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Sample records for active oxygen complex

  1. Oxygen activation with transition metal complexes in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Bakac, Andreja

    2010-04-12

    Coordination to transition-metal complexes changes both the thermodynamics and kinetics of oxygen reduction. Some of the intermediates (superoxo, hydroperoxo, and oxo species) are close analogues of organic oxygen-centered radicals and peroxides (ROO{sm_bullet}, ROOH, and RO{sm_bullet}). Metal-based intermediates are typically less reactive, but more persistent, than organic radicals, which makes the two types of intermediates similarly effective in their reactions with various substrates. The self-exchange rate constant for hydrogen-atom transfer for the couples Cr{sub aq}OO{sup 2+}/Cr{sub aq}OOH{sup 2+} and L{sup 1}(H{sub 2}O)RhOO{sup 2+}/L{sup 1}(H{sub 2}O)RhOOH{sup 2+} was estimated to be 10{sup 1 {+-} 1} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. The use of this value in the simplified Marcus equation for the Cr{sub aq}O{sup 2+}/Cr{sub aq}OOH{sup 2+} cross reaction provided an upper limit k{sub CrO,CrOH} {le} 10{sup (-2{+-}1)} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} for Cr{sub aq}O{sup 2+}/Cr{sub aq}OH{sup 2+} self-exchange. Even though superoxo complexes react very slowly in bimolecular self-reactions, extremely fast cross reactions with organic counterparts, i.e., acylperoxyl radicals, have been observed. Many of the intermediates generated by the interaction of O{sub 2} with reduced metal complexes can also be accessed by alternative routes, both thermal and photochemical.

  2. Thermodynamics of oxygen activation by macrocyclic complexes of rhodium.

    PubMed

    Szajna-Fuller, Ewa; Bakac, Andreja

    2007-12-10

    The oxidation of ABTS2- [2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate)] with a superoxorhodium(III) complex, L2(H2O)RhOO2+ (L2 = meso-hexamethylcyclam) is characterized by an acid-dependent equilibrium constant, log(Ke/[H+]) = 4.91 +/- 0.10 in the pH range of 4.89-6.49. This equilibrium constant was used to calculate the reduction potential for the L2(H2O)RhOO2+/L2(H2O)RhOOH2+ couple, E0 = 0.97 V vs NHE. The pH dependence of the kinetics of the L2(H2O)RhOOH2+/I- reaction yielded the acid dissociation constant for the coordinated water in L2(H2O)RhOOH2+, pKa = 6.9. Spectrophotometric pH titrations provided pKa = 6.6 for the superoxo complex, L2(H2O)RhOO2+. The combination of the two pKa values with the reduction potential measured in acidic solutions yielded the reduction potential E0 = 0.95 V for the L2(HO)RhOO+/L2(HO)RhOOH+ couple. Thermochemical calculations yielded the bond-dissociation free energy of the L2(H2O)RhOO-H2+ bond as 315 kJ/mol at 298 K.

  3. A ligand field chemistry of oxygen generation by the oxygen-evolving complex and synthetic active sites.

    PubMed

    Betley, Theodore A; Surendranath, Yogesh; Childress, Montana V; Alliger, Glen E; Fu, Ross; Cummins, Christopher C; Nocera, Daniel G

    2008-03-27

    Oxygen-oxygen bond formation and O2 generation occur from the S4 state of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC). Several mechanistic possibilities have been proposed for water oxidation, depending on the formal oxidation state of the Mn atoms. All fall under two general classifications: the AB mechanism in which nucleophilic oxygen (base, B) attacks electrophilic oxygen (acid, A) of the Mn4Ca cluster or the RC mechanism in which radical-like oxygen species couple within OEC. The critical intermediate in either mechanism involves a metal oxo, though the nature of this oxo for AB and RC mechanisms is disparate. In the case of the AB mechanism, assembly of an even-electron count, high-valent metal-oxo proximate to a hydroxide is needed whereas, in an RC mechanism, two odd-electron count, high-valent metal oxos are required. Thus the two mechanisms give rise to very different design criteria for functional models of the OEC active site. This discussion presents the electron counts and ligand geometries that support metal oxos for AB and RC O-O bond-forming reactions. The construction of architectures that bring two oxygen functionalities together under the purview of the AB and RC scenarios are described.

  4. Developing mononuclear copper-active-oxygen complexes relevant to reactive intermediates of biological oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Shinobu

    2015-07-21

    Active-oxygen species generated on a copper complex play vital roles in several biological and chemical oxidation reactions. Recent attention has been focused on the reactive intermediates generated at the mononuclear copper active sites of copper monooxygenases such as dopamine β-monooxygenase (DβM), tyramine β-monooxygenase (TβM), peptidylglycine-α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM), and polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMO). In a simple model system, reaction of O2 and a reduced copper(I) complex affords a mononuclear copper(II)-superoxide complex or a copper(III)-peroxide complex, and subsequent H(•) or e(-)/H(+) transfer, which gives a copper(II)-hydroperoxide complex. A more reactive species such as a copper(II)-oxyl radical type species could be generated via O-O bond cleavage of the peroxide complex. However, little had been explored about the chemical properties and reactivity of the mononuclear copper-active-oxygen complexes due to the lack of appropriate model compounds. Thus, a great deal of effort has recently been made to develop efficient ligands that can stabilize such reactive active-oxygen complexes in synthetic modeling studies. In this Account, I describe our recent achievements of the development of a mononuclear copper(II)-(end-on)superoxide complex using a simple tridentate ligand consisting of an eight-membered cyclic diamine with a pyridylethyl donor group. The superoxide complex exhibits a similar structure (four-coordinate tetrahedral geometry) and reactivity (aliphatic hydroxylation) to those of a proposed reactive intermediate of copper monooxygenases. Systematic studies based on the crystal structures of copper(I) and copper(II) complexes of the related tridentate supporting ligands have indicated that the rigid eight-membered cyclic diamine framework is crucial for controlling the geometry and the redox potential, which are prerequisites for the generation of such a unique mononuclear copper(II)-(end-on)superoxide complex

  5. Oxygenation of Organoboronic Acids by a Nonheme Iron(II) Complex: Mimicking Boronic Acid Monooxygenase Activity.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sayanti; Paine, Tapan Kanti

    2015-10-19

    Phenolic compounds are important intermediates in the bacterial biodegradation of aromatic compounds in the soil. An Arthrobacter sp. strain has been shown to exhibit boronic acid monooxygenase activity through the conversion of different substituted phenylboronic acids to the corresponding phenols using dioxygen. While a number of methods have been reported to cleave the C-B bonds of organoboronic acids, there is no report on biomimetic iron complex exhibiting this activity using dioxygen as the oxidant. In that direction, we have investigated the reactivity of a nucleophilic iron-oxygen oxidant, generated upon oxidative decarboxylation of an iron(II)-benzilate complex [(Tp(Ph2))Fe(II)(benzilate)] (Tp(Ph2) = hydrotris(3,5-diphenyl-pyrazol-1-yl)borate), toward organoboronic acids. The oxidant converts different aryl/alkylboronic acids to the corresponding oxygenated products with the incorporation of one oxygen atom from dioxygen. This method represents an efficient protocol for the oxygenation of boronic acids with dioxygen as the terminal oxidant.

  6. Boron oxygen complexes in Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanati, M.; Estreicher, S. K.

    2006-04-01

    The carrier lifetime in boron-doped Czochralski Si is strongly reduced by irradiation (space-based solar cells) or illumination (terrestrial cells). The culprits are believed to be boron-oxygen complexes. We use first-principles theory to predict the structure, electrical activity, and stability of complexes involving substitutional or interstitial B and interstitial O or oxygen dimers. Four complexes with comparable binding energies and thermodynamic gap levels are identified and their local vibrational modes predicted. Replacing B with Ga yields complexes with much smaller binding energies.

  7. Oxygen activation and intramolecular C-H bond activation by an amidate-bridged diiron(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Jones, Matthew B; Hardcastle, Kenneth I; Hagen, Karl S; MacBeth, Cora E

    2011-07-18

    A diiron(II) complex containing two μ-1,3-(κN:κO)-amidate linkages has been synthesized using the 2,2',2''-tris(isobutyrylamido)triphenylamine (H(3)L(iPr)) ligand. The resulting diiron complex, 1, reacts with dioxygen (or iodosylbenzene) to effect intramolecular C-H bond activation at the methine position of the ligand isopropyl group. The ligand-activated product, 2, has been isolated and characterized by a variety of methods including X-ray crystallography. Electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy of 2 prepared from(18)O(2) was used to confirm that the oxygen atom incorporated into the ligand framework is derived from molecular oxygen.

  8. [The role of labile complexes with oxygen in antioxidant activity of carotenoids].

    PubMed

    Prokhorova, L I; Revina, A A

    2001-01-01

    The present research work was done with the main purpose to study early stages of interaction of carotenoids (Car) with molecular oxygen and clarify their role in the mechanism responsible for Car radiochemical stability and carotenoid ability to decrease concentration of the most active oxygen transients like superoxide anion radicals (O2.-). Alcoholic and phosphate buffer (pH 7.5) solutions of carotenoid fucoxanthin (Fx) were used for investigation of the oxygen effect on the absorption spectra in the UV-Visible range. Special analysis of time dependent reversible shifts of absorption bands of evacuated Fx solution after contact with O2 indicated existence of equilibrium between two distinct forms of Car: Fx and the labile charge transfer complex (Fx+delta...O2-delta). The velocity of the achievement of equilibrium state and a degree of reversibility depend on chemical structure of the carotenoid, oxygen content and the solvent nature. Radiation-chemical methods were used to confirm the important role of primary Car oxocomplexes in different redox processes. It appeared that the yield of radiation-chemical bleaching of Fx, G-Fx, is 0.02-0.05 molecule/100 eV in the presence of oxygen, which in hundred times less the yield achieved in anaerobic conditions. The obtained results provide the evidence of Fx high level of stability under radiation, and demonstrate the supreme importance of reversible oxocomplex (Fx+delta...O2-delta) in stabilizing carotenoids in aerobic medium. The pulse radiolysis method with spectrophotometric registration of transients was used for generation and studying of mechanism O2.- interaction with different carotenoids. Introduction of any carotenoids containing oxygen (10(-5) M) in phosphate buffer solutions (pH 7.5) caused a red-shift of absorption maximum (from 5 to 15 nm) and difference in kinetics of O2.- decay. These results prove that radiation generated esolv- are directly accepted by (Car...O2) with consequent formation of

  9. Effect of oxygen on activation state of complex I and lack of oxaloacetate inhibition of complex II in Langendorff perfused rat heart.

    PubMed

    Maklashina, Elena; Kotlyar, Alexander B; Karliner, Joel S; Cecchini, Gary

    2004-01-02

    Two main entry points for electrons into the mitochondrial respiratory chain are NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) and succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex II). Metabolic regulation of these two respiratory complexes is not understood in detail. It has been suggested that the Krebs cycle metabolic intermediate oxaloacetate (OAA) inhibits complex II in vivo, whereas complex I undergoes a reversible active/de-active transition. In normoxic and anoxic hearts it has been shown that the proportion of complex I in the active and de-active states is different suggesting a possible mode of regulation of the enzyme by oxygen concentration. In the current studies rapid isolation of mitochondrial membranes in a state that preserves the activity of both complex I and complex II has been achieved using Langendorff perfused rat hearts. The findings indicate that the state of activation of complex I is controlled by the oxygen saturation in the perfusate. In addition, these studies show that complex II is fully active in the mitochondrion and not inhibited by OAA regardless of the oxygen concentration.

  10. Anti-tumor and immunomodulatory activity of iron hepta-tungsten phosphate oxygen clusters complex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bisong; Qiu, Jianping; Wu, Changsheng; Li, Yunxia; Liu, Zhenxiang

    2015-12-01

    Polyoxometalates (POMs) have attracted a considerable attention due to their unique structural characteristics, physicochemical properties and biological activities. In this study, iron hepta-tungsten phosphate oxygen clusters complex Na12H[Fe(HPW7O28)2]·44H2O (IHTPO) was synthesized and evaluated for in vitro cytotoxic activities on human hepatoma HepG2, leukemia K562, lung carcinoma A549, and large cell lung cancer NCI-H460 cells, therapeutic efficacies on mice transplantable tumor, and immunomodulatory potentials on the immune response in tumor-bearing mice. IHTPO exhibited lower in vitro cytotoxic activities against four human tumor cell lines, with the IC50 values being higher than 62.5μM (ca. 300μg/ml). IHTPO, however, significantly inhibited the growth of S180 sarcoma transplanted in mice. It was further showed that IHTPO could not only significantly promote splenocytes proliferation, NK cell and CTL activity from splenocytes, but remarkably enhance serum antigen-specific IgG, IgG2a and IgG2b antibody levels in S180-bearing mice. IHTPO also significantly promoted Th1 cytokines IFN-γ and IL-2 production, and up-regulated the mRNA expression levels of IFN-γ, IL-2 and Th1 transcription factors T-bet and STAT-4 in splenocytes from the S180-bearing mice. These results suggested that IHTPO significantly inhibited the growth of mice transplantable tumor, and that its in vivo antitumor activity might be achieved by improving Th1 protective cell-mediated immunity. IHTPO could act as antitumor agent with immunomodulatory activity.

  11. Beyond oxygen: complex regulation and activity of hypoxia inducible factors in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Pringle, K.G.; Kind, K.L.; Sferruzzi-Perri, A.N.; Thompson, J.G.; Roberts, C.T.

    2010-01-01

    In the first trimester the extravillous cytotrophoblast cells occlude the uterine spiral arterioles creating a low oxygen environment early in pregnancy, which is essential for pregnancy success. Paradoxically, shallow trophoblast invasion and defective vascular remodelling of the uterine spiral arteries in the first trimester may result in impaired placental perfusion and chronic placental ischemia and hypoxia later in gestation leading to adverse pregnancy outcomes. The hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) are key mediators of the response to low oxygen. We aimed to elucidate mechanisms of regulation of HIFs and the role these may play in the control of placental differentiation, growth and function in both normal and pathological pregnancies. The Pubmed database was consulted for identification of the most relevant published articles. Search terms used were oxygen, placenta, trophoblast, pregnancy, HIF and hypoxia. The HIFs are able to function throughout all aspects of normal and abnormal placental differentiation, growth and function; during the first trimester (physiologically low oxygen), during mid-late gestation (where there is adequate supply of blood and oxygen to the placenta) and in pathological pregnancies complicated by placental hypoxia/ischemia. During normal pregnancy HIFs may respond to complex alterations in oxygen, hormones, cytokines and growth factors to regulate placental invasion, differentiation, transport and vascularization. In the ever-changing environment created during pregnancy, the HIFs appear to act as key mediators of placental development and function and thereby are likely to be important contributors to both normal and adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:19926662

  12. Polydopamine-Coated Manganese Complex/Graphene Nanocomposite for Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity Towards Oxygen Reduction.

    PubMed

    Parnell, Charlette M; Chhetri, Bijay; Brandt, Andrew; Watanabe, Fumiya; Nima, Zeid A; Mudalige, Thilak K; Biris, Alexandru S; Ghosh, Anindya

    2016-08-16

    Platinum electrodes are commonly used electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) in fuel cells. However, this material is not economical due to its high cost and scarcity. We prepared an Mn(III) catalyst supported on graphene and further coated with polydopamine, resulting in superior ORR activity compared to the uncoated PDA structures. During ORR, a peak potential at 0.433 V was recorded, which is a significant shift compared to the uncoated material's -0.303 V (both versus SHE). All the materials reduced oxygen in a wide pH range via a four-electron pathway. Rotating disk electrode and rotating ring disk electrode studies of the polydopamine-coated material revealed ORR occurring via 4.14 and 4.00 electrons, respectively. A rate constant of 6.33 × 10(6) mol(-1)s(-1) was observed for the polydopamine-coated material-over 4.5 times greater than the uncoated nanocomposite and superior to those reported for similar carbon-supported metal catalysts. Simply integrating an inexpensive bioinspired polymer coating onto the Mn-graphene nanocomposite increased ORR performance significantly, with a peak potential shift of over +730 mV. This indicates that the material can reduce oxygen at a higher rate but with lower energy usage, revealing its excellent potential as an ORR electrocatalyst in fuel cells.

  13. Polydopamine-Coated Manganese Complex/Graphene Nanocomposite for Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity Towards Oxygen Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Parnell, Charlette M.; Chhetri, Bijay; Brandt, Andrew; Watanabe, Fumiya; Nima, Zeid A.; Mudalige, Thilak K.; Biris, Alexandru S.; Ghosh, Anindya

    2016-01-01

    Platinum electrodes are commonly used electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) in fuel cells. However, this material is not economical due to its high cost and scarcity. We prepared an Mn(III) catalyst supported on graphene and further coated with polydopamine, resulting in superior ORR activity compared to the uncoated PDA structures. During ORR, a peak potential at 0.433 V was recorded, which is a significant shift compared to the uncoated material’s −0.303 V (both versus SHE). All the materials reduced oxygen in a wide pH range via a four-electron pathway. Rotating disk electrode and rotating ring disk electrode studies of the polydopamine-coated material revealed ORR occurring via 4.14 and 4.00 electrons, respectively. A rate constant of 6.33 × 106 mol−1s−1 was observed for the polydopamine-coated material–over 4.5 times greater than the uncoated nanocomposite and superior to those reported for similar carbon-supported metal catalysts. Simply integrating an inexpensive bioinspired polymer coating onto the Mn-graphene nanocomposite increased ORR performance significantly, with a peak potential shift of over +730 mV. This indicates that the material can reduce oxygen at a higher rate but with lower energy usage, revealing its excellent potential as an ORR electrocatalyst in fuel cells. PMID:27528439

  14. Polydopamine-Coated Manganese Complex/Graphene Nanocomposite for Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity Towards Oxygen Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parnell, Charlette M.; Chhetri, Bijay; Brandt, Andrew; Watanabe, Fumiya; Nima, Zeid A.; Mudalige, Thilak K.; Biris, Alexandru S.; Ghosh, Anindya

    2016-08-01

    Platinum electrodes are commonly used electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) in fuel cells. However, this material is not economical due to its high cost and scarcity. We prepared an Mn(III) catalyst supported on graphene and further coated with polydopamine, resulting in superior ORR activity compared to the uncoated PDA structures. During ORR, a peak potential at 0.433 V was recorded, which is a significant shift compared to the uncoated material’s -0.303 V (both versus SHE). All the materials reduced oxygen in a wide pH range via a four-electron pathway. Rotating disk electrode and rotating ring disk electrode studies of the polydopamine-coated material revealed ORR occurring via 4.14 and 4.00 electrons, respectively. A rate constant of 6.33 × 106 mol-1s-1 was observed for the polydopamine-coated material-over 4.5 times greater than the uncoated nanocomposite and superior to those reported for similar carbon-supported metal catalysts. Simply integrating an inexpensive bioinspired polymer coating onto the Mn-graphene nanocomposite increased ORR performance significantly, with a peak potential shift of over +730 mV. This indicates that the material can reduce oxygen at a higher rate but with lower energy usage, revealing its excellent potential as an ORR electrocatalyst in fuel cells.

  15. Catalytic oxidation of alkanes by iron bispidine complexes and dioxygen: oxygen activation versus autoxidation.

    PubMed

    Comba, Peter; Lee, Yong-Min; Nam, Wonwoo; Waleska, Arkadius

    2014-01-14

    Organic substrates (specifically cis-1,2-dimethylcyclohexane, DMCH) are oxidized by O2 in the presence of iron(II)-bispidine complexes. It is shown that this oxidation reaction is not based on O2 activation by the nonheme iron catalysts as in Nature but due to a radical-based initiation, followed by a radical- and ferryl-based catalytic reaction.

  16. Calcium-manganese oxides as structural and functional models for active site in oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II: lessons from simple models.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi

    2011-01-01

    The oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II which induces the oxidation of water to dioxygen in plants, algae and certain bacteria contains a cluster of one calcium and four manganese ions. It serves as a model to split water by sunlight. Reports on the mechanism and structure of photosystem II provide a more detailed architecture of the oxygen evolving complex and the surrounding amino acids. One challenge in this field is the development of artificial model compounds to study oxygen evolution reaction outside the complicated environment of the enzyme. Calcium-manganese oxides as structural and functional models for the active site of photosystem II are explained and reviewed in this paper. Because of related structures of these calcium-manganese oxides and the catalytic centers of active site of the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II, the study may help to understand more about mechanism of oxygen evolution by the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II.

  17. Oxygen activation by mononuclear Mn, Co, and Ni centers in biology and synthetic complexes.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, Adam T; Fischer, Anne A

    2017-04-01

    The active sites of metalloenzymes that catalyze O2-dependent reactions generally contain iron or copper ions. However, several enzymes are capable of activating O2 at manganese or nickel centers instead, and a handful of dioxygenases exhibit activity when substituted with cobalt. This minireview summarizes the catalytic properties of oxygenases and oxidases with mononuclear Mn, Co, or Ni active sites, including oxalate-degrading oxidases, catechol dioxygenases, and quercetin dioxygenase. In addition, recent developments in the O2 reactivity of synthetic Mn, Co, or Ni complexes are described, with an emphasis on the nature of reactive intermediates featuring superoxo-, peroxo-, or oxo-ligands. Collectively, the biochemical and synthetic studies discussed herein reveal the possibilities and limitations of O2 activation at these three "overlooked" metals.

  18. Activation of Molecular Oxygen: Kinetic Studies of the Oxidation of Hindered Phenols with Cobalt-Dioxygen Complexes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-25

    containing nucleophiles on coordinated substrates; (3) oxygen atom transfers from high oxidation state elements; (4) epoxidation of olefins using metal...or polymers, depending -2- on the choice of catalyst or reagent. The oxidation of hindered phenols by cobalt- salen -dioxygen complexes was first

  19. Photochemical activation of ruthenium(II)-pyridylamine complexes having a pyridine-N-oxide pendant toward oxygenation of organic substrates.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Takahiko; Nakayama, Kazuya; Sakaguchi, Miyuki; Ogura, Takashi; Ohkubo, Kei; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2011-11-09

    Ruthenium(II)-acetonitrile complexes having η(3)-tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine (TPA) with an uncoordinated pyridine ring and diimine such as 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) and 2,2'-bipyrimidine (bpm), [Ru(II)(η(3)-TPA)(diimine)(CH(3)CN)](2+), reacted with m-chloroperbenzoic acid to afford corresponding Ru(II)-acetonitrile complexes having an uncoordinated pyridine-N-oxide arm, [Ru(II)(η(3)-TPA-O)(diimine)(CH(3)CN)](2+), with retention of the coordination environment. Photoirradiation of the acetonitrile complexes having diimine and the η(3)-TPA with the uncoordinated pyridine-N-oxide arm afforded a mixture of [Ru(II)(TPA)(diimine)](2+), intermediate-spin (S = 1) Ru(IV)-oxo complex with uncoordinated pyridine arm, and intermediate-spin Ru(IV)-oxo complex with uncoordinated pyridine-N-oxide arm. A Ru(II) complex bearing an oxygen-bound pyridine-N-oxide as a ligand and bpm as a diimine ligand was also obtained, and its crystal structure was determined by X-ray crystallography. Femtosecond laser flash photolysis of the isolated O-coordinated Ru(II)-pyridine-N-oxide complex has been investigated to reveal the photodynamics. The Ru(IV)-oxo complex with an uncoordinated pyridine moiety was alternatively prepared by reaction of the corresponding acetonitrile complex with 2,6-dichloropyridine-N-oxide (Cl(2)py-O) to identify the Ru(IV)-oxo species. The formation of Ru(IV)-oxo complexes was concluded to proceed via intermolecular oxygen atom transfer from the uncoordinated pyridine-N-oxide to a Ru(II) center on the basis of the results of the reaction with Cl(2)py-O and the concentration dependence of the consumption of the starting Ru(II) complexes having the uncoordinated pyridine-N-oxide moiety. Oxygenation reactions of organic substrates by [Ru(II)(η(3)-TPA-O)(diimine)(CH(3)CN)](2+) were examined under irradiation (at 420 ± 5 nm) and showed selective allylic oxygenation of cyclohexene to give cyclohexen-1-ol and cyclohexen-1-one and cumene oxygenation to afford cumyl alcohol

  20. Making oxygen with ruthenium complexes.

    PubMed

    Concepcion, Javier J; Jurss, Jonah W; Brennaman, M Kyle; Hoertz, Paul G; Patrocinio, Antonio Otávio T; Murakami Iha, Neyde Yukie; Templeton, Joseph L; Meyer, Thomas J

    2009-12-21

    hundreds of turnovers without decomposition with Ce(IV) as oxidant. Detailed mechanistic studies and DFT calculations have revealed a stepwise mechanism: initial 2e(-)/2H(+) oxidation, to Ru(IV)=O(2+), 1e(-) oxidation to Ru(V)=(3+), nucleophilic H(2)O attack to give Ru(III)-OOH(2+), further oxidation to Ru(IV)(O(2))(2+), and, finally, oxygen loss, which is in competition with further oxidation of Ru(IV)(O(2))(2+) to Ru(V)(O(2))(3+), which loses O(2) rapidly. An extended family of 10-15 catalysts based on Mebimpy (Mebimpy is 2,6-bis(1-methylbenzimidazol-2-yl)pyridine), tpy, and heterocyclic carbene ligands all appear to share a common mechanism. The osmium complex Os(tpy)(bpy)(OH(2))(2+) also functions as a water oxidation catalyst. Mechanistic experiments have revealed additional pathways for water oxidation one involving Cl(-) catalysis and another, rate enhancement of O-O bond formation by concerted atom-proton transfer (APT). Surface-bound [(4,4'-((HO)(2)P(O)CH(2))(2)bpy)(2)Ru(II)(bpm)Ru(II)(Mebimpy)(OH(2))](4+) and its tpy analog are impressive electrocatalysts for water oxidation, undergoing thousands of turnovers without loss of catalytic activity. These catalysts were designed for use in dye-sensitized solar cell configurations on TiO(2) to provide oxidative equivalents by molecular excitation and excited-state electron injection. Transient absorption measurements on TiO(2)-[(4,4'((HO)(2)P(O)CH(2))(2)bpy)(2)Ru(II)(bpm)Ru(II)(Mebimpy)(OH(2))](4+), (TiO(2)-Ru(II)-Ru(II)OH(2)) and its tpy analog have provided direct insight into the interfacial and intramolecular electron transfer events that occur following excitation. With added hydroquinone in a PEC configuration, APCE (absorbed-photon-to-current-efficiency) values of 4-5% are obtained for dehydrogenation of hydroquinone, H(2)Q + 2hnu --> Q + H(2). In more recent experiments, we are using the same PEC configuration to investigate water splitting.

  1. The Mechanism of Intralipid®-Mediated Cardioprotection Complex IV Inhibition by the Active Metabolite, Palmitoylcarnitine, Generates Reactive Oxygen Species and Activates Reperfusion Injury Salvage Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Phing-How; Lucchinetti, Eliana; Zhang, Liyan; Affolter, Andreas; Schaub, Marcus C.; Gandhi, Manoj; Hersberger, Martin; Warren, Blair E.; Lemieux, Hélène; Sobhi, Hany F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Intralipid® administration at reperfusion elicits protection against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. However, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Methods Sprague-Dawley rat hearts were exposed to 15 min of ischemia and 30 min of reperfusion in the absence or presence of Intralipid® 1% administered at the onset of reperfusion. In separate experiments, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger N-(2-mercaptopropionyl)-glycine was added either alone or with Intralipid®. Left ventricular work and activation of Akt, STAT3, and ERK1/2 were used to evaluate cardioprotection. ROS production was assessed by measuring the loss of aconitase activity and the release of hydrogen peroxide using Amplex Red. Electron transport chain complex activities and proton leak were measured by high-resolution respirometry in permeabilized cardiac fibers. Titration experiments using the fatty acid intermediates of Intralipid® palmitoyl-, oleoyl- and linoleoylcarnitine served to determine concentration-dependent inhibition of complex IV activity and mitochondrial ROS release. Results Intralipid® enhanced postischemic recovery and activated Akt and Erk1/2, effects that were abolished by the ROS scavenger N-(2-mercaptopropionyl)glycine. Palmitoylcarnitine and linoleoylcarnitine, but not oleoylcarnitine concentration-dependently inhibited complex IV. Only palmitoylcarnitine reached high tissue concentrations during early reperfusion and generated significant ROS by complex IV inhibition. Palmitoylcarnitine (1 µM), administered at reperfusion, also fully mimicked Intralipid®-mediated protection in an N-(2-mercaptopropionyl)-glycine -dependent manner. Conclusions Our data describe a new mechanism of postconditioning cardioprotection by the clinically available fat emulsion, Intralipid®. Protection is elicited by the fatty acid intermediate palmitoylcarnitine, and involves inhibition of complex IV, an increase in ROS production and activation of the RISK

  2. Synthesis and structural characterization of silver(I), aluminium(III) and cobalt(II) complexes with 4-isopropyltropolone (hinokitiol) showing noteworthy biological activities. Action of silver(I)-oxygen bonding complexes on the antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Nomiya, Kenji; Yoshizawa, Akira; Tsukagoshi, Ken; Kasuga, Noriko Chikaraishi; Hirakawa, Shoko; Watanabe, Jun

    2004-01-01

    Through two unequivalent oxygen donor atoms of the hinokitiol (Hhino; C10H12O2; 4-isopropyltropolone) ligand that showed noteworthy biological activities, the dimeric, silver(I)-oxygen bonding complex [Ag(hino)]2 1, the monomeric aluminium(III) complex [Al(hino)3].0.5H2O 4 and the cobalt(II) complex "[Co(hino)2]2.H2O" 6 were synthesized and characterized with elemental analysis, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA), FTIR and solution (1H and 13C) NMR spectroscopy. The crystal structure of 1 was determined by Rietveld analysis based on X-ray powder diffraction (XPD) data and those of [Al(hino)3].MeOH 4a and [Co(hino)2(EtOH)]2 6a, being obtained as yellow block crystals and red platelet crystals, respectively, by crystallization of 4 and 6, were determined by single-crystal X-ray analysis. The antimicrobial activities of 1, 4 and 6, evaluated with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC; microg ml(-1)), were compared with those of other metal complexes (M=Na, Li, Cs, Ca, V, Zn) with the hino- ligand. The antimicrobial activities observed in the alkali-metal salts strongly suggested that they were attributed to the effect of the anionic hino- species. The antimicrobial activities of 1 were significantly enhanced, whereas those of other metal complexes were suppressed, compared with those of the neutral Hhino and anionic hino- molecules. The antimicrobial activities observed in 1 were comparable with those of other recently found silver(I)-oxygen bonding complexes, the ligands of which had no activity. Thus, it is proposed that the antimicrobial activities of the silver(I)-oxygen bonding complexes are due to a direct interaction or complexation of the silver(I) ion with biological ligands such as protein, enzyme and membrane, and the coordinating ligands of the silver(I) complexes play the role of a carrier of the silver(I) ion to the biological system.

  3. Heterodinuclear Ni(ii) and Cu(ii) Schiff base complexes and their activity in oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Realista, Sara; Ramgi, Priscila; Cardoso, Bernardo de P; Melato, Ana I; Viana, Ana S; Calhorda, Maria José; Martinho, Paulo N

    2016-10-07

    New Cu(ii)/Ni(ii) heterodinuclear complexes with salphen-type ligands were synthesised via a stepwise template method. DFT studies were performed to understand their electronic properties, showing localisation of the HOMO on the Ni(ii) fragment, while in the oxidised species the spin density was high at some carbon phenolate atoms. These new complexes were potentiodynamically electropolymerised on glassy carbon and platinum. Atomic force microscopy was used to evaluate the influence of the metal centres on the morphology of the polymers, revealing how the presence of Cu(ii) increased the surface roughness. The oxygen reduction reaction was observed on both glassy carbon and platinum modified electrodes in neutral medium.

  4. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and respiratory complex activity in rats with pressure overload-induced heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzer, Michael; Osterholt, Moritz; Lunkenbein, Anne; Schrepper, Andrea; Amorim, Paulo; Doenst, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the impact of cardiac reactive oxygen species (ROS) during the development of pressure overload-induced heart failure. We used our previously described rat model where transverse aortic constriction (TAC) induces compensated hypertrophy after 2 weeks, heart failure with preserved ejection fraction at 6 and 10 weeks, and heart failure with systolic dysfunction after 20 weeks. We measured mitochondrial ROS production rates, ROS damage and assessed the therapeutic potential of in vivo antioxidant therapies. In compensated hypertrophy (2 weeks of TAC) ROS production rates were normal at both mitochondrial ROS production sites (complexes I and III). Complex I ROS production rates increased with the appearance of diastolic dysfunction (6 weeks of TAC) and remained high thereafter. Surprisingly, maximal ROS production at complex III peaked at 6 weeks of pressure overload. Mitochondrial respiratory capacity (state 3 respiration) was elevated 2 and 6 weeks after TAC, decreased after this point and was significantly impaired at 20 weeks, when contractile function was also impaired and ROS damage was found with increased hydroxynonenal. Treatment with the ROS scavenger α-phenyl-N-tert-butyl nitrone or the uncoupling agent dinitrophenol significantly reduced ROS production rates at 6 weeks. Despite the decline in ROS production capacity, no differences in contractile function between treated and untreated animals were observed. Increased ROS production occurs early in the development of heart failure with a peak at the onset of diastolic dysfunction. However, ROS production may not be related to the onset of contractile dysfunction. PMID:24951621

  5. Cobalt(II) Ammine Complexes as Reversible Absorbers of Oxygen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saito, Kazuo; Ogino, Kazuko

    1988-01-01

    Describes experiments designed to measure the oxygen content in the atmosphere and related areas in the high school laboratories. Considers the application of these activities to other programs. Includes a description of the binuclear complex and recommended procedures. (CW)

  6. Cobalt(II) Ammine Complexes as Reversible Absorbers of Oxygen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saito, Kazuo; Ogino, Kazuko

    1988-01-01

    Describes experiments designed to measure the oxygen content in the atmosphere and related areas in the high school laboratories. Considers the application of these activities to other programs. Includes a description of the binuclear complex and recommended procedures. (CW)

  7. Proton coupled electron transfer and redox-active tyrosine Z in the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex.

    PubMed

    Keough, James M; Jenson, David L; Zuniga, Ashley N; Barry, Bridgette A

    2011-07-27

    Proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions play an essential role in many enzymatic processes. In PCET, redox-active tyrosines may be involved as intermediates when the oxidized phenolic side chain deprotonates. Photosystem II (PSII) is an excellent framework for studying PCET reactions, because it contains two redox-active tyrosines, YD and YZ, with different roles in catalysis. One of the redox-active tyrosines, YZ, is essential for oxygen evolution and is rapidly reduced by the manganese-catalytic site. In this report, we investigate the mechanism of YZ PCET in oxygen-evolving PSII. To isolate YZ(•) reactions, but retain the manganese-calcium cluster, low temperatures were used to block the oxidation of the metal cluster, high microwave powers were used to saturate the YD(•) EPR signal, and YZ(•) decay kinetics were measured with EPR spectroscopy. Analysis of the pH and solvent isotope dependence was performed. The rate of YZ(•) decay exhibited a significant solvent isotope effect, and the rate of recombination and the solvent isotope effect were pH independent from pH 5.0 to 7.5. These results are consistent with a rate-limiting, coupled proton electron transfer (CPET) reaction and are contrasted to results obtained for YD(•) decay kinetics at low pH. This effect may be mediated by an extensive hydrogen-bond network around YZ. These experiments imply that PCET reactions distinguish the two PSII redox-active tyrosines.

  8. Oxygen binding and activation by the complexes of PY2- and TPA-appended diphenylglycoluril receptors with copper and other metals.

    PubMed

    Sprakel, Vera S I; Feiters, Martin C; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Klopstra, Marten; Brinksma, Jelle; Feringa, Ben L; Karlin, Kenneth D; Nolte, Roeland J M

    2005-11-07

    The copper(I) complexes of diphenylglycoluril basket receptors and , appended with bis(2-ethylpyridine)amine (PY2) and tris(2-methylpyridine)amine (TPA), respectively, and their dioxygen adducts were studied with low-temperature UV-vis and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The copper(I) complex of, [.Cu(I)2] or, forms a micro-eta2:eta2 dioxygen complex, whereas the copper(I) complex of, [.Cu(I)2] or, does not form a well defined dioxygen complex, but is oxidized to Cu(II). Dioxygen is bound irreversibly to and the formed complex is stable over time. The coordination geometries of the above complexes were determined by XAS, which revealed that pyridyl groups and amine N-donors participate in the coordination to Cu(I) ions in the complexes of both receptors. The catalytic activities of various metal complexes of and , that were designed as mimics of dinuclear copper enzymes that can activate dioxygen, were investigated. Phenolic substrates that were expected to undergo aromatic hydroxylation, showed oxidative polymerization without insertion of oxygen. The mechanism of this polymerization turns out to be a radical coupling reaction as was established by experiments with the model substrate 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol. In addition to Cu(II), the Mn(III) complex of and the Fe(II) complex of were tested as oxidation catalysts. Oxidation of catechol was observed for the Cu(II) complex of receptor but the other metal complexes did not lead to oxidation.

  9. Singlet Oxygen Generation by Cyclometalated Complexes and Applications†

    PubMed Central

    Ashen-Garry, David; Selke, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    While cyclometalated complexes have been extensively studied for optoelectronic applications, these compounds also represent a relatively new class of photosensitizers for the production of singlet oxygen. Thus far, singlet oxygen generation from cyclometalated Ir and Pt complexes has been studied in detail. In this review, photophysical data for singlet oxygen generation from these complexes is presented, and the mechanism of 1O2 generation is discussed, including evidence for singlet oxygen generation via an electron transfer mechanism for some of cyclometalated Ir complexes. The period from the first report of singlet oxygen generation by a cyclometalated Ir complex in 2002 through August 2013 is covered in this review. This new class of singlet oxygen photosensitizers may prove to be rather versatile due to the ease of substitution of ancillary ligands without loss of activity. Several cyclometalated complexes have been tethered to zeolites, polystyrene, or quantum dots. Applications for photooxygenation of organic molecules, including “traditional” singlet oxygen reactions (ene reaction, [4+2] and [2+2] cycloadditions) as well as oxidative coupling of amines are presented. Potential biomedical applications are also reviewed. PMID:24344628

  10. Singlet oxygen generation by cyclometalated complexes and applications.

    PubMed

    Ashen-Garry, David; Selke, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    While cyclometalated complexes have been extensively studied for optoelectronic applications, these compounds also represent a relatively new class of photosensitizers for the production of singlet oxygen. Thus far, singlet oxygen generation from cyclometalated Ir and Pt complexes has been studied in detail. In this review, photophysical data for singlet oxygen generation from these complexes are presented, and the mechanism of (1) O2 generation is discussed, including evidence for singlet oxygen generation via an electron-transfer mechanism for some of cyclometalated Ir complexes. The period from the first report of singlet oxygen generation by a cyclometalated Ir complex in 2002 through August 2013 is covered in this review. This new class of singlet oxygen photosensitizers may prove to be rather versatile due to the ease of substitution of ancillary ligands without loss of activity. Several cyclometalated complexes have been tethered to zeolites, polystyrene, or quantum dots. Applications for photooxygenation of organic molecules, including "traditional" singlet oxygen reactions (ene reaction, [4 + 2] and [2 + 2] cycloadditions) as well as oxidative coupling of amines are presented. Potential biomedical applications are also reviewed. © 2013 The American Society of Photobiology.

  11. Curcumin prevents maleate-induced nephrotoxicity: relation to hemodynamic alterations, oxidative stress, mitochondrial oxygen consumption and activity of respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Tapia, E; Sánchez-Lozada, L G; García-Niño, W R; García, E; Cerecedo, A; García-Arroyo, F E; Osorio, H; Arellano, A; Cristóbal-García, M; Loredo, M L; Molina-Jijón, E; Hernández-Damián, J; Negrette-Guzmán, M; Zazueta, C; Huerta-Yepez, S; Reyes, J L; Madero, M; Pedraza-Chaverrí, J

    2014-11-01

    The potential protective effect of the dietary antioxidant curcumin (120 mg/Kg/day for 6 days) against the renal injury induced by maleate was evaluated. Tubular proteinuria and oxidative stress were induced by a single injection of maleate (400 mg/kg) in rats. Maleate-induced renal injury included increase in renal vascular resistance and in the urinary excretion of total protein, glucose, sodium, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) and N-acetyl β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), upregulation of kidney injury molecule (KIM)-1, decrease in renal blood flow and claudin-2 expression besides of necrosis and apoptosis of tubular cells on 24 h. Oxidative stress was determined by measuring the oxidation of lipids and proteins and diminution in renal Nrf2 levels. Studies were also conducted in renal epithelial LLC-PK1 cells and in mitochondria isolated from kidneys of all the experimental groups. Maleate induced cell damage and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in LLC-PK1 cells in culture. In addition, maleate treatment reduced oxygen consumption in ADP-stimulated mitochondria and diminished respiratory control index when using malate/glutamate as substrate. The activities of both complex I and aconitase were also diminished. All the above-described alterations were prevented by curcumin. It is concluded that curcumin is able to attenuate in vivo maleate-induced nephropathy and in vitro cell damage. The in vivo protection was associated to the prevention of oxidative stress and preservation of mitochondrial oxygen consumption and activity of respiratory complex I, and the in vitro protection was associated to the prevention of ROS production.

  12. Ligand-based photooxidations of dithiomaltolato complexes of Ru(II) and Zn(II): photolytic CH activation and evidence of singlet oxygen generation and quenching.

    PubMed

    Bruner, Britain; Walker, Malin Backlund; Ghimire, Mukunda M; Zhang, Dong; Selke, Matthias; Klausmeyer, Kevin K; Omary, Mohammad A; Farmer, Patrick J

    2014-08-14

    The complex [Ru(bpy)2(ttma)](+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine; ttma = 3-hydroxy-2-methyl-thiopyran-4-thionate, 1, has previously been shown to undergo an unusual C-H activation of the dithiomaltolato ligand upon outer-sphere oxidation. The reaction generated alcohol and aldehyde products 2 and 3 from C-H oxidation of the pendant methyl group. In this report, we demonstrate that the same products are formed upon photolysis of 1 in presence of mild oxidants such as methyl viologen, [Ru(NH3)6](3+) and [Co(NH3)5Cl](2+), which do not oxidize 1 in the dark. This reactivity is engendered only upon excitation into an absorption band attributed to the ttma ligand. Analogous experiments with the homoleptic Zn(ttma)2, 4, also result in reduction of electron acceptors upon excitation of the ttma absorption band. Complexes 1 and 4 exhibit short-lived visible fluorescence and long-lived near-infrared phosphorescence bands. Singlet oxygen is both generated and quenched during aerobic excitation of 1 or 4, but is not involved in the C-H activation process.

  13. Design of a highly efficient and wide pH electro-Fenton oxidation system with molecular oxygen activated by ferrous-tetrapolyphosphate complex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Cao, Menghua; Ai, Zhihui; Zhang, Lizhi

    2015-03-03

    In this study, a novel electro-Fenton (EF) system was developed with iron wire, activated carbon fiber, and sodium tetrapolyphosphate (Na6TPP) as the anode, cathode, and electrolyte, respectively. This Na6TPP-EF system could efficiently degrade atrazine in a wide pH range of 4.0-10.2. The utilization of Na6TPP instead of Na2SO4 as the electrolyte enhanced the atrazine degradation rate by 130 times at an initial pH of 8.0. This dramatic enhancement was attributed to the formation of ferrous-tetrapolyphosphate (Fe(II)-TPP) complex from the electrochemical corrosion (ECC) and chemical corrosion (CC) of iron electrode in the presence of Na6TPP. The Fe(II)-TPP complex could provide an additional molecular oxygen activation pathway to produce more H2O2 and (•)OH via a series single-electron transfer processes, producing the Fe(III)-TPP complex. The cycle of Fe(II)/Fe(III) was easily realized through the electrochemical reduction (ECR) process on the cathode. More interestingly, we found that the presence of Na6TPP could prevent the iron electrode from excessive corrosion via phosphorization in the later stage of the Na6TPP-EF process, avoiding the generation of iron sludge. Gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and ion chromatography were used to investigate the degradation intermediates to propose a possible atrazine oxidation pathway in the Na6TPP-EF system. These interesting findings provide some new insight on the development of a low-cost and highly efficient EF system for wastewater treatment in a wide pH range.

  14. In vitro effect of copper chloride exposure on reactive oxygen species generation and respiratory chain complex activities of mitochondria isolated from broiler liver.

    PubMed

    Su, Rongsheng; Wang, Rongmei; Guo, Shining; Cao, Huabin; Pan, Jiaqiang; Li, Chengmei; Shi, Dayou; Tang, Zhaoxin

    2011-12-01

    This study is to examine if Cu(2+) can act directly on mitochondria or indirectly by producing reactive oxygen species (ROS), isolated broiler hepatic mitochondria were exposed to different concentrations of Cu(2+) (10, 30, 50 μM). Respiratory chain complex activities, ROS generation, respiratory control ratio (RCR) and mitochondrial membrane potential were investigated. Dose-dependent inhibition of respiratory chain complexes and induction of ROS were observed, which coincided with decreasing RCR both with glutamate + malate or succinate. Further investigation indicated that the membrane potential determined by rhodamine 123 release decreased after CuCl(2) exposure at 30 and 50 μM. In addition, the effects of the antioxidants NAC (200 μM) and GSH (200 μM) were studied at 50 μM Cu(2+). The results indicate that Cu can induce mitochondrial dysfunction in excessive dose and the effect of Cu(2+) exposure on respiratory chain is not site-specific, and antioxidants can protect the mitochondrial function by reducing the formation of free radicals.

  15. Active oxygen doctors the evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelló, Ana; Francès, Francesc; Corella, Dolores; Verdú, Fernando

    2009-02-01

    Investigation at the scene of a crime begins with the search for clues. In the case of bloodstains, the most frequently used reagents are luminol and reduced phenolphthalein (or phenolphthalin that is also known as the Kastle-Meyer colour test). The limitations of these reagents have been studied and are well known. Household cleaning products have evolved with the times, and new products with active oxygen are currently widely used, as they are considered to be highly efficient at removing all kinds of stains on a wide range of surfaces. In this study, we investigated the possible effects of these new cleaning products on latent bloodstains that may be left at a scene of a crime. To do so, various fabrics were stained with blood and then washed using cleaning agents containing active oxygen. The results of reduced phenolphthalein, luminol and human haemoglobin tests on the washed fabrics were negative. The conclusion is that these new products alter blood to such an extent that it can no longer be detected by currently accepted methods employed in criminal investigations. This inability to locate bloodstains means that highly important evidence (e.g. a DNA profile) may be lost. Consequently, it is important that investigators are aware of this problem so as to compensate for it.

  16. Active oxygen doctors the evidence.

    PubMed

    Castelló, Ana; Francès, Francesc; Corella, Dolores; Verdú, Fernando

    2009-02-01

    Investigation at the scene of a crime begins with the search for clues. In the case of bloodstains, the most frequently used reagents are luminol and reduced phenolphthalein (or phenolphthalin that is also known as the Kastle-Meyer colour test). The limitations of these reagents have been studied and are well known. Household cleaning products have evolved with the times, and new products with active oxygen are currently widely used, as they are considered to be highly efficient at removing all kinds of stains on a wide range of surfaces. In this study, we investigated the possible effects of these new cleaning products on latent bloodstains that may be left at a scene of a crime. To do so, various fabrics were stained with blood and then washed using cleaning agents containing active oxygen. The results of reduced phenolphthalein, luminol and human haemoglobin tests on the washed fabrics were negative. The conclusion is that these new products alter blood to such an extent that it can no longer be detected by currently accepted methods employed in criminal investigations. This inability to locate bloodstains means that highly important evidence (e.g. a DNA profile) may be lost. Consequently, it is important that investigators are aware of this problem so as to compensate for it.

  17. Oxygen Radical Scavenger Activity, EPR, NMR, Molecular Mechanics and Extended-Hückel Molecular Orbital Investigation of the Bis(Piroxicam)Copper(II) Complex

    PubMed Central

    Pogni, Rebecca; Basosi, Riccardo; Donati, Alessandro; Rossi, Claudio; Sabadini, Luciano; Rollo, Libertario; Lorenzini, Sauro; Gelli, Renata; Marcolongo, Roberto

    1995-01-01

    The oxygen radical scavenger activity (ORSA) of [CuII(Pir)2] (HPir = Piroxicam = 4-hydroxy -2- methyl -N-2- pyridyl -2H- 1,2-benzothiazine -3- carboxamide 1,1-dioxide) was determined by chemiluminescence of samples obtained by mixing human neutrophils (from healthy subjects) and [CuII(Pir)2(DMF)2] (DMF = N,N -dimethylformammide) in DMSO/GLY/PBS (2:1:2, v/v) solution (DMSO = dimethylsulfoxide, GLY = 1,2,3-propantriol, PBS = Dulbecco’s buffer salt solution). The ratio of the residual radicals, for the HPir (1.02·10−4M) and [CuII(Pir)2(DMF)2] (1.08·10−5M)/HPir (8.01·10−−5M) systems was higher than 12 (not stimulated) [excess of piroxicam was added (Cu/Pir molar ratio ≈1:10) in order to have most of the metal complexed as bischelate]. In contrast, the ratio of residual radicals for the CuCl2 (1.00·10−5M) and [CuII(Pir)2(DMF)2] (1.08·10−5M)/Hpir (8.01·10−5M)system was 5. The [CuII(Pir)2] compound is therefore a stronger radical scavenger than either HPir or CuCl2. A molecular mechanics (MM) analysis of the gas phase structures of neutral HPir, its zwitterionic (HPir+-) and anionic (Pir-) forms, and some CuII-piroxicam complexes based on X-ray structures allowed calculation of force constants. The most stable structure for HPir has a ZZZ conformation similar to that found in the CuII (and CdII complexes) in the solid state as well as in the gas phase. The structure is stabilized by a strong H bond which involves the N(amide)-H and O(enolic) groups. The MM simulation for the [CuII(Pir)2(DMF)2] complex showed that two high repulsive intramolecular contacts exist between a pyridyl hydrogen atom of one Pir- molecule with the O donor of the other ligand. These interactions activate a transition toward a pseudo-tetrahedral geometry, in the case the apical ligands are removed. On refluxing a suspension of [CuII(Pir)2(DMF)2] in acetone a brown microcystalline solid with the Cu(Pir)2·0.5DMF stoichiometry was in fact prepared. 13C spin-lattice relaxation

  18. Probing oxygen activation sites in two flavoprotein oxidases using chloride as an oxygen surrogate.

    PubMed

    Kommoju, Phaneeswara-Rao; Chen, Zhi-wei; Bruckner, Robert C; Mathews, F Scott; Jorns, Marilyn Schuman

    2011-06-21

    A single basic residue above the si-face of the flavin ring is the site of oxygen activation in glucose oxidase (GOX) (His516) and monomeric sarcosine oxidase (MSOX) (Lys265). Crystal structures of both flavoenzymes exhibit a small pocket at the oxygen activation site that might provide a preorganized binding site for superoxide anion, an obligatory intermediate in the two-electron reduction of oxygen. Chloride binds at these polar oxygen activation sites, as judged by solution and structural studies. First, chloride forms spectrally detectable complexes with GOX and MSOX. The protonated form of His516 is required for tight binding of chloride to oxidized GOX and for rapid reaction of reduced GOX with oxygen. Formation of a binary MSOX·chloride complex requires Lys265 and is not observed with Lys265Met. Binding of chloride to MSOX does not affect the binding of a sarcosine analogue (MTA, methylthioactetate) above the re-face of the flavin ring. Definitive evidence is provided by crystal structures determined for a binary MSOX·chloride complex and a ternary MSOX·chloride·MTA complex. Chloride binds in the small pocket at a position otherwise occupied by a water molecule and forms hydrogen bonds to four ligands that are arranged in approximate tetrahedral geometry: Lys265:NZ, Arg49:NH1, and two water molecules, one of which is hydrogen bonded to FAD:N5. The results show that chloride (i) acts as an oxygen surrogate, (ii) is an effective probe of polar oxygen activation sites, and (iii) provides a valuable complementary tool to the xenon gas method that is used to map nonpolar oxygen-binding cavities.

  19. Probing Oxygen Activation Sites in Two Flavoprotein Oxidases Using Chloride as an Oxygen Surrogate

    SciTech Connect

    Kommoju, Phaneeswara-Rao; Chen, Zhi-wei; Bruckner, Robert C.; Mathews, F. Scott; Jorns, Marilyn Schuman

    2011-08-16

    A single basic residue above the si-face of the flavin ring is the site of oxygen activation in glucose oxidase (GOX) (His516) and monomeric sarcosine oxidase (MSOX) (Lys265). Crystal structures of both flavoenzymes exhibit a small pocket at the oxygen activation site that might provide a preorganized binding site for superoxide anion, an obligatory intermediate in the two-electron reduction of oxygen. Chloride binds at these polar oxygen activation sites, as judged by solution and structural studies. First, chloride forms spectrally detectable complexes with GOX and MSOX. The protonated form of His516 is required for tight binding of chloride to oxidized GOX and for rapid reaction of reduced GOX with oxygen. Formation of a binary MSOX-chloride complex requires Lys265 and is not observed with Lys265Met. Binding of chloride to MSOX does not affect the binding of a sarcosine analogue (MTA, methylthioactetate) above the re-face of the flavin ring. Definitive evidence is provided by crystal structures determined for a binary MSOX-chloride complex and a ternary MSOX-chloride-MTA complex. Chloride binds in the small pocket at a position otherwise occupied by a water molecule and forms hydrogen bonds to four ligands that are arranged in approximate tetrahedral geometry: Lys265:NZ, Arg49:NH1, and two water molecules, one of which is hydrogen bonded to FAD:N5. The results show that chloride (i) acts as an oxygen surrogate, (ii) is an effective probe of polar oxygen activation sites, and (iii) provides a valuable complementary tool to the xenon gas method that is used to map nonpolar oxygen-binding cavities.

  20. The rise of oxygen and complex life.

    PubMed

    Van Der Giezen, Mark; Lenton, Timothy M

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria have been put forward as the saviours of anaerobes when their environment became oxygenated. However, despite oxygenic photosynthesis evolving around 2.7 billion years ago (Ga), followed by the "Great Oxidation" of the atmosphere ~ 2.4 Ga, the deep oceans remained largely anoxic and either iron-enriched or sulphidic until 580 million years ago, when the eukaryotic radiation was well underway. Atmospheric oxygen probably remained at an intermediate concentration (1-10% of the present level) from ~ 2.4 until ~ 0.8 Ga when a "lesser oxidation" began. This drastically changes the textbook view of the ecological conditions under which the mitochondrial endosymbiont established itself. It could explain the widespread distribution of anaerobic biochemistry in every eukaryotic supergroup: anaerobic biochemistry is hard-wired into the eukaryotes. © 2012 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2012 International Society of Protistologists.

  1. Unveiling the Reactivity of a Synthetic Mimic of the Oxygen Evolving Complex.

    PubMed

    Raucci, Umberto; Ciofini, Ilaria; Adamo, Carlo; Rega, Nadia

    2016-12-15

    We simulated for the first time the oxygen-oxygen bond formation in a synthetic calcium-tetra manganese complex recently developed by Zhang and co-workers. In spite of promising structural similarities to the native oxygen evolving complex (OEC) in Photosystem II, several uncertainties on the mimic stability in water and on its potential catalytic activity still persist. Here, we characterized at density functional theory level the electronic and structural features of the Sn states of the complex, along with the oxygen-oxygen bond formation reaction, proposing a reasonable model for the hydrate complex. As a main finding, both the synthetic compound and the natural OEC show very close energetic barriers for the oxo-oxyl coupling process, suggesting that key electronic features of the natural OEC reactivity are well reproduced. This result strongly encourages the use of this synthetic complex in combination with other molecular assemblies for the design of successful artificial leaves.

  2. Oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II: better than excellent.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Govindjee

    2011-09-28

    The Oxygen Evolving Complex in photosystem II, which is responsible for the oxidation of water to oxygen in plants, algae and cyanobacteria, contains a cluster of one calcium and four manganese atoms. This cluster serves as a model for the splitting of water by energy obtained from sunlight. The recent published data on the mechanism and the structure of photosystem II provide a detailed architecture of the oxygen-evolving complex and the surrounding amino acids. Biomimetically, we expect to learn some strategies from this natural system to synthesize an efficient catalyst for water oxidation, that is necessary for artificial photosynthesis.

  3. Complex cellular responses to reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Temple, Mark D; Perrone, Gabriel G; Dawes, Ian W

    2005-06-01

    Genome-wide analyses of yeast provide insight into cellular responses to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Many deletion mutants are sensitive to at least one ROS, but no one oxidant is representative of 'oxidative stress' despite the widespread use of a single compound such as H(2)O(2). This has major implications for studies of pathological situations. Cells have a range of mechanisms for maintaining resistance that involves either induction or repression of many genes and extensive remodeling of the transcriptome. Cells have constitutive defense systems that are largely unique to each oxidant, but overlapping, inducible repair systems. The pattern of the transcriptional response to a particular ROS depends on its concentration, and 'classical' antioxidant systems that are induced by high concentrations of ROS can be repressed when cells adapt to low concentrations of ROS.

  4. Hyperbaric Oxygen Environment Can Enhance Brain Activity and Multitasking Performance.

    PubMed

    Vadas, Dor; Kalichman, Leonid; Hadanny, Amir; Efrati, Shai

    2017-01-01

    Background: The Brain uses 20% of the total oxygen supply consumed by the entire body. Even though, <10% of the brain is active at any given time, it utilizes almost all the oxygen delivered. In order to perform complex tasks or more than one task (multitasking), the oxygen supply is shifted from one brain region to another, via blood perfusion modulation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether a hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) environment, with increased oxygen supply to the brain, will enhance the performance of complex and/or multiple activities. Methods: A prospective, double-blind randomized control, crossover trial including 22 healthy volunteers. Participants were asked to perform a cognitive task, a motor task and a simultaneous cognitive-motor task (multitasking). Participants were randomized to perform the tasks in two environments: (a) normobaric air (1 ATA 21% oxygen) (b) HBO (2 ATA 100% oxygen). Two weeks later participants were crossed to the alternative environment. Blinding of the normobaric environment was achieved in the same chamber with masks on while hyperbaric sensation was simulated by increasing pressure in the first minute and gradually decreasing to normobaric environment prior to tasks performance. Results: Compared to the performance at normobaric conditions, both cognitive and motor single tasks scores were significantly enhanced by HBO environment (p < 0.001 for both). Multitasking performance was also significantly enhanced in HBO environment (p = 0.006 for the cognitive part and p = 0.02 for the motor part). Conclusions: The improvement in performance of both single and multi-tasking while in an HBO environment supports the hypothesis which according to, oxygen is indeed a rate limiting factor for brain activity. Hyperbaric oxygenation can serve as an environment for brain performance. Further studies are needed to evaluate the optimal oxygen levels for maximal brain performance.

  5. Oxygen in activator centers of zinc sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Golobeva, N.P.; Fok, M.V.

    1986-05-01

    The authors observed the sensitized luminescence of Tm and Dy without addition of Cu and Ag in samples which had been obtained by the sulfonation of zinc sulfide in hydrogen sulfide; the zinc sulfide has a copper concentration below 5.10/sup -6/ mass %. In this case the excitation can be transmitted from the ZnS lattice to the rare-earth activators mainly through defects including oxygen. The following conclusions were made. In the case of activated ZnS, oxygen is present in formations accounting for the excitation and luminescence of a number of luminophors. When an activator is introduced in the region of ZnS layer faults, where also the oxygen must be located, the positioning of the faults in close vicinity is facilitated even when the oxygen concentration of the ZnS is low. All this must be considered when models of luminescence centers of zinc sulfide are developed.

  6. Mitochondrial alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex generates reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Starkov, Anatoly A; Fiskum, Gary; Chinopoulos, Christos; Lorenzo, Beverly J; Browne, Susan E; Patel, Mulchand S; Beal, M Flint

    2004-09-08

    Mitochondria-produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) are thought to contribute to cell death caused by a multitude of pathological conditions. The molecular sites of mitochondrial ROS production are not well established but are generally thought to be located in complex I and complex III of the electron transport chain. We measured H(2)O(2) production, respiration, and NADPH reduction level in rat brain mitochondria oxidizing a variety of respiratory substrates. Under conditions of maximum respiration induced with either ADP or carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone,alpha-ketoglutarate supported the highest rate of H(2)O(2) production. In the absence of ADP or in the presence of rotenone, H(2)O(2) production rates correlated with the reduction level of mitochondrial NADPH with various substrates, with the exception of alpha-ketoglutarate. Isolated mitochondrial alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (KGDHC) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDHC) complexes produced superoxide and H(2)O(2). NAD(+) inhibited ROS production by the isolated enzymes and by permeabilized mitochondria. We also measured H(2)O(2) production by brain mitochondria isolated from heterozygous knock-out mice deficient in dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (Dld). Although this enzyme is a part of both KGDHC and PDHC, there was greater impairment of KGDHC activity in Dld-deficient mitochondria. These mitochondria also produced significantly less H(2)O(2) than mitochondria isolated from their littermate wild-type mice. The data strongly indicate that KGDHC is a primary site of ROS production in normally functioning mitochondria.

  7. Photoelectric responses of oxygen-evolving complexes of photosystem II

    PubMed

    Mamedov; Beshta; Gurovskaya; Mamedova; Neverov; Samuilov; Semenov

    1999-05-01

    The generation of a transmembrane electric potential difference induced by a series of laser flashes was studied by the direct electrometrical method in proteoliposomes containing oxygen-evolving particles of photosystem II. In addition to the fast stage of generation of the membrane potential, which is due to electron transfer from the redox active tyrosine residue Tyr-161 (YZ) to the primary quinone acceptor QA, electrogenic stages corresponding to the S1 --> S2 (tau = 30 &mgr;sec), S2 --> S3 (tau = 240 &mgr;sec), and S3 --> S4 --> S0 (tau = 6.2 msec) transitions of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) were observed. The amplitudes of the photoelectric responses show that the contribution of the OEC to the overall electrogenicity is small. The parameters of the electrogenic reactions of the OEC as measured in photosystem II preparations containing the peripheral proteins of 23 and 17 kD were similar to those of photosystem II preparations devoid of these peptides. It is concluded that neither the 23- nor the 17-kD proteins are involved in the electrogenic reactions of the OEC.

  8. Enantiotopos-selective C-H oxygenation catalyzed by a supramolecular ruthenium complex.

    PubMed

    Frost, James R; Huber, Stefan M; Breitenlechner, Stefan; Bannwarth, Christoph; Bach, Thorsten

    2015-01-07

    Spirocyclic oxindoles undergo an enantioselective oxygenation reaction (nine examples; e.r. up to 97:3) upon catalysis by a chiral ruthenium porphyrin complex (1 mol %). The catalyst exhibits a lactam ring, which is responsible for substrate association through hydrogen bonds, and an active ruthenium center, which is in a defined spatial relationship to the oxygenation substrate. DFT calculations illustrate the perfect alignment of the active site with the reactive C-H bond and suggest--in line with the kinetic isotope effect--an oxygen rebound mechanism for the reaction.

  9. Catalytic Oxygen Evolution by a Bioinorganic Model of the Photosystem II Oxygen-Evolving Complex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Derrick L.; Tinoco, Arthur D.; Brudvig, Gary W.; Vrettos, John S.; Allen, Bertha Connie

    2005-01-01

    Bioinorganic models of the manganese Mn4 cluster are important not only as aids in understanding the structure and function of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), but also in developing artificial water-oxidation catalysts. The mechanism of water oxidation by photosystem II (PSII) is thought to involve the formation of a high-valent terminal Mn-oxo…

  10. Catalytic Oxygen Evolution by a Bioinorganic Model of the Photosystem II Oxygen-Evolving Complex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Derrick L.; Tinoco, Arthur D.; Brudvig, Gary W.; Vrettos, John S.; Allen, Bertha Connie

    2005-01-01

    Bioinorganic models of the manganese Mn4 cluster are important not only as aids in understanding the structure and function of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), but also in developing artificial water-oxidation catalysts. The mechanism of water oxidation by photosystem II (PSII) is thought to involve the formation of a high-valent terminal Mn-oxo…

  11. The coupling of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism with brain activation is similar for simple and complex stimuli in human primary visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Griffeth, Valerie E M; Simon, Aaron B; Buxton, Richard B

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative functional MRI (fMRI) experiments to measure blood flow and oxygen metabolism coupling in the brain typically rely on simple repetitive stimuli. Here we compared such stimuli with a more naturalistic stimulus. Previous work on the primary visual cortex showed that direct attentional modulation evokes a blood flow (CBF) response with a relatively large oxygen metabolism (CMRO2) response in comparison to an unattended stimulus, which evokes a much smaller metabolic response relative to the flow response. We hypothesized that a similar effect would be associated with a more engaging stimulus, and tested this by measuring the primary human visual cortex response to two contrast levels of a radial flickering checkerboard in comparison to the response to free viewing of brief movie clips. We did not find a significant difference in the blood flow-metabolism coupling (n=%ΔCBF/%ΔCMRO2) between the movie stimulus and the flickering checkerboards employing two different analysis methods: a standard analysis using the Davis model and a new analysis using a heuristic model dependent only on measured quantities. This finding suggests that in the primary visual cortex a naturalistic stimulus (in comparison to a simple repetitive stimulus) is either not sufficient to provoke a change in flow-metabolism coupling by attentional modulation as hypothesized, that the experimental design disrupted the cognitive processes underlying the response to a more natural stimulus, or that the technique used is not sensitive enough to detect a small difference.

  12. Oxygenation via C-H/C-C Bond Activation with Molecular Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yu-Feng; Jiao, Ning

    2017-07-18

    The selective oxidation of organic molecules is a fundamentally important component of modern synthetic chemistry. In the past decades, direct oxidative C-H and C-C bond functionalization has proved to be one of the most efficient and straightforward methods to synthesize complex products from simple and readily available starting materials. Among these oxidative processes, the use of molecular oxygen as a green and sustainable oxidant has attracted considerable attention because of its highly atom-economical, abundant, and environmentally friendly characteristics. The development of new protocols using molecular oxygen as an ideal oxidant is highly desirable in oxidation chemistry. More importantly, the oxygenation reaction of simple molecules using molecular oxygen as the oxygen source offers one of the most ideal processes for the construction of O-containing compounds. Aerobic oxidation and oxygenation by enzymes, such as monooxygenase, tyrosinase, and dopamine β-monooxygenase, have been observed in some biological C-H bond hydroxylation processes. Encouraged by these biological transformations, transition-metal- or organocatalyst-catalyzed oxygenation through dioxygen activation has attracted academic and industrial prospects. In this Account, we describe some advances from our group in oxygenation via C-H/C-C bond activation with molecular oxygen as the oxidant and oxygen source for the synthesis of O-containing compounds. Under an atmosphere of O2 (1 atm) or air (1 atm), we have successfully incorporated one or two O atoms from O2 into simple and readily available substrates through C-H, C-C, C═C, and C≡C bond cleavage by transition-metal catalysis, organocatalysis, and photocatalysis. Moreover, we have devised cyclization reactions with molecular oxygen to construct O-heterocycles. Most of these transformations can tolerate a broad range of functional groups. Furthermore, on the basis of isotope labeling experiments, electron paramagnetic resonance

  13. Clinical Effectiveness of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in Complex Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Opasanon, Supaporn; Pongsapich, Warut; Taweepraditpol, Sitthichoke; Suktitipat, Bhoom; Chuangsuwanich, Apirag

    2015-01-01

    Hyperbaric Oxygen (HBO, HBO2) Therapy is a non-invasive therapy. It has been applied as adjuvant treatment in many medical conditions over the past 50 years. Different treatment protocols have been proven effective for specifically indicated conditions. To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of Hyperbaric Oxygen (HBO) Therapy as an adjunctive treatment for patients with complex wounds. In this prospective cohort study, 40 patients with complex wounds were included. All patients received HBO. HBO was delivered with 100% oxygen for 90 min at 2.0–2.4 ATA. Wound sizes were assessed by one wound surgeon before, during, and every 2 weeks for a total of 12 months after HBO. An analysis of demographic data, wound size and wound photography was performed. Over the 22-month period ending October 31, 2013, 40 patients (21 men and 19 women) with a mean age of 59.73 (range, 29–88) with complex wounds were included. All complex wounds studied were at least 6 months old. The mean wound size was 16.72 cm2 in diameter. Thirty-one patients with complex wounds healed after the completion of a series of HBO treatments (77.5%). Two orocutaneous fistulas were completely closed without further surgery. After 5 HBO treatments, the wound size reduced by 29.7% on average (p = 1.24 × 10−6). After 10 HBO treatments, the wound size statistically significantly reduced by an additional 16.9% (p = 0.0002). There were no complications in this study. Wound healing process was accelerated by HBO. Significant wound size reduction was noted after 5 HBO treatments. Because the biggest reduction in wound size occurred within the first 10 HBO treatments, it is important to conduct these first treatments without interruption. HBO is an effective and safe treatment modality for complex wounds. PMID:26442206

  14. Activation parameters for cyclohexene oxygenation by an oxoiron(IV) porphyrin pi-cation radical complex: entropy control of an allylic hydroxylation reaction.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Akihiro; Kurahashi, Takuya; Fujii, Hiroshi

    2007-08-06

    Activation parameters for epoxidation and allylic hydroxylation reactions of cyclohexene with FeIVO(TMP)*+Cl (1) were determined. Within the experimental temperature range, the epoxidation reaction was enthalpy-controlled (i.e., DeltaH > -TDeltaS), while the allylic hydroxylation reaction was entropy-controlled (i.e., -TDeltaS > DeltaH). An unexpectedly large contribution of the entropy term for the allylic hydroxylation reaction indicated that the free energy of activation, DeltaG, rather than the activation energy, Ea, should be used to discuss the reaction mechanism and chemoselectivity. The results of this study bring caution to previous density functional theory studies, in which the reaction mechanism and chemoselectivity are evaluated from calculated Ea.

  15. Biochar activated by oxygen plasma for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Rakesh Kumar; Dubey, Mukul; Kharel, Parashu; Gu, Zhengrong; Fan, Qi Hua

    2015-01-01

    Biochar, also known as black carbon, is a byproduct of biomass pyrolysis. As a low-cost, environmental-friendly material, biochar has the potential to replace more expensive synthesized carbon nanomaterials (e.g. carbon nanotubes) for use in future supercapacitors. To achieve high capacitance, biochar requires proper activation. A conventional approach involves mixing biochar with a strong base and baking at a high temperature. However, this process is time consuming and energy inefficient (requiring temperatures >900 °C). This work demonstrates a low-temperature (<150 °C) plasma treatment that efficiently activates a yellow pine biochar. Particularly, the effects of oxygen plasma on the biochar microstructure and supercapacitor characteristics are studied. Significant enhancement of the capacitance is achieved: 171.4 F g-1 for a 5-min oxygen plasma activation, in comparison to 99.5 F g-1 for a conventional chemical activation and 60.4 F g-1 for untreated biochar. This enhancement of the charge storage capacity is attributed to the creation of a broad distribution in pore size and a larger surface area. The plasma activation mechanisms in terms of the evolution of the biochar surface and microstructure are further discussed.

  16. Hunting oxygen complexes of nitric oxide synthase at low temperature and high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Marchal, Stephane; Gorren, Antonius C.F.; Andersson, K. Kristoffer; Lange, Reinhard . E-mail: lange@montp.inserm.fr

    2005-12-09

    The reaction of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) with oxygen is fast and takes place within several steps, separated by ephemeral intermediates. The use of extreme experimental conditions, such as low temperature and high pressure, associated to rapid kinetic analysis, has proven to be a convenient tool to study this complex reaction. Stopped-flow experiments under high pressure indicated that oxygen binding occurred in more than one step. This was further corroborated by the detection of two short-lived oxy-compounds, differing in their spectral and electronic properties. Oxy-I resembles the ferrous oxygen complex known for cytochrome P450, whereas oxy-II appears to be locked in the superoxide form. Subzero temperature spectroscopy, together with an analytical separation method, revealed that the subsequent one-electron reduction of the oxygen complex is carried out by the NOS cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4). The low-temperature stabilized oxidation product of BH4 was found to be a protonated BH3 radical. Finally, work in the presence of a BH4 analog indicated that proton transfer to the activated oxygen complex is a second essential function of BH4.

  17. Digalactosyldiacylglycerol is required for stabilization of the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Isamu; Mizusawa, Naoki; Wada, Hajime; Sato, Naoki

    2007-12-01

    The galactolipid digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG) is present in the thylakoid membranes of oxygenic photosynthetic organisms such as higher plants and cyanobacteria. Recent x-ray crystallographic analysis of protein-cofactor supercomplexes in thylakoid membranes revealed that DGDG molecules are present in the photosystem II (PSII) complex (four molecules per monomer), suggesting that DGDG molecules play important roles in folding and assembly of subunits in the PSII complex. However, the specific role of DGDG in PSII has not been fully clarified. In this study, we identified the dgdA gene (slr1508, a ycf82 homolog) of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 that presumably encodes a DGDG synthase involved in the biosynthesis of DGDG by comparison of genomic sequence data. Disruption of the dgdA gene resulted in a mutant defective in DGDG synthesis. Despite the lack of DGDG, the mutant cells grew as rapidly as the wild-type cells, indicating that DGDG is not essential for growth in Synechocystis. However, we found that oxygen-evolving activity of PSII was significantly decreased in the mutant. Analyses of the PSII complex purified from the mutant cells indicated that the extrinsic proteins PsbU, PsbV, and PsbO, which stabilize the oxygen-evolving complex, were substantially dissociated from the PSII complex. In addition, we found that heat susceptibility but not dark-induced inactivation of oxygen-evolving activity was notably increased in the mutant cells in comparison to the wild-type cells, suggesting that the PsbU subunit is dissociated from the PSII complex even in vivo. These results demonstrate that DGDG plays important roles in PSII through the binding of extrinsic proteins required for stabilization of the oxygen-evolving complex.

  18. Oxygen radicals photo-induced by ferric nitrilotriacetate complex.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Koichiro; Akai, Kaori; Tokumura, Akira; Abe, Shinji; Tamaki, Toshiaki; Takiguchi, Yoshiharu; Fukuzawa, Kenji

    2005-08-30

    This study examined the photo-induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the carcinogenic iron(III)-NTA complex. Iron(III)-NTA complex (1:1) has three conformations (type (a) in acidic conditions of pH 1-6, type (n) in neutral conditions of pH 3-9, and type (b) in basic conditions of pH 7-10) with two pK(a) values (pK(a1) approximately 4, pK(a2) approximately 8). The iron(III)-NTA complex was reduced to iron(II) under cool-white fluorescent light without the presence of any reducing agent, and the reduction rates of the three conformations of iron(III)-NTA were in the order type (a)>type (n)>type (b) as reported previously (Akai K. et al., Free Radic. Res. 38, 951-962, 2004). ROS generation was investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy with a spin-trapping technique. Apparent EPR signals attributed to PBN/*(13)CH(3) and PBN/*OCH(3) spin adducts were observed after incubation of the iron(III)-NTA complex was mixed with alpha-phenyl-tert-butylnitrone (PBN) and (13)C-DMSO in an aerobic condition. The addition of catalase effectively attenuated the PBN adducts, but superoxide dismutase enhanced them. Taken together, these results indicate that the iron(III)-NTA complex is spontaneously reduced to the iron(II)-NTA complex by light under acidic to neutral pH, and in turn transfers an electron to molecular oxygen to form ROS.

  19. Oxygen Activation at the Active Site of a Fungal Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    O'Dell, William B; Agarwal, Pratul K; Meilleur, Flora

    2017-01-16

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases have attracted vast attention owing to their abilities to disrupt glycosidic bonds via oxidation instead of hydrolysis and to enhance enzymatic digestion of recalcitrant substrates including chitin and cellulose. We have determined high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of an enzyme from Neurospora crassa in the resting state and of a copper(II) dioxo intermediate complex formed in the absence of substrate. X-ray crystal structures also revealed "pre-bound" molecular oxygen adjacent to the active site. An examination of protonation states enabled by neutron crystallography and density functional theory calculations identified a role for a conserved histidine in promoting oxygen activation. These results provide a new structural description of oxygen activation by substrate free lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases and provide insights that can be extended to reactivity in the enzyme-substrate complex. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Mitochondrial dysfunction in rat brain with aging Involvement of complex I, reactive oxygen species and cardiolipin.

    PubMed

    Petrosillo, G; Matera, M; Casanova, G; Ruggiero, F M; Paradies, G

    2008-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are considered a key factor in brain aging process. Mitochondrial respiration is an important site of ROS production and hence a potential contributor to brain functional changes with aging. In this study we examined the effect of aging on complex I activity, oxygen consumption, ROS production and phospholipid composition in rat brain mitochondria. The activity of complex I was reduced by 30% in brain mitochondria from 24 months aged rats relative to young animals. These changes in complex I activity were associated with parallel changes in state 3 respiration. H(2)O(2) generation was significantly increased in mitochondria isolated from aged rats. The mitochondrial content of cardiolipin, a phospholipid required for optimal activity of complex I, decreased by 31% as function of aging, while there was a significant increase in the level of peroxidized cardiolipin. The age-related decrease in complex I activity in brain mitochondria could be reversed by exogenously added cardiolipin. This effect of cardiolipin could not be replaced by other phospholipids. It is proposed that aging causes brain mitochondrial complex I dysfunction which can be attributed to ROS-induced cardiolipin oxidation. These findings may prove useful in elucidating the mechanism underlying mitochondrial dysfunction associated with brain aging.

  1. A Metal-Amino Acid Complex-Derived Bifunctional Oxygen Electrocatalyst for Rechargeable Zinc-Air Batteries.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yanjun; Niu, Yuchen; Yang, Jia; Ma, Liang; Liu, Jianguo; Xiong, Yujie; Xu, Hangxun

    2016-10-01

    Bifunctional oxygen electrocatalyst: A metal-amino acid complex is developed to prepare high-performance mesoporous carbon electrocatalyst for both oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution reactions. Such prepared catalyst can be used to assemble rechargeable zinc-air batteries with excellent durability. This work represents a new route toward low-cost, highly active, and durable bifunctional electrocatalysts for cutting-edge energy conversion devices.

  2. A model for the water-oxidation and recovery systems of the oxygen-evolving complex.

    PubMed

    Yatabe, Takeshi; Kikkawa, Mitsuhiro; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Nakai, Hidetaka; Kaneko, Kenji; Ogo, Seiji

    2014-02-28

    We propose a model for the water-oxidation and recovery systems of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of the photosystem II (PSII) enzyme. The whole system is constructed from two catalytic cycles, conducted as a tandem reaction: (i) a water-oxidation loop uses cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate as an oxidant to activate a dimanganese complex for water-oxidation and thereby liberate a molecule of O2 and (ii) a recovery loop begins with photoinhibition of the dimanganese complex but then uses O2 to reactivate the manganese centre. The net result is a catalytic water-oxidation catalyst that can use self-generated O2 for recovery.

  3. Luminol chemiluminescence and active oxygen generation by activated neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, R; Edashige, K; Sato, E F; Inoue, M; Matsuno, T; Utsumi, K

    1991-03-01

    Upon stimulation by various ligands and membrane perturbers, neutrophils produce various active oxygen species. Since luminol chemiluminescence (LCL) in neutrophils can be blocked by azide, an inhibitor of myeloperoxidase, LCL has been believed to reflect mainly the myeloperoxidase-catalyzed reaction. When cells were stimulated by formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, LCL was strongly inhibited by superoxide dismutase (SOD) and uric acid, a scavenger for hydroxy radical (.OH) and singlet oxygen, whereas it was stimulated by azide. LCL was also inhibited by .OH scavengers, such as mannitol, ethanol, and dimethylsulfoxide. However, when stimulated by phorbol myristate acetate or opsonized zymosan, LCL was strongly inhibited by azide but not by uric acid, and the inhibitory action of SOD was low. Thus, the qualitative and quantitative aspects of reactive oxygen generation by activated neutrophils differ significantly from one ligand to another. These results suggest that the metabolic fate of active oxygens in neutrophils and, hence, their effect on microorganisms and the surrounding tissues might differ depending on the stimulus.

  4. Re(I) complex doped nanofibers for oxygen optical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, He; Zhu, Long; Wang, Aofang; Lu, Hongwei

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we design and synthesize a novel diamine ligand of PTO (2-(pyridin-2-yl)-5-p-tolyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole). The crystal structure, photophysical character and electronic nature of its corresponding Re(I) complex of Re(CO)3(PTO)Br have been investigated in detail. Experimental data and theoretical calculation suggest that Re(CO)3(PTO)Br owns a long-lived yellow phosphorescence which is sensitive towards molecular oxygen. By doping Re(CO)3(PTO)Br into a polymer matrix of polystyrene (PS), the emission response of the resulted composite nanofibers towards molecular oxygen is studied. The optimal sample with mean diameter of 600 nm shows a maximum sensitivity of 4.14 with short response time of 14 s (here sensitivity is defined as the ratio of emission intensity in pure N2 atmosphere to that in pure O2 atmosphere). The composite nanofibers are also found to be photostable enough to experience UV radiation.

  5. Re(I) complex doped nanofibers for oxygen optical sensing.

    PubMed

    Hong, He; Zhu, Long; Wang, Aofang; Lu, Hongwei

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we design and synthesize a novel diamine ligand of PTO (2-(pyridin-2-yl)-5-p-tolyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole). The crystal structure, photophysical character and electronic nature of its corresponding Re(I) complex of Re(CO)(3)(PTO)Br have been investigated in detail. Experimental data and theoretical calculation suggest that Re(CO)(3)(PTO)Br owns a long-lived yellow phosphorescence which is sensitive towards molecular oxygen. By doping Re(CO)(3)(PTO)Br into a polymer matrix of polystyrene (PS), the emission response of the resulted composite nanofibers towards molecular oxygen is studied. The optimal sample with mean diameter of 600 nm shows a maximum sensitivity of 4.14 with short response time of 14s (here sensitivity is defined as the ratio of emission intensity in pure N(2) atmosphere to that in pure O(2) atmosphere). The composite nanofibers are also found to be photostable enough to experience UV radiation.

  6. Complexes of self-interstitials with oxygen atoms in Ge

    SciTech Connect

    Khirunenko, L. I.; Pomozov, Yu. V.; Sosnin, M. G.; Abrosimov, N. V.; Riemann, H.

    2014-02-21

    Interactions of germanium self-interstitials with interstitial oxygen atoms in Ge subjected to irradiation at ∼80 K and subsequently to annealing have been studied. To distinguish the processes involving vacancies and self-interstitials the doping with tin was used. It was shown that absorption lines with maximum at 602, 674, 713 and 803 cm{sup −1} are self-interstitials-related. Two lines at 602 and 674, which develop upon annealing in the temperature range 180–240 K, belong to IO complexes, while the bands at 713 and 803 cm{sup −1}, which emerge after annealing at T>220 K, are associated with I{sub 2}O. It is argued that the annealing of IO occurs by two mechanisms: by dissociation and by diffusion.

  7. New ruthenium nitrosyl pincer complexes bearing an O2 ligand. Mono-oxygen transfer.

    PubMed

    Fogler, Eran; Efremenko, Irena; Gargir, Moti; Leitus, Gregory; Diskin-Posner, Yael; Ben-David, Yehoshoa; Martin, Jan M L; Milstein, David

    2015-03-02

    We report on Ru((II))(μ(2)-O2) nitrosyl pincer complexes that can return to their original Ru(0) state by reaction with mono-oxygen scavengers. Potential intermediates were calculated by density functional theory (DFT) and a mechanism is proposed, revealing a new type of metal-ligand cooperation consisting of activation of the O2 moiety by both the metal center and the NO ligand. Reaction of the Ru(0) nitrosyl complex 1 with O2 quantitatively yielded the crystallographically characterized Ru((II)) (μ(2)-O2) nitrosyl complex 2. Reaction of 2 with the mono-oxygen scavengers phosphines or CO gave the Ru(0) complex 1 and phosphine oxides, or the carbonyl complex 3 (1 trapped by CO) and CO2, respectively. Reaction of 2 with 1 equiv of phosphine at room temperature or -40 °C resulted in immediate formation of half an equivalent of 1 and 1 equiv of phosphine oxide, while half an equivalent of 2 remained unchanged. Overnight reaction at room temperature of 2 with excess CO (≥3 equiv) resulted in 3 and CO2 gas as the only products. Reaction of 1 with 1 equiv of mono-oxygen source (dioxirane) at -78 °C yielded the Ru((II))(μ(2)-O2) complex 2. Similarly, reaction of the Ru(0) dearomatized complex 4 with O2 led to the crystallographicaly characterized Ru((II))(μ(2)-O2) complex 5. Further reaction of 5 with mono-oxygen scavengers (phosphines or CO) led to the Ru(0) complex 4 and phosphine oxides or complex 6 (4 trapped by CO) and CO2. When instead only 1 equiv of 5 was reacted with 1 equiv of phosphine at room temperature, immediate formation of half an equivalent of 4 and 1 equiv of phosphine oxide took place, while half an equivalent of 5 remained unchanged. When 5 reacted with an excess of CO (≥3 equiv), complex 6 and CO2 gas were the only products obtained. DFT studies indicate a new mode of metal-ligand cooperation involving the nitrosyl ligand in the oxygen transfer process.

  8. Oxidation of phosphine and arsine by metal complexes and free and bound oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorfman, Ya A.; Yukht, I. M.; Levina, L. V.; Polimbetova, G. S.; Petrova, T. V.; Emel'yanova, V. S.

    1991-06-01

    Data on the oxidation of PH3 and AsH3 by metal complexes and oxygen compounds of metals and non-metals and on their catalytic and coupled oxidation by dioxygen, ozone, and peroxide compounds are analysed. The methods for the activation of oxidants, phosphine, and arsine, ensuring the acceleration of the oxidative reactions in processes involving the elimination of the extremely harmful impurities PH3 and AsH3 from gases, are examined. The bibliography includes 176 references.

  9. Correlation between oxygen adsorption energy and electronic structure of transition metal macrocyclic complexes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kexi; Lei, Yinkai; Wang, Guofeng

    2013-11-28

    Oxygen adsorption energy is directly relevant to the catalytic activity of electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In this study, we established the correlation between the O2 adsorption energy and the electronic structure of transition metal macrocyclic complexes which exhibit activity for ORR. To this end, we have predicted the molecular and electronic structures of a series of transition metal macrocyclic complexes with planar N4 chelation, as well as the molecular and electronic structures for the O2 adsorption on these macrocyclic molecules, using the density functional theory calculation method. We found that the calculated adsorption energy of O2 on the transition metal macrocyclic complexes was linearly related to the average position (relative to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the macrocyclic complexes) of the non-bonding d orbitals (d(z(2)), d(xy), d(xz), and d(yz)) which belong to the central transition metal atom. Importantly, our results suggest that varying the energy level of the non-bonding d orbitals through changing the central transition metal atom and/or peripheral ligand groups could be an effective way to tuning their O2 adsorption energy for enhancing the ORR activity of transition metal macrocyclic complex catalysts.

  10. Correlation between oxygen adsorption energy and electronic structure of transition metal macrocyclic complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Kexi; Lei, Yinkai; Wang, Guofeng

    2013-11-28

    Oxygen adsorption energy is directly relevant to the catalytic activity of electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In this study, we established the correlation between the O{sub 2} adsorption energy and the electronic structure of transition metal macrocyclic complexes which exhibit activity for ORR. To this end, we have predicted the molecular and electronic structures of a series of transition metal macrocyclic complexes with planar N{sub 4} chelation, as well as the molecular and electronic structures for the O{sub 2} adsorption on these macrocyclic molecules, using the density functional theory calculation method. We found that the calculated adsorption energy of O{sub 2} on the transition metal macrocyclic complexes was linearly related to the average position (relative to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the macrocyclic complexes) of the non-bonding d orbitals (d{sub z{sup 2}}, d{sub xy}, d{sub xz}, and d{sub yz}) which belong to the central transition metal atom. Importantly, our results suggest that varying the energy level of the non-bonding d orbitals through changing the central transition metal atom and/or peripheral ligand groups could be an effective way to tuning their O{sub 2} adsorption energy for enhancing the ORR activity of transition metal macrocyclic complex catalysts.

  11. Correlation between oxygen adsorption energy and electronic structure of transition metal macrocyclic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kexi; Lei, Yinkai; Wang, Guofeng

    2013-11-01

    Oxygen adsorption energy is directly relevant to the catalytic activity of electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In this study, we established the correlation between the O2 adsorption energy and the electronic structure of transition metal macrocyclic complexes which exhibit activity for ORR. To this end, we have predicted the molecular and electronic structures of a series of transition metal macrocyclic complexes with planar N4 chelation, as well as the molecular and electronic structures for the O2 adsorption on these macrocyclic molecules, using the density functional theory calculation method. We found that the calculated adsorption energy of O2 on the transition metal macrocyclic complexes was linearly related to the average position (relative to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the macrocyclic complexes) of the non-bonding d orbitals (d_{z^2 }, d_{xy}, d_{xz}, and dyz) which belong to the central transition metal atom. Importantly, our results suggest that varying the energy level of the non-bonding d orbitals through changing the central transition metal atom and/or peripheral ligand groups could be an effective way to tuning their O2 adsorption energy for enhancing the ORR activity of transition metal macrocyclic complex catalysts.

  12. BIOLOGICALLY ENHANCED OXYGEN TRANSFER IN THE ACTIVATED SLUDGE PROCESS (JOURNAL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biologically enhanced oxgyen transfer has been a hypothesis to explain observed oxygen transfer rates in activated sludge systems that were well above that predicted from aerator clean-water testing. The enhanced oxygen transfer rates were based on tests using BOD bottle oxygen ...

  13. Influence of lightweight ambulatory oxygen on oxygen use and activity patterns of COPD patients receiving long-term oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Casaburi, Richard; Porszasz, Janos; Hecht, Ariel; Tiep, Brian; Albert, Richard K; Anthonisen, Nicholas R; Bailey, William C; Connett, John E; Cooper, J Allen; Criner, Gerard J; Curtis, Jeffrey; Dransfield, Mark; Lazarus, Stephen C; Make, Barry; Martinez, Fernando J; McEvoy, Charlene; Niewoehner, Dennis E; Reilly, John J; Scanlon, Paul; Scharf, Steven M; Sciurba, Frank C; Woodruff, Prescott

    2012-02-01

    Lightweight ambulatory oxygen devices are provided on the assumptions that they enhance compliance and increase activity, but data to support these assumptions are lacking. We studied 22 patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease receiving long-term oxygen therapy (14 men, average age = 66.9 y, FEV(1) = 33.6%pred, PaO(2) at rest = 51.7 torr) who were using E-cylinders as their portable oxygen. Subjects were recruited at 5 sites and studied over a 2-week baseline period and for 6 months after randomizing them to either continuing to use 22-lb E-cylinders towed on a cart or to carrying 3.6-lb aluminum cylinders. Utilizing novel electronic devices, ambulatory and stationary oxygen use was monitored continuously over the 2 weeks prior to and the 6 months following randomization. Subjects wore tri-axial accelerometers to monitor physical activity during waking hours for 2-3 weeks prior to, and at 3 and 6 months after, randomization. Seventeen subjects completed the study. At baseline, subjects used 17.2 hours of stationary and 2.5 hours of ambulatory oxygen daily. At 6 months, ambulatory oxygen use was 1.4 ± 1.0 hrs in those randomized to E-cylinders and 1.9 ± 2.4 hrs in those using lightweight oxygen (P = NS). Activity monitoring revealed low activity levels prior to randomization and no significant increase over time in either group. In this group of severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients, providing lightweight ambulatory oxygen did not increase either oxygen use or activity. Future efforts might focus on strategies to encourage oxygen use and enhance activity in this patient group. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT003257540).

  14. Cerebral Oxygen Delivery and Consumption During Evoked Neural Activity

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Alberto L.; Masamoto, Kazuto; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Kim, Seong-Gi

    2010-01-01

    Increases in neural activity evoke increases in the delivery and consumption of oxygen. Beyond observations of cerebral tissue and blood oxygen, the role and properties of cerebral oxygen delivery and consumption during changes in brain function are not well understood. This work overviews the current knowledge of functional oxygen delivery and consumption and introduces recent and preliminary findings to explore the mechanisms by which oxygen is delivered to tissue as well as the temporal dynamics of oxygen metabolism. Vascular oxygen tension measurements have shown that a relatively large amount of oxygen exits pial arterioles prior to capillaries. Additionally, increases in cerebral blood flow (CBF) induced by evoked neural activation are accompanied by arterial vasodilation and also by increases in arteriolar oxygenation. This increase contributes not only to the down-stream delivery of oxygen to tissue, but also to delivery of additional oxygen to extra-vascular spaces surrounding the arterioles. On the other hand, the changes in tissue oxygen tension due to functional increases in oxygen consumption have been investigated using a method to suppress the evoked CBF response. The functional decreases in tissue oxygen tension induced by increases in oxygen consumption are slow to evoked changes in CBF under control conditions. Preliminary findings obtained using flavoprotein autofluorescence imaging suggest cellular oxidative metabolism changes at a faster rate than the average changes in tissue oxygen. These issues are important in the determination of the dynamic changes in tissue oxygen metabolism from hemoglobin-based imaging techniques such as blood oxygenation-level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). PMID:20616881

  15. In-situ formation of cobalt-phosphate oxygen-evolving complex-anchored reduced graphene oxide nanosheets for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Jing; Yuan, Yinyin; Lv, Hong; Tian, Yuyu; Wu, Dan; Li, Qing-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Oxygen conversion process between O₂ and H₂O by means of electrochemistry or photochemistry has lately received a great deal of attention. Cobalt-phosphate (Co-Pi) catalyst is a new type of cost-effective artificial oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) with amorphous features during photosynthesis. However, can such Co-Pi OEC also act as oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst in electrochemical processes? The question remains unanswered. Here for the first time we demonstrate that Co-Pi OEC does be rather active for the ORR. Particularly, Co-Pi OEC anchoring on reduced graphite oxide (rGO) nanosheet is shown to possess dramatically improved electrocatalytic activities. Differing from the generally accepted role of rGO as an "electron reservoir", we suggest that rGO serves as "peroxide cleaner" in enhancing the electrocatalytic behaviors. The present study may bridge the gap between photochemistry and electrochemistry towards oxygen conversion.

  16. DNA evidence uncompromised by active oxygen.

    PubMed

    Castelló, Ana; Francés, Francesc; Verdú, Fernando

    2010-03-05

    Currently, forensic sciences can make use of the potential of instrumental analysis techniques to obtain information from the smallest, even invisible, samples. However, as laboratory techniques improve, so too should the procedures applied in the search for and initial testing of clues in order to be equally effective. This requires continuous revision so that those procedures may resolve the problems that samples present. As far as bloodstains are concerned, there are methods available that are recognized as being both highly sensitive and effective. Nevertheless, the marketing of new cleaning products, those that contain active oxygen, has raised doubts about the ability of those procedures to detect blood. It has been shown that stains washed with these detergents (and still visible) invalidated both the presumptive test (reduced phenolphthalein, luminol, and Bluestar) and that applied for determining human hemoglobin. These findings have caused considerable concern both within the forensic and scientific community, and among the general public, so obliging us to seek solutions. In this work, the effect of these new cleaning products on DNA analyses is studied. The results, encouraging ones, show that these detergents, despite invalidating all other tests, do not hinder the extraction, or the subsequent analysis, of DNA.

  17. Solar active region magnetic complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikbakhsh, Shabnam; Tanskanen, Eija; Hackman, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    We have studied the Mount Wilson Classification of solar Active Regions (ARs) for the period from 1996 to 2015. Sunspots are visual indicators of ARs where the solar magnetic field is disturbed. Major manifestations of solar magnetic activity, such as solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), are associated with solar ARs. There has been so many attempts to classify solar ARs based on their magnetic complexity as a measure of their acitivity. For this study we applied the Mount Wilson Classification which groups ARs in terms of their magnetic complexity from the least complex alpha to the most complex one beta-gamma-delta. We compared the magnetic complexity data to two sets of sunspot number: 1- International Sunspot Number (ISSN) 2- NOAA sunspot number We have been found that the number of more complex structures reach its maximum two years after solar maximum. We also compared the result to our identified geomagnetic storm list. The results showed the more complex ARs are responsible for the strongest geomagnetic storms.

  18. Generation kinetics of boron-oxygen complexes in p-type compensated c-Si

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yichao; Yu, Xuegong Chen, Peng; Chen, Xianzi; Yang, Deren

    2014-03-10

    Kinetics characteristics of boron-oxygen complexes responsible for light-induced degradation in p-type compensated c-Si have been investigated. The generation of B-O complexes is well fitted by a fast-forming process and a slow-forming one. Activation energies of complexes generation during the fast-forming process are determined to be 0.29 and 0.24 eV in compensated and non-compensated c-Si, respectively, and those during the slow-forming process are the same, about 0.44 eV. Moreover, it is found that the pre-exponential factors of complexes generation in compensated c-Si is proportional to the square of the net doping concentration, which suggests that the latent centers should exist.

  19. A rare tetranuclear thorium(IV) μ4 -oxo cluster and dinuclear thorium(IV) complex assembled by carbon-oxygen bond activation of 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME).

    PubMed

    Travia, Nicholas E; Scott, Brian L; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L

    2014-12-15

    The synthesis and X-ray crystal structure of two new multinuclear thorium complexes are reported. The tetranuclear μ4 -oxo cluster complex Th4 (μ4 -O)(μ-Cl)2 I6 [κ(2) (O,O')-μ-O(CH2 )2 OCH3 ]6 and the dinuclear complex Th2 I5 [κ(2) (O,O')-μ-O(CH2 )2 OCH3 ]3 (DME) (DME=dimethoxyethane) are formed by CO bond activation of 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) mediated by thorium iodide complexes.

  20. Reversible Oxygenation of 2,4-Diaminobutanoic Acid-Co(II) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Yue, Fan; Wen, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces the structural characterization and studies on reversible oxygenation behavior of a new oxygen carrier Co(II)-2,4-diaminobutanoic acid (DABA) complex in aqueous solution. The composition of the oxygenated complex was determined by gas volumetric method, molar ratio method, and mass spectrometry, and the formula of the oxygenated complex was determined to be [Co(DABA)2O2]. In aqueous solution, the complex can continuously uptake and release dioxygen and exhibit excellent reversibility of oxygenation and deoxygenation ability. This complex can maintain 50% of its original oxygenation capacity after 30 cycles in 24 h and retain 5% of the original oxygenation capacity after more than 260 cycles after 72 h. When a ligand analogue was linked to histidine (His), the new complex exhibited as excellent reversible oxygenation property as His-Co(II) complex. Insight into the relationship between structural detail and oxygenation properties will provide valuable suggestion for a new family of oxygen carriers. PMID:27648004

  1. Stereochemistry of lead(II) complexes with oxygen donor ligands.

    SciTech Connect

    Stavilla, Vitalie; Davidovich, Ruven L.; Whitmire, Kenton Herbert; Voit, Elena I.; Marinin, Dmitry V.

    2008-10-01

    This review discusses the coordination number (CN) and the coordination geometry of the first coordination sphere of Pb(II) atoms in crystal structures of 98 lead(II) complexes with O-donor ligands and the stereochemically active lone pair of electrons (LP, E) in the terms of the valence shell electron-pair repulsion (VSEPR) model. The CN of Pb(II) atoms of the first coordination sphere has values falling into the range (3 + E) to (6 + E). The following coordination polyhedra-{psi}-tetrahedron (I), {psi}-trigonal bipyramid (II), {psi}-octahedron (III), {psi}-pentagonal bipyramid with an axial (IV) or equatorial (V) vacant position are formed. For the investigated structures of the Pb(II) complexes, the formula of each compound, the overall CN of the Pb(II) atom considered as the sum of the CN in the first coordination sphere and the number of secondary bonds, the polyhedron shape, the Pb-O bond lengths, and O-Pb-O bond angles in the first coordination sphere, secondary bond lengths, references and REFCODEs are presented in the comprehensive Tables. The quantum chemical investigations performed using density functional theory (DFT) method have confirmed the stereochemical activity of the LP of Pb(II) atoms in the studied structures of lead(II) complexes with O-donor ligands.

  2. Decomposition of reactive oxygen species by copper(II) bis(1-pyrazolyl)methane complexes.

    PubMed

    Schepetkin, Igor; Potapov, Andrei; Khlebnikov, Andrei; Korotkova, Elena; Lukina, Anna; Malovichko, Galina; Kirpotina, Lilia; Quinn, Mark T

    2006-06-01

    Two bis(1-pyrazolyl)alkane ligands, bis(3,5-dimethyl-1-pyrazolyl)methane and bis(4-iodo-3,5-dimethyl-1-pyrazolyl)methane, and their copper(II) complexes, bis(3,5-dimethyl-1-pyrazolyl)methanedinitratocopper(II) [CuL1(NO3)2] and bis(4-iodo-3,5-dimethyl-1-pyrazolyl)methanedinitratocopper(II) [CuL2(NO3)2] x 2H2O, were prepared. Physiochemical properties of the copper(II) complexes were studied by spectroscopic (UV-vis, IR, EPR) techniques and cyclic voltammetry. Spectroscopic analysis revealed a 1:1 stoichiometry of ligand:copper(II) ion and a bidentate coordination mode for the nitrate ions in both of the complexes. According to experimental and theoretical ab initio data, the copper(II) ion is located in an octahedral hexacoordinated environment. Both complexes were able to catalyze the dismutation of superoxide anion (O2*-) (pH 7.5) and decomposition of H2O2 (pH 7.5) and peroxynitrite (pH 10.9). In addition, both complexes exhibited superoxide dismutase (SOD) like activity toward extracellular and intracellular reactive oxygen species produced by activated human neutrophils in whole blood. Thus, these complexes represent useful SOD mimetics with a broad range of antioxidant activity toward a variety of reactive oxidants.

  3. Oxygen reduction reaction catalyzed by cobalt(III) complexes of macrocyclic ligands supported on multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasini, Udaya B.; Gartia, Yashraj; Ramidi, Punnamchandar; Kazi, Abul; Shaikh, Ali U.; Ghosh, Anindya

    2013-04-01

    A class of amido-macrocyclic cobalt(III) complexes along with multiwalled carbon nanotubes have been studied for electro-catalytic activity to reduce oxygen. These complexes are efficient for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in wide range of pH conditions by following ideal fuel cell reduction mechanism. Depending on the stability of complexes in different pH, electrochemical studies were performed to predict the reduction mechanism. Rotating disk electrode and rotating ring-disk electrode studies show that these complexes reduce oxygen via four electron reduction process in mild acidic pH and two step two electron reduction processes in basic conditions, with negligible amount of hydrogen peroxide generation.

  4. UV activates growth factor receptors via reactive oxygen intermediates

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Exposure of mammalian cells to UV irradiation induces rapid and transient expression of early growth response-1 gene (Egr-1) encoding a transcription factor that plays a role in cell survival. These signals from the irradiated cell surface are likely to involve more than one pathway, and we show here that an essential pathway involves activation of several growth factor receptors by reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI). UVC irradiation causes the tyrosine phosphorylation of EGF receptor (EGFR) in mouse NIH 3T3 fibroblasts and HC11 mouse mammary cells. EGFR activation by irradiation of cells is abrogated by suramin, by antioxidants, and by the presence of a dominant negative EGFR. UV induces the formation of complexes between activated EGFR and SOS, Grb2, PLC gamma, and SHC that can be precipitated with antibodies to EGFR. The activation of EGFR by UV is mimicked by H2O2, suggesting that ROI may function upstream of EGFR activation. Our observations support the hypothesis that ROI and growth factor receptors operate in the early steps of the UV signal that lead to the enhanced expression and activity of Egr-1. PMID:8601609

  5. Simulation of the kinetics of oxygen complexes in crystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo Lee, Young; von Boehm, J.; Nieminen, R. M.

    2002-10-01

    The formation kinetics of thermal double donors (TDD's) is studied by a general kinetic model with parameters based on accurate ab initio total-energy calculations. The kinetic model includes all relevant association, dissociation, and restructuring processes. The simulated kinetics agrees qualitatively and in most cases quantitatively with the experimentally found consecutive kinetics of TDD's. It also supports our earlier assignments of the ring-type oxygen chains to TDD's [Pesola et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 5343 (2000)]. We demonstrate with the kinetic model that the most common assumption that only the O2 dimer acts as a fast diffusing species would lead to an unrealistic steady increase of the concentration of O3. The neglect of restructuring processes leads to an anomalous increase of oxygen dimers and negligible concentrations of TDD's. The capture of interstitial oxygens by diffusing oxygen chains and the escaping of interstitial oxygens from the chains fully dominate the formation kinetics.

  6. Active site densities, oxygen activation and adsorbed reactive oxygen in alcohol activation on npAu catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lu-Cun; Friend, C. M.; Fushimi, Rebecca; Madix, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    The activation of molecular O2as well as the reactivity of adsorbed oxygen species is of central importance in aerobic selective oxidation chemistry on Au-based catalysts. Herein, we address the issue of O2activation on unsupported nanoporous gold (npAu) catalysts by applying a transient pressure technique, a temporal analysis of products (TAP) reactor, to measure the saturation coverage of atomic oxygen, its collisional dissociation probability, the activation barrier for O2dissociation, and the facility with which adsorbed O species activate methanol, the initial step in the catalytic cycle of esterification. The results from these experiments indicate that molecular O2dissociation is associated with surface silver, that the density of reactive sites is quite low, that adsorbed oxygen atoms do not spill over from the sites of activation onto the surrounding surface, and that methanol reacts quite facilely with the adsorbed oxygen atoms. In addition, the O species from O2dissociation exhibits reactivity for the selective oxidation of methanol but not for CO. The TAP experiments also revealed that the surface of the npAu catalyst is saturated with adsorbed O under steady state reaction conditions, at least for the pulse reaction.

  7. Professor Howard Mason and oxygen activation.

    PubMed

    Waterman, Michael R

    2005-12-09

    Our understanding of the classification, function, mechanism, and structure of the enzymes which incorporate atoms of oxygen from atmospheric molecular oxygen during catalysis is based on the thoughtful and technically challenging experiments of two giants in the field of Biochemistry, Howard Mason and Osamu Hayaishi. This volume celebrates the 50th anniversary of the discovery and characterization of these "oxygenase" enzymes and provides a broad view of how far this area of research has advanced. Professor Hayaishi describes herein his perspective on the background and major discoveries which led to the development of this field. Regrettably Howard Mason passed away at age 88 in 2003. I am indeed fortunate to have been a Ph.D. student with Howard and to have the opportunity to briefly review his role in the development of this field for this special commemorative issue of BBRC.

  8. Reversible Oxygenation of α-Amino Acid–Cobalt(II) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xincun; Yue, Fan; Li, Hui; Huang, Yan; Zhang, Yi; Wen, Hongmei; Wang, Jide

    2016-01-01

    We systematically investigated the reversibility, time lapse, and oxygenation-deoxygenation properties of 15 natural α-amino acid–Co(II) complexes through UV-vis spectrophotometer, polarographic oxygen electrode, and DFT calculations, respectively, to explore the relationship between the coordinating structure and reversible oxygenation of α-amino acid–Co(II) complexes. Results revealed that the α-amino acid structure plays a key role in the reversible oxygenation properties of these complexes. The specific configuration of the α-amino acid group affects the eg1 electron of Co(II) transfer to the π⁎ orbit of O2; this phenomenon also favors the reversible formation and dissociation of Co–O2 bond when O2 coordinates with Co(II) complexes. Therefore, the co-coordination of amino and carboxyl groups is a determinant of Co complexes to absorb O2 reversibly. The group adjacent to the α-amino acid unit evidently influences the dioxygen affinity and antioxidation ability of the complexes. The presence of amino (or imino) and hydroxy groups adjacent to the α-amino acid group increases the oxygenation-deoxygenation rate and the number of reversible cycles. Our findings demonstrate a new mechanism to develop reversible oxygenation complexes and to reveal the oxygenation of oxygen carriers. PMID:27022316

  9. Redox activity of surface oxygen anions in oxygen-deficient perovskite oxides during electrochemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Mueller, David N; Machala, Michael L; Bluhm, Hendrik; Chueh, William C

    2015-01-19

    Surface redox-active centres in transition-metal oxides play a key role in determining the efficacy of electrocatalysts. The extreme sensitivity of surface redox states to temperatures, to gas pressures and to electrochemical reaction conditions renders them difficult to investigate by conventional surface-science techniques. Here we report the direct observation of surface redox processes by surface-sensitive, operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy using thin-film iron and cobalt perovskite oxides as model electrodes for elevated-temperature oxygen incorporation and evolution reactions. In contrast to the conventional view that the transition metal cations are the dominant redox-active centres, we find that the oxygen anions near the surface are a significant redox partner to molecular oxygen due to the strong hybridization between oxygen 2p and transition metal 3d electronic states. We propose that a narrow electronic state of significant oxygen 2p character near the Fermi level exchanges electrons with the oxygen adsorbates. This result highlights the importance of surface anion-redox chemistry in oxygen-deficient transition-metal oxides.

  10. Phosphorescent ruthenium complexes with a nitroimidazole unit that image oxygen fluctuation in tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Son, Aoi; Kawasaki, Atsushi; Hara, Daiki; Ito, Takeo; Tanabe, Kazuhito

    2015-02-02

    Understanding oxygen fluctuation in a cancerous tumor is important for effective treatment, especially during radiotherapy. In this paper, ruthenium complexes bearing a nitroimidazole group are shown to report the oxygen status in tumor tissue directly. The nitroimidazole group was known to be accumulated in hypoxic tumor tissues. On the other hand, the ruthenium complex showed strong phosphorescence around 600 nm. The emission of ruthenium is quenched instantaneously by molecular oxygen due to energy transfer between triplet states of oxygen and ruthenium complex, but the emission is then recovered by the removal of oxygen. Thus, we could observe oxygen fluctuation in tumor tissue in a real-time manner by monitoring the phosphorescence of the ruthenium complex. The versatility of the probe is demonstrated by monitoring oxygen fluctuation in living cells and tumor tissue planted in mice. The ruthenium complex promptly penetrated plasma membrane and accumulated in cells to emit its oxygen-dependent phosphorescence. In vivo experiments revealed that the oxygen level in tumor tissue seems to fluctuate at the sub-minute timescale. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. An oxygen-17 dynamic NMR study of the Pr-DOTA complex.

    PubMed

    Fusaro, Luca; Luhmer, Michel

    2014-01-21

    The complex between (17)O-enriched DOTA (tetraazacyclododecanetetraacetic acid) and praseodymium(III) (Pr(3+)) was studied in aqueous solution by variable-temperature (17)O NMR at 14.1 T. pH effects as well as the influence of metal ions free in solution were investigated. At low temperature, the so-called TSAP and SAP conformations give rise to distinct signals for the oxygen atoms coordinated to the metal ion (O2); coalescence occurs between 20 and 30 °C. In contrast, a single signal was detected for the noncoordinated oxygen atoms (O1) in the entire investigated temperature range, i.e. between -3 and 135 °C. At high temperature, the spectra exhibit signal broadening that reveals the interchange of the O1 and O2 oxygen atoms of the carboxylate groups. The linewidths measured for O1 were deconvolved into contributions from quadrupole relaxation and chemical exchange, allowing the corresponding activation barriers to be determined. The present (17)O dynamic NMR study provides the first quantitative experimental data characterizing the interchange of the oxygen atoms in a DOTA chelate of a lanthanide metal ion. The activation entropy of this process is negligible and the activation enthalpy is found to range between 66 and 77 kJ mol(-1), depending on the pH and the presence of free Pr(3+) ions in solution. These data support the results of a previous computational study according to which the exchange mechanism involves the internal rotation of the carboxylate groups.

  12. Active rehabilitation in a pediatric extracorporeal membrane oxygenation patient.

    PubMed

    Zebuhr, Carleen; Sinha, Amit; Skillman, Heather; Buckvold, Shannon

    2014-05-01

    Decreased intensive care unit (ICU) mortality has led to an increase in ICU morbidity. ICU-induced immobilization plays a major role in this morbidity. Recently, ICU mobility has been shown to be safe and effective in adolescent and adult patients. We report the successful rehabilitation of an 8-year-old boy with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. A child who is critically ill may safely perform active rehabilitation while on venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The gains achieved through active rehabilitation and optimal nutrition can facilitate recovery from severe acute respiratory distress syndrome in select pediatric patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

  13. Monovalent copper-activated oxygenated insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parent, C.; Boutinaud, P.; Flem, G. Le; Moine, B.; Pedrini, C.; Garcia, D.; Faucher, M.

    1994-12-01

    The photoluminescence of monovalent copper in oxygenated insulators has been extensively studied. The spectroscopy and the excited states dynamics of Cu + ions were investigated as a function of the copper concentration and temperature in various glassy and crystallized materials, essentially borates and phosphates. The broad band fluorescences observed in the visible range under UV excitation arise from two main emitting centers: isolated Cu + ions and (Cu +) 2 pairs. The spectroscopic characteristics of isolated Cu + depend strongly on the local structure, whereas those of the copper pairs remain nearly unaltered whatever the host-matrix. Energy diagrams are proposed for both centers, using ab initio LCAO calculations, in connection with structural investigations involving XRD, ND and EXAFS spectroscopies. Borate glasses can be considered as potential laser sources for tunable output in the whole visible range.

  14. Activating lattice oxygen redox reactions in metal oxides to catalyse oxygen evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimaud, Alexis; Diaz-Morales, Oscar; Han, Binghong; Hong, Wesley T.; Lee, Yueh-Lin; Giordano, Livia; Stoerzinger, Kelsey A.; Koper, Marc T. M.; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2017-05-01

    Understanding how materials that catalyse the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) function is essential for the development of efficient energy-storage technologies. The traditional understanding of the OER mechanism on metal oxides involves four concerted proton-electron transfer steps on metal-ion centres at their surface and product oxygen molecules derived from water. Here, using in situ 18O isotope labelling mass spectrometry, we provide direct experimental evidence that the O2 generated during the OER on some highly active oxides can come from lattice oxygen. The oxides capable of lattice-oxygen oxidation also exhibit pH-dependent OER activity on the reversible hydrogen electrode scale, indicating non-concerted proton-electron transfers in the OER mechanism. Based on our experimental data and density functional theory calculations, we discuss mechanisms that are fundamentally different from the conventional scheme and show that increasing the covalency of metal-oxygen bonds is critical to trigger lattice-oxygen oxidation and enable non-concerted proton-electron transfers during OER.

  15. Photo-activated oxygen sensitivity of graphene at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berholts, Artjom; Kahro, Tauno; Floren, Aare; Alles, Harry; Jaaniso, Raivo

    2014-10-01

    Photo-induced changes in the electrical conductivity and the sensitivity to oxygen gas of graphene sheets grown by chemical vapor deposition and transferred onto Al2O3 and SiO2 thin film substrates were studied at ambient conditions. The pristine graphene sensors were initially completely insensitive to oxygen gas at room temperature but showed significant (up to 100%) response when illuminated with weak ultraviolet (300 nm or 365 nm) light. Oxygen response was governed by Langmuir law and its activation was insensitive to humidity. The mechanism of sensitization is analyzed together with other photo-induced effects—negative persistent photo-conduction and photo-induced hysteresis of field effect transistor characteristics. While the reduction of conductivity in air is persistent effect, the oxygen sensitization and enlargement of hysteresis take place only under the direct influence of light. It is concluded that the charge traps with differently adsorbed oxygen and water are involved in these phenomena.

  16. Silibinin activates AMP-activated protein kinase to protect neuronal cells from oxygen and glucose deprivation-re-oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhi; Ding, Sheng-quan; Shen, Ya-fang

    2014-11-14

    In this study, we explored the cytoprotective potential of silibinin against oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced neuronal cell damages, and studied underling mechanisms. In vitro model of ischemic stroke was created by keeping neuronal cells (SH-SY5Y cells and primary mouse cortical neurons) in an OGD condition followed by re-oxygenation. Pre-treatment of silibinin significantly inhibited OGD/re-oxygenation-induced necrosis and apoptosis of neuronal cells. OGD/re-oxygenation-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) reduction were also inhibited by silibinin. At the molecular level, silibinin treatment in SH-SY5Y cells and primary cortical neurons led to significant AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling activation, detected by phosphorylations of AMPKα1, its upstream kinase liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and the downstream target acetyl-CoA Carboxylase (ACC). Pharmacological inhibition or genetic depletion of AMPK alleviated the neuroprotective ability of silibinin against OGD/re-oxygenation. Further, ROS scavenging ability by silibinin was abolished with AMPK inhibition or silencing. While A-769662, the AMPK activator, mimicked silibinin actions and suppressed ROS production and neuronal cell death following OGD/re-oxygenation. Together, these results show that silibinin-mediated neuroprotection requires activation of AMPK signaling.

  17. De novo generation of singlet oxygen and ammine ligands by photoactivation of a platinum anticancer complex.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yao; Farrer, Nicola J; Li, Huilin; Butler, Jennifer S; McQuitty, Ruth J; Habtemariam, Abraha; Wang, Fuyi; Sadler, Peter J

    2013-12-16

    Worth the excitement: Highly reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are generated by photoactivation of the anticancer platinum(IV) complex trans,trans,trans-[Pt(N3 )2 (OH)2 (MA)(Py)] (MA=methylamine, Py=pyridine). Singlet oxygen is formed from the hydroxido ligands and not from dissolved oxygen, and ammine ligands are products from the conversion of azido ligands to nitrenes. Both processes can induce oxidation of guanine.

  18. Intracellular and in vivo oxygen sensing using phosphorescent iridium(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Tobita, Seiji; Yoshihara, Toshitada

    2016-08-01

    Molecular oxygen plays an indispensable role as a terminal electron acceptor in the electron transport chain in mitochondria. Acute or chronic oxygen deprivation (hypoxia) in organisms results in various diseases, and the elucidation of the pathogenic mechanism of hypoxia-related diseases and various cellular responses to hypoxia is an urgent issue. Optical oxygen imaging methods using phosphorescent probes have opened up techniques for noninvasive imaging of the intracellular and tissue oxygen status, and oxygen-sensitive probes play a key role in the development of this approach. We expect that phosphorescent Ir(III) complexes can serve as new oxygen-sensing probes for intracellular and intravascular oxygen imaging in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Density functional theory studies of oxygen and carbonate binding to a dicopper patellamide complex.

    PubMed

    Latifi, Reza; Bagherzadeh, Mojtaba; Milne, Bruce F; Jaspars, Marcel; de Visser, Sam P

    2008-12-01

    In this work we present results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations on dicopper patellamides and their affinity for molecular oxygen and carbonate. Patellamides are cyclic octapeptides that are produced by a cyanobacterium, and may show promise as therapeutics. Thus, carbonate binding to a dicopper patellamide center gives a stable cyclic octapeptide with a twist of almost 90 degrees . The system exists in close-lying open-shell singlet and triplet spin states with two unpaired electrons in orthogonal sigma* orbitals on each metal center. Subsequently, we replaced carbonate with dioxygen and found a stable Cu2(mu-O)2 diamond shaped patellamide core. In this structure the original dioxygen bond is significantly weakened to essentially a single bond, which should enable the system to transfer these oxygen atoms to substrates. We predicted the IR and Raman spectra of the Cu2(mu-O)2 diamond shaped patellamide structure using density functional theory and found a considerable isotope effect on the O-O stretch vibration for 16O2 versus 18O2 bound structures. Our studies reveal that carbonate forms an extremely stable complex with dicopper patellamide, but that additional molecular oxygen to this system does not give a potential oxidant. Therefore, it is more likely that carbonate prepares the system for dioxygen binding by folding it into the correct configuration followed in the proposed catalytic cycle by a protonation event preceding dioxygen binding to enable the system to reorganize to form a stable Cu2(mu-O)2-patellamide cluster. Alternatively, carbonate may act as an inhibitor that blocks the catalytic activity of the system. It is anticipated that the Cu2(mu-O)2-patellamide structure is a potential active oxidant of the dicopper patellamide complex.

  20. Functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Wemmer, David E.; Spence, Megan; Rubin, Seth

    2003-11-25

    A functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor that selectively associates with one or more target species, and a method for assaying and screening for one or a plurality of target species utilizing one or a plurality of functionalized active-nucleus complexes with at least two of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes having an attraction affinity to different corresponding target species. The functionalized active-nucleus complex has an active-nucleus and a targeting carrier. The method involves functionalizing an active-nucleus, for each functionalized active-nucleus complex, by incorporating the active-nucleus into a macromolucular or molecular complex that is capable of binding one of the target species and then bringing the macromolecular or molecular complexes into contact with the target species and detecting the occurrence of or change in a nuclear magnetic resonance signal from each of the active-nuclei in each of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes.

  1. Metal complexes with oxygen-functionalized NHC ligands: synthesis and applications.

    PubMed

    Hameury, Sophie; de Frémont, Pierre; Braunstein, Pierre

    2017-02-06

    Ligand design has met with considerable success with both categories of hybrid ligands, which are characterized by chemically different donor groups, and of N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs). Their spectacular development and diversity are attracting worldwide interest and offers almost unlimited diversity and potential in e.g. coordination/organometallic main group and transition metal chemistry, catalysis, medicinal chemistry and materials science. This review aims at providing a comprehensive update on a specific class of ligands that has enjoyed much attention in the past few years, at the intersection between the two categories mentioned above, that of hybrid NHC ligands in which the functionality associated with the carbene donor is of the oxygen-donor type. For each type of oxygen-donor present in such chelating (Section 1) or bridging (Section 2) hybrid ligands, we will examine the synthesis, structures and reactivity of their metal complexes and their applications, with a special focus on homogeneous catalysis (Section 3). Thus, hydrogenation, C-H bond activation, C-C, C-N, C-O bond formation, hydrolysis of silanes, oligomerization, polymerization, metathesis, hydrosilylation, C-C bond cleavage, acceptorless dehydrogenation, dehalogenation/hydrogen transfer, oxidation and reduction reactions will be successively presented in a tabular manner, to facilitate an overview and a rapid identification of the relevant publications describing which metals associated with a given oxygen functionality are most suitable. The literature coverage includes the year 2015.

  2. Neutralizing a Surface Charge on the FMN Subdomain Increases the Activity of Neuronal Nitric-oxide Synthase by Enhancing the Oxygen Reactivity of the Enzyme Heme-Nitric Oxide Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Fadlalla, Mohammed; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Ray, Sougata Sinha; Panda, Koustubh; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2009-01-01

    Nitric-oxide synthases (NOSs) are calmodulin-dependent flavoheme enzymes that oxidize l-Arg to nitric oxide (NO) and l-citrulline. Their catalytic behaviors are complex and are determined by their rates of heme reduction (kr), ferric heme-NO dissociation (kd), and ferrous heme-NO oxidation (kox). We found that point mutation (E762N) of a conserved residue on the enzyme's FMN subdomain caused the NO synthesis activity to double compared with wild type nNOS. However, in the absence of l-Arg, NADPH oxidation rates suggested that electron flux through the heme was slower in E762N nNOS, and this correlated with the mutant having a 60% slower kr. During NO synthesis, little heme-NO complex accumulated in the mutant, compared with ∼50–70% of the wild-type nNOS accumulating as this complex. This suggested that the E762N nNOS is hyperactive because it minimizes buildup of an inactive ferrous heme-NO complex during NO synthesis. Indeed, we found that kox was 2 times faster in the E762N mutant than in wild-type nNOS. The mutational effect on kox was independent of calmodulin. Computer simulation and experimental measures both indicated that the slower kr and faster kox of E762N nNOS combine to lower its apparent Km,O2 for NO synthesis by at least 5-fold, which in turn increases its V/Km value and enables it to be hyperactive in steady-state NO synthesis. Our work underscores how sensitive nNOS activity is to changes in the kox and reveals a novel means for the FMN module or protein-protein interactions to alter nNOS activity. PMID:19473991

  3. Artificial synthetic Mn(IV)Ca-oxido complexes mimic the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changhui; Zhang, Chunxi; Dong, Hongxing; Zhao, Jingquan

    2015-03-14

    A novel family of heteronuclear Mn(IV)Ca-oxido complexes containing Mn(IV)Ca-oxido cuboidal moieties and reactive water molecules on Ca(2+) have been synthesized and characterized to mimic the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) in nature.

  4. Chemical Recognition of Active Oxygen Species on the Surface of Oxygen Evolution Reaction Electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunzhen; Fontaine, Olivier; Tarascon, Jean-Marie; Grimaud, Alexis

    2017-07-17

    Owing to the transient nature of the intermediates formed during the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) on the surface of transition metal oxides, their nature remains largely elusive by the means of simple techniques. The use of chemical probes is proposed, which, owing to their specific affinities towards different oxygen species, unravel the role played by these species on the OER mechanism. For that, tetraalkylammonium (TAA) cations, previously known for their surfactant properties, are introduced, which interact with the active oxygen sites and modify the hydrogen bond network on the surface of OER catalysts. Combining chemical probes with isotopic and pH-dependent measurements, it is further demonstrated that the introduction of iron into amorphous Ni oxyhydroxide films used as model catalysts deeply modifies the proton exchange properties, and therefore the OER mechanism and activity. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. An energetic comparison of different models for the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Siegbahn, Per E M

    2009-12-30

    The computed total energy from a cluster model DFT calculation is used to discriminate between different suggested models for the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II. The comparison between different structures rules out several suggestions. Only one suggested structure remains.

  6. Reactive oxygen species production induced by pore opening in cardiac mitochondria: The role of complex II.

    PubMed

    Korge, Paavo; John, Scott A; Calmettes, Guillaume; Weiss, James N

    2017-06-16

    Succinate-driven reverse electron transport (RET) through complex I is hypothesized to be a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that induces permeability transition pore (PTP) opening and damages the heart during ischemia/reperfusion. Because RET can only generate ROS when mitochondria are fully polarized, this mechanism is self-limiting once PTP opens during reperfusion. In the accompanying article (Korge, P., Calmettes, G., John, S. A., and Weiss, J. N. (2017) J. Biol. Chem. 292, 9882-9895), we showed that ROS production after PTP opening can be sustained when complex III is damaged (simulated by antimycin). Here we show that complex II can also contribute to sustained ROS production in isolated rabbit cardiac mitochondria following inner membrane pore formation induced by either alamethicin or calcium-induced PTP opening. Two conditions are required to maximize malonate-sensitive ROS production by complex II in isolated mitochondria: (a) complex II inhibition by atpenin A5 or complex III inhibition by stigmatellin that results in succinate-dependent reduction of the dicarboxylate-binding site of complex II (site IIf); (b) pore opening in the inner membrane resulting in rapid efflux of succinate/fumarate and other dicarboxylates capable of competitively binding to site IIf The decrease in matrix [dicarboxylate] allows O2 access to reduced site IIf, thereby making electron donation to O2 possible, explaining the rapid increase in ROS production provided that site IIf is reduced. Because ischemia is known to inhibit complexes II and III and increase matrix succinate/fumarate levels, we hypothesize that by allowing dicarboxylate efflux from the matrix, PTP opening during reperfusion may activate sustained ROS production by this mechanism after RET-driven ROS production has ceased. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Activation of oxygen evolving perovskites for oxygen reduction by functionalization with Fe-N(x)/C groups.

    PubMed

    Rincón, Rosalba A; Masa, Justus; Mehrpour, Sara; Tietz, Frank; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2014-12-07

    The incorporation of Fe-Nx/C moieties into perovskites remarkably activates them for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and also leads to notable improvement of their activity towards the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) thus presenting a new route for realizing high performance, low cost bifunctional catalysts for reversible oxygen electrodes.

  8. Inhibition of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II and depletion of extrinsic polypeptides by nickel.

    PubMed

    Boisvert, Steve; Joly, David; Leclerc, Sébastien; Govindachary, Sridharan; Harnois, Johanne; Carpentier, Robert

    2007-12-01

    The toxic effect of Ni(2+) on photosynthetic electron transport was studied in a photosystem II submembrane fraction. It was shown that Ni(2+) strongly inhibits oxygen evolution in the millimolar range of concentration. The inhibition was insensitive to NaCl but significantly decreased in the presence of CaCl(2). Maximal chlorophyll fluorescence, together with variable fluorescence, maximal quantum yield of photosystem II, and flash-induced fluorescence decays were all significantly declined by Ni(2+). Further, the extrinsic polypeptides of 16 and 24 kDa associated with the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II were depleted following Ni(2+) treatment. It was deduced that interaction of Ni(2+) with these polypeptides caused a conformational change that induced their release together with Ca(2+) from the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II with consequent inhibition of the electron transport activity.

  9. A foundational methodology for determining system static complexity using notional lunar oxygen production processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Nicholas James

    This thesis serves to develop a preliminary foundational methodology for evaluating the static complexity of future lunar oxygen production systems when extensive information is not yet available about the various systems under consideration. Evaluating static complexity, as part of a overall system complexity analysis, is an important consideration in ultimately selecting a process to be used in a lunar base. When system complexity is higher, there is generally an overall increase in risk which could impact the safety of astronauts and the economic performance of the mission. To evaluate static complexity in lunar oxygen production, static complexity is simplified and defined into its essential components. First, three essential dimensions of static complexity are investigated, including interconnective complexity, strength of connections, and complexity in variety. Then a set of methods is developed upon which to separately evaluate each dimension. Q-connectivity analysis is proposed as a means to evaluate interconnective complexity and strength of connections. The law of requisite variety originating from cybernetic theory is suggested to interpret complexity in variety. Secondly, a means to aggregate the results of each analysis is proposed to create holistic measurement for static complexity using the Single Multi-Attribute Ranking Technique (SMART). Each method of static complexity analysis and the aggregation technique is demonstrated using notional data for four lunar oxygen production processes.

  10. Reactive oxygen species production induced by pore opening in cardiac mitochondria: The role of complex III.

    PubMed

    Korge, Paavo; Calmettes, Guillaume; John, Scott A; Weiss, James N

    2017-06-16

    Recent evidence has implicated succinate-driven reverse electron transport (RET) through complex I as a major source of damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS) underlying reperfusion injury after prolonged cardiac ischemia. However, this explanation may be incomplete, because RET on reperfusion is self-limiting and therefore transient. RET can only generate ROS when mitochondria are well polarized, and it ceases when permeability transition pores (PTP) open during reperfusion. Because prolonged ischemia/reperfusion also damages electron transport complexes, we investigated whether such damage could lead to ROS production after PTP opening has occurred. Using isolated cardiac mitochondria, we demonstrate a novel mechanism by which antimycin-inhibited complex III generates significant amounts of ROS in the presence of Mg(2+) and NAD(+) and the absence of exogenous substrates upon inner membrane pore formation by alamethicin or Ca(2+)-induced PTP opening. We show that H2O2 production under these conditions is related to Mg(2+)-dependent NADH generation by malic enzyme. H2O2 production is blocked by stigmatellin, indicating its origin from complex III, and by piericidin, demonstrating the importance of NADH-related ubiquinone reduction for ROS production under these conditions. For maximal ROS production, the rate of NADH generation has to be equal or below that of NADH oxidation, as further increases in [NADH] elevate ubiquinol-related complex III reduction beyond the optimal range for ROS generation. These results suggest that if complex III is damaged during ischemia, PTP opening may result in succinate/malate-fueled ROS production from complex III due to activation of malic enzyme by increases in matrix [Mg(2+)], [NAD(+)], and [ADP]. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Microfluidic Platform Generates Oxygen Landscapes for Localized Hypoxic Activation

    PubMed Central

    Rexius, Megan L.; Mauleon, Gerardo; Malik, Asrar B.; Rehman, Jalees; Eddington, David T.

    2014-01-01

    An open-well microfluidic platform generates an oxygen landscape using gas-perfused networks which diffuse across a membrane. The device enables real-time analysis of cellular and tissue responses to oxygen tension to define how cells adapt to heterogeneous oxygen conditions found in the physiological setting. We demonstrate that localized hypoxic activation of cells elicited specific metabolic and gene responses in human microvascular endothelial cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. A robust demonstration of the compatibility of the device with standard laboratory techniques demonstrates the wide utility of the method. This platform is ideally suited to study real-time cell responses and cell-cell interactions within physiologically relevant oxygen landscapes. PMID:25315003

  12. Microfluidic platform generates oxygen landscapes for localized hypoxic activation.

    PubMed

    Rexius-Hall, Megan L; Mauleon, Gerardo; Malik, Asrar B; Rehman, Jalees; Eddington, David T

    2014-12-21

    An open-well microfluidic platform generates an oxygen landscape using gas-perfused networks which diffuse across a membrane. The device enables real-time analysis of cellular and tissue responses to oxygen tension to define how cells adapt to heterogeneous oxygen conditions found in the physiological setting. We demonstrate that localized hypoxic activation of cells elicited specific metabolic and gene responses in human microvascular endothelial cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. A robust demonstration of the compatibility of the device with standard laboratory techniques demonstrates the wide utility of the method. This platform is ideally suited to study real-time cell responses and cell-cell interactions within physiologically relevant oxygen landscapes.

  13. Synthesis, characterization and biological relevance of some metal (II) complexes with oxygen, nitrogen and oxygen (ONO) donor Schiff base ligand derived from thiazole and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagesh, G. Y.; Mruthyunjayaswamy, B. H. M.

    2015-04-01

    The novel Schiff base ligand 2-((2-hydroxynaphthalen-1-yl)methylene)-N-(4-phenylthiazol-2-yl)hydrazinecarboxamide (L) obtained by the condensation of N-(4-phenylthiazol-2-yl)hydrazinecarboxamide with 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde and its newly synthesized Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes have been characterized by microanalysis, molar conductance, IR, 1H NMR, ESI-mass, UV-Visible, TGA/DTA, ESR and powder X-ray diffraction data to explicate their structures. The IR results confirmed the tridentate binding of the ligand involving oxygen atom of amide carbonyl, azomethine nitrogen and naphthol oxygen. 1H NMR spectral data of the ligand (L) and its Zn(II) complex agreed well with the proposed structures. Thermogravimetric studies for Cu(II) and Ni(II) complexes indicated the presence of coordinated water molecules and the final product is the metal oxide. In order to appraise the effect of antimicrobial activity of metal ions upon chelation, the newly synthesized ligand and its metal complexes were screened for their antimicrobial activity by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) method. The DNA cleavage activities were studied using plasmid DNA pBR322 (Bangal re Genei, Bengaluru, Cat. No 105850) as a target molecule by agarose gel electrophoresis method. The brine shrimp bioassay was also carried out to study the in vitro cytotoxicity properties against Artemia salina. Furthermore, the antioxidant activity were determined in vitro by reduction of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH). The ligand exhibited better in vitro-antioxidant activity than its metal complexes.

  14. [Inhibition of oxygen consumption by annonaceous acetogenins in liver cell respiration and their structure-activity relationship].

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhi-Fang; Wei, Xiao-yi; Xie, Hai-hui; Yang, Ren-zhou

    2002-10-01

    To study the inhibition of oxygen consumption by annonaceous acetogenins (ACG) and their structure-activity relationship (SAR). The inhibition of oxygen consumption in chicken liver cell respiration by different structural ACG was studied by using oxygen electrode technique. Six ACG showed potent inhibitory effects like rotenone which was a classical inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I, and was more potent than complex IV inhibitor KCN. The IC50 values of six ACG for inhibiting oxygen consumption suggested that bistetrahydrofuran (THF) ACG was 7-11 times more active than non-THF ACG, and A1-type ACG was more potent than A2-type ACG. The terminal gamma-lactone was crucial for the inhibition of oxygen consumption. The distance between THF and gamma-lactone, the hydroxyl groups in the alkyl chain, were the important factors of SAR, but the 4-OH group possibly played some negative role in the exhibit of potent activity.

  15. Characterization of Oxygen Bridged Manganese Model Complexes Using Multifrequency (17)O-Hyperfine EPR Spectroscopies and Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Rapatskiy, Leonid; Ames, William M; Pérez-Navarro, Montserrat; Savitsky, Anton; Griese, Julia J; Weyhermüller, Thomas; Shafaat, Hannah S; Högbom, Martin; Neese, Frank; Pantazis, Dimitrios A; Cox, Nicholas

    2015-10-29

    Multifrequency pulsed EPR data are reported for a series of oxygen bridged (μ-oxo/μ-hydroxo) bimetallic manganese complexes where the oxygen is labeled with the magnetically active isotope (17)O (I = 5/2). Two synthetic complexes and two biological metallocofactors are examined: a planar bis-μ-oxo bridged complex and a bent, bis-μ-oxo-μ-carboxylato bridge complex; the dimanganese catalase, which catalyzes the dismutation of H2O2 to H2O and O2, and the recently identified manganese/iron cofactor of the R2lox protein, a homologue of the small subunit of the ribonuclotide reductase enzyme (class 1c). High field (W-band) hyperfine EPR spectroscopies are demonstrated to be ideal methods to characterize the (17)O magnetic interactions, allowing a magnetic fingerprint for the bridging oxygen ligand to be developed. It is shown that the μ-oxo bridge motif displays a small positive isotropic hyperfine coupling constant of about +5 to +7 MHz and an anisotropic/dipolar coupling of -9 MHz. In addition, protonation of the bridge is correlated with an increase of the hyperfine coupling constant. Broken symmetry density functional theory is evaluated as a predictive tool for estimating hyperfine coupling of bridging species. Experimental and theoretical results provide a framework for the characterization of the oxygen bridge in Mn metallocofactor systems, including the water oxidizing cofactor of photosystem II, allowing the substrate/solvent interface to be examined throughout its catalytic cycle.

  16. Insusceptibility of oxygen-evolving complex to high light in Betula platyphylla.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Zhang, Shi-Bao; Hu, Hong

    2015-03-01

    High mountain plants growing at high altitude have to regularly cope with high light and high UV radiation that can lead to photodamage of oxygen-evolving complex (OEC). However, the underlying mechanism of photoprotection for OEC in high mountain plants is unclear. Sun leaves of Betula platyphylla were used to examine whether cyclic electron flow (CEF) around photosystem I (PSI) plays an important role in photoprotection for OEC. Our results indicated that the value of ETRI/ETRII ratio significantly increased under high light. With increasing light intensity, non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) gradually increased, and the fraction of P700 that is oxidized in a given state gradually increased. These results indicated that CEF was significantly activated under high light. After treatment with a high light of 1600 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) for 8 h, the OEC activity did not decline, but the maximum quantum yield of PSII (F v /F m ) ratio significantly decreased. These results suggested that CEF-dependent generation of proton gradient across thylakoid membrane protected OEC activity against high light. Furthermore, the stability of PSI activity during exposure to high light suggested that the high CEF activity in B. platyphylla played an important role in photoprotection for PSI activity.

  17. Active and stable carbon nanotube/nanoparticle composite electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hoon T.; Won, Jong H.; Zelenay, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured carbon-based materials, such as nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube arrays, Co3O4/nitrogen-doped graphene hybrids and carbon nanotube–graphene complexes have shown respectable oxygen reduction reaction activity in alkaline media. Although certainly promising, the performance of these materials does not yet warrant implementation in the energy conversion/storage devices utilizing basic electrolytes, for example, alkaline fuel cells, metal-air batteries and certain electrolysers. Here we demonstrate a new type of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube/nanoparticle composite oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalyst obtained from iron acetate as an iron precursor and from cyanamide as a nitrogen and carbon nanotube precursor in a simple, scalable and single-step method. The composite has the highest oxygen reduction reaction activity in alkaline media of any non-precious metal catalysts. When used at a sufficiently high loading, this catalyst also outperforms the most active platinum-based catalysts. PMID:23715281

  18. Excited states in the active media of oxygen - iodine lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Azyazov, V N

    2009-11-30

    A review of investigations of kinetic processes in active media oxygen - iodine lasers (OILs) performed in the last decade is presented. The mechanisms of pumping and quenching of electronically and vibrationally excited O{sub 2} and I{sub 2} molecules are considered, and dissociation mechanisms of I{sub 2} in the active medium of the OIL are analysed. The values of kinetic constants of processes proceeding in the active media of OILs are recommended. (review)

  19. Isolation of photosystem II-enriched membranes and the oxygen-evolving complex subunit proteins from higher plants.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yasusi; Leng, Jing; Shen, Jian-Ren

    2011-01-01

    We describe methods to isolate highly active oxygen-evolving photosystem II (PSII) membranes and core complexes from higher plants, and to purify subunits of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC). The membrane samples used as the material for various in vitro studies of PSII are prepared by solubilizing thylakoid membranes with the nonionic detergent Triton X-100, and the core complexes are prepared by further solubilization of the PSII membranes with n-dodecyl-β-D-maltoside (β-DDM). The OEC subunit proteins are dissociated from the PSII-enriched membranes by alkaline or salt treatment, and are then purified by ion-exchange chromatography using an automated high performance liquid chromatography system.

  20. A synthetic model for the oxygen-evolving complex in Sr(2+)-containing photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changhui; Zhang, Chunxi; Dong, Hongxing; Zhao, Jingquan

    2014-08-25

    A novel heterometallic MnSr complex containing the Mn3SrO4 cuboidal moiety and all types of μ-O(2-) moieties observed in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) in Sr(2+)-containing photosystem II (PSII) has been synthesized and characterized, which provides a new synthetic model of the OEC.

  1. Snapshots of enzymatic Baeyer-Villiger catalysis: oxygen activation and intermediate stabilization.

    PubMed

    Orru, Roberto; Dudek, Hanna M; Martinoli, Christian; Torres Pazmiño, Daniel E; Royant, Antoine; Weik, Martin; Fraaije, Marco W; Mattevi, Andrea

    2011-08-19

    Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases catalyze the oxidation of carbonylic substrates to ester or lactone products using NADPH as electron donor and molecular oxygen as oxidative reactant. Using protein engineering, kinetics, microspectrophotometry, crystallography, and intermediate analogs, we have captured several snapshots along the catalytic cycle which highlight key features in enzyme catalysis. After acting as electron donor, the enzyme-bound NADP(H) forms an H-bond with the flavin cofactor. This interaction is critical for stabilizing the oxygen-activating flavin-peroxide intermediate that results from the reaction of the reduced cofactor with oxygen. An essential active-site arginine acts as anchoring element for proper binding of the ketone substrate. Its positively charged guanidinium group can enhance the propensity of the substrate to undergo a nucleophilic attack by the flavin-peroxide intermediate. Furthermore, the arginine side chain, together with the NADP(+) ribose group, forms the niche that hosts the negatively charged Criegee intermediate that is generated upon reaction of the substrate with the flavin-peroxide. The fascinating ability of Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases to catalyze a complex multistep catalytic reaction originates from concerted action of this Arg-NADP(H) pair and the flavin subsequently to promote flavin reduction, oxygen activation, tetrahedral intermediate formation, and product synthesis and release. The emerging picture is that these enzymes are mainly oxygen-activating and "Criegee-stabilizing" catalysts that act on any chemically suitable substrate that can diffuse into the active site, emphasizing their potential value as toolboxes for biocatalytic applications.

  2. Mitochondrial complex I dysfunction in rat heart with aging: critical role of reactive oxygen species and cardiolipin.

    PubMed

    Petrosillo, Giuseppe; Matera, Mariagiuseppa; Moro, Nicola; Ruggiero, Francesca M; Paradies, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are considered a key factor in the heart aging process. Mitochondrial respiration is an important site of ROS generation and a potential contributor to heart functional changes with aging. We have examined the effects of aging on various parameters related to mitochondrial bioenergetics in rat heart, such as complex I activity, oxygen consumption, membrane potential, ROS production, and cardiolipin content and oxidation. A loss in complex I activity, state 3 respiration, and membrane potential was found in mitochondria with aging. The capacity of mitochondria to produce H(2)O(2) was significantly increased in aged rats. The mitochondrial content of cardiolipin, a phospholipid required for optimal activity of complex I, significantly decreased as a function of aging, whereas there was a significant increase in the level of oxidized cardiolipin. The lower complex I activity in mitochondria from aged rats could be almost completely restored to the level of young heart by exogenously added cardiolipin, but not by other phospholipids nor by peroxidized cardiolipin. It is proposed that aging causes heart mitochondrial complex I deficiency, which can be attributed to ROS-induced cardiolipin peroxidation. These results may prove useful in elucidating the mechanism underlying mitochondrial dysfunction associated with heart aging.

  3. A chromium(III)-superoxo complex in oxygen atom transfer reactions as a chemical model of cysteine dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jaeheung; Woo, Jaeyoung; Nam, Wonwoo

    2012-07-11

    Metal-superoxo species are believed to play key roles in oxygenation reactions by metalloenzymes. One example is cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) that catalyzes the oxidation of cysteine with O(2), and an iron(III)-superoxo species is proposed as an intermediate that effects the sulfoxidation reaction. We now report the first biomimetic example showing that a chromium(III)-superoxo complex bearing a macrocyclic TMC ligand, [Cr(III)(O(2))(TMC)(Cl)](+), is an active oxidant in oxygen atom transfer (OAT) reactions, such as the oxidation of phosphine and sulfides. The electrophilic character of the Cr(III)-superoxo complex is demonstrated unambiguously in the sulfoxidation of para-substituted thioanisoles. A Cr(IV)-oxo complex, [Cr(IV)(O)(TMC)(Cl)](+), formed in the OAT reactions by the chromium(III)-superoxo complex, is characterized by X-ray crystallography and various spectroscopic methods. The present results support the proposed oxidant and mechanism in CDO, such as an iron(III)-superoxo species is an active oxidant that attacks the sulfur atom of the cysteine ligand by the terminal oxygen atom of the superoxo group, followed by the formation of a sulfoxide and an iron(IV)-oxo species via an O-O bond cleavage.

  4. Dichlorodioxomolybdenum(VI) complexes bearing oxygen-donor ligands as olefin epoxidation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Tânia S M; Gomes, Ana C; Lopes, André D; Lourenço, João P; Almeida Paz, Filipe A; Pillinger, Martyn; Gonçalves, Isabel S

    2015-08-21

    Treatment of the solvent adduct [MoO2Cl2(THF)2] with either 2 equivalents of N,N-dimethylbenzamide (DMB) or 1 equivalent of N,N'-diethyloxamide (DEO) gave the dioxomolybdenum(vi) complexes [MoO2Cl2(DMB)2] () and [MoO2Cl2(DEO)] (). The molecular structures of and were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Both complexes present a distorted octahedral geometry and adopt the cis-oxo, trans-Cl, cis-L configuration typical of complexes of the type [MoO2X2(L)n], with either the monodentate DMB or bidentate DEO oxygen-donor ligands occupying the equatorial positions trans to the oxo groups. The complexes were applied as homogeneous catalysts for the epoxidation of olefins, namely cis-cyclooctene (Cy), 1-octene, trans-2-octene, α-pinene and (R)-(+)-limonene, using tert-butylhydroperoxide (TBHP) as oxidant. In the epoxidation of Cy at 55 °C, the desired epoxide was the only product and turnover frequencies in the range of ca. 3150-3200 mol molMo(-1) h(-1) could be reached. The catalytic production of cyclooctene oxide was investigated in detail, varying either the reaction temperature or the cosolvent. Complexes and were also applied in liquid-liquid biphasic catalytic epoxidation reactions by using an ionic liquid of the type [C4mim][X] (C4mim = 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium; X = NTf2, BF4 or PF6] as a solvent to immobilise the metal catalysts. Recycling for multiple catalytic runs was achieved without loss of activity.

  5. Early Oxygen-Utilization and Brain Activity in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Linda S.; Groenendaal, Floris; Toet, Mona C.; Lemmers, Petra M. A.; Vosse van de, Renè E.; van Bel, Frank; Benders, Manon J. N. L.

    2015-01-01

    The combined monitoring of oxygen supply and delivery using Near-InfraRed spectroscopy (NIRS) and cerebral activity using amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG) could yield new insights into brain metabolism and detect potentially vulnerable conditions soon after birth. The relationship between NIRS and quantitative aEEG/EEG parameters has not yet been investigated. Our aim was to study the association between oxygen utilization during the first 6 h after birth and simultaneously continuously monitored brain activity measured by aEEG/EEG. Forty-four hemodynamically stable babies with a GA < 28 weeks, with good quality NIRS and aEEG/EEG data available and who did not receive morphine were included in the study. aEEG and NIRS monitoring started at NICU admission. The relation between regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rScO2) and cerebral fractional tissue oxygen extraction (cFTOE), and quantitative measurements of brain activity such as number of spontaneous activity transients (SAT) per minute (SAT rate), the interval in seconds (i.e. time) between SATs (ISI) and the minimum amplitude of the EEG in μV (min aEEG) were evaluated. rScO2 was negatively associated with SAT rate (β=-3.45 [CI=-5.76- -1.15], p=0.004) and positively associated with ISI (β=1.45 [CI=0.44-2.45], p=0.006). cFTOE was positively associated with SAT rate (β=0.034 [CI=0.009-0.059], p=0.008) and negatively associated with ISI (β=-0.015 [CI=-0.026- -0.004], p=0.007). Oxygen delivery and utilization, as indicated by rScO2 and cFTOE, are directly related to functional brain activity, expressed by SAT rate and ISI during the first hours after birth, showing an increase in oxygen extraction in preterm infants with increased early electro-cerebral activity. NIRS monitored oxygenation may be a useful biomarker of brain vulnerability in high-risk infants. PMID:25965343

  6. Oxygen evolving reactions catalysed by manganese-oxo-complexes adsorbed on clays.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Philipp

    2009-08-21

    A series of dinuclear manganese-oxo-complexes was prepared and adsorbed on kaolinite and montmorillonite clays. As indicated by UV-Vis spectroscopy, immobilization of the manganese compounds greatly altered the electronic properties due to strong interactions with the clay surfaces. When studied for their ability to catalyze oxygen formation upon reactions with the strong oxygen-transferring oxidants H(2)O(2) and oxone, it was found that surface adsorption yielded catalysts of improved performance for oxygen formation in aqueous media. Both the rates of oxygen evolution and catalyst stabilities were significantly increased for the clay hybrids of most complexes in comparison to homogeneous solutions of the compounds. Additionally, four heterogeneous systems were also found to catalyze the evolution of O(2) in reactions with the non-oxygen transferring, single- electron oxidation agent Ce(IV)--a reaction not observed for any dinuclear manganese complex in homogeneous reaction. Implications of these observations concerning the mechanism of oxygen formation and the development of manganese-based water oxidation catalysts are discussed.

  7. Photodamage to the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II by visible light

    PubMed Central

    Zavafer, Alonso; Cheah, Mun Hon; Hillier, Warwick; Chow, Wah Soon; Takahashi, Shunichi

    2015-01-01

    Light damages photosynthetic machinery, primarily photosystem II (PSII), and it results in photoinhibition. A new photodamage model, the two-step photodamage model, suggests that photodamage to PSII initially occurs at the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) by light energy absorbed by manganese and that the PSII reaction center is subsequently damaged by light energy absorbed by photosynthetic pigments due to the limitation of electrons to the PSII reaction center. However, it is still uncertain whether this model is applicable to photodamage to PSII under visible light as manganese absorbs visible light only weakly. In the present study, we identified the initial site of photodamage to PSII upon illumination of visible light using PSII membrane fragments isolated from spinach leaves. When PSII samples were exposed to visible light in the presence of an exogenous electron acceptor, both PSII total activity and the PSII reaction centre activity declined due to photodamage. The supplemental addition of an electron donor to the PSII reaction centre alleviated the decline of the reaction centre activity but not the PSII total activity upon the light exposure. Our results demonstrate that visible light damages OEC prior to photodamage to the PSII reaction center, consistent with two-step photodamage model. PMID:26560020

  8. Photodamage to the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II by visible light.

    PubMed

    Zavafer, Alonso; Cheah, Mun Hon; Hillier, Warwick; Chow, Wah Soon; Takahashi, Shunichi

    2015-11-12

    Light damages photosynthetic machinery, primarily photosystem II (PSII), and it results in photoinhibition. A new photodamage model, the two-step photodamage model, suggests that photodamage to PSII initially occurs at the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) by light energy absorbed by manganese and that the PSII reaction center is subsequently damaged by light energy absorbed by photosynthetic pigments due to the limitation of electrons to the PSII reaction center. However, it is still uncertain whether this model is applicable to photodamage to PSII under visible light as manganese absorbs visible light only weakly. In the present study, we identified the initial site of photodamage to PSII upon illumination of visible light using PSII membrane fragments isolated from spinach leaves. When PSII samples were exposed to visible light in the presence of an exogenous electron acceptor, both PSII total activity and the PSII reaction centre activity declined due to photodamage. The supplemental addition of an electron donor to the PSII reaction centre alleviated the decline of the reaction centre activity but not the PSII total activity upon the light exposure. Our results demonstrate that visible light damages OEC prior to photodamage to the PSII reaction center, consistent with two-step photodamage model.

  9. TDDFT study on recognition mechanism for the oxygen sensing of the cyclometalated platinum (II) complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Huan; Zhao, Zhengyan; Li, Guanglan; Gao, Liguo; Zhao, Ningjiu; Li, Peng; Jia, Yan; Zhou, Chenyang; Zhang, Mingzhen; Wang, Yong; Hao, Ce; Tang, Xiaoying

    2017-08-01

    The influence of oxygen molecule on the luminescent properties of a cyclometalated Pt(II) complex Lxp1, was investigated using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) methods. Analysis of frontier molecular orbitals and electronic configuration indicated that the highest-occupied molecular orbital of the Lxp1 has a significant mixture of metal Pt (d) as well as 2-phenylpyridine and acetyl acetone(π). The lowest-unoccupied orbital of the Lxp1 primarily locates on π* of 2-phenylpyridineligands. The emission mechanism of the cyclometalated Pt(II) complex Lxp1 is assigned to the mixing of ligand-to-metal charge transfer and ligand-to-ligand charge transfer. The emission mechanism of the Lxp1-O2 complex can be attributed to the charge transfer from the oxygen molecule to the luminescent material Lxp1. Our study showed that intermolecular hydrogen bonding between the Lxp1 and oxygen molecule was strengthened by the calculation of electronic excitation, leading to a luminescence-decreasing phenomenon. The calculation of the radiative and non-radiative decay rate constants of the Lxp1 and the Lxp1-O2 complex demonstrates that the phosphorescence from T1-S0 of the Lxp1 would alter to the internal conversion from T1-T0 of the Lxp1-O2 complex. This alteration further explains the luminescence quenching phenomenon of the cyclometalated Pt(II) complex Lxp1 after interacting with oxygen molecule.

  10. A rhenium complex doped in a silica molecular sieve for molecular oxygen sensing: Construction and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaozhou; Li, Yanxiao

    2016-01-01

    This paper reported a diamine ligand and its Re(I) complex for potential application in oxygen sensing. The novelty of this diamine ligand localized at its increased conjugation chain which had a typical electron-withdrawing group of 1,3,4-oxadiazole. Electronic distribution of excited electrons and their lifetime were supposed to be increased, favoring oxygen sensing collision. This hypothesis was confirmed by single crystal analysis, theoretical calculation and photophysical measurement. It was found that this Re(I) complex had a long-lived emission peaking at 545 nm, favoring sensing application. By doping this complex into a silica matrix MCM-41, oxygen sensing performance and mechanism of the resulting composites were discussed in detail. Non-linear Stern-Volmer working curves were observed with maximum sensitivity of 5.54 and short response time of 6 s.

  11. A rhenium complex doped in a silica molecular sieve for molecular oxygen sensing: Construction and characterization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaozhou; Li, Yanxiao

    2016-01-15

    This paper reported a diamine ligand and its Re(I) complex for potential application in oxygen sensing. The novelty of this diamine ligand localized at its increased conjugation chain which had a typical electron-withdrawing group of 1,3,4-oxadiazole. Electronic distribution of excited electrons and their lifetime were supposed to be increased, favoring oxygen sensing collision. This hypothesis was confirmed by single crystal analysis, theoretical calculation and photophysical measurement. It was found that this Re(I) complex had a long-lived emission peaking at 545 nm, favoring sensing application. By doping this complex into a silica matrix MCM-41, oxygen sensing performance and mechanism of the resulting composites were discussed in detail. Non-linear Stern-Volmer working curves were observed with maximum sensitivity of 5.54 and short response time of ~6 s. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Activated oxygen alters cerebral microvascular responses in newborn pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Leffler, C.W.; Busiia, D.W.; Armstead, W.M.; Mirro, R.; Thelin, O. )

    1990-02-26

    In piglets, cerebral ischemia/reperfusion blocks prostanoid dependent cerebral vasodilation to hypercapnia (CO{sub 2}) and hypotension but not prostanoid independent dilation to isoproterenol (Isu) or constriction to norepinephrine (NE). Ischemia/reperfusion increases activated-O{sub 2} production by piglet brains. Using cranial windows in piglets, the authors investigated the hypothesis that activated oxygen can block prostanoid dependent cerebral vasodilator responses to CO{sub 2} and hypotension without altering responses to Isu and NE. Exposure to an activated oxygen generating system of xanthine oxidase, hypoxanthine, and Fe that made about 3 times the activated-O{sub 2} on the brain surface as ischemia/reperfusion caused reversible pial arteriolar dilation. After exposure, pial arteriolar dilation was reduced to CO{sub 2} and hypotension but not to Isu. NE constrictor responses were also unaltered. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or H{sub 2}O{sub 2} + Fe caused constriction followed by reversible dilation. After exposure, pial arteriolar dilation in response to CO{sub 2} and hypotension was not altered. However, addition of xanthine oxidase and hypoxanthine with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and Fe totally eliminated pial arteriolar dilator responses to CO{sub 2} and hypotension but did not decrease dilation caused by Isu or constriction caused by NE. The authors conclude that activated oxygen could produce the altered prostanoid dependent pial arteriolar responses observed following ischemia in piglets.

  13. Changes to coral health and metabolic activity under oxygen deprivation.

    PubMed

    Murphy, James W A; Richmond, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    On Hawaiian reefs, the fast-growing, invasive algae Gracilaria salicornia overgrows coral heads, restricting water flow and light, thereby smothering corals. Field data shows hypoxic conditions (dissolved oxygen (DO2) < 2 mg/L) occurring underneath algal mats at night, and concurrent bleaching and partial tissue loss of shaded corals. To analyze the impact of nighttime oxygen-deprivation on coral health, this study evaluated changes in coral metabolism through the exposure of corals to chronic hypoxic conditions and subsequent analyses of lactate, octopine, alanopine, and strombine dehydrogenase activities, critical enzymes employed through anaerobic respiration. Following treatments, lactate and octopine dehydrogenase activities were found to have no significant response in activities with treatment and time. However, corals subjected to chronic nighttime hypoxia were found to exhibit significant increases in alanopine dehydrogenase activity after three days of exposure and strombine dehydrogenase activity starting after one overnight exposure cycle. These findings provide new insights into coral metabolic shifts in extremely low-oxygen environments and point to ADH and SDH assays as tools for quantifying the impact of hypoxia on coral health.

  14. Changes to coral health and metabolic activity under oxygen deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    On Hawaiian reefs, the fast-growing, invasive algae Gracilaria salicornia overgrows coral heads, restricting water flow and light, thereby smothering corals. Field data shows hypoxic conditions (dissolved oxygen (DO2) < 2 mg/L) occurring underneath algal mats at night, and concurrent bleaching and partial tissue loss of shaded corals. To analyze the impact of nighttime oxygen-deprivation on coral health, this study evaluated changes in coral metabolism through the exposure of corals to chronic hypoxic conditions and subsequent analyses of lactate, octopine, alanopine, and strombine dehydrogenase activities, critical enzymes employed through anaerobic respiration. Following treatments, lactate and octopine dehydrogenase activities were found to have no significant response in activities with treatment and time. However, corals subjected to chronic nighttime hypoxia were found to exhibit significant increases in alanopine dehydrogenase activity after three days of exposure and strombine dehydrogenase activity starting after one overnight exposure cycle. These findings provide new insights into coral metabolic shifts in extremely low-oxygen environments and point to ADH and SDH assays as tools for quantifying the impact of hypoxia on coral health. PMID:27114888

  15. Oxygen-evolving complex of Photosystem II: an analysis of second-shell residues and hydrogen-bonding networks.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Leslie; Vinyard, David J; Khan, Sahr; Brudvig, Gary W

    2015-04-01

    The oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) is a Mn4O5Ca cluster embedded in the Photosystem II (PSII) protein complex. As the site of water oxidation, the OEC is connected to the lumen by channels that conduct water, oxygen, and/or protons during the catalytic cycle. The hydrogen-bond networks found in these channels also serve to stabilize the oxidized intermediates, known as the S states. We review recent developments in characterizing these networks via protein mutations, molecular inhibitors, and computational modeling. On the basis of these results, we highlight regions of the PSII protein in which changes have indirect effects on the S1, S2, and S3 oxidation states of the OEC while still allowing photosynthetic activity.

  16. Activation mechanism of Gi and Go by reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Motohiro; Schey, Kevin L; Takagahara, Shuichi; Kontani, Kenji; Katada, Toshiaki; Urano, Yasuteru; Nagano, Tetsuo; Nagao, Taku; Kurose, Hitoshi

    2002-03-15

    Reactive oxygen species are proposed to work as intracellular mediators. One of their target proteins is the alpha subunit of heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (Galpha(i) and Galpha(o)), leading to activation. H(2)O(2) is one of the reactive oxygen species and activates purified Galpha(i2). However, the activation requires the presence of Fe(2+), suggesting that H(2)O(2) is converted to more reactive species such as c*OH. The analysis with mass spectrometry shows that seven cysteine residues (Cys(66), Cys(112), Cys(140), Cys(255), Cys(287), Cys(326), and Cys(352)) of Galpha(i2) are modified by the treatment with *OH. Among these cysteine residues, Cys(66), Cys(112), Cys(140), Cys(255), and Cys(352) are not involved in *OH-induced activation of Galpha(i2). Although the modification of Cys(287) but not Cys(326) is required for subunit dissociation, the modification of both Cys(287) and Cys(326) is necessary for the activation of Galpha(i2) as determined by pertussis toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation, conformation-dependent change of trypsin digestion pattern or guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate binding. Wild type Galpha(i2) but not Cys(287)- or Cys(326)-substituted mutants are activated by UV light, singlet oxygen, superoxide anion, and nitric oxide, indicating that these oxidative stresses activate Galpha(i2) by the mechanism similar to *OH-induced activation. Because Cys(287) exists only in G(i) family, this study explains the selective activation of G(i)/G(o) by oxidative stresses.

  17. Xanthohumol induces generation of reactive oxygen species and triggers apoptosis through inhibition of mitochondrial electron transfer chain complex I.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Chu, Wei; Wei, Peng; Liu, Ying; Wei, Taotao

    2015-12-01

    Xanthohumol is a prenylflavonoid extracted from hops (Humulus lupulus). It possesses anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory activities in vitro and in vivo, and offers therapeutic benefits for treatment of metabolic syndromes. However, the precise mechanisms underlying its pharmacological effects remain to be elucidated, together with its cellular target. Here, we provide evidence that xanthohumol directly interacts with the mitochondrial electron transfer chain complex I (NADH dehydrogenase), inhibits the oxidative phosphorylation, triggers the production of reactive oxygen species, and induces apoptosis. In addition, we show that as a result of the inhibition of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, xanthohumol exposure causes a rapid decrease of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Furthermore, we showed that xanthohumol up-regulates the glycolytic capacity in cells, and thus compensates cellular ATP generation. Dissection of the multiple steps of aerobic respiration by extracellular flux assays revealed that xanthohumol specifically inhibits the activity of mitochondrial complex I, but had little effect on that of complex II, III and IV. Inhibition of complex I by xanthohumol caused the overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which are responsible for the induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. We also found that isoxanthohumol, the structural isomer of xanthohumol, is inactive to cells, suggesting that the reactive 2-hydroxyl group of xanthohumol is crucial for its targeting to the mitochondrial complex I. Together, the remodeling of cell metabolism revealed here has therapeutic potential for the use of xanthohumol.

  18. Dual sensing of oxygen and temperature using quantum dots and a ruthenium complex.

    PubMed

    Jorge, P A S; Maule, C; Silva, A J; Benrashid, R; Santos, J L; Farahi, F

    2008-01-14

    A scheme for the simultaneous determination of oxygen and temperature using quantum dots and a ruthenium complex is demonstrated. The luminescent complex [Ru(II)-tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline)]2+ is immobilized in a non-hydrolytic sol-gel matrix and used as the oxygen sensor. The temperature information is provided by the luminescent emission of core-shell CdSe-ZnS semiconductor nanocrystals immobilized in the same material. Measurements of oxygen and temperature could be performed with associated errors of +/-2% of oxygen concentration and +/-1 degrees C, respectively. In addition, it is shown that while the dye luminescence intensity is quenched both by oxygen and temperature, the nanocrystals luminescent emission responds only to temperature. Results presented demonstrate that the combined luminescence response allows the simultaneous assessment of both parameters using a single optical fiber system. In particular, it was shown that a 10% error in the measured oxygen concentration, induced by a change in the sample temperature, could be compensated using the nanocrystals temperature information and a correction function.

  19. Nucleophilic attack of hydroxide on a Mn(V) oxo complex: a model of the O-O bond formation in the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan; Akermark, Torbjörn; Liu, Jianhui; Sun, Licheng; Akermark, Björn

    2009-07-01

    A manganese(III) corrole complex, 1, has been synthesized and used to study a potential mechanism for oxidation of water to molecular oxygen. Oxidation by t-BuOOH gave the Mn(V)=O complex 2. Addition of hydroxide led to release of oxygen via the Mn(IV) complex 4 and regeneration of complex 1. It could be shown that the oxygen from (18)O-labeled water was incorporated in both the formed molecular oxygen and the peroxy intermediate 4.

  20. Complexing Methylene Blue with Phosphorus Dendrimers to Increase Photodynamic Activity.

    PubMed

    Dabrzalska, Monika; Janaszewska, Anna; Zablocka, Maria; Mignani, Serge; Majoral, Jean Pierre; Klajnert-Maculewicz, Barbara

    2017-02-23

    The efficiency of photodynamic therapy is limited mainly due to low selectivity, unfavorable biodistribution of photosensitizers, and long-lasting skin sensitivity to light. However, drug delivery systems based on nanoparticles may overcome the limitations mentioned above. Among others, dendrimers are particularly attractive as carriers, because of their globular architecture and high loading capacity. The goal of the study was to check whether an anionic phosphorus dendrimer is suitable as a carrier of a photosensitizer-methylene blue (MB). As a biological model, basal cell carcinoma cell lines were used. We checked the influence of the MB complexation on its singlet oxygen production ability using a commercial fluorescence probe. Next, cellular uptake, phototoxicity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and cell death were investigated. The MB-anionic dendrimer complex (MB-1an) was found to generate less singlet oxygen; however, the complex showed higher cellular uptake and phototoxicity against basal cell carcinoma cell lines, which was accompanied with enhanced ROS production. Owing to the obtained results, we conclude that the photodynamic activity of MB complexed with an anionic dendrimer is higher than free MB against basal cell carcinoma cell lines.

  1. Activation barriers of oxygen transformation at the active site of [FeFe] hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Finkelmann, Arndt R; Stiebritz, Martin T; Reiher, Markus

    2014-11-17

    Oxygen activation at the active sites of [FeFe] hydrogenases has been proposed to be the initial step of irreversible oxygen-induced inhibition of these enzymes. On the basis of a first theoretical study into the thermodynamics of O2 activation [Inorg. Chem. 2009, 48, 7127] we here investigate the kinetics of possible reaction paths at the distal iron atom of the active site by means of density functional theory. A sequence of steps is proposed to either form a reactive oxygen species (ROS) or fully reduce O2 to water. In this reaction cascade, two branching points are identified where water formation directly competes with harmful oxygen activation reactions. The latter are water formation by O-O bond cleavage of a hydrogen peroxide-bound intermediate competing with H2O2 dissociation and CO2 formation by a putative iron-oxo species competing with protonation of the iron-oxo species to form a hydroxyo ligand. Furthermore, we show that proton transfer to activated oxygen is fast and that proton supply to the active site is vital to prevent ROS dissociation. If sufficiently many reduction equivalents are available, oxygen activation reactions are accelerated, and oxygen reduction to water becomes possible.

  2. Removal of Biologically Active Organic Contaminants using Atomic Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor); Banks, Michael A. (Inventor); Banks, Eric B. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Biomedical devices that are to come into contact with living tissue, such as prosthetic and other implants for the human body and the containers used to store and transport them, are together cleaned of non-living, but biologically active organic materials, including endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharides, and assembled into a hermetically sealed package without recontamination. This is achieved by cleaning both the device and package components together in an apparatus, which includes a hermetically sealed chamber, in which they are contacted with atomic oxygen which biocleans them, by oxidizing the biologically active organic materials. The apparatus also includes means for manipulating the device and container and hermetically sealing the cleaned device into the cleaned container to form the package. A calibrated witness coupon visually indicates whether or not the device and container have received enough exposure to the atomic oxygen to have removed the organic materials from their surfaces. Gamma radiation is then used to sterilize the device in the sealed container.

  3. Removal of Biologically Active Organic Contaminants using Atomic Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor); Banks, Michael A. (Inventor); Banks, Eric B. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Biomedical devices that are to come into contact with living tissue, such as prosthetic and other implants for the human body and the containers used to store and transport them, are together cleaned of non-living, but biologically active organic materials, including endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharides, and assembled into a hermetically sealed package without recontamination. This is achieved by cleaning both the device and package components together in an apparatus, which includes a hermetically sealed chamber, in which they are contacted with atomic oxygen which biocleans them, by oxidizing the biologically active organic materials. The apparatus also includes means for manipulating the device and container and hermetically sealing the cleaned device into the cleaned container to form the package. A calibrated witness coupon visually indicates whether or not the device and container have received enough exposure to the atomic oxygen to have removed the organic materials from their surfaces. Gamma radiation is then used to sterilize the device in the sealed container.

  4. Synthesis of a base-stabilized silanone-coordinated complex by oxygenation of a (silyl)(silylene)tungsten complex.

    PubMed

    Muraoka, Takako; Abe, Keisuke; Haga, Youhei; Nakamura, Tomoko; Ueno, Keiji

    2011-10-05

    Base-stabilized silanone complex Cp*(OC)(2)W(SiMe(3)){O═SiMes(2)(DMAP)} (2) was synthesized by the reaction of (silyl)(silylene)tungsten complex Cp*(OC)(2)W(SiMe(3))(═SiMes(2)) (1) with 1 equiv of pyridine-N-oxide (PNO) in the presence of 4-(dimethylamino)pyridine (DMAP). Further oxygenation of 2 with 3 equiv of PNO at 80 °C resulted in the formation of a W-O-Si-O-Si framework to give disiloxanoxy complex Cp*(O)(2)W{OSiMes(2)(OSiMe(3))} (3). Complex 3 was also obtained by the direct reaction of complex 1 with 4 equiv of PNO at 80 °C.

  5. High performance oxygen sensing nanofibrous membranes of Eu(III) complex/polystyrene prepared by electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yingkui, Li

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we report the synthesis, characterization, crystal structure, and photophysical properties of a Eu 3+ complex of Eu(TTA) 3Phen, where TTA = 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetonate, and Phen = 1,10-phenanthroline. Its elementary application for oxygen-sensing application is also investigated by doping it into a polymer matrix of polystyrene (PS). Experimental data suggest that the 3 wt% doped Eu(TTA) 3Phen nanofibrous membrane exhibits a high sensitivity of 3.4 towards oxygen with a good linear relationship of R2 = 0.996. In addition, the 3 wt% doped Eu(TTA) 3Phen nanofibrous membrane owns a quick response of 9 s towards molecular oxygen, along with its excellent atmosphere insensitivity and photobleaching resistance. All these results suggest that both Eu(TTA) 3Phen and Eu(TTA) 3Phen/PS system are promising candidates for oxygen-sensing optical sensors.

  6. The Complex Transcriptional Response of Acaryochloris marina to Different Oxygen Levels

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Prieto, Miguel A.; Lin, Yuankui; Chen, Min

    2016-01-01

    Ancient oxygenic photosynthetic prokaryotes produced oxygen as a waste product, but existed for a long time under an oxygen-free (anoxic) atmosphere, before an oxic atmosphere emerged. The change in oxygen levels in the atmosphere influenced the chemistry and structure of many enzymes that contained prosthetic groups that were inactivated by oxygen. In the genome of Acaryochloris marina, multiple gene copies exist for proteins that are normally encoded by a single gene copy in other cyanobacteria. Using high throughput RNA sequencing to profile transcriptome responses from cells grown under microoxic and hyperoxic conditions, we detected 8446 transcripts out of the 8462 annotated genes in the Cyanobase database. Two-thirds of the 50 most abundant transcripts are key proteins in photosynthesis. Microoxic conditions negatively affected the levels of expression of genes encoding photosynthetic complexes, with the exception of some subunits. In addition to the known regulation of the multiple copies of psbA, we detected a similar transcriptional pattern for psbJ and psbU, which might play a key role in the altered components of photosystem II. Furthermore, regulation of genes encoding proteins important for reactive oxygen species-scavenging is discussed at genome level, including, for the first time, specific small RNAs having possible regulatory roles under varying oxygen levels. PMID:27974439

  7. Inhibition and oxygen activation in copper amine oxidases.

    PubMed

    Shepard, Eric M; Dooley, David M

    2015-05-19

    the roles of Cu(I), TPQSQ, and TPQAMQ in O2 activation, for example, distinguishing inner-sphere versus outer-sphere electron transfer mechanisms, has been actively investigated since the discovery of TPQSQ in 1991 and has only recently been clarified. Kinetics and spectroscopic studies encompassing metal substitution, stopped-flow and temperature-jump relaxation methods, and oxygen kinetic isotope experiments have provided strong support for an inner-sphere electron transfer step from Cu(I) to O2. Data for two enzymes support a mechanism wherein O2 prebinds to a three-coordinate Cu(I) site, yielding a [Cu(II)(η(1)-O2(-1))](+) intermediate, with H2O2 generated from ensuing rate-determining proton coupled electron transfer from TPQSQ. While kinetics data from the cobalt-substituted yeast enzyme indicated that O2 is reduced through an outer-sphere process involving TPQAMQ, new findings with a bacterial CuAO demonstrate that both the Cu(II) and Co(II) forms of the enzyme operate via parallel mechanisms involving metal-superoxide intermediates. Structural observations of a coordinated TPQSQ-Cu(I) complex in two CuAOs supports previous indications that Cu(II)/(I) ligand substitution chemistry may be mechanistically relevant. Substantial evidence indicates that rapid and reversible inner-sphere reduction of O2 at a three-coordinate Cu(I) site occurs, but the existence of a coordinated semiquinone in some AOs suggests that, in these enzymes, an outer-sphere reaction between O2 and TPQSQ may also be possible, since this is expected to be energetically favorable compared with outer-sphere electron transfer from TPQAMQ to O2.

  8. Active impedance matching of complex structural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macmartin, Douglas G.; Miller, David W.; Hall, Steven R.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on active impedance matching of complex structural systems are presented. Topics covered include: traveling wave model; dereverberated mobility model; computation of dereverberated mobility; control problem: optimal impedance matching; H2 optimal solution; statistical energy analysis (SEA) solution; experimental transfer functions; interferometer actuator and sensor locations; active strut configurations; power dual variables; dereverberation of complex structure; dereverberated transfer function; compensators; and relative power flow.

  9. [Metronidazole effect on active oxygen production by human blood neutrophils].

    PubMed

    Shchepetkin, I A

    1997-01-01

    The in vitro effect of metronidazole on production of active oxygen by neutrophila and in the enzymatic system of glucose-glucose oxidase-peroxidase was studied by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. An increase in the spontaneous and zymozan-stimulated chemiluminescence and a decrease in the phorbolmyristate acetate (PMA)-stimulated chemiluminescence after 2-hour preincubation of the neutrophils with 8.5 mM of metronidazole were observed. In concentrations of 0.9 to 8.7 mM metronidazole (without washing) dose-dependently lowered the neutrophil chemiluminescence in response to the effect of PMA and ionophore A23187 and to a lesser degree to that of zymozan. In doses of 20 to 100 mM the drug had an insignificant effect on production of active oxygen by the neutrophils in response to the cell stimulation by PMA, ionophore A23187 and zymozan. The data are in conformity with the scavenger effect of metronidazole on active oxygen radicals generating in the cell-free enzymatic system both in the presence and in the absence of superoxide dismutase.

  10. Bis-cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes as efficient singlet oxygen sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ruomei; Ho, David G; Hernandez, Billy; Selke, Matthias; Murphy, Drew; Djurovich, Peter I; Thompson, Mark E

    2002-12-18

    We report the singlet oxygen sensitization properties of a series of bis-cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes (i.e., (bt)2Ir(acac), (bsn)2Ir(acac), and (pq)2Ir(acac); bt = 2-phenylbenzothiazole, bsn = 2-(1-naphthyl)benzothiazole, pq = 2-phenylquinoline, and acac = acetylacetonate). Complexes with acetylacetonate ancillary ligands give singlet oxygen quantum yields near unity (PhiDelta = (0.7-1.0) +/- 0.1), whether exciting the ligand-based state or the lowest energy excited state (MLCT + 3LC). The singlet oxygen quenching rates for these beta-diketonate complexes were found to be small [(5 +/- 2) x 105 to (6 +/- 0.2) x 106 M-1 s-1], roughly 3 orders of magnitude slower than the corresponding phosphorescence quenching rate. Similar complexes were prepared with glycine or pyridine tethered to the Ir(III) center (i.e., (bsn)2Ir(gly) and (bt)2Ir(py)Cl; gly = glycine and py = pyridine). The glycine and pyridine derivatives give high singlet oxygen yields (PhiDelta = (0.7-1.0) +/- 0.1).

  11. Complex treatment of trophic affections with vascular patients using monochromatic red light and hyperbaric oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babkina, Zinaida M.; Vasilyev, Mikhail V.; Zakharov, Vyacheslav P.; Nikolayev, Viktor V.; Babkin, Vasily I.; Samoday, Valery G.; Zon, Boris A.; Pakhomov, Gennady V.; Naskidashvili, Vasily I.; Kumin, Anatoly A.

    1996-11-01

    Monochromatic red light irradiation therapy of trophic skin affections with vascular patients permits to receive positive results with small wounds. A combination of monochromatic red light and hyperbaric oxygenation is most perspective when conducting a complex therapy of trophic wounds not more than 40 mm2 and allows to diminish time of treatment almost two times.

  12. Experimental and Theoretical Studies on Biologically Active Lanthanide (III) Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostova, I.; Trendafilova, N.; Georgieva, I.; Rastogi, V. K.; Kiefer, W.

    2008-11-01

    The complexation ability and the binding mode of the ligand coumarin-3-carboxylic acid (HCCA) to La(III), Ce(III), Nd(III), Sm(III), Gd(III) and Dy(III) lanthanide ions (Ln(III)) are elucidated at experimental and theoretical level. The complexes were characterized using elemental analysis, DTA and TGA data as well as 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectra. FTIR and Raman spectroscopic techniques as well as DFT quantum chemical calculations were used for characterization of the binding mode and the structures of lanthanide(III) complexes of HCCA. The metal—ligand binding mode is predicted through molecular modeling and energy estimation of different Ln—CCA structures using B3LYP/6-31G(d) method combined with a large quasi-relativistic effective core potential for lanthanide ion. The energies obtained predict bidentate coordination of CCA- to Ln(III) ions through the carbonylic oxygen and the carboxylic oxygen. Detailed vibrational analysis of HCCA, CCA- and Ln(III) complexes based on both calculated and experimental frequencies confirms the suggested metal—ligand binding mode. The natural bonding analysis predicts strongly ionic character of the Ln(III)-CCA bonding in the- complexes studied. With the relatively resistant tumor cell line K-562 we obtained very interesting in-vitro results which are in accordance with our previously published data concerning the activity of lanthanide(III) complexes with other coumarin derivatives.

  13. Development of a novel electrochemical system for oxygen control (ESOC) to examine dissolved oxygen inhibition on algal activity.

    PubMed

    Keymer, Philip C; Pratt, Steven; Lant, Paul A

    2013-09-01

    The development of an Electrochemical System for Oxygen Control (ESOC) for examining algal photosynthetic activity as a function of dissolved oxygen (DO) is outlined. The main innovation of the tool is coulombic titration in order to balance the electrochemical reduction of oxygen with the oxygen input to achieve a steady DO set-point. ESOC allows quantification of algal oxygen production whilst simultaneously maintaining a desired DO concentration. The tool was validated abiotically by comparison with a mass transfer approach for quantifying oxygenation. It was then applied to quantify oxygen inhibition of algal activity. Five experiments, using an enriched culture of Scenedesmus sp. as the inoculum, are presented. For each experiment, ESOC was used to quantify algal activity at a series of DO set-points. In all experiments substantial oxygen inhibition was observed at DO >30 mgO2 L-1. Inhibition was shown to fit a Hill inhibition model, with a common Hill coefficient of 0.22±0.07 L mg-1 and common log10  CI50 of 27.2±0.7 mg L-1. This is the first time that the oxygen inhibition kinetic parameters have been quantified under controlled DO conditions. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Oxygen reduction activity of carbon nitride supported on carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lyth, S M; Nabae, Y; Islam, N M; Kuroki, S; Kakimoto, M; Miyata, S

    2012-06-01

    Fuel cells offer an alternative to burning fossil fuels, but use platinum as a catalyst which is expensive and scarce. Cheap, alternative catalysts could enable fuel cells to become serious contenders in the green energy sector. One promising class of catalyst for electrochemical oxygen reduction is iron-containing, nanostructured, nitrogen-doped carbon. The catalytic activity of such N-doped carbons has improved vastly over the years bringing industrial applications ever closer. Stoichiometric carbon nitride powder has only been observed in recent years. It has nitrogen content up to 57% and as such is an extremely interesting material to work with. The electrochemical activity of carbon nitride has already been explored, confirming that iron is not a necessary ingredient for 4-electron oxygen reduction. Here, we synthesize carbon nitride on a carbon nanotube support and subject it to high temperature treatment in an effort to increase the surface area and conductivity. The results lend insight into the mechanism of oxygen reduction and show the potential for carbon nanotube-supported carbon nitride to be used as a catalyst to replace platinum in fuel cells.

  15. Catalytic oxygenation of sp3 "C-H" bonds with Ir(III) complexes of chelating triazoles and mesoionic carbenes.

    PubMed

    Hohloch, Stephan; Kaiser, Selina; Duecker, Fenja Leena; Bolje, Aljoša; Maity, Ramananda; Košmrlj, Janez; Sarkar, Biprajit

    2015-01-14

    Cp*-Ir(III) complexes with additional chelating ligands are known active pre-catalysts for the oxygenation of C-H bonds. We present here eight examples of such complexes where the denticity of the chelating ligands has been varied from the well-known 2,2'-bpy through pyridyl-triazole, bi-triazole to ligands containing pyridyl-triazolylidene, triazolyl-triazolylidene and bi-triazolylidenes. Additionally, we also compare the catalytic results to complexes containing chelating cyclometallated ligands with additional triazole or triazolylidene donors. Single crystal X-ray structural data are presented for all the new complexes that contain one or more triazolylidene donors of the mesoionic carbene type. We present the first example of a metal complex containing a chelating triazole-triazolylidene ligand. The results of the catalytic screening show that complexes containing unsymmetrical donors of the pyridyl-triazole or pyridyl-triazolylidene types are the most potent pre-catalysts for the C-H oxygenation of cyclooctane in the presence of either m-CPBA or NaIO4 as a sacrificial oxidant. These pre-catalysts can also be used to oxygenate C-H bonds in other substrates such as fluorene and ethyl benzene. The most potent pre-catalysts presented here work with a lower catalyst loading and under milder conditions while delivering better product yields in comparison with related literature known Ir(III) pre-catalysts. These results thus point to the potential of ligands with unsymmetrical donors obtained through the click reaction in oxidation catalysis.

  16. Soluble Mn(III)-L complexes are abundant in oxygenated waters and stabilized by humic ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Véronique E.; Mucci, Alfonso; Tebo, Bradley M.; Luther, George W.

    2017-02-01

    Dissolved Mn (dMnT) is thought to be dominated by metastable Mn(II) in the presence of oxygen, as the stable form is insoluble Mn(IV). We show, for the first time, that Mn(III) is also stable as a soluble species in the oxygenated water column, when stabilized by organic ligands as Mn(III)-L complexes. We measured Mn(III)-L complexes in the oxygenated waters of a coastal fjord and a hemipelagic system where they make up to 86% of the dMnT. Although Mn(III) forms similar complexes to Fe(III), unlike most of the analogous Fe(III)-L complexes, the Mn(III)-L complexes are not colloidal, as they pass through both 0.20 μm and 0.02 μm filters. Depending on the kinetic stability of the Mn(III) complexes and the microbial community of a given system, these Mn(III)-L complexes are capable of donating or accepting electrons and may therefore serve as both reductants or oxidants, can be biologically available, and can thus participate in a multitude of redox reactions and biogeochemical processes. Furthermore, sample acidification experiments revealed that Mn(III) binding to humic ligands is responsible for up to 100% of this complexation, which can influence the formation of other metal complexes including Fe(III) and thus impact nutrient availability and uptake. Hence, humic ligands may play a greater role in dissolved Mn transport from coastal areas to the ocean than previously thought.

  17. Support nanostructure boosts oxygen transfer to catalytically active platinum nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Vayssilov, Georgi N; Lykhach, Yaroslava; Migani, Annapaola; Staudt, Thorsten; Petrova, Galina P; Tsud, Nataliya; Skála, Tomáš; Bruix, Albert; Illas, Francesc; Prince, Kevin C; Matolín, Vladimír; Neyman, Konstantin M; Libuda, Jörg

    2011-04-01

    Interactions of metal particles with oxide supports can radically enhance the performance of supported catalysts. At the microscopic level, the details of such metal-oxide interactions usually remain obscure. This study identifies two types of oxidative metal-oxide interaction on well-defined models of technologically important Pt-ceria catalysts: (1) electron transfer from the Pt nanoparticle to the support, and (2) oxygen transfer from ceria to Pt. The electron transfer is favourable on ceria supports, irrespective of their morphology. Remarkably, the oxygen transfer is shown to require the presence of nanostructured ceria in close contact with Pt and, thus, is inherently a nanoscale effect. Our findings enable us to detail the formation mechanism of the catalytically indispensable Pt-O species on ceria and to elucidate the extraordinary structure-activity dependence of ceria-based catalysts in general.

  18. Oxygen transfer into activated sludge with high MLSS concentrations.

    PubMed

    Krampe, J; Krauth, K

    2003-01-01

    In this report, tests on the impact of the sludge properties on the oxygen transfer at low and high solids contents are presented. Additional to the oxygen transfer tests, the activated sludge was intensively analysed to examine the changes of the alpha-factor in relation to the sludge properties (rheology, EPS, CST, etc.). The alpha-factor did strongly decrease in all sludge types at increasing MLSS or increasing viscosity, respectively. In the second test stage, the impact of the aeration system was examined in detail. For these tests, the same sludge from a membrane bioreactor was used throughout. Apart from the impact of the power density in the reactor and the specific air throughput, the main focus was on the economic efficiency of the examined systems in cases of high MLSS. It became apparent that up to solids contents of 18 g/l the fine-bubble aeration is the most economically efficient method.

  19. Evidence for the role of cyclic electron flow in photoprotection for oxygen-evolving complex.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Yang, Ying-Jie; Hu, Hong; Zhang, Shi-Bao; Cao, Kun-Fang

    2016-05-01

    Cyclic electron flow (CEF) alleviates PSII photo-inhibition under high light by at least two different mechanisms: one is liked to thermal energy dissipation (qE) and the other one is independent of qE. However, the latter mechanism is unclear. Because the photodamage to PSII primarily occurred at the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), and the stability of OEC is dependent on proton gradient across thylakoid membrane (ΔpH), we hypothesize that the CEF-dependent generation of ΔpH can alleviate photodamage to OEC. To test this hypothesis, we determined the effects of antimycin A (AA), methyl viologen (MV), chloramphenicol (CM), nigericin (Nig) on PSII activity and the stability of OEC for leaves of a light-demanding tropical tree species Erythrophleum guineense by the analysis of OKJIP chlorophyll a fluorescence transient. After high light treatment, the stronger decrease in Fv/Fm in the AA-, CM-, MV-, and Nig-treated samples was accompanied with larger photo damage of OEC. The AA-treated samples significantly showed lower CEF activity than the H2O-treated samples. Although the AA-treated leaves significantly showed stronger PSII photo-inhibition and photo-damage of OEC compared to the H2O-treated leaves, the value of non-photochemical quenching did not differ between them. Therefore, CEF activity was partly inhibited in the AA-treated samples, and the stronger PSII photo-inhibition in the AA-treated leaves was independent of qE. Taking together, we propose a hypothesis that CEF-dependent generation of ΔpH under high light plays an important role in photoprotection for the OEC activity.

  20. What Can We Learn from a Biomimetic Model of Nature's Oxygen-Evolving Complex?

    PubMed

    Paul, Satadal; Cox, Nicholas; Pantazis, Dimitrios A

    2017-04-03

    A recently reported synthetic complex with a Mn4CaO4 core represents a remarkable structural mimic of the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (Zhang et al., Science 2015, 348, 690). Oxidized samples of the complex show electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signals at g ≈ 4.9 and 2, similar to those associated with the OEC in its S2 state (g ≈ 4.1 from an S = (5)/2 form and g ≈ 2 from an S = (1)/2 form), suggesting similarities in the electronic as well as geometric structure. We use quantum-chemical methods to characterize the synthetic complex in various oxidation states, to compute its magnetic and spectroscopic properties, and to establish connections with reported data. Only one energetically accessible form is found for the oxidized "S2 state" of the complex. It has a ground spin state of S = (5)/2, and EPR simulations confirm it can be assigned to the g ≈ 4.9 signal. However, no valence isomer with an S = (1)/2 ground state is energetically accessible, a conclusion supported by a wide range of methods, including density matrix renormalization group with full valence active space. Alternative candidates for the g ≈ 2 signal were explored, but no low-spin/low-energy structure was identified. Therefore, our results suggest that despite geometric similarities the synthetic model does not mimic the valence isomerism that is the hallmark of the OEC in its S2 state, most probably because it lacks a coordinatively flexible oxo bridge. Only one of the observed EPR signals can be explained by a structurally intact high-spin one-electron-oxidized form, while the other originates from an as-yet-unidentified rearrangement product. Nevertheless, this model provides valuable information for understanding the high-spin EPR signals of both the S1 and S2 states of the OEC in terms of the coordination number and Jahn-Teller axis orientation of the Mn ions, with important consequences for the development of magnetic spectroscopic

  1. Theoretical Insights to Bulk Activity Towards Oxygen Evolution in Oxyhydroxides

    DOE PAGES

    Doyle, Andrew D.; Bajdich, Michal; Vojvodic, Aleksandra

    2017-04-07

    The nature of the electrochemical water splitting activity of layered pure and Fe-doped NiOOH is investigated using density functional theory calculations. We find similar thermodynamics for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) intermediates between the layers of oxyhydroxides, that is, in the bulk of the materials as on the (001) surface. The effect of interlayer spacing on adsorption energy is affected by both the crystal structure and the level of hydrogenation of the active sites. For the Fe-doped NiOOH, we observe general weakening of binding between the different OER intermediates and the catalyst material. The calculated OER activity depends both onmore » doping and interlayer spacing, and our results are generally congruent with available experimental data. In conclusion, these results suggest that such interlayer “bulk” sites may contribute to measured OER activity for both the pure and Fe-doped NiOOH catalysts.« less

  2. Why O2 is required by complex life on habitable planets and the concept of planetary "oxygenation time".

    PubMed

    Catling, David C; Glein, Christopher R; Zahnle, Kevin J; McKay, Christopher P

    2005-06-01

    Life is constructed from a limited toolkit: the Periodic Table. The reduction of oxygen provides the largest free energy release per electron transfer, except for the reduction of fluorine and chlorine. However, the bonding of O2 ensures that it is sufficiently stable to accumulate in a planetary atmosphere, whereas the more weakly bonded halogen gases are far too reactive ever to achieve significant abundance. Consequently, an atmosphere rich in O2 provides the largest feasible energy source. This universal uniqueness suggests that abundant O2 is necessary for the high-energy demands of complex life anywhere, i.e., for actively mobile organisms of approximately 10(-1)-10(0) m size scale with specialized, differentiated anatomy comparable to advanced metazoans. On Earth, aerobic metabolism provides about an order of magnitude more energy for a given intake of food than anaerobic metabolism. As a result, anaerobes do not grow beyond the complexity of uniseriate filaments of cells because of prohibitively low growth efficiencies in a food chain. The biomass cumulative number density, n, at a particular mass, m, scales as n (> m) proportional to m(-1) for aquatic aerobes, and we show that for anaerobes the predicted scaling is n proportional to m (-1.5), close to a growth-limited threshold. Even with aerobic metabolism, the partial pressure of atmospheric O2 (P(O2)) must exceed approximately 10(3) Pa to allow organisms that rely on O2 diffusion to evolve to a size approximately 10(3) m x P(O2) in the range approximately 10(3)-10(4) Pa is needed to exceed the threshold of approximately 10(2) m size for complex life with circulatory physiology. In terrestrial life, O(2) also facilitates hundreds of metabolic pathways, including those that make specialized structural molecules found only in animals. The time scale to reach P(O(2)) approximately 10(4) Pa, or "oxygenation time," was long on the Earth (approximately 3.9 billion years), within almost a factor of 2 of the Sun

  3. Activation of surface oxygen sites on an iridium-based model catalyst for the oxygen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimaud, Alexis; Demortiere, Arnaud; Saubanere, Matthieu; Dachraoui, Walid; Duchamp, Martial; Doublet, Marie-Liesse; Tarascon, Jean-Marie

    2017-01-01

    The oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is of prime importance in multiple energy storage devices; however, deeper mechanistic understanding is required to design enhanced electrocatalysts for the reaction. Current understanding of the OER mechanism based on oxygen adsorption on a metallic surface site fails to fully explain the activity of iridium and ruthenium oxide surfaces, and the drastic surface reconstruction observed for the most active OER catalysts. Here we demonstrate, using La2LiIrO6 as a model catalyst, that the exceptionally high activity found for Ir-based catalysts arises from the formation of active surface oxygen atoms that act as electrophilic centres for water to react. Moreover, with the help of transmission electron microscopy, we observe drastic surface reconstruction and iridium migration from the bulk to the surface. Therefore, we establish a correlation between surface activity and surface stability for OER catalysts that is rooted in the formation of surface reactive oxygen.

  4. Removal of trichlorobenzene using 'oxygen-enriched' highly active absorbent.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi; He, Peng; Zhang, Yu-Hai; Ma, Shuangchen

    2011-01-01

    Fly ash, industry lime and an additive, Ca(ClO2)2 (C) were used to prepare the 'oxygen-enriched' highly active absorbent (HAA). The influencing factors for removal of 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene (TCB) using this absorbent such as reaction temperature, simulating gas flow rate, oxygen content, etc. were studied in a self-designed reactor. The optimum experimental conditions of removing 1,2,4-TCB are that the content of an oxidizing additive in the absorbent is 3% (wt), simulating gas flow rate is 100 mL/min, reaction temperature is 250 degrees C, and the content of oxygen in simulating gas is 6%. The maximum removal efficiency is 81.71% in 10 mins. The absorption capacity of the absorbent is 0.000111 g/g. The reaction products were determined by gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/ MS), 2,6-Bis-[1,1-Dimethylethyl]-4-methyl-Phenol is considered to be the major intermediate product. The reaction route was revealed.

  5. TOR complex 2–Ypk1 signaling regulates actin polarization via reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Niles, Brad J.; Powers, Ted

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2) signaling pathway is an important regulator of actin cytoskeletal architecture and, as such, is a candidate target for preventing cancer cell motility and invasion. Remarkably, the precise mechanism(s) by which mTORC2 regulates the actin cytoskeleton have remained elusive. Here we show that in budding yeast, TORC2 and its downstream kinase Ypk1 regulate actin polarization by controlling reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. Specifically, we find that TORC2-Ypk1 regulates actin polarization both by vacuole-related ROS, controlled by the phospholipid flippase kinase Fpk1 and sphingolipids, and by mitochondria-mediated ROS, controlled by the PKA subunit Tpk3. In addition, we find that the protein kinase C (Pkc1)/MAPK cascade, a well-established regulator of actin, acts downstream of Ypk1 to regulate ROS, in part by promoting degradation of the oxidative stress responsive repressor, cyclin C. Furthermore, we show that Ypk1 regulates Pkc1 activity through proper localization of Rom2 at the plasma membrane, which is also dependent on Fpk1 and sphingolipids. Together these findings demonstrate important links between TORC2/Ypk1 signaling, Fpk1, sphingolipids, Pkc1, and ROS as regulators of actin and suggest that ROS may play an important role in mTORC2-dependent dysregulation of the actin cytoskeleton in cancer cells. PMID:25253719

  6. TOR complex 2-Ypk1 signaling regulates actin polarization via reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Niles, Brad J; Powers, Ted

    2014-12-01

    The evolutionarily conserved mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2) signaling pathway is an important regulator of actin cytoskeletal architecture and, as such, is a candidate target for preventing cancer cell motility and invasion. Remarkably, the precise mechanism(s) by which mTORC2 regulates the actin cytoskeleton have remained elusive. Here we show that in budding yeast, TORC2 and its downstream kinase Ypk1 regulate actin polarization by controlling reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. Specifically, we find that TORC2-Ypk1 regulates actin polarization both by vacuole-related ROS, controlled by the phospholipid flippase kinase Fpk1 and sphingolipids, and by mitochondria-mediated ROS, controlled by the PKA subunit Tpk3. In addition, we find that the protein kinase C (Pkc1)/MAPK cascade, a well-established regulator of actin, acts downstream of Ypk1 to regulate ROS, in part by promoting degradation of the oxidative stress responsive repressor, cyclin C. Furthermore, we show that Ypk1 regulates Pkc1 activity through proper localization of Rom2 at the plasma membrane, which is also dependent on Fpk1 and sphingolipids. Together these findings demonstrate important links between TORC2/Ypk1 signaling, Fpk1, sphingolipids, Pkc1, and ROS as regulators of actin and suggest that ROS may play an important role in mTORC2-dependent dysregulation of the actin cytoskeleton in cancer cells.

  7. The role of reactive oxygen intermediates in nonspecific monocyte cytotoxicity induced by immune complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Geffner, J R; Giordano, M; Serebrinsky, G; Isturiz, M

    1987-01-01

    Normal human monocytes were induced to lyse nonsensitized target cells when triggered by precipitating immune complexes (IC) or soluble heat-aggregated IgG (HAIgG). Catalase, azide, cyanide and three aminoacids employed as quenchers of ClO, significantly inhibited this nonspecific cytotoxicity (NSC), suggesting an important role for the myeloperoxidase (MPO) system. However, HO and/or 1O2 may also be involved in the lysis, since certain scavengers of these species such as mannitol, benzoate, ethanol and histidine, as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD), partially inhibited NSC. Moreover, cyanide and azide were unable to completely abrogate this lytic activity. When NSC was compared to antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), it was found that neither catalase nor oxygen-species scavengers affected ADCC while azide and cyanide significantly enhanced it. Antibody-coated target cells were also destroyed by IC-triggered monocytes. However, kinetic analysis and studies on the capacity of catalase to inhibit the lysis demonstrated that it was mediated through a NSC-like mechanism. The cytotoxic system described in this report offers a suitable model to study in vitro alternative lytic mechanisms triggered through monocyte receptors for the Fc portion of IgG (Fc gamma R). PMID:3038442

  8. A simple fluorescent probe for the determination of dissolved oxygen based on the catalytic activation of oxygen by iron(II) chelates.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Abbas, M E; Zhu, Lihua; Zhou, Wenyi; Li, Kejing; Tang, Heqing; Liu, Shushen; Li, Weiying

    2009-04-27

    This work aims at establishing a simple fluorescent probe for the determination of dissolved oxygen. It is found that iron(II) ions activate oxygen to produce reactive species being capable of oxidizing non-fluorescent coumarin to fluorescent 7-hydroxycoumarin. However, this process is not effective because the yield of the reactive species is very low in the presence of simple iron(II) salts alone. The addition of organic ligands such as oxalate results in the formation of complexes between iron(II) ions, which leads to considerable increase in the yield of reactive species (such as hydroxyl radicals) and then increase in the fluorescence intensity of 7-hydroxycoumarin to a significant level. It has been observed that in the mixture solution of iron(II) ions, ligand, coumarin, and dissolved oxygen, there is an excellent linear response between the fluorescence and dissolved oxygen. Therefore, a new spectrofluorimetric method has been proposed for the determination of dissolved oxygen by using catalytic activation of O(2) by iron(II) chelates. Under optimized conditions, a linear correlation (r=0.995) has been observed between the fluorescence intensity of 7-hydroxycoumarin at 456 nm and the concentration of dissolved oxygen over the range of 0.96-9.22 mg L(-1). The limit of detection for dissolved oxygen at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 has been estimated to be 0.35 mg L(-1). The proposed method has been applied to determine the concentration of dissolved oxygen in practical water samples with results as satisfactory as that obtained by the standard iodometric method.

  9. Purification and characterization of a stable oxygen-evolving Photosystem II complex from a marine centric diatom, Chaetoceros gracilis.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Ryo; Tomo, Tatsuya; Noguchi, Eri; Nakajima, Saori; Suzuki, Takehiro; Okumura, Akinori; Kashino, Yasuhiro; Mimuro, Mamoru; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Enami, Isao

    2010-02-01

    Oxygen-evolving Photosystem II particles (crude PSII) retaining a high oxygen-evolving activity have been prepared from a marine centric diatom, Chaetoceros gracilis (Nagao et al., 2007). The crude PSII, however, contained a large amount of fucoxanthin chlorophyll a/c-binding proteins (FCP). In this study, a purified PSII complex which was deprived of major components of FCP was isolated by one step of anion exchange chromatography from the crude PSII treated with Triton X-100. The purified PSII was still associated with the five extrinsic proteins of PsbO, PsbQ', PsbV, Psb31 and PsbU, and showed a high oxygen-evolving activity of 2135 micromol O2 (mg Chl a)(-1) h(-1) in the presence of phenyl-p-benzoquinone which was virtually independent of the addition of CaCl2. This activity is more than 2.5-fold higher than the activity of the crude PSII. The activity was completely inhibited by 3-(3,4)-dichlorophenyl-(1,1)-dimethylurea (DCMU). The purified PSII contained 42 molecules of Chl a, 2 molecules of diadinoxanthin and 2 molecules of Chl c on the basis of two molecules of pheophytin a, and showed typical absorption and fluorescence spectra similar to those of purified PSIIs from the other organisms. In this study, we also found that the crude PSII was significantly labile, as a significant inactivation of oxygen evolution, chlorophyll bleaching and degradation of PSII subunits were observed during incubation at 25 degrees C in the dark. In contrast, these inactivation, bleaching and degradation were scarcely detected in the purified PSII. Thus, we succeeded for the first time in preparation of a stable PSII from diatom cells.

  10. Molecular mimicry of substrate oxygen atoms by water molecules in the beta-amylase active site.

    PubMed

    Pujadas, G; Palau, J

    2001-08-01

    Soybean beta-amylase (EC 3.2.1.2) has been crystallized both free and complexed with a variety of ligands. Four water molecules in the free-enzyme catalytic cleft form a multihydrogen-bond network with eight strategic residues involved in enzyme-ligand hydrogen bonds. We show here that the positions of these four water molecules are coincident with the positions of four potential oxygen atoms of the ligands within the complex. Some of these waters are displaced from the active site when the ligands bind to the enzyme. How many are displaced depends on the shape of the ligand. This means that when one of the four positions is not occupied by a ligand oxygen atom, the corresponding water remains. We studied the functional/structural role of these four waters and conclude that their presence means that the conformation of the eight side chains is fixed in all situations (free or complexed enzyme) and preserved from unwanted or forbidden conformational changes that could hamper the catalytic mechanism. The water structure at the active pocket of beta-amylase is therefore essential for providing the ligand recognition process with plasticity. It does not affect the protein active-site geometry and preserves the overall hydrogen-bonding network, irrespective of which ligand is bound to the enzyme. We also investigated whether other enzymes showed a similar role for water. Finally, we discuss the potential use of these results for predicting whether water molecules can mimic ligand atoms in the active center.

  11. Device for measuring oxygen activity in liquid sodium

    DOEpatents

    Roy, P.; Young, R.S.

    1973-12-01

    A composite ceramic electrolyte in a configuration (such as a closed end tube or a plate) suitable to separate liquid sodium from a reference electrode with a high impedance voltmeter connected to measure EMF between the sodium and the reference electrode as a measure of oxygen activity in the sodium is described. The composite electrolyte consists of zirconiacalcia with a bonded layer of thoria-yttria. The device is used with a gaseous reference electrode on the zirconia-calcia side and liquid sodium on the thoria-yttria side of the electrolyte. (Official Gazette)

  12. Oxygen requirements of the food spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii in synthetic and complex media.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, F; Côrte-Real, M; Leão, C; van Dijken, J P; Pronk, J T

    2001-05-01

    Most yeast species can ferment sugars to ethanol, but only a few can grow in the complete absence of oxygen. Oxygen availability might, therefore, be a key parameter in spoilage of food caused by fermentative yeasts. In this study, the oxygen requirement and regulation of alcoholic fermentation were studied in batch cultures of the spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii at a constant pH, pH 3.0. In aerobic, glucose-grown cultures, Z. bailii exhibited aerobic alcoholic fermentation similar to that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and other Crabtree-positive yeasts. In anaerobic fermentor cultures grown on a synthetic medium supplemented with glucose, Tween 80, and ergosterol, S. cerevisiae exhibited rapid exponential growth. Growth of Z. bailii under these conditions was extremely slow and linear. These linear growth kinetics indicate that cell proliferation of Z. bailii in the anaerobic fermentors was limited by a constant, low rate of oxygen leakage into the system. Similar results were obtained with the facultatively fermentative yeast Candida utilis. When the same experimental setup was used for anaerobic cultivation, in complex YPD medium, Z. bailii exhibited exponential growth and vigorous fermentation, indicating that a nutritional requirement for anaerobic growth was met by complex-medium components. Our results demonstrate that restriction of oxygen entry into foods and beverages, which are rich in nutrients, is not a promising strategy for preventing growth and gas formation by Z. bailii. In contrast to the growth of Z. bailii, anaerobic growth of S. cerevisiae on complex YPD medium was much slower than growth in synthetic medium, which probably reflected the superior tolerance of the former yeast to organic acids at low pH.

  13. Oxygen atom transfer to a half-sandwich iridium complex: clean oxidation yielding a molecular product.

    PubMed

    Turlington, Christopher R; White, Peter S; Brookhart, Maurice; Templeton, Joseph L

    2014-03-12

    The oxidation of [Ir(Cp*)(phpy)(NCAr(F))][B(Ar(F))4] (1; Cp* = η(5)-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl, phpy = 2-phenylene-κC(1')-pyridine-κN, NCAr(F) = 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)benzonitrile, B(Ar(F))4 = tetrakis[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]borate) with the oxygen atom transfer (OAT) reagent 2-tert-butylsulfonyliodosobenzene (sPhIO) yielded a single, molecular product at -40 °C. New Ir(Cp*) complexes with bidentate ligands derived by oxidation of phpy were synthesized to model possible products resulting from oxygen atom insertion into the iridium-carbon and/or iridium-nitrogen bonds of phpy. These new ligands were either cleaved from iridium by water or formed unreactive, phenoxide-bridged iridium dimers. The reactivity of these molecules suggested possible decomposition pathways of Ir(Cp*)-based water oxidation catalysts with bidentate ligands that are susceptible to oxidation. Monitoring the [Ir(Cp*)(phpy)(NCAr(F))](+) oxidation reaction by low-temperature NMR techniques revealed that the reaction involved two separate OAT events. An intermediate was detected, synthesized independently with trapping ligands, and characterized. The first oxidation step involves direct attack of the sPhIO oxidant on the carbon of the coordinated nitrile ligand. Oxygen atom transfer to carbon, followed by insertion into the iridium-carbon bond of phpy, formed a coordinated organic amide. A second oxygen atom transfer generated an unidentified iridium species (the "oxidized complex"). In the presence of triphenylphosphine, the "oxidized complex" proved capable of transferring one oxygen atom to phosphine, generating phosphine oxide and forming an Ir-PPh3 adduct in 92% yield. The final Ir-PPh3 product was fully characterized.

  14. Ratiometric Dissolved Oxygen Sensors Based on Ruthenium Complex Doped with Silver Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zike; Yu, Xinsheng; Zhai, Shikui; Hao, Yingyan

    2017-01-01

    A ratiometric optical sensor has been developed with electrospinning processing method for dissolved oxygen measurement. The sensing film is fabricated by using silver nano-particles (Ag NPs) doped with tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline) ruthenium(II) dichloride complex (Ru(DPP)3Cl2) encapsulated in plasticized polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). An insensitive 3-(2-benzothiazolyl)-7-(diethy lamino)-(6CI,7CI) (Coumarin6) is adopted as reference. The ratio of oxygenation is calculated at each image pixel of a 3CCD camera to quantify the oxygen concentration in aqueous environment. Compared to Ag-free film, the response time of Ag-containing films were improved from 1.5 s to 1.0 s upon switching from deoxygenated to air saturation and from 65 s to 45 s from air saturation to fully deoxygenated. The response times of the Ag-free film obtained by knifing was 2.0 s upon switching from deoxygenated to air saturation and 104 s from air saturation to fully deoxygenated. Results of the evaluation of accuracy, limit of detection, stability, and photostability are presented. An experiment measuring the spatiotemporal variation of oxygen distribution within the photosynthesis and respiration of Chlorella vulgaris is demonstrated. It is shown that the nanofiber-based optical sensor film could serve as a promising method for rapid oxygen monitoring in aqueous applications. PMID:28282946

  15. Ratiometric Dissolved Oxygen Sensors Based on Ruthenium Complex Doped with Silver Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zike; Yu, Xinsheng; Zhai, Shikui; Hao, Yingyan

    2017-03-09

    A ratiometric optical sensor has been developed with electrospinning processing method for dissolved oxygen measurement. The sensing film is fabricated by using silver nano-particles (Ag NPs) doped with tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline) ruthenium(II) dichloride complex (Ru(DPP)₃Cl₂) encapsulated in plasticized polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). An insensitive 3-(2-benzothiazolyl)-7-(diethy lamino)-(6CI,7CI) (Coumarin6) is adopted as reference. The ratio of oxygenation is calculated at each image pixel of a 3CCD camera to quantify the oxygen concentration in aqueous environment. Compared to Ag-free film, the response time of Ag-containing films were improved from 1.5 s to 1.0 s upon switching from deoxygenated to air saturation and from 65 s to 45 s from air saturation to fully deoxygenated. The response times of the Ag-free film obtained by knifing was 2.0 s upon switching from deoxygenated to air saturation and 104 s from air saturation to fully deoxygenated. Results of the evaluation of accuracy, limit of detection, stability, and photostability are presented. An experiment measuring the spatiotemporal variation of oxygen distribution within the photosynthesis and respiration of Chlorella vulgaris is demonstrated. It is shown that the nanofiber-based optical sensor film could serve as a promising method for rapid oxygen monitoring in aqueous applications.

  16. Spin-dependent recombination involving oxygen-vacancy complexes in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, David P.; Hoehne, Felix; Vlasenko, Leonid S.; Itoh, Kohei M.; Brandt, Martin S.

    2014-05-01

    Spin-dependent relaxation and recombination processes in γ-irradiated n-type Czochralski-grown silicon are studied using continuous wave (cw) and pulsed electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR). Two processes involving the SL1 center, the neutral excited triplet state of the oxygen-vacancy complex, are observed which can be separated by their different dynamics. One of the processes is the relaxation of the excited SL1 state to the ground state of the oxygen-vacancy complex, the other a charge transfer between 31P donors and SL1 centers forming close pairs, as indicated by electrically detected electron double resonance. For both processes, the recombination dynamics is studied with pulsed EDMR techniques. We demonstrate the feasibility of true zero-field cw and pulsed EDMR for spin-1 systems and use this to measure the lifetimes of the different spin states of SL1 also at vanishing external magnetic field.

  17. Functional Models for the Oxygen-Evolving Complex of Photosystem II

    PubMed Central

    Cady, Clyde W.; Crabtree, Robert H.; Brudvig, Gary W.

    2010-01-01

    In the last ten years, a number of advances have been made in the study of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII). Along with this new understanding of the natural system has come rapid advance in chemical models of this system. The advance of PSII model chemistry is seen most strikingly in the area of functional models where the few known systems available when this topic was last reviewed has grown into two families of model systems. In concert with this work, numerous mechanistic proposals for photosynthetic water oxidation have been proposed. Here, we review the recent efforts in functional model chemistry of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II. PMID:21037800

  18. Two-level multivariable control system of dissolved oxygen tracking and aeration system for activated sludge processes.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The problem of tracking dissolved oxygen is one of the most complex and fundamental issues related to biological processes. The dissolved oxygen level in aerobic tanks has a significant influence on the behavior and activity of microorganisms. Aerated tanks are supplied with air from an aeration system (blowers, pipes, throttling valves, and diffusers). It is a complex, dynamic system governed by nonlinear hybrid dynamics. Control of the aeration system is also difficult in terms of control of the dissolved oxygen. In this article, a two-level multivariable control system for tracking dissolved oxygen and controlling an aeration system is designed. A nonlinear model predictive control algorithm was applied to design controllers for each level. This overall hierarchical control system was validated by simulation based on real data records provided by a water resource recovery facility located in Kartuzy, Northern Poland. The effect of control system parameters and disturbances was also investigated.

  19. Ru, Os, Rh mixed-metal complexes are a potential novel class of oxygen independent photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy (PDT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storrie, Brian; Holder, Alvin; Brewer, Karen J.

    2006-02-01

    Mixed-metal supramolecular complexes coupling Ru and Os light absorber units to a central, reactive Rh site have been designed of the type [{(bpy)2M(dpp)}2RhCl2]5+. These complexes possess intense metal-to-ligand charge transfer transitions when excited at 500-700 nm making them good light absorbers. The presence of the Rh site introduces low lying metal-to-metal charge transfer states that are capable of visible light induced photocleavage of DNA via an oxygen independent pathway.1 We report here a study of the photodynamic action of supramolecular mixed-metal complexes showing that these systems inhibit cell replication after exposure to light while displaying no impact on cell replication in the dark. This photodynamic action has been studied using cultured Vero cells with a pre-incubation with the complexes, rinsing to remove complex from the media, followed by photo-activation and cell growth assay. The photodynamic action of this new series of complexes can be tuned as a function of components of the supramolecular assembly and complexes capable of coupling to targeting proteins and fluorescent reporter groups have been synthesized.

  20. Negative activation volume of oxygen self-diffusion in forsterite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, H.; Wiedenbeck, M.; Sakamoto, N.; Yurimoto, H.; Yoshino, T.; Yamazaki, D.; Katsura, T.

    2016-12-01

    Olivine is thought to contribute 60 % in volume of the Earth's upper mantle. Measurement of the diffusion coefficients of elements in olivine is therefore critical to understand the dynamical processes in the Earth's interior. The Mg and Si diffusion coefficients have already been systematically measured as functions of pressure, temperature, and water content in both natural olivine and pure forsterite in previous studies. For O diffusion, a series of studies about the temperature, water content, and oxygen fugacity dependences have been performed. However, the pressure dependence, which is essential to investigate the kinetic problems in the Earth's interior because of its ultrahigh pressure conditions, is still unclear. In this study, we determined the pressure dependence of the oxygen self-diffusion coefficient (DO) in iron-free forsterite. DO was found to be systematically increase with increasing pressure from 1 atm to 13 GPa with an activation volume of -3.9±0.4 cm3/mol. In contract with Si or Mg diffusion, the oxygen diffusion in forsterite has negative activation volume. Although Mg is the fastest diffusion species in forsterite under low-pressure conditions, O becomes the fastest at pressures higher than 10-11 GPa. Because the ionic conduction is dominated by diffusion of the faster species, the ionic electrical conductivity in the upper mantle should decrease with increasing depth in the asthenosphere down to 350-km depth, and then increase in the deeper part of the upper mantle. This variation with pressure well explains the electrical conductivity profile beneath the Canadian Shield.

  1. NIR-emissive iridium(III) corrole complexes as efficient singlet oxygen sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Woormileela; Ravotto, Luca; Ceroni, Paola; Kar, Sanjib

    2015-10-28

    Three new iridium(iii) corrole complexes, having symmetrically and asymmetrically substituted corrole frameworks and judiciously varied axial ligands are prepared and characterized by various spectroscopic techniques including the X-ray structures of two of them. The observed phosphorescence at ambient temperature appears at much longer wavelengths than the previously reported Ir(iii) porphyrin/corrole derivatives. Efficiencies of these compounds in the generation of singlet oxygen are also studied for the first time.

  2. Sensitization of singlet oxygen via encounter complexes and via exciplexes of pipi* triplet excited sensitizers and oxygen.

    PubMed

    Mehrdad, Zahra; Noll, Astrid; Grabner, Erich-Walter; Schmidt, Reinhard

    2002-04-01

    Both excited singlet states, 1sigma(g)+ and 1delta(g), and the triplet ground state, 3sigma(g)-, of molecular oxygen are competitively formed during the quenching by O2 of triplet (T1) excited sensitizers of sufficient energy. The corresponding overall rate constants kT(1sigma), kT(1delta), and kT(3sigma) as well as the T1 state energies E(T) and the oxidation potentials E(ox), have been determined for a series of six fluorene derivatives. Graduated and in part strong charge transfer (CT) effects on kT(1sigma), kT(1delta), and kT(3sigma) are observed. These and literature data strongly indicate that quenching occurs in two different channels each capable of producing O2(1sigma(g)-), O2(1delta(g)), and O2(3sigma(g)-). One proceeds via internal conversion (IC) of excited 1,3(T1 x 3sigma) complexes with no CT character (nCT), which cannot be distinguished from encounter complexes, the other via IC of 1,3(T1 x 3sigma) exciplexes with partial CT character (pCT). The contributions of nCT and pCT deactivation channels to the overall formation of O2(1sigma(g)+), O2(1delta(g)). and O2(3sigma(g)-) depend on E(T) and E(ox). The rate constants of the nCT channel are controlled by the excess energies of the respective IC processes by an energy gap law. The rate constants of the pCT channel depend on the change of free energy deltaG(CET) for complete electron transfer from T1 excited sensitizer to O2. Equations are presented which show the functional form of the dependence of the oxygen quenching rate constants on E(T) and E(ox). Particular emphasis is laid on the question of whether these relations could generally be valid for pipi* triplet sensitizers.

  3. Purification and crystallization of oxygen-evolving photosystem II core complex from thermophilic cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jian-Ren; Kawakami, Keisuke; Koike, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes the purification and crystallization of oxygen-evolving photosystem II core dimer complex from a thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus vulcanus. Procedures used for purification of photosystem II from the cyanobacterium involves cultivation of cells, isolation of thylakoid membranes, purification of crude and pure photosystem II core complexes by detergent solubilization, followed by differential centrifugation and column chromatography. The purified core dimer particles were successfully used for crystallization, and the methods and conditions used for crystallization are presented. These purification and crystallization procedures can be applied for another thermophilic cyanobacterium T. elongatus.

  4. Variation of antioxidative activity and growth enhancement of Brassicaceae induced by low-pressure oxygen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Reoto; Hayashi, Nobuya

    2015-06-01

    The mechanism of growth enhancement induced by active oxygen species generated in an oxygen plasma is investigated. The plant growth enhancement induced by the active oxygen species would relate to an antioxidative activity, which is one of the biological responses. The amount of generated active oxygen species is varied by the oxygen gas pressure in a low-pressure RF glow discharge plasma. The antioxidative activity of sprouts of Brassicaceae induced by the oxygen plasma is maximized at pressures between 30 and 40 Pa, whereas the antioxidative activity becomes small at around 60 and 80 Pa. The pressure dependence of the antioxidative activity of sprout stems is opposite to that of the stem length of the sprouts. The growth enhancement would be induced by the increase in the concentration of active oxygen species in plants owing to the decrease in the amount of antioxidative substances.

  5. The interrelationship between muscle oxygenation, muscle activation, and pulmonary oxygen uptake to incremental ramp exercise: influence of aerobic fitness.

    PubMed

    Boone, Jan; Barstow, Thomas J; Celie, Bert; Prieur, Fabrice; Bourgois, Jan

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether muscle and ventilatory responses to incremental ramp exercise would be influenced by aerobic fitness status by means of a cross-sectional study with a large subject population. Sixty-four male students (age: 21.2 ± 3.2 years) with a heterogeneous peak oxygen uptake (51.9 ± 6.3 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1), range 39.7-66.2 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1)) performed an incremental ramp cycle test (20-35 W·min(-1)) to exhaustion. Breath-by-breath gas exchange was recorded, and muscle activation and oxygenation were measured with surface electromyography and near-infrared spectroscopy, respectively. The integrated electromyography (iEMG), mean power frequency (MPF), deoxygenated [hemoglobin and myoglobin] (deoxy[Hb+Mb]), and total[Hb+Mb] responses were set out as functions of work rate and fitted with a double linear function. The respiratory compensation point (RCP) was compared and correlated with the breakpoints (BPs) (as percentage of peak oxygen uptake) in muscle activation and oxygenation. The BP in total[Hb+Mb] (83.2% ± 3.0% peak oxygen uptake) preceded (P < 0.001) the BP in iEMG (86.7% ± 4.0% peak oxygen uptake) and MPF (86.3% ± 4.1% peak oxygen uptake), which in turn preceded (P < 0.01) the BP in deoxy[Hb+Mb] (88.2% ± 4.5% peak oxygen uptake) and RCP (87.4% ± 4.5% peak oxygen uptake). Furthermore, the peak oxygen uptake was significantly (P < 0.001) positively correlated to the BPs and RCP, indicating that the BPs in total[Hb+Mb] (r = 0.66; P < 0.001), deoxy[Hb+Mb] (r = 0.76; P < 0.001), iEMG (r = 0.61; P < 0.001), MPF (r = 0.63; P < 0.001), and RCP (r = 0.75; P < 0.001) occurred at a higher percentage of peak oxygen uptake in subjects with a higher peak oxygen uptake. In this study a close relationship between muscle oxygenation, activation, and pulmonary oxygen uptake was found, occurring in a cascade of events. In subjects with a higher aerobic fitness level this cascade occurred at a higher relative intensity.

  6. Reactive oxygen species-activated nanomaterials as theranostic agents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kye S; Lee, Dongwon; Song, Chul Gyu; Kang, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated from the endogenous oxidative metabolism or from exogenous pro-oxidant exposure. Oxidative stress occurs when there is excessive production of ROS, outweighing the antioxidant defense mechanisms which may lead to disease states. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of the most abundant and stable forms of ROS, implicated in inflammation, cellular dysfunction and apoptosis, which ultimately lead to tissue and organ damage. This review is an overview of the role of ROS in different diseases. We will also examine ROS-activated nanomaterials with emphasis on hydrogen peroxide, and their potential medical implications. Further development of the biocompatible, stimuli-activated agent responding to disease causing oxidative stress, may lead to a promising clinical use. PMID:26328770

  7. Activation of Oxygen by Cytochrome P-450 and Other Haemoproteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metelitsa, D. I.

    1982-11-01

    Data on the activation of molecular oxygen by the full microsomal hydroxylating system containing cytochrome P-450 as the terminal oxygenase are examined. The nature of the hydroxylating agent, which is the oxenoid Fe3+O, is analysed. The autoxidation reactions of cytochrome P-450 from various sources, haemoglobin, myoglobin, and peroxidases are compared and the role of the axial ligands of the haem iron and the structure of the active centres of the haemoproteins in this process is demonstrated. The possible mechanisms of the oxidation of organic compounds by peroxides with participation of cytochrome P-450, cytochrome c, haemoglobin, and catalase are examined critically. Haemoproteins have been divided into three groups in terms of the type of peroxide oxidation reactions. The relative contributions of the radical and two-electron reactions in the oxidation of compounds by peroxides with participation of different haemoproteins are analysed. The bibliography includes 184 references.

  8. Antioxidative activity of lactobacilli measured by oxygen radical absorbance capacity.

    PubMed

    Saide, J A O; Gilliland, S E

    2005-04-01

    The reducing ability and antioxidative activity of some species of Lactobacillus were compared under in vitro conditions. Cultures of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. lactis, Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, and Lactobacillus casei were grown at 37 degrees C in de Man, Rogosa, Sharpe (MRS) broth supplemented with 0.5% 2,3,5 triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC) to evaluate reducing activity. Reduced TTC was extracted from the cultures with acetone, and the intensity of the red color measured colorimetrically at 485 nm was an indication of reducing activity. The lactobacilli varied significantly in relative ability to reduce TTC when grown in MRS broth for 15 h. The relative amounts of growth as indicated by pH values at 18 h appeared to influence the amount of reduction. Antioxidative activity was evaluated by the ability of the whole cells or the cell-free extracts from cultures to protect a protein from being attacked by free radicals. These analyses were performed using the oxygen radical absorbance capacity method. All cultures tested exhibited some degree of antioxidative activity. Among the treatments, the cell-free extracts from cells grown in MRS broth exhibited significantly higher values than did whole cells. There was no apparent relationship between the reducing and antioxidative activities of the cultures evaluated. The results from this study show that these cultures can provide a source of dietary antioxidants. Furthermore, selection of cultures that produce antioxidants as starters could provide yet another health or nutritional benefit from cultured or culture-containing dairy products.

  9. [Several indicators of tissue oxygen during modeling of extravehicular activity of man].

    PubMed

    Lan'shina, O E; Loginov, V A; Akinfiev, A V; Kovalenko, E A

    1995-01-01

    Investigations of tissue oxygen indices during simulation of extravehicular activity (EVA) of cosmonauts demonstrated that breathing pure oxygen at approximately 280 mmHg elevates oxygen tension in capillary blood, and capillary-tissue gradient during physical work. Physical work alone stimulates tissue oxygenation due to, apparently, intensification of the processes of oxidative phosphorylation. The observed shifts in oxygen status reverse significantly within the first 5 min after completion of the experiment.

  10. Oxygen reduction reaction catalyzed by nickel complexes based on thiophosphorylated calix[4]resorcinols and immobilized in the membrane electrode assembly of fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Kadirov, M K; Knyazeva, I R; Nizameev, I R; Safiullin, R A; Matveeva, V I; Kholin, K V; Khrizanforova, V V; Ismaev, T I; Burilov, A R; Budnikova, Yu H; Sinyashin, O G

    2016-10-18

    The catalytic activity of the nickel complexes of thiophosphorylated calix[4]resorcinols for oxygen reduction in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) has been studied. The conformation of the macrocyclic ligand determines the morphology and catalytic properties of the resulting organometallic species.

  11. An oxygen-insensitive Hif-3α isoform inhibits Wnt signaling by destabilizing the nuclear β-catenin complex

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Bai, Yan; Lu, Ling; Li, Yun; Duan, Cunming

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), while best known for their roles in the hypoxic response, have oxygen-independent roles in early development with poorly defined mechanisms. Here, we report a novel Hif-3α variant, Hif-3α2, in zebrafish. Hif-3α2 lacks the bHLH, PAS, PAC, and ODD domains, and is expressed in embryonic and adult tissues independently of oxygen availability. Hif-3α2 is a nuclear protein with significant hypoxia response element (HRE)-dependent transcriptional activity. Hif-3α2 overexpression not only decreases embryonic growth and developmental timing but also causes left-right asymmetry defects. Genetic deletion of Hif-3α2 by CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing increases, while Hif-3α2 overexpression decreases, Wnt/β-catenin signaling. This action is independent of its HRE-dependent transcriptional activity. Mechanistically, Hif-3α2 binds to β-catenin and destabilizes the nuclear β-catenin complex. This mechanism is distinct from GSK3β-mediated β-catenin degradation and is conserved in humans. These findings provide new insights into the oxygen-independent actions of HIFs and uncover a novel mechanism regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08996.001 PMID:26765566

  12. Targeted oxidation of Torpedo californica acetylcholinesterase by singlet oxygen: Identification of N-formylkynurenine tryptophan derivatives within the active-site gorge of its complex with the photosensitizer methylene blue

    PubMed Central

    Triquigneaux, Mathilde M.; Ehrenshaft, Marilyn; Roth, Esther; Silman, Israel; Ashani, Yakov; Mason, Ronald P.; Weiner, Lev; Deterding, Leesa J.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis The principal role of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is termination of impulse transmission at cholinergic synapses by rapid hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. The active site of AChE is near the bottom of a long and narrow gorge lined with aromatic residues. It contains a catalytic ‘anionic’ subsite (CAS) and a second peripheral ‘anionic’ site (PAS), the gorge mouth, both of which bind acetylcholine via π-cation interactions, primarily with two conserved tryptophans (Trps). It was earlier shown that generation of 1O2 by illumination of methylene blue (MB) causes irreversible inactivation of Torpedo californica AChE (TcAChE), and suggested that photo-oxidation of Trps might be responsible. In the present study, structural modification of the TcAChE Trps induced by MB-sensitized oxidation was investigated using anti-N-formylkynurenine antibodies and mass spectrometry. From these analyses, we determined that N-formylkynurenine derivatives were specifically produced from Trp 84 and Trp 279 – present at the CAS and PAS, respectively. Peptides containing these two oxidized Trp residues were not detected when the competitive inhibitors, edrophonium and propidium (which should displace MB from the gorge) were present during illumination, in agreement with their efficient protection against the MB-induced photo-inactivation. Thus, the bound MB elicited selective action of 1O2 on Trp residues facing onto the water-filled active-site gorge. Our findings thus demonstrate the localized action and high specificity of MB-sensitized photo-oxidation of TcAChE, as well as the value of this enzyme as a model system for studying the mechanism of action and specificity of photosensitizing agents. PMID:22888904

  13. Mechanism of the inhibition of catalase by ascorbate. Roles of active oxygen species, copper and semidehydroascorbate.

    PubMed

    Davison, A J; Kettle, A J; Fatur, D J

    1986-01-25

    Ascorbate reversibly inhibits catalase, and this inhibition is enhanced and rendered irreversible by the prior addition of copper(II)-bishistidine. In the absence of copper, the inhibition was prevented and reversed by ethanol, but not by superoxide dismutase, benzoate, mannitol, thiourea, desferrioxamine, or DETAPAC. In the presence of the copper complex mannitol, benzoate, and superoxide dismutase still had no effect, but thiourea, desferrioxamine, DETAPAC, or additional histidine decreased the extent of inactivation to that seen in the absence of copper. In the presence of copper, ethanol protected at [ascorbate] less than 1 mM, but was ineffective at [ascorbate] greater than 2 mM, even in the absence of oxygen. Although in the absence of copper, complete removal of oxygen provided full protection against inactivation by ascorbate, this protection was not seen if the catalase was briefly preincubated with H2O2 prior to flushing with nitrogen, or if copper was present. In fact, if copper was present, inactivation was enhanced by the removal of oxygen. Increasing the concentration of oxygen from ambient to 100% slowed the inactivation, whether or not copper was present. It is concluded that the initial reversible inactivation involves reaction with H2O2 to form compound I, followed by one electron reduction of compound I to compound II. In the presence of added copper, the initial (reversible) inactivation allows H2O2 to accumulate sufficiently to permit irreversible inactivation. Since in the presence of copper oxygen is not required, and neither the reversible nor the irreversible inactivation was prevented by conventional scavengers of active forms of oxygen, the inactivation is likely mediated by semidehydroascorbate, and/or it may involve site-specific generation of the damaging intermediates.

  14. Contrasted effects of natural complex mixtures of PAHs and metals on oxygen cycle in a microbial mat.

    PubMed

    Pringault, Olivier; Aube, Johanne; Bouchez, Olivier; Klopp, Christophe; Mariette, Jérome; Escudie, Frédéric; Senin, Pavel; Goni-Urriza, Marisol

    2015-09-01

    The contamination of polluted environments is often due to a complex mixture of pollutants sometimes at trace levels which nevertheless may have significant effects on the diversity and functioning of organisms. The aim of this study was to assess the functional responses of a microbial mat exposed to a natural complex mixture of PAHs and metals as a function of the maturation stage of the biofilm. Microbial mats sampled in a slightly polluted environment were exposed to contaminated water of a retention basin of an oil refinery. The responses of the microbial mats differed according to season. In spring 2012, strong inhibition of both oxygen production and respiration was observed relative to the control, with rates representing less than 5% of the control after 72 h of incubation. A decrease of microbial activities was followed by a decrease of the coupling between autotrophs and heterotrophs. In contrast, in autumn 2012, no significant changes for oxygen production and respiration were observed and the coupling between autotrophs and heterotrophs was not altered. The differences observed between the spring and autumn mats might be explained by the maturity of the microbial mat with dominance of heterotrophic bacteria in spring, and diatoms and cyanobacteria in autumn, as well as by the differences in the chemical composition of the complex mixture of PAHs and metals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Structure-Function of the Cytochrome b6f Complex of Oxygenic Photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, W. A.; Yamashita, E.; Baniulis, D.; Whitelegge, J.; Hasan, S. S.

    2014-03-20

    Structure–function of the major integral membrane cytochrome b6f complex that functions in cyanobacteria, algae, and green plants to transfer electrons between the two reaction center complexes in the electron transport chain of oxygenic photosynthesis is discussed in the context of recently obtained crystal structures of the complex and soluble domains of cytochrome f and the Rieske iron–sulfur protein. The energy-transducing function of the complex, generation of the proton trans-membrane electrochemical potential gradient, centers on the oxidation/reduction pathways of the plastoquinol/plastoquinone (QH2/Q), the proton donor/acceptor within the complex. These redox reactions are carried out by five redox prosthetic groups embedded in each monomer, the high potential two iron–two sulfur cluster and the heme of cytochrome f on the electropositive side (p) of the complex, two noncovalently bound b-type hemes that cross the complex and the membrane, and a covalently bound c-type heme (cn) on the electronegative side (n). These five redox-active groups are organized in high- (cyt f/[2Fe–2S] and low-potential (hemes bp, bn, cn) electron transport pathways that oxidize and reduce the quinol and quinone on the p- and n-sides in a Q-cycle-type mechanism, while translocating as many as 2 H+ to the p-side aqueous side for every electron transferred through the high potential chain to the photosystem I reaction center. The presence of heme cn and the connection of the n-side of the membrane and b6f complex to the cyclic electron transport chain indicate that the Q cycle in the oxygenic photosynthetic electron transport chain differs from those connected to the bc1 complex in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and the chain in photosynthetic bacteria. Inferences from the structure and C2 symmetry of the complex for the pathway of QH2/Q transfer

  16. Asbestos-derived reactive oxygen species activate TGF-beta1.

    PubMed

    Pociask, Derek A; Sime, Patricia J; Brody, Arnold R

    2004-08-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) is a potent peptide that inhibits epithelial and mesenchymal cell proliferation and stimulates the synthesis of extracellular matrix components. This cytokine is produced in a biologically latent complex bound to a latent-associated peptide (LAP), and it is the disassociation of this complex that regulates TGF-beta activity. A number of mechanisms have been shown to activate TGF-beta1. We show here that reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated by the iron in chrysotile or crocidolite asbestos, mediate the biological activity of TGF-beta1. Recombinant human latent TGF-beta1 was activated in a cell free system in the presence of asbestos and ascorbic acid. Latent TGF-beta1 was overexpressed in both A549 and mink lung epithelial cell lines through an adenovirus vector containing the full-length construct for porcine TGF-beta1. This latent TGF-beta1 was activated in a concentration-dependant fashion by introducing asbestos into the cell cultures. This activation was reduced significantly through the use of superoxide dismutase, catalase or deferoxamine. Amino-acid constituents of the LAP were oxidized as demonstrated by the appearance of carbonyls detected by Western analysis. The oxidized LAP could no longer form a complex with TGF-beta1. Our data support the postulate that ROS derived from asbestos provide a mechanism for activating TGF-beta1 in the alveolar environment by oxidizing amino acids in LAP.

  17. Synthesis, characterization, photophysical and oxygen-sensing properties of a novel europium(III) complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Nan; Xie, Jing; Zhang, Dawei

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, we report the synthesis, characterization, crystal structure, and photophysical properties of a novel Eu 3+ complex of Eu(DBM) 3IPD, where DBM = 1,3-diphenyl-propane-1,3-dione and IPD = 4-(1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthrolin-2-yl)-N,N-diphenylaniline. Its elementary application for oxygen-sensing application is also investigated by doping it into a silica matrix of MCM-41. Experimental data suggest that the 20 mg/g doped Eu(DBM) 3IPD/MCM-41 system exhibits a high sensitivity of 3.6 towards molecular oxygen with a good linear relationship of R2 = 0.9987. In addition, the 20 mg/g doped Eu(DBM) 3IPD/MCM-41 system owns a quick response of 8 s towards oxygen, along with its excellent atmosphere insensitivity and photobleaching resistance. All these results suggest that both Eu(DBM) 3IPD and Eu(DBM) 3IPD/MCM-41 systems are promising candidates for oxygen-sensing optical sensors.

  18. Adair-based hemoglobin equilibrium with oxygen, carbon dioxide and hydrogen ion activity.

    PubMed

    Mateják, Marek; Kulhánek, Tomáš; Matoušek, Stanislav

    2015-04-01

    As has been known for over a century, oxygen binding onto hemoglobin is influenced by the activity of hydrogen ions (H⁺), as well as the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO₂). As is also known, the binding of both CO₂and H⁺ on terminal valine-1 residues is competitive. One-parametric situations of these hemoglobin equilibria at specific levels of H⁺, O₂or CO₂are also well described. However, we think interpolating or extrapolating this knowledge into an 'empirical' function of three independent variables has not yet been completely satisfactory. We present a model that integrates three orthogonal views of hemoglobin oxygenation, titration, and carbamination at different temperatures. The model is based only on chemical principles, Adair's oxygenation steps and Van't Hoff equation of temperature dependences. Our model fits the measurements of the Haldane coefficient and CO₂hemoglobin saturation. It also fits the oxygen dissociation curve influenced by simultaneous changes in H⁺, CO₂and O₂, which makes it a strong candidate for integration into more complex models of blood acid-base with gas transport, where any combination of mentioned substances can appear.

  19. A role for human mitochondrial complex II in the production of reactive oxygen species in human skin

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Alasdair; Bowman, Amy; Boulton, Sarah Jayne; Manning, Philip; Birch-Machin, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain is a major generator of cellular oxidative stress, thought to be an underlying cause of the carcinogenic and ageing process in many tissues including skin. Previous studies of the relative contributions of the respiratory chain (RC) complexes I, II and III towards production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have focussed on rat tissues and certainly not on human skin which is surprising as this tissue is regularly exposed to UVA in sunlight, a potent generator of cellular oxidative stress. In a novel approach we have used an array of established specific metabolic inhibitors and DHR123 fluorescence to study the relative roles of the mitochondrial RC complexes in cellular ROS production in 2 types of human skin cells. These include additional enhancement of ROS production by exposure to physiological levels of UVA. The effects within epidermal and dermal derived skin cells are compared to other tissue cell types as well as those harbouring a compromised mitochondrial status (Rho-zero A549). The results show that the complex II inhibitor, TTFA, was the only RC inhibitor to significantly increase UVA-induced ROS production in both skin cell types (P<0.05) suggesting that the role of human skin complex II in terms of influencing ROS production is more important than previously thought particularly in comparison to liver cells. Interestingly, two-fold greater maximal activity of complex II enzyme was observed in both skin cell types compared to liver (P<0.001). The activities of RC enzymes appear to decrease with increasing age and telomere length is correlated with ageing. Our study showed that the level of maximal complex II activity was higher in the MRC5/hTERT (human lung fibroblasts transfected with telomerase) cells than the corresponding wild type cells (P=0.0012) which can be considered (in terms of telomerase activity) as models of younger and older cells respectively. PMID:25460738

  20. Phenol degradation in heterogeneous system generating singlet oxygen employing light activated electropolymerized phenothiazines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piwowar, Katarzyna; Blacha-Grzechnik, Agata; Bernas, Paulina; Zak, Jerzy

    2015-12-01

    Five selected amine-derivatives of phenothiazine were electropolymerized on an ITO/glass substrate and then used in the daylight-activated process to produce in situ singlet oxygen which degrades phenol in a solution. The phenothiazines were immobilized in a simple electrochemical procedure in an acidic solution which led to the formation of an ultrathin transparent polymeric film. All films obtained on the ITO substrate including azure A (AA), azure C (AC), methylene blue (MB), toluidine blue (TBO), and thionine (Th) had a comparable surface coverage at the level of picomoles/cm2. The activity of these materials was then compared and presented in terms of an efficiency of the phenol degradation process in an aqueous solution by photogenerated singlet oxygen. That efficiency was determined by the UV-vis spectroscopy employing a phenol/4-aminoantipyrine complex. All the phenothiazine ultrathin polymeric films were capable of generating the singlet oxygen in the aqueous solution under daylight activation, which was used in the consecutive process of phenol degradation. The highest efficiency at a level of 51.4% and 45.4% was found for the AC/ITO and MB/ITO layers, respectively.

  1. Active Oxygen Species Generator by Low Pressure Silent Discharge and its Application to Water Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Ikeda, Akira; Tanimura, Yasuhiro; Ohta, Koji; Yoshiyasu, Hajimu

    We have proposed the new water treatment using the active oxygen species such as an atomic oxygen with the oxidation power that is stronger than ozone. Based on the results of simulations we designed the silent discharge type active oxygen generator with a water ejector, which is operated on the discharge conditions of low pressure of 6.6kPa. and high temperature of about 200°C. The experimental results are as follows. (1) The yield of the active oxygen increases with the increase of the discharge tube temperature and the decrease of the gas pressure. (2) The life time of active oxygen is tens msec. (3) The active oxygen oxidizes efficiently the formic acid compared with ozone. It is assumed from these results that the active oxygen species having a strong oxidation power is generated.

  2. Infrared spectra of oxygen-rich yttrium and lanthanum dioxygen/ozonide complexes in solid argon.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yu; Ding, Chuanfan; Zhou, Mingfei

    2009-07-30

    The reactions of yttrium and lanthanum atoms with O(2) have been reinvestigated using matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. The ground-state yttrium and lanthanum atoms react with O(2) to produce the inserted yttrium and lanthanum dioxide molecules as the initial products. The yttrium dioxide molecule interacts spontaneously with additional O(2) molecules to form the oxygen-rich OY(eta(2)-O(3)) complex and possibly the (eta(2)-O(2))Y(eta(2)-O(3))(2) complexes upon sample annealing, which can be regarded as the side-on bonded yttrium monoxide ozonide complex and the superoxo yttrium bisozonide complex, respectively. Visible irradiation induces the isomerization of the OY(eta(2)-O(3)) complex to the superoxo yttrium peroxide Y(eta(2)-O(2))(2) isomer, in which both the superoxo and peroxo ligands are side-on bonded to the yttrium center. The lanthanum dioxide molecule reacts with additional O(2) molecules to form the lanthanum dioxide-dioxygen complex with planar C(2v) symmetry, which rearranges to the lanthanum monoxide ozonide complex, OLa(eta(2)-O(3)), under near-infrared excitation.

  3. Comparison of the EXAFS Spectra of Heteronuclear MnCa/Sr Model Complexes to the Oxygen-Evolving Mn(4)Ca Complex of Photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, A.; Yano, J.; Pushkar, Y.; Abboud, K.A.; Yachandra, V.K.; Christou, G.

    2009-06-03

    Heterometallic Mn-Ca and Mn-Sr complexes have been prepared and employed as model complexes for Ca and Sr EXAFS spectral comparisons with the Oxygen-Evolving Complex (OEC) of Photosystem II (PS II); these have revealed similarities that support the presence of at least one O atom bridge between the Mn and Ca/Sr in the OEC.

  4. Heteronuclear Mn-Ca/Sr Complexes, and Ca/Sr EXAFS SpectralComparisons with the Oxygen-Evolving Complex of Photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, A.; Yano, J.; Pushkar, Y.; Yachandra, V.K.; Abboud, K.A.; Christou, G.

    2007-12-19

    HeterometallicMn Ca and Mn Sr complexes have been preparedand employed as model complexes for Ca and Sr EXAFS spectral comparisonswith the Oxygen-Evolving Complex (OEC) of Photosystem II (PS II); thesehave revealed similarities that support the presence of at least one Oatom bridge between the Mn and Ca/Sr in the OEC.

  5. Oxygen Affects Gut Bacterial Colonization and Metabolic Activities in a Gnotobiotic Cockroach Model.

    PubMed

    Tegtmeier, Dorothee; Thompson, Claire L; Schauer, Christine; Brune, Andreas

    2015-12-04

    The gut microbiota of termites and cockroaches represents complex metabolic networks of many diverse microbial populations. The distinct microenvironmental conditions within the gut and possible interactions among the microorganisms make it essential to investigate how far the metabolic properties of pure cultures reflect their activities in their natural environment. We established the cockroach Shelfordella lateralis as a gnotobiotic model and inoculated germfree nymphs with two bacterial strains isolated from the guts of conventional cockroaches. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that both strains specifically colonized the germfree hindgut. In diassociated cockroaches, the facultatively anaerobic strain EbSL (a new species of Enterobacteriaceae) always outnumbered the obligately anaerobic strain FuSL (a close relative of Fusobacterium varium), irrespective of the sequence of inoculation, which showed that precolonization by facultatively anaerobic bacteria does not necessarily favor colonization by obligate anaerobes. Comparison of the fermentation products of the cultures formed in vitro with those accumulated in situ indicated that the gut environment strongly affected the metabolic activities of both strains. The pure cultures formed the typical products of mixed-acid or butyrate fermentation, whereas the guts of gnotobiotic cockroaches accumulated mostly lactate and acetate. Similar shifts toward more-oxidized products were observed when the pure cultures were exposed to oxygen, which corroborated the strong effects of oxygen on the metabolic fluxes previously observed in termite guts. Oxygen microsensor profiles of the guts of germfree, gnotobiotic, and conventional cockroaches indicated that both gut tissue and microbiota contribute to oxygen consumption and suggest that the oxygen status influences the colonization success.

  6. Oxygen Affects Gut Bacterial Colonization and Metabolic Activities in a Gnotobiotic Cockroach Model

    PubMed Central

    Tegtmeier, Dorothee; Thompson, Claire L.; Schauer, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota of termites and cockroaches represents complex metabolic networks of many diverse microbial populations. The distinct microenvironmental conditions within the gut and possible interactions among the microorganisms make it essential to investigate how far the metabolic properties of pure cultures reflect their activities in their natural environment. We established the cockroach Shelfordella lateralis as a gnotobiotic model and inoculated germfree nymphs with two bacterial strains isolated from the guts of conventional cockroaches. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that both strains specifically colonized the germfree hindgut. In diassociated cockroaches, the facultatively anaerobic strain EbSL (a new species of Enterobacteriaceae) always outnumbered the obligately anaerobic strain FuSL (a close relative of Fusobacterium varium), irrespective of the sequence of inoculation, which showed that precolonization by facultatively anaerobic bacteria does not necessarily favor colonization by obligate anaerobes. Comparison of the fermentation products of the cultures formed in vitro with those accumulated in situ indicated that the gut environment strongly affected the metabolic activities of both strains. The pure cultures formed the typical products of mixed-acid or butyrate fermentation, whereas the guts of gnotobiotic cockroaches accumulated mostly lactate and acetate. Similar shifts toward more-oxidized products were observed when the pure cultures were exposed to oxygen, which corroborated the strong effects of oxygen on the metabolic fluxes previously observed in termite guts. Oxygen microsensor profiles of the guts of germfree, gnotobiotic, and conventional cockroaches indicated that both gut tissue and microbiota contribute to oxygen consumption and suggest that the oxygen status influences the colonization success. PMID:26637604

  7. Theoretical, spectral characterization and antineoplastic activity of new lanthanide complexes.

    PubMed

    Kostova, Irena; Trendafilova, Natasha; Momekov, Georgi

    2008-01-01

    The new cerium(III), lanthanum(III) and neodymium(III) complexes were synthesized in view of their application as cytotoxic agents. The complexes were characterized by different physicochemical methods: elemental analysis, mass spectrometry, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and IR spectroscopy. The spectra of the complexes were interpreted on the basis of comparison with the spectrum of the free ligand. The vibrational analysis showed that in the complexes the ligand coordinates to the metal ion through both deprotonated hydroxyl groups, however participation of the carbonyl groups in the coordination to the metal ion was also suggested. Geometry optimization of 3,3'-(ortho-pyridinomethylene)di-[4-hydroxycoumarin] H(2)(o-pyhc), (H(2)L) and its dianionic forms, o-pyhc(2-), (L(2-)) were carried out at AM1 and PM3 levels as well as using density functional theory with Becke's three parameter hybrid method and correlation functional of Lee, Yang and Parr (B3LYP) with 6-31G(d) basis set. The optimized geometries of the neutral ligand isomers were stabilized by two asymmetrical intramolecular O-H...O hydrogen bonds (HBs). The conformational search showed four low-energy dianionic species (o-pyhc(2-)) on the potential energy surface. Molecular electrostatic potential calculations showed that the most preferred sites for electrophilic attack in H(2)(o-pyhc) and o-pyhc(2-) are the carbonyl oxygen atoms. The evaluation of the cytotoxic activity of the novel lantanide complexes on HL-60 myeloid cells revealed, that they are potent cytotoxic agents. The cerium complex was found to exhibit superior activity in comparison to the lanthanum, and neodymium species, the latter being the least active. Taken together our data give us a reason to conclude that the newly synthesized lanthanide complexes should be a subset to further more detailed pharmacological and toxicological evaluation.

  8. High-spin Mn-oxo complexes and their relevance to the oxygen-evolving complex within photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rupal; Taguchi, Taketo; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Bominaar, Emile L; Yano, Junko; Hendrich, Michael P; Borovik, A S

    2015-04-28

    The structural and electronic properties of a series of manganese complexes with terminal oxido ligands are described. The complexes span three different oxidation states at the manganese center (III-V), have similar molecular structures, and contain intramolecular hydrogen-bonding networks surrounding the Mn-oxo unit. Structural studies using X-ray absorption methods indicated that each complex is mononuclear and that oxidation occurs at the manganese centers, which is also supported by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies. This gives a high-spin Mn(V)-oxo complex and not a Mn(IV)-oxy radical as the most oxidized species. In addition, the EPR findings demonstrated that the Fermi contact term could experimentally substantiate the oxidation states at the manganese centers and the covalency in the metal-ligand bonding. Oxygen-17-labeled samples were used to determine spin density within the Mn-oxo unit, with the greatest delocalization occurring within the Mn(V)-oxo species (0.45 spins on the oxido ligand). The experimental results coupled with density functional theory studies show a large amount of covalency within the Mn-oxo bonds. Finally, these results are examined within the context of possible mechanisms associated with photosynthetic water oxidation; specifically, the possible identity of the proposed high valent Mn-oxo species that is postulated to form during turnover is discussed.

  9. Iron(III) [bond] Salen complexes as enzyme models: mechanistic study of oxo(salen)iron complexes oxygenation of organic sulfides.

    PubMed

    Sivasubramanian, Veluchamy Kamaraj; Ganesan, Muniyandi; Rajagopal, Seenivasan; Ramaraj, Ramasamy

    2002-03-08

    The oxidation of a series of para-substituted phenyl methyl sulfides was carried out with several oxo(salen)iron (salen = N,N'-bis(salicylidine)ethylenediaminato) complexes in acetonitrile. The oxo complex [O=Fe(IV)(salen)](*+), generated from an iron(III) [bond] salen complex and iodosylbenzene, effectively oxidizes the organic sulfides to the corresponding sulfoxides. The formation of [O [double bond] Fe(IV)(salen)](*+) as the active oxidant is supported by resonance Raman studies. The kinetic data indicate that the reaction is first-order in the oxidant and fractional-order with respect to sulfide. The observed saturation kinetics of the reaction and spectral data indicate that the substrate binds to the oxidant before the rate-controlling step. The rate constant (k) values for the product formation step determined using Michaelis-Menten kinetics correlate well with Hammett sigma constants, giving reaction constant (rho) values in the range of -0.65 to -1.54 for different oxo(salen)iron complexes. The log k values observed in the oxidation of each aryl methyl sulfide by substituted oxo(salen)iron complexes also correlate with Hammett sigma constants, giving positive rho values. The substituent effect, UV-vis absorption, and EPR spectral studies indicate oxygen atom transfer from the oxidant to the substrate in the rate-determining step.

  10. Successful Treatment of Lower Limb Complex Regional Pain Syndrome following Three Weeks of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Katznelson, Rita; Segal, Shira C.; Clarke, Hance

    2016-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is a treatment that delivers 100% oxygen at increased atmospheric pressures. The efficacy of HBOT for treating pain has been described in various animal pain models and may have clinical efficacy in the treatment of human chronic pain syndromes. We present our experience with posttraumatic Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) type 2 in a patient who underwent 15 sessions of HBOT. A 41-year-old male with one-year history of CRPS of left foot followed by left ankle fracture demonstrated less pain, decreased swelling, less allodynia, and improvement in skin color and range of motion of the lower limb after 3 weeks of HBOT. Patient was back to work for the first time in over a year. HBOT may be considered as a valuable therapeutic tool in the treatment of long-standing CRPS. PMID:27445607

  11. Ammonia Binds to the Dangler Manganese of the Photosystem II Oxygen-Evolving Complex.

    PubMed

    Oyala, Paul H; Stich, Troy A; Debus, Richard J; Britt, R David

    2015-07-15

    High-resolution X-ray structures of photosystem II reveal several potential substrate binding sites at the water-oxidizing/oxygen-evolving 4MnCa cluster. Aspartate-61 of the D1 protein hydrogen bonds with one such water (W1), which is bound to the dangler Mn4A of the oxygen-evolving complex. Comparison of pulse EPR spectra of (14)NH3 and (15)NH3 bound to wild-type Synechocystis PSII and a D1-D61A mutant lacking this hydrogen-bonding interaction demonstrates that ammonia binds as a terminal NH3 at this dangler Mn4A site and not as a partially deprotonated bridge between two metal centers. The implications of this finding on identifying the binding sites of the substrate and the subsequent mechanism of dioxygen formation are discussed.

  12. Synergistic Substrate and Oxygen Activation in Salicylate Dioxygenase Revealed by QM/MM Simulations.

    PubMed

    Roy, Subhendu; Kästner, Johannes

    2016-01-18

    Salicylate 1,2-dioxygenase (SDO) is the first enzyme to be discovered to catalyze the oxidative cleavage of a monohydroxylated aromatic compound, namely salicylate, instead of the well-known electron-rich substrates. We have investigated the mechanism of dioxygen activation in SDO by QM/MM calculations. Our study reveals that the non-heme Fe(II) center in SDO activates salicylate and O2 synergistically through a strong covalent interaction to facilitate the reductive cleavage of O2. A covalent salicylate-Fe(II) -O2 complex is the reactive oxygen species in this case, and its electronic structure is best described as being between the two limiting cases, Fe(II)-O2 and Fe(II)-O2˙(-), with partial electron transfer from the activated salicylate to O2 via the Fe center. Thus SDO employs a synergistic strategy of substrate and oxygen activation to carry out the catalytic reaction, which is unprecedented in the family of iron dioxygenases. Moreover, O2 activation in SDO happens without the assistance of a proton source. Our study essentially shows a new mechanistic possibility for O2 activation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Correlation between the sorption of dissolved oxygen onto chitosan and its antimicrobial activity against Esherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gylienė, Ona; Servienė, Elena; Vepštaitė, Iglė; Binkienė, Rima; Baranauskas, Mykolas; Lukša, Juliana

    2015-10-20

    The ability of chitosan to adsorb dissolved oxygen from solution depends on its physical shape and is related to the surface area. Depending on conditions chitosan is capable of adsorbing or releasing oxygen. Chitosan, modificated by the substances possessing antimicrobial activity, such as succinic acid, Pd(II) ions, metallic Pd or Ag, distinctly increases the ability to adsorb the dissolved oxygen. The additional treatment of chitosan with air oxygen or electrochemically produced oxygen also increases the uptake of dissolved oxygen by chitosan. A strong correlation between the amount of oxygen adsorbed onto chitosan and its antimicrobial activity against Esherichia coli has been observed. This finding suggests that one of the sources of antimicrobial activity of chitosan is the ability to sorb dissolved oxygen, along with other well-known factors such as physical state and chemical composition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Active Oxygen Generator by Silent Discharge and Oxidation Power in Formation of Oxide Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Kawagoe, Yasuyuki; Tsukazaki, Hisashi; Yamanishi, Kenichiro

    We have studied the low pressure silent discharge type active oxygen generator in terms of the application to the formation of oxide thin films. In this paper the oxidation power of active oxygen in the oxide thin film formation is compared with that of oxygen and ozone by forming silicon oxide thin films. It was confirmed that the oxidation power is in turn of active oxygen > ozone > oxygen from the experimental result of the number of x in SiOx thin film. Furthermore we applied active oxygen to the formation of the thin film high temperature super conductor and active oxygen was found to be effective to the formation of the thin film with high performance.

  15. Oxygen isotope fractionation in phosphates: the role of dissolved complex anions in isotope exchange.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yong-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen isotope fractionation factors for phosphates were calculated by means of the increment method. The results suggest that Ag3PO4 and BiPO4 are enriched in (18)O relative to AgPO4, and the three phosphates are consistently depleted in (18)O relative to Ba3[PO4]2; fluorapatite and chlorapatite exhibit a similar behaviour of oxygen isotope fractionation with consistent enrichment of (18)O relative to hydroxyapatite. The valence, radii and coordination of metal cations play a quantitative role in dictating the (18)O/(16)O partitioning in these phosphates of different compositions. The calculated fractionation factors for the Ag3PO4-H2O system are in agreement with experimental determinations derived from enzyme-catalysed isotope exchange between dissolved inorganic phosphate and water at the longest reaction durations at low temperatures. This demonstrates that the precipitated Ag3PO4 has completely captured the oxygen isotope fractionation in the dissolved inorganic phosphate. The calculated fractionation factors for the F/Cl-apatite-water systems are in agreement with the enzyme-catalysed experimental fractionations for the dissolved phosphate-water system at the longest reaction durations but larger than fractionations derived from bacteria-facilitated exchange and inorganic precipitation experiments as well as natural observations. For the experimental calibrations of oxygen isotope fractionation involving the precipitation of dissolved phosphate species from aqueous solutions, the fractionation between precipitate and water is primarily dictated by the isotope equilibration between the dissolved complex anions and water prior to the precipitation. Therefore, the present results provide a quantitative means to interpret the temperature dependence of oxygen isotope fractionation in inorganic and biogenic phosphates.

  16. Collective dynamics of active filament complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogucci, Hironobu; Ishihara, Shuji

    2016-05-01

    Networks of biofilaments are essential for the formation of cellular structures that support various biological functions. For the most part, previous studies have investigated the collective dynamics of rodlike biofilaments; however, the shapes of the actual subcellular components are often more elaborate. In this study, we considered an active object composed of two active filaments, which represents the progression from rodlike biofilaments to complex-shaped biofilaments. Specifically, we numerically assessed the collective behaviors of these active objects in two dimensions and observed several types of dynamics, depending on the density and the angle of the two filaments as shape parameters of the object. Among the observed collective dynamics, a moving density band that we named a "moving smectic" is introduced here for the first time. By analyzing the trajectories of individual objects and the interactions among them, this study demonstrated how interactions among active biofilaments with complex shapes could produce collective dynamics in a nontrivial manner.

  17. Oleic acid increases mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and decreases endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity in cultured endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gremmels, Hendrik; Bevers, Lonneke M; Fledderus, Joost O; Braam, Branko; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; Verhaar, Marianne C; Joles, Jaap A

    2015-03-15

    Elevated plasma levels of free fatty acids (FFA) are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. This may be related to FFA-induced elevation of oxidative stress in endothelial cells. We hypothesized that, in addition to mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-mediated reactive oxygen species production contributes to oleic acid (OA)-induced oxidative stress in endothelial cells, due to eNOS uncoupling. We measured reactive oxygen species production and eNOS activity in cultured endothelial cells (bEnd.3) in the presence of OA bound to bovine serum albumin, using the CM-H2DCFDA assay and the L-arginine/citrulline conversion assay, respectively. OA induced a concentration-dependent increase in reactive oxygen species production, which was inhibited by the mitochondrial complex II inhibitor thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA). OA had little effect on eNOS activity when stimulated by a calcium-ionophore, but decreased both basal and insulin-induced eNOS activity, which was restored by TTFA. Pretreatment of bEnd.3 cells with tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) prevented OA-induced reactive oxygen species production and restored inhibition of eNOS activity by OA. Elevation of OA levels leads to both impairment in receptor-mediated stimulation of eNOS and to production of mitochondrial-derived reactive oxygen species and hence endothelial dysfunction.

  18. First site-specific incorporation of a noncanonical amino acid into the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex.

    PubMed

    Offenbacher, Adam R; Pagba, Cynthia V; Polander, Brandon C; Brahmachari, Udita; Barry, Bridgette A

    2014-04-18

    In photosystem II (PSII), water is oxidized at the oxygen-evolving complex. This process occurs through a light-induced cycle that produces oxygen and protons. While coupled proton and electron transfer reactions play an important role in PSII and other proteins, direct detection of internal proton transfer reactions is challenging. Here, we demonstrate that the unnatural amino acid, 7-azatryptophan (7AW), has unique, pH-sensitive vibrational frequencies, which are sensitive markers of proton transfer. The intrinsically disordered, PSII subunit, PsbO, which contains a single W residue (Trp241), was engineered to contain 7AW at position 241. Fluorescence shows that 7AW-241 is buried in a hydrophobic environment. Reconstitution of 7AW(241)PsbO to PSII had no significant impact on oxygen evolution activity or flash-dependent protein dynamics. We conclude that directed substitution of 7AW into other structural domains is likely to provide a nonperturbative spectroscopic probe, which can be used to define internal proton pathways in PsbO.

  19. Damage to the oxygen-evolving complex by superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radical in photoinhibition of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Song, Yu Guang; Liu, Bin; Wang, Lan Fen; Li, Mai He; Liu, Yang

    2006-10-01

    Under strong illumination of a photosystem II (PSII) membrane, endogenous superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radical were successively produced. These compounds then cooperatively resulted in a release of manganese from the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) and an inhibition of oxygen evolution activity. The OEC inactivation was initiated by an acceptor-side generated superoxide anion, and hydrogen peroxide was most probably responsible for the transportation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) across the PSII membrane from the acceptor-side to the donor-side. Besides ROS being generated in the acceptor-side induced manganese loss; there may also be a ROS-independent manganese loss in the OEC of PSII. Both superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical located inside the PSII membrane were directly identified by a spin trapping-electron spin resonance (ESR) method in combination with a lipophilic spin trap, 5-(diethoxyphosphoryl)-5-phenethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DEPPEPO). The endogenous hydrogen peroxide production was examined by oxidation of thiobenzamide.

  20. Production and Characterization of Active Transparent PET Films for Oxygen Sensitive Foods Packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosaria Galdi, Maria; Incarnato, Loredana

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate possible solutions to realize active, transparent PET film suitable for packaging oxygen sensitive foods. At this purpose, monolayer active PET films at different oxygen scavenger concentrations and multilayer active ones were produced by cast extrusion laboratory scale equipments. To assess their activity and to verify the efficacy of such solutions, O2 absorption analyses were carried out in continuous by an innovative oxygen meter.

  1. Finite Element Model of Oxygen Transport for the Design of Geometrically Complex Microfluidic Devices Used in Biological Studies

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Graham M.; Goldman, Daniel; Ellis, Christopher G.

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cells play a crucial role in the local regulation of oxygen supply in the microcirculation through the oxygen dependent release of ATP. Since red blood cells serve as an oxygen sensor for the circulatory system, the dynamics of ATP release determine the effectiveness of red blood cells to relate the oxygen levels to the vessels. Previous work has focused on the feasibility of developing a microfluidic system to measure the dynamics of ATP release. The objective was to determine if a steep oxygen gradient could be developed in the channel to cause a rapid decrease in hemoglobin oxygen saturation in order to measure the corresponding levels of ATP released from the red blood cells. In the present study, oxygen transport simulations were used to optimize the geometric design parameters for a similar system which is easier to fabricate. The system is composed of a microfluidic device stacked on top of a large, gas impermeable flow channel with a hole to allow gas exchange. The microfluidic device is fabricated using soft lithography in polydimethyl-siloxane, an oxygen permeable material. Our objective is twofold: (1) optimize the parameters of our system and (2) develop a method to assess the oxygen distribution in complex 3D microfluidic device geometries. 3D simulations of oxygen transport were performed to simulate oxygen distribution throughout the device. The simulations demonstrate that microfluidic device geometry plays a critical role in molecule exchange, for instance, changing the orientation of the short wide microfluidic channel results in a 97.17% increase in oxygen exchange. Since microfluidic devices have become a more prominent tool in biological studies, understanding the transport of oxygen and other biological molecules in microfluidic devices is critical for maintaining a physiologically relevant environment. We have also demonstrated a method to assess oxygen levels in geometrically complex microfluidic devices. PMID:27829071

  2. Finite Element Model of Oxygen Transport for the Design of Geometrically Complex Microfluidic Devices Used in Biological Studies.

    PubMed

    Sové, Richard J; Fraser, Graham M; Goldman, Daniel; Ellis, Christopher G

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cells play a crucial role in the local regulation of oxygen supply in the microcirculation through the oxygen dependent release of ATP. Since red blood cells serve as an oxygen sensor for the circulatory system, the dynamics of ATP release determine the effectiveness of red blood cells to relate the oxygen levels to the vessels. Previous work has focused on the feasibility of developing a microfluidic system to measure the dynamics of ATP release. The objective was to determine if a steep oxygen gradient could be developed in the channel to cause a rapid decrease in hemoglobin oxygen saturation in order to measure the corresponding levels of ATP released from the red blood cells. In the present study, oxygen transport simulations were used to optimize the geometric design parameters for a similar system which is easier to fabricate. The system is composed of a microfluidic device stacked on top of a large, gas impermeable flow channel with a hole to allow gas exchange. The microfluidic device is fabricated using soft lithography in polydimethyl-siloxane, an oxygen permeable material. Our objective is twofold: (1) optimize the parameters of our system and (2) develop a method to assess the oxygen distribution in complex 3D microfluidic device geometries. 3D simulations of oxygen transport were performed to simulate oxygen distribution throughout the device. The simulations demonstrate that microfluidic device geometry plays a critical role in molecule exchange, for instance, changing the orientation of the short wide microfluidic channel results in a 97.17% increase in oxygen exchange. Since microfluidic devices have become a more prominent tool in biological studies, understanding the transport of oxygen and other biological molecules in microfluidic devices is critical for maintaining a physiologically relevant environment. We have also demonstrated a method to assess oxygen levels in geometrically complex microfluidic devices.

  3. Heat-induced reorganization of the structure of photosystem II membranes: role of oxygen evolving complex.

    PubMed

    Busheva, Mira; Tzonova, Iren; Stoitchkova, Katerina; Andreeva, Atanaska

    2012-12-05

    The sensitivity of the green plants' photosystem II (PSII) to high temperatures is investigated in PSII enriched membranes and in membranes, from which the oxygen evolving complex is removed. Using steady-state 77 K fluorescence and resonance Raman spectroscopy we analyze the interdependency between the temperature-driven changes in structure and energy distribution in the PSII supercomplex. The results show that the heat treatment induces different reduction of the 77 K fluorescence emission in both types of investigated membranes: (i) an additional considerable decrease of the overall fluorescence emission in Tris-washed membranes as compared to the native membranes; (ii) a transition point at 42°C(,) observed only in native membranes; (iii) a sharp reduction of the PSII core fluorescence in Tris-washed membranes at temperatures higher than 50°C; (iv) a 3 nm red-shift of F700 band's maximum in Tris-washed membranes already at 20°C and its further shift by 1 nm at temperature increase. Both treatments intensified their action by increasing the aggregation and dissociation of the peripheral light harvesting complexes. The oxygen-evolving complex, in addition to its main function to produce O(2), increases the thermal stability of PSII core by strengthening the connection between the core and the peripheral antenna proteins and by keeping their structural integrity.

  4. Linking Complexity with Cultural Historical Activity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMurtry, Angus

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the similarities and differences between complexity science's and cultural-historical activity theory's understandings of human learning. Notable similarities include their emphasis on the importance of social systems or collectives in understanding human knowledge and practices, as well as their characterization of systems'…

  5. A new member of the oxygen-photosensitizers family: a water-soluble polymer binding a platinum complex.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Loredana; Puoci, Francesco; Cirillo, Giuseppe; La Deda, Massimo

    2012-08-28

    The grafting of a 2-picolylamine Pt(II) complex into polymethacrylic acid has been successfully performed. The obtained polymer is water soluble, and it represents the first example of a platinum-containing polymer able to photogenerate singlet oxygen.

  6. Faster oxygen atom transfer catalysis with a tungsten dioxo complex than with its molybdenum analog.

    PubMed

    Arumuganathan, T; Mayilmurugan, Ramasamy; Volpe, Manuel; Mösch-Zanetti, Nadia C

    2011-08-21

    The synthesis and characterization of a series of molybdenum ([MoO(2)Cl(L(n))]; L(1) (1), L(2) (3)) and tungsten ([WO(2)Cl(L(n))]; L(1) (2), L(2) (4)) dioxo complexes (L(1) = 1-methyl-4-(2-hydroxybenzyl)-1,4-diazepane and L(2) = 1-methyl-4-(2-hydroxy-3,5-di-tert-butylbenzyl)-1,4-diazepane) of tridentate aminomonophenolate ligands HL(1) and HL(2) are reported. The ligands were obtained by reductive amination of 1-methyl-1,4-diazepane with the corresponding aldehyde. Complexes 3 and 4 were obtained by the reaction of [MO(2)Cl(2)(dme)(n)] (M = Mo, n = 0; W, n = 1) with the corresponding ligand in presence of a base, whereas for the preparation of 1 and 2 the ligands were deprotonated by KH prior to the addition to the metal. They were characterized by NMR and IR spectroscopy, by cyclic voltammetry, mass spectrometry, elemental analysis and by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Solid-state structures of the molybdenum and tungsten cis-dioxo complexes reveal hexa-coordinate metal centers surrounded by two oxo groups, a chloride ligand and by the tridentate monophenolate ligand which coordinates meridionally through its [ONN] donor set. In the series of compounds 1-4, complexes 3 and 4 have been used as catalysts for the oxygen atom transfer reaction between dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and trimethyl phosphine (PMe(3)). Surprisingly, faster oxygen atom transfer (OAT) reactivity has been observed for the tungsten complex [WO(2)Cl(L(2))] (4) in comparison to its molybdenum analog [MoO(2)Cl(L(2))] (3) at room temperature. The kinetic results are discussed and compared in terms of their reactivity. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  7. Influence of oxygen-vacancy complex /A center/ on piezoresistance of n-type silicon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littlejohn, M. A.; Loggins, C. D., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Changes in both magnitude and temperature dependence of the piezoresistance of electron-irradiated n-type silicon, induced by the latter's oxygen-vacancy complex (A center), are shown to be due to the fact that the presence of the A center causes the total conduction-band electron concentration to change with an applied stress. This change in electron concentration leads to an additional piezoresistance contribution that is expected to be important in certain many-valley semiconductors. This offers the possibility of tailoring the thermal variations of semiconductor mechanical sensors to more desirable values over limited temperature ranges.

  8. Influence of oxygen-vacancy complex /A center/ on piezoresistance of n-type silicon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littlejohn, M. A.; Loggins, C. D., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Changes in both magnitude and temperature dependence of the piezoresistance of electron-irradiated n-type silicon, induced by the latter's oxygen-vacancy complex (A center), are shown to be due to the fact that the presence of the A center causes the total conduction-band electron concentration to change with an applied stress. This change in electron concentration leads to an additional piezoresistance contribution that is expected to be important in certain many-valley semiconductors. This offers the possibility of tailoring the thermal variations of semiconductor mechanical sensors to more desirable values over limited temperature ranges.

  9. Anticancer activity of structurally related ruthenium(II) cyclopentadienyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Côrte-Real, Leonor; Mendes, Filipa; Coimbra, Joana; Morais, Tânia S; Tomaz, Ana Isabel; Valente, Andreia; Garcia, M Helena; Santos, Isabel; Bicho, Manuel; Marques, Fernanda

    2014-08-01

    A set of structurally related Ru(η(5)-C5H5) complexes with bidentate N,N'-heteroaromatic ligands have been evaluated as prospective metallodrugs, with focus on exploring the uptake and cell death mechanisms and potential cellular targets. We have extended these studies to examine the potential of these complexes to target cancer cell metabolism, the energetic-related phenotype of cancer cells. The observations that these complexes can enter cells, probably facilitated by binding to plasma transferrin, and can be retained preferentially at the membranes prompted us to explore possible membrane targets involved in cancer cell metabolism. Most malignant tumors present the Warburg effect, which consists in increasing glycolytic rates with production of lactate, even in the presence of oxygen. The reliance of glycolytic cancer cells on trans-plasma-membrane electron transport (TPMET) systems for their continued survival raises the question of their appropriateness as a target for anticancer drug development strategies. Considering the interesting findings that some anticancer drugs in clinical use are cytotoxic even without entering cells and can inhibit TPMET activity, we investigated whether redox enzyme modulation could be a potential mechanism of action of antitumor ruthenium complexes. The results from this study indicated that ruthenium complexes can inhibit lactate production and TPMET activity in a way dependent on the cancer cell aggressiveness and the concentration of the complex. Combination approaches that target cell metabolism (glycolytic inhibitors) as well as proliferation are needed to successfully cure cancer. This study supports the potential use of some of these ruthenium complexes as adjuvants of glycolytic inhibitors in the treatment of aggressive cancers.

  10. Effect of surface area and chemisorbed oxygen on the SO2 adsorption capacity of activated char

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lizzio, A.A.; DeBarr, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether activated char produced from Illinois coal could be used effectively to remove sulfur dioxide from coal combustion flue gas. Chars were prepared from a high-volatile Illinois bituminous coal under a wide range of pyrolysis and activation conditions. A novel char preparation technique was developed to prepare chars with SO2 adsorption capacities significantly greater than that of a commercial activated carbon. In general, there was no correlation between SO2 adsorption capacity and surface area. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) was used to determine the nature and extent of carbon-oxygen (C-O) complexes formed on the char surface. TPD data revealed that SO2 adsorption was inversely proportional to the amount of C-O complex. The formation of a stable C-O complex during char preparation may have served only to occupy carbon sites that were otherwise reactive towards SO2 adsorption. A fleeting C(O) complex formed during SO2 adsorption is postulated to be the reaction intermediate necessary for conversion of SO2 to H2SO4. Copyright ?? 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  11. [Generation of Superoxide Radicals by Complex III in Heart Mitochondria and Antioxidant Effect of Dinitrosyl Iron Complexes at Different Partial Pressure of Oxygen].

    PubMed

    Dudylina, A L; Ivanova, M V; Shumaev, K B; Ruuge, E K

    2016-01-01

    The EPR spin-trapping technique and EPR-oximetry were used to study generation of superoxide radicals in heart mitochondria isolated from Wistar rats under conditions of variable oxygen concentration. Lithium phthalocyanine and TEMPONE-15N-D16 were chosen to determine oxygen content in a gas-permeable capillary tube containing mitochondria. TIRON was used as a spin trap. We investigated the influence of different oxygen concentrations in incubation mixture and demonstrated that heart mitochondria can generate superoxide in complex III at different partial pressure of oxygen as well as under the conditions of deep hypoxia (< 5% O2). Dinitrosyl iron complexes with glutathione (the pharmaceutical drug "Oxacom") exerted an antioxidant effect, regardless of the value of the partial pressure of oxygen, but the magnitude and kinetic characteristics of the effect depended on the concentration of the drug.

  12. Hydrogen-oxygen driven Zero Emissions bus drives around KSC Visitor Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Zero Emissions (ZE) transit bus passes a mock-up orbiter named Explorer on a trek through the KSC Visitor Complex. Provided by dbb fuel cell engines inc. of Vancouver, Canada, the ZE bus was brought to KSC as part of the Center's Alternative Fuel Initiatives Program. The bus uses a Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell in which hydrogen and oxygen, from atmospheric air, react to produce electricity that powers an electric motor drive system. The by-product 'exhaust' from the fuel cell is water vapor, thus zero harmful emissions. A typical diesel-powered bus emits more than a ton of harmful pollutants from its exhaust every year. The ZE bus is being used on tour routes at the KSC Visitor Complex for two days to introduce the public to the concept.

  13. Hydrogen-oxygen driven Zero Emissions bus drives around KSC Visitor Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Zero Emissions (ZE) transit bus tours the KSC Visitor Complex for a test ride. In the background are a mock-up orbiter named Explorer (left) and a stack of solid rocket boosters and external tank (right), typically used on Shuttle launches. Provided by dbb fuel cell engines inc. of Vancouver, Canada, the ZE bus was brought to KSC as part of the Center's Alternative Fuel Initiatives Program. The bus uses a Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell in which hydrogen and oxygen, from atmospheric air, react to produce electricity that powers an electric motor drive system. The by-product 'exhaust' from the fuel cell is water vapor, thus zero harmful emissions. A typical diesel-powered bus emits more than a ton of harmful pollutants from its exhaust every year. The ZE bus is being used on tour routes at the KSC Visitor Complex for two days to introduce the public to the concept.

  14. Oxygen-dependent conjugation of dopa with cysteine catalysed by iron-EDTA complex.

    PubMed

    Ito, S; Fujita, K

    1984-07-15

    Cytotoxicity of catechols has been ascribed to their binding with proteins through sulfhydryl groups. The possibility that iron-protein complexes catalyse this type of covalent binding was studied with a model system. Reaction of dopa and cysteine catalysed by iron-EDTA complexes at physiological pH resulted in the formation of not only cystine but also conjugation products, cysteinyldopas among which 5-S-cysteinyldopa was the major product. The reaction required iron ion, EDTA, and molecular oxygen. Fe3+ and Fe2+ were equally effective, while other transition metal ions examined had no effect on the formation of cysteinyldopas. Catalase, superoxide dismutase, and scavengers of hydroxyl radical inhibited to some extents the formation of 5-S-cysteinyldopa. Addition of both catalase and superoxide dismutase resulted in approximately 60% inhibition. These results indicated that the iron-EDTA-catalysed conjugation of dopa with cysteine was mainly mediated by hydroxyl radical.

  15. Hydrogen-oxygen driven Zero Emissions bus drives around KSC Visitor Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Zero Emissions (ZE) transit bus passes a mock-up orbiter named Explorer on a trek through the KSC Visitor Complex. Provided by dbb fuel cell engines inc. of Vancouver, Canada, the ZE bus was brought to KSC as part of the Center's Alternative Fuel Initiatives Program. The bus uses a Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell in which hydrogen and oxygen, from atmospheric air, react to produce electricity that powers an electric motor drive system. The by-product 'exhaust' from the fuel cell is water vapor, thus zero harmful emissions. A typical diesel-powered bus emits more than a ton of harmful pollutants from its exhaust every year. The ZE bus is being used on tour routes at the KSC Visitor Complex for two days to introduce the public to the concept.

  16. Hydrogen-oxygen driven Zero Emissions bus drives around KSC Visitor Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Zero Emissions (ZE) transit bus tours the KSC Visitor Complex for a test ride. In the background are a mock-up orbiter named Explorer (left) and a stack of solid rocket boosters and external tank (right), typically used on Shuttle launches. Provided by dbb fuel cell engines inc. of Vancouver, Canada, the ZE bus was brought to KSC as part of the Center's Alternative Fuel Initiatives Program. The bus uses a Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell in which hydrogen and oxygen, from atmospheric air, react to produce electricity that powers an electric motor drive system. The by-product 'exhaust' from the fuel cell is water vapor, thus zero harmful emissions. A typical diesel-powered bus emits more than a ton of harmful pollutants from its exhaust every year. The ZE bus is being used on tour routes at the KSC Visitor Complex for two days to introduce the public to the concept.

  17. Mitochondrial Complex IV Subunit 4 Isoform 2 Is Essential for Acute Pulmonary Oxygen Sensing.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Natascha; Hüttemann, Maik; Pak, Oleg; Scheibe, Susan; Knoepp, Fenja; Sinkler, Christopher; Malczyk, Monika; Gierhardt, Mareike; Esfandiary, Azadeh; Kraut, Simone; Jonas, Felix; Veith, Christine; Aras, Siddhesh; Sydykov, Akylbek; Alebrahimdehkordi, Nasim; Giehl, Klaudia; Hecker, Matthias; Brandes, Ralf P; Seeger, Werner; Grimminger, Friedrich; Ghofrani, Hossein A; Schermuly, Ralph T; Grossman, Lawrence I; Weissmann, Norbert

    2017-08-04

    Acute pulmonary oxygen sensing is essential to avoid life-threatening hypoxemia via hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) which matches perfusion to ventilation. Hypoxia-induced mitochondrial superoxide release has been suggested as a critical step in the signaling pathway underlying HPV. However, the identity of the primary oxygen sensor and the mechanism of superoxide release in acute hypoxia, as well as its relevance for chronic pulmonary oxygen sensing, remain unresolved. To investigate the role of the pulmonary-specific isoform 2 of subunit 4 of the mitochondrial complex IV (Cox4i2) and the subsequent mediators superoxide and hydrogen peroxide for pulmonary oxygen sensing and signaling. Isolated ventilated and perfused lungs from Cox4i2(-/-) mice lacked acute HPV. In parallel, pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) from Cox4i2(-/-) mice showed no hypoxia-induced increase of intracellular calcium. Hypoxia-induced superoxide release which was detected by electron spin resonance spectroscopy in wild-type PASMCs was absent in Cox4i2(-/-) PASMCs and was dependent on cysteine residues of Cox4i2. HPV could be inhibited by mitochondrial superoxide inhibitors proving the functional relevance of superoxide release for HPV. Mitochondrial hyperpolarization, which can promote mitochondrial superoxide release, was detected during acute hypoxia in wild-type but not Cox4i2(-/-) PASMCs. Downstream signaling determined by patch-clamp measurements showed decreased hypoxia-induced cellular membrane depolarization in Cox4i2(-/-) PASMCs compared with wild-type PASMCs, which could be normalized by the application of hydrogen peroxide. In contrast, chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary vascular remodeling were not or only slightly affected by Cox4i2 deficiency, respectively. Cox4i2 is essential for acute but not chronic pulmonary oxygen sensing by triggering mitochondrial hyperpolarization and release of mitochondrial superoxide which, after

  18. Oxygen transfer dynamics and activated sludge floc structure under different sludge retention times at low dissolved oxygen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Fan, Haitao; Liu, Xiuhong; Wang, Hao; Han, Yunping; Qi, Lu; Wang, Hongchen

    2017-02-01

    In activated sludge systems, the aeration process consumes the most energy. The energy cost can be dramatically reduced by decreasing the operating dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration. However, low DO may lead to incomplete nitrification and poor settling performance of activated sludge flocs (ASFs). This study investigates oxygen transfer dynamics and settling performances of activated sludge under different sludge retention times (SRTs) and DO conditions using microelectrodes and microscopic techniques. Our experimental results showed that with longer SRTs, treatment capacity and settling performances of activated sludge improved due to smaller floc size and less extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Long-term low DO conditions produced larger flocs and more EPS per unit sludge, which produced a more extensive anoxic area and led to low oxygen diffusion performance in flocs. Long SRTs mitigated the adverse effects of low DO. According to the microelectrode analysis and fractal dimension determination, smaller floc size and less EPS in the long SRT system led to high oxygen diffusion property and more compact floc structure that caused a drop in the sludge volume index (SVI). In summary, our results suggested that long SRTs of activated sludge can improve the operating performance under low DO conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Rhodium Complexes Promoting C-O Bond Formation in Reactions with Oxygen: The Role of Superoxo Species.

    PubMed

    Vilella-Arribas, Laia; García-Melchor, Max; Balcells, David; Lledós, Agustí; López, José A; Sancho, Sofía; Villarroya, B Eva; Del Río, M Pilar; Ciriano, Miguel A; Tejel, Cristina

    2017-01-28

    C-O bond formation in reactions of olefins with oxygen is a long standing challenge in chemistry for which the very complicated-sometimes controversial-mechanistic panorama slows down the design of catalysts for oxygenations. In this regard, the mechanistic details of the oxidation of the complex [Rh(cod)(Ph2 N3 )] (1) (cod=1,5-cyclooctadiene) with oxygen to the unique 2-rhodaoxetane compound [{Rh(OC8 H12 )(Ph2 N3 )}2 ] (2) has been investigated by DFT calculations. The results of this study provide evidences for a novel bimetallic mechanism in which two rhodium atoms redistribute the four electrons involved in the cleavage of the O=O bond. Furthermore, both oxygen atoms are used to create two new C-O bonds in a controlled fashion with 100 % atom economy. The key intermediates that we have found in this process are a mononuclear open-shell triplet superoxo compound, an open-shell singlet "μ-(peroxo)" derivative, and a closed-shell singlet "bis(μ-oxo)" complex. Some of the findings are used to predict the reactions of Rh(I) complexes with oxygen, exemplified by that of the complex [Rh(cod)(OnapyMe2 )] (3). Starting from 3, [{Rh(OC8 H12 )(OnapyMe2 )}2 ] (4) has been prepared and characterized, which represents the second example of a 2-rhodaoxetane compound coming from an oxygenation reaction with oxygen.

  20. Structural changes of the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II during the catalytic cycle.

    PubMed

    Glöckner, Carina; Kern, Jan; Broser, Matthias; Zouni, Athina; Yachandra, Vittal; Yano, Junko

    2013-08-02

    The oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) in the membrane-bound protein complex photosystem II (PSII) catalyzes the water oxidation reaction that takes place in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms. We investigated the structural changes of the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the OEC during the S state transitions using x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Overall structural changes of the Mn4CaO5 cluster, based on the manganese ligand and Mn-Mn distances obtained from this study, were incorporated into the geometry of the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the OEC obtained from a polarized XAS model and the 1.9-Å high resolution crystal structure. Additionally, we compared the S1 state XAS of the dimeric and monomeric form of PSII from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and spinach PSII. Although the basic structures of the OEC are the same for T. elongatus PSII and spinach PSII, minor electronic structural differences that affect the manganese K-edge XAS between T. elongatus PSII and spinach PSII are found and may originate from differences in the second sphere ligand atom geometry.

  1. Voltage-Dependent Regulation of Complex II Energized Mitochondrial Oxygen Flux

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Fan; Fink, Brian D.; Yu, Liping; Sivitz, William I.

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen consumption by isolated mitochondria is generally measured during state 4 respiration (no ATP production) or state 3 (maximal ATP production at high ADP availability). However, mitochondria in vivo do not function at either extreme. Here we used ADP recycling methodology to assess muscle mitochondrial function over intermediate clamped ADP concentrations. In so doing, we uncovered a previously unrecognized biphasic respiratory pattern wherein O2 flux on the complex II substrate, succinate, initially increased and peaked over low clamped ADP concentrations then decreased markedly at higher clamped concentrations. Mechanistic studies revealed no evidence that the observed changes in O2 flux were due to altered opening or function of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore or to changes in reactive oxygen. Based on metabolite and functional metabolic data, we propose a multifactorial mechanism that consists of coordinate changes that follow from reduced membrane potential (as the ADP concentration in increased). These changes include altered directional electron flow, altered NADH/NAD+ redox cycling, metabolite exit, and OAA inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase. In summary, we report a previously unrecognized pattern for complex II energized O2 flux. Moreover, our findings suggest that the ADP recycling approach might be more widely adapted for mitochondrial studies. PMID:27153112

  2. Detection of Water Binding to the Oxygen Evolving Complex Using Low Frequency Sers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Andrew J.; Jain, Prashant

    2017-06-01

    The oxygen evolving complex (OEC) in Photosystem II (PSII) is a hallmark catalyst for efficiently splitting water to generate molecular oxygen. Much of what is known about the structure of the OEC has been provided by X-ray analysis of PSII at low temperatures, from which the mechanism of water splitting has been inferred. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) offers an opportunity to build on our current understanding of this catalytic system as it can provide time-resolved, molecular vibrational information in a physiological environment. With low frequency SERS, we are able to separate the manganese oxide vibrational modes of the OEC from those in a complex, biological environment. With isotopically labelled water, we use SERS to identify water binding to the OEC. Raman spectra calculated by density functional theory support the assignment of water binding to a manganese atom outside of the cuboidal OEC. Detection of water binding sites on the OEC with SERS can not only compliment previous structural studies, but can also provide a powerful platform for in operando mechanistic studies.

  3. Formation of reactive oxygen species by human and bacterial pyruvate and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes reconstituted from recombinant components.

    PubMed

    Ambrus, Attila; Nemeria, Natalia S; Torocsik, Beata; Tretter, Laszlo; Nilsson, Mattias; Jordan, Frank; Adam-Vizi, Vera

    2015-12-01

    Individual recombinant components of pyruvate and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes (PDHc, OGDHc) of human and Escherichia coli (E. coli) origin were expressed and purified from E. coli with optimized protocols. The four multienzyme complexes were each reconstituted under optimal conditions at different stoichiometric ratios. Binding stoichiometries for the highest catalytic efficiency were determined from the rate of NADH generation by the complexes at physiological pH. Since some of these complexes were shown to possess 'moonlighting' activities under pathological conditions often accompanied by acidosis, activities were also determined at pH 6.3. As reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by the E3 component of hOGDHc is a pathologically relevant feature, superoxide generation by the complexes with optimal stoichiometry was measured by the acetylated cytochrome c reduction method in both the forward and the reverse catalytic directions. Various known affectors of physiological activity and ROS production, including Ca(2+), ADP, lipoylation status or pH, were investigated. The human complexes were also reconstituted with the most prevalent human pathological mutant of the E3 component, G194C and characterized; isolated human E3 with the G194C substitution was previously reported to have an enhanced ROS generating capacity. It is demonstrated that: i. PDHc, similarly to OGDHc, is able to generate ROS and this feature is displayed by both the E. coli and human complexes, ii. Reconstituted hPDHc generates ROS at a significantly higher rate as compared to hOGDHc in both the forward and the reverse reactions when ROS generation is calculated for unit mass of their common E3 component, iii. The E1 component or E1-E2 subcomplex generates significant amount of ROS only in hOGDHc; iv. Incorporation of the G194C variant of hE3, the result of a disease-causing mutation, into reconstituted hOGDHc and hPDHc indeed leads to a decreased activity of both

  4. Formation of reactive oxygen species by human and bacterial pyruvate and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes reconstituted from recombinant components

    PubMed Central

    Ambrus, Attila; Nemeria, Natalia S.; Torocsik, Beata; Tretter, Laszlo; Nilsson, Mattias; Jordan, Frank; Adam-Vizi, Vera

    2015-01-01

    Individual recombinant components of pyruvate and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes (PDHc, OGDHc) of human and Escherichia coli (E. coli) origin were expressed and purified from E. coli with optimized protocols. The four multienzyme complexes were each reconstituted under optimal conditions at different stoichiometric ratios. Binding stoichiometries for the highest catalytic efficiency were determined from the rate of NADH generation by the complexes at physiological pH. Since some of these complexes were shown to possess ‘moonlighting’ activities under pathological conditions often accompanied by acidosis, activities were also determined at pH 6.3. As reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by the E3 component of hOGDHc is a pathologically relevant feature, superoxide generation by the complexes with optimal stoichiometry was measured by the acetylated cytochrome c reduction method in both the forward and the reverse catalytic directions. Various known affectors of physiological activity and ROS production, including Ca2+, ADP, lipoylation status or pH, were investigated. The human complexes were also reconstituted with the most prevalent human pathological mutant of the E3 component, G194C and characterized; isolated human E3 with the G194C substitution was previously reported to have an enhanced ROS generating capacity. It is demonstrated that: i. PDHc, similarly to OGDHc, is able to generate ROS and this feature is displayed by both the E. coli and human complexes, ii. Reconstituted hPDHc generates ROS at a significantly higher rate as compared to hOGDHc in both the forward and the reverse reactions when ROS generation is calculated for unit mass of their common E3 component, iii. The E1 component or E1-E2 subcomplex generates significant amount of ROS only in hOGDHc; iv. Incorporation of the G194C variant of hE3, the result of a disease-causing mutation, into reconstituted hOGDHc and hPDHc indeed leads to a decreased activity of both

  5. Systematic investigation of the catalytic cycle of a single site ruthenium oxygen evolving complex using density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Thomas F; Friesner, Richard A

    2011-07-28

    The mechanism of water oxidation by a single site ruthenium oxygen evolving complex is investigated using fully unrestricted pseudospectral B3LYP with the effective core potential LACV3P in continuum solvent with some quantum mechanical waters. Guess wave functions have been used that allow greater flexibility in sampling different electronic configurations of the complex. Systematic comparison with experiment is improved using these guesses because they provide a complete analysis of the low energy manifold and help to alleviate the formal disconnect between theory and experiment in assigning Lewis structures for transition metal complexes. In agreement with results from the literature, the challenging 4e(-)and 4H(+) oxidation of water is accomplished using a mechanism that features three proton coupled electron transfers, one electron transfer, one atom proton transfer (APT), and one ligand exchange (LE). Calculations on a large database of ruthenium complexes allows us to benchmark the computation of reduction half potentials and free energies of activation and to investigate systematic ligand variations and their effect on the reaction mechanism. Mean unsigned errors of reduction half potentials in comparison to experiment are generally small (100-200 mV). The APT and LE steps are found to be rate limiting with free energy barriers of 19.27 and 19.53 kcal/mol respectively, which is in excellent agreement with the ∼20 kcal/mol barrier obtained from experimental rate constants using classical transition state theory.

  6. Electrostatic effects on proton coupled electron transfer in oxomanganese complexes inspired by the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Amin, Muhamed; Vogt, Leslie; Vassiliev, Serguei; Rivalta, Ivan; Sultan, Mohammad M; Bruce, Doug; Brudvig, Gary W; Batista, Victor S; Gunner, M R

    2013-05-23

    The influence of electrostatic interactions on the free energy of proton coupled electron transfer in biomimetic oxomanganese complexes inspired by the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) are investigated. The reported study introduces an enhanced multiconformer continuum electrostatics (MCCE) model, parametrized at the density functional theory (DFT) level with a classical valence model for the oxomanganese core. The calculated pKa's and oxidation midpoint potentials (E(m)'s) match experimental values for eight complexes, indicating that purely electrostatic contributions account for most of the observed couplings between deprotonation and oxidation state transitions. We focus on pKa's of terminal water ligands in [Mn(II/III)(H2O)6](2+/3+) (1), [Mn(III)(P)(H2O)2](3-) (2, P = 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(2,6-dichloro-3-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrinato), [Mn2(IV,IV)(μ-O)2(terpy)2(H2O)2](4+) (3, terpy = 2,2':6',2″-terpyridine), and [Mn3(IV,IV,IV)(μ-O)4(phen)4(H2O)2](4+) (4, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) and the pKa's of μ-oxo bridges and Mn E(m)'s in [Mn2(μ-O)2(bpy)4] (5, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridyl), [Mn2(μ-O)2(salpn)2] (6, salpn = N,N'-bis(salicylidene)-1,3-propanediamine), [Mn2(μ-O)2(3,5-di(Cl)-salpn)2] (7), and [Mn2(μ-O)2(3,5-di(NO2)-salpn)2] (8). The analysis of complexes 6-8 highlights the strong coupling between electron and proton transfers, with any Mn oxidation lowering the pKa of an oxo bridge by 10.5 ± 0.9 pH units. The model also accounts for changes in the E(m)'s by ligand substituents, such as found in complexes 6-8, due to the electron withdrawing Cl (7) and NO2 (8). The reported study provides the foundation for analysis of electrostatic effects in other oxomanganese complexes and metalloenzymes, where proton coupled electron transfer plays a fundamental role in redox-leveling mechanisms.

  7. Aeration optimization through operation at low dissolved oxygen concentrations: Evaluation of oxygen mass transfer dynamics in different activated sludge systems.

    PubMed

    Fan, Haitao; Qi, Lu; Liu, Guoqiang; Zhang, Yuankai; Fan, Qiang; Wang, Hongchen

    2017-05-01

    In wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) using the activated sludge process, two methods are widely used to improve aeration efficiency - use of high-efficiency aeration devices and optimizing the aeration control strategy. Aeration efficiency is closely linked to sludge characteristics (such as concentrations of mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) and microbial communities) and operating conditions (such as air flow rate and operational dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations). Moreover, operational DO is closely linked to effluent quality. This study, which is in reference to WWTP discharge class A Chinese standard effluent criteria, determined the growth kinetics parameters of nitrifiers at different DO levels in small-scale tests. Results showed that the activated sludge system could meet effluent criteria when DO was as low as 0.3mg/L, and that nitrifier communities cultivated under low DO conditions had higher oxygen affinity than those cultivated under high DO conditions, as indicated by the oxygen half-saturation constant and nitrification ability. Based on nitrifier growth kinetics and on the oxygen mass transfer dynamic model (determined using different air flow rate (Q'air) and mixed liquor volatile suspended solids (MLVSS) values), theoretical analysis indicated limited potential for energy saving by improving aeration diffuser performance when the activated sludge system had low oxygen consumption; however, operating at low DO and low MLVSS could significantly reduce energy consumption. Finally, a control strategy coupling sludge retention time and MLVSS to minimize the DO level was discussed, which is critical to appropriate setting of the oxygen point and to the operation of low DO treatment technology. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. The Kinetics of Dissociations of Aluminum - Oxygen Bonds in Aqueous Complexes - An NMR Study

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. William Casey

    2003-09-03

    OAK B262 The Kinetics of Dissociations of Aluminum--Oxygen Bonds in Aqueous Complexes--An NMR Study. In this project we determined rates and mechanisms of Al(III)-O bond rupture at mineral surfaces and in dissolved aluminum complexes. We then compared the experimental results to simulations in an attempt to predict rate coefficients. Most of the low-temperature reactions that are geochemically important involve a bonded atom or molecule that is replaced with another. We probe these reactions at the most fundamental level in order to establish a model to predict rates for the wide range of reactions that cannot be experimentally studied. The chemistry of small aluminum cluster (Figure) provides a window into the hydrolytic processes that control rates of mineral formation and the transformation of adsorbates into extended structures. The molecule shown below as an example exposes several types of oxygens to the bulk solution including seven structurally distinct sets of bridging hydroxyls. This molecule is a rich model for the aqueous interface of aluminum (hydr)oxide minerals, since it approaches colloidal dimensions in size, yet is a dissolved complex with +18 charge. We have conducted both {sup 17}O- {sup 27}Al- and {sup 19}F-NMR experiments to identify the reactive sites and to determine the rates of isotopic exchange between these sites and the bulk solution. The research was enormously successful and led to a series of papers that are being used as touchstones for assessing the accuracy of computer models of bond ruptures in water.

  9. Potent anticancer activity of photo-activated oxo-bridged diiron(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Chanu, S Binita; Banerjee, Samya; Roy, Mithun

    2017-01-05

    Cancer-specific anticancer drugs are still an elusive goal. Using light as the temporal control to generate cytotoxic species from photo-activated prodrug in the presence or absence of molecular oxygen has shown potential application targeted chemotherapy as in photodynamic therapy (PDT). In the present work we explored the chemistry of several photo-active (μ-oxo)diiron(III) complexes of the following formulation [{Fe(μ-O) (L-his)(B)}2](ClO4)2 (1a-1c), [Fe2(μ-O)(H2O)2B4](ClO4)4 (2b, 2c) and [Fe2(μ-O)(μ-O2CMe)B4](ClO4)3 (3b, 3c), L-his = l-histidine, B is 2,2'-bipyridine, 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) and dipyrido[3,2-d:2',3'-f]quinoxaline (dpq) complexes for tumor-specific anticancer activity. Facile redox chemistry and photochemical aspects of the complexes prompted us to investigate the cytotoxic as well as the photo-activated cytotoxic properties of the complexes to the cancer cells. In the present investigation we explored the cancer-specific condition of excess concentration of H2O2 for our approach to targeted chemotherapy. Cytotoxic effect of the complexes to the cancer cells was found to be significantly higher than in normal cells indicating tumor-specific anticancer activity of the complexes. Cytotoxic effect was even more pronounced when the cancer cells treated with the complexes were exposed to the visible light (400-700 nm). There was >12 fold increase in cytotoxicity of the photoactivated complexes in cancer cells (MCF-7) in comparison to the normal cells (MCF-10a). We have defined a factor viz. cancer cell specificity factor (f) describing the targeted photochemotherapeutic effect of the complexes at their specific concentration. The factor (f) > 1 indicated the cancer cell specificity of the complexes, while f > 2.5 for the complexes under the visible light exposure suggested photodynamic effect. DCFDA assay indicated the presence of excess of ROS in the treated HeLa cells. ROS concentration was found to increase even more on visible

  10. Growth enhancement and gene expression of Arabidopsis thaliana irradiated with active oxygen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Ono, Reoto; Hayashi, Nobuya; Shiratani, Masaharu; Tashiro, Kosuke; Kuhara, Satoru; Inoue, Asami; Yasuda, Kaori; Hagiwara, Hiroko

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of plant growth enhancement effect and the mechanism of the enhancement induced by plasma irradiation are investigated using various active species in plasma. Active oxygen species in oxygen plasma are effective for growth enhancement of plants. DNA microarray analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana indicates that the genes coding proteins that counter oxidative stresses by eliminating active oxygen species are expressed at significantly high levels. The size of plant cells increases owing to oxygen plasma irradiation. The increases in gene expression levels and cell size suggest that the increase in the expression level of the expansin protein is essential for plant growth enhancement phenomena.

  11. Oxygen-independent degradation of HIF-α via bioengineered VHL tumour suppressor complex

    PubMed Central

    Sufan, Roxana I; Moriyama, Eduardo H; Mariampillai, Adrian; Roche, Olga; Evans, Andrew J; Alajez, Nehad M; Vitkin, I Alex; Yang, Victor X D; Liu, Fei-Fei; Wilson, Brian C; Ohh, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Tumour hypoxia promotes the accumulation of the otherwise oxygen-labile hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-α subunit whose expression is associated with cancer progression, poor prognosis and resistance to conventional radiation and chemotherapy. The oxygen-dependent degradation of HIF-α is carried out by the von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) protein-containing E3 that directly binds and ubiquitylates HIF-α for subsequent proteasomal destruction. Thus, the cellular proteins involved in the VHL–HIF pathway have been recognized as attractive molecular targets for cancer therapy. However, the various compounds designed to inhibit HIF-α or HIF-downstream targets, although promising, have shown limited success in the clinic. In the present study, we describe the bioengineering of VHL protein that removes the oxygen constraint in the recognition of HIF-α while preserving its E3 enzymatic activity. Using speckle variance–optical coherence tomography (sv–OCT), we demonstrate the dramatic inhibition of angiogenesis and growth regression of human renal cell carcinoma xenografts upon adenovirus-mediated delivery of the bioengineered VHL protein in a dorsal skin-fold window chamber model. These findings introduce the concept and feasibility of ‘bio-tailored’ enzymes in the treatment of HIF-overexpressing tumours. PMID:20049704

  12. Calcium EXAFS establishes the Mn-Ca cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Cinco, Roehl M; McFarlane Holman, Karen L; Robblee, John H; Yano, Junko; Pizarro, Shelly A; Bellacchio, Emanuele; Sauer, Kenneth; Yachandra, Vittal K

    2002-10-29

    The proximity of Ca to the Mn cluster of the photosynthetic water-oxidation complex is demonstrated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We have collected EXAFS data at the Ca K-edge using active PS II membrane samples that contain approximately 2 Ca per 4 Mn. These samples are much less perturbed than previously investigated Sr-substituted samples, which were prepared after Ca depletion. The new Ca EXAFS clearly shows backscattering from Mn at 3.4 A, a distance that agrees with that surmised from previously recorded Mn EXAFS. This result is also consistent with earlier related experiments at the Sr K-edge, using samples that contained functional Sr, that show Mn is approximately 3.5 A distant from Sr. The totality of the evidence clearly advances the notion that the catalytic center of oxygen evolution is a Mn-Ca heteronuclear cluster.

  13. Calcium EXAFS establishes the Mn-Ca cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex of Photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Cinco, Roehl M.; McFarlane Holman, Karen L.; Robblee, John H.; Yano, Junko; Pizarro, Shelly A.; Bellacchio, Emanuele; Sauer, Kenneth; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2002-08-02

    The proximity of Ca to the Mn cluster of the photosynthetic water-oxidation complex is demonstrated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We have collected EXAFS data at the Ca K-edge using active PS II membrane samples that contain approximately 2 Ca per 4 Mn. These samples are much less perturbed than previously investigated Sr-substituted samples, which were prepared subsequent to Ca depletion. The new Ca EXAFS clearly shows backscattering from Mn at 3.4 angstroms, a distance that agrees with that surmised from previously recorded Mn EXAFS. This result is also consistent with earlier related experiments at the Sr K-edge, using samples that contained functional Sr, that show Mn is {approx}; 3.5 angstroms distant from Sr. The totality of the evidence clearly advances the notion that the catalytic center of oxygen evolution is a Mn-Ca heteronuclear cluster.

  14. Bactericidal activity of Ag-zeolite mediated by reactive oxygen species under aerated conditions.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yoshihiro; Hoshino, Masanobu; Takahashi, Hiroo; Noguchi, Tomoko; Murata, Tomomi; Kanzaki, Yasushi; Hamashima, Hajime; Sasatsu, Masanori

    2002-09-30

    The bactericidal activity induced by the introduction of silver ions into zeolite was studied. Escherichia coli was used as the test microorganism. Silver ions were loaded into zeolite by the ion-exchange method. Silver-loaded zeolite was demonstrated the strong bactericidal activity. Dissolved oxygen was an essential factor for the occurrence of the bactericidal activity because the activity was observed only under aerated condition. Superoxide anions, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radicals and singlet oxygen were formed. Scavengers of these each reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibited the bactericidal activity. This means that all ROS contributed to the activity.

  15. Structure of an Iron(II) Dioxygen Complex; A Model for Oxygen Carrying Hemeproteins

    PubMed Central

    Collman, James P.; Gagne, Robert R.; Reed, Christopher A.; Robinson, Ward T.; Rodley, Gordon A.

    1974-01-01

    The preliminary structural characterization of a reversible ferrous dioxygen complex is reported. Mono(N-methyl imidazole) (dioxygen) meso-tetra (α,α,α,α-o-pivalamidephenyl) porphinatorino(II), [Fe(O2)-(N-Me imid) (α,α,α,α-TpivPP)], 1, isolated from toluene solution, crystallizes in the monoclinic system with four molecules in a unit cell of dimensions a = 18.690 (3), b = 19.514 (3), c = 18.638 (3) Å, and β = 91.00 (1)°. R = 0.15 for 841 reflections having F2 > 3σ (F2). The complex 1 has four pivalamido groups on one side of the porphyrin forming a hydrophobic pocket of 5.4-Å depth which encloses coordinated dioxygen. The dioxygen is coordinated “end-on,” with a bent Fe-O-O bond. The Fe-O-O plane bisects an N-Fe-N right angle of the equatorial iron porphyrin plane and is four way statistically disordered. In addition there is a crystallographic 2-fold axis through iron, coordinated oxygen, and nitrogen of the axially bound N-methyl imidazole. Thus there are two types of coordinated dioxygen with the Fe-O-O plane either parallel or perpendicular to the trans axial imidazole plane. Corresponding values for the Fe-O-O bond angles are 135-(4)° and 137(4)° and for the O-O bond lengths are 1.23 (0.08) and 1.26 (0.08) Å, with a dihedral angle of 90° between alternative orientations of the Fe-O-O plane. The Fe-O distance is 1.75 (0.02) Å and Fe-N (imidazole) is 2.07 (0.02) Å, suggesting multiple bond character in the Fe-O moiety. The similarity of the Mössbauer spectrum of the model complex, 1, with oxyhemoglobin indicates that 1 may be a good model for oxygen binding in the oxygen transport hemeproteins. PMID:4524640

  16. Hydrazide derivatives produce active oxygen species as hydrazine.

    PubMed

    Timperio, Anna Maria; Rinalducci, Sara; Zolla, Lello

    2005-12-01

    It is well documented that some hydrazines are quite sensitive to oxidation and may serve as the electron donor for the reduction of oxygen, whereas hydrazides are not believed to react directly with oxygen. Data presented in this paper show that both hydrazides and hydrazines share an N-N moiety, which is assumed to react with atmospheric oxygen and produce oxygen radicals, at various degrees of efficiency. Since spectrometric measurements of hydrazide just after solubilization showed that the molecular mass remains constant in the absence of oxygen, we can conclude that hydrazides do not react with the oxygen through a slow spontaneous hydrolytic release of hydrazine. However, hydrazine is more reactive than hydrazide, which requires hours rather than minutes to produce measurable quantities of radical species. Differences were also apparent for various substituted derivatives. The reaction was significantly enhanced by the presence of metal ions. Data reported here demonstrate that hydrazides cause irreversible damage to the prosthetic group of proteins as well as causing degradation of the polypeptide chain into small fragments.

  17. P38 activation is more important than ERK activation in lung injury induced by prolonged hyperbaric oxygen.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Fang, Yi-Qun; Gu, Ai-Mei; Wang, Fang-Fang; Zhang, Shi; Li, Kai-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to hyperbaric oxygen can cause pulmonary and nerve system toxicity. Although hyperbaric oxygen treatment has been used for a broad spectrum of ailments, the mechanisms of prolonged hyperbaric oxygen-induced lung injury are not fully understood. The purpose of the present work was to investigate the roles of ERK, p38, and caspase-3 in rat lung tissue exposed to hyperbaric oxygen at 2.3 atmospheres absolute (atm abs) for two, six and 10 hours. The results showed that the ERK and p38 were phosphorylated at two hours and reached a peak at six hours into exposure to hyperbaric oxygen. While the phosphorylation level of ERK decreased, p38 remained at a high level of activation at 10 hours. The activation of ERK and p38 was down-regulated when rats were exposed to normoxic hyperbaric nitrogen for 10 hours. However, caspase-3 was activated at six hours and 10 hours into exposure to hyperbaric oxygen. These results demonstrated different changes of activation of ERK and p38 during lung injury induced by prolonged exposure to hyperbaric oxygen. The time course changes of activated caspase-3 were similar to the process of p38 activation upon exposure to hyperbaric oxygen. In this way, activation of p38, not ERK, seems to be a mechanism associated with prolonged hyperbaric oxygen-induced lung injury.

  18. Fluorescence kinetics of PSII crystals containing Ca(2+) or Sr(2+) in the oxygen evolving complex.

    PubMed

    van Oort, Bart; Kargul, Joanna; Maghlaoui, Karim; Barber, James; van Amerongen, Herbert

    2014-02-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) is the pigment-protein complex which converts sunlight energy into chemical energy by catalysing the process of light-driven oxidation of water into reducing equivalents in the form of protons and electrons. Three-dimensional structures from x-ray crystallography have been used extensively to model these processes. However, the crystal structures are not necessarily identical to those of the solubilised complexes. Here we compared picosecond fluorescence of solubilised and crystallised PSII core particles isolated from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus. The fluorescence of the crystals is sensitive to the presence of artificial electron acceptors (K3Fe(CN)3) and electron transport inhibitors (DCMU). In PSII with reaction centres in the open state, the picosecond fluorescence of PSII crystals and solubilised PSII is indistinguishable. Additionally we compared picosecond fluorescence of native PSII with PSII in which Ca(2) in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) is biosynthetically replaced by Sr(2+). With the Sr(2+) replaced OEC the average fluorescence decay slows down slightly (81ps to 85ps), and reaction centres are less readily closed, indicating that both energy transfer/trapping and electron transfer are affected by the replacement.

  19. Effect of protein modification by malondialdehyde on the interaction between the oxygen-evolving complex 33 kDa protein and photosystem II core proteins.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Yasuo; Sugimoto, Yukihiro

    2010-04-01

    Previously we observed that the oxygen-evolving complex 33 kDa protein (OEC33) which stabilizes the Mn cluster in photosystem II (PSII), was modified with malondialdehyde (MDA), an end-product of peroxidized polyunsaturated fatty acids, and the modification increased in heat-stressed plants (Yamauchi et al. 2008). In this study, we examined whether the modification of OEC33 with MDA affects its binding to the PSII complex and causes inactivation of the oxygen-evolving complex. Purified OEC33 and PSII membranes that had been removed of extrinsic proteins of the oxygen-evolving complex (PSIIOEE) of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) were separately treated with MDA. The binding was diminished when both OEC33 and PSIIOEE were modified, but when only OEC33 or PSIIOEE was treated, the binding was not impaired. In the experiment using thylakoid membranes, release of OEC33 from PSII and corresponding loss of oxygen-evolving activity were observed when thylakoid membranes were treated with MDA at 40 degrees C but not at 25 degrees C. In spinach leaves treated at 40 degrees C under light, maximal efficiency of PSII photochemistry (F(v)/F(m) ratio of chlorophyll fluorescence) and oxygen-evolving activity decreased. Simultaneously, MDA contents in heat-stressed leaves increased, and OEC33 and PSII core proteins including 47 and 43 kDa chlorophyll-binding proteins were modified with MDA. In contrast, these changes were to a lesser extent at 40 degrees C in the dark. These results suggest that MDA modification of PSII proteins causes release of OEC33 from PSII and it is promoted in heat and oxidative conditions.

  20. Glass Durability Modeling, Activated Complex Theory (ACT)

    SciTech Connect

    CAROL, JANTZEN

    2005-02-04

    The most important requirement for high-level waste glass acceptance for disposal in a geological repository is the chemical durability, expressed as a glass dissolution rate. During the early stages of glass dissolution in near static conditions that represent a repository disposal environment, a gel layer resembling a membrane forms on the glass surface through which ions exchange between the glass and the leachant. The hydrated gel layer exhibits acid/base properties which are manifested as the pH dependence of the thickness and nature of the gel layer. The gel layer has been found to age into either clay mineral assemblages or zeolite mineral assemblages. The formation of one phase preferentially over the other has been experimentally related to changes in the pH of the leachant and related to the relative amounts of Al{sup +3} and Fe{sup +3} in a glass. The formation of clay mineral assemblages on the leached glass surface layers ,lower pH and Fe{sup +3} rich glasses, causes the dissolution rate to slow to a long-term steady state rate. The formation of zeolite mineral assemblages ,higher pH and Al{sup +3} rich glasses, on leached glass surface layers causes the dissolution rate to increase and return to the initial high forward rate. The return to the forward dissolution rate is undesirable for long-term performance of glass in a disposal environment. An investigation into the role of glass stoichiometry, in terms of the quasi-crystalline mineral species in a glass, has shown that the chemistry and structure in the parent glass appear to control the activated surface complexes that form in the leached layers, and these mineral complexes ,some Fe{sup +3} rich and some Al{sup +3} rich, play a role in whether or not clays or zeolites are the dominant species formed on the leached glass surface. The chemistry and structure, in terms of Q distributions of the parent glass, are well represented by the atomic ratios of the glass forming components. Thus, glass

  1. Destabilization of the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II by Al3+.

    PubMed

    Hasni, Imed; Hamdani, Saber; Carpentier, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of Al(3+) on photosynthetic electron transport was investigated in isolated thylakoid membranes of spinach. A combination of oxygen evolution, chlorophyll fluorescence induction (FI) and decay and thermoluminescence measurements have been used to characterize photosystem II (PSII) electron transport in the presence of this toxic metal cation. Our results show that below 3 mm, Al(3+) already caused a destabilization of the Mn4 O5 Ca cluster of the oxygen evolving complex (OEC). At these concentrations, an increase in the relative amplitude of the first phase (OJ) of FI curve and retardation of the fluorescence decay kinetics following excitation with a single turnover flash were also observed. A transmembrane structural modification of PSII polypeptides due to the interaction of Al(3+) at the OEC is proposed to retard electron transfer between the quinones QA and QB . Above 3 mm, Al(3+) strongly retarded fluorescence induction and significantly reduced Fv /Fm together with the maximal amplitude of chlorophyll fluorescence induced by a single turnover flash. This chlorophyll fluorescence quenching was attributed to the formation of P680(+) due to inhibition of electron transfer between tyrosine 161 of D1 subunit and P680.

  2. A phosphorescent copper(I) complex: Synthesis, characterization, photophysical property, and oxygen-sensing behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Caihong; Tao, Guoquan; Xu, Xinhua; Feng, Xiaoqing; Luo, Rongcheng

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, we report the synthesis, crystal structure, photophysical properties, and electronic nature of a phosphorescent Cu(I) complex of [Cu(Phen-Np)(POP)]BF 4, where Phen-Np and POP stand for 2-(naphthalen-1-yl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline and bis(2-(diphenylphosphanyl)phenyl) ether, respectively. [Cu(Phen-Np)(POP)]BF 4 renders a yellow phosphorescence peaking at 545 nm, with a long excited state lifetime of 4.69 μs. Density functional calculation reveals that the emission comes from a triplet metal-to-ligand-charge-transfer excited state. We electrospun composite nanofibers of [Cu(Phen-Np)(POP)]BF 4 and polystyrene (PS), hoping to explore the possibility of using the composite nanofibers as an oxygen sensing material. The finally obtained samples with average diameter of ˜300 nm exhibit a maximum sensitivity of 7.2 towards molecular oxygen with short response time of 7 s due to the large surface-area-to-volume ratio of nanofibrous membranes. No photobleaching is detected in these samples.

  3. A Simple Approach to Simulate the Complexity of Planktonic Foraminifer Oxygen Isotope Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waelbroeck, C.; Roche, D. M.; Caley, T.; Kucera, M.; Jonkers, L.; Vazquez Riveiros, N.

    2016-12-01

    Oxygen isotopic curves measured on different planktonic foraminifer species at the same site often exhibit a variable offset. This means that the habitats of the involved species may change through time, which affects the interpretation of the paleoclimatic records. Here we propose to investigate the effect of habitat change by comparing measured and mechanistically computed calcite oxygen isotopic ratios (δ18O) for N. pachyderma left and right coiling, G. bulloides, and G. ruber. To this end we developed the module "Foraminifers as Modeled Entities" (FAME) using species and temperature-dependent growth rates to predict the vertical and seasonal habitat of each species. FAME is forced by hydrography and water δ18O taken from observations or models, and predicts sedimentary average δ18O for each planktonic foraminifer species. FAME yields excellent agreement with MARGO Late Holocene and core top planktonic δ18O data when forced with WOA13 temperature and GISS water δ18O data, in contrast to the calculation of calcite equilibrium δ18O without correction for foraminifer habitat. We explore the applicability of the module to the past by forcing it with vertical temperature and water δ18O profiles computed by the isotope-enabled Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity iLOVECLIM and compare δ18O simulations with fossil data for the LGM time slice and for the last deglaciation.

  4. The Putative Drp1 Inhibitor mdivi-1 Is a Reversible Mitochondrial Complex I Inhibitor that Modulates Reactive Oxygen Species.

    PubMed

    Bordt, Evan A; Clerc, Pascaline; Roelofs, Brian A; Saladino, Andrew J; Tretter, László; Adam-Vizi, Vera; Cherok, Edward; Khalil, Ahmed; Yadava, Nagendra; Ge, Shealinna X; Francis, T Chase; Kennedy, Nolan W; Picton, Lora K; Kumar, Tanya; Uppuluri, Sruti; Miller, Alexandrea M; Itoh, Kie; Karbowski, Mariusz; Sesaki, Hiromi; Hill, R Blake; Polster, Brian M

    2017-03-27

    Mitochondrial fission mediated by the GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) is an attractive drug target in numerous maladies that range from heart disease to neurodegenerative disorders. The compound mdivi-1 is widely reported to inhibit Drp1-dependent fission, elongate mitochondria, and mitigate brain injury. Here, we show that mdivi-1 reversibly inhibits mitochondrial complex I-dependent O2 consumption and reverse electron transfer-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production at concentrations (e.g., 50 μM) used to target mitochondrial fission. Respiratory inhibition is rescued by bypassing complex I using yeast NADH dehydrogenase Ndi1. Unexpectedly, respiratory impairment by mdivi-1 occurs without mitochondrial elongation, is not mimicked by Drp1 deletion, and is observed in Drp1-deficient fibroblasts. In addition, mdivi-1 poorly inhibits recombinant Drp1 GTPase activity (Ki > 1.2 mM). Overall, these results suggest that mdivi-1 is not a specific Drp1 inhibitor. The ability of mdivi-1 to reversibly inhibit complex I and modify mitochondrial ROS production may contribute to effects observed in disease models.

  5. Oxygen Sensing by Arterial Chemoreceptors Depends on Mitochondrial Complex I Signaling.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Agüera, M Carmen; Gao, Lin; González-Rodríguez, Patricia; Pintado, C Oscar; Arias-Mayenco, Ignacio; García-Flores, Paula; García-Pergañeda, Antonio; Pascual, Alberto; Ortega-Sáenz, Patricia; López-Barneo, José

    2015-11-03

    O2 sensing is essential for mammalian homeostasis. Peripheral chemoreceptors such as the carotid body (CB) contain cells with O2-sensitive K(+) channels, which are inhibited by hypoxia to trigger fast adaptive cardiorespiratory reflexes. How variations of O2 tension (PO2) are detected and the mechanisms whereby these changes are conveyed to membrane ion channels have remained elusive. We have studied acute O2 sensing in conditional knockout mice lacking mitochondrial complex I (MCI) genes. We inactivated Ndufs2, which encodes a protein that participates in ubiquinone binding. Ndufs2-null mice lose the hyperventilatory response to hypoxia, although they respond to hypercapnia. Ndufs2-deficient CB cells have normal functions and ATP content but are insensitive to changes in PO2. Our data suggest that chemoreceptor cells have a specialized succinate-dependent metabolism that induces an MCI state during hypoxia, characterized by the production of reactive oxygen species and accumulation of reduced pyridine nucleotides, which signal neighboring K(+) channels.

  6. Sparfloxacin-metal complexes as antifungal agents - Their synthesis, characterization and antimicrobial activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, Najma; Arayne, M. Saeed; Gul, Somia; Shamim, Sana

    2010-06-01

    Metal complexes with the third-generation quinolone antibacterial agent sparfloxacin (SPFX) or 5-amino-1-cyclopropyl-7-(cis-3,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-6,8,di-fluoro-1-4-dihydro-4-oxo-3-quinocarboxylic acid have been synthesized and characterized with physicochemical and spectroscopic techniques such as TLC, IR, NMR and elemental analyses. In these complexes, sparfloxacin acts as bidentate deprotonated ligands bound to the metal through the pyridone oxygen and one carboxylate oxygen. The antimicrobial activity of these complexes has been evaluated against four Gram-positive and seven Gram-negative bacteria. Antifungal activity against five different fungi has been evaluated and compared with reference drug sparfloxacin. Fe 2+-SPFX and Cd 2+-SPFX complexes showed remarkable potency as compared to the parent drug.

  7. Oxygen isotope mapping of the Archean Sturgeon Lake caldera complex and VMS-related hydrothermal system, Northwestern Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holk, Gregory J.; Taylor, Bruce E.; Galley, Alan G.

    2008-08-01

    The hydrothermal and magmatic evolution of the Sturgeon Lake caldera complex is graphically documented by a regional-scale (525 km2) analysis of oxygen isotopes. Spatial variations in whole-rock oxygen isotope compositions provide a thermal map of the cumulative effects of multiple stages of hydrothermal metasomatism before, during, and after volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) mineralization. There is a progressive, upward increase in δ18O from less than 2‰ to greater than 15‰ through a 5-km-thick section above the Biedelman Bay subvolcanic intrusive complex. This isotopic trend makes it clear that at least the earlier phases of this intrusive complex were coeval with the overlying VMS-hosting cauldron succession and provided thermal energy to drive a convective hydrothermal circulation system. The sharp contrast in δ18O values between late stage phases of the Biedelman Bay intrusion and immediate hanging wall strata indicates that the main phase of VMS-related hydrothermal activity took place before late-stage resurgence in the cauldron-related magmatic activity. Mineralogical and isotopic evidence indicates the presence of both syn- and postmineralization hydrothermal activity defined by the presence of widespread semiconformable and more restricted discordant alteration zones that affect the pre- and syncauldron strata. The semiconformable alteration zones formed during early stages of hydrothermal circulation and are defined by widespread silicification and carbonatization in association with relatively high δ18O values. The discordant alteration assemblages, containing Al-silicate minerals with chloritoid and/or Fe-rich carbonate or chlorite, centered on synvolcanic faults represent restricted zones of both seawater inflow and hydrothermal fluid upflow. A rapid increase in δ18O values (˜7-9‰) over a short distance (<200 m) suggests marked cooling of hydrothermal fluid from ˜350°C to less than 130°C either just before or during discharge onto the

  8. Insights into substrate binding to the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II from ammonia inhibition studies.

    PubMed

    Vinyard, David J; Brudvig, Gary W

    2015-01-20

    Water oxidation in Photosystem II occurs at the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), which cycles through distinct intermediates, S0-S4. The inhibitor ammonia selectively binds to the S2 state at an unresolved site that is not competitive with substrate water. By monitoring the yields of flash-induced oxygen production, we show that ammonia decreases the net efficiency of OEC turnover and slows the decay kinetics of S2 to S1. The temperature dependence of biphasic S2 decay kinetics provides activation energies that do not vary in control and ammonia conditions. We interpret our data in the broader context of previous studies by introducing a kinetic model for both the formation and decay of ammonia-bound S2. The model predicts ammonia binds to S2 rapidly (t1/2 = 1 ms) with a large equilibrium constant. This finding implies that ammonia decreases the reduction potential of S2 by at least 2.7 kcal mol(-1) (>120 mV), which is not consistent with ammonia substitution of a terminal water ligand of Mn(IV). Instead, these data support the proposal that ammonia binds as a bridging ligand between two Mn atoms. Implications for the mechanism of O-O bond formation are discussed.

  9. Oxygen is Required for the L-Cysteine-Mediated Decomposition of the Protein-Bound Dinitrosyl Iron Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Juanjuan; Duan, Xuewu; Landry, Aaron P.; Ding, Huangen

    2010-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that iron-sulfur proteins are the primary targets of NO (nitric oxide). Exposure of Escherichia coli cells to NO readily converts iron-sulfur proteins to the protein-bound DNICs (dinitrosyl iron complexes). While the protein-bound DNICs are stable in vitro under aerobic or anaerobic conditions, they are efficiently repaired in aerobically growing E. coli cells even without new protein synthesis. The cellular repair mechanism for the NO-modified iron-sulfur proteins remains largely elusive. Here we report that unlike aerobically growing E. coli cells, the starved E. coli cells fail to re-activate the NO-modified iron-sulfur proteins. Significantly, addition of L-cysteine, but not other related biological thiols, results in decomposition of the protein-bound DNICs in the starved E. coli cells and in the cell extracts under aerobic conditions. However, L-cysteine has little or no effect on the protein-bound DNICs in the starved E. coli cells and in vitro under anaerobic conditions, suggesting that oxygen is required for the L-cysteine-mediated decomposition of the protein-bound DNICs. Additional studies reveal that L-cysteine is able to exchange the DNIC with the protein-bound DNICs to form the L-cysteine-bound DNIC which is rapidly disrupted by oxygen, resulting in eventual decomposition of the protein-bound DNICs under aerobic conditions. PMID:20406681

  10. Chemical Equilibrium Models for the S3 State of the Oxygen-Evolving Complex of Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Hiroshi; Shoji, Mitsuo; Shen, Jian-Ren; Yamaguchi, Kizashi

    2016-01-19

    We have performed hybrid density functional theory (DFT) calculations to investigate how chemical equilibria can be described in the S3 state of the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II. For a chosen 340-atom model, 1 stable and 11 metastable intermediates have been identified within the range of 13 kcal mol(-1) that differ in protonation, charge, spin, and conformational states. The results imply that reversible interconversion of these intermediates gives rise to dynamic equilibria that involve processes with relocations of protons and electrons residing in the Mn4CaO5 cluster, as well as bound water ligands, with concomitant large changes in the cluster geometry. Such proton tautomerism and redox isomerism are responsible for reversible activation/deactivation processes of substrate oxygen species, through which Mn-O and O-O bonds are transiently ruptured and formed. These results may allow for a tentative interpretation of kinetic data on substrate water exchange on the order of seconds at room temperature, as measured by time-resolved mass spectrometry. The reliability of the hybrid DFT method for the multielectron redox reaction in such an intricate system is also addressed.

  11. Oxygen kinetic isotope effects upon catalytic water oxidation by a monomeric ruthenium complex.

    PubMed

    Angeles-Boza, Alfredo M; Roth, Justine P

    2012-04-16

    Oxygen isotope fractionation is applied for the first time to probe the catalytic oxidation of water using a widely studied ruthenium complex, [Ru(II)(tpy)(bpy)(H(2)O)](ClO(4))(2) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine; tpy = 2,2';6",2"-terpyridine). Competitive oxygen-18 kinetic isotope effects ((18)O KIEs) derived from the ratio of (16,16)O(2) to (16,18)O(2) formed from natural-abundance water vary from 1.0132 ± 0.0005 to 1.0312 ± 0.0004. Experiments were conducted with cerium(IV) salts at low pH and a photogenerated ruthenium(III) tris(bipyridine) complex at neutral pH as the oxidants. The results are interpreted within the context of catalytic mechanisms using an adiabatic formalism to ensure the highest barriers for electron-transfer and proton-coupled electron-transfer steps. In view of these contributions, O-O bond formation is predicted to be irreversible and turnover-limiting. The reaction with the largest (18)O KIE exhibits the greatest degree of O-O coupling in the transition state. Smaller (18)O KIEs are observed due to multiple rate-limiting steps or transition-state structures which do not involve significant O-O motion. These findings provide benchmarks for systematizing mechanisms of O-O bond formation, the critical step in water oxidation by natural and synthetic catalysts. In addition, the measurements introduce a new tool for calibrating computational studies using relevant experimental data.

  12. Kinetics and mechanisms of the oxidation of alcohols and hydroxylamines by hydrogen peroxide, catalyzed by methyltrioxorhenium, MTO, and the oxygen binding properties of cobalt Schiff base complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Zauche, Timothy

    1999-02-12

    Catalysis is a very interesting area of chemistry, which is currently developing at a rapid pace. A great deal of effort is being put forth by both industry and academia to make reactions faster and more productive. One method of accomplishing this is by the development of catalysts. Enzymes are an example of catalysts that are able to perform reactions on a very rapid time scale and also very specifically; a goal for every man-made catalyst. A kinetic study can also be carried out for a reaction to gain a better understanding of its mechanism and to determine what type of catalyst would assist the reaction. Kinetic studies can also help determine other factors, such as the shelf life of a chemical, or the optimum temperature for an industrial scale reaction. An area of catalysis being studied at this time is that of oxygenations. Life on this earth depends on the kinetic barriers for oxygen in its various forms. If it were not for these barriers, molecular oxygen, water, and the oxygenated materials in the land would be in a constant equilibrium. These same barriers must be overcome when performing oxygenation reactions on the laboratory or industrial scale. By performing kinetic studies and developing catalysts for these reactions, a large number of reactions can be made more economical, while making less unwanted byproducts. For this dissertation the activation by transition metal complexes of hydrogen peroxide or molecular oxygen coordination will be discussed.

  13. Active Monitoring Complex-Envelope Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unger, R.

    2011-12-01

    Pseudo-random 3-D signal transmission followed by quadrature signal processing significantly enhances seismic Active Monitoring (AM). The algorithm produces complex-envelope seismograms consisting of the dual time series of instantaneous amplitude and phase. Minimum-standard-deviation signal arrival detection and timing from coherent instantaneous-phase seismogram ensembles yields signal time errors inversely proportional to frequency and signal-to-noise ratio. In particular, application to piezo-electric acoustic cross well monitoring as in SAFOD experiments should result in nano-second multiple-signal detection and timing precision. The method is applicable to all types (seismic, EM, acoustic) of AM.

  14. Inhibition of Chlamydia psittaci in oxidatively active thioglycolate-elicited macrophages: distinction between lymphokine-mediated oxygen-dependent and oxygen-independent macrophage activation.

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, G I; Faubion, C L

    1983-01-01

    Immune sensitization of spleen cells was required to generate lymphokines (LK) that activated thioglycolate-elicited peritoneal macrophages (thio MACs) to respond via both oxygen-dependent and oxygen-independent systems. LK produced by incubating spleen cells from immunized A/J and LAF mice with concanavalin A stimulated a response by thio MACs to phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-induced chemiluminescence and activated these cells to inhibit intracellular Chlamydia psittaci replication. Concanavalin A-incubated spleen cell preparations from unimmunized animals stimulated neither PMA-induced chemiluminescence nor antichlamydial activity. Activated thio MACs demonstrated a rapid chemiluminescence response to the intracellular protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, but C. psittaci did not induce chemiluminescence in LK-activated thio MACs, although cells exposed to C. psittaci retained their responsiveness to PMA-induced chemiluminescence. The PMA-induced response was inhibited by the addition of exogenous superoxide dismutase and catalase and was therefore related to the production of superoxide anion (O2 . -) and H2O2 by these cells. LK preparations incubated at 56 degrees C before macrophage treatment retained antichlamydial activity, but heated preparations no longer stimulated thio MACs to respond in the chemiluminescence assay. These data provide evidence that macrophage oxygen-dependent and oxygen-independent systems are simultaneously activated by LK, and these preparations comprise at least two distinct activities. The portion responsible for activating oxygen-dependent systems (PMA-induced chemiluminescence) is heat labile, whereas the portion responsible for activating oxygen-independent systems is heat stable. It is the latter system that results in restriction of chlamydial growth and in vitro parasite persistence. PMID:6840848

  15. X-ray and vibrational spectroscopy of manganese complexes relevant to the oxygen-evolving complex of photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, Hendrik

    2001-01-01

    Manganese model complexes, relevant to the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) in photosynthesis, were studied with Mn K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES), Mn Kb X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), and vibrational spectroscopy. A more detailed understanding was obtained of the influence of nuclearity, overall structure, oxidation state, and ligand environment of the Mn atoms on the spectra from these methods. This refined understanding is necessary for improving the interpretation of spectra of the OEC. Mn XANES and Kb XES were used to study a di-(mu)-oxo and a mono-(mu)-oxo di-nuclear Mn compound in the (III,III), (III,IV), and (IV,IV) oxidation states. XANES spectra show energy shifts of 0.8 - 2.2 eV for 1-electron oxidation-state changes and 0.4 - 1.8 eV for ligand-environment changes. The shifts observed for Mn XES spectra were approximately 0.21 eV for oxidation state-changes and only approximately 0.04 eV for ligand-environment changes. This indicates that Mn Kb XES i s more sensitive to the oxidation state and less sensitive to the ligand environment of the Mn atoms than XANES. These complimentary methods provide information about the oxidation state and the ligand environment of Mn atoms in model compounds and biological systems. A versatile spectroelectrochemical apparatus was designed to aid the interpretation of IR spectra of Mn compounds in different oxidation states. The design, based on an attenuated total reflection device, permits the study of a wide spectral range: 16,700 (600 nm) - 225

  16. Synthesis, photophysical and oxygen-sensing properties of a novel Eu{sup 3+} complex incorporated in mesoporous MCM-41

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo Qinghui; Li Bin; Zhang Liming; Wang Yinghui; Liu Yanhong; Zhang Jun; Chen Ying; Guo Lifan

    2010-07-15

    A novel Eu{sup 3+} complex of Eu(DPIQ)(TTA){sub 3} (DPIQ=10H-dipyrido [f,h] indolo [3,2-b] quinoxaline, TTA=2-thenoyltrifluoroacetonate) was synthesized and encapsulated in the mesoporous MCM-41, hoping to explore an oxygen-sensing system based on the long-lived Eu{sup 3+} emitter. The Eu(DPIQ)(TTA){sub 3}/MCM-41 composites were characterized by infrared spectra (IR), ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectra, small-angle X-ray diffraction (SAXRD), luminescence intensity quenching upon various oxygen concentrations, and fluorescence decay analysis. The results indicated that the composites exhibited the characteristic emission of the Eu{sup 3+} ion and the fluorescence intensity of {sup 5}D{sub 0}-{sup 7}F{sub 2} obviously decreased with increasing oxygen concentrations. The oxygen sensing properties of the composites with different loading levels of Eu(DPIQ)(TTA){sub 3} complex were investigated. A sensitivity of 3.04, a short response time of 7 s, and good linearity were obtained for the composites with a loading level of 20 mg/g. These results are the best reported values for optical oxygen-sensing materials based on Eu{sup 3+} complexes so far. - Graphical abstract: Novel optical oxygen-sensing composites are prepared by incorporating a novel Eu{sup 3+} complex Eu(DPIQ)(TTA){sub 3} into MCM-41. The emission intensity of Eu(DPIQ)(TTA){sub 3}/MCM-41 composites exhibits a strong oxygen dependent characteristic and the composite with a loading level of 20 mg/g possesses better fluorescence quenching with increasing oxygen concentrations.

  17. Biologic Activity of Porphyromonas endodontalis complex lipids

    PubMed Central

    Mirucki, Christopher S.; Abedi, Mehran; Jiang, Jin; Zhu, Qiang; Wang, Yu-Hsiung; Safavi, Kamran E.; Clark, Robert B.; Nichols, Frank C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Periapical infections secondary to pulpal necrosis are associated with bacterial contamination of the pulp. Porphyromonas endodontalis, a Gram-negative organism, is considered to be a pulpal pathogen. P. gingivalis is phylogenetically related to P. endodontalis and synthesizes several classes of novel complex lipids that possess biological activity, including the capacity to promote osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast activation. The purpose of this study was to extract and characterize constituent lipids of P. endodontalis, and evaluate their capacity to promote pro-inflammatory secretory responses in the macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7, as well as their capacity to promote osteoclastogenesis and inhibit osteoblast activity. Methods Constituent lipids of both organisms were fractionated by HPLC and were structurally characterized using electrospray-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) or ESI-MS/MS. The virulence potential of P. endodontalis lipids was then compared with known biologically active lipids isolated from P. gingivalis. Results P. endodontalis total lipids were shown to promote TNF-α secretion from RAW 264.7 cells and the serine lipid fraction appeared to account for the majority of this effect. P. endodontalis lipid preparations also increased osteoclast formation from RAW 264.7 cells but osteoblast differentiation in culture was inhibited and appeared to be dependent on TLR2 expression. Conclusions These effects underscore the importance of P. endodontalis lipids in promoting inflammatory and bone cell activation processes that could lead to periapical pathology. PMID:25146013

  18. Nature of the metastable boron-oxygen complex formation in crystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crandall, Richard S.

    2010-11-01

    Transient capacitance measurements reveal new physics of metastable defect formation in boron-doped oxygen-containing crystalline silicon solar cells. These measurements demonstrate that holes are deeply trapped during defect formation and removed during thermal annealing with activation energy of 1.3 eV. Previous theoretical models {Du et al., [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 256602 (2006)] and Adey et al., [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 055504 (2004)]} are supported by present findings that defect formation is a slow two-stage process with activation energies of 0.17 eV and 0.4 eV at high and low temperature, respectively. Repulsive hole capture by a positive oxygen-dimer determines the defect formation rate at low temperature {Du et al., [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 256602 (2006)]}. The high temperature process is governed by a structural conversion of the dimer {Du et al., [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 256602 (2006)] and Adey et al., [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 055504 (2004)]}. An abnormally low rate prefactor allows this low-enthalpy reaction to be observed at the higher temperature. This dimer conversion presents an excellent example of an "entropy barrier" that explains the low conversion rate. Disparate formation and annealing results published here and in other publications are related by the Meyer-Neldel rule with an isokinetic temperature of 410 K.

  19. Calcium and the Hydrogen-Bonded Water Network in the Photosynthetic Oxygen-Evolving Complex.

    PubMed

    Polander, Brandon C; Barry, Bridgette A

    2013-03-07

    In photosynthesis, photosystem II evolves oxygen from water at a Mn4CaO5 cluster (OEC). Calcium is required for biological oxygen evolution. In the OEC, a water network, extending from the calcium to four peptide carbonyl groups, has recently been predicted by a high-resolution crystal structure. Here, we use carbonyl vibrational frequencies as reporters of electrostatic changes to test the presence of this water network. A single flash, oxidizing Mn(III) to Mn(IV) (the S1 to S2 transition), upshifted the frequencies of peptide C═O bands. The spectral change was attributable to a decrease in C═O hydrogen bonding. Strontium, which supports a lower level of steady state activity, also led to an oxidation-induced shift in C═O frequencies, but treatment with barium and magnesium, which do not support activity, did not. This work provides evidence that calcium maintains an electrostatically responsive water network in the OEC and shows that OEC peptide carbonyl groups can be used as solvatochromic markers.

  20. Oxygen sensitivity of photoluminescence intensity of Pt complex dispersed in fluorinated acrylate for pressure sensitive paint applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Jae Su; Choi, Yong Gyu

    2014-09-01

    Oxygen-sensitive photoluminescence intensity of a new combination of luminophore and matrix has been investigated for use in pressure sensitive paint applications. In consideration of oxygen permeability as well as optical transparency and structural stability, a fluorinated acrylate polymer is chosen as matrix in this study, where PtTFPP complex is dispersed and acts as luminophore responsible for the oxygen quenching. Processing conditions as to spin-coat films of the fluorinated acrylate doped with the PtTFPP are described. Pressure dependence of the photoluminescence emission of such spin-coat films is explained in connection with luminophore concentration, film thickness and types of substrate.

  1. Structure-activity relationships for organometallic osmium arene phenylazopyridine complexes with potent anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ying; Habtemariam, Abraha; Basri, Aida M B H; Braddick, Darren; Clarkson, Guy J; Sadler, Peter J

    2011-10-28

    We report the synthesis and characterisation of 32 half sandwich phenylazopyridine Os(II) arene complexes [Os(η(6)-arene)(phenylazopyridine)X](+) in which X is chloride or iodide, the arene is p-cymene or biphenyl and the pyridine and phenyl rings contain a variety of substituents (F, Cl, Br, I, CF(3), OH or NO(2)). Ten X-ray crystal structures have been determined. Cytotoxicity towards A2780 human ovarian cancer cells ranges from high potency at nanomolar concentrations to inactivity. In general the introduction of an electron-withdrawing group (e.g. F, Cl, Br or I) at specific positions on the pyridine ring significantly increases cytotoxic activity and aqueous solubility. Changing the arene from p-cymene to biphenyl and the monodentate ligand X from chloride to iodide also increases the activity significantly. Activation by hydrolysis and DNA binding appears not to be the major mechanism of action since both the highly active complex [Os(η(6)-bip)(2-F-azpy)I]PF(6) (9) and the moderately active complex [Os(η(6)-bip)(3-Cl-azpy)I]PF(6) (23) are very stable and inert towards aquation. Studies of octanol-water partition coefficients (log P) and subcellular distributions of osmium in A2780 human ovarian cancer cells suggested that cell uptake and targeting to cellular organelles play important roles in determining activity. Although complex 9 induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in A2780 cells, the ROS level did not appear to play a role in the mechanism of anticancer activity. This class of organometallic osmium complexes has new and unusual features worthy of further exploration for the design of novel anticancer drugs.

  2. Oxygen Atom Exchange between H2O and Non-Heme Oxoiron(IV) Complexes: Ligand Dependence and Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Puri, Mayank; Company, Anna; Sabenya, Gerard; Costas, Miquel; Que, Lawrence

    2016-06-20

    Detailed studies of oxygen atom exchange (OAE) between H2(18)O and synthetic non-heme oxoiron(IV) complexes supported by tetradentate and pentadentate ligands provide evidence that they proceed by a common mechanism but within two different kinetic regimes, with OAE rates that span 2 orders of magnitude. The first kinetic regime involves initial reversible water association to the Fe(IV) complex, which is evidenced by OAE rates that are linearly dependent on [H2(18)O] and H2O/D2O KIEs of 1.6, while the second kinetic regime involves a subsequent rate determining proton-transfer step between the bound aqua and oxo ligands that is associated with saturation behavior with [H2(18)O] and much larger H2O/D2O KIEs of 5-6. [Fe(IV)(O)(TMC)(MeCN)](2+) (1) and [Fe(IV)(O)(MePy2TACN)](2+) (9) are examples of complexes that exhibit kinetic behavior in the first regime, while [Fe(IV)(O)(N4Py)](2+) (3), [Fe(IV)(O)(BnTPEN)](2+) (4), [Fe(IV)(O)(1Py-BnTPEN)](2+) (5), [Fe(IV)(O)(3Py-BnTPEN)](2+) (6), and [Fe(IV)(O)(Me2Py2TACN)](2+) (8) represent complexes that fall in the second kinetic regime. Interestingly, [Fe(IV)(O)(PyTACN)(MeCN)](2+) (7) exhibits a linear [H2(18)O] dependence below 0.6 M and saturation above 0.6 M. Analysis of the temperature dependence of the OAE rates shows that most of these complexes exhibit large and negative activation entropies, consistent with the proposed mechanism. One exception is complex 9, which has a near-zero activation entropy and is proposed to undergo ligand-arm dissociation during the RDS to accommodate H2(18)O binding. These results show that the observed OAE kinetic behavior is highly dependent on the nature of the supporting ligand and are of relevance to studies of non-heme oxoiron(IV) complexes in water or acetonitrile/water mixtures for applications in photocatalysis and water oxidation chemistry.

  3. Adsorption of aqueous metal ions on oxygen and nitrogen functionalized nanoporous activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Xiao, B; Thomas, K M

    2005-04-26

    In this study, the adsorption characteristics of two series of oxygen and nitrogen functionalized activated carbons were investigated. These series were a low nitrogen content (approximately 1 wt % daf) carbon series derived from coconut shell and a high nitrogen content (approximately 8 wt % daf) carbon series derived from polyacrylonitrile. In both series, the oxygen contents were varied over the range approximately 2-22 wt % daf. The porous structures of the functionalized activated carbons were characterized using N(2) (77 K) and CO(2) (273 K) adsorption. Only minor changes in the porous structure were observed in both series. This allowed the effect of changes in functional group concentrations on metal ion adsorption to be studied without major influences due to differences in porous structure characteristics. The surface group characteristics were examined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, acid/base titrations, and measurement of the point of zero charge (pH(PZC)). The adsorption of aqueous metal ion species, M(2+)(aq), on acidic oxygen functional group sites mainly involves an ion exchange mechanism. The ratios of protons displaced to the amount of M(2+)(aq) metal species adsorbed have a linear relationship for the carbons with pH(PZC) < or = 4.15. Hydrolysis of metal species in solution may affect the adsorption of metal ion species and displacement of protons. In the case of basic carbons, both protons and metal ions are adsorbed on the carbons. The complex nature of competitive adsorption between the proton and metal ion species and the amphoteric character of carbon surfaces are discussed in relation to the mechanism of adsorption.

  4. Cell death induced by direct laser activation of singlet oxygen at 1270 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anquez, F.; El Yazidi Belkoura, I.; Suret, P.; Randoux, S.; Courtade, E.

    2013-02-01

    Singlet oxygen plays a major role in many chemical and biological photo-oxidation processes. It has a high chemical reactivity, which is commonly harnessed for therapeutic issues. Indeed, singlet oxygen is recognized as the major cytotoxic agent in photodynamic therapy. In this treatment of cancer, singlet oxygen is created, among other reactive species, by an indirect transfer of energy from light to molecular oxygen via excitation of a photosensitizer. In this paper, we show that the conventional singlet oxygen production scheme can be simplified. Production of singlet oxygen is achieved in living cells from photosensitizer-free 1270 nm laser excitation of the electronic ground state of molecular oxygen. The quantity of singlet oxygen produced in this way is sufficient to induce an oxidative stress leading to cell death. Other effects such as thermal stress are discriminated, and we conclude that cell death is only due to singlet oxygen creation. This new simplified scheme of singlet oxygen activation can be seen as a breakthrough for phototherapies of malignant diseases and/or as a non-invasive possibility to generate reactive oxygen species in a tightly controlled manner.

  5. Neutrophil-mediated cytotoxicity triggered by immune complexes: the role of reactive oxygen metabolites.

    PubMed Central

    Geffner, J R; Giordano, M; Palermo, M S; Prat, A; Serebrinsky, G P; Isturiz, M A

    1987-01-01

    Normal human neutrophils triggered by precipitating immune complexes (IC), soluble IC (sIC) or heat-aggregated IgG (HAIgG) displayed low levels of cytotoxicity towards nonsensitized target cells. Catalase, but not heated catalase, completely impaired this nonspecific cytotoxicity (NSC), suggesting a key role for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the lysis of target cells. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and certain HO. and 1O2 scavengers were unable to exert significant effects. Three haem-enzyme inhibitors, sodium azide, sodium cyanide and 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole did not decrease neutrophil NSC, but markedly enhanced it. This data suggest that the mechanism involved was not dependent upon myeloperoxidase (MPO). The analysis of neutrophil-mediated ADCC indicates that oxygen-dependent but MPO-independent mechanisms appeared to be operative in this system. It was also found that the microfilament disrupting agents, cytochalasin B (CB) and dihydrocytochalasin B (dhCB), as well as the chemotactic peptide N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP), significantly enhanced NSC. In contrast, these compounds partially inhibited ADCC. This cytotoxic system provides a suitable model to study events that may occur during the course of immune complex diseases and also permits the evaluation of alternative lytic mechanisms triggered through neutrophil Fc gamma receptors. PMID:2822303

  6. Synthesis, physico-chemical characterization and antimicrobial activities of 3-methoxysalicylaldehyde-2-aminobenzoylhydrazone and its transition metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badiger, Dayananda S.; Hunoor, Rekha S.; Patil, Basavaraj R.; Vadavi, Ramesh S.; Mangannavar, Chandrashekhar V.; Muchchandi, Iranna S.; Gudasi, Kalagouda B.

    2012-07-01

    The transition metal complexes of 3-methoxysalicylaldehyde-2-aminobenzhydrazone (H2L) were synthesized and characterized by various spectroscopic (IR, NMR, UV-Vis, mass), thermal and other physicochemical methods. The ligand acts both in monobasic as well as dibasic manner and coordinates in tridentate fashion with carbonyl oxygen, azomethine nitrogen and phenolic oxygen via deprotonation except in Cu(II) complex where the ligand coordinates via enolization and deprotonation of amide proton. An octahedral geometry was assigned for Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes and square planar for Cu(II) complex. The ligand and its metal complexes have been screened for their in vitro antimicrobial activities using serial dilution method. Metal complexes in general have exhibited better antibacterial and antifungal activity than the free ligand. The Cu(II) complex exhibited highest antimicrobial activity among the compounds tested.

  7. The confines of triple oxygen isotope exponents in elemental and complex mass-dependent processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Huiming; Cao, Xiaobin; Hayles, Justin A.

    2015-12-01

    Small differences in triple isotope relationships, or Δ17O in the case of oxygen, have been increasingly used to study a range of problems including hydrological cycles, stratosphere-troposphere exchange, biogeochemical pathways and fluxes, and the Moon's origin in the geochemical and cosmochemical communities. A Δ17O value depends on the triple isotope exponent θ of involved reaction steps. However, the probabilistic distribution of the intrinsic and apparent θ values has not been examined for elemental processes and for processes that are out of equilibrium or bearing reservoir-transport complexities. A lack of knowledge on the confines of θ may hamper our understanding of the subtle differences among mass-dependent processes and may result in mischaracterization of a set of mass-dependent processes as being in violation of mass-dependent rules. Here we advocate a reductionist approach and explore θ confines starting from kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) within the framework of transition state theory (TST). The advantage of our KIE approach is that any elemental or composite, equilibrium or non-equilibrium process can be reduced to a set of KIEs with corresponding θKIE. We establish that the KIE between a reactant and a transition state (TS) is intrinsic. Given a range of KIEs known for Earth processes involving oxygen, we use a Monte Carlo calculation method and a range of oxygen-bonded molecular masses to obtain a distribution of θKIE values and subsequently that of θeq. Next, complexities are examined by looking into expected effects due to reaction progress, unbalanced fluxes, and reference frame. Finally, compounded reservoir-transport effects are examined using two simple processes - Rayleigh Distillation (RD) and Fractional Distillation (FD). Our results show that the apparent θ values between two species or two states of the same evolving species have much broader confines than the commonly used "canonical" confines of 0.51-0.53, particularly

  8. Supramolecular structural, thermal properties and biological activity of 3-(2-methoxyphenoxy)propane-1,2-diol metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Walaa H.; Mahmoud, Nessma F.; Mohamed, Gehad G.; El-Bindary, Ashraf A.; El-Sonbati, Adel Z.

    2015-04-01

    New bi- and trivalent transition metal complexes of ligand 3-(2-methoxyphenoxy)propane-1,2-diol (GFS) were synthesized. The ligand and complexes were characterized via: melting point, UV/Visible, IR, 1H NMR, mass and diffused reflectance spectroscopy. The molecular structure of the investigated ligand (GFS) is optimized theoretically and the quantum chemical parameters are calculated. In addition, the complexes were characterized based on conductivity measurement, thermal analysis and biological activity. The infrared spectral study of GFS and its complexes, act as monobasic tridentate through the oxygen atom of hydroxyl group and two etheric oxygen atoms. Also, coordination to the unprotonated oxygen is evidenced from the disappearance of the OH signal in the 1H NMR spectra after complexation. The thermogravimetric analysis of the complexes shows metal oxide remaining as the final product. The compounds were tested against four bacterial species; two Gram positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus) and two Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) as well as antifungal activity against (Candida albicans). The complexes showed significant activities against Gram positive bacteria than Gram negative bacteria. [Cd(GFS)Cl(H2O)2] complex showed remarkable antifungal activity. However, some complexes showed more chemotherapeutic efficiency than the parent GFS drug. The drug and complexes were also screened for their in vitro anticancer activity against the Breast cell line (MFC7) and the results obtained show that they exhibit a considerable anticancer activity.

  9. Method of Separating Oxygen From Spacecraft Cabin Air to Enable Extravehicular Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Extravehicular activities (EVAs) require high-pressure, high-purity oxygen. Shuttle EVAs use oxygen that is stored and transported as a cryogenic fluid. EVAs on the International Space Station (ISS) presently use the Shuttle cryo O2, which is transported to the ISS using a transfer hose. The fluid is compressed to elevated pressures and stored as a high-pressure gas. With the retirement of the shuttle, NASA has been searching for ways to deliver oxygen to fill the highpressure oxygen tanks on the ISS. A method was developed using low-pressure oxygen generated onboard the ISS and released into ISS cabin air, filtering the oxygen from ISS cabin air using a pressure swing absorber to generate a low-pressure (high-purity) oxygen stream, compressing the oxygen with a mechanical compressor, and transferring the high-pressure, high-purity oxygen to ISS storage tanks. The pressure swing absorber (PSA) can be either a two-stage device, or a single-stage device, depending on the type of sorbent used. The key is to produce a stream with oxygen purity greater than 99.5 percent. The separator can be a PSA device, or a VPSA device (that uses both vacuum and pressure for the gas separation). The compressor is a multi-stage mechanical compressor. If the gas flow rates are on the order of 5 to 10 lb (.2.3 to 4.6 kg) per day, the compressor can be relatively small [3 16 16 in. (.8 41 41 cm)]. Any spacecraft system, or other remote location that has a supply of lowpressure oxygen, a method of separating oxygen from cabin air, and a method of compressing the enriched oxygen stream, has the possibility of having a regenerable supply of highpressure, high-purity oxygen that is compact, simple, and safe. If cabin air is modified so there is very little argon, the separator can be smaller, simpler, and use less power.

  10. Reactive Oxygen Species Produced by the NOX2 Complex in Monocytes Protect Mice from Bacterial Infections1, 2, 3

    PubMed Central

    Pizzolla, Angela; Hultqvist, Malin; Nilson, Bo; Grimm, Melissa J.; Eneljung, Tove; Jonsson, Ing-Marie; Verdrengh, Margareta; Kelkka, Tiina; Gjertsson, Inger; Segal, Brahm H.; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2012-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an inherited disorder characterized by recurrent life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections. CGD results from defective production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by phagocytes caused by mutations in genes encoding the NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2) complex subunits. Mice with a spontaneous mutation in Ncf1, which encodes the NCF1 (p47phox) subunit of NOX2, have defective phagocyte NOX2 activity. These mice occasionally develop local spontaneous infections by Staphylococcus xylosus or by the common CGD pathogen S. aureus. Ncf1 mutant mice were more susceptible to systemic challenge with these bacteria than wild type mice. Transgenic Ncf1 mutant mice harboring wild type Ncf1 gene under the human CD68 promoter (MN+ mice) gained the expression of NCF1 and functional NOX2 activity specifically in monocyte/macrophages, although minimal NOX2 activity was detected also in some CD11b+Ly6G+ cells defined as neutrophils. MN+ mice did not develop spontaneous infection and were more resistant to administered staphylococcal infections compared to MN− mice. Most strikingly, MN+ mice survived after administered Burkholderia cepacia, an opportunistic pathogen in CGD patients, whereas MN− mice died. Thus, monocyte/macrophage expression of functional NCF1 protected against spontaneous and administered bacterial infections. PMID:22491245

  11. Exceptional Oxygen Sensing Properties of New Blue Light-Excitable Highly Luminescent Europium(III) and Gadolinium(III) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Borisov, Sergey M.; Fischer, Roland; Saf, Robert; Klimant, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    New europium(III) and gadolinium(III) complexes bearing 8-hydroxyphenalenone antenna combine efficient absorption in the blue part of the spectrum and strong emission in polymers at room temperature. The Eu(III) complexes show characteristic red luminescence whereas the Gd(III) dyes are strongly phosphorescent. The luminescence quantum yields are about 20% for the Eu(III) complexes and 50% for the Gd(III) dyes. In contrast to most state-of-the-art Eu(III) complexes the new dyes are quenched very efficiently by molecular oxygen. The luminescence decay times of the Gd(III) complexes exceed 1 ms which ensures exceptional sensitivity even in polymers of moderate oxygen permeability. These sensors are particularly suitable for trace oxygen sensing and may be good substitutes for Pd(II) porphyrins. The photophysical and sensing properties can be tuned by varying the nature of the fourth ligand. The narrow-band emission of the Eu(III) allows efficient elimination of the background light and autofluorescence and is also very attractive for use e.g. in multi-analyte sensors. The highly photostable indicators incorporated in nanoparticles are promising for imaging applications. Due to the straightforward preparation and low cost of starting materials the new dyes represent a promising alternative to the state-of-the-art oxygen indicators particularly for such applications as e.g. food packaging. PMID:27158252

  12. Mitochondria are required for antigen-specific T cell activation through reactive oxygen species signaling.

    PubMed

    Sena, Laura A; Li, Sha; Jairaman, Amit; Prakriya, Murali; Ezponda, Teresa; Hildeman, David A; Wang, Chyung-Ru; Schumacker, Paul T; Licht, Jonathan D; Perlman, Harris; Bryce, Paul J; Chandel, Navdeep S

    2013-02-21

    It is widely appreciated that T cells increase glycolytic flux during activation, but the role of mitochondrial flux is unclear. Here, we have shown that mitochondrial metabolism in the absence of glucose metabolism is sufficient to support interleukin-2 (IL-2) induction. Furthermore, we used mice with reduced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) production in T cells (T-Uqcrfs(-/-) mice) to show that mitochondria are required for T cell activation to produce mROS for activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and subsequent IL-2 induction. These mice could not induce antigen-specific expansion of T cells in vivo, but Uqcrfs1(-/-) T cells retained the ability to proliferate in vivo under lymphopenic conditions. This suggests that Uqcrfs1(-/-) T cells were not lacking bioenergetically but rather lacked specific ROS-dependent signaling events needed for antigen-specific expansion. Thus, mitochondrial metabolism is a critical component of T cell activation through the production of complex III ROS.

  13. Rifabutin Is Active Against Mycobacterium abscessus Complex.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Dinah Binte; Low, Jian Liang; Wu, Mu-Lu; Gengenbacher, Martin; Teo, Jeanette W P; Dartois, Véronique; Dick, Thomas

    2017-04-10

    Lung infections with Mycobacterium abscessus are emerging as a global threat to individuals with cystic fibrosis and other patient groups. Recent evidence for human-to-human transmission worsens the situation. M. abscessus is an intrinsically multidrug resistant pathogen showing resistance even against standard anti tuberculosis drugs such as rifampicin. Here, our objective was to identify existing drugs that may be employed for the treatment of M. abscessus lung disease. A collection of more than 2700 approved drugs was screened at a single point concentration against an M. abscessus clinical isolate. Hits were confirmed with fresh solids in dose response experiments. For the most attractive hit, growth inhibition and bactericidal activities against reference strains of the three M. abscessus subspecies and a collection of clinical isolates were determined. Surprisingly, the rifampicin derivative rifabutin had an MIC of 3 ± 2 μM (3 μg/mL) against the screening strain, the reference strains M. abscessus subsp. abscessus ATCC 19977, M. abscessus subsp. bolletii CCUG 50184-T and M. abscesuss subsp. massiliense CCUG 48898-T, as well as a collection of clinical isolates. Furthermore, rifabutin was active against clarithromycin resistant strains. In conclusion, rifabutin - in contrast to rifampicin - is active against the Mycobacterium abscessus complex bacteria in vitro and may be considered for treatment of M. abscessus lung disease.

  14. Elaboration of copper-oxygen mediated C-H activation chemistry in consideration of future fuel and feedstock generation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Yoon; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2015-04-01

    To contribute solutions to current energy concerns, improvements in the efficiency of dioxygen mediated C-H bond cleavage chemistry, for example, selective oxidation of methane to methanol, could minimize losses in natural gas usage or produce feedstocks for fuels. Oxidative C-H activation is also a component of polysaccharide degradation, potentially affording alternative biofuels from abundant biomass. Thus, an understanding of active-site chemistry in copper monooxygenases, those activating strong C-H bonds is briefly reviewed. Then, recent advances in the synthesis-generation and study of various copper-oxygen intermediates are highlighted. Of special interest are cupric-superoxide, Cu-hydroperoxo and Cu-oxy complexes. Such investigations can contribute to an enhanced future application of C-H oxidation or oxygenation processes using air, as concerning societal energy goals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Elaboration of Copper-Oxygen Mediated C–H Activation Chemistry in Consideration of Future Fuel and Feedstock Generation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Yoon; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2015-01-01

    To contribute solutions for current energy concerns, improvements in the efficiency of C-H bond cleavage chemistry, e.g., selective oxidation of methane to methanol, could minimize losses in natural gas usage or produce feedstocks for fuels. Oxidative C-H activation is also a component of polysaccharide degradation, affording alternative biofuels from abundant biomass. Thus, an understanding of active-site chemistry in copper monooxygenases, those activating strong C-H bonds is briefly reviewed. Then, recent advances in the synthesis-generation and study of various copper-oxygen intermediates are highlighted. Of special interest are cupric-superoxide, Cu-hydroperoxo and Cu-oxy complexes. Such investigations can contribute to an enhanced future application of C-H oxidation or oxygenation processes using air, as concerning societal energy goals. PMID:25756327

  16. Neonatal oxygen adversely affects lung function in adult mice without altering surfactant composition or activity

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Min; Chess, Patricia R.; McGrath-Morrow, Sharon A.; Wang, Zhengdong; Gelein, Robert; Zhou, Rui; Dean, David A.; Notter, Robert H.

    2009-01-01

    Despite its potentially adverse effects on lung development and function, supplemental oxygen is often used to treat premature infants in respiratory distress. To understand how neonatal hyperoxia can permanently disrupt lung development, we previously reported increased lung compliance, greater alveolar simplification, and disrupted epithelial development in adult mice exposed to 100% inspired oxygen fraction between postnatal days 1 and 4. Here, we investigate whether oxygen-induced changes in lung function are attributable to defects in surfactant composition and activity, structural changes in alveolar development, or both. Newborn mice were exposed to room air or 40%, 60%, 80%, or 100% oxygen between postnatal days 1 and 4 and allowed to recover in room air until 8 wk of age. Lung compliance and alveolar size increased, and airway resistance, airway elastance, tissue elastance, and tissue damping decreased, in mice exposed to 60–80% oxygen; changes were even greater in mice exposed to 100% oxygen. These alterations in lung function were not associated with changes in total protein content or surfactant phospholipid composition in bronchoalveolar lavage. Moreover, surface activity and total and hydrophobic protein content were unchanged in large surfactant aggregates centrifuged from bronchoalveolar lavage compared with control. Instead, the number of type II cells progressively declined in 60–100% oxygen, whereas levels of T1α, a protein expressed by type I cells, were comparably increased in mice exposed to 40–100% oxygen. Thickened bundles of elastin fibers were also detected in alveolar walls of mice exposed to ≥60% oxygen. These findings support the hypothesis that changes in lung development, rather than surfactant activity, are the primary causes of oxygen-altered lung function in children who were exposed to oxygen as neonates. Furthermore, the disruptive effects of oxygen on epithelial development and lung mechanics are not equivalently dose

  17. Oxygen Minimum Zones in Miniature: Microbial Community Diversity, Activity, and Assembly Across Oxygen Gradients in Meromictic Marine Lakes, Palau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beman, J. M.

    2016-02-01

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) play a central role in biogeochemical cycles and are expanding as a consequence of climate change, yet our understanding of these changes is limited by a lack of systematic analyses of low-oxygen ecosystems. In particular, forecasting biogeochemical feedbacks to deoxygenation requires detailed knowledge of microbial community assembly and activity as oxygen declines. Marine `lakes'—isolated bodies of seawater surrounded by land—are an ideal comparative system, as they provide a pronounced oxygen gradient extending from well-mixed, holomictic lakes to stratified, meromictic lakes that vary in their extent of anoxia. We examined 13 marine lakes using pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, quantitative PCR for nitrogen (N)- and sulfur (S)-cycling functional genes and groups, and N- and carbon (C)-cycling rate measurements. All lakes were inhabited by well-known marine bacteria, demonstrating the broad relevance of this study system. Microbial diversity was typically highest in the anoxic monimolimnion of meromictic lakes, with marine cyanobacteria, SAR11, and other common bacteria replaced by anoxygenic phototrophs, sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRBs), and SAR406 in the monimolimnion. Denitrifier nitrite reductase (nirS) genes were also detected alongside high abundances (>106 ml-1) of dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrA) genes from SRBs in the monimolimnion. Sharp changes in community structure were linked to environmental gradients (constrained variation in redundancy analysis=76%) and deterministic processes dominated community assembly at all depths (nearest taxon index values >4). These results indicate that oxygen is a strong, deterministic driver of microbial community assembly. We also observed enhanced N- and C-cycling rates along the transition from hypoxic to anoxic to sulfidic conditions, suggesting that microbial communities form a positive feedback loop that may accelerate deoxygenation and OMZ expansion.

  18. [Light-induced oxygen uptake by chromatophores and subchromatophore pigment-protein complexes of Rhodospirillum rubrum].

    PubMed

    Remennikov, V G; Samuilov, V D

    1977-11-01

    Chromatophores of R. rubrum incubated with electron donors, e. g. reduced diaminodurene, TMPD, phenazine methosulphate, cytochrome c or ferrocyanide, are able to catalyze O2 uptake upon illumination. This process is inhibited by o-phenanthroline as well as upon extraction of quinones from chromatophores, but not by antimycin A, rotenone or CN-. The O2 uptake sensitive to the action of o-phenanthroline is also observed in the illuminated subchromatophore P870 reaction center complexes and reaction center plus light-harvesting antenna complexes incubated with electron donors, quinones and detergents. The data obtained are in agreement with a suggestion that the photooxidase activity of chromatophores and subchromatophore pigment-protein complexes is due to the interaction of photoreduced ubiquinone with O2.

  19. The Effect of 30% Oxygen on Visuospatial Performance and Brain Activation: An Fmri Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, S.C.; Tack, G.R.; Lee, B.; Eom, G.M.; Lee, S.Y.; Sohn, J.H.

    2004-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the hypothesis that administration of the air with 30% oxygen compared with normal air (21% oxygen) enhances cognitive functioning through increased activation in the brain. A visuospatial task was presented while brain images were scanned by a 3 T fMRI system. The results showed that there was an improvement in…

  20. The Effect of 30% Oxygen on Visuospatial Performance and Brain Activation: An Fmri Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, S.C.; Tack, G.R.; Lee, B.; Eom, G.M.; Lee, S.Y.; Sohn, J.H.

    2004-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the hypothesis that administration of the air with 30% oxygen compared with normal air (21% oxygen) enhances cognitive functioning through increased activation in the brain. A visuospatial task was presented while brain images were scanned by a 3 T fMRI system. The results showed that there was an improvement in…

  1. Evolution of oxygen secretion in fishes and the emergence of a complex physiological system.

    PubMed

    Berenbrink, Michael; Koldkjaer, Pia; Kepp, Oliver; Cossins, Andrew R

    2005-03-18

    We have reconstructed the events that led to the evolution of a key physiological innovation underpinning the large adaptive radiation of fishes, namely their unique ability to secrete molecular oxygen (O2). We show that O2 secretion into the swimbladder evolved some 100 million years after another O2-secreting system in the eye. We unravel the likely sequence in which the functional components of both systems evolved. These components include ocular and swimbladder countercurrent exchangers, the Bohr and Root effects, the buffering power and surface histidine content of hemoglobins, and red blood cell Na+/H+ exchange activity. Our synthesis reveals the dynamics of gains and losses of these multiple traits over time, accounting for part of the huge diversity of form and function in living fishes.

  2. Oxygen isotopic variability associated with multiple stages of serpentinization, Duke Island Complex, southeastern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakurta, Joyashish; Ripley, Edward M.; Li, Chusi

    2009-10-01

    Ultramafic rocks of the Duke Island Complex in southeastern Alaska crystallized in a supra-subduction zone setting, but the serpentinization of olivine-bearing rocks involved the incursion of late-stage meteoric waters. Three textural types of serpentine (primarily lizardite) have been identified which in part reflect progress in reactions during multiple stages of fluid infiltration. The overall mesh texture of serpentine has been subdivided into a massive-type, found in dunites and wehrlites, and a dendritic-type found in wehrlites and olivine clinopyroxenites. Serpentine veins represent a late-stage in the hydrothermal alteration process. Both FeO contents and δ 18O values of the three textural types of serpentine are variable at the centimeter scale. Magnetite abundance in association with serpentine is also variable with up to 5 vol% of magnetite found in samples with dendritic serpentine. Continued reaction of FeO-bearing serpentine with fluid appears to control the formation of most magnetite. Oxygen isotope ratios of the three textural types of serpentine are distinct, with the massive variety characterized by δ 18O values between -3‰ and 3‰, the dendritic variety showing values between 2‰ and 6‰ and the veins having the highest values between 4‰ and 10‰. Although the δ 18O values may vary by as much as 5‰ on the centimeter scale, δ D values tend to show relatively less variation with over 90% of the measured values between -100‰ and -120‰. The O and H isotopic values are consistent with the involvement of meteoric water that had undergone variable degrees of isotopic exchange with country rocks prior to reacting with olivine in the Duke Island Complex. Small-scale variability in both serpentine FeO content and δ 18O values suggests that chemical and isotopic equilibria may have not been attained at larger than centimeter scales. Oxygen isotopic variability in serpentine produced during relatively low-temperature hydrothermal

  3. Design of high pressure oxygen filter for extravehicular activity life support system, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    The experience of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) with extravehicular activity life support emergency oxygen supply subsystems has shown a large number of problems associated with particulate contamination. These problems have resulted in failures of high pressure oxygen component sealing surfaces. A high pressure oxygen filter was designed which would (a) control the particulate contamination level in the oxygen system to a five-micron glass bead rating, ten-micron absolute condition (b) withstand the dynamic shock condition resulting from the sudden opening of 8000 psi oxygen system shutoff valve. Results of the following program tasks are reported: (1) contaminant source identification tests, (2) dynamic system tests, (3) high pressure oxygen filter concept evaluation, (4) design, (5) fabrication, (6) test, and (7) application demonstration.

  4. High selective antileishmanial activity of vanadium complex with stilbene derivative.

    PubMed

    Machado, Patrícia de Almeida; Mota, Vinícius Zamprogno; Cavalli, Ana Clara de Lima; de Carvalho, Gustavo Senra Gonçalves; Da Silva, Adilson David; Gameiro, Jacy; Cuin, Alexandre; Coimbra, Elaine Soares

    2015-08-01

    Leishmaniasis is a group of disease caused by different species of the parasite Leishmania affecting millions of people worldwide. Conventional therapy relies on multiple parenteral injections with pentavalent antimonials which exhibit high toxicity and various side effects have been reported. Hence, the research for an effective and low toxic effect drug is necessary. In the present work, the synthesis, spectroscopic and analytical characterizations of stilbene derivative (H2Salophen) and its vanadium complex (VOSalophen) are reported. Besides the chemical ancillary information, investigation of the leishmanicidal effects of these compounds were provided. The biological assays against promastigote and amastigote forms of L. amazonensis have been shown that VOSalophen exhibited a strong antiparasitic activity (IC50 of 6.65 and 3.51 μM, respectively). Furthermore, the leishmanicidal activity was concentration and time-dependent. Regarding toxicity and selectivity on mammalian cells, VOSalophen have not caused significant damage to human erythrocytes in all concentrations tested and VOSalophen was almost seven times more destructive for the intracellular parasite than for macrophages. Furthermore, the leishmanicidal activity of VOSalophen in promastigote forms of L. amazonensis could be associated to mitochondrial dysfunction and increase of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. In L. amazonensis-infected macrophages, VOSalophen induces ROS production and a microbicidal action NO-dependent. Our biological results indicate the effective and selective action of VOSalophen against L. amazonensis and the leishmanicidal effect can be associated to parasite disorders and immumodulatory effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A Natural Component-Based Oxygen Indicator with In-Pack Activation for Intelligent Food Packaging.

    PubMed

    Won, Keehoon; Jang, Nan Young; Jeon, Junsu

    2016-12-28

    Intelligent food packaging can provide consumers with reliable and correct information on the quality and safety of packaged foods. One of the key constituents in intelligent packaging is a colorimetric oxygen indicator, which is widely used to detect oxygen gas involved in food spoilage by means of a color change. Traditional oxygen indicators consisting of redox dyes and strong reducing agents have two major problems: they must be manufactured and stored under anaerobic conditions because air depletes the reductant, and their components are synthetic and toxic. To address both of these serious problems, we have developed a natural component-based oxygen indicator characterized by in-pack activation. The conventional oxygen indicator composed of synthetic and artificial components was redesigned using naturally occurring compounds (laccase, guaiacol, and cysteine). These natural components were physically separated into two compartments by a fragile barrier. Only when the barrier was broken were all of the components mixed and the function as an oxygen indicator was begun (i.e., in-pack activation). Depending on the component concentrations, the natural component-based oxygen indicator exhibited different response times and color differences. The rate of the color change was proportional to the oxygen concentration. This novel colorimetric oxygen indicator will contribute greatly to intelligent packaging for healthier and safer foods.

  6. Ab-initio calculation study on the formation mechanism of boron-oxygen complexes in c-Si

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xuegong; Chen, Peng; Chen, Xianzi; Liu, Yong; Yang, Deren

    2015-07-15

    Boron-oxygen (B-O) complex in crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells is responsible for the light-induced efficiency degradation of solar cell. However, the formation mechanism of B-O complex is not clear yet. By Ab-initio calculation, it is found that the stagger-type oxygen dimer (O{sub 2i}{sup st}) should be the component of B-O complex, whose movement occurs through its structure reconfiguration at low temperature, instead of its long-distance diffusion. The O{sub 2i}{sup st} can form two stable “latent centers” with the B{sub s}, which are recombination-inactive. The latent centers can be evolved into the metastable recombination centers via their structure transformation in the presence of excess carriers. These results can well explain the formation behaviors of B-O complexes in c-Si.

  7. Catalytic Activity of Human Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase (hIDO1) at Low Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Kolawole, Ayodele O.; Hixon, Brian P.; Dameron, Laura S.; Chrisman, Ian M.; Smirnov, Valeriy V.

    2015-01-01

    A cytokine-inducible extrahepatic human indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (hIDO1) catalyzes the first step of the kynurenine pathway. Immunosuppressive activity of hIDO1 in tumor cells weakens host T-cell immunity, contributing to the progression of cancer. Here we report on enzyme kinetics and catalytic mechanism of hIDO1, studied at varied levels of dioxygen (O2) and L-tryptophan (L-Trp). Using a cytochrome b5-based activating system, we measured the initial rates of O2 decay with a Clark-type oxygen electrode at physiologically-relevant levels of both substrates. Kinetics was also studied in the presence of two substrate analogs: 1-methyl-L-tryptophan and norharmane. Quantitative analysis supports a steady-state rather than a rapid equilibrium kinetic mechanism, where the rates of individual pathways, leading to a ternary complex, are significantly different, and the overall rate of catalysis depends on contributions of both routes. One path, where O2 binds to ferrous hIDO1 first, is faster than the second route, which starts with the binding of L-Trp. However, L-Trp complexation with free ferrous hIDO1 is more rapid than that of O2. As the level of L-Trp increases, the slower route becomes a significant contributor to the overall rate, resulting in observed substrate inhibition. PMID:25712221

  8. A Method to Perform Direct Oxygen Analysis on Lunar Simulants and Other Complex Oxide Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santiago-Maldonado, Edgardo

    2007-01-01

    An essential requirement for making space travel and long term missions more efficient and affordable to NASA includes finding innovative ways to supply oxygen for life support and propulsion. In this experiment, carrier gas hot extraction was investigated as a possible method for measuring the oxygen from samples of lunar soil simulants before and after oxygen extraction. The determination of oxygen using the R0600 Oxygen Determinator is usually limited to oxides with low oxygen concentrations, but after the manipulation of certain furnace operating parameters such as analysis time and ramp rate, the R0600 was used to determine the oxygen content of high concentration oxides such as Fe 2O3 , Al2O3 , and SiO2.

  9. Anticancer Activity of Metal Complexes: Involvement of Redox Processes

    PubMed Central

    Jungwirth, Ute; Kowol, Christian R.; Keppler, Bernhard K.; Hartinger, Christian G.; Berger, Walter; Heffeter, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Cells require tight regulation of the intracellular redox balance and consequently of reactive oxygen species for proper redox signaling and maintenance of metal (e.g., of iron and copper) homeostasis. In several diseases, including cancer, this balance is disturbed. Therefore, anticancer drugs targeting the redox systems, for example, glutathione and thioredoxin, have entered focus of interest. Anticancer metal complexes (platinum, gold, arsenic, ruthenium, rhodium, copper, vanadium, cobalt, manganese, gadolinium, and molybdenum) have been shown to strongly interact with or even disturb cellular redox homeostasis. In this context, especially the hypothesis of “activation by reduction” as well as the “hard and soft acids and bases” theory with respect to coordination of metal ions to cellular ligands represent important concepts to understand the molecular modes of action of anticancer metal drugs. The aim of this review is to highlight specific interactions of metal-based anticancer drugs with the cellular redox homeostasis and to explain this behavior by considering chemical properties of the respective anticancer metal complexes currently either in (pre)clinical development or in daily clinical routine in oncology. PMID:21275772

  10. Luminescent sensing of dissolved oxygen based on Ru(II) complex embedded in sol-gel matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Yubing; Tao, Wei; Hu, Yanli; Mao, Yimei; Zhao, Hui

    2015-11-01

    In biological cells and tissues environment, real-time monitoring and controlling dissolved oxygen (DO) provides critical information for studying cellular metabolism process, health status and pathological features. This paper developed an optical DO sensor based on fluorescence quenching principle, prepared tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10- phenanthroline)ruthenium(II) dichloride complex sol-gel sensing film, and studied its sensing performance. The principle of this sensor is that dissolved oxygen has quenching effect towards the fluorescence emitted by ruthenium complex. So the fluorescence intensity is reduced due to the existence of DO. The measurement limit of DO was 10- 100%, the response time was 20s, and the resolution was 0.02. Compared to traditional dissolved oxygen electrode probe, this luminescent fiber had many advantages, such as smaller size, shorter response time and higher stability.

  11. Effects of carbohydrate on the internal oxygen concentration, oxygen uptake, and nitrogenase activity in detached pea nodules

    SciTech Connect

    Monroe, J.D. ); LaRue, T.A. )

    1989-10-01

    The interaction between carbon substrates and O{sub 2} and their effects on nitrogenase activity (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) were examined in detached nodules of pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Sparkle). The internal O{sub 2} concentration was estimated from the fractional oxygenation of leghemoglobin measured by reflectance spectroscopy. Lowering the endogenous carbohydrate content of nodules by excising the shoots 16 hours before nodule harvest or by incubating detached nodules at 100 kPa O{sub 2} for 2 hours resulted in a 2- to 10-fold increase in internal O{sub 2}, and a decline in nitrogenase activity. Conversely, when detached nodules were supplied with 100 millimolar succinate, the internal O{sub 2} was lowered. Nitrogenase activity was stimulated by succinate but only at high external O{sub 2}. Oxygen uptake increased linearly with external O{sub 2} but was affected only slightly by the carbon treatments. The apparent diffusion resistance in the nodule cortex was similar in all of the treatments. Carbon substrates can thus affect nitrogenase activity indirectly by affecting the O{sub 2} concentration within detached nodules.

  12. The Complex Relationship of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation and Acute Kidney Injury: Causation or Association?

    PubMed Central

    Kilburn, Daniel J.; Shekar, Kiran; Fraser, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a modified cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) circuit capable of providing prolonged cardiorespiratory support. Recent advancement in ECMO technology has resulted in increased utilisation and clinical application. It can be used as a bridge-to-recovery, bridge-to-bridge, bridge-to-transplant, or bridge-to-decision. ECMO can restitute physiology in critically ill patients, which may minimise the risk of progressive multiorgan dysfunction. Alternatively, iatrogenic complications of ECMO clearly contribute to worse outcomes. These factors affect the risk : benefit ratio of ECMO which ultimately influence commencement/timing of ECMO. The complex interplay of pre-ECMO, ECMO, and post-ECMO pathophysiological processes are responsible for the substantial increased incidence of ECMO-associated acute kidney injury (EAKI). The development of EAKI significantly contributes to morbidity and mortality; however, there is a lack of evidence defining a potential benefit or causative link between ECMO and AKI. This area warrants investigation as further research will delineate the mechanisms involved and subsequent strategies to minimise the risk of EAKI. This review summarizes the current literature of ECMO and AKI, considers the possible benefits and risks of ECMO on renal function, outlines the related pathophysiology, highlights relevant investigative tools, and ultimately suggests an approach for future research into this under investigated area of critical care. PMID:27006941

  13. Radiation Damage in XFEL: Case study from the oxygen-evolving complex of Photosystem II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Muhamed; Badawi, Ashraf; Obayya, S. S.

    2016-11-01

    Structural changes induced by radiation damage in X-ray crystallography hinder the ability to understand the structure/function relationship in chemical reactions. Serial femtosecond crystallography overcomes this problem by exposing the sample to very short and intense laser pulse leading to measurement before destruction. Here we use molecular modeling to map the radiation damage during the 10–50 fs to the intensity, the energy and the time duration of the laser pulse on the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II. In the model, the nuclei move classically in a fully quantum potential created by electron density under the effect of strong laser pulse in the Ehrenfest dynamics regime. The results show that the Mn-Mn and Mn-Ca distances are less affected by radiation damage due to the their heavy masses, while one μ-oxo bridge (O5) moves significantly. The radiation damage may induce conformational changes of the water ligands but only bond elongation for the amino acids ligands. These effects are relatively intensity independent from 1016 to 1017 W/cm2, but changes increase dramatically if the beam intensity is increased to 1018 W/cm2. In addition, the self amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) nature of the laser beam does not affect the dynamics of the ions.

  14. A green-emitting Cu complex for oxygen-sensing purpose: Synthesis, characterization and photophysical features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Han; Wei, Li; Zhentao, Liu; Xiangen, Han

    2015-05-01

    In the present work, a green-emitting Cu(I) complex [Cu(BT-Et)(POP)]BF4 was synthesized and fully characterized, where BT-Et = 4-(1-ethyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)thiazole, POP = bis(2-(diphenylphosphanyl)phenyl) ether, respectively. An ethyl group was connected onto the diamine ligand to breach π-π attraction within solid [Cu(BT-Et)(POP)]BF4, favoring O2 molecule attack and sensitivity improvement. Its molecular identity was confirmed by single crystal analysis and theoretical calculation. [Cu(BT-Et)(POP)]BF4 emitted long-lived green emission peaking at 521 nm upon photoexcitation which was vulnerable towards O2 molecule, making itself a potential oxygen sensing material. [Cu(BT-Et)(POP)]BF4 was then doped into a silica supporting matrix MCM-41. The resulting composite samples showed sensing behavior towards O2 molecule, with short response time of 10 s and sensitivity of 5.56.

  15. Radiation Damage in XFEL: Case study from the oxygen-evolving complex of Photosystem II

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Muhamed; Badawi, Ashraf; Obayya, S. S.

    2016-01-01

    Structural changes induced by radiation damage in X-ray crystallography hinder the ability to understand the structure/function relationship in chemical reactions. Serial femtosecond crystallography overcomes this problem by exposing the sample to very short and intense laser pulse leading to measurement before destruction. Here we use molecular modeling to map the radiation damage during the 10–50 fs to the intensity, the energy and the time duration of the laser pulse on the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II. In the model, the nuclei move classically in a fully quantum potential created by electron density under the effect of strong laser pulse in the Ehrenfest dynamics regime. The results show that the Mn-Mn and Mn-Ca distances are less affected by radiation damage due to the their heavy masses, while one μ-oxo bridge (O5) moves significantly. The radiation damage may induce conformational changes of the water ligands but only bond elongation for the amino acids ligands. These effects are relatively intensity independent from 1016 to 1017 W/cm2, but changes increase dramatically if the beam intensity is increased to 1018 W/cm2. In addition, the self amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) nature of the laser beam does not affect the dynamics of the ions. PMID:27827423

  16. Kinetics of the electronically stimulated formation of a boron-oxygen complex in crystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, Derek W.; Bothe, Karsten; Schmidt, Jan

    2007-07-15

    We present experimental data relating to the slow stage of the illumination-induced or electron-injection-induced generation, in crystalline p-type silicon, of the carrier-recombination center believed to be the defect complex (B{sub s}O{sub 2i}){sup +} formed by diffusion of oxygen interstitial dimers O{sub 2i}{sup ++} to substitutional boron atoms B{sub s}{sup -} and, taking account of those data, we consider a detailed theoretical model for the kinetics of the diffusion reaction. The model proposes that the generation rate of the (B{sub s}O{sub 2i}){sup +} defects is controlled by the capture of a majority-carrier hole by the dimer following the capture of a minority-carrier electron and by the Coulomb attraction of the O{sub 2i}{sup ++} to the B{sub s}{sup -} atom, and leads to predictions for the defect generation rate that are in excellent quantitative agreement with experiment.

  17. Ab initio Calculation of The Magnetic Properties of Oxygen Impurity Complexes in CdSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, W.; Liu, L.; Yu, P. Y.

    2017-06-01

    We have investigated the magnetic dipole moments of interstitial oxygen molecules (O2) and their interactions in CdSe by using spin-dependent first-principle calculations based on the local density functional (DFT) theory. We constructed supercells of Cd64Se64 by repeating the primitive cell Cd2Se2 4×4×2 times. Then an O2 molecule aligned along c-axis was added to the center of the CdSe cage. The charge densities of the complexes were then computed for both spin-up and spin-down electrons. Their difference indicates that O2 molecule in CdSe is paramagnetic, although its magnetic dipole moment is lower than that in free space. Two such O2 molecules were then placed either (a) parallel to each other in side-by-side supercells or (b) in neighboring supercells on top of each other. The computed energies of the resultant magnetic structures suggest that the two O2 magnetic moments interact anti-ferromagnetically in case (a) but do not interact in (b).

  18. Oxygen atom transfer reactions from Mimoun complexes to sulfides and sulfoxides. A bonding evolution theory analysis.

    PubMed

    González-Navarrete, Patricio; Sensato, Fabricio R; Andrés, Juan; Longo, Elson

    2014-08-07

    In this research, a comprehensive theoretical investigation has been conducted on oxygen atom transfer (OAT) reactions from Mimoun complexes to sulfides and sulfoxides. The joint use of the electron localization function (ELF) and Thom's catastrophe theory (CT) provides a powerful tool to analyze the evolution of chemical events along a reaction pathway. The progress of the reaction has been monitored by structural stability domains from ELF topology while the changes between them are controlled by turning points derived from CT which reveal that the reaction mechanism can be separated in several steps: first, a rupture of the peroxo O1-O2 bond, then a rearrangement of lone pairs of the sulfur atom occurs and subsequently the formation of S-O1 bond. The OAT process involving the oxidation of sulfides and sulfoxides is found to be an asynchronous process where O1-O2 bond breaking and S-O1 bond formation processes do not occur simultaneously. Nucleophilic/electrophilic characters of both dimethyl sulfide and dimethyl sulfoxide, respectively, are sufficiently described by our results, which hold the key to unprecedented insight into the mapping of electrons that compose the bonds while the bonds change.

  19. [Kinetic modeling of energy metabolism and generation of active forms of oxygen in hepatocyte mitochondria].

    PubMed

    Demin, O V; Gorianin, I I; Kholodenko, B N; Westerhoff, H V

    2001-01-01

    Direct nonenzymatic oxidation of semiquinone by oxygen is one of the main sources of superoxide radicals (O2.-) in mitochondria. By using all the known data on hepatocyte mitochondria, we have revealed the correlation between the rate of superoxide generation by the bc1 complex and the transmembrane potential (delta psi). If the main electrogenic stage of the Q cycle is suggested to be the electron transfer between the cytochrome b hemes, then the rate of superoxide generation sharply increases when delta psi grows from 150 mV to 180 mV. However, this interrelation is ambiguous. Indeed, the increase of the generation rate with the growth of the potential can occur faster when succinate dehydrogenase is inhibited by malonate than when external ADP is exhausted. When the potential is changed by adding phosphate or potassium (K+), the rate of O2.- production remains constant, although the comparison of the rate values at the same delta psi reveals the effect of phosphate or potassium. It turned out that the rate of O2.- generation is a function of delta mu H rather than any of its components. Phosphate and K+ have practically no influence on delta mu H, since the change in delta psi is compensated by delta pH. The rate of superoxide generation by the bc1 complex is a multiple function of the electron-transfer activity of enzymes, the processes determining the membrane potential (e.g., loading), and of the oxygen concentration. The kinetic model proposed in this work may serve a tool to understand how the superoxide production is regulated.

  20. Bio-affinity of copper(II) complexes with nitrogen and oxygen donor ligands: Synthesis, structural studies and in vitro DNA and HSA interaction of copper(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Jain, Surbhi; Khan, Tanveer A; Patil, Yogesh P; Pagariya, Darshana; Kishore, Nand; Tapryal, Suman; Naik, Anil D; Naik, Sunil G

    2017-09-01

    Reported herein the binding affinity between Human Serum Albumin and the DNA binding and cleavage activity of three copper(II) complexes, [Cu(phen)(o-van)ClO4] (1), [Cu(phen)(gly)]ClO4 (2) and [Cu(L(1))2(H2O)2] (3) wherein 1 and 2 are synthesized with 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) and co-ligands (o-van: o-vanillin; gly: glycine) and 3 with a ligand 2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylidene-4H-1,2,4-triazol-4-amine (H1L(1)). Complex 2 crystallizes in monoclinic (P21/n) space group shows square pyramidal geometry. The complex 3 crystallizes in monoclinic (P21/a) space group. All the three complexes exhibit binding affinity towards the transport protein Human Serum albumin (HSA). Quantitative evaluation of the thermodynamics of interaction and the results obtained from fluorescence spectroscopy suggest that metal coordinated glycynate, o-vanillin and perchlorate groups have a major role to play in the binding process, the latter two being stronger in the binding of complex 1. The coordinated water in complex 3 also plays an important role in the binding, which makes binding of complex 3 with HSA stronger than that of complex 2. Experimental results indicate that the binding affinity of the complexes towards CT-DNA is in the order 1>3>2 implying that complex 1 binds stronger than complex 3 and 2.The DNA cleaving activity of all the three complexes was explored in the presence of reactive oxygen compound, H2O2. All the three complexes have primarily shown the DNA cleaving activity. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Charge separation promoted activation of molecular oxygen by neutral gold clusters.

    PubMed

    Woodham, Alex P; Meijer, Gerard; Fielicke, André

    2013-02-06

    Gold nanoparticles and sub-nanoparticles famously act as highly efficient and selective low-temperature oxidation catalysts with molecular oxygen, in stark contrast to the nobility of the bulk phase. The origins of this activity and the nature of the active species remain open questions. Gas-phase studies of isolated gold clusters hold promise for disentangling these problems. Here we address the interaction of neutral gold clusters (Au(n); 4 ≤ n ≤ 21) with molecular oxygen by probing the highly characteristic O-O vibrational stretch frequencies. This reveals that for selected cluster sizes the oxygen is highly activated with respect to the free moiety. Complementary quantum chemical calculations provide evidence for substantial electron transfer to the O(2) unit and concomitant rearrangement of the parent gold cluster structure upon binding and activation. This gives evidence for a model of the interaction between neutral gold clusters and molecular oxygen.

  2. Formation of a ruthenium(IV)-oxo complex by electron-transfer oxidation of a coordinatively saturated ruthenium(II) complex and detection of oxygen-rebound intermediates in C-H bond oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Takahiko; Nakayama, Kazuya; Ikemura, Kenichiro; Ogura, Takashi; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2011-08-03

    A coordinatively saturated ruthenium(II) complex having tetradentate tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine (TPA) and bidentate 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy), [Ru(TPA)(bpy)](2+) (1), was oxidized by a Ce(IV) ion in H(2)O to afford a Ru(IV)-oxo complex, [Ru(O)(H(+)TPA)(bpy)](3+) (2). The crystal structure of the Ru(IV)-oxo complex 2 was determined by X-ray crystallography. In 2, the TPA ligand partially dissociates to be in a facial tridentate fashion and the uncoordinated pyridine moiety is protonated. The spin state of 2, which showed paramagnetically shifted NMR signals in the range of 60 to -20 ppm, was determined to be an intermediate spin (S = 1) by the Evans' method with (1)H NMR spectroscopy in acetone-d(6). The reaction of 2 with various oraganic substrates in acetonitrile at room temperature afforded oxidized and oxygenated products and a solvent-bound complex, [Ru(H(+)TPA)(bpy)(CH(3)CN)], which is intact in the presence of alcohols. The oxygenation reaction of saturated C-H bonds with 2 proceeds by two-step processes: the hydrogen abstraction with 2, followed by the dissociation of the alcohol products from the oxygen-rebound complexes, Ru(III)-alkoxo complexes, which were successfully detected by ESI-MS spectrometry. The kinetic isotope effects in the first step for the reaction of dihydroanthrathene (DHA) and cumene with 2 were determined to be 49 and 12, respectively. The second-order rate constants of C-H oxygenation in the first step exhibited a linear correlation with bond dissociation energies of the C-H bond cleavage.

  3. Redox-inactive metal ions promoted the catalytic reactivity of non-heme manganese complexes towards oxygen atom transfer.

    PubMed

    Choe, Cholho; Yang, Ling; Lv, Zhanao; Mo, Wanling; Chen, Zhuqi; Li, Guangxin; Yin, Guochuan

    2015-05-21

    Redox-inactive metal ions can modulate the reactivity of redox-active metal ions in a variety of biological and chemical oxidations. Many synthetic models have been developed to help address the elusive roles of these redox-inactive metal ions. Using a non-heme manganese(II) complex as the model, the influence of redox-inactive metal ions as a Lewis acid on its catalytic efficiency in oxygen atom transfer was investigated. In the absence of redox-inactive metal ions, the manganese(II) catalyst is very sluggish, for example, in cyclooctene epoxidation, providing only 9.9% conversion with 4.1% yield of epoxide. However, addition of 2 equiv. of Al(3+) to the manganese(II) catalyst sharply improves the epoxidation, providing up to 97.8% conversion with 91.4% yield of epoxide. EPR studies of the manganese(II) catalyst in the presence of an oxidant reveal a 16-line hyperfine structure centered at g = 2.0, clearly indicating the formation of a mixed valent di-μ-oxo-bridged diamond core, Mn(III)-(μ-O)2-Mn(IV). The presence of a Lewis acid like Al(3+) causes the dissociation of this diamond Mn(III)-(μ-O)2-Mn(IV) core to form monomeric manganese(iv) species which is responsible for improved epoxidation efficiency. This promotional effect has also been observed in other manganese complexes bearing various non-heme ligands. The findings presented here have provided a promising strategy to explore the catalytic reactivity of some di-μ-oxo-bridged complexes by adding non-redox metal ions to in situ dissociate those dimeric cores and may also provide clues to understand the mechanism of methane monooxygenase which has a similar diiron diamond core as the intermediate.

  4. Monitoring of singlet oxygen luminescence and mitochondrial autofluorescence after illumination of hypericin/mitochondria complex: a time-resolved study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrovajova, D.; Jancura, D.; Miskovsky, P.; Chorvat, D., Jr.; Chorvatova, A.; Ragas, X.; Garcia-Diaz, M.; Nonell, S.; Nadova, Z.

    2013-07-01

    A study of hypericin (Hyp) interaction with mitochondria isolated from U-87 MG glioma cells as well as the time-resolved measurement of singlet oxygen (1O2) formation and annihilation after illumination of the Hyp/mitochondria complex is presented in this work. Interaction between Hyp and mitochondria was studied by steady-state and time-resolved UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. A high concentration of Hyp leads to the aggregation of this compound inside the mitochondria and the relative population of the monomeric (biologically active) form of Hyp decreases concomitantly to approximately 10% at the highest used Hyp bulk concentration. Photosensitized production of 1O2 in mitochondria after illumination of the Hyp/mitochondria complex is characterized by a rise lifetime of ˜8 μs and shows saturation behaviour with respect to Hyp concentration. The lifetime of 1O2 depends on the composition of the medium where the mitochondria are suspended, ranging from about 3.0 μs in pure water to 26 μs in H2O-D2O (1:9) phosphate buffer. Our results confirm that only the monomeric form of Hyp is able to produce its excited triplet state, which consequently leads to 1O2 production. An influence of photoactivated Hyp on the mitochondria respiration chain was evaluated by the monitoring of time-resolved NAD(P)H fluorescence. We have demonstrated the rise of the NAD(P)H content after illumination of the Hyp/mitochondria complex.

  5. Reactive oxygen scavenging activity of matured whiskey and its active polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Koga, K; Taguchi, A; Koshimizu, S; Suwa, Y; Yamada, Y; Shirasaka, N; Yoshizumi, H

    2007-04-01

    The quality of whiskey is known to improve remarkably by its storage over many years. This process is commonly termed "maturing." In this process, polyphenols derived from lignin and tannin of the barrel have an important role in not only forming the matured flavor and taste but also contributing to the advance of clustering ethanol and water in whiskey. It is also likely that polyphenols generally possess reactive oxygen (RO) scavenging activity. The present study evaluated the RO scavenging activity (free-radical scavenging activity, H(2)O(2) reduction activity under peroxidase coculture, and H(2)O(2)scavenging activity) of 24 single malt whiskeys with a maturation age of 10 to 30 y produced in Japanese, Scotch (Islay), or Scotch (Speyside and Highland) regions. Single malt whiskey not only showed RO scavenging activity but there was also a positive correlation between this activity and the maturation age of whiskey exceeding the difference resulting from the manufacturing region. A nonvolatile fraction derived from the barrel was responsible for RO scavenging activity. In particular, the contents of ellagic and gallic acids and lyoniresinol, the main polyphenolic compounds in whiskey, increased with maturation age. For the free-radical scavenging activity per molecule, each compound was 1.68 to 3.14 times that of trolox (a water-soluble vitamin E). The activities of ellagic acid, gallic acid, and lyoniresinol in the whiskey (Yamazaki 18) were equivalent to that of 80.3, 31.2, and 11.1 ppm trolox, respectively. Accordingly, the total activity of these 3 compounds accounted for about 20% of the activity of the whiskey (630.7 ppm trolox).

  6. Iridium Oxide Coatings with Templated Porosity as Highly Active Oxygen Evolution Catalysts: Structure-Activity Relationships.

    PubMed

    Bernicke, Michael; Ortel, Erik; Reier, Tobias; Bergmann, Arno; Ferreira de Araujo, Jorge; Strasser, Peter; Kraehnert, Ralph

    2015-06-08

    Iridium oxide is the catalytic material with the highest stability in the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) performed under acidic conditions. However, its high cost and limited availability demand that IrO2 is utilized as efficiently as possible. We report the synthesis and OER performance of highly active mesoporous IrO2 catalysts with optimized surface area, intrinsic activity, and pore accessibility. Catalytic layers with controlled pore size were obtained by soft-templating with micelles formed from amphiphilic block copolymers poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(butadiene)-b-poly(ethylene oxide). A systematic study on the influence of the calcination temperature and film thickness on the morphology, phase composition, accessible surface area, and OER activity reveals that the catalytic performance is controlled by at least two independent factors, that is, accessible surface area and intrinsic activity per accessible site. Catalysts with lower crystallinity show higher intrinsic activity. The catalyst surface area increases linearly with film thickness. As a result of the templated mesopores, the pore surface remains fully active and accessible even for thick IrO2 films. Even the most active multilayer catalyst does not show signs of transport limitations at current densities as high as 75 mA cm(-2) . © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Olefin epoxidation by alkyl hydroperoxide with a novel cross-bridged cyclam manganese complex: demonstration of oxygenation by two distinct reactive intermediates.

    PubMed

    Yin, Guochuan; Danby, Andrew M; Kitko, David; Carter, John D; Scheper, William M; Busch, Daryle H

    2007-03-19

    Olefin epoxidation provides an operative protocol to investigate the oxygen transfer process in nature. A novel manganese complex with a cross-bridged cyclam ligand, MnIV(Me2EBC)(OH)2(2+) (Me2EBC = 4,11-dimethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazabicyclo[6.6.2]hexadecane), was used to study the epoxidation mechanism with biologically important oxidants, alkyl hydroperoxides. Results from direct reaction of the freshly synthesized manganese(IV) complex, [Mn(Me2EBC)(OH)2](PF6)2, with various olefins in neutral or basic solution, and from catalytic epoxidation with oxygen-labeled solvent, H2 18O, eliminate the manganese oxo moiety, Mn(IV)=O, as the reactive intermediate and obviate an oxygen rebound mechanism. Epoxidations of norbornylene under different conditions indicate multiple mechanisms for epoxidation, and cis-stilbene epoxidation under atmospheric 18O2 reveals a product distribution indicating at least two distinctive intermediates serving as the reactive species for epoxidation. In addition to alkyl peroxide radicals as dominant intermediates, an alkyl hydroperoxide adduct of high oxidation state manganese(IV) is suggested as the third kind of active intermediate responsible for epoxidation. This third intermediate functions by the Lewis acid pathway, a process best known for hydrogen peroxide adducts. Furthermore, the tert-butyl peroxide adduct of this manganese(IV) complex was detected by mass spectroscopy under catalytic oxidation conditions.

  8. Effect of oxygen on the microbial activities of thermophilic anaerobic biomass.

    PubMed

    Pedizzi, C; Regueiro, L; Rodriguez-Verde, I; Lema, J M; Carballa, M

    2016-07-01

    Low oxygen levels (μgO2L(-1)) in anaerobic reactors are quite common and no relevant consequences are expected. On the contrary, higher concentrations could affect the process. This work aimed to study the influence of oxygen (4.3 and 8.8mgO2L(-1), respectively) on the different microbial activities (hydrolytic, acidogenic and methanogenic) of thermophilic anaerobic biomass and on the methanogenic community structure. Batch tests in presence of oxygen were conducted using specific substrates for each biological activity and a blank (with minimum oxygen) was included. No effect of oxygen was observed on the hydrolytic and acidogenic activities. In contrast, the methane production rate decreased by 40% in all oxygenated batches and the development of active archaeal community was slower in presence of 8.8mgO2L(-1). However, despite this sensitivity of methanogens to oxygen at saturation levels, the inhibition was reversible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Study of oxygen scavenging PET-based films activated by water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Gabriella; Scarfato, Paola; Incarnato, Loredana

    2016-05-01

    In this work an active barrier system consisting of a thin and transparent film based on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) was studied. Dynamic oxygen absorption measurements were performed at different values of relative humidity and temperature, pointing out that humidity is a key factor in activating the oxidation of the polymer sample. Moreover, the thermal and optical properties of the films were investigated and a good correlation was found between the crystallinity increase and the consequent transparency reduction occurring after the oxygen absorption.

  10. Study of oxygen scavenging PET-based films activated by water

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Gabriella; Scarfato, Paola; Incarnato, Loredana

    2016-05-18

    In this work an active barrier system consisting of a thin and transparent film based on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) was studied. Dynamic oxygen absorption measurements were performed at different values of relative humidity and temperature, pointing out that humidity is a key factor in activating the oxidation of the polymer sample. Moreover, the thermal and optical properties of the films were investigated and a good correlation was found between the crystallinity increase and the consequent transparency reduction occurring after the oxygen absorption.

  11. Oxygen requirements for formation and activity of the squalene expoxidase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, L.; Klein, H. P.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of oxygen on squalene epoxidase activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated. In cells grown in standing cultures, the epoxidase was localized mainly in the 'mitochondrial' fraction. Upon aeration, enzyme activity increased and the newly formed enzyme was associated with the 'microsomal' fraction. At 0.03 percent (vol/vol) oxygen, epoxidase levels doubled, whereas the ergosterol level was only slightly increased. Cycloheximide inhibited the increase in epoxidase under these conditions. An apparent K sub m for oxygen of 0.38 percent (vol/vol) was determined from a crude particulate preparation for the epoxidase.

  12. Oxygen requirements for formation and activity of the squalene expoxidase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, L.; Klein, H. P.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of oxygen on squalene epoxidase activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated. In cells grown in standing cultures, the epoxidase was localized mainly in the 'mitochondrial' fraction. Upon aeration, enzyme activity increased and the newly formed enzyme was associated with the 'microsomal' fraction. At 0.03 percent (vol/vol) oxygen, epoxidase levels doubled, whereas the ergosterol level was only slightly increased. Cycloheximide inhibited the increase in epoxidase under these conditions. An apparent K sub m for oxygen of 0.38 percent (vol/vol) was determined from a crude particulate preparation for the epoxidase.

  13. Enzyme-based online monitoring and measurement of antioxidant activity using an optical oxygen sensor coupled to an HPLC system.

    PubMed

    Quaranta, Michela; Nugroho Prasetyo, Endry; Koren, Klaus; Nyanhongo, Gibson S; Murkovic, Michael; Klimant, Ingo; Guebitz, Georg M

    2013-03-01

    It is estimated that up to 50% of the adult population take antioxidant products on a daily basis to promote their health status. Strangely, despite the well-recognized importance of antioxidants, currently there is no international standard index for labeling owing to the lack of standardized methods for antioxidant measurement in complex products. Here, an online high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-based method to detect and measure the total antioxidant capacity of antioxidant samples is presented. In this approach, complex samples containing antioxidants are separated by the HPLC system, which is further coupled to an antioxidant measuring system consisting of an optical oxygen sensor, laccase, and tetramethoxy azobismethylene quinone (TMAMQ). The antioxidants, separated via HPLC, reduce TMAMQ to syringaldazine, which is then reoxidized by laccase while simultaneously consuming O(2). The amount of consumed oxygen is directly proportional to the concentration of antioxidants and is measured by the optical oxygen sensor. The sensor is fabricated by coating a glass capillary with an oxygen-sensitive thin layer made of platinum(II) meso-tetra(4-fluorophenyl)tetrabenzoporphyrin and polystyrene, which makes real-time analysis possible (t(90) = 1.1 s in solution). Four selected antioxidants (3 mM), namely, catechin, ferulic acid, naringenin (used as a control), and Trolox, representing flavonol, hydrocinnamic acid, flavanone, and vitamin E, respectively, were injected into the online antioxidant monitoring system, separated, and then mixed with the TMAMQ/laccase solution, which resulted in oxygen consumption. This study shows that, with the use of such a system, the antioxidant activity of individual antioxidant molecules in a sample and their contribution to the total antioxidant activity of the sample can be correctly assigned.

  14. Protective activity of propofol, Diprivan and intralipid against active oxygen species.

    PubMed Central

    Mathy-Hartert, M; Deby-Dupont, G; Hans, P; Deby, C; Lamy, M

    1998-01-01

    We separately studied the antioxidant properties of propofol (PPF), Diprivan (the commercial form of PPF) and intralipid (IL) (the vehicle solution of PPF in Diprivan) on active oxygen species produced by phorbol myristate acetate (10(-6) M)-stimulated human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN: 5 x 10(5) cells/assay), human endothelial cells (5 x 10(5) cells/assay) or cell-free systems (NaOCl or H2O2/peroxidase systems), using luminol (10(-4) M)-enhanced chemiluminescence (CL). We also studied the protective effects of Diprivan on endothelial cells submitted to an oxidant stress induced by H2O2/MPO system: cytotoxicity was assessed by the release of preincorporated 51Cr. Propofol inhibited the CL produced by stimulated PMN in a dose dependent manner (until 5 x 10(-5) M, a clinically relevant concentration), while Diprivan and IL were not dose-dependent inhibitors. The CL produced by endothelial cells was dose-dependently inhibited by Diprivan and PPF, and weakly by IL (not dose-dependent). In cell free systems, dose-dependent inhibitions were obtained for the three products with a lower effect for IL. Diprivan efficaciously protected endothelial cells submitted to an oxidant stress, while IL was ineffective. By HPLC, we demonstrated that PPF was not incorporated into the cells. The drug thus acted by scavenging the active oxygen species released in the extracellular medium. IL acted in the same manner, but was a less powerful antioxidant. PMID:9883967

  15. Carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen isotope studies of the regional metamorphic complex at Naxos, Greece

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rye, R.O.; Schuiling, R.D.; Rye, D.M.; Jansen, J.B.H.

    1976-01-01

    At Naxos, Greece, a migmatite dome is surrounded by schists and marbles of decreasing metamorphic grade. Sillimanite, kyanite, biotite, chlorite, and glaucophane zones are recognized at successively greater distances from the migmatite dome. Quartz-muscovite and quartz-biotite oxygen isotope and mineralogie temperatures range from 350 to 700??C. The metamorphic complex can be divided into multiple schist-rich (including migmatites) and marblerich zones. The ??18O values of silicate minerals in migmatite and schist units and quartz segregations in the schist-rich zones decrease with increase in metamorphic grades. The calculated ??18OH2O values of the metamorphic fluids in the schist-rich zones decrease from about 15??? in the lower grades to an average of about 8.5??? in the migmatite. The ??D values of OH-minerals (muscovite, biotite, chlorite, and glaucophane) in the schist-rich zones also decrease with increase in grade. The calculated ??DH2O values for the metamorphic fluid decrease from -5??? in the glaucophane zone to an average of about -70??? in the migmatite. The ??D values of water in fluid inclusions in quartz segregations in the higher grade rocks are consistent with this trend. The??18O values of silicate minerals and quartz segregations in marble-rich zones are usually very large and were controlled by exchange with the adjacent marbles. The ??D values of the OH minerals in some marble-rich zones may reflect the value of water contained in the rocks prior to metamorphism. Detailed data on 20 marble units show systematic variations of ??18O values which depend upon metamorphic grade. Below the 540??C isograd very steep ??18O gradients at the margins and large ??18O values in the interior of the marbles indicate that oxygen isotope exchange with the adjacent schist units was usually limited to the margins of the marbles with more exchange occurring in the stratigraphic bottom than in the top margins. Above the 540??C isograd lower ??18O values occur in

  16. Single Silver Adatoms on Nanostructured Manganese Oxide Surfaces: Boosting Oxygen Activation for Benzene Abatement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yaxin; Huang, Zhiwei; Zhou, Meijuan; Ma, Zhen; Chen, Jianmin; Tang, Xingfu

    2017-02-21

    The involvement of a great amount of active oxygen species is a crucial requirement for catalytic oxidation of benzene, because complete mineralization of one benzene molecule needs 15 oxygen atoms. Here, we disperse single silver adatoms on nanostructured hollandite manganese oxide (HMO) surfaces by using a thermal diffusion method. The single-atom silver catalyst (Ag1/HMO) shows high catalytic activity in benzene oxidation, and 100% conversion is achieved at 220 °C at a high space velocity of 23 000 h(-1). The Mars-van Krevelen mechanism is valid in our case as the reaction orders for both benzene and O2 approach one, according to reaction kinetics data. Data from H2 temperature-programmed reduction and O core-level X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) reveal that Ag1/HMO possesses a great amount of active surface lattice oxygen available for benzene oxidation. Valence-band XPS and density functional theoretical calculations demonstrate that the single Ag adatoms have the upshifted 4d orbitals, thus facilitating the activation of gaseous oxygen. Therefore, the excellent activation abilities of Ag1/HMO toward both surface lattice oxygen and gaseous oxygen account for its high catalytic activity in benzene oxidation. This work may assist with the rational design of efficient metal-oxide catalysts for the abatement of volatile organic compounds such as benzene.

  17. Oxygen activation by mononuclear nonheme iron dioxygenases involved in the degradation of aromatics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yifan; Li, Jiasong; Liu, Aimin

    2017-04-01

    Molecular oxygen is utilized in numerous metabolic pathways fundamental for life. Mononuclear nonheme iron-dependent oxygenase enzymes are well known for their involvement in some of these pathways, activating O2 so that oxygen atoms can be incorporated into their primary substrates. These reactions often initiate pathways that allow organisms to use stable organic molecules as sources of carbon and energy for growth. From the myriad of reactions in which these enzymes are involved, this perspective recounts the general mechanisms of aromatic dihydroxylation and oxidative ring cleavage, both of which are ubiquitous chemical reactions found in life-sustaining processes. The organic substrate provides all four electrons required for oxygen activation and insertion in the reactions mediated by extradiol and intradiol ring-cleaving catechol dioxygenases. In contrast, two of the electrons are provided by NADH in the cis-dihydroxylation mechanism of Rieske dioxygenases. The catalytic nonheme Fe center, with the aid of active site residues, facilitates these electron transfers to O2 as key elements of the activation processes. This review discusses some general questions for the catalytic strategies of oxygen activation and insertion into aromatic compounds employed by mononuclear nonheme iron-dependent dioxygenases. These include: (1) how oxygen is activated, (2) whether there are common intermediates before oxygen transfer to the aromatic substrate, and (3) are these key intermediates unique to mononuclear nonheme iron dioxygenases?

  18. Complex Network for Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daei, Farhad; Safari, Hossein; Dadashi, Neda

    2017-08-01

    In this paper we developed a complex network of solar active regions (ARs) to study various local and global properties of the network. The values of the Hurst exponent (0.8-0.9) were evaluated by both the detrended fluctuation analysis and the rescaled range analysis applied on the time series of the AR numbers. The findings suggest that ARs can be considered as a system of self-organized criticality (SOC). We constructed a growing network based on locations, occurrence times, and the lifetimes of 4227 ARs recorded from 1999 January 1 to 2017 April 14. The behavior of the clustering coefficient shows that the AR network is not a random network. The logarithmic behavior of the length scale has the characteristics of a so-called small-world network. It is found that the probability distribution of the node degrees for undirected networks follows the power law with exponents of about 3.7-4.2. This indicates the scale-free nature of the AR network. The scale-free and small-world properties of the AR network confirm that the system of ARs forms a system of SOC. Our results show that the occurrence probability of flares (classified by GOES class C> 5, M, and X flares) in the position of the AR network hubs takes values greater than that obtained for other nodes.

  19. Active Particles in Complex and Crowded Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechinger, Clemens; Di Leonardo, Roberto; Löwen, Hartmut; Reichhardt, Charles; Volpe, Giorgio; Volpe, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    Differently from passive Brownian particles, active particles, also known as self-propelled Brownian particles or microswimmers and nanoswimmers, are capable of taking up energy from their environment and converting it into directed motion. Because of this constant flow of energy, their behavior can be explained and understood only within the framework of nonequilibrium physics. In the biological realm, many cells perform directed motion, for example, as a way to browse for nutrients or to avoid toxins. Inspired by these motile microorganisms, researchers have been developing artificial particles that feature similar swimming behaviors based on different mechanisms. These man-made micromachines and nanomachines hold a great potential as autonomous agents for health care, sustainability, and security applications. With a focus on the basic physical features of the interactions of self-propelled Brownian particles with a crowded and complex environment, this comprehensive review will provide a guided tour through its basic principles, the development of artificial self-propelling microparticles and nanoparticles, and their application to the study of nonequilibrium phenomena, as well as the open challenges that the field is currently facing.

  20. Interleukin 15 activates Akt to protect astrocytes from oxygen glucose deprivation-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gilbert Aaron; Lai, Yein-Gei; Chen, Ray-Jade; Liao, Nan-Shih

    2017-04-01

    Astrocytes play a pivotal role in neuronal survival under the condition of post-ischemic brain inflammation, but the relevant astrocyte-derived mediators of ischemic brain injury remain to be defined. IL-15 supports survival of multiple lymphocyte lineages in the peripheral immune system, but the role of IL-15 in inflammatory disease of the central nervous system is not well defined. Recent research has shown an increase of IL-15-expressing astrocytes in the ischemic brain. Since astrocytes promote neuron survival under cerebral ischemia by buffering excess extracellular glutamate and producing growth factors, recovery of astrocyte function could be of benefit for stroke therapy. Here, we report that IL-15 is the pro-survival cytokine that prevents astrocyte death from oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced damage. Astrocytes up-regulate expression of the IL-15/IL-15Rα complex under OGD, whereas OGD down-regulates the levels of pSTAT5 and pAkt in astrocytes. IL-15 treatment ameliorates the decline of pAkt, decreases the percentage of annexin V(+) cells, inhibits the activation of caspase-3, and activates the Akt pathway to promote astrocyte survival in response to OGD. We further identified that activation of Akt, but not PKCα/βI, is essential for astrocyte survival under OGD. Taken together, this study reveals the function of IL-15 in astrocyte survival via Akt phosphorylation in response to OGD-induced damage.

  1. Mitochondrial complex II can generate reactive oxygen species at high rates in both the forward and reverse reactions.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Casey L; Orr, Adam L; Perevoshchikova, Irina V; Treberg, Jason R; Ackrell, Brian A; Brand, Martin D

    2012-08-03

    Respiratory complex II oxidizes succinate to fumarate as part of the Krebs cycle and reduces ubiquinone in the electron transport chain. Previous experimental evidence suggested that complex II is not a significant contributor to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in isolated mitochondria or intact cells unless mutated. However, we find that when complex I and complex III are inhibited and succinate concentration is low, complex II in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria can generate superoxide or H(2)O(2) at high rates. These rates approach or exceed the maximum rates achieved by complex I or complex III. Complex II generates these ROS in both the forward reaction, with electrons supplied by succinate, and the reverse reaction, with electrons supplied from the reduced ubiquinone pool. ROS production in the reverse reaction is prevented by inhibition of complex II at either the ubiquinone-binding site (by atpenin A5) or the flavin (by malonate), whereas ROS production in the forward reaction is prevented by malonate but not by atpenin A5, showing that the ROS from complex II arises only from the flavin site (site II(F)). We propose a mechanism for ROS production by complex II that relies upon the occupancy of the substrate oxidation site and the reduction state of the enzyme. We suggest that complex II may be an important contributor to physiological and pathological ROS production.

  2. Biological oxygen sensing via two-photon absorption by an Ir(III) complex using a femtosecond fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritomo, Hiroki; Fujii, Akinari; Suzuki, Yasutaka; Yoshihara, Toshitada; Tobita, Seiji; Kawamata, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Near-infrared two-photon absorption of the phosphorescent Ir(III) complex (2,4-pentanedionato-κO 2,κO 4)bis[2-(6-phenanthridinyl-κN)benzo[b]thien-3-yl-κC]iridium (BTPHSA) was characterized. It exhibited a 800-1200 nm two-photon absorption band, and thus could be electronically excited by 1030-nm femtosecond Ti:sapphire and Yb-doped fiber lasers. By using BTPHSA, oxygen concentrations in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells were imaged. These results demonstrate two-photon oxygen sensing of live tissues via easily operable excitation sources.

  3. The relationship between electrocerebral activity and cerebral fractional tissue oxygen extraction in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    ter Horst, Hendrik J; Verhagen, Elise A; Keating, Paul; Bos, Arend F

    2011-10-01

    Impaired cerebral oxygen delivery may cause cerebral damage in preterm infants. At lower levels of cerebral perfusion and oxygen concentration, electrocerebral activity is disturbed. The balance between cerebral oxygen delivery and oxygen use can be measured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), and electrocerebral activity can be measured by amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG). Our aim was to determine the relationship between regional cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (rcSO2), fractional tissue oxygen extraction (FTOE), and aEEG. We recorded longitudinal digital aEEG and rcSO2 prospectively in 46 preterm infants (mean GA 29.5 wk, SD 1.7) for 2 hr on the 1st to 5th, 8th, and 15th d after birth. We excluded infants with germinal matrix hemorrhage exceeding grade I and recordings of infants receiving inotropes. FTOE was calculated using transcutaneous arterial oxygen saturation (tcSaO2) and rcSO2 values: (tcSaO2 - rcSO2)/tcSaO2. aEEG was assessed by calculating the mean values of the 5th, 50th, and 95th centiles of the aEEG amplitudes. The aEEG amplitude centiles changed with increasing GA. FTOE and aEEG amplitude centiles increased significantly with postnatal age. More mature electrocerebral activity was accompanied by increased FTOE. FTOE also increased with increasing postnatal age and decreasing Hb levels.

  4. Activation processes on GaAs photocathode by different currents of oxygen source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Zhuang; Shi, Feng; Cheng, Hongchang; Wang, Shufei; Zhang, Xiaohui; Yuan, Yuan; Chen, Chang

    2015-04-01

    In order to know the influence of activation processes on GaAs photocathodes, three GaAs samples were activated by a fixed current of cesium source and different currents of oxygen source. The current of caesium source is same during activation to ensure initial adsorption of caesium quantum is similar, which is the base to show the difference during alternation activation of caesium and oxygen. Analysed with the activation data, it is indicated that Cs-to-O current ratio of 1.07 is the optimum ratio to obtain higher sensitivity and better stability. According to double dipole model, stable and uniform double dipole layers of GaAs-O-Cs:Cs-O-Cs are formed and negative electron affinity is achieved on GaAs surface by activation with cesium and oxygen. The analytical result is just coincident with the model. Thus there is an efficient technological method to improve sensitivity and stability of GaAs photocathode.

  5. Synthesis, Characterization, Antibacterial and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Enoxacin Metal Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Arayne, Saeed; Sultana, Najma; Haroon, Urooj; Mesaik, M. Ahmed

    2009-01-01

    The present work comprises the synthesis of enoxacin (Heno) complexes with various transition metals. Two types of complexes [M(eno)2(H2O)2]3H2O(M = CuII, NiII or MnII) and [M(eno)(H2O)2]Cl · 4H2O (M = FeIII) were obtained. The complexes were characterized by different physicochemical, spectroscopic, and elemental analysis. Results suggest that enoxacin interacts with the metals as a monoanionic bidentate ligand. These complexes were also tested for their antibacterial activity against eleven (11) different microorganisms, and the results were compared with the parent drug. Moreover all the metal complexes were also tested for their ability to scavenge reactive oxygen species where by MnII and CuII complexes exhibited potential to mediate anti-inflammatory response. PMID:19657456

  6. Biological oxidation: over a century of hardship for the concept of active oxygen.

    PubMed

    Voeikov, V L

    2005-12-14

    After much research in the field of biological oxidation, two main concepts of the mechanism of energy gain were consecutively proposed--the concept of direct oxygen activation (analogous to combustion), and the concept of activation of hydrogen followed by gradual energy release (analogous to putrefaction). The latter concept currently dominates. According to it, practically all the energy required in life is gained initially in the form of ATP; the latter being synthesized mostly due to the classical oxidative phosphorylation process. Direct activation of oxygen is considered to be a secondary pathway in its utilization, unrelated to bioenergetics. Besides, this pathway seems to be risky, since reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced on account of it. However, evidence has been accumulated that a considerable part of all oxygen consumption undergoes direct activation; and this share increases with energy demand. Recent data also argues that ROS are indispensable for regulating biological function at all levels of biological organization. In spite of intense activation of oxygen, the usual levels of ROS in cells and tissues are extremely low due to their immediate elimination by the powerful an "antioxidant defense" system. In the process of elimination of ROS, high density energy (energy of electronic activation), equivalent to the energy of photons of visible and UV-light, is necessarily released, which has a much higher grade than the energy released in putrefaction. Both previous and more recent data argue that the energy of electronic excitation is biologically significant. The role of an aqueous environment with unusual water structuring in managing this form of energy in biology will also be discussed. Thus, the processes of oxygen activation in aqueous systems seem to be no less fundamental than the processes of activation of hydrogen atoms in organic fuels. Current bioenergetics has to consider both oxygen and hydrogen activation rather than

  7. Time-resolved luminescence and singlet oxygen formation after illumination of the hypericin-low-density lipoprotein complex.

    PubMed

    Gbur, Peter; Dedic, Roman; Chorvat, Dusan; Miskovsky, Pavol; Hala, Jan; Jancura, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence and phosphorescence study of hypericin (Hyp) in complex with low-density lipoproteins (LDL) as well as the evolution of singlet oxygen formation and annihilation after illumination of Hyp/LDL complexes at room temperature are presented in this work. The observed shortening of the fluorescence lifetime of Hyp at high Hyp/LDL molar ratios (>25:1) proves the self-quenching of the excited singlet state of monomeric Hyp at these concentration ratios. The very short lifetime ( approximately 0.5 ns) of Hyp fluorescence at very high Hyp/LDL ratios (>150:1) suggests that at high local Hyp concentration inside LDL molecules fast and ultrafast nonradiative decay processes from excited singlet state of Hyp become more important. Contrary to the lifetime of the singlet excited state, the lifetime (its shorter component) of Hyp phosphorescence is not dependent on Hyp/LDL ratio in the studied concentration range. The amount of singlet oxygen produced as well as the integral intensity of Hyp phosphorescence after illumination of Hyp/LDL complexes resemble the dependence of the concentration of molecules of Hyp in monomeric state on Hyp/LDL until a concentration ratio of 60:1. This fact confirms that only monomeric Hyp is able to produce the excited triplet state of Hyp, which in aerobic conditions leads to singlet oxygen production. The value of singlet oxygen lifetime ( approximately 8 micros) after its formation from the excited triplet state of Hyp in LDL proves that molecules of singlet oxygen remain for a certain period of time inside LDL particles and are not immediately released to the aqueous surrounding. That Hyp exists in the complex with LDL in the monodeprotonated state is also demonstrated.

  8. Synthesis, characterization, and application of vanadium-salan complexes in oxygen transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Adão, Pedro; Costa Pessoa, João; Henriques, Rui T; Kuznetsov, Maxim L; Avecilla, Fernando; Maurya, Mannar R; Kumar, Umesh; Correia, Isabel

    2009-04-20

    We report the synthesis and characterization of several chiral salen- and salan-type ligands and their vanadium complexes, which are derived from salicylaldehyde or salicylaldehyde derivatives and chiral diamines (1R,2R-diaminocyclohexane, 1S,2S-diaminocyclohexane, and 1S,2S-diphenylethylenediamine). The structures of H(2)sal(R,R-chan)(2+) x 2 Cl(-) x (CH(3))(2)CHOH x H(2)O (1c; H(2)sal(R,R-chan) = N,N'-salicyl-R,R-cyclohexanediaminium), Etvan(S,S-chen) (3c; Etvan(S,S-chen) = N,N'-3-ethoxy-salicylidene-S,S-cyclohexanediiminato), and naph(R,R-chen) (6c; naph(R,R-chen) = N,N'-naphthylidene-R,R-cyclohexanediiminato) were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The corresponding vanadium(IV) complexes and several other new complexes involving different salicylaldehyde-type precursors were prepared and characterized in the solid state and in solution by spectroscopic techniques: UV-vis, circular dichroism, electron paramagnetic resonance, and (51)V NMR, which provide information on the coordination geometry. The salan complexes oxidize in organic solvents to V(V) species, and this process was also studied using spectroscopic techniques. Single crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction were obtained for [{V(V)O[sal(S,S-dpan)]}(2)(mu-O)] x H(2)O x 2(CH(3))(2)CHOH (14c; sal(S,S-dpan) = N,N'-salicyl-S,S-diphenylethylenediaminato) and [{V(V)O[t-Busal(R,R-chan)]}(2)(mu-O)] x 2 (CH(3))(2)CHOH (15c), both containing an OV(V)(mu-O)V(V)O moiety (V(2)O(3)(4+) core) with tetradentate ligands and one mu-oxo bridge. Both structures are the first examples of dinuclear vanadium complexes involving the V(V)(2)O(3)(4+) core with tetradentate ligands, the configuration of the V(2)O(3) unit being twist-angular. The V-salen and V-salan complexes are tested as catalysts in the oxidation of styrene, cyclohexene, cumene, and methyl phenyl sulfide with H(2)O(2) and t-BuOOH as oxidants. Overall, the V-salan complexes show higher activity and normally better selectivity in alkene oxidation

  9. Systems analysis of transcription factor activities in environments with stable and dynamic oxygen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Rolfe, Matthew D; Ocone, Andrea; Stapleton, Melanie R; Hall, Simon; Trotter, Eleanor W; Poole, Robert K; Sanguinetti, Guido; Green, Jeffrey

    2012-07-01

    Understanding gene regulation requires knowledge of changes in transcription factor (TF) activities. Simultaneous direct measurement of numerous TF activities is currently impossible. Nevertheless, statistical approaches to infer TF activities have yielded non-trivial and verifiable predictions for individual TFs. Here, global statistical modelling identifies changes in TF activities from transcript profiles of Escherichia coli growing in stable (fixed oxygen availabilities) and dynamic (changing oxygen availability) environments. A core oxygen-responsive TF network, supplemented by additional TFs acting under specific conditions, was identified. The activities of the cytoplasmic oxygen-responsive TF, FNR, and the membrane-bound terminal oxidases implied that, even on the scale of the bacterial cell, spatial effects significantly influence oxygen-sensing. Several transcripts exhibited asymmetrical patterns of abundance in aerobic to anaerobic and anaerobic to aerobic transitions. One of these transcripts, ndh, encodes a major component of the aerobic respiratory chain and is regulated by oxygen-responsive TFs ArcA and FNR. Kinetic modelling indicated that ArcA and FNR behaviour could not explain the ndh transcript profile, leading to the identification of another TF, PdhR, as the source of the asymmetry. Thus, this approach illustrates how systematic examination of regulatory responses in stable and dynamic environments yields new mechanistic insights into adaptive processes.

  10. Homodinuclear lanthanide complexes of phenylthiopropionic acid: synthesis, characterization, cytotoxicity, DNA cleavage, and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Shiju, C; Arish, D; Kumaresan, S

    2013-03-15

    Lanthanide complexes of La(III), Pr(III), Nd(III), Sm(III), and Ho(III) with phenylthiopropionic acid were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, mass, IR, electronic spectra, molar conductance, TGA, and powder XRD. The results show that the lanthanide complexes are homodinuclear in nature. The two lanthanide ions are bridged by eight oxygen atoms from four carboxylate groups. Thermal decomposition profiles are consistent with the proposed formulations. Powder XRD studies show that all the complexes are amorphous in nature. Antimicrobial studies indicate that these complexes exhibit more activity than the ligand itself. The DNA cleavage activity of the ligand and its complexes were assayed on Escherichia coli DNA using gel electrophoresis in the presence of H(2)O(2). The result shows that the Pr(III) and Nd(III) complexes have completely cleaved the DNA. The anticancer activities of the complexes have also been studied towards human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa) and colon cancer cells (HCT116) and it was found that the La(III) and Nd(III) complexes are more active than the corresponding Pr(III), Sm(III), Ho(III) complexes, and the free ligand on both the cancer cells.

  11. Cytotoxic and Antitumor Activity of Sulforaphane: The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species.

    PubMed

    Sestili, Piero; Fimognari, Carmela

    2015-01-01

    According to recent estimates, cancer continues to remain the second leading cause of death and is becoming the leading one in old age. Failure and high systemic toxicity of conventional cancer therapies have accelerated the identification and development of innovative preventive as well as therapeutic strategies to contrast cancer-associated morbidity and mortality. In recent years, increasing body of in vitro and in vivo studies has underscored the cancer preventive and therapeutic efficacy of the isothiocyanate sulforaphane. In this review article, we highlight that sulforaphane cytotoxicity derives from complex, concurring, and multiple mechanisms, among which the generation of reactive oxygen species has been identified as playing a central role in promoting apoptosis and autophagy of target cells. We also discuss the site and the mechanism of reactive oxygen species' formation by sulforaphane, the toxicological relevance of sulforaphane-formed reactive oxygen species, and the death pathways triggered by sulforaphane-derived reactive oxygen species.

  12. The potential of planets orbiting red dwarf stars to support oxygenic photosynthesis and complex life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gale, Joseph; Wandel, Amri

    2017-01-01

    We review the latest findings on extra-solar planets and their potential of having environmental conditions that could support Earth-like life. Focusing on planets orbiting red dwarf (RD) stars, the most abundant stellar type in the Milky Way, we show that including RDs as potential life supporting host stars could increase the probability of finding biotic planets by a factor of up to a thousand, and reduce the estimate of the distance to our nearest biotic neighbour by up to 10. We argue that binary and multiple star systems need to be taken into account when discussing habitability and the abundance of biotic exoplanets, in particular RDs in such systems. Early considerations indicated that conditions on RD planets would be inimical to life, as their habitable zones would be so close to the host star as to make planets tidally locked. This was thought to cause an erratic climate and expose life forms to flares of ionizing radiation. Recent calculations show that these negative factors are less severe than originally thought. It has also been argued that the lesser photon energy of the radiation of the relatively cool RDs would not suffice for oxygenic photosynthesis (OP) and other related energy expending reactions. Numerous authors suggest that OP on RD planets may evolve to utilize photons in the infrared. We however argue, by analogy to the evolution of OP and the environmental physiology and distribution of land-based vegetation on Earth, that the evolutionary pressure to utilize infrared radiation would be small. This is because vegetation on RD planets could enjoy continuous illumination of moderate intensity, containing a significant component of photosynthetic 400-700 nm radiation. We conclude that conditions for OP could exist on RD planets and consequently the evolution of complex life might be possible. Furthermore, the huge number and the long lifetime of RDs make it more likely to find planets with photosynthesis and life around RDs than around

  13. Oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II: correlating structure with spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pokhrel, Ravi; Brudvig, Gary W

    2014-06-28

    Water oxidation at the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) involves multiple redox states called Sn states (n = 0-4). The S1 → S2 redox transition of the OEC has been studied extensively using various forms of spectroscopy, including electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. In the S2 state, two isomers of the OEC are observed by EPR: a ST = 1/2 form and a ST = 5/2 form. DFT-based structural models of the OEC have been proposed for the two spin isomers in the S2 state, but the factors that determine the stability of one form or the other are not known. Using structural information on the OEC and its surroundings, in conjunction with spectroscopic information available on the S1 → S2 transition for a variety of site-directed mutations, Ca(2+) and Cl(-) substitutions, and small molecule inhibitors, we propose that the hydrogen-bonding network encompassing D1-D61 and the OEC-bound waters plays an important role in stabilizing one spin isomer over the other. In the presence of ammonia, PSII centers can be trapped in either the ST = 5/2 form after a 200 K illumination procedure or an ammonia-altered ST = 1/2 form upon annealing at 273 K. We propose a mechanism for ammonia binding to the OEC in the S2 state that takes into account the hydrogen-binding requirements for ammonia binding and the specificity for binding of ammonia but not methylamine. A discussion regarding the possibility of spin isomers of the OEC in the S1 state, analogous to the spin isomers of the S2 state, is also presented.

  14. The effect of mayfly (Hexagenia spp.) burrowing activity on sediment oxygen demand in western Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, William J.; Soster, Frederick M.; Matisoff, Gerald; Schloesser, Donald W.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies support the hypothesis that large numbers of infaunal burrow-irrigating organisms in the western basin of Lake Erie may increase significantly the sediment oxygen demand, thus enhancing the rate of hypolimnetic oxygen depletion. We conducted laboratory experiments to quantify burrow oxygen dynamics and increased oxygen demand resulting from burrow irrigation using two different year classes of Hexagenia spp. nymphs from western Lake Erie during summer, 2006. Using oxygen microelectrodes and hot film anemometry, we simultaneously determined oxygen concentrations and burrow water flow velocities. Burrow oxygen depletion rates ranged from 21.7 mg/nymph/mo for 15 mm nymphs at 23 °C to 240.7 mg/nymph/mo for 23 mm nymphs at 13 °C. Sealed microcosm experiments demonstrated that mayflies increase the rate of oxygen depletion by 2-5 times that of controls, depending on size of nymph and water temperature, with colder waters having greater impact. At natural population densities, nymph pumping activity increased total sediment oxygen demand 0.3-2.5 times compared to sediments with no mayflies and accounted for 22-71% of the total sediment oxygen demand. Extrapolating laboratory results to the natural system suggest that Hexagenia spp. populations may exert a significant control on oxygen depletion during intermittent stratification. This finding may help explain some of the fluctuations in Hexagenia spp. population densities in western Lake Erie and suggests that mayflies, by causing their own population collapse irrespective of other environmental conditions, may need longer term averages when used as a bio-indicator of the success of pollution-abatement programs in western Lake Erie and possibly throughout the Great Lakes.

  15. Photochemical Oxidation of a Manganese(III) Complex with Oxygen and Toluene Derivatives to Form a Manganese(V)-Oxo Complex

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jieun; Ohkubo, Kei; Prokop-Prigge, Katharine A.; Neu, Heather M.; Goldberg, David P.; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2013-01-01

    Visible light photoirradiation of an oxygen-saturated benzonitrile solution of a manganese(III) corrolazine complex [(TBP8Cz)MnIII (1): [TBP8Cz = octakis(p-tert-butylphenyl)corrolazinato3−] in the presence of toluene derivatives resulted in formation of the manganese(V)-oxo complex [(TBP8Cz)MnV(O)]. The photochemical oxidation of (TBP8Cz)MnIII with O2 and hexamethylbenzene (HMB) led to the isosbestic conversion of 1 to (TBP8Cz)MnV(O), accompanied by the selective oxidation of HMB to pentamethylbenzyl alcohol (87%). The formation rate of (TBP8Cz)MnV(O) increased with methyl group substitution, from toluene, p-xylene, mesitylene, durene, pentamethylbenzene, up to hexamethylbenzene. Deuterium kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) were observed for toluene (KIE = 5.4) and mesitylene (KIE = 5.3). Femtosecond laser flash photolysis of (TBP8Cz)MnIII revealed the formation of a tripquintet excited state, which was rapidly converted to a tripseptet excited state. The tripseptet excited state was shown to be the key, activated state that reacts with O2 via a diffusion-limited rate constant. The data allow for a mechanism to be proposed in which the tripseptet excited state reacts with O2 to give the putative (TBP8Cz)MnIV(O2•−), which then abstracts a hydrogen atom from the toluene derivatives in the rate-determining step. The mechanism of hydrogen abstraction is discussed by comparison of the reactivity with the hydrogen abstraction from the same toluene derivatives by cumylperoxyl radical. Taken together, the data suggest a new catalytic method is accessible for the selective oxidation of C-H bonds with O2 and light, and the first evidence for catalytic oxidation of C–H bonds was obtained with 10-methyl-9,10-dihydroacridine as a substrate. PMID:24219426

  16. Exploiting Complexity Information for Brain Activation Detection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Liang, Jiali; Lin, Qiang; Hu, Zhenghui

    2016-01-01

    We present a complexity-based approach for the analysis of fMRI time series, in which sample entropy (SampEn) is introduced as a quantification of the voxel complexity. Under this hypothesis the voxel complexity could be modulated in pertinent cognitive tasks, and it changes through experimental paradigms. We calculate the complexity of sequential fMRI data for each voxel in two distinct experimental paradigms and use a nonparametric statistical strategy, the Wilcoxon signed rank test, to evaluate the difference in complexity between them. The results are compared with the well known general linear model based Statistical Parametric Mapping package (SPM12), where a decided difference has been observed. This is because SampEn method detects brain complexity changes in two experiments of different conditions and the data-driven method SampEn evaluates just the complexity of specific sequential fMRI data. Also, the larger and smaller SampEn values correspond to different meanings, and the neutral-blank design produces higher predictability than threat-neutral. Complexity information can be considered as a complementary method to the existing fMRI analysis strategies, and it may help improving the understanding of human brain functions from a different perspective. PMID:27045838

  17. Exploiting Complexity Information for Brain Activation Detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Liang, Jiali; Lin, Qiang; Hu, Zhenghui

    2016-01-01

    We present a complexity-based approach for the analysis of fMRI time series, in which sample entropy (SampEn) is introduced as a quantification of the voxel complexity. Under this hypothesis the voxel complexity could be modulated in pertinent cognitive tasks, and it changes through experimental paradigms. We calculate the complexity of sequential fMRI data for each voxel in two distinct experimental paradigms and use a nonparametric statistical strategy, the Wilcoxon signed rank test, to evaluate the difference in complexity between them. The results are compared with the well known general linear model based Statistical Parametric Mapping package (SPM12), where a decided difference has been observed. This is because SampEn method detects brain complexity changes in two experiments of different conditions and the data-driven method SampEn evaluates just the complexity of specific sequential fMRI data. Also, the larger and smaller SampEn values correspond to different meanings, and the neutral-blank design produces higher predictability than threat-neutral. Complexity information can be considered as a complementary method to the existing fMRI analysis strategies, and it may help improving the understanding of human brain functions from a different perspective.

  18. First isolated active titanium peroxo complex: characterization and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Kholdeeva, Oxana A; Trubitsina, Tatiana A; Maksimovskaya, Raisa I; Golovin, Anatolii V; Neiwert, Wade A; Kolesov, Boris A; López, Xavier; Poblet, Josep M

    2004-04-05

    The protonated titanium peroxo complex [Bu(4)N](4)[HPTi(O(2))W(11)O(39)] (1) has been first prepared via interaction of the micro-oxo dimeric heteropolytungstate [Bu(4)N](8)[(PTiW(11)O(39))(2)O] (3) with an excess of 30% aqueous H(2)O(2) in MeCN. Peroxo complex 1 has been characterized by using elemental analysis, UV-vis, IR, resonance Raman (RR), (31)P and (183)W NMR spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and potentiometric titration. The electronic and vibrational spectra of 1 are very similar to those of the well-known unprotonated titanium peroxo complex [Bu(4)N](5)[PTi(O(2))W(11)O(39)] (2), while (31)P and (183)W NMR spectra differ significantly. A compilation of the physicochemical techniques supports a monomeric Keggin type structure of 1 bearing one peroxo ligand attached to Ti(IV) in a eta(2)-coordination mode. The protonation of the titanium peroxo complex results in an increase of the redox potential of the peroxo group, E(1/2) = 1.25 and 0.88 V relative to Ag/AgCl reference electrode for 1 and 2, respectively. In contrast to 2, 1 readily reacts with 2,3,6-trimethylphenol (TMP) at 40 degrees C in MeCN to give 2,2',3,3',5,5'-hexamethyl-4,4'-biphenol (BP) and 2,3,5-trimethyl-p-benzoquinone (TMBQ). The proportion between BP and TMBQ in the reaction products depends on the TMP/1 ratio. When a 2-fold excess of TMP is used, the main reaction product is BP (90%), while using a 2-fold excess of 1 leads to TMBQ (95%). On the basis of the product study, a homolytic oxidation mechanism that implicates the formation of phenoxyl radicals is suggested. The RR deuterium labeling experiments show that the activating proton is most likely localized at a Ti-O-W bridging oxygen rather than at the peroxo group. Theoretical calculations carried out at the DFT level on the protonated and unprotonated titanium peroxo derivatives also propose that the most stable complex is formed preferentially after protonation of the Ti-O-W site; however, both Ti-OH-W and TiOO-H protonated anions

  19. XANES, EXAFS and Kbeta spectroscopic studies of the oxygen-evolving complex in Photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Robblee, John Henry

    2000-12-01

    A key question for the understanding of photosynthetic water oxidation is whether the four oxidizing equivalents necessary to oxidize water to dioxygen are accumulated on the four Mn ions of the oxygen evolving complex (OEC), or whether some ligand-centered oxidations take place before the formation and release of dioxygen during the S3 → [S4] → S0 transition. Progress in instrumentation and flash sample preparation allowed us to apply Mn Kβ X-ray emission spectroscopy (Kb XES) to this problem for the first time. The Kβ XES results, in combination with Mn X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) data obtained from the same set of samples, show that the S2 → S3 transition, in contrast to the S0 → S1 and S1 → S2 transitions, does not involve a Mn-centered oxidation. This is rationalized by manganese μ-oxo bridge radical formation during the S2 → S3 transition. Using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, the local environment of the Mn atoms in the S0 state has been structurally characterized. These results show that the Mn-Mn distance in one of the di-μ-oxo-bridged Mn-Mn moieties increases from 2.7 Å in the S1} state to 2.85 Å in the S0 state. Furthermore, evidence is presented that shows three di-μ-oxo binuclear Mn2 clusters may be present in the OEC, which is contrary to the widely held theory that two such clusters are present in the OEC. The EPR properties of the S0 state have been investigated and a characteristic ''multiline'' signal in the S0 state has been discovered in the presence of methanol. This provides the first direct confirmation that the native S0 state is paramagnetic. In addition, this signal was simulated using parameters derived from three possible oxidation

  20. Photosynthesis. Electronic structure of the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II prior to O-O bond formation.

    PubMed

    Cox, Nicholas; Retegan, Marius; Neese, Frank; Pantazis, Dimitrios A; Boussac, Alain; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2014-08-15

    The photosynthetic protein complex photosystem II oxidizes water to molecular oxygen at an embedded tetramanganese-calcium cluster. Resolving the geometric and electronic structure of this cluster in its highest metastable catalytic state (designated S3) is a prerequisite for understanding the mechanism of O-O bond formation. Here, multifrequency, multidimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals that all four manganese ions of the catalyst are structurally and electronically similar immediately before the final oxygen evolution step; they all exhibit a 4+ formal oxidation state and octahedral local geometry. Only one structural model derived from quantum chemical modeling is consistent with all magnetic resonance data; its formation requires the binding of an additional water molecule. O-O bond formation would then proceed by the coupling of two proximal manganese-bound oxygens in the transition state of the cofactor.

  1. Singlet Oxygen Scavenging Activity and Cytotoxicity of Essential Oils from Rutaceae

    PubMed Central

    Ao, Yoko; Satoh, Kazue; Shibano, Katsushige; Kawahito, Yukari; Shioda, Seiji

    2008-01-01

    Since we have been exposed to excessive amounts of stressors, aromatherapy for the relaxation has recently become very popular recently. However, there is a problem which responds to light with the essential oil used by aromatherapy. It is generally believed that singlet oxygen is implicated in the pathogenesis of various diseases such as light-induced skin disorders and inflammatory responses. Here we studied whether essential oils can effectively scavenge singlet oxygen upon irradiation, using the electron spin resonance (ESR) method. Green light was used to irradiate twelve essential oils from rutaceae. Among these twelve essential oils, eight were prepared by the expression (or the compression) method (referred to as E oil), and four samples were prepared by the steam distillation method (referred to as SD oil). Five E oils enhanced singlet oxygen production. As these essential oils may be phototoxic, it should be used for their use whit light. Two E oils and three SD oils showed singlet oxygen scavenging activity. These results may suggest that the antioxidant activity of essential oils are judged from their radical scavenging activity. Essential oils, which enhance the singlet oxygen production and show higher cytotoxicity, may contain much of limonene. These results suggest that limonene is involved not only in the enhancement of singlet oxygen production but also in the expression of cytotoxic activity, and that attention has to be necessary for use of blended essential oils. PMID:18648659

  2. The effects of transit time heterogeneity on brain oxygenation during rest and functional activation

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Peter M; Jespersen, Sune N; Østergaard, Leif

    2015-01-01

    The interpretation of regional blood flow and blood oxygenation changes during functional activation has evolved from the concept of ‘neurovascular coupling', and hence the regulation of arteriolar tone to meet metabolic demands. The efficacy of oxygen extraction was recently shown to depend on the heterogeneity of capillary flow patterns downstream. Existing compartment models of the relation between tissue metabolism, blood flow, and blood oxygenation, however, typically assume homogenous microvascular flow patterns. To take capillary flow heterogeneity into account, we modeled the effect of capillary transit time heterogeneity (CTH) on the ‘oxygen conductance' used in compartment models. We show that the incorporation of realistic reductions in CTH during functional hyperemia improves model fits to dynamic blood flow and oxygenation changes acquired during functional activation in a literature animal study. Our results support earlier observations that oxygen diffusion properties seemingly change during various physiologic stimuli, and posit that this phenomenon is related to parallel changes in capillary flow patterns. Furthermore, our results suggest that CTH must be taken into account when inferring brain metabolism from changes in blood flow- or blood oxygenation-based signals . PMID:25492112

  3. Cytotoxicity of Manganese (III) Complex in Human Breast Adenocarcinoma Cell Line Is Mediated by the Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species Followed by Mitochondrial Damage.

    PubMed

    Al-Anbaky, Qudes; Al-Karakooly, Zeiyad; Kilaparty, Surya P; Agrawal, Megha; Albkuri, Yahya M; RanguMagar, Ambar B; Ghosh, Anindya; Ali, Nawab

    2016-11-01

    Manganese (Mn) complexes are widely studied because of their important catalytic properties in synthetic and biochemical reactions. A Mn (III) complex of an amidoamine ligand was synthesized using a tetradentate amidoamine ligand. In this study, the Mn (III) complex was evaluated for its biological activity by measuring its cytotoxicity in human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF-7). Cytotoxic effects of the Mn (III) complex were determined using established biomarkers in an attempt to delineate the mechanism of action and the utility of the complex as a potential anticancer drug. The Mn (III) complex induces cell death in a dose- and time-dependent manner as shown by microculture tetrazolium assay, a measure of cytotoxic cell death. Our results demonstrated that cytotoxic effects were significantly increased at higher concentrations of Mn (III) complex and with longer time of treatment. The IC50 (Inhibitor concentration that results in 50% cell death) value of Mn (III) complex in MCF-7 cells was determined to be 2.5 mmol/L for 24 hours of treatment. In additional experiments, we determined the Mn (III) complex-mediated cell death was due to both apoptotic and nonspecific necrotic cell death mechanisms. This was assessed by ethidium bromide/acridine orange staining and flow cytometry techniques. The Mn (III) complex produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) triggering the expression of manganese superoxide dismutase 1 and ultimately damaging the mitochondrial function as is evident by a decline in mitochondrial membrane potential. Treatment of the cells with free radical scavenger, N, N-dimethylthiourea decreased Mn (III) complex-mediated generation of ROS and attenuated apoptosis. Together, these results suggest that the Mn (III) complex-mediated MCF-7 cell death utilizes combined mechanism involving apoptosis and necrosis perhaps due to the generation of ROS.

  4. The role of water and structure on the generation of reactive oxygen species in peptide/hypericin complexes.

    PubMed

    Souza, Márcia I; Silva, Emerson R; Jaques, Ygor M; Ferreira, Fabio F; Fileti, Eudes E; Alves, Wendel A

    2014-07-01

    Hybrid associates formed between peptide assemblies and fluorophores are attractive mainly because of their unique properties for biomedical applications. Recently, we demonstrated that the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by hypericin and their stability in excited states are enhanced upon conjugation with l,l-diphenylalanine microtubes (FF-MNTs). Although the detailed mechanisms responsible for improving the photophysical properties of ROS remain unclear, tentative hypotheses have suggested that the driving force is the growth of overall dipolar moments ascribed either to coupling between aligned H2O dipoles within the ordered structures or to the organization of hypericin molecules on peptide interfaces. To provide new insights on ROS activity in hypericin/FF-MNTs hybrids and further explore the role of water in this respect, we present results obtained from investigations on the behavior of these complexes organized into different crystalline arrangements. Specifically, we monitored and compared the photophysical performance of hypericin bound to FF-MNTs with peptides organized in both hexagonal (water-rich) and orthorhombic (water-free) symmetries. From a theoretical perspective, we present the results of new molecular dynamics simulations that highlight the distinct hypericin/peptide interaction at the interface of FF-MNTs for the different symmetries. As a conclusion, we propose that although water enhances photophysical properties, the organization induced by peptide structures and the availability of a hydrophobic environment surrounding the hypericin/peptide interface are paramount to optimizing ROS generation. The findings presented here provide useful basic research insights for designing peptide/fluorophore complexes with outstanding technological potential. Copyright © 2014 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Temperature dependence of oxygen evolution through catalase-like activity of horseradish peroxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popović-Bijelić, A.; Bijelić, G.; Kolar-Anić, Lj.; Vukojević, V.

    2007-09-01

    By experimental investigations of the temperature dependence of catalase-like activity of horseradish peroxidase in the temperature range 278 328 K, different kinetic profiles for oxygen evolution were found below and above 298 K. Extension of the model is proposed to account for these observations. By numeric simulations of the reaction kinetics at different temperatures, it was found that enhanced evaporation of molecular oxygen from the reaction solution is the main root through which oxygen is lost at elevated temperatures in laboratory conditions.

  6. On the existence of free and metal complexed sulfide in the Arabian Sea and its oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theberge, Stephen M.; Luther, George W.; Farrenkopf, Anna M.

    Free hydrogen sulfide was not detected in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Arabian Sea during legs D1 (September 1992) and D3 (October-November 1992) of the Netherlands Indian Ocean Programme (NIOP). However, sulfide complexed to metals was detected by cathodic stripping square wave voltammetry at 2 nM or less throughout the water column. A slight increase in sulfide was measured in the OMZ relative to the surface waters and may be related to sulfur release from organic matter during decomposition. Sulfide complexes are of two general types at low concentrations of metal and sulfide. First, metals such as Mn, Fe, Co and Ni form complexes with bisulfide ion (HS -) that are kinetically labile to dissociation and are reactive. Second, metals such as Cu and Zn form multinuclear complexes with sulfide (S 2-) that are kinetically inert to dissociation; thus, they are less reactive than free (bi)sulfide and the labile metal bisulfide complexes. Zinc and copper sulfide complexes are important in allowing hydrogen sulfide to persist in seawater which contains measurable oxygen.

  7. Activity and Stability of Nanoscale Oxygen Reduction Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Shao-Horn, Yang

    2015-07-28

    Design of highly active and stable nanoscale catalysts for electro-oxidation of small organic molecules is of great importance to the development of efficient fuel cells. The amount and instability of Pt-based catalysts in the cathode limits the cost, efficiency and lifetime of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. We developed a microscopic understanding of the factors governing activity and stability in Pt and PtM alloys. Experimental efforts were focused on probing the size and shape dependence of ORR activity of Pt-based nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes. A microscopic understanding of the activity was achieved by correlating voltammetry and rotating ring disk electrodes to surface atomic and electronic structures, which were elucidated predominantly by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Scanning transmission electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (STEM-EDS) and synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS).

  8. [Oxygen consumption rate and effects of hypoxia stress on enzyme activities of Sepiella maindron].

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-lin; Wu, Dan-hua; Dong, Tian-ye; Jiang, Xia-min

    2008-11-01

    The oxygen consumption rate and suffocation point of Sepiella maindroni were determined through the measurement of dissolved oxygen in control and experimental respiration chambers by Winkler's method, and the changes of S. maindroni enzyme activities under different levels of hypoxia stress were studied. The results indicated that the oxygen consumption rate of S. maindroni exhibited an obvious diurnal fluctuation of 'up-down-up-down', and positively correlated with water temperature (16 degrees C-28 degrees C) and illumination (3-500 micromol x m(-2) x s(-1)) while negatively correlated with water pH (6.25-9.25). With increasing water salinity from 18.1 to 29.8, the oxygen consumption rate had a variation of 'up-down-up', being the lowest at salinity 24. 8. Female S. maindroni had a higher oxygen consumption rate than male S. maindroni. The suffocation point of S. maindroni decreased with its increasing body mass, and that of (38.70 +/- 0.52) g in mass was (0.9427 +/- 0.0318) mg x L(-1). With the increase of hypoxia stress, the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD) decreased after an initial increase, lipase activity decreased, protease activity had a variation of 'decrease-increase-decrease', and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity had a trend of increasing first and decreasing then. The enzyme activities were higher under hypoxia stress than under normal conditions.

  9. Luminescence lifetime standards for the nanosecond to microsecond range and oxygen quenching of ruthenium(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Morris, Kaleem J; Roach, Michael S; Xu, Wenying; Demas, J N; DeGraff, B A

    2007-12-15

    A rapid and reproducible method for determining the temperature dependence of luminescence lifetimes has been developed. With the use of this method, a set of standards for the excited-state lifetime oxygen quenching of several ruthenium(II) transition metal complexes was established. With the use of three solvents of different viscosities and two metal complexes with widely different lifetimes, an overlapping range of ca. 100 ns to 6 micros was obtained. The decays are pure single exponentials, which means that they can be used reliably with both phase and pulsed lifetime instruments. For a pure single-exponential decay, a properly operating phase shift instrument will give the same lifetime as a time domain instrument. With the use of a thermal deactivation model and a three-parameter temperature-dependent oxygen quenching constant, the lifetime temperature-dependent data was well fit by a simple six-parameter equation that covers the temperature range of 10-50 degrees C and oxygen pressures from 0 to 1 atm of oxygen with excellent precision (ca. <1%). This permits both laboratory and field calibration of instruments.

  10. Oxygen Uptake by a Cobalt(II) Complex: An Undergraduate Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appleton, Trevor G.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental procedure is described for studying oxygen uptake by a transition metal. This procedure is designed for use with undergraduates and may be used in organic or biochemistry laboratories. Diagrams of the apparatus are included. (MR)

  11. Oxygen Uptake by a Cobalt(II) Complex: An Undergraduate Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appleton, Trevor G.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental procedure is described for studying oxygen uptake by a transition metal. This procedure is designed for use with undergraduates and may be used in organic or biochemistry laboratories. Diagrams of the apparatus are included. (MR)

  12. Interaction of molecular oxygen with the donor side of photosystem II after destruction of the water-oxidizing complex.

    PubMed

    Yanykin, D V; Khorobrykh, A A; Zastrizhnaya, O M; Klimov, V V

    2014-03-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) is a pigment-protein complex of thylakoid membrane of higher plants, algae, and cyanobacteria where light energy is used for oxidation of water and reduction of plastoquinone. Light-dependent reactions (generation of excited states of pigments, electron transfer, water oxidation) taking place in PSII can lead to the formation of reactive oxygen species. In this review attention is focused on the problem of interaction of molecular oxygen with the donor site of PSII, where after the removal of manganese from the water-oxidizing complex illumination induces formation of long-lived states (P680(+•) and TyrZ(•)) capable of oxidizing surrounding organic molecules to form radicals.

  13. Reporter cell activity within hydrogel constructs quantified from oxygen-independent bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Lambrechts, Dennis; Roeffaers, Maarten; Kerckhofs, Greet; Hofkens, Johan; Van de Putte, Tom; Schrooten, Jan; Van Oosterwyck, Hans

    2014-09-01

    By providing a three-dimensional (3D) support to cells, hydrogels offer a more relevant in vivo tissue-like environment as compared to two-dimensional cell cultures. Hydrogels can be applied as screening platforms to investigate in 3D the role of biochemical and biophysical cues on cell behaviour using bioluminescent reporter cells. Gradients in oxygen concentration that result from the interplay between molecular transport and cell metabolism can however cause substantial variability in the observed bioluminescent reporter cell activity. To assess the influence of these oxygen gradients on the emitted bioluminescence for various hydrogel geometries, a combined experimental and modelling approach was implemented. We show that the applied model is able to predict oxygen gradient independent bioluminescent intensities which correlate better to the experimentally determined viable cell numbers, as compared to the experimentally measured bioluminescent intensities. By analysis of the bioluminescence reaction dynamics we obtained a quantitative description of cellular oxygen metabolism within the hydrogel, which was validated by direct measurements of oxygen concentration within the hydrogel. Bioluminescence peak intensities can therefore be used as a quantitative measurement of reporter cell activity within a hydrogel, but an unambiguous interpretation of these intensities requires a compensation for the influence of cell-induced oxygen gradients on the luciferase activity.

  14. Oxygen radicals inhibit human plasma acetylhydrolase, the enzyme that catabolizes platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosio, G; Oriente, A; Napoli, C; Palumbo, G; Chiariello, P; Marone, G; Condorelli, M; Chiariello, M; Triggiani, M

    1994-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) can exert profound inflammatory effects at very low concentrations. In plasma, PAF is hydrolyzed to lyso-PAF by acetylhydrolase, an enzyme that circulates bound to LDL. Previous studies suggest that oxygen radicals may act synergistically with PAF to potentiate tissue injury. However, mechanisms underlying this interaction have not been elucidated. In this study we investigated whether oxygen radicals may inactivate PAF acetylhydrolase. PAF acetylhydrolase activity was measured in human plasma and purified LDL before and after exposure to radicals (10-20 nmol/min per ml) generated by xanthine/xanthine oxidase. Oxygen radicals induced > 50% loss of PAF acetylhydrolase activity within 60 s and almost complete inactivation by 10 min. This phenomenon was irreversible and independent of oxidative modification of LDL. Inactivation occurred without changes in the affinity constant of the enzyme (Km was 17.9 microM under control conditions and 15.1 microM after exposure to oxygen radicals). Inactivation was prevented by the scavengers superoxide dismutase or dimethylthiourea or by the iron chelator deferoxamine. Thus, superoxide-mediated, iron-catalyzed formation of hydroxyl radicals can rapidly and irreversibly inactivate PAF acetylhydrolase. Since concomitant production of PAF and oxygen radicals can occur in various forms of tissue injury, inactivation of acetylhydrolase might represent one mechanism by which oxygen radicals may potentiate and prolong the proinflammatory effects of PAF. Images PMID:8200975

  15. Oxygen control of breathing by an olfactory receptor activated by lactate

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Andy J.; Ortega, Fabian E.; Riegler, Johannes; Madison, Daniel V.; Krasnow, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Animals have evolved homeostatic responses to changes in oxygen availability that act on different time scales. Although the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) transcriptional pathway that controls long term responses to low oxygen (hypoxia) has been established1, the pathway that mediates acute responses to hypoxia in mammals is not well understood. Here we show that the olfactory receptor Olfr78 is highly and selectively expressed in oxygen-sensitive glomus cells of the carotid body, a chemosensory organ at the carotid artery bifurcation that monitors blood oxygen and stimulates breathing within seconds when oxygen declines2. Olfr78 mutants fail to increase ventilation in hypoxia but respond normally to hypercapnia. Glomus cells are present in normal numbers and appear structurally intact, but hypoxia-induced carotid body activity is diminished. Lactate, a metabolite that rapidly accumulates in hypoxia and induces hyperventilation3–6, activates Olfr78 in heterologous expression experiments, induces calcium transients in glomus cells, and stimulates carotid sinus nerve activity through Olfr78. We propose that in addition to its role in olfaction, Olfr78 acts as a hypoxia sensor in the breathing circuit by sensing lactate produced when oxygen levels decline. PMID:26560302

  16. Stereochemical consequences of oxygen atom transfer and electron transfer in imido/oxido molybdenum(IV, V, VI) complexes with two unsymmetric bidentate ligands.

    PubMed

    Hüttinger, Kristina; Förster, Christoph; Bund, Timo; Hinderberger, Dariush; Heinze, Katja

    2012-04-02

    Two equivalents of the unsymmetrical Schiff base ligand (L(tBu))(-) (4-tert-butyl phenyl(pyrrolato-2-ylmethylene)amine) and MoCl(2)(NtBu)O(dme) (dme = 1,2-dimethoxyethane) gave a single stereoisomer of a mixed imido/oxido Mo(VI) complex 2(tBu). The stereochemistry of 2(tBu) was elucidated using X-ray diffraction, NMR spectroscopy, and DFT calculations. The complex is active in an oxygen atom transfer (OAT) reaction to trimethyl phosphane. The putative intermediate five-coordinate Mo(IV) imido complex coordinates a PMe(3) ligand, giving the six-coordinate imido phosphane Mo(IV) complex 5(tBu). The stereochemistry of 5(tBu) is different from that of 2(tBu) as shown by NMR spectroscopy, DFT calculations, and X-ray diffraction. Single-electron oxidation of 5(tBu) with ferrocenium hexafluorophosphate gave the stable cationic imido phosphane Mo(V) complex [5(tBu)](+) as the PF(6)(-) salt. EPR spectra of [5(tBu)](PF(6)) confirmed the presence of PMe(3) in the coordination sphere. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of [5(tBu)](PF(6)) revealed that electron transfer occurred under retention of the stereochemical configuration. The rate of OAT, the outcome of the electron transfer reaction, and the stabilities of the imido complexes presented here differ dramatically from those of analogous oxido complexes.

  17. Oxygen and the light-dark cycle of nitrogenase activity in two unicellular cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Compaoré, Justine; Stal, Lucas J

    2010-01-01

    Cyanobacteria capable of fixing dinitrogen exhibit various strategies to protect nitrogenase from inactivation by oxygen. The marine Crocosphaera watsonii WH8501 and the terrestrial Gloeothece sp. PCC6909 are unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacteria that are capable of aerobic nitrogen fixation. These cyanobacteria separate the incompatible processes of oxygenic photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation temporally, confining the latter to the dark. Although these cyanobacteria thrive in fully aerobic environments and can be cultivated diazotrophically under aerobic conditions, the effect of oxygen is not precisely known due to methodological limitations. Here we report the characteristics of nitrogenase activity with respect to well-defined levels of oxygen to which the organisms are exposed, using an online and near real-time acetylene reduction assay combined with sensitive laser-based photoacoustic ethylene detection. The cultures were grown under an alternating 12-12 h light-dark cycle and acetylene reduction was recorded continuously. Acetylene reduction was assayed at 20%, 15%, 10%, 7.5%, 5% and 0% oxygen and at photon flux densities of 30 and 76 mumol m(-2) s(-1) provided at the same light-dark cycle as during cultivation. Nitrogenase activity was predominantly but not exclusively confined to the dark. At 0% oxygen nitrogenase activity in Gloeothece sp. was not detected during the dark and was shifted completely to the light period, while C. watsonii did not exhibit nitrogenase activity at all. Oxygen concentrations of 15% and higher did not support nitrogenase activity in either of the two cyanobacteria. The highest nitrogenase activities were at 5-7.5% oxygen. The highest nitrogenase activities in C. watsonii and Gloeothece sp. were observed at 29 degrees C. At 31 degrees C and above, nitrogenase activity was not detected in C. watsonii while the same was the case at 41 degrees C and above in Gloeothece sp. The differences in the behaviour of nitrogenase activity

  18. Evaluation of DNA cleavage, antimicrobial and anti-tubercular activities of potentially active transition metal complexes derived from 2,6-di(benzofuran-2-carbohydrazono)-4-methylphenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokare, Dhoolesh Gangaram; Kamat, Vinayak; Naik, Krishna; Nevrekar, Anupama; Kotian, Avinash; Revankar, Vidyanand K.

    2017-01-01

    A 2,6-diformyl-4-methyl phenol based multidentate novel symmetric ligand and it is late first-row transition metal complexes have been prepared. The ligand and metal complexes were characterized by different spectroscopic techniques. The ligand shows a symmetric polydentate coordination mode through the phenoxide bimetallic bridge, two azomethine nitrogen atoms and two carbonyl oxygen atoms. All the complexes appear to be binuclear with octahedral geometry and nonelectrolytic nature. Complexes have shown significant growth inhibitory activity against tested bacterial and fungal strains as compared to that of ligand. The cobalt complex exhibited better antifungal potency than the standard used. Copper complex exhibits good antifungal activity whereas cobalt and zinc complexes are found to be good antibacterial agents. Ligand and complexes have shown excellent anti-tubercular activity and Calf Thymus-DNA cleavage property.

  19. Activation of granular cells during extracorporeal circulation--comparison between bubble-, membrane and hollowfiber oxygenators.

    PubMed

    Moosdorf, R; Mulch, J; Höge, R; Neuhof, H; Hoffmann, C

    1985-01-01

    Summarizing our data we can say, that some hematologic disorders during extracorporeal circulation can be diminished by the use of new oxygenator types like the membrane and the Hollowfiber oxygenator. This correlates to the results of other research teams. In contrast to that the activation of the complement cascade is caused by the three systems in a similar way. Although we know, that the activation of the complement systems is only one of numerous reasons for postoperative pulmonary complications, we still must regard this as an important factor, so that the aim of further investigations should be to reduce complement activation during long term ECC.

  20. Arousal-related reticular neurons during reduced oxygen tension: resilience and recovery of electrical activity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J; Kow, L-M; Vannucci, S J; Pfaff, D; Martin, E M

    2009-01-01

    Whole-cell patch clamp recordings of the electrical activity of large medullary reticular formation neurons, in nucleus gigantocellularis, were performed under control conditions and under conditions of hypoxia or anoxia. Neurons were discovered whose activity was remarkably resilient during and after the reduction or loss of oxygen. Such cells may relate to the ability of the newborn brain to survive hypoxia/anoxia, and also may demonstrate the preservation of neurons involved in generalized CNS arousal, as would be appropriate for activating behavioral responses to the reduction or loss of oxygen.

  1. BK channels in rat and human pulmonary smooth muscle cells are BKα-β1 functional complexes lacking the oxygen-sensitive stress axis regulated exon insert

    PubMed Central

    Detweiler, Neil D.; Song, Li; McClenahan, Samantha J.; Versluis, Rachel J.; Kharade, Sujay V.; Kurten, Richard C.; Rhee, Sung W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A loss of K+ efflux in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) contributes to abnormal vasoconstriction and PASMC proliferation during pulmonary hypertension (PH). Activation of high-conductance Ca2+-activated (BK) channels represents a therapeutic strategy to restore K+ efflux to the affected PASMCs. However, the properties of BK channels in PASMCs—including sensitivity to BK channel openers (BKCOs)—are poorly defined. The goal of this study was to compare the properties of BK channels between PASMCs of normoxic (N) and chronic hypoxic (CH) rats and then explore key findings in human PASMCs. Polymerase chain reaction results revealed that 94.3% of transcripts encoding BKα pore proteins in PASMCs from N rats represent splice variants lacking the stress axis regulated exon insert, which confers oxygen sensitivity. Subsequent patch-clamp recordings from inside-out (I-O) patches confirmed a dense population of BK channels insensitive to hypoxia. The BK channels were highly activated by intracellular Ca2+ and the BKCO lithocholate; these responses require BKα-β1 subunit coupling. PASMCs of CH rats with established PH exhibited a profound overabundance of the dominant oxygen-insensitive BKα variant. Importantly, human BK (hBK) channels in PASMCs from human donor lungs also represented the oxygen-insensitive BKα variant activated by BKCOs. The hBK channels showed significantly enhanced Ca2+ sensitivity compared with rat BK channels. We conclude that rat BK and hBK channels in PASMCs are oxygen-insensitive BKα-β1 complexes highly sensitive to Ca2+ and the BKCO lithocholate. BK channels are overexpressed in PASMCs of a rat model of PH and may provide an abundant target for BKCOs designed to restore K+ efflux. PMID:28090300

  2. Aerobic composting of waste activated sludge: Kinetic analysis for microbiological reaction and oxygen consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Y.; Kawase, Y. . E-mail: bckawase@mail.eng.toyo.ac.jp

    2006-07-01

    In order to examine the optimal design and operating parameters, kinetics for microbiological reaction and oxygen consumption in composting of waste activated sludge were quantitatively examined. A series of experiments was conducted to discuss the optimal operating parameters for aerobic composting of waste activated sludge obtained from Kawagoe City Wastewater Treatment Plant (Saitama, Japan) using 4 and 20 L laboratory scale bioreactors. Aeration rate, compositions of compost mixture and height of compost pile were investigated as main design and operating parameters. The optimal aerobic composting of waste activated sludge was found at the aeration rate of 2.0 L/min/kg (initial composting mixture dry weight). A compost pile up to 0.5 m could be operated effectively. A simple model for composting of waste activated sludge in a composting reactor was developed by assuming that a solid phase of compost mixture is well mixed and the kinetics for microbiological reaction is represented by a Monod-type equation. The model predictions could fit the experimental data for decomposition of waste activated sludge with an average deviation of 2.14%. Oxygen consumption during composting was also examined using a simplified model in which the oxygen consumption was represented by a Monod-type equation and the axial distribution of oxygen concentration in the composting pile was described by a plug-flow model. The predictions could satisfactorily simulate the experiment results for the average maximum oxygen consumption rate during aerobic composting with an average deviation of 7.4%.

  3. Salidroside inhibits oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD)/re-oxygenation-induced H9c2 cell necrosis through activating of Akt-Nrf2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Koulong; Sheng, Zhenqiang; Li, Yefei; Lu, Huihe

    2014-08-15

    Oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD)/re-oxygenation has been applied to cultured cardiomyocytes to create a cellular model of ischemic heart damage. In the current study, we explored the potential role of salidroside against OGD/re-oxygenation-induced damage in H9c2 cardiomyocytes, and studied the underlying mechanisms. We found that OGD/re-oxygenation primarily induced necrosis in H9c2 cells, which was inhibited by salidroside. Salidroside suppressed OGD/re-oxygenation-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, p53 mitochondrial translocation and cyclophilin D (Cyp-D) association as well as mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) decrease in H9c2 cells. Meanwhile, salidroside activated Akt and promoted transcription of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-regulated genes (heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO-1)). Significantly, Nrf2 shRNA knockdown or Akt inhibitors (LY 294002 and wortmannin) not only prevented salidroside-induced HO-1/NQO-1 transcription, but also alleviated salidroside-mediated cytoprotective effect against OGD/re-oxygenation in H9c2 cells. These observations suggest that salidroside activates Nrf2-regulated anti-oxidant signaling, and protects against OGD/re-oxygenation-induced H9c2 cell necrosis via activation of Akt signaling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Structural oxidation state studies of the manganese cluster in the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Wenchuan

    1994-11-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was performed on Photosystem II (PSII)-enriched membranes prepared from spinach to explore: (1) the correlation between structure and magnetic spin state of the Mn cluster in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) in the S2 state; and (2) the oxidation state changes of the Mn cluster in the flash-induced S-states. The structure of the Mn cluster in the S2 state with the g~4 electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal (S2-g4 state) was compared with that in the S2 state with multiline signal (S2-MLS state) and the S1 state. The S2-g4 state has a higher XAS inflection point energy than that of the S1 state, indicating the oxidation of Mn in the advance from the S1 to the S2-g4 state. Differences in the edge shape and in the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) show that the structure of the Mn cluster in the S2-g4 state is different from that in the S2-MLS or the S1 state. In the S2-g4 state, the second shell of backscatterers from the Mn absorber contains two Mn-Mn distances of 2.73 Å and 2.85 Å. Very little distance disorder exists in the second shell of the S1 or S2-MLS states. The third shell of the S2-g4 state at about 3.3 Å also contains increased heterogeneity relative to that of the S2-MLS or the S1 state. Various S-states were prepared at room-temperature by saturating, single-turnover flashes. The flash-dependent oscillation in the amplitude of the MLS was used to characterize the S-state composition and to construct "pure" S-state Mn K-edge spectra. The edge position shifts to higher energy by 1.8 eV upon the S1 → S2 transition.

  5. Synthesis, characterization and anticancer activities of two lanthanide(III) complexes with a nicotinohydrazone ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhou-Qin; Mao, Xian-Jie; Jia, Lei; Xu, Jun; Zhu, Tao-Feng; Cai, Hong-Xin; Bie, Hong-Yan; Chen, Ru-Hua; Ma, Tie-liang

    2015-12-01

    Two isostructural acylhydrazone based complexes, namely [Ce(penh)2(H2O)4](NO3)3·4H2O (1) and [Sm(penh)2(NO3)2](NO3)·C2H5OH (2) (penh = 2-acetylpyridine nicotinohydrazone), have been obtained and characterized by physico-chemical and spectroscopic methods. The ten-coordinated lanthanide metal ion in each complex is surrounded by two independent tridentate neutral acylhydrazones with two ON2 donor sets. The other four coordination oxygen atoms are from four water molecules and two bidentate nitrate anions for complexes 1 and 2, respectively, thus giving distorted bicapped square antiprism geometry. Both complexes have excellent antitumor activity towards human pancreatic cancer (PATU8988), human colorectal cancer (lovo) and human gastric cancer(SGC7901) cell line. Furthermore, the cell apoptosis of complex 1 is detected by AnnexinV/PI flow cytometry.

  6. Synthesis of Dipyridyl Ketone Isonicotinoyl Hydrazone Copper(II) Complex: Structure, Anticancer Activity and Anticancer Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Deng, JunGang; Chen, Wei; Deng, Hang

    2016-11-01

    In an effort to better understand the biological efficacy of the tridentate aroyl hydrazone Cu(II) complexes, the Cu(II) complex of di-2-pyridyl ketone isonicotinoyl hydrazone ligand (HL), {[Cu(L)(H2O)]·H2O·NO3}n (C1) was synthesized and characterized. Single crystal X-ray study reveals that complex C1 forms 1D zigzag chains in solid state. In water, the hydrolysis of the 1D zigzag chains was observed, and finally formation of monomeric species. In vitro studies revealed that complex C1 showed significantly more anticancer activity than the ligand alone. Investigation of the anticancer mechanisms of C1, confirmed that the Cu(II) complex exhibit a strong capacity to promote productions of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death.

  7. Enzyme-like activities of algal polysaccharide - cerium complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongfeng; Sun, Jipeng; Du, Dehong; Ye, Shen; Wang, Changhong; Zhou, Xiaoling; Xue, Changhu

    2005-01-01

    Water-soluble algal polysaccharides (APS) (alginic acid, fucoidan and laminaran) possess many pharmacological activities. The results of this study showed that the APS-Ce4+ complexes have some enzyme-like activities. Fucoidan and its complex with Ce4+ have activities similar to those of SOD. The activities of laminaran, alginic acid and their complexes are not measurable. The APS do not show measurable activities in the digestion of plasmid DNA. In contrast, the APS - Ce4+ complexes show these measurable activities under the comparable condition when APS bind Ce4+ and form homogenous solutions. The laminaran - Ce4+ complex shows the most obvious activity in the digestion of plasmid DNA, pNPP and chloropy-rifos under neutral conditions.

  8. Copper/α-Ketocarboxylate Chemistry With Supporting Peralkyated Diamines: Reactivity of Copper(I) Complexes and Dicopper-Oxygen Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Aalo K.; Tolman, William B.

    2010-01-01

    To further understand copper-promoted oxidation reactions, the Cu(I) complexes LCuX (L = N,N-di-tert-butyl-N′,N′-dimethylethylenediamine; X = benzoylformate (BF) or p-nitro-benzoylformate) were synthesized, fully characterized by X-ray crystallography and spectroscopy in solution, and their reactivity with O2 at −80 °C examined. Oxidative decarboxylation of the α-ketocarboxylate ligand was observed, but only to a significant extent when cyclohexene, cyclooctene, or acetonitrile was present. Spectroscopic and conductivity data were consistent with mechanistic postulates involving displacement of the α-ketocarboxylate by the additives to a small extent, followed by oxygenation of the LCu(I) moiety to yield copper-oxygen species that subsequently induce decarboxylation. To test these hypotheses, spectroscopic and kinetic studies of the reactions of Bu4NBF with preformed μ-η2:η2-peroxodicopper(II) and/or bis(μ-oxo)dicopper(III) complexes supported by L or N,N,N′,N′-tetramethylpropylenediamine were performed. In an illustration of a new mode of reactivity for such dicopper-oxygen cores, decarboxylation of the added α-ketocarboxylate was observed and the intermediacy of a carboxylate-bridged μ-η2:η2-peroxodicopper(II) complex was implicated. PMID:20218646

  9. Electrochemical activity of some different iron polyphthalocyanines for the oxygen reduction reaction in acidic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreja, Ludwik; Dabrowski, Roman

    The electrochemical activity of iron polyphthalocyanines (pPcFe) synthesized from pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA) or tetracyanobenzene (TCB) and dicyan It was found that pPcFe derived from PMDA has the highest activity and that the temperature dependences of electrical conductivity in vacuum and oxygen

  10. Natural Senescence of Pea Leaves (An Activated Oxygen-Mediated Function for Peroxisomes).

    PubMed Central

    Pastori, G. M.; Del Rio, L. A.

    1997-01-01

    We studied the activated oxygen metabolism of peroxisomes in naturally and dark-induced senescent leaves of pea (Pisum sativum L.). Peroxisomes were purified from three different types of senescent leaves and the activities of different peroxisomal and glyoxysomal enzymes were measured. The activities of the O2-- and H2O2-producing enzymes were enhanced by natural senescence. Senescence also produced an increase in the generation of active oxygen species (O2- and H2O2) in leaf peroxisomes and in the activities of two glyoxylate-cycle marker enzymes. A new fraction of peroxisomes was detected at an advanced stage of dark-induced senescence. Electron microscopy revealed that this new peroxisomal fraction varied in size and electron density. During senescence, the constitutive Mn-superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of peroxisomes increased and two new CuZn-SODs were induced, one of which cross-reacted with an antibody against glyoxysomal CuZn- SOD. This fact and the presence of glyoxylate-cycle enzymes support the idea that foliar senescence is associated with the transition of peroxisomes into glyoxysomes. Our results indicate that natural senescence causes the same changes in peroxisome-activated oxygen metabolism as dark-induced senescence, and reinforce the hypothesis of an effective role of peroxisomes and their activated oxygen metabolism in this stage of the life cycle. PMID:12223615

  11. Impact of oxygen cut off and starvation conditions on biological activity and physico-chemical properties of activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Villain, Maud; Clouzot, Ludiwine; Guibaud, Gilles; Marrot, Benoit

    2013-01-01

    Physico-chemical and biological parameters were monitored both throughout different oxygen cut off and starvation (OCS) times (6 h-72 h) and after the restoration of normal operational conditions. Sludge apparent viscosity and soluble extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) characteristics were measured to determine the activated sludge (AS) properties. Oxygen transfer, biological activity with specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR) measurements during endogenous/exogenous conditions (without any external substrate/with external substrate consumption) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal were measured to assess the AS performances. During the different stress times, AS deflocculated as a decrease of apparent viscosity was observed and microorganisms biodegraded the released EPS to survive. After aeration return, and under endogenous conditions, size exclusion chromatographic fingerprints of soluble EPS were modified and macromolecules probably of type humic-like substances appeared in significant quantities. These new macromolecules presumably acted as biosurfactants. Consequently, the liquid surface tension, as well as the oxygen transfer rate (OTR), decreased. Under exogenous conditions, high biological activity (SOUR = 11.8 +/- 2.1 mg(O2 x g(MLVSS)(-1) x h(-1)) compensated the decrease of oxygen transfer. Finally, AS biomass maintained a constant COD degradation rate (15.7 +/- 1.9 mg(O2) x g(MLVSS)(-1) x h(-1)) before and after the disturbances for all times tested. This work demonstrates that AS microorganisms can counteract concomitant oxygen and nutrients shortage when the duration of such a condition does not exceed 72 h. Dissociation of endogenous/exogenous conditions appears to offer an ideal laboratory model to study EPS and biomass activity effects on oxygen transfer.

  12. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex regulator (PdhR) gene deletion boosts glucose metabolism in Escherichia coli under oxygen-limited culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Soya; Shimizu, Kumiko; Kihira, Chie; Iwabu, Yuki; Kato, Ryuichi; Sugimoto, Makoto; Fukiya, Satoru; Wada, Masaru; Yokota, Atsushi

    2017-04-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex regulator (PdhR) is a transcriptional regulator that negatively regulates formation of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc), NADH dehydrogenase (NDH)-2, and cytochrome bo3 oxidase in Escherichia coli. To investigate the effects of a PdhR defect on glucose metabolism, a pdhR deletion mutant was derived from the wild-type E. coli W1485 strain by λ Red-mediated recombination. While no difference in the fermentation profiles was observed between the two strains under oxygen-sufficient conditions, under oxygen-limited conditions, the growth level of the wild-type strain was significantly decreased with retarded glucose consumption accompanied by by-production of substantial amounts of pyruvic acid and acetic acid. In contrast, the mutant grew and consumed glucose more efficiently than did the wild-type strain with enhanced respiration, little by-production of pyruvic acid, less production yield and rates of acetic acid, thus displaying robust metabolic activity. As expected, increased activities of PDHc and NDH-2 were observed in the mutant. The increased activity of PDHc may explain the loss of pyruvic acid by-production, probably leading to decreased acetic acid formation, and the increased activity of NDH-2 may explain the enhanced respiration. Measurement of the intracellular NAD(+)/NADH ratio in the mutant revealed more oxidative or more reductive intracellular environments than those in the wild-type strain under oxygen-sufficient and -limited conditions, respectively, suggesting another role of PdhR: maintaining redox balance in E. coli. The overall results demonstrate the biotechnological advantages of pdhR deletion in boosting glucose metabolism and also improve our understanding of the role of PdhR in bacterial physiology.

  13. Antiproliferative Pt(IV) complexes: synthesis, biological activity, and quantitative structure-activity relationship modeling.

    PubMed

    Gramatica, Paola; Papa, Ester; Luini, Mara; Monti, Elena; Gariboldi, Marzia B; Ravera, Mauro; Gabano, Elisabetta; Gaviglio, Luca; Osella, Domenico

    2010-09-01

    Several Pt(IV) complexes of the general formula [Pt(L)2(L')2(L'')2] [axial ligands L are Cl-, RCOO-, or OH-; equatorial ligands L' are two am(m)ine or one diamine; and equatorial ligands L'' are Cl- or glycolato] were rationally designed and synthesized in the attempt to develop a predictive quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model. Numerous theoretical molecular descriptors were used alongside physicochemical data (i.e., reduction peak potential, Ep, and partition coefficient, log Po/w) to obtain a validated QSAR between in vitro cytotoxicity (half maximal inhibitory concentrations, IC50, on A2780 ovarian and HCT116 colon carcinoma cell lines) and some features of Pt(IV) complexes. In the resulting best models, a lipophilic descriptor (log Po/w or the number of secondary sp3 carbon atoms) plus an electronic descriptor (Ep, the number of oxygen atoms, or the topological polar surface area expressed as the N,O polar contribution) is necessary for modeling, supporting the general finding that the biological behavior of Pt(IV) complexes can be rationalized on the basis of their cellular uptake, the Pt(IV)-->Pt(II) reduction, and the structure of the corresponding Pt(II) metabolites. Novel compounds were synthesized on the basis of their predicted cytotoxicity in the preliminary QSAR model, and were experimentally tested. A final QSAR model, based solely on theoretical molecular descriptors to ensure its general applicability, is proposed.

  14. Low oxygen tension increased fibronectin fragment induced catabolic activities - response prevented with biomechanical signals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The inherent low oxygen tension in normal cartilage has implications on inflammatory conditions associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Biomechanical signals will additionally contribute to changes in tissue remodelling and influence the inflammatory response. In this study, we investigated the combined effects of oxygen tension and fibronectin fragment (FN-f) on the inflammatory response of chondrocytes subjected to biomechanical signals. Methods Chondrocytes were cultured under free-swelling conditions at 1%, 5% and 21% oxygen tension or subjected to dynamic compression in an ex vivo 3D/bioreactor model with 29 kDa FN-f, interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) and/or the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor for 6 and 48 hours. Markers for catabolic activity (NO, PGE2), tissue remodelling (GAG, MMPs) and cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNFα) were quantified by biochemical assay. Aggrecan, collagen type II, iNOS and COX-2 gene expression were examined by real-time quantitative PCR. Two-way ANOVA and a post hoc Bonferroni-corrected t-test were used to analyse data. Results Both FN-fs and IL-1β increased NO, PGE2 and MMP production (all P < 0.001). FN-f was more active than IL-1β with greater levels of NO observed at 5% than 1% or 21% oxygen tension (P < 0.001). Whilst FN-f reduced GAG synthesis at all oxygen tension, the effect of IL-1β was significant at 1% oxygen tension. In unstrained constructs, treatment with FN-f or IL-1β increased iNOS and COX-2 expression and reduced aggrecan and collagen type II (all P < 0.001). In unstrained constructs, FN-f was more effective than IL-1β at 5% oxygen tension and increased production of NO, PGE2, MMP, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNFα. At 5% and 21% oxygen tension, co-stimulation with compression and the NOS inhibitor abolished fragment or cytokine-induced catabolic activities and restored anabolic response. Conclusions The present findings revealed that FN-fs are more potent than IL-1β in exerting catabolic effects

  15. Suppressed Neuronal Activity and Concurrent Arteriolar Vasoconstriction May Explain Negative Blood Oxygenation Level-Dependent Signal

    PubMed Central

    Devor, Anna; Tian, Peifang; Nishimura, Nozomi; Teng, Ivan C.; Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.; Narayanan, S. N.; Ulbert, Istvan; Boas, David A.; Kleinfeld, David; Dale, Anders M.

    2009-01-01

    Synaptic transmission initiates a cascade of signal transduction events that couple neuronal activity to local changes in blood flow and oxygenation. Although a number of vasoactive molecules and specific cell types have been implicated, the transformation of stimulus-induced activation of neuronal circuits to hemodynamic changes is still unclear. We use somatosensory stimulation and a suite of in vivo imaging tools to study neurovascular coupling in rat primary somatosensory cortex. Our stimulus evoked a central region of net neuronal depolarization surrounded by net hyperpolarization. Hemodynamic measurements revealed that predominant depolarization corresponded to an increase in oxygenation, whereas predominant hyperpolarization corresponded to a decrease in oxygenation. On the microscopic level of single surface arterioles, the response was composed of a combination of dilatory and constrictive phases. Critically, the relative strength of vasoconstriction covaried with the relative strength of oxygenation decrease and neuronal hyperpolarization. These results suggest that a neuronal inhibition and concurrent arteriolar vasoconstriction correspond to a decrease in blood oxygenation, which would be consistent with a negative blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging signal. PMID:17442830

  16. Novel water-resistant UV-activated oxygen indicator for intelligent food packaging.

    PubMed

    Vu, Chau Hai Thai; Won, Keehoon

    2013-09-01

    For the first time, alginate polymer has been applied to prevent dyes from leaching out of colorimetric oxygen indicator films, which enable people to notice the presence of oxygen in the package in an economic and simple manner. The dye-based oxygen indicator film suffers from dye leaching upon contact with water. In this work, UV-activated visual oxygen indicator films were fabricated using thionine, glycerol, P25 TiO2, and zein as a redox dye, a sacrificial electron donor, UV-absorbing semiconducting photocatalyst, and an encapsulation polymer, respectively. When this zein-coated film was immersed in water for 24h, the dye leakage was as high as 80.80±0.45%. However, introduction of alginate (1.25%) as the coating polymer considerably diminished the dye leaching to only 5.80±0.06%. This is because the ion-binding ability of alginate could prevent the cation dye from leaching into water. This novel water-resistant UV-activated oxygen indicator was also successfully photo-bleached and regained colour fast in the presence of oxygen.

  17. Thermodynamic explanation of the universal correlation between oxygen evolution activity and corrosion of oxide catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Binninger, Tobias; Mohamed, Rhiyaad; Waltar, Kay; Fabbri, Emiliana; Levecque, Pieter; Kötz, Rüdiger; Schmidt, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) has attracted increased research interest due to its crucial role in electrochemical energy conversion devices for renewable energy applications. The vast majority of OER catalyst materials investigated are metal oxides of various compositions. The experimental results obtained on such materials strongly suggest the existence of a fundamental and universal correlation between the oxygen evolution activity and the corrosion of metal oxides. This corrosion manifests itself in structural changes and/or dissolution of the material. We prove from basic thermodynamic considerations that any metal oxide must become unstable under oxygen evolution conditions irrespective of the pH value. The reason is the thermodynamic instability of the oxygen anion in the metal oxide lattice. Our findings explain many of the experimentally observed corrosion phenomena on different metal oxide OER catalysts. PMID:26178185

  18. Evaluation of the Catalytic Activity and Cytotoxicity of Palladium Nanocubes. The Role of Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Dahal, Eshan; Curtiss, Jessica; Subedi, Deepak; Chen, Gen; Houston, Jessica P.; Smirnov, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    Recently it has been reported that palladium nanocubes (PdNC) are capable of generating singlet oxygen without photo-excitation simply via chemisorption of molecular oxygen on its surface. Such a trait would make PdNC a highly versatile catalyst suitable in organic synthesis and a Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) inducing cancer treatment reagent. Here we thoroughly investigated the catalytic activity of PdNC with respect to their ability to produce singlet oxygen and to oxidize 3,5,3′,5′-tetramethyl-benzidine (TMB), as well as, analyzed the cytotoxic properties of PdNC on HeLa cells. Our findings showed no evidence of singlet oxygen production by PdNC. The nanocubes’ activity is not necessarily linked to activation of oxygen. The oxidation of substrate on PdNC can be a first step followed by PdNC regeneration with oxygen or other oxidant. The catalytic activity of PdNC towards oxidation of TMB is very high and shows direct two-electrons oxidation when the surface of PdNC is clean and the ratio of TMB/PdNC is not very high. Sequential one electron oxidation is observed when the pristine quality of PdNC surface is compromised by serum or uncontrolled impurities and/or the ratio of TMB/PdNC is high. Clean PdNC in serum-free media efficiently induce apoptosis of HeLa cells. It is the primary route of cell death and is associated with hyperpolarization of mitochondria, contrary to a common mitochondrial depolarization initiated by ROS. Again, the effects are very sensitive to how well the pristine surface of PdNC is preserved, suggesting that PdNC can be used as an apoptosis inducing agent but only with appropriate drug delivery system. PMID:25886644

  19. O2 activation by metal-ligand cooperation with Ir(I) PNP pincer complexes.

    PubMed

    Feller, Moran; Ben-Ari, Eyal; Diskin-Posner, Yael; Carmieli, Raanan; Weiner, Lev; Milstein, David

    2015-04-15

    A unique mode of molecular oxygen activation, involving metal-ligand cooperation, is described. Ir pincer complexes [((t)BuPNP)Ir(R)] (R = C6H5 (1), CH2COCH3 (2)) react with O2 to form the dearomatized hydroxo complexes [((t)BuPNP*)Ir(R)(OH)] ((t)BuPNP* = deprotonated (t)BuPNP ligand), in a process which utilizes both O-atoms. Experimental evidence, including NMR, EPR, and mass analyses, indicates a binuclear mechanism involving an O-atom transfer by a peroxo intermediate.

  20. Synthesis and antioxidant activities of transition metal complexes based 3-hydroxysalicylaldehyde-S-methylthiosemicarbazone.

    PubMed

    Bal-Demirci, Tülay; Şahin, Musa; Kondakçı, Esin; Özyürek, Mustafa; Ülküseven, Bahri; Apak, Reşat

    2015-03-05

    The nickel(II), iron(III), oxovanadium(IV) complexes of the 3-hydroxysalicylidene-S-methyl-thiosemicarbazone (L) were obtained from the 3-hydroxysalicyldehyde-S-methylthiosemicarbazone with the R1-substituted-salicylaldehyde (R1: H, 3-OH) in the presence of Ni(II), Fe(III), VO(IV) as template ion. The ligand and its complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, electronic, UV/Vis., (1)HNMR, EPR and IR studies. The free ligand and its metal complexes have been tested for in vitro antioxidant capacity by reduction of copper(II) neocuproine (Cu(II)-Nc) using the CUPRAC method. The ligand exhibited more potent in vitro antioxidant capacity than its complexes. The obtained trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) value of the iron(III) complex (TEACCUPRAC=3.27) was higher than those of other complexes. Furthermore, the antioxidant activity of the free ligand and its complexes were determined by in vitro methods measuring the scavenging activity of reactive oxygen species (ROS) including hydroxyl radical (OH), superoxide anion radical (O2(-)), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), showing that especially the V(IV) and Fe(III) complexes had significant scavenging activity for ROS.

  1. Redox-Active Oxygen-Containing Functional Groups in Activated Carbon Facilitate Microbial Reduction of Ferrihydrite.

    PubMed

    Wu, Song; Fang, Guodong; Wang, Yujun; Zheng, Yue; Wang, Chao; Zhao, Feng; Jaisi, Deb P; Zhou, Dongmei

    2017-09-05

    Carbonaceous materials are commonly used in agronomic and environmental applications primarily as geosorbents, but their redox properties that may affect biogeochemical reactions are rarely documented. Herein, the role of activated carbon (AC) mediating microbial reduction of ferrihydrite is studied. Our batch experiment results show that AC facilitated the reduction of ferrihydrite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, but the pretreatment of AC with HNO3 further increased the rate of reduction. The redox-active oxygen-containing functional groups in AC were found to be responsible for the enhancement of the microbial reduction of ferrihydrite. This conclusion was supported by the electrochemical evidence that showed that the electron exchange capacity (EEC) of AC was facilitated due to the presence of quinone/hydroquinone groups and strongly positively correlated with the content of C═O groups. Moreover, the coprecipitation of vivianite and siderite was found in the products in the presence of AC, but siderite only was present in the absence of AC. The proper identification of potential functional groups in AC-mediating electron transfer during microbial reduction of ferrihydrite provides insights into the mechanism of reaction and potential roles carbonaceous materials may play in biogeochemical redox processes and, consequently, the fate of contaminants in the environment.

  2. Impact of reduced cytochrome oxidase activity on peak oxygen consumption of muscle.

    PubMed

    McAllister, R M; Ogilvie, R W; Terjung, R L

    1990-07-01

    The impact of reduced muscle oxidative capacity on peak oxygen consumption and isometric performance was evaluated using an isolated rat hindlimb preparation perfused with a high oxygen delivery. Capacity for electron transport was reduced with chloramphenicol (CAP), an inhibitor of mitochondrial gene-coded protein synthesis. The activity of cytochrome oxidase, a mitochondrial cristae component, was reduced approximately 45% (P less than 0.005) in the mixed-fiber-type plantaris muscle. Several facets of muscle remodeling were also evident with the 10- to 14-day CAP treatment, including decreased citrate synthase activity, increased capillarity, and increased numbers of type IIc fibers. Perfusion of CAP (n = 6) and control (n = 7) rat hindlimbs of similar size with similar total flows (10-11 ml/min) and oxygen contents (20-21 vol%) resulted in similarly high oxygen deliveries to contracting muscles of the hindlimbs (CAP, 9.66 +/- 0.83 mumols.min-1.g-1; control, 8.74 +/- 0.75). Performance of the gastrocnemius-plantaris-soleus group declined in a similar fashion for both groups during increasingly intense near-steady-state tetanic contraction (100 ms at 100 Hz) conditions of 4, 8, 15, 30, 45, and 60 per minute. Oxygen consumption was similar for both groups at rest and increased similarly at each contraction condition. Peak oxygen consumption was not different between CAP (5.34 +/- 0.55 mumols.min-1.g-1) and control (5.74 +/- 0.43) groups and required only 56-68% of the oxygen delivered. This implies that rat skeletal muscle can suffer a significant reduction in its electron transport capacity without impairing peak oxygen consumption and muscle performance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Bacterial Activity and Organic Matter Turnover in Oxygen Deficient Waters of the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piontek, J.; Massmig, M.; Endres, S.; Le Moigne, F. A. C.; Bange, H. W.; Engel, A.

    2016-02-01

    The Baltic Sea is an enclosed marine system that suffers from expanding zones of oxygen deficiency due to limited ventilation by the episodic inflow of oxygenated North Sea water combined with high anthropogenic nutrient loads. In particular coastal areas are strongly influenced by eutrophication that leads to enhanced microbial oxygen consumption and sporadic anoxia even at shallow sites. It has been shown that oxygen availability is a powerful determinant of the taxonomic composition of prokaryotic communities in deep waters of the Baltic Sea. However, it remains unclear if community changes in response to low oxygen impact carbon remineralization or if functional redundancy prevents effects on major biogeochemical processes driven by bacterial activity. Our study includes monthly samplings at a coastal time series station over three annual cycles with recurring anoxic periods in late summer. Furthermore, sampling was accomplished in the deep Gotland Basin, where a permanent pycnocline prevents vertical mixing. We determined rates of extracellular glucosidase, aminopeptidase and phosphatase, as well as bacterial protein production using fluorescent and radioactive labelled substrate analogues, respectively. The rate measurements were combined with the analysis of organic matter concentration and composition by different analytical tools. Field data and experimental work show that enzymatic polymer hydrolysis, bacterial biomass production and growth rates in oxygen deficient waters of the Baltic Sea are not inherently lower than in oxic waters. Instead, results reveal that the reactivity of organic carbon and the availability of inorganic nutrients are more powerful constraints on organic matter turnover in oxygen deficient zones of the Baltic Sea. Our results imply that oxygen availability alone is not the decisive factor for heterotrophic bacterial activity in deep waters, instead it is part of a multiple environmental control of carbon remineralization.

  4. Reactivity Descriptors for the Activity of Molecular MN4 Catalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Zagal, José H; Koper, Marc T M

    2016-11-14

    Similarities are established between well-known reactivity descriptors of metal electrodes for their activity in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the reactivity of molecular catalysts, in particular macrocyclic MN4 metal complexes confined to electrode surfaces. We show that there is a correlation between the M(III) /M(II) redox potential of MN4 chelates and the M-O2 binding energies. Specifically, the binding energy of O2 (and other O species) follows the M(III) -OH/M(II) redox transition for MnN4 and FeN4 chelates. The ORR volcano plot for MN4 catalysts is similar to that for metal catalysts: catalysts on the weak binding side (mostly CoN4 chelates) yield mainly H2 O2 as the product, with an ORR onset potential independent of the pH value on the NHE scale (and therefore pH-dependent on the RHE scale); catalysts on the stronger binding side yield H2 O as the product with the expected pH-dependence on the NHE scale. The suggested descriptors also apply to heat-treated pyrolyzed MN4 catalysts. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Oxygen isotope activities and concentrations in aqueous salt solutions at elevated temperatures: Consequences for isotope geochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Truesdell, A.H.

    1974-01-01

    Studies of the effect of dissolved salts on the oxygen isotope activity ratio of water have been extended to 275??C. Dehydrated salts were added to water of known isotope composition and the solutions were equilibrated with CO2 which was sampled for analysis. For comparison similar studies were made using pure water. Results on water nearly coincide with earlier calculations. Salt effects diminish with increasing temperature only for solutions of MgCl2 and LiCl. Other salt solutions show complex behavior due to the temperature-dependent formation of ion pairs of changing character. Equilibrium fractionations (103 ln ??) between 1 molal solutions and pure water at 25, 100, and 275??C are: NaCl 0.0, -1.5, +1.0; KCl 0.0, -1.0, +2.0; LiCl -1.0, -0.6, -0.5; CaCl2 -0.4, -1.8, +0.8; MgCl2 -1.1, -0.7, -0.3; MgSO4 -1.1, +0.1, -; NaF (0.8 m) 0.0, -1.5, -0.3; and NH4Cl (0.55 m) 0.0, -1.2, -1.3. These effects are significant in the isotope study of hot saline fluids responsible for ore deposition and of fluids found in certain geothermal systems. Minor modification of published isotope geothermometers may be required. ?? 1974.

  6. Dynamics of reactive oxygen species generation in the presence of copper(II)-histidine complex and cysteine.

    PubMed

    Ząbek-Adamska, Anna; Drożdż, Ryszard; Naskalski, Jerzy W

    2013-01-01

    Histidine-copper(II) complex (Cu-His2) is a form of bound copper necessary for cellular copper uptake. Due to the high affinity of histidine to copper(II) ions, the binding of copper(II) by histidine is considered a substantial part of plasma antioxidative defense. Also cysteine plays a role in the antioxidative system. However, we show here that in the presence of oxygen the histidine-copper(II) complex plus cysteine produces reactive oxygen species (ROS). Cysteine concentration was assayed using a thiol specific silver-mercury electrode. Hydrogen peroxide was assayed amperometrically using platinum electrode. ROS formation was followed by chemiluminescence of luminol-fluoresceine-enhanced system. Addition of cysteine to Cu-His2 solution at pH 7.4 in the presence of atmospheric oxygen initiates the synthesis of H2O2 and generation of ROS, which manifests as a burst of chemiluminescence. The reaction has two stages; in the first stage, cysteine is utilized for the synthesis of an unstable intermediary product which becomes a substrate for ROS formation. Anaerobic conditions inhibit ROS formation. Increased cysteine concentration enhances the lag phase of the oxidative burst without influencing the amount of ROS. The synthesis of ROS (measured by chemiluminescence) is proportional to the concentration of Cu-His2 employed. ROS production can be repetitively initiated by further additions of cysteine to the reaction medium. The study suggests that Cu-His2 catalyzes cysteine-dependent reduction of oxygen to superoxide employing an intermediary cysteine-copper(I) complex and enabling Fenton reaction with copper and hydrogen peroxide produced as a secondary product. In effect, Cu-His2 with cysteine may be a source of ROS in biological media.

  7. Oxidation of gonadotrophin (PMSG) by oxygen free radicals alters its structure and hormonal activity.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Camarillo, C; Guzmán-Grenfell, A M; Hicks, J J

    1999-03-01

    The effect of oxygen free radicals produced by the Fenton reaction was used to induce oxidation and other structural changes in pregnant mare serum gonadotrophin (PMSG). Modifications in the spectrophotometric scan, an increase in exposed carbonyl groups, and the ability to reduce nitroblue tetrazolium, was achieved by the oxidized hormone when compared to the control PMSG. PMSG loses its biological activity when coming in contact with the free-radical generating system. This lack of activity is manifested as a loss of ovulation and a decrease in the weight of the ovaries and uterus. It was demonstrated that oxygen free radicals can induce structural and biological changes in the gonadotrophin.

  8. On-Orbit Checkout and Activation of the ISS Oxygen Generation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagdigian, Robert M.; Prokhorov, Kimberlee S.

    2007-01-01

    NASA has developed and; deployed an Oxygen Generation System (OGS) into the Destiny Module of the International Space Station (ISS). The major. assembly; included in this system is the Oxygen Generator Assembly. (OGA) which was developed under NASA contract by Hamilton Sundstrand Space Systems International (HSSSI), Inc. This paper summarizes the installation of the system into the Destiny Module, its initial checkout and periodic preventative maintenance activities, and its operational activation. Trade studies and analyses that were conducted with the goal of mitigating on-orbit operational risks are also discussed.

  9. On-Orbit Checkout and Activation of the ISS Oxygen Generation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagdigian, Robert M.; Prokhorov, Kimberlee S.

    2007-01-01

    NASA has developed and; deployed an Oxygen Generation System (OGS) into the Destiny Module of the International Space Station (ISS). The major. assembly; included in this system is the Oxygen Generator Assembly. (OGA) which was developed under NASA contract by Hamilton Sundstrand Space Systems International (HSSSI), Inc. This paper summarizes the installation of the system into the Destiny Module, its initial checkout and periodic preventative maintenance activities, and its operational activation. Trade studies and analyses that were conducted with the goal of mitigating on-orbit operational risks are also discussed.

  10. Antioxidative activity and growth regulation of Brassicaceae induced by oxygen radical irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Nobuya; Ono, Reoto; Shiratani, Masaharu; Yonesu, Akira

    2015-06-01

    The growth regulation characteristics of plants are investigated when plant seeds are irradiated with atmospheric discharge plasma. Enhancement of the germination and lengths of the stem and root of plants are observed after seeding. The total length of the stem and root increases approximately 1.6 times after a cultivation period of 72 h. The growth regulation effect is found to be maintained for 80 h of cultivation after seeding. The growth regulation originates from the change in the antioxidative activity of plant cells induced by active oxygen species generated in the oxygen plasma, which leads to the production of growth factor in plants.

  11. Characterization and activity of cephalosporin metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Auda, S H; Mrestani, Y; Fetouh, M I; Neubert, R H H

    2008-08-01

    Semi-synthetic cephalosporin antibiotics have structures similar to that of penicillins, and both groups of compounds are characterized by similar properties and determined by the same methods. Most antibiotics, including cephalosporins and their decomposition products, contain electron donor groups that can bind naturally occurring metal ions in vivo. Cephalosporin antibiotics exhibit a change in their toxicological properties and biological performance when they were tested as metal complexes. The proposed reason for such a behavior is the capability of chelate binding of the cephalosporins to the metals. In an attempt to understand the coordination mode of metals with cephalosporins, different spectroscopic techniques such as IR, UV-visible, NMR spectroscopy and voltammetric measurements were carried out to elucidate the structure of the metal-cephalosporin complexes. Synthesis, characterization and biological screening of the cephalosporins and of the cephalosporin-metal complexes are discussed in this review. However, little information is available on the influence of the metal ions on the pharmacokinetics of the cephalosporin derivatives.

  12. Inhibition of total oxygen uptake by silica nanoparticles in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Sibag, Mark; Choi, Byeong-Gyu; Suh, Changwon; Lee, Kwan Hyung; Lee, Jae Woo; Maeng, Sung Kyu; Cho, Jinwoo

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticle toxicity to biological activities in activated sludge is largely unknown. Among the widely used nanoparticles, silica nanoparticles (SNP) have a limited number of studies associated with inhibition to the activated sludge process (ASP). We demonstrated SNP inhibition of activated sludge respiration through oxygen uptake rate (OUR) measurement. Based on the percentage inhibition of total oxygen consumption (IT), we observed that smaller SNPs (12 nm, IT=33 ± 3%; 151 nm, IT=23 ± 2%) were stronger inhibitors than larger SNPs (442 and 683 nm, IT=5 ± 1%). Transmission electron micrographs showed that some of the SNPs were adsorbed on and/or apparently embedded somewhere in the microbial cell membrane. Whether SNPs are directly associated with the inhibition of total oxygen uptake warrants further studies. However, it is clear that SNPs statistically significantly altered the composition of microbial membrane lipids, which was more clearly described by principal component analysis and weighted Euclidian distance (PCA-ED) of the fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) data. This study suggests that SNPs potentially affect the biological activity in activated sludge through the inhibition of total oxygen uptake. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Oxygenated drinking water enhances immune activity in pigs and increases immune responses of pigs during Salmonella typhimurium infection.

    PubMed

    Jung, Bock-Gie; Lee, Jin-A; Lee, Bong-Joo

    2012-12-01

    It has been considered that drinking oxygenated water improves oxygen availability, which may increase vitality and improve immune functions. The present study evaluated the effects of oxygenated drinking water on immune function in pigs. Continuous drinking of oxygenated water markedly increased peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation, interleukin-1β expression level and the CD4(+):CD8(+) cell ratio in pigs. During Salmonella Typhimurium infection, total leukocytes and relative cytokines expression levels were significantly increased in pigs consuming oxygenated water compared with pigs consuming tap water. These findings suggest that oxygenated drinking water enhances immune activity in pigs and increases immune responses of pigs during S. Typhimurium Infection.

  14. Noise enhanced activity in a complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Anshul; Kohar, Vivek; Sinha, Sudeshna

    2014-09-01

    We consider the influence of local noise on a generalized network of populations having positive and negative feedbacks. The population dynamics at the nodes is nonlinear, typically chaotic, and allows cessation of activity if the population falls below a threshold value. We investigate the global stability of this large interactive system, as indicated by the average number of nodal populations that manage to remain active. Our central result is that the probability of obtaining active nodes in this network is significantly enhanced under fluctuations. Further, we find a sharp transition in the number of active nodes as noise strength is varied, along with clearly evident scaling behaviour near the critical noise strength. Lastly, we also observe noise induced temporal coherence in the active sub-network, namely, there is an enhancement in synchrony among the nodes at an intermediate noise strength.

  15. Influence of sulf-oxygenation on CO/L substitution and Fe(CO)3 rotation in thiolate-bridged diiron complexes.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Liu, Tianbiao; Singleton, Michael L; Darensbourg, Marcetta Y

    2009-09-07

    Kinetic studies of CO/L substitution reactions of the well-known organometallic complex (mu-pdt)[Fe(CO)(3)](2) (pdt = 1,3-propanedithiolate), complex 1, and its sulfur-oxygenated derivative (mu-pst)[Fe(CO)(3)](2) (pst = 3-sulfenatopropane-1-thiolate), 1-O, have been carried out with the goal of understanding the influence of the sulfenato ligand on the activation barrier to ligand substitution in such diiron carbonyl complexes which consists of two components: intramolecular structural rearrangement (or fluxionality) and nucleophilic attack by the incoming ligand. The CO/PMe(3) substitution reactions of complex 1 follow associative mechanisms in both the first and the second substitutions; the second substitution is found to have a higher activation barrier for the overall reaction that yields 1-(PMe(3))(2). Despite the increased electrophilicity of the Fe(CO)(3) unit in 1-O versus 1, the former reacts more sluggishly with PMe(3), where practical kinetic measurements are at such high temperatures that CO dissociation parallels the associative path. Kinetic studies have established that in complex 1-O both the first and the second CO/CN(-) substitutions proceed via associative paths with higher E(act) barriers than the analogous reactions with complex 1. Theoretical calculations (density functional theory) have been used in conjunction with variable temperature (13)C NMR spectral studies to examine the energy barriers associated with rotation of the Fe(CO)(3) unit. The activation energy required for rotation is higher in the sulfenato than in the analogous thiolato complexes. Thus, the greater barrier to structural deformation in 1-O inhibits its ability to expand its coordination number as compared to the thiolate, 1, resulting in slower reaction rates of both PMe(3) and CN(-) substitution reactions.

  16. Carbon-Oxygen Bond Forming Mechanisms in Rhenium Oxo-Alkyl Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Mu-Jeng; Nielsen, Robert J.; Ahlquist, Marten; Goddard, William A.

    2010-04-07

    Three C-X bond formation mechanisms observed in the oxidation of (HBpz3)ReO(R)(OTf) [HBpz 3 = hydrotris(1-pyrazolyl)borate; R = Me, Et, and iPr; OTf = OSO2CF3] by dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) were investigated using quantum mechanics (M06//B3LYP DFT) combined with solvation (using the PBF Poisson-Boltzmann polarizable continuum solvent model). For R = Et we find the alkyl group is activated through α-hydrogen abstraction by external base OTf- with a free energy barrier of only 12.0 kcal/mol, leading to formation of acetaldehyde. Alternatively, ethyl migration across the M=O bond (leading to the formation of acetaldehyde and ethanol) poses a free energy barrier of 22.1 kcal/mol, and the previously proposed α-hydrogen transfer to oxo (a 2+2 forbidden reaction) poses a barrier of 44.9 kcal/mol. The rate-determining step to formation of the final product acetaldehyde is an oxygen atom transfer from DMSO to the ethylidene, with a free energy barrier of 15.3 kcal/mol. When R = iPr, the alkyl 1,2-migration pathway becomes the more favorable pathway (both kinetically and thermodynamically), with a free energy barrier (ΔG = 11.8 kcal/mol) lower than α-hydrogen abstraction by OTf- (ΔG = 13.5 kcal/mol). This suggests the feasibility of utilizing this type of migration to functionalize M-R to M-OR. We also considered the nucleophilic attack of water and ammonia on the Re-ethylidene α-carbon as a means of recovering two-electron-oxidized products from an alkane oxidation. Nucleophilic attack (with internal deprotonation of the nucleophile) is exothermic. However, the subsequent protonolysis of the Re-alkyl bond (to liberate an alcohol or amine) poses a barrier of 37.0 or 42.4 kcal/mol, respectively. Where comparisons are possible, calculated free energies agree very well with experimental measurements.

  17. Oxygen-functionalized few-layer graphene sheets as active catalysts for oxidative dehydrogenation reactions.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Viviane; Fu, Wujun; Tsai, Yu-Tung; Meyer, Harry M; Rondinone, Adam J; Chen, Jihua; Wu, Zili; Overbury, Steven H; Liang, Chengdu

    2013-05-01

    Nanostructured graphitic forms of carbons have shown intersting potential for catalysis research and are ideal candidates to substitute the conventional metal-oxide catalysts because they can be easily disposed, which enables a greener, more sustainable catalytic process. Few-layer graphene and its functionalized form offer the opportunity to investigate the nature of graphitic active sites for oxidation reactions in well-defined carbon-based catalysts. In this paper, we report the utilization of oxygen-functionalized few-layer graphene sheets containing variable amounts of oxygen in the heterogeneous catalytic oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) reaction of isobutane at 400ºC. Interestingly, there is poor correlation between oxygen content and catalytic performance. Carbonyl groups were found to be highly stable, and graphene that had higher sp(2) character, the lowest oxygen content, and fewer edge sites presented the lowest specific rate of isobutane reaction, although the isobutene selectivity remained high. The reoxidation of the graphene surface occurred at the same rate as the ODH reaction suggesting a Mars-van Krevelen type of mechanism, similar to that which takes place on oxide surfaces. These results appear to suggest that a higher fraction of exposed edges where oxygen active sites can be formed and exchanged should lead to more active catalysts for ODH reactions. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Mononuclear copper complex-catalyzed four-electron reduction of oxygen.

    PubMed

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Kotani, Hiroaki; Lucas, Heather R; Doi, Kaoru; Suenobu, Tomoyoshi; Peterson, Ryan L; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2010-05-26

    A mononuclear Cu(II) complex acts as an efficient catalyst for four-electron reduction of O(2) to H(2)O. Its reduction by a ferrocene derivative (Fc*) and reaction with O(2) leads to the formation of a peroxodicopper(II) complex; this is subsequently reduced by Fc* in the presence of protons to regenerate the Cu(II) complex.

  19. An active particle in a complex fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datt, Charu; Natale, Giovanniantonio; Hatzikiriakos, Savvas G.; Elfring, Gwynn J.

    2016-11-01

    Active particles are self-driven units capable of converting stored or ambient free-energy into systematic movement. We discuss here the case when such particles move through non-Newtonian fluids. Neglecting inertial forces, we employ the reciprocal theorem to calculate the propulsion velocity of a single swimmer in a weakly non-Newtonian fluid with background flow. We also derive a general expression for the velocity of an active particle modelled as a squirmer in a second-order fluid. We then discuss how active colloids are affected by the medium rheology, namely viscoelasticity and shear-thinning.

  20. Heterogenous Oxygen Isotopic Composition of a Complex Wark-Lovering Rim and the Margin of a Refractory Inclusion from Leoville

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, J. I.; Matzel, J. E. P.; Simon, S. B.; Weber, P. K.; Grossman, L.; Ross, D. K.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2014-01-01

    Wark-Lovering (WL) rims [1] surrounding many refractory inclusions represent marker events in the early evolution of the Solar System in which many inclusions were exposed to changes in pressure [2], temperature [3], and isotopic reservoirs [4-7]. The effects of these events can be complex, not only producing mineralogical variability of WL rims [2], but also leading to mineralogical [8-10] and isotopic [7, 11, 12] changes within inclusion interiors. Extreme oxygen isotopic heterogeneity measured in CAIs has been explained by mixing between distinct oxygen gas reservoirs in the nebula [13]. Some WL rims contain relatively simple mineral layering and/or are isotopically homogeneous [14, 15]. As part of a larger effort to document and understand the modifications observed in some CAIs, an inclusion (L6) with a complex WL rim from Leoville, a member of the reduced CV3 subgroup was studied. Initial study of the textures and mineral chemistry was presented by [16]. Here we present NanoSIMS oxygen isotopic measurements to complement these petrologic observations.

  1. Porous yolk-shell microspheres as N-doped carbon matrix for motivating the oxygen reduction activity of oxygen evolution oriented materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jinqiu; Wang, Mengfan; Qian, Tao; Liu, Sisi; Cao, Xuecheng; Yang, Tingzhou; Yang, Ruizhi; Yan, Chenglin

    2017-09-01

    It is highly challenging to explore high-performance bi-functional oxygen electrode catalysts for their practical application in next-generation energy storage and conversion devices. In this work, we synthesize hierarchical N-doped carbon microspheres with porous yolk-shell structure (NCYS) as a metal-free electrocatalyst toward efficient oxygen reduction through a template-free route. The enhanced oxygen reduction performances in both alkaline and acid media profit well from the porous yolk-shell structure as well as abundant nitrogen functional groups. Furthermore, such yolk-shell microspheres can be used as precursor materials to motivate the oxygen reduction activity of oxygen evolution oriented materials to obtain a desirable bi-functional electrocatalyst. To verify its practical utility, Zn-air battery tests are conducted and exhibit satisfactory performance, indicating that this constructed concept for preparation of bi-functional catalyst will afford a promising strategy for exploring novel metal-air battery electrocatalysts.

  2. Porous yolk-shell microspheres as N-doped carbon matrix for motivating the oxygen reduction activity of oxygen evolution oriented materials.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jinqiu; Wang, Mengfan; Qian, Tao; Liu, Sisi; Cao, Xuecheng; Yang, Tingzhou; Yang, Ruizhi; Yan, Chenglin

    2017-09-08

    It is highly challenging to explore high-performance bi-functional oxygen electrode catalysts for their practical application in next-generation energy storage and conversion devices. In this work, we synthesize hierarchical N-doped carbon microspheres with porous yolk-shell structure (NCYS) as a metal-free electrocatalyst toward efficient oxygen reduction through a template-free route. The enhanced oxygen reduction performances in both alkaline and acid media profit well from the porous yolk-shell structure as well as abundant nitrogen functional groups. Furthermore, such yolk-shell microspheres can be used as precursor materials to motivate the oxygen reduction activity of oxygen evolution oriented materials to obtain a desirable bi-functional electrocatalyst. To verify its practical utility, Zn-air battery tests are conducted and exhibit satisfactory performance, indicating that this constructed concept for preparation of bi-functional catalyst will afford a promising strategy for exploring novel metal-air battery electrocatalysts.

  3. Synthesis, DNA interactions and antibacterial PDT of Cu(II) complexes of phenanthroline based photosensitizers via singlet oxygen generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhamani, C. N.; Bhojya Naik, H. S.; Sangeetha Gowda, K. R.; Giridhar, M.; Girija, D.; Prashanth Kumar, P. N.

    2015-03-01

    Cu(II) complexes [Cu(mqt)(B)H2O]ClO4(1-3) of 2-thiol 4-methylquinoline and phenanthroline bases (B), viz 1,10-phenanthroline (phen in 1), Dipyrido[3,2-d:2‧,3‧-f]quinoxaline (dpq in 2) and Dipyrido[3,2-a:2‧,3‧-c]phenazine (dppz in 3) have been prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-Vis, magnetic moment values, EPR spectra and conductivity measurements. The spectral data reveal that all the complexes exhibit square-pyramidal geometry. The DNA-binding behaviors of the three complexes were investigated by absorption spectra, viscosity measurements and thermal denaturation studies. The DNA binding constants for complexes (1), (2) and (3) were determined to 2.2 × 103, 1.3 × 104 and 8.6 × 104 M-1 respectively. The experimental results suggest that these complexes interact with DNA through groove-binding mode. The photo induced cleavage studies shows that the complexes possess photonuclease property against pUC19 DNA under UV-Visible irradiation via a mechanistic pathway involving formation of singlet oxygen as the reactive species. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy was studied using photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) assay against Escherichiacoli and all complexes exhibited significant reduction in bacterial growth on photoirradiation.

  4. New Active Optical Technique Developed for Measuring Low-Earth-Orbit Atomic Oxygen Erosion of Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; deGroh, Kim K.; Demko, Rikako

    2003-01-01

    Polymers such as polyimide Kapton (DuPont) and Teflon FEP (DuPont, fluorinated ethylene propylene) are commonly used spacecraft materials because of desirable properties such as flexibility, low density, and in the case of FEP, a low solar absorptance and high thermal emittance. Polymers on the exterior of spacecraft in the low-Earth-orbit (LEO) environment are exposed to energetic atomic oxygen. Atomic oxygen reaction with polymers causes erosion, which is a threat to spacecraft performance and durability. It is, therefore, important to understand the atomic oxygen erosion yield E (the volume loss per incident oxygen atom) of polymers being considered in spacecraft design. The most common technique for determining E is a passive technique based on mass-loss measurements of samples exposed to LEO atomic oxygen during a space flight experiment. There are certain disadvantages to this technique. First, because it is passive, data are not obtained until after the flight is completed. Also, obtaining the preflight and postflight mass measurements is complicated by the fact that many polymers absorb water and, therefore, the mass change due to water absorption can affect the E data. This is particularly true for experiments that receive low atomic oxygen exposures or for samples that have a very low E. An active atomic oxygen erosion technique based on optical measurements has been developed that has certain advantages over the mass-loss technique. This in situ technique can simultaneously provide the erosion yield data on orbit and the atomic oxygen exposure fluence, which is needed for erosion yield determination. In the optical technique, either sunlight or artificial light can be used to measure the erosion of semitransparent or opaque polymers as a result of atomic oxygen attack. The technique is simple and adaptable to a rather wide range of polymers, providing that they have a sufficiently high optical absorption coefficient. If one covers a photodiode with a

  5. A manganese(V)-oxo π-cation radical complex: influence of one-electron oxidation on oxygen-atom transfer.

    PubMed

    Prokop, Katharine A; Neu, Heather M; de Visser, Sam P; Goldberg, David P

    2011-10-12

    One-electron oxidation of Mn(V)-oxo corrolazine 2 affords 2(+), the first example of a Mn(V)(O) π-cation radical porphyrinoid complex, which was characterized by UV-vis, EPR, LDI-MS, and DFT methods. Access to 2 and 2(+) allowed for a direct comparison of their reactivities in oxygen-atom transfer (OAT) reactions. Both complexes are capable of OAT to PPh(3) and RSR substrates, and 2(+) was found to be a more potent oxidant than 2. Analysis of rate constants and activation parameters, together with DFT calculations, points to a concerted OAT mechanism for 2(+) and 2 and indicates that the greater electrophilicity of 2(+) likely plays a dominant role in enhancing its reactivity. These results are relevant to comparisons between Compound I and Compound II in heme enzymes.

  6. XPC silencing in normal human keratinocytes triggers metabolic alterations through NOX-1 activation-mediated reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Hamid Reza; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Ali, Nsrein; Benard, Giovanni; Tang, Xiuwei; Yang, Hee Seung; Jouary, Thomas; de Verneuil, Hubert; Taïeb, Alain; Kim, Arianna L; Mazurier, Frédéric

    2011-06-01

    Cancer cells utilize complex mechanisms to remodel their bioenergetic properties. We exploited the intrinsic genomic stability of xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) to understand the inter-relationships between genomic instability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and metabolic alterations during neoplastic transformation. We showed that knockdown of XPC (XPC(KD)) in normal human keratinocytes results in metabolism remodeling through NADPH oxidase-1 (NOX-1) activation, which in turn leads to increased ROS levels. While enforcing antioxidant defenses by overexpressing catalase, CuZnSOD, or MnSOD could not block the metabolism remodeling, impaired NOX-1 activation abrogates both alteration in ROS levels and modifications of energy metabolism. As NOX-1 activation is observed in human squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), the blockade of NOX-1 could be a target for the prevention and the treatment of skin cancers.

  7. XPC silencing in normal human keratinocytes triggers metabolic alterations through NOX-1 activation-mediated reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Rezvani, Hamid Reza; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Ali, Nsrein; Benard, Giovanni; Tang, Xiuwei; Yang, Hee Seung; Jouary, Thomas; de Verneuil, Hubert; Taïeb, Alain; Kim, Arianna L.; Mazurier, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    Summary Cancer cells utilize complex mechanisms to remodel their bioenergetic properties. We exploited the intrinsic genomic stability of xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) to understand the interrelationships between genomic instability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and metabolic alterations during neoplastic transformation. We showed that knockdown of XPC (XPCKD) in normal human keratinocytes results in metabolism remodeling through NADPH oxidase-1 (NOX-1) activation, which in turn leads to increased ROS levels. While enforcing antioxidant defenses by overexpressing catalase, CuZnSOD, or MnSOD could not block the metabolism remodeling, impaired NOX-1 activation abrogates both alteration in ROS levels and modifications of energy metabolism. As NOX-1 activation is observed in human squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), the blockade of NOX-1 could be a target for the prevention and the treatment of skin cancers. PMID:21167810

  8. Active and stable Ir@Pt core–shell catalysts for electrochemical oxygen reduction

    DOE PAGES

    Strickler, Alaina L.; Jackson, Ariel; Jaramillo, Thomas F.

    2016-12-28

    Electrochemical oxygen reduction is an important reaction for many sustainable energy technologies, such as fuel cells and metal–air batteries. Kinetic limitations of this reaction, expensive electrocatalysts, and catalyst instability, however, limit the commercial viability of such devices. Herein, we report an active Ir@Pt core–shell catalyst that combines platinum overlayers with nanostructure effects to tune the oxygen binding to the Pt surface, thereby achieving enhanced activity and stability for the oxygen reduction reaction. Ir@Pt nanoparticles with several shell thicknesses were synthesized in a scalable, inexpensive, one-pot polyol method. Electrochemical analysis demonstrates the activity and stability of the Ir@Pt catalyst, with specificmore » and mass activities increasing to 2.6 and 1.8 times that of commercial Pt/C (TKK), respectively, after 10 000 stability cycles. Furthermore, activity enhancement of the Ir@Pt catalyst is attributed to weakening of the oxygen binding to the Pt surface induced by the Ir core.« less

  9. Active and stable Ir@Pt core–shell catalysts for electrochemical oxygen reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Strickler, Alaina L.; Jackson, Ariel; Jaramillo, Thomas F.

    2016-12-28

    Electrochemical oxygen reduction is an important reaction for many sustainable energy technologies, such as fuel cells and metal–air batteries. Kinetic limitations of this reaction, expensive electrocatalysts, and catalyst instability, however, limit the commercial viability of such devices. Herein, we report an active Ir@Pt core–shell catalyst that combines platinum overlayers with nanostructure effects to tune the oxygen binding to the Pt surface, thereby achieving enhanced activity and stability for the oxygen reduction reaction. Ir@Pt nanoparticles with several shell thicknesses were synthesized in a scalable, inexpensive, one-pot polyol method. Electrochemical analysis demonstrates the activity and stability of the Ir@Pt catalyst, with specific and mass activities increasing to 2.6 and 1.8 times that of commercial Pt/C (TKK), respectively, after 10 000 stability cycles. Furthermore, activity enhancement of the Ir@Pt catalyst is attributed to weakening of the oxygen binding to the Pt surface induced by the Ir core.

  10. Arabidopsis plants lacking PsbQ and PsbR subunits of the oxygen-evolving complex show altered PSII super-complex organization and short-term adaptive mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Allahverdiyeva, Yagut; Suorsa, Marjaana; Rossi, Fabio; Pavesi, Andrea; Kater, Martin M; Antonacci, Alessia; Tadini, Luca; Pribil, Mathias; Schneider, Anja; Wanner, Gerhard; Leister, Dario; Aro, Eva-Mari; Barbato, Roberto; Pesaresi, Paolo

    2013-08-01

    The oxygen-evolving complex of eukaryotic photosystem II (PSII) consists of four extrinsic subunits, PsbO (33 kDa), PsbP (23 kDa), PsbQ (17 kDa) and PsbR (10 kDa), encoded by seven nuclear genes, PsbO1 (At5g66570), PsbO2 (At3g50820), PsbP1 (At1g06680), PsbP2 (At2g30790), PsbQ1 (At4g21280), PsbQ2 (At4g05180) and PsbR (At1g79040). Using Arabidopsis insertion mutant lines, we show that PsbP1, but not PsbP2, is essential for photoautotrophic growth, whereas plants lacking both forms of PsbQ and/or PsbR show normal growth rates. Complete elimination of PsbQ has a minor effect on PSII function, but plants lacking PsbR or both PsbR and PsbQ are characterized by more pronounced defects in PSII activity. Gene expression and immunoblot analyses indicate that accumulation of each of these proteins is highly dependent on the presence of the others, and is controlled at the post-transcriptional level, whereas PsbO stability appears to be less sensitive to depletion of other subunits of the oxygen-evolving complex. In addition, comparison of levels of the PSII super-complex in wild-type and mutant leaves reveals the importance of the individual subunits of the oxygen-evolving complex for the supramolecular organization of PSII and their influence on the rate of state transitions.

  11. Oxygen vacancy induced band gap narrowing of ZnO nanostructures by an electrochemically active biofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Sajid Ali; Khan, Mohammad Mansoob; Kalathil, Shafeer; Nisar, Ambreen; Lee, Jintae; Cho, Moo Hwan

    2013-09-01

    Band gap narrowing is important and advantageous for potential visible light photocatalytic applications involving metal oxide nanostructures. This paper reports a simple biogenic approach for the promotion of oxygen vacancies in pure zinc oxide (p-ZnO) nanostructures using an electrochemically active biofilm (EAB), which is different from traditional techniques for narrowing the band gap of nanomaterials. The novel protocol improved the visible photocatalytic activity of modified ZnO (m-ZnO) nanostructures through the promotion of oxygen vacancies, which resulted in band gap narrowing of the ZnO nanostructure (Eg = 3.05 eV) without dopants. X-ray diffraction, UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy confirmed the oxygen vacancy and band gap narrowing of m-ZnO. m-ZnO enhanced the visible light catalytic activity for the degradation of different classes of dyes and 4-nitrophenol compared to p-ZnO, which confirmed the band gap narrowing because of oxygen defects. This study shed light on the modification of metal oxide nanostructures by EAB with a controlled band structure.Band gap narrowing is important and advantageous for potential visible light photocatalytic applications involving metal oxide nanostructures. This paper reports a simple biogenic approach for the promotion of oxygen vacancies in pure zinc oxide (p-ZnO) nanostructures using an electrochemically active biofilm (EAB), which is different from traditional techniques for narrowing the band gap of nanomaterials. The novel protocol improved the visible photocatalytic activity of modified ZnO (m-ZnO) nanostructures through the promotion of oxygen vacancies, which resulted in band gap narrowing of the ZnO nanostructure (Eg = 3.05 eV) without dopants. X-ray diffraction, UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, X

  12. Two tetranuclear Mn-complexes as biomimetic models of the oxygen evolving complex in Photosystem II. A synthesis, characterisation and reactivity study.

    PubMed

    Berggren, Gustav; Thapper, Anders; Huang, Ping; Kurz, Philipp; Eriksson, Lars; Styring, Stenbjörn; Anderlund, Magnus F

    2009-12-07

    In this work we report the preparation of two metallamacrocyclic tetranuclear manganese(II) complexes, [L1(4)Mn4](ClO4)4 and [L2(4)Mn4](ClO4)4 where L1 and L2 are the anions of the heptadentate ligands 2-((2-(bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amino)ethyl)(methyl)amino)acetic acid and 2-(benzyl(2-(bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amino)ethyl)amino)acetic acid), respectively. The complexes have been fully characterized by ESI-MS, elemental analysis, single-crystal X-ray diffraction, magnetic susceptibility, and EPR spectroscopy. Electrochemical reactions as well as reactions with different chemical redox reagents have been performed and a reversible two electron oxidation per manganese ion has been identified. The reaction of [L1(4)Mn4](ClO4)4 with oxone or cerium(IV) results in the evolution of oxygen which makes this system interesting for future studies in the search for a functional mimic of the oxygen evolving complex in Photosystem II.

  13. Oxygen evolution and phosphorylation in Scenedesmus as influenced by the inhibitor-β complex from potato and by phloridzin.

    PubMed

    Tillberg, J E; Kylin, A

    1966-06-01

    Scenedesmus cells were tried as a photosynthesizing test system for the inhibitor-β complex from potato (var. Majestic). The main effect on oxygen evolution is an inhibition of the second gush during the induction period. The formation of bound phosphate is increased by the inhibitor when the cell suspensions are shaken in the light, whereas no significant trend is observed in similar experiments in the dark. - Phloridzin inhibits the same part of oxygen evolution as inhibitor-β from potato when cells pretreated in light are the test object. Concentrations of 1 mM increase the formation of bound phosphate in light, but at 2 mM there is a decrease in this action. Phloridzin and inhibitor-β from potato have different Rf values. - The biochemical effects studied precede possible effects on cell division. - The results are discussed in relation to the localization of the site(s) of action.

  14. Iron-oxygen interaction in silicon: A combined XBIC/XRF-EBIC-DLTS study of precipitation and complex building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trushin, M.; Vyvenko, O.; Seifert, W.; Jia, G.; Kittler, M.

    2009-12-01

    Iron-oxygen interaction in the Czochralski-grown silicon (CZ-Si) giving rise to their final precipitated state was investigated by means of a combination of electrical and element-sensitive techniques. The samples studied were intentionally contaminated with iron at 1150 °C and then they were annealed at temperatures of 850 and 950 °C to stimulate precipitate formation. Fe-related defect levels in silicon band gap and spatial distributions of iron-related precipitates were monitored after each annealing step. It was found that FeB-pairs being the dominant defects in as-contaminated sample transformed completely to the stable FeO-related complexes that served as precursors for further iron-oxygen co-precipitation.

  15. NADPH-oxidase-driven oxygen radical production determines chondrocyte death and partly regulates metalloproteinase-mediated cartilage matrix degradation during interferon-γ-stimulated immune complex arthritis

    PubMed Central

    van Lent, Peter LEM; Nabbe, Karin CAM; Blom, Arjen B; Sloetjes, Annet; Holthuysen, Astrid EM; Kolls, Jay; Van De Loo, Fons AJ; Holland, Steven M; Van Den Berg, Wim B

    2005-01-01

    In previous studies we have found that FcγRI determines chondrocyte death and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-mediated cartilage destruction during IFN-γ-regulated immune complex arthritis (ICA). Binding of immune complexes (ICs) to FcγRI leads to the prominent production of oxygen radicals. In the present study we investigated the contribution of NADPH-oxidase-driven oxygen radicals to cartilage destruction by using p47phox-/- mice lacking a functional NADPH oxidase complex. Induction of a passive ICA in the knee joints of p47phox-/- mice resulted in a significant elevation of joint inflammation at day 3 when compared with wild-type (WT) controls as studied by histology. However, when IFN-γ was overexpressed by injection of adenoviral IFN-γ in the knee joint before ICA induction, a similar influx of inflammatory cells was found at days 3 and 7, comprising mainly macrophages in both mouse strains. Proteoglycan depletion from the cartilage layers of the knee joints in both groups was similar at days 3 and 7. Aggrecan breakdown in cartilage caused by MMPs was further studied by immunolocalisation of MMP-mediated neoepitopes (VDIPEN). VDIPEN expression in the cartilage layers of arthritic knee joints was markedly lower (between 30 and 60%) in IFN-γ-stimulated arthritic p47phox-/- mice at day 7 than in WT controls, despite significant upregulation of mRNA levels of various MMPs such as MMP-3, MMP-9, MMP-12 and MMP-13 in synovia and MMP-13 in cartilage layers as measured with quantitative RT-PCR. The latter observation suggests that oxygen radicals are involved in the activation of latent MMPs. Chondrocyte death, determined as the percentage of empty lacunae in articular cartilage, ranged between 20 and 60% at day 3 and between 30 and 80% at day 7 in WT mice, and was completely blocked in p47phox-/- mice at both time points. FcγRI mRNA expression was significantly lower, and FcγRII and FcγRIII were higher, in p47phox-/- mice than in controls. NADPH

  16. Kinetics and mechanisms of the reactions of alkyl radicals with oxygen and with complexes of Co(III), Ru(III), and Ni(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, D.

    1990-10-08

    The kinetics of the reactions of C{sub 2}H{sub 5} radical with Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}X{sup 2+}, Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}X{sup 2+}, and Co(dmgH){sub 2} (X) (Y) (X = Br, Cl, N{sub 3}, SCN; Y = H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 3}CN) complexes were studied using laser flash photolysis of ethylcobalt complexes. The kinetics were obtained by the kinetic probe method. Some relative rate constants were also determined by a competition method based on ethyl halide product ratios. The kinetics of colligation reactions of a series of alkyl radicals with {beta}-Ni(cyclam){sup 2+} were studied using flaser flash photolysis of alkylcobalt complexes. Again, the kinetics were obtained by employing the kinetic probe competition method. The kinetics of the unimolecular homolysis of a series of RNi(cyclam)H{sub 2}O{sup 2+} were studied. Activation parameters were obtained for the unimolecular homolysis of C{sub 2}H{sub 5}Ni(cyclam)H{sub 2}O{sup 2+}. Kinetic and thermodynamic data obtained from these reactions were compared with those for the {sigma}-bonded organometallic complexes. The kinetics of the unimolecular homolysis of a series of RNi(cyclam)H{sub 2}O{sup 2+} complexes were studied by monitoring the formation of the oxygen insertion product RO{sub 2}Ni(cyclam)H{sub 2}O{sup 2+}. The higher rate constants for the reactions of alkyl radicals with oxygen in solution, as compared with those measured in the gas phase, were discussed. 30 refs.

  17. Studies on chemistry, spectroscopy and antioxidant activities of chromium(III)-hydrazide complexes.

    PubMed

    Shamshad, Bushra; Jamal, Rifat A; Ashiq, Uzma; Mahrooof-Tahir, Mohammad; Shaikh, Zara; Sultan, Sadaf; Khan, Khalid M

    2015-01-01

    Acid hydrazides are vital chemical entities due to their biological activities. Upon complexation with certain metal ions, their biological activities are known to be positively enhanced. The present work describes the synthesis of Cr(III)-hydrazide complexes, and their structural, spectroscopic and antioxidant properties to reveal their chemistry and biochemistry. Physical (magnetic moment, conductivity measurements), analytical (C, H, N and Cr analysis) and spectral (EI-Mass, FTIR) techniques are used for the characterization of synthesized compounds. All Cr(III)-hydrazide complexes exhibit octahedral geometry with general formula [Cr(L)2(H2O)2]Cl3. In these complexes, the hydrazide ligands are coordinated via carbonyl oxygen and terminal amino nitrogen in a bidentate fashion. All Cr(III)-hydrazide complexes were screened for in vitro diphenyldipicryl hydrazine (DPPH), superoxide dismutase and nitric oxide radical scavenging activities. Majority of the Cr(III)-hydrazide complexes were found to be more potent scavengers than their uncoordinated hydrazide ligands. This study demonstrates an interesting structure-activity relationship (SAR) which is presented here.

  18. Oxygenated drinking water enhances immune activity in broiler chicks and increases survivability against Salmonella Gallinarum in experimentally infected broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Jung, Bock-Gie; Lee, Jin-A; Nam, Kyoung-Woo; Lee, Bong-Joo

    2012-03-01

    It has been suggested that drinking oxygenated water may improve oxygen availability, which may increase vitality and improving immune activity. The present study evaluated the immune enhancing effects of oxygenated drinking water in broiler chicks and demonstrated the protective efficacy of oxygenated drinking water against Salmonella Gallinarum in experimentally infected broiler chicks. Continuous drinking of oxygenated water markedly increased serum lysozyme activity, peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation and the CD4(+)/CD8(+) splenocyte ratio in broiler chicks. In the chicks experimentally infected with S. Gallinarum, oxygenated drinking water alleviated symptoms and increased survival. These findings suggest that oxygenated drinking water enhances immune activity in broiler chicks, and increases survivability against S. Gallinarum in experimentally infected broiler chicks.

  19. Practical identification of the dissolved oxygen dynamic in activated sludge plants.

    PubMed

    Suescun, J; Ayesa, E

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the application to a full-scale waste water treatment plant (WWTP) of a practical methodology to identify the oxygen supply and consumption terms, which regulate the dynamic behaviour of the dissolved oxygen concentration (S(O)) in activated sludge reactors. This methodology is based on a periodic adjustment of the selected model for oxygen mass-transfer coefficient (K(L)a) and a continuous estimation of the oxygen uptake rate (r(O)), maintaining constant the adjusted K(L)a model, in order to uncouple the effects that the consumption and supply terms have on the S(O) concentration. The adjustment phase of the K(L)a model is based on typified excitations of the system through the aeration system of the plant, which allow the estimation of K(L)a for different values of the aeration intensity parameter, for instance, air flow rate in air diffusion systems, revolution speed in surface aerators, etc. Once the K(L)a model is adjusted, it is possible to evaluate the K(L)a value in process conditions at any time. The continuous estimation of r(O) is carried out starting from the oxygen mass balance in the activated sludge reactor. This practical methodology has been successfully verified in the Badiolegi WWTP in Azpeitia (Spain), which biological process consists of a double stage AB process, with two different aeration systems: fine pore air diffusers in the A-stage and surface aerators in the B-stage.

  20. Unveiling causal activity of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams-García, Rashid V.; Beggs, John M.; Ortiz, Gerardo

    2017-07-01

    We introduce a novel tool for analyzing complex network dynamics, allowing for cascades of causally-related events, which we call causal webs (c-webs), to be separated from other non-causally-related events. This tool shows that traditionally-conceived avalanches may contain mixtures of spatially-distinct but temporally-overlapping cascades of events, and dynamical disorder or noise. In contrast, c-webs separate these components, unveiling previously hidden features of the network and dynamics. We apply our method to mouse cortical data with resulting statistics which demonstrate for the first time that neuronal avalanches are not merely composed of causally-related events. The original version of this article was uploaded to the arXiv on March 17th, 2016 [1].

  1. Active Control of Complex Physical Systems: An Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    release; distribution is unlimited. 13. ABSTRACT (Maxtmum 200 words) Active control of complex systems imposes unique requirements for physical models and...months after the meeting, SPrinte In USA. Acceslon For NTIS CRA&W DTIC TAB Unlannounced ] Active Control of Complex Physical Systems Justificatton An...control strategies. Physical models This work on the active control of which are adequate to predict the influence of specific physical systems has been

  2. Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) detection of active oxygen species and organic phases in Martian soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Fun-Dow; Kim, Soon Sam; Liang, Ranty H.

    1989-01-01

    The presence of active oxygen species (O(-), O2(-), O3(-)) and other strong oxidants (Fe2O3 and Fe3O4) was invoked in interpretations of the Viking biological experiments and a model was also suggested for Martian surface chemistry. The non-biological interpretations of the biological results gain futher support as no organic compounds were detected in the Viking pyrolysis-gas chromatography mass spectrometer (GCSM) experiments at concentrations as low as 10 ppb. Electron spin resonance (ESR) measures the absorption of microwaves by a paramagnetic and/or ferromagnetic center in the presence of an external field. In many instances, ESR has the advantage of detailed submicroscopic identification of the transient species and/or unstable reaction intermediates in their environments. Since the higly active oxygen species (O(-), O2(-), O3(-), and R-O-O(-)) are all paramagnetic in nature, they can be readily detected in native form by the ESR method. Active oxygen species likely to occur in the Martian surface samples were detected by ESR in UV-irradiated samples containing MgO. A miniaturized ESR spectrometer system can be developed for the Mars Rover Sample Return Mission. The instrument can perform the following in situ Martian samples analyses: detection of active oxygen species; characterization of Martian surface chemistry and photooxidation processes; and searching for organic compounds in the form of free radicals preserved in subsoils, and detection of microfossils with Martian carbonate sediments.

  3. GAS PHASE SELECTIVE PHOTOXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS USING LIGHT-ACTIVATED TITANIUM DIOXIDE AND MOLECULAR OXYGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas Phase Selective Oxidation of Alcohols Using Light-Activated Titanium Dioxide and Molecular Oxygen

    Gas phase selective oxidations of various primary and secondary alcohols are studied in an indigenously built stainless steel up-flow photochemical reactor using ultravi...

  4. GAS PHASE SELECTIVE PHOTOXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS USING LIGHT-ACTIVATED TITANIUM DIOXIDE AND MOLECULAR OXYGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas Phase Selective Oxidation of Alcohols Using Light-Activated Titanium Dioxide and Molecular Oxygen

    Gas phase selective oxidations of various primary and secondary alcohols are studied in an indigenously built stainless steel up-flow photochemical reactor using ultravi...

  5. Effect of gas-liquid-crystal transitions in oxygen clusters on electric and magnetic activity of localized states in In2O3-SrO ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okunev, V. D.; Szymczak, R.; Szymczak, H.; Aleshkevych, P.; Glot, A. B.; Bondarchuk, A. N.

    2015-10-01

    It has been shown that the overlap of tails of the density of states of the valence and conduction bands leads to the formation of a "negative" gap in the In2O3-SrO ceramic with disordered structure and oxygen clusters in nanovoids. Two types of magnetism are observed. One of them caused by the formation of (dangling bond + O- 2 center) complexes has been found in samples saturated with oxygen. The other is associated with the presence of dangling bonds in oxygen-depleted samples. At T < 90.18 K, when oxygen molecules fall from the walls of nanovoids, small liquid oxygen droplets are formed with the release of a large number of free dangling bonds resulting in the variation of magnetization and electrical conductivity of samples. The effects caused by magnetic phase transitions in clusters of crystal oxygen are manifested at T < 54.8 K. The variations of the resistance of samples in the interval T = 5-300 K correspond to Mott's law under the dependence of the local activation energy for electron hopping on the state of oxygen clusters.

  6. Dramatic Influence of an Anionic Donor on the Oxygen-Atom Transfer Reactivity of a MnV–Oxo Complex

    PubMed Central

    Neu, Heather M; Quesne, Matthew G; Yang, Tzuhsiung; Prokop-Prigge, Katharine A; Lancaster, Kyle M; Donohoe, James; DeBeer, Serena; de Visser, Sam P; Goldberg, David P

    2014-01-01

    Addition of an anionic donor to an MnV(O) porphyrinoid complex causes a dramatic increase in 2-electron oxygen-atom-transfer (OAT) chemistry. The 6-coordinate [MnV(O)(TBP8Cz)(CN)]− was generated from addition of Bu4N+CN− to the 5-coordinate MnV(O) precursor. The cyanide-ligated complex was characterized for the first time by Mn K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and gives Mn–O=1.53 Å, Mn–CN=2.21 Å. In combination with computational studies these distances were shown to correlate with a singlet ground state. Reaction of the CN− complex with thioethers results in OAT to give the corresponding sulfoxide and a 2e−-reduced MnIII(CN)− complex. Kinetic measurements reveal a dramatic rate enhancement for OAT of approximately 24 000-fold versus the same reaction for the parent 5-coordinate complex. An Eyring analysis gives ΔH≠=14 kcal mol−1, ΔS≠=−10 cal mol−1 K−1. Computational studies fully support the structures, spin states, and relative reactivity of the 5- and 6-coordinate MnV(O) complexes. PMID:25256417

  7. Classifying organic materials by oxygen-to-carbon elemental ratio to predict the activation regime of Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwata, M.; Shao, W.; Lebouteiller, R.; Martin, S. T.

    2013-05-01

    The governing highly soluble, slightly soluble, or insoluble activation regime of organic compounds as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) was examined as a function of oxygen-to-carbon elemental ratio (O : C). New data were collected for adipic, pimelic, suberic, azelaic, and pinonic acids. Secondary organic materials (SOMs) produced by α-pinene ozonolysis and isoprene photo-oxidation were also included in the analysis. The saturation concentrations C of the organic compounds in aqueous solutions served as the key parameter for delineating regimes of CCN activation, and the values of C were tightly correlated to the O : C ratios. The highly soluble, slightly soluble, and insoluble regimes of CCN activation were found to correspond to ranges of [O : C] > 0.6, 0.2 < [O : C] < 0.6, and [O : C] < 0.2, respectively. These classifications were evaluated against CCN activation data of isoprene-derived SOM (O : C = 0.69-0.72) and α-pinene-derived SOM (O : C = 0.38-0.48). Isoprene-derived SOM had highly soluble activation behavior, consistent with its high O : C ratio. For α-pinene-derived SOM, although CCN activation can be modeled as a highly soluble mechanism, this behavior was not predicted by the O : C ratio, for which a slightly soluble mechanism was anticipated. Complexity in chemical composition, resulting in continuous water uptake and the absence of a deliquescence transition that can thermodynamically limit CCN activation, might explain the difference in the behavior of α-pinene-derived SOM compared to that of pure organic compounds. The present results suggest that atmospheric particles dominated by hydrocarbon-like organic components do not activate (i.e., insoluble regime) whereas those dominated by oxygenated organic components activate (i.e., highly soluble regime) for typical atmospheric cloud life cycles.

  8. Classifying organic materials by oxygen-to-carbon elemental ratio to predict the activation regime of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwata, M.; Shao, W.; Lebouteiller, R.; Martin, S. T.

    2012-12-01

    The governing highly soluble, slightly soluble, or insoluble activation regime of organic compounds as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) was examined as a function of oxygen-to-carbon elemental ratio (O : C). New data were collected for adipic, pimelic, suberic, azelaic and pinonic acids. Secondary organic materials (SOMs) produced by α-pinene ozonolysis and isoprene photo-oxidation were also included in the analysis. The saturation concentrations C of the organic compounds in aqueous solutions served as the key parameter for delineating regimes of CCN activation, and the values of C were tightly correlated to the O : C ratios. The highly soluble, slightly soluble, and insoluble regimes of CCN activation were found to correspond to ranges of [O : C] > 0.6, 0.2 < [O : C] < 0.6, and [O : C] < 0.2, respectively. These classifications were evaluated against CCN activation data of isoprene-derived SOM (O : C = 0.69-0.72) and α-pinene-derived SOM (O : C = 0.38-0.48). Isoprene-derived SOM had highly soluble activation behavior, consistent with its high O : C ratio. For α-pinene-derived SOM, although CCN activation can be modeled as a highly soluble mechanism, this behavior was not predicted by the O : C ratio, for which a slightly soluble mechanism was anticipated. Complexity in chemical composition, resulting in continuous water uptake and the absence of a deliquescence transition that can thermodynamically limit CCN activation, might explain the differences of α-pinene-derived SOM compared to the behavior of pure organic compounds. The present results suggest that atmospheric particles dominated by hydrocarbon-like organic components do not activate (i.e. insoluble regime) whereas those dominated by oxygenated organic components activate (i.e. highly soluble regime).

  9. Oxygen isotopic systematics of an open-system magma chamber:. An example from the Freetown Layered Complex of Sierra Leone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalokwu, Christopher I.; Ripley, Edward M.; Park, Young-Rok

    1999-03-01

    The Freetown Layered Complex of Sierra Leone is a 7-km thick, rift-related tholeiitic intrusion that formed ˜193 Ma ago during the opening of the middle Atlantic Ocean. The Complex was emplaced above Archean basement gneisses, granulites, and schists of the Kasila Group at pressures of 2.8 to 5.1 kbar. The δ 18O values of bulk cumulates (5.5-6.7), separated plagioclase (5.7-6.0), olivine (5.0-5.7), and clinopyroxene (5.1-5.8) spanning the entire stratigraphic section indicate that the Complex has preserved its primary magmatic oxygen isotopic composition. The δ 18O values of whole-rocks are uniform in Zone 1 (average = 5.74 ± 0.01) but vary widely in Zones 2 and 3 (average = 6.18 ± 0.52 and 5.71 ± 0.32, respectively). Variations in whole-rock δ 18O with stratigraphic height correlate well with plagioclase mode, with δ 18O values being highest in the strongly laminated anorthosites of Zones 2 and 3, and lowest in olivine gabbro from the cyclically layered subzone of Zone 3. The overall pattern of oxygen isotopic variation with stratigraphic height in the intrusion appears to the related to the accumulation of high-δ 18O, plagioclase-rich rocks that are overlain by low-δ 18O, olivine or pyroxene-rich rock types. Fractional crystallization in combination with mineral accumulation can explain the observed oxygen isotopic variations in the Complex. Oxygen isotopic thermometry yields equilibration temperatures of 1040 to 1290°C, which are similar to temperatures (1045 to 1381°C) estimated from the plagioclase-liquid thermometer applied to the Freetown bulk magma for each zone obtained by geochemical summation. The oxygen isotopic temperatures are highest where major influxes of new magmas have occurred, indicating negligible subsolidus resetting of mineral compositions. Contemporary diabase dikes intruding the Complex have whole-rock and plagioclase δ 18O values of 6.6 and 6.7, respectively, suggesting minimal interaction of the dikes with hydrothermal

  10. DNA interaction, antioxidant activity, and bioactivity studies of two ruthenium(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Bing-Jie; Jiang, Guang-Bin; Yao, Jun-Hua; Li, Wei; Wang, Ji; Huang, Hong-Liang; Liu, Yun-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Two new ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes [Ru(dmb)2(dcdppz)](ClO4)2 (1) and [Ru(bpy)2(dcdppz)](ClO4)2 (2) were prepared and characterized. The crystal structure of the complex 2 was solved by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The complex crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group P21/n with a = 12.9622(14) Å, b = 17.1619(19) Å, c = 22.7210(3) Å, β = 100.930(2)°, R = 0.0536, Rω = 0.1111. The DNA-binding constants for complexes 1 and 2 were determined to be 1.92 × 105 (s = 1.72) and 2.24 × 105 (s = 1.86) M-1, respectively. The DNA-binding behaviors showed that complexes 1 and 2 interact with DNA by intercalative mode. The antioxidant activities of the ligand and the complexes were performed. Ligand, dcdppz, has no cytotoxicity against the selected cell lines. Complex 1 shows higher cytotoxicity than complex 2, but lower than cisplatin toward selected cell lines. The apoptosis and cell cycle arrest were investigated, and the apoptotic mechanism of BEL-7402 cells was studied by reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential and western blot analysis. Complex 1 induces apoptosis in BEL-7402 cells through ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction pathway and by regulating the expression of Bcl-2 family proteins.

  11. DNA interaction, antioxidant activity, and bioactivity studies of two ruthenium(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Han, Bing-Jie; Jiang, Guang-Bin; Yao, Jun-Hua; Li, Wei; Wang, Ji; Huang, Hong-Liang; Liu, Yun-Jun

    2015-01-25

    Two new ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes [Ru(dmb)2(dcdppz)](ClO4)2 (1) and [Ru(bpy)2(dcdppz)](ClO4)2 (2) were prepared and characterized. The crystal structure of the complex 2 was solved by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The complex crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group P21/n with a=12.9622(14)Å, b=17.1619(19)Å, c=22.7210(3)Å, β=100.930(2)(°), R=0.0536, Rω=0.1111. The DNA-binding constants for complexes 1 and 2 were determined to be 1.92×10(5) (s=1.72) and 2.24×10(5) (s=1.86)M(-1), respectively. The DNA-binding behaviors showed that complexes 1 and 2 interact with DNA by intercalative mode. The antioxidant activities of the ligand and the complexes were performed. Ligand, dcdppz, has no cytotoxicity against the selected cell lines. Complex 1 shows higher cytotoxicity than complex 2, but lower than cisplatin toward selected cell lines. The apoptosis and cell cycle arrest were investigated, and the apoptotic mechanism of BEL-7402 cells was studied by reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential and western blot analysis. Complex 1 induces apoptosis in BEL-7402 cells through ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction pathway and by regulating the expression of Bcl-2 family proteins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Chemistry of high-oxidation-state groups V and VI complexes: Novel silyl and imido complexes and the reactions of silyl and alkyl alkylidyne complexes with oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tianniu

    This dissertation describes the synthesis and characterization of the novel early transition metal (especially group VI metals) complexes free of anionic pi-ligands such as cyclopentadienyl (Cp) and studies of their reactions with oxygen and silanes. Our study of Cp-free tungsten silyl chemistry is reported. A novel d 0 tungsten silyl complex 2 [(ButCH 2)W(=CHBut)2(SiButPh2 ) (2a) ⇌ (ButCH2)2W(≡CBu t)(SiButPh2) (2b)] and an equilibrium between 2a and 2b are described in Chapter 2. The thermodynamics of this equilibrium [DeltaH° = -0.9(0.2) kcal/mol, DeltaS° = -0.6(0.8) eu] was investigated by 1H NMR. The studies of the alpha-hydrogen exchange between 2a and 2b by 2-D EXSY experiments gave kinetic parameters of the exchange: DeltaH≠ = 17.9(1.1) kcal/mol, DeltaS≠ = 1.9(5.7) eu for the forward reaction (2a → 2b) and Delta H≠ = 18.6 (1.1) kcal/mol, DeltaS ≠ = 1.9(5.7) eu for the back reaction (2b → 2a). The reaction of O2 with silyl alkylidyne 2b [(Bu tCH2)W(=CHBut)2(SiBut Ph2) (2a) ⇌ (ButCH2)2W(≡CBu t)(SiButPh2) (2b)] is described in Chapter 3. A silyl migration product (ButCH2) 2W(=O)[=C(But)(SiButPh2)] ( 5) was characterized. A siloxy analog of 2b, (Bu tCH2)2W≡CBut(OSiBu tPh2) (6), was prepared and excluded as a possible intermediate in the formation of 5. Ab initio calculations suggested a pathway involving silyl migration in 2b to give a tungsten (IV) intermediate (ButCH 2)2W=C(But)(SiButPh2) (7) prior to the reaction with O2. A crystal structure of (Me3SiCH2)2W(=O)(=CHSiMe3)(O=PMe 3)•(Me3SiCH2)3W≡CSiMe 3 (12) was obtained from the reaction of alkyl alkylidyne (Me3SiCH2)3W≡CSiMe3 with O2 in the presence of PMe3. In Chapter 4, preparation and characterization of bis(2,6-diisopropylphenylimido)molybdenum(VI) amide and silyl complexes (ArN=)2Mo(NMe2)2 (14), (ArN=)2Mo(NMe2)[Si(SiMe3) 3] (15), (ArN=)2MoCl[N(SiMe3) 2] (16), (ArN=)2Mo(NMe2)[N(SiMe 3)2] (17), and (ArN=)2Mo(NHAr) 2 (18) are reported. In addition, new bis

  13. Combinatorial Development of Water Splitting Catalysts Based on the Oxygen Evolving Complex of Photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Woodbury, Neal

    2010-03-31

    The use of methods to create large arrays of potential catalysts for the reaction H2O ½ O2 + 2H+ on the anode of an electrolysis system were investigated. This reaction is half of the overall reaction involved in the splitting of water into hydrogen and oxygen gas. This method consisted of starting with an array of electrodes and developing patterned electrochemical approaches for creating a different, defined peptide at each position in the array. Methods were also developed for measuring the rate of reaction at each point in the array. In this way, the goal was to create and then tests many thousands of possible catalysts simultaneously. This type of approach should lead to an ability to optimize catalytic activity systematically, by iteratively designing and testing new libraries of catalysts. Optimization is important to decrease energy losses (over-potentials) associated with the water splitting reaction and thus for the generation of hydrogen. Most of the efforts in this grant period were focused on developing the chemistry and analytical methods required to create pattern peptide formation either using a photolithography approach or an electrochemical approach for dictating the positions of peptide bond formation. This involved testing a large number of different reactions and conditions. We have been able to find conditions that have allowed us to pattern peptide bond formation on both glass slides using photolithographic methods and on electrode arrays made by the company Combimatrix. Part of this effort involved generating novel approaches for performing mass spectroscopy directly from the patterned arrays. We have also been able to demonstrate the ability to measure current at each electrode due to electrolysis of water. This was performed with customized instrumentation created in collaboration with Combimatrix. In addition, several different molecular designs for peptides that bound metals (primarily Mn) were developed and synthesized and metal

  14. Activation of Methanogenesis in Arid Biological Soil Crusts Despite the Presence of Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Roey; Matthies, Diethart; Conrad, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Methanogenesis is traditionally thought to occur only in highly reduced, anoxic environments. Wetland and rice field soils are well known sources for atmospheric methane, while aerated soils are considered sinks. Although methanogens have been detected in low numbers in some aerated, and even in desert soils, it remains unclear whether they are active under natural oxic conditions, such as in biological soil crusts (BSCs) of arid regions. To answer this question we carried out a factorial experiment using microcosms under simulated natural conditions. The BSC on top of an arid soil was incubated under moist conditions in all possible combinations of flooding and drainage, light and dark, air and nitrogen headspace. In the light, oxygen was produced by photosynthesis. Methane production was detected in all microcosms, but rates were much lower when oxygen was present. In addition, the δ13C of the methane differed between the oxic/oxygenic and anoxic microcosms. While under anoxic conditions methane was mainly produced from acetate, it was almost entirely produced from H2/CO2 under oxic/oxygenic conditions. Only two genera of methanogens were identified in the BSC-Methanosarcina and Methanocella; their abundance and activity in transcribing the mcrA gene (coding for methyl-CoM reductase) was higher under anoxic than oxic/oxygenic conditions, respectively. Both methanogens also actively transcribed the oxygen detoxifying gene catalase. Since methanotrophs were not detectable in the BSC, all the methane produced was released into the atmosphere. Our findings point to a formerly unknown participation of desert soils in the global methane cycle. PMID:21655270

  15. Oxygen limitation favors the production of protein with antimicrobial activity in Pseudoalteromonas sp

    PubMed Central

    López, Ruth; Monteón, Víctor; Chan, Ernesto; Montejo, Rubí; Chan, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effect of dissolved oxygen concentration on the production of biomass and metabolites with antimicrobial activity of Pseudoalteromonas sp cultured at 0, 150, 250, or 450 revolutions per minute (rev. min-1). Dissolved oxygen (D.O) was monitored during the fermentation process, biomass was quantified by dry weight, and antimicrobial activity was assessed using the disk diffusion method. The bacterium Pseudoalteromonas reached similar concentration of biomass under all experimental agitation conditions, whereas antimicrobial activity was detected at 0 and 150 rev. min-1 registering 0% and 12% of D.O respectively corresponding to microaerophilic conditions. Antibiotic activity was severely diminished when D.O was above 20% of saturation; this corresponded to 250 or 450 rev. min-1. SDS-PAGE electrophoresis revealed a protein with a molecular weight of approximately 80 kilodaltons (kDa) with antimicrobial activity. Pseudoalteromonas is capable of growing under oxic and microaerophilic conditions but the metabolites with antimicrobial activity are induced under microaerophilic conditions. The current opinion is that Pseudoalteromonas are aerobic organisms; we provide additional information on the amount of dissolved oxygen during the fermentation process and its effect on antimicrobial activity. PMID:24031945

  16. Inhibition of Proteasome Activity Induces Formation of Alternative Proteasome Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Welk, Vanessa; Coux, Olivier; Kleene, Vera; Abeza, Claire; Trümbach, Dietrich; Eickelberg, Oliver; Meiners, Silke

    2016-01-01

    The proteasome is an intracellular protease complex consisting of the 20S catalytic core and its associated regulators, including the 19S complex, PA28αβ, PA28γ, PA200, and PI31. Inhibition of the proteasome induces autoregulatory de novo formation of 20S and 26S proteasome complexes. Formation of alternative proteasome complexes, however, has not been investigated so far. We here show that catalytic proteasome inhibition results in fast recruitment of PA28γ and PA200 to 20S and 26S proteasomes within 2–6 h. Rapid formation of alternative proteasome complexes did not involve transcriptional activation of PA28γ and PA200 but rather recruitment of preexisting activators to 20S and 26S proteasome complexes. Recruitment of proteasomal activators depended on the extent of active site inhibition of the proteasome with inhibition of β5 active sites being sufficient for inducing recruitment. Moreover, specific inhibition of 26S proteasome activity via siRNA-mediated knockdown of the 19S subunit RPN6 induced recruitment of only PA200 to 20S proteasomes, whereas PA28γ was not mobilized. Here, formation of alternative PA200 complexes involved transcriptional activation of the activator. Alternative proteasome complexes persisted when cells had regained proteasome activity after pulse exposure to proteasome inhibitors. Knockdown of PA28γ sensitized cells to proteasome inhibitor-mediated growth arrest. Thus, formation of alternative proteasome complexes appears to be a formerly unrecognized but integral part of the cellular response to impaired proteasome function and altered proteostasis. PMID:27129254

  17. Probing ‘Spin-Forbidden’ Oxygen Atom Transfer: Gas-Phase Reactions of Chromium-Porphyrin Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Fornarini, Simonetta; Lanucara, Francesco; Warren, Jeffrey J.

    2010-01-01

    Oxygen-atom transfer reactions of metalloporphyrin species play an important role in biochemical and synthetic oxidation reactions. An emerging theme in this chemistry is that spin-state changes can play important roles, and a ‘two-state’ reactivity model has been extensively applied especially in iron-porphyrin systems. Herein we explore the gas phase oxygen-atom transfer chemistry of meso-tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)porphyrin (TPFPP) chromium complexes, as well as some other tetradentate macrocyclic ligands. Electrospray ionization in concert with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) spectrometry has been used to characterize and observe reactivity of the ionic species [(TPFPP)CrIII]+ (1) and [(TPFPP)CrVO]+ (2). These are an attractive system to examine the effects of spin state change on oxygen atom transfer because the d1 CrV species are doublets while the CrIII complexes have quartet ground states with high-lying doublet excited states. In the gas phase, [(TPFPP)CrIII]+ forms adducts with a variety of neutral donors but O-atom transfer is only observed for NO2. Pyridine N-oxide adducts of 1 do yield 2 upon collision induced dissociation (CID), but the ethylene oxide, DMSO, and TEMPO analogs do not. [(TPFPP)CrVO]+ is shown by its reactivity and by CID experiments to be a terminal metal-oxo with a single vacant coordination site. It also displays limited reaction chemistry, being deoxygenated only by the very potent reductant P(OMe)3. In general, [(TPFPP)CrVO]+ species are much less reactive than the Fe and Mn analogs. Thermochemical analysis of the reactions points towards the involvement of spin issues in the lower observed reactivity of the chromium complexes. PMID:20218631

  18. Electronic metal-support interaction enhanced oxygen reduction activity and stability of boron carbide supported platinum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Colleen; Smith, Graham T.; Inwood, David W.; Leach, Andrew S.; Whalley, Penny S.; Callisti, Mauro; Polcar, Tomas; Russell, Andrea E.; Levecque, Pieter; Kramer, Denis

    2017-06-01

    Catalysing the reduction of oxygen in acidic media is a standing challenge. Although activity of platinum, the most active metal, can be substantially improved by alloying, alloy stability remains a concern. Here we report that platinum nanoparticles supported on graphite-rich boron carbide show a 50-100% increase in activity in acidic media and improved cycle stability compared to commercial carbon supported platinum nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray absorption fine structure analysis confirm similar platinum nanoparticle shapes, sizes, lattice parameters, and cluster packing on both supports, while x-ray photoelectron and absorption spectroscopy demonstrate a change in electronic structure. This shows that purely electronic metal-support interactions can significantly improve oxygen reduction activity without inducing shape, alloying or strain effects and without compromising stability. Optimizing the electronic interaction between the catalyst and support is, therefore, a promising approach for advanced electrocatalysts where optimizing the catalytic nanoparticles themselves is constrained by other concerns.

  19. Novel synthesis of palladium (II) complexes derived from 3-arylsydnone-4-carbaldehyde N(4)-phenylthiosemicarbazones and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Shih, Mei-Hsiu; Chen, Jian-Chyi; Lin, Guan-Ling; Lin, Tzu-Ting; Sun, Ming-Hsiang

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate whether the oxygen atom O(6) in the sydnone ring of 3-arylsydnone-4-carbaldehyde N(4)-phenylthiosemicarbazones (HArSYTSCs, 3a-d) is a good electron donor atom upon metal complexation. Furthermore, ligands 3a-d and the corresponding palladium complexes (Pd(ArSYTSC)Cl, 4a-d) would be expected to find their potent biological activities. The desired palladium complexes 4a-d were first synthesized from thiosemicarbazones 3a-d. Then, the antiproliferative activity of ligands 3a-d and complexes 4a-d were tested against human hepatocellular carcinoma and human cervical epithelioid carcinoma (HeLa) cells by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl trazolium bromide (MTT) assay. According to X-ray analyses, ligands 3a-d are bonded to the Pd (II) center in an O, N, S-tridentate coordination mode through sydnone carbonyl oxygen O(6), azomethine nitrogen and the thiolate sulfur atom. The carbonyl oxygen of the sydnone ring is found to be a good electron donor site upon metal complexation. Moreover, MTT assay results reveal that the palladium complexes 4a-d have greater antiproliferative activity than 5-fluorouracil. In particular, the complexes exhibit obvious better activity than the corresponding ligands 3a-d against HeLa cell. The results indicate that the synthesized novel palladium complexes have greater antiproliferative activity than both 5-fluorouracil and the corresponding ligands against HeLa cell. Accordingly, the study of sydnonyl complexes bearing anticancer activities may support the development of coordination chemistry. © 2013 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  20. Enhanced Activity and Stability of Pt catalysts on Functionalized Graphene Sheets for Electrocatalytic Oxygen Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Kou, Rong; Shao, Yuyan; Wang, Donghai; Engelhard, Mark H.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Wang, Jun; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Wang, Chong M.; Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Yong; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Liu, Jun

    2009-04-30

    Electrocatalysis of oxygen reduction using Pt nanoparticles supported on functionalized graphene sheets (FGSs) was studied. FGSs were prepared by thermal expansion of graphite oxide. Pt nanoparticles with average diameter of 2 nm were uniformly loaded on FGSs by impregnation methods. Pt-FGS showed a higher electrochemical surface area and oxygen reduction activity with improved stability as compared with commercial catalyst. Transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and electrochemical characterization suggest that the improved performance of Pt-FGS can be attributed to smaller particle size and less aggregation of Pt nanoparticles on the functionalized graphene sheets.

  1. Nitrogen-Oxygen Complexes Associated with Shallow Thermal Donors in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Haruhiko

    2008-02-01

    A structural model is described for the shallow thermal donors (STDs), which typically consist of seven identical absorption peaks that are caused by electronic transition. In the STD family, attention was paid to the 247 cm-1 peak that appears to strongly depend on the condition of both the crystal growth and the annealing. We examined NO configuration and the six kinds of NO+Oi configuration. Semi-empirical molecular orbital calculations for these complexes suggested that not only the complex with the C2v symmetry but also the asymmetric NO+Oi complexes could simultaneously exist in the Si crystal. We concluded that the 247 cm-1 peak, which was highly unstable and behaved oddly during annealing, might be the NO complex and that the other six STD peaks might correspond to the six kinds of NO+Oi complexes.

  2. Theoretical study of the multiline EPR signal from the S2 state of the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II

    PubMed Central

    Bonvoisin, Jacques; Blondin, Geneviève; Girerd, Jean-Jacques; Zimmermann, Jean-Luc

    1992-01-01

    The Oxygen evolving complex of plant photosystem II is made of a manganese cluster that gives rise to a low temperature EPR multiline signal in the S2 oxidation state. The origin of this EPR signal has been addressed with respect to the question of the magnetic couplings between the electron and nuclear spins of the four possible Mn ions that make up this complex. Considering Mn(III) and Mn(IV) as the only possible oxidation states present in the S2 state, and no large anisotropy of the magnetic tensors, the breadths of the EPR spectra calculated for dimers and trimers with S = ½ have been compared with that of the biological site. It is concluded that neither a dinuclear nor a trinuclear complex made of Mn(III) and Mn(IV) can be responsible for the multiline signal; but that, by contrast, a tetranuclear Mn complex can be the origin of this signal. The general shape of the experimental spectrum, its particular hyperfine pattern, the positions of most of the hyperfine lines and their relative intensities can be fit by a tetramer model described by the following six fitting parameters: g ≈ 1.987, A1 ≈ 122.4 10-4 cm-1, A2 ≈ 87.2 10-4 cm-1, A3 ≈ 81.6 10-4 cm-1, A4 ≈ 19.1 10-4 cm-1 and δH = 24.5 G. A second model described by parameters very close to those given above except for A4 ≈ 77.5 10-4 cm-1 gives an equally good fit. However, no other set of parameters gives an EPR spectrum that reproduces the hyperfine pattern of the S2 multiline signal. This demonstrates that in the S2 state of the oxygen evolving complex, the four manganese ions are organized in a magnetic tetramer. PMID:19431827

  3. In Situ Observation of Active Oxygen Species in Fe-Containing Ni-Based Oxygen Evolution Catalysts: The Effect of pH on Electrochemical Activity.

    PubMed

    Trześniewski, Bartek J; Diaz-Morales, Oscar; Vermaas, David A; Longo, Alessandro; Bras, Wim; Koper, Marc T M; Smith, Wilson A

    2015-12-09

    Ni-based oxygen evolution catalysts (OECs) are cost-effective and very active materials that can be potentially used for efficient solar-to-fuel conversion process toward sustainable energy generation. We present a systematic spectroelectrochemical characterization of two Fe-containing Ni-based OECs, namely nickel borate (Ni(Fe)-B(i)) and nickel oxyhydroxide (Ni(Fe)OOH). Our Raman and X-ray absorption spectroscopy results show that both OECs are chemically similar, and that the borate anions do not play an apparent role in the catalytic process at pH 13. Furthermore, we show spectroscopic evidence for the generation of negatively charged sites in both OECs (NiOO(-)), which can be described as adsorbed "active oxygen". Our data conclusively links the OER activity of the Ni-based OECs with the generation of those sites on the surface of the OECs. The OER activity of both OECs is strongly pH dependent, which can be attributed to a deprotonation process of the Ni-based OECs, leading to the formation of the negatively charged surface sites that act as OER precursors. This work emphasizes the relevance of the electrolyte effect to obtain catalytically active phases in Ni-based OECs, in addition to the key role of the Fe impurities. This effect should be carefully considered in the development of Ni-based compounds meant to catalyze the OER at moderate pHs. Complementarily, UV-vis spectroscopy measurements show strong darkening of those catalysts in the catalytically active state. This coloration effect is directly related to the oxidation of nickel and can be an important factor limiting the efficiency of solar-driven devices utilizing Ni-based OECs.

  4. Two mammalian MOF complexes regulate transcription activation by distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangzhi; Wu, Lipeng; Corsa, Callie Ann Sprunger; Kunkel, Steve; Dou, Yali

    2009-10-23

    In mammals, MYST family histone acetyltransferase MOF plays important roles in transcription activation by acetylating histone H4 on K16, a prevalent mark associated with chromatin decondensation, and transcription factor p53 on K120, which is important for activation of proapoptotic genes. However, little is known about MOF regulation in higher eukaryotes. Here, we report that the acetyltransferase activity of MOF is tightly regulated in two different but evolutionarily conserved complexes, MSL and MOF-MSL1v1. Importantly, we demonstrate that while the two MOF complexes have indistinguishable activity on histone H4 K16, they differ dramatically in acetylating nonhistone substrate p53. We further demonstrate that MOF-MSL1v1 is specifically required for optimal transcription activation of p53 target genes both in vitro and in vivo. Our results support a model that these two MOF complexes regulate distinct stages of transcription activation in cooperation with other histone modifying activities.

  5. [Oral fluid bacteriocidal activity in complex diagnostics of oral disbiosis].

    PubMed

    Rabinovich, O F; Abramova, E S

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of examination of oral fluid bacteriocidal activity in complex diagnostics of oral mucosa disbiosis was evaluated. Thirty-seven patients were included in