are not sufficient to prevent elevated novelty- and cocaine-induced locomotor activity. Hence, these mice represent a unique model for studying changes of in vivo DAT function and regulation that result from markedly reduced levels of DAT expression. PMID:23564231

  16. Effect of alkyl glycerophosphate on the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and glucose uptake in C2C12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukahara, Tamotsu; Haniu, Hisao; Matsuda, Yoshikazu

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: •Alkyl-LPA specifically interacts with PPARγ. •Alkyl-LPA treatments induces lipid accumulation in C2C12 cells. •Alkyl-LPA enhanced glucose uptake in C2C12 cells. •Alkyl-LPA-treated C2C12 cells express increased amounts of GLUT4 mRNA. •Alkyl-LPA is a novel therapeutic agent that can be used for the treatment of obesity and diabetes. -- Abstract: Studies on the effects of lipids on skeletal muscle cells rarely examine the effects of lysophospholipids. Through our recent studies, we identified select forms of phospholipids, such as alkyl-LPA, as ligands for the intracellular receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). PPARγ is a nuclear hormone receptor implicated in many human diseases, including diabetes and obesity. We previously showed that alkyl-LPA is a specific agonist of PPARγ. However, the mechanism by which the alkyl-LPA–PPARγ axis affects skeletal muscle cells is poorly defined. Our objective in the present study was to determine whether alkyl-LPA and PPARγ activation promotes glucose uptake in skeletal muscle cells. Our findings indicate that PPARγ1 mRNA is more abundant than PPARγ2 mRNA in C2C12 cells. We showed that alkyl-LPA (3 μM) significantly activated PPARγ and increased intracellular glucose levels in skeletal muscle cells. We also showed that incubation of C2C12 cells with alkyl-LPA led to lipid accumulation in the cells. These findings suggest that alkyl-LPA activates PPARγ and stimulates glucose uptake in the absence of insulin in C2C12 cells. This may contribute to the plasma glucose-lowering effect in the treatment of insulin resistance.

  17. Molecularly distinct routes of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake are activated depending on the activity of the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA).

    PubMed

    Waldeck-Weiermair, Markus; Deak, András T; Groschner, Lukas N; Alam, Muhammad Rizwan; Jean-Quartier, Claire; Malli, Roland; Graier, Wolfgang F

    2013-05-24

    The transfer of Ca(2+) across the inner mitochondrial membrane is an important physiological process linked to the regulation of metabolism, signal transduction, and cell death. While the definite molecular composition of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake sites remains unknown, several proteins of the inner mitochondrial membrane, that are likely to accomplish mitochondrial Ca(2+) fluxes, have been described: the novel uncoupling proteins 2 and 3, the leucine zipper-EF-hand containing transmembrane protein 1 and the mitochondrial calcium uniporter. It is unclear whether these proteins contribute to one unique mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake pathway or establish distinct routes for mitochondrial Ca(2+) sequestration. In this study, we show that a modulation of Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum by inhibition of the sarco/endoplasmatic reticulum ATPase modifies cytosolic Ca(2+) signals and consequently switches mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake from an uncoupling protein 3- and mitochondrial calcium uniporter-dependent, but leucine zipper-EF-hand containing transmembrane protein 1-independent to a leucine zipper-EF-hand containing transmembrane protein 1- and mitochondrial calcium uniporter-mediated, but uncoupling protein 3-independent pathway. Thus, the activity of sarco/endoplasmatic reticulum ATPase is significant for the mode of mitochondrial Ca(2+) sequestration and determines which mitochondrial proteins might actually accomplish the transfer of Ca(2+) across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Moreover, our findings herein support the existence of distinct mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake routes that might be essential to ensure an efficient ion transfer into mitochondria despite heterogeneous cytosolic Ca(2+) rises. PMID:23592775

  18. Are Nutrient Stresses Associated with Enantioselectivity of the Chiral Herbicide Imazethapyr in Arabidopsis thaliana?

    PubMed

    Chen, Zunwei; Chen, Hui; Zou, Yuqin; Qiu, Jiguo; Wen, Yuezhong; Xu, Dongmei

    2015-12-01

    Plant growth can be inhibited by herbicides and is strongly limited by the availability of nutrients, which can influence human health through the food chain. Until now, however, cross talk between the enantioselectivity of herbicides and nutrient stresses has been poorly understood. We analyzed trace element and macroelement contents in shoots of Arabidopsis thaliana treated by the chiral herbicide imazethapyr (IM) and observed that multiple-nutrient stress (trace elements Mn, Cu, and Fe and macroelements P, K, Ca, and Mg) was enantioselective. The (R)-IM treatments resulted in Mn 23.37%, Cu 63.53%, P 30.61%, K 63.70%, Ca 34.32%, and Mg 36.14% decreases compared with the control. Interestingly, it was also found that herbicidally active (R)-IM induced notable aggregation of nutrient elements in leaves and roots compared with the control and (S)-IM. Through gene expression analyses, it was found that herbicidally active (R)-IM induced the up- or down-regulation of genes involved in the transport of nutrient elements. We propose that (R)-IM affected the uptake and translocation of nutrient elements in A. thaliana, which destroyed the balance of nutrient elements in the plant. This finding reminds us to reconsider the effect of nutrient stresses in risk assessment of herbicides. PMID:26566036

  19. Community structure and activity of a highly dynamic and nutrient-limited hypersaline microbial mat in Um Alhool Sabkha, Qatar.

    PubMed

    Al-Thani, Roda; Al-Najjar, Mohammad A A; Al-Raei, Abdul Munem; Ferdelman, Tim; Thang, Nguyen M; Al Shaikh, Ismail; Al-Ansi, Mehsin; de Beer, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    The Um Alhool area in Qatar is a dynamic evaporative ecosystem that receives seawater from below as it is surrounded by sand dunes. We investigated the chemical composition, the microbial activity and biodiversity of the four main layers (L1-L4) in the photosynthetic mats. Chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentration and distribution (measured by HPLC and hyperspectral imaging, respectively), the phycocyanin distribution (scanned with hyperspectral imaging), oxygenic photosynthesis (determined by microsensor), and the abundance of photosynthetic microorganisms (from 16S and 18S rRNA sequencing) decreased with depth in the euphotic layer (L1). Incident irradiance exponentially attenuated in the same zone reaching 1% at 1.7-mm depth. Proteobacteria dominated all layers of the mat (24%-42% of the identified bacteria). Anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria (dominated by Chloroflexus) were most abundant in the third red layer of the mat (L3), evidenced by the spectral signature of Bacteriochlorophyll as well as by sequencing. The deep, black layer (L4) was dominated by sulfate reducing bacteria belonging to the Deltaproteobacteria, which were responsible for high sulfate reduction rates (measured using 35S tracer). Members of Halobacteria were the dominant Archaea in all layers of the mat (92%-97%), whereas Nematodes were the main Eukaryotes (up to 87%). Primary productivity rates of Um Alhool mat were similar to those of other hypersaline microbial mats. However, sulfate reduction rates were relatively low, indicating that oxygenic respiration contributes more to organic material degradation than sulfate reduction, because of bioturbation. Although Um Alhool hypersaline mat is a nutrient-limited ecosystem, it is interestingly dynamic and phylogenetically highly diverse. All its components work in a highly efficient and synchronized way to compensate for the lack of nutrient supply provided during regular inundation periods. PMID:24658360

  20. Community Structure and Activity of a Highly Dynamic and Nutrient-Limited Hypersaline Microbial Mat in Um Alhool Sabkha, Qatar

    PubMed Central

    Al-Thani, Roda; Al-Najjar, Mohammad A. A.; Al-Raei, Abdul Munem; Ferdelman, Tim; Thang, Nguyen M.; Shaikh, Ismail Al; Al-Ansi, Mehsin; de Beer, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    The Um Alhool area in Qatar is a dynamic evaporative ecosystem that receives seawater from below as it is surrounded by sand dunes. We investigated the chemical composition, the microbial activity and biodiversity of the four main layers (L1–L4) in the photosynthetic mats. Chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentration and distribution (measured by HPLC and hyperspectral imaging, respectively), the phycocyanin distribution (scanned with hyperspectral imaging), oxygenic photosynthesis (determined by microsensor), and the abundance of photosynthetic microorganisms (from 16S and 18S rRNA sequencing) decreased with depth in the euphotic layer (L1). Incident irradiance exponentially attenuated in the same zone reaching 1% at 1.7-mm depth. Proteobacteria dominated all layers of the mat (24%–42% of the identified bacteria). Anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria (dominated by Chloroflexus) were most abundant in the third red layer of the mat (L3), evidenced by the spectral signature of Bacteriochlorophyll as well as by sequencing. The deep, black layer (L4) was dominated by sulfate reducing bacteria belonging to the Deltaproteobacteria, which were responsible for high sulfate reduction rates (measured using 35S tracer). Members of Halobacteria were the dominant Archaea in all layers of the mat (92%–97%), whereas Nematodes were the main Eukaryotes (up to 87%). Primary productivity rates of Um Alhool mat were similar to those of other hypersaline microbial mats. However, sulfate reduction rates were relatively low, indicating that oxygenic respiration contributes more to organic material degradation than sulfate reduction, because of bioturbation. Although Um Alhool hypersaline mat is a nutrient-limited ecosystem, it is interestingly dynamic and phylogenetically highly diverse. All its components work in a highly efficient and synchronized way to compensate for the lack of nutrient supply provided during regular inundation periods. PMID:24658360

  1. Conservation tillage, optimal water and organic nutrient supply enhance soil microbial activities during wheat (Triticum Aestivum L.) cultivation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pankaj; Singh, Geeta; Singh, Rana P.

    2011-01-01

    The field experiments were conducted on sandy loam soil at New Delhi, during 2007 and 2008 to investigate the effect of conservation tillage, irrigation regimes (sub-optimal, optimal and supra-optimal water regimes), and integrated nutrient management (INM) practices on soil biological parameters in wheat cultivation. The conservation tillage soils has shown significant (p<0.05) increase in soil respiration (81.1%), soil microbial biomass carbon (SMBC) (104%) and soil dehydrogenase (DH) (59.2%) compared to the conventional tillage soil. Optimum water supply (3-irrigations) enhanced soil respiration over sub-optimum and supra-optimum irrigations by 13.32% and 79% respectively. Soil dehydrogenase (DH) activity in optimum water regime has also increased by 23.33% and 8.18% respectively over the other two irrigation regimes. Similarly, SMBC has also increased by 12.14% and 27.17% respectively in soil with optimum water supply compared to that of sub-optimum and supra-optimum water regime fields. The maximum increase in soil microbial activities is found when sole organic source (50% Farm Yard Manure+25% biofertilizer+25% Green Manure) has been used in combination with the conservation tillage and the optimum water supply. Study demonstrated that microbial activity could be regulated by tillage, water and nitrogen management in the soil in a sustainable manner. PMID:24031665

  2. The Impact of Injections of Different Nutrients on the Bacterial Community and Its Dechlorination Activity in Chloroethene-Contaminated Groundwater

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Takamasa; Yamazoe, Atsushi; Ito, Masako; Ohji, Shoko; Hosoyama, Akira; Takahata, Yoh; Fujita, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Dehalococcoides spp. are currently the only organisms known to completely reduce cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) and vinyl chloride (VC) to non-toxic ethene. However, the activation of fermenting bacteria that generate acetate, hydrogen, and CO2 is considered necessary to enhance the dechlorination activity of Dehalococcoides and enable the complete dechlorination of chloroethenes. In the present study, we stimulated chloroethene-contaminated groundwater by injecting different nutrients prepared from yeast extract or polylactate ester using a semicontinuous culture system. We then evaluated changes in the bacterial community structure and their relationship with dechlorination activity during the biostimulation. The populations of Dehalococcoides and the phyla Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Spirochaetes increased in the yeast extract-amended cultures and chloroethenes were completely dechlorinated. However, the phylum Proteobacteria was dominant in polylactate ester-amended cultures, in which almost no cis-DCE and VC were dechlorinated. These results provide fundamental information regarding possible interactions among bacterial community members involved in the dechlorination process and support the design of successful biostimulation strategies. PMID:25877696

  3. Screening of medicinal plants for PPPAR-alpha and PPAR-gamma activation and evaluation of their effects on glucose uptake and 3T3-L1 adipogenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Medicinal plants are a rich source of ligands for nuclear receptors. The present study was aimed to screen a collection of plant extracts for PPAR-alpha/gamma activating properties and identify the active extract that can stimulate cellular glucose uptake without enhancing the adipogenesis. A report...

  4. Nutrient Limitation in Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM): Phytoplankton Communities and Photosynthesis Respond to Nutrient Pulse

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yan; Quigg, Antonietta

    2014-01-01

    Although the Mississippi-Atchafalaya River system exports large amounts of nutrients to the Northern Gulf of Mexico annually, nutrient limitation of primary productivity still occurs offshore, acting as one of the major factors controlling local phytoplankton biomass and community structure. Bioassays were conducted for 48 hrs at two stations adjacent to the river plumes in April and August 2012. High Performance of Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) combined with ChemTax and a Fluorescence Induction and Relaxation (FIRe) system were combined to observe changes in the phytoplankton community structure and photosynthetic activity. Major fluorescence parameters (Fo, Fv/Fm) performed well to reveal the stimulating effect of the treatments with nitrogen (N-nitrate) and with nitrogen plus phosphate (+NPi). HPLC/ChemTax results showed that phytoplankton community structure shifted with nitrate addition: we observed an increase in the proportion of diatoms and prasinophytes and a decrease in cyanobacteria and prymnesiophytes. These findings are consistent with predictions from trait-based analysis which predict that phytoplankton groups with high maximum growth rates (μmax) and high nutrient uptake rates (Vmax) readily take advantage of the addition of limiting nutrients. Changes in phytoplankton community structure, if persistent, could trigger changes of particular organic matter fluxes and alter the micro-food web cycles and bottom oxygen consumption. PMID:24551144

  5. Diphenyl diselenide elicits antidepressant-like activity in rats exposed to monosodium glutamate: A contribution of serotonin uptake and Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Quines, Caroline B; Rosa, Suzan G; Velasquez, Daniela; Da Rocha, Juliana T; Neto, José S S; Nogueira, Cristina W

    2016-03-15

    Depression is a disorder with symptoms manifested at the psychological, behavioral and physiological levels. Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is the most widely used additive in the food industry; however, some adverse effects induced by this additive have been demonstrated in experimental animals and humans, including functional and behavioral alterations. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible antidepressant-like effect of diphenyl diselenide (PhSe)2, an organoselenium compound with pharmacological properties already documented, in the depressive-like behavior induced by MSG in rats. Male and female newborn Wistar rats were divided in control and MSG groups, which received, respectively, a daily subcutaneous injection of saline (0.9%) or MSG (4g/kg/day) from the 1st to 5th postnatal day. At 60th day of life, animals received (PhSe)2 (10mg/kg, intragastrically) 25min before spontaneous locomotor and forced swimming tests (FST). The cerebral cortices of rats were removed to determine [(3)H] serotonin (5-HT) uptake and Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity. A single administration of (PhSe)2 was effective against locomotor hyperactivity caused by MSG in rats. (PhSe)2 treatment protected against the increase in the immobility time and a decrease in the latency for the first episode of immobility in the FST induced by MSG. Furthermore, (PhSe)2 reduced the [(3)H] 5-HT uptake and restored Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity altered by MSG. In the present study a single administration of (PhSe)2 elicited an antidepressant-like effect and decrease the synaptosomal [(3)H] 5-HT uptake and an increase in the Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity in MSG-treated rats. PMID:26738966

  6. Identification of active denitrifiers in full-scale nutrient removal wastewater treatment systems.

    PubMed

    McIlroy, Simon Jon; Starnawska, Anna; Starnawski, Piotr; Saunders, Aaron Marc; Nierychlo, Marta; Nielsen, Per Halkjaer; Nielsen, Jeppe Lund

    2016-01-01

    Denitrification is essential to the removal of nitrogen from wastewater during treatment, yet an understanding of the diversity of the active denitrifying bacteria responsible in full-scale wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is lacking. In this study, stable-isotope probing (SIP) was applied in combination with microautoradiography (MAR)-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to identify previously unrecognized active denitrifying phylotypes in a full-scale WWTP with biological N and P removal. Acknowledging that different denitrifiers will have specific carbon source preferences, a fully (13)C-labelled complex substrate was used for SIP incubations, under nitrite-reducing conditions, in order to maximize the capture of the potentially metabolically diverse denitrifiers likely present. Members of the Rhodoferax, Dechloromonas, Sulfuritalea, Haliangium and Thermomonas were represented in the 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from DNA enriched in (13)C, with FISH probes optimized here for their in situ characterization. FISH and MAR confirmed that they were all active denitrifiers in the community. The combined approach of SIP and MAR-FISH represents an excellent approach for identifying and characterizing an un-described diversity of active denitrifiers in full-scale systems. PMID:25181571

  7. Potassium uptake supporting plant growth in the absence of AKT1 channel activity: Inhibition by ammonium and stimulation by sodium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalding, E. P.; Hirsch, R. E.; Lewis, D. R.; Qi, Z.; Sussman, M. R.; Lewis, B. D.

    1999-01-01

    A transferred-DNA insertion mutant of Arabidopsis that lacks AKT1 inward-rectifying K+ channel activity in root cells was obtained previously by a reverse-genetic strategy, enabling a dissection of the K+-uptake apparatus of the root into AKT1 and non-AKT1 components. Membrane potential measurements in root cells demonstrated that the AKT1 component of the wild-type K+ permeability was between 55 and 63% when external [K+] was between 10 and 1,000 microM, and NH4+ was absent. NH4+ specifically inhibited the non-AKT1 component, apparently by competing for K+ binding sites on the transporter(s). This inhibition by NH4+ had significant consequences for akt1 plants: K+ permeability, 86Rb+ fluxes into roots, seed germination, and seedling growth rate of the mutant were each similarly inhibited by NH4+. Wild-type plants were much more resistant to NH4+. Thus, AKT1 channels conduct the K+ influx necessary for the growth of Arabidopsis embryos and seedlings in conditions that block the non-AKT1 mechanism. In contrast to the effects of NH4+, Na+ and H+ significantly stimulated the non-AKT1 portion of the K+ permeability. Stimulation of akt1 growth rate by Na+, a predicted consequence of the previous result, was observed when external [K+] was 10 microM. Collectively, these results indicate that the AKT1 channel is an important component of the K+ uptake apparatus supporting growth, even in the "high-affinity" range of K+ concentrations. In the absence of AKT1 channel activity, an NH4+-sensitive, Na+/H+-stimulated mechanism can suffice.

  8. Chiral Ruthenium(II) Polypyridyl Complexes: Stabilization of G-Quadruplex DNA, Inhibition of Telomerase Activity and Cellular Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qianqian; Liu, Yanan; Wang, Chuan; Sun, Dongdong; Yang, Xingcheng; Liu, Yanyu; Liu, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Two ruthenium(II) complexes, Λ-[Ru(phen)2(p-HPIP)]2+ and Δ-[Ru(phen)2(p-HPIP)]2+, were synthesized and characterized via proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, and circular dichroism spectroscopy. This study aims to clarify the anticancer effect of metal complexes as novel and potent telomerase inhibitors and cellular nucleus target drug. First, the chiral selectivity of the compounds and their ability to stabilize quadruplex DNA were studied via absorption and emission analyses, circular dichroism spectroscopy, fluorescence-resonance energy transfer melting assay, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and polymerase chain reaction stop assay. The two chiral compounds selectively induced and stabilized the G-quadruplex of telomeric DNA with or without metal cations. These results provide new insights into the development of chiral anticancer agents for G-quadruplex DNA targeting. Telomerase repeat amplification protocol reveals the higher inhibitory activity of Λ-[Ru(phen)2(p-HPIP)]2+ against telomerase, suggesting that Λ-[Ru(phen)2(p-HPIP)]2+ may be a potential telomerase inhibitor for cancer chemotherapy. MTT assay results show that these chiral complexes have significant antitumor activities in HepG2 cells. More interestingly, cellular uptake and laser-scanning confocal microscopic studies reveal the efficient uptake of Λ-[Ru(phen)2(p-HPIP)]2+ by HepG2 cells. This complex then enters the cytoplasm and tends to accumulate in the nucleus. This nuclear penetration of the ruthenium complexes and their subsequent accumulation are associated with the chirality of the isomers as well as with the subtle environment of the ruthenium complexes. Therefore, the nucleus can be the cellular target of chiral ruthenium complexes for anticancer therapy. PMID:23236402

  9. Anti-glioma activity and the mechanism of cellular uptake of asiatic acid-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Garanti, Tanem; Stasik, Aneta; Burrow, Andrea Julie; Alhnan, Mohamed A; Wan, Ka-Wai

    2016-03-16

    Asiatic acid (AA), a pentacyclic triterpene found in Centella Asiatica, has shown neuroprotective and anti-cancer activity against glioma. However, owing to its poor aqueous solubility, effective delivery and absorption across biological barriers, in particular the blood brain barrier (BBB), are challenging. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) have shown a promising potential as a drug delivery system to carry lipophilic drugs across the BBB, a major obstacle in brain cancer therapy. Nevertheless, limited information is available about the cytotoxic mechanisms of nano-lipidic carriers with AA on normal and glioma cells. This study assessed the anti-cancer efficacy of AA-loaded SLNs against glioblastoma and their cellular uptake mechanism in comparison with SVG P12 (human foetal glial) cells. SLNs were systematically investigated for three different solid lipids; glyceryl monostearate (MS), glyceryl distearate (DS) and glyceryl tristearate (TS). The non-drug containing MS-SLNs (E-MS-SLNs) did not show any apparent toxicity towards normal SVG P12 cells, whilst the AA-loaded MS-SLNs (AA-MS-SLNs) displayed a more favourable drug release profile and higher cytotoxicity towards U87 MG cells. Therefore, MS-SLNs were chosen for further in vitro studies. Cytotoxicity studies of SLNs (± AA) were performed using MTT assay where AA-SLNs showed significantly higher cytotoxicity towards U87 MG cells than SVG P12 normal cells, as confirmed by flow cell cytometry. Cellular uptake of SLNs also appeared to be preferentially facilitated by energy-dependent endocytosis as evidenced by fluorescence imaging and flow cell cytometry. Using the Annexin V-PI double staining technique, it was found that these AA-MS-SLNs displayed concentration-dependent apoptotic activity on glioma cells, which further confirms the potential of exploiting these AA-loaded MS-SLNs for brain cancer therapy. PMID:26775062

  10. Effects of carbohydrate on the internal oxygen concentration, oxygen uptake, and nitrogenase activity in detached pea nodules

    SciTech Connect

    Monroe, J.D. ); LaRue, T.A. )

    1989-10-01

    The interaction between carbon substrates and O{sub 2} and their effects on nitrogenase activity (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) were examined in detached nodules of pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Sparkle). The internal O{sub 2} concentration was estimated from the fractional oxygenation of leghemoglobin measured by reflectance spectroscopy. Lowering the endogenous carbohydrate content of nodules by excising the shoots 16 hours before nodule harvest or by incubating detached nodules at 100 kPa O{sub 2} for 2 hours resulted in a 2- to 10-fold increase in internal O{sub 2}, and a decline in nitrogenase activity. Conversely, when detached nodules were supplied with 100 millimolar succinate, the internal O{sub 2} was lowered. Nitrogenase activity was stimulated by succinate but only at high external O{sub 2}. Oxygen uptake increased linearly with external O{sub 2} but was affected only slightly by the carbon treatments. The apparent diffusion resistance in the nodule cortex was similar in all of the treatments. Carbon substrates can thus affect nitrogenase activity indirectly by affecting the O{sub 2} concentration within detached nodules.

  11. The Effects of Heat Activation on Bacillus Spore Germination, with Nutrients or under High Pressure, with or without Various Germination Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Stephanie; Cruz-Mora, Jose; Setlow, Barbara; Feeherry, Florence E.; Doona, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Nutrient germination of spores of Bacillus species occurs through germinant receptors (GRs) in spores' inner membrane (IM) in a process stimulated by sublethal heat activation. Bacillus subtilis spores maximum germination rates via different GRs required different 75°C heat activation times: 15 min for l-valine germination via the GerA GR and 4 h for germination with the l-asparagine–glucose–fructose–K+ mixture via the GerB and GerK GRs, with GerK requiring the most heat activation. In some cases, optimal heat activation decreased nutrient concentrations for half-maximal germination rates. Germination of spores via various GRs by high pressure (HP) of 150 MPa exhibited heat activation requirements similar to those of nutrient germination, and the loss of the GerD protein, required for optimal GR function, did not eliminate heat activation requirements for maximal germination rates. These results are consistent with heat activation acting primarily on GRs. However, (i) heat activation had no effects on GR or GerD protein conformation, as probed by biotinylation by an external reagent; (ii) spores prepared at low and high temperatures that affect spores' IM properties exhibited large differences in heat activation requirements for nutrient germination; and (iii) spore germination by 550 MPa of HP was also affected by heat activation, but the effects were relatively GR independent. The last results are consistent with heat activation affecting spores' IM and only indirectly affecting GRs. The 150- and 550-MPa HP germinations of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens spores, a potential surrogate for Clostridium botulinum spores in HP treatments of foods, were also stimulated by heat activation. PMID:25681191

  12. Effect of nutrient limitation on biofilm formation and phosphatase activity of a Citrobacter sp.

    PubMed

    Allan, Victoria J M; Callow, Maureen E; Macaskie, Lynne E; Paterson-Beedle, Marion

    2002-01-01

    A phosphatase-overproducing Citrobacter sp. (NCIMB 40259) was grown in an air-lift reactor in steady-state continuous culture under limitation of carbon, phosphorus or nitrogen. Substantial biofilm formation, and the highest phosphatase activity, were observed under lactose limitation. However, the total amount of biofilm wet biomass and the phosphatase specific activity were reduced in phosphorus- or nitrogen-limited cultures or when glucose was substituted for lactose as the limiting carbon source. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) showed differences in cell and biofilm morphology in relation to medium composition. Electron microscopy suggested that the differences in biofilm formation may relate to differential expression of fimbriae on the cell surface. PMID:11782520

  13. Changes in Nutrient Composition, Antioxidant Properties, and Enzymes Activities of Snake Tomato (Trichosanthes cucumerina) during Ripening.

    PubMed

    Badejo, Adebanjo Ayobamidele; Adebowale, Adeyemi Philips; Enujiugha, Victor Ndigwe

    2016-06-01

    Snake tomato (Trichosanthes cucumerina) has been cultivated and used as a replacement for Lycopersicum esculentum in many Asian and African diets. Matured T. cucumerina fruits were harvested at different ripening stages and separated into coats and pulps for analyses to determine their suitability for use in culinary. They were analyzed for the nutritional composition and antioxidant potential using different biochemical assays [1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, 2,2'-azinobis( 3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radical scavenging activities, and ferric reducing antioxidant power] and antioxidative enzymes activities. The nutritional composition revealed that T. cucumerina contains over 80% water and is very rich in fiber, thus it can serve as a good natural laxative. The lycopene and β-carotene contents were especially high in the ripe pulp with values of 21.62±1.22 and 3.96±0.14 mg/100 g, respectively. The ascorbic acid content was highest in the pulp of unripe fruit with a value of 56.58±1.08 mg/100 g and significantly (P<0.05) decreased as ripening progressed. The antioxidant potential of the fruits for the 3 assays showed that unripe pulp> ripe coat> ripe pulp> unripe coat. There were decreases in the antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, and glutathione reductase) activities, with the exception of catalase, as ripening progressed in the fruits. These decreased activities may lead to the softening of the fruit during ripening. Harnessing the antioxidative potential of T. cucumerina in culinary through consumption of the coats and pulps will alleviate food insecurity and help maintain good health among many dwellers in sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia. PMID:27390724

  14. Changes in Nutrient Composition, Antioxidant Properties, and Enzymes Activities of Snake Tomato (Trichosanthes cucumerina) during Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Badejo, Adebanjo Ayobamidele; Adebowale, Adeyemi Philips; Enujiugha, Victor Ndigwe

    2016-01-01

    Snake tomato (Trichosanthes cucumerina) has been cultivated and used as a replacement for Lycopersicum esculentum in many Asian and African diets. Matured T. cucumerina fruits were harvested at different ripening stages and separated into coats and pulps for analyses to determine their suitability for use in culinary. They were analyzed for the nutritional composition and antioxidant potential using different biochemical assays [1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, 2,2′-azinobis( 3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radical scavenging activities, and ferric reducing antioxidant power] and antioxidative enzymes activities. The nutritional composition revealed that T. cucumerina contains over 80% water and is very rich in fiber, thus it can serve as a good natural laxative. The lycopene and β-carotene contents were especially high in the ripe pulp with values of 21.62±1.22 and 3.96±0.14 mg/100 g, respectively. The ascorbic acid content was highest in the pulp of unripe fruit with a value of 56.58±1.08 mg/100 g and significantly (P<0.05) decreased as ripening progressed. The antioxidant potential of the fruits for the 3 assays showed that unripe pulp> ripe coat> ripe pulp> unripe coat. There were decreases in the antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, and glutathione reductase) activities, with the exception of catalase, as ripening progressed in the fruits. These decreased activities may lead to the softening of the fruit during ripening. Harnessing the antioxidative potential of T. cucumerina in culinary through consumption of the coats and pulps will alleviate food insecurity and help maintain good health among many dwellers in sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia. PMID:27390724

  15. Antiproliferative Activity of Triterpene Glycoside Nutrient from Monk Fruit in Colorectal Cancer and Throat Cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Can; Dai, Longhai; Liu, Yueping; Rong, Long; Dou, Dequan; Sun, Yuanxia; Ma, Lanqing

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer and throat cancer are the world's most prevalent neoplastic diseases, and a serious threat to human health. Plant triterpene glycosides have demonstrated antitumor activity. In this study, we investigated potential anticancer effects of mogroside IVe, a triterpenoid glycoside from monk fruit, using in vitro and in vivo models of colorectal and laryngeal cancer. The effects of mogroside IVe on the proliferation of colorectal cancer HT29 cells and throat cancer Hep-2 cells were determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, and the expression levels of p53, phosphorylated ERK1/2, and MMP-9 were analyzed by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. The results indicated that mogroside IVe inhibited, in a dose-dependent manner, the proliferation of HT29 and Hep-2 cells in culture and in xenografted mice, which was accompanied by the upregulation of tumor suppressor p53, and downregulation of matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9) and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK)1/2. This study revealed the suppressive activity of mogroside IVe towards colorectal and throat cancers and identified the underlying mechanisms, suggesting that mogroside IVe may be potentially used as a biologically-active phytochemical supplement for treating colorectal and throat cancers. PMID:27304964

  16. Antiproliferative Activity of Triterpene Glycoside Nutrient from Monk Fruit in Colorectal Cancer and Throat Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Can; Dai, Longhai; Liu, Yueping; Rong, Long; Dou, Dequan; Sun, Yuanxia; Ma, Lanqing

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer and throat cancer are the world’s most prevalent neoplastic diseases, and a serious threat to human health. Plant triterpene glycosides have demonstrated antitumor activity. In this study, we investigated potential anticancer effects of mogroside IVe, a triterpenoid glycoside from monk fruit, using in vitro and in vivo models of colorectal and laryngeal cancer. The effects of mogroside IVe on the proliferation of colorectal cancer HT29 cells and throat cancer Hep-2 cells were determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, and the expression levels of p53, phosphorylated ERK1/2, and MMP-9 were analyzed by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. The results indicated that mogroside IVe inhibited, in a dose-dependent manner, the proliferation of HT29 and Hep-2 cells in culture and in xenografted mice, which was accompanied by the upregulation of tumor suppressor p53, and downregulation of matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9) and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK)1/2. This study revealed the suppressive activity of mogroside IVe towards colorectal and throat cancers and identified the underlying mechanisms, suggesting that mogroside IVe may be potentially used as a biologically-active phytochemical supplement for treating colorectal and throat cancers. PMID:27304964

  17. Equilibrium uptake, sorption dynamics, process optimization, and column operations for the removal and recovery of malachite green from wastewater using activated carbon and activated slag

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, V.K.; Srivastava, S.K.; Mohan, D.

    1997-06-01

    The waste slurry generated in fertilizer plants and slag (blast furnace waste) have been converted into low-cost adsorbents, activated carbon and activated slag, respectively, and these are utilized for the removal of malachite green (a basic dye) from wastewater. In the batch experiments, parameters studied include the effect of pH, sorbent dosage, adsorbate concentration, temperature, and contact time. Kinetic studies have been performed to have an idea of the mechanistic aspects and to obtain the thermodynamic parameters of the process. The uptake of the dye is greater on carbonaceous material than on activated slag. Sorption data have been correlated with both Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models. The presence of anionic surfactants does not affect the uptake of dye significantly. The mass transfer kinetic approach has been applied for the determination of various parameters necessary for the designing of fixed-bed contactors. Chemical regeneration has been achieved with acetone in order to recover the loaded dye and restore the column to its original capacity without dismantling the same.

  18. Nutrient availability as a control of the abundance and activities of deep subsurface microorganisms. Final report, June 30, 1991--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Ghiorse, W.C.

    1992-12-31

    The focus of our research is to determine whether the availability of major nutrients (C, N, P) control the abundance, distribution, and activity of heterotrophic microorganisms in subsurface sediments. Specifically we have developed and are testing a microcosm system using subsurface sediment samples from a DOE site. We are using this system to conduct a preliminary nutrient enrichment experiments. The flow-through microcosm system simulates conditions in natural aquifers and can be regulated with respect to water flow rate, temperature, oxygen concentration, and nutrient concentration. Furthermore, the system cam be run aseptically, excluding exogenous bacteria from test cores. In our preliminary nutrient enrichment experiment, we collected deep vadose sediment from the Savannah River Site and pumped sterilized well water from sampling area through microcosms that were filled with this sediment. Experimental treatments included the flow-through of this water amen with different combinations of nutrients (+N+P, +C, +N+P+C) or no additional nutrients. We found that asepsis was maintained for the entire 30 day experiment. We also found that microbial abundance, biomass, and activity increased in several microcosms in response to the flow through of the well water, which was rich in nitrate. This response, however, was variable among both microcosms containing intact sediments and microcosms containing intact sediment core sections. No significant treatment responses were observed, but each microcosm that had an increase in microbial growth also immobilized N from the well water. We infer that water and N availability, and water table fluctuations strongly influence microbial growth and activity in the deep vadose.

  19. Azepines and piperidines with dual norepinephrine dopamine uptake inhibition and antidepressant activity.

    PubMed

    Brown, Dean G; Bernstein, Peter R; Wu, Ye; Urbanek, Rebecca A; Becker, Christopher W; Throner, Scott R; Dembofsky, Bruce T; Steelman, Gary B; Lazor, Lois A; Scott, Clay W; Wood, Michael W; Wesolowski, Steven S; Nugiel, David A; Koch, Stephanie; Yu, Jian; Pivonka, Donald E; Li, Shuang; Thompson, Carol; Zacco, Anna; Elmore, Charles S; Schroeder, Patricia; Liu, JianWei; Hurley, Christopher A; Ward, Stuart; Hunt, Hazel J; Williams, Karen; McLaughlin, Joseph; Hoesch, Valerie; Sydserff, Simon; Maier, Donna; Aharony, David

    2013-01-10

    Herein, we describe the discovery of inhibitors of norepinephrine (NET) and dopamine (DAT) transporters with reduced activity relative to serotonin transporters (SERT). Two compounds, 8b and 21a, along with nomifensine were tested in a rodent receptor occupancy study and demonstrated dose-dependent displacement of radiolabeled NET and DAT ligands. These compounds were efficacious in a rat forced swim assay (model of depression) and also had activity in rat spontaneous locomotion assay. PMID:24900562

  20. Modeling the Effect of External Carbon Source Addition under Different Electron Acceptor Conditions in Biological Nutrient Removal Activated Sludge Systems.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiang; Wisniewski, Kamil; Czerwionka, Krzysztof; Zhou, Qi; Xie, Li; Makinia, Jacek

    2016-02-16

    The aim of this study was to expand the International Water Association Activated Sludge Model No. 2d (ASM2d) to predict the aerobic/anoxic behavior of polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) and "ordinary" heterotrophs in the presence of different external carbon sources and electron acceptors. The following new aspects were considered: (1) a new type of the readily biodegradable substrate, not available for the anaerobic activity of PAOs, (2) nitrite as an electron acceptor, and (3) acclimation of "ordinary" heterotrophs to the new external substrate via enzyme synthesis. The expanded model incorporated 30 new or modified process rate equations. The model was evaluated against data from several, especially designed laboratory experiments which focused on the combined effects of different types of external carbon sources (acetate, ethanol and fusel oil) and electron acceptors (dissolved oxygen, nitrate and nitrite) on the behavior of PAOs and "ordinary" heterotrophs. With the proposed expansions, it was possible to improve some deficiencies of the ASM2d in predicting the behavior of biological nutrient removal (BNR) systems with the addition of external carbon sources, including the effect of acclimation to the new carbon source. PMID:26783836

  1. The activation of nutrient signaling components leading to mRNA translation in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs is developmentally regulated

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insulin and amino acids (AA) can act independently to stimulate skeletal muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs. To elucidate the role of development in the AA-induced activation of nutrient signaling components leading to translation in skeletal muscle, a balanced AA mixture was infused into fa...

  2. Controlling Salmonella infection in weanling pigs through water delivery of direct-fed microbials or organic acids: Part II. Effects on intestinal histology and active nutrient transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of water-delivered direct-fed microbials (DFM) or organic acids on intestinal morphology and active nutrient absorption in weanling pigs following deliberate Salmonella infection. Pigs (n = 88) were weaned at 19 ± 2 d of age and assigned to one...

  3. Microbial Enzyme Activities of Wetland Soils as Indicators of Nutrient Condition: A Test in Wetlands of Gulf of Mexico Coastal Watershed

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbial enzyme activities measured from wetland soils are being tested as indicators of wetland nutrient function and human disturbance. This is part of an assessment of condition of wetlands being conducted by the U.S. EPA Gulf Ecology Division in coastal watersheds along the...

  4. Influence of exogenous urea on photosynthetic pigments, (14)CO 2 uptake, and urease activity in Elodea densa-environmental implications.

    PubMed

    Maleva, Maria; Borisova, Galina; Chukina, Nadezda; Nekrasova, Galina; Prasad, M N V

    2013-09-01

    This paper analyzes the effect of exogenous urea in increased concentration gradient (0, 100, 500 and 1,000 mg L(-1)) on photosynthetic pigments (measured spectrophotometrically), uptake of (14)CO2 (using radioisotope), and urease activity (by measuring ammonia with Nessler's reagent) in leaves of Elodea densa Planch. We have observed that low concentration of urea (100 mg L(-1)) stimulates the accumulation of photosynthetic pigments and intensifies photosynthesis in E. densa, whereas high concentration (1,000 mg L(-1)) suppresses these processes. Urease activity increased by approximately 2.7 and 8 fold when exogenous urea concentrations were 100 and 500 mg L(-1), respectively. However, exogenous urea in high concentration (1,000 mg L(-1)) decreased urease activity by 1.5 fold compared to the control. The necessity of mitigating urea and other nitrogen-containing compounds (NH3 from urea) in water bodies has been discussed with emphasis on the potential for phytoremediation of urea using common water weed viz. E. densa. PMID:23546854

  5. Vaccine activation of the nutrient sensor GCN2 in dendritic cells enhances antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Rajesh; Khan, Nooruddin; Nakaya, Helder I; Li, Shuzhao; Loebbermann, Jens; Maddur, Mohan S; Park, Youngja; Jones, Dean P; Chappert, Pascal; Davoust, Jean; Weiss, David S; Virgin, Herbert W; Ron, David; Pulendran, Bali

    2014-01-17

    The yellow fever vaccine YF-17D is one of the most successful vaccines ever developed in humans. Despite its efficacy and widespread use in more than 600 million people, the mechanisms by which it stimulates protective immunity remain poorly understood. Recent studies using systems biology approaches in humans have revealed that YF-17D-induced early expression of general control nonderepressible 2 kinase (GCN2) in the blood strongly correlates with the magnitude of the later CD8(+) T cell response. We demonstrate a key role for virus-induced GCN2 activation in programming dendritic cells to initiate autophagy and enhanced antigen presentation to both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. These results reveal an unappreciated link between virus-induced integrated stress response in dendritic cells and the adaptive immune response. PMID:24310610

  6. Optimization of the activated sludge anoxic reactor configuration as a means to control nutrient removal kinetically.

    PubMed

    Plósz, Benedek Gy

    2007-04-01

    Factors influencing the determination of optimum reactor configuration for activated sludge denitrification are investigated in this paper. A kinetic optimization method is presented to evaluate optimal pre- and post-denitrification bioreactor stages. Applying the method developed, simulation studies were carried out to investigate the impacts of the ratio of the influent readily biodegradable and slowly biodegradable substrates and the oxygen entering the denitrification zones on the optimal anoxic reactor configuration. In addition, the paper describes the effects of the slowly biodegradable substrate on the denitrification efficiency using external substrate dosing, and it demonstrates kinetic considerations concerning the hydrolysis process. It has been shown that as a function of the biodegradable substrate composition, the stage system design with three optimized reactor compartments can effectively increase reaction rates in the denitrification zones, and can provide flexibility for varying operation conditions. PMID:17321565

  7. Dynamic relationships between microbial biomass, respiration, inorganic nutrients and enzyme activities: informing enzyme-based decomposition models

    PubMed Central

    Moorhead, D. L.; Rinkes, Z. L.; Sinsabaugh, R. L.; Weintraub, M. N.

    2013-01-01

    We re-examined data from a recent litter decay study to determine if additional insights could be gained to inform decomposition modeling. Rinkes et al. (2013) conducted 14-day laboratory incubations of sugar maple (Acer saccharum) or white oak (Quercus alba) leaves, mixed with sand (0.4% organic C content) or loam (4.1% organic C). They measured microbial biomass C, carbon dioxide efflux, soil ammonium, nitrate, and phosphate concentrations, and β-glucosidase (BG), β-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (NAG), and acid phosphatase (AP) activities on days 1, 3, and 14. Analyses of relationships among variables yielded different insights than original analyses of individual variables. For example, although respiration rates per g soil were higher for loam than sand, rates per g soil C were actually higher for sand than loam, and rates per g microbial C showed little difference between treatments. Microbial biomass C peaked on day 3 when biomass-specific activities of enzymes were lowest, suggesting uptake of litter C without extracellular hydrolysis. This result refuted a common model assumption that all enzyme production is constitutive and thus proportional to biomass, and/or indicated that part of litter decay is independent of enzyme activity. The length and angle of vectors defined by ratios of enzyme activities (BG/NAG vs. BG/AP) represent relative microbial investments in C (length), and N and P (angle) acquiring enzymes. Shorter lengths on day 3 suggested low C limitation, whereas greater lengths on day 14 suggested an increase in C limitation with decay. The soils and litter in this study generally had stronger P limitation (angles >45°). Reductions in vector angles to <45° for sand by day 14 suggested a shift to N limitation. These relational variables inform enzyme-based models, and are usually much less ambiguous when obtained from a single study in which measurements were made on the same samples than when extrapolated from separate studies. PMID:23964272

  8. mTORC2 regulates renal tubule sodium uptake by promoting ENaC activity.

    PubMed

    Gleason, Catherine E; Frindt, Gustavo; Cheng, Chih-Jen; Ng, Michael; Kidwai, Atif; Rashmi, Priyanka; Lang, Florian; Baum, Michel; Palmer, Lawrence G; Pearce, David

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) is essential for Na+ homeostasis, and dysregulation of this channel underlies many forms of hypertension. Recent studies suggest that mTOR regulates phosphorylation and activation of serum/glucocorticoid regulated kinase 1 (SGK1), which is known to inhibit ENaC internalization and degradation; however, it is not clear whether mTOR contributes to the regulation of renal tubule ion transport. Here, we evaluated the effect of selective mTOR inhibitors on kidney tubule Na+ and K+ transport in WT and Sgk1-/- mice, as well as in isolated collecting tubules. We found that 2 structurally distinct competitive inhibitors (PP242 and AZD8055), both of which prevent all mTOR-dependent phosphorylation, including that of SGK1, caused substantial natriuresis, but not kaliuresis, in WT mice, which indicates that mTOR preferentially influences ENaC function. PP242 also substantially inhibited Na+ currents in isolated perfused cortical collecting tubules. Accordingly, patch clamp studies on cortical tubule apical membranes revealed that mTOR inhibition markedly reduces ENaC activity, but does not alter activity of K+ inwardly rectifying channels (ROMK channels). Together, these results demonstrate that mTOR regulates kidney tubule ion handling and suggest that mTOR regulates Na+ homeostasis through SGK1-dependent modulation of ENaC activity. PMID:25415435

  9. Enhancement of glucose uptake in muscular cell by soybean charged peptides isolated by electrodialysis with ultrafiltration membranes (EDUF): activation of the AMPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Roblet, Cyril; Doyen, Alain; Amiot, Jean; Pilon, Geneviève; Marette, André; Bazinet, Laurent

    2014-03-15

    Soy peptides consumption has been associated with beneficial effects in type 2 diabetes patients. However, the peptide fractions responsible for these effects, and their mechanisms of action, have not been identified yet. In this study, we have isolated soybean peptides by electrodialysis with an ultrafiltration membrane (EDUF) at 50 V/100 kDa, and tested them for their capacity to improve glucose uptake in L6 muscle cells. We observed that these fractions were able to significantly enhance glucose uptake in the presence of insulin. The reported bioactivity would be due to the low molecular weight peptides (300-500 Da) recovered. Moreover, we observed that an enhancement of glucose uptake was correlated to the activation of the AMPK enzyme, well known for its capacity to increase glucose uptake in muscle cells. To our knowledge, this is the first time that bioactive peptides with glucose uptake activity have been isolated from a complex soy matrix, and that the implication of AMPK in it is demonstrated. PMID:24206695

  10. Nutrient regeneration by mussel Mytilus edulis spat assemblages in a macrotidal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Broekhoven, Wouter; Troost, Karin; Jansen, Henrice; Smaal, Aad

    2014-04-01

    Besides exercising grazing control over phytoplankton populations, suspension-feeding bivalves can also stimulate carrying capacity by regeneration of nutrients. This study provides new data on nutrient uptake and release dynamics, and potential implications for availability and stoichiometry of nutrients, for Mytilus edulis spat collectors in the Netherlands. Uptake and release rates were measured in situ on intact spat collector ropes in a eutrophic macrotidal system in relation to development of ropes in terms of mussel biomass and associated components (fauna, flora, and organic material). There was a good fit between uptake/release rates and mussel weight based on allometric scaling functions, despite the occurrence of a substantial biomass of associated fauna, flora and organic matter on ropes. On a unit biomass basis, nutrient release rates were much higher than reported in other studies, which we attribute to greater activity of small mussels. Accounting for greater weight-specific activity of small mussels, spat collectors released more P than reported for other systems. We show that spat collectors can affect relative availabilities of N, P and Si, and we show that SMCs (Seed Mussel Collectors) likely stimulated phytoplankton production through regeneration of N and of Si, which were at limiting concentrations at different points in time. In the case of Si, stimulation would be restricted to diatoms. We conclude that SMCs are able to stimulate phytoplankton production rates, and thereby carrying capacity, and are able to influence phytoplankton composition.

  11. Nutrient composition and antioxidant activity of gonads of sea urchin Stomopneustes variolaris.

    PubMed

    Archana, Ayyagari; Babu, K Ramesh

    2016-04-15

    The study investigated, for the first time, proximate nutritional composition and antioxidant activity of gonads from the sea urchin, Stomopneustes variolaris, inhabiting the coastal area of Visakhapatnam (India). Moisture, ash, proteins, lipids and carbohydrate content were 77.53%±0.80, 3.76%±0.25, 12.10%±0.41, 4.98%±0.36 and 1.63%±0.18, respectively, based on dry weight. The gonads were rich in essential amino acids (ca. 32.1% of total amino acids) with the most predominant being phenylalanine, lysine and valine. The essential to non-essential amino acid ratio was 0.5. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) constituted 22.01%±2.2 of total fatty acids. The ω6:ω3 ratio was 0.94. Total phenol content of the gonad was 9.90±0.01 mg GAE/g and the IC50 of the extract, using the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, was 57.81 μg/ml. PMID:26616993

  12. Nutrient composition, phenolic content and free radical scavenging activity of some uncommon vegetables of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Khattak, Khanzadi Fatima

    2011-07-01

    Vegetables play a vital role in the prevention of human disease and in the improvement of general health as these contain vitamins, amino acids, fiber, antioxidants and minerals. In the present study, some less familiar vegetables of Pakistan namely chickpea (leaves), chungah (shoots), drumstick tree (inflorescences), radish (fruit pods), mountain ebony (flower buds), mustard (leaves), purslane (leaves) and white goosefoot (leaves and shoots) were evaluated for proximate composition, mineral content, phenolic content and free radical scavenging activity. The protein, fat, fiber, carbohydrate and ash contents of the selected vegetables were in the range of 2.9 to 6.6%, 0.2 to 2.5%, 2.4 to 8.6%, 9.7 to 20.1% and 1.0 to 2.3%, respectively. The concentration of vitamin C ranged between 32.6 to 120.1 mg/100 g. The phosphorus, calcium, iron, zinc, manganese, magnesium and copper were 190 to 3400, 103 to 987, 19 to 93, 12 to 47, 9 to 121, 299 to 1635 and non detectable level to 42 mg/kg, respectively. The amount of total phenolic content varied from 55.3 to 221.0 mg/g in the dry methanolic extracts of the studied plants. The EC(50) values were below 1400 μg/ml, indicating that all the studied vegetables have good scavenging effect on DPPH radical. PMID:21715260

  13. Response of non-added solutes during nutrient addition experiments in streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Cardona, B.; Wymore, A.; Koenig, L.; Coble, A. A.; McDowell, W. H.

    2015-12-01

    Nutrient addition experiments, such as Tracer Additions for Spiraling Curve Characterization (TASCC), have become widely popular as a means to study nutrient uptake dynamics in stream ecosystems. However, the impact of these additions on ambient concentrations of non-added solutes is often overlooked. TASCC addition experiments are ideal for assessing interactions among solutes because it allows for the characterization of multiple solute concentrations across a broad range of added nutrient concentrations. TASCC additions also require the addition of a conservative tracer (NaCl) to track changes in conductivity during the experimental manipulation. Despite its use as a conservative tracer, chloride (Cl) and its associated sodium (Na) might change the concentrations of other ions and non-added nutrients through ion exchange or other processes. Similarly, additions of biologically active solutes might change the concentrations of other non-added solutes. These methodological issues in nutrient addition experiments have been poorly addressed in the literature. Here we examine the response of non-added solutes to pulse additions (i.e. TASCC) of NaCl plus nitrate (NO3-), ammonium, and phosphate across biomes including temperate and tropical forests, and arctic taiga. Preliminary results demonstrate that non-added solutes respond to changes in the concentration of these added nutrients. For example, concentrations of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) in suburban headwater streams of New Hampshire both increase and decrease in response to NO3- additions, apparently due to biotic processes. Similarly, cations such as potassium, magnesium, and calcium also increase during TASCC experiments, likely due to cation exchange processes associated with Na addition. The response of non-added solutes to short-term pulses of added nutrients and tracers needs to be carefully assessed to ensure that nutrient uptake metrics are accurate, and to detect biotic interactions that may

  14. Immunologic activity of lipopolysaccharides released from macrophages after the uptake of intact E coli in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, R.L. Jr.; Hoffman, J.; Tesh, V.L.; Morrison, D.C.

    1986-04-15

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) have been isolated from culture supernatants and from cell lysates after the in vitro phagocytosis of E. coli by murine macrophages. By using E. coli radiolabeled specifically in the LPS component with (/sup 3/H)galactose, the authors studies have shown that the macrophage-processed LPS is enhanced with respect to its immunostimulatory activity in comparison with control phenol-water-extracted LPS. As assessed by its ability to induce interluekin 1 production in naive macrophages or proliferation in cultures of murine splenocytes, the macrophage-processed LPS is between 10- and 100-fold greater in specific activity. Evidence is presented for both structural and chemical alterations in the LPS macromolecule.

  15. Pigment identification, antioxidant activity, and nutrient composition of Tinospora cordifolia (willd.) Miers ex Hook. f & Thoms fruit.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Imtiyaj; Harsha, P S C Sri; Giridhar, P; Ravishankar, G A

    2011-05-01

    The stem, leaf, and root of Tinospora cordifolia (willd.) have been highly exploited for medicinal preparations; however, the nutritional and nutraceutical potential of its attractive red berries (fruits) have not so far been studied. Pigments, berberine (107.0 mg/100 g) and lycopene (50.8 mg/100 g), were identified in the deseeded fruit. Total phenol content in the fruit was 3.2 mg gallic acid equivalent/g. The IC(50) of DPPH· (82, and 468 ppm) and OH· (100, and 1,000 ppm) scavenging activity, and the EC(50) of reducing power (2,616, and 1,472 ppm) of hexane and methanol extracts, respectively, were observed. Oxygen radical absorbance capacities of the fruit extracts (150 and 300 ppm) were 1,107 and 2,614 μM trolox equivalent/g, respectively. Nutrient composition including carbohydrate (18.4%), proteins (1.5%), lipids (6%) of which ∼62% was unsaturated fatty acids, vitamins like ascorbic acid (0.24 μg), niacin (0.7 mg), and tocopherols (2.4 mg) in 100 g fruits were determined. Potassium content was 1.2 g/100 g dry tissue of berries. These findings show that components of T. cordifolia fruit could be bioactive and used in food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetics. PMID:21155657

  16. Two-stage thermophilic-mesophilic anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge from a biological nutrient removal plant.

    PubMed

    Watts, S; Hamilton, G; Keller, J

    2006-01-01

    A two-stage thermophilic-mesophilic anaerobic digestion pilot-plant was operated solely on waste activated sludge (WAS) from a biological nutrient removal (BNR) plant. The first-stage thermophilic reactor (HRT 2 days) was operated at 47, 54 and 60 degrees C. The second-stage mesophilic digester (HRT 15 days) was held at a constant temperature of 36-37 degrees C. For comparison with a single-stage mesophilic process, the mesophilic digester was also operated separately with an HRT of 17 days and temperature of 36-37 degrees C. The results showed a truly thermophilic stage (60 degrees C) was essential to achieve good WAS degradation. The lower thermophilic temperatures examined did not offer advantages over single-stage mesophilic treatment in terms of COD and VS removal. At a thermophilic temperature of 60 degrees C, the plant achieved 35% VS reduction, representing a 46% increase compared to the single-stage mesophilic digester. This is a significant level of degradation which could make such a process viable in situations where there is no primary sludge generated. The fate of the biologically stored phosphorus in this BNR sludge was also investigated. Over 80% of the incoming phosphorus remained bound up with the solids and was not released into solution during the WAS digestion. Therefore only a small fraction of phosphorus would be recycled to the main treatment plant with the dewatering stream. PMID:16784199

  17. Chemical form of selenium affects its uptake, transport and glutathione peroxidase activity in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determining the effect of selenium (Se) chemical form on uptake and transport in human intestinal cells is critical to assess Se bioavailability. In the present study, we measured the uptake and transport of various Se compounds in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell model. We found that two sources...

  18. Plumbagin-silver nanoparticle formulations enhance the cellular uptake of plumbagin and its antiproliferative activities.

    PubMed

    Appadurai, Prakash; Rathinasamy, Krishnan

    2015-10-01

    Colloidal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have attracted much attention in recent years as diagnostics and new drug delivery system in cancer medicine. To study the effects of plumbagin (PLB), a relatively non-toxic napthaquinone isolated from the roots of Plumbago indica in human cervical cancer cell line and developed a formulation to enhance its cytotoxic activities. Silver nanoparticles were synthesised by chemical reduction method and complexed with PLB. Both the AgNPs and the complex PLB-AgNPs were characterised by dynamic light scattering, high-resolution scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The amount of PLB and PLB-AgNPs internalised was determined by ultra-violet-visible spectrophotometer. Cell inhibition was determined by sulphorhodamine B assay. Mitotic index was determined by Wright-Giemsa staining. Apoptosis induction was assessed by western blot using cleaved poly adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase antibody. The scanning electron microscope analysis indicated an average particle size of 32±8 nm in diameter. Enhanced internalisation of PLB into the HeLa cells was observed in PLB-AgNPs. PLB inhibited proliferation of cells with IC50 value of about 18±0.6 µM and blocked the cells at mitosis in a concentration-dependent manner. PLB also inhibited the post-drug exposure clonogenic survival of cells and induced apoptosis. The antiproliferative, antimitotic and apoptotic activities were also found to be increased when cells were treated with PLB-AgNPs. The authors results support the idea that AgNP could be a promising and effective drug delivery system for enhanced activity of PLB in cancer treatment. PMID:26435279

  19. Enhanced cellular uptake and gene silencing activity of siRNA molecules mediated by chitosan-derivative nanocomplexes.

    PubMed

    Guzman-Villanueva, Diana; El-Sherbiny, Ibrahim M; Vlassov, Alexander V; Herrera-Ruiz, Dea; Smyth, Hugh D C

    2014-10-01

    The RNA interference (RNAi) constitutes a conservative mechanism in eukaryotic cells that induces silencing of target genes. In mammalians, the RNAi is triggered by siRNA (small interfering RNA) molecules. Due to its potential in silencing specific genes, the siRNA has been considered a potential alternative for the treatment of genetic and acquired diseases. However, the siRNA therapy has been limited by its low stability and rapid degradation in presence of nucleases, low cellular uptake, and immune response activation. In order to overcome these drawbacks, we propose the synthesis and characterization of non-viral delivery systems using chitosan derivatives to obtain siRNA complexes (polyplexes). The non-viral delivery systems synthesized included PEG-g-OCs (oligochitosan) and PEG-g-Cs (chitosan medium molecular weight). Both systems allowed the formation of siRNA polyplexes, increased the stability of siRNA in the presence of nucleases, enhanced cellular internalization, and showed low toxicity in the A549 cell line. Finally, the complexes obtained with the PEG-g-OCs system showed silencing activity in a GFP model in the cell line A549 in comparison with naked siRNA. PMID:25063077

  20. The role of destabilization of palladium hydride on the hydrogen uptake of Pd-containing activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Vinay V; Contescu, Cristian I; Gallego, Nidia C

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on differences in stability of Pd hydride phases in palladium particles with various degrees of contact with microporous carbon supports. A sample containing Pd embedded in activated carbon fiber (Pd-ACF; 2 wt% Pd) was compared with commercial Pd nanoparticles deposited on microporous activated carbon (Pd-catalyst, 3 wt% Pd) and with suppo