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Sample records for active optical elements

  1. Conformal optical elements for correcting wavefront distortions in YAG : Nd{sup 3+} active elements

    SciTech Connect

    Korolkov, V P; Nasyrov, R K; Poleshchuk, A G; Arapov, Yu D; Ivanov, A F

    2013-02-28

    Correction of the wavefront is studied for the light beam passing wide-aperture YAG : Nd3+ single-crystal rods, which are used as active elements in high-power solid-state lasers. A nonideal character of the crystal structure is responsible for the deformation of the wavefront of passing radiation. By using the halftone technology we have developed conformal aberration correctors capable of compensating rod nonuniformities and reducing the laser radiation divergence by an order of magnitude. The results obtained make it possible to employ optically nonuniform active elements in laser constructions. (laser optics 2012)

  2. Optical activity of catalytic elements of hetero-metallic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antosiewicz, Tomasz J.; Apell, S. Peter; Wadell, Carl; Langhammer, Christoph

    2015-05-01

    Interaction of light with metals in the form of surface plasmons is used in a wide range of applications in which the scattering decay channel is important. The absorption channel is usually thought of as unwanted and detrimental to the efficiency of the device. This is true in many applications, however, recent studies have shown that maximization of the decay channel of surface plasmons has potentially significant uses. One of these is the creation of electron-hole pairs or hot electrons which can be used for e.g. catalysis. Here, we study the optical properties of hetero-metallic nanostructures that enhance light interaction with the catalytic elements of the nanostructures. A hybridized LSPR that matches the spectral characteristic of the light source is excited. This LSPR through coupling between the plasmonic elements maximizes light absorption in the catalytic part of the nanostructure. Numerically calculated visible light absorption in the catalytic nanoparticles is enhanced 12-fold for large catalytic disks and by more 30 for small nanoparticles on the order of 5 nm. In experiments we measure a sizable increase in the absorption cross section when small palladium nanoparticles are coupled to a large silver resonator. These observations suggest that heterometallic nanostructures can enhance catalytic reaction rates.

  3. Tunable diffractive optical elements on various electro active polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döring, Sebastian; Kollosche, Matthias; Hildebrandt, Niko; Stumpe, Joachim; Kofod, Guggi

    2010-05-01

    An innovative approach for voltage-tunable optical gratings based on dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) using electro active polymers is presented. Sinusoidal surface gratings, holographically written into azobenzene containing films, are transferred via nanoimprinting to DEAs of different carrier materials. We demonstrate that the surface relief deformation depends on the mechanical and geometrical properties of the actuators. The tested DEAs were made using commercially available elastomers, including a tri-block copolymer poly-styrene-ethylene-butadiene-styrene (SEBS), a silicone polydimethylsiloxane rubber (PDMS) and commonly used polyacrylic glue. The polyacrylic glue is ready to use, whereas the SEBS and the PDMS precursors have to be processed into thin films via different casting methods. The DEA material was pre-stretched, fixed to a stiff frame and coated with stretchable electrodes in appropriate designs. Since the actuation strain of the DEA depends strongly upon the conditions such as material properties, pre-stretch and geometry, the desired voltage-controllable deformations can be optimized during manufacturing of the DEA and also in the choice of materials in the grating transfer process. A full characterization of the grating deformation includes measurements of the grating pitch and depth modulation, plus the change of the diffraction angle and efficiency. The structural surface distortion was characterized by measuring the shape of the transmitted and diffracted laser beam with a beam profiling system while applying an electro-mechanical stress to the grating. Such surface distortions may lead to decreasing diffraction efficiency and lower beam quality. With properly chosen manufacturing parameters, we found a period shift of up to 9 % in a grating with 1 μm pitch. To describe the optical behavior, a model based on independently measured material parameters is presented.

  4. Three-dimensional display utilizing a diffractive optical element and an active matrix liquid crystal display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordin, Gregory P.; Jones, Michael W.; Kulick, Jeffrey H.; Lindquist, Robert G.; Kowel, Stephen T.

    1996-12-01

    We describe the design, construction, and performance of the first real-time autostereoscopic 3D display based on the partial pixel 3D display architecture. The primary optical components of the 3D display are an active-matrix liquid crystal display and a diffractive optical element (DOE). The display operates at video frame rates and is driven with a conventional VGA signal. 3D animations with horizontal motion parallax are readily viewable as sets of stereo images. Formation of the virtual viewing slits by diffraction from the partial pixel apertures is experimentally verified. The measured contrast and perceived brightness of the display are excellent, but there are minor flaws in image quality due to secondary images. The source of these images and how they may be eliminated is discussed. The effects of manufacturing-related systematic errors in the DOE are also analyzed.

  5. Optical element for photographic radiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, M.J.

    1984-02-21

    An optical element for filtering infrared light for use in a radiometer is disclosed wherein at least one metalorganic infrared absorbing dye is at least partially dissolved homogeniously throughout a molded optical plastic.

  6. Active optical zoom system

    DOEpatents

    Wick, David V.

    2005-12-20

    An active optical zoom system changes the magnification (or effective focal length) of an optical imaging system by utilizing two or more active optics in a conventional optical system. The system can create relatively large changes in system magnification with very small changes in the focal lengths of individual active elements by leveraging the optical power of the conventional optical elements (e.g., passive lenses and mirrors) surrounding the active optics. The active optics serve primarily as variable focal-length lenses or mirrors, although adding other aberrations enables increased utility. The active optics can either be LC SLMs, used in a transmissive optical zoom system, or DMs, used in a reflective optical zoom system. By appropriately designing the optical system, the variable focal-length lenses or mirrors can provide the flexibility necessary to change the overall system focal length (i.e., effective focal length), and therefore magnification, that is normally accomplished with mechanical motion in conventional zoom lenses. The active optics can provide additional flexibility by allowing magnification to occur anywhere within the FOV of the system, not just on-axis as in a conventional system.

  7. Active thermal lensing elements for mode matching optimization in optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulda, Paul

    2014-03-01

    In interferometric gravitational wave detectors of the advanced era and beyond, the high laser powers used lead to the generation of thermal lenses in the optics. This can lead to a reduction in the coupling between the various optical cavities comprising the detector, thus reducing its overall sensitivity. We present here an active device which can be used to compensate for such thermal effects, as well as static mismatches between cavities. The device uses a 4 segmented heater to heat a transmissive optic, generating a spherical or astigmatic lens which can be used to compensate other thermal lenses within an optical system. We report on in-vacuum tests of the device, including an interferometric measurement of the wavefront distortions induced by the device, and measurements of the dynamic range and response time. The device was shown to have no observable detrimental effect on wavefront distortion, a focal power dynamic range of 0 to -40 mD, and a response time of the order 1000 s. Supported by NSF grant PHY-1205512.

  8. Diffractive optical element for optical data storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, S.; Unno, N.; Akamatsu, H.; Yamada, K.; Taniguchi, J.; Yamamoto, M.

    2013-05-01

    The diffractive optical element (DOE) has the transformation function of wavefront, and its applications are forming or homogenization of beam, and aberration correction, and so on. In this study, we evaluate possibility as storage application of the DOE. The optical data storage using the DOE is thought of as a kind of holographic data storage (HDS). In the HDS, digital data is recorded and read out as modulated 2-dimensional page data, instead of bit-by-bit recording in conventional optical storages. Therefore, HDS actualize high data transfer rate. We design and optimize phase distribution of the DOE using the iterative method with regularization. In the optimization process, we use iterative Fourier transform algorithm (IFTA) that is known as Gerchberg-Saxton (GS) algorithm. At this time, the regularization method is adopted to suppress minute oscillation of the diffraction pattern. Designed and optimized DOE is fabricated by ultraviolet (UV) nanoimprinting technology. High productivity can be expected by adopting nanoimprinting technology. DOEs are duplicated on the silicon (Si) substrate as reflection-type elements. Fabricated DOE is evaluated in the experiment. We verify that DOE for optical data storage can be actualized through our approach.

  9. Finite element analyses of thin film active grazing incidence x-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, William N.; Reid, Paul B.; Schwartz, Daniel A.

    2010-09-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory, with its sub-arc second resolution, has revolutionized X-ray astronomy by revealing an extremely complex X-ray sky and demonstrating the power of the X-ray window in exploring fundamental astrophysical problems. Larger area telescopes of still higher angular resolution promise further advances. We are engaged in the development of a mission concept, Generation-X, a 0.1 arc second resolution x-ray telescope with tens of square meters of collecting area, 500 times that of Chandra. To achieve these two requirements of imaging and area, we are developing a grazing incidence telescope comprised of many mirror segments. Each segment is an adjustable mirror that is a section of a paraboloid or hyperboloid, aligned and figure corrected in situ on-orbit. To that end, finite element analyses of thin glass mirrors are performed to determine influence functions for each actuator on the mirrors, in order to develop algorithms for correction of mirror deformations. The effects of several mirror mounting schemes are also studied. The finite element analysis results, combined with measurements made on prototype mirrors, will be used to further refine the correction algorithms.

  10. Method of lightening radiation darkened optical elements

    DOEpatents

    Reich, Frederich R.; Schwankoff, Albert R.

    1980-01-01

    A method of lightening a radiation-darkened optical element in wich visible optical energy or electromagnetic radiation having a wavelength in the range of from about 2000 to about 20,000 angstroms is directed into the radiation-darkened optical element; the method may be used to lighten radiation-darkened optical element in-situ during the use of the optical element to transmit data by electronically separating the optical energy from the optical output by frequency filtering, data cooling, or interlacing the optic energy between data intervals.

  11. Advanced optical document security elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škereš, Marek; Svoboda, Jakub; Possolt, Martin; Květoš, Milan; Fiala, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Synthetic diffractive structures represent an important tool in the optical document security. Their macroscopic visual behavior is based on properties of a very fine micro-structure which cannot be copied using common copying techniques. The visual effects can be easily observed by a common observer without any special inspection tools. However, when a high level of security is needed, additional features are often included based on an optical encryption of information. In this paper, a novel encryption technique is presented, which is based on utilizing the plastic holographic foil as a waveguide and special diffractive structures as coupling elements. When an in-coupling area is illuminated with a defined light beam, the light is coupled into the waveguide and travels to an out-coupling part. The encrypted information is encoded either in the shape of the out-coupling area or it can be formed from an out-coupling hologram in free space above the element. Both laser and normal white light sources can be used for reading the information. The coupling areas can be mixed with diffractive micro-structures forming visual effects and can be invisible during a normal observation of the hologram. The couplers can be realized using the technology fully compatible with the standard process for mastering and replication of the security elements. Several extensions of the described idea of waveguide cryptograms are also included. Finally, a set of real samples of the security elements is presented, which were realized using an advanced matrix laser lithography technique.

  12. Investigation of uses of holographic optical elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zech, R. G.; Latta, J. N.

    1973-01-01

    The data represent a thorough study of the aberrations and imaging properties of holographic optical elements. Principle studies include (1) the indepth experimental investigation of single holographic optical elements, (2) the verification of the accuracy of the theoretical computer-based description of hologram behavior, (3) the computer-generation of interferograms that are characteristic of a prescribed aberrated imaging condition, (4) the experimental verification of wavelength optimization, (5) the experimental determination of the space bandwidth product of single holographic optical elements as a function of bending and field angle, and (6) the first experimental study of the aberration properties of holographic optical elements constructed in very thick (750 microns) recording media.

  13. Optical system storage design with diffractive optical elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostuk, Raymond K.; Haggans, Charles W.

    1993-01-01

    Optical data storage systems are gaining widespread acceptance due to their high areal density and the ability to remove the high capacity hard disk from the system. In magneto-optical read-write systems, a small rotation of the polarization state in the return signal from the MO media is the signal which must be sensed. A typical arrangement used for detecting these signals and correcting for errors in tracking and focusing on the disk is illustrated. The components required to achieve these functions are listed. The assembly and alignment of this complex system has a direct impact on cost, and also affects the size, weight, and corresponding data access rates. As a result, integrating these optical components and improving packaging techniques is an active area of research and development. Most designs of binary optic elements have been concerned with optimizing grating efficiency. However, rigorous coupled wave models for vector field diffraction from grating surfaces can be extended to determine the phase and polarization state of the diffracted field, and the design of polarization components. A typical grating geometry and the phase and polarization angles associated with the incident and diffracted fields are shown. In our current stage of work, we are examining system configurations which cascade several polarization functions on a single substrate. In this design, the beam returning from the MO disk illuminates a cascaded grating element which first couples light into the substrate, then introduces a quarter wave retardation, then a polarization rotation, and finally separates s- and p-polarized fields through a polarization beam splitter. The input coupler and polarization beam splitter are formed in volume gratings, and the two intermediate elements are zero-order elements.

  14. Two position optical element actuator device

    DOEpatents

    Holdener, Fred R.; Boyd, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention is a two position optical element actuator device utilizing a powered means to hold an actuation arm, to which an optical element is attached, in a first position. A non-powered means drives the actuation arm to a second position, when the powered means ceases to receive power. The optical element may be a electromagnetic (EM) radiation or particle source, an instrument, or EM radiation or particle transmissive, reflective or absorptive elements. A bearing is used to transfer motion and smoothly transition the actuation arm from the first to second position.

  15. Bi-stable optical element actuator device

    DOEpatents

    Holdener, Fred R.; Boyd, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention is a bistable optical element actuator device utilizing a powered means to move an actuation arm, to which an optical element is attached, between two stable positions. A non-powered means holds the actuation arm in either of the two stable positions. The optical element may be a electromagnetic (EM) radiation or particle source, an instrument, or EM radiation or particle transmissive reflective or absorptive elements. A bearing is used to transfer motion and smoothly transition the actuation arm between the two stable positions.

  16. Holographic optical elements: Fabrication and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zech, R. G.; Shareck, M.; Ralston, L. M.

    1974-01-01

    The basic properties and use of holographic optical elements were investigated to design and construct wide-angle, Fourier-transform holographic optical systems for use in a Bragg-effect optical memory. The performance characteristics are described along with the construction of the holographic system.

  17. Scattering Optical Elements: Stand-Alone Optical Elements Exploiting Multiple Light Scattering.

    PubMed

    Park, Jongchan; Cho, Joong-Yeon; Park, Chunghyun; Lee, KyeoReh; Lee, Heon; Cho, Yong-Hoon; Park, YongKeun

    2016-07-26

    Optical design and fabrication techniques are crucial for making optical elements. From conventional lenses to diffractive optical elements and to recent metasurfaces, various types of optical elements have been proposed to manipulate light where optical materials are fabricated into desired structures. Here, we propose a scattering optical element (SOE) that exploits multiple light scattering and wavefront shaping. Instead of fabricating optical materials, the SOE consists of a disordered medium and a photopolymer-based wavefront recorder, with shapes impinging on light on demand. With the proposed stand-alone SOEs, we experimentally demonstrate control of various properties of light, including intensity, polarization, spectral frequency, and near field. Due to the tremendous freedom brought about by disordered media, the proposed approach will provide unexplored routes to manipulate arbitrary optical fields in stand-alone optical elements. PMID:27331616

  18. Optically intraconnected computer employing dynamically reconfigurable holographic optical element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, Larry A. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An optically intraconnected computer and a reconfigurable holographic optical element employed therein. The basic computer comprises a memory for holding a sequence of instructions to be executed; logic for accessing the instructions in sequence; logic for determining for each the instruction the function to be performed and the effective address thereof; a plurality of individual elements on a common support substrate optimized to perform certain logical sequences employed in executing the instructions; and, element selection logic connected to the logic determining the function to be performed for each the instruction for determining the class of each function and for causing the instruction to be executed by those the elements which perform those associated the logical sequences affecting the instruction execution in an optimum manner. In the optically intraconnected version, the element selection logic is adapted for transmitting and switching signals to the elements optically.

  19. Method and apparatus for staking optical elements

    DOEpatents

    Woods, Robert O.

    1988-10-04

    A method and apparatus for staking two optical elements together in order to retain their alignment is disclosed. The apparatus includes a removable adaptor made up of first and second adaptor bodies each having a lateral slot in their front and side faces. The adaptor also includes a system for releasably attaching each adaptor body to a respective optical element such that when the two optical elements are positioned relative to one another the adaptor bodies are adjacent and the lateral slots therein are aligned to form key slots. The adaptor includes keys which are adapted to fit into the key slots. A curable filler material is employed to retain the keys in the key slots and thereby join the first and second adaptor bodies to form the adaptor. Also disclosed is a method for staking together two optical elements employing the adaptor of the present invention.

  20. Method and apparatus for staking optical elements

    DOEpatents

    Woods, Robert O.

    1988-01-01

    A method and apparatus for staking two optical elements together in order to retain their alignment is disclosed. The apparatus includes a removable adaptor made up of first and second adaptor bodies each having a lateral slot in their front and side faces. The adaptor also includes a system for releasably attaching each adaptor body to a respective optical element such that when the two optical elements are positioned relative to one another the adaptor bodies are adjacent and the lateral slots therein are aligned to form key slots. The adaptor includes keys which are adapted to fit into the key slots. A curable filler material is employed to retain the keys in the key slots and thereby join the first and second adaptor bodies to form the adaptor. Also disclosed is a method for staking together two optical elements employing the adaptor of the present invention.

  1. Passive optical element with selective angular reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, C.; Rheault, F.; Boulay, R.; Tremblay, R.

    1987-02-01

    This work is related to the development of passive selective transmission materials that will contribute to regularize the solar thermal gain. We propose an original solution to the problem of seasonal control of energetic input into buildings through windows. A passive optical element with selective angular reflection is used to solve this problem. This optical element allows sunlight to enter windows during the fall and winter, whereas, owing to the different astronomical path of the sun, it stops and rejects direct sunlight by means of the optical effect called total internal reflection (TIR) during the central spring-Summer period. The purpose of this paper is to describe the optical element in some detail, to develop the principal design equations, and give the results of the optimization of optical and geometrical parameters.

  2. Developments in Ultra Lightweight Membrane Optical Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patrick, Brian; Moore, James D., Jr.; Montgomery, Edward E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    25-micron polymer membranes have been fabricated with optical quality surface properties. Films of up to 17 inches in diameter have been manufactured with rms surface roughness of about 1.5 nanometer and subwavelength thickness variations. Current research is now focusing on figure control of these membrane optical elements.

  3. Sputter metalization of Wolter type optical elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledger, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical task showed that the coating thickness distribution for both internal and external optical elements coated using either electron beam or sputter sources can be made uniform and will not affect the surface figure of coated elements. Also, sputtered samples of nickel, molybdenum, iridium and ruthenium deposited onto both hot and cold substrates showed excellent adhesion.

  4. Optical coupling elements for coherent optical multiport receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langenhorst, Ralf

    1992-05-01

    Three by three (3 by 3) and four by four (4 by 4) port coupling elements and receivers for heterodyne multiport systems are realized. Commercial (3 by 3) fiber coupling elements were used to achieve a usual (3 by 3) port receiver and a (3 by 3) port receiver in pushpull switching, whose concept was theoretically and experimentally analyzed. It is established that intensity oscillations of laser sources are suppressed by pushpull switching. The influence of thermal noise of opto-electronic input levels is shown to be weaker than in usual (3 by 3) port and (4 by 4) port receivers. Thermal noise effect in pushpull switching is similar to this one in heterodyne receivers. An integrated optical coupling element in LiNbO3 was made with bridge circuit from four waveguide coupling elements and two phase converters, which are electro-optically tunable so that a continuous regulation of intermediate frequency phase can be compensated by temperature variations of the element. To obtain fiber-to-fiber losses lower than a dB, a compact crystal optical coupling element was developed with reference to polarization properties of optical waves. This element supplied the eight necessary intermediate frequency output signals. A direct experimental comparison of bandwidth efficiency of multiport and heterodyne receivers shows a factor two in optical area and a factor three in electrical frequency area.

  5. Spectrograph Measures Contamination Of Optical Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flint, Bruce K.; Fancy, Robert D.; Jarratt, Robert V., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Scanning-monochromator spectrograph designed to measure contamination on surfaces of optical elements as function of time. Repeatedly exposes samples to environment, then measures their transmittances or reflectances over range of wavelengths. Intended for use at vacuum-ultraviolet wavelengths to evaluate effects of outgassing, heating, and cooling on optical instruments. Principle of operation also applicable to spectral monitoring of time-dependent contamination at other wavelengths and in laboratory, industrial, or other settings.

  6. Optical bench elements (petals) for IXO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampf, Dirk; Erhard, Markus; Bavdaz, Marcos; Wallace, Kotska; Gondoin, Philippe; Collon, Maximilien J.

    2009-08-01

    X-rays at various energies can be focussed with reflective optics at grazing incidence with a well-known reflectivity achieving a high effective area by means of various designs. On XMM the high collecting area was achieved by means of thin mirror shells which were made by nickel replication combining the parabola and hyperbola sections according to the WOLTER I design in a single element. 58 of these "elements" were combined to build a mirror assembly with an effective area of 1450 cm2 @1.5 keV per mirror assembly. In order to achieve a higher effective area for IXO the density needs to be reduced. This could be achieved by pore optics elements integrated into a set of 8 petals made of Cesic as an optical bench. This design is fitting into the fairing of Ariane with a diameter of 4.2 m and achieves an effective area of 3.36 m2. It will withstand the high launch loads of up to 60 g and provide a negligible degradation to the optical performance due to thermal loads and gravitational relaxation. The design, including the interfaces to the telescope and to the pore optics, will be presented.

  7. Method and system for processing optical elements using magnetorheological finishing

    DOEpatents

    Menapace, Joseph Arthur; Schaffers, Kathleen Irene; Bayramian, Andrew James; Molander, William A

    2012-09-18

    A method of finishing an optical element includes mounting the optical element in an optical mount having a plurality of fiducials overlapping with the optical element and obtaining a first metrology map for the optical element and the plurality of fiducials. The method also includes obtaining a second metrology map for the optical element without the plurality of fiducials, forming a difference map between the first metrology map and the second metrology map, and aligning the first metrology map and the second metrology map. The method further includes placing mathematical fiducials onto the second metrology map using the difference map to form a third metrology map and associating the third metrology map to the optical element. Moreover, the method includes mounting the optical element in the fixture in an MRF tool, positioning the optical element in the fixture; removing the plurality of fiducials, and finishing the optical element.

  8. Quantum state sharing using linear optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yan; Song, Jie; Song, He-Shan

    2008-10-01

    Motivated by protocols [G. Gordon, G. Rigolin, Phys. Rev. A 73 (2006) 062316] and [N.B. An, G. Mahler, Phys. Lett. A 365 (2007) 70], we propose a linear optical protocol for quantum state sharing of polarization entangled state in terms optical elements. Our protocol can realize a near-complete quantum state sharing of polarization entangled state with arbitrary coefficients, and it is possible to achieve unity fidelity transfer of the state if the parties collaborate. This protocol can also be generalized to the multi-party system.

  9. Optical sensing: recognition elements and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauglitz, Guenter G.

    2012-09-01

    The requirements in chemical and biochemical sensing with respect to recognition elements, avoiding non-specific interactions, and high loading of the surface for detection of low concentrations as well as optimized detection systems are discussed. Among the many detection principles the optical techniques are classified. Methods using labeled compounds like Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) and direct optical methods like micro reflectometry or refractometry are discussed in comparison. Reflectometric Interference Spectroscopy (RIfS) is presented as a robust simple method for biosensing. As applications, trace analysis of endocrine disruptors in water, hormones in food, detection of viruses and bacteria in food and clinical diagnostics are discussed.

  10. Optical design and active optics methods in astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaitre, Gerard R.

    2013-03-01

    Optical designs for astronomy involve implementation of active optics and adaptive optics from X-ray to the infrared. Developments and results of active optics methods for telescopes, spectrographs and coronagraph planet finders are presented. The high accuracy and remarkable smoothness of surfaces generated by active optics methods also allow elaborating new optical design types with high aspheric and/or non-axisymmetric surfaces. Depending on the goal and performance requested for a deformable optical surface analytical investigations are carried out with one of the various facets of elasticity theory: small deformation thin plate theory, large deformation thin plate theory, shallow spherical shell theory, weakly conical shell theory. The resulting thickness distribution and associated bending force boundaries can be refined further with finite element analysis.

  11. Holographic Optical Elements as Scanning Lidar Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Rallison, Richard D.; Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Guerra, David V.

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated and developed the use of holographic optical elements (HOE) and holographic transmission gratings for scanning lidar telescopes. By rotating a flat HOE in its own plane with the focal spot on the rotation axis, a very simple and compact conical scanning telescope is possible. We developed and tested transmission and reflection HOES for use with the first three harmonics of Nd:YAG lasers, and designed, built, and tested two lidar systems based on this technology.

  12. Optimization Algorithm for Designing Diffractive Optical Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agudelo, Viviana A.; Orozco, Ricardo Amézquita

    2008-04-01

    Diffractive Optical Elements (DOEs) are commonly used in many applications such as laser beam shaping, recording of micro reliefs, wave front analysis, metrology and many others where they can replace single or multiple conventional optical elements (diffractive or refractive). One of the most versatile way to produce them, is to use computer assisted techniques for their design and optimization, as well as optical or electron beam micro-lithography techniques for the final fabrication. The fundamental figures of merit involved in the optimization of such devices are both the diffraction efficiency and the signal to noise ratio evaluated in the reconstructed wave front at the image plane. A design and optimization algorithm based on the error—reduction method (Gerchberg and Saxton) is proposed to obtain binary discrete phase-only Fresnel DOEs that will be used to produce specific intensity patterns. Some experimental results were obtained using a spatial light modulator acting as a binary programmable diffractive phase element. Although the DOEs optimized here are discrete in phase, they present an acceptable signal noise relation and diffraction efficiency.

  13. Measurement of optical activity of honey bee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Gutiérrez, Mauricio; Olivares-Pérez, Arturo; Salgado-Verduzco, Marco Antonio; Ibarra-Torres, Juan Carlos

    2016-03-01

    Optical activity of some substances, such as chiral molecules, often exhibits circular birefringence. Circular birefringence causes rotation of the vibration plane of the plane polarized light as it passes through the substance. In this work we present optical characterization of honey as function of the optical activity when it is placed in a polariscope that consists of a light source and properly arranged polarizing elements.

  14. Method of holding optical elements without deformation during their fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Hed, P. Paul

    1997-01-01

    An improved method for securing and removing an optical element to and from a blocking tool without causing deformation of the optical element. A lens tissue is placed on the top surface of the blocking tool. Dots of UV cement are applied to the lens tissue without any of the dots contacting each other. An optical element is placed on top of the blocking tool with the lens tissue sandwiched therebetween. The UV cement is then cured. After subsequent fabrication steps, the bonded blocking tool, lens tissue, and optical element are placed in a debonding solution to soften the UV cement. The optical element is then removed from the blocking tool.

  15. Holographic Optical Elements with Electro-optic Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermold, Michael Leigh

    Although polymeric and liquid crystalline materials have been separately studied for many years, optical devices based the interaction between these two materials in a composite device have come to the forefront of technology in recent years. Liquid crystals typically have strong interactions with the surfaces with which they make contact, with the dominant effects arising from geometrical and chemical contributions. It is this surface interaction that allows the construction of thin, flat liquid crystal displays that now can be found in almost every type of portable electronic device requiring information display. Instead of the liquid crystals lying on a polymer surface, they can be embedded within a thin film. In this format, the liquid crystal will assume the shape of ellipsoidal cavities, forming the so-called polymer dispersed liquid crystals. The index mismatch between the liquid crystal and the surrounding polymer matrix creates a highly efficient scattering device. This index mismatch can be modulated by applied electric fields, facilitating electronic grayscale control of the scattering efficiency. With a sufficiently high applied field, the device can be made transparent. Utilizing the holographic techniques developed by Gabor, Leith, and Upatnieks, polymer dispersed liquid crystals can be formed under holographic conditions to produce holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystals (H-PDLC). The resulting stratified structure is composed of layers of hardened polymer separated by layers of liquid crystal droplet-rich planes. Optical structures in this form also possess the same electro-optic properties as their unstructured predecessors. A whole host of diffractive optical devices can be created via holographic means, which includes, but is not limited to transmission gratings, reflection gratings, 2D and 3D photonic crystals and holographic optical elements. In this work, I have examined the role of H-PLDC gratings that function as holographic focusing

  16. Holographic Optical Elements as Scanning Lidar Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Rallison, Richard D.; Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Guerra, David V.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed and investigated the use of holographic optical elements (HOEs) and holographic transmission gratings for scanning lidar telescopes. For example, rotating a flat HOE in its own plane with the focal spot on the rotation axis makes a very simple and compact conical scanning telescope. We developed and tested transmission and reflection HOEs for use at the first three harmonic wavelengths of Nd:YAG lasers. The diffraction efficiency, diffraction angle, focal length, focal spot size and optical losses were measured for several HOEs and holographic gratings, and found to be suitable for use as lidar receiver telescopes, and in many cases could also serve as the final collimating and beam steering optic for the laser transmitter. Two lidar systems based on this technology have been designed, built, and successfully tested in atmospheric science applications. This technology will enable future spaceborne lidar missions by significantly lowering the size, weight, power requirement and cost of a large aperture, narrow field of view scanning telescope.

  17. Mass Replication Of Optically Recorded Holographic Optical Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzi, M. L.; Delvo, P.

    1987-01-01

    This paper deals with the application to HOE's of the experience acquired by CISE Holographic Labora-tory in the embossing technique of 3D or 2D images. The embossing of HOE's in plastic transparent materials is not able, up to this time, of performing the high diffraction efficiencies associated with HOE's recorded by DCG or photopolymers. However a large number of applications requires the production of great quantity, medium standard, low cost special optical elements to be used in rather complex instruments. Some notes about the embossing process and example of industrial components under development are reported.

  18. Multi-element optical waveguide sensor: General concept and design.

    PubMed

    Smardzewski, R R

    1988-02-01

    A prototype of a self-contained multi-element optical waveguide sensor for detection and identification of the constituents of gaseous or liquid mixtures has been fabricated. The device consists of eight optical waveguides, each coated with a thin film known to react specifically with one or more components in a multicomponent system. An array of eight sequentially-activated light-emitting diodes is attached to the waveguide assembly in such a fashion as to activate each detection channel separately. Each waveguide is a fiber-optic coupled to a single high-gain, low-noise photomultiplier tube or photodiode/operational amplifier detector. The amplified signals can be displayed visually or input to a microprocessor pattern-recognition algorithm. CMOS analog switches/multiplexers are used in feedback loops to control automatic gain-ranging, light-level adjustment and channel-sequencing. Preliminary experiments involving the monitoring of redox/pH changes are discussed. PMID:18964475

  19. Athermalization and thermal characteristics of multilayer diffractive optical elements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ju; Xue, Changxi

    2015-11-20

    A mathematical model to analyze the thermal characteristics of the multilayer diffractive optical elements (MLDOEs) is presented with consideration of the thermal characteristics for the refractive optical elements and single-layer diffractive optical elements. The analysis process of athermalization for MLDOEs by using the opto-thermal expansion coefficient of optical materials is given. Meanwhile, the microstructure heights of surface relief MLDOEs, the optical path difference, and the polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency with the ambient temperature changed are analyzed. The analysis results can be used to guide an athermalization design for the hybrid refractive-diffractive optical systems with MLDOEs. PMID:26836521

  20. Modal liquid crystal array of optical elements.

    PubMed

    Algorri, J F; Love, G D; Urruchi, V

    2013-10-21

    In this study, a novel liquid crystal array based on modal control principle is proposed and demonstrated. The advanced device comprises a six striped electrode structure that forms a configurable 2D matrix of optical elements. A simulation program based on the Frank-Oseen equations and modal control theory has been developed to predict the device electrooptic response, that is, voltage distribution, interference pattern and unwrapped phase. A low-power electronics circuit, that generates complex waveforms, has been built for driving the device. A combined variation of the waveform amplitude and phase has provided a high tuning versatility to the device. Thus, the simulations have demonstrated the generation of a liquid crystal prism array with tunable slope. The proposed device has also been configured as an axicon array. Test measurements have allowed us to demonstrate that electrooptic responses, simulated and empirical, are fairly in agreement. PMID:24150324

  1. Optical lumped element microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, Danica; Mazin, Benjamin A.; Bumble, Bruce; Meeker, Seth; O'Brien, Kieran; McHugh, Sean; Strader, Matthew; Langman, Eric

    2012-07-01

    Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors, or MKIDs, have proven to be a powerful cryogenic detector technology due to their sensitivity and the ease with which they can be multiplexed into large arrays. An MKID is an energy sensor based on a photon-variable superconducting inductance in a lithographed microresonator. It is capable of functioning as both a photon detector across the electromagnetic spectrum and a particle detector. We have recently demonstrated the world's first photon-counting, energy-resolving, ultraviolet, optical, and near infrared MKID focal plane array in the ARCONS camera at the Palomar 200" telescope. Optical Lumped Element (OLE) MKID arrays have significant advantages over semiconductor detectors such as charge coupled devices (CCDs). They can count individual photons with essentially no false counts and determine the energy (to a few percent) and arrival time (to ≍1μs) of every photon, with good quantum efficiency. Initial devices were degraded by substrate events from photons passing through the Titanium Nitride (TiN) material of the resonator and being absorbed in the substrate. Recent work has eliminated this issue, with a solution found to be increasing the thickness of the TiN resonator from 20 to 60 nm.

  2. Diffractive optical element for creating visual 3D images.

    PubMed

    Goncharsky, Alexander; Goncharsky, Anton; Durlevich, Svyatoslav

    2016-05-01

    A method is proposed to compute and synthesize the microrelief of a diffractive optical element to produce a new visual security feature - the vertical 3D/3D switch effect. The security feature consists in the alternation of two 3D color images when the diffractive element is tilted up/down. Optical security elements that produce the new security feature are synthesized using electron-beam technology. Sample optical security elements are manufactured that produce 3D to 3D visual switch effect when illuminated by white light. Photos and video records of the vertical 3D/3D switch effect of real optical elements are presented. The optical elements developed can be replicated using standard equipment employed for manufacturing security holograms. The new optical security feature is easy to control visually, safely protected against counterfeit, and designed to protect banknotes, documents, ID cards, etc. PMID:27137530

  3. Using multiple diffractive optical elements in infrared lens design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, R. Lawrence; High, Martin; Strnad, Vladimir

    1999-07-01

    Many IR lenses include Diffractive Optical Elements (DOEs) which have been incorporated to reduce the lens complexity and/or the tolerance sensitivity. In many cases the diffractive surface includes an asphere to achieve further aberration correction. For complex lens systems such as IR multi-FOV and IR zoom lenses there is a strong motivation to use multiple diffractive optical elements. This paper reviews the performance impact and productivity advantages of using multiple diffractive optical elements in an IR lens.

  4. Transmissive Diffractive Optical Element Solar Concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baron, Richard; Moynihan, Philip; Price, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    Solar-thermal-radiation concentrators in the form of transmissive diffractive optical elements (DOEs) have been proposed as alternatives to mirror-type solar concentrators now in use. In comparison with functionally equivalent mirror-type solar concentrators, the transmissive, diffractive solar concentrators would weigh and cost less, and would be subject to relaxed mechanical tolerances. A DOE concentrator would be made from a thin, flat disk or membrane of a transmissive material having a suitable index of refraction. By virtue of its thinness, the DOE concentrator would have an areal mass density significantly less than that of a functionally equivalent conventional mirror. The DOE concentrator would have a relatively wide aperture--characterized by a focal-length/aperture-diameter ratio ('f number') on the order of 1. A kinoform (a surface-relief phase hologram) of high diffractive order would be microfabricated onto one face of the disk. The kinoform (see figure) would be designed to both diffract and refract incident solar radiation onto a desired focal region, without concern for forming an image of the Sun. The high diffractive order of this kinoform (in contradistinction to the low diffractive orders of some other kinoforms) would be necessary to obtain the desired f number of 1, which, in turn, would be necessary for obtaining a desired concentration ratio of 2,500 or greater. The design process of optimizing the concentration ratio of a proposed DOE solar concentrator includes computing convolutions of the optical bandwidth of the Sun with the optical transmission of the diffractive medium. Because, as in the cases of other non-imaging, light-concentrating optics, image quality is not a design requirement, the process also includes trading image quality against concentration ratio. A baseline design for one example calls for an aperture diameter of 1 m. This baseline design would be scalable to a diameter as large as 10 m, or to a smaller diameter for a

  5. Determination of positions of optical elements of the human eye

    SciTech Connect

    Galetskii, S O; Cherezova, T Yu

    2009-02-28

    An original method for noninvasive determining the positions of elements of intraocular optics is proposed. The analytic dependence of the measurement error on the optical-scheme parameters and the restriction in distance from the element being measured are determined within the framework of the method proposed. It is shown that the method can be efficiently used for determining the position of elements in the classical Gullstrand eye model and personalised eye models. The positions of six optical surfaces of the Gullstrand eye model and four optical surfaces of the personalised eye model can be determined with an error of less than 0.25 mm. (human eye optics)

  6. Photovoltaic concentrator assembly with optically active cover

    DOEpatents

    Plesniak, Adam P

    2014-01-21

    A photovoltaic concentrator assembly that includes a housing that defines an internal volume and includes a rim, wherein the rim defines an opening into the internal volume, a photovoltaic cell positioned in the internal volume, and an optical element that includes an optically active body and a flange extending outward from the body, wherein the flange is sealingly engaged with the rim of the housing to enclose the internal volume.

  7. Optical choppers with high speed rotating elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duma, Virgil-Florin; Demian, Dorin; Cira, Octavian

    2014-05-01

    Choppers are optomechatronic devices used for the modulation of light: to attenuate or eliminate certain wavelength ranges or to generate series of laser impulses with different profiles. We have previously made a detailed study on choppers with rotating wheels with different configurations (with windows with linear and with non-linear margins) - and for different types of laser beams (i.e., top-hat, Gaussian and Bessel). In this paper we report a novel configuration of optical choppers with fast rotating elements (patent pending). The possible configurations of the device are discussed, and several chopper types are presented. The modulation functions of one of the types of choppers newly introduced (i.e., the functions of the transmitted flux) are deduced and studied with regard to the geometry of the device. Comparison with other types of choppers - classical and eclipse (the latter introduced by us) - are being made. Aspects like chop frequency, attenuation coefficient, and profile of the light impulses transmitted by the device are taken into account.

  8. Optically active quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerard, Valerie; Govan, Joseph; Loudon, Alexander; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Gun'ko, Yurii K.

    2015-10-01

    The main goal of our research is to develop new types of technologically important optically active quantum dot (QD) based materials, study their properties and explore their biological applications. For the first time chiral II-VI QDs have been prepared by us using microwave induced heating with the racemic (Rac), D- and L-enantiomeric forms of penicillamine as stabilisers. Circular dichroism (CD) studies of these QDs have shown that D- and L-penicillamine stabilised particles produced mirror image CD spectra, while the particles prepared with a Rac mixture showed only a weak signal. It was also demonstrated that these QDs show very broad emission bands between 400 and 700 nm due to defects or trap states on the surfaces of the nanocrystals. These QDs have demonstrated highly specific chiral recognition of various biological species including aminoacids. The utilisation of chiral stabilisers also allowed the preparation of new water soluble white emitting CdS nano-tetrapods, which demonstrated circular dichroism in the band-edge region of the spectrum. Biological testing of chiral CdS nanotetrapods displayed a chiral bias for an uptake of the D- penicillamine stabilised nano-tetrapods by cancer cells. It is expected that this research will open new horizons in the chemistry of chiral nanomaterials and their application in nanobiotechnology, medicine and optical chemo- and bio-sensing.

  9. Integrated optical devices using bacteriorhodopsin as active nonlinear optical material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dér, András; Fábián, László; Valkai, Sándor; Wolff, Elmar; Ramsden, Jeremy; Ormos, Pál

    2006-08-01

    Coupling of optical data-processing devices with microelectronics, telecocommunication and sensory functions, is among the biggest challenges in molecular electronics. Intensive research is going on to find suitable nonlinear optical materials that could meet the demanding requirements of optoelectronic applications, especially regarding high sensitivity and stability. In addition to inorganic and organic crystals, biological molecules have also been considered for use in integrated optics, among which the bacterial chromoprotein, bacteriorhodopsin (bR) generated the most interest. bR undergoes enormous absorption and concomitant refractive index changes upon initiation of a cyclic series of photoreactions by a burst of actinic light. This effect can be exploited to create highly versatile all-optical logical elements. We demonstrate the potential of this approach by investigating the static and dynamic response of several basic elements of integrated optical devices. Our results show that, due to its relatively high refractive index changes, bR can be used as an active nonlinear optical material to produce a variety of integrated optical switching and modulation effects.

  10. Method of holding optical elements without deformation during their fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Hed, P.P.

    1997-04-29

    An improved method for securing and removing an optical element to and from a blocking tool without causing deformation of the optical element is disclosed. A lens tissue is placed on the top surface of the blocking tool. Dots of UV cement are applied to the lens tissue without any of the dots contacting each other. An optical element is placed on top of the blocking tool with the lens tissue sandwiched therebetween. The UV cement is then cured. After subsequent fabrication steps, the bonded blocking tool, lens tissue, and optical element are placed in a debonding solution to soften the UV cement. The optical element is then removed from the blocking tool. 16 figs.

  11. Micro-taper as focusing or scattering optical element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtyarev, S. A.; Ustinov, A. V.; Khonina, S. N.

    2016-04-01

    We consider micro-taper (narrow refractive axicon) as optical element which is focusing or scattering in dependence on axicon's cone angle. The diffraction of laser beam by micro-taper is simulated by two methods: multiply internal ray reflections using geometrical approach and Helmholtz equation solving using finite elements method. Based on ray optics we derive analytic formulas for conical angles values which provide focusing or scattering features of micro-taper. Numerical simulation by finite elements method verifies theoretical results.

  12. Method And Apparatus For Coupling Optical Elements To Optoelectronic Devices For Manufacturing Optical Transceiver Modules

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Gene R.; Armendariz, Marcelino G.; Bryan, Robert P.; Carson, Richard F.; Chu, Dahwey; Duckett, III, Edwin B.; Giunta, Rachel Knudsen; Mitchell, Robert T.; McCormick, Frederick B.; Peterson, David W.; Rising, Merideth A.; Reber, Cathleen A.; Reysen, Bill H.

    2005-06-14

    A process is provided for aligning and connecting at least one optical fiber to at least one optoelectronic device so as to couple light between at least one optical fiber and at least one optoelectronic device. One embodiment of this process comprises the following steps: (1) holding at least one optical element close to at least one optoelectronic device, at least one optical element having at least a first end; (2) aligning at least one optical element with at least one optoelectronic device; (3) depositing a first non-opaque material on a first end of at least one optoelectronic device; and (4) bringing the first end of at least one optical element proximate to the first end of at least one optoelectronic device in such a manner that the first non-opaque material contacts the first end of at least one optoelectronic device and the first end of at least one optical element. The optical element may be an optical fiber, and the optoelectronic device may be a vertical cavity surface emitting laser. The first non-opaque material may be a UV optical adhesive that provides an optical path and mechanical stability. In another embodiment of the alignment process, the first end of at least one optical element is brought proximate to the first end of at least one optoelectronic device in such a manner that an interstitial space exists between the first end of at least one optoelectronic device and the first end of at least one optical element.

  13. Diffractive optical elements for transformation of modes in lasers

    DOEpatents

    Sridharan, Arun K.; Pax, Paul H.; Heebner, John E.; Drachenberg, Derrek R.; Armstrong, James P.; Dawson, Jay W.

    2015-09-01

    Spatial mode conversion modules are described, with the capability of efficiently transforming a given optical beam profile, at one plane in space into another well-defined optical beam profile at a different plane in space, whose detailed spatial features and symmetry properties can, in general, differ significantly. The modules are comprised of passive, high-efficiency, low-loss diffractive optical elements, combined with Fourier transform optics. Design rules are described that employ phase retrieval techniques and associated algorithms to determine the necessary profiles of the diffractive optical components. System augmentations are described that utilize real-time adaptive optical techniques for enhanced performance as well as power scaling.

  14. Diffractive optical elements for transformation of modes in lasers

    DOEpatents

    Sridharan, Arun K; Pax, Paul H; Heebner, John E; Drachenberg, Derrek R.; Armstrong, James P.; Dawson, Jay W.

    2016-06-21

    Spatial mode conversion modules are described, with the capability of efficiently transforming a given optical beam profile, at one plane in space into another well-defined optical beam profile at a different plane in space, whose detailed spatial features and symmetry properties can, in general, differ significantly. The modules are comprised of passive, high-efficiency, low-loss diffractive optical elements, combined with Fourier transform optics. Design rules are described that employ phase retrieval techniques and associated algorithms to determine the necessary profiles of the diffractive optical components. System augmentations are described that utilize real-time adaptive optical techniques for enhanced performance as well as power scaling.

  15. Design of cubic-phase optical elements using subwavelength microstructures.

    PubMed

    Mirotznik, Mark S; van der Gracht, Joseph; Pustai, David; Mathews, Scott

    2008-01-21

    We describe a design methodology for synthesizing cubic-phase optical elements using two-dimensional subwavelength microstructures. We combined a numerical and experimental approach to demonstrate that by spatially varying the geometric properties of binary subwavelength gratings it is possible to produce a diffractive element with a cubic-phase profile. A test element was designed and fabricated for operation in the LWIR, approximately lambda=10.6 microm. Experimental results verify the cubic-phase nature of the element. PMID:18542199

  16. Application of holographic optical elements to magneto-optic read/write heads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostuk, R. K.; Campbell, E.; Kim, T.

    1993-01-01

    Objectives of this research are to determine the theoretical and practical performance limits of holographic optical elements (HOE's) formed in different recording materials, and to evaluate the application of these components to magneto-optic read/write heads.

  17. Optics activity for hospitalized children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gargallo, Ana; Gómez-Varela, Ana I.; González-Nuñez, Hector; Delgado, Tamara; Almaguer, Citlalli; Cambronero, Ferran; Garcia-Sanchez, Angel; Flores-Arias, Maria T.

    2014-08-01

    USC-OSA is a student chapter whose objective is to bring Optics knowledge closer to the non-optics community. The activity developed at the Hospital school was one of the most important last year. It was consisted in a few Optics experiments and workshops with hospitalized children of different ages and pathologies. The experiments had to be adapted to their physical conditions with the aim of everyone could participate. We think this activity has several benefits including spreading Optics through children meanwhile they have fun and forget their illness for a while.

  18. Scalar limitations of diffractive optical elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Eric G.; Hochmuth, Diane; Moharam, M. G.; Pommet, Drew

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, scalar limitations of diffractive optic components are investigated using coupled wave analyses. Results are presented for linear phase gratings and fanout devices. In addition, a parametric curve is given which correlates feature size with scalar performance.

  19. Diffractive optical element in materials testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvennoinen, Raimo V. J.; Peiponen, Kai-Erik

    1998-09-01

    The object of this paper is to present a sensor based on diffractive optics that can be applied for the materials testing. The present sensor, which is based on the use of a computer-generated hologram (CGH) exploits the holographic imagery. The CGH-sensor was introduced for inspection of surface roughness and flatness of metal surfaces. The results drawn out by the present sensor are observed to be in accordance with the experimental data. Together with the double exposure holographic interferometry (DEHI) and digital electronic speckle pattern interferometry (DSPI) in elasticity inspection, the sensor was applied for the investigations of surface quality of opaque fragile materials, which are pharmaceutical compacts. The optical surface quality was observed to be related to the porosity of the pharmaceutical tablets. The CGH-sensor was also applied for investigations of optical quality of thin films as PLZT ceramics and coating of pharmaceutical compacts. The surfaces of PLZT samples showed fluctuations in optical curvature, and wedgeness for all the cases studied. For pharmaceutical compacts, the optical signals were observed to depend to a great extent on the optical constants of the coatings and the substrates, and in addition to the surface porosity under the coating.

  20. Organic Light-Sensitive Media For Holographic Optical Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barachevsky, Valery A.

    1990-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide an overview of the art organic media for photofabrication of holographic optical elements. Perforce data are presented for a variety of relevant organic light-sensitive media manufactured by Soviet scientists.

  1. Diffractive Elements in the Optical System: Successes, Challenges, and Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greisukh, G. I.; Ezhov, E. G.; Levin, I. A.; Kazin, S. V.; Stepanov, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    Correction of aberrations is regarded as one of the most successful applications of diffractive optical elements in the optical system. The ways of overcoming these negative properties of the diffractive elements as spherochromatism and power spectral selectivity are presented. Using the technique given in this paper, a compact plastic-lens refractive-diffractive objective, which can operate in a wide spectral range including the visible and near-infrared radiation, has been designed.

  2. SORPTION OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY BY ACTIVATED CARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mechanisms and rate of elemental mercury (HgO) capture by activated carbons have been studied using a bench-scale apparatus. Three types of activated carbons, two of which are thermally activated (PC-100 and FGD) and one with elemental sulfur (S) impregnated in it (HGR), were...

  3. System and method for reproducibly mounting an optical element

    DOEpatents

    Eisenbies, Stephen; Haney, Steven

    2005-05-31

    The present invention provides a two-piece apparatus for holding and aligning the MEMS deformable mirror. The two-piece apparatus comprises a holding plate for fixedly holding an adaptive optics element in an overall optical system and a base spatially fixed with respect to the optical system and adapted for mounting and containing the holding plate. The invention further relates to a means for configuring the holding plate through adjustments to each of a number of off-set pads touching each of three orthogonal plane surfaces on the base, wherein through the adjustments the orientation of the holding plate, and the adaptive optics element attached thereto, can be aligned with respect to the optical system with six degrees of freedom when aligning the plane surface of the optical element. The mounting system thus described also enables an operator to repeatedly remove and restore the adaptive element in the optical system without the need to realign the system once that element has been aligned.

  4. Phase encryption of biometrics in diffractive optical elements.

    PubMed

    Johnson, E G; Brasher, J D

    1996-08-15

    A new technique for the optical encoding of images is presented. The method of generalized projections is used to design diffractive optical elements for the phase encryption of biometrics for security applications. The encryption algorithm converges rapidly, and the decryption is seen to be secure and tolerant to additive noise. PMID:19876322

  5. Capabilites of an arch element for correcting conformal optical domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparrold, Scott W.; Knapp, David J.; Manhart, Paul K.; Elsberry, Kevin W.

    1999-10-01

    This paper presents an approach for correcting conformal missile domes with a non-rotationally symmetric optical element called an arch. A parametric study in terms of aerodynamics, fineness ratio, maximum seeker look angle and dome index of refraction will demonstrate its capabilities for correcting conformal domes. A nomograph for trading optical performance versus relative missile range will also be presented.

  6. Phase encryption of biometrics in diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, E. G.; Brasher, J. D.

    1996-08-01

    A new technique for the optical encoding of images is presented. The method of generalized projections is used to design diffractive optical elements for the phase encryption of biometrics for security applications. The encryption algorithm converges rapidly, and the decryption is seen to be secure and tolerant to additive noise.

  7. Active Faraday optical frequency standard.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Wei; Chen, Jingbiao

    2014-11-01

    We propose the mechanism of an active Faraday optical clock, and experimentally demonstrate an active Faraday optical frequency standard based on narrow bandwidth Faraday atomic filter by the method of velocity-selective optical pumping of cesium vapor. The center frequency of the active Faraday optical frequency standard is determined by the cesium 6 (2)S(1/2) F=4 to 6 (2)P(3/2) F'=4 and 5 crossover transition line. The optical heterodyne beat between two similar independent setups shows that the frequency linewidth reaches 281(23) Hz, which is 1.9×10(4) times smaller than the natural linewidth of the cesium 852-nm transition line. The maximum emitted light power reaches 75 μW. The active Faraday optical frequency standard reported here has advantages of narrow linewidth and reduced cavity pulling, which can readily be extended to other atomic transition lines of alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms trapped in optical lattices at magic wavelengths, making it useful for new generation of optical atomic clocks. PMID:25361349

  8. Diffractive Optical Elements based in Diamond Like Carbon (DLC) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparvoli, M. Marina; Mansano, Ronaldo D.

    2008-04-01

    In this work was developed a Diffractive Optical Elements (DOEs) based in amorphous hydrogenated carbon (Diamond Like Carbon) films. DOEs can be built in large scale with high reproducibility and eliminating almost stages used in optical elements tradicional fabrication, as abrasion and burnishing. These devices had been built by the etching of DLC deposited by sputtering process. The characterizations of these devices are realized by optical analyzes with a 633 nm HeNe laser. The DLC films roughness and etch rate after process were measured by high step meter.

  9. Specular optical activity of achiral metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plum, Eric; Fedotov, Vassili A.; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2016-04-01

    Optical activity in 3D-chiral media in the form of circular dichroism and birefringence is a fundamental phenomenon that serves as evidence of life forms and is widely used in spectroscopy. Even in 3D-chiral media exhibiting strong transmission optical activity, the reflective effect is weak and sometimes undetectable. Here, we report that specular optical activity at structured interfaces can be very strong. Resonant polarization rotation reaching 25 ° and reflectivity contrast exceeding 50% for oppositely circularly polarized waves are observed for microwaves reflected by a metasurface with structural elements lacking two-fold rotational symmetry. The effect arises at oblique incidence from a 3D-chiral arrangement of the wave's direction and the metasurface's structure that itself does not possess chiral elements. Specular optical activity of such magnitude is unprecedented. It is fundamentally different from the polarization effects occurring upon scattering, reflection, and transmission from surfaces with 2D-chiral patterns. The scale of the effect allows applications in polarization sensitive devices and surface spectroscopies.

  10. Optical diffractive elements for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikula, Grzegorz; Kolodziejczyk, Andrzej; Makowski, Michal; Sypek, Maciej

    2005-09-01

    We present a class of diffractive elements that can be used in medical applications. We describe their physical properties, in particular the point spread functions and modulation transfer functions. Our analyses consist of the detailed numerical simulations. The obtained results correspond to the different setup parameters and confirm usefulness of such structures in medical aspect, especially in presbyopia treatment.

  11. Presbyopia compensation with a light sword optical element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ares Garcia, J.; Bará, S.; Gomez Garcia, M.; Jaroszewicz, Z.; Kołodziejczyk, A.; Petelczyc, K.

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents numerical analysis of imaging quality of a refractive light sword optical element (LSOE). For comparison other optical imaging elements with extended focal depth, such as the bifocal lens, the trifocal lens, the forward axicon and the backward axicon, were also checked. The parameters of all elements were assumed according to the human eye parameters in order to check possibilities of presbyopia compensation. Obtained results allow to state that the LSOE is a promising solution for compensation of insufficient human eye accommodation.

  12. Diffractive micro-optical element with nonpoint response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soifer, Victor A.; Golub, Michael A.

    1993-01-01

    Common-use diffractive lenses have microrelief zones in the form of simple rings that provide only an optical power but do not contain any image information. They have a point-image response under point-source illumination. We must use a more complicated non-point response to focus a light beam into different light marks, letter-type images as well as for optical pattern recognition. The current presentation describes computer generation of diffractive micro- optical elements with complicated curvilinear zones of a regular piecewise-smooth structure and grey-level or staircase phase microrelief. The manufacture of non-point response elements uses the steps of phase-transfer calculation and orthogonal-scan masks generation or lithographic glass etching. Ray-tracing method is shown to be applicable in this task. Several working samples of focusing optical elements generated by computer and photolithography are presented. Using the experimental results we discuss here such applications as laser branding.

  13. OPTOGELs: optically active xerogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canva, Michael; Georges, Patrick M.; Brun, Alain; Chaput, Frederic; Devreux, Francois; Boilot, Jean-Pierre

    1992-12-01

    Using the sol-gel process, we synthesized zirconia/silica matrices doped with different organic dyes (rhodamine 640, ...). These samples were used to perform optical Kerr effect experiments with sequences of ultrashort light pulses (100 fs, 620 nm, 1 (mu) J focused on 50 micrometers diameter) to induce refractive index changes. A permanent birefringence around 7 X 10-5 was obtained. By changing the direction of the polarization of the excitation pulses, we were able to locally control the directions of the neutral axes. We thus demonstrated the possibility of using this media as an all optical memory matrix and such doped xerogels will subsequently be referred to as OPTOGELS. We interpret our results as the possibility of locally controlling the orientation of the doping molecules encaged in the solid host matrix. The memory effect is probably due to links of hydrogen bond type between the organic molecules and the pore surface which prevent thermal reorientation. The electric field of the optical excitation pulses exerts a torque on the molecules. If this torque is greater than the energy linking the molecules to the pore surface, the molecules are temporarily released and aligned in the direction of the pulse polarization. Based on this interpretation, we have developed a model to explain the evolution of the birefringence as a function of the number of excitation pulses.

  14. Holographic polarization-selective elements in optical network applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yang-Tung; Lin, Meng-Fu; Deng, Jiun-Shjou; Fan, Kai-Ting; Chen, Mu-Jung

    1996-09-01

    Highly polarization-selective holographic elements can be achieved with suitable designs. The presented holographic polarization-selective elements are compact and light- weight, and the feature of normally incident and output coupling provide better flexibility and easier alignment for system applications. With suitable designs and arrangements, these elements can be combined to implement star couplers to distribute equal optical power from each input channel to all output channels. In addition, based on our holographic polarization-selective elements with electro-optic halfwave plates, holographic polarization-dependent and polarization- independent optical switches are introduced. The structures to use these switches in various compact 3D multistage interconnection networks for reconfigurable interconnections and in self-healing rings for network service restoration are presented.

  15. Sighting optics including an optical element having a first focal length and a second focal length

    DOEpatents

    Crandall, David Lynn

    2011-08-01

    One embodiment of sighting optics according to the teachings provided herein may include a front sight and a rear sight positioned in spaced-apart relation. The rear sight includes an optical element having a first focal length and a second focal length. The first focal length is selected so that it is about equal to a distance separating the optical element and the front sight and the second focal length is selected so that it is about equal to a target distance. The optical element thus brings into simultaneous focus, for a user, images of the front sight and the target.

  16. Diffraction efficiency analysis for multi-level diffractive optical elements

    SciTech Connect

    Erteza, I.A.

    1995-11-01

    Passive optical components can be broken down into two main groups: Refractive elements and diffractive elements. With recent advances in manufacturing technologies, diffractive optical elements are becoming increasingly more prevalent in optical systems. It is therefore important to be able to understand and model the behavior of these elements. In this report, we present a thorough analysis of a completely general diffractive optical element (DOE). The main goal of the analysis is to understand the diffraction efficiency and power distribution of the various modes affected by the DOE. This is critical to understanding cross talk and power issues when these elements are used in actual systems. As mentioned, the model is based on a completely general scenario for a DOE. This allows the user to specify the details to model a wide variety of diffractive elements. The analysis is implemented straightforwardly in Mathematica. This report includes the development of the analysis, the Mathematica implementation of the model and several examples using the Mathematical analysis tool. It is intended that this tool be a building block for more specialized analyses.

  17. Holographic optical element for visual display applications.

    PubMed

    McCauley, D G; Simpson, C E; Murbach, W J

    1973-02-01

    Off-axis and off-bisector reflection-type holographic visual display elements have been recorded in dichromated gelatin deposited on planar or spherical shell substrates of glass or Plexiglas. A procedure for bonding gelatin to Plexiglas is given. Holographic elements are recorded at the argon wavelength of 514.5 nm and reconstructed with spectral lines from a low pressure mercury arc lamp. Measured image characteristics for a flat substrate hologram agree with ray-tracing calculations. A swelling of the gelatin by approximately 6.6% after processing does not perceptibly affect the dispersion, astigmatism, or distortion in the image, that is, the grating equation depends on the spacing between the fringes on the surface of the gelatin and is not affected by the swelling or shrinking. However, the Bragg equation depends on the distance normal to the fringe planes and is affected by thickness changes of the gelatin. Therefore, this thickness change is taken as an independent parameter and used to adjust the wavelength for maximum diffraction efficiency, without affecting the image angle. Data reveal a near linear relationship between the dichromate concentration of 0.5-10% used to photosensitive the gelatin and the display wavelength of maximum diffraction efficiency. Lateral dispersion is 0.12 +/- 0.01 degrees / nanometer for both planar and spherical shell substrate elements recorded in quite similar geometry, but their astigmatisms are not alike. PMID:20125273

  18. Technological applications of focusing optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abul'khanov, Stanislav R.

    2015-03-01

    The article analyzes a wide range of technologies generated by the application of focusators of laser radiation. I give a brief review of the methods of monitoring substrate and forming a diffraction microrelief, optical systems and devices for experimental research of focusators, laser technologies and units on their basis. In particular, I analyze using focusator into the ring for growing single-crystalline fibers in device of mini pedestal, using focusator into a set of rings for information-measuring system of three-dimensional control of grid spacers and other applications of focusators.

  19. Precision holographic optical elements in Bayfol HX photopolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruder, Friedrich-Karl; Bang, Hyungseok; Fäcke, Thomas; Hagen, Rainer; Hönel, Dennis; Orselli, Enrico; Rewitz, Christian; Rölle, Thomas; Vukicevic, Dalibor; Walze, Günther

    2016-03-01

    The versatility of Volume Holographic Optical Elements (vHOE) is high, especially because of their tunable angular and spectral Bragg selectivity. Those unique lightweight, thin and flat optical elements are enabled by the new instant developing photopolymer film Bayfol® HX technology, which allows to mass produce cost effective diffractive optics due to its simplified and robust holographic recording process. From a pure scientific point of view volume holography is well established. In practice though, commercially available optical design software is not adapted to handle the specific characteristics of photopolymer diffractive optical elements and their recording. To achieve high quality vHOE precision optics, the recording setup needs to accommodate several aspects that will be covered in this paper. We report on means how to deal with photopolymer shrinkage and average refractive index changes of the recording media. An important part in diffractive optics design is the compensation of different conditions between the holographic recording setup and in a final product containing the vHOE. Usually substrates might need to be changed (in material, in refractive index) as well the illumination sources are using incoherent light having angular and spectral emission profiles with finite bandwidth. Recently special in- and out-coupling vHOEs are becoming attractive e.g. in near eye displays and in compact lighting devices. We will report on design considerations and adjustments to the recording condition for a specific in-coupling vHOE and demonstrate the effects of pre-compensation on this example.

  20. Micro-optical elements for optical wireless applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xian; Guerrero, Daniel; Klukas, Richard; Holzman, Jonathan F.

    2013-09-01

    Customized high-contact-angle microlenses are presented for optical wireless communication (OWC) and optical wireless location (OWL) applications. These microlenses are fabricated by way of an electro-dispensing technique to establish wide field-of-views (FOVs). Each microlens is formed from dispensed UV-curable polymer with pressurecontrol defining the microlens volume and a voltage on the metal needle tip defining the microlens shape (by way of electrowetting). UV curing is then applied. Microlenses with FOVs up to 90° are fabricated for high-density integration above a CMOS imaging sensor for wide-FOV operation in emerging OWC and OWL applications. Both theoretical raytracing analyses and experimental imaging results are presented with good agreement.

  1. Spectral diffraction efficiency characterization of broadband diffractive optical elements.

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Junoh; Cruz-Cabrera, Alvaro Augusto; Tanbakuchi, Anthony

    2013-03-01

    Diffractive optical elements, with their thin profile and unique dispersion properties, have been studied and utilized in a number of optical systems, often yielding smaller and lighter systems. Despite the interest in and study of diffractive elements, the application has been limited to narrow spectral bands. This is due to the etch depths, which are optimized for optical path differences of only a single wavelength, consequently leading to rapid decline in efficiency as the working wavelength shifts away from the design wavelength. Various broadband diffractive design methodologies have recently been developed that improve spectral diffraction efficiency and expand the working bandwidth of diffractive elements. We have developed diffraction efficiency models and utilized the models to design, fabricate, and test two such extended bandwidth diffractive designs.

  2. Design and Analysis of Single and Cascaded Diffractive Optical Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Eric Gordon

    The design of complex diffractive optical elements requires both a mathematical formulation of the problem and the appropriate optimization method. The mathematical formulations are very complex, since in some circumstances scalar based strategies are acceptable, whereas, in other cases exact solutions to Maxwell's equations are required. Once the mathematical formulations are coupled with the appropriate optimization algorithms, then the design of single and cascaded diffractive optical elements can be exploited. This Dissertation develops the mathematical framework for diffractive optics utilizing scalar based design and exact solutions to complex periodic dielectric structures. Additionally, a new method of optimization is introduced which is based on the foundations of genetics. This methodology is used to design unique elements for wavefront splitting, polarization filtering, and wavelength filtering. An additional algorithm is developed for scalar based solutions using variants of existing methods, resulting in some interesting designs concerning data encryption and beam shaping.

  3. Compact holographic printer using RGB waveguide holographic optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyun, Kyungsuk P.; Choi, Chilsung; Morozov, Alexander V.; Kim, Sunil; An, Jungkwuen

    2013-03-01

    We propose compact holographic printer using RGB waveguide hologram while reducing overall device size and quantity of elements with integrated functionality of each optical element. For glasses-free 3D experience anywhere anytime, it is critical to make holography device that can be as compact and integrated as possible. Compared to the conventional optics-based structure, our RGB WGH-based one reduces the overall size by 20 times, the number of components by 10 times, and improves the optical efficiency by 3 times, with comparable holographic quality to the conventional optics-based approaches. Proposed research can be useful for both general consumers and professionals like 3D photography and medical 3D image printing applications.

  4. Diffractive Optical Elements for Lidar Beam Scanning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordin, Gregory P.

    1996-01-01

    Wind measurement from space can provide critical data for understanding weather patterns and large-scale storm phenomena. An instrument for providing such measurements is currently under development at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. The instrument utilizes a pulsed coherent lidar system operating at a wavelength of 2.06 micrometers in order to achieve decreased weight, size, and cost compared to systems operating at longer wavelengths, and it is being developed to be compatible with the capabilities of small satellites. A key aspect of such an orbital lidar system is that the beam must be conically scanned after it exits the final beam expansion telescope. Previous work indicates that the aperture of the beam expansion telescope should be 50 cm with a scanner half-angle of 300 and a rotation rate of 10 RPM. The critical requirements for the beam scanning element include a 50 cm aperture, an induced wavefront error of less than lambda/10, and high efficiency deflection (i.e., 95+ % of the incident light is deflected). This report is intended to provide a brief overview and discussion of potential technologies for space-borne laser radar (lidar) beam scanning.

  5. Method and system for high power reflective optical elements

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, Stavros G.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Negres, Raluca A.

    2013-03-12

    A method of repairing damage in an optical element includes providing a laser system including at least one optical element having a coating layer having an incident light surface and directing a laser pulse from the laser system to impinge on the incident light surface. The method also includes sustaining damage to a portion of the incident light surface and melting the damaged portion of the incident light surface and a region adjacent to the damaged portion. The method further includes flowing material from the region adjacent the damaged portion to the damaged portion and solidifying the material in the damaged portion and the region adjacent to the damaged portion.

  6. Cascaded diffractive optical elements for improved multiplane image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Gülses, A Alkan; Jenkins, B Keith

    2013-05-20

    Computer-generated phase-only diffractive optical elements in a cascaded setup are designed by one deterministic and one stochastic algorithm for multiplane image formation. It is hypothesized that increasing the number of elements as wavefront modulators in the longitudinal dimension would enlarge the available solution space, thus enabling enhanced image reconstruction. Numerical results show that increasing the number of holograms improves quality at the output. Design principles, computational methods, and specific conditions are discussed. PMID:23736247

  7. Survivable virtual optical network embedding with probabilistic network-element failures in elastic optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Cheng, Lei; Luo, Guangjun; Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Yongli; Ding, Huixia; Zhou, Jing; Wang, Yang

    2015-06-01

    The elastic optical networks can elastically allocate spectrum tailored for various bandwidth requirements. In addition, different virtual optical networks (VONs) formed by different applications or service providers need to be embedded on the common physical optical network, it brings virtual optical network embedding (VONE) problem. There is no precise standard to measure the survivability of VON from the failure probability view and take minimum VON failure probability as an objective in a VONE problem. In this paper, we investigate a survivable VONE problem from a new perspective. Considering probabilistic physical network-element failures, a novel metric, named virtual optical network failure probability (VON-FP), is introduced to evaluate the survivability of VONs in elastic optical networks. Moreover, a failure-probability-aware virtual optical network embedding (FPA-VONE) algorithm is proposed to deploy VONs on the physical network elements with small failure probability, and finally to decrease the VON-FP and enhance the spectrum utilization effectively.

  8. Programmable diffractive optical elements for extending the depth of focus in ophthalmic optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Lenny A.; Millán, María. S.; Jaroszewicz, Zbigniew; Kołodziejczyk, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    The depth of focus (DOF) defines the axial range of high lateral resolution in the image space for object position. Optical devices with a traditional lens system typically have a limited DOF. However, there are applications such as in ophthalmology, which require a large DOF in comparison to a traditional optical system, this is commonly known as extended DOF (EDOF). In this paper we explore Programmable Diffractive Optical Elements (PDOEs), with EDOF, as an alternative solution to visual impairments, especially presbyopia. These DOEs were written onto a reflective liquid cystal on silicon (LCoS) spatial light modulator (SLM). Several designs of the elements are analyzed: the Forward Logarithmic Axicon (FLAX), the Axilens (AXL), the Light sword Optical Element (LSOE), the Peacock Eye Optical Element (PE) and Double Peacock Eye Optical Element (DPE). These elements focus an incident plane wave into a segment of the optical axis. The performances of the PDOEs are compared with those of multifocal lenses. In all cases, we obtained the point spread function and the image of an extended object. The results are presented and discussed.

  9. Analog of Optical Elements for Sound Waves in Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Paul; Perkalskis, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    Optical elements manipulate light waves. They may be used to focus the light or to change the phase, the polarization, the direction, or the intensity of light. Many of these functions are often demonstrated with microwaves, since the devices normally available in teaching laboratories produce wavelengths in the centimeter range and are therefore…

  10. Optical activity of BL Lacertae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionov, V.; Blinov, D.; Konstantinova, T.

    2012-04-01

    We perform optical photometric and R-band polarimetric monitoring of BL Lac using 70-cm AZT-8 (CrAO, Ukraine) and 0.4-m LX-200 (St.Petersburg, Russia) telescopes, as a part of GASP project. As reported in Atel#4028, this blazar was found by Fermi LAT in active state on 2012 April 9. Our data show that a sharp optical maximum was reached on the date 2012-04-08UT02:20, R=13.10, while on 2012-04-11UT01:30 R=13.40.

  11. Special diffractive elements for optical trapping fabricated on optical fiber tips using the focused ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues Ribeiro, R. S.; Guerreiro, A.; Viegas, J.; Jorge, P. A. S.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, spiral phase lenses and Fresnel zone lenses for beam tailoring, fabricated on the tip of optical fibers, are reported. The spiral phase lenses allow tailoring the fundamental guided mode, a Gaussian beam, into a Laguerre - Gaussian profile without using additional optical elements. Whereas, the Fresnel lenses are used as focusing systems. The lenses are fabricated using Focused Ion Beam milling, enabling high resolution in the manufacturing process. The output optical intensity profiles matching the numerical simulations are presented and analyzed.

  12. Optical Studies of Active Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewitt, David

    1998-01-01

    This grant was to support optical studies of comets close enough to the sun to be outgassing. The main focus of the observations was drawn to the two extraordinarily bright comets Hyakutake and Hale-Bopp, but other active comets were also studied in detail during the period of funding. Major findings (all fully published) under this grant include: (1) Combined optical and submillimeter observations of the comet/Centaur P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1 were used to study the nature of mass loss from this object. The submillimeter observations show directly that the optically prominent dust coma is ejected by the sublimation of carbon monoxide. Simultaneous optical-submillimeter observations allowed us to test earlier determinations of the dust mass loss rate. (2) We modelled the rotation of cometary nuclei using time-resolved images of dust jets as the primary constraint. (3) We obtained broad-band optical images of several comets for which we subsequently attempted submillimeter observations, in order to test and update the cometary ephemerides. (4) Broad-band continuum images of a set of weakly active comets and, apparently, inactive asteroids were obtained in BVRI using the University of Hawaii 2.2-m telescope. These images were taken in support of a program to test the paradigm that many near-Earth asteroids might be dead or dormant comets. We measured coma vs. nucleus colors in active comets (finding that coma particle scattering is different from, and cannot be simply related to, nucleus color). We obtained spectroscopic observations of weakly active comets and other small bodies using the HIRES spectrograph on the Keck 10-m telescope. These observation place sensitive limits to outgassing from these bodies, aided by the high (40,000) spectral resolution of HIRES.

  13. The application of diffractive optical elements in the optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, D. I.; Tsyganok, E. A.

    2016-04-01

    The article investigates the possibility of using diffractive optical elements on an example of the kinoform in the optical coherence tomography (OCT). The article gives a brief overview of modern methods of research in the OCT, the expediency of development hyperchromatic lenses for spectral OCT systems. The authors made the aberration analysis of diffractive optical element (DOE), conducted a review of its application, and the DOE proposed to use in the example of a kinoform as the main force component of the hyperchromatic lens. In conclusion, the article provides examples of developed hybrid lenses for two spectral ranges, lens transmittance analysis and the assessment of their adaptability.

  14. Diffractive optical elements for the production of synthetic spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, M.B.; Butler, M.A.; Ricco, A.J.

    1997-03-01

    We demonstrate that computer-generated diffractive optical elements can be used to synthesize the infrared spectra of real compounds. In particular, we describe a modified phase-retrieval algorithm that we have used to design diffractive elements of this type and we present experimental results for a diffractive optic which is capable of synthesizing the infrared spectrum of HF between 3600 cm{sup -1} and 4300 cm{sup -1}. The reflection-mode diffractive optic consists of 4096 lines, each 4.5 {mu}m wide, at 16 discrete depths relative to the substrate (from 0 to 1.2 {mu}m), and was fabricated on a silicon wafer using anisotropic reactive ion-beam etching in a four-mask-level process. We propose the use of such elements to replace reference cells in a new type of correlation spectroscopy that we call {open_quotes}holographic correlation spectroscopy.{close_quotes} Storage of a large number of diffractive elements, each producing a synthetic spectrum corresponding to a different target compound, in compact disk-like format, will allow a spectrometer of this type to rapidly determine the composition of unknown samples. Further, this approach can be used to perform correlation-based measurements of hazardous or transient species, for which conventional correlation spectroscopy is impractical.

  15. Tunable Diffractive Optical Elements Based on Shape-Memory Polymers Fabricated via Hot Embossing.

    PubMed

    Schauer, Senta; Meier, Tobias; Reinhard, Maximilian; Röhrig, Michael; Schneider, Marc; Heilig, Markus; Kolew, Alexander; Worgull, Matthias; Hölscher, Hendrik

    2016-04-13

    We introduce actively tunable diffractive optical elements fabricated from shape-memory polymers (SMPs). By utilizing the shape-memory effect of the polymer, at least one crucial attribute of the diffractive optical element (DOE) is tunable and adjustable subsequent to the completed fabrication process. A thermoplastic, transparent, thermoresponsive polyurethane SMP was structured with diverse diffractive microstructures via hot embossing. The tunability was enabled by programming a second, temporary shape into the diffractive optical element by mechanical deformation, either by stretching or a second embossing cycle at low temperatures. Upon exposure to the stimulus heat, the structures change continuously and controllable in a predefined way. We establish the novel concept of shape-memory diffractive optical elements by illustrating their capabilities, with regard to tunability, by displaying the morphing diffractive pattern of a height tunable and a period tunable structure, respectively. A sample where an arbitrary structure is transformed to a second, disparate one is illustrated as well. To prove the applicability of our tunable shape-memory diffractive optical elements, we verified their long-term stability and demonstrated the precise adjustability with a detailed analysis of the recovery dynamics, in terms of temperature dependence and spatially resolved, time-dependent recovery. PMID:26998646

  16. Holographic optical elements for the extreme-ultravioletregime

    SciTech Connect

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Salmassi, Farhad; Gullikson, Eric M.; Anderson, Erik H.

    2006-08-14

    As the development of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography progresses, interest grows in the extension of traditional optical components to the EUV regime. The strong absorption of EUV by most materials and its extremely short wavelength, however, makes it very difficult to implement many components that are commonplace in the longer wavelength regimes. One such component is the diffractive optical element used, for example, in illumination systems to efficiently generate modified pupil fills. Here we demonstrate the fabrication and characterization of EUV binary phase-only computer-generated holograms allowing arbitrary far-field diffraction patterns to be generated.

  17. MERTIS: geometrical calibration of thermal infrared optical system by applying diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, M.; Baumbach, D.; Buder, M.; Börner, A.; Grießbach, D.; Peter, G.; Santier, E.; Säuberlich, T.; Schischmanow, A.; Schrader, S.; Walter, I.

    2015-09-01

    Geometrical sensor calibration is essential for space applications based on high accuracy optical measurements, in this case for the thermal infrared push-broom imaging spectrometer MERTIS. The goal is the determination of the interior sensor orientation. A conventional method is to measure the line of sight for a subset of pixels by single pixel illumination with collimated light. To adjust angles, which define the line of sight of a pixel, a manipulator construction is used. A new method for geometrical sensor calibration is using Diffractive Optical Elements (DOE) in connection with laser beam equipment. Diffractive optical elements (DOE) are optical microstructures, which are used to split an incoming laser beam with a dedicated wavelength into a number of beams with well-known propagation directions. As the virtual sources of the diffracted beams are points at infinity, the resulting image is invariant against translation. This particular characteristic allows a complete geometrical sensor calibration with only one taken image avoiding complex adjustment procedures, resulting in a significant reduction of calibration effort. We present a new method for geometrical calibration of a thermal infrared optical system, including an thermal infrared test optics and the MERTIS spectrometer bolometer detector. The fundamentals of this new approach for geometrical infrared optical systems calibration by applying diffractive optical elements and the test equipment are shown.

  18. Different ways to active optical frequency standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Duo; Xue, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiaogang; Chen, Jingbiao

    2016-06-01

    Active optical frequency standard, or active optical clock, is a new concept of optical frequency standard, where a weak feedback with phase coherence information in optical bad-cavity limitation is formed, and the continuous self-sustained coherent stimulated emission between two atomic transition levels with population inversion is realized. Through ten years of both theoretical and experimental exploration, the narrow linewidth and suppression of cavity pulling effect of active optical frequency standard have been initially proved. In this paper, after a simple review, we will mainly present the most recent experimental progresses of active optical frequency standards in Peking University, including 4-level cesium active optical frequency standards and active Faraday optical frequency standards. The future development of active optical frequency standards is also discussed.

  19. Optical positions of active galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meurs, E. J. A.

    1984-04-01

    Optical positions are calculated for 26 active galaxies (mainly Markarian dn Arakelian objects), using the plate-measuring apparatus at Leiden Observatory on the O plates of the Palomar Sky Survey and applying AGK-3 data in the reductions. The results are presented in a table and have accuracy 0.5 arcsec; a comparison with the positions determined by Clements (1981, 1983) for 19 objects reveals a possible offset of -0.28 arcsec in the right-ascension determinations.

  20. Optical control of antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velema, Willem A.; van der Berg, Jan Pieter; Hansen, Mickel J.; Szymanski, Wiktor; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial resistance is a major problem in the modern world, stemming in part from the build-up of antibiotics in the environment. Novel molecular approaches that enable an externally triggered increase in antibiotic activity with high spatiotemporal resolution and auto-inactivation are highly desirable. Here we report a responsive, broad-spectrum, antibacterial agent that can be temporally activated with light, whereupon it auto-inactivates on the scale of hours. The use of such a ‘smart’ antibiotic might prevent the build-up of active antimicrobial material in the environment. Reversible optical control over active drug concentration enables us to obtain pharmacodynamic information. Precisely localized control of activity is achieved, allowing the growth of bacteria to be confined to defined patterns, which has potential for the development of treatments that avoid interference with the endogenous microbial population in other parts of the organism.

  1. Method of Bonding Optical Elements with Near-Zero Displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, David; McClelland, Ryan; Byron, Glenn; Evans, Tyler

    2012-01-01

    The International X-ray Project seeks to build an x-ray telescope using thousands of pieces of thin and flexible glass mirror segments. Each mirror segment must be bonded into a housing in nearly perfect optical alignment without distortion. Forces greater than 0.001 Newton, or displacements greater than 0.5 m of the glass, cause unacceptable optical distortion. All known epoxies shrink as they cure. Even the epoxies with the least amount of shrinkage (<0.01%) cause unacceptable optical distortion and misalignment by pulling the mirror segments towards the housing as it cures. A related problem is that the shrinkage is not consistent or predictable so that it cannot be accounted for in the setup (i.e., if all of the bonds shrunk an equal amount, there would be no problem). A method has been developed that allows two components to be joined with epoxy in such a way that reduces the displacement caused by epoxy shrinking as it cures to less than 200 nm. The method involves using ultraviolet-cured epoxy with a displacement sensor and a nanoactuator in a control loop. The epoxy is cured by short-duration exposures to UV light. In between each exposure, the nano-actuator zeroes out the displacement caused by epoxy shrinkage and thermal expansion. After a few exposures, the epoxy has cured sufficiently to prevent further displacement of the two components. Bonding of optical elements has been done for many years, but most optics are thick and rigid elements that resist micro-Newton-level forces without causing distortion. When bonding thin glass optics such as the 0.40-mm thick IXO X-ray mirrors, forces in the micro- and milli-Newton levels cause unacceptable optical figure error. This innovation can now repeatedly and reliably bond a thin glass mirror to a metal housing with less than 0.2 m of displacement (<200 nm). This is an enabling technology that allows the installation of virtually stress-free, undistorted thin optics onto structures. This innovation is

  2. The Study of Optically Induced Effects due to Bending and Twisting using Vector Finite Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Dacles-Mariani, J; Rodrigue, G

    2005-05-11

    We study the effects of macroscopic bends and twists in an optical waveguide and how they influence the transmission capabilities of a waveguide. These mechanical stresses and strains distort the optical indicatrix of the medium producing optical anisotropy. The spatially varying refractive indices are incorporated into the full-wave Maxwell's equations. The governing equations are discretized using a vector finite element method cast in a high-order finite element approximation. This approach allows us to study the complexities of the mechanical deformation within a framework of a high-order formulation which can in turn, reduce the computational requirement without degrading its performance. The optical activities generated, total energy produced and power loss due to the mechanical stresses and strains are reported and discussed.

  3. Encoding Active Device Elements at Nanowire Tips.

    PubMed

    No, You-Shin; Gao, Ruixuan; Mankin, Max N; Day, Robert W; Park, Hong-Gyu; Lieber, Charles M

    2016-07-13

    Semiconductor nanowires and other one-dimensional materials are attractive for highly sensitive and spatially confined electrical and optical signal detection in biological and physical systems, although it has been difficult to localize active electronic or optoelectronic device function at one end of such one-dimensional structures. Here we report a new nanowire structure in which the material and dopant are modulated specifically at only one end of nanowires to encode an active two-terminal device element. We present a general bottom-up synthetic scheme for these tip-modulated nanowires and illustrate this with the synthesis of nanoscale p-n junctions. Electron microscopy imaging verifies the designed p-Si nanowire core with SiO2 insulating inner shell and n-Si outer shell with clean p-Si/n-Si tip junction. Electrical transport measurements with independent contacts to the p-Si core and n-Si shell exhibited a current rectification behavior through the tip and no detectable current through the SiO2 shell. Electrical measurements also exhibited an n-type response in conductance versus water-gate voltage with pulsed gate experiments yielding a temporal resolution of at least 0.1 ms and ∼90% device sensitivity localized to within 0.5 μm from the nanowire p-n tip. In addition, photocurrent experiments showed an open-circuit voltage of 0.75 V at illumination power of ∼28.1 μW, exhibited linear dependence of photocurrent with respect to incident illumination power with an estimated responsivity up to ∼0.22 A/W, and revealed localized photocurrent generation at the nanowire tip. The tip-modulated concept was further extended to a top-down/bottom-up hybrid approach that enabled large-scale production of vertical tip-modulated nanowires with a final synthetic yield of >75% with >4300 nanowires. Vertical tip-modulated nanowires were fabricated into >50 individually addressable nanowire device arrays showing diode-like current-voltage characteristics. These tip

  4. Diffractive optical element embedded in silver-doped nanocomposite glass.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Lauren A H; Wackerow, Stefan; Hourd, Andrew C; Gillespie, W Allan; Seifert, Gerhard; Abdolvand, Amin

    2012-09-24

    A diffractive optical element is fabricated with relative ease in a glass containing spherical silver nanoparticles 30 to 40 nm in diameter and embedded in a surface layer of thickness ~10 μm. The nanocomposite was sandwiched between a mesh metallic electrode with a lattice constant 2 μm, facing the nanoparticle containing layer and acting as an anode, and a flat metal electrode as cathode. Applying moderate direct current electric potentials of 0.4 kV and 0.6 kV at an elevated temperature of 200 °C for 30 minutes across the nanocomposites led to the formation of a periodic array of embedded structures of metallic nanoparticles. The current-time dynamics of the structuring processes, optical analyses of the structured nanocomposites and diffraction pattern of one such fabricated element are presented. PMID:23037407

  5. Precision compression molding of chalcogenide glass optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Chaowei; Ma, Tao; Chen, Fan

    2013-12-01

    Precision glass molding process (GMP) is a promising process to manufacture small precision optical elements in large volume. In this paper, we report on the fabrication of a molded chalcogenide glass lens as an optical element. A set of mold was designed and manufactured with silicon carbide material for the molding test. The structure of the mold set was semi-closed and detachable which can make the molded lens easy releasing with non-invasion. The surfaces of the mold cores are coated with thin protecting DLC film to relieve adhesion problem and increase the working life. Experiments were also performed using a precision glass molding machine Toshiba GMP-311V to determine the molding parameters i.e. molding temperature, pressure and cooling rate. The glass lens breakage during precision molding process was analyzed according to the glass property and the molding parameters. By modifying the mold design and optimization the processing parameters, ultimately achieve the desired molded lens.

  6. The Heritable Activation of Cryptic Suppressor-Mutator Elements by an Active Element

    PubMed Central

    Fedoroff, N.

    1989-01-01

    A weakly active maize Suppressor-mutator (Spm-w) element is able to heritably activate cryptic Spm elements in the maize genome. The spontaneous activation frequency, which is 1-5 X 10(-5) in the present genetic background, increases by about 100-fold in the presence of an Spm-w and remains an order of magnitude above the background level a generation after removal of the activating Spm-w. Sectorial somatic reactivation of cryptic elements can be detected phenotypically in kernels. Selection of such kernels constitutes an efficient selection for plants with reactivated Spm elements. Analysis of the reactivation process reveals that it is gradual and proceeds through genetically metastable intermediates that exhibit different patterns of element expression during plant development. Newly reactivated elements tend to return to an inactive form. However, the probability that an element will remain in a heritably active state increases when the element is maintained in the presence of an active Spm element for several generations. PMID:2541047

  7. Simultaneous multicolor image formation with a single diffractive optical element.

    PubMed

    Levy, U; Marom, E; Mendlovic, D

    2001-08-01

    A design for a novel diffractive optical element (DOE) that can reconstruct three different intensity patterns when it is illuminated by three different wavelengths is presented. If the chosen wavelengths are red, green, and blue, full-color reconstruction capability is obtained. Reconstruction is achieved in the near field (Fresnel domain). Computer simulation results as well as experimental evidence are presented, proving the capabilities of this novel DOE design procedure. PMID:18049545

  8. Hybrid curved nano-structured micro-optical elements.

    PubMed

    Balčytis, A; Hakobyan, D; Gabalis, M; Žukauskas, A; Urbonas, D; Malinauskas, M; Petruškevičius, R; Brasselet, E; Juodkazis, S

    2016-07-25

    Tailoring the spatial degree of freedom of light is an essential step towards the realization of advanced optical manipulation tools. A topical challenge consists of device miniaturization for improved performance and enhanced functionality at the micron scale. We demonstrate a novel approach that combines the additive three-dimensional (3D) structuring capability of laser polymerization and the subtractive subwavelength resolution patterning of focused ion beam lithography. As a case in point hybrid (dielectric/metallic) micro-optical elements that deliver a well-defined topological shaping of light are produced. Here we report on hybrid 3D binary spiral zone plates with unit and double topological charge. Their optical performances are compared to corresponding 2D counterparts both numerically and experimentally. Cooperative refractive capabilities without compromising topological beam shaping are shown. Realization of advanced designs where the dielectric architecture itself is endowed with singular properties is also discussed. PMID:27464151

  9. Two diffusion photopolymer for sharp diffractive optical elements recording.

    PubMed

    Gallego, S; Fernández, R; Márquez, A; Ortuño, M; Neipp, C; Gleeson, M R; Sheridan, J T; Beléndez, A

    2015-07-15

    Photopolymers as recording media are widely used in optical applications. In such materials, changes in the phase of the transmittance function are generated during exposure due to refractive index and thickness modulations. These changes arise primarily as a consequence of photopolymerization and mass transport processes. Characterizing polymers' performance, for example, quantifying the value of monomer diffusion, is therefore very important. Applying index matching, the volume and surface optical effect are separated in an acrylamide/polyvinylalcohol (AA/PVA) material. Using a simplified model that includes the effects of the holes produced during polymerization, both hole and monomer diffusion are analyzed. The analysis presented indicates higher material sensitivity than previously estimated. The results also indicate the possibility of recording sharper diffractive optical elements profiles, like blazed gratings, having diffraction efficiencies higher than 80%. PMID:26176434

  10. Nano-antenna elements for controlling optical phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yifat, Yuval; Eitan, Michal; Iluz, Zeev; Boag, Amir; Hanein, Yael; Scheuer, Jacob

    2014-02-01

    We demonstrate the use of nano-antenna unit cells composed of coupled dipole and patch elements over a reflective back plane, which are designed to control the phase of a reflected optical beam. The antennas were studied both numerically and experimentally and allow exact control over the output phase in the range of 00-3600. Several diffractive optical applications are shown numerically and experimentally: Blazed gratings which allow deflection of the output beam to high reflection angles show very high diffraction efficiency, and arbitrary wave shapes such as computer generated holograms can be formed with very high efficiency and large angles relative to the incident beam. The optical conversion efficiency was measured to be above 40% for all applications.

  11. Temperature control system for optical elements in astronomical instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verducci, Orlando; de Oliveira, Antonio C.; Ribeiro, Flávio F.; Vital de Arruda, Márcio; Gneiding, Clemens D.; Fraga, Luciano

    2014-07-01

    Extremely low temperatures may damage the optical components assembled inside of an astronomical instrument due to the crack in the resin or glue used to attach lenses and mirrors. The environment, very cold and dry, in most of the astronomical observatories contributes to this problem. This paper describes the solution implemented at SOAR for remotely monitoring and controlling temperatures inside of a spectrograph, in order to prevent a possible damage of the optical parts. The system automatically switches on and off some heat dissipation elements, located near the optics, as the measured temperature reaches a trigger value. This value is set to a temperature at which the instrument is not operational to prevent malfunction and only to protect the optics. The software was developed with LabVIEWTM and based on an object-oriented design that offers flexibility and ease of maintenance. As result, the system is able to keep the internal temperature of the instrument above a chosen limit, except perhaps during the response time, due to inertia of the temperature. This inertia can be controlled and even avoided by choosing the correct amount of heat dissipation and location of the thermal elements. A log file records the measured temperature values by the system for operation analysis.

  12. MERTIS: using diffractive optical elements for geometrical calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, M.; Griessbach, D.; Säuberlich, T.; Scheele, M.; Schischmanow, A.

    2010-09-01

    Geometrical sensor calibration is essential for space applications based on high accuracy optical measurements, in this case for MERTIS. The goal is the determination of interiour sensor parameters. A conventional method is to measure the line of sight for a subset of pixels by single pixel illumination with collimated light. To adjust angles which define the line of sight of a pixel a manipulator construction is used. A new method for geometrical sensor calibration is presented using Diffractive Optical Elements (DOE) in connection with laser beam equipment. This method is especially used for 2D-sensor array systems but can also be applied to the thermal infrared push-broom imaging spectrometer MERTIS. Diffractive optical elements (DOE) are optical microstructures which are used to split an incoming laser beam with a dedicated wavelength into a number of beams with well-known propagation directions. As the virtual sources of the diffracted beams are points at infinity, the object to be imaged is similar to the starry sky which gives an image invariant against translation. This particular feature allows a complete geometrical sensor calibration with one image avoiding complex adjustment procedures which means a significant reduction of calibration effort.

  13. Actively controlled thin-shell space optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denoyer, Keith K.; Flint, Eric M.; Main, John A.; Lindler, Jason E.

    2003-08-01

    Increasingly, scientific and military missions require the use of space-based optical systems. For example, new capabilities are required for imaging terrestrial like planets, for surveillance, and for directed energy applications. Given the difficulties in producing and launching large optics, it is doubtful that refinements of conventional technology will meet future needs, particularly in a cost-effective manner. To meet this need, recent research has been investigating the feasibility of a new class of ultra-lightweight think-skin optical elements that combine recent advances in lightweight thermally formed materials, active materials, and novel sensing and control architectures. If successful, the approach may lead to an order of magnitude reduction in space optics areal density, improved large scale manufacturing capability, and dramatic reductions in manufacturing and launch costs. In a recent effort, a one meter thin-film mirror like structure was fabricated. This paper provides an overview of tools used to model and simulate this structure as well as results from structural dynamic testing. In addition, progress in the area of non-contact global shape control using smart materials is presented.

  14. Harmonizing an opaque core network with transparent optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankel, Michael Y.; Livas, Jeffrey

    2004-10-01

    Over the last decade, deployed core telecom networks have migrated from being based on single-channel SONET regeneration links to multi-span, multi-channel optically amplified systems. More recently, the industry has been aggressively pursuing a natural extension of this philosophy towards all-optical "analog" core networks, with each traffic demand touching electrical digital circuitry only at the in/egress nodes. This trend produced a substantial elimination of regeneration costs, increase in network capacity, and notionally simpler operation and service turn-up. At the same time, the optical "analog" network requires a large amount of sophisticated hardware and software for monitoring and manipulating high bit rate optical signals. The primary goal for current equipment suppliers is to provide cost effective system designs that are simple to deploy and operate. This paper will examine the trade-offs inherent in the technology and architecture choices needed to reach this goal through the "analog" transmission/all-optical ideal and concludes that it is difficult to improve on the present approach which uses a mix of transparent and opaque network elements.

  15. Micro-optical elements and optical materials of certain spider webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, D. M.; Naidoo, N.; Little, D. J.

    2012-06-01

    Certain spider webs are composed of several types of micro-optical elements made from transparent optical materials. The silks (radial and capture) are almost exclusively protein. The nearly cylindrical silks have diameters in the range 0.1 to several microns and cross-sectional morphology that is cylindrical-multi-layered,.as studied by transmission electron microscopy, The capture threads are coated with aqueous adhesive that also forms into nearly elliptical micro-lenses (adhesive droplets) mounted on the near cylindrical silks. The remaining elements of the web are the cement junctions tying the radial and the capture threads of the web together. These are irregularly shaped platelets. Progress to date on our research characterizing the optical properties and function of these transparent orb webs has been to interpret the reflection and transmission properties of the elements of the web, and the web as a whole, in natural lighting; to evaluate the optical finish of the surface of the silks and capture droplets; and to measure the principal refractive indices of radial silks using new immersion based methods developed for application to micron-sized, curved optical elements. Here we report the principal refractive indices, birefringence, dispersion and morphology of transparent spider silk subject to various chemical treatments. The morphology is measured using TEM. Insight into the physical origin of the refractive index properties will be discussed.

  16. Design and fabrication of space variant micro optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Pradeep

    A wide range of applications currently utilize conventional optical elements to individually transform the phase, polarization, and spectral transmission/reflection of the incident radiation to realize the desired system level function. The material properties and the feasibility of fabrication primarily impact the device and system functionality that can be realized. With the advancement in micro/nano patterning, growth, deposition and etching technology, devices with novel and multiplexed optical functionalities have become feasible. As a result, it has become possible to engineer the device response in the near and far field by controlling the phase, polarization or spectral response at the micro scale. One of the methods that have been explored to realize unique optical functionalities is by varying the structural properties of the device as a function of spatial location at the sub-micron scale across the device aperture. Spatially varying the structural parameters of these devices is analogous to local modifications of the material properties. In this dissertation, the optical response of interference transmission filters, guided mode resonance reflection filters, and diffraction gratings operated in Littrow condition with strategically introduced spatial variation have been investigated. Spatial variations in optical interference filters were used to demonstrate wavelength tunable spatial filters. The effect was realized by integrating diffractive and continuous phase functions on the defect layer of a one-dimensional photonic crystal structure. Guided mode resonance filters are free space optical filters that provide narrow spectral reflection by combining grating and waveguide dispersion effects. Frequency dependent spatial reflection profiles were achieved by spatially varying the grating fill fraction in designed contours. Diffraction gratings with space variant fill fractions operating in Littrow condition were used to provide graded feedback profiles

  17. Holographic optical elements as laser irradiation sensor components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leib, Kenneth G.; Pernick, Benjamin J.

    1991-12-01

    The use of holographic optical elements (HOEs) to discriminate between coherent irradiation and broadband, noncoherent light has been experimentally demonstrated under adverse scattering and attenuating conditions. As a passive sensor component in a laser irradiation detection system, an HOE can be used in several application areas, e.g., data transmission systems, aircraft warning system, underwater communications, and alignment systems, where wavelength and direction of arrival information can be used. The efficient concentration or focusing of laser light by an HOE onto a detector stage and, of equal importance, the ability to form bright, unique geometric patterns are characteristics that establish the HOE's use as a readily compatible irradiation sensor component. In addition, there is a considerable size and weight advantage over other functionally comparable optical components. Finally, as a passive element, an HOE can fmd use with CW or pulsed illumination. The properties and advantages, pros and cons, of the use of HOEs as sensor elements are discussed in the paper and illustrated in several laboratory experiments and a field test.

  18. Reflectionless design of optical elements using impedance-tunable transformation optics

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Jun; Zhang, Lifa; Yan, Senlin; Sun, Xiaohan

    2014-05-12

    We report a strategy to remove the reflections resulted from the finite embedded transformation-optical design by proposing a theory of impedance-tunable transformation optics, on which the functions of impedance coefficients can be derived in the original space without changing the refractive index. Based on the approach, two-dimensional reflectionless beam compressors/expanders, bends, shifters, and splitters are designed using the modified anisotropic medium. It is found that the reflections can be removed in magnetic response materials for TE polarization or dielectric response materials for TM polarization. The numerical simulations confirm that various reflectionless optical elements can be realized in the pure transformation optics. The proposed method can be generalized to three-dimensional cases and can be applied to other transformation-optical designs.

  19. James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element Mirror Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keski-Kuha, Ritva A.; Bowers, Charles W.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Heaney, James B.; Gallagher, Benjamin; McKay, Andrew; Stevenson, Ian

    2012-01-01

    James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) mirror coating program has been completed. The science goals of the JWST mission require a uniform, low stress, durable optical coating with high reflectivity over the JWST spectral region. The coating has to be environmentally stable, radiation resistant and compatible with the cryogenic operating environment. The large size, 1.52 m point to point, light weight, beryllium primary mirror (PM) segments and flawless coating process during the flight mirror coating program that consisted coating of 21 flight mirrors were among many technical challenges. This paper provides an overview of the JWST telescope mirror coating program. The paper summarizes the coating development program and performance of the flight mirrors.

  20. Fourier holographic display for augmented reality using holographic optical element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Lee, Dukho; Jeong, Youngmo; Lee, Byoungho

    2016-03-01

    A method for realizing a three-dimensional see-through augmented reality in Fourier holographic display is proposed. A holographic optical element (HOE) with the function of Fourier lens is adopted in the system. The Fourier hologram configuration causes the real scene located behind the lens to be distorted. In the proposed method, since the HOE is transparent and it functions as the lens just for Bragg matched condition, there is not any distortion when people observe the real scene through the lens HOE (LHOE). Furthermore, two optical characteristics of the recording material are measured for confirming the feasibility of using LHOE in the proposed see-through augmented reality holographic display. The results are verified experimentally.

  1. Processing and error compensation of diffractive optical element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunlong; Wang, Zhibin; Zhang, Feng; Qin, Hui; Li, Junqi; Mai, Yuying

    2014-09-01

    Diffractive optical element (DOE) shows high diffraction efficiency and good dispersion performance, which makes the optical system becoming light-weight and more miniature. In this paper, the design, processing, testing, compensation of DOE are discussed, especially the analyzing of compensation technology which based on the analyzing the DOE measurement date from Taylor Hobson PGI 1250. In this method, the relationship between shadowing effect with diamond tool and processing accuracy are analyzed. According to verification processing on the Taylor Hobson NANOFORM 250 lathe, the results indicate that the PV reaches 0.539 micron, the surface roughness reaches 4nm, the step position error is smaller than λ /10 and the step height error is less than 0.23 micron after compensation processing one time.

  2. Field test of two 16-element fiber optic seismometer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fei; Wang, Xiaofei; Wang, Xiaodong; Zhu, Wanyu; Fu, Lixi; Zhang, Min

    2015-08-01

    Two 16-element fiber-optic seismometer arrays based on combined wavelength- and time domain multiplexing technology have been designed and investigated, followed by a field test, which is focused on the sensitivities of the sensors and correlation of the signal. The field test shows that the consistency of the sensitivities is pretty good, though the fluctuation of sensitivities at different frequencies should not be ignored. The method to calculate the correlation of two sensors is presented briefly and the results show an acceptable high level. The field test indicates that it's available to use the arrays in practical applications of micro-seismic.

  3. Direct measurement of the spectral reflectance of OP-SDL gain elements under optical pumping.

    PubMed

    Borgentun, Carl; Bengtsson, Jörgen; Larsson, Anders

    2011-08-29

    We report on a direct measurement method for acquiring highly precise reflectance spectra of gain elements for semiconductor disk lasers under optical pumping. The gain element acts as an active mirror, and the active mirror reflectance (AMR) was measured with a weak and tunable probe beam coincident on the gain element with a high-power pump beam. In particular, we measured the spectral AMR of a gain element designed to have a broad and flat AMR spectrum by being anti-resonant at the center wavelength and employing a parametrically optimized anti-reflection structure. We were able to confirm that this sophisticated gain element performs according to design, with an almost constant AMR of ∼103% over a wavelength range of nearly 35 nm, very well matching the simulated behavior. Such gain characteristics are useful for optically pumped semiconductor disk lasers (OP-SDLs) designed for broadband tuning and short-pulse generation through mode-locking. The measurement technique was also applied to a conventional resonant periodic gain element designed for fixed wavelength OP-SDL operation; its AMR spectrum is markedly different with a narrow peak, again in good agreement with the simulations. PMID:21935050

  4. Multivariate optical element platform for compressed detection of fluorescence markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priore, Ryan J.; Swanstrom, Joseph A.

    2014-05-01

    The success of a commercial fluorescent diagnostic assay is dependent on the selection of a fluorescent biomarker; due to the broad nature of fluorescence biomarker emission profiles, only a small number of fluorescence biomarkers may be discriminated from each other as a function of excitation source. Multivariate Optical Elements (MOEs) are thin-film devices that encode a broad band, spectroscopic pattern allowing a simple broadband detector to generate a highly sensitive and specific detection for a target analyte. MOEs have historically been matched 1:1 to a discrete analyte or class prediction; however, MOE filter sets are capable of sensing projections of the original sparse spectroscopic space enabling a small set of MOEs to discriminate a multitude of target analytes. This optical regression can offer real-time measurements with relatively high signal-to-noise ratios that realize the advantages of multiplexed detection and pattern recognition in a simple optical instrument. The specificity advantage of MOE-based sensors allows fluorescent biomarkers that were once incapable of discrimination from one another via optical band pass filters to be employed in a common assay panel. A simplified MOE-based sensor may ultimately reduce the requirement for highly trained operators as well as move certain life science applications like disease prognostication from the laboratory to the point of care. This presentation will summarize the design and fabrication of compressed detection MOE filter sets for detecting multiple fluorescent biomarkers simultaneously with strong spectroscopic interference as well as comparing the detection performance of the MOE sensor with traditional optical band pass filter methodologies.

  5. Cryogenic Optical Position Encoders for Mechanisms in the JWST Optical Telescope Element Simulator (OSIM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.; Anderjaska, Thomas; Badger, James (Inventor); Capon, Tom; Davis, CLinton; Dicks, Brent (Inventor); Eichhorn, William; Garza, Mario; Guishard, Corina; Haghani, Shadan; Hakun, Claef; Haney, Paul; Happs, David (Inventor); Hovmand, Lars; Kadari, Madhu; Kirk, Jeffrey; Nyquist, Richard (Inventor); Robinson, F. David; Sullivan, Joseph (Inventor); Wilson, Erin

    2013-01-01

    The JWST Optical Telescope Element Simulator (OSIM) is a configurable, cryogenic, optical stimulus for high fidelity ground characterization and calibration of JWST's flight instruments. OSIM and its associated Beam Image Analyzer (BIA) contain several ultra-precise, cryogenic mechanisms that enable OSIM to project point sources into the instruments according to the same optical prescription as the flight telescope images stars - correct in focal surface position and chief ray angle. OSIM's and BIA's fifteen axes of mechanisms navigate according to redundant, cryogenic, absolute, optical encoders - 32 in all operating at or below 100 K. OSIM's encoder subsystem, the engineering challenges met in its development, and the encoders' sub-micron and sub-arcsecond performance are discussed.

  6. Experiment system of LAMOST active optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiangqun; Su, Ding; Li, Guoping; Yao, Zhengqiu; Zhang, Zhengcao; Li, Yeping; Zhang, Yong; Wang, You; Xu, Xinqi; Wang, Hai

    2004-10-01

    Active optics is the most difficult part in LAMOST project. Especially for the segmented reflecting Schmidt plate Ma, in which both segmented mirror active optics and thin mirror (or deformable mirror) active optics are applied. To test and optimize the thin mirror active optics of Ma, and to approach the reality of operating environment of the telescope, an outdoor experiment system has been established. This experiment system is also a `small LAMOST" with one sub-mirror of the primary mirror Mb and one sub-mirror of the Schmidt plate Ma, and with full scale in spacing (40 meters) between Ma and Mb. many parts of LAMOST were tested in the experiment system except segmented mirror active optics. Especially for force actuators, thin mirror support system, friction driving of the alt-azimuth mounting and its control system, wave front test along such a long optical path. This paper presents the experiment system, research and developments, and some experiment results.

  7. Optical and thermal characterization on micro-optical elements made by femtosecond laser writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buividas, R.; Mizeikis, V.; Kiršanske, G.; Žukauskas, A.; Malinauskas, M.; Murayama, T.; Hikima, Y.; Morikawa, J.; Juodkazis, S.

    2013-12-01

    Femtosecond laser polymerization of photonic crystals (PhCs) and diffractive micro-optical elements which can be easily integrated into complex 3D geometries of micro-fluidic chips is analysed in IR spectral domain. Thermal properties of such 3D optical elements and patterns were investigated by thermal imaging, IR spectroscopy and a heat-wave method using absorption-heating with visible light. Thermal imaging allows a simple in situ judgement on a 3D fabrication quality of photonic crystals and is simpler compared with scanning electron imaging. Photonic stop gaps at IR spectral range were clearly observed and IR mapping at the specific spectral wavelength reveals spatial uniformity of PhCs. Potential to use IR imaging with spectral IR plasmonic filters for sensor applications is discussed.

  8. Discussion of the finite element method in optical diffraction tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobera, Julia; Coupland, Jeremy

    2006-04-01

    In Optical Diffraction Tomography (ODT) the refractive index is reconstructed from images with different illuminating wavefronts. In most cases the Born approximation is assumed, although this limits the applicability of the technique to weak-scattering problems. In this work we examine the scattering problem from first principles beginning from the Helmholtz equation that governs scalar diffraction and wave propagation. We demonstrate the use of the Born approximation and show typical errors when it is applied in practice. Solution of the Helmholtz equation using a Finite Element Method (FEM) with an appropriate Absorbing Boundary Condition (ABC) is described, and a non-linear optimization technique, the Conjugate Gradient Method (CGM), previously proposed for microwave imaging, is applied to the inverse problem.

  9. Biological elements carry out optical tasks in coherent imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, P.; Bianco, V.; Paturzo, M.; Miccio, L.; Memmolo, P.; Merola, F.; Marchesano, V.

    2016-03-01

    We show how biological elements, like live bacteria species and Red Blood Cells (RBCs) can accomplish optical functionalities in DH systems. Turbid media allow coherent microscopy despite the strong light scattering these provoke, acting on light just as moving diffusers. Furthermore, a turbid medium can have positive effects on a coherent imaging system, providing resolution enhancement and mimicking the action of noise decorrelation devices, thus yielding an image quality significantly higher than the quality achievable through a transparent medium in similar recording conditions. Besides, suspended RBCs are demonstrated to behave as controllable liquid micro-lenses, opening new possibilities in biophotonics for endoscopy imaging purposes, as well as telemedicine for point-of-care diagnostics in developing countries and low-resource settings.

  10. Analysis and optimal design of diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnaya, Svetlana

    1999-12-01

    The problem we study arose in an industrial application. For an optical system, Diffractive Optical Elements (DOE) are used to produce a certain light intensity pattern in the near field. Of our particular interest is an Inverse problem: given a target image, determine the DOE configuration, e.g. thickness, that would produce this image. The problem can be complicated by specific constraints such as finite number of thickness levels that the DOE can have. Diffraction theory and Green's function approach are applied to construct a mathematical model for the light propagating through the DOE. Asymptotic methods of stationary phase and multiple-scale analysis are used to derive analytic solutions for periodic and quasi-periodic cases. These analytical expressions do not involve integration, save computational resources, and allow us to solve the Inverse problem analytically. Numerical results for particular applications are presented. The Inverse problem can be posed a large optimization problem with finite discrete variables, which can not be solved by traditional methods. We propose Genetic Algorithms based on analogies to natural evolution and representing a combination of random and directed search. A modification of the method that suits better to our problem, the Micro-Genetic Algorithm (MGA), is proposed. The MGA operates on a small set of potential solutions and restarts, using an adaptive mutation scheme, each time the local convergence is achieved. We prove convergence for the MGA using the Markov chain analysis. Numerical results of the MGA optimization are provided.

  11. Conically scanned lidar telescope using holographic optical elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Wilkerson, Thomas D.

    1992-01-01

    Holographic optical elements (HOE) using volume phase holograms make possible a new class of lightweight scanning telescopes having advantages for lidar remote sensing instruments. So far, the only application of HOE's to lidar has been a non-scanning receiver for a laser range finder. We introduce a large aperture, narrow field of view (FOV) telescope used in a conical scanning configuration, having a much smaller rotating mass than in conventional designs. Typically, lidars employ a large aperture collector and require a narrow FOV to limit the amount of skylight background. Focal plane techniques are not good approaches to scanning because they require a large FOV within which to scan a smaller FOV mirror or detector array. Thus, scanning lidar systems have either used a large flat scanning mirror at which the receiver telescope is pointed, or the entire telescope is steered. We present a concept for a conically scanned lidar telescope in which the only moving part is the HOE which serves as the primary collecting optic. We also describe methods by which a multiplexed HOE can be used simultaneously as a dichroic beamsplitter.

  12. Scanning Lidar Transceiver Telescopes Using Holographic Optical Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.

    2000-01-01

    Scanning enables remote measurements perpendicular to the ground track of airborne and spaceborne lidar systems, giving us three dimensional images of atmospheric backscatter or other measurable parameters. For ground based systems, scanning allows one to record a time series of data in multiple spatial dimensions. The large size and cost of scanning systems for atmospheric lidars using conventional scanning technologies is prohibitive for space based systems. By replacing the conventional reflective telescope with a holographic optical element (HOE) in the lidar, single axis conical scanning can be achieved with a mechanically simple system. Relatively inexpensive to produce, HOES can be used to satisfy a variety of scanning lidar applications. I will introduce the concept of the HOE and describe its production and use as a scanning lidar transceiver telescope. I will describe the advantages as well as the disadvantages and limitations of HOES in this application. Optical performance test results and two lidar systems currently using HOES will be described. Examples of data taken with these systems will be presented. Current and planned future developments will be described, including scanning without mechanical motion and wide field-of-view lidar imaging.

  13. Sighting optics including an optical element having a first focal length and a second focal length and methods for sighting

    DOEpatents

    Crandall, David Lynn

    2011-08-16

    Sighting optics include a front sight and a rear sight positioned in a spaced-apart relation. The rear sight includes an optical element having a first focal length and a second focal length. The first focal length is selected so that it is about equal to a distance separating the optical element and the front sight and the second focal length is selected so that it is about equal to a target distance. The optical element thus brings into simultaneous focus for a user images of the front sight and the target.

  14. Accurate optical CD profiler based on specialized finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrero, Jesus; Perçin, Gökhan

    2012-03-01

    As the semiconductor industry is moving to very low-k1 patterning solutions, the metrology problems facing process engineers are becoming much more complex. Choosing the right optical critical dimension (OCD) metrology technique is essential for bridging the metrology gap and achieving the required manufacturing volume throughput. The critical dimension scanning electron microscope (CD-SEM) measurement is usually distorted by the high aspect ratio of the photoresist and hard mask layers. CD-SEM measurements cease to correlate with complex three-dimensional profiles, such as the cases for double patterning and FinFETs, thus necessitating sophisticated, accurate and fast computational methods to bridge the gap. In this work, a suite of computational methods that complement advanced OCD equipment, and enabling them to operate at higher accuracies, are developed. In this article, a novel method for accurately modeling OCD profiles is presented. A finite element formulation in primal form is used to discretize the equations. The implementation uses specialized finite element spaces to solve Maxwell equations in two dimensions.

  15. Diffractive optical element with asymmetric microrelief for creating visual security features.

    PubMed

    Goncharsky, Alexander; Goncharsky, Anton; Durlevich, Svyatoslav

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate a new security feature for visual control of the authenticity of optical security features - the change of the images when the optical element is turned by 180 degrees ("switch-180°"). The diffractive optical element has an asymmetric microrelief structure resulting from the asymmetry of the scattering pattern. The phase function of the diffractive optical element is computed in terms of Fresnel's scalar wave model. We developed efficient algorithms for computing the structure of flat optical elements to produce the switch effect. A sample of flat optical element for the "switch-180" effect has been developed using electron-beam lithography. The effectiveness of the development is illustrated by the photos and the video captured from a real sample. The visual "switch-180°" effect is easy to control allowing secure anti-counterfeit protection of the optical security feature developed. The new security feature is already used to protect IDs and excise stamps. PMID:26561188

  16. Low Scatter Edge Blackening Compounds For Refractive Optical Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Isabella T.; Telkamp, Arthur R.; Ledebuhr, Arno G.

    1990-01-01

    Perkin-Elmer's Applied Optics Operation recently delivered several prototype wide-field-of-view (WFOV), F/2.8, 250 mm efl, near diffraction limited, concentric refractive lenses to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). In these lenses, special attention was paid to reducing stray light to allow viewing of very dim objects. Because of the very large FOV, the use of a long baffle to eliminate direct illumination of lens edges was not practical. With the existing relatively short baffle design, one-bounce stray light paths off the element edges are possible. The scattering off the inside edges thus had to be kept to an absolute minimum. While common means for blackening the edges of optical elements are easy to apply and quite cost effective for normal lens assemblies, their blackening effect is limited by the Fresnel reflection due to the index of refraction mismatch at the glass boundary. At high angles of incidence, total internal reflection (TIR) might occur ruining the effect of the blackening process. An index-matched absorbing medium applied to the edges of such elements is the most effective approach for reducing the amount of undesired light reflected or scattered off these edges. The presence of such a medium provides an extended path outside the glass boundary in which an absorptive non-scattering dye can be used to eliminate light that might otherwise have propagated to the focal plane. Perkin-Elmer and LLNL undertook a program to develop epoxy-based dye carrier compounds with refractive indices corresponding to the glass types used in the WFOV lens. This program involved the measuring of the refractive index of a number of epoxy compounds and catalysts, the experimental combination of epoxies to match our glass indices, and the identification of a suitable non-scattering absorptive dye. Measurements on these blacks showed Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Functions (BRDFs) between 1.4 and 3.1 orders of magnitude lower than Perkin

  17. Holographically recorded photopolymer diffractive optical element for holographic and electronic speckle-pattern interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guntaka, Sridhar Reddy; Toal, Vincent; Martin, Suzanne

    2002-12-01

    A diffractive optical element is described that can be used to implement a very simple self-aligning electronic speckle-pattern interferometer and holographic interferometer that requires only a laser source and a camera in the optical setup.

  18. Research on the Design of an Optical Information Storage Sensing System Using a Diffractive Optical Element

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xuemin; Hao, Qun; Hou, Jianbo; Li, Xiangping; Ma, Jianshe; Gu, Min

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces a compact optical information storage sensing system. Applications of this system include longitudinal surface plasmon resonance detection of gold nanorods with a single femtosecond laser in three-dimensional space as well as data storage. A diffractive optical element (DOE) is applied in the system to separate the recording-reading beam from the servo beam. This allows us to apply a single laser and one objective lens in a single optical path for the servo beam and the recording-reading beam. The optical system has a linear region of 8 λ, which is compatible with current DVD servo modules. The wavefront error of the optical system is below 0.03 λrms. The minimum grating period of the DOE is 13.4 μm, and the depth of the DOE is 1.2 μm, which makes fabrication of it possible. The DOE is also designed to conveniently control the layer-selection process, as there is a linear correlation between the displacement of the DOE and the layer-selection distance. The displacement of DOE is in the range of 0–6.045 mm when the thickness of the layer-selection is 0.3 mm. Experiments were performed and the results have been verified. PMID:24217360

  19. Optical sensing elements for nitrogen dioxide (NO.sub.2) gas detection, a sol-gel method for making the sensing elements and fiber optic sensors incorporating nitrogen dioxide gas optical sensing elements

    DOEpatents

    Mechery, Shelly John; Singh, Jagdish P.

    2007-07-03

    A sensing element, a method of making a sensing element, and a fiber optic sensor incorporating the sensing element are described. The sensor can be used for the quantitative detection of NO.sub.2 in a mixture of gases. The sensing element can be made by incorporating a diazotizing reagent which reacts with nitrous ions to produce a diazo compound and a coupling reagent which couples with the diazo compound to produce an azo dye into a sol and allowing the sol to form an optically transparent gel. The sensing element changes color in the presence of NO.sub.2 gas. The temporal response of the absorption spectrum at various NO.sub.2 concentrations has also been recorded and analyzed. Sensors having different design configurations are described. The sensing element can detect NO.sub.2 gas at levels of parts per billion.

  20. Diffractive optics with high Bragg selectivity: volume holographic optical elements in Bayfol® HX photopolymer film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruder, Friedrich-Karl; Fäcke, Thomas; Hagen, Rainer; Hönel, Dennis; Orselli, Enrico; Rewitz, Christian; Rölle, Thomas; Walze, Günther

    2015-09-01

    For a long time volume Holographic Optical Elements (vHOE) have been discussed as an alternative, but were hampered by a lack of suitable materials. They provide several benefits over surface corrugated diffractive optical element like high diffraction efficiency due to their ability to reconstruct a single diffraction order, freedom of optical design by freely setting the replay angles and adjusting their bandwidth by a selection of the vHOE's thickness. Additional interesting features are related to their high Bragg selectivity providing transparent films for off-Bragg illumination. In this paper we report on our newly developed photopolymer film technology (Bayfol® HX) that uniquely requires no post processing after holographic exposure. We explain the governing non-local polymerization driven diffusion process leading to an active mass transport triggered by constructive interference. Key aspects of the recording process and their impact on index modulation formation is discussed. The influence on photopolymer film thickness on the bandwidth is shown. A comparison between coupled wave theory (CWT) simulation and experimental results is given. There are two basic recording geometries: reflection and transmission vHOEs. We explain consequences of how to record them properly and discuss in more detail the special challenges in transmission hologram recording. Here beam ratio and customization of photopolymer film properties can be applied most beneficially to achieve highest diffraction efficiency.

  1. Optical magnetism and optical activity in nonchiral planar plasmonic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Li, Guozhou; Li, Qiang; Yang, Lizhen; Wu, Lijun

    2016-07-01

    We investigate optical magnetism and optical activity in a simple planar metamolecule composed of double U-shaped metal split ring resonators (SRRs) twisted by 90° with respect to one another. Compared to a single SRR, the resonant energy levels are split and strong magnetic response can be observed due to inductive and conductive coupling. More interestingly, the nonchiral structures exhibit strong optical gyrotropy (1100°/λ) under oblique incidence, benefiting from the strong electromagnetic coupling. A chiral molecule model is proposed to shed light on the physical origin of optical activity. These artificial chiral metamaterials could be utilized to control the polarization of light and promise applications in enantiomer sensing-based medicine, biology, and drug development. PMID:27367063

  2. Fabrication of Diffractive Optical Elements for an Integrated Compact Optical-MEMS Laser Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    WENDT,JOEL R.; KRYGOWSKI,T.W.; VAWTER,GREGORY A.; SPAHN,OLGA B.; SWEATT,WILLIAM C.; WARREN,MIAL E.; REYES,DAVID NMN

    2000-07-13

    The authors describe the microfabrication of a multi-level diffractive optical element (DOE) onto a micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) as a key element in an integrated compact optical-MEMS laser scanner. The DOE is a four-level off-axis microlens fabricated onto a movable polysilicon shuttle. The microlens is patterned by electron beam lithography and etched by reactive ion beam etching. The DOE was fabricated on two generations of MEMS components. The first generation design uses a shuttle suspended on springs and displaced by a linear rack. The second generation design uses a shuttle guided by roller bearings and driven by a single reciprocating gear. Both the linear rack and the reciprocating gear are driven by a microengine assembly. The compact design is based on mounting the MEMS module and a vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) onto a fused silica substrate that contains the rest of the optical system. The estimated scan range of the system is {+-}4{degree} with a spot size of 0.5 mm.

  3. Micromilled optical elements for edge-lit illumination panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronny, Rahima Afrose; Knopf, George K.; Bordatchev, Evgueni; Nikumb, Suwas

    2013-04-01

    Edge-lit light guide panels (LGPs) with micropatterned surfaces represent a new technology for developing small- and medium-sized illumination sources for application such as automotive, residential lighting, and advertising displays. The shape, density, and spatial distribution of the micro-optical structures (MOSs) imprinted on the transparent LGP must be selected to achieve high brightness and uniform luminance over the active surface. We examine how round-tip cylindrical MOSs fabricated by precision micromilling can be used to create patterned surfaces on low-cost transparent polymethyl-methacrylate substrates for high-intensity illumination applications. The impact of varying the number, pitch, spatial distribution, and depth of the optical microstructures on lighting performance is initially investigated using LightTools™ simulation software. To illustrate the microfabrication process, several 100×100×6 mm3 LGP prototypes are constructed and tested. The prototypes include an "optimized" array of MOSs that exhibit near-uniform illumination (approximately 89%) across its active light-emitting surface. Although the average illumination was 7.3% less than the value predicted from numerical simulation, it demonstrates how LGPs can be created using micromilling operations. Customized MOS arrays with a bright rectangular pattern near the center of the panel and a sequence of MOSs that illuminate a predefined logo are also presented.

  4. Hyper-spectral imaging using an optical fiber transition element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Brett C.; Otten, Leonard J., III; Schmoll, Juergen

    2007-09-01

    The Bi-static Optical Imaging Sensor (BOIS) is a 2-D imaging sensor that operates in the short-wave infra-red (SWIR) spectral regime over wavelengths from approximately 1.0 to 2.4 microns. The conceptual design of the sensor is based on integral field spectroscopy techniques. The BOIS sensor utilizes a fiber transition element consisting of multiple optical fibers to map the 2-D spatial input scene into a 1-D linear array for injection into a hyper-spectral imaging (HSI) sensor. The HSI spectrometer acquires fast time resolution snapshots (60 Hz) of the entire input target scene in numerous narrowband spectral channels covering the SWIR spectral band. The BOIS sensor is developed to spatially observe the fast time-evolving radiative signature of targets over a variety of spectral bands, thus simultaneously characterizing the overall scene in four dimensions: 2 spatial, wavelength, and time. We describe the successful design, operation, and testing of a laboratory prototype version of the BOIS sensor as well as further development of a field version of the sensor. The goal of the laboratory prototype BOIS sensor was to validate the proof-of-concept ability in the 4-D measurement concept of this unique design. We demonstrate the 2-D spatial remapping of the input scene (using SWIR laser and blackbody cavity sources) in multiple spectral channels from the spatial versus spectral pixel output of the HSI snapshot. We also describe algorithms developed in the data processing to retrieve temperatures of the observation scene from the hyper-spectral measurements.

  5. Tolerancing of single point diamond turned diffractive optical elements and optical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, R. F.

    2007-10-01

    Single point diamond turning has an increasing importance with the production of the surfaces for different optical systems such as infrared systems, prototype production of mobile phone cameras or head mounted displays with plastic lenses or master manufacturing for the injection moulding of plastic lenses for mass products. Tolerances which occur during single point diamond turning of aspheric surfaces and diffractive elements or during polar coordinate laser plotting of Computer-generated holograms will be treated. In both cases we expect similar tolerances, because the work piece is rotated in both diamond turning and laser plotting. The purpose is to understand the typical tolerances and to simulate their influence to the aberrations in the optical system.

  6. Investigation of diffractive optical element femtosecond laser machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabrol, Grégoire R.; Ciceron, Adline; Twardowski, Patrice; Pfeiffer, Pierre; Flury, Manuel; Mermet, Frédéric; Lecler, Sylvain

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an explorative study on the machining of diffractive optical elements (DOEs) in transparent materials using a femtosecond laser source. A simple form of DOE, a binary phase grating with a period of 20.85 μm (σ = 0.5 μm), a groove depth and width of 0.7 μm (σ = 0.2 μm) and 8.8 μm (σ = 0.5 μm) respectively, was successfully machined in BK7. The topographic characteristics were measured by white light interferometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The processing was carried out on high precision stages with an ultrafast fibre laser (350 fs) emitting a 343 nm pulse focused onto the sample with a stationary microscope objective. A diffracted efficiency of 27%, obtained with a spectro goniometer, was corroborated by the theoretical results obtained by the Fourier modal method (FMM), taking into account the measured topographic values. These encouraging results demonstrate that high-speed femtosecond laser manufacturing of DOE in bulk glasses can be achieved, opening the way to rapid prototyping of multi-layered-DOEs.

  7. Study on automatic optical element addition or deletion in lens optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xuemin; Wang, Yongtian; Hao, Qun

    2002-09-01

    Two lens form parameters, quantifying the symmetry of the optical system and the optical power distribution among the individual lens elements, are used as the criteria for automatic element addition or deletion in lens optimization. The scheme based on the criteria is described in this paper. Design examples are provided, which demonstrate that the scheme is practicable.

  8. Entangling unstable optically active matter qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuzaki, Yuichiro; Fitzsimons, Joseph; Benjamin, Simon C.

    2011-06-15

    In distributed quantum computation, small devices composed of a single or a few qubits are networked together to achieve a scalable machine. Typically, there is an optically active matter qubit at each node, so that photons are exploited to achieve remote entanglement. However, in many systems the optically active states are unstable or poorly defined. We report a scheme to perform a high-fidelity entanglement operation even given severe instability. The protocol exploits the existence of optically excited states for phase acquisition without actually exciting those states; it functions with or without cavities and does not require number-resolving detectors.

  9. Simulation of the optical performance of refractive elements to mimic the human eye focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Gonzalez, G.; Santiago-Alvarado, Agustín.; Cruz-Félix, Ángel S.

    2015-09-01

    Refractive optics has evolved and incorporated new elements in optical systems every day, such as conventional lenses, tunable lenses, GRIN lenses, diffractive lenses, intraocular lenses, etc. Some of these elements are reported in the literature together with different proposed models of the human eye. In this work, optical properties of some of these lenses will be studied, and simulations of their behavior will be done in order to analyze which one is better for imaging process. Such lenses will be incorporated in an optical system that mimics the human eye behavior. Analysis and obtained results are reported, as well as the proposed optical system. Finally, we present the conclusions of the work.

  10. Increasing reconstruction quality of diffractive optical elements displayed with LC SLM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheremkhin, Pavel A.; Evtikhiev, Nikolay N.; Krasnov, Vitaly V.; Rodin, Vladislav G.; Starikov, Sergey N.

    2015-03-01

    Phase liquid crystal (LC) spatial light modulators (SLM) are actively used in various applications. However, majority of scientific applications require stable phase modulation which might be hard to achieve with commercially available SLM due to its consumer origin. The use of digital voltage addressing scheme leads to phase temporal fluctuations, which results in lower diffraction efficiency and reconstruction quality of displayed diffractive optical elements (DOE). Due to high periodicity of fluctuations it should be possible to use knowledge of these fluctuations during DOE synthesis to minimize negative effect. We synthesized DOE using accurately measured phase fluctuations of phase LC SLM "HoloEye PLUTO VIS" to minimize its negative impact on displayed DOE reconstruction. Synthesis was conducted with versatile direct search with random trajectory (DSRT) method in the following way. Before DOE synthesis begun, two-dimensional dependency of SLM phase shift on addressed signal level and time from frame start was obtained. Then synthesis begins. First, initial phase distribution is created. Second, random trajectory of consecutive processing of all DOE elements is generated. Then iterative process begins. Each DOE element sequentially has its value changed to one that provides better value of objective criterion, e.g. lower deviation of reconstructed image from original one. If current element value provides best objective criterion value then it left unchanged. After all elements are processed, iteration repeats until stagnation is reached. It is demonstrated that application of SLM phase fluctuations knowledge in DOE synthesis with DSRT method leads to noticeable increase of DOE reconstruction quality.

  11. Laser-assisted manufacturing of micro-optical volume elements for enhancing the amount of light absorbed by solar cells in photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peharz, Gerhard; Kuna, Ladislav; Leiner, Claude

    2015-03-01

    The laser-generation of micro-optical volume elements is a promising approach to decrease the optical shadowing of front side metal contacts of solar cells. Focusing a femtosecond laser beam into the volume of the encapsulation material causes a local modification its optical constants. Suchlike fabricated micro-optical elements can be used to decrease the optical shadowing of the front side metallization of c-Si solar cells. Test samples comprising of a sandwich structure of a glass sheet with metallic grid-lines, an Ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) encapsulant and another glass sheet were manufactured in order to investigate the optical performance of the volume optics. Transmission measurements show that the shadowing of the metalling grid-lines is substantially decreased by the micro-optical volume elements created in the EVA bulk right above the grid-fingers. A detailed investigation of the optical properties of these volume elements was performed: (i) experimentally on the basis of goniometric measurements, as well as (ii) theoretically by applying optical modelling and optimization procedures. This resulted in a better understanding of the effectiveness of the optical volume elements in decreasing the optical shadowing of metal grid lines on the active cell surfaces. Moreover, results of photovoltaic mini-modules with incorporated micro-optical volume elements are presented. Results of optical simulation and Laser Beam Induced Current (LBIC) experiments show that the losses due to the grid fingers can be reduced by about 50%, when using this fs-laser structuring approach for the fabrication of micro-optical volume elements in the EVA material.

  12. Research on high precision centering assembly method of roll edge optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hua; Liu, Xiaomei

    2015-08-01

    In order to improve the imaging quality of target imaging optical system, in the special environment of large temperature difference, the centering assembly precision of roll edge optical elements was studied. According to the hole-axis coordinate error theory of mechanics, by analyzing the factors affected the precision of mechanical heating surface, combining with the existing method to eliminate error and centering assembly process, a new kind of high precision centering assembly method was put forward. Using additional grinding device to grinding roll edge of optical element, eliminate the machining error on the surface of the mechanical hot working, thus improve the centering assembly precision between the roll edge optical element and lens tube. The result of experiment shows that the centering precision can reach less than 3μm when assembled optical element after roll edge using new centering assembly method, and improved by 25% compared to the traditional method of roll edge optical elements are assembled directly after hot working. New assembly method with additional grinding device can improve the centering assembly precision of roll edge optical elements, and greatly reduce the difficulty of optical design of such optical imaging system using in large temperature difference environment, when meet the same image quality.

  13. Hybrid plasmon/dielectric waveguide for integrated silicon-on-insulator optical elements.

    PubMed

    Flammer, P D; Banks, J M; Furtak, T E; Durfee, C G; Hollingsworth, R E; Collins, R T

    2010-09-27

    VLSI compatible optical waveguides on silicon are currently of particular interest in order to integrate optical elements onto silicon chips, and for possible replacements of electrical cross-chip/inter-core interconnects. Here we present simulation and experimental verification of a hybrid plasmon/dielectric, single-mode, single-polarization waveguide for silicon-on-insulator wafers. Its fabrication is compatible with VLSI processing techniques, and it possesses desirable properties such as the absence of birefringence and low sensitivity to surface roughness and metallic losses. The waveguide structure naturally forms an MOS capacitor, possibly useful for active device integration. Simulations predict very long propagation lengths of millimeter scale with micron scale confinement, or sub-micron scale confinement with propagation lengths still in excess of 100 microns. The waveguide may be tuned continuously between these states using standard VLSI processing. Extremely long propagation lengths have been simulated: one configuration presented here has a simulated propagation length of 34 cm. PMID:20940996

  14. Chiral THz metamaterial with tunable optical activity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jiangfeng; Taylor, Antoinette; O' Hara, John; Chowdhury, Roy; Zhao, Rongkuo; Soukoullis, Costas M

    2010-01-01

    Optical activity in chiral metamaterials is demonstrated in simulation and shows actively tunable giant polarization rotation at THz frequencies. Electric current distributions show that pure chirality is achieved by our bi-Iayer chiral metamaterial design. The chirality can be optically controlled by illumination with near-infrared light. Optical activity, occurring in chiral materials such as DNA, sugar and many other bio-molecules, is a phenomenon of great importance to many areas of science including molecular biology, analytical chemistry, optoelectronics and display applications. This phenomenon is well understood at an effective medium level as a magnetic/electric moment excited by the electric/magnetic field of the incident electromagnetic (EM) wave. Usually, natural chiral materials exhibit very weak optical activity e.g. a gyrotropic quartz crystal. The optical activity of chiral metamaterials, however, can be five orders of magnitude stronger. Chiral metamaterials are made of sub-wavelength resonators lacking symmetry planes. The asymmetry allows magnetic moments to be excited by the electric field of the incident EM wave and vice versa. Recently, chiral metamaterials have been demonstrated and lead to prospects in giant optical activity, circular dichroism, negative refraction and reversing the Casmir force. These fascinating optical properties require strong chirality, which may be designed through the microscopic structure of chiral metamaterials. However, these metamaterials have a fixed response function, defined by the geometric structuring, which limits their ability to manipulate EM waves. Active metamaterials realize dynamic control of response functions and have produced many influential applications such as ultra-fast switching devices, frequency and phase modulation and memory devices. Introducing active designs to chiral metamaterials will give additional freedom in controlling the optical activity, and therefore enable dynamic manipulation

  15. Large Aperture Scanning Lidar Based on Holographic Optical Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Miller, David O.; Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Andrus, Ionio; Guerra, David V.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Lidar remote sensing instruments can make a significant contribution to satisfying many of the required measurements of atmospheric and surface parameters for future spaceborne platforms, including topographic altimeters, atmospheric profiles of, wind, humidity, temperature, trace molecules, aerosols, and clouds. It is highly desirable to have wide measurement swaths for rapid coverage rather than just the narrow ribbon of data that is obtained with a nadir only observation. For most applications global coverage is required, and for wind measurements scanning or pointing is required in order to retrieve the full 3-D wind vector from multiple line-of-sight Doppler measurements. Conventional lidar receivers make up a substantial portion of the instrument's size and weight. Wide angle scanning typically requires a large scanning mirror in front of the receiver telescope, or pointing the entire telescope and aft optics assembly, Either of these methods entails the use of large bearings, motors, gearing and their associated electronics. Spaceborne instruments also need reaction wheels to counter the torque applied to the spacecraft by these motions. NASA has developed simplified conical scanning telescopes using Holographic Optical Elements (HOEs) to reduce the size, mass, angular momentum, and cost of scanning lidar systems. NASA has developed two operating lidar systems based on 40 cm diameter HOEs. The first such system, named Prototype Holographic Atmospheric Scanner for Environmental Remote Sensing (PHASERS) was a joint development between NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and the University of Maryland College Park. PHASERS is based on a reflection HOE for use at the doubled Nd:YAG laser wavelength of 532 nm and has recently undergone a number of design changes in a collaborative effort between GSFC and Saint Anselm College in New Hampshire. The next step was to develop IR transmission HOEs for use with the Nd:YAG fundamental in the Holographic Airborne

  16. Large Aperture Scanning Lidar Based on Holographic Optical Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Miller, David O.; Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Andrus, Ionio; Guerra, David V.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Lidar remote sensing instruments can make a significant contribution to satisfying many of the required measurements of atmospheric and surface parameters for future spaceborne platforms, including topographic altimeters, atmospheric profiles of, wind, humidity, temperature, trace molecules, aerosols, and clouds. It is highly desirable to have wide measurement swaths for rapid coverage rather than just the narrow ribbon of data that is obtained with a nadir only observation. For most applications global coverage is required, and for wind measurements scanning or pointing is required in order to retrieve the full 3-D wind vector from multiple line-of-sight Doppler measurements. Conventional lidar receivers make up a substantial portion of the instrument's size and weight. Wide angle scanning typically requires a large scanning mirror in front of the receiver telescope, or pointing the entire telescope and aft optics assembly, Either of these methods entails the use of large bearings, motors, gearing and their associated electronics. Spaceborne instruments also need reaction wheels to counter the torque applied to the spacecraft by these motions. NASA has developed simplified conical scanning telescopes using Holographic Optical Elements (HOEs) to reduce the size, mass, angular momentum, and cost of scanning lidar systems. NASA has developed two operating lidar systems based on 40 cm diameter HOEs. The first such system, named Prototype Holographic Atmospheric Scanner for Environmental Remote Sensing (PHASERS) was a joint development between NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and the University of Maryland College Park. PHASERS is based on a reflection HOE for use at the doubled Nd:YAG laser wavelength of 532 nm and has recently undergone a number of design changes in a collaborative effort between GSFC and Saint Anselm College in New Hampshire. The next step was to develop IR transmission HOEs for use with the Nd:YAG fundamental in the Holographic Airborne

  17. Optical concept for an active headlamp with a DMD array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, A.

    2008-04-01

    Present car-headlamps can adapt their light distribution to the traffic situation only in a predefined way. The next generation of headlamps will offer a more flexible adaptation of their light distribution like an adaptive Cut-Off-Line in "Advanced Frontlighting Systems" (AFS). Addressable light sources in future active headlamps enable functions like glare free high beam or marking light. There are several possibilities to design such an addressable light source. In this contribution one solution using a digital micro mirror device (DMD) is presented. With this device an adaptive light distribution can be generated by modulating every pixel of the DMD individually. For the design of an optical system for a DMD headlamp a DMD-Projector was analyzed. The procedure of generating a light distribution can be divided into two processes: a.) illumination of DMD b.) projecting the image of the DMD on the street. In a DMD projector the illumination of a DMD is a very complex optical system with many optical elements. Some of these optical elements are not necessary for a car headlamp because of different requirements for car headlamps and DMD projectors. The illumination system can be simplified if these elements are eliminated. Also the aspect ratio of the imaging system for the DMD has to change 4:3 (DMD) to 7:2 (light distribution on the street).

  18. Optical theorem detectors for active scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marengo, Edwin A.; Tu, Jing

    2015-10-01

    We develop a new theory of the optical theorem for scalar fields in nonhomogeneous media which can be bounded or unbounded. It applies to arbitrary lossless backgrounds and quite general probing fields. The derived formulation holds for arbitrary passive scatterers, which can be dissipative, as well as for the more general class of active scatterers which are composed of a (passive) scatterer component and an active, radiating (antenna) component. The generalization of the optical theorem to active scatterers is relevant to many applications such as surveillance of active targets including certain cloaks and invisible scatterers and wireless communications. The derived theoretical framework includes the familiar real power optical theorem describing power extinction due to both dissipation and scattering as well as a novel reactive optical theorem related to the reactive power changes. The developed approach naturally leads to three optical theorem indicators or statistics which can be used to detect changes or targets in unknown complex media. The paper includes numerical simulation results that illustrate the application of the derived optical theorem results to change detection in complex and random media.

  19. Optical and laser characterization of Nd:YAG ceramics elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Librant, Zdzisław; Węglarz, Helena; Wajler, Anna; Tomaszewski, Henryk; Łukasiewicz, Tadeusz; Jabczyński, Jan K.; Zendzian, Waldemar; Kwiatkowski, Jacek

    2008-12-01

    The Nd:YAG ceramics of nominal 1% and 2% Nd dopant were produced by a solid-state reaction of high-purity (4N) nanometric oxides powders i.e. Al2O3, Y2O3 and Nd2O3. Yttrium oxide nanopowder (XRD crystallite size of 79 nm) was produced by precipitation from water solution of high-purity hydrated nitrate, by means of ammonia hydro-carbonate. The cold isostatic pressing method was applied to densify granulated powder. Further the sintering and annealing processes were deployed to produce the final Nd:YAG ceramic samples. Mean grain sizes of about 20 µm and grain boundaries less than 10 nm of elaborated Nd:YAG ceramic samples were evaluated in SEM and TEM measurements. Thus, in microscale the quality of obtained ceramic was quite satisfactory. However, in macroscale, the samples had unacceptable level of voids and pores observed in visual inspection, which resulted in low 76% transmission, corresponding to extinction coefficient of 0.32 cm-1 at 1064-nm wavelength. The sizes of defects, pores and inclusions were of several dozens of micrometer. The active elements of rod and slab shape were fabricated and characterized in two diode pumping laser set ups. In end pumping configuration as a pump source 20-W fiber coupled laser diode was deployed. For the low duty cycle pumping (1 ms/20 Hz) above 30% slope efficiency was achieved. In the best case, 3.7 W of output power for 18 W of pump power, with M2 <1.4 were demonstrated for uncoated ceramics rod of φ4x3mm size. We have used uncoated elements, thus we can expect increase in laser parameters for optimized pumping conditions and samples with anti-reflective coatings. The parameters of elaborated ceramic material at this stage of work are unsatisfactory for laser application. However, the results of TEM measurements and laser characterizations seems to be quite promising..

  20. Stem cell tracking with optically active nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yu; Cui, Yan; Chan, Jerry KY; Xu, Chenjie

    2013-01-01

    Stem-cell-based therapies hold promise and potential to address many unmet clinical needs. Cell tracking with modern imaging modalities offers insight into the underlying biological process of the stem-cell-based therapies, with the goal to reveal cell survival, migration, homing, engraftment, differentiation, and functions. Adaptability, sensitivity, resolution, and non-invasiveness have contributed to the longstanding use of optical imaging for stem cell tracking and analysis. To identify transplanted stem cells from the host tissue, optically active probes are usually used to label stem cells before the administration. In comparison to the traditional fluorescent probes like fluorescent proteins and dyes, nanoparticle-based probes are advantageous in terms of the photo-stabilities and minimal changes to the cell phenotype. The main focus here is to overview the recent development of optically active nanoparticles for stem cells tracking. The related optical imaging modalities include fluorescence imaging, photoacoustic imaging, Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy imaging. PMID:23638335

  1. LDEF active optical system components experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    A preliminary report on the Active Optical System Components Experiment is presented. This experiment contained 136 components in a six inch deep tray including lasers, infrared detectors and arrays, ultraviolet light detectors, light-emitting diodes, a light modulator, flash lamps, optical filters, glasses, and samples of surface finishes. Thermal, mechanical, and structural considerations leading to the design of the tray hardware are discussed. In general, changes in the retested component characteristics appear as much related to the passage of time as to the effects of the space environment, but organic materials, multilayer optical interference filters, and extreme-infrared reflectivity of black paints show unexpected changes.

  2. Recent optical activity of Mrk 421

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semkov, E.; Bachev, R.; Strigachev, A.; Ibryamov, S.; Peneva, S.; Gupta, A. C.

    2013-04-01

    Our BVRI optical observations of Mrk 421 were performed within the multiwavelength international campaign (December 2012-June 2013), with the participation of GASP-WEBT, Swift, MAGIC, VLBA, NuSTAR, Fermi, VERITAS, F-GAMMA and other collaborations. Following the reports of enhanced X-ray and gamma activity of Mrk 421 (ATel #4978, ATel #4977, ATel #4976, ATel #4974, ATel #4918), we observed this blazar with the optical telescopes of the National Astronomical Observatory Rozhen and the Astronomical Observatory Belogradchik, Bulgaria.

  3. Optical, elemental and structural analyses of acetoacetanilide single crystals for nonlinear optical applications.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, N; Rani, Neelam; Bhagavannarayana, G; Haranath, D; Jayabharathi, J; Wahab, M A; Das, S

    2012-07-01

    Single crystals of acetoacetanilide have been successfully grown by slow evaporation solution growth method at room temperature. The grown crystal belongs to orthorhombic crystal system having the lattice dimensions of a=8.686Å, b=11.104Å, c=19.232Å. Its crystalline perfection was examined by home-made high resolution X-ray diffractometer (HRXRD), and found that that the quality of the specimen is reasonable. The presence of carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen were experimentally determined by elemental analysis and that are in good agreement with the theoretically calculated values. Its laser damage threshold, phase matching and second harmonic generation efficiency were determined by using Nd:YAG laser as a source. Optical behavior of acetoacetanilide was examined by using photoluminescence studies. Its hyerpolarizability and HOMO-LUMO energies were calculated by using density functional theory (DFT). PMID:22465771

  4. Multiple-Zone Diffractive Optic Element for Laser Ranging Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis A.

    2011-01-01

    A diffractive optic element (DOE) can be used as a beam splitter to generate multiple laser beams from a single input laser beam. This technology has been recently used in LRO s Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) instrument to generate five laser beams that measure the lunar topography from a 50-km nominal mapping orbit (see figure). An extension of this approach is to use a multiple-zone DOE to allow a laser altimeter instrument to operate over a wider range of distances. In particular, a multiple-zone DOE could be used for applications that require both mapping and landing on a planetary body. In this case, the laser altimeter operating range would need to extend from several hundred kilometers down to a few meters. The innovator was recently involved in an investigation how to modify the LOLA instrument for the OSIRIS asteroid mapping and sample return mission. One approach is to replace the DOE in the LOLA laser beam expander assembly with a multiple-zone DOE that would allow for the simultaneous illumination of the asteroid with mapping and landing laser beams. The proposed OSIRIS multiple-zone DOE would generate the same LOLA five-beam output pattern for high-altitude topographic mapping, but would simultaneously generate a wide divergence angle beam using a small portion of the total laser energy for the approach and landing portion of the mission. Only a few percent of the total laser energy is required for approach and landing operations as the return signal increases as the inverse square of the ranging height. A wide divergence beam could be implemented by making the center of the DOE a diffractive or refractive negative lens. The beam energy and beam divergence characteristics of a multiple-zone DOE could be easily tailored to meet the requirements of other missions that require laser ranging data. Current single-zone DOE lithographic manufacturing techniques could also be used to fabricate a multiple-zone DOE by masking the different DOE zones during

  5. Evaluation of centricity of optical elements by using a point spread function

    SciTech Connect

    Miks, Antonin; Novak, Jiri; Novak, Pavel

    2008-06-20

    Our work describes a technique for testing the centricity of optical systems by using the point spread function. It is shown that a specific position of an axial object point can be found for every optical element, where the spherical aberration is either zero or minimal. If we image such a point with an optical element, then its point spread function will be almost identical to the point spread function of the diffraction-limited optical system. This consequence can be used for testing the centricity of precisely fabricated optical elements, because we can simply detect asymmetry of the point spread function, which is caused by the decentricity of the tested optical element. One can also use this method for testing optical elements in connection with a cementing process. Moreover, a simple formula is also derived for calculation of the coefficient of third-order coma, which is caused by the decentricity of the optical surface due to a tilt of the surface with respect to the optical axis, and a simple method for detecting the asymmetry of the point spread function is proposed.

  6. Micro-optical elements functioning in non-visible spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qin; Zhang, Andy Z. Z.; Bergström, Andreas; Huo, Vicky Z. J.; Almqvist, Susanne; Kaplan, Wlodek; Andersson, Jan Y.

    2010-05-01

    Nowadays novel micro-fabrication and wafer-based manufacturing approach allows realizing micro-optics in a way scientists have dreamt for generations, in particular, utilizing nano-imprint lithography as fabrication tooling enables greatly accelerating the micro-optics technology to its frontier. In this report, we present wafer-scale fabrication of various types of micro-optical elements based on photoresist, benzocyclobutene, photocurable imprint resist, and semiconductor materials by using thermal reflow, reactive ion etching, and imprint techniques. Especially, several concave or convex 3-dimensional micro-optical structures shaped by imprint method are detailed. These micro-optical elements can be monolithically or hybrid integrated onto optoelectronics devices, such as photodetectors and emitters as optical beam focuser, collimator, filter, or anti-reflectance elements. As application examples, polymer microlenses were integrated directly on the top of UV dual functional devices and quantum dot long wavelength infrared photodetectors, respectively.

  7. Programmable diffractive optical element using a multichannel lanthanum-modified lead zirconate titanate phase modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, James A.; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    1995-07-01

    We introduce a programmable diffractive optical element based on an electro-optic phased array implemented with a multichannel lanthanum-modified lead zirconate titanate phase modulator. The design and fabrication procedures are outlined, along with an experimental demonstration of the device. Experimental results from a 16-channel device operating with a 2 pi voltage of 300 V demonstrate selective beam steering. The programmable diffractive optical element allows for efficient, high-speed high-resolution random-access optical beam steering over a continuous scanning range.

  8. Manifestation of optical activity in different materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinova, A. F.; Golovina, T. G.; Konstantinov, K. K.

    2014-07-01

    Various manifestations of optical activity (OA) in crystals and organic materials are considered. Examples of optically active enantiomorphic and nonenantiomorphic crystals of 18 symmetry classes are presented. The OA of enantiomorphic organic materials as components of living nature (amino acids, sugars, and proteins) is analyzed. Questions related to the origin of life on earth are considered. Examples of differences in the enantiomers of drugs are shown. The consequences of replacing conventional left-handed amino acids with additionally right-handed amino acids for living organisms are indicated.

  9. Membrane optical activity: some facts and fallacies.

    PubMed

    Wallach, D F; Low, D A; Bertland, A V

    1973-11-01

    The circular dichroism of hypothetical, water-filled, spherical shells, 75-3500 nm in radius, with walls 7.5 nm thick, composed of poly(L-lysine) in various conformational proportions, and suspended in water, were computed from the known optical properties of this polypeptide by classical general light-scattering theory (Mie theory). Comparison of the computed curves of circular dichroism spectra with those of diverse membranes reveals large discrepancies below 215 nm and shows that light scattering does not adequately account for the optical activity of membranes containing appreciable proportions of nonhelical conformation. However, turbidity effects can explain the anomalies of membrane optical rotatory dispersion near 233 nm, if not uniquely so. We conclude that the optical activity of neither most soluble proteins nor membrane proteins can provide accurate conformational information when synthetic polypeptides are used as standards and list the reasons for this argument. We also show that present techniques to "correct" membrane optical activity are likely to produce additional artifact. PMID:4522300

  10. Application of the light sword optical element in a case of presbyopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaroszewicz, Zbigniew; Kolodziejczyk, Andrzej; Makowski, Michał; Mikuła, Grzegorz; Pawlak, Iwona; Petelczyc, Krzysztof; Suszek, Jarosław; Sypek, Maciej

    2006-04-01

    The paper presents abilities of the Light Sword Optical Element (LSOE) for imaging with extended depth of focus. The LSOE belongs to the class of optical elements focusing incident light into a segment of the optical axis. The elements of this kind can be used as correctors of some defects of human eye accommodation, especially in a case of presbyopia. The paper illustrates imaging properties of the LSOE. In particular, the point spread functions of the LSOE are analysed numerically. Imaging properties of the LSOE are compared with properties of optical elements being potentially useful for presbyopia correction as axicons, bifocal lens and trifocal lens. The experimental results illustrating usefulness of the LSOE in a case of presbyopia are given.

  11. Fabrication of a phase transmission holographic optical element in polycarbonate and its characterization.

    PubMed

    Vadivelan, V; Chandar Shekar, B

    2016-08-10

    The phase transmission holographic optical element in silver halide holographic emulsion, especially for holographic collimator sights, is fabricated and the desired diffraction efficiency is obtained with very high transmission. One of the main drawbacks of these holograms are that they become dark by being exposed under sunlight, and this darkness drastically reduces the visible transmission and diffraction efficiency of a holographic optical element, hence it is not suitable for weapon sight application. To overcome this problem, we transferred a holographic optical element with a reticle image from silver halide into polycarbonate by using copying, electroforming, and recombination techniques. The holographic optical element in polycarbonate has many advantages; the detailed method of fabrication, transfer, and its characterization are presented. The very interesting result of diffraction efficiency variation with angle obtained in polycarbonate is discussed. PMID:27534494

  12. Design of an Airborne Scanning Lidar Using a Holographic Optical Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Hopf, Dan; Neuman, Mark; Kubalak, David; Christhilif, Ellen; Hasselbrack, William; Ranganayakamma, Belthur; Kim, Jin; Hwang, I. H.

    1998-01-01

    An aerosol and cloud backscatter lidar system has been built using a one meter focal length transmission holographic optical element that functions as a scanning telescope. Rotating the disk about the center line normal effects a 45 degree conical scan.

  13. Multifunctional micro-optical elements for laser beam homogenizing and beam shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bich, A.; Rieck, J.; Dumouchel, C.; Roth, S.; Weible, K. J.; Eisner, M.; Voelkel, R.; Zimmermann, M.; Rank, M.; Schmidt, M.; Bitterli, R.; Ramanan, N.; Ruffieux, P.; Scharf, T.; Noell, W.; Herzig, H.-P.; De Rooij, Nico

    2008-02-01

    Refractive, diffractive and reflective micro-optical elements for laser beam shaping and homogenizing have been manufactured and tested. The presented multifunctional optical elements are used for shaping arbitrary laser beam profiles into a variety of geometries like, a homogeneous spot array or line pattern, a laser light sheet or flat-top intensity profiles. The resulting profiles are strongly influenced by the beam properties of the laser and by diffraction and interference effects at the micro-optical elements. We present general design rules for beam shaping and homogenizing. We demonstrate the application of such multifunctional micro-optical elements for a variety of applications from micro-laser machining to laser diagnostic systems.

  14. Double peacock eye optical element for extended focal depth imaging with ophthalmic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Lenny A.; Millán, María S.; Jaroszewicz, Zbigniew; Kolodziejczyk, Andrzej

    2012-04-01

    The aged human eye is commonly affected by presbyopia, and therefore, it gradually loses its capability to form images of objects placed at different distances. Extended depth of focus (EDOF) imaging elements can overcome this inability, despite the introduction of a certain amount of aberration. This paper evaluates the EDOF imaging performance of the so-called peacock eye phase diffractive element, which focuses an incident plane wave into a segment of the optical axis and explores the element's potential use for ophthalmic presbyopia compensation optics. Two designs of the element are analyzed: the single peacock eye, which produces one focal segment along the axis, and the double peacock eye, which is a spatially multiplexed element that produces two focal segments with partial overlapping along the axis. The performances of the peacock eye elements are compared with those of multifocal lenses through numerical simulations as well as optical experiments in the image space. The results demonstrate that the peacock eye elements form sharper images along the focal segment than the multifocal lenses and, therefore, are more suitable for presbyopia compensation. The extreme points of the depth of field in the object space, which represent the remote and the near object points, have been experimentally obtained for both the single and the double peacock eye optical elements. The double peacock eye element has better imaging quality for relatively short and intermediate distances than the single peacock eye, whereas the latter seems better for far distance vision.

  15. Realization of binary radial diffractive optical elements by two-photon polymerization technique.

    PubMed

    Osipov, Vladimir; Pavelyev, Vladimir; Kachalov, Denis; Zukauskas, Albertas; Chichkov, Boris

    2010-12-01

    Application of the two-photon polymerization (2PP) technique for the fabrication of submicron-size relief of radial binary diffractive optical elements (DOE's) is studied. Binary DOE's for the formation of special longitudinal intensity distribution (axial light segment) are realized. Interferometric investigations of the diffractive relief produced by the 2PP-technique and investigations of optical properties of the formed elements are presented. Results of computer simulations are in good agreement with the experimental observations. PMID:21164925

  16. An Overhead Projection Demonstration of Optical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, John W.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the use of two polarizing lenses, a yellow filter, an oatmeal bos, a piece of cardboard, a 1,000 ml beaker, and an overhead projector to demonstrate compound optical activity to large classes. Indicates the presence of an accuracy within 1-2 degrees of usually acceptable data. (CC)

  17. Elements of fiber-optic communication lines and methods for their investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belovolov, M. I.; Kriukov, A. P.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Pencheva, V. Kh.

    Experimental results are presented on optical feedback effects arising during the matching of semiconductor lasers with single-mode fiber-optic waveguides. It is shown that matching elements such as focusing concentrators and microobjectives can be used in high-speed fiber-optic lines with direct detection, while microobjectives with obligatory monitoring of their effect on the width of the laser-action line should be used in coherent fiber-optic lines. Based on this approach, a simple fiber-optic Michelson interferometer has been constructed with a discretely variable arm difference and a novel scheme of visibility recording.

  18. Multipoint photonic doppler velocimetry using optical lens elements

    DOEpatents

    Frogget, Brent Copely; Romero, Vincent Todd

    2014-04-29

    A probe including a fisheye lens is disclosed to measure the velocity distribution of a moving surface along many lines of sight. Laser light, directed to the surface and then reflected back from the surface, is Doppler shifted by the moving surface, collected into fisheye lens, and then directed to detection equipment through optic fibers. The received light is mixed with reference laser light and using photonic Doppler velocimetry, a continuous time record of the surface movement is obtained. An array of single-mode optical fibers provides an optic signal to an index-matching lens and eventually to a fisheye lens. The fiber array flat polished and coupled to the index-matching lens using index-matching gel. Numerous fibers in a fiber array project numerous rays through the fisheye lens which in turn project many measurement points at numerous different locations to establish surface coverage over a hemispherical shape with very little crosstalk.

  19. Optical activity in planar chiral metamaterials: Theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Benfeng; Svirko, Yuri; Turunen, Jari; Vallius, Tuomas

    2007-08-15

    A thorough theoretical study of the optical activity in planar chiral metamaterial (PCM) structures, made of both dielectric and metallic media, is conducted by the analysis of gammadion-shaped nanoparticle arrays. The general polarization properties are first analyzed from an effective-medium perspective, by analogy with natural optical activity, and then verified by rigorous numerical simulation, some of which are corroborated by previous experimental results. The numerical analysis suggests that giant polarization rotation (tens of degrees) may be achieved in the PCM structures with a thickness of only hundreds of nanometers. The artificial optical activity arises from circular birefringence induced by the structural chirality and is enhanced by the guided-mode or surface-plasmon resonances taking place in the structures. There are two polarization conversion types in the dielectric PCMs, whereas only one type in the metallic ones. Many intriguing features of the polarization property of PCMs are also revealed and explained: the polarization effect is reciprocal and vanishes in the symmetrically layered structures; the effect occurs only in the transmitted field, but not in the reflected field; and the polarization spectra of two enantiomeric PCM structures are mirror symmetric to each other. These remarkable properties pave the way for the PCMs to be used as polarization elements in new-generation integrated optical systems.

  20. Dual focus diffractive optical element with extended depth of focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Katsuhiro; Shimizu, Isao

    2014-09-01

    A dual focus property and an extended depth of focus were verified by a new type of diffractive lens displaying on liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) devices. This type of lens is useful to read information on multilayer optical discs and tilted discs. The radial undulation of the phase groove on the diffractive lens gave the dual focus nature. The focal extension was performed by combining the dual focus lens with the axilens that was invented for expanding the depth of focus. The number of undulations did not affect the intensity along the optical axis but the central spot of the diffraction pattern.

  1. Optical elements formed by compressed gases: Analysis and potential applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howes, W. L.

    1986-01-01

    Spherical, cylindrical, and conical shock waves are optically analogous to gas lenses. The geometrical optics of these shock configurations are analyzed as they pertain to flow visualization instruments, particularly the rainbow schlieren apparatus and single-pass interferometers. It is proposed that a lens or mirror formed by gas compressed between plastic sheets has potential as a fluid visualization test object; as the objective mirror in a very large space-based telescope, communication antenna, or energy collector; as the objective mirror in inexpensive commercial telescopes; and as a component in fluid visualization apparatuses.

  2. The Adaptive Optics Summer School Laboratory Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammons, S. M.; Severson, S.; Armstrong, J. D.; Crossfield, I.; Do, T.; Fitzgerald, M.; Harrington, D.; Hickenbotham, A.; Hunter, J.; Johnson, J.; Johnson, L.; Li, K.; Lu, J.; Maness, H.; Morzinski, K.; Norton, A.; Putnam, N.; Roorda, A.; Rossi, E.; Yelda, S.

    2010-12-01

    Adaptive Optics (AO) is a new and rapidly expanding field of instrumentation, yet astronomers, vision scientists, and general AO practitioners are largely unfamiliar with the root technologies crucial to AO systems. The AO Summer School (AOSS), sponsored by the Center for Adaptive Optics, is a week-long course for training graduate students and postdoctoral researchers in the underlying theory, design, and use of AO systems. AOSS participants include astronomers who expect to utilize AO data, vision scientists who will use AO instruments to conduct research, opticians and engineers who design AO systems, and users of high-bandwidth laser communication systems. In this article we describe new AOSS laboratory sessions implemented in 2006-2009 for nearly 250 students. The activity goals include boosting familiarity with AO technologies, reinforcing knowledge of optical alignment techniques and the design of optical systems, and encouraging inquiry into critical scientific questions in vision science using AO systems as a research tool. The activities are divided into three stations: Vision Science, Fourier Optics, and the AO Demonstrator. We briefly overview these activities, which are described fully in other articles in these conference proceedings (Putnam et al., Do et al., and Harrington et al., respectively). We devote attention to the unique challenges encountered in the design of these activities, including the marriage of inquiry-like investigation techniques with complex content and the need to tune depth to a graduate- and PhD-level audience. According to before-after surveys conducted in 2008, the vast majority of participants found that all activities were valuable to their careers, although direct experience with integrated, functional AO systems was particularly beneficial.

  3. LDEF active optical system components experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, M. D.

    1991-01-01

    A preliminary report on the Active Optical System Components Experiment is presented. This experiment contained 136 components in a six-inch deep tray including lasers, infrared detectors and arrays, ultraviolet light detectors, light-emitting diodes, a light modulator, flash lamps, optical filters, glasses, and samples of surface finishes. The experimental results for those component characteristics appear as much related to the passage of time as to the effects of the space environment, but organic materials and extreme-infrared reflectivity of black paints show unexpected changes.

  4. Optical fiber sensor having an active core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egalon, Claudio Oliveira (Inventor); Rogowski, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An optical fiber is provided. The fiber is comprised of an active fiber core which produces waves of light upon excitation. A factor ka is identified and increased until a desired improvement in power efficiency is obtained. The variable a is the radius of the active fiber core and k is defined as 2 pi/lambda wherein lambda is the wavelength of the light produced by the active fiber core. In one embodiment, the factor ka is increased until the power efficiency stabilizes. In addition to a bare fiber core embodiment, a two-stage fluorescent fiber is provided wherein an active cladding surrounds a portion of the active fiber core having an improved ka factor. The power efficiency of the embodiment is further improved by increasing a difference between the respective indices of refraction of the active cladding and the active fiber core.

  5. Active pixel sensors with substantially planarized color filtering elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Kemeny, Sabrina E. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A semiconductor imaging system preferably having an active pixel sensor array compatible with a CMOS fabrication process. Color-filtering elements such as polymer filters and wavelength-converting phosphors can be integrated with the image sensor.

  6. Developing of in-suit long trance profiler for testing slope error of aspherical optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Changxin; Li, Hengshun; Chen, Chukang; Zhou, Chengzhi

    2005-12-01

    Profile error of super smooth surface of optical elements at x-ray/EUV in synchrotron radiation (SR) light beam line is described as slope error of them generally. The Long Trace Profiler (LPT) is used for testing surface slope error of SR optical elements in world generally. It is requisite to use In-suit LTP measuring surface thermal distortion of SR optical elements with high heat under high bright SR source. Authors design an In-suit LTP by means of co-path interferometer with pencil light beam. The instrument not only can be used for testing slope error of mirrors in Lab. also in situation test the distortion of mirror with high heat load at synchrotron light beam line. The device can be used to test various absolute surface figures of optical elements such as aspherieal, spherical and plane. It is needless standard reference surface. It is named by LTP-III. This paper describes its basic operating principle, optical system, mechanical constructions, DC serve motor control system, array detector, data acquisition system and computer system for controlling and data analysis of LTP-III. The Instrument has advantages of high accuracy, low cost, multifunction and wide application. Length of surface measured of optical element accuracy is 0.04 arcsec.

  7. Infrared optical element mounting techniques for wide temperature ranges

    SciTech Connect

    Saggin, Bortolino; Tarabini, Marco; Scaccabarozzi, Diego

    2010-01-20

    We describe the optimization of a mounting system for the infrared (IR) optics of a spaceborne interferometer working in the temperature range between -120 deg. C and +150 deg. C. The concept is based on an aluminum alloy frame with designed mechanical compliance, which allows for compensation of the different coefficient of thermal expansion between the optics and the holder; at the same time, the system provides for the high stiffness required to reach natural frequencies above 200 Hz, which are mandatory in most space missions. Thermal adapters with properly chosen thermomechanical characteristics are interposed between the metallic structure and the lens, so as to reduce the interface stresses on the mechanically weak IR material, due to both the thermoelastic and acceleration loads. With the proposed mount, the competitive requirements of stiffness and stress-free mounting can be matched in wide temperature ranges. The case study of the interferometer of a miniaturized Fourier transform IR spectrometer is presented.

  8. Recent development in light Ultramicroscopy using aspherical optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saghafi, Saiedeh; Becker, Klaus; Hahn, Christian; Dodt, Hans-Ulrich

    2012-12-01

    Here we present a new light sheet generator unit for Ultramicroscopy (UM) employing a combination of optical lenses with aspherical surface structure. UM allows 3D-vizualization of chemically transparent biological specimens with μm-resolution. Improving optical characteristics parameters of light sheet such as the uniformity factor of spatial intensity distribution along the line of focus, the thickness of light sheet, and chromatic aberrations are the most important criteria in this design. Since we do not use any hard edge aperture there is no truncation of the beam and laser energy is used more efficiently. Due to these improvements, a marked enhancement in presenting fine details of biological specimens such as Drosophila melanogaster, entire mouse brain, and hippocampus are achieved.

  9. Trace elemental composition of curry by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES).

    PubMed

    Gonzálvez, A; Armenta, S; De La Guardia, M

    2008-01-01

    A methodology based on inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) after microwave-assisted acid digestion was developed to determine the content of traces elements in curry samples from the Spanish market. The methodology was validated in terms of accuracy by the analysis of citrus and tomato leaf reference materials achieving comparable results with the certified values. The trace metal content of curry samples was compared with data available from previously published reports concerning Indian samples, especially in terms of heavy metal composition, in order to guarantee the quality of the commercially available spices in the European countries. Values found for the analysis of arsenic, lead and cadmium were significantly lower than the maximum limit allowed by European Union statutory limits for heavy metals and lower than those obtained for Indian curry leaves reported by Indian research teams by using neutron activation and γ-ray analysis. PMID:24784807

  10. Active Optical Control of Quasi-Static Aberrations for ATST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L. C.; Upton, R.; Rimmele, T. R.; Hubbard, R.; Barden, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) requires active control of quasi-static telescope aberrations in order to achieve the image quality set by its science requirements. Four active mirrors will be used to compensate for optical misalignments induced by changing gravitational forces and thermal gradients. These misalignments manifest themselves primarily as low-order wavefront aberrations that will be measured by a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. When operating in closed-loop with the wavefront sensor, the active optics control algorithm uses a linear least-squares reconstructor incorporating force constraints to limit force applied to the primary mirror while also incorporating a neutral-point constraint on the secondary mirror to limit pointing errors. The resulting system compensates for astigmatism and defocus with rigid-body motion of the secondary mirror and higher-order aberrations with primary mirror bending modes. We demonstrate this reconstruction method and present simulation results that apply the active optics correction to aberrations generated by finite-element modeling of thermal and gravitational effects over a typical day of ATST operation. Quasi-static wavefront errors are corrected to within limits set by wavefront sensor noise in all cases with very little force applied to the primary mirror surface and minimal pointing correction needed.

  11. Method and apparatus for making an optical element having a dielectric film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Augason, Gordon C. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A film-application device (FAD) comprising a pair of exterior, tapered, O-ring bearing plate members and a central plate member for simplifying the process of thermally bonding a thin dielectric film to a substrate comprising an optical element are discussed. In use, the film is sandwiched between the O rings and stretched across the optical element by squeezing the exterior plates together before bonding to the element. The film may be used for protecting the optical element or to reduce surface reflection of radiation. The FAD may also be used without the center plate to stretch a dielectric film prior to its attachment to or insertion in a holder to make pellicles or beam-splitters.

  12. James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element/Integrated Science Instrument Module (OTIS) Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Voyton, Mark; Lander, Juli; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Matthews, Gary

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element (OTE) and Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) are integrated together to form the OTIS. Once integrated, the OTIS undergoes primary mirror center of curvature optical tests, electrical and operational tests, acoustics and vibration testing at the Goddard Space Flight Center before being shipped to the Johnson Space Center for cryogenic optical testing of the OTIS. In preparation for the cryogenic optical testing, the JWST project has built a Pathfinder telescope and has completed two Optical Ground System Equipment (OGSE) cryogenic optical tests with the Pathfinder. In this paper, we will summarize optical test results to date and status the final Pathfinder test and the OTIS integration and environmental test preparations

  13. Simple, monolithic optical element for forward-viewing spectrally encoded endoscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Dukho; Kang, Dongkyun; Ikuta, Mitsuhiro; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2016-03-01

    Spectrally encoded endoscopy (SEE) is a miniature endoscopic technology that can acquire images of internal organs through a hair-thin probe. While most previously described SEE probes have been side viewing, forward-view (FV)-SEE is advantageous in certain clinical applications as it provides more natural navigation of the probe and has the potential to provide a wider field of view. Prior implementations of FV-SEE used multiple optical elements that increase fabrication complexity and may diminish the robustness of the device. In this paper, we present a new design that uses a monolithic optical element to realize FV-SEE imaging. The optical element is specially designed spacer, fabricated from a 500-μm-glass rod that has a mirror surface on one side and a grating stamped on its distal end. The mirror surface is used to change the incident angle on the grating to diffract the shortest wavelength of the spectrum so that it is parallel to the optical axis. Rotating the SEE optics creates a circular FV-SEE image. Custom-designed software processes FV-SEE images into circular images, which are displayed in real-time. In order to demonstrate this new design, we have constructed the FV-SEE optical element using a 1379 lines/mm diffraction grating. When illuminated with a source with a spectral bandwidth of 420-820 nm, the FV-SEE optical element provides 678 resolvable points per line. The imaging performance of the FV-SEE device was tested by imaging a USAF resolution target. SEE images showed that this new approach generates high quality images in the forward field with a field of view of 58°. Results from this preliminary study demonstrate that we can realize FV-SEE imaging with simple, monolithic, miniature optical element. The characteristics of this FV-SEE configuration will facilitate the development of robust miniature endoscopes for a variety of medical imaging applications.

  14. Target for optically activated seekers and trackers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakin, C. T.; Willett, N. F.

    1984-05-01

    This abstract discloses a target for optically activated seekers and trackers (TOAST) which provides for calibrated and variable target characteristics such as size, intensity, spatial position, color and interfering background. The TOAST has a first ilumination system providing a target light beam through an adjustable iris which controls image size. The target beam passes through a collimator lens which focuses the light at infinity. With the target beam focused at infinity, the motion of an elevation plate lengthens or shortens the distance from the collimator lens to a one motion mirror. The target beam is attenuated by a variable filter driven by a servo-motor, and a color selection process is provided by passing the beam through spectral filters. A background light beam with background imagery is provided to the beamsplitter mirror and mixed with the target image so as to simulate the target environment encountered by an operating optically activated seeker and tracker.

  15. Optically active particles of chiral polymers.

    PubMed

    Song, Ci; Liu, Xuan; Liu, Dong; Ren, Chonglei; Yang, Wantai; Deng, Jianping

    2013-09-01

    Particles constructed by chiral polymers (defined as PCPs) have emerged as a rapidly expanding research field in recent years because of their potentially wide-ranging applications in asymmetric catalysis, enantioselective crystallization, enantioselective release, amongst many others. The particles show considerable optical activity, due to the chirality of the corresponding polymers from which the particles are derived. This review article presents an overview on PCPs with emphasis on our group's recent achievements in the preparation of PCPs derived from optically active helical polymers and their applications. PCPs can be prepared via emulsion polymerization, precipitation polymerization, and suspension polymerization by starting from monomers. Emulsification of preformed chiral polymers and self-assembly approaches also can lead to PCPs. Chiral polymer-based core/shell particles, hollow particles, and magnetic particles are also covered because of their remarkable properties and significant potential applications. PMID:24030962

  16. Elements of active vibration control for rotating machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, Heinz

    1990-01-01

    The success or failure of active vibration control is determined by the availability of suitable actuators, modeling of the entire system including all active elements, positioning of the actuators and sensors, and implementation of problem-adapted control concepts. All of these topics are outlined and their special problems are discussed in detail. Special attention is given to efficient modeling of systems, especially for considering the active elements. Finally, design methods for and the application of active vibration control on rotating machinery are demonstrated by several real applications.

  17. Aplanatic grazing incidence diffraction grating: a new optical element

    SciTech Connect

    Hettrick, M.C.

    1986-09-15

    We present the theory of a grazing incidence reflection grating capable of imaging at submicron resolution. The optic is mechanically ruled on a spherical or cylindrical surface with varied groove spacings, delivering diffraction-limited response and a wide field of view at a selected wavelength. Geometrical aberrations are calculated on the basis of Fermat's principle, revealing significant improvements over a grazing incidence mirror. Aplanatic and quasi-aplanatic versions of the grating have applications in both imaging and scanning microscopes, microprobes, collimators, and telescopes. A 2-D crossed system of such gratings, similar to the grazing incidence mirror geometry of Kirkpatrick and Baez, could potentially provide spatial resolutions of --200 A.

  18. Optical activity of chirally distorted nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepliakov, Nikita V.; Baimuratov, Anvar S.; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Rukhlenko, Ivan D.

    2016-05-01

    We develop a general theory of optical activity of semiconductor nanocrystals whose chirality is induced by a small perturbation of their otherwise achiral electronic subsystems. The optical activity is described using the quantum-mechanical expressions for the rotatory strengths and dissymmetry factors introduced by Rosenfeld. We show that the rotatory strengths of optically active transitions are decomposed on electric dipole and magnetic dipole contributions, which correspond to the electric dipole and magnetic dipole transitions between the unperturbed quantum states. Remarkably, while the two kinds of rotatory strengths are of the same order of magnitude, the corresponding dissymmetry factors can differ by a factor of 105. By maximizing the dissymmetry of magnetic dipole absorption one can significantly enhance the enantioselectivity in the interaction of semiconductor nanocrystals with circularly polarized light. This feature may advance chiral and analytical methods, which will benefit biophysics, chemistry, and pharmaceutical science. The developed theory is illustrated by an example of intraband transitions inside a semiconductor nanocuboid, whose rotatory strengths and dissymmetry factors are calculated analytically.

  19. Optically Active Porphyrin and Phthalocyanine Systems.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hua; Kobayashi, Nagao

    2016-05-25

    This review highlights and summarizes various optically active porphyrin and phthalocyanine molecules prepared using a wide range of structural modification methods to improve the design of novel structures and their applications. The induced chirality of some illustrative achiral bis-porphyrins with a chiral guest molecule is introduced because these systems are ideal for the identification and separation of chiral biologically active substrates. In addition, the relationship between CD signal and the absolute configuration of the molecule is analyzed through an analysis of the results of molecular modeling calculations. Possible future research directions are also discussed. PMID:27186902

  20. Two-axes spectral splitting optical concentrator based on single plastic element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefancich, M.; Maragliano, C.; Apostoleris, Harry; Chiesa, Matteo

    2014-10-01

    High efficiency concentrator photovoltaic systems are currently based on costly III/V cells and, to offset the high cell capital cost, elevated optical concentrations are used, with consequent reduction in acceptance angles and tight tolerance optics. While this allows for spectacular conversion efficiencies, it does not provide cost effectiveness in a market dominated by low efficiency/low cost technologies. An alternative approach, well known in literature, is based on the combined use of an optical concentrator and a spectral splitting element allowing for the use of separate cells with different spectral responses and, thus, opening the way to a much wider range of possible materials and technologies. While many configurations have been presented during the years, optical efficiency has often been an issue due to the separate action of the concentrating and splitting element. We propose here, as substantial evolution of a previous design [1], a single injection molded plastic non-imaging optical element embodying both two axes concentration and spectral splitting functions. Based on the specific dispersion characteristics of polycarbonate and on a constructive analytical design procedure, this element allows for optical efficiencies exceeding 80%. Theory, simulations and preliminary experimental results will be presented.

  1. Fault analysis and detection in large active optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Charles D.; Furber, Mark E.; Jordan, David C.; Blaszak, David D.

    1995-05-01

    Active optical systems are complex systems that may be expected to operate in hostile environments such as space. The ability of such a system either to tolerate failures of components or to reconfigure to accommodate failed components could significantly increase the useful lifetime of the system. Active optical systems often contain hundreds of actuators and sensor channels but have an inherent redundancy, i.e., more actuators or sensor channels than the minimum needed to achieve the required performance. A failure detection and isolation system can be used to find and accommodate failures. One type of failure is the failure of an actuator. The effect of actuator failure on the ability of a deformable mirror to correct aberrations is analyzed using a finite-element model of the deformable mirror, and a general analytical procedure for determining the effect of actuator failures on system performance is given. The application of model-based failure detection, isolation and identification algorithms to active optical systems is outlined.

  2. Refraction and interference in micro- and nanostructure optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharf, Toralf; Jaquet, Sylvain; Ruffieux, Patrick; Herzig, Hans Peter

    2008-04-01

    Iridescent colors created by sophisticated nanostructured materials are known from nature and attract a lot of attention nowadays. A closer look reveals that such colors are often produced by combination of structures at different lengths scales at the micrometer and nanometer level. While simulation and analysis of such structures can be done with rigorous methods fabrication is seldom attacked because if its complexity. We have chosen a particular design concept that uses Bragg reflectors as dispersive components and microoptical elements to steer the light. We focused on fabrication in organic materials, where compatibility of different process steps is an issue. Fabrication is done by spin-coating of thin films and soft replication of microoptical elements. The structures were entirely fabricated in polymer materials on glass substrates or polymer films that serve as substrates. Microoptical structures with dimensions ranging from 30 to 250 microns are embossed on Bragg reflectors having periods of 160 nm. Of main interest for us were the spectral reflection properties. Reflection properties were measured for white light in a goniometric setup and their behavior is discussed. To understand the basic features modeling is carried out by combining ray tracing and rigorous methods.

  3. Diffractive optical elements for generating arbitrary line foci

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mait, Joseph N.; Prather, Dennis W.; Vandergracht, Joseph; Tayag, Tristan J.

    1993-01-01

    The key optical component in the architecture of the linearly variable magnification telescope presented here is a conical lens. This architecture has application to Doppler radar processing and to wavelet processing. Unfortunately, the unique surface profile of a conical lens does not allow traditional grinding techniques to be used for fabrication; therefore, its fabrication is considered custom. In addition to the requirement of custom fabrication, a refractive conical lens introduces phase aberrations that are intrinsic to its conic shape. Further, due to the large prismatic component of the lens, the variable magnification telescope architecture is off-axis. To overcome the fabrication and application difficulties of a refractive lens, we consider the construction of a hybrid diffractive-refractive lens.

  4. Optical pumping of generalized laser active materials.

    PubMed

    Fry, F H

    1967-11-01

    Results are presented of a computer-based study on the rate of excitation in the active cores of two types of optically pumped lasers as a function of a number of parameters of the active core. The absorption bands of the active materials are generated by Lorentzian and Gaussian functions. The excitation rate of the active core is proportional to the width of the absorption band at all depths of penetration. The plots of excitation rate as a function of frequency show curves similar to line reversal spectra and emphasize the importance of excitation some distance from the center of the absorption band in the slab model. In the cylindrical model, this wing pumping is even more important due to focusing. The effect of refractive index on the excitation rate is also described. PMID:20062337

  5. Optical encryption in spatially-incoherent light using two LC SLMs for both information input and encryption element imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondareva, Alyona P.; Cheremkhin, Pavel A.; Evtikhiev, Nikolay N.; Krasnov, Vitaly V.; Rodin, Vladislav G.; Starikov, Sergey N.

    2014-10-01

    At present time methods of optical encryption are actively developed. The majority of existing methods of optical encryption use not only light intensity distribution, easily registered with photosensors, but also its phase distribution which require application of complex holographic schemes in conjunction with spatially coherent monochromatic illumination. This leads to complex optical schemes and low decryption quality. To eliminate these disadvantages it is possible to implement optical encryption using spatially incoherent monochromatic illumination which requires registration of light intensity distribution only. Encryption is accomplished by means of optical convolution of image of scene to be encrypted and encryption diffractive optical element (DOE) point spread function (PSF) which serves as encryption key. Encryption process is described as follows. Scene is illuminated with spatially-incoherent monochromatic light. In the absence of encryption DOE lens forms image of scene in photosensor plane. DOE serves as encryption element, its PSF - encryption key. Light passing through DOE forms convolution of object image and DOE PSF. Registered by photosensor convolution is encrypted image. Decryption was conducted numerically on computer by means of inverse filtration with regularization. Kinoforms were used as encryption DOE because they have single diffraction order. Two liquid crystal (LC) spatial light modulators (SLM) were used to implement dynamic digital information input and dynamic encryption key change. As input scene amplitude LC SLM HoloEye LC2002 with 800×600 pixels 32×32 μm2 and 256 gray levels was used. To image synthesized encryption kinoforms phase LC SLM HoloEye PLUTO VIS with 1920×1080 pixels 8×8 μm2 and 256 phase levels was used. Set of test images was successfully optically encrypted and then numerically decrypted. Encrypted images contents are hidden. Decrypted images despite quite high noise levels are positively recognizable

  6. Visible-band testbed projector with a replicated diffractive optical element.

    PubMed

    Chen, C B; Hegg, R G; Johnson, W T; King, W B; Rock, D F; Spande, R

    1999-12-01

    Raytheon has designed, fabricated, and tested a diffractive-optical-element-based (DOE-based) testbed projector for direct and indirect visual optical applications. By use of a low-cost replicated DOE surface from Rochester Photonics Corporation for color correction the projector optics bettered the modular transfer function of an equivalent commercial camera lens. The testbed demonstrates that a practical DOE-based optical system is suitable for both visual applications (e.g., head-mounted displays) and visual projection (e.g., tactical sensors). The need for and the proper application of DOE's in visual optical systems, the nature and the performance of the projector optical design, and test results are described. PMID:18324257

  7. Characteristics of optical multiple channelled filters made of aperiodically patterned phase elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chung Ping; Lee, Kuei Jen; Ko, Cheng Hao; Dong, Bi Zhen

    2007-03-01

    Alternative optical filtered phase elements (OFPEs) in a rotationally symmetrically optical system are designed based on the general theory of the phase-retrieval. The OFPEs can implement simultaneously the filtering and focusing functions of optical waves at the preassigned wavelengths. The design procedure corresponds to solving an inverse source problem in optics. The designed OFPEs have aperiodic surface-relief depth distributions. Numerical results demonstrate that the constructed OFPEs can achieve the predetermined goal well. The performances of the designed OFPEs are appraised in detail, for instance, the line-width of the transmissive peaks, the spot size of the focusing point on the focal plane, and the effect of phase quantized level of the OFPEs, etc. It is expected that the presented OFPEs may diversify the optical filtering devices to meet various applications in micro-optics.

  8. Multifunctional diffractive optical elements for the generation of higher order Bessel-like-beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, A.; Bhattacharya, Shanti

    2015-01-01

    Higher Order Bessel Beams (HOBBs) have many useful applications in optical trapping experiments. The generation of HOBBs is achieved by illuminating an axicon by a Laguerre-Gaussian beam generated by a spiral phase plate. It can also be generated by a Holographic Optical Element (HOE) containing the functions of the Spiral Phase Plate (SPP) and an axicon. However the HOBB's large focal depth reduces the intensity at each plane. In this paper, we propose a multifunctional Diffractive Optical Element (DOE) containing the functions of a SPP, axicon and a Fresnel Zone Lens (FZL) to generate higher efficiency higher order Bessel-like-beams with a reduced focal depth. The functions of a SPP and a FZL were combined by shifting the location of zones of FZL in a spiral fashion. The resulting element is combined with an axicon by modulo-2π phase addition technique. The final composite element contains the functions of SPP, FZL and axicon. The elements were designed with different topological charges and fabricated using electron beam direct writing. The elements were tested and the generation of a higher order Bessel-like-beams is confirmed. Besides, the elements also generated high quality donut beams at two planes equidistant from the focal plane of the FZL.

  9. Plasmonic Biofoam: A Versatile Optically Active Material.

    PubMed

    Tian, Limei; Luan, Jingyi; Liu, Keng-Ku; Jiang, Qisheng; Tadepalli, Sirimuvva; Gupta, Maneesh K; Naik, Rajesh R; Singamaneni, Srikanth

    2016-01-13

    Owing to their ability to confine and manipulate light at the nanoscale, plasmonic nanostructures are highly attractive for a broad range of applications. While tremendous progress has been made in the synthesis of size- and shape-controlled plasmonic nanostructures, their integration with other materials and application in solid-state is primarily through their assembly on rigid two-dimensional (2D) substrates, which limits the plasmonically active space to a few nanometers above the substrate. In this work, we demonstrate a simple method to create plasmonically active three-dimensional biofoams by integrating plasmonic nanostructures with highly porous biomaterial aerogels. We demonstrate that plasmonic biofoam is a versatile optically active platform that can be harnessed for numerous applications including (i) ultrasensitive chemical detection using surface-enhanced Raman scattering; (ii) highly efficient energy harvesting and steam generation through plasmonic photothermal heating; and (iii) optical control of enzymatic activity by triggered release of biomolecules encapsulated within the aerogel. Our results demonstrate that 3D plasmonic biofoam exhibits significantly higher sensing, photothermal, and loading efficiency compared to conventional 2D counterparts. The design principles and processing methodology of plasmonic aerogels demonstrated here can be broadly applied in the fabrication of other functional foams. PMID:26630376

  10. A high-accuracy optical linear algebra processor for finite element applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casasent, D.; Taylor, B. K.

    1984-01-01

    Optical linear processors are computationally efficient computers for solving matrix-matrix and matrix-vector oriented problems. Optical system errors limit their dynamic range to 30-40 dB, which limits their accuray to 9-12 bits. Large problems, such as the finite element problem in structural mechanics (with tens or hundreds of thousands of variables) which can exploit the speed of optical processors, require the 32 bit accuracy obtainable from digital machines. To obtain this required 32 bit accuracy with an optical processor, the data can be digitally encoded, thereby reducing the dynamic range requirements of the optical system (i.e., decreasing the effect of optical errors on the data) while providing increased accuracy. This report describes a new digitally encoded optical linear algebra processor architecture for solving finite element and banded matrix-vector problems. A linear static plate bending case study is described which quantities the processor requirements. Multiplication by digital convolution is explained, and the digitally encoded optical processor architecture is advanced.

  11. Non-contact high precision measurement of surface form tolerances and central thickness for optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Ying

    2010-10-01

    The traditional contact measuring methods could not satisfy the current optical elements measuring requirements. Noncontact high precision measuring theory, principle and instrument of the surface form tolerances and central thickness for optical elements were studied in the paper. In comparison with other types of interferometers, such as Twyman-Green and Mach-Zehnder, a Fizeau interferometer has the advantages of having fewer optical components, greater accuracy, and is easier to use. Some relations among the 3/A(B/C), POWER/PV and N/ΔN were studied. The PV with POWER removed can be the reference number of ΔN. The chromatic longitudinal aberration of a special optical probe can be used for non-contanct central thickness measurement.

  12. Simply Scan—Optical Methods for Elemental Carbon Measurement in Diesel Exhaust Particulate

    PubMed Central

    Forder, James A.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a performance assessment of three optical methods, a Magee Scientific OT21 Transmissometer, a Hach-Lange Microcolor II difference gloss meter, and a combination of an office scanner with Adobe Photoshop software. The optical methods measure filter staining as a proxy for elemental carbon in diesel exhaust particulate (DEP) exposure assessment and the suitability of each as a replacement for the existing Bosch meter optical method. Filters loaded with DEP were produced from air in a non-coal mine and the exhaust gases from a mobile crane. These were measured with each apparatus and then by combustion to obtain a reference elemental carbon value. The results from each apparatus were then plotted against both the Bosch number and reference elemental carbon values. The equations of the best fit lines for these plots were derived, and these gave functions for elemental carbon and Bosch number from the output of each new optical method. For each optical method, the range of DEP loadings which can be measured has been determined, and conversion equations for elemental carbon and Bosch number have been obtained. All three optical methods studied will effectively quantify blackness as a measure of elemental carbon. Of these the Magee Scientific OT21 transmissometer has the best performance. The Microcolor II and scanner/photoshop methods will in addition allow conversion to Bosch number which may be useful if historical Bosch data are available and functions for this are described. The scanner/photoshop method demonstrates a technique to obtain measurements of DEP exposure without the need to purchase specialized instrumentation. PMID:24939982

  13. Simply scan--optical methods for elemental carbon measurement in diesel exhaust particulate.

    PubMed

    Forder, James A

    2014-08-01

    This article describes a performance assessment of three optical methods, a Magee Scientific OT21 Transmissometer, a Hach-Lange Microcolor II difference gloss meter, and a combination of an office scanner with Adobe Photoshop software. The optical methods measure filter staining as a proxy for elemental carbon in diesel exhaust particulate (DEP) exposure assessment and the suitability of each as a replacement for the existing Bosch meter optical method. Filters loaded with DEP were produced from air in a non-coal mine and the exhaust gases from a mobile crane. These were measured with each apparatus and then by combustion to obtain a reference elemental carbon value. The results from each apparatus were then plotted against both the Bosch number and reference elemental carbon values. The equations of the best fit lines for these plots were derived, and these gave functions for elemental carbon and Bosch number from the output of each new optical method. For each optical method, the range of DEP loadings which can be measured has been determined, and conversion equations for elemental carbon and Bosch number have been obtained. All three optical methods studied will effectively quantify blackness as a measure of elemental carbon. Of these the Magee Scientific OT21 transmissometer has the best performance. The Microcolor II and scanner/photoshop methods will in addition allow conversion to Bosch number which may be useful if historical Bosch data are available and functions for this are described. The scanner/photoshop method demonstrates a technique to obtain measurements of DEP exposure without the need to purchase specialized instrumentation. PMID:24939982

  14. Quantum homogenization for continuous variables: Realization with linear optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaj, Daniel; Štelmachovič, Peter; Bužek, Vladimír; Kim, Myungshik

    2002-12-01

    Recently Ziman et al. [Phys. Rev. A 65, 042105 (2002)] have introduced a concept of a universal quantum homogenizer which is a quantum machine that takes as input a given (system) qubit initially in an arbitrary state ρ and a set of N reservoir qubits initially prepared in the state ξ. The homogenizer realizes, in the limit sense, the transformation such that at the output each qubit is in an arbitrarily small neighborhood of the state ξ irrespective of the initial states of the system and the reservoir qubits. In this paper we generalize the concept of quantum homogenization for qudits, that is, for d-dimensional quantum systems. We prove that the partial-swap operation induces a contractive map with the fixed point which is the original state of the reservoir. We propose an optical realization of the quantum homogenization for Gaussian states. We prove that an incoming state of a photon field is homogenized in an array of beam splitters. Using Simon's criterion, we study entanglement between outgoing beams from beam splitters. We derive an inseparability condition for a pair of output beams as a function of the degree of squeezing in input beams.

  15. Development of adaptive optics elements for solar telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, V. P.; Grigor'ev, V. M.; Antoshkin, L. V.; Botugina, N. N.; Kovadlo, P. G.; Konyaev, P. A.; Kopulov, E. A.; Skomorovsky, V. I.; Trifonov, V. D.; Chuprakov, S. A.

    2012-07-01

    The devices and components of adaptive optical system ANGARA, which is developed for image correction in the Big solar vacuum telescope (BSVT) at Baykal astrophysical observatory are described. It is shown that the use of modernized adaptive system on BSVT not only reduces the turbulent atmospheric distortions of image, but also gives a possibility to improve the telescope developing new methods of solar observations. A high precision Shack-Hartmann wavefront (WF) sensor has been developed on the basis of a low-aperture off-axis diffraction lens array. The device is capable of measuring WF slopes at array sub-apertures of size 640X640 μm with an error not exceeding 4.80 arc.sec. Also the modification of this sensor for adaptive system of solar telescope using extended scenes as tracking objects, such as sunspot, pores, solar granulation and limb, is presented. The software package developed for the proposed WF sensors includes three algorithms of local WF slopes estimation (modified centroids, normalized cross-correlation and fast Fourier-demodulation), as well as three methods of WF reconstruction (modal Zernike polynomials expansion, deformable mirror response functions expansion and phase unwrapping), that can be selected during operation with accordance to the application.

  16. Direct finite element solution on an optical laboratory matrix-vector processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casasent, David; Riedl, Steven

    1988-01-01

    The first optical laboratory system results employing a direct LU decomposition solution of a system of linear algebraic equations are presented for a finite element problem solution. This also represents the first laboratory demonstration of the use of sign-magnitude negative number representation as well as new bit partitioning techniques to increase the accuracy of an optical encoded processor beyond the number of bit channels available.

  17. Finite-element model for three-dimensional optical scattering problems.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiuhong; Wachters, Arthur J; Urbach, H Paul

    2007-03-01

    We present a three-dimensional model based on the finite-element method for solving the time-harmonic Maxwell equation in optics. It applies to isotropic or anisotropic dielectrics and metals and to many configurations such as an isolated scatterer in a multilayer, bi-gratings, and crystals. We discuss the application of the model to near-field optical recording. PMID:17301875

  18. Influence of the photopolymer properties in the fabrication of diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, Sergi; Fernández, Roberto; Márquez, Andrés.; Martínez, Francisco J.; Neipp, Cristian; Ortuño, Manuel; Francés, Jorge; Beléndez, Augusto; Pascual, Inmaculada

    2014-09-01

    A wide range of chemical compositions are possible to design photopolymers. These materials are also appealing for diffractive and holographic applications due to their capability to modulate the refractive index and/or the thickness when illuminated. Some of the most interesting applications for photopolymers are the optical data storage, security systems, surface relief photo-embossing, diffractive and refractive optical elements, holographic elements, solar concentrators, optical detectors and hybrid optoelectronic 3-D circuitry. Looking for an optimized chemical composition for each application many different photopolymers compositions may be needed enabling a variety of materials properties: materials with low or high rates of monomer diffusion, low or high values of shrinkage, long or short length of polymer chains and low or high light absorption. In parallel many models are presented in order to predict the photopolymers recording and the post exposure evolution. In this work we use one of these experimentally checked models to study the influence of the material characteristics in the final diffractive optical element recorded in the material. We study the changes in the surface relief and in the refractive index in order to understand the importance of each material property in the final diffractive optical element recorded.

  19. Measurement of the complex transmittance of large optical elements with Ptychographical Iterative Engine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Yan; Liu, Cheng; Veetil, Suhas P; Pan, Xing-Chen; Zhu, Jian-Qiang

    2014-01-27

    Wavefront control is a significant parameter in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The complex transmittance of large optical elements which are often used in ICF is obtained by computing the phase difference of the illuminating and transmitting fields using Ptychographical Iterative Engine (PIE). This can accurately and effectively measure the transmittance of large optical elements with irregular surface profiles, which are otherwise not measurable using commonly used interferometric techniques due to a lack of standard reference plate. Experiments are done with a Continue Phase Plate (CPP) to illustrate the feasibility of this method. PMID:24515226

  20. Nanofabrication of Optical Elements for SXR and EUV Applications: Ion Beam Lithography as a New Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, J.; Krupp, N.; Wilhein, T.; Irsen, S.

    2011-09-01

    Diffractive optical elements are important components for applications in soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet radiation. At present, the standard fabrication method for such optics is based on electron beam lithography followed by nanostructuring. This requires a series of complex processes including exposure, reactive ion-etching, and electro-plating. We report on experiments showing the single-step fabrication of such elements using ion beam lithography. Both transmission and reflection gratings were fabricated and successfully implemented as spectrometers at laboratory soft x-ray sources. Additionally, first steps toward zone plate fabrication are described.

  1. Femtosecond laser fabrication of hybrid micro-optical elements and their integration on the fiber tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinauskas, Mangirdas; Gilbergs, Holger; Zukauskas, Albertas; Belazaras, Kastytis; Purlys, Vytautas; Rutkauskas, Marius; Bickauskaite, Gabija; Momot, Andrej; Paipulas, Domas; Gadonas, Roaldas; Juodkazis, Saulius; Piskarskas, Algis

    2010-05-01

    Femtosecond laser photo-polymerization of zirconium-silicon based sol-gel photopolymer SZ2080 is used to fabricate micro-optical elements with a single and hybrid optical functions. We demonstrate photo-polymerization of the solid immersion and Fresnel lenses. Gratings can be added onto the surface of lenses. The effective refractive index of polymerized structures can be controlled via the volume fraction of polymer. We used woodpile structure with volume fraction of 0.65-0.8. Tailoring of dispersion properties of micro-optical elements by changing filling ratio of polymer are discussed. Direct write approach is used to form such structures on a cover glass and on the tip of an optical fiber. Close matching of refractive indices between the polymer and substrate in visible and near infra red spectral regions (nSZ2080 = 1.504, nglass = 1.52) is favorable for such integration. The surface roughness of laser-polymerized resits was ~30 nm (min-max value), which is acceptable for optical applications in the visible range. For the bulk micro-optical elements the efficiency of 3D laser polymerization is increased by a factor ~ (2 - 4) × 102 times (depends on the design) by the shell-formation polymerization: (i) contour scanning for definition of shell-surface, (ii) development for removal of nonfunctional resist, and (iii) UV exposure for the final volumetric polymerization of an enclosed volume.

  2. Evolutionary active transposable elements in the genome of the coelacanth.

    PubMed

    Chalopin, Domitille; Fan, Shaohua; Simakov, Oleg; Meyer, Axel; Schartl, Manfred; Volff, Jean-Nicolas

    2014-09-01

    The apparent morphological stasis in the lineage of the coelacanth, which has been called a "living fossil" by many, has been suggested to be causally related to a slow evolution of its genome, with strongly reduced activity of transposable elements (TEs). Analysis of the African coelacanth showed that at least 25% of its genome is constituted of transposable elements including retrotransposons, endogenous retroviruses and DNA transposons, with a strong predominance of non-Long Terminal Repeat (non-LTR) retrotransposons. The coelacanth genome has been shaped by four major general bursts of transposition during evolution, with major contributions of LINE1, LINE2, CR1, and Deu non-LTR retrotransposons. Many transposable elements are expressed in different tissues and might be active. The number of TE families in coelacanth, but also in lungfish, is lower than in teleost fish, but is higher than in chicken and human. This observation is in agreement with the hypothesis of a sequential elimination of many TE families in the sarcopterygian lineage during evolution. Taken together, our analysis indicates that the coelacanth contains more TE families than birds and mammals, and that these elements have been active during the evolution of the coelacanth lineage. Hence, at the level of transposable element activity, the coelacanth genome does not appear to evolve particularly slowly. PMID:23908136

  3. Optical Activity of Anisotropic Achiral Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Verbiest, T.; Kauranen, M.; Van Rompaey, Y.; Persoons, A. |

    1996-08-01

    Anisotropic achiral surfaces respond differently to left- and right-hand circularly polarized light. This occurs when the orientation of the surface with respect to an otherwise achiral experimental setup makes the total geometry chiral. Such optical activity is demonstrated in second-harmonic generation from an anisotropic thin molecular film. The circular-difference response reverses sign as the handedness of the geometry is reversed and vanishes when the setup possesses a mirror plane. The results are explained within the electric-dipole-allowed second-order surface nonlinearity. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  4. Implementation of ordinary and extraordinary beams interference by application of diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khonina, S. N.; Karpeev, S. V.; Morozov, A. A.; Paranin, V. D.

    2016-07-01

    We apply diffractive optical elements in problems of transformation of Bessel beams in a birefringent crystal. Using plane waves expansion we show a significant interference between the ordinary and extraordinary beams due to the energy transfer in the orthogonal transverse components in the nonparaxial mode. A comparative analysis of the merits and lack of diffractive and refractive axicons in problems of formation non-paraxial Bessel beams has shown the preferability of diffractive optics application in crystal optics. The transformation of uniformly polarised Bessel beams in the crystal of Iceland spar in the nonparaxial mode by application of a diffractive axicon is investigated numerically and experimentally.

  5. Directly laser-written integrated photonics devices including diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jiyeon; Ramme, Mark; Richardson, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Femtosecond laser-written integrated devices involving Fresnel Zone Plates (FZPs) and waveguide arrays are demonstrated as built-in optical couplers. These structures were fabricated in borosilicate glass using a direct laser writing technique. The optical properties of these integrated photonic structures were investigated using CW lasers and high-resolution CCDs. For a single FZP coupled to a single waveguide, the overall coupling efficiency was 9%. A multiplexed optical coupler composed of three FZP layers was demonstrated to couple three waveguides simultaneously in a waveguide array. Structures of this type can be used as platforms for multichannel waveguide coupling elements or as microfluidic sensors that require higher light collecting efficiency.

  6. Optically imprinted reconfigurable photonic elements in a VO{sub 2} nanocomposite

    SciTech Connect

    Jostmeier, Thorben; Betz, Markus; Zimmer, Johannes; Krenner, Hubert J.; Karl, Helmut

    2014-08-18

    We investigate the optical and thermal hysteresis of single-domain vanadium dioxide nanocrystals fabricated by ion beam synthesis in a fused silica matrix. The nanocrystals exhibit a giant hysteresis, which permits to optically generate a long-time stable supercooled metallic phase persistent down to practically room temperature. Spatial patterns of supercooled and insulating nanocrystals feature a large dielectric contrast, in particular, for telecom wavelengths. We utilize this contrast to optically imprint reconfigurable photonic elements comprising diffraction gratings as well as on- and off-axis zone plates. The structures allow for highly repetitive (>10{sup 4}) cycling through the phase transition without structural damage.

  7. Polarization selecting Optical Element using a Porro Prism Incorporating a thin film Polarizer in a single element

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrix, James lee

    2000-01-28

    A Porro prism and a light polarizer are combined in a single optical element termed a Hendrix Prism. The design provides retro-reflection of incoming light of a predetermined polarization in a direction anti-parallel to the direction of light incidence, while reflecting undesired light, i.e., that having a polarization orthogonal to the predetermined polarization, from the surface of the light polarizer. The undesired light is reflected in a direction that does not interfere with the intended operation of the device in which the Hendrix Prism is installed yet provides feedback to the system in which it is used.

  8. Polarization selecting optical element using a porro prism incorporating a thin film polarizer in a single element

    DOEpatents

    Hendrix, James Lee

    2001-05-08

    A Porro prism and a light polarizer are combined in a single optical element termed a Hendrix Prism. The design provides retro-reflection of incoming light of a predetermined polarization in a direction anti-parallel to the direction of light incidence, while reflecting undesired light, i.e., that having a polarization orthogonal to the predetermined polarization, from the surface of the light polarizer. The undesired light is reflected in a direction that does not interfere with the intended operation of the device in which the Hendrix Prism is installed yet provides feedback to the system in which it is used.

  9. Integrated Modeling Activities for the James Webb Space Telescope: Structural-Thermal-Optical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, John D.; Howard, Joseph M.; Mosier, Gary E.; Parrish, Keith A.; McGinnis, Mark A.; Bluth, Marcel; Kim, Kevin; Ha, Kong Q.

    2004-01-01

    The James Web Space Telescope (JWST) is a large, infrared-optimized space telescope scheduled for launch in 2011. This is a continuation of a series of papers on modeling activities for JWST. The structural-thermal-optical, often referred to as STOP, analysis process is used to predict the effect of thermal distortion on optical performance. The benchmark STOP analysis for JWST assesses the effect of an observatory slew on wavefront error. Temperatures predicted using geometric and thermal math models are mapped to a structural finite element model in order to predict thermally induced deformations. Motions and deformations at optical surfaces are then input to optical models, and optical performance is predicted using either an optical ray trace or a linear optical analysis tool. In addition to baseline performance predictions, a process for performing sensitivity studies to assess modeling uncertainties is described.

  10. Finite-element model of the active organ of Corti.

    PubMed

    Ni, Guangjian; Elliott, Stephen J; Baumgart, Johannes

    2016-02-01

    The cochlear amplifier that provides our hearing with its extraordinary sensitivity and selectivity is thought to be the result of an active biomechanical process within the sensory auditory organ, the organ of Corti. Although imaging techniques are developing rapidly, it is not currently possible, in a fully active cochlea, to obtain detailed measurements of the motion of individual elements within a cross section of the organ of Corti. This motion is predicted using a two-dimensional finite-element model. The various solid components are modelled using elastic elements, the outer hair cells (OHCs) as piezoelectric elements and the perilymph and endolymph as viscous and nearly incompressible fluid elements. The model is validated by comparison with existing measurements of the motions within the passive organ of Corti, calculated when it is driven either acoustically, by the fluid pressure or electrically, by excitation of the OHCs. The transverse basilar membrane (BM) motion and the shearing motion between the tectorial membrane and the reticular lamina are calculated for these two excitation modes. The fully active response of the BM to acoustic excitation is predicted using a linear superposition of the calculated responses and an assumed frequency response for the OHC feedback. PMID:26888950

  11. Design methodology of focusing elements for multilevel planar optical systems in optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Hafiz, Md. Abdullah; MacKenzie, Mark R.; Kwok, Chee-Yee

    2009-12-01

    We present a simple technique to determine the design parameters of an optical interconnect system that uses integral planar lenses. The technique is based on the ABCD transformation matrix method. This analysis technique is significantly simpler and more efficient than the previously published methods for finding the design parameters and predicting the coupling efficiency of the system. The proposed method is applied to compute the coupling efficiency of single- and two-level optical systems.

  12. Neutron Activation of NIF Final Optics Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Sitaraman, S; Dauffy, L; Khater, H; Brereton, S

    2009-09-29

    Analyses were performed to characterize the radiation field in the vicinity of the Final Optics Assemblies (FOAs) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) due to neutron activation following Deuterium-Deuterium (DD), Tritium-Hydrogen-Deuterium (THD), and Deuterium-Tritium (DT) shots associated with different phases of the NIF operations. The activation of the structural components of the FOAs produces one of the larger sources of gamma radiation and is a key factor in determining the stay out time between shots to ensure worker protection. This study provides estimates of effective dose rates in the vicinity of a single FOA and concludes that the DD and THD targets produce acceptable dose rates within 10 minutes following a shot while about 6-days of stay out time is suggested following DT shots. Studies are ongoing to determine the combined effects of multiple FOAs and other components present in the Target Bay on stay-out time and worker dose.

  13. Active polarimeter optical system laser hazard analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2005-07-01

    A laser hazard analysis was performed for the SNL Active Polarimeter Optical System based on the ANSI Standard Z136.1-2000, American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers and the ANSI Standard Z136.6-2000, American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors. The Active Polarimeter Optical System (APOS) uses a pulsed, near-infrared, chromium doped lithium strontium aluminum fluoride (Cr:LiSAF) crystal laser in conjunction with a holographic diffuser and lens to illuminate a scene of interest. The APOS is intended for outdoor operations. The system is mounted on a height adjustable platform (6 feet to 40 feet) and sits atop a tripod that points the beam downward. The beam can be pointed from nadir to as much as 60 degrees off of nadir producing an illuminating spot geometry that can vary from circular (at nadir) to elliptical in shape (off of nadir). The JP Innovations crystal Cr:LiSAF laser parameters are presented in section II. The illuminating laser spot size is variable and can be adjusted by adjusting the separation distance between the lens and the holographic diffuser. The system is adjusted while platform is at the lowest level. The laser spot is adjusted for a particular spot size at a particular distance (elevation) from the laser by adjusting the separation distance (d{sub diffuser}) to predetermined values. The downward pointing angle is also adjusted before the platform is raised to the selected operation elevation.

  14. Optical Input/Electrical Output Memory Elements based on a Liquid Crystalline Azobenzene Polymer.

    PubMed

    Mosciatti, Thomas; Bonacchi, Sara; Gobbi, Marco; Ferlauto, Laura; Liscio, Fabiola; Giorgini, Loris; Orgiu, Emanuele; Samorì, Paolo

    2016-03-01

    Responsive polymer materials can change their properties when subjected to external stimuli. In this work, thin films of thermotropic poly(metha)acrylate/azobenzene polymers are explored as active layer in light-programmable, electrically readable memories. The memory effect is based on the reversible modifications of the film morphology induced by the photoisomerization of azobenzene mesogenic groups. When the film is in the liquid crystalline phase, the trans → cis isomerization induces a major surface reorganization on the mesoscopic scale that is characterized by a reduction in the effective thickness of the film. The film conductivity is measured in vertical two-terminal devices in which the polymer is sandwiched between a Au contact and a liquid compliant E-GaIn drop. We demonstrate that the trans → cis isomerization is accompanied by a reversible 100-fold change in the film conductance. In this way, the device can be set in a high- or low-resistance state by light irradiation at different wavelengths. This result paves the way toward the potential use of poly(metha)acrylate/azobenzene polymer films as active layer for optical input/electrical output memory elements. PMID:26890532

  15. Microfabrication of optical elements with femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Bing; Zhou, Changhe; Sun, Xiaohui; Ru, Huayi

    2005-01-01

    We report the experimental fabrication of optical elements with femtosecond pulses. The laser source we adopted is a low power Ti: sapphire laser oscillator, with a central wavelength of 790 nm and pulse duration of 100 fs. Positive-photoresist-coated film acts as the sacrificial material. To obtain the optical elements, three microobjectives with high numerical aperture 0.25 and 0.1 were used to focus the light beam of femtosecond laser. Due to the extreme high intensity of the tightly focused femtosecond laser beam, nonlinear effect occurred between photoresist and the laser pulses, which enable the ablation of the photoresist. In the experiments, we use a translational stage that hold the sample by a pump through a ventage. Various gratings and phase plates are fabricated by this method. The obtained gratings patterns are checked with a conventional optical microscopy. The fabricating widths and depths are measured with the Taylor Hobson equipment. With the same method, photomask for microelectronics can also be fabricated. From the experimental results, we see that the fabrication of the different microobjectives can be achieved with this method. This technique can be applied to the fields of microoptics and microelectronics. The mechanism between femtosecond laser and photoresist is also investigated. The processing mechanics is considered as laser ablation. Fabrication of optical elements with femtosecond laser reflects a new trend for fabrication of microoptical elements.

  16. Microfabrication of optical elements with femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaohui; Zhou, Changhe; Liu, Liren; Yu, Bingkun

    2004-10-01

    We demonstrate experimentally fabrication of optical elements with femtosecond pulses. The laser source we adopted is a low power Ti: sapphire laser oscillator, with a central wavelength of 790 nm and pulse duration of 100 fs. Positive-photoresist-film-coated glass substrate acts as the sacrificial material. Due to the extreme high intensity of the tightly focused femtosecond laser beam, nonlinear processing occurred between photoresist and the laser pulses, which enable the sub-micron feature processing. In the experiments, we use a translational stage that is controlled by a computer to accurately move for fabrication of optical elements with high precision. Various gratings and phase plates are fabricated by this method. The obtained gratings patterns are checked with a conventional optical microscopy. The fabricating widths and depths are measured with the Taylor Hobson equipment. With the same method, photomask for microelectronics can also be fabricated. From the experimental results, we see that a high processing precision and the feature size exceeding the diffraction limit can be achieved with this method. This technique can be applied to the fields of microoptics and microelectronics. The mechanism between femtosecond laser and photoresist is also investigated. The processing mechanics is considered as laser ablation and nonlinear two-photon absorption phenomenon. Fabrication of optical elements with femtosecond laser reflects a new trend for fabrication of microoptical elements.

  17. Modified Method of Increasing of Reconstruction Quality of Diffractive Optical Elements Displayed with LC SLM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnov, V. V.; Cheremkhin, P. A.; Erkin, I. Yu.; Evtikhiev, N. N.; Starikov, R. S.; Starikov, S. N.

    Modified method of increasing of reconstruction quality of diffractive optical elements (DOE) displayed with liquid crystal (LC) spatial light modulators (SLM) is presented. Method is based on optimization of DOE synthesized with conventional method by application of direct search with random trajectory method while taking into account LC SLM phase fluctuations. Reduction of synthesis error up to 88% is achieved.

  18. Optimizing diffraction efficiency for transmission holographic optical elements with HARMAN holographic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Steven L.; Harvey, Karen; Richardson, Martin; Blyth, Jeff

    2011-02-01

    HARMAN technology's new holographic emulsions; red sensitive and green sensitive assisted by smaller grain sizes, novel sensitization and coating technology have been shown to achieve high diffraction efficiencies and narrow band reconstruction capabilities. Authors demonstrate processing optimizations and material behavior characteristics for Transmission image Masters as well as Holographic Optical Elements (HOE's).

  19. Method for studying the phase function in tunable diffraction optical elements

    SciTech Connect

    Paranin, V D; Tukmakov, K N

    2014-04-28

    A method for studying the phase function in tunable diffraction optical elements is proposed, based on measurement of the transmission of interelectrode gaps. The mathematical description of the method, which is approved experimentally, is developed. The instrumental error effects are analysed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  20. Three-dimensional/two-dimensional convertible projection screen using see-through integral imaging based on holographic optical element.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Jiwoon; Jeong, Jinsoo; Jang, Changwon; Li, Gang; Hong, Keehoon; Lee, Byoungho

    2015-10-20

    We propose a 3D/2D convertible screen using a holographic optical element and angular multiplexing method of volume hologram. The proposed screen, named a multiplexed holographic optical element screen (MHOES), is composed of passive optical components, and displaying modes between 3D and 2D modes are converted according to projection directions. In a recording process, the angular multiplexing method by using two reference waves with different incidence angles enables the functions of 3D and 2D screens to be recorded in a single holographic material. Also, in order to avoid the bulky experimental setup due to adopting different projectors for the 3D and 2D modes, the projection part is realized based on a prism. The designed projection part enables the single projector to present 3D on 2D mode, where the 3D and 2D contents are simultaneously displayed in one scene, without active components. The optical characteristics of MHOES are experimentally analyzed, and displaying experiments with a full-color MHOES are presented in order to verify the 3D/2D convertibility and see-through properties. PMID:26560370

  1. Detecting eavesdropping activity in fiber optic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Gregory G.

    The secure transmission of data is critical to governments, military organizations, financial institutions, health care providers and other enterprises. The primary method of securing in-transit data is though data encryption. A number of encryption methods exist but the fundamental approach is to assume an eavesdropper has access to the encrypted message but does not have the computing capability to decrypt the message in a timely fashion. Essentially, the strength of security depends on the complexity of the encryption method and the resources available to the eavesdropper. The development of future technologies, most notably quantum computers and quantum computing, is often cited as a direct threat to traditional encryption schemes. It seems reasonable that additional effort should be placed on prohibiting the eavesdropper from coming into possession of the encrypted message in the first place. One strategy for denying possession of the encrypted message is to secure the physical layer of the communications path. Because the majority of transmitted information is over fiber-optic networks, it seems appropriate to consider ways of enhancing the integrity and security of the fiber-based physical layer. The purpose of this research is to investigate the properties of light, as they are manifested in single mode fiber, as a means of insuring the integrity and security of the physical layer of a fiber-optic based communication link. Specifically, the approach focuses on the behavior of polarization in single mode fiber, as it is shown to be especially sensitive to fiber geometry. Fiber geometry is necessarily modified during the placement of optical taps. The problem of detecting activity associated with the placement of an optical tap is herein approached as a supervised machine learning anomaly identification task. The inputs include raw polarization measurements along with additional features derived from various visualizations of the raw data (the inputs are

  2. Sol-gel prepared glass for micro-optical elements and arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruvy, Yair; Gilath, Irith; Maniewictz, M.; Eisenberg, Naftali P.

    1997-09-01

    Sol-gel processes of metal alkoxides involve hydrolysis of the alkoxy groups and condensation to a 3-D oxide glass network. Volume reduction of the drying gel typically results in cracking, unless sufficient relaxation is allowed to take place. Further, the common shrinkage by a factor of 2.5 and higher imposes great difficulty to obtain dimensional accuracy in thus prepared micro-optical elements. The new fast sol-gel method enables facile preparation of siloxane-based glassy materials in which polymerization is completed within minutes and curing within a few hours. The optical quality of thin films obtained by the fast sol-gel method and the ease of preparation makes this method technologically and economically attractive for micro-lenses and micro-optical arrays by replication. Micro-optical arrays are highly patterned, including sharp curvatures of small radii. This necessitates to study primarily two aspects of the sol-gel replication process: (1) the chemical constitution of the sol-gel and the reaction pathway that ensures prompt adhesion to the template during the process. (2) the surface chemical adaptation of the template that allows timing of adhesion and release of the produced elements. The adaptation of this process to the desired replication is described. Thence, the results of preliminary fabrication of micro-optical elements and arrays by this method are shown and their features discussed.

  3. Multilevel micro-structuring of glassy carbon for precision glass molding of diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prater, Karin; Dukwen, Julia; Scharf, Toralf; Herzig, Hans Peter; Plöger, Sven; Hermerschmidt, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    A consumer market for diffractive optical elements in glass can only be created if high efficient elements are available at affordable prices. In diffractive optics the efficiency and optical properties increases with the number of levels used, but in the same way the costs are multiplied by the number if fabrication steps. Replication of multilevel diffractive optical elements in glass would allow cost efficient fabrication but a suitable mold material is needed. Glassy carbon shows a high mechanical strength, thermal stability and non-sticking adhesion properties, which makes it an excellent candidate as mold material for precision compression molding of low and high glass-transition temperature materials. We introduce an 8 level micro structuring process for glassy carbon molds with standard photolithography and a Ti layer as hard mask for reactive ion etching. The molds were applied to thermal imprinting onto low and high transition temperature glass. Optical performance was tested for the molded samples with different designs for laser beamsplitters. The results show a good agreement to the design specification. Our result allow us to show limitations of our fabrication technique and we discussed the suitability of precision glass molding for cost efficient mass production with a high quality.

  4. Multi-elemental analysis of aqueous geological samples by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Todorov, Todor I.; Wolf, Ruth E.; Adams, Monique

    2014-01-01

    Typically, 27 major, minor, and trace elements are determined in natural waters, acid mine drainage, extraction fluids, and leachates of geological and environmental samples by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). At the discretion of the analyst, additional elements may be determined after suitable method modifications and performance data are established. Samples are preserved in 1–2 percent nitric acid (HNO3) at sample collection or as soon as possible after collection. The aqueous samples are aspirated into the ICP-OES discharge, where the elemental emission signals are measured simultaneously for 27 elements. Calibration is performed with a series of matrix-matched, multi-element solution standards.

  5. Apparatus and method using a holographic optical element for converting a spectral distribution to image points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, Matthew J. (Inventor); Scott, Vibart S. (Inventor); Marzouk, Marzouk (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A holographic optical element transforms a spectral distribution of light to image points. The element comprises areas, each of which acts as a separate lens to image the light incident in its area to an image point. Each area contains the recorded hologram of a point source object. The image points can be made to lie in a line in the same focal plane so as to align with a linear array detector. A version of the element has been developed that has concentric equal areas to match the circular fringe pattern of a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The element has high transmission efficiency, and when coupled with high quantum efficiency solid state detectors, provides an efficient photon-collecting detection system. The element may be used as part of the detection system in a direct detection Doppler lidar system or multiple field of view lidar system.

  6. Fiber optic refractometric sensors using a semi-ellipsoidal sensing element.

    PubMed

    Castro Martinez, Amalia Nallely; Komanec, Matej; Nemecek, Tomas; Zvanovec, Stanislav; Khotiaintsev, Sergei

    2016-04-01

    We present theoretical and experimental results for a fiber optic refractometric sensor employing a semi-ellipsoidal sensing element made of polymethyl methacrylate. The double internal reflection of light inside the element provides sensitivity to the refractive index of the external analyte. We demonstrate that the developed sensor, operating at a wavelength of 632 nm, is capable of measurement within a wide range of refractive indices from n=1.00 to n=1.47 with sensitivity over 500 dB/RIU. A comparison of the developed sensor with two more complex refractometric sensors, one based on tapered optical fiber and the other based on suspended-core microstructure optical fiber, is presented. PMID:27139659

  7. Tunable photonic elements at the surface of an optical fiber with piezoelectric core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, A. V.; Sumetsky, M.

    2016-05-01

    Tunable photonic elements at the surface of an optical fiber with piezoelectric core are proposed and analyzed theoretically. These elements are based on whispering gallery modes whose propagation along the fiber is fully controlled by nanoscale variation of the effective fiber radius, which can be tuned by means of a piezoelectric actuator embedded into the core. The developed theory allows one to express the introduced effective radius variation through the shape of the actuator and the voltage applied to it. In particular, the design of a miniature tunable optical delay line and a miniature tunable dispersion compensator is presented. The potential application of the suggested model to the design of a miniature optical buffer is discussed.

  8. Tunable photonic elements at the surface of an optical fiber with piezoelectric core.

    PubMed

    Dmitriev, A V; Sumetsky, M

    2016-05-15

    Tunable photonic elements at the surface of an optical fiber with piezoelectric core are proposed and analyzed theoretically. These elements are based on whispering gallery modes whose propagation along the fiber is fully controlled by nanoscale variation of the effective fiber radius, which can be tuned by means of a piezoelectric actuator embedded into the core. The developed theory allows one to express the introduced effective radius variation through the shape of the actuator and the voltage applied to it. In particular, the designs of a miniature tunable optical delay line and a miniature tunable dispersion compensator are presented. The potential application of the suggested model to the design of a miniature optical buffer is also discussed. PMID:27176953

  9. Contrast transfer characteristics of the light sword optical element designed for presbyopia compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petelczyc, K.; Bará, S.; Ciro López, A.; Jaroszewicz, Z.; Kakarenko, K.; Kolodziejczyk, A.; Sypek, M.

    2011-11-01

    The paper discusses the abilities of the light sword optical element (LSOE) for presbyopia compensation. The imaging properties are analyzed by means of the modulation transfer functions and output images of the star resolution test. All numerical calculations are performed assuming an optical set-up simulating the presbyopic human eye and based on the Gullstrand model. In order to have a meaningful comparison we expand our study and present adequate analysis for other elements potentially useful in ophthalmology as reading glasses, bifocal lenses and axicons. According to the obtained results the LSOE can successfully realize vision with an extended depth of field. The element makes possible the compensation of an assumed defocus up to 4 dioptres. The output images formed by the LSOE are well recognizable and have acceptable qualities for near as well as far object distances.

  10. Design and analysis of diffractive optical elements for flattening of single modal Gaussian beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Kewei; Huang, Zhiqiang; Lin, Wumei; Xing, Tingwen

    2012-10-01

    A design method of diffractive optical element is presented for converting a single modal Gaussian beam into a flat-top beam in the far field of the source. The design is based on geometrical method and modified Gerchberg-Saxton method. Geometrical method derives from the conservation of energy and the constant optical path length. This method could supply initial phase distribution of the modified Gerchberg-Saxton method. To find the optimization design results, the modified Gerchberg-Saxton method is important to choose the feedback factor to increase the convergent speed. In addition, tolerances and limitations of such elements result in a reduction of the diffraction efficiency and as a result of stray light. Further study indicates that deviation of the laser wavelength, incident beam, and observation plane can greatly influence flat-top beam shaping quality. On the basis of theoretical and experimental results, limitations for the application of diffractive beam shaping elements are investigated.

  11. Femtosecond laser polymerization of hybrid/integrated micro-optical elements and their characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinauskas, Mangirdas; Žukauskas, Albertas; Purlys, Vytautas; Belazaras, Kastytis; Momot, Andrej; Paipulas, Domas; Gadonas, Roaldas; Piskarskas, Algis; Gilbergs, Holger; Gaidukevičiūtė, Arunė; Sakellari, Ioanna; Farsari, Maria; Juodkazis, Saulius

    2010-12-01

    The femtosecond laser-induced multi-photon polymerization of a zirconium-silicon based sol-gel photopolymer was employed for the fabrication of a series of micro-optical elements with single and combined optical functions: convex and Fresnel lenses, gratings, solid immersion lenses on a glass slide and on the tip of an optical fiber. The microlenses were produced as polymer caps of varying radii from 10 to 90 µm. The matching of refractive indices between the polymer and substrate was exploited for the creation of composite glass-resist structures which functioned as single lenses. Using this principle, solid immersion lenses were fabricated and their performance demonstrated. The magnification of the composite solid immersion lenses corresponded to the calculated values. The surface roughness of the lenses was below ~ 30 nm, acceptable for optical applications in the visible range. In addition, the integration of micro-optical elements onto the tip of an optical fiber was demonstrated. To increase the efficiency of the 3D laser polymerization, the lenses were formed by scanning only the outer shell and polymerizing the interior by exposure to UV light.

  12. Stratified Volume Diffractive Optical Elements as Low-Mass Coherent Lidar Scanners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Diana M.; Nordin, Gregory P.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    Transmissive scanning elements for coherent laser radar systems are typically optical wedges, or prisms, which deflect the lidar beam at a specified angle and are then rotated about the instrument optical axis to produce a scan pattern. The wedge is placed in the lidar optical system subsequent to a beam-expanding telescope, implying that it has the largest diameter of any element in the system. The combination of the wedge diameter and asymmetric profile result in the element having very large mass and, consequently, relatively large power consumption required for scanning. These two parameters, mass and power consumption, are among the instrument requirements which need to be minimized when designing a lidar for a space-borne platform. Reducing the scanner contributions in these areas will have a significant effect on the overall instrument specifications, Replacing the optical wedge with a diffraction grating on the surface of a thin substrate is a straight forward approach with potential to reduce the mass of the scanning element significantly. For example, the optical wedge that will be used for the SPAce Readiness Coherent Lidar Experiment (SPARCLE) is approximately 25 cm in diameter and is made from silicon with a wedge angle designed for 30 degree deflection of a beam operating at approx. 2 micrometer wavelength. The mass of this element could be reduced by a factor of four by instead using a fused silica substrate, 1 cm thick, with a grating fabricated on one of the surfaces. For a grating to deflect a beam with a 2 micrometer wavelength by 30 degrees, a period of approximately 4 micrometers is required. This is small enough that fabrication of appropriate high efficiency blazed or multi-phase level diffractive optical gratings is prohibitively difficult. Moreover, bulk or stratified volume holographic approaches appear impractical due to materials limitations at 2 micrometers and the need to maintain adequate wavefront quality. In order to avoid the

  13. A new generation active arrays for optical flexibility in astronomical instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroes, G.; Jaskó, A.; Pragt, J. H.; Venema, L.; De Haan, M.

    2012-09-01

    Throughout the history of telescopes and astronomical instrumentation, new ways were found to open up unexplored possibilities in fundamental astronomical research by increasing the telescope size and instrumentation complexity. The ever demanding requirements on instrument performance pushes instrument complexity to the edge. In order to take the next leap forward in instrument development the optical design freedom needs to be increased drastically. The use of more complex and more accurate optics allows for shorter optical trains with smaller sizes, smaller number of components and reduced fabrication and alignment verification time and costs. Current optics fabrication is limited in surface form complexity and/or accuracy. Traditional active and adaptive optics lack the needed intrinsic long term stability and simplicity in design, manufacturing, verification and control. This paper explains how and why active arrays literally provide a flexible but stable basis for the next generation optical instruments. Combing active arrays with optically high quality face sheets more complex and accurate optical surface forms can be provided including extreme a-spherical (freeform) surfaces and thus allow for optical train optimization and even instrument reconfiguration. A zero based design strategy is adopted for the development of the active arrays addressing fundamental issues in opto-mechanical engineering. The various choices are investigated by prototypes and Finite Element Analysis. Finally an engineering concept will be presented following a highly stable adjustment strategy allowing simple verification and control. The Optimization metrology is described in an additional paper for this conference by T. Agócs et al.

  14. James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element Integrated Science Instrument Module (OTIS) Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Voyton, Mark; Lander, Julie; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Matthews, Gary

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element (OTE) and Integrated ScienceInstrument Module (ISIM)are integrated together to form the OTIS. Once integrated, the OTIS undergoes primary mirrorcenter of curvatureoptical tests, electrical and operational tests, acoustics and vibration testing at the Goddard SpaceFlight Center beforebeing shipped to the Johnson Space Center for cryogenic optical testing of the OTIS. In preparationfor the cryogenicoptical testing, the JWST project has built a Pathfinder telescope and has completed two OpticalGround SystemEquipment (OGSE) cryogenic optical tests with the Pathfinder. In this paper, we will summarize opticaltest results todate and status the final Pathfinder test and the OTIS integration and environmental test preparations

  15. Two-Photon Microscopy with Diffractive Optical Elements and Spatial Light Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Brendon O.; Nikolenko, Volodymyr; Araya, Roberto; Peterka, Darcy S.; Woodruff, Alan; Yuste, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Two-photon microscopy is often performed at slow frame rates due to the need to serially scan all points in a field of view with a single laser beam. To overcome this problem, we have developed two optical methods that split and multiplex a laser beam across the sample. In the first method a diffractive optical element (DOE) generates a fixed number of beamlets that are scanned in parallel resulting in a corresponding increase in speed or in signal-to-noise ratio in time-lapse measurements. The second method uses a computer-controlled spatial light modulator (SLM) to generate any arbitrary spatio-temporal light pattern. With an SLM one can image or photostimulate any predefined region of the image such as neurons or dendritic spines. In addition, SLMs can be used to mimic a large number of optical transfer functions including light path corrections as adaptive optics. PMID:20859526

  16. Network-element view information model for an optical burst core switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Chao; Balt, Halt; Michel, Stephane R.; Verchere, Dominique G.

    2001-10-01

    To natively support the bursty IP datagrams over all-optical Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) networks, the Optical Burst Switching (OBS) WDM network has been proposed as a suitable architecture for future optical Internet backbone networks. However, managing the OBS network will be complicated due to the scale of the networks and the correlation between different technology layers. This paper presents an information model for the OBS core node, from the network-element view, to describe the management information flows between the optical burst layer and the traditional WDM transport layer, and how to model them using various Managed Objects (MOs). We also provide the structure of Management Information Base (MIB) used in SNMP management interface for managing the parameters identified at different layers.

  17. Active optics with a minimum number of actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaitre, Gerard R.

    2014-06-01

    Optics for astronomy implies powerful developments of active and adaptive optics methods applied to instrumentation from X-rays to the near infrared for the design of telescopes, spectrographs, and coronagraph planet finders. This presentation particularly emphasizes the development of active optics methods. Highly accurate and remarkably smooth surfaces from active optics methods allow new optical systems that use highly aspheric and non-axisymmetric - freeform - surfaces. Depending on the goal and performance required for a deformable optical surface, elasticity theory analysis is carried out either with small deformation thin plate theory, large deformation thin plate theory, shallow spherical shell theory, or the weakly conical shell theory. A mirror thickness distribution is then determined as a function of associated bending actuators and boundary conditions. For a given optical shape to generate, one searches for optical solutions with a minimum number of actuators.

  18. Enhancement of RIE: etched Diffractive Optical Elements surfaces by using Ion Beam Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, J.; Bischoff, Ch.; Rädel, U.; Grau, M.; Wallrabe, U.; Völklein, F.

    2015-09-01

    Shaping of laser light intensities by using Diffractive Optical Elements allows the adaption of the incident light to its application. Fused silica is used where for example UV-light or high temperatures are mandatory. For high diffraction efficiency the quality of the etched surface areas is important. The investigation of different process parameters for Ion Beam and Reactive Ion Etching reveals that only Ion Beam Etching provides surfaces with optical quality. Measurements of the influence of the surface quality on the diffraction efficiencies prove that the surfaces generated by Reactive Ion Etching are not suitable. Due to the high selectivity of the process Reactive Ion Etching is nevertheless a reasonable choice for the fabrication of Diffractive Optical Elements. To improve the quality of the etched surfaces a post processing with Ion Beam Etching is developed. Simulations in MATLAB display that the angle dependent removal of the surface during the Ion Beam Etching causes a smoothing of the surface roughness. The positive influence of a post processing on the diffraction efficiency is outlined by measurements. The ion beam post processing leads to an increase of the etching depth. For the fabrication of high efficient Diffractive Optical Elements this has to be taken into account. The relation is investigated and transferred to the fabrication of four-level gratings. Diffraction efficiencies up to 78 % instead of the ideal 81 % underline the practicability of the developed post processing.

  19. Anti-Reflective and Waterproof Hard Coating for High Power Laser Optical Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murahara, Masataka; Yabe, Takashi; Uchida, Shigeaki; Yoshida, Kunio; Okamoto, Yoshiaki

    2006-05-01

    A hard coating method of single crystalline porous silica film is widely used for high power laser optical elements in the air. However, there is no protective hard coating method for the elements to survive high power laser irradiance while in the water. We, thus, developed a new method for a waterproof coating with photo-oxidation of silicone oil. The silicone oil was spin-coated onto the surface of optical elements, and then irradiated with a xenon excimer lamp in the air. In this treatment, a protective coating for plastic lenses, mirrors, and nonlinear optical crystals, which are highly deliquescent, was developed by taking advantage of the phenomenon in which organic silicone oil is transformed to inorganic amorphous glass by a process of photo-oxidation. This technique has enabled an optical thin coating film to transmit ultraviolet rays of wavelengths under 200 nm and possess the characteristics of homogeneity, high density, resistance to environment, anti-reflectiveness, resistance to water, and Mohs' scale of 5, which is comparable to apatite. This allows us to cool a slab laser head and use as a mirror for underwater laser welding.

  20. The effect of machining error on the diffraction efficiency of refraction and diffractive optical element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Long; Xue, Changxi; Yang, Hongfang; Nie, Xin

    2014-08-01

    According to the expression of the phase delay and diffraction efficiency of the diffractive optical elements(DOEs), the expression of diffraction efficiency of refraction and diffractive optical element with the tilt and decenter error in fabrication process was presented in this paper. Analysis results show, in the wavelength band of 501nm-554nm, the cycle of 500μm, the center wavelength of 521nm, when the tilt angleα increases form 0° to9.8° , the diffraction efficiency is above 99%; when the tilt angleα increases form 9.8° to 29.7° , diffraction efficiency is above 92.5%; when the tilt angleα is above 29.7° , the diffraction efficiency declines rapidly, diffraction efficiency is 0 when the tilt angleα is above 58° . When the decenter Δ increases form 0nm to 21.6μm,the diffraction efficiency is above 98%; when the decenter Δ increases form 21.6nm to 63.3μm, the diffraction efficiency is above 90%; when the decenter Δ is above 63.3μm, the diffraction efficiency declines rapidly, diffraction efficiency is 0 when the he decenter Δ is above 241.7μm. To sum up the results of analysis,mathematical analysis model of the relationship between the decenter and tilt error of diffractive optical element in processing and the diffraction efficiency can be used to guide the design of the refraction and diffractive hybrid optical system comprising the diffractive optical element.

  1. Optical tomography reconstruction algorithm with the finite element method: An optimal approach with regularization tools

    SciTech Connect

    Balima, O.; Favennec, Y.; Rousse, D.

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •New strategies to improve the accuracy of the reconstruction through mesh and finite element parameterization. •Use of gradient filtering through an alternative inner product within the adjoint method. •An integral form of the cost function is used to make the reconstruction compatible with all finite element formulations, continuous and discontinuous. •Gradient-based algorithm with the adjoint method is used for the reconstruction. -- Abstract: Optical tomography is mathematically treated as a non-linear inverse problem where the optical properties of the probed medium are recovered through the minimization of the errors between the experimental measurements and their predictions with a numerical model at the locations of the detectors. According to the ill-posed behavior of the inverse problem, some regularization tools must be performed and the Tikhonov penalization type is the most commonly used in optical tomography applications. This paper introduces an optimized approach for optical tomography reconstruction with the finite element method. An integral form of the cost function is used to take into account the surfaces of the detectors and make the reconstruction compatible with all finite element formulations, continuous and discontinuous. Through a gradient-based algorithm where the adjoint method is used to compute the gradient of the cost function, an alternative inner product is employed for preconditioning the reconstruction algorithm. Moreover, appropriate re-parameterization of the optical properties is performed. These regularization strategies are compared with the classical Tikhonov penalization one. It is shown that both the re-parameterization and the use of the Sobolev cost function gradient are efficient for solving such an ill-posed inverse problem.

  2. Holographic display for see-through augmented reality using mirror-lens holographic optical element.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Lee, Dukho; Jeong, Youngmo; Cho, Jaebum; Lee, Byoungho

    2016-06-01

    A holographic display system for realizing a three-dimensional optical see-through augmented reality (AR) is proposed. A multi-functional holographic optical element (HOE), which simultaneously performs the optical functions of a mirror and a lens, is adopted in the system. In the proposed method, a mirror that is used to guide the light source into a reflection type spatial light modulator (SLM) and a lens that functions as Fourier transforming optics are recorded on a single holographic recording material by utilizing an angular multiplexing technique of volume hologram. The HOE is transparent and performs the optical functions just for Bragg matched condition. Therefore, the real-world scenes that are usually distorted by a Fourier lens or an SLM in the conventional holographic display can be observed without visual disturbance by using the proposed mirror-lens HOE (MLHOE). Furthermore, to achieve an optimized optical recording condition of the MLHOE, the optical characteristics of the holographic material are measured. The proposed holographic AR display system is verified experimentally. PMID:27244395

  3. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy determination of trace element composition of argan oil.

    PubMed

    Gonzálvez, A; Ghanjaoui, M E; El Rhazi, M; de la Guardia, M

    2010-02-01

    A methodology based on inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) after microwave assisted acid digestion has been developed to determine the trace element content of Moroccan argan oil. Limit of detection values equal or lower than few mg/kg were obtained for all elements under study. To assure the accuracy of the whole procedure, recovery studies were carried out on argan oil samples spiked at different concentration levels from 10 to 200 µg/L. Quantitative average recovery values were obtained for all elements evaluated, demonstrating the suitability of this methodology for the determination of trace elements in argan oil samples. Aluminum, calcium, chromium, iron, potassium, lithium, magnesium, sodium, vanadium and zinc were quantitatively determined in Moroccan argan oils being found that their concentration is different of that found in other edible oils thus offering a way for authentication and for the evaluation of possible adulterations. PMID:21339122

  4. Progress on the development of active micro-structured optical arrays for x-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Sanmartin, Daniel; Zhang, Dou; Button, Tim; Atkins, Carolyn; Doel, Peter; Wang, Hongchang; Brooks, David; Feldman, Charlotte; Willingale, Richard; Michette, Alan; Pfauntsch, Slawka; Sahraei, Shahin; Shand, Matthew; James, Ady; Dunare, Camelia; Stevenson, Tom; Parkes, William; Smith, Andy

    2009-08-01

    The Smart X-Ray Optics (SXO) project comprises a U.K.-based consortium developing active/adaptive micro-structured optical arrays (MOAs). These devices are designed to focus X-rays using grazing incidence reflection through consecutive aligned arrays of microscopic channels etched in silicon. The silicon channels have been produced both by dry and wet etching, the latter providing smoother channel walls. Adaptability is achieved using piezoelectric actuators, which bend the device and therefore change its focal distance. We aim to achieve a 5 cm radius of curvature which can provide a suitable focal length using a tandem pair MOA configuration. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) modelling has been carried out for the optimization of the MOA device design, consider different types of actuators (unimorph, bimorph and active fibre composites), and different Si/piezoelectric absolute and relative thicknesses. Prototype devices have been manufactured using a Viscous Plastic Processing Process for the piezoelectric actuators and dry etched silicon channels, bonded together using a low shrinkage adhesive. Characterisation techniques have been developed in order to evaluate the device performance in terms of the bending of the MOA channels produced by the actuators. This paper evaluates the progress to date on the actuation of the MOAs, comparing FEA modelling with the results obtained for different prototype structures.

  5. Dynamic Analysis of 2D Electromagnetic Resonant Optical Scanner Using 3D Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Katsuhiro; Hong, Sara; Maeda, Kengo

    The optical scanner is a scanning device in which a laser beam is reflected by a mirror that can be rotated or oscillated. In this paper, we propose a new 2D electromagnetic resonant optical scanner that employs electromagnets and leaf springs. Torque characteristics and resonance characteristics of the scanner are analyzed using the 3D finite element method. The validity of the analysis is shown by comparing the characteristics inferred from the analysis with the characteristics of the prototype. Further, 2D resonance is investigated by introducing a superimposed-frequency current in a single coil.

  6. Arbitrarily complete Bell-state measurement using only linear optical elements

    SciTech Connect

    Grice, W. P.

    2011-10-15

    A complete Bell-state measurement is not possible using only linear-optic elements, and most schemes achieve a success rate of no more than 50%, distinguishing, for example, two of the four Bell states but returning degenerate results for the other two. It is shown here that the introduction of a pair of ancillary entangled photons improves the success rate to 75%. More generally, the addition of 2{sup N}-2 ancillary photons yields a linear-optic Bell-state measurement with a success rate of 1-1/2{sup N}.

  7. Rare-Earth Elements in Lighting and Optical Applications and Their Recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xin; Chang, Moon-Hwan; Pecht, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Rare-earth elements (REEs) are used in lighting and optical applications to enable color and light adjustment, miniaturization, and energy efficiency. Common applications of REEs include phosphors for light-emitting diodes, lasers, and electronic video displays. This article reviews how REEs are widely used in these applications. However, supply constraints, including rising prices, environmental concerns over mining and refining processes, and China's control over the supply of the vast majority of REEs, are of concern for manufacturers. In view of these supply constraints, this article discusses ways for manufacturers of lighting and optical devices to identify potential substitutes and recycling methods for REEs.

  8. Optical laboratory solution and error model simulation of a linear time-varying finite element equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, B. K.; Casasent, D. P.

    1989-01-01

    The use of simplified error models to accurately simulate and evaluate the performance of an optical linear-algebra processor is described. The optical architecture used to perform banded matrix-vector products is reviewed, along with a linear dynamic finite-element case study. The laboratory hardware and ac-modulation technique used are presented. The individual processor error-source models and their simulator implementation are detailed. Several significant simplifications are introduced to ease the computational requirements and complexity of the simulations. The error models are verified with a laboratory implementation of the processor, and are used to evaluate its potential performance.

  9. Extrinsic chirality: Tunable optically active reflectors and perfect absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plum, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Conventional three-dimensional (3D) chiral media can exhibit optical activity for transmitted waves, but optical activity for reflected waves is negligible. This work shows that mirror asymmetry of the experimental arrangement—extrinsic 3D chirality—leads to giant optical activity for reflected waves with fundamentally different characteristics. It is demonstrated experimentally that extrinsically 3D-chiral illumination of a lossy metasurface backed by a mirror enables tunable circular dichroism and circular birefringence as well as perfect absorption of circularly polarized waves. In contrast, such polarization phenomena vanish for conventional optically active media backed by a mirror.

  10. Achromatic imaging by means of the refractive light sword optical element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ares Garcia, J.; Bará, S.; Gomez Garcia, M.; Jaroszewicz, Z.; Kolodziejczyk, A.; Petelczyc, K.

    2008-12-01

    The paper presents experiments with a refractive light sword optical element (LSOE). A refractive version of the LSOE was prepared in photoresist by gray scale photolithography. Then we examined chromatic aberrations of the produced element and compared them with those corresponding to a lens. For this purpose we performed two experiments, the first one where white light illumination was used and the latter one by the help of monochromatic illumination with three different wavelengths. The obtained results lead to the conclusion that the refractive LSOE does not exhibit significant chromatic aberrations and can be successfully used for imaging with extended depth of focus in polychromatic illumination.

  11. Approach to improve beam quality of inter-satellite optical communication system based on diffractive optical elements.

    PubMed

    Tan, Liying; Yu, Jianjie; Ma, Jing; Yang, Yuqiang; Li, Mi; Jiang, Yijun; Liu, Jianfeng; Han, Qiqi

    2009-04-13

    For inter-satellite optical communication transmitter with reflective telescope of two-mirrors on axis, a large mount of the transmitted energy will be blocked by central obscuration of the secondary mirror. In this paper, a novel scheme based on diffractive optical element (DOE) is introduced to avoid it. This scheme includes one diffractive beam shaper and another diffractive phase corrector, which can diffract the obscured part of transmitted beam into the domain unobscured by the secondary mirror. The proposed approach is firstly researched with a fixed obscuration ratio of 1/4. Numerical simulation shows that the emission efficiency of new figuration is 99.99%; the beam divergence from the novel inter-satellite optical communication transmitter is unchanged; and the peak intensity of receiver plane is increased about 31% compared with the typical configuration. Then the intensy patterns of receiver plane are analyzed with various obscuration ratio, the corresponding numerical modelling reveals that the intensity patterns with various obscuration ratio are nearly identical, but the amplify of relative peak intensity is getting down with the growth of obscuration ratio. This work can improve the beam quality of inter-satellite optical communication system without affecting any other functionality. PMID:19365457

  12. Ultrafast optical pulse interactions in active disordered condensed matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddique, Masood

    2005-07-01

    The goal of this research is to better understand the basic physics that governs the behavior of short-pulsed light propagating in scattering media where either the host medium or the scattering particles exhibit emission or absorption interact with the incident light in form of absorption or stimulated emission. The temporal and spectral dynamics from the interactions of optically active disordered-media with ultrashort optical pulses is the focus of the research performed in this thesis. The interaction processes studied are optical gain, spectral narrowing, fluorescence and pulse lifetime reduction and transport of ultrashort optical pulses in disordered media containing optically active discrete scattering particles. Linear and nonlinear effects are presented where the propagation of picosecond and femtosecond laser pulses in active disordered media is measured experimentally and compared with the theories of Boltzmann radiative transport and diffusive propagation of radiation in disordered media. Active media can be involved in optical processes in disordered media where either the propagation of optical radiation can result in gain or absorption upon optical excitation. A study of optical scattering in non-discrete media such as the biological heterogeneously-continuous scattering tissues is carried out as well. Lasing in random media is one of the outcomes of these results. The optical gain of optically excited active media is divided into clear subdivisions of Amplified Spontaneous Emission, Stimulated Emission and Laser Emission by characterizing them by their temporal and spectral emission.

  13. An optical region elemental abundance analysis of the chemically peculiar HgMn star chi Lupi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahlgren, Glenn M.; Adelman, Saul J.; Robinson, Richard D.

    1994-01-01

    The optical spectrum of the chemically peculiar HgMn type binary star chi Lupi has been analyzed to determine atmospheric parameters and elemental abundances. Echelle spectra were obtained with the 3.9 m Anglo-Australian telescope to exploit the extreme shape-lined nature of the spectrum. This study was undertaken in support of ultraviolet analyses currently underway that utilize echell spectra obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope. For the B9.5 V primary star we obtain T(sub eff) = 10650 K, log g = 3.9, and xi = 0 km/s, while for the A2 V secondary, T(sub eff) = 9200 K, log g = 4.0, and xi = 2 km/s. Most of the elemental abundances are typical of HgMn stars with similar T(sub eff) showing an overall iron-peak elemental abundance distribution that is basically solar in nature with enhancement of the light elements Si, P, and S, as well as all detected elements heavier than the iron group. Abundances for several elements have been determined for the first time in this star, including several of the rare-earths. The secondary star spectrum shows Am star characteristics. We also discuss the relative merits of the equivalent width and synthetic spectrum techniques in determining the elemental abundences, concluding that the synthetic spectrum technique is necessary for obtaining abundances with the utmost accuracy.

  14. Programmable multiple true-time-delay elements based on a Fourier-domain optical processor.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xiaoke; Li, Liwei; Huang, Thomas X H; Minasian, Robert A

    2012-02-15

    A new technique to realize an array of multiple true-time-delay elements, which can be independently and continuously tuned, is reported. It is based on a WDM parallel signal processing approach in conjunction with a diffraction-based Fourier-domain optical signal processor. Programmable linear optical phase transfer functions are realized to obtain different electrical true-time delays. The technique can scale to a large number of wideband true-time-delay lines, with continuously tunable programmable delay. Results demonstrate multiple true-time-delay elements with independent tuning control and verify the concept by tuning the free spectral range of a microwave photonic notch filter. To our best knowledge, this is the first demonstration of multiple independently controllable true-time-delay lines for microwave photonic systems. PMID:22344122

  15. 3D holographic head mounted display using holographic optical elements with astigmatism aberration compensation.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Han-Ju; Kim, Hee-Jae; Kim, Seong-Bok; Zhang, HuiJun; Li, BoNi; Ji, Yeong-Min; Kim, Sang-Hoo; Park, Jae-Hyeung

    2015-12-14

    We propose a bar-type three-dimensional holographic head mounted display using two holographic optical elements. Conventional stereoscopic head mounted displays may suffer from eye fatigue because the images presented to each eye are two-dimensional ones, which causes mismatch between the accommodation and vergence responses of the eye. The proposed holographic head mounted display delivers three-dimensional holographic images to each eye, removing the eye fatigue problem. In this paper, we discuss the configuration of the bar-type waveguide head mounted displays and analyze the aberration caused by the non-symmetric diffraction angle of the holographic optical elements which are used as input and output couplers. Pre-distortion of the hologram is also proposed in the paper to compensate the aberration. The experimental results show that proposed head mounted display can present three-dimensional see-through holographic images to each eye with correct focus cues. PMID:26698993

  16. Design and fabrication for the diffractive optical element of an infrared system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Changcheng; Li, Shenghui; Li, Yong; Wang, Bin

    2009-05-01

    A diffractive/refractive system with a relative aperture of f/4.0, the EFL of 150mm at 3.7-4.8μm is designed. A diffractive optical element (DOE) is fabricated by means of diamond turning on a conic substrate of the Germanium lens in this system. The characteristics of the diffractive optical element are analyzed in the software of Diffsys. And the zone radius of DOE and step height are detected by profilometry and result is produced. Test results of DOE are coincided with the design figures and the DOE has tiny surface error and high diffractive efficiency. Result of Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) for the system is tested by Ealing and the tested value is closely approximate to diffractive limit. The DOE has better behaviour of chromatic aberration and athermalization.

  17. James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee D.

    2004-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) is a segmented, cryogenic telescope scheduled for launch in 2011. In September of 2002, NASA selected prime contractor Northrop Grumman Space Technology (NGST) to build the observatory including management of the OTE. NGST is teamed with subcontractors Ball Aerospace, Alliant Techsystems (ATK). and Kodak. The team has completed several significant design, technology, architecture definition, and manufacturing milestones in the past year that are summarized in this paper.

  18. Photopolymer-Based Volume Holographic Optical Elements: Design and Possible Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, G.; Ferrara, M. A.; Borbone, F.; Roviello, A.; Striano, V.; Coppola, G.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, Volume Holographic Optical Elements (V-HOEs), such as holographic gratings and spherical lenses, are designed and fabricated by using a prototype of photopolymer. The recording process of V-HOEs and their appropriate characterization are described. Moreover, V-HOEs possible applications as solar concentrator are investigated and results are discussed. Finally, a system that allows passive solar tracking is proposed and preliminary results are reported.

  19. Optical Testing and Verification Methods for the James Webb Space Telescope Integrated Science Instrument Module Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonille, Scott R.; Miskey, Cherie L.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Rohrbach, Scott O.; Aronstein, David L.; Bartoszyk, Andrew E.; Bowers, Charles W.; Cofie, Emmanuel; Collins, Nicholas R.; Comber, Brian J.; Eichhorn, William L.; Glasse, Alistair C.; Gracey, Renee; Hartig, George F.; Howard, Joseph M.; Kelly, Douglas M.; Kimble, Randy A.; Kirk, Jeffrey R.; Kubalak, David A.; Landsman, Wayne B.; Lindler, Don J.; Malumuth, Eliot M.; Maszkiewicz, Michael; Rieke, Marcia J.; Rowlands, Neil; Sabatke, Derek S.; Smith, Corbett T.; Smith, J. Scott; Sullivan, Joseph F.; Telfer, Randal C.; Plate, Maurice Te; Vila, M. Begona; Warner, Gerry D.; Wright, Raymond H.; Wright, David; Zhou, Julia; Zielinski, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a 6.6m diameter, segmented, deployable telescope for cryogenic IR space astronomy (40K). The JWST Observatory includes the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) and the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) that contains four science instruments (SI) and the fine guider. The SIs are mounted to a composite metering structure. The SI and guider units were integrated to the ISIM structure and optically tested at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center as a suite using the Optical Telescope Element SIMulator (OSIM). OSIM is a full field, cryogenic JWST telescope simulator. SI performance, including alignment and wave front error, were evaluated using OSIM. We describe test and analysis methods for optical performance verification of the ISIM Element, with an emphasis on the processes used to plan and execute the test. The complexity of ISIM and OSIM drove us to develop a software tool for test planning that allows for configuration control of observations, associated scripts, and management of hardware and software limits and constraints, as well as tools for rapid data evaluation, and flexible re-planning in response to the unexpected. As examples of our test and analysis approach, we discuss how factors such as the ground test thermal environment are compensated in alignment. We describe how these innovative methods for test planning and execution and post-test analysis were instrumental in the verification program for the ISIM element, with enough information to allow the reader to consider these innovations and lessons learned in this successful effort in their future testing for other programs.

  20. Design and experiments of combined diffractive optical element for virtual displays and indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odinokov, Sergey B.; Ruchkina, Maria A.; Sagatelyan, Gaik R.; Solomashenko, Artem B.; Zherdev, Alexander Y.

    2015-05-01

    Combined diffractive optical elements, which perform the functions of deflection, focusing or transformation of wave fronts and together with the spectral-angular selection of the incident polychromatic radiation, obtained on a single substrate, the method of their design and fabrication are described. The combination of four-level diffraction grating with plasmon meander diffraction grating as a spectral filter that have a bandwidth that varies with the angle of incidence are investigated for use in virtual displays and indicators.

  1. Annular force based variable curvature mirror aiming to realize non-moving element optical zooming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hui; Xie, Xiaopeng; Wei, Jingxuan; Ren, Guorui; Pang, Zhihai; Xu, Liang

    2015-10-01

    Recently, a new kind of optical zooming technique in which no moving elements are involved has been paid much attention. The elimination of moving elements makes optical zooming suitable for applications which has exacting requirements in space, power cost and system stability. The mobile phone and the space-borne camera are two typical examples. The key to realize non-moving elements optical zooming lies in the introduction of variable curvature mirror (VCM) whose radius of curvature could be changed dynamically. When VCM is about to be used to implement optical zoom imaging, two characteristics should be ensured. First, VCM has to provide large enough saggitus variation in order to obtain a big magnification ratio. Second, after the radius of curvature has been changed, the corresponding surface figure accuracy should still be maintained superior to a threshold level to make the high quality imaging possible. In this manuscript, based on the elasticity theory, the physical model of the annular force based variable curvature mirror is established and numerically analyzed. The results demonstrate that when the annular force is applied at the half-the-aperture position, the actuation force is reduced and a smaller actuation force is required to generate the saggitus variation and thus the maintenance of surface figure accuracy becomes easier during the variation of radius of curvature. Besides that, a prototype VCM, whose diameter and thickness are 100mm and 3mm respectively, have been fabricated and the maximum saggitus variation that could be obtained approaches more than 30 wavelengths. At the same time, the degradation of surface figure accuracy is weakly correlated to the curvature radius variation. Keywords: optical zooming; variable curvature mirror; surface figure accuracy; saggitus;

  2. Optical detection enhancement in porous volumetric microfluidic capture elements using refractive index matching fluids.

    PubMed

    Wiederoder, M S; Peterken, L; Lu, A X; Rahmanian, O D; Raghavan, S R; DeVoe, D L

    2015-08-21

    Porous volumetric capture elements in microfluidic sensors are advantageous compared to planar capture surfaces due to higher reaction site density and decreased diffusion lengths that can reduce detection limits and total assay time. However a mismatch in refractive indices between the capture matrix and fluid within the porous interstices results in scattering of incident, reflected, or emitted light, significantly reducing the signal for optical detection. Here we demonstrate that perfusion of an index-matching fluid within a porous matrix minimizes scattering, thus enhancing optical signal by enabling the entire capture element volume to be probed. Signal enhancement is demonstrated for both fluorescence and absorbance detection, using porous polymer monoliths in a silica capillary and packed beds of glass beads within thermoplastic microchannels, respectively. Fluorescence signal was improved by a factor of 3.5× when measuring emission from a fluorescent compound attached directly to the polymer monolith, and up to 2.6× for a rapid 10 min direct immunoassay. When combining index matching with a silver enhancement step, a detection limit of 0.1 ng mL(-1) human IgG and a 5 log dynamic range was achieved. The demonstrated technique provides a simple method for enhancing optical sensitivity for a wide range of assays, enabling the full benefits of porous detection elements in miniaturized analytical systems to be realized. PMID:26160546

  3. Optical detection enhancement in porous volumetric microfluidic capture elements using refractive index matching fluids

    PubMed Central

    Wiederoder, M. S.; Peterken, L.; Lu, A. X.; Rahmanian, O. D.; Raghavan, S. R.; DeVoe, D. L.

    2015-01-01

    Porous volumetric capture elements in microfluidic sensors are advantageous compared to planar capture surfaces due to higher reaction site density and decreased diffusion lengths that can reduce detection limits and total assay time. However a mismatch in refractive indices between the capture matrix and fluid within the porous interstices results in scattering of incident, reflected, or emitted light, significantly reducing the signal for optical detection. Here we demonstrate that perfusion of an index-matching fluid within a porous matrix minimizes scattering, thus enhancing optical signal by enabling the entire capture element volume to be probed. Signal enhancement is demonstrated for both fluorescence and absorbance detection, using porous polymer monoliths in a silica capillary and packed beds of glass beads within thermoplastic microchannels, respectively. Fluorescence signal was improved by a factor of 3.5× when measuring emission from a fluorescent compound attached directly to the polymer monolith, and up to 2.6× for a rapid 10 min direct immunoassay. When combining index matching with a silver enhancement step, a detection limit of 0.1 ng/mL human IgG and a 5 log dynamic range was achieved. The demonstrated technique provides a simple method for enhancing optical sensitivity for a wide range of assays, enabling the full benefits of porous detection elements in miniaturized analytical systems to be realized. PMID:26160546

  4. Fabrication of gray-scale masks and diffractive optical elements with LDW glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolkov, Victor P.; Malyshev, Anatoly I.; Poleshchuk, Alexander G.; Cherkashin, Vadim V.; Tiziani, Hans J.; Pruss, Christof; Schoder, Thomas; Westhauser, Johann; Wu, Chuck

    2001-11-01

    In the last years the application of gray-scale masks (GSM) for diffractive optics manufacturing attracts attention because of cost-effective possibility to produce a lot of diffractive elements on hard and heat-resistant thermally stable substrates. Direct laser writing of GSMs and fabrication of diffractive optical elements are effectively realized with application of LDW-glass (material for Laser Direct Write from CANYON MATERIALS, Inc). An important advantage of this material is the real-time change of transmittance in a single-step process without liquid development. It is shown that optimal transmittance range in which track width is not more than 1 micrometers is from 5-10% (transmittance of unexposed area) to 60-65% for LDW-glass type I having thinner colored layer. Power modulation and surroundings dependent peculiarities of direct laser writing on LDW-glass are discussed. Results of fabrication of diffractive optical elements using LDW-glass masks are presented. Among several types of LDW glasses studied the advantages of new GS-11 glass are elaborated. Application of GS-11 glass for GSMs allowed to fabricate blazed diffractive structures with backward slope width of 0.8 micrometers .

  5. Three dimensional fabrication of optical waveguiding elements for on-chip integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsi Sreenivas, V. V.; Bülters, M.; Schröder, M.; Bergmann, R. B.

    2014-05-01

    We present micro polymer optical waveguide elements fabricated using femtosecond laser and two-photon absorption (TPA) process. The POWs are constructed by tightly focusing a laser beam in SU-8 based resists transparent to the laser wavelength for single-photon absorption. The TPA process enables the patterning of the resist in three dimensions at a resolution of 100-200 nm, which provides a high degree of freedom for POW designs. Using this technology, we provide a novel approach to fabricate Three dimensional Polymer Optical Waveguides (3D-POW) and coupling with single mode fibers in the visible wavelength regions. Our research is also focused on fabricating passive micro optical elements such as splitters, combiners and simple logical gates. For this reason we are aiming to achieve optimum coupling efficiency between the 3D-POW and fibers. The technology also facilitates 3D-POW fabrication independent of the substrate material. We present these fabrication techniques and designs, along with supporting numerical simulations and its transmission properties. With a length of 270 μm and polymer core diameter of 9 μm with air cladding, the waveguides possess a total loss of 12 dB. This value also includes the external in and out mode coupling and in continuously being improved upon by design optimization and simulations. We verify the overall feasibility of the design and coupling mechanisms that can be exploited to execute waveguide based optical functions such as filtering and logical operations.

  6. Polarization ray tracing in anisotropic optically active media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclain, Stephen C.; Chipman, Russell A.

    1992-01-01

    Procedures for performing polarization ray tracing through birefringent media are presented in a form compatible with the standard methods of geometric ray tracing. The birefringent materials treated include the following: anisotropic optically active materials such as quartz, non-optically active uniaxial materials such as calcite, and isotropic optically active materials such as mercury sulfide or organic liquids. Refraction and reflection algorithms are presented which compute both ray directions and wave directions. Methods for computing polarization modes, refractive indices, optical path lengths, and Fresnel transmission and reflection coefficients are also specified.

  7. Steady-state heating of active fibres under optical pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Gainov, V V; Shaidullin, R I; Ryabushkin, Oleg A

    2011-07-31

    We have measured the temperature in the core of rare-earth-doped optical fibres under lasing conditions at high optical pump powers using a fibre Mach - Zehnder interferometer and probe light of wavelength far away from the absorption bands of the active ions. From the observed heating kinetics of the active medium, the heat transfer coefficient on the polymer cladding - air interface has been estimated. The temperature of the active medium is shown to depend on the thermal and optical properties of the polymer cladding. (fiber and integrated optics)

  8. VISUAL ELEMENTS OF SUBJECTIVE PREFERENCE MODULATE AMYGDALA ACTIVATION

    PubMed Central

    Bar, Moshe; Neta, Maital

    2010-01-01

    What are the basic visual cues that determine our preference towards mundane everyday objects? We previously showed that a highly potent cue is the nature of the object’s contour: people generally like objects with a curved contour compared with objects that have pointed features and a sharp-angled contour. This bias is hypothesized here to stem from an implicit perception of potential threat conveyed by sharp elements. Using human neuroimaging to test this hypothesis, we report that the amygdala, a brain structure that is involved in fear processing and has been shown to exhibit activation level that is proportional to arousal in general, is significantly more active for everyday sharp objects (e.g., a sofa with sharp corners) compared with their curved-contour counterparts. Therefore, our results indicate that a preference bias towards a visual object can be induced by low-level perceptual properties, independent of semantic meaning, via visual elements that on some level could be associated with threat. We further present behavioral results that provide initial support for the link between the sharpness of the contour and threat perception. Our brains might be organized to extract these basic contour elements rapidly for deriving an early warning signal in the presence of potential danger. PMID:17462678

  9. Focusing and imaging properties of diffractive optical elements with star-ring topological structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Jie; Zhang, Junyong; Zhang, Yanli; Sun, Meizhi

    2015-08-01

    A kind of diffractive optical elements (DOE) with star-ring topological structure is proposed and their focusing and imaging properties are studied in detail. The so-called star-ring topological structure denotes that a large number of pinholes distributed in many specific zone orbits. In two dimensional plane, this structure can be constructed by two constrains, one is a mapping function, which yields total potential zone orbits, corresponding to the optical path difference (OPD); the other is a switching sequence based on the given encoded seed elements and recursion relation to operate the valid zone orbits. The focusing and imaging properties of DOE with star-ring topological structure are only determined by the aperiodic sequence, and not relevant to the concrete geometry structure. In this way, we can not only complete the traditional symmetrical DOE, such as circular Dammam grating, Fresnel zone plates, photon sieves, and their derivatives, but also construct asymmetrical elements with anisotropic diffraction pattern. Similarly, free-form surface or three dimensional DOE with star-ring topological structure can be constructed by the same method proposed. In consequence of smaller size, lighter weight, more flexible design, these elements may allow for some new applications in micro and nanphotonics.

  10. Composite axilens-axicon diffractive optical elements for generation of ring patterns with high focal depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmavarapu, Raghu; Vijayakumar, A.; Brunner, R.; Bhattacharya, Shanti

    2016-03-01

    A binary Fresnel Zone Axilens (FZA) is designed for the infinite conjugate mode and the phase profile of a refractive axicon is combined with it to generate a composite Diffractive Optical Element (DOE). The FZA designed for two focal lengths generates a line focus along the propagation direction extending between the two focal planes. The ring pattern generated by the axicon is focused through this distance and the radius of the ring depends on the propagation distance. Hence, the radius of the focused ring pattern can be tuned, during the design process, within the two focal planes. The integration of the two functions was carried out by shifting the location of zones of FZA with respect to the phase profile of the refractive axicon resulting in a binary composite DOE. The FZAs and axicons were designed for different focal depth values and base angles respectively, in order to achieve different ring radii within the focal depth of each element. The elements were simulated using scalar diffraction formula and their focusing characteristics were analyzed. The DOEs were fabricated using electron beam direct writing and evaluated using a fiber coupled diode laser. The tunable ring patterns generated by the DOEs have prospective applications in microdrilling as well as microfabrication of circular diffractive and refractive optical elements.

  11. Transition Metals Catalyzed Element-Cyano Bonds Activations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Falck, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Cyano group as a versatile functionalized intermediate has been explored for several decades, as it readily transfers to many useful functionalization groups such as amine, amide, acid, etc., which make it possess high popularization and use value in organic synthesis. Reactions involved with element-cyano bond cleavage can provide not only a new cyano group but also a freshly functionalized skeleton in one-pot, consequently making it of high importance. The highlights reviewed herein include H-CN, Si-CN, C-CN, B-CN, Sn-CN, Ge-CN, S-CN, Halo-CN, N-CN, and O-CN bonds cleavages and will summarize progress in such an important research area. This review article will focus on transition metal catalyzed reactions involving element-cyano bond activation. PMID:25558119

  12. Lightweight, Active Optics for Space and Near Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wick, D.; Bagwell, B.; Martinez, T.; Payne, D.; Restaino, S.; Romeo, R.

    Size, weight, and a lack of adaptability currently hinder the effectiveness of conventional imaging sensors in a number of military applications, including space-based space situational awareness (SSA), intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR), and missile tracking. The development of sensors that are smaller, lighter weight, adaptive, and use less power is critical for the success of future military initiatives. Threat detection systems need the flexibility of a wide FOV for surveillance and situational awareness while simultaneously maintaining high-resolution for target identification and precision tracking from a single, nonmechanical imaging system. Sandia National Laboratories, the Naval Research Laboratory, Narrascape, Inc., and Composite Mirror Applications, Inc. are at the forefront of active optics research, leading the development of active systems for foveated imaging, nonmechanical zoom, phase diversity, and actively enhanced multi-spectral imaging. Increasing the field-of-view, spatial resolution, spectral capability and system magnification have all been demonstrated with active optics. Adding active components to existing systems should significantly enhance capability in a number of military applications, including night vision, remote sensing and surveillance, chemical/biological detection, and large aperture, space-based systems. Deployment costs of large aperture systems in space or near-space are directly related to the weight of the system. In order to minimize the weight of conventional primary mirrors and simultaneously achieve an agile system that is capable of true optical zoom without macroscopic moving parts, we are proposing a revolutionary alternative to conventional telescopes where moving lenses/mirrors and gimbals are replaced with lightweight carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) variable radius-of-curvature mirrors (VRMs) and MEMS deformable mirrors (DMs). CFRP and MEMS DMs can provide a variable effective focal

  13. Construction of optical data processing systems based on optoelectronic liquid crystal elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstik, Alexei; Melnikova, Elena

    2005-11-01

    The methods for the optical signal conversion based on the optoelectronic system "relief grating - liquid crystal" and liquid-crystal (LC) cells using S- or twist-effect have been presented. New schemes forming the basis for realization of bistable LC devices, optoelectronic logic elements and systems of electrically-coupled LC elements intended for the production of laser oscillations at the constant input intensity have been proposed. It has been demonstrated that with the use of varying parameters of optoelectronic feedback one is enabled to set up both regular and chaotic intensity oscillations, to control the frequency and form of these oscillations, to realize functional changes of logic elements. The developed LC systems have been introduced into the educational practice of students mastering modem information techniques.

  14. High-precision micro-optic elements by wafer-scale replication on arbitrary substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannberg, Peter; Bierbaum, Ralf; Erdmann, Lars; Krehl, A.; Braeuer, Andreas H.

    1999-09-01

    A solution is described for replication of polymer microoptical elements on arbitrary substrates. The replication is done on wafer scale level and includes the adjustment step between the optical elements and the substrate. Demonstrators are various microlens arrays, structures for the efficient coupling between monomode waveguides or multimode fibers and photodiodes, and between multimode waveguides and LED's. Out of the many different replication techniques, UV-reaction molding is chosen for this application. This technique has advantages against hot embossing and injection molding. Network polymers which are stable against temperature changes can be used. The replication is made in thin layers on a solid substrate resulting in high mechanical stability and very good flatness of the samples. The process introduces mechanical stress nor thermal load on the substrate which can be a fully processed semiconductor wafer containing elements like diodes or LEDs.

  15. Soft x-ray magneto-optic Kerr rotation and element-specific hysteresis measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Kortright, J.B.; Rice, M.

    1996-03-01

    Soft x-ray magneto-optic Kerr rotation has been measured using a continuously tunable multilayer linear polarizer in the beam reflected form samples in applied magnetic fields. Like magnetic circular dichroism, Kerr rotation in the soft x-ray can be element - specific and much larger than in the visible spectral range when the photon energy is tuned near atomic core resonances. Thus sensitive element-specific hysteresis measurements are possible with this technique. Examples showing large Kerr rotation from an Fe film and element-specific hysteresis loops of the Fe and Cr in an Fe/Cr multilayer demonstrate these new capabilities. Some consequences of the strong anomalous dispersion near the FeL{sub 2,3} edges to the Kerr rotation are discussed.

  16. Active Learning Environment with Lenses in Geometric Optics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tural, Güner

    2015-01-01

    Geometric optics is one of the difficult topics for students within physics discipline. Students learn better via student-centered active learning environments than the teacher-centered learning environments. So this study aimed to present a guide for middle school teachers to teach lenses in geometric optics via active learning environment…

  17. Matching Element Symbols with State Abbreviations: A Fun Activity for Browsing the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woelk, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    A classroom activity is presented in which students are challenged to find matches between the United States two-letter postal abbreviations for states and chemical element symbols. The activity aims to lessen negative apprehensions students might have when the periodic table of the elements with its more than 100 combinations of letters is first…

  18. Quantification of morphology of bacterial colonies using laser scatter measurements and solid element optical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavesley, Silas; Bayraktar, Bülent; Venkatapathi, Murugesan; Hirleman, E. Dan; Bhunia, Arun K.; Robinson, J. Paul; Hassler, Richard; Smith, Linda; Rajwa, Bartek

    2007-02-01

    Traditional biological and chemical methods for pathogen identification require complicated sample preparation for reliable results. Optical scattering technology has been used for identification of bacterial cells in suspension, but with only limited success. Our published reports have demonstrated that scattered light based identification of Listeria colonies growing on solid surfaces is feasible with proper pattern recognition tools. Recently we have extended this technique to classification of other bacterial genera including, Salmonella, Bacillus, and Vibrio. Our approach may be highly applicable to early detection and classification of pathogens in food-processing industry and in healthcare. The unique scattering patterns formed by colonies of different species are created through differences in colony microstructure (on the order of wavelength used), bulk optical properties, and the macroscopic morphology. While it is difficult to model the effect on scatter-signal patterns owing to the microstructural changes, the influence of bulk optical properties and overall shape of colonies can be modeled using geometrical optics. Our latest research shows that it is possible to model the scatter pattern of bacterial colonies using solid-element optical modeling software (TracePro), and theoretically assess changes in macro structure and bulk refractive indices. This study allows predicting the theoretical limits of resolution and sensitivity of our detection and classification methods. Moreover, quantification of changes in macro morphology and bulk refractive index provides an opportunity to study the response of colonies to various reagents and antibiotics.

  19. Determination of elemental impurities in poly(vinyl chloride) by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Leticia S F; Pedrotti, Matheus F; Miceli, Tatiane M; Pereira, Juliana S F; Flores, Erico M M

    2016-05-15

    In this work, a method for poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) analysis by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) was developed. Samples were digested by microwave-induced combustion (MIC) and thirteen elements (Ba, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sr, V and Zn) were determined by ICP-OES. Operational conditions of MIC were investigated allowing quantitative determination of all the analytes and suitable results were achieved using a 3 mol L(-1) HNO3 solution. Microwave-assisted wet digestion (MAWD) using closed quartz vessels and a single reaction chamber microwave digestion system (MAWD-SRC), were also evaluated for PVC digestion for results comparison. All the evaluated sample preparation methods were considered suitable for PVC digestion but MIC was preferable due to the possibility of using diluted HNO3 instead of concentrated reagents and due to the better digestion efficiency. The residual carbon content (RCC) in digests obtained by MIC was significantly lower in comparison with the values obtained after MAWD and by MAWD-SRC. Accuracy for the proposed method was better than 94% for all analytes by comparison of results with those obtained by neutron activation analysis (NAA). Using MIC, it was possible to digest a relatively high sample mass (500 mg) and up to 8 samples in less time (25 min) in comparison with MAWD and MAWD-SRC (about 60 min for both methods). The efficiency of digestion by MIC was higher 99% and lower limits of detection (as low as 0.1 µg g(-1)) were obtained avoiding the use of concentrated acids that is of great concern according to the current green chemistry recommendations. PMID:26992533

  20. Deep Optical Spectroscopy of Planetary Nebulae: The Search for Neutron-Capture Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, Nicholas C.; Garofali, K.; Dinerstein, H. L.; Hwang, S.; Redfield, S.

    2013-01-01

    We present deep, high-resolution (R=36,700) optical spectra of five planetary nebulae (PNe), taken with the 2D-coude echelle spectrograph on the 2.7-m Harlan J. Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory. These observations are part of a larger optical survey of PNe, designed to unambiguously detect emission lines from neutron(n)-capture elements (atomic number Z>30). The abundances of these elements are of particular interest in PNe, since they can be produced by slow n-capture nucleosynthesis (the ``s-process'') during the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stage of evolution of PN progenitor stars. The first large-scale investigation of n-capture element abundances in PNe (Sterling & Dinerstein 2008, ApJS, 174, 157) surveyed [Kr III] and [Se IV] transitions in the K band spectra of more than 80 PNe. However, the abundances derived from these data relied on ionization corrections that were often large and uncertain due to the detection of only one ion per element. Transitions of other Se and Kr ions, as well as many other trans-iron species, reside at optical wavelengths. High-resolution spectra are essential to unequivocally identify these lines and resolve potential blends with other species. The spectra we present are rich in emission features, with between 125 and 600 distinct lines detected in each PN. Emission from at least one Kr ion is detected in all five objects, and two (Hb 12 and J 900) exhibit emission from multiple Kr ions. We detected multiple Xe ions in J 900, as well as Se, Br, and Rb lines. Hb 12 also exhibits Xe emission, and the first detection of [Se II] in a PN to our knowledge. The spectra display a wealth of other emission lines, including permitted features of second-row elements and forbidden transitions of several iron-peak elements (e.g., Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu). Our survey makes it possible to derive more accurate Se and Kr abundances in PNe, and reveals the enrichment of other trans-iron elements. This enables more accurate s

  1. Active control of multi-element rotor blade airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torok, Michael S. (Inventor); Moffitt, Robert C. (Inventor); Bagai, Ashish (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A multi-element rotor blade includes an individually controllable main element and fixed aerodynamic surface in an aerodynamically efficient location relative to the main element. The main element is controlled to locate the fixed aerodynamic surface in a position to increase lift and/or reduce drag upon the main element at various azimuthal positions during rotation.

  2. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Upgrade Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past year the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) has been undergoing a significant upgrade beyond its initial configuration. The NTREES facility is designed to perform realistic non-nuclear testing of nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) fuel elements and fuel materials. Although the NTREES facility cannot mimic the neutron and gamma environment of an operating NTR, it can simulate the thermal hydraulic environment within an NTR fuel element to provide critical information on material performance and compatibility. The first phase of the upgrade activities which was completed in 2012 in part consisted of an extensive modification to the hydrogen system to permit computer controlled operations outside the building through the use of pneumatically operated variable position valves. This setup also allows the hydrogen flow rate to be increased to over 200 g/sec and reduced the operation complexity of the system. The second stage of modifications to NTREES which has just been completed expands the capabilities of the facility significantly. In particular, the previous 50 kW induction power supply has been replaced with a 1.2 MW unit which should allow more prototypical fuel element temperatures to be reached. The water cooling system was also upgraded to so as to be capable of removing 100% of the heat generated during. This new setup required that the NTREES vessel be raised onto a platform along with most of its associated gas and vent lines. In this arrangement, the induction heater and water systems are now located underneath the platform. In this new configuration, the 1.2 MW NTREES induction heater will be capable of testing fuel elements and fuel materials in flowing hydrogen at pressures up to 1000 psi at temperatures up to and beyond 3000 K and at near-prototypic reactor channel power densities. NTREES is also capable of testing potential fuel elements with a variety of propellants, including hydrogen with additives to inhibit

  3. Soft-x-ray magneto-optical Kerr effect and element-specific hysteresis measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Kortright, J.B.; Rice, M.

    1997-04-01

    Interest in the utilization of x-ray magneto-optical properties to provide element-specific magnetic information, combined with recent development of tunable linear polarizers for spectroscopic polarization measurement, have led the authors to the study of magneto-optical rotation (MOR) near core levels of magnetic atoms in magnetic multilayer and alloy films. Their initial observation of Faraday rotation (in transmission) demonstrated that for Fe MOR is easily measured and is larger at its L{sub 3} resonance than in the near-visible spectral regions. This work also demonstrated that the spectroscopic behavior of the MOR signal in transmission, resulting from the differential reaction of left- and right-circular components of a linearly polarized beam, is related to the magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), or differential absorption, as expected by a Kramers-Kronig transformation. Thus MCD measurements using circular polarization and MOR measurements using linear polarization can provide complementary, and in some cases equivalent, information. On beamline 6.3.2 the authors have begun to investigate soft x-ray MOR in the reflection geometry, the x-ray magneto-optic Kerr effect (XMOKE). Early measurements have demonstrated the ability to measure element-specific hysteresis loops and large rotations compared to analogous near-visible measurements. The authors are investigating the spectral dependence of the XMOKE signal, and have initiated systematic materials studies of sputter-deposited films of Fe, Fe{sub x}Cr{sub 1{minus}x} alloys, and Fe/Cr multilayers.

  4. Optical elements with extended depth of focus and arbitrary distribution of intensity along the focal segment obtained by angular modulation of the optical power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakarenko, K.; Ducin, I.; Jaroszewicz, Z.; Kołodziejczyk, A.; Petelczyc, K.; Stompor, A.; Sypek, M.

    2015-04-01

    Light Sword Lens (LSL), i.e., an optical element with extended depth of focus (EDOF) characterized by angular modulation of the optical power in its conventional form is characterized by a linear relationship between the optical power and the angular coordinate of the corresponding angular lens sector. This dependence may be manipulated in function of the required design needs. In the present communicate this additional degree of freedom of design is used for elimination of the LSL shape discontinuity.

  5. Tempo and Mode of Transposable Element Activity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kofler, Robert; Nolte, Viola; Schlötterer, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary dynamics of transposable element (TE) insertions have been of continued interest since TE activity has important implications for genome evolution and adaptation. Here, we infer the transposition dynamics of TEs by comparing their abundance in natural D. melanogaster and D. simulans populations. Sequencing pools of more than 550 South African flies to at least 320-fold coverage, we determined the genome wide TE insertion frequencies in both species. We suggest that the predominance of low frequency insertions in the two species (>80% of the insertions have a frequency <0.2) is probably due to a high activity of more than 58 families in both species. We provide evidence for 50% of the TE families having temporally heterogenous transposition rates with different TE families being affected in the two species. While in D. melanogaster retrotransposons were more active, DNA transposons showed higher activity levels in D. simulans. Moreover, we suggest that LTR insertions are mostly of recent origin in both species, while DNA and non-LTR insertions are older and more frequently vertically transmitted since the split of D. melanogaster and D. simulans. We propose that the high TE activity is of recent origin in both species and a consequence of the demographic history, with habitat expansion triggering a period of rapid evolution. PMID:26186437

  6. Active learning in optics and photonics: Fraunhofer diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghalila, H.; Ben Lakhdar, Z.; Lahmar, S.; Dhouaidi, Z.; Majdi, Y.

    2014-07-01

    "Active Learning in Optics and Photonics" (ALOP), funded by UNESCO within its Physics Program framework with the support of ICTP (Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics) and SPIE (Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers), aimed to helps and promotes a friendly and interactive method in teaching optics using simple and inexpensive equipment. Many workshops were organized since 2005 the year when Z. BenLakhdar, whom is part of the creators of ALOP, proposed this project to STO (Société Tunisienne d'Optique). These workshops address several issues in optics, covering geometrical optics, wave optics, optical communication and they are dedicated to both teachers and students. We focus this lecture on Fraunhofer diffraction emphasizing the facility to achieve this mechanism in classroom, using small laser and operating a slit in a sheet of paper. We accompany this demonstration using mobile phone and numerical modeling to assist in the analysis of the diffraction pattern figure.

  7. Development in the ISSP of Integrated-Optical Elements and Devices in LiNbO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuneva, Mariana; Tonchev, Svetlen

    2010-01-01

    The article presented is a review of the main results on integrated-optical elements and devices developed in the Institute of Solid State Physics. Optical waveguiding structures were obtained by titanium in-diffusion and proton exchange using standard photolithography methods for device patterning. Electro-optical prism, electro-optical Bragg-modulator, electrically induced strip waveguides, integrated-optical Y-switches, total-internal-reflection modulator, Mach-Zehnder modulators of classic and new constructions etc. are discussed concerning their parameters and describing their fabrication as well. The emphasis is put on the novelties, advantages and disadvantages of each of them and on the specific problems of their fabrication.

  8. Pancharatnam-Berry optical element sorter of full angular momentum eigenstate.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Gary F

    2016-03-21

    We propose and numerically demonstrate a Pancharatnam-Berry optical element (PBOE) device that simultaneously sorts spin (SAM) and orbital (OAM) angular momentum. This device exploits the circular polarization selective properties of PBOEs to modulate independently the orthogonal SAM eigenstates within a geometric optical transformation that sorts OAM, enabling single measurement characterization of the full angular momentum eigenstate. This expands the available state space for OAM communication and enables characterization of the eigenmode composition of structured polarization beams. We define the two-dimensional orientation patterns of the transversely varying half-waveplate PBOEs that implement the angular momentum sorter. We show that the device discriminates the OAM and SAM eigenstates of optical beams including laser cavity modes such as Laguerre-Gaussian OAM eigenmodes, Hermite-Gaussian modes, and hybrid modes with complex structured polarization. We also demonstrate that it can determine the m parameter of higher order LGml Laguerre-Gaussian modes. The ability of this device to decode information from spatially structured optical phase has potential for applications in communication, encryption, modal characterization, and scientific measurements. PMID:27136857

  9. Effectiveness of holographic optical element module sensor in measuring blood prothrombin time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Cheng; Yen, Shih-Chieh; Cheng, Stone; Huang, Tony

    2014-07-01

    A small-form-factor holographic optical element (HOE) module, which was mounted on a dual-stage seesaw actuator, was utilized to evaluate blood coagulation in real time. The method involved assessing the decrease in transmitted light of the blood sample surface when the clotting is formed. The prothrombin time (PT) was measured by illumining and focusing a 635 nm laser beam onto the sample. As the fibrinogen turned into non-solute fibrin, the transmitted efficiency and total intensity of the reflected light from the reflector changed. A low-pass filter suppressed the noise in the coagulation-related transient response to yield accurate signals. Finally, the PT measurements were compared to those made classically using other optical sensors.

  10. Improving performance of optical phase conjugation by splitting the nonlinear element.

    PubMed

    Morshed, Monir; Lowery, Arthur J; Du, Liang B

    2013-02-25

    We show that optical phase conjugation (OPC) based on third order nonlinear effects for mid-span spectral inversion (MSSI) can be improved by splitting the nonlinear element into two parts and adding an optical filter between them. This band-stop filter suppresses the cross-phase-modulation products that are generated around the pump, which, if not removed, will be shifted to fall around the output OPC signal band. Numerical simulations show that this method reduces the fundamental limitations introduced by OPC by 3 dB, which results in improvement of the maximum signal quality, Qmax, by 1 dB in a 10 × 80-km 4-QAM 224-Gb/s CO-OFDM system with MSSI. PMID:23481990

  11. Prediction of metallic nano-optical trapping forces by finite element-boundary integral method.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiao-Min; Xu, Kai-Jiang; Yang, Ming-Lin; Sheng, Xin-Qing

    2015-03-01

    The hybrid of finite element and boundary integral (FE-BI) method is employed to predict nano-optical trapping forces of arbitrarily shaped metallic nanostructures. A preconditioning strategy is proposed to improve the convergence of the iterative solution. Skeletonization is employed to speed up the design and optimization where iteration has to be repeated for each beam configuration. The radiation pressure force (RPF) is computed by vector flux of the Maxwell's stress tensor. Numerical simulations are performed to validate the developed method in analyzing the plasmonic effects as well as the optical trapping forces. It is shown that the proposed method is capable of predicting the trapping forces of complex metallic nanostructures accurately and efficiently. PMID:25836836

  12. Diffractive optical element with same diffraction pattern for multicolor light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mengzhu; Wang, Qixia; Gu, Huarong; Tan, Qiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    The wavelength-division multiplexing technique can be utilized in visible light communication to increase the channel capacity when a multicolor mixed white LED is used as light source. In such an application, the illumination area of LEDs should be invariant to the incident wavelength, so as to decrease interference within the adjacent regions. Diffractive optical elements (DOEs) can be used in the optical transmitter system to shape the diffraction patterns into polygons. However, traditional DOEs illuminated by a multicolor mixed white LED would result into diffraction patterns with unequal sizes. In this paper, a hybrid algorithm which combines particle swarm optimization with a genetic algorithm is proposed for multicolor oriented DOEs design. A DOE is designed and fabricated for blue and red LEDs, and experimental results show that diffraction patterns with rather good uniformity as well as quasi-equal size for red and blue LEDs are obtained. PMID:26835636

  13. Adaptive optics vision simulator based on 35 element bimorph deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lina; Dai, Yun; Xiao, Fei; Kang, Jian; Zhao, Haoxin; Bao, Hua; Zhou, Hong; Zhou, Yifeng; Zhang, Yudong

    2014-09-01

    A novel adaptive optics vision simulator (AOVS) is presented and characterized for several design features, including automated measuring and compensating eye's aberrations up to the fifth order, which fully cover aberrations typically found in the human eye, even for the cases of highly aberrated eyes. Especially, it is equipped with 35 elements bimorph deformable mirror with bigger stroke and smaller size, which could help establish near-diffraction-limited ocular optics condition. To investigate the validity of this apparatus, pilot data under different aberration correction pattern from one subjects are collected, and contrast sensitivity function (CSF), an important psychophysical function in vision, is obtained also. Results from living eyes show a practically perfect aberration correction and demonstrate the utility of this system.

  14. Active Optics Modernization of the AEOS Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwald, D.

    2012-09-01

    Since first light in 1997, the Advanced Electro-Optical System (AEOS) telescope at the Maui Space Surveillance Site has used an active system for figure control that applies forces on the primary mirror and positions the secondary mirror to minimize wavefront aberrations. Periodically a wavefront optimization loop is closed with a Shack-Hartmann WaveFront Sensor (WFS), 84 primary mirror force actuators and three secondary mirror translation actuators. This optimization loop is used with a series of stellar targets to find coefficients for each force or position in a sine and cosine of elevation model. During normal telescope operation when the WFS is not in use, this elevation angle dependant model is used to control the primary mirror forces and secondary mirror positions. Recently the system was upgraded with new computers, electronics and algorithms. The primary goal of the upgrade was to replace obsolete and no longer maintainable hardware with secondary goals of reducing the effort required to update the wavefront model, and improving the final operational wavefront performance. This paper discusses the algorithms implemented to achieve the secondary goals and initial performance results. In order to eliminate erroneous data from the WFS, the processing algorithms were modified to dynamically assign pixels on the WFS camera to lenslets, and closed loop tracking of the gimbal was implemented using a camera that shares the focal plane with the WFS. These changes permit the elimination of human operator review from the wavefront optimization loop. The original system collected data for either a single star or a series of stars and then replaced either the constant or the complete model at the end of a data collection session. In the revised system, each wavefront measurement is used for a Kalman update to the model. Operationally, the Kalman updates allow data to be collected intermittently as time is available between other telescope tasks. By combining the

  15. Real-time transposable element activity in individual live cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gloria; Martini, K. Michael

    2016-01-01

    The excision and reintegration of transposable elements (TEs) restructure their host genomes, generating cellular diversity involved in evolution, development, and the etiology of human diseases. Our current knowledge of TE behavior primarily results from bulk techniques that generate time and cell ensemble averages, but cannot capture cell-to-cell variation or local environmental and temporal variability. We have developed an experimental system based on the bacterial TE IS608 that uses fluorescent reporters to directly observe single TE excision events in individual cells in real time. We find that TE activity depends upon the TE’s orientation in the genome and the amount of transposase protein in the cell. We also find that TE activity is highly variable throughout the lifetime of the cell. Upon entering stationary phase, TE activity increases in cells hereditarily predisposed to TE activity. These direct observations demonstrate that real-time live-cell imaging of evolution at the molecular and individual event level is a powerful tool for the exploration of genome plasticity in stressed cells. PMID:27298350

  16. Real-time transposable element activity in individual live cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Neil H; Lee, Gloria; Sherer, Nicholas A; Martini, K Michael; Goldenfeld, Nigel; Kuhlman, Thomas E

    2016-06-28

    The excision and reintegration of transposable elements (TEs) restructure their host genomes, generating cellular diversity involved in evolution, development, and the etiology of human diseases. Our current knowledge of TE behavior primarily results from bulk techniques that generate time and cell ensemble averages, but cannot capture cell-to-cell variation or local environmental and temporal variability. We have developed an experimental system based on the bacterial TE IS608 that uses fluorescent reporters to directly observe single TE excision events in individual cells in real time. We find that TE activity depends upon the TE's orientation in the genome and the amount of transposase protein in the cell. We also find that TE activity is highly variable throughout the lifetime of the cell. Upon entering stationary phase, TE activity increases in cells hereditarily predisposed to TE activity. These direct observations demonstrate that real-time live-cell imaging of evolution at the molecular and individual event level is a powerful tool for the exploration of genome plasticity in stressed cells. PMID:27298350

  17. Active Correction of Aberrations of Low-Quality Telescope Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid; Chen, Yijian

    2007-01-01

    A system of active optics that includes a wavefront sensor and a deformable mirror has been demonstrated to be an effective means of partly correcting wavefront aberrations introduced by fixed optics (lenses and mirrors) in telescopes. It is envisioned that after further development, active optics would be used to reduce wavefront aberrations of about one wave or less in telescopes having aperture diameters of the order of meters or tens of meters. Although this remaining amount of aberration would be considered excessive in scientific applications in which diffraction-limited performance is required, it would be acceptable for free-space optical- communication applications at wavelengths of the order of 1 m. To prevent misunderstanding, it is important to state the following: The technological discipline of active optics, in which the primary or secondary mirror of a telescope is directly and dynamically tilted, distorted, and/or otherwise varied to reduce wavefront aberrations, has existed for decades. The term active optics does not necessarily mean the same thing as does adaptive optics, even though active optics and adaptive optics are related. The term "adaptive optics" is often used to refer to wavefront correction at speeds characterized by frequencies ranging up to between hundreds of hertz and several kilohertz high enough to enable mitigation of adverse effects of fluctuations in atmospheric refraction upon propagation of light beams. The term active optics usually appears in reference to wavefront correction at significantly lower speeds, characterized by times ranging from about 1 second to as long as minutes. Hence, the novelty of the present development lies, not in the basic concept of active or adaptive optics, but in the envisioned application of active optics in conjunction with a deformable mirror to achieve acceptably small wavefront errors in free-space optical communication systems that include multi-meter-diameter telescope mirrors that are

  18. James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element Mirror Development History and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinber, Lee D.; Clampin, Mark; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Atkinson, Charlie; Texter, Scott; Bergeland, Mark; Gallagher, Benjamin B.

    2012-01-01

    In a little under a decade, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) program has designed, manufactured, assembled and tested 21 flight beryllium mirrors for the James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element. This paper will summarize the mirror development history starting with the selection of beryllium as the mirror material and ending with the final test results. It will provide an overview of the technological roadmap and schedules and the key challenges that were overcome. It will also provide a summary or the key tests that were performed and the results of these tests.

  19. Viewing angle enhancement of an integral imaging display using Bragg mismatched reconstruction of holographic optical elements.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungjae; Jang, Changwon; Cho, Jaebum; Yeom, Jiwoon; Jeong, Jinsoo; Lee, Byoungho

    2016-01-20

    Holographic-optical-element (HOE)-based integral imaging display can be applied to augmented reality. However, a narrow viewing angle is a bottleneck for commercialization. Here, we propose a method to enhance the viewing angle of the integral imaging display using Bragg mismatched reconstruction of HOEs. The viewing angle of the integral imaging display can be enlarged with two probe waves, which form two different viewing zones. The effect of Bragg mismatched reconstruction is analyzed with simulation and experiment. In order to show feasibility of the proposed method, a display experiment is demonstrated. PMID:26835963

  20. Holographic characterization of DYE-PVA films studied at 442 nm for optical elements fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couture, Jean J.

    1991-12-01

    The present work is an experimental study of the speed of hologram recording in dichromated polyvinyl alcohol films (DC-PVA) and DYE-DC-PVA films. Real-time recordings give high diffraction efficiency and low signal-to-noise ratio holograms without any chemical development. The dyes studied here are MALACHITE GREEN, EOSIN Y, and ROSE BENGAL introduced in DC-PVA films having a thickness of 60 - 62 micrometers . The best of these DYE-DC-PVA systems is a good candidate for holographic optical elements fabrication.

  1. Development of full color holographic optical element recorded on aspherical substrate with photopolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Mei-Lan; Wu, Hui-Ying; Kim, Nam

    2014-11-01

    Holographic optical element (HOE) have classically been designed using grating theory, logically so, since an HOE is a grating produced on film by two interfering beams of coherent light. This paper describes the development of full color HOE recorded on aspherical substrate using a photopolymer. The reflection HOE was evaluated by measuring the diffraction efficiencies of holographic volume gratings recorded individually at 633 nm, 532 nm, and 473nm wavelengths. The spectral characterization of the HOE, recorded using a combined single beam, and recorded using sequential beam, was carried out. Practical methods for fabrication of high efficiency aspheric HOE by single layer photopolymer were developed.

  2. Optical antenna gain. III - The effect of secondary element support struts on transmitter gain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, B. J.; Degnan, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of a secondary-element spider support structure on optical antenna transmitter gain is analyzed. An expression describing the influence of the struts on the axial gain, in both the near and far fields, is derived as a function of the number of struts and their width. It is found that, for typical systems, the struts degrade the on-axis gain by less than 0.4 dB, and the first side-lobe level is not increased significantly. Contour plots have also been included to show the symmetry of the far-field distributions for three- and four-support members.

  3. Diffractive optical elements on non-flat substrates using electron beam lithography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maker, Paul D. (Inventor); Muller, Richard E. (Inventor); Wilson, Daniel W. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present disclosure describes a technique for creating diffraction gratings on curved surfaces with electron beam lithography. The curved surface can act as an optical element to produce flat and aberration-free images in imaging spectrometers. In addition, the fabrication technique can modify the power structure of the grating orders so that there is more energy in the first order than for a typical grating. The inventors noticed that by using electron-beam lithography techniques, a variety of convex gratings that are well-suited to the requirements of imaging spectrometers can be manufactured.

  4. Low voltage vertical flaps arrays as optical modulating elements for reflective display and switchable gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jutzi, F.; Noell, W.; de Rooij, N. F.

    2012-03-01

    A novel technology is presented for arrays of vertical flaps as optically modulating elements which are actuated electrostatically to horizontal position at low voltages of 30-50V. One application is a reflective display exhibiting a contrast ratio of 1:95. We will also show a) shutters for transmissive devices in an array configuration and b) switchable gratings. A large variety of flap geometries are fabricated such as flat reflective, grating, lens or grid shape. Poly-Si refill of thin high aspect-ratio trenches followed of dry etching of the surrounding material is used to fabricate the flaps suspended by torsion beams.

  5. Comparison of two interactive finite-element programs for analysis of optical and microwave waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, Srba R.; Fernandez, F. Anibal; Zhao, An Ping; Ettinger, Robert D.; Sewell, Granville; Davies, J. Brian

    This paper presents a comparison of two finite-element programs developed for accurate cross-sectional analysis of arbitrary optical and microwave waveguiding structures. Both techniques were developed in response to the growing demand from scientists and engineers for application-specific expert systems, and employ advanced interactive pre- and post-processing facilities. They show good agreement, strongly complement one another, and could form the core of a whole library of similar `intelligent' software for computer-assisted analysis and design, with a wide range of possible applications within both supercomputer and workstation environments.

  6. Generation of mask patterns for diffractive optical elements using Mathematica{sup T}{sup M}

    SciTech Connect

    OShea, D.C.

    1996-07-01

    The generation of binary and grayscale masks used in the fabrication of diffractive optical elements is usually performed using a proprietary piece of software or a computer-aided drafting package. Once the pattern is computed or designed, it must be output to a plotting or imaging system that will produce a reticle plate. This article describes a number of short Mathematica modules that can be used to generate binary and grayscale patterns in a PostScript-compatible format. Approaches to ensure that the patterns are directly related to the function of the element and the design wavelength are discussed. A procedure to preserve the scale of the graphic output when it is transferred to another application is given. Examples of surfaces for a 100 mm effective focal length lens and an Alvarez surface are given. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Diffraction efficiency sensitivity to oblique incident angle for multilayer diffractive optical elements.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongfang; Xue, Changxi; Li, Chuang; Wang, Ju; Zhang, Ran

    2016-09-01

    The relationship between diffraction efficiency of multilayer diffractive optical elements (MLDOEs) and arbitrary incident angle was numerically analyzed with the effective area method. The method is based on the shield effect between two elements of MLDOEs; a generalized diffraction efficiency formulation was obtained in a wide range of tilt angles, which overcame the limitations of scalar diffraction theory when the period width of MLDOEs is taken into account. A detailed comparison of the proposed effective area method with the scalar diffraction theory is numerically presented for MLDOEs. The validity of the proposed method is verified by comparison with the rigorous electromagnetic analysis method, especially the finite-difference time-domain method. The analysis results show that the shield effect augments with the increase of the incident angles; the effect of incident angles on MLDOEs with finite period widths is more noticeable than that with large period widths. PMID:27607291

  8. Comparative Analysis of Time and Spatially Multiplexed Diffractive Optical Elements in a Ferroelectric Liquid Crystal Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Antonio; Moreno, Ignacio; Sánchez-López, María M.

    2008-03-01

    We present a very simple method of generating time-multiplexed optical diffractive elements. We use a commercially available ferroelectric liquid crystal device originally designed to visualize colour images by sequentially displaying the three red, green, and blue (RGB) colour channels. We substitute the original light emitting diode (LED) light source by monochromatic illumination. Then we generate a three time-multiplexed diffractive element simply by addressing a colour RGB image where each colour component corresponds to a different diffractive screen. We carry out computer simulations in order to compare this simple time multiplexing technique with various spatial multiplexing techniques proposed in the literature. We numerically evaluate the different methods in terms of light efficiency, noise level and the quality of the hologram reconstruction. We provide experimental results that verify the simulations and show the advantage of using the time multiplexing technique.

  9. Structural Anomaly Detection Using Fiber Optic Sensors and Inverse Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quach, Cuong C.; Vazquez, Sixto L.; Tessler, Alex; Moore, Jason P.; Cooper, Eric G.; Spangler, Jan. L.

    2005-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center is investigating a variety of techniques for mitigating aircraft accidents due to structural component failure. One technique under consideration combines distributed fiber optic strain sensing with an inverse finite element method for detecting and characterizing structural anomalies anomalies that may provide early indication of airframe structure degradation. The technique identifies structural anomalies that result in observable changes in localized strain but do not impact the overall surface shape. Surface shape information is provided by an Inverse Finite Element Method that computes full-field displacements and internal loads using strain data from in-situ fiberoptic sensors. This paper describes a prototype of such a system and reports results from a series of laboratory tests conducted on a test coupon subjected to increasing levels of damage.

  10. GPU-Accelerated Finite Element Method for Modelling Light Transport in Diffuse Optical Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Schweiger, Martin

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a GPU-accelerated finite element forward solver for the computation of light transport in scattering media. The forward model is the computationally most expensive component of iterative methods for image reconstruction in diffuse optical tomography, and performance optimisation of the forward solver is therefore crucial for improving the efficiency of the solution of the inverse problem. The GPU forward solver uses a CUDA implementation that evaluates on the graphics hardware the sparse linear system arising in the finite element formulation of the diffusion equation. We present solutions for both time-domain and frequency-domain problems. A comparison with a CPU-based implementation shows significant performance gains of the graphics accelerated solution, with improvements of approximately a factor of 10 for double-precision computations, and factors beyond 20 for single-precision computations. The gains are also shown to be dependent on the mesh complexity, where the largest gains are achieved for high mesh resolutions. PMID:22013431

  11. Structural Health Monitoring Using High-Density Fiber Optic Strain Sensor and Inverse Finite Element Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazquez, Sixto L.; Tessler, Alexander; Quach, Cuong C.; Cooper, Eric G.; Parks, Jeffrey; Spangler, Jan L.

    2005-01-01

    In an effort to mitigate accidents due to system and component failure, NASA s Aviation Safety has partnered with industry, academia, and other governmental organizations to develop real-time, on-board monitoring capabilities and system performance models for early detection of airframe structure degradation. NASA Langley is investigating a structural health monitoring capability that uses a distributed fiber optic strain system and an inverse finite element method for measuring and modeling structural deformations. This report describes the constituent systems that enable this structural monitoring function and discusses results from laboratory tests using the fiber strain sensor system and the inverse finite element method to demonstrate structural deformation estimation on an instrumented test article

  12. Optical properties of beam-steering elements utilizing volume holographic gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, James Jay

    2000-06-01

    An optical beam steering element is a device that is used to control the direction in which a beam of light travels. We have investigated the optical properties of two classes of optical beam steering elements. The first type utilized the polarization dependence of the diffraction efficiency of volume holographic gratings. The second type utilized the fact that the diffraction efficiency of holograms imbibed with a nematic liquid crystal can be controlled by the application of an electric field. In both cases, elements with excellent switching contrasts were fabricated for operation in the visible and near infrared wavelength range including the commonly used telecommunications wavelength of 1.3μm. The holographic recording material that we have used is Polaroid Corporation's DMP-128 photopolymer. This material is porous after exposure and processing, a feature useful in two ways for this work. First, volume gratings with very large refractive index modulations, on the order of 0.2, can be fabricated using this material. Secondly, the pores can be filled with a nematic liquid crystal, resulting in electrically-switchable gratings. In our analysis of polarization-sensitive gratings we have employed several coupled wave theories, each with a different set of approximations. We have found that rigorous coupled wave theory must be used in predicting the diffractive properties of highly modulated volume gratings, where the effects of higher diffraction orders and form birefringence become important. In our analysis of the optical properties of electrically-switchable liquid crystal composite holograms, we have employed a theoretical analysis that treats the birefringent nature of the gratings. The results of Kogelnik theory that neglects the grating anisotropy, a two-wave theory that treats anisotropy, and a formulation of rigorous coupled wave theory that includes anisotropy were compared. We found it was necessary to include the effects of optical anisotropy to

  13. THE NATURE OF OPTICALLY DULL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN COSMOS

    SciTech Connect

    Trump, Jonathan R.; Impey, Chris D.; Gabor, Jared M.; Taniguchi, Yoshi; Nagao, Tohru; Shioya, Yasuhiro; Brusa, Marcella; Civano, Francesca; Elvis, Martin; Kelly, Brandon C.; Huchra, John P.; Jahnke, Knud; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Salvato, Mara; Capak, Peter; Scoville, Nick Z.; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; Lanzuisi, Giorgio; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Maineri, Vincenzo

    2009-11-20

    We present infrared, optical, and X-ray data of 48 X-ray bright, optically dull active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the COSMOS field. These objects exhibit the X-ray luminosity of an AGN but lack broad and narrow emission lines in their optical spectrum. We show that despite the lack of optical emission lines, most of these optically dull AGNs are not well described by a typical passive red galaxy spectrum: instead they exhibit weak but significant blue emission like an unobscured AGN. Photometric observations over several years additionally show significant variability in the blue emission of four optically dull AGNs. The nature of the blue and infrared emission suggest that the optically inactive appearance of these AGNs cannot be caused by obscuration intrinsic to the AGNs. Instead, up to approx70% of optically dull AGNs are diluted by their hosts, with bright or simply edge-on hosts lying preferentially within the spectroscopic aperture. The remaining approx30% of optically dull AGNs have anomalously high f{sub X} /f{sub O} ratios and are intrinsically weak, not obscured, in the optical. These optically dull AGNs are best described as a weakly accreting AGN with a truncated accretion disk from a radiatively inefficient accretion flow.

  14. A Hyperactive Transposase of the Maize Transposable Element Activator (Ac)

    PubMed Central

    Lazarow, Katina; Du, My-Linh; Weimer, Ruth; Kunze, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    Activator/Dissociation (Ac/Ds) transposable elements from maize are widely used as insertional mutagenesis and gene isolation tools in plants and more recently also in medaka and zebrafish. They are particularly valuable for plant species that are transformation-recalcitrant and have long generation cycles or large genomes with low gene densities. Ac/Ds transposition frequencies vary widely, however, and in some species they are too low for large-scale mutagenesis. We discovered a hyperactive Ac transposase derivative, AcTPase4x, that catalyzes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae 100-fold more frequent Ds excisions than the wild-type transposase, whereas the reintegration frequency of excised Ds elements is unchanged (57%). Comparable to the wild-type transposase in plants, AcTPase4x catalyzes Ds insertion preferentially into coding regions and to genetically linked sites, but the mutant protein apparently has lost the weak bias of the wild-type protein for insertion sites with elevated guanine–cytosine content and nonrandom protein-DNA twist. AcTPase4x exhibits hyperactivity also in Arabidopsis thaliana where it effects a more than sixfold increase in Ds excision relative to wild-type AcTPase and thus may be useful to facilitate Ac/Ds-based insertion mutagenesis approaches. PMID:22562933

  15. Hybrid plasmonic lattices with tunable magneto-optical activity.

    PubMed

    Kataja, Mikko; Pourjamal, Sara; Maccaferri, Nicolò; Vavassori, Paolo; Hakala, Tommi K; Huttunen, Mikko J; Törmä, Päivi; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2016-02-22

    We report on the optical and magneto-optical response of hybrid plasmonic lattices that consist of pure nickel and gold nanoparticles in a checkerboard arrangement. Diffractive far-field coupling between the individual emitters of the lattices results in the excitation of two orthogonal surface lattice resonance modes. Local analyses of the radiation fields indicate that both the nickel and gold nanoparticles contribute to these collective resonances and, thereby, to the magneto-optical activity of the hybrid arrays. The strong effect of noble metal nanoparticles on the magneto-optical response of hybrid lattices opens up new avenues for the realization of sensitive and tunable magneto-plasmonic nanostructures. PMID:26907022

  16. Neutron activation analysis; A sensitive test for trace elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, T.Z. . Ward Lab.)

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses neutron activation analysis (NAA), an extremely sensitive technique for determining the elemental constituents of an unknown specimen. Currently, there are some twenty-five moderate-power TRIGA reactors scattered across the United States (fourteen of them at universities), and one of their principal uses is for NAA. NAA is procedurally simple. A small amount of the material to be tested (typically between one and one hundred milligrams) is irradiated for a period that varies from a few minutes to several hours in a neutron flux of around 10{sup 12} neutrons per square centimeter per second. A tiny fraction of the nuclei present (about 10{sup {minus}8}) is transmuted by nuclear reactions into radioactive forms. Subsequently, the nuclei decay, and the energy and intensity of the gamma rays that they emit can be measured in a gamma-ray spectrometer.

  17. Computational optical palpation: micro-scale force mapping using finite-element methods (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijesinghe, Philip; Sampson, David D.; Kennedy, Brendan F.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate quantification of forces, applied to, or generated by, tissue, is key to understanding many biomechanical processes, fabricating engineered tissues, and diagnosing diseases. Many techniques have been employed to measure forces; in particular, tactile imaging - developed to spatially map palpation-mimicking forces - has shown potential in improving the diagnosis of cancer on the macro-scale. However, tactile imaging often involves the use of discrete force sensors, such as capacitive or piezoelectric sensors, whose spatial resolution is often limited to 1-2 mm. Our group has previously presented a type of tactile imaging, termed optical palpation, in which the change in thickness of a compliant layer in contact with tissue is measured using optical coherence tomography, and surface forces are extracted, with a micro-scale spatial resolution, using a one-dimensional spring model. We have also recently combined optical palpation with compression optical coherence elastography (OCE) to quantify stiffness. A main limitation of this work, however, is that a one-dimensional spring model is insufficient in describing the deformation of mechanically heterogeneous tissue with uneven boundaries, generating significant inaccuracies in measured forces. Here, we present a computational, finite-element method, which we term computational optical palpation. In this technique, by knowing the non-linear mechanical properties of the layer, and from only the axial component of displacement measured by phase-sensitive OCE, we can estimate, not only the axial forces, but the three-dimensional traction forces at the layer-tissue interface. We use a non-linear, three-dimensional model of deformation, which greatly increases the ability to accurately measure force and stiffness in complex tissues.

  18. Optical activity of chitosan films with induced anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gegel, Natalia O.; Shipovskaya, Anna B.

    2016-04-01

    The optical anisotropy and optical activity of salt and basic chitosan films, both initial and modified in formic acid vapor were studied. The modification of such films was found to be accompanied by induced time-stable optical anisotropy, by varying the values of specific optical rotation [α] and an inversion of the sign of [α]. The angular dependences (indicatrices) of the specific optical rotation of films on the orientation angle of the sample relative to the direction of the polarization vector of the incident light beam in a plane perpendicular to the beam were obtained. The indicatrices of the initial chitosan films have an almost symmetrical character while those of the films modified in formic acid vapor are irregular. It is concluded of the formation of a vitrified cholesteric mesophase in the chitosan films with induced optical anisotropy.

  19. High-performance oscillators employing adaptive optics comprised of discrete elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackel, Steven M.; Moshe, Inon; Lavi, Raphael

    1999-05-01

    Flashlamp pumped oscillators utilizing Nd:Cr:GSGG or Nd:YAG rods were stabilized against varying levels of thermal focusing by use of a Variable Radius Mirror (VRM). In its simplest form, the VRM consisted of a lens followed by a concave mirror. Separation of the two elements controlled the radius of curvature of the reflected phase front. Addition of a concave-convex variable-separation cylindrical lens pair, allowed astigmatism to be corrected. These distributed optical elements together with a computer controlled servo system formed an adaptive optic capable of correcting the varying thermal focusing and astigmatism encountered in a Nd:YAG confocal unstable resonator (0 - 30 W) and in Nd:Cr:GSGG stable (hemispherical or concave- convex) resonators so that high beam quality could be maintained over the entire operating range. By utilizing resonators designed to eliminate birefringence losses, high efficiency could also be maintained. The ability to eliminate thermally induced losses in GSGG allows operating power to be increased into the range where thermal fracture is a factor. We present some results on the effect of surface finish (fine grind, grooves, chemical etch strengthening) on fracture limit and high gain operation.

  20. Subject-specific finite element model with an optical tracking system in total hip replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Miles, Brad; Kolos, Elizabeth; Walter, William L; Appleyard, Richard; Li, Qing; Chen, Youngang; Ruys, Andrew J

    2015-04-01

    Intra-operative peri-prosthetic femoral fractures are a significant concern in total hip arthroplasty and can occur at any time during surgery, with the highest incidence during implant insertion. This study combines subject-specific finite element analysis modeling with an optical tracking system to characterize the resultant strain in the bone and results of impaction during total hip replacement surgery. The use of ABG II femoral stem (Stryker Orthopaedics, Mahwah, NJ, USA) in the model yielded the following results. Hammer velocity was measured experimentally using a three-dimensional optical tracking system and these data were input into the finite element analysis model so that intra-operative loading scenario could be simulated. A quasi-static explicit simulation and a dynamic loading step using two implant-bone interface friction (0.1 and 0.4 friction coefficients) states were simulated. The maximum swing velocity of a mallet was experimentally measured at 1.5 m/s and occurred just before impaction of the hammer with implant introducer. Two friction states resulted in different results with the lower friction coefficient generating higher strains in the anterior regions of the model and higher displacement of the implant with respect to the femur when compared to the high friction state. PMID:25934257

  1. An electrically tunable depth-of-field endoscope using a liquid crystal lens as an active focusing element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hung-Shan; Chen, Ming-Syuan; Lin, Yi-Hsin

    2013-09-01

    An electrically tunable depth-of-field (DOF) endoscope using a liquid crystal lens (LC lens) as an active focusing element is demonstrated. The optical mechanism of the electrically-tunable DOF endoscope adopting a two-mode switching LC lens is introduced. The two-mode switching LC lens provides not only a positive lens power but also a negative lens power. Therefore, we could extend the range of DOF originally from 27 mm ~ 55 mm to 12.4 mm ~ 76.4 mm by using the two-mode switching LC lens as an active focusing element. The detail derivations of the optical mechanism of the endoscopic system adopting a LC lens are invistgated. The more detail experimental results are demonstrated. We believe this study can provide a more detail understanding of an endoscopic system adopting a tunable focusing lens.

  2. Effects of spatial variation of skull and cerebrospinal fluid layers on optical mapping of brain activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuping; Shibahara, Nanae; Kuramashi, Daishi; Okawa, Shinpei; Kakuta, Naoto; Okada, Eiji; Maki, Atsushi; Yamada, Yukio

    2010-07-01

    In order to investigate the effects of anatomical variation in human heads on the optical mapping of brain activity, we perform simulations of optical mapping by solving the photon diffusion equation for layered-models simulating human heads using the finite element method (FEM). Particularly, the effects of the spatial variations in the thicknesses of the skull and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) layers on mapping images are investigated. Mapping images of single active regions in the gray matter layer are affected by the spatial variations in the skull and CSF layer thicknesses, although the effects are smaller than those of the positions of the active region relative to the data points. The increase in the skull thickness decreases the sensitivity of the images to active regions, while the increase in the CSF layer thickness increases the sensitivity in general. The images of multiple active regions are also influenced by their positions relative to the data points and by their depths from the skin surface.

  3. Extended volume and surface scatterometer for optical characterization of 3D-printed elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannenberg, Florian; Uebeler, Denise; Weiß, Jürgen; Pescoller, Lukas; Weyer, Cornelia; Hahlweg, Cornelius

    2015-09-01

    The use of 3d printing technology seems to be a promising way for low cost prototyping, not only of mechanical, but also of optical components or systems. It is especially useful in applications where customized equipment repeatedly is subject to immediate destruction, as in experimental detonics and the like. Due to the nature of the 3D-printing process, there is a certain inner texture and therefore inhomogeneous optical behaviour to be taken into account, which also indicates mechanical anisotropy. Recent investigations are dedicated to quantification of optical properties of such printed bodies and derivation of corresponding optimization strategies for the printing process. Beside mounting, alignment and illumination means, also refractive and reflective elements are subject to investigation. The proposed measurement methods are based on an imaging nearfield scatterometer for combined volume and surface scatter measurements as proposed in previous papers. In continuation of last year's paper on the use of near field imaging, which basically is a reflective shadowgraph method, for characterization of glossy surfaces like printed matter or laminated material, further developments are discussed. The device has been extended for observation of photoelasticity effects and therefore homogeneity of polarization behaviour. A refined experimental set-up is introduced. Variation of plane of focus and incident angle are used for separation of various the images of the layers of the surface under test, cross and parallel polarization techniques are applied. Practical examples from current research studies are included.

  4. Uniformity of reshaped beam by diffractive optical elements with light-emitted diode illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mengzhu; Gu, Huarong; Wang, Qixia; Tan, Qiaofeng

    2015-10-01

    Due to its low energy consumption, high efficiency and fast switching speed, light-emitted diode (LED) has been used as a new light source in optical wireless communication. To ensure uniform lighting and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) during the data transmission, diffractive optical elements (DOEs) can be employed as optical antennas. Different from laser, LED has a low temporal and spatial coherence. And its impacts upon the far-field diffraction patterns of DOEs remain unclear. Thus the mathematical models of far-field diffraction intensity for LED with a spectral bandwidth and source size are first derived in this paper. Then the relation between source size and uniformity of top-hat beam profile for LEDs either considering the spectral bandwidth or not are simulated. The results indicate that when the size of LED is much smaller than that of reshaped beam, the uniformity of reshaped beam obtained by light source with a spectral bandwidth is significantly better than that by a monochromatic light. However, once the size is larger than a certain threshold value, the uniformity of reshaped beam of two LED models are almost the same, and the influence introduced by spectral bandwidth can be ignored. Finally the reshaped beam profiles are measured by CCD camera when the areas of LED are 0.5×0.5mm2 and 1×1mm2. And the experimental results agree with the simulations.

  5. ALINET: neural net automatic alignment of high-energy laser resonator optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, George A.; Bailey, Adam W.; Palumbo, Louis J.; Kuperstein, Michael

    1993-10-01

    A novel neural net approach has successfully solved the time consuming practical problem of aligning the many optical elements used in the resonator of high power chemical lasers. Moreover, because the neural net can achieve optimal performance in only 2 - 4 steps, as compared with 50 for other techniques, the important ability to effect real time control is gained. This represents a significant experimental breakthrough because of the difficulty previously associated with this alignment process. Use of either near or far field image information produces excellent performance. The method is very robust in the presence of noise. For cases where the initial misalignment falls outside the regime encompassed by the training set, a hybrid approach utilizing an advanced conventional method can bring the optical system within the capture range of the neural net. This reported use of a neural net to rapidly convert imagery information into high precision control information is of broad applicability to optical, acoustic, or electromagnetic alignment, positioning, and control problems.

  6. Assessment of nose protector for sport activities: finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Coto, Neide Pena; Meira, Josete Barbosa Cruz; Brito e Dias, Reinaldo; Driemeier, Larissa; de Oliveira Roveri, Guilherme; Noritomi, Pedro Yoshito

    2012-04-01

    There has been a significant increase in the number of facial fractures stemming from sport activities in recent years, with the nasal bone one of the most affected structures. Researchers recommend the use of a nose protector, but there is no standardization regarding the material employed. Clinical experience has demonstrated that a combination of a flexible and rigid layer of ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) offers both comfort and safety to practitioners of sports. The aim of the present study was the investigation into the stresses generated by the impact of a rigid body on the nasal bone on models with and without an EVA protector. For such, finite element analysis was employed. A craniofacial model was constructed from images obtained through computed tomography. The nose protector was modeled with two layers of EVA (1 mm of rigid EVA over 2 mm of flexible EVA), following the geometry of the soft tissue. Finite element analysis was performed using the LS Dyna program. The bone and rigid EVA were represented as elastic linear material, whereas the soft tissues and flexible EVA were represented as hyperelastic material. The impact from a rigid sphere on the frontal region of the face was simulated with a constant velocity of 20 m s(-1) for 9.1 μs. The model without the protector served as the control. The distribution of maximal stress of the facial bones was recorded. The maximal stress on the nasal bone surpassed the breaking limit of 0.13-0.34 MPa on the model without a protector, while remaining below this limit on the model with the protector. Thus, the nose protector made from both flexible and rigid EVA proved effective at protecting the nasal bones under high-impact conditions. PMID:21790992

  7. Active stabilization of a fiber-optic two-photon interferometer using continuous optical length control.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seok-Beom; Kim, Heonoh

    2016-05-16

    The practical realization of long-distance entanglement-based quantum communication systems strongly rely on the observation of highly stable quantum interference between correlated single photons. This task must accompany active stabilization of the optical path lengths within the single-photon coherence length. Here, we provide two-step interferometer stabilization methods employing continuous optical length control and experimentally demonstrate two-photon quantum interference using an actively stabilized 6-km-long fiber-optic Hong-Ou-Mandel interferometer. The two-step active control techniques are applied for measuring highly stable two-photon interference fringes by scanning the optical path-length difference. The obtained two-photon interference visibilities with and without accidental subtraction are found to be approximately 90.7% and 65.4%, respectively. PMID:27409920

  8. LRE2, an active human L1 element, has low level transcriptional activity and extremely low reverse transcriptase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, S.E.; Dombroski, B.A.; Sassaman, D.M.

    1994-09-01

    Previously, we found a 2 kb insertion containing a rearranged L1 element plus a unique sequence component (USC) within exon 48 of the dystrophin gene of a patient with muscular dystrophy. We used the USC to clone the precursor of this insertion, the second known {open_quotes}active{close_quotes} human L1 element. The locus LRE2 (L1 Retrotransposable Element 2) has an allele derived from the patient which matches the insertion sequence exactly. LRE2 has a perfect 13-15 bp target site duplication, 2 open reading frames (ORFs), and an unusual 21 bp truncation of the 5{prime} end in a region known to be important for L1 transcription. The truncated LRE2 promoter has about 20% of the transcriptional activity of a previously studied L1 promoter after transfection into NTera2D1 cells of a construct in which the L1 promoter drives the expression of a lacZ gene. In addition, the reverse transcriptase (RT) encoded by LRE2 is active in an in vivo pseudogene assay in yeast and an in vitro assay. However, in both assays the RT of LRE2 is 1-5% as active as that of LRE1. These data demonstrate that multiple {open_quotes}active{close_quotes} L1 elements exist in the human genome, and that active elements can have highly variable rates of transcription and reverse transcriptase activity. That the RT of LRE2 has extremely low activity suggests the possibility that retrotransposition of an L1 element may in some cases involve an RT encoded by another L1 element.

  9. Construction of a composite thin-element TLD using an optical-heating method.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, O; Yasuno, Y; Minamide, S; Hasegawa, S; Tsutsui, H; Takenaga, M; Yamashita, T

    1982-09-01

    A composite thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD), composed of four, thin TL elements with a high-speed reader, has been developed by employing an optical-heating method. Each TL element, which is 15 mg/cm2 thick with a 3 mm dia., is prepared by applying Li2B4O7:Cu or CaSO4:Tm to a plastic substrate 14 mg/cm2 thick. Each element can be heated to 350 degree C within 0.8 sec. by IR radiation from a tungsten lamp. The characteristics of this TLD system include the following: (1) the detection limit of the Li2B4O7:Cu is 3 mR and the limit for CaSO4:Tm is 0.1 mR; (2) the energy-dependence curves are similar to the dose-equivalent curve, showing slight under-responses by 15% near 70 KeV for Li2B4O7:Cu and over-responses by 50% at high energies for CaSO4:Tm; (3) despite quick heating, the residual dose is as low as 0.1% of the last exposure signal; (4) responses are very stable for more than 1,000 cycles of repeated exposure readings; (5) no false signal could be detected, even in the cases of sweat or soil contamination; (6) the thin Li2B4O7;Cu element can be used for skin dose monitoring; and (7) the processing time of the automatic reader for the composite dosimeter is 3 hr/500 dosimeters. This TLD system can be applied to personnel dosimetry, gate monitoring and environmental monitoring. PMID:7174331

  10. Determination of 28 selected elements in textiles by axially viewed inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rezić, Iva; Zeiner, Michaela; Steffan, Ilse

    2011-01-15

    A simple, robust and reliable analytical procedure for the determination of 28 selected elements, namely Al, As, Ba, Be, Bi, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Hg, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, Pb, Sc, Si, Se, Sn, Sm, Sr, Tl, V, and Zn in textile materials by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) after microwave digestion of samples was optimized and validated in this work. The total amount of elements present in textile samples was determined after microwave digestion of materials in 7 mol/L nitric acid within the optimal working program: 5 min at 150°C (power 250 W), 15 min 180°C (300 W) and 20 min at the maximum temperature of 200°C (350 W). For the quality control reasons, which were ascertained by analysis of the certified cotton trace elements reference material IAEA-V9, the ICP-OES method was optimized through several parameters: by comparing Meinhard and Gemcone Low Flow nebulizers efficiency, ranging nebulizer gas flows from 0.6 to 1.0 L/min, ranging sample flows from 0.8 to 1.2 mL/min, testing RF power from 1200 to 1400 W, detecting data acquisition time (read time) from 0 to 527 s, ranging washing (delay) time from 0 to 408 s, as well as by checking the occurring interferences for the optimal line selection. Validation included determination of linearity, selectivity, accuracy, reproducibility, precision and limits of detection calculated for all 28 selected elements of interest. The developed analytical procedure was successfully applied on textile fibers (cotton, flax and hemp) as well as on standard knitted textile sample materials (cotton and wool). PMID:21147330

  11. Capillary Optics Based X-Ray Micro-Imaging Elemental Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampai, D.; Dabagov, S. B.; Cappuccio, G.; Longoni, A.; Frizzi, T.; Cibin, G.

    2010-04-01

    A rapidly developed during the last few years micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (μXRF) is a promising multi-elemental technique for non-destructive analysis. Typically it is rather hard to perform laboratory μXRF analysis because of the difficulty of producing an original small-size X-ray beam as well as its focusing. Recently developed for X-ray beam focusing polycapillary optics offers laboratory X-ray micro probes. The combination of polycapillary lens and fine-focused micro X-ray tube can provide high intensity radiation flux on a sample that is necessary in order to perform the elemental analysis. In comparison to a pinhole, an optimized "X-ray source-op tics" system can result in radiation density gain of more than 3 orders by the value. The most advanced way to get that result is to use the confocal configuration based on two X-ray lenses, one for the fluorescence excitation and the other for the detection of secondary emission from a sample studied. In case of X-ray capillary microfocusing a μXRF instrument designed in the confocal scheme allows us to obtain a 3D elemental mapping. In this work we will show preliminary results obtained with our prototype, a portable X-ray microscope for X-ray both imaging and fluorescence analysis; it enables μXRF elemental mapping simultaneously with X-ray imaging. A prototype of compact XRF spectrometer with a spatial resolution less than 100 μm has been designed.

  12. Heavy Element Abundances in Planetary Nebulae from Deep Optical Echelle Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashburn, Amanda; Sterling, Nicholas C.; Dinerstein, Harriet L.; Garofali, Kristen; Jensema, Rachael; Turbyfill, Amanda; Wieser, Hannah-Marie N.; Reed, Evan C.; Redfield, Seth

    2016-01-01

    We present the abundances of neutron(n)-capture elements (atomic number Z > 30) and iron determined from deep optical echelle spectroscopy of 14 Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe). The spectra were obtained with the 2D-coudé spectrograph on the 2.7-m Harlan J. Smith telescope at McDonald Observatory. The abundances of n-capture elements can be enhanced in PNe due to slow n-capture nucleosynthesis in the progenitor asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. The high spectral resolution of these data (R = 36,700) allow most n-capture element emission lines to be resolved from other nebular and telluric features. We detect Kr in all of the observed PNe (with multiple ions detected in several objects), while Br, Rb, and Xe were each detected in 4--5 objects. Using the new Kr ionization correction factors (ICFs) of Sterling et al. (2015, ApJS, 218, 25), we find [Kr/O] abundances ranging from 0.05 to 1.1 dex. We utilize approximate ICFs for the other n-capture elements, and find slightly lower enrichments for Br and Rb (-0.1 to 0.7 dex), while Xe is enhanced relative to solar by factors of two to 30. The [Xe/Kr] ratios range from -0.3 to 1.4 dex, indicating a significant range in neutron exposures in PN progenitor stars. Interestingly, the largest [Xe/Kr] ratio is found in the thick-disk PN NGC 6644, which has a lower metallicity than the other observed PNe. We detect iron emission lines in all but one target. Fe can be depleted into dust grains in ionized nebulae, and its abundance thus provides key information regarding dust-to-gas ratios and grain destruction processes. We find that [Fe/O] ranges from -1.3 to -0.7 dex in the observed PNe, a smaller spread of depletion factors than found in recent studies (Delgado-Inglada & Rodriguez 2014, ApJ, 784, 173) though this may be due in part to our smaller sample. These data are part of a larger study of heavy elements in PNe, which will provide more accurate determinations of n-capture element abundances than previous estimates in

  13. Label-free optical activation of astrocyte in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Myunghwan; Yoon, Jonghee; Ku, Taeyun; Choi, Kyungsun; Choi, Chulhee

    2011-07-01

    As the most abundant cell type in the central nervous system, astrocyte has been one of main research topics in neuroscience. Although various tools have been developed, at present, there is no tool that allows noninvasive activation of astrocyte in vivo without genetic or pharmacological perturbation. Here we report a noninvasive label-free optical method for physiological astrocyte activation in vivo using a femtosecond pulsed laser. We showed the laser stimulation robustly induced astrocytic calcium activation in vivo and further verified physiological relevance of the calcium increase by demonstrating astrocyte mediated vasodilation in the brain. This novel optical method will facilitate noninvasive physiological study on astrocyte function.

  14. Optical response and activity of ultrathin films of topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parhizgar, Fariborz; Moghaddam, Ali G.; Asgari, Reza

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the optical properties of ultrathin film of a topological insulator in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field. We show that due to the combination of the overlap between the surface states of the two layers and the magnetic field, the optical conductivity can show strong anisotropy. This leads to the effective optical activity of the ultrathin film by influencing the circularly polarized incident light. Intriguingly, for a range of magnetic fields, the reflected and transmitted lights exhibit elliptic character. Even for certain values almost linear polarizations are obtained, indicating that the thin film can act as a polaroid in reflection. All these features are discussed in the context of the time-reversal symmetry breaking as one of the key ingredients for the optical activity.

  15. Active Learning Strategies for Introductory Light and Optics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokoloff, David R.

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that traditional approaches are ineffective in teaching physics concepts, including light and optics concepts. A major focus of the work of the Activity Based Physics Group has been on the development of active learning curricula like RealTime Physics (RTP) labs and Interactive Lecture Demonstrations (ILDs). Among…

  16. Visual Method of Measuring Reflection-Type Characteristics of Holographic Optical Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jai-Soon; Smirnov, Vadim V.; Son, Jung-Young; Chun, You-Seek; Im, Tong-Gun

    1998-12-01

    A highly diverging laser beam is used to measure angular and spectral selectivities and grating vector direction for reflection-type holographic optical elements (HOE s). The intensity distribution of the beam transmitted from the HOE s reveals dark, ring-shaped patterns. Since these ring patterns are formed as a result of the beam diffracted by the HOE s, the thicknesses and the diameters of the ring patterns convey information on both the angular and the spectral selectivities of the HOE s. In addition the deviation of the ring centers relative to the center of the intensity distribution reveals the grating vector direction. Determination of values related to the ring patterns permits highly accurate measurement of HOE characteristics, such as the upper limit of the diffraction wavelength, the angular and the spectral selectivities, and the grating vector direction. This is proved experimentally.

  17. Multi-level diffractive optical elements produced by excimer laser ablation of sol-gel.

    PubMed

    Neiss, Estelle; Flury, Manuel; Mager, Loïc; Rehspringer, Jean-Luc; Fort, Alain; Montgomery, Paul; Gérard, Philippe; Fontaine, Joël; Robert, Stéphane

    2008-09-01

    Material ablation by excimer laser micromachining is a promising approach for structuring sol-gel materials as we demonstrate in the present study. Using the well-known direct etching technique, the behaviour of different hybrid organic/inorganic self-made sol-gel materials is examined with a KrF* laser. Ablated depths ranging from 0.1 to 1.5 microm are obtained with a few laser pulses at low fluence (< 1 J/cm(2)). The aim is to rapidly transfer surface relief multi-level diffractive patterns in such a substrate, without intermediate steps. The combination with the 3D profilometry technique of coherence probe microscopy permits to analyse the etching process with the aim of producing multi-level Diffractive Optical Elements (DOE). Examples of four-level DOEs with 10 microm square elementary cells are presented, as well as their laser reconstructions in the infrared. PMID:18773015

  18. Characterization of volume holographic optical elements recorded in Bayfol HX photopolymer for solar photovoltaic applications.

    PubMed

    Marín-Sáez, Julia; Atencia, Jesús; Chemisana, Daniel; Collados, María-Victoria

    2016-03-21

    Volume Holographic Optical Elements (HOEs) present interesting characteristics for photovoltaic applications as they can select spectrum for concentrating the target bandwidth and avoiding non-desired wavelengths, which can cause the decrease of the performance on the cell, for instance by overheating it. Volume HOEs have been recorded on Bayfol HX photopolymer to test the suitability of this material for solar concentrating photovoltaic systems. The HOEs were recorded at 532 nm and provided a dynamic range, reaching close to 100% efficiency at 800 nm. The diffracted spectrum had a FWHM of 230 nm when illuminating at Bragg angle. These characteristics prove HOEs recorded on Bayfol HX photopolymer are suitable for concentrating solar light onto photovoltaic cells sensitive to that wavelength range. PMID:27136889

  19. Halo Reduction By Means of Non Linear Optical Elements in the NLC Final Focus System

    SciTech Connect

    Seryi, Andrei

    2001-07-23

    In the Beam Delivery Systems (BDS) for linear colliders that have been designed or built, collimators (or scrapers) are used to suppress backgrounds due to the beam halo. Off-energy and off-axis particles are stopped on the collimator jaws, physically limiting the acceptance of the system. This concept does not scale well to higher beam energy, higher intensity or lower emittance. The increased beam density requires longer and more demanding collimator regions. In contrast, this paper studies the possibility of inserting non-linear optical elements into the Final Focus in order to effectively increase the acceptance of the system. This technique could make the traditional collimation scheme obsolete so that only protection collimators would be needed.

  20. The real-time monitoring surface figure of optical elements in continuous polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Xu, Xueke; Wei, Chaoyang; Gu, Jianxun; Dun, Aihuan; Shao, Jianda

    2014-08-01

    Continuous ring polishing is the key process in large aperture optical elements. The surface figure of polishing pad is inferred by the offline testing surface figure of workpiece. The defects, low processing efficiency and uncertainty processing time in traditional continuous polishing, the real-time monitoring method of polishing is proposed. The realtime monitoring system is set up based on the computer, the dynamic interferometer, a beam expanding system and a beam reflecting system. There are a workpiece and a glass monitoring plate placing in same ring. The surface figure of workpiece, monitored by the monitoring plate, synchronize with the surface of glass monitoring plate in Peak-Valley (PV) and POWER. The new method with simple structure is fast measuring and judgmental directly to the changes of surface figures. The results of real-time monitoring and surface figure converging on the workpiece are valid for continuous polishing through experimental validation.

  1. Germinal and Somatic Activity of the Maize Element Activator (Ac) in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Keller, J.; Lim, E.; James-Jr., D. W.; Dooner, H. K.

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the germinal and somatic activity of the maize Activator (Ac) element in Arabidopsis with the objective of developing an efficient transposon-based system for gene isolation in that plant. Transposition activity was assayed with a chimeric marker that consists of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and a bacterial streptomycin phosphotransferase gene (SPT). Somatic activity was detected in seedlings germinated on plates containing streptomycin as green-resistant sectors against a background of white-sensitive cells. Germinal excisions resulted in fully green seedlings. The transposition frequency was extremely low when a single copy of the transposon was present, but appeared to increase with an increase in Ac copy number. Plants that were selected as variegated produced an increased number of green progeny. The methylation state of the Ac elements in lines with either low or high levels of excision was assessed by restriction analysis. No difference was found between these lines, indicating that the degree of methylation did not contribute to the level of Ac activity. Germinal excision events were analyzed molecularly and shown to carry reinserted transposons in about 50% of the cases. In several instances, streptomycin-resistant siblings carried the same transposed Ac element, indicating that excision had occurred prior to meiosis in the parent. We discuss parameters that need to be considered to optimize the use of Ac as a transposon tag in Arabidopsis. PMID:1322854

  2. Magneto-Optical Activity in High Index Dielectric Nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, N; Froufe-Pérez, L S; Sáenz, J J; García-Martín, A

    2016-01-01

    The magneto-optical activity, namely the polarization conversion capabilities of high-index, non-absorbing, core-shell dielectric nanospheres is theoretically analyzed. We show that, in analogy with their plasmonic counterparts, the polarization conversion in resonant dielectric particles is linked to the amount of electromagnetic field probing the magneto-optical material in the system. However, in strong contrast with plasmon nanoparticles, due to the peculiar distribution of the internal fields in resonant dielectric spheres, the magneto-optical response is fully governed by the magnetic (dipolar and quadrupolar) resonances with little effect of the electric ones. PMID:27488903

  3. Magneto-Optical Activity in High Index Dielectric Nanoantennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sousa, N.; Froufe-Pérez, L. S.; Sáenz, J. J.; García-Martín, A.

    2016-08-01

    The magneto-optical activity, namely the polarization conversion capabilities of high-index, non-absorbing, core-shell dielectric nanospheres is theoretically analyzed. We show that, in analogy with their plasmonic counterparts, the polarization conversion in resonant dielectric particles is linked to the amount of electromagnetic field probing the magneto-optical material in the system. However, in strong contrast with plasmon nanoparticles, due to the peculiar distribution of the internal fields in resonant dielectric spheres, the magneto-optical response is fully governed by the magnetic (dipolar and quadrupolar) resonances with little effect of the electric ones.

  4. Magneto-Optical Activity in High Index Dielectric Nanoantennas

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa, N.; Froufe-Pérez, L. S.; Sáenz, J. J.; García-Martín, A.

    2016-01-01

    The magneto-optical activity, namely the polarization conversion capabilities of high-index, non-absorbing, core-shell dielectric nanospheres is theoretically analyzed. We show that, in analogy with their plasmonic counterparts, the polarization conversion in resonant dielectric particles is linked to the amount of electromagnetic field probing the magneto-optical material in the system. However, in strong contrast with plasmon nanoparticles, due to the peculiar distribution of the internal fields in resonant dielectric spheres, the magneto-optical response is fully governed by the magnetic (dipolar and quadrupolar) resonances with little effect of the electric ones. PMID:27488903

  5. A tactile sensing element based on a hetero-core optical fiber for force measurement and texture detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Koyama, Yuya; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2014-05-01

    Tactile sensing technology can measure a given property of an object through physical contact between a sensing element and the object. Various tactile sensing techniques have been developed for several applications such as intelligent robots, tactile interface, medical support and nursing care support. A desirable tactile sensing element for supporting human daily life can be embedded in the soft material with high sensitivity and accuracy in order to prevent from damaging to human or object physically. This report describes a new tactile sensing element. Hetero-core optical fibers have high sensitivity of macro-bending at local sensor portion and temperature independency, including advantages of optical fiber itself; thin size, light weight, flexible transmission line, and immunity to electro-magnetic interference. The proposed tactile sensing element could detect textures of touched objects through the optical loss caused by the force applied to the sensing element. The characteristics of the sensing element have been evaluated, in which the sensing element has the monotonic and non-linear sensitivity against the normal force ranged from 0 to 5 N with lower accuracy than 0.25 dB. Additionally, texture detection have been successfully demonstrated in which small surface figures of 0.1 mm in height were detected with spatial resolution of 0.4 mm.

  6. Emergy of the Global Biogeochemical Cycles of Biologically Active Elements

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate estimates of the emergy of elemental flows are needed to accurately evaluate the far field effects of anthropogenic wastes. The transformity and specific emergy of the elements and of their different chemical species is also needed to quantify the inputs to many producti...

  7. Elemental composition and optical properties reveal changes in dissolved organic matter along a permafrost thaw chronosequence in a subarctic peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkins, Suzanne B.; Tfaily, Malak M.; Podgorski, David C.; McCalley, Carmody K.; Saleska, Scott R.; Crill, Patrick M.; Rich, Virginia I.; Chanton, Jeffrey P.; Cooper, William T.

    2016-08-01

    The fate of carbon stored in permafrost-zone peatlands represents a significant uncertainty in global climate modeling. Given that the breakdown of dissolved organic matter (DOM) is often a major pathway for decomposition in peatlands, knowledge of DOM reactivity under different permafrost regimes is critical for determining future climate feedbacks. To explore the effects of permafrost thaw and resultant plant succession on DOM reactivity, we used a combination of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS), UV/Vis absorbance, and excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy (EEMS) to examine the DOM elemental composition and optical properties of 27 pore water samples gathered from various sites along a permafrost thaw sequence in Stordalen Mire, a thawing subarctic peatland in northern Sweden. The presence of dense Sphagnum moss, a feature that is dominant in the intermediate thaw stages, appeared to be the main driver of variation in DOM elemental composition and optical properties at Stordalen. Specifically, DOM from sites with Sphagnum had greater aromaticity, higher average molecular weights, and greater O/C, consistent with a higher abundance of phenolic compounds that likely inhibit decomposition. These compounds are released by Sphagnum and may accumulate due to inhibition of phenol oxidase activity by the acidic pH at these sites. In contrast, sites without Sphagnum, specifically fully-thawed rich fens, had more saturated, more reduced compounds, which were high in N and S. Optical properties at rich fens indicated the presence of microbially-derived DOM, consistent with the higher decomposition rates previously measured at these sites. These results indicate that Sphagnum acts as an inhibitor of rapid decomposition and CH4 release in thawing subarctic peatlands, consistent with lower rates of CO2 and CH4 production previously observed at these sites. However, this inhibitory effect may disappear if Sphagnum-dominated bogs

  8. Active stabilization of the optical part in fiber optic quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balygin, K. A.; Klimov, A. N.; Kulik, S. P.; Molotkov, S. N.

    2016-03-01

    The method of active stabilization of the polarization and other parameters of the optical part of a two-pass fiber optic quantum cryptography has been proposed and implemented. The method allows the completely automated maintenance of the visibility of interference close to an ideal value ( V ≥ 0.99) and the reduction of the instrumental contribution to the error in primary keys (QBER) to 0.5%.

  9. Research of the new optical diffractive super-resolution element of the two-photon microfabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Peng; Zhu, Yu; Duan, Guanghong

    2006-11-01

    The new optical diffractive superresolution element (DSE) is being applied to improve the microfabrication radial superresolution in the two-photon three-dimension (3D) microfabrication system, which appeared only a few years ago and can provide the ability to confine photochemical and physical reactions to the order of laser wavelength in three dimensions. The design method of the DSE is that minimizing M if the lowest limit S l of the S and the highest limit G u of the G is set, where Liu [1] explained the definition of the S, M and G. Simulation test result proved that the microfabrication radial superresolution can be improved by the new optical DSE. The phenomenon can only be interpreted as the intensity of high-order and side of the zero-order diffraction peaks have been clapped under the twophoton absorption (TPA) polymerization threshold. In a word the polymerized volume can be chosen because the S l and the G u is correspondingly adjustable, even if the laser wavelength, objective lens and the photosensitive resin is fixed for a given two-photon microfabrication system. That means the radial superresolution of the two-photon microfabrication can be chosen.

  10. Fabrication of continuous diffractive optical elements using a fast tool servo diamond turning process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jingbo; Li, Lei; Naples, Neil; Sun, Tao; Yi, Allen Y.

    2013-07-01

    Continuous diffractive optical elements (CDOEs) can be used for laser-beam reshaping, pattern generation and can help reduce large angle scattering. Lithography, the method for the production of binary diffractive surfaces, is not suitable for fabrication of CDOEs. Diamond turning using fast tool servo, on the other hand, is a non-cleanroom method for generating continuous microstructures with high precision and efficiency. In this paper, an algorithm for designing CDOEs is introduced. The moving least-squares (MLS) method is then used to obtain the local fitting equation of the diffractive surface. Based on the MLS fitting equation, the selection of diamond cutting tool geometries (including the tool nose radius, rake angle and clearance angle) is discussed and a tool nose radius compensation algorithm is included. This algorithm is a general method for the diamond turning of complex surfaces that can be represented by a point cloud. Surface measurements and diffractive patterns generated on test samples have shown that continuous diffractive surfaces were successfully machined. In the future, CDOEs can be machined on an optical mold surface for high-volume industrial production using methods such as injection molding.

  11. Monochromatizing and focussing femtosecond high-order harmonic radiation with one optical element.

    PubMed

    Ibek, Mateusz; Leitner, Torsten; Erko, Alexei; Firsov, Alexander; Wernet, Philippe

    2013-10-01

    A novel approach for monochromatizing and focussing the Vacuum-Ultraviolet and soft x-ray radiation from high-order harmonic generation of a femtosecond optical laser with only one optical element is presented. We demonstrate that off-axis reflection zone plates applied as focussing monochromators allow for efficiently optimizing the trade-off between energy resolution and temporal dispersion of the femtosecond pulses. In the current experimental realization, we show how the temporal dispersion can be varied between 2 fs and 16 fs with a correlating variation of the energy resolution E/ΔE between 20 and 90 for an off-axis reflection zone plate optimized for harmonic 13 at 20.41 eV. We also show how the focal spot size varies correspondingly between 80 × 90 μm(2) and 290 × 140 μm(2) as determined with a computational fitting approach based on a 3D Gaussian model. The diffraction efficiency for the tested zone plates amounts to up to 10%. We furthermore evaluate the influence of pointing stability on the performance of the zone plates. Based on our results we propose an optimized realization of a dedicated beam line for femtosecond pulses from high-order harmonic generation with an off-axis reflection zone plate. PMID:24182096

  12. Design study for supporting of thin glass optical elements for x-ray telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Mark D.; Reid, Paul B.; Davis, William N.

    2008-07-01

    The next large x-ray astrophysics mission launched will likely include soft x-ray spectroscopy as a primary capability. A requirement to fulfill the science goals of such a mission is a large-area x-ray telescope focusing sufficient x-ray flux to perform high-resolution spectroscopy with reasonable observing times. One approach to manufacturing such a telescope is a Wolter-I optic utilizing thin glass segments rather than full shells of revolution. We describe a parameterized Finite Element Modeling (FEM) study that provides insights useful in optimizing the design of a discrete support system to balance the competing requirements of minimizing the effect on optical performance while providing sufficient support to withstand launch loads. Parameters analyzed are number and location of the supports around the glass segments, as well as the glass thickness, size, and angular span. In addition, we utilize more detailed models of several cases taken from the parametric study to examine stress around the bonded area and bond pad size, and compare the stress from the detailed model to the parametric cases from which they were derived.

  13. Active optics: variable curvature mirrors for ELT laser guide star refocusing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challita, Zalpha; Hugot, Emmanuel; Madec, Fabrice; Ferrari, Marc; Le Mignant, David; Vivès, Sébastien; Cuby, Jean-Gabriel

    2011-10-01

    The future generation of Extremely Large Telescopes will require a complex combination of technologies for adaptive optics (AO) systems assisted by laser guide stars (LGS). In this context, the distance from the LGS spot to the telescope pupil ranges from about 80 to 200 km, depending on the Sodium layer altitude and the elevation of the telescope. This variation leads to a defocusing effect on the LGS wave-front sensor which needs to be compensated. We propose an active mirror able to compensate for this variation, based on an original optical design including this active optics component. This LGS Variable Curvature Mirror (LGS-VCM) is a 120 mm spherical active mirror able to achieve 820 μm deflection sag with an optical quality better than 150 nm RMS, allowing the radius of curvature variation from F/12 to F/2. Based on elasticity theory, the deformation of the metallic mirror is provided by an air pressure applied on a thin meniscus with a variable thickness distribution. In this article, we detail the analytical development leading to the specific geometry of the active component, the results of finite element analysis and the expected performances in terms of surface error versus the range of refocalisation. Three prototypes have been manufactured to compare the real behavior of the mirror and the simulations data. Results obtained on the prototypes are detailed, showing that the deformation of the VCM is very close to the simulation, and leads to a realistic active concept.

  14. SIRT1 Activation Confers Neuroprotection in Experimental Optic Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Shindler, Kenneth S.; Ventura, Elvira; Rex, Tonia S.; Elliott, Peter; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Axonal damage and loss of neurons correlate with permanent vision loss and neurologic disability in patients with optic neuritis and multiple sclerosis (MS). Current therapies involve immunomodulation, with limited effects on neuronal damage. The authors examined potential neuroprotective effects in optic neuritis by SRT647 and SRT501, two structurally and mechanistically distinct activators of SIRT1, an enzyme involved in cellular stress resistance and survival. Methods Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS, was induced by immunization with proteolipid protein peptide in SJL/J mice. Optic neuritis developed in two thirds of eyes with significant retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss detected 14 days after immunization. RGCs were labeled in a retrograde fashion with fluorogold by injection into superior colliculi. Optic neuritis was detected by inflammatory cell infiltration of the optic nerve. Results Intravitreal injection of SIRT1 activators 0, 3, 7, and 11 days after immunization significantly attenuated RGC loss in a dose-dependent manner. This neuroprotective effect was blocked by sirtinol, a SIRT1 inhibitor. Treatment with either SIRT1 activator did not prevent EAE or optic nerve inflammation. A single dose of SRT501 on day 11 was sufficient to limit RGC loss and to preserve axon function. Conclusions SIRT1 activators provide an important potential therapy to prevent the neuronal damage that leads to permanent neurologic disability in optic neuritis and MS patients. Intravitreal administration of SIRT1 activators does not suppress inflammation in this model, suggesting that their neuroprotective effects will be additive or synergistic with current immunomodulatory therapies. PMID:17652729

  15. Finite element simulation of extrusion of optical fiber preforms: Effects of wall slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhi Feng; Zhang, Yilei

    2016-03-01

    Extrusion has been successfully used to fabricate optical fiber preforms, especially microstructured ones. Although simplified mathematical model has been used to calculate the extrusion pressure or speed, more frequently die design and extrusion process optimization depend on trial and error, which is especially true for complex die and preform design. This paper employs the finite element method (FEM) to simulate the billet extrusion process to investigate the relationship between the extruding pressure, the billet viscosity, the wall slip condition and the extruding speed for extrusion of rod preforms. The slipping wall boundary condition is taken into account of the finite element model, and the simulated extruding pressure agrees with the one experimental value reported preciously. Then the dependence of the extruding speed on the extruding pressure, billet viscosity and the slip speed is systematically simulated. Simulated data is fitted to a second order polynomial model to describe their relationship, and the terms of the model are reduced from nine to five by using a statistical method while maintaining the fitting accuracy. The FEM simulation and the fitted model provide a convenient and dependable way to calculate the extrusion pressure, speed or other process parameters, which could be used to guide experimental design for future preform extrusion. Furthermore, the same simulation could be used to optimize die design and extrusion process to improve quality of extruded preforms.

  16. Optimal design of multilayer diffractive optical elements with effective area method.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongfang; Xue, Changxi; Li, Chuang; Wang, Ju

    2016-03-01

    The effective area method is described to design high-efficiency multiplayer diffractive optical elements (MLDOEs) with finite feature sizes for wide wave band. This method is presented with consideration of the shield effect between two elements of MLDOEs, and the optimal surface relief heights of MLDOEs are calculated with the effective area method. Then the comparisons of diffraction efficiency and polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency for MLDOEs with different period widths are described and simulated with the effective area method and scalar diffraction theory (SDT). Finally, the design results of MLDOEs obtained by SDT and the effective area method are compared by a rigorous electromagnetic analysis method, specifically, the finite-difference time-domain method. These results show that the limits of SDT for MLDOEs, ascertain and quantify the greatest sources of the diffraction efficiency loss due to the shield effect. The design results of the effective area method can obtain higher polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency than that of the SDT when the period width of MLDOEs is taken into account. PMID:26974629

  17. Novel implementations of optical switch control module and 3D-CSP for 10 Gbps active optical access system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakayama, Koji; Okuno, Michitaka; Matsuoka, Yasunobu; Hosomi, Kazuhiko; Sagawa, Misuzu; Sugawara, Toshiki

    2009-11-01

    We propose an optical switch control procedure for high-performance and cost-effective 10 Gbps Active Optical Access System (AOAS) in which optical switches are used instead of optical splitters in PON (Passive Optical Network). We demonstrate the implemented optical switch control module on Optical Switching Unit (OSW) with logic circuits works effectively. We also propose a compact optical 3D-CSP (Chip Scale Package) to achieve the high performance of AOAS without losing cost advantage of PON. We demonstrate the implemented 3D-CSP works effectively.

  18. Novel cost-effective process for the replication of hybrid diffractive/refractive optical elements in silica glass

    SciTech Connect

    Maxey, L.C.; Nogues, J.L.; Moreshead, B.

    1998-08-01

    This CRADA between Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Contractor) and GELTECH, Inc. (Participant) has demonstrated the feasibility of producing hybrid diffractive/refractive optics by a replication process which lends itself to high-volume, low-cost production. The program has built unpon unique capabilities of the Contractor and the Participant to achieve this demonstration. The Contractor has extensive experience and unique capabilities in the technology of single point diamong turning for optical components. The Participant has achieved unique success in the development of manufacturing processes for high-quality silica optical components using sol-gel technology. The merging of these two leading technologies has provided a synergism resulting in the demonstration of a manufacturing technology for cost-effective, high-volume production of silica glass precision hybrid optical components. Hybrid optical components are systems that integrate diffractive optical surfaces into lenses, resulting in designs that minimize the aberrations that degrade image quality without the need for additional glass elements. This reduces the cost, weight, and complexity of the system, while improving the overall optical efficiency. Previous applications of hybrid optical components have been primarily for infra-red applications, where diamond-turned germanium or silicon optics have been used. Hybrid optics for use in the visible have been limited to laboratory curiosities that were directly turned into plastic substrates. Through this CRADA the authors have achieved a manufacturing process for producing high quality silica glass hybrid lenses in an way that lends itself to mass production.

  19. Polarization converter for higher-order laser beams using a single binary diffractive optical element as beam splitter.

    PubMed

    Khonina, Svetlana N; Karpeev, Sergey V; Alferov, Sergey V

    2012-06-15

    We propose a new approach to generating a pair of initial beams for a polarization converter that operates by summing up two opposite-sign circularly polarized beams. The conjugated pairs of vortex beams matched with laser modes are generated using binary diffractive optical elements (DOEs). The same binary element simultaneously serves two functions: a beam shaper and a beam splitter. Two proposed optical arrangements are compared in terms of alignment complexity and energy efficiency. The DOEs in question have been designed and fabricated. Natural experiments that demonstrate the generation of vector higher-order cylindrical beams have been conducted. PMID:22739916

  20. Vector Finite Element Modeling of the Full-Wave Maxwell Equations to Evaluate Power Loss in Bent Optical Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Koning, J; Rieben, R; Rodrigue, G

    2004-12-09

    We measure the loss of power incurred by the bending of a single mode step-indexed optical fiber using vector finite element modeling of the full-wave Maxwell equations in the optical regime. We demonstrate fewer grid elements can be used to model light transmission in longer fiber lengths by using high-order basis functions in conjunction with a high order energy conserving time integration method. The power in the core is measured at several points to determine the percentage loss. We also demonstrate the effect of bending on the light polarization.

  1. A Wafer-Bonded, Floating Element Shear-Stress Sensor Using a Geometric Moire Optical Transduction Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, Stephen; Chen, Tai-An; Chandrasekaran, Venkataraman; Tedjojuwono, Ken; Cattafesta, Louis; Nishida, Toshikazu; Sheplak, Mark

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a geometric Moir optical-based floating-element shear stress sensor for wind tunnel turbulence measurements. The sensor was fabricated using an aligned wafer-bond/thin-back process producing optical gratings on the backside of a floating element and on the top surface of the support wafer. Measured results indicate a static sensitivity of 0.26 microns/Pa, a resonant frequency of 1.7 kHz, and a noise floor of 6.2 mPa/(square root)Hz.

  2. 3D laser inspection of fuel assembly grid spacers for nuclear reactors based on diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finogenov, L. V.; Lemeshko, Yu A.; Zav'yalov, P. S.; Chugui, Yu V.

    2007-06-01

    Ensuring the safety and high operation reliability of nuclear reactors takes 100% inspection of geometrical parameters of fuel assemblies, which include the grid spacers performed as a cellular structure with fuel elements. The required grid spacer geometry of assembly in the transverse and longitudinal cross sections is extremely important for maintaining the necessary heat regime. A universal method for 3D grid spacer inspection using a diffractive optical element (DOE), which generates as the structural illumination a multiple-ring pattern on the inner surface of a grid spacer cell, is investigated. Using some DOEs one can inspect the nomenclature of all produced grids. A special objective has been developed for forming the inner surface cell image. The problems of diffractive elements synthesis, projecting optics calculation, adjusting methods as well as calibration of the experimental measuring system are considered. The algorithms for image processing for different constructive elements of grids (cell, channel hole, outer grid spacer rim) and the experimental results are presented.

  3. Synthesis and biological evaluation of optically active Ki16425.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takanao; Sugimoto, Kenji; Inoue, Asuka; Okudaira, Shinichi; Aoki, Junken; Tokuyama, Hidetoshi

    2012-07-01

    An enantionselective synthesis of both enantiomers of Ki16425, which possesses selective LPA antagonistic activity, was achieved. The isoxazole core was constructed by a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of nitrile oxide with alkyne and condensation with the optically active α-phenethyl alcohol segment, which was prepared by an enantioselective reduction of arylmethylketone. Biological evaluation of both enantiomers of Ki16425 revealed that the (R)-isomer showed much higher antagonistic activity for LPA(1) and LPA(3) receptors. PMID:22658556

  4. Trace element analysis of coal by neutron activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    The irradiation, counting, and data reduction scheme is described for an analysis capability of 1000 samples per year. Up to 56 elements are reported on each sample. The precision and accuracy of the method are shown for 25 elements designated as hazardous by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The interference corrections for selenium and ytterbium on mercury and ytterbium on selenium are described. The effect of bromine and antimony on the determination of arsenic is also mentioned. The use of factorial design techniques to evaluate interferences in the determination of mercury, selenium, and arsenic is shown. Some typical trace element results for coal, fly ash, and bottom ash are given.

  5. Trace element analysis of coal by neutron activation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    The irradiation, counting, and data reduction scheme is described for an analysis capability of 1000 samples per year. Up to 56 elements are reported on each sample. The precision and accuracy of the method are shown for 25 elements designated as hazardous by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The interference corrections for selenium and ytterbium on mercury and ytterbium on selenium are described. The effect of bromine and antimony on the determination of arsenic is also mentioned. The use of factorial design techniques to evaluate interferences in the determination of mercury, selenium, and arsenic is shown. Some typical trace element results for coal, fly ash, and bottom ash are given.

  6. Polarized Raman optical activity of menthol and related molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, L. D.; Hecht, L.; Blyth, S. M.

    1989-01-01

    Polarized and depolarized Raman optical activity spectra of menthol, menthyl chloride, neomenthol and neothiomenthol from 800 to 1500 cm -1 are reported. Despite axial symmetry in all the bonds, the presence of the heteroatoms O or S seems to induce large deviations from the expected ratio of 2:1 between the polarized and depolarized Raman optical activity intensities, but Cl does not. These deviations might originate in large electric quadrupole contributions induced by excited state interactions involving O or S Rydberg p orbitals and valence orbitals on other parts of the molecule. Such interactions appear to undermine the bond polarizability theory of Raman intensities.

  7. Active optics for space applications: an ESA perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuccaro Marchi, Alessandro; Hallibert, Pascal; Pereira do Carmo, Joao; Wille, Eric

    2014-07-01

    Active optics for Space is relatively new field that takes advantage of lessons learnt on ground, and together with the tighter constrains of space environment it allows operation of larger mirrors apertures for space telescopes and better image quality. Technical developments are crucial to guarantee proper technological readiness for applications on new missions whose performance can be driven also by these novelties. This paper describes the philosophy pursued at ESA, providing an overview of the activities run within the Agency, as well as perspectives for new developments. The Optics Section of the Directorate of Technical and Quality Management of ESA/ESTEC is currently running three projects. Two examples are here addressed.

  8. Giant optical activity of sugar in thin soap films.

    PubMed

    Emile, Janine; Emile, Olivier; Ghoufi, Aziz; Moréac, Alain; Casanova, Federico; Ding, Minxia; Houizot, Patrick

    2013-10-15

    We report on enhanced experimental optical activity measurements of thin soap films in the presence of sugar. This unusual optical activity is linked to the intramolecular chiral conformation of the glucose molecules at the air/liquid interface. Choosing sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) as a model surfactant and glucose as model sugar, favorable interactions between the anionic group -OSO3(-)- and the glucose molecules are highlighted. This induces an interfacial anchoring of glucose molecules leading to a perturbing influence of the asymmetric chiral environment. PMID:23932406

  9. Application of fluidic lens technology to an adaptive holographic optical element see-through autophoropter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chancy, Carl H.

    A device for performing an objective eye exam has been developed to automatically determine ophthalmic prescriptions. The closed loop fluidic auto-phoropter has been designed, modeled, fabricated and tested for the automatic measurement and correction of a patient's prescriptions. The adaptive phoropter is designed through the combination of a spherical-powered fluidic lens and two cylindrical fluidic lenses that are orientated 45o relative to each other. In addition, the system incorporates Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing technology to identify the eye's wavefront error and corresponding prescription. Using the wavefront error information, the fluidic auto-phoropter nulls the eye's lower order wavefront error by applying the appropriate volumes to the fluidic lenses. The combination of the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor the fluidic auto-phoropter allows for the identification and control of spherical refractive error, as well as cylinder error and axis; thus, creating a truly automated refractometer and corrective system. The fluidic auto-phoropter is capable of correcting defocus error ranging from -20D to 20D and astigmatism from -10D to 10D. The transmissive see-through design allows for the observation of natural scenes through the system at varying object planes with no additional imaging optics in the patient's line of sight. In this research, two generations of the fluidic auto-phoropter are designed and tested; the first generation uses traditional glass optics for the measurement channel. The second generation of the fluidic auto-phoropter takes advantage of the progress in the development of holographic optical elements (HOEs) to replace all the traditional glass optics. The addition of the HOEs has enabled the development of a more compact, inexpensive and easily reproducible system without compromising its performance. Additionally, the fluidic lenses were tested during a National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) parabolic flight campaign, to

  10. Extremely aspheric mirrors: prototype development of an innovative manufacturing process based on active optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challita, Zalpha; Hugot, Emmanuel; Ferrari, Marc; Le Merrer, Joël.; Le Mignant, David; Cuby, Jean-Gabriel

    2012-09-01

    The next generation of focal-plane astronomical instruments requires technological breakthroughs to reduce their system complexity while increasing their scientific performances. Applied to the optical systems, recent studies show that the use of freeform reflective optics allows competitive compact systems with less optical components. In this context, our challenge is to supply an active freeform mirror system, using a combination of different active optics techniques. The optical shape will be provided during the fabrication using the mechanical property of metals to plasticize and will be coupled with a specific actuator system to compensate for the residual form errors, during the instrument operation phase. We present in this article the development of an innovative manufacturing process based on cold hydro-forming method, with the aim to adapt it for VIS/NIR requirements in terms of optical surface quality. It can operate on thin and flat polished initial substrates. The realization of a first prototype for a 100 mm optical diameter mirror is in progress, to compare the mechanical behaviours obtained by tests and by Finite Element Analysis (FEA), for different materials. Then, the formed samples will be characterized optically. The opto-mechanical results will allow a fine tuning of FEA parameters to optimize the residual form errors obtained through this process. It concerns the microstructure considerations, the springback effects and the work hardening evolutions of the samples, depending on the initial substrate properties and the boundary conditions applied. Modeling and tests have started with axi-symmetric spherical and aspherical shapes and will continue with highly aspherics and freeforms.

  11. Influence of optical activity on rogue waves propagating in chiral optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temgoua, D. D. Estelle; Kofane, T. C.

    2016-06-01

    We derive the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation in chiral optical fiber with right- and left-hand nonlinear polarization. We use the similarity transformation to reduce the generalized chiral NLS equation to the higher-order integrable Hirota equation. We present the first- and second-order rational solutions of the chiral NLS equation with variable and constant coefficients, based on the modified Darboux transformation method. For some specific set of parameters, the features of chiral optical rogue waves are analyzed from analytical results, showing the influence of optical activity on waves. We also generate the exact solutions of the two-component coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations, which describe optical activity effects on the propagation of rogue waves, and their properties in linear and nonlinear coupling cases are investigated. The condition of modulation instability of the background reveals the existence of vector rogue waves and the number of stable and unstable branches. Controllability of chiral optical rogue waves is examined by numerical simulations and may bring potential applications in optical fibers and in many other physical systems.

  12. Design of an Optically Controlled MR-Compatible Active Needle

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Seok Chang; Quek, Zhan Fan; Koh, Je-Sung; Renaud, Pierre; Black, Richard J.; Moslehi, Behzad; Daniel, Bruce L.; Cho, Kyu-Jin; Cutkosky, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    An active needle is proposed for the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided percutaneous procedures. The needle uses a low-transition-temperature shape memory alloy (LT SMA) wire actuator to produce bending in the distal section of the needle. Actuation is achieved with internal optical heating using laser light transported via optical fibers and side coupled to the LT SMA. A prototype, with a size equivalent to a standard 16-gauge biopsy needle, exhibits significant bending, with a tip deflection of more than 14° in air and 5° in hard tissue. A single-ended optical sensor with a gold-coated tip is developed to measure the curvature independently of temperature. The experimental results in tissue phantoms show that human tissue causes fast heat dissipation from the wire actuator; however, the active needle can compensate for typical targeting errors during prostate biopsy. PMID:26512231

  13. Human brain activity with functional NIR optical imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qingming

    2001-08-01

    In this paper we reviewed the applications of functional near infrared optical imager in human brain activity. Optical imaging results of brain activity, including memory for new association, emotional thinking, mental arithmetic, pattern recognition ' where's Waldo?, occipital cortex in visual stimulation, and motor cortex in finger tapping, are demonstrated. It is shown that the NIR optical method opens up new fields of study of the human population, in adults under conditions of simulated or real stress that may have important effects upon functional performance. It makes practical and affordable for large populations the complex technology of measuring brain function. It is portable and low cost. In cognitive tasks subjects could report orally. The temporal resolution could be millisecond or less in theory. NIR method will have good prospects in exploring human brain secret.

  14. Optimisation of the diffractive optical element for snapshot spectral imaging used in fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, R.; Arnold, T.; De Biasio, M.; McGunnigle, G.; Rogojanu, R.; Steiner, G. E.; Hermerschmidt, A.

    2012-03-01

    Snapshot approaches address various possibilities to acquire the spectral and spatial information of a scene within a single camera frame. One advantage over the classical push broom or staring imager approaches is that the temporal inconsistency between consecutive scan lines in first case or between the acquired monochromatic images in the second case is avoided. However, this has to be paid by some effort to rearrange or reconstruct the explicit spectral cube from the entangled raw data in the single camera frame. Besides others, the utilization of a diffractive optical element (DOE) is one such snapshot approach (CTIS - computed tomography imaging spectrometer). The DOE is used to create an optical transfer function that projects both the spectral and spatial information of a scene onto a sensor array and a reconstruction algorithm is used that recovers the spectral cube from the dispersed image pattern. The design of the DOE is crucial for the overall system performance as the absolute transmission efficiency of the zeroth and first order versus the relative efficiency between the two over the required wavelength range are difficult to optimize if the limited dynamic range of a real camera is considered. We describe the optimization of such a DOE for the wavelength range from 400 to 780nm and the required reconstruction algorithm to recover the spectral cube from the entangled snapshot image. The described snapshot approach has been evaluated using experiments to assess the spatial and spectral resolution using diffuse reflectance standards. Additionally the results achieved using the described setup for multi-color in-situ fluorescence hybridized preparations (M-FISH) are discussed.

  15. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Upgrade Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William J. Jr.; Moran, Robert P.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2012-01-01

    To support the on-going nuclear thermal propulsion effort, a state-of-the-art non nuclear experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The facility to perform this testing is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator (NTREES). This device can simulate the environmental conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel components will be subjected during reactor operation. Test articles mounted in the simulator are inductively heated in such a manner so as to accurately reproduce the temperatures and heat fluxes which would normally occur as a result of nuclear fission and would be exposed to flowing hydrogen. Initial testing of a somewhat prototypical fuel element has been successfully performed in NTREES and the facility has now been shutdown to allow for an extensive reconfiguration of the facility which will result in a significant upgrade in its capabilities

  16. Trace elements by instrumental neutron activation analysis for pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    Methods and technology were developed to analyze 1000 samples/yr of coal and other pollution-related samples. The complete trace element analysis of 20-24 samples/wk averaged 3-3.5 man-hours/sample. The computerized data reduction scheme could identify and report data on as many as 56 elements. In addition to coal, samples of fly ash, bottom ash, crude oil, fuel oil, residual oil, gasoline, jet fuel, kerosene, filtered air particulates, ore, stack scrubber water, clam tissue, crab shells, river sediment and water, and corn were analyzed. Precision of the method was plus or minus 25% based on all elements reported in coal and other sample matrices. Overall accuracy was estimated at 50%.

  17. Genetically encoded optical activation of DNA recombination in human cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, J; Arbely, E; Zhang, J; Chou, C; Uprety, R; Chin, J W; Deiters, A

    2016-06-30

    We developed two tightly regulated, light-activated Cre recombinase enzymes through site-specific incorporation of two genetically-encoded photocaged amino acids in human cells. Excellent optical off to on switching of DNA recombination was achieved. Furthermore, we demonstrated precise spatial control of Cre recombinase through patterned illumination. PMID:27277957

  18. Multicolour Optical Photometry of Active Geostationary Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolley, A.; Wade, G.; Bedard, D.

    Although broadband photometry has been used to infer information about artificial satellites since soon after the launch of Sputnik 1, the development of photometric techniques for non-resolved space object identification or characterisation has been hampered by the large number of variables involved. Many individual studies, and some long ongoing experiments, have used costly metre-class telescopes to obtain data despite other experiments demonstrating that much more flexible and affordable small aperture telescopes may be suitable for the task. In addition, due to the highly time consuming and weather dependent nature of obtaining photometric observations, many studies have suffered from data sets of limited size, or relied upon simulations to support their claims. With this in mind, an experiment was conducted with the aim of determining the utility of small aperture telescopes for conducting broadband photometry of satellites for the purpose of non-resolved space object identification and characterisation. A 14 inch Celestron CG-14 telescope was used to gain multiple night-long, high temporal resolution data sets of six active geostationary satellites. The results of the experiment cast doubt on the efficacy of some of the previous approaches to obtaining and analysing photometric data. It was discovered that geostationary satellite lightcurves can vary to a greater degree than has generally been recognised, and colour ratios vary considerably with changes in the illumination/observation geometry, making it difficult to use colour for satellite discrimination. Evidence was also detected of variations in the spectral energy distribution of sunlight reflected off satellite surface materials, which could have implications for surface material characterisation and techniques that aim to separate satellite body and solar panel contributions to the total observed spectra.

  19. All-optical active switching in individual semiconductor nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccione, Brian; Cho, Chang-Hee; van Vugt, Lambert K.; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2012-10-01

    The imminent limitations of electronic integrated circuits are stimulating intense activity in the area of nanophotonics for the development of on-chip optical components, and solutions incorporating direct-bandgap semiconductors are important in achieving this end. Optical processing of data at the nanometre scale is promising for circumventing these limitations, but requires the development of a toolbox of components including emitters, detectors, modulators, waveguides and switches. In comparison to components fabricated using top-down methods, semiconductor nanowires offer superior surface properties and stronger optical confinement. They are therefore ideal candidates for nanoscale optical network components, as well as model systems for understanding optical confinement. Here, we demonstrate all-optical switching in individual CdS nanowire cavities with subwavelength dimensions through stimulated polariton scattering, as well as a functional NAND gate built from multiple switches. The device design exploits the strong light-matter coupling present in these nanowires, leading to footprints that are a fraction of those of comparable silicon-based dielectric contrast and photonic crystal devices.

  20. Recent advances in the application of computer-controlled optical finishing to produce very high-quality transmissive optical elements and windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askinazi, Joel; Estrin, Aleksandr; Green, Alan; Turner, Aaron N.

    2003-09-01

    Large aperture (20-inch diameter) sapphire optical windows have been identified as a key element of new and/or upgraded airborne electro-optical systems. These windows typically require a transmitted wave front error of much less than 0.1 waves rms @ 0.63 microns over 7 inch diameter sub-apertures. Large aperture (14-inch diameter by 4-inch thick) sapphire substrates have also been identified as a key optical element of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO). This project is under joint development by the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under cooperative agreement with the National Science foundation (NSF). These substrates are required to have a transmitted wave front error of 20 nm (0.032 waves) rms @ 0.63 microns over 6-inch sub-apertures with a desired error of 10 nm (0.016 waves) rms. Owing to the spatial variations in the optical index of refraction potentially anticipated within 20-inch diameter sapphire, thin (0.25 - 0.5-inch) window substrates, as well as within the 14-inch diameter by 4-inch thick substrates for the LIGO application, our experience tells us that the required transmitted wave front errors can not be achieved with standard optical finishing techniques as they can not readily compensate for errors introduced by inherent material characteristics. Computer controlled optical finishing has been identified as a key technology likely required to enable achievement of the required transmitted wave front errors. Goodrich has developed this technology and has previously applied it to finish high quality sapphire optical windows with a range of aperture sizes from 4-inch to 13-inch to achieve transmitted wavefront errors comparable to these new requirements. This paper addresses successful recent developments and accomplishments in the application of this optical finishing technology to sequentially larger aperture and thicker sapphire windows to achieve the

  1. Imprinting high-gradient topographical structures onto optical surfaces using magnetorheological finishing: manufacturing corrective optical elements for high-power laser applications.

    PubMed

    Menapace, Joseph A; Ehrmann, Paul E; Bayramian, Andrew J; Bullington, Amber; Di Nicola, Jean-Michel G; Haefner, Constantin; Jarboe, Jeffrey; Marshall, Christopher; Schaffers, Kathleen I; Smith, Cal

    2016-07-01

    Corrective optical elements form an important part of high-precision optical systems. We have developed a method to manufacture high-gradient corrective optical elements for high-power laser systems using deterministic magnetorheological finishing (MRF) imprinting technology. Several process factors need to be considered for polishing ultraprecise topographical structures onto optical surfaces using MRF. They include proper selection of MRF removal function and wheel sizes, detailed MRF tool and interferometry alignment, and optimized MRF polishing schedules. Dependable interferometry also is a key factor in high-gradient component manufacture. A wavefront attenuating cell, which enables reliable measurement of gradients beyond what is attainable using conventional interferometry, is discussed. The results of MRF imprinting a 23 μm deep structure containing gradients over 1.6 μm / mm onto a fused-silica window are presented as an example of the technique's capabilities. This high-gradient element serves as a thermal correction plate in the high-repetition-rate advanced petawatt laser system currently being built at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. PMID:27409216

  2. Imprinting high-gradient topographical structures onto optical surfaces using magnetorheological finishing: Manufacturing corrective optical elements for high-power laser applications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Menapace, Joseph A.; Ehrmann, Paul E.; Bayramian, Andrew J.; Bullington, Amber; Di Nicola, Jean -Michel G.; Haefner, Constantin; Jarboe, Jeffrey; Marshall, Christopher; Schaffers, Kathleen I.; Smith, Cal

    2016-03-15

    Corrective optical elements form an important part of high-precision optical systems. We have developed a method to manufacture high-gradient corrective optical elements for high-power laser systems using deterministic magnetorheological finishing (MRF) imprinting technology. Several process factors need to be considered for polishing ultraprecise topographical structures onto optical surfaces using MRF. They include proper selection of MRF removal function and wheel sizes, detailed MRF tool and interferometry alignment, and optimized MRF polishing schedules. Dependable interferometry also is a key factor in high-gradient component manufacture. A wavefront attenuating cell, which enables reliable measurement of gradients beyond what is attainable using conventional interferometry,more » is discussed. The results of MRF imprinting a 23 μm deep structure containing gradients over 1.6 μm / mm onto a fused-silica window are presented as an example of the technique’s capabilities. As a result, this high-gradient element serves as a thermal correction plate in the high-repetition-rate advanced petawatt laser system currently being built at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.« less

  3. Finite Element Learning Modules as Active Learning Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Ashland O.; Jensen, Daniel; Rencis, Joseph; Wood, Kristin; Wood, John; White, Christina; Raaberg, Kristen Kaufman; Coffman, Josh

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of active learning is to solicit participation by students beyond the passive mode of traditional classroom lectures. Reading, writing, participating in discussions, hands-on activities, engaging in active problem solving, and collaborative learning can all be involved. The skills acquired during active learning tend to go above and…

  4. Trace elements removal from water using modified activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Campos, V; Buchler, P M

    2008-02-01

    This paper present the possible alternative options for the remove of trace elements from drinking water supplies in the trace. Arsenic and chromium are two of the most toxic pollutants, introduced into natural waters from a variety of sources and causing various adverse effects on living bodies. The performance of three filter bed methods was evaluated in the laboratory. Experiments were conducted to investigate the sorption of arsenic and chromium on carbon steel and removal of trace elements from drinking water with a household filtration process. The affinity of the arsenic and chromium species for Fe/Fe3C (iron/iron carbide) sites is the key factor controlling the removal of the elements. The method is based on the use of powdered block carbon, powder carbon steel and ceramic spheres in the ion-sorption columns as a cleaning process. The modified powdered block carbon is a satisfactory and economical sorbent for trace elements (arsenite and chromate) dissolved in water due to its low unit cost of about $23 and compatibility with the traditional household filtration system. PMID:18613611

  5. ELEMENTAL MERCURY ADSORPTION BY ACTIVATED CARBON TREATED WITH SULFURIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a study of the adsorption of elemental mercury at 125 C by a sulfuric-acid (H2S04, 50% w/w/ solution)-treated carbon for the removal of mercury from flue gas. The pore structure of the sample was characterized by nitrogen (N2) at -196 C and the t-plot m...

  6. Optical imaging of neural and hemodynamic brain activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schei, Jennifer Lynn

    Optical imaging technologies can be used to record neural and hemodynamic activity. Neural activity elicits physiological changes that alter the optical tissue properties. Specifically, changes in polarized light are concomitant with neural depolarization. We measured polarization changes from an isolated lobster nerve during action potential propagation using both reflected and transmitted light. In transmission mode, polarization changes were largest throughout the center of the nerve, suggesting that most of the optical signal arose from the inner nerve bundle. In reflection mode, polarization changes were largest near the edges, suggesting that most of the optical signal arose from the outer sheath. To overcome irregular cell orientation found in the brain, we measured polarization changes from a nerve tied in a knot. Our results show that neural activation produces polarization changes that can be imaged even without regular cell orientations. Neural activation expends energy resources and elicits metabolic delivery through blood vessel dilation, increasing blood flow and volume. We used spectroscopic imaging techniques combined with electrophysiological measurements to record evoked neural and hemodynamic responses from the auditory cortex of the rat. By using implantable optics, we measured responses across natural wake and sleep states, as well as responses following different amounts of sleep deprivation. During quiet sleep, evoked metabolic responses were larger compared to wake, perhaps because blood vessels were more compliant. When animals were sleep deprived, evoked hemodynamic responses were smaller following longer periods of deprivation. These results suggest that prolonged neural activity through sleep deprivation may diminish vascular compliance as indicated by the blunted vascular response. Subsequent sleep may allow vessels to relax, restoring their ability to deliver blood. These results also suggest that severe sleep deprivation or chronic

  7. Origin of optical activity in the purple bacterial photoreaction center

    SciTech Connect

    Mar, T.; Gingras, G.

    1995-07-18

    The photoreaction center (RC) of purple bacteria contains four bacteriochlorophyll (Bph) and two bacteriopheophytin (Bph) molecules as prosthetic groups. Their optical activity, as measured by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, is largely increased in situ as compared to organic solutions. The all-exciton hypothesis posits that this enhanced optical activity is entirely due to excitonic interactions between the electronic transitions of all six bacteriochlorin molecules. Using the simple exciton theory, this model predicts that the near-infrared CD spectra should be conservative. The fact that they are not, whether the special pair of Bch (SP) that constitutes the primary electron donor is reduced or oxidized, has been explained by hyperchromic effects. The present work tests this hypothesis by successively eliminating the absorption and, therefore, the optical activity of the Bphs and of the non-special-pair (non-SP) Bchs. This was accomplished by trapping these pigments in their reduced state. RC preparations with the four non-SP bacteriochlorins trapped in their reduced state and, therefore, with an intact SP displayed conservative CD spectra. RC preparations with only the electronic transitions of SP and of one non-SP Bch also showed conservative CD spectra. These conservative CD spectra and their corresponding absorption spectra were simulated using simple exciton theory without assuming hyperchromic effects. Bleaching half of the 755-nm absorption band by phototrapping one of the two Bph molecules led to the complete disappearance of the corresponding CD band. This cannot be explained by the all-exciton hypothesis. These results suggest that the optical activity of the SP alone, or with one non-SP Bch, is due to excitonic interactions. They also suggest that the optical activity of the other three bacteriochlorins is due to other factors, such as pigment-protein interaction. 32 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Fabrication of continuous relief micro-optic elements using real-time maskless lithography technique based on DMD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Kejun; Gao, Yiqing; Li, Feng; Luo, Ningning; Zhang, Weiwei

    2014-03-01

    A novel method is proposed to fabricate continuous relief micro-optic elements using real-time maskless lithography technique based on digital mirror device (DMD). To evaluate the method, aspheric and spheric micro-lens array was fabricated by following the proposed principle. Firstly distribution of the required exposure dose of lens array was obtained and sliced into a number of contours of equal proportions. Then the contour planes instead of virtual masks were converted into binary image. On the lithography system, the dose accumulated over multiple exposures and the required exposure dose profiles were reconstructed. Finally in the photoresist layer, virtual profiles of lens array were formed, consistent with the original designed elements. The method is feasible and reliable for the fabrication of arbitrary continuous relief micro-optic elements.

  9. Using acrylamide-based photopolymers for fabrication of holographic optical elements in solar energy applications.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Hoda; Naydenova, Izabela; Martin, Suzanne

    2014-03-01

    A holographic device is under development that aims to improve light collection in solar cells. The aim is to explore the potential of using photopolymer holographic optical elements (HOEs) to collect light from a moving source, such as the sun, and redirect it for concentration by a holographic lens. A working range of 45° is targeted for such a device to be useful in solar applications without tracking. A photopolymer HOE is capable of efficiently redirecting light, but the angular selectivity of a single grating is usually of the order of one degree at the thicknesses required for high efficiency. The challenge here is to increase the angular and wavelength range of the gratings so that a reasonable number may be multiplexed and/or combined to create a device that can concentrate light incident from a large range of angles. In this paper, low spatial frequency holographic recording is explored to increase the angular and wavelength range of an individual grating. Ultimately, a combination of gratings will be used so that a broad range of angles of incidence are accepted. A design is proposed for the combination of such elements into a holographic solar collector. The first step in achieving this is optimization of recording at low spatial frequency. This requires a photopolymer material with unique properties, such as a fast monomer diffusion rate. This paper reports results on the efficiency of holograms recorded in an acrylamide-based photopolymer at low spatial frequencies (100, 200, and 300  l/mm). The diffraction efficiency and angular selectivity of recorded holograms have been studied for various photopolymer layer thicknesses and different intensities of the recording beams. A diffraction efficiency of over 80% was achieved at a spatial frequency of 200  l/mm. The optimum intensity of recording at this spatial frequency was found to be 1  mW/cm2. Individual gratings and focusing elements with high efficiency and FWHM angles of 3° are

  10. Large-aperture continuous-phase diffractive optical element for beam transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Qiaofeng; Yan, Yingbai; Jin, Guofan; Wu, Minxian

    1999-11-01

    Beam transform, such as to obtain uniform focal spot with flat top, steep edge, low side lobes and high light efficiency, can be realized well by diffractive optical element (DOE). The DOE has many advantages, such as high light efficiency and strong phase distribution design flexibility. To increase the light efficiency and decrease large-angle scattering, continuous phase DOE should be used. The phase design is competed by a kind of multi-resolution hybrid algorithm based on hill-climbing and simulated annealing, which exploits sufficiently strong convergence ability of the hill climbing and global optimization potential of the simulated annealing. A kind of phase distribution with good geometrical structure and diameter 80 mm is obtained by choosing disturbance function, receipt and refused probability and so on. The simulated results show that the light efficiency is more than 95 percent, and the non-uniformity is less than 5 percent. Because the etching depth is direct proportion to the exposure time, to obtain continuous phase DOE, a kind of hollowed-out mask, namely gray-scale mask is used to control exposure time of each are. The mask is manufactured by linear cutting machine. The continuous phase DOE with diameter 80mm is fabricated by ion-etching with the mask. Finally, the tolerance of manufacturing error including depth error and alignment error are analyzed.

  11. 360-degree three-dimensional flat panel display using holographic optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabu, Hirofumi; Takeuchi, Yusuke; Yoshimoto, Kayo; Takahashi, Hideya; Yamada, Kenji

    2015-03-01

    We proposed the 360-degree 3D display system which is composed of a flat panel display, a light control film, and holographic optical element (HOE). The HOE is a diffraction grating which is made by holography technique. HOE lens can be produced on the thin polygonal glass plate. The light control film and HOE lenses are used to control the direction of light from the flat panel display in our system. The size of proposed system depends on the size of the flat panel display is because other parts of proposed system are thin and placed on the screen of the flat panel display. HOE lenses and a light control film are used to control lights from multiple pixels of a flat panel display to multiple viewpoints. To display large 3D images and to increase viewpoints, we divided parallax images into striped images and distributed them on the display for multiple viewpoints. Therefore, observers can see the large 3D image around the system. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed system, we made the experimental system. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed system, we constructed the part of the proposed system. The experimental system is composed of the liquid crystal display (LCD), prototype HOE lenses, and light control films. We confirmed that experimental system can display two images to different viewpoints. This paper describes the configuration of the proposed system, and also describes the experimental result.

  12. Three-dimensional diffractive micro- and nano-optical elements fabricated by electron-beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divliansky, Ivan B.; Johnson, Eric G.

    2007-02-01

    The broad development of the micro- and nano-technologies in the past few years increased the need of techniques capable of fabricating sub-micron structures with arbitrary surface profiles. Out of the several fabrication approaches (HEBS lithography, laser writing, etc.) the electron beam writing stands out as the one capable of the highest resolution, superior alignment accuracy and very small surface roughness. These characteristics make the technique greatly applicable in the fields of photonics and micro-opto-electro-mechanical-systems (MOEMS). Here we describe the specificity of fabricating 3D diffractive micro- and nano-optical elements using Leica EBPG 5000+ electron beam system. Parameters like speed of writing, dose accumulation, pattern writing specifics, etc. affect greatly the electronbeam resist properties and the desired 3D profile. We present data that can be used to better understand the different dependencies and therefore achieve better profile and surface roughness management. The results can be useful in future developments in the areas of integrated photonic circuits and MOEMS.

  13. Finite element analysis of a variable optical attenuator based on s-shape polymer waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Jing; Wu, Lingxun; Xue, Fenglan; Hu, Jian; Fu, Yanjun; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Fangren

    2016-01-01

    A variable optical attenuator (VOA) based on S-shape polymer waveguide is demonstrated at the wavelength λ = 1.55 micron. The VOA consists of straight input and output waveguides, an S-shape waveguide and a pair of deposited electrodes. The cladding material of S waveguide is Poly (methyl methacrylate/disperse red 1) (PMMA/DR1) and the core material of S waveguide is SiON. The refractive index of the polymer cladding at S waveguide is modified by the applied electric voltage. Light scatters at the S waveguide and the VOA has large energy loss in the original state at voltage-off. In the voltage-on state, the refractive index of the polymer of the S waveguide reduces, and energy loss changes as the voltage increases. The attenuation of the VOA can be controled and adjusted by the applied voltage. The beam propagation method(BPM) and finite element analysis are employed to simulate and analyse the VOA. The results show that the VOA has large variable attenuation range of 45.2dB and low insertion loss of 0.8dB.

  14. Multilevel diffractive optical element manufacture by excimer laser ablation and halftone masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quentel, Francois; Fieret, Jim; Holmes, Andrew S.; Paineau, Sylvain

    2001-06-01

    A novel method is presented to manufacture multilevel diffractive optical elements (DOEs) in polymer by single- step KrF excimer laser ablation using a halftone mask. The DOEs have a typical pixel dimension of 5 micrometers and are up to 512 by 512 pixels in size. The DOEs presented are Fresnel lenses and Fourier computer generated holograms, calculated by means of a conventional iterative Fourier transform algorithm. The halftone mask is built up as an array of 5 micrometers -square pixels, each containing a rectangular or L- shaped window on an opaque background. The mask is imaged onto the polymer with a 5x, 0.13 NA reduction lens. The pixels are not resolved by the lens, so they behave simply as attenuators, allowing spatial variation of the ablation rate via the window size. The advantages of halftone mask technology over other methods, such as pixel-by-pixel ablation and multi-mask overlay, are that it is very fast regardless of DOE size, and that no high-precision motion stages and alignment are required. The challenges are that the halftone mask is specific to the etch curve of the polymer used, that precise calibration of each grey-level is required, and that the halftone mask must be calculated specifically for the imaging lens used. This paper describes the design procedures for multilevel DOEs and halftone masks, the calibration of the various levels, and some preliminary DOE test results.

  15. Optical Breast Shape Capture and Finite Element Mesh Generation for Electrical Impedance Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, J.; Borsic, A.; Halter, R.J.; Hartov, A.; Paulsen, K.D.

    2011-01-01

    X-Ray mammography is the standard for breast cancer screening. The development of alternative imaging modalities is desirable because Mammograms expose patients to ionizing radiation. Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) may be used to determine tissue conductivity, a property which is an indicator of cancer presence. EIT is also a low-cost imaging solution and does not involve ionizing radiation. In breast EIT, impedance measurements are made using electrodes placed on the surface of the patient’s breast. The complex conductivity of the volume of the breast is estimated by a reconstruction algorithm. EIT reconstruction is a severely ill-posed inverse problem. As a result, noisy instrumentation and incorrect modelling of the electrodes and domain shape produce significant image artefacts. In this paper, we propose a method that has the potential to reduce these errors by accurately modelling the patient breast shape. A 3D hand-held optical scanner is used to acquire the breast geometry and electrode positions. We develop methods for processing the data from the scanner and producing volume meshes accurately matching the breast surface and electrode locations, which can be used for image reconstruction. We demonstrate this method for a plaster breast phantom and a human subject. Using this approach will allow patient-specific finite element meshes to be generated which has the potential to improve the clinical value of EIT for breast cancer diagnosis. PMID:21646711

  16. Fabrication error analysis for diffractive optical elements used in a lithography illumination system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Fang; Song, Qiang; Zeng, Aijun; Zhu, Jing; Huang, Huijie

    2015-04-01

    With the constant shrinking of printable critical dimensions in photolithography, off-axis illumination (OAI) becomes one of the effective resolution-enhancement methods facing these challenges. This, in turn, is driving much more strict requirements, such as higher diffractive efficiency of the diffractive optical elements (DOEs) used in the OAI system. Since the design algorithms to optimize DOEs' phase profile are improved, the fabrication process becomes the main limiting factor leading to energy loss. Tolerance analysis is the general method to evaluate the fabrication accuracy requirement, which is especially useful for highly specialized deep UV applications with small structures and tight tolerances. A subpixel DOE simulation model is applied for tolerance analysis of DOEs by converting the abstractive fabrication structure errors into quantifiable subpixel phase matrices. Adopting the proposed model, four kinds of fabrication errors including misetch, misalignment, feature size error, and feature rounding error are able to be investigated. In the simulation experiments, systematic fabrication error studies of five typical DOEs used in 90-nm scanning photolithography illumination system are carried out. These results are valuable in the range of high precision DOE design algorithm and fabrication process optimization.

  17. Kepler Observations of Rapid Optical Variability in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, R. F.; Edelson, R.; Baumgartner, W. H.; Gandhi, P.

    2012-01-01

    Over three quarters in 2010 - 2011, Kepler monitored optical emission from four active galactic nuclei (AGN) with approx 30 min sampling, > 90% duty cycle and approx < 0.1% repeatability. These data determined the AGN optical fluctuation power spectral density functions (PSDs) over a wide range in temporal frequency. Fits to these PSDs yielded power law slopes of -2.6 to -3.3, much steeper than typically seen in the X-rays. We find evidence that individual AGN exhibit intrinsically different PSD slopes. The steep PSD fits are a challenge to recent AGN variability models but seem consistent with first order MRI theoretical calculations of accretion disk fluctuations.

  18. Active radiation hardening technology for fiber-optic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuanhong; Suo, Xinxin; Yang, Mingwei

    2013-09-01

    We demonstrated an active radiation hardening technology for fiber optic source developed for high performance fiber optic gyroscope. The radiation characteristic of erbium-doped fiber was studied experimentally. The radiation induced attenuation (RIA) at 980nm pump light was identified to be the main reason for the degradation and there was photo-bleaching effect in EDF too. A variable parameters control technology was proposed and taken to keep the 980nm and 1550nm light energy stable and high stability and radiation-resistance fiber source with gauss profile spectrum was realized .The source can stand against more than 50 krad (Si) total radiation dose.

  19. Strong optical activity from twisted-cross photonic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Decker, M; Ruther, M; Kriegler, C E; Zhou, J; Soukoulis, C M; Linden, S; Wegener, M

    2009-08-15

    Following a recent theoretical suggestion and microwave experiments, we fabricate photonic metamaterials composed of pairs of twisted gold crosses using two successive electron-beam-lithography steps and intermediate planarization via a spin-on dielectric. The resulting two effective resonances of the coupled system lie in the 1-2 microm wavelength regime and exhibit pronounced circular dichroism, while the circular polarization conversion is very small. In between the two resonances, we find a fairly broad spectral regime with strong optical activity, i.e., with a pure rotation of incident linear polarization. The measured optical transmittance spectra agree well with theory. PMID:19684829

  20. Optical packaging activities at Institute of Microelectronics (IME), Singapore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, Keng-Hwa; Sudharsanam, Krishnamachari; Pamidighantam, Ramana V.; Yeo, Yongkee; Iyer, Mahadevan K.

    2002-08-01

    The development of optoelectronic components for gigabit Ethernet communications is converging towards access networks where the cost of device makes a significant impact on the market acceptance. Device fabrication and packaging cost have to be brought down with novel assembly and packaging methods. Singapore has established a reputation in semiconductor device development and fabrication with excellent process and packaging facilities. Institute of Microelectronics (IME) was founded in 1991 to add value to the Singapore electronics industry. IME is involved in the development of active and passive photonics components using Silicon and polymer materials. We present a brief report on the development activities taking place in the field of optical component packaging at IME in recent years. We present a review of our competence and some of the optical device packaging activities that are being undertaken.

  1. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Upgrade Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William

    2013-01-01

    A key technology element in Nuclear Thermal Propulsion is the development of fuel materials and components which can withstand extremely high temperatures while being exposed to flowing hydrogen. NTREES provides a cost effective method for rapidly screening of candidate fuel components with regard to their viability for use in NTR systems. The NTREES is designed to mimic the conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel elements and other components would be subjected to during reactor operation. The NTREES consists of a water cooled ASME code stamped pressure vessel and its associated control hardware and instrumentation coupled with inductive heaters to simulate the heat provided by the fission process. The NTREES has been designed to safely allow hydrogen gas to be injected into internal flow passages of an inductively heated test article mounted in the chamber.

  2. Optically active surfaces formed by ion implantation and thermal treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Gea, L.A.; Boatner, L.A.; Evans, H.M.; Zuhr, R.

    1996-08-01

    Embedded VO{sub 2} precipitates have been formed in single-crystal sapphire by the ion co-implantation of vanadium and oxygen and subsequent thermal annealing. The embedded VO{sub 2} particles have been shown to exhibit an optical switching behavior that is comparable to that of continuous thin films. In this work, the mechanisms of formation of these optically active particles are investigated. It is shown that precipitation of the vanadium dioxide phase is favored when the thermal treatment is performed on an ion-damaged but still crystalline (rather than amorphized) Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate. The best optical switching behavior is observed in this case, and this behavior is apparently correlated with a more-favorable dispersion of VO{sub 2} small particles inside the matrix.

  3. Optical ordnance system for use in explosive ordnance disposal activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merson, J. A.; Salas, F. J.; Helsel, F.M.

    1994-01-01

    A portable hand-held solid state rod laser system and an optically-ignited detonator have been developed for use in explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) activities. Laser prototypes from Whittaker Ordnance and Universal Propulsion have been tested and evaluated. The optical detonator contains 2-(5 cyanotetrazolato) pentaamine cobalt(III) perchlorate (CP) as the DDT column and the explosive Octahydro- 1,3,5,7 - tetrazocine (HMX) as the output charge. The laser is designed to have an output of 150 mJ in a 500 microsecond pulse. This output allows firing through 2000 meters of optical fiber. The detonator can also be ignited with a portable laser diode source through a shorter length of fiber.

  4. Optical ordance system for use in explosive ordnance disposal activities

    SciTech Connect

    Merson, J.A.; Salas, F.J.; Helsel, F.M.

    1994-01-01

    A portable hand-held solid state rod laser system and an optically-ignited detonator have been developed for use in explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) activities. Laser prototypes from Whittaker Ordnance and Universal Propulsion have been tested and evaluated. The optical detonator contains 2-(5 cyanotetrazolato) pentaamine cobalt III perchlorate (CP) as the DDT column and the explosive Octahydro 1, 3, 5, 7 -- tetranitro -- 1, 3, 5, 7 -- tetrazocine (HMX) as the output charge. The laser is designed to have an output of 150 mJ in a 500 microsecond pulse. This output allows firing through 2000 meters of optical fiber. The detonator can also be ignited with a portable laser diode source through a shorter length of fiber.

  5. An expanded x-ray beam facility (BEaTriX) to test the modular elements of the ATHENA optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiga, D.; Pelliciari, C.; Bonnini, E.; Buffagni, E.; Ferrari, C.; Pareschi, G.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2014-07-01

    Future large X-ray observatories like ATHENA will be equipped with very large optics, obtained by assembling modular optical elements, named X-ray Optical Units (XOU) based on the technology of either Silicon Pore Optics or Slumped Glass Optics. In both cases, the final quality of the modular optic (a 5 arcsec HEW requirement for ATHENA) is determined by the accuracy alignment of the XOUs within the assembly, but also by the angular resolution of the individual XOU. This is affected by the mirror shape accuracy, its surface roughness, and the mutual alignment of the mirrors within the XOU itself. Because of the large number of XOUs to be produced, quality tests need to be routinely done to select the most performing stacked blocks, to be integrated into the final optic. In addition to the usual metrology based on profile and roughness measurements, a direct measurement with a broad, parallel, collimated and uniform Xray beam would be the most reliable test, without the need of a focal spot reconstruction as usually done in synchrotron light. To this end, we designed the BEaTriX (Beam Expander Testing X-ray facility) to be realized at INAF-OAB, devoted to the functional tests of the XOUs. A grazing incidence parabolic mirror and an asymmetrically cut crystal will produce a parallel X-ray beam broad enough to illuminate the entire aperture of the focusing elements. An X-ray camera at the focal distance from the mirrors will directly record the image. The selection of different crystals will enable to test the XOUs in the 1 - 5 keV range, included in the X-ray energy band of ATHENA (0.2-12 keV). In this paper we discuss a possible BEaTriX facility implementation. We also show a preliminary performance simulation of the optical system.

  6. Quality assurance and quality control for thermal/optical analysis of aerosol samples for organic and elemental carbon.

    PubMed

    Chow, Judith C; Watson, John G; Robles, Jerome; Wang, Xiaoliang; Chen, L-W Antony; Trimble, Dana L; Kohl, Steven D; Tropp, Richard J; Fung, Kochy K

    2011-12-01

    Accurate, precise, and valid organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC, respectively) measurements require more effort than the routine analysis of ambient aerosol and source samples. This paper documents the quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) procedures that should be implemented to ensure consistency of OC and EC measurements. Prior to field sampling, the appropriate filter substrate must be selected and tested for sampling effectiveness. Unexposed filters are pre-fired to remove contaminants and acceptance tested. After sampling, filters must be stored in the laboratory in clean, labeled containers under refrigeration (<4 °C) to minimize loss of semi-volatile OC. QA activities include participation in laboratory accreditation programs, external system audits, and interlaboratory comparisons. For thermal/optical carbon analyses, periodic QC tests include calibration of the flame ionization detector with different types of carbon standards, thermogram inspection, replicate analyses, quantification of trace oxygen concentrations (<100 ppmv) in the helium atmosphere, and calibration of the sample temperature sensor. These established QA/QC procedures are applicable to aerosol sampling and analysis for carbon and other chemical components. PMID:21626190

  7. Brain activation during immediate and delayed reaching in optic ataxia.

    PubMed

    Himmelbach, Marc; Nau, Marion; Zündorf, Ida; Erb, Michael; Perenin, Marie-Therese; Karnath, Hans-Otto

    2009-05-01

    Patients with optic ataxia after lesions of the occipito-parietal cortex demonstrate gross deviations of movements to visual targets in their peripheral visual field. When the same patients point to remembered target locations their accuracy improves considerably. Taking into account opposite findings in a single patient suffering from visual form agnosia due to bilateral occipito-temporal lesions (D.F.), this paradoxical improvement was attributed to brain structures outside the dorsal stream, and supposed to be specifically associated with delayed movement execution. This conclusion was based on the still unverified assumption that the dorsal system is almost completely lacking any localization function in patients with optic ataxia who demonstrate the paradoxical delay effect. We thus investigated brain activity associated with immediately executed and delayed movements in a patient with optic ataxia due to extensive bilateral lesions (I.G.) and in 16 healthy subjects using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Our analysis revealed robust and indistinguishable activation of intact dorsal occipital and parietal areas adjacent to the patient's lesions for both types of movements. In healthy subjects, we found the same visuomotor network activated during immediate and delayed movements as well as additionally higher signal increases for movements to visible targets than for delayed movements in bilateral occipito-parietal and occipito-temporal areas. Our results suggest that in healthy subjects as well as in the optic ataxia patient I.G. dorsal areas are not only involved in immediate but also in delayed reaching. This observation questions the hypothesis that residual visuospatial abilities in patients with optic ataxia could only be mediated by a system outside of the dorsal stream. PMID:19428407

  8. Diffuse optical imaging of brain activation to joint attention experience.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Banghe; Yadav, Nitin; Rey, Gustavo; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2009-08-24

    In the early development of social cognition and language, infants tend to participate in face-to-face interactions engaging in joint attention exchanges. Joint attention is vital to social competence at all ages, lacking which is a primary feature to distinguish autistic from non-autistic population. In this study, diffuse optical imaging is used for the first time to investigate the joint attention experience in normal adults. Imaging studies were performed in the frontal regions of the brain (BA9 and BA10) in order to study the differences in the brain activation in response to video clips corresponding to joint attention based skills. The frontal regions of the brain were non-invasively imaged using a novel optical cap coupled to a frequency-domain optical imaging system. The statistical analysis from 11 normal adult subjects, with three repetitions from each subject, indicated that the averaged changes in the cerebral blood oxygenation levels were different under the joint and non-joint attention based stimulus. The preliminary studies demonstrate the feasibility of implementing diffuse optical imaging towards autism-related research to study the brain activation in response to socio-communication skills. PMID:19447278

  9. Optical to optical interface device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, D. S.; Vohl, P.; Nisenson, P.

    1972-01-01

    The development, fabrication, and testing of a preliminary model of an optical-to-optical (noncoherent-to-coherent) interface device for use in coherent optical parallel processing systems are described. The developed device demonstrates a capability for accepting as an input a scene illuminated by a noncoherent radiation source and providing as an output a coherent light beam spatially modulated to represent the original noncoherent scene. The converter device developed under this contract employs a Pockels readout optical modulator (PROM). This is a photosensitive electro-optic element which can sense and electrostatically store optical images. The stored images can be simultaneously or subsequently readout optically by utilizing the electrostatic storage pattern to control an electro-optic light modulating property of the PROM. The readout process is parallel as no scanning mechanism is required. The PROM provides the functions of optical image sensing, modulation, and storage in a single active material.

  10. Transparent selective illumination means suitable for use in optically activated electrical switches and optically activated electrical switches constructed using same

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, R.B.

    1991-09-10

    A planar transparent light conducting means and an improved optically activated electrical switch made using the novel light conducting means are disclosed. The light conducting means further comprise light scattering means on one or more opposite planar surfaces thereof to transmit light from the light conducting means into adjacent media and reflective means on other surfaces of the light conducting means not containing the light scattering means. The optically activated electrical switch comprises at least two stacked photoconductive wafers, each having electrodes formed on both surfaces thereof, and separated by the planar transparent light conducting means. The light scattering means on the light conducting means face surfaces of the wafers not covered by the electrodes to transmit light from the light conducting means into the photoconductive wafers to uniformly illuminate and activate the switch. 11 figures.

  11. Transparent selective illumination means suitable for use in optically activated electrical switches and optically activated electrical switches constructed using same

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, Russell B.

    1991-01-01

    A planar transparent light conducting means and an improved optically activated electrical switch made using the novel light conducting means are disclosed. The light conducting means further comprise light scattering means on one or more opposite planar surfaces thereof to transmit light from the light conducting means into adjacent media and reflective means on other surfaces of the light conducting means not containing the light scattering means. The optically activated electrical switch comprises at least two stacked photoconductive wafers, each having electrodes formed on both surfaces thereof, and separated by the planar transparent light conducting means. The light scattering means on the light conducting means face surfaces of the wafers not covered by the electrodes to transmit light from the light conducting means into the photoconductive wafers to uniformly illuminate and activate the switch.

  12. Design, tolerance, and fabrication of an optical see-through head-mounted display with free-form surface elements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingfeng; Cheng, Dewen; Wang, Yongtian; Hua, Hong; Jin, Guofan

    2013-03-01

    Free-form surfaces (FFSs) provide more freedom to design an optical system with fewer elements and hence to reduce the size and weight of the overall system than rotationally symmetric optical surfaces. In this paper, an optical see-through (OST), head-mounted display (HMD) consisting of a free-form, wedge-shaped prism and a free-form lens is designed and fabricated through the injection molding method. The free-form prism for the projection system is designed with a field-of-view (FOV) of 36°; the free-form lens is cemented to the prism for the see-through system to achieve a FOV of 50°. The free-form prism and lens are expanded at the edge area during the design stage in order to reduce the effects of surface deformation in the working area in molding fabrication process and to improve ergonomic fit with the head of a user. The tolerance analyzes considering the mold design for the free-form optical systems are carried out using the Monte Carlo method. The FFS optical elements are successfully fabricated and the system performance is carefully examined. The results indicate that the performance of the OST-HMD is sufficient for both entertainment and scientific applications. PMID:23458822

  13. Control of adaptive optic element displacement with the help of a magnetic rheology drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deulin, Eugeni A.; Mikhailov, Valeri P.; Sytchev, Victor V.

    2000-10-01

    The control system of adaptive optic of a large astronomical segmentated telescope was designed and tested. The dynamic model and the amplitude-frequency analysis of the new magnetic rheology (MR) drive are presented. The loop controlled drive consists of hydrostatic carrier, MR hydraulic loop controlling system, elastic thin wall seal, stainless seal which are united in a single three coordinate manipulator. This combination ensures short positioning error (delta) (phi) elements: MR-valve Tm

  14. Determination of elements in National Bureau of Standards' geological Standard Reference Materials by neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, C.C.; Glascock, M.D.; Carni, J.J.; Vogt, J.R.; Spalding, T.G.

    1982-08-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) have been used to determine elemental concentrations in two recently issued National Bureau of Standards (NBS) Standard Reference Materials (SRM's). The results obtained are in good agreement with the certified and information values reported by NBS for those elements in each material for which comparisons are available. Average concentrations of 35 elements in SRM 278 obsidian rock and 32 elements in SRM 688 basalt rock are reported for comparison with results that may be obtained by other laboratories.

  15. Design and fabrication of a diffractive optical element as a spectrum-splitting solar concentrator for lateral multijunction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qingli; Wang, Jinze; Quan, Baogang; Zhang, Qiulin; Zhang, Dongxiang; Li, Dongmei; Meng, Qingbo; Pan, Li; Wang, Yanqin; Yang, Guozhen

    2013-04-10

    We have designed a single thin planar diffractive optical element (DOE) based on the principle of diffractive optics to simultaneously split and concentrate the incident light into several energy ranges for lateral multijunction solar cells. A prototype with the maximum thickness of 6.95 μm and 32 quantized levels in depth was fabricated by photolithographic technology. The spectrum-splitting and concentrating performance of the prototype, which were measured quantitatively, show good agreement with the simulation results. As mass production of a DOE can be produced by imprint technology, our design provides a feasible means for low-cost, large-scale, and high-efficiency photovoltaic applications. PMID:23670760

  16. Three-element phased-array approach to diffuse optical imaging based on postprocessing of continuous-wave data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ning; Sassaroli, Angelo; Zucker, Max A.; Fantini, Sergio

    2005-02-01

    We present a multielement phased-array approach to diffuse optical imaging based on postprocessing of continuous-wave data for the improvement of spatial resolution. In particular, we present a theoretical and experimental analysis of the performance of a three-element source array in the study of an optically turbid medium with two embedded cylindrical inclusions. We find that the proposed phased-array approach is able to resolve two cylinders with side-to-side separation of 10 mm that are not resolved by the intensity associated with a single light source.

  17. Thermal strain along optical fiber in lightweight composite FOG : Brillouin-based distributed measurement and finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakuchi, Shu; Sanada, Teruhisa; Takeda, Nobuo; Mitani, Shinji; Mizutani, Tadahito; Sasaki, Yoshinobu; Shinozaki, Keisuke

    2014-05-01

    Thermal strain significantly affects stability of fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) performance. This study investigates thermal strain development in a lightweight carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) FOG under thermal vacuum condition simulating space environment. First, we measure thermal strain distribution along an optical fiber in a CFRP FOG using a Brillouin-based high-spatial resolution system. The key strain profile is clarified and the strain development is simulated using finite element analysis. Finally, several constituent materials for FOG are quantitatively compared from the aspect of the maximum thermal strain and the density, confirming the clear advantage of CFRP.

  18. Laser-heating-based active optics for synchrotron radiation applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fugui; Li, Ming; Gao, Lidan; Sheng, Weifan; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Xiaowei

    2016-06-15

    Active optics has attracted considerable interest from researchers in synchrotron radiation facilities because of its capacity for x-ray wavefront correction. Here, we report a novel and efficient technique for correcting or modulating a mirror surface profile based on laser-heating-induced thermal expansion. An experimental study of the characteristics of the surface thermal deformation response indicates that the power of a milliwatt laser yields a bump height as low as the subnanometer scale and that the variation of the spot size modulates the response function width effectively. In addition, the capacity of the laser-heating technique for free-form surface modulation is demonstrated via a one-dimensional surface correction experiment. The developed method is a promising new approach toward effective x-ray active optics coupled with at-wavelength metrology techniques. PMID:27304296

  19. Diamagnetic Raman Optical Activity of Chlorine, Bromine, and Iodine Gases.

    PubMed

    Šebestík, Jaroslav; Kapitán, Josef; Pačes, Ondřej; Bouř, Petr

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic Raman optical activity of gases provides unique information about their electric and magnetic properties. Magnetic Raman optical activity has recently been observed in a paramagnetic gas (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2012, 51, 11058; Angew. Chem. 2012, 124, 11220). In diamagnetic molecules, it has been considered too weak to be measurable. However, in chlorine, bromine and iodine vapors, we could detect a significant signal as well. Zeeman splitting of electronic ground-state energy levels cannot rationalize the observed circular intensity difference (CID) values of about 10(-4) . These are explicable by participation of paramagnetic excited electronic states. Then a simple model including one electronic excited state provides reasonable spectral intensities. The results suggest that this kind of scattering by diamagnetic molecules is a general event observable under resonance conditions. The phenomenon sheds new light on the role of excited states in the Raman scattering, and may be used to probe molecular geometry and electronic structure. PMID:26845382

  20. Hemodynamic responses to functional activation accessed by optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Songlin; Li, Pengcheng; Yang, Yuanyuan; Lv, Xiaohua; Luo, Qingming

    2006-01-01

    A multi-wavelength light-emitting diode (LED) and laser diode (LD) based optical imaging system was developed to visualize the changes in cerebral blood flow, oxygenation following functional activation simultaneously in rodent cortex. The 2-D blood flow image was accessed by laser speckle contrast imaging, and the spectroscopic imaging of intrinsic signal was used for the calculation of oxyhemoglobin (HbO), deoxyhemoglobin (Hb) and total hemoglobin (HbT) concentration. The combination of spectroscopic imaging and laser speckle contrast imaging provides the capability to simultaneously investigate the spatial and temporal blood flow and hemoglobin concentration changes with high resolution, which may lead to a better understanding of the coupling between neuronal activation and vascular responses. The optical imaging system been built is compact and convenient to investigators. And it is reliable to acquire raw data. In present study, the hemodynamic responses to cortical spreading depression (CSD) in parietal cortex of ~-chloralose/urethan anesthetized rats were demonstrated.

  1. Status of optical model activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Young, P.G.

    1995-12-01

    An update will be given of activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory aimed at developing optical model potentials for applied calculations. Recent work on a coupled-channels potential for neutron reactions on {sup 241,243}Am and spherical neutron potential updates for {sup 56}Fe and {sup 59}Co will be presented, together with examples of their application in nuclear reaction calculations with the GNASH code system. New potentials utilized in evaluations at Livermore for {sup 12}C, {sup 14}N and {sup 16}O are described and additional potentials from earlier analyses at Los Alamos of Ti, V, and Ni data are made available for possible inclusion in the Reference Input Parameter Library (RIPL) for nuclear model calculations of nuclear data. Specific activities directed at development of the optical potential segment of the RIPL will be summarized.

  2. Active optics system of the VLT Survey Telescope.

    PubMed

    Schipani, Pietro; Noethe, Lothar; Magrin, Demetrio; Kuijken, Konrad; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Argomedo, Javier; Capaccioli, Massimo; Dall'Ora, Massimo; D'Orsi, Sergio; Farinato, Jacopo; Fierro, Davide; Holzlöhner, Ronald; Marty, Laurent; Molfese, Cesare; Perrotta, Francesco; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Savarese, Salvatore; Rakich, Andrew; Umbriaco, Gabriele

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes the active optics system of the VLT Survey Telescope, the 2.6-m survey telescope designed for visible wavelengths of the European Southern Observatory at Cerro Paranal, in the Atacama desert. The telescope is characterized by a wide field of view (1.42 deg diameter), leading to tighter active optics than in conventional telescopes, in particular for the alignment requirements. We discuss the effects of typical error sources on the image quality and present the specific solutions adopted for wavefront sensing and correction of the aberrations, which are based on the shaping of a monolithic primary mirror and the positioning of the secondary in five degrees of freedom. PMID:26974616

  3. Optical properties, morphology and elemental composition of atmospheric particles at T1 supersite on MILAGRO campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carabali, G.; Mamani-Paco, R.; Castro, T.; Peralta, O.; Herrera, E.; Trujillo, B.

    2012-03-01

    Atmospheric particles were sampled at T1 supersite during MILAGRO campaign, in March 2006. T1 was located at the north of Mexico City (MC). Aerosol sampling was done by placing copper grids for Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) on the last five of an 8-stage MOUDI cascade impactor. Samples were obtained at different periods to observe possible variations on morphology. Absorption and scattering coefficients, as well as particle concentrations (0.01-3 μm aerodynamic diameter) were measured simultaneously using a PSAP absorption photometer, a portable integrating nephelometer, and a CPC particle counter. Particle images were acquired at different magnifications using a CM 200 Phillips TEM-EDAX system, and then calculated the border-based fractal dimension. Also, Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) was used to determine the elemental composition of particles. The morphology of atmospheric particles for two aerodynamic diameters (0.18 and 1.8 μm) was compared using border-based fractal dimension to relate it to the other particle properties, because T1-generated particles have optical, morphological and chemical properties different from those transported by the MC plume. Particles sampled under MC pollution influence showed not much variability, suggesting that more spherical particles (border-based fractal dimension close to 1.0) are more common in larger sizes (d50 = 1.8 μm), which may be attributed to aerosol aging and secondary aerosol formation. Between 06:00 and 09:00 a.m., smaller particles (d50 = 0.18 μm) had more irregular shapes resulting in higher border-based fractal dimensions (1.2-1.3) for samples with more local influence. EDS analysis in d50 = 0.18 μm particles showed high contents of carbonaceous material, Si, Fe, K, and Co. Perhaps, this indicates an impact from industrial and vehicle emissions on atmospheric particles at T1.

  4. Adaptive optical zoom sensor.

    SciTech Connect

    Sweatt, William C.; Bagwell, Brett E.; Wick, David Victor

    2005-11-01

    In order to optically vary the magnification of an imaging system, continuous mechanical zoom lenses require multiple optical elements and use fine mechanical motion to precisely adjust the separations between individual or groups of lenses. By incorporating active elements into the optical design, we have designed and demonstrated imaging systems that are capable of variable optical magnification with no macroscopic moving parts. Changing the effective focal length and magnification of an imaging system can be accomplished by adeptly positioning two or more active optics in the optical design and appropriately adjusting the optical power of those elements. In this application, the active optics (e.g. liquid crystal spatial light modulators or deformable mirrors) serve as variable focal-length lenses. Unfortunately, the range over which currently available devices can operate (i.e. their dynamic range) is relatively small. Therefore, the key to this concept is to create large changes in the effective focal length of the system with very small changes in the focal lengths of individual elements by leveraging the optical power of conventional optical elements surrounding the active optics. By appropriately designing the optical system, these variable focal-length lenses can provide the flexibility necessary to change the overall system focal length, and therefore magnification, that is normally accomplished with mechanical motion in conventional zoom lenses.

  5. Final Report: Imaging of Buried Nanoscale Optically Active Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Appelbaum, Ian

    2011-07-05

    This is a final report covering work done at University of Maryland to develop a Ballistic Electron Emission Luminescence (BEEL) microscope. This technique was intended to examine the carrier transport and photon emission in deeply buried optically-active layers and thereby provide a means for materials science to unmask the detailed consequences of experimentally controllable growth parameters, such as quantum dot size, statistics and orientation, and defect density and charge recombination pathways.

  6. Demonstrating Optical Activity Using an iPad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Pauline M.; Lepore, Dante M.; Morneau, Brandy N.; Barratt, Carl

    2011-01-01

    Optical activity using an iPad as a source of polarized light is demonstrated. A sample crystal or solution can be placed on the iPad running a white screen app. The sample is viewed through a polarized filter that can be rotated. This setup can be used in the laboratory or with a document camera to easily project in a large lecture hall.…

  7. Synthesis of Optically Active Polystyrene Catalyzed by Monophosphine Pd Complexes.

    PubMed

    Jouffroy, Matthieu; Armspach, Dominique; Matt, Dominique; Osakada, Kohtaro; Takeuchi, Daisuke

    2016-07-11

    Cationic Pd(II) monophosphine complexes derived from α- and β-cyclodextrins (CDs) promote the homopolymerization of styrene under carbon monoxide pressure. Although reversible CO coordination takes place under catalytic conditions according to (13) C NMR studies with (13) C-enriched CO, both complexes catalyze the formation of CO-free styrene polymers. These macromolecules display optical activity as a result of the presence of stereoregular sequences within the overall atactic polymer. PMID:27218801

  8. 3D imaging with the light sword optical element and deconvolution of distance-dependent point spread functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowski, Michal; Petelczyc, Krzysztof; Kolodziejczyk, Andrzej; Jaroszewicz, Zbigniew; Ducin, Izabela; Kakarenko, Karol; Siemion, Agnieszka; Siemion, Andrzej; Suszek, Jaroslaw; Sypek, Maciej; Wojnowski, Dariusz

    2010-12-01

    The experimental demonstration of a blind deconvolution method on an imaging system with a Light Sword optical element (LSOE) used instead of a lens. Try-and-error deconvolution of known Point Spread Functions (PSF) from an input image captured on a single CCD camera is done. By establishing the optimal PSF providing the optimal contrast of optotypes seen in a frame, one can know the defocus parameter and hence the object distance. Therefore with a single exposure on a standard CCD camera we gain information on the depth of a 3-D scene. Exemplary results for a simple scene containing three optotypes at three distances from the imaging element are presented.

  9. Active hexagonally segmented mirror to investigate new optical phasing technologies for segmented telescopes.

    PubMed

    Gonté, Frédéric; Dupuy, Christophe; Luong, Bruno; Frank, Christoph; Brast, Roland; Sedghi, Baback

    2009-11-10

    The primary mirror of the future European Extremely Large Telescope will be equipped with 984 hexagonal segments. The alignment of the segments in piston, tip, and tilt within a few nanometers requires an optical phasing sensor. A test bench has been designed to study four different optical phasing sensor technologies. The core element of the test bench is an active segmented mirror composed of 61 flat hexagonal segments with a size of 17 mm side to side. Each of them can be controlled in piston, tip, and tilt by three piezoactuators with a precision better than 1 nm. The context of this development, the requirements, the design, and the integration of this system are explained. The first results on the final precision obtained in closed-loop control are also presented. PMID:19904341

  10. Puckering Energetics and Optical Activities of [7]Circulene Conformers.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Masashi

    2016-02-25

    The structural preference of [7]circulene is analyzed by taking into account vibronic interactions. DFT calculations reveal that pseudo-Jahn-Teller effects cause the D7h-symmetry structure to relax to C2- and Cs-symmetry structures, which are both ca. 9 kcal/mol lower in energy than the D7h structure. In energy terms, the C2-symmetry structure is 0.05 kcal/mol lower than that of the Cs-symmetry. The active vibrations are attributed to low-frequency puckering modes that are coupled with π-σ excitation states. The optical activities of the C2-symmetry structure were simulated by configuration interaction calculations, and the simulated CD/ORD spectra were reasonable and consistent with the experimental data. The optical rotatory strengths obeyed the helix rule; that is, the left-handed helix shows negative Cotton effects through the antisymmetric excited states. The calculated spectra will serve as a foundation for further investigation of optical activities of negatively curved structures. PMID:26829071

  11. Preconcentration and Speciation of Trace Elements and Trace-Element Analogues of Radionuclides by Neutron Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chatt, A.

    1999-11-14

    We have developed a number of preconcentration neutron activation analysis (PNAA) methods in our laboratory for the determination of trace elements in a variety of complex sample matrices. We developed a number of cocrystallization and coprecipitation methods for the determination of trace elements in water samples. We developed several methods for the determination of I in foods and diets. We have developed a number of PNAA methods in our laboratory We determined As and Sb in geological materials and natural waters by coprecipitation with Se and Au in silicate rocks and ores by coprecipitation with Te followed by NAA. We developed an indirect NAA method for the determination of B in leachates of borosilicate glass. We have been interested in studying the speciation of Am, Tc, and Np in simulated vitrified groundwater leachates of high-level wastes under oxid and anoxic conditions using a number of techniques. We then used PNAA methods to study speciation of trace-element analogues of radionuclides. We have been able to apply biochemical techniques and NAA for the separation, preconcentration, and characterization of metalloprotein and protein-bound trace-element species in subcellular fractions of bovine kidneys. Lately, we have concentrated our efforts to develop chemical and biochemical methods in conjunction with NAA, NMR, and MS for the separation and identification of extractable organohalogens (EOX) in tissues of beluga whales, cod, and northern pink shrimp

  12. The research and realization of digital management platform for ultra-precision optical elements within life-cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juan; Wang, Jian; Li, Lijuan; Zhou, Kun

    2014-08-01

    In order to solve the information fusion, process integration, collaborative design and manufacturing for ultra-precision optical elements within life-cycle management, this paper presents a digital management platform which is based on product data and business processes by adopting the modern manufacturing technique, information technique and modern management technique. The architecture and system integration of the digital management platform are discussed in this paper. The digital management platform can realize information sharing and interaction for information-flow, control-flow and value-stream from user's needs to offline in life-cycle, and it can also enhance process control, collaborative research and service ability of ultra-precision optical elements.

  13. Space Active Optics: toward optimized correcting mirrors for future large spaceborne observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laslandes, Marie; Hugot, Emmanuel; Ferrari, Marc; Lemaitre, Gérard; Liotard, Arnaud

    2011-10-01

    Wave-front correction in optical instruments is often needed, either to compensate Optical Path Differences, off-axis aberrations or mirrors deformations. Active optics techniques are developed to allow efficient corrections with deformable mirrors. In this paper, we will present the conception of particular deformation systems which could be used in space telescopes and instruments in order to improve their performances while allowing relaxing specifications on the global system stability. A first section will be dedicated to the design and performance analysis of an active mirror specifically designed to compensate for aberrations that might appear in future 3m-class space telescopes, due to lightweight primary mirrors, thermal variations or weightless conditions. A second section will be dedicated to a brand new design of active mirror, able to compensate for given combinations of aberrations with a single actuator. If the aberrations to be corrected in an instrument and their evolutions are known in advance, an optimal system geometry can be determined thanks to the elasticity theory and Finite Element Analysis.

  14. Active phase compensation system for fiber optic holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Carolyn R.; Beheim, Glenn

    1989-01-01

    Fiber optic delivery systems promise to extend the application of holography to severe environments by simplifying test configurations and permitting the laser to be remotely placed in a more benign location. However, the introduction of optical fiber leads to phase stability problems. Environmental effects cause the pathlengths of the fibers to change randomly, preventing the formation of stationary interference patterns which are required for holography. An active phase control system has been designed and used with an all-fiber optical system to stabilize the phase difference between light emitted from two fibers, and to step the phase difference by 90 deg without applying any constraints on the placement of the fibers. The accuracy of the phase steps is shown to be better than 0.02 deg., and a stable phase difference can be maintained for 30 min. This system can be applied to both conventional and electro-optic holography, as well as to any system where the maintenance of an accurate phase difference between two coherent beams is required.

  15. Active phase compensation system for fiber optic holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Carolyn R.; Beheim, Glenn

    1988-01-01

    Fiber optic delivery systems promise to extend the application of holography to severe environments by simplifying test configurations and permitting the laser to be remotely placed in a more benign location. However, the introduction of optical fiber leads to phase stability problems. Environmental effects cause the pathlengths of the fibers to change randomly, preventing the formation of stationary interference patterns which are required for holography. An active phase control system has been designed and used with an all-fiber optical system to stabilize the phase difference between light emitted from two fibers, and to step the phase difference by 90 deg without applying any constraints on the placement of the fibers. The accuracy of the phase steps is shown to be better than 0.02 deg., and a stable phase difference can be maintained for 30 min. This system can be applied to both conventional and electro-optic holography, as well as to any system where the maintenance of an accurate phase difference between two coherent beams is required.

  16. Characterization of photoresist and simulation of a developed resist profile for the fabrication of gray-scale diffractive optic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jong Rak; Sierchio, Justin; Zaverton, Melissa; Kim, Youngsik; Milster, Tom D.

    2012-02-01

    We have characterized a photoresist used for the fabrication of gray-scale diffractive optic elements in terms of Dill's and Mack's model parameters. The resist model parameters were employed for the simulations of developed resist profiles for sawtooth patterns executed by solving the Eikonal equation with the fast-marching method. The simulated results were shown to be in good agreement with empirical data.

  17. Element-specific soft x-ray magneto-optic rotation studies of magnetic films and multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Kortright, J.B.; Rice, M.

    1996-05-01

    Tunable multilayer linear polarizers extend magneto-optic rotation techniques that directly sense polarization changes into the 50--1,000 eV range. The resonant response at atomic core levels yields element-specific magnetic signals that can be much larger than the analogous signal in the visible. A tunable multilayer polarimeter is described, and examples of its use in early Kerr rotation hysteresis studies of Fe films and Fe/Cr multilayers are given.

  18. Low-power MOEMS components for active optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castracane, James; Yan, Dong; Madison, Seth; Xu, Bai

    2004-01-01

    The eventual, widespread insertion of Micro-Opto-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MOEMS) into the marketplace rests fundamentally on the ability to produce viable components that maximize optical performance while minimizing power consumption and size. In addition, the incorporation of optical reconfigurability into custom MOEMS devices offers an extra degree of freedom not possible with conventional components. Active control of surface topology allows for one component to perform multiple functions thus reducing cost and complexity. This paper will focus on the current status of the MOEMS research program at the University at Albany Institute for Materials" (UAIM) NanoFab 200 with several examples described to illustrate component and system development. In particular, among the MOEMS research portfolio at UAIM, the development of selected MOEMS-based, active optics will be discussed. This active control of diffraction and reflection forms the basis for the utility of such devices. Leveraging the extensive research expertise on the patented MEMS Compound Grating (MCG), emphasis will be placed on the extension of the approach to novel designs, materials and fabrication methods to yield low power, high performance prototypes. The main focus of this paper is on the development of a polymer version (including sacrificial layer, in some designs) of the MCG which allows for ease of fabrication and a reduced electrostatic actuation voltage. Following a system design effort, several generations of the component were fabricated to optimize the process flow. Component metrology, electromechanical characterization and initial results of optical tests will be reported. A second example presented is the design and prototype fabrication of a spring micrograting using a customized SOI process. This highly flexible component builds on the MCG concept and yields an order of magnitude reduction in actuation voltage. These examples will be presented against a backdrop of the broad UAIM

  19. Space bandwidth product enhancement of holographic display using high-order diffraction guided by holographic optical element.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Jeong, Jinsoo; Lee, Dukho; Yeom, Jiwoon; Jang, Changwon; Lee, Seungjae; Lee, Byoungho

    2015-12-28

    A space bandwidth product (SBP) enhancement method for holographic display using high-order diffraction of a spatial light modulator (SLM) is proposed. Among numerous high order diffraction terms, the plus-minus first and the zeroth are adopted and guided by holographic optical elements (HOEs) to an identical direction with the same intensity. By using a set of electro-shutters synchronized with corresponding order component, the system acts as if three SLMs are tiled in the horizontal direction. To confirm the feasibility of using HOE as the guiding optics for the system, several optical characteristics of the recording material are measured before using them. Furthermore, a computer generated hologram algorithm is proposed for compensating the wavefront distortion caused by use of the HOE. The demonstrated system achieves a three-fold increase in SBP of a single SLM. The results are verified experimentally. PMID:26831985

  20. Investigation of Lamb Waves Propagation by Fibre-Coupling Optical Beam Deflection Detection Technique and Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiao; Xu, Bo-qiang; Xu, Rong-qing; Shen, Zhong-hua; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiao-wu

    2004-02-01

    Measurement of laser-generated transient Lamb waves propagation has been performed in 0.25 mm-thick iron plate by using a fibre sensor based on optical beam deflection technique. The detection principle of this optical method is discussed in detail. A high-powered Q-switched Nd:YAG laser was used to excite Lamb waves on the polished surface of iron plate. The well-defined Lamb waveforms, as well as their properties of oscillation and dispersion are presented in this paper. Furthermore, according to the ablation model, the development and propagation of Lamb waves are numerical simulated by the finite element method that has been widely used in laser ultrasonic field. The experimental results show good agreement with the numerical simulation. Therefore, this optical detection technique has considerable potential in ultrasonic field.

  1. Building blocks for actively-aligned micro-optical systems in rapid prototyping and small series production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttger, Gunnar; Queisser, Marco; Arndt-Staufenbiel, Norbert; Schröder, Henning; Lang, K.-D.

    2015-03-01

    In recent years there has been considerable progress in utilizing fully automated machines for the assembly of microoptical systems. Such systems integrate laser sources, optical elements and detectors into tight packages, and efficiently couple light to free space beams, waveguides in optical backplanes, or optical fibers for longer reach transmission. The required electrical-optical and optical components are placed and aligned actively in more than one respect. For one, all active components are actually operated in the alignment process, and, more importantly, the placing of all components is controlled actively by camera systems and power detectors with live feedback for an optimal coupling efficiency. The total number of optical components typically is in the range of 5 to 50, whereas the number of actors with gripping tools for the actual handling and aligning is limited, with little flexibility in the gripping width. The assembly process therefore is strictly sequential and, given that an automated tool changing has not been established in this class of machines yet, there are either limitations in the geometries of components that may be used, or time-consuming interaction by human operators is needed. As a solution we propose and present lasered glass building blocks with standardized gripping geometries that enclose optical elements of various shapes and functionalities. These are cut as free form geometries with green short pulse and CO2 lasers. What seems to add cost at first rather increases freedom of design and adds an economical flexibility to create very hybrid assemblies of various micro-optical assemblies also in small numbers.

  2. Emergy Evaluations of the Global Biogeochemical Cycles of Six Biologically Active Elements and Two Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimates of the emergy carried by the flows of biologically active elements (BAE) and compounds are needed to accurately evaluate the near and far field effects of anthropogenic wastes. The transformities and specific emergies of these elements and of their different chemical sp...

  3. Numerical study on the optical coupling by evanescent whispering gallery modes between two microspheres with discontinuous spectral element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Nailong

    Our research is motivated by the concept of Coupled Resonator Optical Waveguides (CROWs) [Aya99, Nst98, Bel97] emerged only a few years ago as a new way of integrating coupled cavities onto a single chip. This concept can be used to manipulate light paths and photonic dispersions [Tmu99, Bmm04] on a microscopic scale. Due to the weak evanescent coupling between adjacent high quality resonators, the group velocity of light can be significantly reduced in such structures leading to applications in optical buffering and controllable delay lines. CROWs are not limited to coupled defects in photonic crystals and can be realized in a coherent coupling of whispering gallery modes (WGMs) in microrings [Bel97], microdisks, dielectric bispheres [Tmu99, Bmm04] and long chains [Vna04] of microspheres. To numerically study the optical coupling by evanescent WGMs between two microspheres, the building blocks of coupled resonator optical waveguide devices, we introduce a high-order time-domain discontinuous spectral element method to the 3-D Maxwell's equations, and propose a mesh generation method for optical coupled spherical resonators with well conditioned mass matrices. A Legendre orthogonal polynomial basis is used on cubes, cuboids, and truncated square pyramids with a spherical surface. A general multidomain scheme is developed to simulate scattering of plane wave by a dielectric sphere, and the corresponding numerical results demonstrate the exponential convergence of the discontinuous spectral element method (DSEM) with increasing expansion order. The numerical results of WGMs show the successful optical coupling of WGMs between two microspheres, and validate our numerical method and algorithms. Finally, an algorithm for improving the efficiency of DSEM is proposed, and a theorem to estimate the maximum error, introduced by this algorithm, is proved.

  4. In-flight aberrations corrections for large space telescopes using active optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laslandes, M.; Ferrari, M.; Hugot, E.; Lemaitre, G.

    2010-07-01

    The need for both high quality images and light structures is a constant concern in the conception of space telescopes. The goal here is to determine how an active optics system could be embarked on a satellite in order to correct the wave front deformations of the optical train. The optical aberrations appearing in a space environment are due to mirrors' deformations, with three main origins: the thermal variations, the weightlessness in space with respect to the Assemblage, Integration and Testing (AIT) conditions on ground and the use of large weightlighted primary mirrors. We are developing a model of deformable mirror as minimalist as possible, especially in term of number of actuators, which is able to correct the first Zernike polynomials in the specified range of amplitude and precision. Flight constraints as weight, volume and power consumption have to be considered. Firstly, such a system is designed according to the equations from the elasticity theory: we determine the geometrical and mechanical characteristics of the mirror, the location of the forces to be applied and the way to apply them. The concept is validated with a Finite Element Analysis (FEA), allowing optimizing the system by taking into account parameters absent from the theory. At the end of the program the mirror will be realized and characterized in a representative optical configuration.

  5. Space active optics: in situ compensation of lightweight primary mirrors' deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laslandes, M.; Ferrari, M.; Hugot, E.; Lemaitre, G.

    2010-12-01

    The need for both high quality images and light structures is a constant concern in the conception of space telescopes. The goal here is to determine how an active optics system could be embarked on a satellite in order to correct the wave front deformations of the optical train. The optical aberrations appearing in a space environment are due to mirrors' deformations, with three main origins: the thermal variations, the weightlessness conditions and the use of large weightlighted primary mirrors. We are developing a model of deformable mirror as minimalist as possible, especially in term of number of actuators, which is able to correct the first Zernike polynomials in a specified range of amplitude and precision. Flight constraints as weight, volume and power consumption are considered. Firstly, such a system is designed according to the equations from the elasticity theory: we determine the geometrical and mechanical characteristics of the mirror, the location of the forces to be applied and the way to apply them. Then the concept is validated with a Finite Element Analysis, allowing to optimize the system by taking into account parameters absent from the theory. At the end, the mirror will be realized and characterized in a representative optical configuration.

  6. Randomly varying micro-optical elements for the generation of uniform intensity profiles in coherent laser sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weible, K. J.; Bich, A.; Roth, S.; Dumouchel, C.; Pernet, P.; Eisner, M.; Völkel, R.; Bitterli, R.; Scharf, T.; Noell, W.

    2008-08-01

    A wide range of lasers from the UV to the IR are selected based on their optical power and spectral characteristics to match the particular absorption behavior for the material to be processed. Periodic microlens arrays are often used as multi-aperture integrators to transform the Gaussian or non-uniform beam profile into a homogenized intensity profile either in 1-D or 2-D distribution. Each microlens element samples the input inhomogeneous beam and spreads it over a given angular distribution. Incoherent beams that are either temporally or spatially incoherent can produce very uniform intensity profiles. However, coherent beams will experience interference effects in the recombination of the beams generated by each individual microlens element. For many applications, for example pulsed laser sources, it is not possible to use a rotating or moving element, such as a rotating diffuser, to circumvent the interferences resulting from the beam coherence. Micro-optical elements comprised of a randomly varying component can be used to help smooth out the interference effects within the far-field intensity profile.

  7. Active alignment and vibration control system for a large airborne optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kienholz, David A.

    2000-04-01

    Airborne optical or electro-optical systems may be too large for all elements to be mounted on a single integrating structure, other than the aircraft fuselage itself. An active system must then be used to maintain the required alignment between elements. However the various smaller integrating structures (benches) must still be isolated from high- frequency airframe disturbances that could excite resonances outside the bandwidth of the alignment control system. The combined active alignment and vibration isolation functions must be performed by flight-weight components, which may have to operate in vacuum. A testbed system developed for the Air Force Airborne Laser program is described. The payload, a full-scale 1650-lb simulated bench, is mounted in six degrees- of-freedom to a vibrating platform by a set of isolator- actuators. The mounts utilize a combination of pneumatics and magnetics to perform the dual functions of low-frequency alignment and high-frequency isolation. Test results are given and future directions for development are described.

  8. KEPLER OBSERVATIONS OF RAPID OPTICAL VARIABILITY IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Mushotzky, R. F.; Edelson, R.; Baumgartner, W.

    2011-12-10

    Over three quarters in 2010-2011, Kepler monitored optical emission from four active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with {approx}30 minute sampling, >90% duty cycle, and {approx}<0.1% repeatability. These data determined the AGN optical fluctuation power spectral density (PSD) functions over a wide range in temporal frequency. Fits to these PSDs yielded power-law slopes of -2.6 to -3.3, much steeper than typically seen in the X-rays. We find evidence that individual AGNs exhibit intrinsically different PSD slopes. The steep PSD fits are a challenge to recent AGN variability models but seem consistent with first-order magnetorotational instability theoretical calculations of accretion disk fluctuations.

  9. Active terahertz device based on optically controlled organometal halide perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Lv, Longfeng; He, Ting; Chen, Tianji; Zang, Mengdi; Zhong, Liang; Wang, Xinke; Shen, Jingling; Hou, Yanbing

    2015-08-01

    An active all-optical high-efficiency broadband terahertz device based on an organometal halide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3, MAPbI3)/inorganic (Si) structure is investigated. Spectrally broadband modulation of the THz transmission is obtained in the frequency range from 0.2 to 2.6 THz, and a modulation depth of nearly 100% can be achieved with a low-level photoexcitation power (˜0.4 W/cm2). Both THz transmission and reflection were suppressed in the MAPbI3/Si structure by an external continuous-wave (CW) laser. Enhancement of the charge carrier density at the MAPbI3/Si interface is crucial for photo-induced absorption. The results show that the proposed high-efficiency broadband optically controlled terahertz device based on the MAPbI3/Si structure has been realized.

  10. Determination of elemental carbon in lake sediments using a thermal-optical transmittance (TOT) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, A. J.; Swami, Kamal; Ahmed, Tanveer; Bari, A.; Shareef, Akhtar; Husain, Liaquat

    2009-12-01

    An improved chemical oxidation pretreatment method has been developed for the determination of elemental carbon (EC) [also known as black carbon (BC) or soot] in lake sediments, using a thermal-optical transmittance (TOT) carbon analyzer. The method employs six steps: (1) removal of carbonates by treatment with HCl; (2) removal of silicates by treatment with HF + HCl; (3) removal of any remaining carbonates by treatment with HCl; (4) removal of humic acids by treatment with NaOH; and (5) oxidation of kerogens by K 2Cr 2O 7 + H 2SO 4. A critical step of zinc chloride treatment was added; this apparently changes EC's morphology and enhances retention on quartz fiber filter, resulting in several-fold increased chemical yield. EC was determined using the TOT method with modified combustion timings. Carbon black (acetylene) and four NIST standard reference materials (SRMs) were used for quality control, and to assess the precision of the analysis. The EC recoveries from 18 carbon black samples varied from 90 to 111%, with a mean value of 99 ± 6%. The high EC recoveries confirmed the validity of the method. Char reference materials (i.e. chestnut wood and grass char) were used to determine potential contribution to EC in our measurements. The char references containing about 700 mg total organic carbon (OC) contributed ˜1.5% EC. The measured EC values from four NIST standards were 17.0 ± 0.6, 24.2 ± 3.2, 5.6, and 1.9 ± 0.1 mg g dw-1 for SRM-1648, SRM-1649a, SRM-1941b and SRM-8704, respectively. These values in SRMs were in agreement (<±4%) with the previously reported values. The method was applied to determine the EC in sediment cores from an urban lake and a remote mountain lake in the Northeastern United States. The EC concentrations in two lakes mimic the model EC emissions from the industrial revolution in United States.

  11. Predicting ambient aerosol thermal-optical reflectance measurements from infrared spectra: elemental carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2015-10-01

    Elemental carbon (EC) is an important constituent of atmospheric particulate matter because it absorbs solar radiation influencing climate and visibility and it adversely affects human health. The EC measured by thermal methods such as thermal-optical reflectance (TOR) is operationally defined as the carbon that volatilizes from quartz filter samples at elevated temperatures in the presence of oxygen. Here, methods are presented to accurately predict TOR EC using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from atmospheric particulate matter collected on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters. This method is similar to the procedure developed for OC in prior work (Dillner and Takahama, 2015). Transmittance FT-IR analysis is rapid, inexpensive and nondestructive to the PTFE filter samples which are routinely collected for mass and elemental analysis in monitoring networks. FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 filter samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites collected during 2011. Partial least squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to collocated TOR EC measurements. The FT-IR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets. Two calibrations are developed: one developed from uniform distribution of samples across the EC mass range (Uniform EC) and one developed from a uniform distribution of Low EC mass samples (EC < 2.4 μg, Low Uniform EC). A hybrid approach which applies the Low EC calibration to Low EC samples and the Uniform EC calibration to all other samples is used to produce predictions for Low EC samples that have mean error on par with parallel TOR EC samples in the same mass range and an estimate of the minimum detection limit (MDL) that is on par with TOR EC MDL. For all samples, this hybrid approach leads to precise and accurate TOR EC predictions by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of determination (R2; 0.96), no bias (0.00 μg m-3, a

  12. Liquid gallium metal cooling for optical elements with high heat loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smither, Robert K.; Forster, George A.; Kot, Christian A.; Kuzay, Tuncer M.

    1988-04-01

    The intense photon beams from the insertion devices of the Argonne Advanced Photon Source (APS) will have very high total powers, which in some cases will exceed 10 kW, spread over a few cm 2. These high heat loads will require special cooling methods for the optical elements to preserve the quality of the photon beam. A set of finite element analysis calculations were made in three dimensions to determine the temperature distributions and thermal stresses in a single crystal of silicon with heat loads of 2-20 kW. Different geometric arrangements and different cooling fluids (water, gallium, oil, Na, etc.) were considered. These data were then used in a second set of calculations to determine the distortion of the surface of the crystal and the change in the crystal plane spacing for different parts of the surface. The best heat transfer, smallest surface distortions and smallest temperature gradients on the surface of the crystals were obtained when the cooling fluid was allowed to flow through channels in the crystal. The two best fluids for room temperature operation were found to be water and liquid gallium metal. In all cases tried, the variation in temperature across the face of the crystal and the distortion of the surface was at least a factor of two less for the gallium cooling case than for the water cooling case. The water cooling was effective only for very high flow rates. These high flow rates can cause vibrations in the diffraction crystal and in its mount that can seriously degrade the quality of the diffracted photon beam. When the flow rates were decreased the gallium cooling became 3-10 times more effective. This very efficient cooling and the very low vapor pressure for liquid gallium (less than 10 -12 Torr at 100°C) make liquid gallium a very attractive cooling fluid for high vacuum synchrotron applications. A small electromagnetic induction pump for liquid Ga was built to test this cooling method. A pumping volume of 100 cm 3/s was achieved

  13. Predicting ambient aerosol Thermal Optical Reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: elemental carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2015-06-01

    Elemental carbon (EC) is an important constituent of atmospheric particulate matter because it absorbs solar radiation influencing climate and visibility and it adversely affects human health. The EC measured by thermal methods such as Thermal-Optical Reflectance (TOR) is operationally defined as the carbon that volatilizes from quartz filter samples at elevated temperatures in the presence of oxygen. Here, methods are presented to accurately predict TOR EC using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from atmospheric particulate matter collected on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters. This method is similar to the procedure tested and developed for OC in prior work (Dillner and Takahama, 2015). Transmittance FT-IR analysis is rapid, inexpensive, and non-destructive to the PTFE filter samples which are routinely collected for mass and elemental analysis in monitoring networks. FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 filter samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites collected during 2011. Partial least squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to collocated TOR EC measurements. The FTIR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets. Two calibrations are developed, one which is developed from uniform distribution of samples across the EC mass range (Uniform EC) and one developed from a~uniform distribution of low EC mass samples (EC < 2.4 μg, Low Uniform EC). A hybrid approach which applies the low EC calibration to low EC samples and the Uniform EC calibration to all other samples is used to produces predictions for low EC samples that have mean error on par with parallel TOR EC samples in the same mass range and an estimate of the minimum detection limit (MDL) that is on par with TOR EC MDL. For all samples, this hybrid approach leads to precise and accurate TOR EC predictions by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of variation (R2; 0.96), no

  14. Optical Control of Living Cells Electrical Activity by Conjugated Polymers.

    PubMed

    Martino, Nicola; Bossio, Caterina; Vaquero Morata, Susana; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Antognazza, Maria Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid interfaces between organic semiconductors and living tissues represent a new tool for in-vitro and in-vivo applications. In particular, conjugated polymers display several optimal properties as substrates for biological systems, such as good biocompatibility, excellent mechanical properties, cheap and easy processing technology, and possibility of deposition on light, thin and flexible substrates. These materials have been employed for cellular interfaces like neural probes, transistors for excitation and recording of neural activity, biosensors and actuators for drug release. Recent experiments have also demonstrated the possibility to use conjugated polymers for all-optical modulation of the electrical activity of cells. Several in-vitro study cases have been reported, including primary neuronal networks, astrocytes and secondary line cells. Moreover, signal photo-transduction mediated by organic polymers has been shown to restore light sensitivity in degenerated retinas, suggesting that these devices may be used for artificial retinal prosthesis in the future. All in all, light sensitive conjugated polymers represent a new approach for optical modulation of cellular activity. In this work, all the steps required to fabricate a bio-polymer interface for optical excitation of living cells are described. The function of the active interface is to transduce the light stimulus into a modulation of the cell membrane potential. As a study case, useful for in-vitro studies, a polythiophene thin film is used as the functional, light absorbing layer, and Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK-293) cells are employed as the biological component of the interface. Practical examples of successful control of the cell membrane potential upon stimulation with light pulses of different duration are provided. In particular, it is shown that both depolarizing and hyperpolarizing effects on the cell membrane can be achieved depending on the duration of the light stimulus. The reported

  15. Polymer optical fiber grating as water activity sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Webb, David J.

    2014-05-01

    Controlling the water content within a product has long been required in the chemical processing, agriculture, food storage, paper manufacturing, semiconductor, pharmaceutical and fuel industries. The limitations of water content measurement as an indicator of safety and quality are attributed to differences in the strength with which water associates with other components in the product. Water activity indicates how tightly water is "bound," structurally or chemically, in products. Water absorption introduces changes in the volume and refractive index of poly(methyl methacrylate) PMMA. Therefore for a grating made in PMMA based optical fiber, its wavelength is an indicator of water absorption and PMMA thus can be used as a water activity sensor. In this work we have investigated the performance of a PMMA based optical fiber grating as a water activity sensor in sugar solution, saline solution and Jet A-1 aviation fuel. Samples of sugar solution with sugar concentration from 0 to 8%, saline solution with concentration from 0 to 22%, and dried (10ppm), ambient (39ppm) and wet (68ppm) aviation fuels were used in experiments. The corresponding water activities are measured as 1.0 to 0.99 for sugar solution, 1.0 to 0.86 for saline solution, and 0.15, 0.57 and 1.0 for the aviation fuel samples. The water content in the measured samples ranges from 100% (pure water) to 10 ppm (dried aviation fuel). The PMMA based optical fiber grating exhibits good sensitivity and consistent response, and Bragg wavelength shifts as large as 3.4 nm when the sensor is transferred from dry fuel to wet fuel.

  16. Active Optics for a Segmented Primary Mirror on a Deep-Space Optical Receiver Antenna (DSORA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clymer, B. D.

    1990-01-01

    This article investigates the active optical control of segments in the primary mirror to correct for wavefront errors in the Deep-Space Optical Receiver Antenna (DSORA). Although an exact assessment of improvement in signal blur radius cannot be made until a more detailed preliminary structural design is completed, analytical tools are identified for a time when such designs become available. A brief survey of appropriate sensing approaches is given. Since the choice of control algorithm and architecture depends on the particular sensing system used, typical control systems, estimated complexities, and the type of equipment required are discussed. Once specific sensor and actuator systems are chosen, the overall control system can be optimized using methods identified in the literature.

  17. Optical impedance spectroscopy with single-mode electro-active-integrated optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Han, Xue; Mendes, Sergio B

    2014-02-01

    An optical impedance spectroscopy (OIS) technique based on a single-mode electro-active-integrated optical waveguide (EA-IOW) was developed to investigate electron-transfer processes of redox adsorbates. A highly sensitive single-mode EA-IOW device was used to optically follow the time-dependent faradaic current originated from a submonolayer of cytochrome c undergoing redox exchanges driven by a harmonic modulation of the electric potential at several dc bias potentials and at several frequencies. To properly retrieve the faradaic current density from the ac-modulated optical signal, we introduce here a mathematical formalism that (i) accounts for intrinsic changes that invariably occur in the optical baseline of the EA-IOW device during potential modulation and (ii) provides accurate results for the electro-chemical parameters. We are able to optically reconstruct the faradaic current density profile against the dc bias potential in the working electrode, identify the formal potential, and determine the energy-width of the electron-transfer process. In addition, by combining the optically reconstructed faradaic signal with simple electrical measurements of impedance across the whole electrochemical cell and the capacitance of the electric double-layer, we are able to determine the time-constant connected to the redox reaction of the adsorbed protein assembly. For cytochrome c directly immobilized onto the indium tin oxide (ITO) surface, we measured a reaction rate constant of 26.5 s(-1). Finally, we calculate the charge-transfer resistance and pseudocapacitance associated with the electron-transfer process and show that the frequency dependence of the redox reaction of the protein submonolayer follows as expected the electrical equivalent of an RC-series admittance diagram. Above all, we show here that OIS with single-mode EA-IOW's provide strong analytical signals that can be readily monitored even for small surface-densities of species involved in the redox

  18. Optical Impedance Spectroscopy with Single-Mode Electro-Active-Integrated Optical Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    An optical impedance spectroscopy (OIS) technique based on a single-mode electro-active-integrated optical waveguide (EA-IOW) was developed to investigate electron-transfer processes of redox adsorbates. A highly sensitive single-mode EA-IOW device was used to optically follow the time-dependent faradaic current originated from a submonolayer of cytochrome c undergoing redox exchanges driven by a harmonic modulation of the electric potential at several dc bias potentials and at several frequencies. To properly retrieve the faradaic current density from the ac-modulated optical signal, we introduce here a mathematical formalism that (i) accounts for intrinsic changes that invariably occur in the optical baseline of the EA-IOW device during potential modulation and (ii) provides accurate results for the electro-chemical parameters. We are able to optically reconstruct the faradaic current density profile against the dc bias potential in the working electrode, identify the formal potential, and determine the energy-width of the electron-transfer process. In addition, by combining the optically reconstructed faradaic signal with simple electrical measurements of impedance across the whole electrochemical cell and the capacitance of the electric double-layer, we are able to determine the time-constant connected to the redox reaction of the adsorbed protein assembly. For cytochrome c directly immobilized onto the indium tin oxide (ITO) surface, we measured a reaction rate constant of 26.5 s–1. Finally, we calculate the charge-transfer resistance and pseudocapacitance associated with the electron-transfer process and show that the frequency dependence of the redox reaction of the protein submonolayer follows as expected the electrical equivalent of an RC-series admittance diagram. Above all, we show here that OIS with single-mode EA-IOW’s provide strong analytical signals that can be readily monitored even for small surface-densities of species involved in the redox

  19. Compensation for thermally induced birefringence in polycrystalline ceramic active elements

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, M A; Khazanov, E A

    2003-10-31

    Polycrystalline ceramics differ significantly from single crystals in that the crystallographic axes (and hence of the axes of thermally induced birefringence) are oriented randomly in each granule of the ceramic. The quaternion formalism is employed to calculate the depolarisation in the ceramics and the efficiency of its compensation. The obtained analytic expressions are in good agreement with the numerical relations. It is shown that the larger the ratio of the sample length to the granule size, the closer the properties of the ceramics to those of a single crystal with the [111] orientation (in particular, the uncompensated depolarisation is inversely proportional to this ratio). (active media)

  20. Optimal placement of active elements in control augmented structural synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepulveda, A. E.; Jin, I. M.; Schmit, L. A., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A methodology for structural/control synthesis is presented in which the optimal location of active members is treated in terms of (0,1) variables. Structural member sizes, control gains and (0,1) placement variables are treated simultaneously as design variables. Optimization is carried out by generating and solving a sequence of explicit approximate problems using a branch and bound strategy. Intermediate design variable and intermediate response quantity concepts are used to enhance the quality of the approximate design problems. Numerical results for example problems are presented to illustrate the efficacy of the design procedure set forth.

  1. neutron activation analysis using thermochromatography. II. thermochromatographic separation of elements in the analysis of geological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Sattarov, G.; Davydov, A.V.; Khamatov, S.; Kist, A.A.

    1986-07-01

    The use of gas thermochromatography (GTC) in the radioactivation analysis of difficulty soluble samples with a strongly activating substrate is discussed. The effect of sample coarseness and ore type on the rate of extraction of gold and accompanying elements was studied. The limits of detection of 22 elements were compared using neutron activation analysis with GTC and INAA. The analytical parameters of the procedure were estimated.

  2. Using DFT Methods to Study Activators in Optical Materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Du, Mao-Hua

    2015-08-17

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of various activators (ranging from transition metal ions, rare-earth ions, ns2 ions, to self-trapped and dopant-bound excitons) in phosphors and scintillators are reviewed. As a single-particle ground-state theory, DFT calculations cannot reproduce the experimentally observed optical spectra, which involve transitions between multi-electronic states. However, DFT calculations can generally provide sufficiently accurate structural relaxation and distinguish different hybridization strengths between an activator and its ligands in different host compounds. This is important because the activator-ligand interaction often governs the trends in luminescence properties in phosphors and scintillators, and can be used to search for new materials.more » DFT calculations of the electronic structure of the host compound and the positions of the activator levels relative to the host band edges in scintillators are also important for finding optimal host-activator combinations for high light yields and fast scintillation response. Mn4+ activated red phosphors, scintillators activated by Ce3+, Eu2+, Tl+, and excitons are shown as examples of using DFT calculations in phosphor and scintillator research.« less

  3. Using DFT Methods to Study Activators in Optical Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Mao-Hua

    2015-08-17

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of various activators (ranging from transition metal ions, rare-earth ions, ns2 ions, to self-trapped and dopant-bound excitons) in phosphors and scintillators are reviewed. As a single-particle ground-state theory, DFT calculations cannot reproduce the experimentally observed optical spectra, which involve transitions between multi-electronic states. However, DFT calculations can generally provide sufficiently accurate structural relaxation and distinguish different hybridization strengths between an activator and its ligands in different host compounds. This is important because the activator-ligand interaction often governs the trends in luminescence properties in phosphors and scintillators, and can be used to search for new materials. DFT calculations of the electronic structure of the host compound and the positions of the activator levels relative to the host band edges in scintillators are also important for finding optimal host-activator combinations for high light yields and fast scintillation response. Mn4+ activated red phosphors, scintillators activated by Ce3+, Eu2+, Tl+, and excitons are shown as examples of using DFT calculations in phosphor and scintillator research.

  4. Zeno inhibition of polarization rotation in an optically active medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalo, Isabel; Porras, Miguel A.; Luis, Alfredo

    2015-07-01

    We describe an experiment in which the rotation of the polarization of light propagating in an optically active water solution of D-fructose tends to be inhibited by frequent monitoring whether the polarization remains unchanged. This is an example of the Zeno effect that has remarkable pedagogical interest because of its conceptual simplicity, easy implementation, low cost, and because the same the Zeno effect holds at classical and quantum levels. An added value is the demonstration of the Zeno effect beyond typical idealized assumptions in a practical setting with real polarizers.

  5. Active optics control of VST telescope secondary mirror.

    PubMed

    Schipani, Pietro; D'Orsi, Sergio; Fierro, Davide; Marty, Laurent

    2010-06-01

    In telescopes based on active optics, defocus and coma are usually compensated for by secondary mirror movements. They are performed at the Very Large Telescope Survey Telescope (VST) with a hexapod--a parallel robot with six degrees of freedom positioning capability. We describe the application of the two-mirror telescope theory to the VST case and the solutions adopted for the hexapod control. We present the results of performance and reliability tests performed both in the laboratory and at the telescope. PMID:20517391

  6. Multistate transitions and quantum oscillations of optical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Celia; Hochberg, David

    2012-02-01

    We consider the effects of multistate transitions on the tunneling racemization of chiral molecules. This requires going beyond simple two-state models of enantiomers and to include transitions within a multiple-level quantum-mechanical system. We derive an effective two-level description which accounts for transitions from the enantiomers to an arbitrary number of excited states as an application of the Weisskopf-Wigner approximation scheme. Modifications to the optical activity from these additional states are considered in general terms under the assumption of CPT invariance and then under T invariance. Some formal dynamical analogies between enantiomers and the neutral K-meson system are discussed.

  7. (Bio)hybrid materials based on optically active particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitzig, Manuela; Härtling, Thomas; Opitz, Jörg

    2014-03-01

    In this contribution we provide an overview of current investigations on optically active particles (nanodiamonds, upconversion phospors) for biohybrid and sensing applications. Due to their outstanding properties nanodiamonds gain attention in various application elds such as microelectronics, optical monitoring, medicine, and biotechnology. Beyond the typical diamond properties such as high thermal conductivity and extreme hardness, the carbon surface and its various functional groups enable diverse chemical and biological surface functionalization. At Fraunhofer IKTS-MD we develop a customization of material surfaces via integration of chemically modi ed nanodiamonds at variable surfaces, e.g bone implants and pipelines. For the rst purpose, nanodiamonds are covalently modi ed at their surface with amino or phosphate functionalities that are known to increase adhesion to bone or titanium alloys. The second type of surface is approached via mechanical implementation into coatings. Besides nanodiamonds, we also investigate the properties of upconversion phosphors. In our contribution we show how upconversion phosphors are used to verify sterilization processes via a change of optical properties due to sterilizing electron beam exposure.

  8. Application of Optical Biosensors in Small-Molecule Screening Activities

    PubMed Central

    Geschwindner, Stefan; Carlsson, Johan F.; Knecht, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    The last two decades have seen remarkable progress and improvements in optical biosensor systems such that those are currently seen as an important and value-adding component of modern drug screening activities. In particular the introduction of microplate-based biosensor systems holds the promise to match the required throughput without compromising on data quality thus representing a sought-after complement to traditional fluidic systems. This article aims to highlight the application of the two most prominent optical biosensor technologies, namely surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and optical waveguide grating (OWG), in small-molecule screening and will present, review and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different assay formats on these platforms. A particular focus will be on the specific advantages of the inhibition in solution assay (ISA) format in contrast to traditional direct binding assays (DBA). Furthermore we will discuss different application areas for both fluidic as well as plate-based biosensor systems by considering the individual strength of the platforms. PMID:22666031

  9. Which Neuronal Elements are Activated Directly by Spinal Cord Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Holsheimer, Jan

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss which nerve fibers in the various quadrants of the spinal cord are immediately activated under normal conditions of spinal cord stimulation, ie, at voltages within the therapeutic range. The conclusions are based on both empirical and computer modeling data. The recruitment of dorsal column (DC) fibers is most likely restricted to Aβ fibers with a diameter ≥ 10.7 μm in a 0.20-0.25 mm layer under the pia mater and fibers of 9.4-10.7 μm in an even smaller outer layer when a conventional SCS lead is used. In a 0.25-mm outer layer of the T11 segment the number of Aβ fibers ≥ 10.7 μm, as estimated in a recent morphometric study, is about 56 in each DC. Because a DC at T11 innervates 12 dermatomes, a maximum of 4-5 fibers (≥ 10.7 μm) may be recruited in each dermatome near the discomfort threshold. The dermatome activated just below the discomfort threshold is likely to be stimulated by just a single fiber, suggesting that paresthesia and pain relief may be effected in a dermatome by the stimulation of a single large Aβ fiber. The depth of stimulation in the DCs, and thereby the number of recruited Aβ fibers, may be increased 2-3 fold when stimulation is applied by an optimized electrode configuration (a narrow bi/tripole or a transverse tripole). Assuming that the largest Aβ fibers in a dorsal root have a diameter of 15 μm, the smallest ones recruited at discomfort threshold would be 12 μm. The latter are presumably of proprioceptive origin and responsible for segmental reflexes and uncomfortable sensations. Furthermore, it is shown to be unlikely that, apart from dorsal roots and a thin outer layer of the DCs, any other spinal structures are recruited when stimulation is applied in the dorsal epidural space. Finally, anodal excitation and anodal propagation block are unlikely to occur with SCS. PMID:22151778

  10. Calculation of optical second-harmonic susceptibilities and optical activity for crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, Z.H.

    1994-12-31

    A new generation of nearly first-principles calculations predicts both the linear and second-harmonic susceptibilities for a variety of insulating crystals, including GaAs, GaP, AlAs, AlP, Se, {alpha}-quartz, and c-urea. The results are typically in agreement with experimental measurements. The calculations have been extended to optical activity, with somewhat less success to date. The theory, based on a simple self-energy correction to the local density approximation, and results are reviewed herein.

  11. Activation of enhancer elements by the homeobox gene Cdx2 is cell line specific.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, J K; Levy, T; Suh, E R; Traber, P G

    1997-01-01

    Cdx2 is a caudal-related homeodomain transcription factor that is expressed in complex patterns during mouse development and at high levels in the intestinal epithelium of adult mice. Cdx2 activates transcription of intestinal gene promoters containing specific binding sites. Moreover, Cdx2 has been shown to induce intestinal differentiation in cell lines. In this study, we show that Cdx2 is able to bind to two well defined enhancer elements in the HoxC8 gene. We then demonstrate that Cdx2 is able to activate transcription of heterologous promoters when its DNA binding element is placed in an enhancer context. Furthermore, the ability to activate enhancer elements is cell-line dependent. When the Cdx2 activation domain was linked to the Gal4 DNA binding domain, the chimeric protein was able to activate Gal4 enhancer constructs in an intestinal cell line, but was unable to activate transcription in NIH3T3 cells. These data suggest that there are cell-specific factors that allow the Cdx2 activation domain to function in the activation of enhancer elements. We hypothesize that either a co-activator protein or differential phosphorylation of the activation domain may be the mechanism for intestinal cell line-specific function of Cdx2 and possibly in other tissues in early development. PMID:9171078

  12. Fabrication of optical element from unidirectional grown imidazole-imidazolium picrate monohydrate (IIP) organic crystals for nonlinear optical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivek, P.; Murugakoothan, P.

    2014-12-01

    Nonlinear optical bulk single crystal of Imidazole-imidazolium picrate monohydrate (IIP) has been grown by Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (SR) method using acetonitrile as solvent. First time we report the bulk growth of IIP crystal by SR method. The transparent IIP single crystal of maximum diameter 21 mm and length 46 mm was obtained by employing SR method. The grown crystal was subjected to high resolution X-ray diffraction, UV-vis-NIR transmittance, refractive index, hardness, dielectric and laser damage threshold studies. The crystalline perfection of the grown crystal was analyzed using HRXRD. Cut off wavelength and optical transmission window of the crystal was assessed by UV-vis-NIR and the refractive index of the crystal was found. The mechanical property of the crystal was estimated by Vicker's hardness test. The dielectric property of the crystal was measured as a function of frequency. The laser damage threshold value was determined. The particle size dependent second harmonic generation efficiency for IIP was evaluated with standard reference material potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) by Kurtz-Perry powder method using Nd:YAG laser, which established the existence of phase matching. The second harmonic generation (SHG) of IIP crystal was investigated by the SHG Maker fringes technique. The mechanism of growth is revealed by carrying out chemical etching using acetonitrile as etchant.

  13. Rapid detection of delamination areas in laminated structural elements by means of optically monitored strain solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenova, I. V.; Belashov, A. V.; Dreiden, G. V.; Petrov, N. V.; Samsonov, A. M.

    2015-05-01

    Modern structural elements are often made of laminated polymer materials or composites on the base of polymer matrices. The proper functioning of these elements may be of vital importance especially in automotive and aerospace industries, in gas and oil transportation. The major problem in their performance is a possibility of a sudden and irreversible delamination caused by various factors. We propose and study a NDT approach aimed to detect delamination areas in adhesively bonded layered structural elements made of different materials. The proposed approach is evaluated by use of holographic detection and monitoring of the evolution of bulk strain solitons generated in such structures.

  14. Antenna Gain Enhancement and Beamshaping using a Diffractive Optical Element (DOE) Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbitt, Christopher

    Dielectric and metamaterial lenses have been designed for gain enhancement and beam shaping. The motivation for this work came from a commercially available slotted waveguide antenna with a dielectric lens that shapes the beam and enhances the gain only in the azimuth plane. When two of these antennas, each with a dielectric lens, are stacked as an array to form the sum and difference patterns the elevation plane gain is low and the beam width too wide to be acceptable for radar applications. The objective of the present work is to design a diffractive optical element (DOE) lens for gain enhancement gain and beam shaping. As compared to other available lenses it is much thinner, lighter and easily machined. The DOE lens is made from rexolite which has a dielectric constant of 2.53. The DOE lens is composed of a series of zones which focus the light at a certain focal length. The phase is the same everywhere on each zone at the focal point. The phase difference between neighboring zones is 2pi, resulting in a constructive interference at the focus. These zones are able to focus the radiation from an antenna in order to enhance the gain and shape the beam. The design parameters include the lens diameter, number of zones, the center zone thickness for a particular frequency and refractive index of the dielectric material. A comprehensive study has been performed in CST Microwave Studio to illustrate the properties of the DOE lens. The focusing property for image formation is verified by a plane wave excitation. Lenses have been designed and tested at different frequencies and with varying design parameters. Gain enhancement and beam shaping are illustrated by modeling the DOE lens in CST and placing it in front of different antennas. This work presents lenses for 10GHz and 40GHz horn antennas, a 3GHz slotted waveguide antenna array, and a 10GHz microstrip patch arrays. Beam shaping and focusing is clearly illustrated for each type of antenna. It is seen that the size

  15. Active mode-locked lasers and other photonic devices using electro-optic whispering gallery mode resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsko, Andrey B. (Inventor); Ilchenko, Vladimir (Inventor); Savchenkov, Anatoliy (Inventor); Maleki, Lutfollah (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Techniques and devices using whispering gallery mode (WGM) optical resonators, where the optical materials of the WGM resonators exhibit an electro-optical effect to perform optical modulation. Examples of actively mode-locked lasers and other devices are described.

  16. Ultrasensitive detection of mode splitting in active optical microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    He, Lina; Oezdemir, Sahin Kaya; Zhu Jiangang; Yang Lan

    2010-11-15

    Scattering-induced mode splitting in active microcavities is demonstrated. Below the lasing threshold, quality factor enhancement by optical gain allows resolving, in the wavelength-scanning transmission spectrum, of resonance dips of the split modes which otherwise would not be detected in a passive resonator. In the lasing regime, mode splitting manifests itself as two lasing modes with extremely narrow linewidths. Mixing these lasing modes in a detector leads to a heterodyne beat signal whose frequency corresponds to the mode-splitting amount. Lasing regime not only allows ultra-high sensitivity for mode-splitting measurements but also provides an easily accessible scheme by eliminating the need for wavelength scanning around resonant modes. Mode splitting in active microcavities has an immediate impact in enhancing the sensitivity of subwavelength scatterer detection and in studying light-matter interactions in a strong-coupling regime.

  17. Active Learning Strategies for Introductory Light and Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokoloff, David R.

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that traditional approaches are ineffective in teaching physics concepts, including light and optics concepts. A major focus of the work of the Activity Based Physics Group has been on the development of active learning curricula like RealTime Physics (RTP) labs and Interactive Lecture Demonstrations (ILDs). Among the characteristics of these curricula are: (1) use of a learning cycle in which students are challenged to compare predictions—discussed with their peers in small groups—to observations of the physical world, (2) use of guided hands-on work to construct basic concepts from observations, and (3) use of computer-based tools. It has been possible to change the lecture and laboratory learning environments at a large number of universities, colleges, and high schools without changing the structure of the introductory course. For example, in the United States, nearly 200 physics departments have adopted RTP, and many others use pre-publication, open-source versions or have adopted the RTP approach to develop their own labs. Examples from RTP and ILDs (including optics magic tricks) are described in this paper.

  18. Temporally-stable active precision mount for large optics.

    PubMed

    Reinlein, Claudia; Damm, Christoph; Lange, Nicolas; Kamm, Andreas; Mohaupt, Matthias; Brady, Aoife; Goy, Matthias; Leonhard, Nina; Eberhardt, Ramona; Zeitner, Uwe; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2016-06-13

    We present a temporally-stable active mount to compensate for manufacturing-induced deformations of reflective optical components. In this paper, we introduce the design of the active mount, and its evaluation results for two sample mirrors: a quarter mirror of 115 × 105 × 9 mm3, and a full mirror of 228 × 210 × 9 mm3. The quarter mirror with 20 actuators shows a best wavefront error rms of 10 nm. Its installation position depending deformations are addressed by long-time measurements over 14 weeks indicating no significance of the orientation. Size-induced differences of the mount are studied by a full mirror with 80 manual actuators arranged in the same actuator pattern as the quarter mirror. This sample shows a wavefront error rms of (27±2) nm over a measurement period of 46 days. We conclude that the developed mount is suitable to compensate for manufacturing-induced deformations of large reflective optics, and likely to be included in the overall systems alignment procedure. PMID:27410369

  19. Heavy metals and rare earth elements source-sink in some Egyptian cigarettes as determined by neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Nada, A; Abdel-Wahab, M; Sroor, A; Abdel-Haleem, A S; Abdel-Sabour, M F

    1999-07-01

    Heavy metals and rare earth elements in two types of cigarettes were studied. The contents of trace elements were determined by using delayed neutron activation analysis. In the present study 11 elements have been detected in popular and fine brand cigarettes marketed in Egypt. Evaluation of these elements with their potential hazards for smokers is briefly discussed. The material balance (source and sink) for each element was determined. Also the ratio of element recovery to the total amount was assessed. PMID:10376325

  20. A finite element approach to model and analyze photostrictive optical actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mosfequr

    Photostrictive materials, called PLZT, exhibit large photostriction under uniform illumination of high-energy light. These materials are of interest for future generation wireless remote control photo-actuators, micro-actuators, and micro-sensors applications. The photostrictive effect is a superposition phenomenon of bulk photovoltaic effect and converse piezoelectric effect. In this present research photostrictive thin films are analyzed to evaluate their use as actuators in a future MEMS gyroscope. The finite element method is used for accurate analysis of photostrictive thin films. Four-node isoparametric quadrilateral plane stress elements are used to model photostrictive thin film and eight-node nonconforming brick elements are used to model a silicon wafer under the photostrictive thin film. A numerical finite element code, BAMAFEM, has been modified by introducing photostrictive material modeling capability. For generation of program code the FORTRAN90 language is used. Established analytical solutions have been used to verify the BAMAFEM finite element results. Comparison of BAMAFEM results and MATLAB results of 2-D displacements indicate that BAMAFEM results almost match with the theoretical results. For the verification of the finite element formulation of the photostrictive element and the BAMAFEM program code, a steel simply supported beam with one PLZT actuator bonded on top of the beam is studied. The BAMAFEM result for transverse deflection matches the analytical result within a small difference (1.7%). Using the valid and verified modified BAMAFEM finite element program code, static analysis has been done to calculate transverse deflection for a silicon cantilever beam with a PLZT actuator bonded on the whole top surface of the beam. BAMAFEM output of transverse deflection matched the analytical result of the same with a percent error of 1%.