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Sample records for active orogenic systems

  1. Thermo-kinematic evolution of the Annapurna-Dhaulagiri Himalaya, central Nepal: The Composite Orogenic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, A. J.; Law, R. D.; Lloyd, G. E.; Phillips, R. J.; Searle, M. P.

    2016-04-01

    The Himalayan orogen represents a "Composite Orogenic System" in which channel flow, wedge extrusion, and thrust stacking operate in separate "Orogenic Domains" with distinct rheologies and crustal positions. We analyze 104 samples from the metamorphic core (Greater Himalayan Sequence, GHS) and bounding units of the Annapurna-Dhaulagiri Himalaya, central Nepal. Optical microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses provide a record of deformation microstructures and an indication of active crystal slip systems, strain geometries, and deformation temperatures. These data, combined with existing thermobarometry and geochronology data are used to construct detailed deformation temperature profiles for the GHS. The profiles define a three-stage thermokinematic evolution from midcrustal channel flow (Stage 1, >700°C to 550-650°C), to rigid wedge extrusion (Stage 2, 400-600°C) and duplexing (Stage 3, <280-400°C). These tectonic processes are not mutually exclusive, but are confined to separate rheologically distinct Orogenic Domains that form the modular components of a Composite Orogenic System. These Orogenic Domains may be active at the same time at different depths/positions within the orogen. The thermokinematic evolution of the Annapurna-Dhaulagiri Himalaya describes the migration of the GHS through these Orogenic Domains and reflects the spatial and temporal variability in rheological boundary conditions that govern orogenic systems.

  2. Association of orogenic activity with the Ordovician radiation of marine life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, A. I.; Mao, S.

    1995-01-01

    The Ordovician radiation of marine life was among the most substantial pulses of diversification in Earth history and coincided in time with a major increase in the global level of orogenic activity. To investigate a possible causal link between these two patterns, the geographic distributions of 6576 individual appearances of Ordovician vician genera around the world were evaluated with respect to their proximity to probable centers of orogeny (foreland basins). Results indicate that these genera, which belonged to an array of higher taxa that diversified in the Middle and Late Ordovician (trilobites, brachiopods, bivalves, gastropods, monoplacophorans), were far more diverse in, and adjacent to, foreland basins than they were in areas farther removed from orogenic activity (carbonate platforms). This suggests an association of orogeny with diversification at that time.

  3. Active thrusting within the Himalayan orogenic wedge in the Kashmir Himalayas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavillot, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Numerous lines of evidence indicate that significant distributed deformation occurs within the Himalayan fold-thrust belt. Active thrust faults lie as much as 100 km north of the active thrust front. Whereas geochemical and topographical data provide circumstantial evidence for internal deformation in Nepal, new mapping demonstrates that an active emergent thrust fault system extends stepwise from the Balakot-Bagh fault (source of the Mw 7.6 2005 Kashmir earthquake in Pakistan) more than 200 km to the southeast on the Riasi fault (RT). The RT with a fault length of ~70 km, is a ~50° northeast-dipping reverse fault system, which sits ~40 km north of the deformation front in the Kashmiri Himalaya of northwest India. Our mapping demonstrates that the Riasi thrust consists of two strands. The northern strand, Main Riasi thrust (MRT) strand, places Precambrian Sirban Limestone on folded unconsolidated (Pleistocene?) conglomerates. Undeformed younger alluvial deposits (Holocene?) overlyie the MRT, which implies no Holocene (?) surface rupture on this strand. To the south, the surface expression of the Riasi frontal thrust (RFT) includes a fault scarp and offset ~10 ka terrace deposits dated with 36CL depth profiles. OSL and 10Be depth profile dating indicate an age range between ~80 ka to ~30 ka for the Bidda terrace in the upper plate of the MRT, yielding estimates of long-term uplift rate of 5.0 ± 2.2 mm/yr, slip rate of 6.4 ± 2.9 mm/yr, and shortening rate of 4.1 ± 1.9mm/yr. Given a ~34 mm/yr India-Asia convergence rate in the NW Himalaya, our results indicate that internal deformation within the orogenic belt accounts for at least ~10% of the total India-Eurasia plate convergence, with remaining shortening absorbed mainly at the deformation front.

  4. Acadian orogen Which Acadian orogen

    SciTech Connect

    Ludman, A. )

    1993-03-01

    The Acadian orogeny is widely viewed as the climactic event in much of the Northern Appalachians, resulting from the closing of one or more ocean basins and the accretion of the Avalonian continent to ancestral North America. Unconformities have traditionally dated the Acadian orogeny as Middle Devonian in the east and Late Middle to Late Devonian in the western part of the orogen. The recent recognition that several post-Acadian'' plutons are actually Late Silurian suggests that the tectonic models are too simplistic; that accretion previously attributed to a Devonian (Acadian) event may have been a two-stage process: Late Silurian (Salinic ) and Acadian sensu stricto; that orogenic activity may have been continuous from Taconian through Acadian'' times. Differences between the records of the Taconic (Ordovician) and Acadian orogenies suggest different plate interactions: near-orthogonal subduction for the former vs transcurrent faulting for the latter as the dominant mechanisms. Distribution of Salinic'' unconformities across the Northern Appalachian orogen in Maine suggests that accretion of Avalon may have been completed by that Silurian event, but faunal provincialities displayed by fossils as young as Early Devonian in terranes bordering the Fredericton Trough argue for later (Devonian) accretion. A further complication is the imprecise knowledge of the extent to which post-Devonian tectonism is responsible for the current terrane configuration in the Northern Appalachians. Alleghenian folding and thrusting is well-established in some areas where post-Acadian (Carboniferous) strata are present, and is now being documented in older rocks in eastern Maine as well: transcurrent faulting as young as post-Mesozoic( ) along the Norumbega Fault Zone; east-directed thrusting involving the Early Devonian Center Pond pluton.

  5. Migration of hydrothermal systems in an evolving collisional orogen, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craw, D.; Upton, P.; Horton, T.; Williams, J.

    2013-02-01

    The Pacific-Australian tectonic plate boundary through the South Island of New Zealand consists of the transpressional Southern Alps mountain belt and the transcurrent Marlborough Fault System, both of which have active tectonically driven hydrothermal systems, with topographically driven meteoric incursion and warm springs. The Southern Alps hydrothermal system is relatively diffuse, with little or no fault control, and is channelled through scattered extensional sites beneath the mountains, where gold mineralisation is occurring locally. The hydrothermal activity along the Marlborough Fault System is controlled by the principal faults in well-defined valleys separated by narrow high ridges. Lateral evolution of Marlborough fault strands southwestwards into the Southern Alps has caused diversion of diffuse Southern Alps hydrothermal activity into the structural superimposition zone, where fluid flow is increasingly being controlled by faults. This hydrothermal diversion was accompanied by major topographic reorientation and river drainage reversal in the late Quaternary. Vein swarms now exposed in the remnants of the Southern Alps north of the superimposition zone formed at shallow levels, with some evidence for fluid boiling, from a mixture of meteoric and deep-sourced fluid. These veins, some of which contain gold, are part of an abandoned <1 million-year-old hydrothermal zone beneath the fossil topographic divide of the Southern Alps that has now been dismembered by lateral incursion of the Marlborough fault strands. Observations on this active plate boundary provide some insights into processes that controlled orogenic gold mineralisation in ancient belts, particularly with respect to relationships between hydrothermal fluid flow, structure and topography.

  6. Orogen-Parallel and -Normal Extension at the Dinarides-Hellenides Junction during Clockwise Rotation and Radial Expansion of the Retreating Hellenic Arc-Trench System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handy, M.; Fügenschuh, B.; Giese, J.; Le Breton, E.; Muceku, B.; Onuzi, K.; Pleuger, J.; Schmid, S. M.; Ustaszewski, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    Normal faults at the junction of the Dinarides and Hellenides in northern Albania trend both perpendicular and parallel to thrusts and fold axes. Most prominent is the SSE-dipping Skutari-Pec Normal Fault (SPNF), one of a system of normal faults that accommodate NW-SE-directed, orogen-parallel extension. Extensional throw along the SPNF increases from zero in northwestern Albania to at least 2 km near the Albania-Kosovo border, near where the brittle arm of the SPNF bounds the Mio-Pliocene Kosovo Basin. This differential orogen-parallel extension along the SPNF defines a vertical rotational axis in northwestern Albania that is interpreted to have accommodated 20-30° of clockwise motion of internal units on the southeastern (Hellenic) side of the fault with respect to the northwestern (Dinaric) side. Such rotation is in agreement with previously published paleomagnetic data and plate motion studies. The footwall of the SPNF exposes lower units of the Dinaric nappe stack that underwent vertical shortening and non-coaxial shearing during extensional exhumation. In the hangingwall of the SPNF, a system of orogen-parallel trending normal faults accommodate orogen-normal displacement of up to several km. Both orogen-parallel and -perpendicular systems of normal faults cut Late Cretaceous to Oligocene thrusts and folds, and are associated with pronounced Miocene paleo-relief. Most of this normal faulting is Miocene to Pliocene based on syn-extensional deposits in the Kosovo Basins and on thermal modelling of ZHe, AFT and AHe data, which suggest accelerated cooling at 18 Ma and between 4-6 Ma. Both fault systems also cut Holocene deposits, indicating ongoing extension. This corroborates published GPS data and earthquake focal mechanisms indicating active extension of the crust south and southeast of the SPNF. It is proposed that extension and clockwise rotation in this area were coeval and accommodated southwestward retreat and radial expansion of the Hellenic arc during

  7. Active Tectonics in crossroads of an evolving orogen and morphological consequences: Anatolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koral, Hayrettin

    2016-04-01

    Anatolia lies in a curved setting of the active Alpine Mountain Range and is located in crossroads of the European and Asian terrains. It is one of the fastest deforming land in the world, manifested by seismicity, characteristic landforms and GPS measurements. Active tectonics in Anatolia provides not only a comparable geological model for the past orogens, but also a laboratory case for morphological consequences of an orogenic processes. Anatolia comprise different tectonic subsettings with its own characteristics. Northern part is influenced by tectonic characteristics of the Black Sea Basin, the Pontides and the Caucasian Range; northwestern part by the Balkanides; eastern-southeastern part by the Bitlis-Zagros suture; and south-southwestern part by the eastern Mediterranean subduction setting. Much of its present tectonic complexity was inherited from the convergence dominant plate tectonic setting of the platelets prior to the Middle-Neogene. Beginning about 11 Ma ago, the deformed and uplifted landmass unable to accommodate further deformation in Anatolia and ongoing tectonic activity gave rise to rearrangement of tectonic forces and westerly translational movements. Formation of major strike-slip faults in Anatolia including the North and East Anatolian Faults and a new platelet called the Anatolian Plate are the consequences of this episode. Such change in the tectonic regime has led to modification of previously-formed landscape, modification and sometimes termination of previously-formed basins. Evidence is present in the Plio-Quaternary stratigraphy, tectonic characteristics and morphology of the well-studied areas. This presentation will discuss active tectonic features of the northwestern, southwestern and eastern Anatolian subsettings and their influence on morphology that is closely related to sites of pre-historical human settlement.

  8. Tectonic and kinematics of curved orogenic systems: insights from AMS analysis and paleomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cifelli, Francesca; Mattei, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    During the past few years, paleomagnetism has been considered a unique tool for constraining kinematic models of curved orogenic systems, because of its great potential in quantifying vertical axis rotations and in discriminating between primary and secondary (orocline s.l.) arcs. In fact, based on the spatio-temporal relationships between deformation and vertical axis rotation, curved orogens can be subdivided as primary or secondary (oroclines s.l.), if they formed respectively in a self-similar manner without undergoing important variations in their original curved shape or if their curvature in map-view is the result of a bending about a vertical axis of rotation. In addition to the kinematics of the arc and the timing of its curvature, a crucial factor for understanding the origin of belts curvature is the knowledge of the geodynamic process governing arc formation. In this context, the detailed reconstruction of the rotational history is mainly based on paleomagnetic and structural analyses (fold axes, kinematic indicators), which include the magnetic fabric. In fact, in curved fold and thrust belts, assuming that the magnetic lineation is tectonically originated and formed during layer-parallel shortening (LPS) before vertical axis rotations, the orientation of the magnetic lineation often strictly follows the curvature of the orogeny. This assumption represents a fundamental prerequisite to fully understand the origin of orogenic arcs and to unravel the geodynamic processes responsible for their curvature. We present two case studies: the central Mediterranean arcs and the Alborz Mts in Iran. The Mediterranean area has represented an attractive region to apply paleomagnetic analysis, as it shows a large number of narrow arcs, whose present-day shape has been driven by the space-time evolution of the Mediterranean subduction system, which define a irregular and rather diffuse plate boundary. The Alborz Mts. form a sinuous range over 1,200 km long, defining

  9. Stress Dynamics of Magma Activity during Orogenic Evolution: An Example from Kinmen Island, SE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ping-Chuan; Yeh, En-Chao; Lin, Jian-Wei; Lee, Chi-Yu; Chen, Rou-Fei; Lin, Wayne; Hsieh, Pei-Shan; Lin, Cheng-Kuo; Iizuka, Yoshiyuki

    2016-04-01

    During orogeny, a mountain belt experienced different orogenic stages with various conditions of temperature, pressure, stress and fluid pressure. The speculation, that the orogenic stresses evolve from reverse faulting via strike-slip faulting to normal faulting stress regimes corresponding to syn-orogenic, post-orogenic and an-orogenic stage respectively, has been proposed but has not been proved yet. Here we report the study of dikes from Kinmen Island can shed light on understanding the stress evolution of orogeny. The Kinmen Island, located in the southeastern continental margin of Mainland China, cropped out the middle to lower crust of NE structural grain, which was experienced deformation and metamorphism during Late Yenshanian Orogeny(LYO). Based on previous studies of geochemistry, geochronology, and P-T conditions, various types of dike have been identified. They are syn-orognic dikes of amphibolite (130-110Ma), post-orogenic dikes of pegmatite and aplite (110-100Ma), and an-orogenic dike of gabbro (94-76Ma). During syn-orogenic stage of LYO, dike intrusion appeared as low-angle dip, which reflected that reverse faulting regime and horizontal maximum stress direction in E-W orientation. In post-orogenic stage, stress would be divided into two sub-stages. The early one was strike-slip faulting regime and horizontal maximum stress was in NW-SE orientation. The late one was normal faulting regime and horizontal maximum stress direction returned to E-W orientation. Finally, an-orogenic dike intrusion striked NE-SW with vertical dip, which displayed that normal faulting regime and NE-SW horizontal maximum stress direction. Our observation is consistent with the expected stress evolution during orogeny. Deviatoric stresses from new findings were decreased at early post-orogenic stage but increased after late post-orogenic stage, indicating the change of fluid pressure ratio with time. The spatiotemporal variation of stress field might be suggested the change

  10. Active shortening within the Himalayan orogenic wedge implied by the 2015 Gorkha earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whipple, Kelin X.; Shirzaei, Manoochehr; Hodges, Kip V.; Ramon Arrowsmith, J.

    2016-09-01

    Models of Himalayan neotectonics generally attribute active mountain building to slip on the Himalayan Sole Thrust, also termed the Main Himalayan Thrust, which accommodates underthrusting of the Indian Plate beneath Tibet. However, the geometry of the Himalayan Sole Thrust and thus how slip along it causes uplift of the High Himalaya are unclear. We show that the geodetic record of the 2015 Gorkha earthquake sequence significantly clarifies the architecture of the Himalayan Sole Thrust and suggests the need for revision of the canonical view of how the Himalaya grow. Inversion of Gorkha surface deformation reveals that the Himalayan Sole Thrust extends as a planar gently dipping fault surface at least 20-30 km north of the topographic front of the High Himalaya. This geometry implies that building of the high range cannot be attributed solely to slip along the Himalayan Sole Thrust over a steep ramp; instead, shortening within the Himalayan wedge is required to support the topography and maintain rapid rock uplift. Indeed, the earthquake sequence may have included a moderate rupture (Mw 6.9) on an out-of-sequence thrust fault at the foot of the High Himalaya. Such internal deformation is an expected response to sustained, focused rapid erosion, and may be common to most compressional orogens.

  11. Deformation Partitioning Processes in a Mid-crustal Detachment System, the Ketilidian Orogen, South Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffrey, K.; Grocott, J.; Garde, A.; Hamilton, M.; Chadwick, B.

    2001-12-01

    The upper crust in convergent margins is commonly segmented into fault-bounded blocks or terranes. The mechanism(s) by which orogen-parallel movement and/or rotation of these blocks takes place in convergent margins remains an open question. Models require sub-horizontal detachments within or at the base of the lithosphere in addition to vertical strike-parallel boundaries. We present an example of an exposed mid-crustal detachment system in which vertical and lateral deformation partitioning can be demonstrated. We present a model of how the detachment system developed and suggest that it provides one possible mechanism for decoupling in cordilleran-style orogenic belts. Continental growth by juvenile magmatic arc processes is typified by the Palaeoproterozoic (c.1800 Ma) Ketilidian orogen which formed in response to oblique convergence between an oceanic plate and an Archaean craton. The core of this orogen is a 100-200 km wide, NE-trending continental magmatic arc, the Julianehaab batholith (JB), that was constructed by calc-alkaline magmas emplaced between c.1855-1795 Ma. To the south-east beyond the outboard margin of the batholith, the Psammite (PsZ) and Pelite Zones (PeZ) with a minimum width of c. 100 km, comprise deformed and metamorphosed arkosic, calcareous, semipelitic, pelitic and minor metavolcanic rocks, with an estimated pre-erosional thickness of over 15 km. These zones are collectively interpreted as the relics of a forearc basin. Transpression during early deformation (D1) was partitioned into sinistral strike-slip in the magmatic arc rocks of the JB and SE-directed thrusting in the sedimentary and volcaniclastic sequences of the proximal forearc (PsZ). Subsequently, D1 fabrics in the PsZ were overprinted and transposed in an intense, flat-lying, D2 ductile shear zone with arc-parallel stretching lineations and top-ENE kinematic indicators. The D2 shear zone is interpreted as a mid-crustal partitioning detachment that lay beneath a domain of

  12. Distribution of active faulting along orogenic wedges: Minimum-work models and natural analogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagupsky, Daniel L.; Brooks, Benjamin A.; Whipple, Kelin X.; Duncan, Christopher C.; Bevis, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Numerical 2-D models based on the principle of minimum work were used to examine the space-time distribution of active faulting during the evolution of orogenic wedges. A series of models focused on thin-skinned thrusting illustrates the effects of arid conditions (no erosion), unsteady state conditions (accretionary influx greater than erosional efflux) and steady state conditions (accretionary influx balances erosional efflux), on the distribution of fault activity. For arid settings, a general forward accretion sequence prevails, although a significant amount of internal deformation is registered: the resulting fault pattern is a rather uniform spread along the profile. Under fixed erosional efficiency settings, the frontal advance of the wedge-front is inhibited, reaching a steady state after a given forward propagation. Then, the applied shortening is consumed by surface ruptures over a narrow frontal zone. Under a temporal increase in erosional efficiency (i.e., transient non-steady state mass balance conditions), a narrowing of the synthetic wedge results; a rather diffuse fault activity distribution is observed during the deformation front retreat. Once steady balanced conditions are reached, a single long-lived deformation front prevails. Fault activity distribution produced during the deformation front retreat of the latter scenario, compares well with the structural evolution and hinterlandward deformation migration identified in southern Bolivian Subandes (SSA) from late Miocene to present. This analogy supports the notion that the SSA is not in steady state, but is rather responding to an erosional efficiency increase since late Miocene. The results shed light on the impact of different mass balance conditions on the vastly different kinematics found in mountain ranges, suggesting that those affected by growing erosion under a transient unbalanced mass flux condition tend to distribute deformation along both frontal and internal faults, while others

  13. Extensional deformation structures within a convergent orogen: The Val di Lima low-angle normal fault system (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemenzi, Luca; Molli, Giancarlo; Storti, Fabrizio; Muchez, Philippe; Swennen, Rudy; Torelli, Luigi

    2014-09-01

    A low-angle extensional fault system affecting the non metamorphic rocks of the carbonate dominated Tuscan succession is exposed in the Lima valley (Northern Apennines, Italy). This fault system affects the right-side-up limb of a kilometric-scale recumbent isoclinal anticline and is, in turn, affected by superimposed folding and late-tectonic high-angle extensional faulting. The architecture of the low-angle fault system has been investigated through detailed structural mapping and damage zone characterization. Pressure-depth conditions and paleofluid evolution of the fault system have been studied through microstructural, mineralogical, petrographic, fluid inclusion and stable isotope analyses. Our results show that the low-angle fault system was active during exhumation of the Tuscan succession at about 180°C and 5 km depth, with the involvement of low-salinity fluids. Within this temperature - depth framework, the fault zone architecture shows important differences related to the different lithologies involved in the fault system and to the role played by the fluids during deformation. In places, footwall overpressuring influenced active deformation mechanisms and favored shear strain localization. Our observations indicate that extensional structures affected the central sector of the Northern Apennines thrust wedge during the orogenic contractional history, modifying the fluid circulation through the upper crust and influencing its mechanical behavior.

  14. Effect of processing on the displacement of whey proteins: applying the orogenic model to a real system.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Nicola C; Wilde, Peter J; Mackie, Alan R; Gunning, A Patrick; Gunning, Paul A; Morris, Victor J

    2004-03-10

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to investigate the displacement of a commercial whey protein system and the behavior as compared to that of beta-lactoglobulin (Mackie, A. R.; Gunning, A. P.; Wilde, P. J.; Morris, V. J. Orogenic displacement of protein from the air-water interface by competitive adsorption. J. Colloid Interface Sci. 1999, 210, 157-166). The whey protein isolate (WPI) was displaced from an air-water interface by the surfactants Tween 20 and Tween 60. Displacement data obtained were compared with data obtained for pure beta-lactoglobulin and have shown that WPI was more resistant to displacement from the air-water interface than native beta-lactoglobulin. This was related to the greater surface elasticity of WPI at higher surface stresses. In the presence of Tween 20, WPI was observed to remain on the interface at surface pressures up to 8 mN/m greater than the surface pressure at which complete displacement of beta-lactoglobulin was observed. Displacement of WPI and beta-lactoglobulin films by the surfactant Tween 60 showed similar results. However, because of the lower surface activity of Tween 60, it was not possible to reach surface tension values similar to those obtained for Tween 20. Despite the lower surface activity of Tween 60, WPI was still observed to be present at the interface at surface pressure values greater than those by which beta-lactoglobulin had been completely displaced.

  15. Syn- and post-orogenic alkaline magmatism in a continental arc: Along-strike variations in the composition, source, and timing of igneous activity in the Ross Orogen, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen-Peter, G.; Cottle, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Neoproterozoic-Paleozoic convergence and subduction along the margin of East Gondwana (Australia, New Zealand, Antarctica) resulted in a belt of deformed and metamorphosed sedimentary rocks and batholith-scale igneous intrusions comparable in size to the present day Andes. Mid-crustal levels of this belt, known as the Ross Orogen in Antarctica, are exposed in the basement of the Cenozoic Transantarctic Mountains, providing snapshots of the intrusive magma system of a major continental arc. Whole rock major- and trace-element geochemistry, Hf isotopes in zircon, and U-Pb geochronology have identified along-strike variations in the composition, source, and timing of magmatism along ~200 km of the southern Victoria Land segment of the orogen. There is an apparent younging of the igneous activity from south to north. New U-Pb ages for intrusive rocks from the Koettlitz Glacier Alkaline Province (KGAP) reveal that igneous activity spanned ca. 565-500 Ma (~30 m.y. longer than previously recognized), while immediately to the north in the Dry Valleys area most igneous activity was confined to a relatively short period (ca. 515-495 Ma). Alkaline and subalkaline igneous rocks occur in both the Dry Valleys area and the KGAP, but alkaline rocks in the Dry Valleys are restricted to the latest phase of magmatism. Na-alkaline rocks in the KGAP, including nepheline syenites, carbonatites, and A-type granites, range in age from ca. 545-500 Ma and overlap in age with more typical subduction/collision-related I- and S-type granites elsewhere in southern Victoria Land. Strong enrichments in the LILE and LREE and high LILE/HFSE and LREE/HREE of samples from the KGAP reveal a source enriched in aqueous-mobile elements, potentially a strongly metasomatized mantle wedge beneath the arc. In the Dry Valleys area, rocks with alkali-calcic composition constitute only the youngest intrusions (505-495 Ma), apparently reflecting a shift to post-orogenic magmatism. Zircons from Dry Valleys

  16. Late-stage orogenic processes: How to link surface motion with distinct lithospheric processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, F.; Heberer, B.

    2009-04-01

    There is still a lack of knowledge of surface expression caused by deep-seated lithospheric processes, and how such processes could be distinguished from other, e.g. climate-induced, surface processes like denudation. Surface expressions of deep-seated lithospheric processes in convergent settings are expected to have been long-lived and to show large wave-length structures creating a dynamic topography (Wortel and Spakman, 2000; Cloetingh and Ziegler, 2007). Resulting continent-continent collisional orogens are bivergent, and the principal vergency of collisional orogens is controlled by the previous subduction of oceanic lithosphere (Beaumont et al., 1996). A number of tectonic processes are shown to be active during late orogenic phases and these processes particularly result in specific patterns of surface uplift and denudation of the evolving orogens as well as subsidence in the associated foreland basin. A number of these processes are not fully understood. Late-stage orogenic processes include, among others, slab break-off, slab delamination respectively of lithospheric roots, back-thrusting, tectonic indentation and consequent orogen-parallel lateral extrusion and formation of Subduction-Transform Edge Propagator (STEP) faults acting on the subducting lithosphere (Molnar and Tapponnier, 1975; Wortel and Spakman, 2000; Ratschbacher et al., 1991; Govers and Wortel, 2005). Here, we discuss these processes mainly in terms of their near-surface geological expressions within the orogen and the associated foreland basins, and how these processes could be distinguished by such geological features. We also show distinct theoretical models applied to the arcuate Alpine-Balkan-Carpathian-Dinaric system, which is driven by the oblique convergence of Africa-Europe. Slab-break-off results in lateral orogen-parallel migration of sharp subsidence in a linear belt in front of the slab window, coupled subsidence and subsequent uplift/basin inversion of peripheral foreland

  17. Isolating active orogenic wedge deformation in the southern Subandes of Bolivia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Jonathan R.; Brooks, Benjamin A.; Foster, James H.; Bevis, Michael; Echalar, Arturo; Caccamise, Dana; Heck, Jacob; Kendrick, Eric; Ahlgren, Kevin; Raleigh, David; Smalley, Robert; Vergani, Gustavo

    2016-08-01

    A new GPS-derived surface velocity field for the central Andean backarc permits an assessment of orogenic wedge deformation across the southern Subandes of Bolivia, where recent studies suggest that great earthquakes (>Mw 8) are possible. We find that the backarc is not isolated from the main plate boundary seismic cycle. Rather, signals from subduction zone earthquakes contaminate the velocity field at distances greater than 800 km from the Chile trench. Two new wedge-crossing velocity profiles, corrected for seasonal and earthquake affects, reveal distinct regions that reflect (1) locking of the main plate boundary across the high Andes, (2) the location of and loading rate at the back of orogenic wedge, and (3) an east flank velocity gradient indicative of décollement locking beneath the Subandes. Modeling of the Subandean portions of the profiles indicates along-strike variations in the décollement locked width (WL) and wedge loading rate; the northern wedge décollement has a WL of ~100 km while accumulating slip at a rate of ~14 mm/yr, whereas the southern wedge has a WL of ~61 km and a slip rate of ~7 mm/yr. When compared to Quaternary estimates of geologic shortening and evidence for Holocene internal wedge deformation, the new GPS-derived wedge loading rates may indicate that the southern wedge is experiencing a phase of thickening via reactivation of preexisting internal structures. In contrast, we suspect that the northern wedge is undergoing an accretion or widening phase primarily via slip on relatively young thrust-front faults.

  18. The initiation of orogenic margin reverse faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, R. C.

    2002-04-01

    Laboratory values of rock friction coefficients suggest that reverse faulting should be very difficult to initiate by simple horizontal compression of the crust. Values of stresses required by Andersonian faulting may be an order of magnitude higher than those actually present in orogenic margins. A simple stress balance calculation shows that the effect of the excess lithostatic pressure under an elevated orogen, if transmitted laterally through a crustal ductile layer to the orogenic margin, is to provide sufficient hydraulic lift under the orogen flanks to initiate reverse faulting by direct lift, even with rock friction coefficients of order 0.8. The required orogenic elevation above surrounding ``normal'' lithosphere is about one fifth of the thickness of the brittle crust of the orogen. This elevation may be as small as 2 km in tectonically active regions. The mechanism works even in the absence of regional lithospheric compressive stresses.

  19. Sediment-hosted/orogenic gold mineral systems exploration using PALSAR remote sensing data in Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiranvand Pour, Amin; Hashim, Mazlan

    2016-06-01

    The Bentong-Raub Suture Zone (BRSZ) is genetically related to the sediment-hosted/orogenic gold deposits associated with the major lineaments and form-lines in the Central Gold Belt of Peninsular Malaysia. In this investigation, the Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) satellite remote sensing data were used to analyse major geological structures in Peninsular Malaysia and provide detailed characterization of lineaments and form-lines in the BRSZ, as well as its implications for sediment-hosted/orogenic gold exploration in tropical environments. The pervasive array of N-S faults in the study area and surrounding terrain is mainly linked to the N-S trending of the BRSZ Suture Zone. N-S striking lineaments are often cut by younger NE-SW and NW-SE-trending lineaments. Three generations of folding event have been discerned from remote sensing structural analysis. Gold mineralized trends lineaments are associated with the intersection of N-S, NE-SW, NNW-SSE and ESE-WNW faults and curvilinear features in shearing and alteration zones. Compressional tectonics structures such as NW-SE trending thrust, ENE-WSW oriented faults in mylonite and phyllite, recumbent folds and asymmetric anticlines in argillite are high potential zones for gold prospecting.

  20. New geomorphic data on the active Taiwan orogen: A multisource approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deffontaines, B.; Lee, J.-C.; Angelier, J.; Carvalho, J.; Rudant, J.-P.

    1994-01-01

    A multisource and multiscale approach of Taiwan morphotectonics combines different complementary geomorphic analyses based on a new elevation model (DEM), side-looking airborne radar (SLAR), and satellite (SPOT) imagery, aerial photographs, and control from independent field data. This analysis enables us not only to present an integrated geomorphic description of the Taiwan orogen but also to highlight some new geodynamic aspects. Well-known, major geological structures such as the Longitudinal Valley, Lishan, Pingtung, and the Foothills fault zones are of course clearly recognized, but numerous, previously unrecognized structures appear distributed within different regions of Taiwan. For instance, transfer fault zones within the Western Foothills and the Central Range are identified based on analyses of lineaments and general morphology. In many cases, the existence of geomorphic features identified in general images is supported by the results of geological field analyses carried out independently. In turn, the field analyses of structures and mechanisms at some sites provide a key for interpreting similar geomorphic featues in other areas. Examples are the conjugate pattern of strike-slip faults within the Central Range and the oblique fold-and-thrust pattern of the Coastal Range. Furthermore, neotectonic and morphological analyses (drainage and erosional surfaces) has been combined in order to obtain a more comprehensive description and interpretation of neotectonic features in Taiwan, such as for the Longitudinal Valley Fault. Next, at a more general scale, numerical processing of digital elevation models, resulting in average topography, summit level or base level maps, allows identification of major features related to the dynamics of uplift and erosion and estimates of erosion balance. Finally, a preliminary morphotectonic sketch map of Taiwan, combining information from all the sources listed above, is presented.

  1. Crimean orogene: A nappe interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Popadyuk, I.V.; Smirnov, S.E. )

    1993-09-01

    On the International Tectonic Map of Europe, the Crimean orogene presents a structure that has no analog in the Alpine orogenic belt. The Crimean mountain system lacks nappe structures of Alpine age. Its geosynclinal folding deformation is restricted to the Tavria flysch formation, previously dated as Triassic-Liassic. Therefore, the Crimean orogene was considered as the Kimmerian tectonotype. In our model, the Crimean orogene is characterized by nappe structures. The Yayla nappe is composed to Upper Jurassic and Neocomian sediments and is located below the Tavrian nappe, which consists of the Tavrian flysch formation. We dated the age of the Tavrian formation as Hauterivian-Aptian on the basis of published ammonite finds in the stratotype section. Nappe displacements are dated roughly as Austrian (albian) by the occurrence of upper-middle Albian sediments below the nappes and the Upper Cretaceous age of their neoautochthonous sedimentary cover. These north-vergent nappes have a horizontal displacement of about 20 km. In the eastern part of the orogene, these nappe structures were overprinted by Laramide-Savic (Paleocene and end Oligocene-early Miocene) deformations, as evident in the Kerch peninsula. The nature of these late deformation is not clear. The hydrocarbon potential of the prenapping autochthonous series has not yet been studied. Exploration for oil and gas in the Crimean sector of the Black Sea must take the suggested model and its implications into account.

  2. Unravelling the influence of orogenic inheritance on the architecture and tectonic evolution of hyper-extended rift systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenin, Pauline; Manatschal, Gianreto; Lavier, Luc

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this starting PhD thesis is to determine under what conditions inheritance produced by former orogens influences subsequent rifting, and to unravel the influence of inherited structures and heterogeneities on the architecture and tectonic evolution of hyper-extended rift systems. To complete this task, we map along the Central and North Atlantic margin 1) rift domains; 2) age of the major rift events; and 3) key structure and heterogeneities inherited from the Caledonian and Variscan orogens. We will then study these data in the light of minimal numerical modelling experiments and use them as a basis for designing more comprehensive numerical models for the North Atlantic rifting. In order to map the Atlantic margins, we use gravity, magnetic data, seismic reflection and refraction to identify the necking zone and the continentward limit of the oceanic domain. This allows us to define the proximal domain where continental crust is not or barely thinned on one side, the unequivocal oceanic domain on the other side, and the hyper-extended domain between them. Within the hyper-extended domain, we rely on seismic data (refraction and reflection) to distinguish the area where the crust and the mantle are decoupled from the area where they are coupled, and to identify potential zones with mantle exhumation and/or magmatic additions. Previous studies mapped these domains along Iberia-Newfoundland and Bay of Biscay. The objective of this PhD is to extend this mapping further to the North, along the Irish, UK and Norwegian margins, into domains with polyphase rifting and magmatic additions. One of the goals of this work is to highlight potential correlations between first-order changes in the architecture and/or magmatic evolution of the Atlantic margin and first-order structures and heterogeneities inherited from the Caledonian and/or Variscan orogens. We also aim to assess the importance of inheritance in structuring and controlling the evolution of hyper

  3. Accretionary orogens through Earth history

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cawood, Peter A.; Kroner, A.; Collins, W.J.; Kusky, T.M.; Mooney, W.D.; Windley, B.F.

    2009-01-01

    Accretionary orogens form at intraoceanic and continental margin convergent plate boundaries. They include the supra-subduction zone forearc, magmatic arc and back-arc components. Accretionary orogens can be grouped into retreating and advancing types, based on their kinematic framework and resulting geological character. Retreating orogens (e.g. modern western Pacific) are undergoing long-term extension in response to the site of subduction of the lower plate retreating with respect to the overriding plate and are characterized by back-arc basins. Advancing orogens (e.g. Andes) develop in an environment in which the overriding plate is advancing towards the downgoing plate, resulting in the development of foreland fold and thrust belts and crustal thickening. Cratonization of accretionary orogens occurs during continuing plate convergence and requires transient coupling across the plate boundary with strain concentrated in zones of mechanical and thermal weakening such as the magmatic arc and back-arc region. Potential driving mechanisms for coupling include accretion of buoyant lithosphere (terrane accretion), flat-slab subduction, and rapid absolute upper plate motion overriding the downgoing plate. Accretionary orogens have been active throughout Earth history, extending back until at least 3.2 Ga, and potentially earlier, and provide an important constraint on the initiation of horizontal motion of lithospheric plates on Earth. They have been responsible for major growth of the continental lithosphere through the addition of juvenile magmatic products but are also major sites of consumption and reworking of continental crust through time, through sediment subduction and subduction erosion. It is probable that the rates of crustal growth and destruction are roughly equal, implying that net growth since the Archaean is effectively zero. ?? The Geological Society of London 2009.

  4. Provenance of Cretaceous trench slope sediments from the Mesozoic Wandashan Orogen, NE China: Implications for determining ancient drainage systems and tectonics of the Paleo-Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ming-Dao; Xu, Yi-Gang; Wilde, Simon A.; Chen, Han-Lin

    2015-06-01

    The Wandashan Orogen of NE China is a typical accretionary orogen related to Paleo-Pacific subduction. The Raohe Complex, as a major part of the orogen, consists of mid-Triassic to mid-Jurassic radiolarian chert and intraoceanic igneous rocks in an accretionary prism overlain by weakly sheared terrestrial-sourced clastic trench slope sediments. Sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe U-Pb dating and LA-MC-ICPMS Hf isotopic analysis of detrital zircons from the terrestrial-sourced Yongfuqiao Formation sandstone show that most zircons are Phanerozoic (90%): 140-150 Ma (10%), 180-220 Ma (25%), 240-270 Ma (15%), 300-360 Ma (15%), 391-395 Ma (3%), and 450-540 Ma (20%), whereas 10% are Precambrian in age. About 90% of the zircons have ɛHf(t) values ranging from +11.1 to -12.8. This suggests that the major provenance of the trench slope sediments was from the adjacent eastern segment of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt and the Jiamusi Block. The age of the Yongfuqiao Formation is constrained to the earliest Cretaceous, which represents the accretion time of the mid-Triassic to mid-Jurassic oceanic complexes. When compared with the Mino Complex in Japan and the Tananao Complex in Taiwan, three different provenances are identified suggesting three ancient drainage systems which transported sediments from NE China, North China, and South China to the Paleo-Pacific subduction-accretion system.

  5. Deciphering the Late Quaternary fluvial dynamics at the foothill of an active orogen - the example of the Transcaucasian depression in eastern Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Suchodoletz, Hans; Faust, Dominik

    2013-04-01

    Generally, the dynamics of fluvial systems can be triggered by climate, tectonics, anthropogenic activity or internal mechanisms. The lowland of the Transcaucasian depression is located between the Greater Caucasus in the north and the Lesser Caucasus in the south. Both mountainous massifs form a part of the Alpidic orogenic belt and are thus characterized by a high tectonic activity. During the Weichselian glaciation, due to their altitude >3000 m the massifs were strongly glaciated. During the last years, we investigated fluvial sediment sequences of several rivers that originate from the mountain belts and cross the eastern semi-arid part of the Transcauscasian depression towards the Caspian Sea (e.g. Algeti, Khrami, Kura, Alazani), in order to decipher changes of their fluvial dynamics during the past. The investigated sediments of Late Pleistocene and Holocene age show thicknesses up to 50 m and are mostly well outcropped. Our morphologic, sedimentologic and chronostratigraphic investigations of different sediment sequences demonstrate distinctive changes of the fluvial dynamics between the Late Pleistocene and the Holocene, and show that high-frequent Holocene changes of the fluvial pattern of the rivers are probably linked to climatic and/or anthropogenic triggers. Additionally, on a longer time scale the fluvial dynamics of the rivers is obviously controlled by ongoing tectonic processes.

  6. From slab rollback to orogenic plateau formation - a numerical modeling study of ocean-continent subduction systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Sebastian; Huismans, Ritske S.; Rondenay, Stéphane

    2016-04-01

    The crustal structures of overriding plates in subduction settings around the world can vary between a wide range of deformation styles, ranging from extensional structures and back arc opening induced by slab roll back as in the Hellenic subduction zone to large, plateau-like orogens such as the central Andes. Both end member types have been intensively studied over the last decades and a range of hypotheses have been proposed to explain their characteristics. Here we model ocean-continent collision using lithospheric scale plane-strain thermo-mechanical models, which also account for phase changes of rocks which enter the eclogite stability field. We consider the oceanic plate velocity, back-arc crustal strength, back-arc lithospheric strength, subduction interface strength, strain weakening thresholds in the crust and mantle flow patterns as the main variables in upper plate deformation and conducted a sensibility study with those parameters. The influence of eclogitized lower continental crust is also accounted for and shows to have a modulating effect. To verify and discuss our modeling results, we also present a comparison of the models with natural subduction systems.

  7. Neoarchean orogenic, magmatic and hydrothermal events in the Kalgoorlie-Kambalda area, Western Australia: constraints on gold mineralization in the Boulder Lefroy-Golden Mile fault system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Andreas G.; Hagemann, Steffen G.; McNaughton, Neal J.

    2016-08-01

    The Boulder Lefroy-Golden Mile (BLF-GMF) fault system is the most intensely mineralized structure (>2150 t Au to 2015) in the Archean Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia. The fault system links the Kalgoorlie and Kambalda mining districts in the Eastern Goldfields Province, a continental-margin orogen subdivided into the western Kalgoorlie ensialic rift and the eastern Kurnalpi volcanic arc. After rifting, the 2.73-2.66 Ga greenstone-greywacke succession in the Kalgoorlie-Kambalda area underwent five phases of orogenic deformation, predominantly during ENE-WSW shortening: D1 upright folding at ca. 2680 Ma, D2 sinistral strike-slip faulting at 2678-2663 Ma, D3 folding of late conglomerate-turbidite successions at 2665-2655 Ma, D4 dextral strike-slip faulting at 2655-2640 Ma and D5 east-northeast-striking normal faulting. Regional prehnite-pumpellyite to greenschist facies burial metamorphism took place during D1 and D3 crustal thickening, and amphibolite facies aureoles formed around granite batholiths during and after D3 at 400 ± 100 MPa pressure. The D2 BLF offsets D1 folds by 12 km SW-side south and contains a porphyry dyke (2676 ± 7 Ma) boudinaged by transtensional oblique-slip along a line pitching 21° southeast. The BLF is linked by transverse D2 thrusts to other sinistral faults recording strike-slip until 2663 ± 7 Ma. Late D2 strike-slip movement alternated with early D3 shortening. D3 thrusts accommodated strain in fault blocks of rigid mafic-ultramafic volcanic rocks consolidated during D1, while the sedimentary rocks in D3 synclines were foliated at high strain. Biotite-sericite alteration and gold-pyrite mineralization in the BLF-GMF system took place at 11 ± 4 km burial depth in faults active during D2 and D3. The Golden Mile (1708 t Au) and other deposits are associated with stocks and dykes of high-Mg monzodiorite-tonalite porphyry, part of a late-orogenic (2665-2645 Ma) mantle-derived suite of adakitic affinity. Hornblende and apatite compositions

  8. The Ediacaran Rio Doce magmatic arc revisited (Araçuaí-Ribeira orogenic system, SE Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tedeschi, Mahyra; Novo, Tiago; Pedrosa-Soares, Antônio; Dussin, Ivo; Tassinari, Colombo; Silva, Luiz Carlos; Gonçalves, Leonardo; Alkmim, Fernando; Lana, Cristiano; Figueiredo, Célia; Dantas, Elton; Medeiros, Sílvia; De Campos, Cristina; Corrales, Felipe; Heilbron, Mônica

    2016-07-01

    Described half a century ago, the Galiléia tonalite represents a milestone in the discovery of plate margin magmatic arcs in the Araçuaí-Ribeira orogenic system (southeastern Brazil). In the 1990's, analytical studies on the Galiléia tonalite finally revealed the existence of a Late Neoproterozoic calc-alkaline magmatic arc in the Araçuaí orogen. Meanwhile, the name Rio Doce magmatic arc was applied to calc-alkaline plutons found in the Araçuaí-Ribeira boundary. After those pioneer studies, the calc-alkaline plutons showing a pre-collisional volcanic arc signature and age between 630 Ma and 585 Ma have been grouped in the G1 supersuite, corresponding to the Rio Doce arc infrastructure. Here, we revisit the Rio Doce arc with our solid field knowledge of the region and a robust analytical database (277 lithochemical analyses, and 47 U-Pb, 53 Sm-Nd, 25 87Sr/86Sr and 7 Lu-Hf datasets). The G1 supersuite consists of regionally deformed, tonalitic to granodioritic batholiths and stocks, generally rich in melanocratic to mesocratic enclaves and minor gabbroic to dioritic plutons. Gabbroic to dioritic enclaves show evidence of magma mixing processes. The lithochemical and isotopic signatures clearly reveal a volcanic arc formed on a continental margin setting. Melts from a Rhyacian basement form the bulk of the magma produced, whilst gabbroic plutons and enclaves record involvement of mantle magmas in the arc development. Tonalitic stocks (U-Pb age: 618-575 Ma, εNd(t): -5.7 to -7.8, Nd TDM ages: 1.28-1.68 Ga, 87Sr/86Sr(t): 0.7059-0.7118, and εHf(t): -5.2 to -11.7) form the northernmost segment of the Rio Doce arc, which dies out in the ensialic sector of the Araçuaí orogen. At arc eastern and central zones, several batholiths (e.g., Alto Capim, Baixo Guandu, Galiléia, Muniz Freire, São Vítor) record a long-lasting magmatic history (632-580 Ma; εNd(t): -5.6 to -13.3; Nd TDM age: 1.35-1.80 Ga; 87Sr/86Sr(t): 0.7091-0.7123). At arc western border, the magmatic

  9. Age, tectonic evolution and origin of the Aswa Shear Zone in Uganda: Activation of an oblique ramp during convergence in the East African Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saalmann, K.; Mänttäri, I.; Nyakecho, C.; Isabirye, E.

    2016-05-01

    Shear Zone activation is linked to underthrusting of the Congo Craton and coeval high-grade metamorphism and intense deformation in the orogen interior. During E-W convergence between ca. 690 and 650 Ma, the NE-dipping ASZ was activated as an oblique ramp leading to deflection of the transport direction and concentration of non-coaxial strain and sinistral shear along the shear zone system. During progressive convergence, between ca. 645 and 620 Ma, sinistral shearing along ASZ changed to ductile-brittle deformation mechanisms, while thrusting took place in Pan-African belts in eastern and western Uganda. Late-orogenic brittle sinistral reactivation of the ASZ can be regarded as the result of continent collision and closure of the Mozambique ocean further to the east, that potentially caused lateral escape manifested in NW-SE striking sinistral shear zones in Kenya and the southern Arabina-Nubian Shield between 620 and 570 Ma.

  10. On the link between orogenic shortening and back-arc extensional collapse in low topography orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matenco, L. C.

    2012-04-01

    Classical models of orogenic evolution assume that back arc basins form in the hinterland of orogens, collapsing the upper plate above oceanic subduction zones. This is a common characteristic commonly thought to apply to all low-topography orogens of Mediterranean type driven by the fast roll-back of subducted slabs, or other analogues such as the Miocene to recent evolution of the SE Asia subduction zones. This extension may take place far at the interior of the upper plate, as is the case in various segments of the Carpathians or in the core of the SE Asian domain, but in most cases of the Dinarides, Apennines or Hellenides it take place superposed or far into the foreland of oceanic suture zones. Therefore, the term back-arc extension in many cases is misleading, as exhumation along major detachment zones takes place in the core of the orogen (Rif, Betics), in the accreted crustal material of the lower plate (Apennines, Dinarides) or even in a presumed former fore-arc (Aegean, Sunda-Banda arc). In all these subduction zones, collision has largely duplicated crustal blocks from the lower plate and has gradually shifted subduction zone far towards the lower plate. As a result, crustal thickening takes place in the foreland of the orogen, in contrast with the typical crustal roots of the high convergence orogens, such as the Alps or Himalaya. This demonstrate an active shift of the main subduction zone, the position of slabs detected by teleseismic mantle tomography is displaced to the foreland and cannot be connected with the position of the lower plate crust beneath the orogen. This shift is associated with large scale magmatism with unusual large crustal signatures, atypical for subduction related magmas. These observations demonstrate the need for an active reconsideration of existing orogenic models which should include displacements of subduction zones during orogenic shortening and an active investigation of the role of continental subduction and associated

  11. When sink becomes source: Importance of sediment recycling in linked orogen-basin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romans, Brian W.; Fosdick, Julie C.; Hubbards, Stephen M.; Fildani, Andrea

    2013-04-01

    Much of the recent research on sedimentary system dynamics has focused on extant systems where the linkage of sediment production from eroding highlands can be directly linked to deposition in lowlands and/or offshore basins. Studies of such systems, typically late Pleistocene to Holocene in age, are especially valuable for quantitative constraints such as system morphometrics (e.g., longitudinal profiles, basin volumes, etc.) and rates of processes (e.g., erosion/denudation, sediment accumulation, etc.), which can be measured directly or estimated with relatively high certainty. Moreover, information about climate and tectonic forcings that are independent to the system is explicitly known for extant systems. However, an understanding of longer-term (>105 yr) evolution can only be gained through the investigation of ancient systems. Such systems are either buried in the subsurface, which requires geophysical remote sensing and/or drilling, or exposed at the Earth's surface as outcrops as the result of uplift and exhumation. The dynamic linkage of mountain belt and adjacent basin makes foreland basin systems ideal natural laboratories to address long-term sedimentary system evolution. In this presentation, we highlight important issues and challenges that sedimentary systems research is currently facing, with an emphasis on sediment recycling during progressive stages of basin development. In this context, we focus on sedimentary systems in which multiple episodes of uplift and erosion of the primary depocenter led to a history whereby basin material was repeatedly recycled. The spatial and temporal aspects of sediment recycling have implications for how provenance signals (based on composition, crystallization or metamorphic age information, thermal history, etc.) are used. Additionally, improved constraints regarding the timescales and magnitude of sediment recycling have implications for system-scale modeling. Key parameters such as total sediment volumes and

  12. Early Cretaceous tectono-magmatic activity and tectonic implications along the Sulu Orogenic Belt - case study of the Dashan complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanghe; Liu, Junlai; Shi, Xiaoxiao; Yuan, Fengjie; Ni, Jinlong; Wu, Wenbin; Chen, Xiaoyu

    2016-04-01

    The tectonic extension of the eastern Eurasian continent during the Early Cretaceous resulted in widespread occurrence of metamorphic core complexes, wide rifts and related magmatic emplacement, among which the Dashan complex of the Jiaonan orogenic belt is a typical example. The complex is a complex massif of several types of granitic rocks. The core of the complex is composed of massive porphry-bearing biotite-hornblende granitoid without any evidence of ductile deformation. Mylonitized augen quartz monzonite and granodiorite constitute the margin of the complex. A transition zone is composed of porphyritic biotite-hornblende monzonite with weakly orientated K-feldspar phenocryst and mafic microgranular enclave. The foliations along the northwestern margin of the complex dip to NW at with dip angles of about 38°, and along the southwestern and northeastern margins to SE with dip angles of about 45°. Stretching lineations are constantly plunging WNW-ESE with pitch angles between 10° and 40°, which is consistent with the orientation of lineations in the other regions in eastern China. The granites,porphyritic monzogranite and the mafic microgranular enclaves in monzogranite are dated of ca.126Ma. The similarities in ages of crystallization of the monzogranite and its MME's implies the existence of magmatic mixing processes. Meanwhile, the mylonitized augen quartz monzonite and granodiorite along the margins of the complex possess crystallization ages of 129.8±1.1Ma and 132.7±2.8Ma, respectively. The petrographical zonation , structural characteristics and the systematical zircon U-Pb geochronology of the granitic rocks may suggest that the Dashan complex has experienced multistage emplacement under the same tectonic extension setting. In despite of the location of the complex near the Tanlu fault zone, the remarkable consistency of the orientations of stretching lineation of the Dashan complex to those from the other parts of the eastern China area implies

  13. Tectonic stress evolution in the Pan-African Lufilian Arc and its foreland (Katanga, DRC): orogenic bending, late orogenic extensional collapse and transition to rifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipata, M. L.; Delvaux, D.; Sebagenzi, M. N.; Cailteux, J.; Sintubin, M.

    2012-04-01

    Between the paroxysm of the Lufilian orogeny at ~ 550 Ma and the late Neogene to Quaternary development of the south-western branch of the East African rift system, the tectonic evolution of the Lufilian Arc and Kundelungu foreland in the Katanga region of the Democratic Republic of Congo remains poorly unknown although it caused important Cu-dominated mineral remobilizations leading to world-class ore deposits. This long period is essentially characterized by brittle tectonic deformations that have been investigated by field studies in open mines spread over the entire arc and foreland. Paleostress tensors were computed for a database of 1450 fault-slip data by interactive stress tensor inversion and data subset separation, and the relative succession of 8 brittle deformation events established. The oldest brittle structures observed are related to the Lufilian brittle compressional climax (stage 1). They have been re-oriented during the orogenic bending that led to the arcuate shape of the belt. Unfolding the stress directions from the first stage allows to reconstruct a consistent NE-SW direction of compression for this stage. Constrictional deformation occurred in the central part of the arc, probably during orogenic bending (Stage 2). After the orogenic bending, a sequence of 3 deformation stages marks the progressive onset of late-orogenic extension: strike-slip deformations (stages 3-4) and late-orogenic arc-parallel extension (stage 5). It is proposed that these 3 stages correspond to orogenic collapse. In early Mesozoic, NW-SE compression was induced by a transpressional inversion, interpreted as induced by far-field stresses generated at the southern active margin of Gondwana (stage 6). Since then, this region was affected by rift-related extension, successively in a NE-SW direction (stage 7, Tanganyika trend) and NW-SE direction (stage 8, Moero trend).

  14. 'Extra-regional' strike-slip fault systems in Chile and Alaska: the North Pacific Rim orogenic Stream vs. Beck's Buttress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redfield, T. F.; Scholl, D. W.; Fitzgerald, P. G.

    2010-12-01

    The ~2000 km long Denali Fault System (DFS) of Alaska is an example of an extra-regional strike-slip fault system that terminates in a zone of widely-distributed deformation. The ~1200 km long Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault Zone (LOFZ) of Patagonia (southern Chile) is another. Both systems are active, having undergone large-magnitude seismic rupture is 2002 (DFS) and 2007 (LOFZ). Both systems appear to be long-lived: the DFS juxtaposes terranes that docked in at least early Tertiary time, whilst the central LOFZ appears to also record early Tertiary or Mesozoic deformation. Both fault systems comprise a relatively well-defined central zone where individual fault traces can be identified from topographic features or zones of deformed rock. In both cases the proximal and distal traces are much more diffuse tributary and distributary systems of individual, branching fault traces. However, since their inception the DFS and LOFZ have followed very different evolutionary paths. Copious Alaskan paleomagnetic data are consistent with vertical axis small block rotation, long-distance latitudinal translation, and a recently-postulated tectonic extrusion towards a distributary of subordinate faults that branch outward towards the Aleution subduction zone (the North Pacific Rim orogenic Stream; see Redfield et al., 2007). Paleomagnetic data from the LOFZ region are consistent with small block rotation but preclude statistically-significant latitudinal transport. Limited field data from the southernmost LOFZ suggest that high-angle normal and reverse faults dominate over oblique to strike-slip structures. Rather than the high-angle oblique 'slivering regime' of the southeasternmost DFS, the initiation of the LOFZ appears to occur across a 50 to 100 km wide zone of brittly-deformed granitic and gneissic rock characterized by bulk compression and vertical pathways of exhumation. In both cases, relative plate motions are consistent with the hypothetical style, and degree, of offset, leading

  15. Brittle tectonic history document the late- to post-orogenic evolution in the Lufilian Arc, RDCongo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipata, Louis; Delvaux, Damien; Ntabwoba Sebagenzi, Mwene; Cailteux, Jean-Jacques; Sintubin, Manuel

    2013-04-01

    Pan-African orogenic processes in Centra Africa involve intracontinental collision but also late-orogenic and intraplate processes that occurred in dominantly brittle conditions and can be documented by fault kinematic analysis and paleostress reconstructions. The Congo and Tanzania cratons in Central Africa are surrounded by Pan-African belts orogenic belts which all entered almost synchronously in collision stage in the early Paleozoic. While their tectonic history up to the collision stage is increasingly better documented by ductile deformation and metamorphic studies, their late evolution remain poorly known as soon as they enter in the brittle deformation regime. This results in an incomplete understanding of the orogenic processes, especially when the transition from ductile to the brittle regime occurred at the end of the orogenic compression. In this case, the last compressional stages and the entire late orogenic extension and extensional collapse stages remain undocumented. This is the case for the Lufilian orogeny which developed along the southern margin of the Congo Craton in Central Africa during the pan-African and was marked by a collisional event with crustal thickening and white schist formation at 550-530 Ma. The Lufilian Arc which forms the external part of the Lufilian orogeny developed as an arcuate fold-and-thrust belt. Its foreland is formed by the Kundelungu plateau, between the Bangweulu block and the Kibaran belt. This entire region is also tectonically active, as part of the incipient SW branch of the East African rift system. The long period between the paroxysm of the Lufilian orogeny and the late Neogene to Quaternary rifting has been investigated by fault-kinematic analysis and paleostress reconstruction in open mines spread over the entire arc and foreland. Paleostress tensors were computed from 23 sites totaling 1900 fault-slip data by interactive stress tensor inversion and data subset separation, and a succession of 8 brittle

  16. Inheritance and refertilization of Upper Mantle rocks in Alpine type orogens and rift systems: what and why

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muntener, O.

    2015-12-01

    Mantle peridotites and their serpentinized counterparts from ocean-continent transition zones (OCT's) and (ultra-) slow spreading ridges question a series of 'common beliefs' that have been applied to understand Alpine-type collisional orogens in the framework of the ophiolite concept. I will show that inherited mantle signatures play a key role for the interpretation of ophiolites, and similar processes are relevant for present-day passive margins. Field data and petrology demonstrates that ancient, thermally undisturbed, pyroxenite-veined subcontinental mantle formed parts of the ocean floor next to thinned continental crust. These heterogeneities might comprise an ancient subduction component. Mantle upwelling and decompression melting during rifting forms partial melts that enter a thick conductive lithospheric mantle and inevitably leads to freezing of the melt and refertilization of the lithospheric mantle. Mafic bodies (gabbros, basalts) are small and discontinous. The abundance of plagioclase peridotites in the Alpine ophiolites and elswhere along rifted margins are interpreted as recorders of refertilization processes related to thinning and exhumation of mantle lithosphere. Similar features are found (ultra-) slow spreading ridges. Another important result is the discovery of extremely refractory Nd-isotopic compositions with highly radiogenic 147Sm/144Nd, which indicates that partial melting processes and Jurassic magmatism in the Western Tethys are locally decoupled. Although the isotopic variability along ridges is generally explained by mantle heterogeneities such as pyroxenites, an alternative is that these depleted domains represent snapshots of melting processes that are related to Permian and/or even older crust forming processes, and during the most recent decompression they were unffected by (further) melting. Similarly, refractory rocks from rifted margins and (ultra-) slow spreading ridges have been interpreted to represent ancient melting

  17. Predictive mapping of prospectivity for orogenic gold in Uganda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbert, Sarah; Woldai, Tsehaie; Carranza, Emmanuel John M.; van Ruitenbeek, Frank J. A.

    2014-11-01

    Integration of enhanced regional geo-datasets has facilitated new geological interpretation and modelling of prospectivity for orogenic gold in southwestern Uganda. The geo-datasets include historical geological maps, geological field data, digital terrain models, Landsat TM data and airborne geophysical data. The study area, bordered by the western branch of the East African Rift, covers a range of different aged terranes including the Archaean basement gneisses, Palaeoproterozoic volcano-sedimentary Buganda Toro Belt, Mesoproterozoic clastic sedimentary Karagwe Ankolean Belt and several outliers of undeformed Neoproterozoic sediments. The mineral systems approach to practical exploration targeting requires a framework to link conceptual models of mineralisation with available data. A conceptual model requires good understanding of key processes and their timing within the geodynamic history of an area. The challenge is that processes cannot be mapped, only their results or effects. In this study, a district-scale (1:100,000) investigation is considered appropriate given the scarcity of geological information and the absence of world-renowned gold deposits in southwestern Uganda. At this scale of orogenic gold mineral systems understanding, evidence for the source of gold, active pathways and the physical traps are considered critical. Following the mineral system approach, these processes critical to orogenic gold systems are translated into district-scale mappable proxies using available regional-scale datasets. Tectono-stratigraphic domains, mantle indicators and gold occurrences represent the “source of gold” as a critical process. Zones of hydrothermal alteration were extracted from radiometric data, structures involved in the orogenies and terrane contacts were extracted to represent the active pathway as a critical process and finally the physical throttle is represented by rheological contrasts and geological complexity. Then, the knowledge

  18. Terminal magmatic activities along the Solonker suture zone in the southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt: New insights from the end-Permian magmatic record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Wilde, Simon A.; Xiao, Wen-Jiao; Wang, Tao; Guo, Qian-Qian

    2016-04-01

    A compilation of U-Pb age, geochemical and isotopic data for granitoid plutons in the southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), enables evaluation of the interaction between magmatism and orogenesis in the context of Paleo-Asian oceanic closure and continental amalgamation. These constraints, in conjunction with other geologic evidence, suggest that following consumption of the ocean, collision-related calc-alkaline granitoid and mafic magmatism occurred at 255 to 251 Ma along the Solonker-Xar Moron suture zone. The linear end-Permian magmatism is interpreted as in a setting of continental contraction and crustal thickening, probably as a result of slab break-off. Crustal anatexis slightly post-dated the earliest phases of collision, producing adakite-like granitoids with some S-type granites during the Early-Middle Triassic (ca. 251-245 Ma). Between 235 and 220 Ma, the local tectonic regime switched from compression to extension, probably caused by regional lithospheric extension and orogenic collapse. The proposed collision-related magmatism from the southern CAOB is thus a prime example of minor, yet tell-tale linking magmatism with orogenic contraction and collision in an archipelago-type accretionary orogen.

  19. Compressional intracontinental orogens: Ancient and modern perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimondo, Tom; Hand, Martin; Collins, William J.

    2014-03-01

    Compressional intracontinental orogens are major zones of crustal thickening produced at large distances from active plate boundaries. Consequently, any account of their initiation and subsequent evolution must be framed outside conventional plate tectonics theory, which can only explain the proximal effects of convergent plate-margin interactions. This review considers a range of hypotheses regarding the origins and transmission of compressive stresses in intraplate settings. Both plate-boundary and intraplate stress sources are investigated as potential driving forces, and their relationship to rheological models of the lithosphere is addressed. The controls on strain localisation are then evaluated, focusing on the response of the lithosphere to the weakening effects of structural, thermal and fluid processes. With reference to the characteristic features of intracontinental orogens in central Asia (the Tien Shan) and central Australia (the Petermann and Alice Springs Orogens), it is argued that their formation is largely driven by in-plane stresses generated at plate boundaries, with the lithosphere acting as an effective stress guide. This implies a strong lithospheric mantle rheology, in order to account for far-field stress propagation through the discontinuous upper crust and to enable the support of thick uplifted crustal wedges. Alternative models of intraplate stress generation, primarily involving mantle downwelling, are rejected on the grounds that their predicted temporal and spatial scales for orogenesis are inconsistent with the observed records of deformation. Finally, inherited mechanical weaknesses, thick sedimentary blanketing over a strongly heat-producing crust, and pervasive reaction softening of deep fault networks are identified as important and interrelated controls on the ability of the lithosphere to accommodate rather than transmit stress. These effects ultimately produce orogenic zones with architectural features and evolutionary

  20. New (U-Th)/He titanite data from a complex orogen-passive margin system: A case study from northern Mozambique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Friederike U.; Jacobs, Joachim; Emmel, Benjamin U.; van Soest, Matthijs C.

    2016-08-01

    New titanite (U-Th)/He (He) data on basement rocks from NE Mozambique are presented. The objective was to test the applicability of titanite He thermochronology in an orogen-passive margin setting and to better constrain the exhumation history across the Lurio Belt, a major structural discontinuity in Mozambique. Therefore, samples from existing geochronological and thermochronological studies were dated using titanite He thermochronology. Resulting titanite He data (from abraded crystals) provide average cooling ages from 178 ± 15 to 383 ± 23 Ma. The data fit well into the age pattern obtained from previous thermochronological studies in NE Mozambique, revealing differential exhumation across the Lurio Belt. The basement to the north experienced earlier cooling than that to the south, while overall youngest titanite He ages are from the Lurio Belt, indicating reactivation linked to the post-collisional extension and break-up of Gondwana. Thermal history modelling revealed two possibilities, able to account for the different cooling histories of NE Mozambique since initial Gondwana break-up in Permian times: One involves a transient sedimentary overburden that buried and (re)heated the southern basement, with subsequent basin inversion at ˜250 Ma in response to rift shoulder uplift. The second model implies delayed cooling of the southern basement, possibly due to delamination of the crustal root shortly after Gondwana formation. The formerly upwelling asthenosphere and the subsequently formed sag basin might have caused a prolonged thermal effect. Titanite He ages and thermal histories point to rift shoulder uplift of the southern part and increased thermal activity within the reactivated Lurio Belt, signifying first rifting activities as precursor of Gondwana break-up.

  1. New (U-Th)/He titanite data from a complex orogen-passive margin system: A case study from northern Mozambique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Friederike U.; Jacobs, Joachim; Emmel, Benjamin U.; van Soest, Matthijs C.

    2016-08-01

    New titanite (U-Th)/He (He) data on basement rocks from NE Mozambique are presented. The objective was to test the applicability of titanite He thermochronology in an orogen-passive margin setting and to better constrain the exhumation history across the Lurio Belt, a major structural discontinuity in Mozambique. Therefore, samples from existing geochronological and thermochronological studies were dated using titanite He thermochronology. Resulting titanite He data (from abraded crystals) provide average cooling ages from 178 ± 15 to 383 ± 23 Ma. The data fit well into the age pattern obtained from previous thermochronological studies in NE Mozambique, revealing differential exhumation across the Lurio Belt. The basement to the north experienced earlier cooling than that to the south, while overall youngest titanite He ages are from the Lurio Belt, indicating reactivation linked to the post-collisional extension and break-up of Gondwana. Thermal history modelling revealed two possibilities, able to account for the different cooling histories of NE Mozambique since initial Gondwana break-up in Permian times: One involves a transient sedimentary overburden that buried and (re)heated the southern basement, with subsequent basin inversion at ∼250 Ma in response to rift shoulder uplift. The second model implies delayed cooling of the southern basement, possibly due to delamination of the crustal root shortly after Gondwana formation. The formerly upwelling asthenosphere and the subsequently formed sag basin might have caused a prolonged thermal effect. Titanite He ages and thermal histories point to rift shoulder uplift of the southern part and increased thermal activity within the reactivated Lurio Belt, signifying first rifting activities as precursor of Gondwana break-up.

  2. Ore geology and fluid inclusion geochemistry of the Tiemurt Pb-Zn-Cu deposit, Altay, Xinjiang, China: A case study of orogenic-type Pb-Zn systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Zheng, Yi; Chen, YanJing

    2012-04-01

    The Tiemurt Pb-Zn-Cu deposit is hosted in a Devonian volcanic-sedimentary basin of the Altay orogenic belt, and is thus interpreted to have formed by sea-floor hydrothermal exhalation in previous studies. Our investigation discovered that the deposit is not stratiform or stratabound, but structure-controlled instead. The hydrothermal ore-forming process can be divided into the early, middle and late stage, represented by pyrite-quartz, polymetallic sulfide-quartz and carbonate-quartz veinlets, respectively. The early-stage veins and contained minerals are structurally deformed and brecciated, suggesting a compressional or transpressional tectonic regime. The middle-stage veinlets intrude and infill the fissures of the early-stage assemblages, and show no deformation, suggesting a tensional shear setting. The late-stage veinlets mostly infill open-space fissures that crosscut veins and replacements formed in the earlier stages. Four types of fluid inclusions (FIs), including aqueous (type W), carbonic-aqueous (type C), pure carbonic (type PC) and solid-bearing (type S), are identified at the Tiemurt deposit. The early-stage minerals contain the C- and W-type primary FIs that are totally homogenized at temperatures of 330-390 °C with low salinities of 0.8-11.9 wt.% NaCl eqv.; whilst the late-stage quartz or calcite contains only the W-type FIs with homogenization temperatures of 118-205 °C, and salinities of 1.4-3.4 wt.% NaCl eqv. This indicates that the ore fluid system evolved from CO2-rich, probably metamorphic to CO2-poor, meteoric fluids; and that a significant CO2-escape must have occurred. All the four types of FIs can be only observed in the middle-stage minerals, and even in a microscopic domain of a crystal, representing an association trapped from a boiling fluid system. These FIs homogenize at temperatures ranging from 270 to 330 °C, with two salinity clusters of 1.9-14.5 and 37.4-42.4 wt.% NaCl eqv., respectively. This implies that metal precipitation

  3. The Development of Topography in Ancient and Active Orogens: Case Studies of Landscape Evolution in the Southern Appalachians, USA and Crete, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallen, Sean Francis

    Understanding the development of topography is fundamental to the geosciences. Topography represents the sum of all tectonic and geodynamic processes that force the earth's surface upward paired with those that act to bring it down. Spatial and temporal changes in topographic relief can modulate the various feedbacks between atmospheric, earth surface and rock exhumation processes, sediment flux, and the magnitude and style of gravity driven natural hazards. Plate tectonics provides the first-order framework necessary to understand how topography is built through the interaction of lithospheric plates. However, density contrasts in the mantle can also influence the elevation of the earth's surface through dynamic topography, while poorly understood nuances of mountain building at convergent margins complicate drawing direct connections between tectonics and topography. Such linkages are further confounded by non-linearity between rock uplift and erosion, variations in rates of deformation, changes in climate and the properties of bedrock. Great advances in our understanding of the evolution of topography have been achieved, yet numerous questions remain regarding the evolution of topography in ancient and active orogens. This research addresses knowledge gaps in the development of topography through case-studies of landscape evolution in the southern Appalachians Mountains, USA and the forearc overlying the Hellenic subduction zone. Chapter 1 explores the origins of modern topographic relief in the southern Appalachians, where tectonic activity ceased prior to 200 Ma. Conventional theories invoked to explain modern relief in the region are challenged. Quantitative analyses of digital elevation models and numerical modeling are coupled to provide the magnitudes and timing of changes in topographic relief. The results suggest that the southern Appalachians experienced a phase of topographic rejuvenation during the Miocene that increased the distance between the

  4. Upper Triassic turbidites of the northern Tethyan Himalaya (Langjiexue Group): the terminal of a sediment-routing system sourced in the Gondwanide Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-Gang; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Garzanti, Eduardo; Hu, Xiu-Mian; Ji, Wei-Qiang; Liu, Zhi-Chao; Liu, Xiao-Chi

    2016-04-01

    zircons with uniform ɛHf(t) values from -5 to +10 are incompatible with any nearby source, including the Qiantang Block, the Lhasa Block or the India subcontinent, and indicate instead supply from a long-lived magmatic-arc terrane. Considering what is known about Late Triassic paleogeography, a plausible source for Langjiexue sediments is represented by the Gondwanide Orogen, generated during subduction of the pan-Pacific oceanic lithosphere beneath southeastern Gondwana. This scenario is supported by the age range and Hf isotopic signatures of Late Paleozoic-Early Mesozoic zircons contained in Langjiexue turbidites as in coeval turbidites exposed in western Myanmar (Sevastjanova et al., 2016). New data are needed to confirm/falsify the existence of a thousands-km-long sediment-routing system similar to the modern Amazon, which - sourced in a cordillera-type orogen rising along the southeastern margin of Gondwana - crossed an entire continent to feed turbiditic fans now exposed from western Myanmar to the northern Tethys Himalaya.

  5. Mantle refertilization and magmatism in old orogenic regions: The role of late-orogenic pyroxenites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Lydéric; Chazot, Gilles; Kornprobst, Jacques; Dallai, Luigi; Vannucci, Riccardo; Grégoire, Michel; Bertrand, Hervé; Boivin, Pierre

    2015-09-01

    Pyroxenites and garnet pyroxenites are mantle heterogeneities characterized by a lower solidus temperature than the enclosing peridotites; it follows that they are preferentially involved during magma genesis. Constraining their origin, composition, and the interactions they underwent during their subsequent evolution is therefore essential to discuss the sources of magmatism in a given area. Pyroxenites could represent either recycling of crustal rocks in mantle domains or mantle originated rocks (formed either by olivine consuming melt-rock reactions or by crystal fractionation). Petrological and geochemical (major and trace elements, Sr-Nd and O isotopes) features of xenoliths from various occurrences (French Massif-Central, Jordan, Morocco and Cameroon) show that these samples represent cumulates crystallized during melt percolation at mantle conditions. They formed in mantle domains at pressures of 1-2 GPa during post-collisional magmatism (possibly Hercynian for the French Massif-Central, and Panafrican for Morocco, Jordan and Cameroon). The thermal re-equilibration of lithospheric domains, typical of the late orogenic exhumation stages, is also recorded by the samples. Most of the samples display a metasomatic overprint that may be either inherited or likely linked to the recent volcanic activity that occurred in the investigated regions. The crystallization of pyroxenites during late orogenic events has implications for the subsequent evolution of the mantle domains. The presence of large amounts of mantle pyroxenites in old orogenic regions indeed imparts peculiar physical and chemical characteristics to these domains. Among others, the global solidus temperature of the whole lithospheric domain will be lowered; in turn, this implies that old orogenic regions are refertilized zones where magmatic activity would be enhanced.

  6. The Wassa deposit: A poly-deformed orogenic gold system in southwest Ghana - Implications for regional exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrouty, Stéphane; Jessell, Mark W.; Bourassa, Yan; Miller, John; Apau, Daniel; Siebenaller, Luc; Velásquez, Germán; Baratoux, Lenka; Aillères, Laurent; Béziat, Didier; Salvi, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    The Ashanti greenstone belt in southwest Ghana hosts many gold deposits distinguished by different timing and structural contexts. This study investigates the evolution of the Wassa system by integrating field and geophysical observations. This 4 million ounces (past production and current resources) gold deposit is interpreted to represent the oldest gold mineralization event in West Africa with gold-bearing pyrites aligned and stretched within the S1 ductile fabric. Mineralized quartz-carbonate veins were strongly deformed during the D1 deformation event. Three additional folding events are characterized by hectometer-scale tight to isoclinal folds, by a kilometer-scale synform fold centered on the mine and by a late recumbent metric-scale folds. Because of its early timing, the Wassa system represents a new poly-deformed deposit type in West Africa and highlights a potential for new discoveries in the underexplored meta-volcanic and meta-sedimentary Sefwi Group. Timing of the gold mineralization at the Wassa mine makes this deposit type a possible candidate for the source of the gold contained in the Tarkwa paleoplacer.

  7. Late Paleozoic tectonic evolution of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt: Constraints from multiple arc-basin systems in Altai-Junggar area, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we report results from integrated geological, geophysical and geochemical investigations on the Wulungu Depression of the Junggar Basin to understand the Late Paleozoic continental growth of the Junggar area and its amalgamation history with the Altai terrane, within the broad tectonic evolution of the Altai-Junggar area. Based on seismic and borehole data, the Wulungu Depression can be divided into two NW-trending tectonic units by southward thrust faults. The Suosuoquan Sag is composed of gray basaltic andesite, andesite, tuff, tuffaceous sandstone and tuffite, and the overlying Early Carboniferous volcano-sedimentary sequence with lava gushes and marine sediments from a proximal juvenile provenance, compared to the andesite in the Hongyan High. The SIMS Zircon U-Pb ages for andesites from Late Paleozoic strata indicate that these volcanics in Suosuoquan Sag and Hongyan High erupted at 376.3Ma and 313.4Ma, respectively. Most of the intermediate-mafic volcanic rocks exhibit calc-alkaline affinity, low initial 87Sr/86Sr and positive ɛNd(t) and ɛHf(t) values. Furthermore, these rocks have high Th/Yb and low Ce/Pb and La/Yb ratios as well as variable Ba/Th and Ba/La ratios. These features imply that the rocks were derived from partial melting of a mantle wedge metasomatized by subduction-related components in an island arc setting. The basin filling pattern and the distribution of island arc-type volcanics and their zircon Hf model ages with the eruptive time suggest that the Wulungu Depression represents an island arc-basin system with the development of a Carboniferous retro-arc basin. The gravity and magnetic anomaly data suggest that Altai-Junggar area incorporates three arc-basin belts from north to south: the Karamaili-Luliang-Darbut, Yemaquan-Wulungu, and Dulate-Fuhai-Saur. The recognition of the Wulungu arc-basin system demonstrates that the northern Junggar area is built by amalgamation of multiple Paleozoic linear arcs and accretionary

  8. Detrital muscovite 40Ar/39Ar ages from Carboniferous sandstones of the British Isles: Provenance and implications for the uplift history of orogenic belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, Finlay M.; Bluck, Brian J.; Pringle, Malcolm S.

    2001-04-01

    Major progradations of clastic sediments are recorded in the sedimentary record of the Famennian and the Visean-Namurian of the United Kingdom and surrounding waters. We have determined 40Ar/39Ar ages of 162 detrital muscovites from 11 coarse sandstones which were deposited between 370 and 465 Ma, spanning both progradations. Detrital mica ages are dominated by a peak at 415 Ma, with minor peaks at 440 Ma and 390 Ma. The 415 Ma muscovites are derived from the unroofing of the Scandian nappes during the compressional phase of the Caledonian orogeny in Scandinavia. The 440 Ma muscovites record pre-Scandian orogenic activity, which is rarely preserved in the orogenic record. Thermochronological evidence suggests that episodic postorogenic uplift, and exhumation events kept the Scandian orogen a major topographic feature and likely a sediment source for over 100 million years after nappe emplacement and implicates tectonic rather than climatic control on the clastic sediment progradations. The near total absence of detrital muscovites with ages <415 Ma suggests that the Scandian nappes had not been entirely eroded despite repeated uplift during the postorogenic extension. The river(s) which supplied the sediments probably ran parallel to the strike of the major Scandian thrusts, along the length of the Caledonian orogen, in a manner analogous to the major river systems of contemporary orogenic highlands.

  9. Pn anisotropic tomography under the entire Tienshan orogenic belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhigang; Lei, Jianshe

    2015-11-01

    We present a new anisotropic tomography of the uppermost mantle under the Tienshan orogenic belt and surrounding regions using a number of Pn arrival-time data hand-picked from portable seismic stations and chosen from the Xinjiang provincial observation bulletins and the EHB datasets. Our results exhibit prominent lateral heterogeneities in the study region. Distinct low-velocity anomalies are visible under the tectonically active regions, such as the Tienshan orogenic belt and western Kunlun Mountains, whereas pronounced high-velocity anomalies are imaged beneath the stable blocks, such as the Kazakh shield, the Junggar, Tarim, Qaidam, and Turpan-Hami basins, and the Tajik depression. Most strong earthquakes (Ms > 7.0) are mainly distributed along the transition zone of high to low velocity anomalies, suggesting a possible correlation between the strong earthquakes and the upper mantle structure. The fast directions of Pn anisotropy beneath the Tienshan orogenic belt are generally parallel to its striking orientation, whereas those beneath Pamir show a northward arc-shaped distribution. The Pn fast-velocity directions on the boundaries of the Kazakh shield and the Tarim and Junngar basins are approximately perpendicular to the strike of the Tienshan orogenic belt. By integrating with previous findings, our results suggest that the Tarim and Kazakh lithospheric materials could have underthrusted beneath the Tienshan orogenic belt that leads to the hot mantle material upwelling under the Tienshan orogenic belt, which is attributable to the Indo-Asian collision. These dynamic processes could play important roles in the Tienshan mountain building.

  10. Detrital fission-track-compositional signature of an orogenic chain-hinterland basin system: The case of the late Neogene Quaternary Valdelsa basin (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balestrieri, M. L.; Benvenuti, M.; Tangocci, F.

    2013-05-01

    Detrital thermochronological data collected in syn-tectonic basin deposits are a promising tool for deciphering time and processes of the evolution of orogenic belts. Our study deals with the Valdelsa basin, one of the wider basins of central Tuscany, Italy. The Valdelsa basin is located at the rear of the Northern Apennines, a collisional orogen whose late Neogene Quaternary development is alternatively attributed to extensional and compressional regimes. These contrasting interpretations mostly rely on different reconstructions of the tectono-sedimentary evolution of several basins formed at the rear of the chain since the late Tortonian. Here, we explore the detrital thermochronological-compositional signature of tectonic and surface processes during the Valdelsa basin development. For this aim, detrital apatite fission-track analysis of 21 sand samples from the latest Messinian Gelasian fluvial to shallow marine basin deposits, has been accompanied by a clast composition analysis of 7 representative outcrops of the conglomerate facies. The grain-age distributions of the sediment samples are generally characterized by two distinct components, one younger peak (P1) varying between 5.5 ± 2.8 and 9.5 ± 1.0 Ma and one older peak (P2) varying from 15.0 ± 8.0 to 41.0 ± 10 Ma. By comparison with some bedrock ages obtained from the E-NE basin shoulder, we attributed the P2 peak to the Ligurian Units and the P1 peak to the Macigno Formation (Tuscan Units). These units are arranged one upon the other in the complex nappe pile forming the Northern Apennines orogen. While the gravel composition indicates a predominant feeding from the Ligurian units all along the sedimentary succession with a subordinate occurrence of Macigno pebbles slightly increasing upsection, the P1 peak is present even in the oldest collected sandy sediments. The early P1 occurrence reveals that the Macigno was exposed in the E-NE basin shoulder since at least the latest Messinian-early Zanclean

  11. Age and geochemistry of Silurian gabbroic rocks in the Tongbai orogen, central China: Implications for the geodynamic evolution of the North Qinling arc-back-arc system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Wu, Yuan-Bao; Qin, Zheng-Wei; Zhu, Liu-Qin; Liu, Qian; Liu, Xiao-Chi; Gao, Shan; Wijbrans, Jan R.; Zhou, Lian; Gong, Hu-Jun; Yuan, Hong-Lin

    2013-10-01

    The tectonic properties of the Erlangping unit and the subduction polarity of oceanic basins in the North Qinling-Tongbai orogen have been the focus of debate for more than twenty years. The resolution of these controversies hinges on the refined constraints on the location and nature of subduction-related magmatism. In this contribution, we provide a combined study of zircon U-Pb ages, major and trace element geochemistry, and Sr-Nd-Hf isotope compositions of gabbroic rocks from the Erlangping unit in the Tongbai orogen. U-Pb dating of zircons from two gabbroic diorite samples yielded two weighted mean ages of 443 ± 3 and 440 ± 4 Ma. The Erlangping gabbroic rocks are tholeiitic in composition with variable MgO (4.48-8.17%), and low K2O (0.25-1.01%) and TiO2 (0.60-1.79%) contents. They are characterized by enrichment of LILEs, depletion of HFSEs, and highly positive whole-rock ɛNd(t) (3.76-5.68) and zircon ɛHf(t) (12.0-12.1) values. The geochemical features indicate that the Erlangping gabbroic rocks were derived from a depleted lithospheric mantle that had been exposed to metasomatism by slab-derived fluid shortly before their generation. Their occurrence, coupled with coeval granitoids with highly positive ɛNd(t) values, manifest significant crustal growth in the North Qinling-Tongbai orogen during the late Ordovician-Silurian. In addition, the Erlangping gabbroic rocks have low Sr/Y (7.32-26.2) and (La/Yb)N (1.34-4.07) ratios, but high HREEs, Y and Sc contents. This implies that their mantle source had no residual garnet, and thus partial melting of the lithospheric mantle occurred under relatively low-pressure conditions. The generation of the Erlangping gabbroic rocks might result from incipient rifting of the Erlangping back-arc basin induced by the northward subduction of the Paleotethyan Shangdan Ocean. Taking into account the ca. 490 Ma collision between the Erlangping arc and North Qinling microcontinent, we suggested that the evolution of the North

  12. The Impact of Partial Melting in the Orogenic Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, P. F.; Teyssier, C.; Whitney, D. L.

    2010-12-01

    Open source, community driven numerical codes available at geodynamics.org allow geologists to model orogenic processes including partial melting and its consequences during orogenic cycles. Here we explore the role of partial melting during continental subduction and its impact on the evolution of orogenic plateaux and that of migmatite-cored metamorphic core complexes. Continental subduction and orogenic plateaux: Numerical experiments show that when continental slabs buried into the mantle meet their solidus, crustal melt is confined to the slab during its ascent and ponds at the Moho (Fig. 1a). The displaced overlying crust is extruded horizontally into the weak lower crust of the continent, resulting in Earth’s surface uplift to form an orogenic plateau, and Moho downward motion to accommodate the influx of material into the lower crust. This model suggests a link between continental subduction, melting and the build up of orogenic plateaux, and show that partial melting may be a significant process in exhumation of ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) rocks. Model results are consistent with the common association of UHP rocks and migmatite. Growth and destruction of orogenic plateaux: The lateral growth of orogenic plateaux is often attributed to the flow of the plateau weak partially melted lower crust into its foreland in some cases over a distance > 1500 km in 15 myr. Using pre-thickening temperatures compatible with Tibet’s uplift history, we show that mass redistribution processes are dynamically coupled, and that CFE velocities are limited to less than 1 cm.yr-1 (~150 km in 15 myr) by cooling and crystallization of the melted channel in the foreland and by any upward deviation into metamorphic domes of the melted channel by extension in the plateau (Fig. 1b). Gravitational collapse and metamorphic core complexes: Localization of extension in the upper crust triggers convergent flow in the partially molten deep crust channel. This convergent flow leads to the

  13. Ambient tremors in a collisional orogenic belt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chuang, Lindsay Yuling; Chen, Kate Huihsuan; Wech, Aaron G.; Byrne, Timothy; Peng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Deep-seated tectonic tremors have been regarded as an observation tied to interconnected fluids at depth, which have been well documented in worldwide subduction zones and transform faults but not in a collisional mountain belt. In this study we explore the general features of collisional tremors in Taiwan and discuss the possible generation mechanism. In the 4 year data, we find 231 ambient tremor episodes with durations ranging from 5 to 30 min. In addition to a coseismic slip-induced stress change from nearby major earthquake, increased tremor rate is also highly correlated with the active, normal faulting earthquake swarms at the shallower depth. Both the tremor and earthquake swarm activities are confined in a small, area where the high attenuation, high thermal anomaly, the boundary between high and low resistivity, and localized veins on the surfaces distributed, suggesting the involvement of fluids from metamorphic dehydration within the orogen.

  14. Reconstructing multiple arc-basin systems in the Altai-Junggar area (NW China): Implications for the architecture and evolution of the western Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Di; He, Dengfa; Tang, Yong

    2016-05-01

    The Altai-Junggar area in northwestern China is a critical region to gain insights on the tectonic framework and geological evolution of the western Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB). In this study, we report results from integrated geological, geochemical and geophysical investigations on the Wulungu Depression of the Junggar Basin to determine the basement nature of the basin and understand its amalgamation history with the Chinese Altai, within the broad tectonic evolution of the Altai-Junggar area. Based on borehole and seismic data, the Wulungu Depression is subdivided into two NW-trending tectonic units (Suosuoquan Sag and Hongyan High) by southward-vergent thrust faults. The Suosuoquan Sag consists of the Middle-Late Devonian basaltic andesite, andesite, dacite, tuff, tuffaceous sandstone and tuffite, and the overlying Early Carboniferous volcano-sedimentary sequence with lava flows and shallow marine sediments from a proximal juvenile provenance (zircon εHf(t) = 6.0-14.9), compared to the Late Carboniferous andesite and rhyolite in the Hongyan High. Zircon SIMS U-Pb ages for dacites and andesites indicate that these volcanics in the Suosuoquan Sag and Hongyan High erupted at 376.3 Ma and 313.4 Ma, respectively. The Middle-Late Devonian basaltic andesites from well LC1 are calc-alkaline and exhibit primitive magma-like MgO contents (7.9-8.6%) and Mg# values (66-68), with low initial 87Sr/86Sr (0.703269-0.704808) and positive εNd(t) values (6.6-7.6), and relatively high Zr abundance (98.2-116.0 ppm) and Zr/Y ratios (5.1-5.4), enrichment in LREEs and LILEs (e.g., Th and U) and depletion in Nb, Ta and Ti, suggesting that they were probably derived from a metasomatized depleted mantle in a retro-arc extensional setting. The well LC1 andesitic tuffs, well L8 dacites, well WL1 dacitic tuffs and well L5 andesites belong to calc-alkaline and metaluminous to peraluminous (A/CNK = 0.8-1.7) series, and display low Mg# values (35-46) and variably positive εNd(t) (4

  15. Proterozoic orogens in southern Peninsular India: Contiguities and complexities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chetty, T. R. K.; Santosh, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Precambrian terranes of southern Peninsular India have been central to discussions on the history of formation and breakup of supercontinents. Of particular interest are the Proterozoic high grade metamorphic orogens at the southern and eastern margins of the Indian shield, skirting the 3.4 Ga Dharwar craton which not only preserve important records of lower crustal processes and lithospheric geodynamics, but also carry imprints of the tectonic framework related to the assembly of the major Neoproterozoic supercontinents - Rodinia and Gondwana. These Proterozoic orogens are described as Southern Granulite Terrane (SGT) in the southern tip and the Eastern Ghats Mobile Belt (EGMB) in the eastern domains of the peninsula. The contiguity of these orogens is broken for a distance of ˜400 km and disappears in the Bay of Bengal. These orogens expose windows of middle to lower crust with well-preserved rock records displaying multiple tectonothermal events and multiphase exhumation paths.Recent studies in these orogens have led to the recognition of discrete crustal blocks or terranes separated by major shear zone systems, some of which represent collisional sutures. The SGT and EGMB carry several important features such as fold-thrust tectonics, regional granulite facies metamorphism of up to ultrahigh-temperature conditions in some cases, multiple P-T paths, development of lithospheric shear zones, emplacement of ophiolites, presence of alkaline and anorthositic complexes, development of crustal-scale "flower structures", transpressional strains, and reactivation tectonics. A heterogeneous distribution of different metamorphic and magmatic assemblages with distinct spatial and temporal strain variations in shaping the fabric elements in different blocks is identified. Both EGMB and SGT share a common transpressional deformation history during the latest Neoproterozoic characterized by the steepening of the initial low angle crustal scale structures leading to a

  16. Part I: Neoacadian to Alleghanian foreland basin development and provenance in the central appalachian orogen, pine mountain thrust sheet Part II: Structural configuration of a modified Mesozoic to Cenozoic forearc basin system, south-central Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Peter Benjamin

    . Four samples of Lower Mississippian to Middle Pennsylvanian sandstone were collected from the hanging wall (n = 3) and footwall (n = 1) of the Pine Mountain thrust sheet at Pound Gap to determine sediment provenance in this long-lived foreland basin system. Paleocurrent indicators considered in the context of the regional foreland basin system suggest transverse regional drainage during the development of Early and Late Mississippian delta complexes. Eustatic fall during the early stages of the Alleghanian orogeny to the east saw a shift in regional drainage with the development of a southwestward-flowing and axial braided river system in Early Pennsylvanian time followed by Middle Mississippian transgression of a fluvio-deltaic complex. Detrital zircon U-Pb age data from Lower Mississippian to Lower Pennsylvanian sandstone support regional interpretations of sediment sourcing from probably recycled foreland basin strata along the east Laurentian margin, whereas compositionally immature Middle Pennsylvanian sediment was sourced by a limited distribution of east Laurentia sources reflecting thrust belt migration into the adjacent foreland basin system during Alleghanian orogenesis. In addition, the stratigraphy of the foreland basin system in the central Appalachian basin is significantly different compared to the stratigraphic record that is typified for foreland basin systems and suggests that the Carboniferous Appalachian foreland basin system investigated in this study does not fit the typical foreland basin model that is used widely today for both ancient and modern systems. Possible factors that produce the observed discrepancies between the central Appalachian and typical foreland basin systems may include differences in the timing, type, and frequency of orogenic events leading to foreland basin development, related variations in the rheology of the underlying lithosphere, and whether forebulge migration is mechanically static or mobile. The Cordilleran margin

  17. The Capricorn Orogen Passive source Array (COPA) in Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessner, K.; Yuan, H.; Murdie, R.; Dentith, M. C.; Johnson, S.; Brett, J.

    2015-12-01

    COPA is the passive source component of a multi-method geophysical program aimed at assessing the mineral deposits potential of the Proterozoic Capricorn Orogen. Previous results from the active source surveys, receiver functions and magnetotelluric studies show reworked orogenic crust in the orogen that contrasts with more simple crust in the neighbouring Archean cratons, suggesting progressive and punctuated collisional processes during the final amalgamation of the Western Australian craton. Previous seismic studies are all based on line deployment or single station analyses; therefore it is essential to develop 3D seismic images to test whether these observations are representative for the whole orogen. With a careful design that takes advantage of previous passive source surveys, the current long-term and short-term deployments span an area of approximately 500 x 500 km. The 36-month total deployment can guarantee enough data recording for 3D structure imaging using body wave tomography, ambient noise surface wave tomography and P- and S-wave receiver function Common Conversion Point (CCP) stacking techniques. A successive instrument loan from the ANSIR national instrument pool, provided 34 broadband seismometers that have been deployed in the western half of the orogen since March 2014. We expect approximately 40-km lateral resolution near the surface for the techniques we propose, which due to low frequency nature of earthquake waves will degrade to about 100 km near the base of the cratonic lithosphere, which is expected at depths between 200 to 250 km. Preliminary results from the first half of the COPA deployment will be presented in the light of the hypotheses that 1) distinct crustal blocks can be detected continuously throughout the orogen (using ambient noise/body wave tomography); 2) distinct lithologies are present in the crust and upper mantle across the orogen (using receiver function CCP images); and 3) crustal and lithosphere deformation along

  18. Multi-stage barites in partially melted UHP eclogite: implications for fluid/melt activities during deep continental subduction in the Sulu orogenic belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Songjie; Wang, Lu

    2015-04-01

    Barite (BaSO4) is well-known from deep-sea sedimentary environments but has received less attention to its presence in high-grade metamorphic rocks. Recently, barite in ultrahigh pressure (UHP) eclogite has drawn increasing attention from geologists, especially in the Dabie-Sulu orogen, since it is an important indicator for high-salinity fluid events, thus aiding in further understanding HP-UHP fluid / melt evolution. However, its formation time and mechanism in UHP eclogite are still controversial, with three representative viewpoints: (1) Liu et al. (2000) found barite-anhydrite-coesite inclusions in zircon and interpreted them to have formed by UHP metamorphic fluids; (2) Zeng et al. (2007) recognized isolated barite within K-feldspar (Kfs) and Quartz (Qz) surrounded by radial cracks in omphacite, and interpreted Kfs+Qz to be reaction products of potassium-rich fluid/melt and coesite, with the barite formed by prograde metamorphic fluids; (3) Gao et al. (2012) and Chen et al. (2014) found barite-bearing Multiphase Solid (MS) inclusions within garnet and omphacite and assumed that the barite formed by phengite breakdown possibly caused by eclogite partial melting during exhumation, though no direct evidence were proposed. The controversy above is mainly due to the lack of direct formation evidence and absence of a clear link with the metamorphic evolution of UHP eclogite along the subduction-exhumation path. We report detailed petrological and micro-structural analyses revealing four types of barites clearly linked with (1) the prograde, (2) earlier stage of partial melting and (3) later stage of crystallization differentiation, as well as (4) high-grade amphibolite-facies retrogression of a deeply subducted and partially melted intergranular coesite-bearing eclogite from Yangkou Bay, Sulu Orogen. Round barite inclusions (type-I) within UHP-stage garnet and omphacite are formed by internally buffered fluids from mineral dehydration during prograde metamorphism

  19. Orogenic delamination - dynamics, effects, and geological expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Kosuke; Gerya, Taras

    2010-05-01

    collision rate, melting and hydration, the latter two incorporating the effects of sediment subduction and phase changes. The drag available for slab retreat scales with the age of the descending oceanic lithosphere; integrated strength of the lithosphere and activation volume for mantle creep additionally control angle and depth of the descent. Fully developed delamination is observed from between 10 to 15 Ma after collision ceases, with following trenchward migration of the delamination front. Consequently, the main maximum extension migrates, while local, partly intermittent compression can be observed on smaller scale. Across the orogen, extension thus has a strongly diachronous main component. We track common surface observables such as heat flow, partially melted rocks (domal migmatites), and predicted geo-/thermochronological ages over the evolving plate boundary. Geochemical projections of our observations confirm potential contamination of reservoirs - although the net delamination level follows the Moho, some crustal remnants along the old slab still sink through the 660-discontinuity. On the other hand, the base of the delaminated domain is not as plain a contact as in concept. Where the contact of asthenosphere with delaminated crust is the location of high-degree melting, also traces of original lithospheric mantle can be entangled. Our results do not fully support the conceptual distinction between convective thinning and blockwise delamination. While the foundering portion initially retains a fairly coherent, slab-like perimeter, the actual separation of layers in a limited process-zone occurs in smaller -scale eddies. Also, convection of the whole uprising asthenosphere wedge is dynamically not discernible from the latter and crucial for the removal of lithospheric mantle. The removed lithosphere does initially not convect, but subsequently shows an increasing tendency to drip down. In the presented case, extension in the axial zone of the orogen is not

  20. Curved orogen and syntaxes formation during subduction and collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajolet, F.; Replumaz, A.; Faccenna, C.; Lainé, R.

    2012-04-01

    The sustained convergence between India and Asia with successive stages of oceanic subduction, continental subduction and continental collision has lead to the formation of the Tibetan plateau while the Himalayan orogenic front acquired an arcuate shape convex toward the South. The Indian plate is bounded by north-south strike-slip faults, which accommodate a large indentation of Asia, between two oceanic subductions, beneath Makran to the west, beneath Indonesia to the east. Two syntaxes formed at both east and west termination of the Himalayan orogenic front at the transition between Indian and Asian plates. In order to better understand this particular configuration, we performed analog experiments at the Laboratory of Experimental Tectonics of Roma TRE to simulate, at the scale of the mantle - lithosphere system, the mechanics of the indentation process. The configuration is set to drive the India indenter towards the Asian continent with a motor-controlled-piston, to simulate far field stresses necessary for indentation. In particular, we test (1) which geometry and rheological parameters favor arcuate orogen and syntaxes formation, (2) what are the consequences on the topography of both the orogenic front and the plateau, and (3) how they relate with the subduction/collision dynamics. The setup is composed of a subducting and an overriding plate made of visco-elastic silicone putty, floating on low-viscosity syrup simulating the asthenosphere. The subducting plate simulates an oceanic lithosphere followed by a continental indenter (analog for the Indian craton) flanked or not by oceans (analog for Makran and Indonesian domains), while the upper continental plate simulates the Tibetan plateau. Results show that the curvature of the orogen and syntaxes' formation are primarily controlled by the strength and gravitational potential energy of the upper plate, and the shape of the subducting plate. A relatively strong upper plate flanked by oceans leads to a

  1. And the Variscan Orogen Buckled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor-Galán, D.; Groenewegen, T.; Gutiérrez-Alonso, G.; Langereis, C. G.

    2013-12-01

    Oroclines are the largest scale folds in nature, and as folds can be produced by bending or by buckling. The most commonly invoked bending mechanisms are indentation (the Himalayan syntaxes) and slab roll-back (The Calabria Arc) whereas buckling usually are commonly related with collision of the apex of ribbon continents along strike (Alaskan oroclines). In Western Europe the tectonostratigraphic zonation of Variscan orogen shows a complex 'S' shape pattern recently interpreted as a double orocline consisting of a northern and southern arc. The northern arc, known as Cantabria-Asturias Arc or Cantabrian Orocline, was developed after closure of the Rheic Ocean and the building and collapse of the Variscan orogenic edifice and, therefore, is considered post-Variscan in age. On the other hand, neither the geometry nor the kinematics of the so-called Central Iberian orocline, situated at the south of the Iberian peninsula are properly known. However, it seems reasonable to think that both oroclines developed at the same time as other coupled oroclines, such as the New England oroclines or the Carpathian oroclines. The particular paleogeography of the Variscan belt in Pangea and the kinematics of the oroclinal formation make impossible the mechanisms of indentation or buckling of a ribbon continent. The occurrence of an intense syn- and slightly post-Cantabrian orocline magmatic event (310-290 Ma) has been linked to the development of the orocline(s) due to the particular spatial-temporal distribution of these post-tectonic granitoids and its isotopic signature which would imply that the oroclines (if synchronous) are thick-skinned. This magmatic pulse has also been interpreted as due to slab roll-back. We present widespread evidences of buckling around the whole orocline at different lithospheric levels and new insights of the particular geometry of the southern orocline which is difficult to reconcile with a roll-back related origin. Therefore, a major change in the

  2. Structural inversion of the Tamworth Belt: Insights into the development of orogenic curvature in the southern New England Orogen, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, G.; Robinson, J.; Glen, R.; Roberts, J.

    2016-05-01

    The middle to late Permian Hunter Bowen Event is credited with the development of orogenic curvature in the southern New England Orogen, yet contention surrounds the structural dynamics responsible for the development of this curvature. Debate is largely centred on the roles of orogen parallel strike-slip and orogen normal extension and contraction to explain the development of curvature. To evaluate the dynamic history of the Hunter Bowen Event, we present new kinematic reconstructions of the Tamworth Belt. The Tamworth Belt formed as a Carboniferous forearc basin and was subsequently inverted during the Hunter Bowen Event. Kinematic reconstructions of the Tamworth Belt are based on new maps and cross-sections built from a synthesis of best-available mapping, chronostratigraphic data and new interpretations of depth-converted seismic data. The following conclusions are made from our study: (i) the Hunter Bowen Event was dominantly driven by margin normal contraction (east-west shortening; present-day coordinates), and; (ii) variations in structural style along the strike of the Tamworth Belt can be explained by orthogonal vs. oblique inversion, which reflects the angular relationship between the principal shortening vector and continental-arc margin. Given these conclusions, we suggest that curvature around the controversial Manning Bend was influenced by the presence of primary curvature in the continental margin, and that the Hastings Block was translated along a sinistral strike-slip fault system that formed along this oblique (with respect to the regional east-west extension and convergence direction) part of the margin. Given the available temporal data, the translation of the Hastings Block took place in the Early Permian (Asselian) and therefore preceded the Hunter Bowen Event. Accordingly, we suggest that the Hunter Bowen Event was dominantly associated with enhancing curvature that was either primary in origin, or associated with fault block translation

  3. Crustal Seismic Anisotropy Produced by Rock Fabric Terranes in the Taiwan Central Range Deformational Orogen: Integrative Study Combining Rock Physics, Structural Geology, and Passive/Active-Source Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okaya, D. A.; Ross, Z.; Christensen, N. I.; Wu, F. T.; Byrne, T. B.

    2014-12-01

    The island of Taiwan is currently under construction due to the collision of the northwestern corner of the Philippine Sea plate and the embedded Luzon island arc with the larger continental Eurasian plate. This collision is responsible for the current growth of the Central Range that dominates the eastern half of the island. An international collaboration involving several USA and Taiwan universities and academic institutions was formed to study how the orogen evolves through time and to understand the role of a colliding island arc in mountain building. The project, Taiwan Integrated Geodynamics Research (TAIGER), was funded by NSF-Continental Dynamics and Taiwan National Science Council. The Central Range grows at one of the most rapid rates of uplift in the world, exposing metamorphic rocks that were once at least 10 km deep. The range offers unique opportunities for studies of crustal seismic anisotropy for two major reasons: (1) its geological makeup is conducive for producing crustal seismic anisotropy; that is, the rocks are highly foliated; and (2) a seismological data volume of significant breadth offers extensive coverage of sources and recording stations throughout the region. We carried out a crustal shear wave splitting study by data mining 3300 local earthquakes collected in the TAIGER 2009 sea-land experiment. We used an automated P and S wave arrival time picking method (Ross and Ben-Zion, 2014) applied to over 100,000 event-station pairs. These data were analyzed for shear-wave splitting using the MFAST automated package (Savage et al., 2010), producing 3300 quality shear wave split measurements. The splitting results were then station-averaged. The results show NNE to NE orientation trends that are consistent with regional cleavage strikes. Average crustal shear wave split time is 0.244 sec. These measurements are consistent with rock physics measurements of Central Range slate and metamorphic acoustic velocities. The splits exhibit orientations

  4. Porphyry molybdenum deposits in the Tianshan-Xingmeng orogenic belt, northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Qingdong; Qin, Kezhang; Liu, Jianming; Li, Guangming; Zhai, Mingguo; Chu, Shaoxiong; Guo, Yunpeng

    2015-06-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) exploration activity in China has increased tremendously over the past decade, and China is now known to have the largest Mo reserves in the world. The Tianshan-Xingmeng orogenic belt, the second largest Mo metallogenic belt, possesses over 8.2 Mt of Mo reserves. Porphyry Mo deposits contain 99 % of the Mo reserves in the Tianshan-Xingmeng orogenic belt; other Mo deposits contain 1 % of the Mo reserves. Five subtypes of the porphyry Mo deposits can be distinguished by deposit associations, such as Mo, Mo-Cu, Mo-W, Mo-Pb-Zn-Ag, and Cu-Mo deposits. These porphyry Mo deposits are formed at different stages: during the Ordovician, Devonian, Carboniferous, Late Permian, Triassic, Jurassic, and Cretaceous Periods. The polystage porphyry Mo mineralizations indicate that polystage tectonic-magmatic activity occurred in the orogenic belt. The Ordovician-Carboniferous porphyry Cu-Mo deposits are formed in an island-arc setting; the Late Permian porphyry Mo deposits are formed in a syn-collisional tectonic setting; and the Triassic porphyry Mo deposits are formed in a syn-collisional to post-collisional tectonic setting. The Ordovician-Triassic porphyry deposits are related to the Paleo-Asian Ocean tectonic system. The Jurassic porphyry Mo deposits are formed at the eastern margin of the Asian continent and are associated with a Paleo-Pacific plate-subduction tectonic setting. Cretaceous porphyry Mo deposits are formed in a lithospheric thinning setting and are related to the rollback of the Paleo-Pacific subduction plate.

  5. Synthesis and tectonic interpretation of the westernmost Paleozoic Variscan orogen in southern Mexico: From rifted Rheic margin to active Pacific margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppie, J. Duncan; Dostal, Jaroslav; Murphy, J. Brendan; Nance, R. Damian

    2008-12-01

    Paleozoic rocks in southern Mexico occur in two terranes, Oaxaquia (Oaxacan Complex) and Mixteca (Acatlán Complex) that appear to record: (1) Ordovician rifting on the southern margin of the Rheic Ocean, (2) passive drifting with Amazonia during the Silurian, (3) Devonian-Permian subduction beneath southern Mexico producing an arc complex that was partially removed by subduction erosion, subjected to HP metamorphism and Mississippian extrusion into the upper plate, followed by reestablishment of a Permian arc. In the Oaxaquia terrane, the 920-1300 Ma basement is unconformably overlain by a ˜ 200 m uppermost Cambrian-lowest Ordovician shelf sequence containing Gondwanan fauna (Tiñu Formation), unconformably overlain by 650 m of shallow marine-continental Carboniferous sedimentary rocks containing a Midcontinent (USA) fauna. In the Mixteca terrane, the low-grade Paleozoic sequence is composed of: (a) a ?Cambrian-Ordovician clastic sequence intruded by ca. 480-440 Ma bimodal, rift-related igneous rocks; and (b) a latest Devonian-Permian shallow marine sequence (> 906 m) consisting of metapsammites, metapelites and tholeiitic mafic volcanic rocks. High pressure (HP) metamorphic rocks in the Mixteca terrane consists of: (i) a Cambro-Ordovician rift-shelf intruded by bimodal rift-related intrusions that are similar to the low-grade rocks; (ii) periarc ultramafic rocks, and (iii) arc and MORB rocks. The Ordovician granitoids contain concordant inherited zircons that range in age from ca. 900 to 1300 Ma, indicating a source in the Oaxacan Complex. Concordant ages of detrital zircons in both the low- and high-grade Cambro-Ordovician metasedimentary rocks indicate a provenance in local Ordovician plutons and/or ca. 1 Ga Oaxacan basement, and distal northwestern Gondwana sources with a unique source in the 900-750 Ma Goiás magmatic arc within the Brasiliano orogen. These data combined with the rift-related nature of the Cambro-Ordovician rocks are most consistent with an

  6. Paleozoic tectonics of the Ouachita Orogen through Nd isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, J.D.; Patchett, P.J.; Dickinson, W.R.; Ruiz, J. . Dept. of Geosciences)

    1992-01-01

    A combined isotopic and trace-element study of the Late Paleozoic Ouachita Orogenic belt has the following goals: (1) define changing provenance of Ouachita sedimentary systems throughout the Paleozoic; (2) constrain sources feeding into the Ouachita flysch trough during the Late Paleozoic; (3) isolate the geochemical signature of proposed colliding terranes to the south; (4) build a data base to compare with possible Ouachita System equivalents in Mexico. The ultimate aim is to constrain the tectonic setting of the southern margin of North America during the Paleozoic, with particular emphasis on collisional events leading to the final suturing of Pangea. Nd isotopic data identify 3 distinct groups: (1) Ordovician passive margin sequence; (2) Carboniferous proto-flysch (Stanley Fm.), main flysch (Jackfork and Atoka Fms.) and molasse (foreland Atoka Fm.); (3) Mississippian ash-flow tuffs. The authors interpret the Ordovician signature to be essentially all craton-derived, whereas the Carboniferous signature reflects mixed sources from the craton plus orogenic sources to the east and possibly the south, including the evolving Appalachian Orogen. The proposed southern source is revealed by the tuffs to be too old and evolved to be a juvenile island arc terrane. They interpret the tuffs to have been erupted in a continental margin arc-type setting. Surprisingly, the foreland molasse sequence is indistinguishable from the main trough flysch sequence, suggesting the Ouachita trough and the craton were both inundated with sediment of a single homogenized isotopic signature during the Late Carboniferous. The possibility that Carboniferous-type sedimentary dispersal patterns began as early as the Silurian has important implications for the tectonics and paleogeography of the evolving Appalachian-Ouachita Orogenic System.

  7. Feeding the "aneurysm": Orogen-parallel mass transport into Nanga Parbat and the western Himalayan syntaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whipp, David M.; Beaumont, Christopher; Braun, Jean

    2014-06-01

    The Nanga Parbat-Haramosh massif (NPHM; western Himalayan syntaxis) requires an influx of mass exceeding that in the adjacent Himalayan arc to sustain high topography and rapid erosional exhumation rates. What supplies this mass flux and feeds this "tectonic aneurysm?" We show, using a simple 3-D model of oblique orogen convergence, that velocity/strain partitioning results in horizontal orogen-parallel (OP) crustal transport, and the same behavior is inferred for the Himalaya, with OP transport diverting converging crust toward the syntaxis. Model results also show that the OP flow rate decreases in the syntaxis, thereby thickening the crust and forming a structure like the NPHM. The additional crustal thickening, over and above that elsewhere in the Himalayan arc, sustains the rapid exhumation of this "aneurysm." Normally, velocity/strain partitioning would be minimal for the Himalayan arc where the convergence obliquity is no greater than ~40°. However, we show analytically that the Himalayan system can act both as a critical wedge and exhibit strain partitioning if both the detachment beneath the wedge and the bounding rear shear zone, which accommodates OP transport, are very weak. Corresponding numerical results confirm this requirement and demonstrate that a Nanga Parbat-type shortening structure can develop spontaneously if the orogenic wedge and bounding rear shear zone can strain rate soften while active. These results lead us to question whether the position of NPHM aneurysm is localized by river incision, as previously suggested, or by a priori focused tectonic shortening of the crust in the syntaxis region as demonstrated by our models.

  8. Part I: Neoacadian to Alleghanian foreland basin development and provenance in the central appalachian orogen, pine mountain thrust sheet Part II: Structural configuration of a modified Mesozoic to Cenozoic forearc basin system, south-central Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Peter Benjamin

    . Four samples of Lower Mississippian to Middle Pennsylvanian sandstone were collected from the hanging wall (n = 3) and footwall (n = 1) of the Pine Mountain thrust sheet at Pound Gap to determine sediment provenance in this long-lived foreland basin system. Paleocurrent indicators considered in the context of the regional foreland basin system suggest transverse regional drainage during the development of Early and Late Mississippian delta complexes. Eustatic fall during the early stages of the Alleghanian orogeny to the east saw a shift in regional drainage with the development of a southwestward-flowing and axial braided river system in Early Pennsylvanian time followed by Middle Mississippian transgression of a fluvio-deltaic complex. Detrital zircon U-Pb age data from Lower Mississippian to Lower Pennsylvanian sandstone support regional interpretations of sediment sourcing from probably recycled foreland basin strata along the east Laurentian margin, whereas compositionally immature Middle Pennsylvanian sediment was sourced by a limited distribution of east Laurentia sources reflecting thrust belt migration into the adjacent foreland basin system during Alleghanian orogenesis. In addition, the stratigraphy of the foreland basin system in the central Appalachian basin is significantly different compared to the stratigraphic record that is typified for foreland basin systems and suggests that the Carboniferous Appalachian foreland basin system investigated in this study does not fit the typical foreland basin model that is used widely today for both ancient and modern systems. Possible factors that produce the observed discrepancies between the central Appalachian and typical foreland basin systems may include differences in the timing, type, and frequency of orogenic events leading to foreland basin development, related variations in the rheology of the underlying lithosphere, and whether forebulge migration is mechanically static or mobile. The Cordilleran margin

  9. Metamorphic origin of ore-forming fluids for orogenic gold-bearing quartz vein systems in the North American Cordillera: constraints from a reconnaissance study of δ15N, δD, and δ18O

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jia, Y.; Kerrich, R.; Goldfarb, R.

    2003-01-01

    The western North American Cordillera hosts a large number of gold-bearing quartz vein systems from the Mother Lode of southern California, through counterparts in British Columbia and southeastern Alaska, to the Klondike district in central Yukon. These vein systems are structurally controlled by major fault zones, which are often reactivated terrane-bounding sutures that formed in orogens built during accretion and subduction of terranes along the continental margin of North America. Mineralization ages span mid-Jurassic to early Tertiary and encompass much of the evolution ofthe Cordilleran orogen. Nitrogen contents and ??15N values of hydrothermal micas from veins are between 130 and 3,500 ppm and 1.7 to 5.5 per mil, respectively. These values are consistent with fluids derived from metamorphic dehydration reactions within the Phanerozoic accretion-subduction complexes, which have ??15N values of 1 to 6 per mil. The ??18O values of gold-bearing vein quartz from different locations in the Cordillera are between 14.6 and 22.2 per mil but are uniform for individual vein systems. The ??D values of hydrothermal micas are between -110 and -60 per mil. Ore fluids have calculated ??18O values of 8 to 16 per mil and ??D values of -65 to -10 per mil at an estimated temperature of 300??C; ??D values of ore fluids do not show any latitudinal control. These results indicate a deep crustal source for the ore-forming fluids, most likely of metamorphic origin. Low ??DH2O values of -120 to -130 per mil for a hydrous muscovite from the Sheba vein in the Klondike district reflect secondary exchange between recrystallizing mica and meteoric waters. Collectively, the N, H, and O isotope compositions of ore-related hydrothermal minerals indicate that the formation of these gold-bearing veins involved dilute, aqueous carbonic, and nitrogen-bearing fluids that were generated from metamorphic dehydration reactions at deep crustal levels. These data are not consistent with either mantle

  10. Deformation during terrane accretion in the Saint Elias orogen, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bruhn, R.L.; Pavlis, T.L.; Plafker, G.; Serpa, L.

    2004-01-01

    The Saint Elias orogen of southern Alaska and adjacent Canada is a complex belt of mountains formed by collision and accretion of the Yakutat terrane into the transition zone from transform faulting to subduction in the northeast Pacific. The orogen is an active analog for tectonic processes that formed much of the North American Cordillera, and is also an important site to study (1) the relationships between climate and tectonics, and (2) structures that generate large- to great-magnitude earthquakes. The Yakutat terrane is a fragment of the North American plate margin that is partly subducted beneath and partly accreted to the continental margin of southern Alaska. Interaction between the Yakutat terrane and the North American and Pacific plates causes significant differences in the style of deformation within the terrane. Deformation in the eastern part of the terrane is caused by strike-slip faulting along the Fairweather transform fault and by reverse faulting beneath the coastal mountains, but there is little deformation immediately offshore. The central part of the orogen is marked by thrusting of the Yakutat terrane beneath the North American plate along the Chugach-Saint Elias fault and development of a wide, thin-skinned fold-and-thrust belt. Strike-slip faulting in this segment may he localized in the hanging wall of the Chugach-Saint Elias fault, or dissipated by thrust faulting beneath a north-northeast-trending belt of active deformation that cuts obliquely across the eastern end of the fold-and-thrust belt. Superimposed folds with complex shapes and plunging hinge lines accommodate horizontal shortening and extension in the western part of the orogen, where the sedimentary cover of the Yakutat terrane is accreted into the upper plate of the Aleutian subduction zone. These three structural segments are separated by transverse tectonic boundaries that cut across the Yakutat terrane and also coincide with the courses of piedmont glaciers that flow from

  11. Recognizing remnants of magma-poor rifted margins in high-pressure orogenic belts: The Alpine case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrando, Marco; Manatschal, Gianreto; Mohn, Geoffroy; Dal Piaz, Giorgio Vittorio; Vitale Brovarone, Alberto; Masini, Emmanuel

    2014-04-01

    Magma-poor rifted margins are being increasingly recognized in present-day Atlantic-type systems. However, findings of fossil areas floored by exhumed mantle or hyper-extended crust are comparatively rare within orogenic belts that were originated through the inversion of pre-existing rifted margins. This discrepancy may be due to the common reactivation of lithological contacts during subduction/orogeny, potentially masking pre-orogenic relationships, and, most importantly, to the frequent lack of a pre-orogenic layer-cake architecture, hindering retro-deformation of multiply deformed tectonic units. This study outlines a methodology to detect sections of magma-poor, hyper-extended rifted margins without a layer-cake architecture in multiply deformed/metamorphosed terrains. This approach is defined by comparison to well studied examples of fossil analogues preserved in weakly deformed parts of Alpine orogens. In the latter domains, continental basement and hydrated peridotites were exhumed at the basin floor during Jurassic rifting along long-offset detachment systems. Extensional geometries locally resulted in tectonic sampling of laterally discontinuous slivers of allochthonous continental basement and pre-rift sediments from the hanging wall blocks. Lithostratigraphic associations consisting of continental basement rocks directly juxtaposed with syn- to post-rift meta-sediments and/or serpentinized subcontinental mantle are widespread within sections of Alpine-type orogenic belts that underwent high- to ultra-high-pressure metamorphism. However, similar associations may arise from a variety of processes other than rift-related lithospheric thinning in magma-poor environments, including subduction mélange dynamics or deposition of sedimentary mélanges along convergent/divergent margins. The partial preservation of rift-related lithostratigraphic associations may still be assessed, despite the lack of biostratigraphic evidence, by (1) the consistency of the

  12. Synchronous unroofing and faulting in the Precordillera of Argentina: thermochronometric constraints on fault-propagation in a thin- to thick-skinned orogenic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fosdick, J. C.; Carrapa, B.

    2013-12-01

    Mass removal via erosion is an important process that interacts with deformation in convergent mountain belts such as the Andes, and improved quantification of denudation is critical for elucidating spatio-temporal patterns of deformation. We report new apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He (AHe, ZHe) and apatite fission track (AFT) results from the Precordillera of Argentina that record Neogene fault-related unroofing during growth of the Andean retroarc fold-and-thrust belt. The Precordillera fold-and-thrust belt of Argentina is located west of the thick-skinned Sierras Pampeanas and evolved concurrently with the Bermejo retroarc foreland basin since at least the early Miocene. At the Rio Jáchal latitude (30°S), most crustal shortening associated with the Andean orogen is accommodated across the Precordillera, however, its unroofing record remains poorly constrained. Here we test the relationships between thrust faulting and exhumation and quantify the erosional input of sediments to the foreland basin. ZHe samples from Silurian-Carboniferous metasedimentary rocks collected across the Rio Jáchal transect yield entirely Permo-Triassic cooling ages, indicating that the present-day erosional depth of the Precordillera has resided above the ZHe partial retention zone (PRZ) throughout Mesozoic-Cenozoic time. Preliminary AFT data of the Precordillera also indicate mixed pre-Cenozoic ages. ZHe and AFT ages provide a nominal <6-7 km maximum constraint on the degree of erosion associated with Andean deformation, despite over 50% shortening. In contrast, AHe dates range between ~2 to 16 Ma and track eastward with the progressive faulting of the Blanca, San Roque, and Niquivil thrust sheets from ~16 to 2 Ma. Cooling related to out-of-sequence thrusting is also reflected by the AHe results; the youngest AHe ages (5-2 Ma) are located along the margins of the Iglesia piggy-back basin and the Las Salinas anticline at the eastern boundary between the Precordillera and Pampean craton

  13. Rapid exhumation of deep crust in an obliquely convergent orogen: The Kaoko Belt of the Damara Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, David A.; Goscombe, Ben D.; Gray, David R.

    2009-08-01

    The exhumation of deep crustal rocks and juxtaposition of structural-metamorphic domains from different depths in a transpressional orogen may occur during the prograde evolution of the orogen by vertical extrusion or during the retrograde evolution of the orogen via extension. Metamorphic petrology, kinematics, and thermochronology of strike-slip shear zones in the Kaoko Belt of the Damara Orogen are used to evaluate extrusion and extension processes in this transpressional orogen. Mineral assemblages and deformation mechanisms record shearing at pressures of 4-6 kbar and temperatures of ˜550°C for the Three Palms mylonite zone, 600-650°C for the Purros mylonite zone, and ˜630-700°C for the Village and Khumib mylonite zones. The Three Palms mylonite zone, which separates the accreted Coastal Terrane from the former passive margin of the Congo Craton, exhibits progressive deformation during decreasing temperatures through lower greenschist facies and into the brittle field, with consistent oblique normal shear indicators. Lower-temperature fabrics and brittle features also overprint the Village mylonite zone. The 207Pb-206Pb (titanite) and 40Ar/39Ar (hornblende, muscovite, and biotite) data indicate rapid cooling, at rates of 30-100°C/Ma, of all high-grade structural domains in the core of the Kaoko Belt between circa 535 and 525 Ma, which is about 20-30 Ma younger then peak metamorphism. The 40Ar/39Ar data from synkinematic muscovite fish in the retrograde shear zone assemblages indicate that the Khumib, Village, and Three Palms mylonite zones were actively deforming at temperatures below 350°C at circa 530-524 Ma. These data indicate that the high-grade metamorphic rocks of the Kaoko were rapidly exhumed and juxtaposed after the main transpressive deformation by oblique extension. Reactivation of the shear zones and tectonic exhumation of high-grade structural domains from beneath the accreted Coastal Terrane was caused by collision in the Damara Belt and

  14. Orogen styles in the East African Orogen: A review of the Neoproterozoic to Cambrian tectonic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, H.; Abdelsalam, M.; Ali, K. A.; Bingen, B.; Collins, A. S.; Fowler, A. R.; Ghebreab, W.; Hauzenberger, C. A.; Johnson, P. R.; Kusky, T. M.; Macey, P.; Muhongo, S.; Stern, R. J.; Viola, G.

    2013-10-01

    The East African Orogen, extending from southern Israel, Sinai and Jordan in the north to Mozambique and Madagascar in the south, is the world´s largest Neoproterozoic to Cambrian orogenic complex. It comprises a collage of individual oceanic domains and continental fragments between the Archean Sahara-Congo-Kalahari Cratons in the west and Neoproterozoic India in the east. Orogen consolidation was achieved during distinct phases of orogeny between ∼850 and 550 Ma. The northern part of the orogen, the Arabian-Nubian Shield, is predominantly juvenile Neoproterozoic crust that formed in and adjacent to the Mozambique Ocean. The ocean closed during a protracted period of island-arc and microcontinent accretion between ∼850 and 620 Ma. To the south of the Arabian Nubian Shield, the Eastern Granulite-Cabo Delgado Nappe Complex of southern Kenya, Tanzania and Mozambique was an extended crust that formed adjacent to theMozambique Ocean and experienced a ∼650-620 Ma granulite-facies metamorphism. Completion of the nappe assembly around 620 Ma is defined as the East African Orogeny and was related to closure of the Mozambique Ocean. Oceans persisted after 620 Ma between East Antarctica, India, southern parts of the Congo-Tanzania-Bangweulu Cratons and the Zimbabwe-Kalahari Craton. They closed during the ∼600-500 Ma Kuungan or Malagasy Orogeny, a tectonothermal event that affected large portions of southern Tanzania, Zambia, Malawi, Mozambique, Madagascar and Antarctica. The East African and Kuungan Orogenies were followed by phases of post-orogenic extension. Early ∼600-550 Ma extension is recorded in the Arabian-Nubian Shield and the Eastern Granulite-Cabo Delgado Nappe Complex. Later ∼550-480 Ma extension affected Mozambique and southern Madagascar. Both extension phases, although diachronous,are interpreted as the result of lithospheric delamination. Along the strike of the East African Orogen, different geodynamic settings resulted in the evolution of

  15. Orogen styles in the East African Orogen: A review of the Neoproterozoic to Cambrian tectonic evolution☆

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, H.; Abdelsalam, M.; Ali, K.A.; Bingen, B.; Collins, A.S.; Fowler, A.R.; Ghebreab, W.; Hauzenberger, C.A.; Johnson, P.R.; Kusky, T.M.; Macey, P.; Muhongo, S.; Stern, R.J.; Viola, G.

    2013-01-01

    The East African Orogen, extending from southern Israel, Sinai and Jordan in the north to Mozambique and Madagascar in the south, is the world́s largest Neoproterozoic to Cambrian orogenic complex. It comprises a collage of individual oceanic domains and continental fragments between the Archean Sahara–Congo–Kalahari Cratons in the west and Neoproterozoic India in the east. Orogen consolidation was achieved during distinct phases of orogeny between ∼850 and 550 Ma. The northern part of the orogen, the Arabian–Nubian Shield, is predominantly juvenile Neoproterozoic crust that formed in and adjacent to the Mozambique Ocean. The ocean closed during a protracted period of island-arc and microcontinent accretion between ∼850 and 620 Ma. To the south of the Arabian Nubian Shield, the Eastern Granulite–Cabo Delgado Nappe Complex of southern Kenya, Tanzania and Mozambique was an extended crust that formed adjacent to theMozambique Ocean and experienced a ∼650–620 Ma granulite-facies metamorphism. Completion of the nappe assembly around 620 Ma is defined as the East African Orogeny and was related to closure of the Mozambique Ocean. Oceans persisted after 620 Ma between East Antarctica, India, southern parts of the Congo–Tanzania–Bangweulu Cratons and the Zimbabwe–Kalahari Craton. They closed during the ∼600–500 Ma Kuungan or Malagasy Orogeny, a tectonothermal event that affected large portions of southern Tanzania, Zambia, Malawi, Mozambique, Madagascar and Antarctica. The East African and Kuungan Orogenies were followed by phases of post-orogenic extension. Early ∼600–550 Ma extension is recorded in the Arabian–Nubian Shield and the Eastern Granulite–Cabo Delgado Nappe Complex. Later ∼550–480 Ma extension affected Mozambique and southern Madagascar. Both extension phases, although diachronous,are interpreted as the result of lithospheric delamination. Along the strike of the East African Orogen, different geodynamic settings

  16. Orogenic gold deposits: a proposed classification in the context of their crustal distribution and relationship to other gold deposit types

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Groves, D.I.; Goldfarb, R.J.; Gebre-Mariam, M.; Hagemann, S.G.; Robert, F.

    1998-01-01

    The so-called 'mesothermal' gold deposits are associated with reginally metamorphosed terranes of all ages. Ores were formed during compressional to transpressional deformation processes at convergent plate margins in accretionary and collisional orogens. In both types of orogen, hydrated marine sedimentary and volcanic rocks have been added to continental margins during tens to some 100 million years of collision. Subduction-related thermal events, episodically raising geothermal gradients within the hydrated accretionary sequences, initiate and drive long-distance hydrothermal fluid migration. The resulting gold-bearing quartz veins are emplaced over a unique depth range for hydrothermal ore deposits, with gold deposition from 15-20 km to the near surface environment. On the basis of this broad depth range of formation, the term 'mesothermal' is not applicable to this deposit types as a whole. Instead, the unique temporal and spatial association of this deposit type with orogeny means that the vein systems are best termed orogenic gold deposits. Most ores are post-orogenic with respect to to tectonism of their immediate host rocks, but are simultaneously syn-orogenic with respect to ongoing deep-crustal, subduction-related thermal processes and the prefix orogenic satisfies both these conditions. On the basis of their depth of formation, the orogenic deposits are best subdivided into epizonal (12 km) classes.

  17. Exploration of the Banda orogen, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, R.A. ); Audley-Charles, M.G. ); Tobing, S.L. )

    1990-06-01

    An integrated geologic evaluation of the late Miocene to present Banda orogen and its petroleum potential is in progress. The focus of the investigation involves sedimentary sections of the NW Australian continental margin incorporated into the Banda orogen. The islands of Timor and Seram, and several other islands throughout the Banda orogenic arc, are the closest exposed lithostratigraphic equivalents of the hydrocarbon producing NW Australian subsurface stratigraphy. Hydrocarbon occurrences are well documented on many of the islands, and over 13 million barrels of oil have been produced from the Bula field in Seram. Recent studies of seeps in Timor and associated stratigraphic, structural, and geochemical relations indicate that (1) oil and gas seeps occur throughout the Permian to Pliocene stratigraphic section; (2) bituminous limestones of the Triassic Aituti Formation are the most likely source for many of the seeps; (3) preliminary geochemical analyses of the oils indicate a mixed terrestrial and marine organic source, and suggest a genetic link between the Aitutu oils and oils seeping from Tertiary reservoirs; (4) triterpane and sterane parameters indicate some of these oils are highly mature; (5) palynomorph coloration, conodont alteration, and clay mineralogy data yield paleotemperature estimates in the range of hydrocarbon generation from much of the pre-rift sequence (Permian-Jurassic); (6) structural modeling suggests that the initial decollement zone of the orogenic wedge formed near the Jurassic breakup unconformity of the underthrust NW Australian margin, imbricating the post-rift sequence; (7) in Timor and Seram the decollement has stepped to deeper levels involving prerift sequences that form structural culminations in the core of the orogen. The culminations are expressed as topographic highs as in New Guinea and Oman.

  18. The Tyrrhenian stage geodinamic evolution of Apenninic-Maghrebian orogen (Southern Apennines and Sicily)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentini, F.; Carbone, S.; Barreca, G.

    2009-04-01

    detachments occurred with further forward transport, which generated repeated slices with an apparent increase to the original thickness. . The Alpine Tethydes are composed of sedimentary sequences, which were deposited in the Alpine Tethys, and originally were located between the European and the Panormide/Apenninic Block. They are represented by allochthonous far travelled tectonic units, resting on both the Panormide/Apenninic Platforms and the Ionides. The Calabride Chain originated by the delamination of the European margin. This roof thrust system includes nappes of Hercynian basement with remains of the original Meso-Cenozoic covers deformed during the Paleogene and sutured by the Late Oligocene-Early Burdigalian Capo d'Orlando Flysch. The geological, geophysical data and the volcanological characters permit to restore the palaeogeography and the geodynamic evolution, and allow to recognize three orogenic stages: the Eo-Alpine, originated during Cretaceous-Eocene times, evident in the western Calabria, in the Tyrrhenian basin and the Alpine Corsica; the Balearic stage (Late Oligocene-Early Miocene), in which the Corsica-Sardinia block rotated and collided with the Adria-Africa margins with thrusting of the Alpine Tethydes over Panormide/Apenninic platforms; and the Tyrrhenian stage (Middle Miocene to Present), when the onset of the Tyrrhenian back-arc basin occurred and after the closure of the interposed Palaeoionian branches the Ionides were tectonically transported onto the foreland blocks. The CROP crustal sections allow to distinguish thickness and distribution of the crusts in this area of the Mediterranean Sea, and their clear influence on geodynamic evolution of the Tyrrhenian stage. They confirm that both the foreland blocks extend below the orogenic belt, reaching the Tyrrhenian margins, with a gradual thinning and a transition to a Palaeo-Ionian slab, probably not active at present time, from which the Ionides detached and overrode the ETS. The

  19. Sand fairway mapping as a tool for tectonic restoration in orogenic belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Rob

    2016-04-01

    geomorphology. The stratigraphic records are preserved in many parts of the Alpine-Mediterranean region. Examples are drawn from the Eo-Oligocene of the western Alps and the early Miocene of the Maghreb-Apennine system to illustrate how turbidite sedimentology, linked to studies of basin structure, can inform understanding of tectonic processes on regional and local scales. In both examples, sediment was delivered across deforming basin arrays containing contractional structures, sourced from beyond the immediate orogenic segments. The depositional systems show that multiple structures were active in parallel, rather than develop in any particular sequence. Both systems show that significant deformation occurs, emerging to the syn-orogenic surface ahead of the main orogenic wedge. The cycling of uplift and subsidence of "massifs" can be significantly more complex that the histories resolved from thermochronological data alone.

  20. Paleozoic orogens in New England, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, P.; Tucker, R.D.; Bradley, D.; Berry, H.N.; Osberg, P.H.

    1998-01-01

    Stratigraphy and isotope geochronology in the crystalline core of the Appalachians suggest revised interpretations of the extent, nature and timing of Paleozoic orogens in New England. Five major episodes of magmatism, deformation, and high-grade regional metamorphism are recognized: Taconian (455-442 Ma), Acadian (423-385 Ma), Neo-Acadian (366-350 Ma), Late Pennsylvanian (300-290 Ma) and Alleghanian (280-260 Ma). In the Taconian, the passive margin of Laurentia was subducted below a complex magmatic arc lasting from 480 to 442 Ma, founded in part on continental crust of a Medial New England terrane with possible affinities with Amazonia. Questions about Medial New England involve its coherence as a single plate, and the nature of its underlying crust. The Acadian began in Late Silurian as a collision between the amalgamated Laurentia-Medial New England and outer belts of Composite Avalon along a cryptic suture in coastal Maine, and progressed northwestward to the Connecticut Valley basin by mid-Devonian. Tonalitic-granitic magmatism and up to granulite-facies metamorphism culminated in Early Devonian, possibly tied to lithospheric detachment below the subducting northwestern plate and consequent asthenosphere upwelling. Newly discovered Neo-Acadian Late Devonian to Early Mississippian tonalitic-granitic magmatism, up to granulite-facies metamorphism, and severe deformation in central Massachusetts took place in a plate context poorly understood. Late Pennsylvanian effects include magmatism, metamorphism, and deformation near south New England gneiss domes and the Sebago batholith, and development of the right-lateral Norumbega fault system. Permian Alleghanian effects include penetrative deformation, granitic intrusions and up to sillimanite-grade metamorphism of Pennsylvanian beds in southeastern New England. These last two episodes relate to the arrival of Africa.

  1. Active optical zoom system

    DOEpatents

    Wick, David V.

    2005-12-20

    An active optical zoom system changes the magnification (or effective focal length) of an optical imaging system by utilizing two or more active optics in a conventional optical system. The system can create relatively large changes in system magnification with very small changes in the focal lengths of individual active elements by leveraging the optical power of the conventional optical elements (e.g., passive lenses and mirrors) surrounding the active optics. The active optics serve primarily as variable focal-length lenses or mirrors, although adding other aberrations enables increased utility. The active optics can either be LC SLMs, used in a transmissive optical zoom system, or DMs, used in a reflective optical zoom system. By appropriately designing the optical system, the variable focal-length lenses or mirrors can provide the flexibility necessary to change the overall system focal length (i.e., effective focal length), and therefore magnification, that is normally accomplished with mechanical motion in conventional zoom lenses. The active optics can provide additional flexibility by allowing magnification to occur anywhere within the FOV of the system, not just on-axis as in a conventional system.

  2. Using crystal records to investigate the parentage of orogenic andesites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, A. J.; Koleszar, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    The role of andesitic magmas in continental growth and differentiation and in material fluxes related to subduction zones continues to be an active research topic. The high proportion of andesitic magmas erupted in convergent margin settings contrasts with much more limited evidence for the presence of true andesitic liquids. This suggests that magma mixing plays a dominant role in andesite genesis, consistent with the prevalence of disequilibrium textures and mineral assemblages evident in many orogenic andesites. The high proportion of andesitic magma erupted in convergent margins can be related to the link between mafic recharge, which results in magma mixing to produce andesitic magmas, and eruption initiation. We describe this process as recharge filtering, as it results in preferential eruption of mixed andesites relative to the mafic and felsic components that combine to produce them. Many discussions about andesites also revolve around the relative importance of crustal and mantle contributions. This information is crucial for understanding andesite genesis, although owing to the prevalence of mixing, bulk rock compositions may be difficult to interpret. Fortunately a range of techniques based on the study of crystalline material lets us explore the compositions and origins of the parental magmas involved in formation of orogenic andesite magmas in greater detail. Important records reside in the abundance and composition of erupted phenocryst phases, together with their entrained mineral and melt inclusions, and the relatively long timescales required for crystal re-equilibration, relative to the often-shorter timescales of mixing and eruption mean that phenocrysts primarily preserve information about their parental melts. Phenocrysts from a wide range of orogenic andesites show evidence for contributions from a diversity of mafic and felsic parental melts. This is reflected in major, trace and isotopic compositions, and interactions between these melts are

  3. Tectonic evolution of the Qinling orogen, China: Review and synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yunpeng; Zhang, Guowei; Neubauer, Franz; Liu, Xiaoming; Genser, Johann; Hauzenberger, Christoph

    2011-05-01

    represents the Mianlue ocean which separates the South Qinling from the South China Block in Devonian to Mid Triassic times. After the closure of the Mianlue ocean, the South Qinling Belt was emplaced onto the Yangtze Block along the Middle Triassic Mianlue suture zone in Late Triassic-Jurassic times. This suture was overprinted by the south-directed overthrust of the Mianlue-Bashan-Xiangguang thrust fault operative in Late Jurassic-Cretaceous times. Furthermore, we note that the Yanshanian tectonic events play a major role for rapid Early Cretaceous exhumation of significant portions of the Qinling orogenic belt. In contrast, although high topographic gradients, the Cenozoic tectonism related to lateral extrusion of the Tibet plateau resulted in minor and continuous exhumation and erosion along major transtensional and strike-slip faults were activated.

  4. Post-orogenic thermal evolution of newborn Archean continents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaupart, C.; Mareschal, J.-C.

    2015-12-01

    The post-orogenic thermal evolution of newborn cratons in the Archean is marked by high-temperature metamorphism and plutonic activity that lag accretion by several tens of million years. The source of the heat that is required remains controversial. Here, we show that such late activity is consistent with the thermal evolution of new continental crust that adjusts to heat released by radioactive decay. Quantitative results depend on the total amount of radioactive elements in the newborn crust. Using heat flow and heat production data from the Archean Superior Province of the Canadian Shield, we show that temperatures ≈800-900 °C were reached in the lower crust a few tens of million years after the final accretion event. The timing of post-orogenic metamorphism is sensitive to the thermal structure acquired at the end of accretion. For the Superior Province, the relatively short time-lag between the end of accretion and metamorphism suggests that the lithosphere was thin or had been heated up by sustained magma percolation.

  5. GEOPHYSICS. Layered deformation in the Taiwan orogen.

    PubMed

    Huang, T-Y; Gung, Y; Kuo, B-Y; Chiao, L-Y; Chen, Y-N

    2015-08-14

    The underthrusting of continental crust during mountain building is an issue of debate for orogens at convergent continental margins. We report three-dimensional seismic anisotropic tomography of Taiwan that shows a nearly 90° rotation of anisotropic fabrics across a 10- to 20-kilometer depth, consistent with the presence of two layers of deformation. The upper crust is dominated by collision-related compressional deformation, whereas the lower crust of Taiwan, mostly the crust of the subducted Eurasian plate, is dominated by convergence-parallel shear deformation. We interpret this lower crustal shearing as driven by the continuous sinking of the Eurasian mantle lithosphere when the surface of the subducted plate is coupled with the orogen. The two-layer deformation clearly defines the role of subduction in the formation of the Taiwan mountain belt. PMID:26273051

  6. Tectono-metamorphic evolution of the internal zone of the Pan-African Lufilian orogenic belt (Zambia): Implications for crustal reworking and syn-orogenic uranium mineralizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eglinger, Aurélien; Vanderhaeghe, Olivier; André-Mayer, Anne-Sylvie; Goncalves, Philippe; Zeh, Armin; Durand, Cyril; Deloule, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    The internal zone of the Pan-African Lufilian orogenic belt (Zambia) hosts a dozen uranium occurrences mostly located within kyanite micaschists in a shear zone marking the contact between metasedimentary rocks attributed to the Katanga Neoproterozoic sedimentary sequence and migmatites coring domes developed dominantly at the expense of the pre-Neoproterozoic basement. The P-T-t-d paths reconstructed for these rocks combining field observations, microstructural analysis, metamorphic petrology and thermobarometry and geochronology indicate that they have recorded burial and exhumation during the Pan-African orogeny. Both units of the Katanga metasedimentary sequence and pre-Katanga migmatitic basement have underwent minimum peak P-T conditions of ~ 9-11 kbar and ~ 640-660 °C, dated at ca. 530 Ma by garnet-whole rock Lu-Hf isochrons. This suggests that this entire continental segment has been buried up to a depth of 40-50 km with geothermal gradients of 15-20 °C.km- 1 during the Pan-African orogeny and the formation of the West Gondwana supercontinent. Syn-orogenic exhumation of the partially molten root of the Lufilian belt is attested by isothermal decompression under P-T conditions of ~ 6-8 kbar at ca. 530-500 Ma, witnessing an increase of the geothermal gradients to 25-30 °C·km- 1. Uranium mineralizations that consist of uraninite and brannerite took place at temperatures ranging from ~ 600 to 700 °C, and have been dated at ca. 540-530 Ma by U-Pb ages on uraninite. The main uranium deposition thus occurred at the transition from the syn-orogenic burial to the syn-orogenic exhumation stages and has been then partially transposed and locally remobilized during the post-orogenic exhumation accommodated by activation of low-angle extensional detachment.

  7. Origin and structure of major orogen-scale exhumed strike-slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shuyun; Neubauer, Franz

    2016-04-01

    The formation of major exhumed strike-slip faults represents one of the most important dynamic processes affecting the evolution of the Earth's lithosphere and surface. Detailed models of the potential initiation and properties and architecture of orogen-scale exhumed strike-slip faults and how these relate to exhumation are rare. In this study, we deal with key properties controlling the development of major exhumed strike-slip fault systems, which are equivalent to the deep crustal sections of active across fault zones. We also propose two dominant processes for the initiation of orogen-scale exhumed strike-slip faults: (1) pluton-controlled and (2) metamorphic core complex-controlled strike-slip faults. In these tectonic settings, the initiation of faults occurs by rheological weakening along hot-to-cool contacts and guides the overall displacement and ultimate exhumation. These processes result in a specific thermal and structural architecture of such faults. These types of strike-slip dominated fault zones are often subparallel to mountain ranges and expose a wide variety of mylonitic, cataclastic and non-cohesive fault rocks, which were formed at different structural levels of the crust during various stages of faulting. The high variety of distinctive fault rocks is a potential evidence for recognition of these types of strike-slip faults. Exhumation of mylonitic rocks is, therefore, a common feature of such reverse oblique-slip strike-slip faults, implying major transtensive and/or transpressive processes accompanying pure strike-slip motion during exhumation. Some orogen-scale strike-slip faults nucleate and initiate along rheologically weak zones, e.g. at granite intrusions, zones of low-strength minerals, thermally weakened crust due to ascending fluids, and lateral borders of hot metamorphic core complexes. A further mechanism is the juxtaposition of mechanically strong mantle lithosphere to hot asthenosphere in continental transform faults (e.g., San

  8. The Tyrrhenian stage geodinamic evolution of Apenninic-Maghrebian orogen (Southern Apennines and Sicily)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentini, F.; Carbone, S.; Barreca, G.

    2009-04-01

    detachments occurred with further forward transport, which generated repeated slices with an apparent increase to the original thickness. . The Alpine Tethydes are composed of sedimentary sequences, which were deposited in the Alpine Tethys, and originally were located between the European and the Panormide/Apenninic Block. They are represented by allochthonous far travelled tectonic units, resting on both the Panormide/Apenninic Platforms and the Ionides. The Calabride Chain originated by the delamination of the European margin. This roof thrust system includes nappes of Hercynian basement with remains of the original Meso-Cenozoic covers deformed during the Paleogene and sutured by the Late Oligocene-Early Burdigalian Capo d'Orlando Flysch. The geological, geophysical data and the volcanological characters permit to restore the palaeogeography and the geodynamic evolution, and allow to recognize three orogenic stages: the Eo-Alpine, originated during Cretaceous-Eocene times, evident in the western Calabria, in the Tyrrhenian basin and the Alpine Corsica; the Balearic stage (Late Oligocene-Early Miocene), in which the Corsica-Sardinia block rotated and collided with the Adria-Africa margins with thrusting of the Alpine Tethydes over Panormide/Apenninic platforms; and the Tyrrhenian stage (Middle Miocene to Present), when the onset of the Tyrrhenian back-arc basin occurred and after the closure of the interposed Palaeoionian branches the Ionides were tectonically transported onto the foreland blocks. The CROP crustal sections allow to distinguish thickness and distribution of the crusts in this area of the Mediterranean Sea, and their clear influence on geodynamic evolution of the Tyrrhenian stage. They confirm that both the foreland blocks extend below the orogenic belt, reaching the Tyrrhenian margins, with a gradual thinning and a transition to a Palaeo-Ionian slab, probably not active at present time, from which the Ionides detached and overrode the ETS. The

  9. Asymmetric vs. symmetric deep lithospheric architecture of intra-plate continental orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calignano, Elisa; Sokoutis, Dimitrios; Willingshofer, Ernst; Gueydan, Frédéric; Cloetingh, Sierd

    2015-08-01

    The initiation and subsequent evolution of intra-plate orogens, resulting from continental plate interior deformation due to transmission of stresses over large distances from the active plate boundaries, is controlled by lateral and vertical strength contrasts in the lithosphere. We present lithospheric-scale analogue models combining 1) lateral strength variations in the continental lithosphere, and 2) different vertical rheological stratifications. The experimental continental lithosphere has a four-layer brittle-ductile rheological stratification. Lateral heterogeneity is implemented in all models by increased crustal strength in a central narrow block. The main investigated parameters are strain rate and strength of the lithospheric mantle, both playing an important role in crust-mantle coupling. The experiments show that the presence of a strong crustal domain is effective in localizing deformation along its boundaries. After deformation is localized, the evolution of the orogenic system is governed by the mechanical properties of the lithosphere such that the final geometry of the intra-plate mountain depends on the interplay between crust-mantle coupling and folding versus fracturing of the lithospheric mantle. Underthrusting is the main deformation mode in case of high convergence velocity and/or thick brittle mantle with a final asymmetric architecture of the deep lithosphere. In contrast, lithospheric folding is dominant in case of low convergence velocity and low strength brittle mantle, leading to the development of a symmetric lithospheric root. The presented analogue modelling results provide novel insights for 1) strain localization and 2) the development of the asymmetric architecture of the Pyrenees.

  10. The East African Orogen: Accretion versus Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröner, A.; Muhongo, S.; Sommer, H.; Vogt, M.

    2003-04-01

    The East African Orogen is an extensive Neoproterozoic (Pan-African) orogenic belt extending from Arabia to Mozambique and containing elements of both accretion and collision tectonics. The predominantly upper crustal northern part (Arabian-Nubian Shield, ANS) consists of Neoproterozoic juvenile arc assemblages that accreted onto the African continent along ophiolite-decorated sutures. In contrast, the tectonic evolution of the predominantly middle to lower crustal southern part (Mozambique belt, MB) is still poorly understood, and simple continental collision models as previously applied are not compatible with new isotopic and petrological data. Published Nd isotopic systematics and our new zircon ages demonstrate that large parts of the high-grade MB in Tanzania consists of late Archaean to Palaeoproterozoic granitoid gneisses which may either constitute an extension of the Tanzania craton to the E, reworked during the Pan-African orogeny, or these rocks may constitute a separate terrane, or terranes, tectonically interdigitated with Neoproterozoic gneisses, similar to the situation in Madagascar. Small-scale tectonic interlayering of >1800 Ma and 650-800 Ma gneisses have been documented at several localities, and the amount of pre-Neoproterozoic crust in the MB appears to be ˜70% or more. Relatively small volumes of ˜1000-1100 Ma granitoids have so far only been recorded in southern Tanzania, and their significance in the orogenic evolution and their relation to more extensive rocks of this age in northern Mozambique are not known. High-grade metamorphism in the MB of Tanzania led to granulite and charnockite formation and occurred at 620-640 Ma, slightly earlier than in Mozambique (˜615 Ma) but significantly earlier than in Malawi (˜550-580 Ma) and in Madagascar (˜550-560 Ma). The significance of these age differences is not understood. Petrological data suggest both clockwise and anti-clockwise PT path for the metamorphic assemblages, suggesting that

  11. Crustal Development in the Northeast Asian Orogenic Belt and its comparison with the Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahn, Bor-ming

    2016-04-01

    The Northeast Asian Orogenic Belt is a Mesozoic-Cenozoic accretionary orogenic collage, and it constitutes the northern and principal part of the "Nipponides" (Sengor and Natal'in, 1996). The tectonic framework was formed in Mesozoic and Cenozoic, and it continues to evolve along the modern Pacific arc-trench systems. Generally, a oceanward younging of tectonic units may be discerned, but such a simple pattern is disrupted in many places by extensive strike-slip faulting, most of which is left-lateral. In this talk, the issue of crustal development in the sector of Sikhote-Alin and Japanese Islands will be discussed based on the geochemical and isotopic analyses of granitoids that intruded in various tectonostratigraphic terrains. The majority of granitoids in the NE Asian Orogenic Belt formed from Jurassic to late Cenozoic, with Cretaceous as the dominant period of granitic magmatism and tectonothermal events. A few Early Paleozoic granitic rocks (500 to 450 Ma) have been identified in SW Japan (Kurosegawa Belt) as well as in NE Japan (Kitakami Belt), among them the ca. 500 Ma diorites and tonalites of southern Kitakami are the oldest rocks in Japan and interpreted as the first TTG crust of proto-Japan (Isozaki et al., 2015). Cretaceous granitoids are widespread in Sikhote-Alin and in NE and SW Japan. However, granitoids were emplaced only in the Cenozoic in Sakhalin (ca. 44 - 42 Ma) and Hokkaido (45, 37 and 18 Ma). Most granitoids from Sikhote-Alin are of I-type and have ISr = 0.7040 to 0.7083, and ɛNd(T) = +3.0 to -6.0 (mostly 0 to -5). The Sr-Nd isotopic data fall within the range of granitoids from SW Japan (0.704 to 0.712; +5.0 to -13.0), and the data of Cretaceous granitoids from Sikhote-Alin and SW Japan overlap almost completely. The Cenozoic granitoids of Hokkaido are characterized by ISr = 0.7044 - 0.7061, ɛNd(T) = +1.0 to +4.7, and Sm-Nd model-1 ages = 400-1000 Ma. This is remarkably similar to the Sakhalin granitoids with ISr = 0.7047 - 0.7050,

  12. Landscape Evolution in Orogens with Significant Lateral Advection of Rock: Insights from Numerical Simulations of Fault-Bend Folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S. R.; Slingerland, R. L.; Kirby, E.

    2002-12-01

    Steady-state orogens must balance lateral as well as vertical rock motions by erosion, but how this balance is effected and what its topographic signature might be are open questions. Here we explore the conditions necessary to achieve a topographic steady state above fault-bend folds, a major class of topography-forming orogenic structures in which lateral motion is significant. Field observations indicate that many active fault-bend folds, such as those underlying the Siwalik Hills, Nepal, and the foothills of the Kyrgyz Range, Kyrgyzstan, have only their backlimbs preserved, implying the achievement of at least exhumational steady state. To determine if their topography and drainage networks are at steady-state we have conducted numerical experiments using CHILD, a landscape evolution model. Rock particle motions above a fault bend were modeled using a planar ramp dipping at 30° along which slip occurs at 20 mm/yr. Results indicate that the system achieves a topographic steady-state in which the drainage divide lies above the ramp tip, but drainage nets continuously evolve because longitudinal streams are advected into transverse streams draining the back limb. Transverse streams draining the back of the fold are significantly less concave (θ < 0.4) than streams draining the front (θ > 1), supporting the notion that stream longitudinal profiles reflect lateral advection of their beds in addition to intrinsic hydrologic controls.

  13. Communication Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Barbara, Ed.

    This communication systems guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, a list of objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 32 modules on the following topics: story…

  14. Production Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Ann, Ed.

    This production systems guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, domains and objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 30 modules on the following topics: production…

  15. The role of radiogenic heat in prolonged intraplate reworking: The Capricorn Orogen explained?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Fawna J.; Johnson, Simon P.

    2015-10-01

    Links between intraplate crustal deformation and the thermal regime of the lithosphere have been investigated using numerical models, but these conceptual models must be tested using well-constrained natural systems. The Proterozoic Capricorn Orogen of Western Australia is ideally suited for such a study; after arc accretion, it records a protracted history of intracrustal differentiation and over one billion years of subsequent tectonic reworking. The early addition of juvenile arc material initially reduced the heat production of the crust, whereas subsequent recycling of the deep crust ultimately produced radiogenic granites in the shallow crust. Using whole rock and magmatic zircon compositions, we show that the shallow crust of the Capricorn Orogen has been progressively enriched in heat-producing elements with time. The high heat production is mainly controlled by thorium, concentrated in LREE-enriched phosphates that grew during the late stages of crystallization of crustally-derived granites. Using a numerical model, we investigate the thermal effects of this evolved crustal stratification and compare them with quantitative data on the pressure-temperature-time evolution of a non-magmatic Mesoproterozoic reworking event. The results provide new information concerning the process by which the thermal conditions necessary for the reworking of orogenic crust are generated and sustained for prolonged timescales (>110 Ma). Furthermore, we demonstrate that perturbations to the radiogenic crust lead to warmer geotherms and consequent lithospheric weakening, which has a fundamental control on intraplate reworking of long-lived orogens.

  16. Tectonic controls of Mississippi Valley-type lead-zinc mineralization in orogenic forelands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, D.C.; Leach, D.L.

    2003-01-01

    Most of the world's Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) zinc-lead deposits occur in orogenic forelands. We examine tectonic aspects of foreland evolution as part of a broader study of why some forelands are rich in MVT deposits, whereas others are barren. The type of orogenic foreland (collisional versus Andean-type versus inversion-type) is not a first-order control, because each has MVT deposits (e.g., Northern Arkansas, Pine Point, and Cevennes, respectively). In some MVT districts (e.g., Tri-State and Central Tennessee), mineralization took place atop an orogenic forebulge, a low-amplitude (a few hundred meters), long-wavelength (100-200 km) swell formed by vertical loading of the foreland plate. In the foreland of the active Banda Arc collision zone, a discontinuous forebulge reveals some of the physiographic and geologic complexities of the forebulge environment, and the importance of sea level in determining whether or not a forebulge will emerge and thus be subject to erosion. In addition to those on extant forebulges, some MVT deposits occur immediately below unconformities that originated at a forebulge, only to be subsequently carried toward the orogen by the plate-tectonic conveyor (e.g., Daniel's Harbour and East Tennessee). Likewise, some deposits are located along syn-collisional, flexure-induced normal and strike-slip faults in collisional forelands (e.g., Northern Arkansas, Daniel's Harbour, and Tri-State districts). These findings reveal the importance of lithospheric flexure, and suggest a conceptual tectonic model that accounts for an important subset of MVT deposits-those in the forelands of collisional orogens. The MVT deposits occur both in flat-lying and in thrust-faulted strata; in the latter group, mineralization postdated thrusting in some instances (e.g., Picos de Europa) but may have predated thrusting in other cases (e.g., East Tennessee).

  17. The thermal-mechanical evolution of crustal orogenic belts at convergent plate boundaries: A reappraisal of the orogenic cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderhaeghe, Olivier

    2012-05-01

    Convergent plate boundaries are characterized by the development of crustal orogenic wedges and orogenic plateaus but also by gravitational collapse of previously thickened crust leading to the opening of intermontane and eventually oceanic back-arc basins. Foreland and extensional sedimentary basins in the plate boundary region are filled by the erosional products of the orogenic crust. Metamorphic rocks forming orogenic crust attest to burial and exhumation under contrasted geothermal gradients. These features portray the crustal orogenic cycle and are first-order indicators of the thermal and mechanical evolution of the crust within the plate boundary region. This evolution is controlled by complex interactions among (i) the dynamic balance among forces that arise from plate-tectonic, gravitational potential energy, and buoyancy, (ii) the thermal balance between deformation-induced and radioactive heat production and heat advection related to subduction, orogenic deformation, and magma transfer, and (iii) the mass transfer balance between uplift and erosion. To account for these geological characteristics, a generic model, that integrates results from physical modeling, is proposed for the thermal-mechanical evolution of crustal orogenic belts and for its implication in controlling the transition between the different phases of the orogenic cycle. In this model, the transition from low to high geothermal gradient is associated with increased heat production in the thickened crust owing to radioactive decay and deformation. Partial melting and rheologic weakening of the thermally mature thickened crust triggers gravity-driven lateral flow of the lower crust and controls the transition from wedge to orogenic plateau. Destruction of the orogenic crust is achieved in part by erosion but mostly by gravitational collapse. The style of extension is controlled by the rheology of the crust at the onset of gravitational collapse and its evolution as the crust thins and

  18. How does the mid-crust accommodate deformation in large, hot collisional orogens? A review of recent research in the Himalayan orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottle, John M.; Larson, Kyle P.; Kellett, Dawn A.

    2015-09-01

    The presence of hot, weak crust is a central component of recent hypotheses that seek to explain the evolution of continent-continent collisions, and in particular may play an important role in accommodating the >3000 km of convergence within the Himalaya-Tibetan collision over the last ˜55 Myr. Models that implicate flow of semi-viscous midcrustal rocks south toward the front of the Himalayan orogen, 'channel flow', are able to account for many geologic observations in the Himalaya, while alternative models of collision, particularly 'thrust-wedge taper', demonstrate that much of the observed geology could have formed in the absence of a low-viscosity mid-crustal layer. Several recent studies, synthesized here, have prompted a shift from initial assumptions that channel flow and thrust-wedge taper processes are by definition mutually exclusive. These new studies reveal the presence of several tectonometamorphic discontinuities in the midcrust that appear to reflect a continuum of deformation in which both channel- and wedge-type processes operate in spatially and temporally distinct domains within the orogen, and further, that the system may migrate back and forth between these types of behavior. This continuum of deformation styles within the collisional system is of crucial importance for explaining the evolution of the Himalayan orogen and, hence, for understanding the evolution of Earth's many continent-continent collision zones.

  19. Visualizing the sedimentary response through the orogenic cycle using multi-dimensional scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, C. J.; Kirkland, C.

    2015-12-01

    connect the evolutionary patterns of detrital zircon age spectra to the geodynamics of an orogenic system, which in many cases is a direct function of proximity to the orogenic front.

  20. ADASY (Active Daylighting System)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Moliní, Daniel; González-Montes, Mario; Fernández-Balbuena, Antonio Á.; Bernabéu, Eusebio; García-Botella, Ángel; García-Rodríguez, Lucas; Pohl, Wilfried

    2009-08-01

    The main objective of ADASY (Active Daylighting System) work is to design a façade static daylighting system oriented to office applications, mainly. The goal of the project is to save energy by guiding daylight into a building for lighting purpose. With this approach we can reduce the electrical load for artificial lighting, completing it with sustainable energy. The collector of the system is integrated on a vertical façade and its distribution guide is always horizontal inside of the false ceiling. ADASY is designed with a specific patent pending caption system, a modular light-guide and light extractor luminaire system. Special care has been put on the final cost of the system and its building integration purpose. The current ADASY configuration is able to illuminate 40 m2 area with a 300lx-400lx level in the mid time work hours; furthermore it has a good enough spatial uniformity distribution and a controlled glare. The data presented in this study are the result of simulation models and have been confirmed by a physical scaled prototype. ADASY's main advantages over regular illumination systems are: -Low maintenance; it has not mobile pieces and therefore it lasts for a long time and require little attention once installed. - No energy consumption; solar light continue working even if there has been a power outage. - High quality of light: the colour rendering of light is very high - Psychological benefits: People working with daylight get less stress and more comfort, increasing productivity. - Health benefits

  1. Orogenic gold: Common or evolving fluid and metal sources through time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfarb, Richard J.; Groves, David I.

    2015-09-01

    generations, many which are not related to ore formation. Radiogenic isotopes, such as those of Pb, Sr, Nd, Sm, and Os, measured on hydrothermal minerals are even more difficult to interpret for defining metal source, particularly as the low-salinity ore fluids transport limited amounts of these elements and significant amounts of these may be locally added to the minerals during alteration reactions at the sites of gold deposition. Noble gas and halogen data are equally equivocal. Fluid exsolution from granitoids emplaced into the upper and middle crust, metamorphism of the crust, or fluids entering trans-crustal fault zones from below the crust all remain as permissive scenarios associated with orogenic gold formation, as the abundant geochemical data are equivocal. However, geological and geochronological data weigh heavily against a magmatic-hydrothermal model in the upper to middle crust. There is no universal temporal association between orogenic gold and magmatism, and where there is an overlap in age, there is no specific type of magmatism consistently associated with gold formation, nor element zonation around any specific pluton. A crustal metamorphic model for fluid and metal sources is very consistent with geological, geochronological, and geochemical data, although metamorphism on a regional scale that releases these components into major fault zones can be associated with many processes along active continental margins. These can include crustal thickening and radiogenic heating, slab rollback and heating during crustal extension, or subduction of a spreading ridge heating the base of an accretionary prism. In rare examples where Phanerozoic orogenic gold deposits are hosted in Precambrian high-grade metamorphic terranes, fluids and metals must, however, enter a transcrustal fault system from a sub-crustal source. This could either be a devolatilized, subducted, relatively flat, perhaps stalled slab and its overlying sediment, or the corner of the fertilized

  2. Sulfur- and lead-isotope signatures of orogenic gold mineralisation associated with the Hill End Trough, Lachlan Orogen, New South Wales, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downes, P. M.; Seccombe, P. K.; Carr, G. R.

    2008-11-01

    The Hill End Trough (HET) is a deformed middle Silurian to Early Devonian sediment-dominated rift within the northeastern Lachlan Orogen. The HET hosts the Hill End, Hargraves, Napoleon Reefs, Stuart Town and Windeyer low-sulfide orogenic gold deposits. Adjacent to the HET are the Bodangora and Gulgong gold deposits. In this study we present 91 new sulfur- and 18 new lead-isotope analyses and collate a further 25 sulfur- and 32 lead-isotopes analyses from unpublished sources for these deposits. Larger gold deposits in the HET have near 0 δ34S‰ values indicating that sulfur in these systems was sourced from a magmatic reservoir. The dominant lead isotope signature for HET-hosted deposits reflects a crustal source however some mantle-derived lead has been introduced into the HET. Sulfur- and lead-isotopic results suggest that gold was sourced from mantle-derived magmatic units beneath the HET. The study supports earlier studies at Hill End by concluding that the majority of orogenic gold mineralisation in and adjacent to the HET formed during the Early Carboniferous period.

  3. Crustal and lithospheric structure of the Albany-Fraser Orogen, Western Australia, from passive-source seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sippl, C.; Tkalcic, H.; Kennett, B. L. N.; Spaggiari, C. V.; Gessner, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Paleoproterozoic to Mesoproterozoic Albany-Fraser Orogen is situated along the southeastern margin of the Archean Yilgarn Craton in Western Australia. The orogen records a long history of extension and magmatism, dominantly in a rift or back-arc setting, inboard of the collision zone between the West Australian and South Australian Cratons. The extensional structures were inverted during formation of a fold and thrust architecture during the Mesoproterozoic, which must have left its mark on the orogen's deep crustal and lithospheric structure. In November 2013, a 40-station passive seismic array was installed across the east Albany-Fraser Orogen, which was shifted southeast, along strike of the orogen, in October 2014. The goal of this project is the retrieval of three-dimensional models of crustal and mantle lithospheric structure for the east Albany-Fraser Orogen, thereby extending recently acquired active seismic profiles into the third dimension. First results from analyzing the data recorded by the northern sub-array are presented, exploiting ambient noise, receiver functions and information from occasional local events. Ambient noise tomography yields a three-dimensional S-wave velocity model of the upper and middle crust. The obtained velocity distribution shows a marked contrast between faster upper crustal velocities throughout the Yilgarn margin and the Albany-Fraser Orogen and markedly slower velocities in the Eucla Basin further east. The Fraser Zone, a ~450 km long body of metamorphic gabbros in the Albany-Fraser Orogen, shows up as a prominent upper crustal high-wavespeed anomaly. At mid-crustal levels, the average seismic velocitiy decreases, and the basement beneath the Eucla Basin appears to be faster than the regions further west. P receiver functions have been used for the estimation of bulk crustal Vp/Vs (H-K stacking) as well as for Bayesian inversion that yields a 1D S-wave velocity profiles. The westernmost stations, which lie on the

  4. Neutron activation analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, M.C.; Rhodes, J.R.

    1973-12-25

    A neutron activation analysis system for monitoring a generally fluid media, such as slurries, solutions, and fluidized powders, including two separate conduit loops for circulating fluid samples within the range of radiation sources and detectors is described. Associated with the first loop is a neutron source that emits s high flux of slow and thermal neutrons. The second loop employs a fast neutron source, the flux from which is substantially free of thermal neutrons. Adjacent to both loops are gamma counters for spectrographic determination of the fluid constituents. Other gsmma sources and detectors are arranged across a portion of each loop for deterMining the fluid density. (Official Gazette)

  5. Intraplate geodynamics and magmatism in the evolution of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarmolyuk, V. V.; Kuzmin, M. I.; Ernst, R. E.

    2014-10-01

    The Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) was produced as a consequence of the successive closure of the Paleoasian Ocean and the accretion of structures formed within it (island arcs, oceanic islands, and backarc basins) to the Siberian continent. The belt started developing in the latest Late Neoproterozoic, and this process terminated in the latest Permian in response to the collision of the Siberian and North China continents that resulted in closure of the Paleoasian ocean (Metcalfe, 2006; Li et al., 2014; Liu et al., 2009; Xiao et al., 2010; Didenko et al., 2010). Throughout the whole evolutionary history of this Orogenic Belt, a leading role in its evolution was played by convergent processes. Along with these processes, an important contribution to the evolution of the composition and structure of the crust in the belt was made by deep geodynamic processes related to the activity of mantle plumes. Indicator complexes of the activity of mantle plumes are identified, and their major distribution patterns in CAOB structures are determined. A number of epochs and areas of intraplate magmatism are distinguished, including the Neoproterozoic one (Rodinia breakup and the origin of alkaline rock belt in the marginal part of the Siberian craton); Neoproterozoic-Early Cambrian (origin of oceanic islands in the Paleoasian Ocean); Late Cambrian-Early Ordovician (origin of LIP within the region of Early Caledonian structures in CAOB); Middle Paleozoic (origin of LIP in the Altai-Sayan rift system); Late Paleozoic-Early Mesozoic (origin of the Tarim flood-basalt province, Central Asian rift system, and a number of related zonal magmatic areas); Late Mesozoic-Cenozoic (origin of continental volcanic areas in Central Asia). Geochemical and isotopic characteristics are determined for magmatic complexes that are indicator complexes for areas of intraplate magmatism of various age, and their major evolutionary trends are discussed. Available data indicate that mantle plumes

  6. European Neutron Activation System.

    2013-01-11

    Version 03 EASY-2010 (European Activation System) consists of a wide range of codes, data and documentation all aimed at satisfying the objective of calculating the response of materials irradiated in a neutron flux. The main difference from the previous version is the upper energy limit, which has increased from 20 to 60 MeV. It is designed to investigate both fusion devices and accelerator based materials test facilities that will act as intense sources of high-energymore » neutrons causing significant activation of the surrounding materials. The very general nature of the calculational method and the data libraries means that it is applicable (with some reservations) to all situations (e.g. fission reactors or neutron sources) where materials are exposed to neutrons below 60 MeV. EASY can be divided into two parts: data and code development tools and user tools and data. The former are required to develop the latter, but EASY users only need to be able to use the inventory code FISPACT and be aware of the contents of the EAF library (the data source). The complete EASY package contains the FISPACT-2007 inventory code, the EAF-2003, EAF-2005, EAF-2007 and EAF-2010 libraries, and the EASY User Interface for the Window version. The activation package EASY-2010 is the result of significant development to extend the upper energy range from 20 to 60 MeV so that it is capable of being used for IFMIF calculations. The EAF-2010 library contains 66,256 reactions, almost five times more than in EAF-2003 (12,617). Deuteron-induced and proton-induced cross section libraries are also included, and can be used with EASY to enable calculations of the activation due to deuterons and proton [2].« less

  7. A crustal model of the ultrahigh-pressure Dabie Shan orogenic belt, China, derived from deep seismic refraction profiling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Chun-Yong; Zeng, Rong-Sheng; Mooney, W.D.; Hacker, B.R.

    2000-01-01

    We present a new crustal cross section through the east-west trending ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) Dabie Shan orogenic belt, east central China, based on a 400-km-long seismic refraction profile. Data from our profile reveal that the cratonal blocks north and south of the orogen are composed of 35-km-thick crust consisting of three layers (upper, middle, and lower crust) with average seismic velocities of 6.0±0.2 km/s, 6.5±0.1 km/s, and 6.8±0.1 km/s. The crust reaches a maximum thickness of 41.5 km beneath the northern margin of the orogen, and thus the present-day root beneath the orogen is only 6.5 km thick. The upper mantle velocity is 8.0±0.1 km/s. Modeling of shear wave data indicate that Poisson's ratio increases from 0.24±0.02 in the upper crust to 0.27±0.03 in the lower crust. This result is consistent with a dominantly felsic upper crustal composition and a mafic lower crustal composition within the amphibolite or granulite metamorphic facies. Our seismic model indicates that eclogite, which is abundant in surface exposures within the orogen, is not a volumetrically significant component in the middle or lower crust. Much of the Triassic structure associated with the formation of the UHP rocks of the Dabie Shan has been obscured by post-Triassic igneous activity, extension and large-offset strike-slip faulting. Nevertheless, we can identify a high-velocity (6.3 km/s) zone in the upper (<5 km depth) crustal core of the orogen which we interpret as a zone of ultrahigh-pressure rocks, a north dipping suture, and an apparent Moho offset that marks a likely active strike-slip fault.

  8. Geology of the Byrd Glacier Discontinuity (Ross Orogen): New survey data from the Britannia Range, Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carosi, R.; Giacomini, F.; Talarico, F.; Stump, E.

    2007-01-01

    Field activities in the Britannia Range (Transantarctic Mountains, Antarctica) highlighted new geological features around the so-called Byrd Glacier discontinuity. Recent field surveys revealed the occurrence of significant amounts of medium- to high-grade metamorphic rocks, intruded by abundant coarse-grained porphyritic granitoids. Most of the granitoids are deformed, with foliation parallel to the regional foliation in the metamorphics. Two main episodes of deformation are observed. Tight to isoclinal folds and penetrative axial plane foliation are related to the D1 phase, open folds to the D2. The main foliation (D1) trends nearly E-W in agreement with the trend in the southern portion of the Byrd Glacier. In most outcrops, granitic dykes are folded and stretched by the D2 deformation, which shows similar characteristics with the D2 deformation south of the Byrd Glacier. This suggests the occurrence in the Ross orogen of an orogen-normal structure south and north of the Byrd Glacier.

  9. The deep structure of Alpine-type orogens: how important is rift-inheritance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tugend, Julie; Manatschal, Gianreto; Mohn, Geoffroy

    2016-04-01

    Collisional belts are commonly thought to result from the closure of oceanic basins and subsequent inversion of former rifted margins. The formation and evolution of collisional belts should therefore be closely interlinked with the initial architecture of former rifted margins. Reflection and refraction seismic data from present-day magma-poor rifted margins show the omnipresence of hyperextended domains (severely thinned continental crust (<10 km) and/or exhumed serpentinized mantle with minor magmatic additions) between unequivocal continental and oceanic domains. Integrating these new observations and exploring their impact on mountain building processes may result in alternative interpretations of the lithospheric structure of collisional orogens. We focus on the Pyrenees and Western to Central Alps, respectively resulting from the inversion of a Late Jurassic to Mid Cretaceous and an Early to Mid Jurassic rift system eventually floored by hyperextended crust, exhumed mantle or proto-oceanic crust. The rift-related pre-collisional architecture of the Pyrenees shows many similarities with that proposed for the Alps; although the width of the hyperextended and in particular of the proto-oceanic domains is little constrained. Contrasting with the Pyrenees, remnants of these domains are largely affected by orogeny-related deformation and show a HP-LT to HT-MP metamorphic overprint in the Alps. Nevertheless, in spite of the occurrence of these highly deformed and metamorphosed rocks constituting the internal parts of the Alps, the overall crustal and lithospheric structure looks surprisingly comparable. High resolution tomographic images across both orogens unravel the occurrence of a velocity anomaly dipping underneath the internal domains and progressively attenuated at depth that we interpret as former hyperextended domains subducted/underthrusted during collision. This interpretation contrasts with the classical assumption that the subducted material is made of

  10. Anomalous nitrogen isotopes in ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic rocks from the Sulu orogenic belt: Effect of abiotic nitrogen reduction during fluid-rock interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long; Zheng, Yong-Fei; Cartigny, Pierre; Li, Jianghanyang

    2014-10-01

    Modern nitrogen (N) fixation is primarily mediated by biological processes. However, in the early Earth where biological activity was absent or limited, abiotic N reduction in hydrothermal systems is thought to be a key process to transform atmospheric N2 and NOx to ammonium, an essential nutrient to support the emergence of life and also an N form that can be incorporated into rocks. Surprisingly, evidence for abiotic N reduction in the rock record has not been clearly identified. In this study, we reported anomalously low N isotope compositions (δN15 values as low as -15.8‰) of mica samples in ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic rocks from the Donghai area in the Sulu orogenic belt, eastern China. Compared with mica samples with typical crustal δN15 values (3-9‰) in similar metamorphic rocks from the western Dabie orogen, the 15N-depleted mica samples from the Sulu orogen are characterized by significant N enrichment (10 times higher) and extreme 18O depletion (δO18 values as low as -9‰). These features can be best explained by assimilation of N from a source characterized by extremely low δN15 values (less than ∼-16‰). The extremely low δN15 value would be produced by abiotic N reduction during reaction of a meteoric-hydrothermal fluid with crustal rocks before subduction. This observation provides a clue to the occurrence of abiotic N reduction in continental supracrustal rocks and infer that abiotic N reduction process could be a fundamental process driving the geological N cycling in early Earth.

  11. The Development of the SW Pacific Margin of Gondwana: Correlations Between the Rangitata and New England Orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cawood, Peter A.

    1984-10-01

    Prior to formation of the Tasman Sea, the Late Paleozoic-Mesozoic Rangitata Orogen of New Zealand and New Caledonia abutted the Paleozoic New England Orogen of eastern Australia. Comparison of the record of Permian-Cretaceous igneous and deformational events from the two orogens suggests that their tectonic evolution was interrelated and is a consequence of convergent plate interaction along the southwest Pacific margin of Gondwana. The following relations are proposed: (1) termination of arc volcanism and widespread sedimentation in New England, together with the onset of regional deformation and crustal anatexis were synchronous with the commencement of volcanism and sedimentation within the Rangitata Orogen; (2) Early Permian andesitic volcanism in eastern New England represents an along-strike extension of the Brook Street terrane of New Zealand; (3) Late Permian regional deformation in New England coincides with both a break in subduction-related igneous activity in the New England and Rangitata Orogens and a shift in the locus of this activity; (4) Late Permian-Triassic calc-alkaline igneous activity in New England correlates with a phase of relatively continuous accumulation of pyroclastic material in the forearc basin of the Rangitata Orogen; (5) cessation of plutonism in New England corresponds with commencement of formation of the Esk Head Melange in New Zealand and the probable commencement of juxtaposition of the Te Anau and Alpine Assemblage; (6) Late Cretaceous epizonal plutons intruded into the New England Orogen are similar in character and age to those emplaced during the final phases of Rangitata orogenesis, and both appear to mark initial stages of rifting associated with formation of the Tasman Sea. The generation of Permian and Triassic igneous activity in eastern New England by convergent plate interaction results, on present reconstructions of the Gondwana margin, in an excessively wide arc-trench gap succession, for the position of the

  12. Amalgamating eastern Gondwana: The evolution of the Circum-Indian Orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Alan S.; Pisarevsky, Sergei A.

    2005-08-01

    The Neoproterozoic global reorganisation that saw the demise of Rodinia and the amalgamation of Gondwana took place during an incredibly dynamic period of Earth evolution. To better understand the palaeogeography of these times, and hence help quantify the interrelations between tectonics and other Earth systems, we here integrate Neoproterozoic palaeomagnetic solutions from the various blocks that made up eastern Gondwana, with the large amount of recent geological data available from the orogenic belts that formed as eastern Gondwana amalgamated. From this study, we have: (1) identified large regions of pre-Neoproterozoic crust within late Neoproterozoic/Cambrian orogenic belts that significantly modify the geometry and number of continental blocks present in the Neoproterozoic world; (2) suggested that one of these blocks, Azania, which consists of Archaean and Palaeoproterozoic crust within the East African Orogen of Madagascar, Somalia, Ethiopia and Arabia, collided with the Congo/Tanzania/Bangweulu Block at ˜ 650-630 Ma to form the East African Orogeny; (3) postulated that India did not amalgamate with any of the Gondwana blocks until the latest Neoproterozoic/Cambrian forming the Kuunga Orogeny between it and Australia/Mawson and coeval orogenesis between India and the previously amalgamated Congo/Tanzania/Bangweulu-Azania Block (we suggest the name 'Malagasy Orogeny' for this event); and, (4) produced a palaeomagnetically and geologically permissive model for Neoproterozoic palaeogeography between 750 and 530 Ma, from the detritus of Rodinia to an amalgamated Gondwana.

  13. Basin-mountain structures and hydrocarbon exploration potential of west Junggar orogen in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaozhi; He, Dengfa; Qi, Xuefeng

    2016-04-01

    Situated in northern Xinjiang, China, in NE-SW trend, West Junggar Orogen is adjacent to Altai fold belt on the north with the Ertix Fault as the boundary, North Tianshan fold belt on the south with the Ebinur Lake Strike-slip Fault as the boundary, and the Junggar Basin on the southeast with Zaire-Genghis Khan-Hala'alat fold belt as the boundary. Covering an area of about 10×104 km2 in China, there are medium and small intermontane basins, Burqin-Fuhai, Tacheng, Hefeng and Hoxtolgay, distributing inside the orogen. Tectonically West Junggar Orogen lies in the middle section of the Palaeo-Asian tectonic domain where the Siberia, Kazakhstan and Tarim Plates converge, and is the only orogen trending NE-SW in the Palaeo-Asian tectonic domain. Since the Paleozoic, the orogen experienced pre-Permian plate tectonic evolution and post-Permian intra-plate basin evolution. Complex tectonic evolution and multi-stage structural superimposition not only give rise to long term controversial over the basin basement property but also complex basin-mountain coupling relations, structures and basin superimposition modes. According to analysis of several kinds of geological and geophysical data, the orogen was dominated by compressive folding and thrust napping from the Siberia plate in the north since the Late Paleozoic. Compressive stress weakened from north to south, corresponding to subdued vertical movement and enhanced horizontal movement of crustal surface from north to south, and finally faded in the overthrust-nappe belt at the northwest margin of the Junggar Basin. The variation in compressive stress is consistent with the surface relief of the orogen, which is high in the north and low in the south. There are two kinds of basin-mountain coupling relationships, i.e. high angle thrusting and overthrusting and napping, and two kinds of basin superimposition modes, i.e. inherited and progressive, and migrating and convulsionary modes. West Junggar orogen has rich oil and gas

  14. Stalled Orogen Linked to East Antarctic Craton Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martos, Y. M.; Ferraccioli, F.; Finn, C.; Bell, R. E.; Jordan, T. A.; Damaske, D.

    2015-12-01

    The interior of East Antarctica is often regarded as a coherent Archean craton surrounded by Paleo to Neoproterozoic orogenic belts. Here we use recent aerogeophysical, satellite magnetic, satellite gravity and passive seismic results in central East Antarctica to challenge this view. Firstly, anomalously thick crust (compared to most other cratons) has been imaged in East Antarctica by both passive seismic and gravity modelling with values up to 60 km (Ferraccioli et al., 2011, Nature; An et al., 2015, JGR). The thick crust underlies both the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains and an elevated region between Lake Vostok and Dronning Maud Land, referred to as the East Antarctic Mountain Ranges plateau (An et al., 2015). Second, satellite magnetic data reveal that the Gamburtev Province lies in between the Ruker/Princess Elizabeth Land, Vostok, Nimrod/South Pole and Recovery provinces. The Nimrod/ South Pole province is a Paleo to Meso Proterozoic igneous province formed along the edges of the Archean/Paleoproterozoic Mawson continent (e.g. Goodge and Fanning, 2010 JGR). Our aerogeophysical and sediment provenance data interpretations suggest that the Gamburtsev Province represents a distinct Grenvillian-age orogenic belt. A stalled orogen with thick crust (i.e. an orogen where widespread orogenic collapse and root delamination has not occurred)- is preserved in the interior of East Antarctica resembling e.g. the Paleoproterozoic Trans Hudson Orogen and segments of Grenvillian orogens in Laurentia. The stalled orogen may relate to widespread accretionary and collisional events within Rodinia. However, passive seismic interpretations (An et al., 2015) favour linking crustal thickening to the Pan-African age assembly of Greater India, East Antarctica and Australia within Gondwana (e.g. Aitken et al., 2014 GRL). Further aerogeophysical observations over Princess Elizabeth Land are timely to enable more robust correlations with geological observations and to help dating the

  15. Strong imprint of past orogenic events on the thermochronological record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Jean

    2016-06-01

    Using a simple solution to the heat conduction equation, I show how, at the end of an orogenic event, the relaxation of isotherms from a syn-orogenic advection-dominated geometry to a post-orogenic conduction-dominated geometry leads to the creation of a thick iso-age crustal layer. Subsequent erosion of this layer yields peculiar age-elevation profiles and detrital age distributions that cannot be easily interpreted using traditional techniques. I illustrate these points by using a simple analytical solution of the heat equation as well as a transient, three-dimensional numerical model. I also demonstrate that the age of the end of an orogenic event is so strongly imprinted in the thermochronological record that it erases most of the information pertaining to the orogenic phase itself and the subsequent isostatically-driven exhumation. The concept is used to explain two thermochronological datasets from the Himalayas and demonstrate that their most likely interpretation involves the sudden interruption of extremely fast exhumation accommodated by movement along the South Tibetan Detachment in the Higher Himalayas around 15 Ma.

  16. Linking magmatism with collision in an accretionary orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Wilde, Simon A.; Wang, Tao; Xiao, Wen-Jiao; Guo, Qian-Qian

    2016-05-01

    A compilation of U-Pb age, geochemical and isotopic data for granitoid plutons in the southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), enables evaluation of the interaction between magmatism and orogenesis in the context of Paleo-Asian oceanic closure and continental amalgamation. These constraints, in conjunction with other geological evidence, indicate that following consumption of the ocean, collision-related calc-alkaline granitoid and mafic magmatism occurred from 255 ± 2 Ma to 251 ± 2 Ma along the Solonker-Xar Moron suture zone. The linear or belt distribution of end-Permian magmatism is interpreted to have taken place in a setting of final orogenic contraction and weak crustal thickening, probably as a result of slab break-off. Crustal anatexis slightly post-dated the early phase of collision, producing adakite-like granitoids with some S-type granites during the Early-Middle Triassic (ca. 251–245 Ma). Between 235 and 220 Ma, the local tectonic regime switched from compression to extension, most likely caused by regional lithospheric extension and orogenic collapse. Collision-related magmatism from the southern CAOB is thus a prime example of the minor, yet tell-tale linking of magmatism with orogenic contraction and collision in an archipelago-type accretionary orogen.

  17. Linking magmatism with collision in an accretionary orogen.

    PubMed

    Li, Shan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Wilde, Simon A; Wang, Tao; Xiao, Wen-Jiao; Guo, Qian-Qian

    2016-01-01

    A compilation of U-Pb age, geochemical and isotopic data for granitoid plutons in the southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), enables evaluation of the interaction between magmatism and orogenesis in the context of Paleo-Asian oceanic closure and continental amalgamation. These constraints, in conjunction with other geological evidence, indicate that following consumption of the ocean, collision-related calc-alkaline granitoid and mafic magmatism occurred from 255 ± 2 Ma to 251 ± 2 Ma along the Solonker-Xar Moron suture zone. The linear or belt distribution of end-Permian magmatism is interpreted to have taken place in a setting of final orogenic contraction and weak crustal thickening, probably as a result of slab break-off. Crustal anatexis slightly post-dated the early phase of collision, producing adakite-like granitoids with some S-type granites during the Early-Middle Triassic (ca. 251-245 Ma). Between 235 and 220 Ma, the local tectonic regime switched from compression to extension, most likely caused by regional lithospheric extension and orogenic collapse. Collision-related magmatism from the southern CAOB is thus a prime example of the minor, yet tell-tale linking of magmatism with orogenic contraction and collision in an archipelago-type accretionary orogen. PMID:27167207

  18. Linking magmatism with collision in an accretionary orogen

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Wilde, Simon A.; Wang, Tao; Xiao, Wen-Jiao; Guo, Qian-Qian

    2016-01-01

    A compilation of U-Pb age, geochemical and isotopic data for granitoid plutons in the southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), enables evaluation of the interaction between magmatism and orogenesis in the context of Paleo-Asian oceanic closure and continental amalgamation. These constraints, in conjunction with other geological evidence, indicate that following consumption of the ocean, collision-related calc-alkaline granitoid and mafic magmatism occurred from 255 ± 2 Ma to 251 ± 2 Ma along the Solonker-Xar Moron suture zone. The linear or belt distribution of end-Permian magmatism is interpreted to have taken place in a setting of final orogenic contraction and weak crustal thickening, probably as a result of slab break-off. Crustal anatexis slightly post-dated the early phase of collision, producing adakite-like granitoids with some S-type granites during the Early-Middle Triassic (ca. 251–245 Ma). Between 235 and 220 Ma, the local tectonic regime switched from compression to extension, most likely caused by regional lithospheric extension and orogenic collapse. Collision-related magmatism from the southern CAOB is thus a prime example of the minor, yet tell-tale linking of magmatism with orogenic contraction and collision in an archipelago-type accretionary orogen. PMID:27167207

  19. Cumberland batholith, Trans-Hudson Orogen, Canada: Petrogenesis and implications for Paleoproterozoic crustal and orogenic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalen, Joseph B.; Wodicka, Natasha; Taylor, Bruce E.; Jackson, Garth D.

    2010-06-01

    Large volume, plutonic belts, such as the ˜ 221,000 km 2, ca. 1.865-1.845 Ga Cumberland batholith (CB) of the Trans-Hudson Orogen in Canada, are major components of Paleoproterozoic orogenic belts. In many cases, they have been interpreted as continental arc batholiths. The petrogenesis and tectonic context of the CB and implications for crustal growth and recycling are interpreted herein based on a 900 km geochemical-isotopic (Nd-O) transect across it and into granitoid plutons within bounding Archean cratons in central and southern Baffin Island. The mainly granulite grade CB, emplaced over an age span of between 14 and 24 Ma, consists mainly of high-K to shoshonitic monzogranite and granodiorite, but also includes low- and medium-K granitoid rocks. Metaluminous to slightly peraluminous compositions and δ 18O (VSMOW) values (+ 6 to + 10‰) indicate derivation from infracrustal (I-type) sources. ɛ Nd 1.85 Ga signatures (- 12 to - 2) of both mafic and felsic units suggest a dominance of evolved sources. Isotopic signatures in the interior of the CB (- 2 to - 7) are more radiogenic than those within Archean domains in central (- 8 to - 15) and southern (- 5 to - 19) Baffin Island. The isotopic transect is interpreted as 'imaging' an accreted microcontinental block (Meta Incognita) and bounding Archean cratons. The CB includes granites of arc, within-plate (A-type) and post-collisional affinity and volumetrically minor mafic rocks with both arc and non-arc features. (La/Yb) CN and Sr/Y values range from < 1 to 225 and < 1 to 611, respectively. In these respects, some CB granitoid rocks resemble Paleozoic adakitic granites, interpreted as partial melts of greatly thickened crust within post-collisional settings, such as Tibet. Thus, the CB likely encompasses various non-consanguineous magmatic suites generated at deep- to mid-crustal depths. Although CB granitoid rocks undoubtedly had important crustal sources, it is hard to assess the relative contribution of

  20. How Orogen-scale Exhumed Strike-slip Faults Initiate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, S.; Neubauer, F.

    2015-12-01

    Orogen-scale strike-slip faults present one the most important geodynamic processes affecting the lithosphere-asthenosphere system. In specific subtypes, faulting is virtually initiated along hot-to-cool boundaries, e.g. at such of hot granite intrusions or metamorphic core complexes to cool country rocks. Such fault zones are often subparallel to mountain ranges and expose a wide variety of mylonitic, cataclastic and non-cohesive fault rocks, which were formed at different structural levels of the crust and are stacked within each other ("telescoping"). Exhumation of rocks is, therefore, a common feature of such strike-slip faults implying major transtensive and/or transpressive processes accompanying pure strike-slip motion. The hot-to-cool thermal structure across the fault zone significantly influences the physical fault rock properties. One major question is how and where a major strike-slip initiates and further development. Here, we propose a model in which major continental exhumed strike-slip faults potentially evolve along rheologically weak zones such as plutons or margins of metamorphic complexes. As an example, we propose a model for the Ailao Shan-Red River (ASRR) fault, SE Asia, which initiated along the edge of a plutonic belt and evolved in response to India-Asia collision with four tectonic phases.

  1. Window into the Caledonian orogen: Structure of the crust beneath the East Shetland platform, United Kingdom

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McBride, J.H.; England, R.W.

    1999-01-01

    Reprocessing and interpretation of commercial and deep seismic reflection data across the East Shetland platform and its North Sea margin provide a new view of crustal subbasement structure beneath a poorly known region of the British Caledonian orogen. The East Shetland platform, east of the Great Glen strike-slip fault system, is one of the few areas of the offshore British Caledonides that remained relatively insulated from the Mesozoic and later rifting that involved much of the area around the British Isles, thus providing an "acoustic window" into the deep structure of the orogen. Interpretation of the reflection data suggests that the crust beneath the platform retains a significant amount of its original Caledonian and older architecture. The upper to middle crust is typically poorly reflective except for individual prominent dipping reflectors with complex orientations that decrease in dip with depth and merge with a lower crustal layer of high reflectivity. The three-dimensional structural orientation of the reflectors beneath the East Shetland platform is at variance with Caledonian reflector trends observed elsewhere in the Caledonian orogen (e.g., north of the Scottish mainland), emphasizing the unique tectonic character of this part of the orogen. Upper to middle crustal reflectors are interpreted as Caledonian or older thrust surfaces that were possibly reactivated by Devonian extension associated with post-Caledonian orogenic collapse. The appearance of two levels of uneven and diffractive (i.e., corrugated) reflectivity in the lower crust, best developed on east-west-oriented profiles, is characteristic of the East Shetland platform. However, a north-south-oriented profile reveals an interpreted south-vergent folded and imbricated thrust structure in the lower crust that appears to be tied to the two levels of corrugated reflectivity on the east-west profiles. A thrust-belt origin for lower crustal reflectivity would explain its corrugated

  2. 40Ar/39Ar cooling history of the Albany Mobile Belt, Albany-Fraser Orogen, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scibiorski, Elisabeth; Tohver, Eric; Jourdan, Fred

    2013-04-01

    The Albany-Fraser Orogen of southwestern Australia is a Grenville-age orogenic belt that marks the suturing of the Yilgarn Craton of Western Australia to the Mawson Craton of South Australia and Antarctica. The Albany Mobile Belt is situated in the west of the orogen and consists of three geological domains: the Nornalup Zone, the Biranup Zone and the Northern Foreland. The crustal genesis and nature of boundaries between these domains is unknown. 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology of biotite and muscovite grains from a 250 km transect across all three domains in the Albany Mobile Belt is used to study the exhumation and cooling history of the amphibolite to granulite facies orogenic root. Previously published geochronological data dates peak amphibolite or granulite facies metamorphism in the Nornalup Zone, Biranup Zone and Northern Foreland at ca. 1170 Ma, ca. 1180 Ma and ca. 1210 - 1180 Ma respectively. All samples reported in this study yielded well defined plateau ages consistent with Stage II of the Albany-Fraser Orogeny (1215 - 1140 Ma). Four biotites from the Nornalup Zone give cooling ages ranging from 1144 ± 5 Ma to 1168 ± 5 Ma, one biotite from the Biranup Zone gives a cooling age of 1159 ± 5 Ma, and four muscovites from the Northern Foreland give statistically indistinguishable cooling ages ranging from 1157 ± 6 Ma to 1164 ± 5 Ma, with a weighted mean age of 1159 ± 6 Ma (P = 0.10). The new cooling ages imply that the three domains had been brought to a similar structural level (12 - 17 km depth) by ca. 1158 Ma, and have shared a common geological history since that time. This suggests that Stage II tectonic activity may have ended at ca. 1158 Ma in the Albany Mobile Belt, 20 Myr earlier than previously assumed. A cooling rate of 25°C/Myr for the Biranup Zone was calculated based on the 20 Myr interval between peak granulite-facies metamorphism and the cooling of the domain through the estimated biotite closure temperature (ca. 300°C) by ca. 1159 Ma

  3. Hillslope response to knickpoint migration in the Southern Appalachians: Implications for the evolution of post-orogenic landscapes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wegmann, S.F.G.; Franke, K.L.; Hughes, S.; Lewis, R.Q.; Lyons, N.; Paris, P.; Ross, K.; Bauer, J.B.; Witt, A.C.

    2011-01-01

    The southern Appalachians represent a landscape characterized by locally high topographic relief, steep slopes, and frequent mass movement in the absence of significant tectonic forcing for at least the last 200 Ma. The fundamental processes responsible for landscape evolution in a post-orogenic landscape remain enigmatic. The non-glaciated Cullasaja River basin of south-western North Carolina, with uniform lithology, frequent debris flows, and the availability of high-resolution airborne lidar DEMs, is an ideal natural setting to study landscape evolution in a post-orogenic landscape through the lens of hillslope-channel coupling. This investigation is limited to channels with upslope contributing areas >2.7 km2, a conservative estimate of the transition from fluvial to debris-flow dominated channel processes. Values of normalized hypsometry, hypsometric integral, and mean slope vs elevation are used for 14 tributary basins and the Cullasaja basin as a whole to characterize landscape evolution following upstream knickpoint migration. Results highlight the existence of a transient spatial relationship between knickpoints present along the fluvial network of the Cullasaja basin and adjacent hillslopes. Metrics of topography (relief, slope gradient) and hillslope activity (landslide frequency) exhibit significant downstream increases below the current position of major knickpoints. The transient effect of knickpoint-driven channel incision on basin hillslopes is captured by measuring the relief, mean slope steepness, and mass movement frequency of tributary basins and comparing these results with the distance from major knickpoints along the Cullasaja River. A conceptual model of area-elevation and slope distributions is presented that may be representative of post-orogenic landscape evolution in analogous geologic settings. Importantly, the model explains how knickpoint migration and channel- hillslope coupling is an important factor in tectonically-inactive (i

  4. The nature of orogenic crust in the central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Susan L.; Zandt, George

    2002-10-01

    The central Andes (16°-22°S) are part of an active continental margin mountain belt and the result of shortening of the weak western edge of South America between the strong lithospheres of the subducting Nazca plate and the underthrusting Brazilian shield. We have combined receiver function and surface wave dispersion results from the BANJO-SEDA project with other geophysical studies to characterize the nature of the continental crust and mantle lithospheric structure. The major results are as follows: (1) The crust supporting the high elevations is thick and has a felsic to intermediate bulk composition. (2) The relatively strong Brazilian lithosphere is underthrusting as far west (65.5°W) as the high elevations of the western part of the Eastern Cordillera (EC) but does not underthrust the entire Altiplano. (3) The subcrustal lithosphere is delaminating piecemeal under the Altiplano-EC boundary but is not completely removed beneath the central Altiplano. The Altiplano crust is characterized by a brittle upper crust decoupled from a very weak lower crust that is dominated by ductile deformation, leading to lower crustal flow and flat topography. In contrast, in the high-relief, inland-sloping regions of the EC and sub-Andean zone, the upper crust is still strongly coupled across the basal thrust of the fold-thrust belt to the underthrusting Brazilian Shield lithosphere. Subcrustal shortening between the Altiplano and Brazilian lithosphere appears to be accommodated by delamination near the Altiplano-EC boundary. Our study suggests that orogenic reworking may be an important part of the "felsification" of continental crust.

  5. Physiologic activities of the contact activation system.

    PubMed

    Schmaier, Alvin H

    2014-05-01

    The plasma contact activation (CAS) and kallikrein/kinin (KKS) systems consist of 4 proteins: factor XII, prekallikrein, high molecular weight kininogen, and the bradykinin B2 receptor. Murine genetic deletion of factor XII (F12(-/-)), prekallikrein (Klkb1(-/-)), high molecular weight kininogen (Kgn1(-/-)) and the bradykinin B2 receptor (Bdkrb2(-/-)) yield animals protected from thrombosis. With possible exception of F12(-/-) and Kgn1(-/-) mice, the mechanism(s) for thrombosis protection is not reduced contact activation. Bdkrb2(-/-) mice are best characterized and they are protected from thrombosis through over expression of components of the renin angiotensin system (RAS) leading to elevated prostacyclin with vascular and platelet inhibition. Alternatively, prolylcarboxypeptidase, a PK activator and degrader of angiotensin II, when deficient in the mouse leads to a prothrombotic state. Its mechanism for increased thrombosis also is mediated in part by components of the RAS. These observations suggest that thrombosis in mice of the CAS and KKS are mediated in part through the RAS and independent of reduced contact activation. PMID:24759141

  6. Exhumed Himalayan-type syntaxis in the Grenville orogen, northeastern Laurentia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, Alexander E.; Valentino, David W.; Chiarenzelli, Jeffrey R.; Solar, Gary S.; Hamilton, Michael A.

    2004-04-01

    A deep-seated analog of the syntaxis developed in the Tibetan Plateau occurs in the Grenville Orogen of eastern Laurentia. During the final assembly of Rodinia, Amazonia collided with Laurentia and produced a series of large, conjugate, transcurrent, shear systems and pervasive strike-slip deformation that overprinted compressional structures related to the Ottawan Orogeny (the last orogenic phase of what is considered Grenvillian). A northeast-striking dextral system at least 35-km wide developed in the Reading Prong of New York (locally known as the Hudson Highlands), New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. U-Pb SHRIMP zircon geochronology and Ar/Ar thermochronology on the lowest grade cataclasites constrain the age of movement between 1008 and 876 Ma. A 60-km-wide, east-west striking, sinistral shear system developed across the central Adirondack Highlands. This system overprints rocks with granulite-facies metamorphic assemblages containing ca. 1050 Ma metamorphic zircons and is cut by a swarm of 950 Ma leucogranites. The timing, geometric relationships, and shear sense of the Adirondacks and Reading Prong shear systems suggest a conjugate system within a syntaxis with bulk compression directed ENE-WSW. This tectonic scenario invokes a component of strike-parallel deformation during the Ottawan Orogeny and provides a kinematic mechanism for an otherwise enigmatic, synchronous, late (ca. 930 Ma) extensional event including the Carthage-Colton mylonite zone in the northwest Adirondacks and Canada.

  7. Exhumation of the southern Pyrenean fold-thrust belt (Spain) from orogenic growth to decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rushlow, Caitlin R.; Barnes, Jason B.; Ehlers, Todd A.; Vergés, Jaume

    2013-07-01

    The deformation and exhumation history of an orogen reflects the interactions between tectonic and surface processes. We investigate orogenic wedge deformation, erosion, and sedimentation in the Pyrenees by (a) quantifying the spatiotemporal patterns of exhumation across the southern fold-thrust belt (FTB) with bedrock apatite fission track (AFT) thermochronology and (b) comparing the results with existing deformation, exhumation, and sedimentation chronologies. Eighteen new samples record exhumation during and after orogenesis between 90 and 10 Ma. Rocks from the range core (Axial Zone) record rapid exhumation that progresses east to west and north to south, consistent with patterns of tectonically driven uplift. Synorogenic sediments shed into piggyback basins on the southern fold-thrust belt during mountain building retain a detrital exhumation signal from the Axial Zone. In contrast, samples from other structural positions record exhumation of the thin-skinned Pyrenean thrust sheets, suggesting sediment burial and heating of sufficient magnitudes to reset the AFT system (>~3 km). In some locations, exhumation of these fold-thrust structures is likely an erosional response to thrust-driven rock uplift. We identify an exhumation phase ~25-20 Ma that occurs along the central and eastern Spanish Pyrenees at the boundary between thick- and thin-skinned portions of the wedge. We suggest that this distributed exhumation event records (a) a taper response in the southern orogenic wedge to sediment loading and/or (b) a shift to wetter, stormier climate conditions following convergence-driven uplift and full topographic development. A final exhumation phase between ~20 and 10 Ma may record the excavation of the southern fold-thrust system following base level lowering in the Ebro Basin.

  8. Active Response Gravity Offload System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valle, Paul; Dungan, Larry; Cunningham, Thomas; Lieberman, Asher; Poncia, Dina

    2011-01-01

    The Active Response Gravity Offload System (ARGOS) provides the ability to simulate with one system the gravity effect of planets, moons, comets, asteroids, and microgravity, where the gravity is less than Earth fs gravity. The system works by providing a constant force offload through an overhead hoist system and horizontal motion through a rail and trolley system. The facility covers a 20 by 40-ft (approximately equals 6.1 by 12.2m) horizontal area with 15 ft (approximately equals4.6 m) of lifting vertical range.

  9. Sedimentary basin evolution and the link with the deformation of surrounding orogens in European case-studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matenco, Liviu

    2014-05-01

    major extensional structures during the subsequent back-arc evolution. In all these areas, understanding the quantitative evolution of sedimentary basins means critically the understanding of the exhumation of surrounding mountains and subsequent sediment routing. All these findings demonstrate that the legacy of defining strain localization and rheological contrast at regional level driven by orogenic activity or activation of extensional basins is larger that commonly thought. References Ziegler, P.A., Cloetingh, S., van Wees, J.-D., 1995. Dynamics of intra-plate compressional deformation: the Alpine foreland and other examples. Tectonophysics 252, 7-22. Ziegler, P.A., van Wees, J.-D., Cloetingh, S., 1998. Mechanical controls on collision-related compressional intraplate deformation. Tectonophysics 300, 103-129. Ziegler, P.A., Cloetingh, S., 2004. Dynamic processes controlling evolution of rifted basins. Earth-Science Reviews 64, 1-50. Ziegler, P.A., Schumacher, M.E., Dezes, P., Van Wees, J.D., Cloetingh, S., 2006. Post-Variscan evolution of the lithosphere in the area of the European Cenozoic Rift System. Geological Society, London, Memoirs 32, 97-112.

  10. Erosion and Sediment Transport Across Pronounced Topographic and Climatic Gradients in the Himalayan Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strecker, M. R.; Bookhagen, B.

    2014-12-01

    The interaction between the NW-directed trajectories of moisture transport associated with the Indian Summer Monsoon circulation and the high topography of the Himalayan orogen results in one of the most efficient orographic barriers on Earth. The steep topographic gradients, the impact of focused rainfall along the southern flank of the range, and northward shifts of rainfall during frequent intensified Indian Summer Monsoons are responsible for an efficient erosional regime, with some of the highest known erosion rates. The spatiotemporal correlation between various topographic, tectonic, climatic, and exhumational phenomena in this region has resulted in the formulation of models of possible long-term erosional and tectonic feedback processes that drive the lateral expansion and vertical growth of the mountain belt. However, despite an increase in thermochronologic, cosmogenic radionuclide, and sedimentological datasets that help explain the underlying mechanisms, the true nature of these relationships is still unclear and controversies particularly exist concerning the importance of the different forcing factors that drive exhumation and, ultimately, deformation. Here, we synthesize and assess these controversies with observations from studies conducted perpendicular to and along strike of the orogen, and combine them with our new basin-wide erosion-rate data from the Sutlej Valley in the NW Himalaya. In our regional comparison we highlight the importance of large river systems and climate-controlled aspects of weathering concerning fluvial mass distribution as there appear to be positive feedbacks between tectonics and surface processes. In contrast, observations from smaller catchments along the orogenic front suggest a negative correlation. Similar to other environments with steep topographic and climatic gradients, our observations from the Sutlej catchments emphasize that erosional processes in the Himalayan realm are most efficient in geomorphic

  11. Noble gases fingerprint a metasedimentary fluid source in the Macraes orogenic gold deposit, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Nicholas R. J.; Burgess, Ray; Craw, Dave; Teagle, Damon A. H.; Ballentine, Chris J.

    2016-04-01

    The world-class Macraes orogenic gold deposit (˜10 Moz resource) formed during the late metamorphic uplift of a metasedimentary schist belt in southern New Zealand. Mineralising fluids, metals and metalloids were derived from within the metasedimentary host. Helium and argon extracted from fluid inclusions in sulphide mineral grains (three crush extractions from one sample) have crustal signatures, with no evidence for mantle input (R/Ra = 0.03). Xenon extracted from mineralised quartz samples provides evidence for extensive interaction between fluid and maturing organic material within the metasedimentary host rocks, with 132Xe/36Ar ratios up to 200 times greater than air. Similarly, I/Cl ratios for fluids extracted from mineralised quartz are similar to those of brines from marine sediments that have interacted with organic matter and are ten times higher than typical magmatic/mantle fluids. The Macraes mineralising fluids were compositionally variable, reflecting either mixing of two different crustal fluids in the metasedimentary pile or a single fluid type that has had varying degrees of interaction with the host metasediments. Evidence for additional input of meteoric water is equivocal, but minor meteoric incursion cannot be discounted. The Macraes deposit formed in a metasedimentary belt without associated coeval magmatism, and therefore represents a purely crustal metamorphogenic end member in a spectrum of orogenic hydrothermal processes that can include magmatic and/or mantle fluid input elsewhere in the world. There is no evidence for involvement of minor intercalated metabasic rocks in the Macraes mineralising system. Hydrothermal fluids that formed other, smaller, orogenic deposits in the same metamorphic belt have less pronounced noble gas and halogen evidence for crustal fluid-rock interaction than at Macraes, but these deposits also formed from broadly similar metamorphogenic processes.

  12. Taconic plate kinematics as revealed by foredeep stratigraphy, Appalachian Orogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    Destruction of the Ordovician passive margin of eastern North America is recorded by an upward deepening succession of carbonates, shales, and flysch. Shelf drowning occurred first at the northern end of the orogen in Newfoundland, then at the southern end of the orogen in Georgia, and finally in Quebec. Diachronism is attributed to oblique collision between an irregular passive margin, that had a deep embayment in Quebec, and at least one east dipping subduction complex. The rate of plate convergence during collision is estimated at 1 to 2 cm/yr, and the minimum width of the ocean that closed is estimated at 500 to 900 km. The drowning isochron map provides a new basis for estimating tectonic transport distances of four of these allochthons (about 165 to 450 km), results not readily obtained by conventional structural analysis. -Author

  13. Rivers, re-entrants, and 3D variations in orogenic wedge development: a case study of the NW Indian Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, A. G.; Yu, H.; Hendershott, Z.

    2010-12-01

    Orogenic wedges are standard elements of collisional plate tectonics, from accretionary prisms to retro-arc basins. Recent study of orogenic wedge development has focused on links between mechanisms of internal deformation and surface processes. Models of orogenic wedges are commonly presented in the cross-section plane, which is generally effective as wedges largely develop via plane strain. The 3rd dimension can be utilized to explore effects of differences in controlling parameters on wedge evolution. We are investigating a stretch of the western Himalayan orogenic wedge that has two prominent changes in along-strike morphology: (1) a tectonic window (the Kullu Window) that appears to be strongly influenced by erosion along the 3rd largest river in the Himalayan system, the Sutlej River and (2) the Kangra Re-entrant, the largest re-entrant along the Himalayan arc. In addition to the along-strike heterogeneity, a key advantage of the proposed study area is its rich stratigraphy, with the most known diversity in the Himalayan arc. The stratigraphic wealth, combined with the along-strike heterogeneity in exposure level, offers a high resolution view of regional structural geometry. Our preliminary reconstructions suggest that the Sutlej River erosion increases the exposure depth and shortening budget across a narrow segment of the orogen, strongly warping the Kullu Window. Previous models have suggested that the out-of-sequence Munsiari thrust is the main structure associated with Kullu window formation, while our work suggests that most of this uplift and warping is accomplished by antiformal stacking of basement thrust horses. Late Miocene ages (U-Pb ages of zircons and Th-Pb ages of monazites) from a leucogranite in the core of the Kullu Window along the Sutlej River further suggests that this segment of the orogen represents a middle ground between plane strain orogenic wedge development and a tectonic aneurysm model. We have constructed a palinspastic

  14. Jurassic sedimentary basins in the Central Asian orogenic belt

    SciTech Connect

    Bebeshev, I.I.

    1995-05-01

    The principal stages of development of Jurassic sedimentary basins (from their origin to the end of their existence) in the Central Asian orogenic belt are considered. The interrelations of the basins with the surrounding paleorises are investigated. Paleogeographic maps are compiled representing the evolution of paleolandscapes and revealing their interrelations in space and time for each stage. Areas with the highest prospects for coal are found.

  15. Orogenic gold and geologic time: A global synthesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldfarb, R.J.; Groves, D.I.; Gardoll, S.

    2001-01-01

    Orogenic gold deposits have formed over more than 3 billion years of Earth's history, episodically during the Middle Archean to younger Precambrian, and continuously throughout the Phanerozoic. This class of gold deposit is characteristically associated with deformed and metamorphosed mid-crustal blocks, particularly in spatial association with major crustal structures. A consistent spatial and temporal association with granitoids of a variety of compositions indicates that melts and fluids were both inherent products of thermal events during orogenesis. Including placer accumulations, which are commonly intimately associated with this mineral deposit type, recognized production and resources from economic Phanerozoic orogenic-gold deposits are estimated at just over one billion ounces gold. Exclusive of the still-controversial Witwatersrand ores, known Precambrian gold concentrations are about half this amount. The recent increased applicability of global paleo-reconstructions, coupled with improved geochronology from most of the world's major gold camps, allows for an improved understanding of the distribution pattern of orogenic gold in space and time.

  16. Possible genetic link between I-type granite and orogenic gold deposits in Egypt (metamorphic-magmatic interaction?)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El Monsef, Mohamed

    2015-04-01

    The orogenic gold deposits are a distinctive type of deposits that revealed unique temporal and spatial association with an orogeny. Where, the system of gold veins and related ore minerals was confined to hydrothermal solutions formed during compressional to transpressional deformation processes at convergent plate margins in accretionary and collisional orogens, with the respect to ongoing deep-crustal, subduction-related thermal processes. In Egypt, most of vein-type and dyke-type gold mineralization are restricted to granitic rocks or at least near of granitic intrusion that seems to have had an important influence on gold mineralization. Shear zone-related, mesothermal gold deposits of Fatira and Gidami mines in the northern Eastern Desert of Egypt are found within granitic bodies or at the contact between granites and metavolcanic rocks. The hosting-granitic rocks in Fatira and Gidami areas are mainly of granodioritic composition (I-Type granite) which is related to calc-alkaline magmatic series. However, Fatira granitoids were developed within island arc tectonic settings related to mature island arc system (Late-orogenic stage), at relatively low temperature (around 660° C) and medium pressure between (5 - 10 Kbar). On the other hand, Gidami granitoids were developed during the collision stage in continental arc regime related to active continental margin (Syn-orogeny), which were crystallized at relatively high temperature (700-720° C) and low pressure (around 0.1 Kbar). The ore mineralogy includes pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite, covellite, ilmenite, goethite ± pyrrhotite ± pentlandite ± galena ± molybdenite. Native gold is detected only in Gidami mineralization as small inclusions within pyrite and goethite or as tiny grains scattered within quartz vein (in close proximity to the sulfides). In Fatira deposits, it is detected only by microprobe analysis within the crystal lattice of pyrite and jarosite. Fluid inclusions study for the mineralized

  17. The Calama-Olacapato-El Toro fault system in the Puna Plateau, Central Andes: Geodynamic implications and stratovolcanoes emplacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norini, Gianluca; Baez, Walter; Becchio, Raul; Viramonte, Jose; Giordano, Guido; Arnosio, Marcelo; Pinton, Annamaria; Groppelli, Gianluca

    2013-11-01

    The structural evolution of the Puna Plateau is characterized by the activity of both orogen-parallel and orogen-oblique faults. Understanding the possible relationship between these two structural styles, their geodynamic implications and the influence on the migration of magmas is important to get insights into the tectonic and magmatic evolution of the Central Andes. In this study, we present a structural analysis of the orogen-oblique Calama-Olacapato-El Toro fault system and the surrounding orogen-parallel thrust faults in the central-eastern Puna Plateau. Morphostructural analysis and field mapping reveal the geometry, kinematics and dynamics of the tectonic features in the studied area. We propose a three-dimensional geometrical reconstruction of the main fault planes showing their attitude and intersections at depth. The study indicates that the crust underwent simultaneous deformation along both the vertical transcurrent Calama-Olacapato-El Toro fault system and the low-angle thrust faults, and that the back-arc portion of the Calama-Olacapato-El Toro fault system developed as a transfer zone among the main N-striking thrusts. Our model considers that both orogen-parallel and orogen-oblique fault systems should be regarded as parts of the same tectonic system, accommodating crustal shortening of a thickened crust. The study suggests that the tectonic control on the magma and fluid circulation in the crust is mainly related to the geometry of the fault planes and the orientation of the stress field, with a previously unrecognized important role played by the orogen-parallel thrust faults on the emplacement of the stratovolcanoes.

  18. Modeling approaches for active systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herold, Sven; Atzrodt, Heiko; Mayer, Dirk; Thomaier, Martin

    2006-03-01

    To solve a wide range of vibration problems with the active structures technology, different simulation approaches for several models are needed. The selection of an appropriate modeling strategy is depending, amongst others, on the frequency range, the modal density and the control target. An active system consists of several components: the mechanical structure, at least one sensor and actuator, signal conditioning electronics and the controller. For each individual part of the active system the simulation approaches can be different. To integrate the several modeling approaches into an active system simulation and to ensure a highly efficient and accurate calculation, all sub models must harmonize. For this purpose, structural models considered in this article are modal state-space formulations for the lower frequency range and transfer function based models for the higher frequency range. The modal state-space formulations are derived from finite element models and/or experimental modal analyses. Consequently, the structure models which are based on transfer functions are directly derived from measurements. The transfer functions are identified with the Steiglitz-McBride iteration method. To convert them from the z-domain to the s-domain a least squares solution is implemented. An analytical approach is used to derive models of active interfaces. These models are transferred into impedance formulations. To couple mechanical and electrical sub-systems with the active materials, the concept of impedance modeling was successfully tested. The impedance models are enhanced by adapting them to adequate measurements. The controller design strongly depends on the frequency range and the number of modes to be controlled. To control systems with a small number of modes, techniques such as active damping or independent modal space control may be used, whereas in the case of systems with a large number of modes or with modes that are not well separated, other control

  19. The crust-mantle interaction in continental subduction channels: Zircon evidence from orogenic peridotite in the Sulu orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai-Yong; Chen, Ren-Xu; Zheng, Yong-Fei; Hu, Zhaochu

    2016-02-01

    A combined secondary ion mass spectrometer and laser ablation-(multicollector)-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer study of zircon U-Pb ages, trace elements, and O and Hf isotopes was carried out for orogenic peridotite and its host gneiss in the Sulu orogen. Newly grown zircon domains exhibit weak zoning or no zoning, relatively low Th/U ratios (<0.1), low heavy rare earth element (HREE) contents, steep middle rare earth element-HREE patterns, negative Eu anomalies, and negative to low δ18O values of -11.3 to 0.9‰ and U-Pb ages of 220 ± 2 to 231 ± 4 Ma. Thus, these zircons would have grown from metasomatic fluids during the early exhumation of deeply subducted continental crust. The infiltration of metasomatic fluids into the peridotite is also indicated by the occurrence of hydrous minerals such as amphibole, serpentine, and chlorite. In contrast, relict zircon domains exhibit magmatic zircon characteristics. Their U-Pb ages and trace element and Hf-O isotope compositions are similar to those for protolith zircons from ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic rocks in the Dabie-Sulu orogenic belt. Thus, these relict magmatic zircons would be physically transported into the peridotite by metasomatic fluids originated from the deeply subducted continental crust. Therefore, the peridotite underwent metasomatism by aqueous solutions derived from dehydration of the deeply subducted continental crust during the early exhumation. It is these crustally derived fluids that would have brought not only such chemical components as Zr and Si but also tiny zircon grains from the deeply subducted crustal rocks into the peridotite at the slab-mantle interface in continental subduction channels. As such, the orogenic peridotite records the crust-mantle interaction at the deep continental subduction zone.

  20. Orogenic structural inheritance and rifted passive margin formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar Mora, Claudio A.; Huismans, Ritske S.

    2016-04-01

    Structural inheritance is related to mechanical weaknesses in the lithosphere due to previous tectonic events, e.g. rifting, subduction and collision. The North and South Atlantic rifted passive margins that formed during the breakup of Western Gondwana, are parallel to the older Caledonide and the Brasiliano-Pan-African orogenic belts. In the South Atlantic, 'old' mantle lithospheric fabric resulting from crystallographic preferred orientation of olivine is suggested to play a role during rifted margin formation (Tommasi and Vauchez, 2001). Magnetometric and gravimetric mapping of onshore structures in the Camamu and Almada basins suggest that extensional faults are controlled by two different directions of inherited older Brasiliano structures in the upper lithosphere (Ferreira et al., 2009). In the South Atlantic Campos Basin, 3D seismic data indicate that inherited basement structures provide a first order control on basin structure (Fetter, 2009). Here we investigate the role of structural inheritance on the formation of rifted passive margins with high-resolution 2D thermo-mechanical numerical experiments. The numerical domain is 1200 km long and 600 km deep and represents the lithosphere and the sublithospheric mantle. Model experiments were carried out by creating self-consistent orogenic inheritance where a first phase of orogen formation is followed by extension. We focus in particular on the role of varying amount of orogenic shortening, crustal rheology, contrasting styles of orogen formation on rifted margin style, and the time delay between orogeny and subsequent rifted passive formation. Model results are compared to contrasting structural styles of rifted passive margin formation as observed in the South Atlantic. Ferreira, T.S., Caixeta, J.M., Lima, F.D., 2009. Basement control in Camamu and Almada rift basins. Boletim de Geociências da Petrobrás 17, 69-88. Fetter, M., 2009. The role of basement tectonic reactivation on the structural evolution

  1. Zirconolite, zircon and monazite-(Ce) U-Th-Pb age constraints on the emplacement, deformation and alteration history of the Cummins Range Carbonatite Complex, Halls Creek Orogen, Kimberley region, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downes, Peter J.; Dunkley, Daniel J.; Fletcher, Ian R.; McNaughton, Neal J.; Rasmussen, Birger; Jaques, A. Lynton; Verrall, Michael; Sweetapple, Marcus T.

    2016-04-01

    In situ SHRIMP U-Pb dating of zirconolite in clinopyroxenite from the Cummins Range Carbonatite Complex, situated in the southern Halls Creek Orogen, Kimberley region, Western Australia, has provided a reliable 207Pb/206Pb age of emplacement of 1009 ± 16 Ma. Variably metamict and recrystallised zircons from co-magmatic carbonatites, including a megacryst ~1.5 cm long, gave a range of ages from ~1043-998 Ma, reflecting partial isotopic resetting during post-emplacement deformation and alteration. Monazite-(Ce) in a strongly foliated dolomite carbonatite produced U-Th-Pb dates ranging from ~900-590 Ma. Although the monazite-(Ce) data cannot give any definitive ages, they clearly reflect a long history of hydrothermal alteration/recrystallisation, over at least 300 million years. This is consistent with the apparent resetting of the Rb-Sr and K-Ar isotopic systems by a post-emplacement thermal event at ~900 Ma during the intracratonic Yampi Orogeny. The emplacement of the Cummins Range Carbonatite Complex probably resulted from the reactivation of a deep crustal structure within the Halls Creek Orogen during the amalgamation of Proterozoic Australia with Rodinia over the period ~1000-950 Ma. This may have allowed an alkaline carbonated silicate magma that was parental to the Cummins Range carbonatites, and generated by redox and/or decompression partial melting of the asthenospheric mantle, to ascend from the base of the continental lithosphere along the lithospheric discontinuity constituted by the southern edge of the Halls Creek Orogen. There is no evidence of a link between the emplacement of the Cummins Range Carbonatite Complex and mafic large igneous province magmatism indicative of mantle plume activity. Rather, patterns of Proterozoic alkaline magmatism in the Kimberley Craton may have been controlled by changing plate motions during the Nuna-Rodinia supercontinent cycles (~1200-800 Ma).

  2. U-Pb geochronology of the Grenville Orogen of Ontario and New York: constraints on ancient crustal tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezger, K.; Essene, E. J.; van der Pluijm, B. A.; Halliday, A. N.

    1993-05-01

    Based on lithological, structural and geophysical characteristics, the Proterozoic Grenville Orogen of southern Ontario and New York has been divided into domains that are separated from each other by ductile shear zones. In order to constrain the timing of metamorphism, U-Pb ages were determined on metamorphic and igneous sphenes from marbles, calc-silicate gneisses, amphibolites, granitoids, skarns and pegmatites. In addition, U-Pb ages were obtained for monazites from metapelites and for a rutile from an amphibolite. These mineral ages constrain the timing of mineral growth, the duration of metamorphism and the cooling history of the different domains that make up the southern part of the exposed Grenville Orogen. Based on the ages from metamorphic minerals, regional and contact metamorphism occurred in the following intervals: Central Granulite Terrane: Adirondack Highlands: 1150 Ma; 1070 1050 Ma; 1030 1000 Ma Central Metasedimentary Belt: Adirondack Lowlands 1170 1130 Ma Frontenac domain 1175 1150 Ma Sharbot Lake domain ca. 1152 Ma Flzevir domain: 1240 Ma; 1060 1020 Ma Bancroft domain: ca. 1150 Ma; 1045 1030 Ma Central Gneiss Belt: ca. 1450 Ma; ca. 1150 Ma; 1100 1050 Ma Grenville Front Tectonic Zone ca. 1000 Ma. Combination of mineral ages with results from thermobarometry indicates that metamorphic pressures and temperatures recorded by thermobarometers were reached polychronously in the different domains that are separated by major shear zones. Some of these shear zones such as the Robertson Lake shear zone and the Carthage-Colton shear zone represent major tectonic boundaries. The Grenville Orogen is made up of a collage of crustal terranes that have distinct thermal and tectonic histories and that were accreted laterally by tectonic processes analogous to those observed along modern active continental margins. The subsequent history of the orogen is characterized by slow time-integrated cooling rates of 3±1°C/Ma and denudation rates of 120±40m/Ma.

  3. A Major Out of Sequence Fault in Central Range and Its Implication to Mountain Building Process of Taiwan Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y. H.

    2015-12-01

    A Major Out of Sequence Fault in Central Range and Its Implication to Mountain Building Process of Taiwan Orogenic Belt Yuan-Hsi Lee1, Wei Lo2, Wei-Hau Wang1, Tim-Byrne 3, Ruey-Juen Rau 41. Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan, R.O.C. 2. Department of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Taipei, National Taipei University of Technology, Taiwan, R.O.C. 3. Center for Integrative Geosciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA 4. Department of Earth Science, National Chen-Kung University, Taiwan, R.O.C. Taiwan mountain belt results from collision between Eurasia continental crust and Philippine Sea plate that result in exposing the metamorphic complex with high exhumation rate in eastern Central Range of Taiwan orogenic belt. In this study we combine with field survey, zircon fission track (ZFT), metamorphic grade, and tomography data to identify there exists a major out of sequence fault (MOSF) in eastern Central Range of Taiwan orogenic belt. This MOSF extends from north to south of eastern central Range with several segments and the total length is more than 250 km. The ZFT shows total annealing age of ca.1-3 Ma on the hanging wall and partial annealing ages on the foot wall. The seismicity data indicates the MOSF is still active from central to southern central Range. We consider that the MOSF is related with crustal channel flow in depth. To the western side of crustal flow it shows thrusting mechanism associated with MOSF and the normal faults (or normal shearing zone) develop in eastern side of the crustal channel flow. This crustal channel flow is also related with exposing the metamorphic complex in Central Range that is important mechanism for the mountain building process of Taiwan orogenic belt.

  4. Role of Neogene Exhumation and Sedimentation on Critical-Wedge Kinematics in the Zagros Orogenic Belt, Northeastern Iraq, Kurdistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshnaw, R. I.; Horton, B. K.; Stockli, D. F.; Barber, D. E.; Tamar-Agha, M. Y.; Kendall, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Zagros orogenic belt and foreland basin formed during the Cenozoic Arabia-Eurasia collision, but the precise histories of shortening and sediment accumulation remain ambiguous, especially at the NW extent of the fold-thrust belt in Iraqi Kurdistan. This region is characterized by well-preserved successions of Cenozoic clastic foreland-basin fill and deformed Paleozoic-Mesozoic hinterland bedrock. The study area provides an excellent opportunity to investigate the linkage between orogenic wedge behavior and surface processes of erosion and deposition. The aim of this research is to test whether the Zagros orogenic wedge advanced steadily under critical to supercritical wedge conditions involving in-sequence thrusting with minimal erosion or propagated intermittently under subcritical condition involving out-of-sequence deformation with intense erosion. These endmember modes of mountain building can be assessed by integrating geo/thermochronologic and basin analyses techniques, including apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronology, detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology, stratigraphic synthesis, and seismic interpretations. Preliminary apatite (U-Th)/He data indicate activation of the Main Zagros Fault (MZF) at ~10 Ma with frontal thrusts initiating at ~8 Ma. However, thermochronometric results from the intervening Mountain Front Flexure (MFF), located between the MZF and the frontal thrusts, suggest rapid exhumation at ~6 Ma. These results suggest that the MFF, represented by the thrust-cored Qaradagh anticline, represents a major episode of out-of-sequence deformation. Detrital zircon U-Pb analyses from the Neogene foreland-basin deposits show continuous sediment derivation from sources to the NNE in Iraq and western Iran, suggesting that out-of-sequence thrusting did not significantly alter sedimentary provenance. Rather, intense hinterland erosion and recycling of older foreland-basin fill dominated sediment delivery to the basin. The irregular distribution of

  5. Tectonic and economic implications of trace element, 40Ar/ 39Ar and Sm-Nd data from mafic dykes associated with orogenic gold mineralisation in central Victoria, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierlein, F. P.; Hughes, M.; Dunphy, J.; McKnight, S.; Reynolds, P.; Waldron, H.

    2001-08-01

    Mafic to intermediate dykes are spatially and temporally closely associated with major post-tectonic granitic complexes in the western Lachlan Orogen of SE Australia. These dykes, which range petrographically from basaltic to andesitic, are concentrated within several, north- to northwest-trending zones and were emplaced during two broad intervals of extensive magmatic activity during the Silurian-Devonian period. Geochemical and Sm-Nd isotopic characteristics of these mafic intrusives are consistent with their formation in a complex subduction-related tectonic setting. Interaction between mantle-wedge material, sinking oceanic crust and input from the overlying continental crust resulted in the petrological and geochemical variations displayed by these and more felsic dykes throughout the study region. Field evidence and 40Ar/ 39Ar data show that in the eastern part of the Stawell Zone and in the northwest portion of the Bendigo Zone, mafic dyke were intruded between 410 and 400 Ma (Late Silurian/Early Devonian). Further emplacement in the Bendigo Zone and the eastern part of the Melbourne Zone took place at between 375 and 365 Ma (Middle to Late Devonian). Episodic mantle-derived magmatism was possibly related to step-wise rollback, slab detachment or changes in the angle and rate of westward subduction in response to periodically occurring accretionary pulses. A close spatial and temporal relationship also exists between the dykes and orogenic gold mineralisation in the central Victorian gold province. Mafic to intermediate dykes both crosscut, and are host to, mineralisation in a number of goldfields. Although there is little evidence for a direct genetic association, the two processes are linked by the common utilisation of translithospheric structures, which facilitated the rapid ascent into shallow crustal levels of both mantle-derived magma and crustal-scale ore-forming fluid systems. Previous studies have suggested that transfer of heat into the crust via

  6. Late Jurassic blueschist facies pebbles from the Western Carpathian orogenic wedge and paleostructural implications for Western Tethys evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Piaz, Giorgio V.; Martin, Silvana; Villa, Igor M.; Gosso, Guido; Marschalko, Robert

    1995-08-01

    In spite of the absence of ophiolitic slices at the surface, some traces of the lost Tethys ocean are recorded along the Pieniny Klippen Belt (PKB), a narrow décollement thrust system sutured at the transpressive boundary between the Outer and Inner Carpathians. The enigmatic precollisional evolution of Western Carpathians can be deciphered from some late Albian to Campanian flysch conglomerates which display chrome spinel grains, ophiolitic detritus and pebbles of blueschist facies tholeiitic metabasalts yielding a 40Ar/39Ar plateau age of 155.4+/-0.6 Ma. Other detrital components are represented by extrabasinal pebbles of limestones, arc volcanics, and igneous to metamorphic basement rocks from southern sources. Our results suggest a markedly northward extension of the sublongitudinal Triassic Vardar (Meliata) Ocean and its subduction since the late Middle Jurassic, supposedly balanced westward by coeval spreading in the Ligurian-Piedmont basin of the Apennine-Western Alpine Tethys. A lateral kinematic connection between these diachronous and roughly parallel Tethys branches was provided on the north by a left-lateral east-west trending shear zone running from the Swiss-Austrian Penninic domain to the Northern Carpathians. This reconstruction replaces the classic model of two paired North Penninic and South Penninic oceanic basins and eastern homologues with the Briançonnais-Hochstegen and Czorstin microcontinents in between. The Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous evolution of the Carpathian active margin was characterized by subduction metamorphism and accretion of a wide orogenic wedge; in this time, the shallowing to deeply subsiding basins inferred from facies analyses on the sedimentary units of the PKB were likely floored by individual sections of the growing wedge. Later, some exhuming blueschist ophiolitic units of the wedge were uplifted to the surface and functioned in the Albian-Campanian as an ``exotic ridge'' supplying clasts to the forearc basin

  7. Late-orogenic, post-orogenic, and anorogenic granites: Distinction by major-element and trace-element chemistry and possible origins

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.J.W.; Greenberg, J.K. )

    1990-05-01

    Granites classified into four categories based solely on tectonics of occurrence and associated rock types also have compositional characteristics that are consistent within groups and different among groups. Orogenically related granites include late-orogenic varieties (LO) associated with calc-alkaline batholiths, and post-orogenic varieties (PO), which occur in broad zones of isolated diapiric plutons in recently deformed orogenic belts. Inclined REE patterns, moderate Sr contents, and K{sub 2}O-SiO{sub 2} relationships show that late-orogenic granites formed by fractionation of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, and amphibole from calcalkaline magmas. Flatter REE patterns and K{sub 2}O contents near 5%, plus the absence of associated magmatic rocks, indicate that the post-orogenic granites developed by partial melting of subduction-produced mafic/intermediate magmatic rocks. Both the late- and post-orogenic granites can be part of material newly added to continental crust as a result of orogeny. Anorogenic granites in anorthosite/rapakivi complexes (AR) or alkaline ring complexes (RC) have LIL contents too high to have been equilibrated with a mafic mineral assemblage. These anorogenic rocks probably formed by partial melting of preexisting sialic crust and do not represent new crustal increment.

  8. The evolution of a Gondwanan collisional orogen: A structural and geochronological appraisal from the Southern Granulite Terrane, South India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavsa, Diana; Collins, Alan S.; Foden, John D.; Clark, Chris

    2015-05-01

    Gondwana amalgamated along a suite of Himalayan-scale collisional orogens, the roots of which lace the continents of Africa, South America, and Antarctica. The Southern Granulite Terrane of India is a generally well-exposed, exhumed, Gondwana-forming orogen that preserves a record of the tectonic evolution of the eastern margin of the East African Orogen during the Ediacaran-Cambrian (circa 600-500 Ma) as central Gondwana formed. The deformation associated with the closure of the Mozambique Ocean and collision of the Indian and East African/Madagascan cratonic domains is believed to have taken place along the southern margin of the Salem Block (the Palghat-Cauvery Shear System, PCSS) in the Southern Granulite Terrane. Investigation of the structural fabrics and the geochronology of the high-grade shear zones within the PCSS system shows that the Moyar-Salem-Attur shear zone to the north of the PCSS system is early Paleoproterozoic in age and associated with dextral strike-slip motion, while the Cauvery shear zone (CSZ) to the south of the PCSS system can be loosely constrained to circa 740-550 Ma and is associated with dip-slip dextral transpression and north side-up motion. To the south of the proposed suture zone (the Cauvery shear zone), the structural fabrics of the Northern Madurai Block suggest four deformational events (D1-D4), some of which are likely to be contemporaneous. The timing of high pressure-ultrahigh temperature metamorphism and deformation (D1-D3) in the Madurai Block (here interpreted as the southern extension of Azania) is constrained to circa 550-500 Ma and interpreted as representing collisional orogeny and subsequent orogenic collapse of the eastern margin of the East African Orogen. The disparity in the nature of the structural fabrics and the timing of the deformation in the Salem and the Madurai Blocks suggest that the two experienced distinct tectonothermal events prior to their amalgamation along the Cauvery shear zone during the

  9. Denudation rates across the seaward side of a juvenile orogenic topography, western Cantabrian Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Marron, Joaquina; Menendez-Duarte, R.; Stuart, F.; Fernandez, S.; Grobe, R.; Glasmacher, U. A.; Pallas, R.; Rodes, A.; Braucher, R.; Bourles, D.

    2010-05-01

    The Cantabrian Range in northern Spain reaches average elevations above 1500 m a.s.l. (up to 2700 m). This topography grew by uplift of Variscan basement rocks along the North Spanish coast during minor Iberia-Eurasia convergence since Eocene times. The convergence also caused limited subduction along the margin. The generation of this obvious topography has not coincided with significant exhumation; apatite fission track and He thermochronology suggests that less than 1.5 km has been removed since 80 Ma. Despite this, the landscape in the seaward side of the mountain belt shows features consistent with it not being in equilibrium. Relict landforms, in particular low relief surfaces, are preserved above 600 m in the interfluves of the incised fluvial system. These surfaces are interpreted to have evolved from a pre-Eocene palaeo-landscape. The low relief surface in the Oscos area is perhaps the best example. It covers an area of ~450 km2 at 600 to 1000 m, and is composed of broad, rolling hills and hillslopes that never exceed 15°. The river catchments draining these surfaces drop up to 500 m along short bedrock canyons to join the surrounding incised rivers. Small river basins that flow northwards and drain the lowest ~1000 m topography have incised into the 1.5 Ma old wave-cut platform that rises several tens of metres above sea-level along the coast. In order to investigate the distribution of erosion throughout this seemingly inefficient erosional system, in situ cosmogenic nuclides have been analysed in bedrock and alluvial sediment samples. Cosmogenic 21Ne concentrations in sediments from the river mouths imply that basin-average denudation rates are at least a few tens of mm/kyr. These rates are similar to those measured in active Alpine areas elsewhere in Europe. However, denudation rates measured from bedrock quartz in the Oscos paleosurface are significantly lower (1-5 mm/kyr) similar to rates determined in cratonic areas. This heterogeneous distribution

  10. The appalachian-Ouachita orogen in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Hatcher, R.D. Jr.; Thomas, W.A.; Viele, G.W.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents information from more than 1,000 sources in academia, state and federal agencies, and industry on the geology and geophysics of the crustal plates in the Appalachian and Ouachita mountains of the U.S. Discusses the tectonics, magnetic and gravity anomaly patterns, regional stress fields, thermal aspects, seismicity, and neotectonics of the area. Other topics include energy resources of the Appalachian orogen; stratigraphy, sedimentology, and depositional setting of reorogenic rocks; and mineral deposits and resources of the Ouachita Mountains. Includes separate maps and charts.

  11. Asymmetric gravitational spreading - Analogue experiments on the Svecofennian orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkilä, Kaisa; Korja, Annakaisa; Koyi, Hemin; Eklund, Olav

    2015-04-01

    Over-thickened orogenic crust may suffer from rheological, gravitational and topographical unbalancing resulting in discharging via gravitational spreading. If the thickened orogen is also hot, then increased temperature may reduce the viscosity of the crust that may induce large-scale horizontal flow. The effect of flow on the crustal architecture has previously been modeled with symmetric two-way spreading or asymmetric one- or two-way spreading (like channel flow) experiments. Most models do not take into account of the contrasting mechanical properties of the juxtaposed terranes. We have made analogue experiments to study gravitational one-way spreading and the interplay between two crustal blocks with contrasting rheological properties. The models are 3 cm thick replicas of 60 km thick crust. They have three horizontal layers representing strong lower, weak middle and brittle upper crust. The models have cuts to study the effect of inherited crustal-scale weakness zones. The experiments have been conducted within a large centrifuge in the Hans Ramberg Tectonic Laboratory at Uppsala University. The analogue models propose that asymmetric, unilateral flow has different effect on the contrasting crustal units, in both horizontal and vertical directions. The laterally heterogeneous crust flows towards the direction of extension, and it rotates and extends the pre-existing weakness zones. The weakness zones facilitate exhumation and they increase strain rate. The weakness zones split the crust into subblocks, which stretch individually and which may show signatures of compression or rotation. The changes in thickness of the model reflect changes in the layers, which may thin or thicken depending on the mechanical properties of crustal layers. A consequence of this the total amount of flattening is less than the model extension. The results are compared to geophysical and geological data from Precambrian Svecofennian orogen in Fennoscandia. The comparison suggest

  12. Convergence rate controls seismicity styles in collision orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Zilio, Luca; van Dinther, Ylona; Gerya, Taras

    2016-04-01

    The 25 April 2015 Mw 7.8 Gorkha earthquake in Nepal resulted from the unzipping of the previously locked Main Himalayan Thrust (MHT) fault, along which the Himalayan wedge is thrust over India. Strong ground shaking caused the collapse of more than half a million homes, killing more than 8500 people. Can such a large magnitude event also occur within the populated European Alps? Or is there a distinctly different seismicity pattern in different orogens? We show that their long-term seismicity patterns are indeed different and that their differences can be explained by a single parameter: their convergence rate. To do so we present the first self-consistent seismic cycle model for continental collisional margins. We use the viscoelastoplastic continuum Seismo-Thermo-Mechanical model (STM) validated for seismic cycle applications against a laboratory model (van Dinther et al., 2013a) and natural observations (van Dinther et al., 2013b), which includes Drucker-Prager plasticity and spontaneous rupture events governed by strongly rate-dependent friction. The 2-D model setup consists of two continental plates separated by an oceanic plate, in which the incipient subduction phase is followed by collisional orogeny. Results show the physically consistent spontaneous emergence of complex rupture paths, both on and off the main frontal thrust. These off-main frontal thrust events within the upper and lower plate complement the main frontal thrust seismicity leading to a Gutenberg-Richter frequency-magnitude distribution. This is a key observational feature of seismicity, which is typically not reproduced in seismic cycle models. The range of simulated b-values agrees with natural ranges, as we observe values from 0.97 up to 1.25 for convergence rates decreasing from 5 to 1 cm/yr. Decreasing convergence rates thus lead to relatively larger amounts of smaller earthquakes (increasing b-value) and lower maximum magnitudes. This change in b-value also observed to corresponds to

  13. Solar active region display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golightly, M.; Raben, V.; Weyland, M.

    2003-04-01

    The Solar Active Region Display System (SARDS) is a client-server application that automatically collects a wide range of solar data and displays it in a format easy for users to assimilate and interpret. Users can rapidly identify active regions of interest or concern from color-coded indicators that visually summarize each region's size, magnetic configuration, recent growth history, and recent flare and CME production. The active region information can be overlaid onto solar maps, multiple solar images, and solar difference images in orthographic, Mercator or cylindrical equidistant projections. Near real-time graphs display the GOES soft and hard x-ray flux, flare events, and daily F10.7 value as a function of time; color-coded indicators show current trends in soft x-ray flux, flare temperature, daily F10.7 flux, and x-ray flare occurrence. Through a separate window up to 4 real-time or static graphs can simultaneously display values of KP, AP, daily F10.7 flux, GOES soft and hard x-ray flux, GOES >10 and >100 MeV proton flux, and Thule neutron monitor count rate. Climatologic displays use color-valued cells to show F10.7 and AP values as a function of Carrington/Bartel's rotation sequences - this format allows users to detect recurrent patterns in solar and geomagnetic activity as well as variations in activity levels over multiple solar cycles. Users can customize many of the display and graph features; all displays can be printed or copied to the system's clipboard for "pasting" into other applications. The system obtains and stores space weather data and images from sources such as the NOAA Space Environment Center, NOAA National Geophysical Data Center, the joint ESA/NASA SOHO spacecraft, and the Kitt Peak National Solar Observatory, and can be extended to include other data series and image sources. Data and images retrieved from the system's database are converted to XML and transported from a central server using HTTP and SOAP protocols, allowing

  14. Kinematics of post-orogenic extension and exhumation of the Taku Schist, NE Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Md Ali, M. A.; Willingshofer, E.; Matenco, L.; Francois, T.; Daanen, T. P.; Ng, T. F.; Taib, N. I.; Shuib, M. K.

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies imply that the formation and evolution of many SE Asian basins was driven by extensional detachments or systems of low-angle normal faults that created significant crustal exhumation in their footwalls. In this context, the architecture of the Triassic Indosinian orogen presently exposed in Peninsular Malaysia is compatible with significant extension post-dating the orogenic event. In this study we performed a kinematic analysis based on fieldwork and microstructural observations in the Taku Schist, Kemahang granite and the surrounding Gua Musang sediments of northern Peninsular Malaysia in order to shed light on processes related to the build-up and subsequent demise of the Indosinian orogen. The first three phases of deformation were related to an overall period of E-W oriented contraction and burial metamorphism. These phases of deformation are characterized by isoclinal folding with flat lying axial plane cleavages (D1), asymmetrical folding, top-to-the-W-SW shearing (D2) and upright folding (D3). All are in general agreement with observations of the previously inferred Permo-Triassic Indosinian orogeny. During these times, the Taku Schist, a sequence of Paleozoic clastic sediments with mafic intercalations was metamorphosed to amphibolite facies. These rocks are most likely equivalent to the ones exposed in the Bentong-Raub suture zone. Structural relations suggest that the Triassic Kemahang pluton is syn-kinematic, which provides important constraints for the timing of these contractional events. We demonstrate that the overall shortening was followed by a hitherto undescribed extension in NW-SE direction resulting in the formation of a large-scale detachment, the Taku detachment, in northern Peninsular Malaysia. Extension probably reactivated the former subduction plane as a detachment and exhumed previously buried and metamorphosed rocks of similar lithological composition to the neighboring Bentong-Raub suture zone. Such a mechanism is

  15. Plume-orogenic lithosphere interaction recorded in the Haladala layered intrusion in the Southwest Tianshan Orogen, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Peng-Li; Huang, Xiao-Long; Xu, Yi-Gang; Li, Hong-Yan; Wang, Xue; Li, Wu-Xian

    2016-03-01

    The plume-orogenic lithosphere interaction may be common and important for the generation of large igneous provinces. The information regarding such a process is recorded by the Haladala gabbroic intrusion (~300 Ma), the largest layered ultramafic-mafic intrusion hosting V-Ti magnetite deposits in the Southwest Tianshan Orogen, NW China. The Haladala gabbros exhibit unfractionated chondrite-normalized rare earth element patterns with negative Nb and Ta anomalies and positive Pb anomaly on the primitive mantle-normalized multielement variation diagram. They are characterized by low initial Sr isotopes, slightly decoupled but high positive bulk rock ɛNd(t) and ɛHf(t), and high 207Pb/204Pb and 208Pb/204Pb relative to 206Pb/204Pb, delineating a DUPAL signature in the sources. The Haladala gabbros cannot be arc or postcollisional magmatism, given the lack of hydrous minerals and low K contents, respectively. This is further supported by the relatively low oxygen fugacity required for the gradual enrichment of V-Ti magnetite during the magma fractionation and by an overall anhydrous mantle source suggested by troctolite mineral assemblage (olivine + plagioclase). The emplacement age of the Haladala gabbros is identical to that of the Wajilitag kimberlites in the Tarim's interior, which have been interpreted as the first magmatic expression of the Tarim mantle plume. We thus propose that the Haladala gabbroic intrusion was generated in a hybrid geodynamic setting in which the Southwest Tianshan Orogen was impacted by an upwelling mantle plume. In this sense, the Haladala layered gabbroic intrusion records the early phase of magmatism of the Tarim plume, which was preferentially emplaced in a lithospheric weak zone.

  16. Groundwater flow within a sub-aerial orogenic wedge subject to depth-dependent permeability structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollyea, R.; Van Dusen, E.; Fischer, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, investigators have revisited the problem of basin-scale fluid flow with an emphasis on depth-dependent permeability, which is a frequently observed geological phenomenon that is seldom accounted for in basin-scale flow models. These recent investigations have shown that depth-dependent permeability at the basin scale strongly influences the relationship between sub-basin and regional-scale flow paths. Here, we revisit topography driven fluid flow within a foreland basin using a numerical modeling experiment designed to assess first-order fluid system behavior when permeability decreases systematically with depth. Critical taper theory is invoked to define two-dimensional basin geometry, and three sub-aerially exposed orogenic wedge models are presented with critical taper angles of 2°, 4°, and 10°. To assess the combined influence of topographic slope and depth-dependent permeability, a constant rate infiltration is applied at the wedge surface and a transient simulation is performed within each model for 500,000 years. Our results suggest that fluid system structure within the narrowly tapering orogenic wedge (2°) is explained by recent investigations applying depth-decaying permeability to the classic Tóth basin; however, increasing topographic slope beyond 3° results in a fundamentally different fluid system architecture. As topographic slope increases, fluid system structure is characterized by (1) dominant regional flow paths and little, if any, sub-basin scale fluid circulation, (2) shallow meteoric water penetration, (3) a stratified distribution of groundwater residence time without pronounced stagnation points. Moreover, for a given detachment slope, these effects become more pronounced as topographic gradient increases.

  17. Continuation of the New England Orogen, Australia, beneath the Queensland Plateau and Lord Howe rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mortimer, N.; Hauff, F.; Calvert, A.T.

    2008-01-01

    Greywacke, argillite, greyschist and hypabyssal igneous rocks have been obtained from an Ocean Drilling Program core on the Queensland Plateau and from xenoliths in a volcanic breccia dredged from the crest of the Lord Howe Rise. Low to intermediate detrital quartz contents, 260-240 Ma K-Ar ages, and only moderately radiogenic Sr and Nd isotope compositions, suggest a correlation with the New England Orogen of eastern Australia, rather than with Australia's Lachlan Orogen or other adjacent geological provinces. Our results indicate that the New England Orogen terranes continue towards New Zealand at least as far as the southern Lord Howe Rise. The projected offshore boundaries of the major east Australian orogens are now known with more confidence, and do not appear to require any major cross-orogen offsets.

  18. The Oligocene Alps: Domal unroofing and drainage development during early orogenic growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzanti, Eduardo; Malusà, Marco G.

    2008-04-01

    Tertiary evolution of the Alps-Apennines orogenic couple, but also for general relationships among tectonic activity, relief formation, drainage development, erosion distribution, and long-distance sediment transfer during continental collision and orogenic growth.

  19. Active thermal control system evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petete, Patricia A.; Ames, Brian E.

    1991-01-01

    The 'restructured' baseline of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) has eliminated many of the growth options for the Active Thermal Control System (ATCS). Modular addition of baseline technology to increase heat rejection will be extremely difficult. The system design and the available real estate no longer accommodate this type of growth. As the station matures during its thirty years of operation, a demand of up to 165 kW of heat rejection can be expected. The baseline configuration will be able to provide 82.5 kW at Eight Manned Crew Capability (EMCC). The growth paths necessary to reach 165 kW have been identified. Doubling the heat rejection capability of SSF will require either the modification of existing radiator wings or the attachment of growth structure to the baseline truss for growth radiator wing placement. Radiator performance can be improved by enlarging the surface area or by boosting the operating temperature with a heat pump. The optimal solution will require both modifications. The addition of growth structure would permit the addition of a parallel ATCS using baseline technology. This growth system would simplify integration. The feasibility of incorporating these growth options to improve the heat rejection capacity of SSF is under evaluation.

  20. Tectonic processes during oblique collision: Insights from the St. Elias orogen, northern North American Cordillera

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pavlis, T.L.; Picornell, C.; Serpa, L.; Bruhn, R.L.; Plafker, G.

    2004-01-01

    Oblique convergence in the St. Elias orogen of southern Alaska and northwestern Canada has constructed the world's highest coastal mountain range and is the principal driver constructing all of the high topography in northern North America. The orogen originated when the Yakutat terrane was excised from the Cordilleran margin and was transported along margin-parallel strike-slip faults into the subduction-transform transition at the eastern end of the Aleutian trench. We examine the last 3 m.y. of this collision through an analysis of Euler poles for motion of the Yakutat microplate with respect to North America and the Pacific. This analysis indicates a Yakutat-Pacific pole near the present southern triple junction of the microplate and' predicts convergence to dextral-oblique convergence across the offshore Transition fault, onland structures adjacent to the Yakutat foreland, or both, with plate speeds increasing from 10 to 30 mm/yr from southeast to northwest. Reconstructions based on these poles show that NNW transport of the collided block into the NE trending subduction zone forced contraction of EW line elements as the collided block was driven into the subduction-transform transition. This suggests the collided block was constricted as it was driven into the transition. Constriction provides an explanation for observed vertical axis refolding of both earlier formed fold-thrust systems and the collisional suture at the top of the fold-thrust stack. We also suggest that this motion was partially accommodated by lateral extrusion of the western portion of the orogen toward the Aleutian trench. Important questions remain regarding which structures accommodated parts of this motion. The Transition fault may have accommodated much of the Yakutat-Pacific convergence on the basis of our analysis and previous interpretations of GPS-based geodetic data. Nonetheless, it is locally overlapped by up to 800 m of undeformed sediment, yet elsewhere shows evidence of young

  1. Crustal channel flows: 2. Numerical models with implications for metamorphism in the Himalayan-Tibetan orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, Rebecca A.; Beaumont, Christopher; Medvedev, Sergei; Nguyen, Mai H.

    2004-06-01

    Results from a thermal-mechanical model (HT1) that includes midcrustal channel flow are compatible with many features of the Himalayan-Tibetan system. Radioactive self-heating and rheological weakening of thickened model orogenic crust lead to the formation of a hot, low-viscosity midcrustal channel and a broad plateau. Channel material, corresponding to the Greater Himalayan Sequence (GHS), flows outward from beneath the plateau in response to topographically induced differential pressure. At the plateau flank it is exhumed by focused surface denudation and juxtaposed with cooler, newly accreted material corresponding to the Lesser Himalayan Sequence (LHS). The model channel is bounded by coeval thrust and normal sense ductile shear zones, interpreted to represent the Main Central Thrust (MCT) zone and South Tibetan Detachment system, respectively. Inverted metamorphism associated with the model MCT zone results from distributed ductile shear along the MCT and extrusion of the hot channel. A variety of model P-T-t path styles, resembling those observed in the GHS and LHS, are produced for points traveling through contrasting tectonic regimes that coexist in different parts of the model. Predicted times of peak metamorphism, cooling, and erosion of metamorphic facies are generally compatible with observations, although model GHS cooling ages are too young. The times of M1 and M2 metamorphic "events" observed in the GHS correspond to model times of maximum burial and maximum heating, respectively. The results highlight the need to integrate tectonics and metamorphism in continental collision models and demonstrate the importance of lateral transport of both heat and material in large hot orogens.

  2. Determining the significance of high-grade shear zones by using temperature-time paths, with examples from the Grenville orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Pluijm, Ben A.; Mezger, Klaus; Cosca, Michael A.; Essene, Eric J.

    1994-08-01

    Ductile shear zones preserve essential information on processes that are active in orogenic roots, but the significance of these zones is often difficult to interpret. Structural, petrologic, and geochronologic data from shear zones yield elements of the history that are not necessarily synchronous. However, by combining these data with temperature-time (T-t) paths, insights are obtained into the nature of shear zones, the relation between bounding blocks, and orogenic evolution of the deep crust. This procedure is illustrated with two examples from the mid-Proterozoic Grenville orogen. T-t paths from ˜1160 to ˜900 Ma are based on U-Pb dating of metamorphic minerals—including garnet (closure temperature, Tc, >800 °C), monazite (Tc ≅ 725 °C), sphene (Tc ≅ 600 °C), and rutile (Tc ≅ 400 °C)—and 40Ar/39Ar hornblende ages (Tc ≅ 480°C). Comparison of T-t paths from adjacent blocks allows predictions about the significance, kinematics, and timing of displacement of shear zones. In the Grenville orogen, T-t paths can distinguish between major terrane boundaries (e.g., the Carthage-Colton shear zone) and within-terrane shear zones (e.g., the Bancroft shear zone). Thus, these data can also be used to identify individual tectonic terranes in the deep crust. This integrated approach to analysis of shear zones provides constraints needed to determine the nature and rate of deep orogenic processes in areas that are complicated by high metamorphic grades.

  3. Disclosing the Paleoarchean to Ediacaran history of the São Francisco craton basement: The Porteirinha domain (northern Araçuaí orogen, Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Luiz Carlos da; Pedrosa-Soares, Antonio Carlos; Armstrong, Richard; Pinto, Claiton Piva; Magalhães, Joana Tiago Reis; Pinheiro, Marco Aurélio Piacentini; Santos, Gabriella Galliac

    2016-07-01

    This geochronological and isotopic study focuses on one of the Archean-Paleoproterozoic basement domains of the São Francisco craton reworked in the Araçuaí orogen, the Porteirinha domain, Brazil. It also includes a thorough compilation of the U-Pb geochronological data related to the adjacent Archean and Rhyacian terranes from the São Francisco craton and Araçuaí orogen. The main target of this study is the TTG gneisses of the Porteirinha complex (Sample 1). The gneiss dated at 3371 ± 6 Ma unraveled a polycyclic evolution characterized by two metamorphic overprinting episodes, dated at 3146 ± 24 Ma (M1) and ca. 600 Ma (M2). The former (M1) is so far the most reliable evidence of the oldest metamorphic episode ever dated in Brazil. The latter (M2), in turn, is endemic in most of the exposed eastern cratonic margin within the Araçuaí orogen. Whole-rock Sm-Nd analysis from the gneiss provided a slightly negative εNd(t3370) = - 0.78 value, and a depleted mantle model (TDM) age of 3.5 Ga, indicating derivation mainly from the melting of a ca. 3.5 Ga tholeiitic source. Sample 2, a K-rich leuco-orthogneiss from the Rio Itacambiriçu Complex, was dated at 2657 ± 25 Ma and also presents a ca. 600 Ma M2 overprinting M2 age. The other two analyses were obtained from Rhyacian granitoids. Sample 3 is syn-collisional, peraluminous leucogranite from the Tingui granitic complex, showing a crystallization age of 2140 ± 14 Ma and strong post-crystallization Pb*-loss, also ascribed to the Ediacaran overprinting. Accordingly, it is interpreted as a correlative of the late Rhyacian (ca. 2150-2050 Ma) collisional stage of the Mantiqueira orogenic system/belt (ca. 2220-2000 Ma), overprinted by the Ediacaran collage. Sample 4 is a Rhyacian post-orogenic (post-collisional), mixed-source, peralkaline, A1-type suite, with a crystallization age of 2050 ± 10 Ma, presenting an important post-crystallization Pb*-loss related to Ediacaran collision. The focused region records some

  4. Gravitational removal of volcanic arc roots in Cordilleran orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, C. A.; Ducea, M. N.; DeCelles, P. G.; Beaumont, C.

    2013-12-01

    Cordilleran orogens, such as the central Andes, form above subduction zones and their evolution depends on processes associated with oceanic plate subduction and continental plate shortening. Such orogens are characterized by abundant arc volcanism and the formation of thick (>30 km) granitoid batholiths. The magma composition is consistent with a multi-stage model, in which parental mantle-derived basaltic magmas stagnate within the continental lithosphere and then undergo differentiation. Felsic partial melts rise through the crust, leaving a high-density garnet pyroxenite root in the deep lithosphere. Here, we study the dynamics of gravitational removal of this root using regional two-dimensional thermal-mechanical models of subduction below a continent. In the models, the volcanic arc location is determined dynamically based on subduction zone thermal structure, and formation of the batholith-root complex is simulated by changing the density of the volcanic arc lithosphere over time. For the lithosphere structure used in our models, arc roots that undergo even a small density increase are readily removed through gravitational foundering for a wide range of root strengths and subduction rates. The dynamics of removal depend on the relative rates of downward gravitational growth and horizontal shearing by subduction-induced mantle flow. Gravitational growth dominates for high root densification rates, high root viscosities and low subduction rates, leading to drip-like removal of the root as a single downwelling over 1-3 Myr. At lower growth rates, the root is removed over ~6 Myr through shear entrainment, as it is carried sideways by mantle flow and then subducted on top of the oceanic plate. In all models, >80% of the root is removed, making this an effective way to thin mantle lithosphere in the volcanic arc region. This can help resolve the mass problem in the central Andes, where observations indicate a thin mantle lithosphere, despite significant crustal

  5. Magnetic constraints on the thermal evolution of a collapsing orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platzman, Ellen

    2002-06-01

    The thermal evolution of an orogen undergoing late-stage extension was investigated using rock magnetic properties of a suite of mafic dyke rocks affected by greenschist facies metamorphism in the internal zones of the Betic Cordillera, southern Spain. The natural remanent magnetization (NRM) in the dykes intruded into the lowest geological unit is made up of up to three components. The lowest temperature component (LT) is in the direction of the present day magnetic field and is believed to be a chemical remanent magnetization (CRM) or viscous remanent magnetization (VRM) acquired in the recent magnetic field. The intermediate temperature (IT) component unblocked between 200°C and 450°C is thought to be largely a thermoviscous overprint acquired during metamorphism. This component is carried by either primary or authogenic sulfides and low-unblocking temperature magnetite. The component of magnetization with the highest blocking temperature (HT) is isolated above 450°C and is interpreted as the primary component of remanent magnetization. It is most likely that this component is carried by magnetite that resides in the plagioclase and has been shielded from the metamorphism, which transformed most of the original magnetite to metamorphic amphibole, chlorite and biotite. Thermal demagnetization of these dykes separates the IT overprint from the HT primary remanence at a sharp junction occurring at 450°C. For single domain grains this translates to a peak palaeotemperature in the natural sample of approximately 370°C, which is close to the estimated temperature experienced by the greenschist facies country rocks (400°C). In contrast, results obtained from a dyke that is intruded into an overlying weakly metamorphosed geological unit, indicates that temperatures only reached about 175°C in this unit. These results are consistent with temperatures deduced from geological constraints and they imply that between 4 and 6 km of section has been removed between the

  6. High-resolution multicomponent seismic imaging for VMS deposits within the Paleoproterozoic Flin Flon Belt, Trans-Hudson Orogen, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinowski, M.; White, D.

    2008-12-01

    The Flin Flon-Glennie complex (Trans-Hudson Orogen) hosts the largest Paleoproterozoic volcanogenic massive sulphide (VMS) district in the world. The main deposits of the Flin Flon camp have mineral compositions of predominantly pyrite, pyrrhotite, sphalerite, and chalcopyrite. All of these minerals are characterised by high acoustic impedances relative to typical host rocks, thus making them excellent candidates for seismic exploration. In a concerted effort to support exploration for new ore deposits in the vicinity of Flin Flon and surrounding region, a program of seismic investigations has been implemented as part of the Targetted Geoscience Initiative-3 (TGI-3) Saskatchewan-Manitoba project. This project is a joint Federal-Provincial effort led by the Geological Survey of Canada with active participation by Hudson Bay Mining and Smelting Ltd. Rock property measurements, downhole geophysical logging and vertical seismic profiles acquired in advance of the main seismic survey demonstrated the expected reflectivity of the mining camp geology. The principle seismic survey was conducted during May-September, 2007 and comprised a total of 75 km of high- resolution 2D seismic profiles and a 3D survey covering approximately 10 km2. Seismic imaging in the Flin Flon area poses significant challenges due to the complex crystalline geology, the location of the imaging targets beneath an active town and operational mine site, and the highly variable terrain. Data were recoreded using IO System IV digital vector (3-component) accelerometers, spaced at 5 m intervals (for 2D survey) with recording times of 4 s. Seismic sources spaced at 20 m intervals included Vibroseis and dynamite sources on land, and an airgun for lake areas. The results of processing the vertical-component data for P-wave reflections reveal subhorizontal reflectivity associated mainly with the Missi metasedimentary complex and steeply dipping reflectivity associated with the polydeformed volcanic rocks

  7. Proterozoic collisional tectonism in the Trans-Hudson orogen, Saskatchewan

    SciTech Connect

    Bickford, M.E.; Chiarenzelli, J.R.; Van Schmus, W.R. ); Collerson, K.D. ); Lewry, J.F. )

    1990-01-01

    Isotopic and structural data from the juvenile Reindeer zone of the Trans-Hudson orogen, northern Saskatchewan, indicate a pre-1.85 Ga thermotectonic event, possibly reflecting arc-continent collision, followed by a more extensive, nappe-forming, ca. 1.83-1.80 Ga thermotectonism during terminal continent-continent collision. Preliminary data from the adjacent, ensialic Cree Lake zone suggest high-grade reworking of Archean crust by the pre-1.85 Ga event. In the Rae province to the west, high-grade metamorphism and reworking of Archean crust occurred about 2.0 Ga and may be related to the formation of the coeval Taltson magmatic zone.

  8. Neoproterozoic and Paleozoic accretionary orogens exposed at different crustal levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroener, A.

    2002-12-01

    Accretionary orogens in the upper crust are dominated by trench and forearc deposits, obducted ophiolite fragments, exotic terranes and well defined structural boundaries such as major shear zones. The Neoproterozoic Arabian-Nubian shield (ANS) of western Arabia and NE Africa, the huge terrain of the Neoproterozoic to Palaeozoic Central Asian mobile belt (CAMB) and the present Indonesian Archipelago are prime examples of such orogens. In the ANS and CAMB, field relationships, rock associations, differences in structural style and metamorphic grade, and geochronology have led to the recognition of terrane assemblages that are related to processes of lateral accretion as now observed in the southwest Pacific and lasting for several hundred my. In the ANS, ocean crust and arc formation began about 900 Ma ago, and terrane accretion was completed by ~600 Ma, whereas in the CAMB the oldest oceanic crust formed some 1000 Ma ago, and terrane accretion continued into the late Palaeozoic. Typical rock associations are trench and forearc sediments, island-arc volcanics, calc-alkaline granitoids, dismembered ophiolite suites and gneissic rocks (microcontinents?) constituting exotic terranes and mostly of distinctly older age and more complex tectono-metamorphic history than the surrounding lower grade rocks. Shear zones frequently separate the terranes and in the ANS also constitue seismic discontinuities extending to the lower crust. The middle to lower crustal high grade assemblages of the Neoproterozoic Mozambique belt (MB) of East Africa, Madagascar, southernmost India, Sri Lanka and East Antarctica are considered to be a deep crustal analogue to the upper crustal accretionary belts described above. Typical characteristics are (1) voluminous calc-alkaline granitoid suites, now layered gneisses, and interpreted as root zones of arc terranes, (2) tectonic interdigitation of Archaean to Palaeoproterozoic gneisses with Neoproterozoic rocks, probably brought about during

  9. Tectonics of an early Proterozoic geosuture: The Halls Creek orogenic sub-province, northern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, S. L.; Rutland, R. W. R.

    1984-12-01

    The exposed elements of the Lower Proterozoic orogenic belts of the Halls Creek sub-province, Northern Australia, lie in fault zones which have suffered repeated tectonic activity at various times through the Proterozoic and Phanerozoic. The Halls Creek and King Leopold orogenic domains subtend an angle of 80° and are characterized by linear late tectonic batholithic complexes several hundred kilometres long but only a few tens of kilometres wide, reminiscent of those in Phanerozoic Cordilleran orogenies. The associated superposed folding and high temperature metamorphism are more akin to those in Phanerozoic collision orogenies. The sub-province is analyzed in the wider context of the North Australian orogenic province which was deformed, metamorphosed and intruded by granitic plutons approximately 1900-1800 Ma ago. In this province the Archaen basement was extended and broken into a mosaic of blocks, some of which (now largely concealed by younger Kimberley and McArthur basin sediments) retained a more positive character and fed sediment to intervening regions (such as the Pine Creek Geosyncline) which suffered greater extension and subsidence, but which retained a thinned Archaean basement. The Halls Creek Group was deposited in a trough to the south-east of the Kimberley island continent, and deposition was probably broadly contemporaneous with, and continuous with, that in the Pine Creek geosyncline. A volcanic—fine grained clastic—carbonate phase of marine deposition, following basin formation, is represented by the Biscay Formation. During the later phase of basin evolution widespread flysch facies (Olympio Formation), partly derived from the island continent, was deposited and is now preserved in low grade zones on both sides of the main belt of high strain and upper amphibolite to lower granulite facies metamorphism which displays recumbent folding and nappe tectonics with fold axes oblique to the major faults. No island arc compex or paired

  10. Seismic anisotropy and mantle creep in young orogens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meissner, R.; Mooney, W.D.; Artemieva, I.

    2002-01-01

    Seismic anisotropy provides evidence for the physical state and tectonic evolution of the lithosphere. We discuss the origin of anisotropy at various depths, and relate it to tectonic stress, geotherms and rheology. The anisotropy of the uppermost mantle is controlled by the orthorhombic mineral olivine, and may result from ductile deformation, dynamic recrystallization or annealing. Anisotropy beneath young orogens has been measured for the seismic phase Pn that propagates in the uppermost mantle. This anisotropy is interpreted as being caused by deformation during the most recent thermotectonic event, and thus provides information on the process of mountain building. Whereas tectonic stress and many structural features in the upper crust are usually orientated perpendicular to the structural axis of mountain belts, Pn anisotropy is aligned parallel to the structural axis. We interpret this to indicate mountain-parallel ductile (i.e. creeping) deformation in the uppermost mantle that is a consequence of mountain-perpendicular compressive stresses. The preferred orientation of the fast axes of some anisotropic minerals, such as olivine, is known to be in the creep direction, a consequence of the anisotropy of strength and viscosity of orientated minerals. In order to explain the anisotropy of the mantle beneath young orogens we extend the concept of crustal 'escape' (or 'extrusion') tectonics to the uppermost mantle. We present rheological model calculations to support this hypothesis. Mountain-perpendicular horizontal stress (determined in the upper crust) and mountain-parallel seismic anisotropy (in the uppermost mantle) require a zone of ductile decoupling in the middle or lower crust of young mountain belts. Examples for stress and mountain-parallel Pn anisotropy are given for Tibet, the Alpine chains, and young mountain ranges in the Americas. Finally, we suggest a simple model for initiating mountain parallel creep.

  11. Metabasalts as sources of metals in orogenic gold deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitcairn, Iain K.; Craw, Dave; Teagle, Damon A. H.

    2015-03-01

    Although metabasaltic rocks have been suggested to be important source rocks for orogenic gold deposits, the mobility of Au and related elements (As, Sb, Se, and Hg) from these rocks during alteration and metamorphism is poorly constrained. We investigate the effects of increasing metamorphic grade on the concentrations of Au and related elements in a suite of metabasaltic rocks from the Otago and Alpine Schists, New Zealand. The metabasaltic rocks in the Otago and Alpine Schists are of MORB and WPB affinity and are interpreted to be fragments accreted from subducting oceanic crust. Gold concentrations are systematically lower in the higher metamorphic grade rocks. Average Au concentrations vary little between sub-greenschist (0.9 ± 0.5 ppb) and upper greenschist facies (1.0 ± 0.5 ppb), but decrease significantly in amphibolite facies samples (0.21 ± 0.07 ppb). The amount of Au depleted from metabasaltic rocks during metamorphism is on a similar scale to that removed from metasedimentary rocks in Otago. Arsenic concentrations increase with metamorphic grade with the metabasaltic rocks acting as a sink rather than a source of this element. The concentrations of Sb and Hg decrease between sub-greenschist and amphibolite facies but concentration in amphibolite facies rocks are similar to those in unaltered MORB protoliths and therefore unaltered oceanic crust cannot be a net source of Sb and Hg in a metamorphic environment. The concentrations of Au, As, Sb, and Hg in oceanic basalts that have become integrated into the metamorphic environment may be heavily influenced by the degree of seafloor alteration that occurred prior to metamorphism. We suggest that metasedimentary rocks are much more suitable source rocks for fluids and metals in orogenic gold deposits than metabasaltic rocks as they show mobility during metamorphism of all elements commonly enriched in this style of deposit.

  12. A Reconsideration of Pan African Orogenic Cycle in the Anti-Atlas Mountains, Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hefferan, K. P.; Soulaimani, A.; Samson, S. D.; Admou, H.; Inglis, J.; Saquaque, A.; Heywood, N. C.

    2013-12-01

    The term 'Pan African' orogeny was first proposed in 1964 for a tectonothermal event in Africa ~ 500+/- 50 Ma. Over the past 50 years, the Pan African orogeny has been extended to as much as ~1050-450 Ma and recognized in other Gondwanan continents where regional names such as Brasiliano (South America), Adelaidean (Australian) and Bearmore (Antarctica) have been applied. The Pan African time span of ~500 million years is much longer than any Phanerozoic orogeny. However, it does correlate with time ranges of well defined Phanerozoic orogenic cycles such as the Appalachian cycle, extending from ~1,100 to 250 Ma, and the Cordilleran cycle of ~350 Ma to the present. A significant difference of course is that the Appalachian orogenic cycle has long been recognized as consisting of separate Grenville, Taconic, Acadian and Alleghenian orogenies. Similarly, the Mesozoic-Cenozoic Cordilleran orogenic cycle consists of distinct Antler, Sonoma, Nevadan, Sevier, Laramide and ongoing Cascadian-Andean orogenies. Until recently, the absence of precise geochronology in West Africa has prevented a more refined analysis of individual orogenic events within the Pan-African orogenic cycle. Since 2000, precision geochronologic dating by various researchers in the Anti-Atlas Mountains, Morocco, has provided critical data by which it is now appropriate to designate a Pan African orogenic cycle consisting of three separate orogenic events. We herein propose the following distinct orogenic events in the Anti-Atlas Mountains of Morocco: Iriri-Tichibanine orogeny (750-700 Ma), Bou Azzer orogeny (660-640 Ma) and the WACadomian orogeny (620-580 Ma). Generalized tectonic map of the Anti-Atlas Mountain inliers (Adapted from Ennih and Liégeois, 2008). Geodynamic model of the Pan African orogenic cycle in the Anti-Atlas Mountains. Modified from Walsh et al. (2012) and incorporating ideas from Thomas et al. (2002) and El Hadi et al. (2012).

  13. The early Cretaceous orogen-scale Dabieshan metamorphic core complex: implications for extensional collapse of the Triassic HP-UHP orogenic belt in east-central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wenbin; Lin, Wei; Faure, Michel; Shi, Yonghong; Wang, Qingchen

    2016-03-01

    The Dabieshan massif is famous as a portion of the world's largest HP-UHP metamorphic belt in east-central China that was built by the Triassic North-South China collision. The central domain of the Dabieshan massif is occupied by a huge migmatite-cored dome [i.e., the central Dabieshan dome (CDD)]. Origin of this domal structure remains controversial. Synthesizing previous and our new structural and geochronological data, we define the Cretaceous Dabieshan as an orogen-scale metamorphic core complex (MCC) with a multistage history. Onset of lithospheric extension in the Dabieshan area occurred as early as the commencement of crustal anatexis at the earliest Cretaceous (ca. 145 Ma), which was followed by primary (early-stage) detachment during 142-130 Ma. The central Dabieshan complex in the footwall and surrounding detachment faults recorded a consistently top-to-the-NW shearing. It is thus inferred that the primary detachment was initiated from a flat-lying detachment zone at the middle crust level. Removal of the orogenic root by delamination at ca. 130 Ma came into the extensional climax, and subsequently isostatic rebound resulted in rapid doming. Along with exhumation of the footwall, the mid-crustal detachment zone had been warped as shear zones around the CDD. After 120 Ma, the detachment system probably experienced a migration accommodated to the crustal adjustment, which led to secondary (late-stage) detachment with localized ductile shearing at ca. 110 Ma. The migmatite-gneiss with HP/UHP relicts in the CDD (i.e., the central Dabieshan complex) was product of the Cretaceous crustal anatexis that consumed the deep-seated part of the HP-UHP slices and the underlying para-autochthonous basement. Compared with the contemporaneous MCCs widely developed along the eastern margin of the Eurasian continent, we proposed that occurrence of the Dabieshan MCC shares the same tectonic setting as the "destruction of the North China craton". However, geodynamic trigger

  14. Geochronology of the Baie Verte Peninsula, Newfoundland: implications for the tectonic evolution of the Humber and Dunnage Zones of the Appalachian Orogen

    SciTech Connect

    Dallmeyer, R.D.; Hibbard, J.

    1984-09-01

    U-Pb analyses of zircon from the Burlington Granodiorite suggest intrusion at c. 460-465 Ma. Hornblende and biotite from central portions of the pluton record markedly younger /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar plateau dates (410-420 Ma) which are interpreted to date contact metamorphic effects associated with the widespread emplacement of Silurian-Devonian igneous suites. Northern portions of the Burlington Granodiorite are polydeformed and regionally metamorphosed. Hornblende and biotite from this terrane yield /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar plateau ages of 345-350 Ma. U-Pb analyses of zircon from the Dunamagon Granite indicate emplacement at c. 440-460 Ma, thereby providing an upper limit for tectonic juxtapositioning of the Humber and Dunnage Zones along the Baie Verte Line. Similar ages are also recorded by hornblende and biotite throughout northerly portions of the Mings Bight (Humber Zone) and Pacquet Harbour (Dunnage Zone) Groups. These results indicate that the tectonic evolution of the Baie Verte Line as polygenetic, and involved: (1) regionally significant tectonothermal activity prior to the Middle Ordovician and (2) Middle to Late Paleozoic tectonothermal activity centered along easterly segments of the Baie Verte Line. The regional metamorphism associated with this orogenic activity altered primary U-Pb and Rb-Sr isotopic systems within various igneous suites exposed in northeastern portions of the Burlington Peninsula, which may explain some inconsistent geochronological results previously obtained. 54 references, 6 figures, 5 tables.

  15. Signature of Cenozoic orogenic movements in combustion metamorphic rocks: mineralogy and geochronology (example of the Salair-Kuznetsk Basin transition)

    SciTech Connect

    Novikov, I.S.; Sokol, E.V.; Travin, A.V.; Novikova, S.A.

    2008-06-15

    Cenozoic combustion metamorphic (CM) complexes produced by fossil natural coal fires are widespread at range-basin junctions worldwide. Large-scale fires accompany the initial orogenic phases as fresh coal-bearing strata become drawn into the aeration zone as a result of crustal deformation. In combustion metamorphism, the protolith melts to different degrees either into ferrous basic paralava or in glassy clinker. The melt rocks have a phase composition favorable for Ar-40/Ar-39 dating of ignition coeval with the onset of each episode in Late Cenozoic orogenic events. We suggest an algorithm providing correct Ar-40/Ar-39 age determination of CM rocks followed by well-grounded geological interpretation and test the new approach on melt rocks from the Kuznetsk Coal Basin. Paralava samples were dated by Ar-40/Ar-39 incremental heating and the isotope ratios were corrected for Ca-, Cl-, and K-derived Ar isotopic interferences. The interpretation of age-spectrum results was checked against internal and external criteria. The former were plateau and isochrone ages and the latter included the so-called 'couple criterion' and conventional relative ages inferred from geological and stratigraphic evidence. As a result, we distinguished two groups of dates for combustion metamorphic events bracketed between 1.2 {+-} 0.4 and 0.2 {+-} 0.3 Ma. The older ages represent rocks in the western edge of the Prokopievsk-Kiselevsk block of the Salair zone and the younger dates correspond to those in its eastern edge. The reported dates record the time when the fault boundaries of the blocks were rejuvenated during recent activity and the block accreted to the Salair orogenic area as a submontane step. The suggested approach to the choice of objects, classification of rocks, and interpretation of Ar-40/Ar-39 spectra is universal and can be practiced in any area of combustion metamorphism.

  16. Linking the Timescales of Orogenic growth and Climatic Feedback in Southern New Zealand: A Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batt, G. E.; Zwingmann, H.

    2008-12-01

    Orogenic systems are the rejuvenating engines of the Global Earth system, converting the thermal and kinetic energy of tectonic processes into uplift of the landscape that, in turn, drives erosion and renews the fertility of the biosphere. Understanding the relationships between tectonic uplift, erosion, and local climate, however, lags behind quantitative understanding of other areas of Earth Systems Science. The challenge in developing this field lies in the requirement of independently documenting the long-term evolution of these three systems for a given region. Although sensitive chronometric constraint has long been successfully derived for climatic and structural systems, an inability to constrain the temporal evolution of topography has represented a fundamental deficiency in our understanding. Without such chronometric constraint, correlation and testing of models of fundamental links between tectonic forcing and climate variation remain essentially arbitrary and artificial. We present here the results of a pilot investigation into the feasibility of dating authigenic illite extracted from Miocene-Recent paleosols and weathered surfaces formed during the development of the Southern Alps of New Zealand. Chamberlain et al. (1999) have previously attributed a stable isotope signature resolved in Kaolinite from these weathered horizons as recording development of strongly asymmetric climatic zonation as a consequence of Mio-Pliocene growth of the Southern Alps. By re-visiting this approach to assessing the topographic record of the orogen through isotopic proxy measurements, and combining this with direct chronological constraint of the weathered materials making up this record, we hope to examine the potential of developing a robust framework in which to investigate and model the linked processes of mountain growth and local scale climatic effects. Initial results have been mixed. Clay fractions have been separated from 7 variably weathered paleosols and

  17. Pressure-temperature-deformation-time of the ductile Alpine shearing in Corsica: From orogenic construction to collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossetti, Federico; Glodny, Johannes; Theye, Thomas; Maggi, Matteo

    2015-03-01

    Definition of the Tertiary tectono-metamorphic history of Alpine Corsica is a key task to decipher the space-time linkage between the Alpine and Apennine subduction systems in the Mediterranean region. Alpine Corsica exposes a nappe stack of oceanic- and continental-derived units, structurally juxtaposed onto the former European continental margin (Hercynian Corsica). Still uncertain is the timing of involvement of the continental-derived units in orogenic construction and shift to regional extension. This paper focuses on reconstruction of the pressure-temperature-deformation-time evolution of selected ductile shear zones activated during transition from the tectonic underplating to the extensional reworking stages. New Rb-Sr mineral age data, integrated with structural and thermobarometric investigations constrain the waning stages of the high-pressure (from blueschist to greenschist facies metamorphic conditions) top-to-the-W thrusting of the HP, oceanic-derived realm (Schistes Lustrés Complex) onto the Hercynian Corsica along the East Tenda Shear Zone in the early Oligocene (from ~ 32 to ~ 27 Ma). This early compressional evolution is overprinted by a major phase of retrogressive, syn-greenschist top-to-the-E extensional shearing in the Schistes Lustrés Complex with the last episode of deformation-related ductile recrystallization recorded during the early Miocene at ~ 20-21 Ma, in a continuum transition from ductile to brittle shearing. The same early Miocene Rb-Sr deformation ages are recovered from the ductile-to-brittle top-to-the-E reactivation domains within the East Tenda Shear Zone, documenting that transition from compression to extension in Alpine Corsica occurred during the late Oligocene-early Miocene time lapse. Implications of these data are discussed in the broader context of the Tertiary geodynamic evolution of the Central Mediterranean region.

  18. What Is an Activity? Appropriating an Activity-Centric System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarosh, Svetlana; Matthews, Tara; Moran, Thomas P.; Smith, Barton

    Activity-Centric Computing (ACC) systems seek to address the fragmentation of office work across tools and documents by allowing users to organize work around the computational construct of an Activity. Defining and structuring appropriate Activities within a system poses a challenge for users that must be overcome in order to benefit from ACC support. We know little about how knowledge workers appropriate the Activity construct. To address this, we studied users’ appropriation of a production-quality ACC system, Lotus Activities, for everyday work by employees in a large corporation. We contribute to a better understanding of how users articulate their individual and collaborative work in the system by providing empirical evidence of their patterns of appropriation. We conclude by discussing how our findings can inform the design of other ACC systems for the workplace.

  19. Contrasting Triassic ferroan granitoids from northwestern Liaoning, North China: Magmatic monitor of Mesozoic decratonization and a craton-orogen boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Yuan, Lingling; Xue, Fuhong; Zhang, Yanbin

    2012-07-01

    The diversity exhibited by ferroan granitoids testifies to multiple distinct crustal and mantle processes generally within extensional environments and thus holds the key to monitoring important geodynamic and crustal evolutionary processes and calibrating terrane tectonic affinity. This study documents three Middle to Late Triassic ferroan granitoid suites from northwestern Liaoning, North China, and proposes distinct petrogenetic scenarios for each. The Middle Triassic (ca. 238 Ma) Ping'andi (PAD) granites are mainly calc-alkali and peraluminous. Their radiogenic whole-rock Nd and zircon Hf isotopic signatures argue for an origin consistent with partial melting of a juvenile quartzofeldspathic crust formed by prior mantle-derived magmatic underplating and their differentiations. By contrast, the Late Triassic (ca. 220 Ma) Dashaoleng (DSL) and Sijiazi (SJZ) suites show an evolved character from alkali-calcic to alkali and from metaluminous to peraluminous. Their variably evolved whole-rock Sr-Nd and mixed zircon Hf isotopic compositions suggest that both suites were formed by variable mixing between depleted mantle-derived mafic magma and old crust-derived felsic magma, with distinctively higher input from juvenile components in the DSL suite. These contrasting ferroan granitoid suites not only provide a spatial marker for monitoring juxtaposition of the North China Craton (NCC) and the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) along a lithospheric-scale boundary fault in the region, but also present a temporal snapshot that records a southwardly-progressing crustal growth scenario possibly in response to lithospheric dripping within a post-orogenic extensional regime. The cratonic scale synthesis further indicates that diachronous decratonization pattern of the NCC might record episodic response of the craton to evolved plate tectonic processes with two contrasting Phanerozoic orogenic systems.

  20. The geometries and development of late orogenic strike-slip faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, M. W.; Peacock, D. C. P.

    2003-04-01

    Strike-slip faults are commonly the final phase of contraction in orogenic belts, occurring when the folds have locked-up and the thrusts have become too steep for further displacement to occur. Where the maximum stress axis (sigma1) is perpendicular to the orogenic belt (i.e. pure shear), the strike-slip faults are conjugate and represent strike-perpendicular shortening and necessary strike-parallel extension. An example of such behaviour occurs in the steeply dipping Silurian sandstones and shales in Kirkcudbrightshire, in the Southern Uplands of Scotland. If sigma1 is at ~ 70°; to the strike of the orogenic belt, the conjugate strike-slip faults become asymmetric. One set of strike-slip faults occurs at a high angle to the strike of bedding, and the conjugate set has a ramp-flat trajectory across steeply dipping beds. An example of this behaviour occurs in the steeply dipping Silurian turbidites at Ardglass, in the Longford-Down terrane of Northern Ireland. If sigma1 is at a lower angle to the orogenic belt (i.e. transpression), one set of strike-slip faults tends to dominate. In some cases, the dominant strike-slip fault set is parallel to the strike of the orogenic belt, the Caledonian-age Great Glen Fault of Scotland being such an example. In other cases, block rotation occurs on the set of strike-slip faults that are at a high angle to the orogenic belt, as in the Variscan Orogenic Belt of SW England. An annulus model is presented to illustrate the variations in geometries of late-orogenic strike-slip faults from pure shear to transpression.

  1. Mechanisms of doubly-vergent vs. single-sided orogens: insights from numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, K.; Matenco, L. C.; Gerya, T.; Cloetingh, S.

    2014-12-01

    Zones of continent collision form mountain ranges with high topographies and complex geometries. Compressional stresses during ongoing convergence result in crustal thickening and localized deformation, where crustal material is transported and redistributed within the orogen. We use numerical high-resolution thermo-mechanical models to investigate the physical processes of continent collision zones and its implications on rock exhumation. We demonstrate that compression of two continental blocks, separated by a rheologically weak suture zone can result in (i) doubly-vergent (Fig. A) or (ii) single-sided orogens (Fig. B), with distinct geometries, deformation and exhumation patterns. The transition between these different modes of collision is strongly controlled by the rheology of the continental lithosphere and therefore its temperature distribution. Doubly-vergent orogens form at relatively high thermal gradients, while single-sided orogens are typical for lower ones. Doubly-vergent orogens (Fig. A) are formed in response to the gradual accretion of crustal material to the upper plate along retro-shears. In these models continental subduction results in upper plate deformation and nested exhumation against retro-shears. Typical examples include the collision recorded by the Swiss Alps and the Pyrenees. In contrast, single-sided orogens are characterized by large-scale lower plate deformation and are accompanied by the subduction of lower crustal material (Fig. B). Modeling infers that shortening and associated exhumation will gradually propagate towards the foreland. In this situation, no significant retro-shear formation is observed, which is in agreement with recent physical modelling studies on deformation of the continental lithosphere [Willingshofer et al., 2013]. Natural examples of such single sided orogens are common in the Mediterranean (Carpathians, Dinarides, Apennines, Betics) or the SE Asia subduction zones. We conclude that deformation and

  2. Data base management systems activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The Data Management System-1100 is designed to operate in conjunction with the UNIVAC 1100 Series Operating System on any 1100 Series computer. DMS-1100 is divided into the following four major software components: (1) Data Definition Languages (DDL); (2) Data Management Routine (DMR); (3) Data Manipulation Languages (DML); and (4) Data Base Utilities (DBU). These software components are described in detail.

  3. How is Silurian-Early Devonian faulting in the North America continental interior related to orogenic processes at plate boundaries? A working hypothesis from the Canadian North

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinet, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    The Paleozoic Appalachian/Franklinian orogen that rims the North America continent on its eastern and northern sides is comparable in size with Tethyan orogenic belts. However, the far-field effects in the continental interior of the multiple Ordovician to Carboniferous deformation phases that built the orogen were relatively minor if compared with those associated with the Himalayas and Alps, a characteristics related to the high integrated strength of the North American craton. Despite the generally little deformation of the continental interior, two regional-scale tectonic features preserved evidence of significant Paleozoic tectonism: the fault bounded Hudson Bay Central High (HBCH) and the Boothia uplift/Cornwallis fold belt (BUCF) in the Canadian Arctic. In the Hudson Bay intracratonic basin, the lower part of the sedimentary succession (Upper Ordovician to Lower Devonian) is cut by high-angle faults and overlain by a saucer-shape, essentially underformed sedimentary package (Middle to Upper Devonian). The main structural feature is the NNW-trending HBCH that extends for a minimum length of 500 km with normal faults characterized by throws up to 500 m that were mainly active during the Silurian - Early Devonian period. The >700-km long, N-trending BUCF is nearly perpendicular to the deformation front of the Franklinian mobile belt. In its southern segment (Boothia uplift), its western side is characterized by an east-dipping reverse fault zone that puts Precambrian rocks over Paleozoic strata. In its northern segment (Cornwallis fold belt), the Paleozoic succession is involved in open folds and cuts by steeply dipping reverse faults. Syn-tectonic clastic sediments constrain the age of structures to the latest Silurian-Early Devonian. Comparison of the HBCH and BUCF indicates that they are grossly parallel, partly contemporaneous but with different kinematics. This kinematic variability may be explained if they are genetically linked with different segments of

  4. Orbiter active thermal control system description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laubach, G. E.

    1975-01-01

    A brief description of the Orbiter Active Thermal Control System (ATCS) including (1) major functional requirements of heat load, temperature control and heat sink utilization, (2) the overall system arrangement, and (3) detailed description of the elements of the ATCS.

  5. Late Paleozoic orogenic episodes, Trans-Pecos Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Muehlberger, W.R. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    The onset of the Ouachita orogeny is marked by the absence of rock of Early Mississippian age. This is interpreted to be the result of the narrowing of the trans-equatorial seaway between North America and the oncoming South American plate. Foredeep filling (Pulse I) began in Early Meramecian time with northward-prograding Tesnus Fm siliciclastic turbidites. Pulse 2 began in Atokan time with northward-prograding siliciclastic turbidites of the Haymond Fm. The thrust belt to the south had now intersected the edge of the NAm carbonate platform as shown by clasts of Middle Cambrian carbonates, as well as Ouachita facies clasts, and rounded clasts of Precambrian quartzite, metarhyolite, and gneiss of unknown source. During Late Pennsylvanian time deltaic sediments prograded across the Marathon region into the southern Permian Basin (Gaptank Fm). In Early Wolfcampian time (Pulse 3), all these units were translated on the Dugout Creek thrust, then (Pulse 4 ) translated finally on a frontal imbricate before deposition of Upper Wolfcampian units across the eroded toes of the thrust sheets. Permian Basin orogenic phases parallel those outlined above. Transgressive clastics from the south and the subdivision of the earlier broad, shallow Tobosa Basin into the uplifts and basins that characterize the Permian Basin began in the Mississippian and became prominent structural units by Late Mississippian time.

  6. Tectonic evolution of the western Kunlun orogenic belt, western China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhihong, Wang

    2004-11-01

    The western Kunlun orogenic belt in western China evolved through the development of a large subduction-accretionary complex, including flysch sediments and granitic plutons, and by collision of three terranes, namely the North and South Kunlun and Karakorum-Qiangtang blocks from the early Paleozoic to the early Mesozoic. North-dipping subduction of the Paleo-Tethys ocean beneath the Kunlun terranes, which may have commenced in the Cambrian, produced an early Paleozoic Andean-type magmatic arc on the South Kunlun, and a marginal back arc basin, represented by the early Paleozoic Oytag-Kudi ophiolite belt, between the North and South Kunlun. A northward subduction zone consumed the basin and the young, hot upper plate lithosphere was obducted southward onto the South Kunlun following closure of the basin. This resulted in collision of the North and South Kunlun in the early Devonian. Continuous northward subduction of Paleo-Tethys resulted in the development of a Carboniferous-Triassic magmatic arc, and a back arc rifting sequence composed of the Carboniferous to Permian carbonates and clastic sediments on the North and South Kunlun terranes. The Paleo-Tethys ocean finally closed in the late Triassic-early Jurassic, when the Kunlun and Karakorum-Qiangtang blocks were accreted, with the Kara-Kunlun accretionary prism marking their suture zone.

  7. Lithosphere delamination and topography evolution in collisional orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. H.; Liu, M.; Gerya, T.

    2015-12-01

    Systematic high-resolution thermo-mechanical numerical models are conducted in order to better understand the behavior of deep mantle lithosphere and surface topography response during continental collision. In the models with similar rheological properties for the pro- (subducting) and retro- (overriding) continental plates, subduction mode is preferred, with localized topography uplift and mountain building. However, if the effective viscosities of the retro-plate are decreased, then delamination of the lithospheric mantle may occur there, which results in large-scale topography buildup and plateau formation. Several other factors that may also influence the delamination dynamics are further investigated, e.g., plastic weakening of the lithospheric mantle, density contrast between the lithospheric and asthenospheric mantle, convergence velocity, as well as the possible lower crust eclogitization effects. Based on the series of numerical simulations, the delamination processes in collisional orogens are summarized into three modes: (1) pro-plate delamination, (2) retro-plate delamination, and (3) a transitional double-plates (both the pro- and retro-plate) delamination. The controlling factors, as well as the geological applications in nature, of the variable delamination modes are also discussed.

  8. Modeling Cytoskeletal Active Matter Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwell, Robert

    Active networks of filamentous proteins and crosslinking motor proteins play a critical role in many important cellular processes. One of the most important microtubule-motor protein assemblies is the mitotic spindle, a self-organized active liquid-crystalline structure that forms during cell division and that ultimately separates chromosomes into two daughter cells. Although the spindle has been intensively studied for decades, the physical principles that govern its self-organization and function remain mysterious. To evolve a better understanding of spindle formation, structure, and dynamics, I investigate course-grained models of active liquid-crystalline networks composed of microtubules, modeled as hard spherocylinders, in diffusive equilibrium with a reservoir of active crosslinks, modeled as hookean springs that can adsorb to microtubules and and translocate at finite velocity along the microtubule axis. This model is investigated using a combination of brownian dynamics and kinetic monte carlo simulation. I have further refined this model to simulate spindle formation and kinetochore capture in the fission yeast S. pombe. I then make predictions for experimentally realizable perturbations in motor protein presence and function in S. pombe.

  9. The Andes as a peripheral orogen of the breaking-up Pangea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomize, M. G.

    2008-05-01

    Formation conditions of the peripheral orogen are expressed most fully in the Central Andes, a mountain system almost not yielding in height to the Himalayan-Tibetan system but formed at the margin of ocean without any relations to intercontinental collision. The marine transgression and rejuvenation of subduction in the Early Jurassic during the origination of foldbelt at the margin of Pangea marked the transition to a new supercontinental cycle, and the overall further evolution began and continues now in the frame of the first half of this cycle. The marginal position of this belt above the subduction zone, the rate and orientation of convergence of the lithospheric plates, the age of “absolute” movement of the continental plate, variation in slab velocity, and subduction of heterogeneities of the oceanic crust were the crucial factors that controlled the evolution of the marginal foldbelt. At the stage of initial subsidence (Jurassic-Mid-Cretaceous), during extension of the crust having a moderate thickness (30-35 km), the Andean continental margin comprises the full structural elements of an ensialic island arc that resembled the present-day Sunda system. These conditions changed with the separation and onset of the western drift of the South American continent. Being anchored in the mantle and relatively young, the slab of the Andean subduction zone served as a stop that brought about compression that controlled the subsequent evolution. Due to the contribution of deep magma sources along with marine sediments and products of tectonic erosion removed to a depth, the growth of crust above the subduction zone was favorable for heating of the crust. By the middle Eocene, when compression enhanced owing to the acceleration of subduction, the thermal evolution of the crust had already prepared the transition to the orogenic stage of evolution, i.e., to the progressive viscoplastic shortening and swelling of the mechanically weakened lower crust and the

  10. Strong Lg-wave attenuation in the Middle East continental collision orogenic belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lian-Feng; Xie, Xiao-Bi

    2016-04-01

    Using Lg-wave Q tomography, we construct a broadband crustal attenuation model for the Middle East. The QLg images reveal a relationship between attenuation and geological structures. Strong attenuation is found in the continental collision orogenic belt that extends from the Turkish and Iranian plateau to the Pamir plateau. We investigate the frequency dependence of QLg in different geologic formations. The results illustrate that QLg values generally increase with increasing frequency but exhibit complex relationships both with frequency and between regions. An average QLg value between 0.2 and 2.0 Hz, QLg (0.2-2.0 Hz), may be a critical index for crustal attenuation and is used to infer the regional geology. Low-QLg anomalies are present in the eastern Turkish plateau and correlate well with low Pn-velocities and Cenozoic volcanic activity, thus indicating possible partial melting within the crust in this region. Very strong attenuation is also observed in central Iran, the Afghanistan block, and the southern Caspian Sea. This in line with the previously observed high crustal temperature, high-conductivity layers, and thick marine sediments in these areas, suggests the high Lg attenuation is caused by abnormally high tectonic and thermal activities.

  11. An active tactile perception system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petriu, E.; Greenspan, M.; Gelinas, F.; McMath, W. S.; Yeung, S. K.

    System development and application aspects are described for an experimental robotic system for the tactile perception of the global geometric profile of object surfaces which are larger than the dimensions of the tactile sensor. Local cutaneous information provided by a tactile sensor is integrated with the kinesthetic position parameters of a robot arm, resulting in a 3D geometric model of the tactile sensor pose on the explored object surface. Currently available tactile sensors provide poor information on the geometric profile of 3D object surfaces. In order to maximize the information available for 3D analysis, an instrumented passive compliant wrist was used to attach a pressure measuring tactile probe to the robot arm carrier. Data was collected by a noncompliant planar sensing array in direct contact with an object surface. Information recorded includes the following: positional and orientation data on the robot arm manipulator, passive compliance kinesthetic data as measured by the kinematics of the wrist, and cutaneous tactile data represented by the binary image of the sensors pose on the object. The dimensions of the sensor array were found to be a critical factor in system performance. Use of a large array results in fewer touch poses being required to explore an object's surface, on the other hand a large planar array will touch fewer and higher peaks thus missing surface detail. To improve performance, there is a need to design tactile sensors specifically for geometric profile measuring.

  12. Syn-orogenic extensional pulses within the contractional history of thrust wedges. The Val di Lima low-angle normal fault case study, Northern Apennines, Italy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemenzi, Luca; Molli, Giancarlo; Storti, Fabrizio; Muchez, Philippe; Swennen, Rudy; Torelli, Luigi

    2014-05-01

    In this contribution we describe the Val di Lima low-angle fault system, a kilometric-scale extensional structure exposed in the central sector of the Northern Apennines thrust wedge, Italy. The low-angle extensional fault system delaminates the right-side-up limb of a km-scale recumbent isoclinal anticline that affects the carbonate-dominated Late Triassic to early Early Miocene non-metamorphic Tuscan succession. The low-angle fault system, in turn, is affected by superimposed folding and late-tectonic high-angle extensional faulting. The three-dimensional configuration of the low-angle fault system has been investigated through detailed structural mapping and restoration of the superimposed deformations, while the fault damage zone architecture has been characterized in outcrops with appropriate exposure. Pressure-depth conditions and palaeofluid evolution of the fault system have been studied through microstructural, mineralogical, petrographic, fluid inclusion and stable isotope analysis of fault rocks and fault-related calcite and quartz veins. Our results show that the low-angle fault system was active during exhumation of the Tuscan succession, at estimated conditions of about 180°C and 5.2 km depth. The fault system had a twofold influence on fluid circulation within the orogenic wedge: i) it allowed the migration of low-salinity fluids, due to the increased permeability along the fault zone; ii) it favored footwall fluid overpressures where the fault core acted as an efficient hydraulic barrier. Abundant fluid circulation in fault damage zones also characterized the late-stage evolution of the low-angle fault system, allowing the recrystallization of calcite veins and limestone host rocks at shallower conditions (~ 4 km). Within this P-T framework, the fault zone architecture shows important differences, related to the different lithologies involved in the fault system and to the role played by the fluids during deformation. In particular, footwall fluid

  13. Seismic Tomography Reveals Breaking Crust and Lithosphere Beneath a Classic Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, T. B.; Rau, R.; Kuo-Chen, H.; Lee, Y.; Ouimet, W. B.; Van Soest, M. C.; Huang, C.; Wu, F. T.

    2013-12-01

    The orogenic system in Taiwan is often considered a classic example of an accretionary prism that has grown to a steady-state size and shape above an also steady subduction zone. A new study of vertical and horizontal sections of a tomographic velocity model created by Kuo-Chen et al. (2012) show, however, both a well-developed crack in the subducted crust beneath southern Taiwan and a discontinuous lithosphere beneath northern Taiwan, suggesting that slab breakoff is actively occurring beneath Taiwan. The transition from slab breakoff to cracking crust in southern Taiwan also suggests that slab breakoff is propagating southward, consistent an oblique collision. The crack in the subducting crust is revealed by progressively deeper horizontal sections of the local-scale tomographic model. The sections show an ellipsoidal-shaped area of high velocity that plunges southeast, oblique to all of the regional trends. Taking into account the dip of the slab, however, the area of high velocity is nearly parallel to previously recognized fracture zone in the Eurasian continental margin. We interpret the area of high velocity to be a crack in the Eurasian crust that is filled high velocity Eurasian mantle. Support for this interpretation comes from: 1) new exhumation cooling data from Mt Yu, the highest peak in Taiwan; 2) a recent leveling survey along the South Cross-Island Highway that shows unusually high rates of surface uplift (up to 15 mm/yr; Ching et al., 2011); 3) Vp attenuation studies that suggest anomalously high temperatures and/or the presence of fluids; 4) earthquake focal mechanisms in the core of the southern Central Range that are dominated by NE-SW extension; and finally, 5) the core of the southern Central Range preserves anomalous areas of low topographic relief that straddle the crest of the range. The areas of low relief are fringed by stream channels with relatively high stream gradient indexes and do not appear related to weaker rock types, glacial

  14. Kinematics of the Torcal Shear Zone: transpressional tectonics shaping orogenic curves in the northern Gibraltar Arc.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcos, Leticia; Balanyá, Juan Carlos; Díaz-Azpiroz, Manuel; Expósito, Inmaculada; Jiménez-Bonilla, Alejandro

    2014-05-01

    zones as well as normal faults accommodating fold axis parallel extension. iiii) The Sierra de las Cabras-Camorolos sector, located at the E-end of the TSZ, is divided into two structural domains: a western domain, dominated by N120ºE dextral strike-slip faults, and an eastern domain structured by a WSW-ENE thrust system and normal faults with extension subparallel to the direction of the shortening structures. TSZ displacement at the lateral tip of this sector seems to be mainly accommodated by NNE trending thrusts in the northern TSZ block. The TSZ induces the near vertical extrusion of paleomargin rock units within the deformation band and the dextral deflection of the structural trend shaping the lateral end of the WGA salient. Our results suggest the TSZ started in the Upper Miocene and is still active. Moreover, the TSZ trends oblique to regional transport direction assessed both by field data and modelling. The estimated WNW-ESE far-field velocity vector in the TAM and the SVA points to the importance of the westward drift of the Internal Zones relative to the external wedge and fits well with the overall WGA kinematic frame. Nor the WGA salient neither the TSZ can be fully explained by the single Europe-Africa plate convergence.

  15. Sediment supply from the Betic-Rif orogen to basins through Neogene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iribarren, L.; Vergés, J.; Fernàndez, M.

    2009-09-01

    We present a quantification of total and partial (divided by time slices) sedimentary volumes in the Neogene basins of the Betic-Rif orogen. These basins include the Alboran Sea, the intramontane basins, the Guadalquivir and Rharb foreland basins and the Atlantic Margin of the Gibraltar Arc. The total volume of Neogene sediments deposited in these basins is ~ 209,000 km 3 and is equally distributed between the internal (Alboran Basin and intramontane basins) and the external basins (foreland basins and Atlantic Margin). The largest volumes are recorded by the Alboran Basin (89,600 km 3) and the Atlantic Margin (81,600 km 3). The Guadalquivir and Rharb basins amount 14,000 km 3 and 14,550 km 3, respectively whereas the intramontane basins record 9235 km 3. Calculated mean sediment accumulation rates for the early-middle Miocene show an outstanding asymmetry between the Alboran basin (0.24 mm/yr) and the foreland basins (0.06-0.07 mm/yr) and the Atlantic Margin (0.03 mm/yr). During the late Miocene, sedimentation rates range between 0.17 and 0.18 mm/yr recorded in the Alboran Basin and 0.04 mm/yr in the intramontane basins. In the Pliocene-Quaternary, the highest sedimentation rates are recorded in the Atlantic Margin reaching 0.22 mm/yr. Sedimentary contribution shows similar values for the inner and outer basins with a generalized increase from late Miocene to present (from 3500 to 6500 km 3/My). Interestingly, the Alboran Basin records the maximum sedimentary contribution during the late Miocene (5500 km 3/My), whereas the Atlantic Margin does during the Pliocene-Quaternary (6600 km 3/My). The spatial and time variability of the sediment supply from the Betic-Rif orogen to basins is closely related to the morphotectonic evolution of the region. The high sedimentation rates obtained in the Alboran Basin during the early-middle Miocene are related to active extensional tectonics, which produced narrow and deep basins in its western domain. The highest sedimentary

  16. Continental Construction and Crustal Growth of Central Asian Orogenic Belt in Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulmann, K.; Guy, A.; Lehmann, J.; Seltmann, R.; Lexa, O.

    2013-12-01

    The geophysical and geochemical data document crustal growth and continent construction processes responsible for episodic formation of Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) crust in Mongolia. Here, well-defined Cambrian suture rims the western borders of Proterozoic continental fragments in Mongolia and Russia (1200 to 700 Ma). This arcuate suture zone is defined by numerous ophiolites (800-560 Ma) originated by Early Cambrian obduction of young (Late Proterozoic) oceanic basins and magmatic arcs. The juvenile crust further south is built by gneisses a metasediments dated at 530-470 Ma interpreted as a Cambro-Ordovician accretionary prism intruded by juvenile Devono-Carboniferous Japan type magmatic arcs. The southerly mantle fragments covered by Silurian cherts, Devonian basaltic volcanics and late Devonian volcanoclastic sediments are interpreted as an oceanic crust of back arc and oceanic arc affinity. Following scenario is proposed: 1) Proterozoic basement blocks formed N-S trending zone documented by the shape of Early Cambrian suture, 2) Devono-Carboniferous magmatic arcs were emplaced during E-W shortening event along western margin of this zone leading to moderate crustal shortening, 3) the intra oceanic ophiolites were thrust over Devonian volcanoclastics during Late Carboniferous in the E-W direction. All that suggests that the early Devonian (Phillipiny sea type) back arc spreading was replaced by 50 to 80 My lasting E-W compressive regime during prolonged activity of north trending Mongol-Okhotsk Pacific type subduction zone. The change in tectonic movements from E-W to N-S is responsible for oroclinal bending of trail of Mongolian microcontinents and scissor-like closure of Mongol Okhotsk (Pacific ocean embayment) ocean. We conclude that both crustal growth and crustal construction are episodic in the CAOB. The former process occurred in two main episodes related to Pacific subduction, while the continental construction is a complex sequence of two peri

  17. Aeromagnetic study of the Hengshan-Wutai-Fuping region: Unraveling a crustal profile of the Paleoproterozoic Trans-North China Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Zhao, Guochun; Shen, Wenlue; Li, Sanzhong; Sun, Min

    2015-11-01

    An integrated crustal profile of the intervening Trans-North China Orogen (TNCO) is one of the key issues to understanding the tectonic evolution of the North China Craton. However, the existing geological studies focus only on the surface-mapping based petrological, geochemical and structural analysis, but lack subsurface geophysical evidence and thus make the crustal profile interpretations ambiguous. In contrast, the current geophysical data covers a very large-scale lithospheric mantle and fails to image the detailed structural pattern of the orogenic crust. To achieve this goal, we present high-resolution aeromagnetic data for the Hengshan-Wutai-Fuping region, the largest exposure of the central TNCO. The reduced-to-pole magnetic anomaly map firstly verifies the regional tectonic subdivision that the high-grade metamorphic terranes (i.e. Hengshan and Fuping Complexes) are consistent with high-magnetic responses and long-wavelength anomalies, intervened by a low-grade terrane (Wutai Complex) characterized by low-magnetic responses and short-wavelength anomalies. 3D Euler deconvolution reveals that the tendencies of the clustered solutions show large consistence with the major structural pattern of the region which is characterized by a fan-shaped doubly-vergent orogenic wedge. Upward continuation further shows that the northwest part of the orogen yields a thicker crust and is most likely located closer to the paleosubduction zone. The new aeromagnetic data, combined with structural, petrological and metamorphic data indicate that an eastward-dipping subduction zone was most possibly active before the collision of the Western and Eastern Blocks, leading to the formation of the TNCO and the final amalgamation of the North China Craton.

  18. Centrally activated pipe snubbing system

    DOEpatents

    Cawley, William E.

    1985-01-01

    An electromechanical pipe snubbing system and an electromechanical pipe snubber. In the system, each pipe snubber, in a set of pipe snubbers, has an electromechanical mechanism to lock and unlock the snubber. A sensor, such as a seismometer, measures a quantity related to making a snubber locking or unlocking decision. A control device makes an electrical connection between a power supply and each snubber's electromechanical mechanism to simultaneously lock each snubber when the sensor measurement indicates a snubber locking condition. The control device breaks the connection to simultaneously unlock each snubber when the sensor measurement indicates a snubber unlocking condition. In the snubber, one end of the shaft slides within a bore in one end of a housing. The other end of the shaft is rotatably attached to a pipe; the other end of the housing is rotatively attached to a wall. The snubber's electromechanical mechanism locks the slidable end of the shaft to the housing and unlocks that end from the housing. The electromechanical mechanism permits remote testing and lockup status indication for each snubber.

  19. Time-space focused intrusion of genetically unrelated arc magmas in the early Paleozoic Ross-Delamerian Orogen (Morozumi Range, Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocchi, S.; Di Vincenzo, G.; Dini, A.; Petrelli, M.; Vezzoni, S.

    2015-09-01

    The growth of continental crust in accretionary orogenic belts takes place through repeated cycles of subduction-accretion of rock units from continental and oceanic magmatic arcs, supra-subduction zone backarcs and forearcs loaded with continent-derived materials. An ancient example relevant to magmatic arc accretion models is represented by the remnants of the Cambrian-Ordovician Ross Orogen in the Morozumi Range, Victoria Land (Antarctica). There, late Neoproterozoic phyllites host an intrusive complex which preserves a remarkably uncommon record of genetically unrelated magma pulses emplaced under a variable stress regime in a short time span: (1) a dominant K-feldspar-phyric granite, (2) fine-grained dioritic stocks and dykes, (3) a peraluminous granite; and (4) a tonalitic-granodioritic dyke swarm. Laserprobe U-Pb zircon dates cluster at late Cambrian times for all these units, yet they carry differential cargoes of relict cores. Unique geochemical-isotopic signatures for both the less evolved magmas (diorite and dyke tonalite) and the most acidic ones (granite and peraluminous granite) indicate that each one of them originated from distinct sources at depth. Additionally, field relationships and chemical evolutionary trends testify for a variety of shallow level open-system processes, such as magma mingling/mixing between diorite and main granite magmas, as well as progressive incorporation of the host schists by the dyke tonalite magma. In summary, crustal growth in the Morozumi intrusive complex was contributed by fresh mantle magma issuing from the metasomatised mantle wedge, while the production of other melts did recycle different crustal portions/layers: the main granite derived from Grenville-age granulitic lower crust; the peraluminous granite from late Proterozoic upper crust, and the tonalite magmas derived from subduction erosion-enriched subarc mantle and evolved by ingestion of local metasedimentary rocks. Overall, the Morozumi intrusive complex

  20. Lithosphere profiles across Central Asian Orogenic Belt in Uzbekistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorova, Irina

    2014-05-01

    This study was made with complex geophysical and geological observations by the DSS-MRW seismic profiles, which cross CAOB in the southern Tien Shan in part of Uzbekistan. The southern Tien Shan is situated along the SW margin of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt-one of key region for understanding both the amalgamation of Eurasia and the Phanerozoic growth of the CAOB itself. The aim of our study was to reveal new features, which characteristic of the upper mantle rocks, related to morphology of bodies. their physical properties, consisting mainly in their contrasting values for contiguous blocks, and general increased velocity and density of the rocks they contain. The most interesting results were obtained by three DSS profiles in Central Kyzylkum: anomalous geological objects (Muruntau, Kokpatas, Kuldjuktau and other) having anomalous high velocity and density values, have been mapped at different depths within the part of CAOB. The alteration zones, the tectonic faults and circular structures related to the cones and calderas determined these methods and checked by group truth studies may the target areas to explore for some new deposits.New regional features have been revealed:they include peculiarities of the Earth's crust's deep geological structure and spatial distribution of deposits:they are contrast areas of the earth's crust geoblocks with anomalously high and low seismic and density parameters. Mapping of these zones helps select new ways in th search for mineral deposits. All the final products was created using ArcGIS and RS methodologies:1)DEM on the base of SRTM dataset;2) 3-D models of crustal basement and Moho surface;3) 3-D potential fields modeling;4) tabular database of tectonic, boreholes data;5)various types of original geological information concerning the Paleozoic to present geological evolution of the region.

  1. Distribution of strain rates in the Taiwan orogenic wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouthereau, F.; Fillon, C.; Ma, K.-F.

    2009-07-01

    To constrain the way Eurasian crust is accreted to the Taiwan orogenic wedge we investigate the present-day 3D seismogenic deformation field using the summation of 1129 seismic moment tensors of events ( Mw > 4) covering a period of 11 years (1995 to 2005). Based on the analysis of the principal strain-rate field, including dilatation and maximum shear rates, we distinguish four domains. Domain I comprises the Coastal Plain and the Western Foothills. It is mainly contractional in both the horizontal plane and in cross-section. Domain II comprises the eastern Western Foothills, the Hsuehshan Range and the Backbone Range. It is characterized by the highest contraction rates of 10 - 6 yr - 1 in association with area expansion in cross-section and area contraction in the horizontal plane. Domain III corresponds to the Central Range. It is characterized by area contraction in cross-section and area expansion in the horizontal plane. The maximum contractional axis is typically low and plunges ~ 30°E. Extension is larger, horizontal and strikes parallel to the axis of the mountain range. Domain IV corresponding to the Coastal Range and offshore Luzon Arc shows deformation patterns similar to domain II. This seismogenic strain-rate field, which is found in good agreement with the main features of the geodetic field, supports shortening within a thick wedge whose basal décollement is relatively flat and located in the middle-to-lower crust > 20 km. The east plunges of maximum strain-rate axes below the Central Range argue for the development of top-to-the-east transport of rocks resulting from the extrusion of the whole crust along west-dipping crustal-scale shear zones. The study of seismogenic strain rates argues that the initiation of subduction reversal has already started in the Taiwan collision domain.

  2. Orogenic potassic mafic magmatism, a product of alkaline-peraluminous mixing ? Variscan 'calc-alkaline' rocks from the Central Iberian and Ossa Morena Zones, Central Spain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarrow, Jane H.; Cambeses, Aitor; Bea, Fernando; Montero, Pilar; Molina, José F.; Moreno, Juan Antonio

    2013-04-01

    Orogenic magmatic rocks provide information about mantle and crust melt-generation and -interaction processes. In this context, minor potassic mafic stocks which are formed of enriched mantle and crustal components and are common as late-orogenic intrusions in granitic plutons give insight into the timing of new crust formation and crustal recycling. Potassic mafic stocks are prevalent, albeit low volume, constituents of granite batholiths all through the European Variscan (350-280 Ma). In the Central Iberia Zone, Spanish Central System, crustal-melt, S-type, granitoid plutons are intruded by minor concomitant ultramafic-intermediate appinitic-vaugneritic stocks. Notwithstanding their whole-rock calc-alkaline composition, the stocks apparently did not have a subduction-related origin. Recent studies have attributed their genesis to mixing of alkaline mantle and peraluminous crustal melts. Their primary alkaline character, as indicated by amphibole and biotite mineral chemistry data, points, rather, towards an extension-related genesis. In the Ossa Morena Zone, south of the Central Iberian Zone, the igneous rocks also have a whole-rock calc-alkaline composition which has been considered to be the result of northward subduction of the South Portuguese Zone. Nevertheless, identification of a 'sill' of significant volume of mafic magma in the middle crust, the ´IBERSEIS reflective body', in a seismic profile across the Ossa Morena and South Portuguese Zones has cast doubt upon the calc-alkaline magmatism-subduction model; leading, instead, to the magmatism being attributed to intra-orogenic extension related to a mantle plume active from 340 Ma to 330 Ma. The aim here, then, is to reinvestigate the petrogenesis and age of the calc-alkaline rocks of the Ossa Morena Zone to determine their tectonomagmatic context be it subduction-, plume- or extension-related, and establish what they may reveal about mantle-crust interactions. Focussing, initially, on the Valencia del

  3. Influence of syn-sedimentary faults on orogenic structures in a collisional belt: Insights from the inner zone of the Northern Apennines (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogi, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    This paper discusses the possible influence of syn-sedimentary structures on the development of orogenic structures during positive tectonic inversion in the inner Northern Apennines (Italy). Examples from key areas located in southern Tuscany provided original cartographic, structural and kinematics data for Late Oligocene-Early Miocene thrusts, organized in duplex systems, verging in the opposite direction of the foreland propagation (back-thrusts), which affected the Late Triassic-Oligocene sedimentary succession of the Tuscan Domain, previously affected by pre-orogenic structures. These latter consist of mesoscopic-to cartographic-scale Jurassic syn-sedimentary normal faults and extensional structures, which gave rise to effective stratigraphic lateral variation and mechanical heterogeneities. Structural analysis of both syn-sedimentary faults and back-thrusts were therefore compared in order to discuss the possible role of the pre-existing anisotropies in influencing the evolution of the back-thrusts. As a result, it can be reasonably proposed that back-thrusts trajectories and stacking pattern were controlled by relevant syn-sedimentary normal faults; these latter were reactivated, in some cases, if properly oriented. Such an issue adds new inputs for discussing the potential role of structural inheritance during tectonic inversions, and helps to better understand the processes suitable for the development of back-thrusts in the inner zones of orogenic belts, as it is the case of the inner Northern Apennines.

  4. Controls of erosional denudation in the orogen on foreland basin evolution: The Oligocene central Swiss Molasse Basin as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlunegger, Fritz; Jordan, Teresa E.; Klaper, Eva Maria

    1997-10-01

    A high-resolution three-dimensional reconstruction of the 25-m.y.-old central Swiss Molasse Basin reveals two sedimentary domains separated by a ˜5-km-wide flood-plain. The proximal domain of the basin attained a width of 20 km, and its basement is steeply flexed (6°-7° dip). Petrographic data indicate that it was filled by sediment from the Rigi dispersal system derived from the central Alps of eastern Switzerland and by locally sourced bajadas. In contrast, the distal sedimentary domain, located farther north, was gently dipping (<2°) and was filled by the meandering Lac Léman and Honegg dispersal systems. Chronological data reveal that sedimentation in the northern proximal part of the basin started at ˜27 Ma, when sediment supply to the basin started to increase. Deflection of the foreland plate at ˜25 Ma is successfully simulated by flexural modeling of the thrust load and the sediment load. The model reveals that the Lac Léman and Honegg dispersal systems are located on a buried flexural bulge. Furthermore, it shows that burial and suppression of the flexural bulge at ˜27 Ma as well as an increase of the basin wavelength were controlled by the contemporaneous increase in the sediment supply rate of the Rigi system. The model presented suggests that the tectonic subsidence of the Molasse Basin was mainly controlled by tectonic events in the northern part of the orogen, within ˜70 km distance from the tip of the orogenic wedge. Crustal thickening in this part of the orogen is reflected in the proximal Molasse by sedimentary cycles characterized by an increase in the sediment accumulation rates up section and by the presence of locally sourced bajada fans at the top of each cycle. Although south vergent back thrusting along the Insubric Line ˜150 km south of the foreland basin contributed little to flexure, it resulted in an increase of the sediment supply to the foreland basin. This is reflected in the Molasse by coarsening and thickening upward

  5. Crustal Architecture along BABEL and FIRE profiles - Insight in the Growth of the Svecofennian Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korja, Annakaisa

    2016-04-01

    The Precambrian Svecofennian orogen is characterized by LP- HT metamorphism and voluminous granitoid magmatism that usually develop in transitional to plateau stages of a collisional orogeny. Deep seismic reflection profiles BABEL and FIRE have been interpreted using PURC concepts: prowedge, retrowedg, uplifted plug, subduction conduit and elevated plateau. BABEL profiles image a transitional orogen with several nuclei displaying prowedge-uplifted plug-retrowedge architecture above paleo-subduction conduits. Prowedge and -continent are on the south-southwestern side and retrowedge and -continent on the north-northwestern side. This implies a long-lived southwesterly retreating convergent margin, where transitional accretionary orogens have developed. FIRE1-3 profiles images a hot orogen with a pronounced super-infra structure, typical of an elevated plateau stage, below the Central Finland Granitoid Complex. Large volumes of granitoid intrusions suggest large scale melting of the middle and/or lower crust. Reflection structures, analogue and numerical modeling suggest midcrustal flow. The plateau is flanked by prowedges that are characterized by HT-LP migmatite belts. The Svecofennian orogeny has progressed to an elevated plateau stage in the thickest core of the orogen, west of the arc-continent collision zone.

  6. Early Cretaceous extensional reworking of the Triassic HP-UHP metamorphic orogen in Eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei; Ji, Wenbin; Faure, Michel; Wu, Lin; Li, Qiuli; Shi, Yonghong; Scharer, Urs; Wang, Fei; Wang, Qingchen

    2015-11-01

    Corresponding to the Early Mesozoic continental subduction between the North China Block (NCB) and the South China Block (SCB), the Tongbaishan-Hong'an-Dabieshan-Sulu massifs are famous for their HP-UHP metamorphism. More than 50% of the HP-UHP Orogenic Belt was significantly reworked by Early Cretaceous extensional tectonics. This Early Cretaceous event with a fast cooling period, at 130-120 Ma, superimposed on the Early Mesozoic HP-UHP orogenic belt and intensively changed the architecture of this orogen. Each individual segment documents different Early Cretaceous extensional structures, namely the central Tongbaishan domain is a metamorphic core complex (MCC) represented by an A-type non-cylindrical antiform; the central Dabieshan domain is a typical Cordilleran-type migmatite-cored MCC; the Southern Sulu UHP domain is a "wedge-shaped" structure exhumed by a simple detachment fault. These late stage extensional structures expose the previous HP-UHP orogenic belt as fragments along the NCB-SCB boundary. The geodynamic setting of this Early Cretaceous extensional tectonics along the HP-UHP orogen is a part of a 1000 km-scale crustal extension belt that is widespread in eastern Eurasia continent from Trans-Baikal to the central part of SCB. Convective erosion or delamination of the mantle lithosphere might be considered as a possible mechanism for mantle removal.

  7. Early Cretaceous extensional reworking of the Triassic HP-UHP metamorphic orogen in Eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, W.; Ji, W.; Faure, M.; Wu, L.; Li, Q. L.; Shi, Y.; Scharer, U.; Wang, F.; Wang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Corresponding to the Early Mesozoic continental subduction between the North China Block (NCB) and the South China Block (SCB), the Tongbaishan-Hong'an-Dabieshan-Sulu massifs are famous for their HP-UHP metamorphism. More than 50% of the HP-UHP Orogenic Belt was significantly reworked by Early Cretaceous extensional tectonics. This Early Cretaceous event with a fast cooling period, at 130-120 Ma, superimposed on the Early Mesozoic HP-UHP orogenic belt and intensively changed the architecture of this orogen. Each individual segment documents different Early Cretaceous extensional structures, namely the central Tongbaishan domain is a metamorphic core complex (MCC) represented by an A-type non-cylindrical antiform; the central Dabieshan domain is a typical Cordilleran-type migmatite-cored MCC; the Southern Sulu UHP domain is a "wedge-shaped" structure exhumed by a simple detachment fault. These late stage extensional structures expose the previous HP-UHP orogenic belt as fragments along the NCB-SCB boundary. The geodynamic setting of this Early Cretaceous extensional tectonics along the HP-UHP orogen is a part of a 1000 km-scale crustal extension belt that is widespread in eastern Eurasia continent from Trans-Baikal to the central part of the South China Block. Convective erosion or delamination of the mantle lithosphere might be considered as a possible mechanism for mantle removal.

  8. Active microrheology in active matter systems: Mobility, intermittency, and avalanches.

    PubMed

    Reichhardt, C; Reichhardt, C J Olson

    2015-03-01

    We examine the mobility and velocity fluctuations of a driven particle moving through an active matter bath of self-mobile disks for varied density or area coverage and varied activity. We show that the driven particle mobility can exhibit nonmonotonic behavior that is correlated with distinct changes in the spatiotemporal structures that arise in the active media. We demonstrate that the probe particle velocity distributions exhibit specific features in the different dynamic regimes and identify an activity-induced uniform crystallization that occurs for moderate activity levels and is distinct from the previously observed higher activity cluster phase. The velocity distribution in the cluster phase has telegraph noise characteristics produced when the probe particle moves alternately through high-mobility areas that are in the gas state and low-mobility areas that are in the dense phase. For higher densities and large activities, the system enters what we characterize as an active jamming regime. Here the probe particle moves in intermittent jumps or avalanches that have power-law-distributed sizes that are similar to the avalanche distributions observed for nonactive disk systems near the jamming transition.

  9. Active microrheology in active matter systems: Mobility, intermittency, and avalanches.

    PubMed

    Reichhardt, C; Reichhardt, C J Olson

    2015-03-01

    We examine the mobility and velocity fluctuations of a driven particle moving through an active matter bath of self-mobile disks for varied density or area coverage and varied activity. We show that the driven particle mobility can exhibit nonmonotonic behavior that is correlated with distinct changes in the spatiotemporal structures that arise in the active media. We demonstrate that the probe particle velocity distributions exhibit specific features in the different dynamic regimes and identify an activity-induced uniform crystallization that occurs for moderate activity levels and is distinct from the previously observed higher activity cluster phase. The velocity distribution in the cluster phase has telegraph noise characteristics produced when the probe particle moves alternately through high-mobility areas that are in the gas state and low-mobility areas that are in the dense phase. For higher densities and large activities, the system enters what we characterize as an active jamming regime. Here the probe particle moves in intermittent jumps or avalanches that have power-law-distributed sizes that are similar to the avalanche distributions observed for nonactive disk systems near the jamming transition. PMID:25871116

  10. Active microrheology in active matter systems: Mobility, intermittency, and avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichhardt, C.; Reichhardt, C. J. Olson

    2015-03-01

    We examine the mobility and velocity fluctuations of a driven particle moving through an active matter bath of self-mobile disks for varied density or area coverage and varied activity. We show that the driven particle mobility can exhibit nonmonotonic behavior that is correlated with distinct changes in the spatiotemporal structures that arise in the active media. We demonstrate that the probe particle velocity distributions exhibit specific features in the different dynamic regimes and identify an activity-induced uniform crystallization that occurs for moderate activity levels and is distinct from the previously observed higher activity cluster phase. The velocity distribution in the cluster phase has telegraph noise characteristics produced when the probe particle moves alternately through high-mobility areas that are in the gas state and low-mobility areas that are in the dense phase. For higher densities and large activities, the system enters what we characterize as an active jamming regime. Here the probe particle moves in intermittent jumps or avalanches that have power-law-distributed sizes that are similar to the avalanche distributions observed for nonactive disk systems near the jamming transition.

  11. Active impedance matching of complex structural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macmartin, Douglas G.; Miller, David W.; Hall, Steven R.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on active impedance matching of complex structural systems are presented. Topics covered include: traveling wave model; dereverberated mobility model; computation of dereverberated mobility; control problem: optimal impedance matching; H2 optimal solution; statistical energy analysis (SEA) solution; experimental transfer functions; interferometer actuator and sensor locations; active strut configurations; power dual variables; dereverberation of complex structure; dereverberated transfer function; compensators; and relative power flow.

  12. PASS: Creating Physically Active School Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciotto, Carol M.; Fede, Marybeth H.

    2014-01-01

    PASS, a Physically Active School System, is a program by which school districts and schools utilize opportunities for school-based physical activity that enhance overall fitness and cognition, which can be broken down into four integral parts consisting of connecting, communicating, collaborating, and cooperating. There needs to be an…

  13. Architecture of orogenic belts and convergent zones in Western Ishtar Terra, Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Head, James W.; Vorderbruegge, R. W.; Crumpler, L. S.

    1989-01-01

    Linear mountain belts in Ishtar Terra were recognized from Pioneer-Venus topography, and later Arecibo images showed banded terrain interpreted to represent folds. Subsequent analyses showed that the mountains represented orogenic belts, and that each had somewhat different features and characteristics. Orogenic belts are regions of focused shortening and compressional deformation and thus provide evidence for the nature of such deformation, processes of crustal thickening (brittle, ductile), and processes of crustal loss. Such information is important in understanding the nature of convergent zones on Venus (underthrusting, imbrication, subduction), the implications for rates of crustal recycling, and the nature of environments of melting and petrogenesis. The basic elements of four convergent zones and orogenic belts in western Ishtar Terra are identified and examined, and then assess the architecture of these zones (the manner in which the elements are arrayed), and their relationships. The basic nomenclature of the convergent zones is shown.

  14. Remagnetization and orogenic fluids: testing the hypothesis in the central Appalachians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmore, R. Douglas; Kelley, Jeff; Evans, Mark; Lewchuk, Michael T.

    2001-03-01

    Palaeomagnetic and geochemical studies on Devonian sedimentary rocks in the Valley and Ridge province in West Virginia indicate that the hypothesized relationship between orogenic fluids and remagnetization is not straightforward. The Helderberg Group, an aquitard, and the Oriskany Formation, a palaeoaquifer, both contain similar, synfolding late Palaeozoic chemical remanent magnetizations (CRMs) residing in magnetite. The results from the Oriskany Formation are consistent with remagnetization by orogenic fluids because the unit contains geochemical evidence for the migration of such fluids. In contrast, there is no geochemical evidence for the widespread migration of orogenic fluids into the Helderberg Group and thus the CRM cannot be related to such fluids. Another remagnetization mechanism, which remains elusive, must be responsible for the CRM in the Helderberg Group.

  15. Mechanical model for subduction-collision tectonics of Alpine-type compressional orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaumont, Christopher; Ellis, Susan; Hamilton, Juliet; Fullsack, Philippe

    1996-08-01

    Alpine-type orogens are characterized by three distinct convergent tectonic phases: subduction with deformation that has primarily single vergence, a transition from subduction to collision, and continental collision with double vergence. Although the Cenozoic history of the European Alps has additional complexities, a mechanical explanation for these three phases would provide the necessary crustal-scale framework in which to develop an understanding of the smaller-scale processes. We present results from a simple numerical model, which explain the mechanics of these three phases as a consequence of the changing buoyancy of the lithosphere subducted beneath the orogen. The development and exhumation of a subduction complex, suture zone, and basement nappe stack (Piemont suture, Penninic Nappes); the presence of a crustal-scale back fold and thrust (Insubric Line); and uplift of basement on the pro- (European) side of the orogen (external basement massifs) may be explained as a simple consequence of changing dynamics during the transition from subduction to collision.

  16. Active imaging system with Faraday filter

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, J.J.

    1993-04-13

    An active imaging system has a low to medium powered laser transmitter and receiver wherein the receiver includes a Faraday filter with an ultranarrow optical bandpass and a bare (nonintensified) CCD camera. The laser is locked in the vicinity of the passband of the Faraday filter. The system has high sensitivity to the laser illumination while eliminating solar background.

  17. Active imaging system with Faraday filter

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, James J.

    1993-01-01

    An active imaging system has a low to medium powered laser transmitter and receiver wherein the receiver includes a Faraday filter with an ultranarrow optical bandpass and a bare (nonintensified) CCD camera. The laser is locked in the vicinity of the passband of the Faraday filter. The system has high sensitivity to the laser illumination while eliminating solar background.

  18. The VST active primary mirror support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schipani, Pietro; Capaccioli, Massimo; D'Orsi, Sergio; Ferragina, Luigi; Marty, Laurent; Molfese, Cesare; Perrotta, Francesco; De Paris, Giacinto; Fierro, Davide; Tomelleri, Raffaele; Rossettini, Pierfrancesco; Perina, Francesco; Recchia, Stefano; Magrin, Demetrio

    2010-07-01

    The 2.6-m primary mirror of the VST telescope is equipped with an active optics system in order to correct low-order aberrations, constantly monitoring the optical quality of the image and controlling the relative position and the shape of the optical elements. Periodically an image analyser calculates the deviation of the image from the best quality. VST is equipped with both a Shack-Hartmann in the probe system and a curvature sensor embedded in the OmegaCAM instrument. The telescope control software decomposes the deviation into single optical contributions and calculates the force correction that each active element has to perform to achieve the optimal quality. The set of correction forces, one for each axial actuator, is computed by the telescope central computer and transmitted to the local control unit of the primary mirror system for execution. The most important element of the VST active optics is the primary mirror, with its active support system located within the primary mirror cell structure. The primary mirror support system is composed by an axial and a lateral independent systems and includes an earthquake safety system. The system is described and the results of the qualification test campaign are discussed.

  19. Phase Transitions in Model Active Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redner, Gabriel S.

    The amazing collective behaviors of active systems such as bird flocks, schools of fish, and colonies of microorganisms have long amazed scientists and laypeople alike. Understanding the physics of such systems is challenging due to their far-from-equilibrium dynamics, as well as the extreme diversity in their ingredients, relevant time- and length-scales, and emergent phenomenology. To make progress, one can categorize active systems by the symmetries of their constituent particles, as well as how activity is expressed. In this work, we examine two categories of active systems, and explore their phase behavior in detail. First, we study systems of self-propelled spherical particles moving in two dimensions. Despite the absence of an aligning interaction, this system displays complex emergent dynamics, including phase separation into a dense active solid and dilute gas. Using simulations and analytic modeling, we quantify the phase diagram and separation kinetics. We show that this nonequilibrium phase transition is analogous to an equilibrium vapor-liquid system, with binodal and spinodal curves and a critical point. We also characterize the dense active solid phase, a unique material which exhibits the structural signatures of a crystalline solid near the crystal-hexatic transition point, as well as anomalous dynamics including superdiffusive motion on intermediate timescales. We also explore the role of interparticle attraction in this system. We demonstrate that attraction drastically changes the phase diagram, which contains two distinct phase-separated regions and is reentrant as a function of propulsion speed. We interpret this complex situation with a simple kinetic model, which builds from the observed microdynamics of individual particles to a full description of the macroscopic phase behavior. We also study active nematics, liquid crystals driven out of equilibrium by energy-dissipating active stresses. The equilibrium nematic state is unstable in these

  20. Reconciling the detrital zircon record and crustal growth within juvenile accretionary orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, C. J.; Cawood, P. A.; Roberts, N. M. W.

    2014-12-01

    Ancient cratons are generally characterised by Archaean cores surrounded by Proterozoic accretionary belts with large volumes of juvenile crust. Their crustal growth histories provide important insights into the genesis of continents and orogenic evolution. Whole-rock and detrital zircon isotopic studies are often used to deduce those histories, but the extent to which representative lithologies within the orogens are reliably sampled for such studies is not well established. This is especially true in cases where juvenile, zircon-poor mafic crust comprises a significant proportion of an orogen such as the East African (0.8-0.5 Ga), Namaqua-Natal (1.2-1.0 Ga), Trans-Hudson (1.9-1.8 Ga), and Kola (2.5 Ga). In particular, the Mesoproterozoic Namaqua-Natal orogenic belt (NNO) fringing the Kalahari Craton is a case in point in which Nd isotopic studies of whole-rock outcrop samples and U-Pb-Hf isotopic studies of detrital zircons from sediments of the Orange River (which drains the NNO) show different crust-formation ages and proportions of new and reworked crustal material. We hypothesise that this discrepancy is due to biasing of the detrital zircon record towards felsic rocks. Understanding the representative nature of the crustal archive preserved in detrital zircons remains critical for many studies of crustal evolution. We present data that: (a) addresses the scale of potential bias within an accretionary orogen containing large proportions of juvenile material, (b) demonstrates how the whole-rock and detrital zircon records can be reconciled for the Namaqua-Natal orogen to start, and (c) can be used to evaluate the effect of zircon bias on previous crustal growth models.

  1. Active containment systems incorporating modified pillared clays

    SciTech Connect

    Lundie, P. |; McLeod, N.

    1997-12-31

    The application of treatment technologies in active containment systems provides a more advanced and effective method for the remediation of contaminated sites. These treatment technologies can be applied in permeable reactive walls and/or funnel and gate systems. The application of modified pillared clays in active containment systems provides a mechanism for producing permeable reactive walls with versatile properties. These pillared clays are suitably modified to incorporate reactive intercalatants capable of reacting with both a broad range of organic pollutants of varying molecular size, polarity and reactivity. Heavy metals can be removed from contaminated water by conventional ion-exchange and other reactive processes within the clay structure. Complex contamination problems can be addressed by the application of more than one modified clay on a site specific basis. This paper briefly describes the active containment system and the structure/chemistry of the modified pillared clay technology, illustrating potential applications of the in-situ treatment process for contaminated site remediation.

  2. Porphyry copper assessment of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt and eastern Tethysides: China, Mongolia, Russia, Pakistan, Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, and India: Chapter X in Global mineral resource assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mihalasky, Mark J.; Ludington, Stephen; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Alexeiev, Dmitriy V.; Frost, Thomas P.; Light, Thomas D.; Robinson,, Gilpin R.; Briggs, Deborah A.; Wallis, John C.; Miller, Robert J.; Bookstrom, Arthur A.; Panteleyev, Andre; Chitalin, Andre; Seltmann, Reimar; Guangsheng, Yan; Changyun, Lian; Jingwen, Mao; Jinyi, Li; Keyan, Xiao; Ruizhao, Qiu; Jianbao, Shao; Gangyi, Shai; Yuliang, Du

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey collaborated with international colleagues to assess undiscovered resources in porphyry copper deposits in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt and eastern Tethysides. These areas host 20 known porphyry copper deposits, including the world class Oyu Tolgoi deposit in Mongolia that was discovered in the late 1990s. The study area covers major parts of the world’s largest orogenic systems. The Central Asian Orogenic Belt is a collage of amalgamated Precambrian through Mesozoic terranes that extends from the Ural Mountains in the west nearly to the Pacific Coast of Asia in the east and records the evolution and final closure of the Paleo-Asian Ocean in Permian time. The eastern Tethysides, the orogenic belt to the south of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt, records the evolution of another ancient ocean system, the Tethys Ocean. The evolution of these orogenic belts involved magmatism associated with a variety of geologic settings appropriate for formation of porphyry copper deposits, including subduction-related island arcs, continental arcs, and collisional and postconvergent settings. The original settings are difficult to trace because the arcs have been complexly deformed and dismembered by younger tectonic events. Twelve mineral resource assessment tracts were delineated to be permissive for the occurrence of porphyry copper deposits based on mapped and inferred subsurface distributions of igneous rocks of specific age ranges and compositions. These include (1) nine Paleozoic tracts in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt, which range in area from about 60,000 to 800,000 square kilometers (km2); (2) a complex area of about 400,000 km2 on the northern margin of the Tethysides, the Qinling-Dabie tract, which spans central China and areas to the west, encompassing Paleozoic through Triassic igneous rocks that formed in diverse settings; and (3) assemblages of late Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks that define two other tracts in the Tethysides, the 100

  3. Reconciling competing models for the tectono-stratigraphic zonation of the Variscan orogen in Western Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, J. Brendan; Quesada, Cecilio; Gutiérrez-Alonso, Gabriel; Johnston, Stephen T.; Weil, Arlo

    2016-06-01

    The Late Paleozoic Variscan orogen in Europe is the result of convergence and collision between Laurussia and Gondwana during closure of the Rheic Ocean. The orogen is divided into tectonostratigraphic zones that have a distinct curvature (Ibero-Armorican Arc, IAA) and record the Late Cambrian-Early Ordovician opening of the Rheic Ocean, the migration of terranes from the Gondwanan margin towards Laurussia, as well as the closure of that ocean and development of the IAA. Three models have emerged to explain the distribution of tectonostratigraphic zones:

  4. Basin-mountain structures and hydrocarbon exploration potential of west Junggar orogen in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.; Qi, X.; Zheng, M.

    2015-12-01

    Situated in northern Xinjiang, China, in NE-SW trend, West Junggar Orogen is adjacent to Altai fold belt on the north with the Ertix Fault as the boundary, North Tianshan fold belt on the south with the Ebinur Lake Strike-slip Fault as the boundary, and the Junggar Basin on the southeast with Zaire-Genghis Khan-Hala'alat fold belt as the boundary. Covering an area of about 10×104 km2 in China, there are medium and small intermontane basins, Burqin-Fuhai, Tacheng, Hefeng and Hoxtolgay, distributing inside the orogen. Tectonically West Junggar Orogen lies in the middle section of the Palaeo-Asian tectonic domain where the Siberia, Kazakhstan and Tarim Plates converge, and is the only orogen trending NE-SW in the Palaeo-Asian tectonic domain. Since the Paleozoic, the orogen experienced pre-Permian plate tectonic evolution and post-Permian intra-plate basin evolution. Complex tectonic evolution and multi-stage structural superimposition not only give rise to long term controversial over the basin basement property but also complex basin-mountain coupling relations, structures and basin superimposition modes. According to analysis of several kinds of geological and geophysical data, the orogen was dominated by compressive folding and thrust napping from the Siberia plate in the north since the Late Paleozoic. Compressive stress weakened from north to south, corresponding to subdued vertical movement and enhanced horizontal movement of crustal surface from north to south, and finally faded in the overthrust-nappe belt at the northwest margin of the Junggar Basin. The variation in compressive stress is consistent with the surface relief of the orogen, which is high in the north and low in the south. There are two kinds of basin-mountain coupling relationships, i.e. high angle thrusting and overthrusting and napping, and two kinds of basin superimposition modes, i.e. inherited and progressive, and migrating and convulsionary modes. West Junggar orogen has rich oil and gas

  5. Unraveling complex orogenic histories by integrating Foliation Intersection Axis (FIA) orientation data with thermodynamic modeling: the Swat area case study, NW Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayab, M.; Shah, S. Z.; Aerden, D. G.

    2012-12-01

    Barrovian-type mineral assemblages typically result from regional- to plate-scale collision tectonics and resulting clockwise P-T paths. Inclusion trail patterns preserved within such assemblages can provide important information about the kinematics of an orogen and of orogenic processes in general. We have measured Foliation Intersection Axes (FIA) preserved in garnet porphyroblasts of a metapelitic sequence exposed south of the Main Mantle Thrust in the Swat region of the NW Himalaya, Pakistan. This area underwent multiply deformation and metamorphism from ca. 55 to 38 Ma as part of the Himalayan orogen. Metamorphic garnets in the area contain spiral, sigmoidal, millipede and straight inclusion trails that represent progressive stages of a complex succession of deformations during this period. Spiral trails are commonly truncated by the matrix foliation, whereas the other types can be followed in the matrix indicating an older age of the spiral garnets. Determination of FIA for these garnets using two complementary techniques reveals two main FIA sets with broadly E-W versus N-S trends. Relative timing criteria indicate an older age of the E-W trending FIA consistent with development during progressive N-S crustal shortening, thrusting and convergence between the Indian plate and Kohistan-Ladakh Island Arc (KLIA). Younger N-S trending FIA formed in response to E-W crustal shortening as a result of orogen-parallel compression. The trends of FIA sub-classes suggest a progressive rotation of about 125° in the orientation of collision between the Indian Plate and KLIA. In order to estimate P-T conditions during this orogenic evolution, representative samples preserving different geometric types of inclusion trails in garnets (FIAs) are modeled in the chemical system MnNCKFMASH using THERMOCALC 3.33. A sophisticated clockwise P-T-t-d path is obtained that brackets metamorphic conditions during the N-S shortening (M1 metamorphism) between 4.0-8.7 kbars and 495-565o

  6. Trans-Hudson Orogen of North America and Himalaya-Karakoram-Tibetan Orogen of Asia: Structural and thermal characteristics of the lower and upper plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St-Onge, Marc R.; Searle, Michael P.; Wodicka, Natasha

    2006-08-01

    The Trans-Hudson Orogen (THO) of North America and the Himalaya-Karakoram-Tibetan Orogen (HKTO) of Asia preserve a Paleoproterozoic and Cenozoic record, respectively, of continent-continent collision that is notably similar in scale, duration and character. In THO, the tectonothermal evolution of the lower plate involves (1) early thin-skinned thrusting and Barrovian metamorphism, (2) out-of-sequence thrusting and high-T metamorphism, and (3) fluid-localized reequilibration, anatexis, and leucogranite formation. The crustal evolution of the Indian lower plate in HKTO involves (1) early subduction of continental crust to ultrahigh pressure (UHP) eclogite depths, (2) regional Barrovian metamorphism, and (3) widespread high-T metamorphism, anatexis, and leucogranite formation. The shallow depths of the high-T metamorphism in HKTO are consistent with early to mid-Miocene ductile flow of an Indian lower plate midcrustal channel, from beneath the southern Tibetan Plateau to the Greater Himalaya. Melt weakening of the lower plate in THO is not observed at a similar scale probably due to the paucity of pelitic lithologies. Tectonothermal events in the upper plate of both orogens include precollisional accretion of crustal blocks, emplacement of Andean-type plutonic suites, and high-T metamorphism. Syncollisional to postcollisional events include emplacement of garnet-biotite-muscovite leucogranites, anatectic granites, and sporadic metamorphism (up to 90 Myr following the onset of collision in THO). Comparing the type and duration of tectonothermal events for THO and HKTO supports the notion of tectonic uniformitarianism for at least the later half of dated Earth history and highlights the complementary nature of the rock record in an older "exhumed" orogen compared to one undergoing present-day orogenesis.

  7. Flexural bending-induced plumelets and their seamounts in accretionary (Japanese-style) and collisional (Tethyan-style) orogenic belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, N.; Dilek, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Seamounts and seamount chains are common in both the upper and lower plates of active subduction zones. Their OIB-type volcanic products are distinctly different from suprasubduction zone (arc, forearc and backarc) generated volcanic rocks in terms of their compositions and mantle sources. Tectonic accretion of such seamounts into the Japanese archipelago in the NW Pacific and into subduction-accretion complexes and active margins of continents/microcontinents within the Tethyan realm during the Cretaceous played a significant role in continental growth. Seamount assemblages comprise alkaline volcanic rocks intercalated with radiolarian and hemipelagic chert, and limestone, and may also include hypabyssal dolerite and gabbro intrusions. In the Tethyan orogenic belts these seamount rocks commonly occur as km-scale blocks in mélange units beneath the late Jurassic - Cretaceous ophiolites nappes, whereas on the Japanese islands they form discrete, narrow tectonic belts within the late Jurassic - Cretaceous accretionary prism complexes. We interpret some of these OIB occurrences in the Japanese and Tethyan mountain belts as asperities in downgoing oceanic plates that formed in <10 million years before their accretion. Their magmas were generated by decompressional melting of upwelling asthenosphere, without any significant mantle plume component, and were brought to the seafloor along deep-seated brittle fractures that developed in the flexed, downgoing lithosphere as it started bending near a trench. The modern occurrences of these "petit-spot volcanoes" are well established in the northwestern Pacific plate, off the coast of Japan. The proposed mechanism of the formation of these small seamounts better explains the lack of hotspot trails associated with their occurrence in the geological record. Magmatic outputs of such flexural bending-induced plumelets should be ubiquitious in the accretionary (Japanese-style) and collisional (Tethyan-style) orogenic belts.

  8. A robust activity marking system for exploring active neuronal ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Andreas T; Cooper, Yonatan A; Baratta, Michael V; Weng, Feng-Ju; Zhang, Yuxiang; Ramamoorthi, Kartik; Fropf, Robin; LaVerriere, Emily; Xue, Jian; Young, Andrew; Schneider, Colleen; Gøtzsche, Casper René; Hemberg, Martin; Yin, Jerry CP; Maier, Steven F; Lin, Yingxi

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how the brain captures transient experience and converts it into long lasting changes in neural circuits requires the identification and investigation of the specific ensembles of neurons that are responsible for the encoding of each experience. We have developed a Robust Activity Marking (RAM) system that allows for the identification and interrogation of ensembles of neurons. The RAM system provides unprecedented high sensitivity and selectivity through the use of an optimized synthetic activity-regulated promoter that is strongly induced by neuronal activity and a modified Tet-Off system that achieves improved temporal control. Due to its compact design, RAM can be packaged into a single adeno-associated virus (AAV), providing great versatility and ease of use, including application to mice, rats, flies, and potentially many other species. Cre-dependent RAM, CRAM, allows for the study of active ensembles of a specific cell type and anatomical connectivity, further expanding the RAM system’s versatility. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13918.001 PMID:27661450

  9. The crustal structures from Wuyi-Yunkai orogen to Taiwan orogen: the onshore-offshore wide-angle seismic experiment of TAIGER and ATSEE projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuochen, H.; Kuo, N. Y. W.; Wang, C. Y.; Jin, X.; Cai, H. T.; Lin, J. Y.; Wu, F. T.; Yen, H. Y.; Huang, B. S.; Liang, W. T.; Okaya, D. A.; Brown, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    The crustal structure is key information for understanding the tectonic framework and geological evolution in the southeastern China and its adjacent area. In this study, we integrated the data sets from the TAIGER and ATSEE projects to resolve onshore-offshore deep crustal seismic profiles from the Wuyi-Yunkai orogen to the Taiwan orogen in southeastern China. Totally, there are three seismic profiles resolved and the longest profile is 850 km. Unlike 2D and 3D first arrival travel-time tomography from previous studies, we used both refracted and reflected phases (Pg, Pn, PcP, and PmP) to model the crustal structures and the crustal reflectors. 40 shots, 2 earthquakes, and about 1,950 stations were used and 15,319 arrivals were picked among three transects. As a result, the complex crustal evolution since Paleozoic era are shown, which involved the closed Paleozoic rifted basin in central Fujian, the Cenozoic extension due to South China sea opening beneath the coastline of southern Fujian, and the on-going collision of the Taiwan orogen.

  10. Feeding the ';aneurysm': Orogen-parallel mass flux into Nanga Parbat and the western Himalayan syntaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whipp, D. M.; Beaumont, C.; Braun, J.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last ~2 Ma, exhumation of the Nanga Parbat-Haramosh massif (NPHM) in the western Himalayan syntaxis region has occurred at rates that are more than double the exhumation rates in the central Himalaya (up to 13 mm/a). Coupled with surface elevations comparable to the rest of the Himalaya, this suggests an additional source of mass flux, over and above that supplied by normal convergence, is required to sustain localized, very rapid exhumation of the NPHM. The ';tectonic aneurysm' model provides an explanation for localized, rapid exhumation in the NPHM based on incision by the Indus River, but the source of the excess mass is not clear. One source capable of providing the requisite crustal mass is orogen-parallel (OP) mass transport as a result of strain partitioning along the Himalayan thrust front, where convergence is variably oblique, with obliquity up to ~40°. Conceptual and analog models of strain partitioning in convergent orogens have indicated how orogen-normal thrust motion results in OP mass transport within oblique orogenic wedges. However, there has been no quantitative demonstration that this may lead to the development of NPHM-type structures. We use geometrically simple 3D mechanical numerical experiments of an obliquely convergent orogen to demonstrate that the OP mass transport flux resulting from strain partitioning is capable of sustaining syntaxis topography and rapid exhumation rates. The model design includes a frictional-plastic orogenic wedge with predefined weak shear zones at its base and rear, and a neighboring plateau underlain by low-viscosity middle-lower crust. The geometry of the orogen thrust front is segmented, such that there is a region of oblique convergence at 45° obliquity bounded by two regions of orogen-normal convergence. Analytical and numerical results show that strain partitioning in the critical wedge orogen requires both the basal and rear shear zones to be very weak, with angles of internal friction of ~2

  11. Aging assessment for active fire protection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, S.B.; Nowlen, S.P.; Tanaka, T.

    1995-06-01

    This study assessed the impact of aging on the performance and reliability of active fire protection systems including both fixed fire suppression and fixed fire detection systems. The experience base shows that most nuclear power plants have an aggressive maintenance and testing program and are finding degraded fire protection system components before a failure occurs. Also, from the data reviewed it is clear that the risk impact of fire protection system aging is low. However, it is assumed that a more aggressive maintenance and testing program involving preventive diagnostics may reduce the risk impact even further.

  12. Active Displacement Control of Active Magnetic Bearing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertész, Milan; Kozakovič, Radko; Magdolen, Luboš; Masaryk, Michal

    2014-12-01

    The worldwide energy production nowadays is over 3400 GW while storage systems have a capacity of only 90 GW [1]. There is a good solution for additional storage capacity in flywheel energy storage systems (FES). The main advantage of FES is its relatively high efficiency especially with using the active magnetic bearing system. Therefore there exist good reasons for appropriate simulations and for creating a suitable magneto-structural control system. The magnetic bearing, including actuation, is simulated in the ANSYS parametric design language (APDL). APDL is used to create the loops of transient simulations where boundary conditions (BC) are updated based upon a "gap sensor" which controls the nodal position values of the centroid of the shaft and the current density inputs onto the copper windings.

  13. Pleistocene onset of Simultaneous and Rapid Exhumation in the Eastern Central Range of the Taiwan Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S.; Hsu, W. H.; Byrne, T. B.; Ouimet, W. B.; Lee, Y. H.; Chen, Y. G.; Van Soest, M. C.; Hodges, K. V.

    2015-12-01

    The Taiwan orogenic belt is often treated as a steady, southward propagating orogenic system with an erosion rate of 4-6 mm/yr for 5 My. A few recent studies of the exhumation history, however, suggest that the collision was initially simultaneous and that exhumation rates changed through time. To test this hypothesis, we constructed four new age-elevation curves that span the length of the orogen from the Central Cross-Island Hwy (CXIH) in northern Taiwan to Small Ghost Lake (XGH) in the south. The age-elevation curves are based on 10 new zircon (U-Th)/He (ZrnHe), 10 new zircon fission track (ZrnFT) ages and 82 previously published ZrnFT and ZrnHe dates. Samples used for each age-elevation analysis extended map distances, ranging from 11 to 17 km for ZrnHe and 11 to 27 Km for ZrnFT to limit the influence of topography on estimated uplift rates. Three of the sites, CXIH, XGH and the South Cross-Island Hwy, are from the eastern Central Range whereas the fourth, Mt Yu, is from western Central Range. The results show that all four sites record similar exhumation histories from about 5 Ma to the present, except for a slight difference at Mt Yu. For example, the three eastern sites record an apparent increase in exhumation rate from < 1.2 mm/yr. to ~ 3-5 mm/yr. at about 1.5 Ma. At Mt. Yu, however, a similar increase in the rate of exhumation occurs at about 2 Ma. In addition, the zero-age intercepts of the youngest phase of uplift from the three eastern sites suggest the possibility of an additional increase in exhumation rate after ~0.4 Ma that is not recorded at Mt. Yu. Interestingly, Mt Yu is also mapped as a continuation of the Eocene rocks exposed in the Hsüehshan Range rather than part of the Central Range, consistent with the presence of a major structural boundary between Mt Yu and the three areas to the east. These data suggest the following conclusions: 1) the Hsüehshan and Central Ranges appear to have different exhumation histories; 2) the eastern Central

  14. Thermal History of the Central Pyrenees: Combining Low-Temperature Thermochronology and Thermal Modeling to Constrain the Formation of Convergent Orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalf, J. R.; Fitzgerald, P. G.; Baldwin, S. L.; Muñoz, J.

    2008-12-01

    Constraining the timing of thrusting is fundamental to understanding the tectonic evolution of convergent orogens. Without external constraints, it is difficult to directly tie low-temperature thermochronology to thrust fault activity in convergent orogens. This is largely because thrust faults do not exhume, and therefore do not directly cool, rocks. Topography generated in convergent orogens can cool rocks, either via lateral heat loss from the flanks of orogens ("topographic cooling") or more typically by increasing erosion rates. Neither of these scenarios can be simply applied to the Pyrenees. Prior to the Late Cretaceous initiation of convergence between the Iberian and European plates, the region that makes up the Pyrenees was part of a broad shallow marine basin. Many of the major thrust faults that were active during convergence are inverted low-angle extensional faults. Therefore, a significant amount of convergence and thrust faulting was accommodated prior to emergence above sea-level of the proto-Pyrenees, and hence there was no significant erodable topography. Topographic cooling is unlikely to be significant in the Pyrenees due to their relatively long wavelength and moderate amplitude. However, rocks in the footwall of thrust faults will record the onset of faulting as heating events. In the Pyrenees we are applying 40Ar/39Ar K-feldspar multi-diffusion domain (MDD) modeling and apatite fission track (AFT) thermochronology to examine the onset and magnitude of thrust faulting in the Axial Zone of the central and west-central Pyrenees. Both MDD modeling and AFT thermochronology can record heating events and can therefore provide quantitative constraints on the timing and rate of thrust fault activity in convergent orogens. MDD thermal models from granitic massifs in the Orri thrust sheet (the footwall of the Gavarnie Thrust) suggest reheating beginning at 65-60 Ma. This is interpreted to reflect burial due to thrusting beneath the Nogueres thrust

  15. sup 40 Ar/ sup 39 Ar polyorogenic mineral age record within the southern Mauritanide orogen (M'Bout-Bakel region) West Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Dallmeyer, R.D. ); Lecorche, J.P. )

    1990-12-01

    The southern Mauritanide orogen exposed between M'Bout and Bakel is characterized by several internally imbricated, polydeformed, and variably metamorphosed infrastructural allochthons. {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar incremental-release ages recorded by hornblende within undeformed granodiorite of the Guidimakha Complex suggest post-magmatic cooling through appropriate argon closure temperatures at approx 670 Ma. {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ages recorded by muscovite within lithologic elements of both the Guidimakha Complex and the Diala-Bouanze Series suggest initial regional metamorphism (associated with Pan-African I orogenesis) was following by cooling through muscovite argon closure temperatures between approx 600 and 620 Ma. Slight rejuvenation of muscovite argon systems occurred locally between approx 325 and 350 Ma. Muscovite and whole-rock slate/phyllite argon systems within metavolcanic and metavolcaniclastic components of the infrastructural calc-alkaline igneous complex (easternmost sectors of the M'Bout Series) record {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar plateau age of approx 300 to 320 Ma. Muscovite and whole-rock slate/phyllite argon systems within westernmost portions of the study area (western portions of the M'Bout Series) record {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar plateau ages of approx 267 to 312 Ma. All foreland units within the M'Bout-Bakel area were affected by post-Emsian folding. Effects of this tectonic activity are widespread throughout the parautochthon and western metamorphic sequences. These effects include emplacement of suprastructural ( ) allochthons and local reactivation of older thrust faults within infrastructural units.

  16. Gamma Band Activity in the Reticular Activating System

    PubMed Central

    Urbano, Francisco J.; Kezunovic, Nebojsa; Hyde, James; Simon, Christen; Beck, Paige; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2012-01-01

    This review considers recent evidence showing that cells in three regions of the reticular activating system (RAS) exhibit gamma band activity, and describes the mechanisms behind such manifestation. Specifically, we discuss how cells in the mesopontine pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), intralaminar parafascicular nucleus (Pf), and pontine subcoeruleus nucleus dorsalis (SubCD) all fire in the beta/gamma band range when maximally activated, but no higher. The mechanisms behind this ceiling effect have been recently elucidated. We describe recent findings showing that every cell in the PPN have high-threshold, voltage-dependent P/Q-type calcium channels that are essential, while N-type calcium channels are permissive, to gamma band activity. Every cell in the Pf also showed that P/Q-type and N-type calcium channels are responsible for this activity. On the other hand, every SubCD cell exhibited sodium-dependent subthreshold oscillations. A novel mechanism for sleep–wake control based on well-known transmitter interactions, electrical coupling, and gamma band activity is described. The data presented here on inherent gamma band activity demonstrates the global nature of sleep–wake oscillation that is orchestrated by brainstem–thalamic mechanism, and questions the undue importance given to the hypothalamus for regulation of sleep–wakefulness. The discovery of gamma band activity in the RAS follows recent reports of such activity in other subcortical regions like the hippocampus and cerebellum. We hypothesize that, rather than participating in the temporal binding of sensory events as seen in the cortex, gamma band activity manifested in the RAS may help stabilize coherence related to arousal, providing a stable activation state during waking and paradoxical sleep. Most of our thoughts and actions are driven by pre-conscious processes. We speculate that continuous sensory input will induce gamma band activity in the RAS that could participate in the processes of

  17. Traveling and resting crystals in active systems.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Andreas M; Löwen, Hartmut

    2013-02-01

    A microscopic field theory for crystallization in active systems is proposed which unifies the phase-field-crystal model of freezing with the Toner-Tu theory for self-propelled particles. A wealth of different active crystalline states are predicted and characterized. In particular, for increasing strength of self-propulsion, a transition from a resting crystal to a traveling crystalline state is found where the particles migrate collectively while keeping their crystalline order. Our predictions, which are verifiable in experiments and in particle-resolved computer simulations, provide a starting point for the design of new active materials.

  18. Distributed control system for active mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Ramos, Luis F.; Williams, Mark R.; Castro, Javier; Cruz, A.; Gonzalez, Juan C.; Mack, Brian; Martin, Carlos; Pescador, German; Sanchez, Vicente; Sosa, Nicolas A.

    1994-06-01

    This paper presents the IAC (Instituto de Astrofisica de Canaries, Spain) proposal of a distributed control system intended for the active support of a 8 m mirror. The system incorporates a large number of compact `smart' force actuators, six force definers, and a mirror support computer (MSC) for interfacing with the telescope control system and for general housekeeping. We propose the use of a network for the interconnection of the actuators, definers and the MSC, which will minimize the physical complexity of the interface between the mirror support system and the MSC. The force actuator control electronics are described in detail, as is the system software architecture of the actuator and the MSC. As the network is a key point for the system, we also detail the evaluation of three candidates, before electing the CAN bus.

  19. Syn-orogenic high-temperature crustal melting: Geochronological and Nd-Sr-Pb isotope constraints from basement-derived granites (Central Damara Orogen, Namibia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostendorf, Jörg; Jung, Stefan; Berndt-Gerdes, Jasper; Hauff, Folkmar

    2014-04-01

    Major and trace element and Nd, Sr and Pb isotope data from c. 550 Ma-old gray granites and c. 510 Ma-old red leucogranites of the high-grade central part of the Damara orogen (Namibia) indicate a dominantly deep crustal origin. Moderately peraluminous gray granites are isotopically evolved (initial ɛNd: c. - 17) and were likely derived from meta-igneous sources with late Archean to Paleoproterozoic crustal residence ages. Based on a comparison with experimental results, the granites were derived by partial melting of a granodioritic biotite gneiss at c. 900-950 °C and less than 10 kbar. Slightly peraluminous red leucogranites are also isotopically evolved (initial ɛNd: - 15 to - 18) but have undergone extensive crystal fractionation coupled with minor contamination of mid crustal meta-pelitic material. Major and trace element data do not support closed-system fractional crystallization processes for all samples, however, some chemical features underline the importance of crystal fractionation processes especially for the leucogranites. Isotope data do not support mixing of different crust-derived melts or assimilation of crustal rocks by a mafic magma on a large scale. For the gray granites, unradiogenic Pb isotope compositions with substantial variation in 207Pb/204Pb at almost constant 206Pb/204Pb, strongly negative ɛNd values and moderately radiogenic Sr isotope compositions argue for an undepleted nature of the source. High Rb/Sr ratios of the red leucogranites permit a comparison with the gray granites but similar initial ɛNd values indicate that the source of these granites is not fundamentally different to the source of the gray granites. The most acceptable model for both granite types involves partial melting of meta-igneous basement rocks of Archean to Proterozoic age. The consistency of the chemical data with a crustal anatectic origin and the observation that the gray granites intruded before the first peak of high-grade regional metamorphism

  20. Evidence of Early Cretaceous transpression in the Sulu orogenic belt, eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Chang, Su-Chin; Lin, Peijun; Zhu, Xiaoqing; Fu, Yongtao; Zhang, Haichun

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have documented marine turbidites with syn-sedimentary deformation features in the central Sulu orogenic belt of eastern China. These units preserve essential information on the Late Mesozoic evolution of the Sulu orogenic belt. Referred to as the Baxiandun Formation, the turbidites exhibit similar lithologic characteristics to nearby units such as the Lingshandao Formation that have been well studied even though precise geochronologic constraints are lacking for a more precise correlation. This study reports detrital zircon Usbnd Pb age data that correlate the Baxiandun Formation turbidites of the central Sulu orogenic belt to the Early Cretaceous Lingshandao Formation. We also report Al-in-hornblende emplacement depth estimates for granitic intrusions of the Sulu orogenic belt's Laoshan mountain. A sharp contact between the Laoshan granites and the marine Baxiandun Formation indicates that the Baxiandun basin rapidly subsided to the emplacement depth of the Laoshan plutons. Lateral correlation among the marine turbidites, the Lingshandao and Baxiandun Formations, combined with information established by previous studies indicates initiation of transpressional tectonics at 122-121 Ma. Transpression ceased with the emplacement of the Laoshan granites, whose A1-type composition indicates a return to extensional tectonics at ca. 111 Ma.

  1. Paleomagnetic data from the New England Orogen (eastern Australia) and implications for oroclinal bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaanan, Uri; Rosenbaum, Gideon; Pisarevsky, Sergei; Speranza, Fabio

    2015-11-01

    Orogenic curvatures (oroclines) are common in modern and ancient orogens, but the geodynamic driving forces of many oroclines remain controversial. Here we focus on the New England oroclines of eastern Australia, the formation of which had been previously broadly constrained to the Early-Middle Permian. This time interval encompasses periods of both back-arc extension (at ~ 300-280 Ma) and subsequent contractional deformation (Hunter-Bowen Orogeny) that commenced at ~ 270 Ma along the paleo-Pacific and Gondwanan subduction plate boundary. We present new paleomagnetic data from volcanic rocks that were extruded during the transition from extension to contraction (at ~ 272 Ma), and we show that the oroclinal structure must have formed prior to the emplacement of the volcanic rocks. Our results thus indicate that oroclinal bending in the southernmost New England Orogen has been completed prior to the onset of Middle Permian contractional deformation. It is therefore concluded that the oroclines have likely formed during back-arc extension, and that a major contribution to the orogenic curvature was driven by trench retreat.

  2. Crustal structure and orogenic material budget in the west central Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixell, Antonio

    1998-06-01

    Surface and subsurface data are combined to construct a crustal-scale cross section of the western central Pyrenees (France and Spain) at the boundary between the European and Iberian plates. The position of Moho reflections in the ECORS-Arzacq reflection profile suggests a tectonic wedge of European crust and upper mantle had indented the Iberian plate at lower crustal levels. The European wedge is overlain by an upper, Iberian wedge thus constituting a double (stacked) wedge geometry. The upper wedge was delaminated and deformed giving rise to the Pyrenean orogenic prism, manifested as a bivergent fan in upper crustal levels. The underthrust lower Iberian plate has been imaged to depths of 55-60 km, but crustal budget considerations based on a palinspastic reconstruction require that this continental root subducted to depths up to 90 km. Total orogenic contraction calculated from surface structures is about 75-80 km, which was accomplished between the latest Cretaceous and the early Miocene at an averaged rate of 1.2 mm/yr. Consistent with these moderate values, exhumation of the orogen is much less than in the more shortened eastern parts of the range. Paleozoic basement and preorogenic Mesozoic rocks are little eroded, and much of the exhumation involved cannibalization of early foreland basins, which once covered the entire, poorly emergent orogen at this transect. This resulted in a continuous process of sediment recycling and, coupled with a considerable lateral arrival of material, a bulk negative erosion-sedimentation budget.

  3. Post-collisional magmatism in the central East African Orogen: The Maevarano Suite of north Madagascar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodenough, K.M.; Thomas, Ronald J.; De Waele, B.; Key, R.M.; Schofield, D.I.; Bauer, W.; Tucker, R.D.; Rafahatelo, J.-M.; Rabarimanana, M.; Ralison, A.V.; Randriamananjara, T.

    2010-01-01

    Late tectonic, post-collisional granite suites are a feature of many parts of the Late Neoproterozoic to Cambrian East African Orogen (EAO), where they are generally attributed to late extensional collapse of the orogen, accompanied by high heat flow and asthenospheric uprise. The Maevarano Suite comprises voluminous plutons which were emplaced in some of the tectonostratigraphic terranes of northern Madagascar, in the central part of the EAO, following collision and assembly during a major orogeny at ca. 550 Ma. The suite comprises three main magmatic phases: a minor early phase of foliated gabbros, quartz diorites, and granodiorites; a main phase of large batholiths of porphyritic granitoids and charnockites; and a late phase of small-scale plutons and sheets of monzonite, syenite, leucogranite and microgranite. The main phase intrusions tend to be massive, but with variably foliated margins. New U-Pb SHRIMP zircon data show that the whole suite was emplaced between ca. 537 and 522 Ma. Geochemically, all the rocks of the suite are enriched in the LILE, especially K, and the LREE, but are relatively depleted in Nb, Ta and the HREE. These characteristics are typical of post-collisional granitoids in the EAO and many other orogenic belts. It is proposed that the Maevarano Suite magmas were derived by melting of sub-continental lithospheric mantle that had been enriched in the LILE during earlier subduction events. The melting occurred during lithospheric delamination, which was associated with extensional collapse of the East African Orogen. ?? 2009 Natural Environment Research Council.

  4. New isotopic ages and the timing of orogenic events in the Cordillera Darwin, southernmost Chilean Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervé, F.; Nelson, E.; Kawashita, K.; Suárez, M.

    1981-10-01

    The Cordillera Darwin, a structural culmination in the Andes of Tierra del Fuego, exposes an orogenic core zone that has undergone polyphase deformation and metamorphism. Some of the classic problems of orogenic zones have remained unanswered in the Cordillera Darwin: the age of deformed plutonic rocks, the distinction of structurally reactivated basement and metamorphosed cover rocks, and the timing of orogenic events. This study addresses and partially answers these questions. A well-constrained Rb-Sr isochron age of157±8m.y. and an initial 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio of 0.7087 obtained from a pre-tectonic granitic suite suggest a genetic relation between this suite and Upper Jurassic silicic volcanic rocks in the cover sequence (Tobifera Formation), and also suggest involvement of continental crust in formation of these magmas. A poorly constrained Rb-Sr isochron age of240±40m.y. obtained from supposed basement schists is consistent with field relations in the area which suggest a late Paleozoic/early Mesozoic metamorphism for these pre-Late Jurassic rocks. However, because of scatter in the data and the uncertainties involved in dating metasedimentary rocks, the significance of the isotopic age is dubious. Compilation of previously published ages in the area [9] with new mineral ages reported here indicate that "early Andean" orogenic events occurred between 100 and 84 m.y. ago, and that subduction-related magmatism has contributed, probably discontinuously, to the crustal evolution of the region throughout the Mesozoic.

  5. A tectonic linkage between the Rodelide orogen (Sierra Leone) and the St. Lucie metamorphic complex in the Florida subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Dallmeyer, R.D. )

    1989-03-01

    Hornblende concentrates prepared from cuttings from two deep test wells penetrating the complex display internally concordant {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar incremental-release spectra defining plateau ages of 510.8 {plus minus} 1.1 Ma and 513.1 {plus minus} 1.8 Ma, which are interpreted to date post-metamorphic cooling through temperatures required for intracrystalline argon retention. The Kasila Group constitutes the western segment of the Rokelide orogen in Sierra Leone. Four hornblende concentrations prepared for amphibolite within the Kasila Group yield {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar plateau ages of 505.0 {plus minus} 5.2, 508.2 {plus minus} 2.1, 510.5 {plus minus} 2.6, and 546.1 {plus minus} 6.8 Ma. They are interpreted to date post-metamorphic cooling through appropriate argon closure temperature following a ca. 550-560 Ma, Pan-African II phase of tectonothermal activity. A biotite concentrate from paragneiss within the Kasila Group displays an internally concordant {sup 40}/Ar{sup 39}Ar release spectrum defining a plateau age of 524.7 {plus minus} 1.3 Ma, which likely reflects slight contamination with extraneous (excess) argon. Muscovite from the Marampa Group yields a {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar plateau age of 561.1 {plus minus} 2.3 Ma, which is interpreted to date cooling through appropriate argon closure temperatures. Although these temperatures are generally considered to be lower than those for hornblenede, the muscovite records an older cooling age, suggesting that the Marampa Group experienced slightly earlier post-metamorphic uplift and cooling relative to the Kasila Group. Lithologic comparison combined with similarities in post-metamorphic thermal evolution suggest that the St. Lucie Metamorphic Complex originated within the Rockelide orogen. This and other lithotectonic elements of the Suwannee terrane appear to represent a fragment of Gondwana which accreted to Laurentia during late Paleozoic amalgamation of Pangea.

  6. Transient and Steady-State Kinematic Response to Erosional Forcing in an Orogenic Wedge: Sandbox Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, L.; Teyssier, C.; Annia, F.; Take, A.

    2005-12-01

    The evolution of orogens is highly affected by surface processes that control mass distribution. Transportation and redistribution of mass at the Earth's surface modifies the gravitational load and alters the stress field and kinematics within orogens. We explore the role of asymmetric erosion, indenter dip angle, and flux steady/non-steady state in determining the patterns of deformation and exhumation in doubly-sided orogenic wedges. In our analogue model, shortening of the orogen is driven by rigid indenters, represented by Plexiglas wedged blocks (35 and 70 degrees) that deform a non-cohesive dry Coulomb material (walnut shells) representing crustal material. Three end-member erosional scenarios are considered. In the first case, erosion is not applied, and thus the doubly-sided orogenic wedge evolves without restraints (non-steady state). In the second case, erosion is concentrated solely on the indenters side of the orogen (retrowedge), and in the third case, erosion is focused on the flank opposite to the indenter side (prowedge). In the last two cases, steady-state conditions were present in the middle stages of shortening. Strain and exhumation were calculated using displacement fields from 2D particle image velocimetry (PIV analysis). In the three cases, the model deforms as a combination of lateral compaction and localization of strain in shear bands. In the early stages of deformation, a "pop-up" structure develops, bounded by a fore-shear on the front and a back-shear toward the indenter. As deformation continues, a new fore-shear develops, and the previous one remains inactive and is passively pushed up the wedge. In the case of no erosion, the old fore-shears rotate slightly toward the indenter, and the shear bands evolve to steeply dipping structures. In the case of retrowedge erosion, the old fore-shears back rotate toward the indenter, and the shear bands evolve to shallowly dipping structures. In the case of prowedge erosion, old fore

  7. Supporting Classroom Activities with the BSUL System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogata, Hiroaki; Saito, Nobuji A.; Paredes J., Rosa G.; San Martin, Gerardo Ayala; Yano, Yoneo

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the integration of ubiquitous computing systems into classroom settings, in order to provide basic support for classrooms and field activities. We have developed web application components using Java technology and configured a classroom with wireless network access and a web camera for our purposes. In this classroom, the…

  8. Computer-automated neutron activation analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Minor, M.M.; Garcia, S.R.

    1983-01-01

    An automated delayed neutron counting and instrumental neutron activation analysis system has been developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Omega West Reactor (OWR) to analyze samples for uranium and 31 additional elements with a maximum throughput of 400 samples per day. 5 references.

  9. Actively Controlled Magnetic Vibration-Isolation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodsinky, Carlos M.; Logsdon, Kirk A.; Wbomski, Joseph F.; Brown, Gerald V.

    1993-01-01

    Prototype magnetic suspension system with active control isolates object from vibrations in all six degrees of freedom at frequencies as low as 0.01 Hz. Designed specifically to protect instruments aboard spacecraft by suppressing vibrations to microgravity levels; basic control approach used for such terrestrial uses as suppression of shocks and other vibrations in trucks and railroad cars.

  10. Design of nutrient removal activated sludge systems.

    PubMed

    Manga, J; Ferrer, J; Seco, A; Garcia-Usach, F

    2003-01-01

    A mechanistic mathematical model for nutrient and organic matter removal was used to describe the behavior of a nitrification denitrification enhanced biological phosphorus removal (NDEBPR) system. This model was implemented in a user-friendly software DESASS (design and simulation of activated sludge systems). A 484-L pilot plant was operated to verify the model results. The pilot plant was operated for three years over three different sludge ages. The validity of the model was confirmed with data from the pilot plant. Also, the utility of DESASS as a valuable tool for designing NDEBPR systems was confirmed.

  11. Design of nutrient removal activated sludge systems.

    PubMed

    Manga, J; Ferrer, J; Seco, A; Garcia-Usach, F

    2003-01-01

    A mechanistic mathematical model for nutrient and organic matter removal was used to describe the behavior of a nitrification denitrification enhanced biological phosphorus removal (NDEBPR) system. This model was implemented in a user-friendly software DESASS (design and simulation of activated sludge systems). A 484-L pilot plant was operated to verify the model results. The pilot plant was operated for three years over three different sludge ages. The validity of the model was confirmed with data from the pilot plant. Also, the utility of DESASS as a valuable tool for designing NDEBPR systems was confirmed. PMID:12906279

  12. Neotectonics, drainage pattern and geomorphology of the orogen-parallel Upper Enns Valley (Eastern Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keil, Melanie; Neubauer, Franz

    2011-06-01

    The geomorphology and neotectonics of the Upper Enns Valley (Austria) in the Eastern Alps reveal the formation of a fault-controlled orogen-parallel valley. In the study area, the Eastern Alps have been under surface uplift since Early Miocene times. Quaternary processes such as uplift and cyclic glaciations likely interfere with neotectonic activity as the Upper Enns Valley follows the Salzach-Enns-Mariazell-Puchberg (SEMP) fault. The geomorphologically different landscapes comprise three main tectonic units: (1) the Austroalpine crystalline basement exposed in the Niedere Tauern, (2) the Austroalpine Paleozoic units (Greywacke Zone) and (3) the Dachstein Plateau dominated by Triassic carbonate successions. The Upper Pleistocene Ramsau Conglomerate overlying the Greywacke Zone on the northern slope of the Upper Enns Valley is a crucial element to reconstruct the evolution of the valley. A new 14C date (uncalibrated) indicates an age older than 53,300 years, outside of the analytical limit of the methods. Provenance analysis of the Ramsau Conglomerate shows the Niedere Tauern as a source region and consequently a post-early Late Pleistocene dissection of the landscape by the Upper Enns Valley. Paleosurfaces at elevations of about 1100 m on the northern and southern slopes of the Upper Enns Valley allow us to estimate surface uplift/incision of about 2.5 mm/yr. Regularly oriented outcrop-scale faults and joints of the Ramsau Conglomerate document Pleistocene to Holocene tectonic deformation, which is consistent with ongoing seismicity. Paleostress tensors deduced from slickensides and striae of pre-Cenozoic basement rocks indicate two stages of Late Cretaceous to Paleogene deformation independent of the SEMP fault; the Oligocene-Neogene evolution comprises NW-SE strike-slip compression followed by E-W compression and Late Pleistocene ca. E-W extension, the latter recorded in the Ramsau Conglomerate.

  13. Thin visous sheet modelling of orogen scale deformation. The Eastern Alps in plan view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robl, J.; Stuewe, K.

    2003-04-01

    We present first results of a new numerical model to describe the dynamic evolution of the eastern Alps in plan view on the orogen scale. We investigate the influence of boundary conditions, gravitational potential energy, rheology contrast of major tectonic units and internal structures on the deformation field. We aim at estimating the Argan number of the Eastern Alps and to calculate slip rates along big lineaments that represent the northern and southern border of the Austro-Alpine extrusion corridor. A further aim is to predict the position and the activity of major faults where they disappear below quartenary sediments. All calculation are perfomed with the mechanical finite element code BASIL that allows computation on a thin visous sheet. The starting conditons are controlled by the varying crustal thickness of the region and by the rheolgy of the Adriatic indenter in the south, the Bohemian massif in the north and the Eastern Alps inbetween. We assume that the Eastern Alps are fixed to the north and the west while the southern boundary moves northward at a rate of 6-8 mm /y. The geodynamic setting in the east changed over the last 5 my. While a roll back subduction zone beneath the Carparthian belt accompanied by extension, crustal thinning and basin formation controlled the deformation of the Eastern Alps until the Miocene. Later on subduction stopped and the overall stress field changed from extension to compression resulting in uplift of many basins and the lack sediments younger than Pliocene. This well known variation of plate tectonic scenarios over the last 5 my allows us to place tight constraints for the boundary conditions of our model. Although our work is only now in progress, we can report some promising results: some of the kinematics and mechaniscs predicted by our modelling are consistent with field observations of the structural geologists and geodeticists.

  14. From orogenic collapse to rifting ; structures of the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pubellier, M.; Chan, L. S.; Chamot Rooke, N.; Shen, W.; Ringenbach, J. C.

    2009-04-01

    The opening of the South China Sea has been a matter of debate for many years because of its internal structure, the differences between the conjugate margins and the variations of rifting and spreading directions. Although it is considered as being a back-arc basin, it is not sitting directly above a subduction zone, and the rifting process lasted for an unusually long duration. Among the specific characteristics is the early phase of rifting which took place early in place of the former Yanshanian andean-type mountain range. This stage is marked by narrow basins filled with deformed conglomerate, and initiated around 70My ago within a framework where the oblique subduction marked by igneous activity and ductile wrench faults, was replaced by orogenic collapse. The rifting stage is marked by Eocene syntectonic normal faults and occasional volcanics centres and has proceeded from NW-SE to NS extension. The NW stretching created at least two aborted basins which remained at rift stage. Extension was followed by spreading from 33 to ~20 Ma in the South China Sea. The ocean floor spreading also changed direction to NW-SE with a propagator inside the Sunda shelf from 20 to 17My ago. However the propagator opening implies that deformation is also taken by rifting around a southern wedge which in turn created strain inside the thinned crust. Another extension parallel to the margin is also observed althought the spreading was in process. The southward motion of the southern conjugate margin was later accommodated by its subduction beneath the NW Borneo wedge until completion of the Proto South China Sea subduction. Variations of rifting spreading through time and variations of structural styles are discussed in terms of boundary forces acting to the SE.

  15. Tectonic, magmatic, and metallogenic evolution of the Late Cretaceous arc in the Carpathian-Balkan orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallhofer, Daniela; Quadt, Albrecht von; Peytcheva, Irena; Schmid, Stefan M.; Heinrich, Christoph A.

    2015-09-01

    The Apuseni-Banat-Timok-Srednogorie Late Cretaceous magmatic arc in the Carpathian-Balkan orogen formed on the European margin during closure of the Neotethys Ocean. It was subsequently deformed into a complex orocline by continental collisions. The Cu-Au mineralized arc consists of geologically distinct segments: the Apuseni, Banat, Timok, Panagyurishte, and Eastern Srednogorie segments. New U-Pb zircon ages and geochemical whole rock data for the Banat and Apuseni segments are combined with previously published data to reconstruct the original arc geometry and better constrain its tectonic evolution. Trace element and isotopic signatures of the arc magmas indicate a subduction-enriched source in all segments and variable contamination by continental crust. The magmatic arc was active for 25 Myr (~92-67 Ma). Across-arc age trends of progressively younger ages toward the inferred paleo-trench indicate gradual steepening of the subducting slab away from the upper plate European margin. This leads to asthenospheric corner flow in the overriding plate, which is recorded by decreasing 87Sr/86Sr (0.70577 to 0.70373) and increasing 143Nd/144Nd (0.51234 to 0.51264) ratios over time in some segments. The close spatial relationship between arc magmatism, large-scale shear zones, and related strike-slip sedimentary basins in the Timok and Pangyurishte segments indicates mild transtension in these central segments of the restored arc. In contrast, the Eastern Srednogorie segment underwent strong orthogonal intraarc extension. Segmental distribution of tectonic stress may account for the concentration of rich porphyry Cu deposits in the transtensional segments, where lower crustal magma storage and fractionation favored the evolution of volatile-rich magmas.

  16. Green Bank Telescope active surface system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacasse, Richard J.

    1998-05-01

    During the design phase of the Green Bank Telescope (GBT), various means of providing an accurate surface on a large aperture paraboloid, were considered. Automated jacks supporting the primary reflector were selected as the appropriate technology since they promised greater performance and potentially lower costs than a homologous or carbon fiber design, and had certain advantages over an active secondary. The design of the active surface has presented many challenges. Since the actuators are mounted on a tipping structure, it was required that they support a significant side-load. Such devices were not readily available commercially so they had to be developed. Additional actuator requirements include low backlash, repeatable positioning, and an operational life of at least 230 years. Similarly, no control system capable of controlling the 2209 actuators was commercially available. Again a prime requirement was reliability. Maintaining was also a very important consideration. The system architecture is tree-like. An active surface 'master-computer' controls interaction with the telescope control system, and controls ancillary equipment such as power supplies and temperature monitors. Two slave computers interface with the master- computer, and each closes approximately 1100 position loops. For simplicity, the servo is an 'on/off' type, yet achieves a positioning resolution of 25 microns. Each slave computer interfaces with 4 VME I/O cards, which in turn communicate with 140 control modules. The control modules read out the positions of the actuators every 0.1 sec and control the actuators' DC motors. Initial control of the active surface will be based on an elevation dependant structural model. Later, the model will be improved by holographic observations.Surface accuracy will be improved further by using laser ranging system which will actively measure the surface figure. Several tests have been conducted to assure that the system will perform as desired when

  17. Active gated imaging in driver assistance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grauer, Yoav

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we shall present the active gated imaging system (AGIS) in relation to the automotive field. AGIS is based on a fast-gated camera and pulsed illuminator, synchronized in the time domain to record images of a certain range of interest. A dedicated gated CMOS imager sensor and near infra-red (NIR) pulsed laser illuminator, is presented in this paper to provide active gated technology. In recent years, we have developed these key components and learned the system parameters, which are most beneficial to nighttime (in all weather conditions) driving in terms of field of view, illumination profile, resolution, and processing power. We shall present our approach of a camera-based advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) named BrightEye™, which makes use of the AGIS technology in the automotive field.

  18. SVM-based base-metal prospectivity modeling of the Aravalli Orogen, Northwestern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porwal, Alok; Yu, Le

    2010-05-01

    The Proterozoic Aravalli orogen in the state of Rajasthan, northwestern India, constitutes the most important metallogenic province for base-metal deposits in India and hosts the entire economically viable lead-zinc resource-base of the country. The orogen evolved through near-orderly Wilson cycles of repeated extensional and compressional tectonics resulting in sequential opening and closing of intracratonic rifts and amalgamation of crustal domains during a circa 1.0-Ga geological history from 2.2 Ga to 1.0 Ga. This study develops a conceptual tectonostratigraphic model of the orogen based on a synthesis of the available geological, geophysical and geochronological data followed by deep-seismic-reflectivity-constrained 2-D forward gravity modeling, and links it to the Proterozoic base-metal metallogeny in the orogen in order to identify key geological controls on the base-metal mineralization. These controls are translated into exploration criteria for base-metal deposits, validated using empirical spatial analysis, and used to derive input spatial variables for model-based base-metal prospectivity mapping of the orogen. A support vector machine (SVM) algorithm augmented by incorporating a feature selection procedure is used in a GIS environment to implement the prospectivity mapping. A comparison of the SVM-derived prospectivity map with the ones derived using other established models such as neural-networks, logistic regression, and Bayesian weights-of-evidence indicates that the SVM outperforms other models, which is attributed to the capability of the SVM to return robust classification based on small training datasets.

  19. Orogenic structure of the Eastern Alps, Europe, from TRANSALP deep seismic reflection profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüschen, Ewald; Lammerer, Bernd; Gebrande, Helmut; Millahn, Karl; Nicolich, Rinaldo; Transalp Working Group

    2004-09-01

    The TRANSALP Group, comprising of partner institutions from Italy, Austria and Germany, acquired data on a 340 km long deep seismic reflection line crossing the Eastern Alps between Munich and Venice. Although the field work was split into four campaigns, between fall 1998 and summer 2001, the project gathered for the first time a continuous profile across the Alps using consistent field acquisition and data processing parameters. These sections span the orogen itself, at its broadest width, as well as the editor Fred Davey and the two adjacent basins. Vibroseis and explosion data, complementary in their depth penetration and resolution characteristics, were obtained along with wide-angle and teleseismic data. The profile shows a bi-vergent asymmetric structure of the crust beneath the Alpine axis which reaches a maximum thickness of 55 km, and 80-100 km long transcrustal ramps, the southward dipping 'Sub-Tauern-Ramp' and the northward-dipping 'Sub-Dolomites-Ramp'. Strongly reflective patterns of these ramps can be traced towards the north to the Inn Valley and towards the south to the Valsugana thrust belt, both of which show enhanced seismicity in the brittle upper crust. The seismic sections do not reveal any direct evidence for the presence of the Periadriatic Fault system, the presumed equivalent to the Insubric Line in the Western Alps. According to our new evolutionary model, the Sub-Tauern-Ramp is linked at depth with remnants of the subducted Penninic Ocean. The 'crocodile'-type model describes an upper/lower crustal decoupling and wedging of both the European and the Adriatic-African continents.

  20. The Ust-Belaya ophiolite terrane, West Koryak Orogen: Isotopic dating and paleotectonic interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palandzhyan, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    The Ust-Belaya ophiolite terrane in the West Koryak Orogen, which is the largest in northeastern Asia, consists of three nappe complexes. The upper Ust-Belaya Nappe is composed of a thick (>5 km) sheet of fertile peridotites and mafic rocks (remnants of the proto-Pacific lithosphere); its upper age boundary is marked by Late Neoproterozoic plagiogranites. In the middle Tolovka-Otrozhny Nappe, the Late Precambrian lherzolite-type ophiolites are supplemented by fragments of tectonically delaminated harzburgite-type ophiolites, which make up the Tolovka rock association. The isotopic age of metadacite (K-Ar method, whole-rock sample) and zircons from plagiogranite porphyry (U-Pb method, SHRIMP) determines the upper chronological limit of the Tolovka ophiolites as 262-265 Ma ago. It is suggested that igneous rocks of these ophiolites were generated in a backarc basin during the Early Carboniferous and then incorporated into the fold-nappe structure in the Mid-Permian. This was the future basement of the Koni-Taigonos arc, where the Early Carboniferous ophiolites together with Late Neoproterozoic precursors were subject to low-temperature metamorphism and intruded by plagiogranite porphyry dikes in Permian-Triassic. The polymicte serpentinite mélange, which was formed in the accretionary complex of the Koni-Taigonos arc comprises rock blocks of the upper units of Late Precambrian ophiolites (in particular, plagiogranite), the overlying Middle to Upper Devonian and Early Carboniferous deposits, as well as Early Carboniferous (?) Tolovka ophiolites and meta-ophiolites. Mélange of this type with inclusions of Late Precambrian "oceanic" granitoids also developed in the lower Utyosiki Nappe composed of Middle Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous sedimentary and volcanic sequences, the formation of which was related to the next Uda-Murgal island-arc systems.

  1. Late Paleozoic tectonic evolution and concentrated mineralization in Balkhash and West Junggar, western part of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Shuwen; Chen, Xuanhua; Chen, Zhengle

    2016-04-01

    The Central Asia Orogenic Belt (CAOB) is an important area with significant growth of the crust and metallogeny in the Late Paleozoic. The Balkhash-Junggar tectono-metallogenic belt consists of the Balkhash, the West Junggar, and the East Junggar tectono-metallogenic belts in western part of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB). According to the structural geological relationship, the East Junggar, the West Junggar, and the Balkhash belts are considered to be once a continuous E-W-trending tectono-metallogenic belt in Late Carboniferous. The West Junggar belt is featured with NE-trending left-lateral strike-slip faulting tectonic system (WJTS), while the left-lateral strike-slip faults are E-W-trending in the Balkhash belt. The WJTS consists of the Darabut, the Mayile, and the Baerluke faults, and the blocks among them. All these left-lateral strike-slip faults are forming due to the transition of tectonic settings from syn-collisional orogeny to post-collisional extension during the closure of the ocean (the Junggar Sea) in Late Carboniferous, with significant intrusion of batholiths and crust growth occurred in this period. These faults are truncated by the right-lateral strike-slip faults, such as the Chingiz-Junggar fault, and the Central Balkhash fault in Mesozoic. The Balkhash-Junggar tectono-metallogenic belt is important for the occurrence of many well-known super-large and large porphyry Cu-Mo deposits (such as the Kounrad, the Aktogai, the Borly, and the Baogutu deposits), large skarn Cu deposits (in the Sayak ore-filed), large rare metal deposits (such as the East Kounrad, the Zhanet, and the Akshatau deposits), and large gold deposits (such as the Hatu deposit). Zircon U-Pb ages, Re-Os isotopic dating of molybdenites, 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology of hornblendes, muscovites, biotites, and K-feldspars, and zircon and apatite fission track (FT) and (U-Th)/He dating and thermal history modeling, provide a multidisciplinary approach to constrain the whole

  2. Modular System to Enable Extravehicular Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargusingh, Miriam J.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to perform extravehicular activity (EVA), both human and robotic, has been identified as a key component to space missions to support such operations as assembly and maintenance of space systems (e.g. construction and maintenance of the International Space Station), and unscheduled activities to repair an element of the transportation and habitation systems that can only be accessed externally and via unpressurized areas. In order to make human transportation beyond lower Earth orbit (LEO) practical, efficiencies must be incorporated into the integrated transportation systems to reduce system mass and operational complexity. Affordability is also a key aspect to be considered in space system development; this could be achieved through commonality, modularity and component reuse. Another key aspect identified for the EVA system was the ability to produce flight worthy hardware quickly to support early missions and near Earth technology demonstrations. This paper details a conceptual architecture for a modular EVA system that would meet these stated needs for EVA capability that is affordable, and that could be produced relatively quickly. Operational concepts were developed to elaborate on the defined needs, and to define the key capabilities, operational and design constraints, and general timelines. The operational concept lead to a high level design concept for a module that interfaces with various space transportation elements and contains the hardware and systems required to support human and telerobotic EVA; the module would not be self-propelled and would rely on an interfacing element for consumable resources. The conceptual architecture was then compared to EVA Systems used in the Space Shuttle Orbiter, on the International Space Station to develop high level design concepts that incorporate opportunities for cost savings through hardware reuse, and quick production through the use of existing technologies and hardware designs. An upgrade option

  3. Optically Active Porphyrin and Phthalocyanine Systems.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hua; Kobayashi, Nagao

    2016-05-25

    This review highlights and summarizes various optically active porphyrin and phthalocyanine molecules prepared using a wide range of structural modification methods to improve the design of novel structures and their applications. The induced chirality of some illustrative achiral bis-porphyrins with a chiral guest molecule is introduced because these systems are ideal for the identification and separation of chiral biologically active substrates. In addition, the relationship between CD signal and the absolute configuration of the molecule is analyzed through an analysis of the results of molecular modeling calculations. Possible future research directions are also discussed. PMID:27186902

  4. Control Systems Cyber Security Standards Support Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Evans

    2009-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security’s Control Systems Security Program (CSSP) is working with industry to secure critical infrastructure sectors from cyber intrusions that could compromise control systems. This document describes CSSP’s current activities with industry organizations in developing cyber security standards for control systems. In addition, it summarizes the standards work being conducted by organizations within the sector and provides a brief listing of sector meetings and conferences that might be of interest for each sector. Control systems cyber security standards are part of a rapidly changing environment. The participation of CSSP in the development effort for these standards has provided consistency in the technical content of the standards while ensuring that information developed by CSSP is included.

  5. Advanced extravehicular activity systems requirements definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A study to define the requirements for advanced extravehicular activities (AEVA) was conducted. The purpose of the study was to develop an understanding of the EVA technology requirements and to map a pathway from existing or developing technologies to an AEVA system capable of supporting long-duration missions on the lunar surface. The parameters of an AEVA system which must sustain the crewmembers and permit productive work for long periods in the lunar environment were examined. A design reference mission (DRM) was formulated and used as a tool to develop and analyze the EVA systems technology aspects. Many operational and infrastructure design issues which have a significant influence on the EVA system are identified.

  6. Active State Model for Autonomous Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Han; Chien, Steve; Zak, Michail; James, Mark; Mackey, Ryan; Fisher, Forest

    2003-01-01

    The concept of the active state model (ASM) is an architecture for the development of advanced integrated fault-detection-and-isolation (FDI) systems for robotic land vehicles, pilotless aircraft, exploratory spacecraft, or other complex engineering systems that will be capable of autonomous operation. An FDI system based on the ASM concept would not only provide traditional diagnostic capabilities, but also integrate the FDI system under a unified framework and provide mechanism for sharing of information between FDI subsystems to fully assess the overall health of the system. The ASM concept begins with definitions borrowed from psychology, wherein a system is regarded as active when it possesses self-image, self-awareness, and an ability to make decisions itself, such that it is able to perform purposeful motions and other transitions with some degree of autonomy from the environment. For an engineering system, self-image would manifest itself as the ability to determine nominal values of sensor data by use of a mathematical model of itself, and selfawareness would manifest itself as the ability to relate sensor data to their nominal values. The ASM for such a system may start with the closed-loop control dynamics that describe the evolution of state variables. As soon as this model was supplemented with nominal values of sensor data, it would possess self-image. The ability to process the current sensor data and compare them with the nominal values would represent self-awareness. On the basis of self-image and self-awareness, the ASM provides the capability for self-identification, detection of abnormalities, and self-diagnosis.

  7. Peripheral neural activity recording and stimulation system.

    PubMed

    Loi, D; Carboni, C; Angius, G; Angotzi, G N; Barbaro, M; Raffo, L; Raspopovic, S; Navarro, X

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents a portable, embedded, microcontroller-based system for bidirectional communication (recording and stimulation) between an electrode, implanted in the peripheral nervous system, and a host computer. The device is able to record and digitize spontaneous and/or evoked neural activities and store them in data files on a PC. In addition, the system has the capability of providing electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves, injecting biphasic current pulses with programmable duration, intensity, and frequency. The recording system provides a highly selective band-pass filter from 800 Hz to 3 kHz, with a gain of 56 dB. The amplification range can be further extended to 96 dB with a variable gain amplifier. The proposed acquisition/stimulation circuitry has been successfully tested through in vivo measurements, implanting a tf-LIFE electrode in the sciatic nerve of a rat. Once implanted, the device showed an input referred noise of 0.83 μVrms, was capable of recording signals below 10 μ V, and generated muscle responses to injected stimuli. The results demonstrate the capability of processing and transmitting neural signals with very low distortion and with a power consumption lower than 1 W. A graphic, user-friendly interface has been developed to facilitate the configuration of the entire system, providing the possibility to activate stimulation and monitor recordings in real time.

  8. Multipurpose active/passive motion compensation system

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.A.; Clements, R.E.; Davenport, M.R.

    1984-05-01

    A microprocessor-controlled active/passive motion compensation system has been developed for deploying a variety of geotechnical in-situ testing devices with mobile drilling rigs from low-cost service vessels. The light-weight rotary heave compensator incorporates a hydraulic motor as the compensator actuator and a servo-controlled closed loop pump to reduce the air storage and power requirements. Unique features of the system are the use of inertial sensors to measure three components of boat motion, the ability to run the system in active/passive or passive modes, and the ability to automatically lower the drillstring at a constant velocity while maintaining motion compensation. Quantitative measurements made during sea trials offshore California yielded motion compensation accuracy approaching 98 percent which is much better than the compensation achieved with passive systems. Results are presented from offshore in-situ testing with a cone penetrometer, a vane shear device, and a suspension PS logger. The system can also be used for other offshore applications.

  9. PCM Passive Cooling System Containing Active Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanding, David E.; Bass, David I.

    2005-01-01

    A multistage system has been proposed for cooling a circulating fluid that is subject to intermittent intense heating. The system would be both flexible and redundant in that it could operate in a basic passive mode, either sequentially or simultaneously with operation of a first, active cooling subsystem, and either sequentially or simultaneously with a second cooling subsystem that could be active, passive, or a combination of both. This flexibility and redundancy, in combination with the passive nature of at least one of the modes of operation, would make the system more reliable, relative to a conventional cooling system. The system would include a tube-in-shell heat exchanger, within which the space between the tubes would be filled with a phase-change material (PCM). The circulating hot fluid would flow along the tubes in the heat exchanger. In the basic passive mode of operation, heat would be conducted from the hot fluid into the PCM, wherein the heat would be stored temporarily by virtue of the phase change.

  10. Research on an Active Seat Belt System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Takeshi

    In a car crash, permanent injury can be avoided if deformation of an occupant's rib cage is maintained within the allowable value. In order to realize this condition, the occupant's seat belt tension must be instantaneously adjusted by a feedback control system. In this study, a seat belt tension control system based on the active shock control system is proposed. The semi-active control law used is derived from the sliding mode control method. One advantage of this proposed system is that it does not require a large power actuator because the seat belt tension is controlled by a brake mechanism. The effectiveness is confirmed by numerical simulation using general parameters of a human thorax and a passenger car in a collision scenario with a wall at a velocity of 100 km/h. The feasibility is then confirmed with a control experiment using a scale model of about 1/10 scale. The relative displacement of the thorax model approaches the allowable value smoothly along the control reference and settles near this value. Thus, the proposed seat belt tension control system design is established.

  11. Active Aircraft Pylon Noise Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H. (Inventor); Czech, Michael J (Inventor); Elmiligui, Alaa A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An active pylon noise control system for an aircraft includes a pylon structure connecting an engine system with an airframe surface of the aircraft and having at least one aperture to supply a gas or fluid therethrough, an intake portion attached to the pylon structure to intake a gas or fluid, a regulator connected with the intake portion via a plurality of pipes, to regulate a pressure of the gas or fluid, a plenum chamber formed within the pylon structure and connected with the regulator, and configured to receive the gas or fluid as regulated by the regulator, and a plurality of injectors in communication with the plenum chamber to actively inject the gas or fluid through the plurality of apertures of the pylon structure.

  12. Voice activity detection for speaker verification systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowski, Filip

    2008-01-01

    Complex algorithm for speech activity detection was presented in this article. It is based on speech enhancement, features extraction and final detection algorithm. The first one was published in ETSI standard as a module of "Advanced front-end feature extraction algorithm" in distributed speech recognition system. It consists of two main parts, noise estimatiom and Wiener filtering. For the final detection modified linear prediction coefficients and spectral entropy features are extracted form denoised signal.

  13. Differential decay of the East-African Antarctic Orogen : an integrated examination of Northeastern Mozambique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, K.; Jacobs, J.; Emmel, B.; Thomas, R. J.; Matola, R.

    2009-04-01

    In Northeastern Mozambique, the late Proterozoic - early Paleozoic East African-Antarctic Orogen can be subdivided into two major blocks that exhibit some relevant differences. The line of divide is represented by the Lurio Belt, a kinematically poorly constrained shear zone that also marks the conceptual northern limit of frequent late-tectonic granitoid intrusions. Moreover, far-travelled granulite-facies nappes cover a much larger area north of this belt (Viola et. al, 2008), giving rise to the assumption of different exhumation and present exposure levels. U/Pb data from previous surveys (e.g., Norconsult consortium, 2007) show coeval high-grade metamorphism in the whole region between c. 610 - 550 Ma, while the block south of the Lurio Belt also shows continuing metamorphism until c. 490 Ma that can be related to extension. Geothermobarometry for samples from within the Lurio Belt (Engvik et. al, 2007) indicates rapid exhumation after high-pressure granulite facies metamorphism and is consistant with the assumption of long tectonic activity. A possible model for the outlined pattern is the delamination of the orogenic root only in the southern part, followed by rapid mechanical thinning as well as by isostatic accommodation along the Lurio Belt. A valuable marker was identified in the metasedimentary Mecuburi group that overlies the southern basement. U/Pb analysis of detrital zircons have yielded a maximum deposition age of c. 600 Ma, while metamorphism is recorded until c. 505 Ma. Investigations of the relationship between metasediments and older basement show that the basal contact is a fairly preserved depositional contact, allowing to suppose a conjoint post-depositional evolution. It is notable that the timing of deposition shortly follows the onset of the main, widespread high-grade metamorphism. Relatively high but variable degrees of migmatisation in the Mecuburi Group require a phase of burial from surface to deep levels after 600 Ma, followed by

  14. Active Space Telescope Systems - A New Paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unwin, Stephen C.; Coulter, D. R.; Gallagher, D. B.; Hickey, G. S.; Laskin, R. A.; Redding, D. C.; Traub, W. A.; Werner, M. W.

    2010-01-01

    New active optics technologies are rapidly maturing that will enable outstanding scientific performance for the next generation of astronomical space telescopes, while dramatically reducing cost drivers such as mass and manufacturing time. Using these technologies, NASA can, with modest further development, field high-performance space telescopes at a cost, risk and development schedule substantially below historical norms. Many key elements of this new system architecture are currently, or soon will be, demonstrated at TRL 6 or even space qualified through previous and ongoing work at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This paper describes the overall architecture, discusses the current status of the relevant active optics technologies, and proposes a technology development path to address the remaining elements for some specific NASA science mission examples. Our approach is a new paradigm for moderate-to-large space telescopes, building on the advancements incorporated into the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) including primary and secondary mirror deployment, segmented optics and a modest level of active control. The primary new ingredients of the flight system are lightweight, easily replicable, mirror segments, incorporating actuators which can control the segment figure on orbit; a robust Wavefront Sensing and Control system to establish the overall figure, phasing, and alignment; and a real time, high dynamic range, high precision control system which maintains the rigid body alignment of the segments to the required precision. This controllability makes it possible to fabricate and assemble to looser tolerances, while reducing overall mission risk. In addition, the control system can greatly simplify the lengthy and expensive integration and test process that is faced by all large telescope missions. The research described in this talk was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National

  15. Oroclines of the Variscan orogen of Iberia: Paleocurrent analysis and paleogeographic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Jessica; Johnston, Stephen T.; Gutiérrez-Alonso, Gabriel; Weil, Arlo B.

    2012-05-01

    Coupled structural and paleomagnetic analyses have shown that the northern Iberian bend of the Variscan orogen, referred to as the Cantabrian Orocline, developed by vertical axis rotation of an originally linear orogen. However, palinspastic restoration of the orocline has proven difficult owing to (1) an unusually great orogenic width of over 700 km and (2) exposure of shallow water strata of the Gondwanan margin in the northern and southern portions of the orogen. We present paleocurrent data from Lower Ordovician shallow marine clastic sedimentary rocks across the Variscan of northern and central Iberia collected to constrain palinspastic restoration of the orogen. Paleocurrent data were collected from over 50 sites, and include cross bed foresets, ripple crests and casts, as well as rare ball and pillow structures, syn-sedimentary slump folds, and incised channels. Paleocurrent directions fan around the Cantabrian Orocline, are consistently oriented at a high angle to structural strike, and yield a consistent offshore direction outward from the oroclinal core. Similarly, changes in structural strike and paleocurrent direction across central Iberia imply the presence of a second more southerly orocline, the Central Iberian Orocline, that is continuous with, but convex in the opposite direction of the Cantabrian Orocline. Together, the Cantabrian and Central Iberian oroclines define an S-shaped pair of continental-scale buckle folds. Palinspastic restoration of the oroclines yields a linear continental margin > 1500 km long characterized by consistent offshore paleoflow to the west, defining a westerly oceanic domain (presumably the Rheic Ocean) and an easterly landward direction (presumably Gondwana). Recognition of the southern orocline explains the unusual width of the orogen, the geometry of aeromagnetic anomalies attributable to Variscan rocks, and is consistent with available structural data, paleomagnetic declination data, and the distribution of

  16. Crustal Structure And Magmatism, Coast Mountains Orogen, Latitude 52-53 degrees North, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusmore, M. E.; Gehrels, G.; Woodsworth, G. J.

    2007-12-01

    New geologic data and U-Pb ages reveal complex history of arc accretion, crustal thickening and migration of magmatic fronts during deformation. Plutonic ages define distinct western and eastern Jurassic - mid Cretaceous arcs that share a common history after ~90 Ma. Juxtaposition of these arcs occurred during mid- Cretaceous crustal shortening in a dominantly SW-vergent crustal-scale thrust belt. Significant crustal thickening buried 151 Ma granitic clasts to pressures > 6 kb, and mid-Cretaceous plutons were emplaced at this depth along the axis of the orogen. Thrusting continued after establishment of the 90 Ma arc; a regional SW-verging thrust emplaced high-grade metamorphic rocks of the Yukon-Tanana terrane and deep-seated plutons over low- grade rocks of the Alexander and Wrangellia terranes. The shear zone is coincident with the western boundary of 82-89 Ma plutons and a regionally extensive, late-kinematic, sill-like pluton. Dextral shear zones preserved on the flanks of the orogen suggest a component of Late Cretaceous transpression. By 75 Ma, metamorphism, deformation, and magmatism had migrated central portions of the orogen and there is no evidence of ductile deformation and syn-kinematic metarmorphism younger than ~70 - 65 along the western flank of the orogen. The Coast shear zone localized 62-58 Ma synkinematic plutons during NE-side up displacement, creating a sharp western magmatic front. Sparse cooling ages suggest plutons and metamorphic rocks adjacent to the CSZ cooled through 500-600 deg between 54-58 Ma during exhumation along the shear zone. Voluminous granitic plutons were emplaced from ~55-50 Ma, but significant crustal extension that affected the eastern side of the orogen farther north is not evident along this transect. This history supports previous models of crustal subcretion and the generation of arc magmas in thickened crust. Definition of two pre-90 Ma arcs negates models calling for simple Andean-style orogen prior to mid

  17. Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T. (Inventor); Book, Michael L. (Inventor); Bryan, Thomas C. (Inventor); Bell, Joseph L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System (GPSSALADS) for automatically docking a chase vehicle with a target vehicle comprising at least one active light emitting target which is operatively attached to the target vehicle. The target includes a three-dimensional array of concomitantly flashing lights which flash at a controlled common frequency. The GPSSALADS further comprises a visual tracking sensor operatively attached to the chase vehicle for detecting and tracking the target vehicle. Its performance is synchronized with the flash frequency of the lights by a synchronization means which is comprised of first and second internal clocks operatively connected to the active light target and visual tracking sensor, respectively, for providing timing control signals thereto, respectively. The synchronization means further includes first and second Global Positioning System receivers operatively connected to the first and second internal clocks, respectively, for repeatedly providing simultaneous synchronization pulses to the internal clocks, respectively. In addition, the GPSSALADS includes a docking process controller means which is operatively attached to the chase vehicle and is responsive to the visual tracking sensor for producing commands for the guidance and propulsion system of the chase vehicle.

  18. Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System (GPSSALADS) for automatically docking a chase vehicle with a target vehicle comprises at least one active light emitting target which is operatively attached to the target vehicle. The target includes a three-dimensional array of concomitantly flashing lights which flash at a controlled common frequency. The GPSSALADS further comprises a visual tracking sensor operatively attached to the chase vehicle for detecting and tracking the target vehicle. Its performance is synchronized with the flash frequency of the lights by a synchronization means which is comprised of first and second internal clocks operatively connected to the active light target and visual tracking sensor, respectively, for providing timing control signals thereto, respectively. The synchronization means further includes first and second Global Positioning System receivers operatively connected to the first and second internal clocks, respectively, for repeatedly providing simultaneous synchronization pulses to the internal clocks, respectively. In addition, the GPSSALADS includes a docking process controller means which is operatively attached to the chase vehicle and is responsive to the visual tracking sensor for producing commands for the guidance and propulsion system of the chase vehicle.

  19. Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Richard

    1994-08-01

    A Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System (GPSSALADS) for automatically docking a chase vehicle with a target vehicle comprises at least one active light emitting target which is operatively attached to the target vehicle. The target includes a three-dimensional array of concomitantly flashing lights which flash at a controlled common frequency. The GPSSALADS further comprises a visual tracking sensor operatively attached to the chase vehicle for detecting and tracking the target vehicle. Its performance is synchronized with the flash frequency of the lights by a synchronization means which is comprised of first and second internal clocks operatively connected to the active light target and visual tracking sensor, respectively, for providing timing control signals thereto, respectively. The synchronization means further includes first and second Global Positioning System receivers operatively connected to the first and second internal clocks, respectively, for repeatedly providing simultaneous synchronization pulses to the internal clocks, respectively. In addition, the GPSSALADS includes a docking process controller means which is operatively attached to the chase vehicle and is responsive to the visual tracking sensor for producing commands for the guidance and propulsion system of the chase vehicle.

  20. Processing abstract language modulates motor system activity.

    PubMed

    Glenberg, Arthur M; Sato, Marc; Cattaneo, Luigi; Riggio, Lucia; Palumbo, Daniele; Buccino, Giovanni

    2008-06-01

    Embodiment theory proposes that neural systems for perception and action are also engaged during language comprehension. Previous neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies have only been able to demonstrate modulation of action systems during comprehension of concrete language. We provide neurophysiological evidence for modulation of motor system activity during the comprehension of both concrete and abstract language. In Experiment 1, when the described direction of object transfer or information transfer (e.g., away from the reader to another) matched the literal direction of a hand movement used to make a response, speed of responding was faster than when the two directions mismatched (an action-sentence compatibility effect). In Experiment 2, we used single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation to study changes in the corticospinal motor pathways to hand muscles while reading the same sentences. Relative to sentences that do not describe transfer, there is greater modulation of activity in the hand muscles when reading sentences describing transfer of both concrete objects and abstract information. These findings are discussed in relation to the human mirror neuron system. PMID:18470821

  1. Active polarimeter optical system laser hazard analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2005-07-01

    A laser hazard analysis was performed for the SNL Active Polarimeter Optical System based on the ANSI Standard Z136.1-2000, American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers and the ANSI Standard Z136.6-2000, American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors. The Active Polarimeter Optical System (APOS) uses a pulsed, near-infrared, chromium doped lithium strontium aluminum fluoride (Cr:LiSAF) crystal laser in conjunction with a holographic diffuser and lens to illuminate a scene of interest. The APOS is intended for outdoor operations. The system is mounted on a height adjustable platform (6 feet to 40 feet) and sits atop a tripod that points the beam downward. The beam can be pointed from nadir to as much as 60 degrees off of nadir producing an illuminating spot geometry that can vary from circular (at nadir) to elliptical in shape (off of nadir). The JP Innovations crystal Cr:LiSAF laser parameters are presented in section II. The illuminating laser spot size is variable and can be adjusted by adjusting the separation distance between the lens and the holographic diffuser. The system is adjusted while platform is at the lowest level. The laser spot is adjusted for a particular spot size at a particular distance (elevation) from the laser by adjusting the separation distance (d{sub diffuser}) to predetermined values. The downward pointing angle is also adjusted before the platform is raised to the selected operation elevation.

  2. Extravehicular Activity (EVA) 101: Constellation EVA Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Nicole C.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Systems is shown. The topics include: 1) Why do we need space suits? 2) Protection From the Environment; 3) Primary Life Support System (PLSS); 4) Thermal Control; 5) Communications; 6) Helmet and Extravehicular Visor Assy; 7) Hard Upper Torso (HUT) and Arm Assy; 8) Display and Controls Module (DCM); 9) Gloves; 10) Lower Torso Assembly (LTA); 11) What Size Do You Need?; 12) Boot and Sizing Insert; 13) Boot Heel Clip and Foot Restraint; 14) Advanced and Crew Escape Suit; 15) Nominal & Off-Nominal Landing; 16) Gemini Program (mid-1960s); 17) Apollo EVA on Service Module; 18) A Bold Vision for Space Exploration, Authorized by Congress; 19) EVA System Missions; 20) Configurations; 21) Reduced Gravity Program; and 22) Other Opportunities.

  3. Tectonic interpretation of the westernmost part of the Ouachita-Marathon (Hercynian) orogenic belt, west Texas Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shurbet, D. H.; Cebull, S. E.

    1987-05-01

    The disposition of the Ouachita-Marathon orogenic belt as it extends through west Texas into Mexico has been the subject of diverse interpretations. However, an explanation developed earlier for the general shape of the Ouachita-Marathon orogenic belt in the southern United States, which was based on the relation of craton margin to direction of Paleozoic plate motion, is adequate to account for the belt's puzzling disposition upon entering Mexico. It is suggested that crustal thickness, gravity, and geologic data indicate that the orogen follows the shape of the craton margin, which swings around a reentrant south of the Marathon region and extends southward into Mexico. In Mexico the orogen apparently ends in association with the westernmost of the Ouachita-Marathon zones of transform offset.

  4. Testing models of orogen exhumation using zircon (U-Th)/He thermochronology: Insight from the Ligurian Alps, Northern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maino, Matteo; Dallagiovanna, Giorgio; Dobson, Katherine J.; Gaggero, Laura; Persano, Cristina; Seno, Silvio; Stuart, Finlay M.

    2012-08-01

    Testing models of orogen exhumation requires precise constraint of the time-temperature paths of the exhumed rocks. The zircon (U-Th)/He (ZHe) thermochronometer has a closure temperature of ~ 140-210 °C, and can provide temporal constraints on the exhumation history of rocks through a thermal range which crucially corresponds the onset of brittle behaviour of an exhuming orogen. We performed ZHe analyses to test the existing contradictory models for the exhumation of the Ligurian Alps. The ZHe ages indicate a very rapid (1.3-6.8 mm/yr) and southward migrating exhumation of the orogen between ~ 32 and 25 Ma. These high exhumation rates are unique within the Alpine belt and cannot be reconciled with existing geodynamic models of the evolution of the Ligurian Alps. We propose a model of tectonic denudation via detachment accomplished in the shallowest crust (< 5 km) as a result of the last orogenic phase of extension.

  5. Active Thermal Control System Development for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westheimer, David

    2007-01-01

    All space vehicles or habitats require thermal management to maintain a safe and operational environment for both crew and hardware. Active Thermal Control Systems (ATCS) perform the functions of acquiring heat from both crew and hardware within a vehicle, transporting that heat throughout the vehicle, and finally rejecting that energy into space. Almost all of the energy used in a space vehicle eventually turns into heat, which must be rejected in order to maintain an energy balance and temperature control of the vehicle. For crewed vehicles, Active Thermal Control Systems are pumped fluid loops that are made up of components designed to perform these functions. NASA has been actively developing technologies that will enable future missions or will provide significant improvements over the state of the art technologies. These technologies have are targeted for application on the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), or Orion, and a Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM). The technologies that have been selected and are currently under development include: fluids that enable single loop ATCS architectures, a gravity insensitive vapor compression cycle heat pump, a sublimator with reduced sensitivity to feedwater contamination, an evaporative heat sink that can operate in multiple ambient pressure environments, a compact spray evaporator, and lightweight radiators that take advantage of carbon composites and advanced optical coatings.

  6. Noninvasive ambulatory measurement system of cardiac activity.

    PubMed

    Pino, Esteban J; Chavez, Javier A P; Aqueveque, Pablo

    2015-08-01

    This work implements a noninvasive system that measures the movements caused by cardiac activity. It uses unobtrusive Electro-Mechanical Films (EMFi) on the seat and on the backrest of a regular chair. The system detects ballistocardiogram (BCG) and respiration movements. Real data was obtained from 54 volunteers. 19 of them were measured in the laboratory and 35 in a hospital waiting room. Using a BIOPAC acquisition system, the ECG was measured simultaneously to the BCG for comparison. Wavelet Transform (WT) is a better option than Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) for signal extraction and produces higher effective measurement time. In the laboratory, the best results are obtained on the seat. The correlation index was 0.9800 and the Bland-Altman limits of agreement were 0.7136 ± 4.3673 [BPM]. In the hospital waiting room, the best results are also from the seat sensor. The correlation index was 0.9840, and the limits of agreement were 0.4386 ± 3.5884 [BPM]. The system is able to measure BCG in an unobtrusive way and determine the cardiac frequency with high precision. It is simple to use, which means the system can easily be used in non-standard settings: resting in a chair or couch, at the gym, schools or in a hospital waiting room, as shown. PMID:26738057

  7. Advanced Active Thermal Control Systems Architecture Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanford, Anthony J.; Ewert, Michael K.

    1996-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) initiated a dynamic study to determine possible improvements available through advanced technologies (not used on previous or current human vehicles), identify promising development initiatives for advanced active thermal control systems (ATCS's), and help prioritize funding and personnel distribution among many research projects by providing a common basis to compare several diverse technologies. Some technologies included were two-phase thermal control systems, light-weight radiators, phase-change thermal storage, rotary fluid coupler, and heat pumps. JSC designed the study to estimate potential benefits from these various proposed and under-development thermal control technologies for five possible human missions early in the next century. The study compared all the technologies to a baseline mission using mass as a basis. Each baseline mission assumed an internal thermal control system; an external thermal control system; and aluminum, flow-through radiators. Solar vapor compression heat pumps and light-weight radiators showed the greatest promise as general advanced thermal technologies which can be applied across a range of missions. This initial study identified several other promising ATCS technologies which offer mass savings and other savings compared to traditional thermal control systems. Because the study format compares various architectures with a commonly defined baseline, it is versatile and expandable, and is expected to be updated as needed.

  8. Scuba diving activates vascular antioxidant system.

    PubMed

    Sureda, A; Batle, J M; Ferrer, M D; Mestre-Alfaro, A; Tur, J A; Pons, A

    2012-07-01

    The aim was to study the effects of scuba diving immersion on plasma antioxidant defenses, nitric oxide production, endothelin-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor levels. 9 male divers performed an immersion at 50 m depth for a total time of 35 min. Blood samples were obtained before diving at rest, immediately after diving, and 3 h after the diving session. Leukocyte counts, plasma 8oxoHG, malondialdehyde and nitrite levels significantly increased after recovery. Activities of lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, catalase and superoxide significantly increased immediately after diving and these activities remained high after recovery. Plasma myeloperoxidase activity and protein levels and extracellular superoxide dismutase protein levels increased after 3 h. Endothelin-1 concentration significantly decreased after diving and after recovery. Vascular endothelial growth factor concentration significantly increased after diving when compared to pre-diving values, returning to initial values after recovery. Scuba diving at great depth activated the plasma antioxidant system against the oxidative stress induced by elevated pO₂ oxygen associated with hyperbaria. The decrease in endothelin-1 levels and the increase in nitric oxide synthesis could be factors that contribute to post-diving vasodilation. Diving increases vascular endothelial growth factor plasma levels which can contribute to the stimulation of tissue resistance to diving-derived oxidative damage.

  9. Tectonic Implications of U-Pb Zircon Ages of the Himalayan Orogenic Belt in Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCelles, P. G.; Gehrels, G. E.; Quade, J.; LaReau, B.; Spurlin, M.

    2000-04-01

    Metasedimentary rocks of the Greater Himalaya are traditionally viewed as Indian shield basement that has been thrust southward onto Lesser Himalayan sedimentary rocks during the Cenozoic collision of India and Eurasia. Ages determined from radioactive decay of uranium to lead in zircon grains from Nepal suggest that Greater Himalayan protoliths were shed from the northern end of the East African orogen during the late Proterozoic pan-African orogenic event. These rocks were accreted onto northern Gondwana and intruded by crustal melts during Cambrian-Ordovician time. Our data suggest that the Main Central thrust may have a large amount of pre-Tertiary displacement, that structural restorations placing Greater Himalayan rocks below Lesser Himalayan rocks at the onset of Cenozoic orogenesis are flawed, and that some metamorphism of Greater Himalayan rocks may have occurred during early Paleozoic time.

  10. Tectonic implications of U-Pb zircon ages of the himalayan orogenic belt in nepal

    PubMed

    DeCelles; Gehrels; Quade; LaReau; Spurlin

    2000-04-21

    Metasedimentary rocks of the Greater Himalaya are traditionally viewed as Indian shield basement that has been thrust southward onto Lesser Himalayan sedimentary rocks during the Cenozoic collision of India and Eurasia. Ages determined from radioactive decay of uranium to lead in zircon grains from Nepal suggest that Greater Himalayan protoliths were shed from the northern end of the East African orogen during the late Proterozoic pan-African orogenic event. These rocks were accreted onto northern Gondwana and intruded by crustal melts during Cambrian-Ordovician time. Our data suggest that the Main Central thrust may have a large amount of pre-Tertiary displacement, that structural restorations placing Greater Himalayan rocks below Lesser Himalayan rocks at the onset of Cenozoic orogenesis are flawed, and that some metamorphism of Greater Himalayan rocks may have occurred during early Paleozoic time.

  11. Geologic evolution of the Cordillera Darwin orogenic core complex, Southern Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, E. P.

    1981-08-01

    Located in the east-west trending Andes of Tierra del Fuego is a structural culmination exposing deeper crustal levels than in surrounding areas, termed an orogenic core complex because of the localization there of relatively high-grade metamorphism, intense polyphase deformation, and differential uplift. Strongly deformed and regionally metamorphosed pre-Late Jurassic basement rocks mainly of sedimentary origin are unconformably overlain by a cover sequence of Upper Jurassic silicic-intermediate volcanic rocks (Tobifera Formation) and Lower Cretaceous clastic sedimentary rocks (Yahgan Formation). The D1 and D2 phases produced major and minor fold structures, extension and intersection lineations, and axial planar and transposition foliations in complex patterns similar to those in other collision-type orogens. The Darwin and Beagle suites show affinities with S- and I-type granitic suites respectively.

  12. Velocity distribution in active particles systems

    PubMed Central

    Marconi, Umberto Marini Bettolo; Gnan, Nicoletta; Paoluzzi, Matteo; Maggi, Claudio; Di Leonardo, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We derive an analytic expression for the distribution of velocities of multiple interacting active particles which we test by numerical simulations. In clear contrast with equilibrium we find that the velocities are coupled to positions. Our model shows that, even for two particles only, the individual velocities display a variance depending on the interparticle separation and the emergence of correlations between the velocities of the particles. When considering systems composed of many particles we find an analytic expression connecting the overall velocity variance to density, at the mean-field level, and to the pair distribution function valid in the limit of small noise correlation times. Finally we discuss the intriguing analogies and main differences between our effective free energy functional and the theoretical scenario proposed so far for phase-separating active particles. PMID:27001289

  13. The structure, stratigraphy, tectonostratigraphy, and evolution of the southernmost part of the Appalachian Orogen

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, M.W.; Atkins, R.L.; Crawford, T.J.; Crawford, R.F. III; Brooks, R.; Cook, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    The southernmost part of the Appalachian Orogen is composed of three stacks of folded thrust sheets, which preserve rocks formed in a variety of environments that virtually spanned the Iapetus Ocean. All of the metamorphism, deformation, and plutonism in the southernmost Appalachians can be related to the movement of the thrust sheets and stacks. Thrusting took place continuously from Early Ordovician through Carboniferous time. An account is given of the origins, assembly, transport, and arrival of the thrust sheets and stacks.

  14. Influenza virus activation of the interferon system

    PubMed Central

    Killip, Marian J.; Fodor, Ervin; Randall, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    The host interferon (IFN) response represents one of the first barriers that influenza viruses must surmount in order to establish an infection. Many advances have been made in recent years in understanding the interactions between influenza viruses and the interferon system. In this review, we summarise recent work regarding activation of the type I IFN response by influenza viruses, including attempts to identify the viral RNA responsible for IFN induction, the stage of the virus life cycle at which it is generated and the role of defective viruses in this process. PMID:25678267

  15. System and method for monitoring cellular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, Gregory H. (Inventor); Fraser, Scott E. (Inventor); Lansford, Russell D. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A system and method for monitoring cellular activity in a cellular specimen. According to one embodiment, a plurality of excitable markers are applied to the specimen. A multi-photon laser microscope is provided to excite a region of the specimen and cause fluorescence to be radiated from the region. The radiating fluorescence is processed by a spectral analyzer to separate the fluorescence into respective wavelength bands. The respective bands of fluorescence are then collected by an array of detectors, with each detector receiving a corresponding one of the wavelength bands.

  16. System and method for monitoring cellular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, Gregory H. (Inventor); Fraser, Scott E. (Inventor); Lansford, Russell D. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A system and method for monitoring cellular activity in a cellular specimen. According to one embodiment, a plurality of excitable markers are applied to the specimen. A multi-photon laser microscope is provided to excite a region of the specimen and cause fluorescence to be radiated from the region. The radiating fluorescence is processed by a spectral analyzer to separate the fluorescence into respective wavelength bands. The respective bands of fluorescence are then collected by an array of detectors, with each detector receiving a corresponding one of the wavelength bands.

  17. Key role of Upper Mantle rocks in Alpine type orogens: some speculations derived from extensional settings for subduction zone processes and mountain roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müntener, Othmar

    2016-04-01

    Orogenic architecture and mountain roots are intrinsically related. Understanding mountain roots largely depends on geophysical methods and exhumed high pressure and high temperature rocks that might record snapshots of the temporal evolution at elevated pressure, temperatures and/or fluid pulses. If such high pressure rocks represent ophiolitic material they are commonly interpreted as exhumed remnants of some sort of 'mid-ocean ridge' processes. Mantle peridotites and their serpentinized counterparts thus play a key role in understanding orogenic architecture as they are often considered to track suture zones or ancient plate boundaries. The recognition that some mantle peridotites and their serpentinized counterparts are derived from ocean-continent transition zones (OCT's) or non-steady state (ultra-)slow plate separation systems question a series of 'common beliefs' that have been applied to understand Alpine-type collisional orogens in the framework of the ophiolite concept. Among these are: (i) the commonly held assumption of a simple genetic link between mantle melting and mafic (MORB-type) magmatism, (ii) the commonly held assumption that mélange zones represent deep subduction zone processes at the plate interface, (iii) that pre-collisional continental crust and oceanic crust can easily be reconstructed to their original thickness and used for reconstructions of the size of small subducted oceanic basins as geophysical data from rifted margins increasingly indicate that continental crust is thinned to much less than the average 30-35 kilometers over a large area that might be called the 'zone of hyperextension', and (iv) the lack of a continuous sheet of mafic oceanic crust and the extremely short time interval of formation results in a lack of 'eclogitization potential' during convergence and hence a lack of potential for subsequent slab pull and, perhaps, a lack of potential for 'slab-breakoff'. Here we provide a synopsis of mantle rocks from the

  18. Tectonic evolution of the Black Sea orogene belt and the history of opening of the Black Sea basin

    SciTech Connect

    Uesuemezsoy, S. )

    1988-08-01

    The Black Sea basin is surrounded by successive orogenic belts of Hercynian, Cimmerian, and Alpine ages. The Rhodope, Thracian, western Pontian, and Transcaucasian (RTPT) blocks of Precambrian age were involved by the circum-Black Sea orogene belts. The Hercynian orogene was documented in the Balkanide, Great Caucasian, Kriastide, southern Pontian, and Transcaucasian belts. The Cimmerian orogene extended north and south of the Black Sea. The southern Cimmerian orogene was represented by the circum-Rhodope and East Thracian-Strandja-Kuere belts. The northern Cimmerian orogene belt extended along the Dobruca-Crimean and southern slope belts. Following the demise of the Black Sea Cimmerian basin, the northernmost oceanic branch extending from Nish-Trajan through the present Black Sea to the intra-Transcaucasian basin, was opened within the Hercynian and Cimmerian consolidated terrain in the Late Jurassic. The other oceanic branch, extending from Izmir-Ankara through circum Kirsehir to various basins, was opened within the Paleotethyan collision belt, considered to be eastern extension of the Pindus basin. The Nish-Trajan sector of the northernmost basin was closed in the middle Cretaceous, and the Moesian platform re-fused to the Getic-Serbo-Macedonian-Rhodope belt. The easternmost extension of the intra-Transcaucasian basin disappeared in the Late Cretaceous. Consequently, the northernmost oceanic branch was reduced to the present Black Sea basin.

  19. Spontaneous Oscillations in an Active Matter System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Robert; Tsang, Boyce; Granick, Steve

    Active matter (which consumes energy to move about) can organize into dynamic structures more interesting than those possible at steady-state. Here we show spontaneous periodic self-assembly in a simple three-component system of water, oil phase, and surfactant at constant room temperature, with emphasis on one model system. Benchtop experiments show that liquid crystal oil droplets spontaneously and collectively oscillate like a `beating heart' for several hours; contract, relax, and subsequently re-contract in a petri dish at a rate of a few `beats' per minute. These oscillations, emergent from the cooperative interaction of the three components, are driven by the competition between positive and negative feedback processes. This illustration of feedback in action reveals a new way to program self-assembled structures to vary with time.

  20. Analog VLSI system for active drag reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, B.; Goodman, R.; Jiang, F.; Tai, Y.C.; Tung, S.; Ho, C.M.

    1996-10-01

    In today`s cost-conscious air transportation industry, fuel costs are a substantial economic concern. Drag reduction is an important way to reduce costs. Even a 5% reduction in drag translates into estimated savings of millions of dollars in fuel costs. Drawing inspiration from the structure of shark skin, the authors are building a system to reduce drag along a surface. Our analog VLSI system interfaces with microfabricated, constant-temperature shear stress sensors. It detects regions of high shear stress and outputs a control signal to activate a microactuator. We are in the process of verifying the actual drag reduction by controlling microactuators in wind tunnel experiments. We are encouraged that an approach similar to one that biology employs provides a very useful contribution to the problem of drag reduction. 9 refs., 21 figs.

  1. Active alignment/contact verification system

    DOEpatents

    Greenbaum, William M.

    2000-01-01

    A system involving an active (i.e. electrical) technique for the verification of: 1) close tolerance mechanical alignment between two component, and 2) electrical contact between mating through an elastomeric interface. For example, the two components may be an alumina carrier and a printed circuit board, two mating parts that are extremely small, high density parts and require alignment within a fraction of a mil, as well as a specified interface point of engagement between the parts. The system comprises pairs of conductive structures defined in the surfaces layers of the alumina carrier and the printed circuit board, for example. The first pair of conductive structures relate to item (1) above and permit alignment verification between mating parts. The second pair of conductive structures relate to item (2) above and permit verification of electrical contact between mating parts.

  2. Actively controlled vibration welding system and method

    DOEpatents

    Cai, Wayne W.; Kang, Bongsu; Tan, Chin-An

    2013-04-02

    A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an active material element, and anvil assembly. The assembly may include an anvil body connected to a back plate and support member. The element, e.g., a piezoelectric stack or shape memory alloy, is positioned with respect to the assembly. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction to form a weld on a work piece. The element controls any vibrations in a second direction by applying calibrated response to the anvil body in the second direction. A method for controlling undesirable vibrations in the system includes positioning the element with respect to the anvil assembly, connecting the anvil body to the support member through the back plate, vibrating the horn in a desirable first direction, and transmitting an input signal to the element to control vibration in an undesirable second direction.

  3. Active balance system and vibration balanced machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Songgang (Inventor); Augenblick, John E. (Inventor); Peterson, Allen A. (Inventor); White, Maurice A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An active balance system is provided for counterbalancing vibrations of an axially reciprocating machine. The balance system includes a support member, a flexure assembly, a counterbalance mass, and a linear motor or an actuator. The support member is configured for attachment to the machine. The flexure assembly includes at least one flat spring having connections along a central portion and an outer peripheral portion. One of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion is fixedly mounted to the support member. The counterbalance mass is fixedly carried by the flexure assembly along another of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion. The linear motor has one of a stator and a mover fixedly mounted to the support member and another of the stator and the mover fixedly mounted to the counterbalance mass. The linear motor is operative to axially reciprocate the counterbalance mass.

  4. Formation of Secondary Lherzolite and Refertilization of the Subcontinental Lithospheric Mantle: The Record of Orogenic Peridotites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, Carlos J.; Varas-Reus, María Isabel; Bodinier, Jean-Louis; Marchesi, Claudio; Bosch, Delphine; Hidas, Károly

    2016-04-01

    Correlations observed between major and minor transition elements in tectonically-emplaced orogenic peridotites have classically been ascribed to variable degrees of melt extraction. There is a growing body of evidence indicating that these chemical variations mostly reflect melt redistribution and near solidus reactions superimposed onto previous melting depletion events. Here we will assess this hypothesis using a large database of peridotites from orogenic peridotites in the westernmost Mediterranean (Ronda and Beni Bousera peridotites). We show that lherzolite samples show some trends in major elements and modal variations that are inconsistent with their interpretation as depleted MORB mantle (DMM). These trends are more consistent with the secondary formation of lherzolites by refertilization processes involving a least two different near-solidus, melt-processes: refertilization by pyroxenite-derived melts and by hydrous melts leading, respectively, to secondary lherzolites with Ol/Opx and Cpx/Opx ratios greater than those expected from residues from a primitive upper mantle source. Together with their N-MORB, LREE-depleted pattern, their fertile lherzolitic composition may have been acquired as a result of melt-rock interaction processes associated with the thermomechanical erosion of lithospheric mantle by asthenosphere. Major refertilization of depleted subcontinental mantle is an alternative to the small degrees of melt extraction to account for LREE depletion in otherwise fertile orogenic lherzolites.

  5. Foreland-forearc collisional granitoid and mafic magmatism caused by lower-plate lithospheric slab breakoff: The Acadian of Maine, and other orogens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoonmaker, A.; Kidd, W.S.F.; Bradley, D.C.

    2005-01-01

    During collisional convergence, failure in extension of the lithosphere of the lower plate due to slab pull will reduce the thickness or completely remove lower-plate lithosphere and cause decompression melting of the asthenospheric mantle; magmas from this source may subsequently provide enough heat for substantial partial melting of crustal rocks under or beyond the toe of the collisional accretionary system. In central Maine, United States, this type of magmatism is first apparent in the Early Devonian West Branch Volcanics and equivalent mafic volcanics, in the slightly younger voluminous mafic/silicic magmatic event of the Moxie Gabbro-Katahdin batholith and related ignimbrite volcanism, and in other Early Devonian granitic plutons. Similar lower-plate collisional sequences with mafic and related silicic magmatism probably caused by slab breakoff are seen in the Miocene-Holocene Papuan orogen, and the Hercynian-Alleghenian belt. Magmatism of this type is significant because it gives evidence in those examples of whole-lithosphere extension. We infer that normal fault systems in outer trench slopes of collisional orogens in general, and possibly those of oceanic subduction zones, may not be primarily due to flexural bending, but are also driven by whole-lithosphere extension due to slab pull. The Maine Acadian example suggests that slab failure and this type of magmatism may be promoted by pre-existing large margin-parallel faults in the lower plate. ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

  6. Orogen-parallel mass transport along the arcuate Himalayan front into Nanga Parbat and the western Himalayan syntaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whipp, David; Beaumont, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Along the length of the Himalayan arc, Quaternary rock exhumation rates are highest in the Himalayan syntaxes at the lateral ends of the arc. In the western Himalayan syntaxis, these rates may exceed 10 mm/a over the past 2 Ma, requiring an additional source of crustal mass into this region to maintain the high-elevation topography. We have previously demonstrated that strain partitioning of oblique convergence can produce a significant orogen-parallel mass flux into the syntaxis of a Himalaya-like orogen and balance the rapid rates of surface denudation. However, the magnitude of this orogen parallel mass flux and whether strain is partitioned across the Himalayan thrust front is affected by the strength of the material bounding and within the Himalayan orogenic wedge, the dip angle of the basal detachment and the convergence obliquity angle γ. Strain partitioning is expected for a finite-length Himalaya-like segmented linear orogen with an obliquity of γ = 30 - 40°, but the obliquity angle in the Himalayan arc varies from 0 at the center of the arc to ˜ 40° in the western Himalayan syntaxis region. Thus, the conditions in which strain partitioning will occur may not be met along much of the length of the arc. Though there is clear evidence of strain partitioning in the Himalaya, preliminary results from 3D numerical geodynamic models of an orogen with an arcuate geometry based on the Himalaya suggest strain partitioning does not occur for the same conditions observed in earlier models of segmented linear orogens or orogens with a smaller arc radius. In those models, the proportion of the orogen length with a high obliquity angle was greater, which favors strain partitioning. In numerical experiments of an arcuate Himalayan orogen with weak material (friction angle φ ≤ 5°) at the back of the orogenic wedge, strain partitioning is only observed in the toe of the orogenic wedge (10-15 km from the thrust front) at the western end of the arc, rather than for

  7. Extreme variation of sulfur isotopic compositions in pyrite from the Qiuling sediment-hosted gold deposit, West Qinling orogen, central China: an in situ SIMS study with implications for the source of sulfur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lei; Li, Xian-hua; Li, Jian-wei; Hofstra, Albert H.; Liu, Yu; Koenig, Alan E.

    2015-08-01

    high δ34S values. The variations in Au content and sulfur isotopic compositions across a single ore-stage pyrite grain may reflect displacement of indigenous groundwater with low δ34S values by auriferous metamorphic fluids with high δ34S values. The very low-grade metamorphism of the host rocks and the metamorphic derivation of sulfur for the ore pyrite indicate that the Qiuling sediment-hosted gold deposit is an epizonal manifestation of an orogenic gold system in the West Qinling orogen.

  8. Next Generation Active Buffet Suppression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galea, Stephen C.; Ryall, Thomas G.; Henderson, Douglas A.; Moses, Robert W.; White, Edward V.; Zimcik, David G.

    2003-01-01

    Buffeting is an aeroelastic phenomenon that is common to high performance aircraft, especially those with twin vertical tails like the F/A-18, at high angles of attack. These loads result in significant random stresses, which may cause fatigue damage leading to restricted capabilities and availability of the aircraft. This paper describes an international collaborative research activity among Australia, Canada and the United States involving the use of active structural control to alleviate the damaging structural response to these loads. The research program is being co-ordinated by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and is being conducted under the auspices of The Technical Cooperative Program (TTCP). This truly unique collaborative program has been developed to enable each participating country to contribute resources toward a program that coalesces a broad range of technical knowledge and expertise into a single investigation. This collaborative program is directed toward a full-scale test of an F/A-18 empennage, which is an extension of an earlier initial test. The current program aims at applying advanced directional piezoactuators, the aircraft rudder, switch mode amplifiers and advanced control strategies on a full-scale structure to demonstrate the enhanced performance and capability of the advanced active BLA control system in preparation for a flight test demonstration.

  9. Linking collisional and accretionary orogens during Rodinia assembly and breakup: Implications for models of supercontinent cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cawood, Peter A.; Strachan, Robin A.; Pisarevsky, Sergei A.; Gladkochub, Dmitry P.; Murphy, J. Brendan

    2016-09-01

    Periodic assembly and dispersal of continental fragments has been a characteristic of the solid Earth for much of its history. Geodynamic drivers of this cyclic activity are inferred to be either top-down processes related to near surface lithospheric stresses at plate boundaries or bottom-up processes related to mantle convection and, in particular, mantle plumes, or some combination of the two. Analysis of the geological history of Rodinian crustal blocks suggests that internal rifting and breakup of the supercontinent were linked to the initiation of subduction and development of accretionary orogens around its periphery. Thus, breakup was a top-down instigated process. The locus of convergence was initially around north-eastern and northern Laurentia in the early Neoproterozoic before extending to outboard of Amazonia and Africa, including Avalonia-Cadomia, and arcs outboard of Siberia and eastern to northern Baltica in the mid-Neoproterozoic (∼760 Ma). The duration of subduction around the periphery of Rodinia coincides with the interval of lithospheric extension within the supercontinent, including the opening of the proto-Pacific at ca. 760 Ma and the commencement of rifting in east Laurentia. Final development of passive margin successions around Laurentia, Baltica and Siberia was not completed until the late Neoproterozoic to early Paleozoic (ca. 570-530 Ma), which corresponds with the termination of convergent plate interactions that gave rise to Gondwana and the consequent relocation of subduction zones to the periphery of this supercontinent. The temporal link between external subduction and internal extension suggests that breakup was initiated by a top-down process driven by accretionary tectonics along the periphery of the supercontinent. Plume-related magmatism may be present at specific times and in specific places during breakup but is not the prime driving force. Comparison of the Rodinia record of continental assembly and dispersal with that

  10. Timing of magmatism and migmatization in the 2.0-1.8 Ga accretionary Svecokarelian orogen, south-central Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Åke; Stephens, Michael B.

    2016-07-01

    The Palaeoproterozoic (2.0-1.8 Ga) Svecokarelian orogen in central Sweden consists of a low-pressure, predominantly medium-grade metamorphic domain (central part of Bergslagen lithotectonic unit), enclosed to the north and south by low-pressure migmatite belts. Two periods of metamorphism (1.87-1.85 and 1.83-1.79 Ga) are known in the migmatite belts. In this study, new U-Th-Pb ion microprobe data on zircon and monazite from twelve samples of locally migmatized gneisses and felsic intrusive bodies determine both protolith and metamorphic ages in four sample areas north of Stockholm, inside or immediately adjacent to the medium-grade metamorphic domain. Two orthogneiss samples from the Rimbo area yield unusually old protolith ages of 1909 ± 4 and 1908 ± 4 Ma, while three orthogneisses from the Skutskär and Forsmark areas yield more typical protolith ages between 1901 ± 3 and 1888 ± 3 Ma. Migmatized paragneiss samples from this and two earlier studies contain a significant detrital component sourced from this 1.9 Ga magmatic suite. They are interpreted to be deposited contemporaneously with or shortly after this magmatism. Migmatization of the paragneiss at Rimbo was followed by intrusion of leucogranite at 1846 ± 3 Ma. Even in the other sample areas to the north (Hedesunda-Tierp, Skutskär and Forsmark), metamorphism including migmatization is constrained to the 1.87-1.85 Ga interval and penetrative ductile deformation is limited by earlier studies in the Forsmark area to 1.87-1.86 Ga. However, apart from a metamorphic monazite age of 1863 ± 1 Ma, precise ages were not possible to obtain due to the presence of only partially reset recrystallized domains in zircon, or highly discordant U-rich metamict and altered metamorphic rims. Migmatization was contemporaneous with magmatic activity at 1.87-1.84 Ga in the Bergslagen lithotectonic unit involving a mantle-derived component, and there is a spatial connection between migmatization and this magmatic phase in the

  11. Orogenic front propagation in the basement involved Malargüe fold and thrust belt, Neuquén Basin, (Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branellec, Matthieu; Nivière, Bertrand; Callot, Jean-Paul; Ringenbach, Jean-Claude

    2015-04-01

    The Malargüe fold and thrust belt (MFTB) and the San Rafael Block (SRB) are located in the northern termination of the Neuquén basin in Argentina. This basin is a wide inverted intracratonic sag basin with polyphased evolution controlled at large scale by the dynamic of the Pacific subduction. By late Triassic times, narrow rift basins developed and evolved toward a sag basin from middle Jurassic to late Cretaceous. From that time on, compression at the trench resulted in various shortening pulses in the back-arc area. Here we aim to analyze the Andean system at 35°S by comparing the Miocene structuration in the MFTB and the current deformation along the oriental border or the San Rafael Block. The main structuration stage in the MFTB occurred by Miocene times (15 to 10 Ma) producing the principal uplift of the Andean Cordillera. As shown by new structural cross sections, Triassic-early Jurassic rift border faults localized the Miocene compressive tectonics. Deformation is compartmentalized and does not exhibit a classical propagation of homogeneous deformation sequence expected from the critical taper theory. Several intramontane basins in the hangingwall of the main thrusts progressively disconnected from the foreland. In addition, active tectonics has been described in the front of the MFTB attesting for the on-going compression in this area. 100 km farther to the east, The San Rafael Block, is separated from the MFTB by the Rio Grande basin. The SRB is mostly composed of Paleozoic terranes and Triassic rift-related rocks, overlain by late Miocene synorogenic deposits. The SRB is currently uplifted along its oriental border along several active faults. These faults have clear morphologic signatures in Quaternary alluvial terraces and folded Pleistocene lavas. As in the MFTB, the active deformation localization remains localized by structural inheritance. The Andean system is thus evolving as an atypical orogenic wedge partly by frontal accretion at the front

  12. The tectonic frame of the Variscan Alleghanian orogen in Southern Europe and Northern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simancas, J. Fernando; Tahiri, Abdelfatah; Azor, Antonio; Lodeiro, Francisco González; Martínez Poyatos, David J.; El Hadi, Hassan

    2005-04-01

    By confronting different geological and geophysical data, we attempt to reconstruct the Variscan-Alleghanian orogenic belt, with especial emphasis on the links between Iberia, northwest Africa, and northeast America. The northern Iberia transect corresponds to the rifted margin of Gondwana, inverted during the Variscan orogeny and overthrust in its westernmost sector by a pile of allochthonous units, some of them with oceanic affinity and witnessing an orogenic suture. The southern Iberia section reveals two sutures at both boundaries of a terrane closely tied to Gondwana, namely the Ossa-Morena Zone. The southern boundary of this zone (i.e., the contact with the South Portuguese Zone) is enhanced by amphibolites with oceanic affinity and probably represents the suture of the Rheic Ocean. The Moroccan Variscides can be divided into: (i) a western external zone, namely the Coastal Block and the Central Massif; (ii) an internal zone, namely the Eastern Meseta; (iii) an eastern external zone represented in the Anti Atlas region; and (iv) the African cratonic foreland. Since neither ophiolites nor eclogites crop out along this transect of the orogen, we consider it to be an incomplete transect, lacking the main suture zone (Rheic Ocean). Stratigraphic and faunal affinities between the Moroccan Meseta, on the one hand, and the Central Iberian, Western Asturian-Leonese, and Cantabrian zones of Iberia, on the other hand, suggest that they may well have been part of a common pre-orogenic domain at the margin of Gondwana. On the contrary, there are no counterparts in Morocco for the Ossa-Morena Zone. Thus, the northern Iberia palaeogeographic zones would prolong in the Moroccan Meseta through an eastward arcuate structure, while the suture of the Rheic Ocean would do so offshore Morocco. In our reconstruction, an Avalonian spur (Grand Banks indentor), which included the Caledonian Sehoul block in northern Morocco and the crust of the South Portuguese Zone in SW Iberia

  13. A new melanoma diagnosis active support system.

    PubMed

    Fiorini, R A; Dacquino, G; Laguteta, G

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the operational performance of a new MDASS (Melanoma Diagnosis Active Support System) prototype able to distil optimal knowledge from acquired data to automatically capture and reliably discriminate and quantify the stage of disease evolution. Automated classification dermatoscopical parameters can be divided into two main classes: Size Descriptor (point size, local, and global) and Intrinsic Descriptor (morphological, geometrical, chromatic, others). Usually elementary geometric shape robust and effective characterization, invariant to environment and optical geometry transformations, on a rigorous mathematical level is a key and computational intensive problem. MDASS uses GEOGINE (GEOmetrical enGINE), a state-of-the-art OMG (Ontological Model Generator) based on n-D Tensor Moment Invariants for shape/texture effective description. MDASS main results show robust disease classification procedure with distillation of minimal reference grids for pathological cases and they ultimately achieve effective early diagnosis of melanocytic lesion. System results are validated by carefully designed experiments with certified clinical reference database. Overall system operational performance is presented. Finally, MDASS error analysis and computational complexity are addressed and discussed. PMID:17270962

  14. Orogenic-type copper-gold-arsenic-(bismuth) mineralization at Flatschach (Eastern Alps), Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raith, Johann G.; Leitner, Thomas; Paar, Werner H.

    2015-10-01

    Structurally controlled Cu-Au mineralization in the historic Flatschach mining district (Styria, Austria) occurs in a NE-SW to NNE-WSW oriented vein system as multiple steep-dipping calcite-(dolomite)-quartz veins in amphibolite facies metamorphic rocks (banded gneisses/amphibolites, orthogneisses, metagranitoids) of the poly-metamorphosed Austroalpine Silvretta-Seckau nappe. Vein formation postdated ductile deformation events and Eoalpine (Late Cretaceous) peak metamorphism but predated Early to Middle Miocene sediment deposition in the Fohnsdorf pull-apart basin; coal-bearing sediments cover the metamorphic basement plus the mineralized veins at the northern edge of the basin. Three gold-bearing ore stages consist of a stage 1 primary hydrothermal (mesothermal?) ore assemblage dominated by chalcopyrite, pyrite and arsenopyrite. Associated minor minerals include alloclasite, enargite, bornite, sphalerite, galena, bismuth and matildite. Gold in this stage is spatially associated with chalcopyrite occurring as inclusions, along re-healed micro-fractures or along grain boundaries of chalcopyrite with pyrite or arsenopyrite. Sericite-carbonate alteration is developed around the veins. Stage 2 ore minerals formed by the replacement of stage 1 sulfides and include digenite, anilite, "blue-remaining covellite" (spionkopite, yarrowite), bismuth, and the rare copper arsenides domeykite and koutekite. Gold in stage 2 is angular to rounded in shape and occurs primarily in the carbonate (calcite, Fe-dolomite) gangue and less commonly together with digenite, domeykite/koutekite and bismuth. Stage 3 is a strongly oxidized assemblage that includes hematite, cuprite, and various secondary Cu- and Fe-hydroxides and -carbonates. It formed during supergene weathering. Stage 1 and 2 gold consists mostly of electrum (gold fineness 640-860; mean = 725; n = 46), and rare near pure gold (fineness 930-940; n = 6). Gold in stage 3 is Ag-rich electrum (fineness 350-490, n = 12), and has a

  15. Late Devonian Anoxia Events in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt: a Global Phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmichael, S. K.; Waters, J. A.; Suttner, T. J.; Kido, E.; DeReuil, A. A.; Moore, L. M.; Batchelor, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric CO2 values decreased dramatically during the Middle Devonian due to the rapid rise of land plants. These changing environmental conditions resulted in widespread anoxia and extinction events throughout the Late Devonian, including the critical Kellwasser and Hangenberg anoxia events, which are associated with major mass extinctions at both the beginning and end of the Famennian Stage of the Late Devonian. Fammenian sediments in northwestern Xinjiang Province, China, represent a highly fossiliferous shallow marine setting associated with a Devonian oceanic island arc complex. Analysis of multiple geochemical proxies (such as U/Th, Ba, normalized P2O5, V/Cr, Zr), magnetic susceptibility, and mineralogical data (biogenic apatite and pyrite framboids) indicates that these Famennian sequences record not only the Upper Kellwasser Anoxic Event at the Frasnian/Famennian (F/F) boundary but also the rebound from the F/F extinction event. Preliminary evidence suggests that the Hangenberg Anoxic Event can also be recognized in the same sequence, although our biostratigraphic control is less precise. Previous studies of the Kellwasser and Hangenberg Events have been performed on continental shelf environments of Laurussia, Gondwana, Siberia, and South China. The Devonian formations of northwest Xinjiang in this study, however, are part of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), which is thought to have formed as part of a complex amalgamation of intra-oceanic island arcs and continental fragments prior to the end of the latest Carboniferous. These results allow us to confirm the presence of the Kellwasser and Hangenberg Events in the open oceanic part of Paleotethys, indicating that both events were global in scope. The presence of an abundant diverse Famennian fauna between these anoxia/extinction events suggests that the shallow marine ecosystems in the CAOB were somewhat protected due to their tectonic location and relative isolation within an open ocean system

  16. Distribution, microfabric, and geochemical characteristics of siliceous rocks in central orogenic belt, China: implications for a hydrothermal sedimentation model.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongzhong; Zhai, Mingguo; Zhang, Lianchang; Gao, Le; Yang, Zhijun; Zhou, Yongzhang; He, Junguo; Liang, Jin; Zhou, Liuyu; Voudouris, Panagiotis Ch

    2014-01-01

    Marine siliceous rocks are widely distributed in the central orogenic belt (COB) of China and have a close connection to the geological evolution and metallogenesis. They display periodic distributions from Mesoproterozoic to Jurassic with positive peaks in the Mesoproterozoic, Cambrian--Ordovician, and Carboniferous--Permian and their deposition is enhanced by the tensional geological settings. The compressional regimes during the Jinning, Caledonian, Hercynian, Indosinian, and Yanshanian orogenies resulted in sudden descent in their distribution. The siliceous rocks of the Bafangshan-Erlihe ore deposit include authigenic quartz, syn-depositional metal sulphides, and scattered carbonate minerals. Their SiO2 content (71.08-95.30%), Ba (42.45-503.0 ppm), and ΣREE (3.28-19.75 ppm) suggest a hydrothermal sedimentation origin. As evidenced by the Al/(Al + Fe + Mn), Sc/Th, (La/Yb) N, and (La/Ce) N ratios and δCe values, the studied siliceous rocks were deposited in a marginal sea basin of a limited ocean. We suggest that the Bafangshan-Erlihe area experienced high- and low-temperature stages of hydrothermal activities. The hydrothermal sediments of the former stage include metal sulphides and silica, while the latter was mainly composed of silica. Despite the hydrothermal sedimentation of the siliceous rocks, minor terrigenous input, magmatism, and biological activity partly contributed to geochemical features deviating from the typical hydrothermal characteristics.

  17. Distribution, microfabric, and geochemical characteristics of siliceous rocks in central orogenic belt, China: implications for a hydrothermal sedimentation model.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongzhong; Zhai, Mingguo; Zhang, Lianchang; Gao, Le; Yang, Zhijun; Zhou, Yongzhang; He, Junguo; Liang, Jin; Zhou, Liuyu; Voudouris, Panagiotis Ch

    2014-01-01

    Marine siliceous rocks are widely distributed in the central orogenic belt (COB) of China and have a close connection to the geological evolution and metallogenesis. They display periodic distributions from Mesoproterozoic to Jurassic with positive peaks in the Mesoproterozoic, Cambrian--Ordovician, and Carboniferous--Permian and their deposition is enhanced by the tensional geological settings. The compressional regimes during the Jinning, Caledonian, Hercynian, Indosinian, and Yanshanian orogenies resulted in sudden descent in their distribution. The siliceous rocks of the Bafangshan-Erlihe ore deposit include authigenic quartz, syn-depositional metal sulphides, and scattered carbonate minerals. Their SiO2 content (71.08-95.30%), Ba (42.45-503.0 ppm), and ΣREE (3.28-19.75 ppm) suggest a hydrothermal sedimentation origin. As evidenced by the Al/(Al + Fe + Mn), Sc/Th, (La/Yb) N, and (La/Ce) N ratios and δCe values, the studied siliceous rocks were deposited in a marginal sea basin of a limited ocean. We suggest that the Bafangshan-Erlihe area experienced high- and low-temperature stages of hydrothermal activities. The hydrothermal sediments of the former stage include metal sulphides and silica, while the latter was mainly composed of silica. Despite the hydrothermal sedimentation of the siliceous rocks, minor terrigenous input, magmatism, and biological activity partly contributed to geochemical features deviating from the typical hydrothermal characteristics. PMID:25140349

  18. Distribution, Microfabric, and Geochemical Characteristics of Siliceous Rocks in Central Orogenic Belt, China: Implications for a Hydrothermal Sedimentation Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongzhong; Zhai, Mingguo; Zhang, Lianchang; Gao, Le; Yang, Zhijun; Zhou, Yongzhang; He, Junguo; Liang, Jin; Zhou, Liuyu; Voudouris, Panagiotis Ch.

    2014-01-01

    Marine siliceous rocks are widely distributed in the central orogenic belt (COB) of China and have a close connection to the geological evolution and metallogenesis. They display periodic distributions from Mesoproterozoic to Jurassic with positive peaks in the Mesoproterozoic, Cambrian—Ordovician, and Carboniferous—Permian and their deposition is enhanced by the tensional geological settings. The compressional regimes during the Jinning, Caledonian, Hercynian, Indosinian, and Yanshanian orogenies resulted in sudden descent in their distribution. The siliceous rocks of the Bafangshan-Erlihe ore deposit include authigenic quartz, syn-depositional metal sulphides, and scattered carbonate minerals. Their SiO2 content (71.08–95.30%), Ba (42.45–503.0 ppm), and ΣREE (3.28–19.75 ppm) suggest a hydrothermal sedimentation origin. As evidenced by the Al/(Al + Fe + Mn), Sc/Th, (La/Yb)N, and (La/Ce)N ratios and δCe values, the studied siliceous rocks were deposited in a marginal sea basin of a limited ocean. We suggest that the Bafangshan-Erlihe area experienced high- and low-temperature stages of hydrothermal activities. The hydrothermal sediments of the former stage include metal sulphides and silica, while the latter was mainly composed of silica. Despite the hydrothermal sedimentation of the siliceous rocks, minor terrigenous input, magmatism, and biological activity partly contributed to geochemical features deviating from the typical hydrothermal characteristics. PMID:25140349

  19. Miocene magmatism and tectonics within the Peri-Alboran orogen (western Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Azzouzi, M.; Bellon, H.; Coutelle, A.; Réhault, J.-P.

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this paper concerns Miocene igneous activity in the Alboran Sea and Peri-Alboran area (northern Morocco, western Algeria and Betic Cordilleras in Spain), considering its age and its location with regard to major tectonics structures. We have compiled previous K-Ar isotopic ages of lavas and plutonic boulders and intrusives with an error of ±1σ and completed this set by a new K-Ar isotopic age for andesitic tuffites from Alboran Island. Geochemistry of most of these samples has been considered after previous analyses completed with new data for Spain magmatism. These two sets of data allow us to place the magmatic activity within the regional stratigraphy and tectonics and their chronological framework of the three major tectonic phases of the Maghrebian orogen, at 17 Ma (Burdigalian), 15 Ma (Langhian) and 9 Ma (Tortonian). Petro-geochemical characteristics are compared through time and geographical locations. A major goal of this coupled approach is to help the elaboration of possible geodynamical processes. As an application, we present the case study of the Dellys, Djinet and Thenia region (east of Algiers) where the successive magmatic events between 19.4 ± 1 and 11.6 ± 0.5 Ma are closely related to the local tectonics and sedimentation. The Peri-Alboran igneous activity is placed in a multidisciplinary framework. Timing of activity is defined according to the ages of the neighbouring sedimentary units and the K-Ar ages of igneous rocks. In Spain, the Cabo de Gata-Carboneras magmatic province displays late Oligocene and early Miocene leucogranitic dikes, dated from 24.8 ± 1.3 to 18.1 ± 1.2 Ma; three following andesitic to rhyolitic events took place around 15.1 ± 0.8 to 14.0 ± 0.7 Ma, 11.8 ± 0.6 to 9.4 ± 0.4 Ma, 8.8 ± 0.4 to 7.9 ± 0.4 Ma; this last event displays also granitic rocks. Lamproitic magmas dated between 8.4 ± 0.4 and 6.76 ± 0.04 Ma were emplaced after the Tortonian phase. In Morocco, after the complex building of the Ras Tarf

  20. The Kharapeh orogenic gold deposit: Geological, structural, and geochemical controls on epizonal ore formation in West Azerbaijan Province, Northwestern Iran

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Niroomand, Shojaeddin; Goldfarb, Richard J.; Moore, Farib; Mohajjel, Mohammad; Marsh, Erin E.

    2011-01-01

    part of a diachronous gold event during the middle to late Tertiary throughout the SSZ and during the final stages of the Zagros orogeny. The proximity of Kharapeh to the main tectonic suture of the orogen, well-developed regional fold systems with superimposed complex fracture geometries, and recognition of nearby volcanogenic massive sulfide systems that suggest a region characterized by sulfur- and metal-rich crustal rocks, collectively indicate an area of the SSZ with high favorability for undiscovered gold resources.

  1. Distinct magnetic fabric in weakly deformed sediments from extensional basins and fold-and-thrust structures in the Northern Apennine orogenic belt (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caricchi, Chiara; Cifelli, Francesca; Kissel, Catherine; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Mattei, Massimo

    2016-02-01

    We report on results from anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) analyses carried out on weakly deformed fine-grained sediments from the Northern Apennine orogenic system (Italy). We sampled 63 sites from preorogenic, synorogenic, and postorogenic sequences, which differ in age, composition, depositional environment, degrees of deformation, and tectonic regimes. The magnetic fabric is typical of weakly deformed sediments, with a magnetic foliation subparallel to the bedding plane and a magnetic lineation well defined in this plane. Northern Apennine chain deposits are characterized by strongly oblate magnetic susceptibility ellipsoids, indicating that the magnetic fabric is the result of both compaction process and tectonic load experienced by the sediments during diagenesis and orogenic events. The orientation of magnetic lineation is significantly different depending whether the studied sites underwent extensional or compressional tectonic regimes. In the Northern Apennine chain, the magnetic lineation is mostly oriented NNW-SSE, parallel to the main compressional structures. It suggests a tectonic origin of the magnetic lineation with an acquisition related to the Apennines compressional phases. In the extensional Tuscan Tyrrhenian margin, magnetic lineation is oriented ENE-WSW, almost perpendicular to the main extensional faults, which represent the main deformation elements of the area. Our results demonstrate a close relationship between the shape and orientation of magnetic fabric and the tectonic history of rocks, confirming that AMS represents a valuable tool to investigate the tectonic history of weakly deformed sedimentary rocks.

  2. Proto-Pacific-margin source for the Ordovician turbidite submarine fan, Lachlan Orogen, southeast Australia: Geochemical constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offler, R.; Fergusson, C. L.

    2016-04-01

    diagrams involving major, trace and REE strongly support a collisional/continental volcanic arc setting that was substantially eroded to produce the plutonic detritus observed in the sandstones. The collisional setting accords with that proposed previously by other authors who suggested that it developed during the Delamerian Orogeny, resulting in the uplifted source areas providing detritus that inundated the backarc and forearc sites of the Macquarie Arc. Some of the detritus, however, may have been derived from a continental arc that existed in the late Cambrian along the margin of the Ross Orogen. Based on palaeocurrent analyses in previous studies and shoshonitic signature of the detritus, it is proposed that the Cambrian volcanics along the eastern active margin of Gondwana provided much of the detritus in the Adaminaby Group. Zircons with the Grenvillian signature suggest that some detritus were also derived from the Ross Orogen.

  3. Activity systems in the inquiry classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wortham, Donald William

    Inquiry science, as called for by reform-minded organizations such as the National Research Council (1996), offers a platform with the potential for introducing all students to the practice of science while maintaining focus on key concepts and theories. This project followed two small groups as they completed an inquiry unit on genetics at a Midwestern high school. I investigated whether levels of student-to-teacher, student-to-student, student-apparatus, and student-concept connections were approximately equal across all students in each of the two groups. I found differences among students in levels of student-to-teacher, student-to-student, and student-concept connections. From a situated idiopathic perspective, these differences may indicate different levels of opportunity-to-learn. At a more abstract (nomothetic) level, these differences may be due to emergent divisions of labor (roles) within the two groups. From the perspective of Activity Theory (Leont'ev, 1978; Engestrom, 1987), roles serve as important mediators that simultaneously allow the social unit to accomplish its objectives, while shaping the development of participants. I describe three roles that capture modes of participation for students interacting in the small groups, and that may contribute to what Engestrom (2001) calls subject-producing activity systems: networked contributor, social member, and isolate. This paper also describes tools for teachers and researchers to use in identifying levels of mediation and roles as they occur in small groups.

  4. High-pressure metamorphism in the southern New England Orogen: Implications for long-lived accretionary orogenesis in eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, G.; Offler, R.; Rubatto, D.; Phillips, D.

    2015-09-01

    New geochemical, metamorphic, and isotopic data are presented from high-pressure metamorphic rocks in the southern New England Orogen (eastern Australia). Conventional and optimal thermobarometry are augmented by U-Pb zircon and 40Ar/39Ar phengite dating to define pressure-temperature-time (P-T-t) histories for the rocks. The P-T-t histories are compared with competing geodynamic models for the Tasmanides, which can be summarized as (i) a retreating orogen model, the Tasmanides formed above a continuous, west dipping, and eastward retreating subduction zone, and (ii) a punctuated orogen model, the Tasmanides formed by several arc accretion, subduction flip, and/or transference events. Whereas both scenarios are potentially supported by the new data, an overlap between the timing of metamorphic recrystallization and key stages of Tasmanides evolution favors a relationship between a single, long-lived subduction zone and the formation, exhumation, and exposure of the high-pressure rocks. By comparison with the retreating orogen model, the following links with the P-T-t histories emerge: (i) exhumation and underplating of oceanic eclogite during the Delamerian Orogeny, (ii) recrystallization of underplated and exhuming high-pressure rocks at amphibolite facies conditions coeval with a period of rollback, and (iii) selective recrystallization of high-pressure rocks at blueschist facies conditions, reflecting metamorphism in a cooled subduction zone. The retreating orogen model can also account for the anomalous location of the Cambrian-Ordovician high-pressure rocks in the Devonian-Carboniferous New England Orogen, where sequential rollback cycles detached and translated parts of the leading edge of the overriding plate to the next, younger orogenic cycle.

  5. ROVER: A prototype active vision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coombs, David J.; Marsh, Brian D.

    1987-08-01

    The Roving Eyes project is an experiment in active vision. We present the design and implementation of a prototype that tracks colored balls in images from an on-line charge coupled device (CCD) camera. Rover is designed to keep up with its rapidly changing environment by handling best and average case conditions and ignoring the worst case. This allows Rover's techniques to be less sophisticated and consequently faster. Each of Rover's major functional units is relatively isolated from the others, and an executive which knows all the functional units directs the computation by deciding which jobs would be most effective to run. This organization is realized with a priority queue of jobs and their arguments. Rover's structure not only allows it to adapt its strategy to the environment, but also makes the system extensible. A capability can be added to the system by adding a functional module with a well defined interface and by modifying the executive to make use of the new module. The current implementation is discussed in the appendices.

  6. Crustal structure of the Innuitian region of Arctic Canada and Greenland from gravity modelling: implications for the Palaeogene Eurekan orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oakey, Gordon N.; Stephenson, Randell

    2008-06-01

    calculate depth-to-Moho and crustal thicknesses. These have been interpreted in terms of crustal affinity and crustal thinning and thickening processes associated with the Late Cretaceous-Palaeogene plate tectonics of the area. Significant crustal thinning is observed beneath the Lancaster Basin, between Baffin Island and Devon Island, corresponding with 40 km of separation. This is interpreted to be a failed rift-arm of the Eocene spreading system in Baffin Bay. A Fourier-domain transfer function analysis (Q) determined an intermediate average crustal strength (flexural rigidity of 1022 N m) over the Innuitian region. Comparisons with theoretical models, based on a simple thin elastic plate model, suggest that the crust is relatively thin (30 km) and in near-isostatic equilibrium-that is, not flexurally supporting the existing sedimentary or topographic load. A clearly defined anisotropy is identified, correlating with the direction of Eocene plate convergence, suggesting that the Eurekan collisional forces have not yet dissipated and are at least partially supporting large-scale orogenic structures.

  7. Geochemistry, Metamorphism, and Partial Melting of Hydrothermally Altered Rocks in the Sherridon Complex, Trans Hudson Orogen, Manitoba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinkham, D. K.

    2009-05-01

    Lithogeochemistry and field investigations of regionally metamorphosed rocks in the central portion of the Sherridon Complex of the Trans-Hudson orogen indicates high-grade gneisses are dominantly derived from protoliths with rhyodacite and basaltic compositions that subsequently experienced pre-metamorphic seafloor- related hydrothermal alteration. Immobile trace element geochemistry results indicate the voluminous rhyodacite composition rocks formed in a volcanic arc environment, and associated VMS deposits and less voluminous basaltic composition rocks suggest a bimodal-felsic VMS environment. Felsic lithologies are interpreted to have experienced local pre-metamorphic sericite, chlorite, carbonate, and possible silica alteration, with an extensive zone of carbonate alteration associated with more basaltic-composition protoliths. Upper amphibolite facies metamorphism of hydrothermally altered felsic lithologies resulted in a variety of quartz-rich rocks containing combinations of gahnite, garnet, cordierite, sillimanite, orthoamphibole, biotite, and feldspar bearing assemblages. An extensive garnet-cordierite-sillimanite-biotite ± orthoamphibole quartz-rich gneiss unit (GCSB) grades into a stromatic migmatite with a modal decrease in garnet and sillimanite in the host gneiss. Cordierite commonly overgrows and locally completely replaces sillimanite. Increased amounts of melting results in very local diatexite and locally mobilized melt crystallizing to a massive biotite clotted granitoid. The biotite-rich clots in the granitoid are interpreted to have resulted from replacement of garnet ± cordierite within the melt based on their shape, small remnants of garnet, and local sillimanite. Phase equilibria modelling of a suite of GCSB rocks (average Mg# = 0.55) in the MnNCKFMASHT chemical system utilizing program Domino predicts pressures in excess of 5.5 kilobars for sillimanite stability, and is most compatible with pressures between 6.5-7.0 kilobars based on

  8. Palaeozoic - Mesozoic tectonics of the western Transbaikalian segment of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkochub, Dmitry; Donskaya, Tatiana; Mazukabzov, Anatoly

    2014-05-01

    The western Transbaikalian segment of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) is a key to understand a scenario of gradual growth of continental crust in this part of the Northern Eurasia. In general this growth was directly controlled by long-living processes related to interaction of the southern margin of the Siberian craton with different units of the Palaeo-Asian and Mongol-Okhotsk oceans. The Neoproterozoic activity within this area was related to opening and development of the Palaeo-Asian Ocean. The early Palaeozoic stage was characterized by collision of numerous terranes (microcontinents, relicts of island arcs and back-arc basins, etc.) with the southern flank of the Siberian craton. These events reflect an early stage of Palaeo-Asian Ocean closure and the beginning of CAOB building. Since the late Palaeozoic the development of the Transbaikalian segment of the CAOB was related to the evolution of the Mongol-Okhotsk Ocean. Late Silurian - middle Devonian clastic and carbonate sediments were deposited along a passive margin of the Mongol-Okhotsk Ocean. The low-angle subduction of oceanic lithosphere of the Mongol-Okhotsk Ocean beneath the Siberian continent started in the middle Devonian. In the early to late Carboniferous, a steeper dip of subduction led to tectonic switching from extension to compression. This period was characterized by compression, metamorphism, deformations and thickening of continental crust. Autochthonous biotite granites of the Angara-Vitim batholith (ca. 320-300 Ma) were emplaced during this phase. Destruction of the subducted slab and roll-back toward the ocean in the late Carboniferous - early Permian caused extension of continental lithosphere and magmatic input from the mantle into the continental crust. These processes were responsible for voluminous magmatism that is spectacularly represented by allochthonous granitoids of the Angara-Vitim batholith and magmatic rocks of the western Transbaikalian belt (ca. 300-270 Ma). In

  9. Late Cryogenian-Ediacaran history of the Arabian-Nubian Shield: A review of depositional, plutonic, structural, and tectonic events in the closing stages of the northern East African Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, P. R.; Andresen, A.; Collins, A. S.; Fowler, A. R.; Fritz, H.; Ghebreab, W.; Kusky, T.; Stern, R. J.

    2011-10-01

    affected by oblique (transpressional) convergence of continental blocks that formed eastern and western Gondwana—the pANS was approaching the Saharan Metacraton; north-trending shear and shortening zones developed in the southern ANS; and northwest-trending strike-slip shear zones of the Najd fault system dominated farther north. In the northwestern ANS, convergence and Najd transpression buckled the crust causing structural highs with domes of gneissic infracrust overlain by supracrust composed of ophiolitic and volcanosedimentary assemblages dating from the Tonian-middle Cryogenian period of island-arc activity. The supracrust was extensively translated to the northwest above a high-strain zone. Extension and tectonic escape augmented exhumation of the gneissic infracrust particularly between ˜620-580 Ma. In the northeastern ANS, linear belts of gneiss formed from reworked older intrusive bodies or syntectonic intrusions that were emplaced along Najd faults. By ˜620 Ma a marine basin on the eastern margin of the pANS (present coordinates) was beginning to close. A thick sedimentary assemblage (Abt formation) in this basin underwent metamorphism and folding, and subduction-related magmatism and volcanism farther into this basin (Al Amar arc; >690-615 Ma) was coming to an end. Amalgamation of the Abt formation, Al Amar arc, and the pANS occurred between ˜620 and ˜605 Ma, and terminal collision between the pANS and the Saharan Metacraton was complete by ˜580 Ma. At this time, the ANS was fully assembled. Granite magmatism continued until ˜565-560 Ma and orogeny ceased by ˜550 Ma. During these terminal events, the region underwent strong chemical weathering and became a vast low-relief surface on which Lower Paleozoic sandstone was eventually deposited.

  10. Spatially Concentrated Erosion Focuses Deformation Within the Himalayan Orogenic Wedge: Sutlej Valley, NW Himalaya, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiede, R. C.; Arrowsmith, J.; Bookhagen, B.; McWilliams, M.; Sobel, E. R.; Strecker, M. R.

    2004-12-01

    Long-term erosion processes in the NW-Himalaya have not only shaped the distribution of topography and relief, but may also exert a regional control on the kinematic history of the Himalayan orogenic wedge. The topographic front of the orogenic wedge forms the southern margin of the High Himalaya and may be related to subsurface structures such as a crustal ramp or a blind thrust. Drastic along- and across-strike erosional gradients characterize the modern Himalaya and range from high-erosion regions along the southern High Himalayan front where monsoonal precipitation is able to penetrate far into the range, to low-erosion sectors across the moderately elevated Lesser Himalaya to the south and the high-elevation, arid sectors to the north. Published paleo-elevation estimates from the Thakkhola Graben (Nepal) suggest that by ~11 Ma the southern Tibetan Plateau and probably the High Himalaya had been uplifted to elevations comparable to the recent conditions. Thus, the presently observed pronounced erosional gradients have likely existed across the orogen since then. However, the cause of high rock-uplift and exhumation rates along distinct segments of the southern front of the High Himalaya are still a matter of debate. New apatite fission track (AFT) and 40Ar/39Ar data sampled along an orogen-perpendicular transect following the Sutlej Valley, approximately perpendicular to the Himalayan orogen, constrain the distribution patterns of rapid cooling related to rock uplift and exhumation. Combined with published thermochronologic data, this comprehensive AFT dataset from south of the High Himalaya mountain front to the interior of the Tethyan Himalaya allows us to derive a regional uplift and exhumation scenario. Our new 40Ar/39Ar ages ranging between 17 and 4 Ma reveal diachronous exhumation of two crystalline nappes (Higher and Lesser Himalayan crystalline) during Miocene-Pliocene time. In contrast, the AFT data ranging from 1.3 to 4.6 Ma indicate synchronous, fast

  11. Geomorphological-thermo-mechanical modeling: Application to orogenic wedge dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, K.; Willett, S. D.; Gerya, T.; Ruh, J.

    2015-09-01

    Coupled geomorphological-thermo-mechanical modeling is presented in a new implementation that combines two established thermo-mechanical and landscape evolution models. A finite-difference marker-in-cell technique is used to solve for the thermo-mechanical problem including complex visco-plastic rheologies in high resolution. Each timestep is synchronously solved with a fluvial landscape evolution model that includes numerical solution of fluvial incision and analytical hillslope processes for both diffusive and slope-limited processes on an adaptive grid. The implementation is successful in modeling large deformation at different scales. We demonstrate high degrees of coupling through processes such as exhumation of rocks with different erodibilities. Sensitivity of the coupled system evolution to surface parameters, and mechanical parameters, is explored for the established case of development of compressive wedges. The evolution of wedge models proves to be primarily sensitive to erodibility and the degree of river network integration. Relief follows deformation in propagating forward with wedge growth. We apply the method to a large-scale model of continental collision, in which a close relationship between deep tectonics, fluvial network evolution, and uplift and erosion can be demonstrated.

  12. Geology and metallogeny of the Ar Rayn terrane, eastern Arabian shield: Evolution of a Neoproterozoic continental-margin arc during assembly of Gondwana within the East African orogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doebrich, J.L.; Al-Jehani, A. M.; Siddiqui, A.A.; Hayes, T.S.; Wooden, J.L.; Johnson, P.R.

    2007-01-01

    characteristics of the Ar Rayn terrane are analogous to the Andean continental margin of Chile, with opposite subduction polarity. The Ar Rayn terrane represents a continental margin arc that lay above a west-dipping subduction zone along a continental block represented by the Afif composite terrane. The concentration of epithermal, porphyry Cu and IOCG mineral systems, of central arc affiliation, along the AAF suggests that the AAF is not an ophiolitic suture zone, but originated as a major intra-arc fault that localized magmatism and mineralization. West-directed oblique subduction and ultimate collision with a land mass from the east (East Gondwana?) resulted in major transcurrent displacement along the AAF, bringing the eastern part of the arc terrane to its present exposed position, juxtaposed across the AAF against a back-arc basin assemblage represented by the Abt schist of the Ad Dawadimi terrane. Our findings indicate that arc formation and accretionary processes in the Arabian shield were still ongoing into the latest Neoproterozoic (Ediacaran), to about 620-600 Ma, and lead us to conclude that evolution of the Ar Rayn terrane (arc formation, accretion, syn- to postorogenic plutonism) defines a final stage of assembly of the Gondwana supercontinent along the northeastern margin of the East African orogen. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Zongo-San Gaban zone: Eocene foreland boundary of the Central Andean orogen, northwest Bolivia and southeast Peru

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, E.; Clark, A.H.; Kontak, D.J.; Archibald, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Discordant muscovite and biotite K-Ar dates of samples taken in six transects through the Cordillera Oriental of southeast Peru and northwest Bolivia, combined with /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar age spectra, reveal a northwest-trending, structurally cryptic, tectonothermal zone of late Eocene age (ca. 38 Ma) that overprints Triassic and older igneous and metamorphic rocks. The zone is at least 450 km long but is less than 25 km wide; temperatures along its northeast boundary are estimated to have reached 350/sup 0/C. No Paleogene magmatism has been recognized that could account for the thermal resetting of the K-Ar isotopic system. Uplift, erosion, and southwest-verging thrusting accompanied the development of this domain, which defined the foreland boundary of the orogen prior to inception of northeast-verging Andean thrusting in Miocene time. It is proposed that this tectonothermal zone, the Zongo-San Gaban zone (ZSGZ), which involves thrusting and basement shortening, is the southerly manifestation of the Incaic compressional deformation, which produced the thin-skinned Maranon thrust and fold belt (MTFB) north of the Abancay deflection of central Peru.

  14. Sediment yield along the Andes: continental budget, regional variations, and comparisons with other basins from orogenic mountain belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latrubesse, Edgardo M.; Restrepo, Juan D.

    2014-07-01

    We assess the sediment yield at 119 gauging stations distributed from Colombia to Patagonia, covering the different morphotectonic and morphoclimatic settings of the Andes. The most productive areas are the Meta River basin within the northern Andes and the Bolivian and northern Argentina-Chaco systems, which produce an average of 3345, 4909 and 2654 t km2 y- 1 of sediment, respectively. The rivers of the northern and central Andes (excluding the Pacific watersheds of Peru, northern Chile, and central Argentina) have a weighted mean sediment yield of 2045 t km- 2 y- 1 and produce 2.25 GTy- 1 of total sediment. A major constraint estimating the Andean continental budget of sediment yield lies in the lack of gauging data for the Peruvian region. Using the available gauge stations, the regional sediment yield appears underestimated. Assuming a higher value of sediment yield for the Peruvian Andes, the total budget for the whole central Andes could range between 2.57 GT y- 1 and 3.44 GT y- 1. A minimum of ~ 0.55 GT y- 1 and a probable maximum of ~ 1.74 GT y- 1 of sediment are deposited in the intramontane and surrounding proximal sedimentary basins. The magnitude of sediment yield in the Andes is comparable to other rivers draining orogenic belts around the world.

  15. Flake tectonics in the Sulu orogen in eastern China as revealed by seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Peifen; Liu, Futian; Ye, Kai; Wang, Qingchen; Cong, Bolin; Chen, Hui

    2002-05-01

    Seismic tomographic image reveals a crocodile-like P-waves velocity structure beneath the Sulu orogenic belt, which marks the subduction/collision zone between the Sino-Korean block (SK) and Yangtze block (YZ) in eastern China. It may imply that the upper crust of the YZ was detached from its lower crust and thrust over the SK for a maximum of ~400 km in the Sulu region, whereas the remnant of the subducted Yangtze lithosphere was lay beneath the SK. This crustal detached structure (flake tectonics) might have occurred after the Triassic subduction/collision.

  16. Carbonatitic metasomatism in orogenic dunites from Lijiatun in the Sulu UHP terrane, eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Bin; Chen, Yi; Guo, Shun; Chu, Zhu-Yin; Liu, Jing-Bo; Gao, Yi-Jie

    2016-10-01

    Among orogenic peridotites, dunites suffer the weakest crustal metasomatism at the slab-mantle interface and are the best lithology to trace the origins of orogenic peridotites and their initial geodynamic processes. Petrological and geochemical investigations of the Lijiatun dunites from the Sulu ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) terrane indicate a complex petrogenetic history involving melt extraction and multistage metasomatism (carbonatitic melt and slab-derived fluid). The Lijiatun dunites consist mainly of olivine (Fo = 92.0-92.6, Ca = 42-115 ppm), porphyroblastic orthopyroxene (En = 91.8-92.8), Cr-spinel (Cr# = 50.4-73.0, TiO2 < 0.2 wt.%) and serpentine. They are characterized by refractory bulk-rock compositions with high MgO (45.31-47.07 wt.%) and Mg# (91.5-91.9), and low Al2O3 (0.48-0.70 wt.%), CaO (0.25-0.44 wt.%) and TiO2 (< 0.03 wt.%) contents. Whole-rock platinum group elements (PGE) are similar to those of cratonic mantle peridotites and Re-Os isotopic data suggest that dunites formed in the early Proterozoic (~ 2.2 Ga). These data indicate that the Lijiatun dunites were the residues of ~ 30% partial melting and were derived from the subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) beneath the North China craton (NCC). Subsequent carbonatitic metasomatism is characterized by the formation of olivine-rich (Fo = 91.6-92.6, Ca = 233-311 ppm), clinopyroxene-bearing (Mg# = 95.9-96.7, Ti/Eu = 104-838) veins cutting orthopyroxene porphyroblasts. Based on the occurrence of dolomite, mass-balance calculation and thermodynamic modeling, carbonatitic metasomatism had occurred within the shallow SCLM (low-P and high-T conditions) before dunites were incorporated into the continental subduction channel. These dunites then suffered weak metasomatism by slab-derived fluids, forming pargasitic amphibole after pyroxene. This work indicates that modification of the SCLM beneath the eastern margin of the NCC had already taken place before the Triassic continental subduction. Orogenic

  17. Preliminary design activities for solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Information on the development of solar heating and cooling systems is presented. The major emphasis is placed on program organization, system size definition, site identification, system approaches, heat pump and equipment design, collector procurement, and other preliminary design activities.

  18. Late Paleozoic closure of the Ob-Zaisan Ocean along the Irtysh/Chara shear zone and implications for arc amalgamation and oroclinal bending in the western Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengfei; Sun, Min; Rosenbaum, Gideon

    2016-04-01

    The Irtysh/Chara Shear Zone is one of the largest strike-slip systems in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB). It records collisional processes of the peri-Siberian orogenic system with the West Junggar-Kazakhstan-Tianshan orogenic system following the closure of the Ob-Zaisan Ocean, but the exact timing of these events remains enigmatic. We conducted detailed structural analysis along the Irtysh Shear Zone (NW China), which together with new geochronological data allows us to reconstruct the tectonic evolution during the final closure of the Ob-Zaisan Ocean. Our results showed that subduction-accretion processes lasted at least until the Late Carboniferous in the Chinese Altai and the East/West Junggar. The subsequent arc amalgamation is characterized by a cycle of crustal thickening, orogenic collapse and transpressional thickening. On a larger scale, the West Junggar- Kazakhstan -Tianshan orogenic system defines a U-shape oroclinal structure (e.g. Xiao et al., 2010). A major phase of oroclinal bending that involved ~110° rotation may have occurred during the Late Devonian to Early Carboniferous (Levashova et al., 2012). Previous authors have linked oroclinal bending with the late Paleozoic amalgamation of the western CAOB, and proposed that a quasi-linear West Junggar- Kazakhstan -Tianshan orogenic system was buckled during the convergence of the Siberian and Tarim cratons following the closure of the Ob-Zaisan Ocean (in the north) and the South Tianshan Ocean (in the south) (e.g. Abrajevitch et al., 2008). This model, however, is not supported by our new data that constrain the closure of the Ob-Zaisan Ocean to the Late Carboniferous. Alternatively, we propose that oroclinal bending may have involved two phases of bending, with the ~110° rotation in the Late Devonian to Early Carboniferous possibly associated with trench retreat. Further tightening may have occurred in response to the convergence of the Siberian and Tarim cratons during the Late

  19. A comparative analysis of pre-Silurian crustal building blocks of the northern and the southern Appalachian orogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hibbard, J.P.; van Staal, C.R.; Rankin, D.W.

    2007-01-01

    The New York promontory serves as the divide between the northern and southern segments of the Appalachian orogen. Antiquated subdivisions, distinct for each segment, implied that they had lithotectonic histories that were independent of each other. Using new lithotectonic subdivisions we compare first order features of the pre-Silurian orogenic 'building blocks' in order to test the validity of the implication of independent lithotectonic histories for the two segments. Three lithotectonic divisions, termed here the Laurentian, Iapetan, and the peri-Gondwanan realms, characterize the entire orogen. The Laurentian realm, composed of native North American rocks, is remarkably uniform for the length of the orogen. It records the multistage Neoproterozoic-early Paleozoic rift-drift history of the Appalachian passive margin, formation of a Taconic Seaway, and the ultimate demise of both in the Middle Ordovician. The Iapetan realm encompasses mainly oceanic and magmatic arc tracts that once lay within the Iapetus Ocean, between Laurentia and Gondwana. In the northern segment, the realm is divisible on the basis of stratigraphy and faunal provinciality into peri-Laurentian and peri-Gondwanan tracts that were amalgamated in the Late Ordovician. South of New York, stratigraphic and faunal controls decrease markedly; rock associations are not inconsistent with those of the northern Appalachians, although second-order differences exist. Exposed exotic crustal blocks of the peri-Gondwanan realm include Ganderia, Avalonia, and Meguma in the north, and Carolinia in the south. Carolinia most closely resembles Ganderia, both in early evolution and Late Ordovician-Silurian docking to Laurentia. Our comparison indicates that, to a first order, the pre-Silurian Appalachian orogen developed uniformly, starting with complex rifting and a subsequent drift phase to form the Appalachian margin, followed by the consolidation of Iapetan components and ending with accretion of the peri

  20. Activity Systems and Moral Reasoning: An Intervention Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wardi, Eva; Helkama, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Seventeen social educator students were taught to analyze their work activity by means of a Vygotsky-inspired method, drawing on Engeström's notion of an activity system. The method aimed at increasing the consciousness of the students of the structure of work activity system. The participants wrote two accounts of their field-work practice…

  1. New approaches to enhance active steering system functionalities: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serarslan, Benan

    2014-09-01

    An important development of the steering systems in general is active steering systems like active front steering and steer-by-wire systems. In this paper the current functional possibilities in application of active steering systems are explored. A new approach and additional functionalities are presented that can be implemented to the active steering systems without additional hardware such as new sensors and electronic control units. Commercial active steering systems are controlling the steering angle depending on the driving situation only. This paper introduce methods for enhancing active steering system functionalities depending not only on the driving situation but also vehicle parameters like vehicle mass, tyre and road condition. In this regard, adaptation of the steering ratio as a function of above mentioned vehicle parameters is presented with examples. With some selected vehicle parameter changes, the reduction of the undesired influences on vehicle dynamics of these parameter changes has been demonstrated theoretically with simulations and with real-time driving measurements.

  2. Ediacaran 2,500-km-long synchronous deep continental subduction in the West Gondwana Orogen.

    PubMed

    Ganade de Araujo, Carlos E; Rubatto, Daniela; Hermann, Joerg; Cordani, Umberto G; Caby, Renaud; Basei, Miguel A S

    2014-10-16

    The deeply eroded West Gondwana Orogen is a major continental collision zone that exposes numerous occurrences of deeply subducted rocks, such as eclogites. The position of these eclogites marks the suture zone between colliding cratons, and the age of metamorphism constrains the transition from subduction-dominated tectonics to continental collision and mountain building. Here we investigate the metamorphic conditions and age of high-pressure and ultrahigh-pressure eclogites from Mali, Togo and NE-Brazil and demonstrate that continental subduction occurred within 20 million years over at least a 2,500-km-long section of the orogen during the Ediacaran. We consider this to be the earliest evidence of large-scale deep-continental subduction and consequent appearance of Himalayan-scale mountains in the geological record. The rise and subsequent erosion of such mountains in the Late Ediacaran is perfectly timed to deliver sediments and nutrients that are thought to have been necessary for the subsequent evolution of sustainable life on Earth.

  3. Crustal structure of the alaska range orogen and denali fault along the richardson highway

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, M.A.; Pellerin, L.; Nokleberg, W.J.; Ratchkovski, N.A.; Glen, J.M.G.

    2007-01-01

    A suite of geophysical data obtained along the Richardson Highway crosses the eastern Alaska Range and Denali fault and reveals the crustal structure of the orogen. Strong seismic reflections from within the orogen north of the Denali fault dip as steeply as 25?? north and extend downward to depths between 20 and 25 km. These reflections reveal what is probably a shear zone that transects most of the crust and is part of a crustal-scale duplex structure that probably formed during the Late Cretaceous. These structures, however, appear to be relict because over the past 20 years, they have produced little or no seismicity despite the nearby Mw = 7.9 Denali fault earthquake that struck in 2002. The Denali fault is nonreflective, but we interpret modeled magnetotelluric (MT), gravity, and magnetic data to propose that the fault dips steeply to vertically. Modeling of MT data shows that aftershocks of the 2002 Denali fault earthquake occurred above a rock body that has low electrical resistivity (>10 ohm-m), which might signify the presence of fluids in the middle and lower crust. Copyright ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America.

  4. Devonian sedimentation in the Xiqingshan Mountains: Implications for paleogeographic reconstructions of the SW Qinling Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhen; Aitchison, Jonathan C.; Fu, Changlei; Guo, Xianqing; Xia, Wenjing; Niu, Manlan

    2016-08-01

    The Qinling Orogen between the North China and Yangtze plates comprises various accreted and collisional terranes, recording the evolution of the Proto-Tethyan Ocean and the formation of east Asia. Knowledge of the provenance and tectonic setting of a thick succession of E-W striking Devonian sedimentary rocks sandwiched tectonically between the Shangdan and Mianlue ophiolitic suture zones in this belt is essential to understanding the evolution of the Qinling Orogen and the assembly of the North China and Yangtze plates during the Late Paleozoic. Systematic studies of the Devonian sedimentary facies in the Xiqingshan Mountains indicate the northern margin of the South Qinling belt was uplifted prior to the Early Devonian. Lower Devonian sandstones are dominated by feldspathic litharenite (Q12-31F18-37L40-65), indicative of a continental arc derivation. Detrital zircon U-Pb data demonstrate that the Lower and Middle Devonian sandstones were derived respectively from ca. 770 Ma and ca. 400 Ma felsic arc-related magmatic sources. Devonian sedimentation in the Xiqingshan Mountains is interpreted to have occurred in a foreland basin between the Yangtze plate and the North Qinling continental arc.

  5. Ediacaran 2,500-km-long synchronous deep continental subduction in the West Gondwana Orogen.

    PubMed

    Ganade de Araujo, Carlos E; Rubatto, Daniela; Hermann, Joerg; Cordani, Umberto G; Caby, Renaud; Basei, Miguel A S

    2014-01-01

    The deeply eroded West Gondwana Orogen is a major continental collision zone that exposes numerous occurrences of deeply subducted rocks, such as eclogites. The position of these eclogites marks the suture zone between colliding cratons, and the age of metamorphism constrains the transition from subduction-dominated tectonics to continental collision and mountain building. Here we investigate the metamorphic conditions and age of high-pressure and ultrahigh-pressure eclogites from Mali, Togo and NE-Brazil and demonstrate that continental subduction occurred within 20 million years over at least a 2,500-km-long section of the orogen during the Ediacaran. We consider this to be the earliest evidence of large-scale deep-continental subduction and consequent appearance of Himalayan-scale mountains in the geological record. The rise and subsequent erosion of such mountains in the Late Ediacaran is perfectly timed to deliver sediments and nutrients that are thought to have been necessary for the subsequent evolution of sustainable life on Earth. PMID:25319269

  6. Shallow, old, and hydrologically insignificant fault zones in the Appalachian orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malgrange, Juliette; Gleeson, Tom

    2014-01-01

    The permeability of fault zones impacts diverse geological processes such as hydrocarbon migration, hydrothermal fluid circulation, and regional groundwater flow, yet how fault zones affect groundwater flow at a regional scale (1-10 km) is highly uncertain. The objective of this work is to determine whether faults affect regional patterns of groundwater flow, by using radioactive radon and chloride to quantify groundwater discharge to lakes underlain by faults and not underlain by faults. We sampled lakes overlying the Paleozoic Appalachian fold and thrust belt in the Eastern Townships in Québec, and compared our results to a previous study in a crystalline watershed in the Canadian Shield. The field data was analyzed with an analytical geochemical mixing model. The uncertainties of model parameters were assessed in a sensitivity analysis using Monte Carlo simulation, and the difference between lakes tested with statistical analysis. While the model results indicate non-negligible groundwater discharge for most of the lakes in the Paleozoic orogen, the difference between the groundwater discharge rate into the lakes located on faults and the other lakes is not statistically significant. However, the groundwater discharge rate to lakes in the Paleozoic orogeny is significantly higher than lakes that overlay crystalline bedrock, which is consistent with independent estimates of permeability. The rate of groundwater discharge is not significantly enhanced or diminished around the thrust fault zones, suggesting that in a regional scale, permeability of fault zones is not significantly different from the bedrock permeability at shallow depth in this old, tectonically- inactive orogen.

  7. Process of activation of a palladium catalyst system

    DOEpatents

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A.; Knapke, Michael J.

    2011-08-02

    Improved processes for activating a catalyst system used for the reduction of nitrogen oxides are provided. In one embodiment, the catalyst system is activated by passing an activation gas stream having an amount of each of oxygen, water vapor, nitrogen oxides, and hydrogen over the catalyst system and increasing a temperature of the catalyst system to a temperature of at least 180.degree. C. at a heating rate of from 1-20.degree./min. Use of activation processes described herein leads to a catalyst system with superior NOx reduction capabilities.

  8. A Hybrid Activity System as Educational Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamazumi, Katsuhiro

    2008-01-01

    This article analyzes a hybrid after-school learning activity for children called "New School" (NS). NS is an inter-institutional, collaborative project based on a partnership between a university and local elementary schools that also involves other social actors and institutions. Using a framework of third generation activity theory, the article…

  9. The Grenville Orogenic Cycle (ca. 1350-1000 Ma): an Adirondack perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLelland, James; Daly, J. Stephen; McLelland, Jonathan M.

    1996-11-01

    The Adirondack Mountains are characterized by three major events that took place during the interval ca. 1350-1000 Ma. The earliest of these is the arc-related Elzevirian Orogeny (ca. 1350-1185 Ma) during which substantial volumes of juvenile calc-alkaline crust were added to the Adirondacks as well as to the northwest segment of the Central Metasedimentary Belt. Data from the southwestern United States as well as from Ireland and Baltica indicate that Elzevirian magmatism and orogeny were of global dimensions. Within the southwestern sector of the Grenville Province, the Elzevirian Orogeny culminated at ca. 1185 Ma when accretion of all outboard terranes was completed. Compressional orogeny related to this convergence resulted in overthickened crust and lithosphere which subsequently delaminated giving rise to orogen collapse and AMCG magmatism that swept southeastward from the Frontenac Terrane into the Adirondack Highlands during the interval ca. 1180-1130 Ma. Localized compressional events within neighboring parts of the Grenville Province emphasize the continued existence of contraction during this interval, although crustal extension caused local in sedimentary basins in which were deposited the Flinton and the St. Boniface Groups. The Adirondacks have not yet provided any record of events within the interval ca. 1125-1100 Ma, although there is evidence of contraction elsewhere in the southwestern Grenville Province at that time. At 1100-1090 Ma the northern Adirondack Highlands were invaded by mildly A-type hornblende granites (Hawkeye suite) that are interpreted to be the result of local crustal thinning contemporaneous with rifting and mafic magmatism taking place in the Midcontinent rift. Immediately following, at ca. 1090 Ma, the global-scale continental collision of the Ottawan Orogeny was initiated. Strong convergence, deformation, and metamorphism continued to at least ca. 1070 Ma, and rocks older than this are profoundly affected by this event

  10. An analysis of the daily precipitation variability in the Himalayan orogen using a statistical parameterisation and its potential in driving landscape evolution models with stochastic climatic forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deal, Eric; Braun, Jean

    2015-04-01

    A current challenge in landscape evolution modelling is to integrate realistic precipitation patterns and behaviour into longterm fluvial erosion models. The effect of precipitation on fluvial erosion can be subtle as well as nonlinear, implying that changes in climate (e.g. precipitation magnitude or storminess) may have unexpected outcomes in terms of erosion rates. For example Tucker and Bras (2000) show theoretically that changes in the variability of precipitation (storminess) alone can influence erosion rate across a landscape. To complicate the situation further, topography, ultimately driven by tectonic uplift but shaped by erosion, has a major influence on the distribution and style of precipitation. Therefore, in order to untangle the coupling between climate, erosion and tectonics in an actively uplifting orogen where fluvial erosion is dominant it is important to understand how the 'rain dial' used in a landscape evolution model (LEM) corresponds to real precipitation patterns. One issue with the parameterisation of rainfall for use in an LEM is the difference between the timescales for precipitation (≤ 1 year) and landscape evolution (> 103 years). As a result, precipitation patterns must be upscaled before being integrated into a model. The relevant question then becomes: What is the most appropriate measure of precipitation on a millennial timescale? Previous work (Tucker and Bras, 2000; Lague, 2005) has shown that precipitation can be properly upscaled by taking into account its variable nature, along with its average magnitude. This captures the relative size and frequency of extreme events, ensuring a more accurate characterisation of the integrated effects of precipitation on erosion over long periods of time. In light of this work, we present a statistical parameterisation that accurately models the mean and daily variability of ground based (APHRODITE) and remotely sensed (TRMM) precipitation data in the Himalayan orogen with only a few

  11. Formation of Cretaceous Cordilleran and post-orogenic granites and their microgranular enclaves from the Dalat zone, southern Vietnam: Tectonic implications for the evolution of Southeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shellnutt, J. Gregory; Lan, Ching-Ying; Van Long, Trinh; Usuki, Tadashi; Yang, Huai-Jen; Mertzman, Stanley A.; Iizuka, Yoshi; Chung, Sun-Lin; Wang, Kuo-Lung; Hsu, Wen-Yu

    2013-12-01

    Cordilleran-type batholiths are useful in understanding the duration, cyclicity and tectonic evolution of continental margins. The Dalat zone of southern Vietnam preserves evidence of Late Mesozoic convergent zone magmatism superimposed on Precambrian rocks of the Indochina Block. The Dinhquan, Deoca and Ankroet plutons and their enclaves indicate that the Dalat zone transitioned from an active continental margin producing Cordilleran-type batholiths to highly extended crust producing within-plate plutons. The Deoca and Dinhquan plutons are compositionally similar to Cordilleran I-type granitic rocks and yield mean zircon U/Pb ages between 118 ± 1.4 Ma and 115 ± 1.2 Ma. Their Sr-Nd whole rock isotopes (ISr = 0.7044 to 0.7062; εNd(T) = - 2.4 to + 0.2) and zircon Hf isotopes (εHf(T) = + 8.2 ± 1.2 and + 6.4 ± 0.9) indicate that they were derived by mixing between a mantle component and an enriched component (i.e. GLOSS). The Ankroet pluton is chemically similar to post-orogenic/within-plate granitic rocks and has a zircon U/Pb age of 87 ± 1.6 Ma. Geobarometric calculations indicate that amphibole within the Ankroet pluton crystallized at a depth of ~ 6 kbar which is consistent with the somewhat more depleted Sr-Nd isotope (ISr = 0.7017 to 0.7111; εNd(T) = - 2.8 to + 0.6) and variable εHf(T) compositions suggesting a stronger influence of crustal material in the parental magma. The compositional change of the Dalat zone granitic rocks during the middle to late Cretaceous indicates that the tectonic regime evolved from a continental arc environment to one of post-orogenic extension. The appearance of sporadic post-90 Ma magmatism in the Dalat zone and along the eastern margin of Eurasian indicates that there was no subsequent orogenic event and the region was likely one of highly extended crust that facilitated the opening of the South China Sea during the latter half of the Cenozoic.

  12. A network extraction tool for mineral exploration: a case study from the Wopmay Orogen, Northwest Territories, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Madeline; Morris, William; Harris, Jeff; Leblanc, George

    2012-03-01

    Many mineral exploration initiatives target regional- and local-scale lineaments (e.g. fault systems and dyke swarms) as they may act as conduits for mineralized fluids. In this work, we apply an automatic lineament `network extraction' method that draws on similar processes as the Blakely-Simpson peak detection algorithm and a stream network extraction algorithm commonly used in the mapping of drainage patterns from a topographic surface (e.g. DEM, DTM) within a Geographic Information System (GIS) environment. We apply the network extraction algorithm to a magnetic surface (grid) rather than a topographic surface. The method uses a simple quadratic surface across a 3×3 window to determine the degree of surface slope and if the centre cell of the window represents a localised low point in the surface. Thus this routine is particularly effective at identifying magnetic lows that may represent faults, which have undergone magnetite depletion (e.g. hematization). These lineament solutions provide insight into mineral exploration vectors through the computation of rose diagrams, fracture density plots and intersection locations. These diagrams, plots, and locations are used in conjunction with other geophysical layers (e.g. radiometrics) to help identify potential mineral exploration targets. We successfully applied this algorithm to an aeromagnetic dataset from the Wopmay Orogen in Northwestern Canada. This area is characterised by extensive regional and localised fault systems and dyke swarms, along with promising polymetallic hydrothermal mineral occurrences. Key areas for follow up exploration are identified through a combined study of geophysical grids and lineament analysis.

  13. Cretaceous Exhumation of the North American Cordillera Measured through Mineral Multi-Dating: Insights into Basin Filling Models and Orogenic Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, C. S.; Carrapa, B.; DeCelles, P. G.; Gehrels, G. E.; Thomson, S. N.

    2015-12-01

    Apatite fission track (AFT) thermochronology is an effective thermochronometer to measure source exhumation in the North American Cordillera, western U.S.A. We use a combination of thermochronology and geochronology to measure lag times, i.e., the difference in time between the cooling and depositional ages of a mineral crystal. These lag-time measurements using source exhumation ages, measured with AFT thermochronology, and depositional ages, measured with biostratigraphy and detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology, indicate constant to decreasing lag times of 0-5 m.y. throughout the Cretaceous. These lag times are consistent with rapid exhumation rates of ~0.9->1 km/m.y. One pitfall of using detrital thermochronology to measure source exhumation is assuring that the apatite crystals are exhumed apatites and not volcanic apatites introduced into the system from the volcanic arc. To do this we use U-Pb geochronology to remove samples contaminated with young arc derived apatites and keep those with old exhumed apatites. Five of the seven detrital AFT samples were significantly contaminated with young volcanic apatites, showing that U-Pb geochronology should be a routine step in measuring lag times. Our findings demonstrate that coarse-grained foreland basin deposits in the Cretaceous Western Interior, in both the proximal and distal settings, were deposited during times of active tectonism and exhumation and that sediments are not stored in wedge-top and proximal foredeep settings for long periods of time, i.e. >5 m.y., and then subsequently reworked distally. Exhumation rates of ~0.9->1 km/m.y. are not sustainable over the entire orogenic belt for the duration of the Sevier orogeny, indicated by the lack of deep-crustal material exhumed in the North American Cordillera. High exhumation rates were likely concentrated over the eastward-propagating Sevier fold-thrust belt, whereas the Nevadaplano and hinterland experienced much slower rates of exhumation. This variation in

  14. The Permian post-orogenic collapse in the Alps: insights from the Campo unit (Austroalpine nappes, N-Italy, SE-Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petri, Benoît; Mohn, Geoffroy; Štípská, Pavla; Manatschal, Gianreto; Schulmann, Karel

    2014-05-01

    the ~290 Ma (U-Pb on zircon) mafic intrusion give conditions of ~6 kbar and > 900°C. Our results bring constrains on the thermal and mechanical relation between the pluton and the host rock in the middle crust and confirm the mid-crustal position of the Campo unit during the Permian. Furthermore, this study highlights the contrasted evolution of mid-crustal levels compared to lower-crustal systems such as the Ivrea zone. Eventually at a larger scale, these results provide insights on the tectonic and magmatic processes and thermal conditions of the continental crust during Variscan post-orogenic evolution.

  15. Petrogenesis and ore genesis of the Permian Huangshanxi sulfide ore-bearing mafic-ultramafic intrusion in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt, western China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Ya-Jing; Qin, Ke-Zhang; Li, Chusi; Xue, Sheng-Chao; Ripley, Edward M.

    2014-07-01

    The Permian Huangshanxi mafic-ultramafic intrusion hosts one of the two largest magmatic sulfide deposits in the Eastern Tianshan which is situated in the southern margin of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt. In this paper we use mineral compositions and whole-rock geochemical data to decipher the genetic relationship between magma evolution and sulfide mineralization. The Huangshanxi intrusion consists of three separate intrusive units. Important sulfide mineralization occurs in the base of the last intrusive unit, an elongated, layered ultramafic body composed of lherzolite at the bottom, olivine websterite in the middle and websterite at the top. Based on olivine-liquid equilibria and mass balance, the MgO and FeO contents in the parental magma for a lherzolite sample are estimated to be 8.71 and 8.36 wt.%, respectively. The Huangshanxi mafic-ultramafic intrusive rocks and the estimated "trapped liquids" for several olivine-orthopyroxene cumulate rocks all show light rare earth element enrichments relative to heavy rare earth elements and significant Nb depletions relative to Th and La, which are similar to the characteristics of coeval basalts in the region. The arc-like geochemical features are attributed to pre-Permian mantle metasomatism by slab-derived fluids. Partial melting of the previously-modified mantle is thought to have resulted from heating by upwelling asthenosphere associated with post-subduction lithosphere delamination or by mantle plume activity. The relationship between the Fo and Ni contents of olivine crystals from the Huangshanxi sulfide-poor ultramafic rocks (< 1 wt.% S) indicates cotectic sulfide segregation during olivine crystallization. Significant depletions in platinum group elements (PGE) relative to Ni and Cu in the bulk sulfide ores of the Huangshanxi deposit are likely due to sulfide retention in the source mantle. Stratigraphic reversals in olivine Fo contents and bulk sulfide PGE tenors suggest that multiple magma replenishments

  16. Active fluidization in dense glassy systems.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Rituparno; Bhuyan, Pranab Jyoti; Rao, Madan; Dasgupta, Chandan

    2016-07-20

    Dense soft glasses show strong collective caging behavior at sufficiently low temperatures. Using molecular dynamics simulations of a model glass former, we show that the incorporation of activity or self-propulsion, f0, can induce cage breaking and fluidization, resulting in the disappearance of the glassy phase beyond a critical f0. The diffusion coefficient crosses over from being strongly to weakly temperature dependent as f0 is increased. In addition, we demonstrate that activity induces a crossover from a fragile to a strong glass and a tendency of active particles to cluster. Our results are of direct relevance to the collective dynamics of dense active colloidal glasses and to recent experiments on tagged particle diffusion in living cells. PMID:27380935

  17. Active vibration control of lightweight floor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baader, J.; Fontana, M.

    2016-04-01

    Wide-span and lightweight floors are often prone to structural vibrations due to their low resonance frequency and poor material damping. Their dynamic behaviour can be improved using passive, semi-active or active vibration control devices. The following article proposes a novel method for the controller synthesis for active vibration control. An existing passive TMD (tuned mass damper) is modelled and equipped with an actuator in order to provide more efficient damping. Using an iterative optimization approach under constraints, an optimal controller is found which minimizes a quadratic cost function in frequency domain. A simulation of an existing test bench shows that the active vibration control device is able to provide increased damping compared to the passive TMD.

  18. Geochronological and geochemical constraints on the Lüliang Group in the Lüliang Complex: Implications for the tectonic evolution of the Trans-North China Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chaohui; Zhao, Guochun; Liu, Fulai; Shi, Jianrong

    2014-06-01

    The Lüliang Complex is located at the western margin of the middle segment of the Trans-North China Orogen, along which the Western and Eastern Blocks amalgamated to form the basement of the North China Craton. The complex consists of the late Neoarchean to Paleoproterozoic granitic plutons and meta-supracrustal rocks, of which the latter are subdivided into the Jiehekou, Lüliang, Yejishan, and Heichashan/Lanhe Groups. The Lüliang Group is composed mainly of siliciclastic rocks in the lower part and volcanic rocks in the upper part, all of which have been metamorphosed from greenschist- to amphibolite-facies. U-Pb ages of detrital zircons from meta-sedimentary rocks in the Lüliang Group yield four populations of 3061-2920 Ma, 2790-2600 Ma, 2599-2280 Ma and 2211-2202 Ma, suggesting that their provenances were derived mainly from the Lüliang and Taihua Complexes in the Trans-North China Orogen. The meta-volcanic rocks give igneous zircon U-Pb ages of 2209-2178 Ma and εHf(t) values of - 0.8 to + 3.6. Geochemically, they are subalkaline basalts and andesites that can be classified into two groups, of which one group has flat LREEs, weak enrichment in LREEs relative to HREEs and flat HREEs and displays E-MORB-like spider diagrams with the exception of insignificantly negative Nb-Ta, Zr-Hf and Ti anomalies. In contrast, the other group displays stronger LREE fractionation, stronger enrichment in LREEs relative to HREEs and mildly fractionated HREEs and is characterized by “spiky” spider diagrams similar to arc volcanic rocks. The first group is interpreted to have originated from a Neoarchean E-MORB source, whereas the second group shows inputs of newly subduction-derived fluids in the mantle source. These geochronological and geochemical signatures indicate the existence of an 2.2-2.1 Ga continental back-arc system in the Lüliang Complex of the Trans-North China Orogen, which is consistent with the model that the collision between the Eastern and Western

  19. Description of data base management systems activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    One of the major responsibilities of the JPL Computing and Information Services Office is to develop and maintain a JPL plan for providing computing services to the JPL management and administrative community that will lead to improved productivity. The CISO plan to accomplish this objective has been titled 'Management and Administrative Support Systems' (MASS). The MASS plan is based on the continued use of JPL's IBM 3032 Computer system for administrative computing and for the MASS functions. The current candidate administrative Data Base Management Systems required to support the MASS include ADABASE, Cullinane IDMS and TOTAL. Previous uses of administrative Data Base Systems have been applied to specific local functions rather than in a centralized manner with elements common to the many user groups. Limited capacity data base systems have been installed in microprocessor based office automation systems in a few Project and Management Offices using Ashton-Tate dBASE II. These experiences plus some other localized in house DBMS uses have provided an excellent background for developing user and system requirements for a single DBMS to support the MASS program.

  20. Acidosis activates complement system in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Emeis, M; Sonntag, J; Willam, C; Strauss, E; Walka, M M; Obladen, M

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the in vitro effect of different forms of acidosis (pH 7.0) on the formation of anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. Metabolic acidosis due to addition of hydrochloric acid (10 micromol/ml blood) or lactic acid (5.5 micromol/ml) to heparin blood (N=12) caused significant activation of C3a and C5a compared to control (both p=0.002). Respiratory acidosis activated C3a (p=0.007) and C5a (p=0.003) compared to normocapnic controls. Making blood samples with lactic acidosis hypocapnic resulted in a median pH of 7.37. In this respiratory compensated metabolic acidosis, C3a and C5a were not increased. These experiments show that acidosis itself and not lactate trigger for activation of complement components C3 and C5. PMID:9927235

  1. Antibacterial activity of four dentin bonding systems.

    PubMed

    Herrera, M; Carrión, P; Bravo, M; Castillo, A

    2000-08-01

    The antibacterial action of bonding systems Gluma 2000, Syntac, Prisma Universal Bond 3, Scotchbond Multipurpose and Prime-Bond was tested against 32 strains of the caries-producing bacteria Streptococcus spp., Lactobacillus spp., Actinomyces spp., Porphyromonas spp. and Clostridium spp. An agar plate diffusion method was used with chlorhexidine as the positive control. Assays were performed in triplicate for each component (primer and adhesive) of the bonding systems. All the adhesives were found to inhibit bacterial growth but with differences in their spectra of action. The sum action of the Scotchbond Multipurpose components were most inhibitory and Prime-Bond was found to be the least effective system.

  2. Hybrid energy storage systems utilizing redox active organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Xu, Wu; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2015-09-08

    Redox flow batteries (RFB) have attracted considerable interest due to their ability to store large amounts of power and energy. Non-aqueous energy storage systems that utilize at least some aspects of RFB systems are attractive because they can offer an expansion of the operating potential window, which can improve on the system energy and power densities. One example of such systems has a separator separating first and second electrodes. The first electrode includes a first current collector and volume containing a first active material. The second electrode includes a second current collector and volume containing a second active material. During operation, the first source provides a flow of first active material to the first volume. The first active material includes a redox active organic compound dissolved in a non-aqueous, liquid electrolyte and the second active material includes a redox active metal.

  3. The active-passive continuous-wave terahertz imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolganova, Irina N.; Zaytsev, Kirill I.; Metelkina, Anna A.; Yurchenko, Stanislav O.

    2016-08-01

    Active and passive terahertz (THz) imaging have recently become essential instruments of various THz applications. In this paper the active- and passive-mode THz imaging systems are studied and the hybrid active-passive THz imaging system is suggested. The concept of image contrast was used to compare the active and passive THz imaging results. In order to achieve better image quality the hybrid system is considered to be effective. The main advantage of the proposed system is the combination of the self-emitted radiation of the object with the back scattered source radiation. The experimental results demonstrate that the active-passive modality of THz imaging system allows retrieving maximum information about the object. An approach to synthesise the active-passive THz images was proposed using the false-color representation.

  4. South Tien Shan orogenic belt: structure, magmatism and gold mineralization (Uzbekistan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koneev, Rustam; Seltmann, Reimer

    2014-05-01

    The Southern Tien Shan represents one of the key units of the Central Asian orogenic belt in Uzbekistan. Together with the Beltau-Kurama volcano-plutonic arc it formed as a result of subduction of the crust under the Turkistan paleoocean and the Kazakhstan continent, followed by collision and post-collisional strike-slip processes. The Southern Tien Shan is of particular interest due to its gold mineralisation. It hosts the giant Muruntau gold deposit and the large gold deposits of Amantaitau, Daugyztau, Myutenbay (Kyzylkum ore district) and Charmitan, Guzhumsay, Urtalik (Nurata ore district). The Middle Tienshan hosts within the Beltau-Kurama volcano-plutonic arc the Kurama ore district with the giant Kalmakyr Cu-Au porphyry and large epithermal Au-Ag deposits of Kochbulak and Kyzylalma. Yakubchuk et al. (2005) and others stress that the largest ore clusters are confined by the intersections of volcano-plutonic belts and transform faults in result of sinistral strike slip dislocations during the Permo-Carboniferous. Others believe that the ore giants are in addition controlled by hot spots - a mantle plume, superimposed on the crust architecture shaped by the subduction processes. Zircon U-Pb geochronology of main intrusive massifs of Uzbekistan (CERCAMS data) showed that granitoid magmatism is predominantly of postcollisional age, manifested in the accretionary units at 270-290 Ma, whereas subduction magmatism prevails as characteristic in the volcano-plutonic arc at 300-320 Ma. Determination of sulphide mineralization ages using Os-Re method (CERCAMS data), are respectively 283-289 Ma and 298-314 Ma. The studies were performed in the framework of IGCP- 592. References 1. Yakubchuk A.S., Shatov V.V., Kirwin D. et al., (2005) Gold and base metal metallogeny of the Central Asian Orogenic supercollage: Society of Economic Geologists, Inc. Economic Geology, 100th, Anniversary Volume, 1035-1068. 2. Groves, D.I., Goldfarb, R.J., Gebre-Mariam, M., Hagemann, S.G. and

  5. Lateral flow in the middle crust - Analogue experiments from the Svecofennian orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkilä, Kaisa; Koyi, Hemin; Korja, Annakaisa; Eklund, Olav

    2013-04-01

    The exposed Svecofennian crust (50-65 km) has been suggested to have thickened in continental accretion between Archean and Paleoproterozoic terranes, probably at a high convergence rate. It is likely that this thickened orogen experienced lateral spreading during its final stages. This post-orogenic event has reshaped the collisional framework and modified its bulk appearance. In this study, we have used scaled analogue centrifuge modeling to simulate extensional lateral flow at the Archean- Paleoproterozoic boundary zone during final stages of the Svecofennian orogeny. The analogue models simulate both the evolution of a mechanical boundary between two rheologically different tectonic blocks, and the role of pre-existing weaknesses at moderate angles (representing the old stacking structures). In models the upper layer is brittle, the middle layer is ductile, and the lower layer is more viscous. The layers represent upper, middle and lower crust, respectively. The Proterozoic layers have lower viscosity values than the Archean layers at similar depths. The materials are based on the plastilina modelling putty, which is mixed with acid oil, silicone, sweetener and/or barium sulphate to get the appropriate composition for each layer. Both the Archean and the Paleoproterozoic blocks have a low-viscous middle crust. The three layered models are extended unilaterally. The model results show that during extension the rheologically different layers deform and spread at different rates during the tectonic collapse. This results in 1) vertical rotation of the Archean and Proterozoic boundary; 2) the pre-existed faults become listric and discontinuous; and 3) the upward flow of the low viscosity middle layer to fill the newly-formed gaps between the upper layer blocks. The experiments show geometrically similar crustal-scale structures to those observed in the deep seismic reflection profiles (FIRE). Thus it is possible that lateral flow has taken place in the core of the

  6. Electricity/Electronics Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Barbara, Ed.

    This electricity/electronics guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, a list of objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 35 modules on the following topics: electrical…

  7. Magmatic to solid state fabrics in syntectonic granitoids recording early Carboniferous orogenic collapse in the Bohemian Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žák, Jiří; Verner, Kryštof; Holub, František V.; Kabele, Petr; Chlupáčová, Marta; Halodová, Patricie

    2012-03-01

    The ˜354-336 Ma Central Bohemian Plutonic Complex is a Variscan magmatic arc that developed in the central Bohemian Massif in response to subduction of the Saxothuringian lithosphere beneath the Teplá-Barrandian microplate. Magmatic to solid state fabrics in the most voluminous portion of this arc (the ˜346 Ma Blatná pluton) record two superposed orogenic events: dextral transpression associated with arc-parallel stretching and arc-perpendicular shortening, and normal shearing associated with exhumation of the high-grade core of the orogen (Moldanubian unit). This kinematic switch is an important landmark in the evolution of this segment of the Variscan belt for it marks the cessation of subduction-related compressive forces in the upper crust giving way to gravity-driven normal movements of the Teplá-Barrandian hanging wall block relative to the high-grade Moldanubian footwall. We use thermal modeling to demonstrate that the emplacement of huge volumes of arc magmas and their slow cooling produced a thermally softened domain in the upper crust and that the magmatic arc granitoids may have played a major role in initiating the orogenic collapse in the Bohemian Massif through lubrication and reactivation of a pre-existing lithospheric boundary and decreasing the overall strength of the rigid orogenic lid.

  8. MiSIS (Michigan Student Information System) Activities Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1979

    The Michigan Student Information System (MiSIS) is the student flow component of the Michigan Community College Occupational Education Evaluation System (MCCOEES), a comprehensive state-wide system for evaluating occupational education. The Michigan Student Information System (MiSIS) Activities Manual was designed to help college-level personnel…

  9. Orogenic development of the Adrar des Iforas (Tuareg Shield, NE Mali): new geochemical and geochronological data and geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, Delphine; Bruguier, Olivier; Caby, Renaud; Buscail, Francois; Hammor, Dalila

    2016-04-01

    Laser-ablation U-Th-Pb analyses of zircon and allanite from magmatic and metamorphic rocks of the Adrar des Iforas (Northern Mali) allow re-examining the relationships between the different crustal units constituting the western part of the Tuareg Shield, as well as the timing of magmatic and metamorphic events in the West Gondwana Orogen. Granulite-facies metamorphism in the Iforas Granulitic Unit (IGU) and at In Bezzeg occurred at 1986 ± 7 Ma and 1988 ± 5 Ma respectively. This age is slightly younger, but consistent with that of the HT granulite facies event characterizing the In Ouzzal granulitic unit (IOGU), thereby substantiating the view that these units once formed a single granulitic belt of c. 800 km long. High-grade metamorphic basement units of the Kidal terrane surrounding the IGU contain Paleoproterozoic magmatic rocks crystallized between 1982 ± 8 Ma and 1966 ± 9 Ma. Inherited components in these rocks (2.1 Ga and 2.3-2.5 Ga) have ages similar to that of detrital zircons at In Bezzeg and to that of basement rocks from the IGU. This is taken as evidence that the Kidal terrane and the IGU formed a single crustal block at least until 1.9 Ga. East of the Adrar fault, the Tin Essako orthogneiss is dated at 2020 ± 5 Ma, but escaped granulite facies metamorphism. During the Neoproterozoic, the Kidal terrane underwent a long-lived continental margin magmatism. To the west, this terrane is bounded by the Tilemsi intra-oceanic island arc, for which a gneissic sub-alkali granite was dated at 716 ± 6 Ma. A synkinematic diorite extends the magmatic activity of the arc down to 643 ± 4 Ma, and, along with litterature data, indicates that the Tilemsi arc had a life span of about 90 Ma. Backward docking to the western margin of the Kidal terrane is documented by migmatites dated at 628 ± 6 Ma. Subduction related processes and the development of the Kidal active margin was responsible for the development of a back-arc basin in the Tafeliant area, with

  10. Orogenic development of the Adrar des Iforas (Tuareg Shield, NE Mali): New geochemical and geochronological data and geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, Delphine; Bruguier, Olivier; Caby, Renaud; Buscail, François; Hammor, Dalila

    2016-05-01

    Laser-ablation U-Th-Pb analyses of zircon and allanite from magmatic and metamorphic rocks of the Adrar des Iforas in Northern Mali allow re-examining the relationships between the different crustal units constituting the western part of the Tuareg Shield, as well as the timing of magmatic and metamorphic events in the West Gondwana Orogen. Granulite-facies metamorphism in the Iforas Granulitic Unit (IGU) and at In Bezzeg occurred at 1986 ± 7 Ma and 1988 ± 5 Ma respectively. This age is slightly younger, but consistent with that of the HT granulite facies event characterizing the In Ouzzal granulitic unit (IOGU), thereby substantiating the view that these units once formed a single granulitic belt of c. 800 km long. High-grade metamorphic basement units of the Kidal terrane surrounding the IGU contain Paleoproterozoic magmatic rocks crystallized between 1982 ± 8 Ma and 1966 ± 9 Ma. Inherited components in these rocks (2.1 Ga and 2.3-2.5 Ga) have ages similar to that of detrital zircons at In Bezzeg and to that of basement rocks from the IGU. This is taken as evidence that the Kidal terrane and the IGU formed a single crustal block at least until 1.9 Ga. East of the Adrar fault, the Tin Essako orthogneiss is dated at 2020 ± 5 Ma, but escaped granulite facies metamorphism. During the Neoproterozoic, the Kidal terrane underwent a long-lived continental margin magmatism. To the west, this terrane is bounded by the Tilemsi intra-oceanic island arc, for which a gneissic sub-alkali granite was dated at 716 ± 6 Ma. A synkinematic diorite extends the magmatic activity of the arc down to 643 ± 4 Ma, and, along with literature data, indicates that the Tilemsi arc has a life span of about 90 Ma. Backward docking to the western margin of the Kidal terrane is documented by migmatites dated at 628 ± 6 Ma. Subduction related processes and the development of the Kidal active margin was responsible for the development of a back-arc basin in the Tafeliant area, with

  11. A dual doubly vergent orogen in the Banda Arc continent-arc collision zone as observed on deep seismic reflection profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, D. B.; Prasetyo, H.; Blundell, D. J.; Pigram, C. J.; Barber, A. J.; Richardson, A.; Tjokosaproetro, S.

    1996-02-01

    New deep seismic reflection profiles across the Banda Arc of Indonesia reveal reflectors in the uppermost 50 km of the lithosphere. Combined with existing earthquake hypocenter locations and focal mechanisms, the new structural geometries inferred from the reflectors yield a more complete analysis of deformation during the past 10 m.y. and provide insights into how strain is partitioned across an orogenic belt in which volcanic arcs and continents converge. A clearly defined Wadati-Benioff zone, and recent deformation of shelf sediments observed on older shallow seismic profiles, indicated to previous workers that substantial convergence occurred at the Timor Trough. A few focal mechanisms, seafloor escarpments, and recent geodetic surveying indicate that convergence at ˜7 cm yr-1 currently (last 200 kyr?) occurs at the northern margin of the now inactive volcanic arc, the Wetar Thrust zone. Reflectors on the new seismic profiles are interpreted as thrust faults and folds that occur throughout the crust and within the uppermost mantle between the Timor Trough and Wetar Thrust. Specifically, basement reflectors beneath the toe of the accretionary complex have reverse-sense offsets that imply blind thrusts. The whole crust is horizontally shortened, not only the sedimentary cover rocks that previously deformed into duplexes above a decollément. Reflectors dipping away from both margins of the forearc basin and at the northern margin of the volcanic arc are interpreted as evidence of thrusting. Thus each arc represents a doubly vergent fold-and-thrust belt, but only the northern one is currently active. Crustal thicknesses inferred from seismic velocities, reflectors, and gravity anomalies are consistent with the merging of a thinned continental shelf margin with oceanic lithosphere to form an orogenic belt with at present 3-4 km of topographic relief in the region of eastern Timor.

  12. From cessation of south-directed mid-crust extrusion to onset of orogen-parallel extension, NW Nepal Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Carl

    Field mapping and, structural, microstructural, and chronological analyses confirm the existence of a segment of the Gurla-Mandhata-Humla fault, an orogen-parallel strike-slip dominated shear zone in the upper Karnali valley of northwestern Nepal. This shear zone forms the upper contact of, and cuts obliquely across the Greater Himalayan Sequence (GHS). Data from this study reveal two phases of GHS deformation. Phase 1 is characterized by U-Th-Pb monazite crystallization ages (˜26--12 Ma, peak ˜18--15 Ma), consistent with typical Neohimalayan metamorphic ages, and the final stages of south-directed extrusion of the GHS. Phase 2 is characterized by south-dipping high-strain foliations and intensely developed ESE-WNW trending, shallowly plunging mineral elongation lineations, indicating orogen-parallel extension. Thermochronology of muscovite defining these fabrics implies that the area was cooling and experiencing orogen-parallel extension by ˜15--9 Ma. Mineral deformation mechanisms and quartz c-axis patterns of these fabrics record a rapid increase in temperature from ˜350°C along the shear zone, to ˜650°C at ˜2.5 structural km below the shear zone. Such temperature gradients may be remnants of telescoped and/or flattened isotherms generated during south-directed extrusion of the GHS. Overprinting ESE-WNW fabrics record progressive deformation of the GHS at lower temperatures. Progressive deformation included a significant component of pure shear, as indicated by symmetric high-temperature quartz c-axis fabrics and a lower-temperature vorticity estimate (˜59% pure shear). A transition in c-axis fabrics from type I to type II cross-girdles at ˜ 1.2 km below the fault could indicate a transition from plane strain towards constriction. Together, these data suggest orogen-parallel extension was occurring as a result of transtension. This study reveals a transition from south-directed extrusion of the GHS to orogen-parallel extension between ˜15--13 Ma

  13. Erosional Control of Orogenesis: Approximate Analytical Solution for a Two-Sided, Frictional Orogenic Wedge at Steady State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whipple, K.; Meade, B.

    2002-12-01

    The recognition of a dynamic coupling among climate, erosion and tectonics is arguably one of the most exciting discoveries in the last 20 years. Numerical simulations using coupled thermo-mechanical and surface process models have been most influential. However, analyses to date leave the strength of the coupling between climate and tectonics uncertain. Can an intensification of erosion induce a sufficiently strong increase in rock uplift rate that steady-state relief is increased rather than reduced? In addition, it has remained unclear whether the details of the erosion processes are important to the geodynamic evolution of the orogen, and if so, how they come into play. We present an approximate analytical solution for two-sided orogenic wedges obeying a frictional rheology, and in a condition of flux steady state, that makes explicit the nature and sensitivity of the coupling between climate and rock uplift rate. A closed-form solution for the inter-relations among steady-state orogen width, rock uplift rate, patterns of internal deformation, and climate is found by combining (1) a statement of mass balance, (2) the geometry dictated by critical taper theory for a frictional wedge, (3) relations for equilibrium topography consistent with both the tapered wedge geometry and with erosion rates necessary to satisfy the mass balance condition, and (4) a kinematic solution for internal deformation. An approximate relation for the timescale of adjustment to a new steady state following a step-function change in climatic or tectonic conditions is also found. We make the simplifying assumption that the topographic taper is invariant with orogen width, tectonic influx rate, climate, and time. Erosion rates are assumed to be dictated by the bedrock channel network and are described by the stream-power model of bedrock channel incision. Erosional efficiency (and its spatial distribution) is shown to control steady-state orogen width, crest elevation, crustal thickness

  14. Tectonic evolution of the Montagne Noire and a possible orogenic model for syncollisional exhumation of deep rocks, Variscan belt, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aerden, Domingo G. A. M.

    1998-02-01

    Structural analysis in the Montagne Noire, including a study of inclusion trail patterns in andalusite, garnet, and staurolite porphyroblasts, reveals a succession of five foliations in alternately steep and flat-lying orientations. This is inferred to reflect multiple gravitational collapse phases that intervened during continuous plate convergence. Initial crustal thickening by foliation development and folding (D1) was responsible for eclogite-facies metamorphism in the gneissic basement. Subsequent thrusting and recumbent folding (D2) generated a subhorizontal crenulation cleavage during Namuro-Westphalian times, while previous steep structures became rotated. Petrological and microstructural evidence indicate that thrust nappes were emplaced by a gravitational spreading mechanism, while undergoing internal thinning. An important amount of basement exhumation took place synchronously. These observations form the basis for a new orogenic model in which thermal reequilibration of a previously thickened orogen induces gravitational instability in the upper crust. Collapse of the upper crust causes it to spreadout horizontally over continuously converging relatively cool plates thereby creating low-angle thrust nappes. The upper crustal thinning facilitates simultaneous extrusion of lower crust in vertical root zones at the orogen center, which on reaching the higher part of the orogen can be incorporated in the nappes and displaced horizontally. Following such a mechanism of nappe tectonics, renewed horizontal shortening (D3) produced the Montagne Noire gneissic dome by upright folding of nappe-related foliations with orogen-parallel stretching. Previous crustal thinning had led to an increased heat flux between basement and cover so that during D3, cover sequences were still rising in temerature, while basement rocks had already commenced their retrograde path during D2. Peak-metamorphic conditions in the cover triggered a second gravitational collapse during

  15. Active annular-beam laser autocollimator system.

    PubMed

    Yoder, P R; Schlesinger, E R; Chickvary, J L

    1975-08-01

    An autocollimator using an axicon and a beam expander telescope to generate a 12.5-cm. o.d. annular beam of helium-neon laser light with high (25:1) diameter-to-width ratio has been developed. It is used with a two-axis, electromagnetically actuated mirror assembly to acquire automatically and maintain dynamically autocollimation from a nearby but separately mounted annular mirror. The servo system controls beam alignment even though angular vibratory motions of the annular mirror make it appear to tilt relative to the autocollimator as much as 7 mrad at frequencies below 300 Hz. This paper describes the optical system and the alignment sensing and control system.

  16. An active noise reduction system for aircrew helmets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, P. D.; Rawlinson, D.; Pelc, S. F.; Dorey, T. P.

    1978-01-01

    An active noise reduction system was developed for use in aircrew flying helmets in which the acoustic noise field inside the ear defender is detected using a miniature microphone and an antiphase signal is fed back to a communications telephone within the ear defender. Performance of the active noise reduction system in a laboratory trial simulating flight conditions is shown to be satisfactory.

  17. Entry-Level Activities in System Consultation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hylander, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    System-level consultation or organizational development in schools is an area in great need of theoretical models and definitions. The three articles in this special issue provide a unique learning opportunity not only for consultation across borders but also for consultation within the same nation. In my commentary, I limit my remarks to a few…

  18. Methodology for the systems engineering process. Volume 1: System functional activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Systems engineering is examined in terms of functional activities that are performed in the conduct of a system definition/design, and system development is described in a parametric analysis that combines functions, performance, and design variables. Emphasis is placed on identification of activities performed by design organizations, design specialty groups, as well as a central systems engineering organizational element. Identification of specific roles and responsibilities for doing functions, and monitoring and controlling activities within the system development operation are also emphasized.

  19. Activity-promoting gaming systems in exercise and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Matthew J D; McCormick, Darren; Shawis, Teshk; Impson, Rebecca; Griffin, Murray

    2011-01-01

    Commercial activity-promoting gaming systems provide a potentially attractive means to facilitate exercise and rehabilitation. The Nintendo Wii, Sony EyeToy, Dance Dance Revolution, and Xbox Kinect are examples of gaming systems that use the movement of the player to control gameplay. Activity-promoting gaming systems can be used as a tool to increase activity levels in otherwise sedentary gamers and also be an effective tool to aid rehabilitation in clinical settings. Therefore, the aim of this current work is to review the growing area of activity-promoting gaming in the context of exercise, injury, and rehabilitation.

  20. Deep origin and hot melting of an Archaean orogenic peridotite massif in Norway.

    PubMed

    Spengler, Dirk; van Roermund, Herman L M; Drury, Martyn R; Ottolini, Luisa; Mason, Paul R D; Davies, Gareth R

    2006-04-13

    The buoyancy and strength of sub-continental lithospheric mantle is thought to protect the oldest continental crust (cratons) from destruction by plate tectonic processes. The exact origin of the lithosphere below cratons is controversial, but seems clearly to be a residue remaining after the extraction of large amounts of melt. Models to explain highly melt-depleted but garnet-bearing rock compositions require multi-stage processes with garnet and clinopyroxene possibly of secondary origin. Here we report on orogenic peridotites (fragments of cratonic mantle incorporated into the crust during continent-continent plate collision) from Otrøy, western Norway. We show that the peridotites underwent extensive melting during upwelling from depths of 350 kilometres or more, forming a garnet-bearing cratonic root in a single melting event. These peridotites appear to be the residue after Archaean aluminium depleted komatiite magmatism. PMID:16612379

  1. Drainage Pattern, Along-Strike Topography and Three-Dimensional Construction of the Himalayan orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, A.

    2005-12-01

    Past studies on the Himalayan orogen have mostly emphasized its 2-D evolution in cross-section view. As a result, how the orogen has grown in 3-D remains poorly understood. For example, it is not clear if the >1500-km long Main Central Thrust (MCT) and Main Boundary Thrust (MBT) were initiated synchronously along the whole orogen or started at one segment and then propagated laterally during subsequent fault motion. To clarify this issue, I examined the Himalayan drainage pattern, along-strike topography, and geometry and kinematics of growing contractional structures across both the Himalayan front and the Shillong Plateau. The main observations may be summarized as follows. (1) The five rivers that cut across the Himalaya are arranged approximately symmetric with respect to the Himalayan-arc axis (~85° E): the Arun River (87° E) is in the middle with the Sutlej (77° E) and Indus (72° E) Rivers in the west and the Subansiri (93° E) and Yalu-Brahmaputra (96° E) Rivers in the east. (2) Between the eastern and western syntaxes, south-flowing drainages east of 85.5° E are consistently deflected to the east by east-growing anticlines and thrusts, whereas drainages west of 85.5°E are deflected systematically to the west by west-growing anticlines and thrusts along the Himalayan front. The only region where no drainage deflection is observed is the Bhutan Himalaya. There all rivers flow straight across the Himalayan front. (3) The deflected drainage pattern indicates that the Shillong Plateau south of the eastern Himalaya has been growing westward. (4) The along-crest Himalayan topographic profile concaves downward, starting from ~5200 m just inside the two syntaxes and reaching 8848 m at Mt. Everest (~87° E). (5) There are a total of 17 major growing contractional structures in the Main Frontal Thrust Zone (MFTZ), with 10 in the west and 7 in the east. Each structure has a length between ~20 km and >150 km, but the west-growing structures in the west are

  2. Deep crustal structure and seismic expression of the central Appalachian orogenic belt

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, G.C. Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ )

    1992-03-01

    Deep-seismic reflection profiles across parts of the Central Appalachian orogenic belt indicate that the crust here includes an exposed Paleozoic fold-and-thrust belt that is mainly soled in Proterozoic Grenville basement. Translation strain in the foreland and Highlands resulting from Paleozoic orogenesis is as much as 25 km, exclusive of layer-parallel-shortening penetrative strains. This estimate is limited by the slight structural relief beneath the Pocono plateau and by the lack of extensive Cambrian-Ordovician cover beneath the sole thrust. Earlier estimates of translation strain are much higher. To the southwest, this parautochthonous region is separated by an unrecognized structural transition from the more allochthonous parts of the central and southern Appalachian overthrust belt, marked by significantly larger translation strains. Crustal architecture in the hinterland part of the region is poorly understood due to data gaps.

  3. Fault dating in the Canadian Rocky Mountains: Evidence for late Cretaceous and early Eocene orogenic pulses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van der Pluijm, B.A.; Vrolijk, P.J.; Pevear, D.R.; Hall, C.M.; Solum, J.

    2006-01-01

    Fault rocks from the classic Rocky Mountain foreland fold-and-thrust belt in south-western Canada were dated by Ar analysis of clay grain-size fractions. Using X-ray diffraction quantification of the detrital and authigenic component of each fraction, these determinations give ages for individual faults in the area (illite age analysis). The resulting ages cluster around 72 and 52 Ma (here called the Rundle and McConnell pulses, respectively), challenging the traditional view of gradual forward progression of faulting and thrust-belt history of the area. The recognition of spatially and temporally restricted deformation episodes offers field support for theoretical models of critically stressed wedges, which result in geologically reasonable strain rates for the area. In addition to regional considerations, this study highlights the potential of direct dating of shallow fault rocks for our understanding of upper-crustal kinematics and regional tectonic analysis of ancient orogens. ?? 2006 Geological Society of America.

  4. Deep origin and hot melting of an Archaean orogenic peridotite massif in Norway.

    PubMed

    Spengler, Dirk; van Roermund, Herman L M; Drury, Martyn R; Ottolini, Luisa; Mason, Paul R D; Davies, Gareth R

    2006-04-13

    The buoyancy and strength of sub-continental lithospheric mantle is thought to protect the oldest continental crust (cratons) from destruction by plate tectonic processes. The exact origin of the lithosphere below cratons is controversial, but seems clearly to be a residue remaining after the extraction of large amounts of melt. Models to explain highly melt-depleted but garnet-bearing rock compositions require multi-stage processes with garnet and clinopyroxene possibly of secondary origin. Here we report on orogenic peridotites (fragments of cratonic mantle incorporated into the crust during continent-continent plate collision) from Otrøy, western Norway. We show that the peridotites underwent extensive melting during upwelling from depths of 350 kilometres or more, forming a garnet-bearing cratonic root in a single melting event. These peridotites appear to be the residue after Archaean aluminium depleted komatiite magmatism.

  5. Paleozoic accretionary orogenesis in the eastern Beishan orogen: constraints from zircon U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Songjian; Xiao, Wenjiao; Windley, Brian; Mao, Qigui

    2016-04-01

    The continental growth mechanism of the Altaids in Central Asia is still in controversy between models of continuous subduction-accretion versus punctuated accretion by closure of multiple oceanic basins. The Beishan orogenic belt, located in the southern Altaids, is a natural laboratory to address this controversy. Key questions that are heavily debated are: the closure time and subduction polarity of former oceans, the emplacement time of ophiolites, and the styles of accretion and collision. This paper reports new structural data, zircon ages and Ar-Ar dates from the eastern Beishan Orogen that provide information on the accretion process and tectonic affiliation of various terranes. Our geochronological and structural results show that the younging direction of accretion was northwards and the subduction zone dipped southwards under the northern margin of the Shuangyingshan micro-continent. This long-lived and continuous accretion process formed the Hanshan accretionary prism. Our field investigations show that the emplacement of the Xiaohuangshan ophiolite was controlled by oceanic crust subduction beneath the forearc accretionary prism of the Shuangyingshan-Mazongshan composite arc to the south. Moreover, we address the age and terrane affiliation of lithologies in the eastern Beishan orogen through detrital zircon geochronology of meta-sedimentary rocks. We provide new information on the ages, subduction polarities, and affiliation of constituent structural units, as well as a new model of tectonic evolution of the eastern Beishan orogen. The accretionary processes and crustal growth of Central Asia were the result of multiple sequences of accretion and collision of manifold terranes. Reference: Ao, S.J., Xiao, W., Windley, B.F., Mao, Q., Han, C., Zhang, J.e., Yang, L., Geng, J., Paleozoic accretionary orogenesis in the eastern Beishan orogen: Constraints from zircon U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. Gondwana Research, doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j

  6. Cross-sectional anatomy and geodynamic evolution of the Central Pontide orogenic belt (northern Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hippolyte, J.-C.; Espurt, N.; Kaymakci, N.; Sangu, E.; Müller, C.

    2016-01-01

    Geophysical data allowed the construction of a ~250-km-long lithospheric-scale balanced cross section of the southern Black Sea margin (Espurt et al. in Lithosphere 6:26-34, 2014). In this paper, we combine structural field data, stratigraphic data, and fault kinematics analyses with the 70-km-long onshore part of the section to reconstruct the geodynamic evolution of the Central Pontide orogen. These data reveal new aspects of the structural evolution of the Pontides since the Early Cretaceous. The Central Pontides is a doubly vergent orogenic wedge that results from the inversion of normal faults. Extensional subsidence occurred with an ENE-trend from Aptian to Paleocene. We infer that the Black Sea back-arc basin also opened during this period, which was also the period of subduction of the Tethys Ocean below the Pontides. As in the Western Pontides, the Cretaceous-Paleocene subsidence was interrupted from Latest Albian to Coniacian time by uplift and erosion that was probably related to a block collision and accretion in the subduction zone. The restoration of the section to its pre-shortening state (Paleocene) shows that fault-related subsidence locally reached 3600 m within the forearc basin. Structural inversion occurred from Early Eocene to Mid-Miocene as a result of collision and indentation of the Pontides by the Kırşehir continental block to the south, with 27.5 km (~28 %) shortening along the section studied. The inversion was characterized by NNE-trending shortening that predated the Late Neogene dextral escape of Anatolia along the North Anatolian Fault and the modern stress field characterized by NW-trending compression within the Eocene Boyabat basin.

  7. Seismological structure of the 1.8 Ga Trans-Hudson Orogen of North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilligan, Amy; Bastow, Ian D.; Darbyshire, Fiona A.

    2016-06-01

    Precambrian tectonic processes are debated: what was the nature and scale of orogenic events on the younger, hotter, and more ductile Earth? Northern Hudson Bay records the Paleoproterozoic collision between the Western Churchill and Superior plates—the ˜1.8 Ga Trans-Hudson Orogeny (THO)—and is an ideal locality to study Precambrian tectonic structure. Integrated field, geochronological, and thermobarometric studies suggest that the THO was comparable to the present-day Himalayan-Karakoram-Tibet Orogen (HKTO). However, detailed understanding of the deep crustal architecture of the THO, and how it compares to that of the evolving HKTO, is lacking. The joint inversion of receiver functions and surface wave data provides new Moho depth estimates and shear velocity models for the crust and uppermost mantle of the THO. Most of the Archean crust is relatively thin (˜39 km) and structurally simple, with a sharp Moho; upper-crustal wave speed variations are attributed to postformation events. However, the Quebec-Baffin segment of the THO has a deeper Moho (˜45 km) and a more complex crustal structure. Observations show some similarity to recent models, computed using the same methods, of the HKTO crust. Based on Moho character, present-day crustal thickness, and metamorphic grade, we support the view that southern Baffin Island experienced thickening during the THO of a similar magnitude and width to present-day Tibet. Fast seismic velocities at >10 km below southern Baffin Island may be the result of partial eclogitization of the lower crust during the THO, as is currently thought to be happening in Tibet.

  8. Exhumation and subduction erosion in orogenic wedges: Insights from numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinther, Y.; Morra, G.; Funiciello, F.; Rossetti, F.; Faccenna, C.

    2012-06-01

    At oceanic margins, syn-convergent exhumation, subduction erosion, and inter-plate coupling are intimately related, but ample questions remain concerning their interaction and individual mechanisms. To analyze these interactions for a thick-skinned, visco-elastic wedge, we focus on properly modeling stresses, energies, and topographies at the inter-plate and wedge bounding interfaces using a Coulomb frictional contact algorithm. In this innovative plane-strain, free surface, Lagrangian finite element model, fault dynamics is modulated by retreating subduction. Subduction is dynamically driven by slab-pull due to a slab sinking in a semi-analytic, computationally favorable approximation of three-dimensional induced mantle flow. Nodal trajectories show that continuous underthrusting of a slab induces a steady state corner flow through forced underplating and subsequent trenchward extrusion due to gravitational spreading. This flow pattern confirms early-proposed models of syn-orogenic deep-seated rock exhumation propelled by coexisting extension and continuous shortening at depth. A distinct reduction in upward flowing material and accompanying decrease of exhumation velocities, to millimeters per year as observed in nature, is induced by a diversion of orogenic wedge material toward the mantle once a subduction channel is formed. The key parameter affecting model evolution and spontaneous formation of a subduction channel is basal friction, which modulates the amount of erosion. However, formation of a subduction channel entrance needs to be ensured through the deformability of the overriding plate, which is influenced by applied pressure at the overriding plate tip and material properties. The down dragging of the overriding plate is sufficient above a threshold inter-plate shear stress of about 2-7 MPa.

  9. A microscopic field theoretical approach for active systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaimo, F.; Praetorius, S.; Voigt, A.

    2016-08-01

    We consider a microscopic modeling approach for active systems. The approach extends the phase field crystal (PFC) model and allows us to describe generic properties of active systems within a continuum model. The approach is validated by reproducing results obtained with corresponding agent-based and microscopic phase field models. We consider binary collisions, collective motion and vortex formation. For larger numbers of particles we analyze the coarsening process in active crystals and identify giant number fluctuation in a cluster formation process.

  10. MARS PATHFINDER PYRO SYSTEMS SWITCHING ACTIVITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder lander is subjected to a electrical and functional tests of its pyrotechic petal deployer system by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) engineers and technicians in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility (SAEF-2). In the background is the Pathfinder cruise stage, which the lander will be mated to once its functional tests are complete. The lander will remain attached to this stage during its six-to-seven-month journey to Mars. When the lander touches down on the surface of Mars next year, the pyrotechnic system will deploy its three petals open like a flower and allow the Sojourner autonomous rover to explore the Martian surface. The Mars Pathfinder is scheduled for launch aboard a Delta II expendable launch vehicle on Dec. 2, the beginning of a 24-day launch period. JPL is managing the Mars Pathfinder project for NASA.

  11. Zircon dating of Neoproterozoic and Cambrian ophiolites in West Mongolia and implications for the timing of orogenic processes in the central part of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Ping; Kröner, Alfred; Jahn, Bor-ming; Windley, Brian F.; Shi, Yuruo; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Fuqin; Miao, Laicheng; Tomurhuu, Dondov; Liu, Dunyi

    2014-06-01

    We present new isotopic and trace element data to review the geochronological/geochemical/geological evolution of the central part of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), and find a fundamental geological problem in West Mongolia, which has traditionally been subdivided into northwestern early Paleozoic (formerly Caledonian) and southerly late Paleozoic (formerly Hercynian) belts by the Main Mongolian Lineament (MML). We resolve this problem with SHRIMP zircon dating of ophiolites and re-evaluation of much published literature. In Northwest Mongolia the Dariv-Khantaishir ophiolite marks the boundary between the Lake arc in the west and the Dzabkhan-Baydrag microcontinent in the east. Zircons from a microgabbro and four plagiogranites yielded weighted mean 206Pb/238U ages of 568 ± 5 Ma, 567 ± 4 Ma, 560 ± 8 Ma (Dariv), 573 ± 8 Ma and 566 ± 7 Ma (Khantaishir) that we interpret as reflecting the time of ophiolite formation (ca. 573-560 Ma). Metamorphic zircons from an amphibolite on a thrust boundary between the Khantaishir ophiolite and the Dzabkhan-Baydrag microcontinent formed at 514 ± 8 Ma, which we interpret as the time of overthrusting. In South Mongolia the Gobi Altai ophiolite and the Trans-Altai Gurvan Sayhan-Zoolen forearc with an ophiolite basement were investigated. Zircons of a layered gabbro (lower ophiolite crust) and a leucogabbro (mid-upper crust) of the Gobi Altai ophiolite yielded crystallization ages of 523 ± 5 Ma and 518 ± 6 Ma. The age data constrain the formation time of ophiolite within ca. 523-518 Ma. Zircons from four samples of the Gurvan Sayhan-Zoolen forearc, with similar hybrid adakite-boninite affinities, yielded 519 ± 4 Ma for an anorthosite, ≥ 512 ± 4 Ma for a hornblendite and 520 ± 5 and 511 ± 5 Ma for two diorites. The ophiolite basement has an upper age limit of 494 ± 6 Ma, determined by dating a tonalite dike cutting the Zoolen ophiolite. Integrating available zircon ages as well as geochemical and geological data

  12. Motor Cortex Activity Organizes the Developing Rubrospinal System.

    PubMed

    Williams, Preston T J A; Martin, John H

    2015-09-30

    The corticospinal and rubrospinal systems function in skilled movement control. A key question is how do these systems develop the capacity to coordinate their motor functions and, in turn, if the red nucleus/rubrospinal tract (RN/RST) compensates for developmental corticospinal injury? We used the cat to investigate whether the developing rubrospinal system is shaped by activity-dependent interactions with the developing corticospinal system. We unilaterally inactivated M1 by muscimol microinfusion between postnatal weeks 5 and 7 to examine activity-dependent interactions and whether the RN/RST compensates for corticospinal tract (CST) developmental motor impairments and CST misprojections after M1 inactivation. We examined the RN motor map and RST cervical projections at 7 weeks of age, while the corticospinal system was inactivated, and at 14 weeks, after activity returned. During M1 inactivation, the RN on the same side showed normal RST projections and reduced motor thresholds, suggestive of precocious development. By contrast, the RN on the untreated/active M1 side showed sparse RST projections and an immature motor map. After M1 activity returned later in adolescent cat development, RN on the active M1/CST side continued to show a substantial loss of spinal terminations and an impaired motor map. RN/RST on the inactivated side regressed to a smaller map and fewer axons. Our findings suggest that the developing rubrospinal system is under activity-dependent regulation by the corticospinal system for establishing mature RST connections and RN motor map. The lack of RS compensation on the non-inactivated side can be explained by development of ipsilateral misprojections from the active M1 that outcompete the RST. Significance statement: Skilled movements reflect the activity of multiple descending motor systems and their interactions with spinal motor circuits. Currently, there is little insight into whether motor systems interact during development to

  13. Motor Cortex Activity Organizes the Developing Rubrospinal System

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Preston T.J.A.

    2015-01-01

    The corticospinal and rubrospinal systems function in skilled movement control. A key question is how do these systems develop the capacity to coordinate their motor functions and, in turn, if the red nucleus/rubrospinal tract (RN/RST) compensates for developmental corticospinal injury? We used the cat to investigate whether the developing rubrospinal system is shaped by activity-dependent interactions with the developing corticospinal system. We unilaterally inactivated M1 by muscimol microinfusion between postnatal weeks 5 and 7 to examine activity-dependent interactions and whether the RN/RST compensates for corticospinal tract (CST) developmental motor impairments and CST misprojections after M1 inactivation. We examined the RN motor map and RST cervical projections at 7 weeks of age, while the corticospinal system was inactivated, and at 14 weeks, after activity returned. During M1 inactivation, the RN on the same side showed normal RST projections and reduced motor thresholds, suggestive of precocious development. By contrast, the RN on the untreated/active M1 side showed sparse RST projections and an immature motor map. After M1 activity returned later in adolescent cat development, RN on the active M1/CST side continued to show a substantial loss of spinal terminations and an impaired motor map. RN/RST on the inactivated side regressed to a smaller map and fewer axons. Our findings suggest that the developing rubrospinal system is under activity-dependent regulation by the corticospinal system for establishing mature RST connections and RN motor map. The lack of RS compensation on the non-inactivated side can be explained by development of ipsilateral misprojections from the active M1 that outcompete the RST. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Skilled movements reflect the activity of multiple descending motor systems and their interactions with spinal motor circuits. Currently, there is little insight into whether motor systems interact during development to

  14. Motor Cortex Activity Organizes the Developing Rubrospinal System.

    PubMed

    Williams, Preston T J A; Martin, John H

    2015-09-30

    The corticospinal and rubrospinal systems function in skilled movement control. A key question is how do these systems develop the capacity to coordinate their motor functions and, in turn, if the red nucleus/rubrospinal tract (RN/RST) compensates for developmental corticospinal injury? We used the cat to investigate whether the developing rubrospinal system is shaped by activity-dependent interactions with the developing corticospinal system. We unilaterally inactivated M1 by muscimol microinfusion between postnatal weeks 5 and 7 to examine activity-dependent interactions and whether the RN/RST compensates for corticospinal tract (CST) developmental motor impairments and CST misprojections after M1 inactivation. We examined the RN motor map and RST cervical projections at 7 weeks of age, while the corticospinal system was inactivated, and at 14 weeks, after activity returned. During M1 inactivation, the RN on the same side showed normal RST projections and reduced motor thresholds, suggestive of precocious development. By contrast, the RN on the untreated/active M1 side showed sparse RST projections and an immature motor map. After M1 activity returned later in adolescent cat development, RN on the active M1/CST side continued to show a substantial loss of spinal terminations and an impaired motor map. RN/RST on the inactivated side regressed to a smaller map and fewer axons. Our findings suggest that the developing rubrospinal system is under activity-dependent regulation by the corticospinal system for establishing mature RST connections and RN motor map. The lack of RS compensation on the non-inactivated side can be explained by development of ipsilateral misprojections from the active M1 that outcompete the RST. Significance statement: Skilled movements reflect the activity of multiple descending motor systems and their interactions with spinal motor circuits. Currently, there is little insight into whether motor systems interact during development to

  15. Continental Margin of Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia: the Mode and Nature of Crustal Growth in the Accretionary Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinovskaya, E. A.; Bindeman, I. N.

    2001-12-01

    Tectonic accretion of island arc terranes is the process widely developed in Pacific Rim in the present and in the past. The mode and nature of crustal growth of continental margins during arc accretion are various and essentially determined by deformation of the margin. The Cenozoic Kamchatka orogen formed by the accretion of two island arc terranes: Achaivayam-Valaginskaya arc (A-V, Eocene) (2) and Kronotskaya arc (terminal Miocene) to the continental margin of Asia. During the Early Eocene, the southern segment of the A-V arc collided with the Sredinny metamorphic massif, which was the frontal part of the Asian continental margin (3). New results from SHRIMP dating of zircons (1) from metamorphic rocks of Sredinny massif (Kolpakovskaya series) show that the massif contains an abundance of Archean, Proterozoic and Phanerozoic detrital zircon cores, and ubiquitous 77 Ma rims. The youngest ages are from four 47-53 Ma unzoned zircon cores, with dull cathodoluminescence, and irregular morphology. We regard the 47-53 Ma episode of zircon growth in the Sredinny massif as evidence for superimposed metamorphism induced by continental margin subduction at the beginning of its collision with the A-V arc in the early Eocene. Physical modeling experiments of arc-continent collision suggest that deformation at continental margin is controlled by strength of the subducting crust. Failure, accretion and erosion-activated extrusion/exhumation of the subducted crust occur in the continental margin in the case when the margin is weakened by pre-existing faulting, extension, or heating. At the beginning of the continental margin subduction, crust of the margin fails along the continent-vergent thrust. The subducted crustal slice is, then, completely scraped from the mantle base and accreted to the fore-arc block. Subsequent thrusting and thickening of the subducting crust within the continental margin lead to formation of the accretionary orogen composed of crustal slices in front

  16. Relative strength of lithospheric mantle compared to granulite lower crust in orogenic roots: insight from field laboratory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusbach, V.; Ulrich, S.; Schulmann, K.

    2009-04-01

    filled shear zones S3 oriented at high angle to the megafold axial plane. The mineral zoning of coarse-grained peridotite pre-mylonitic microstructure reflects probably metamorphic processes deep in the mantle and is not connected with variations in observed olivine LPO patterns in fine-grained mylonite. The LPO of olivine most likely results from strain partitioning in the intra-mantle transpressive shear zone, along which the mantle sheet was emplaced into orogenic lower crust. At this stage the granulites responded by development of mylonitic fabric S1-2 and the coherency of fabrics may indicate at least partial mechanical coupling and low rheological contrast between lower crust and mantle. The whole sequence was subsequently exhumed, folded and re-deformed at mid-crustal levels during almost orthogonal D3 event. Folding mechanism of peridotite sheet is governed by active amplification, while the flow in retrogressed and partially molten granulites was entirely passive. The folds in front of fold hinge are probably related to propagation of fold head in frontally constrained space, while shear zones in the core of megafold reflect post-buckle flattening. Our observations suggest transient evolution of the rheological contrast between mantle and crust lithologies marked by decrease of competence of partially molten crustal material in mid-crustal levels.

  17. 3-D ore body modeling and structural settings of syn-to late orogenic Variscan hydrothermal mineralization, Siegerland district, Rhenish Massif, NW Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Meike; Hellmann, André; Meyer, Franz Michael

    2013-04-01

    The Siegerland district is located in the fold-and thrust-belt of the Rhenish Massif and hosts diverse syn-to late orogenic mineralization styles. Peak-metamorphism and deformation occurred at 312-316±10 Ma (Ahrendt et al., 1978) at temperature-pressure conditions of 280-320°C and 0.7-1.4 kbar (Hein, 1993). In addition to syn-orogenic siderite-quartz mineralization at least four different syn-to late orogenic mineralization stages are identified comprising Co-Ni-Cu-Au, Pb-Zn-Cu, Sb-Au, and hematite-digenite-bornite ores (Hellmann et al., 2012). The earliest type of syn-orogenic ore mineralization is formed by siderite-quartz veins, trending N-S, E-W and NE-SW. The vein systems are closely related to fold and reverse fault geometries (Hellmann et al., 2012). The most important structural feature is the first-order Siegen main reverse fault showing an offset into three major faults (Peters et al., 2012). The structural control on ore formation is demonstrated by the Co-Ni-Cu-Au mineralization generally hosted by NE-ENE trending reverse faults and associated imbrication zones that have reactivated the older siderite-quartz veins. In this study, we developed a 3-D model of the Alte Buntekuh ore bodies in the Siegerland district, using Datamine Studio3 to investigate the structural setting of Co-Ni-Cu-Au mineralization. The salient structural and spatial data for the 3-D model were taken from old mine level plans as well as from geological and topographical maps. The ore bodies are located immediately in the hanging wall of the southern branch of the Siegen main reverse fault (Peters et al., 2012). From the model it becomes obvious, that the earlier siderite-quartz veins, dipping steeply to the NW, are cross-cut and segmented by oppositely dipping oblique reverse faults. Individual ore body segments are rotated and displaced, showing a plunge direction to the SW. The 3-D model further reveals the presence of hook-like, folded vein arrays, highly enriched in cobalt

  18. A fuselage/tank structure study for actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles: Active cooling system analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of fuselage cross section and structural arrangement on the performance of actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles are investigated. An active cooling system which maintains the aircraft's entire surface area at temperatures below 394 K at Mach 6 is developed along with a hydrogen fuel tankage thermal protection system. Thermodynamic characteristics of the actively cooled thermal protection systems established are summarized. Design heat loads and coolant flowrate requirements are defined for each major structural section and for the total system. Cooling system weights are summarized at the major component level. Conclusions and recommendations are included.

  19. Active synchronization between two different chaotic dynamical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheri, M.; Arifin, N. Md; Ismail, F.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we investigate on the synchronization problem between two different chaotic dynamical system based on the Lyapunov stability theorem by using nonlinear control functions. Active control schemes are used for synchronization Liu system as drive and Rossler system as response. Numerical simulation by using Maple software are used to show effectiveness of the proposed schemes.

  20. 49 CFR 234.225 - Activation of warning system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... seconds warning time for the normal operation of through trains before the grade crossing is occupied by... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GRADE CROSSING SAFETY, INCLUDING SIGNAL SYSTEMS, STATE ACTION PLANS....225 Activation of warning system. A highway-rail grade crossing warning system shall be maintained...

  1. 49 CFR 234.225 - Activation of warning system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... seconds warning time for the normal operation of through trains before the grade crossing is occupied by... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GRADE CROSSING SAFETY, INCLUDING SIGNAL SYSTEMS, STATE ACTION PLANS....225 Activation of warning system. A highway-rail grade crossing warning system shall be maintained...

  2. Active synchronization between two different chaotic dynamical system

    SciTech Connect

    Maheri, M.; Arifin, N. Md; Ismail, F.

    2015-05-15

    In this paper we investigate on the synchronization problem between two different chaotic dynamical system based on the Lyapunov stability theorem by using nonlinear control functions. Active control schemes are used for synchronization Liu system as drive and Rossler system as response. Numerical simulation by using Maple software are used to show effectiveness of the proposed schemes.

  3. NASA's UAS [Unmanned Aircraft Systems] Related Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    NASA continues to operate all sizes of UAS in all classes of airspace both domestically and internationally. Missions range from highly complex operations in coordination with piloted aircraft, ground, and space systems in support of science objectives to single aircraft operations in support of aeronautics research. One such example is a scaled commercial transport aircraft being used to study recovery techniques due to large upsets. NASA's efforts to support routine UAS operations continued on several fronts last year. At the national level in the United States (U.S.), NASA continued its support of the UAS Executive Committee (ExCom) comprised of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Defense (DoD), Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and NASA. The committee was formed in recognition of the need of UAS operated by these agencies to access to the National Airspace System (NAS) to support operational, training, development and research requirements. Recommendations were received on how to operate both manned and unmanned aircraft in class D airspace and plans are being developed to validate and implement those recommendations. In addition the UAS ExCom has begun developing recommendations for how to achieve routine operations in remote areas as well as for small UAS operations in class G airspace. As well as supporting the UAS ExCom, NASA is a participant in the recently formed Aviation Rule Making Committee for UAS. This committee, established by the FAA, is intended to propose regulatory guidance which would enable routine civil UAS operations. As that effort matures NASA stands ready to supply the necessary technical expertise to help that committee achieve its objectives. By supporting both the UAS ExCom and UAS ARC, NASA is positioned to provide its technical expertise across the full spectrum of UAS airspace access related topic areas. The UAS NAS Access Project got underway this past year under the leadership of NASA s Aeronautics

  4. Active and intelligent packaging systems for a modern society.

    PubMed

    Realini, Carolina E; Marcos, Begonya

    2014-11-01

    Active and intelligent packaging systems are continuously evolving in response to growing challenges from a modern society. This article reviews: (1) the different categories of active and intelligent packaging concepts and currently available commercial applications, (2) latest packaging research trends and innovations, and (3) the growth perspectives of the active and intelligent packaging market. Active packaging aiming at extending shelf life or improving safety while maintaining quality is progressing towards the incorporation of natural active agents into more sustainable packaging materials. Intelligent packaging systems which monitor the condition of the packed food or its environment are progressing towards more cost-effective, convenient and integrated systems to provide innovative packaging solutions. Market growth is expected for active packaging with leading shares for moisture absorbers, oxygen scavengers, microwave susceptors and antimicrobial packaging. The market for intelligent packaging is also promising with strong gains for time-temperature indicator labels and advancements in the integration of intelligent concepts into packaging materials. PMID:25034453

  5. Active control system for high speed windmills

    DOEpatents

    Avery, D.E.

    1988-01-12

    A pump stroke is matched to the operating speed of a high speed windmill. The windmill drives a hydraulic pump for a control. Changes in speed of a wind driven shaft open supply and exhaust valves to opposite ends of a hydraulic actuator to lengthen and shorten an oscillating arm thereby lengthening and shortening the stroke of an output pump. Diminishing wind to a stall speed causes the valves to operate the hydraulic cylinder to shorten the oscillating arm to zero. A pressure accumulator in the hydraulic system provides the force necessary to supply the hydraulic fluid under pressure to drive the actuator into and out of the zero position in response to the windmill shaft speed approaching and exceeding windmill stall speed. 4 figs.

  6. Active control system for high speed windmills

    DOEpatents

    Avery, Don E.

    1988-01-01

    A pump stroke is matched to the operating speed of a high speed windmill. The windmill drives a hydraulic pump for a control. Changes in speed of a wind driven shaft open supply and exhaust valves to opposite ends of a hydraulic actuator to lengthen and shorten an oscillating arm thereby lengthening and shortening the stroke of an output pump. Diminishing wind to a stall speed causes the valves to operate the hydraulic cylinder to shorten the oscillating arm to zero. A pressure accumulator in the hydraulic system provides the force necessary to supply the hydraulic fluid under pressure to drive the actuator into and out of the zero position in response to the windmill shaft speed approaching and exceeding windmill stall speed.

  7. On protolith-, metamorphic overprint, microstructure and rheology of mineral assemblages in orogenic peridotites of the central Scandinavian Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilio, Mattia; Clos, Frediano; Van Roermund, Herman L. M.

    2013-04-01

    The Scandinavian Caledonides (SC) are a deeply eroded Alpine-type orogenic belt formed by closure of the Iapetus ocean and collision between Baltica and Laurentia (500-380 Ma). The SC consists of a stack of Nappe Complexes (from bottom to top called Lower, Middle, Upper and Uppermost Allochthons) thrusted to the east over the Baltic Shield (Brueckner and Van Roermund, 2004; Gee et al., 2008). Fossil lithospheric mantle fragments, called orogenic peridotites, have been found within the (upper part of) middle, upper and uppermost Allochthons, as well as in the reworked basement gneisses (a.o Western Gneiss Complex (WGC)) along the Norwegian west coast. They occur as isolated lenses that contain diverse mineral parageneses and/or bulk rock compositions. Crustal incorporation of orogenic peridotite is classically interpreted to be the result of plate collisional processes related to orogeny (Brueckner and Medaris, 2000). The WGC and parts of the upper part of the Middle Allochthon (a.o. Seve Nappe Complex (SNC) in N Jämtland/S Västerbotten, central Sweden), are well known for the occurrence of high (HP) and ultrahigh pressure (UHP) metamorphic terranes (of Caledonian age). The (U)HPM evidence clearly demonstrates the deep metamorphic origin of these rocks interpreted to be caused by continental subduction and/or collision. Other metamorphic rocks (of Caledonian age) exposed in allochthonous nappes are solely characterised by greenschist-, amphibolite- and/or MP granulite "facies" mineral assemblages that can be interpreted, in the absence of retrogression, to have formed in less deeply subducted (and/or metamorphic) environments. This duality in metamorphic "facies" allows for a discrimination (at least theoretically) between "deep" versus "shallow" rooted nappes (in central parts of the Scandinavian Caledonides). Conform this reasoning, this duality should also be present within the Caledonian mineral assemblages (= metamorphic overprint) of orogenic peridotites (in

  8. An Active RFID Accountability System (RAS) for Constrained Wireless Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, Alan M; Hanson, Gregory R; Sexton, Angela Kay; Jones Jr, J P; Freer, Eva B; Sjoreen, Andrea L

    2011-01-01

    A team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed an RFID Accountability System (RAS) that allows items with active RFID tags to be tracked in environments where tags may not be able to transmit their location continuously. The system uses activators that transmit a short range signal. Active RFID tags are in a sleep state until they encounter an activator. Then they transmit a signal that is picked up by the antennas installed throughout the building. This paper presents the theory of operation, application areas, lessons learned, and key features developed over the course of seven years of development and use.

  9. [Activities of System Studies and Simulation, Inc.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Contents include the following: 1. Launch Vehicle Interface Work Performed: a. S3 provided to KSC the new launch inclination targets needed for the April '04 launch date. 2. Prelaunch operations work performed: a. S3 updated the staffing plan for MSFC on-console personnel\\during the Final Countdown prior to launch. 3. Software Assessment Work Performed: a. S3 evaluated and recommended approval for Program Control Board (PCB) proposed change 649 for ground software changes, as well as change 650 and 650A for Stored Program Commands. 4. Education and Public Outreach Work Performed: a. S3 continues to coordinate the effort for the design and fabrication of scale models of the GP-3 for use at the launch site, education forums, and management/technical briefings. S3 also prepared a Change Request for additional funds needed for fabrication of additional scale models. S3 drafted the planned uses of these models, including the possibility of participation in the Boston, MA showings of the traveling Einstein Exhibit. 5. Program Management Support Work Performed: a. S3 prepared the input for and closed three MSFC Centerwide Action Item Tracking Systems (CAITS) actions during this period.

  10. Comparative study between two different active flutter suppression systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.

    1978-01-01

    An activated leading-edge (LE)-tailing-edge (TE) control system is applied to a drone aircraft with the objective of enabling the drone to fly subsonically at dynamic pressures which are 44% above the open-loop flutter dynamic pressure. The control synthesis approach is based on the aerodynamic energy concept and it incorporates recent developments in this area. A comparison is made between the performance of the activated LE-TE control system and the performance of a TE control system, analyzed in a previous work. The results obtained indicate that although all the control systems achieve the flutter suppression objectives, the TE control system appears to be somewhat superior to the LE-TE control system, in this specific application. This superiority is manifested through reduced values of control surface activity over a wide range of flight conditions.

  11. [The informative mechanisms of systemic organization of psychic activity].

    PubMed

    Sudakov, K V

    2012-01-01

    In this review on the basis of functional systems theory developed by P. Anokhin theoretical approaches to informative mechanisms of systemic organization of psychic activity are presented. Author formulates the conception on discrete system quantums of psychic and behavioral activity from needs to its satisfaction and develops its informative equivalents. It was shown that informative equivalents of needs and its satisfaction are reflected in structures of action acceptors in the form of dynamic informative images. On the basis of acceptors of results of action informative systemic quantums are developed which constantly control its manifestation in behavioral systemic quantums. Informative systemic quantums are extracted in advance by predominate motivations and are associated with negative emotions of needs and positive emotions of their satisfaction. The content of this review confirms I.P. Pavlov's foresight on possible confluence of material and idealistic processes in psychic human activity.

  12. Space Activism as an Epiphanic Belief System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendell, Wendell

    2006-01-01

    Years of interaction with young people in the space industry and in space activists groups led to my observation that many such individuals can cite a quite specific life event that triggered a life-long interest in or commitment to creating a space future. I am particularly intrigued by parallels between such experiences and the phenomenon of epiphanic experiences among committed Christians. I see analogies between the puzzlement among space activists and among Christian groups as to the reasons for so many people being "unbelievers." At a small international meeting on lunar exploration in 2003, I heard two separate lunch speakers cite such personal experiences. At the beginning of a break in that meeting, I grabbed the microphone from the chairman and asked each person to write down on a pad by his chair whether or not he (or she) had experienced a specific event that led to their involvement in space. If the answer was positive, I asked for a brief narrative, for their age at the time, and for their current age. I received 53 submissions, 20% of which simply stated that their involvement in space exploration was happenstance. (Apollo astronaut John Young was among these.) The other 80% of the submissions had specific stories. The ages at the time of the epiphany ranged from 4 to 47; and their current ages ranged from 22 to 78. I will present a high-level characterization of these inputs. Interest in space exploration as a form of belief system is consistent with choosing NASA goals for the purpose of inspiration and with phenomena such as the "Overview Effect". More research might explore what form the transcendent experience takes and whether it might be associated with feelings of universal connection such as the noosphere or "The Force". From a pragmatic point of view, outreach strategies for exploration should focus on giving individuals access to personal, potentially transformational experiences as opposed to astronaut talks at civic clubs.

  13. Active Storage Processing in a Parallel File System

    SciTech Connect

    Felix, Evan J.; Fox, Kevin M.; Regimbal, Kevin M.; Nieplocha, Jarek

    2006-01-01

    By creating a processing system within a parallel file system one can harness the power of unused processing power on servers that have very fast access to the disks they are serving. By inserting a module the Lustre file system the Active Storage Concept is able to perform processing with the file system architecture. Results of using this technology are presented as the results of the Supercomputing StorCloud Challenge Application are reviewed.

  14. Development of a glacially dominated shelf-slope-fan system in tectonically active southeast Alaska: Results of IODP Expedition 341 core-log-seismic integrated studies at glacial cycle resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulick, Sean; Jaeger, John; Mix, Alan; Swartz, John; Worthington, Lindsay; Reece, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Collision of the Yakutat microplate with North American formed the St. Elias Mountains in coastal Gulf of Alaska. While the tectonic driver for orogenesis has been ongoing since the Miocene, results from the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 341 suggests that direct climatic perturbation of active orogenesis through glacial erosion is non-linear. Geophysical studies of the glaciated continental margin, slope, and adjacent deep-sea Surveyor Fan allow examination of the glaciated orogen from source to sink. Using high-resolution and crustal-scale seismic data and through comparison with other glaciated margins, we can identify key diagnostic seismic morphologies and facies indicative of glacial proximity and sediment routing. Expedition drilling results calibrated these images suggesting a timeline for initial advances of the Cordilleran ice sheet related glacial systems onto the shelf and a further timeline for the development of ice streams that reach the shelf edge. Comparisons can be made within this single margin between evolution of the tectonic-glacial system where erosion and sediment transport are occurring within a fold and thrust belt versus on a more stable shelf region. Onshore the Bering-Bagley glacial system in the west flows across the Yakataga fold and thrust belt, allowing examination of whether glacial erosion can cause tectonic feedbacks, whereas offshore the Bering-Bagley system interacts with the Pamplona Zone thrusts in a region of significant sediment accommodation. Results from Expedition 341 imply that timing of glacial advance to the shelf edge in this region may be driven by the necessity of filling up the accommodation through aggradation followed by progradation and thus is autogenic. In contrast the Malaspina-Hubbard glacial system to the east encountered significantly less accommodation and more directly responded to climatic forcing including showing outer shelf glacial occupation since the mid-Pleistocene transition-MPT to

  15. Dual-Actuator Active Vibration-Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, Albert F.; Kiraly, Louis J.; Montague, Gerald T.; Palazzolo, Alan B.; Manchala, Daniel

    1994-01-01

    Dual-actuator active vibration-control (DAAVC) system is developmental system of type described in "Active Vibration Dampers for Rotating Machinery" (LEW-15427). System features sensors and actuators positioned and oriented at bearings to measure and counteract vibrations of shaft along either of two axes perpendicular to axis of rotation. Effective in damping vibrations of helicopter-engine test stand, making it safer to operate engine at speeds near and above first resonance of engine/test-stand system. Opens new opportunities for engine designers to draw more power from engine, and concept applicable to other rotating machines.

  16. A hybrid electromagnetic shock absorber for active vehicle suspension systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Babak; Bolandhemmat, Hamidreza; Behrad Khamesee, Mir; Golnaraghi, Farid

    2011-02-01

    The use of electromagnetic dampers (ED) in vehicle active suspension systems has drawn considerable attention in the past few years, attributed to the fact that active suspension systems have shown superior performance in improving ride comfort and road handling of terrain vehicles, compared with their passive and semi-active counterparts. Although demonstrating superb performance, active suspensions still have some shortcomings that must be overcome. They have high energy consumption, weight, and cost and are not fail-safe in case of a power breakdown. The novel hybrid ED, which is proposed in this paper, is a potential solution to the above-mentioned drawbacks of conventional active suspension systems. The proposed hybrid ED is designed to inherit the high-performance characteristics of an active ED with the reliability of a passive damper in a single package. The eddy current damping effect is utilised as a source of the passive damping. First, a prototype ED is designed and fabricated. The prototype ED is then utilised to experimentally establish the design requirements for a real-size active ED. This is accomplished by comparing its vibration isolation performance in a 1-DOF quarter-car test rig with that of a same-class semi-active damper. Then, after a real-size active ED is designed, the concept of hybrid damper is introduced to the damper design to address the drawbacks of the active ED. Finally, the finite-element method is used to accurately model and analyse the designed hybrid damper. It is demonstrated that by introducing the eddy current damping effect to the active part, a passive damping of approximately 1570 Ns/m is achieved. This amount of passive damping guarantees that the damper is fail-safe and reduces the power consumption more than 70%, compared with an active ED in an automotive active suspension system.

  17. Active support system for 1-m SONG primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Dongsheng; Wang, Guomin; Gu, Bozhong

    2012-05-01

    Chinese-node telescope of Stellar Observations Network Group (SONG) has a primary mirror 1m in diameter with flat back, which will be supported actively. The performance evaluation of the telescope's active optics system is conducted. Finite element analysis (FEA) is employed to analyze the optical surface figures of the primary mirror, and two optimizations are carried out by using ANSYS: (1) the locations and forces of axial supports are optimized with the telescope pointing to zenith; (2) the lateral support forces are calculated with the telescope pointing to horizon. Axial support force sensitivities are calculated in a case that a single axial support has a force error of 0.5N. The correction ability of the active support system is analyzed when an arbitrary axial support is failure. Several low order Zernike modes are modeled with MATLAB procedure, and active optics corrections are applied to these modes. Thermal deformation of the mirror is also corrected using active support system.

  18. Activity Theory in Information Systems Research and Practice: Theoretical Underpinnings for an Information Systems Development Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mursu, Anja; Luukkonen, Irmeli; Toivanen, Marika; Korpela, Mikko

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of information systems is to facilitate work activities: here we consider how Activity Theory can be applied in information systems development. Method. The requirements for an analytical model for emancipatory, work-oriented information systems research and practice are specified. Previous research work in Activity…

  19. Survey of Active Vibration Isolation Systems for Microgravity Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodsinsky, Carlos M.; Whorton, Mark S.

    2000-01-01

    In view of the utility of space vehicles as orbiting science laboratories, the need for vibration isolation systems for acceleration-sensitive experiments has gained increasing visibility. To date, three active microgravity vibration isolation systems have successfully been demonstrated in flight. A tutorial discussion of the microgravity vibration isolation problem, including a description of the acceleration environment of the International Space Station and attenuation requirements, as well as a comparison or the dynamics of passive isolation, active rack-level isolation, and active payload-level isolation is provided. The flight test results of the three demonstrated systems: suppression of transient accelerations by levitation, the microgravity vibration isolation mount, and the active rack isolation system are surveyed.

  20. Activity-Based Costing Systems for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Dennis H.

    1993-01-01

    Examines traditional costing models utilized in higher education and pinpoints shortcomings related to proper identification of costs. Describes activity-based costing systems as a superior alternative for cost identification, measurement, and allocation. (MLF)

  1. [Evaluation of systemic lupus erythematosus activity during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Olesińska, Marzena; Wiesik-Szewczyk, Ewa; Chwalińska-Sadowska, Hanna

    2007-07-01

    Pregnancy in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is considered a high-risk pregnancy. It is complicated by preeclampsia, premature labour and miscarriage more frequently than in the general population. Improved prognosis depends on low disease activity during conception and on appropriate medical care (SLE activity monitoring, selection of therapy safe for the mother and the developing foetus, advances in neonatology). Because symptoms of physiological pregnancy and SLE exacerbation are similar, their correct interpretation is essential for skin lesions, arthralgias, arterial hypertension or results of laboratory tests: proteinuria, thrombocytopenia or leucopenia observed in the patient. In order to standardise the assessment of SLE activity during pregnancy, scores of this activity are used. In the past, scores validated on non-pregnant populations (including male patients) were used: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI), Systemic Lupus Activity Measure (SLAM), European Consensus Lupus Activity Measurment (ECLAM). Only recently have SLE activity scores been introduced that are specific for pregnant women: Lupus Activity Index In Pregnancy (LAI-P), Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Pregnancy Disease Activity Index (SLEPDAI), modified--Systemic Lupus Activity Measure (m-SLAM) and a visual three-grade score modified--Physician Global Assessment (m-PGA). So far, only scores LAI-P and m-PGA have been validated. According to the LAI-P score, clinical data are divided into 4 groups. Group 1 includes mild clinical symptoms, group 2--symptoms of involvement of internal organs, group 3 pertains to modifications of treatment and group 4 to laboratory parameters. Point values are ascribed to individual parameters depending on their intensity.

  2. Intracontinental strike-slip faults, associated magmatism, mineral systems and mantle dynamics: examples from NW China and Altay-Sayan (Siberia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirajno, Franco

    2010-09-01

    In the orogenic belts of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), many mafic and felsic plutons are temporally and spatially associated with orogen-scale strike-slip faults. The CAOB is a huge and complex orogenic collage of accreted terranes that was formed in the Early to Mid-Palaeozoic. In the CAOB, orogen-scale strike-slip faults extend for 100-1000 s of kilometres marking the boundaries of tectonic units and terranes. I use examples from southern Siberia and NW China to illustrate the important role that strike-slip faults have in localising intraplate magmatism and associated metallogeny. Cases from the Altay-Sayan in southern Siberia, the Altay and Tianshan orogens in NW China, are compelling for providing good evidence of the control that strike-slip structures exert for the emplacement of magmas and related mineral systems. These strike-slip faults controlled the emplacement of mafic-ultramafic intrusions, alkaline mafic and felsic magmatism in the period 280-240 Ma, which coincides with mantle plume(s) activity that led to the emplacement of the Tarim and Siberian large igneous provinces (LIPs). Mineral systems that are associated with these LIPs include magmatic Ni-Cu in sill-like intrusions, concentrically zoned mafic-ultramafic intrusions (e.g. Kalatongke, the second largest Ni-Cu sulphide deposit in China, after Jinchuan), epithermal systems, breccia pipes, polymetallic hydrothermal veins, granitoid-related greisen and rare earth pegmatites, as well as kimberlite fields. In the Altay-Sayan and NW China regions, orogen-scale translithospheric strike-slip faults provided the channels for the emplacement of magmas, resulting from lateral flow of mantle melts along the base of the lithosphere. This lateral flow is interpreted to have resulted from the impingement of mantle plumes to the base of the lithosphere of what was, to all intents and purposes, a stationary plate. Lateral flow from mantle plumes head was sustained or facilitated, during stages of

  3. Achaean Continental Crust Under the Pan-African Orogenic Belt, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, M.

    2001-12-01

    Lützow-Holm Complex, located in East Antarctica, is a Cambrian collision zone between Achaean craton (Napier Complex) and Dronning Moud Land, where occurs the upper amphibolite- to granulite-facies rocks, and it is regarded as a part of the Pan-African orogenic belt during Gondwana continent amalgamation. The exhumation of the granulite-facies rocks with clockwise P-T path has been attributed to extensive surface erosion (up to 30 km thick) of double-thickened crust, but the common belief that higher-pressure garnet bearing rocks e.g. high-pressure granulites and/or eclogites exist at deeper level of crust is not supported by geophysical data. In this paper we reconstruct crustal structure beneath Lützow-Holm Complex by combining ultrasonic velocity of rocks with seismic velocity structure. Consequently our results suggest that Achaean continental crust (lower pressure) exists under the Pan-African Orogenic Belt (higher pressure), and propose a new tectonic model for exhumation of the granulite-facies metamorphic belt instead of the double-thickened crust model. P-wave velocity (Vp) in ultra-high temperature granulites (UHT) was measured up to 1.0 GPa from 25°C to 400°C with a piston-cylinder-type high-pressure apparatus. Rocks measured are meta-igneous UHT rocks collected from Mount Riiser-Larsen, Enderby Land, East Antarctica where the Achaean Napier Complex occurs. Core rock samples with 14mm diameter and 12mm long were subjected to high-pressure experiments. All rocks show a rapid increase of Vp at low pressure up to 0.4 GPa and nearly constant Vp at higher pressures. The Vp values measured at 1.0 GPa and 400°C are 7.17 km/s for a meta-pyroxenite, 6.93 km/s, 6.88 km/s for mafic granulites and 6.17 km/s for an orthopyroxene felsic gneiss. The Vp values measured for the Napier mafic granulites are comparable to the lower crustal layer (6.95 km/s of Vp at depth from 33 to 40 km) under the Lützow-Holm Complex. The present results suggest that the lower crust

  4. Pressure--Temperature--Time (P--T--t) Histories of Orogenic Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, A. B.; Ridley, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal modelling shows that a cycle of crustal thickening and erosion reproduces many of the characteristics of medium-pressure metamorphic terranes. In contrast, the structural and metamorphic features of high-pressure terranes suggest rapid exhumation, possibly tectonically as fault-bounded blocks. Low-pressure metamorphism requires an augmented heat supply. Such terranes are characterized by granite--gneiss domes, and evidence of crustal extension, and hence may be the result of the mechanically likely orogenic sequence of early thickening followed by extension. Whether earlier isograd sequences are extended, condensed, or reset depends upon the relative rates of deformation and thermal relaxation, and when the deformation occurs relative to the thermal peak of metamorphism. Detailed determinations of relations between deformation events and metamorphism is made difficult by the contrast between continuous metamorphic evolution and short time-span deformation events. Combined microstructural and geochronological studies, together with a consideration of the distribution of isograds will give most information on complex, polymetamorphic histories, and allow distinction between regional and local features, especially those due to differential uplift. Considerations of rates of heat flow within the crust indicate how isotherms evolve in response to tectonic events, and how isograd distribution will relate to local and regional structures. Important controls are the relative rates of deformation and thermal relaxation, and whether the deformation predates, is synchronous with, or postdates the metamorphic peak. Only tectonic events close to or after the metainorphic peak, result in deformed isograds; at the peak, in areas where deformation induces local cooling; after the peak isograd sequences may be folded and expanded or condensed by crustal thickening or thinning. As repeated Information on orogenic development during the cooling and uplift stage of

  5. Understanding Tensions: Activity Systems Analysis of Cross-Continental Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryder, LanHui Zhang; Yamagata-Lynch, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Using the lens of Vygotsky's sociocultural theory, activity theory, and Engeström's activity systems analysis, this qualitative study explores students' experiences in the context of a sixteen-week transpacific collaboration between seven students at Northern Illinois University (NIU) and seven students from Shandong Normal…

  6. Disorder-mediated crowd control in an active matter system

    PubMed Central

    Pinçe, Erçağ; Velu, Sabareesh K. P.; Callegari, Agnese; Elahi, Parviz; Gigan, Sylvain; Volpe, Giovanni; Volpe, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Living active matter systems such as bacterial colonies, schools of fish and human crowds, display a wealth of emerging collective and dynamic behaviours as a result of far-from-equilibrium interactions. The dynamics of these systems are better understood and controlled considering their interaction with the environment, which for realistic systems is often highly heterogeneous and disordered. Here, we demonstrate that the presence of spatial disorder can alter the long-term dynamics in a colloidal active matter system, making it switch between gathering and dispersal of individuals. At equilibrium, colloidal particles always gather at the bottom of any attractive potential; however, under non-equilibrium driving forces in a bacterial bath, the colloids disperse if disorder is added to the potential. The depth of the local roughness in the environment regulates the transition between gathering and dispersal of individuals in the active matter system, thus inspiring novel routes for controlling emerging behaviours far from equilibrium. PMID:26956085

  7. Disorder-mediated crowd control in an active matter system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinçe, Erçağ; Velu, Sabareesh K. P.; Callegari, Agnese; Elahi, Parviz; Gigan, Sylvain; Volpe, Giovanni; Volpe, Giorgio

    2016-03-01

    Living active matter systems such as bacterial colonies, schools of fish and human crowds, display a wealth of emerging collective and dynamic behaviours as a result of far-from-equilibrium interactions. The dynamics of these systems are better understood and controlled considering their interaction with the environment, which for realistic systems is often highly heterogeneous and disordered. Here, we demonstrate that the presence of spatial disorder can alter the long-term dynamics in a colloidal active matter system, making it switch between gathering and dispersal of individuals. At equilibrium, colloidal particles always gather at the bottom of any attractive potential; however, under non-equilibrium driving forces in a bacterial bath, the colloids disperse if disorder is added to the potential. The depth of the local roughness in the environment regulates the transition between gathering and dispersal of individuals in the active matter system, thus inspiring novel routes for controlling emerging behaviours far from equilibrium.

  8. Coupled delamination and indentor-escape tectonics in the southern part of the c. 650-500 Ma East African/Antarctic Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, J.; Thomas, R. J.; Ueda, K.; Kleinhanns, I.; Emmel, B.; Kumar, R.; Engvik, A.; Bingen, B.

    2009-12-01

    The East African/Antarctic Orogen (EAAO) is one of the largest orogenic belts on the planet, resulting from the collision of various parts of East and West- Protogondwana between 620 and 550 Ma. The central and southern parts of the orogen are typified by high-grade rocks, representing the overprinted margins of the various colliding continental blocks. The southern third of this Himalayan-type orogen can be interpreted in terms of a lateral tectonic escape model, similar to the situation presently developing in SE-Asia. One of the escape-related shear zones of the EAAO is exposed as the approximately 20 km wide Heimefront transpression zone in western Dronning Maud Land (Antarctica). During Gondwana break-up, the southern part of the EAAO broke up into a number of microplates (Falkland, Ellsworth-Haag and Filchner blocks). These microplates probably represent shear zone-bound blocks, which were segmented by tectonic translation during lateral tectonic extrusion. The southern part of the EAAO is also typified by large volumes of late-tectonic A2-type granitoids that intruded at c. 530-490 Ma, and can constitute up to 50% of the exposed basement. They are likely the consequence of delamination of the orogenic root and the subsequent influx of hot asthenospheric mantle during tectonic escape. The intrusion of these voluminous melts into the lower crust was accompanied by orogenic collapse. The A2-type magmatism appears to terminate along the Lurio Belt in northern Mozambique. Therefore, the Lurio Belt could represent an accommodation zone, separating an area to the south in which the orogen underwent delamination of the orogenic root, and an area to the north, where the orogenic keel is still present. Erosional unroofing of the northern EAAO is documented by the remnants of originally extensive areas covered by Cambro-Ordovician molasse-type clastic sedimentary rocks throughout North Africa and Arabia, testifying to the size of this mega-orogen. Whilst the EAAO

  9. Disruption and translation of an orogenic wedge by exhumation of large continental ultrahigh pressure terranes: Examples from the Scandinavian Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuthbert, S.; Brueckner, H.

    2012-04-01

    Many collisional orogens are cored by extensive metamorphic terranes composed of reworked continental crust that developed high pressure/ultrahigh pressure (HP/UHP) metamorphic assemblages during subduction into the mantle. The return of these large, buoyant masses to shallow crustal levels has a major effect on orogenic architecture. A model is proposed where thrust-dominated accretion of an orogenic wedge during continental subduction is succeeded by stretching and passive transport of the wedge on top of an exhuming UHP terrane. Initial thrusting occurs when cratons collide and one subducts beneath the other into the mantle. The subducted portion of the craton undergoes HP/UHP metamorphism while an accretionary orogenic wedge develops at its junction with the overlying craton. Subsequent exhumation of the HP/UHP portion occurs either by true extension, which pulls it out of the mantle, and/or by buoyancy-driven extrusion, which inserts it along faults between the lower craton and the base of the wedge. In either case, shearing along the top of the exhuming terrane will reverse from foreland-directed thrusting during subduction to hinterlandward normal displacement during exhumation. The latter shear traction stretches the frontal part of the orogenic wedge away from the rearward part and may even detach it, allowing a fragment to be carried passively towards the foreland on the exhuming plate. The length of displacement would be a function of the amount of exhumation of the UHP terrane, and the total displacement of the leading wedge taper could be considerably further than indicated by palinspastic restorations of thrust allochthons alone. The Jotun and Trondheim Nappe Complexes form major allochthon elements of the Caledonide orogenic wedge in southern and central Scandinavia, respectively. We propose the late-stage behaviour of these allochthons was a response to the rise and lateral transport of the underlying HP/UHP Western Gneiss Complex (WGC). During the

  10. Mass flux into the Nanga Parbat-Haramosh massif: Orogen-parallel transport, lower crustal flow, or both?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whipp, D. M.; Beaumont, C.; Braun, J.

    2011-12-01

    Relative to most of the Himalaya, the Nanga Parbat-Haramosh massif requires an additional mass flux into its base to balance extreme rates of surface denudation (>10 mm/a) over the last ~2-3 Ma. One proposed source is middle to lower crustal flow into the massif (e.g., Zeitler et al., 2001), which while likely inactive elsewhere along strike, may be sustainable by very rapid surface denudation, a high geothermal gradient, and thermal weakening of rocks beneath the syntaxes. An alternative source is orogen-parallel (OP) transport due to oblique convergence and strain partitioning along the Himalayan arc (e.g., Seeber and Pêcher, 1998). Several observations including (1) predominantly orogen-normal slip on the frontal thrusts deduced from seismic events, (2) OP extension accommodated on orogen-normal structures, and (3) distributed and segmented strike-slip faulting trending parallel to the arc are consistent with strain partitioning and OP mass transport. A key question is can this mechanism supply sufficient mass to the Nanga Parbat syntaxis, or is local channel flow required? We explore mass transport into the western Himalayan syntaxis region using lithospheric-scale 3D mechanical and coupled thermo-mechanical models of an arcuate orogen. The crust is either frictional plastic or power-law viscous, with a constant low viscosity lower crust present in some experiments. Applied velocity boundary conditions are transmitted to the base of the crust by a strong frictional plastic mantle lithosphere, and mantle detachment/subduction drives formation of a bivergent, arcuate orogen. To assess the magnitude of mass transport from strain partitioning, we first explore purely mechanical experiments featuring a 5-km-high Tibet-like plateau above a weak lower crust and with a frictional plastic decollement that dips at 10° beneath the incipient orogen, similar to the Himalayan basal detachment. Preliminary results show gravitational feedback from the plateau drives

  11. Clinoform deposition across a boundary between orogenic front and foredeep - an example from the Lower Cretaceous in Arctic Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houseknecht, David W.; Wartes, Marwan A.

    2013-01-01

    The Lower Cretaceous Fortress Mountain Formation occupies a spatial and temporal niche between syntectonic deposits at the Brooks Range orogenic front and post-tectonic strata in the Colville foreland basin. The formation includes basin-floor fan, marine-slope and fan-delta facies that define a clinoform depositional profile. Texture and composition of clasts in the formation suggest progressive burial of a tectonic wedge-front that included older turbidites and mélange. These new interpretations, based entirely on outcrop study, suggest that the Fortress Mountain Formation spans the boundary between orogenic wedge and foredeep, with proximal strata onlapping the tectonic wedge-front and distal strata downlapping the floor of the foreland basin. Our reconstruction suggests that clinoform amplitude reflects the structural relief generated by tectonic wedge development and load-induced flexural subsidence of the foreland basin.

  12. Moho depth model from GOCE gravity gradient data for the Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, Alexandra; Holzrichter, Nils; Ebbing, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    GOCE gravity gradient data are used together with published seismic data to determine the Moho geometry and the isostatic state of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB). The CAOB is an accretionary orogen formed during the Palaeozoic at the periphery of the Siberian cratonic nucleus by the successive amalgamation of different types of crust (cratonic, oceanic, passive margin, magmatic arc, back-arc, ophiolites, accretionary wedge) followed by an oroclinal bending during Permian-Triassic times. This large area was and is still of great interest for geoscientific studies mainly because of its potential in mineral and fossil resources and also for its outstanding, but still misunderstood, geodynamic evolution. However, the geophysical investigations remain scarce due to the remoteness of the area. A systematic analysis of the crustal thickness has been omitted yet, although the geometry of the crust-mantle boundary (Moho boundary) provides crucial information on the evolution of the lithosphere and on the coupling between upper mantle and the crust - particularly interesting for oroclinal bending processes. In this study, the gravity gradient data of GOCE are used to investigate the topography of the Moho for Mongolia and its surroundings. In addition, we used inversion of gravity data and calculation of the isostatic Moho from topographic data to the World Gravity Map (WGM) 2012 satellite-terrestrial model of the Earth's gravity anomalies and these results are compared together with those obtained for the GOCE gravity data. The results of the gravity inversion are constrained by the few xenolith studies and the seismic data available: the receiver function seismic method for north and central Mongolia, deep seismic sounding and seismic reflection profiles in northern China; and tomography in southern Siberia. Then, the effects of isostatic compensation are evaluated by the comparison between the results of the gravity inversion and the isostatic Moho. Finally, a 3D

  13. A Late Cretaceous Orogen Triggering the Tertiary Rifting of the West Sunda Plate; Andaman Sea Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sautter, B.; Pubellier, M. F.; Menier, D.

    2015-12-01

    Rifted Basins often develop in internal zones of orogenic belts, although the latter may not be easy to unravel. We chose the example of the super-stretched Andaman sea region affected by several stages of rifting in the internal zone of a composite collage of allochthonous terranes. We made use of a set of geophysical, geochronological and structural data to analyze the rifting evolution and reconstruct the previous compressional structures. - Starting in the late Oligocene the East Andaman Basin opened as a back arc in a right-lateral pull- apart. The rifting propagated Westward to the central Andaman basin in the Middle Miocene, and to the oceanic spreading stage in the Pliocene. - An early extension occurred in the Paleogene, marked by widespread opening of isolated continental basins onshore Malay Peninsula and offshore Andaman Shelf and Malacca Straits. The rifting was accommodated by LANF's along preexisting weakness zones such as hinges of folds and granitic batholiths. Continuous extension connected the isolated basins offshore, whereas onshore, the grabens remained confined. There, AFT data show an uplift phase around 30Ma. In the Late Cretaceous, a major deformation occurred oblique to the pre-existing Indosinian basement fabrics. The convergence was partitioned into thrusting and uplift of the Cretaceous volcanic arc in Thailand and Myanmar, inversion of Mesozoic basins, and coeval wrenching responsible for large phacoid-shaped crustal slivers bounded by wide strike slip fault zones. The slivers share similar characteristics: a thick continental core of lower Paleozoic sedimentary basins units surrounded by Late Cretaceous granitoids. Radiometric data and fission tracks indicate a widespread thermal anomaly in all West Sunda Plate synchronous to a strong uplift. In the Latest Mesozoic, the Western Margin of Sunda plate was subjected to a major E-W compression, accommodated by oblique conjugate strike slip faults, leading to the formation of a large

  14. Crustal recycling through intraplate magmatism: Evidence from the Trans-North China Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiao-Fang; Santosh, M.

    2014-12-01

    The North China Craton (NCC) preserves the history of crustal growth and craton formation during the early Precambrian followed by extensive lithospheric thinning and craton destruction in the Mesozoic. Here we present evidence for magma mixing and mingling associated with the Mesozoic tectonic processes from the Central NCC, along the Trans-North China Orogen, a paleo suture along which the Eastern and Western Blocks were amalgamated at end of Paleoproterozoic. Our investigations focus on two granitoids - the Chiwawu and the Mapeng plutons. Typical signatures for the interaction of mafic and felsic magmas are observed in these plutons such as: (1) the presence of diorite enclaves; (2) flow structures; (3) schlierens; (4) varying degrees of hybridization; and (5) macro-, and micro-textures. Porphyritic feldspar crystals show numerous mineral inclusions as well as rapakivi and anti-rapakivi textures. We present bulk chemistry, zircon U-Pb geochronology and REE data, and Lu-Hf isotopes on the granitoids, diorite enclaves, and surrounding basement rocks to constrain the timing of intraplate magmatism and processes of interaction between felsic and mafic magmas. Our LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb data show that the pophyritic granodiorite was emplaced at 129.7 ± 1.0 Ma. The diorite enclaves within this granodiorite show identical ages (128.2 ± 1.5 Ma). The basement TTG (tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite) gneisses formed at ca. 2.5 Ga coinciding with the major period of crustal accretion in the NCC. The 1.85 Ga age from zircons in the gabbro with positive Hf isotope signature may be related to mantle magmatism during post-collisional extension following the assembly of the Western and Eastern Blocks of the NCC along the Trans-North China Orogen. Our Hf isotope data indicate that the Neoarchean-Paleoproterozoic basement rocks were derived from complex sources of both juvenile magmas and reworked ancient crust, whereas the magma source for the Mesozoic units are dominantly

  15. Syn-Uralian orogenic heavy mineral provenance analysis from southeastern Taimyr, Arctic Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Pease, V.; Scott, R. A.

    2012-12-01

    The Taimyr peninsula is on the northern margin of the Siberian craton and divides into the southern, central and northern NE - SW trending domains. The southern Taimyr domain represents the passive margin of Siberia and is dominated by a Paleozoic, extending into the early Mesozoic, succession. The central Taimyr domain accreted to the southern domain during Late Precambrian time, followed by collision with the northern Taimyr domain of Baltican affinity during the Late Paleozoic as part of Uralian orogenesis. The Carboniferous - Permian sedimentary succession, which was deposited during the later stage of Uralian Orogeny, can provide crucial information about the extent of contemporaneous Uralian orogensis and its influence on the tectonic evolution of southern Taimyr. Three Carboniferous - Permian samples from southeastern Taimyr were analyzed for petrography and heavy mineral analysis to define their sedimentary and provenance characteristics. The Upper Carboniferous to Lower Permian sample (VP10-25, Turuzovskya Formation, C2-P1tr), the Lower Permian sample (VP10-14, Sokolinskaya Formation, P1sk) and the Upper Permian sample (VP10-12, Baykurskaya Formation, P2bk)) classify as subarkose, lithic arkose and feldspathic litharenite, respectively- they record decreasing sediment maturity through time. While all the samples represent a 'recycled orogen' source based on QtFL plots, the C2-P1tr sample represents a recycled quartzite, while the P1sk sample plots within the mixed field, and the P2bk sample is transitional on QmFLt plots. According to the heavy mineral analysis results, the C2-P1tr sample and P1sk sample show great similarity in heavy mineral assemblage, dominated by zircon, apatite and rutile. The P2bk sample shows distinct differences, containing apatite, tourmaline, garnet and zircon. The prominent increase of garnet suggests a metamorphic source. These similarities and variations among the three samples are also shown in other discrimination diagrams

  16. From migmatites to granites in the Pan-African Damara orogenic belt, Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toé, W.; Vanderhaeghe, O.; André-Mayer, A.-S.; Feybesse, J.-L.; Milési, J.-P.

    2013-09-01

    The Swakop River exposes a unique structural section into the root of the Pan-African Damara orogenic belt (DOB) in Namibia formed as a result of collision between the Congo and the Kalahari cratons from ca. 550 to 500 Ma. The Central Zone of the Damara orogenic belt is characterized by amphibolite to granulite facies metamorphism accompanied by intense partial melting. Three tectonic units are defined in the Central Zone based on the proportion and distribution of the granitic fraction, namely (1) a lower unit dominated by diatexites and comprising plutons of homogeneous granites, (2) a middle unit composed by metatexites with mainly a metasedimentary protolith, and (3) an upper unit corresponding to metamorphic rocks with intrusive leucogranitic sills and laccoliths. The increase in the granitic fraction with structural depth is suggesting an increase in the degree of partial melting and implies a relative inefficiency of magma mobility from the source to higher structural levels. The transition from metatexites of the middle unit to diatexites and granites of the lower unit is interpreted as reflecting the former transition from partially molten rocks to a crustal-scale magmatic layer. Mushroom-shaped granitic plutons in the lower unit are consistent with their emplacement as diapirs and the development of gravitational instabilities within the magmatic layer. In the middle unit, granitic veins concordant and discordant to the synmigmatitic foliation localized in structurally-controlled sites (foliation, boudin's necks, shear zones, fold hinges) indicate that, within the partially molten zone, deformation plays the dominant role in melt segregation and migration at the outcrop scale. Melt migration from the partially molten zone to the intrusive zone is related to the build-up of an interconnected network of dikes and sills with diffuse contacts with the migmatitic hosts in the middle unit. In contrast, the upper unit is characterized by homogeneous

  17. Flow-injection-type biosensor system for salivary amylase activity.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masaki; Kanemaru, Masashi; Kanemori, Takahiro; Mizuno, Yasufumi

    2003-05-01

    The authors aim to establish a method that can quantitatively evaluate vital reactions to stress. We have been examining the correlation between stress and salivary amylase activity in order to verify its validity as a stress index. In order to quantify human stress, which changes over time, the relationship between stress and salivary amylase activity must be verified by fast and repeated analysis of salivary amylase activity. Standard biosensors are designed such that the enzyme immobilized on an electrode (enzyme electrode) and the substrate-dependent activity is measured. The reverse approach of measuring the alpha-amylase-dependent activity was adopted. We fabricated an amylase activity analytical system. Maltopentaose was selected as a substrate for alpha-amylase and a flow-injection-type device was used to supply maltopentaose continuously. alpha-Glucosidase, having relatively low enzyme activity, was immobilized on a pre-activated membrane so that it could be enclosed in a pre-column, Glucose oxidase, having higher enzyme activity, was immobilized on a working electrode so that it could function as an amperometric biosensor. A saliva-collecting device was fabricated to make saliva pretreatment unnecessary. As a result, an amylase activity analytical system was fabricated that enabled us to measure salivary amylase activity from 0 to 30 kU/l, with an R(2) value of 0.97. The time-course changes in the salivary amylase activities for 1 week were 5.1%, and the initial sensitivity remained nearly constant. Through this study, we were able to verify the possible development of the amylase activity analytical system.

  18. The pre-Devonian tectonic framework of Xing'an-Mongolia orogenic belt (XMOB) in north China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bei; Zhao, Pan; Wang, Yanyang; Liao, Wen; Luo, Zhiwen; Bao, Qingzhong; Zhou, Yongheng

    2015-01-01

    A new tectonic division of the Xing'an-Mongolia orogenic belt (XMOB) in north China has been presented according to our research and a lot of new data of tectonics, geochronology and geochemistry. Four blocks and four sutures have been recognized in the XMOB, including the Erguna (EB), Xing'an-Airgin Sum (XAB), Songliao-Hunshandake (SHB), and Jiamusi (JB), and Xinlin-Xiguitu (XXS), Xilinhot-Heihe (XHS), Mudanjiang (MS) and Ondor Sum-Yongji sutures (OYS). The framework of the XMOB is characterized by a tectonic collage of the blocks and orogenic belts between them. Different Precambrian basements have been found in the blocks, including the Neoproterozoic metamorphic rocks and plutons in the EB, the Neoproterozoic metamorphic rocks in western and eastern of segments of the XAB, Mesoproterozoic and Neoproterozoic metamorphic rocks in middle segments of the XAB, respectively, the Neoproterozoic metamorphic rocks and Mesoproterozoic volcanic rocks and plutons in the SHB, and Neoproterozoic metamorphic rocks in the JB. The XXS resulted from a northwestward subduction of the XAB beneath the EB during the Cambrian, which was followed by the forming of the XHS and OYS in the northwest and south margins of the SHB in the Silurian, respectively. The MS was caused by a westward subduction of the JB beneath the east margin of the SHB during the middle Devonian. The three Cambrian, Silurian and middle Devonian events indicate that the XMOB belongs to a pre-middle Devonian multiple orogenic belt in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB). Forming of the XMOB suggests that the southeast part of the Paleo Asian Ocean closed before the middle Devonian.

  19. Early Mesozoic granitoid and rhyolite magmatism of the Bureya Terrane of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt: Age and geodynamic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, A. A.; Kotov, A. B.; Kudryashov, N. M.; Kovach, V. P.

    2016-09-01

    Early Mesozoic granitoids and volcanic rocks are widespread throughout the structures of all of the continental massifs in the eastern part of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt, although its tectonic setting is not yet clear. Generally, they are associated with subduction and plume processes or rifting. Such uncertainty is mostly explained by the unequal investigation of Early Mesozoic magmatism. This paper presents the results of geochemical, Sm-Nd isotope, and U-Pb geochronologic (ID-TIMS) studies of "key-type" Early Mesozoic magmatic rock complexes of the Bureya Terrane. This is one of the largest continental massifs in the eastern Central Asian Orogenic Belt and knowledge of its geological structure is of fundamental importance in understanding the history of its formation. It has been established that the leucogranites of the Altakhtinsky Complex and the trachyrhyolites of the Talovsky Complex are practically coeval (~ 209-208 Ma). The subalkaline leucogranites of the Kharinsky Complex have a slightly younger age of ~ 199 Ma. These data correspond to the general stage of Early Mesozoic magmatic and metamorphic events (236-180 Ma) in most continental massifs in the eastern Central Asian Orogenic Belt. We believe that large-scale Early Mesozoic events were related to the amalgamation of the continental massifs of the eastern Central Asian Orogenic Belt into a single continental structure (the Amur superterrane or microcontinent Amuria) and collision with the North Asian Craton. It should be noted that the collision processes were followed by crustal thickening, thus creating the conditions for metamorphism and formation of magmatic rock complexes of various geochemical types.

  20. Large along-strike variations in the onset of Subandean exhumation: Implications for Central Andean orogenic growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lease, Richard O.; Ehlers, Todd A.; Enkelmann, Eva

    2016-10-01

    Plate tectonics drives mountain building in general, but the space-time pattern and style of deformation is influenced by how climate, geodynamics, and basement structure modify the orogenic wedge. Growth of the Subandean thrust belt, which lies at the boundary between the arid, high-elevation Central Andean Plateau and its humid, low-elevation eastern foreland, figures prominently into debates of orogenic wedge evolution. We integrate new apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He thermochronometer data with previously published apatite fission-track data from samples collected along four Subandean structural cross-sections in Bolivia between 15° and 20°S. We interpret cooling ages vs. structural depth to indicate the onset of Subandean exhumation and signify the forward propagation of deformation. We find that Subandean growth is diachronous south (11 ± 3 Ma) vs. north (6 ± 2 Ma) of the Bolivian orocline and that Subandean exhumation magnitudes vary by more than a factor of two. Similar north-south contrasts are present in foreland deposition, hinterland erosion, and paleoclimate; these observations both corroborate diachronous orogenic growth and illuminate potential propagation mechanisms. Of particular interest is an abrupt shift to cooler, more arid conditions in the Altiplano hinterland that is diachronous in southern Bolivia (16-13 Ma) vs. northern Bolivia (10-7 Ma) and precedes the timing of Subandean propagation in each region. Others have interpreted the paleoclimate shift to reflect either rapid surface uplift due to lithosphere removal or an abrupt change in climate dynamics once orographic threshold elevations were exceeded. These mechanisms are not mutually exclusive and both would drive forward propagation of the orogenic wedge by augmenting the hinterland backstop, either through surface uplift or spatially variable erosion. In summary, we suggest that diachronous Subandean exhumation was driven by piecemeal hinterland uplift, orography, and the outward

  1. A unified model for gold mineralisation in accretionary orogens and implications for regional-scale exploration targeting methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hronsky, Jon M. A.; Groves, David I.; Loucks, Robert R.; Begg, Graham C.

    2012-04-01

    Accretionary orogens are the sites of long-lived convergent margin tectonics, both compressional and extensional. They are also the hosts to the majority of the world's important gold deposits. A very diverse range of deposit types occurs within accretionary orogens, commonly in close proximity in space and time to each other. These include porphyry and associated high-sulphidation Au-Cu-Ag deposits, classic low-sulphidation Au-Ag deposits, low-sulphidation Au deposits centred on alkalic intrusive complexes, Carlin-type Au deposits, Au-rich volcanic-hosted massive sulphide deposits, orogenic Au deposits, intrusion-related Au deposits and iron oxide Cu-Au deposits. Empirical patterns of spatial distribution of these deposits suggest there must be fundamental generic controls on gold metallogeny. Various lines of evidence lead to the proposal that the underlying key generic factor controlling accretionary orogen gold metallogeny is regional-scale, long-term, pre- and syn-subduction heterogeneous fertilisation of the lithospheric mantle that becomes a source of mineralisation-associated arc magma or hydrothermal fluid components. This process provides a gold-enriched reservoir that can be accessed later in a diverse range of tectonomagmatic settings. Based on this concept, a unified model is proposed in which the formation of a major gold deposit of any type requires the conjunction in time and space of three essential factors: a fertile upper-mantle source region, a favourable transient remobilisation event, and favourable lithospheric-scale plumbing structure. This framework provides the basis for a practical regional-scale targeting methodology that is applicable to data-poor regions.

  2. Neoproterozoic to Paleozoic Geological Evolution of Mongolia: Constraints on Modes of "Crustal Growth" in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdonald, F. A.; Bold, U.; Smith, E.; Olin, P. H.; Crowley, J. L.; Schmitz, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    The Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) is widely considered the largest area of Phanerozoic juvenile crustal growth on Earth. However, the timing and nature of the orogenic events in the core of the CAOB in Mongolia has remained poorly constrained due to a dearth of detailed geological and geochronological studies. To bridge this gap and test models of crustal growth, here we refine the sequencing of geological events by focusing on the formation and destruction of Neoproterozoic and Paleozoic tectonic basins. Mongolia's basins record a complete Neoproterozoic to Cambrian Wilson cycle with rifting of the Mongolian continent at ca. 700 Ma, the development of a Cryogenian to Ediacaran thermally subsiding passive margin, an arc-continent collision at ca. 520 Ma, and a continent-arc-continent collision at ca. 500 Ma. During this collisional orogeny, that is the Cambrian Altaids, crustal growth occurred largely through the obduction of ophiolites. Rifting of the southern margin occurred during the Ordovician Period, with the development of a Silurian passive margin. Oblique northwest-dipping subduction was initiated during the Devonian and resulted in a transpressional accretionary orogen. The CAOB culminated with a continent-arc-continent collision and the accretion of the North China and Tarim Blocks in the latest Permian. The Devonian to early Permian accretionary orogen is associated not only with voluminous plutonism, but also, major translational structures oblique to the margin resulting in the appearance of many accreted terranes. These data are consistent with existing coarse Hf and Nd isotopic data, but also provide a framework for future detailed studies. Although our geological constraints suggest distinct periods of apparent crustal growth through either collisional or accretionary orogenies, net crustal growth after accounting for recycling is equivocal.

  3. 49 CFR 234.225 - Activation of warning system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GRADE CROSSING SIGNAL SYSTEM SAFETY AND STATE ACTION PLANS...-rail grade crossing warning system shall be maintained to activate in accordance with the design of the... operation of through trains before the grade crossing is occupied by rail traffic....

  4. 49 CFR 234.225 - Activation of warning system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GRADE CROSSING SIGNAL SYSTEM SAFETY AND STATE ACTION PLANS...-rail grade crossing warning system shall be maintained to activate in accordance with the design of the... operation of through trains before the grade crossing is occupied by rail traffic....

  5. Mesoproterozoic continental arc magmatism and crustal growth in the eastern Central Tianshan Arc Terrane of the southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt: Geochronological and geochemical evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhen-Yu; Klemd, Reiner; Zhang, Ze-Ming; Zong, Ke-Qing; Sun, Li-Xin; Tian, Zuo-Lin; Huang, Bo-Tao

    2015-11-01

    Numerous microcontinents are known to occur in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), one of the largest accretionary orogens and the most significant area of Paleozoic crustal growth in the world. The evolution of the Precambrian crust in these microcontinents is central to understanding the accretionary and collisional tectonics of the CAOB. Here, we present systematic zircon U-Pb dating and Hf isotope studies of Mesoproterozoic gneissic granitoids from the eastern Central Tianshan Arc Terrane (CTA) of the southern CAOB. The investigated intermediate to felsic (SiO2 = 60.48-78.92 wt.%) granitoids belong to the calcic- to calc-alkaline series and usually have pronounced negative Nb, Ta and Ti anomalies, relative enrichments of light rare earth elements (LREEs) and large ion lithophile elements (LILEs) while heavy rare earth elements (HREEs) and high field strength elements (HFSEs) are depleted, revealing typical active continental margin magmatic arc geochemical characteristics. These spatially-distant rocks show consistent zircon U-Pb crystallization ages from ca. 1.45 to 1.40 Ga and thus constitute a previously unknown Mesoproterozoic continental magmatic arc covering hundreds of kilometers in the eastern segment of the CTA. Furthermore the high and mainly positive zircon εHf(t) values between - 1.0 and + 8.6 and the zircon Hf model ages of 1.95 to 1.55 Ga, which are slightly older than their crystallization ages, suggest that they were mainly derived from rapid reworking of juvenile material with a limited input of an ancient crustal component. Therefore, the formation of these granitoids defines an extensive Mesoproterozoic intermediate to felsic, subduction-related intrusive magmatic arc activity that was active from at least 1.45 to 1.40 Ga, involving significant juvenile continental growth in the eastern segment of the CTA. Furthermore the zircon U-Pb and Hf isotopic data challenge the common belief that the CTA was part of the Tarim Craton during Paleo

  6. Perceiving active listening activates the reward system and improves the impression of relevant experiences.

    PubMed

    Kawamichi, Hiroaki; Yoshihara, Kazufumi; Sasaki, Akihiro T; Sugawara, Sho K; Tanabe, Hiroki C; Shinohara, Ryoji; Sugisawa, Yuka; Tokutake, Kentaro; Mochizuki, Yukiko; Anme, Tokie; Sadato, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    Although active listening is an influential behavior, which can affect the social responses of others, the neural correlates underlying its perception have remained unclear. Sensing active listening in social interactions is accompanied by an improvement in the recollected impressions of relevant experiences and is thought to arouse positive feelings. We therefore hypothesized that the recognition of active listening activates the reward system, and that the emotional appraisal of experiences that had been subject to active listening would be improved. To test these hypotheses, we conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on participants viewing assessments of their own personal experiences made by evaluators with or without active listening attitude. Subjects rated evaluators who showed active listening more positively. Furthermore, they rated episodes more positively when they were evaluated by individuals showing active listening. Neural activation in the ventral striatum was enhanced by perceiving active listening, suggesting that this was processed as rewarding. It also activated the right anterior insula, representing positive emotional reappraisal processes. Furthermore, the mentalizing network was activated when participants were being evaluated, irrespective of active listening behavior. Therefore, perceiving active listening appeared to result in positive emotional appraisal and to invoke mental state attribution to the active listener. PMID:25188354

  7. Perceiving active listening activates the reward system and improves the impression of relevant experiences

    PubMed Central

    Kawamichi, Hiroaki; Yoshihara, Kazufumi; Sasaki, Akihiro T.; Sugawara, Sho K.; Tanabe, Hiroki C.; Shinohara, Ryoji; Sugisawa, Yuka; Tokutake, Kentaro; Mochizuki, Yukiko; Anme, Tokie; Sadato, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    Although active listening is an influential behavior, which can affect the social responses of others, the neural correlates underlying its perception have remained unclear. Sensing active listening in social interactions is accompanied by an improvement in the recollected impressions of relevant experiences and is thought to arouse positive feelings. We therefore hypothesized that the recognition of active listening activates the reward system, and that the emotional appraisal of experiences that had been subject to active listening would be improved. To test these hypotheses, we conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on participants viewing assessments of their own personal experiences made by evaluators with or without active listening attitude. Subjects rated evaluators who showed active listening more positively. Furthermore, they rated episodes more positively when they were evaluated by individuals showing active listening. Neural activation in the ventral striatum was enhanced by perceiving active listening, suggesting that this was processed as rewarding. It also activated the right anterior insula, representing positive emotional reappraisal processes. Furthermore, the mentalizing network was activated when participants were being evaluated, irrespective of active listening behavior. Therefore, perceiving active listening appeared to result in positive emotional appraisal and to invoke mental state attribution to the active listener. PMID:25188354

  8. Advanced Active-Magnetic-Bearing Thrust-Measurement System