Science.gov

Sample records for active organic chemistry

  1. Online Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janowicz, Philip A.

    2010-01-01

    This is a comprehensive study of the many facets of an entirely online organic chemistry course. Online homework with structure-drawing capabilities was found to be more effective than written homework. Online lecture was found to be just as effective as in-person lecture, and students prefer an online lecture format with shorter Webcasts. Online…

  2. Organic Chemistry in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Astronomical observations, theoretical modeling, laboratory simulation and analysis of extraterrestrial material have enhanced our knowledge of the inventory of organic matter in the interstellar medium (ISM) and on small bodies such as comets and asteroids (Ehrenfreund & Charnley 2000). Comets, asteroids and their fragments, meteorites and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), contributed significant amounts of extraterrestrial organic matter to the young Earth. This material degraded and reacted in a terrestrial prebiotic chemistry to form organic structures that may have served as building blocks for life on the early Earth. In this talk I will summarize our current understanding of the organic composition and chemistry of interstellar clouds. Molecules of astrobiological relevance include the building blocks of our genetic material: nucleic acids, composed of subunits such as N-heterocycles (purines and pyrimidines), sugars and amino acids. Signatures indicative of inheritance of pristine and modified interstellar material in comets and meteorites will also be discussed.

  3. The Birthday of Organic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benfey, Otto Theodor; Kaufman, George B.

    1979-01-01

    Describes how the synthesis of urea, 150 years ago, was a major factor in breaking the artificial barrier that existed between organic and inorganic chemistry, and this contributed to the rapid growth of organic chemistry. (GA)

  4. Six Pillars of Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullins, Joseph J.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an approach to teaching organic chemistry, which is to have students build their knowledge of organic chemistry upon a strong foundation of the fundamental concepts of the subject. Specifically, the article focuses upon a core set of concepts that I call "the six pillars of organic chemistry": electronegativity, polar…

  5. Global distribution and surface activity of macromolecules in offline simulations of marine organic chemistry

    DOE PAGES

    Ogunro, Oluwaseun O.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Elliott, Scott; Frossard, Amanda A.; Hoffman, Forrest M.; Letscher, Robert T.; Moore, J. Keith; Russell, Lynn M.; Wang, Shanlin; Wingenter, Oliver W.

    2015-10-13

    Here, organic macromolecules constitute high percentage components of remote sea spray. They enter the atmosphere through adsorption onto bubbles followed by bursting at the ocean surface, and go on to influence the chemistry of the fine mode aerosol. We present a global estimate of mixed-layer organic macromolecular distributions, driven by offline marine systems model output. The approach permits estimation of oceanic concentrations and bubble film surface coverages for several classes of organic compound. Mixed layer levels are computed from the output of a global ocean biogeochemistry model by relating the macromolecules to standard biogeochemical tracers. Steady state is assumed formore » labile forms, and for longer-lived components we rely on ratios to existing transported variables. Adsorption is then represented through conventional Langmuir isotherms, with equilibria deduced from laboratory analogs. Open water concentrations locally exceed one micromolar carbon for the total of protein, polysaccharide and refractory heteropolycondensate. The shorter-lived lipids remain confined to regions of strong biological activity. Results are evaluated against available measurements for all compound types, and agreement is generally quite reasonable. Global distributions are further estimated for both fractional coverage of bubble films at the air-water interface and the two-dimensional concentration excess. Overall, we show that macromolecular mapping provides a novel tool for the comprehension of oceanic surfactant distributions. Results may prove useful in planning field experiments and assessing the potential response of surface chemical behaviors to global change.« less

  6. Global distribution and surface activity of macromolecules in offline simulations of marine organic chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Ogunro, Oluwaseun O.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Elliott, Scott; Frossard, Amanda A.; Hoffman, Forrest M.; Letscher, Robert T.; Moore, J. Keith; Russell, Lynn M.; Wang, Shanlin; Wingenter, Oliver W.

    2015-10-13

    Here, organic macromolecules constitute high percentage components of remote sea spray. They enter the atmosphere through adsorption onto bubbles followed by bursting at the ocean surface, and go on to influence the chemistry of the fine mode aerosol. We present a global estimate of mixed-layer organic macromolecular distributions, driven by offline marine systems model output. The approach permits estimation of oceanic concentrations and bubble film surface coverages for several classes of organic compound. Mixed layer levels are computed from the output of a global ocean biogeochemistry model by relating the macromolecules to standard biogeochemical tracers. Steady state is assumed for labile forms, and for longer-lived components we rely on ratios to existing transported variables. Adsorption is then represented through conventional Langmuir isotherms, with equilibria deduced from laboratory analogs. Open water concentrations locally exceed one micromolar carbon for the total of protein, polysaccharide and refractory heteropolycondensate. The shorter-lived lipids remain confined to regions of strong biological activity. Results are evaluated against available measurements for all compound types, and agreement is generally quite reasonable. Global distributions are further estimated for both fractional coverage of bubble films at the air-water interface and the two-dimensional concentration excess. Overall, we show that macromolecular mapping provides a novel tool for the comprehension of oceanic surfactant distributions. Results may prove useful in planning field experiments and assessing the potential response of surface chemical behaviors to global change.

  7. Organic chemistry on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.; Scattergood, T.; Aronowitz, S.; Flores, J.

    1979-01-01

    Features taken from various models of Titan's atmosphere are combined in a working composite model that provides environmental constraints within which different pathways for organic chemical synthesis are determined. Experimental results and theoretical modeling suggest that the organic chemistry of the satellite is dominated by two processes: photochemistry and energetic particle bombardment. Photochemical reactions of CH4 in the upper atmosphere can account for the presence of C2 hydrocarbons. Reactions initiated at various levels of the atmosphere by cosmic rays, Saturn 'wind', and solar wind particle bombardment of a CH4-N2 atmospheric mixture can account for the UV-visible absorbing stratospheric haze, the reddish appearance of the satellite, and some of the C2 hydrocarbons. In the lower atmosphere photochemical processes will be important if surface temperatures are sufficiently high for gaseous NH3 to exist. It is concluded that the surface of Titan may contain ancient or recent organic matter (or both) produced in the atmosphere.

  8. Photoredox Catalysis in Organic Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, photoredox catalysis has come to the forefront in organic chemistry as a powerful strategy for the activation of small molecules. In a general sense, these approaches rely on the ability of metal complexes and organic dyes to convert visible light into chemical energy by engaging in single-electron transfer with organic substrates, thereby generating reactive intermediates. In this Perspective, we highlight the unique ability of photoredox catalysis to expedite the development of completely new reaction mechanisms, with particular emphasis placed on multicatalytic strategies that enable the construction of challenging carbon–carbon and carbon–heteroatom bonds. PMID:27477076

  9. Photoredox Catalysis in Organic Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Megan H; Twilton, Jack; MacMillan, David W C

    2016-08-19

    In recent years, photoredox catalysis has come to the forefront in organic chemistry as a powerful strategy for the activation of small molecules. In a general sense, these approaches rely on the ability of metal complexes and organic dyes to convert visible light into chemical energy by engaging in single-electron transfer with organic substrates, thereby generating reactive intermediates. In this Perspective, we highlight the unique ability of photoredox catalysis to expedite the development of completely new reaction mechanisms, with particular emphasis placed on multicatalytic strategies that enable the construction of challenging carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bonds. PMID:27477076

  10. Photoredox Catalysis in Organic Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Megan H; Twilton, Jack; MacMillan, David W C

    2016-08-19

    In recent years, photoredox catalysis has come to the forefront in organic chemistry as a powerful strategy for the activation of small molecules. In a general sense, these approaches rely on the ability of metal complexes and organic dyes to convert visible light into chemical energy by engaging in single-electron transfer with organic substrates, thereby generating reactive intermediates. In this Perspective, we highlight the unique ability of photoredox catalysis to expedite the development of completely new reaction mechanisms, with particular emphasis placed on multicatalytic strategies that enable the construction of challenging carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bonds.

  11. COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY METHOD FOR PREDICTING VAPOR PRESSURES AND ACTIVITY COEFFICIENTS OF POLAR ORGANIC OXYGENATES IN PM2.5

    EPA Science Inventory

    Parameterizations of interactions of polar multifunctional organic oxygenates in PM2.5 must be included in aerosol chemistry models for evaluating control strategies for reducing ambient concentrations of PM2.5 compounds. Vapor pressures and activity coefficients of these compo...

  12. Environmental Chemistry Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackland, Thomas; And Others

    The authors of this curriculum supplement believe in a laboratory approach to chemistry and express the feeling that environmental chemistry provides the students an opportunity to apply theoretical chemistry to important practical problems. There are eighteen activities presented, each accompanied with behavioral objectives, one or more suggested…

  13. Organic chemistry on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.; Scattergood, T.; Aronowitz, S.; Flores, J.

    1978-01-01

    Observations of nonequilibrium phenomena on the Saturn satellite Titan indicate the occurrence of organic chemical evolution. Greenhouse and thermal inversion models of Titan's atmosphere provide environmental constraints within which various pathways for organic chemical synthesis are assessed. Experimental results and theoretical modeling studies suggest that the organic chemistry of the satellite may be dominated by two atmospheric processes: energetic-particle bombardment and photochemistry. Reactions initiated in various levels of the atmosphere by cosmic ray, Saturn wind, and solar wind particle bombardment of a CH4 - N2 atmospheric mixture can account for the C2-hydrocarbons, the UV-visible-absorbing stratospheric haze, and the reddish color of the satellite. Photochemical reactions of CH4 can also account for the presence of C2-hydrocarbons. In the lower Titan atmosphere, photochemical processes will be important if surface temperatures are sufficiently high for gaseous NH3 to exist. Hot H-atom reactions initiated by photo-dissociation of NH3 can couple the chemical reactions of NH3 and CH4 and produce organic matter.

  14. Organic Experiments for Introductory Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayner-Canham, Geoff

    1985-01-01

    Describes test-tube organic chemistry procedures (using comparatively safe reagents) for the beginning student. These procedures are used to: examine differences between saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons; compare structural isomers; and compare organic and inorganic acids and bases. (DH)

  15. Organic Chemistry for the Gifted.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    deBeer, W. H. J.

    In response to a serious shortage of chemists in South Africa, gifted secondary school students are enrolled in an enrichment program in organic chemistry and encouraged to consider chemistry or one of its related fields as a career. The introductory portion of the program involves approximately 90 hours over a 3-year period while the advanced…

  16. Organic chemistry in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    Organic cosmochemistry, organic materials in space exploration, and biochemistry of man in space are briefly surveyed. A model of Jupiter's atmosphere is considered, and the search for organic molecules in the solar system and in interstellar space is discussed. Materials and analytical techniques relevant to space exploration are indicated, and the blood and urine analyses performed on Skylab are described.

  17. Mass spectrometry. [in organic chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Shackleton, C. H. L.; Howe, I.; Chizhov, O. S.

    1978-01-01

    A review of mass spectrometry in organic chemistry is given, dealing with advances in instrumentation and computer techniques, selected topics in gas-phase ion chemistry, and applications in such fields as biomedicine, natural-product studies, and environmental pollution analysis. Innovative techniques and instrumentation are discussed, along with chromatographic-mass spectrometric on-line computer techniques, mass spectral interpretation and management techniques, and such topics in gas-phase ion chemistry as electron-impact ionization and decomposition, photoionization, field ionization and desorption, high-pressure mass spectrometry, ion cyclotron resonance, and isomerization reactions of organic ions. Applications of mass spectrometry are examined with respect to bio-oligomers and their constituents, biomedically important substances, microbiology, environmental organic analysis, and organic geochemistry.

  18. Titan's organic chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, C.; Thompson, W. R.; Khare, B. N.

    1985-01-01

    Voyager discovered nine simple organic molecules in the atmosphere of Titan. Complex organic solids, called tholins, produced by irradiation of the simulated Titanian atmosphere, are consistent with measured properties of Titan from ultraviolet to microwave frequencies and are the likely main constituents of the observed red aerosols. The tholins contain many of the organic building blocks central to life on earth. At least 100-m, and possibly kms thicknesses of complex organics have been produced on Titan during the age of the solar system, and may exist today as submarine deposits beneath an extensive ocean of simple hydrocarbons.

  19. Organic Chemistry Self Instructional Package 1: Review of General Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zdravkovich, V.

    This booklet is one of a series of 17 developed at Prince George's Community College, Largo, Maryland. It provides an individualized, self-paced undergraduate organic chemistry instruction module designed to augment any course in organic chemistry but particularly those taught using the text "Organic Chemistry" by Morrison and Boyd. The entire…

  20. Soil Organic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, G.

    1979-01-01

    A brief review is presented of some of the organic compounds and reactions that occur in soil. Included are nitrogenous compounds, compounds of phosphorus and sulfur, carbohydrates, phenolic compounds, and aliphatic acids. (BB)

  1. Interstellar organic chemistry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, C.

    1972-01-01

    Most of the interstellar organic molecules have been found in the large radio source Sagittarius B2 toward the galactic center, and in such regions as W51 and the IR source in the Orion nebula. Questions of the reliability of molecular identifications are discussed together with aspects of organic synthesis in condensing clouds, degradational origin, synthesis on grains, UV natural selection, interstellar biology, and contributions to planetary biology.

  2. Perspectives on Computational Organic Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Streitwieser, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The author reviews how his early love for theoretical organic chemistry led to experimental research and the extended search for quantitative correlations between experiment and quantum calculations. The experimental work led to ion pair acidities of alkali-organic compounds and most recently to equilibria and reactions of lithium and cesium enolates in THF. This chemistry is now being modeled by ab initio calculations. An important consideration is the treatment of solvation in which coordination of the alkali cation with the ether solvent plays a major role. PMID:19518150

  3. Organic Chemistry of Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Studies of the molecular structures and C,N,H-isotopic compositions of organic matter in meteorites reveal a complex history beginning in the parent interstellar cloud which spawned the solar system. Incorporation of interstellar dust and gas in the protosolar nebula followed by further thermal and aqueous processing on primordial parent bodies of carbonaceous, meteorites have produced an inventory of diverse organic compounds including classes now utilized in biochemistry. This inventory represents one possible set of reactants for chemical models for the origin of living systems on the early Earth. Evidence bearing on the history of meteoritic organic matter from astronomical observations and laboratory investigations will be reviewed and future research directions discussed.

  4. Radiation Chemistry in Organized Assemblies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, J. K.; Chen, T. S.

    1981-01-01

    Expands the basic concepts regarding the radiation chemistry of simple aqueous systems to more complex, but well defined, organized assemblies. Discusses the differences in behavior in comparison to simple systems. Reviews these techniques: pulse radiolysis, laser flash, photolysis, and steady state irradiation by gamma rays or light. (CS)

  5. Organic chemistry in meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, Oliver

    2002-11-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites contain a suite of soluble organic compounds that possess characteristics that help to understand their formation and to trace back the early history of the solar system. Relative amino acid abundances can be used to discriminate between different parent bodies. The Tagish Lake meteorite is a unique sample from a new type of solar system object that will help to further constrain the physical and chemical conditions found on parent bodies. Enantiomeric excesses have been detected in nonbiological amino acids in the Murchison and Murray meteorites that are still difficult to explain in the current scenario for the synthesis of extraterrestrial amino acids. Finally, new classes of compounds, dipeptides and sugar-related molecules, have been detected in CM carbonaceous chondrites.

  6. Reaction-Map of Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murov, Steven

    2007-01-01

    The Reaction-Map of Organic Chemistry lists all the most commonly studied reactions in organic chemistry on one page. The discussed Reaction-Map will act as another learning aide for the students, making the study of organic chemistry much easier.

  7. Organic Chemistry Self Instructional Package 2: Methane.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zdravkovich, V.

    This booklet, one of a series of 17 developed at Prince George's Community College, Largo, Maryland, provides an individualized, self-paced undergraduate organic chemistry instruction module designed to augment any course in organic chemistry but particularly those taught using the text "Organic Chemistry" by Morrison and Boyd. The entire series…

  8. Organic Chemistry Self Instructional Package 17: Arenes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zdravkovich, V.

    This booklet, one of a series of 17 developed at Prince George's Community College, Largo, Maryland, provides an individualized, self-paced undergraduate organic chemistry instruction module designed to augment any course in organic chemistry but particularly those taught using the text "Organic Chemistry" by Morrison and Boyd. The entire series…

  9. Chemistry of Covalent Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Waller, Peter J; Gándara, Felipe; Yaghi, Omar M

    2015-12-15

    growing library of linkers amenable to the synthesis of COFs is now available, and new COFs and topologies made by reticular synthesis are being reported. Much research is also directed toward the development of new methods of linking organic building units to generate other crystalline COFs. These efforts promise not only new COF chemistry and materials, but also the chance to extend the precision of molecular covalent chemistry to extended solids.

  10. Evidence for linkages between ecoenzyme activity and soil organic matter chemistry following encroachment of leguminous woody plant into grasslands.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filley, Timothy; Stott, Diane; Boutton, Thomas; Creamer, Courtney; Olk, Dan

    2010-05-01

    The encroachment of woody plants into grasslands is a worldwide phenomenon. In the Rio Grande Plains of southern Texas, subtropical thorn woodlands dominated by the N-fixing tree Prosopis glandulosa have largely replaced native grasslands as a result of fire suppression and extensive cattle grazing. This land cover change has resulted in the increase of belowground stocks of C, N, and P, changes to the amount and chemical nature of soil-stabilized plant biopolymers, and the composition and activity of soil microbes. Given that extracellular enzymes produced by plants and microbes are the principal means by which complex compounds are degraded and that the production of such enzymes is triggered or suppressed by changes in substrate and nutrient availability we sought to relate how these fundamental changes in this ecosystem are reflected in the activity of soil stabilized ecoenzymes and soil organic matter (SOM) chemistry in this system. We investigated a chronosequence of woody encroachment (14-86 yrs) into a C4-dominant grassland. We related the potential activities of five extracellular enzymes (arylamidase, acid phosphatase, β-glucosidase, β-glucosaminidase (NAGase, polyphenoloxidase (PPO)) and a general marker for hydrolytic activity, fluorescein diacetate (FDA) to the molecular composition and concentration of total hydrolysable amino acids and amino sugars, sugars, as well as CuO extractable lignin and substituted fatty acid to. When normalized to dry weight soil all chemical components increase in concentration with cluster age and all clusters have greater concentrations than background grasslands. All enzymes activities exhibit higher potential activity in woody clusters than grasslands but only NAGase and FDA increase with cluster age when normalized to dry weight of soil. Conversely, when normalized to SOC only lignin phenols, hydroxyl proline, and glucose from cellulose are positively correlated with cluster age indicating a selective accrual with

  11. Incorporation of Medicinal Chemistry into the Organic Chemistry Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbes, David C.

    2004-01-01

    Application of concepts presented in organic chemistry lecture using a virtual project involving the sythesis of medicinally important compounds is emphasized. The importance of reinforcing the concepts from lecture in lab, thus providing a powerful instructional means is discussed.

  12. Understanding Academic Performance in Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szu, Evan; Nandagopal, Kiruthiga; Shavelson, Richard J.; Lopez, Enrique J.; Penn, John H.; Scharberg, Maureen; Hill, Geannine W.

    2011-01-01

    Successful completion of organic chemistry is a prerequisite for many graduate and professional programs in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, yet the failure rate for this sequence of courses is notoriously high. To date, few studies have examined why some students succeed while others have difficulty in organic chemistry. This…

  13. STS Education and Social Organic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yong, Wu

    1994-01-01

    Gives an overview of Science-Technology-Society (STS) education, which views scientific and technological progress as social processes. An STS course called Social Organic Chemistry is described as a replacement for Application of Organic Chemistry in a teachers' college. The course addresses the application of the principles and fundamentals of…

  14. Form and Function: An Organic Chemistry Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvis, Bruce; Mazzocchi, Paul

    This book is one in the series of Interdisciplinary Approaches to Chemistry (IAC) designed to help students discover that chemistry is a lively science and actively used to pursue solutions to the important problems of today. It is expected for students to see how chemistry takes place continuously all around and to readily understand the daily…

  15. Green chemistry oriented organic synthesis in water.

    PubMed

    Simon, Marc-Olivier; Li, Chao-Jun

    2012-02-21

    The use of water as solvent features many benefits such as improving reactivities and selectivities, simplifying the workup procedures, enabling the recycling of the catalyst and allowing mild reaction conditions and protecting-group free synthesis in addition to being benign itself. In addition, exploring organic chemistry in water can lead to uncommon reactivities and selectivities complementing the organic chemists' synthetic toolbox in organic solvents. Studying chemistry in water also allows insight to be gained into Nature's way of chemical synthesis. However, using water as solvent is not always green. This tutorial review briefly discusses organic synthesis in water with a Green Chemistry perspective. PMID:22048162

  16. Green chemistry oriented organic synthesis in water.

    PubMed

    Simon, Marc-Olivier; Li, Chao-Jun

    2012-02-21

    The use of water as solvent features many benefits such as improving reactivities and selectivities, simplifying the workup procedures, enabling the recycling of the catalyst and allowing mild reaction conditions and protecting-group free synthesis in addition to being benign itself. In addition, exploring organic chemistry in water can lead to uncommon reactivities and selectivities complementing the organic chemists' synthetic toolbox in organic solvents. Studying chemistry in water also allows insight to be gained into Nature's way of chemical synthesis. However, using water as solvent is not always green. This tutorial review briefly discusses organic synthesis in water with a Green Chemistry perspective.

  17. The Chemistry of Fitness. Active Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergandine, David R.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    The outline for a unit on the chemistry of fitness and nutrition is presented. Topics discussed include the organic basis of life, functional groups, kitchen experiments, micronutrients, energetics, fitness vs. fatness, current topics, and evaluation. This unit reviews the basic concepts of chemical bonding, acid-base chemistry, stoichiometry, and…

  18. Peer Mentoring in the General Chemistry and Organic Chemistry Laboratories: The Pinacol Rearrangement--An Exercise in NMR and IR Spectroscopy for General Chemistry and Organic Chemistry Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arrington, Caleb A.; Hill, Jameica B.; Radfar, Ramin; Whisnant, David M.; Bass, Charles G.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a discovery experiment for general chemistry and organic chemistry labs. Although the pinacol rearrangement has been employed in undergraduate organic laboratories before, in this application organic chemistry students act as mentors to students of general chemistry. Students work together using distillation--a new technique…

  19. A Colorful Solubility Exercise for Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shugrue, Christopher R.; Mentzen, Hans H., II; Linton, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    A discovery chemistry laboratory has been developed for the introductory organic chemistry student to investigate the concepts of polarity, miscibility, solubility, and density. The simple procedure takes advantage of the solubility of two colored dyes in a series of solvents or solvent mixtures, and the diffusion of colors can be easily…

  20. Newer Reagents in Preparative Organic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grundy, J.

    1990-01-01

    Outlined is the development and use of oxidants for use in elementary organic chemistry classes. Discussed is the oxidation of alcohols to carbonyl compounds, and the oxidation of primary alcohols or aldehydes to carboxylic acids. (CW)

  1. Organic and petroleum chemistry for nonchemists

    SciTech Connect

    Schmerling, L.

    1981-01-01

    A nontechnical book dealing with organic and petroleum chemistry is presented. The contents include: elements and compounds; hydrocarbons; equations; alcohols and phenols; aldehydes; ketones; carboxylic acids; esters; acid halides; amides, and anhydrides; petroleum; and a glossary of compounds. (JMT)

  2. Organic chemistry in Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scattergood, T.

    1982-01-01

    Laboratory photochemical simulations and other types of chemical simulations are discussed. The chemistry of methane, which is the major known constituent of Titan's atmosphere was examined with stress on what can be learned from photochemistry and particle irradiation. The composition of dust that comprises the haze layer was determined. Isotope fractionation in planetary atmospheres is also discussed.

  3. Plasma chemistry and organic synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tezuka, M.

    1980-01-01

    The characteristic features of chemical reactions using low temperature plasmas are described and differentiated from those seen in other reaction systems. A number of examples of applications of plasma chemistry to synthetic reactions are mentioned. The production of amino acids by discharge reactions in hydrocarbon-ammonia-water systems is discussed, and its implications for the origins of life are mentioned.

  4. Novel Aryne Chemistry in Organic Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhijian

    2006-12-12

    Arynes are among the most intensively studied systems in chemistry. However, many aspects of the chemistry of these reactive intermediates are not well understood yet and their use as reagents in synthetic organic chemistry has been somewhat limited, due to the harsh conditions needed to generate arynes and the often uncontrolled reactivity exhibited by these species. Recently, o-silylaryl triflates, which can generate the corresponding arynes under very mild reaction conditions, have been found very useful in organic synthesis. This thesis describes several novel and useful methodologies by employing arynes, which generate from o-silylaryl triflates, in organic synthesis. An efficient, reliable method for the N-arylation of amines, sulfonamides and carbamates, and the O-arylation of phenols and carboxylic acids is described in Chapter 1. Amines, sulfonamides, phenols, and carboxylic acids are good nucleophiles, which can react with arynes generated from a-silylaryl triflates to afford the corresponding N- and O-arylated products in very high yields. The regioselectivity of unsymmetrical arynes has also been studied. A lot of useful, functional groups can tolerate our reaction conditions. Carbazoles and dibenzofurans are important heteroaromatic compounds, which have a variety of biological activities. A variety of substituted carbazoles and dibenzofwans are readily prepared in good to excellent yields starting with the corresponding o-iodoanilines or o-iodophenols and o-silylaryl triflates by a treatment with CsF, followed by a Pd-catalyzed cyclization, which overall provides a one-pot, two-step process. By using this methodology, the carbazole alkaloid mukonine has been concisely synthesized in a very good yield. Insertion of an aryne into a σ-bond between a nucleophile and an electrophile (Nu-E) should potentially be a very beneficial process from the standpoint of organic synthesis. A variety of substituted ketones and sulfoxides have been synthesized in good

  5. Chemistry: Experiments, Demonstrations and Other Activities Suggested for Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    This publication is a handbook used in conjunction with the course of study in chemistry developed through the New York State Education Department and The University of the State of New York. It contains experiments, demonstrations, and other activities for a chemistry course. Areas covered include the science of chemistry, the atomic structure of…

  6. Click chemistry from organic halides, diazonium salts and anilines in water catalysed by copper nanoparticles on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Francisco; Moglie, Yanina; Radivoy, Gabriel; Yus, Miguel

    2011-09-21

    An easy-to-prepare, reusable and versatile catalyst consisting of oxidised copper nanoparticles on activated carbon has been fully characterised and found to effectively promote the multicomponent synthesis of 1,2,3-triazoles from organic halides, diazonium salts, and aromatic amines in water at a low copper loading. PMID:21789331

  7. The 'wired' universe of organic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, Bartosz A; Bishop, Kyle J M; Kowalczyk, Bartlomiej; Wilmer, Christopher E

    2009-04-01

    The millions of reactions performed and compounds synthesized by organic chemists over the past two centuries connect to form a network larger than the metabolic networks of higher organisms and rivalling the complexity of the World Wide Web. Despite its apparent randomness, the network of chemistry has a well-defined, modular architecture. The network evolves in time according to trends that have not changed since the inception of the discipline, and thus project into chemistry's future. Analysis of organic chemistry using the tools of network theory enables the identification of most 'central' organic molecules, and for the prediction of which and how many molecules will be made in the future. Statistical analyses based on network connectivity are useful in optimizing parallel syntheses, in estimating chemical reactivity, and more.

  8. Love Story: Oxygen in Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, John D.

    1974-01-01

    Significant discoveries and developments regarding oxygen and organic compounds are recounted to show that research in this specific area is worthwhile and relevant and to point out that research in other areas of organic chemistry deserves continued encouragement as well. (DT)

  9. Titan: a laboratory for prebiological organic chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, C.; Thompson, W. R.; Khare, B. N.

    1992-01-01

    When we examine the atmospheres of the Jovian planets (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune), the satellites in the outer solar system, comets, and even--through microwave and infrared spectroscopy--the cold dilute gas and grains between the stars, we find a rich organic chemistry, presumably abiological, not only in most of the solar system but throughout the Milky Way galaxy. In part because the composition and surface pressure of the Earth's atmosphere 4 x 10(9) years ago are unknown, laboratory experiments on prebiological organic chemistry are at best suggestive; but we can test our understanding by looking more closely at the observed extraterrestrial organic chemistry. The present Account is restricted to atmospheric organic chemistry, primarily on the large moon of Saturn. Titan is a test of our understanding of the organic chemistry of planetary atmospheres. Its atmospheric bulk composition (N2/CH4) is intermediate between the highly reducing (H2/He/CH4/NH3/H2O) atmospheres of the Jovian planets and the more oxidized (N2/CO2/H2O) atmospheres of the terrestrial planets Mars and Venus. It has long been recognized that Titan's organic chemistry may have some relevance to the events that led to the origin of life on Earth. But with Titan surface temperatures approximately equal to 94 K and pressures approximately equal to 1.6 bar, the oceans of the early Earth have no ready analogue on Titan. Nevertheless, tectonic events in the water ice-rich interior or impact melting and slow re-freezing may lead to an episodic availability of liquid water. Indeed, the latter process is the equivalent of a approximately 10(3)-year-duration shallow aqueous sea over the entire surface of Titan.

  10. Ethical Issues in Organic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coad, Peter; Coad, Raylene

    1985-01-01

    Suggests that a literature survey can alert students to real-life ethical problems surrounding many organic compounds. Topic areas students could explore include: hazards in the workplace, toxic chemicals, and nerve gas structures. Background information and an extensive bibliography are given. (DH)

  11. Flipping organic chemistry course: Possibilities and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, J.; Kim, H. B.

    2016-06-01

    The flipped classroom approach was applied to an introductory organic chemistry course. A total of 76 video clips (15 hours of running time) were developed and delivered to 41 sophomores (21 females and 20 males) through Youtube in addition to the university's learning management system. The students were asked to preview the lecture contents before each class by watching a pre-class video. For in-class activities, exercise problems were presented to groups of 3-5 students. An instructor and a teaching assistant guided each group to solve problems cooperatively, monitored the students’ group activity and answered their questions. At the end of every chapter, the students were asked to evaluate their group work and personal preparedness for the class and also to write a short reflective journal. The muddiest point of each chapter, i.e., the topic posing the most difficulty to students’ understanding, was surveyed through Google Forms®. The students liked watching the videos before each class and performing student-centered, in-class group activities but a few limitations were also found and reported.

  12. Measuring Student Performance in General Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Ara C.; Ben-Daat, Hagit; Zhu, Mary; Atkinson, Robert; Barrows, Nathan; Gould, Ian R.

    2015-01-01

    Student performance in general organic chemistry courses is determined by a wide range of factors including cognitive ability, motivation and cultural capital. Previous work on cognitive factors has tended to focus on specific areas rather than exploring performance across all problem types and cognitive skills. In this study, we have categorized…

  13. Experimental interstellar organic chemistry - Preliminary findings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, B. N.; Sagan, C.

    1973-01-01

    Review of the results of some explicit experimental simulation of interstellar organic chemistry consisting in low-temperature high-vacuum UV irradiation of condensed simple gases known or suspected to be present in the interstellar medium. The results include the finding that acetonitrile may be present in the interstellar medium. The implication of this and other findings are discussed.

  14. Microscale Experiments in the Organic Chemistry Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Kenneth L.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the advent of microscale experiments within undergraduate organic chemistry laboratories mainly resulting from environmental safety concerns involving waste disposal. Considers the cost savings in purchasing less reagents and chemicals, the typical glassware and apparatus, the reduced hazards from elimination of open flames, and other…

  15. Organic chemistry: Precision pruning of molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kin S.; Engle, Keary M.

    2016-05-01

    If organic molecules were trees, then the numerous carbon-hydrogen bonds within them would be leaves. A catalyst that targets one 'leaf' out of many similar other ones looks set to be a huge leap for synthetic chemistry. See Letter p.230

  16. Peer Mentoring in the General Chemistry and Organic Chemistry Laboratories. The Pinacol Rearrangement: An Exercise in NMR and IR Spectroscopy for General Chemistry and Organic Chemistry Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrington, Caleb A.; Hill, Jameica B.; Radfar, Ramin; Whisnant, David M.; Bass, Charles G.

    2008-02-01

    This article describes a discovery experiment for general chemistry and organic chemistry labs. Although the pinacol rearrangement has been employed in undergraduate organic laboratories before, in this application organic chemistry students act as mentors to students of general chemistry. Students work together using distillation—a new technique for the general chemistry students and a basic one for the organic students—to isolate an unknown compound. Then, using spectroscopy (IR and NMR), the students collaborate to determine the structure of the product of the reaction. This application of a standard experiment allows general chemistry students to gain exposure to modern spectroscopic instrumentation and to enhance their problem-solving skills. Organic chemistry students improve their understandings of laboratory techniques and spectroscopic interpretation by acting as the resident experts for the team.

  17. Organic chemistry by irradiation in space.

    PubMed

    Bibring, J P; Rocard, F

    1984-01-01

    The irradiation of grains and/or ices by particles from solar or stellar winds, as well as cosmic rays, induces the synthesis of molecular species. We have shown by in-situ infrared spectroscopy of irradiated samples that this chemistry may be responsible for the presence of organic compounds in a large variety of astrophysical sites such as: lunar and asteroidal regoliths, cometary nucleus, rings and satellites of outer planets, circumstellar shells, interstellar clouds. We present our experimental results concerning the mature and efficiency of C and N irradiation chemistries, and give plausible astrophysical implications.

  18. Medical Mycology and the Chemistry Classroom: Germinating Student Interest in Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bliss, Joseph M.; Reid, Christopher W.

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to provide active research context to introductory courses in basic sciences are likely to better engage learners and provide a framework for relevant concepts. A simple teaching and learning experiment was conducted to use concepts in organic chemistry to solve problems in the life sciences. Bryant University is a liberal arts university…

  19. Organic Chemistry in Action! What Is the Reaction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Dwyer, Anne; Childs, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The "Organic Chemistry in Action!" ("OCIA!") program is a set of teaching resources designed to facilitate the teaching and learning of introductory level organic chemistry. The "OCIA!" program was developed in collaboration with practicing and experienced chemistry teachers, using findings from Chemistry Education…

  20. Activities across Nation Mark National Chemistry Week.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Ernest, Ed.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes national and local activities done during National Chemistry Week including chemistry demonstrations, shopping center exhibits, contests, and museum exhibits. Discusses the supplementary material about chemistry in selected editions of 16 newspapers, "Solution for the Future." Presents many pictures showing those activities. (YP)

  1. Titan's organic chemistry: Results of simulation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, Carl; Thompson, W. Reid; Khare, Bishun N.

    1992-01-01

    Recent low pressure continuous low plasma discharge simulations of the auroral electron driven organic chemistry in Titan's mesosphere are reviewed. These simulations yielded results in good accord with Voyager observations of gas phase organic species. Optical constants of the brownish solid tholins produced in similar experiments are in good accord with Voyager observations of the Titan haze. Titan tholins are rich in prebiotic organic constituents; the Huygens entry probe may shed light on some of the processes that led to the origin of life on Earth.

  2. Cellular uptake: lessons from supramolecular organic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Gasparini, Giulio; Bang, Eun-Kyoung; Montenegro, Javier; Matile, Stefan

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this Feature Article is to reflect on the importance of established and emerging principles of supramolecular organic chemistry to address one of the most persistent problems in life sciences. The main topic is dynamic covalent chemistry on cell surfaces, particularly disulfide exchange for thiol-mediated uptake. Examples of boronate and hydrazone exchange are added for contrast, comparison and completion. Of equal importance are the discussions of proximity effects in polyions and counterion hopping, and more recent highlights on ring tension and ion pair-π interactions. These lessons from supramolecular organic chemistry apply to cell-penetrating peptides, particularly the origin of "arginine magic" and the "pyrenebutyrate trick," and the currently emerging complementary "disulfide magic" with cell-penetrating poly(disulfide)s. They further extend to the voltage gating of neuronal potassium channels, gene transfection, and the delivery of siRNA. The collected examples illustrate that the input from conceptually innovative chemistry is essential to address the true challenges in biology beyond incremental progress and random screening.

  3. Physical Organic Chemistry of Supramolecular Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Serpe, Michael J.; Craig, Stephen L.

    2008-01-01

    Unlike the case of traditional covalent polymers, the entanglements that determine properties of supramolecular polymers are defined by very specific, intermolecular interactions. Recent work using modular molecular platforms to probe the mechanisms underlying mechanical response of supramolecular polymers is reviewed. The contributions of supramolecular kinetics, thermodynamics, and conformational flexibility to supramolecular polymer properties in solutions of discrete polymers, in networks, and at interfaces, are described. Molecule-to-material relationships are established through methods reminiscent of classic physical organic chemistry. PMID:17279638

  4. Organic Chemistry Self Instructional Package 16: Aromatic Chemistry Effect of Substituents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zdravkovich, V.

    This booklet, one of a series of 17 developed at Prince George's Community College, Largo, Maryland, provides an individualized, self-paced undergraduate organic chemistry instruction module designed to augment any course in organic chemistry but particularly those taught using the text "Organic Chemistry" by Morrison and Boyd. The entire series…

  5. Systems chemistry approach in organic photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Würthner, Frank; Meerholz, Klaus

    2010-08-16

    The common approach in organic materials science is dominated by the perception that the properties of the bulk materials are virtually determined by the properties of the molecular building blocks. In this Concept Article, we advocate for taking into account supramolecular organization principles for all kinds of organic solid-state materials, irrespective of them being crystalline, liquid crystalline, or amorphous, and discuss a showcase example, that is, the utilization of merocyanine dyes as p-type organic semiconductors in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. Despite their extraordinarily large dipole moments, which are considered to be detrimental for efficient charge carrier transport, BHJ organic photovoltaic materials of these dyes with fullerenes have reached remarkable power conversion efficiencies of meanwhile nearly 5%. These at the first glance contradictory properties are, however, well-understandable on the systems chemistry level.

  6. Organic Chemistry Self Instructional Package 10: Alkenes-Reactions 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zdravkovich, V.

    This booklet, one of a series of 17 developed at Prince George's Community College, Largo, Maryland, provides an individualized, self-paced undergraduate organic chemistry instruction module designed to augment any course in organic chemistry but particularly those taught using the text "Organic Chemistry" by Morrison and Boyd. The entire series…

  7. Synthesis-Spectroscopy Roadmap Problems: Discovering Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurth, Laurie L.; Kurth, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Organic chemistry problems that interrelate and integrate synthesis with spectroscopy are presented. These synthesis-spectroscopy roadmap (SSR) problems uniquely engage second-year undergraduate organic chemistry students in the personal discovery of organic chemistry. SSR problems counter the memorize-or-bust strategy that many students tend to…

  8. Organic Chemistry Self Instructional Package 15: Benzene, Aromaticity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zdravkovich, V.

    This booklet, one of a series of 17 developed at Prince George's Community College, Largo, Maryland, provides an individualized, self-paced undergraduate organic chemistry instruction module designed to augment any course in organic chemistry but particularly those taught using the text "Organic Chemistry" by Morrison and Boyd. The entire series…

  9. A Physical Chemist Looks at Organic Chemistry Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickering, Miles

    1988-01-01

    Criticizes the way organic chemistry teaching laboratory experiments are approached from the viewpoint of physical chemistry. Compares these experiments to cooking. Stresses that what matters is not the practice of the finger skills of organic chemistry but practice in the style of thinking of organic chemists. (CW)

  10. Mechanistic Insight into Ketone α-Alkylation with Unactivated Olefins via C-H Activation Promoted by Metal-Organic Cooperative Catalysis (MOCC): Enriching the MOCC Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Dang, Yanfeng; Qu, Shuanglin; Tao, Yuan; Deng, Xi; Wang, Zhi-Xiang

    2015-05-20

    Metal-organic cooperative catalysis (MOCC) has been successfully applied for hydroacylation of olefins with aldehydes via directed C(sp(2))-H functionalization. Most recently, it was reported that an elaborated MOCC system, containing Rh(I) catalyst and 7-azaindoline (L1) cocatalyst, could even catalyze ketone α-alkylation with unactivated olefins via C(sp(3))-H activation. Herein we present a density functional theory study to understand the mechanism of the challenging ketone α-alkylation. The transformation uses IMesRh(I)Cl(L1)(CH2═CH2) as an active catalyst and proceeds via sequential seven steps, including ketone condensation with L1, giving enamine 1b; 1b coordination to Rh(I) active catalyst, generating Rh(I)-1b intermediate; C(sp(2))-H oxidative addition, leading to a Rh(III)-H hydride; olefin migratory insertion into Rh(III)-H bond; reductive elimination, generating Rh(I)-1c(alkylated 1b) intermediate; decoordination of 1c, liberating 1c and regenerating Rh(I) active catalyst; and hydrolysis of 1c, furnishing the final α-alkylation product 1d and regenerating L1. Among the seven steps, reductive elimination is the rate-determining step. The C-H bond preactivation via agostic interaction is crucial for the bond activation. The mechanism rationalizes the experimental puzzles: why only L1 among several candidates performed perfectly, whereas others failed, and why Wilkinson's catalyst commonly used in MOCC systems performed poorly. Based on the established mechanism and stimulated by other relevant experimental reactions, we attempted to enrich MOCC chemistry computationally, exemplifying how to develop new organic catalysts and proposing L7 to be an alternative for L1 and demonstrating the great potential of expanding the hitherto exclusive use of Rh(I)/Rh(III) manifold to Co(0)/Co(II) redox cycling in developing MOCC systems.

  11. Optical activity and Alfred Werner's coordination chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Karl-Heinz; Berke, Heinz

    2011-03-01

    It is widely accepted, that Pasteur's seminal discovery of the opposite optical activity of ammonium sodium tartrate enantiomorphs in solution gave the spark to organic stereochemistry and led to the development of the tetrahedron model by van't Hoff and Le Bel. The proof that chirality is inherently connected to octahedral coordination chemistry fostered greatly Werner's spatial views of metal complexes and his coordination theory. The actual proof of principle was established via separation of diastereomeric camphor sulfonate salts of racemic metal complexes. PMID:20928897

  12. Atmospheric Chemistry of Micrometeoritic Organic Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kress, M. E.; Belle, C. L.; Pevyhouse, A. R.; Iraci, L. T.

    2011-01-01

    Micrometeorites approx.100 m in diameter deliver most of the Earth s annual accumulation of extraterrestrial material. These small particles are so strongly heated upon atmospheric entry that most of their volatile content is vaporized. Here we present preliminary results from two sets of experiments to investigate the fate of the organic fraction of micrometeorites. In the first set of experiments, 300 m particles of a CM carbonaceous chondrite were subject to flash pyrolysis, simulating atmospheric entry. In addition to CO and CO2, many organic compounds were released, including functionalized benzenes, hydrocarbons, and small polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In the second set of experiments, we subjected two of these compounds to conditions that simulate the heterogeneous chemistry of Earth s upper atmosphere. We find evidence that meteor-derived compounds can follow reaction pathways leading to the formation of more complex organic compounds.

  13. Form and Function: An Organic Chemistry Module. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvis, Bruce; Mazzocchi, Paul; Hearle, Robert

    This teacher's guide is designed to provide science teachers with the necessary guidance and suggestions for teaching organic chemistry. In this book, the diverse field of organic chemistry modules is introduced. The material in this book can be integrated with the other modules in a sequence that helps students to see that chemistry is a unified…

  14. Chemistry of secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Lindsay Diana

    The photooxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere can lead to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA), a major component of fine particulate matter. Improvements to air quality require insight into the many reactive intermediates that lead to SOA formation, of which only a small fraction have been measured at the molecular level. This thesis describes the chemistry of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from several atmospherically relevant hydrocarbon precursors. Photooxidation experiments of methoxyphenol and phenolic compounds and C12 alkanes were conducted in the Caltech Environmental Chamber. These experiments include the first photooxidation studies of these precursors run under sufficiently low NOx levels, such that RO2 + HO2 chemistry dominates, an important chemical regime in the atmosphere. Using online Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometery (CIMS), key gas-phase intermediates that lead to SOA formation in these systems were identified. With complementary particle-phase analyses, chemical mechanisms elucidating the SOA formation from these compounds are proposed. Three methoxyphenol species (phenol, guaiacol, and syringol) were studied to model potential photooxidation schemes of biomass burning intermediates. SOA yields (ratio of mass of SOA formed to mass of primary organic reacted) exceeding 25% are observed. Aerosol growth is rapid and linear with the organic conversion, consistent with the formation of essentially non-volatile products. Gas and aerosol-phase oxidation products from the guaiacol system show that the chemical mechanism consists of highly oxidized aromatic species in the particle phase. Syringol SOA yields are lower than that of phenol and guaiacol, likely due to unique chemistry dependent on methoxy group position. The photooxidation of several C12 alkanes of varying structure n-dodecane, 2-methylundecane, cyclododecane, and hexylcyclohexane) were run under extended OH exposure to investigate the

  15. Shock-induced chemistry in organic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dattelbaum, Dana M; Sheffield, Steve; Engelke, Ray; Manner, Virginia; Chellappa, Raja; Yoo, Choong - Shik

    2011-01-20

    The combined 'extreme' environments of high pressure, temperature, and strain rates, encountered under shock loading, offer enormous potential for the discovery of new paradigms in chemical reactivity not possible under more benign conditions. All organic materials are expected to react under these conditions, yet we currently understand very little about the first bond-breaking steps behind the shock front, such as in the shock initiation of explosives, or shock-induced reactivity of other relevant materials. Here, I will present recent experimental results of shock-induced chemistry in a variety of organic materials under sustained shock conditions. A comparison between the reactivity of different structures is given, and a perspective on the kinetics of reaction completion under shock drives.

  16. Introducing Undergraduates to Research Using a Suzuki-Miyaura Cross-Coupling Organic Chemistry Miniproject

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliveira, Deyvid G. M.; Rosa, Clarissa H.; Vargas, Bruna P.; Rosa, Diego S.; Silveira, Ma´rcia V.; de Moura, Neusa F.; Rosa, Gilber R.

    2015-01-01

    A five-week miniproject is described for an upper-division experimental organic chemistry course. The activities include synthesis of a phenylboronic acid via a Grignard reaction and its use in a Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reaction. Technical skills and concepts normally presented in practical organic chemistry courses are covered, including…

  17. Vial OrganicTM-Organic Chemistry Labs for High School and Junior College

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Thomas J.; Meszaros, Mark

    1999-01-01

    Vial Organic is the most economical, safe, and time-effective method of performing organic chemistry experiments. Activities are carried out in low-cost, sealed vials. Vial Organic is extremely safe because only micro quantities of reactants are used, reactants are contained in tightly sealed vials, and only water baths are used for temperature control. Vial Organic laboratory activities are easily performed within one 50-minute class period. When heat is required, a simple hot-water bath is prepared from a beaker of water and an inexpensive immersion heater. The low cost, ease of use, and relatively short time requirement will allow organic chemistry to be experienced by more students with less confusion and intimidation.

  18. Measurement and Chemistry of Atmospheric Organic Nitrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhr, Martin Patrick

    1990-01-01

    Organic nitrates are important reservoir species for NO_{rm x} (NO + NO_2) in the atmosphere. Typically formed in and around urban areas, the organic nitrates sequester NO_{rm x} and allow it to be transported to rural and remote regions, wherein it may be released into the atmosphere and participate in catalytic cycles leading to the formation of ozone. The research described in this work focusses on two problems related to our understanding of the atmospheric chemistry of the organic nitrates, (1) measuring the organic nitrates contributions to total reactive nitrogen (NO_ {rm y}) in the atmosphere, and (2) determining the conditions under which the organic nitrates release NO_{rm x} into the atmosphere and thereby participate in ozone formation. The work performed included development of measurement methods for the organic nitrates, ambient measurements of several organic nitrates made under a variety of conditions, and data interpretation using a combination of bivariate and multivariate analysis. The instrument development that was performed centered around incorporation of capillary column technology in a gas chromatographic method. Use of a capillary column resulted in improved chromatographic resolution and instrument sensitivity. In addition to the work on the chromatographic separation of the organic nitrates, some work was done regarding the sensitivity of the electron capture detector (ECD) as a function of electrical mode of operation. Ambient measurements of several of the organic nitrates were made during three field experiments in conjunction with NOAA's Aeronomy laboratory, including PAN rm CH_3C(O)O_2NO_2), PPN rm (C_2H_5C(O)O_2NO _2), and the C_1-C _5 alkyl nitrates (RONO_2 ). The measurements were made in conjunction with a wide variety of other chemical and physical parameters. Data interpretation was performed using bivariate analysis in order to understand the diurnal variation of the concentrations of the organic nitrates and their

  19. Understanding the Impact of a General Chemistry Course on Students' Transition to Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins-Webb, Alexandra; Jeffery, Kathleen A.; Sweeder, Ryan D.

    2016-01-01

    The move from general chemistry to organic chemistry can be a challenge for students as it often involves a transition from quantitatively-oriented to mechanistically-oriented thinking. This study found that the design of the general chemistry course can change the student experience of this transition as assessed by a reflective survey. The…

  20. Cocrystal Controlled Solid-State Synthesis: A Green Chemistry Experiment for Undergraduate Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheney, Miranda L.; Zaworotko, Michael J.; Beaton, Steve; Singer, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    Green chemistry has become an important area of concern for all chemists from practitioners in the pharmaceutical industry to professors and the students they teach and is now being incorporated into lectures of general and organic chemistry courses. However, there are relatively few green chemistry experiments that are easily incorporated into…

  1. Integrating Advanced High School Chemistry Research with Organic Chemistry and Instrumental Methods of Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Brian J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes and discusses the unique chemistry course opportunities beyond the advanced placement-level available at a science and technology magnet high school. Students may select entry-level courses such as honors and advanced placement chemistry; they may also take electives in organic chemistry with instrumental methods of analysis;…

  2. Atmospheric Prebiotic Chemistry and Organic Hazes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trainer, Melissa G.

    2012-01-01

    Earth's atmospheric composition at the time of the origin of life is not known, but it has often been suggested that chemical transformation of reactive species in the atmosphere was a significant source of pre biotic organic molecules. Experimental and theoretical studies over the past half century have shown that atmospheric synthesis can yield molecules such as amino acids and nucleobases, but these processes are very sensitive to gas composition and energy source. Abiotic synthesis of organic molecules is more productive in reduced atmospheres, yet the primitive Earth may not have been as reducing as earlier workers assumed, and recent research has reflected this shift in thinking. This work provides a survey of the range of chemical products that can be produced given a set of atmospheric conditions, with a particular focus on recent reports. Intertwined with the discussion of atmospheric synthesis is the consideration of an organic haze layer, which has been suggested as a possible ultraviolet shield on the anoxic early Earth. Since such a haze layer - if formed - would serve as a reservoir for organic molecules, the chemical composition of the aerosol should be closely examined. The results highlighted here show that a variety of products can be formed in mildly reducing or even neutral atmospheres, demonstrating that contributions of atmospheric synthesis to the organic inventory on early Earth should not be discounted. This review intends to bridge current knowledge of the range of possible atmospheric conditions in the prebiotic environment and pathways for synthesis under such conditions by examining the possible products of organic chemistry in the early atmosphere.

  3. Atmospheric Prebiotic Chemistry and Organic Hazes.

    PubMed

    Trainer, Melissa G

    2013-08-01

    Earth's atmospheric composition at the time of the origin of life is not known, but it has often been suggested that chemical transformation of reactive species in the atmosphere was a significant source of prebiotic organic molecules. Experimental and theoretical studies over the past half century have shown that atmospheric synthesis can yield molecules such as amino acids and nucleobases, but these processes are very sensitive to gas composition and energy source. Abiotic synthesis of organic molecules is more productive in reduced atmospheres, yet the primitive Earth may not have been as reducing as earlier workers assumed, and recent research has reflected this shift in thinking. This work provides a survey of the range of chemical products that can be produced given a set of atmospheric conditions, with a particular focus on recent reports. Intertwined with the discussion of atmospheric synthesis is the consideration of an organic haze layer, which has been suggested as a possible ultraviolet shield on the anoxic early Earth. Since such a haze layer - if formed - would serve as a reservoir for organic molecules, the chemical composition of the aerosol should be closely examined. The results highlighted here show that a variety of products can be formed in mildly reducing or even neutral atmospheres, demonstrating that contributions of atmospheric synthesis to the organic inventory on early Earth should not be discounted. This review intends to bridge current knowledge of the range of possible atmospheric conditions in the prebiotic environment and pathways for synthesis under such conditions by examining the possible products of organic chemistry in the early atmosphere.

  4. Atmospheric Prebiotic Chemistry and Organic Hazes

    PubMed Central

    Trainer, Melissa G.

    2013-01-01

    Earth’s atmospheric composition at the time of the origin of life is not known, but it has often been suggested that chemical transformation of reactive species in the atmosphere was a significant source of prebiotic organic molecules. Experimental and theoretical studies over the past half century have shown that atmospheric synthesis can yield molecules such as amino acids and nucleobases, but these processes are very sensitive to gas composition and energy source. Abiotic synthesis of organic molecules is more productive in reduced atmospheres, yet the primitive Earth may not have been as reducing as earlier workers assumed, and recent research has reflected this shift in thinking. This work provides a survey of the range of chemical products that can be produced given a set of atmospheric conditions, with a particular focus on recent reports. Intertwined with the discussion of atmospheric synthesis is the consideration of an organic haze layer, which has been suggested as a possible ultraviolet shield on the anoxic early Earth. Since such a haze layer – if formed – would serve as a reservoir for organic molecules, the chemical composition of the aerosol should be closely examined. The results highlighted here show that a variety of products can be formed in mildly reducing or even neutral atmospheres, demonstrating that contributions of atmospheric synthesis to the organic inventory on early Earth should not be discounted. This review intends to bridge current knowledge of the range of possible atmospheric conditions in the prebiotic environment and pathways for synthesis under such conditions by examining the possible products of organic chemistry in the early atmosphere. PMID:24143126

  5. Benchmarking Problems Used in Second Year Level Organic Chemistry Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raker, Jeffrey R.; Towns, Marcy H.

    2010-01-01

    Investigations of the problem types used in college-level general chemistry examinations have been reported in this Journal and were first reported in the "Journal of Chemical Education" in 1924. This study extends the findings from general chemistry to the problems of four college-level organic chemistry courses. Three problem typologies were…

  6. Distributed Pore Chemistry in Porous Organic Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A method for making a biocompatible polymer article using a uniform atomic oxygen treatment is disclosed. The sub-strate may be subsequently optionally grated with a compatibilizing compound. Compatibilizing compounds may include proteins, phosphorylcholine groups, platelet adhesion preventing polymers, albumin adhesion promoters, and the like. The compatibilized substrate may also have a living cell layer adhered thereto. The atomic oxygen is preferably produced by a flowing afterglow microwave discharge, wherein the substrate resides in a sidearm out of the plasma. Also, methods for culturing cells for various purposes using the various membranes are disclosed as well. Also disclosed are porous organic polymers having a distributed pore chemistry (DPC) comprising hydrophilic and hydrophobic region, and a method for making the DPC by exposing the polymer to atomic oxygen wherein the rate of hydrophilization is greater than the rate of mass loss.

  7. Distributed Pore Chemistry in Porous Organic Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method for making a biocompatible polymer article using a uniform atomic oxygen treatment is disclosed. The substrate may be subsequently optionally grated with a compatibilizing compound. Compatibilizing compounds may include proteins, phosphorylcholine groups, platelet adhesion preventing polymers, albumin adhesion promoters, and the like. The compatibilized substrate may also have a living cell layer adhered thereto. The atomic oxygen is preferably produced by a flowing afterglow microwave discharge. wherein the substrate resides in a sidearm out of the plasma. Also, methods for culturing cells for various purposes using the various membranes are disclosed as well. Also disclosed are porous organic polymers having a distributed pore chemistry (DPC) comprising hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. and a method for making the DPC by exposing the polymer to atomic oxygen wherein the rate of hydrophilization is greater than the rate of mass loss.

  8. A Forty Year Odyssey in Metallo-Organic Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Kenneth M

    2015-07-17

    In this invited Perspective, I provide a personal account highlighting several of my group's research contributions in metallo-organic chemistry over the past 40 years. Our early work focused primarily in stoichiometric structure/reactivity of transition metal-organic compounds and their use in organic synthesis. More recent efforts have centered on the discovery and development of new metal-catalyzed organic reactions via reactive metal-organic intermediates. The major research findings that are described here include (1) propargyl-cobalt complexes as electrophilic agents for C-C and C-Nu coupling; (2) the activation of carbon dioxide by metal complexes; (3) metal-promoted C-H nitrogenation reactions; (4) oxo-metal catalyzed deoxygenation reactions; and (5) catalyst discovery via dynamic templating with substrate- and transition-state analogues.

  9. Comparing Carbonyl Chemistry in Comprehensive Introductory Organic Chemistry Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Donna J.; Kumar, Ravi; Ramasamy, Saravanan

    2015-01-01

    Learning the chemistry of compounds containing carbonyl groups is difficult for undergraduate students partly because of a convolution of multiple possible reaction sites, competitive reactions taking place at those sites, different criteria needed to discern between the mechanisms of these reactions, and no straightforward selection method…

  10. Piaget and Organic Chemistry: Teaching Introductory Organic Chemistry through Learning Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libby, R. Daniel

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes the first application of the Piaget-based learning cycle technique (Atkin & Karplus, Sci. Teach. 1962, 29, 45-51) to an introductory organic chemistry course. It also presents the step-by-step process used to convert a lecture course into a discussion-based active learning course. The course is taught in a series of learning cycles. A learning cycle is a three phase process that provides opportunities for students to explore new material and work with an instructor to recognize logical patterns in data, and devise and test hypotheses. In this application, the first phase, exploration, involves out-of-class student evaluation of data in attempts to identify significant trends and develop hypotheses that might explain the trends in terms of fundamental scientific principles. In the second phase, concept invention, the students and instructor work together in-class to evaluate student hypotheses and find concepts that work best in explaining the data. The third phase, application, is an out-of-class application of the concept to new situations. The development of learning cycles from lecture notes is presented as an 8 step procedure. The process involves revaluation and restructuring of the course material to maintain a continuity of concept development according to the instructor's logic, dividing topics into individual concepts or techniques, and refocusing the presentation in terms of large numbers of examples that can serve as data for students in their exploration and application activities. A sample learning cycle and suggestions for ways of limited implementation of learning cycles into existing courses are also provided.

  11. Students' Understanding of Alkyl Halide Reactions in Undergraduate Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruz-Ramirez de Arellano, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Organic chemistry is an essential subject for many undergraduate students completing degrees in science, engineering, and pre-professional programs. However, students often struggle with the concepts and skills required to successfully solve organic chemistry exercises. Since alkyl halides are traditionally the first functional group that is…

  12. Representational Translation with Concrete Models in Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stull, Andrew T.; Hegarty, Mary; Dixon, Bonnie; Stieff, Mike

    2012-01-01

    In representation-rich domains such as organic chemistry, students must be facile and accurate when translating between different 2D representations, such as diagrams. We hypothesized that translating between organic chemistry diagrams would be more accurate when concrete models were used because difficult mental processes could be augmented by…

  13. Organic Chemistry Trivia: A Way to Interest Nonchemistry Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Steven C.

    2011-01-01

    The use of in-class stories is an excellent way to keep a class interested in subject matter. Many organic chemistry classes are populated by nonchemistry majors, such as pre-med, pre-pharm, and biology students. Trivia questions are presented that are designed to show how organic chemistry is an important subject to students regardless of their…

  14. Teaching Introductory Organic Chemistry: 'Blooming' beyond a Simple Taxonomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pungente, Michael D.; Badger, Rodney A.

    2003-01-01

    Suggests that most students approach organic chemistry classes with a certain amount of apprehension and try to just manage or memorize the material rather than understand it. Recommends the use of Bloom's taxonomy as a way to increase comprehension and gives an example of how to use it in an organic chemistry classroom. (SOE)

  15. MIANN models in medicinal, physical and organic chemistry.

    PubMed

    González-Díaz, Humberto; Arrasate, Sonia; Sotomayor, Nuria; Lete, Esther; Munteanu, Cristian R; Pazos, Alejandro; Besada-Porto, Lina; Ruso, Juan M

    2013-01-01

    Reducing costs in terms of time, animal sacrifice, and material resources with computational methods has become a promising goal in Medicinal, Biological, Physical and Organic Chemistry. There are many computational techniques that can be used in this sense. In any case, almost all these methods focus on few fundamental aspects including: type (1) methods to quantify the molecular structure, type (2) methods to link the structure with the biological activity, and others. In particular, MARCH-INSIDE (MI), acronym for Markov Chain Invariants for Networks Simulation and Design, is a well-known method for QSAR analysis useful in step (1). In addition, the bio-inspired Artificial-Intelligence (AI) algorithms called Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) are among the most powerful type (2) methods. We can combine MI with ANNs in order to seek QSAR models, a strategy which is called herein MIANN (MI & ANN models). One of the first applications of the MIANN strategy was in the development of new QSAR models for drug discovery. MIANN strategy has been expanded to the QSAR study of proteins, protein-drug interactions, and protein-protein interaction networks. In this paper, we review for the first time many interesting aspects of the MIANN strategy including theoretical basis, implementation in web servers, and examples of applications in Medicinal and Biological chemistry. We also report new applications of the MIANN strategy in Medicinal chemistry and the first examples in Physical and Organic Chemistry, as well. In so doing, we developed new MIANN models for several self-assembly physicochemical properties of surfactants and large reaction networks in organic synthesis. In some of the new examples we also present experimental results which were not published up to date.

  16. Mass spectrometry. [in organic ion and biorganic chemistry and medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Cox, R. E.; Derrick, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Review of the present status of mass spectrometry in the light of pertinent recent publications spanning the period from December 1971 to January 1974. Following an initial survey of techniques, instruments, and computer applications, a sharp distinction is made between the chemistry of organic (radical-)ions and analytical applications in biorganic chemistry and medicine. The emphasis is on the chemistry of organic (radical-)ions at the expense of inorganic, organometallic, and surface ion chemistry. Biochemistry and medicine are chosen because of their contemporary importance and because of the stupendous contributions of mass spectroscopy to these fields in the past two years. In the review of gas-phase organic ion chemistry, special attention is given to studies making significant contributions to the understanding of ion chemistry.

  17. Student Active Learning Methods in Physical Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinde, Robert J.; Kovac, Jeffrey

    2001-01-01

    We describe two strategies for implementing active learning in physical chemistry. One involves supplementing a traditional lecture course with heavily computer-based active-learning exercises carried out by cooperative groups in a department computer lab. The other uses cooperative learning almost exclusively, supplemented by occasional mini-lectures. Both approaches seemed to result in better student learning and a more positive attitude toward the subject. On the basis of our respective experiences using active learning techniques, we discuss some of the strengths of these techniques and some of the challenges we encountered using the active-learning approach in teaching physical chemistry.

  18. Directed evolution of aldolases for exploitation in synthetic organic chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Bolt, Amanda; Berry, Alan; Nelson, Adam

    2008-01-01

    This review focuses on the directed evolution of aldolases with synthetically useful properties. Directed evolution has been used to address a number of limitations associated with the use of wild-type aldolases as catalysts in synthetic organic chemistry. The generation of aldolase enzymes with a modified or expanded substrate repertoire is described. Particular emphasis is placed on the directed evolution of aldolases with modified stereochemical properties: such enzymes can be useful catalysts in the stereoselective synthesis of biologically active small molecules. The review also describes some of the fundamental insights into mechanistic enzymology that directed evolution can provide. PMID:18230325

  19. Activity cliff networks for medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Stumpfe, Dagmar; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2014-08-01

    Network representations are widely used in bioinformatics but have only been little explored in chemistry. Thus far, only a few attempts have been made to generate and analyze compound networks. Among these are the first activity cliff networks. In medicinal chemistry, activity cliffs are focal points of structure-activity relationships (SAR) analysis. Activity cliffs have generally been defined as pairs of structurally similar or analogous active compounds that have a large difference in potency against their target. However, most activity cliffs are not formed in isolation but in a coordinated manner involving multiple highly and weakly potent compounds. Recently, a comprehensive activity cliff network has been generated for current public domain bioactive compounds, hence providing a first global view of activity cliff formation. The design of activity cliff networks is discussed herein. From the global activity cliff network, local networks can be extracted for individual compound activity classes that provide graphical access to high-level SAR information for compound optimization efforts.

  20. 11(th) National Meeting of Organic Chemistry and 4(th) Meeting of Therapeutic Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Maria Emília; Araújo, Maria João; do Vale, Maria Luísa; Andrade, Paula B; Branco, Paula; Gomes, Paula; Moreira, Rui; Pinho E Melo, Teresa M V D; Freitas, Victor

    2016-03-17

    For the first time under the auspices of Sociedade Portuguesa de Química, the competences of two important fields of Chemistry are brought together into a single event, the 11st National Organic Chemistry Meeting and the the 4th National Medicinal Chemistry Meeting, to highlight complementarities and to promote new synergies. Abstracts of plenary lectures, oral communications, and posters presented during the meeting are collected in this report.

  1. 11(th) National Meeting of Organic Chemistry and 4(th) Meeting of Therapeutic Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Maria Emília; Araújo, Maria João; do Vale, Maria Luísa; Andrade, Paula B; Branco, Paula; Gomes, Paula; Moreira, Rui; Pinho E Melo, Teresa M V D; Freitas, Victor

    2016-01-01

    For the first time under the auspices of Sociedade Portuguesa de Química, the competences of two important fields of Chemistry are brought together into a single event, the 11st National Organic Chemistry Meeting and the the 4th National Medicinal Chemistry Meeting, to highlight complementarities and to promote new synergies. Abstracts of plenary lectures, oral communications, and posters presented during the meeting are collected in this report. PMID:27102166

  2. 11th National Meeting of Organic Chemistry and 4th Meeting of Therapeutic Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Maria Emília; Araújo, Maria João; do Vale, Maria Luísa; Andrade, Paula B.; Branco, Paula; Gomes, Paula; Moreira, Rui; Pinho e Melo, Teresa M.V.D.; Freitas, Victor

    2016-01-01

    For the first time under the auspices of Sociedade Portuguesa de Química, the competences of two important fields of Chemistry are brought together into a single event, the 11st National Organic Chemistry Meeting and the the 4th National Medicinal Chemistry Meeting, to highlight complementarities and to promote new synergies. Abstracts of plenary lectures, oral communications, and posters presented during the meeting are collected in this report. PMID:27102166

  3. Modeling the Explicit Chemistry of Anthropogenic and Biogenic Organic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Madronich, Sasha

    2015-12-09

    The atmospheric burden of Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) remains one of the most important yet uncertain aspects of the radiative forcing of climate. This grant focused on improving our quantitative understanding of SOA formation and evolution, by developing, applying, and improving a highly detailed model of atmospheric organic chemistry, the Generation of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) model. Eleven (11) publications have resulted from this grant.

  4. The low temperature organic chemistry of Titan's geofluid.

    PubMed

    Raulin, F; Bruston, P; Paillous, P; Sternberg, R

    1995-03-01

    Organic chemistry on Titan and prebiotic chemistry on Earth involve the same N-containing organics: nitriles and their oligomers. Couplings of their chemistry in the three parts of Titan's geofluid (atmosphere, aerosols and surface) seem to play a key role in the organic chemical evolution of the planet. If liquid water was present on Titan, then a prebiotic chemistry, involving eutectics, similar to that of the early Earth, may have occurred. However, liquid water is currently absent and a prebiotic chemistry based only on N-organics may be evolving now on Titan. The other consequence of the low temperatures of Titan is the possible formation of organics unstable at room temperature and very reactive. So far, these compounds have not been systematically searched for in experimental studies of Titan's organic chemistry. C4N2 has already been detected on Titan. Powerful reactants in organic chemistry, CH2N2, and CH3N3, may be also present. They exhibit spectral signatures in the mid-IR strong enough to allow their detection at the 10-100 ppb level. They may be detectable on future IR spectra (ISO and Cassini) of Titan.

  5. A Perspective on Physical Organic Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A perspective on the development of mechanistic carbene chemistry is presented. The author will point out questions that have been answered, and a next generation of questions will be proposed. PMID:24571434

  6. Neural Networks for the Prediction of Organic Chemistry Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Reaction prediction remains one of the major challenges for organic chemistry and is a prerequisite for efficient synthetic planning. It is desirable to develop algorithms that, like humans, “learn” from being exposed to examples of the application of the rules of organic chemistry. We explore the use of neural networks for predicting reaction types, using a new reaction fingerprinting method. We combine this predictor with SMARTS transformations to build a system which, given a set of reagents and reactants, predicts the likely products. We test this method on problems from a popular organic chemistry textbook. PMID:27800555

  7. Improving Student Performance in Organic Chemistry: Help Seeking Behaviors and Prior Chemistry Aptitude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Gail; Rabin, Laura A.; Brodale, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    Organic Chemistry is perceived to be one of the most challenging of undergraduate science courses, and attrition from this course may impact decisions about pursuing a professional or academic career in the biomedical and related sciences. Research suggests that chemistry students who are strategic help seekers may outperform those students who…

  8. Organic First: A Biology-Friendly Chemistry Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reingold, I. David

    2005-01-01

    In this essay, the author describes to biologists the advantages of organic-first curriculum, on the assumption that few biologists are regular readers of "Journal of Chemistry Education" and therefore are probably unaware of the method for integrating chemistry and biology curricula. The author begins with the assumption that the majority of…

  9. Caring for the Environment while Teaching Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Elvira Santos; Gavilan Garcia, Irma Cruz; Lejarazo Gomez, Eva Florencia

    2004-01-01

    A comprehensive program in the field of green chemistry, which concentrates on processing and managing of wastes produced during laboratory experiments, is presented. The primary aim of the program is to instill a sense of responsibility and a concern for the environment through organic chemistry education.

  10. Creatine Synthesis: An Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Andri L.; Tan, Paula

    2006-01-01

    Students in introductory chemistry classes typically appreciate seeing the connection between course content and the "real world". For this reason, we have developed a synthesis of creatine monohydrate--a popular supplement used in sports requiring short bursts of energy--for introductory organic chemistry laboratory courses. Creatine monohydrate…

  11. Searching the Chemistry Files for Synthetic Organic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antony, Arthur

    1978-01-01

    Examines a number of searches dealing with the synthesis of organic compounds which the author performed on CA CONDENSATES and CASIA data bases (on DIALOG) at the request of users. Results show that a combined use provides the users with a more satisfying result even if the larger output contains some undesired citations. (JD)

  12. CARBINOLAMINES AND GEMINAL DIOLS IN AQUEOUS ENVIRONMENTAL ORGANIC CHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organic chemistry textbooks generally treat geminal diols as curiosities-exceptions to the stability of the C=O double bond. However, most aldehydes of environmental significance, to wit, trichloroethanal (chloral), methanala (formaldehyde), ethanal (acetaldehyde), and propanal ...

  13. The Application of Physical Organic Chemistry to Biochemical Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westheimer, Frank

    1986-01-01

    Presents the synthesis of the science of enzymology from application of the concepts of physical organic chemistry from a historical perspective. Summarizes enzyme and coenzyme mechanisms elucidated prior to 1963. (JM)

  14. A Novel Philosophy for a First Course in Organic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Melvin S.

    1982-01-01

    Focusing on research is suggested as an approach for teaching organic chemistry for nonmajors. Topics of saturated hydrocarbons and unsaturated hydrocarbons are used as examples to illustrate the approach. (SK)

  15. Improvements to the Characterization of Organic Nitrogen Chemistry

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess atmospheric nitrogen deposition can cause significant harmful effects to ecosystems. Organic nitrogen deposition can be an important contributor to the total nitrogen budget, contributing 10-30%, however there are large uncertainties in the chemistry and deposition of thes...

  16. Topic Sequence and Emphasis Variability of Selected Organic Chemistry Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houseknecht, Justin B.

    2010-01-01

    Textbook choice has a significant effect upon course success. Among the factors that influence this decision, two of the most important are material organization and emphasis. This paper examines the sequencing of 19 organic chemistry topics, 21 concepts and skills, and 7 biological topics within nine of the currently available organic textbooks.…

  17. Solar Energy Project, Activities: Chemistry & Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tullock, Bruce, Ed.; And Others

    This guide contains lesson plans and outlines of science activities which present concepts of solar energy in the context of chemistry and physics experiments. Each unit presents an introduction to the unit; objectives; required skills and knowledge; materials; method; questions; recommendations for further work; and a teacher information sheet.…

  18. Automated Combinatorial Chemistry in the Organic Chemistry Majors Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Christopher J.; Hanne, Larry F.

    2010-01-01

    A multidisciplinary experiment has been developed in which students each synthesize a combinatorial library of 48 hydrazones with the aid of a liquid-handling robot. Each product is then subjected to a Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion assay to assess its antibacterial activity. Students gain experience working with automation and at the…

  19. A context based approach using Green Chemistry/Bio-remediation principles to enhance interest and learning of organic chemistry in a high school AP chemistry classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Tricia

    The ability of our planet to sustain life and heal itself is not as predictable as it used to be. Our need for educated future scientists who know what our planet needs, and can passionately apply that knowledge to find solutions should be at the heart of science education today. This study of learning organic chemistry through the lens of the environmental problem "What should be done with our food scraps?" explores student interest, and mastery of certain concepts in organic chemistry. This Green Chemistry/ Bio-remediation context-based teaching approach utilizes the Nature MillRTM, which is an indoor food waste composting machine, to learn about organic chemistry, and how this relates to landfill reduction possibilities, and resource production. During this unit students collected food waste from their cafeteria, and used the Nature MillRTM to convert food waste into compost. The use of these hands on activities, and group discussions in a context-based environment enhanced their interest in organic chemistry, and paper chromatography. According to a one-tailed paired T-test, the result show that this context-based approach is a significant way to increase both student interest and mastery of the content.

  20. Ceria-based solid catalysts for organic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Vivier, Laurence; Duprez, Daniel

    2010-06-21

    Ceria has been the subject of thorough investigations, mainly because of its use as an active component of catalytic converters for the treatment of exhaust gases. However, ceria-based catalysts have also been developed for different applications in organic chemistry. The redox and acid-base properties of ceria, either alone or in the presence of transition metals, are important parameters that allow to activate complex organic molecules and to selectively orient their transformation. Pure ceria is used in several organic reactions, such as the dehydration of alcohols, the alkylation of aromatic compounds, ketone formation, and aldolization, and in redox reactions. Ceria-supported metal catalysts allow the hydrogenation of many unsaturated compounds. They can also be used for coupling or ring-opening reactions. Cerium atoms can be added as dopants to catalytic system or impregnated onto zeolites and mesoporous catalyst materials to improve their performances. This Review demonstrates that the exceptional surface (and sometimes bulk) properties of ceria make cerium-based catalysts very effective for a broad range of organic reactions.

  1. [Lipases in catalytic reactions of organic chemistry].

    PubMed

    Bezborodov, A M; Zagustina, N A

    2014-01-01

    Aspects of enzymatic catalysis in lipase-catalyzed reactions of organic synthesis are discussed in the review. The data on modern methods of protein engineering and enzyme modification allowing a broader range of used substrates are briefly summarized. The application of lipase in the preparation of pharmaceuticals and agrochemicals containing no inactive enantiomers and in the synthesis of secondary alcohol enantiomers and optically active amides is demonstrated. The subject of lipase involvement in the C-C bond formation in the Michael reaction is discussed. Data on the enzymatic synthesis of construction materials--polyesters, siloxanes, etc.--are presented. Examples demonstrating the application of lipase enzymatic catalysis in industry are given. PMID:25707112

  2. The nucleophilicity N index in organic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Luis R; Pérez, Patricia

    2011-10-21

    The nucleophilicity N index (J. Org. Chem. 2008, 73, 4615), the inverse of the electrophilicity, 1/ω, and the recently proposed inverse of the electrodonating power, 1/ω⁻, (J. Org. Chem. 2010, 75, 4957) have been checked toward (i) a series of single 5-substituted indoles for which rate constants are available, (ii) a series of para-substituted phenols, and for (iii) a series of 2,5-disubstituted bicyclic[2.2.1]hepta-2,5-dienes which display concurrently electrophilic and nucleophilic behaviors. While all considered indices account well for the nucleophilic behavior of organic molecules having a single substitution, the nucleophilicity N index works better for more complex molecules. Unlike, the inverse of the electrophilicity, 1/ω, (R(2) = 0.71), and the inverse of the electrodonating power, 1/ω⁻ (R(2) = 0.83), a very good correlation of the nucleophilicity N index of twelve 2-substituted-6-methoxy-bicyclic[2.2.1]hepta-2,5-dienes versus the activation energy associated with the nucleophilic attack on 1,1-dicyanoethylene is found (R(2) = 0.99). This comparative study allows to assert that the nucleophilicity N index is a measure of the nucleophilicity of complex organic molecules displaying concurrently electrophilic and nucleophilic behaviors. PMID:21842104

  3. Organic N-chloramines: chemistry and toxicology.

    PubMed Central

    Scully, F E; Bempong, M A

    1982-01-01

    The stability of aqueous solutions of organic N-chloramines, suspected of contaminating chlorinated water, has been studied. Two factors influence the decomposition of solutions of N-chloropiperidine and N-chlorodiethylamine: a spontaneous decomposition and photodecomposition. Since solutions of these compounds are relatively long-lived, a need for an analytical method for their identification is discussed. A new method is described which involves reaction of organic N-chloramines with arenesulfinic acid salts. The method gives high yields of stable arenesulfonamides. Several toxicological studies of N-chloropiperidine are described. The compound is mutagenic by Ames assay in Salmonella typhimurium strain TA 100 and does not require metabolic activation as indicated in a total body fluids analysis using C57BL/J6 mice. N-Chloropiperidine was subjected to a modified in vitro cell transformation assay using diploid fibroblast cells from Syrian hamster fetuses. A maximum number of foci of 4 per dish was observed at a seeding of 5 X 10(3) cells/60 mm dish. Under similar conditions, MNNG-induced foci ranged from 4 to 7 per dish. PMID:7151751

  4. The nucleophilicity N index in organic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Luis R; Pérez, Patricia

    2011-10-21

    The nucleophilicity N index (J. Org. Chem. 2008, 73, 4615), the inverse of the electrophilicity, 1/ω, and the recently proposed inverse of the electrodonating power, 1/ω⁻, (J. Org. Chem. 2010, 75, 4957) have been checked toward (i) a series of single 5-substituted indoles for which rate constants are available, (ii) a series of para-substituted phenols, and for (iii) a series of 2,5-disubstituted bicyclic[2.2.1]hepta-2,5-dienes which display concurrently electrophilic and nucleophilic behaviors. While all considered indices account well for the nucleophilic behavior of organic molecules having a single substitution, the nucleophilicity N index works better for more complex molecules. Unlike, the inverse of the electrophilicity, 1/ω, (R(2) = 0.71), and the inverse of the electrodonating power, 1/ω⁻ (R(2) = 0.83), a very good correlation of the nucleophilicity N index of twelve 2-substituted-6-methoxy-bicyclic[2.2.1]hepta-2,5-dienes versus the activation energy associated with the nucleophilic attack on 1,1-dicyanoethylene is found (R(2) = 0.99). This comparative study allows to assert that the nucleophilicity N index is a measure of the nucleophilicity of complex organic molecules displaying concurrently electrophilic and nucleophilic behaviors.

  5. Synthesis Road Map Problems in Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaller, Chris P.; Graham, Kate J.; Jones, T. Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Road map problems ask students to integrate their knowledge of organic reactions with pattern recognition skills to "fill in the blanks" in the synthesis of an organic compound. Students are asked to identify familiar organic reactions in unfamiliar contexts. A practical context, such as a medicinally useful target compound, helps…

  6. Organic chemistry and biology of the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, C.

    1973-01-01

    Interstellar organic chemistry is discussed as the field of study emerging from the discovery of microwave lines of formaldehyde and of hydrogen cyanide in the interstellar medium. The reliability of molecular identifications and comparisons of interstellar and cometary compounds are considered, along with the degradational origin of simple organics. It is pointed out that the contribution of interstellar organic chemistry to problems in biology is not substantive but analogical. The interstellar medium reveals the operation of chemical processes which, on earth and perhaps on vast numbers of planets throughout the universe, led to the origin of life, but the actual molecules of the interstellar medium are unlikely to play any significant biological role.

  7. Organic chemistry in the atmosphere. [laboratory modeling of Titan atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, C.

    1974-01-01

    The existence of an at least moderately complex organic chemistry on Titan is stipulated based on clear evidence of methane, and at least presumptive evidence of hydrogen in its atmosphere. The ratio of methane to hydrogen is the highest of any atmosphere in the solar system. Irradiation of hydrogen/methane mixtures produces aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. A very reasonable hypothesis assumes that the red cloud cover of Titan is made of organic chemicals. Two-carbon hydrocarbons experimentally produced from irradiated mixtures of methane, ammonia, water, and hydrogen bear out the possible organic chemistry of the Titanian environment.

  8. Acid-Base Learning Outcomes for Students in an Introductory Organic Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoyanovich, Carlee; Gandhi, Aneri; Flynn, Alison B.

    2015-01-01

    An outcome-based approach to teaching and learning focuses on what the student demonstrably knows and can do after instruction, rather than on what the instructor teaches. This outcome-focused approach can then guide the alignment of teaching strategies, learning activities, and assessment. In organic chemistry, mastery of organic acid-base…

  9. Using Popular Nonfiction in Organic Chemistry: Teaching More than Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amaral, Katie E.; Shibley, Ivan A., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Assigning a popular nonfiction book as a supplemental text in organic chemistry can help students learn valuable skills. An analysis of student feedback on assignments related to a nonfiction book in two different organic courses revealed that students applied the information from the book, improved their communication skills, and were more…

  10. Building Bridges between Science Courses Using Honors Organic Chemistry Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickey, Timothy; Pontrello, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Introductory undergraduate science courses are traditionally offered as distinct units without formalized student interaction between classes. To bridge science courses, the authors used three Honors Organic Chemistry projects paired with other science courses. The honors students delivered presentations to mainstream organic course students and…

  11. Saying What You Mean: Teaching Mechanisms in Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friesen, J. Brent

    2008-01-01

    Organic reactions in introductory organic chemistry courses are most commonly taught with a mechanism-based approach to the understanding of molecular reactivity. However, the effectiveness of the popular curved arrow representation to describe reaction mechanisms is often compromised by the overuse of shortcuts and obscure notation. The…

  12. Undergraduate Oral Examinations in a University Organic Chemistry Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dicks, Andrew P.; Lautens, Mark; Koroluk, Katherine J.; Skonieczny, Stanislaw

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the successful implementation of an oral examination format in the organic chemistry curriculum at the University of Toronto. Oral examinations are used to replace traditional written midterm examinations in several courses. In an introductory organic class, each student is allotted 15 min to individually discuss one…

  13. A Multistep Synthesis for an Advanced Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang Ji; Peters, Dennis G.

    2006-01-01

    Multistep syntheses are often important components of the undergraduate organic laboratory experience and a three-step synthesis of 5-(2-sulfhydrylethyl) salicylaldehyde was described. The experiment is useful as a special project for an advanced undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory course and offers opportunities for students to master a…

  14. Recent advances in the chemistry of organic thiocyanates.

    PubMed

    Castanheiro, Thomas; Suffert, Jean; Donnard, Morgan; Gulea, Mihaela

    2016-02-01

    Organic thiocyanates are important synthetic intermediates to access valuable sulfur-containing compounds. In this review the different methods for their preparation and their synthetic applications will be presented. The literature of the last 15 years will be covered, highlighting selected recent advances in the chemistry of this class of compounds. We hope to offer chemists the tools to have a good grasp of this singular functionality and open the door to further progress in this chemistry.

  15. Students' understanding of alkyl halide reactions in undergraduate organic chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Ramirez de Arellano, Daniel

    Organic chemistry is an essential subject for many undergraduate students completing degrees in science, engineering, and pre-professional programs. However, students often struggle with the concepts and skills required to successfully solve organic chemistry exercises. Since alkyl halides are traditionally the first functional group that is studied in undergraduate organic chemistry courses, establishing a robust understanding of the concepts and reactions related to them can be beneficial in assuring students' success in organic chemistry courses. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to elucidate and describe students' understanding of alkyl halide reactions in an undergraduate organic chemistry course. Participants were interviewed using a think-aloud protocol in which they were given a set of exercises dealing with reactions and mechanisms of alkyl halide molecules in order to shed light on the students' understanding of these reactions and elucidate any gaps in understanding and incorrect warrants that may be present. These interviews were transcribed and analyzed using qualitative inquiry approaches. In general, the findings from this study show that the students exhibited gaps in understanding and incorrect warrants dealing with: (1) classifying substances as bases and/or nucleophiles, (2) assessing the basic or nucleophilic strength of substances, (3) accurately describing the electron movement of the steps that take place during alkyl halide reaction mechanisms, and (4) assessing the viability of their proposed reactive intermediates and breakage of covalent bonds. In addition, implications for teaching and future research are proposed.

  16. Organic chemistry on Titan: Surface interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, W. Reid; Sagan, Carl

    1992-01-01

    The interaction of Titan's organic sediments with the surface (solubility in nonpolar fluids) is discussed. How Titan's sediments can be exposed to an aqueous medium for short, but perhaps significant, periods of time is also discussed. Interactions with hydrocarbons and with volcanic magmas are considered. The alteration of Titan's organic sediments over geologic time by the impacts of meteorites and comets is discussed.

  17. Organic chemistry. Strain-release amination.

    PubMed

    Gianatassio, Ryan; Lopchuk, Justin M; Wang, Jie; Pan, Chung-Mao; Malins, Lara R; Prieto, Liher; Brandt, Thomas A; Collins, Michael R; Gallego, Gary M; Sach, Neal W; Spangler, Jillian E; Zhu, Huichin; Zhu, Jinjiang; Baran, Phil S

    2016-01-15

    To optimize drug candidates, modern medicinal chemists are increasingly turning to an unconventional structural motif: small, strained ring systems. However, the difficulty of introducing substituents such as bicyclo[1.1.1]pentanes, azetidines, or cyclobutanes often outweighs the challenge of synthesizing the parent scaffold itself. Thus, there is an urgent need for general methods to rapidly and directly append such groups onto core scaffolds. Here we report a general strategy to harness the embedded potential energy of effectively spring-loaded C-C and C-N bonds with the most oft-encountered nucleophiles in pharmaceutical chemistry, amines. Strain-release amination can diversify a range of substrates with a multitude of desirable bioisosteres at both the early and late stages of a synthesis. The technique has also been applied to peptide labeling and bioconjugation.

  18. The Organic Chemistry of Conducting Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, Laren Malcolm

    2014-12-01

    For the last several years, we have examined the fundamental principles of conduction in one-dimensional systems, i.e., molecular “wires”. It is, of course, widely recognized that such systems, as components of electronically conductive materials, function in a two- and three-dimensional milieu. Thus interchain hopping and grain-boundary resistivity are limiting conductivity factors in highly conductive materials, and overall conductivity is a function of through-chain and boundary hopping. We have given considerable attention to the basic principles underlying charge transport (the “rules of the game”) in two-dimensional systems by using model systems which allow direct observation of such processes, including the examination of tunneling and hopping as components of charge transfer. In related work, we have spent considerable effort on the chemistry of conjugated heteropolymers, most especially polythiophens, with the aim of using these most efficient of readily available electroactive polymers in photovoltaic devices.

  19. A Coordination Chemistry Approach for Lithium-Ion Batteries: The Coexistence of Metal and Ligand Redox Activities in a One-Dimensional Metal-Organic Material.

    PubMed

    Li, Gaihua; Yang, Hao; Li, Fengcai; Cheng, Fangyi; Shi, Wei; Chen, Jun; Cheng, Peng

    2016-05-16

    We demonstrate herein the use of a one-dimensional metal-organic material as a new type of electrode material for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) in place of the classic porous three-dimensional materials, which are subject to the size of the channel for lithium-ion diffusion and blocking of the windows of the framework by organic solvents during the charging and discharging processes. Introducing a one-dimensional coordination compound can keep organic active substances insoluble in the electrolyte during the charging and discharging processes, providing a facile and general new system for further studies. The results show that both the aromatic ligand and the metal center can participate in lithium storage simultaneously, illustrating a new energy storage mechanism that has been well-characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry. In addition, the fact that the one-dimensional chains are linked by weak hydrogen bonds rather than strong π-π stacking interactions or covalent bonds is beneficial for the release of capacity entirely without the negative effect of burying the active sites.

  20. Organic chemistry: No double bond left behind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarlah, David

    2016-03-01

    Alkenyl halides are some of the most useful building blocks for synthesizing small organic molecules. A catalyst has now allowed their direct preparation from widely available alkenes using the cross-metathesis reaction. See Article p.459

  1. Using Art-Based Chemistry Activities to Improve Students' Conceptual Understanding in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danipog, Dennis L.; Ferido, Marlene B.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of art-based chemistry activities (ABCA) on high school students' conceptual understanding in chemistry. The study used the pretest-posttest control group design. A total of 64 third-year high school students from two different chemistry classes participated in the study. One class was exposed to art-based…

  2. Predicted versus Actual Performance in Undergraduate Organic Chemistry and Implications for Student Advising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pursell, David P.

    2007-01-01

    Performance as measured by grades in the first and second semesters of organic chemistry was predicted using pre-college measures (SAT scores, high school rank, validation exams) and college measures (general chemistry GPA, overall college GPA prior to beginning organic chemistry, first-semester organic chemistry GPA). Data indicate that overall…

  3. Teaching Introductory Organic Chemistry: 'Blooming' beyond a Simple Taxonomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pungente, Michael D.; Badger, Rodney A.

    2003-07-01

    Undergraduate students often experience fear and trepidation when studying introductory organic chemistry: the majority of these students use a memorization approach to the material, sacrificing understanding. This paper describes one way the problem can be resolved. The cognitive working level we emphasize in our teaching practice involves making the necessary connections between the general chemistry principles that students have learned (or at least have been exposed to in their senior high school years and have revisited again in their university freshman year) and the many reactions and mechanisms they will encounter in organic chemistry. Educating students early in the course about the various levels of the cognitive process and the necessary working level of cognition for success in organic chemistry teaches connections between the general chemistry principles and reaction mechanisms. This empowers students to approach the subject from a perspective of understanding rather than memorization, and replaces fear and trepidation with confidence. In addition, this can help narrow the gap between what instructors expect from their students and what their students think is sufficient to master the course content.

  4. Applications of the Cambridge Structural Database in organic chemistry and crystal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Allen, Frank H; Motherwell, W D Samuel

    2002-06-01

    The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) and its associated software systems have formed the basis for more than 800 research applications in structural chemistry, crystallography and the life sciences. Relevant references, dating from the mid-1970s, and brief synopses of these papers are collected in a database, DBUse, which is freely available via the CCDC website. This database has been used to review research applications of the CSD in organic chemistry, including supramolecular applications, and in organic crystal chemistry. The review concentrates on applications that have been published since 1990 and covers a wide range of topics, including structure correlation, conformational analysis, hydrogen bonding and other intermolecular interactions, studies of crystal packing, extended structural motifs, crystal engineering and polymorphism, and crystal structure prediction. Applications of CSD information in studies of crystal structure precision, the determination of crystal structures from powder diffraction data, together with applications in chemical informatics, are also discussed.

  5. Chemistry: Small molecular replicators go organic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Annette F.

    2016-09-01

    The emergence of complex, dynamic molecular behaviour might have had a role in the origin of life. Such behaviour has now been seen in a reaction network involving small, organic, self-replicating molecules of biological relevance. See Letter p.656

  6. Oxidation and Reduction Reactions in Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shibley, Ivan A., Jr.; Amaral, Katie E.; Aurentz, David J.; McCaully, Ronald J.

    2010-01-01

    A variety of approaches to the concept of oxidation and reduction appear in organic textbooks. The method proposed here is different than most published approaches. The oxidation state is calculated by totaling the number of heterogeneous atoms, [pi]-bonds, and rings. A comparison of the oxidation states of reactant and product determine what type…

  7. Habitat management affects soil chemistry and allochthonous organic inputs mediating microbial structure and exo-enzyme activity in Wadden Sea salt-marsh soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Peter; Granse, Dirk; Thi Do, Hai; Weingartner, Magdalena; Nolte, Stefanie; Hoth, Stefan; Jensen, Kai

    2016-04-01

    The Wadden Sea (WS) region is Europe's largest wetland and home to approximately 20% of its salt marsh area. Mainland salt marshes of the WS are anthropogenically influenced systems and have traditionally been used for livestock grazing in wide parts. After foundation of WS National Parks in the late 1980s and early 1990s, artificial drainage has been abandoned; however, livestock grazing is still common in many areas of the National Parks and is under ongoing discussion as a habitat-management practice. While studies so far focused on effects of livestock grazing on biodiversity, little is known about how biogeochemical processes, element cycling, and particularly carbon sequestration are affected. Here, we present data from a recent field study focusing on grazing effects on soil properties, microbial exo-enzyme activity, microbial abundance and structure. Exo-enzyme activity was studied conducting digestive enzyme assays for various enzymes involved in C- and N cycling. Microbial abundance and structure was assessed measuring specific gene abundance of fungi and bacteria using quantitative PCR. Soil compaction induced by grazing led to higher bulk density and decreases in soil redox (∆ >100 mV). Soil pH was significantly lower in grazed parts. Further, the proportion of allochthonous organic matter (marine input) was significantly smaller in grazed vs. ungrazed sites, likely caused by a higher sediment trapping capacity of the taller vegetation in the ungrazed sites. Grazing induced changes in bulk density, pH and redox resulted in reduced activity of enzymes involved in microbial C acquisition; however, there was no grazing effect on enzymes involved in N acquisition. While changes in pH, bulk density or redox did not affect microbial abundance and structure, the relative amount of marine organic matter significantly reduced the relative abundance of fungi (F:B ratio). We conclude that livestock grazing directly affects microbial exo-enzyme activity, thus

  8. Student Response to a Partial Inversion of an Organic Chemistry Course for Non-Chemistry Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rein, Kathleen S.; Brookes, David T.

    2015-01-01

    We report the student response to a two-year transformation of a one-semester organic chemistry course for nonchemistry majors. The transformed course adopted a peer led team learning approach and incorporated case studies. Student attitudes toward the course transformation were assessed throughout the semester, and adjustments to the methods were…

  9. Alternative Conceptions of Organic Chemistry Topics among Fourth Year Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushton, Gregory T.; Hardy, Rebecca C.; Gwaltney, Kevin P.; Lewis, Scott E.

    2008-01-01

    This study describes the conceptual understanding for a series of fundamental organic concepts by fourth year chemistry students from a midsize, southeastern, state university. Student volunteers (n = 19) participated in semi-structured interviews using a think aloud protocol. The interview questions were eleven multiple choice questions selected…

  10. Implementing a Student-Designed Green Chemistry Laboratory Project in Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Kate J.; Jones, T. Nicholas; Schaller, Chris P.; McIntee, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    A multiweek organic chemistry laboratory project is described that emphasizes sustainable practices in experimental design. An emphasis on student-driven development of the project is meant to mirror the independent nature of research. Students propose environmentally friendly modifications of several reactions. With instructor feedback, students…

  11. Interstellar grain chemistry and organic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S. A.

    1990-01-01

    The detection of prominant infrared absorption bands at 3250, 2170, 2138, 1670 and 1470 cm(-1) (3.08, 4.61, 4.677, 5.99 and 6.80 micron m) associated with molecular clouds show that mixed molecular (icy) grain mantles are an important component of the interstellar dust in the dense interstellar medium. These ices, which contain many organic molecules, may also be the production site of the more complex organic grain mantles detected in the diffuse interstellar medium. Theoretical calculations employing gas phase as well as grain surface reactions predict that the ices should be dominated only by the simple molecules H2O, H2CO, N2, CO, O2, NH3, CH4, possibly CH3OH, and their deuterated counterparts. However, spectroscopic observations in the 2500 to 1250 cm(-1)(4 to 8 micron m) range show substantial variation from source reactions alone. By comparing these astronomical spectra with the spectra of laboratory-produced analogs of interstellar ices, one can determine the composition and abundance of the materials frozen on the grains in dense clouds. Experiments are described in which the chemical evolution of an interstellar ice analog is determined during irradiation and subsequent warm-up. Particular attention is paid to the types of moderately complex organic materials produced during these experiments which are likely to be present in interstellar grains and cometary ices.

  12. Academia–Industry Symbiosis in Organic Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus Collaboration between academia and industry is a growing phenomenon within the chemistry community. These sectors have long held strong ties since academia traditionally trains the future scientists of the corporate world, but the recent drastic decrease of public funding is motivating the academic world to seek more private grants. This concept of industrial “sponsoring” is not new, and in the past, some companies granted substantial amounts of money per annum to various academic institutions in exchange for prime access to all their scientific discoveries and inventions. However, academic and industrial interests were not always aligned, and therefore the investment has become increasingly difficult to justify from industry’s point of view. With fluctuating macroeconomic factors, this type of unrestricted grant has become more rare and has been largely replaced by smaller and more focused partnerships. In our view, forging a partnership with industry can be a golden opportunity for both parties and can represent a true symbiosis. This type of project-specific collaboration is engendered by industry’s desire to access very specific academic expertise that is required for the development of new technologies at the forefront of science. Since financial pressures do not allow companies to spend the time to acquire this expertise and even less to explore fundamental research, partnering with an academic laboratory whose research is related to the problem gives them a viable alternative. From an academic standpoint, it represents the perfect occasion to apply “pure science” research concepts to solve problems that benefit humanity. Moreover, it offers a unique opportunity for students to face challenges from the “real world” at an early stage of their career. Although not every problem in industry can be solved by research developments in academia, we argue that there is significant scientific overlap between these two seemingly disparate

  13. Academia-industry symbiosis in organic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Michaudel, Quentin; Ishihara, Yoshihiro; Baran, Phil S

    2015-03-17

    Collaboration between academia and industry is a growing phenomenon within the chemistry community. These sectors have long held strong ties since academia traditionally trains the future scientists of the corporate world, but the recent drastic decrease of public funding is motivating the academic world to seek more private grants. This concept of industrial "sponsoring" is not new, and in the past, some companies granted substantial amounts of money per annum to various academic institutions in exchange for prime access to all their scientific discoveries and inventions. However, academic and industrial interests were not always aligned, and therefore the investment has become increasingly difficult to justify from industry's point of view. With fluctuating macroeconomic factors, this type of unrestricted grant has become more rare and has been largely replaced by smaller and more focused partnerships. In our view, forging a partnership with industry can be a golden opportunity for both parties and can represent a true symbiosis. This type of project-specific collaboration is engendered by industry's desire to access very specific academic expertise that is required for the development of new technologies at the forefront of science. Since financial pressures do not allow companies to spend the time to acquire this expertise and even less to explore fundamental research, partnering with an academic laboratory whose research is related to the problem gives them a viable alternative. From an academic standpoint, it represents the perfect occasion to apply "pure science" research concepts to solve problems that benefit humanity. Moreover, it offers a unique opportunity for students to face challenges from the "real world" at an early stage of their career. Although not every problem in industry can be solved by research developments in academia, we argue that there is significant scientific overlap between these two seemingly disparate groups, thereby presenting an

  14. Academia-industry symbiosis in organic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Michaudel, Quentin; Ishihara, Yoshihiro; Baran, Phil S

    2015-03-17

    Collaboration between academia and industry is a growing phenomenon within the chemistry community. These sectors have long held strong ties since academia traditionally trains the future scientists of the corporate world, but the recent drastic decrease of public funding is motivating the academic world to seek more private grants. This concept of industrial "sponsoring" is not new, and in the past, some companies granted substantial amounts of money per annum to various academic institutions in exchange for prime access to all their scientific discoveries and inventions. However, academic and industrial interests were not always aligned, and therefore the investment has become increasingly difficult to justify from industry's point of view. With fluctuating macroeconomic factors, this type of unrestricted grant has become more rare and has been largely replaced by smaller and more focused partnerships. In our view, forging a partnership with industry can be a golden opportunity for both parties and can represent a true symbiosis. This type of project-specific collaboration is engendered by industry's desire to access very specific academic expertise that is required for the development of new technologies at the forefront of science. Since financial pressures do not allow companies to spend the time to acquire this expertise and even less to explore fundamental research, partnering with an academic laboratory whose research is related to the problem gives them a viable alternative. From an academic standpoint, it represents the perfect occasion to apply "pure science" research concepts to solve problems that benefit humanity. Moreover, it offers a unique opportunity for students to face challenges from the "real world" at an early stage of their career. Although not every problem in industry can be solved by research developments in academia, we argue that there is significant scientific overlap between these two seemingly disparate groups, thereby presenting an

  15. Patterns in Organometallic Chemistry with Application in Organic Synthesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Jeffrey; Labinger, Jay A.

    1980-01-01

    Of interest in this discussion of organometallic complexes are stoichiometric or catalytic reagents for organic synthesis in the complex transformations observed during synthesis for transition metal organometallic complexes. Detailed are general reaction types from which the chemistry or many transition metal organometallic complexes can be…

  16. Learning Organic Chemistry through a Study of Semiochemicals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pernaa, Johannes; Aksela, Maija

    2011-01-01

    The topics of nature, for example semiochemicals, are motivating topics, which can be used to teach organic chemistry at high school level. The history, classifications, a few important applications of semiochemicals, and an semiochemical that can be synthesized in the laboratory are presented. The laboratory synthesis is carried out through the…

  17. An Organic Chemistry Experiment for Forensic Science Majors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothchild, Robert

    1979-01-01

    The laboratory experiment described here is intended to be of use to the forensic science major enrolled in a course in organic chemistry. The experiment is the use of thin-layer chromotography for qualitative analysis, specifically for the identification of drugs. (Author/SA)

  18. Does Mechanistic Thinking Improve Student Success in Organic Chemistry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grove, Nathaniel P.; Cooper, Melanie M.; Cox, Elizabeth L.

    2012-01-01

    The use of the curved-arrow notation to depict electron flow during mechanistic processes is one of the most important representational conventions in the organic chemistry curriculum. Our previous research documented a disturbing trend: when asked to predict the products of a series of reactions, many students do not spontaneously engage in…

  19. A Process Model for the Comprehension of Organic Chemistry Notation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havanki, Katherine L.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the cognitive processes individuals use when reading organic chemistry equations and factors that affect these processes, namely, visual complexity of chemical equations and participant characteristics (expertise, spatial ability, and working memory capacity). A six stage process model for the comprehension of organic…

  20. Synthesis and Chemistry of Organic Geminal Di- and Triazides.

    PubMed

    Häring, Andreas P; Kirsch, Stefan F

    2015-11-06

    This review recapitulates all available literature dealing with the synthesis and reactivity of geminal organic di- and triazides. These compound classes are, to a large extent, unexplored despite their promising chemical properties and their simple preparation. In addition, the chemistry of carbonyl diazide (2) and tetraazidomethane (105) is described in separate sections.

  1. Omar Yaghi on Chemistry and Metal Organic Frameworks

    ScienceCinema

    Omar Yaghi

    2016-07-12

    In this edited version of the hour long talk, Omar Yaghi, director of the Molecular Foundry, sat down in conversation with Jeff Miller, head of Public Affairs, on July 11th, 2012 to discuss his fascination with the hidden world of chemistry and his work on Metal Organic Frameworks.

  2. Biodiesel from Seeds: An Experiment for Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    Plants can store the chemical energy required by their developing offspring in the form of triglycerides. These lipids can be isolated from seeds and then converted into biodiesel through a transesterification reaction. This second-year undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory experiment exemplifies the conversion of an agricultural energy…

  3. Promoting Representational Competence with Molecular Models in Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stull, Andrew T.; Gainer, Morgan; Padalkar, Shamin; Hegarty, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Mastering the many different diagrammatic representations of molecules used in organic chemistry is challenging for students. This article summarizes recent research showing that manipulating 3-D molecular models can facilitate the understanding and use of these representations. Results indicate that students are more successful in translating…

  4. Telling It like It Is: Teaching Mechanisms in Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ault, Addison

    2010-01-01

    In this article I support and extend the ideas presented by J. Brent Friesen in his article "Saying What You Mean; Teaching Mechanisms in Organic Chemistry" ("JCE" November, 2008). I emphasize "telling the truth" about proton transfers. The truth is that in aqueous acid most reactions are subject to "specific" acid catalysis: the only kinetically…

  5. Organic chemistry meets polymers, nanoscience, therapeutics and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Rotello, Vincent M

    2016-01-01

    The atom-by-atom control provided by synthetic organic chemistry presents a means of generating new functional nanomaterials with great precision. Bringing together these two very disparate skill sets is, however, quite uncommon. This autobiographical review provides some insight into how my program evolved, as well as giving some idea of where we are going. PMID:27559417

  6. The Role of Spatial Ability and Achievement in Organic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pribyl, Jeffrey R.; Bodner, George M.

    This study investigated the role that spatial ability has in achievement in organic chemistry. Spatial ability was defined as containing two subfactors--spatial visualization and spatial orientation. Spatial visualization is the ability to mentally manipulate pictorially presented stimuli; involved in the processes of manipulation are the…

  7. Biodiesel Synthesis and Evaluation: An Organic Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bucholtz, Ehren C.

    2007-01-01

    A new lab esterification reaction based on biodiesel preparation and viscosity, which provides a model experience of industrial process to understand oxidation of vicinal alcohols by periodic acid, is presented. This new desertification experiment and periodate analysis of glycerol for the introductory organic chemistry laboratory provides an…

  8. Integrating Symmetry in Stereochemical Analysis in Introductory Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taagepera, Mare; Arasasingham, Ramesh D.; King, Susan; Potter, Frank; Martorell, Ingrid; Ford, David; Wu, Jason; Kearney, Aaron M.

    2011-01-01

    We report a comparative study using "knowledge space theory" (KAT) to assess the impact of a hands-on laboratory exercise that used molecular model kits to emphasize the connections between a plane of symmetry, Charity, and isomerism in an introductory organic chemistry course. The experimental design compared three groups of students--two that…

  9. Toward Consistent Terminology for Cyclohexane Conformers in Introductory Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Donna J.; Brammer, Christopher N.

    2011-01-01

    Recommended changes in use of cyclohexane conformers and their nomenclature will remedy inconsistencies in cyclohexane conformers and their nomenclature that exist across currently used organic chemistry textbooks. These inconsistencies prompted this logical analysis and the resulting recommendations. Recommended conformer names are "chair",…

  10. A Simple Mnemonic for Tautomerization Mechanisms in Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Chad E.

    2010-01-01

    The familiar word OREO (as in the cookie) is presented as a simple mnemonic for remembering the basic steps of the classical tautomerization mechanisms in organic chemistry. For acid-catalyzed tautomerizations, OREO stands for proton on, resonance, proton off. For base-catalyzed tautomerizations, OREO stands for proton off, resonance, proton on.…

  11. Organic chemistry meets polymers, nanoscience, therapeutics and diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary The atom-by-atom control provided by synthetic organic chemistry presents a means of generating new functional nanomaterials with great precision. Bringing together these two very disparate skill sets is, however, quite uncommon. This autobiographical review provides some insight into how my program evolved, as well as giving some idea of where we are going. PMID:27559417

  12. Using Ozone in Organic Chemistry Lab: The Ozonolysis of Eugenol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branan, Bruce M.; Butcher, Joshua T.; Olsen, Lawrence R.

    2007-01-01

    An ozonolysis experiment, suitable for undergraduate organic chemistry lab, is presented. Ozonolysis of eugenol (clove oil), followed by reductive workup furnishes an aldehyde that is easily identified by its NMR and IR spectra. Ozone (3-5% in oxygen) is produced using an easily built generator. (Contains 2 figures and 1 scheme.)

  13. Synthesis of Bisphenol Z: An Organic Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregor, Richard W.

    2012-01-01

    A student achievable synthesis of bisphenol Z, 4,4'-(cyclohexane-1,1-diyl)diphenol, from the acid-catalyzed reaction of phenol with cyclohexanone is presented. The experiment exemplifies all the usual pedagogy for the standard topic of electrophilic aromatic substitution present in the undergraduate organic chemistry curriculum, while providing…

  14. Radical Recombination Kinetics: An Experiment in Physical Organic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickering, Miles

    1980-01-01

    Describes a student kinetic experiment involving second order kinetics as well as displaying photochromism using a wide variety of techniques from both physical and organic chemistry. Describes measurement of (1) the rate of the recombination reaction; (2) the extinction coefficient; and (3) the ESR spectrometer signal. (Author/JN)

  15. Organic chemistry meets polymers, nanoscience, therapeutics and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Rotello, Vincent M

    2016-01-01

    The atom-by-atom control provided by synthetic organic chemistry presents a means of generating new functional nanomaterials with great precision. Bringing together these two very disparate skill sets is, however, quite uncommon. This autobiographical review provides some insight into how my program evolved, as well as giving some idea of where we are going.

  16. Sudoku Puzzles for First-Year Organic Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Alice L.; Lamoureux, G.

    2007-01-01

    Sudoku puzzle was designed to teach about amino acids and functional groups to the students of undergraduate organic chemistry students. The puzzles focus on helping the student learn the name, 3-letter code and 1-letter code of common amino acids and functional groups.

  17. Omar Yaghi on Chemistry and Metal Organic Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Omar Yaghi

    2012-07-23

    In this edited version of the hour long talk, Omar Yaghi, director of the Molecular Foundry, sat down in conversation with Jeff Miller, head of Public Affairs, on July 11th, 2012 to discuss his fascination with the hidden world of chemistry and his work on Metal Organic Frameworks.

  18. How Do Organic Chemistry Students Understand and Apply Hydrogen Bonding?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderleiter, J.; Smart, R.; Anderson, J.; Elian, O.

    2001-01-01

    Examines how students completing a two-semester organic sequence understand, explain, and apply hydrogen bonding to determine the physical attributes of molecules. Suggests that some students completing what is typically their second year of college-level chemistry still possess misconceptions about hydrogen bonds. (Contains 21 references.) (ASK)

  19. Solvated Electrons in Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilich, Predrag-Peter; McCormick, Kathleen R.; Atkins, Adam D.; Mell, Geoffrey J.; Flaherty, Timothy J.; Bruck, Martin J.; Goodrich, Heather A.; Hefel, Aaron L.; Juranic, Nenad; Seleem, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    A novel experiment is described in which solvated electrons in liquid ammonia reduce a benzyl alcohol carbon without affecting the aromatic ring. The reductive activity of solvated electrons can be partially or completely quenched through the addition of electron scavengers to the reaction mixture. The effectiveness of these scavengers was found…

  20. Organic Chemistry in Action! Developing an Intervention Program for Introductory Organic Chemistry to Improve Learners' Understanding, Interest, and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Dwyer, Anne; Childs, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The main areas of difficulty experienced by those teaching and learning organic chemistry at high school and introductory university level in Ireland have been identified, and the findings support previous studies in Ireland and globally. Using these findings and insights from chemistry education research (CER), the Organic Chemistry in Action!…

  1. Planetary organic chemistry and the origins of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Benner, Steven A; Kim, Hyo-Joong; Kim, Myung-Jung; Ricardo, Alonso

    2010-07-01

    Organic chemistry on a planetary scale is likely to have transformed carbon dioxide and reduced carbon species delivered to an accreting Earth. According to various models for the origin of life on Earth, biological molecules that jump-started Darwinian evolution arose via this planetary chemistry. The grandest of these models assumes that ribonucleic acid (RNA) arose prebiotically, together with components for compartments that held it and a primitive metabolism that nourished it. Unfortunately, it has been challenging to identify possible prebiotic chemistry that might have created RNA. Organic molecules, given energy, have a well-known propensity to form multiple products, sometimes referred to collectively as "tar" or "tholin." These mixtures appear to be unsuited to support Darwinian processes, and certainly have never been observed to spontaneously yield a homochiral genetic polymer. To date, proposed solutions to this challenge either involve too much direct human intervention to satisfy many in the community, or generate molecules that are unreactive "dead ends" under standard conditions of temperature and pressure. Carbohydrates, organic species having carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms in a ratio of 1:2:1 and an aldehyde or ketone group, conspicuously embody this challenge. They are components of RNA and their reactivity can support both interesting spontaneous chemistry as part of a "carbohydrate world," but they also easily form mixtures, polymers and tars. We describe here the latest thoughts on how on this challenge, focusing on how it might be resolved using minerals containing borate, silicate, and molybdate, inter alia.

  2. Planetary organic chemistry and the origins of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Benner, Steven A; Kim, Hyo-Joong; Kim, Myung-Jung; Ricardo, Alonso

    2010-07-01

    Organic chemistry on a planetary scale is likely to have transformed carbon dioxide and reduced carbon species delivered to an accreting Earth. According to various models for the origin of life on Earth, biological molecules that jump-started Darwinian evolution arose via this planetary chemistry. The grandest of these models assumes that ribonucleic acid (RNA) arose prebiotically, together with components for compartments that held it and a primitive metabolism that nourished it. Unfortunately, it has been challenging to identify possible prebiotic chemistry that might have created RNA. Organic molecules, given energy, have a well-known propensity to form multiple products, sometimes referred to collectively as "tar" or "tholin." These mixtures appear to be unsuited to support Darwinian processes, and certainly have never been observed to spontaneously yield a homochiral genetic polymer. To date, proposed solutions to this challenge either involve too much direct human intervention to satisfy many in the community, or generate molecules that are unreactive "dead ends" under standard conditions of temperature and pressure. Carbohydrates, organic species having carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms in a ratio of 1:2:1 and an aldehyde or ketone group, conspicuously embody this challenge. They are components of RNA and their reactivity can support both interesting spontaneous chemistry as part of a "carbohydrate world," but they also easily form mixtures, polymers and tars. We describe here the latest thoughts on how on this challenge, focusing on how it might be resolved using minerals containing borate, silicate, and molybdate, inter alia. PMID:20504964

  3. Surface-active organics in atmospheric aerosols.

    PubMed

    McNeill, V Faye; Sareen, Neha; Schwier, Allison N

    2014-01-01

    Surface-active organic material is a key component of atmospheric aerosols. The presence of surfactants can influence aerosol heterogeneous chemistry, cloud formation, and ice nucleation. We review the current state of the science on the sources, properties, and impacts of surfactants in atmospheric aerosols. PMID:23408277

  4. The Flipped Classroom for Teaching Organic Chemistry in Small Classes: Is It Effective?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fautch, Jessica M.

    2015-01-01

    The flipped classroom is a pedagogical approach that moves course content from the classroom to homework, and uses class time for engaging activities and instructor-guided problem solving. The course content in a sophomore level Organic Chemistry I course was assigned as homework using video lectures, followed by a short online quiz. In class,…

  5. Formalizing the First Day in an Organic Chemistry Laboratory Using a Studio-Based Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collison, Christina G.; Cody, Jeremy; Smith, Darren; Swartzenberg, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    A novel studio-based lab module that incorporates student-centered activities was designed and implemented to introduce second-year undergraduate students to the first-semester organic chemistry laboratory. The "First Day" studio module incorporates learning objectives for the course, lab safety, and keeping a professional lab notebook.

  6. Searching for Synthetic Antimicrobial Peptides: An Experiment for Organic Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasquez, Thomas E., Jr.; Saldan~a, Cristina; Muzikar, Katy A.; Mashek, Debra; Liu, Jane M.

    2016-01-01

    This laboratory experiment provides undergraduate students enrolled in organic chemistry the opportunity to design and synthesize their own peptide, which is then tested for antimicrobial activity. After reading a primary scientific paper on antimicrobial peptides, students design and synthesize their own hexapeptide that they hypothesize will…

  7. Using Green Chemistry Principles as a Framework to Incorporate Research into the Organic Laboratory Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Nancy E.; Gurney, Rich; Soltzberg, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    Despite the accepted pedagogical value of integrating research into the laboratory curriculum, this approach has not been widely adopted. The activation barrier to this change is high, especially in organic chemistry, where a large number of students are required to take this course, special glassware or setups may be needed, and dangerous…

  8. Visualizing Molecular Chirality in the Organic Chemistry Laboratory Using Cholesteric Liquid Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popova, Maia; Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Hartley, C. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Although stereochemistry is an important topic in second-year undergraduate organic chemistry, there are limited options for laboratory activities that allow direct visualization of macroscopic chiral phenomena. A novel, guided-inquiry experiment was developed that allows students to explore chirality in the context of cholesteric liquid crystals.…

  9. Infusing the Chemistry Curriculum with Green Chemistry Using Real-World Examples, Web Modules, and Atom Economy in Organic Chemistry Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cann, Michael C.; Dickneider, Trudy A.

    2004-01-01

    Green chemistry is the awareness of the damaging environmental effects due to chemical research and inventions. There is emphasis on a need to include green chemistry in synthesis with atom economy in organic chemistry curriculum to ensure an environmentally conscious future generation of chemists, policy makers, health professionals and business…

  10. Solid-state chemistry of molecular metal oxide clusters. Multiple, sequential C-H activation processes in the hydrogenation of coordinated cyclooctene. Lattice mobility of small organic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Siedle, A.R.; Newmark, R.A.; Sahyun, M.R.V.; Lyon, P.A.; Hunt, S.L.; Skarjune, R.P. )

    1989-10-25

    Reaction of solid ((Ph{sub 3}P){sub 2}Ir(C{sub 8}H{sub 12})){sub 3}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40} with D{sub 2} gas produces cyclooctane containing up to 16 deuterium atoms. The c-C{sub 8}D{sub n}H{sub 16-n} isotopomer distribution is analyzed by Poisson statistics and interpreted in terms of C-H activation involving Ir-D-C-H exchange in an intermediate species containing coordinated cyclooctene. The results are compared with those from D{sub 2} reduction of ((Ph{sub 3}P){sub 2}Ir(C{sub 8}H{sub 12}))(PF{sub 6}) in the solid state and in acetone solution, in which cases, an additional exchange process operates. Solid-state {sup 2}H NMR shows that, even at low temperatures, small organic molecules such as cyclooctane and benzene undergo nearly isotropic motion.

  11. A Process Model for the Comprehension of Organic Chemistry Notation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havanki, Katherine L.

    This dissertation examines the cognitive processes individuals use when reading organic chemistry equations and factors that affect these processes, namely, visual complexity of chemical equations and participant characteristics (expertise, spatial ability, and working memory capacity). A six stage process model for the comprehension of organic chemistry notation was proposed that accounts for the movement of the eyes across the chemical equation (get next); the search of a chemical structure for key features (search); the encoding of features to create an internal representation (encoding and access lexicon); the assignments of relationships among features in the same molecule (intramolecular relationship) and between molecules (intermolecular relationship); and a check of the internal representation for inconsistencies (reaction wrap-up). Two studies were conducted in this investigation. The first study assessed the validity and ability of the Complexity Rubric for Organic Chemistry Notation to quantify visual complexity of structural formulas. A three-part investigation examined the content of the rubric, its capacity to measure visual complexity, and its ability to predict visual complexity as perceived by novices. The results suggest that the rubric differentiates structural formulas with high visual complexity from those with medium-low visual complexity. A follow-up study examined the effect of prior knowledge on the encoding of organic formulas and suggests that knowledge from domains outside chemistry plays a role in the perceived complexity of structural formulas. In the second study, eye tracking methodology was used to validate the proposed process model for the comprehension of organic chemistry notation and examine factors that affect these processes. Eight instructors and 19 students were eye tracked while reading five high/low complexity pairs of organic chemistry equations for comprehension. The frequency, duration, and sequence of participants

  12. Beyond Clickers, Next Generation Classroom Response Systems for Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Web-based classroom response systems offer a variety of benefits versus traditional clicker technology. They are simple to use for students and faculty and offer various question types suitable for a broad spectrum of chemistry classes. They facilitate active learning pedagogies like peer instruction and successfully engage students in the…

  13. Soap from Nutmeg: An Integrated Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mattos, Marcio C. S.; Nicodem, David E.

    2002-01-01

    The extraction of trimyristin from nutmeg, its purification, and its conversion to a soap (sodium myristate) are described. Concepts such as the isolation of a natural product, recrystallization, identification of a solid, solubility, acidity and basicity, and organic reaction can be presented to students using integrated experiments in an introductory experimental chemistry laboratory. These experiments can easily be done in three class periods of four hours.

    See Letter re: this article.

  14. Organic Chemistry Educators' Perspectives on Fundamental Concepts and Misconceptions: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duis, Jennifer M.

    2011-01-01

    An exploratory study was conducted with 23 organic chemistry educators to discover what general chemistry concepts they typically review, the concepts they believe are fundamental to introductory organic chemistry, the topics students find most difficult in the subject, and the misconceptions they observe in undergraduate organic chemistry…

  15. Mixed-Methods Study of Online and Written Organic Chemistry Homework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malik, Kinza; Martinez, Nylvia; Romero, Juan; Schubel, Skyler; Janowicz, Philip A.

    2014-01-01

    Connect for organic chemistry is an online learning tool that gives students the opportunity to learn about all aspects of organic chemistry through the ease of the digital world. This research project consisted of two fundamental questions. The first was to discover whether there was a difference in undergraduate organic chemistry content…

  16. Chemistry, biological activity, and uses of formamidine pesticides.

    PubMed Central

    Hollingworth, R M

    1976-01-01

    The formamidines, a relatively new group of acaricide-insecticides, are novel both in their range of biological activities and in their mode of action, which is presently unknown. This paper is a review of the historical development, properties, structures, uses, and chemistry of this group of pesticides, with particular emphasis on chlordimeform (Galecron or Fundal), N'-4-chloro-o-tolyl-N,N-dimethylformamidine, and amitraz, 1,3=di-(2,4-dimethylphenylimino)-2-methyl-2-azapropane. Their biological activity and uses are defined by their toxicity to spider mites, ticks, and certain insects, and they are particularly effective against juvenile and resistant forms of these organisms. A significant, but poorly understood feature of their field effectiveness is their breadth of toxic action which includes direct lethality, excitant-repellant behavioral effects, and chemosterilization. They are generally of low hazard for nontarget species with the significant exception of predaceous mites. Several aspects of the chemistry of these compounds are considered, including structure--activity relations, synthetic pathways, isomerism and configuration, and their chemical and environmental stability. A significant feature of the metabolism and toxicity of these agents is the possible activation of chlordimeform by N-demethylation in vivo. Strong evidence for this has been presented with the cattle tick, but recent results discussed here suggest that in other species, i.e., mice, German cockroaches or black cutworm eggs, N-demethylation is neither a strong activation nor a detoxication reaction. PMID:789070

  17. Planetary Organic Chemistry and the Origins of Biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Benner, Steven A.; Kim, Hyo-Joong; Kim, Myung-Jung; Ricardo, Alonso

    2010-01-01

    Organic chemistry on a planetary scale is likely to have transformed carbon dioxide and reduced carbon species delivered to an accreting Earth. According to various models for the origin of life on Earth, biological molecules that jump-started Darwinian evolution arose via this planetary chemistry. The grandest of these models assumes that ribonucleic acid (RNA) arose prebiotically, together with components for compartments that held it and a primitive metabolism that nourished it. Unfortunately, it has been challenging to identify possible prebiotic chemistry that might have created RNA. Organic molecules, given energy, have a well-known propensity to form multiple products, sometimes referred to collectively as “tar” or “tholin.” These mixtures appear to be unsuited to support Darwinian processes, and certainly have never been observed to spontaneously yield a homochiral genetic polymer. To date, proposed solutions to this challenge either involve too much direct human intervention to satisfy many in the community, or generate molecules that are unreactive “dead ends” under standard conditions of temperature and pressure. Carbohydrates, organic species having carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms in a ratio of 1:2:1 and an aldehyde or ketone group, conspicuously embody this challenge. They are components of RNA and their reactivity can support both interesting spontaneous chemistry as part of a “carbohydrate world,” but they also easily form mixtures, polymers and tars. We describe here the latest thoughts on how on this challenge, focusing on how it might be resolved using minerals containing borate, silicate, and molybdate, inter alia. PMID:20504964

  18. Recent Discoveries and Future Challenges in Atmospheric Organic Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Glasius, Marianne; Goldstein, Allen H

    2016-03-15

    Earth's atmosphere contains a multitude of organic compounds, which differ by orders of magnitude regarding fundamental properties such as volatility, reactivity, and propensity to form cloud droplets, affecting their impact on global climate and human health. Despite recent major research efforts and advances, there are still substantial gaps in understanding of atmospheric organic chemistry, hampering efforts to understand, model, and mitigate environmental problems such as aerosol formation in both polluted urban and more pristine regions. The analytical toolbox available for chemists to study atmospheric organic components has expanded considerably during the past decade, opening new windows into speciation, time resolution and detection of reactive and semivolatile compounds at low concentrations. This has provided unprecedented opportunities, but also unveiled new scientific challenges. Specific groundbreaking examples include the role of epoxides in aerosol formation especially from isoprene, the importance of highly oxidized, reactive organics in air-surface processes (whether atmosphere-biosphere exchange or aerosols), as well as the extent of interactions of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions and the resulting impact on atmospheric organic chemistry.

  19. Spectroscopic diagnostics of organic chemistry in the protostellar environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, S. B.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Kuan, Y. J.

    2001-01-01

    A combination of astronomical observations, laboratory studies, and theoretical modelling is necessary to determine the organic chemistry of dense molecular clouds. We present spectroscopic evidence for the composition and evolution of organic molecules in protostellar environments. The principal reaction pathways to complex molecule formation by catalysis on dust grains and by reactions in the interstellar gas are described. Protostellar cores, where warming of dust has induced evaporation of icy grain mantles, are excellent sites in which to study the interaction between gas phase and grain-surface chemistries. We investigate the link between organics that are observed as direct products of grain surface reactions and those which are formed by secondary gas phase reactions of evaporated surface products. Theory predicts observable correlations between specific interstellar molecules, and also which new organics are viable for detection. We discuss recent infrared observations obtained with the Infrared Space Observatory, laboratory studies of organic molecules, theories of molecule formation, and summarise recent radioastronomical searches for various complex molecules such as ethers, azaheterocyclic compounds, and amino acids.

  20. Spectroscopic diagnostics of organic chemistry in the protostellar environment.

    PubMed

    Charnley, S B; Ehrenfreund, P; Kuan, Y J

    2001-03-15

    A combination of astronomical observations, laboratory studies, and theoretical modelling is necessary to determine the organic chemistry of dense molecular clouds. We present spectroscopic evidence for the composition and evolution of organic molecules in protostellar environments. The principal reaction pathways to complex molecule formation by catalysis on dust grains and by reactions in the interstellar gas are described. Protostellar cores, where warming of dust has induced evaporation of icy grain mantles, are excellent sites in which to study the interaction between gas phase and grain-surface chemistries. We investigate the link between organics that are observed as direct products of grain surface reactions and those which are formed by secondary gas phase reactions of evaporated surface products. Theory predicts observable correlations between specific interstellar molecules, and also which new organics are viable for detection. We discuss recent infrared observations obtained with the Infrared Space Observatory, laboratory studies of organic molecules, theories of molecule formation, and summarise recent radioastronomical searches for various complex molecules such as ethers, azaheterocyclic compounds, and amino acids.

  1. Using Computational Chemistry Activities to Promote Learning and Retention in a Secondary School General Chemistry Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ochterski, Joseph W.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the results of using state-of-the-art, research-quality software as a learning tool in a general chemistry secondary school classroom setting. I present three activities designed to introduce fundamental chemical concepts regarding molecular shape and atomic orbitals to students with little background in chemistry, such as…

  2. Writing Chemistry Jingles as an Introductory Activity in a High School Chemistry Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heid, Peter F.

    2011-01-01

    Starting the school year in an introductory high school chemistry class can be a challenge. The topic and approach is new to the students; many of the early chapters in the texts can be a bit tedious; and for many students the activities are uninspiring. My goal in the first few weeks of school is to hook the students on chemistry by getting them…

  3. Active Learning Applications in the History of Chemistry: Pre-Service Chemistry Teachers' Level of Knowledge and Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sendur, Gülten; Polat, Merve; Toku, Abdullah; Kazanci, Coskun

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of a History and Philosophy of Chemistry-I course based on active learning applications on the level of knowledge of pre-service chemistry teachers about the history of chemistry. The views of pre-service chemistry teachers about these activities were also investigated. The study was carried out with 38…

  4. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Describes 13 activities, experiments and demonstrations, including the preparation of iron (III) chloride, simple alpha-helix model, investigating camping gas, redox reactions of some organic compounds, a liquid crystal thermometer, and the oxidation number concept in organic chemistry. (JN)

  5. Neutron activation analysis in archaeological chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Harbottle, G.

    1987-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis has proven to be a convenient way of performing the chemical analysis of archaeologically-excavated artifacts and materials. It is fast and does not require tedious laboratory operations. It is multielement, sensitive, and can be made nondestructive. Neutron activation analysis in its instrumental form, i.e., involving no chemical separation, is ideally suited to automation and conveniently takes the first step in data flow patterns that are appropriate for many taxonomic and statistical operations. The future will doubtless see improvements in the practice of NAA in general, but in connection with archaeological science the greatest change will be the filling, interchange and widespread use of data banks based on compilations of analytical data. Since provenience-oriented data banks deal with materials (obsidian, ceramics, metals, semiprecious stones, building materials and sculptural media) that participated in trade networks, the analytical data is certain to be of interest to a rather broad group of archaeologists. It is to meet the needs of the whole archaeological community that archaeological chemistry must now turn.

  6. Modules for Introducing Organometallic Reactions: A Bridge between Organic and Inorganic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaller, Chris P.; Graham, Kate J.; Johnson, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal organometallic reactions have become increasingly important in the synthesis of organic molecules. A new approach has been developed to introduce organometallic chemistry, along with organic and inorganic chemistry, at the foundational level. This change highlights applications of organometallic chemistry that have dramatically…

  7. Molecular Images in Organic Chemistry: Assessment of Understanding in Aromaticity, Symmetry, Spectroscopy, and Shielding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ealy, Julie B.; Hermanson, Jim

    2006-01-01

    When students take General Chemistry there are substantially fewer molecular images than they will encounter in Organic Chemistry. The molecular images Organic Chemistry students see in their textbooks are ones that use dashes and wedges to represent 2D and semi 3D views, ball and spoke, ball and wire, and structural formulas, to name just a few.…

  8. Biocatalysis in organic chemistry and biotechnology: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Reetz, Manfred T

    2013-08-28

    Enzymes as catalysts in synthetic organic chemistry gained importance in the latter half of the 20th century, but nevertheless suffered from two major limitations. First, many enzymes were not accessible in large enough quantities for practical applications. The advent of recombinant DNA technology changed this dramatically in the late 1970s. Second, many enzymes showed a narrow substrate scope, often poor stereo- and/or regioselectivity and/or insufficient stability under operating conditions. With the development of directed evolution beginning in the 1990s and continuing to the present day, all of these problems can be addressed and generally solved. The present Perspective focuses on these and other developments which have popularized enzymes as part of the toolkit of synthetic organic chemists and biotechnologists. Included is a discussion of the scope and limitation of cascade reactions using enzyme mixtures in vitro and of metabolic engineering of pathways in cells as factories for the production of simple compounds such as biofuels and complex natural products. Future trends and problems are also highlighted, as is the discussion concerning biocatalysis versus nonbiological catalysis in synthetic organic chemistry. This Perspective does not constitute a comprehensive review, and therefore the author apologizes to those researchers whose work is not specifically treated here.

  9. Mimicking enzymatic active sites on surfaces for energy conversion chemistry.

    PubMed

    Gutzler, Rico; Stepanow, Sebastian; Grumelli, Doris; Lingenfelder, Magalí; Kern, Klaus

    2015-07-21

    Metal-organic supramolecular chemistry on surfaces has matured to a point where its underlying growth mechanisms are well understood and structures of defined coordination environments of metal atoms can be synthesized in a controlled and reproducible procedure. With surface-confined molecular self-assembly, scientists have a tool box at hand which can be used to prepare structures with desired properties, as for example a defined oxidation number and spin state of the transition metal atoms within the organic matrix. From a structural point of view, these coordination sites in the supramolecular structure resemble the catalytically active sites of metallo-enzymes, both characterized by metal centers coordinated to organic ligands. Several chemical reactions take place at these embedded metal ions in enzymes and the question arises whether these reactions also take place using metal-organic networks as catalysts. Mimicking the active site of metal atoms and organic ligands of enzymes in artificial systems is the key to understanding the selectivity and efficiency of enzymatic reactions. Their catalytic activity depends on various parameters including the charge and spin configuration in the metal ion, but also on the organic environment, which can stabilize intermediate reaction products, inhibits catalytic deactivation, and serves mostly as a transport channel for the reactants and products and therefore ensures the selectivity of the enzyme. Charge and spin on the transition metal in enzymes depend on the one hand on the specific metal element, and on the other hand on its organic coordination environment. These two parameters can carefully be adjusted in surface confined metal-organic networks, which can be synthesized by virtue of combinatorial mixing of building synthons. Different organic ligands with varying functional groups can be combined with several transition metals and spontaneously assemble into ordered networks. The catalytically active metal

  10. Gender Differences in Cognitive and Noncognitive Factors Related to Achievement in Organic Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Ronna C.; Lindsay, Harriet A.

    2003-05-01

    For many college students in the sciences, organic chemistry poses a difficult challenge. Indeed, success in organic chemistry has proven pivotal in the careers of a vast number of students in a variety of science disciplines. A better understanding of the factors that contribute to achievement in this course should contribute to efforts to increase the number of students in the science disciplines. Further, an awareness of gender differences in factors associated with achievement should aid efforts to bolster the participation of women in chemistry and related disciplines. Using a correlation research design, the individual relationships between organic chemistry achievement and each of several cognitive variables and noncognitive variables were assessed. In addition, the relationships between organic chemistry achievement and combinations of these independent variables were explored. Finally, gender- and instructor-related differences in the relationships between organic chemistry achievement and the independent variables were investigated. Cognitive variables included the second-semester general chemistry grade, the ACT English, math, reading, and science-reasoning scores, and scores from a spatial visualization test. Noncognitive variables included anxiety, confidence, effectance motivation, and usefulness. The second-semester general chemistry grade was found to be the best indicator of performance in organic chemistry, while the effectiveness of other predictors varied between instructors. In addition, gender differences were found in the explanations of organic chemistry achievement variance provided by this study. In general, males exhibited stronger correlations between predictor variables and organic chemistry achievement than females.

  11. Student-Directed Learning in the Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hass, Martha A.

    2000-08-01

    A cooperative, student-directed experience was designed and implemented for the organic chemistry laboratory. Ten traditional organic chemistry experiments were performed by students working in groups of three or four to complete the experiment and related exercises, including worksheets and laboratory notebooks. One student in each group assumed the role of experiment coordinator and was responsible for instructing the group on the theoretical and practical aspects of the lab experiment. The coordinator was also responsible for ensuring that all group members participated in the experience. The role of coordinator rotated among the members of the group with each new experiment. Students were required to evaluate each other and the experiments they performed. Assessment of student content knowledge was based on performance on worksheet exercises and notebooks, and qualitative benefits were ascertained from student and instructor evaluation of the experience. The data were compared with the performance of students who conducted the same experiments in an individual-learning environment. No differences in content knowledge between students in the two groups were observed. Qualitative assessment of the experiment suggested that benefits associated with cooperative learning include greater student preparedness and satisfaction with the laboratory experience.

  12. From organic chemistry in small bodies of the solar system to low temperature chemistry in the universe. Preface.

    PubMed

    Levasseur-Regourd, A C; Raulin, F

    1995-01-01

    A COSPAR two days Symposium has been dedicated to "Prebiotic chemistry in Space" at the COSPAR Plenary Meeting, (Hamburg, Germany, July 1994). This Symposium was jointly organized by Commissions B (Space studies of the Earth-Moon system, planets and small bodies of the solar system) and F (Life sciences as related to space). Its goal was to review, from an interdisciplinary approach, our knowledge on organic and prebiotic chemistry in small bodies of the Solar System, and on low temperature chemistry and exobiology. The Symposium was sponsored by COSPAR and the IAU (session 1), ESA, NASA, and ISSOL (session 2).

  13. Solvothermal in situ metal/ligand reactions: a new bridge between coordination chemistry and organic synthetic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Ming; Tong, Ming-Liang

    2007-02-01

    Several important solvothermal (including hydrothermal) in situ metal/ligand reactions and their mechanisms, including dehydrogenative carbon-carbon coupling, hydroxylation of aromatic rings, cycloaddition of organic nitriles with azide and ammonia, transformation of inorganic and organic sulfur, as well as the CuII to CuI reduction, are outlined in this Account. The current progress clearly demonstrates the important potential of such reactions in the crystal engineering of functional coordination compounds and one-pot synthesis of some unusual organic ligands that are inaccessible or not easily obtainable via conventional methods, thereby substantiating our expectation that a new bridge has been created between coordination chemistry and synthetic organic chemistry.

  14. Using Microcomputers in the Physical Chemistry Laboratory: Activation Energy Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Touvelle, Michele; Venugopalan, Mundiyath

    1986-01-01

    Describes a computer program, "Activation Energy," which is designed for use in physical chemistry classes and can be modified for kinetic experiments. Provides suggestions for instruction, sample program listings, and information on the availability of the program package. (ML)

  15. Redox chemistry and natural organic matter (NOM): Geochemists' dream, analytical chemists' nightmare

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacAlady, Donald L.; Walton-Day, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) is an inherently complex mixture of polyfunctional organic molecules. Because of their universality and chemical reversibility, oxidation/reductions (redox) reactions of NOM have an especially interesting and important role in geochemistry. Variabilities in NOM composition and chemistry make studies of its redox chemistry particularly challenging, and details of NOM-mediated redox reactions are only partially understood. This is in large part due to the analytical difficulties associated with NOM characterization and the wide range of reagents and experimental systems used to study NOM redox reactions. This chapter provides a summary of the ongoing efforts to provide a coherent comprehension of aqueous redox chemistry involving NOM and of techniques for chemical characterization of NOM. It also describes some attempts to confirm the roles of different structural moieties in redox reactions. In addition, we discuss some of the operational parameters used to describe NOM redox capacities and redox states, and describe nomenclature of NOM redox chemistry. Several relatively facile experimental methods applicable to predictions of the NOM redox activity and redox states of NOM samples are discussed, with special attention to the proposed use of fluorescence spectroscopy to predict relevant redox characteristics of NOM samples.

  16. Impact of a Library Instruction Session on Bibliographies of Organic Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kromer, John

    2015-01-01

    Students in Chemistry 254: Organic Chemistry for Majors were required to write a paper about an organic name reaction. Before turning in this assignment, students had the option of attending a one-hour library instruction session covering SciFinder, sources for spectra, ACS Style, and print resources about organic name reactions. Twenty-five…

  17. Organic Chemistry Students' Ideas about Nucleophiles and Electrophiles: The Role of Charges and Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anzovino, Mary E.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2015-01-01

    Organic chemistry students struggle with reaction mechanisms and the electron-pushing formalism (EPF) used by practicing organic chemists. Faculty have identified an understanding of nucleophiles and electrophiles as one conceptual prerequisite to mastery of the EPF, but little is known about organic chemistry students' knowledge of nucleophiles…

  18. What Does the Acid Ionization Constant Tell You? An Organic Chemistry Student Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossi, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Many students find the transition from first-year general chemistry to second-year organic chemistry a daunting task. There are many reasons for this, not the least of which is their lack of a solid understanding and appreciation of the importance of some basic concepts and principles from general chemistry that play an extremely critical role in…

  19. The Photochemical Isomerization of Maleic to Fumaric Acid: An Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castro, Albert J.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate organic chemistry experiment on the photochemical isomerization of maleic to fumaric acid. Background information, chemical reactions involved, and experimental procedures are included. (JN)

  20. Lesson Planner for Demonstrations in Organic Chemistry Videodisc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surovell, Todd A.

    1995-09-01

    Lesson Planner is a Microsoft Excel (1) macro that generates barcodes for video included on the Demonstrations in Organic Chemistry videodisc (2). It allows instructors who do not have computer control capability for their videodisc player, but do have a barcode reader, to prepare customized lessons for use in the classroom or laboratory. There is no need to flip through pages in the documentation manual or photocopy pages of barcodes and physically cut and paste them to follow your lecture notes. Lesson Planner includes a complete list of the demonstrations and all sections and subsections included on the videodisc. You simply select the entire demos, sections, or subsections of demos you want to include in your presentation and add them to a lesson list with a mouse click. Lesson Planner generates a list of your selections with barcodes to access the correct video frames. Simply print a copy of the lesson on a laser printer and you are ready to go.

  1. Ethanol Metabolism and the Transition from Organic Chemistry to Biochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinman, Richard D.

    2001-09-01

    To ease the transition from organic chemistry at the beginning of a biochemistry course or at the beginning of the metabolism section of the organic course, an early presentation of the oxidation of ethanol is proposed. Alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase reactions can smooth the introduction to biochemistry, since they involve three of the simplest compounds: ethanol, acetaldehyde, and acetic acid. Using these reactions as a model encourages the study of metabolic pathways by a systematic approach rather than by rote memorization. Reactions that can be presented as variations on a theme include methanol poisoning, the polyol reaction, and, most important, the sequence glycerol-3-phosphate to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate to 3-phosphoglyceric acid. This last sequence integrates lipid and carbohydrate metabolism and, by comparison with the model reaction, brings out the principles of substrate-level phosphorylation. The method has evoked favorable verbal feedback from students and, in addition to medical and graduate courses, has been successfully used in the biochemical section of an undergraduate organic course.

  2. Irradiated Benzene Ice Provides Clues to Meteoritic Organic Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, Michael Patrick; Gerakines, Perry Alexander; Martin, Mildred G.; Hudson, Reggie L.; Peeters, Zan

    2013-01-01

    Aromatic hydrocarbons account for a significant portion of the organic matter in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites, as a component of both the low molecular weight, solvent-extractable compounds and the insoluble organic macromolecular material. Previous work has suggested that the aromatic compounds in carbonaceous chondrites may have originated in the radiation-processed icy mantles of interstellar dust grains. Here we report new studies of the organic residue made from benzene irradiated at 19 K by 0.8 MeV protons. Polyphenyls with up to four rings were unambiguously identified in the residue by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Atmospheric pressure photoionization Fourier transform mass spectrometry was used to determine molecular composition, and accurate mass measurements suggested the presence of polyphenyls, partially hydrogenated polyphenyls, and other complex aromatic compounds. The profile of low molecular weight compounds in the residue compared well with extracts from the Murchison and Orgueil meteorites. These results are consistent with the possibility that solid phase radiation chemistry of benzene produced some of the complex aromatics found in meteorites.

  3. Synthesis of a Partially Protected Azidodeoxy Sugar. A Project Suitable for the Advanced Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Peter; Freeze, Scott; Gabriel, Christopher J.

    2001-01-01

    The synthetic chemistry of carbohydrates provides a wealth of possible experiments for the undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory. However, few appropriate examples have been developed to date. With this simple two-step synthesis of a partially protected azidodeoxy sugar, we demonstrate several important concepts introduced in undergraduate chemistry (alcohol activation, steric hindrance, nucleophilic substitution) while offering products that are readily amenable to analysis by high field NMR. Students are exposed to techniques such as monitoring reactions by TLC, workup of reaction mixtures, and isolation by flash chromatography. Suitable methods for analysis of products include NMR, IR, MS, and polarimetry.

  4. Development and Implementation of a Two-Semester Introductory Organic-Bioorganic Chemistry Sequence: Conclusions from the First Six Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goess, Brian C.

    2014-01-01

    A two-semester second-year introductory organic chemistry sequence featuring one semester of accelerated organic chemistry followed by one semester of bioorganic chemistry is described. Assessment data collected over a six-year period reveal that such a course sequence can facilitate student mastery of fundamental organic chemistry in the first…

  5. Perception of the Relevance of Organic Chemistry in a German Pharmacy Students' Course.

    PubMed

    Wehle, Sarah; Decker, Michael

    2016-04-25

    Objective. To investigate German pharmacy students' attitudes toward the relevance of organic chemistry training in Julius Maximilian University (JMU) of Würzburg with regard to subsequent courses in the curricula and in later prospective career options. Methods. Surveys were conducted in the second-year organic chemistry course (50 participants) as well as during the third-year and fourth-year lecture cycle on medicinal and pharmaceutical chemistry (66 participants) in 2014. Results. Students' attitudes were surprisingly consistent throughout the progress of the degree course. Students considered organic chemistry very relevant to the pharmacy study program (95% junior and 97% senior students), and of importance for their future pharmacy program (88% junior and 94% senior students). With regard to prospective career options, the perceived relevance was considerably lower and attitudes were less homogenous. Conclusions. German pharmacy students at JMU Würzburg consider organic chemistry of high relevance for medicinal chemistry and other courses in JMU's pharmacy program.

  6. Perception of the Relevance of Organic Chemistry in a German Pharmacy Students' Course.

    PubMed

    Wehle, Sarah; Decker, Michael

    2016-04-25

    Objective. To investigate German pharmacy students' attitudes toward the relevance of organic chemistry training in Julius Maximilian University (JMU) of Würzburg with regard to subsequent courses in the curricula and in later prospective career options. Methods. Surveys were conducted in the second-year organic chemistry course (50 participants) as well as during the third-year and fourth-year lecture cycle on medicinal and pharmaceutical chemistry (66 participants) in 2014. Results. Students' attitudes were surprisingly consistent throughout the progress of the degree course. Students considered organic chemistry very relevant to the pharmacy study program (95% junior and 97% senior students), and of importance for their future pharmacy program (88% junior and 94% senior students). With regard to prospective career options, the perceived relevance was considerably lower and attitudes were less homogenous. Conclusions. German pharmacy students at JMU Würzburg consider organic chemistry of high relevance for medicinal chemistry and other courses in JMU's pharmacy program. PMID:27170811

  7. Indoor air chemistry: Formation of organic acids and aldehydes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.; Lioy, P.J. ||; Wilson, W.E.

    1994-12-31

    Laying emphasis on the formation of aldehydes and organic acids, the study has examined the gas-phase reactions of ozone with unsaturated VOCs. The formation of formaldehyde and formic acid was observed for all the three selected unsaturated VOCs: styrene, limonene, and 4-vinylcyclohexene. In addition, benzaldehyde was detected in the styrene-ozone-air reaction system, and acetic acid was also found in limonene-ozone-air system. The study has also examined the gas-phase reactions among formaldehyde, ozone, and nitrogen dioxide and found the formation of formic acid. The nitrate radical was suggested to play an important role in converting formaldehyde into formic acid. Experiments for all the reactions were conducted by using a 4.3 m{sup 3} Teflon chamber. Since the conditions for the reactions were similar to those for indoor environments, the results from the study can be implicated to real indoor situations and can be employed to support the findings and suggestions from the previous studies: certain aldehydes and organic acids could be generated by indoor chemistry.

  8. The organization of an educational program for specialists in clinical chemistry by the Greek Society of Clinical Chemistry-Clinical Biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Rizos, Demetrios; Karababa, Photini; Sarandakou, Angeliki; Panagiotakis, Othon; Haliassos, Alexander; Makris, Konstantinos; Psarra, Katerina; Bairaktari, Eleni; Spyropoulou, Panagiota; Nikolou, Chara; Galiatsatos, Nikolaos; Trakas, Nikolaos; Ferderigou, Angeliki; Seferiadis, Konstantin

    2011-01-01

    In Greece, there is no officially organized training in clinical chemistry for scientists. The Greek Society of Clinical Chemistry-Clinical Biochemistry decided to organize an intensive educational program of 18 seminars on clinical chemistry content as it is described in the EC4 Syllabus. The duration of each seminar was about 6 hours and consisted of 6 to 9 lectures. At the end of each seminar there was a voluntary written examination, comprised of 24 multiple choice questions. Successful completion of the Educational program was leading to a Certificate of Competence. Two cycles of the 18 seminars were performed: 1st cycle from October 2003 to December 2005 and 2nd cycle from March 2005 to October 2007. One hundred eighty nine colleagues was the mean attendance per seminar for the seminars of the 1st cycle and 38 colleagues for the seminars of the 2nd cycle. The mean participation to the examination for each seminar was almost 80% for the 1st cycle and 68% for the 2nd cycle. More than 80% of the participants performed Good or Very good in the examination in both cycles. It is estimated that more than 40% of the scientists who practice Clinical Chemistry in Greece, participated to this educational activity. This program is now provided as an e-learning application, and it is open for all scientists who want to follow the discipline of clinical chemistry.

  9. Analysis of the Effect of Sequencing Lecture and Laboratory Instruction on Student Learning and Motivation Towards Learning Chemistry in an Organic Chemistry Lecture Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pakhira, Deblina

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to organic chemistry concepts in the laboratory can positively affect student performance, learning new chemistry concepts and building motivation towards learning chemistry in the lecture. In this study, quantitative methods were employed to assess differences in student performance, learning, and motivation in an organic chemistry…

  10. Using Structure-Based Organic Chemistry Online Tutorials with Automated Correction for Student Practice and Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Sullivan, Timothy P.; Hargaden, Gra´inne C.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development and implementation of an open-access organic chemistry question bank for online tutorials and assessments at University College Cork and Dublin Institute of Technology. SOCOT (structure-based organic chemistry online tutorials) may be used to supplement traditional small-group tutorials, thereby allowing…

  11. Organic Chemistry and the Native Plants of the Sonoran Desert: Conversion of Jojoba Oil to Biodiesel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daconta, Lisa V.; Minger, Timothy; Nedelkova, Valentina; Zikopoulos, John N.

    2015-01-01

    A new, general approach to the organic chemistry laboratory is introduced that is based on learning about organic chemistry techniques and research methods by exploring the natural products found in local native plants. As an example of this approach for the Sonoran desert region, the extraction of jojoba oil and its transesterification to…

  12. Integration of Video-Based Demonstrations to Prepare Students for the Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadelson, Louis S.; Scaggs, Jonathan; Sheffield, Colin; McDougal, Owen M.

    2015-01-01

    Consistent, high-quality introductions to organic chemistry laboratory techniques effectively and efficiently support student learning in the organic chemistry laboratory. In this work, we developed and deployed a series of instructional videos to communicate core laboratory techniques and concepts. Using a quasi-experimental design, we tested the…

  13. Student Perceptions of Online Homework Use for Formative Assessment of Learning in Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards-Babb, Michelle; Curtis, Reagan; Georgieva, Zornitsa; Penn, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Use of online homework as a formative assessment tool for organic chemistry coursework was examined. Student perceptions of online homework in terms of (i) its ranking relative to other course aspects, (ii) their learning of organic chemistry, and (iii) whether it improved their study habits and how students used it as a learning tool were…

  14. Medicinal chemistry of drugs with active metabolites following conjugation.

    PubMed

    Kalász, Huba; Petroianu, Georg; Hosztafi, Sándor; Darvas, Ferenc; Csermely, Tamás; Adeghate, Ernest; Siddiq, Afshan; Tekes, Kornélia

    2013-10-01

    Authorities of Drug Administration in the United States of America approved about 5000 drugs for use in the therapy or management of several diseases. About two hundred of these drugs have active metabolites and the knowledge of their medicinal chemistry is important both in medical practice and pharmaceutical research. This review gives a detailed description of the medicinal chemistry of drugs with active metabolites generated after conjugation. This review focused on glucuronide-, acetyl-, sulphate- and phosphate-conjugation of drugs, converting the drug into an active metabolite. This conversion essentially changed the lipophilicity of the drug.

  15. Size distribution dynamics reveal particle-phase chemistry in organic aerosol formation.

    PubMed

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Yee, Lindsay D; Schilling, Katherine A; Loza, Christine L; Craven, Jill S; Zuend, Andreas; Ziemann, Paul J; Seinfeld, John H

    2013-07-16

    Organic aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and play a central role in climate, air quality, and public health. The aerosol size distribution is key in determining its optical properties and cloud condensation nucleus activity. The dominant portion of organic aerosol is formed through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, so-called secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). Typical experimental measurements of SOA formation include total SOA mass and atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratio. These measurements, alone, are generally insufficient to reveal the extent to which condensed-phase reactions occur in conjunction with the multigeneration gas-phase photooxidation. Combining laboratory chamber experiments and kinetic gas-particle modeling for the dodecane SOA system, here we show that the presence of particle-phase chemistry is reflected in the evolution of the SOA size distribution as well as its mass concentration. Particle-phase reactions are predicted to occur mainly at the particle surface, and the reaction products contribute more than half of the SOA mass. Chamber photooxidation with a midexperiment aldehyde injection confirms that heterogeneous reaction of aldehydes with organic hydroperoxides forming peroxyhemiacetals can lead to a large increase in SOA mass. Although experiments need to be conducted with other SOA precursor hydrocarbons, current results demonstrate coupling between particle-phase chemistry and size distribution dynamics in the formation of SOAs, thereby opening up an avenue for analysis of the SOA formation process.

  16. Size distribution dynamics reveal particle-phase chemistry in organic aerosol formation.

    PubMed

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Yee, Lindsay D; Schilling, Katherine A; Loza, Christine L; Craven, Jill S; Zuend, Andreas; Ziemann, Paul J; Seinfeld, John H

    2013-07-16

    Organic aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and play a central role in climate, air quality, and public health. The aerosol size distribution is key in determining its optical properties and cloud condensation nucleus activity. The dominant portion of organic aerosol is formed through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, so-called secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). Typical experimental measurements of SOA formation include total SOA mass and atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratio. These measurements, alone, are generally insufficient to reveal the extent to which condensed-phase reactions occur in conjunction with the multigeneration gas-phase photooxidation. Combining laboratory chamber experiments and kinetic gas-particle modeling for the dodecane SOA system, here we show that the presence of particle-phase chemistry is reflected in the evolution of the SOA size distribution as well as its mass concentration. Particle-phase reactions are predicted to occur mainly at the particle surface, and the reaction products contribute more than half of the SOA mass. Chamber photooxidation with a midexperiment aldehyde injection confirms that heterogeneous reaction of aldehydes with organic hydroperoxides forming peroxyhemiacetals can lead to a large increase in SOA mass. Although experiments need to be conducted with other SOA precursor hydrocarbons, current results demonstrate coupling between particle-phase chemistry and size distribution dynamics in the formation of SOAs, thereby opening up an avenue for analysis of the SOA formation process. PMID:23818634

  17. Size distribution dynamics reveal particle-phase chemistry in organic aerosol formation

    PubMed Central

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Yee, Lindsay D.; Schilling, Katherine A.; Loza, Christine L.; Craven, Jill S.; Zuend, Andreas; Ziemann, Paul J.; Seinfeld, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Organic aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and play a central role in climate, air quality, and public health. The aerosol size distribution is key in determining its optical properties and cloud condensation nucleus activity. The dominant portion of organic aerosol is formed through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, so-called secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). Typical experimental measurements of SOA formation include total SOA mass and atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratio. These measurements, alone, are generally insufficient to reveal the extent to which condensed-phase reactions occur in conjunction with the multigeneration gas-phase photooxidation. Combining laboratory chamber experiments and kinetic gas-particle modeling for the dodecane SOA system, here we show that the presence of particle-phase chemistry is reflected in the evolution of the SOA size distribution as well as its mass concentration. Particle-phase reactions are predicted to occur mainly at the particle surface, and the reaction products contribute more than half of the SOA mass. Chamber photooxidation with a midexperiment aldehyde injection confirms that heterogeneous reaction of aldehydes with organic hydroperoxides forming peroxyhemiacetals can lead to a large increase in SOA mass. Although experiments need to be conducted with other SOA precursor hydrocarbons, current results demonstrate coupling between particle-phase chemistry and size distribution dynamics in the formation of SOAs, thereby opening up an avenue for analysis of the SOA formation process. PMID:23818634

  18. Learning Activity Package, Chemistry I, (LAP) Study 29.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Naomi

    Presented is a Learning Activity Package (LAP) study concerned with carbon and its compounds. This LAP in chemistry includes a rationale for studying the chemical element of carbon, a list of student objectives (stated in behavioral terms), of activities (reading, laboratory experiments, model construction, etc.), a two-page worksheet, a…

  19. Molecular Mechanism of Acrylamide Neurotoxicity: Lessons Learned from Organic Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Gavin, Terrence

    2012-01-01

    Background: Acrylamide (ACR) produces cumulative neurotoxicity in exposed humans and laboratory animals through a direct inhibitory effect on presynaptic function. Objectives: In this review, we delineate how knowledge of chemistry provided an unprecedented understanding of the ACR neurotoxic mechanism. We also show how application of the hard and soft, acids and bases (HSAB) theory led to the recognition that the α,β-unsaturated carbonyl structure of ACR is a soft electrophile that preferentially forms covalent bonds with soft nucleophiles. Methods: In vivo proteomic and in chemico studies demonstrated that ACR formed covalent adducts with highly nucleophilic cysteine thiolate groups located within active sites of presynaptic proteins. Additional research showed that resulting protein inactivation disrupted nerve terminal processes and impaired neurotransmission. Discussion: ACR is a type-2 alkene, a chemical class that includes structurally related electrophilic environmental pollutants (e.g., acrolein) and endogenous mediators of cellular oxidative stress (e.g., 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal). Members of this chemical family produce toxicity via a common molecular mechanism. Although individual environmental concentrations might not be toxicologically relevant, exposure to an ambient mixture of type-2 alkene pollutants could pose a significant risk to human health. Furthermore, environmentally derived type-2 alkenes might act synergistically with endogenously generated unsaturated aldehydes to amplify cellular damage and thereby accelerate human disease/injury processes that involve oxidative stress. Conclusions: These possibilities have substantial implications for environmental risk assessment and were realized through an understanding of ACR adduct chemistry. The approach delineated here can be broadly applied because many toxicants of different chemical classes are electrophiles that produce toxicity by interacting with cellular proteins. PMID:23060388

  20. Students' Perceptions of Teaching in Context-based and Traditional Chemistry Classrooms: Comparing content, learning activities, and interpersonal perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overman, Michelle; Vermunt, Jan D.; Meijer, Paulien C.; Bulte, Astrid M. W.; Brekelmans, Mieke

    2014-07-01

    Context-based curriculum reforms in chemistry education are thought to bring greater diversity to the ways in which chemistry teachers organize their teaching. First and foremost, students are expected to perceive this diversity. However, empirical research on how students perceive their teacher's teaching in context-based chemistry classrooms, and whether this teaching differs from traditional chemistry lessons, is scarce. This study aims to develop our understanding of what teaching looks like, according to students, in context-based chemistry classrooms compared with traditional chemistry classrooms. As such, it might also provide a better understanding of whether teachers implement and attain the intentions of curriculum developers. To study teacher behaviour we used three theoretical perspectives deemed to be important for student learning: a content perspective, a learning activities perspective, and an interpersonal perspective. Data were collected from 480 students in 24 secondary chemistry classes in the Netherlands. Our findings suggest that, according to the students, the changes in teaching in context-based chemistry classrooms imply a lessening of the emphasis on fundamental chemistry and the use of a teacher-centred approach, compared with traditional chemistry classrooms. However, teachers in context-based chemistry classrooms seem not to display more 'context-based' teaching behaviour, such as emphasizing the relation between chemistry, technology, and society and using a student-centred approach. Furthermore, students in context-based chemistry classrooms perceive their teachers as having less interpersonal control and showing less affiliation than teachers in traditional chemistry classrooms. Our findings should be interpreted in the context of former and daily experiences of both teachers and students. As only chemistry is reformed in the schools in which context-based chemistry is implemented, it is challenging for both students and teachers to

  1. Factors related to achievement in sophomore organic chemistry at the University of Arkansas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, Harriet Arlene

    The purpose of this study was to identify the significant cognitive and non-cognitive variables that related to achievement in the first semester of organic chemistry at the University of Arkansas. Cognitive variables included second semester general chemistry grade, ACT composite score, ACT English, mathematics, reading, and science reasoning subscores, and spatial ability. Non-cognitive variables included anxiety, confidence, effectance motivation, and usefulness. Using a correlation research design, the individual relationships between organic chemistry achievement and each of the cognitive variables and non-cognitive variables were assessed. In addition, the relationships between organic chemistry achievement and combinations of these independent variables were explored. Finally, gender- and instructor-related differences in the relationships between organic chemistry achievement and the independent variables were investigated. The samples consisted of volunteers from the Fall 1999 and Fall 2000 sections of Organic Chemistry I at the University of Arkansas. All students in each section were asked to participate. Data for spatial ability and non-cognitive independent variables were collected using the Purdue Visualization of Rotations test and the modified Fennema-Sherman Attitude Scales. Data for other independent variables, including ACT scores and second semester general chemistry grades, were obtained from the Office of Institutional Research. The dependent variable, organic chemistry achievement, was measured by each student's accumulated points in the course and consisted of scores on quizzes and exams in the lecture section only. These totals were obtained from the lecture instructor at the end of each semester. Pearson correlation and stepwise multiple regression analyses were used to measure the relationships between organic chemistry achievement and the independent variables. Prior performance in chemistry as measured by second semester general

  2. Aqueous organic chemistry in the atmosphere: sources and chemical processing of organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    McNeill, V Faye

    2015-02-01

    Over the past decade, it has become clear that aqueous chemical processes occurring in cloud droplets and wet atmospheric particles are an important source of organic atmospheric particulate matter. Reactions of water-soluble volatile (or semivolatile) organic gases (VOCs or SVOCs) in these aqueous media lead to the formation of highly oxidized organic particulate matter (secondary organic aerosol; SOA) and key tracer species, such as organosulfates. These processes are often driven by a combination of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions, and therefore their accurate representation in models is important for effective air quality management. Despite considerable progress, mechanistic understanding of some key aqueous processes is still lacking, and these pathways are incompletely represented in 3D atmospheric chemistry and air quality models. In this article, the concepts, historical context, and current state of the science of aqueous pathways of SOA formation are discussed.

  3. A Collaborative, Wiki-Based Organic Chemistry Project Incorporating Free Chemistry Software on the Web

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Michael J.; Moore, Jeffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, postsecondary instructors have recognized the potential of wikis to transform the way students learn in a collaborative environment. However, few instructors have embraced in-depth student use of chemistry software for the creation of interactive chemistry content on the Web. Using currently available software, students are able…

  4. The ACS Exams Institute Undergraduate Chemistry Anchoring Concepts Content Map II: Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raker, Jeffrey; Holme, Thomas; Murphy, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    As a way to assist chemistry departments with programmatic assessment of undergraduate chemistry curricula, the ACS Examinations Institute is devising a map of the content taught throughout the undergraduate curriculum. The structure of the map is hierarchal, with large grain size at the top and more content detail as one moves "down"…

  5. Comparing Recent Organizing Templates for Test Content between ACS Exams in General Chemistry and AP Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holme, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Two different versions of "big ideas" rooted content maps have recently been published for general chemistry. As embodied in the content outline from the College Board, one of these maps is designed to guide curriculum development and testing for advanced placement (AP) chemistry. The Anchoring Concepts Content Map for general chemistry…

  6. Iodine-124: a promising positron emitter for organic PET chemistry.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Lena; Gagnon, Katherine; McQuarrie, Steve; Wuest, Frank

    2010-04-13

    The use of radiopharmaceuticals for molecular imaging of biochemical and physiological processes in vivo has evolved into an important diagnostic tool in modern nuclear medicine and medical research. Positron emission tomography (PET) is currently the most sophisticated molecular imaging methodology, mainly due to the unrivalled high sensitivity which allows for the studying of biochemistry in vivo on the molecular level. The most frequently used radionuclides for PET have relatively short half-lives (e.g. 11C: 20.4 min; 18F: 109.8 min) which may limit both the synthesis procedures and the time frame of PET studies. Iodine-124 (124I, t1/2 = 4.2 d) is an alternative long-lived PET radionuclide attracting increasing interest for long term clinical and small animal PET studies. The present review gives a survey on the use of 124I as promising PET radionuclide for molecular imaging. The first part describes the production of 124I. The second part covers basic radiochemistry with 124I focused on the synthesis of 124I-labeled compounds for molecular imaging purposes. The review concludes with a summary and an outlook on the future prospective of using the long-lived positron emitter 124I in the field of organic PET chemistry and molecular imaging.

  7. Organic Mastery: An Activity for the Undergraduate Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosher, Michael D.; Mosher, Melvyn W.; Garoutte, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    A group activity for use in the classroom or recitation section of an organic chemistry course is described. This activity, a board game using trivia and concepts from the course material, can be used periodically throughout the semester to introduce or reinforce content knowledge. Alternate versions can be easily constructed for other courses.…

  8. Students' Understanding of Acids/Bases in Organic Chemistry Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartrette, David P.; Mayo, Provi M.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding key foundational principles is vital to learning chemistry across different contexts. One such foundational principle is the acid/base behavior of molecules. In the general chemistry sequence, the Bronsted-Lowry theory is stressed, because it lends itself well to studying equilibrium and kinetics. However, the Lewis theory of…

  9. Synthetic biology: lessons from the history of synthetic organic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Brian J; Lim, Wendell A

    2007-09-01

    The mid-nineteenth century saw the development of a radical new direction in chemistry: instead of simply analyzing existing molecules, chemists began to synthesize them--including molecules that did not exist in nature. The combination of this new synthetic approach with more traditional analytical approaches revolutionized chemistry, leading to a deep understanding of the fundamental principles of chemical structure and reactivity and to the emergence of the modern pharmaceutical and chemical industries. The history of synthetic chemistry offers a possible roadmap for the development and impact of synthetic biology, a nascent field in which the goal is to build novel biological systems. PMID:17710092

  10. Empowering Girls with Chemistry, Exercise and Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clapham, Emily D.; Ciccomascolo, Lori E.; Clapham, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Research suggests that a girl's career interests in the areas of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) declines between grades 6 and 8. Similarly, in middle school, there is a decrease in physical activity among girls. Researchers at the University of Rhode Island (URI) conducted a chemistry-based science camp that took place…

  11. Active Learning Strategies in the Analytical Chemistry Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Michael R.; Fulton, Robert B.

    1994-01-01

    Describes an analytical chemistry course restructured around the use of cooperative groups to help students become active learners in a non-competitive environment. Five years of experience with the course indicates that the syllabus covers almost exactly the same content as old courses and that test scores compare favorably on the national level.…

  12. Lunar carbon chemistry - Relations to and implications for terrestrial organic geochemistry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eglinton, G.; Maxwell, J. R.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1972-01-01

    Survey of the various ways in which studies of lunar carbon chemistry have beneficially affected terrestrial organic geochemistry. A lunar organic gas-analysis operating system is cited as the most important instrumental development in relation to terrestrial organic geochemistry. Improved methods of analysis and handling of organic samples are cited as another benefit derived from studies of lunar carbon chemistry. The problem of controlling contamination and minimizing organic vapors is considered, as well as the possibility of analyzing terrestrial samples by the techniques developed for lunar samples. A need for new methods of analyzing carbonaceous material which is insoluble in organic solvents is indicated.

  13. Cyclopenta[c]phenanthrenes--chemistry and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Brzuzan, Paweł; Góra, Maciej; Luczyński, Michał K; Woźny, Maciej

    2013-06-25

    Despite cyclopenta-fused polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (CP-PAHs) having been detected in the environment, the ability of these compounds to induce cellular and tissue responses remains poorly characterized. In this review, we look at the chemistry and biological activity of the cyclopenta[c]phenanthrenes (CP[c]Phs) as potential chemicals of concern in the process of risk assessment. The first part of the review deals with the environmental occurrence and chemistry of CP-PAHs, focusing on available methods of CP[c]Ph chemical synthesis. The most interesting structural feature of the CP[c]Ph is the presence of a pseudo fjord-region constructed by the cyclopentane ring. This compound can be treated either as a structurally similar one to B[c]Ph, or as a phenanthrene skeleton with an electrodonating alkyl substituent in the bay-region of the molecule. The second thread, providing available data on the adverse effects of CP[c]Ph compounds on cells and tissues of living organisms, mainly fish, improves our understanding of these possible environmental hazards. The data show that CP[c]Ph is less potent at inducing CYP1A gene expression in rainbow trout than benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), a well-known Ah-receptor agonist. Interestingly, the CP[c]Ph dependent up-regulation of CYP1A mRNA is positively correlated with the incidences of clastogenic changes in rainbow trout erythrocytes. CP[c]Ph has, comparably to B[a]P, a potential to repress expression of tumor suppressor p53, in the head kidney of rainbow trout. Furthermore, estrogen responsive genes in fish liver, ERα and VTG, are not induced by CP[c]Ph, suggesting that the compound has no endocrine disrupting potential. However, some CP[c]Phs show mutagenic activity when investigated in the Ames test, and exhibit genotoxic properties in in vitro micronucleus assay. The above characteristics suggest that CP-PAHs are chemicals of concern for which potential pathways of exposure should be further identified. PMID:23628509

  14. Organic carbamates in drug design and medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arun K; Brindisi, Margherita

    2015-04-01

    The carbamate group is a key structural motif in many approved drugs and prodrugs. There is an increasing use of carbamates in medicinal chemistry and many derivatives are specifically designed to make drug-target interactions through their carbamate moiety. In this Perspective, we present properties and stabilities of carbamates, reagents and chemical methodologies for the synthesis of carbamates, and recent applications of carbamates in drug design and medicinal chemistry.

  15. Organic Carbamates in Drug Design and Medicinal Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The carbamate group is a key structural motif in many approved drugs and prodrugs. There is an increasing use of carbamates in medicinal chemistry and many derivatives are specifically designed to make drug–target interactions through their carbamate moiety. In this Perspective, we present properties and stabilities of carbamates, reagents and chemical methodologies for the synthesis of carbamates, and recent applications of carbamates in drug design and medicinal chemistry. PMID:25565044

  16. Chemistry, chemoecology, and bioactivity of the South China Sea opisthobranch molluscs and their dietary organisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Rong; He, Wen-Fei; Guo, Yue-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Opisthobranchs are slow-moving, brightly colored, and shell-less slug. Interestingly, these naked molluscs appear to be free of predation causing great interests to biologists, chemists, and pharmacologists as well. It is well documented that their ability to escape predation is realized by utilizing chemical substances as defensive allomones. Due to their extraordinary capacity to produce a variety of chemical defensive molecules and in particular, some of which exhibited promising pharmacological activities, opisthobranch molluscs became the hotspot of research subject in the recent years. The authors and co-workers have systematically investigated the possible diet relationship between the South China Sea opisthobranch molluscs and their related prey organisms, including sponges, corals, and algae in the last decade. A series of interesting results have been obtained concerning the chemistry and chemoecology of the studied marine organisms. The present review focuses on recent development dealing with chemistry, chemoecology, and bioactivity of the South China Sea opisthobranch molluscs and their dietary organisms. Some selected representative examples are described in detail.

  17. Intuitive Judgments Govern Students' Answering Patterns in Multiple-Choice Exercises in Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graulich, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Research in chemistry education has revealed that students going through their undergraduate and graduate studies in organic chemistry have a fragmented conceptual knowledge of the subject. Rote memorization, rule-based reasoning, and heuristic strategies seem to strongly influence students' performances. There appears to be a gap between what we…

  18. The Tip of the Iceberg in Organic Chemistry Classes: How Do Students Deal with the Invisible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graulich, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Organic chemistry education is one of the youngest research areas among all chemistry related research efforts, and its published scholarly work has become vibrant and diverse over the last 15 years. Research on problem-solving behavior, students' use of the arrow-pushing formalism, the investigation of students' conceptual knowledge and…

  19. Synthesis and Characterization of Calixarene Tetraethers: An Exercise in Supramolecular Chemistry for the Undergraduate Organic Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debbert, Stefan L.; Hoh, Bradley D.; Dulak, David J.

    2016-01-01

    In this experiment for an introductory undergraduate organic chemistry lab, students tetraalkylate tertbutylcalix[4]arene, a bowl-shaped macrocyclic oligophenol, and examine the supramolecular chemistry of the tetraether product by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Complexation with a sodium ion reduces the conformational…

  20. Ethnically Diverse Students' Knowledge Structures in First-Semester Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Enrique J.; Shavelson, Richard J.; Nandagopal, Kiruthiga; Szu, Evan; Penn, John

    2014-01-01

    Chemistry courses remain a challenge for many undergraduate students. In particular, first-semester organic chemistry has been labeled as a gatekeeper with high attrition rates, especially among students of color. Our study examines a key factor related to conceptual understanding in science and predictive of course outcomes-knowledge structures.…

  1. An Asymptotic Approach to the Development of a Green Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Thomas E.

    2004-01-01

    Green chemistry is the utilization of a set of principles that reduces or eliminates the use or generation of hazardous substances in the design, manufacture and application of chemical products. Some of the philosophical questions and practical decisions that have guided the greening of the organic chemistry laboratory at Hendrix College in…

  2. A Simple Assignment that Enhances Students' Ability to Solve Organic Chemistry Synthesis Problems and Understand Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teixeira, Jennifer; Holman, R. W.

    2008-01-01

    Organic chemistry students typically struggle with the retrosynthetic approach to solving synthesis problems because most textbooks present the chemistry grouped by "reactions of the functional group". In contrast, the retrosynthetic approach requires the student to envision "reactions that yield the functional group". A second challenge is the…

  3. Synthetic Methods, Chemistry, and the Anticonvulsant Activity of Thiadiazoles

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Bhawna; Verma, Amita; Prajapati, Sunil; Sharma, Upendra Kumar

    2013-01-01

    The chemistry of heterocyclic compounds has been an interesting field of study for a long time. Heterocyclic nucleus 1,3,4-thiadiazole constitutes an important class of compounds for new drug development. The synthesis of novel thiadiazole derivatives and investigation of their chemical and biological behavior have gained more importance in recent decades. The search for antiepileptic compounds with more selective activity and lower toxicity continues to be an active area of intensive investigation in medicinal chemistry. During the recent years, there has been intense investigation of different classes of thiadiazole compounds, many of which possess extensive pharmacological activities, namely, antimicrobial activity, anticonvulsant, antifungal antidiabetic, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antituberculosis activities, and so forth. The resistance towards available drugs is rapidly becoming a major worldwide problem. The need to design new compounds to deal with this resistance has become one of the most important areas of research today. Thiadiazole is a versatile moiety that exhibits a wide variety of biological activities. Thiadiazole moiety acts as “hydrogen binding domain” and “two-electron donor system.” It also acts as a constrained pharmacophore. On the basis of the reported literature, we study here thiadiazole compounds and their synthetic methods chemistry and anticonvulsant activity. PMID:25405032

  4. Exploring organic chemistry in planet-forming zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bast, J. E.; Lahuis, F.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2013-03-01

    Context. Over the last few years, the chemistry of molecules other than CO in the planet-forming zones of disks is starting to be explored with Spitzer and high-resolution ground-based data. However, these studies have focused only on a few simple molecules. Aims: The aim of this study is to put observational constraints on the presence of more complex organic and sulfur-bearing molecules predicted to be abundant in chemical models of disks and to simulate high resolution spectra in view of future missions. Methods: High signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) Spitzer spectra of the near edge-on disks IRS 46 and GV Tau are used to search for mid-infrared absorption bands of various molecules. These disks are good laboratories because absorption studies do not suffer from low line/continuum ratios that plague emission data. Simple local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) slab models are used to infer column densities (or upper limits) and excitation temperatures. Results: Mid-infrared bands of HCN, C2H2 and CO2 are clearly detected toward both sources. The HCN and C2H2 absorption arises in warm gas with excitation temperatures of 400-700 K, whereas the CO2 absorption originates in cooler gas of ~250 K. Column densities and their ratios are comparable for the two sources. No other absorption features are detected at the 3σ level. Column density limits of the majority of molecules predicted to be abundant in the inner disk - C2H4, C2H6, C6H6, C3H4, C4H2, CH3, HNC, HC3N, CH3CN, NH3 and SO2 - are determined and compared with disk models. Conclusions: The inferred abundance ratios and limits with respect to C2H2 and HCN are roughly consistent with models of the chemistry in high temperature gas. Models of UV irradiated disk surfaces generally agree better with the data than pure X-ray models. The limit on NH3/HCN implies that evaporation of NH3-containing ices is only a minor contributor. The inferred abundances and their limits also compare well with those found in comets, suggesting

  5. Organic Chemistry of the Cell: An Interdisciplinary Approach To Learning with a Focus on Reading, Analyzing, and Critiquing Primary Literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Craig A.; Liotta, Louis J.

    2005-12-01

    A sophomore-level learning community entitled Organic Chemistry of the Cell has been designed that is comprised of two linked courses, Organic Chemistry I and Cell Biology, and an Integrative Seminar. The Integrative Seminar is grounded in the reading, critical analysis, and discussion of primary literature that ties together organic chemistry and cell biology. Each student takes on the roles of learner, facilitator, and research proposal writer throughout the semester. Students take an active role in their learning; student teams lead the class through an in-depth analysis of selected articles. This leadership role requires the students to understand and be familiar with the relevant background knowledge, the experiments conducted, the interpretation of data, and conclusions drawn from that data. The discussion leaders must also be able to organize and prioritize the information and their thoughts, and be able to clearly communicate to their classmates in an engaging manner. The seminar culminates with student teams developing research proposals that outline experiments addressing a specific area of interest on the boundary between organic chemistry and cell biology. The proposals are communicated in both written and oral forms allowing fellow students to evaluate and expand upon the proposed ideas.

  6. Improvements to the characterization of organic nitrogen chemistry and deposition in CMAQ (CMAS Presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess atmospheric nitrogen deposition can cause significant harmful effects to ecosystems. Organic nitrogen deposition can be an important contributor to the total nitrogen budget, contributing 10-30%, however there are large uncertainties in the chemistry and deposition of thes...

  7. Improvements to the treatment of organic nitrogen chemistry & deposition in CMAQ

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess atmospheric nitrogen deposition can cause significant harmful effects to ecosystems. Organic nitrogen deposition can be an important contributor to the total nitrogen budget, contributing 10-30%, however there are large uncertainties in the chemistry and deposition of thes...

  8. Improvements to the characterization of organic nitrogen chemistry and deposition in CMAQ

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess atmospheric nitrogen deposition can cause significant harmful effects to ecosystems. Organic nitrogen deposition can be an important contributor to the total nitrogen budget, contributing 10-30%, however there are large uncertainties in the chemistry and deposition of thes...

  9. Microwave-Assisted Chemistry: A Rapid and Sustainable Route to Synthesis of Organics and Nanomaterials

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of emerging MW-assisted chemistry techniques in conjunction with benign reaction media is dramatically reducing chemical waste and reaction times in several organic syntheses and chemical transformations. This review summarizes recent developments in MW-assisted synthesis...

  10. The interfacial chemistry of organic materials on commercial glass surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Joy

    The hydrolytic stability of glass is dependent on its composition. Glasses are exposed to water during their processing and in many applications; therefore, their surface or interface with other materials must withstand hydrolytic attack. Multi-component silicate glasses are widely used but have been the least studied. In coatings-based applications, these glasses come in contact with organosilanes and organic molecules where the adsorption may be affected by surface water. For example, the influence of glass composition on the wet strength of a glass/polymer composite material is unclear, but it is presumed to be driven by the hydrolytic stability of the interfacial chemistry. Organosilanes are critical for increasing the performance of composite materials in humid environments but the precise manner by which the improvement occurs has not been verified. The current school of thought is that the application of silane coatings on a multi-component glass surface transforms the chemically heterogeneous surface into a homogenous and hydrolytically stable surface. In this study, multi-component silicate glass surfaces were silanized by both aqueous and non-aqueous methods. The effect of glass composition and surface hydration on silane coverage was quantified by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The monolayer-level adsorption results showed that the low-sodium content glasses had greater coverage than a high-sodium content glass in dry conditions in contrast to an equivalent coverage in wet conditions. The hydrolytically-stable coverage on multi-component silicate glass surfaces by both silanization methods was found to be sub-monolayer. A thin film model in conjunction with XPS and Infrared Spectroscopy was used to probe the interfacial region of a fiberglass insulation material containing a sodium-rich multi-component silicate glass and an acrylate resin binder. Upon the application of the aqueous binder, the leaching of sodium from the glass promoted

  11. Measuring Meaningful Learning in the Undergraduate General Chemistry and Organic Chemistry Laboratories: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galloway, Kelli R.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how students learn in the undergraduate chemistry teaching laboratory is an essential component to developing evidence-based laboratory curricula. The Meaningful Learning in the Laboratory Instrument (MLLI) was developed to measure students' cognitive and affective expectations and experiences for learning in the chemistry…

  12. Integration of Computational Chemistry into the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esselman, Brian J.; Hill, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in software and hardware have promoted the use of computational chemistry in all branches of chemical research to probe important chemical concepts and to support experimentation. Consequently, it has become imperative that students in the modern undergraduate curriculum become adept at performing simple calculations using computational…

  13. Profiles in chemistry: a historical perspective on the national organic symposium.

    PubMed

    Fenlon, Edward E; Myers, Brian J

    2013-06-21

    This perspective delineates the history of the National Organic Chemistry Symposium (NOS) and, in doing so, traces the development of organic chemistry over the past 88 years. The NOS is the premier event sponsored by the ACS Division of Organic Chemistry (ORGN) and has been held in odd-numbered years since 1925, with the exceptions of 1943 and 1945. During the 42 symposia, 332 chemists have given 549 plenary lectures. The role the NOS played in the launch of The Journal of Organic Chemistry and Organic Reactions and the initiation of the Roger Adams Award are discussed. Representative examples highlighting the chemistry presented in each era are described, and the evolution of the field is examined by assigning each NOS talk to one of seven subdisciplines and analyzing how the number of talks in each subdiscipline has changed over time. Comparisons of the demographics of speakers, attendees, and ORGN members are made, and superlatives are noted. Personal interest stories of the speakers are discussed, along with the relationships among them, especially their academic lineage. Logistical aspects of the NOS and their historical trends are reviewed. Finally, the human side of science is examined, where over the past century, the NOS has been intertwined with some of the most heated debates in organic chemistry. Conflicts and controversies involving free radicals, reaction mechanisms, and nonclassical carbocations are discussed.

  14. Motivational Beliefs and Learning Strategies in Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Douglas Jay; Trujillo, Hernando

    2011-01-01

    Students enter college chemistry courses with different sources of motivation, appropriate or inappropriate assumptions about their probability of success and how to study. This study is theoretically aligned with self-regulated learning research. Clearly, academic performance is closely related to student motivational beliefs and learning…

  15. Organic chemistry in circumstellar envelopes: Setting the stage for prebiotic synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziurys, Lucy M.

    2008-10-01

    One of the few carbon-rich environments found in interstellar space is the ejecta of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Such material, which forms a circumstellar envelope, becomes enriched in carbon due to “dredge-up” phenomena associated with nucleosynthesis. A unique organic synthesis flourishes in the gas phase in these envelopes, and radio and millimeter observations have identified a wide range of C-bearing compounds, including long acetylenic chains such as HC5N, HC7N, C4H, C6H, C8H, C6H-, C8H-, and C3O. Oxygen-rich envelopes also have a non-negligible carbon chemistry, fostering species such as HCN and HCO+. Phosphorus chemistry appears to be active as well in circumstellar shells, as evidenced by the recent detections of HCP, CCP, and PO. Radio observations also indicate that some fraction of the circumstellar molecular material survives into the planetary nebula stage, and then becomes incorporated into diffuse, and eventually, dense clouds. The complex organic molecules found in dense clouds such as Sgr B2(N) may be the products of “seed” material that can be traced back to the carbon-enriched circumstellar gas.

  16. Problem Types in Synthetic Organic Chemistry Research: Implications for the Development of Curricular Problems for Second-Year Level Organic Chemistry Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raker, Jeffrey R.; Towns, Marcy H.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding of the nature of science is key to the development of new curricular materials that mirror the practice of science. Three problem types (project level, synthetic planning, and day-to-day) in synthetic organic chemistry emerged during a thematic content analysis of the research experiences of eight practising synthetic organic…

  17. Computational organic chemistry: bridging theory and experiment in establishing the mechanisms of chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gui-Juan; Zhang, Xinhao; Chung, Lung Wa; Xu, Liping; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2015-02-11

    Understanding the mechanisms of chemical reactions, especially catalysis, has been an important and active area of computational organic chemistry, and close collaborations between experimentalists and theorists represent a growing trend. This Perspective provides examples of such productive collaborations. The understanding of various reaction mechanisms and the insight gained from these studies are emphasized. The applications of various experimental techniques in elucidation of reaction details as well as the development of various computational techniques to meet the demand of emerging synthetic methods, e.g., C-H activation, organocatalysis, and single electron transfer, are presented along with some conventional developments of mechanistic aspects. Examples of applications are selected to demonstrate the advantages and limitations of these techniques. Some challenges in the mechanistic studies and predictions of reactions are also analyzed.

  18. Development and analysis of educational technologies for a blended organic chemistry course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Michael James

    Blended courses incorporate elements of both face-to-face and online instruction. The extent to which blended courses are conducted online, and the proper role of the online components of blended courses, have been debated and may vary. What can be said in general, however, is that online tools for blended courses are typically culled together from a variety of sources, are often very large scale, and may present distractions for students that decrease their utility as teaching tools. Furthermore, large-scale educational technologies may not be amenable to rigorous, detailed study, limiting evaluation of their effectiveness. Small-scale educational technologies run from the instructor's own server have the potential to mitigate many of these issues. Such tools give the instructor or researcher direct access to all available data, facilitating detailed analysis of student use. Code modification is simple and rapid if errors arise, since code is stored where the instructor can easily access it. Finally, the design of a small-scale tool can target a very specific application. With these ideas in mind, this work describes several projects aimed at exploring the use of small-scale, web-based software in a blended organic chemistry course. A number of activities were developed and evaluated using the Student Assessment of Learning Gains survey, and data from the activities were analyzed using quantitative methods of statistics and social network analysis methods. Findings from this work suggest that small-scale educational technologies provide significant learning benefits for students of organic chemistry---with the important caveat that instructors must offer appropriate levels of technical and pedagogical support for students. Most notably, students reported significant learning gains from activities that included collaborative learning supported by novel online tools. For the particular context of organic chemistry, which has a unique semantic language (Lewis

  19. The Organic Chemistry of Volcanoes: Case Studies at Cerro Negro, Nicaragua and Oldoinyo Lengai, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teague, A. J.; Seward, T. M.; Gize, A. P.; Hall, T.

    2005-12-01

    Though it has long been known that volcanoes emit organic compounds within their fumarolic gases, it is only in recent years that a concerted attempt has been made to catalogue and quantify the species and fluxes. Two general lines of interest dominate this study. Firstly, volcanic gases represent some of the most likely environments in which the precursor molecules necessary for the origin of life were synthesised. The existence of an active, abiotic, organic chemistry in such settings today is fundamental to our understanding of the early Earth. Secondly, the presence of halogenated organic compounds is of interest to the atmospheric sciences, particularly with respect to their ozone depleting potential. It is clear that natural sources of halocarbons must exist, and though current natural fluxes are low with respect to the anthropogenic signature, volcanogenic halocarbons may have proved to be significant during the eruption of supervolcanoes and continental flood basalts. In this study, gases were collected from fumaroles in the craters of two, very different, active volcanoes. Cerro Negro, a young basaltic cinder cone belonging to the Central American Volcanic Belt, could be defined as a typical subduction zone volcano. Gases were collected from Cerro Negro during March 2003 and 2004 from a single fumarole discharging close to the crater floor. In contrast, Oldoinyo Lengai is the world's only active carbonatite volcano and represents the most extreme case of alkali volcanism in the East African Rift system. Fieldwork was conducted in the northern summit crater of Lengai over 8 days in October 2003. In this period, the volcano was in near continuous eruption and gases were sampled from two fumaroles situated within 20m of the eruptive centre, though measured gas temperatures were low at around 195°C. Organic compounds were collected using a variety of activated carbon, molecular sieve type adsorbents, packed into glass cartridges. The water and acid matrix of

  20. Integrating medicinal chemistry, organic/combinatorial chemistry, and computational chemistry for the discovery of selective estrogen receptor modulators with Forecaster, a novel platform for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Therrien, Eric; Englebienne, Pablo; Arrowsmith, Andrew G; Mendoza-Sanchez, Rodrigo; Corbeil, Christopher R; Weill, Nathanael; Campagna-Slater, Valérie; Moitessier, Nicolas

    2012-01-23

    As part of a large medicinal chemistry program, we wish to develop novel selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) as potential breast cancer treatments using a combination of experimental and computational approaches. However, one of the remaining difficulties nowadays is to fully integrate computational (i.e., virtual, theoretical) and medicinal (i.e., experimental, intuitive) chemistry to take advantage of the full potential of both. For this purpose, we have developed a Web-based platform, Forecaster, and a number of programs (e.g., Prepare, React, Select) with the aim of combining computational chemistry and medicinal chemistry expertise to facilitate drug discovery and development and more specifically to integrate synthesis into computer-aided drug design. In our quest for potent SERMs, this platform was used to build virtual combinatorial libraries, filter and extract a highly diverse library from the NCI database, and dock them to the estrogen receptor (ER), with all of these steps being fully automated by computational chemists for use by medicinal chemists. As a result, virtual screening of a diverse library seeded with active compounds followed by a search for analogs yielded an enrichment factor of 129, with 98% of the seeded active compounds recovered, while the screening of a designed virtual combinatorial library including known actives yielded an area under the receiver operating characteristic (AU-ROC) of 0.78. The lead optimization proved less successful, further demonstrating the challenge to simulate structure activity relationship studies.

  1. Effectiveness of Analogy Instructional Strategy on Undergraduate Student's Acquisition of Organic Chemistry Concepts in Mutah University, Jordan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samara, Nawaf Ahmad Hasan

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the effectiveness of analogy instructional strategy on undergraduate students' acquisition of organic chemistry concepts in Mutah University, Jordan. A quasi-experimental design was used in the study; Participants were 97 students who enrolled in organic chemistry course at the department of chemistry during the…

  2. "Molecules-in-Medicine": Peer-Evaluated Presentations in a Fast-Paced Organic Chemistry Course for Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadnikova, Ekaterina N.

    2013-01-01

    To accentuate the importance of organic chemistry in development of contemporary pharmaceuticals, a three-week unit entitled "Molecules-in-Medicine" was included in the curriculum of a comprehensive one-semester four-credit organic chemistry course. After a lecture on medicinal chemistry concepts and pharmaceutical practices, students…

  3. Synthesis and Metalation of a Ligand: An Interdisciplinary Laboratory Experiment for Second-Year Organic and Introductory Inorganic Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasting, Benjamin J.; Bowser, Andrew K.; Anderson-Wile, Amelia M.; Wile, Bradley M.

    2015-01-01

    An interdisciplinary laboratory experiment involving second-year undergraduate organic chemistry and introductory inorganic chemistry undergraduate students is described. Organic chemistry students prepare a series of amine-bis(phenols) via a Mannich reaction, and characterize their products using melting point; FTIR; and [superscript 1]H,…

  4. Indoor Chemistry: Materials, Ventilation Systems, and Occupant Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, G.C.; Corsi, R.L.; Destaillats, H.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Wells, J.R.

    2006-05-01

    Chemical processes taking place in indoor environments can significantly alter the nature and concentrations of pollutants. Exposure to secondary contaminants generated in these reactions needs to be evaluated in association with many aspects of buildings to minimize their impact on occupant health and well-being. Focusing on indoor ozone chemistry, we describe alternatives for improving indoor air quality by controlling chemical changes related to building materials, ventilation systems, and occupant activities.

  5. Water and complex organic chemistry in the cold dark cloud Barnard 5: Observations and Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirström, Eva; Charnley, Steven B.; Taquet, Vianney; Persson, Carina M.

    2015-08-01

    Studies of complex organic molecule (COM) formation have traditionally been focused on hot cores in regions of massive star formation, where chemistry is driven by the elevated temperatures - evaporating ices and allowing for endothermic reactions in the gas-phase. As more sensitive instruments have become available, the types of objects known to harbour COMs like acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), dimethyl ether (CH3OCH3), methyl formate (CH3OCHO), and ketene (CH2CO) have expanded to include low mass protostars and, recently, even pre-stellar cores. We here report on the first in a new category of objects harbouring COMs: the cold dark cloud Barnard 5 where non-thermal ice desorption induce complex organic chemistry entirely unrelated to local star-formation.Methanol, which only forms efficiently on the surfaces of dust grains, provide evidence of efficient non-thermal desorption of ices in the form of prominent emission peaks offset from protostellar activity and high density tracers in cold molecular clouds. A study with Herschel targeting such methanol emission peaks resulted in the first ever detection of gas-phase water offset from protostellar activity in a dark cloud, at the so called methanol hotspot in Barnard 5.To model the effect a transient injection of ices into the gas-phase has on the chemistry of a cold, dark cloud we have included gas-grain interactions in an existing gas-phase chemical model and connected it to a chemical reaction network updated and expanded to include the formation and destruction paths of the most common COMs. Results from this model will be presented.Ground-based follow-up studies toward the methanol hotspot in B5 have resulted in the detection of a number of COMs, including CH2CO, CH3CHO, CH3OCH3, and CH3OCHO, as well as deuterated methanol (CH2DOH). Observations have also confirmed that COM emission is extended and not localised to a core structure. The implications of these observational and theoretical studies of B5 will be discussed

  6. CODEX: Assessing the Historical Context of Chemistry and Organics on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, F. Scott; Whitaker, Tom; Levine, Jonathan

    2014-05-01

    The Chemistry, Organics and Dating EXperiment (CODEX) is a laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometer designed for use on Mars, which, by varying the type of ionization used, can operate as an elemental detector, an organics detector, and a radiometric dating instrument. CODEX uses three ionization modes: A) laser ablation mass spectrometry (LAMS) to measure chemistry and isotopes, B) two-step laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (L2MS) to measure organics, and C) laser desorption resonance ionization mass spectrometry (LDRIMS) to measure rubidium-strontium geochronology. Using these modes sequentially, CODEX interrogates hundreds of locations on the surface of a drill core, each of which are initially cleaned by laser ablation to remove surface contaminants. Using microscopic mapping, CODEX places elemental chemistry observations in spatial and temporal context with organic signatures revealing the complex historical context of chemistry and organics. The modes of CODEX have been demonstrated on three well-known samples: a) the Boulder Creek Granite (chemistry and dating), b) the carbonaceous chondrite Murchison (organics and chemistry), and c) the Martian meteorite Zagami (dating). The BCG measurements result in a high-sensitivity chemistry measurements, with isotope ratio precision exceeding ±0.35%; using dating mode, we derived an average age of 1727±62 Ma, as compared to a TIMS age of 1700±40 Ma. The measurements of the Murchison meteorite revealed hundreds of organic compounds consistent with an abiotic carbonaceous chondrite, and elemental abundances that match previous work. Finally, Zagami is a Martian meteorite with a Rb-Sr age of 166±6 Ma. Our measurements result in an age of 170±105 Ma, consistent with the previously published dates, and an accuracy exceeding NASA requirements (±200 Ma).

  7. Modeling SOAaq Formation: Explicit Organic Chemistry in Cloud Droplets with CMAQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlton, A. G.; Sareen, N.; Fahey, K.; Hutzell, W. T.

    2013-12-01

    Aqueous multiphase chemistry in the atmosphere has a substantial impact on climate and can lead to air quality changes that adversely impact human health and the environment. The chemistry is complex because of the variety of compounds present in the atmosphere and the phase transitions associated with multiphase reactions. These reactions can lead to the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOAAQ) in the atmosphere. When included, current photochemical models typically use a simple parameterization to describe SOAAQ formation. Here, we discuss the implementation of explicit aqueous SOA chemistry in a box model of the CMAQ 5.0.1 aqueous phase chemistry mechanism using the Kinetic PreProcessor (KPP). The expanded chemistry model includes reactions of glyoxal, methylglyoxal, and glycolaldehyde as precursors to form SOAAQ and is based on the mechanism from Lim et. al. 2010. The current aqueous phase chemistry module in CMAQ uses a forward Euler method to solve the system of oxidation equations, estimating the pH with a bisection method assuming electroneutrality, and multiphase processes are solved sequentially. This is not robust for systems with large dynamic range (e.g., multiphase systems), and inhibits expansion of the aqueous phase chemical mechanism to adequately incorporate the growing body of literature that describes multiphase organic chemistry. The KPP solver allows for all processes to be solved simultaneously and facilitates expansion of the current mechanism. Addition of explicit organic reactions and H2O2 photolysis in the KPP box model results in increased mass of organic aerosol and more realistic predictions. For particulate matter focused air quality management strategies to be effective, it is important that models move away from the yield-based approach currently used and expand to include more explicit organic chemistry.

  8. On the Applicability of the Green Chemistry Principles to Sustainability of Organic Matter on Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Vera M.

    2010-06-01

    The connection between astrobiology and green chemistry represents a new approach to sustainability of organic matter on asteroids or similar bodies. Green chemistry is chemistry which is environmentally friendly. One obvious way for chemistry to be green is to use water as a solvent, instead of more toxic organic solvents. Many astrobiological reactions occur in the aqueous medium, for example in the prebiotic soup or during the aqueous alteration period on asteroids. Thus any advances in the green organic reactions in water are directly applicable to astrobiology. Another green chemistry approach is to abolish use of toxic solvents. This can be accomplished by carrying out the reactions without a solvent in the solventless or solid-state reactions. The advances in these green reactions are directly applicable to the chemistry on asteroids during the periods when water was not available. Many reactions on asteroids may have been done in the solid mixtures. These reactions may be responsible for a myriad of organic compounds that have been isolated from the meteorites.

  9. Perception of the Relevance of Organic Chemistry in a German Pharmacy Students’ Course

    PubMed Central

    Wehle, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate German pharmacy students’ attitudes toward the relevance of organic chemistry training in Julius Maximilian University (JMU) of Würzburg with regard to subsequent courses in the curricula and in later prospective career options. Methods. Surveys were conducted in the second-year organic chemistry course (50 participants) as well as during the third-year and fourth-year lecture cycle on medicinal and pharmaceutical chemistry (66 participants) in 2014. Results. Students’ attitudes were surprisingly consistent throughout the progress of the degree course. Students considered organic chemistry very relevant to the pharmacy study program (95% junior and 97% senior students), and of importance for their future pharmacy program (88% junior and 94% senior students). With regard to prospective career options, the perceived relevance was considerably lower and attitudes were less homogenous. Conclusions. German pharmacy students at JMU Würzburg consider organic chemistry of high relevance for medicinal chemistry and other courses in JMU’s pharmacy program. PMID:27170811

  10. Combination of organotrifluoroborates with photoredox catalysis marking a new phase in organic radical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Koike, Takashi; Akita, Munetaka

    2016-08-01

    Combination of organotrifluoroborates and visible-light-driven photoredox catalysis, both of which have attracted the attention of synthetic chemists, marks a new phase in the field of organic radical chemistry. We have developed photoredox-catalyzed radical reactions with organotrifluoroborates, which turn out to serve not only as a source of organic radicals but also as radical acceptors. The first part of this Perspective deals with the generation of organic radicals from organotrifluoroborates, and the latter part describes addition of the CF3 radical to alkenyltrifluoroborates. The good chemistry between organoborates and photoredox catalysis and its future will be discussed.

  11. Implementing POGIL in the Lecture and the Science Writing Heuristic in the Laboratory--Student Perceptions and Performance in Undergraduate Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder, Jacob D.; Greenbowe, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the possible connection between effective laboratory activities and student performance on lecture exams. In a traditional undergraduate organic chemistry course for non-science majors, students could predict the products of organic reactions, but struggled to provide reaction mechanisms for those same reactions, despite…

  12. Nomenclature101.com: A Free, Student-Driven Organic Chemistry Nomenclature Learning Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Alison B.; Caron, Jeanette; Laroche, Jamey; Daviau-Duguay, Melissa; Marcoux, Caroline; Richard, Gise`le

    2014-01-01

    Fundamental to a student's understanding of organic chemistry is the ability to interpret and use its language, including molecules' names and other key terms. A learning gap exists in that students often struggle with organic nomenclature. Although many resources describe the rules for naming molecules, there is a paucity of resources…

  13. A Cost-Effective Two-Part Experiment for Teaching Introductory Organic Chemistry Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadek, Christopher M.; Brown, Brenna A.; Wan, Hayley

    2011-01-01

    This two-part laboratory experiment is designed to be a cost-effective method for teaching basic organic laboratory techniques (recrystallization, thin-layer chromatography, column chromatography, vacuum filtration, and melting point determination) to large classes of introductory organic chemistry students. Students are exposed to different…

  14. A One-Pot, Asymmetric Robinson Annulation in the Organic Chemistry Majors Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarski, Kiel E.; Rich, Alan A.; Mascarenhas, Cheryl M.

    2008-01-01

    The Robinson annulation is a topic of importance in the second-year organic curriculum. A one-pot, enantioselective Robinson annulation is described. The experiment is completed in two lab periods and is geared towards the second-year organic chemistry major. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a one-pot enantioselective Robinson…

  15. Chemkarta: A Card Game for Teaching Functional Groups in Undergraduate Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knudtson, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Students in undergraduate organic chemistry courses are frequently overwhelmed by the volume and complexity of information they are expected to learn. To aid in students' learning of organic functional groups, a novel card game "ChemKarta" is reported that can serve as a useful alternative to flashcards. This pedagogy is a simple…

  16. An Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory: The Facile Hydrogenation of Methyl Trans-Cinnamate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Kenneth J.; Zuspan, Kimberly; Berry, Lonnie

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogenation of alkenes is an important reaction in the synthesis of organic molecules. In this experiment, students conduct a high-yield microscale hydrogenation reaction of methyl "trans"-cinnamate using a readily available, safe, and convenient hydrogen source. The conditions are similar to those seen in an organic chemistry textbook for an…

  17. Student Perceptions of the Benefits of a Learner-Based Writing Assignment in Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ablin, Lois

    2008-01-01

    A writing assignment to increase student understanding of and interest in practical applications of organic chemistry is described. Students were required to study a pharmaceutical or other organic compound and perform a qualitative risk assessment on the chemical. Student perceptions of the benefits of the paper were generally positive. (Contains…

  18. A Mass Spectral Chlorine Rule for Use in Structure Determinations in Sophomore Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Ray A., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The low-resolution mass spectrum of integral masses is used to determine the number of bromine and chlorine atoms in an organic compound. The chlorine rule is a tool suitable for use in structural determinations in first year organic chemistry and it is supported by the ability of sophomore-level students to successfully determine n and m from the…

  19. 28 CFR 551.34 - Organization activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Organization activities. 551.34 Section... MISCELLANEOUS Inmate Organizations § 551.34 Organization activities. (a) An officer of the inmate organization... organization; (2) Nature or purpose of the activity; (3) Date, time, and estimated duration of the activity;...

  20. 28 CFR 551.34 - Organization activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Organization activities. 551.34 Section... MISCELLANEOUS Inmate Organizations § 551.34 Organization activities. (a) An officer of the inmate organization... organization; (2) Nature or purpose of the activity; (3) Date, time, and estimated duration of the activity;...

  1. 28 CFR 551.34 - Organization activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Organization activities. 551.34 Section... MISCELLANEOUS Inmate Organizations § 551.34 Organization activities. (a) An officer of the inmate organization... organization; (2) Nature or purpose of the activity; (3) Date, time, and estimated duration of the activity;...

  2. 28 CFR 551.34 - Organization activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Organization activities. 551.34 Section... MISCELLANEOUS Inmate Organizations § 551.34 Organization activities. (a) An officer of the inmate organization... organization; (2) Nature or purpose of the activity; (3) Date, time, and estimated duration of the activity;...

  3. 28 CFR 551.34 - Organization activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Organization activities. 551.34 Section... MISCELLANEOUS Inmate Organizations § 551.34 Organization activities. (a) An officer of the inmate organization... organization; (2) Nature or purpose of the activity; (3) Date, time, and estimated duration of the activity;...

  4. Minimal impact of organic chemistry prerequisite on student performance in introductory biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Wright, Robin; Cotner, Sehoya; Winkel, Amy

    2009-01-01

    Curriculum design assumes that successful completion of prerequisite courses will have a positive impact on student performance in courses that require the prerequisite. We recently had the opportunity to test this assumption concerning the relationship between completion of the organic chemistry prerequisite and performance in introductory biochemistry. We found no statistically significant differences between average biochemistry grades or grade distribution among students with or without the organic chemistry prerequisite. However, students who had not completed the organic chemistry prerequisite before biochemistry were more likely to withdraw from the course than those who had completed the prerequisite. In contrast to the lack of correlation between performance in biochemistry and completion of organic chemistry, we observed a strong, highly significant positive relationship between cumulative GPA and the biochemistry grade. Our data suggest that excluding students without organic chemistry would have less positive impact on student success in biochemistry than would providing additional support for all students who enroll in biochemistry with a cumulative GPA below 2.5.

  5. Minimal Impact of Organic Chemistry Prerequisite on Student Performance in Introductory Biochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Cotner, Sehoya; Winkel, Amy

    2009-01-01

    Curriculum design assumes that successful completion of prerequisite courses will have a positive impact on student performance in courses that require the prerequisite. We recently had the opportunity to test this assumption concerning the relationship between completion of the organic chemistry prerequisite and performance in introductory biochemistry. We found no statistically significant differences between average biochemistry grades or grade distribution among students with or without the organic chemistry prerequisite. However, students who had not completed the organic chemistry prerequisite before biochemistry were more likely to withdraw from the course than those who had completed the prerequisite. In contrast to the lack of correlation between performance in biochemistry and completion of organic chemistry, we observed a strong, highly significant positive relationship between cumulative GPA and the biochemistry grade. Our data suggest that excluding students without organic chemistry would have less positive impact on student success in biochemistry than would providing additional support for all students who enroll in biochemistry with a cumulative GPA below 2.5. PMID:19255135

  6. Do Long-Term Changes in Organic Matter Inputs to Forest Soils Affect Dissolved Organic Matter Chemistry and Export?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajtha, K.; Strid, A.; Lee, B. S.

    2014-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) production and transport play an important role in regulating organic matter (OM) distribution through a soil profile and ultimately, OM stabilization or export to aquatic systems. The contributions of varying OM inputs to the quality and amount of DOM as it passes through a soil profile remain relatively unknown. The Detrital Input and Removal Treatment (DIRT) site at the H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest in Oregon has undergone 17 years of litter, wood and root input manipulations and allows us to guage shifts in DOM chemistry induced by long-term changes to aboveground and belowground OM additions and exclusions. Using fluorescence and UV spectroscopy to characterize fluorescent properties, extent of decomposition, and sources of DOM in streams and soil solutions collected with lysimeters and soil extractions, we have assessed the importance of fresh OM inputs to DOM chemistry. Soil extracts from DIRT plots had a higher fluorescence index (FI) than lysimeter solutions or stream water. A high FI in surface water is generally interpreted as indicative of a high proportion of microbially-derived DOM. However, we suspect that the high FI in soil extracts is due to a higher proportion of non-aromatic DOM from fresh soil that microorganisms consume in transit through the soil profile to lysimeters or to streams. High redox index (RI) values were observed in lysimeters from the April 2014 sampling compared with the November 2013 sampling. These RI values show evidence of more reducing conditions at the end of the rainy season in the spring compared to the onset of the rainy season in the fall. Lysimeter water collected in No Input, No Litter, and No Root treatments contained high proportions of protein, suggesting the absence of carbon inputs changes activities of the microbial community. Observed variations reflect the viability of using fluorescent properties to explore the terrestrial-aquatic interface.

  7. Organic peroxide and OH formation in aerosol and cloud water: laboratory evidence for this aqueous chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Y. B.; Turpin, B. J.

    2015-06-01

    Aqueous chemistry in atmospheric waters (e.g., cloud droplets or wet aerosols) is well accepted as an atmospheric pathway to produce secondary organic aerosol (SOAaq). Water-soluble organic compounds with small carbon numbers (C2-C3) are precursors for SOAaq and products include organic acids, organic sulfates, and high molecular weight compounds/oligomers. Fenton reactions and the uptake of gas-phase OH radicals are considered to be the major oxidant sources for aqueous organic chemistry. However, the sources and availability of oxidants in atmospheric waters are not well understood. The degree to which OH is produced in the aqueous phase affects the balance of radical and non-radical aqueous chemistry, the properties of the resulting aerosol, and likely its atmospheric behavior. This paper demonstrates organic peroxide formation during aqueous photooxidation of methylglyoxal using ultra high resolution Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). Organic peroxides are known to form through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds. They contribute secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation directly by forming peroxyhemiacetals, and epoxides, and indirectly by enhancing gas-phase oxidation through OH recycling. We provide simulation results of organic peroxide/peroxyhemiacetal formation in clouds and wet aerosols and discuss organic peroxides as a source of condensed-phase OH radicals and as a contributor to aqueous SOA.

  8. Size distribution dynamics reveal particle-phase chemistry in organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraiwa, M.; Yee, L. D.; Schilling, K.; Loza, C. L.; Craven, J. S.; Zuend, A.; Ziemann, P. J.; Seinfeld, J.

    2013-12-01

    Organic aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and play a central role in climate, air quality and public health. The aerosol size distribution is key in determining its optical properties and cloud condensation nucleus activity. The dominant portion of organic aerosol is formed through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, so-called secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Typical experimental measurements of SOA formation include total SOA mass and atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratio. These measurements, alone, are generally insufficient to reveal the extent to which condensed-phase reactions occur in conjunction with the multi-generation gas-phase photooxidation. Combining laboratory chamber experiments and kinetic gas-particle modeling for the dodecane SOA system, here we show that the presence of particle-phase chemistry is reflected in the evolution of the SOA size distribution as well as its mass concentration. Particle-phase reactions are predicted to occur mainly at the particle surface and the reaction products contribute more than half of the SOA mass. Chamber photooxidation with a mid-experiment aldehyde injection confirms that heterogeneous reaction of aldehydes with organic hydroperoxides forming peroxyhemiacetals can lead to a large increase in SOA mass. The results of the current work have a number of implications for SOA models. While the dynamics of an aerosol size distribution reflects the mechanism of growth, we demonstrate here that it provides a key constraint in interpreting laboratory and ambient SOA formation. This work, although carried out specifically for the long chain alkane, dodecane, is expected to be widely applicable to other major classes of SOA precursors. SOA consists of a myriad of organic compounds containing various functional groups, which can generally undergo heterogeneous/multiphase reactions forming low-volatility products such as oligomers and other high molecular mass compounds. If particle-phase chemistry is indeed

  9. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium. Volume 4, Organic methods

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This interim notice covers the following: extractable organic halides in solids, total organic halides, analysis by gas chromatography/Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, hexadecane extracts for volatile organic compounds, GC/MS analysis of VOCs, GC/MS analysis of methanol extracts of cryogenic vapor samples, screening of semivolatile organic extracts, GPC cleanup for semivolatiles, sample preparation for GC/MS for semi-VOCs, analysis for pesticides/PCBs by GC with electron capture detection, sample preparation for pesticides/PCBs in water and soil sediment, report preparation, Florisil column cleanup for pesticide/PCBs, silica gel and acid-base partition cleanup of samples for semi-VOCs, concentrate acid wash cleanup, carbon determination in solids using Coulometrics` CO{sub 2} coulometer, determination of total carbon/total organic carbon/total inorganic carbon in radioactive liquids/soils/sludges by hot persulfate method, analysis of solids for carbonates using Coulometrics` Model 5011 coulometer, and soxhlet extraction.

  10. Active-Inductive-Cooperative Learning: An Instructional Model for Chemistry?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felder, Richard M.

    1996-09-01

    Five chemical engineering courses were taught to a cohort of students in consecutive semesters using an instructional model based on active, inductive, and cooperative learning and other methods designed to address a broad spectrum of learning styles. The results suggest that the approach enhances understanding and promotes the development of a variety of interpersonal and thinking skills, and that while it may initially provoke resistance from some students, the resistance can be overcome if the methods are implemented with care. With suitable modifications for content differences, the model may be equally effective for chemistry instruction.

  11. A Research Module for the Organic Chemistry Laboratory: Multistep Synthesis of a Fluorous Dye Molecule.

    PubMed

    Slade, Michael C; Raker, Jeffrey R; Kobilka, Brandon; Pohl, Nicola L B

    2014-01-14

    A multi-session research-like module has been developed for use in the undergraduate organic teaching laboratory curriculum. Students are tasked with planning and executing the synthesis of a novel fluorous dye molecule and using it to explore a fluorous affinity chromatography separation technique, which is the first implementation of this technique in a teaching laboratory. Key elements of the project include gradually introducing students to the use of the chemical literature to facilitate their searching, as well as deliberate constraints designed to force them to think critically about reaction design and optimization in organic chemistry. The project also introduces students to some advanced laboratory practices such as Schlenk techniques, degassing of reaction mixtures, affinity chromatography, and microwave-assisted chemistry. This provides students a teaching laboratory experience that closely mirrors authentic synthetic organic chemistry practice in laboratories throughout the world.

  12. A Research Module for the Organic Chemistry Laboratory: Multistep Synthesis of a Fluorous Dye Molecule

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A multi-session research-like module has been developed for use in the undergraduate organic teaching laboratory curriculum. Students are tasked with planning and executing the synthesis of a novel fluorous dye molecule and using it to explore a fluorous affinity chromatography separation technique, which is the first implementation of this technique in a teaching laboratory. Key elements of the project include gradually introducing students to the use of the chemical literature to facilitate their searching, as well as deliberate constraints designed to force them to think critically about reaction design and optimization in organic chemistry. The project also introduces students to some advanced laboratory practices such as Schlenk techniques, degassing of reaction mixtures, affinity chromatography, and microwave-assisted chemistry. This provides students a teaching laboratory experience that closely mirrors authentic synthetic organic chemistry practice in laboratories throughout the world. PMID:24501431

  13. Design, Development, and Psychometric Analysis of a General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry Topic Inventory Based on the Identified Main Chemistry Topics Relevant to Nursing Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Corina E.

    2013-01-01

    This two-stage study focused on the undergraduate nursing course that covers topics in general, organic, and biological (GOB) chemistry. In the first stage, the central objective was to identify the main concepts of GOB chemistry relevant to the clinical practice of nursing. The collection of data was based on open-ended interviews of both nursing…

  14. Interstellar chemistry recorded in organic matter from primitive meteorites.

    PubMed

    Busemann, Henner; Young, Andrea F; Alexander, Conel M O'd; Hoppe, Peter; Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy; Nittler, Larry R

    2006-05-01

    Organic matter in extraterrestrial materials has isotopic anomalies in hydrogen and nitrogen that suggest an origin in the presolar molecular cloud or perhaps in the protoplanetary disk. Interplanetary dust particles are generally regarded as the most primitive solar system matter available, in part because until recently they exhibited the most extreme isotope anomalies. However, we show that hydrogen and nitrogen isotopic compositions in carbonaceous chondrite organic matter reach and even exceed those found in interplanetary dust particles. Hence, both meteorites (originating from the asteroid belt) and interplanetary dust particles (possibly from comets) preserve primitive organics that were a component of the original building blocks of the solar system. PMID:16675696

  15. An Experimental Introduction to Organic Chemistry by Way of Ethene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Hans-Jurgen

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the importance of ethene (ethylene) in industry and the pipeline grid in western Europe for transporting ethene. Describes methods for investigating organic compounds in school laboratories using ethene as the key compound. (JR)

  16. On-demand droplet loading for automated organic chemistry on digital microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Shah, Gaurav J; Ding, Huijiang; Sadeghi, Saman; Chen, Supin; Kim, Chang-Jin C J; van Dam, R Michael

    2013-07-21

    Organic chemistry applications on digital microfluidic devices often involve reagents that are volatile or sensitive and must be introduced to the chip immediately before use. We present a new technique for automated, on-demand loading of ~1 μL droplets from large (~1 mL), sealed, off-chip reservoirs to a digital microfluidic chip in order to address this challenge. Unlike aqueous liquids which generally are non-wetting to the hydrophobic surface and must be actively drawn into the electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) chip by electrode activation, organic liquids tend to be wetting and can spontaneously flood the chip, and hence require a retracting force for controlled liquid delivery. Using a combination of compressed inert gas and gravity to exert driving and retracting forces on the liquid, the simple loading technique enables precise loading of droplets of both wetting and non-wetting liquids in a reliable manner. A key feature from a practical point of view is that all of the wetted parts are inexpensive and potentially disposable, thus avoiding cross-contamination in chemical and biochemical applications. We provide a theoretical treatment of the underlying physics, discuss the effect of geometry and liquid properties on its performance, and show repeatable reagent loading using the technique. Its versatility is demonstrated with the loading of several aqueous and non-aqueous liquids on an EWOD digital microfluidic device.

  17. Phylogenetic organization of bacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, Ember M; Mau, Rebecca L; Schwartz, Egbert; Caporaso, J Gregory; Dijkstra, Paul; van Gestel, Natasja; Koch, Benjamin J; Liu, Cindy M; Hayer, Michaela; McHugh, Theresa A; Marks, Jane C; Price, Lance B; Hungate, Bruce A

    2016-09-01

    Phylogeny is an ecologically meaningful way to classify plants and animals, as closely related taxa frequently have similar ecological characteristics, functional traits and effects on ecosystem processes. For bacteria, however, phylogeny has been argued to be an unreliable indicator of an organism's ecology owing to evolutionary processes more common to microbes such as gene loss and lateral gene transfer, as well as convergent evolution. Here we use advanced stable isotope probing with (13)C and (18)O to show that evolutionary history has ecological significance for in situ bacterial activity. Phylogenetic organization in the activity of bacteria sets the stage for characterizing the functional attributes of bacterial taxonomic groups. Connecting identity with function in this way will allow scientists to begin building a mechanistic understanding of how bacterial community composition regulates critical ecosystem functions.

  18. Phylogenetic organization of bacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Morrissey, Ember M; Mau, Rebecca L; Schwartz, Egbert; Caporaso, J Gregory; Dijkstra, Paul; van Gestel, Natasja; Koch, Benjamin J; Liu, Cindy M; Hayer, Michaela; McHugh, Theresa A; Marks, Jane C; Price, Lance B; Hungate, Bruce A

    2016-01-01

    Phylogeny is an ecologically meaningful way to classify plants and animals, as closely related taxa frequently have similar ecological characteristics, functional traits and effects on ecosystem processes. For bacteria, however, phylogeny has been argued to be an unreliable indicator of an organism's ecology owing to evolutionary processes more common to microbes such as gene loss and lateral gene transfer, as well as convergent evolution. Here we use advanced stable isotope probing with 13C and 18O to show that evolutionary history has ecological significance for in situ bacterial activity. Phylogenetic organization in the activity of bacteria sets the stage for characterizing the functional attributes of bacterial taxonomic groups. Connecting identity with function in this way will allow scientists to begin building a mechanistic understanding of how bacterial community composition regulates critical ecosystem functions. PMID:26943624

  19. Application of the organic on water reactions to prebiotic chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Vera M.

    2012-10-01

    The old view that prebiotic reactions in water are hampered by the low solubility of the organic compounds in water is now being revised due to the discoveries of the reactions "on water". These reactions occur in the heterogeneous system comprising of the organic compounds and water. Unexpectedly, such reactions are extremely efficient; they often give quantitative yields, and are accelerated in the presence of water as compared to the organic solvents. These "on water" reactions are not the same as the "in water" reactions, which occur in solution, and are thus homogenous. Examples of the "on water" reactions include Diels-Alder, Claisen, Passerini and Ugi reactions, among many others. Some of these reactions are multicomponent, but give a single product. We survey a selected number of the "on water" reactions, which have a potential prebiotic applications.

  20. Synthesis of Organic Matter of Prebiotic Chemistry at the Protoplanetary Disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snytnikov, Valeriy; Stoynovskaya, Olga; Rudina, Nina

    We have carried out scanning electron microscopic examination of CM carbonaceous chondrites meteorites Migey, Murchison, Staroe Boriskino aged more than 4.56 billion years (about 50 million years from the beginning of the formation of the Solar system). Our study confirmed the conclusion of Rozanov, Hoover and other researchers about the presence of microfossils of bacterial origin in the matrix of all these meteorites. Since the time of the Solar system formation is 60 - 100 million years, the primary biocenosis emerged in the protoplanetary disc of the Solar system before meteorites or simultaneously with them. It means that prebiological processes and RNA world appeared even earlier in the circumsolar protoplanetary disc. Most likely, this appearance of prebiotic chemistry takes place nowday in massive and medium-massive discs of the observed young stellar objects (YSO) class 0 and I. The timescale of the transition from chemical to biological evolution took less than 50 million years for the Solar system. Further evolution of individual biocenosis in a protoplanetary disc associated with varying physico-chemical conditions during the formation of the Solar system bodies. Biocenosis on these bodies could remove or develop under the influence of many cosmic factors and geological processes in the case of Earth. To complete the primary biosphere formation in short evolution time - millions of years - requires highly efficient chemical syntheses. In industrial chemistry for the efficient synthesis of ammonia, hydrogen cyanide, methanol and other organic species, that are the precursors to obtain prebiotic compounds, catalytic reactors of high pressure are used. Thus (1) necessary amount of the proper catalyst in (2) high pressure areas of the disc can trigger these intense syntheses. The disc contains the solids with the size from nanoparticle to pebble. Iron and magnesium is catalytically active ingredient for such solids. The puzzle is a way to provide hydrogen

  1. Emergence of complex chemistry on an organic monolayer.

    PubMed

    Prins, Leonard J

    2015-07-21

    In many origin-of-life scenarios, inorganic materials, such as FeS or mineral clays, play an important role owing to their ability to concentrate and select small organic molecules on their surface and facilitate their chemical transformations into new molecules. However, considering that life is made up of organic matter, at a certain stage during the evolution the role of the inorganic material must have been taken over by organic molecules. How this exactly happened is unclear, and, indeed, a big gap separates the rudimentary level of organization involving inorganic materials and the complex organization of cells, which are the building blocks of life. Over the past years, we have extensively studied the interaction of small molecules with monolayer-protected gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) for the purpose of developing innovative sensing and catalytic systems. During the course of these studies, we realized that the functional role of this system is very similar to that typically attributed to inorganic surfaces in the early stages of life, with the important being difference that the functional properties (molecular recognition, catalysis, signaling, adaptation) originate entirely from the organic monolayer rather than the inorganic support. This led us to the proposition that this system may serve as a model that illustrates how the important role of inorganic surfaces in dictating chemical processes in the early stages of life may have been taken over by organic matter. Here, we reframe our previously obtained results in the context of the origin-of-life question. The following functional roles of Au NPs will be discussed: the ability to concentrate small molecules and create different local populations, the ability to catalyze the chemical transformation of bound molecules, and, finally, the ability to install rudimentary signaling pathways and display primitive adaptive behavior. In particular, we will show that many of the functional properties of the system

  2. Organic nitrogen chemistry during low-grade metamorphism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boudou, J.-P.; Schimmelmann, A.; Ader, M.; Mastalerz, Maria; Sebilo, M.; Gengembre, L.

    2008-01-01

    Most of the organic nitrogen (Norg) on Earth is disseminated in crustal sediments and rocks in the form of fossil nitrogen-containing organic matter. The chemical speciation of fossil Norg within the overall molecular structure of organic matter changes with time and heating during burial. Progressive thermal evolution of organic matter involves phases of enhanced elimination of Norg and ultimately produces graphite containing only traces of nitrogen. Long-term chemical and thermal instability makes the chemical speciation of Norg a valuable tracer to constrain the history of sub-surface metamorphism and to shed light on the subsurface biogeochemical nitrogen cycle and its participating organic and inorganic nitrogen pools. This study documents the evolutionary path of Norg speciation, transformation and elimination before and during metamorphism and advocates the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to monitor changes in Norg speciation as a diagnostic tool for organic metamorphism. Our multidisciplinary evidence from XPS, stable isotopes, traditional quantitative coal analyses, and other analytical approaches shows that at the metamorphic onset Norg is dominantly present as pyrrolic and pyridinic nitrogen. The relative abundance of nitrogen substituting for carbon in condensed, partially aromatic systems (where N is covalently bonded to three C atoms) increases exponentially with increasing metamorphic grade, at the expense of pyridinic and pyrrolic nitrogen. At the same time, much Norg is eliminated without significant nitrogen isotope fractionation. The apparent absence of Rayleigh-type nitrogen isotopic fractionation suggests that direct thermal loss of nitrogen from an organic matrix does not serve as a major pathway for Norg elimination. Instead, we propose that hot H, O-containing fluids or some of their components gradually penetrate into the carbonaceous matrix and eliminate Norg along a progressing reaction front, without causing nitrogen

  3. Connecting scientific research and classroom instruction: Developing authentic problem sets for the undergraduate organic chemistry curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raker, Jeffrey R.

    Reform efforts in science education have called for instructional methods and resources that mirror the practice of science. Little research and design methods have been documented in the literature for designing such materials. The purpose of this study was to develop problems sets for sophomore-level organic chemistry instruction. This research adapted an instructional design methodology from the science education literature for the creation of new curricular problem sets. The first phase of this study was to establish an understanding of current curricular problems in sophomore-level organic chemistry instruction. A sample of 792 problems was collected from four organic chemistry courses. These problems were assessed using three literature reported problem typologies. Two of these problem typologies have previously been used to understand general chemistry problems; comparisons between general and organic chemistry problems were thus made. Data from this phase was used to develop a set of five problems for practicing organic chemists. The second phase of this study was to explore practicing organic chemists' experiences solving problems in the context of organic synthesis research. Eight practicing organic chemists were interviewed and asked to solve two to three of the problems developed in phase one of this research. These participants spoke of three problem types: project level, synthetic planning, and day-to-day. Three knowledge types (internal knowledge, knowledgeable others, and literature) were used in solving these problems in research practice and in the developed problems. A set of guiding factors and implications were derived from this data and the chemistry education literature for the conversion of the problems for practicing chemists to problems for undergraduate students. A subsequent conversion process for the five problems occurred. The third, and last phase, of this study was to explore undergraduate students' experiences solving problems in

  4. Geochemistry and Organic Chemistry on the Surface of Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, J. I.; Beauchamp, P.; Beauchamp, J.; Dougherty, D.; Welch, C.; Raulin, F.; Shapiro, R.; Smith, M.

    2001-01-01

    Titan's atmosphere produces a wealth of organic products from methane and nitrogen. These products, deposited on the surface in liquid and solid form, may interact with surface ices and energy sources to produce compounds of exobiological interest. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  5. Culturing Reality: How Organic Chemistry Graduate Students Develop into Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharyya, Gautam; Bodner, George M.

    2014-01-01

    Although one of the presumed aims of graduate training programs is to help students develop into practitioners of their chosen fields, very little is known about how this transition occurs. In the course of studying how graduate students learn to solve organic synthesis problems, we were able to identify some of the key factors in the epistemic…

  6. An Enzyme Kinetics Experiment for the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Robert J.; Olsen, Julie A.; Giles, Greta A.

    2010-01-01

    An experiment using [superscript 1]H NMR spectroscopy to observe the kinetics of the acylase 1-catalyzed hydrolysis of "N"-acetyl-DL-methionine has been developed for the organic laboratory. The L-enantiomer of the reactant is hydrolyzed completely in less than 2 h, and [superscript 1]H NMR spectroscopic data from a single sample can be worked up…

  7. Effect of photosensitized chemistry on organic aerosol evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouvière, A.; Decarlo, P. F.; Bartels-Rausch, T.; Ammann, M.

    2009-12-01

    Photochemistry in aerosol particles is an emerging new field of atmospheric science. Up to now, photochemical processes in the condensed phase of atmospheric aerosol particles are not well understood. Primary and secondary compounds in the gas and aerosol phase continuously interact and change phase during their or their descendants life time in the atmosphere. Partially oxised aromatic compounds such as aromatic ketones may act as photosensitizer to promote charge and energy transfer to other organic compounds under conditions, where direct photolysis processes of the latter are not possible. The resulting radicals undergo numerous secondary chemical reactions, some of which may lead to polymerization. In this study we show that the presence of a photosensitizer in the aerosol phase leads to significant processing of simple organic compounds such as small organic acids due to exposure to simulated sunlight. The aerosol flow tube experiments were performed in a photoreactor, which was coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer and a scanning mobility particle sizer. For some experiments an aerosol mass spectrometer was also used. We used ammonium sulfate and organic acids as matrix and Benzoyl Benzoic Acid (BBA) as sensitizer. BBA is a well known photosensitizer absorbing in the UV. The results will be shown and discussed.

  8. Real World of Industrial Chemistry: Organic Chemicals from Carbon Monoxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Kenneth E.; Kolb, Doris

    1983-01-01

    Carbon Monoxide obtained from coal may serve as the source for a wide variety of organic compounds. Several of these compounds are discussed, including phosgene, benzaldehyde, methanol, formic acid and its derivatives, oxo aldehydes, acrylic acids, and others. Commercial reactions of carbon monoxide are highlighted in a table. (JN)

  9. Shock-induced chemistry in simple organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dattelbaum, Dana

    2011-06-01

    Interrogating chemical reactions behind a shock front is immensely difficult, and as a result, the details of shock-induced chemistry remain poorly understood. Shock compression creates transient distorted structures from which molecular reactions initiate. Previous works have reported that dimerizations, polymerizations, ring-opening and decomposition reactions occur under shock compression, depending on molecular structure. Certainly for explosives, exothermic decomposition reactions ultimately drive self-supported detonation. Questions regarding the thresholds for incipient reaction for different chemical functional groups, the nature of first and subsequent reaction steps, and the influence of shock input conditions on reaction kinetics remain to be answered. Evidence of reaction can be discerned from discontinuities in the mechanical variables for reactions with a change in density along the reaction coordinate, similar to first-order phase transformations. Here, we have applied in-situ electromagnetic gauging at multiple Lagrangian positions to elucidate the evolution of multiple-wave structures associated with shock-induced reactions. We have applied in-situ gauging, in concert with reactive molecular dynamic simulations, to investigate shock-reactivity of several simple functional groups: carbon-carbon double (-C=C-) and triple bonds, and nitriles (e.g. phenylacetylene and acrylonitrile), and aromatic ring structures (benzene), all building blocks for explosives. From measurements of the reactive flow, we have obtained detailed information about the temporal evolution of the waves, and global kinetics associated with transformation(s) between partially- and fully-reacted states. Near the reactive threshold, evolution in particle velocities point to reaction timescales on the order of several hundred nanoseconds. We have defined the reactive cusp Hugoniot states, and established the relative order of group reactivity under single shock conditions. These

  10. Supramolecular chemistry: from molecular information towards self-organization and complex matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2004-03-01

    Molecular chemistry has developed a wide range of very powerful procedures for constructing ever more sophisticated molecules from atoms linked by covalent bonds. Beyond molecular chemistry lies supramolecular chemistry, which aims at developing highly complex chemical systems from components interacting via non-covalent intermolecular forces. By the appropriate manipulation of these interactions, supramolecular chemistry became progressively the chemistry of molecular information, involving the storage of information at the molecular level, in the structural features, and its retrieval, transfer, and processing at the supramolecular level, through molecular recognition processes operating via specific interactional algorithms. This has paved the way towards apprehending chemistry also as an information science. Numerous receptors capable of recognizing, i.e. selectively binding, specific substrates have been developed, based on the molecular information stored in the interacting species. Suitably functionalized receptors may perform supramolecular catalysis and selective transport processes. In combination with polymolecular organization, recognition opens ways towards the design of molecular and supramolecular devices based on functional (photoactive, electroactive, ionoactive, etc) components. A step beyond preorganization consists in the design of systems undergoing self-organization, i.e. systems capable of spontaneously generating well-defined supramolecular architectures by self-assembly from their components. Self-organization processes, directed by the molecular information stored in the components and read out at the supramolecular level through specific interactions, represent the operation of programmed chemical systems. They have been implemented for the generation of a variety of discrete functional architectures of either organic or inorganic nature. Self-organization processes also give access to advanced supramolecular materials, such as

  11. Organic Chemistry: From the Interstellar Medium to the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    This talk will review the various types of organic materials observed in different environments in the interstellar medium, discuss the processes by which these materials may have formed and been modified, and present the evidence supporting the contention that at least a fraction of this material survived incorporation, substantially unaltered, into our Solar System during its formation. The nature of this organic material is of direct interest to issues associated with the origin of life, both because this material represents a large fraction of the Solar System inventory of the biogenically-important elements, and because many of the compounds in this inventory have biogenic implications. Several specific examples of such molecules will be briefly discussed.

  12. Modelling of The Atmospheric Chemistry of Organic Nitrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winsland, N.

    Organic nitrates are linked to the formation of tropospheric ozone and the cycling and transport of nitrogen-containing species in the atmosphere. Few laboratory stud- ies have been carried out on the reactions of organic nitrates. Photolysis quantum yield studies and UV absorption spectra have been carried out for the simple alkyl nitrates and PAN. Studies of PAN and ethyl nitrate with other atmospheric components (the hydroxyl radical - OH - and the chlorine atom - Cl) have been carried out to mea- sure their rates of reaction. However, the products and mechanisms of these reactions are poorly understood. We present here the results of modelling the reactions of the C1-C8 alkyl nitrates and PAN with the hydroxyl radical. These models are based on information from current literature and from photochemical reactor studies carried out at the Environment Institute, EU Joint Research Centre, Ispra, Italy. These studies give us a more detailed understanding of the mechanisms and products of the atmospheric loss of organic nitrates due to reaction with the hydroxyl radical. Preliminary studies show that the major products are aldehydes, ketones, nitro-oxy aldehydes, nitro-oxy ketones, NOx and nitric acid.

  13. Borohydride Reduction of Estrone: Demonstration of Diastereoselectivity in the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aditya, Animesh; Nichols, David E.; Loudon, G. Marc

    2008-01-01

    This experiment presents a guided-inquiry approach to the demonstration of diastereoselectivity in an undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory. Chiral hindered ketones such as estrone, undergo facile reduction with sodium borohydride in a highly diastereoselective manner. The diastereomeric estradiols produced in the reaction can be analyzed and…

  14. Another Piece of the Puzzle: The Relationship between Beliefs and Practice in Higher Education Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farre, Andrea Soledad; Lorenzo, Maria Gabriela

    2009-01-01

    An original study about beliefs, conceptions and discourse analyses of organic chemistry teachers is presented. We used Likert questionnaires and discourse analysis to examine conceptions of the nature of science, learning and teaching at university level. A case study of four female teachers with varying experience and teacher training was…

  15. Accidental Drowning or Foul Play?: A Case Study in Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konaklieva, Monika

    2004-01-01

    This case was developed for a sophomore organic chemistry lab to illustrate how a combination of techniques is usually required in the identification of chemical compounds. It involves a murder mystery with a forensic twist: Two bodies have been recovered from two different lakes, but because of a mix-up at the morgue, the coroner is unable to…

  16. Circular Dichroism Investigation of Dess-Martin Periodinane Oxidation in the Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Nicole A.; Rapp, Robert D.; Hamann, Christian S.; Artz, Pamela G.

    2005-01-01

    Dess-Martin periodinane oxidation is an experiment that provides an avenue to the introduction of Circular Dichroism (CD) spectroscopy in organic chemistry curriculum as a diagnostic tool for examination of the results of a familiar reaction, and absolute configuration. From the experiment, students increased their understanding of CD theory and…

  17. Microwave-Assisted Chemistry: Synthetic Applications for Rapid Assembly of Nanomaterials and Organics

    EPA Science Inventory

    The magic of microwave (MW) heating technique, termed as the Bunsen burner of the 21th Century, has emerged as valuable alternative in synthesis of organics, polymers, inorganics, and nanomaterials. Important innovations in MW-assisted chemistry now enable chemists to prepare cat...

  18. Providing Students with Interdisciplinary Support to Improve Their Organic Chemistry Posters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widanski, Bozena; Thompson, Jo Ann; Foran-Mulcahy, Katie; Abafo, Amy

    2016-01-01

    A two-semester-long interdisciplinary support effort to improve student posters in organic chemistry lab is described. In the first semester, students' literature search report is supported by a workshop conducted by an Instruction Librarian. During the subsequent semester, a second workshop is presented by the Instruction Librarian, an English…

  19. Green Oxidation of Menthol Enantiomers and Analysis by Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy: An Advanced Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geiger, H. Cristina; Donohoe, James S.

    2012-01-01

    Green chemistry addresses environmental concerns associated with chemical processes and increases awareness of possible harmful effects of chemical reagents. Efficient reactions that eliminate or reduce the use of organic solvents or toxic reagents are increasingly available. A two-week experiment is reported that entails the calcium hypochlorite…

  20. A Historical Analysis of the Curriculum of Organic Chemistry Using ACS Exams as Artifacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raker, Jeffrey R.; Holme, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Standardized examinations, such as those developed and disseminated by the ACS Examinations Institute, are artifacts of the teaching of a course and over time may provide a historical perspective on how curricula have changed and evolved. This study investigated changes in organic chemistry curricula across a 60-year period by evaluating 18 ACS…

  1. A Performance Enhanced Interactive Learning Workshop Model as a Supplement for Organic Chemistry Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Karen E. S.; Grose-Fifer, Jilliam

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the authors describe a Performance Enhanced Interactive Learning (PEIL) workshop model as a supplement for organic chemistry instruction. This workshop model differs from many others in that it includes public presentations by students and other whole-class-discussion components that have not been thoroughly investigated in the…

  2. Using Web-Based Video as an Assessment Tool for Student Performance in Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tierney, John; Bodek, Matthew; Fredricks, Susan; Dudkin, Elizabeth; Kistler, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    This article shows the potential for using video responses to specific questions as part of the assessment process in an organic chemistry class. These exercises have been used with a postbaccalaureate cohort of 40 students, learning in an online environment, over a period of four years. A second cohort of 25 second-year students taking the…

  3. Engaging Organic Chemistry Students Using ChemDraw for iPad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morsch, Layne A.; Lewis, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Drawing structures, mechanisms, and syntheses is a vital part of success in organic chemistry courses. ChemDraw for iPad has been used to increase classroom experiences in the preparation of high quality chemical drawings. The embedded Flick-to-Share allows for simple, real-time exchange of ChemDraw documents. ChemDraw for iPad also allows…

  4. The Role of Spatial Ability and Strategy Preference for Spatial Problem Solving in Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stieff, Mike; Ryu, Minjung; Dixon, Bonnie; Hegarty, Mary

    2012-01-01

    In organic chemistry, spatial reasoning is critical for reasoning about spatial relationships in three dimensions and representing spatial information in diagrams. Despite its importance, little is known about the underlying cognitive components of spatial reasoning and the strategies that students employ to solve spatial problems in organic…

  5. A New Higher Education Curriculum in Organic Chemistry: What Questions Should Be Asked?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lafarge, David L.; Morge, Ludovic M.; Méheut, Martine M.

    2014-01-01

    Organic chemistry is often considered to be a difficult subject to teach and to learn, particularly as students prefer to resort to memorization alone rather than reasoning using models from chemical reactivity. Existing studies have led us to suggest principles for redefining the curriculum, ranging from its overall structure to the tasks given…

  6. Decorating with Arrows: Toward the Development of Representational Competence in Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grove, Nathaniel P.; Cooper, Melanie M.; Rush, Kelli M.

    2012-01-01

    Much effort has been expended in developing improved methods for presenting mechanistic thinking and the curved-arrow notation to organic chemistry students; however, most of these techniques are not research-based. The little research that has been conducted has mainly focused on understanding the meaning that students associate with the…

  7. The Impacts of an "Organic First" Chemistry Curriculum at a Liberal Arts College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malinak, Steven M.; Bayline, Jennifer Logan; Brletic, Patricia A.; Harris, Mark F.; Iuliucci, Robbie J.; Leonard, Michael S.; Matsuno, Nobunaka; Pallack, Linda A.; Stringfield, Thomas W.; Sunderland, Deborah Polvani

    2014-01-01

    The chemistry department at Washington & Jefferson College implemented an "organic first" curriculum in the fall semester of 2005. Assessment data suggest that the net impact of this change for the department and associated constituencies has been positive: (i) Student outcomes have generally not been impacted by the curricular…

  8. The Use of Solid Aluminum Heat Transfer Devices in Organic Chemistry Laboratory Instruction and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lodwig, Siegfried N.

    1989-01-01

    Presents a practical and attractive alternative to the sand bath used in the microscale procedures developed by Mayo, Pike, and Butcher. Urges the organic chemistry teaching community to continue towards complete conversion to microscale techniques. Presents the use of aluminum devices in the microlaboratory. (MVL)

  9. Adapting to Student Learning Styles: Engaging Students with Cell Phone Technology in Organic Chemistry Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pursell, David P.

    2009-01-01

    Students of organic chemistry traditionally make 3 x 5 in. flash cards to assist learning nomenclature, structures, and reactions. Advances in educational technology have enabled flash cards to be viewed on computers, offering an endless array of drilling and feedback for students. The current generation of students is less inclined to use…

  10. Minimal Impact of Organic Chemistry Prerequisite on Student Performance in Introductory Biochemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Robin; Cotner, Sehoya; Winkel, Amy

    2009-01-01

    Curriculum design assumes that successful completion of prerequisite courses will have a positive impact on student performance in courses that require the prerequisite. We recently had the opportunity to test this assumption concerning the relationship between completion of the organic chemistry prerequisite and performance in introductory…

  11. Vegetation effects on soil organic matter chemistry of aggregate fractions in a Hawaiian forest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined chemical changes from live plant tissue to soil organic matter (SOM) to determine the persistence of individual plant compounds into soil aggregate fractions. We characterized the tissue chemistry of a slow- (Dicranopteris linearis) and fast-decomposing species (Cheirodendron trigynum) a...

  12. A Template-Controlled Solid-State Reaction for the Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friscic, Tomislav; Hamilton, Tamara D.; Papaefstathiou, Giannis S.; MacGillivray, Leonard R.

    2005-01-01

    An experiment for the organic chemistry laboratory that involves a template-controlled solid-state reaction is described. The experiment utilizes a template to direct the assembly of an olefin in the solid state that undergoes a [2 + 2] photodimerization.

  13. Using Biocatalysis to Integrate Organic Chemistry into a Molecular Biology Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beers, Mande; Archer, Crystal; Feske, Brent D.; Mateer, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    Current cutting-edge biomedical investigation requires that the researcher have an operational understanding of several diverse disciplines. Biocatalysis is a field of science that operates at the crossroads of organic chemistry, biochemistry, microbiology, and molecular biology, and provides an excellent model for interdisciplinary research. We…

  14. Grade/Study-Performance Contracts, Enhanced Communication, Cooperative Learning, and Student Performance in Undergraduate Organic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Ralph C.

    1997-01-01

    Describes and evaluates a teaching strategy, designed to increase student retention while maintaining academic performance levels in undergraduate organic chemistry, that uses grade/study-performance contracts, enhanced communication using electronic mail, and cooperative learning. Concludes that a series of interventions can substantially…

  15. An Introductory Organic Chemistry Review Homework Exercise: Deriving Potential Mechanisms for Glucose Ring Opening in Mutarotation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murdock, Margaret; Holman, R. W.; Slade, Tyler; Clark, Shelley L. D.; Rodnick, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    A unique homework assignment has been designed as a review exercise to be implemented near the end of the one-year undergraduate organic chemistry sequence. Within the framework of the exercise, students derive potential mechanisms for glucose ring opening in the aqueous mutarotation process. In this endeavor, 21 general review principles are…

  16. The Relationship of Test Performance to ISDP Rating in Organic Chemistry Texts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Soo-Young; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Describes the Instructional Strategy Diagnostic Profile (ISDP)--an analytic tool that facilitates the evaluation and revision of existing instruction and the design of new instruction--and recounts its use in comparing two textbooks to determine the most appropriate for an organic chemistry course. (JEG)

  17. What Lies at the Heart of Good Undergraduate Teaching? A Case Study in Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidowitz, Bette; Rollnick, Marissa

    2011-01-01

    Teaching organic chemistry at the undergraduate level has long been regarded as challenging and students are often alienated by the mass of detail which seems to characterise the subject. In this paper we investigate the practice of an accomplished lecturer by trying to capture and portray his pedagogical content knowledge, PCK, in order to reveal…

  18. Structure Determination of Unknown Organic Liquids Using NMR and IR Spectroscopy: A General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavel, John T.; Hyde, Erin C.; Bruch, Martha D.

    2012-01-01

    This experiment introduced general chemistry students to the basic concepts of organic structures and to the power of spectroscopic methods for structure determination. Students employed a combination of IR and NMR spectroscopy to perform de novo structure determination of unknown alcohols, without being provided with a list of possible…

  19. A Learning-Cycle-Based Organic Chemistry Laboratory Program for Students in Dietetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, William J.

    1982-01-01

    The laboratory of an organic chemistry course for dietetics students is based on the learning cycle approach (exploration, invention-concept introduction, and concept application). The laboratory program is divided into four sections: lab techniques, compound types, reaction types, and reaction characteristics. (SK)

  20. Meaningful Understanding and Systems Thinking in Organic Chemistry: Validating Measurement and Exploring Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vachliotis, Theodoros; Salta, Katerina; Tzougraki, Chryssa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was dual: First, to develop and validate assessment schemes for assessing 11th grade students' meaningful understanding of organic chemistry concepts, as well as their systems thinking skills in the domain. Second, to explore the relationship between the two constructs of interest based on students' performance…

  1. Solvent-Free Wittig Reaction: A Green Organic Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Sam H.; Angel, Stephen A.

    2004-01-01

    Some Wittig reactions can be carried out by grinding the reactants in a mortar with a pestle for about 20 minutes, as per investigation. A laboratory experiment involving a solvent-free Wittig reaction that can be completed in a three-hour sophomore organic chemistry laboratory class period, are developed.

  2. A Survey of the Practices, Procedures, and Techniques in Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Teaching Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Christopher B.; Schmidt, Monica; Soniat, Michael

    2011-01-01

    A survey was conducted of four-year institutions that teach undergraduate organic chemistry laboratories in the United States. The data include results from over 130 schools, describes the current practices at these institutions, and discusses the statistical results such as the scale of the laboratories performed, the chemical techniques applied,…

  3. The Implementation of a Service-Learning Component in an Organic Chemistry Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glover, Sarah R.; Sewry, Joyce D.; Bromley, Candice L.; Davies-Coleman, Michael T.; Hlengwa, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    avenues for the implementation of service-learning into their curricula. A second-year undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory experiment, in which the undergraduate students make azo dyes, can provide a vehicle for a service-learning module in which university undergraduate…

  4. A Practical Introduction to Separation and Purification Techniques for the Beginning Organic Chemistry Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Jack E.

    1981-01-01

    Describes a sequence of experiments developed at Texas A&M University for use in one-semester and two-semester (nonmajors) organic chemistry courses to teach a maximum number of separation and purification techniques such as distillations, recrystallization, liquid-liquid extraction, and chromatography. (SK)

  5. Incorporating Chemical Information Instruction and Environmental Science into the First-Year Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landolt, R. G.

    2006-01-01

    The chemical information instruction and environmental science which is incorporated into a first-year organic chemistry laboratory is presented. The students are charged with devised search strategies, conducting online searches and limiting the project scope to ocean systems. The laboratory serves to provide for search strategy development…

  6. 2005 Nobel Prize in Chemistry: Development of the Olefin Metathesis Method in Organic Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Charles P.

    2006-01-01

    The 2005 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded "for the development of the metathesis method in organic synthesis". The discoveries of the laureates provided a chemical reaction used daily in the chemical industry for the efficient and more environmentally friendly production of important pharmaceuticals, fuels, synthetic fibers, and many other…

  7. Reasonable Reasoning: Multi-Variate Problem-Solving in Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraft, Adam; Strickland, Amanda M.; Bhattacharyya, Gautam

    2010-01-01

    In order to understand how students approach multi-variate problems, we report a study on the cues organic chemistry graduate students perceive from mechanism tasks, and the reasoning processes induced by those cues. We used the think-aloud protocol in interviews with sixteen graduate students as they worked on two types of tasks: one, in which…

  8. A Green, Guided-Inquiry Based Electrophilic Aromatic Substitution for the Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eby, Eric; Deal, S. Todd

    2008-01-01

    We developed an alternative electrophilic aromatic substitution reaction for the organic chemistry teaching laboratory. The experiment is an electrophilic iodination reaction of salicylamide, a popular analgesic, using environmentally friendly reagents--sodium iodide and household bleach. Further, we designed the lab as a guided-inquiry…

  9. Content-Related Interactions and Methods of Reasoning within Self-Initiated Organic Chemistry Study Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christian, Karen Jeanne

    2011-01-01

    Students often use study groups to prepare for class or exams; yet to date, we know very little about how these groups actually function. This study looked at the ways in which undergraduate organic chemistry students prepared for exams through self-initiated study groups. We sought to characterize the methods of social regulation, levels of…

  10. Interdisciplinary Learning for Chemical Engineering Students from Organic Chemistry Synthesis Lab to Reactor Design to Separation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Matt; Comitz, Richard L.; Biaglow, Andrew; Lachance, Russ; Sloop, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    A novel approach to the Chemical Engineering curriculum sequence of courses at West Point enabled our students to experience a much more realistic design process, which more closely replicated a real world scenario. Students conduct the synthesis in the organic chemistry lab, then conduct computer modeling of the reaction with ChemCad and…

  11. The Synthesis of a Cockroach Pheromone: An Experiment for the Second-Year Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feist, Patty L.

    2008-01-01

    This experiment describes the synthesis of gentisyl quinone isovalerate, or blattellaquinone, a sex pheromone of the German cockroach that was isolated and identified in 2005. The synthesis is appropriate for the second semester of a second-year organic chemistry laboratory course. It can be completed in two, three-hour laboratory periods and uses…

  12. A Guided Inquiry Liquid/Liquid Extractions Laboratory for Introductory Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raydo, Margaret L.; Church, Megan S.; Taylor, Zane W.; Taylor, Christopher E.; Danowitz, Amy M.

    2015-01-01

    A guided inquiry laboratory experiment for teaching liquid/liquid extractions to first semester undergraduate organic chemistry students is described. This laboratory is particularly useful for introductory students as the analytes that are separated are highly colored dye molecules. This allows students to track into which phase each analyte…

  13. Physics, chemistry, and biology of organics in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, John L.

    The Groundwater Committee of AGU's Hydrology Section sponsored this special session at the 1986 Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif. The session was chaired by John L. Wilson of the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (New Mexico Tech, Socorro). At earlier meetings a number of sessions had focused on the mathematical modeling of dissolved organic transport. More recently, AGU sponsored a Chapman Conference on “Microbial Processes in the Transport, Fate, and In Situ Treatment of Subsurface Contaminants.” The fall special session was the first to examine a much wider view of the scientific issues and brought together modelers and experimentalists; chemists, biologists, physicists, and engineers.

  14. Connecting biology and organic chemistry introductory laboratory courses through a collaborative research project.

    PubMed

    Boltax, Ariana L; Armanious, Stephanie; Kosinski-Collins, Melissa S; Pontrello, Jason K

    2015-01-01

    Modern research often requires collaboration of experts in fields, such as math, chemistry, biology, physics, and computer science to develop unique solutions to common problems. Traditional introductory undergraduate laboratory curricula in the sciences often do not emphasize connections possible between the various disciplines. We designed an interdisciplinary, medically relevant, project intended to help students see connections between chemistry and biology. Second term organic chemistry laboratory students designed and synthesized potential polymer inhibitors or inducers of polyglutamine protein aggregation. The use of novel target compounds added the uncertainty of scientific research to the project. Biology laboratory students then tested the novel potential pharmaceuticals in Huntington's disease model assays, using in vitro polyglutamine peptide aggregation and in vivo lethality studies in Drosophila. Students read articles from the primary literature describing the system from both chemical and biological perspectives. Assessment revealed that students emerged from both courses with a deeper understanding of the interdisciplinary nature of biology and chemistry and a heightened interest in basic research. The design of this collaborative project for introductory biology and organic chemistry labs demonstrated how the local interests and expertise at a university can be drawn from to create an effective way to integrate these introductory courses. Rather than simply presenting a series of experiments to be replicated, we hope that our efforts will inspire other scientists to think about how some aspect of authentic work can be brought into their own courses, and we also welcome additional collaborations to extend the scope of the scientific exploration.

  15. Correlation of Preadmission Organic Chemistry Courses and Academic Performance in Biochemistry at a Midwest Chiropractic Doctoral Program*

    PubMed Central

    McRae, Marc P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Organic chemistry has been shown to correlate with academic success in the preclinical years of medicine, dentistry, and graduate physiology. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between undergraduate organic chemistry grades and first-semester biochemistry grades at a Midwest chiropractic doctoral program. Methods: Students enrolled in a first-semester biochemistry course who had completed the prerequisite courses in organic chemistry offered at this same institution were entered into the study. The total grade for each of the three courses was calculated using the midterm and final exam raw scores with a weighting of 50% each. Analysis consisted of obtaining correlation coefficients between the total grades of organic 1 with biochemistry and organic 2 with biochemistry. Using the biochemistry total grade, the students were divided into quartiles and course grades for both organic chemistry 1 and 2 were calculated. Results: For the 109 students in the study, the correlation coefficient between the biochemistry and organic chemistry 1 and biochemistry and organic chemistry 2 courses was r = 0.744 and r = 0.725, respectively. The difference in organic chemistry grades between those in the first and fourth quartiles was 63.2% and 86.9% for organic chemistry 1 (p < .001) and 60.9% and 79.4% for organic chemistry 2 (p < .001). Conclusion: This study shows that organic chemistry can be used as an indicator of future academic success in a chiropractic biochemistry course. Knowledge of such a relationship could prove useful to identify students who may potentially run into academic difficulty with first-year biochemistry PMID:20480012

  16. Spicing Things up by Adding Color and Relieving Pain: The Use of "Napoleon's Buttons" in Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bucholtz, Kevin M.

    2011-01-01

    For some students, organic chemistry can be a distant subject and unrelated to any courses they have seen in their college careers. To develop a more contextual learning experience in organic chemistry, an additional text, "Napoleon's Buttons: 17 Molecules That Changed History," by Penny Le Couteur and Jay Burreson, was incorporated as a…

  17. Azeotropic Preparation of a "C"-Phenyl "N"-Aryl Imine: An Introductory Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverberg, Lee J.; Coyle, David J.; Cannon, Kevin C.; Mathers, Robert T.; Richards, Jeffrey A.; Tierney, John

    2016-01-01

    Imines are important in biological chemistry and as intermediates in organic synthesis. An experiment for introductory undergraduate organic chemistry is presented in which benzaldehyde was condensed with "p"-methoxyaniline in toluene to give 4-methoxy-"N"-(phenylmethylene)benzenamine. Water was removed by azeotropic…

  18. Perry's Scheme of Intellectual and Epistemological Development as a Framework for Describing Student Difficulties in Learning Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grove, Nathaniel P.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated student difficulties with the learning of organic chemistry. Using Perry's Model of Intellectual Development as a framework revealed that organic chemistry students who function as dualistic thinkers struggle with the complexity of the subject matter. Understanding substitution/elimination reactions and multi-step syntheses is…

  19. Using Commercially Available Techniques to Make Organic Chemistry Representations Tactile and More Accessible to Students with Blindness or Low Vision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Supalo, Cary A.; Kennedy, Sean H.

    2014-01-01

    Organic chemistry courses can present major obstacles to access for students with blindness or low vision (BLV). In recent years, efforts have been made to represent organic chemistry concepts in tactile forms for blind students. These methodologies are described in this manuscript. Further work being done at Illinois State University is also…

  20. Using Tactile Learning Aids for Students with Visual Impairments in a First-Semester Organic Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poon, Thomas; Ovadia, Ronit

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes two techniques for rendering visual concepts encountered in an organic chemistry course into tactile representations for students who have low vision. The techniques--which utilize commercially available products--facilitate communication of organic chemistry between student and instructor. (Contains 1 figure, 2 tables and 1…

  1. Structure and Evaluation of Flipped Chemistry Courses: Organic & Spectroscopy, Large and Small, First to Third Year, English and French

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Alison B.

    2015-01-01

    Organic chemistry is a traditionally difficult subject with high failure & withdrawal rates and many areas of conceptual difficulty for students. To promote student learning and success, four undergraduate organic chemistry and spectroscopy courses at the first to third year level (17-420 students) were "flipped" in 2013-2014. In the…

  2. Using Tactile Learning Aids for Students with Visual Impairments in a First-Semester Organic Chemistry Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Thomas; Ovadia, Ronit

    2008-02-01

    This paper describes two techniques for rendering visual concepts encountered in an organic chemistry course into tactile representations for students who have low vision. The techniques—which utilize commercially available products—facilitate communication of organic chemistry between student and instructor.

  3. When hospitals limit organizing activity.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, C B

    1988-01-01

    Since 1974, when the NLRA was extended to cover nonprofit medical institutions, hospitals have been faced with the challenge of accommodating their employees' right to engage in organizing and concerted activities while preventing such activities from disrupting patient care. Some hospitals have sought to protect the interests of patients by prohibiting solicitation and distribution in all areas to which patients and visitors have access. The Board and the courts have generally found such rules overly broad and violative of employee rights under the NLRA. In the following survey of cases involving solicitation/distribution rules, the author points out that the courts have consistently evaluated these rules on the basis of the special nature of the hospital setting. Accordingly, advises the author, hospital administrators who are promulgating distributions and solicitation rules covering a given location must consider the individual characteristics of that location, namely, its physical layout, the type of work performed there, and the availability of alternate space.

  4. Lead-Lead and Rubidium-Strontium In Situ Dating Using the Chemistry, Organics, and Dating EXperiment (CODEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, F. S.; Whitaker, T. J.; Levine, J.; Beck, S.

    2016-10-01

    We describe new results for Pb-Pb dating, and progress on laser development, for the Pb-Pb and Rb-Sr measuring, organics detecting, and elemental abundance mapping Chemistry, Organics, and Dating EXperiment (CODEX) instrument.

  5. Tholins - Organic chemistry of interstellar grains and gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, C.; Khare, B. N.

    1979-01-01

    The paper discusses tholins, defined as complex organic solids formed by the interaction of energy - for example, UV light or spark discharge - with various mixtures of cosmically abundant gases - CH4, C2H6, NH3, H2O, HCHO, and H2S. It is suggested that tholins occur in the interstellar medium and are responsible for some of the properties of the interstellar grains and gas. Additional occurrences of tholins are considered. Tholins have been produced experimentally; 50 or so pyrolytic fragments of the brown, sometimes sticky substances have been identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the incidence of these fragments in tholins produced by different procedures is reported.

  6. Organic chemistry of Murchison meteorite: Carbon isotopic fractionation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, G. U.; Blair, N. E.; Desmarais, D. J.; Cronin, J. R.; Chang, S.

    1986-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of individual organic compounds of meteoritic origin remains unknown, as most reported carbon isotopic ratios are for bulk carbon or solvent extractable fractions. The researchers managed to determine the carbon isotopic ratios for individual hydrocarbons and monocarboxylic acids isolated from a Murchison sample by a freeze-thaw-ultrasonication technique. The abundances of monocarboxylic acids and saturated hydrocarbons decreased with increasing carbon number and the acids are more abundant than the hydrocarbon with the same carbon number. For both classes of compounds, the C-13 to C-12 ratios decreased with increasing carbon number in a roughly parallel manner, and each carboxylic acid exhibits a higher isotopic number than the hydrocarbon containing the same number of carbon atoms. These trends are consistent with a kinetically controlled synthesis of higher homologues for lower ones.

  7. Using biocatalysis to integrate organic chemistry into a molecular biology laboratory course.

    PubMed

    Beers, Mande; Archer, Crystal; Feske, Brent D; Mateer, Scott C

    2012-01-01

    Current cutting-edge biomedical investigation requires that the researcher have an operational understanding of several diverse disciplines. Biocatalysis is a field of science that operates at the crossroads of organic chemistry, biochemistry, microbiology, and molecular biology, and provides an excellent model for interdisciplinary research. We have developed an inquiry-based module that uses the mutagenesis of the yeast reductase, YDL124w, to study the bioorganic synthesis of the taxol side-chain, a pharmacologically important molecule. Using related structures, students identify regions they think will affect enzyme stereoselective, design and generate site-specific mutants, and then characterize the effect of these changes on enzyme activity. This laboratory activity gives our students experience, working in a scientific discipline outside of biology and exposes them to techniques and equipment they do not normally work with in a molecular biology course. These inter-disciplinary experiences not only show the relevance of other sciences to biology, but also give our students the ability to communicate more effectively with scientists outside their discipline.

  8. Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Development of the Olefin Metathesis Method in Organic Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, Charles P.

    2006-02-01

    The 2005 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Yves Chauvin of the Institut Français du Pétrole, Robert H. Grubbs of CalTech, and Richard R. Schrock of MIT "for development of the metathesis method in organic synthesis". The discoveries of the laureates provided a chemical reaction now used daily in the chemical industry for the efficient and more environmentally friendly production of important pharmaceuticals, fuels, synthetic fibers, and many other products. This article tells the story of how olefin metathesis became a truly useful synthetic transformation and a triumph for mechanistic chemistry, and illustrates the importance of fundamental research. See JCE Featured Molecules .

  9. Bringing the science of proteins into the realm of organic chemistry: total chemical synthesis of SEP (synthetic erythropoiesis protein).

    PubMed

    Kent, Stephen B H

    2013-11-11

    Erythropoietin, commonly known as EPO, is a glycoprotein hormone that stimulates the production of red blood cells. Recombinant EPO has been described as "arguably the most successful drug spawned by the revolution in recombinant DNA technology". Recently, the EPO glycoprotein molecule has re-emerged as a major target of synthetic organic chemistry. In this article I will give an account of an important body of earlier work on the chemical synthesis of a designed EPO analogue that had full biological activity and improved pharmacokinetic properties. The design and synthesis of this "synthetic erythropoiesis protein" was ahead of its time, but has gained new relevance in recent months. Here I will document the story of one of the major accomplishments of synthetic chemistry in a more complete way than is possible in the primary literature, and put the work in its contemporaneous context.

  10. [Exploitation of the chemistry of magnesium carbenoids and their use in organic synthesis].

    PubMed

    Satoh, Tsuyoshi

    2009-09-01

    Synthetic organic chemistry is a base of medicinal chemistry and the exploitation of new methods for carbon-carbon bond formation is of most importance in synthetic organic chemistry. Carbenes and carbenoids have long been known to be highly reactive carbon species that show a variety of unique reactivity. However, those reactive species are not fully used in organic synthesis. The reasons are as follows: one is the precursors for the generation of carbenes and carbenoids are quite limited and the other is that the reactivity of the species is too high to control. In order to solve the problem mentioned above, we used alpha-haloalkyl (or alkenyl) aryl sulfoxides as the precursors and used sulfoxide-magnesium exchange reaction for generation of much mild magnesium carbenoids. alpha-Haloalkyl (or alkenyl) aryl sulfoxides are quite easily synthesized in high overall yields. Magnesium carbenoids, cyclopropylmagnesium carbenoids, cyclobutylmagnesium carbenoids, magnesium beta-oxido carbenoids, and magnesium alkylidene carbenoids are generated at low temperature from the corresponding sulfoxides with a Grignard reagent in quantitative yields. They were found to be stable usually at below -60 degrees C for at least 30 min. The each magnesium carbenoids have their own unique reactivities and we could find many unprecedented reactions from these reactive species. Recent results for the developments of new synthetic methods based on the chemistry of magnesium carbenoids are described.

  11. Laboratory Investigations Into The Origins Of Organic Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ruette, Nathalie; Miller, K. A.; O'Connor, A.; Stuetzel, J.; Urbain, X.; Savin, D. W.

    2013-06-01

    The chain of chemical reactions leading towards life is thought to begin in molecular clouds when atomic carbon is fixed into molecules, initiating the synthesis of complex organic species. Spectroscopic observations, combined with sophisticated astrochemical models to interpret the collected spectra, provide much of our knowledge of this process. However, uncertainties in the underlying chemical data in these models limit our understanding of the molecular universe. Theory provides little insight as fully quantum mechanical calculations for reactions with four or more atoms are too complex for current capabilities. Measurements of rate coefficients for reactions of C with molecular ions are extremely challenging. This is due to the difficulty in producing a sufficiently intense and well characterized beam of neutral carbon atoms. We have developed a novel merged beam apparatus to study reactions of neutral atomic C with molecular ions. A C- beam is created in a cesium ion sputter source and accelerated to 28 keV. A series of apertures and electrostatic optics create a collimated beam. Using an 808 nm (1.53 eV) laser beam, ~4% of the C- beam is neutralized via photodetachment. We produce a pure ground term neutral C beam by electrostatically removing the remaining C-. A velocity matched, co-propagating H3+ beam at 7.05 keV, created with a duoplasmatron source, is then merged with the C beam. The merged beams method allows us to use fast beams, which are easy to handle and monitor, while being able to achieve relative collision energies down to some tens of meV. An electrostatic energy analyzer separates and detects the charged end products of the different reaction channels. The reactions rate coefficients are determined by measuring all the relevant currents, beam shapes, energies, signal counts and background rates. We have measured the absolute rate coefficients for C + H3+ → CH+ + H2 and C + H3+ → CH2+ + H. Since H3+ is ubiquitous in molecular clouds, these

  12. Ubiquity of organic nitrates from nighttime chemistry in the European submicron aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Mensah, A. A.; Friese, E.; Topping, D.; Nemitz, E.; Prevot, A. S. H.; ńijälä, M.; Allan, J.; Canonaco, F.; Canagaratna, M.; Carbone, S.; Crippa, M.; Dall Osto, M.; Day, D. A.; De Carlo, P.; Di Marco, C. F.; Elbern, H.; Eriksson, A.; Freney, E.; Hao, L.; Herrmann, H.; Hildebrandt, L.; Hillamo, R.; Jimenez, J. L.; Laaksonen, A.; McFiggans, G.; Mohr, C.; O'Dowd, C.; Otjes, R.; Ovadnevaite, J.; Pandis, S. N.; Poulain, L.; Schlag, P.; Sellegri, K.; Swietlicki, E.; Tiitta, P.; Vermeulen, A.; Wahner, A.; Worsnop, D.; Wu, H.-C.

    2016-07-01

    In the atmosphere nighttime removal of volatile organic compounds is initiated to a large extent by reaction with the nitrate radical (NO3) forming organic nitrates which partition between gas and particulate phase. Here we show based on particle phase measurements performed at a suburban site in the Netherlands that organic nitrates contribute substantially to particulate nitrate and organic mass. Comparisons with a chemistry transport model indicate that most of the measured particulate organic nitrates are formed by NO3 oxidation. Using aerosol composition data from three intensive observation periods at numerous measurement sites across Europe, we conclude that organic nitrates are a considerable fraction of fine particulate matter (PM1) at the continental scale. Organic nitrates represent 34% to 44% of measured submicron aerosol nitrate and are found at all urban and rural sites, implying a substantial potential of PM reduction by NOx emission control.

  13. 25th anniversary article: progress in chemistry and applications of functional indigos for organic electronics.

    PubMed

    Głowacki, Eric Daniel; Voss, Gundula; Sariciftci, Niyazi Serdar

    2013-12-17

    Indigo and its derivatives are dyes and pigments with a long and distinguished history in organic chemistry. Recently, applications of this 'old' structure as a functional organic building block for organic electronics applications have renewed interest in these molecules and their remarkable chemical and physical properties. Natural-origin indigos have been processed in fully bio-compatible field effect transistors, operating with ambipolar mobilities up to 0.5 cm(2) /Vs and air-stability. The synthetic derivative isoindigo has emerged as one of the most successful building-blocks for semiconducting polymers for plastic solar cells with efficiencies > 5%. Another isomer of indigo, epindolidione, has also been shown to be one of the best reported organic transistor materials in terms of mobility (∼2 cm(2) /Vs) and stability. This progress report aims to review very recent applications of indigoids in organic electronics, but especially to logically bridge together the hereto independent research directions on indigo, isoindigo, and other materials inspired by historical dye chemistry: a field which was the root of the development of modern chemistry in the first place.

  14. Water and Organics: A Lens to View the Coupled Physics and Chemistry of Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergin, Edwin

    We propose to study the formation and survival of water and organics in the terrestrial planet-forming zone of protoplanetary disks. The recent detections of these molecules in the warm, inner regions of classical T Tauri systems suggests that they can not only survive in a hostile radiation-dominated environment, but do so in great quantities. These observations have direct implications for the origins of terrestrial prebiotic material. Despite this apparent ubiquity, they appear absent in disks with inner gaps - the transitional disks - hypothesized to be systems containing young planetary systems. Thus, the abundance of gas phase water and organics possibly represents an important tracer of incipient planet-formation. The surprisingly large quantities of water observed can be explained by a previously unrecognised self-shielding mechanism in which water protects itself from the harmful effects of stellar radiation. At the same time the emergent water is theorized to provide a sanctuary for organic chemistry, thus explaining the correlation between the detections of water and organics. Furthermore, the absorption of starlight by water instead of dust also has profound - and as yet, unexplored - thermodynamic implications for the inner disk. Combining our observational and modeling strengths we shall perform a comprehensive study of the physical conditions that allow these molecules to exist. The proposed study emphasizes the inclusion of new physics, and as such is unique amongst theoretical models of disk physics and chemistry. This three stage program will first develop a thermodynamic model of gas in the inner disk that includes the thermodynamic implications of high concentrations of water. Second, organic chemistry networks will be developed that include high-temperature reactions and grain processes appropriate for the warm terrestrial zone. Finally, the water and organic chemistry will be solved in a suite of 2D disk models that include self- consistent

  15. New Mechanistic Insights on the Selectivity of Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Organic Reactions: The Role of Computational Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinhao; Chung, Lung Wa; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2016-06-21

    With new advances in theoretical methods and increased computational power, applications of computational chemistry are becoming practical and routine in many fields of chemistry. In organic chemistry, computational chemistry plays an indispensable role in elucidating reaction mechanisms and the origins of various selectivities, such as chemo-, regio-, and stereoselectivities. Consequently, mechanistic understanding improves synthesis and assists in the rational design of new catalysts. In this Account, we present some of our recent works to illustrate how computational chemistry provides new mechanistic insights for improvement of the selectivities of several organic reactions. These examples include not only explanations for the existing experimental observations, but also predictions which were subsequently verified experimentally. This Account consists of three sections discuss three different kinds of selectivities. The first section discusses the regio- and stereoselectivities of hydrosilylations of alkynes, mainly catalyzed by [Cp*Ru(MeCN)3](+) or [CpRu(MeCN)3](+). Calculations suggest a new mechanism that involves a key ruthenacyclopropene intermediate. This mechanism not only explains the unusual Markovnikov regio-selectivity and anti-addition stereoselectivity observed by Trost and co-workers, but also motivated further experimental investigations. New intriguing experimental observations and further theoretical studies led to an extension of the reaction mechanism. The second section includes three cases of meta-selective C-H activation of aryl compounds. In the case of Cu-catalyzed selective meta-C-H activation of aniline, a new mechanism that involves a Cu(III)-Ar-mediated Heck-like transition state, in which the Ar group acts as an electrophile, was proposed. This mechanism predicted a higher reactivity for more electron-deficient Ar groups, which was supported by experiments. For two template-mediated, meta-selective C-H bond activations catalyzed by

  16. New Mechanistic Insights on the Selectivity of Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Organic Reactions: The Role of Computational Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinhao; Chung, Lung Wa; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2016-06-21

    With new advances in theoretical methods and increased computational power, applications of computational chemistry are becoming practical and routine in many fields of chemistry. In organic chemistry, computational chemistry plays an indispensable role in elucidating reaction mechanisms and the origins of various selectivities, such as chemo-, regio-, and stereoselectivities. Consequently, mechanistic understanding improves synthesis and assists in the rational design of new catalysts. In this Account, we present some of our recent works to illustrate how computational chemistry provides new mechanistic insights for improvement of the selectivities of several organic reactions. These examples include not only explanations for the existing experimental observations, but also predictions which were subsequently verified experimentally. This Account consists of three sections discuss three different kinds of selectivities. The first section discusses the regio- and stereoselectivities of hydrosilylations of alkynes, mainly catalyzed by [Cp*Ru(MeCN)3](+) or [CpRu(MeCN)3](+). Calculations suggest a new mechanism that involves a key ruthenacyclopropene intermediate. This mechanism not only explains the unusual Markovnikov regio-selectivity and anti-addition stereoselectivity observed by Trost and co-workers, but also motivated further experimental investigations. New intriguing experimental observations and further theoretical studies led to an extension of the reaction mechanism. The second section includes three cases of meta-selective C-H activation of aryl compounds. In the case of Cu-catalyzed selective meta-C-H activation of aniline, a new mechanism that involves a Cu(III)-Ar-mediated Heck-like transition state, in which the Ar group acts as an electrophile, was proposed. This mechanism predicted a higher reactivity for more electron-deficient Ar groups, which was supported by experiments. For two template-mediated, meta-selective C-H bond activations catalyzed by

  17. Flow through reactors for organic chemistry: directly electrically heated tubular mini reactors as an enabling technology for organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Ulrich; Turek, Thomas

    2009-11-30

    Until recently traditional heating in organic chemistry has been done with oil heating baths or using electric heat exchangers. With the advent of microwave equipment, heating by microwaves was rapidly introduced as standard method in organic chemistry laboratories, mainly because of the convenient possibility to operate at high temperature accompanied by accelerated reaction rates. In the present contribution we discuss the method of heating small, continuously operated reactors by passing electric current directly through the reactor wall as an enabling technology in organic chemistry. The benefit of this method is that the heat is generated directly inside the reactor wall. By this means high heating rates comparable to microwave ovens can be reached but at much lower cost for the equipment. A tool for the comparison of microwave heating and traditional heating is provided. As an example kinetic data for the acid catalyzed hydrolysis of methyl formate were measured using this heating concept. The reaction is not only a suitable model but also one of industrial importance since this is the main production process for formic acid.

  18. Flow through reactors for organic chemistry: directly electrically heated tubular mini reactors as an enabling technology for organic synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Turek, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Summary Until recently traditional heating in organic chemistry has been done with oil heating baths or using electric heat exchangers. With the advent of microwave equipment, heating by microwaves was rapidly introduced as standard method in organic chemistry laboratories, mainly because of the convenient possibility to operate at high temperature accompanied by accelerated reaction rates. In the present contribution we discuss the method of heating small, continuously operated reactors by passing electric current directly through the reactor wall as an enabling technology in organic chemistry. The benefit of this method is that the heat is generated directly inside the reactor wall. By this means high heating rates comparable to microwave ovens can be reached but at much lower cost for the equipment. A tool for the comparison of microwave heating and traditional heating is provided. As an example kinetic data for the acid catalyzed hydrolysis of methyl formate were measured using this heating concept. The reaction is not only a suitable model but also one of industrial importance since this is the main production process for formic acid. PMID:20300506

  19. "No one does this for fun": Contextualization and process writing in an organic chemistry laboratory course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, Andrea

    This study investigated the introduction of curriculum innovations into an introductory organic chemistry laboratory course. Pre-existing experiments in a traditional course were re-written in a broader societal context. Additionally, a new laboratory notebook methodology was introduced, using the Decision/Explanation/Observation/Inference (DEOI) format that required students to explicitly describe the purpose of procedural steps and the meanings of observations. Experts in organic chemistry, science writing, and chemistry education examined the revised curriculum and deemed it appropriate. The revised curriculum was introduced into two sections of organic chemistry laboratory at Columbia University. Field notes were taken during the course, students and teaching assistants were interviewed, and completed student laboratory reports were examined to ascertain the impact of the innovations. The contextualizations were appreciated for making the course more interesting; for lending a sense of purpose to the study of chemistry; and for aiding in students' learning. Both experts and students described a preference for more extensive connections between the experiment content and the introduced context. Generally, students preferred the DEOI method to journal-style laboratory reports believing it to be more efficient and more focused on thinking than stylistic formalities. The students claimed that the DEOI method aided their understanding of the experiments and helped scaffold their thinking, though some students thought that the method was over-structured and disliked the required pre-laboratory work. The method was used in two distinct manners; recursively writing and revising as intended and concept contemplation only after experiment completion. The recursive use may have been influenced by TA attitudes towards the revisions and seemed to engender a sense of preparedness. Students' engagement with the contextualizations and the DEOI method highlight the need for

  20. Introducing chemical biology applications to introductory organic chemistry students using series of weekly assignments.

    PubMed

    Kanin, Maralee R; Pontrello, Jason K

    2016-01-01

    Calls to bring interdisciplinary content and examples into introductory science courses have increased, yet strategies that involve course restructuring often suffer from the need for a significant faculty commitment to motivate change. Minimizing the need for dramatic course reorganization, the structure, reactivity, and chemical biology applications of classes of biological monomers and polymers have been integrated into introductory organic chemistry courses through three series of semester-long weekly assignments that explored (a) Carbohydrates and Oligosaccharides, (b) Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins, and (c) Nucleosides, Nucleotides, and Nucleic Acids. Comparisons of unannounced pre- and post tests revealed improved understanding of a reaction introduced in the assignments, and course examinations evaluated cumulative assignment topics. Course surveys revealed that demonstrating biologically relevant applications consistently throughout the semesters enhanced student interest in the connection between basic organic chemistry content and its application to new and unfamiliar bio-related examples. Covering basic material related to these classes of molecules outside of the classroom opened lecture time to allow the instructor to further build on information developed through the weekly assignments, teaching advanced topics and applications typically not covered in an introductory organic chemistry lecture course. Assignments were implemented as homework, either with or without accompanying discussion, in both laboratory and lecture organic courses within the context of the existing course structures.

  1. Introducing chemical biology applications to introductory organic chemistry students using series of weekly assignments.

    PubMed

    Kanin, Maralee R; Pontrello, Jason K

    2016-01-01

    Calls to bring interdisciplinary content and examples into introductory science courses have increased, yet strategies that involve course restructuring often suffer from the need for a significant faculty commitment to motivate change. Minimizing the need for dramatic course reorganization, the structure, reactivity, and chemical biology applications of classes of biological monomers and polymers have been integrated into introductory organic chemistry courses through three series of semester-long weekly assignments that explored (a) Carbohydrates and Oligosaccharides, (b) Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins, and (c) Nucleosides, Nucleotides, and Nucleic Acids. Comparisons of unannounced pre- and post tests revealed improved understanding of a reaction introduced in the assignments, and course examinations evaluated cumulative assignment topics. Course surveys revealed that demonstrating biologically relevant applications consistently throughout the semesters enhanced student interest in the connection between basic organic chemistry content and its application to new and unfamiliar bio-related examples. Covering basic material related to these classes of molecules outside of the classroom opened lecture time to allow the instructor to further build on information developed through the weekly assignments, teaching advanced topics and applications typically not covered in an introductory organic chemistry lecture course. Assignments were implemented as homework, either with or without accompanying discussion, in both laboratory and lecture organic courses within the context of the existing course structures. PMID:26560414

  2. Chemical insights, explicit chemistry and yields of secondary organic aerosol from methylglyoxal and glyoxal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Y. B.; Tan, Y.; Turpin, B. J.

    2013-02-01

    Atmospherically abundant, volatile water soluble organic compounds formed through gas phase chemistry (e.g., glyoxal (C2), methylglyoxal (C3) and acetic acid) have great potential to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) via aqueous chemistry in clouds, fogs and wet aerosols. This paper (1) provides chemical insights into aqueous-phase OH radical-initiated reactions leading to SOA formation from methylglyoxal and (2) uses this and a previously published glyoxal mechanism (Lim et al., 2010) to provide SOA yields for use in chemical transport models. Detailed reaction mechanisms including peroxy radical chemistry and a full kinetic model for aqueous photochemistry of acetic acid and methylglyoxal are developed and validated by comparing simulations with the experimental results from previous studies (Tan et al., 2010, 2012). This new methylglyoxal model is then combined with the previous glyoxal model (Lim et al., 2010), and is used to simulate the profiles of products and to estimate SOA yields. At cloud relevant concentrations (∼ 10-6-∼ 10-3 M; Munger et al., 1995) of glyoxal and methylglyoxal, the major photooxidation products are oxalic acid and pyruvic acid, and simulated SOA yields (by mass) are ∼ 120% for glyoxal and ∼ 80% for methylglyoxal. Oligomerization of unreacted aldehydes during droplet evaporation could enhance yields. In wet aerosols, where total dissolved organics are present at much higher concentrations (∼ 10 M), the major products are oligomers formed via organic radical-radical reactions, and simulated SOA yields (by mass) are ∼ 90% for both glyoxal and methylglyoxal.

  3. The meteoritic record of presolar and early solar system organic chemistry. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, John R.; Pizzarello, Sandra

    1994-01-01

    Carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen isotopic analyses of various classes of organic compounds done in collaboration with Epstein and Krishnamurthy (Caltech) have shown these compounds to be enriched to varying degrees in the heavier isotopes. These results, in particular the large deuterium enrichments, have been interpreted as indicating an interstellar origin for the meteorite compounds or their precursors. Such isotopic fractionations, of hydrogen especially, are characteristic of low temperature ion-molecule reactions in cold interstellar clouds. There is also evidence from the large corresponding suites of alpha-amino and alpha-hydroxy acids found in meteorites suggesting that aqueous phase chemistry on the meteorite parent body played an important role in the formation of these compounds. These data support the hypothesis that interstellar compounds survived in the solar nebula at a radial distance corresponding to the asteroid belt, were incorporated into the parent body in icy, volatile-rich, planetesinals, and underwent further reactions during a period of aqueous activity within the early parent body to give the present suite of meteorite compounds. This formation hypothesis will be discussed and the results of recent isotopic and molecular analyses bearing on it will be presented.

  4. Chemistry, biogenesis, and biological activities of Cinnamomum zeylanicum.

    PubMed

    Jayaprakasha, G K; Rao, L Jagan Mohan

    2011-07-01

    The genus Cinnamomum comprises of several hundreds of species, which are distributed in Asia and Australia. Cinnamomum zeylanicum, the source of cinnamon bark and leaf oils, is an indigenous tree of Sri Lanka, although most oil now comes from cultivated areas. C. zeylanicum is an important spice and aromatic crop having wide applications in flavoring, perfumery, beverages, and medicines. Volatile oils from different parts of cinnamon such as leaves, bark, fruits, root bark, flowers, and buds have been isolated by hydro distillation/steam distillation and supercritical fluid extraction. The chemical compositions of the volatile oils have been identified by GC and GC-MS. More than 80 compounds were identified from different parts of cinnamon. The leaf oil has a major component called eugenol. Cinnamaldehyde and camphor have been reported to be the major components of volatile oils from stem bark and root bark, respectively. Trans-cinnamyl acetate was found to be the major compound in fruits, flowers, and fruit stalks. These volatile oils were found to exhibit antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antidiabetic activities. C. zeylanicum bark and fruits were found to contain proanthocyandins with doubly linked bis-flavan-3-ol units in the molecule. The present review provides a coherent presentation of scattered literature on the chemistry, biogenesis, and biological activities of cinnamon.

  5. Understanding Chemistry Professors' Use of Educational Technologies: An Activity Theoretical Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahveci, Ajda; Gilmer, Penny J.; Southerland, Sherry A.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to understand the influences on chemistry professors' use of educational technology. For this, we use activity theory to focus on two university chemistry professors and the broader activity system in which they work. We analyse their beliefs and past experiences related to teaching, learning, and technology as well as…

  6. Planet Chemistry. Hands-on Activities for Kids from All Planets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Michael, Ed.

    This publication issues a challenge to students to collect data in a nationwide analysis of water hardness. Background information on the chemistry of hard water is presented using a cartoon format, and each of the four activities contains an explanation about the chemistry illustrated in the activity. The effect of hard water on soap, the effect…

  7. Turkish Chemistry Teachers' Views about an Implementation of the Active Learning Approaches in Their Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karamustafaoglu, Sevilay; Costu, Bayram; Ayas, Alipasa

    2006-01-01

    Active learning is advocated as a better way of teaching for several decades in science education. The purpose of this study was to determine chemistry teachers' thinking and views about student-centered activities applicable in chemistry teaching and learning in the study context. A case study approach was used in this research. At the beginning,…

  8. Projects that Assist with Content in a Traditional Organic Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esteb, John J.; Magers, John R.; McNulty, LuAnne; Wilson, Anne M.

    2006-01-01

    Two projects, the reaction notebook and the end-of-semester synthesis activity are described which could help students to adopt a discovery-based learning and engage students in practical applications of chemistry. Students have provided positive feedback on this classroom assignment and have felt that it has helped them crystallize their thought…

  9. Detection of Organics at Mars: How Wet Chemistry Onboard SAM Helps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buch, A.; Freissinet, Caroline; Szopa, C.; Glavin, D.; Coll, P.; Cabane, M.; Eigenbrode, J.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Coscia, D.; Teinturier, S.; Mahaffy, P.

    2013-01-01

    For the first time in the history of space exploration, a mission of interest to astrobiology could be able to analyze refractory organic compounds in the soil of Mars. Wet chemistry experiment allow organic components to be altered in such a way that improves there detection either by releasing the compounds from sample matricies or by changing the chemical structure to be amenable to analytical conditions. The latter is particular important when polar compounds are present. Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM), on the Curiosity rover of the Mars Science Laboratory mission, has onboard two wet chemistry experiments: derivatization and thermochemolysis. Here we report on the nature of the MTBSTFA derivatization experiment on SAM, the detection of MTBSTFA in initial SAM results, and the implications of this detection.

  10. The Discovery-Oriented Approach to Organic Chemistry. 7. Rearrangement of "trans"-Stilbene Oxide with Bismuth Trifluoromethanesulfonate and Other Metal Triflates: A Microscale Green Organic Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, James E.; Huddle, Matthew G.; Rogers, Jamie L.; Yung, Herbie; Mohan, Ram S.

    2008-01-01

    Although green chemistry principles are increasingly stressed in the undergraduate curriculum, there are only a few lab experiments wherein the toxicity of reagents is taken into consideration in the design of the experiment. We report a microscale green organic chemistry laboratory experiment that illustrates the utility of metal triflates,…

  11. 3CPO, Cloud Chemistry and Cloud Physics Organization: Data index, June 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Tichler, J.; Norden, K.; Sharp, D.

    1988-12-01

    This document is an index of the data that was collected as part of the Cloud Chemistry and Cloud Physics Organization (3CPO) cooperative convective storms program which took place in June 1988 in east central Illinois. The objective of 3CPO was to ''assemble at a common time and location, the necessary measurement facilities to provide a previously unattained description of convective storm characteristics in polluted environments. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Evaluation of Potential Impacts of Microbial Activity on Drift Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Wang

    2004-11-18

    ''Evaluation of Potential Impacts of Microbial Activity on Drift Chemistry'' focuses on the potential for microbial communities that could be active in repository emplacement drifts to influence the in-drift bulk chemical environment. This report feeds analyses to support the inclusion or exclusion of features, events, and processes (FEPs) in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA), but this work is not expected to generate direct feeds to the TSPA-LA. The purpose was specified by, and the evaluation was performed and is documented in accordance with, ''Technical Work Plan For: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Analyses'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 172402], Section 2.1). This report addresses all of the FEPs assigned by the technical work plan (TWP), including the development of exclusion arguments for FEPs that are not carried forward to the TSPA-LA. Except for an editorial correction noted in Section 6.2, there were no other deviations from the TWP. This report documents the completion of all assigned tasks, as follows (BSC 2004 DIRS 172402, Section 1.2.1): (1) Perform analyses to evaluate the potential for microbial activity in the waste emplacement drift under the constraints of anticipated physical and chemical conditions. (2) Evaluate uncertainties associated with these analyses. (3) Determine whether the potential for microbes warrants a feed to TSPA-LA to account for predicted effects on repository performance. (4) Provide information to address the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'' (NUREG-1804) (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]) and Key Technical Issues and agreements, as appropriate. (5) Develop information for inclusion or exclusion of FEPs.

  13. Varying responses of insect herbivores to altered plant chemistry under organic and conventional treatments

    PubMed Central

    Staley, Joanna T.; Stewart-Jones, Alex; Pope, Tom W.; Wright, Denis J.; Leather, Simon R.; Hadley, Paul; Rossiter, John T.; van Emden, Helmut F.; Poppy, Guy M.

    2010-01-01

    The hypothesis that plants supplied with organic fertilizers are better defended against insect herbivores than those supplied with synthetic fertilizers was tested over two field seasons. Organic and synthetic fertilizer treatments at two nitrogen concentrations were supplied to Brassica plants, and their effects on the abundance of herbivore species and plant chemistry were assessed. The organic treatments also differed in fertilizer type: a green manure was used for the low-nitrogen treatment, while the high-nitrogen treatment contained green and animal manures. Two aphid species showed different responses to fertilizers: the Brassica specialist Brevicoryne brassicae was more abundant on organically fertilized plants, while the generalist Myzus persicae had higher populations on synthetically fertilized plants. The diamondback moth Plutella xylostella (a crucifer specialist) was more abundant on synthetically fertilized plants and preferred to oviposit on these plants. Glucosinolate concentrations were up to three times greater on plants grown in the organic treatments, while foliar nitrogen was maximized on plants under the higher of the synthetic fertilizer treatments. The varying response of herbivore species to these strong differences in plant chemistry demonstrates that hypotheses on defence in organically grown crops have over-simplified the response of phytophagous insects. PMID:19906673

  14. Substantial secondary organic aerosol formation in a coniferous forest: observations of both day- and nighttime chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Alex K. Y.; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Leaitch, W. Richard; Li, Shao-Meng; Sjostedt, Steve J.; Wentzell, Jeremy J. B.; Liggio, John; Macdonald, Anne Marie

    2016-06-01

    Substantial biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA) formation was investigated in a coniferous forest mountain region in Whistler, British Columbia. A largely biogenic aerosol growth episode was observed, providing a unique opportunity to investigate BSOA formation chemistry in a forested environment with limited influence from anthropogenic emissions. Positive matrix factorization of aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) measurement identified two types of BSOA (BSOA-1 and BSOA-2), which were primarily generated by gas-phase oxidation of monoterpenes and perhaps sesquiterpenes. The temporal variations of BSOA-1 and BSOA-2 can be explained by gas-particle partitioning in response to ambient temperature and the relative importance of different oxidation mechanisms between day and night. While BSOA-1 arises from gas-phase ozonolysis and nitrate radical chemistry at night, BSOA-2 is likely less volatile than BSOA-1 and consists of products formed via gas-phase oxidation by OH radical and ozone during the day. Organic nitrates produced through nitrate radical chemistry can account for 22-33 % of BSOA-1 mass at night. The mass spectra of BSOA-1 and BSOA-2 have higher values of the mass fraction of m/z 91 (f91) compared to the background organic aerosol. Using f91 to evaluate BSOA formation pathways in this unpolluted, forested region, heterogeneous oxidation of BSOA-1 is a minor production pathway of BSOA-2.

  15. Grade/Performance Contracts, Enhanced Communication, Cooperative Learning and Student Performance in Undergraduate Organic Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, Ralph C.

    1997-06-01

    This paper describes a grade/study-performance contract that was designed to increase student retention while maintaining academic performance levels in undergraduate organic chemistry. The experimental course included enhanced communication using electronic mail, and cooperative learning in addition to grade/study-performance contracts. The objective of the grade/study-performance contract was the development of learning skills with creation of a basis for unobtrusive auditing of performance. The retention rate in the experimental course was 0.82 for the first term and 0.93 for the second term. The overall retention was 0.76. This value was 3.8 times the average retention for the same sequence in the previous five years at the same institution. It was seven standard deviations away from the previous mean. The ACS Organic Chemistry Examination percentile score for the control section was 46+25 (n=117). The corresponding data for the experimental section was 53+23 (n=143). When the course was offered with the same instructor, cooperative learning, e-mail, but no grade/study-performance contract the ACS Exam percentile average 37+29. This represents a drop of 9.9 standard deviations for comparison of the means. We conclude that grade/study-performance contracts can be effective in increasing both student performance and retention in undergraduate organic chemistry.

  16. What Can We Do about "Parker"? A Case Study of a Good Student Who Didn't "Get" Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Trisha L.; Bodner, George M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is based on a qualitative study of seven students enrolled in a two-semester organic chemistry course for chemistry and chemical engineering majors that focused on the reasoning the students had used to answer questions on the course exams. Narrative analysis was applied to create case records for each participant that were then…

  17. Effectiveness of Student-Generated Video as a Teaching Tool for an Instrumental Technique in the Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Jeremy T.; Box, Melinda C.; Eguren, Kristen E.; Parker, Thomas A.; Saraldi-Gallardo, Victoria M.; Wolfe, Michael I.; Gallardo-Williams, Maria T.

    2016-01-01

    Multimedia instruction has been shown to serve as an effective learning aid for chemistry students. In this study, the viability of student-generated video instruction for organic chemistry laboratory techniques and procedure was examined and its effectiveness compared to instruction provided by a teaching assistant (TA) was evaluated. After…

  18. A Need to Reassess Physical-Organic Curricula: A Course Enhancement Using Readily Available Quantum Chemistry Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipkowitz, Kenny B.

    1982-01-01

    Describes a graduate-level course in physical-organic chemistry in which students learn to solve problems using computer programs available through the Quantum Chemistry Program Exchange. Includes condensed syllabus and time line showing where various computational programs are introduced. (Author/JN)

  19. 3D-printed devices for continuous-flow organic chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Dragone, Vincenza; Sans, Victor; Rosnes, Mali H; Kitson, Philip J

    2013-01-01

    Summary We present a study in which the versatility of 3D-printing is combined with the processing advantages of flow chemistry for the synthesis of organic compounds. Robust and inexpensive 3D-printed reactionware devices are easily connected using standard fittings resulting in complex, custom-made flow systems, including multiple reactors in a series with in-line, real-time analysis using an ATR-IR flow cell. As a proof of concept, we utilized two types of organic reactions, imine syntheses and imine reductions, to show how different reactor configurations and substrates give different products. PMID:23766811

  20. Organic chemistry as a language and the implications of chemical linguistics for structural and retrosynthetic analyses.

    PubMed

    Cadeddu, Andrea; Wylie, Elizabeth K; Jurczak, Janusz; Wampler-Doty, Matthew; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2014-07-28

    Methods of computational linguistics are used to demonstrate that a natural language such as English and organic chemistry have the same structure in terms of the frequency of, respectively, text fragments and molecular fragments. This quantitative correspondence suggests that it is possible to extend the methods of computational corpus linguistics to the analysis of organic molecules. It is shown that within organic molecules bonds that have highest information content are the ones that 1) define repeat/symmetry subunits and 2) in asymmetric molecules, define the loci of potential retrosynthetic disconnections. Linguistics-based analysis appears well-suited to the analysis of complex structural and reactivity patterns within organic molecules.

  1. Thalidomide Makes a Comeback: A Case Discussion Exercise That Integrates Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Nicole; Cornely, Kathleen

    2001-06-01

    The case discussion method, which involves teaching scientific theory in a framework that students can relate to their own world, is an interdisciplinary pedagogical tool. Therefore, case study exercises can be used to integrate biochemistry with other advanced chemistry courses. The case presented here can be used at the end of a second-semester organic chemistry course or in an introductory biochemistry course. The case is a fact-based, fictional story in which an FDA official must decide whether to carry out the agency's threat to shut down several buyers clubs that import thalidomide from overseas and dispense it to their members for the treatment of AIDS. Students are required to read the body of the case, analyze data, and search for information using limited leads. Using well-considered arguments based on their research, they are asked to come to conclusions about how the element of risk involved in thalidomide distribution is assessed. They apply their knowledge of biochemistry to assess how thalidomide acts at the cellular level and they apply their knowledge of organic chemistry in writing mechanisms of thalidomide hydrolysis and in the design of thalidomide analogs. Students are assessed on their ability to work in groups, to critically analyze scientific data, and to develop public policies based on risk-benefit analysis.

  2. Nickel-Catalyzed Suzuki–Miyaura Cross-Coupling in a Green Alcohol Solvent for an Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A modern undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory experiment involving the Suzuki–Miyaura coupling is reported. Although Suzuki–Miyaura couplings typically employ palladium catalysts in environmentally harmful solvents, this experiment features the use of inexpensive nickel catalysis, in addition to a “green” alcohol solvent. The experiment employs heterocyclic substrates, which are important pharmaceutical building blocks. Thus, this laboratory procedure exposes students to a variety of contemporary topics in organic chemistry, including transition metal-catalyzed cross-couplings, green chemistry, and the importance of heterocycles in drug discovery, none of which are well represented in typical undergraduate organic chemistry curricula. The experimental protocol uses commercially available reagents and is useful in both organic and inorganic instructional laboratories. PMID:25774064

  3. A Titanium-Organic Framework as an Exemplar of Combining the Chemistry of Metal- and Covalent-Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ha L; Gándara, Felipe; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Doan, Tan L H; Cordova, Kyle E; Yaghi, Omar M

    2016-04-01

    A crystalline material with a two-dimensional structure, termed metal-organic framework-901 (MOF-901), was prepared using a strategy that combines the chemistry of MOFs and covalent-organic frameworks (COFs). This strategy involves in situ generation of an amine-functionalized titanium oxo cluster, Ti6O6(OCH3)6(AB)6 (AB = 4-aminobenzoate), which was linked with benzene-1,4-dialdehyde using imine condensation reactions, typical of COFs. The crystal structure of MOF-901 is composed of hexagonal porous layers that are likely stacked in staggered conformation (hxl topology). This MOF represents the first example of combining metal cluster chemistry with dynamic organic covalent bond formation to give a new crystalline, extended framework of titanium metal, which is rarely used in MOFs. The incorporation of Ti(IV) units made MOF-901 useful in the photocatalyzed polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA). The resulting polyMMA product was obtained with a high-number-average molar mass (26 850 g mol(-1)) and low polydispersity index (1.6), which in many respects are better than those achieved by the commercially available photocatalyst (P-25 TiO2). Additionally, the catalyst can be isolated, reused, and recycled with no loss in performance.

  4. From the interstellar clouds, through the inner to the outer solar system: a universally distributed complex organic chemistry. Preface.

    PubMed

    Raulin, F; Greenberg, J M

    1997-01-01

    High molecular weight organic compounds are involved in the chemistry and physics of many astrophysical and planetary objects. They are or should be present in interstellar dust, in comets and meteorites, in the Giant planets and Titan, in asteroids Triton and icy satellites. They represent a class of very complex organic material, part of which may have played a role in the origin of life on Earth. Thus they directly concern prebiotic chemistry and exobiology.

  5. Comparative analysis of click chemistry mediated activity-based protein profiling in cell lysates.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yinliang; Yang, Xiaomeng; Verhelst, Steven H L

    2013-01-01

    Activity-based protein profiling uses chemical probes that covalently attach to active enzyme targets. Probes with conventional tags have disadvantages, such as limited cell permeability or steric hindrance around the reactive group. A tandem labeling strategy with click chemistry is now widely used to study enzyme targets in situ and in vivo. Herein, the probes are reacted in live cells, whereas the ensuing detection by click chemistry takes place in cell lysates. We here make a comparison of the efficiency of the activity-based tandem labeling strategy by using Cu(I)-catalyzed and strain-promoted click chemistry, different ligands and different lysis conditions. PMID:24126377

  6. Contribution of microbial activity to carbon chemistry in clouds.

    PubMed

    Vaïtilingom, Mickaël; Amato, Pierre; Sancelme, Martine; Laj, Paolo; Leriche, Maud; Delort, Anne-Marie

    2010-01-01

    The biodegradation of the most abundant atmospheric organic C1 to C4 compounds (formate, acetate, lactate, succinate) by five selected representative microbial strains (three Pseudomonas strains, one Sphingomonas strain, and one yeast strain) isolated from cloud water at the puy de Dôme has been studied. Experiments were first conducted under model conditions and consisted of a pure strain incubated in the presence of a single organic compound. Kinetics showed the ability of the isolates to degrade atmospheric compounds at temperatures representative of low-altitude clouds (5 degrees C and 17 degrees C). Then, to provide data that can be extrapolated to real situations, microcosm experiments were developed. A solution that chemically mimicked the composition of cloud water was used as an incubation medium for microbial strains. Under these conditions, we determined that microbial activity would significantly contribute to the degradation of formate, acetate, and succinate in cloud water at 5 degrees C and 17 degrees C, with lifetimes of 0.4 to 69.1 days. Compared with the reactivity involving free radicals, our results suggest that biological activity drives the oxidation of carbonaceous compounds during the night (90 to 99%), while its contribution accounts for 2 to 37% of the reactivity during the day, competing with photochemistry.

  7. Organic active materials for batteries

    DOEpatents

    Abouimrane, Ali; Weng, Wei; Amine, Khalil

    2016-08-16

    A rechargeable battery includes a compound having at least two active sites, R.sup.1 and R.sup.2; wherein the at least two active sites are interconnected by one or more conjugated moieties; each active site is coordinated to one or more metal ions M.sup.a+ or each active site is configured to coordinate to one or more metal ions; and "a" is 1, 2, or 3.

  8. Incorporating More Individual Accountability in Group Activities in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Charles T., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    A modified model of cooperative learning known as the GIG model (for group-individual-group) designed and implemented in a large enrollment freshman chemistry course. The goal of the model is to establish a cooperative environment while emphasizing greater individual accountability using both group and individual assignments. The assignments were…

  9. Laboratory Studies of the Reactive Chemistry and Changing CCN Properties of Secondary Organic Aerosol, Including Model Development

    SciTech Connect

    Scot Martin

    2013-01-31

    The chemical evolution of secondary-organic-aerosol (SOA) particles and how this evolution alters their cloud-nucleating properties were studied. Simplified forms of full Koehler theory were targeted, specifically forms that contain only those aspects essential to describing the laboratory observations, because of the requirement to minimize computational burden for use in integrated climate and chemistry models. The associated data analysis and interpretation have therefore focused on model development in the framework of modified kappa-Koehler theory. Kappa is a single parameter describing effective hygroscopicity, grouping together several separate physicochemical parameters (e.g., molar volume, surface tension, and van't Hoff factor) that otherwise must be tracked and evaluated in an iterative full-Koehler equation in a large-scale model. A major finding of the project was that secondary organic materials produced by the oxidation of a range of biogenic volatile organic compounds for diverse conditions have kappa values bracketed in the range of 0.10 +/- 0.05. In these same experiments, somewhat incongruently there was significant chemical variation in the secondary organic material, especially oxidation state, as was indicated by changes in the particle mass spectra. Taken together, these findings then support the use of kappa as a simplified yet accurate general parameter to represent the CCN activation of secondary organic material in large-scale atmospheric and climate models, thereby greatly reducing the computational burden while simultaneously including the most recent mechanistic findings of laboratory studies.

  10. Explicit modeling of organic chemistry and secondary organic aerosol partitioning for Mexico City and its outflow plume

    SciTech Connect

    Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, Sasha; Aumont, B.; Baker, A.; Camredon, M.; Hodzic, Alma; Tyndall, G. S.; Apel, Eric; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2011-12-21

    The evolution of organic aerosols (OA) in Mexico City and its outflow is investigated with the nearly explicit gas phase photochemistry model GECKO-A (Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere), wherein precursor hydrocarbons are oxidized to numerous intermediate species for which vapor pressures are computed and used to determine gas/particle partitioning in a chemical box model. Precursor emissions included observed C3-10 alkanes, alkenes, and light aromatics, as well as larger n-alkanes (up to C25) not directly observed but estimated by scaling to particulate emissions according to their volatility. Conditions were selected for comparison with observations made in March 2006 (MILAGRO). The model successfully reproduces the magnitude and diurnal shape for both primary (POA) and secondary (SOA) organic aerosols, with POA peaking in the early morning at 15-20 ug m-3, and SOA peaking at 10-15 μg m-3 during mid-day. The majority (> 75%) of the model SOA stems from the large n-alkanes, with the remainder mostly from the light aromatics. Simulated OA elemental composition reproduces observed H/C and O/C ratios reasonably well, although modeled ratios develop more slowly than observations suggest. SOA chemical composition is initially dominated by *- hydroxy ketones and nitrates from the large alkanes, with contributions from peroxy acyl nitrates and, at later times when NOx is lower, organic hydroperoxides. The simulated plume-integrated OA mass continues to increase for several days downwind despite dilution-induced particle evaporation, since oxidation chemistry leading to SOA formation remains strong. In this model, the plume SOA burden several days downwind exceeds that leaving the city by a factor of >3. These results suggest significant regional radiative impacts of SOA.

  11. The Isolation of Rubber from Milkweed Leaves. An Introductory Organic Chemistry Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volaric, Lisa; Hagen, John P.

    2002-01-01

    We present an introductory organic chemistry lab in which students isolate rubber from the leaves of milkweed plants (Asclepias syriaca). Students isolated rubber with a recovery of 2.4 ± 1.8% and 1.8 ± 0.7% for the microscale and macroscale procedures, respectively. Infrared spectra of their products were compared with the spectrum of synthetic rubber, cis-polyisoprene. Students tested for elasticity of their product by twisting it on a spatula and pulling; all students found some degree of elasticity.

  12. A Fifty-Year Love Affair with Organic Chemistry (by William S. Johnson)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffman, Reviewed By George B.; Kauffman, Laurie M.

    1999-12-01

    This latest volume is the 20th in Jeff Seeman's projected 22-volume series of autobiographies of 20th-century organic chemists that began publication in 1990 (Kauffman, G. B. J. Chem. Educ. 1991, 68, A21). Unfortunately, Johnson did not live to see this volume in print. Ted Bartlett and Ray Conrow reviewed the final manuscript, galleys, and page proofs; and Ted Bartlett, Paul Bartlett, John D. Roberts, and Gilbert Stork contributed an epilogue that complements Johnson's own words, adds a warm, personal final touch that he was unable to provide, and incorporates his final research into the volume. Born in New Rochelle, New York, on February 24, 1913, William Summer Johnson attended Amherst College with the aid of a scholarship and various odd jobs such as tending furnace, washing dishes, and playing saxophone in dance bands (he seriously considered becoming a professional musician). Here he became enamored with organic chemistry, which he taught as an instructor for a year after his graduation magna cum laude in 1936. He then worked with a fellowship under Louis Fieser, who sparked his interest in steroids, at Harvard University, from which he received his M.A. (1938) and Ph.D. (1940) degrees. In 1940 Johnson joined the faculty at the University of Wisconsin, where he rose through the ranks, eventually becoming Homer Adkins Professor of Chemistry (1954-60). He began the total synthesis of steroids, the main subject of his life's work, "which soon proved to be the hottest synthetic target of the time". In 1960 he accepted an invitation to become head of and to upgrade the Stanford University Chemistry Department. With faculty recruiting as his primary concern, he was able to add Carl Djerassi, Paul J. Flory, Harden M. McConnell, Henry Taube, and Eugene E. van Tamelen to the department, resulting in its spectacular rise from 15th to 5th place in the nation. He remained at Stanford for the rest of his career, serving as department head for nine years. He died at the

  13. A One-Pot Synthesis of m-Terphenyls: A Guided Exploration of Reaction Chemistry, Chromatography, and Spectroscopy. A Miniproject for the Advanced Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anam, Kishorekumar T.; Curtis, Michael P.; Irfan, Muhammad J.; Johnson, Michael P.; Royer, Andrew P.; Shahmohammadi, Kianor; Vinod, Thottumkara K.

    2002-05-01

    This four-week project-based laboratory exercise, developed for advanced organic chemistry students, involves a one-pot synthesis of m-terphenyls. Chemistry of aryl diazonium salts and Grignard reagents and reactivity of aryne intermediates toward nucleophilic reagents form the reaction chemistry basis for the project. The project exposes students to a number of important laboratory techniques (thin-layer chromatography, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and column chromatography) for monitoring reaction progress and product isolation. A variety of spectroscopic techniques, including IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, and attached proton test are used for product characterization. Students are also introduced to a useful empirical relationship to help predict (with considerable accuracy) the 13C chemical shift values of carbon atoms of substituted benzenes.

  14. Distinct optical chemistry of dissolved organic matter in urban pond ecosystems.

    PubMed

    McEnroe, Nicola A; Williams, Clayton J; Xenopoulos, Marguerite A; Porcal, Petr; Frost, Paul C

    2013-01-01

    Urbanization has the potential to dramatically alter the biogeochemistry of receiving freshwater ecosystems. We examined the optical chemistry of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in forty-five urban ponds across southern Ontario, Canada to examine whether optical characteristics in these relatively new ecosystems are distinct from other freshwater systems. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations ranged from 2 to 16 mg C L(-1) across the ponds with an average value of 5.3 mg C L(-1). Excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) modelling showed urban pond DOM to be characterized by microbial-like and, less importantly, by terrestrial derived humic-like components. The relatively transparent, non-humic DOM in urban ponds was more similar to that found in open water, lake ecosystems than to rivers or wetlands. After irradiation equivalent to 1.7 days of natural solar radiation, DOC concentrations, on average, decreased by 38% and UV absorbance decreased by 25%. Irradiation decreased the relative abundances of terrestrial humic-like components and increased protein-like aspects of the DOM pool. These findings suggest that high internal production and/or prolonged exposure to sunlight exerts a distinct and significant influence on the chemistry of urban pond DOM, which likely reduces its chemical similarity with upstream sources. These properties of urban pond DOM may alter its biogeochemical role in these relatively novel aquatic ecosystems.

  15. Distinct Optical Chemistry of Dissolved Organic Matter in Urban Pond Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    McEnroe, Nicola A.; Williams, Clayton J.; Xenopoulos, Marguerite A.; Porcal, Petr; Frost, Paul C.

    2013-01-01

    Urbanization has the potential to dramatically alter the biogeochemistry of receiving freshwater ecosystems. We examined the optical chemistry of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in forty-five urban ponds across southern Ontario, Canada to examine whether optical characteristics in these relatively new ecosystems are distinct from other freshwater systems. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations ranged from 2 to 16 mg C L-1 across the ponds with an average value of 5.3 mg C L-1. Excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) modelling showed urban pond DOM to be characterized by microbial-like and, less importantly, by terrestrial derived humic-like components. The relatively transparent, non-humic DOM in urban ponds was more similar to that found in open water, lake ecosystems than to rivers or wetlands. After irradiation equivalent to 1.7 days of natural solar radiation, DOC concentrations, on average, decreased by 38% and UV absorbance decreased by 25%. Irradiation decreased the relative abundances of terrestrial humic-like components and increased protein-like aspects of the DOM pool. These findings suggest that high internal production and/or prolonged exposure to sunlight exerts a distinct and significant influence on the chemistry of urban pond DOM, which likely reduces its chemical similarity with upstream sources. These properties of urban pond DOM may alter its biogeochemical role in these relatively novel aquatic ecosystems. PMID:24348908

  16. Pollution Prevention Plan for the Y-12 Analytical Chemistry Organization Off-Site Union Valley Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J. G.

    2010-03-01

    The Y-12 Analytical Chemistry Organization (ACO) Off-Site Union Valley Facility (Union Valley Facility) is managed by Babcock and Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, L.L.C. (B and W Y-12) through the Y-12 National Security Complex organization. Accordingly, the Y-12 Pollution Prevention Program encompasses the operations conducted at the Union Valley Facility. The Y-12 Program is designed to fully comply with state, federal and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements concerning waste minimization/pollution prevention as documented in the Y-12 Pollution Prevention Program Plan. The Program is formulated to reduce the generation and toxicity of all Y-12 wastes in all media, including those wastes generated by the Union Valley Facility operations. All regulatory and DOE requirements are met by the Y-12 Program Plan.

  17. Organic chemistry on planetary satellites around the gas giants and implications for habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coustenis, Athena

    2015-08-01

    The icy satellites of the outer solar system present a variety of chemical compositions where initial complements of ices, minerals, and elements provided during formation have been subjected to various internal and external processes. Additional material has been gained via cometary and meteoritic infall, transfer of material between satellites and magnetospheric interactions. Exchanges also occur between the surface and the interior.Organic compounds have been detected on several of our Solar System’s satellites around the gas giant planets, each with unique characteristics as to organic chemistry. Jupiter’s Europa, Ganymede and Callisto show evidence of undersurface layers of liquid water that offer potentially interesting environments for organic synthesis. Spectra obtained by Galileo’s NIMS show absorption bands indicative of C-H and C≡N organic compounds. Potential organics on the large Galilean moons include CO2, carbonic acid and different kinds of carbonates, hydrocarbons and nitriles.Saturn’s Titan is a chemical factory, where the mother molecules N2 (at about 95%), CH4 (at 1.5-5%) and H2 (at 0.1%) produce a host of hydrocarbons and nitriles. The Cassini-Huygens mission has shown Titan to be indeed very rich in organic molecules, which are formed in the upper atmosphere and then deposited on the surface. Some of these species are of prebiotic importance, such as C6H6, HC3N and HCN. Titan's surface displays unique geomorphological features while it probably overlies an internal liquid water ocean. The organic deposits, if in contact with the underground liquid water could undergo an aqueous chemistry that could replicate aspects of life’s origins. Enceladus, a smaller moon of Saturn, ejects large amounts of water and organics in the space from plumes located in its southern pole. The implied requirement for liquid water reservoirs under its surface, significantly broadens the diversity of solar system environments which could be habitable

  18. Organic Chemistry Students' Fragmented Ideas about the Structure and Function of Nucleophiles and Electrophiles: A Concept Map Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anzovino, Mary E.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2016-01-01

    Organic chemistry students struggle with multiple aspects of reaction mechanisms and the curved arrow notation used by organic chemists. Many faculty believe that an understanding of nucleophiles and electrophiles, among other concepts, is required before students can develop fluency with the electronpushing formalism (EPF). An expert concept map…

  19. Mechanisms before Reactions: A Mechanistic Approach to the Organic Chemistry Curriculum Based on Patterns of Electron Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Alison B.; Ogilvie, William W.

    2015-01-01

    A significant redesign of the introductory organic chemistry curriculum at the authors' institution is described. There are two aspects that differ greatly from a typical functional group approach. First, organic reaction mechanisms and the electron-pushing formalism are taught before students have learned a single reaction. The conservation of…

  20. Synthesis of 10-Ethyl Flavin: A Multistep Synthesis Organic Chemistry Laboratory Experiment for Upper-Division Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sichula, Vincent A.

    2015-01-01

    A multistep synthesis of 10-ethyl flavin was developed as an organic chemistry laboratory experiment for upper-division undergraduate students. Students synthesize 10-ethyl flavin as a bright yellow solid via a five-step sequence. The experiment introduces students to various hands-on experimental organic synthetic techniques, such as column…

  1. Self-Directed Activity-Based Learning and Achievement in High School Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassett, Meighan M.; Martinez, James; Martin, Ellice P.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of student-directed activity-based learning (SDABL) were examined in two high school chemistry classes. Students in the SDABL class were given pretest results, a list of standards to be mastered, and a chart of learning activities categorized by difficulty level. They selected activities to meet their needs and preferences.…

  2. Integration of Computational and Preparative Techniques to Demonstrate Physical Organic Concepts in Synthetic Organic Chemistry: An Example Using Diels-Alder Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, David R. J.

    2004-01-01

    The Diels-Alder reaction is used as an example for showing the integration of computational and preparative techniques, which help in demonstrating the physical organic concepts in synthetic organic chemistry. These experiments show that the students should not accept the computational results without questioning them and in many Diels-Alder…

  3. Liaison activities with the Institute of Physical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences: FY 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, C.H.; Elovich, R.J.

    1997-09-01

    The Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences is conducting a program of fundamental and applied research into the chemistry of the actinides and technetium in alkaline media such as are present in the Hanford Site underground waste storage tanks. This work is being coordinated and the results disseminated through a technical liaison maintained at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The technical liaison is performing laboratory studies on plutonium chemistry in alkaline media. The activities at the Institute of Physical Chemistry and through the liaison are pursued to improve understanding of the chemical behavior of key long-lived radioactive elements under current operating and proposed tank waste processing conditions. Both activities are supported by the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program under the Office of Science and Technology of the U.S. Department of Energy.

  4. The sequence of learning cycle activities in high school chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Michael R.; Renner, John W.

    The sequence of the three phases of two high school learning cycles in chemistry was altered in order to: (I ) give insights into the factors which account for the success of the learning cycle, (2) serve as an indirect test of the association between Piaget's theory and the learning cycle, and (3) to compare the learning cycle with traditional instruction. Each of the six sequences (one n o d and five altered) was studied with content and atritudc measures. The outcomes of the study supported the contention that the normal learning cycle sequence is the optimum sequence for achievement of content knowledge.

  5. The Molecular Modeling Workbook for Organic Chemistry (by Warren J. Hehre, Alan J. Shusterman, and Janet E. Nelson)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouch, R. David

    1999-09-01

    can be used to display models and data obtained using Spartan or MacSpartan and stored on a disk. In this way, student exercises can be customized by the instructor or the instructor can prepare customized examples for use in lecture. Each chapter in the workbook contains a series of 3 to 17 exercises that use models and associated data contained on the accompanying CD-ROM. The exercises are not simply cookbook procedures in which the student is directed how to solve a problem. Instead, the authors provide background in a two-part tutorial and several essays that describe the information that can be obtained through molecular modeling, and then introduce a problem in organic chemistry that can be addressed using molecular modeling. The student is left to determine how best to obtain the requested data. For example, an exercise in the chapter Acids & Bases directs the student to determine the atomic charges and view the electrostatic potential map of the conjugate bases of three organic acids. The student is not, however, told which menu to pull or button to push. At the end of the exercise, the student is directed to compare the reactivity of the acids with the data collected from Spartan View. The exercises are relatively easy to complete after spending a few minutes with the tutorials, and many require students to compare the results of calculations with the reactivity of the molecules as discussed in the traditional lecture portion of the course. In this sense, the workbook provides a meaningful link between molecular modeling exercises outside of class and activities in the classroom. While some exercises involve comparing the energies of intermediates or transition states, others are more like videos of processes. Instructors will find many of these to be useful as visual aids in lecture. Mechanisms of Ring Inversion, for example, allows the instructor to show the stepwise ring flip of cyclohexane. Although some of the animations are very similar to those

  6. Oxygenated Organic Chemicals in the Pacific Troposphere: Distribution, Sources and Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Hanwant B.; Salas, L.; Chatfield, R.; Czech, E.; Fried, A.; Evans, M.; Jacob, D. J.; Blake, D.; Heikes, B.; Talbot, R.

    2003-01-01

    Airborne measurements of a large number of oxygenated organic chemicals (Oxorgs) were carried out in the Pacific troposphere (0.1-12 km) in the Spring of 2001 (Feb. 24-April 10). Specifically these measuremen ts included acetone, methylethyl ketone (MEK), methanol, ethanol, ace taldehyde, propionaldehyde, PANS, and organic nitrates. Complementary measurements of formaldehyde, organic peroxides, and tracers were al so available. Ox-orgs were abundant in the clean troposphere and were greatly enhanced in the outflow regions from Asia. Their mixing ratios were typically highest in the lower troposphere and declined toward s the upper troposphere and the lowermost stratosphere. Their total a bundance (Ox-orgs) significantly exceeded that of NMHC (C2-C8 NMHC). A comparison of these data with observations collected some seven yea rs earlier (Feb.-March, 1994), did not reveal any significant changes . Throughout the troposphere mixing ratios of Ox-orgs were strongly c orrelated with each other as well as with tracers of fossil and bioma sshiof'uel combustion. Analysis of the relative enhancement of selected Oxorgs with respect to CH3Cl and CO in twelve sampled plumes, origi nating from fires, is used to assess their primary and secondary sour ces from biomass combustion. The composition of these plumes also ind icates a large shift of reactive nitrogen into the PAN reservoir ther eby limiting ozone formation. The Harvard 3-D photochemical model, th at uses state of the art chemistry and source information, is used to compare simulated and observed mixing ratios of selected species. A 1 -D model is used to explore the chemistry of aldehydes. These results will be presented.

  7. The Organic Puppet Theatre. Health Activities Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Terry Louis; Sorenson, Linda M.

    The Organic Puppet Theatre is a creative medium for the classroom, home, day care center, hospital, community center, and clinic. It is designed for children in the early elementary years. The objective of the activity is to acquaint children with the functions of the various organs of the body, how they interact, and how they are affected by poor…

  8. Poster 6: Influence of traces elements in the organic chemistry of upper atmosphere of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathe, Christophe; Carrasco, Nathalie; Trainer, Melissa G.; Gautier, Thomas; Gavilan, Lisseth; Dubois, David; Li, Xiang

    2016-06-01

    In the upper atmosphere of Titan, complex chemistry leads to the formation of organic aerosols. Since the work of Khare et al. in 1984, several experiments investigated the formation of Titan aerosols, so called tholins, in the laboratory. It has been suggested that nitrogen-containing compounds may contribute significantly to the aerosols formation process. In this study, we focused on the influence of pyridine, the simplest nitrogenous aromatic hydrocarbon, on the chemistry of Titan's atmosphere and on aerosol formation. To assess the effect of pyridine on aerosol formation chemistry, we used two different experimental setups : a capacitively coupled radio-frequency (electronic impact), and a VUV Deuterium lamp (photochemistry) in a collaboration between LATMOS (Guyancourt) and NASA-GSFC (Greenbelt), respectively. Aerosols produced with both setups were first analyzed using a FTIR-ATR (Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy - Attenuated Total Reflection) with a spectral range of 4000-800 cm-1 to characterize their optical properties. Next the samples were analysed using a Bruker Autoflex Speed MALDI mass spectrometer with a m/z range up to 2000 Da in order to infer their composition. Infrared spectroscopy analysis showed that tholins produced with a nitrogen-methane gas mixture (95:5) and nitrogenpyridine gas mixture (99:250ppm) present very similar spectra features. Tholins produced with a mixture of nitrogenmethane-pyridine (99:1:250ppm) do not present aliphatic CH2 or CH3 vibrational signatures. This could indicate a cyclic polymerization by a pyridine skeleton. Mass spectrometry is still in progress to confirm this.

  9. On the use of plant emitted volatile organic compounds for atmospheric chemistry simulation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Hohaus, T.; Yu, Z.; Tillmann, R.; Kuhn, U.; Andres, S.; Kaminski, M.; Wegener, R.; Novelli, A.; Fuchs, H.; Wahner, A.

    2015-12-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) contribute to about 90% of the emitted VOC globally with isoprene being one of the most abundant BVOC (Guenther 2002). Intensive efforts in studying and understanding the impact of BVOC on atmospheric chemistry were undertaken in the recent years. However many uncertainties remain, e.g. field studies have shown that in wooded areas measured OH reactivity can often not be explained by measured BVOC and their oxidation products (e.g. Noelscher et al. 2012). This discrepancy may be explained by either a lack of understanding of BVOC sources or insufficient understanding of BVOC oxidation mechanisms. Plants emit a complex VOC mixture containing likely many compounds which have not yet been measured or identified (Goldstein and Galbally 2007). A lack of understanding BVOC sources limits bottom-up estimates of secondary products of BVOC oxidation such as SOA. Similarly, the widespread oversimplification of atmospheric chemistry in simulation experiments, using single compound or simple BVOC mixtures to study atmospheric chemistry processes limit our ability to assess air quality and climate impacts of BVOC. We will present applications of the new extension PLUS (PLant chamber Unit for Simulation) to our atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR. PLUS is used to produce representative BVOC mixtures from direct plant emissions. We will report on the performance and characterization of the newly developed chamber. As an exemplary application, trees typical of a Boreal forest environment were used to compare OH reactivity as directly measured by LIF to the OH reactivity calculated from BVOC measured by GC-MS and PTRMS. The comparison was performed for both, primary emissions of trees without any influence of oxidizing agents and using different oxidation schemes. For the monoterpene emitters investigated here, we show that discrepancies between measured and calculated total OH reactivity increase with increasing degree of oxidation

  10. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and chemistry experiments. Topics include sublimation, electronegativity, electrolysis, experimental aspects of strontianite, halide test, evaluation of present and future computer programs in chemistry, formula building, care of glass/saturated calomel…

  11. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Describes experiments, demonstrations, activities and ideas relating to various fields of chemistry to be used in chemistry courses of secondary schools. Three experiments concerning differential thermal analysis are among these notes presented. (HM)

  12. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Described are eight chemistry experiments and demonstrations applicable to introductory chemistry courses. Activities include: measure of lattice enthalpy, Le Chatelier's principle, decarboxylation of soap, use of pocket calculators in pH measurement, and making nylon. (SL)

  13. Chemistry of Mesoporous Organosilica in Nanotechnology: Molecularly Organic-Inorganic Hybridization into Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Shi, Jianlin

    2016-05-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid materials aiming to combine the individual advantages of organic and inorganic components while overcoming their intrinsic drawbacks have shown great potential for future applications in broad fields. In particular, the integration of functional organic fragments into the framework of mesoporous silica to fabricate mesoporous organosilica materials has attracted great attention in the scientific community for decades. The development of such mesoporous organosilica materials has shifted from bulk materials to nanosized mesoporous organosilica nanoparticles (designated as MONs, in comparison with traditional mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs)) and corresponding applications in nanoscience and nanotechnology. In this comprehensive review, the state-of-art progress of this important hybrid nanomaterial family is summarized, focusing on the structure/composition-performance relationship of MONs of well-defined morphology, nanostructure, and nanoparticulate dimension. The synthetic strategies and the corresponding mechanisms for the design and construction of MONs with varied morphologies, compositions, nanostructures, and functionalities are overviewed initially. Then, the following part specifically concentrates on their broad spectrum of applications in nanotechnology, mainly in nanomedicine, nanocatalysis, and nanofabrication. Finally, some critical issues, presenting challenges and the future development of MONs regarding the rational synthesis and applications in nanotechnology are summarized and discussed. It is highly expected that such a unique molecularly organic-inorganic nanohybrid family will find practical applications in nanotechnology, and promote the advances of this discipline regarding hybrid chemistry and materials.

  14. Molecular identification of organic compounds in atmospheric complex mixtures and relationship to atmospheric chemistry and sources.

    PubMed Central

    Mazurek, Monica A

    2002-01-01

    This article describes a chemical characterization approach for complex organic compound mixtures associated with fine atmospheric particles of diameters less than 2.5 m (PM2.5). It relates molecular- and bulk-level chemical characteristics of the complex mixture to atmospheric chemistry and to emission sources. Overall, the analytical approach describes the organic complex mixtures in terms of a chemical mass balance (CMB). Here, the complex mixture is related to a bulk elemental measurement (total carbon) and is broken down systematically into functional groups and molecular compositions. The CMB and molecular-level information can be used to understand the sources of the atmospheric fine particles through conversion of chromatographic data and by incorporation into receptor-based CMB models. Once described and quantified within a mass balance framework, the chemical profiles for aerosol organic matter can be applied to existing air quality issues. Examples include understanding health effects of PM2.5 and defining and controlling key sources of anthropogenic fine particles. Overall, the organic aerosol compositional data provide chemical information needed for effective PM2.5 management. PMID:12634131

  15. Final Report: Main Group Element Chemistry in Service of Hydrogen Storage and Activation

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Dixon; Anthony J. Arduengo, III

    2010-09-30

    goal was met in terms of reducing the number of costly experiments and helping to focus the experimental effort on the potentially optimal targets. We have used computational chemistry approaches to predict the thermodynamic properties of a wide range of compounds containing boron, nitrogen, hydrogen, and other elements as appropriate including carbon. These calculations were done in most cases with high level molecular orbital theory methods that have small error bars on the order of ± 1 to 2 kcal/mol. The results were used to benchmark more approximate methods such as density functional theory for larger systems and for database development. We predicted reliable thermodynamics for thousands of compounds for release and regeneration schemes to aid/guide materials design and process design and simulation. These are the first reliable computed values for these compounds and for many represent the only available values. Overall, the computational results have provided us with new insights into the chemistry of main group and organic-base chemical hydrogen systems from the release of hydrogen to the regeneration of spent fuel. A number of experimental accomplishments were also made in this project. The experimental work on hydrogen storage materials centered on activated polarized σ- or π-bonded frameworks that hold the potential for ready dihydrogen activation, uptake, and eventually release. To this end, a large number of non-traditional valence systems including carbenes, cyanocarbons, and C-B and and B-N systems were synthesized and examined. During the course of these studies an important lead arose from the novel valency of a class of stable organic singlet bi-radical systems. A synthetic strategy to an “endless” hydrogen storage polymer has been developed based on our cyanocarbon chemistry. A key issue with the synthetic efforts was being able to link the kinetics of release with the size of the substituents as it was difficult to develop a low molecular

  16. Molecular Chemistry of Organic Aerosols Through the Application of High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nizkorodov, Serguei; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

    2011-01-05

    Understanding of molecular composition and fundamental chemical transformations of organic aerosols (OA) during their formation and aging is both a major challenge and the area of greatest uncertainty in atmospheric research. Particularly little is known about fundamental relationship between the chemical composition and physicochemical properties of OA, their atmospheric history, evolution, and impact on the environment. Ambient soft-ionization methods combined with high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS) analysis provide detailed information on the molecular content of OA that is pivotal for improved understanding of their complex composition, multi-phase aging chemistry, direct (light absorption and scattering) and indirect (aerosol-cloud interactions) effects on atmospheric radiation and climate, and health effects. The HR-MS methods can detect thousands of individual OA constituents at once, provide their elemental formulae from accurate mass measurements, and provide structural information based on tandem mass spectrometry. Integration with additional analytical tools, such as chromatography and UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy, makes it possible to further separate OA compounds by their polarity and ability to absorb solar radiation. The goal of this perspective is to describe modern HR-MS methods, review recent applications to field and laboratory studies of OA, and explain how the information obtained from HR-MS methods can be translated into improved understanding of OA chemistry.

  17. Green Chemistry in the Organic Teaching Laboratory: An Environmentally Benign Synthesis of Adipic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Scott M.; Hutchison, James E.

    2000-12-01

    Environmentally benign ("green") chemical techniques are growing in importance in academic and industrial research laboratories. Such chemistry has been slow to appear in teaching laboratories, owing in part to a lack of published material on this subject. Recent developments in green synthesis provide opportunities to introduce this material in teaching laboratories. We present a synthesis of adipic acid that utilizes green reagents (hydrogen peroxide as the oxidant), solvents (water), and methods (phase-transfer catalysis, catalyst recycling). The synthesis works well and provides an excellent forum for emphasizing green chemical concepts while teaching laboratory skills. It demonstrates reuse of a product, synthesis using a nonhazardous solvent, elimination of deleterious by-products, and use of a recyclable catalyst. It can be carried out on either the macroscale or microscale and generates little waste if the catalyst solution is recycled. This experiment fits well in a sophomore organic sequence; it covers the topics of oxidation, phase-transfer catalysis, and the technique of recrystallization, reinforces lecture topics such as alkene synthesis and reactivity, and provides an opportunity to introduce polymer chemistry.

  18. Metal-dithiocarbamate complexes: chemistry and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Hogarth, Graeme

    2012-10-01

    Dithiocarbamates are highly versatile mono-anionic chelating ligands which form stable complexes with all the transition elements and also the majority of main group, lanthanide and actinide elements. They are easily prepared from primary or secondary amines and depending upon the nature of the cation can show good solubility in water or organic solvents. They are related to the thiuram disulfides by a one-electron redox process (followed by dimerisation via sulfur-sulfur bond formation) which is easily carried out upon addition of iodide or ferric salts. Dithiocarbamates are lipophilic and generally bind to metals in a symmetrical chelate fashion but examples of other coordination modes are known, the monodentate and anisobidentate modes being most prevalent. They are planar sterically non-demanding ligands which can be electronically tuned by judicious choice of substituents. They stabilize metals in a wide range of oxidation states, this being attributed to the existence of soft dithiocarbamate and hard thioureide resonance forms, the latter formally resulting from delocalization of the nitrogen lone pair onto the sulfurs, and consequently their complexes tend to have a rich electrochemistry. Tetraethyl thiuramdisulfide (disulfiram or antabuse) has been used as a drug since the 1950s but it is only recently that dithiocarbamate complexes have been explored within the medicinal domain. Over the past two decades anti-cancer activity has been noted for gold and copper complexes, technetium and copper complexes have been used in PET-imaging, dithiocarbamates have been used to treat acute cadmium poisoning and copper complexes also have been investigated as SOD inhibitors.

  19. Metal-dithiocarbamate complexes: chemistry and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Hogarth, Graeme

    2012-10-01

    Dithiocarbamates are highly versatile mono-anionic chelating ligands which form stable complexes with all the transition elements and also the majority of main group, lanthanide and actinide elements. They are easily prepared from primary or secondary amines and depending upon the nature of the cation can show good solubility in water or organic solvents. They are related to the thiuram disulfides by a one-electron redox process (followed by dimerisation via sulfur-sulfur bond formation) which is easily carried out upon addition of iodide or ferric salts. Dithiocarbamates are lipophilic and generally bind to metals in a symmetrical chelate fashion but examples of other coordination modes are known, the monodentate and anisobidentate modes being most prevalent. They are planar sterically non-demanding ligands which can be electronically tuned by judicious choice of substituents. They stabilize metals in a wide range of oxidation states, this being attributed to the existence of soft dithiocarbamate and hard thioureide resonance forms, the latter formally resulting from delocalization of the nitrogen lone pair onto the sulfurs, and consequently their complexes tend to have a rich electrochemistry. Tetraethyl thiuramdisulfide (disulfiram or antabuse) has been used as a drug since the 1950s but it is only recently that dithiocarbamate complexes have been explored within the medicinal domain. Over the past two decades anti-cancer activity has been noted for gold and copper complexes, technetium and copper complexes have been used in PET-imaging, dithiocarbamates have been used to treat acute cadmium poisoning and copper complexes also have been investigated as SOD inhibitors. PMID:22931592

  20. Stable isotope N-phosphorylation labeling for Peptide de novo sequencing and protein quantification based on organic phosphorus chemistry.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Wu, Hanzhi; Lee, Kim-Chung; Liu, Hongxia; Zhao, Yufen; Cai, Zongwei; Jiang, Yuyang

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of a novel stable isotope N-phosphorylation labeling (SIPL) strategy for peptide de novo sequencing and protein quantification based on organic phosphorus chemistry. The labeling reaction could be performed easily and completed within 40 min in a one-pot reaction without additional cleanup procedures. It was found that N-phosphorylation labeling reagents were activated in situ to form labeling intermediates with high reactivity targeting on N-terminus and ε-amino groups of lysine under mild reaction conditions. The introduction of N-terminal-labeled phosphoryl group not only improved the ionization efficiency of peptides and increased the protein sequence coverage for peptide mass fingerprints but also greatly enhanced the intensities of b ions, suppressed the internal fragments, and reduced the complexity of the tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) fragmentation patterns of peptides. By using nano liquid chromatography chip/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (nano LC-chip/TOF MS) for the protein quantification, the obtained results showed excellent correlation of the measured ratios to theoretical ratios with relative errors ranging from 0.5% to 6.7% and relative standard deviation of less than 10.6%, indicating that the developed method was reproducible and precise. The isotope effect was negligible because of the deuterium atoms were placed adjacent to the neutral phosphoryl group with high electrophilicity and moderately small size. Moreover, the SIPL approach used inexpensive reagents and was amenable to samples from various sources, including cell culture, biological fluids, and tissues. The method development based on organic phosphorus chemistry offered a new approach for quantitative proteomics by using novel stable isotope labeling reagents.

  1. Evaluation of the contact and respiratory sensitization potential of volatile organic compounds generated by simulated indoor air chemistry.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Stacey E; Wells, J R; Fedorowicz, Adam; Butterworth, Leon F; Meade, B J; Munson, Albert E

    2007-06-01

    Up to 60 million people working indoors experience symptoms such as eye, nose and throat irritation, headache, and fatigue. Investigations into these complaints have ascribed the effects to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from building materials, cleaning formulations, or other consumer products. New compounds can result when the VOCs react with hydroxyl or nitrate radicals or ozone present in indoor environments. Several oxygenated organic compounds, such as glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, and diacetyl, have been identified as possible reaction products of indoor environment chemistry. Although research has previously identified diacetyl and glyoxal as sensitizers, additional experiments were conducted in these studies to further classify their sensitization potential. Sensitization potential of these four compounds was assessed using quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) programs. Derek for Windows and National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health logistic regression predicted all compounds to be sensitizers, while TOPKAT 6.2 predicted all compounds except for methylglyoxal. All compounds were tested in a combined irritancy and local lymph node assay (LLNA). All compounds except for glyoxal were found to be irritants and all tested positive in the LLNA with EC3 values ranging from 0.42 to 1.9%. Methylglyoxal significantly increased both the B220(+) and IgE(+)B220(+) cell populations in the draining lymph nodes and total serum IgE levels. The four compounds generated by indoor air chemistry were predicted by QSAR and animal modeling to be sensitizers, with the potential for methylglyoxal to induce IgE. The identification of these compounds as sensitizers may help to explain some of the health effects associated with indoor air complaints.

  2. Anatomy of a cluster IDP. Part 2: Noble gas abundances, trace element geochemistry, isotopic abundances, and trace organic chemistry of several fragments from L2008#5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.; Mckay, David S.; Messenger, S.; Nier, A. O.; Schlutter, D. J.; Sutton, S. R.; Walker, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: noble gas content and release temperatures; trace element abundances; heating summary of cluster fragments; isotopic measurements; and trace organic chemistry.

  3. Distributed Pore Chemistry in Porous Organic Polymers in Tissue Culture Flasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method for making a biocompatible polymer article using a uniform atomic oxygen treatment is disclose. The substrate may be subsequently optionally grated with a compatibilizing compound. Compatibilizing compounds may include proteins, phosphorylcholine groups, platelet adhesion preventing polymers, albumin adhesion promoters, and the like. The compatibilized substrate may also have a living cell layer adhered thereto. The atomic oxygen is preferably produced by a flowing afterglow microwave discharge, wherein the substrate resides in a sidearm out of the plasma. Also, methods for culturing cells for various purposes using the various membranes are disclosed as well. Also disclosed are porous organic polymers having a distributed pore chemistry (DPC) comprising hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions, and a method for making the DPC by exposing the polymer to atomic oxygen wherein the rate of hydrophilization is greater than the rate of mass loss.

  4. My maize and blue brick road to physical organic chemistry in materials.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Anne J

    2016-01-01

    Similar to Dorothy's journey along the yellow brick road in The Wizard of Oz, this perspective carves out the path I took from my early childhood fascinations with science through my independent career at the University of Michigan (maize and blue). The influential research projects and mentors are highlighted, including some fortuitous experimental results that drew me into the field of supramolecular chemistry, specifically, and organic materials, broadly. My research group's efforts toward designing new sensors based on small molecule gelators are described. In particular, I highlight how our design strategy has evolved as we learn more about molecular gelators. This perspective concludes with some predictions about where molecular gels, as well as my personal and professional life, are headed.

  5. My maize and blue brick road to physical organic chemistry in materials

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary Similar to Dorothy’s journey along the yellow brick road in The Wizard of Oz, this perspective carves out the path I took from my early childhood fascinations with science through my independent career at the University of Michigan (maize and blue). The influential research projects and mentors are highlighted, including some fortuitous experimental results that drew me into the field of supramolecular chemistry, specifically, and organic materials, broadly. My research group’s efforts toward designing new sensors based on small molecule gelators are described. In particular, I highlight how our design strategy has evolved as we learn more about molecular gelators. This perspective concludes with some predictions about where molecular gels, as well as my personal and professional life, are headed. PMID:26977181

  6. Final Report. IUT No. B560420 with UC Berkeley. Organic Chemistry at High Pressures &Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, W; Crowhurst, J C; Zaug, J M; Jeanloz, R

    2007-03-20

    We have successfully completed the research outlined in our proposal: Organic Chemistry at High Pressures and Temperatures. We have experimentally determined a phase diagram which documents the phases and reaction regimes of cyanuric acid , H{sub 3}C{sub 3}N{sub 3}O{sub 3} (1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-trione), from 300 - 750 K and 0 - 8.1 GPa. We utilized a comparatively new technique to study thin samples of cyanuric acid in the diamond anvil cell in order to collect ambient temperature, high pressure FTIR and Raman data as well as the high-pressure, high-temperature data used in the phase diagram. These experiments made use of the CMLS High-pressure lab's diamond anvil facilities as well as the FTIR and Raman systems.

  7. Chemistry of Metal-organic Frameworks Monitored by Advanced X-ray Diffraction and Scattering Techniques.

    PubMed

    Mazaj, Matjaž; Kaučič, Venčeslav; Zabukovec Logar, Nataša

    2016-01-01

    The research on metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) experienced rapid progress in recent years due to their structure diversity and wide range of application opportunities. Continuous progress of X-ray and neutron diffraction methods enables more and more detailed insight into MOF's structural features and significantly contributes to the understanding of their chemistry. Improved instrumentation and data processing in high-resolution X-ray diffraction methods enables the determination of new complex MOF crystal structures in powdered form. By the use of neutron diffraction techniques, a lot of knowledge about the interaction of guest molecules with crystalline framework has been gained in the past few years. Moreover, in-situ time-resolved studies by various diffraction and scattering techniques provided comprehensive information about crystallization kinetics, crystal growth mechanism and structural dynamics triggered by external physical or chemical stimuli. The review emphasizes most relevant advanced structural studies of MOFs based on powder X-ray and neutron scattering. PMID:27640372

  8. Implementation of a peer-led team learning instructional approach in an undergraduate organic chemistry course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, Lydia T.; Roth, Vicki; Kampmeier, J. A.

    2002-09-01

    This study focuses on the implementation of a peer-led team learning (PLTL) instructional approach for all students in an undergraduate organic chemistry course and the evaluation of student outcomes over 8 years. Students who experienced the student-centered instruction and worked in small groups facilitated by a peer leader (treatment) in 1996-1999 were compared with students who experienced the traditional recitation section (control) in 1992-1994. Quantitative and qualitative data show statistically significant improvements in student performance, retention, and attitudes about the course. These findings suggest that using undergraduate leaders to implement a peer-led team learning model that is built on a social constructivist foundation is a workable mechanism for effecting change in undergraduate science courses.

  9. Chemistry of Metal-organic Frameworks Monitored by Advanced X-ray Diffraction and Scattering Techniques.

    PubMed

    Mazaj, Matjaž; Kaučič, Venčeslav; Zabukovec Logar, Nataša

    2016-01-01

    The research on metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) experienced rapid progress in recent years due to their structure diversity and wide range of application opportunities. Continuous progress of X-ray and neutron diffraction methods enables more and more detailed insight into MOF's structural features and significantly contributes to the understanding of their chemistry. Improved instrumentation and data processing in high-resolution X-ray diffraction methods enables the determination of new complex MOF crystal structures in powdered form. By the use of neutron diffraction techniques, a lot of knowledge about the interaction of guest molecules with crystalline framework has been gained in the past few years. Moreover, in-situ time-resolved studies by various diffraction and scattering techniques provided comprehensive information about crystallization kinetics, crystal growth mechanism and structural dynamics triggered by external physical or chemical stimuli. The review emphasizes most relevant advanced structural studies of MOFs based on powder X-ray and neutron scattering.

  10. Ionic Liquids Beyond Simple Solvents: Glimpses at the State of the Art in Organic Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Kuchenbuch, Andrea; Giernoth, Ralf

    2015-12-01

    Within the last 25 years ionic liquids have written a tremendous success story, which is documented in a nearly uncountable amount of original research papers, reviews, and numerous applications in research and industry. These days, ionic liquids can be considered as a mature class of compounds for many different applications. Frequently, they are used as neoteric solvents for chemical tansformations, and the number of reviews on this field of research is huge. In this focused review, though, we are trying to evaluate the state of the art of ionic liquid chemistry beyond using them simply as solvents for chemical transformations. It is not meant to be a comprehensive overview on the topic; the choice of emphasis and examples rather refects the authors' personal view on the field. We are especially highlighting fields in which we believe the most fundamental developments within the next five years will take place: biomass processing, (chiral) ionic liquids from natural sources, biotransformations, and organic synthesis.

  11. Chemistry For Kids: Pre-Chemistry Acid Rain Activities for Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrow, Lloyd H.

    1985-01-01

    Presents two activities on acid rain for students in intermediate grades. Materials needed and procedures used are included. Also describes "chemical magic" shows performed by high school students for sixth-grade students in seven elementary schools in Altus, Oklahoma. (JN)

  12. Supramolecular organic frameworks: engineering periodicity in water through host-guest chemistry.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jia; Chen, Lan; Zhang, Dan-Wei; Liu, Yi; Li, Zhan-Ting

    2016-05-11

    The development of homogeneous, water-soluble periodic self-assembled structures comprise repeating units that produce porosity in two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) spaces has become a topic of growing interest in the field of supramolecular chemistry. Such novel self-assembled entities, known as supramolecular organic frameworks (SOFs), are the result of programmed host-guest interactions, which allows for the thermodynamically controlled generation of monolayer sheets or a diamondoid architecture with regular internal cavities or pores under mild conditions. This feature article aims at propagating the conceptually novel SOFs as a new entry into conventional supramolecular polymers. In the first section, we will describe the background of porous solid frameworks and supramolecular polymers. We then introduce the self-assembling behaviour of several multitopic flexible molecules, which is closely related to the design of periodic SOFs from rigid multitopic building blocks. This is followed by a brief discussion of cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8])-encapsulation-enhanced aromatic stacking in water. The three-component host-guest pattern based on this stacking motif has been utilized to drive the formation of most of the new SOFs. In the following two sections, we will highlight the main advances in the construction of 2D and 3D SOFs and the related functional aspects. Finally, we will offer our opinions on future directions for both structures and functions. We hope that this article will trigger the interest of researchers in the field of chemistry, physics, biology and materials science, which should help accelerate the applications of this new family of soft self-assembled organic frameworks. PMID:27094341

  13. Supramolecular organic frameworks: engineering periodicity in water through host-guest chemistry.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jia; Chen, Lan; Zhang, Dan-Wei; Liu, Yi; Li, Zhan-Ting

    2016-05-11

    The development of homogeneous, water-soluble periodic self-assembled structures comprise repeating units that produce porosity in two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) spaces has become a topic of growing interest in the field of supramolecular chemistry. Such novel self-assembled entities, known as supramolecular organic frameworks (SOFs), are the result of programmed host-guest interactions, which allows for the thermodynamically controlled generation of monolayer sheets or a diamondoid architecture with regular internal cavities or pores under mild conditions. This feature article aims at propagating the conceptually novel SOFs as a new entry into conventional supramolecular polymers. In the first section, we will describe the background of porous solid frameworks and supramolecular polymers. We then introduce the self-assembling behaviour of several multitopic flexible molecules, which is closely related to the design of periodic SOFs from rigid multitopic building blocks. This is followed by a brief discussion of cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8])-encapsulation-enhanced aromatic stacking in water. The three-component host-guest pattern based on this stacking motif has been utilized to drive the formation of most of the new SOFs. In the following two sections, we will highlight the main advances in the construction of 2D and 3D SOFs and the related functional aspects. Finally, we will offer our opinions on future directions for both structures and functions. We hope that this article will trigger the interest of researchers in the field of chemistry, physics, biology and materials science, which should help accelerate the applications of this new family of soft self-assembled organic frameworks.

  14. Heterogeneous chemistry and reaction dynamics of the atmospheric oxidants, O3, NO3, and OH, on organic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Chapleski, Robert C; Zhang, Yafen; Troya, Diego; Morris, John R

    2016-07-01

    Heterogeneous chemistry of the most important atmospheric oxidants, O3, NO3, and OH, plays a central role in regulating atmospheric gas concentrations, processing aerosols, and aging materials. Recent experimental and computational studies have begun to reveal the detailed reaction mechanisms and kinetics for gas-phase O3, NO3, and OH when they impinge on organic surfaces. Through new research approaches that merge the fields of traditional surface science with atmospheric chemistry, researchers are developing an understanding for how surface structure and functionality affect interfacial chemistry with this class of highly oxidizing pollutants. Together with future research initiatives, these studies will provide a more complete description of atmospheric chemistry and help others more accurately predict the properties of aerosols, the environmental impact of interfacial oxidation, and the concentrations of tropospheric gases.

  15. Dissolved organic matter conformation and its interaction with pyrene as affected by water chemistry and concentration.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bo; Ghosh, Saikat; Xing, Baoshan

    2008-03-01

    Water chemistry and concentration of dissolved organic matter (DOM) have been reported to affect DOM conformation and binding properties with hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs). However, relationship between DOM conformation and its binding properties remains unclear. We designed a multibag equilibration system (MBES) to investigate the variation of carbon-normalized sorption coefficients (K(DOC)) of pyrene at different DOM concentrations based on an identical free solute concentration at different pHs and in the presence of Al ions. In addition, we studied the conformation of DOM under different conditions via atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, dynamic light scattering, and zeta potential measurements. Zeta potential measurements indicated that intra- and intermolecular interaction was facilitated at low pH or with the presence of Al ions, and a more organized molecular aggregate (such as a micelle-like structure) could form, thus, enhancing K(DOC). As DOM concentration increased, DOM molecular aggregation was promoted in a way reducing K(DOC). This research is a first attempt to correlate DOM conformation with K(DOC). Aggregation of DOM molecules resulting from increased zeta potential (less negative) generally led to an increased K(DOC). Further study in this area will provide valuable information on HOC-DOM interactions, thus, leading to more accurate predictions of K(DOC).

  16. Organic-rich hybrid O/I systems based on isocyanate chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Cuney, S. |; Gerard, J.F.; Pascault, J.P.Vigier, G.

    1996-12-31

    The isocyanate chemistry has been used to prepare, without adding any solvent, organic-rich hybrid O/I systems, {alpha}-{omega} hydroxy-terminated prepolymers (soft segments, denoted SS) can be end-capped with {gamma}-isocyanato propyl triethoxy silane ({gamma}-IPS), or previously reacted with a diisocyanate (DI) and then end-capped with {gamma}-amino propyl triethoxy silane ({gamma}-APS), or with {gamma}-amino propyl methyl diethoxy silane ({gamma}-APMDES). With this second pathway, a double distribution of molecules is present. The aim of this work is to investigate the morphologies and structural properties of different organic-rich hybrid organic/inorganic materials. Two types of {alpha}-{Omega} hydroxy prepolymers have been used: hydrogenated polybutadiene, HPBD, and polycaprolactone, PCL. The inorganic phase is obtained through the hydrolysis and condensation of the silane groups under acidic conditions and with [H{sub 2}O]/Si = 3. The nanometric silica-rich particles in the final morphologies, after a post-cure at 150 C, were also studied by means of SAXS measurements. Viscoelastic measurements show one or two main relaxation peaks depending on the phase separation process during reaction and the polarity of the initial SS. However for full crosslinked SS/{gamma}-IPS hybrid networks, the relaxed modulus does not depend on SS nature and it is well described by the affine network theory.

  17. Quantification and classification of substituent effects in organic chemistry: a theoretical molecular electrostatic potential study.

    PubMed

    Remya, Geetha S; Suresh, Cherumuttathu H

    2016-07-27

    Substituent effects in organic chemistry are generally described in terms of experimentally derived Hammett parameters whereas a convenient theoretical tool to study these effects in π-conjugated molecular systems is molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) analysis. The present study shows that the difference between MESP at the nucleus of the para carbon of substituted benzene and a carbon atom in benzene, designated as ΔVC, is very useful to quantify and classify substituent effects. On the basis of positive and negative ΔVC values, a broad classification of around 381 substituents into electron withdrawing and donating categories is made. Each category is again sorted based on the magnitude of ΔVC into subcategories such as very strong, strong, medium, and weak electron donating/withdrawing. Furthermore, the data are used to show the transferability and additivity of substituent effects in π-conjugated organic molecules such as condensed aromatic, olefinic, acetylenic, and heterocyclic systems. The transferability properties hold good for ΔVC in all these molecular systems. The additive properties of substituent effects are strongly reflected on ΔVC and the predictive power of the data to assign the total substituent effects of multi-substituted systems is verified. The ΔVC data and the present classification of substituents are very useful to design π-conjugated organic molecular systems with desired electron rich/poor character. PMID:27412764

  18. Effect of Organic Coatings, Humidity and Aerosol Acidity on Multiphase Chemistry of Isoprene Epoxydiols.

    PubMed

    Riva, Matthieu; Bell, David M; Hansen, Anne-Maria Kaldal; Drozd, Greg T; Zhang, Zhenfa; Gold, Avram; Imre, Dan; Surratt, Jason D; Glasius, Marianne; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2016-06-01

    Multiphase chemistry of isomeric isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) has been shown to be the dominant source of isoprene-derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Recent studies have reported particles composed of ammonium bisulfate (ABS) mixed with model organics exhibit slower rates of IEPOX uptake. In the present study, we investigate the effect of atmospherically relevant organic coatings of α-pinene (AP) SOA on the reactive uptake of trans-β-IEPOX onto ABS particles under different conditions and coating thicknesses. Single particle mass spectrometry was used to characterize in real-time particle size, shape, density, and quantitative composition before and after reaction with IEPOX. We find that IEPOX uptake by pure sulfate particles is a volume-controlled process, which results in particles with uniform concentration of IEPOX-derived SOA across a wide range of sizes. Aerosol acidity was shown to enhance IEPOX-derived SOA formation, consistent with recent studies. The presence of water has a weaker impact on IEPOX-derived SOA yield, but significantly enhanced formation of 2-methyltetrols, consistent with offline filter analysis. In contrast, IEPOX uptake by ABS particles coated with AP-derived SOA is lower compared to that of pure ABS particles, strongly dependent on particle composition, and therefore on particle size. PMID:27176464

  19. Quantification and classification of substituent effects in organic chemistry: a theoretical molecular electrostatic potential study.

    PubMed

    Remya, Geetha S; Suresh, Cherumuttathu H

    2016-07-27

    Substituent effects in organic chemistry are generally described in terms of experimentally derived Hammett parameters whereas a convenient theoretical tool to study these effects in π-conjugated molecular systems is molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) analysis. The present study shows that the difference between MESP at the nucleus of the para carbon of substituted benzene and a carbon atom in benzene, designated as ΔVC, is very useful to quantify and classify substituent effects. On the basis of positive and negative ΔVC values, a broad classification of around 381 substituents into electron withdrawing and donating categories is made. Each category is again sorted based on the magnitude of ΔVC into subcategories such as very strong, strong, medium, and weak electron donating/withdrawing. Furthermore, the data are used to show the transferability and additivity of substituent effects in π-conjugated organic molecules such as condensed aromatic, olefinic, acetylenic, and heterocyclic systems. The transferability properties hold good for ΔVC in all these molecular systems. The additive properties of substituent effects are strongly reflected on ΔVC and the predictive power of the data to assign the total substituent effects of multi-substituted systems is verified. The ΔVC data and the present classification of substituents are very useful to design π-conjugated organic molecular systems with desired electron rich/poor character.

  20. Effect of Organic Coatings, Humidity and Aerosol Acidity on Multiphase Chemistry of Isoprene Epoxydiols.

    PubMed

    Riva, Matthieu; Bell, David M; Hansen, Anne-Maria Kaldal; Drozd, Greg T; Zhang, Zhenfa; Gold, Avram; Imre, Dan; Surratt, Jason D; Glasius, Marianne; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2016-06-01

    Multiphase chemistry of isomeric isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) has been shown to be the dominant source of isoprene-derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Recent studies have reported particles composed of ammonium bisulfate (ABS) mixed with model organics exhibit slower rates of IEPOX uptake. In the present study, we investigate the effect of atmospherically relevant organic coatings of α-pinene (AP) SOA on the reactive uptake of trans-β-IEPOX onto ABS particles under different conditions and coating thicknesses. Single particle mass spectrometry was used to characterize in real-time particle size, shape, density, and quantitative composition before and after reaction with IEPOX. We find that IEPOX uptake by pure sulfate particles is a volume-controlled process, which results in particles with uniform concentration of IEPOX-derived SOA across a wide range of sizes. Aerosol acidity was shown to enhance IEPOX-derived SOA formation, consistent with recent studies. The presence of water has a weaker impact on IEPOX-derived SOA yield, but significantly enhanced formation of 2-methyltetrols, consistent with offline filter analysis. In contrast, IEPOX uptake by ABS particles coated with AP-derived SOA is lower compared to that of pure ABS particles, strongly dependent on particle composition, and therefore on particle size.

  1. De novo synthesis and cellular uptake of organic nanocapsules with tunable surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kun; Jacobs, Amy; Rzayev, Javid

    2011-06-13

    Water-soluble organic nanocapsules were prepared from bottlebrush copolymers with triblock terpolymer side chains composed of a degradable inner block (polylactide), a cross-linkable middle block (poly(4-butenylstyrene)), and a functional outer block (poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride)). Bottlebrush copolymers are macromolecules with a long linear backbone and shorter polymeric side chains densely grafted onto the backbone. Hollow cylindrical nanoparticles were prepared by peripheral cross-linking of the bottlebrush copolymers and subsequent selective removal of the core. Reactive anhydride groups of the outer functional layer allowed for the preparation of nanocapsules with tunable surface characteristics. Cellular uptake of negatively charged organic nanocapsules showed strong surface chemistry dependence. The presence of hydrophobic groups on the nanocapsule surface was necessary for their nonspecific association with the cell membrane and subsequent internalization by endocytosis. The length of surface grafted oligoethylene glycol chains also had a dramatic influence on the intracellular accumulation of nanocapsules. Macropinocytosis was shown to be the predominant pathway for the cellular uptake of organic nanocapsules.

  2. Content-related interactions and methods of reasoning within self-initiated organic chemistry study groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, Karen Jeanne

    2011-12-01

    Students often use study groups to prepare for class or exams; yet to date, we know very little about how these groups actually function. This study looked at the ways in which undergraduate organic chemistry students prepared for exams through self-initiated study groups. We sought to characterize the methods of social regulation, levels of content processing, and types of reasoning processes used by students within their groups. Our analysis showed that groups engaged in predominantly three types of interactions when discussing chemistry content: co-construction, teaching, and tutoring. Although each group engaged in each of these types of interactions at some point, their prevalence varied between groups and group members. Our analysis suggests that the types of interactions that were most common depended on the relative content knowledge of the group members as well as on the difficulty of the tasks in which they were engaged. Additionally, we were interested in characterizing the reasoning methods used by students within their study groups. We found that students used a combination of three content-relevant methods of reasoning: model-based reasoning, case-based reasoning, or rule-based reasoning, in conjunction with one chemically-irrelevant method of reasoning: symbol-based reasoning. The most common way for groups to reason was to use rules, whereas the least common way was for students to work from a model. In general, student reasoning correlated strongly to the subject matter to which students were paying attention, and was only weakly related to student interactions. Overall, results from this study may help instructors to construct appropriate tasks to guide what and how students study outside of the classroom. We found that students had a decidedly strategic approach in their study groups, relying heavily on material provided by their instructors, and using the reasoning strategies that resulted in the lowest levels of content processing. We suggest

  3. Offering Community Engagement Activities to Increase Chemistry Knowledge and Confidence for Teachers and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sewry, Joyce D.; Glover, Sarah R.; Harrison, Timothy G.; Shallcross, Dudley E.; Ngcoza, Kenneth M.

    2014-01-01

    Given the emphasis on community engagement in higher education, academic departments need to become more involved in the community. This paper discusses a number of outreach activities undertaken by the chemistry department at Rhodes University, South Africa. The activities range from service learning to community engagement with teachers and…

  4. "SimChemistry" as an Active Learning Tool in Chemical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolton, Kim; Saalman, Elisabeth; Christie, Michael; Ingerman, Ake; Linder, Cedric

    2008-01-01

    The publicly available free computer program, "SimChemistry," was used as an active learning tool in the chemical engineering curriculum at the University College of Boras, Sweden. The activity involved students writing their own simulation programs on topics in the area of molecular structure and interactions. Evaluation of the learning…

  5. Using Laboratory Chemicals to Imitate Illicit Drugs in a Forensic Chemistry Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasan, Shawn; Bromfield-Lee, Deborah; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.; Cintron-Maldonado, Jose A.

    2008-01-01

    This forensic chemistry activity utilizes presumptive forensic testing procedures and laboratory chemicals that produce screening results similar to controlled substances. For obvious reasons, obtaining heavily regulated controlled substances to create an undergraduate student activity is not practical for most educational institutions. We were…

  6. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and experiments for chemistry. Topics include superheavy elements, polarizing power and chemistry of alkali metals, particulate carbon from combustion, tips for the chemistry laboratory, interesting/colorful experiments, behavior of bismuth (III) iodine, and…

  7. Organic solvent regeneration of granular activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, W. H.; Suidan, M. T.; Roller, M. A.; Kim, B. R.; Gould, J. P.

    1982-09-01

    The use of activated carbon for the treatment of industrial waste-streams was shown to be an effective treatment. The high costs associated with the replacement or thermal regeneration of the carbon have prohibited the economic feasibility of this process. The in situ solvent regeneration of activated carbon by means of organic solvent extraction was suggested as an economically alternative to thermal regeneration. The important aspects of the solvent regeneration process include: the physical and chemical characteristics of the adsorbent, the pore size distribution and energy of adsorption associated with the activated carbon; the degree of solubility of the adsorbate in the organic solvent; the miscibility of the organic solvent in water; and the temperature at which the generation is performed.

  8. Climate, Litter Chemistry, and Nitrogen Controls on Litter Decomposition and Organic Matter Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DelGrosso, S.; Parton, W. J.; Adair, C.

    2012-12-01

    Climate interacts with N availability and other factors to control organic matter decomposition rates and carbon cycling. We analyzed data from the LIDET (Long-Term Inter-site Decomposition Experiment Team) experiment to investigate the controls on litter decomposition rates and organic matter stabilization. Bags containing vegetative litter from different woody and herbaceous species were placed in 28 sites representing a wide array of biomes. Samples were collected approximately ten times, once per year for all sites except tropical sites, which were sampled every 3-6 months. Each sample was analyzed for total N, ash, lignin, and cellulose using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy. To account for water and temperature impacts on decomposition, we calculated a Climate Decomposition Index (CDI) for each site based on long term weather data. We then performed step-wise regression analyses to test how well CDI and litter chemistry were correlated with the amount of biomass remaining in litter bags after 1, 5, and 10 years. CDI was the primary control, accounting for 74, 48, and 58% of variability in biomass remaining at 1, 5, and 10 years, respectively. In addition to CDI, The C/N ratio of labile organic matter and lignin content significantly impacted biomass remaining at 1 and 5 years, while lignin and cellulose content were significant for biomass remaining at 10 years. Increased C/N ratio was associated with slower initial decomposition rate. Lignin content was positively, and cellulose negatively, correlated with long term organic matter stabilization. If CDI and lignin content were similar, then C/N did not influence long term stabilization. If N was not limiting, cellulose decomposed quickly.

  9. Organic geochemistry and pore water chemistry of sediments from Mangrove Lake, Bermuda

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; Simoneit, B.R.T.; MacKenzie, F.T.; Neumann, A.C.; Thorstenson, D.C.; Gerchakov, S.M.

    1982-01-01

    Mangrove Lake, Bermuda, is a small coastal, brackish-water lake that has accumulated 14 m of banded, gelatinous, sapropelic sediments in less than 104 yr. Stratigraphic evidence indicates that Mangrove Lake's sedimentary environment has undergone three major depositional changes (peat, freshwater gel, brackish-water gel) as a result of sea level changes. The deposits were examined geochemically in an effort to delineate sedimentological and diagenetic changes. Gas and pore water studies include measurements of sulfides, ammonia, methane, nitrogen gas, calcium, magnesium, chloride, alkalinity, and pH. Results indicate that sulfate reduction is complete, and some evidence is presented for bacterial denitrification and metal sulfide precipitation. The organic-rich sapropel is predominantly algal in origin, composed mostly of carbohydrates and insoluble macromolecular organic matter called humin with minor amounts of proteins, lipids, and humic acids. Carbohydrates and proteins undergo hydrolysis with depth in the marine sapropel but tend to be preserved in the freshwater sapropel. The humin, which has a predominantly aliphatic structure, increases linearly with depth and composes the greatest fraction of the organic matter. Humic acids are minor components and are more like polysaccharides than typical marine humic acids. Fatty acid distributions reveal that the lipids are of an algal and/or terrestrial plant source. Normal alkanes with a total concentration of 75 ppm exhibit two distribution maxima. One is centered about n-C22 with no odd/even predominance, suggestive of a degraded algal source. The other is centered at n-C31 with a distinct odd/even predominance indicative of a vascular plant origin. Stratigraphic changes in the sediment correlate to observed changes in the gas and pore water chemistry and the organic geochemistry. ?? 1982.

  10. Project-focused activity and knowledge tracker: a unified data analysis, collaboration, and workflow tool for medicinal chemistry project teams.

    PubMed

    Brodney, Marian D; Brosius, Arthur D; Gregory, Tracy; Heck, Steven D; Klug-McLeod, Jacquelyn L; Poss, Christopher S

    2009-12-01

    Advances in the field of drug discovery have brought an explosion in the quantity of data available to medicinal chemists and other project team members. New strategies and systems are needed to help these scientists to efficiently gather, organize, analyze, annotate, and share data about potential new drug molecules of interest to their project teams. Herein we describe a suite of integrated services and end-user applications that facilitate these activities throughout the medicinal chemistry design cycle. The Automated Data Presentation (ADP) and Virtual Compound Profiler (VCP) processes automate the gathering, organization, and storage of real and virtual molecules, respectively, and associated data. The Project-Focused Activity and Knowledge Tracker (PFAKT) provides a unified data analysis and collaboration environment, enhancing decision-making, improving team communication, and increasing efficiency.

  11. Linkages between land Cover, enzymes, and soil organic matter chemistry following encroachment of leguminous woody plant into grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filley, T. R.; Stott, D. E.; Boutton, T. W.; Creamer, C. A.; Olk, D.

    2009-12-01

    In the Rio Grande Plains of southern Texas, subtropical thorn woodlands dominated by the N-fixing tree Prosopis glandulosa have largely replaced native grasslands over the last 150 years as a result of fire suppression and over grazing. This land cover change has resulted in the increase of belowground stocks of C, N, and P, changes to the amount and chemical nature of soil-stabilized plant biopolymers, and the composition and activity of soil microbes. Given that extracellular enzymes produced by plants and microbes are the principal means by which complex compounds are degraded and the production of such enzymes is triggered or suppressed by changes in primary input and nutrient availability we sought to relate how these fundamental changes in this ecosystem are reflected in the activity of soil stabilized extracellular enzymes and soil organic matter (SOM) chemistry in this system. We focused upon a successional chronosequence from C4-dominant grassland to woody patches of up to 86 yrs age since mesquite establishment. We related the molecular composition and concentration of hydrolysable amino acids and amino sugars, as well as CuO extractable lignin and substituted fatty acid to the potential activities of five extracellular enzymes (arylamidase, acid phosphatase, β-glucosidase, β-glucosaminidase (NAGase, polyphenoloxidase (PPO)) and a general marker for hydrolytic activity, fluorescein diacetate (FDA). Each of these enzymes, with the exception of PPO, showed higher potential activity in soils from woody clusters than grasslands and had activities generally well correlated to carbon content. PPO, often defined as a proxy for microbial lignin decay activity, showed no statistical difference between grassland and forest sites and no significant relationship to soil C content. Yields of total amino acids and amino sugars all show increases in content with cluster age when normalized to soil mass, as did the enzyme activities targeted to their decomposition, but

  12. Beyond static structures: Putting forth REMD as a tool to solve problems in computational organic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Petraglia, Riccardo; Nicolaï, Adrien; Wodrich, Matthew D; Ceriotti, Michele; Corminboeuf, Clemence

    2016-01-01

    Computational studies of organic systems are frequently limited to static pictures that closely align with textbook style presentations of reaction mechanisms and isomerization processes. Of course, in reality chemical systems are dynamic entities where a multitude of molecular conformations exists on incredibly complex potential energy surfaces (PES). Here, we borrow a computational technique originally conceived to be used in the context of biological simulations, together with empirical force fields, and apply it to organic chemical problems. Replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) permits thorough exploration of the PES. We combined REMD with density functional tight binding (DFTB), thereby establishing the level of accuracy necessary to analyze small molecular systems. Through the study of four prototypical problems: isomer identification, reaction mechanisms, temperature-dependent rotational processes, and catalysis, we reveal new insights and chemistry that likely would be missed using static electronic structure computations. The REMD-DFTB methodology at the heart of this study is powered by i-PI, which efficiently handles the interface between the DFTB and REMD codes.

  13. Quantum Chemistry in Nanoscale Environments: Insights on Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering and Organic Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares-Amaya, Roberto

    The understanding of molecular effects in nanoscale environments is becoming increasingly relevant for various emerging fields. These include spectroscopy for molecular identification as well as in finding molecules for energy harvesting. Theoretical quantum chemistry has been increasingly useful to address these phenomena to yield an understanding of these effects. In the first part of this dissertation, we study the chemical effect of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). We use quantum chemistry simulations to study the metal-molecule interactions present in these systems. We find that the excitations that provide a chemical enhancement contain a mixed contribution from the metal and the molecule. Moreover, using atomistic studies we propose an additional source of enhancement, where a transition metal dopant surface could provide an additional enhancement. We also develop methods to study the electrostatic effects of molecules in metallic environments. We study the importance of image-charge effects, as well as field-bias to molecules interacting with perfect conductors. The atomistic modeling and the electrostatic approximation enable us to study the effects of the metal interacting with the molecule in a complementary fashion, which provides a better understanding of the complex effects present in SERS. In the second part of this dissertation, we present the Harvard Clean Energy Project, a high-throughput approach for a large-scale computational screening and design of organic photovoltaic materials. We create molecular libraries to search for candidates structures and use quantum chemistry, machine learning and cheminformatics methods to characterize these systems and find structure-property relations. The scale of this study requires an equally large computational resource. We rely on distributed volunteer computing to obtain these properties. In the third part of this dissertation we present our work related to the acceleration of electronic structure

  14. Development and Implementation of a First-Semester Hybrid Organic Chemistry Course: Yielding Advantages for Educators and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ealy, Julie B.

    2013-01-01

    A first-semester organic chemistry course was developed as a hybrid course. The students met face-to-face for one class each week (50 minutes) and the lectures were accessible online via Adobe Connect. Quizzes were scheduled for almost every lecture with access online through ANGEL. In addition, the students had three in-class tests and one final…

  15. Gender Fair Efficacy of Concept Mapping Tests in Identifying Students' Difficulties in High School Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gafoor, Kunnathodi Abdul; Shilna, V.

    2014-01-01

    In view of the perceived difficulty of organic chemistry unit for high schools students, this study examined the usefulness of concept mapping as a testing device to assess students' difficulty in the select areas. Since many tests used for identifying students misconceptions and difficulties in school subjects are observed to favour one or…

  16. Nickel-Catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura Cross-Coupling in a Green Alcohol Solvent for an Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hie, Liana; Chang, Jonah J.; Garg, Neil K.

    2015-01-01

    A modern undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory experiment involving the Suzuki-Miyaura coupling is reported. Although Suzuki-Miyaura couplings typically employ palladium catalysts in environmentally harmful solvents, this experiment features the use of inexpensive nickel catalysis, in addition to a "green" alcohol solvent. The…

  17. ConfChem Conference on Flipped Classroom: Improving Student Engagement in Organic Chemistry Using the Inverted Classroom Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossi, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Improving student engagement in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) courses generally, and organic chemistry specifically, has long been a goal for educators. Recently educators at all academic levels have been exploring the "inverted classroom" or "flipped classroom" pedagogical model for improving student…

  18. Development and Assessment of a Diagnostic Tool to Identify Organic Chemistry Students' Alternative Conceptions Related to Acid Strength

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClary, LaKeisha M.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2012-01-01

    The central goal of this study was to create a new diagnostic tool to identify organic chemistry students' alternative conceptions related to acid strength. Twenty years of research on secondary and college students' conceptions about acids and bases has shown that these important concepts are difficult for students to apply to qualitative problem…

  19. Two Methods of Determining Total Phenolic Content of Foods and Juices in a General, Organic, and Biological (GOB) Chemistry Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaver, Lee Alan; Leung, Sam H.; Puderbaugh, Amy; Angel, Stephen A.

    2011-01-01

    The determination of total phenolics in foods and fruit juices was used successfully as a laboratory experiment in our undergraduate general, organic, and biological (GOB) chemistry course. Two different colorimetric methods were used over three years and comparative student results indicate that a ferrous ammonium sulfate (FAS) indicator…

  20. Extraction and [superscript 1]H NMR Analysis of Fats from Convenience Foods: A Laboratory Experiment for Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartel, Aaron M.; Moore, Amy C.

    2014-01-01

    The extraction and analysis of fats from convenience foods (crackers, cookies, chips, candies) has been developed as an experiment for a second-year undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory course. Students gravimetrically determine the fat content per serving and then perform a [superscript 1]H NMR analysis of the recovered fat to determine the…