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Sample records for active oxygen metabolism

  1. Changes to coral health and metabolic activity under oxygen deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    On Hawaiian reefs, the fast-growing, invasive algae Gracilaria salicornia overgrows coral heads, restricting water flow and light, thereby smothering corals. Field data shows hypoxic conditions (dissolved oxygen (DO2) < 2 mg/L) occurring underneath algal mats at night, and concurrent bleaching and partial tissue loss of shaded corals. To analyze the impact of nighttime oxygen-deprivation on coral health, this study evaluated changes in coral metabolism through the exposure of corals to chronic hypoxic conditions and subsequent analyses of lactate, octopine, alanopine, and strombine dehydrogenase activities, critical enzymes employed through anaerobic respiration. Following treatments, lactate and octopine dehydrogenase activities were found to have no significant response in activities with treatment and time. However, corals subjected to chronic nighttime hypoxia were found to exhibit significant increases in alanopine dehydrogenase activity after three days of exposure and strombine dehydrogenase activity starting after one overnight exposure cycle. These findings provide new insights into coral metabolic shifts in extremely low-oxygen environments and point to ADH and SDH assays as tools for quantifying the impact of hypoxia on coral health. PMID:27114888

  2. [Effect of copper pollution on seedling growth and activate oxygen metabolism of Trifolium pratense].

    PubMed

    Chu, Ling; Liu, Dengyi; Wang, Youbao; Li, Ying; Liu, Huijun

    2004-01-01

    The effect of copper (Cu) pollution on the seedling growth and activate oxygen metabolism of Trifolium pratense was studied by water cultivation experiments. The results showed that under low concentration of Cu (< 10 mg.L-1), the growth of Trifolium pratense seedlings could be improved, their fresh/dry weight and the contents of soluble protein and chlorophylls in leaves increased slightly, the MDA content of leaf cells decreased, the activities of SOD, CAT and POD in the activate oxygen metabolism system slightly increased, and the balance of protective enzyme system was hold. However, with the increase of Cu concentration (10-100 mg.L-1), there existed an obvious negative effect on the growth of Trifolium pratense seedlings. The seedlings under high concentrations of Cu were shorter and smaller, their fibrous roots were shorter and fewer, and their fresh/dry weight and the contents of soluble protein and chlorophylls in leaves decreased drastically. With the increase of Cu concentration, the membrane penetration, electric conductivity and MDA content of leaf cells increased. Furthermore, the activate oxygen metabolism system was destroyed, the balance of protective enzyme system was broken, the activities of SOD and CAT decreased by 26.67% and 71.31%, respectively, while the POD activity increased by 10.6 times.

  3. Oxygen Affects Gut Bacterial Colonization and Metabolic Activities in a Gnotobiotic Cockroach Model

    PubMed Central

    Tegtmeier, Dorothee; Thompson, Claire L.; Schauer, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota of termites and cockroaches represents complex metabolic networks of many diverse microbial populations. The distinct microenvironmental conditions within the gut and possible interactions among the microorganisms make it essential to investigate how far the metabolic properties of pure cultures reflect their activities in their natural environment. We established the cockroach Shelfordella lateralis as a gnotobiotic model and inoculated germfree nymphs with two bacterial strains isolated from the guts of conventional cockroaches. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that both strains specifically colonized the germfree hindgut. In diassociated cockroaches, the facultatively anaerobic strain EbSL (a new species of Enterobacteriaceae) always outnumbered the obligately anaerobic strain FuSL (a close relative of Fusobacterium varium), irrespective of the sequence of inoculation, which showed that precolonization by facultatively anaerobic bacteria does not necessarily favor colonization by obligate anaerobes. Comparison of the fermentation products of the cultures formed in vitro with those accumulated in situ indicated that the gut environment strongly affected the metabolic activities of both strains. The pure cultures formed the typical products of mixed-acid or butyrate fermentation, whereas the guts of gnotobiotic cockroaches accumulated mostly lactate and acetate. Similar shifts toward more-oxidized products were observed when the pure cultures were exposed to oxygen, which corroborated the strong effects of oxygen on the metabolic fluxes previously observed in termite guts. Oxygen microsensor profiles of the guts of germfree, gnotobiotic, and conventional cockroaches indicated that both gut tissue and microbiota contribute to oxygen consumption and suggest that the oxygen status influences the colonization success. PMID:26637604

  4. Oxygen Affects Gut Bacterial Colonization and Metabolic Activities in a Gnotobiotic Cockroach Model.

    PubMed

    Tegtmeier, Dorothee; Thompson, Claire L; Schauer, Christine; Brune, Andreas

    2015-12-04

    The gut microbiota of termites and cockroaches represents complex metabolic networks of many diverse microbial populations. The distinct microenvironmental conditions within the gut and possible interactions among the microorganisms make it essential to investigate how far the metabolic properties of pure cultures reflect their activities in their natural environment. We established the cockroach Shelfordella lateralis as a gnotobiotic model and inoculated germfree nymphs with two bacterial strains isolated from the guts of conventional cockroaches. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that both strains specifically colonized the germfree hindgut. In diassociated cockroaches, the facultatively anaerobic strain EbSL (a new species of Enterobacteriaceae) always outnumbered the obligately anaerobic strain FuSL (a close relative of Fusobacterium varium), irrespective of the sequence of inoculation, which showed that precolonization by facultatively anaerobic bacteria does not necessarily favor colonization by obligate anaerobes. Comparison of the fermentation products of the cultures formed in vitro with those accumulated in situ indicated that the gut environment strongly affected the metabolic activities of both strains. The pure cultures formed the typical products of mixed-acid or butyrate fermentation, whereas the guts of gnotobiotic cockroaches accumulated mostly lactate and acetate. Similar shifts toward more-oxidized products were observed when the pure cultures were exposed to oxygen, which corroborated the strong effects of oxygen on the metabolic fluxes previously observed in termite guts. Oxygen microsensor profiles of the guts of germfree, gnotobiotic, and conventional cockroaches indicated that both gut tissue and microbiota contribute to oxygen consumption and suggest that the oxygen status influences the colonization success.

  5. Reduced muscle activation during exercise related to brain oxygenation and metabolism in humans.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, P; Nielsen, J; Overgaard, M; Krogh-Madsen, R; Gjedde, A; Secher, N H; Petersen, N C

    2010-06-01

    Maximal exercise may be limited by central fatigue defined as an inability of the central nervous system to fully recruit the involved muscles. This study evaluated whether a reduction in the cerebral oxygen-to-carbohydrate index (OCI) and in the cerebral mitochondrial oxygen tension relate to the ability to generate a maximal voluntary contraction and to the transcranial magnetic stimulated force generation. To determine the role of a reduced OCI and in central fatigue, 16 males performed low intensity, maximal intensity and hypoxic cycling exercise. Exercise fatigue was evaluated by ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), arm maximal voluntary force (MVC), and voluntary activation of elbow flexor muscles assessed with transcranial magnetic stimulation. Low intensity exercise did not produce any indication of central fatigue or marked cerebral metabolic deviations. Exercise in hypoxia (0.10) reduced cerebral oxygen delivery 25% and decreased 11+/-4 mmHg (P<0.001) together with OCI (6.2+/-0.7 to 4.8+/-0.5, P<0.001). RPE increased while MVC and voluntary activation were reduced (P<0.05). During maximal exercise declined 8+/-4 mmHg (P<0.05) and OCI to 3.8+/-0.5 (P<0.001). RPE was 18.5, and MVC and voluntary activation were reduced (P<0.05). We observed no signs of muscular fatigue in the elbow flexors and all control MVCs were similar to resting values. Exhaustive exercise provoked cerebral deoxygenation, metabolic changes and indices of fatigue similar to those observed during exercise in hypoxia indicating that reduced cerebral oxygenation may play a role in the development of central fatigue and may be an exercise capacity limiting factor.

  6. Ventilation rates and activity levels of juvenile jumbo squid under metabolic suppression in the oxygen minimum zone.

    PubMed

    Trübenbach, Katja; Pegado, Maria R; Seibel, Brad A; Rosa, Rui

    2013-02-01

    The Humboldt (jumbo) squid, Dosidicus gigas, is a part-time resident of the permanent oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) in the Eastern Tropical Pacific and, thereby, it encounters oxygen levels below its critical oxygen partial pressure. To better understand the ventilatory mechanisms that accompany the process of metabolic suppression in these top oceanic predators, we exposed juvenile D. gigas to the oxygen levels found in the OMZ (1% O(2), 1 kPa, 10 °C) and measured metabolic rate, activity cycling patterns, swimming mode, escape jet (burst) frequency, mantle contraction frequency and strength, stroke volume and oxygen extraction efficiency. In normoxia, metabolic rate varied between 14 and 29 μmol O(2) g(-1) wet mass h(-1), depending on the level of activity. The mantle contraction frequency and strength were linearly correlated and increased significantly with activity level. Additionally, an increase in stroke volume and ventilatory volume per minute was observed, followed by a mantle hyperinflation process during high activity periods. Squid metabolic rate dropped more than 75% during exposure to hypoxia. Maximum metabolic rate was not achieved under such conditions and the metabolic scope was significantly decreased. Hypoxia changed the relationship between mantle contraction strength and frequency from linear to polynomial with increasing activity, indicating that, under hypoxic conditions, the jumbo squid primarily increases the strength of mantle contraction and does not regulate its frequency. Under hypoxia, jumbo squid also showed a larger inflation period (reduced contraction frequency) and decreased relaxed mantle diameter (shortened diffusion pathway), which optimize oxygen extraction efficiency (up to 82%/34%, without/with consideration of 60% potential skin respiration). Additionally, they breathe 'deeply', with more powerful contractions and enhanced stroke volume. This deep-breathing behavior allows them to display a stable ventilatory volume per

  7. XPC silencing in normal human keratinocytes triggers metabolic alterations through NOX-1 activation-mediated reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Hamid Reza; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Ali, Nsrein; Benard, Giovanni; Tang, Xiuwei; Yang, Hee Seung; Jouary, Thomas; de Verneuil, Hubert; Taïeb, Alain; Kim, Arianna L; Mazurier, Frédéric

    2011-06-01

    Cancer cells utilize complex mechanisms to remodel their bioenergetic properties. We exploited the intrinsic genomic stability of xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) to understand the inter-relationships between genomic instability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and metabolic alterations during neoplastic transformation. We showed that knockdown of XPC (XPC(KD)) in normal human keratinocytes results in metabolism remodeling through NADPH oxidase-1 (NOX-1) activation, which in turn leads to increased ROS levels. While enforcing antioxidant defenses by overexpressing catalase, CuZnSOD, or MnSOD could not block the metabolism remodeling, impaired NOX-1 activation abrogates both alteration in ROS levels and modifications of energy metabolism. As NOX-1 activation is observed in human squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), the blockade of NOX-1 could be a target for the prevention and the treatment of skin cancers.

  8. XPC silencing in normal human keratinocytes triggers metabolic alterations through NOX-1 activation-mediated reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Rezvani, Hamid Reza; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Ali, Nsrein; Benard, Giovanni; Tang, Xiuwei; Yang, Hee Seung; Jouary, Thomas; de Verneuil, Hubert; Taïeb, Alain; Kim, Arianna L.; Mazurier, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    Summary Cancer cells utilize complex mechanisms to remodel their bioenergetic properties. We exploited the intrinsic genomic stability of xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) to understand the interrelationships between genomic instability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and metabolic alterations during neoplastic transformation. We showed that knockdown of XPC (XPCKD) in normal human keratinocytes results in metabolism remodeling through NADPH oxidase-1 (NOX-1) activation, which in turn leads to increased ROS levels. While enforcing antioxidant defenses by overexpressing catalase, CuZnSOD, or MnSOD could not block the metabolism remodeling, impaired NOX-1 activation abrogates both alteration in ROS levels and modifications of energy metabolism. As NOX-1 activation is observed in human squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), the blockade of NOX-1 could be a target for the prevention and the treatment of skin cancers. PMID:21167810

  9. Separate and combined effects of Cu and Cd on seedling growth and active oxygen metabolism system of Trifolium repens L.

    PubMed

    Chu, Ling; Liu, Deng-Yi; Wang, You-Bao; Ding, Jia-Hong; Wang, Li-Long

    2006-09-01

    Pot-culture experiments were used to examine the individual and combined effects of Cu and Cd pollutants on Trifolium repens L. seedlings, both on their growth and their active oxygen metabolism system, mainly superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and peroxidase (POD) activities. The results showed that the negative action took place at low concentrations of Cu (less than 500 ppm) and Cd (less than 0.5 ppm), which had no obvious effects on the seedlings' growth. However, as the concentrations of Cu and Cd increased (500-3000 ppm and 0.5-50 ppm respectively), synergistic activities was observed, showing obvious negative effects (P less than 0.05). Compared with the control samples, the seedlings affected by Cu and Cd pollutants were shorter and smaller, their fresh/dry weight and content of soluble protein decreased drastically, their leaf electric conductivity increased, and the contents of their leaf pigments decreased. Chlorophyll a was more sensitive than chlorophyll b to Cu and Cd pollutants, and chlorophyll b was more sensitive than carotenoid. It was also shown that the active oxygen metabolism of T. repens seedlings was destroyed by high amounts of Cu and Cd, the balance of the anti-oxidase system was broken, and the CAT and SOD activities noticeably decreased while POD activity evidently increased. Cd had a more noticeable effect on seedling growth than Cu.

  10. Influence of uranium (VI) on the metabolic activity of stable multispecies biofilms studied by oxygen microsensors and fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk-Bärsch, Evelyn; Grossmann, Kay; Arnold, Thuro; Hofmann, Susann; Wobus, Axel

    2008-11-01

    The effect of uranium added in ecologically relevant concentrations (1 × 10 -5 and 1 × 10 -6 M) to stable multispecies biofilms was studied by electrochemical oxygen microsensors with tip diameters of 10 μm and by confocal laser fluorescence microscopy (CLSM). The microsensor profile measurements in the stable multispecies biofilms exposed to uranium showed that the oxygen concentration decreased faster with increasing biofilm depth compared to the uranium free biofilms. In the uranium containing biofilms, the oxygen consumption, calculated from the steady-state microprofiles, showed high consumption rates of up to 61.7 nmol cm -3 s -1 in the top layer (0-70 μm) and much lower consumption rates in the lower zone of the biofilms. Staining experiments with 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC) and 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) confirmed the high respiratory activities of the bacteria in the upper layer. Analysis of the amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments showed that the addition of uranium in ecologically relevant concentrations did not change the bacterial diversity in the stable multispecies biofilms and is therefore not responsible for the different oxygen profiles in the biofilms. The fast decrease in the oxygen concentrations in the biofilm profiles showed that the bacteria in the top region of the biofilms, i.e., the metabolically most active biofilm zone, battle the toxic effects of aqueous uranium with an increased respiratory activity. This increased respiratory activity results in O 2 depleted zones closer to the biofilm/air interface which may trigger uranium redox processes, since suitable redox partners, e.g., extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) and other organics (e.g., metabolites), are sufficiently available in the biofilm porewaters. Such redox reactions may lead to precipitation of uranium (IV) solids and consequently to a removal of uranium from the aqueous phase.

  11. Frequency-dependent changes in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen during activation of human visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Vafaee, M S; Meyer, E; Marrett, S; Paus, T; Evans, A C; Gjedde, A

    1999-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that brain oxidative metabolism is significantly increased upon adequate stimulation, we varied the presentation of a visual stimulus to determine the frequency at which the metabolic response would be at maximum. The authors measured regional CMR(O2) in 12 healthy normal volunteers with the ECAT EXACT HR+ (CTI/Siemens, Knoxville, TN, U.S.A.) three-dimensional whole-body positron emission tomograph (PET). In seven successive activating conditions, subjects viewed a yellow-blue annular checkerboard reversing its contrast at frequencies of 0, 1, 4, 8, 16, 32, and 50 Hz. Stimulation began 4 minutes before and continued throughout the 3-minute dynamic scan. In the baseline condition, the subjects began fixating a cross hair 30 seconds before the scan and continued to do so for the duration of the 3-minute scan. At the start of each scan, the subjects inhaled 20 mCi of (15)O-O2 in a single breath. The CMR(O2) value was calculated using a two-compartment, weighted integration method. Normalized PET images were averaged across subjects and coregistered with the subjects' magnetic resonance imaging in stereotaxic space. Mean subtracted image volumes (activation minus baseline) of CMR(O2) then were obtained and converted to z statistic volumes. The authors found a statistically significant focal change of CMR(O2) in the striate cortex (x = 9; y = -89; z = -1) that reached a maximum at 4 Hz and dropped off sharply at higher stimulus frequencies.

  12. Critical State of Energy Metabolism in Brain Slices: The Principal Role of Oxygen Delivery and Energy Substrates in Shaping Neuronal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Anton; Zilberter, Yuri

    2011-01-01

    The interactive vasculo-neuro-glial system controlling energy supply in the brain is absent in vitro where energy provision is determined by experimental conditions. Despite the fact that neuronal activity is extremely energy demanding, little has been reported on the state of energy metabolism in submerged brain slices. Without this information, the arbitrarily chosen oxygenation and metabolic provisions make questionable the efficient oxidative metabolism in slices. We show that in mouse hippocampal slices (postnatal day 19–44), evoked neuronal discharges, spontaneous network activity (initiated by 4-aminopyridine), and synaptic stimulation-induced NAD(P)H autofluorescence depend strongly on the oxygen availability. Only the rate of perfusion as high as ~15 ml/min (95% O2) provided appropriate oxygenation of a slice. Lower oxygenation resulted in the decrease of both local field potentials and spontaneous network activity as well as in significant modulation of short-term synaptic plasticity. The reduced oxygen supply considerably inhibited the oxidation phase of NAD(P)H signaling indicating that the changes in neuronal activity were paralleled by the decrease in aerobic energy metabolism. Interestingly, the dependence of neuronal activity on oxygen tension was clearly shifted toward considerably larger pO2 values in slices when compared to in vivo conditions. With sufficient pO2 provided by a high perfusion rate, partial substitution of glucose in ACSF for β-hydroxybutyrate, pyruvate, or lactate enhanced both oxidative metabolism and synaptic function. This suggests that the high pO2 in brain slices is compulsory for maintaining oxidative metabolism, and glucose alone is not sufficient in fulfilling energy requirements during neuronal activity. Altogether, our results demonstrate that energy metabolism determines the functional state of neuronal network, highlighting the need for the adequate metabolic support to be insured in the in vitro experiments. PMID

  13. [Kinetic modeling of energy metabolism and generation of active forms of oxygen in hepatocyte mitochondria].

    PubMed

    Demin, O V; Gorianin, I I; Kholodenko, B N; Westerhoff, H V

    2001-01-01

    Direct nonenzymatic oxidation of semiquinone by oxygen is one of the main sources of superoxide radicals (O2.-) in mitochondria. By using all the known data on hepatocyte mitochondria, we have revealed the correlation between the rate of superoxide generation by the bc1 complex and the transmembrane potential (delta psi). If the main electrogenic stage of the Q cycle is suggested to be the electron transfer between the cytochrome b hemes, then the rate of superoxide generation sharply increases when delta psi grows from 150 mV to 180 mV. However, this interrelation is ambiguous. Indeed, the increase of the generation rate with the growth of the potential can occur faster when succinate dehydrogenase is inhibited by malonate than when external ADP is exhausted. When the potential is changed by adding phosphate or potassium (K+), the rate of O2.- production remains constant, although the comparison of the rate values at the same delta psi reveals the effect of phosphate or potassium. It turned out that the rate of O2.- generation is a function of delta mu H rather than any of its components. Phosphate and K+ have practically no influence on delta mu H, since the change in delta psi is compensated by delta pH. The rate of superoxide generation by the bc1 complex is a multiple function of the electron-transfer activity of enzymes, the processes determining the membrane potential (e.g., loading), and of the oxygen concentration. The kinetic model proposed in this work may serve a tool to understand how the superoxide production is regulated.

  14. [Effect of the active nitrogen and oxygen metabolities on the level of cGMP in uterus myocytes].

    PubMed

    Danylovych, Iu V; Tuhaĭ, V A

    2006-01-01

    The level of cGMP in myocytes of uterus of rats at an action active metabolities of nitrogen and oxygen (NO, NO2- and H2O2) in the conditions of influence of progesteron on myocytes was studied. Cell suspension was selected with the use of collagenase and soy-bean inhibitor of tripsin. Determining the amount of cGMP was conducted with the use of standard kit produced by "Amersham" (Great Britain). The basal level of cGMP in unactivated myocytes made 1.5 +/- 0.17 pmol cGMP/mg of protein (n = 5). It is shown that incubation of myocytes with 0.1 mM acetylcholin during 1 hour resulted in 2 times growth of cGMP content in suspension approximately, this increase is fully supressed in the presenced 0.1 mM methilene blue, that specifies activity of soluble cGMP in myocytes. Treatment of cells with 10 nM progesteron during 1 hour did not cause substantial changes in the level of cGMP. At the same time addition of 0.1 mM sodium nitroprussid or 10 nM H2O2 to suspension resulted in such conditions in the increase of level of cGMP to 3.1 +/- 0.6 and 6.8 +/- 0.4 pmol cGMP/mg of protein. Poor penetration of NO2- (10 nM) to the cells did not cause changes in the level of cGMP. The results got by us testify that the long-term influence of active metabolities of nitrogen and oxygen, instead of progesteron, provides the increase of the level of cGMP in the myometrium.

  15. Oxidative metabolism of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and biologically active oxygenated metabolites of DHEA and epiandrosterone (EpiA)--recent reports.

    PubMed

    El Kihel, Laïla

    2012-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is a multifunctional steroid with a broad range of biological effects in humans and animals. DHEA can be converted to multiple oxygenated metabolites in the brain and peripheral tissues. The mechanisms by which DHEA exerts its effects are not well understood. However, evidence that the effects of DHEA are mediated by its oxygenated metabolites has accumulated. This paper will review the panel of oxygenated DHEA metabolites (7, 16 and 17-hydroxylated derivatives) including a number of 5α-androstane derivatives, such as epiandrosterone (EpiA) metabolites. The most important aspects of the oxidative metabolism of DHEA in the liver, intestine and brain are described. Then, this article reviews the reported biological effects of oxygenated DHEA metabolites from recent findings with a specific focus on cancer, inflammatory and immune processes, osteoporosis, thermogenesis, adipogenesis, the cardiovascular system, the brain and the estrogen and androgen receptors.

  16. Oxygen metabolism in human placenta mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, J; Ramírez-Vélez, R; Czerniczyniec, A; Cicerchia, D; Aguilar de Plata, A C; Lores-Arnaiz, S

    2014-12-01

    Due to the high metabolic demands of the placental tissue during gestation, we decide to analyzed the mitochondrial bioenergetic functions in the human term placenta. Different mitochondrial morphological parameters, membrane potential and cardiolipin content were determined by flow cytometry. Oxygen uptake, hydrogen peroxide production and cytochrome P450 content, were also measured. Some apoptotic mitochondrial proteins were also analyzed by western blot. Two isolated mitochondrial fractions were observed: large/heavy and small/light with different functional characteristics. Oxygen uptake showed a respiratory control (RC) of 3.4 ± 0.3 for the heavy mitochondria, and 1.1 ± 0.4 for light mitochondria, indicating a respiratory dysfunction in the light fraction. Good levels of polarization were detected in the heavy fraction, meanwhile the light population showed a collapsed ΔΨm. Increased levels of cytochrome P450, higher levels of hydrogen peroxide, and low cardiolipin content were described for the light fraction. Three pro-apoptotic proteins p53, Bax, and cytochrome c were found increased in the heavy mitochondrial fraction; and deficient in the light fraction. The heavy mitochondrial fraction showed an improved respiratory function. This mitochondrial fraction, being probably from cytotrophoblast cells showed higher content of proteins able to induce apoptosis, indicating that these cells can effectively execute an apoptotic program in the presence of a death stimulus. Meanwhile the light and small organelles probably from syncytiotrophoblast, with a low oxygen metabolism, low level of ΔΨm, and increased hydrogen peroxide production, may not actively perform an apoptotic process due to their deficient energetic level. This study contributes to the characterization of functional parameters of human placenta mitochondria in order to understand the oxygen metabolism during the physiological process of gestation.

  17. Oxygen-18 incorporation into malic acid during nocturnal carbon dioxide fixation in crassulacean acid metabolism plants: a new approach to estimating in vivo carbonic anhydrase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Holtum, J.A.M.; Summons, R.; Roeske, C.A.; Comins, H.N.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1984-01-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants fix carbon dioxide at night by the carboxylation of phosphoenolpyruvate. If CO2 fixation is conducted with TC YO2, then in the absence of carbonic anhydrase, the malate formed by dark CO2 fixation should also contain high levels of carbon-13 and oxygen-18. Conversely, if carbonic anhydrase is present and highly active, oxygen exchange between CO2 and cellular H2O will occur more rapidly than carboxylation, and the ( TC) malate formed will contain little or no oxygen-18 above the natural abundance level. The presence of oxygen-18 in these molecules can be detected either by nuclear magnetic resonance or by mass spectrometry. Studies of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in the presence and absence of carbonic anhydrase in vitro confirm the validity of the method. When CAM plants are studied by this method, we find that most species show incorporation of a significant amount of oxygen-18. Comparison of these results with results of isotope fractionation and gas exchange studies permits calculation of the in vivo activity of carbonic anhydrase toward HCO3 compared with that of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. The ratio (carbonic anhydrase activity/phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity) is species dependent and varies from a low of about 7 for Ananas comosus to values near 20 for Hoya carnosa and Bryophyllum pinnatum, 40 for Kalanchoee daigremontiana, and 100 or greater for Bryophyllum tubiflorum, Kalanchoee serrata, and Kalanchoae tomentosa. Carbonic anhydrase activity increases relative to phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity at higher temperature. 37 references, 2 figures, 8 tables.

  18. Interpreting Oxygenation-Based Neuroimaging Signals: The Importance and the Challenge of Understanding Brain Oxygen Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Buxton, Richard B.

    2010-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging is widely used to map patterns of brain activation based on blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal changes associated with changes in neural activity. However, because oxygenation changes depend on the relative changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2), a quantitative interpretation of BOLD signals, and also other functional neuroimaging signals related to blood or tissue oxygenation, is fundamentally limited until we better understand brain oxygen metabolism and how it is related to blood flow. However, the positive side of the complexity of oxygenation signals is that when combined with dynamic CBF measurements they potentially provide the best tool currently available for investigating the dynamics of CMRO2. This review focuses on the problem of interpreting oxygenation-based signals, the challenges involved in measuring CMRO2 in general, and what is needed to put oxygenation-based estimates of CMRO2 on a firm foundation. The importance of developing a solid theoretical framework is emphasized, both as an essential tool for analyzing oxygenation-based multimodal measurements, and also potentially as a way to better understand the physiological phenomena themselves. The existing data, integrated within a simple theoretical framework of O2 transport, suggests the hypothesis that an important functional role of the mismatch of CBF and CMRO2 changes with neural activation is to prevent a fall of tissue pO2. Future directions for better understanding brain oxygen metabolism are discussed. PMID:20616882

  19. Oxygen-deficient metabolism and corneal edema.

    PubMed

    Leung, B K; Bonanno, J A; Radke, C J

    2011-11-01

    Wear of low-oxygen-transmissible soft contact lenses swells the cornea significantly, even during open eye. Although oxygen-deficient corneal edema is well-documented, a self-consistent quantitative prediction based on the underlying metabolic reactions is not available. We present a biochemical description of the human cornea that quantifies hypoxic swelling through the coupled transport of water, salt, and respiratory metabolites. Aerobic and anaerobic consumption of glucose, as well as acidosis and pH buffering, are incorporated in a seven-layer corneal model (anterior chamber, endothelium, stroma, epithelium, postlens tear film, contact lens, and prelens tear film). Corneal swelling is predicted from coupled transport of water, dissolved salts, and especially metabolites, along with membrane-transport resistances at the endothelium and epithelium. At the endothelium, the Na+/K+ - ATPase electrogenic channel actively transports bicarbonate ion from the stroma into the anterior chamber. As captured by the Kedem-Katchalsky membrane-transport formalism, the active bicarbonate-ion flux provides the driving force for corneal fluid pump-out needed to match the leak-in tendency of the stroma. Increased lactate-ion production during hypoxia osmotically lowers the pump-out rate requiring the stroma to swell to higher water content. Concentration profiles are predicted for glucose, water, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and hydronium, lactate, bicarbonate, sodium, and chloride ions, along with electrostatic potential and pressure profiles. Although the active bicarbonate-ion pump at the endothelium drives bicarbonate into the aqueous humor, we find a net flux of bicarbonate ion into the cornea that safeguards against acidosis. For the first time, we predict corneal swelling upon soft-contact-lens wear from fundamental biophysico-chemical principles. We also successfully predict that hypertonic tear alleviates contact-lens-induced edema.

  20. Oxygen-deficient metabolism and corneal edema

    PubMed Central

    Leung, B.K.; Bonanno, J.A.; Radke, C.J.

    2014-01-01

    Wear of low-oxygen-transmissible soft contact lenses swells the cornea significantly, even during open eye. Although oxygen-deficient corneal edema is well-documented, a self-consistent quantitative prediction based on the underlying metabolic reactions is not available. We present a biochemical description of the human cornea that quantifies hypoxic swelling through the coupled transport of water, salt, and respiratory metabolites. Aerobic and anaerobic consumption of glucose, as well as acidosis and pH buffering, are incorporated in a seven-layer corneal model (anterior chamber, endothelium, stroma, epithelium, postlens tear film, contact lens, and prelens tear film). Corneal swelling is predicted from coupled transport of water, dissolved salts, and especially metabolites, along with membrane-transport resistances at the endothelium and epithelium. At the endothelium, the Na+/K+ - ATPase electrogenic channel actively transports bicarbonate ion from the stroma into the anterior chamber. As captured by the Kedem–Katchalsky membrane-transport formalism, the active bicarbonate-ion flux provides the driving force for corneal fluid pump-out needed to match the leak-in tendency of the stroma. Increased lactate-ion production during hypoxia osmotically lowers the pump-out rate requiring the stroma to swell to higher water content. Concentration profiles are predicted for glucose, water, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and hydronium, lactate, bicarbonate, sodium, and chloride ions, along with electrostatic potential and pressure profiles. Although the active bicarbonate-ion pump at the endothelium drives bicarbonate into the aqueous humor, we find a net flux of bicarbonate ion into the cornea that safeguards against acidosis. For the first time, we predict corneal swelling upon soft-contact-lens wear from fundamental biophysico-chemical principles. We also successfully predict that hypertonic tear alleviates contact-lens-induced edema. PMID:21820076

  1. Common catabolic enzyme patterns in a microplankton community of the Humboldt Current System off northern and central-south Chile: Malate dehydrogenase activity as an index of water-column metabolism in an oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, R. R.; Quiñones, R. A.

    2009-07-01

    An extensive subsurface oxygen minimum zone off northern and central-south Chile, associated with the Peru-Chile undercurrent, has important effects on the metabolism of the organisms inhabiting therein. Planktonic species deal with the hypoxic and anoxic environments by relying on biochemical as well as physiological processes related to their anaerobic metabolisms. Here we characterize, for the first time, the potential enzymatic activities involved in the aerobic and anaerobic energy production pathways of microplanktonic organisms (<100 μm), their relationship, and this relationship's association with the oxygen concentration and microplanktonic biomass in the oxygen minimum zone and adjacent areas of the Humboldt Current System water column. Our results demonstrate significant potential enzymatic activity of catabolic pathways in the oxygen minimum zone. Malate dehydrogenase had the highest oxidizing activity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (reduced form) in the batch of catabolic enzymatic activities assayed, including potential pyruvate oxidoreductases activity, the electron transport system, and dissimilatory nitrate reductase. Malate dehydrogenase correlated significantly with almost all the enzymes analyzed within and above the oxygen minimum zone, and also with the oxygen concentration and microplankton biomass in the water column of the Humboldt Current System, especially in the oxygen minimum zone off Iquique. These results suggest a possible specific pattern for the catabolic activity of the microplanktonic realm associated with the oxygen minimum zone spread along the Humboldt Current System off Chile. We hypothesize that malate dehydrogenase activity could be an appropriate indicator of microplankton catabolism in the oxygen minimum zone and adjacent areas.

  2. [The relationship between the desiccation-induced browning and the metabolism of active oxygen and phenolics in pericarp of postharvest longan fruit].

    PubMed

    Lin, He-Tong; Xi, Yu-Fang; Chen, Shao-Jun

    2005-06-01

    Longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour.) fruits are very susceptible to water loss and pericarp browning, and postharvest pericarp browning is the most important factors degrading the quality of longan fruit and shorting storage life. Pericarp browning has been attributed to desiccation, chilling, heat stress, senescence and pest or pathogen attack. Desiccation is the most main factor of induced-pericarp browning in longan. The relationship between water loss from pericarp and pericarp browning in longan cv. Fuyan fruits using open plastic punnets and sealed polyethylene bags at 10 degrees C +/-1 degrees C and 50% relative humidity, and the effect of pericarp water loss of the fruit on active oxygen metabolism and phenolics metabolism were investigated. Water loss resulted in rapid pericarp browning. Development of pericarp browning was higher with higher rate of water loss from pericarp and storage time (from 0 to 6 days). Water loss from pericarp was positively correlated with pericarp browning index significantly (P<0.01). Water loss from pericarp resulted in reduced activities of reactive-oxygen-scavenging enzymes (SOD, CAT, APX and GR), decreased amounts of endogenous antioxidant substances (AsA and GSH), and increased rates of O(-.)(2) production, MDA content and relative leakage rate, which showed that membrane structure was broken. Water loss from pericarp resulted in an increase in activity of PPO, and obvious reductions in total phenolic and flavonoid contents, whereas there was not obvious change in anthocyanin content. These results show that phenolics and flavonoids are the main substrates for PPO during desiccation-induced browning. Water loss from pericarp caused a significant increase in activity of POD, which also plays an important role in desiccation-induced browning in pericarp of longan fruit. Water loss from pericarp caused an increase in pH value, which resulted in changes in anthocyanin structure and color, the degradation of anthocyanin became

  3. Metabolic Prosthesis for Oxygenation of Ischemic Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, Elias

    2009-01-01

    This communication discloses new ideas and preliminary results on the development of a "metabolic prosthesis" for local oxygenation of ischemic tissue under physiological neutral conditions. We report for the first time the selective electrolysis of physiological saline by repetitively pulsed charge-limited electrolysis for the production of oxygen and suppression of free chlorine. For example, using 800 A amplitude current pulses and <200 sec pulse durations, we demonstrated prompt oxygen production and delayed chlorine production at the surface of a shiny 0.85 mm diameter spherical platinum electrode. The data, interpreted in terms of the ionic structure of the electric double layer, suggest a strategy for in situ production of metabolic oxygen via a new class of "smart" prosthetic implants for dealing with ischemic disease such as diabetic retinopathy. We also present data indicating that drift of the local pH of the oxygenated environment can be held constant using a feedback-controlled three electrode electrolysis system that chooses anode and cathode pair based on pH data provided by local microsensors. The work is discussed in the context of diabetic retinopathy since surgical techniques for multielectrode prosthetic implants aimed at retinal degenerative diseases have been developed.

  4. Metabolic Response of Clostridium ljungdahlii to Oxygen Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Whitham, Jason M.; Tirado-Acevedo, Oscar; Chinn, Mari S.; Pawlak, Joel J.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium ljungdahlii is an important synthesis gas-fermenting bacterium used in the biofuels industry, and a preliminary investigation showed that it has some tolerance to oxygen when cultured in rich mixotrophic medium. Batch cultures not only continue to grow and consume H2, CO, and fructose after 8% O2 exposure, but fermentation product analysis revealed an increase in ethanol concentration and decreased acetate concentration compared to non-oxygen-exposed cultures. In this study, the mechanisms for higher ethanol production and oxygen/reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxification were identified using a combination of fermentation, transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) differential expression, and enzyme activity analyses. The results indicate that the higher ethanol and lower acetate concentrations were due to the carboxylic acid reductase activity of a more highly expressed predicted aldehyde oxidoreductase (CLJU_c24130) and that C. ljungdahlii's primary defense upon oxygen exposure is a predicted rubrerythrin (CLJU_c39340). The metabolic responses of higher ethanol production and oxygen/ROS detoxification were found to be linked by cofactor management and substrate and energy metabolism. This study contributes new insights into the physiology and metabolism of C. ljungdahlii and provides new genetic targets to generate C. ljungdahlii strains that produce more ethanol and are more tolerant to syngas contaminants. PMID:26431975

  5. Regional differences in the coupling of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism changes in response to activation: Implications for BOLD-fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Ances, Beau M.; Leontiev, Oleg; Perthen, Joanna E.; Liang, Christine; Lansing, Amy E.; Buxton, Richard B.

    2010-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) based on blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal changes is a sensitive tool for mapping brain activation, but quantitative interpretation of the BOLD response is problematic. The BOLD response is primarily driven by cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes, but is moderated by M, a scaling parameter reflecting baseline deoxyhemoglobin, and n, the ratio of fractional changes in CBF to cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO2). We compared M and n between cortical (visual cortex, VC) and subcortical (lentiform nuclei, LN) regions using a quantitative approach based on calibrating the BOLD response with a hypercapnia experiment. Although M was similar in both regions (∼5.8%), differences in n (2.21±0.03 in VC and 1.58±0.03 in LN; Cohen d=1.71) produced substantially weaker (∼3.7×) subcortical than cortical BOLD responses relative to CMRO2 changes. Because of this strong sensitivity to n, BOLD response amplitudes cannot be interpreted as a quantitative reflection of underlying metabolic changes, particularly when comparing cortical and sub-cortical regions. PMID:18164629

  6. Regional differences in the coupling of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism changes in response to activation: implications for BOLD-fMRI.

    PubMed

    Ances, Beau M; Leontiev, Oleg; Perthen, Joanna E; Liang, Christine; Lansing, Amy E; Buxton, Richard B

    2008-02-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) based on blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal changes is a sensitive tool for mapping brain activation, but quantitative interpretation of the BOLD response is problematic. The BOLD response is primarily driven by cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes, but is moderated by M, a scaling parameter reflecting baseline deoxyhemoglobin, and n, the ratio of fractional changes in CBF to cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO(2)). We compared M and n between cortical (visual cortex, VC) and subcortical (lentiform nuclei, LN) regions using a quantitative approach based on calibrating the BOLD response with a hypercapnia experiment. Although M was similar in both regions (~5.8%), differences in n (2.21+/-0.03 in VC and 1.58+/-0.03 in LN; Cohen d=1.71) produced substantially weaker (~3.7x) subcortical than cortical BOLD responses relative to CMRO(2) changes. Because of this strong sensitivity to n, BOLD response amplitudes cannot be interpreted as a quantitative reflection of underlying metabolic changes, particularly when comparing cortical and subcortical regions.

  7. Oxygen isotope ratios of PO4: an inorganic indicator of enzymatic activity and P metabolism and a new biomarker in the search for life.

    PubMed

    Blake, R E; Alt, J C; Martini, A M

    2001-02-27

    The distinctive relations between biological activity and isotopic effect recorded in biomarkers (e.g., carbon and sulfur isotope ratios) have allowed scientists to suggest that life originated on this planet nearly 3.8 billion years ago. The existence of life on other planets may be similarly identified by geochemical biomarkers, including the oxygen isotope ratio of phosphate (delta(18)O(p)) presented here. At low near-surface temperatures, the exchange of oxygen isotopes between phosphate and water requires enzymatic catalysis. Because enzymes are indicative of cellular activity, the demonstration of enzyme-catalyzed PO(4)-H(2)O exchange is indicative of the presence of life. Results of laboratory experiments are presented that clearly show that delta(18)O(P) values of inorganic phosphate can be used to detect enzymatic activity and microbial metabolism of phosphate. Applications of delta(18)O(p) as a biomarker are presented for two Earth environments relevant to the search for extraterrestrial life: a shallow groundwater reservoir and a marine hydrothermal vent system. With the development of in situ analytical techniques and future planned sample return strategies, delta(18)O(p) may provide an important biosignature of the presence of life in extraterrestrial systems such as that on Mars.

  8. Special Feature: Oxygen isotope ratios of PO4: An inorganic indicator of enzymatic activity and P metabolism and a new biomarker in the search for life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Ruth E.; Alt, Jeffrey C.; Martini, Anna M.

    2001-02-01

    The distinctive relations between biological activity and isotopic effect recorded in biomarkers (e.g., carbon and sulfur isotope ratios) have allowed scientists to suggest that life originated on this planet nearly 3.8 billion years ago. The existence of life on other planets may be similarly identified by geochemical biomarkers, including the oxygen isotope ratio of phosphate (18Op) presented here. At low near-surface temperatures, the exchange of oxygen isotopes between phosphate and water requires enzymatic catalysis. Because enzymes are indicative of cellular activity,the demonstration of enzyme-catalyzed PO4-H2O exchange is indicative of the presence of life. Results of laboratory experiments are presented that clearly show that δ18OP values of inorganic phosphate can be used to detect enzymatic activity and microbial metabolism of phosphate. Applications of δ18Op as a biomarker are presented for two Earth environments relevant to the search for extraterrestrial life: a shallow groundwater reservoir and a marine hydrothermal vent system. With the development of in situ analytical techniques and future planned sample return strategies, δ18Op may provide an important biosignature of the presence of life in extraterrestrial systems such as that on Mars.

  9. Oxygen isotope ratios of PO4: An inorganic indicator of enzymatic activity and P metabolism and a new biomarker in the search for life

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Ruth E.; Alt, Jeffrey C.; Martini, Anna M.

    2001-01-01

    The distinctive relations between biological activity and isotopic effect recorded in biomarkers (e.g., carbon and sulfur isotope ratios) have allowed scientists to suggest that life originated on this planet nearly 3.8 billion years ago. The existence of life on other planets may be similarly identified by geochemical biomarkers, including the oxygen isotope ratio of phosphate (δ18Op) presented here. At low near-surface temperatures, the exchange of oxygen isotopes between phosphate and water requires enzymatic catalysis. Because enzymes are indicative of cellular activity, the demonstration of enzyme-catalyzed PO4–H2O exchange is indicative of the presence of life. Results of laboratory experiments are presented that clearly show that δ18OP values of inorganic phosphate can be used to detect enzymatic activity and microbial metabolism of phosphate. Applications of δ18Op as a biomarker are presented for two Earth environments relevant to the search for extraterrestrial life: a shallow groundwater reservoir and a marine hydrothermal vent system. With the development of in situ analytical techniques and future planned sample return strategies, δ18Op may provide an important biosignature of the presence of life in extraterrestrial systems such as that on Mars. PMID:11226207

  10. Oxygen and the evolution of metabolic pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, L. L.

    1986-01-01

    While a considerable amount of evidence has been accumulated about the history of oxygen on this planet, little is known about the relative amounts to which primitive cells might have been exposed. One clue may be found in the metabolic pathways of extant microorganisms. While eucaryotes are principally aerobic organisms, a number are capable of anaerobic growth by fermentation. One such eucaryotic microorganism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, will grow in the complete absence of oxygen when supplemented with unsaturated fatty acid and sterol. Oxygen-requiring enzymes are involved in the synthesis of both of these compounds. Studies have demonstrated that the oxidative desaturation of palmitic acid and the conversion of squalene to sterols occur in the range of 10-(3) to 10(-2) PAL. Thus, if the oxygen requirements of these enzymatic processes are an indication, eucaryotes might be more primitive than anticipated from the microfossil record. Results of studies on the oxygen requirements for sterol and unsaturated fatty acid synthesis in a more primitive procaryotic system are also discussed.

  11. Metabolism Supports Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Langston, P. Kent; Shibata, Munehiko; Horng, Tiffany

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages are found in most tissues of the body, where they have tissue- and context-dependent roles in maintaining homeostasis as well as coordinating adaptive responses to various stresses. Their capacity for specialized functions is controlled by polarizing signals, which activate macrophages by upregulating transcriptional programs that encode distinct effector functions. An important conceptual advance in the field of macrophage biology, emerging from recent studies, is that macrophage activation is critically supported by metabolic shifts. Metabolic shifts fuel multiple aspects of macrophage activation, and preventing these shifts impairs appropriate activation. These findings raise the exciting possibility that macrophage functions in various contexts could be regulated by manipulating their metabolism. Here, we review the rapidly evolving field of macrophage metabolism, discussing how polarizing signals trigger metabolic shifts and how these shifts enable appropriate activation and sustain effector activities. We also discuss recent studies indicating that the mitochondria are central hubs in inflammatory macrophage activation. PMID:28197151

  12. Phenotypic variation in metabolism and morphology correlating with animal swimming activity in the wild: relevance for the OCLTT (oxygen- and capacity-limitation of thermal tolerance), allocation and performance models

    PubMed Central

    Baktoft, Henrik; Jacobsen, Lene; Skov, Christian; Koed, Anders; Jepsen, Niels; Berg, Søren; Boel, Mikkel; Aarestrup, Kim; Svendsen, Jon C.

    2016-01-01

    Ongoing climate change is affecting animal physiology in many parts of the world. Using metabolism, the oxygen- and capacity-limitation of thermal tolerance (OCLTT) hypothesis provides a tool to predict the responses of ectothermic animals to variation in temperature, oxygen availability and pH in the aquatic environment. The hypothesis remains controversial, however, and has been questioned in several studies. A positive relationship between aerobic metabolic scope and animal activity would be consistent with the OCLTT but has rarely been tested. Moreover, the performance model and the allocation model predict positive and negative relationships, respectively, between standard metabolic rate and activity. Finally, animal activity could be affected by individual morphology because of covariation with cost of transport. Therefore, we hypothesized that individual variation in activity is correlated with variation in metabolism and morphology. To test this prediction, we captured 23 wild European perch (Perca fluviatilis) in a lake, tagged them with telemetry transmitters, measured standard and maximal metabolic rates, aerobic metabolic scope and fineness ratio and returned the fish to the lake to quantify individual in situ activity levels. Metabolic rates were measured using intermittent flow respirometry, whereas the activity assay involved high-resolution telemetry providing positions every 30 s over 12 days. We found no correlation between individual metabolic traits and activity, whereas individual fineness ratio correlated with activity. Independent of body length, and consistent with physics theory, slender fish maintained faster mean and maximal swimming speeds, but this variation did not result in a larger area (in square metres) explored per 24 h. Testing assumptions and predictions of recent conceptual models, our study indicates that individual metabolism is not a strong determinant of animal activity, in contrast to individual morphology, which is

  13. The coupling of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism with brain activation is similar for simple and complex stimuli in human primary visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Griffeth, Valerie E M; Simon, Aaron B; Buxton, Richard B

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative functional MRI (fMRI) experiments to measure blood flow and oxygen metabolism coupling in the brain typically rely on simple repetitive stimuli. Here we compared such stimuli with a more naturalistic stimulus. Previous work on the primary visual cortex showed that direct attentional modulation evokes a blood flow (CBF) response with a relatively large oxygen metabolism (CMRO2) response in comparison to an unattended stimulus, which evokes a much smaller metabolic response relative to the flow response. We hypothesized that a similar effect would be associated with a more engaging stimulus, and tested this by measuring the primary human visual cortex response to two contrast levels of a radial flickering checkerboard in comparison to the response to free viewing of brief movie clips. We did not find a significant difference in the blood flow-metabolism coupling (n=%ΔCBF/%ΔCMRO2) between the movie stimulus and the flickering checkerboards employing two different analysis methods: a standard analysis using the Davis model and a new analysis using a heuristic model dependent only on measured quantities. This finding suggests that in the primary visual cortex a naturalistic stimulus (in comparison to a simple repetitive stimulus) is either not sufficient to provoke a change in flow-metabolism coupling by attentional modulation as hypothesized, that the experimental design disrupted the cognitive processes underlying the response to a more natural stimulus, or that the technique used is not sensitive enough to detect a small difference.

  14. Oxygen-glucose deprivation inducing B1 RNA inhibits neuronal cells metabolic activity by NLRP3 and associated proinflammatory cytokines production.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Wang, Weihua; Zhang, Lei; Dai, Peng; Wang, Kai; Hui, Hao; Rao, Wei; Peng, Cheng; Yang, Jinghua; Yan, Zhen; Fei, Zhou

    2015-02-19

    Cerebral ischemia occurs when blood flow to part of the brain is obstructed, which can result in oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) and neuronal damage. However, the mechanisms remain poorly understood. The present study investigated the production and effects of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) induced by OGD in neuronal cells. By confocal microscopy, dsRNA containing B1 and B2 RNA, was found accumulating in HT22 cells under OGD treatment. The sequence of B1 RNA was identified and transfected into HT22 cells. Interestingly, B1 RNA induced transcription and expression of NLRP3, interleukin (IL)-1β, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, which was similar to the effects of OGD treatment. Moreover, HT22 cell growth inhibition and proinflammatory cytokines production induced by OGD and B1 RNA treatment were down-regulated by NLRP3 knock-down. These findings suggest that B1 RNA induced by OGD forms as dsRNA and inhibits neuronal cell metabolic activity by regulating the NLRP3 and associated proinflammatory cytokines production.

  15. Inner retinal metabolic rate of oxygen by oxygen tension and blood flow imaging in rat.

    PubMed

    Wanek, Justin; Teng, Pang-Yu; Albers, John; Blair, Norman P; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2011-09-01

    The metabolic function of inner retinal cells relies on the availability of nutrients and oxygen that are supplied by the retinal circulation. Assessment of retinal tissue vitality and function requires knowledge of both the rate of oxygen delivery and consumption. The purpose of the current study is to report a novel technique for assessment of the inner retinal metabolic rate of oxygen (MO(2)) by combined measurements of retinal blood flow and vascular oxygen tension (PO(2)) in rat. The application of this technology has the potential to broaden knowledge of retinal oxygen dynamics and advance understanding of disease pathophysiology.

  16. Cerebral Oxygen Delivery and Consumption During Evoked Neural Activity

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Alberto L.; Masamoto, Kazuto; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Kim, Seong-Gi

    2010-01-01

    Increases in neural activity evoke increases in the delivery and consumption of oxygen. Beyond observations of cerebral tissue and blood oxygen, the role and properties of cerebral oxygen delivery and consumption during changes in brain function are not well understood. This work overviews the current knowledge of functional oxygen delivery and consumption and introduces recent and preliminary findings to explore the mechanisms by which oxygen is delivered to tissue as well as the temporal dynamics of oxygen metabolism. Vascular oxygen tension measurements have shown that a relatively large amount of oxygen exits pial arterioles prior to capillaries. Additionally, increases in cerebral blood flow (CBF) induced by evoked neural activation are accompanied by arterial vasodilation and also by increases in arteriolar oxygenation. This increase contributes not only to the down-stream delivery of oxygen to tissue, but also to delivery of additional oxygen to extra-vascular spaces surrounding the arterioles. On the other hand, the changes in tissue oxygen tension due to functional increases in oxygen consumption have been investigated using a method to suppress the evoked CBF response. The functional decreases in tissue oxygen tension induced by increases in oxygen consumption are slow to evoked changes in CBF under control conditions. Preliminary findings obtained using flavoprotein autofluorescence imaging suggest cellular oxidative metabolism changes at a faster rate than the average changes in tissue oxygen. These issues are important in the determination of the dynamic changes in tissue oxygen metabolism from hemoglobin-based imaging techniques such as blood oxygenation-level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). PMID:20616881

  17. [Metabolic fitness: physical activity and health].

    PubMed

    Saltin, Bengt; Pilegaard, Henriette

    2002-04-15

    Physical inactivity is strongly associated with an increased risk of premature disease and death, and the falling level of physical activity in Denmark (as in many other countries) makes physical inactivity a major life-style risk factor in many western countries today. Both aerobic fitness (maximum oxygen uptake) and metabolic capacity of the muscles are important in this matter. The present paper focuses on the role of the metabolic capacity/fitness of muscle, because this appears to be especially critical for the development of metabolic-related diseases and thus for the health of the individual. A definition of metabolic fitness is proposed as the ratio between mitochondrial capacity for substrate utilisation and maximum oxygen uptake of the muscle. Indirect means of determining this parameter are discussed. Skeletal muscle is an extraordinarily plastic tissue and metabolic capacity/fitness changes quickly when the level of physical activity is altered. High metabolic fitness includes an elevated use of fat at rest and during exercise. The capacity for glucose metabolism is also enhanced in trained muscle. Some of these adaptations to physical activity are explained. Exercise-induced activation of genes coding for proteins involved in metabolism is described as an underlying mechanism for some of these adaptations. The increased gene expression is of relatively short duration, which implies that a certain regularity of physical activity is required to maintain high metabolic fitness. Thus, metabolic fitness is directly related to how much the muscle is used, but even low levels of physical activity have a beneficial effect on metabolic fitness and the overall health of the individual.

  18. Distinct profiles of human embryonic stem cell metabolism and mitochondria identified by oxygen.

    PubMed

    Lees, Jarmon G; Rathjen, Joy; Sheedy, John R; Gardner, David K; Harvey, Alexandra J

    2015-10-01

    Oxygen is a powerful regulator of cell function and embryonic development. It has previously been determined that oxygen regulates human embryonic stem (hES) cell glycolytic and amino acid metabolism, but the effects on mitochondria are as yet unknown. Two hES cell lines (MEL1, MEL2) were analyzed to determine the role of 5% (physiological) and 20% (atmospheric) oxygen in regulating mitochondrial activity. In response to extended physiological oxygen culture, MEL2 hES cells displayed reduced mtDNA content, mitochondrial mass and expression of metabolic genes TFAM, NRF1, PPARa and MT-ND4. Furthermore, MEL2 hES cell glucose consumption, lactate production and amino acid turnover were elevated under physiological oxygen. In stark contrast, MEL1 hES cell amino acid and carbohydrate use and mitochondrial function were relatively unaltered in response to oxygen. Furthermore, differentiation kinetics were delayed in the MEL1 hES cell line following BMP4 treatment. Here we report the first incidence of metabolic dysfunction in a hES cell population, defined as a failure to respond to oxygen concentration through the modulation of metabolism, demonstrating that hES cells can be perturbed during culture despite exhibiting the defining characteristics of pluripotent cells. Collectively, these data reveal a central role for oxygen in the regulation of hES cell metabolism and mitochondrial function, whereby physiological oxygen promotes glucose flux and suppresses mitochondrial biogenesis and gene expression.

  19. Label-free oxygen-metabolic photoacoustic microscopy in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Junjie; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Younan; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-07-01

    Almost all diseases, especially cancer and diabetes, manifest abnormal oxygen metabolism. Accurately measuring the metabolic rate of oxygen (MRO2) can be helpful for fundamental pathophysiological studies, and even early diagnosis and treatment of disease. Current techniques either lack high resolution or rely on exogenous contrast. Here, we propose label-free metabolic photoacoustic microscopy (mPAM) with small vessel resolution to noninvasively quantify MRO2 in vivo in absolute units. mPAM is the unique modality for simultaneously imaging all five anatomical, chemical, and fluid-dynamic parameters required for such quantification: tissue volume, vessel cross-section, concentration of hemoglobin, oxygen saturation of hemoglobin, and blood flow speed. Hyperthermia, cryotherapy, melanoma, and glioblastoma were longitudinally imaged in vivo. Counterintuitively, increased MRO2 does not necessarily cause hypoxia or increase oxygen extraction. In fact, early-stage cancer was found to be hyperoxic despite hypermetabolism.

  20. Measuring respiration of cultured cell with oxygen electrode as a metabolic indicator for drug screening.

    PubMed

    Amano, Y; Okumura, C; Yoshida, M; Katayama, H; Unten, S; Arai, J; Tagawa, T; Hoshina, S; Hashimoto, H; Ishikawa, H

    1999-03-01

    New trend in methods for assessing pharmacological action to bacteria and cell is to measure their metabolic activities induced, while the conventional methods used population growth. We focused on respiration volume as an indicator of cell metabolism, and developed inexpensive disposable oxygen electrode sensor and multi-channel dissolved oxygen meters (DOX-10 and DOX-96KB). Using these instruments, cytotoxicity was measured for 48 hrs and the method showed superior features to conventional methods in its handiness of one step assay, and excellent adaptability to automated systems. Total usability of this oxygen electrode method is being evaluated in bacterial drug susceptibility test, anticancer drug susceptibility test, and alternatives to animal experiment.

  1. Visible light optical coherence tomography measures retinal oxygen metabolic response to systemic oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ji; Liu, Wenzhong; Chen, Siyu; Backman, Vadim; Sheibani, Nader; Sorenson, Christine M.; Fawzi, Amani A.; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Zhang, Hao F.

    2015-01-01

    The lack of capability to quantify oxygen metabolism noninvasively impedes both fundamental investigation and clinical diagnosis of a wide spectrum of diseases including all the major blinding diseases such as age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. Using visible light optical coherence tomography (vis-OCT), we demonstrated accurate and robust measurement of retinal oxygen metabolic rate (rMRO2) noninvasively in rat eyes. We continuously monitored the regulatory response of oxygen consumption to a progressive hypoxic challenge. We found that both oxygen delivery, and rMRO2 increased from the highly regulated retinal circulation (RC) under hypoxia, by 0.28 ± 0.08 μL min−1 (p < 0.001), and 0.20 ± 0.04 μL min−1 (p < 0.001) per 100 mmHg systemic pO2 reduction, respectively. The increased oxygen extraction compensated for the deficient oxygen supply from the poorly regulated choroidal circulation. Results from an oxygen diffusion model based on previous oxygen electrode measurements corroborated our in vivo observations. We believe that vis-OCT has the potential to reveal the fundamental role of oxygen metabolism in various retinal diseases. PMID:26658555

  2. A quantitative study of oxygen as a metabolic regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; LaManna, Joseph C.; Cabrera, Marco E.

    2003-01-01

    An acute reduction in oxygen delivery to a tissue is associated with metabolic changes aimed at maintaining ATP homeostasis. However, given the complexity of the human bioenergetic system, it is difficult to determine quantitatively how cellular metabolic processes interact to maintain ATP homeostasis during stress (e.g., hypoxia, ischemia, and exercise). In particular, we are interested in determining mechanisms relating cellular oxygen concentration to observed metabolic responses at the cellular, tissue, organ, and whole body levels and in quantifying how changes in tissue oxygen availability affect the pathways of ATP synthesis and the metabolites that control these pathways. In this study, we extend a previously developed mathematical model of human bioenergetics, to provide a physicochemical framework that permits quantitative understanding of oxygen as a metabolic regulator. Specifically, the enhancement--sensitivity analysis--permits studying the effects of variations in tissue oxygenation and parameters controlling cellular respiration on glycolysis, lactate production, and pyruvate oxidation. The analysis can distinguish between parameters that must be determined accurately and those that require less precision, based on their effects on model predictions. This capability may prove to be important in optimizing experimental design, thus reducing use of animals.

  3. A Quantitative Study of Oxygen as a Metabolic Regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; LaManna, Joseph C.; Cabera, Marco E.

    2000-01-01

    An acute reduction in oxygen delivery to a tissue is associated with metabolic changes aimed at maintaining ATP homeostasis. However, given the complexity of the human bio-energetic system, it is difficult to determine quantitatively how cellular metabolic processes interact to maintain ATP homeostasis during stress (e.g., hypoxia, ischemia, and exercise). In particular, we are interested in determining mechanisms relating cellular oxygen concentration to observed metabolic responses at the cellular, tissue, organ, and whole body levels and in quantifying how changes in tissue oxygen availability affect the pathways of ATP synthesis and the metabolites that control these pathways. In this study; we extend a previously developed mathematical model of human bioenergetics, to provide a physicochemical framework that permits quantitative understanding of oxygen as a metabolic regulator. Specifically, the enhancement - sensitivity analysis - permits studying the effects of variations in tissue oxygenation and parameters controlling cellular respiration on glycolysis, lactate production, and pyruvate oxidation. The analysis can distinguish between parameters that must be determined accurately and those that require less precision, based on their effects on model predictions. This capability may prove to be important in optimizing experimental design, thus reducing use of animals.

  4. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and oxygenated metabolism in atherothrombosis.

    PubMed

    Guichardant, Michel; Calzada, Catherine; Bernoud-Hubac, Nathalie; Lagarde, Michel; Véricel, Evelyne

    2015-04-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies and clinical trials have reported the health benefits of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), including a lower risk of coronary heart diseases. This review mainly focuses on the effects of alpha-linolenic (ALA), eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids on some risk factors associated with atherothrombosis, including platelet activation, plasma lipid concentrations and oxidative modification of low-density lipoproteins (LDL). Special focus is given to the effects of marine PUFA on the formation of eicosanoids and docosanoids, and to the bioactive properties of some oxygenated metabolites of omega-3 PUFA produced by cyclooxygenases and lipoxygenases. The antioxidant effects of marine omega-3 PUFA at low concentrations and the pro-oxidant effects of DHA at high concentrations on the redox status of platelets and LDL are highlighted. Non enzymatic peroxidation end-products deriving from omega-3 PUFA such as hydroxy-hexenals, neuroketals and EPA-derived isoprostanes are also considered in relation to atherosclerosis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Oxygenated metabolism of PUFA: analysis and biological relevance".

  5. Apollo experience report: Assessment of metabolic expenditures. [extravehicular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waligora, J. M.; Hawkins, W. R.; Humbert, G. F.; Nelson, L. J.; Vogel, S. J.; Kuznetz, L. H.

    1975-01-01

    A significant effort was made to assess the metabolic expenditure for extravehicular activity on the lunar surface. After evaluation of the real-time data available to the flight controller during extravehicular activity, three independent methods of metabolic assessment were chosen based on the relationship between heart rate and metabolic production, between oxygen consumption and metabolic production, and between the thermodynamics of the liquid-cooled garment and metabolic production. The metabolic assessment procedure is analyzed and discussed. Real-time use of this information by the Apollo flight surgeon is discussed. Results and analyses of the Apollo missions and comments concerning future applications are included.

  6. Effect of hyperbaric oxygenation on carbohydrate metabolism protein synthesis in the myocardium during sustained hypodynamia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makarov, G. A.

    1980-01-01

    Glycolysis and the intensity of protein synthesis were studied in 140 white male rats in subcellular fractions of the myocardium during 45 day hypodynamia and hyperbaric oxygenation. Hypodynamia increased: (1) the amount of lactic acids; (2) the amount of pyruvic acid; (3) the lactate/pyruvate coefficient; and (4) the activities of aldolase and lactate dehydrogenase. Hyperbaric oxygenation was found to have a favorable metabolic effect on the animals with hypodynamia.

  7. Active oxygen doctors the evidence.

    PubMed

    Castelló, Ana; Francès, Francesc; Corella, Dolores; Verdú, Fernando

    2009-02-01

    Investigation at the scene of a crime begins with the search for clues. In the case of bloodstains, the most frequently used reagents are luminol and reduced phenolphthalein (or phenolphthalin that is also known as the Kastle-Meyer colour test). The limitations of these reagents have been studied and are well known. Household cleaning products have evolved with the times, and new products with active oxygen are currently widely used, as they are considered to be highly efficient at removing all kinds of stains on a wide range of surfaces. In this study, we investigated the possible effects of these new cleaning products on latent bloodstains that may be left at a scene of a crime. To do so, various fabrics were stained with blood and then washed using cleaning agents containing active oxygen. The results of reduced phenolphthalein, luminol and human haemoglobin tests on the washed fabrics were negative. The conclusion is that these new products alter blood to such an extent that it can no longer be detected by currently accepted methods employed in criminal investigations. This inability to locate bloodstains means that highly important evidence (e.g. a DNA profile) may be lost. Consequently, it is important that investigators are aware of this problem so as to compensate for it.

  8. Inner retinal oxygen metabolism in the 50/10 oxygen-induced retinopathy model

    PubMed Central

    Soetikno, Brian T.; Yi, Ji; Shah, Ronil; Liu, Wenzhong; Purta, Patryk; Zhang, Hao F.; Fawzi, Amani A.

    2015-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) represents a major cause of childhood vision loss worldwide. The 50/10 oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) model mimics the findings of ROP, including peripheral vascular attenuation and neovascularization. The oxygen metabolism of the inner retina has not been previously explored in this model. Using visible-light optical coherence tomography (vis-OCT), we measured the oxygen saturation of hemoglobin and blood flow within inner retinal vessels, enabling us to compute the inner retinal oxygen delivery (irDO2) and metabolic rate of oxygen (irMRO2). We compared these measurements between age-matched room-air controls and rats with 50/10 OIR on postnatal day 18. To account for a 61% decrease in the irDO2 in the OIR group, we found an overall statistically significant decrease in retinal vascular density affecting the superficial and deep retinal vascular capillary networks in rats with OIR compared to controls. Furthermore, matching the reduced irDO2, we found a 59% decrease in irMRO2, which we correlated with a statistically significant reduction in retinal thickness in the OIR group, suggesting that the decreased irMRO2 was due to decreased neuronal oxygen utilization. By exploring these biological and metabolic changes in great detail, our study provides an improved understanding of the pathophysiology of OIR model. PMID:26576731

  9. Oxygen monitor for semi-closed rebreathers: design and use for estimating metabolic oxygen consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, John R.; Southerland, David

    1999-07-01

    Semi-closed circuit underwater breathing apparatus (UBA) provide a constant flow of mixed gas containing oxygen and nitrogen or helium to a diver. However, as a diver's work rate and metabolic oxygen consumption varies, the oxygen percentages within the UBA can change dramatically. Hence, even a resting diver can become hypoxic and become at risk for oxygen induced seizures. Conversely, a hard working diver can become hypoxic and lose consciousness. Unfortunately, current semi-closed UBA do not contain oxygen monitors. We describe a simple oxygen monitoring system designed and prototyped at the Navy Experimental Diving Unit. The main monitor components include a PIC microcontroller, analog-to-digital converter, bicolor LED, and oxygen sensor. The LED, affixed to the diver's mask is steady green if the oxygen partial pressure is within pre- defined acceptable limits. A more advanced monitor with a depth senor and additional computational circuitry could be used to estimate metabolic oxygen consumption. The computational algorithm uses the oxygen partial pressure and the diver's depth to compute O2 using the steady state solution of the differential equation describing oxygen concentrations within the UBA. Consequently, dive transients induce errors in the O2 estimation. To evalute these errors, we used a computer simulation of semi-closed circuit UBA dives to generate transient rich data as input to the estimation algorithm. A step change in simulated O2 elicits a monoexponential change in the estimated O2 with a time constant of 5 to 10 minutes. Methods for predicting error and providing a probable error indication to the diver are presented.

  10. On the depth and scale of metabolic rate variation: scaling of oxygen consumption rates and enzymatic activity in the Class Cephalopoda (Mollusca).

    PubMed

    Seibel, Brad A

    2007-01-01

    Recent ecological theory depends, for predictive power, on the apparent similarity of metabolic rates within broad taxonomic or functional groups of organisms (e.g. invertebrates or ectotherms). Such metabolic commonality is challenged here, as I demonstrate more than 200-fold variation in metabolic rates independent of body mass and temperature in a single class of animals, the Cephalopoda, over seven orders of magnitude size range. I further demonstrate wide variation in the slopes of metabolic scaling curves. The observed variation in metabolism reflects differential selection among species for locomotory capacity rather than mass or temperature constraints. Such selection is highest among epipelagic squids (Lolignidae and Ommastrephidae) that, as adults, have temperature-corrected metabolic rates higher than mammals of similar size.

  11. Metabolic cost of extravehicular activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waligora, J. M.; Horrigan, D. J., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The data on metabolic rates during Skylab extravehicular activities are presented and compared with prior experience during Gemini and Apollo. Difficulties experienced with Gemini extravehicular activities are reviewed. The effect of a pressure suit on metabolic rate is discussed and the life support equipment capabilities of each life support system are reviewed. The methods used to measure metabolic rate, utilizing bioinstrumentation and operational data on the life support system, are described. Metabolic rates are correlated with different activities. Metabolic rates in Skylab were found to be within the capacities of the life support systems and to be similar to the metabolic rates experienced during Apollo lunar 1/6-g extravehicular activities. They were found to range from 100 kcal/h to 500 kcal/h, during both 1/6-g and zero-g extravehicular activities. The average metabolic rates measured during long extravehicular activities were remarkably consistent and appeared to be a function of crew pacing of activity rather than to the effort involved in individual tasks.

  12. Visible light optical coherence tomography measure retinal oxygen metabolic response to systemic oxygenation (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Ji; Liu, Wenzhong; Chen, Siyu; Backman, Vadim; Sheibani, Nader; Sorenson, Christine M.; Fawzi, Amani A.; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-03-01

    The lack of capability to quantify oxygen metabolism noninvasively impedes both fundamental investigation and clinical diagnosis of a wide spectrum of diseases including all the major blinding diseases such as age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. Using visible light optical coherence tomography (vis-OCT), we demonstrated accurate and robust measurement of retinal oxygen metabolic rate (rMRO2) noninvasively in rat eyes. The rMRO2 was calculated by concurrent measurement of blood flow and blood oxygen saturation (sO2). Blood flow was calculated by the principle of Doppler optical coherence tomography, where the phase shift between two closely spaced A-lines measures the axial velocity. The distinct optical absorption spectra of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin provided the contrast for sO2 measurement, combined with the spectroscopic analysis of vis-OCT signal within the blood vessels. We continuously monitored the regulatory response of oxygen consumption to a progressive hypoxic challenge. We found that both oxygen delivery, and rMRO2 increased from the highly regulated retinal circulation (RC) under hypoxia, by 0.28+/-0.08 μL/min (p<0.001), and 0.20+/-0.04 μL/min (p<0.001) per 100 mmHg systemic pO2 reduction, respectively. The increased oxygen extraction compensated for the deficient oxygen supply from the poorly regulated choroidal circulation (CC).

  13. Metabolism of 11-oxygenated steroids. Metabolism in vitro by preparations of liver

    PubMed Central

    Bush, I. E.; Hunter, Sheila A.; Meigs, R. A.

    1968-01-01

    1. The isolation and partial purification of 11β-hydroxy steroid dehydrogenase from rat and guinea-pig liver microsomes has been achieved by conventional methods. 2. The efficiency of different 11-oxygenated steroids as substrates has been examined. The relative efficiencies confirm in the main the stereochemical theory of the enzyme–coenzyme–substrate complex that was proposed earlier on the basis of studies in vivo. Δ4-3-Ketones and 5α-hydrogen steroids are readily metabolized by the enzyme. 5β-Hydrogen steroids and Δ4-3-ketones with certain large α-substituents are metabolized to a limited extent or not at all. Halogen substitution in the 9α-position enhances the rate of reduction of 11-ketones but blocks the oxidation of the related 11β-ols. 3. 9α-Fluorocortisol is a competitive inhibitor of the oxidation of cortisol, but 9α-fluorocortisone is reduced at five to ten times the initial velocity of cortisone. 4. 11β-Hydroxy steroid dehydrogenase activity has been found in liver microsomes of rat, guinea pig, rabbit and calf. 5. Relative substrate efficiencies and Km values are similar in whole (debris-free) homogenates, washed microsomes and acetone-dried powders of washed microsomes. 6. A variety of conditions have been examined for the observation of 11β-hydroxy steroid dehydrogenase activity. NADP(H) is an efficient and NAD(H) a very poor coenzyme for the reaction. PMID:4384445

  14. Metabolic assessments during extra-vehicular activity.

    PubMed

    Osipov YuYu; Spichkov, A N; Filipenkov, S N

    1998-01-01

    Extra-vehicular activity (EVA) has a significant role during extended space flights. It demonstrates that humans can survive and perform useful work outside the Orbital Space Stations (OSS) while wearing protective space suits (SS). When the International Space Station 'Alpha' (ISSA) is fully operational, EVA assembly, installation, maintenance and repair operations will become an everyday repetitive work activity in space. It needs new ergonomic evaluation of the work/rest schedule for an increasing of the labor amount per EVA hour. The metabolism assessment is a helpful method to control the productivity of the EVA astronaut and to optimize the work/rest regime. Three following methods were used in Russia to estimate real-time metabolic rates during EVA: 1. Oxygen consumption, computed from the pressure drop in a high pressure bottle per unit time (with actual thermodynamic oxygen properties under high pressure and oxygen leakage taken into account). 2. Carbon dioxide production, computed from CO2 concentration at the contaminant control cartridge and gas flow rate in the life support subsystem closed loop (nominal mode) or gas leakage in the SS open loop (emergency mode). 3. Heat removal, computed from the difference between the temperatures of coolant water or gas and its flow rate in a unit of time (with assumed humidity and wet oxygen state taken into account). Comparison of heat removal values with metabolic rates enables us to determine the thermal balance during an operative medical control of EVA at "Salyut-6", "Salyut-7" and "Mir" OSS. Complex analysis of metabolism, body temperature and heat rate supports a differential diagnosis between emotional and thermal components of stress during EVA. It gives a prognosis of human homeostasis during EVA. Available information has been acquired into an EVA data base which is an effective tool for ergonomical optimization.

  15. Metabolic assessments during extra-vehicular activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, Yu. Yu.; Spichkov, A. N.; Filipenkov, S. N.

    Extra-vehicular activity (EVA) has a significant role during extended space flights. It demonstrates that humans can survive and perform useful work outside the Orbital Space Stations (OSS) while wearing protective space suits (SS). When the International Space Station 'Alpha'(ISSA) is fully operational, EVA assembly, installation, maintenance and repair operations will become an everyday repetitive work activity in space. It needs new ergonomic evaluation of the work/rest schedule for an increasing of the labor amount per EVA hour. The metabolism assessment is a helpful method to control the productivity of the EVA astronaut and to optimize the work/rest regime. Three following methods were used in Russia to estimate real-time metabolic rates during EVA: 1. Oxygen consumption, computed from the pressure drop in a high pressure bottle per unit time (with actual thermodynamic oxygen properties under high pressure and oxygen leakage taken into account). 2. Carbon dioxide production, computed from CO 2 concentration at the contaminant control cartridge and gas flow rate in the life support subsystem closed loop (nominal mode) or gas leakage in the SS open loop (emergency mode). 3. Heat removal, computed from the difference between the temperatures of coolant water or gas and its flow rate in a unit of time (with assumed humidity and wet oxygen state taken into account). Comparison of heat removal values with metabolic rates enables us to determine the thermal balance during an operative medical control of EVA at "Salyut-6", "Salyut-7" and "Mir" OSS. Complex analysis of metabolism, body temperature and heat rate supports a differential diagnosis between emotional and thermal components of stress during EVA. It gives a prognosis of human homeostasis during EVA. Available information has been acquired into an EVA data base which is an effective tool for ergonomical optimization.

  16. Monitoring tissue perfusion, oxygenation, and metabolism in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Ekbal, Nasirul J; Dyson, Alex; Black, Claire; Singer, Mervyn

    2013-06-01

    Alterations in oxygen transport and use are integral to the development of multiple organ failure; therefore, the ultimate goal of resuscitation is to restore effective tissue oxygenation and cellular metabolism. Hemodynamic monitoring is the cornerstone of management to promptly identify and appropriately manage (impending) organ dysfunction. Prospective randomized trials have confirmed outcome benefit when preemptive or early treatment is directed toward maintaining or restoring adequate tissue perfusion. However, treatment end points remain controversial, in large part because of current difficulties in determining what constitutes "optimal." Information gained from global whole-body monitoring may not detect regional organ perfusion abnormalities until they are well advanced. Conversely, the ideal "canary" organ that is readily accessible for monitoring, yet offers an early and sensitive indicator of tissue "unwellness," remains to be firmly identified. This review describes techniques available for real-time monitoring of tissue perfusion and metabolism and highlights novel developments that may complement or even supersede current tools.

  17. Low oxygen levels as a trigger for enhancement of respiratory metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Rintala, Eija; Toivari, Mervi; Pitkänen, Juha-Pekka; Wiebe, Marilyn G; Ruohonen, Laura; Penttilä, Merja

    2009-01-01

    Background The industrially important yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to grow both in the presence and absence of oxygen. However, the regulation of its metabolism in conditions of intermediate oxygen availability is not well characterised. We assessed the effect of oxygen provision on the transcriptome and proteome of S. cerevisiae in glucose-limited chemostat cultivations in anaerobic and aerobic conditions, and with three intermediate (0.5, 1.0 and 2.8% oxygen) levels of oxygen in the feed gas. Results The main differences in the transcriptome were observed in the comparison of fully aerobic, intermediate oxygen and anaerobic conditions, while the transcriptome was generally unchanged in conditions receiving different intermediate levels (0.5, 1.0 or 2.8% O2) of oxygen in the feed gas. Comparison of the transcriptome and proteome data suggested post-transcriptional regulation was important, especially in 0.5% oxygen. In the conditions of intermediate oxygen, the genes encoding enzymes of the respiratory pathway were more highly expressed than in either aerobic or anaerobic conditions. A similar trend was also seen in the proteome and in enzyme activities of the TCA cycle. Further, genes encoding proteins of the mitochondrial translation machinery were present at higher levels in all oxygen-limited and anaerobic conditions, compared to fully aerobic conditions. Conclusion Global upregulation of genes encoding components of the respiratory pathway under conditions of intermediate oxygen suggested a regulatory mechanism to control these genes as a response to the need of more efficient energy production. Further, cells grown in three different intermediate oxygen levels were highly similar at the level of transcription, while they differed at the proteome level, suggesting post-transcriptional mechanisms leading to distinct physiological modes of respiro-fermentative metabolism. PMID:19804647

  18. The influence of oxygen supply on metabolism of neural cells cultured on a gas-permeable PTFE foil.

    PubMed

    Mauth, Corinna; Pavlica, Sanja; Deiwick, Andrea; Steffen, Anja; Bader, Augustinus

    2010-01-01

    The influence of oxygen on neural stem cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis is of great interest for regenerative therapies in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease. These oxygen depending mechanisms have to been considered for the optimization of neural cell culture conditions. In this study, we used a cell culture system with an oxygen-permeable polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) foil to investigate the effect of oxygen on metabolism and survival of neural cell lines in vitro. Human glial astrocytoma-derived cells (GOS-3) and rat pheochromacytoma cells (PC12) were cultured on the gas-permeable PTFE foil as well as a conventional non oxygen-permeable cell culture substrate at various oxygen concentrations. Analyses of metabolic activity, gene expression of apoptotic grade, and dopamine synthesis were performed. Under low oxygen partial pressure (2%, 5%) the anaerobic metabolism and apoptotic rate of cultured cells is diminished on PTFE foil when compared with the conventional culture dishes. In contrast, under higher oxygen atmosphere (21%) the number of apoptotic cells on the PTFE foil was enhanced. This culture model demonstrates a suitable model for the improvement of oxygen dependent metabolism under low oxygen conditions as well as for induction of oxidative stress by high oxygen atmosphere without supplementation of neurotoxins.

  19. Radioactive oxygen-15 in the study of cerebral blood flow, blood volume, and oxygen metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Ter-Pogossian, M.M.; Herscovitch, P.

    1985-10-01

    The short half-life of /sup 15/O led early observers to believe that it was unsuitable for use as a biological tracer. However, initial studies with this nuclide demonstrated its potential usefulness for in vivo, regional physiologic measurements. Subsequently, techniques were developed to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF), blood volume, and oxygen metabolism using intracarotid injection of /sup 15/O-labeled radiopharmaceuticals and highly collimated scintillation probes to record the time course of radioactivity in the brain. The development of positron emission tomography (PET) made possible the in vivo, noninvasive measurement of the absolute concentration of positron-emitting nuclides. A variety of tracer kinetic models were formulated to obtain physiologic measurements from tomographic images of the distribution of 15O-labeled radiopharmaceuticals in the brain. Regional cerebral oxygen metabolism is measured using scan data obtained following the inhalation of /sup 15/O-labeled oxygen. The tracer kinetic models used to measure rCBV, blood flow, and oxygen metabolism will be described and their relative advantages and limitations discussed. Several examples of the use of /sup 15/O tracer methods will be reviewed to demonstrate their widespread applicability to the study of cerebral physiology and pathophysiology. 110 references.

  20. [Effects of water and light interaction on reactive oxygen metabolism in ginger leaves].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Zheng; Li, Hai-Dong; Li, Xiu; Xiao, Jing; Xu, Kun

    2013-12-01

    To explore the relationship between water supply in roots, light intensity on leaves and reactive oxygen metabolism, the effects of various treatments including natural light plus normal watering (T1), 50% shading plus normal watering (T2), natural light plus PEG-6000 simulated drought (T3), 50% shading plus simulated drought (T4) on reactive oxygen level and antioxidant enzyme activity in ginger leaves were studied. The results showed that, 6 days after treatment, the O2* production rate and H2O2 and MDA contents remarkably increased in ginger leaves at midday. Treatment T3 showed the greatest increment, followed by T4, T1 and T2 in order. In addition, the activities of SOD and POD in all treatments and CAT in T3 and T4 noticeably decreased, while CAT in T1 and T2 exhibited a high activity at midday. Throughout the whole treatment, reactive oxygen level and antioxidant enzyme activities of ginger leaves in T1 and T2 remained stable, with a higher activity in T1 than in T2. However, the reactive oxygen level kept increasing in leaves exposed to treatments T3 and T4. Meanwhile, the activities of antioxidant enzymes increased firstly and then decreased. Taken together, this study demonstrated that drought stress, especially drought plus light stress, led to an increased accumulation of reactive oxygen in ginger leaves, while shading was conducive to maintaining high activity of protective enzymes, and therefore to reducing reactive oxygen level and alleviate drought-induced injury.

  1. Eat and run: prioritization of oxygen delivery during elevated metabolic states.

    PubMed

    Hicks, James W; Bennett, Albert F

    2004-12-15

    The principal function of the cardiopulmonary system is the matching of oxygen and carbon dioxide transport to the metabolic requirements of different tissues. Increased oxygen demands (VO2), for example during physical activity, result in a rapid compensatory increase in cardiac output and redistribution of blood flow to the appropriate skeletal muscles. These cardiovascular changes are matched by suitable ventilatory increments. This matching of cardiopulmonary performance and metabolism during activity has been demonstrated in a number of different taxa, and is universal among vertebrates. In some animals, large increments in aerobic metabolism may also be associated with physiological states other than activity. In particular, VO2 may increase following feeding due to the energy requiring processes associated with prey handling, digestion and ensuing protein synthesis. This large increase in VO2 is termed "specific dynamic action" (SDA). In reptiles, the increase in VO2 during SDA may be 3-40-fold above resting values, peaking 24-36 h following ingestion, and remaining elevated for up to 7 days. In addition to the increased metabolic demands, digestion is associated with secretion of H+ into the stomach, resulting in a large metabolic alkalosis (alkaline tide) and a near doubling in plasma [HCO3-]. During digestion then, the cardiopulmonary system must meet the simultaneous challenges of an elevated oxygen demand and a pronounced metabolic alkalosis. This paper will compare and contrast the patterns of cardiopulmonary response to similar metabolic increments in these different physiological states (exercise and/or digestion) in a variety of reptiles, including the Burmese python, Python morulus, savannah monitor lizard, Varanus exanthematicus, and American alligator Alligator mississipiensis.

  2. Taking their breath away: metabolic responses to low-oxygen levels in anchialine shrimps (Crustacea: Atyidae and Alpheidae).

    PubMed

    Havird, Justin C; Vaught, Rebecca C; Weeks, Jeffrey R; Fujita, Yoshihisa; Hidaka, Michio; Santos, Scott R; Henry, Raymond P

    2014-12-01

    Crustaceans generally act as oxy-regulators, maintaining constant oxygen uptake as oxygen partial pressures decrease, but when a critical low level is reached, ventilation and aerobic metabolism shut down. Cave-adapted animals, including crustaceans, often show a reduced metabolic rate possibly owing in part to the hypoxic nature of such environments. However, metabolic rates have not been thoroughly explored in crustaceans from anchialine habitats (coastal ponds and caves), which can experience variable oxygenic regimes. Here, an atypical oxy-conforming pattern of oxygen uptake is reported in the Hawaiian anchialine atyid Halocaridina rubra, along with other unusual metabolic characteristics. Ventilatory rates are near-maximal in normoxia and did not increase appreciably as PO₂ declined, resulting in a decline in VO₂ during progressive hypoxia. Halocaridina rubra maintained in anoxic waters survived for seven days (the duration of the experiment) with no measureable oxygen uptake, suggesting a reliance on anaerobic metabolism. Supporting this, lactate dehydrogenase activity was high, even in normoxia, and oxygen debts were quickly repaid by an unusually extreme increase in oxygen uptake upon exposure to normoxia. In contrast, four related anchialine shrimp species from the Ryukyu Islands, Japan, exhibited physiological properties consistent with previously studied crustaceans. The unusual respiratory patterns found in H. rubra are discussed in the context of a trade-off in gill morphology for osmoregulatory ion transport vs. diffusion of respiratory gasses. Future focus on anchialine species may offer novel insight into the diversity of metabolic responses to hypoxia and other physiological challenges experienced by crustaceans.

  3. Nitrogen metabolism in plants under low oxygen stress.

    PubMed

    Limami, Anis M; Diab, Houssein; Lothier, Jérémy

    2014-03-01

    More frequent flooding and waterlogging events due to more heavy precipitation are expected worldwide in the context of climate change. Accordingly, adaptation of plants to oxygen limitation at both cellular and whole plant levels should be investigated thoroughly, that derived knowledge could be taken into account in breeding programs and agronomical practices for saving plant fitness, growth and development even when oxygen availability is low. In the present review, we highlight current knowledge on essential aspects of low oxygen stress-induced changes in nitrogen metabolism. The involvement of two possible pathways for NO production either via the reaction catalyzed by nitrate reductase or at Complex III or IV of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, thus contributing to ATP synthesis via the so-called nitrite-NO respiration, is discussed. NO is proposed to be scavenged by non-symbiotic hemoglobin (Hb) in a Hb/NO cycle, in which NAD(P)H is oxidized for the conversion of NO into NO3(-). The investigation of an additional adaptation to the decrease in oxygen availability via transcriptional and posttranslational regulation of amino acid synthesis pathways, using publicly available transcriptome and translatome data for Arabidopsis thaliana and rice is also discussed.

  4. Variability of the coupling of blood flow and oxygen metabolism responses in the brain: a problem for interpreting BOLD studies but potentially a new window on the underlying neural activity

    PubMed Central

    Buxton, Richard B.; Griffeth, Valerie E. M.; Simon, Aaron B.; Moradi, Farshad

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies from our group and others using quantitative fMRI methods have found that variations of the coupling ratio of blood flow (CBF) and oxygen metabolism (CMRO2) responses to a stimulus have a strong effect on the BOLD response. Across a number of studies an empirical pattern is emerging in the way CBF and CMRO2 changes are coupled to neural activation: if the stimulus is modulated to create a stronger response (e.g., increasing stimulus contrast), CBF is modulated more than CMRO2; on the other hand, if the brain state is altered such that the response to the same stimulus is increased (e.g., modulating attention, adaptation, or excitability), CMRO2 is modulated more than CBF. Because CBF and CMRO2 changes conflict in producing BOLD signal changes, this finding has an important implication for conventional BOLD-fMRI studies: the BOLD response exaggerates the effects of stimulus variation but is only weakly sensitive to modulations of the brain state that alter the response to a standard stimulus. A speculative hypothesis is that variability of the coupling ratio of the CBF and CMRO2 responses reflects different proportions of inhibitory and excitatory evoked activity, potentially providing a new window on neural activity in the human brain. PMID:24966808

  5. New perspectives on the molecular basis of the interaction between oxygen homeostasis and iron metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Recalcati, Stefania; Gammella, Elena; Cairo, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen and iron are two elements closely related from a (bio)chemical point of view. Moreover, they share the characteristic of being indispensable for life, while also being potentially toxic. Therefore, their level is strictly monitored, and sophisticated pathways have evolved to face variations in either element. In addition, the expression of proteins involved in iron and oxygen metabolism is mainly controlled by a complex interplay of proteins that sense both iron levels and oxygen availability (ie, prolyl hydroxylases, hypoxia inducible factors, and iron regulatory proteins), and in turn activate feedback mechanisms to re-establish homeostasis. In this review, we describe how cells and organisms utilize these intricate networks to regulate responses to changes in oxygen and iron levels. We also explore the role of these pathways in some pathophysiological settings. PMID:27774486

  6. Low oxygen level increases proliferation and metabolic changes in bovine granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Shiratsuki, Shogo; Hara, Tomotaka; Munakata, Yasuhisa; Shirasuna, Koumei; Kuwayama, Takehito; Iwata, Hisataka

    2016-12-05

    The present study addresses molecular backgrounds underlying low oxygen induced metabolic changes and 1.2-fold change in bovine granulosa cell (GCs) proliferation. RNA-seq revealed that low oxygen (5%) upregulated genes associated with HIF-1 and glycolysis and downregulated genes associated with mitochondrial respiration than that in high oxygen level (21%). Low oxygen level induced high glycolytic activity and low mitochondrial function and biogenesis. Low oxygen level enhanced GC proliferation with high expression levels of HIF-1, VEGF, AKT, mTOR, and S6RP, whereas addition of anti-VEGF antibody decreased cellular proliferation with low phosphorylated AKT and mTOR expression levels. Low oxygen level reduced SIRT1, whereas activation of SIRT1 by resveratrol increased mitochondrial replication and decreased cellular proliferation with reduction of phosphorylated mTOR. These results suggest that low oxygen level stimulates the HIF1-VEGF-AKT-mTOR pathway and up-regulates glycolysis, which contributes to GC proliferation, and downregulation of SIRT1 contributes to hypoxia-associated reduction of mitochondria and cellular proliferation.

  7. Continuous Dissolved Oxygen Measurements and Modelling Metabolism in Peatland Streams.

    PubMed

    Dick, Jonathan J; Soulsby, Chris; Birkel, Christian; Malcolm, Iain; Tetzlaff, Doerthe

    2016-01-01

    Stream water dissolved oxygen was monitored in a 3.2km2 moorland headwater catchment in the Scottish Highlands. The stream consists of three 1st order headwaters and a 2nd order main stem. The stream network is fringed by peat soils with no riparian trees, though dwarf shrubs provide shading in the lower catchment. Dissolved oxygen (DO) is regulated by the balance between atmospheric re-aeration and the metabolic processes of photosynthesis and respiration. DO was continuously measured for >1 year and the data used to calibrate a mass balance model, to estimate primary production, respiration and re-aeration for a 1st order site and in the 2nd order main stem. Results showed that the stream was always heterotrophic at both sites. Sites were most heterotrophic in the summer reflecting higher levels of stream metabolism. The 1st order stream appeared more heterotrophic which was consistent with the evident greater biomass of macrophytes in the 2nd order stream, with resulting higher primary productivity. Comparison between respiration, primary production, re-aeration and potential physical controls revealed only weak relationships. However, the most basic model parameters (e.g. the parameter linking light and photosynthesis) controlling ecosystem processes resulted in significant differences between the sites which seem related to the stream channel geometry.

  8. Continuous Dissolved Oxygen Measurements and Modelling Metabolism in Peatland Streams

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Jonathan J.; Soulsby, Chris; Birkel, Christian; Malcolm, Iain; Tetzlaff, Doerthe

    2016-01-01

    Stream water dissolved oxygen was monitored in a 3.2km2 moorland headwater catchment in the Scottish Highlands. The stream consists of three 1st order headwaters and a 2nd order main stem. The stream network is fringed by peat soils with no riparian trees, though dwarf shrubs provide shading in the lower catchment. Dissolved oxygen (DO) is regulated by the balance between atmospheric re-aeration and the metabolic processes of photosynthesis and respiration. DO was continuously measured for >1 year and the data used to calibrate a mass balance model, to estimate primary production, respiration and re-aeration for a 1st order site and in the 2nd order main stem. Results showed that the stream was always heterotrophic at both sites. Sites were most heterotrophic in the summer reflecting higher levels of stream metabolism. The 1st order stream appeared more heterotrophic which was consistent with the evident greater biomass of macrophytes in the 2nd order stream, with resulting higher primary productivity. Comparison between respiration, primary production, re-aeration and potential physical controls revealed only weak relationships. However, the most basic model parameters (e.g. the parameter linking light and photosynthesis) controlling ecosystem processes resulted in significant differences between the sites which seem related to the stream channel geometry. PMID:27556278

  9. Microfluidic Platform Generates Oxygen Landscapes for Localized Hypoxic Activation

    PubMed Central

    Rexius, Megan L.; Mauleon, Gerardo; Malik, Asrar B.; Rehman, Jalees; Eddington, David T.

    2014-01-01

    An open-well microfluidic platform generates an oxygen landscape using gas-perfused networks which diffuse across a membrane. The device enables real-time analysis of cellular and tissue responses to oxygen tension to define how cells adapt to heterogeneous oxygen conditions found in the physiological setting. We demonstrate that localized hypoxic activation of cells elicited specific metabolic and gene responses in human microvascular endothelial cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. A robust demonstration of the compatibility of the device with standard laboratory techniques demonstrates the wide utility of the method. This platform is ideally suited to study real-time cell responses and cell-cell interactions within physiologically relevant oxygen landscapes. PMID:25315003

  10. Microfluidic platform generates oxygen landscapes for localized hypoxic activation.

    PubMed

    Rexius-Hall, Megan L; Mauleon, Gerardo; Malik, Asrar B; Rehman, Jalees; Eddington, David T

    2014-12-21

    An open-well microfluidic platform generates an oxygen landscape using gas-perfused networks which diffuse across a membrane. The device enables real-time analysis of cellular and tissue responses to oxygen tension to define how cells adapt to heterogeneous oxygen conditions found in the physiological setting. We demonstrate that localized hypoxic activation of cells elicited specific metabolic and gene responses in human microvascular endothelial cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. A robust demonstration of the compatibility of the device with standard laboratory techniques demonstrates the wide utility of the method. This platform is ideally suited to study real-time cell responses and cell-cell interactions within physiologically relevant oxygen landscapes.

  11. A Quantitative Study of Oxygen as a Metabolic Regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; LaManna, Joseph C.; Cabrera, Marco E.

    1999-01-01

    An acute reduction in oxygen (O2) delivery to a tissue is generally associated with a decrease in phosphocreatine, increases in ADP, NADH/NAD, and inorganic phosphate, increased rates of glycolysis and lactate production, and reduced rates of pyruvate and fatty acid oxidation. However, given the complexity of the human bioenergetic system and its components, it is difficult to determine quantitatively how cellular metabolic processes interact to maintain ATP homeostasis during stress (e.g., hypoxia, ischemia, and exercise). Of special interest is the determination of mechanisms relating tissue oxygenation to observed metabolic responses at the tissue, organ, and whole body levels and the quantification of how changes in tissue O2 availability affect the pathways of ATP synthesis and the metabolites that control these pathways. In this study, we extend a previously developed mathematical model of human bioenergetics to provide a physicochemical framework that permits quantitative understanding of O2 as a metabolic regulator. Specifically, the enhancement permits studying the effects of variations in tissue oxygenation and in parameters controlling the rate of cellular respiration on glycolysis, lactate production, and pyruvate oxidation. The whole body is described as a bioenergetic system consisting of metabolically distinct tissue/organ subsystems that exchange materials with the blood. In order to study the dynamic response of each subsystem to stimuli, we solve the ordinary differential equations describing the temporal evolution of metabolite levels, given the initial concentrations. The solver used in the present study is the packaged code LSODE, as implemented in the NASA Lewis kinetics and sensitivity analysis code, LSENS. A major advantage of LSENS is the efficient procedures supporting systematic sensitivity analysis, which provides the basic methods for studying parameter sensitivities (i.e., changes in model behavior due to parameter variation

  12. Effect of ectomycorrhizal colonization and drought on reactive oxygen species metabolism of Nothofagus dombeyi roots.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Maricel; Huygens, Dries; Fernandez, Carlos; Gacitúa, Yessy; Olivares, Erick; Saavedra, Isabel; Alberdi, Miren; Valenzuela, Eduardo

    2009-08-01

    Infection with ectomycorrhizal fungi can increase the ability of plants to resist drought stress through morphophysiological and biochemical mechanisms. However, the metabolism of antioxidative enzyme activities in the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis remains poorly understood. This study investigated biomass production, reactive oxygen metabolism (hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde concentration) and antioxidant enzyme activity (superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase) in pure cultures of the ectomycorrhizal fungi Descolea antartica Sing. and Pisolithus tinctorius (Pers.) Coker & Couch, and non-mycorrhizal and mycorrhizal roots of Nothofagus dombeyi (Mirb.) roots under well-watered conditions and drought conditions (DC). The studied ectomycorrhizal fungi regulated their antioxidative enzyme metabolism differentially in response to drought, resulting in cellular damage in D. antartica but not in P. tinctorius. Ectomycorrhizal inoculation and water treatment had a significant effect on all parameters studied, including relative water content of the plant. As such, N. dombeyi plants in symbiosis experienced a lower oxidative stress effect than non-mycorrhizal plants under DC. Additionally, ectomycorrhizal N. dombeyi roots showed a greater antioxidant enzyme activity relative to non-mycorrhizal roots, an effect which was further expressed under DC. The association between the non-specific P. tinctorius and N. dombeyi had a more effective reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism than the specific D. antartica-N. dombeyi symbiosis. We conclude that the combination of effective ROS prevention and ROS detoxification by ectomycorrhizal plants resulted in reduced cellular damage and increased plant growth relative to non-mycorrhizal plants under drought.

  13. Effects of adenosine metabolism in astrocytes on central nervous system oxygen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-liang; Zhang, Ya-nan; Wang, Zhong-zhuang; Xu, Wei-gang; Li, Run-ping; Zhang, Jun-dong

    2016-03-15

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) is widely used in military operations, especially underwater missions. However, prolonged and continuous inhalation of HBO can cause central nervous system oxygen toxicity (CNS-OT), which greatly limits HBO's application. The regulation of astrocytes to the metabolism of adenosine is involved in epilepsy. In our study, we aimed to observe the effects of HBO exposure on the metabolism of adenosine in the brain. Furthermore, we aimed to confirm the possible mechanism underlying adenosine's mediation of the CNS-OT. Firstly, anesthetized rats exposed to 5 atm absolute HBO for 80 min. The concentrations of extracellular adenosine, ATP, ADP, and AMP were detected. Secondly, free-moving rats were exposed to HBO at the same pressure for 20 min, and the activities of 5'-nucleotidase and ADK in brain tissues were measured. For the mechanism studies, we observed the effects of a series of different doses of drugs related to adenosine metabolism on the latency of CNS-OT. Results showed HBO exposure could increase adenosine content by inhibiting ADK activity and improving 5'-nucleotidase activity. And adenosine metabolism during HBO exposure may be a protective response against HBO-induced CNS-OT. Moreover, the improvement of adenosine concentration, activation of adenosine A1R, or suppression of ADK and adenosine A2AR, which are involved in the prevention of HBO-induced CNS-OT. This is the first study to demonstrate HBO exposure regulated adenosine metabolism in the brain. Adenosine metabolism and adenosine receptors are related to HBO-induced CNS-OT development. These results will provide new potential targets for the termination or the attenuation of CNS-OT.

  14. Pulmonary metabolism of foreign compounds: Its role in metabolic activation

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, G.M. )

    1990-04-01

    The lung has the potential of metabolizing many foreign chemicals to a vast array of metabolites with different pharmacological and toxicological properties. Because many chemicals require metabolic activation in order to exert their toxicity, the cellular distribution of the drug-metabolizing enzymes in a heterogeneous tissue, such as the lung, and the balance of metabolic activation and deactivation pathways in any particular cell are key factors in determining the cellular specificity of many pulmonary toxins. Environmental factors such as air pollution, cigarette smoking, and diet markedly affect the pulmonary metabolism of some chemicals and, thereby, possibly affect their toxicity.

  15. Oxygen in activator centers of zinc sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Golobeva, N.P.; Fok, M.V.

    1986-05-01

    The authors observed the sensitized luminescence of Tm and Dy without addition of Cu and Ag in samples which had been obtained by the sulfonation of zinc sulfide in hydrogen sulfide; the zinc sulfide has a copper concentration below 5.10/sup -6/ mass %. In this case the excitation can be transmitted from the ZnS lattice to the rare-earth activators mainly through defects including oxygen. The following conclusions were made. In the case of activated ZnS, oxygen is present in formations accounting for the excitation and luminescence of a number of luminophors. When an activator is introduced in the region of ZnS layer faults, where also the oxygen must be located, the positioning of the faults in close vicinity is facilitated even when the oxygen concentration of the ZnS is low. All this must be considered when models of luminescence centers of zinc sulfide are developed.

  16. Noninvasive in vivo imaging of oxygen metabolic rate in the retina.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenzhong; Zhang, Hao F

    2014-01-01

    Precise and noninvasive measurement of retinal oxygen metabolic rate is important for retinal pathological investigations as well as retinal disease detection, which has not been achieved until recently. Here, we quantified retinal oxygen metabolic rate in rats by combining photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy with spectral domain-optical coherence tomography. We employed multi-wavelength photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy for oxygen saturation measurement and applied dual-ring scanning Doppler spectral domain-optical coherence tomography to image retinal blood flow. With retinal oxygen saturation and blood flow being measured, we determined the retinal oxygen metabolic rate in a typical rat to be 373.41 ± 88.04 ng/minute.

  17. In Situ Coral Reef Oxygen Metabolism: An Eddy Correlation Study

    PubMed Central

    Long, Matthew H.; Berg, Peter; de Beer, Dirk; Zieman, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative studies of coral reefs are challenged by the three-dimensional hard structure of reefs and the high spatial variability and temporal dynamics of their metabolism. We used the non-invasive eddy correlation technique to examine respiration and photosynthesis rates, through O2 fluxes, from reef crests and reef slopes in the Florida Keys, USA. We assessed how the photosynthesis and respiration of different reef habitats is controlled by light and hydrodynamics. Numerous fluxes (over a 0.25 h period) were as high as 4500 mmol O2 m−2 d−1, which can only be explained by efficient light utilization by the phototrophic community and the complex canopy structure of the reef, having a many-fold larger surface area than its horizontal projection. Over diel cycles, the reef crest was net autotrophic, whereas on the reef slope oxygen production and respiration were balanced. The autotrophic nature of the shallow reef crests implies that the export of organics is an important source of primary production for the larger area. Net oxygen production on the reef crest was proportional to the light intensity, up to 1750 µmol photons m−2 s−1 and decreased thereafter as respiration was stimulated by high current velocities coincident with peak light levels. Nighttime respiration rates were also stimulated by the current velocity, through enhanced ventilation of the porous framework of the reef. Respiration rates were the highest directly after sunset, and then decreased during the night suggesting that highly labile photosynthates produced during the day fueled early-night respiration. The reef framework was also important to the acquisition of nutrients as the ambient nitrogen stock in the water had sufficient capacity to support these high production rates across the entire reef width. These direct measurements of complex reefs systems yielded high metabolic rates and dynamics that can only be determined through in situ, high temporal resolution measurements

  18. Sustained high-altitude hypoxia increases cerebral oxygen metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Zachary M.; Krizay, Erin; Guo, Jia; Shin, David D.; Scadeng, Miriam

    2013-01-01

    Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is a common condition occurring within hours of rapid exposure to high altitude. Despite its frequent occurrence, the pathophysiological mechanisms that underlie the condition remain poorly understood. We investigated the role of cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO2) in AMS. The purpose of this study was to test 1) if CMRO2 changes in response to hypoxia, and 2) if there is a difference in how individuals adapt to oxygen metabolic changes that may determine who develops AMS and who does not. Twenty-six normal human subjects were recruited into two groups based on Lake Louise AMS score (LLS): those with no AMS (LLS ≤ 2), and those with unambiguous AMS (LLS ≥ 5). [Subjects with intermediate scores (LLS 3–4) were not included.] CMRO2 was calculated from cerebral blood flow and arterial-venous difference in O2 content. Cerebral blood flow was measured using arterial spin labeling MRI; venous O2 saturation was calculated from the MRI of transverse relaxation in the superior sagittal sinus. Arterial O2 saturation was measured via pulse oximeter. Measurements were made during normoxia and after 2-day high-altitude exposure at 3,800 m. In all subjects, CMRO2 increased with sustained high-altitude hypoxia [1.54 (0.37) to 1.82 (0.49) μmol·g−1·min−1, n = 26, P = 0.045]. There was no significant difference in CMRO2 between AMS and no-AMS groups. End-tidal Pco2 was significantly reduced during hypoxia. Low arterial Pco2 is known to increase neural excitability, and we hypothesize that the low arterial Pco2 resulting from ventilatory acclimatization causes the observed increase in CMRO2. PMID:23019310

  19. Aerobic and anaerobic metabolism in oxygen minimum layer fishes: the role of alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Torres, Joseph J; Grigsby, Michelle D; Clarke, M Elizabeth

    2012-06-01

    Zones of minimum oxygen form at intermediate depth in all the world's oceans as a result of global circulation patterns that keep the water at oceanic mid-depths out of contact with the atmosphere for hundreds of years. In areas where primary production is very high, the microbial oxidation of sinking organic matter results in very low oxygen concentrations at mid-depths. Such is the case with the Arabian Sea, with O(2) concentrations reaching zero at 200 m and remaining very low (<0.1 ml O(2)l(-1)) for hundreds of meters below this depth, and in the California borderland, where oxygen levels reach 0.2 ml O(2)l(-1) at 700 m with severely hypoxic (<1.0 ml O(2)l(-1)) waters at depths 300 m above and below that. Despite the very low oxygen, mesopelagic fishes (primarily lanternfishes: Mytophidae) inhabiting the Arabian Sea and California borderland perform a daily vertical migration into the low-oxygen layer, spending daylight hours in the oxygen minimum zone and migrating upward into normoxic waters at night. To find out how fishes were able to survive their daily sojourns into the minimum zone, we tested the activity of four enzymes, one (lactate dehydrogenase, LDH) that served as a proxy for anaerobic glycolysis with a conventional lactate endpoint, a second (citrate synthase, CS) that is indicative of aerobic metabolism, a third (malate dehydrogenase) that functions in the Krebs' cycle and as a bridge linking mitochondrion and cytosol, and a fourth (alcohol dehydrogenase, ADH) that catalyzes the final reaction in a pathway where pyruvate is reduced to ethanol. Ethanol is a metabolic product easily excreted by fish, preventing lactate accumulation. The ADH pathway is rarely very active in vertebrate muscle; activity has previously been seen only in goldfish and other cyprinids capable of prolonged anaerobiosis. Activity of the enzyme suite in Arabian Sea and California fishes was compared with that of ecological analogs in the same family and with the same

  20. A mathematical model of metabolism and regulation provides a systems-level view of how Escherichia coli responds to oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Ederer, Michael; Steinsiek, Sonja; Stagge, Stefan; Rolfe, Matthew D.; Ter Beek, Alexander; Knies, David; Teixeira de Mattos, M. Joost; Sauter, Thomas; Green, Jeffrey; Poole, Robert K.; Bettenbrock, Katja; Sawodny, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    The efficient redesign of bacteria for biotechnological purposes, such as biofuel production, waste disposal or specific biocatalytic functions, requires a quantitative systems-level understanding of energy supply, carbon, and redox metabolism. The measurement of transcript levels, metabolite concentrations and metabolic fluxes per se gives an incomplete picture. An appreciation of the interdependencies between the different measurement values is essential for systems-level understanding. Mathematical modeling has the potential to provide a coherent and quantitative description of the interplay between gene expression, metabolite concentrations, and metabolic fluxes. Escherichia coli undergoes major adaptations in central metabolism when the availability of oxygen changes. Thus, an integrated description of the oxygen response provides a benchmark of our understanding of carbon, energy, and redox metabolism. We present the first comprehensive model of the central metabolism of E. coli that describes steady-state metabolism at different levels of oxygen availability. Variables of the model are metabolite concentrations, gene expression levels, transcription factor activities, metabolic fluxes, and biomass concentration. We analyze the model with respect to the production capabilities of central metabolism of E. coli. In particular, we predict how precursor and biomass concentration are affected by product formation. PMID:24723921

  1. Oxygen sensitivity of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation depends on metabolic conditions.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, David L; Brookes, Paul S

    2009-06-12

    The mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays a central role in many cell signaling pathways, but debate still surrounds its regulation by factors, such as substrate availability, [O2] and metabolic state. Previously, we showed that in isolated mitochondria respiring on succinate, ROS generation was a hyperbolic function of [O2]. In the current study, we used a wide variety of substrates and inhibitors to probe the O2 sensitivity of mitochondrial ROS generation under different metabolic conditions. From such data, the apparent Km for O2 of putative ROS-generating sites within mitochondria was estimated as follows: 0.2, 0.9, 2.0, and 5.0 microM O2 for the complex I flavin site, complex I electron backflow, complex III QO site, and electron transfer flavoprotein quinone oxidoreductase of beta-oxidation, respectively. Differential effects of respiratory inhibitors on ROS generation were also observed at varying [O2]. Based on these data, we hypothesize that at physiological [O2], complex I is a significant source of ROS, whereas the electron transfer flavoprotein quinone oxidoreductase may only contribute to ROS generation at very high [O2]. Furthermore, we suggest that previous discrepancies in the assignment of effects of inhibitors on ROS may be due to differences in experimental [O2]. Finally, the data set (see supplemental material) may be useful in the mathematical modeling of mitochondrial metabolism.

  2. Effects of aging on cerebral blood flow, oxygen metabolism, and blood oxygenation level dependent responses to visual stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ances, Beau M; Liang, Christine L; Leontiev, Oleg; Perthen, Joanna E; Fleisher, Adam S; Lansing, Amy E; Buxton, Richard B

    2009-04-01

    Calibrated functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides a noninvasive technique to assess functional metabolic changes associated with normal aging. We simultaneously measured both the magnitude of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) responses in the visual cortex for separate conditions of mild hypercapnia (5% CO(2)) and a simple checkerboard stimulus in healthy younger (n = 10, mean: 28-years-old) and older (n = 10, mean: 53-years-old) adults. From these data we derived baseline CBF, the BOLD scaling parameter M, the fractional change in the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO(2)) with activation, and the coupling ratio n of the fractional changes in CBF and CMRO(2). For the functional activation paradigm, the magnitude of the BOLD response was significantly lower for the older group (0.57 +/- 0.07%) compared to the younger group (0.95 +/- 0.14%), despite the finding that the fractional CBF and CMRO(2) changes were similar for both groups. The weaker BOLD response for the older group was due to a reduction in the parameter M, which was significantly lower for older (4.6 +/- 0.4%) than younger subjects (6.5 +/- 0.8%), most likely reflecting a reduction in baseline CBF for older (41.7 +/- 4.8 mL/100 mL/min) compared to younger (59.6 +/- 9.1 mL/100 mL/min) subjects. In addition to these primary responses, for both groups the BOLD response exhibited a post-stimulus undershoot with no significant difference in this magnitude. However, the post-undershoot period of the CBF response was significantly greater for older compared to younger subjects. We conclude that when comparing two populations, the BOLD response can provide misleading reflections of underlying physiological changes. A calibrated approach provides a more quantitative reflection of underlying metabolic changes than the BOLD response alone.

  3. Eucalanoid copepod metabolic rates in the oxygen minimum zone of the eastern tropical north Pacific: Effects of oxygen and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cass, Christine J.; Daly, Kendra L.

    2014-12-01

    The eastern tropical north Pacific Ocean (ETNP) contains one of the world's most severe oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), where oxygen concentrations are less than 2 μmol kg-1. OMZs cause habitat compression, whereby species intolerant of low oxygen are restricted to near-surface oxygenated waters. Copepods belonging to the family Eucalanidae are dominant zooplankters in this region and inhabit a variety of vertical habitats within the OMZ. The purpose of this study was to compare the metabolic responses of three species of eucalanoid copepods, Eucalanus inermis, Rhincalanus rostrifrons, and Subeucalanus subtenuis, to changes in temperature and environmental oxygen concentrations. Oxygen consumption and urea, ammonium, and phosphate excretion rates were measured via end-point experiments at three temperatures (10, 17, and 23 °C) and two oxygen concentrations (100% and 15% air saturation). S. subtenuis, which occurred primarily in the upper 50 m of the water column at our study site, inhabiting well-oxygenated to upper oxycline conditions, had the highest metabolic rates per unit weight, while E. inermis, which was found throughout the water column to about 600 m depth in low oxygen waters, typically had the lowest metabolic rates. Rates for R. rostrifrons (found primarily between 200 and 300 m depth) were intermediate between the other two species and more variable. Metabolic ratios suggested that R. rostrifrons relied more heavily on lipids to fuel metabolism than the other two species. S. subtenuis was the only species that demonstrated a decrease in oxygen consumption rates (at intermediate 17 °C temperature treatment) when environmental oxygen concentrations were lowered. The percentage of total measured nitrogen excreted as urea (% urea-N), as well as overall urea excretion rates, responded in a complex manner to changes in temperature and oxygen concentration. R. rostrifrons and E. inermis excreted a significantly higher % of urea-N in low oxygen treatments at

  4. Bidirectional Control of Blood Flow by Astrocytes: A Role for Tissue Oxygen and Other Metabolic Factors.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Grant R J; Howarth, Clare; MacVicar, Brian A

    2016-01-01

    Altering cerebral blood flow through the control of cerebral vessel diameter is critical so that the delivery of molecules important for proper brain functioning is matched to the activity level of neurons. Although the close relationship of brain glia known as astrocytes with cerebral blood vessels has long been recognized, it is only recently that these cells have been demonstrated to translate information on the activity level and energy demands of neurons to the vasculature. In particular, astrocytes respond to elevations in extracellular glutamate as a consequence of synaptic transmission through the activation of group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors. These Gq-protein coupled receptors elevate intracellular calcium via IP3 signaling. A close examination of astrocyte endfeet calcium signals has been shown to cause either vasoconstriction or vasodilation. Common to both vasomotor responses is the generation of arachidonic acid in astrocytes by calcium sensitive phospholipase A2. Vasoconstriction ensues from the conversion of arachidonic acid to 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, while vasodilation ensues from the production of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids or prostaglandins. Factors that determine whether constrictor or dilatory pathways predominate include brain oxygen, lactate, adenosine as well as nitric oxide. Changing the oxygen level itself leads to many downstream changes that facilitate the switch from vasoconstriction at high oxygen to vasodilation at low oxygen. These findings highlight the importance of astrocytes as sensors of neural activity and metabolism to coordinate the delivery of essential nutrients via the blood to the working cells.

  5. Forest clearfelling effects on dissolved oxygen and metabolism in peatland streams.

    PubMed

    O'Driscoll, Connie; O'Connor, Mark; Asam, Zaki-Ul-Zaman; de Eyto, Elvira; Brown, Lee E; Xiao, Liwen

    2016-01-15

    Peatlands cover ∼3% of the world's landmass and large expanses have been altered significantly as a consequence of land use change. Forestry activities are a key pressure on these catchments increasing suspended sediment and nutrient export to receiving waters. The aim of this study was to investigate stream dissolved oxygen (DO) and metabolic activity response following clearfelling of a 39-year-old lodgepole pine and Sitka spruce forestry in an upland peat catchment. Significant effects of clearfelling on water temperature, flows, DO and stream metabolic (photosynthesis, respiration) rates were revealed. Stream temperature and discharge significantly increased in the study stream following clearfelling. Instream ecosystem respiration increased significantly following clearfelling, indicating an increase in the net consumption of organic carbon.

  6. [Effect of hyperbaric oxygenation on metabolism of glutamine in the liver].

    PubMed

    Savilov, P N

    2014-01-01

    The effect of three-day course of hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO; 3 atm, 50 min, 1 session per day) on glutamine metabolism in the liver has been investigated in 72 adult albino rats. The content of ammonia, glutamate, glutamine, activity of glutamine synthetase (GS), phosphate-dependent glutaminase (PDG), and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) were studied in left (LLL) and median (MLL) lobes of the liver. The course of HBO had an inhibitory effect on all the enzymes studied. Inhibitory effect of hyperoxia on GDH activity persisted up to day 11 after the course of HBO in both lobes of the liver, while decreased glutamate normalized in both lobes. Reduced glutamine concentration normalized to day 4, and the concentration of ammonia and remained elevated for 11 days after the end of hyperoxic exposure. Inhibitory effect of hyperoxia on GS activity in LLL and MLL disappeared on day 4 and day 11 day after the end of the HBO course. PDG activity reduced by HBO in both lobes normalized to the day 4 day after oxygenation; however, on day 11 it selectively decreased in LLL, where simultaneous stimulation of GS activity was also observed. The results demonstrate different sensitivity of liver GS, PDG and GDH of normal rats to the inhibitory effect of HBO. Different dynamics of GS and PDG activity in LLL and MLL of oxygenated rats suggests functional heterogeneity of the glutamine cycle in hepatocytes of liver lobes after HBO.

  7. Limited Influence of Oxygen on the Evolution of Chemical Diversity in Metabolic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, Kazuhiro; Yoshitake, Ikumi

    2013-01-01

    Oxygen is thought to promote species and biomolecule diversity. Previous studies have suggested that oxygen expands metabolic networks by acquiring metabolites with different chemical properties (higher hydrophobicity, for example). However, such conclusions are typically based on biased evaluation, and are therefore non-conclusive. Thus, we re-investigated the effect of oxygen on metabolic evolution using a phylogenetic comparative method and metadata analysis to reduce the bias as much as possible. Notably, we found no difference in metabolic network expansion between aerobes and anaerobes when evaluating phylogenetic relationships. Furthermore, we showed that previous studies have overestimated or underestimated the degrees of differences in the chemical properties (e.g., hydrophobicity) between oxic and anoxic metabolites in metabolic networks of unicellular organisms; however, such overestimation was not observed when considering the metabolic networks of multicellular organisms. These findings indicate that the contribution of oxygen to increased chemical diversity in metabolic networks is lower than previously thought; rather, phylogenetic signals and cell-cell communication result in increased chemical diversity. However, this conclusion does not contradict the effect of oxygen on metabolic evolution; instead, it provides a deeper understanding of how oxygen contributes to metabolic evolution despite several limitations in data analysis methods. PMID:24958261

  8. Effects of Aging on Cerebral Blood Flow, Oxygen Metabolism, and Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent Responses to Visual Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ances, Beau M.; Liang, Christine L.; Leontiev, Oleg; Perthen, Joanna E.; Fleisher, Adam S.; Lansing, Amy E.; Buxton, Richard B.

    2010-01-01

    Calibrated functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides a noninvasive technique to assess functional metabolic changes associated with normal aging. We simultaneously measured both the magnitude of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) responses in the visual cortex for separate conditions of mild hypercapnia (5% CO2) and a simple checkerboard stimulus in healthy younger (n = 10, mean: 28-years-old) and older (n = 10, mean: 53-years-old) adults. From these data we derived baseline CBF, the BOLD scaling parameter M, the fractional change in the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO2) with activation, and the coupling ratio n of the fractional changes in CBF and CMRO2. For the functional activation paradigm, the magnitude of the BOLD response was significantly lower for the older group (0.57 ± 0.07%) compared to the younger group (0.95 ± 0.14%), despite the finding that the fractional CBF and CMRO2 changes were similar for both groups. The weaker BOLD response for the older group was due to a reduction in the parameter M, which was significantly lower for older (4.6 ± 0.4%) than younger subjects (6.5 ± 0.8%), most likely reflecting a reduction in baseline CBF for older (41.7 ± 4.8 mL/100 mL/min) compared to younger (59.6 ± 9.1 mL/100 mL/min) subjects. In addition to these primary responses, for both groups the BOLD response exhibited a post-stimulus undershoot with no significant difference in this magnitude. However, the post-undershoot period of the CBF response was significantly greater for older compared to younger subjects. We conclude that when comparing two populations, the BOLD response can provide misleading reflections of underlying physiological changes. A calibrated approach provides a more quantitative reflection of underlying metabolic changes than the BOLD response alone. PMID:18465743

  9. [Band 3 protein as a metabolic sensor--CO2 regulates the amount of oxygen delivered to tissues from red blood cells].

    PubMed

    Hamasaki, Naotaka

    2006-03-01

    Oxygen is essential for most forms of life, but too much oxygen is harmful and can induce tissue damage. Living creatures therefore have a tightly regulated system to deliver the necessary amount of oxygen to specific tissues at the right time. CO2 is not simply waste matter from tissues, but regulates the amount of oxygen delivered to tissues from red blood cells, utilizing the synergistic effects of hemoglobin, carbonic anhydrase and the anion exchange activity of band 3 protein. Red blood cells play an important role in this system and provide an ideal vehicle for delivering oxygen to tissues, depending on their metabolic activity.

  10. Evaluation of MR derived cerebral oxygen metabolic index in experimental hyperoxic hypercapnia, hypoxia and ischemia

    PubMed Central

    An, Hongyu; Liu, Qingwei; Chen, Yasheng; Lin, Weili

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose A non-invasive MRI method to measure cerebral oxygen metabolism has the potential to assess tissue viability during cerebral ischemia. The purposes of this study were 1) to validate MR oxygenation measurements across a wide range of global cerebral oxygenation; and 2) to examine the spatiotemporal evolution of oxygen metabolism during focal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in rats. Methods A group of rats (n=28) under normal, hyperoxic hypercapnia and hypoxia were studied to compare MR measured cerebral oxygen saturation (O2SatMRv) with blood gas oximetry measurements in the jugular vein (O2SatJV) and superior sagittal sinus (O2SatSSS). In a separate group of rats (n=31), MR measured cerebral oxygen metabolic index (MR_COMI) was acquired at multiple time-points during MCAO. Histogram analysis was performed on the normalized MR_COMI (rMR_COMI) to examine evolution of oxygen metabolism during acute ischemia. Results Highly linear relationships were obtained between O2SatMRv and O2SatJV/O2SatSSS in rats under global cerebral oxygenation alterations. In the focal ischemia study, rMR_COMI values were significantly lower within the areas of eventual infarction than other regions. Moreover, the rMR_COMI values within the ischemic territory decreased with time, concomitant with an increase in the number of voxels with severely impaired oxygen metabolism. Conclusion Accurate estimates of O2SatMRv can be obtained across a broad and physiologically relevant range of cerebral oxygenation. Furthermore, this method demonstrates a dynamic alteration of cerebral oxygen metabolism during acute ischemia in rats. PMID:19359642

  11. Early Oxygen-Utilization and Brain Activity in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Linda S.; Groenendaal, Floris; Toet, Mona C.; Lemmers, Petra M. A.; Vosse van de, Renè E.; van Bel, Frank; Benders, Manon J. N. L.

    2015-01-01

    The combined monitoring of oxygen supply and delivery using Near-InfraRed spectroscopy (NIRS) and cerebral activity using amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG) could yield new insights into brain metabolism and detect potentially vulnerable conditions soon after birth. The relationship between NIRS and quantitative aEEG/EEG parameters has not yet been investigated. Our aim was to study the association between oxygen utilization during the first 6 h after birth and simultaneously continuously monitored brain activity measured by aEEG/EEG. Forty-four hemodynamically stable babies with a GA < 28 weeks, with good quality NIRS and aEEG/EEG data available and who did not receive morphine were included in the study. aEEG and NIRS monitoring started at NICU admission. The relation between regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rScO2) and cerebral fractional tissue oxygen extraction (cFTOE), and quantitative measurements of brain activity such as number of spontaneous activity transients (SAT) per minute (SAT rate), the interval in seconds (i.e. time) between SATs (ISI) and the minimum amplitude of the EEG in μV (min aEEG) were evaluated. rScO2 was negatively associated with SAT rate (β=-3.45 [CI=-5.76- -1.15], p=0.004) and positively associated with ISI (β=1.45 [CI=0.44-2.45], p=0.006). cFTOE was positively associated with SAT rate (β=0.034 [CI=0.009-0.059], p=0.008) and negatively associated with ISI (β=-0.015 [CI=-0.026- -0.004], p=0.007). Oxygen delivery and utilization, as indicated by rScO2 and cFTOE, are directly related to functional brain activity, expressed by SAT rate and ISI during the first hours after birth, showing an increase in oxygen extraction in preterm infants with increased early electro-cerebral activity. NIRS monitored oxygenation may be a useful biomarker of brain vulnerability in high-risk infants. PMID:25965343

  12. Role of redox metabolism for adaptation of aquatic animals to drastic changes in oxygen availability.

    PubMed

    Welker, Alexis F; Moreira, Daniel C; Campos, Élida G; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

    2013-08-01

    Large changes in oxygen availability in aquatic environments, ranging from anoxia through to hyperoxia, can lead to corresponding wide variation in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by animals with aquatic respiration. Therefore, animals living in marine, estuarine and freshwater environments have developed efficient antioxidant defenses to minimize oxidative stress and to regulate the cellular actions of ROS. Changes in oxygen levels may lead to bursts of ROS generation that can be particularly harmful. This situation is commonly experienced by aquatic animals during abrupt transitions from periods of hypoxia/anoxia back to oxygenated conditions (e.g. intertidal cycles). The strategies developed differ significantly among aquatic species and are (i) improvement of their endogenous antioxidant system under hyperoxia (that leads to increased ROS formation) or other similar ROS-related stresses, (ii) increase in antioxidant levels when displaying higher metabolic rates, (iii) presence of constitutively high levels of antioxidants, that attenuates oxidative stress derived from fluctuations in oxygen availability, or (iv) increase in the activity of antioxidant enzymes (and/or the levels of their mRNAs) during hypometabolic states associated with anoxia/hypoxia. This enhancement of the antioxidant system - coined over a decade ago as "preparation for oxidative stress" - controls the possible harmful effects of increased ROS formation during hypoxia/reoxygenation. The present article proposes a novel explanation for the biochemical and molecular mechanisms involved in this phenomenon that could be triggered by hypoxia-induced ROS formation. We also discuss the connections among oxygen sensing, oxidative damage and regulation of the endogenous antioxidant defense apparatus in animals adapted to many natural or man-made challenges of the aquatic environment.

  13. The effect of myoglobin-facilitated oxygen transport on the basal metabolism of papillary muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Loiselle, D S

    1987-01-01

    A mathematical model of oxygen diffusion into cylindrical papillary muscles is presented. The model partitions total oxygen flux into its simple and myoglobin-facilitated components. The model includes variable sigmoidal, exponential, or hyperbolic functions relating oxygen partial pressure to both fractional myoglobin saturation and rate of oxygen consumption. The behavior of the model was explored for a variety of saturation- and consumption-concentration relations. Facilitation of oxygen transport by myoglobin was considerable as indexed both by the elevation of oxygen partial pressure on the longitudinal axis of the muscle and by the fraction of total oxygen flux at the muscle center contributed by oxymyoglobin. Despite its facilitation of oxygen flux at the muscle center, myoglobin made only a negligible contribution to the total oxygen consumption averaged over the muscle cross-section. Hence the presence of myoglobin fails to explain either the experimentally determined basal metabolism-muscle radius relation or the stretch effect observed in isolated papillary muscle. PMID:3607211

  14. Partitioning the metabolic scope: the importance of anaerobic metabolism and implications for the oxygen- and capacity-limited thermal tolerance (OCLTT) hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Ejbye-Ernst, Rasmus; Michaelsen, Thomas Y; Tirsgaard, Bjørn; Wilson, Jonathan M; Jensen, Lasse F; Steffensen, John F; Pertoldi, Cino; Aarestrup, Kim; Svendsen, Jon C

    2016-01-01

    Ongoing climate change is predicted to affect the distribution and abundance of aquatic ectotherms owing to increasing constraints on organismal physiology, in particular involving the metabolic scope (MS) available for performance and fitness. The oxygen- and capacity-limited thermal tolerance (OCLTT) hypothesis prescribes MS as an overarching benchmark for fitness-related performance and assumes that any anaerobic contribution within the MS is insignificant. The MS is typically derived from respirometry by subtracting standard metabolic rate from the maximal metabolic rate; however, the methodology rarely accounts for anaerobic metabolism within the MS. Using gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) and Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata), this study tested for trade-offs (i) between aerobic and anaerobic components of locomotor performance; and (ii) between the corresponding components of the MS. Data collection involved measuring oxygen consumption rate at increasing swimming speeds, using the gait transition from steady to unsteady (burst-assisted) swimming to detect the onset of anaerobic metabolism. Results provided evidence of the locomotor performance trade-off, but only in S. aurata. In contrast, both species revealed significant negative correlations between aerobic and anaerobic components of the MS, indicating a trade-off where both components of the MS cannot be optimized simultaneously. Importantly, the fraction of the MS influenced by anaerobic metabolism was on average 24.3 and 26.1% in S. aurata and P. reticulata, respectively. These data highlight the importance of taking anaerobic metabolism into account when assessing effects of environmental variation on the MS, because the fraction where anaerobic metabolism occurs is a poor indicator of sustainable aerobic performance. Our results suggest that without accounting for anaerobic metabolism within the MS, studies involving the OCLTT hypothesis could overestimate the metabolic scope available for

  15. Partitioning the metabolic scope: the importance of anaerobic metabolism and implications for the oxygen- and capacity-limited thermal tolerance (OCLTT) hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Ejbye-Ernst, Rasmus; Michaelsen, Thomas Y.; Tirsgaard, Bjørn; Wilson, Jonathan M.; Jensen, Lasse F.; Steffensen, John F.; Pertoldi, Cino; Aarestrup, Kim; Svendsen, Jon C.

    2016-01-01

    Ongoing climate change is predicted to affect the distribution and abundance of aquatic ectotherms owing to increasing constraints on organismal physiology, in particular involving the metabolic scope (MS) available for performance and fitness. The oxygen- and capacity-limited thermal tolerance (OCLTT) hypothesis prescribes MS as an overarching benchmark for fitness-related performance and assumes that any anaerobic contribution within the MS is insignificant. The MS is typically derived from respirometry by subtracting standard metabolic rate from the maximal metabolic rate; however, the methodology rarely accounts for anaerobic metabolism within the MS. Using gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) and Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata), this study tested for trade-offs (i) between aerobic and anaerobic components of locomotor performance; and (ii) between the corresponding components of the MS. Data collection involved measuring oxygen consumption rate at increasing swimming speeds, using the gait transition from steady to unsteady (burst-assisted) swimming to detect the onset of anaerobic metabolism. Results provided evidence of the locomotor performance trade-off, but only in S. aurata. In contrast, both species revealed significant negative correlations between aerobic and anaerobic components of the MS, indicating a trade-off where both components of the MS cannot be optimized simultaneously. Importantly, the fraction of the MS influenced by anaerobic metabolism was on average 24.3 and 26.1% in S. aurata and P. reticulata, respectively. These data highlight the importance of taking anaerobic metabolism into account when assessing effects of environmental variation on the MS, because the fraction where anaerobic metabolism occurs is a poor indicator of sustainable aerobic performance. Our results suggest that without accounting for anaerobic metabolism within the MS, studies involving the OCLTT hypothesis could overestimate the metabolic scope available for

  16. Metabolic adaptations of Azospirillum brasilense to oxygen stress by cell-to-cell clumping and flocculation.

    PubMed

    Bible, Amber N; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K; Mukherjee, Tanmoy; Green, Calvin S; Mishra, Priyanka; Purcell, Alicia; Aksenova, Anastasia; Hurst, Gregory B; Alexandre, Gladys

    2015-12-01

    The ability of bacteria to monitor their metabolism and adjust their behavior accordingly is critical to maintain competitiveness in the environment. The motile microaerophilic bacterium Azospirillum brasilense navigates oxygen gradients by aerotaxis in order to locate low oxygen concentrations that can support metabolism. When cells are exposed to elevated levels of oxygen in their surroundings, motile A. brasilense cells implement an alternative response to aerotaxis and form transient clumps by cell-to-cell interactions. Clumping was suggested to represent a behavior protecting motile cells from transiently elevated levels of aeration. Using the proteomics of wild-type and mutant strains affected in the extent of their clumping abilities, we show that cell-to-cell clumping represents a metabolic scavenging strategy that likely prepares the cells for further metabolic stresses. Analysis of mutants affected in carbon or nitrogen metabolism confirmed this assumption. The metabolic changes experienced as clumping progresses prime cells for flocculation, a morphological and metabolic shift of cells triggered under elevated-aeration conditions and nitrogen limitation. The analysis of various mutants during clumping and flocculation characterized an ordered set of changes in cell envelope properties accompanying the metabolic changes. These data also identify clumping and early flocculation to be behaviors compatible with the expression of nitrogen fixation genes, despite the elevated-aeration conditions. Cell-to-cell clumping may thus license diazotrophy to microaerophilic A. brasilense cells under elevated oxygen conditions and prime them for long-term survival via flocculation if metabolic stress persists.

  17. Metabolic Adaptations of Azospirillum brasilense to Oxygen Stress by Cell-to-Cell Clumping and Flocculation

    PubMed Central

    Bible, Amber N.; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K.; Mukherjee, Tanmoy; Green, Calvin S.; Mishra, Priyanka; Purcell, Alicia; Aksenova, Anastasia; Hurst, Gregory B.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of bacteria to monitor their metabolism and adjust their behavior accordingly is critical to maintain competitiveness in the environment. The motile microaerophilic bacterium Azospirillum brasilense navigates oxygen gradients by aerotaxis in order to locate low oxygen concentrations that can support metabolism. When cells are exposed to elevated levels of oxygen in their surroundings, motile A. brasilense cells implement an alternative response to aerotaxis and form transient clumps by cell-to-cell interactions. Clumping was suggested to represent a behavior protecting motile cells from transiently elevated levels of aeration. Using the proteomics of wild-type and mutant strains affected in the extent of their clumping abilities, we show that cell-to-cell clumping represents a metabolic scavenging strategy that likely prepares the cells for further metabolic stresses. Analysis of mutants affected in carbon or nitrogen metabolism confirmed this assumption. The metabolic changes experienced as clumping progresses prime cells for flocculation, a morphological and metabolic shift of cells triggered under elevated-aeration conditions and nitrogen limitation. The analysis of various mutants during clumping and flocculation characterized an ordered set of changes in cell envelope properties accompanying the metabolic changes. These data also identify clumping and early flocculation to be behaviors compatible with the expression of nitrogen fixation genes, despite the elevated-aeration conditions. Cell-to-cell clumping may thus license diazotrophy to microaerophilic A. brasilense cells under elevated oxygen conditions and prime them for long-term survival via flocculation if metabolic stress persists. PMID:26407887

  18. Viscosity dictates metabolic activity of Vibrio ruber

    PubMed Central

    Borić, Maja; Danevčič, Tjaša; Stopar, David

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about metabolic activity of bacteria, when viscosity of their environment changes. In this work, bacterial metabolic activity in media with viscosity ranging from 0.8 to 29.4 mPas was studied. Viscosities up to 2.4 mPas did not affect metabolic activity of Vibrio ruber. On the other hand, at 29.4 mPas respiration rate and total dehydrogenase activity increased 8 and 4-fold, respectively. The activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) increased up to 13-fold at higher viscosities. However, intensified metabolic activity did not result in faster growth rate. Increased viscosity delayed the onset as well as the duration of biosynthesis of prodigiosin. As an adaptation to viscous environment V. ruber increased metabolic flux through the pentose phosphate pathway and reduced synthesis of a secondary metabolite. In addition, V. ruber was able to modify the viscosity of its environment. PMID:22826705

  19. Influence of host seed on metabolic activity by Enterobacter cloacae in the spermosphere

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known regarding the influences of nutrients released from plants on the metabolic activity of colonizing microbes. To gain a better understanding of these influences, we used bioluminescence- and oxygen consumption-based methods to compare bacterial metabolic activity expressed during col...

  20. Biochar activated by oxygen plasma for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Rakesh Kumar; Dubey, Mukul; Kharel, Parashu; Gu, Zhengrong; Fan, Qi Hua

    2015-01-01

    Biochar, also known as black carbon, is a byproduct of biomass pyrolysis. As a low-cost, environmental-friendly material, biochar has the potential to replace more expensive synthesized carbon nanomaterials (e.g. carbon nanotubes) for use in future supercapacitors. To achieve high capacitance, biochar requires proper activation. A conventional approach involves mixing biochar with a strong base and baking at a high temperature. However, this process is time consuming and energy inefficient (requiring temperatures >900 °C). This work demonstrates a low-temperature (<150 °C) plasma treatment that efficiently activates a yellow pine biochar. Particularly, the effects of oxygen plasma on the biochar microstructure and supercapacitor characteristics are studied. Significant enhancement of the capacitance is achieved: 171.4 F g-1 for a 5-min oxygen plasma activation, in comparison to 99.5 F g-1 for a conventional chemical activation and 60.4 F g-1 for untreated biochar. This enhancement of the charge storage capacity is attributed to the creation of a broad distribution in pore size and a larger surface area. The plasma activation mechanisms in terms of the evolution of the biochar surface and microstructure are further discussed.

  1. Metabolically Derived Human Ventilation Rates: A Revised Approach Based Upon Oxygen Consumption Rates (Final Report, 2009)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, Metabolically Derived Human Ventilation Rates: A Revised Approach Based Upon Oxygen Consumption Rates. This report provides a revised approach for calculating an individual's ventilation rate directly from their oxygen c...

  2. Silvering and swimming effects on aerobic metabolism and reactive oxygen species in the European eel.

    PubMed

    Amérand, Aline; Mortelette, Hélène; Belhomme, Marc; Moisan, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Silvering, the last metamorphosis in the eel life cycle induces morphological and physiological modifications in yellow eels (sedentary stage). It pre-adapts them to cope with the extreme conditions they will encounter during their 6000-km spawning migration. A previous study showed that silver eels are able to cope with reactive oxygen species (ROS) over-production linked to an increase in aerobic metabolism during sustained swimming, but the question remains as to whether this mechanism is associated with silvering. A sustained swimming session decreased red muscle in vitro mitochondrial oxygen consumption (MO2) but increased ROS production in both eel stages. The swimming exercise used here was perhaps too intense to induce a stimulation of mitochondrial function or biogenesis even when antioxidant enzyme activities were unchanged. Pro-oxidant/antioxidant imbalance by lipid peroxidation increased in yellow but significantly decreased in silver eels. The silvering process therefore appears to allow a pre-adaptation of red muscle radical metabolism to the demands of spawning migration.

  3. Staphylococcus epidermidis: metabolic adaptation and biofilm formation in response to different oxygen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Uribe-Alvarez, Cristina; Chiquete-Félix, Natalia; Contreras-Zentella, Martha; Guerrero-Castillo, Sergio; Peña, Antonio; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador

    2016-02-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis has become a major health hazard. It is necessary to study its metabolism and hopefully uncover therapeutic targets. Cultivating S. epidermidis at increasing oxygen concentration [O2] enhanced growth, while inhibiting biofilm formation. Respiratory oxidoreductases were differentially expressed, probably to prevent reactive oxygen species formation. Under aerobiosis, S. epidermidis expressed high oxidoreductase activities, including glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate dehydrogenase, ethanol dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase, as well as cytochromes bo and aa3; while little tendency to form biofilms was observed. Under microaerobiosis, pyruvate dehydrogenase and ethanol dehydrogenase decreased while glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase nearly disappeared; cytochrome bo was present; anaerobic nitrate reductase activity was observed; biofilm formation increased slightly. Under anaerobiosis, biofilms grew; low ethanol dehydrogenase, pyruvate dehydrogenase and cytochrome bo were still present; nitrate dehydrogenase was the main terminal electron acceptor. KCN inhibited the aerobic respiratory chain and increased biofilm formation. In contrast, methylamine inhibited both nitrate reductase and biofilm formation. The correlation between the expression and/or activity or redox enzymes and biofilm-formation activities suggests that these are possible therapeutic targets to erradicate S. epidermidis.

  4. Metabolic suppression during protracted exposure to hypoxia in the jumbo squid, Dosidicus gigas, living in an oxygen minimum zone.

    PubMed

    Seibel, Brad A; Häfker, N Sören; Trübenbach, Katja; Zhang, Jing; Tessier, Shannon N; Pörtner, Hans-Otto; Rosa, Rui; Storey, Kenneth B

    2014-07-15

    The jumbo squid, Dosidicus gigas, can survive extended forays into the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Eastern Pacific Ocean. Previous studies have demonstrated reduced oxygen consumption and a limited anaerobic contribution to ATP production, suggesting the capacity for substantial metabolic suppression during hypoxic exposure. Here, we provide a more complete description of energy metabolism and explore the expression of proteins indicative of transcriptional and translational arrest that may contribute to metabolic suppression. We demonstrate a suppression of total ATP demand under hypoxic conditions (1% oxygen, PO2 =0.8 kPa) in both juveniles (52%) and adults (35%) of the jumbo squid. Oxygen consumption rates are reduced to 20% under hypoxia relative to air-saturated controls. Concentrations of arginine phosphate (Arg-P) and ATP declined initially, reaching a new steady state (~30% of controls) after the first hour of hypoxic exposure. Octopine began accumulating after the first hour of hypoxic exposure, once Arg-P breakdown resulted in sufficient free arginine for substrate. Octopine reached levels near 30 mmol g(-1) after 3.4 h of hypoxic exposure. Succinate did increase through hypoxia but contributed minimally to total ATP production. Glycogenolysis in mantle muscle presumably serves to maintain muscle functionality and balance energetics during hypoxia. We provide evidence that post-translational modifications on histone proteins and translation factors serve as a primary means of energy conservation and that select components of the stress response are altered in hypoxic squids. Reduced ATP consumption under hypoxia serves to maintain ATP levels, prolong fuel store use and minimize the accumulation of acidic intermediates of anaerobic ATP-generating pathways during prolonged diel forays into the OMZ. Metabolic suppression likely limits active, daytime foraging at depth in the core of the OMZ, but confers an energetic advantage over competitors that must

  5. Silver nanoparticles affect glucose metabolism in hepatoma cells through production of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi Jin; Lee, Seung Jun; Yun, Su Jin; Jang, Ji-Young; Kang, Hangoo; Kim, Kyongmin; Choi, In-Hong; Park, Sun

    2016-01-01

    The silver nanoparticle (AgNP) is a candidate for anticancer therapy because of its effects on cell survival and signaling. Although numerous reports are available regarding their effect on cell death, the effect of AgNPs on metabolism is not well understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of AgNPs on glucose metabolism in hepatoma cell lines. Lactate release from both HepG2 and Huh7 cells was reduced with 5 nm AgNPs as early as 1 hour after treatment, when cell death did not occur. Treatment with 5 nm AgNPs decreased glucose consumption in HepG2 cells but not in Huh7 cells. Treatment with 5 nm AgNPs reduced nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 expression in both cell types without affecting its activation at the early time points after AgNPs’ treatment. Increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was detected 1 hour after 5 nm AgNPs’ treatment, and lactate release was restored in the presence of an ROS scavenger. Our results suggest that 5 nm AgNPs affect glucose metabolism by producing ROS. PMID:26730190

  6. Silver nanoparticles affect glucose metabolism in hepatoma cells through production of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Jin; Lee, Seung Jun; Yun, Su Jin; Jang, Ji-Young; Kang, Hangoo; Kim, Kyongmin; Choi, In-Hong; Park, Sun

    2016-01-01

    The silver nanoparticle (AgNP) is a candidate for anticancer therapy because of its effects on cell survival and signaling. Although numerous reports are available regarding their effect on cell death, the effect of AgNPs on metabolism is not well understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of AgNPs on glucose metabolism in hepatoma cell lines. Lactate release from both HepG2 and Huh7 cells was reduced with 5 nm AgNPs as early as 1 hour after treatment, when cell death did not occur. Treatment with 5 nm AgNPs decreased glucose consumption in HepG2 cells but not in Huh7 cells. Treatment with 5 nm AgNPs reduced nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 expression in both cell types without affecting its activation at the early time points after AgNPs' treatment. Increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was detected 1 hour after 5 nm AgNPs' treatment, and lactate release was restored in the presence of an ROS scavenger. Our results suggest that 5 nm AgNPs affect glucose metabolism by producing ROS.

  7. Reactive oxygen species-activated nanomaterials as theranostic agents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kye S; Lee, Dongwon; Song, Chul Gyu; Kang, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated from the endogenous oxidative metabolism or from exogenous pro-oxidant exposure. Oxidative stress occurs when there is excessive production of ROS, outweighing the antioxidant defense mechanisms which may lead to disease states. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of the most abundant and stable forms of ROS, implicated in inflammation, cellular dysfunction and apoptosis, which ultimately lead to tissue and organ damage. This review is an overview of the role of ROS in different diseases. We will also examine ROS-activated nanomaterials with emphasis on hydrogen peroxide, and their potential medical implications. Further development of the biocompatible, stimuli-activated agent responding to disease causing oxidative stress, may lead to a promising clinical use. PMID:26328770

  8. Oxygen transport through soft contact lens and cornea: Lens characterization and metabolic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhabra, Mahendra

    The human cornea requires oxygen to sustain metabolic processes critical for its normal functioning. Any restriction to corneal oxygen supply from the external environment (e.g., by wearing a low oxygen-permeability contact lens) can lead to hypoxia, which may cause corneal edema (swelling), limbal hyperemia, neovascularization, and corneal acidosis. The need for adequate oxygen to the cornea is a major driving force for research and development of hypertransmissible soft contact lenses (SCLs). Currently, there is no standard technique for measuring oxygen permeability (Dk) of hypertransmissible silicone-hydrogel SCLs. In this work, an electrochemistry-based polarographic apparatus was designed, built, and operated to measure oxygen permeability in hypertransmissible SCLs. Unlike conventional methods where a range of lens thickness is needed for determining oxygen permeabilities of SCLs, this apparatus requires only a single lens thickness. The single-lens permeameter provides a reliable, efficient, and economic tool for measuring oxygen permeabilities of commercial hypertransmissible SCLs. The single-lens permeameter measures not only the product Dk, but, following modification, it measures separately diffusivity, D, and solubility, k, of oxygen in hypertransmissible SCLs. These properties are critical for designing better lens materials that ensure sufficient oxygen supply to the cornea. Metabolism of oxygen in the cornea is influenced by contact-lens-induced hypoxia, diseases such as diabetes, surgery, and drug treatment, Thus, estimation of the in-vivo corneal oxygen consumption rate is essential for gauging adequate oxygen supply to the cornea. Therefore, we have developed an unsteady-state reactive-diffusion model for the cornea-contact-lens system to determine in-vivo human corneal oxygen-consumption rate. Finally, a metabolic model was developed to determine the relation between contact-lens oxygen transmissibility (Dk/L) and corneal oxygen deficiency. A

  9. Oxygen and coronary vascular resistance during autoregulation and metabolic vasodilation in the dog.

    PubMed Central

    Drake-Holland, A J; Laird, J D; Noble, M I; Spaan, J A; Vergroesen, I

    1984-01-01

    The hypothesis that tissue oxygen tension controls coronary vascular resistance during changes in perfusion pressure and oxygen consumption was expressed in a simplified mathematical form capable of making quantitative predictions. The predictive value of this formulation of the hypothesis was tested in experiments on anaesthetized mongrel dogs subjected to constant-pressure perfusion of the left main coronary artery, with measurements of coronary blood flow and arterio-venous oxygen content differences. Coronary venous oxygen content was used as an index of tissue oxygenation. The responses of coronary blood flow and arterio-venous oxygen content difference, made over a range of perfusion pressures (which caused autoregulation) and heart rates (which caused metabolic regulation) were predicted qualitatively by the model. Coronary vascular conductance was positively related to metabolic rate only during metabolic regulation (heart rate changes); during autoregulation the relationship between these two variables was inverse. Coronary vascular conductance and resistance values taken from both interventions (both perfusion pressure and heart rate variations) were closely related to coronary venous oxygen content and calculated PO2. These findings suggest that further examination of oxygen tension, as the controller of the coronary vascular bed under physiological conditions should be considered. PMID:6716287

  10. Hypoxia and oxygenation induce a metabolic switch between pentose phosphate pathway and glycolysis in glioma stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Kathagen, Annegret; Schulte, Alexander; Balcke, Gerd; Phillips, Heidi S; Martens, Tobias; Matschke, Jakob; Günther, Hauke S; Soriano, Robert; Modrusan, Zora; Sandmann, Thomas; Kuhl, Carsten; Tissier, Alain; Holz, Mareike; Krawinkel, Lutz A; Glatzel, Markus; Westphal, Manfred; Lamszus, Katrin

    2013-11-01

    Fluctuations in oxygen tension during tissue remodeling impose a major metabolic challenge in human tumors. Stem-like tumor cells in glioblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor, possess extraordinary metabolic flexibility, enabling them to initiate growth even under non-permissive conditions. We identified a reciprocal metabolic switch between the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and glycolysis in glioblastoma stem-like (GS) cells. Expression of PPP enzymes is upregulated by acute oxygenation but downregulated by hypoxia, whereas glycolysis enzymes, particularly those of the preparatory phase, are regulated inversely. Glucose flux through the PPP is reduced under hypoxia in favor of flux through glycolysis. PPP enzyme expression is elevated in human glioblastomas compared to normal brain, especially in highly proliferative tumor regions, whereas expression of parallel preparatory phase glycolysis enzymes is reduced in glioblastomas, except for strong upregulation in severely hypoxic regions. Hypoxia stimulates GS cell migration but reduces proliferation, whereas oxygenation has opposite effects, linking the metabolic switch to the "go or grow" potential of the cells. Our findings extend Warburg's observation that tumor cells predominantly utilize glycolysis for energy production, by suggesting that PPP activity is elevated in rapidly proliferating tumor cells but suppressed by acute severe hypoxic stress, favoring glycolysis and migration to protect cells against hypoxic cell damage.

  11. Nitric Oxide and Reactive Oxygen Species Mediate Metabolic Changes in Barley Seed Embryo during Germination

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhenguo; Marsolais, Frédéric; Bykova, Natalia V.; Igamberdiev, Abir U.

    2016-01-01

    The levels of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), ATP/ADP ratios, reduction levels of ascorbate and glutathione, expression of the genes encoding proteins involved in metabolism of NO and activities of the enzymes involved in fermentation and in metabolism of NO and ROS were studied in the embryos of germinating seeds of two barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cultivars differing in dormancy level. The level of NO production continuously increased after imbibition while the level of nitrosylated SH-groups in proteins increased. This corresponded to the decrease of free SH-groups in proteins. At early stage of germination (0–48 h post imbibition) the genes encoding class 1 phytoglobin (the protein scavenging NO) and S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (scavenging S-nitrosoglutathione) were markedly expressed. More dormant cultivar exhibited lower ATP/ADP and ascorbate/dehydroascorbate ratios and lower lactate and alcohol dehydrogenase activities, while the production of NO and nitrosylation of proteins was higher as compared to the non-dormant cultivar. The obtained data indicate that at the onset of germination NO is actively generated causing nitrosylation of SH-groups and a switch from respiration to fermentation. After radicle protrusion the metabolism changes in a more reducing type as recorded by ratio of reduced and oxidized glutathione and ascorbate. The turnover of NO by the scavenging systems (phytoglobin, S-nitrosoglutathione reductase and interaction with ROS) might contribute to the maintenance of redox and energy balance of germinating seeds and lead to alleviation of dormancy. PMID:26909088

  12. Generation of oxygen free radicals during the metabolism of cyclosporine A: a cause-effect relationship with metabolism inhibition.

    PubMed

    Serino, F; Grevel, J; Napoli, K L; Kahan, B D; Strobel, H W

    1993-05-26

    A better understanding of the mechanism of lipid peroxidation during the metabolism of cyclosporine A (CsA) might help explain the toxicities of this immunosuppressive drug on various organs. Our in vitro work used microsomes prepared from livers of phenobarbital-induced male rats. The incubations (total volume 1ml) also contained a NADPH regenerating system and substrate (i.e., CsA, carbon tetrachloride, or aminopyrine) dissolved in ethanol. Lipid peroxidation was inferred from the presence of malondialdehyde (MDA) which was detected by the thiobarbituric acid assay. The formation of CsA hydroxylated metabolites (AM9 and AM1) was monitored by liquid chromatography. The activity of the microsomal incubation was confirmed by measurements of MDA and formaldehyde production caused by increasing concentrations of CsA, carbon tetrachloride, and aminopyrine. The occurrence of hydroxylated metabolites was not coupled to the production of MDA. Aminopyrine could inhibit MDA production by CsA, but CsA could not reduce the formation of formaldehyde by aminopyrine. Erythromycin, a competitor for the binding site of CsA on cytochrome P450, reduced MDA production by CsA, and CsA inhibited formaldehyde production by erythromycin. Interaction studies with SKF 525A, ketoconazole, superoxide dismutase, catalase, alpha-tocopherol, and reduced glutathione confirmed the role of cytochrome P450 and the presence of activated oxygen species as a source of microsomal peroxidation which in return may explain the inhibitory effect of CsA on cytochrome P450 itself.

  13. Mild Hyperbaric Oxygen Inhibits Growth-related Decrease in Muscle Oxidative Capacity of Rats with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Takemura, Ai

    2017-01-01

    Aim: We examined the effects of mild hyperbaric oxygen on the properties of the soleus muscle in rats with metabolic syndrome. Methods: Five-week-old metabolic syndrome (SHR/NDmcr-cp, cp/cp) rats were divided into normobaric (CP) and mild hyperbaric oxygen (CP-H) groups (n = 5/group). In addition, 5-week-old Wistar rats were assigned as the normobaric control (WR) group (n = 5). The CP-H group was exposed to 1.25 atmospheres absolute with 36% oxygen for 3 h daily for 16 weeks. Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity and mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (Pgc-1α) in the soleus muscle were examined. The fiber type composition, cross-sectional areas, and SDH staining intensity in the soleus muscle were also examined. Results: The CP-H group showed lower fasting and nonfasting blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin, total cholesterol, triglyceride, insulin, and systolic blood pressure levels; higher adiponectin levels; and higher SDH activity and mRNA levels of Pgc-1α in the muscle than the CP group. Compared with the CP group, the CP-H group had a lower percentage of type I fibers and observed type IIA fibers in the muscle. The CP-H group also had higher SDH staining intensity of type I and type IIC fibers in the muscle than the CP group. No differences in these values were observed in the muscles of the WR and CP-H groups. Conclusion: Mild hyperbaric oxygen inhibited growth-related increase in blood glucose levels and decrease in muscle oxidative capacity of rats with metabolic syndrome because of improved oxidative metabolism. PMID:27237220

  14. Metabolic Adaptations of Azospirillum brasilense to Oxygen Stress by Cell-to-Cell Clumping and Flocculation

    SciTech Connect

    Bible, Amber N.; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K.; Mukherjee, Tanmoy; Green, Calvin S.; Mishra, Priyanka; Purcell, Alicia; Aksenova, Anastasia; Hurst, Gregory B.; Alexandre, Gladys

    2015-09-25

    The ability of bacteria to monitor their metabolism and adjust their behavior accordingly is critical to maintain competitiveness in the environment. The motile microaerophilic bacteriumAzospirillum brasilensenavigates oxygen gradients by aerotaxis in order to locate low oxygen concentrations that can support metabolism. When cells are exposed to elevated levels of oxygen in their surroundings, motileA. brasilensecells implement an alternative response to aerotaxis and form transient clumps by cell-to-cell interactions. Clumping was suggested to represent a behavior protecting motile cells from transiently elevated levels of aeration. Using the proteomics of wild-type and mutant strains affected in the extent of their clumping abilities, we show that cell-to-cell clumping represents a metabolic scavenging strategy that likely prepares the cells for further metabolic stresses. Analysis of mutants affected in carbon or nitrogen metabolism confirmed this assumption. The metabolic changes experienced as clumping progresses prime cells for flocculation, a morphological and metabolic shift of cells triggered under elevated-aeration conditions and nitrogen limitation. The analysis of various mutants during clumping and flocculation characterized an ordered set of changes in cell envelope properties accompanying the metabolic changes. These data also identify clumping and early flocculation to be behaviors compatible with the expression of nitrogen fixation genes, despite the elevated-aeration conditions. Finally, cell-to-cell clumping may thus license diazotrophy to microaerophilicA. brasilensecells under elevated oxygen conditions and prime them for long-term survival via flocculation if metabolic stress persists.

  15. Metabolic Adaptations of Azospirillum brasilense to Oxygen Stress by Cell-to-Cell Clumping and Flocculation

    DOE PAGES

    Bible, Amber N.; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K.; Mukherjee, Tanmoy; ...

    2015-09-25

    The ability of bacteria to monitor their metabolism and adjust their behavior accordingly is critical to maintain competitiveness in the environment. The motile microaerophilic bacteriumAzospirillum brasilensenavigates oxygen gradients by aerotaxis in order to locate low oxygen concentrations that can support metabolism. When cells are exposed to elevated levels of oxygen in their surroundings, motileA. brasilensecells implement an alternative response to aerotaxis and form transient clumps by cell-to-cell interactions. Clumping was suggested to represent a behavior protecting motile cells from transiently elevated levels of aeration. Using the proteomics of wild-type and mutant strains affected in the extent of their clumping abilities,more » we show that cell-to-cell clumping represents a metabolic scavenging strategy that likely prepares the cells for further metabolic stresses. Analysis of mutants affected in carbon or nitrogen metabolism confirmed this assumption. The metabolic changes experienced as clumping progresses prime cells for flocculation, a morphological and metabolic shift of cells triggered under elevated-aeration conditions and nitrogen limitation. The analysis of various mutants during clumping and flocculation characterized an ordered set of changes in cell envelope properties accompanying the metabolic changes. These data also identify clumping and early flocculation to be behaviors compatible with the expression of nitrogen fixation genes, despite the elevated-aeration conditions. Finally, cell-to-cell clumping may thus license diazotrophy to microaerophilicA. brasilensecells under elevated oxygen conditions and prime them for long-term survival via flocculation if metabolic stress persists.« less

  16. Metabolic activation and inactivation of chemical carcinogens

    SciTech Connect

    Pelkonen, O.; Vaehaekangas, K.

    1980-09-01

    Chemical carcinogens are metabolized by numerous pathways catalyzed by enzymes in endoplasmic reticulum and other parts of the cell. Reactions in which functional groups are created are especially important in the activation of polycyclic hydrocarbon carcinogens to ultimate carcinogenic forms, although other enzymes may also participate in the activation of other chemical carcinogens. The reasons why carcinogens act on specific target tissues are incompletely understood, although differences in enzyme profiles between tissues certainly contribute to the target tissue variability. The concept of metabolic activation of carcinogens by body's own enzymes has led to the development of short-term assay systems, which essentially measure the production of biologically active metabolites from potential carcinogens.

  17. Mitochondrial metabolism, reactive oxygen species, and macrophage function-fishing for insights.

    PubMed

    Hall, Christopher J; Sanderson, Leslie E; Crosier, Kathryn E; Crosier, Philip S

    2014-11-01

    Metabolism and defense mechanisms that protect against pathogens are two fundamental requirements for the survival of multicellular organisms. Research into metabolic disease has revealed these core mechanisms are highly co-dependent. This emerging field of research, termed immunometabolism, focuses on understanding how metabolism influences immunological processes and vice versa. It is now accepted that obesity influences the immune system and that obesity-driven inflammation contributes to many diseases including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and Alzheimer's disease. The immune response requires the reallocation of nutrients within immune cells to different metabolic pathways to satisfy energy demands and the production of necessary macromolecules. One aspect of immunometabolic research is understanding how these metabolic changes help regulate specific immune cell functions. It is hoped that further understanding of the pathways involved in managing this immunological-metabolic interface will reveal new ways to treat metabolic disease. Given their growing status as principle drivers of obesity-associated inflammation, monocytes/macrophages have received much attention when studying the consequences of inflammation within adipose tissue. Less is known regarding how metabolic changes within macrophages (metabolic reprogramming) influence their immune cell function. In this review, we focus on our current understanding of how monocytes/macrophages alter their intracellular metabolism during the immune response and how these changes dictate specific effector functions. In particular, the immunomodulatory functions of mitochondrial metabolism and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. We also highlight how the attributes of the zebrafish model system can be exploited to reveal new mechanistic insights into immunometabolic processes.

  18. Multimodal optical imaging system for in vivo investigation of cerebral oxygen delivery and energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Gorczynska, Iwona; Fujimoto, James G.; Boas, David A.; Sakadžić, Sava

    2015-01-01

    Improving our understanding of brain function requires novel tools to observe multiple physiological parameters with high resolution in vivo. We have developed a multimodal imaging system for investigating multiple facets of cerebral blood flow and metabolism in small animals. The system was custom designed and features multiple optical imaging capabilities, including 2-photon and confocal lifetime microscopy, optical coherence tomography, laser speckle imaging, and optical intrinsic signal imaging. Here, we provide details of the system’s design and present in vivo observations of multiple metrics of cerebral oxygen delivery and energy metabolism, including oxygen partial pressure, microvascular blood flow, and NADH autofluorescence. PMID:26713212

  19. Cold tolerance is unaffected by oxygen availability despite changes in anaerobic metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boardman, Leigh; Sørensen, Jesper G.; Koštál, Vladimír; Šimek, Petr; Terblanche, John S.

    2016-09-01

    Insect cold tolerance depends on their ability to withstand or repair perturbations in cellular homeostasis caused by low temperature stress. Decreased oxygen availability (hypoxia) can interact with low temperature tolerance, often improving insect survival. One mechanism proposed for such responses is that whole-animal cold tolerance is set by a transition to anaerobic metabolism. Here, we provide a test of this hypothesis in an insect model system (Thaumatotibia leucotreta) by experimental manipulation of oxygen availability while measuring metabolic rate, critical thermal minimum (CTmin), supercooling point and changes in 43 metabolites in moth larvae at three key timepoints (before, during and after chill coma). Furthermore, we determined the critical oxygen partial pressure below which metabolic rate was suppressed (c. 4.5 kPa). Results showed that altering oxygen availability did not affect (non-lethal) CTmin nor (lethal) supercooling point. Metabolomic profiling revealed the upregulation of anaerobic metabolites and alterations in concentrations of citric acid cycle intermediates during and after chill coma exposure. Hypoxia exacerbated the anaerobic metabolite responses induced by low temperatures. These results suggest that cold tolerance of T. leucotreta larvae is not set by oxygen limitation, and that anaerobic metabolism in these larvae may contribute to their ability to survive in necrotic fruit.

  20. Cold tolerance is unaffected by oxygen availability despite changes in anaerobic metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Boardman, Leigh; Sørensen, Jesper G.; Koštál, Vladimír; Šimek, Petr; Terblanche, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Insect cold tolerance depends on their ability to withstand or repair perturbations in cellular homeostasis caused by low temperature stress. Decreased oxygen availability (hypoxia) can interact with low temperature tolerance, often improving insect survival. One mechanism proposed for such responses is that whole-animal cold tolerance is set by a transition to anaerobic metabolism. Here, we provide a test of this hypothesis in an insect model system (Thaumatotibia leucotreta) by experimental manipulation of oxygen availability while measuring metabolic rate, critical thermal minimum (CTmin), supercooling point and changes in 43 metabolites in moth larvae at three key timepoints (before, during and after chill coma). Furthermore, we determined the critical oxygen partial pressure below which metabolic rate was suppressed (c. 4.5 kPa). Results showed that altering oxygen availability did not affect (non-lethal) CTmin nor (lethal) supercooling point. Metabolomic profiling revealed the upregulation of anaerobic metabolites and alterations in concentrations of citric acid cycle intermediates during and after chill coma exposure. Hypoxia exacerbated the anaerobic metabolite responses induced by low temperatures. These results suggest that cold tolerance of T. leucotreta larvae is not set by oxygen limitation, and that anaerobic metabolism in these larvae may contribute to their ability to survive in necrotic fruit. PMID:27619175

  1. Caffeine’s effects on cerebrovascular reactivity and coupling between cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yufen; Parrish, Todd B.

    2009-01-01

    The blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) signal is dependent on multiple physiological factors such as cerebral blood flow (CBF), local oxygen metabolism (CMRO2) and cerebral blood volume (CBV). Since caffeine affects both CBF and neural activity, its effects on BOLD remain controversial. The calibrated BOLD approach is an excellent tool to study caffeine because it combines CBF and BOLD measures to estimate changes in CMRO2. The present study used the calibrated BOLD approach with 5% CO2 to determine if a 2.5mg/kg intravenous injection of caffeine changes the coupling between CBF and CMRO2 during motor and visual tasks. The results show that caffeine decreases n, the CBF:CMRO2 coupling ratio, from 2.58 to 2.33 in motor (p=0.006) and from 2.45 to 2.23 in visual (p=0.002) areas respectively. The current study also demonstrated that caffeine does not alter cerebrovascular reactivity to CO2. These results highlight the importance of the calibrated BOLD approach in improving interpretation of the BOLD signal in the presence of substances like caffeine. PMID:19000770

  2. Improving estimates of the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen from optical imaging data.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Matthew J P; Suresh, Vinod

    2015-02-01

    The cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) is an important measure of brain function. Since it is challenging to measure directly, especially dynamically, a number of neuroimaging techniques aim to infer activation-induced changes in CMRO2 from indirect data. Here, we employed a mathematical modelling approach, based on fundamental biophysical principles, to investigate the validity of the widely-used method to calculate CMRO2 from optical measurements of cerebral blood flow and haemoglobin saturation. In model-only simulations and simulations of in vivo data changes in CMRO2 calculated in this way differed substantially from the changes in CMRO2 directly imposed on the model, under both steady state and dynamic conditions. These results suggest that the assumptions underlying the calculation method are not appropriate, and that it is important to take into account, under steady state conditions: 1) the presence of deoxyhaemoglobin in arteriolar vessels; and 2) blood volume changes, especially in veins. Under dynamic conditions, the model predicted that calculated changes in CMRO2 are moderately correlated with the rate of oxygen extraction--not consumption--during the initial phase of stimulation. However, during later phases of stimulation the calculation is dominated by the change in blood flow. Therefore, we propose that a more sophisticated approach is required to estimate CMRO2 changes from these types of data.

  3. Oxygen metabolism in oral cancer: HIF and GLUTs (Review)

    PubMed Central

    PEREIRA, KARUZA MARIA ALVES; CHAVES, FILIPE NOBRE; VIANA, THALES SALLES ANGELIM; CARVALHO, FRANCISCO SAMUEL RODRIGUES; COSTA, FÁBIO WILDSON GURGEL; ALVES, ANA PAULA NEGREIROS NUNES; SOUSA, FABRÍCIO BITU

    2013-01-01

    Oral cancer is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, and has a poor prognosis. This has encouraged additional studies into factors that may affect the development of this disease. The biological behavior of malignant neoplasms is complex. Studies have investigated the energy metabolism of tumor cells, in an endeavor to elucidate the tumor biology. The identification of molecular signatures and mechanisms, in order to understand tumor progression, may facilitate the identification of novel predictive and prognostic markers. Pathways that influence tumor progression, such as those involving hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and glucose transporter (GLUT) proteins, have been the targets of recent studies. PMID:24137322

  4. Influence of lightweight ambulatory oxygen on oxygen use and activity patterns of COPD patients receiving long-term oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Casaburi, Richard; Porszasz, Janos; Hecht, Ariel; Tiep, Brian; Albert, Richard K; Anthonisen, Nicholas R; Bailey, William C; Connett, John E; Cooper, J Allen; Criner, Gerard J; Curtis, Jeffrey; Dransfield, Mark; Lazarus, Stephen C; Make, Barry; Martinez, Fernando J; McEvoy, Charlene; Niewoehner, Dennis E; Reilly, John J; Scanlon, Paul; Scharf, Steven M; Sciurba, Frank C; Woodruff, Prescott

    2012-02-01

    Lightweight ambulatory oxygen devices are provided on the assumptions that they enhance compliance and increase activity, but data to support these assumptions are lacking. We studied 22 patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease receiving long-term oxygen therapy (14 men, average age = 66.9 y, FEV(1) = 33.6%pred, PaO(2) at rest = 51.7 torr) who were using E-cylinders as their portable oxygen. Subjects were recruited at 5 sites and studied over a 2-week baseline period and for 6 months after randomizing them to either continuing to use 22-lb E-cylinders towed on a cart or to carrying 3.6-lb aluminum cylinders. Utilizing novel electronic devices, ambulatory and stationary oxygen use was monitored continuously over the 2 weeks prior to and the 6 months following randomization. Subjects wore tri-axial accelerometers to monitor physical activity during waking hours for 2-3 weeks prior to, and at 3 and 6 months after, randomization. Seventeen subjects completed the study. At baseline, subjects used 17.2 hours of stationary and 2.5 hours of ambulatory oxygen daily. At 6 months, ambulatory oxygen use was 1.4 ± 1.0 hrs in those randomized to E-cylinders and 1.9 ± 2.4 hrs in those using lightweight oxygen (P = NS). Activity monitoring revealed low activity levels prior to randomization and no significant increase over time in either group. In this group of severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients, providing lightweight ambulatory oxygen did not increase either oxygen use or activity. Future efforts might focus on strategies to encourage oxygen use and enhance activity in this patient group. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT003257540).

  5. Contributions to elevated metabolism during recovery: dissecting the excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) in the desert iguana (Dipsosaurus dorsalis).

    PubMed

    Hancock, Thomas V; Gleeson, Todd T

    2008-01-01

    The excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC), a measure of recovery costs, is known to be large in ectothermic vertebrates such as the desert iguana (Dipsosaurus dorsalis), especially after vigorous activity. To analyze the cause of these large recovery costs in a terrestrial ectotherm, Dipsosaurus were run for 15 s at maximal-intensity (distance 35.0+/-1.9 m; 2.33+/-0.13 m s(-1)) while O(2) uptake was monitored via open-flow respirometry. Muscle metabolites (adenylates, phosphocreatine, and lactate) were measured at rest and after 0, 3, 10, and 60 min of recovery. Cardiac and ventilatory activity during rest and recovery were measured, as were whole-body lactate and blood lactate, which were used to estimate total muscle activity. This vigorous activity was supported primarily by glycolysis (65%) and phosphocreatine hydrolysis (29%), with only a small contribution from aerobic metabolism (2.5%). Aerobic recovery lasted 43.8+/-4.6 min, and EPOC measured 0.166+/-0.025 mL O(2) g(-1). This was a large proportion (98%) of the total suprabasal metabolic cost of the activity to the animal. The various contributions to EPOC after this short but vigorous activity were quantified, and a majority of EPOC was accounted for. The two primary causes of EPOC were phosphocreatine repletion (32%-50%) and lactate glycogenesis (30%-47%). Four other components played smaller roles: ATP repletion (8%-13%), elevated ventilatory activity (2%), elevated cardiac activity (2%), and oxygen store resaturation (1%).

  6. Biochemical studies on the metabolic activation of halogenated alkanes.

    PubMed Central

    Cheeseman, K H; Albano, E F; Tomasi, A; Slater, T F

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews recent investigations by Slater and colleagues into the metabolic activation of halogenated alkanes in general and carbon tetrachloride in particular. It is becoming increasingly accepted that free radical intermediates are involved in the toxicity of many such compounds through mechanisms including lipid peroxidation, covalent binding, and cofactor depletion. Here we describe the experimental approaches that are used to establish that halogenated alkanes are metabolized in animal tissues to reactive free radicals. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy is used to identify free-radical products, often using spin-trapping compounds. The generation of specific free radicals by radiolytic methods is useful in the determination of the precise reactivity of radical intermediates postulated to be injurious to the cell. The enzymic mechanism of the production of such free radicals and their subsequent reactions with biological molecules is studied with specific metabolic inhibitors and free-radical scavengers. These combined techniques provide considerable insight into the process of metabolic activation of halogenated compounds. It is readily apparent, for instance, that the local oxygen concentration at the site of activation is of crucial importance to the subsequent reactions; the formation of peroxy radical derivatives from the primary free-radical product is shown to be of great significance in relation to carbon tetrachloride and may be of general importance. However, while these studies have provided much information on the biochemical mechanisms of halogenated alkane toxicity, it is clear that many problems remain to be solved. PMID:3007102

  7. Reduced metabolic rate and oxygen radicals production in stored insect sperm.

    PubMed

    Ribou, Anne-Cécile; Reinhardt, Klaus

    2012-06-07

    Females of internally fertilizing species can significantly extend sperm lifespan and functionality during sperm storage. The mechanisms for such delayed cellular senescence remain unknown. Here, we apply current hypotheses of cellular senescence developed for diploid cells to sperm cells, and empirically test opposing predictions on the relationship between sperm metabolic rate and oxygen radical production in an insect model, the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. Using time-resolved microfluorimetry, we found a negative correlation between metabolic rate (proportion of protein-bound NAD[P]H) and in situ intracellular oxygen radicals production in freshly ejaculated sperm. In contrast, sperm stored by females for periods of 1 h to 26 days showed a positive correlation between metabolic rate and oxygen radicals production. At the same time, stored sperm showed a 37 per cent reduced metabolic rate, and 42 per cent reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, compared with freshly ejaculated sperm. Rank differences between males in ROS production and metabolic rate observed in ejaculated sperm did not predict rank differences in stored sperm. Our method of simultaneously measuring ROS production and metabolic rate of the same sample has the advantage of providing data that are independent of sperm density and any extracellular antioxidants that are proteins. Our method also excludes effects owing to accumulated hydrogen peroxide. Our results unify aspects of competing theories of cellular ageing and suggest that reducing metabolic rate may be an important means of extending stored sperm lifespan and functionality in crickets. Our data also provide a possible explanation for why traits of ejaculates sampled from the male may be rather poor predictors of paternity in sexual selection studies and likelihood of pregnancy in reproductive medicine.

  8. Accessing 3D microtissue metabolism: Lactate and oxygen monitoring in hepatocyte spheroids.

    PubMed

    Weltin, Andreas; Hammer, Steffen; Noor, Fozia; Kaminski, Yeda; Kieninger, Jochen; Urban, Gerald A

    2017-01-15

    3D hepatic microtissues, unlike 2D cell cultures, retain many of the in-vivo-like functionalities even after long-term cultivation. Such 3D cultures are increasingly applied to investigate liver damage due to drug exposure in toxicology. However, there is a need for thorough metabolic characterization of these microtissues for mechanistic understanding of effects on culture behaviour. We measured metabolic parameters from single human HepaRG hepatocyte spheroids online and continuously with electrochemical microsensors. A microsensor platform for lactate and oxygen was integrated in a standard 96-well plate. Electrochemical microsensors for lactate and oxygen allow fast, precise and continuous long-term measurement of metabolic parameters directly in the microwell. The demonstrated capability to precisely detect small concentration changes by single spheroids is the key to access their metabolism. Lactate levels in the culture medium starting from 50µM with production rates of 5µMh(-1) were monitored and precisely quantified over three days. Parallel long-term oxygen measurements showed no oxygen depletion or hypoxic conditions in the microwell. Increased lactate production by spheroids upon suppression of the aerobic metabolism was observed. The dose-dependent decrease in lactate production caused by the addition of the hepatotoxic drug Bosentan was determined. We showed that in a toxicological application, metabolic monitoring yields quantitative, online information on cell viability, which complements and supports other methods such as microscopy. The demonstrated continuous access to 3D cell culture metabolism within a standard setup improves in vitro toxicology models in replacement strategies of animal experiments. Controlling the microenvironment of such organotypic cultures has impact in tissue engineering, cancer therapy and personalized medicine.

  9. Coupling of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism is conserved for chromatic and luminance stimuli in human visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Leontiev, Oleg; Buracas, Giedrius T.; Liang, Christine; Ances, Beau M.; Perthen, Joanna E.; Shmuel, Amir; Buxton, Richard B.

    2013-01-01

    The ratio of the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) during brain activation is a critical determinant of the magnitude of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Cytochrome oxidase (CO), a key component of oxidative metabolism in the mitochondria, is non-uniformly distributed in visual area V1 in distinct blob and interblob regions, suggesting significant spatial variation in the capacity for oxygen metabolism. The goal of this study was to test whether CBF/CMRO2 coupling differed when these subpopulations of neurons were preferentially stimulated, using chromatic and luminance stimuli to preferentially stimulate either the blob or interblob regions. A dual-echo spiral arterial spin labeling (ASL) technique was used to measure CBF and BOLD responses simultaneously in 7 healthy human subjects. When the stimulus contrast levels were adjusted to evoke similar CBF responses (mean 65.4%±19.0% and 64.6%±19.9%, respectively for chromatic and luminance contrast), the BOLD responses were remarkably similar (1.57%±0.39% and 1.59%±0.35%) for both types of stimuli. We conclude that CBF-CMRO2 coupling is conserved for the chromatic and luminance stimuli used, suggesting a consistent coupling for blob and inter-blob neuronal populations despite the difference in CO concentration. PMID:23238435

  10. Coupling of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism is conserved for chromatic and luminance stimuli in human visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Leontiev, Oleg; Buracas, Giedrius T; Liang, Christine; Ances, Beau M; Perthen, Joanna E; Shmuel, Amir; Buxton, Richard B

    2013-03-01

    The ratio of the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO(2)) during brain activation is a critical determinant of the magnitude of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Cytochrome oxidase (CO), a key component of oxidative metabolism in the mitochondria, is non-uniformly distributed in visual area V1 in distinct blob and interblob regions, suggesting significant spatial variation in the capacity for oxygen metabolism. The goal of this study was to test whether CBF/CMRO(2) coupling differed when these subpopulations of neurons were preferentially stimulated, using chromatic and luminance stimuli to preferentially stimulate either the blob or interblob regions. A dual-echo spiral arterial spin labeling (ASL) technique was used to measure CBF and BOLD responses simultaneously in 7 healthy human subjects. When the stimulus contrast levels were adjusted to evoke similar CBF responses (mean 65.4% ± 19.0% and 64.6% ± 19.9%, respectively for chromatic and luminance contrast), the BOLD responses were remarkably similar (1.57% ± 0.39% and 1.59% ± 0.35%) for both types of stimuli. We conclude that CBF-CMRO(2) coupling is conserved for the chromatic and luminance stimuli used, suggesting a consistent coupling for blob and inter-blob neuronal populations despite the difference in CO concentration.

  11. Using near-infrared spectroscopy to measure cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen under multiple levels of arterial oxygenation in piglets.

    PubMed

    Tichauer, Kenneth M; Elliott, Jonathan T; Hadway, Jennifer A; Lee, David S; Lee, Ting-Yim; St Lawrence, Keith

    2010-09-01

    Improving neurological care of neonates has been impeded by the absence of suitable techniques for measuring cerebral hemodynamics and energy metabolism at the bedside. Currently, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) appears to be the technology best suited to fill this gap, and techniques have been proposed to measure both cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2). We have developed a fast and reliable bolus-tracking method of determining CMRO2 that combines measurements of CBF and cerebral venous oxygenation [venous oxygen saturation (CSvO2)]. However, this method has never been validated at different levels of arterial oxygenation [arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2)], which can be highly variable in the clinical setting. In this study, NIRS measurements of CBF, CSvO2, and CMRO2 were obtained over a range of SaO2 in newborn piglets (n=12); CSvO2 values measured directly from sagittal sinus blood samples were collected for validation. Two alternative NIRS methods that measure CSvO2 by manipulating venous oxygenation (i.e., head tilt and partial venous occlusion methods) were also employed for comparison. Statistically significant correlations were found between each NIRS technique and sagittal sinus blood oxygenation (P<0.05). Correlation slopes were 1.03 (r=0.91), 0.73 (r=0.73), and 0.73 (r=0.81) for the bolus-tracking, head tilt, and partial venous occlusion methods, respectively. The bolus-tracking technique displayed the best correlation under hyperoxic (SaO2=99.9±0.03%) and normoxic (SaO2=86.9±6.6%) conditions and was comparable to the other techniques under hypoxic conditions (SaO2=40.7±9.9%). The reduced precision of the bolus-tracking method under hypoxia was attributed to errors in CSvO2 measurement that were magnified at low SaO2 levels. In conclusion, the bolus-tracking technique of measuring CSvO2, and therefore CMRO2, is accurate and robust for an SaO2>50% but provides reduced accuracy under more severe hypoxic levels.

  12. DNA evidence uncompromised by active oxygen.

    PubMed

    Castelló, Ana; Francés, Francesc; Verdú, Fernando

    2010-03-05

    Currently, forensic sciences can make use of the potential of instrumental analysis techniques to obtain information from the smallest, even invisible, samples. However, as laboratory techniques improve, so too should the procedures applied in the search for and initial testing of clues in order to be equally effective. This requires continuous revision so that those procedures may resolve the problems that samples present. As far as bloodstains are concerned, there are methods available that are recognized as being both highly sensitive and effective. Nevertheless, the marketing of new cleaning products, those that contain active oxygen, has raised doubts about the ability of those procedures to detect blood. It has been shown that stains washed with these detergents (and still visible) invalidated both the presumptive test (reduced phenolphthalein, luminol, and Bluestar) and that applied for determining human hemoglobin. These findings have caused considerable concern both within the forensic and scientific community, and among the general public, so obliging us to seek solutions. In this work, the effect of these new cleaning products on DNA analyses is studied. The results, encouraging ones, show that these detergents, despite invalidating all other tests, do not hinder the extraction, or the subsequent analysis, of DNA.

  13. Improving estimates of ecosystem metabolism by reducing effects of tidal advection on dissolved oxygen time series

    EPA Science Inventory

    In aquatic systems, time series of dissolved oxygen (DO) have been used to compute estimates of ecosystem metabolism. Central to this open-water method is the assumption that the DO time series is a Lagrangian specification of the flow field. However, most DO time series are coll...

  14. Diabetes-Induced Decrease in Renal Oxygen Tension: Effects of an Altered Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palm, Fredrik; Carlsson, Per-Ola; Fasching, Angelica; Hansell, Peter; Liss, Per

    During conditions with experimental diabetes mellitus, it is evident that several alterations in renal oxygen metabolism occur, including increased mitochondrial respiration and increased lactate accumulation in the renal tissue. Consequently, these alterations will contribute to decrease the interstitial pO2, preferentially in the renal medulla of animals with sustained long-term hyperglycemia.

  15. Metabolic activation of 2-methylfuran by rat microsomal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ravindranath, V.; Boyd, M.R.

    1985-05-01

    2-Methylfuran (2-MF), a constituent of cigarette smoke and coffee, causes necrosis of liver, lungs, and kidneys in rodents. 2-MF is metabolically activated by mixed-function oxidases to acetylacrolein, a reactive metabolite that binds covalently to microsomal protein. The hepatic microsomal metabolism of 2-MF to reactive metabolite required the presence of NADPH and oxygen and was dependent on incubation time and substrate concentration. The microsomal metabolism of 2-MF was inducible by pretreatment of rats with phenobarbital and was inhibited by piperonyl butoxide and N-octyl imidazole, which indicates that the metabolism of 2-MF may be mediated by cytochrome P-450. Acetylacrolein was a potent inhibitor of mixed-function oxidase and completely inhibited the microsomal metabolism of 2-MF, indicating that 2-MF is a suicide substrate for the enzyme. The sulfhydryl nucleophile cysteine was a better trapping agent of the reactive metabolite of 2-MF than N-acetylcysteine or glutathione. Lysine decreased the covalent binding of 2-MF metabolites, presumably by reacting with the aldehyde group of acetylacrolein. In addition, in the presence of NADPH, 2-MF was bioactivated by both pulmonary and renal cortical microsomes to reactive metabolites that were covalently bound to microsomal proteins.

  16. Adrenochrome reaction implicates oxygen radicals in metabolism of cyclosporine A and FK-506 in rat and human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S S; Strobel, H W; Napoli, K L; Grevel, J

    1993-06-01

    The role of oxygen radicals in the metabolism of cyclosporine A (CyA), FR900506 (FK-506) and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) catalyzed by the cytochrome P450 system was investigated in vitro in rat and human microsomal preparations. Varying concentrations of CyA, FK-506 and CCl4 (100 microM-1.0 mM) were added to microsomal preparations, and lipid peroxidation was measured by malondialdehyde (MDA) formation as detected by the thiobarbituric acid assay. The effects of oxygen radical scavengers [superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT)] and an antioxidant [glutathione (GLUT)] were tested on various incubations of CyA, FK-506 and CCl4 to assess the role of oxygen radicals in lipid peroxidation. CyA-dependent MDA formation was moderately inhibited by SOD in the rat model and increased by SOD in the human model. In both models, CAT slightly inhibited CyA-dependent MDA formation and GLUT significantly inhibited MDA formation. FK-506-dependent MDA formation, studied only in the rat model, paralleled CyA-induced MDA formation but showed greater inhibition with CAT and less inhibition with SOD or GLUT. In both models, CCl4-dependent MDA formation was significantly inhibited by GLUT and showed no sensitivity to SOD or CAT. In addition, the adrenochrome reaction, which measures the oxidation of epinephrine to adrenochrome, was used to measure the increased oxygen radical-flux resulting from the metabolism of CyA, FK-506 and CCl4. CyA with epinephrine showed the highest oxidative activity, followed by FK-506 and then CCl4, which showed the least formation of adrenochrome. These results indicated a role for oxygen radicals in CyA and FK-506 metabolism.

  17. Metabolic Activity - Skylab Experiment M171

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This chart details Skylab's Metabolic Activity experiment (M171), a medical evaluation facility designed to measure astronauts' metabolic changes while on long-term space missions. The experiment obtained information on astronauts' physiological capabilities and limitations and provided data useful in the design of future spacecraft and work programs. Physiological responses to physical activity was deduced by analyzing inhaled and exhaled air, pulse rate, blood pressure, and other selected variables of the crew while they performed controlled amounts of physical work with a bicycle ergometer. The Marshall Space Flight Center had program responsibility for the development of Skylab hardware and experiments.

  18. Effect of Exercise Training on Enos Expression, NO Production and Oxygen Metabolism in Human Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson; Bustamante, Juanita; Czerniczyniec, Analia; Aguilar de Plata, Ana C.; Lores-Arnaiz, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the effects of combined aerobic and resistance exercise training during the second half of pregnancy on endothelial NOS expression (eNOS), nitric oxide (NO) production and oxygen metabolism in human placenta. Methods The study included 20 nulliparous in gestational week 16–20, attending prenatal care at three tertiary hospitals in Colombia who were randomly assigned into one of two groups: The exercise group (n = 10) took part in an exercise session three times a week for 12 weeks which consisted of: aerobic exercise at an intensity of 55–75% of their maximum heart rate for 60 min and 25 mins. Resistance exercise included 5 exercise groups circuit training (50 repetitions of each) using barbells (1–3 kg/exercise) and low-to-medium resistance bands. The control group (n = 10) undertook their usual physical activity. Mitochondrial and cytosol fractions were isolated from human placental tissue by differential centrifugation. A spectrophotometric assay was used to measure NO production in cytosolic samples from placental tissue and Western Blot technique to determine eNOS expression. Mitochondrial superoxide levels and hydrogen peroxide were measured to determine oxygen metabolism. Results Combined aerobic and resistance exercise training during pregnancy leads to a 2-fold increase in eNOS expression and 4-fold increase in NO production in placental cytosol (p = 0.05). Mitochondrial superoxide levels and hydrogen peroxide production rate were decreased by 8% and 37% respectively in the placental mitochondria of exercising women (p = 0.05). Conclusion Regular exercise training during the second half of pregnancy increases eNOS expression and NO production and decreases reactive oxygen species generation in human placenta. Collectively, these data demonstrate that chronic exercise increases eNOS/NO production, presumably by increasing endothelial shear stress. This adaptation may contribute to the beneficial effects of

  19. [Ultrastructure and metabolic activity of pea mitochondria under clinorotation].

    PubMed

    Brykov, V A; Generozova, I P; Shugaev, A G

    2012-01-01

    Experimental data on the mitochondrial ultrastructure and tissue respiration in root apex as well as metabolic activity of the organelles isolated from pea seedling roots after 5-day of clinorotation are presented. It was shown that mitochondrial condensation in the distal elongation zone correlated with an increased rate of oxygen uptake on 7%. We also observed increase in rate of malate oxidation and respiratory control ratio increased simultaneously with a decreased in efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation. Such character of mitochondrial rearrangements in simulated microgravity is assumed to be a consequence of adaptation to these conditions.

  20. Reporter cell activity within hydrogel constructs quantified from oxygen-independent bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Lambrechts, Dennis; Roeffaers, Maarten; Kerckhofs, Greet; Hofkens, Johan; Van de Putte, Tom; Schrooten, Jan; Van Oosterwyck, Hans

    2014-09-01

    By providing a three-dimensional (3D) support to cells, hydrogels offer a more relevant in vivo tissue-like environment as compared to two-dimensional cell cultures. Hydrogels can be applied as screening platforms to investigate in 3D the role of biochemical and biophysical cues on cell behaviour using bioluminescent reporter cells. Gradients in oxygen concentration that result from the interplay between molecular transport and cell metabolism can however cause substantial variability in the observed bioluminescent reporter cell activity. To assess the influence of these oxygen gradients on the emitted bioluminescence for various hydrogel geometries, a combined experimental and modelling approach was implemented. We show that the applied model is able to predict oxygen gradient independent bioluminescent intensities which correlate better to the experimentally determined viable cell numbers, as compared to the experimentally measured bioluminescent intensities. By analysis of the bioluminescence reaction dynamics we obtained a quantitative description of cellular oxygen metabolism within the hydrogel, which was validated by direct measurements of oxygen concentration within the hydrogel. Bioluminescence peak intensities can therefore be used as a quantitative measurement of reporter cell activity within a hydrogel, but an unambiguous interpretation of these intensities requires a compensation for the influence of cell-induced oxygen gradients on the luciferase activity.

  1. Multiplexed MRI methods for rapid estimation of global cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunyeol; Langham, Michael C; Rodriguez-Soto, Ana E; Wehrli, Felix W

    2017-04-01

    The global cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2), which reflects metabolic activity of the brain under various physiologic conditions, can be quantified using a method, referred to as 'OxFlow', which simultaneously measures hemoglobin oxygen saturation in a draining vein (Yv) and total cerebral blood flow (tCBF). Conventional OxFlow (Conv-OxFlow) entails four interleaves incorporated in a single pulse sequence - two for phase-contrast based measurement of tCBF in the supplying arteries of the neck, and two to measure the intra- to extravascular phase difference in the superior sagittal sinus to derive Yv [Jain et al., JCBFM 2010]. However, this approach limits achievable temporal resolution thus precluding capture of rapid changes of brain metabolic states such as the response to apneic stimuli. Here, we developed a time-efficient, multiplexed OxFlow method and evaluated its potential for measuring dynamic alterations in global CMRO2 during a breath-hold challenge. Two different implementations of multiplexed OxFlow were investigated: 1) simultaneous-echo-refocusing based OxFlow (SER-OxFlow) and 2) simultaneous-multi-slice imaging-based dual-band OxFlow (DB-OxFlow). The two sequences were implemented on 3T scanners (Siemens TIM Trio and Prisma) and their performance was evaluated in comparison to Conv-OxFlow in ten healthy subjects for baseline CMRO2 quantification. Comparison of measured parameters (Yv, tCBF, CMRO2) revealed no significant bias of SER-OxFlow and DB-OxFlow, with respect to the reference Conv-OxFlow while improving temporal resolution two-fold (12.5 versus 25s). Further acceleration shortened scan time to 8 and 6s for SER and DB-OxFlow, respectively, for time-resolved CMRO2 measurement. The two sequences were able of capturing smooth transitions of Yv, tCBF, and CMRO2 over the time course consisting of 30s of normal breathing, 30s of volitional apnea, and 90s of recovery. While both SER- and DB-OxFlow techniques provide significantly improved

  2. MR Imaging-derived Oxygen Metabolism and Neovascularization Characterization for Grading and IDH Gene Mutation Detection of Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Stadlbauer, Andreas; Zimmermann, Max; Kitzwögerer, Melitta; Oberndorfer, Stefan; Rössler, Karl; Dörfler, Arnd; Buchfelder, Michael; Heinz, Gertraud

    2016-12-13

    Purpose To explore the diagnostic performance of physiological magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of oxygen metabolism and neovascularization activity for grading and characterization of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) gene mutation status of gliomas. Materials and Methods This retrospective study had institutional review board approval; written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Eighty-three patients with histopathologically proven glioma (World Health Organization [WHO] grade II-IV) were examined with quantitative blood oxygen level-dependent imaging and vascular architecture mapping. Biomarker maps of neovascularization activity (microvessel radius, microvessel density, and microvessel type indicator [MTI]) and oxygen metabolism (oxygen extraction fraction [OEF] and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen [CMRO2]) were calculated. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to determine diagnostic performance for grading and detection of IDH gene mutation status. Results Low-grade (WHO grade II) glioma showed areas with increased OEF (+18%, P < .001, n = 20), whereas anaplastic glioma (WHO grade III) and glioblastoma (WHO grade IV) showed decreased OEF when compared with normal brain tissue (-54% [P < .001, n = 21] and -49% [P < .001, n = 41], respectively). This allowed clear differentiation between low- and high-grade glioma (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC], 1) for the patient cohort. MTI had the highest diagnostic performance (AUC, 0.782) for differentiation between gliomas of grades III and IV among all biomarkers. CMRO2 was decreased (P = .037) in low-grade glioma with a mutated IDH gene, and MTI was significantly increased in glioma grade III with IDH mutation (P = .013) when compared with the IDH wild-type counterparts. CMRO2 showed the highest diagnostic performance for IDH gene mutation detection in low-grade glioma (AUC, 0.818) and MTI in high-grade glioma (AUC, 0.854) and for all WHO grades (AUC, 0.899) among

  3. Differential contribution of key metabolic substrates and cellular oxygen in HIF signalling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhdanov, Alexander V.; Waters, Alicia H.C.; Golubeva, Anna V.; Papkovsky, Dmitri B.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in availability and utilisation of O{sub 2} and metabolic substrates are common in ischemia and cancer. We examined effects of substrate deprivation on HIF signalling in PC12 cells exposed to different atmospheric O{sub 2}. Upon 2–4 h moderate hypoxia, HIF-α protein levels were dictated by the availability of glutamine and glucose, essential for deep cell deoxygenation and glycolytic ATP flux. Nuclear accumulation of HIF-1α dramatically decreased upon inhibition of glutaminolysis or glutamine deprivation. Elevation of HIF-2α levels was transcription-independent and associated with the activation of Akt and Erk1/2. Upon 2 h anoxia, HIF-2α levels strongly correlated with cellular ATP, produced exclusively via glycolysis. Without glucose, HIF signalling was suppressed, giving way to other regulators of cell adaptation to energy crisis, e.g. AMPK. Consequently, viability of cells deprived of O{sub 2} and glucose decreased upon inhibition of AMPK with dorsomorphin. The capacity of cells to accumulate HIF-2α decreased after 24 h glucose deprivation. This effect, associated with increased AMPKα phosphorylation, was sensitive to dorsomorphin. In chronically hypoxic cells, glutamine played no major role in HIF-2α accumulation, which became mainly glucose-dependent. Overall, the availability of O{sub 2} and metabolic substrates intricately regulates HIF signalling by affecting cell oxygenation, ATP levels and pathways involved in production of HIF-α. - Highlights: • Gln and Glc regulate HIF levels in hypoxic cells by maintaining low O{sub 2} and high ATP. • HIF-α levels under anoxia correlate with cellular ATP and critically depend on Glc. • Gln and Glc modulate activity of Akt, Erk and AMPK, regulating HIF production. • HIF signalling is differentially inhibited by prolonged Glc and Gln deprivation. • Unlike Glc, Gln plays no major role in HIF signalling in chronically hypoxic cells.

  4. Influence of induction and flavones on lung microsomal oxygen metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, E.M.; Barlow, R.; Ebel, R.E.

    1986-05-01

    NADPH oxidase activity, H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ production and O/sub 2/ production were studied using microsomes isolated from lungs of control rats and rats treated with phenobarbital (PB), 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC), 5,6-benzoflavone (..beta..-NF), or chlordecone (CD). 3-MC, ..beta..-NF or Cd treatment resulted in induction of lung P-450 and P-450 reductase. NADPH oxidase activity was slightly higher in 3-MC or ..beta..-NF lung microsomes than in control, PB or CD microsomes. 5 mM metyrapone inhibited oxidase activity of these microsomes by 20-50% depending upon their source. The rates of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and O/sub 2/ production did not appear to vary significantly as a function of induction and metyrapone had only a marginal effect on these rates. The rates of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and O/sub 2/ production at 37/sup 0/ were 1.8 +/- 0.2 and 1.8 +/- 0.3 nmol/min/mg, respectively. 50 ..mu..M ..beta..-NF stimulated H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ production by about 2-fold regardless of microsomal source while the stimulation of O/sub 2/ production was marginal. In each case, the effect of ..beta..-NF was greater than a comparable amount of 7,8-benzoflavone (..cap alpha..-NF). NADPH oxidase activity was dramatically stimulated by ..beta..-NF. For example, at 37/sup 0/ 100 ..mu..M ..beta..-NF increased the oxidase activity of control lung microsomes by about 9-fold from 3.4 to 31.6 nmol/min/mg. Lung microsomes from induced rats were comparably stimulated by ..beta..-NF. This stimulation was concentration dependent although not hyperbolic. Metyrapone did not inhibit the ..beta..-NF stimulated NADPH oxidase activity.

  5. Tolerance and metabolic response of acetogenic bacteria toward oxygen.

    PubMed

    Karnholz, Arno; Küsel, Kirsten; Gössner, Anita; Schramm, Andreas; Drake, Harold L

    2002-02-01

    The acetogens Sporomusa silvacetica, Moorella thermoacetica, Clostridium magnum, Acetobacterium woodii, and Thermoanaerobacter kivui (i) grew in both semisolid and liquid cultivation media containing O(2) and (ii) consumed small amounts of O(2). Low concentrations of O(2) caused a lag phase in growth but did not alter the ability of these acetogens to synthesize acetate via the acetyl coenzyme A pathway. Cell extracts of S. silvacetica, M. thermoacetica, and C. magnum contained peroxidase and NADH oxidase activities; catalase and superoxide dismutase activities were not detected.

  6. Physical activity in obesity and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Barbara

    2013-04-01

    Biological aging is typically associated with a progressive increase in body fat mass and a loss of lean body mass. Owing to the metabolic consequences of reduced muscle mass, it is understood that normal aging and/or decreased physical activity may lead to a higher prevalence of metabolic disorders. Lifestyle modification, specifically changes in diet, physical activity, and exercise, is considered the cornerstone of obesity management. However, for most overweight people it is difficult to lose weight permanently through diet or exercise. Thus, prevention of weight gain is thought to be more effective than weight loss in reducing obesity rates. A key question is whether physical activity can extenuate age-related weight gain and promote metabolic health in adults. Current guidelines suggest that adults should accumulate about 60 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity daily to prevent unhealthy weight gain. Because evidence suggests that resistance training may promote a negative energy balance and may change body fat distribution, it is possible that an increase in muscle mass after resistance training may be a key mediator leading to better metabolic control.

  7. Quantitative metabolomics analysis of amino acid metabolism in recombinant Pichia pastoris under different oxygen availability conditions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Environmental and intrinsic stress factors can result in the global alteration of yeast physiology, as evidenced by several transcriptional studies. Hypoxia has been shown to have a beneficial effect on the expression of recombinant proteins in Pichia pastoris growing on glucose. Furthermore, transcriptional profiling analyses revealed that oxygen availability was strongly affecting ergosterol biosynthesis, central carbon metabolism and stress responses, in particular the unfolded protein response. To contribute to the better understanding of the effect and interplay of oxygen availability and foreign protein secretion on central metabolism, a first quantitative metabolomic analysis of free amino acids pools in a recombinant P. pastoris strain growing under different oxygen availability conditions has been performed. Results The values obtained indicate significant variations in the intracellular amino acid pools due to different oxygen availability conditions, showing an overall increase of their size under oxygen limitation. Notably, even while foreign protein productivities were relatively low (about 40–80 μg Fab/gDCW·h), recombinant protein production was found to have a limited but significant impact on the intracellular amino acid pools, which were generally decreased in the producing strain compared with the reference strain. However, observed changes in individual amino acids pools were not correlated with their corresponding relative abundance in the recombinant protein sequence, but to the overall cell protein amino acid compositional variations. Conclusions Overall, the results obtained, combined with previous transcriptomic and proteomic analyses provide a systematic metabolic fingerprint of the oxygen availability impact on recombinant protein production in P. pastoris. PMID:22704468

  8. Oxygen Metabolic Responses of Three Species of Large Benthic Foraminifers with Algal Symbionts to Temperature Stress

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Kazuhiko; Okai, Takaaki; Hosono, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Water temperature affects the physiology of large benthic foraminifers (LBFs) with algal symbionts dwelling in coral reef environments. However, the detailed physiological responses of LBF holobionts to temperature ranges occurring in their habitats are not known. We report net oxygen (O2) production and respiration rates of three LBF holobionts (Baculogypsina sphaerulata and Calcarina gaudichaudii hosting diatom symbionts, and Amphisorus kudakajimensis hosting dinoflagellate symbionts) measured in the laboratory at water temperatures ranging from 5°C to 45°C in 2.5°C or 5°C intervals and with light saturation levels of ∼500 µmol m−2 s−1. In addition, the recovery of net O2 production and respiration rates after exposure to temperature stress was assessed. The net O2 production and respiration rates of the three LBF holobionts peaked at ∼30°C, indicating their optimal temperature for a short exposure period. At extreme high temperatures (≥40°C), the net O2 production rates of all three LBF holobionts declined to less than zero and the respiration rates slightly decreased, indicating that photosynthesis of algal symbionts was inactivated. At extreme low temperatures (≤10°C for two calcarinid species and ≤5°C for A. kudakajimensis), the net O2 production and respiration rates were near zero, indicating a weakening of holobiont activity. After exposure to extreme high or low temperature, the net O2 production rates did not recover until the following day, whereas the respiration rates recovered rapidly, suggesting that a longer time (days) is required for recovery from damage to the photosystem by temperature stress compared to the respiration system. These results indicate that the oxygen metabolism of LBF holobionts can generally cope well with conditions that fluctuate diurnally and seasonally in their habitats. However, temporal heat and cold stresses with high light levels may induce severe damage to algal symbionts and also damage to host

  9. Oxygen metabolic responses of three species of large benthic foraminifers with algal symbionts to temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kazuhiko; Okai, Takaaki; Hosono, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Water temperature affects the physiology of large benthic foraminifers (LBFs) with algal symbionts dwelling in coral reef environments. However, the detailed physiological responses of LBF holobionts to temperature ranges occurring in their habitats are not known. We report net oxygen (O2) production and respiration rates of three LBF holobionts (Baculogypsina sphaerulata and Calcarina gaudichaudii hosting diatom symbionts, and Amphisorus kudakajimensis hosting dinoflagellate symbionts) measured in the laboratory at water temperatures ranging from 5°C to 45°C in 2.5°C or 5°C intervals and with light saturation levels of ∼500 µmol m(-2) s(-1). In addition, the recovery of net O2 production and respiration rates after exposure to temperature stress was assessed. The net O2 production and respiration rates of the three LBF holobionts peaked at ∼30°C, indicating their optimal temperature for a short exposure period. At extreme high temperatures (≥40°C), the net O2 production rates of all three LBF holobionts declined to less than zero and the respiration rates slightly decreased, indicating that photosynthesis of algal symbionts was inactivated. At extreme low temperatures (≤10°C for two calcarinid species and ≤5°C for A. kudakajimensis), the net O2 production and respiration rates were near zero, indicating a weakening of holobiont activity. After exposure to extreme high or low temperature, the net O2 production rates did not recover until the following day, whereas the respiration rates recovered rapidly, suggesting that a longer time (days) is required for recovery from damage to the photosystem by temperature stress compared to the respiration system. These results indicate that the oxygen metabolism of LBF holobionts can generally cope well with conditions that fluctuate diurnally and seasonally in their habitats. However, temporal heat and cold stresses with high light levels may induce severe damage to algal symbionts and also damage to host

  10. Noninvasive imaging of brain oxygen metabolism in children with primary nocturnal enuresis during natural sleep.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bing; Huang, Mingzhu; Zhang, Xu; Ma, Hongwei; Peng, Miao; Guo, Qiyong

    2017-02-14

    A series of studies have revealed that nocturnal enuresis is closely related to hypoxia in children with primary nocturnal enuresis (PNE). However, brain oxygen metabolism of PNE children has not been investigated before. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in whole-brain cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2 ), cerebral blood flow (CBF), and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) in children suffering from PNE. We used the newly developed T2-relaxation-under-spin-tagging (TRUST) magnetic resonance imaging technique. Neurological evaluation, structural imaging, phase-contrast, and the TRUST imaging method were applied in children with PNE (n = 37) and healthy age- and sex-matched control volunteers (n = 39) during natural sleep to assess whole-brain CMRO2 , CBF, OEF, and arousal from sleep scores. Results showed that whole-brain CMRO2 and OEF values of PNE children were higher in controls, while there was no significant difference in CBF. Consequently, OEF levels of PNE children were increased to maintain oxygen supply. The elevation of OEF was positively correlated with the difficulty of arousal. Our results provide the first evidence that high oxygen consumption and high OEF values could make PNE children more susceptible to hypoxia, which may induce cumulative arousal deficits and make them more prone to nocturnal enuresis. Hum Brain Mapp, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Reduction of reactive oxygen species ameliorates metabolism-secretion coupling in islets of diabetic GK rats by suppressing lactate overproduction.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Mayumi; Fujimoto, Shimpei; Sato, Yuichi; Nishi, Yuichi; Mukai, Eri; Yamano, Gen; Sato, Hiroki; Tahara, Yumiko; Ogura, Kasane; Nagashima, Kazuaki; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2013-06-01

    We previously demonstrated that impaired glucose-induced insulin secretion (IS) and ATP elevation in islets of Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats, a nonobese model of diabetes, were significantly restored by 30-60-min suppression of endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction. In this study, we investigated the effect of a longer (12 h) suppression of ROS on metabolism-secretion coupling in β-cells by exposure to tempol, a superoxide (O2(-)) dismutase mimic, plus ebselen, a glutathione peroxidase mimic (TE treatment). In GK islets, both H2O2 and O2(-) were sufficiently reduced and glucose-induced IS and ATP elevation were improved by TE treatment. Glucose oxidation, an indicator of Krebs cycle velocity, also was improved by TE treatment at high glucose, whereas glucokinase activity, which determines glycolytic velocity, was not affected. Lactate production was markedly increased in GK islets, and TE treatment reduced lactate production and protein expression of lactate dehydrogenase and hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α). These results indicate that the Warburg-like effect, which is characteristic of aerobic metabolism in cancer cells by which lactate is overproduced with reduced linking to mitochondria metabolism, plays an important role in impaired metabolism-secretion coupling in diabetic β-cells and suggest that ROS reduction can improve mitochondrial metabolism by suppressing lactate overproduction through the inhibition of HIF1α stabilization.

  12. Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptors and Lipoprotein Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kersten, Sander

    2008-01-01

    Plasma lipoproteins are responsible for carrying triglycerides and cholesterol in the blood and ensuring their delivery to target organs. Regulation of lipoprotein metabolism takes place at numerous levels including via changes in gene transcription. An important group of transcription factors that mediates the effect of dietary fatty acids and certain drugs on plasma lipoproteins are the peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs). Three PPAR isotypes can be distinguished, all of which have a major role in regulating lipoprotein metabolism. PPARα is the molecular target for the fibrate class of drugs. Activation of PPARα in mice and humans markedly reduces hepatic triglyceride production and promotes plasma triglyceride clearance, leading to a clinically significant reduction in plasma triglyceride levels. In addition, plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol levels are increased upon PPARα activation in humans. PPARγ is the molecular target for the thiazolidinedione class of drugs. Activation of PPARγ in mice and human is generally associated with a modest increase in plasma HDL-cholesterol and a decrease in plasma triglycerides. The latter effect is caused by an increase in lipoprotein lipase-dependent plasma triglyceride clearance. Analogous to PPARα, activation of PPARβ/δ leads to increased plasma HDL-cholesterol and decreased plasma triglyceride levels. In this paper, a fresh perspective on the relation between PPARs and lipoprotein metabolism is presented. The emphasis is on the physiological role of PPARs and the mechanisms underlying the effect of synthetic PPAR agonists on plasma lipoprotein levels. PMID:18288277

  13. Visible-light OCT to quantify retinal oxygen metabolism (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao F.; Yi, Ji; Chen, Siyu; Liu, Wenzhong; Soetikno, Brian T.

    2016-03-01

    We explored, both numerically and experimentally, whether OCT can be a good candidate to accurately measure retinal oxygen metabolism. We first used statistical methods to numerically simulate photon transport in the retina to mimic OCT working under different spectral ranges. Then we analyze accuracy of OCT oximetry subject to parameter variations such as vessel size, pigmentation, and oxygenation. We further developed an experimental OCT system based on the spectral range identified by our simulation work. We applied the newly developed OCT to measure both retinal hemoglobin oxygen saturation (sO2) and retinal retinal flow. After obtaining the retinal sO2 and blood velocity, we further measured retinal vessel diameter and calculated the retinal oxygen metabolism rate (MRO2). To test the capability of our OCT, we imaged wild-type Long-Evans rats ventilated with both normal air and air mixtures with various oxygen concentrations. Our simulation suggested that OCT working within visible spectral range is able to provide accurate measurement of retinal MRO2 using inverse Fourier transform spectral reconstruction. We called this newly developed technology vis-OCT, and showed that vis-OCT was able to measure the sO2 value in every single major retinal vessel around the optical disk as well as in micro retinal vessels. When breathing normal air, the averaged sO2 in arterial and venous blood in Long-Evans rats was measured to be 95% and 72%, respectively. When we challenge the rats using air mixtures with different oxygen concentrations, vis-OCT measurement followed analytical models of retinal oxygen diffusion and pulse oximeter well.

  14. [Dynamic variance of intracellular metabolic energies under rhythmical control for dissolved oxygen in PHB mixed cultivation].

    PubMed

    Qian, Z W; Tohyama, M; Hua, Q; Shimizu, K

    2001-07-01

    The mixed cultivation using cheaper carbon source-wasted food material contained glucose and lactate at the same time was conducted in 5L fermentor, within which glucose was converted to lactate by L. delbrueckii in anaerobic condition and the lactate was converted to PHB by R. eutropha in aerobic condition. Considering dissolved oxygen concentration may affect the level of intracellular ATP and NADPH of the metabolic pathways for R. eutropha in lactate under autotrophy or heterotrophy, rhythmical oscillated control for DO based on chaos control method was consequently presented. This method was employed to satisfy two strains for opposite oxygen preferences, moreover, excite the intracellular metabolic energy simultaneously. The values examined through spectrophotofluorimetry represented that both ATP and NADPH exhibited fluctuations in accordance with the DO rhythm. By means of this control design, the concentration of PHB can be doubled than the usual under stable DO control.

  15. [Effect of solcoseryl on oxygen metabolism and growth of experimental tumors].

    PubMed

    Mosienko, V S; Zagoruĭko, L I; Todor, I N; Khasanova, L T

    1987-01-01

    Antihypoxant and antitumour properties of solcoseryl were studied on intact and tumour-bearing rats and mice. By the polarographic method it is found that solcoseryl increases the oxygen metabolism only in animal hypoxic tissues and improves, probably, energy production of their mitochondria. On many tumour strains it is shown that the injections of solcoseryl decelerate the growth of some tumours, inhibit the metastatic process and produce no toxic effect on the animals.

  16. Oxygen sensing and signaling.

    PubMed

    van Dongen, Joost T; Licausi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is an indispensable substrate for many biochemical reactions in plants, including energy metabolism (respiration). Despite its importance, plants lack an active transport mechanism to distribute oxygen to all cells. Therefore, steep oxygen gradients occur within most plant tissues, which can be exacerbated by environmental perturbations that further reduce oxygen availability. Plants possess various responses to cope with spatial and temporal variations in oxygen availability, many of which involve metabolic adaptations to deal with energy crises induced by low oxygen. Responses are induced gradually when oxygen concentrations decrease and are rapidly reversed upon reoxygenation. A direct effect of the oxygen level can be observed in the stability, and thus activity, of various transcription factors that control the expression of hypoxia-induced genes. Additional signaling pathways are activated by the impact of oxygen deficiency on mitochondrial and chloroplast functioning. Here, we describe the molecular components of the oxygen-sensing pathway.

  17. Redox activity of surface oxygen anions in oxygen-deficient perovskite oxides during electrochemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Mueller, David N; Machala, Michael L; Bluhm, Hendrik; Chueh, William C

    2015-01-19

    Surface redox-active centres in transition-metal oxides play a key role in determining the efficacy of electrocatalysts. The extreme sensitivity of surface redox states to temperatures, to gas pressures and to electrochemical reaction conditions renders them difficult to investigate by conventional surface-science techniques. Here we report the direct observation of surface redox processes by surface-sensitive, operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy using thin-film iron and cobalt perovskite oxides as model electrodes for elevated-temperature oxygen incorporation and evolution reactions. In contrast to the conventional view that the transition metal cations are the dominant redox-active centres, we find that the oxygen anions near the surface are a significant redox partner to molecular oxygen due to the strong hybridization between oxygen 2p and transition metal 3d electronic states. We propose that a narrow electronic state of significant oxygen 2p character near the Fermi level exchanges electrons with the oxygen adsorbates. This result highlights the importance of surface anion-redox chemistry in oxygen-deficient transition-metal oxides.

  18. Functions for diverse metabolic activities in heterochromatin

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xue Bessie; Pillus, Lorraine

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence demonstrates that metabolism and chromatin dynamics are not separate processes but that they functionally intersect in many ways. For example, the lysine biosynthetic enzyme homocitrate synthase was recently shown to have unexpected functions in DNA damage repair, raising the question of whether other amino acid metabolic enzymes participate in chromatin regulation. Using an in silico screen combined with reporter assays, we discovered that a diverse range of metabolic enzymes function in heterochromatin regulation. Extended analysis of the glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (Gdh1) revealed that it regulates silent information regulator complex recruitment to telomeres and ribosomal DNA. Enhanced N-terminal histone H3 proteolysis is observed in GDH1 mutants, consistent with telomeric silencing defects. A conserved catalytic Asp residue is required for Gdh1’s functions in telomeric silencing and H3 clipping. Genetic modulation of α-ketoglutarate levels demonstrates a key regulatory role for this metabolite in telomeric silencing. The metabolic activity of glutamate dehydrogenase thus has important and previously unsuspected roles in regulating chromatin-related processes. PMID:26936955

  19. Functions for diverse metabolic activities in heterochromatin.

    PubMed

    Su, Xue Bessie; Pillus, Lorraine

    2016-03-15

    Growing evidence demonstrates that metabolism and chromatin dynamics are not separate processes but that they functionally intersect in many ways. For example, the lysine biosynthetic enzyme homocitrate synthase was recently shown to have unexpected functions in DNA damage repair, raising the question of whether other amino acid metabolic enzymes participate in chromatin regulation. Using an in silico screen combined with reporter assays, we discovered that a diverse range of metabolic enzymes function in heterochromatin regulation. Extended analysis of the glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (Gdh1) revealed that it regulates silent information regulator complex recruitment to telomeres and ribosomal DNA. Enhanced N-terminal histone H3 proteolysis is observed in GDH1 mutants, consistent with telomeric silencing defects. A conserved catalytic Asp residue is required for Gdh1's functions in telomeric silencing and H3 clipping. Genetic modulation of α-ketoglutarate levels demonstrates a key regulatory role for this metabolite in telomeric silencing. The metabolic activity of glutamate dehydrogenase thus has important and previously unsuspected roles in regulating chromatin-related processes.

  20. Perioperative cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism in neonates with single-ventricle physiology

    PubMed Central

    Dehaes, Mathieu; Cheng, Henry H.; Buckley, Erin M.; Lin, Pei-Yi; Ferradal, Silvina; Williams, Kathryn; Vyas, Rutvi; Hagan, Katherine; Wigmore, Daniel; McDavitt, Erica; Soul, Janet S.; Franceschini, Maria Angela; Newburger, Jane W.; Ellen Grant, P.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) patients are at risk for neurodevelopmental delay. The etiology of these delays is unclear, but abnormal prenatal cerebral maturation and postoperative hemodynamic instability likely play a role. A better understanding of these factors is needed to improve neurodevelopmental outcome. In this study, we used bedside frequency-domain near infrared spectroscopy (FDNIRS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) to assess cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism in neonates with single-ventricle (SV) CHD undergoing surgery and compared them to controls. Our goals were 1) to compare cerebral hemodynamics between unanesthetized SV and healthy neonates, and 2) to determine if FDNIRS-DCS could detect alterations in cerebral hemodynamics beyond cerebral hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2). Eleven SV neonates were recruited and compared to 13 controls. Preoperatively, SV patients showed decreased cerebral blood flow (CBFi), cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO2i) and SO2; and increased oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) compared to controls. Compared to preoperative values, unstable postoperative SV patients had decreased CMRO2i and CBFi, which returned to baseline when stable. However, SO2 showed no difference between unstable and stable states. Preoperative SV neonates are flow-limited and show signs of impaired cerebral development compared to controls. FDNIRS-DCS shows potential to improve assessment of cerebral development and postoperative hemodynamics compared to SO2 alone. PMID:26713191

  1. Phloem metabolism and function have to cope with low internal oxygen.

    PubMed

    van Dongen, Joost T; Schurr, Ulrich; Pfister, Michelle; Geigenberger, Peter

    2003-04-01

    We have investigated the consequences of endogenous limitations in oxygen delivery for phloem transport in Ricinus communis. In situ oxygen profiles were measured directly across stems of plants growing in air (21% [v/v] oxygen), using a microsensor with a tip diameter of approximately 30 microm. Oxygen levels decreased from 21% (v/v) at the surface to 7% (v/v) in the vascular region and increased again to 15% (v/v) toward the hollow center of the stem. Phloem sap exuding from small incisions in the bark of the stem was hypoxic, and the ATP to ADP ratio (4.1) and energy charge (0.78) were also low. When 5-cm stem segments of intact plants were exposed to zero external oxygen for 90 min, oxygen levels within the phloem decreased to approximately 2% (v/v), and ATP to ADP ratio and adenylate energy charge dropped further to 1.92 and 0.68, respectively. This was accompanied by a marked decrease in the phloem sucrose (Suc) concentration and Suc transport rate, which is likely to be explained by the inhibition of retrieval processes in the phloem. Germinating seedlings were used to analyze the effect of a stepwise decrease in oxygen tension on phloem transport and energy metabolism in more detail. Within the endosperm embedding the cotyledons-next to the phloem loading sites-oxygen decreased from approximately 14% (v/v) in 6-d-old seedlings down to approximately 6% (v/v) in 10-d-old seedlings. This was paralleled by a similar decrease of oxygen inside the hypocotyl. When the endosperm was removed and cotyledons incubated in a 100 mM Suc solution with 21%, 6%, 3%, or 0.5% (v/v) oxygen for 3 h before phloem sap was analyzed, decreasing oxygen tensions led to a progressive decrease in phloem energy state, indicating a partial inhibition of respiration. The estimated ratio of NADH to NAD(+) in the phloem exudate remained low (approximately 0.0014) when oxygen was decreased to 6% and 3% (v/v) but increased markedly (to approximately 0.008) at 0.5% (v/v) oxygen, paralleled by

  2. Integration of Carbon, Nitrogen, and Oxygen Metabolism in Escherichia coli--Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinowitz, Joshua D; Wingreen, Ned s; Rabitz, Herschel A; Xu, Yifan

    2012-10-22

    A key challenge for living systems is balancing utilization of multiple elemental nutrients, such as carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, whose availability is subject to environmental fluctuations. As growth can be limited by the scarcity of any one nutrient, the rate at which each nutrient is assimilated must be sensitive not only to its own availability, but also to that of other nutrients. Remarkably, across diverse nutrient conditions, E. coli grows nearly optimally, balancing effectively the conversion of carbon into energy versus biomass. To investigate the link between the metabolism of different nutrients, we quantified metabolic responses to nutrient perturbations using LC-MS based metabolomics and built differential equation models that bridge multiple nutrient systems. We discovered that the carbonaceous substrate of nitrogen assimilation, -ketoglutarate, directly inhibits glucose uptake and that the upstream glycolytic metabolite, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, ultrasensitively regulates anaplerosis to allow rapid adaptation to changing carbon availability. We also showed that NADH controls the metabolic response to changing oxygen levels. Our findings support a general mechanism for nutrient integration: limitation for a nutrient other than carbon leads to build-up of the most closely related product of carbon metabolism, which in turn feedback inhibits further carbon uptake.

  3. Probing Oxygen Activation Sites in Two Flavoprotein Oxidases Using Chloride as an Oxygen Surrogate

    SciTech Connect

    Kommoju, Phaneeswara-Rao; Chen, Zhi-wei; Bruckner, Robert C.; Mathews, F. Scott; Jorns, Marilyn Schuman

    2011-08-16

    A single basic residue above the si-face of the flavin ring is the site of oxygen activation in glucose oxidase (GOX) (His516) and monomeric sarcosine oxidase (MSOX) (Lys265). Crystal structures of both flavoenzymes exhibit a small pocket at the oxygen activation site that might provide a preorganized binding site for superoxide anion, an obligatory intermediate in the two-electron reduction of oxygen. Chloride binds at these polar oxygen activation sites, as judged by solution and structural studies. First, chloride forms spectrally detectable complexes with GOX and MSOX. The protonated form of His516 is required for tight binding of chloride to oxidized GOX and for rapid reaction of reduced GOX with oxygen. Formation of a binary MSOX-chloride complex requires Lys265 and is not observed with Lys265Met. Binding of chloride to MSOX does not affect the binding of a sarcosine analogue (MTA, methylthioactetate) above the re-face of the flavin ring. Definitive evidence is provided by crystal structures determined for a binary MSOX-chloride complex and a ternary MSOX-chloride-MTA complex. Chloride binds in the small pocket at a position otherwise occupied by a water molecule and forms hydrogen bonds to four ligands that are arranged in approximate tetrahedral geometry: Lys265:NZ, Arg49:NH1, and two water molecules, one of which is hydrogen bonded to FAD:N5. The results show that chloride (i) acts as an oxygen surrogate, (ii) is an effective probe of polar oxygen activation sites, and (iii) provides a valuable complementary tool to the xenon gas method that is used to map nonpolar oxygen-binding cavities.

  4. The Role of Mitochondria in Reactive Oxygen Species Metabolism and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Starkov, Anatoly A.

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress is considered a major contributor to the etiology of both “normal” senescence and severe pathologies with serious public health implications. Several cellular sources, including mitochondria, are known to produce significant amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that may contribute to intracellular oxidative stress. Mitochondria possess at least 10 known sites that are capable of generating ROS, but they also feature a sophisticated multilayered ROS defense system that is much less studied. This review summarizes the current knowledge about major components involved in mitochondrial ROS metabolism and factors that regulate ROS generation and removal at the level of mitochondria. An integrative systemic approach is applied to analysis of mitochondrial ROS metabolism, which is “dissected” into ROS generation, ROS emission, and ROS scavenging. The in vitro ROS-producing capacity of several mitochondrial sites is compared in the metabolic context and the role of mitochondria in ROS-dependent intracellular signaling is discussed. PMID:19076429

  5. Activity syndromes and metabolism in giant deep-sea isopods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Alexander D. M.; Szekeres, Petra; Violich, Mackellar; Gutowsky, Lee F. G.; Eliason, Erika J.; Cooke, Steven J.

    2017-03-01

    Despite growing interest, the behavioural ecology of deep-sea organisms is largely unknown. Much of this scarcity in knowledge can be attributed to deepwater animals being secretive or comparatively 'rare', as well as technical difficulties associated with accessing such remote habitats. Here we tested whether two species of giant marine isopod (Bathynomus giganteus, Booralana tricarinata) captured from 653 to 875 m in the Caribbean Sea near Eleuthera, The Bahamas, exhibited an activity behavioural syndrome across two environmental contexts (presence/absence of food stimulus) and further whether this syndrome carried over consistently between sexes. We also measured routine metabolic rate and oxygen consumption in response to a food stimulus in B. giganteus to assess whether these variables are related to individual differences in personality. We found that both species show an activity syndrome across environmental contexts, but the underlying mechanistic basis of this syndrome, particularly in B. giganteus, is unclear. Contrary to our initial predictions, neither B. giganteus nor B. tricarinata showed any differences between mean expression of behavioural traits between sexes. Both sexes of B. tricarinata showed strong evidence of an activity syndrome underlying movement and foraging ecology, whereas only male B. giganteus showed evidence of an activity syndrome. Generally, individuals that were more active and bolder, in a standard open arena test were also more active when a food stimulus was present. Interestingly, individual differences in metabolism were not related to individual differences in behaviour based on present data. Our study provides the first measurements of behavioural syndromes and metabolism in giant deep-sea isopods.

  6. Reconstructing ecosystem functions of the active microbial community of the Baltic Sea oxygen depleted sediments

    PubMed Central

    Franzetti, Andrea; Lundin, Daniel; Sjöling, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Baltic Sea deep water and sediments hold one of the largest anthropogenically induced hypoxic areas in the world. High nutrient input and low water exchange result in eutrophication and oxygen depletion below the halocline. As a consequence at Landsort Deep, the deepest point of the Baltic Sea, anoxia in the sediments has been a persistent condition over the past decades. Given that microbial communities are drivers of essential ecosystem functions we investigated the microbial community metabolisms and functions of oxygen depleted Landsort Deep sediments by metatranscriptomics. Results show substantial expression of genes involved in protein metabolism demonstrating that the Landsort Deep sediment microbial community is active. Identified expressed gene suites of metabolic pathways with importance for carbon transformation including fermentation, dissimilatory sulphate reduction and methanogenesis were identified. The presence of transcripts for these metabolic processes suggests a potential for heterotrophic-autotrophic community synergism and indicates active mineralisation of the organic matter deposited at the sediment as a consequence of the eutrophication process. Furthermore, cyanobacteria, probably deposited from the water column, are transcriptionally active in the anoxic sediment at this depth. Results also reveal high abundance of transcripts encoding integron integrases. These results provide insight into the activity of the microbial community of the anoxic sediment at the deepest point of the Baltic Sea and its possible role in ecosystem functioning. PMID:26823996

  7. Metabolic activity of microorganisms in evaporites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, L. J.; Giver, L. J.; White, M. R.; Mancinelli, R. L.

    1994-01-01

    Crystalline salt is generally considered so hostile to most forms of life that it has been used for centuries as a preservative. Here, we present evidence that prokaryotes inhabiting a natural evaporite crust of halite and gypsum are metabolically active while inside the evaporite for at least 10 months. In situ measurements demonstrated that some of these "endoevaporitic" microorganisms (probably the cyanobacterium Synechococcus Nageli) fixed carbon and nitrogen. Denitrification was not observed. Our results quantified the slow microbial activity that can occur in salt crystals. Implications of this study include the possibility that microorganisms found in ancient evaporite deposits may have been part of an evaporite community.

  8. Metabolic activity of microorganisms in evaporites.

    PubMed

    Rothschild, L J; Giver, L J; White, M R; Mancinelli, R L

    1994-06-01

    Crystalline salt is generally considered so hostile to most forms of life that it has been used for centuries as a preservative. Here, we present evidence that prokaryotes inhabiting a natural evaporite crust of halite and gypsum are metabolically active while inside the evaporite for at least 10 months. In situ measurements demonstrated that some of these "endoevaporitic" microorganisms (probably the cyanobacterium Synechococcus Nageli) fixed carbon and nitrogen. Denitrification was not observed. Our results quantified the slow microbial activity that can occur in salt crystals. Implications of this study include the possibility that microorganisms found in ancient evaporite deposits may have been part of an evaporite community.

  9. Active rehabilitation in a pediatric extracorporeal membrane oxygenation patient.

    PubMed

    Zebuhr, Carleen; Sinha, Amit; Skillman, Heather; Buckvold, Shannon

    2014-05-01

    Decreased intensive care unit (ICU) mortality has led to an increase in ICU morbidity. ICU-induced immobilization plays a major role in this morbidity. Recently, ICU mobility has been shown to be safe and effective in adolescent and adult patients. We report the successful rehabilitation of an 8-year-old boy with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. A child who is critically ill may safely perform active rehabilitation while on venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The gains achieved through active rehabilitation and optimal nutrition can facilitate recovery from severe acute respiratory distress syndrome in select pediatric patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

  10. Oxygen-inducible glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase as protective switch transforming neurotoxic glutamate to metabolic fuel during acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Rink, Cameron; Gnyawali, Surya; Peterson, Laura; Khanna, Savita

    2011-05-15

    This work rests on our previous report (J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 30: 1275-1287, 2010) recognizing that glutamate (Glu) oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT) is induced when brain tissue hypoxia is corrected during acute ischemic stroke (AIS). GOT can metabolize Glu into tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates and may therefore be useful to harness excess neurotoxic extracellular Glu during AIS as a metabolic substrate. We report that in cultured neural cells challenged with hypoglycemia, extracellular Glu can support cell survival as long as there is sufficient oxygenation. This effect is abrogated by GOT knockdown. In a rodent model of AIS, supplemental oxygen (100% O(2) inhaled) during ischemia significantly increased GOT expression and activity in the stroke-affected brain tissue and prevented loss of ATP. Biochemical analyses and in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy during stroke demonstrated that such elevated GOT decreased Glu levels at the stroke-affected site. In vivo lentiviral gene delivery of GOT minimized lesion volume, whereas GOT knockdown worsened stroke outcomes. Thus, brain tissue GOT emerges as a novel target in managing stroke outcomes. This work demonstrates that correction of hypoxia during AIS can help clear extracellular neurotoxic Glu by enabling utilization of this amino acid as a metabolic fuel to support survival of the hypoglycemic brain tissue. Strategies to mitigate extracellular Glu-mediated neurodegeneration via blocking receptor-mediated excitotoxicity have failed in clinical trials. We introduce the concept that under hypoglycemic conditions extracellular Glu can be transformed from a neurotoxin to a survival factor by GOT, provided there is sufficient oxygen to sustain cellular respiration.

  11. Inner Retinal Oxygen Delivery, Metabolism, and Extraction Fraction in Ins2Akita Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Norman P.; Wanek, Justin; Felder, Anthony E.; Brewer, Katherine C.; Joslin, Charlotte E.; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Retinal nonperfusion and hypoxia are important factors in human diabetic retinopathy, and these presumably inhibit energy production and lead to cell death. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effect of diabetes on inner retinal oxygen delivery and metabolism in a mouse model of diabetes. Methods Phosphorescence lifetime and blood flow imaging were performed in spontaneously diabetic Ins2Akita (n = 22) and nondiabetic (n = 22) mice at 12 and 24 weeks of age to measure retinal arterial (O2A) and venous (O2V) oxygen contents and total retinal blood flow (F). Inner retinal oxygen delivery (DO2) and metabolism (MO2) were calculated as F ∗ O2A and F ∗ (O2A − O2V), respectively. Oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), which equals MO2/DO2, was calculated. Results DO2 at 12 weeks were 112 ± 40 and 97 ± 29 nL O2/min in nondiabetic and diabetic mice, respectively (NS), and 148 ± 31 and 85 ± 37 nL O2/min at 24 weeks, respectively (P < 0.001). MO2 were 65 ± 31 and 66 ± 27 nL O2/min in nondiabetic and diabetic mice at 12 weeks, respectively, and 79 ± 14 and 54 ± 28 nL O2/min at 24 weeks, respectively (main effects = NS). At 12 weeks OEF were 0.57 ± 0.17 and 0.67 ± 0.09 in nondiabetic and diabetic mice, respectively, and 0.54 ± 0.07 and 0.63 ± 0.08 at 24 weeks, respectively (main effect of diabetes: P < 0.01). Conclusions Inner retinal MO2 was maintained in diabetic Akita mice indicating that elevation of the OEF adequately compensated for reduced DO2 and prevented oxidative metabolism from being limited by hypoxia. PMID:27802520

  12. Oxygen metabolism under various bypass flow conditions during cardiopulmonary support in awake goats.

    PubMed

    Takewa, Y; Tatsumi, E; Taenaka, Y; Takano, H

    2001-02-01

    Despite its wide clinical application, patient recovery from cardiopulmonary support (CPS) is not necessarily satisfactory. To clarify what influence CPS has on organ perfusion, we investigated the oxygen metabolism under various bypass flow (BF) conditions in a series of chronic animal CPS experiments. The CPS system, which consists of a pulsatile ventricular assist device and a compact artificial lung was installed without anesthesia in 6 adult goats weighing 49-51 kg. BF was adjusted stepwise from 0% to 50%, 75%, 90%, and 100% of total systemic blood flow (TSF) by balancing the pulmonary arterial flow. The animals' TSF and oxygen delivery (DO2) were sufficiently maintained throughout the experiments. The oxygen consumption (VO2) and the oxygen extraction rate (ExO2) increased from 178+/-14 to 342+/-19 ml/min, and from 28+/-2% to 64+/-1%, respectively, in proportion to the increase of CPBF dependency from 0% to 100%. The blood lactate level did not change appreciably even at 90% BF from 5.7+/-0.3 to 11.2+/-1.2 mg/dl, but drastically elevated to 23.5+/-4.6 mg/dl at the total bypass. This indicates that CPS leads to a relative lack of oxygen and can induce organ dysfunction due to increasing VO2 and ExO2 in proportion to the increase of BF dependence even if TSF and DO2 are sufficiently maintained.

  13. High- and moderate-intensity aerobic exercise and excess post-exercise oxygen consumption in men with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Larsen, I; Welde, B; Martins, C; Tjønna, A E

    2014-06-01

    Physical activity is central in prevention and treatment of metabolic syndrome. High-intensity aerobic exercise can induce larger energy expenditure per unit of time compared with moderate-intensity exercise. Furthermore, it may induce larger energy expenditure at post-exercise recovery. The aim of this study is to compare the excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) in three different aerobic exercise sessions in men with metabolic syndrome. Seven men (age: 56.7 ± 10.8) with metabolic syndrome participated in this crossover study. The sessions consisted of one aerobic interval (1-AIT), four aerobic intervals (4-AIT), and 47-min continuous moderate exercise (CME) on separate days, with at least 48 h between each test day. Resting metabolic rate (RMR) was measured pre-exercise and used as baseline value. EPOC was measured until baseline metabolic rate was re-established. An increase in O2 uptake lasting for 70.4 ± 24.8 min (4-AIT), 35.9 ± 17.3 min (1-AIT), and 45.6 ± 17.3 min (CME) was observed. EPOC were 2.9 ± 1.7 L O2 (4-AIT), 1.3 ±  .1 L O2 (1-AIT), and 1.4 ± 1.1 L O2 (CME). There were significant differences (P < 0.001) between 4-AIT, CME, and 1-AIT. Total EPOC was highest after 4-AIT. These data suggest that exercise intensity has a significant positive effect on EPOC in men with metabolic syndrome.

  14. The role of oxygen in yeast metabolism during high cell density brewery fermentations.

    PubMed

    Verbelen, P J; Saerens, S M G; Van Mulders, S E; Delvaux, F; Delvaux, F R

    2009-04-01

    The volumetric productivity of the beer fermentation process can be increased by using a higher pitching rate (i.e., higher inoculum size). However, the decreased yeast net growth observed in these high cell density fermentations can have a negative impact on the physiological stability throughout subsequent yeast generations. The use of different oxygen conditions (wort aeration, wort oxygenation, yeast preoxygenation) was investigated to improve the growth yield during high cell density fermentations and yeast metabolic and physiological parameters were assessed systematically. Together with a higher extent of growth (dependent on the applied oxygen conditions), the fermentation power and the formation of unsaturated fatty acids were also affected. Wort oxygenation had a significant decreasing effect on the formation of esters, which was caused by a decreased expression of the alcohol acetyl transferase gene ATF1, compared with the other conditions. Lower glycogen and trehalose levels at the end of fermentation were observed in case of the high cell density fermentations with oxygenated wort and the reference fermentation. The expression levels of BAP2 (encoding the branched chain amino acid permease), ERG1 (encoding squalene epoxidase), and the stress responsive gene HSP12 were predominantly influenced by the high cell concentrations, while OLE1 (encoding the fatty acid desaturase) and the oxidative stress responsive genes SOD1 and CTT1 were mainly affected by the oxygen availability per cell. These results demonstrate that optimisation of high cell density fermentations could be achieved by improving the oxygen conditions, without drastically affecting the physiological condition of the yeast and beer quality.

  15. Impact of oxygen concentration on adult murine pre-antral follicle development in vitro and the corresponding metabolic profile.

    PubMed

    Gook, Debra A; Edgar, D H; Lewis, K; Sheedy, J R; Gardner, D K

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen concentration during in vitro culture has a significant effect on the physiology of embryos, altering metabolic profile and developmental outcome. Although atmospheric oxygen has been used routinely for the culture of ovarian follicles, oxygen concentration may also be critical for follicle growth but the optimal concentration has not been determined. In this study, mechanically isolated primary and secondary follicles (80-140 µm diameter) from adult mouse ovaries were cultured in serum-free conditions for 8 days in either 5 or 20% oxygen to determine growth (follicular diameter), morphology and viability. For each oxygen concentration, half of the medium was replaced on Days 2, 4 and 6 or on Day 4 only. In the latter group, metabolic analysis of spent follicular culture media was performed by (1)H-NMR. The proportion of viable, growing follicles was significantly (P < 0.0001) higher in 5% than in 20% oxygen (59% versus 8%). Reducing the frequency of medium replacement during culture in 5% oxygen resulted in significantly (P < 0.001) more viable follicles (79 versus 46%). In 20% oxygen, poor follicular viability was observed irrespective of the frequency of medium replacement (8 and 10% respectively). Metabolic profiles showed marked differences in amino acid and carbohydrate utilization with respect to both oxygen concentration and between Days 4 and 8 of development. Metabolites which significantly discriminated between oxygen concentration at both time points were glucose consumption, lactate utilization, alanine, alanyl-glutamine, leucine and proline. In conclusion, the poor in vitro follicular development previously observed in minimal culture conditions may reflect the use of 20% oxygen. Frequent medium replenishment is not necessary and does not overcome the detrimental effect of high oxygen on follicle viability. Further optimization of culture conditions would benefit from metabolic analyses and the use of 5% oxygen should be tested further for

  16. Silibinin activates AMP-activated protein kinase to protect neuronal cells from oxygen and glucose deprivation-re-oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhi; Ding, Sheng-quan; Shen, Ya-fang

    2014-11-14

    In this study, we explored the cytoprotective potential of silibinin against oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced neuronal cell damages, and studied underling mechanisms. In vitro model of ischemic stroke was created by keeping neuronal cells (SH-SY5Y cells and primary mouse cortical neurons) in an OGD condition followed by re-oxygenation. Pre-treatment of silibinin significantly inhibited OGD/re-oxygenation-induced necrosis and apoptosis of neuronal cells. OGD/re-oxygenation-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) reduction were also inhibited by silibinin. At the molecular level, silibinin treatment in SH-SY5Y cells and primary cortical neurons led to significant AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling activation, detected by phosphorylations of AMPKα1, its upstream kinase liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and the downstream target acetyl-CoA Carboxylase (ACC). Pharmacological inhibition or genetic depletion of AMPK alleviated the neuroprotective ability of silibinin against OGD/re-oxygenation. Further, ROS scavenging ability by silibinin was abolished with AMPK inhibition or silencing. While A-769662, the AMPK activator, mimicked silibinin actions and suppressed ROS production and neuronal cell death following OGD/re-oxygenation. Together, these results show that silibinin-mediated neuroprotection requires activation of AMPK signaling.

  17. Myocardial Reloading After Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Alters Substrate Metabolism While Promoting Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly Priddy, Colleen M.; Ledee, Dolena R.; Xu, Chun; Isern, Nancy; Olson, Aaron K.; Rosiers, Christine Des; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) unloads the heart, providing a bridge to recovery in children after myocardial stunning. ECMO also induces stress which can adversely affect the ability to reload or wean the heart from the circuit. Metabolic impairments induced by altered loading and/or stress conditions may impact weaning. However, cardiac substrate and amino acid requirements upon weaning are unknown. We assessed the hypothesis that ventricular reloading with ECMO modulates both substrate entry into the citric acid cycle (CAC) and myocardial protein synthesis. Methods and Results Sixteen immature piglets (7.8 to 15.6 kg) were separated into 2 groups based on ventricular loading status: 8‐hour ECMO (UNLOAD) and postwean from ECMO (RELOAD). We infused into the coronary artery [2‐13C]‐pyruvate as an oxidative substrate and [13C6]‐L‐leucine as an indicator for amino acid oxidation and protein synthesis. Upon RELOAD, each functional parameter, which were decreased substantially by ECMO, recovered to near‐baseline level with the exclusion of minimum dP/dt. Accordingly, myocardial oxygen consumption was also increased, indicating that overall mitochondrial metabolism was reestablished. At the metabolic level, when compared to UNLOAD, RELOAD altered the contribution of various substrates/pathways to tissue pyruvate formation, favoring exogenous pyruvate versus glycolysis, and acetyl‐CoA formation, shifting away from pyruvate decarboxylation to endogenous substrate, presumably fatty acids. Furthermore, there was also a significant increase of tissue concentrations for all CAC intermediates (≈80%), suggesting enhanced anaplerosis, and of fractional protein synthesis rates (>70%). Conclusions RELOAD alters both cytosolic and mitochondrial energy substrate metabolism, while favoring leucine incorporation into protein synthesis rather than oxidation in the CAC. Improved understanding of factors governing these metabolic perturbations may

  18. Myocardial Oxidative Metabolism and Protein Synthesis during Mechanical Circulatory Support by Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    SciTech Connect

    Priddy, MD, Colleen M.; Kajimoto, Masaki; Ledee, Dolena; Bouchard, Bertrand; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-02-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides mechanical circulatory support essential for survival in infants and children with acute cardiac decompensation. However, ECMO also causes metabolic disturbances, which contribute to total body wasting and protein loss. Cardiac stunning can also occur which prevents ECMO weaning, and contributes to high mortality. The heart may specifically undergo metabolic impairments, which influence functional recovery. We tested the hypothesis that ECMO alters oxidative. We focused on the amino acid leucine, and integration with myocardial protein synthesis. We used a translational immature swine model in which we assessed in heart (i) the fractional contribution of leucine (FcLeucine) and pyruvate (FCpyruvate) to mitochondrial acetyl-CoA formation by nuclear magnetic resonance and (ii) global protein fractional synthesis (FSR) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Immature mixed breed Yorkshire male piglets (n = 22) were divided into four groups based on loading status (8 hours of normal circulation or ECMO) and intracoronary infusion [13C6,15N]-L-leucine (3.7 mM) alone or with [2-13C]-pyruvate (7.4 mM). ECMO decreased pulse pressure and correspondingly lowered myocardial oxygen consumption (~ 40%, n = 5), indicating decreased overall mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. However, FcLeucine was maintained and myocardial protein FSR was marginally increased. Pyruvate addition decreased tissue leucine enrichment, FcLeucine, and Fc for endogenous substrates as well as protein FSR. Conclusion: The heart under ECMO shows reduced oxidative metabolism of substrates, including amino acids, while maintaining (i) metabolic flexibility indicated by ability to respond to pyruvate, and (ii) a normal or increased capacity for global protein synthesis, suggesting an improved protein balance.

  19. Non-invasive Quantification of Whole-brain Cerebral Metabolic Rate of Oxygen by MRI

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Ge, Yulin; Lu, Hanzhang

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) is an important marker for brain function and brain health. Existing techniques for quantification of CMRO2 with Positron Emission Tomography (PET) or MRI involve special equipment and/or exogenous agent, and may not be suitable for routine clinical studies. In the present study, a non-invasive method is developed to estimate whole-brain CMRO2 in humans. This method applies phase-contrast MRI for quantitative blood flow measurement and T2-Relaxation-Under-Spin-Tagging (TRUST) MRI for venous oxygenation estimation, and uses the Fick principle of arteriovenous difference for the calculation of CMRO2. Whole-brain averaged CMRO2 values in young, healthy subjects were 132.1±20.0 μmol/100g/min, in good agreement with literature reports using PET. Various acquisition strategies for phase-contrast and TRUST MRI were compared, and it was found that non-gated phase-contrast and sagittal sinus TRUST MRI were able to provide the most efficient and accurate estimation of CMRO2. In addition, blood flow and venous oxygenation were found to be positively correlated across subjects. Owing to the non-invasive nature of this method, it may be a convenient and useful approach for assessment of brain metabolism in brain disorders as well as under various physiologic conditions. PMID:19353674

  20. Increased Retinal Oxygen Metabolism Precedes Microvascular Alterations in Type 1 Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenzhong; Wang, Shoujian; Soetikno, Brian; Yi, Ji; Zhang, Kevin; Chen, Siyu; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Sorenson, Christine M.; Sheibani, Nader; Zhang, Hao F.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate inner retinal oxygen metabolic rate (IRMRO2) during early stages of type 1 diabetes in a transgenic mouse model. Methods In current study, we involved seven diabetic mice (Akita/+, TSP1−/−) and seven control mice (TSP1−/−), and applied visible-light optical coherence tomography (vis-OCT) to image functional parameters including retinal blood flow rate, oxygen saturation (sO2) and the IRMRO2 value longitudinally from 5 weeks of age to 13 weeks of age. After imaging at 13 weeks of age, we analyzed the imaging results, and examined histology of mouse retina. Results Between diabetic mice and the control group, we observed significant differences in venous sO2 from 9 weeks of age (P = 0.006), and significant increment in IRMRO2 from 11 weeks of age (P = 0.001) in diabetic mice compared with control group. We did not find significant differences in retinal blood flow rate as well as arterial sO2 during imaging between diabetic and control mice. Histologic examination of diabetic and control mice at 13 weeks of age also revealed no anatomical retinal alternations. Conclusions In diabetic retinopathy, complications in retinal oxygen metabolism may occur before changes of retinal anatomical structure.

  1. Warm-up effects on muscle oxygenation, metabolism and sprint cycling performance.

    PubMed

    Wittekind, Anna; Cooper, Chris E; Elwell, Clare E; Leung, Terence S; Beneke, Ralph

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the effects of warm-up intensity on all-out sprint cycling performance, muscle oxygenation and metabolism, 8 trained male cyclists/triathletes undertook a 30-s sprint cycling test preceded by moderate, heavy or severe warm up and 10-min recovery. Muscle oxygenation was measured by near-infrared spectroscopy, with deoxyhaemoglobin ([HHb]) during the sprint analysed with monoexponential models with time delay. Aerobic, anaerobic-glycolytic and phosphocreatine energy provision to the sprint were estimated from oxygen uptake and lactate production. Immediately prior to the sprint, blood [lactate] was different for each warm up and higher than resting for the heavy and severe warm ups (mod. 0.94 ± 0.36, heavy 1.92 ± 0.64, severe 4.37 ± 0.93 mmol l(-1) P < 0.05), although muscle oxygenation was equally raised above rest. Mean power during the sprint was lower following severe compared to moderate warm up (mod. 672 ± 54, heavy 666 ± 56, severe 655 ± 59 W, P < 0.05). The [HHb] kinetics during the sprint were not different among conditions, although the time delay before [HHb] increased was shorter for severe versus moderate warm up (mod. 5.8 ± 0.6, heavy 5.6 ± 0.9, severe 5.2 ± 0.7 s, P < 0.05). The severe warm up was without effect on estimated aerobic metabolism, but increased estimated phosphocreatine hydrolysis, the latter unable to compensate for the reduction in estimated anaerobic-glycolytic metabolism. It appears that despite all warm ups equally increasing muscle oxygenation, and indicators of marginally faster oxygen utilisation at the start of exercise following a severe-intensity warm up, other energy sources may not be able to fully compensate for a reduced glycolytic rate in sprint exercise with potential detrimental effects on performance.

  2. Oxygen dependence of metabolic fluxes and energy generation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CEN.PK113-1A

    PubMed Central

    Jouhten, Paula; Rintala, Eija; Huuskonen, Anne; Tamminen, Anu; Toivari, Mervi; Wiebe, Marilyn; Ruohonen, Laura; Penttilä, Merja; Maaheimo, Hannu

    2008-01-01

    Background The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to adjust to external oxygen availability by utilizing both respirative and fermentative metabolic modes. Adjusting the metabolic mode involves alteration of the intracellular metabolic fluxes that are determined by the cell's multilevel regulatory network. Oxygen is a major determinant of the physiology of S. cerevisiae but understanding of the oxygen dependence of intracellular flux distributions is still scarce. Results Metabolic flux distributions of S. cerevisiae CEN.PK113-1A growing in glucose-limited chemostat cultures at a dilution rate of 0.1 h-1 with 20.9%, 2.8%, 1.0%, 0.5% or 0.0% O2 in the inlet gas were quantified by 13C-MFA. Metabolic flux ratios from fractional [U-13C]glucose labelling experiments were used to solve the underdetermined MFA system of central carbon metabolism of S. cerevisiae. While ethanol production was observed already in 2.8% oxygen, only minor differences in the flux distribution were observed, compared to fully aerobic conditions. However, in 1.0% and 0.5% oxygen the respiratory rate was severely restricted, resulting in progressively reduced fluxes through the TCA cycle and the direction of major fluxes to the fermentative pathway. A redistribution of fluxes was observed in all branching points of central carbon metabolism. Yet only when oxygen provision was reduced to 0.5%, was the biomass yield exceeded by the yields of ethanol and CO2. Respirative ATP generation provided 59% of the ATP demand in fully aerobic conditions and still a substantial 25% in 0.5% oxygenation. An extensive redistribution of fluxes was observed in anaerobic conditions compared to all the aerobic conditions. Positive correlation between the transcriptional levels of metabolic enzymes and the corresponding fluxes in the different oxygenation conditions was found only in the respirative pathway. Conclusion 13C-constrained MFA enabled quantitative determination of intracellular fluxes in conditions of

  3. Resveratrol inhibits polyphosphoinositide metabolism in activated platelets.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Wachowicz, Barbara; Holmsen, Holm; Fukami, Miriam H

    2005-08-15

    The effects of resveratrol (trans-3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene) on activation responses and the polyphosphoinositide metabolism in human blood platelets have been studied. Resveratrol partially inhibited secretory responses (liberation of dense granule nucleotides and lysosomal acid hydrolases), microparticle formation and protein phosphorylations induced by thrombin. The effects of resveratrol on phosphoinositide metabolites, phosphatidate (PtdOH), phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns), phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PtdIns-4(5)-P), phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns-4,5-P2), phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate (PtdIns-3,4-P2) and phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdIns-3,4,5-P3) were monitored in blood platelets prelabelled with [32P]Pi. Resveratrol not only inhibited the marked increase in levels of PtdOH in platelets activated by thrombin (0.1 U/ml) but it decreased the steady state levels of the other polyphosphoinositide metabolites. The distribution of 32P in phosphoinositides in activated platelets was consistent with inhibition of CDP-DAG inositol transferase and a weak inhibition of PtdIns-4(5)-P kinase. These observations show that resveratrol has a profound effect on phospholipids, particularly on polyphosphoinositide metabolism, and may decrease the amount of PtdIns-4,5-P2 available for signalling in these cells.

  4. Metabolic responses to simulated extravehicular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, Rebecca C.; Sharer, Peter J.; Webbon, Bruce W.; Rendon, Lisa R.

    1992-01-01

    Automatic control of the liquid cooling garment (LCG) worn by astronauts during extravehicular activity (EVA) would more efficiently regulate astronaut thermal comfort and improve astronaut productivity. An experiment was conducted in which subjects performed exercise profiles on a unique, supine upper body ergometer to elicit physiological and thermal responses similar to those achieved during zero-g EVAs. Results were analyzed to quantify metabolic rate, various body temperatures, and other heat balance parameters. Such data may lead to development of a microprocessor-based system to automatically maintain astronaut heat balance during extended EVAs.

  5. Can the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen be estimated with near-infrared spectroscopy?

    PubMed

    Boas, D A; Strangman, G; Culver, J P; Hoge, R D; Jasdzewski, G; Poldrack, R A; Rosen, B R; Mandeville, J B

    2003-08-07

    We have measured the changes in oxy-haemoglobin and deoxy-haemoglobin in the adult human brain during a brief finger tapping exercise using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). The cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) can be estimated from these NIRS data provided certain model assumptions. The change in CMRO2 is related to changes in the total haemoglobin concentration, deoxy-haemoglobin concentration and blood flow. As NIRS does not provide a measure of dynamic changes in blood flow during brain activation, we relied on a Windkessel model that relates dynamic blood volume and flow changes, which has been used previously for estimating CMRO2 from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. Because of the partial volume effect we are unable to quantify the absolute changes in the local brain haemoglobin concentrations with NIRS and thus are unable to obtain an estimate of the absolute CMRO2 change. An absolute estimate is also confounded by uncertainty in the flow-volume relationship. However, the ratio of the flow change to the CMRO2 change is relatively insensitive to these uncertainties. For the linger tapping task, we estimate a most probable flow-consumption ratio ranging from 1.5 to 3 in agreement with previous findings presented in the literature, although we cannot exclude the possibility that there is no CMRO2 change. The large range in the ratio arises from the large number of model parameters that must be estimated from the data. A more precise estimate of the flow-consumption ratio will require better estimates of the model parameters or flow information, as can be provided by combining NIRS with fMRI.

  6. Can the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen be estimated with near-infrared spectroscopy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boas, D. A.; Strangman, G.; Culver, J. P.; Hoge, R. D.; Jasdzewski, G.; Poldrack, R. A.; Rosen, B. R.; Mandeville, J. B.

    2003-08-01

    We have measured the changes in oxy-haemoglobin and deoxy-haemoglobin in the adult human brain during a brief finger tapping exercise using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). The cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) can be estimated from these NIRS data provided certain model assumptions. The change in CMRO2 is related to changes in the total haemoglobin concentration, deoxy-haemoglobin concentration and blood flow. As NIRS does not provide a measure of dynamic changes in blood flow during brain activation, we relied on a Windkessel model that relates dynamic blood volume and flow changes, which has been used previously for estimating CMRO2 from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. Because of the partial volume effect we are unable to quantify the absolute changes in the local brain haemoglobin concentrations with NIRS and thus are unable to obtain an estimate of the absolute CMRO2 change. An absolute estimate is also confounded by uncertainty in the flow-volume relationship. However, the ratio of the flow change to the CMRO2 change is relatively insensitive to these uncertainties. For the finger tapping task, we estimate a most probable flow-consumption ratio ranging from 1.5 to 3 in agreement with previous findings presented in the literature, although we cannot exclude the possibility that there is no CMRO2 change. The large range in the ratio arises from the large number of model parameters that must be estimated from the data. A more precise estimate of the flow-consumption ratio will require better estimates of the model parameters or flow information, as can be provided by combining NIRS with fMRI.

  7. Activation of oxygen evolving perovskites for oxygen reduction by functionalization with Fe-N(x)/C groups.

    PubMed

    Rincón, Rosalba A; Masa, Justus; Mehrpour, Sara; Tietz, Frank; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2014-12-07

    The incorporation of Fe-Nx/C moieties into perovskites remarkably activates them for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and also leads to notable improvement of their activity towards the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) thus presenting a new route for realizing high performance, low cost bifunctional catalysts for reversible oxygen electrodes.

  8. Impaired Tissue Oxygenation in Metabolic Syndrome Requires Increased Microvascular Perfusion Heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Mason McClatchey, P; Wu, Fan; Olfert, I Mark; Ellis, Christopher G; Goldman, Daniel; Reusch, Jane E B; Frisbee, Jefferson C

    2017-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) in obese Zucker rats (OZR) is associated with impaired skeletal muscle performance and blunted hyperemia. Studies suggest that reduced O2 diffusion capacity is required to explain compromised muscle performance and that heterogeneous microvascular perfusion distribution is critical. We modeled tissue oxygenation during muscle contraction in control and OZR skeletal muscle using physiologically realistic relationships. Using a network model of Krogh cylinders with increasing perfusion asymmetry and increased plasma skimming, we predict increased perfusion heterogeneity and decreased muscle oxygenation in OZR, with partial recovery following therapy. Notably, increasing O2 delivery had less impact on VO2 than equivalent decreases in O2 delivery, providing a mechanism for previous empirical work associating perfusion heterogeneity and impaired O2 extraction. We demonstrate that increased skeletal muscle perfusion asymmetry is a defining characteristic of MS and must be considered to effectively model and understand blood-tissue O2 exchange in this model of human disease.

  9. Atrial natriuretic peptide regulates lipid mobilization and oxygen consumption in human adipocytes by activating AMPK

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, Sandra C.; Chau, Mary D.L.; Yang, Qing; Gauthier, Marie-Soleil; Clairmont, Kevin B.; Wu, Zhidan; Gromada, Jesper; Dole, William P.

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Treatment of differentiated human adipocytes with atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) increased lipolysis and oxygen consumption by activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). {yields} ANP stimulated lipid mobilization by selective activation of the alpha2 subunit of AMPK and increased energy utilization through activation of both the alpha1 and alpha2 subunits of AMPK. {yields} ANP enhanced adipocyte mitochondrial oxidative capacity as evidenced by induction of oxidative mitochondrial genes and increase in oxygen consumption. {yields} Exposure of human adipocytes to fatty acids and (TNF{alpha}) induced insulin resistance and decreased expression of mitochondrial genes which was restored to normal by ANP. -- Abstract: Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) has been shown to regulate lipid and carbohydrate metabolism providing a possible link between cardiovascular function and metabolism by mediating the switch from carbohydrate to lipid mobilization and oxidation. ANP exerts a potent lipolytic effect via cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK)-I mediated-stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Activation of the ANP/cGK signaling cascade also promotes muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and fat oxidation. Here we demonstrate that ANP regulates lipid metabolism and oxygen utilization in differentiated human adipocytes by activating the alpha2 subunit of AMPK. ANP treatment increased lipolysis by seven fold and oxygen consumption by two fold, both of which were attenuated by inhibition of AMPK activity. ANP-induced lipolysis was shown to be mediated by the alpha2 subunit of AMPK as introduction of dominant-negative alpha2 subunit of AMPK attenuated ANP effects on lipolysis. ANP-induced activation of AMPK enhanced mitochondrial oxidative capacity as evidenced by a two fold increase in oxygen consumption and induction of mitochondrial genes, including carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1a) by 1.4-fold, cytochrome C (CytC) by 1.3-fold, and

  10. Alteration of oxygen consumption and energy metabolism during repetitive exposure of mice to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Lu, G W; Cui, X Y; Zhao, B M

    1999-05-01

    Changes in oxygen consumption, body temperature and energy metabolism were studied while mice were repeatedly exposed to a sealed environment. The average tolerance limits of environmental oxygen level (vol%) and the average oxygen consumption rates (ml/g x min) were exponentially decreased and the average body rectal temperatures (degrees C) were linearly declined while the average tolerable times (min) to hypoxia were linearly increased as animals were repeatedly exposed to hypoxia for 5 runs. The average survival times (min) in sealed environments after administration of normal saline, iodoacetic acid, malonic acid, potassium cyanide, and potassium cyanide plus iodoacetic acid in group exposed repeatedly to hypoxia for three runs were, respectively, 3.1, 3.9, 1.4, 2.6, and 2.8 times those of the control groups that had corresponding administration of the different chemicals, but no exposure to hypoxia. The results indicate that progressive increase in hypoxia tolerance is related to progressively lower rate of oxygen consumption and heat production, and the lowered energy requirement during repetitive exposure to hypoxia is achieved mainly via pathways of the respiratory chain and glycolysis.

  11. Metabolically active Crenarchaeota in Altamira Cave.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Juan M; Portillo, M Carmen; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2006-01-01

    Altamira Cave contains valuable paleolithic paintings dating back to 15,000 years. The conservation of these unique paintings is attracting increasing interest, and so, understanding microbial proliferation in Altamira Cave represents a prioritary objective. Here, we show for the first time that members of the Crenarchaeota were metabolically active components of developing microbial communities. RNA was extracted directly from the studied environment, and a number of 16S rRNA gene sequences belonging to the low-temperature Crenarchaeota were detected. Although low-temperature Crenarchaeota detected in a variety of ecosystems by using molecular techniques remain uncultured, this RNA-based study confirms an active participation of the Crenarchaeota in cave biogeochemical cycles.

  12. DELETION OR INHIBITION OF THE OXYGEN SENSOR PHD1 PROTECTS AGAINST ISCHEMIC STROKE VIA REPROGRAMMING OF NEURONAL METABOLISM

    PubMed Central

    Quaegebeur, Annelies; Segura, Inmaculada; Schmieder, Roberta; Verdegem, Dries; Decimo, Ilaria; Bifari, Francesco; Dresselaers, Tom; Eelen, Guy; Ghosh, Debapriva; Schoors, Sandra; Janaki Raman, Sudha Rani; Cruys, Bert; Govaerts, Kristof; De Legher, Carla; Bouché, Ann; Schoonjans, Luc; Ramer, Matt S.; Hung, Gene; Bossaert, Goele; Cleveland, Don W.; Himmelreich, Uwe; Voets, Thomas; Lemmens, Robin; Bennett, C. Frank; Robberecht, Wim; De Bock, Katrien; Dewerchin, Mieke; Fendt, Sarah-Maria; Ghesquière, Bart; Carmeliet, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Summary The oxygen-sensing prolyl hydroxylase domain proteins (PHDs) regulate cellular metabolism, but their role in neuronal metabolism during stroke is unknown. Here we report that PHD1 deficiency provides neuroprotection in a murine model of permanent brain ischemia. This was not due to an increased collateral vessel network, nor to enhanced neurotrophin expression. Instead, PHD1−/− neurons were protected against oxygen-nutrient deprivation by reprogramming glucose metabolism. Indeed, PHD1−/− neurons enhanced glucose flux through the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway by diverting glucose from glycolysis. As a result, PHD1−/− neurons increased their redox buffering capacity to scavenge oxygen radicals in ischemia. Intracerebroventricular injection of PHD1-antisense oligonucleotides reduced the cerebral infarct size and neurological deficits following stroke. These data identify PHD1 as a novel regulator of neuronal metabolism and a potential therapeutic target in ischemic stroke. PMID:26774962

  13. Deletion or Inhibition of the Oxygen Sensor PHD1 Protects against Ischemic Stroke via Reprogramming of Neuronal Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Quaegebeur, Annelies; Segura, Inmaculada; Schmieder, Roberta; Verdegem, Dries; Decimo, Ilaria; Bifari, Francesco; Dresselaers, Tom; Eelen, Guy; Ghosh, Debapriva; Davidson, Shawn M; Schoors, Sandra; Broekaert, Dorien; Cruys, Bert; Govaerts, Kristof; De Legher, Carla; Bouché, Ann; Schoonjans, Luc; Ramer, Matt S; Hung, Gene; Bossaert, Goele; Cleveland, Don W; Himmelreich, Uwe; Voets, Thomas; Lemmens, Robin; Bennett, C Frank; Robberecht, Wim; De Bock, Katrien; Dewerchin, Mieke; Ghesquière, Bart; Fendt, Sarah-Maria; Carmeliet, Peter

    2016-02-09

    The oxygen-sensing prolyl hydroxylase domain proteins (PHDs) regulate cellular metabolism, but their role in neuronal metabolism during stroke is unknown. Here we report that PHD1 deficiency provides neuroprotection in a murine model of permanent brain ischemia. This was not due to an increased collateral vessel network. Instead, PHD1(-/-) neurons were protected against oxygen-nutrient deprivation by reprogramming glucose metabolism. Indeed, PHD1(-/-) neurons enhanced glucose flux through the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway by diverting glucose away from glycolysis. As a result, PHD1(-/-) neurons increased their redox buffering capacity to scavenge oxygen radicals in ischemia. Intracerebroventricular injection of PHD1-antisense oligonucleotides reduced the cerebral infarct size and neurological deficits following stroke. These data identify PHD1 as a regulator of neuronal metabolism and a potential therapeutic target in ischemic stroke.

  14. Metabolism of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) plants under low temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Airaki, Morad; Leterrier, Marina; Mateos, Rosa M; Valderrama, Raquel; Chaki, Mounira; Barroso, Juan B; Del Río, Luis A; Palma, José M; Corpas, Francisco J

    2012-02-01

    Low temperature is an environmental stress that affects crop production and quality and regulates the expression of many genes, and the level of a number of proteins and metabolites. Using leaves from pepper (Capsicum annum L.) plants exposed to low temperature (8 °C) for different time periods (1 to 3 d), several key components of the metabolism of reactive nitrogen and oxygen species (RNS and ROS, respectively) were analysed. After 24 h of exposure at 8 °C, pepper plants exhibited visible symptoms characterized by flaccidity of stems and leaves. This was accompanied by significant changes in the metabolism of RNS and ROS with an increase of both protein tyrosine nitration (NO(2) -Tyr) and lipid peroxidation, indicating that low temperature induces nitrosative and oxidative stress. During the second and third days at low temperature, pepper plants underwent cold acclimation by adjusting their antioxidant metabolism and reverting the observed nitrosative and oxidative stress. In this process, the levels of the soluble non-enzymatic antioxidants ascorbate and glutathione, and the activity of the main NADPH-generating dehydrogenases were significantly induced. This suggests that ascorbate, glutathione and the NADPH-generating dehydrogenases have a role in the process of cold acclimation through their effect on the redox state of the cell.

  15. Metabolic Equivalent in Adolescents, Active Adults and Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Melzer, Katarina; Heydenreich, Juliane; Schutz, Yves; Renaud, Anne; Kayser, Bengt; Mäder, Urs

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic Equivalent” (MET) represents a standard amount of oxygen consumed by the body under resting conditions, and is defined as 3.5 mL O2/kg × min or ~1 kcal/kg × h. It is used to express the energy cost of physical activity in multiples of MET. However, universal application of the 1-MET standard was questioned in previous studies, because it does not apply well to all individuals. Height, weight and resting metabolic rate (RMR, measured by indirect calorimetry) were measured in adolescent males (n = 50) and females (n = 50), women during pregnancy (gestation week 35–41, n = 46), women 24–53 weeks postpartum (n = 27), and active men (n = 30), and were compared to values predicted by the 1-MET standard. The RMR of adolescent males (1.28 kcal/kg × h) was significantly higher than that of adolescent females (1.11 kcal/kg × h), with or without the effects of puberty stage and physical activity levels. The RMR of the pregnant and post-pregnant subjects were not significantly different. The RMR of the active normal weight (0.92 kcal/kg × h) and overweight (0.89 kcal/kg × h) adult males were significantly lower than the 1-MET value. It follows that the 1-MET standard is inadequate for use not only in adult men and women, but also in adolescents and physically active men. It is therefore recommended that practitioners estimate RMR with equations taking into account individual characteristics, such as sex, age and Body Mass Index, and not rely on the 1-MET standard. PMID:27447667

  16. Body metabolic rate and electromyographic activities of antigravitational muscles in supine and standing postures.

    PubMed

    Rubini, Alessandro; Paoli, Antonio; Parmagnani, Andrea

    2012-06-01

    We measured metabolic (oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide production, respiratory ratio), cardio-circulatory (heart rate, systolic and diastolic arterial blood pressure, rate-pressure product, an index of myocardial oxygen consumption calculated by multiplying heart rate by systolic pressure) and electromyographic (integrated electromyographic activities of two antigravitational muscles of the lower limb, soleus and gastrocnemius) variables on 12 young healthy subjects in supine and standing positions at rest. We found statistically significant increments of oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide production, heart rate and integrated electromyographic activities in standing versus supine position. Rate-pressure product increased but not significantly, and no other significant changes were detected. We conclude that postural changes influence metabolic rate, antigravitational muscle reflex activities, and heart rate. A significant positive correlation was found between oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide production and integrated electromyographic activities of antigravitational muscles, while the same was not found for cardio-circulatory variables. These results suggest that the increased metabolic rate in standing position is, at least in part, due to antigravitational muscle tone.

  17. The effect of electromagnetic radiation emitted by display screens on cell oxygen metabolism – in vitro studies

    PubMed Central

    Henrykowska, Gabriela A.; Pacholski, Krzysztof; Śmigielski, Janusz; Rutkowski, Maciej; Dziedziczak-Buczyńska, Maria; Buczyński, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Research studies carried out for decades have not solved the problem of the effect of electromagnetic radiation of various frequency and strength on the human organism. Due to this fact, we decided to investigate the changes taking place in human blood platelets under the effect of electromagnetic radiation (EMR) emitted by LCD monitors. Material and methods The changes of selected parameters of oxygen metabolism were measured, i.e. reactive oxygen species concentration, enzymatic activity of antioxidant defence proteins – superoxide dismutase (SOD-1) and catalase (CAT) – and malondialdehyde concentration (MDA). A suspension of human blood platelets was exposed to electromagnetic radiation of 1 kHz frequency and 150 V/m and 220 V/m intensity for 30 and 60 min. The level of changes of the selected parameters of oxidative stress was determined after the exposure and compared to the control samples (not exposed). Results The measurements revealed an increase of the concentration of reactive oxygen species. The largest increase of ROS concentration vs. the control sample was observed after exposure to EMF of 220 V/m intensity for 60 min (from x = 54.64 to x = 72.92). The measurement of MDA concentration demonstrated a statistically significant increase after 30-min exposure to an EMF of 220 V/m intensity in relation to the initial values (from x = 3.18 to x = 4.41). The enzymatic activity of SOD-1 decreased after exposure (the most prominent change was observed after 60-min and 220 V/m intensity from x = 3556.41 to x = 1084.83). The most significant change in activity of catalase was observed after 60 min and 220 v/m exposure (from x = 6.28 to x = 4.15). Conclusions The findings indicate that exposure to electromagnetic radiation of 1 kHz frequency and 150 V/m and 220 V/m intensity may cause adverse effects within blood platelets’ oxygen metabolism and thus may lead to physiological dysfunction of the organism. PMID:26788099

  18. A NOVEL METABOLIC ACTIVATION PATHWAY FOR POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS: REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES-MEDIATED DNA DAMAGE AND MORPHOLOGICAL CELL TRANSFORMATION IN MOUSE EMBRYO CELLS BY K-REGION DIOL METABOLITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benzo[ a ]pyrene (BP) is a well-studied polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (P AH) .Many
    mechanisms have been suggested to explain its carcinogenic activity, yet many questions still
    remain. K-region dihydrodiols (diols) ofPAHs are common metabolites and some are genotoxic. W...

  19. Myocardial Reloading after Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Alters Substrate Metabolism While Promoting Protein Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Priddy, Colleen M.; Ledee, Dolena; Xu, Chun; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-08-19

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) unloads the heart providing a bridge to recovery in children after myocardial stunning. Mortality after ECMO remains high.Cardiac substrate and amino acid requirements upon weaning are unknown and may impact recovery. We assessed the hypothesis that ventricular reloading modulates both substrate entry into the citric acid cycle (CAC) and myocardial protein synthesis. Fourteen immature piglets (7.8-15.6 kg) were separated into 2 groups based on ventricular loading status: 8 hour-ECMO (UNLOAD) and post-wean from ECMO (RELOAD). We infused [2-13C]-pyruvate as an oxidative substrate and [13C6]-L-leucine, as a tracer of amino acid oxidation and protein synthesis into the coronary artery. RELOAD showed marked elevations in myocardial oxygen consumption above baseline and UNLOAD. Pyruvate uptake was markedly increased though RELOAD decreased pyruvate contribution to oxidative CAC metabolism.RELOAD also increased absolute concentrations of all CAC intermediates, while maintaining or increasing 13C-molar percent enrichment. RELOAD also significantly increased cardiac fractional protein synthesis rates by >70% over UNLOAD. Conclusions: RELOAD produced high energy metabolic requirement and rebound protein synthesis. Relative pyruvate decarboxylation decreased with RELOAD while promoting anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation and amino acid incorporation into protein rather than to the CAC for oxidation. These perturbations may serve as therapeutic targets to improve contractile function after ECMO.

  20. Metaproteomics reveals differential modes of metabolic coupling among ubiquitous oxygen minimum zone microbes

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, Alyse K.; Brewer, Heather M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Hallam, Steven J.

    2014-08-05

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) are intrinsic water column features arising from respiratory oxygen demand during organic matter degradation in stratified marine waters. Currently OMZs are expanding due to global climate change. This expansion alters marine ecosystem function and the productivity of fisheries due to habitat compression and changes in biogeochemical cycling leading to fixed nitrogen loss and greenhouse gas production. Here we use metaproteomics to chart spatial and temporal patterns of gene expression along defined redox gradients in a seasonally anoxic fjord, Saanich Inlet to better understand microbial community responses to OMZ expansion. The expression of metabolic pathway components for nitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), denitrification and inorganic carbon fixation predominantly co-varied with abundance and distribution patterns of Thaumarchaeota, Nitrospira, Planctomycetes and SUP05/ARCTIC96BD-19 Gammaproteobacteria. Within these groups, pathways mediating inorganic carbon fixation and nitrogen and sulfur transformations were differentially expressed across the redoxcline. Nitrification and inorganic carbon fixation pathways affiliated with Thaumarchaeota dominated dysoxic waters and denitrification, sulfur-oxidation and inorganic carbon fixation pathways affiliated with SUP05 dominated suboxic and anoxic waters. Nitrite-oxidation and anammox pathways affiliated with Nitrospina and Planctomycetes respectively, also exhibited redox partitioning between dysoxic and suboxic waters. The differential expression of these pathways under changing water column redox conditions has quantitative implications for coupled biogeochemical cycling linking different modes of inorganic carbon fixation with distributed nitrogen and sulfur-based energy metabolism extensible to coastal and open ocean OMZs.

  1. Excited states in the active media of oxygen - iodine lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Azyazov, V N

    2009-11-30

    A review of investigations of kinetic processes in active media oxygen - iodine lasers (OILs) performed in the last decade is presented. The mechanisms of pumping and quenching of electronically and vibrationally excited O{sub 2} and I{sub 2} molecules are considered, and dissociation mechanisms of I{sub 2} in the active medium of the OIL are analysed. The values of kinetic constants of processes proceeding in the active media of OILs are recommended. (review)

  2. [The priority contribution of academician A.L. Kursanov's scientific school to the study of oxygen metabolism and anaerobiosis in plants].

    PubMed

    Vartapetian, B B

    2003-01-01

    The biographical data on scientific activity of Academician A.L. Kursanov are presented. The contribution of A.L. Kursanov and his school to study of oxygen metabolism and plants anaerobiosis is reviewed. Special attention is given to the works on plant respiration, biosynthesis of endogenous water within plants and animals, mechanism of vitamin A biosynthesis and the metabolism of intracellular water studied with 18O methods. The important works of A.L. Kursanov's school that played an essential role in establishing the new brunch of science at the interface of physiology, biochemistry and ecology of plants, focused on the plant anaerobiosis theory are considered in details.

  3. Identification of HIF-1 signaling pathway in Pelteobagrus vachelli using RNA-Seq: effects of acute hypoxia and reoxygenation on oxygen sensors, respiratory metabolism, and hematology indices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guosong; Zhao, Cheng; Wang, Qintao; Gu, Yichun; Li, Zecheng; Tao, Panfeng; Chen, Jiawei; Yin, Shaowu

    2017-03-28

    Oxygen is a vital element in aquatic environments. The concentration of oxygen to which aquatic organisms are exposed is influenced by salinity, water temperature, weather, and surface water runoff. Hypoxia has a serious effect on fish populations, and can lead to the loss of habitat and die-offs. Therefore, in the present study we used next-generation sequencing technology to characterize the transcriptomes of Pelteobagrus vachelli and identified 70 candidate genes in the HIF-1 signaling pathway that are important for the hypoxic response in all metazoan species. For the first time, the present study reported the effects of acute hypoxia and reoxygenation on oxygen sensors, respiratory metabolism, and hematology indices in P. vachelli. The predicted physiological adjustments show that P. vachelli's blood oxygen-carrying capacity was increased through increased RBC, HB, and SI after hypoxia exposure. Glycolysis-related enzyme activities (PFK, HK, and PK) and LDH in the brain and liver also increased, indicating a rise in anaerobic metabolism. The observed reduction in oxidative enzyme level (CS) in the liver during hypoxia suggests a concomitant depression in aerobic metabolism. There were significant increases in oxygen sensor mRNA expression and HIF-1α protein expression during hypoxia and reoxygenation exposure, suggesting that the HIF-1 signaling pathway was activated in the liver and brain of P. vachelli in response to acute hypoxia and reoxygenation. Our findings suggest that oxygen sensors (e.g., HIF-1α) of P. vachelli are potentially useful biomarkers of environmental hypoxic exposure. These data contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of the hypoxia signaling pathway in fish under hypoxia and reoxygenation.

  4. Right ventricular metabolism during venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in immature swine heart in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Ledee, Dolena R; Isern, Nancy G; Portman, Michael A

    2017-04-01

    Venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO) provides hemodynamic rescue for patients encountering right or left ventricular (RV or LV) decompensation, particularly after surgery for congenital heart defects. ECMO, supported metabolically by parenteral nutrition, provides reductions in myocardial work and energy demand and, therefore, enhances functional recovery. The RV must often assume systemic ventricular pressures and function on weaning from VA-ECMO. However the substrate utilization responses of the RV to VA-ECMO or stimulation are unknown. We determined RV and LV substrate utilization response to VA-ECMO in immature swine heart. Mixed-breed male Yorkshire pigs (33-49 days old) underwent normal pressure volume loading (control, n = 5) or were unloaded by VA-ECMO (ECMO, n = 10) for 8 h. Five pigs with ECMO received intravenous thyroid hormone [triiodothyronine (T3)] to alter substrate utilization. Carbon 13 ((13)C)-labeled substrates (lactate and medium-chain and long-chain fatty acids) were systemically infused as metabolic tracers. Analyses by nuclear magnetic resonance showed that both ventricles have similar trends of fractional (13)C-labeled substrate contributions to the citric acid cycle under control conditions. VA-ECMO produced higher long-chain fatty acids and lower lactate contribution to the citric acid cycle via inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase, whereas T3 promoted lactate metabolism in both ventricles. However, these metabolic shifts were smaller in RV, and RV fatty acid contributions showed minimal response to perturbations. Furthermore, VA-ECMO and T3 also achieved high [phosphocreatine]/[ATP] and low [NADH]/[NAD(+)] in LV but not in RV. These data suggest that the RV shows decreased ability to modify substrate utilization and achieve improvements in energy supply/demand during VA-ECMO.NEW & NOTEWORTHY We showed that the right ventricle unloaded by venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO) has diminished

  5. Mitochondrial metabolic suppression in fasting and daily torpor: consequences for reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jason C L; Staples, James F

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Daily torpor results in an ∼70% decrease in metabolic rate (MR) and a 20%-70% decrease in state 3 (phosphorylating) respiration rate of isolated liver mitochondria in both dwarf Siberian hamsters and mice even when measured at 37°C. This study investigated whether mitochondrial metabolic suppression also occurs in these species during euthermic fasting, when MR decreases significantly but torpor is not observed. State 3 respiration rate measured at 37°C was 20%-30% lower in euthermic fasted animals when glutamate but not succinate was used as a substrate. This suggests that electron transport chain complex I is inhibited during fasting. We also investigated whether mitochondrial metabolic suppression alters mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. In both torpor and euthermic fasting, ROS production (measured as H(2)O(2) release rate) was lower with glutamate in the presence (but not absence) of rotenone when measured at 37°C, likely reflecting inhibition at or upstream of the complex I ROS-producing site. ROS production with succinate (with rotenone) increased in torpor but not euthermic fasting, reflecting complex II inhibition during torpor only. Finally, mitochondrial ROS production was twofold more temperature sensitive than mitochondrial respiration (as reflected by Q(10) values). These data suggest that electron leak from the mitochondrial electron transport chain, which leads to ROS production, is avoided more efficiently at the lower body temperatures experienced during torpor.

  6. Inhibition and oxygen activation in copper amine oxidases.

    PubMed

    Shepard, Eric M; Dooley, David M

    2015-05-19

    Copper-containing amine oxidases (CuAOs) use both copper and 2,4,5-trihydroxyphenylalanine quinone (TPQ) to catalyze the oxidative deamination of primary amines. The CuAO active site is highly conserved and comprised of TPQ and a mononuclear type II copper center that exhibits five-coordinate, distorted square pyramidal coordination geometry with histidine ligands and equatorially and axially bound water in the oxidized, resting state. The active site is buried within the protein, and CuAOs from various sources display remarkable diversity with respect to the composition of the active site channel and cofactor accessibility. Structural and mechanistic factors that influence substrate preference and inhibitor sensitivity and selectivity have been defined. This Account summarizes the strategies used to design selective CuAO inhibitors based on active site channel characteristics, leading to either enhanced steric fits or the trapping of reactive electrophilic products. These findings provide a framework to support the future development of candidate molecules aimed at minimizing the negative side effects associated with drugs containing amine functionalities. This is vital given the existence of human diamine oxidase and vascular adhesion protein-1, which have distinct amine substrate preferences and are associated with different metabolic processes. Inhibition of these enzymes by antifungal or antiprotozoal agents, as well as classic monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors, may contribute to the adverse side effects associated with drug treatment. These observations provide a rationale for the limited clinical value associated with certain amine-containing pharmaceuticals and emphasize the need for more selective AO inhibitors. This Account also discusses the novel roles of copper and TPQ in the chemistry of O2 activation and substrate oxidation. Reduced CuAOs exist in a redox equilibrium between the Cu(II)-TPQAMQ (aminoquinol) and Cu(I)-TPQSQ (semiquinone). Elucidating

  7. Overexpression of genes encoding glycolytic enzymes in Corynebacterium glutamicum enhances glucose metabolism and alanine production under oxygen deprivation conditions.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shogo; Gunji, Wataru; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Toda, Hiroshi; Suda, Masako; Jojima, Toru; Inui, Masayuki; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2012-06-01

    We previously reported that Corynebacterium glutamicum strain ΔldhAΔppc+alaD+gapA, overexpressing glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase-encoding gapA, shows significantly improved glucose consumption and alanine formation under oxygen deprivation conditions (T. Jojima, M. Fujii, E. Mori, M. Inui, and H. Yukawa, Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 87:159-165, 2010). In this study, we employ stepwise overexpression and chromosomal integration of a total of four genes encoding glycolytic enzymes (herein referred to as glycolytic genes) to demonstrate further successive improvements in C. glutamicum glucose metabolism under oxygen deprivation. In addition to gapA, overexpressing pyruvate kinase-encoding pyk and phosphofructokinase-encoding pfk enabled strain GLY2/pCRD500 to realize respective 13% and 20% improved rates of glucose consumption and alanine formation compared to GLY1/pCRD500. Subsequent overexpression of glucose-6-phosphate isomerase-encoding gpi in strain GLY3/pCRD500 further improved its glucose metabolism. Notably, both alanine productivity and yield increased after each overexpression step. After 48 h of incubation, GLY3/pCRD500 produced 2,430 mM alanine at a yield of 91.8%. This was 6.4-fold higher productivity than that of the wild-type strain. Intracellular metabolite analysis showed that gapA overexpression led to a decreased concentration of metabolites upstream of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, suggesting that the overexpression resolved a bottleneck in glycolysis. Changing ratios of the extracellular metabolites by overexpression of glycolytic genes resulted in reduction of the intracellular NADH/NAD(+) ratio, which also plays an important role on the improvement of glucose consumption. Enhanced alanine dehydrogenase activity using a high-copy-number plasmid further accelerated the overall alanine productivity. Increase in glycolytic enzyme activities is a promising approach to make drastic progress in growth-arrested bioprocesses.

  8. Event-related changes of the prefrontal cortex oxygen delivery and metabolism during driving measured by hyperspectral fNIRS

    PubMed Central

    Nosrati, Reyhaneh; Vesely, Kristin; Schweizer, Tom A.; Toronov, Vladislav

    2016-01-01

    Recent technological advancements in optical spectroscopy allow for the construction of hyperspectral (broadband) portable tissue oximeters. In a series of our recent papers we have shown that hyperspectral NIRS (hNIRS) has similar or better capabilities in the absolute tissue oximetry as frequency-domain NIRS, and that hNIRS is also very efficient in measuring temporal changes in tissue hemoglobin concentration and oxygenation. In this paper, we extend the application of hNIRS to the measurement of event-related hemodynamic and metabolic functional cerebral responses during simulated driving. In order to check if hNIRS can detect event-related changes in the brain, we measured the concentration changes of oxygenated (HbO2) and deoxygenated (HHb) hemoglobin and of the oxidized state of cytochrome c oxidase, on the right and left prefrontal cortices (PFC) simultaneously during simulated driving on sixteen healthy right-handed participants (aged between 22–32). We used our in-house hNIRS system based on a portable spectrometer with cooled CCD detector and a driving simulator with a fully functional steering wheel and foot pedals. Each participant performed different driving tasks and participants were distracted during some driving conditions by asking general knowledge true/false questions. Our findings suggest that more complex driving tasks (non-distracted) deactivate PFC while distractions during driving significantly activate PFC, which is in agreement with previous fMRI results. Also, we found the changes in the redox state of the cytochrome C oxidase to be very consistent with those in the concentrations of HbO2 and HHb. Overall our findings suggest that in addition to the suitability of absolute tissue oximetry, hyperspectral NIRS may also offer advantages in functional brain imaging. In particular, it can be used to measure the metabolic functional brain activity during actual driving. PMID:27446658

  9. Effects of macrophyte development on the oxygen metabolism of an urban river rehabilitation structure.

    PubMed

    Sukhodolova, Tatiana; Weber, Arnd; Zhang, Jingxin; Wolter, Christian

    2017-01-01

    To compensate for fairway enlargements and the hydraulic impacts of navigation activity, an artificial rehabilitation structure was constructed in the urban, navigable River Spree in 2004. This wave-protected, shallow littoral zone proved to be highly effective in reducing vessel-induced waves and provided suitable conditions for the development of aquatic plants. However, in time it became less suitable for other aquatic organisms due to hypoxic conditions in late summer. This study aimed to comparatively calculate and analyze the oxygen balance of the rehabilitation structure and the main channel five years after the construction in 2009. In the rehabilitation structure, the production to respiration ratio ranged between 0.10 and 0.34 at the peak of vegetation density, while in the main channel in front of the rehabilitation structure it ranged between 0.67 and 0.86. Dense vegetation limited the water exchange and caused oxygen depletion. Thus, atmospheric oxygen input through the water surface and due to long-term water level changes became the most important supply processes for oxygen in the rehabilitation structure. Enhancing the oxygen supply to improve the suitability of the rehabilitation structure for other aquatic taxa requires an increase in water exchange with the main channel, e.g. by adaptively increasing the lateral connectivity.

  10. Metabolic Activity of Bacteria at High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, A.; Daniel, I.; Oger, P.

    2008-12-01

    a depth of marine sediment of 500 m, or even beneath a water column of 6 km in surface sediments. This suggests that the metabolic activity of surface microorganisms that receive nutrients through sea water percolation into the deeper parts of the sediment, or that sink with the sediment, may represent a significant fraction of the total activity observed in subsurface environments. The present results indicate also that cells in stationary phase at HHP, which preclude growth, can still have a short-term metabolic activity independent of the growth-related activity. Consequently, surface microorganisms have the ability to impact significantly and rapidly on biogeochemical cycles in deep environments.

  11. [Metabolism inhibition stimulates, metabolism activation inhibits cancerogenic activity of ortho-aminoazotoluene in mouse liver].

    PubMed

    Kaledin, V I; Il'nitskaia, S I

    2011-01-01

    Pentachlorophenol, an inhibitor of metabolic activation of aminoazo dyes was administered to suckling mice prior to o-aminoazotoluene (OAT). It was followed by formation of numerous preneoplastic nodules and tumors in the lungs and liver. At the same time, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxine treatment decreased their number in the liver while slightly increasing them in the lung. A possible mechanism of aminoazo dye carcinogenicity is suggested.

  12. A non-invasive fluorescence-based oxygen sensor and platform for studying cell responses to metabolic agents in real-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchapudi, Koutilya Reddy

    A fluorescence-based sensor in a transverse flow/stop measurement platform has been developed to determine real-time changes in oxygen consumption rates for cell metabolic studies. The oxygen sensitive fluorophore platinum octaethylporphyrin was embedded in a cellulose acetate matrix and affixed to a fiber optic bundle, which provided for transmission of the excitation and emission wavelengths of the film. The fiber optic bundle was sealed in a sensor head that can be used in standard 24-well plates common to research labs. The utility of the sensor and sensing platform were determined by measuring the changes in oxygen consumption rates of Candida albicans during 90/30 s flow/stop cycles. Exposure of these cells to metabolic antagonists and an enhancer showed the expected decrease and increase in oxygen consumption rates in real time. The applicability of the platform to biological studies is illustrated by determination of synergistic activities between antifungal drugs and fluoride exposure in Candida albicans. The robustness of the fluorophore film is demonstrated by perfusion with different media and analyte conditions in the absence of cells. For stop cycle time intervals less than 1 minute the sensor exhibited a rapid and fairly linear change in fluorescence intensity to changing oxygen concentrations in the measurement chamber. Flow cycle fluorescence intensities were used as a baseline correction for treating the stop cycle fluorescence peaks.

  13. Oxygen Sensing via the Ethylene Response Transcription Factor RAP2.12 Affects Plant Metabolism and Performance under Both Normoxia and Hypoxia1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Melanie Verena; Iyer, Srignanakshi; Lehmann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Subgroup-VII-ethylene-response-factor (ERF-VII) transcription factors are involved in the regulation of hypoxic gene expression and regulated by proteasome-mediated proteolysis via the oxygen-dependent branch of the N-end-rule pathway. While research into ERF-VII mainly focused on their role to regulate anoxic gene expression, little is known on the impact of this oxygen-sensing system in regulating plant metabolism and growth. By comparing Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants overexpressing N-end-rule-sensitive and insensitive forms of the ERF-VII-factor RAP2.12, we provide evidence that oxygen-dependent RAP2.12 stability regulates central metabolic processes to sustain growth, development, and anoxic resistance of plants. (1) Under normoxia, overexpression of N-end-rule-insensitive Δ13RAP2.12 led to increased activities of fermentative enzymes and increased accumulation of fermentation products, which were accompanied by decreased adenylate energy states and starch levels, and impaired plant growth and development, indicating a role of oxygen-regulated RAP2.12 degradation to prevent aerobic fermentation. (2) In Δ13RAP2.12-overexpressing plants, decreased carbohydrate reserves also led to a decrease in anoxic resistance, which was prevented by external Suc supply. (3) Overexpression of Δ13RAP2.12 led to decreased respiration rates, changes in the levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, and accumulation of a large number of amino acids, including Ala and γ-amino butyric acid, indicating a role of oxygen-regulated RAP2.12 abundance in controlling the flux-modus of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. (4) The increase in amino acids was accompanied by increased levels of immune-regulatory metabolites. These results show that oxygen-sensing, mediating RAP2.12 degradation is indispensable to optimize metabolic performance, plant growth, and development under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. PMID:27372243

  14. Metabolic activity of subsurface life in deep-sea sediments.

    PubMed

    D'Hondt, Steven; Rutherford, Scott; Spivack, Arthur J

    2002-03-15

    Global maps of sulfate and methane in marine sediments reveal two provinces of subsurface metabolic activity: a sulfate-rich open-ocean province, and an ocean-margin province where sulfate is limited to shallow sediments. Methane is produced in both regions but is abundant only in sulfate-depleted sediments. Metabolic activity is greatest in narrow zones of sulfate-reducing methane oxidation along ocean margins. The metabolic rates of subseafloor life are orders of magnitude lower than those of life on Earth's surface. Most microorganisms in subseafloor sediments are either inactive or adapted for extraordinarily low metabolic activity.

  15. Hypoxia Tolerance and Metabolic Suppression in Oxygen Minimum Zone Euphausiids: Implications for Ocean Deoxygenation and Biogeochemical Cycles.

    PubMed

    Seibel, Brad A; Schneider, Jillian L; Kaartvedt, Stein; Wishner, Karen F; Daly, Kendra L

    2016-10-01

    The effects of regional variations in oxygen and temperature levels with depth were assessed for the metabolism and hypoxia tolerance of dominant euphausiid species. The physiological strategies employed by these species facilitate prediction of changing vertical distributions with expanding oxygen minimum zones and inform estimates of the contribution of vertically migrating species to biogeochemical cycles. The migrating species from the Eastern Tropical Pacific (ETP), Euphausia eximia and Nematoscelis gracilis, tolerate a Partial Pressure (PO2) of 0.8 kPa at 10 °C (∼15 µM O2) for at least 12 h without mortality, while the California Current species, Nematoscelis difficilis, is incapable of surviving even 2.4 kPa PO2 (∼32 µM O2) for more than 3 h at that temperature. Euphausia diomedeae from the Red Sea migrates into an intermediate oxygen minimum zone, but one in which the temperature at depth remains near 22 °C. Euphausia diomedeae survived 1.6 kPa PO2 (∼22 µM O2) at 22 °C for the duration of six hour respiration experiments. Critical oxygen partial pressures were estimated for each species, and, for E. eximia, measured via oxygen consumption (2.1 kPa, 10 °C, n = 2) and lactate accumulation (1.1 kPa, 10 °C). A primary mechanism facilitating low oxygen tolerance is an ability to dramatically reduce energy expenditure during daytime forays into low oxygen waters. The ETP and Red Sea species reduced aerobic metabolism by more than 50% during exposure to hypoxia. Anaerobic glycolytic energy production, as indicated by whole-animal lactate accumulation, contributed only modestly to the energy deficit. Thus, the total metabolic rate was suppressed by ∼49-64%. Metabolic suppression during diel migrations to depth reduces the metabolic contribution of these species to vertical carbon and nitrogen flux (i.e., the biological pump) by an equivalent amount. Growing evidence suggests that metabolic suppression is a widespread strategy among migrating

  16. Optical measurement of cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism in neonates with congenital heart defects

    PubMed Central

    Durduran, Turgut; Zhou, Chao; Buckley, Erin M.; Kim, Meeri N.; Yu, Guoqiang; Choe, Regine; Gaynor, J. William; Spray, Thomas L.; Durning, Suzanne M.; Mason, Stefanie E.; Montenegro, Lisa M.; Nicolson, Susan C.; Zimmerman, Robert A.; Putt, Mary E.; Wang, Jiongjiong; Greenberg, Joel H.; Detre, John A.; Yodh, Arjun G.; Licht, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    We employ a hybrid diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) monitor for neonates with congenital heart disease (n=33). The NIRS-DCS device measured changes during hypercapnia of oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and total hemoglobin concentrations; cerebral blood flow (rCBFDCS); and oxygen metabolism (rCMRO2). Concurrent measurements with arterial spin-labeled magnetic resonance imaging (rCBFASL-MRI, n=12) cross-validate rCBFDCS against rCBFASL-MRI, showing good agreement (R=0.7, p=0.01). The study demonstrates use of NIRS-DCS on a critically ill neonatal population, and the results indicate that the optical technology is a promising clinical method for monitoring this population. PMID:20615033

  17. Optical measurement of cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism in neonates with congenital heart defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durduran, Turgut; Zhou, Chao; Buckley, Erin M.; Kim, Meeri N.; Yu, Guoqiang; Choe, Regine; Gaynor, J. William; Spray, Thomas L.; Durning, Suzanne M.; Mason, Stefanie E.; Montenegro, Lisa M.; Nicolson, Susan C.; Zimmerman, Robert A.; Putt, Mary E.; Wang, Jiongjiong; Greenberg, Joel H.; Detre, John A.; Yodh, Arjun G.; Licht, Daniel J.

    2010-05-01

    We employ a hybrid diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) monitor for neonates with congenital heart disease (n=33). The NIRS-DCS device measured changes during hypercapnia of oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and total hemoglobin concentrations; cerebral blood flow (rCBFDCS); and oxygen metabolism (rCMRO2). Concurrent measurements with arterial spin-labeled magnetic resonance imaging (rCBFASL-MRI, n=12) cross-validate rCBFDCS against rCBFASL-MRI, showing good agreement (R=0.7, p=0.01). The study demonstrates use of NIRS-DCS on a critically ill neonatal population, and the results indicate that the optical technology is a promising clinical method for monitoring this population.

  18. Activated oxygen alters cerebral microvascular responses in newborn pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Leffler, C.W.; Busiia, D.W.; Armstead, W.M.; Mirro, R.; Thelin, O. )

    1990-02-26

    In piglets, cerebral ischemia/reperfusion blocks prostanoid dependent cerebral vasodilation to hypercapnia (CO{sub 2}) and hypotension but not prostanoid independent dilation to isoproterenol (Isu) or constriction to norepinephrine (NE). Ischemia/reperfusion increases activated-O{sub 2} production by piglet brains. Using cranial windows in piglets, the authors investigated the hypothesis that activated oxygen can block prostanoid dependent cerebral vasodilator responses to CO{sub 2} and hypotension without altering responses to Isu and NE. Exposure to an activated oxygen generating system of xanthine oxidase, hypoxanthine, and Fe that made about 3 times the activated-O{sub 2} on the brain surface as ischemia/reperfusion caused reversible pial arteriolar dilation. After exposure, pial arteriolar dilation was reduced to CO{sub 2} and hypotension but not to Isu. NE constrictor responses were also unaltered. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or H{sub 2}O{sub 2} + Fe caused constriction followed by reversible dilation. After exposure, pial arteriolar dilation in response to CO{sub 2} and hypotension was not altered. However, addition of xanthine oxidase and hypoxanthine with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and Fe totally eliminated pial arteriolar dilator responses to CO{sub 2} and hypotension but did not decrease dilation caused by Isu or constriction caused by NE. The authors conclude that activated oxygen could produce the altered prostanoid dependent pial arteriolar responses observed following ischemia in piglets.

  19. Mitochondria are required for antigen-specific T cell activation through reactive oxygen species signaling.

    PubMed

    Sena, Laura A; Li, Sha; Jairaman, Amit; Prakriya, Murali; Ezponda, Teresa; Hildeman, David A; Wang, Chyung-Ru; Schumacker, Paul T; Licht, Jonathan D; Perlman, Harris; Bryce, Paul J; Chandel, Navdeep S

    2013-02-21

    It is widely appreciated that T cells increase glycolytic flux during activation, but the role of mitochondrial flux is unclear. Here, we have shown that mitochondrial metabolism in the absence of glucose metabolism is sufficient to support interleukin-2 (IL-2) induction. Furthermore, we used mice with reduced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) production in T cells (T-Uqcrfs(-/-) mice) to show that mitochondria are required for T cell activation to produce mROS for activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and subsequent IL-2 induction. These mice could not induce antigen-specific expansion of T cells in vivo, but Uqcrfs1(-/-) T cells retained the ability to proliferate in vivo under lymphopenic conditions. This suggests that Uqcrfs1(-/-) T cells were not lacking bioenergetically but rather lacked specific ROS-dependent signaling events needed for antigen-specific expansion. Thus, mitochondrial metabolism is a critical component of T cell activation through the production of complex III ROS.

  20. Metabolic profiling and flux analysis of MEL-2 human embryonic stem cells during exponential growth at physiological and atmospheric oxygen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Turner, Jennifer; Quek, Lake-Ee; Titmarsh, Drew; Krömer, Jens O; Kao, Li-Pin; Nielsen, Lars; Wolvetang, Ernst; Cooper-White, Justin

    2014-01-01

    As human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) steadily progress towards regenerative medicine applications there is an increasing emphasis on the development of bioreactor platforms that enable expansion of these cells to clinically relevant numbers. Surprisingly little is known about the metabolic requirements of hESCs, precluding the rational design and optimisation of such platforms. In this study, we undertook an in-depth characterisation of MEL-2 hESC metabolic behaviour during the exponential growth phase, combining metabolic profiling and flux analysis tools at physiological (hypoxic) and atmospheric (normoxic) oxygen concentrations. To overcome variability in growth profiles and the problem of closing mass balances in a complex environment, we developed protocols to accurately measure uptake and production rates of metabolites, cell density, growth rate and biomass composition, and designed a metabolic flux analysis model for estimating internal rates. hESCs are commonly considered to be highly glycolytic with inactive or immature mitochondria, however, whilst the results of this study confirmed that glycolysis is indeed highly active, we show that at least in MEL-2 hESC, it is supported by the use of oxidative phosphorylation within the mitochondria utilising carbon sources, such as glutamine to maximise ATP production. Under both conditions, glycolysis was disconnected from the mitochondria with all of the glucose being converted to lactate. No difference in the growth rates of cells cultured under physiological or atmospheric oxygen concentrations was observed nor did this cause differences in fluxes through the majority of the internal metabolic pathways associated with biogenesis. These results suggest that hESCs display the conventional Warburg effect, with high aerobic activity despite high lactate production, challenging the idea of an anaerobic metabolism with low mitochondrial activity. The results of this study provide new insight that can be used in

  1. Metaproteomics reveals differential modes of metabolic coupling among ubiquitous oxygen minimum zone microbes

    PubMed Central

    Hawley, Alyse K.; Brewer, Heather M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Hallam, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) are intrinsic water column features arising from respiratory oxygen demand during organic matter degradation in stratified waters. Currently OMZs are expanding due to global climate change with resulting feedback on marine ecosystem function. Here we use metaproteomics to chart spatial and temporal patterns of gene expression along defined redox gradients in a seasonally stratified fjord to better understand microbial community responses to OMZ expansion. The expression of metabolic pathway components for nitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), denitrification, and inorganic carbon fixation were differentially expressed across the redoxcline and covaried with distribution patterns of ubiquitous OMZ microbes including Thaumarchaeota, Nitrospina, Nitrospira, Planctomycetes, and SUP05/ARCTIC96BD-19 Gammaproteobacteria. Nitrification and inorganic carbon fixation pathways affiliated with Thaumarchaeota dominated dysoxic waters, and denitrification, sulfur oxidation, and inorganic carbon fixation pathways affiliated with the SUP05 group of nitrate-reducing sulfur oxidizers dominated suboxic and anoxic waters. Nitrifier nitrite oxidation and anammox pathways affiliated with Nirospina, Nitrospira, and Planctomycetes, respectively, also exhibited redox partitioning between dysoxic and suboxic waters. The numerical abundance of SUP05 proteins mediating inorganic carbon fixation under anoxic conditions suggests that SUP05 will become increasingly important in global ocean carbon and nutrient cycling as OMZs expand. PMID:25053816

  2. Effect of ginkgolide B on brain metabolism and tissue oxygenation in severe haemorrhagic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Chun-Ling; Shen, Dong-Fang; Wang, Peng-Jun; Li, Hu-Lun; Zhang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Ginkgolide B, a diterpene, is an herbal constituent isolated from the leaves of Ginkgo biloba tree. The present study demonstrates the effect of ginkgolide B in osmotherapy on brain metabolism and tissue oxygenation. Multimodality monitoring including intracranial pressure (ICP), cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), partial pressure of brain tissue oxygen (PbtO2), lactate/pyruvate ratio (LPR) and microdialysis were employed to study the effect of ginkgolide B osmotherapy. The results demonstrated that administration of 15% solution of ginkgolide B to the comatose patients with raised ICP (> 20 mm Hg) and resistant to standard therapy led to a significant decrease in ICP. The cerebral microdialysis was used to compare mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), ICP, CPP, PbtO2, brain lactate, pyruvate and glucose level after hourly intervals starting 3 h before and up to 4 h after hyperosmolar therapy. There was a decrease in ICP in 45 min from 23 ± 14 mm Hg (P < 0.001) to 18 ± 24 mm Hg and increase in CPP after 1 h of gingkolide B infusion from 74 ± 18 to 85 ± 22 mm Hg (P < 0.002). However there was no significant effect on MAP but PbtO2 was maintained in the range of 22-26. The peak lactate/pyruvate ratio was recorded at the time of initiation of osmotherapy (44 ± 20) with an 18% decrease over 2 h following gingkolide B therapy. Also the brain glucose remained unaffected. PMID:26064244

  3. Oxygen exchange and energy metabolism in erythrocytes of Rett syndrome and their relationships with respiratory alterations.

    PubMed

    Ciaccio, Chiara; Di Pierro, Donato; Sbardella, Diego; Tundo, Grazia Raffaella; Curatolo, Paolo; Galasso, Cinzia; Santarone, Marta Elena; Casasco, Maurizio; Cozza, Paola; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Rossi, Marcello; De Felice, Claudio; Hayek, Joussef; Coletta, Massimo; Marini, Stefano

    2017-02-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder, mainly affecting females, which is associated to a mutation on the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 gene. In the pathogenesis and progression of classic RTT, red blood cell (RBC) morphology has been shown to be an important biosensor for redox imbalance and chronic hypoxemia. Here we have evaluated the impact of oxidation and redox imbalance on several functional properties of RTT erythrocytes. In particular, we report for the first time a stopped-flow measurement of the kinetics of oxygen release by RBCs and the analysis of the intrinsic affinity of the hemoglobin (Hb). According to our experimental approach, RBCs from RTT patients do not show any intrinsic difference with respect to those from healthy controls neither in Hb's oxygen-binding affinity nor in O2 exchange processes at 37 °C. Therefore, these factors do not contribute to the observed alteration of the respiratory function in RTT patients. Moreover, the energy metabolism of RBCs, from both RTT patients and controls, was evaluated by ion-pairing HPLC method and related to the level of malondialdehyde and to the oxidative radical scavenging capacity of red cells. Results have clearly confirmed significant alterations in antioxidant defense capability, adding important informations concerning the high-energy compound levels in RBCs of RTT subjects, underlying possible correlations with inflammatory tissue alterations.

  4. Increased oxygen radical-dependent inactivation of metabolic enzymes by liver microsomes after chronic ethanol consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Dicker, E.; Cederbaum, A.I. )

    1988-10-01

    Enzymatic and nonenzymatic mixed-function oxidase systems have been shown to generate an oxidant that catalyzes the inactivation of glutamine synthetase and other metabolic enzymes. Recent studies have shown that microsomes isolated from rats chronically fed ethanol generate reactive oxygen intermediates at elevated rates compared with controls. Microsomes from rats fed ethanol were found to be more effective than control microsomes in catalyzing the inactivation of enzymes added to the incubation system. The enzymes studied were alcohol dehydrogenase, lactic dehydrogenase, and pyruvate kinase. The inactivation process by both types of microsomal preparations was sensitive to catalase and glutathione plus glutathione peroxidase, but was not affected by superoxide dismutase or hydroxyl radical scavengers. Iron was required for the inactivation of added enzymes; microsomes from the rats fed ethanol remained more effective than control microsomes in catalyzing the inactivation of enzymes in the absence or presence of several ferric complexes. The inactivation of enzymes was enhanced by the addition of menadione or paraquat to the microsomes, and rates of inactivation were higher with the microsomes from the ethanol-fed rats. The enhanced generation of reactive oxygen intermediates and increased inactivation of enzymes by microsomes may contribute toward the hepatotoxic effects associated with ethanol consumption.

  5. Activation mechanism of Gi and Go by reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Motohiro; Schey, Kevin L; Takagahara, Shuichi; Kontani, Kenji; Katada, Toshiaki; Urano, Yasuteru; Nagano, Tetsuo; Nagao, Taku; Kurose, Hitoshi

    2002-03-15

    Reactive oxygen species are proposed to work as intracellular mediators. One of their target proteins is the alpha subunit of heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (Galpha(i) and Galpha(o)), leading to activation. H(2)O(2) is one of the reactive oxygen species and activates purified Galpha(i2). However, the activation requires the presence of Fe(2+), suggesting that H(2)O(2) is converted to more reactive species such as c*OH. The analysis with mass spectrometry shows that seven cysteine residues (Cys(66), Cys(112), Cys(140), Cys(255), Cys(287), Cys(326), and Cys(352)) of Galpha(i2) are modified by the treatment with *OH. Among these cysteine residues, Cys(66), Cys(112), Cys(140), Cys(255), and Cys(352) are not involved in *OH-induced activation of Galpha(i2). Although the modification of Cys(287) but not Cys(326) is required for subunit dissociation, the modification of both Cys(287) and Cys(326) is necessary for the activation of Galpha(i2) as determined by pertussis toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation, conformation-dependent change of trypsin digestion pattern or guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate binding. Wild type Galpha(i2) but not Cys(287)- or Cys(326)-substituted mutants are activated by UV light, singlet oxygen, superoxide anion, and nitric oxide, indicating that these oxidative stresses activate Galpha(i2) by the mechanism similar to *OH-induced activation. Because Cys(287) exists only in G(i) family, this study explains the selective activation of G(i)/G(o) by oxidative stresses.

  6. The oxygen-independent metabolism of cyclic monoterpenes in Castellaniella defragrans 65Phen

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    for the monoterpene metabolism but not for growth on acetate. Conclusions The genome of Castellaniella defragrans 65Phen is related to other genomes of Alcaligenaceae, but contains a genomic island with genes of the monoterpene metabolism. Castellaniella defragrans 65Phen degrades limonene via a limonene dehydrogenase and the oxidation of perillyl alcohol. The initial oxidation at the primary methyl group is independent of molecular oxygen. PMID:24952578

  7. Correlation between cerebral oxygen metabolism and cerebral blood flow simultaneously measured before and after acetazolamide administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroichiro; Yamauchi, Hideto; Hazama, Shiro; Hamamoto, Hirotsugu; Inoue, Nobuhiro

    1999-10-01

    The cerebral circulation and metabolism of ten preoperative cardiac surgery patients were assessed. Alterations in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), measured by 123I-N- isopropyl-p-iodo-amphetamine single-photon emission computed tomography, and in cerebral oxygen metabolism, simultaneously detected by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) before and after acetazolamide administration, were investigated. The rCBF (ml/min/100 g) increased significantly from 40.21 +/- 7.65 to 56.24 +/- 13.69 (p equals 0.001), and a significant increase in oxyhemoglobin (Oxy-Hb) of 13.9% (p equals 0.0022) and total hemoglobin (Total-Hb) of 5.7% (0.0047) along with a significant decrease in deoxyhemoglobin (Deoxy-Hb) of 8.9% (p equals 0.0414) were observed concomitantly. Thus, the Oxy-Hb/Total- Hb ratio (%Oxy-Hb) rose significantly from 67.26 +/- 9.82% to 72.98 +/- 8.09% (p equals 0.0022). Examination of the relationships between individual parameters showed that the percentage changes in rCBF and Oxy-Hb were significantly correlated (r equals 0.758, p equals 0.011). The percentage changes in rCBF and %Oxy-Hb were also correlated significantly (r equals 0.740, p equals 0.014). In conclusion, this evidence suggested that NIRS is able to detect relative changes in cerebral hemodynamics and reflect luxury perfusion induced by acetazolamide.

  8. Early postoperative changes in cerebral oxygen metabolism following neonatal cardiac surgery: Effects of surgical duration

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Erin M.; Lynch, Jennifer M.; Goff, Donna A.; Schwab, Peter J.; Baker, Wesley B.; Durduran, Turgut; Busch, David R.; Nicolson, Susan C.; Montenegro, Lisa M.; Naim, Maryam Y.; Xiao, Rui; Spray, Thomas L.; Yodh, A. G.; Gaynor, J. William; Licht, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The early postoperative period following neonatal cardiac surgery is a time of increased risk for brain injury, yet the mechanisms underlying this risk are unknown. To understand these risks more completely, we quantified changes in postoperative cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), and cerebral blood flow (CBF) compared with preoperative levels by using noninvasive optical modalities. Methods Diffuse optical spectroscopy and diffuse correlation spectroscopy were used concurrently to derive cerebral blood flow and oxygen utilization postoperatively for 12 hours. Relative changes in CMRO2, OEF, and CBF were quantified with reference to preoperative data. A mixed-effect model was used to investigate the influence of total support time and deep hypothermic circulatory arrest duration on relative changes in CMRO2, OEF, and CBF. Results Relative changes in CMRO2, OEF, and CBF were assessed in 36 patients, 21 with single-ventricle defects and 15 with 2-ventricle defects. Among patients with single-ventricle lesions, deep hypothermic circulatory arrest duration did not affect relative changes in CMRO2, CBF, or OEF (P > .05). Among 2-ventricle patients, total support time was not a significant predictor of relative changes in CMRO2 or CBF (P > .05), although longer total support time was associated significantly with greater increases in relative change of postoperative OEF (P = .008). Conclusions Noninvasive diffuse optical techniques were used to quantify postoperative relative changes in CMRO2, CBF, and OEF for the first time in this observational pilot study. Pilot data suggest that surgical duration does not account for observed variability in the relative change in CMRO2, and that more comprehensive clinical studies using the new technology are feasible and warranted to elucidate these issues further. PMID:23111021

  9. Oxygen uptake and blood metabolic responses to a 400-m run.

    PubMed

    Hanon, Christine; Lepretre, Pierre-Marie; Bishop, David; Thomas, Claire

    2010-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the oxygen uptake and metabolic responses during a 400-m run reproducing the pacing strategy used in competition. A portable gas analyser was used to measure the oxygen uptake (VO2) of ten specifically trained runners racing on an outdoor track. The tests included (1) an incremental test to determine maximal VO2 (VO2max) and the velocity associated with VO2(max) (v - VO2max), (2) a maximal 400-m (400T) and 3) a 300-m running test (300T) reproducing the exact pacing pattern of the 400T. Blood lactate, bicarbonate concentrations [HCO3(-)], pH and arterial oxygen saturation were analysed at rest and 1, 4, 7, 10 min after the end of the 400 and 300T. The peak VO2 recorded during the 400T corresponded to 93.9 +/- 3.9% of VO2max and was reached at 24.4 +/- 3.2 s (192 +/- 22 m). A significant decrease in VO2 (P < 0.05) was observed in all subjects during the last 100 m, although the velocity did not decrease below v - VO2max. The VO2 in the last 5 s was correlated with the pH (r = 0.86, P < 0.0005) and [HCO3(-)] (r = 0.70, P < 0.05) measured at the end of 300T. Additionally, the velocity decrease observed in the last 100 m was inversely correlated with [HCO3(-)] and pH at 300T (r = -0.83, P < 0.001, r = -0.69, P < 0.05, respectively). These track running data demonstrate that acidosis at 300 m was related to both the VO2 response and the velocity decrease during the final 100 m of a 400-m run.

  10. Brain Tissue Oxygenation and Cerebral Metabolic Patterns in Focal and Diffuse Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Purins, Karlis; Lewén, Anders; Hillered, Lars; Howells, Tim; Enblad, Per

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Neurointensive care of traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients is currently based on intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) targeted protocols. There are reasons to believe that knowledge of brain tissue oxygenation (BtipO2) would add information with the potential of improving patient outcome. The aim of this study was to examine BtipO2 and cerebral metabolism using the Neurovent-PTO probe and cerebral microdialysis (MD) in TBI patients. Methods: Twenty-three severe TBI patients with monitoring of physiological parameters, ICP, CPP, BtipO2, and MD for biomarkers of energy metabolism (glucose, lactate, and pyruvate) and cellular distress (glutamate, glycerol) were included. Patients were grouped according to injury type (focal/diffuse) and placement of the Neurovent-PTO probe and MD catheter (injured/non-injured hemisphere). Results: We observed different patterns in BtipO2 and MD biomarkers in diffuse and focal injury where placement of the probe also influenced the results (ipsilateral/contralateral). In all groups, despite fairly normal levels of ICP and CPP, increased MD levels of glutamate, glycerol, or the L/P ratio were observed at BtipO2 <5 mmHg, indicating increased vulnerability of the brain at this level. Conclusion: Monitoring of BtipO2 adds important information in addition to traditional ICP and CPP surveillance. Because of the different metabolic responses to very low BtipO2 in the individual patient groups we submit that brain tissue oximetry is a complementary tool rather than an alternative to MD monitoring. PMID:24817863

  11. The Impact of Venoarterial and Venovenous Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation on Cerebral Metabolism in the Newborn Brain

    PubMed Central

    Reitman, Aaron J.; Chapman, Rachel; Stein, James E.; Paquette, Lisa; Panigrahy, Ashok; Nelson, Marvin D.; Friedlich, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is an effective therapy for supporting infants with reversible cardiopulmonary failure. Still, survivors are at risk for long-term neurodevelopmental impairments, the cause of which is not fully understood. Objective To elucidate the effects of ECMO on the newborn brain. We hypothesized that the cerebral metabolic profile of neonates who received ECMO would differ from neonates who did not receive ECMO. To address this, we used magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) to investigate the effects of venoarterial and venovenous ECMO on cerebral metabolism. Methods 41 neonates treated with ECMO were contrasted to 38 age-matched neonates. Results All 1H-MRS data were acquired from standardized grey matter and white matter regions of interest using a short-echo (TE = 35 milliseconds), point-resolved spectroscopy sequence (PRESS) and quantitated using LCModel. Metabolite concentrations (mmol/kg) were compared across groups using multivariate analysis of covariance. Elevated creatine (p = 0.002) and choline (p = 0.005) concentrations were observed in the grey matter among neonates treated with ECMO relative to the reference group. Likewise, choline concentrations were elevated in the white matter (p = 0.003) while glutamate was reduced (p = 0.03). Contrasts between ECMO groups revealed lower osmolite concentrations (e.g. myoinositol) among the venovenous ECMO group. Conclusion Neonates who underwent ECMO were found to have an abnormal cerebral metabolic profile, with the pattern of abnormalities suggestive of an underlying inflammatory process. Additionally, neonates who underwent venovenous ECMO had low cerebral osmolite concentrations as seen in vasogenic edema. PMID:28033354

  12. Removal of Biologically Active Organic Contaminants using Atomic Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor); Banks, Michael A. (Inventor); Banks, Eric B. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Biomedical devices that are to come into contact with living tissue, such as prosthetic and other implants for the human body and the containers used to store and transport them, are together cleaned of non-living, but biologically active organic materials, including endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharides, and assembled into a hermetically sealed package without recontamination. This is achieved by cleaning both the device and package components together in an apparatus, which includes a hermetically sealed chamber, in which they are contacted with atomic oxygen which biocleans them, by oxidizing the biologically active organic materials. The apparatus also includes means for manipulating the device and container and hermetically sealing the cleaned device into the cleaned container to form the package. A calibrated witness coupon visually indicates whether or not the device and container have received enough exposure to the atomic oxygen to have removed the organic materials from their surfaces. Gamma radiation is then used to sterilize the device in the sealed container.

  13. Neural activity triggers neuronal oxidative metabolism followed by astrocytic glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Kasischke, Karl A; Vishwasrao, Harshad D; Fisher, Patricia J; Zipfel, Warren R; Webb, Watt W

    2004-07-02

    We have found that two-photon fluorescence imaging of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) provides the sensitivity and spatial three-dimensional resolution to resolve metabolic signatures in processes of astrocytes and neurons deep in highly scattering brain tissue slices. This functional imaging reveals spatiotemporal partitioning of glycolytic and oxidative metabolism between astrocytes and neurons during focal neural activity that establishes a unifying hypothesis for neurometabolic coupling in which early oxidative metabolism in neurons is eventually sustained by late activation of the astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle. Our model integrates existing views of brain energy metabolism and is in accord with known macroscopic physiological changes in vivo.

  14. A novel Bayesian approach to accounting for uncertainty in fMRI-derived estimates of cerebral oxygen metabolism fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Aaron B.; Dubowitz, David J.; Blockley, Nicholas P.; Buxton, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Calibrated blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) imaging is a multimodal functional MRI technique designed to estimate changes in cerebral oxygen metabolism from measured changes in cerebral blood flow and the BOLD signal. This technique addresses fundamental ambiguities associated with quantitative BOLD signal analysis; however, its dependence on biophysical modeling creates uncertainty in the resulting oxygen metabolism estimates. In this work, we developed a Bayesian approach to estimating the oxygen metabolism response to a neural stimulus and used it to examine the uncertainty that arises in calibrated BOLD estimation due to the presence of unmeasured model parameters. We applied our approach to estimate the CMRO2 response to a visual task using the traditional hypercapnia calibration experiment as well as to estimate the metabolic response to both a visual task and hypercapnia using the measurement of baseline apparent R2′ as a calibration technique. Further, in order to examine the effects of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) signal contamination on the measurement of apparent R2′, we examined the effects of measuring this parameter with and without CSF-nulling. We found that the two calibration techniques provided consistent estimates of the metabolic response on average, with a median R2′-based estimate of the metabolic response to CO2 of 1.4%, and R2′- and hypercapnia-calibrated estimates of the visual response of 27% and 24%, respectively. However, these estimates were sensitive to different sources of estimation uncertainty. The R2′-calibrated estimate was highly sensitive to CSF contamination and to uncertainty in unmeasured model parameters describing flow-volume coupling, capillary bed characteristics, and the iso-susceptibility saturation of blood. The hypercapnia-calibrated estimate was relatively insensitive to these parameters but highly sensitive to the assumed metabolic response to CO2. PMID:26790354

  15. A novel Bayesian approach to accounting for uncertainty in fMRI-derived estimates of cerebral oxygen metabolism fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Simon, Aaron B; Dubowitz, David J; Blockley, Nicholas P; Buxton, Richard B

    2016-04-01

    Calibrated blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) imaging is a multimodal functional MRI technique designed to estimate changes in cerebral oxygen metabolism from measured changes in cerebral blood flow and the BOLD signal. This technique addresses fundamental ambiguities associated with quantitative BOLD signal analysis; however, its dependence on biophysical modeling creates uncertainty in the resulting oxygen metabolism estimates. In this work, we developed a Bayesian approach to estimating the oxygen metabolism response to a neural stimulus and used it to examine the uncertainty that arises in calibrated BOLD estimation due to the presence of unmeasured model parameters. We applied our approach to estimate the CMRO2 response to a visual task using the traditional hypercapnia calibration experiment as well as to estimate the metabolic response to both a visual task and hypercapnia using the measurement of baseline apparent R2' as a calibration technique. Further, in order to examine the effects of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) signal contamination on the measurement of apparent R2', we examined the effects of measuring this parameter with and without CSF-nulling. We found that the two calibration techniques provided consistent estimates of the metabolic response on average, with a median R2'-based estimate of the metabolic response to CO2 of 1.4%, and R2'- and hypercapnia-calibrated estimates of the visual response of 27% and 24%, respectively. However, these estimates were sensitive to different sources of estimation uncertainty. The R2'-calibrated estimate was highly sensitive to CSF contamination and to uncertainty in unmeasured model parameters describing flow-volume coupling, capillary bed characteristics, and the iso-susceptibility saturation of blood. The hypercapnia-calibrated estimate was relatively insensitive to these parameters but highly sensitive to the assumed metabolic response to CO2.

  16. Effects of Body Mass Index on Task-Related Oxygen Uptake and Dyspnea during Activities of Daily Life in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Vaes, Anouk W.; Franssen, Frits M. E.; Meijer, Kenneth; Cuijpers, Martijn W. J.; Wouters, Emiel F. M.; Rutten, Erica P. A.; Spruit, Martijn A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with COPD use a higher proportion of their peak aerobic capacity during the performance of domestic activities of daily life (ADLs) compared to healthy peers, accompanied by a higher degree of task-related symptoms. To date, the influence of body mass index (BMI) on the task-related metabolic demands remains unknown in patients with COPD. Therefore, the aim of our study was to determine the effects of BMI on metabolic load during the performance of 5 consecutive domestic ADLs in patients with COPD. Methodology Ninety-four COPD patients and 20 healhty peers performed 5 consecutive, self-paced domestic ADLs putting on socks, shoes and vest; folding 8 towels; putting away groceries; washing up 4 dishes, cups and saucers; and sweeping the floor for 4 min. Task-related oxygen uptake and ventilation were assessed using a mobile oxycon, while Borg scores were used to assess task-related dyspnea and fatigue. Principal Findings 1. Relative task-related oxygen uptake after the performance of domestic ADLs was increased in patients with COPD compared to healthy elderly, whereas absolute oxygen uptake is similar between groups; 2. Relative oxygen uptake and oxygen uptake per kilogram fat-free mass were comparable between BMI groups; and 3. Borg symptom scores for dyspnea en fatigue were comparable between BMI groups. Conclusion Patients with COPD in different BMI groups perform self-paced domestic ADLs at the same relative metabolic load, accompanied by comparable Borg symptom scores for dyspnea and fatigue. PMID:22815922

  17. Evidence for metabolic activity of airborne bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatigny, M. A.; Wolochow, H.

    1974-01-01

    Aerosols of the bacterium Serratia marcescens, and of uniformly labeled C-14 glucose were produced simultaneously and mixed in tubing leading to an aerosol chamber. During a subsequent period of about 5 hrs, carbon dioxide was produced metabolically within the chamber, and labeled material incorporated within the suspended particles first increased then decreased. This constitutes the first direct evidence of microbial metabolism of bacteria suspended in the air.

  18. Improving estimates of ecosystem metabolism by reducing effects of tidal advection on dissolved oxygen time series-Abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    Continuous time series of dissolved oxygen (DO) have been used to compute estimates of metabolism in aquatic ecosystems. Central to this open water or "Odum" method is the assumption that the DO time is not strongly affected by advection and that effects due to advection or mixin...

  19. Metabolically-Derived Human Ventilation Rates: A Revised Approach Based Upon Oxygen Consumption Rates (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has released a draft report entitled, Metabolically-Derived Human Ventilation Rates: A Revised Approach Based Upon Oxygen Consumption Rates, for independent external peer review and public comment. NCEA published the Exposure Factors Handbook in 1997. This comprehens...

  20. Plankton community respiration, net ecosystem metabolism, and oxygen dynamics on the Louisiana continental shelf: implications for hypoxia

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted a multi-year study of the Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) to better understand the linkages between water column metabolism and the formation of hypoxia (dissolved oxygen <2 mg L-1) in the region. Water column community respiration rates (WR) were measured on 10 cr...

  1. Bioirrigation impacts on sediment respiration and microbial metabolic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, V. A.; Lewandowski, J.; Romeijn, P.; Krause, S.

    2015-12-01

    Some bioturbators build tubes in the sediment and pump water through their burrows (ventilation). Oxygen is transferred through the burrow walls in the adjacent sediment (bioirrigation). Bioirrigation is playing a pivotal role in the mediation of biogeochemical processes in lake sediments and has the potential to enhance nutrient cycling. The present study investigates the impact of bioirrigation on lake sediment metabolism, respiration rates and in particular, the biogeochemical impacts of bioirrigation intensity as a function of organism density. We therefore apply the bioreactive Resazurin/Resorufin smart tracer system for quantifying the impact of different densities of Chironomidae (Diptera) larvae (0-2112 larvae/m2) on lake sediment respiration in a microcosm experiment. Tracer decay has been found to be proportional to the amount of the aerobic respiration at the sediment-water interface. Tracer transformation was in good agreement with Chironomidae density (correlation, r=0.9). Tracer transformation rates (and sediment respiration) were found to be correlated to Chironomidae density, with highest transformation rates observed in the microcosms with highest density of 2112 larvae/m2. This relationship was not linear though, with sediment respiration rates at the highest larvae densities declining from the linear trend predicted from lower and intermediate larvae density-respiration relationships. We interpret this effect as a density dependent suppression of the Chironomid's metabolic activity. The observations of this study have implications for eutrophied lakes with high densities of bioirrigators. Despite high density of bioirrigirrigating benthos, mineralization of the organic matter in such habitats would likely be lower than in lakes with intermediate densities of the bioturbators.

  2. Quiescence in Artemia franciscana embryos: reversible arrest of metabolism and gene expression at low oxygen levels.

    PubMed

    Hand, S C

    1998-04-01

    Depression of the production and consumption of cellular energy appears to be a prerequisite for the survival of prolonged bouts of anoxia. A correlation exists between the degree of metabolic depression under anoxia and the duration of anoxia tolerance. In the case of brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) embryos, oxygen deprivation induces a reversible quiescent state that can be tolerated for several years with substantial survivorship. A global arrest of cytoplasmic translation accompanies the transition into anoxia, and rates of protein synthesis in mitochondria from these embryos appears to be markedly reduced in response to anoxia. Previous evidence suggests that the acute acidification of intracellular pH (pHi) by over 1.0 unit during the transition into anoxia contributes to the depression of biosynthesis, but message limitation does not appear to play a role in the down-regulation in either cellular compartment. The ontogenetic increase in mRNA levels for a mitochondrial-encoded subunit of cytochrome c oxidase (COX I) and for nuclear-encoded actin is blocked by anoxia and aerobic acidosis (artificial quiescence imposed by intracellular acidification under aerobic conditions). Further, the levels of COX I and actin mRNA do not decline appreciably during 6 h bouts of quiescence, even though protein synthesis is acutely arrested across this same period. Thus, the constancy of mRNA levels during quiescence indicates that reduced protein synthesis is not caused by message limitation but, instead, is probably controlled at the translational level. This apparent stabilization of mRNA under anoxia is mirrored in an extension of protein half-life. The ubiquitin-dependent pathway for protein degradation is depressed under anoxia and aerobic acidosis, as judged by the acute drop in levels of ubiquitin-conjugated proteins. Mitochondrial protein synthesis is responsive to both acidification of pHi and removal of oxygen per se. Matrix pH declines in parallel with pHi, and

  3. A universal molecular clock of protein folds and its power in tracing the early history of aerobic metabolism and planet oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minglei; Jiang, Ying-Ying; Kim, Kyung Mo; Qu, Ge; Ji, Hong-Fang; Mittenthal, Jay E; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    The standard molecular clock describes a constant rate of molecular evolution and provides a powerful framework for evolutionary timescales. Here, we describe the existence and implications of a molecular clock of folds, a universal recurrence in the discovery of new structures in the world of proteins. Using a phylogenomic structural census in hundreds of proteomes, we build phylogenies and time lines of domains at fold and fold superfamily levels of structural complexity. These time lines correlate approximately linearly with geological timescales and were here used to date two crucial events in life history, planet oxygenation and organism diversification. We first dissected the structures and functions of enzymes in simulated metabolic networks. The placement of anaerobic and aerobic enzymes in the time line revealed that aerobic metabolism emerged about 2.9 billion years (giga-annum; Ga) ago and expanded during a period of about 400 My, reaching what is known as the Great Oxidation Event. During this period, enzymes recruited old and new folds for oxygen-mediated enzymatic activities. Remarkably, the first fold lost by a superkingdom disappeared in Archaea 2.6 Ga ago, within the span of oxygen rise, suggesting that oxygen also triggered diversification of life. The implications of a molecular clock of folds are many and important for the neutral theory of molecular evolution and for understanding the growth and diversity of the protein world. The clock also extends the standard concept that was specific to molecules and their timescales and turns it into a universal timescale-generating tool.

  4. Metabolic physiology of the Humboldt squid, Dosidicus gigas: Implications for vertical migration in a pronounced oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Rui; Seibel, Brad A.

    2010-07-01

    The Humboldt (or jumbo) squid, Dosidicus gigas, is an active predator endemic to the Eastern Pacific that undergoes diel vertical migrations into a pronounced oxygen minimum layer (OML). Here, we investigate the physiological mechanisms that facilitate these migrations and assess the associated costs and benefits. Exposure to hypoxic conditions equivalent to those found in the OML (∼10 μM O 2 at 10 °C) led to a significant reduction in the squid’s routine metabolic rate (RMR), from 8.9 to 1.6 μmol O 2 g -1 h -1 ( p < 0.05), and a concomitant increase in mantle muscle octopine levels (from 0.50 to 5.24 μmol g -1 tissue, p < 0.05). Enhanced glycolitic ATP production accounted for only 7.0% and 2.8% at 10 °C and 20 °C, respectively, of the energy deficit that resulted from the decline in aerobic respiration. The observed metabolic suppression presumably extends survival time in the OML by conserving the finite stores of fermentable substrate and avoiding the accumulation of the deleterious anaerobic end products in the tissues. RMR increased significantly with temperature ( p < 0.05), from 8.9 (at 10 °C) to 49.85 μmol O 2 g -1 h -1 (at 25 °C) which yielded a Q10 of 2.0 between 10 and 20 °C and 7.9 between 20 and 25 °C ( p < 0.05). These results suggest that 25 °C, although within the normal surface temperature range in the Gulf of California, is outside this species’ normal temperature range. By following the scattering layer into oxygen-enriched shallow water at night, D. gigas may repay any oxygen debt accumulated during the daytime. The dive to deeper water may minimize exposure to stressful surface temperatures when most prey have migrated to depth during the daytime. The physiological and ecological strategies demonstrated here may have facilitated the recent range expansion of this species into northern waters where expanding hypoxic zones prohibit competing top predators.

  5. The effects of dissolved oxygen levels on the metabolic interaction between digestion and locomotion in Cyprinid fishes with different locomotive and digestive performances.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Cao, Zhen-Dong; Fu, Shi-Jian

    2012-07-01

    To test whether the effects of water oxygen concentration ([O(2)]) on the metabolic interaction between locomotion and digestion differ between fish species with different locomotive and digestive behaviours in normoxia, we investigated the swimming performance of fasted and fed fish at water [O(2)] of 1, 2 and 8 (normoxia) mg L(-1) (2.5, 5 and 20 kPa) at 25°C in three juvenile Cyprinidae fish species: goldfish (Carassius auratus), common carp (Cyprinus carpio) and qingbo (Spinibarbus sinensis). Digestion, taxon and water [O(2)] all had significant effects on the pre-exercise oxygen consumption rate [Formula: see text] and the swimming performance (P < 0.05). Among the three fishes, qingbo showed the highest swimming performance and the lowest feeding [Formula: see text] at the saturated water [O(2)], and its active oxygen consumption rate [Formula: see text] and critical swimming speed (U (crit)) decreased the most with decreases in water [O(2)]. Qingbo exhibited a locomotion-priority metabolic mode at all three water [O(2)]. Digestion was sacrificed to locomotion in a postprandial swimming situation, but fed qingbo could not maintain their U (crit) at water [O(2)] of 2 and 1 mg L(-1). Goldfish showed the lowest swimming performance and the highest feeding [Formula: see text] at the saturated water [O(2)]. They exhibited a digestion-priority metabolic mode at high water [O(2)]. However, with a decrease in water [O(2)], the feeding [Formula: see text] decreased more acutely than the respiratory capacity; thus, digestion and locomotion performed independently in a postprandial swimming situation (i.e., an additive metabolic mode) at a water [O(2)] of 1 mg L(-1). The common carp showed moderate and balanced swimming performance and feeding [Formula: see text] at the saturated water [O(2)], and exhibited an additive metabolic mode at all 3 water [O(2)], because digestion, swimming and respiratory capacities decreased in parallel with the decrease in water [O(2)].

  6. [Kinetics of oxygen metabolism in pregnant women with high risk of developing late toxemia during intermittent normobaric hypoxia].

    PubMed

    Chizhov, A Ia; Evgen'eva, I A; Karash, Iu M

    1989-05-01

    Oxygen metabolism kinetics (OMK) was investigated in 90 pregnant females with high risk for late gestoses and associated vascular disorders (essential hypertension, stage I, and neurocirculatory asthenia of hyper- and hypotonic type) exposed to preventive treatment with intermitting normobaric hypoxia (INH). The study revealed that initial disorders of tissue respiration were featured with compensatory stimulation of tissue oxygen consumption. In early signs of late gestosis the consumption intensity was found to be diminished. During INH treatment course there was an evidence of normalization in oxygen metabolism. The time-course of OMK values permitted to assess the level of systemic adaptation to hypoxia in pregnancy. INH technique was proved to be an efficient nonpharmacological method of late gestosis prevention.

  7. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Regulates Oxidative Metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans through the NHR-49 and MDT-15 Transcriptional Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Arriola, Elizabeth; EL Hafidi, Mohammed; Ortega-Cuéllar, Daniel; Carvajal, Karla

    2016-01-01

    Cellular energy regulation relies on complex signaling pathways that respond to fuel availability and metabolic demands. Dysregulation of these networks is implicated in the development of human metabolic diseases such as obesity and metabolic syndrome. In Caenorhabditis elegans the AMP-activated protein kinase, AAK, has been associated with longevity and stress resistance; nevertheless its precise role in energy metabolism remains elusive. In the present study, we find an evolutionary conserved role of AAK in oxidative metabolism. Similar to mammals, AAK is activated by AICAR and metformin and leads to increased glycolytic and oxidative metabolic fluxes evidenced by an increase in lactate levels and mitochondrial oxygen consumption and a decrease in total fatty acids and lipid storage, whereas augmented glucose availability has the opposite effects. We found that these changes were largely dependent on the catalytic subunit AAK-2, since the aak-2 null strain lost the observed metabolic actions. Further results demonstrate that the effects due to AAK activation are associated to SBP-1 and NHR-49 transcriptional factors and MDT-15 transcriptional co-activator, suggesting a regulatory pathway that controls oxidative metabolism. Our findings establish C. elegans as a tractable model system to dissect the relationship between distinct molecules that play a critical role in the regulation of energy metabolism in human metabolic diseases. PMID:26824904

  8. Reactive Oxygen Species and the Aging Eye: Specific Role of Metabolically Active Mitochondria in Maintaining Lens Function and in the Initiation of the Oxidation-Induced Maturity Onset Cataract--A Novel Platform of Mitochondria-Targeted Antioxidants With Broad Therapeutic Potential for Redox Regulation and Detoxification of Oxidants in Eye Diseases.

    PubMed

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2016-01-01

    The aging eye appears to be at considerable risk from oxidative stress. A great deal of research indicates that dysfunctional mitochondria are the primary site of reactive oxygen species (ROS). More than 95% of O2 produced during normal metabolism is generated by the electron transport chain in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Mitochondria are also the major target of ROS. Cataract formation, the opacification of the eye lens, is one of the leading causes of human blindness worldwide, accounting for 47.8% of all causes of blindness. Cataracts result from the deposition of aggregated proteins in the eye lens and lens fiber cell plasma membrane damage, which causes clouding of the lens, light scattering, and obstruction of vision. ROS-induced damage in the lens cell may consist of oxidation of proteins, DNA damage, and/or lipid peroxidation, all of which have been implicated in cataractogenesis. This article is an attempt to integrate how mitochondrial ROS are altered in the aging eye along with those protective and repair therapeutic systems believed to regulate ROS levels in ocular tissues and how damage to these systems contributes to age-onset eye disease and cataract formation. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidants might be used to effectively prevent ROS-induced oxidation of lipids and proteins in the inner mitochondrial membrane in vivo. As a result of the combination of weak metal chelating, OH and lipid peroxyl radicals scavenging, reducing activities to liberated fatty acid, and phospholipid hydroperoxides, carnosine and carcinine appear to be physiological antioxidants able to efficiently protect the lipid phase of biologic membranes and aqueous environments and act as the antiapoptotic natural drug compounds The authors developed and patented the new ophthalmic compositions, including N-acetylcarnosine, acting as a prodrug of naturally targeted to mitochondria L-carnosine endowed with pluripotent antioxidant activities combined with mitochondria

  9. Development of a novel electrochemical system for oxygen control (ESOC) to examine dissolved oxygen inhibition on algal activity.

    PubMed

    Keymer, Philip C; Pratt, Steven; Lant, Paul A

    2013-09-01

    The development of an Electrochemical System for Oxygen Control (ESOC) for examining algal photosynthetic activity as a function of dissolved oxygen (DO) is outlined. The main innovation of the tool is coulombic titration in order to balance the electrochemical reduction of oxygen with the oxygen input to achieve a steady DO set-point. ESOC allows quantification of algal oxygen production whilst simultaneously maintaining a desired DO concentration. The tool was validated abiotically by comparison with a mass transfer approach for quantifying oxygenation. It was then applied to quantify oxygen inhibition of algal activity. Five experiments, using an enriched culture of Scenedesmus sp. as the inoculum, are presented. For each experiment, ESOC was used to quantify algal activity at a series of DO set-points. In all experiments substantial oxygen inhibition was observed at DO >30 mgO2 L-1. Inhibition was shown to fit a Hill inhibition model, with a common Hill coefficient of 0.22±0.07 L mg-1 and common log10  CI50 of 27.2±0.7 mg L-1. This is the first time that the oxygen inhibition kinetic parameters have been quantified under controlled DO conditions.

  10. Preliminary Insights Into the Interplay Among Oxygen, Organic Carbon, and Microbial Metabolism in North Atlantic Subseafloor Sediment Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amenabar, M. J.; Dore, J. E.; Spivack, A. J.; Murray, R. W.; D'Hondt, S.; Boyd, E. S.

    2015-12-01

    Deep marine sediments harbor abundant microbial cells that, if active, are likely to exert a strong influence on element biogeochemical cycling. However, our understanding of the fraction of cells that are active in situ and the metabolic processes that sustain them remain underexplored. Here we describe recent results of our studies aimed at unraveling the links between geochemical heterogeneity, cellular viability and synthesis, and metabolism along a vertical depth profile in sediment from four deep sites (>5 km beneath ocean surface) cored by R/V KNORR Expedition KN-223 in the North Atlantic (2014). These sediment columns exhibit varying levels of organic carbon and different vertical extents of oxygen (O2) penetration, which we hypothesize is due to variation in the extent of heterotrophic metabolism. We prepared most probable number (MPN) assays with acetate or peptone as electron donor and carbon source, and five different terminal electron acceptors (O2, NO3, SO4, MnO2, and ferrihydrite) with sediments from 4 to 5 depths in each of the four cores MPNs were similar for acetate- and peptone-amended cultures, regardless of electron acceptor, and generally decreased with depth in the sediment column. MPNs amended with O2 as electron acceptor were greater than MPNs amended with NO3, SO4, MnO2, and ferrihydrite in samples from all depths. Moreover, MPNs were higher for assays amended with O2 from cores where the depth of O2 penetration was shallow when compared to cores where O2 is predicted to penetrate to basement rock. These results are consistent with aerobic heterotrophs limiting the penetration of O2 in deep marine sediments, and thereby provide a mechanism to explain the relationship between low O2 penetrations in sediment cores with elevated organic carbon contents. We will also present results of our ongoing isotopic labeling experiments aimed at determining rates of DNA and protein synthesis as proxies for cell replication and productivity, respectively

  11. Utilization of a BGO detector as an active oxygen target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveman, R.; Gozani, T.; Bendahan, J.; Krivicich, J.; Elias, E.; Altschuler, E.

    1994-12-01

    The (n, n'γx) cross section for the 6.13 MeV state in oxygen has recently become of general interest because of the possibility of using this process to assay oxygen as a part of non-intrusive inspections. Localized densities of carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen are particularly useful in determining the presence of explosives and/or drugs in containers of all sizes, from suitcases to cargo containers. The presence of oxygen in BGO (Bi 4Ge 3O 12) scintillator makes this detector suitable for use as an active target for the measurement of the energy dependence of the excitation, of the first (6.049 MeV O +) and second (6.130 MeV 3 -) excited states in 16O by fast neutron interactions. An active target functions as both a target and an active device such as a detector. The de-excitations of the 6.049 and 6.130 states take place by nuclear pair production and γ-ray emission respectively. There is a large probability of absorbing all of the de-excitation energy in the scintillator in either of these cases. Since the energies deposited in the scintillator by these transitions are very close, the de-excitations are indistinguishable. However, since the cross section for the excitation of the 6.13 MeV state is believed to be larger than that of the 6.049 MeV, the major measured features of the energy variations are those related to the second state. The validity of the technique was initially tested using (MCNP) calculations. The calculations established that the detected neutron count rate in the crystal was proportional to the cross-sections used as input for the calculations, and that the constant of proportionality did not vary with neutron energy. Subsequently, measurements were made with a BGO detector as an active oxygen target. The results clearly show a strong energy dependence including several resonances.

  12. Support nanostructure boosts oxygen transfer to catalytically active platinum nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Vayssilov, Georgi N; Lykhach, Yaroslava; Migani, Annapaola; Staudt, Thorsten; Petrova, Galina P; Tsud, Nataliya; Skála, Tomáš; Bruix, Albert; Illas, Francesc; Prince, Kevin C; Matolín, Vladimír; Neyman, Konstantin M; Libuda, Jörg

    2011-04-01

    Interactions of metal particles with oxide supports can radically enhance the performance of supported catalysts. At the microscopic level, the details of such metal-oxide interactions usually remain obscure. This study identifies two types of oxidative metal-oxide interaction on well-defined models of technologically important Pt-ceria catalysts: (1) electron transfer from the Pt nanoparticle to the support, and (2) oxygen transfer from ceria to Pt. The electron transfer is favourable on ceria supports, irrespective of their morphology. Remarkably, the oxygen transfer is shown to require the presence of nanostructured ceria in close contact with Pt and, thus, is inherently a nanoscale effect. Our findings enable us to detail the formation mechanism of the catalytically indispensable Pt-O species on ceria and to elucidate the extraordinary structure-activity dependence of ceria-based catalysts in general.

  13. Imaging oxygen metabolism with hyperpolarized magnetic resonance: a novel approach for the examination of cardiac and renal function

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Every tissue in the body critically depends on meeting its energetic demands with sufficient oxygen supply. Oxygen supply/demand imbalances underlie the diseases that inflict the greatest socio-economic burden globally. The purpose of this review is to examine how hyperpolarized contrast media, used in combination with MR data acquisition methods, may advance our ability to assess oxygen metabolism non-invasively and thus improve management of clinical disease. We first introduce the concept of hyperpolarization and how hyperpolarized contrast media have been practically implemented to achieve translational and clinical research. We will then analyse how incorporating hyperpolarized contrast media could enable realization of unmet technical needs in clinical practice. We will focus on imaging cardiac and renal oxygen metabolism, as both organs have unique physiological demands to satisfy their requirements for tissue oxygenation, their dysfunction plays a fundamental role in society’s most prevalent diseases, and each organ presents unique imaging challenges. It is our aim that this review attracts a multi-disciplinary audience and sparks collaborations that utilize an exciting, emergent technology to advance our ability to treat patients adversely affected by an oxygen supply/demand mismatch. PMID:27899435

  14. Optically based quantification of absolute cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) with high spatial resolution in rodents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Sakadžić, Sava; Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Boas, David A.

    2010-02-01

    Measuring oxygen delivery in brain tissue is important for identifying the pathophysiological changes associated with brain injury and various diseases such as cancer, stroke, and Alzheimer's disease. We have developed a multi-modal imaging system for minimally invasive measurement of cerebral oxygenation and blood flow in small animals with high spatial resolution. The system allows for simultaneous measurement of blood flow using Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography, and oxygen partial pressure (pO2) using either confocal or multiphoton phosphorescence lifetime imaging with exogenous porphyrin-based dyes sensitive to dissolved oxygen. Here we present the changes in pO2 and blood flow in superficial cortical vessels of Sprague Dawley rats in response to conditions such as hypoxia, hyperoxia, and functional stimulation. pO2 measurements display considerable heterogeneity over distances that cannot be resolved with more widely used oxygen-monitoring techniques such as BOLD-fMRI. Large increases in blood flow are observed in response to functional stimulation and hypoxia. Our system allows for quantification of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) with high spatial resolution, providing a better understanding of metabolic dynamics during functional stimulation and under various neuropathologies. Ultimately, better insight into the underlying mechanisms of neuropathologies will facilitate the development of improved therapeutic strategies to minimize damage to brain tissue.

  15. Caffeine-induced uncoupling of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism: a calibrated BOLD fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Perthen, Joanna E; Lansing, Amy E; Liau, Joy; Liu, Thomas T; Buxton, Richard B

    2008-03-01

    Although functional MRI (fMRI) based on blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal changes is a sensitive tool for mapping brain activation, quantitative studies of the physiological effects of pharmacological agents using fMRI alone are difficult to interpret due to the complexities inherent in the BOLD response. Hypercapnia-calibrated BOLD methodology is potentially a more powerful physiological probe of brain function, providing measures of the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO(2)). In this study, we implemented a quantitative R(2)* approach for assessing the BOLD response to improve the stability of repeated measurements, in combination with the calibrated BOLD method, to examine the CBF and CMRO(2) responses to caffeine ingestion. Ten regular caffeine consumers were imaged before and after a 200-mg caffeine dose. A dual-echo arterial spin labeling technique was used to measure CBF and BOLD responses to visual stimulation, caffeine consumption and mild hypercapnia. For a region of interest defined by CBF activation to the visual stimulus, the results were: hypercapnia increased CBF (+46.6%, +/-11.3, mean and standard error), visual stimulation increased both CBF (+47.9%, +/-2.9) and CMRO(2) (+20.7%, +/-1.4), and caffeine decreased CBF (-34.5%, +/-2.6) with a non-significant change in CMRO(2) (+5.2%, +/-6.4). The coupling between CBF and CMRO(2) was significantly different in response to visual stimulation compared to caffeine consumption. A calibrated BOLD methodology using R(2) * is a promising approach for evaluating CBF and CMRO(2) changes in response to pharmacological interventions.

  16. Caffeine induced uncoupling of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism: A calibrated-BOLD fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Perthen, Joanna E; Lansing, Amy E; Liau, Joy; Liu, Thomas T; Buxton, Richard B

    2009-01-01

    Although functional MRI (fMRI) based on blood oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) signal changes is a sensitive tool for mapping brain activation, quantitative studies of the physiological effects of pharmacological agents using fMRI alone are difficult to interpret due to the complexities inherent in the BOLD response. Hypercapnia calibrated-BOLD methodology is potentially a more powerful physiological probe of brain function, providing measures of the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2). In this study, we implemented a quantitative R2* approach for assessing the BOLD response to improve the stability of repeated measurements, in combination with the calibrated-BOLD method, to examine the CBF and CMRO2 responses to caffeine ingestion. Ten regular caffeine consumers were imaged before and after a 200mg caffeine dose. A dual echo arterial spin labeling technique was used to measure CBF and BOLD responses to visual stimulation, caffeine consumption and mild hypercapnia. For a region of interest defined by CBF activation to the visual stimulus, the results were: hypercapnia increased CBF (+46.6%, ±11.3, mean and standard error), visual stimulation increased both CBF (+47.9%, ±2.9) and CMRO2 (+20.7%, ±1.4), and caffeine decreased CBF (-34.5%, ±2.6) with a non-significant change in CMRO2 (+5.2%, ±6.4). The coupling between CBF and CMRO2 was significantly different in response to visual stimulation compared to caffeine consumption. A calibrated-BOLD methodology using R2* is a promising approach for evaluating CBF and CMRO2 changes in response to pharmacological interventions. PMID:18191583

  17. Oxygenation of Earth's atmosphere and its impact on the evolution of nitrogen-based metabolisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papineau, D.; Mojzsis, S. J.

    2002-12-01

    The evolution of metabolic pathways is closely linked to the evolution of the redox state of the terrestrial atmosphere. Nitrogen has been an essential biological element since the emergence of life when reduced nitrogen compounds (e.g. ammonia) were utilized in the prebiotic synthesis of proteins and nucleic acids. The nitrogen isotopic composition of sediments has been used to trace the origin of sedimentary organic matter in the rock record. Nitrogen is therefore suitable as a biosignature to trace the emergence of life on Earth or other planetary bodies as well as to follow the subsequent evolution of the biosphere in response to global redox changes. Evidence is strong that biological nitrogen fixation evolved very early in the history of life. The Last Common Ancestor (LCA) on Earth was most likely capable of nitrogen fixation as seen from the phylogenetic distribution of nitrogen-fixing organisms in both the domains of Bacteria and Archaea. Phylogenetic trees plotted with nitrogen-fixing gene (Nif) sequences from lineages of Bacteria and Archaea suggest that the Nif genes originated in a common ancestor of the two domains. Other phylogenetic analyses have also demonstrated that the paralogous duplication of the nifDK and nifEN operons, central to nitrogen fixation, predated the divergence of Archaea from Bacteria and therefore occurred prior to the emergence of the LCA. Although the same may be true for denitrification, this metabolic pathway probably did not become dominant until atmospheric pO2 increased between ~2.4 to 1.9 Ga during the Great Oxygenation Event (GOE). Recent work has shown a general depletion in 15N content of Archean (pre-2.5 Ga) relative to Phanerozoic (<540 Ma) kerogens. Studies have shown that the distribution of the δ15N values in kerogens shift from negative values in the Early Archean (from -6 to +6‰ with an average near 0‰ ) to approximately contemporary positive values (from +2 to +10‰ with an average at +6‰ ) by the

  18. Quantitative Mapping of Cerebral Metabolic Rate of Oxygen (CMRO2) using Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping (QSM)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingwei; Liu, Tian; Gupta, Ajay; Spincemaille, Pascal; Nguyen, Thanh D.; Wang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To quantitatively map cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) in human brains using quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) and arterial spin labeling measured cerebral blood flow (CBF) before and after caffeine vasoconstriction. Methods Using the multiecho 3D gradient echo sequence and an oral bolus of 200 mg caffeine, whole brain CMRO2 and OEF were mapped at 3mm isotropic resolution on 13 healthy subjects. The QSM based CMRO2 was compared with an R2* based CMRO2 to analyze the regional consistency within cortical gray matter (CGM) with the scaling in the R2* method set to provide same total CMRO2 as the QSM method for each subject. Results Compared to pre-caffeine, susceptibility increased (5.1±1.1ppb, p<0.01) and CBF decreased (−23.6±6.7ml/100g/min, p<0.01) at 25min post-caffeine in CGM. This corresponded to a CMRO2 of 153.0±26.4µmol/100g/min with an OEF of 33.9±9.6% and 54.5±13.2% (p<0.01) pre- and post- caffeine respectively at CGM, and a CMRO2 of 58.0±26.6µmol/100g/min at white matter. CMRO2 from both QSM and R2* based methods showed good regional consistency (p>0.05), but quantitation of R2* based CMRO2 required an additional scaling factor. Conclusion QSM can be used with perfusion measurements pre- and post- caffeine vascoconstriction to map CMRO2 and OEF. PMID:25263499

  19. The measurement of sequential changes in cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism by positron computed tomography with continuous inhalation of oxygen-15 labeled gases

    SciTech Connect

    Tanada, S.; Yonekura, Y.; Senda, M.; Nishimura, K.; Tamaki, N.; Saji, H.; Fujita, T.; Kobayashi, A.; Taki, W.; Ishikawa, M.

    1984-01-01

    The use of continuous inhalation of oxygen-15 labeled gases is a widely accepted method to measure regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen metabolism (CMRO/sub 2/) with positron computed tomography (PCT). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility to measure sequential changes in CBF and CMRO/sub 2/ by PCT. The functional images of CBF, oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), and CMRO/sub 2/ were obtained using continuous inhalation of oxygen-15 labeled carbon dioxide and oxygen. The effects of spinal drainage in CBF and CMRO/sub 2/ were studied in patients with hydrocephalus following subarachnoid hemorrhage due to the rupture of intracranial aneurysm. Following the measurement in control state, 20 ml of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were withdrawn gradually through lumbar puncture, and sequential PCT scans were performed. CBF and CMRO/sub 2/ were markedly depressed in the case with hydrocephalus. The drainage of CSF significantly improved OEF and CMRO/sub 2/, whereas CBF remained depressed. In patients with chronic cerebrovascular disease, the changes in CBF were studied with inhalation of 5% carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/). CO/sub 2/ loading demonstrated the increase in CBF, while poor regional increase was observed in ''moyamoya'' disease, which permitted the assessment of vascular response to the elevation of plasma CO/sub 2/. The authors preliminary work indicated the potential usefulness of sequential PCT to study the changes in CBF and CMRO/sub 2/ with various interventions.

  20. Correlation between cerebral oxygen metabolism and cerebral blood flow simultaneously measured before and after acetazolamide administration.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, H; Yamauchi, H; Hazama, S; Hamamoto, H; Inoue, N

    1999-10-01

    The cerebral circulation and metabolism of ten preoperative cardiac surgery patients were assessed. Alterations in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), measured by 123I-N-isopropyl-p-iodo-amphetamine single-photon emission computed tomography, and in cerebral oxygen metabolism, simultaneously detected by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) before and after acetazolamide administration, were investigated. The rCBF (ml/min/100 g) increased significantly from 40.21±7.65 to 56.24±13.69(p<0.001), and a significant increase in oxyhemoglobin (Oxy-Hb) of 13.9% (p=0.0022) and total hemoglobin (Total-Hb) of 5.7% (0.0047) along with a significant decrease in deoxyhemoglobin (Deoxy-Hb) of 8.9% (p=0.0414) were observed concomitantly. Thus, the Oxy-Hb/Total-Hb ratio (%Oxy-Hb) rose significantly from 67.26±9.82% to 72.98±8.09%(p=0.0022). Examination of the relationships between individual parameters showed that the percentage changes in rCBF and Oxy-Hb were significantly correlated (r=0.758,p=0.011). The percentage changes in rCBF and %Oxy-Hb were also correlated significantly (r=0.740,p=0.014). In conclusion, this evidence suggested that NIRS is able to detect relative changes in cerebral hemodynamics and reflect luxury perfusion induced by acetazolamide. © 1999 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

  1. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex regulator (PdhR) gene deletion boosts glucose metabolism in Escherichia coli under oxygen-limited culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Soya; Shimizu, Kumiko; Kihira, Chie; Iwabu, Yuki; Kato, Ryuichi; Sugimoto, Makoto; Fukiya, Satoru; Wada, Masaru; Yokota, Atsushi

    2017-04-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex regulator (PdhR) is a transcriptional regulator that negatively regulates formation of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc), NADH dehydrogenase (NDH)-2, and cytochrome bo3 oxidase in Escherichia coli. To investigate the effects of a PdhR defect on glucose metabolism, a pdhR deletion mutant was derived from the wild-type E. coli W1485 strain by λ Red-mediated recombination. While no difference in the fermentation profiles was observed between the two strains under oxygen-sufficient conditions, under oxygen-limited conditions, the growth level of the wild-type strain was significantly decreased with retarded glucose consumption accompanied by by-production of substantial amounts of pyruvic acid and acetic acid. In contrast, the mutant grew and consumed glucose more efficiently than did the wild-type strain with enhanced respiration, little by-production of pyruvic acid, less production yield and rates of acetic acid, thus displaying robust metabolic activity. As expected, increased activities of PDHc and NDH-2 were observed in the mutant. The increased activity of PDHc may explain the loss of pyruvic acid by-production, probably leading to decreased acetic acid formation, and the increased activity of NDH-2 may explain the enhanced respiration. Measurement of the intracellular NAD(+)/NADH ratio in the mutant revealed more oxidative or more reductive intracellular environments than those in the wild-type strain under oxygen-sufficient and -limited conditions, respectively, suggesting another role of PdhR: maintaining redox balance in E. coli. The overall results demonstrate the biotechnological advantages of pdhR deletion in boosting glucose metabolism and also improve our understanding of the role of PdhR in bacterial physiology.

  2. Obesity, Metabolic Syndrome, and Physical Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeater, Rachel

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the scope of the problem of obesity in the United States, noting the health risks associated with being overweight or obese (e.g., gallstones, osteoarthritis, sleep apnea, and colon cancer); discussing the association of type-II diabetes mellitus with obesity; examining the effects of exercise on metabolic disease; and looking at…

  3. Edelfosine-induced metabolic changes in cancer cells that precede the overproduction of reactive oxygen species and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Metabolic flux profiling based on the analysis of distribution of stable isotope tracer in metabolites is an important method widely used in cancer research to understand the regulation of cell metabolism and elaborate new therapeutic strategies. Recently, we developed software Isodyn, which extends the methodology of kinetic modeling to the analysis of isotopic isomer distribution for the evaluation of cellular metabolic flux profile under relevant conditions. This tool can be applied to reveal the metabolic effect of proapoptotic drug edelfosine in leukemia Jurkat cell line, uncovering the mechanisms of induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. Results The study of 13C distribution of Jukat cells exposed to low edelfosine concentration, which induces apoptosis in ≤5% of cells, revealed metabolic changes previous to the development of apoptotic program. Specifically, it was found that low dose of edelfosine stimulates the TCA cycle. These metabolic perturbations were coupled with an increase of nucleic acid synthesis de novo, which indicates acceleration of biosynthetic and reparative processes. The further increase of the TCA cycle fluxes, when higher doses of drug applied, eventually enhance reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and trigger apoptotic program. Conclusion The application of Isodyn to the analysis of mechanism of edelfosine-induced apoptosis revealed primary drug-induced metabolic changes, which are important for the subsequent initiation of apoptotic program. Initiation of such metabolic changes could be exploited in anticancer therapy. PMID:20925932

  4. Activation of surface oxygen sites on an iridium-based model catalyst for the oxygen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimaud, Alexis; Demortiere, Arnaud; Saubanere, Matthieu; Dachraoui, Walid; Duchamp, Martial; Doublet, Marie-Liesse; Tarascon, Jean-Marie

    2017-01-01

    The oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is of prime importance in multiple energy storage devices; however, deeper mechanistic understanding is required to design enhanced electrocatalysts for the reaction. Current understanding of the OER mechanism based on oxygen adsorption on a metallic surface site fails to fully explain the activity of iridium and ruthenium oxide surfaces, and the drastic surface reconstruction observed for the most active OER catalysts. Here we demonstrate, using La2LiIrO6 as a model catalyst, that the exceptionally high activity found for Ir-based catalysts arises from the formation of active surface oxygen atoms that act as electrophilic centres for water to react. Moreover, with the help of transmission electron microscopy, we observe drastic surface reconstruction and iridium migration from the bulk to the surface. Therefore, we establish a correlation between surface activity and surface stability for OER catalysts that is rooted in the formation of surface reactive oxygen.

  5. Metabolic profiling reveals ethylene mediated metabolic changes and a coordinated adaptive mechanism of 'Jonagold' apple to low oxygen stress.

    PubMed

    Bekele, Elias A; Beshir, Wasiye F; Hertog, Maarten L A T M; Nicolai, Bart M; Geeraerd, Annemie H

    2015-11-01

    Apples are predominantly stored in controlled atmosphere (CA) storage to delay ripening and prolong their storage life. Profiling the dynamics of metabolic changes during ripening and CA storage is vital for understanding the governing molecular mechanism. In this study, the dynamics of the primary metabolism of 'Jonagold' apples during ripening in regular air (RA) storage and initiation of CA storage was profiled. 1-Methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) was exploited to block ethylene receptors and to get insight into ethylene mediated metabolic changes during ripening of the fruit and in response to hypoxic stress. Metabolic changes were quantified in glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, the Yang cycle and synthesis of the main amino acids branching from these metabolic pathways. Partial least square discriminant analysis of the metabolic profiles of 1-MCP treated and control apples revealed a metabolic divergence in ethylene, organic acid, sugar and amino acid metabolism. During RA storage at 18°C, most amino acids were higher in 1-MCP treated apples, whereas 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) was higher in the control apples. The initial response of the fruit to CA initiation was accompanied by an increase of alanine, succinate and glutamate, but a decline in aspartate. Furthermore, alanine and succinate accumulated to higher levels in control apples than 1-MCP treated apples. The observed metabolic changes in these interlinked metabolites may indicate a coordinated adaptive strategy to maximize energy production.

  6. Removal of trichlorobenzene using 'oxygen-enriched' highly active absorbent.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi; He, Peng; Zhang, Yu-Hai; Ma, Shuangchen

    2011-01-01

    Fly ash, industry lime and an additive, Ca(ClO2)2 (C) were used to prepare the 'oxygen-enriched' highly active absorbent (HAA). The influencing factors for removal of 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene (TCB) using this absorbent such as reaction temperature, simulating gas flow rate, oxygen content, etc. were studied in a self-designed reactor. The optimum experimental conditions of removing 1,2,4-TCB are that the content of an oxidizing additive in the absorbent is 3% (wt), simulating gas flow rate is 100 mL/min, reaction temperature is 250 degrees C, and the content of oxygen in simulating gas is 6%. The maximum removal efficiency is 81.71% in 10 mins. The absorption capacity of the absorbent is 0.000111 g/g. The reaction products were determined by gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/ MS), 2,6-Bis-[1,1-Dimethylethyl]-4-methyl-Phenol is considered to be the major intermediate product. The reaction route was revealed.

  7. Combined administration of hyperbaric oxygen and hydroxocobalamin improves cerebral metabolism after acute cyanide poisoning in rats.

    PubMed

    Hansen, M B; Olsen, N V; Hyldegaard, O

    2013-11-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) or intravenous hydroxocobalamin (OHCob) both abolish cyanide (CN)-induced surges in interstitial brain lactate and glucose concentrations. HBOT has been shown to induce a delayed increase in whole blood CN concentrations, whereas OHCob may act as an intravascular CN scavenger. Additionally, HBOT may prevent respiratory distress and restore blood pressure during CN intoxication, an effect not seen with OHCob administration. In this report, we evaluated the combined effects of HBOT and OHCob on interstitial lactate, glucose, and glycerol concentrations as well as lactate-to-pyruvate ratio in rat brain by means of microdialysis during acute CN poisoning. Anesthetized rats were allocated to three groups: 1) vehicle (1.2 ml isotonic NaCl intra-arterially); 2) potassium CN (5.4 mg/kg intra-arterially); 3) potassium CN, OHCob (100 mg/kg intra-arterially) and subsequent HBOT (284 kPa in 90 min). OHCob and HBOT significantly attenuated the acute surges in interstitial cerebral lactate, glucose, and glycerol concentrations compared with the intoxicated rats given no treatment. Furthermore, the combined treatment resulted in consistent low lactate, glucose, and glycerol concentrations, as well as in low lactate-to-pyruvate ratios compared with CN intoxicated controls. In rats receiving OHCob and HBOT, respiration improved and cyanosis disappeared, with subsequent stabilization of mean arterial blood pressure. The present findings indicate that a combined administration of OHCob and HBOT has a beneficial and persistent effect on the cerebral metabolism during CN intoxication.

  8. Metabolic Agents that Enhance ATP can Improve Cognitive Functioning: A Review of the Evidence for Glucose, Oxygen, Pyruvate, Creatine, and L-Carnitine

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Lauren; Sunram-Lea, Sandra I.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past four or five decades, there has been increasing interest in the neurochemical regulation of cognition. This field received considerable attention in the 1980s, with the identification of possible cognition enhancing agents or “smart drugs”. Even though many of the optimistic claims for some agents have proven premature, evidence suggests that several metabolic agents may prove to be effective in improving and preserving cognitive performance and may lead to better cognitive aging through the lifespan. Aging is characterized by a progressive deterioration in physiological functions and metabolic processes. There are a number of agents with the potential to improve metabolic activity. Research is now beginning to identify these various agents and delineate their potential usefulness for improving cognition in health and disease. This review provides a brief overview of the metabolic agents glucose, oxygen, pyruvate, creatine, and L-carnitine and their beneficial effects on cognitive function. These agents are directly responsible for generating ATP (adenosine triphosphate) the main cellular currency of energy. The brain is the most metabolically active organ in the body and as such is particularly vulnerable to disruption of energy resources. Therefore interventions that sustain adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels may have importance for improving neuronal dysfunction and loss. Moreover, recently, it has been observed that environmental conditions and diet can affect transgenerational gene expression via epigenetic mechanisms. Metabolic agents might play a role in regulation of nutritional epigenetic effects. In summary, the reviewed metabolic agents represent a promising strategy for improving cognitive function and possibly slowing or preventing cognitive decline. PMID:22254121

  9. Physical activity and metabolic syndrome in liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Kallwitz, Eric R; Loy, Veronica; Mettu, Praveen; Von Roenn, Natasha; Berkes, Jamie; Cotler, Scott J

    2013-10-01

    There is a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome in liver transplant recipients, a population that tends to be physically inactive. The aim of this study was to characterize physical activity and evaluate the relationship between physical activity and metabolic syndrome after liver transplantation. A cross-sectional analysis was performed in patients more than 3 months after transplantation. Metabolic syndrome was classified according to National Cholesterol Education Panel Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines. Physical activity, including duration, frequency, and metabolic equivalents of task (METs), was assessed. The study population consisted of 204 subjects, with 156 more than 1 year after transplantation. The median time after transplantation was 53.5 months (range = 3-299 months). The mean duration of exercise was 90 ± 142 minutes, and the mean MET score was 3.6 ± 1.5. Metabolic syndrome was observed in 58.8% of all subjects and in 63.5% of the subjects more than 1 year after transplantation. In a multivariate analysis involving all subjects, metabolic syndrome was associated with a time after transplantation greater than 1 year [odds ratio (OR) = 2.909, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.389-6.092] and older age (OR = 1.036, 95% CI = 1.001-1.072). A second analysis was performed for only patients more than 1 year after transplantation. In a multivariate analysis, metabolic syndrome was associated with lower exercise intensity (OR = 0.690, 95% CI = 0.536-0.887), older age (OR = 1.056, 95% CI = 1.014-1.101), and pretransplant diabetes (OR = 4.246, 95% CI = 1.300-13.864). In conclusion, metabolic syndrome is common after liver transplantation, and the rate is significantly higher in patients more than 1 year after transplantation. The observation that exercise intensity is inversely related to metabolic syndrome after transplantation is novel and suggests that physical activity might provide a means for reducing metabolic syndrome complications in liver

  10. Device for measuring oxygen activity in liquid sodium

    DOEpatents

    Roy, P.; Young, R.S.

    1973-12-01

    A composite ceramic electrolyte in a configuration (such as a closed end tube or a plate) suitable to separate liquid sodium from a reference electrode with a high impedance voltmeter connected to measure EMF between the sodium and the reference electrode as a measure of oxygen activity in the sodium is described. The composite electrolyte consists of zirconiacalcia with a bonded layer of thoria-yttria. The device is used with a gaseous reference electrode on the zirconia-calcia side and liquid sodium on the thoria-yttria side of the electrolyte. (Official Gazette)

  11. PET studies of changes in cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism after unilateral microembolization of the brain in anesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Weyne, J; De Ley, G; Demeester, G; Vandecasteele, C; Vermeulen, F L; Donche, H; Deman, J

    1987-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism have been measured with the steady-state oxygen-15 technique and positron emission tomography in anesthetized dogs. Regional microembolization was induced by infusing Sephadex particles (diameter, 40 micron) into one of the common carotid arteries. In the first series of experiments, 2.5 mg Sephadex was infused, and the dogs were examined within 3-4 hours after embolization. In a second series 0.55 mg Sephadex was infused, and the dogs were examined either in the first 3-4 hours or 24-48 hours after embolization. Cerebral blood flow, oxygen extraction ratio, and cerebral oxygen utilization were measured at 3 PCO2 levels. In the acute experiments, cerebral oxygen utilization in the embolized hemisphere was 6 (0.55 mg Sephadex) and 25% (2.5 mg Sephadex) lower than on the contralateral side. While cerebral blood flow was symmetrically distributed in normocapnia and hypocapnia, it was 9 (0.55 mg Sephadex) and 35% (2.5 mg Sephadex) lower in the embolized hemisphere during hypercapnia. In normocapnia and hypocapnia the lower oxygen utilization in the embolized hemisphere was characterized by a lower oxygen extraction ratio, and in hypercapnia by an unchanged (0.55 mg Sephadex) or by a higher (2.5 mg Sephadex) extraction ratio. The different effect on oxygen extraction ratio in the control and embolized hemispheres resulted in images of uncoupling between perfusion and oxygen demand that varied according to the PCO2. The experiments also showed a fall in cerebral blood flow in the embolized hemisphere after 3-4 hours, indicating delayed hypoperfusion. After 24-48 hours, blood flow was about 10% higher in the embolized hemisphere, and this was observed at the 3 PCO2 levels, while the oxygen extraction ratio was systematically lower. Oxygen utilization in the embolized hemisphere was depressed to practically the same extent as in acute experiments. It can be concluded that between 4 and 24 hours after microembolization the cerebral

  12. Calcium-dependent activation of mitochondrial metabolism in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Gaspers, Lawrence D.; Thomas, Andrew P.

    2008-01-01

    Endogenous fluorophores provide a simple, but elegant means to investigate the relationship between agonist-evoked Ca2+ signals and the activation of mitochondrial metabolism. In this article, we discuss the methods and strategies to measure cellular pyridine nucleotide and flavoprotein fluorescence alone or in combination with Ca2+-sensitive indicators. These methods were developed using primary cultured hepatocytes and neurons, which contain relatively high levels of endogenous fluorophores and robust metabolic responses. Nevertheless, these methods are amendable to a wide variety of primary cell types and cell lines that maintain active mitochondrial metabolism. PMID:18854213

  13. Chemoprotective activity of boldine: modulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kubínová, R; Machala, M; Minksová, K; Neca, J; Suchý, V

    2001-03-01

    Possible chemoprotective effects of the naturally occurring alkaloid boldine, a major alkaloid of boldo (Peumus boldus Mol.) leaves and bark, including in vitro modulations of drug-metabolizing enzymes in mouse hepatoma Hepa-1 cell line and mouse hepatic microsomes, were investigated. Boldine manifested inhibition activity on hepatic microsomal CYP1A-dependent 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase and CYP3A-dependent testosterone 6 beta-hydroxylase activities and stimulated glutathione S-transferase activity in Hepa-1 cells. In addition to the known antioxidant activity, boldine could decrease the metabolic activation of other xenobiotics including chemical mutagens.

  14. Functional modules, structural topology, and optimal activity in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Resendis-Antonio, Osbaldo; Hernández, Magdalena; Mora, Yolanda; Encarnación, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Modular organization in biological networks has been suggested as a natural mechanism by which a cell coordinates its metabolic strategies for evolving and responding to environmental perturbations. To understand how this occurs, there is a need for developing computational schemes that contribute to integration of genomic-scale information and assist investigators in formulating biological hypotheses in a quantitative and systematic fashion. In this work, we combined metabolome data and constraint-based modeling to elucidate the relationships among structural modules, functional organization, and the optimal metabolic phenotype of Rhizobium etli, a bacterium that fixes nitrogen in symbiosis with Phaseolus vulgaris. To experimentally characterize the metabolic phenotype of this microorganism, we obtained the metabolic profile of 220 metabolites at two physiological stages: under free-living conditions, and during nitrogen fixation with P. vulgaris. By integrating these data into a constraint-based model, we built a refined computational platform with the capability to survey the metabolic activity underlying nitrogen fixation in R. etli. Topological analysis of the metabolic reconstruction led us to identify modular structures with functional activities. Consistent with modular activity in metabolism, we found that most of the metabolites experimentally detected in each module simultaneously increased their relative abundances during nitrogen fixation. In this work, we explore the relationships among topology, biological function, and optimal activity in the metabolism of R. etli through an integrative analysis based on modeling and metabolome data. Our findings suggest that the metabolic activity during nitrogen fixation is supported by interacting structural modules that correlate with three functional classifications: nucleic acids, peptides, and lipids. More fundamentally, we supply evidence that such modular organization during functional nitrogen fixation is

  15. Metabolic activity, experiment M171. [space flight effects on human metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, E. L.; Rummel, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    The Skylab metabolic activity experiment determines if man's metabolic effectiveness in doing mechanical work is progressively altered by a simulated Skylab environment, including environmental factors such as slightly increased pCO2. This test identified several hardware/procedural anomalies. The most important of these were: (1) the metabolic analyzer measured carbon dioxide production and expired water too high; (2) the ergometer load module failed under continuous high workload conditions; (3) a higher than desirable number of erroneous blood pressure measurements were recorded; (4) vital capacity measurements were unreliable; and (5) anticipated crew personal exercise needs to be more structured.

  16. Size-fraction partitioning of community gene transcription and nitrogen metabolism in a marine oxygen minimum zone

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Sangita; Bristow, Laura A; Larsen, Morten; Sarode, Neha; Thamdrup, Bo; Stewart, Frank J

    2015-01-01

    The genetic composition of marine microbial communities varies at the microscale between particle-associated (PA; >1.6 μm) and free-living (FL; 0.2–1.6 μm) niches. It remains unclear, however, how metabolic activities differ between PA and FL fractions. We combined rate measurements with metatranscriptomics to quantify PA and FL microbial activity in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Eastern Tropical North Pacific, focusing on dissimilatory processes of the nitrogen (N) cycle. Bacterial gene counts were 8- to 15-fold higher in the FL compared with the PA fraction. However, rates of all measured N cycle processes, excluding ammonia oxidation, declined significantly following particle (>1.6 μm) removal. Without particles, rates of nitrate reduction to nitrite (1.5–9.4nMNd−1) fell to zero and N2 production by denitrification (0.5–1.7nMNd−1) and anammox (0.3–1.9nMNd−1) declined by 53–85%. The proportional representation of major microbial taxa and N cycle gene transcripts in metatranscriptomes followed fraction-specific trends. Transcripts encoding nitrate reductase were uniform among PA and FL fractions, whereas anammox-associated transcripts were proportionately enriched up to 15-fold in the FL fraction. In contrast, transcripts encoding enzymes for N2O and N2 production by denitrification were enriched up to 28-fold in PA samples. These patterns suggest that the majority of N cycle activity, excluding N2O and N2 production by denitrification, is confined to a FL majority that is critically dependent on access to particles, likely as a source of organic carbon and inorganic N. Variable particle distributions may drive heterogeneity in N cycle activity and gene expression in OMZs. PMID:25848875

  17. Growth of Trypanosoma cruzi in a cloned macrophage cell line and in a variant defective in oxygen metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Y; Tanowitz, H; Bloom, B R

    1983-01-01

    A continuous cloned murine macrophage-like cell line, clone 16 derived from J774, has been found upon appropriate stimulation to be capable of oxidizing glucose by the hexose monophosphate shunt and producing O2- and H2O2. A variant in oxidative metabolism, clone C3C, was selected from this cell line which under similar conditions is unable to produce significant amounts of O2- and H2O2. When cells of the parental clone 16 were infected with epimastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi, there was significant killing or growth inhibition of the parasites at 3 to 4 days after infection. In contrast, the parasites grew in the oxidative variant, clone C3C. Trypomastigote forms of T. cruzi were found to be only partially killed in the parental clone 16 but grew abundantly in the oxidative variant. Infection of the parental clone, but not the variant, was sufficient to stimulate oxygen metabolism as demonstrated by the increased reduction of nitro blue tetrazolium. Studies on the killing of T. cruzi epimastigotes in cell-free suspension by xanthine-xanthine oxidase indicated that 90% of the killing was catalase sensitive and due to H2O2, with at most 7 to 8% killing which could be inhibited by scavengers of . OH and singlet oxygen (1O2). In the in vitro experiment with H2O2 produced by glucose and glucose oxidase, the 50% lethal doses of epimastigotes and trypomastigotes were 6.0 and 8.7 nmol of H2O2 per min per ml, respectively, indicating that trypomastigotes were more resistant to killing by H2O2 than epimastigotes were. A reconstitution experiment of trypanocidal activity in clone C3C by ingestion of zymosan particles coupled with glucose oxidase showed that H2O2 was essential for this cytocidal process in the macrophage cell line. These results provide clear evidence for killing of an intracellular parasite by a continuous macrophage-like cell line and suggest the importance of the oxidative cytocidal mechanism in this process. Images PMID:6350185

  18. Fate of oxygen losses from Typha domingensis (Typhaceae) and Cladium jamaicense (Cyperaceae) and consequences for root metabolism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chabbi, A.; McKee, K.L.; Mendelssohn, I.A.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this work was to determine whether radial oxygen loss (ROL) from roots of Typha domingensis and Cladium jamaicense creates an internal oxygen deficiency or, conversely, indicates adequate internal aeration and leakage of excess oxygen to the rhizosphere. Methylene blue in agar was used to quantify oxygen leakage. Typha's roots had a higher porosity than Cladium's and responded to flooding treatment by increasing cortical air space, particularly near the root tips. A greater oxygen release, which occurred along the subapical root axis, and an increase in rhizosphere redox potential (Eh) over time were associated with the well-developed aerenchyma system in Typha. Typha roots, regardless of oxygen release pattern, showed low or undetectable alcohol dehydrogenage (ADH) activity or ethanol concentrations, indicating that ROL did not cause internal deficiencies. Cladium roots also releases oxygen, but this loss primarily occurred at the root tips and was accompanied by increased root ADH activity and ethanol concentrations. These results support the hypothesis that oxygen release by Cladium is accompanied by internal deficiencies of oxygen sufficient to stimulate alcoholic fermentation and helps explain Cladium's lesser flood tolerance in comparison with Typha.

  19. Variation of antioxidative activity and growth enhancement of Brassicaceae induced by low-pressure oxygen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Reoto; Hayashi, Nobuya

    2015-06-01

    The mechanism of growth enhancement induced by active oxygen species generated in an oxygen plasma is investigated. The plant growth enhancement induced by the active oxygen species would relate to an antioxidative activity, which is one of the biological responses. The amount of generated active oxygen species is varied by the oxygen gas pressure in a low-pressure RF glow discharge plasma. The antioxidative activity of sprouts of Brassicaceae induced by the oxygen plasma is maximized at pressures between 30 and 40 Pa, whereas the antioxidative activity becomes small at around 60 and 80 Pa. The pressure dependence of the antioxidative activity of sprout stems is opposite to that of the stem length of the sprouts. The growth enhancement would be induced by the increase in the concentration of active oxygen species in plants owing to the decrease in the amount of antioxidative substances.

  20. Regulation of metabolic flux in Lactobacillus casei for lactic acid production by overexpressed ldhL gene with two-stage oxygen supply strategy.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiang-Yang; Xu, Yan; Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Long-Yun

    2015-01-01

    This study describes a novel strategy to regulate the metabolic flux for lactic acid production in Lactobacillus casei. The ldhL gene encoding L-lactate dehydrogenase (L-LDH) was overexpressed in L. casei, and a two-stage oxygen supply strategy (TOS) that maintained a medium oxygen supply level during the early fermentation phase, and a low oxygen supply level in the later phase was carried out. As a consequence, a maximum L-LDH activity of 95.6 U/ml was obtained in the recombinant strain, which was over 4-fold higher than that of the initial strain. Under the TOS for L. casei (pMG-ldhL), the maximum lactic acid concentration of 159.6 g/l was obtained in 36 h, corresponding to a 62.8% increase. The results presented here provide a novel way to regulate the metabolic flux of L. casei for lactic acid production in different fermentation stages, which is available to enhance organic acid production in other strains.

  1. Activating transcription factor 3 regulates immune and metabolic homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Rynes, Jan; Donohoe, Colin D; Frommolt, Peter; Brodesser, Susanne; Jindra, Marek; Uhlirova, Mirka

    2012-10-01

    Integration of metabolic and immune responses during animal development ensures energy balance, permitting both growth and defense. Disturbed homeostasis causes organ failure, growth retardation, and metabolic disorders. Here, we show that the Drosophila melanogaster activating transcription factor 3 (Atf3) safeguards metabolic and immune system homeostasis. Loss of Atf3 results in chronic inflammation and starvation responses mounted primarily by the larval gut epithelium, while the fat body suffers lipid overload, causing energy imbalance and death. Hyperactive proinflammatory and stress signaling through NF-κB/Relish, Jun N-terminal kinase, and FOXO in atf3 mutants deregulates genes important for immune defense, digestion, and lipid metabolism. Reducing the dose of either FOXO or Relish normalizes both lipid metabolism and gene expression in atf3 mutants. The function of Atf3 is conserved, as human ATF3 averts some of the Drosophila mutant phenotypes, improving their survival. The single Drosophila Atf3 may incorporate the diversified roles of two related mammalian proteins.

  2. The interrelationship between muscle oxygenation, muscle activation, and pulmonary oxygen uptake to incremental ramp exercise: influence of aerobic fitness.

    PubMed

    Boone, Jan; Barstow, Thomas J; Celie, Bert; Prieur, Fabrice; Bourgois, Jan

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether muscle and ventilatory responses to incremental ramp exercise would be influenced by aerobic fitness status by means of a cross-sectional study with a large subject population. Sixty-four male students (age: 21.2 ± 3.2 years) with a heterogeneous peak oxygen uptake (51.9 ± 6.3 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1), range 39.7-66.2 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1)) performed an incremental ramp cycle test (20-35 W·min(-1)) to exhaustion. Breath-by-breath gas exchange was recorded, and muscle activation and oxygenation were measured with surface electromyography and near-infrared spectroscopy, respectively. The integrated electromyography (iEMG), mean power frequency (MPF), deoxygenated [hemoglobin and myoglobin] (deoxy[Hb+Mb]), and total[Hb+Mb] responses were set out as functions of work rate and fitted with a double linear function. The respiratory compensation point (RCP) was compared and correlated with the breakpoints (BPs) (as percentage of peak oxygen uptake) in muscle activation and oxygenation. The BP in total[Hb+Mb] (83.2% ± 3.0% peak oxygen uptake) preceded (P < 0.001) the BP in iEMG (86.7% ± 4.0% peak oxygen uptake) and MPF (86.3% ± 4.1% peak oxygen uptake), which in turn preceded (P < 0.01) the BP in deoxy[Hb+Mb] (88.2% ± 4.5% peak oxygen uptake) and RCP (87.4% ± 4.5% peak oxygen uptake). Furthermore, the peak oxygen uptake was significantly (P < 0.001) positively correlated to the BPs and RCP, indicating that the BPs in total[Hb+Mb] (r = 0.66; P < 0.001), deoxy[Hb+Mb] (r = 0.76; P < 0.001), iEMG (r = 0.61; P < 0.001), MPF (r = 0.63; P < 0.001), and RCP (r = 0.75; P < 0.001) occurred at a higher percentage of peak oxygen uptake in subjects with a higher peak oxygen uptake. In this study a close relationship between muscle oxygenation, activation, and pulmonary oxygen uptake was found, occurring in a cascade of events. In subjects with a higher aerobic fitness level this cascade occurred at a higher relative intensity.

  3. [Oxygen metabolism in the body during substitution of nitrogen by helium in the air].

    PubMed

    Troshikhin, G V; Isaakian, L A; Bekirova, G G

    1975-01-01

    The total gas exchange, body temperature, content of free oxygen in the quadriceps muscle and its changes upon oxygen inhalation of a known dosage (oxygen test) were measured in the Wistar rats during their one-hour exposure to a helium-oxygen atmosphere (21%) at 25 degrees C. In this atmosphere the animals displayed a 1.8 degrees decline in the body temperature, a 20.5% increase in the gas exchange and a 26% decrease of oxygen in the muscular tissue as compared with the respective parameters in the air. After the experiment during the first 20 min exposure to the normal atmosphere oxygen tests were 10-15% lower than before the experiment. These findings give evidence for an increase of oxygen exchange in the muscles of animals exposed to the helium-oxygen atmosphere at a temperature below the comfortable level.

  4. Effect of 6-day hypokinesia on oxygen metabolism indices in elderly and senile subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, L. A.; Orlov, P. A.

    1978-01-01

    After a strict 6 day confinement to bed of elderly and senile subjects the oxygen supply of the subcutaneous cellular tissue was impaired, and the intensity of its tissue respiration was somewhat reduced. The vacat-oxygen of the blood and urine, the coefficient of incomplete oxidation, and the oxygen deficiency in the organism were increased.

  5. Atmospheric oxygen level affects growth trajectory, cardiopulmonary allometry and metabolic rate in the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis).

    PubMed

    Owerkowicz, Tomasz; Elsey, Ruth M; Hicks, James W

    2009-05-01

    Recent palaeoatmospheric models suggest large-scale fluctuations in ambient oxygen level over the past 550 million years. To better understand how global hypoxia and hyperoxia might have affected the growth and physiology of contemporary vertebrates, we incubated eggs and raised hatchlings of the American alligator. Crocodilians are one of few vertebrate taxa that survived these global changes with distinctly conservative morphology. We maintained animals at 30 degrees C under chronic hypoxia (12% O(2)), normoxia (21% O(2)) or hyperoxia (30% O(2)). At hatching, hypoxic animals were significantly smaller than their normoxic and hyperoxic siblings. Over the course of 3 months, post-hatching growth was fastest under hyperoxia and slowest under hypoxia. Hypoxia, but not hyperoxia, caused distinct scaling of major visceral organs-reduction of liver mass, enlargement of the heart and accelerated growth of lungs. When absorptive and post-absorptive metabolic rates were measured in juvenile alligators, the increase in oxygen consumption rate due to digestion/absorption of food was greatest in hyperoxic alligators and smallest in hypoxic ones. Hyperoxic alligators exhibited the lowest breathing rate and highest oxygen consumption per breath. We suggest that, despite compensatory cardiopulmonary remodelling, growth of hypoxic alligators is constrained by low atmospheric oxygen supply, which may limit their food utilisation capacity. Conversely, the combination of elevated metabolism and low cost of breathing in hyperoxic alligators allows for a greater proportion of metabolised energy to be available for growth. This suggests that growth and metabolic patterns of extinct vertebrates would have been significantly affected by changes in the atmospheric oxygen level.

  6. Anatomical Grading for Metabolic Activity of Brown Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Anton S.; Nagel, Hannes W.; Wolfrum, Christian; Burger, Irene A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent advances in obesity research suggest that BAT activity, or absence thereof, may be an important factor in the growing epidemic of obesity and its manifold complications. It is thus important to assess larger populations for BAT-activating and deactivating factors. 18FDG-PET/CT is the standard method to detect and quantify metabolic BAT activity, however, the manual measurement is not suitable for large studies due to its time-consuming nature and poor reproducibility across different software and devices. Methodology/Main Findings In a retrospective study, 1060 consecutive scans of 1031 patients receiving a diagnostic 18FDG-PET/CT were examined for the presence of active BAT. Patients were classified according to a 3-tier system (supraclavicular, mediastinal, infradiaphragmatic) depending on the anatomical location of their active BAT depots, with the most caudal location being the decisive factor. The metabolic parameters (maximum activity, total volume and total glycolysis) were measured on a standard PET/CT workstation. Mean age of the population was 60±14.6y. 41.61% of patients were female. Metabolically active BAT was found in 53 patients (5.1%). Female, younger and leaner patients tended to have more active BAT, higher metabolic activity and more caudally active BAT. In total, 15 patients showed only supraclavicular, 27 additional mediastinal, and 11 infradiaphragmal activity. Interestingly, the activation of BAT always followed a cranio-caudal gradient. This anatomical pattern correlated with age and BMI as well as with all metabolic parameters, including maximum and total glycolysis (p<0.001). Conclusion Based on our data we propose a simple method to grade or quantify the degree of BAT amount/activity in patients based on the most caudally activated depot. As new modalities for BAT visualization may arise in the future, this system would allow direct comparability with other modalities, in contrary to the PET-metrics, which are

  7. Metabolic responses of novel cellulolytic and saccharolytic agricultural soil Bacteria to oxygen.

    PubMed

    Schellenberger, Stefanie; Kolb, Steffen; Drake, Harold L

    2010-04-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer in terrestrial ecosystems and is degraded by microbial communities in soils. However, relatively little is known about the diversity and function of soil prokaryotes that might participate in the overall degradation of this biopolymer. The active cellulolytic and saccharolytic Bacteria in an agricultural soil were evaluated by 16S rRNA (13)C-based stable isotope probing. Cellulose, cellobiose and glucose were mineralized under oxic conditions in soil slurries to carbon dioxide. Under anoxic conditions, these substrates were converted primarily to acetate, butyrate, carbon dioxide, hydrogen and traces of propionate and iso-butyrate; the production of these fermentation end-products was concomitant with the apparent reduction of iron(III). [(13)C]-cellulose was mainly degraded under oxic conditions by novel family-level taxa of the Bacteroidetes and Chloroflexi, and a known family-level taxon of Planctomycetes, whereas degradation under anoxic conditions was facilitated by the Kineosporiaceae (Actinobacteria) and cluster III Clostridiaceae and novel clusters within Bacteroidetes. Active aerobic sub-communities in oxic [(13)C]-cellobiose and [(13)C]-glucose treatments were dominated by Intrasporangiaceae and Micrococcaceae (Actinobacteria) whereas active cluster I Clostridiaceae (Firmicutes) were prevalent in anoxic treatments. A very large number (i.e. 28) of the detected taxa did not closely affiliate with known families, and active Archaea were not detected in any of the treatments. These collective findings suggest that: (i) a large uncultured diversity of soil Bacteria was involved in the utilization of cellulose and products of its hydrolysis, (ii) the active saccharolytic community differed phylogenetically from the active cellulolytic community, (iii) oxygen availability impacted differentially on the activity of taxa and (iv) different redox guilds (e.g. fermenters and iron reducers) compete or interact during

  8. Pyruvate modifies metabolic flux and nutrient sensing during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in an immature swine model

    SciTech Connect

    Ledee, Dolena R.; Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly-Priddy, Colleen M.; Olson, Aaron; Isern, Nancy G.; Robillard Frayne, Isabelle; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2015-07-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides mechanical circulatory support for infants and children with postoperative cardiopulmonary failure. Nutritional support is mandatory during ECMO, although specific actions for substrates on the heart have not been delineated. Prior work shows that enhancing pyruvate oxidation promotes successful weaning from ECMO. Accordingly, we closely examined the role of prolonged systemic pyruvate supplementation in modifying metabolic parameters during the unique conditions of ventricular unloading provided by ECMO. Twelve male mixed breed Yorkshire piglets (age 30-49 days) received systemic infusion of either normal saline (Group C) or pyruvate (Group P) during ECMO for 8 hours. Over the final hour piglets received [2-13C] pyruvate, and [13C6]-L-leucine, as an indicator for oxidation and protein synthesis. A significant increase in lactate and pyruvate concentrations occurred, along with an increase in the absolute concentration of all measured CAC intermediates. Group P showed greater anaplerotic flux through pyruvate carboxylation although pyruvate oxidation relative to citrate synthase flux was similar to Group C. The groups demonstrated similar leucine fractional contributions to acetyl-CoA and fractional protein synthesis rates. Pyruvate also promoted an increase in the phosphorylation state of several nutrient sensitive enzymes, such as AMPK and ACC, and promoted O-GlcNAcylation through the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP). In conclusion, prolonged pyruvate supplementation during ECMO modified anaplerotic pyruvate flux and elicited changes in important nutrient and energy sensitive pathways, while preserving protein synthesis. Therefore, the observed results support the further study of nutritional supplementation and its downstream effects on cardiac adaptation during ventricular unloading.

  9. Breakpoints in ventilation, cerebral and muscle oxygenation, and muscle activity during an incremental cycling exercise

    PubMed Central

    Racinais, Sebastien; Buchheit, Martin; Girard, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to locate the breakpoints of cerebral and muscle oxygenation and muscle electrical activity during a ramp exercise in reference to the first and second ventilatory thresholds. Twenty-five cyclists completed a maximal ramp test on an electromagnetically braked cycle-ergometer with a rate of increment of 25 W/min. Expired gazes (breath-by-breath), prefrontal cortex and vastus lateralis (VL) oxygenation [Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)] together with electromyographic (EMG) Root Mean Square (RMS) activity for the VL, rectus femoris (RF), and biceps femoris (BF) muscles were continuously assessed. There was a non-linear increase in both cerebral deoxyhemoglobin (at 56 ± 13% of the exercise) and oxyhemoglobin (56 ± 8% of exercise) concomitantly to the first ventilatory threshold (57 ± 6% of exercise, p > 0.86, Cohen's d < 0.1). Cerebral deoxyhemoglobin further increased (87 ± 10% of exercise) while oxyhemoglobin reached a plateau/decreased (86 ± 8% of exercise) after the second ventilatory threshold (81 ± 6% of exercise, p < 0.05, d > 0.8). We identified one threshold only for muscle parameters with a non-linear decrease in muscle oxyhemoglobin (78 ± 9% of exercise), attenuation in muscle deoxyhemoglobin (80 ± 8% of exercise), and increase in EMG activity of VL (89 ± 5% of exercise), RF (82 ± 14% of exercise), and BF (85 ± 9% of exercise). The thresholds in BF and VL EMG activity occurred after the second ventilatory threshold (p < 0.05, d > 0.6). Our results suggest that the metabolic and ventilatory events characterizing this latter cardiopulmonary threshold may affect both cerebral and muscle oxygenation levels, and in turn, muscle recruitment responses. PMID:24782786

  10. Peroxisome Proliferators-Activated Receptor (PPAR) Modulators and Metabolic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Min-Chul; Lee, Kyoung; Paik, Sang-Gi; Yoon, Do-Young

    2008-01-01

    Overweight and obesity lead to an increased risk for metabolic disorders such as impaired glucose regulation/insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Several molecular drug targets with potential to prevent or treat metabolic disorders have been revealed. Interestingly, the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), which belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily, has many beneficial clinical effects. PPAR directly modulates gene expression by binding to a specific ligand. All PPAR subtypes (α, γ, and σ) are involved in glucose metabolism, lipid metabolism, and energy balance. PPAR agonists play an important role in therapeutic aspects of metabolic disorders. However, undesired effects of the existing PPAR agonists have been reported. A great deal of recent research has focused on the discovery of new PPAR modulators with more beneficial effects and more safety without producing undesired side effects. Herein, we briefly review the roles of PPAR in metabolic disorders, the effects of PPAR modulators in metabolic disorders, and the technologies with which to discover new PPAR modulators. PMID:18566691

  11. Spontaneous ultraweak photon emission imaging of oxidative metabolic processes in human skin: effect of molecular oxygen and antioxidant defense system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Anshu; Pospíšil, Pavel

    2011-09-01

    All living organisms emit spontaneous ultraweak photon emission as a result of cellular metabolic processes. In this study, the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formed as the byproduct of oxidative metabolic processes in spontaneous ultraweak photon emission was studied in human hand skin. The effect of molecular oxygen and ROS scavengers on spontaneous ultraweak photon emission from human skin was monitored using a highly sensitive photomultiplier tube and charged coupled device camera. When spontaneous ultraweak photon emission was measured under anaerobic conditions, the photon emission was decreased, whereas under hyperaerobic condition the enhancement in photon emission was observed. Spontaneous ultraweak photon emission measured after topical application of glutathione, α-tocopherol, ascorbate, and coenzyme Q10 was observed to be decreased. These results reveal that ROS formed during the cellular metabolic processes in the epidermal cells play a significant role in the spontaneous ultraweak photon emission. It is proposed that spontaneous ultraweak photon emission can be used as a noninvasive tool for the temporal and spatial monitoring of the oxidative metabolic processes and intrinsic antioxidant system in human skin.

  12. Active Oxygen Species Generator by Low Pressure Silent Discharge and its Application to Water Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Ikeda, Akira; Tanimura, Yasuhiro; Ohta, Koji; Yoshiyasu, Hajimu

    We have proposed the new water treatment using the active oxygen species such as an atomic oxygen with the oxidation power that is stronger than ozone. Based on the results of simulations we designed the silent discharge type active oxygen generator with a water ejector, which is operated on the discharge conditions of low pressure of 6.6kPa. and high temperature of about 200°C. The experimental results are as follows. (1) The yield of the active oxygen increases with the increase of the discharge tube temperature and the decrease of the gas pressure. (2) The life time of active oxygen is tens msec. (3) The active oxygen oxidizes efficiently the formic acid compared with ozone. It is assumed from these results that the active oxygen species having a strong oxidation power is generated.

  13. Ionizing Radiation Impairs T Cell Activation by Affecting Metabolic Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Li, Heng-Hong; Wang, Yi-Wen; Chen, Renxiang; Zhou, Bin; Ashwell, Jonathan D; Fornace, Albert J

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has a variety of acute and long-lasting adverse effects on the immune system. Whereas measureable effects of radiation on immune cell cytotoxicity and population change have been well studied in human and animal models, little is known about the functional alterations of the surviving immune cells after ionizing radiation. The objective of this study was to delineate the effects of radiation on T cell function by studying the alterations of T cell receptor activation and metabolic changes in activated T cells isolated from previously irradiated animals. Using a global metabolomics profiling approach, for the first time we demonstrate that ionizing radiation impairs metabolic reprogramming of T cell activation, which leads to substantial decreases in the efficiency of key metabolic processes required for activation, such as glucose uptake, glycolysis, and energy metabolism. In-depth understanding of how radiation impacts T cell function highlighting modulation of metabolism during activation is not only a novel approach to investigate the pivotal processes in the shift of T cell homeostasis after radiation, it also may lead to new targets for therapeutic manipulation in the combination of radiotherapy and immune therapy. Given that appreciable effects were observed with as low as 10 cGy, our results also have implications for low dose environmental exposures.

  14. Ethanol Metabolism Activates Cell Cycle Checkpoint Kinase, Chk2

    PubMed Central

    Clemens, Dahn L.; Mahan Schneider, Katrina J.; Nuss, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic ethanol abuse results in hepatocyte injury and impairs hepatocyte replication. We have previously shown that ethanol metabolism results in cell cycle arrest at the G2/M transition, which is partially mediated by inhibitory phosphorylation of the cyclin-dependent kinase, Cdc2. To further delineate the mechanisms by which ethanol metabolism mediates this G2/M arrest, we investigated the involvement of upstream regulators of Cdc2 activity. Cdc2 is activated by the phosphatase Cdc25C. The activity of Cdc25C can, in turn, be regulated by the checkpoint kinase, Chk2, which is regulated by the kinase ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM). To investigate the involvement of these regulators of Cdc2 activity, VA-13 cells, which are Hep G2 cells modified to efficiently express alcohol dehydrogenase, were cultured in the presence or absence of 25 mM ethanol. Immunoblots were performed to determine the effects of ethanol metabolism on the activation of Cdc25C, Chk2, and ATM. Ethanol metabolism increased the active forms of ATM, and Chk2, as well as the phosphorylated form of Cdc25C. Additionally, inhibition of ATM resulted in approximately 50% of the cells being rescued from the G2/M cell cycle arrest, and ameliorated the inhibitory phosphorylation of Cdc2. Our findings demonstrate that ethanol metabolism activates ATM. ATM can activate the checkpoint kinase Chk2, resulting in phosphorylation of Cdc25C, and ultimately in the accumulation of inactive Cdc2. This may, in part, explain the ethanol metabolism-mediated impairment in hepatocyte replication, which may be important in the initiation and progression of alcoholic liver injury. PMID:21924579

  15. The effect of sustained compression on oxygen metabolic transport in the intervertebral disc decreases with degenerative changes.

    PubMed

    Malandrino, Andrea; Noailly, Jérôme; Lacroix, Damien

    2011-08-01

    Intervertebral disc metabolic transport is essential to the functional spine and provides the cells with the nutrients necessary to tissue maintenance. Disc degenerative changes alter the tissue mechanics, but interactions between mechanical loading and disc transport are still an open issue. A poromechanical finite element model of the human disc was coupled with oxygen and lactate transport models. Deformations and fluid flow were linked to transport predictions by including strain-dependent diffusion and advection. The two solute transport models were also coupled to account for cell metabolism. With this approach, the relevance of metabolic and mechano-transport couplings were assessed in the healthy disc under loading-recovery daily compression. Disc height, cell density and material degenerative changes were parametrically simulated to study their influence on the calculated solute concentrations. The effects of load frequency and amplitude were also studied in the healthy disc by considering short periods of cyclic compression. Results indicate that external loads influence the oxygen and lactate regional distributions within the disc when large volume changes modify diffusion distances and diffusivities, especially when healthy disc properties are simulated. Advection was negligible under both sustained and cyclic compression. Simulating degeneration, mechanical changes inhibited the mechanical effect on transport while disc height, fluid content, nucleus pressure and overall cell density reductions affected significantly transport predictions. For the healthy disc, nutrient concentration patterns depended mostly on the time of sustained compression and recovery. The relevant effect of cell density on the metabolic transport indicates the disturbance of cell number as a possible onset for disc degeneration via alteration of the metabolic balance. Results also suggest that healthy disc properties have a positive effect of loading on metabolic transport. Such

  16. Physical Activity, Metabolic Syndrome, and Overweight in Rural Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Justin B.; Davis, Catherine L.; Baxter, Suzanne Domel; Lewis, Richard D.; Yin, Zenong

    2008-01-01

    Background: Research suggests significant health differences between rural dwelling youth and their urban counterparts with relation to cardiovascular risk factors. This study was conducted to (1) determine relationships between physical activity and markers of metabolic syndrome, and (2) to explore factors relating to physical activity in a…

  17. Cat carotid body oxygen metabolism and chemoreception described by a two-cytochrome model.

    PubMed

    Nair, P K; Buerk, D G; Whalen, W J

    1986-02-01

    We have analyzed O2 disappearance curves (DCs) in cat carotid bodies (CBs) measured with our O2 microelectrode, after stopping flow of either blood (108 DCs in 12 cats) or a hemoglobin-free (Locke) perfusion solution (35 DCs in 6 cats). Prior to occlusion, the mean tissue PO2 levels were 74.5 +/- 2.8 (SE) Torr in blood-perfused CBs and 103.4 +/- 2.6 in Locke-perfused CBs. The O2 consumption rates (VO2) determined from the initial 3 s of the DCs were 1.46 +/- 0.08 and 1.50 +/- 0.10 (SE) ml O2 . 100 g-1 . min-1, respectively, for the blood-perfused and Locke-perfused CBs. The change in total sinus nerve activity from the CB was also measured following stopped flow. The nerve activity began to increase immediately, providing further evidence that classic hypoxia is not the mechanism of chemoreceptor discharge. However, about two-thirds of the increased activity in blood-perfused CBs occurred after tissue PO2 levels fell below 20 Torr. As the CB tissue PO2 decreased, the O2 disappearance rate (-dPO2/dt) also decreased for both experimental conditions, indicating that the CB VO2 varies with O2 concentration. The increase in nerve discharge and O2 disappearance rate can be interpreted by a two-cytochrome model for O2 metabolism, with both high and low affinities.

  18. Spatial and temporal regulation of the metabolism of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species during the early development of pepper (Capsicum annuum) seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Airaki, Morad; Leterrier, Marina; Valderrama, Raquel; Chaki, Mounira; Begara-Morales, Juan C.; Barroso, Juan B.; del Río, Luis A.; Palma, José M.; Corpas, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims The development of seedlings involves many morphological, physiological and biochemical processes, which are controlled by many factors. Some reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS, respectively) are implicated as signal molecules in physiological and phytopathological processes. Pepper (Capsicum annuum) is a very important crop and the goal of this work was to provide a framework of the behaviour of the key elements in the metabolism of ROS and RNS in the main organs of pepper during its development. Methods The main seedling organs (roots, hypocotyls and green cotyledons) of pepper seedlings were analysed 7, 10 and 14 d after germination. Activity and gene expression of the main enzymatic antioxidants (catalase, ascorbate–glutathione cycle enzymes), NADP-generating dehydrogenases and S-nitrosoglutathione reductase were determined. Cellular distribution of nitric oxide (·NO), superoxide radical (O2·–) and peroxynitrite (ONOO–) was investigated using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Key Results The metabolism of ROS and RNS during pepper seedling development was highly regulated and showed significant plasticity, which was co-ordinated among the main seedling organs, resulting in correct development. Catalase showed higher activity in the aerial parts of the seedling (hypocotyls and green cotyledons) whereas roots of 7-d-old seedlings contained higher activity of the enzymatic components of the ascorbate glutathione cycle, NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase and NADP-malic enzyme. Conclusions There is differential regulation of the metabolism of ROS, nitric oxide and NADP dehydrogenases in the different plant organs during seedling development in pepper in the absence of stress. The metabolism of ROS and RNS seems to contribute significantly to plant development since their components are involved directly or indirectly in many metabolic pathways. Thus, specific molecules such as H2O2 and NO have implications for signalling

  19. Linking neuronal brain activity to the glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Energy homeostasis ensures the functionality of the entire organism. The human brain as a missing link in the global regulation of the complex whole body energy metabolism is subject to recent investigation. The goal of this study is to gain insight into the influence of neuronal brain activity on cerebral and peripheral energy metabolism. In particular, the tight link between brain energy supply and metabolic responses of the organism is of interest. We aim to identifying regulatory elements of the human brain in the whole body energy homeostasis. Methods First, we introduce a general mathematical model describing the human whole body energy metabolism. It takes into account the two central roles of the brain in terms of energy metabolism. The brain is considered as energy consumer as well as regulatory instance. Secondly, we validate our mathematical model by experimental data. Cerebral high-energy phosphate content and peripheral glucose metabolism are measured in healthy men upon neuronal activation induced by transcranial direct current stimulation versus sham stimulation. By parameter estimation we identify model parameters that provide insight into underlying neurophysiological processes. Identified parameters reveal effects of neuronal activity on regulatory mechanisms of systemic glucose metabolism. Results Our examinations support the view that the brain increases its glucose supply upon neuronal activation. The results indicate that the brain supplies itself with energy according to its needs, and preeminence of cerebral energy supply is reflected. This mechanism ensures balanced cerebral energy homeostasis. Conclusions The hypothesis of the central role of the brain in whole body energy homeostasis as active controller is supported. PMID:23988084

  20. Seasonal changes in thermal environment and metabolic enzyme activity in the diamondback terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin).

    PubMed

    Williard, Amanda Southwood; Harden, Leigh Anne

    2011-04-01

    Diamondback terrapins experience broad fluctuations in temperature on both a daily and seasonal basis in their estuarine environment. We measured metabolic enzyme activity in terrapin muscle tissue to assess thermal dependence and the role of temperature in seasonal metabolic downregulation in this species. Activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), pyruvate kinase (PK), citrate synthase (CS), and cytochrome c oxidase (CCO) was assayed at 10, 20, 30, and 40 °C for tissue collected during summer and winter. The Q(10) for enzyme activity varied between 1.31 and 2.11 within the temperature range at which terrapins were active (20-40 °C). The Q(10) for LDH, CS, and CCO varied between 1.39 and 1.76 and between 10 and 20 °C, but PK exhibited heightened thermal sensitivity within this lower temperature range, with a Q(10) of 2.90 for summer-collected tissue and 5.55 for winter-collected tissue. There was no significant effect of season on activity of LDH or PK, but activity of CS and CCO was significantly lower in winter-collected tissue compared with summer-collected tissue. Results indicate that temperature effects contribute to seasonal metabolic downregulation and dormancy in terrapins, but other environmental factors (i.e. oxygen availability), as well as seasonal shifts in blood biochemistry and circulating hormones may also play an important role.

  1. MFN1 deacetylation activates adaptive mitochondrial fusion and protects metabolically challenged mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo-Yong; Kapur, Meghan; Li, Ming; Choi, Moon-Chang; Choi, Sujin; Kim, Hak-June; Kim, Inhye; Lee, Eunji; Taylor, J Paul; Yao, Tso-Pang

    2014-11-15

    Fasting and glucose shortage activate a metabolic switch that shifts more energy production to mitochondria. This metabolic adaptation ensures energy supply, but also elevates the risk of mitochondrial oxidative damage. Here, we present evidence that metabolically challenged mitochondria undergo active fusion to suppress oxidative stress. In response to glucose starvation, mitofusin 1 (MFN1) becomes associated with the protein deacetylase HDAC6. This interaction leads to MFN1 deacetylation and activation, promoting mitochondrial fusion. Deficiency in HDAC6 or MFN1 prevents mitochondrial fusion induced by glucose deprivation. Unexpectedly, failure to undergo fusion does not acutely affect mitochondrial adaptive energy production; instead, it causes excessive production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and oxidative damage, a defect suppressed by an acetylation-resistant MFN1 mutant. In mice subjected to fasting, skeletal muscle mitochondria undergo dramatic fusion. Remarkably, fasting-induced mitochondrial fusion is abrogated in HDAC6-knockout mice, resulting in extensive mitochondrial degeneration. These findings show that adaptive mitochondrial fusion protects metabolically challenged mitochondria.

  2. Plasticity in body temperature and metabolic capacity sustains winter activity in a small endotherm (Rattus fuscipes).

    PubMed

    Glanville, Elsa J; Seebacher, Frank

    2010-03-01

    Small mammals that remain active throughout the year at a constant body temperature have a much greater energy and food requirement in winter. Lower body temperatures in winter may offset the increased energetic cost of remaining active in the cold, if cellular metabolism is not constrained by a negative thermodynamic effect. We aimed to determine whether variable body temperatures can be advantageous for small endotherms by testing the hypothesis that body temperature fluctuates seasonally in a wild rat (Rattus fuscipes); conferring an energy saving and reducing food requirements during resource restricted winter. Additionally we tested whether changes in body temperature affected tissue specific metabolic capacity. Winter acclimatized rats had significantly lower body temperatures and thicker fur than summer acclimatized rats. Mitochondrial oxygen consumption and the activity of enzymes that control oxidative (citrate synthase, cytochrome c-oxidase) and anaerobic (lactate dehydrogenase) metabolism were elevated in winter and were not negatively affected by the lower body temperature. Energy transfer modeling showed that lower body temperatures in winter combined with increased fur thickness to confer a 25 kJ day(-1) energy saving, with up to 50% owing to reduced body temperature alone. We show that phenotypic plasticity at multiple levels of organization is an important component of the response of a small endotherm to winter. Mitochondrial function compensates for lower winter body temperatures, buffering metabolic heat production capacity.

  3. Active Oxygen Generator by Silent Discharge and Oxidation Power in Formation of Oxide Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Kawagoe, Yasuyuki; Tsukazaki, Hisashi; Yamanishi, Kenichiro

    We have studied the low pressure silent discharge type active oxygen generator in terms of the application to the formation of oxide thin films. In this paper the oxidation power of active oxygen in the oxide thin film formation is compared with that of oxygen and ozone by forming silicon oxide thin films. It was confirmed that the oxidation power is in turn of active oxygen > ozone > oxygen from the experimental result of the number of x in SiOx thin film. Furthermore we applied active oxygen to the formation of the thin film high temperature super conductor and active oxygen was found to be effective to the formation of the thin film with high performance.

  4. Correlation between the sorption of dissolved oxygen onto chitosan and its antimicrobial activity against Esherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gylienė, Ona; Servienė, Elena; Vepštaitė, Iglė; Binkienė, Rima; Baranauskas, Mykolas; Lukša, Juliana

    2015-10-20

    The ability of chitosan to adsorb dissolved oxygen from solution depends on its physical shape and is related to the surface area. Depending on conditions chitosan is capable of adsorbing or releasing oxygen. Chitosan, modificated by the substances possessing antimicrobial activity, such as succinic acid, Pd(II) ions, metallic Pd or Ag, distinctly increases the ability to adsorb the dissolved oxygen. The additional treatment of chitosan with air oxygen or electrochemically produced oxygen also increases the uptake of dissolved oxygen by chitosan. A strong correlation between the amount of oxygen adsorbed onto chitosan and its antimicrobial activity against Esherichia coli has been observed. This finding suggests that one of the sources of antimicrobial activity of chitosan is the ability to sorb dissolved oxygen, along with other well-known factors such as physical state and chemical composition.

  5. STAT3 Activities and Energy Metabolism: Dangerous Liaisons

    PubMed Central

    Camporeale, Annalisa; Demaria, Marco; Monteleone, Emanuele; Giorgi, Carlotta; Wieckowski, Mariusz R.; Pinton, Paolo; Poli, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    STAT3 mediates cytokine and growth factor receptor signalling, becoming transcriptionally active upon tyrosine 705 phosphorylation (Y-P). Constitutively Y-P STAT3 is observed in many tumors that become addicted to its activity, and STAT3 transcriptional activation is required for tumor transformation downstream of several oncogenes. We have recently demonstrated that constitutively active STAT3 drives a metabolic switch towards aerobic glycolysis through the transcriptional induction of Hif-1α and the down-regulation of mitochondrial activity, in both MEF cells expressing constitutively active STAT3 (Stat3C/C) and STAT3-addicted tumor cells. This novel metabolic function is likely involved in mediating pre-oncogenic features in the primary Stat3C/C MEFs such as resistance to apoptosis and senescence and rapid proliferation. Moreover, it strongly contributes to the ability of primary Stat3C/C MEFs to undergo malignant transformation upon spontaneous immortalization, a feature that may explain the well known causative link between STAT3 constitutive activity and tumor transformation under chronic inflammatory conditions. Taken together with the recently uncovered role of STAT3 in regulating energy metabolism from within the mitochondrion when phosphorylated on Ser 727, these data place STAT3 at the center of a hub regulating energy metabolism under different conditions, in most cases promoting cell survival, proliferation and malignant transformation even though with distinct mechanisms. PMID:25089666

  6. Influence of physical activity to bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Drenjančević, Ines; Davidović Cvetko, Erna

    2013-02-01

    Bone remodeling is a lifetime process. Peak bone mass is achieved in the twenties, and that value is very important for skeleton health in older years of life. Modern life style with its diet poor in nutrients, and very low intensity of physical activity negatively influences health in general, and bone health as well. Bones are adapting to changes in load, so applying mechanical strain to bones results in greater bone mass and hardness. That makes physical activity important in maintaining skeleton health. Numerous studies confirm good influence of regular exercising to bone health, and connection of physical activity in youth to better bone density in older age. To activate bone remodeling mechanisms, it is necessary to apply mechanical strain to bones by exercise. Considering global problem of bone loss and osteoporosis new ways of activating young people to practice sports and active stile of life are necessary to maintain skeleton health and health in general. This paper aims to review physiological mechanisms of bone remodeling that are influenced by physical exercise.

  7. A ligand field chemistry of oxygen generation by the oxygen-evolving complex and synthetic active sites.

    PubMed

    Betley, Theodore A; Surendranath, Yogesh; Childress, Montana V; Alliger, Glen E; Fu, Ross; Cummins, Christopher C; Nocera, Daniel G

    2008-03-27

    Oxygen-oxygen bond formation and O2 generation occur from the S4 state of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC). Several mechanistic possibilities have been proposed for water oxidation, depending on the formal oxidation state of the Mn atoms. All fall under two general classifications: the AB mechanism in which nucleophilic oxygen (base, B) attacks electrophilic oxygen (acid, A) of the Mn4Ca cluster or the RC mechanism in which radical-like oxygen species couple within OEC. The critical intermediate in either mechanism involves a metal oxo, though the nature of this oxo for AB and RC mechanisms is disparate. In the case of the AB mechanism, assembly of an even-electron count, high-valent metal-oxo proximate to a hydroxide is needed whereas, in an RC mechanism, two odd-electron count, high-valent metal oxos are required. Thus the two mechanisms give rise to very different design criteria for functional models of the OEC active site. This discussion presents the electron counts and ligand geometries that support metal oxos for AB and RC O-O bond-forming reactions. The construction of architectures that bring two oxygen functionalities together under the purview of the AB and RC scenarios are described.

  8. Oxidative metabolism in guinea pig ventricular myocytes protected from proteolytic enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Bailey, L E; Carlos, H; Amian, A; Moon, K E

    1987-07-01

    Surface structures on guinea pig ventricular myocytes were protected from proteolytic enzyme activity with 100 KIU.ml-2 aprotinin during mechanical disaggregation. Intact myocytes, approximately 7.5 X 10(6) cells.g-1 ventricular wet weight, were separated from debris and damaged cells using Cytodex I tissue culture supports. Cellular ultrastructure did not differ from that observed in intact tissue. Neither spontaneous contractions nor contracture were ever observed in these myocytes in calcium concentrations of 10 mmol.litre-1. Dinitrophenol (0.2 mmol. litre-1) uncoupled respiration in the myocytes but only after the sarcolemma had been disrupted with Triton X100. The adenosine diphosphate to oxygen ratio of mitochondria isolated from the myocytes was 2.4(0.2) and the respiratory control index 2.6(0.3). Calcium (1.8 mmol.litre-1) increased oxygen uptake in the presence of 10 mmol.litre-1 pyruvate or 11 mmol.litre-1 glucose but not 17 mmol. litre-1 succinate. Succinate dependent oxygen consumption was greater than pyruvate dependent oxygen consumption (1090.0(190.0) and 40.1(0.8) nl.min-1.mg-1 protein respectively). The Crabtree effect was present. Oxidative metabolism was normal in cells stored at 10 degrees C for seven days but deteriorated rapidly thereafter. The results indicate that myocytes disaggregated by this procedure retain many of the morphological and metabolic characteristics of intact cardiac muscle cells and are relatively homogeneous with respect to calcium tolerance and metabolic function.

  9. Effect of oxygen on the microbial activities of thermophilic anaerobic biomass.

    PubMed

    Pedizzi, C; Regueiro, L; Rodriguez-Verde, I; Lema, J M; Carballa, M

    2016-07-01

    Low oxygen levels (μgO2L(-1)) in anaerobic reactors are quite common and no relevant consequences are expected. On the contrary, higher concentrations could affect the process. This work aimed to study the influence of oxygen (4.3 and 8.8mgO2L(-1), respectively) on the different microbial activities (hydrolytic, acidogenic and methanogenic) of thermophilic anaerobic biomass and on the methanogenic community structure. Batch tests in presence of oxygen were conducted using specific substrates for each biological activity and a blank (with minimum oxygen) was included. No effect of oxygen was observed on the hydrolytic and acidogenic activities. In contrast, the methane production rate decreased by 40% in all oxygenated batches and the development of active archaeal community was slower in presence of 8.8mgO2L(-1). However, despite this sensitivity of methanogens to oxygen at saturation levels, the inhibition was reversible.

  10. Effects of activation of endocannabinoid system on myocardial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Polak, Agnieszka; Harasim, Ewa; Chabowski, Adrian

    2016-05-21

    Endocannabinoids exert their effect on the regulation of energy homeostasis via activation of specific receptors. They control food intake, secretion of insulin, lipids and glucose metabolism, lipid storage. Long chain fatty acids are the main myocardial energy substrate. However, the heart exerts enormous metabolic flexibility emphasized by its ability to utilzation not only fatty acids, but also glucose, lactate and ketone bodies. Endocannabinoids can directly act on the cardiomyocytes through the CB1 and CB2 receptors present in cardiomyocytes. It appears that direct activation of CB1 receptors promotes increased lipogenesis, pericardial steatosis and bioelectrical dysfunction of the heart. In contrast, stimulation of CB2 receptors exhibits cardioprotective properties, helping to maintain appropriate amount of ATP in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, the effects of endocannabinoids at both the central nervous system and peripheral tissues, such as liver, pancreas, or adipose tissue, resulting indirectly in plasma availability of energy substrates and affects myocardial metabolism. To date, there is little evidence that describes effects of activation of the endocannabinoid system in the cardiovascular system under physiological conditions. In the present paper the impact of metabolic diseases, i. e. obesity and diabetes, as well as the cardiovascular diseases - hypertension, myocardial ischemia and myocardial infarction on the deregulation of the endocannabinoid system and its effect on the metabolism are described.

  11. Pyruvate modifies metabolic flux and nutrient sensing during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in an immature swine model

    PubMed Central

    Ledee, Dolena R.; Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly Priddy, Colleen M.; Olson, Aaron K.; Isern, Nancy; Robillard-Frayne, Isabelle; Des Rosiers, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides mechanical circulatory support for infants and children with postoperative cardiopulmonary failure. Nutritional support is mandatory during ECMO although specific actions for substrates on the heart have not been delineated. Prior work shows that enhancing pyruvate oxidation promotes successful weaning from ECMO. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that prolonged systemic pyruvate supplementation activates pyruvate oxidation in an immature swine model in vivo. Twelve male mixed-breed Yorkshire piglets (age 30–49 days) received systemic infusion of either normal saline (group C) or pyruvate (group P) during the final 6 h of 8 h of ECMO. Over the final hour, piglets received [2-13C] pyruvate, as a reference substrate for oxidation, and [13C6]-l-leucine, as an indicator for amino acid oxidation and protein synthesis. A significant increase in lactate and pyruvate concentrations occurred, along with an increase in the absolute concentration of the citric acid cycle intermediates. An increase in anaplerotic flux through pyruvate carboxylation in group P occurred compared with no change in pyruvate oxidation. Additionally, pyruvate promoted an increase in the phosphorylation state of several nutrient-sensitive enzymes, like AMP-activated protein kinase and acetyl CoA carboxylase, suggesting activation for fatty acid oxidation. Pyruvate also promoted O-GlcNAcylation through the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway. In conclusion, although prolonged pyruvate supplementation did not alter pyruvate oxidation, it did elicit changes in nutrient- and energy-sensitive pathways. Therefore, the observed results support the further study of pyruvate and its downstream effect on cardiac function. PMID:25910802

  12. Metabolic activation of benzodiazepines by CYP3A4.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Katsuhiko; Katoh, Miki; Okumura, Hirotoshi; Nakagawa, Nao; Negishi, Toru; Hashizume, Takanori; Nakajima, Miki; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2009-02-01

    Cytochrome P450 3A4 is the predominant isoform in liver, and it metabolizes more than 50% of the clinical drugs commonly used. However, CYP3A4 is also responsible for metabolic activation of drugs, leading to liver injury. Benzodiazepines are widely used as hypnotics and sedatives for anxiety, but some of them induce liver injury in humans. To clarify whether benzodiazepines are metabolically activated, 14 benzodiazepines were investigated for their cytotoxic effects on HepG2 cells treated with recombinant CYP3A4. By exposure to 100 microM flunitrazepam, nimetazepam, or nitrazepam, the cell viability in the presence of CYP3A4 decreased more than 25% compared with that of the control. In contrast, in the case of other benzodiazepines, the changes in the cell viability between CYP3A4 and control Supersomes were less than 10%. These results suggested that nitrobenzodiazepines such as flunitrazepam, nimetazepam, and nitrazepam were metabolically activated by CYP3A4, which resulted in cytotoxicity. To identify the reactive metabolite, the glutathione adducts of flunitrazepam and nimetazepam were investigated by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The structural analysis for the glutathione adducts of flunitrazepam indicated that a nitrogen atom in the side chain of flunitrazepam was conjugated with the thiol of glutathione. Therefore, the presence of a nitro group in the side chain of benzodiazepines may play a crucial role in the metabolic activation by CYP3A4. The present study suggested that metabolic activation by CYP3A4 was one of the mechanisms of liver injury by nitrobenzodiazepines.

  13. Effects of nicardipine and nisoldipine on myocardial metabolism, coronary blood flow and oxygen supply in angina pectoris.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, M F; Vincent, M F; Van Hoof, F; Van den Berghe, G; Charlier, A A; Pouleur, H

    1984-12-01

    The effects of the calcium antagonists nicardipine and nisoldipine on left ventricular (LV) metabolism were analyzed in 32 patients with angina pectoris. Measurements were made at a fixed heart rate under the basal state and during a cold pressor test (CPT). After administration of the drugs, coronary blood flow increased significantly and the mean aortic pressure decreased by 10% (p less than 0.01) in the basal state and by 11% (p less than 0.01) during CPT. Despite the reduction in pressure-rate product, myocardial oxygen consumption was unchanged in the basal state (18 +/- 4 vs 19 +/- 4 ml/min, difference not significant) and during CPT (21 +/- 5 vs 21 +/- 5 ml/min, difference not significant); this discrepancy between a reduced pressure-rate product and an unchanged oxygen consumption was also noted when nicardipine was given after propranolol (0.1 mg/kg; 12 patients). Both agents also increased LV lactate uptake, particularly during CPT (+13 mumol/min, p less than 0.05 vs control CPT) and reduced LV glutamine production. In 10 patients in whom 14C-lactate was infused, the chemical LV lactate extraction ratio increased more than the 14C-lactate extraction ratio after administration of the drugs, indicating a reduction in LV lactate production. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that nicardipine and nisoldipine improve perfusion and aerobic metabolism in chronically ischemic areas, resulting in an augmented oxygen consumption and in a reduced lactate production.

  14. Quantifying the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen by combining diffuse correlation spectroscopy and time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Verdecchia, Kyle; Diop, Mamadou; Lee, Ting-Yim; St Lawrence, Keith

    2013-02-01

    Preterm infants are highly susceptible to ischemic brain injury; consequently, continuous bedside monitoring to detect ischemia before irreversible damage occurs would improve patient outcome. In addition to monitoring cerebral blood flow (CBF), assessing the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) would be beneficial considering that metabolic thresholds can be used to evaluate tissue viability. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that changes in absolute CMRO2 could be measured by combining diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) with time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (TR-NIRS). Absolute CBF was determined using bolus-tracking TR-NIRS to calibrate the DCS measurements. Cerebral venous blood oxygenation (SvO2) was determined by multiwavelength TR-NIRS measurements, the accuracy of which was assessed by directly measuring the oxygenation of sagittal sinus blood. In eight newborn piglets, CMRO2 was manipulated by varying the anesthetics and by injecting sodium cyanide. No significant differences were found between the two sets of SvO2 measurements obtained by TR-NIRS or sagittal sinus blood samples and the corresponding CMRO2 measurements. Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean CMRO2 difference of 0.0268 ± 0.8340 mLO2/100 g/min between the two techniques over a range from 0.3 to 4 mL O2/100 g/min.

  15. Quantifying the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen by combining diffuse correlation spectroscopy and time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdecchia, Kyle; Diop, Mamadou; Lee, Ting-Yim; St. Lawrence, Keith

    2013-02-01

    Preterm infants are highly susceptible to ischemic brain injury; consequently, continuous bedside monitoring to detect ischemia before irreversible damage occurs would improve patient outcome. In addition to monitoring cerebral blood flow (CBF), assessing the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) would be beneficial considering that metabolic thresholds can be used to evaluate tissue viability. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that changes in absolute CMRO2 could be measured by combining diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) with time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (TR-NIRS). Absolute CBF was determined using bolus-tracking TR-NIRS to calibrate the DCS measurements. Cerebral venous blood oxygenation (SvO2) was determined by multiwavelength TR-NIRS measurements, the accuracy of which was assessed by directly measuring the oxygenation of sagittal sinus blood. In eight newborn piglets, CMRO2 was manipulated by varying the anesthetics and by injecting sodium cyanide. No significant differences were found between the two sets of SvO2 measurements obtained by TR-NIRS or sagittal sinus blood samples and the corresponding CMRO2 measurements. Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean CMRO2 difference of 0.0268±0.8340 mL O2/100 g/min between the two techniques over a range from 0.3 to 4 mL O2/100 g/min.

  16. Enzyme activities of D-glucose metabolism in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Tsai, C S; Shi, J L; Beehler, B W; Beck, B

    1992-12-01

    The activities of key enzymes that are members of D-glucose metabolic pathways in Schizosaccharomyces pombe undergoing respirative, respirofermentative, and fermentative metabolisms are monitored. The steady-state activities of glycolytic enzymes, except phosphofructokinase, decrease with a reduced efficiency in D-glucose utilization by yeast continuous culture. On the other hand, the enzymic activities of pentose monophosphate pathway reach the maximum when the cell mass production of the cultures is optimum. Enzymes of tricarboxylate cycle exhibit the maximum activities at approximately the washout rate. The steady-state activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex increases rapidly when D-glucose is efficiently utilized. By comparison, the activity of pyruvate decarboxylase begins to increase only when ethanol production occurs. Depletion of dissolved oxygen suppresses the activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex but facilitates that of pyruvate decarboxylase. Acetate greatly enhances the acetyl CoA synthetase activity. Similarly, ethanol stimulates alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activities. Evidence for the existence of alcohol dehydrogenase isozymes in the fission yeast is presented.

  17. Metabolically active microbial communities in uranium-contaminated subsurface sediments.

    PubMed

    Akob, Denise M; Mills, Heath J; Kostka, Joel E

    2007-01-01

    In order to develop effective bioremediation strategies for radionuclide contaminants, the composition and metabolic potential of microbial communities need to be better understood, especially in highly contaminated subsurface sediments for which little cultivation-independent information is available. In this study, we characterized metabolically active and total microbial communities associated with uranium-contaminated subsurface sediments along geochemical gradients. DNA and RNA were extracted and amplified from four sediment-depth intervals representing moderately acidic (pH 3.7) to near-neutral (pH 6.7) conditions. Phylotypes related to Proteobacteria (Alpha-, Beta-, Delta- and Gammaproteobacteria), Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Planctomycetes were detected in DNA- and RNA-derived clone libraries. Diversity and numerical dominance of phylotypes were observed to correspond to changes in sediment geochemistry and rates of microbial activity, suggesting that geochemical conditions have selected for well-adapted taxa. Sequences closely related to nitrate-reducing bacteria represented 28% and 43% of clones from the total and metabolically active fractions of the microbial community, respectively. This study provides the first detailed analysis of total and metabolically active microbial communities in radionuclide-contaminated subsurface sediments. Our microbial community analysis, in conjunction with rates of microbial activity, points to several groups of nitrate-reducers that appear to be well adapted to environmental conditions common to radionuclide-contaminated sites.

  18. Physical activity for the prevention and treatment of metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Montesi, Luca; Moscatiello, Simona; Malavolti, Marcella; Marzocchi, Rebecca; Marchesini, Giulio

    2013-12-01

    Metabolic syndrome and its various features (obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease) are increasing worldwide and constitute a severe risk for the sustainability of the present universal Italian health care system. Lifestyle interventions should be the first therapeutic strategy to prevent/treat metabolic diseases, far before pharmacologic treatment. The role of diet and weight loss has been fully ascertained, whereas the role of physical activity is frequently overlooked both by physicians and by patients. Physical activity has favorable effects on all components of the metabolic syndrome and on the resulting cardiovascular risk, the cornerstone in the development of cardiometabolic diseases. The quantity and the frequency of physical activity necessary to produce beneficial effects has not been defined as yet, but brisk walking is considered particularly appropriate, as it can be practiced by a large number of individuals, without any additional cost, and has a low rate of injury. The effects of exercise and leisure time physical activity extend from prevention to treatment of the various components of the metabolic syndrome, as well as to mood and quality of life. Any effort should be done to favor adherence to protocols of physical activity in the community.

  19. Reactive oxygen species production and redox state in parthenogenetic and sperm-mediated bovine oocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Morado, S; Cetica, P; Beconi, M; Thompson, J G; Dalvit, G

    2013-05-01

    The knowledge concerning redox and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated regulation of early embryo development is scarce and remains controversial. The aim of this work was to determine ROS production and redox state during early in vitro embryo development in sperm-mediated and parthenogenetic activation of bovine oocytes. Sperm-mediated oocyte activation was carried out in IVF-modified synthetic oviductal fluid (mSOF) with frozen-thawed semen. Parthenogenetic activation was performed in TALP plus ionomycin and then in IVF-mSOF with 6-dimethylaminopurine plus cytochalasin B. Embryos were cultured in IVF-mSOF. ROS and redox state were determined at each 2-h interval (7-24 h from activation) by 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate and RedoxSensor Red CC-1 fluorochromes respectively. ROS levels and redox state differed between activated and non-activated oocytes (P<0.05 by ANOVA). In sperm-activated oocytes, an increase was observed between 15 and 19 h (P<0.05). Conversely, in parthenogenetically activated oocytes, we observed a decrease at 9 h (P<0.05). In sperm-activated oocytes, ROS fluctuated throughout the 24 h, presenting peaks around 7, 19, and 24 h (P<0.05), while in parthenogenetic activation, peaks were detected at 7, 11, and 17 h (P<0.05). In the present work, we found clear distinctive metabolic patterns between normal and parthenogenetic zygotes. Oxidative activity and ROS production are an integral part of bovine zygote behavior, and defining a temporal pattern of change may be linked with developmental competence.

  20. Activation of SAT1 engages polyamine metabolism with p53-mediated ferroptotic responses.

    PubMed

    Ou, Yang; Wang, Shang-Jui; Li, Dawei; Chu, Bo; Gu, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Although p53-mediated cell-cycle arrest, senescence, and apoptosis remain critical barriers to cancer development, the emerging role of p53 in cell metabolism, oxidative responses, and ferroptotic cell death has been a topic of great interest. Nevertheless, it is unclear how p53 orchestrates its activities in multiple metabolic pathways into tumor suppressive effects. Here, we identified the SAT1 (spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase 1) gene as a transcription target of p53. SAT1 is a rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine catabolism critically involved in the conversion of spermidine and spermine back to putrescine. Surprisingly, we found that activation of SAT1 expression induces lipid peroxidation and sensitizes cells to undergo ferroptosis upon reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced stress, which also leads to suppression of tumor growth in xenograft tumor models. Notably, SAT1 expression is down-regulated in human tumors, and CRISPR-cas9-mediated knockout of SAT1 expression partially abrogates p53-mediated ferroptosis. Moreover, SAT1 induction is correlated with the expression levels of arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase (ALOX15), and SAT1-induced ferroptosis is significantly abrogated in the presence of PD146176, a specific inhibitor of ALOX15. Thus, our findings uncover a metabolic target of p53 involved in ferroptotic cell death and provide insight into the regulation of polyamine metabolism and ferroptosis-mediated tumor suppression.

  1. Molecular Evidence for Metabolically Active Bacteria in the Atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Ann M.; Bohannan, Brendan J. M.; Jaffe, Daniel A.; Levin, David A.; Green, Jessica L.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial metabolisms are responsible for critical chemical transformations in nearly all environments, including oceans, freshwater, and soil. Despite the ubiquity of bacteria in the atmosphere, little is known about the metabolic functioning of atmospheric bacterial communities. To gain a better understanding of the metabolism of bacterial communities in the atmosphere, we used a combined empirical and model-based approach to investigate the structure and composition of potentially active bacterial communities in air sampled at a high elevation research station. We found that the composition of the putatively active bacterial community (assayed via rRNA) differed significantly from the total bacterial community (assayed via rDNA). Rare taxa in the total (rDNA) community were disproportionately active relative to abundant taxa, and members of the order Rhodospirillales had the highest potential for activity. We developed theory to explore the effects of random sampling from the rRNA and rDNA communities on observed differences between the communities. We found that random sampling, particularly in cases where active taxa are rare in the rDNA community, will give rise to observed differences in community composition including the occurrence of “phantom taxa”, taxa which are detected in the rRNA community but not the rDNA community. We show that the use of comparative rRNA/rDNA techniques can reveal the structure and composition of the metabolically active portion of bacterial communities. Our observations suggest that metabolically active bacteria exist in the atmosphere and that these communities may be involved in the cycling of organic compounds in the atmosphere. PMID:27252689

  2. Association of Active and Sedentary Behaviors with Postmenopausal Estrogen Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Dallal, Cher M.; Brinton, Louise A.; Matthews, Charles E.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Hartman, Terryl J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Falk, Roni T.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Xu, Xia; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Gierach, Gretchen L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Physical activity may reduce endogenous estrogens but few studies have assessed effects on estrogen metabolism and none have evaluated sedentary behavior in relation to estrogen metabolism. We assessed relationships between accelerometer-measured physical activity and sedentary behavior and 15 urinary estrogens and estrogen metabolites (EM) among postmenopausal controls from a population-based breast cancer case-control study conducted in Poland (2000-2003). Methods Postmenopausal women (N=542) were ages 40 to 72 years and not currently using hormone therapy. Accelerometers, worn for seven days, were used to derive measures of average activity (counts/day) and sedentary behavior (<100 counts/min/day). EM were measured in 12-hour urine samples using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. EM were analyzed individually, in metabolic pathways (C-2, -4, or -16), and as ratios relative to parent estrogens. Geometric means of EM by tertiles of accelerometer-measures, adjusted for age and body mass, were computed using linear models. Results High activity was associated with lower levels of estrone and estradiol (p-trend=0.01) while increased sedentary time was positively associated with these parent estrogens (p-trend=0.04). Inverse associations were observed between high activity and 2-methoxyestradiol, 4-methoxyestradiol, 17-epiestriol and 16-epiestriol (p-trend=0.03). Sedentary time was positively associated with methylated catechols in the 2- and 4-hydroxylation pathways (p-trend≤0.04). Women in the highest tertile of activity had increased hydroxylation at the C-2, -4, and -16 sites relative to parent estrogens (p-trend≤0.02) while increased sedentary time was associated with a lower 16-pathway:parent estrogen ratio (p-trend=0.01). Conclusions Higher activity was associated with lower urinary estrogens, possibly through increased estrogen hydroxylation and subsequent metabolism, while sedentary behavior may reduce metabolism. PMID:26460631

  3. Influence of mechanical and metabolic strain on the oxygen consumption slow component during forward pulled running.

    PubMed

    Avogadro, Patrick; Kyröläinen, Heikki; Belli, Alain

    2004-10-01

    The possible influence of increased eccentric mechanical work on the increase in oxygen uptake ( V(.)O(2)) after 3 min of running (Delta V(.)O(2)) was investigated through forward pulled running. Ten subjects ran at individually predetermined constant velocity on a treadmill, while being pulled forward. Ground reaction forces, expired gas and EMGs from leg muscles were collected after 3 min and at the end of the run. V(.)O(2) and mechanical work were then calculated. The amplitude of Delta V(.)O(2) was 138 (139) ml x min(-1) [mean (SD)]. Increased ventilation explained only 8% of Delta V(.)O(2). Stride frequency slightly decreased, inducing a similar decrease in internal work and total mechanical work (all P<0.01), while integrated EMG showed no modifications. It was concluded that Delta V(.)O(2) does not come from either an increase in mechanical work production or an increase in muscular activity. Delta V(.)O(2) could come from a lower muscle efficiency that could be due to a modification of fibre type recruitment.

  4. Dehydration affects cerebral blood flow but not its metabolic rate for oxygen during maximal exercise in trained humans.

    PubMed

    Trangmar, Steven J; Chiesa, Scott T; Stock, Christopher G; Kalsi, Kameljit K; Secher, Niels H; González-Alonso, José

    2014-07-15

    Intense exercise is associated with a reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF), but regulation of CBF during strenuous exercise in the heat with dehydration is unclear. We assessed internal (ICA) and common carotid artery (CCA) haemodynamics (indicative of CBF and extra-cranial blood flow), middle cerebral artery velocity (MCA Vmean), arterial-venous differences and blood temperature in 10 trained males during incremental cycling to exhaustion in the heat (35°C) in control, dehydrated and rehydrated states. Dehydration reduced body mass (75.8 ± 3 vs. 78.2 ± 3 kg), increased internal temperature (38.3 ± 0.1 vs. 36.8 ± 0.1°C), impaired exercise capacity (269 ± 11 vs. 336 ± 14 W), and lowered ICA and MCA Vmean by 12-23% without compromising CCA blood flow. During euhydrated incremental exercise on a separate day, however, exercise capacity and ICA, MCA Vmean and CCA dynamics were preserved. The fast decline in cerebral perfusion with dehydration was accompanied by increased O2 extraction (P < 0.05), resulting in a maintained cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO2). In all conditions, reductions in ICA and MCA Vmean were associated with declining cerebral vascular conductance, increasing jugular venous noradrenaline, and falling arterial carbon dioxide tension (P aCO 2) (R(2) ≥ 0.41, P ≤ 0.01) whereas CCA flow and conductance were related to elevated blood temperature. In conclusion, dehydration accelerated the decline in CBF by decreasing P aCO 2 and enhancing vasoconstrictor activity. However, the circulatory strain on the human brain during maximal exercise does not compromise CMRO2 because of compensatory increases in O2 extraction.

  5. Dehydration affects cerebral blood flow but not its metabolic rate for oxygen during maximal exercise in trained humans

    PubMed Central

    Trangmar, Steven J; Chiesa, Scott T; Stock, Christopher G; Kalsi, Kameljit K; Secher, Niels H; González-Alonso, José

    2014-01-01

    Intense exercise is associated with a reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF), but regulation of CBF during strenuous exercise in the heat with dehydration is unclear. We assessed internal (ICA) and common carotid artery (CCA) haemodynamics (indicative of CBF and extra-cranial blood flow), middle cerebral artery velocity (MCA Vmean), arterial–venous differences and blood temperature in 10 trained males during incremental cycling to exhaustion in the heat (35°C) in control, dehydrated and rehydrated states. Dehydration reduced body mass (75.8 ± 3 vs. 78.2 ± 3 kg), increased internal temperature (38.3 ± 0.1 vs. 36.8 ± 0.1°C), impaired exercise capacity (269 ± 11 vs. 336 ± 14 W), and lowered ICA and MCA Vmean by 12–23% without compromising CCA blood flow. During euhydrated incremental exercise on a separate day, however, exercise capacity and ICA, MCA Vmean and CCA dynamics were preserved. The fast decline in cerebral perfusion with dehydration was accompanied by increased O2 extraction (P < 0.05), resulting in a maintained cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO2). In all conditions, reductions in ICA and MCA Vmean were associated with declining cerebral vascular conductance, increasing jugular venous noradrenaline, and falling arterial carbon dioxide tension () (R2 ≥ 0.41, P ≤ 0.01) whereas CCA flow and conductance were related to elevated blood temperature. In conclusion, dehydration accelerated the decline in CBF by decreasing and enhancing vasoconstrictor activity. However, the circulatory strain on the human brain during maximal exercise does not compromise CMRO2 because of compensatory increases in O2 extraction. PMID:24835170

  6. 2D-Visualization of metabolic activity with planar optical chemical sensors (optodes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, R. J.; Liebsch, G.

    2015-12-01

    Microbia plays an outstandingly important role in many hydrologic compartments, such as e.g. the benthic community in sediments, or biologically active microorganisms in the capillary fringe, in ground water, or soil. Oxygen, pH, and CO2 are key factors and indicators for microbial activity. They can be measured using optical chemical sensors. These sensors record changing fluorescence properties of specific indicator dyes. The signals can be measured in a non-contact mode, even through transparent walls, which is important for many lab-experiments. They can measure in closed (transparent) systems, without sampling or intruding into the sample. They do not consume the analytes while measuring, are fully reversible and able to measure in non-stirred solutions. These sensors can be applied as high precision fiberoptic sensors (for profiling), robust sensor spots, or as planar sensors for 2D visualization (imaging). Imaging enables to detect thousands of measurement spots at the same time and generate 2D analyte maps over a region of interest. It allows for comparing different regions within one recorded image, visualizing spatial analyte gradients, or more important to identify hot spots of metabolic activity. We present ready-to-use portable imaging systems for the analytes oxygen, pH, and CO2. They consist of a detector unit, planar sensor foils and a software for easy data recording and evaluation. Sensors foils for various analytes and measurement ranges enable visualizing metabolic activity or analyte changes in the desired range. Dynamics of metabolic activity can be detected in one shot or over long time periods. We demonstrate the potential of this analytical technique by presenting experiments on benthic disturbance-recovery dynamics in sediments and microbial degradation of organic material in the capillary fringe. We think this technique is a new tool to further understand how microbial and geochemical processes are linked in (not solely) hydrologic

  7. Oxygen transfer dynamics and activated sludge floc structure under different sludge retention times at low dissolved oxygen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Fan, Haitao; Liu, Xiuhong; Wang, Hao; Han, Yunping; Qi, Lu; Wang, Hongchen

    2017-02-01

    In activated sludge systems, the aeration process consumes the most energy. The energy cost can be dramatically reduced by decreasing the operating dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration. However, low DO may lead to incomplete nitrification and poor settling performance of activated sludge flocs (ASFs). This study investigates oxygen transfer dynamics and settling performances of activated sludge under different sludge retention times (SRTs) and DO conditions using microelectrodes and microscopic techniques. Our experimental results showed that with longer SRTs, treatment capacity and settling performances of activated sludge improved due to smaller floc size and less extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Long-term low DO conditions produced larger flocs and more EPS per unit sludge, which produced a more extensive anoxic area and led to low oxygen diffusion performance in flocs. Long SRTs mitigated the adverse effects of low DO. According to the microelectrode analysis and fractal dimension determination, smaller floc size and less EPS in the long SRT system led to high oxygen diffusion property and more compact floc structure that caused a drop in the sludge volume index (SVI). In summary, our results suggested that long SRTs of activated sludge can improve the operating performance under low DO conditions.

  8. Isomaltulose is actively metabolized in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Luguang; Birch, Robert G

    2011-12-01

    Isomaltulose is a structural isomer of sucrose (Suc). It has been widely used as a nonmetabolized sugar in physiological studies aimed at better understanding the regulatory roles and transport of sugars in plants. It is increasingly used as a nutritional human food, with some beneficial properties including low glycemic index and acariogenicity. Cloning of genes for Suc isomerases opened the way for direct commercial production in plants. The understanding that plants lack catabolic capabilities for isomaltulose indicated a possibility of enhanced yields relative to Suc. However, this understanding was based primarily on the treatment of intact cells with exogenous isomaltulose. Here, we show that sugarcane (Saccharum interspecific hybrids), like other tested plants, does not readily import or catabolize extracellular isomaltulose. However, among intracellular enzymes, cytosolic Suc synthase (in the breakage direction) and vacuolar soluble acid invertase (SAI) substantially catabolize isomaltulose. From kinetic studies, the specificity constant of SAI for isomaltulose is about 10% of that for Suc. Activity varied against other Suc isomers, with V(max) for leucrose about 6-fold that for Suc. SAI activities from other plant species varied substantially in substrate specificity against Suc and its isomers. Therefore, in physiological studies, the blanket notion of Suc isomers including isomaltulose as nonmetabolized sugars must be discarded. For example, lysis of a few cells may result in the substantial hydrolysis of exogenous isomaltulose, with profound downstream signal effects. In plant biotechnology, different V(max) and V(max)/K(m) ratios for Suc isomers may yet be exploited, in combination with appropriate developmental expression and compartmentation, for enhanced sugar yields.

  9. Effects of temperature on metabolism, ventilation, and oxygen extraction in the southern brown bandicoot Isoodon obesulus (Marsupialia: Peramelidae).

    PubMed

    Larcombe, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    The effects of ambient temperatures (T(a)) from 10 degrees to 35 degrees C on metabolism, ventilation, and oxygen extraction were examined for the southern brown bandicoot (Isoodon obesulus). Oxygen consumption (VO2) followed the pattern typical for endotherms, decreasing with increasing T(a) from 10 degrees to 25 degrees C. It did not significantly change between Ta=25 degrees and 35 degrees C (the thermoneutral zone). VO2 was approximately 2.4 times higher at Ta=10 degrees C (0.967 mL O(2) g(-1) h(-1)) compared with basal (0.410 mL O(2) g(-1) h(-1)) at Ta=30 degrees C. While the metabolic rates of the bandicoots were basal at Ta=30 degrees C, respiratory frequency (f(R)) was 24.6 breaths min(-1), tidal volume (V(T)) was 7.79 mL, minute volume (V(I)) was 191.3 mL min(-1), and oxygen extraction efficiency (EO2) was 26.8%. Increased VO2 at Ta< or =25 degrees C was associated with a large increase in V(I) due to increases in V(T) and f(R). A greater proportion of the change was due to the increase in tidal volume. EO2 was constant at approximately 26% for all T(a) up to and including 30 degrees C. At Ta=35 degrees C, EO2 decreased to 17.7%, f(R) increased to 35.6 breaths min(-1), and V(T) decreased to 7.22 mL. The metabolic and ventilatory physiology of the southern brown bandicoot are typical of an unspecialized medium-sized marsupial.

  10. Multi-timescale Modeling of Activity-Dependent Metabolic Coupling in the Neuron-Glia-Vasculature Ensemble

    PubMed Central

    Jolivet, Renaud; Coggan, Jay S.; Allaman, Igor; Magistretti, Pierre J.

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is the main energy substrate in the adult brain under normal conditions. Accumulating evidence, however, indicates that lactate produced in astrocytes (a type of glial cell) can also fuel neuronal activity. The quantitative aspects of this so-called astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle (ANLS) are still debated. To address this question, we developed a detailed biophysical model of the brain’s metabolic interactions. Our model integrates three modeling approaches, the Buxton-Wang model of vascular dynamics, the Hodgkin-Huxley formulation of neuronal membrane excitability and a biophysical model of metabolic pathways. This approach provides a template for large-scale simulations of the neuron-glia-vasculature (NGV) ensemble, and for the first time integrates the respective timescales at which energy metabolism and neuronal excitability occur. The model is constrained by relative neuronal and astrocytic oxygen and glucose utilization, by the concentration of metabolites at rest and by the temporal dynamics of NADH upon activation. These constraints produced four observations. First, a transfer of lactate from astrocytes to neurons emerged in response to activity. Second, constrained by activity-dependent NADH transients, neuronal oxidative metabolism increased first upon activation with a subsequent delayed astrocytic glycolysis increase. Third, the model correctly predicted the dynamics of extracellular lactate and oxygen as observed in vivo in rats. Fourth, the model correctly predicted the temporal dynamics of tissue lactate, of tissue glucose and oxygen consumption, and of the BOLD signal as reported in human studies. These findings not only support the ANLS hypothesis but also provide a quantitative mathematical description of the metabolic activation in neurons and glial cells, as well as of the macroscopic measurements obtained during brain imaging. PMID:25719367

  11. AMP-activated protein kinase and metabolic control

    PubMed Central

    Viollet, Benoit; Andreelli, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a phylogenetically conserved serine/threonine protein kinase, is a major regulator of cellular and whole-body energy homeostasis that coordinates metabolic pathways in order to balance nutrient supply with energy demand. It is now recognized that pharmacological activation of AMPK improves blood glucose homeostasis, lipid profile and blood pressure in insulin-resistant rodents. Indeed, AMPK activation mimics the beneficial effects of physical activity or those of calorie restriction by acting on multiple cellular targets. In addition it is now demonstrated that AMPK is one of the probable (albeit indirect) targets of major antidiabetic drugs including, the biguanides (metformin) and thiazolidinediones, as well as of insulin sensitizing adipokines (e.g., adiponectin). Taken together, such findings highlight the logic underlying the concept of targeting the AMPK pathway for the treatment of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. PMID:21484577

  12. Peroxiredoxin-3 Is Involved in Bactericidal Activity through the Regulation of Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sena; Wi, Sae Mi; Min, Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin-3 (Prdx3) is a mitochondrial protein of the thioredoxin family of antioxidant peroxidases and is the principal peroxidase responsible for metabolizing mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide. Recent reports have shown that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) contribute to macrophage-mediated bactericidal activity in response to Toll-like receptors. Herein, we investigated the functional effect of Prdx3 in bactericidal activity. The mitochondrial localization of Prdx3 in HEK293T cells was confirmed by cell fractionation and confocal microscopy analyses. To investigate the functional role of Prdx3 in bactericidal activity, Prdx3-knockdown (Prdx3KD) THP-1 cells were generated. The mROS levels in Prdx3KD THP-1 cells were significantly higher than those in control THP-1 cells. Moreover, the mROS levels were markedly increased in response to lipopolysaccharide. Notably, the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection assay revealed that the Prdx3KD THP-1 cells were significantly resistant to S. Typhimurium infection, as compared with control THP-1 cells. Taken together, these results indicate that Prdx3 is functionally important in bactericidal activity through the regulation of mROS. PMID:28035213

  13. Metabolic Regulation of “Ca. Methylacidiphilum Fumariolicum” SolV Cells Grown Under Different Nitrogen and Oxygen Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Khadem, Ahmad F.; Pol, Arjan; Wieczorek, Adam S.; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Op den Camp, Huub J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Aerobic methanotrophic bacteria can use methane as their sole energy source. The discovery of “Ca. Methylacidiphilum fumariolicum” strain SolV and other verrucomicrobial methanotrophs has revealed that the ability of bacteria to oxidize CH4 is much more diverse than has previously been assumed in terms of ecology, phylogeny, and physiology. A remarkable characteristic of the methane-oxidizing Verrucomicrobia is their extremely acidophilic phenotype, growing even below pH 1. In this study we used RNA-Seq to analyze the metabolic regulation of “Ca. M. fumariolicum” SolV cells growing at μmax in batch culture or under nitrogen fixing or oxygen limited conditions in chemostats, all at pH 2. The analysis showed that two of the three pmoCAB operons each encoding particulate methane monoxygenases were differentially expressed, probably regulated by the available oxygen. The hydrogen produced during N2 fixation is apparently recycled as demonstrated by the upregulation of the genes encoding a Ni/Fe-dependent hydrogenase. These hydrogenase genes were also upregulated under low oxygen conditions. Handling of nitrosative stress was shown by the expression of the nitric oxide reductase encoding genes norB and norC under all conditions tested, the upregulation of nitrite reductase nirK under oxygen limitation and of hydroxylamine oxidoreductase hao in the presence of ammonium. Unraveling the gene regulation of carbon and nitrogen metabolism helps to understand the underlying physiological adaptations of strain SolV in view of the harsh conditions of its natural ecosystem. PMID:22848206

  14. The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in β-Adrenergic Signaling in Cardiomyocytes from Mice with the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Llano-Diez, Monica; Sinclair, Jon; Yamada, Takashi; Zong, Mei; Fauconnier, Jeremy; Zhang, Shi-Jin; Katz, Abram; Jardemark, Kent; Westerblad, Håkan; Andersson, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is associated with prolonged stress and hyperactivity of the sympathetic nervous system and afflicted subjects are prone to develop cardiovascular disease. Under normal conditions, the cardiomyocyte response to acute β-adrenergic stimulation partly depends on increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we investigated the interplay between beta-adrenergic signaling, ROS and cardiac contractility using freshly isolated cardiomyocytes and whole hearts from two mouse models with the metabolic syndrome (high-fat diet and ob/ob mice). We hypothesized that cardiomyocytes of mice with the metabolic syndrome would experience excessive ROS levels that trigger cellular dysfunctions. Fluorescent dyes and confocal microscopy were used to assess mitochondrial ROS production, cellular Ca2+ handling and contractile function in freshly isolated adult cardiomyocytes. Immunofluorescence, western blot and enzyme assay were used to study protein biochemistry. Unexpectedly, our results point towards decreased cardiac ROS signaling in a stable, chronic phase of the metabolic syndrome because: β-adrenergic-induced increases in the amplitude of intracellular Ca2+ signals were insensitive to antioxidant treatment; mitochondrial ROS production showed decreased basal rate and smaller response to β-adrenergic stimulation. Moreover, control hearts and hearts with the metabolic syndrome showed similar basal levels of ROS-mediated protein modification, but only control hearts showed increases after β-adrenergic stimulation. In conclusion, in contrast to the situation in control hearts, the cardiomyocyte response to acute β-adrenergic stimulation does not involve increased mitochondrial ROS production in a stable, chronic phase of the metabolic syndrome. This can be seen as a beneficial adaptation to prevent excessive ROS levels. PMID:27907040

  15. Biogeography of Metabolically Active Microbial Populations within the Subseafloor Biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reese, B. K.; Shepard, A.; St. Peter, C.; Mills, H. J.

    2011-12-01

    Microbial life in deep marine sediments is widespread, metabolically active and diverse. Evidence of prokaryotic communities in sediments as deep as 800 m below the seafloor (mbsf) have been found. By recycling carbon and nutrients through biological and geochemical processes, the deep subsurface has the potential to remain metabolically active over geologic time scales. While a vast majority of the subsurface biosphere remains under studied, recent advances in molecular techniques and an increased focus on microbiological sampling during IODP expeditions have provided the initial steps toward better characterizations of the microbial communities. Coupling of geochemistry and RNA-based molecular analysis is essential to the description of the active microbial populations within the subsurface biosphere. Studies based on DNA may describe the taxa and metabolic pathways from the total microbial community within the sediment, whether the cells sampled were metabolically active, quiescent or dead. Due to a short lifespan within a cell, only an RNA-based analysis can be used to identify linkages between active populations and observed geochemistry. This study will coalesce and compare RNA sequence and geochemical data from Expeditions 316 (Nankai Trough), 320 (Pacific Equatorial Age Transect), 325 (Great Barrier Reef) and 329 (South Pacific Gyre) to evaluate the biogeography of microbial lineages actively altering the deep subsurface. The grouping of sediments allows for a wide range of geochemical environments to be compared, including two environments limited in organic carbon. Significant to this study is the use of similar extraction, amplification and simultaneous 454 pyrosequencing on all sediment populations allowing for robust comparisons with similar protocol strengths and biases. Initial trends support previously described reduction of diversity with increasing depth. The co-localization of active reductive and oxidative lineages suggests a potential cryptic

  16. Validity of using a 3-dimensional PET scanner during inhalation of 15O-labeled oxygen for quantitative assessment of regional metabolic rate of oxygen in man.

    PubMed

    Hori, Yuki; Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Koshino, Kazuhiro; Moriguchi, Tetsuaki; Iguchi, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Akihide; Enmi, Junichiro; Kawashima, Hidekazu; Zeniya, Tsutomu; Morita, Naomi; Nakagawara, Jyoji; Casey, Michael E; Iida, Hidehiro

    2014-09-21

    Use of 15O labeled oxygen (15O2) and positron emission tomography (PET) allows quantitative assessment of the regional metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) in vivo, which is essential to understanding the pathological status of patients with cerebral vascular and neurological disorders. The method has, however, been challenging, when a 3D PET scanner is employed, largely attributed to the presence of gaseous radioactivity in the trachea and the inhalation system, which results in a large amount of scatter and random events in the PET assessment. The present study was intended to evaluate the adequacy of using a recently available commercial 3D PET scanner in the assessment of regional cerebral radioactivity distribution during an inhalation of 15O2. Systematic experiments were carried out on a brain phantom. Experiments were also performed on a healthy volunteer following a recently developed protocol for simultaneous assessment of CMRO2 and cerebral blood flow, which involves sequential administration of 15O2 and C15O2. A particular intention was to evaluate the adequacy of the scatter-correction procedures. The phantom experiment demonstrated that errors were within 3% at the practically maximum radioactivity in the face mask, with the greatest radioactivity in the lung. The volunteer experiment demonstrated that the counting rate was at peak during the 15O gas inhalation period, within a verified range. Tomographic images represented good quality over the entire FOV, including the lower part of the cerebral structures and the carotid artery regions. The scatter-correction procedures appeared to be important, particularly in the process to compensate for the scatter originating outside the FOV. Reconstructed images dramatically changed if the correction was carried out using inappropriate procedures. This study demonstrated that accurate reconstruction could be obtained when the scatter compensation was appropriately carried out. This study also suggested the

  17. Validity of using a 3-dimensional PET scanner during inhalation of 15O-labeled oxygen for quantitative assessment of regional metabolic rate of oxygen in man

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Yuki; Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Koshino, Kazuhiro; Moriguchi, Tetsuaki; Iguchi, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Akihide; Enmi, Junichiro; Kawashima, Hidekazu; Zeniya, Tsutomu; Morita, Naomi; Nakagawara, Jyoji; Casey, Michael E.; Iida, Hidehiro

    2014-09-01

    Use of 15O labeled oxygen (15O2) and positron emission tomography (PET) allows quantitative assessment of the regional metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) in vivo, which is essential to understanding the pathological status of patients with cerebral vascular and neurological disorders. The method has, however, been challenging, when a 3D PET scanner is employed, largely attributed to the presence of gaseous radioactivity in the trachea and the inhalation system, which results in a large amount of scatter and random events in the PET assessment. The present study was intended to evaluate the adequacy of using a recently available commercial 3D PET scanner in the assessment of regional cerebral radioactivity distribution during an inhalation of 15O2. Systematic experiments were carried out on a brain phantom. Experiments were also performed on a healthy volunteer following a recently developed protocol for simultaneous assessment of CMRO2 and cerebral blood flow, which involves sequential administration of 15O2 and C15O2. A particular intention was to evaluate the adequacy of the scatter-correction procedures. The phantom experiment demonstrated that errors were within 3% at the practically maximum radioactivity in the face mask, with the greatest radioactivity in the lung. The volunteer experiment demonstrated that the counting rate was at peak during the 15O gas inhalation period, within a verified range. Tomographic images represented good quality over the entire FOV, including the lower part of the cerebral structures and the carotid artery regions. The scatter-correction procedures appeared to be important, particularly in the process to compensate for the scatter originating outside the FOV. Reconstructed images dramatically changed if the correction was carried out using inappropriate procedures. This study demonstrated that accurate reconstruction could be obtained when the scatter compensation was appropriately carried out. This study also suggested the

  18. Activity before exercise influences recovery metabolism in the lizard Dipsosaurus dorsalis.

    PubMed

    Scholnick, D A; Gleeson, T T

    2000-06-01

    During recovery from even a brief period of exercise, metabolic rate remains elevated above resting levels for extended periods. The intensity and duration of exercise as well as body temperature and hormone levels can influence this excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC). We examined the influence of activity before exercise (ABE), commonly termed warm-up in endotherms, on EPOC in the desert iguana Dipsosaurus dorsalis. The rate of oxygen consumption and blood lactate levels were measured in 11 female D. dorsalis (mass 41.1 +/- 3.0 g; mean +/- s.e.m.) during rest, after two types of ABE and after 5 min of exhaustive exercise followed by 60 min of recovery. ABE was either single (15 s of maximal activity followed by a 27 min pause) or intermittent (twelve 15 s periods of exercise separated by 2 min pauses). Our results indicate that both single and intermittent ABE reduced recovery metabolic rate. EPOC volumes decreased from 0.261 to 0.156 ml of oxygen consumed during 60 min of recovery when lizards were subjected to intermittent ABE. The average cost of activity (net V(O2) during exercise and 60 min of recovery per distance traveled) was almost 40 % greater in lizards that exercised without any prior activity than in lizards that underwent ABE. Blood lactate levels and removal rates were greatest in animals that underwent ABE. These findings may be of particular importance for terrestrial ectotherms that typically use burst locomotion and have a small aerobic scope and a long recovery period.

  19. Physiological community ecology: variation in metabolic activity of ecologically important rocky intertidal invertebrates along environmental gradients.

    PubMed

    Dahlhoff, Elizabeth P; Stillman, Jonathon H; Menge, Bruce A

    2002-08-01

    Rocky intertidal invertebrates live in heterogeneous habitats characterized by steep gradients in wave activity, tidal flux, temperature, food quality and food availability. These environmental factors impact metabolic activity via changes in energy input and stress-induced alteration of energetic demands. For keystone species, small environmentally induced shifts in metabolic activity may lead to disproportionately large impacts on community structure via changes in growth or survival of these key species. Here we use biochemical indicators to assess how natural differences in wave exposure, temperature and food availability may affect metabolic activity of mussels, barnacles, whelks and sea stars living at rocky intertidal sites with different physical and oceanographic characteristics. We show that oxygen consumption rate is correlated with the activity of key metabolic enzymes (e.g., citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase) for some intertidal species, and concentrations of these enzymes in certain tissues are lower for starved individuals than for those that are well fed. We also show that the ratio of RNA to DNA (an index of protein synthetic capacity) is highly variable in nature and correlates with short-term changes in food availability. We also observed striking patterns in enzyme activity and RNA/DNA in nature, which are related to differences in rocky intertidal community structure. Differences among species and habitats are most pronounced in summer and are linked to high nearshore productivity at sites favored by suspension feeders and to exposure to stressful low-tide air temperatures in areas of low wave splash. These studies illustrate the great promise of using biochemical indicators to test ecological models, which predict changes in community structure along environmental gradients. Our results also suggest that biochemical indices must be carefully validated with laboratory studies, so that the indicator selected is likely to respond to the

  20. Metabolic activity of subseafloor microbes in the South Pacific Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morono, Y.; Ito, M.; Terada, T.; Inagaki, F.

    2013-12-01

    The South Pacific Gyre (SPG) is characterized as the most oligotrophic open ocean environment. The sediment is rich in oxygen but poor in energy-sources such as reduced organic matter, and hence harbors very low numbers of microbial cells in relatively shallow subseafloor sediment (D'Hondt et al., 2009; Kallmeyer et al., 2012). In such an energy-limited sedimentary habitat, a small size of microbial community persists living functions with extraordinary low oxygen-consumption rate (Røy et al., 2012). During IODP Expedition 329, a series of sediment samples were successfully recovered from 7 drill sites (U1365-1371) from the seafloor to basement in the SPG, providing an unprecedented opportunity to study metabolic activity of the aerobic subseafloor microbial communities. We initiated incubation onboard by adding stable isotope-labeled substrates to the freshly collected sediment sample, such as 13C and/or 15N-labeled bicarbonate, glucose, amino acids, acetate, and ammonium under the (micro-) aerobic condition. One of the technological challenges in this study is to harvest microbial cells from very low-biomass sediment samples for the analysis using nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS). To address the technical issue, we improved existing cell separation technique for the SPG sediment samples with small inorganic zeolitic grains. By monitoring cell recovery rates through an image-based cell enumeration technique (Morono et al., 2009), we found that cell recovery rates in the SPG sediment samples are generally lower than those in other oceanographic settings (i.e., organic-rich ocean margin sediments). To gain higher cell recovery ratio, we applied multiple density gradient layers, resulting in the cell recovery ratio up to around 80-95% (Morono et al., in press). Then, using the newly developed cell separation technique, we successfully sorted enough number of microbial cells in small spots on the membrane (i.e., 103 to 105 cells per spot). Nano

  1. EPR oxygen imaging and hyperpolarized 13C MRI of pyruvate metabolism as noninvasive biomarkers of tumor treatment response to a glycolysis inhibitor 3-bromopyruvate.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Shingo; Saito, Keita; Yasui, Hironobu; Morris, H Douglas; Munasinghe, Jeeva P; Lizak, Martin; Merkle, Hellmut; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan Henrik; Choudhuri, Rajani; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Subramanian, Sankaran; Koretsky, Alan P; Mitchell, James B; Krishna, Murali C

    2013-05-01

    The hypoxic nature of tumors results in treatment resistance and poor prognosis. To spare limited oxygen for more crucial pathways, hypoxic cancerous cells suppress mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and promote glycolysis for energy production. Thereby, inhibition of glycolysis has the potential to overcome treatment resistance of hypoxic tumors. Here, EPR imaging was used to evaluate oxygen dependent efficacy on hypoxia-sensitive drug. The small molecule 3-bromopyruvate blocks glycolysis pathway by inhibiting hypoxia inducible enzymes and enhanced cytotoxicity of 3-bromopyruvate under hypoxic conditions has been reported in vitro. However, the efficacy of 3-bromopyruvate was substantially attenuated in hypoxic tumor regions (pO2<10 mmHg) in vivo using squamous cell carcinoma (SCCVII)-bearing mouse model. Metabolic MRI studies using hyperpolarized 13C-labeled pyruvate showed that monocarboxylate transporter-1 is the major transporter for pyruvate and the analog 3-bromopyruvate in SCCVII tumor. The discrepant results between in vitro and in vivo data were attributed to biphasic oxygen dependent expression of monocarboxylate transporter-1 in vivo. Expression of monocarboxylate transporter-1 was enhanced in moderately hypoxic (8-15 mmHg) tumor regions but down regulated in severely hypoxic (<5 mmHg) tumor regions. These results emphasize the importance of noninvasive imaging biomarkers to confirm the action of hypoxia-activated drugs.

  2. Bryostatins trigger human polymorphonuclear neutrophil and monocyte oxidative metabolism: association with in vitro antineoplastic activity.

    PubMed

    Esa, A H; Warren, J T; Hess, A D; May, W S

    1995-01-01

    Bryostatin-1-but not bryostatin-13-a macrocyclic lactone isolated from the marine bryozoan Bugula neritina, triggered human polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) and monocyte release of reactive oxygen radicals, as measured by the generation of lucigenin chemiluminescence and by the ferricytochrome c reduction assay. The release of oxygen radicals by bryostatins was sensitive to inhibitors of protein kinases, but resistant to the inhibition of phospholipase A2 activity and arachidonic acid metabolism (prior treatment with mepacrine or indomethacin). Comparison of the effect of protein kinase (PK) inhibitors H-8, H-7 and staurosporine on bryostatin-1-induced neutrophil oxygen radical release further suggested a requirement for activation of phospholipid-dependent PKC, but not for cGMP- or cAMP-dependent PK. In cytostatic assays, PMNs treated with bryostatin-1 inhibited the growth of the erythroleukaemic cell line K562 in a concentration-dependent manner. These findings suggest that the reported antineoplastic effect of bryostatins may result at least in part from activation of PMNs and monocytes.

  3. Enumerating Minimal Active Metabolic Pathways by Model Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soh, Takehide; Inoue, Katsumi

    In systems biology, identifying vital functions like glycolysis from a given metabolic pathway is important to understand living organisms. In this paper, we particularly focus on the problem of enumerating minimal active pathways producing target metabolites from source metabolites. We represent the problem in propositional formulas and solve it through minimal model generation. An advantage of our method is that each solution satisfies qualitative laws of biochemical reactions. Moreover, we can calculate such solutions for a cellular scale metabolic pathway within a few seconds. In experiments, we have applied our method to a whole Escherichia coli metabolic pathway. As a result, we found a minimal set of reactions corresponding to the conventional glycolysis pathway described in a biological database EcoCyc.

  4. Probing Saltern Brines with an Oxygen Electrode: What Can We Learn about the Community Metabolism in Hypersaline Systems?

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Aharon

    2016-01-01

    We have explored the use of optical oxygen electrodes to study oxygenic photosynthesis and heterotrophic activities in crystallizer brines of the salterns in Eilat, Israel. Monitoring oxygen uptake rates in the dark enables the identification of organic substrates that are preferentially used by the community. Addition of glycerol (the osmotic solute synthesized by Dunaliella) or dihydroxyacetone (produced from glycerol by Salinibacter) enhanced respiration rates. Pyruvate, produced from glycerol or from some sugars by certain halophilic Archaea also stimulated community respiration. Fumarate had a sparing effect on respiration, possibly as many halophilic Archaea can use fumarate as a terminal electron acceptor in respiration. Calculating the photosynthetic activity of Dunaliella by monitoring oxygen concentration changes during light/dark incubations is not straightforward as light also affects respiration of some halophilic Archaea and Bacteria due to action of light-driven proton pumps. When illuminated, community respiration of brine samples in which oxygenic photosynthesis was inhibited by DCMU decreased by ~40%. This effect was interpreted as the result of competition between two energy yielding systems: the bacteriorhodopsin proton pump and the respiratory chain of the prokaryotes. These findings have important implications for the interpretation of other published data on photosynthetic and respiratory activities in hypersaline environments. PMID:27338478

  5. Growth enhancement and gene expression of Arabidopsis thaliana irradiated with active oxygen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Ono, Reoto; Hayashi, Nobuya; Shiratani, Masaharu; Tashiro, Kosuke; Kuhara, Satoru; Inoue, Asami; Yasuda, Kaori; Hagiwara, Hiroko

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of plant growth enhancement effect and the mechanism of the enhancement induced by plasma irradiation are investigated using various active species in plasma. Active oxygen species in oxygen plasma are effective for growth enhancement of plants. DNA microarray analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana indicates that the genes coding proteins that counter oxidative stresses by eliminating active oxygen species are expressed at significantly high levels. The size of plant cells increases owing to oxygen plasma irradiation. The increases in gene expression levels and cell size suggest that the increase in the expression level of the expansin protein is essential for plant growth enhancement phenomena.

  6. Activating Transcription Factor 3 Regulates Immune and Metabolic Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Rynes, Jan; Donohoe, Colin D.; Frommolt, Peter; Brodesser, Susanne; Jindra, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Integration of metabolic and immune responses during animal development ensures energy balance, permitting both growth and defense. Disturbed homeostasis causes organ failure, growth retardation, and metabolic disorders. Here, we show that the Drosophila melanogaster activating transcription factor 3 (Atf3) safeguards metabolic and immune system homeostasis. Loss of Atf3 results in chronic inflammation and starvation responses mounted primarily by the larval gut epithelium, while the fat body suffers lipid overload, causing energy imbalance and death. Hyperactive proinflammatory and stress signaling through NF-κB/Relish, Jun N-terminal kinase, and FOXO in atf3 mutants deregulates genes important for immune defense, digestion, and lipid metabolism. Reducing the dose of either FOXO or Relish normalizes both lipid metabolism and gene expression in atf3 mutants. The function of Atf3 is conserved, as human ATF3 averts some of the Drosophila mutant phenotypes, improving their survival. The single Drosophila Atf3 may incorporate the diversified roles of two related mammalian proteins. PMID:22851689

  7. Dynamic model for selective metabolic activation in chemical carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Selkirk, J.K.; MacLeod, M.C.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical calculations predict the relative ease of formation of carbonium ions from 7,8-dihydro-7,8-dihydroxybenzo(a)pyrene-9,10-oxide or from either of the 2 symmetrical bay regions of B(e)P, and suggest their attraction to cellular nucleophiles. When both isomers were metabolized by hamster embryo fibroblasts (HEF) and the products analyzed, the results showed that the probable reason for benzo(e)pyrene's lack of carcinogenicity was its metabolic preference to attack the molecule away from the bay-region area. Particularly striking was the absence of any evidence for the formation of a significant amount of B(e)P-9,10-dihydrodiol. This suggests a metabolic basis for the relative lack of carcinogenic and mutagenic activity of B(e)P. The reason for this is not clear but may be due to physical or chemical factors such as membrane solubility or stereochemical requirements of the active site of the enzyme. The bay-region theory of PAH carcinogenesis predicts that carbonium ion formation from 9,10-dihydro-9,10-dihydroxybenzo(e)pyrene-11, 12-oxide, if formed, would be energetically favorable. Thus, the inability of HEF and microcomes to form B(e)P-9,10-dihydrodiol, the precursor of its potentially highly reactive diol-epoxide, would explain the relative inertness of B(e)P in several biological systems. As the subtle biochemical interactions of the various carcinogen intermediates become clarified, it becomes apparent that susceptibility and resistance to malignant transformation are based on a complex set of both chemical and physical parameters. It is becoming clear that metabolism kinetics, membrane interaction, and the role of nuclear metabolism help dictate the passage of the carcinogen and its reactive intermediates into and through the metabolic machinery of the cell. (ERB)

  8. Metabolic adaptation to a disruption in oxygen supply during myocardial ischemia and reperfusion is underpinned by temporal and quantitative changes in the cardiac proteome.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Arslan, Fatih; Ren, Yan; Adav, Sunil S; Poh, Kian Keong; Sorokin, Vitaly; Lee, Chuen Neng; de Kleijn, Dominique; Lim, Sai Kiang; Sze, Siu Kwan

    2012-04-06

    Despite decades of intensive research, there is still no effective treatment for ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, an important corollary in the treatment of ischemic disease. I/R injury is initiated when the altered biochemistry of cells after ischemia is no longer compatible with oxygenated microenvironment (or reperfusion). To better understand the molecular basis of this alteration and subsequent incompatibility, we assessed the temporal and quantitative alterations in the cardiac proteome of a mouse cardiac I/R model by an iTRAQ approach at 30 min of ischemia, and at 60 or 120 min reperfusion after the ischemia using sham-operated mouse heart as the baseline control. Of the 509 quantified proteins identified, 121 proteins exhibited significant changes (p-value<0.05) over time and were mostly clustered in eight functional groups: Fatty acid oxidation, Glycolysis, TCA cycle, ETC (electron transport chain), Redox Homeostasis, Glutathione S-transferase, Apoptosis related, and Heat Shock proteins. The first four groups are intimately involved in ATP production and the last four groups are known to be important in cellular antioxidant activity. During ischemia and reperfusion, the short supply of oxygen precipitates a pivotal metabolic switch from aerobic metabolism involving fatty acid oxidation, TCA, and phosphorylation to anaerobic metabolism for ATP production and this, in turn, increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Therefore the implication of these 8 functional groups suggested that ischemia-reperfusion injury is underpinned in part by proteomic alterations. Reversion of these alterations to preischemia levels took at least 60 min, suggesting a refractory period in which the ischemic cells cannot adjust to the presence of oxygen. Therefore, therapeutics that could compensate for these proteomic alterations during this interim refractory period could alleviate ischemia-reperfusion injury to enhance cellular recovery from an ischemic to a normoxic

  9. Analytic Models of Oxygen and Nutrient Diffusion, Metabolism Dynamics, and Architecture Optimization in Three-Dimensional Tissue Constructs with Applications and Insights in Cerebral Organoids

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion models are important in tissue engineering as they enable an understanding of gas, nutrient, and signaling molecule delivery to cells in cell cultures and tissue constructs. As three-dimensional (3D) tissue constructs become larger, more intricate, and more clinically applicable, it will be essential to understand internal dynamics and signaling molecule concentrations throughout the tissue and whether cells are receiving appropriate nutrient delivery. Diffusion characteristics present a significant limitation in many engineered tissues, particularly for avascular tissues and for cells whose viability, differentiation, or function are affected by concentrations of oxygen and nutrients. This article seeks to provide novel analytic solutions for certain cases of steady-state and nonsteady-state diffusion and metabolism in basic 3D construct designs (planar, cylindrical, and spherical forms), solutions that would otherwise require mathematical approximations achieved through numerical methods. This model is applied to cerebral organoids, where it is shown that limitations in diffusion and organoid size can be partially overcome by localizing metabolically active cells to an outer layer in a sphere, a regionalization process that is known to occur through neuroglial precursor migration both in organoids and in early brain development. The given prototypical solutions include a review of metabolic information for many cell types and can be broadly applied to many forms of tissue constructs. This work enables researchers to model oxygen and nutrient delivery to cells, predict cell viability, study dynamics of mass transport in 3D tissue constructs, design constructs with improved diffusion capabilities, and accurately control molecular concentrations in tissue constructs that may be used in studying models of development and disease or for conditioning cells to enhance survival after insults like ischemia or implantation into the body, thereby providing a

  10. Microbial metabolic activity in soil as measured by dehydrogenase determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The dehydrogenase technique for measuring the metabolic activity of microorganisms in soil was modified to use a 6-h, 37 C incubation with either glucose or yeast extract as the electron-donating substrate. The rate of formazan production remained constant during this time interval, and cellular multiplication apparently did not occur. The technique was used to follow changes in the overall metabolic activities of microorganisms in soil undergoing incubation with a limiting concentration of added nutrient. The sequence of events was similar to that obtained by using the Warburg respirometer to measure O2 consumption. However, the major peaks of activity occurred earlier with the respirometer. This possibly is due to the lack of atmospheric CO2 during the O2 consumption measurements.

  11. Human Aldo-Keto Reductases and the Metabolic Activation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) are promiscuous NAD(P)(H) dependent oxidoreductases implicated in the metabolic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). These enzymes catalyze the oxidation of non-K-region trans-dihydrodiols to the corresponding o-quinones with the concomitant production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The PAH o-quinones are Michael acceptors and can form adducts but are also redox-active and enter into futile redox cycles to amplify ROS formation. Evidence exists to support this metabolic pathway in humans. The human recombinant AKR1A1 and AKR1C1–AKR1C4 enzymes all catalyze the oxidation of PAH trans-dihydrodiols to PAH o-quinones. Many human AKRs also catalyze the NADPH-dependent reduction of the o-quinone products to air-sensitive catechols, exacerbating ROS formation. Moreover, this pathway of PAH activation occurs in a panel of human lung cell lines, resulting in the production of ROS and oxidative DNA damage in the form of 8-oxo-2′-deoxyguanosine. Using stable-isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, this pathway of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) metabolism was found to contribute equally with the diol-epoxide pathway to the activation of this human carcinogen in human lung cells. Evaluation of the mutagenicity of anti-B[a]P-diol epoxide with B[a]P-7,8-dione on p53 showed that the o-quinone produced by AKRs was the more potent mutagen, provided that it was permitted to redox cycle, and that the mutations observed were G to T transversions, reminiscent of those observed in human lung cancer. It is concluded that there is sufficient evidence to support the role of human AKRs in the metabolic activation of PAH in human lung cell lines and that they may contribute to the causation of human lung cancer. PMID:25279998

  12. Hydrazide derivatives produce active oxygen species as hydrazine.

    PubMed

    Timperio, Anna Maria; Rinalducci, Sara; Zolla, Lello

    2005-12-01

    It is well documented that some hydrazines are quite sensitive to oxidation and may serve as the electron donor for the reduction of oxygen, whereas hydrazides are not believed to react directly with oxygen. Data presented in this paper show that both hydrazides and hydrazines share an N-N moiety, which is assumed to react with atmospheric oxygen and produce oxygen radicals, at various degrees of efficiency. Since spectrometric measurements of hydrazide just after solubilization showed that the molecular mass remains constant in the absence of oxygen, we can conclude that hydrazides do not react with the oxygen through a slow spontaneous hydrolytic release of hydrazine. However, hydrazine is more reactive than hydrazide, which requires hours rather than minutes to produce measurable quantities of radical species. Differences were also apparent for various substituted derivatives. The reaction was significantly enhanced by the presence of metal ions. Data reported here demonstrate that hydrazides cause irreversible damage to the prosthetic group of proteins as well as causing degradation of the polypeptide chain into small fragments.

  13. [Response of reactive oxygen metabolism in melon chloroplasts to short-term salinity-alkalinity stress regulated by exogenous γ-aminobutyric acid].

    PubMed

    Xiang, Li-xia; Hu, Li-pan; Hu, Xiao-hui; Pan, Xiong-bo; Ren, Wen-qi

    2015-12-01

    The regulatory effect of exogenous γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on metabolism of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in melon chloroplasts under short-term salinity-alkalinity stress were investigated in melon variety 'Jinhui No. 1', which was cultured with deep flow hydroponics. The result showed that under salinity-alkalinity stress, the photosynthetic pigment content, MDA content, superoxide anion (O₂·) production rate and hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) content in chloroplast increased significantly, the contents of antioxidants ascorbic acid (AsA) and glutathione (GSH) increased, and the activities of H⁺-ATPase and H⁺-PPiase were inhibited obviously. With exogenous GABA application, the accumulations of O₂·, MDA and H₂O₂ induced by salinity-alkalinity stress were inhibited. Exogenous GABA alleviated the increase of photosynthetic pigment content, improved the activity of SOD, enzymes of AsA-GSH cycle, total AsA and total GSH while decreased the AsA/DHA ratio and GSH/GSSH ratio. Foliar GABA could enhance the H⁺-ATPase and H⁺-PPiase activities. Our results suggested that the exogenous GABA could accelerate the ROS metabolism in chloroplast, promote the recycle of AsA-GSH, and maintain the permeability of cell membrane to improve the ability of melon chloroplast against salinity-alkalinity stress.

  14. The effect of intravitreal vascular endothelial growth factor on inner retinal oxygen delivery and metabolism in rats.

    PubMed

    Blair, Norman P; Wanek, Justin; Teng, Pang-yu; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2016-02-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is stimulated by hypoxia and plays an important role in pathologic vascular leakage and neovascularization. Increased VEGF may affect inner retinal oxygen delivery (DO2) and oxygen metabolism (MO2), however, quantitative information is lacking. We tested the hypotheses that VEGF increases DO2, but does not alter MO2. In 10 rats, VEGF was injected intravitreally into one eye, whereas balanced salt solution (BSS) was injected into the fellow eye, 24 h prior to imaging. Vessel diameters and blood velocities were determined by red-free and fluorescent microsphere imaging, respectively. Vascular PO2 values were derived by phosphorescence lifetime imaging of an intravascular oxyphor. Retinal blood flow, vascular oxygen content, DO2 and MO2 were calculated. Retinal arterial and venous diameters were larger in VEGF-injected eyes compared to control eyes (P < 0.03), however no significant difference was observed in blood velocity (P = 0.21). Thus, retinal blood flow was greater in VEGF-injected eyes (P = 0.007). Retinal vascular PO2 and oxygen content were similar between control and VEGF-injected eyes (P > 0.11), while the arteriovenous oxygen content difference was marginally lower in VEGF-injected eyes (P = 0.05). DO2 was 950 ± 340 and 1380 ± 650 nL O2/min in control and VEGF-injected eyes, respectively (P = 0.005). MO2 was 440 ± 150 and 490 ± 190 nL O2/min in control and VEGF-injected eyes, respectively (P = 0.31). Intravitreally administered VEGF did not alter MO2 but increased DO2, suggesting VEGF may play an offsetting role in conditions characterized by retinal hypoxia.

  15. P38 activation is more important than ERK activation in lung injury induced by prolonged hyperbaric oxygen.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Fang, Yi-Qun; Gu, Ai-Mei; Wang, Fang-Fang; Zhang, Shi; Li, Kai-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to hyperbaric oxygen can cause pulmonary and nerve system toxicity. Although hyperbaric oxygen treatment has been used for a broad spectrum of ailments, the mechanisms of prolonged hyperbaric oxygen-induced lung injury are not fully understood. The purpose of the present work was to investigate the roles of ERK, p38, and caspase-3 in rat lung tissue exposed to hyperbaric oxygen at 2.3 atmospheres absolute (atm abs) for two, six and 10 hours. The results showed that the ERK and p38 were phosphorylated at two hours and reached a peak at six hours into exposure to hyperbaric oxygen. While the phosphorylation level of ERK decreased, p38 remained at a high level of activation at 10 hours. The activation of ERK and p38 was down-regulated when rats were exposed to normoxic hyperbaric nitrogen for 10 hours. However, caspase-3 was activated at six hours and 10 hours into exposure to hyperbaric oxygen. These results demonstrated different changes of activation of ERK and p38 during lung injury induced by prolonged exposure to hyperbaric oxygen. The time course changes of activated caspase-3 were similar to the process of p38 activation upon exposure to hyperbaric oxygen. In this way, activation of p38, not ERK, seems to be a mechanism associated with prolonged hyperbaric oxygen-induced lung injury.

  16. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Azhar, Salman

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a constellation of risk factors including insulin resistance, central obesity, dyslipidemia and hypertension that markedly increase the risk of Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor (PPAR) isotypes, PPARα, PPARδ/β and PPARγ are ligand-activated nuclear transcription factors, which modulate the expression of an array of genes that play a central role in regulating glucose, lipid and cholesterol metabolism, where imbalance can lead to obesity, T2DM and CVD. They are also drug targets, and currently, PPARα (fibrates) and PPARγ (thiazolodinediones) agonists are in clinical use for treating dyslipidemia and T2DM, respectively. These metabolic characteristics of the PPARs, coupled with their involvement in metabolic diseases, mean extensive efforts are underway worldwide to develop new and efficacious PPAR-based therapies for the treatment of additional maladies associated with the MetS. This article presents an overview of the functional characteristics of three PPAR isotypes, discusses recent advances in our understanding of the diverse biological actions of PPARs, particularly in the vascular system, and summarizes the developmental status of new single, dual, pan (multiple) and partial PPAR agonists for the clinical management of key components of MetS, T2DM and CVD. It also summarizes the clinical outcomes from various clinical trials aimed at evaluating the atheroprotective actions of currently used fibrates and thiazolodinediones. PMID:20932114

  17. Cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism during mild hypothermia in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, S; Suzuki, A; Hadeishi, H; Yasui, N; Hatazawa, J

    2000-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow and O2 metabolism during hypothermia (33-34 degrees C) was evaluated in 5 patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage by positron emission tomography (PET). Their preoperative clinical condition was WFNS scale IV or V. The patients received surface cooling postoperatively, and were maintained in a hypothermic state during transfer for radiological examination. Positron emission tomography revealed a decrease in cerebral blood flow and O2 metabolic rate. Cerebral blood flow was 34.8+/-15.1 ml/100 ml/min and the O2 metabolic rate was 1.85+/-0.61 ml/100 ml/min in areas of the middle cerebral artery ipsilateral to the ruptured aneurysms, whereas these values were 30.8+/-7.1 and 2.21+/-0.45 ml/100 ml/min, respectively, on the contralateral side. This represents a decrease of 37+/-27% compared to normal cerebral blood flow and 52+/-16% compared to normal O2 metabolic rate (p < 0.02) in the ipsilateral areas, and decreases of 44+/-13% and 43+/-12%, respectively, on the contralateral side. The present results reflected the luxury perfusion state in almost all cases and provide the first PET evidence of decreased cerebral blood flow and metabolic rate of O2 during hypothermia in humans.

  18. Modulation of Retinoic Acid Receptor-related Orphan Receptor α and γ Activity by 7-Oxygenated Sterol Ligands*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongjun; Kumar, Naresh; Solt, Laura A.; Richardson, Timothy I.; Helvering, Leah M.; Crumbley, Christine; Garcia-Ordonez, Ruben D.; Stayrook, Keith R.; Zhang, Xi; Novick, Scott; Chalmers, Michael J.; Griffin, Patrick R.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2010-01-01

    The retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors α and γ (RORα (NR1F1) and RORγ (NR1F3)) are orphan nuclear receptors and perform critical roles in regulation of development, metabolism, and immune function. Cholesterol and cholesterol sulfate have been suggested to be RORα ligands, but the physiological significance is unclear. To date, no endogenous RORγ ligands have been described. Here, we demonstrate that 7-oxygenated sterols function as high affinity ligands for both RORα and RORγ by directly binding to their ligand-binding domains (Ki ∼20 nm), modulating coactivator binding, and suppressing the transcriptional activity of the receptors. One of the 7-oxygenated sterols, 7α-hydroxycholesterol (7α-OHC), serves as a key intermediate in bile acid metabolism, and we show that 7α-OHC modulates the expression of ROR target genes, including Glc-6-Pase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, in an ROR-dependent manner. Furthermore, glucose output from hepatocytes is suppressed by 7α-OHC functioning as an RORα/γ ligand. Thus, RORα and RORγ are ligand-regulated members of the NR superfamily and may serve as sensors for 7-oxygenated sterols. PMID:19965867

  19. Activity monitoring reflects cardiovascular and metabolic variations in COPD patients across GOLD stages II to IV.

    PubMed

    Kortianou, E A; Louvaris, Z; Vasilopoulou, M; Nasis, I; Kaltsakas, G; Koulouris, N G; Vogiatzis, I

    2013-12-01

    We investigated whether activity monitoring reliably reflects variations in oxygen transport and utilization during walking in COPD patients. Forty-two patients (14 in each GOLD stage II, III and IV) performed an incremental treadmill protocol to the limit of tolerance. Breath-by-breath gas exchange, central hemodynamic variables and activity monitoring were simultaneously recorded. Physiological variables and accelerometer outputs rose linearly with walking speeds. Strong correlations (r[interquartile range, IQR]) were found between treadmill walking intensity (WI: range 0.8-2.0 ms(-2)) and oxygen consumption (0.95 [IQR 0.87-0.97]), (range 7.6-15.5 ml kg(-1)min(-1)); minute ventilation (0.95 [IQR 0.86-0.98]), (range 20-37 l min(-1)); cardiac output (0.89 [IQR 0.73-0.94]), (range 6.8-11.5 l min(-1)) and arteriovenous oxygen concentration difference (0.84 [IQR 0.76-0.90]), (range 7.7-12.1 ml O2100 ml(-1)). Correlations between WI and gas exchange or central hemodynamic parameters were not different across GOLD stages. In conclusion, central hemodynamic, respiratory and muscle metabolic variations during incremental treadmill exercise are tightly associated to changes in walking intensity as recorded by accelerometry across GOLD stages II to IV. Interestingly, the magnitude of these associations is not different across GOLD stages.

  20. Inhibition of Chlamydia psittaci in oxidatively active thioglycolate-elicited macrophages: distinction between lymphokine-mediated oxygen-dependent and oxygen-independent macrophage activation.

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, G I; Faubion, C L

    1983-01-01

    Immune sensitization of spleen cells was required to generate lymphokines (LK) that activated thioglycolate-elicited peritoneal macrophages (thio MACs) to respond via both oxygen-dependent and oxygen-independent systems. LK produced by incubating spleen cells from immunized A/J and LAF mice with concanavalin A stimulated a response by thio MACs to phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-induced chemiluminescence and activated these cells to inhibit intracellular Chlamydia psittaci replication. Concanavalin A-incubated spleen cell preparations from unimmunized animals stimulated neither PMA-induced chemiluminescence nor antichlamydial activity. Activated thio MACs demonstrated a rapid chemiluminescence response to the intracellular protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, but C. psittaci did not induce chemiluminescence in LK-activated thio MACs, although cells exposed to C. psittaci retained their responsiveness to PMA-induced chemiluminescence. The PMA-induced response was inhibited by the addition of exogenous superoxide dismutase and catalase and was therefore related to the production of superoxide anion (O2 . -) and H2O2 by these cells. LK preparations incubated at 56 degrees C before macrophage treatment retained antichlamydial activity, but heated preparations no longer stimulated thio MACs to respond in the chemiluminescence assay. These data provide evidence that macrophage oxygen-dependent and oxygen-independent systems are simultaneously activated by LK, and these preparations comprise at least two distinct activities. The portion responsible for activating oxygen-dependent systems (PMA-induced chemiluminescence) is heat labile, whereas the portion responsible for activating oxygen-independent systems is heat stable. It is the latter system that results in restriction of chlamydial growth and in vitro parasite persistence. PMID:6840848

  1. [Effect of reduced oxygen concentrations and hydrogen sulfide on the amino acid metabolism and mesenchymal cells proliferation].

    PubMed

    Plotnikova, L N; Berezovskii, V A; Veselskii, S P

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of hydrogen sulfide donor (10(-12) mol/l NaHS--I group) alone and together with the reduced oxygen concentrations (5% O2--II group, 3% O2--III group, 24 h) on the biological processes of human stem cells culture. It was shown that the cells proliferation by the third day of cultivation in I, II and III group decreased 1,7; 2,8 and 4,2 times. On the 4th day of culture proliferation inhibited in I, II and III group by 29; 33 and 54% compared to the control. Thus, adverse effects NaHS enhanced by reducing the oxygen concentration. It was established that in all experimental versions rapidly absorbed from the culture medium amino acids: cysteine and cystine, serine and aspartic acid, valine and tryptophan, proline and hydroxyproline, which are involved in the synthesis of proteins, in particular collagen. In the culture medium increased the concentration of free amino acids of the three factions: arginine, histidine and taurine; glycine and methionine; alanine and glutamine. We believe that in the applied concentration of hydrogen sulfide donor in conditions of low oxygen in a gaseous medium incubation inhibits the proliferation and alters the amino acid metabolism of human cells line 4BL.

  2. Routine Metabolic Rate and Limiting Oxygen Concentration of Freshwater Prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii Larvae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Malaysian prawns, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, are hatched and raised indoors in small tanks. Prawns may be raised and shipped at high densities which could result in low dissolved oxygen (DO) conditions. Because DO may play an important role in prawn development and survival, we measured routine me...

  3. Metabolically Derived human ventilation rates: A revised approach based upon oxygen consumption rates (Final Report) 2009

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this report is to provide a revised approach for calculating an individual's ventilation rate directly from their oxygen consumption rate. This revised approach will be used to update the ventilation rate information in the Exposure Factors Handbook, which serve as...

  4. Modeling Diel Oxygen Dynamics and Ecosystem Metabolism in a Shallow, Eutrophic Estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Weeks Bay is a shallow eutrophic estuary that exhibits frequent summertime diel-cycling hypoxia and periods of dissolved oxygen (DO) oversaturation during the day. Diel DO dynamics in shallow estuaries like Weeks Bay are complex, and may be influenced by wind forcing, vertical an...

  5. Modeling Diel Oxygen Dynamics and Ecosystem Metabolism in Weeks Bay, Alabama.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Weeks Bay is a shallow eutrophic estuary that exhibits frequent summertime diel-cycling hypoxia and periods of dissolved oxygen (DO) oversaturation during the day. Diel DO dynamics in shallow estuaries like Weeks Bay are complex, and may be influenced by wind forcing, vertical an...

  6. Bench-to-bedside review: Oxygen debt and its metabolic correlates as quantifiers of the severity of hemorrhagic and post-traumatic shock

    PubMed Central

    Rixen, Dieter; Siegel, John H

    2005-01-01

    Evidence is increasing that oxygen debt and its metabolic correlates are important quantifiers of the severity of hemorrhagic and post-traumatic shock and and may serve as useful guides in the treatment of these conditions. The aim of this review is to demonstrate the similarity between experimental oxygen debt in animals and human hemorrhage/post-traumatic conditions, and to examine metabolic oxygen debt correlates, namely base deficit and lactate, as indices of shock severity and adequacy of volume resuscitation. Relevant studies in the medical literature were identified using Medline and Cochrane Library searches. Findings in both experimental animals (dog/pig) and humans suggest that oxygen debt or its metabolic correlates may be more useful quantifiers of hemorrhagic shock than estimates of blood loss, volume replacement, blood pressure, or heart rate. This is evidenced by the oxygen debt/probability of death curves for the animals, and by the consistency of lethal dose (LD)25,50 points for base deficit across all three species. Quantifying human post-traumatic shock based on base deficit and adjusting for Glasgow Coma Scale score, prothrombin time, Injury Severity Score and age is demonstrated to be superior to anatomic injury severity alone or in combination with Trauma and Injury Severity Score. The data examined in this review indicate that estimates of oxygen debt and its metabolic correlates should be included in studies of experimental shock and in the management of patients suffering from hemorrhagic shock. PMID:16277731

  7. Activity of anandamide (AEA) metabolic enzymes in rat placental bed.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, B M; Battista, N; Correia-da-Silva, G; Rapino, C; Maccarrone, M; Teixeira, N A

    2014-11-01

    Endocannabinoids are endogenous lipid mediators, with anandamide (AEA) being the first member identified. It is now widely accepted that AEA influences early pregnancy events and its levels, which primarily depend on its synthesis by an N-acyl-phosphatidylethanolamine-specific phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD) and degradation by a fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), must be tightly regulated. Previous studies demonstrated that AEA levels require in situ regulation of these respective metabolic enzymes, and thus, any disturbance in AEA levels may impact maternal remodeling processes occurring during placental development. In this study, the activities of the AEA-metabolic enzymes that result in the establishment of proper local AEA levels during rat gestation were examined. Here, we demonstrate that during placentation NAPE-PLD and FAAH activities change in a temporal manner. Our findings suggest that NAPE-PLD and FAAH create the appropriate AEA levels required for tissue remodeling in the placental bed, a process essential to pregnancy maintenance.

  8. Activation of molecular oxygen by infrared laser radiation in pigment-free aerobic systems.

    PubMed

    Krasnovsky, A A; Drozdova, N N; Ivanov, A V; Ambartsumian, R V

    2003-09-01

    With the goal of mimicking the mechanisms of the biological effects of low energy laser irradiation, we have shown that infrared low intensity laser radiation causes oxygenation of the chemical traps of singlet oxygen dissolved in organic media and water saturated by air at normal atmospheric pressure. The photooxygenation rate was directly proportional to the oxygen concentration and strongly inhibited by the singlet oxygen quenchers. The maximum of the photooxygenation action spectrum coincided with the maximum of the oxygen absorption band at 1270 nm. The data provide unambiguous evidence that photooxygenation is determined by the reactive singlet (1)Delta(g )state formed as a result of direct laser excitation of molecular oxygen. Hence, activation of oxygen caused by its direct photoexcitation may occur in natural systems.

  9. Measurement of Metabolic Activity in Dormant Spores of Bacillus Species

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-14

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Spores of Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus subtilis were harvested shortly after release from sporangia, incubated under...Dec-2014 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Measurement of Metabolic Activity in Dormant Spores of Bacillus Species...Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 spores, Bacillus , spore dormancy, 3-phosphoglycerate REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11

  10. Probing the metabolic water contribution to intracellular water using oxygen isotope ratios of PO4

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Yu, Chan; Wang, Fei; Chang, Sae Jung; Yao, Jun; Blake, Ruth E.

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the relative contributions of different water sources to intracellular fluids and body water is important for many fields of study, ranging from animal physiology to paleoclimate. The intracellular fluid environment of cells is challenging to study due to the difficulties of accessing and sampling the contents of intact cells. Previous studies of multicelled organisms, mostly mammals, have estimated body water composition—including metabolic water produced as a byproduct of metabolism—based on indirect measurements of fluids averaged over the whole organism (e.g., blood) combined with modeling calculations. In microbial cells and aquatic organisms, metabolic water is not generally considered to be a significant component of intracellular water, due to the assumed unimpeded diffusion of water across cell membranes. Here we show that the 18O/16O ratio of PO4 in intracellular biomolecules (e.g., DNA) directly reflects the O isotopic composition of intracellular water and thus may serve as a probe allowing direct sampling of the intracellular environment. We present two independent lines of evidence showing a significant contribution of metabolic water to the intracellular water of three environmentally diverse strains of bacteria. Our results indicate that ∼30–40% of O in PO4 comprising DNA/biomass in early stationary phase cells is derived from metabolic water, which bolsters previous results and also further suggests a constant metabolic water value for cells grown under similar conditions. These results suggest that previous studies assuming identical isotopic compositions for intracellular/extracellular water may need to be reconsidered. PMID:27170190

  11. Probing the metabolic water contribution to intracellular water using oxygen isotope ratios of PO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Yu, Chan; Wang, Fei; Chang, Sae Jung; Yao, Jun; Blake, Ruth E.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of the relative contributions of different water sources to intracellular fluids and body water is important for many fields of study, ranging from animal physiology to paleoclimate. The intracellular fluid environment of cells is challenging to study due to the difficulties of accessing and sampling the contents of intact cells. Previous studies of multicelled organisms, mostly mammals, have estimated body water composition—including metabolic water produced as a byproduct of metabolism—based on indirect measurements of fluids averaged over the whole organism (e.g., blood) combined with modeling calculations. In microbial cells and aquatic organisms, metabolic water is not generally considered to be a significant component of intracellular water, due to the assumed unimpeded diffusion of water across cell membranes. Here we show that the 18O/16O ratio of PO4 in intracellular biomolecules (e.g., DNA) directly reflects the O isotopic composition of intracellular water and thus may serve as a probe allowing direct sampling of the intracellular environment. We present two independent lines of evidence showing a significant contribution of metabolic water to the intracellular water of three environmentally diverse strains of bacteria. Our results indicate that ˜30-40% of O in PO4 comprising DNA/biomass in early stationary phase cells is derived from metabolic water, which bolsters previous results and also further suggests a constant metabolic water value for cells grown under similar conditions. These results suggest that previous studies assuming identical isotopic compositions for intracellular/extracellular water may need to be reconsidered.

  12. Oxygen Dependence and Extravascular Transport of Hypoxia-Activated Prodrugs: Comparison of the Dinitrobenzamide Mustard PR-104A and Tirapazamine

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, Kevin O. Myint, Hilary; Patterson, Adam V.; Pruijn, Frederik B.; Siim, Bronwyn G.; Patel, Kashyap; Wilson, William R.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To compare oxygen dependence and tissue transport properties of a new hypoxia-activated prodrug, PR-104A, with tirapazamine, and to evaluate the implications for antitumor activity when combined with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Oxygen dependence of cytotoxicity was measured by clonogenic assay in SiHa cell suspensions. Tissue transport parameters were determined using SiHa multicellular layers. Spatially resolved pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) models were developed to predict cell killing in SiHa tumors and tested by clonogenic assay 18 h after treatment with the corresponding phosphate ester, PR-104. Results: The K-value (oxygen concentration to halve cytotoxic potency) of PR-104A was 0.126 {+-} 0.021 {mu}M (10-fold lower than tirapazamine at 1.30 {+-} 0.28 {mu}M). The diffusion coefficient of PR-104A in multicellular layers (4.42 {+-} 0.15 x 10{sup -7} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1}) was lower than that of tirapazamine (1.30 {+-} 0.05 x 10{sup -6} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1}) but PK modeling predicted better penetration to hypoxic cells in tumors because of its slower metabolism. The tirapazamine PK/PD model successfully predicted the measured activity in combination with single-dose radiation against SiHa tumors, and the PR-104A model underpredicted the activity, which was greater for PR-104 than for tirapazamine (at equivalent host toxicity) both with radiation and as a single agent. Conclusion: PR-104/PR-104A has different PK/PD properties from tirapazamine and superior activity with single-dose radiotherapy against SiHa xenografts. We have inferred that PR-104A is better able to kill cells at intermediate partial pressure of oxygen in tumors than implied by the PK/PD model, most likely because of a bystander effect resulting from diffusion of its activated metabolites from severely hypoxic zones.

  13. Haloacetonitriles: metabolism, genotoxicity, and tumor-initiating activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, E.L.C.; Daniel, F.B.; Herren-Freund, S.L.; Pereira, M.A.

    1986-11-01

    Haloacetonitriles (HAN) are drinking water contaminants produced during chlorine disinfection. This paper evaluates metabolism, genotoxicity, and tumor-initiating activity of these chemicals. The alkylating potential of the HAN to react with the electrophile-trapping agent, 4-(p-nitrobenzyl)pyridine, followed the order dibromoacetonitrile (DBAN) > bromochloroacetonitrile (BCAN) > chloroacetonitrile (CAN) > dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) > trichloroacetonitrile (TCAN). When administered orally to rats, the HAN were metabolized to cyanide and excreted in the urine as thiocyanate. The extent of thiocyanate excretion was CAN > BCAN > DCAN > DDAN >> TCAN. Haloacetonitriles inhibited in vitro microsomal dimethylnitrosamine demethylase (DMN-DM) activity. The most potent inhibitors were DBAN and BCAN. The HAN produced DNA strand breaks in cultured human lymphoblastic (CCRF-CEM) cells. TCAN was the most potent DNA strand breaker. DCAN reacted with polyadenylic acid and DNA to form adducts in a cell-free system. None of the HAN initiated ..gamma..-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT) foci when assayed for tumor-initiating activity in rat liver foci bioassay. In summary, the HAN were demonstrated to possess alkylating activity and genotoxicity in vitro and appeared after oral administration to possess biological activity as indicated by the inhibition of DMN-DM by TCAN but appeared to lack genotoxic and tumor-initiating activity in rat liver. It is proposed that if the HAN found in drinking water pose a carcinogenic hazard it would be limited to the gastrointestinal tract.

  14. Cell death induced by direct laser activation of singlet oxygen at 1270 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anquez, F.; El Yazidi Belkoura, I.; Suret, P.; Randoux, S.; Courtade, E.

    2013-02-01

    Singlet oxygen plays a major role in many chemical and biological photo-oxidation processes. It has a high chemical reactivity, which is commonly harnessed for therapeutic issues. Indeed, singlet oxygen is recognized as the major cytotoxic agent in photodynamic therapy. In this treatment of cancer, singlet oxygen is created, among other reactive species, by an indirect transfer of energy from light to molecular oxygen via excitation of a photosensitizer. In this paper, we show that the conventional singlet oxygen production scheme can be simplified. Production of singlet oxygen is achieved in living cells from photosensitizer-free 1270 nm laser excitation of the electronic ground state of molecular oxygen. The quantity of singlet oxygen produced in this way is sufficient to induce an oxidative stress leading to cell death. Other effects such as thermal stress are discriminated, and we conclude that cell death is only due to singlet oxygen creation. This new simplified scheme of singlet oxygen activation can be seen as a breakthrough for phototherapies of malignant diseases and/or as a non-invasive possibility to generate reactive oxygen species in a tightly controlled manner.

  15. Activated Macrophages as a Novel Determinant of Tumor Cell Radioresponse: The Role of Nitric Oxide-Mediated Inhibition of Cellular Respiration and Oxygen Sparing

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Heng; De Ridder, Mark; Verovski, Valeri N.; Sonveaux, Pierre; Jordan, Benedicte F.; Law, Kalun; Monsaert, Christinne; Van den Berge, Dirk L.; Verellen, Dirk; Feron, Olivier; Gallez, Bernard; Storme, Guy A.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Nitric oxide (NO), synthesized by the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), is known to inhibit metabolic oxygen consumption because of interference with mitochondrial respiratory activity. This study examined whether activation of iNOS (a) directly in tumor cells or (b) in bystander macrophages may improve radioresponse through sparing of oxygen. Methods and Materials: EMT-6 tumor cells and RAW 264.7 macrophages were exposed to bacterial lipopolysaccharide plus interferon-gamma, and examined for iNOS expression by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting and enzymatic activity. Tumor cells alone, or combined with macrophages were subjected to metabolic hypoxia and analyzed for radiosensitivity by clonogenic assay, and for oxygen consumption by electron paramagnetic resonance and a Clark-type electrode. Results: Both tumor cells and macrophages displayed a coherent picture of iNOS induction at transcriptional/translational levels and NO/nitrite production, whereas macrophages showed also co-induction of the inducible heme oxygenase-1, which is associated with carbon monoxide (CO) and bilirubin production. Activation of iNOS in tumor cells resulted in a profound oxygen sparing and a 2.3-fold radiosensitization. Bystander NO-producing, but not CO-producing, macrophages were able to block oxygen consumption by 1.9-fold and to radiosensitize tumor cells by 2.2-fold. Both effects could be neutralized by aminoguanidine, a metabolic iNOS inhibitor. An improved radioresponse was clearly observed at macrophages to tumor cells ratios ranging between 1:16 to 1:1. Conclusions: Our study is the first, as far as we are aware, to provide evidence that iNOS may induce radiosensitization through oxygen sparing, and illuminates NO-producing macrophages as a novel determinant of tumor cell radioresponse within the hypoxic tumor microenvironment.

  16. Boosting oxygen reduction/evolution reaction activities with layered perovskite catalysts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dengjie; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Zhenbao; Shao, Zongping; Ciucci, Francesco

    2016-08-25

    Layered PrBaMn2O5+δ (H-PBM) was simply prepared by annealing pristine Pr0.5Ba0.5MnO3-δ in H2. The oxygen reduction/evolution reaction activities are remarkably enhanced by employing H-PBM. The improvement can be ascribed to the introduction of additional oxygen vacancies, an optimized eg filling of Mn ions, and the facile incorporation of oxygen into layered H-PBM.

  17. Metabolism of mometasone furoate and biological activity of the metabolites.

    PubMed

    Sahasranaman, S; Issar, M; Hochhaus, G

    2006-02-01

    To better evaluate the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of the new inhaled glucocorticoid mometasone furoate (MF), the metabolism of MF was evaluated in rat and human tissues and in rat after i.v. administration. Metabolic studies with 3H-MF in human and rat plasma and S9 fractions of human and rat lung showed relatively high stability and a degradation pattern similar to that seen in buffer systems. MF was efficiently metabolized into at least five metabolites in S9 fractions of both rat and human liver. There were, however, quantitative differences in the metabolites between the two species. The apparent half-life of MF in the S9 fraction of human liver was found to be 3 times greater compared with that in rat. MET1, the most polar metabolite, was the major metabolite in rat liver fractions, whereas both MET1 and MET2 were formed to an equal extent in human liver. Metabolism and distribution studies in rats after intravenous and intratracheal administration of [1,2-(3)H]MF revealed that most of the radioactivity (approximately 90%) was present in the stomach, intestines, and intestinal contents, suggesting biliary excretion of MF and its metabolites. Radiochromatography showed that most radioactivity was associated with MET1, MET2, and MET 3. Fractionation of the high-performance liquid chromatography eluate (MET1-5) revealed that only MF [relative binding affinity (RBA) 2900] and MET2 (RBA 700) had appreciable glucocorticoid receptor binding affinity. These results suggest that MF undergoes distinct extrahepatic metabolism but generates active metabolites that might be in part responsible for the systemic side effects of MF.

  18. Method of Separating Oxygen From Spacecraft Cabin Air to Enable Extravehicular Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Extravehicular activities (EVAs) require high-pressure, high-purity oxygen. Shuttle EVAs use oxygen that is stored and transported as a cryogenic fluid. EVAs on the International Space Station (ISS) presently use the Shuttle cryo O2, which is transported to the ISS using a transfer hose. The fluid is compressed to elevated pressures and stored as a high-pressure gas. With the retirement of the shuttle, NASA has been searching for ways to deliver oxygen to fill the highpressure oxygen tanks on the ISS. A method was developed using low-pressure oxygen generated onboard the ISS and released into ISS cabin air, filtering the oxygen from ISS cabin air using a pressure swing absorber to generate a low-pressure (high-purity) oxygen stream, compressing the oxygen with a mechanical compressor, and transferring the high-pressure, high-purity oxygen to ISS storage tanks. The pressure swing absorber (PSA) can be either a two-stage device, or a single-stage device, depending on the type of sorbent used. The key is to produce a stream with oxygen purity greater than 99.5 percent. The separator can be a PSA device, or a VPSA device (that uses both vacuum and pressure for the gas separation). The compressor is a multi-stage mechanical compressor. If the gas flow rates are on the order of 5 to 10 lb (.2.3 to 4.6 kg) per day, the compressor can be relatively small [3 16 16 in. (.8 41 41 cm)]. Any spacecraft system, or other remote location that has a supply of lowpressure oxygen, a method of separating oxygen from cabin air, and a method of compressing the enriched oxygen stream, has the possibility of having a regenerable supply of highpressure, high-purity oxygen that is compact, simple, and safe. If cabin air is modified so there is very little argon, the separator can be smaller, simpler, and use less power.

  19. Metabolic, anabolic, and mitogenic insulin responses: A tissue-specific perspective for insulin receptor activators

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insulin acts as the major regulator of the fasting-to-fed metabolic transition by altering substrate metabolism, promoting energy storage, and helping activate protein synthesis. In addition to its glucoregulatory and other metabolic properties, insulin can also act as a growth factor. The metabolic...

  20. The Effect of 30% Oxygen on Visuospatial Performance and Brain Activation: An Fmri Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, S.C.; Tack, G.R.; Lee, B.; Eom, G.M.; Lee, S.Y.; Sohn, J.H.

    2004-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the hypothesis that administration of the air with 30% oxygen compared with normal air (21% oxygen) enhances cognitive functioning through increased activation in the brain. A visuospatial task was presented while brain images were scanned by a 3 T fMRI system. The results showed that there was an improvement in…

  1. Metabolic transistor strategy for controlling electron transfer chain activity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui; Tuli, Leepika; Bennett, George N; San, Ka-Yiu

    2015-03-01

    A novel strategy to finely control a large metabolic flux by using a "metabolic transistor" approach was established. In this approach a small change in the level or availability of an essential component for the process is controlled by adding a competitive reaction that affects a precursor or an intermediate in its biosynthetic pathway. The change of the basal level of the essential component, considered as a base current in a transistor, has a large effect on the flux through the major pathway. In this way, the fine-tuning of a large flux can be accomplished. The "metabolic transistor" strategy was applied to control electron transfer chain function by manipulation of the quinone synthesis pathway in Escherichia coli. The achievement of a theoretical yield of lactate production under aerobic conditions via this strategy upon manipulation of the biosynthetic pathway of the key participant, ubiquinone-8 (Q8), in an E. coli strain provides an in vivo, genetically tunable means to control the activity of the electron transfer chain and manipulate the production of reduced products while limiting consumption of oxygen to a defined amount.

  2. Metabolic Tumor Profiling with pH, Oxygen, and Glucose Chemosensors on a Quantum Dot Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Lemon, Christopher M.; Curtin, Peter N.; Somers, Rebecca C.; Greytak, Andrew B.; Lanning, Ryan M.; Jain, Rakesh K.; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Nocera, Daniel G.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis Acidity, hypoxia and glucose levels characterize the tumor microenvironment rendering pH, pO2 and pGlucose, respectively, important indicators of tumor health. To this end, understanding how these parameters change can be a powerful tool for the development of novel and effective therapeutics. We have designed optical chemosensors that feature a quantum dot and an analyte-responsive dye. These non-invasive chemosensors permit pH, oxygen, and glucose to be monitored dynamically within the tumor microenvironment by using multiphoton imaging. PMID:24143874

  3. No effect of acute beetroot juice ingestion on oxygen consumption, glucose kinetics, or skeletal muscle metabolism during submaximal exercise in males.

    PubMed

    Betteridge, Scott; Bescós, Raúl; Martorell, Miquel; Pons, Antoni; Garnham, Andrew P; Stathis, Christos C; McConell, Glenn K

    2016-02-15

    Beetroot juice, which is rich in nitrate (NO3 (-)), has been shown in some studies to decrease oxygen consumption (V̇o2) for a given exercise workload, i.e., increasing efficiency and exercise tolerance. Few studies have examined the effect of beetroot juice or nitrate supplementation on exercise metabolism. Eight healthy recreationally active males participated in three trials involving ingestion of either beetroot juice (Beet; ∼8 mmol NO3 (-)), Placebo (nitrate-depleted Beet), or Beet + mouthwash (Beet+MW), all of which were performed in a randomized single-blind crossover design. Two-and-a-half hours later, participants cycled for 60 min on an ergometer at 65% of V̇o2 peak. [6,6-(2)H]glucose was infused to determine glucose kinetics, blood samples obtained throughout exercise, and skeletal muscle biopsies that were obtained pre- and postexercise. Plasma nitrite [NO2 (-)] increased significantly (∼130%) with Beet, and this was attenuated in MW+Beet. Beet and Beet+MW had no significant effect on oxygen consumption, blood glucose, blood lactate, plasma nonesterified fatty acids, or plasma insulin during exercise. Beet and Beet+MW also had no significant effect on the increase in glucose disposal during exercise. In addition, Beet and Beet+MW had no significant effect on the decrease in muscle glycogen and phosphocreatine and the increase in muscle creatine, lactate, and phosphorylated acetyl CoA carboxylase during exercise. In conclusion, at the dose used, acute ingestion of beetroot juice had little effect on skeletal muscle metabolism during exercise.

  4. Metabolic profile analysis of a single developing zebrafish embryo via monitoring of oxygen consumption rates within a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Hao; Huang, Kuo-Sheng; Yu, Chu-Hung; Gong, Hong-Yi

    2013-01-01

    A combination of a microfluidic device with a light modulation system was developed to detect the oxygen consumption rate (OCR) of a single developing zebrafish embryo via phase-based phosphorescence lifetime detection. The microfluidic device combines two components: an array of glass microwells containing Pt(II) octaethylporphyrin as an oxygen-sensitive luminescent layer and a microfluidic module with pneumatically actuated glass lids above the microwells to controllably seal the microwells of interest. The total basal respiration (OCR, in pmol O2/min/embryo) of a single developing zebrafish embryo inside a sealed microwell has been successfully measured from the blastula stage (3 h post-fertilization, 3 hpf) through the hatching stage (48 hpf). The total basal respiration increased in a linear and reproducible fashion with embryonic age. Sequentially adding pharmacological inhibitors of bioenergetic pathways allows us to perform respiratory measurements of a single zebrafish embryo at key developmental stages and thus monitor changes in mitochondrial function in vivo that are coordinated with embryonic development. We have successfully measured the metabolic profiles of a single developing zebrafish embryo from 3 hpf to 48 hpf inside a microfluidic device. The total basal respiration is partitioned into the non-mitochondrial respiration, mitochondrial respiration, respiration due to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) turnover, and respiration due to proton leak. The changes in these respirations are correlated with zebrafish embryonic development stages. Our proposed platform provides the potential for studying bioenergetic metabolism in a developing organism and for a wide range of biomedical applications that relate mitochondrial physiology and disease.

  5. Role of skeletal muscles impairment and brain oxygenation in limiting oxidative metabolism during exercise after bed rest.

    PubMed

    Porcelli, Simone; Marzorati, Mauro; Lanfranconi, Francesca; Vago, Paola; Pisot, Rado; Grassi, Bruno

    2010-07-01

    "Central" and "peripheral" limitations to oxidative metabolism during exercise were evaluated in 10 young males following a 35-day horizontal bed rest (BR). Incremental exercise (IE) and moderate- and heavy-intensity constant-load exercises (CLE) were carried out on a cycloergometer before and 1-2 days after BR. Pulmonary gas exchange, cardiac output (Q; by impedance cardiography), skeletal muscle (vastus lateralis), and brain (frontal cortex) oxygenation (by near-infrared spectroscopy) were determined. After BR, "peak" (values at exhaustion during IE) workload, peak O(2) uptake (Vo(2 peak)), peak stroke volume, Q(peak), and peak skeletal muscle O(2) extraction were decreased (-18, -18, -22, -19, and -33%, respectively). The gas exchange threshold was approximately 60% of Vo(2 peak) both before and after BR. At the highest workloads, brain oxygenation data suggest an increased O(2) extraction, which was unaffected by BR. Vo(2) kinetics during CLE (same percentage of peak workload before and after BR) were slower (time constant of the "fundamental" component: 31.1 +/- 2.0 s before vs. 40.0 +/- 2.2 s after BR); the amplitude of the "slow component" was unaffected by BR, thus it would be greater, after BR, at the same absolute workload. A more pronounced "overshoot" of skeletal muscle O(2) extraction during CLE was observed after BR, suggesting an impaired adjustment of skeletal muscle O(2) delivery. The role of skeletal muscles in the impairment of oxidative metabolism during submaximal and maximal exercise after BR was identified. The reduced capacity of peak cardiovascular O(2) delivery did not determine a "competition" for the available O(2) between skeletal muscles and brain.

  6. Moonlighting transcriptional activation function of a fungal sulfur metabolism enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Levati, Elisabetta; Sartini, Sara; Bolchi, Angelo; Ottonello, Simone; Montanini, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Moonlighting proteins, including metabolic enzymes acting as transcription factors (TF), are present in a variety of organisms but have not been described in higher fungi so far. In a previous genome-wide analysis of the TF repertoire of the plant-symbiotic fungus Tuber melanosporum, we identified various enzymes, including the sulfur-assimilation enzyme phosphoadenosine-phosphosulfate reductase (PAPS-red), as potential transcriptional activators. A functional analysis performed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, now demonstrates that a specific variant of this enzyme, PAPS-red A, localizes to the nucleus and is capable of transcriptional activation. TF moonlighting, which is not present in the other enzyme variant (PAPS-red B) encoded by the T. melanosporum genome, relies on a transplantable C-terminal polypeptide containing an alternating hydrophobic/hydrophilic amino acid motif. A similar moonlighting activity was demonstrated for six additional proteins, suggesting that multitasking is a relatively frequent event. PAPS-red A is sulfur-state-responsive and highly expressed, especially in fruitbodies, and likely acts as a recruiter of transcription components involved in S-metabolism gene network activation. PAPS-red B, instead, is expressed at low levels and localizes to a highly methylated and silenced region of the genome, hinting at an evolutionary mechanism based on gene duplication, followed by epigenetic silencing of this non-moonlighting gene variant. PMID:27121330

  7. Vampires, Pasteur and reactive oxygen species. Is the switch from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism a preventive antioxidant defence in blood-feeding parasites?

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Pedro L; Oliveira, Marcus F

    2002-08-14

    Several species of parasites show a reduction of their respiratory activity along their developmental cycles after they start to feed on vertebrate blood, relying on anaerobic degradation of carbohydrates to achieve their energy requirements. Usually, these parasites choose not to breathe despite of living in an environment of high oxygen availability such as vertebrate blood. Absence of the 'Pasteur effect' in most of these parasites has been well documented. Interestingly, together with the switch from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism in these parasites, there is clear evidence pointing to an increase in their antioxidant defences. As the respiratory chain in mitochondria is a major site of production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), we propose here that the arrest of respiration constitutes an adaptation to avoid the toxic effects of ROS. This situation would be especially critical for blood-feeding parasites because ROS produced in mitochondria would interact with pro-oxidant products of blood digestion, such as haem and/or iron, and increase the oxidative damage to the parasite's cells.

  8. Design of high pressure oxygen filter for extravehicular activity life support system, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    The experience of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) with extravehicular activity life support emergency oxygen supply subsystems has shown a large number of problems associated with particulate contamination. These problems have resulted in failures of high pressure oxygen component sealing surfaces. A high pressure oxygen filter was designed which would (a) control the particulate contamination level in the oxygen system to a five-micron glass bead rating, ten-micron absolute condition (b) withstand the dynamic shock condition resulting from the sudden opening of 8000 psi oxygen system shutoff valve. Results of the following program tasks are reported: (1) contaminant source identification tests, (2) dynamic system tests, (3) high pressure oxygen filter concept evaluation, (4) design, (5) fabrication, (6) test, and (7) application demonstration.

  9. PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT 4 affects reactive oxygen species metabolism, cell wall and wood properties in hybrid aspen (Populus tremula L. × tremuloides).

    PubMed

    Ślesak, Ireneusz; Szechyńska-Hebda, Magdalena; Fedak, Halina; Sidoruk, Natalia; Dąbrowska-Bronk, Joanna; Witoń, Damian; Rusaczonek, Anna; Antczak, Andrzej; Drożdżek, Michał; Karpińska, Barbara; Karpiński, Stanisław

    2015-07-01

    The phytoalexin deficient 4 (PAD4) gene in Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPAD4) is involved in the regulation of plant--pathogen interactions. The role of PAD4 in woody plants is not known; therefore, we characterized its function in hybrid aspen and its role in reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent signalling and wood development. Three independent transgenic lines with different suppression levels of poplar PAD expression were generated. All these lines displayed deregulated ROS metabolism, which was manifested by an increased H2O2 level in the leaves and shoots, and higher activities of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and catalase (CAT) in the leaves in comparison to the wild-type plants. However, no changes in non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) between the transgenic lines and wild type were observed in the leaves. Moreover, changes in the ROS metabolism in the pad4 transgenic lines positively correlated with wood formation. A higher rate of cell division, decreased tracheid average size and numbers, and increased cell wall thickness were observed. The results presented here suggest that the Populus tremula × tremuloides PAD gene might be involved in the regulation of cellular ROS homeostasis and in the cell division--cell death balance that is associated with wood development.

  10. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism refers to all the physical and chemical processes in the body that convert or use energy, ... Tortora GJ, Derrickson BH. Metabolism. In: Tortora GJ, Derrickson ... Physiology . 14th ed. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons; 2014:chap ...

  11. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... El metabolismo Metabolism Basics Our bodies get the energy they need from food through metabolism, the chemical ... that convert the fuel from food into the energy needed to do everything from moving to thinking ...

  12. Reduced cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in extremely preterm neonates with low-grade germinal matrix- intraventricular hemorrhage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Pei-Yi; Hagan, Katherine; Fenoglio, Angela; Grant, P. Ellen; Franceschini, Maria Angela

    2016-05-01

    Low-grade germinal matrix-intraventricular hemorrhage (GM-IVH) is the most common complication in extremely premature neonates. The occurrence of GM-IVH is highly associated with hemodynamic instability in the premature brain, yet the long-term impact of low-grade GM-IVH on cerebral blood flow and neuronal health have not been fully investigated. We used an innovative combination of frequency-domain near infrared spectroscopy and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (FDNIRS-DCS) to measure cerebral oxygen saturation (SO2) and an index of cerebral blood flow (CBFi) at the infant’s bedside and compute an index of cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO2i). We enrolled twenty extremely low gestational age (ELGA) neonates (seven with low-grade GM-IVH) and monitored them weekly until they reached full-term equivalent age. During their hospital stay, we observed consistently lower CBFi and CMRO2i in ELGA neonates with low-grade GM-IVH compared to neonates without hemorrhages. Furthermore, lower CBFi and CMRO2i in the former group persists even after the resolution of the hemorrhage. In contrast, SO2 does not differ between groups. Thus, CBFi and CMRO2i may have better sensitivity than SO2 in detecting GM-IVH-related effects on infant brain development. FDNIRS-DCS methods may have clinical benefit for monitoring the evolution of GM-IVH, evaluating treatment response, and potentially predicting neurodevelopmental outcome.

  13. Analysis of metabolic alterations in Arabidopsis following changes in the carbon dioxide and oxygen partial pressures.

    PubMed

    Florian, Alexandra; Timm, Stefan; Nikoloski, Zoran; Tohge, Takayuki; Bauwe, Hermann; Araújo, Wagner L; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2014-09-01

    As sessile organisms, plants are subject to a multitude of environmental variations including several which directly affect their interaction with the atmosphere. Given the indiscriminant nature of Rubisco, the relative rates of photosynthesis and photorespiration are known to be responsive to changes in gas composition. However, comprehensive profiling methods have not yet been applied in order to characterize the wider consequences of these changes on primary metabolism in general. Moreover, although transcriptional profiling has revealed that a subset of photorespiratory enzymes are co-expressed, whether transcriptional responses play a role in short-term responses to atmospheric compositional changes remains unknown. To address these questions, plants Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) ecotype Columbia (Col-O) grown under normal air conditions were transferred to different CO2 and O2 concentrations and characterized at the physiological, molecular, and metabolic levels following this transition. The results reveal alterations in the components, which are directly involved in, or supporting, photorespiration, including transcripts and metabolite levels. The results further highlight that the majority of the regulation of these pathways is not mediated at the level of transcription and that the photorespiratory pathway is essential also in conditions in which flux through the pathway is minimized, yet suggest that flux through this pathway is not mediated at the level of transcription.

  14. Effects of increased temperature on metabolic activity and oxidative stress in the first life stages of marble trout (Salmo marmoratus).

    PubMed

    Simčič, Tatjana; Jesenšek, Dušan; Brancelj, Anton

    2015-08-01

    Climate change may result in future alterations in thermal regime which could markedly affect the early developmental stages of cold water fish due to their expected high sensitivity to increasing temperature. In the present study, the effect of temperature increase of 2, 4 and 6°C on the oxygen consumption rate (R), the activity of respiratory electron transport system (ETS) and oxidative stress have been studied in four developmental stages of the marble trout (Salmo marmoratus)-eyed eggs, yolk-sac larvae and juveniles of 1 and 3 months. Oxygen consumption rate and ETS activity increased with level of development and with temperature in all four stages. ETS/R ratios decreased during development and correlated with temperature in eyed eggs, larvae and juveniles of 1 month, but not in juveniles of 3 months. Low ETS/R ratios at higher temperatures indicate stress response in eyed eggs, the most temperature sensitive developmental stage. Catalase (CAT) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities increased during development, but responded differently to elevated temperature in the different developmental stages. Stress in eyed eggs, caused by higher temperatures, resulted in increased oxygen consumption rate and increased activities of CAT and GR. Larvae were sensitive to increased temperature only at the highest experimental temperature of 16°C. Increased temperature did not stress the metabolism of the juveniles, since they were able to compensate their metabolic activity. The earlier developmental stages of marble trout are thus more sensitive to temperature increase than juveniles and therefore more endangered by higher water temperatures. This is the first report connecting oxygen consumption, ETS activity and ETS/R ratio with the activities of antioxidant enzymes in relation to increased temperature in salmonids.

  15. High temporal resolution MRI quantification of global cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption in response to apneic challenge.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Zachary B; Jain, Varsha; Englund, Erin K; Langham, Michael C; Wehrli, Felix W

    2013-10-01

    We present a technique for quantifying global cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO2) in absolute physiologic units at 3-second temporal resolution and apply the technique to quantify the dynamic CMRO2 response to volitional apnea. Temporal resolution of 3 seconds was achieved via a combination of view sharing and superior sagittal sinus-based estimation of total cerebral blood flow (tCBF) rather than tCBF measurement in the neck arteries. These modifications were first validated in three healthy adults and demonstrated to produce minimal errors in image-derived blood flow and venous oxygen saturation (SvO2) values. The technique was then applied in 10 healthy adults during an apnea paradigm of three repeated 30-second breath-holds. Subject-averaged baseline tCBF, arteriovenous oxygen difference (AVO2D), and CMRO2 were 48.6 ± 7.0 mL/100 g per minute, 29.4 ± 3.4 %HbO2, and 125.1 ± 11.4 μmol/100 g per minute, respectively. Subject-averaged maximum changes in tCBF and AVO2D were 43.5 ± 9.4% and -32.1 ± 5.7%, respectively, resulting in a small (6.0 ± 3.5%) but statistically significant (P=0.00044, two-tailed t-test) increase in average end-apneic CMRO2. This method could be used to investigate neurometabolic-hemodynamic relationships in normal physiology, to better define the biophysical origins of the BOLD signal, and to quantify neurometabolic responsiveness in diseases of altered neurovascular reactivity.

  16. Effects of carbohydrate on the internal oxygen concentration, oxygen uptake, and nitrogenase activity in detached pea nodules

    SciTech Connect

    Monroe, J.D. ); LaRue, T.A. )

    1989-10-01

    The interaction between carbon substrates and O{sub 2} and their effects on nitrogenase activity (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) were examined in detached nodules of pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Sparkle). The internal O{sub 2} concentration was estimated from the fractional oxygenation of leghemoglobin measured by reflectance spectroscopy. Lowering the endogenous carbohydrate content of nodules by excising the shoots 16 hours before nodule harvest or by incubating detached nodules at 100 kPa O{sub 2} for 2 hours resulted in a 2- to 10-fold increase in internal O{sub 2}, and a decline in nitrogenase activity. Conversely, when detached nodules were supplied with 100 millimolar succinate, the internal O{sub 2} was lowered. Nitrogenase activity was stimulated by succinate but only at high external O{sub 2}. Oxygen uptake increased linearly with external O{sub 2} but was affected only slightly by the carbon treatments. The apparent diffusion resistance in the nodule cortex was similar in all of the treatments. Carbon substrates can thus affect nitrogenase activity indirectly by affecting the O{sub 2} concentration within detached nodules.

  17. Hepatically-metabolized and -excreted artificial oxygen carrier, hemoglobin vesicles, can be safely used under conditions of hepatic impairment

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, Kazuaki; Miyasato, Mayumi; Ujihira, Hayato; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Kadowaki, Daisuke; Sakai, Hiromi; Tsuchida, Eishun; Horinouchi, Hirohisa; Kobayashi, Koichi; Maruyama, Toru; Otagiri, Masaki

    2010-11-01

    The hemoglobin vesicle (HbV) is an artificial oxygen carrier in which a concentrated Hb solution is encapsulated in lipid vesicles. Our previous studies demonstrated that HbV is metabolized by the mononuclear phagocyte system, and the lipid components are excreted from the liver. It is well-known that many hepatically-metabolized and -excreted drugs show altered pharmaceutics under conditions of liver impairment, which results in adverse effects. The aim of this study was to determine whether the administration of HbV causes toxicity in rats with carbon tetrachloride induced liver cirrhosis. Changes in plasma biochemical parameters, histological staining and the pharmacokinetic distribution of HbV were evaluated after an HbV injection of the above model rats at a putative clinical dose (1400 mgHb/kg). Plasma biochemical parameters were not significantly affected, except for a transient elevation of lipase, lipid components and bilirubin, which recovered within 14 days after an HbV infusion. Negligible morphological changes were observed in the kidney, liver, spleen, lung and heart. Hemosiderin, a marker of iron accumulation in organs, was observed in the liver and spleen up to 14 days after HbV treatment, but no evidence of oxidative stress in the plasma and liver were observed. HbV is mainly distributed in the liver and spleen, and the lipid components are excreted into feces within 7 days. In conclusion, even under conditions of hepatic cirrhosis, HbV and its components exhibit the favorable metabolic and excretion profile at the putative clinical dose. These findings provide further support for the safety and effectiveness of HbV in clinical settings.

  18. In vivo enzyme activity in inborn errors of metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, G.N.; Walter, J.H.; Leonard, J.V.; Halliday, D. )

    1990-08-01

    Low-dose continuous infusions of (2H5)phenylalanine, (1-13C)propionate, and (1-13C)leucine were used to quantitate phenylalanine hydroxylation in phenylketonuria (PKU, four subjects), propionate oxidation in methylmalonic acidaemia (MMA, four subjects), and propionic acidaemia (PA, four subjects) and leucine oxidation in maple syrup urine disease (MSUD, four subjects). In vivo enzyme activity in PKU, MMA, and PA subjects was similar to or in excess of that in adult controls (range of phenylalanine hydroxylation in PKU, 3.7 to 6.5 mumol/kg/h, control 3.2 to 7.9, n = 7; propionate oxidation in MMA, 15.2 to 64.8 mumol/kg/h, and in PA, 11.1 to 36.0, control 5.1 to 19.0, n = 5). By contrast, in vivo leucine oxidation was undetectable in three of the four MSUD subjects (less than 0.5 mumol/kg/h) and negligible in the remaining subject (2 mumol/kg/h, control 10.4 to 15.7, n = 6). These results suggest that significant substrate removal can be achieved in some inborn metabolic errors either through stimulation of residual enzyme activity in defective enzyme systems or by activation of alternate metabolic pathways. Both possibilities almost certainly depend on gross elevation of substrate concentrations. By contrast, only minimal in vivo oxidation of leucine appears possible in MSUD.

  19. Reactive oxygen scavenging activity of matured whiskey and its active polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Koga, K; Taguchi, A; Koshimizu, S; Suwa, Y; Yamada, Y; Shirasaka, N; Yoshizumi, H

    2007-04-01

    The quality of whiskey is known to improve remarkably by its storage over many years. This process is commonly termed "maturing." In this process, polyphenols derived from lignin and tannin of the barrel have an important role in not only forming the matured flavor and taste but also contributing to the advance of clustering ethanol and water in whiskey. It is also likely that polyphenols generally possess reactive oxygen (RO) scavenging activity. The present study evaluated the RO scavenging activity (free-radical scavenging activity, H(2)O(2) reduction activity under peroxidase coculture, and H(2)O(2)scavenging activity) of 24 single malt whiskeys with a maturation age of 10 to 30 y produced in Japanese, Scotch (Islay), or Scotch (Speyside and Highland) regions. Single malt whiskey not only showed RO scavenging activity but there was also a positive correlation between this activity and the maturation age of whiskey exceeding the difference resulting from the manufacturing region. A nonvolatile fraction derived from the barrel was responsible for RO scavenging activity. In particular, the contents of ellagic and gallic acids and lyoniresinol, the main polyphenolic compounds in whiskey, increased with maturation age. For the free-radical scavenging activity per molecule, each compound was 1.68 to 3.14 times that of trolox (a water-soluble vitamin E). The activities of ellagic acid, gallic acid, and lyoniresinol in the whiskey (Yamazaki 18) were equivalent to that of 80.3, 31.2, and 11.1 ppm trolox, respectively. Accordingly, the total activity of these 3 compounds accounted for about 20% of the activity of the whiskey (630.7 ppm trolox).

  20. Microvascular oxygen tension and flow measurements in rodent cerebral cortex during baseline conditions and functional activation

    PubMed Central

    Yaseen, Mohammad A; Srinivasan, Vivek J; Sakadžić, Sava; Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Gorczynska, Iwona; Wu, Weicheng; Fujimoto, James G; Boas, David A

    2011-01-01

    Measuring cerebral oxygen delivery and metabolism microscopically is important for interpreting macroscopic functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data and identifying pathological changes associated with stroke, Alzheimer's disease, and brain injury. Here, we present simultaneous, microscopic measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen partial pressure (pO2) in cortical microvessels of anesthetized rats under baseline conditions and during somatosensory stimulation. Using a custom-built imaging system, we measured CBF with Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT), and vascular pO2 with confocal phosphorescence lifetime microscopy. Cerebral blood flow and pO2 measurements displayed heterogeneity over distances irresolvable with fMRI and positron emission tomography. Baseline measurements indicate O2 extraction from pial arterioles and homogeneity of ascending venule pO2 despite large variation in microvessel flows. Oxygen extraction is linearly related to flow in ascending venules, suggesting that flow in ascending venules closely matches oxygen demand of the drained territory. Oxygen partial pressure and relative CBF transients during somatosensory stimulation further indicate arteriolar O2 extraction and suggest that arterioles contribute to the fMRI blood oxygen level dependent response. Understanding O2 supply on a microscopic level will yield better insight into brain function and the underlying mechanisms of various neuropathologies. PMID:21179069

  1. Computational Models of Reactive Oxygen Species as Metabolic Byproducts and Signal-Transduction Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Elizabeth J.; Smolko, Christian M.; Janes, Kevin A.

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are widely involved in intracellular signaling and human pathologies, but their precise roles have been difficult to enumerate and integrate holistically. The context- and dose-dependent intracellular effects of ROS can lead to contradictory experimental results and confounded interpretations. For example, lower levels of ROS promote cell signaling and proliferation, whereas abundant ROS cause overwhelming damage to biomolecules and cellular apoptosis or senescence. These complexities raise the question of whether the many facets of ROS biology can be joined under a common mechanistic framework using computational modeling. Here, we take inventory of some current models for ROS production or ROS regulation of signaling pathways. Several models captured non-intuitive observations or made predictions that were later verified by experiment. There remains a need for systems-level analyses that jointly incorporate ROS production, handling, and modulation of multiple signal-transduction cascades. PMID:27965578

  2. Effect of oxygen on activation state of complex I and lack of oxaloacetate inhibition of complex II in Langendorff perfused rat heart.

    PubMed

    Maklashina, Elena; Kotlyar, Alexander B; Karliner, Joel S; Cecchini, Gary

    2004-01-02

    Two main entry points for electrons into the mitochondrial respiratory chain are NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) and succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex II). Metabolic regulation of these two respiratory complexes is not understood in detail. It has been suggested that the Krebs cycle metabolic intermediate oxaloacetate (OAA) inhibits complex II in vivo, whereas complex I undergoes a reversible active/de-active transition. In normoxic and anoxic hearts it has been shown that the proportion of complex I in the active and de-active states is different suggesting a possible mode of regulation of the enzyme by oxygen concentration. In the current studies rapid isolation of mitochondrial membranes in a state that preserves the activity of both complex I and complex II has been achieved using Langendorff perfused rat hearts. The findings indicate that the state of activation of complex I is controlled by the oxygen saturation in the perfusate. In addition, these studies show that complex II is fully active in the mitochondrion and not inhibited by OAA regardless of the oxygen concentration.

  3. Benzene's metabolites alter c-MYB activity via reactive oxygen species in HD3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Joanne; Winn, Louise M. . E-mail: winnl@queensu.ca

    2007-07-15

    Benzene is a known leukemogen that is metabolized to form reactive intermediates and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The c-Myb oncoprotein is a transcription factor that has a critical role in hematopoiesis. c-Myb transcript and protein have been overexpressed in a number of leukemias and cancers. Given c-Myb's role in hematopoiesis and leukemias, it is hypothesized that benzene interferes with the c-Myb signaling pathway and that this involves ROS. To investigate our hypothesis, we evaluated whether benzene, 1,4-benzoquinone, hydroquinone, phenol, and catechol generated ROS in chicken erythroblast HD3 cells, as measured by 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) and dihydrorhodamine-123 (DHR-123), and whether the addition of 100 U/ml of the antioxidating enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) could prevent ROS generation. Reduced to oxidized glutathione ratios (GSH:GSSG) were also assessed as well as hydroquinone and benzoquinone's effects on c-Myb protein levels and activation of a transiently transfected reporter construct. Finally we attempted to abrogate benzene metabolite mediated increases in c-Myb activity with the use of SOD. We found that benzoquinone, hydroquinone, and catechol increased DCFDA fluorescence, increased DHR-123 fluorescence, decreased GSH:GSSG ratios, and increased reporter construct expression after 24 h of exposure. SOD was able to prevent DCFDA fluorescence and c-Myb activity caused by benzoquinone and hydroquinone only. These results are consistent with other studies, which suggest metabolite differences in benzene-mediated toxicity. More importantly, this study supports the hypothesis that benzene may mediate its toxicity through ROS-mediated alterations in the c-Myb signaling pathway.

  4. Iridium Oxide Coatings with Templated Porosity as Highly Active Oxygen Evolution Catalysts: Structure-Activity Relationships.

    PubMed

    Bernicke, Michael; Ortel, Erik; Reier, Tobias; Bergmann, Arno; Ferreira de Araujo, Jorge; Strasser, Peter; Kraehnert, Ralph

    2015-06-08

    Iridium oxide is the catalytic material with the highest stability in the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) performed under acidic conditions. However, its high cost and limited availability demand that IrO2 is utilized as efficiently as possible. We report the synthesis and OER performance of highly active mesoporous IrO2 catalysts with optimized surface area, intrinsic activity, and pore accessibility. Catalytic layers with controlled pore size were obtained by soft-templating with micelles formed from amphiphilic block copolymers poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(butadiene)-b-poly(ethylene oxide). A systematic study on the influence of the calcination temperature and film thickness on the morphology, phase composition, accessible surface area, and OER activity reveals that the catalytic performance is controlled by at least two independent factors, that is, accessible surface area and intrinsic activity per accessible site. Catalysts with lower crystallinity show higher intrinsic activity. The catalyst surface area increases linearly with film thickness. As a result of the templated mesopores, the pore surface remains fully active and accessible even for thick IrO2 films. Even the most active multilayer catalyst does not show signs of transport limitations at current densities as high as 75 mA cm(-2) .

  5. Muscle metabolic function and free-living physical activity.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Gary R; Larson-Meyer, D Enette; Sirikul, Bovorn; Newcomer, Bradley R

    2006-11-01

    We have previously shown that muscle metabolic function measured during exercise is related to exercise performance and subsequent 1-yr weight gain. Because it is well established that physical activity is important in weight maintenance, we examined muscle function relationships with free-living energy expenditure and physical activity. Subjects were 71 premenopausal black and white women. Muscle metabolism was evaluated by (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy during 90-s isometric plantar flexion contractions (45% maximum). Free-living energy expenditure (TEE) was measured using doubly labeled water, activity-related energy expenditure (AEE) was calculated as 0.9 x TEE - sleeping energy expenditure from room calorimetry, and free-living physical activity (ARTE) was calculated by dividing AEE by energy cost of standard physical activities. At the end of exercise, anaerobic glycolytic rate (ANGLY) and muscle concentration of phosphomonoesters (PME) were negatively related to TEE, AEE, and ARTE (P < 0.05). Multiple regression analysis showed that both PME (partial r = -0.29, <0.02) and ANGLY (partial r = -0.24, P < 0.04) were independently related to ARTE. PME, primarily glucose-6-phosphate and fructose-6-phosphate, was significantly related to ratings of perceived exertion (r = 0.21, P < or = 0.05) during a maximal treadmill test. PME was not related to ARTE after inclusion of RPE in the multiple regression model, suggesting that PME may be obtaining its relationship with ARTE through an increased perception of effort during physical activity. In conclusion, physically inactive individuals tend to be more dependent on anaerobic glycolysis during exercise while relying on a glycolytic pathway that may not be functioning optimally.

  6. The relationship between body temperature, heart rate, breathing rate, and rate of oxygen consumption, in the tegu lizard (Tupinambis merianae) at various levels of activity.

    PubMed

    Piercy, Joanna; Rogers, Kip; Reichert, Michelle; Andrade, Denis V; Abe, Augusto S; Tattersall, Glenn J; Milsom, William K

    2015-12-01

    The present study determined whether EEG and/or EMG recordings could be used to reliably define activity states in the Brazilian black and white tegu lizard (Tupinambis merianae) and then examined the interactive effects of temperature and activity states on strategies for matching O2 supply and demand. In a first series of experiments, the rate of oxygen consumption (VO2), breathing frequency (fR), heart rate (fH), and EEG and EMG (neck muscle) activity were measured in different sleep/wake states (sleeping, awake but quiet, alert, or moving). In general, metabolic and cardio-respiratory changes were better indictors of the transition from sleep to wake than were changes in the EEG and EMG. In a second series of experiments, the interactive effects of temperature (17, 27 and 37 °C) and activity states on fR, tidal volume (VT), the fraction of oxygen extracted from the lung per breath (FIO2-FEO2), fH, and the cardiac O2 pulse were quantified to determine the relative roles of each of these variables in accommodating changes in VO2. The increases in oxygen supply to meet temperature- and activity-induced increases in oxygen demand were produced almost exclusively by increases in fH and fR. Regression analysis showed that the effects of temperature and activity state on the relationships between fH, fR and VO2 was to extend a common relationship along a single curve, rather than separate relationships for each metabolic state. For these lizards, the predictive powers of fR and fH were maximized when the effects of changes in temperature, digestive state and activity were pooled. However, the best r(2) values obtained were 0.63 and 0.74 using fR and fH as predictors of metabolic rate, respectively.

  7. Simultaneous PET-MRI reveals brain function in activated and resting state on metabolic, hemodynamic and multiple temporal scales.

    PubMed

    Wehrl, Hans F; Hossain, Mosaddek; Lankes, Konrad; Liu, Chih-Chieh; Bezrukov, Ilja; Martirosian, Petros; Schick, Fritz; Reischl, Gerald; Pichler, Bernd J

    2013-09-01

    Combined positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a new tool to study functional processes in the brain. Here we study brain function in response to a barrel-field stimulus simultaneously using PET, which traces changes in glucose metabolism on a slow time scale, and functional MRI (fMRI), which assesses fast vascular and oxygenation changes during activation. We found spatial and quantitative discrepancies between the PET and the fMRI activation data. The functional connectivity of the rat brain was assessed by both modalities: the fMRI approach determined a total of nine known neural networks, whereas the PET method identified seven glucose metabolism-related networks. These results demonstrate the feasibility of combined PET-MRI for the simultaneous study of the brain at activation and rest, revealing comprehensive and complementary information to further decode brain function and brain networks.

  8. Evolution of the metabolic and regulatory networks associated with oxygen availability in two phytopathogenic enterobacteria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dickeya dadantii and Pectobacterium atrosepticum are phytopathogenic enterobacteria capable of facultative anaerobic growth in a wide range of O2 concentrations found in plant and natural environments. The transcriptional response to O2 remains under-explored for these and other phytopathogenic enterobacteria although it has been well characterized for animal-associated genera including Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica. Knowledge of the extent of conservation of the transcriptional response across orthologous genes in more distantly related species is useful to identify rates and patterns of regulon evolution. Evolutionary events such as loss and acquisition of genes by lateral transfer events along each evolutionary branch results in lineage-specific genes, some of which may have been subsequently incorporated into the O2-responsive stimulon. Here we present a comparison of transcriptional profiles measured using densely tiled oligonucleotide arrays for two phytopathogens, Dickeya dadantii 3937 and Pectobacterium atrosepticum SCRI1043, grown to mid-log phase in MOPS minimal medium (0.1% glucose) with and without O2. Results More than 7% of the genes of each phytopathogen are differentially expressed with greater than 3-fold changes under anaerobic conditions. In addition to anaerobic metabolism genes, the O2 responsive stimulon includes a variety of virulence and pathogenicity-genes. Few of these genes overlap with orthologous genes in the anaerobic stimulon of E. coli. We define these as the conserved core, in which the transcriptional pattern as well as genetic architecture are well preserved. This conserved core includes previously described anaerobic metabolic pathways such as fermentation. Other components of the anaerobic stimulon show variation in genetic content, genome architecture and regulation. Notably formate metabolism, nitrate/nitrite metabolism, and fermentative butanediol production, differ between E. coli and the phytopathogens

  9. Aconitase post-translational modification as a key in linkage between Krebs cycle, iron homeostasis, redox signaling, and metabolism of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Lushchak, Oleh V; Piroddi, Marta; Galli, Francesco; Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2014-01-01

    Aconitase, an enzyme possessing an iron-sulfur cluster that is sensitive to oxidation, is involved in the regulation of cellular metabolism. There are two isoenzymes of aconitase (Aco)--mitochondrial (mAco) and cytosolic (cAco) ones. The primary role of mAdco is believed to be to control cellular ATP production via regulation of intermediate flux in the Krebs cycle. The cytosolic Aco in its reduced form operates as an enzyme, whereas in the oxidized form it is involved in the control of iron homeostasis as iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a central role in regulation of Aco functions. Catalytic Aco activity is regulated by reversible oxidation of [4Fe-4S]²⁺ cluster and cysteine residues, so redox-dependent posttranslational modifications (PTMs) have gained increasing consideration as regards possible regulatory effects. These include modifications of cysteine residues by oxidation, nitrosylation and thiolation, as well as Tyr nitration and oxidation of Lys residues to carbonyls. Redox-independent PTMs such as phosphorylation and transamination also have been described. In the presence of a sustained ROS flux, redox-dependent PTMs may lead to enzyme damage and cell stress by impaired energy and iron metabolism. Aconitase has been identified as a protein that undergoes oxidative modification and inactivation in aging and certain oxidative stress-related disorders. Here we describe possible mechanisms of involvement of the two aconitase isoforms, cAco and mAco, in the control of cell metabolism and iron homeostasis, balancing the regulatory, and damaging effects of ROS.

  10. Study of oxygen scavenging PET-based films activated by water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Gabriella; Scarfato, Paola; Incarnato, Loredana

    2016-05-01

    In this work an active barrier system consisting of a thin and transparent film based on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) was studied. Dynamic oxygen absorption measurements were performed at different values of relative humidity and temperature, pointing out that humidity is a key factor in activating the oxidation of the polymer sample. Moreover, the thermal and optical properties of the films were investigated and a good correlation was found between the crystallinity increase and the consequent transparency reduction occurring after the oxygen absorption.

  11. Oxygen requirements for formation and activity of the squalene expoxidase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, L.; Klein, H. P.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of oxygen on squalene epoxidase activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated. In cells grown in standing cultures, the epoxidase was localized mainly in the 'mitochondrial' fraction. Upon aeration, enzyme activity increased and the newly formed enzyme was associated with the 'microsomal' fraction. At 0.03 percent (vol/vol) oxygen, epoxidase levels doubled, whereas the ergosterol level was only slightly increased. Cycloheximide inhibited the increase in epoxidase under these conditions. An apparent K sub m for oxygen of 0.38 percent (vol/vol) was determined from a crude particulate preparation for the epoxidase.

  12. Protective activity of propofol, Diprivan and intralipid against active oxygen species.

    PubMed Central

    Mathy-Hartert, M; Deby-Dupont, G; Hans, P; Deby, C; Lamy, M

    1998-01-01

    We separately studied the antioxidant properties of propofol (PPF), Diprivan (the commercial form of PPF) and intralipid (IL) (the vehicle solution of PPF in Diprivan) on active oxygen species produced by phorbol myristate acetate (10(-6) M)-stimulated human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN: 5 x 10(5) cells/assay), human endothelial cells (5 x 10(5) cells/assay) or cell-free systems (NaOCl or H2O2/peroxidase systems), using luminol (10(-4) M)-enhanced chemiluminescence (CL). We also studied the protective effects of Diprivan on endothelial cells submitted to an oxidant stress induced by H2O2/MPO system: cytotoxicity was assessed by the release of preincorporated 51Cr. Propofol inhibited the CL produced by stimulated PMN in a dose dependent manner (until 5 x 10(-5) M, a clinically relevant concentration), while Diprivan and IL were not dose-dependent inhibitors. The CL produced by endothelial cells was dose-dependently inhibited by Diprivan and PPF, and weakly by IL (not dose-dependent). In cell free systems, dose-dependent inhibitions were obtained for the three products with a lower effect for IL. Diprivan efficaciously protected endothelial cells submitted to an oxidant stress, while IL was ineffective. By HPLC, we demonstrated that PPF was not incorporated into the cells. The drug thus acted by scavenging the active oxygen species released in the extracellular medium. IL acted in the same manner, but was a less powerful antioxidant. PMID:9883967

  13. Single Silver Adatoms on Nanostructured Manganese Oxide Surfaces: Boosting Oxygen Activation for Benzene Abatement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yaxin; Huang, Zhiwei; Zhou, Meijuan; Ma, Zhen; Chen, Jianmin; Tang, Xingfu

    2017-02-21

    The involvement of a great amount of active oxygen species is a crucial requirement for catalytic oxidation of benzene, because complete mineralization of one benzene molecule needs 15 oxygen atoms. Here, we disperse single silver adatoms on nanostructured hollandite manganese oxide (HMO) surfaces by using a thermal diffusion method. The single-atom silver catalyst (Ag1/HMO) shows high catalytic activity in benzene oxidation, and 100% conversion is achieved at 220 °C at a high space velocity of 23 000 h(-1). The Mars-van Krevelen mechanism is valid in our case as the reaction orders for both benzene and O2 approach one, according to reaction kinetics data. Data from H2 temperature-programmed reduction and O core-level X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) reveal that Ag1/HMO possesses a great amount of active surface lattice oxygen available for benzene oxidation. Valence-band XPS and density functional theoretical calculations demonstrate that the single Ag adatoms have the upshifted 4d orbitals, thus facilitating the activation of gaseous oxygen. Therefore, the excellent activation abilities of Ag1/HMO toward both surface lattice oxygen and gaseous oxygen account for its high catalytic activity in benzene oxidation. This work may assist with the rational design of efficient metal-oxide catalysts for the abatement of volatile organic compounds such as benzene.

  14. Metabolic rates, enzyme activities and chemical compositions of some deep-sea pelagic worms, particularly Nectonemertes mirabilis (Nemertea; Hoplonemertinea) and Poeobius meseres (Annelida; Polychaeta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuesen, Erik V.; Childress, James J.

    1993-05-01

    Investigations of metabolic rate, enzyme activity and chemical composition were undertaken on two abundant deep-sea pelagic worms: Nectonemertes mirabilis (Nemertea; Hoplonemertinea) and Poeobius meseres (Annelida; Polychaeta). Six other species of worms ( Pelagonemertes brinkmanni (Nemertea) and the following polychaetes: Pelagobia species A, Tomopteris nisseni, Tomopteris pacifica, Tomopteris species A, and Traviopsis lobifera) were captured in smaller numbers and used for comparison in the physiological and biochemical measurements. Polychaete worms had the highest oxygen consumption rates and, along with N. mirabilis, displayed significant size effects on metabolic rate. Poeobius meseres had the lowest rates of oxygen consumption and displayed no significant relationship of oxygen consumption rate to wet weight. No significant effect of size on the activities of citrate synthase, lactate dehydrogenase or pyruvate kinase was observed in P. meseres or N. mirabilis. Lipid content was higher than protein content for all the worms in this study. Carbohydrate was of little significance in these worms and was usually <0.01% of the total weight. Citrate synthase activities of pelagic worms showed excellent correlation with metabolic rates. It appears that polychaete worms as a group have higher metabolic rates than bathypelagic shrimps, copepods and fishes, and may be the animals with the highest metabolic rates in the bathypelagic regions of the world's oceans.

  15. Cytosolic calcium coordinates mitochondrial energy metabolism with presynaptic activity.

    PubMed

    Chouhan, Amit K; Ivannikov, Maxim V; Lu, Zhongmin; Sugimori, Mutsuyuki; Llinas, Rodolfo R; Macleod, Gregory T

    2012-01-25

    Most neurons fire in bursts, imposing episodic energy demands, but how these demands are coordinated with oxidative phosphorylation is still unknown. Here, using fluorescence imaging techniques on presynaptic termini of Drosophila motor neurons (MNs), we show that mitochondrial matrix pH (pHm), inner membrane potential (Δψm), and NAD(P)H levels ([NAD(P)H]m) increase within seconds of nerve stimulation. The elevations of pHm, Δψm, and [NAD(P)H]m indicate an increased capacity for ATP production. Elevations in pHm were blocked by manipulations that blocked mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, including replacement of extracellular Ca2+ with Sr2+ and application of either tetraphenylphosphonium chloride or KB-R7943, indicating that it is Ca2+ that stimulates presynaptic mitochondrial energy metabolism. To place this phenomenon within the context of endogenous neuronal activity, the firing rates of a number of individually identified MNs were determined during fictive locomotion. Surprisingly, although endogenous firing rates are significantly different, there was little difference in presynaptic cytosolic Ca2+ levels ([Ca2+]c) between MNs when each fires at its endogenous rate. The average [Ca2+]c level (329±11 nM) was slightly above the average Ca2+ affinity of the mitochondria (281±13 nM). In summary, we show that when MNs fire at endogenous rates, [Ca2+]c is driven into a range where mitochondria rapidly acquire Ca2+. As we also show that Ca2+ stimulates presynaptic mitochondrial energy metabolism, we conclude that [Ca2+]c levels play an integral role in coordinating mitochondrial energy metabolism with presynaptic activity in Drosophila MNs.

  16. Cytosolic Calcium Coordinates Mitochondrial Energy Metabolism with Presynaptic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chouhan, Amit K.; Ivannikov, Maxim V.; Lu, Zhongmin; Sugimori, Mutsuyuki; Llinas, Rodolfo R.; Macleod, Gregory T.

    2012-01-01

    Most neurons fire in bursts, imposing episodic energy demands, but how these demands are coordinated with oxidative phosphorylation is still unknown. Here, using fluorescence imaging techniques on presynaptic termini of Drosophila motor neurons (MNs), we show that mitochondrial matrix pH (pHm), inner membrane potential (Δψm), and NAD(P)H levels ([NAD(P)H]m) increase within seconds of nerve stimulation. The elevations of pHm, Δψm, and [NAD(P)H]m indicate an increased capacity for ATP production. Elevations in pHm were blocked by manipulations which blocked mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, including replacement of extracellular Ca2+ with Sr2+, and application of either tetraphenylphosphonium chloride or KB-R7943, indicating that it is Ca2+ that stimulates presynaptic mitochondrial energy metabolism. To place this phenomenon within the context of endogenous neuronal activity, the firing rates of a number of individually identified MNs were determined during fictive locomotion. Surprisingly, although endogenous firing rates are significantly different, there was little difference in presynaptic cytosolic Ca2+ levels ([Ca2+]c) between MNs when each fires at its endogenous rate. The average [Ca2+]c level (329±11nM) was slightly above the average Ca2+ affinity of the mitochondria (281±13nM). In summary, we show that when MNs fire at endogenous rates [Ca2+]c is driven into a range where mitochondria rapidly acquire Ca2+. As we also show that Ca2+ stimulates presynaptic mitochondrial energy metabolism, we conclude that [Ca2+]c levels play an integral role in coordinating mitochondrial energy metabolism with presynaptic activity in Drosophila MNs. PMID:22279208

  17. Genotoxicity of imidacloprid in relation to metabolic activation and composition of the commercial product.

    PubMed

    Costa, C; Silvari, V; Melchini, A; Catania, S; Heffron, J J; Trovato, A; De Pasquale, R

    2009-01-01

    Imidacloprid is a neonicotinoid insecticide combining excellent efficiency against parasites with low toxicity for mammals. Commercially, it is co-formulated with dimethyl sulfoxide, methylpyrrolidone, propylene carbonate and mineral oil, which can modify its bioavailability and toxicological profile for humans following occupational exposure. A combined in vitro approach employing the comet assay and the micronucleus test was used to assess the genotoxicity of imidacloprid in relation to formulation, metabolic activation and exposure level. Human peripheral blood lymphocytes from unexposed healthy volunteers were treated with imidacloprid (0.2, 2 and 20 μM) and with equimolar concentrations of a commercial product, with and without addition of S9 fraction. Imidacloprid significantly increased the comet score and the frequency of micronuclei only at the highest concentration tested. DNA damage was slightly more severe with the commercial product, and was increased, though not significantly, by metabolic activation. Formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) does not seem to be involved as a mechanism of genotoxicity, but this result may be explained by the insufficient sensitivity of the 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate assay at the test concentrations of imidacloprid. These results suggest that at concentrations<20 μM imidacloprid is not genotoxic to human lymphocytes in vitro. Nonetheless, the presence of co-formulants in the commercial product and occupational exposure, along with poor safety procedures, may present an increased risk for DNA fragmentation and chromosomal aberrations.

  18. Characterization of distinct root and shoot responses to low-oxygen stress in Arabidopsis with a focus on primary C- and N-metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mustroph, Angelika; Barding, Gregory A; Kaiser, Kayla A; Larive, Cynthia K; Bailey-Serres, Julia

    2014-10-01

    Oxygen deficiency, caused by flooding of all or a portion of a plant, leads to significant gene regulatory and metabolic responses associated with survival. When oxygen-deprived in light, aerial organs and root systems respond in distinct manners because of their respective autotrophy and heterotrophy, as well as intrinsic differences in cell biology and organ function. To better understand organ-specific responses to oxygen deficiency, we monitored changes in the metabolome of roots and shoots of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and (1) H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Only roots accumulated high amounts of γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) and lactate, whereas both organs accumulated alanine (Ala) upon hypoxia. Meta-analysis of gene regulation data revealed higher induction of mRNAs coding for fermentative enzymes in roots as compared with shoots. However, the elevation in GABA level was not correlated with changes in transcript abundance, supporting the proposal that post-translational mechanisms are important in metabolic acclimation to hypoxia. The biosynthesis, degradation and function of GABA and Ala during oxygen deprivation and re-aeration is discussed. Finally, a systematic survey of low-oxygen mediated regulation of genes associated with primary metabolism across organs and cell types reveals exciting new avenues for future studies.

  19. Brain Hyperglycemia Induced by Heroin: Association with Metabolic Neural Activation.

    PubMed

    Solis, Ernesto; Bola, R Aaron; Fasulo, Bradley J; Kiyatkin, Eugene A

    2017-02-15

    Glucose enters the brain extracellular space from arterial blood, and its proper delivery is essential for metabolic activity of brain cells. By using enzyme-based biosensors coupled with high-speed amperometry in freely moving rats, we previously showed that glucose levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) display high variability, increasing rapidly following exposure to various arousing stimuli. In this study, the same technology was used to assess NAc glucose fluctuations induced by intravenous heroin. Heroin passively injected at a low dose optimal for maintaining self-administration behavior (100 μg/kg) induces a rapid but moderate glucose rise (∼150-200 μM or ∼15-25% over resting baseline). When the heroin dose was doubled and tripled, the increase became progressively larger in magnitude and longer in duration. Heroin-induced glucose increases also occurred in other brain structures (medial thalamus, lateral striatum, hippocampus), suggesting that brain hyperglycemia is a whole-brain phenomenon but changes were notably distinct in each structure. While local vasodilation appears to be the possible mechanism underlying the rapid rise in extracellular glucose levels, the driving factor for this vasodilation (central vs peripheral) remains to be clarified. The heroin-induced NAc glucose increases positively correlated with increases in intracerebral heat production determined in separate experiments using multisite temperature recordings (NAc, temporal muscle and skin). However, glucose levels rise very rapidly, preceding much slower increases in brain heat production, a measure of metabolic activation associated with glucose consumption.

  20. Vasoconstrictors alter oxygen, lactate, and glycerol metabolism in the perfused hindlimb of a rat kangaroo.

    PubMed

    Ye, J M; Edwards, S J; Rose, R W; Rattigan, S; Clark, M G; Colquhoun, E Q

    1995-05-01

    The Tasmanian bettong (Bettongia gaimardi) is a small marsupial rat kangaroo without detectable brown adipose tissue (BAT). The hindlimb was perfused with constant flow at 25 degrees C after cannulation under anesthesia of the femoral artery and vein to one hindlimb. Norepinephrine (NE, 25 nM-2.5 microM) and vasopressin (VP, 10 nM-0.1 microM) each increased perfusion pressure, oxygen consumption (VO2), and lactate and glycerol efflux of the perfused hindlimb. NE-mediated increases in VO2 and the efflux of lactate and glycerol were unaffected by propranolol (10 microM) but were completely blocked by the further addition of phentolamine (10 microM). In contrast, serotonin (5-HT; 0.1-2.5 microM) inhibited VO2 and inhibited lactate efflux. The changes induced by NE, VP, and 5-HT were all rapidly reversed by nitroprusside. These results suggest that resting thermogenesis in bettong hindlimb can be differentially controlled by the vasculature, which may also contribute to the induced VO2. This vascular control of skeletal muscle VO2 appears widespread in homeotherm evolution.

  1. Activation processes on GaAs photocathode by different currents of oxygen source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Zhuang; Shi, Feng; Cheng, Hongchang; Wang, Shufei; Zhang, Xiaohui; Yuan, Yuan; Chen, Chang

    2015-04-01

    In order to know the influence of activation processes on GaAs photocathodes, three GaAs samples were activated by a fixed current of cesium source and different currents of oxygen source. The current of caesium source is same during activation to ensure initial adsorption of caesium quantum is similar, which is the base to show the difference during alternation activation of caesium and oxygen. Analysed with the activation data, it is indicated that Cs-to-O current ratio of 1.07 is the optimum ratio to obtain higher sensitivity and better stability. According to double dipole model, stable and uniform double dipole layers of GaAs-O-Cs:Cs-O-Cs are formed and negative electron affinity is achieved on GaAs surface by activation with cesium and oxygen. The analytical result is just coincident with the model. Thus there is an efficient technological method to improve sensitivity and stability of GaAs photocathode.

  2. The relationship between electrocerebral activity and cerebral fractional tissue oxygen extraction in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    ter Horst, Hendrik J; Verhagen, Elise A; Keating, Paul; Bos, Arend F

    2011-10-01

    Impaired cerebral oxygen delivery may cause cerebral damage in preterm infants. At lower levels of cerebral perfusion and oxygen concentration, electrocerebral activity is disturbed. The balance between cerebral oxygen delivery and oxygen use can be measured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), and electrocerebral activity can be measured by amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG). Our aim was to determine the relationship between regional cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (rcSO2), fractional tissue oxygen extraction (FTOE), and aEEG. We recorded longitudinal digital aEEG and rcSO2 prospectively in 46 preterm infants (mean GA 29.5 wk, SD 1.7) for 2 hr on the 1st to 5th, 8th, and 15th d after birth. We excluded infants with germinal matrix hemorrhage exceeding grade I and recordings of infants receiving inotropes. FTOE was calculated using transcutaneous arterial oxygen saturation (tcSaO2) and rcSO2 values: (tcSaO2 - rcSO2)/tcSaO2. aEEG was assessed by calculating the mean values of the 5th, 50th, and 95th centiles of the aEEG amplitudes. The aEEG amplitude centiles changed with increasing GA. FTOE and aEEG amplitude centiles increased significantly with postnatal age. More mature electrocerebral activity was accompanied by increased FTOE. FTOE also increased with increasing postnatal age and decreasing Hb levels.

  3. Metabolically inert perfluorinated fatty acids directly activate uncoupling protein 1 in brown-fat mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Shabalina, Irina G; Kalinovich, Anastasia V; Cannon, Barbara; Nedergaard, Jan

    2016-05-01

    The metabolically inert perfluorinated fatty acids perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) can display fatty acid-like activity in biological systems. The uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in brown adipose tissue is physiologically (re)activated by fatty acids, including octanoate. This leads to bioenergetically uncoupled energy dissipation (heat production, thermogenesis). We have examined here the possibility that PFOA/PFOS can directly (re)activate UCP1 in isolated mouse brown-fat mitochondria. In wild-type brown-fat mitochondria, PFOS and PFOA overcame GDP-inhibited thermogenesis, leading to increased oxygen consumption and dissipated membrane potential. The absence of this effect in brown-fat mitochondria from UCP1-ablated mice indicated that it occurred through activation of UCP1. A competitive type of inhibition by increased GDP concentrations indicated interaction with the same mechanistic site as that utilized by fatty acids. No effect was observed in heart mitochondria, i.e., in mitochondria without UCP1. The stimulatory effect of PFOA/PFOS was not secondary to non-specific mitochondrial membrane permeabilization or to ROS production. Thus, metabolic effects of perfluorinated fatty acids could include direct brown adipose tissue (UCP1) activation. The possibility that this may lead to unwarranted extra heat production and thus extra utilization of food resources, leading to decreased fitness in mammalian wildlife, is discussed, as well as possible negative effects in humans. However, a possibility to utilize PFOA-/PFOS-like substances for activating UCP1 therapeutically in obesity-prone humans may also be envisaged.

  4. Systems analysis of transcription factor activities in environments with stable and dynamic oxygen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Rolfe, Matthew D; Ocone, Andrea; Stapleton, Melanie R; Hall, Simon; Trotter, Eleanor W; Poole, Robert K; Sanguinetti, Guido; Green, Jeffrey

    2012-07-01

    Understanding gene regulation requires knowledge of changes in transcription factor (TF) activities. Simultaneous direct measurement of numerous TF activities is currently impossible. Nevertheless, statistical approaches to infer TF activities have yielded non-trivial and verifiable predictions for individual TFs. Here, global statistical modelling identifies changes in TF activities from transcript profiles of Escherichia coli growing in stable (fixed oxygen availabilities) and dynamic (changing oxygen availability) environments. A core oxygen-responsive TF network, supplemented by additional TFs acting under specific conditions, was identified. The activities of the cytoplasmic oxygen-responsive TF, FNR, and the membrane-bound terminal oxidases implied that, even on the scale of the bacterial cell, spatial effects significantly influence oxygen-sensing. Several transcripts exhibited asymmetrical patterns of abundance in aerobic to anaerobic and anaerobic to aerobic transitions. One of these transcripts, ndh, encodes a major component of the aerobic respiratory chain and is regulated by oxygen-responsive TFs ArcA and FNR. Kinetic modelling indicated that ArcA and FNR behaviour could not explain the ndh transcript profile, leading to the identification of another TF, PdhR, as the source of the asymmetry. Thus, this approach illustrates how systematic examination of regulatory responses in stable and dynamic environments yields new mechanistic insights into adaptive processes.

  5. Ethanol metabolism and oxidative stress are required for unfolded protein response activation and steatosis in zebrafish with alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsedensodnom, Orkhontuya; Vacaru, Ana M.; Howarth, Deanna L.; Yin, Chunyue; Sadler, Kirsten C.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Secretory pathway dysfunction and lipid accumulation (steatosis) are the two most common responses of hepatocytes to ethanol exposure and are major factors in the pathophysiology of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). However, the mechanisms by which ethanol elicits these cellular responses are not fully understood. Recent data indicates that activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in response to secretory pathway dysfunction can cause steatosis. Here, we examined the relationship between alcohol metabolism, oxidative stress, secretory pathway stress and steatosis using zebrafish larvae. We found that ethanol was immediately internalized and metabolized by larvae, such that the internal ethanol concentration in 4-day-old larvae equilibrated to 160 mM after 1 hour of exposure to 350 mM ethanol, with an average ethanol metabolism rate of 56 μmol/larva/hour over 32 hours. Blocking alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (Adh1) and cytochrome P450 2E1 (Cyp2e1), the major enzymes that metabolize ethanol, prevented alcohol-induced steatosis and reduced induction of the UPR in the liver. Thus, we conclude that ethanol metabolism causes ALD in zebrafish. Oxidative stress generated by Cyp2e1-mediated ethanol metabolism is proposed to be a major culprit in ALD pathology. We found that production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased in larvae exposed to ethanol, whereas inhibition of the zebrafish CYP2E1 homolog or administration of antioxidants reduced ROS levels. Importantly, these treatments also blocked ethanol-induced steatosis and reduced UPR activation, whereas hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) acted as a pro-oxidant that synergized with low doses of ethanol to induce the UPR. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ethanol metabolism and oxidative stress are conserved mechanisms required for the development of steatosis and hepatic dysfunction in ALD, and that these processes contribute to ethanol-induced UPR activation and secretory pathway stress in hepatocytes. PMID

  6. A novel method of combining blood oxygenation and blood flow sensitive magnetic resonance imaging techniques to measure the cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism responses to an unknown neural stimulus.

    PubMed

    Simon, Aaron B; Griffeth, Valerie E M; Wong, Eric C; Buxton, Richard B

    2013-01-01

    Simultaneous implementation of magnetic resonance imaging methods for Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) and Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) imaging makes it possible to quantitatively measure the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO(2)) that occur in response to neural stimuli. To date, however, the range of neural stimuli amenable to quantitative analysis is limited to those that may be presented in a simple block or event related design such that measurements may be repeated and averaged to improve precision. Here we examined the feasibility of using the relationship between cerebral blood flow and the BOLD signal to improve dynamic estimates of blood flow fluctuations as well as to estimate metabolic-hemodynamic coupling under conditions where a stimulus pattern is unknown. We found that by combining the information contained in simultaneously acquired BOLD and ASL signals through a method we term BOLD Constrained Perfusion (BCP) estimation, we could significantly improve the precision of our estimates of the hemodynamic response to a visual stimulus and, under the conditions of a calibrated BOLD experiment, accurately determine the ratio of the oxygen metabolic response to the hemodynamic response. Importantly we were able to accomplish this without utilizing a priori knowledge of the temporal nature of the neural stimulus, suggesting that BOLD Constrained Perfusion estimation may make it feasible to quantitatively study the cerebral metabolic and hemodynamic responses to more natural stimuli that cannot be easily repeated or averaged.

  7. Metabolic pathways in immune cell activation and quiescence.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Erika L; Pearce, Edward J

    2013-04-18

    Studies of immune system metabolism ("immunometabolism") segregate along two paths. The first investigates the effects of immune cells on organs that regulate whole-body metabolism, such as adipose tissue and liver. The second explores the role of metabolic pathways within immune cells and how this regulates immune response outcome. Distinct metabolic pathways diverge and converge at many levels, and, therefore, cells face choices as to how to achieve their metabolic goals. There is interest in fully understanding how and why immune cells commit to particular metabolic fates and in elucidating the immunologic consequences of reaching a metabolic endpoint by one pathway versus another. This is particularly intriguing, given that metabolic commitment is influenced not only by substrate availability but also by signaling pathways elicited by metabolites. Thus, metabolic choices in cells enforce fate and function, and this area will be the subject of this review.

  8. The effect of mayfly (Hexagenia spp.) burrowing activity on sedi