Science.gov

Sample records for active parental consent

  1. Bias in Student Survey Findings from Active Parental Consent Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Thérèse; Cross, Donna; Thomas, Laura T.; Zubrick, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly, researchers are required to obtain active (explicit) parental consent prior to surveying children and adolescents in schools. This study assessed the potential bias present in a sample of actively consented students, and in the estimates of associations between variables obtained from this sample. Students (n = 3496) from 36…

  2. A Comparison of Methods to Obtain Active Parental Consent for an International Student Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMorris, Barbara J.; Clements, Jackie; Evans-Whipp, Tracy; Gangnes, Danielle; Bond, Lyndal; Toumbourou, John W.; Catalano, Richard F.

    2004-01-01

    Many school-based research efforts require active parental consent for student participation. Maximizing rates of consent form return and agreement is an important issue, because sample representativeness may be compromised when these rates are low. This article compares two methods for obtaining active parental consent: return of consent forms in…

  3. How Does Active Parental Consent Influence the Findings of Drug-Use Surveys in Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Victoria M.; Hill, David J.; Effendi, Yuksel

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the impact of passive and active parental consent procedures on the type of adolescents participating in a school-based survey examining substance use. Schools recruited from a random sample of metropolitan schools were assigned to passive or active parental consent condition. Results showed that participation rates in active…

  4. Active Parental Consent in School-Based Research: How Much Is Enough and How Do We Get It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esbensen, Finn-Aage; Melde, Chris; Taylor, Terrance J.; Peterson, Dana

    2008-01-01

    Active parental consent policies have been blamed for low participation rates and selection bias (i.e., loss of "high-risk" youths) in school-based studies. In this article, the authors describe active consent procedures that produced an overall active consent rate of 79% in a sample of more than 4,500 middle school students attending 29 schools…

  5. Active Parental Consent for a School-Based Community Violence Screening: Comparing Distribution Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Bradley D.; Jaycox, Lisa H.; Langley, Audra; Kataoka, Sheryl H.; Wilkins, Windy S.; Wong, Marleen

    2007-01-01

    Background: Students are unable to benefit from many school programs designed to address their mental health needs if their parents do not consent to their participation. As part of an ongoing effort in a large urban school district to meet the mental health needs of students traumatized by violence exposure, this paper examines the impact of…

  6. 16 CFR 312.5 - Parental consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... obtain verifiable parental consent before any collection, use, and/or disclosure of personal information... consent to the collection and use of the child's personal information without consenting to disclosure of his or her personal information to third parties. (b) Mechanisms for verifiable parental consent....

  7. 16 CFR 312.5 - Parental consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... obtain verifiable parental consent before any collection, use, and/or disclosure of personal information... consent to the collection and use of the child's personal information without consenting to disclosure of his or her personal information to third parties. (b) Mechanisms for verifiable parental consent....

  8. 34 CFR 300.300 - Parental consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....504, obtain informed consent, consistent with § 300.9, from the parent of the child before conducting... efforts to obtain the informed consent from the parent for an initial evaluation to determine whether the... with a disability must obtain informed consent from the parent of the child before the...

  9. 34 CFR 300.300 - Parental consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....504, obtain informed consent, consistent with § 300.9, from the parent of the child before conducting... efforts to obtain the informed consent from the parent for an initial evaluation to determine whether the... with a disability must obtain informed consent from the parent of the child before the...

  10. 34 CFR 300.300 - Parental consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....504, obtain informed consent, consistent with § 300.9, from the parent of the child before conducting... efforts to obtain the informed consent from the parent for an initial evaluation to determine whether the... with a disability must obtain informed consent from the parent of the child before the...

  11. 34 CFR 300.300 - Parental consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES Evaluations, Eligibility Determinations, Individualized Education Programs, and Educational Placements Parental Consent § 300.300 Parental consent. (a) Parental consent for initial evaluation. (1)(i) The public agency proposing to conduct an initial evaluation to determine if a child qualifies as...

  12. Do participation rates change when active consent procedures replace passive consent.

    PubMed

    Pokorny, S B; Jason, L A; Schoeny, M E; Townsend, S M; Curie, C J

    2001-10-01

    Researchers face considerable ambiguity and controversy regarding the issue of informed consent. Decisions about consent procedures can affect study participation rates and prevalence estimates among specific populations. Changing from passive to active parental consent procedures was examined in a case study with an anonymous survey of sixth- through eighth-grade students' substance use. Four types of procedures for obtaining parental consent were examined. Results suggest that certain types of consent procedures can yield high levels of participation. This study also demonstrates that low participation rates with some active consent procedures can cause biases in sample characteristics and outcome data. PMID:11575030

  13. Parental consent in paediatric clinical research

    PubMed Central

    Chappuy, H; Doz, F; Blanche, S; Gentet, J‐C; Pons, G; Tréluyer, J‐M

    2006-01-01

    Aims To assess parental understanding and memorisation of the information given when seeking for consent to their child's participation to clinical research, and to identify the factors of significant influence on parents' decision making process. Methods Sixty eight parents who had been approached for enrolling their child in a clinical oncology or HIV study were asked to complete an interview. Their understanding was measured by a score which included items required to obtain a valid consent according to French legislation. Results Items that were best understood by parents were the aims of the study (75%), the risks (70%), the potential benefits to their child (83%), the potential benefits to other children (70%), the right to withdraw (73%), and voluntariness (84%). Items that were least understood were the procedures (44%), the possibility of alternative treatments (53%), and the duration of participation (39%). Less than 10% of the parents had understood all these points. Ten parents (15%) did not remember that they had signed up for a research protocol. Thirty three parents (48%) reported no difficulty in making their decision. Twenty four parents (38%) declared that they made their decision together with the investigator; 26 (41%) let the physician decide. Fifty four parents (78%) felt that the level of information given was satisfactory. Conclusion There was an apparent discrepancy between parents' evaluation of the adequacy of the information delivered and evaluation of their understanding and memorisation. The majority of parents preferred that the physician take as much responsibility as possible in the decision making process. PMID:16246853

  14. 34 CFR 300.300 - Parental consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Parental consent. 300.300 Section 300.300 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES Evaluations,...

  15. Parents, adolescents, and consent for research participation.

    PubMed

    Iltis, Ana S

    2013-06-01

    Decisions concerning children in the health care setting have engendered significant controversy and sparked ethics policies and statements, legal action, and guidelines regarding who ought to make decisions involving children and how such decisions ought to be made. Traditionally, parents have been the default decision-makers for children not only with regard to health care but with regard to other matters, such as religious practice and education. In recent decades, there has been a steady trend away from the view that parents are in authority over their children and toward the view that children are rights-bearers who should be granted greater authority over themselves. The mature minor doctrine refers to the decision to grant mature minors the authority to make decisions traditionally reserved for their parents. This essay (1) documents the trend towards expanding the understanding of some minors as "mature" and hence as having the right and authority to give informed consent, (2) examines the reasons for which some commentators have a special interest in expanding the mature minor doctrine to the research setting and allowing minors to enroll in research without parental permission, and (3) defends the view that the mature minor doctrine, regardless of its application to clinical health care decisions, ought to be set aside in the research setting in favor of greater parental involvement. PMID:23607974

  16. Effects of Active Parental Consent on Response Rates for a Statewide Secondary School Substance Use Survey and Relationships with School Level Measures of Student Ethnicity, Poverty and Educational Advancement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skager, Rodney; Austin, Gregory

    Legislative mandates in California and at the federal level require written parental consent for surveys of children and youth on: sexual behavior and attitudes; illegal, antisocial and criminal behavior; and psychological problems. Active parental refusal and nonresponse to requests for permission threaten the generalizability of information…

  17. 16 CFR 312.5 - Parental consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS CHILDREN'S ONLINE... online contact information of a parent or child to be used for the sole purpose of obtaining parental... its records; (2) Where the operator collects online contact information from a child for the...

  18. Missouri's parental consent law and teen pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pierson, V H

    1995-01-01

    The Supreme Court decision of July 1989 upholding state regulation of abortion has led to numerous attempts to impose parental consent and/or parental notification legislation for females under the age of 18 seeking abortions. The effect of such legislation on teen pregnancy outcomes is hotly debated. Missouri vital statistics data from 1980 through 1992 are examined for the effect of such a law on pregnancy resolution choices among teens. The Missouri data suggest that since the enforcement of the parental consent statute in 1985 there has been a decrease in the selection of abortion as a pregnancy outcome, particularly among white teens. In addition there has been an increase in the percent of abortions among teens taking place in other states and an irregular but steady trend toward later abortions. The increasing number of births to unmarried mothers under the age of 18 suggest the need for specific services to help these young mothers cope. PMID:7638977

  19. 78 FR 51677 - Children's Online Privacy Protection Rule Proposed Parental Consent Method; AssertID, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-21

    ... meets the requirements for parental consent described in 16 CFR 312.5(b)(1). \\1\\ 64 FR 59888 (1999). \\2\\ 16 CFR part 312. \\3\\ 78 FR 3972 (2013). \\4\\ 16 CFR 312.12(a); 78 FR at 3991-3992, 4013. Pursuant to... Parental Consent Method; AssertID, Inc. Application for Approval of Parental Consent Method AGENCY:...

  20. Patient and parent understanding of informed consent in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Micah G; Kiyak, H Asuman; Omnell, Lena

    2003-11-01

    In both medical and dental settings, researchers have found that patients do not adequately comprehend the information given during informed consent discussions, especially the less educated, low-income patients. Because of the importance of patient compliance with orthodontic treatment regimens, this study examined patient and parent understanding of the child's Phase I orthodontic treatment in a public dental clinic with ethnically diverse, low-income patients. Interviews were conducted with 29 children (ages 6-12) and their parents or guardians at the orthodontic case presentation appointment. The orthodontist explained the reasons for treatment, the orthodontic procedures to be used, the risks, the alternatives, and patient and parent responsibilities during treatment; the session was audiotaped. Interviews were conducted immediately after this discussion and the results compared with the orthodontists' presentations. In general, both children and parents recalled significantly fewer reasons for treatment (1.10, 1.66, and 2.34 items, respectively), procedures (1.55, 1.59, and 2.45, respectively), risks associated with treatment (0.66, 1.48, and 4.66, respectively), and responsibilities of the child during treatment (2.21, 2.07, and 3.38, respectively) than what the orthodontist had told them. They were also less likely to recall the reasons, procedures, and risks that were most frequently cited by the orthodontist. These findings raise concerns about the effectiveness of current informed consent techniques with public health populations, especially the low recall rates within 30 minutes of the case presentations. Low recall of risks by children and their parents, particularly for critical risks such as relapse, caries, and periodontal problems, raises concerns about treatment compliance, success, and more importantly, the effectiveness of the informed consent process itself. Future research should focus on methods to improve the informed consent process among

  1. Parental Notification/Consent for Treatment of the Adolescent.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    A continuing debate exists in both law and medicine regarding an adolescent's capacity to make rational, independent decisions. This is particularly true concerning an adolescent's capacity to make an informed decision with regard to abortion. Neuroscience research responds to the question by noting that the area of the brain involved in critical thinking and decision-making does not reach full maturity until the early to mid-twenties. Consequently, teens are more likely to act impulsively, rather than with rational and goal-oriented thought. Relying upon outdated information, medical organizations have generally maintained that most teens are fully competent to understand the risks and consequences of, and give informed consent to, medical procedures including abortion without parental knowledge, involvement, or consent. The American College of Pediatricians examines the data and challenges this position, emphasizing the important contribution of parents in advising their adolescent children about such life-changing decisions. PMID:26103711

  2. Parental notice and consent for abortion: out of step with family law principles and policies.

    PubMed

    Greenberger, M D; Connor, K

    1991-01-01

    In 1990, the US Supreme Court in Hodgson v. Minnesota allowed a state to require, with limited exceptions, notification of both parents before a woman under 18 has an abortion, as long as the law provides a judicial bypass procedure. If the judge finds that she is mature enough to give informed consent or that notification is not in her best interest, judicial bypass permits nondisclosure to the parents. The notification requirement is contrary to many of the general principles to family law. The Minnesota statute requires physicians to notify both parents; notice to merely one parent is permissible only if the other parent is dead or cannot be located after a "reasonably diligent effort." Without the judicial bypass procedure Justice O'Connor would have invalidated the statute as unconstitutional, for conflicting with the best interests of the minor, infringing on family autonomy, and failing to foster the state's alleged goal of improving parent-child communication. We are left with a ruling that fails to protect the privacy of family decision making from government interference, fails to uphold court-ordered custody and parental decision making arrangements, fails to recognize state laws allowing minors access to medical services relating to sexual activity, and conflicts with the general rule of requiring only 1 parents' consent before a minor receives medical treatment. The parental notification law can cause serious harm, precipitating a dangerous family crisis where physical, psychological, or sexual abuse is present, and can cause delay in pursuing and abortion until it is too late to get one, causing life-long repercussions. The best interests of minors strongly argue against mandatory parental consent and notification laws. PMID:2029941

  3. Research with Children and Young People: The Issue of Parental (Proxy) Consent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyne, Imelda

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the potential problems with the parental consent requirement, substantiated with examples mainly from healthcare and social research studies. This will illustrate how the parental consent requirement, instead of promoting high ethical standards, may result in some instances of children's rights and ethical considerations being…

  4. 78 FR 56183 - Children's Online Privacy Protection Rule Proposed Parental Consent Method; Imperium, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-12

    ... meets the requirements for parental consent described in 16 CFR 312.5(b)(1). \\1\\ 64 FR 59888 (1999). \\2\\ 16 CFR Part 312. \\3\\ 78 FR 3972 (2013). \\4\\ 16 CFR 312.12(a); 78 FR at 3991-3992, 4013. Pursuant to... CFR Part 312 RIN 3084-AB20 Children's Online Privacy Protection Rule Proposed Parental Consent...

  5. Why Do Parents Grant or Deny Consent for Adolescent Participation in Sexuality Research?

    PubMed

    Moilanen, Kristin L

    2016-05-01

    To date, there is limited knowledge about how parents make decisions about adolescents' participation in sexuality research. This gap was addressed in the present study, which explored parents' reasons for providing or denying consent and their suggestions for improving the likelihood of consent. 151 parents responded through anonymous internet surveys (85.3 % mothers; 87 % European American). Those who would likely consent were largely motivated by potential benefits and limited risks of participating in the study. Those unlikely to consent expressed discomfort with sexual content, which they viewed as inappropriate for sexually-naïve adolescents. Most were somewhat more likely to consent if researchers engaged in ethical research practices (e.g., protecting confidentiality). As in other adolescent life domains, parents' decisions strongly reflected their desire to protect their teenagers' wellbeing, though respondents' means of pursuing this goal varied. The discussion centers on the findings' implications for theory development and recruitment efforts. PMID:26910523

  6. Consent.

    PubMed

    Rowe, A H

    1994-06-01

    Before a dental practitioner examines a patient he or she must obtain the patient's consent to do so, and before undertaking any form of complex or expensive treatment the patient's consent must be in writing. Failure to do this could leave the practitioner open to prosecution for assault, and liable for damages in a civil court. PMID:7875347

  7. Clinical Trial Decisions in Difficult Circumstances: Parental Consent Under Time Pressure.

    PubMed

    Jansen-van der Weide, Marijke C; Caldwell, Patrina H Y; Young, Bridget; de Vries, Martine C; Willems, Dick L; Van't Hoff, William; Woolfall, Kerry; van der Lee, Johanna H; Offringa, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Treatments and interventions used to care for children in emergencies should be based on strong evidence. Well-designed clinical trials investigating these interventions for children are therefore indispensable. Parental informed consent is a key ethical requirement for the enrollment of children in such studies. However, if time is limited because of an urgent need for intervention, there are additional ethical challenges to adequately support the informed consent process. The acute situation and associated psychological impact may compromise the ability of parents to give informed consent. Little evidence exists to guide the process of consent seeking for a child's research participation when time is limited. It is also unclear in what circumstances alternatives to prospective informed consent could be applied. This article describes possible options to manage the informed consent process in an appropriate, practical, and, we believe, ethical way when time is limited. PMID:26416935

  8. Parental Refusal to Consent for Evaluation: A Legal Analysis with Implications for School Psychologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Etscheidt, Susan; Clopton, Kerri; Haselhuhn, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    The decision to begin the process for special education eligibility has complexities impacting children, parents, teachers, and schools. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA) eligibility provisions specify the need to obtain consent prior to evaluation and options when consent cannot be obtained. School psychologists…

  9. Constitutional Law: Abortion, Parental Consent, Minors' Right to Due Process, Equal Protection and Privacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child, Barbara

    1975-01-01

    In State v. Koome, the Washington Supreme Court has striken that state's statute regarding parental consent for a minor's abortion. Implications of the finding for a minor's right to due process, equal protection, and privacy are discussed. (LBH)

  10. 34 CFR 303.7 - Consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... General Definitions Used in This Part § 303.7 Consent. Consent means that— (a) The parent has been fully informed of all information relevant to the activity for which consent is sought, in the parent's native... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Consent. 303.7 Section 303.7 Education Regulations...

  11. 34 CFR 303.7 - Consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... General Definitions Used in This Part § 303.7 Consent. Consent means that— (a) The parent has been fully informed of all information relevant to the activity for which consent is sought, in the parent's native... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Consent. 303.7 Section 303.7 Education Regulations...

  12. 34 CFR 303.7 - Consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... General Definitions Used in This Part § 303.7 Consent. Consent means that— (a) The parent has been fully informed of all information relevant to the activity for which consent is sought, in the parent's native... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Consent. 303.7 Section 303.7 Education Regulations...

  13. How parents and practitioners experience research without prior consent (deferred consent) for emergency research involving children with life threatening conditions: a mixed method study

    PubMed Central

    Woolfall, Kerry; Frith, Lucy; Gamble, Carrol; Gilbert, Ruth; Mok, Quen; Young, Bridget

    2015-01-01

    Objective Alternatives to prospective informed consent to enable children with life-threatening conditions to be entered into trials of emergency treatments are needed. Across Europe, a process called deferred consent has been developed as an alternative. Little is known about the views and experiences of those with first-hand experience of this controversial consent process. To inform how consent is sought for future paediatric critical care trials, we explored the views and experiences of parents and practitioners involved in the CATheter infections in CHildren (CATCH) trial, which allowed for deferred consent in certain circumstances. Design Mixed method survey, interview and focus group study. Participants 275 parents completed a questionnaire; 20 families participated in an interview (18 mothers, 5 fathers). 17 CATCH practitioners participated in one of four focus groups (10 nurses, 3 doctors and 4 clinical trial unit staff). Setting 12 UK children's hospitals. Results Some parents were momentarily shocked or angered to discover that their child had or could have been entered into CATCH without their prior consent. Although these feelings resolved after the reasons why consent needed to be deferred were explained and that the CATCH interventions were already used in clinical care. Prior to seeking deferred consent for the first few times, CATCH practitioners were apprehensive, although their feelings abated with experience of talking to parents about CATCH. Parents reported that their decisions about their child's participation in the trial had been voluntary. However, mistiming the deferred consent discussion had caused distress for some. Practitioners and parents supported the use of deferred consent in CATCH and in future trials of interventions already used in clinical care. Conclusions Our study provides evidence to support the use of deferred consent in paediatric emergency medicine; it also indicates the crucial importance of practitioner communication

  14. Your Hands Are (Not) Tied: School-Based Ethics When Parents Revoke Special Education Consent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Rachel; Sharkey, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Parents currently have the unilateral ability to reject special education services. Yet, it is unclear how schools should support students with special education needs in this situation as schools may not challenge a parent's choice to revoke special education assessment consent or the provision of services. Guidelines for school…

  15. Parent Participation and Physician-Parent Communication During Informed Consent in Child Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Cousino, Melissa; Hazen, Rebecca; Yamokoski, Amy; Miller, Victoria; Zyzanski, Stephen; Drotar, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In this study we evaluated the effectiveness of a physician-directed intervention at enhancing positive physician behaviors and communication strategies during informed consent conferences (ICCs) for pediatric acute leukemia clinical trials. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Physicians at 2 large pediatric hospitals were recruited to participate in a physician-directed intervention (PDI), which included 1 full-day seminar and successive half-day booster sessions. ICCs were then observed, audiotaped, coded, and analyzed to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention. Data also were collected at 2 control sites. Between 2003 and 2007, 59 ICCs were observed and analyzed. RESULTS: Significant group differences were found in physician rapport-building behaviors. Physicians in the PDI + booster session group engaged in greater rapport-building than did physicians in the PDI group who did not attend booster sessions and physicians in the control group. No group differences were detected for physician partnership-building. In addition, parents in the PDI + booster session group engaged in more general communication and study-related communication, and mothers in the PDI groups asked significantly more questions per minute than did mothers in the control group. CONCLUSIONS: These results provide support for the effectiveness of the PDI at enhancing positive physician behaviors. Booster-session attendance is a critical component of physician-directed interventions to improve parental participation and physician-parent communication during ICCs. PMID:22065265

  16. Does parental consent for birth control affect underage pregnancy rates? The case of Texas.

    PubMed

    Girma, Sourafel; Paton, David

    2013-12-01

    Previous work based on conjectural responses of minors predicted that the 2003 Texas requirement for parental consent for state-funded birth control to minors would lead to a large increase in underage pregnancies. We use state- and county-level data to test this prediction. The latter allow us to compare the impact of parental consent in counties with and without state-funded family planning clinics. We control for characteristics systematically correlated with the presence of state-funded clinics by combining difference-in-difference estimation with propensity score-weighted regressions. The evidence suggests that the parental consent mandate led to a large decrease in attendance at family planning clinics among teens but did not lead to an increase in underage pregnancies. PMID:23765262

  17. Parental Consent: Factors Influencing Adolescent Disclosure Regarding Abortion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin-Carlson, Mary S.; Mackin, Kathleen J.

    1993-01-01

    Surveyed 439 women (ages 12-21) seeking abortions concerning support networks they used during their pregnancy. Fifty-one percent reported having confided in their parents. Results revealed that degree of financial and emotional dependence and quality and nature of family communication were closely related to decisions to confide in parents about…

  18. 34 CFR 300.9 - Consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.9 Consent. Consent means that— (a) The parent has been fully informed of all information relevant to the activity for which consent is sought, in his or her native... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Consent. 300.9 Section 300.9 Education Regulations...

  19. 34 CFR 300.9 - Consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.9 Consent. Consent means that— (a) The parent has been fully informed of all information relevant to the activity for which consent is sought, in his or her native... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Consent. 300.9 Section 300.9 Education Regulations...

  20. 34 CFR 300.9 - Consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.9 Consent. Consent means that— (a) The parent has been fully informed of all information relevant to the activity for which consent is sought, in his or her native... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Consent. 300.9 Section 300.9 Education Regulations...

  1. 34 CFR 300.9 - Consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.9 Consent. Consent means that— (a) The parent has been fully informed of all information relevant to the activity for which consent is sought, in his or her native... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Consent. 300.9 Section 300.9 Education Regulations...

  2. 34 CFR 300.9 - Consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.9 Consent. Consent means that— (a) The parent has been fully informed of all information relevant to the activity for which consent is sought, in his or her native... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Consent. 300.9 Section 300.9 Education Regulations...

  3. Constitutional Law: Abortion, Parental and Spousal Consent Requirements, Right to Privacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Sharon L.; Ravenscraft, Patricia

    1976-01-01

    The constitutionality of the Missouri abortion statute was challenged by two physicians and Planned Parenthood of Central Missouri in the Danforth case. The Supreme Court reversed a district court decision in part, ruling that parental and spousal consent requirements are unconstitutional. For journal availability see HE 508 875. (LBH)

  4. 78 FR 64423 - Children's Online Privacy Protection Rule Applications for Approval of Proposed Parental Consent...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ...\\ 64 FR 59888 (1999). \\2\\ 16 CFR part 312. \\3\\ 78 FR 3972 (2013). \\4\\ 16 CFR 312.12(a); 78 FR at 3991-3992, 4013. \\5\\ See 16 CFR 312.11; 78 FR at 3995-96, 4012-13. The Children's Online Privacy Protection... Proposed Parental Consent Methods by AssertID, Inc., Imperium LLC, and iVeriFly, Inc.; Application...

  5. Judicial bypass of parental consent for abortion: characteristics of pregnant minor "Jane Doe's".

    PubMed

    Friedman, Susan Hatters; Hendrix, Todd; Haberman, Jessica; Jain, Abhishek

    2015-06-01

    Pregnant minors can obtain an abortion without parental consent through a judicial bypass procedure in 38 states. To grant such a petition in Ohio, the Court must determine that the young woman is either "sufficiently mature and well enough informed to intelligently decide whether to have an abortion," or that notification of her parents is "not in her best interest," usually due to abuse. For the sake of anonymity in these emotionally and politically charged cases, the evaluee is referred to as "Jane Doe." This project sought to describe characteristics of teenagers seeking judicial bypass for abortion, which have not been well described in the scientific literature. Data were collected from Jane Doe evaluations completed at a metropolitan juvenile court psychiatric clinic, over 3 years. The mean age of the evaluees (N = 55) was 16.4 years. The vast majority (95%) were granted a judicial bypass. They usually had long-term boyfriends of comparable age. They had often told trusted adults about their pregnancy, though not their parents, due to concerns of violence or being excluded from the family. This study presents the first comprehensive description of characteristics of minors seeking judicial bypasses for abortion. Psychiatrists may apply general principles of informed consent in such evaluations, including ascertaining whether the decision is being made voluntarily, knowingly, and with sufficient decision-making capacity. PMID:26034870

  6. Informed Parent Consent for Pre-School and School-Aged Children with Disabilities. Alliance Action Information Sheets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Assistance ALLIANCE for Parent Centers, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Informed Parent Consent is one of the important parent rights in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA 2004). IDEA is the federal special education law. When your child receives special education services, there are times when the school must obtain your written permission before acting. More details are presented in this paper.…

  7. 78 FR 77026 - Children's Online Privacy Protection Rule Proposed Parental Consent Method; iVeriFly, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-20

    ....5(b)(1). \\1\\ 64 FR 59888 (1999). \\2\\ 16 CFR part 312. \\3\\ 78 FR 3972 (2013). \\4\\ 16 CFR 312.12(a); 78 FR at 3991-3992, 4013. Pursuant to Section 312.12(a) of the Rule, iVeriFly has submitted a... CFR Part 312 RIN 3084-AB20 Children's Online Privacy Protection Rule Proposed Parental Consent...

  8. Nutrition Activities: Preschoolers and Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randell, Jill; Olson, Christine

    This activity book contains ditto masters of information sheets, recipes, and activity sheets to be given to parents of preschool children. This book was developed as a component of another book, "Educator's Guide: Food Experiences for Young Children," to bring the classroom experiences into the home. It is intended to give parents some background…

  9. Parents' Attitude towards Extracurricular Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Chi-chung; Wong, Ngai-ying

    1997-01-01

    Argues that it is important to understand parents' attitudes and perceptions of extracurricular activities to promote their involvement in them. Shows that parents in Hong Kong view extracurricular activities favorably but are more willing to invest their money than their time in promoting them. Makes suggestions for policy formation. (DSK)

  10. Arts Activities Bank for Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD. Dept. of Instructional Planning and Development.

    The guide presents instructions for art activities to be used by parents at home, particularly with handicapped children. The objective is to encourage parents to bring the arts into the lives of these children on a regular basis and also to help them develop basic learning skills, self-esteem, and an interest in the arts. The guide is divided…

  11. 34 CFR 300.622 - Consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... authorized without parental consent under 34 CFR part 99. (b)(1) Except as provided in paragraphs (b)(2) and.... (2) Parental consent, or the consent of an eligible child who has reached the age of majority under... § 300.622 Consent. (a) Parental consent must be obtained before personally identifiable information...

  12. Actividades Para Padres: A Parent Handbook (Activities for Parents: A Parent Handbook).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coca, Benjamin

    Thirty Mora, New Mexico parents attended a 13-session parent involvement workshop (The Mora Adventure) designed to help parents foster successful school experiences through non-school activities with their children. A parent involvement model was used as the basis of the workshop in which the parents developed more effective communication skills;…

  13. Parental perceptions and predictors of consent for school-located influenza vaccination in urban elementary school children in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Susan; Wang, Hai-Lin; Mascola, Laurene; El Amin, Alvin Nelson; Pannaraj, Pia S

    2015-01-01

    Background School-located influenza vaccination (SLV) programs have the potential to mass-vaccinate all enrolled children, but parental consent is required. Objective To examine parental attitudes and determine predictors of parental consent for vaccination of schoolchildren through SLV programs. Patients/Methods Surveys were distributed to parents of 4517 children during 2009–2010 (year 1) and 4414 children during 2010–2011 (year 2) in eight elementary schools in conjunction with a SLV program. Results Participants included 1259 (27·9%) parents in year 1 and 1496 (33·9%) in year 2. Parental consent for 2009 H1N1, 2009 seasonal, and 2010 seasonal influenza vaccines was obtained from 738 (70·8%), 673 (64·5%), and 1151 (77·2%) respondents, respectively. During the 2009 pandemic, respondents concerned about influenza severity were twice as likely to consent for the 2009 H1N1 vaccination compared to unconcerned respondents (OR 2·04, 95% CI:1·19–3·51). During year 2, factors that predicted parental consent were the perception of high susceptibility to influenza infection (OR 2·19, 95% CI:1·50–3·19) and high benefit of vaccine (OR 2·23, 95% CI:1·47–3·40). In both years, college-educated parents were more likely to perceive vaccine risks (year 1: 83·6 versus 61·5%, P < 0·001 and year 2: 81·1% versus 60·6%, P < 0·001) and less likely to consent for seasonal influenza vaccine (year 1: OR 0·69, 95% CI:0·53–0·89 and year 2: OR 0·61, 95% CI:0·47–0·78) compared to non-college-educated parents. Conclusions Parents who appreciate the risks of influenza and benefits of vaccination are more likely to consent for SLV. More research is needed to determine how to address heightened safety concerns among college-educated parents. PMID:26073870

  14. Care and Consent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottesman, Roberta

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the legal ramifications of informed consent for medical treatment of schoolchildren, including the problems posed by parents unwilling to give adequate medical protection to their children because of religious or other reasons. Covers the types of medical care that minors can receive without parental consent. (WD)

  15. Active Parenting Now: Program Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popkin, Michael H.

    Based largely on the theories of Alfred Adler and Rudolf Dreikurs, this parent education curriculum is a video-based interactive learning experience that teaches a comprehensive model of parenting to parents of children ages 5 to 12 years. The kit provides parents with the skills needed to help their children develop courage, responsibility, and…

  16. Informed parental consent for cochlear implantation of young deaf children: social and other considerations in the use of the 'bionic ear'.

    PubMed

    Hyde, M; Power, D

    2000-05-01

    This paper examines the social parameters surrounding the management of informed consent procedures for the parents of young deaf children for the surgical fitting of a cochlear implant ('bionic ear') to their child. Although most observers of this remarkable and well publicised medical development only see benefits in its use, the authors examine the nature of the conflict which has emerged between medical and media portrayals of the 'miracle' device and contrasting social, cultural and linguistic views of many Deaf people. The paper analyses the components of parental consent procedures for surgical implantation of their child, covering the risk-benefit analysis and, in particular, the information base that is provided for parents about the social construction of a 'Deaf life' by many Deaf people. PMID:14627014

  17. Informed Consent

    PubMed Central

    Manion, F.; Hsieh, K.; Harris, M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Despite efforts to provide standard definitions of terms such as “medical record”, “computer-based patient record”, “electronic medical record” and “electronic health record”, the terms are still used interchangeably. Initiatives like data and information governance, research biorepositories, and learning health systems require availability and reuse of data, as well as common understandings of the scope for specific purposes. Lacking widely shared definitions, utilization of the afore-mentioned terms in research informed consent documents calls to question whether all participants in the research process — patients, information technology and regulatory staff, and the investigative team — fully understand what data and information they are asking to obtain and agreeing to share. Objectives This descriptive study explored the terminology used in research informed consent documents when describing patient data and information, asking the question “Does the use of the term “medical record” in the context of a research informed consent document accurately represent the scope of the data involved?” Methods Informed consent document templates found on 17 Institutional Review Board (IRB) websites with Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) were searched for terms that appeared to be describing the data resources to be accessed. The National Library of Medicine’s (NLM) Terminology Services was searched for definitions provided by key standards groups that deposit terminologies with the NLM. Discussion The results suggest research consent documents are using outdated terms to describe patient information, health care terminology systems need to consider the context of research for use cases, and that there is significant work to be done to assure the HIPAA Omnibus Rule is applied to contemporary activities such as biorepositories and learning health systems. Conclusions “Medical record”, a term used extensively

  18. Girls' Physically Active Play and Parental Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tauber, Margaret A.

    Sex differences in children's physical activity levels, and associations between girls' activity level, childrearing characteristics and parent-child play behavior were investigated in a quasi-naturalistic situation. As part of a longitudinal project, 144 third grade children were videotaped in a 1-hour play session with one of their parents. A…

  19. Parent Involvement in School-Related Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics (ED), Washington, DC.

    Noting that some schools have adopted practices or policies that encourage parents to become more involved in their children's school activities and events, this statistical report (based on the National Household Education Survey) details the level and character of parental involvement in school activities. Findings highlighted are: (1) parents…

  20. Parental Influence on Young Children's Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zecevic, Cheryl A.; Tremblay, Line; Lovsin, Tanya; Michel, Lariviere

    2010-01-01

    Parents influence on their young children's physical activity (PA) behaviours was examined in a sample of 102 preschool-aged children (54 boys). Questionnaires regarding family sociodemographics and physical activity habits were completed. Results showed that children who received greater parental support for activity (B = .78, P < .10) and had parents who rated PA as highly enjoyable (B = .69, P < .05) were significantly more likely to engage in one hour or more of daily PA. Being an older child (B = −.08, P < .01), having older parents (B = −.26, P < .01), and watching more than one hour of television/videos per day (B = 1.55, P < .01) reduced the likelihood that a child would be rated as highly active. Children who received greater parental support for PA were 6.3 times more likely to be highly active than inactive (B = 1.44, P < .05). Thus, parents can promote PA among their preschoolers, not only by limiting TV time but also by being highly supportive of their children's active pursuits. PMID:20671967

  1. Predicting Child Physical Activity and Screen Time: Parental Support for Physical Activity and General Parenting Styles

    PubMed Central

    Crain, A. Lauren; Senso, Meghan M.; Levy, Rona L.; Sherwood, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine relationships between parenting styles and practices and child moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and screen time. Methods: Participants were children (6.9 ± 1.8 years) with a body mass index in the 70–95th percentile and their parents (421 dyads). Parent-completed questionnaires assessed parental support for child physical activity (PA), parenting styles and child screen time. Children wore accelerometers to assess MVPA. Results: Parenting style did not predict MVPA, but support for PA did (positive association). The association between support and MVPA, moreover, varied as a function of permissive parenting. For parents high in permissiveness, the association was positive (greater support was related to greater MVPA and therefore protective). For parents low in permissiveness, the association was neutral; support did not matter. Authoritarian and permissive parenting styles were both associated with greater screen time. Conclusions: Parenting practices and styles should be considered jointly, offering implications for tailored interventions. PMID:24812256

  2. Informed Consent

    MedlinePlus

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Informed Consent Download Printable Version [PDF] » ( En español ) Learn about informed consent, a process you go through before getting a ...

  3. Nest predation increases with parental activity: Separating nest site and parental activity effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, T.E.; Scott, J.; Menge, C.

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Skutch hypothesized that increased parental activity can increase the risk of nest predation. We tested this hypothesis using ten open-nesting bird species in Arizona, USA. Parental activity was greater during the nestling than incubation stage because parents visited the nest frequently to feed their young during the nestling stage. However, nest predation did not generally increase with parental activity between nesting stages across the ten study species. Previous investigators have found similar results. We tested whether nest site effects might yield higher predation during incubation because the most obvious sites are depredated most rapidly. We conducted experiments using nest sites from the previous year to remove parental activity. Our results showed that nest sites have highly repeatable effects on nest predation risk; poor nest sites incurred rapid predation and caused predation rates to be greater during the incubation than nestling stage. This pattern also was exhibited in a bird species with similar (i.e. controlled) parental activity between nesting stages. Once nest site effects are taken into account, nest predation shows a strong proximate increase with parental activity during the nestling stage within and across species. Parental activity and nest sites exert antagonistic influences on current estimates of nest predation between nesting stages and both must be considered in order to understand current patterns of nest predation, which is an important source of natural selection.

  4. Nest predation increases with parental activity: separating nest site and parental activity effects.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, T E; Scott, J; Menge, C

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Skutch hypothesized that increased parental activity can increase the risk of nest predation. We tested this hypothesis using ten open-nesting bird species in Arizona, USA. Parental activity was greater during the nestling than incubation stage because parents visited the nest frequently to feed their young during the nestling stage. However, nest predation did not generally increase with parental activity between nesting stages across the ten study species. Previous investigators have found similar results. We tested whether nest site effects might yield higher predation during incubation because the most obvious sites are depredated most rapidly. We conducted experiments using nest sites from the previous year to remove parental activity. Our results showed that nest sites have highly repeatable effects on nest predation risk; poor nest sites incurred rapid predation and caused predation rates to be greater during the incubation than nestling stage. This pattern also was exhibited in a bird species with similar (i.e. controlled) parental activity between nesting stages. Once nest site effects are taken into account, nest predation shows a strong proximate increase with parental activity during the nestling stage within and across species. Parental activity and nest sites exert antagonistic influences on current estimates of nest predation between nesting stages and both must be considered in order to understand current patterns of nest predation, which is an important source of natural selection. PMID:11413645

  5. Parents' Networking Strategies: Participation of Formal and Informal Parent Groups in School Activities and Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanat, Carolyn L.

    2010-01-01

    This case study examined parent groups' involvement in school activities and their participation in decision making. Research questions included the following: (1) What is the nature of parent groups in schools? (2) What activities and issues gain parent groups' attention and participation? (3) How do parent groups communicate concerns about…

  6. Adolescents and consent to treatment.

    PubMed

    Dickens, B M; Cook, R J

    2005-05-01

    Adolescents, defined by WHO as 10 to 19 years old, can give independent consent for reproductive health services if their capacities for understanding have sufficiently evolved. The international Convention on the Rights of the Child, almost universally ratified, limits parental powers, and duties, by adolescents' "evolving capacities" for self-determination. Legal systems may recognize "mature minors" as enjoying adult rights of medical consent, even when consent to sexual relations does not absolve partners of criminal liability; their consent does not make the adolescents offenders. There is usually no chronological "age of consent" for medical care, but a condition of consent, meaning capacity for understanding. Like adults, mature minors enjoy confidentiality and the right to treatment according to their wishes rather than their best interests. Minors incapable of self-determination may grant or deny assent to treatment for which guardians provide consent. Emancipated minors' self-determination may also be recognized, for instance on marriage or default of adults' guardianship. PMID:15847892

  7. ‘The Words Will Pass with the Blowing Wind’: Staff and Parent Views of the Deferred Consent Process, with Prior Assent, Used in an Emergency Fluids Trial in Two African Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Molyneux, Sassy; Njue, Maureen; Boga, Mwanamvua; Akello, Lilian; Olupot-Olupot, Peter; Engoru, Charles; Kiguli, Sarah; Maitland, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    Objective To document and explore the views and experiences of key stakeholders regarding the consent procedures of an emergency research clinical trial examining immediate fluid resuscitation strategies, and to discuss the implications for similar trials in future. Methods A social science sub-study of the FEAST (Fluid Expansion As Supportive Therapy) trial. Interviews were held with trial team members (n = 30), health workers (n = 15) and parents (n = 51) from two purposively selected hospitals in Soroti, Uganda, and Kilifi, Kenya. Findings Overall, deferred consent with prior assent was seen by staff and parents as having the potential to protect the interests of both patients and researchers, and to avoid delays in starting treatment. An important challenge is that the validity of verbal assent is undermined when inadequate initial information is poorly understood. This concern needs to be balanced against the possibility that full prior consent on admission potentially causes harm through introducing delays. Full prior consent also potentially imposes worries on parents that clinicians are uncertain about how to proceed and that clinicians want to absolve themselves of any responsibility for the child’s outcome (some parents’ interpretation of the need for signed consent). Voluntariness is clearly compromised for both verbal assent and full prior consent in a context of such vulnerability and stress. Further challenges in obtaining verbal assent were: what to do in the absence of the household decision-maker (often the father); and how medical staff handle parents not giving a clear agreement or refusal. Conclusion While the challenges identified are faced in all research in low-income settings, they are magnified for emergency trials by the urgency of decision making and treatment needs. Consent options will need to be tailored to particular studies and settings, and might best be informed by consultation with staff members and community

  8. Parent Stress and the Active Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Karen; Prom, Megan

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to look at whether a child's activity level was correlated with the level of stress a mother experiences. Parents can describe their children as having distinct and recognizable patterns of behavior as young as in infancy (Paaren, Hewitt, Lemery, Bihun & Goldsmith, 2000). Even at birth, some children are much…

  9. Supporting Head Start Parents: Impact of a Text Message Intervention on Parent-Child Activity Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurwitz, Lisa B.; Lauricella, Alexis R.; Hanson, Ann; Raden, Anthony; Wartella, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Head Start emphasises parent engagement as a critical strategy in promoting children's long-term learning. Parents can support children's positive development by engaging them in stimulating activities. The following study assessed whether a service that delivered parenting tips via text message could prompt parents of children enrolled in Head…

  10. Helping Adolescents with Career Development: The Active Role of Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    Offers suggestions for counselors and parents regarding active role parents can play in career development of their adolescent children. Three dimensions of the active role of parents are discussed: intentionality and meaning attributed to career influence by parents and adolescents, use of narrative, and sources of conflict. (Author/NB)

  11. Parent's Interests, Current Involvement and Level of Parental Involvement in School Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gbadamosi, Tara; Lin, Huey-Ling

    This study examined what school activities parents were involved in and the relationship between parents' interests and level of participation. Parents completed self-report questionnaires examining activities they were currently involved in and activities they would like to do in their children's classrooms. Out of 208 surveys distributed, 114…

  12. Informed Consent in Decision-Making in Pediatric Practice.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    Informed consent should be seen as an essential part of health care practice; parental permission and childhood assent is an active process that engages patients, both adults and children, in health care. Pediatric practice is unique in that developmental maturation allows, over time, for increasing inclusion of the child's and adolescent's opinion in medical decision-making in clinical practice and research. PMID:27456514

  13. Parental Grief Following the Brain Death of a Child: Does Consent or Refusal to Organ Donation Affect Their Grief?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellali, Thalia; Papadatou, Danai

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the grieving process of parents who were faced with the dilemma of donating organs and tissues of their underage brain dead child, and to explore the impact of their decision on their grief process. A grounded theory methodology was adopted and a semi-structured interview was conducted with 11 bereaved…

  14. Informed Consent in Decision-Making in Pediatric Practice.

    PubMed

    Katz, Aviva L; Webb, Sally A

    2016-08-01

    Informed consent should be seen as an essential part of health care practice; parental permission and childhood assent is an active process that engages patients, both adults and children, in their health care. Pediatric practice is unique in that developmental maturation allows, over time, for increasing inclusion of the child's and adolescent's opinion in medical decision-making in clinical practice and research. This technical report, which accompanies the policy statement "Informed Consent in Decision-Making in Pediatric Practice" was written to provide a broader background on the nature of informed consent, surrogate decision-making in pediatric practice, information on child and adolescent decision-making, and special issues in adolescent informed consent, assent, and refusal. It is anticipated that this information will help provide support for the recommendations included in the policy statement. PMID:27456510

  15. Parental Support Exceeds Parenting Style for Promoting Active Play in Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schary, David P.; Cardinal, Bradley J.; Loprinzi, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that parenting style may directly or indirectly influence school-aged children's activity behaviour. Given that relatively fewer studies have been conducted among preschool-aged children, this study's primary purpose was to examine the direct relationships between parental support and parenting style on preschool…

  16. Personality as a factor in parental encouragement and parent-child TV and physical activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our purpose was to evaluate the relation of personality to parent TV watching, physical activity (PA), and encouragement for child PA as parental influences on child TV and PA. Structural equation modeling (LISREL 8.7) was used to examine cross-sectional responses from 674 parents (63.0% female, 55...

  17. Engaging parents to increase youth physical activity: A systematic review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parents are often involved in interventions to engage youth in physical activity, but it is not clear which methods for involving parents are effective. A systematic review was conducted of interventions with physical activity and parental components among healthy youth to identify how best to invol...

  18. Fun and Learning for Parents and Children: An Activities Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trans-Management Systems, Inc.

    Based on the assumption that the more parents enjoy playing with their children, the more children will learn from their parents, this booklet is a collection of fun activities for parents to do with their preschool children. The booklet is organized according to location for the activity, whether in a particular room in the house or outdoors.…

  19. Parental knowledge of adolescent activities: links with parental attachment style and adolescent substance use.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jason D; Ehrlich, Katherine B; Lejuez, C W; Cassidy, Jude

    2015-04-01

    Parents' knowledge of their adolescents' whereabouts and activities is a robust predictor of adolescent risk behavior, including the use of drugs and alcohol. Surprisingly few studies have attempted to identify parental characteristics that are associated with the degree of parental knowledge. The present study is the first to examine how parental attachment style relates to mother, father, and adolescent reports of parental knowledge. Further, we used structural equation modeling to test the associations among parents' attachment styles, reports of parental knowledge, and adolescents' alcohol and marijuana use. Participants included 203 adolescents (M age = 14.02, SD = .91) living in 2-parent households and their parent(s). As predicted, mothers' and fathers' insecure attachment styles were negatively associated with self-reported and adolescent-reported parental knowledge, and all 3 reports of parental knowledge were negatively related to adolescent substance use. Mothers' and fathers' attachment styles were unrelated to adolescent substance use. However, evidence emerged for indirect effects of parental attachment style on adolescent substance use through reports of parental knowledge. Implications for prevention efforts and the importance of multiple reporters within the family are discussed. PMID:25730406

  20. Physical activity parenting measurement and research: challenges, explanations, and solutions.

    PubMed

    Davison, Kirsten K; Mâsse, Louise C; Timperio, Anna; Frenn, Marilyn D; Saunders, Julie; Mendoza, Jason A; Gobbi, Erica; Hanson, Phillip; Trost, Stewart G

    2013-08-01

    Physical activity (PA) parenting research has proliferated over the past decade, with findings verifying the influential role that parents play in children's emerging PA behaviors. This knowledge, however, has not translated into effective family-based PA interventions. During a preconference workshop to the 2012 International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity annual meeting, a PA parenting workgroup met to: (1) Discuss challenges in PA parenting research that may limit its translation, (2) identify explanations or reasons for such challenges, and (3) recommend strategies for future research. Challenges discussed by the workgroup included a proliferation of disconnected and inconsistently measured constructs, a limited understanding of the dimensions of PA parenting, and a narrow conceptualization of hypothesized moderators of the relationship between PA parenting and child PA. Potential reasons for such challenges emphasized by the group included a disinclination to employ theory when developing measures and examining predictors and outcomes of PA parenting as well as a lack of agreed-upon measurement standards. Suggested solutions focused on the need to link PA parenting research with general parenting research, define and adopt rigorous standards of measurement, and identify new methods to assess PA parenting. As an initial step toward implementing these recommendations, the workgroup developed a conceptual model that: (1) Integrates parenting dimensions from the general parenting literature into the conceptualization of PA parenting, (2) draws on behavioral and developmental theory, and (3) emphasizes areas which have been neglected to date including precursors to PA parenting and effect modifiers. PMID:23944918

  1. Newborn Male Circumcision with Parental Consent, as Stated in the AAP Circumcision Policy Statement, Is Both Legal and Ethical.

    PubMed

    Brady, Michael T

    2016-06-01

    Newborn male circumcision is a minor surgical procedure that has generated significant controversy. Accumulating evidence supports significant health benefits, most notably reductions in urinary tract infections, acquisition of HIV and a number of other sexually transmitted infections, penile cancer, phimosis, paraphimosis, balanitis and lichen sclerosis. While circumcision, like any surgical procedure, has risks for complications, they occur in less than 1 in 500 infants circumcised and most are minor and require minimal intervention. The CDC and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) believe that health benefits of circumcision outweigh the risks. For this reason, the AAP believes that parents should be allowed to make the decision concerning circumcision of their male infants after receiving non-biased information on health risks and health benefits. PMID:27338601

  2. Exploring Healthy Eating: Activities for Parents and Children Together.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tufts Univ., Medford, MA. Center on Hunger, Poverty and Nutrition Policy.

    This collection of learning units introduces parents to the role of nutrition in their young child's cognitive development. Designed to be easy to read and useful for families with limited resources, the materials help parents teach their young children good eating habits by offering information, feeding tips, creative activities for parents and…

  3. Moon Watch: A Parental-Involvement Homework Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillero, Peter; Gonzalez-Jensen, Margarita; Moy, Tracy

    2000-01-01

    Presents the goals, philosophy, and methods of the SPLASH (Student-Parent Laboratories Achieving Science at Home) program. Describes an at-home, parental-involvement activity called Moon Watch in which students and their parents observe how the phases of the moon and the moon's position in the sky change over a two-week period. (WRM)

  4. Parental Knowledge of Adolescent Activities: Links with Parental Attachment Style and Adolescent Substance Use

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jason D.; Ehrlich, Katherine B.; Lejuez, C. W.; Cassidy, Jude

    2015-01-01

    Parents’ knowledge of their adolescents’ whereabouts and activities is a robust predictor of adolescent risk behavior, including the use of drugs and alcohol. Surprisingly few studies have attempted to identify parental characteristics that are associated with the degree of parental knowledge. The present study is the first to examine how parental attachment style relates to mother, father, and adolescent reports of parental knowledge. Further, we used structural equation modeling to test the associations among parents’ attachment styles, reports of parental knowledge, and adolescents’ alcohol and marijuana use. Participants included 203 adolescents (mean age = 14.02, SD = .91) living in two-parent households and their parent(s). As predicted, mothers’ and fathers’ insecure attachment styles were negatively associated with self-reported and adolescent-reported parental knowledge, and all three reports of parental knowledge were negatively related to adolescent substance use. Mothers’ and fathers’ attachment styles were unrelated to adolescent substance use. However, evidence emerged for indirect effects of parental attachment style on adolescent substance use through reports of parental knowledge. Implications for prevention efforts and the importance of multiple reporters within the family are discussed. PMID:25730406

  5. Parenting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jochim, Lisa; Mueller, Andrea

    This guide contains 15 learning activities that can be used in parenting classes, especially for adults with limited literacy skills. Activities include quotations for discussion and suggestions for conducting group discussions and writing lessons. The following activities are included: interpreting quotations about raising children; positive…

  6. Low-Income Parents' Warmth and Parent-Child Activities for Children with Disabilities, Suspected Delays and Biological Risks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eshbaugh, Elaine M.; Peterson, Carla A.; Wall, Shavaun; Carta, Judith J.; Luze, Gayle; Swanson, Mark; Jeon, Hyun-Joo

    2011-01-01

    Warm and responsive parenting is optimal for child development, but this style of parenting may be difficult for some parents to achieve. This study examines how parents' observed warmth and their reported frequency of parent-child activities were related to children's classifications as having biological risks or a range of disability indicators.…

  7. Ideas for the Parent Volunteer: Activities for the Gifted.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Nancy

    The booklet presents suggestions for parents working as volunteers in their gifted children's classrooms. Parents are advised to allow the children to help plan and execute the activities, which are designed to be multidisciplinary, inexpensive, and adaptable. Activities described include explorations of the language, geography, and culture of…

  8. An Examination of Parents' Preferred School Counselor Professional Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilder, Christopher R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine parent preferences for school counselor professional activities. The primary focus of research was to determine if any relationship exists between (1) parents' demographic factors--gender, age, socioeconomic status, ethnicity--and their preferences for school counselors' professional activities; (2)…

  9. [From informed to shared: the developing process of consent].

    PubMed

    Casari, E F; Massimo, L M E

    2002-06-01

    Based on the respect of the four well known ethical principles "autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence and justice", of clinical cognitive psychology, social psychology and bioethics, and in the light of moral values, we wish to comment the clinical problems involving informed consent for diagnostic procedures, treatment and research in pediatrics. Studies of the issues in attitudes and shared consent in the clinical management involving children, their parents and the therapeutic team are still limited. Our suggestion is to manage the process of informed consent as a negotiated "shared consent" originated from the cognitive social representation theory, and taking into consideration the evolutive characteristics of the cognitive processes in children and adolescents, the ego defence mechanisms, the coping behaviour activated in the relationship among the pediatric patient, his/her family and the physicians. Many parents told us that the informed consent process is helpful though often confusing. Satisfaction was not related to ethnicity or education level. They found discussions more helpful than the consent documents. The more difficult process concerned their understanding of the concept of randomisation and the request of their consent to this procedure. The model we suggest has also the aim to give adequate and honest informations to children and adolescents through a continuous dialogue with the physician, until this become a routine part of their life in hospital care, to avoid confusion, to satisfy any request and curiosity, to be honest and helpful with any answer. We strongly believe that medical students, and in particular pediatricians, must be trained on "communication" and that they need to acquire, in addition to their medical capability, a good knowledge on this topic, including ethics and relational aspects. In our opinion, pediatricians must become expert also in the following topics: "Problem-related Learning", "The Family System Health Model

  10. Parenting

    MedlinePlus

    ... parents, people are always ready to offer advice. Parenting tips, parents' survival guides, dos, don'ts, shoulds ... right" way to be a good parent. Good parenting includes Keeping your child safe Showing affection and ...

  11. Parental Factors in Children’s Active Transport to School

    PubMed Central

    Henne, Heather M.; Tandon, Pooja S.; Frank, Larry D.; Saelens, Brian E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Identify non-distance factors related to children’s active transport (AT) to school, including parental, home, and environment characteristics. Understanding the factors related to children’s AT to school, beyond distance to school, could inform interventions to increase AT and children’s overall physical activity. Study Design Participants were in the Neighborhood Impact on Kids Study, a longitudinal, observational cohort study of children aged 6 - 11 and their parents in King County, WA and San Diego County, CA between 2007-2009. Parents reported frequency and mode of child transport to school, perceived neighborhood, home and family environments, parental travel behaviors, and sociodemographics. Methods Children living less than a 20 minute walk to school were in this analysis. Children classified as active transporters (walked/bicycled to or from school at least once per week) were compared with those not using AT as often. Results Children using AT were older and had parents who reported themselves using active transport. Having a family rule that restricts the child to stay within sight of the parent or home and more parent working hours was related to lower odds of a child using AT. Conclusions Children’s AT to school is associated with parental AT to work and other locations. Interventions should be considered that enable whole family AT, ameliorate safety concerns and decrease the need for parental supervision, such as walking school buses. PMID:24999161

  12. Explaining the erectile responses of rapists to rape stories: the contributions of sexual activity, non-consent, and violence with injury.

    PubMed

    Harris, Grant T; Lalumière, Martin L; Seto, Michael C; Rice, Marnie E; Chaplin, Terry C

    2012-02-01

    In phallometric research, rapists have a unique pattern of erectile responses to stimuli depicting sexual activities involving coercion and violence. In this study, we attempted to determine the cues that control rapists' erectile responses to rape stories in the laboratory. A total of 12 rapists and 14 non-rapists were exposed to recorded audio scenarios that systematically varied with regard to the presence or absence of three orthogonally varied elements: sexual activity and nudity, violence and injury, and expression of non-consent. As expected from prior research, an index computed by subtracting participants' greatest mean responses to stories describing mutually consenting sexual activity from their greatest mean responses to stories describing rape was much higher among rapists than non-rapists. Both groups showed larger responses when stories involved sexual activity and nudity, but neither group exhibited a preference for cues of violence and serious injury, or for cues of non-consent. The element that produced the larger group difference, however, was the presence or absence of active consent. The results indicated that a sexual interest in (or indifference to) non-consent is at least as central to accounting for the unique sexual orientation of rapists as is sexual responding to violence and injury. PMID:22415328

  13. Parental Consent Act of 2011

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Paul, Ron [R-TX-14

    2011-08-01

    09/08/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  14. Dog Ownership, Dog Walking, and Children's and Parents' Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmon, Jo; Timperio, Anna; Chu, Binh; Veitch, Jenny

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to determine cross-sectional associations of dog ownership, dog walking, and physical activity (PA) among children and their parents. Objective measures of PA were obtained for children ages 5-6 and 10-12 years from 19 primary schools across Melbourne, Australia. Parents self-reported their PA, dog ownership, and frequency of dog…

  15. Physical activity parenting measurement and research: Challenges, explanations, and solutions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physical activity (PA) parenting research has proliferated over the past decade, with findings verifying the influential role that parents play in children's emerging PA behaviors. This knowledge, however, has not translated into effective family-based PA interventions. During a preconference worksh...

  16. 12 CFR 347.119 - Specific consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Specific consent. 347.119 Section 347.119 Banks... INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.119 Specific consent. General consent and expedited processing under this subpart do... activity that can be engaged in by foreign branches, which are not authorized under §§ 347.117 or...

  17. 12 CFR 347.119 - Specific consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Specific consent. 347.119 Section 347.119 Banks... INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.119 Specific consent. General consent and expedited processing under this subpart do... activity that can be engaged in by foreign branches, which are not authorized under §§ 347.117 or...

  18. 12 CFR 347.117 - General consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false General consent. 347.117 Section 347.117 Banks... INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.117 General consent. (a) General consent to establish or relocate a foreign branch... establish a foreign branch conducting activities authorized by section 347.115 of this section in...

  19. 12 CFR 347.119 - Specific consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Specific consent. 347.119 Section 347.119 Banks... INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.119 Specific consent. General consent and expedited processing under this subpart do... activity that can be engaged in by foreign branches, which are not authorized under §§ 347.117 or...

  20. 12 CFR 347.117 - General consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false General consent. 347.117 Section 347.117 Banks... INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.117 General consent. (a) General consent to establish or relocate a foreign branch... establish a foreign branch conducting activities authorized by section 347.115 of this section in...

  1. 12 CFR 347.117 - General consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false General consent. 347.117 Section 347.117 Banks... INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.117 General consent. (a) General consent to establish or relocate a foreign branch... establish a foreign branch conducting activities authorized by section 347.115 of this section in...

  2. 12 CFR 347.119 - Specific consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Specific consent. 347.119 Section 347.119 Banks... INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.119 Specific consent. General consent and expedited processing under this subpart do... activity that can be engaged in by foreign branches, which are not authorized under §§ 347.117 or...

  3. 12 CFR 347.119 - Specific consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Specific consent. 347.119 Section 347.119 Banks... INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.119 Specific consent. General consent and expedited processing under this subpart do... activity that can be engaged in by foreign branches, which are not authorized under §§ 347.117 or...

  4. 12 CFR 347.117 - General consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false General consent. 347.117 Section 347.117 Banks... INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.117 General consent. (a) General consent to establish or relocate a foreign branch... establish a foreign branch conducting activities authorized by section 347.115 of this section in...

  5. 12 CFR 347.117 - General consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General consent. 347.117 Section 347.117 Banks... INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.117 General consent. (a) General consent to establish or relocate a foreign branch... establish a foreign branch conducting activities authorized by section 347.115 of this section in...

  6. 10 CFR 820.23 - Consent order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Consent order. 820.23 Section 820.23 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROCEDURAL RULES FOR DOE NUCLEAR ACTIVITIES Enforcement Process § 820.23 Consent order. (a... public and there shall be no transcript. (b) Consent order. Notwithstanding any other provision of...

  7. 10 CFR 820.23 - Consent order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Consent order. 820.23 Section 820.23 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROCEDURAL RULES FOR DOE NUCLEAR ACTIVITIES Enforcement Process § 820.23 Consent order. (a... public and there shall be no transcript. (b) Consent order. Notwithstanding any other provision of...

  8. Voluntary Informed Consent in Paediatric Oncology Research.

    PubMed

    Dekking, Sara A S; Van Der Graaf, Rieke; Van Delden, Johannes J M

    2016-07-01

    In paediatric oncology, research and treatments are often closely combined, which may compromise voluntary informed consent of parents. We identified two key scenarios in which voluntary informed consent for paediatric oncology studies is potentially compromised due to the intertwinement of research and care. The first scenario is inclusion by the treating paediatric oncologist, the second scenario concerns treatments confined to the research context. In this article we examine whether voluntary informed consent of parents for research is compromised in these two scenarios, and if so whether this is also morally problematic. For this, we employ the account of voluntary consent from Nelson and colleagues, who assert that voluntary consent requires substantial freedom from controlling influences. We argue that, in the absence of persuasion or manipulation, inclusion by the treating physician does not compromise voluntariness. However, it may function as a risk factor for controlling influence as it narrows the scope within which parents make decisions. Furthermore, physician appeal to reciprocity is not controlling as it constitutes persuasion. In addition, framing information is a form of informational manipulation and constitutes a controlling influence. In the second scenario, treatments confined to the research context qualify as controlling if the available options are restricted through manipulation of options. Although none of the influences is morally problematic in itself, a combination of influences may create morally problematic instances of involuntary informed consent. Therefore, safeguards should be implemented to establish an optimal environment for parents to provide voluntary informed consent in an integrated research-care context. PMID:26686529

  9. Parental influences on adolescent physical activity: a longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Ornelas, India J; Perreira, Krista M; Ayala, Guadalupe X

    2007-01-01

    Background Physical inactivity is increasing among adolescents in the U.S., especially among girls. Despite growing evidence that parents are an important influence on adolescent health, few longitudinal studies have explored the causal relationship between parental influence and physical activity. This study examines how the relationships between parental influences and adolescent physical activity differ by gender and tests whether these relationships are mediated by adolescents' self-esteem and depression. Methods Data are from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. The sample includes 13,246 youth, grades 7 to 12, interviewed in 1995 and again 1 year later. Logit models were used to evaluate parental influences on achieving five or more bouts of moderate to vigorous physical activity per week [MVPA] and whether the relationship between parental influence and MVPA was mediated by adolescents' level of self-esteem and depression. Results Family cohesion, parent-child communication and parental engagement positively predicted MVPA for both genders one year later (odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for females, 1.09 [1.05–1.12], 1.13 [1.07–1.19], 1.25 [1.17–1.33] and males, 1.08 [1.04–1.11], 1.14 [1.07–1.23], 1.23 [1.14–1.33], respectively); however, parental monitoring did not (odds ratio and confidence intervals for females and males, 1.02 [.97–1.07]). For both females and males, self-esteem mediated the relationship between parental influence and physical activity. Depressive symptoms were only a mediator among males. Females reported higher levels of parent-child communication and lower family cohesion compared with males. There were no gender differences in levels of parental monitoring and engagement. Females had significantly lower levels of self-esteem and higher levels of depressive symptoms than males. Conclusion Strategies to promote physical activity among adolescents should focus on increasing levels of family

  10. Informed consent - adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... state). What Should Occur During the Informed Consent Process? When asking for your informed consent, your doctor ... What is Your Role in the Informed Consent Process? You are an important member of your health ...

  11. Informed consent.

    PubMed

    Steevenson, Grania

    2006-08-01

    Disclosure of information prior to consent is a very complex area of medical ethics. On the surface it would seem to be quite clear cut, but on closer inspection the scope for 'grey areas' is vast. In practice, however, it could be argued that the number of cases that result in complaint or litigation is comparatively small. However, this does not mean that wrong decisions or unethical scenarios do not occur. It would seem that in clinical practice these ethical grey areas concerning patients' full knowledge of their condition or treatment are quite common. One of the barometers for how much disclosure should be given prior to consent could be the feedback obtained from the patients. Are they asking relevant questions pertinent to their condition and do they show a good understanding of the options available? This should be seen as a positive trait and should be welcomed by the healthcare professionals. Ultimately it gives patients greater autonomy and the healthcare professional can expand and build on the patient's knowledge as well as allay fears perhaps based on wrongly held information. Greater communication with the patient would help the healthcare professional pitch their explanations at the right level. Every case and scenario is different and unique and deserves to be treated as such. Studies have shown that most patients can understand their medical condition and treatment provided communication has been thorough (Gillon 1996). It is in the patients' best interests to feel comfortable with the level of disclosure offered to them. It can only foster greater trust and respect between them and the healthcare profession which has to be mutually beneficial to both parties. PMID:16939165

  12. Child physical activity and parent-child attitude congruence of athletic competence and activity type

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our purpose was to evaluate parental influence on child physical activity (PA) through parental beliefs on child competence and importance of specific types of PA. Utilizing Eccles' expectancy-value model of task choice, the study examined parent-child attitude congruence and whether task value bel...

  13. [Parenting].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pawl, Jeree, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Contributions to this theme issue of a bulletin on infants aged birth to three, point out that becoming a parent is an evolving process and that infants' meanings to their parents shape parenting behavior and the capacity to change. Articles also examine the challenge of how to support parents as they come to, and continue in, the process of…

  14. Drinking Water Activities for Students, Teachers, and Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    This guide provides teachers with materials, information, and classroom activities to enhance any drinking water curriculum. Students can use the activity sheets to further lessons and stimulate thought. Parents can use the guide to develop science projects that will provoke thought, encourage research, and provide a scientific approach to…

  15. Environmental and cultural correlates of physical activity parenting practices among Latino parents with preschool-aged children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parents can influence their children's physical activity (PA) through parenting practices (PP). Correlates of PA-PP have not been investigated. This study therefore aimed to examine the independent contributions of (1) socio-demographic, (2) cultural, (3) parent perceived-environmental, and (4) obje...

  16. Environmental and cultural correlates of physical activity parenting practices among Latino parents with preschool-aged children: Ninos Activos

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Latino children are at high risk of becoming obese. Physical activity (PA) can help prevent obesity. Parents can influence children's PA through parenting practices. This study aimed to examine the independent contributions of (1) sociodemographic, (2) cultural, (3) parent perceived environmental, a...

  17. Dutch children and parents' views on active and non-active video gaming.

    PubMed

    De Vet, Emely; Simons, Monique; Wesselman, Maarten

    2014-06-01

    Active video games that require whole body movement to play the game may be an innovative health promotion tool to substitute sedentary pastime with more active time and may therefore contribute to children's health. To inform strategies aimed at reducing sedentary behavior by replacing non-active by active gaming, opinions about active and non-active video games are explored among 8- to 12-year-old children and their parents. Six qualitative, semi-structured focus groups were held with 8- to 12-year-old children (n = 46) and four with their parents (n = 19) at three different primary schools in The Netherlands. The focus groups with children discussed game preferences, gaming context and perceived game-related parenting. The focus groups with parents addressed considerations in purchasing video games, perceived positive and negative consequences of gaming, and game-related parenting. Both children and their parents were very positive about active video games and preferred active games over non-active games. Active video games were considered more social than non-active video games, and active games were played more often together with friends and family than non-active video games. Parenting practices did not differ for active and non-active video games, although some parents were less strict regarding active games. Two conditions for practical implementation were met: children enjoyed active video games, and parents were willing to buy active video games. Active video games were preferred to non-active video games, illustrating that using active video games is a promising health promotion tool to reduce sedentary pastime in youth. PMID:23208151

  18. Examining a conceptual model of parental nurturance, parenting practices and physical activity among 5–6 year olds

    PubMed Central

    Sebire, Simon J.; Jago, Russell; Wood, Lesley; Thompson, Janice L.; Zahra, Jezmond; Lawlor, Deborah A.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Parenting is an often-studied correlate of children's physical activity, however there is little research examining the associations between parenting styles, practices and the physical activity of younger children. Objective This study aimed to investigate whether physical activity-based parenting practices mediate the association between parenting styles and 5–6 year-old children's objectively-assessed physical activity. Methods 770 parents self-reported parenting style (nurturance and control) and physical activity-based parenting practices (logistic and modeling support). Their 5–6 year old child wore an accelerometer for five days to measure moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Linear regression was used to examine direct and indirect (mediation) associations. Data were collected in the United Kingdom in 2012/13 and analyzed in 2014. Results Parent nurturance was positively associated with provision of modeling (adjusted unstandardized coefficient, β = 0.11; 95% CI = 0.02, 0.21) and logistic support (β = 0.14; 0.07, 0.21). Modeling support was associated with greater child MVPA (β = 2.41; 0.23, 4.60) and a small indirect path from parent nurturance to child's MVPA was identified (β = 0.27; 0.04, 0.70). Conclusions Physical activity-based parenting practices are more strongly associated with 5–6 year old children's MVPA than parenting styles. Further research examining conceptual models of parenting is needed to understand in more depth the possible antecedents to adaptive parenting practices beyond parenting styles. PMID:26647364

  19. Parent participation plays an important part in promoting physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Lindqvist, Anna-Karin; Kostenius, Catrine; Gard, Gunvor; Rutberg, Stina

    2015-01-01

    Although physical activity (PA) is an important and modifiable determinant of health, in Sweden only 15% of boys and 10% of girls aged 15 years old achieve the recommended levels of PA 7 days per week. Adolescents’ PA levels are associated with social influence exerted by parents, friends, and teachers. The purpose of this study was to describe parents’ experiences of being a part of their adolescents’ empowerment-inspired PA intervention. A qualitative interview study was performed at a school in the northern part of Sweden. A total of 10 parents were interviewed, and the collected data were analyzed with qualitative content analysis. Three subthemes were combined into one main theme, demonstrating that parents are one important part of a successful PA intervention. The life of an adolescent has many options and demands that make it difficult to prioritize PA. Although parents felt that they were important in supporting their adolescent, a successful PA intervention must have multiple components. Moreover, the parents noted that the intervention had a positive effect upon not only their adolescents’, but also their own PA. Interventions aimed at promoting PA among adolescents should include measures to stimulate parent participation, have an empowerment approach, and preferably be school-based. PMID:26282870

  20. Understood consent versus informed consent: a new paradigm for obtaining consent for pediatric research studies.

    PubMed

    Isles, Alan F

    2013-01-01

    All too often the informed consent process is viewed by members of research teams as a challenge of getting a parent or young person's signature on a form. Informed consent is, however, much more than a signed form. Rather, it is a process, often iterative, in which the parent or young person is given sufficient information about a study in order that they can make a truly informed decision about participation. Substantial effort is required in producing appropriately formatted and readable documents using plain language at about Grade 6 or 12-year old reading level. Achieving truly understood consent involves the researcher spending significant one-on-one time with the parent or young person explaining in simple language what is proposed and then using so-called repeat-back techniques to test the understanding of the participants. This is critically important if the research involves randomization to different treatments or use of a placebo arm and, in particular if the research involves more than minimal risk. PMID:24400284

  1. Physical activity parenting: A systematic review of questionnaires and their associations with child activity levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insufficient physical activity (PA) is considered a critical contributor to childhood overweight. Parents are a key in influencing their child's PA through various mechanisms of PA parenting, including support, restriction of PA, and facilitation of enrollment in PA classes or activities. However, s...

  2. Descriptive Study of Activities Identified by Principals as Parental Involvement Activities through Survey Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Melinda

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to identify parental involvement activities used by successful schools. Participating schools were identified as successful by an Academic Excellence Indicator System (AEIS) rating of recognized or exemplary. Using survey methods, data was collected from the principals of the schools about parental involvement activities on…

  3. Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lao Parents and Teachers Association, Minneapolis, MN.

    This collection presents advice to help parents help their children succeed in school. Information sheets are included from many sources, in English and translated into Lao by the Lao Parents and Teachers Association. The emphasis is on the elementary grades, although some of the materials are useful for parents of high school students. The…

  4. Daddy's Days Away. A Deployment Activity Book for Parents & Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps, Washington, DC.

    This booklet grew from an idea that the children of Marines might appreciate some special discussion of their family's separation during deployment. Information is provided for parents to help them express their feelings with their children about the deployment. Outlines of activities to do before leaving are included. Suggestions are given for…

  5. Factors Associated with Physical Activity Literacy among Foster Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominick, Gregory M.; Friedman, Daniela B.; Saunders, Ruth P.; Hussey, Jim R.; Watkins, Ken W.; W.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To explore associations between physical activity (PA) literacy and psychosocial constructs for providing instrumental social support for youth PA. Methods: Ninety-one foster parents completed surveys assessing PA literacy (overall and specific), perceptions of child PA, coordination, PA enjoyment, psychosocial variables:…

  6. From Informed Consent to Negotiated Consent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moody, Harry R.

    1988-01-01

    Considers informed consent standard inadequate for insuring autonomy in long term care. Argues for complex standard of "negotiated consent." Illuminates philosophical argument by qualitative data from interviews with physicians, nurses, and social workers in nursing homes, which demonstrated continuum of interventions ranging from advocacy and…

  7. Can Broad Consent be Informed Consent?

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Mark

    2011-11-01

    In biobanks, a broader model of consent is often used and justified by a range of different strategies that make reference to the potential benefits brought by the research it will facilitate combined with the low level of risk involved (provided adequate measures are in place to protect privacy and confidentiality) or a questioning of the centrality of the notion of informed consent. Against this, it has been suggested that the lack of specific information about particular uses of the samples means that such consent cannot be fully autonomous and so is unethical. My answer to the title question is a definite 'yes'. Broad consent can be informed consent and is justified by appeal to the principle of respect for autonomy. Indeed, I will suggest that the distinction between the various kinds of consent is not a distinction between kinds of consent but between the kinds of choice a person makes. When an individual makes a choice (of any kind) it is important that they do so according to the standards of informed consent and consistent with the choice that they are making. PMID:22102849

  8. Guideline 2: Informed Consent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Journal on Mental Retardation, 2000

    2000-01-01

    The second in seven sets of guidelines based on the consensus of experts in the treatment of psychiatric and behavioral problems in mental retardation (MR) focuses on informed consent. Guidelines cover underlying concepts, usual components, informed consent as a process, information to include, what to provide, when to obtain informed consent, and…

  9. Informed Consent to Treatment in Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Neilson, Grainne; Chaimowitz, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Summary Patients have a right to be informed and actively involved in their health care. Fundamental to a person’s dignity and autonomy is the right to make decisions about their psychiatric treatment, including their right to refuse unwanted treatments, providing that the refusal is a capable one. It is important that psychiatrists have an awareness of the ethical underpinnings of consent and the legislated requirements related to consent, including precedent cases. Consent may change over time and for different conditions and circumstances. Consent must be an ongoing process.

  10. Parental Perceptions of Physical Activity Benefits for Youth with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitchford, E. Andrew; Siebert, Erin; Hamm, Jessica; Yun, Joonkoo

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity promotion is of need for youth with developmental disabilities. Parental perceptions of physical activity benefits may influence youth behaviors. This study investigated the relationship between parental beliefs on the importance of physical activity and physical activity levels among youth with disabilities. Parents and…

  11. Parenting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziff, Barry, Ed.; Hostettler, Karen, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    The newsletter of the California Association for the Gifted includes the following brief articles on parenting: "Your Challenge, Their Lives" (Barry Ziff); "Courage to Be Who I Am, Unafraid" (Elizabeth Meckstroth); "Attribution: A Key to Encouraging More Responsible Behavior in the Gifted" (Saundra Sparling); "A Parent's Perspective" (Carolyn…

  12. Parenting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markun, Patricia Maloney, Ed.

    This document contains 11 articles which are concerned with the education and development of people who are, or will be, parents. The term "parenting" is used to emphasize the need to help fathers and mothers to deal effectively with their own children. Also, the term reflects the growing awareness that child rearing is the function of many…

  13. 12 CFR 980.6 - Finance Board consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Finance Board consent. 980.6 Section 980.6 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD NEW FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK ACTIVITIES NEW BUSINESS ACTIVITIES § 980.6 Finance Board consent. The Finance Board may at any time provide consent for a Bank...

  14. 12 CFR 980.6 - Finance Board consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Finance Board consent. 980.6 Section 980.6 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD NEW FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK ACTIVITIES NEW BUSINESS ACTIVITIES § 980.6 Finance Board consent. The Finance Board may at any time provide consent for a Bank...

  15. Where no consent = death.

    PubMed

    1977-01-01

    Men must be made to understand the value of family planning - particularly in societies where men hold the power of decision in the family. Dr. Kotha Pannikar, chairman of the Kedah Family Planning Association (FPA) in Malaysia, illustrated this point in discussion which followed the Consultation of Medical and Communication Fieldworkers conference in Kuala Lumpur in August, with a story about 1 of her own patients. When the girl, who had a rheumatic heart, was 16, Dr. Pannikar advised the parents that she needed cardiac surgery if she were to be a healthy wife and mother. But the parents lived some distance from Dr. Pannikar's surgery and did not heed the advice. The girl was married to a carpenter from a traditional Chinese family, in which "the man is lord and master." Her new home had no piped water, and in additional to normal domestic tasks she had to carry water from a source 1 1/2 miles agay. In the 7th month of her 1st pregnancy, she went into cardiac failure. After the 3rd pregnancy and a 3rd cardiac failure, Dr. Pannikar tried to arrange a sterilization "but we could not get consent - her husband refused to turn up at the hospital." When the girl was admitted to hospital 6 months into her 4th pregnancy, Dr. Pannikar got hold of her patient's mother-in-law. "I told her if she wanted a servant in the house, it was easy to get one. But no servant would look after her grandchildren the way their mother would. I told her if she wanted to save the girl's life she had better speak to her son." During the 4th delivery, the girl went into cardiac arrest and spent 2 weeks in intensive care. The mother-in-law prevailed upon her son to at least consent, and the girl was sterilized before she left hospital. But "it was a very near thing," Dr. Pannikar recalls "and it wouldn't have happened if the husband had felt he was responsible in parenthood." The Kedah FPA makes special efforts to reach men. Dr. Pannikar herself talks to men's organizations like the Lions and

  16. Is Parenting Style Related to Children's Healthy Eating and Physical Activity in Latino Families?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arredondo, Elva M.; Elder, John P.; Ayala, Guadalupe X.; Campbell, Nadia; Baquero, Barbara; Duerksen, Susan

    2006-01-01

    Parenting styles influence a child's risk for obesity. The goals of this study are to evaluate the influence of (i) parenting style on children's health behaviors (physical activity and dietary intake), (ii) children's sociodemographic characteristics on parenting style and on children's health behaviors and (iii) parents' sociodemographic…

  17. Activity-related parenting practices: development of the Parenting Related to Activity Measure (PRAM) and links with mothers' eating psychopathology and compulsive exercise beliefs.

    PubMed

    Haycraft, Emma; Powell, Faye; Meyer, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    This is a two-study paper that developed a measure to assess parenting practices related to children's physical activity and explored maternal predictors of such parenting practices. Study 1: A self-report measure of parents' activity-related practices (the Parenting Related to Activity Measure) was developed, and a principal component analysis was carried out using data from 233 mothers of 4.5- to 9-year-old children. The results supported a six-factor model and yielded the following subscales: Responsibility/monitoring; Activity regulation; Control of active behaviours; Overweight concern; Rewarding parenting; and Pressure to exercise. Study 2: Mothers (N = 170) completed the Parenting Related to Activity Measure, alongside measures of eating psychopathology and compulsive exercise, to identify predictors of activity-related parenting practices. Mothers' eating psychopathology and exercise beliefs predicted activity parenting practices with their sons and daughters, but different predictors were seen for mothers of daughters versus sons. Mothers' eating and exercise attitudes are important predictors of their activity-related parenting practices, particularly with girls. Identifying early interactions around activity/exercise could be important in preventing the development of problematic beliefs about exercise, which are often a key symptom of eating disorders. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. PMID:25377732

  18. Minors' Competence to Consent to Abortion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Catherine C.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews psychological evidence regarding minors' competence to consent to abortion. Covers the following topics: (1) the source and nature of advice regarding the abortion decision; (2) conformity to peer and parent advice; (3) the developmental tasks of adolescence; and (4) reasoning skills. (Author/LHW)

  19. 34 CFR 303.401 - Definitions of consent, native language, and personally identifiable information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Definitions of consent, native language, and personally... Definitions of consent, native language, and personally identifiable information. As used in this subpart— (a... which consent is sought, in the parent's native language or other mode of communication; (2) The...

  20. 34 CFR 303.401 - Definitions of consent, native language, and personally identifiable information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Definitions of consent, native language, and personally... Definitions of consent, native language, and personally identifiable information. As used in this subpart— (a... which consent is sought, in the parent's native language or other mode of communication; (2) The...

  1. Playing "The Ladybug Game": Parent Guidance of Young Children's Numeracy Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandermaas-Peeler, Maureen; Ferretti, Larissa; Loving, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Parent guidance for numeracy activities and preschoolers' numeracy performance were examined in the context of playing a board game in three sessions over a two-week period. Twenty-eight parent-child dyads were randomly assigned to a numeracy awareness group in which parents were provided with suggested numeracy activities to incorporate into the…

  2. Parental Attitudes and Young People's Online Sexual Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorbring, Emma; Hallberg, Jonas; Bohlin, Margareta; Skoog, Therése

    2015-01-01

    Parental attitudes towards young people's sexuality in traditional (i.e. non-online media) settings have been associated with young people's sexual activities. In this study, we explored the association between key parent and youth characteristics and parental attitudes towards young people's online sexual activities. We also…

  3. Involving parents from the start: formative evaluation for a large randomised controlled trial with Botswana Junior Secondary School students.

    PubMed

    Vig, Jessica; Miller, Kim S; Chirwa-Motswere, Catherine; Winskell, Kate; Stallcup, Elizabeth

    2016-03-01

    While HIV prevention research conducted among adolescent populations may encounter parental resistance, the active engagement of parents from inception to trial completion may alleviate opposition. In preparation for implementing a large randomised controlled trial (RCT) examining the efficacy of a behavioural intervention targeting adolescent sexual risk behaviours, a formative evaluation was undertaken to assess parental reactions to the proposed trial. Six focus groups were conducted with parents of adolescents (aged 13-17) from rural, peri-urban and urban junior secondary schools in Botswana. Focus groups explored comprehension and acceptability among parents of the forthcoming trial including HSV-2 testing, the return of results to the adolescent (not the parent), trial information materials and the parental consent process. Parents welcomed the study and understood and accepted its moral and ethical considerations. Their reactions regarding return of HSV-2 results only to adolescents (not the parent) were mixed. Parents understood the consent process and most agreed to consent, while indicating their desire to remain informed and involved throughout the RCT. The focus group discussions (FGDs) provided valuable information and insights that helped strengthen the study. As a result of parents' feedback, counselling procedures were strengthened and direct linkages to local services and care were made. Informational materials were revised to increase clarity, and materials and procedures were developed to encourage and support parental involvement and parent-child dialogue. Ultimately, parental feedback led to a decision by the Government of Botswana to allow parents to access their child's HSV-2 test results. PMID:27002354

  4. Is parenting style related to children's healthy eating and physical activity in Latino families?

    PubMed

    Arredondo, Elva M; Elder, John P; Ayala, Guadalupe X; Campbell, Nadia; Baquero, Barbara; Duerksen, Susan

    2006-12-01

    Parenting styles influence a child's risk for obesity. The goals of this study are to evaluate the influence of (i) parenting style on children's health behaviors (physical activity and dietary intake), (ii) children's sociodemographic characteristics on parenting style and on children's health behaviors and (iii) parents' sociodemographic characteristics on their use of controlling styles to promote a healthy home environment. Survey and anthropometric data were collected from a community sample of Latino parents (n = 812) and their children in kindergarten through second grade. Parental use of positive reinforcement and monitoring was associated with children's healthy eating and exercise. Also, parents' use of appropriate disciplining styles was associated with healthier eating, while parental use of control styles was associated with unhealthy eating. The daughters of parents who used controlling styles ate more unhealthy foods than did the sons. Older, employed and more acculturated parents used less controlling styles than their counterparts. Parenting interventions targeting children's dietary intake and physical activity should encourage parents to use more positive reinforcement and monitor their children's health behaviors as these parenting styles are associated with healthier behaviors. Moreover, intervention researchers may want to encourage Latino parents to use less controlling styles with girls as this parenting style increased girls' risk for unhealthy eating. PMID:17032706

  5. Parent-child interactions and objectively measured child physical activity: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Parents influence their children's behaviors directly through specific parenting practices and indirectly through their parenting style. Some practices such as logistical and emotional support have been shown to be positively associated with child physical activity (PA) levels, while for others (e.g. monitoring) the relationship is not clear. The objectives of this study were to determine the relationship between parent's PA-related practices, general parenting style, and children's PA level. Methods During the spring of 2007 a diverse group of 99 parent-child dyads (29% White, 49% Black, 22% Hispanic; 89% mothers) living in low-income rural areas of the US participated in a cross-sectional study. Using validated questionnaires, parents self-reported their parenting style (authoritative, authoritarian, permissive, and uninvolved) and activity-related parenting practices. Height and weight were measured for each dyad and parents reported demographic information. Child PA was measured objectively through accelerometers and expressed as absolute counts and minutes engaged in intensity-specific activity. Results Seventy-six children had valid accelerometer data. Children engaged in 113.4 ± 37.0 min. of moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) per day. Children of permissive parents accumulated more minutes of MVPA than those of uninvolved parents (127.5 vs. 97.1, p < 0.05), while parents who provided above average levels of support had children who participated in more minutes of MVPA (114.2 vs. 98.3, p = 0.03). While controlling for known covariates, an uninvolved parenting style was the only parenting behavior associated with child physical activity. Parenting style moderated the association between two parenting practices - reinforcement and monitoring - and child physical activity. Specifically, post-hoc analyses revealed that for the permissive parenting style group, higher levels of parental reinforcement or monitoring were associated with higher

  6. Parental Perceptions of Physical Activity Benefits for Youth With Developmental Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Pitchford, E Andrew; Siebert, Erin; Hamm, Jessica; Yun, Joonkoo

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity promotion is of need for youth with developmental disabilities. Parental perceptions of physical activity benefits may influence youth behaviors. This study investigated the relationship between parental beliefs on the importance of physical activity and physical activity levels among youth with disabilities. Parents and caregivers of 113 youth with disabilities reported on the perceived benefits of physical activity, the child's physical activity level, and demographic information. Linear regression analyses to examine the relative association between parental perceived benefits and child physical activity (R² = 0.19) indicated that physical activity level was predicted by parental beliefs and child gender. Health promotion for youth with disabilities should consider educating parents and caregivers of physical activity benefits, in addition to creating more opportunities. PMID:26701072

  7. Positive parenting during childhood moderates the impact of recent negative events on cortisol activity in parentally bereaved youth

    PubMed Central

    Roubinov, Danielle S.; Gress-Smith, Jenna; Luecken, Linda J.; Sandler, Irwin N.; Wolchik, Sharlene

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Early parental loss has been associated with neuroendocrine dysregulation in youth; however, the form of cortisol dysregulation varies widely. Identifying risk and protective factors that influence physiological regulation has important implications for understanding the development of mental health problems in parentally bereaved youth. Objectives The current study investigated the prospective effects of positive parenting on the relation between recent negative life events and cortisol activity in adolescents/young adults several years after bereavement. Methods Positive parenting was assessed an average of 18.5 months following parental death. Six years later, adolescents/young adults (N=55) reported on exposure to recent negative life events, and salivary cortisol was assessed before and after a conflict discussion task with their caregiver. The interaction between positive parenting and exposure to recent negative events was used to predict total cortisol output and response to the task. Results Multilevel modeling and the probing of the interaction effect demonstrated that total cortisol output increased with greater exposure to recent negative events among those with lower levels of past positive parenting. These relations were significant over and above current internalizing and externalizing symptoms. Conclusions The current results highlight the need to consider the interactive influence of proximal and distal factors on neuroendocrine functioning for youth exposed to early parental loss. PMID:20521029

  8. Parenting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spock, Benjamin; And Others

    Various aspects of child-rearing are covered in this transcript of a program broadcast in the National Public Radio weekly series, "Options in Education." Authors of current popular books on parenting are interviewed. Benjamin Spock discusses changes (including sex role revisions) in his "Baby and Child Care" since the 1946 first edition. Eda…

  9. Do specific parenting practices and related parental self-efficacy associate with physical activity and screen time among primary schoolchildren? A cross-sectional study in Belgium

    PubMed Central

    De Lepeleere, Sara; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Cardon, Greet; Verloigne, Maïté

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the association between specific parenting practices and related parental self-efficacy with children's physical activity (PA) and screen time. Parental body mass index (BMI), family socioeconomic status (SES), and child's age and gender were examined as possible influencing factors. Design Cross-sectional. Setting January 2014, Flanders (Belgium). Participants 207 parents (87.4% mothers) of children aged 6–12 years. Outcome measures Specific parenting practices, related parental self-efficacy, and children's PA and screen time. Results The majority of investigated parenting practices and related parental self-efficacy were not significantly associated with children's PA or screen time. However, children were more physically active if sports equipment was available at home (p<0.10) and if parents did not find it difficult to motivate their child to be physically active (p<0.05). Children had a lower screen time if parents limited their own gaming (p<0.01). The associations between parenting practices and related parental self-efficacy with children's PA or screen time were significant for parents with a normal BMI, for medium-high SES families and for parents of younger children. Furthermore, the association between the parenting relating factors and children's PA and screen time differed for boys and girls. Conclusions In contrast to what we expected, the findings of the current study show that only a very few specific parenting practices and related parental self-efficacy were associated with children's PA and screen time. It was expected that parental self-efficacy would play a more important role. This can be due to the fact that parental self-efficacy was already high in this group of parents. Therefore, it is possible that parents do not realise how difficult it is to perform certain parenting practices until they are faced with it in an intervention. Trial registration number EC/2012/317. PMID:26346871

  10. Involving parents from the start: Formative evaluation for a large RCT with Botswana Junior Secondary School students

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Kim S.; Chirwa-Motswere, Catherine; Winskell, Kate; Stallcup, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    While HIV prevention research conducted among adolescent populations may encounter parental resistance, the active engagement of parents from inception to trial completion may alleviate opposition. In preparation for implementing a large randomized controlled trial (RCT) examining the efficacy of a behavioural intervention targeting adolescent sexual risk behaviours, a formative evaluation was undertaken to assess parental reactions to the proposed trial. Six focus groups were conducted with parents of adolescents (aged 13–17) from rural, peri-urban, and urban Botswana junior secondary schools. Focus groups explored comprehension and acceptability among parents of the forthcoming trial including HSV-2 testing, the return of results to the adolescent (not the parent), trial information materials and the parental consent process. Parents welcomed the study and understood and accepted its moral and ethical considerations. Their reactions regarding return of HSV-2 results only to adolescents (not the parent) were mixed. Parents understood the consent process and most agreed to consent, while indicating their desire to remain informed and involved throughout the RCT. The FGDs provided valuable information and insights that helped strengthen the study. As a result of parents’ feedback, counselling procedures were strengthened and direct linkages to local services and care were made. Informational materials were revised to increase clarity, and materials and procedures were developed to encourage and support parental involvement and parent-child dialogue. Ultimately, parental feedback led to a decision by the Government of Botswana to allow parents to access their child’s HSV-2 test results. PMID:27002354

  11. Parent-Offspring Correlations in Pedometer-Assessed Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Jacobi, David; Caille, Agnès; Borys, Jean-Michel; Lommez, Agnès; Couet, Charles; Charles, Marie-Aline; Oppert, Jean-Michel

    2011-01-01

    Background Physical activity is a major component of a healthy lifestyle in youth and adults. To identify determinants of this complex behavior is an important research objective in the process of designing interventions to promote physical activity at population level. In addition to individual determinants, there is evidence documenting familial influences on physical activity. However, the few studies that have addressed this issue with objective measures did not provide data on parent-offspring physical activity relationships throughout childhood and adolescence. The purpose of this study was to assess familial correlations in pedometer-assessed physical activity. Methods We measured ambulatory activity in 286 French nuclear families (283 mothers, 237 fathers, and 631 children aged 8–18 years) by pedometer recordings (Yamax Digiwalker DW 450) over a week. Correlations were computed with their 95% confidence intervals (CI) for spouse pairs, siblings, mother-offspring, and father-offspring. Data were expressed as steps per day and computed both for the full recording period and separately for weekdays and weekends. Results The correlations were the highest between siblings (r = 0.28, 95%CI: 0.17–0.38). Parent–offspring correlations were significant in mothers (r = 0.21, 95%CI: 0.12–0.30), especially between mothers and daughters (r = 0.24, 95%CI: 0.12–0.36 vs. r = 0.18, 95%CI: 0.05–0.31 for sons), but were almost nonexistent in fathers. Correlations were generally higher on weekend days compared to weekdays. Mother-offspring correlations did not decrease with increasing age of children (r = 0.17, 95%CI: 0.00–0.34 in 8–11-year-olds, r = 0.20, 95%CI: 0.07–0.33 in 12–15-year-olds, and r = 0.25, 95%CI: 0.07–0.39 in ≥16-year-olds). Finally, between-spouse correlations were significant only during weekend days (r = 0.14, 95%CI: 0.01–0.27). Conclusion Ambulatory activity correlated within families, with a

  12. Parent-child interactions and objectively measured child physical activity: a cross-sectional study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parents influence their children's behaviors directly through specific parenting practices and indirectly through their parenting style. Some practices such as logistical and emotional support have been shown to be positively associated with child physical activity (PA) levels, while for others (e.g...

  13. Association of Active Play-Related Parenting Behaviors, Orientations, and Practices with Preschool Sedentary Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loprinzi, Paul D.; Cardinal, Bradley J.; Kane, Christy; Lee, Hyo; Beets, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Parents' behaviors, practices, beliefs, and attitudes greatly influence children's active play behavior; however, little research has examined these parental influences on preschool children's sedentary behavior (SB). Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the association between parental influences on…

  14. Parents' Perceptions of Home Reading Activities: Comparing Children with and without Learning Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Ensa; Bornman, Juan; Alant, Erna

    2010-01-01

    The early reading process can be viewed as triadic, encompassing the child, the parents and the environment. We examine the impact of each of these three components on children's participation in home reading activities as perceived by their parents. The results obtained from a questionnaire completed by parents of Grade 1 children, with and…

  15. The Relation of Exposure to Parental Criminal Activity, Arrest, and Sentencing to Children's Maladjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dallaire, Danielle H.; Wilson, Laura C.

    2010-01-01

    We examined the psychosocial maladjustment of 32 children with an incarcerated parent from the child's perspective as well as from the perspective of their caregiver. We focused on the relation between the incarcerated parent's report of children's exposure to parental criminal activity, arrest, and sentencing and caregivers' and children's…

  16. Family Ecological Predictors of Physical Activity Parenting in Low-Income Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lampard, Amy M.; Jurkowski, Janine M.; Lawson, Hal A.; Davison, Kirsten K.

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) parenting, or strategies parents use to promote PA in children, has been associated with increased PA in children of all ages, including preschool-aged children. However, little is known about the circumstances under which parents adopt such behaviors. This study examined family ecological factors associated with PA…

  17. Athletics, Music, Languages, and Leadership: How Parents Influence the Extracurricular Activities of Their Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbourne, Dianne; Andres, Lesley

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we explore the impact that parents have on the participation of their children in extracurricular activities (ECAs) in a sample of Canadian parents with children between the ages of four and 17. Employing a concurrent, nested, mixed methods strategy, we use the insights gained through semi-structured interviews with parents to…

  18. Beyond informed consent.

    PubMed Central

    Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.

    2004-01-01

    Although a relatively recent phenomenon, the role of informed consent in human research is central to its ethical regulation and conduct. However, guidelines often recommend procedures for obtaining informed consent (usually written consent) that are difficult to implement in developing countries. This paper reviews the guidelines for obtaining informed consent and also discusses prevailing views on current controversies, ambiguities and problems with these guidelines and suggests potential solutions. The emphasis in most externally sponsored research projects in developing countries is on laborious documentation of several mechanical aspects of the research process rather than on assuring true comprehension and voluntary participation. The onus for the oversight of this process is often left to overworked and ill-equipped local ethics review committees. Current guidelines and processes for obtaining informed consent should be reviewed with the specific aim of developing culturally appropriate methods of sharing information about the research project and obtaining and documenting consent that is truly informed. Further research is needed to examine the validity and user friendliness of innovations in information sharing procedures for obtaining consent in different cultural settings. PMID:15643799

  19. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PARENTS' MOTIVATION FOR PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND THEIR BELIEFS, AND SUPPORT OF THEIR CHILDREN'S PHYSICAL ACTIVITY: A CLUSTER ANALYSIS.

    PubMed

    Naisseh, Matilda; Martinent, Guillaume; Ferrand, Claude; Hautier, Christophe

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies have neglected the multivariate nature of motivation. The purpose of the current study was to first identify motivational profiles of parents' own physical activity. Second, the study examined if such profiles differ in the way in which parents perceive their children's competence in physical activity and the importance and support given to their children's physical activity. 711 physically active parents (57% mothers; M age = 39.7 yr.; children 6-11 years old) completed the Situational Motivation Scale, the Parents' Perceptions of Physical Activity Importance and their Children's Ability Questionnaire, and the Parental Support for Physical Activity Scale. Cluster analyses indicated four motivational profiles: Highly self-determined, Moderately self-determined, Non-self-determined, and Externally motivated profiles. Parents' beliefs and support toward their children's physical activity significantly differed across these profiles. It is the first study using Self-Determination Theory that provides evidence for the interpersonal outcomes of motivation. PMID:26302295

  20. Research consent from young people in resource-poor settings

    PubMed Central

    Cheah, Phaik Yeong; Parker, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Authoritative international guidelines stipulate that for minors to participate in research, consent must be obtained from their parents or guardians. Significant numbers of mature minors, particularly in low-income settings, are currently being ruled out of research participation because their parents are unavailable or refuse to provide consent despite the possibility that they might wish to do so and that such research has the potential to be of real benefit. These populations are under-represented in all types of clinical research. We propose that, for research with a prospect of direct benefit that has been approved by relevant ethics committees, the default position should be that minors who are able to provide valid consent and meet the following criteria should be able to consent for themselves regardless of age and whether they have reached majority: the minor must be competent and mature relative to the decision; their consent must be voluntary and they must be relatively independent and used to decision making of comparable complexity. In addition, the context must be appropriate, the information related to the research must be provided in a manner accessible to the minor and the consent must be obtained by a trained consent taker in surroundings conducive for decision making by the minor. In this paper, we have argued that consent by mature minors to research participation is acceptable in some situations and should be allowed. PMID:25477309

  1. Are Parental Health Habits Transmitted to Their Children? An Eight Year Longitudinal Study of Physical Activity in Adolescents and Their Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderssen, Norman; Wold, Bente; Torsheim, Torbjorn

    2006-01-01

    Parents are believed to play a role in influencing their children's health behaviours. This longitudinal study of two generations (parents and their children) examined associations between parents' self-reported leisure-time physical activity changes and the self-reported physical activity changes of their offspring in a sample of 557 adolescents…

  2. Proxy consent and counterfactuals.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Yujin

    2008-01-01

    When patients are in vegetative states and their lives are maintained by medical devices, their surrogates might offer proxy consents on their behalf in order to terminate the use of the devices. The so-called 'substituted judgment thesis' has been adopted by the courts regularly in order to determine the validity of such proxy consents. The thesis purports to evaluate proxy consents by appealing to putative counterfactual truths about what the patients would choose, were they to be competent. The aim of this paper is to reveal a significant limitation of the thesis, which has hitherto been recognised only vaguely and intuitively. By appealing to the metaphysics of counterfactuals I explain how the thesis fails to determine the validity of proxy consents in a number of actual cases. PMID:18154585

  3. Associations of Parental Influences with Physical Activity and Screen Time among Young Children: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Parents play a critical role in developing and shaping their children's physical activity (PA) and sedentary behaviours, particularly in the early years of life. The aim of this systematic review is to identify current literature investigating associations of parental influences with both PA and screen time in young children. This systematic review was conducted in November 2013 using 6 electronic databases covering research literature from January 1998 to November 2013. Thirty articles that met inclusion criteria were identified. These studies covered five important aspects of parenting: (1) parenting practices; (2) parents' role modelling; (3) parental perceptions of children's PA and screen viewing behaviours; (4) parental self-efficacy; and (5) general parenting style. Findings suggest that parents' encouragement and support can increase children's PA, and reducing parents' own screen time can lead to decreased child screen time. Improving parenting practices, parental self-efficacy or changing parenting style may also be promising approaches to increasing PA time and decreasing screen time of young children. PMID:25874123

  4. Informed consent: II.

    PubMed

    Miller, L J

    1980-11-21

    In the second article of his four-part series on informed consent, the author discusses defenses a physician may employ against informed consent claims. Seven situations are described where failure to disclose risks might be justified by lack of materiality, standards of medical practice, or lack of proximate cause of the injury. Miller cites cases in which these arguments were recognized by the courts, but cautions against generalization of their applicability to other cases. PMID:7431561

  5. Parenting practices as mediators of child physical activity and weight status.

    PubMed

    Loprinzi, Paul D; Cardinal, Bradley J; Loprinzi, Kristina L; Lee, Hyo

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the environmental factors that influence children's physical activity is an important prerequisite before effective physical activity interventions can be developed and implemented. Parenting is one environmental factor that has been empirically shown to positively influence children's physical activity. However, in order to promote physical activity in children, a better understanding of how parents influence children's physical activity behavior is required. Previously, Birch and Davison developed a model depicting parental factors hypothesized to influence child dietary behaviors. We extended this model by identifying parental factors hypothesized to promote physical activity in children. This review focuses on the mediational role that parenting practices and behaviors play in influencing child mediators of physical activity behavior, and, ultimately, weight status. Priorities for future research are discussed. PMID:22797369

  6. Adolescents' Perceptions of Their Consent to Psychiatric Mental Health Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Roberson, Anthony James; Kjervik, Diane K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of a small-scale study in which the decision-making process of adolescents who consent to psychiatric mental health treatment was examined. Sixteen (16) adolescents were interviewed about their decisions related to initial and continued treatment, along with their understanding of minor consent laws. Interviews were audio-recorded, and transcripts were analyzed through concept analysis. Findings are presented in the context of the decision-making steps and research questions. Most adolescents did not recognize consequences related to psychiatric mental health treatment and did not assimilate and integrate information provided to them about treatment choices. Adolescents disagreed with current minor consent laws that allow minors to consent to certain healthcare treatments without the required consent of the parent. Further, adolescents reported that a collaborative approach in making decisions about the adolescent's psychiatric mental health treatment was most facilitative of achieving the goals of treatment. PMID:22474581

  7. [Legally effective consent with minors and incompetent patients].

    PubMed

    Krukemeyer, M G; Pflugmacher, I; Spiegel, H U

    2007-10-01

    Legal consent to medical treatment requires comprehensive clarification and the patient's capability to consent. Minors under 14 years are usually not capable of consent -- the right to decide rests with the parents. With persons over 14 years the doctor must test for capability to consent. With adults incapable of consent the court-appointed guardian decides. In acute cases the doctor may act first and obtain permission afterwards. Contractual capability is decisive for a treatment contract to be effective and the doctor's claim for remuneration. Minors up to 7 years are absolutely contractually incapable. Since minors under 18 years are only limitedly contractually capable, the approval of the statutory guardian suffices. With contractually incapable adults the court-appointed guardian or in serious cases the Guardianship Court decides. The legal position is explained, using three sample cases. PMID:17907094

  8. Infants, Children, and Informed Consent*

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, A. G. M.

    1974-01-01

    Obtaining informed consent for non-therapeutic experimentation on infants and children has ethical and legal implications that cause great controversy. There is some danger that worthy research will be inhibited if current ethical codes are interpreted too strictly, yet infants, children, and other vulnerable groups clearly must be protected from exploitation as research subjects. It is suggested that permission from parents coupled with integrity of the investigator will remain the child's best protection, but several additional protective mechanisms are available and should be used. Some guidelines for non-therapeutic research are suggested which should not only provide adequate protection for infants and young children involved in research projects, but allow investigators reasonable freedom to prosecute worthy research vital to continued improvements in child care. PMID:4413853

  9. Report on the remedial action to isolate DDT from people and the environment in the Huntsville Spring Branch, Indian Creek System, Wheeler Reservoir, Alabama: Review panel activities, (United States v. Olin Corporation consent decree), May 31, 1983-June 30, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-07-01

    The Consent Decree requires the Olin Corporation to develop and implement a remedial plan that will meet a performance standard of 5 parts per million (ppM) of DDT in fillets of channel catfish, largemouth bass, and smallmouth buffalo in specified reaches of the HSB-IC System. This performance standard is to be achieved by a remedy that is consistent with the goals and objectives of the Consent Decree. A Review Panel, consisting of members from the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), United States Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), the Department of the Army (DA), the State of Alabama (ADEM), and nonvoting participants from the town of Triana, Alabama (Triana), and the Olin Corporation (Olin), was established by the Consent Decree. Review Panel responsibilities include technical overview and approval of Olin's proposals to achieve the requirements of the Consent Decree. This report summarizes the activities of the Review Panel associated with implementation of Consent Decree requirements from May 31, 1983 through June 30, 1986.

  10. The Role of Parents in Adolescents' Reading Motivation and Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klauda, Susan Lutz

    2009-01-01

    Parent support for reading is one of the many elements that may play a role in the development and sustainment of children's reading motivation; to date, however, research has focused much more on the role that parents play in their preschool and primary-grade children's reading than in their older children's reading. Thus, this paper examines the…

  11. Male Single Parent/Homemaker Activity. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern Kentucky Univ., Highland Heights.

    A study was conducted to identify some unique needs of male single parents who are raising their children alone. Information on the problems of single fathers was gathered through a literature review and by surveying and interviewing male single parents in an area in northern Kentucky near Cincinnati, Ohio. Following a review of literature,…

  12. Pizzas, Pennies and Pumpkin Seeds: Mathematical Activities for Parents and Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apelman, Maja; King, Julie

    Children have many natural opportunities to learn about the basic aspects of quantity. This booklet is addressed to parents who want to support their children's mathematical growth. The activities presented suggest many ways in which parents and children can use mathematics in their environment. The activities are organized around common…

  13. Political Activism of Palestinian Youth: Exploring Individual, Parental, and Ecological Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spellings, Carolyn R.; Barber, Brian K.; Olsen, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    The growing literature on youth and political conflict has not included an adequate focus on youth activism. To address this deficit, this study used youth- and parent-reported data (N = 6,718) from the 1994-1995 Palestinian Family Study to test an ecological model of family influence (parents' activism, expectations for their adolescents'…

  14. Barriers Affecting Physical Activity in Rural Communities: Perceptions of Parents and Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWhinney, Sharon; McDonald, Andrea; Dawkins-Moultin, Lenna; Outley, Corliss; McKyer, E. Lisako; Thomas, Audrene

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the barriers inhibiting physical activity among children is critical in the fight against childhood obesity. This qualitative interview study examined parents' and children's perceptions of the barriers to physical activity in rural communities of low socioeconomic status. Parents and children concurred that the…

  15. Association between Hypothesized Parental Influences and Preschool Children's Physical Activity Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loprinzi, Paul D.; Schary, David P.; Beets, Michael W.; Leary, Janie; Cardinal, Bradley J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: To date, most research investigating the influence of parents on children"s physical activity behavior has been conducted among school-aged children. As a result, we have a limited understanding of the mechanisms through which parents can influence their young children's physical activity behavior. The purpose of this study was to…

  16. Parental Social Support and the Physical Activity-Related Behaviors of Youth: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beets, Michael W.; Cardinal, Bradley J.; Alderman, Brandon L.

    2010-01-01

    Social support from parents serves as one of the primary influences of youth physical activity-related behaviors. A systematic review was conducted on the relationship of parental social support to the physical activity-related behaviors of youth. Four categories of social support were identified, falling under two distinct mechanisms--tangible…

  17. PAKS: Parents-and-Kids Science. 24 Activities for Kids and Adults To Share.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenzie, Danny L.

    This activity book designed for grades 1-3 provides teachers with ready-to-use materials designed to get parents and children excited about science, help establish a home-school connection, and provide interesting learning activities for children to share with adults. This program gets parents involved in developing their children's science…

  18. Parents' Perceptions of Physical Activity for Their Children with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, Kara; Columna, Luis; Lieberman, Lauren; Bailey, JoEllen

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Ongoing communication with parents and the acknowledgment of their preferences and expectations are crucial to promote the participation of physical activity by children with visual impairments. Purpose: The study presented here explored parents' perceptions of physical activity for their children with visual impairments and explored…

  19. How Parents Perceive and Feel about Participation in Community Activities: The Comparison between Parents of Preschoolers with and without Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Shui-Fong; Wong, Bernard P.H.; Leung, Doris; Ho, Daphne; Au-Yeung, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The present study compared how parents of preschoolers with and without Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) perceived and felt about participation in community activities. A questionnaire survey was conducted with 380 Hong Kong parents of preschoolers with ASD and 214 Hong Kong parents of preschoolers without ASD. The two groups were not different in…

  20. Issues for informed consent.

    PubMed

    Pindyck, J P; Barber, B; Miller, L J; Lammers, S E; Merton, V; Hubbard, J B; Mauer, A M; Taswell, H F; Surgenor, D M

    1983-01-01

    Informed consent from a cytapheresis donor is the culmination of a complex decision making process during which the blood collecting agency presents sufficient information to enable the donor to make a free choice whether or not to donate. The institution bears the responsibility for providing all information relevant to the donor's decision, whether favorable or unfavorable. At no other stage of its contact with the donor can a collecting agency discharge its public trust more meaningfully. Thus, informed consent is not only the greatest altruistic expression from the unrelated volunteer donor, or the expression of deepest commitment to the family for the related donor, it is also the fullest expression of the value which the institute places on the autonomy of the donor. The foundation upon which the concept of informed consent rests has been laid by law, medicine, government, ethics, and religion. Although the procedures accompanying the informed consent process appear bureaucratic, they should be viewed as the components of a remarkable, dynamic process. The consent of a donor to undergo cytapheresis is an eloquent statement of the value he or she places on the importance of another human being's life. PMID:6546055

  1. Parental brain: cerebral areas activated by infant cries and faces. A comparison between different populations of parents and not

    PubMed Central

    Piallini, Giulia; De Palo, Francesca; Simonelli, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Literature about parenting traditionally focused on caring behaviors and parental representations. Nowadays, an innovative line of research, interested in evaluating the neural areas and hormones implicated in the nurturing and caregiving responses, has developed. The only way to permit a newborn to survive and grow up is to respond to his needs and in order to succeed it is necessary, first of all, that the adults around him understand what his needs are. That is why adults’ capacity of taking care of infants cannot disregard from some biological mechanisms, which allow them to be more responsive to the progeny and to infants in general. Many researches have proved that exist specific neural basis activating in response to infant evolutionary stimuli, such as infant cries and infant emotional facial expression. There is a sort of innate predisposition in human adults to respond to infants’ signals, in order to satisfy their need and allow them to survive and become young adults capable of taking care of themselves. This article focuses on research that has investigated, in the last decade, the neural circuits underlying parental behavioral responses. Moreover, the paper compares the results of those studies that investigated the neural responses to infant stimuli under different conditions: familiar versus unknown children, parents versus non-parents and normative versus clinical samples (depression, addiction, adolescence, and PTSD). PMID:26539154

  2. 16 CFR 312.5 - Parental consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... to protect the safety of a child participant on the website or online service, and the operator uses... other purpose; (iii) Not disclosed on the website or online service; and (5) Where the operator collects..., to the extent reasonably necessary: (i) To protect the security or integrity of its website or...

  3. 34 CFR 303.404 - Parent consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of the Act (34 CFR 300.571) and 34 CFR part 99 (Family Educational Rights and Privacy), both of which... REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS WITH... and toddlers....

  4. 16 CFR 312.5 - Parental consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... to children in § 312.2 collects a persistent identifier and no other personal information from a user... indicates that such user is not a child. In such case, there also shall be no obligation to provide...

  5. Informed Consent in California

    PubMed Central

    Fine, Arthur

    1977-01-01

    Informed consent is a legal obligation due from a physician to his patient, an obligation which may not be met by the physician's skillful treatment of his patient. It may only be met by the treating physician obtaining from his patient knowing authorization for carrying out the intended medical procedure. The physician is required to disclose whatever would be material to his patient's decision, including the nature and purpose of the procedure, and the risks and alternatives. The disclosures should be made by the physician to his patient, and not through use of consent forms which are not particular to individual patients. To minimize any subsequent claim by the patient that there was a lack of adequate disclosures, the physician should record in the patient's chart the circumstances of the patient's consent, and should not rely on the patient's unreliable ability to recall those circumstances. PMID:898948

  6. Factors Associated With Parental Activation in Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Pennarola, Brian W.; Rodday, Angie Mae; Mayer, Deborah K.; Ratichek, Sara J.; Davies, Stella M.; Syrjala, Karen L.; Patel, Sunita; Bingen, Kristin; Kupst, Mary Jo; Schwartz, Lisa; Guinan, Eva C.; Hibbard, Judith H.; Parsons, Susan K.

    2014-01-01

    Patient activation, the extension of self-efficacy into self-management, is an essential component of effective chronic care. In pediatric populations, caregiver activation is also needed for proper disease management. This study investigates the relationships between parental activation and other characteristics of parent–child dyads (N = 198) presenting for pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Parental activation concerning their child’s health was assessed using the Parent Patient Activation Measure (Parent-PAM), a modified version of the well-validated Patient Activation Measure (PAM). Using hierarchical linear regression and following the Belsky process model for determining parenting behaviors, a multivariate model was created for parental activation on behalf of their child that showed that the parent’s age, rating of their own general health, self-activation, and duration of the child’s illness were significantly related to Parent-PAM score. Our findings characterize a potentially distinct form of activation in a parent–child cohort preparing for a demanding clinical course. PMID:22203645

  7. Feasibility trial evaluation of a physical activity and screen-viewing course for parents of 6 to 8 year-old children: Teamplay

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many children spend too much time screen-viewing (watching TV, surfing the internet and playing video games) and do not meet physical activity (PA) guidelines. Parents are important influences on children’s PA and screen-viewing (SV). There is a shortage of parent-focused interventions to change children’s PA and SV. Methods Teamplay was a two arm individualized randomized controlled feasibility trial. Participants were parents of 6–8 year old children. Intervention participants were invited to attend an eight week parenting program with each session lasting 2 hours. Children and parents wore an accelerometer for seven days and minutes of moderate-to-vigorous intensity PA (MVPA) were derived. Parents were also asked to report the average number of hours per day that both they and the target child spent watching TV. Measures were assessed at baseline (time 0) at the end of the intervention (week 8) and 2 months after the intervention had ended (week 16). Results There were 75 participants who provided consent and were randomized but 27 participants withdrew post-randomization. Children in the intervention group engaged in 2.6 fewer minutes of weekday MVPA at Time 1 but engaged in 11 more minutes of weekend MVPA. At Time 1 the intervention parents engaged in 9 more minutes of weekday MVPA and 13 more minutes of weekend MVPA. The proportion of children in the intervention group watching ≥ 2 hours per day of TV on weekend days decreased after the intervention (time 0 = 76%, time 1 = 39%, time 2 = 50%), while the control group proportion increased slightly (79%, 86% and 87%). Parental weekday TV watching decreased in both groups. In post-study interviews many mothers reported problems associated with wearing the accelerometers. In terms of a future full-scale trial, a sample of between 80 and 340 families would be needed to detect a mean difference of 10-minutes of weekend MVPA. Conclusions Teamplay is a promising parenting program

  8. Licence to be active: parental concerns and 10–11-year-old children's ability to be independently physically active

    PubMed Central

    Jago, Russell; Thompson, Janice L.; Page, Angie S.; Brockman, Rowan; Cartwright, Kim; Fox, Kenneth R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Physical activity independent of adult supervision is an important component of youth physical activity. This study examined parental attitudes to independent activity, factors that limit licence to be independently active and parental strategies to facilitate independent activity. Methods In-depth phone interviews were conducted with 24 parents (4 males) of 10–11-year-old children recruited from six primary schools in Bristol. Results Parents perceived that a lack of appropriate spaces in which to be active, safety, traffic, the proximity of friends and older children affected children's ability to be independently physically active. The final year of primary school was perceived as a period when children should be afforded increased licence. Parents managed physical activity licence by placing time limits on activity, restricting activity to close to home, only allowing activity in groups or under adult supervision. Conclusions Strategies are needed to build children's licence to be independently active; this could be achieved by developing parental self-efficacy to allow children to be active and developing structures such as safe routes to parks and safer play areas. Future programmes could make use of traffic-calming programmes as catalysts for safe independent physical activity. PMID:19505927

  9. Qualitative Iranian study of parents' roles in adolescent girls' physical activity habit development.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Seyyed Vahide; Anoosheh, Monireh; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Ehsani, Mohammad

    2013-06-01

    Parents are likely to be key influences on children's physical activity behaviors, although it is not clear how. This study was designed to explore parents' roles in Iranian adolescent girls' physical activity habit development. A qualitative study was conducted by means of semistructured one-to-one interviews with 25 participants, including 16 adolescent girls (10-19 years of age), seven mothers, and two fathers. Content analysis was applied. Two main themes emerged as parental role in adolescent girls' physical activity behavior: developing interest in physical activity (making children familiar with physical activity, discovering talents, and role modeling) and providing support to adolescents for physical activity (material and immaterial). This study provided a better understanding of how Iranian parents influence their children's physical activity behavior. This will enable nurses to design more effective family-based interventions. PMID:23302074

  10. Parents’ views on child physical activity and their implications for physical activity parenting interventions: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Establishing healthy physical activity (PA) behaviours in early childhood is important for future PA behaviours. Parents play a central role in young children’s PA. However, there is currently little research on parenting interventions to increase child PA. This study was formative work to inform the content of a pilot randomised-controlled trial. Methods In-depth telephone interviews were carried out with 32 parents of 6 to 8 year old children residing in two areas that varied in their socio-economic characteristics, in Bristol, UK. Data were analysed thematically using a framework approach. Results Most parents described their child as being active or very active and indicated that they did not perceive a need for an increase in their child’s PA. Parents used a variety of visual cues to make this judgement, the most common being that they perceived their child as having lots of energy or that they did not view them as overweight. Parents reported environmental factors such as monetary cost, time constraints, lack of activity provision and poor weather as the main barriers to their child’s PA. Parental support and child’s enjoyment of PA appeared to be important facilitators to children participating in PA. Conclusion Improving parents’ knowledge of the PA recommendations for children, and increasing their awareness of the benefits of PA beyond weight status may be an important first step for a parenting PA intervention. Although parents commonly perceive environmental factors as the main barriers to their child’s PA, parental concern about low levels of child PA, their capacity to support behaviour change, child motivation, self confidence and independence may be key areas to address within an intervention to increase child PA. Effective methods of helping parents address the latter have been developed in the context of generic parenting programmes. PMID:23167910

  11. Parental Youth Assets and Sexual Activity: Differences by Race/Ethnicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolma, Eleni L.; Oman, Roy F.; Vesely, Sara K.; Aspy, Cheryl B.; Beebe, Laura; Fluhr, Janene

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To examine how the relationship between parental-related youth assets and youth sexual activity differed by race/ethnicity. Methods: A random sample of 976 youth and their parents living in a Midwestern city participated in the study. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted for 3 major ethnic groups controlling for the…

  12. American, Chinese, and Japanese Students' Acceptance of Their Parents' Values about Academic and Social Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chuansheng

    This study investigates cross-cultural differences in students' acceptance of their parents' values about education and social activities. It also examines the relation between acceptance of values and such factors as type of values, knowledge of parental values, mathematics achievement, and psychological well-being. Participants were over 3,000…

  13. Parent Perceptions of Factors Influencing After-School Physical Activity of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obrusnikova, Iva; Miccinello, Dannielle L.

    2012-01-01

    The study assessed parental perceptions of the benefits of physical activity (PA) and the factors that influence participation of children with autism spectrum disorders in PA after school. Data were collected from 103 parents using an online open-ended questionnaire and focus-group interviews. Data were analyzed using a socioecological model.…

  14. Positive Activities: Qualitative Research with Parents. Solutions Research. Research Report. DCSF-RR142

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department for Children, Schools and Families, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This research was commissioned by COI and DCSF to understand in depth, the barriers, motivators and messages for parents to encourage participation in positive activities for young people. Within this the research was designed to understand the level of influence of parents in whether a young person participates/what a young person might…

  15. Parents' and Children's Perceptions of the Keep It Moving! After-School Physical Activity Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrens, Timothy K.; Wegner, Rebekah L.; Miller, Daniel J.; Liebert, Mina L.; Smith, Jennifer Howard

    2015-01-01

    After-school PA programs have been used as an outlet to help children increase PA levels. To attract children and their parents, it is important to understand perceptions about programs. With child and parent input, researchers and practitioners will better be able to increase PA with activities the children enjoy and encourage increased PA. A…

  16. A Networking Guide on Teenage Pregnancy & Parenting in Maryland. Local Activities and Contact People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Interdepartmental Committee on Teenage Pregnancy and Parenting in Maryland, Baltimore.

    This networking guide is intended to encourage public agencies and the private sector throughout Maryland to share information, concerns, and strategies with one another regarding teenage pregnancy and parenting. The first section, a summary of local-level activities regarding teenage pregnancy and parenting, emphasizes efforts undertaken in…

  17. A Qualitative Study of Parental Modeling and Social Support for Physical Activity in Underserved Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Marcie S.; Wilson, Dawn K.; Griffin, Sarah; Evans, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    This study obtained qualitative data to assess how parental role modeling and parental social support influence physical activity in underserved (minority, low-income) adolescents. Fifty-two adolescents (22 males, 30 females; ages 10-14 years, 85% African-American) participated in a focus group (6-10 per group, same gender). Focus groups were…

  18. Are Adolescents Talking with Their Parents about Sex before Becoming Sexually Active? Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leuschner, Kristin

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines parent-child discussions of sexual behavior. It finds consistency in the timing and content of such discussions; however, many parents and children do not discuss key topics, such as birth control, before adolescents become sexually active. [This fact sheet is based on Megan K. Beckett, Marc N. Elliott, Steven Martino, David E.…

  19. Parental History of Myopia, Sports and Outdoor Activities, and Future Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Lisa A.; Sinnott, Loraine T.; Mutti, Donald O.; Mitchell, Gladys L.; Moeschberger, Melvin L.; Zadnik, Karla

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE To identify whether parental history of myopia and/or parent-reported children’s visual activity levels can predict juvenile-onset myopia. METHODS Survey-based data from Orinda Longitudinal Study of Myopia subjects from 1989 to 2001 were used to predict future myopia. Univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed, and receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves were generated. Differences among the areas under the ROC curves were compared using the method of multiple comparison with the best. RESULTS Of the 514 children eligible for this analysis, 111 (21.6%) became myopic. Differences in the third grade between eventual myopes and nonmyopes were seen for the number of myopic parents (P < 0.001) and for the number of sports and outdoor activity hours per week (11.65 ± 6.97 hours for nonmyopes vs. 7.98 ± 6.54 hours for future myopes, P < 0.001). Analysis of the areas under the ROC curves showed three variables with a predictive value better than chance: the number of myopic parents, the number of sports and outdoor activity hours per week, and the number of reading hours per week. After controlling for sports and outdoor hours per week and parental myopia history, reading hours per week was no longer a statistically significant factor. The area under the curve for the parental myopia history and sports and outdoor activities model was 0.73. A significant interaction in the logistic model showed a differential effect of sport and outdoor activity hours per week based on a child’s number of myopic parents. CONCLUSIONS Parental history of myopia was an important predictor in univariate and multivariate models, with a differential effect of sports and outdoor activity hours per week based on the number of myopic parents. Lower amounts of sports and outdoor activity increased the odds of becoming myopic in those children with two myopic parents more than in those children with either zero or one myopic parent. The chance of becoming

  20. Locations of Joint Physical Activity in Parent-Child Pairs Based on Accelerometer and GPS Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Dunton, Genevieve Fridlund; Liao, Yue; Almanza, Estela; Jerrett, Micheal; Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Pentz, Mary Ann

    2012-01-01

    Background Parental factors may play an important role in influencing children’s physical activity levels. Purpose This cross-sectional study sought to describe the locations of joint physical activity among parents and children. Methods Parent-child pairs (N = 291) wore an Actigraph GT2M accelerometer and GlobalSat BT-335 Global Positioning Systems (GPS) device over the same 7-day period. Children were ages 8–14 years. Joint behavior was defined by a linear separation distance of less than 50m between parent and child. Land use classifications were assigned to GPS data points. Results Joint physical activity was spread across residential locations (35%), and commercial venues (24%), and open spaces/parks (20%). Obese children and parents performed less joint physical activity in open spaces/parks than under/normal weight children and parents (p’s < .01). Conclusions Understanding where joint parent-child physical activity naturally occurs may inform location-based interventions to promote these behaviors. PMID:23011914

  1. Measuring Parental Support for Children’s Physical Activity in White and African American Parents: The Activity Support Scale for Multiple Groups (ACTS-MG)

    PubMed Central

    Davison, Kirsten K.; Li, Kaigang; Baskin, Monica L.; Cox, Tiffany; Affuso, Olivia

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The Activity Support Scale (ACTS) was expanded for use with African American families. Its factorial invariance and internal reliability were examined for non-Hispanic white and African American parents. Methods The ACTS was modified to improve its applicability to African American families based on information from five focus groups with 27 African American parents of elementary school-aged children. Between 2006 and 2008, the revised scale was administered to 119 African American and 117 non-Hispanic white parents in northeastern NY and Alabama. Its factorial invariance across race/ethnicity and internal consistency were examined. Results Factor analysis of the revised scale, the Activity Support Scale for Multiple Groups (ACTS-MG), identified four parenting factors in white and African American parents including logistic support, modeling, use of community resources to promote physical activity (PA), and restriction of sedentary behaviors. Results supported the scale’s internal reliability and factorial invariance across race/ethnicity. Conclusion The ACTS-MG is appropriate for use with non-Hispanic white and African American families and will enable the extension of current research with white families to the examination of strategies supporting PA in African American families. Additional psychometric work with the ACTS-MG is encouraged. PMID:21111755

  2. Parent Self-Efficacy as an Influencing Factor in Parent Participation in Homework Activities: Perceptions of Head Start Parents and Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivas, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to explore the perceptions of parents and educators toward the role parents assumed in supporting preschool children academically, and to assess parents' self-efficacy and its influence on parental involvement in preschoolers' homework tasks. A further purpose was to compare parents' perceived self-efficacy…

  3. Developing Active Readers: Ideas for Parents, Teachers, and Librarians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monson, Dianne L., Ed.; McClenathan, DayAnn K., Ed.

    Developed by the International Reading Association Library Resources and Reading Committee, this book is designed to help parents, teachers, and librarians provide children with books and reading experiences that will make reading a lifetime habit. Part One, "The Right Book for Each Child: Book Selection and Library Use," contains the following…

  4. Parenting Stress After Deployment in Navy Active Duty Fathers.

    PubMed

    Yablonsky, Abigail M; Yan, Guofen; Bullock, Linda

    2016-08-01

    Military fathers are being deployed, and leaving their families, for greater lengths of time and more frequently than ever before. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of recent deployment on parenting stress in U.S. Navy fathers with young children. Of the 111 participants who completed the one-time study questionnaire at a large military outpatient clinic on the Eastern seaboard, 67.6% had returned from a ship-based deployment. Regression analyses were performed, using the Parenting Stress Index as the outcome variable, deployment elements (such as time away from home in the past 5 years) as predictors, and adjusting for other factors such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. Higher perceived threat and greater warfare exposure were both associated with increased parenting stress (p < 0.05) in the unadjusted model. These associations were greatly attenuated and no longer significant after adjustment for depression. In addition, rates of positive screens for PTSD and depression (17.1%) in this sample were higher than in other recent studies. In summary, these data indicate that various deployment factors are associated with increased parenting stress in Navy fathers back from deployment within the past year; these relationships are largely explained by depressive symptoms. Clinical implications are discussed. PMID:27483524

  5. Providing Minority Parents with Relevant Literacy Activities for Their Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliam, Brenda; Gerla, Jacqueline Parten; Wright, Gary

    2004-01-01

    Since relevant research indicates that immersion in a literate environment is critical to academic success, the authors of this study designed a program, Project ROAR (Reach Out and Read), in cooperation with a predominately Hispanic elementary school. Project ROAR was planned to help interested parents of kindergarten children learn in-home…

  6. Parental influences on child physical activity and screen viewing time: a population based study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Parents can influence their children's physical activity participation and screen time.This study examined the relative significance of perceived parental barriers and self-efficacy in relation to children's physical activity participation and screen time viewing. The associations between these factors and the behaviours were analysed. Methods Cross-sectional population survey in New South Wales, Australia of parents of pre-school (N = 764), younger (Kindergarten, Grades 2 and 4; N = 1557) and older children (Grades 6, 8 and 10; N = 1665). Parents reported barriers and self-efficacy to influence their child's physical activity and screen time behaviours in a range of circumstances. Differences were examined by child's sex and age group, household income, maternal education and location of residence. The duration of physical activity and screen viewing was measured by parental report for pre-school and younger children and self-report for older children. Associations between parental factors and children's organised, non-organised and total activity and screen time were analysed. Results Cost, lack of opportunities for participation and transport problems were the barriers most often reported, particularly by low income parents and those in rural areas. The number of barriers was inversely related to children's time spent in organised activity, but not their non-organised activity. Higher parental self-efficacy was positively associated with organised physical activity in the younger and older children's groups and the non-organised activity of older children. School-age children (younger and older groups) were less likely to meet physical activity guidelines when parents reported ≥4 barriers (OR 3.76, 95% CI 1.25-11.34 and OR 3.72, 95% CI 1.71-8.11 respectively). Low parental self-efficacy was also associated with the likelihood of children exceeding screen time guidelines for each age group (pre-school OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.43-0.87; young children OR 0

  7. Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between parenting style and adolescent girls’ physical activity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Understanding the influences on physical activity is crucial, particularly among important target groups such as adolescent girls. This study describes cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between parenting style and girls’ participation in organized sport, walking/cycling trips and objectively assessed moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Methods Data were collected from adolescent girls (n=222) and their parents in 2004 and again in 2006. Parents self-reported their demographic characteristics and parenting style. Girls self-reported their organized sport participation and weekly walking/cycling trips, while MVPA was assessed using accelerometers. Linear regression and interaction analyses were performed. Interactions between socio-demographic factors and parenting style with organized sport, walking/cycling trips and MVPA are presented. Results There were cross-sectional associations between authoritative (B=−0.45, p=0.042) and indulgent (B=−0.56, p=0.002) parenting and the number of walking/cycling trips, and authoritarian (B=0.27, p=0.033) parenting and frequency of organized sport. Significant interactions included those between: family status, authoritative parenting and daily (p=0.048) and week day (p=0.013) MVPA; education, indulgent parenting and MVPA on weekend days (p=0.006); and, employment, authoritarian parenting and duration and frequency of organized sport (p=0.004), highlighting the complexity of these relationships. Longitudinal analyses revealed significant decreases in organized sport and MVPA, significant increases in walking/cycling trips and no significant associations between parenting and physical activity. Conclusion Parenting styles appear to influence walking and cycling trips among adolescent girls, though not physical activity within other domains. Socio-demographic characteristics interact with the relationships between parenting and physical activity. While these findings can inform the

  8. Informed Consent for Intrusive Behavioral Treatments: Behavioral Treatment and Review System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irvin, Larry K.; Singer, George S.

    Informed consent is required from a child's parent or guardian before use of some types of behavior modification for severe behavior problems, such as tantrums, self-abuse, aggression, stealing, destruction of property, etc. Behavior modification procedures that produce physical or psychological discomfort or pain require informed consent because…

  9. Longitudinal relationships of executive cognitive function and parent influence to child substance use and physical activity.

    PubMed

    Pentz, Mary Ann; Riggs, Nathaniel R

    2013-06-01

    Considered a set of neuro-cognitive skills, executive cognitive function (ECF) may serve to protect children from initiating substance use, although its role relative to other protective influences that parents and physical activity might provide is not known. As part of a large multiple health risk behavior trial for prevention of substance use and obesity, Pathways, the present study evaluated the relative impact of ECF on lifetime substance use (tobacco and alcohol) and physical activity in a panel of fourth grade children over a 6-month period (N = 1005; 51 % female; 25 % on free/reduced lunch; 60 % Hispanic/Latino or multi-racial; 28 elementary schools). A self-report survey included measures of ECF, lifetime tobacco and alcohol use, out-of-school physical activity, exercising with parents, and parent rules about food/sedentary behavior, monitoring, and arguing, was adapted for use with children. A path analysis demonstrated that ECF was the major predictor of lower substance use and higher physical activity and exercising with parents. Physical activity and exercising with parents showed reciprocal positive relationships. Findings suggest that promoting ECF skills should be a major focus of child health promotion and substance use prevention programs, although the potential protective effects of physical activity and exercise with parents on substance use in this young age group are not yet clear. PMID:23345012

  10. School travel mode, parenting practices and physical activity among UK Year 5 and 6 children

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background School travel mode and parenting practices have been associated with children’s physical activity (PA). The current study sought to examine whether PA parenting practices differ by school travel mode and whether school travel mode and PA parenting practices are associated with PA. Methods 469 children (aged 9-11) wore accelerometers from which mean weekday and after-school (3.30 to 8.30 pm) minutes of moderate-to-vigorous intensity PA (MVPA) and counts per minute (CPM) were derived. Mode of travel to and from school (passive vs. active) and PA parenting practices (maternal and paternal logistic support and modelling behaviour) were child-reported. Results Children engaged in an average of 59.7 minutes of MVPA per weekday. Active travel to school by girls was associated with 5.9 more minutes of MVPA per day compared with those who travelled to school passively (p = 0.004). After-school CPM and MVPA did not differ by school travel mode. There was no evidence that physical activity parenting practices were associated with school travel mode. Conclusions For girls, encouraging active travel to school is likely to be important for overall PA. Further formative research may be warranted to understand how both parental logistic support and active travel decisions are operationalized in families as a means of understanding how to promote increased PA among pre-adolescent children. PMID:24739338

  11. Clustering of diet- and activity-related parenting practices: cross-sectional findings of the INPACT study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Various diet- and activity-related parenting practices are positive determinants of child dietary and activity behaviour, including home availability, parental modelling and parental policies. There is evidence that parenting practices cluster within the dietary domain and within the activity domain. This study explores whether diet- and activity-related parenting practices cluster across the dietary and activity domain. Also examined is whether the clusters are related to child and parental background characteristics. Finally, to indicate the relevance of the clusters in influencing child dietary and activity behaviour, we examined whether clusters of parenting practices are related to these behaviours. Methods Data were used from 1480 parent–child dyads participating in the Dutch IVO Nutrition and Physical Activity Child cohorT (INPACT). Parents of children aged 8–11 years completed questionnaires at home assessing their diet- and activity-related parenting practices, child and parental background characteristics, and child dietary and activity behaviours. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to identify clusters of parenting practices. Backward regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between child and parental background characteristics with cluster scores, and partial correlations to examine associations between cluster scores and child dietary and activity behaviours. Results PCA revealed five clusters of parenting practices: 1) high visibility and accessibility of screens and unhealthy food, 2) diet- and activity-related rules, 3) low availability of unhealthy food, 4) diet- and activity-related positive modelling, and 5) positive modelling on sports and fruit. Low parental education was associated with unhealthy cluster 1, while high(er) education was associated with healthy clusters 2, 3 and 5. Separate clusters were related to both child dietary and activity behaviour in the hypothesized directions: healthy clusters

  12. Associations among social capital, parenting for active lifestyles, and youth physical activity in rural families living in upstate New York.

    PubMed

    Davison, Kirsten K; Nishi, Akihiro; Kranz, Sibylle; Wyckoff, Lynae; May, John J; Earle-Richardson, Giulia B; Strogatz, David S; Jenkins, Paul L

    2012-10-01

    While emerging research supports a positive relationship between social capital and youth physical activity (PA), few studies have examined possible mechanisms explaining this relationship and no studies have focused on rural youth. In this study, we examined parents' support of children's PA as an intermediary factor linking social capital and youth PA in a largely rural cross sectional sample of American children aged 6- to 19-years and their parents/guardians (N=767 families) living in upstate New York. Parents completed a self-administered survey assessing demographic factors, perceived social capital, support for children's PA, and children's PA including time spent outdoors and days per week of sufficient PA. Structural equation modeling was used to test the hypothesis that higher social capital is linked with higher parental support for PA and, in turn, higher PA in children. Analyses were conducted separately for younger (6-12 years) and older (13-19 years) children and controlled for demographic factors (child age, household education, participation in a food assistance program) and perceived neighborhood safety. Anticipated relationships among social capital, parents' activity-related support, and children's PA were identified for older, but not younger children. Findings suggest that parent support for children's PA is one possible mechanism linking social capital and youth PA and the parents of adolescents may rely more heavily on cues from their social environment to shape their approaches to supporting their children's PA than parents of younger children. PMID:22818486

  13. Making Meaning of Everyday Practices: Parents' Attitudes toward Children's Extracurricular Activities in the United States and in Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kremer-Sadlik, Tamar; Izquierdo, Carolina; Fatigante, Marilena

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on children's engagement in extracurricular activities from the perspective of middle-class parents in Rome, Italy, and Los Angeles, California. Analysis of parents' accounts captured in interviews and ethnographic fieldwork reveals that both sets of parents perceive activities as important for children's success. Yet Roman…

  14. Parents' beliefs and intentions toward supporting physical activity participation for their children with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Mihye; Kim, So Yeun; Lee, Eunkyung; Lee, Euikyung

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine validity and reliability evidence of a questionnaire regarding parents' beliefs and intentions toward supporting physical activity (PA) participation of their children with disabilities (CWD). A total of 220 parents of CWD in South Korea completed a questionnaire that was developed using the theory of planned behavior (TPB). Exploratory factor analysis revealed that behavioral, control, and normative beliefs accounted for 31.13%, 20.45%, and 19.63% of the total variance of the intention, respectively. Reliability of entire scale was .85 using Cronbach's alpha. Reliabilities of the 3 beliefs were .86, .82, and .87, respectively. Standard multiple-regression analysis indicated that behavioral and normative beliefs significantly predicted parents' intention, p < .01. Intention was a significant predictor of parents' behavior, p < .01. The results of this study indicated that the TPB can be useful to examine parental support for PA participation of their CWD. PMID:25799591

  15. Disclosure to parents about everyday activities among american adolescents from mexican, chinese, and European backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Yau, Jenny P; Tasopoulos-Chan, Marina; Smetana, Judith G

    2009-01-01

    Disclosure to parents and reasons for not disclosing different activities were examined in 489 Chinese, Mexican, and European American adolescents (M = 16.37 years, SD = 0.77). With generational status controlled, Chinese American adolescents disclosed less to mothers about personal and multifaceted activities than European Americans and less about personal feelings than other youth, primarily because these acts were considered personal, not harmful, or because parents would not listen or understand. Disclosure regarding prudential behavior was lower among Mexican American than among European American adolescents, primarily due to concerns with parental disapproval. Multigroup path analyses indicated that greater closeness to parents is associated with more disclosure for all youth and activities; associations between family obligation and disclosure varied by domain and ethnicity. PMID:19765013

  16. Parental physical activity, safety perceptions and children’s independent mobility

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Parents are likely to be a basic influence on their children's behavior. There is an absence of information about the associations between parents' physical activity and perception of neighborhood environment with children’s independent mobility. The purpose of this study is to examine the contribution of parental physical activity and perception of neighborhood safety to children’s independent mobility. Methods In this cross-sectional study of 354 pupils and their parents, independent mobility, perceptions of neighborhood safety and physical activity were evaluated by questionnaire. Categorical principal components analyses were used to determine the underlying dimensions of both independent mobility and perceptions of neighborhood safety items. Results The strongest predictor of independent mobility was the parental perception of sidewalk and street safety (ß = 0.132). Parent’s physical activity was also a significant predictor. The final model accounted for 13.0% of the variance. Conclusions Parental perception of neighborhood safety and parents’ self reported physical activity might be associated with children’s independent mobility. Further research in this topic is needed to explore this possible association. PMID:23767778

  17. 78 FR 27243 - Proposed Collection; 60-Day Comment Request: Interactive Informed Consent for Pediatric Clinical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-09

    ... parents' and children's understanding of information about a hypothetical clinical trial presented using... Informed Consent for Pediatric Clinical Trials SUMMARY: In compliance with the requirement of Section 3506... information on the proposed project, contact: Ms. Victoria Pemberton, Clinical Trials Specialist,...

  18. Nuclear fear and children: the impact of parental nuclear activism, responsivity, and fear

    SciTech Connect

    LaGuardia, M.R.

    1986-01-01

    This study examines the extent to which parental nuclear fear, parental activism, and parental responsivity is associated with children's (age 10) nuclear fear. Other associated variables investigated include: nuclear denial, general anxiety and fear, and the personal characteristics of sex, socio-economic status, and academic aptitude. Findings indicate that children attend to nuclear issues when their parents attend to a significant degree. Children's hopelessness about the arms race is increased as parents' worry about nuclear war increases. Children's fear about not surviving a nuclear war increases as parents' worry about survivability decreases. Children who have more general fears also indicated that they have a high level of hopelessness, pervasive worry, and much concern about being able to survive a nuclear war. Children with a high degree of general anxiety did not indicate high degrees of nuclear fears. Children with high academic aptitude were more knowledgeable about nuclear issues and expressed more fears about the nuclear threat. Boys demonstrated more knowledge about nuclear issues than girls, and girls expressed much more frequent fear and worry about the nuclear threat than boys. Parents of lower socio-economic statues (SES) expressed more denial about the nuclear threat and were more pro-military than the higher SES parents.

  19. Ethical Issues Regarding Informed Consent for Minors for Space Tourism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Melvin S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the difficulty with informed consent and debates whether or not whether adults should be able to ethically, morally, and legally consent for their children during the high-risk activity of space tourism. The experimental nature of space vehicles combined with the high likelihood of medical complications and the destination places space tourism legally in the category of "adventure activities," which include adventure travel to exotic locations as well as adventure sports, such as mountain climbing, rafting, etc. which carry a high risk of danger (http://rescommunis.wordpress.com/2008/02/14/interview-tracey-l-knutson-adventure-sports-defense-attorney-on-space-tourism-risk-and-informed-consente/). However, unlike other adventure sports, adults currently cannot consent for their minor children. Other topics also receive attention, such as a "mature minors" clause, radiation exposure of potential future children, and other difficulties preventing adults from legally consenting to space travel.

  20. Are Parental Perceptions of Child Activity Levels and Overall Health More Important than Perceptions of Weight?

    PubMed Central

    Vangeepuram, Nita; Ramos, Michelle A.; Fei, Kezhen; Fox, Ashley M.; Horowitz, Carol R.; Kleinman, Lawrence C.; Galvez, Maida P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine relationships between parental perceptions of child weight and overall health, reported lifestyle behaviors and measured body mass index (BMI). Methods Using community-partnered methods, we surveyed families residing in a two census tract area identified for targeted interventions to decrease diabetes related disparities. The survey included demographics, child dietary and physical activity behaviors, and parental perception of child’s health and weight. We measured child BMI using a standardized protocol. Results We surveyed parents of 116 children with a mean age of 7 years (range 3–15) with 51 % boys, 74 % Hispanic, and 26 % Black. Over half of the children (55 %) were overweight or obese. Half (50 %) of the parents underestimated their children’s weight. Reported daily hours of walking and/or running trended higher (3.6 vs. 2.6 h, p = 0.08) for children perceived to be of normal weight. Parents who correctly estimated their child’s weight status reported more hours of daily walking/running than parents who underestimated child weight status, 4.5 versus 2.4 h, p = 0.0002. Parents of healthy weight children were more likely to report that children were in excellent or very good health compared to parents of overweight/obese children, 75 versus 56 % respectively (p = 0.04). We found significant racial/ethnic differences in reported diet and physical activity behaviors and perception of overall health. Conclusions for Practice Parental perceptions of child health and physical activity level may be related to perceptions of their child’s weight status. Study findings informed community-based initiatives for reducing diabetes risk among children. PMID:27010551

  1. Are Parental Perceptions of Child Activity Levels and Overall Health More Important than Perceptions of Weight?

    PubMed

    Vangeepuram, Nita; Ramos, Michelle A; Fei, Kezhen; Fox, Ashley M; Horowitz, Carol R; Kleinman, Lawrence C; Galvez, Maida P

    2016-07-01

    Objectives To examine relationships between parental perceptions of child weight and overall health, reported lifestyle behaviors and measured body mass index (BMI). Methods Using community-partnered methods, we surveyed families residing in a two census tract area identified for targeted interventions to decrease diabetes related disparities. The survey included demographics, child dietary and physical activity behaviors, and parental perception of child's health and weight. We measured child BMI using a standardized protocol. Results We surveyed parents of 116 children with a mean age of 7 years (range 3-15) with 51 % boys, 74 % Hispanic, and 26 % Black. Over half of the children (55 %) were overweight or obese. Half (50 %) of the parents underestimated their children's weight. Reported daily hours of walking and/or running trended higher (3.6 vs. 2.6 h, p = 0.08) for children perceived to be of normal weight. Parents who correctly estimated their child's weight status reported more hours of daily walking/running than parents who underestimated child weight status, 4.5 versus 2.4 h, p = 0.0002. Parents of healthy weight children were more likely to report that children were in excellent or very good health compared to parents of overweight/obese children, 75 versus 56 % respectively (p = 0.04). We found significant racial/ethnic differences in reported diet and physical activity behaviors and perception of overall health. Conclusions for Practice Parental perceptions of child health and physical activity level may be related to perceptions of their child's weight status. Study findings informed community-based initiatives for reducing diabetes risk among children. PMID:27010551

  2. Living with the Active Alert Child: Groundbreaking Strategies for Parents. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budd, Linda S.

    Bright, controlling, fearful, and highly energetic, active alert children are frequently misdiagnosed as hyperactive or learning disabled. This book offers guidance for the special challenge of parenting the active alert infant, child, and adolescent. Part 1 of the book profiles the active alert child and examines 11 traits that characterize…

  3. A Calendar of Activities for Parents of Handicapped Students, 1983-1984. Developmentally Young.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    District of Columbia Public Schools, Washington, DC. Div. of Special Education and Pupil Personnel Services.

    These activities for handicapped preschool children in the Washington, D.C. school district can be used by all parents interested in developing a structured home development program for their children. A calendar format offers daily activities ranging from brief discussions and exercises to day-long family excursions. Each month's activities cover…

  4. A Calendar of Activities for Parents of Handicapped Students, 1983-1984. Early Stimulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    District of Columbia Public Schools, Washington, DC. Div. of Special Education and Pupil Personnel Services.

    Developed by the Washington, D.C. public schools, these activities for handicapped infants and toddlers can be used by all parents interested in establishing a structured home development program for their children. A calendar format outlines daily activities ranging from 10-minute exercises to longer excursions. Each month's activities focus on…

  5. How Are Transition-to-Kindergarten Activities Associated with Parent Involvement during Kindergarten?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathbun, Amy H.; Hausken, Elvira Germino

    This study identified the types of transition activities practiced by kindergarten teachers/schools around the country, the relation of various school characteristics to transition activities, and the relation between transition activities and parent involvement during kindergarten. The study sample was comprised of 2,826 public school and 417…

  6. Parental Involvement in Active Transport to School Initiatives: A Multi-Site Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyler, Amy; Baldwin, Julie; Carnoske, Cheryl; Nickelson, Jan; Troped, Philip; Steinman, Lesley; Pluto, Delores; Litt, Jill; Evenson, Kelly; Terpstra, Jennifer; Brownson, Ross; Schmid, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Background: Increasing physical activity in youth is a recommended approach to curbing the childhood obesity epidemic. One way to help increase children's daily activity is to promote active transportation to and from school (ATS). Purpose: The purpose of this case study was to explore parental perception of, and participation in, ATS initiatives.…

  7. Environmental and cultural correlates of physical activity parenting practices among Latino parents with preschool-aged children: Niños Activos

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Latino children are at high risk of becoming obese. Physical activity (PA) can help prevent obesity. Parents can influence children’s PA through parenting practices. This study aimed to examine the independent contributions of (1) sociodemographic, (2) cultural, (3) parent perceived environmental, and (4) objectively measured environmental factors, to PA parenting practices. Methods A cross-sectional sample of Latino parents (n = 240) from Harris County, TX in 2011–2012 completed validated questionnaires to assess PA parenting practices, acculturation, familism, perception of their neighborhood environment, and demographics. Home addresses were mapped and linked to Census block-level crime and traffic data. Distance to the closest park was mapped by GIS. Regression models were built in a hierarchical step-wise fashion. Results Combined models showed R2 of 6.8% to 38.9% for different parenting practices. Significant correlations included sociodemographic variables with having outdoor toys available, psychological control, and promotion of inactivity. Cultural factors correlated with PA safety concern practices. Perceived environmental attributes correlated with five of seven parenting practices, while objectively-measured environmental attributes did not significantly correlate with PA parenting practices. Conclusion Interventions promoting PA among Latino preschoolers may need to address the social-ecological context in which families live to effectively promote PA parenting, especially parents’ perceptions of neighborhoods. PMID:25011669

  8. Healthy Children, Healthy Families: Parents Making a Difference! A Curriculum Integrating Key Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Parenting Practices to Help Prevent Childhood Obesity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lent, Megan; Hill, Tisa F.; Dollahite, Jamie S.; Wolfe, Wendy S.; Dickin, Katherine L.

    2012-01-01

    A new dialogue-based curriculum combines nutrition, active play and parenting practices to help parents and caregivers gain skills that promote healthy habits for themselves and their families and to create healthy environments where children live, learn, and play. Graduates report significant improvements in behaviors that promote healthy weights…

  9. [Recreational activities for parents of risk babies: experience at the Clinics Hospital of Ribeirao Preto].

    PubMed

    Brunherotti, M R; Pereira, F L; de Souza, M I; Nogueira, F S; Scochi, C G

    2000-01-01

    The nursing team at the University of São Paulo Hospital has implemented actions directed to parents, such as support groups, training for hospital discharge and their involvement in the progressive care to their children. Aiming at expanding such care, the authors have implemented a support program involving ludic and recreational activities with the parents of hospitalized preterm babies under risk. The account of this experience is the object of this work. The interventions were performed by a group of nursing students who gather with the parents weekly for a period of two hours and develop group-dynamics techniques; leisure activities; creativity workshops involving manual work and discussions on themes concerning personal and environmental hygiene. Through these new care strategies directed to parents, the authors expect to contribute to the process of construction of more integral and humanized care in the area of neonatology by focusing on the family. PMID:12143823

  10. Understanding of informed consent in a low-income setting: three case studies from the Kenyan Coast.

    PubMed

    Molyneux, C S; Peshu, N; Marsh, K

    2004-12-01

    In our research unit on the Kenyan Coast, parents sign consent for over 4000 children to be involved in research activities every year. Children are recruited into studies ranging from purely observational research to the testing of new procedures and drugs. Thousands more community members consent verbally or in writing to the interviews and sometimes invasive procedures required in community-based research. Although every study and consent form is reviewed in advance by independent national and international committees, the views and understanding of the 'subjects' of these activities had not been documented before this study. In this paper, we focus on participant understanding of one field-based and two hospital-based studies, all of which involve blood sampling. The findings highlight a range of inter-related issues for consideration in the study setting and beyond, including conceptual and linguistic barriers to communicating effectively about research, the critical and complex role of communicators (fieldworkers and nurses) in consent procedures, features of research unit-community relations which impact on these processes, and the special sensitivity of certain issues such as blood sampling. These themes and emerging recommendations are expected to be relevant to, and would benefit from, experiences and insights of researchers working elsewhere. PMID:15474208

  11. Children's activities and their meanings for parents: a mixed-methods study in six Western cultures.

    PubMed

    Harkness, Sara; Zylicz, Piotr Olaf; Super, Charles M; Welles-Nyström, Barbara; Bermúdez, Moisés Ríos; Bonichini, Sabrina; Moscardino, Ughetta; Mavridis, Caroline Johnston

    2011-12-01

    Theoretical perspectives and research in sociology, anthropology, sociolinguistics, and cultural psychology converge in recognizing the significance of children's time spent in various activities, especially in the family context. Knowing how children's time is deployed, however, only gives us a partial answer to how children acquire competence; the other part must take into account the culturally constructed meanings of activities, from the perspective of those who organize and direct children's daily lives. In this article, we report on a study of children's routine daily activities and on the meanings that parents attribute to them in six Western middle-class cultural communities located in Italy, The Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Sweden, and the United States (N = 183). Using week-long time diaries kept by parents, we first demonstrate similarities as well as significant differences in children's daily routines across the cultural samples. We then present brief vignettes--"a day in the life" --of children from each sample. Parent interviews were coded for themes in the meanings attributed to various activities. Excerpts from parent interviews, focusing on four major activities (meals, family time, play, school- or developmentally related activities), are presented to illustrate how cultural meanings and themes are woven into parents' organization and understanding of their children's daily lives. The results of this mixed-method approach provide a more reliable and nuanced picture of children's and families' daily lives than could be derived from either method alone. PMID:22149041

  12. Engaging Urban Parents of Early Adolescents in Parenting Interventions: Home Visits vs. Group Sessions

    PubMed Central

    Finigan-Carr, Nadine M.; Copeland-Linder, Nikeea; Haynie, Denise L.; Cheng, Tina L.

    2016-01-01

    Interventions targeting parents of young children have shown effectiveness, but research is lacking about best practices for engaging parents of early adolescents. Low levels of enrollment and attendance in parenting interventions present major problems for researchers and clinicians. Effective and efficient ways to engage and collaborate with parents to strengthen parenting practices and to promote healthy development of early adolescents are needed. This exploratory mixed methods study examined the feasibility of three methods of engaging parents in positive parenting activities. Participants were parents of youth ages 11–13 enrolled in three urban, public middle schools in neighborhoods characterized by high rates of community violence. Families (N = 144) were randomized into one of three interventions: six home sessions, two home sessions followed by four group sessions, or six group sessions. The majority of parents were single, non-Hispanic, African American mothers. Urban parents of middle school students were more likely to participate in home visits than in group sessions; offering a combination did not increase participation in the group sessions. As only 34% of those who consented participated in the intervention, qualitative data were examined to explain the reasons for non-participation. PMID:27122960

  13. Informed consent for HPV vaccination: a relational approach.

    PubMed

    Gottvall, Maria; Tydén, Tanja; Larsson, Margareta; Stenhammar, Christina; Höglund, Anna T

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the relational aspects of the consent process for HPV vaccination as experienced by school nurses, based on the assumption that individuals have interests related to persons close to them, which is not necessarily to be apprehended as a restriction of autonomy; rather as a voluntary and emotionally preferred involvement of their close ones. Thirty Swedish school nurses were interviewed in five focus groups, before the school based vaccination program had started in Sweden. The empirical results were discussed in light of theories on relational autonomy. The school nurses were convinced that parental consent was needed for HPV vaccination of 11-year-old girls, but problems identified were the difficulty to judge when a young person is to be regarded as autonomous and what to do when children and parents do not agree on the decision. A solution suggested was that obtaining informed consent in school nursing is to be seen as a deliberative process, including the child, the parents and the nurse. The nurses described how they were willing strive for a dialogue with the parents and negotiate with them in the consent process. Seeing autonomy as relational might allow for a more dialogical approach towards how consent is obtained in school based vaccination programs. Through such an approach, conflicts of interests can be made visible and become possible to deal with in a negotiating dialogue. If the school nurses do not focus exclusively on accepting the individual parent's choice, but strive to engage in a process of communication and deliberation, the autonomy of the child might increase and power inequalities might be reduced. PMID:23275146

  14. Effect of Parental Migration Background on Childhood Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Body Mass Index

    PubMed Central

    Bottai, Matteo; Kull, Inger; Wickman, Magnus; Wolk, Alicja; Moradi, Tahereh

    2014-01-01

    Background. Poor nutrition, lack of physical activity, and obesity in children have important public health implications but, to date, their effects have not been studied in the growing population of children in Sweden with immigrant parents. Methods. We estimated the association between parental migration background and nutrition, physical activity, and weight in 8-year-old children born in Stockholm between 1994 and 1996 of immigrants and Swedish parents (n = 2589). Data were collected through clinical examination and questionnaires filled out by parents. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated using multivariable logistic regression. Results. Children of immigrants complied more closely with Nordic Nutrition Recommendations compared with those of Swedes (OR = 1.35, 95% CI 1.11–1.64). They had higher intake of dietary fibre, vitamins C, B6, and E, folic acid, and polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3 and omega-6) reflecting higher consumption of foods of plant origin, but lower intake of vitamins A and D, calcium, and iron reflecting lower consumption of dairy products. Children of immigrants had higher intake of sucrose reflecting higher consumption of sugar and sweets. Furthermore, these children had a higher risk of having low physical activity (OR = 1.31, 95% CI 1.06–1.62) and being overweight (OR = 1.33, 95% CI 1.06–1.65) compared with children of Swedish parents. The odds of having low physical activity and being overweight were even higher in children whose parents were both immigrants. A low level of parental education was associated with increased risk of low physical activity regardless of immigration background. Conclusions. Culturally appropriate tools to capture the diverse range of ethnic foods and other lifestyle habits are needed. Healthcare professionals should be aware of the low levels of physical activity, increased weight, and lack of consumption of some important vitamins among children of immigrants

  15. Measurement of General and Specific Approaches to Physical Activity Parenting: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Samantha; Cohen, Alysia

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Parents play a significant role in shaping youth physical activity (PA). However, interventions targeting PA parenting have been ineffective. Methodological inconsistencies related to the measurement of parental influences may be a contributing factor. The purpose of this article is to review the extant peer-reviewed literature related to the measurement of general and specific parental influences on youth PA. Methods A systematic review of studies measuring constructs of PA parenting was conducted. Computerized searches were completed using PubMed, MEDLINE, Academic Search Premier, SPORTDiscus, and PsycINFO. Reference lists of the identified articles were manually reviewed as well as the authors' personal collections. Articles were selected on the basis of strict inclusion criteria and details regarding the measurement protocols were extracted. A total of 117 articles met the inclusionary criteria. Methodological articles that evaluated the validity and reliability of PA parenting measures (n=10) were reviewed separately from parental influence articles (n=107). Results A significant percentage of studies used measures with indeterminate validity and reliability. A significant percentage of articles did not provide sample items, describe the response format, or report the possible range of scores. No studies were located that evaluated sensitivity to change. Conclusion The reporting of measurement properties and the use of valid and reliable measurement scales need to be improved considerably. PMID:23944923

  16. A comparison of the effects of child management and planned activities training in five parenting environments.

    PubMed

    Sanders, M R; Christensen, A P

    1985-03-01

    This study compared the effects of two procedures designed to enhance the extratraining effects of behavioral parent training. Twenty parents of oppositional children were randomly assigned to either a child management training condition or a combined child management plus planned activities condition. A further 10 nonproblem children and their parents served as a social validation group. Observations of both parent and child behavior were conducted in each of five home observation settings (breakfast time, kindy (kindergarten) or school exit, a structured playtime, bathtime, and bedtime). Both training procedures resulted in changes in both child oppositional and parent aversive behavior in all observation settings. In addition, desired positive parenting behaviors also improved in all settings. Treatment effects were maintained in all settings at 3-month follow-up. Comparisons between oppositional children following treatment and children in the social validation group showed that they each displayed similarly low levels of oppositional behavior in all settings. The implications of the results for facilitating generalized changes in behavioral parent training are discussed. PMID:3973246

  17. Staying in or moving away from structured activities: Explanations involving parents and peers.

    PubMed

    Persson, Andreas; Kerr, Margaret; Stattin, Håkan

    2007-01-01

    Adolescent participation in structured activities, meaning those with adult leaders, regular meetings, and skill-building activities, is related to good adjustment. Participation in unstructured, unsupervised, peer-oriented activities is related to poor adjustment. Structured activity participation is high in early adolescence and then declines, raising the question of why youths leave structured activities. The authors examined explanations involving parents and peers. They used longitudinal data from 861 youths (ages 13-17 years). Results showed that, compared with youths who stayed in structured activities, those who switched to hanging out on the streets were less likely to have peers in structured activities and had less positive feelings about the home context and more negative interactions with parents. In addition, delinquency predicted switching to hanging out in the streets and never joining structured activities in the first place. The results concerning parents support a theoretical explanation of how parents might unintentionally affect youths' leisure choices. Furthermore, the authors found some indications that positive feelings at home might protect youths who switch from structured activities to hanging out on the streets from increases in delinquency. PMID:17201519

  18. Barriers to Participation in Physical Activity Among South Sudanese Children in South Australia: Parents' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mude, William; Mwanri, Lillian

    2016-01-01

    Physical inactivity is one of the determinants of childhood obesity. Although its facilitators are well documented for the general community, limited evidence exists informing newly arrived and emerging migrant communities in Australia. To explore parents' perspectives of barriers to participation in physical activity among South Sudanese children in South Australia. Qualitative, face-to-face interviews were conducted with parents. Data were transcribed, coded, and analyzed thematically using NVivo software. Multiple and complex barriers to physical activity participation were described. Enabling and supportive programs are needed to improve physical activity participation and health outcomes of new migrants. PMID:27536934

  19. Minor Consent and Delivery of Adolescent Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Carol A.; Skiles, Martha P.; English, Abigail; Cai, Jianwen; Agans, Robert P.; Stokley, Shannon; Markowitz, Lauri; Koumans, Emilia H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To explore whether, and to what extent, minor consent influences adolescent vaccine delivery in the United States. Methods A telephone survey was completed by 263 professionals with responsibilities for adolescent health care and/or vaccination in 43 states. Measures included perceived frequency of unaccompanied minor visits and perceived likelihood of vaccine delivery to unaccompanied minors in hypothetical scenarios that varied by adolescent age, vaccine type, visit type, and clinical setting. Results Among the 76 respondents most familiar with private primary care clinics, 47.1% reported perceptions that 17-year-old patients often present without a parent/legal guardian. Among the 104 respondents most familiar with public primary care clinics, 56.7% reported that 17-year-old patients often present alone. In response to hypothetical scenarios, approximately 30% of respondents familiar with private clinics and 50% of respondents familiar with public clinics reported perceptions that unaccompanied 17-year-old adolescents would not receive influenza, Tdap, or human papillomavirus vaccines during routine check-ups because they could not provide consent. Perceived likelihood of unaccompanied minors receiving vaccines when seen for confidential services in primary care, sexually transmitted disease, and Title X/family planning clinics varied significantly by vaccine type and clinical setting. On average, respondents reported that they would support minors having the ability to self-consent for vaccines at age 14. Conclusions The inability of minors to consent for vaccines is likely one barrier to vaccination. Interventions to increase adolescent vaccination should consider strategies that increase the ability of unaccompanied minors, particularly older minors, to receive vaccines within the context of legal, ethical, and professional guidelines. PMID:24074605

  20. Young Children's Engagement and Learning Opportunities in a Cooking Activity with Parents and Older Siblings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Lauren; Vandermaas-Peeler, Maureen

    2013-01-01

    Parents teach their children through informal social interactions in a process known as guided participation (Rogoff, 1990). Although most research focuses on parent-child dyads, young children also learn from older siblings and parents through shared participation in daily activities. Utilizing a structured observational design, the authors…

  1. Children′s physical activity and screen time: qualitative comparison of views of parents of infants and preschool children

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background While parents are central to the development of behaviours in their young children, little is known about how parents view their role in shaping physical activity and screen time behaviours. Methods Using an unstructured focus group design, parental views and practices around children′s physical activity and screen time (television and computer use) were explored with eight groups of new parents (n=61; child age <12 months) and eight groups of parents with preschool-aged (3–5 year old) children (n=36) in Melbourne, Australia. Results Parents generally believed children are naturally active, which may preclude their engagement in strategies designed to increase physical activity. While parents across both age groups shared many overarching views concerning parenting for children′s physical activity and screen time behaviours, some strategies and barriers differed depending on the age of the child. While most new parents were optimistic about their ability to positively influence their child′s behaviours, many parents of preschool-aged children seemed more resigned to strategies that worked for them, even when aware such strategies may not be ideal. Conclusions Interventions aiming to increase children′s physical activity and decrease screen time may need to tailor strategies to the age group of the child and address parents′ misconceptions and barriers to optimum parenting in these domains. PMID:23270548

  2. Relationships between Parent-Teaching Activities and Emergent Literacy in Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haney, Michelle; Hill, Jacqueline

    2004-01-01

    Research indicates that both home literacy activities and direct instruction of reading skills promote reading development. The current study investigates how parent-led direct teaching activities impact emergent literacy. Preschool children (n = 47) were administered subtests from the Test of Early Reading Ability-3 and the Kaufman Survey of…

  3. Elementary School Recess: Selected Readings, Games, and Activities for Teachers and Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clements, Rhonda L., Ed.

    Based upon the principle that all children have a right to play and to experience the benefits of recess, this book assists elementary school teachers and parents in offering children in preschool through Grade 6 appropriate recess games and activities and provides a variety of readings that support the need for recess activities. The book is…

  4. It's PTA Showtime, Baby! Promoting Physical Activity among Parents and Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Tammy; Berg, Kim; Martin, Amanda Shoe; Martin, Gary; Lux, Karen

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors state, that to help children value and participate in regular physical activity, it is important that significant adults in their lives do the same. Furthermore, research has consistently shown that adults, particularly parents, influence children's participation in physical activity (e.g., Brustad, 1996; Freedson &…

  5. Psychometrics of the preschooler physical activity parenting practices instrument among a Latino sample

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Latino preschoolers (3-5 year old children) have among the highest rates of obesity. Low levels of physical activity (PA) are a risk factor for obesity. Characterizing what Latino parents do to encourage or discourage their preschooler to be physically active can help inform interventions to increas...

  6. Pro-Activeness of Parents in Accepting Behavior Management Techniques: A Cross-Sectional Evaluative Study

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jolly; Kaur, Manpreet; Trivedi, Krishna; Shah, Shalin; Virda, Mira

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The contemporary parents are more active and participate in the decision making during dental treatment. Aim To assess the parents’ acceptance towards behavior management techniques commonly used in the pediatric dentistry in different dental situation. Materials and Methods Fifty-one parents participated in the study. Children’s dental fear was assessed by the parents before attending power point presentation using Dental Subscale of the Children’s Fear Survey Schedule (CFSS-DS). Parents viewed power point presentation of eight behavior management techniques being used during pediatric dental treatment. The techniques were: 1) Voice control; 2) Tell-Show-Do; 3) Positive reinforcement; 4) Parental presence or absence; 5) HOME; 6) Physical restraint; 7) N2O-O2 sedation; 8) General anesthesia. Parents were asked to arrange various behavior management techniques from most accepted technique to least accepted technique in various dental situations according to their view. Results All the parents completed the questionnaire. Most children show increased anxiety related to dental component of CFSS-DS scale particularly during the administration of local anesthetic. In present study most preferred behavior management technique was Tell-Show-Do followed by positive reinforcement and least preferred behavior management technique was general anesthesia followed by physical restraint. Conclusion Children’s anxiety level increases during the condition related to dentistry which can be overcome by developing positive approach in children and parents towards dentistry and by utilizing various behaviour management strategies. A generalized low parental tolerance level for firm management techniques was seen in the present study population.

  7. Harsh Parenting, Parasympathetic Activity, and Development of Delinquency and Substance Use

    PubMed Central

    Hinnant, J. Benjamin; Erath, Stephen; El-Sheikh, Mona

    2014-01-01

    Stress response systems are thought to play an important role in the development of psychopathology. Additionally, family stress may have a significant influence on the development of stress response systems. One potential avenue of change is through alterations to thresholds for the activation of stress responses: Decreased threshold for responding may mark increased stress sensitivity. Our first aim was to evaluate the interaction between thresholds for parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) responding, operationalized as resting respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), and harsh parenting in the prediction of development of delinquency and adolescent substance use (resting RSA as a biomarker of risk). The second aim was to evaluate if resting RSA changes over time as a function of harsh parenting and stress reactivity indexed by RSA withdrawal (altered threshold for stress responding). Our third aim was to evaluate the moderating role of sex in these relations. We used longitudinal data from 251 children ages 8 to 16. Mother-reports of child delinquency and RSA were acquired at all ages. Adolescents self-reported substance use at age 16. Family stress was assessed with child-reported harsh parenting. Controlling for marital conflict and change over time in harsh parenting, lower resting RSA predicted increases in delinquency and increased likelihood of drug use in contexts of harsh parenting, especially for boys. Harsh parenting was associated with declining resting RSA for children who exhibited greater RSA withdrawal to stress. Findings support resting PNS activity as a moderator of developmental risk that can be altered over time. PMID:25688440

  8. Daily parental knowledge of youth activities is linked to youth physical symptoms and HPA functioning.

    PubMed

    Lippold, Melissa A; Davis, Kelly D; McHale, Susan M; Almeida, David M

    2016-03-01

    Considerable evidence documents linkages between parental knowledge of youth activities and youth risky behavior. We extended this research to determine whether parental knowledge was associated with youth physical health, including reports of physical symptoms (e.g., headaches, stomachaches) and a biomarker of hypothalamic pituitary adrenocortical (HPA) axis functioning (i.e., salivary cortisol levels). Participants were children of employees in the Information Technology division of a Fortune 500 company (N = 132, mean age youth = 13.39 years, 55% female) who participated in a daily diary study. Data were collected via telephone calls on 8 consecutive evenings. On 4 study days, cortisol samples were collected at 4 time points (waking, 30 min after waking, before dinner, bedtime). Multilevel models revealed that, at the between-person level, youth whose parents had higher average knowledge about their activities, exhibited lower bedtime cortisol levels. Furthermore, at the within-person level, on days when parents displayed more knowledge than usual (relative to their own 8-day average), youth had lower before-dinner cortisol than usual. Linkages between average parental knowledge and physical health symptoms were moderated by youth age: Younger but not older adolescents whose parents were more knowledgeable had fewer physical health symptoms, on average. A next step is to identify the processes that underlie these associations. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26751757

  9. Adolescent online gambling: the impact of parental practices and correlates with online activities.

    PubMed

    Floros, Georgios D; Siomos, Konstantinos; Fisoun, Virginia; Geroukalis, Dimitrios

    2013-03-01

    We present results from a cross-sectional study of the entire adolescent student population aged 12-19 of the island of Kos and their parents, on the relationship between their Internet gambling and respective parental practices, including aspects of psychological bonding and online security measures. The sample consisted of 2,017 students (51.8% boys, 48.2% girls). Our results indicate that gender, parenting practices as perceived by the adolescents and distinct patterns of adolescent Internet activities are among the best predictor variables for Internet gambling. Security practices exercised by the parents failed to make an impact on the extent of Internet gambling, demonstrating the need for specific measures to tackle this phenomenon since the provision of simple education on the dangers of the Internet is not sufficient to this regard. PMID:22271406

  10. Individual differences in activation of the parental care motivational system: assessment, prediction, and implications.

    PubMed

    Buckels, Erin E; Beall, Alec T; Hofer, Marlise K; Lin, Eden Y; Zhou, Zenan; Schaller, Mark

    2015-03-01

    We report on the development, validation, and utility of a measure assessing individual differences in activation of the parental care motivational system: The Parental Care and Tenderness (PCAT) questionnaire. Results from 1,608 adults (including parents and nonparents) show that the 25-item PCAT measure has high internal consistency, high test-retest reliability, high construct validity, and unique predictive utility. Among parents, it predicted self-child identity overlap and caring child-rearing attitudes; among nonparents, it predicted desire to have children. PCAT scores predicted the intensity of tender emotions aroused by infants, and also predicted the amount of time individuals chose look at infant (but not adult) faces. PCAT scores uniquely predicted additional outcomes in the realm of social perception, including mate preferences, moral judgments, and trait inferences about baby-faced adults. Practical and conceptual implications are discussed. PMID:25559194

  11. [The origin of informed consent].

    PubMed

    Mallardi, V

    2005-10-01

    The principle of informed consent, aimed at the lawfulness of health assistance, tends to reflect the concept of autonomy and of decisional autodetermination of the person requiring and requesting medical and/or surgical interventions. This legal formula, over the last few years, has gained not only considerable space but also importance in the doctrinal elaboration and approaches, as well as juridical interpretations, thereby influencing the everyday activities of the medical profession. Informed consent is still the object of continuous explorations, not only asfar as concerns the already confirmed theoretical profile but, instead, the ambiguous practical and consequential aspect. Analysing how the concept and role of consensus was born and developed with the more adequate and reasonable excursions to make it valid and obtain it, it is impossible not to take into consideration, on the one hand, the very ancient philosophical origins and, on the other, the fact that it was conditioned by religion with the moral aspects and the accelerated deontological evolution with pathways parallel to the needs and the progress offered by new forms of treatment and novel biotechnological applications. The principle of consent is a relatively new condition. In fact, already in the times of not only the Egyptian civilisation, but also the Greek and Roman, documents have been found which show how the doctor's intervention had, in some way, first to be approved by the patient. Plato (law IV) had already foreseen the problems, the procedures and the modes of information which are, in synthesis, at the root of the principles of the present formula of informed consent and correlated the practice of the information and consensus with the quality and social position of the patient. The only guarantee that the patient might have, derived from a fundamental principle of medicine of all times: "in disease, focus on two aims, to improve and not to cause damage". A figure can be recognised

  12. Informed consent: what does it mean?

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, M D

    1983-01-01

    The editorial in the September 1982 issue of this journal and many articles before and since have addressed the problem of informed consent. Is it possible? Is it a useful concept? Is there anything new to be said about it? In this article the basic rationale of the rule (patient autonomy) is explained and the extent of the rule explored. Various exceptions have been offered by the law and an attempt is made to catalogue the chief of these. A number of specially vulnerable groups are then identified, the most important, and vexed, being children. How can informed consent be secured in the case of young patients? Finally, a few problems are mentioned in an attempt to get this subject back to reality. The appeal to the principle primum non nocere may be medical paternalism in disguise. Informed consent is the competing principle that reminds us of the primacy of human autonomy. A pointer is given to the future: even the use of sound recordings to explain medical procedures and to activate informed consent so that it may become a reality and not just a lawyer's myth, should be considered. PMID:6876100

  13. 32 CFR 634.8 - Implied consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION Driving Privileges § 634.8 Implied consent. (a) Implied consent... their consent to evidential tests for alcohol or other drug content of their blood, breath, or...

  14. 32 CFR 634.8 - Implied consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION Driving Privileges § 634.8 Implied consent. (a) Implied consent... their consent to evidential tests for alcohol or other drug content of their blood, breath, or...

  15. What do parents and preschool staff tell us about young children's physical activity: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Genevieve M; Higgs, Joy; Hardy, Louise L; Baur, Louise A

    2008-01-01

    Background Physical activity and small screen recreation are two modifiable behaviours associated with childhood obesity and the development of chronic health problems. Parents and preschool staff shape behaviour habits in young children. The aims of this qualitative study were to explore the attitudes, values, knowledge and understanding of parents and carers of preschool-age children in relation to physical activity and small screen recreation and to identify influences upon these behaviours. Methods This research involved a focus group study with parents and carers of the target population. A purposive sample of 39 participants (22 parents, 17 carers) participated in 9 focus groups. Participants were drawn from three populations of interest: those from lower socioeconomic status, and Middle-Eastern and Chinese communities in the Sydney (Australia) metropolitan region. Results All participants understood the value of physical activity and the impact of excessive small screen recreation but were unfamiliar with national guidelines for these behaviours. Participants described the nature and activity patterns of young children; however, the concept of activity 'intensity' in this age group was not a meaningful term. Factors which influenced young children's physical activity behaviour included the child's personality, the physical activity facilities available, and the perceived safety of their community. Factors facilitating physical activity included a child's preference for being active, positive parent or peer modelling, access to safe play areas, organised activities, preschool programs and a sense of social connectedness. Barriers to physical activity included safety concerns exacerbated by negative media stories, time restraints, financial constraints, cultural values favouring educational achievement, and safety regulations about equipment design and use within the preschool environment. Parents considered that young children are naturally 'programmed' to be

  16. Abnormal Neural Activation to Faces in the Parents of Children with Autism.

    PubMed

    Yucel, G H; Belger, A; Bizzell, J; Parlier, M; Adolphs, R; Piven, J

    2015-12-01

    Parents of children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) show subtle deficits in aspects of social behavior and face processing, which resemble those seen in ASD, referred to as the "Broad Autism Phenotype " (BAP). While abnormal activation in ASD has been reported in several brain structures linked to social cognition, little is known regarding patterns in the BAP. We compared autism parents with control parents with no family history of ASD using 2 well-validated face-processing tasks. Results indicated increased activation in the autism parents to faces in the amygdala (AMY) and the fusiform gyrus (FG), 2 core face-processing regions. Exploratory analyses revealed hyper-activation of lateral occipital cortex (LOC) bilaterally in autism parents with aloof personality ("BAP+"). Findings suggest that abnormalities of the AMY and FG are related to underlying genetic liability for ASD, whereas abnormalities in the LOC and right FG are more specific to behavioral features of the BAP. Results extend our knowledge of neural circuitry underlying abnormal face processing beyond those previously reported in ASD to individuals with shared genetic liability for autism and a subset of genetically related individuals with the BAP. PMID:25056573

  17. "BodyWorks": A Parent-Focused Program to Promote Healthful Eating and Physical Activity for Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borden, Valerie Melino; Labiner-Wolfe, Judith; Blake, Susan M.; Marr, Amanda; Rowe, Jonelle; Wasserman, Jill

    2012-01-01

    The "BodyWorks" program was designed to help parents improve family eating and activity behaviors. "BodyWorks" was associated with significant gains in parents' knowledge about nutrition and activity, and greater self-efficacy to set family nutrition goals, plan physical activities, and change eating habits. (Contains 1 table.)

  18. The Influence of Parental Nativity, Neighborhood Disadvantage and the Built Environment on Physical Activity Behaviors in Latino Youth

    PubMed Central

    Ohri-Vachaspati, Punam; Yedidia, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Little evidence exists examining if parental nativity, neighborhood disadvantage and built environment features are associated with physical activity behaviors in Latino youth. We used a representative sample of Latino youth (n = 616) living in New Jersey to examine parental nativity associations with active transport to school, active use of sidewalks, use of local neighborhood parks, and use of neighborhood physical activity facilities. We estimated prevalence ratios (PR) that accounted for the complex survey design. Latino youth with foreign-born parents were generally more active than their US-born peers, and those with parents in the US 10 years or less were more likely to engage in active transport to school (PR = 1.51, 95 % CI 1.04–2.21), after adjusting for census-based neighborhood disadvantage, self-reported neighborhood measures, and geocoded distance to school. Parental nativity status should be considered in policies or interventions designed to increase physical activity among Latino youth. PMID:24162884

  19. Physical activity among adolescents: The role of various kinds of parental support.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, P W; Ingholt, L; Rasmussen, M; Holstein, B E

    2016-08-01

    The objectives of this study were (a) to examine the association between various kinds of parental social support and adolescents' physical activity (PA) and (b) to examine whether various kinds of social support from mothers and fathers were differently associated with boys' and girls' PA. Data came from the Aarhus School Survey that included 2100 schoolchildren at 11, 13, and 15 years of age. Parental social support for PA was measured by items about encouragement to do PA, doing joint PA, parents watching PA, and talking about PA. PA was measured as at least 4 h of vigorous PA per week during leisure time. We used logistic regression analyses to estimate the associations for girls and boys separately, adjusted by age group, parents' occupational social class, family structure, and migration status. There were significant and graded associations between adolescents' PA and all four dimensions of parental support for PA. The association patterns were similar for mothers' and fathers' social support and similar for girls and boys. Social processes in the family are important for adolescents' participation in PA. It is important to continue to explore these social processes in order to understand why some adolescents are physically active and others are not. PMID:26346509

  20. The Relationship Between Parental Physical Activity and Screen Time Behaviors and the Behaviors of their Young Children.

    PubMed

    Carson, Valerie; Stearns, Jodie; Janssen, Ian

    2015-08-01

    The main purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between parental and children's physical activity and screen time behaviors in a large sample of children in the early years. The results are based on 738 children aged 0-5 years and their parents from the Kingston, Canada area. Parents completed a questionnaire from May to September 2011 that assessed sociodemographic characteristics, their physical activity and screen time, and their child's physical activity and screen time. Logistic regression models, adjusted for potential confounders, were conducted. Parents in the lowest quartile of physical activity were 2.77 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.68-4.57) times more likely to have a child in the lowest quartile of physical activity compared with parents in the highest quartile of physical activity. Relationships were stronger in two parent homes compared with single-parent homes. Parents in the second (odds ratio = 2.27, 95% CI: 1.36-3.78), third (2.30, 1.32-3.99), and fourth (7.47, 4.53-12.33) screen time quartiles were significantly more likely to have a child in the highest quartile of screen time compared with parents in quartile one. To optimize healthy growth and development in the early years, future family-centered interventions targeting both physical activity and screen time appear important. PMID:25918825

  1. Adolescent Substance Use with Friends: Moderating and Mediating Effects of Parental Monitoring and Peer Activity Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiesner, Jeff; Poulin, Francois; Dishion, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of using substances with friends on future individual use was examined in the context of parental monitoring rules and the ecology of peer activities. A 1-year longitudinal study design included a combined sample of North Italian and French Canadian adolescents (N = 285, 53% girls, M = 14.25 years). Data analyses were conducted using…

  2. Physical Activity and Childhood Obesity: Strategies and Solutions for Schools and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Gregory; Riley, Clarence; Hargrove, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    One of the reasons American children and adolescents gain weight over the generations is that children expend significantly less energy on a daily basis than their parents and grandparents did at their age. Today's youth spend many hours participating in sedentary activities. Additionally, we eat more fast food and vending machine food than we…

  3. Physical Activity in Young Children: A Systematic Review of Parental Influences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Jessica; Skouteris, Helen; McCabe, Marita; Ricciardelli, Lina A.; Milgrom, Jeannette; Baur, Louise A.; Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew; Dwyer, Genevieve

    2012-01-01

    The primary aim of this review was to identify and evaluate the strength of associations of the key parental factors measured in studies examining early childhood physical activity (PA). A systematic review of the literature, using databases PsychINFO, Medline, Academic Search Complete, PSYCHinfo, and CINHAL, published between January 1986 and…

  4. Romantic and Sexual Activities, Parent-Adolescent Stress, and Depressive Symptoms among Early Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davila, Joanne; Stroud, Catherine B.; Starr, Lisa R.; Miller, Melissa Ramsay; Yoneda, Athena; Hershenberg, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    Building on evidence that romantic experiences are associated with depressive symptoms in adolescence, we examined their bidirectional association, as well as the role of sexual activity and parent-adolescent stress in their association. Data were collected from 71 early adolescent girls (M age 13.45 years; SD = 0.68) and their primary caregiver…

  5. Physical Activity and Sport Participation in Youth with Congenital Heart Disease: Perceptions of Children and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moola, Fiona; Faulkner, Guy E. J.; Kirsh, Joel A.; Kilburn, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    This study explored perceptions toward physical activity and sport in the lives of youth with congenital heart disease. Thirteen cardiac participants were interviewed in the presence of their parents, and a process of inductive analysis was conducted. Sport was not considered a valued pursuit despite the belief that it is essential for the…

  6. Involving Parents of Young Children in Science, Math and Literacy Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landerholm, Elizabeth; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes a collaborative parent-involvement project for inner-city Hispanic primary students sponsored by the Chicago Community Trust. A university professor, two graduate assistants, the principal, and the school community representative designed a summer program featuring hospitality and support activities, free books, and hands-on science and…

  7. Korean Children's Evaluation of Parental Restrictions Regarding Gender-Stereotypic Peer Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Yoonjung; Lee-Kim, Jennie; Killen, Melanie; Park, Kyoungja; Kim, Jihyun

    2012-01-01

    Korean children's evaluations of parental restrictions of children's activities based on gender stereotypic expectations were investigated. Third and sixth grade Korean (N = 128) children evaluated scenarios in which a boy or girl desired to play ballet or soccer. Participants used stereotypes to support children's desires to play…

  8. Young Children at Home and in School: 212 Educational Activities for Their Parents, Teachers, and Caregivers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morse, Philip S.; Brand, Lillian B.

    This source book is designed to give parents, teachers, and other caregivers of young children more than 200 sample activities for children that are fun, easy, and educationally sound. Chapter 1 introduces principles of early childhood programs, the "home-school connection," and tips on how to communicate with children. This chapter also gives an…

  9. Role of Parent Literacy and Numeracy Expectations and Activities in Predicting Early Numeracy Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segers, Eliane; Kleemans, Tijs; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2015-01-01

    The home numeracy environment (i.e., parents' numeracy expectations and activities), is related to early numeracy in young children. As recent studies have shown that both cognitive and linguistic factors play an important role in predicting numeracy development, it may be assumed that rather than the home "numeracy" environment, the…

  10. Normative consent and presumed consent for organ donation: a critique.

    PubMed

    Potts, Michael; Verheijde, Joseph L; Rady, Mohamed Y; Evans, David W

    2010-08-01

    Ben Saunders claims that actual consent is not necessary for organ donation due to 'normative consent', a concept he borrows from David Estlund. Combining normative consent with Peter Singer's 'greater moral evil principle', Saunders argues that it is immoral for an individual to refuse consent to donate his or her organs. If a presumed consent policy were thus adopted, it would be morally legitimate to remove organs from individuals whose wishes concerning donation are not known. This paper disputes Saunders' arguments. First, if death caused by the absence of organ transplant is the operational premise, then, there is nothing of comparable moral precedence under which a person is not obligated to donate. Saunders' use of Singer's principle produces a duty to donate in almost all circumstances. However, this premise is based on a flawed interpretation of cause and effect between organ availability and death. Second, given growing moral and scientific agreement that the organ donors in heart-beating and non-heart-beating procurement protocols are not dead when their organs are surgically removed, it is not at all clear that people have a duty to consent to their lives being taken for their organs. Third, Saunders' claim that there can be good reasons for refusing consent clashes with his claim that there is a moral obligation for everyone to donate their organs. Saunders' argument is more consistent with a conclusion of 'mandatory consent'. Finally, it is argued that Saunders' policy, if put into place, would be totalitarian in scope and would therefore be inconsistent with the freedom required for a democratic society. PMID:20663768

  11. Assessing children’s competence to consent in research by a standardized tool: a validity study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Currently over 50% of drugs prescribed to children have not been evaluated properly for use in their age group. One key reason why children have been excluded from clinical trials is that they are not considered able to exercise meaningful autonomy over the decision to participate. Dutch law states that competence to consent can be presumed present at the age of 12 and above; however, in pediatric practice children’s competence is not that clearly presented and the transition from assent to active consent is gradual. A gold standard for competence assessment in children does not exist. In this article we describe a study protocol on the development of a standardized tool for assessing competence to consent in research in children and adolescents. Methods/design In this study we modified the MacCAT-CR, the best evaluated competence assessment tool for adults, for use in children and adolescents. We will administer the tool prospectively to a cohort of pediatric patients from 6 to18 years during the selection stages of ongoing clinical trials. The outcomes of the MacCAT-CR interviews will be compared to a reference standard, established by the judgments of clinical investigators, and an expert panel consisting of child psychiatrists, child psychologists and medical ethicists. The reliability, criterion-related validity and reproducibility of the tool will be determined. As MacCAT-CR is a multi-item scale consisting of 13 items, power was justified at 130–190 subjects, providing a minimum of 10–15 observations per item. MacCAT-CR outcomes will be correlated with age, life experience, IQ, ethnicity, socio-economic status and competence judgment of the parent(s). It is anticipated that 160 participants will be recruited over 2 years to complete enrollment. Discussion A validity study on an assessment tool of competence to consent is strongly needed in research practice, particularly in the child and adolescent population. In this study we will establish

  12. Physical activity and screen-media-related parenting practices have different associations with children's objectively measured physical activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Children's physical activity (PA) is inversely associated with children's weight status. Parents may be an important influence on children's PA by restricting sedentary time or supporting PA. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of PA and screen-media–related [television (TV) and...

  13. Children's Physical Activity, Health and Physical Education in Isolated Rural Contexts: The Views of Parent Educators in Queensland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossi, Tony; Wright, Jan

    2002-01-01

    A study of rural Queensland (Australia) parents' views of their children's involvement in physical activity interviewed parents who taught their children at home using distance education. Physical activity was encouraged, but not formally taught; health was linked more to nutrition than exercise; and lack of participation in team games was…

  14. Models of Traumatic Experiences and Children's Psychological Adjustment: The Roles of Perceived Parenting and the Children's Own Resources and Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Punamaki, Raija-Leena; Qouta, Samir; El Sarraj, Eyad

    1997-01-01

    Used path analysis to examine relations between trauma, perceived parenting, resources, political activity, and adjustment in Palestinian 11- and 12-year olds. Found that the more trauma experienced, the more negative parenting the children experienced, the more political activity they showed, and the more they suffered from adjustment problems.…

  15. Balancing the quality of consent.

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, M O

    1998-01-01

    The rule that one must obtain informed consent is well established in medical ethics and an intrinsic part of clinical practice and of research in biomedicine. However, there is a tendency that the rule today is being applied too rigidly and with too little sensitivity to the values that are at stake in connection with different kinds of research protocols. It is here argued that the quality of consent needs to be balanced against variables such as degree of confidentiality and importance of values at stake, in order to be ethically acceptable. Appropriate information and consent procedures should be adjusted accordingly. Three levels are suggested, ranging from extensively informed consent with both written and oral information, through informed refusal with only a limited amount of information given to, at the other end of the scale, just making relevant information available. PMID:9650113

  16. Xenotransplantation, consent and international justice.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Robert

    2009-12-01

    The risk posed to the community by possible xenozoonosis after xenotransplantation suggests that some form of 'community consent' is required before whole organ animal-to-human xenotransplantation should take place. I argue that this requirement places greater obstacles in the path of ethical xenotransplantation than has previously been recognised. The relevant community is global and there are no existing institutions with democratic credentials sufficient to establish this consent. The distribution of the risks and benefits from xenotransplantation also means that consent is unlikely to be forthcoming. Proceeding on the basis of hypothetical consent to a package of global health measures that includes xenotransplantation, as Rothblatt has recently advocated, is more problematic than she acknowledges. Given that it may place the lives of citizens of poor nations at risk to benefit the citizens of wealthy nations, xenotransplantation raises significant questions of international justice. PMID:19416345

  17. New Law Requiring Adult Consent for a Minor's Abortion (1991 Wisconsin Act 263). Information Memorandum 92-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Legislative Council, Madison.

    This document describes Wisconsin's new law requiring the consent of a minor's parent or adult relative in order for a physician to perform an abortion on a minor. Part I describes highlights of the new law, including the consent requirement, exemptions, and court bypass procedure. Part II gives the background of the law, including incidence of…

  18. Carbonates and sulfates in CI chondrites - Formation by aqueous activity on the parent body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredriksson, Kurt; Kerridge, John F.

    1988-01-01

    Compositions and morphologies of dolomites, breunnerites, Ca-carbonates, Ca-sulfates and Mg, Ni, Na-sulfates, and their petrologic interrelations, in four CI chondrites are consistent with their having been formed by aqueous activity on the CI parent body. Radiochronometric data indicate that this activity took place very early in solar-system history. No evidence for original ('primitive') condensates seems to be present. However, alteration apparently took place without change in bulk meteorite composition.

  19. What practices do parents perceive as effective or ineffective in promoting a healthy diet, physical activity, and less sitting in children: parent focus groups

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To support parents in improving the health of their young children, examples of effective parenting practices for a healthy diet, physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB) are needed. This study explores perceived effective and ineffective parenting practices in difficult situations concerning raising healthy children and investigates their relationship with Self-Determination Theory (SDT) and Social Cognitive Theory (SCT). The current study is formative work to inform the content of a randomized controlled trial. Methods Four focus groups were conducted between June and October 2012 at worksites during lunch break. A total of 21 unrelated parents of primary schoolchildren (6 fathers, 15 mothers) participated. A short written questionnaire introduced typical difficult situations derived from parental anecdotal reports, concerning healthy diet, PA and SB. These situations formed the backbone for the subsequent focus group discussion. In October 2012, discussions were audio-recorded and analyzed in Nvivo to identify key response items using thematic analysis. Results Parents experienced explaining why the child should behave healthily, monitoring, being consistent, offering alternatives, reacting empathetically, modeling, motivating, increasing intrinsic value and availability, and using time-out as effective practices, whereas anger was considered ineffective. Opinions were mixed about the effectiveness of giving as much freedom as possible, obliging, rewarding and punishing, and setting rules and agreements. Parenting practices were consistent with principles from both SDT and SCT. Conclusions Parents identified numerous perceived effective practices to respond to their child’s health-related behavior. Since many of them coincide with the evidence base and the success of a parenting program depends upon the degree to which parents’ concerns and motivations are integrated into the program design, important opportunities are created for future

  20. School Psychologists Engagement in Parent Training/Education Activities with the Parents of Children with Chronic Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarlo, Rebecca K.

    2010-01-01

    The purposes of this research were to determine the rate at which school psychologists engage in parent training/education with the parents of children with chronic behavior problems and to determine the relationships between school psychologists' demographic variables, professional practice, training, and perception of barriers and their…

  1. Development and Validation of a Parental Monitoring Instrument: Measuring How Parents Monitor Adolescents' Activities and Risk Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cottrell, Scott A.; Branstetter, Steven; Cottrell, Lesley; Harris, Carole V.; Rishel, Carrie; Stanton, Bonita F.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the development and validation of the Parental Monitoring Instrument (PMI). The PMI was administered to a sample of 518 parent-adolescent (aged 12 to 17 years) dyads. Initial findings provide evidence of instrument reliability and validity. The exploratory factor analysis results suggested a seven-factor…

  2. 42 CFR 441.257 - Informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Informed consent. 441.257 Section 441.257 Public... Sterilizations § 441.257 Informed consent. (a) Informing the individual. For purposes of this subpart, an individual has given informed consent only if— (1) The person who obtained consent for the...

  3. 42 CFR 441.257 - Informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Informed consent. 441.257 Section 441.257 Public... Sterilizations § 441.257 Informed consent. (a) Informing the individual. For purposes of this subpart, an individual has given informed consent only if— (1) The person who obtained consent for the...

  4. 42 CFR 441.257 - Informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Informed consent. 441.257 Section 441.257 Public... Sterilizations § 441.257 Informed consent. (a) Informing the individual. For purposes of this subpart, an individual has given informed consent only if— (1) The person who obtained consent for the...

  5. Development and validation of a scale to measure Latino parenting strategies related to children's obesigenic behaviors. The parenting strategies for eating and activity scale (PEAS).

    PubMed

    Larios, Sandra E; Ayala, Guadalupe X; Arredondo, Elva M; Baquero, Barbara; Elder, John P

    2009-02-01

    Research has shown that children's dietary and activity-related behaviors are shaped by the family environment and parenting behaviors. The present study describes the development and validation of a bilingual (Spanish and English) scale assessing parenting strategies associated with children's dietary and activity-related behaviors in the home. Items were generated from focus groups with Latina mothers and a review of the literature, and two different samples were used to assess the scale's psychometric properties, including an examination of predictive validity using measured child body mass index. Factor analysis of the first sample (N=91) yielded a 5-factor solution (limit setting, monitoring, discipline, control and concern) and accounted for 65% of the variance. Confirmatory factor analyses on a second sample of Latina mothers recruited into a childhood obesity prevention study (N=714) showed that a 26-item 5-factor solution (limit setting, monitoring, discipline, control and reinforcement) provided the best fit for the data. Parenting strategies characterized as controlling were associated with a lower BMI among children. After using multiple samples and establishing its validity, the parenting strategies for eating and activity scale (PEAS) was found to be valid and reliable in measuring Latino parenting strategies related to children's dietary and activity-related behaviors. PMID:18845197

  6. Parent-Targeted Mobile Phone Intervention to Increase Physical Activity in Sedentary Children: Randomized Pilot Trial

    PubMed Central

    Marker, Arwen M; Allen, H Raymond; Machtmes, Ryan; Han, Hongmei; Johnson, William D; Schuna Jr, John M; Broyles, Stephanie T; Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Church, Timothy S

    2014-01-01

    Background Low levels of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity are associated with adverse health consequences. Objective The intent of the study was to determine the feasibility and efficacy of a 12-week physical activity promotion program targeting children, which was delivered to parents through mobile phones. Methods Potential participants were recruited through advertisements placed in the newspaper, local hospitals and schools, and an email listserv. Sedentary children aged 6-10 years were randomly assigned to a minimal (MIG) or intensive (IIG) intervention group. Parents in the MIG were given a goal to increase (within 1 month) and maintain their child’s activity at 6000 pedometer steps/day above their baseline levels and to monitor their child’s steps daily. Parents in the IIG were given the same steps/day and monitoring goals, in addition to text messages and articles containing additional behavioral strategies (based on the Social Cognitive Theory) designed to promote their child’s physical activity. The intervention components were delivered via mobile phone. Anthropometrics, body composition, and questionnaires were administered in a clinic. Children wore a New Lifestyles pedometer (NL-1000) each day throughout the intervention and parents were to monitor their child’s step counts daily. Results Out of 59 children who screened for the study, a total of 27 children (mean age 8.7, SD 1.4 years; 56%, 15/27 female; 59%, 16/27 African American) were enrolled and completed the study. Overall, 97.90% (2220/2268; 98.20%, 1072/1092 for MIG; 97.60%, 1148/1176 for IIG) of expected step data were successfully entered by the parent or study coordinator. Parents in the MIG and IIG were sent approximately 7 and 13 text messages per week, respectively, averaged over the course of the study. IIG parents accessed an average of 6.1 (SD 4.4) articles over the course of the intervention and accessed a fewer number of articles in the last month compared to the first

  7. Development of scales to assess children's perceptions of friend and parental influences on physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Jago, Russell; Fox, Kenneth R; Page, Angie S; Brockman, Rowan; Thompson, Janice L

    2009-01-01

    Background Many children do not meet physical activity guidelines. Parents and friends are likely to influence children's physical activity but there is a shortage of measures that are able to capture these influences. Methods A new questionnaire with the following three scales was developed: 1) Parental influence on physical activity; 2) Motives for activity with friends scale; and 3) Physical activity and sedentary group normative values. Content for each scale was informed by qualitative work. One hundred and seventy three, 10-11 year old children completed the new questionnaire twice, one week apart. Participants also wore an accelerometer for 5 days and mean minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity, light physical activity and sedentary time per day were obtained. Test-retest reliability of the items was calculated and Principal Component analysis of the scales performed and sub-scales produced. Alphas were calculated for main scales and sub-scales. Correlations were calculated among sub-scales. Correlations between each sub-scale and accelerometer physical activity variables were calculated for all participants and stratified by sex. Results The Parental influence scale yielded four factors which accounted for 67.5% of the variance in the items and had good (α > 0.7) internal consistency. The Motives for physical activity scale yielded four factors that accounted for 66.1% and had good internal consistency. The Physical activity norms scale yielded 4 factors that accounted for 67.4% of the variance, with good internal consistency for the sub-scales and alpha of .642 for the overall scale. Associations between the sub-scales and physical activity differed by sex. Although only 6 of the 11 sub-scales were significantly correlated with physical activity there were a number of associations that were positively correlated >0.15 indicating that these factors may contribute to the explanation of children's physical activity. Conclusion Three scales that

  8. Informed consent in dental malpractice claims. A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Nicolas, Manuel; Falcón, Maria; Perez-Carceles, Maria Dolores; Osuna, Eduardo; Luna, Aurelio

    2007-06-01

    With the introduction of informed consent in dental practice in Spain during the last ten years activity has been focused on avoiding complaints rather than on giving adequate information to the patient. However, in the eyes of many professionals the document by which patients accept the cost or estimated charge of treatment is the equivalent of informed consent. Although Spanish law permits verbal consent in some cases (low risk therapeutic activities), some dentists interpret this law in a very broad way. The aim of this paper was to study the fulfilment of informed consent in relation to professional malpractice claims presented to the College of Dentists of the province of Murcia, south east Spain (regional professional association) during the last twelve years (n=52). Evaluation of the complaints pointed to adequate professional behaviour in 14 cases and malpractice in 38 cases (in 29 of which the treatment applied was technically correct but with inadequate information provided during the process, while nine cases represented technical errors). The written document of informed consent was absent in 40 cases, although the verbal information supplied was considered adequate in 14 cases. When the document of informed consent was present (12 cases) it was considered unsuitable, although adequately complemented by oral information. PMID:17695737

  9. Parental perception on the efficacy of a physical activity program for preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Bellows, Laura; Silvernail, Sara; Caldwell, Lisa; Bryant, Angela; Kennedy, Cathy; Davies, Patricia; Anderson, Jennifer

    2011-04-01

    Childhood obesity is among the leading health concerns in the United States. The relationship between unmet physical activity needs in young children is of particular interest as the trend in childhood obesity continues to rise and unmet physical activity needs are identified. The preschool years are an influential time in promoting healthful lifestyle habits and early childhood interventions may help establish lifelong healthful behaviors which could help prevent obesity later in life. The Food Friends®: Get Movin' with Mighty Moves® is a preschool physical activity program which aims to improve children's gross motor skills and physical activity levels. The home environment and parental modeling are critical factors related to child physical activity in this population. The parent component, Mighty Moves®: Fun Ways to Keep Families Active and Healthy, was designed to address barriers in the home environment that lead to unmet physical activity needs in preschoolers and their families. The program and materials were designed based on Social Marketing tenets and Social Learning Theory principles. Four Colorado Head Start centers were assigned to an experimental group as part of the Mighty Moves® group randomized trial. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation methods were used to determine what messages and materials reached and motivated the target audience to increase physical activity levels. Results of the study indicated the program's materials helped families and children to be more physically active. Additionally, materials and material dissemination were revised to enhance program goals. PMID:20697786

  10. Adolescents' leisure activities, parental monitoring and cigarette smoking - a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Adolescent participation in leisure activities is developmentally beneficial, but certain activities may increase health compromising behaviours, such as tobacco smoking. A limited range of leisure activities has been studied, with little research on out-of-school settings where parental supervision is a potential protective factor. Tobacco smoking is an important, potentially modifiable health determinant, so understanding associations between adolescent leisure activities, parental monitoring, demographic factors and daily smoking may inform preventive strategies. These associations are reported for a New Zealand adolescent sample. Methods Randomly selected schools (n = 145) participated in the 2006 Youth In-depth Survey, a national, biennial study of Year 10 students (predominantly 14-15 years). School classes were randomly selected and students completed a self-report questionnaire in class time. Adjustment for clustering at the school level was included in all analyses. Since parental monitoring and demographic variables potentially confound relations between adolescent leisure activities and smoking, variables were screened before multivariable modelling. Given prior indications of demographic differences, gender and ethnic specific regression models were built. Results and Discussion Overall, 8.5% of the 3,161 students were daily smokers, including more females (10.5%) than males (6.5%). In gender and ethnic specific multivariate analysis of associations with daily smoking (adjusted for age, school socioeconomic decile rating, leisure activities and ethnicity or gender, respectively), parental monitoring exhibited a consistently protective, dose response effect, although less strongly among Māori. Attending a place of worship and going to the movies were protective for non-Māori, as was watching sports, whereas playing team sport was protective for all, except males. Attending a skate park was a risk factor for females and Māori which

  11. Developmental patterns and parental correlates of youth leisure-time physical activity.

    PubMed

    Lam, Chun Bun; McHale, Susan M

    2015-02-01

    This study examined the developmental patterns and parental correlates of youth leisure-time physical activity from middle childhood through adolescence. On 5 occasions across 7 years, fathers, mothers, and children who were first- and second born from 201 European American, working- and middle-class families participated in home and multiple nightly phone interviews. Multilevel modeling revealed that, controlling for family socioeconomic status, neighborhood characteristics, and youth overweight status and physical health, leisure-time physical activity increased during middle childhood and declined across adolescence, and the decline was more pronounced for girls than for boys. Moreover, controlling for time-varying, parental work hours and youth interest in sports and outdoor activities, on occasions when fathers and mothers spent proportionally more time on these activities with youth than usual, youth also spent more total time on these activities than usual. The within-person association between mother-youth joint involvement and youth's total involvement in leisure-time physical activity reached statistical significance at the transition to adolescence, and became stronger over time. Findings highlight the importance of maintaining adolescents', especially girls', physical activity levels and targeting both fathers' and mothers' involvement to promote youth's physical activity. PMID:25485671

  12. Parental influences on 7–9 year olds’ physical activity: A conceptual model

    PubMed Central

    Leary, Janie M.; Lilly, Christa L.; Dino, Geri; Loprinzi, Paul D.; Cottrell, Lesley

    2016-01-01

    Objective Models characterizing parental influence on child and adolescent physical activity (PA) over time are limited. Preschool and Adolescent Models (PM and AM) of PA are available leaving the need to focus on elementary-aged children. We tested current models (PM and AM) with a sample of 7–9 year-olds, and then developed a model appropriate to this specific target population. Methods Parent–child dyads completed questionnaires in 2010–2011. All models were assessed using path analysis and model fit indices. Results For adequate power, 90 families were needed, with 174 dyads participating. PM and AM exhibited poor fit when applied to the study population. A gender-specific model was developed and demonstrated acceptable fit. To develop an acceptable model for this population, constructs from both the PM (i.e. parental perception of child competency) and AM (i.e., child-reported self-efficacy) were used. For boys, self-efficacy was a strong predictor of PA, which was influenced by various parental variables. For girls, parental PA demonstrated the greatest strength of association with child PA. Conclusion This new model can be used to promote PA and guide future research/interventions. Future studies, particularly longitudinal designs, are needed to confirm the utility of this model as a bridge between currently available models. PMID:23438761

  13. Informed consent for antipsychotic medication.

    PubMed Central

    Schachter, D.; Kleinman, I.; Williams, J. I.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine family physicians' attitudes and practices regarding documentation of informed consent for antipsychotic medication. DESIGN: Pilot cross-sectional study. SETTING: Teaching and non-teaching hospitals in Toronto, Ont. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty family physicians were selected in equal numbers from teaching and non-teaching hospitals with no more than five physicians from a given hospital. Participants were treating at least 10 patients with antipsychotic medication. Participants' mean age was 44.3 years; 83% were men. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Documentation of consent and of disclosure of consent for antipsychotic medication in patients' charts. RESULTS: Documentation was found in only 13% of charts. Whether it was there or not did not correlate with information disclosed, score on an attitude scale, or demographics. Physicians who found documentation time-consuming were less likely to document. Most physicians disclosed reasons for antipsychotic medication, but less than half described tardive dyskinesia, a potentially irreversible movement disorder that affects about 25% of patients on long-term treatment. CONCLUSIONS: The low rate of documentation observed in this sample was consistent with reports of similar samples and might indicate that family physicians are unaware of recommendations for documentation or simply do not have time to keep abreast of current recommendations. Many physicians thought signed consent forms unnecessary for psychotic patients, and even more believed seeking consent for antipsychotic medications would increase patient anxiety. PMID:10386214

  14. Racial differences in parental perceptions of the neighborhood as predictors of children's physical activity and sedentary behavior

    PubMed Central

    Budd, Elizabeth L.; Aaron Hipp, J.; Geary, Nora; Dodson, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Most U.S. children engage in insufficient physical activity (PA) and spend too much time in sedentary behaviors (SBs), leading to increased risk of obesity and chronic disease. Evidence remains inconsistent on relationships between parental perceptions of the neighborhood and children's PA and SB. This study examines parental neighborhood perceptions, stratified by race, as predictors of children's PA and SB. Methods Relationships were tested with regressions stratified by parental race. The sample included 196 parents, residing in St. Louis, Missouri with a child at home. Participants responded to a mailed survey in 2012. Parental neighborhood perceptions were examined by mean composite scores and individual items. Results For parents of all races, perceived barriers negatively predicted the number of days in a week children engaged in ≥ 60 min of PA. Examining parental neighborhood perceptions by individual item, the perception that drivers exceed neighborhood speed limits was a positive predictor of their children's SB only among white parents. Only among minority-race parents was perceived neighborhood crime rate a positive predictor of their children's SB. Conclusions While predictors of children's PA did not differ widely, several distinct predictors of children's SB by parental race lend support toward further examination of this topic. PMID:26844096

  15. BMI and Attitudes and Beliefs about Physical Activity and Nutrition of Parents of Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, V. A.; Shacter, S. D.; Johnson, P. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was: (1) to evaluate the beliefs, attitudes and behaviours associated with nutrition and physical activity of parents with adolescents with intellectual disabilities (ID); (2) to determine if these variables related to the body mass index (BMI) of the adolescents and the parents' BMI; and (3) to investigate if…

  16. Effects of Parental Depressive Symptoms on Child Adjustment Moderated by Hypothalamic Pituitary Adrenal Activity: Within- and between-Family Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurent, Heidemarie K.; Leve, Leslie D.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Natsuaki, Misaki N.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Fisher, Philip A.; Marceau, Kristine; Harold, Gordon T.; Reiss, David

    2013-01-01

    Child hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) activity was investigated as a moderator of parental depressive symptom effects on child behavior in an adoption sample ("n" = 210 families). Adoptive parents' depressive symptoms and child internalizing and externalizing were assessed at 18, 27, and 54 months, and child morning and evening HPA activity…

  17. Mothers' and Fathers' Involvement in Home Activities with Their Children: Psychosocial Factors and the Role of Parental Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giallo, Rebecca; Treyvaud, Karli; Cooklin, Amanda; Wade, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Parent involvement in play, learning, and everyday home activities is important for promoting children's cognitive and language development. The aims of the study were to (a) examine differences between mothers' and fathers' self-reported involvement with their children, (b) explore the relationship between child, parent and family factors, and…

  18. Parents' Perspectives of Early Childhood Special Education, Engagement in Everyday Learning Activities, and Kindergarten Performance of Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epley, Pamela H.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between parents' perspectives of early childhood special education (ECSE) and their engagement in everyday learning activities with kindergarten performance of children with disabilities in one Midwestern state. Findings show that although parents' perspective of ECSE and their engagement in everyday learning…

  19. Parent Involvement Activities in School Improvement Plans in the Northwest Region. Summary. Issues & Answers. REL 2008-No. 064

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speth, Timothy; Saifer, Steffen; Forehand, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    This document presents a summary of the larger report, "Parent Involvement Activities in School Improvement Plans in the Northwest Region." Although the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) spells out parent involvement requirements for schools in need of improvement, the majority of the Northwest Region school improvement plans reviewed failed…

  20. Physical activity and beverage consumption in preschoolers: focus groups with parents and teachers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Qualitative research is a method in which new ideas and strategies can be discovered. This qualitative study aimed to investigate parents’ and teachers’ opinions on physical activity and beverage consumption of preschool children. Through separate, independent focus groups, they expressed their perceptions on children’s current physical activity and beverage consumption levels, factors that influence and enhance these behaviours, and anticipated barriers to making changes. Methods Multi-cultural and multi-geographical focus groups were carried out in six European countries (Belgium, Bulgaria, Germany, Greece, Poland and Spain). In total, twenty-four focus groups with 122 parents and eighteen focus groups with 87 teachers were conducted between October 2010 and January 2011. Based on a semi-structured interview guide, questions on preschoolers’ physical activity (opinions on preschoolers’ physical activity, how to increase physical activity, facilitators and barriers of physical activity) and beverage consumption (rules and policies, factors influencing promotion of healthy drinking, recommendations for future intervention development) were asked. The information was analyzed using qualitative data analysis software (NVivo8). Results The focus group results indicated misperceptions of caregivers on preschoolers’ physical activity and beverage consumption levels. Caregivers perceived preschoolers as sufficiently active; they argue that children need to learn to sit still in preparation for primary school. At most preschools, children can drink only water. In some preschools sugar-sweetened beverages like chocolate milk or fruit juices, are also allowed. It was mentioned that sugar-sweetened beverages can be healthy due to mineral and vitamin content, although according to parents their daily intake is limited. These opinions resulted in low perceived needs to change behaviours. Conclusions Although previous research shows need of change in

  1. THE PARAMETERS OF INFORMED CONSENT

    PubMed Central

    Raab, Edward L

    2004-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose To describe the components of a proper informed consent; which risks must be disclosed and which need not; additional safeguards for incapacitated persons, minors, and research subjects; and where the law will imply consent that is not otherwise obtained. Methods Summarization of current law obtained from legal treatises, reports of recent cases, and personal experience as a reviewer and expert. Results Lack of informed consent can reinforce a claim of medical malpractice or serve as an alternative point of attack when the case is otherwise weak. Special requirements must be met when patients are the subjects of clinical research. Conclusion Demonstration of a well-conducted process, not merely of a paper, not only protects the physician from exposure to liability, but increases the patient’s autonomy in decisions concerning health and encourages compliance with treatment. PMID:15747761

  2. Social Influences and the Physical Activity Intentions of Parents of Young-Children Families: An Extended Theory of Planned Behavior Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Kyra; White, Katherine M.

    2012-01-01

    Evidence within Australia and internationally suggests parenthood as a risk factor for inactivity; however, research into understanding parental physical activity is scarce. Given that active parents can create active families and social factors are important for parents' decision making, the authors investigated a range of social influences on…

  3. Abortion and parental responsibility.

    PubMed

    Winston, M E

    1986-01-01

    A theory on the morality of abortion is derived from the presumption that parents have special moral obligations to nurture their immature children. Three alternative models of the acquisition of parental responsibilities are examined: one based on biological relationships, one based on consent, and one based on causal responsibility. Each of the models is examined in terms of its ability to handle cases involving nonstandard methods of procreation, such as surrogate motherhood, artificial insemination by donor, and embryo transfer. It is concluded that the model based on causal responsibility provides the most adequate criterion for the ascription of parental responsibility toward fetuses. PMID:11650732

  4. Health-related quality of life in youth with Crohn's disease: The role of disease activity and parenting stress

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Wendy N.; Boyle, Shana L.; Graef, Danielle M.; Janicke, David M.; Jolley, Christopher D.; Denson, Lee A.; Baldassano, Robert N.; Hommel, Kevin A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is an important, but understudied construct in pediatric IBD. Family-level predictors of HRQOL have been understudied as are the mechanisms through which disease activity impacts HRQOL. The current study examines the relationship between a family-level factor (parenting stress) and HRQOL in youth with Crohn's disease. Parenting stress is examined as a mechanism through with disease activity impacts HRQOL. Methods 99 adolescents with Crohn's disease and their parents were recruited across three sites. Adolescents completed the IMPACT-III (IBD-specific HRQOL). Parents completed the Pediatric Inventory for Parents, a measure of medically-related parenting stress that assesses: 1) stress due to the occurrence of medical stressors and 2) stress due to the perceived difficulty of stressors. Disease activity was obtained from medical records. Results Parenting stress due to the occurrence of medical stressors partially mediated the disease severity-HRQOL relationship, reducing the relationship between these variables from 49.67% to 31.58% (B = -.56, p <.0001). Boot strapping analysis confirmed that the indirect effect of disease severity on HQROL via parenting stress significantly differed from zero. Parenting stress due to the perceived difficulty of medical stressors partially mediated the disease severity-HRQOL relationship, reducing the relationship from 49.67% to 30.29% (B = -.55, p < .0001). The indirect effect was confirmed via bootstrapping procedures. Conclusions As disease severity increased, parenting stress also increased, and adolescent HRQOL decreased. Parenting stress should be considered and assessed for along with medical factors as part of a comprehensive approach to improving HRQOL in adolescents with Crohn's disease. PMID:25564807

  5. Informed Consent for Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Stephen B.; Stagno, Susan J.

    2001-01-01

    A new international standard of editorial policy calls for written informed consent by the subject of every case report. Although this appears to be ethically appealing, the authors posit that in some situations, requesting informed consent may be unethical, can harm patients, and may erode the use of case reports as a valuable teaching method in psychiatry and psychotherapy. The authors discuss concerns regarding this new policy for mental health publication based on issues of transference, countertransference, best interest of the patient, and practicality. PMID:11402083

  6. Assessing the Validity of a Physical Activity Questionnaire Developed for Parents of Preschool Children in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Bacardi-Gascón, Montserrat; Reveles-Rojas, Claudia; Woodward-Lopez, Gail; Crawford, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    To assess the validity of a questionnaire developed for parents of preschool children to know their physical activity (PA) status, we compared the questionnaire results with the measures of accelerometer for children's activities. Thirty-five preschoolers who wore the accelerometer for at least 10 hours daily on 3 weekdays and one weekend day were included in the analyses. Time spent in activities of varied intensity was calculated by applying 15-second ActiGraph count cutoffs (ACC). Parents’ perceptions of their children's PA were associated with the percentage of vigorous and moderate physical activity recorded with ACC at r=0.62 (p=0.0001). An association was shown between the percentage of a child's time spent in vigorous physical activity, as reported by parents, with that measured by ACC at r=0.53 (p=0.001). Results of this study suggest that the designed questionnaire might be a useful tool for assessing children's activity while, additionally, it warrants further investigation on larger samples of children. PMID:23304910

  7. Early aqueous activity on the ordinary and carbonaceous chondrite parent bodies recorded by fayalite

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Doyle, Patricia M.; Jogo, Kaori; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N.; Wakita, Shigeru; Ciesla, Fred J.; Hutcheon, Ian D.

    2015-06-23

    Here, chronology of aqueous activity on chondrite parent bodies constrains their accretion times and thermal histories. Radiometric 53Mn–53Cr dating has been successfully applied to aqueously formed carbonates in CM carbonaceous chondrites. Owing to the absence of carbonates in ordinary (H, L and LL), and CV and CO carbonaceous chondrites, and the lack of proper standards, there are no reliable ages of aqueous activity on their parent bodies. Here we report the first 53Mn–53Cr ages of aqueously formed fayalite in the L3 chondrite Elephant Moraine 90161 as 2.4 +1.8-1.3 Myr after calcium–aluminium-rich inclusions (CAIs), the oldest Solar System solids. In addition,more » measurements using our synthesized fayalite standard show that fayalite in the CV3 chondrite Asuka 881317 and CO3-like chondrite MacAlpine Hills 88107 formed and 4.2+0.8-0.7 Myr after CAIs, respectively. Thermal modelling, combined with the inferred conditions (temperature and water/rock ratio) and 53Mn–53Cr ages of aqueous alteration, suggests accretion of the L, CV and CO parent bodies ~1.8–2.5 Myr after CAIs.« less

  8. Early aqueous activity on the ordinary and carbonaceous chondrite parent bodies recorded by fayalite

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Patricia M.; Jogo, Kaori; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N.; Wakita, Shigeru; Ciesla, Fred J.; Hutcheon, Ian D.

    2015-06-23

    Here, chronology of aqueous activity on chondrite parent bodies constrains their accretion times and thermal histories. Radiometric 53Mn–53Cr dating has been successfully applied to aqueously formed carbonates in CM carbonaceous chondrites. Owing to the absence of carbonates in ordinary (H, L and LL), and CV and CO carbonaceous chondrites, and the lack of proper standards, there are no reliable ages of aqueous activity on their parent bodies. Here we report the first 53Mn–53Cr ages of aqueously formed fayalite in the L3 chondrite Elephant Moraine 90161 as 2.4 +1.8-1.3 Myr after calcium–aluminium-rich inclusions (CAIs), the oldest Solar System solids. In addition, measurements using our synthesized fayalite standard show that fayalite in the CV3 chondrite Asuka 881317 and CO3-like chondrite MacAlpine Hills 88107 formed and 4.2+0.8-0.7 Myr after CAIs, respectively. Thermal modelling, combined with the inferred conditions (temperature and water/rock ratio) and 53Mn–53Cr ages of aqueous alteration, suggests accretion of the L, CV and CO parent bodies ~1.8–2.5 Myr after CAIs.

  9. Early aqueous activity on the ordinary and carbonaceous chondrite parent bodies recorded by fayalite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Patricia M.; Jogo, Kaori; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N.; Wakita, Shigeru; Ciesla, Fred J.; Hutcheon, Ian D.

    2015-06-01

    Chronology of aqueous activity on chondrite parent bodies constrains their accretion times and thermal histories. Radiometric 53Mn-53Cr dating has been successfully applied to aqueously formed carbonates in CM carbonaceous chondrites. Owing to the absence of carbonates in ordinary (H, L and LL), and CV and CO carbonaceous chondrites, and the lack of proper standards, there are no reliable ages of aqueous activity on their parent bodies. Here we report the first 53Mn-53Cr ages of aqueously formed fayalite in the L3 chondrite Elephant Moraine 90161 as Myr after calcium-aluminium-rich inclusions (CAIs), the oldest Solar System solids. In addition, measurements using our synthesized fayalite standard show that fayalite in the CV3 chondrite Asuka 881317 and CO3-like chondrite MacAlpine Hills 88107 formed and Myr after CAIs, respectively. Thermal modelling, combined with the inferred conditions (temperature and water/rock ratio) and 53Mn-53Cr ages of aqueous alteration, suggests accretion of the L, CV and CO parent bodies ~1.8-2.5 Myr after CAIs.

  10. Early aqueous activity on the ordinary and carbonaceous chondrite parent bodies recorded by fayalite.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Patricia M; Jogo, Kaori; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N; Wakita, Shigeru; Ciesla, Fred J; Hutcheon, Ian D

    2015-01-01

    Chronology of aqueous activity on chondrite parent bodies constrains their accretion times and thermal histories. Radiometric (53)Mn-(53)Cr dating has been successfully applied to aqueously formed carbonates in CM carbonaceous chondrites. Owing to the absence of carbonates in ordinary (H, L and LL), and CV and CO carbonaceous chondrites, and the lack of proper standards, there are no reliable ages of aqueous activity on their parent bodies. Here we report the first (53)Mn-(53)Cr ages of aqueously formed fayalite in the L3 chondrite Elephant Moraine 90161 as Myr after calcium-aluminium-rich inclusions (CAIs), the oldest Solar System solids. In addition, measurements using our synthesized fayalite standard show that fayalite in the CV3 chondrite Asuka 881317 and CO3-like chondrite MacAlpine Hills 88107 formed and Myr after CAIs, respectively. Thermal modelling, combined with the inferred conditions (temperature and water/rock ratio) and (53)Mn-(53)Cr ages of aqueous alteration, suggests accretion of the L, CV and CO parent bodies ∼1.8-2.5 Myr after CAIs. PMID:26100451

  11. Language Interpretation, Parent Participation, and Young Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheatham, Gregory A.

    2011-01-01

    Spoken parent-educator interactions through language interpreters for parents who do not speak English can challenge early intervention/early childhood special education professionals. Research suggests that language interpretation is often inadequate to ensure that the parental participation, informed parental consent, and interpretation mandates…

  12. Perceptions of Equine Assisted Activities and Therapies by Parents and Children with Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lemke, Danielle; Rothwell, Erin; Newcomb, Tara M.; Swoboda, Kathryn J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To identify the physical and psychosocial effects of equine assisted activities and therapies (EAAT) on children with Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) from the perspective of the child and their parents. Methods The families of all eligible children with SMA, who reported participation in EAAT, from a western metropolitan academic center were contacted and invited to participate. This study implemented qualitative, semi-structured interviews of children with SMA and their parents. Results Three themes emerged from the qualitative content analysis: physical/psychosocial benefits; relationship development with the horses, instructors, and children; and barriers to continued EAAT engagement. Conclusions The data suggest the overall EAAT experience was a source of enjoyment, self-confidence, and normalcy for the children with SMA. The results of this study provide preliminary support for the use of EAAT among children with SMA. PMID:24675128

  13. Potential Effect of Physical Activity Calorie Equivalent Labeling on Parent Fast Food Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Antonelli, Ray

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Menu labels displaying food energy in physical activity calorie equivalents (PACE) is a possible strategy to encourage ordering meals with fewer calories and promoting physical activity. Potential effects of such labeling for children have never been examined. METHODS: We conducted a national survey of 1000 parents randomized to 1 of 4 fast food menus: no labels, calories only, calories plus minutes, or calories plus miles needed to walk to burn the calories. Respondents were asked to imagine they were in a fast food restaurant and place an order for their child. At the survey’s conclusion, all respondents were shown a calorie-only label and both PACE labels and asked to rate the likelihood each label would influence them to encourage their child to exercise. RESULTS: We excluded respondents whose meals totaled 0 calories or >4000 calories, leaving 823 parents in the analysis. The mean age of the child for whom the meal was “ordered” was 9.5 years. Parents whose menus displayed no label ordered an average of 1294 calories, whereas those shown calories only, calories plus minutes, or calories plus miles ordered 1066, 1060, and 1099 calories, respectively (P = .0001). Only 20% of parents reported that calories-only labeling would be “very likely” to prompt them to encourage their children to exercise versus 38% for calories plus minutes (P < .0001) and 37% for calories plus miles (P < .0001). CONCLUSIONS: PACE labeling may influence parents’ decisions on what fast food items to order for their children and encourage them to get their children to exercise. PMID:25624379

  14. Maternal and paternal parenting practices and their influence on children's adiposity, screen-time, diet and physical activity.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Adam B; Lubans, David R; Plotnikoff, Ronald C; Collins, Clare E; Morgan, Philip J

    2014-08-01

    The primary aim of this study was to examine a range of potential behavioral and maternal/paternal correlates of adiposity in children. Secondary aims were to examine (a) correlates of screen-time, diet and physical activity and (b) if there were differences in maternal and paternal physical activity- and dietary-related parenting practices. Cross-sectional analysis was conducted using 70 families with children (59% boys (41/70), mean age 8.4 (±2.4) years). Parenting practices were measured using the Parenting Strategies for Eating and Activity Scale. Children's outcomes included: 7-day pedometry (physical activity), screen-time, percent energy from core foods (Food frequency questionnaire) and BMI z-score. Multiple regression models were generated to examine the associations between maternal and paternal parenting practices and children's variables. In the regression analyses, fathers' BMI (p < .01) and mothers' control (p < .001) were significantly associated with child weight status. Fathers' reinforcement (p < .01) was significantly associated with child physical activity. For screen-time, mothers' monitoring (p < .001) and child characteristics [age (p = .01), sex (p = .01), BMI z-score (p = .03)] were significant predictors. Mothers' parenting practices [limit setting (p = .01), reinforcement (p = .02)] and child screen-time (p = .02) were significantly associated with intake of core foods. Despite some similarities within families, three out of five parenting constructs were significantly different between mothers and fathers. Mothers and fathers have different parental influences on their children's weight status and lifestyle behaviors and both should be included in lifestyle interventions targeting children. A focus on maternal parenting specifically relating to screen-time and diet, and father's physical activity parenting and weight status may support their children in developing more healthy behaviors. PMID:24751915

  15. Physical activity in young children and their parents-An Early STOPP Sweden-China comparison study.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Elin; Mei, Hong; Xiu, Lijuan; Svensson, Viktoria; Xiong, Yueling; Marcus, Claude; Zhang, Jianduan; Hagströmer, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Understanding about socio-cultural differences in physical activity in children with high and low risk for obesity can help tailor intervention programs in different settings. This study aimed to compare objectively measured physical activity in two-year-olds and their parents, living in Stockholm, Sweden, and Wuhan, China. Data from Early STOPP was used. Children and parents wore an accelerometer in connection with the child's second birthday. Weekly and hourly patterns were examined. Correlation between child and parental physical activity was assessed. Data on 146 Swedish and 79 Chinese children and their parents was available. Children, mothers and fathers in Stockholm were significantly more active than their counterparts in Wuhan (children; 2989 (SD 702) vs. 1997 (SD 899) counts per minute (CPM), mothers 2625 (SD 752) vs. 2042 (SD 821) CPM; fathers 2233 (SD 749) vs. 1588 (SD 754) CPM). Activity levels were similar over a week for children and parents within both countries. No parental-child correlations, except for a paternal-son correlation in Stockholm, were found. Children, mothers and fathers in Stockholm are more active compared with their counterparts in Wuhan. Interventions to increase physical activity needs to take cultural aspects into account, also when targeting very young children. PMID:27404563

  16. Dyadic Adjustment and Spiritual Activities in Parents of Children with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Grossoehme, Daniel H.; Szczesniak, Rhonda; Dodd, Caitlin; Opipari-Arrigan, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Children’s diseases can negatively impact marital adjustment and contribute to poorer child health outcomes. To cope with increased marital stress and childhood diseases severity, many people turn to spirituality. While most studies show a positive relationship between spirituality and marital adjustment, spirituality has typically been measured only in terms of individual behaviors. Using the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS) and Daily Phone Diary data from a sample of 126 parents of children with cystic fibrosis as a context for increased marital stress, spiritual behavior of mother-father dyads and of whole families were used as predictors of marital adjustment. Frequency and duration of individual, dyadic and familial spiritual activities correlated positively with dyadic adjustment. Significant differences in spiritual activities existed between couples with marital adjustment scores above and below the cutoff for distress. The only significant factors in regressions of spiritual activities on marital adjustment scores were number of pulmonary exacerbations and parent age. Higher odds of maintaining a marital adjustment score greater than 100 were significantly associated with spending approximately twelve minutes per day in individual, but not conjugal or familial, spiritual activities. The Daily Phone Diary is a feasible tool to study conjugal and familial activities and their relationships with beliefs and attitudes, including spirituality. PMID:26900486

  17. Opt-out and consent.

    PubMed

    MacKay, Douglas

    2015-10-01

    A chief objection to opt-out organ donor registration policies is that they do not secure people's actual consent to donation, and so fail to respect their autonomy rights to decide what happens to their organs after they die. However, scholars have recently offered two powerful responses to this objection. First, Michael B Gill argues that opt-out policies do not fail to respect people's autonomy simply because they do not secure people's actual consent to donation. Second, Ben Saunders argues that opt-out policies do secure people's actual-if not explicit-consent, provided that certain conditions are satisfied. I argue that Gill and Saunders' arguments are not successful. My conclusion does not imply that jurisdictions should not implement opt-out policies-their failure to secure people's actual consent may be outweighed by other considerations. But, my conclusion does imply that Gill and Saunders are mistaken to claim that opt-out policies are respectful of people's autonomy. PMID:26037283

  18. Parental encouragement is positively associated with outdoor active play outside of school hours among 7-12 year olds.

    PubMed

    Ferrao, Thomas; Janssen, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Background. Physical activity is important for children's physical, mental, and social well-being. Outdoor active play is an important yet unstudied domain of children's physical activity. The objective of this study was to determine if parental encouragement is associated with the frequency that children engage in outdoor active play outside of school hours. Methods. Participants consisted of 514 children aged 7-12 years and one of their parents. Parents completed a survey that included four questions that assessed how frequently they used verbal cues to encourage their child to play outdoors. Points were assigned to each response and averaged across the 4 questions, and based on this average participants were assigned to quintiles. The survey included seven questions that asked parents to assess how frequently their child played outdoors outside of school hours. Points were assigned to each response and summed to create an active outdoor play frequency score. General linear models assessed associations between parental encouragement and outdoor play while controlling for individual, family, and neighborhood covariates. Results. The mean outdoor active play frequency score increased significantly across quintiles of the parental encouragement score as follows: 6.0 (standard error = 0.7) in quintile 1, 9.8 (0.6) in quintile 2, 11.4 (0.6) in quintile 3, 16.2 (0.9) in quintile 4, and 23.3 (1.3) in quintile 5. After adjusting for covariates, the mean outdoor active play frequency score was almost three times higher in the highest parental encouragement quintile than in the lowest quintile (20.4 vs. 7.8). Conclusions. Parents use of verbal cues to encourage their children to play outdoors was independently associated with outdoor active play among 7-12 year olds. PMID:26644990

  19. Parental encouragement is positively associated with outdoor active play outside of school hours among 7–12 year olds

    PubMed Central

    Ferrao, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background. Physical activity is important for children’s physical, mental, and social well-being. Outdoor active play is an important yet unstudied domain of children’s physical activity. The objective of this study was to determine if parental encouragement is associated with the frequency that children engage in outdoor active play outside of school hours. Methods. Participants consisted of 514 children aged 7–12 years and one of their parents. Parents completed a survey that included four questions that assessed how frequently they used verbal cues to encourage their child to play outdoors. Points were assigned to each response and averaged across the 4 questions, and based on this average participants were assigned to quintiles. The survey included seven questions that asked parents to assess how frequently their child played outdoors outside of school hours. Points were assigned to each response and summed to create an active outdoor play frequency score. General linear models assessed associations between parental encouragement and outdoor play while controlling for individual, family, and neighborhood covariates. Results. The mean outdoor active play frequency score increased significantly across quintiles of the parental encouragement score as follows: 6.0 (standard error = 0.7) in quintile 1, 9.8 (0.6) in quintile 2, 11.4 (0.6) in quintile 3, 16.2 (0.9) in quintile 4, and 23.3 (1.3) in quintile 5. After adjusting for covariates, the mean outdoor active play frequency score was almost three times higher in the highest parental encouragement quintile than in the lowest quintile (20.4 vs. 7.8). Conclusions. Parents use of verbal cues to encourage their children to play outdoors was independently associated with outdoor active play among 7–12 year olds. PMID:26644990

  20. Consent and the Indian medical practitioner

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ajay; Mullick, Parul; Prakash, Smita; Bharadwaj, Aseem

    2015-01-01

    Consent is a legal requirement of medical practice and not a procedural formality. Getting a mere signature on a form is no consent. If a patient is rushed into signing consent, without giving sufficient information, the consent may be invalid, despite the signature. Often medical professionals either ignore or are ignorant of the requirements of a valid consent and its legal implications. Instances where either consent was not taken or when an invalid consent was obtained have been a subject matter of judicial scrutiny in several medical malpractice cases. This article highlights the essential principles of consent and the Indian law related to it along with some citations, so that medical practitioners are not only able to safeguard themselves against litigations and unnecessary harassment but can act rightfully. PMID:26755833

  1. Psychometrics of the preschooler physical activity parenting practices instrument among a Latino sample

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Latino preschoolers (3-5 year old children) have among the highest rates of obesity. Low levels of physical activity (PA) are a risk factor for obesity. Characterizing what Latino parents do to encourage or discourage their preschooler to be physically active can help inform interventions to increase their PA. The objective was therefore to develop and assess the psychometrics of a new instrument: the Preschooler Physical Activity Parenting Practices (PPAPP) among a Latino sample, to assess parenting practices used to encourage or discourage PA among preschool-aged children. Methods Cross-sectional study of 240 Latino parents who reported the frequency of using PA parenting practices. 95% of respondents were mothers; 42% had more than a high school education. Child mean age was 4.5 (±0.9) years (52% male). Test-retest reliability was assessed in 20%, 2 weeks later. We assessed the fit of a priori models using Confirmatory factor analyses (CFA). In a separate sub-sample (35%), preschool-aged children wore accelerometers to assess associations with their PA and PPAPP subscales. Results The a-priori models showed poor fit to the data. A modified factor structure for encouraging PPAPP had one multiple-item scale: engagement (15 items), and two single-items (have outdoor toys; not enroll in sport-reverse coded). The final factor structure for discouraging PPAPP had 4 subscales: promote inactive transport (3 items), promote screen time (3 items), psychological control (4 items) and restricting for safety (4 items). Test-retest reliability (ICC) for the two scales ranged from 0.56-0.85. Cronbach’s alphas ranged from 0.5-0.9. Several sub-factors correlated in the expected direction with children’s objectively measured PA. Conclusion The final models for encouraging and discouraging PPAPP had moderate to good fit, with moderate to excellent test-retest reliabilities. The PPAPP should be further evaluated to better assess its associations with children’s PA

  2. 10 CFR 706.11 - Consent elections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Consent elections. 706.11 Section 706.11 Energy DEPARTMENT... and Procedures in National Labor Relations Board Proceedings § 706.11 Consent elections. In accordance... determine bargaining units and representatives by agreement and consent elections in preference to...

  3. 10 CFR 706.11 - Consent elections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Consent elections. 706.11 Section 706.11 Energy DEPARTMENT... and Procedures in National Labor Relations Board Proceedings § 706.11 Consent elections. In accordance... determine bargaining units and representatives by agreement and consent elections in preference to...

  4. 10 CFR 706.11 - Consent elections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Consent elections. 706.11 Section 706.11 Energy DEPARTMENT... and Procedures in National Labor Relations Board Proceedings § 706.11 Consent elections. In accordance... determine bargaining units and representatives by agreement and consent elections in preference to...

  5. 10 CFR 706.11 - Consent elections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Consent elections. 706.11 Section 706.11 Energy DEPARTMENT... and Procedures in National Labor Relations Board Proceedings § 706.11 Consent elections. In accordance... determine bargaining units and representatives by agreement and consent elections in preference to...

  6. 42 CFR 441.257 - Informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Sterilizations § 441.257 Informed consent. (a) Informing the individual. For purposes of this subpart, an individual has given informed consent only if— (1) The person who obtained consent for the sterilization... procedure at any time before the sterilization without affecting the right to future care or treatment...

  7. 47 CFR 1.93 - Consent orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Consent orders. 1.93 Section 1.93... Procedure Miscellaneous Proceedings § 1.93 Consent orders. (a) As used in this subpart, a “consent order” is... disposing of all issues on which the proceeding was designated for hearing. The order is issued by...

  8. 14 CFR 16.34 - Consent orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Consent orders. 16.34 Section 16.34....34 Consent orders. (a) The parties may agree at any time before the issuance of a final agency decision to dispose of the case by proposing a consent order. Good faith efforts to resolve a...

  9. 47 CFR 1.93 - Consent orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Consent orders. 1.93 Section 1.93... Procedure Miscellaneous Proceedings § 1.93 Consent orders. (a) As used in this subpart, a “consent order” is... disposing of all issues on which the proceeding was designated for hearing. The order is issued by...

  10. 14 CFR 16.243 - Consent orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Consent orders. 16.243 Section 16.243... PRACTICE FOR FEDERALLY-ASSISTED AIRPORT ENFORCEMENT PROCEEDINGS Hearings § 16.243 Consent orders. (a) The... order to dispose of the case by issuance of a consent order. Good faith efforts to resolve a...

  11. Pediatric consent: case study analysis using a principles approach.

    PubMed

    Azotam, Adaorah N U

    2012-07-01

    This article will explore pediatric consent through the analysis of a clinical case study using the principles of biomedical ethics approach. Application of the principles of autonomy, nonmaleficence, beneficence, and justice will be dissected in order to attempt to establish resolution of the ethical dilemma. The main conflict in this case study deals with whether the wishes of an adolescent for end-of-life care should be followed or should the desire of his parents outweigh this request. In terminal cancer, the hope of early palliative care and dignity in dying serve as priorities in therapy. Application of the moral principles to both sides of the dilemma aided in providing an objective resolution to uphold pediatric consent. PMID:22753459

  12. Built environment characteristics and parent active transportation are associated with active travel to school in youth age 12–15

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Jordan A; Sallis, James F; Kerr, Jacqueline; Conway, Terry L; Cain, Kelli; Frank, Lawrence D; Saelens, Brian E

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the relation of factors from multiple levels of ecological models (ie, individual, interpersonal and environmental) to active travel to/from school in an observational study of young adolescents. Methods Participants were 294 12–15-year olds living within two miles of their school. Demographic, psychosocial and perceived built environment characteristics around the home were measured by survey, and objective built environment factors around home and school were assessed in Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Mixed effects multinomial regression models tested correlates of engaging in 1–4 (vs 0) and 5–10 (vs 0) active trips/week to/from school, adjusted for distance and other covariates. Results 64% of participants reported ≥1 active trip/ week to/from school. Significant correlates of occasional and/or habitual active travel to/from school included barriers (ORs=0.27 and 0.15), parent modelling of active travel (OR=3.27 for habitual), perceived street connectivity (OR=1.78 for occasional), perceived pedestrian safety around home (OR=2.04 for habitual), objective street connectivity around home (OR=0.97 for occasional), objective residential density around home (ORs=1.10 and 1.11) and objective residential density around school (OR=1.14 for habitual). Parent modelling interacted with pedestrian safety in explaining active travel to/from school. Conclusions Results supported multilevel correlates of adolescents active travel to school, consistent with ecological models. Correlates of occasional and habitual active travel to/from school were similar. Built environment attributes around schools, particularly residential density, should be considered when siting new schools and redeveloping neighbourhoods around existing schools. PMID:24659503

  13. The Promotion of Gross and Fine Motor Development for Infants and Toddlers: Developmentally Appropriate Activities for Parents and Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Debra S.

    In recognition of the close relationship between motor skill and cognitive development in the first 2 years of life, this guide presents 78 developmentally appropriate activities that parents and teachers can use to enhance infant and toddler motor development. Activities are categorized by age group as follows: (1) 16 activities for newborn to…

  14. Let Nature Be the Teacher: Seasonal Natural History Activities for Parents and Other Educators To Share with Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gertz, Lucille N.

    This book is designed to provide parents and other adult companions with activities to do with children on outdoor walks. The activities offer adults and children a shared learning experience and have been adapted from the children's education program at Habitat Institute for the Environment (Massachusetts). The activities are arranged seasonally,…

  15. Aspects of vulnerable patients and informed consent in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Kuthning, Maria; Hundt, Ferdinand

    2013-01-01

    Scope: To discuss the rationale behind informed consent in clinical trials focusing on vulnerable patients from a European and German viewpoint. Methods: Scientific literature search via PubMed, Medline, Google. Results: Voluntary informed consent is the cornerstone of policies regulating clinical trials. To enroll a patient into a clinical trial without having obtained written and signed consent is to be considered as a serious issue in the conduct of a clinical trial. Development of ethical guidance for physicians started before Christ Era with the Hippocratic Oath. Main function of consent, as articulated in all guidelines developed for clinical research, is to facilitate an individual’s freedom of choice, respect autonomy, and thus to ensure welfare of the participants in clinical trials. Minors are unable to provide legally binding informed consent, this issue is addressed through a combination of parental permission and minor’s assent. Illiteracy is a critical problem that affects all corners of our earth; it has no boundaries and exists among every race and ethnicity, age group, and economic class. New strategies to improve communication with patients including the use of videotapes or animated cartoon illustrations could be taught. Finally the time with the potential participant seems to be the best way to improve understanding. Conclusion: Discovery of life saving and life enhancing new treatments requires partnership that is based on good communication and trust between patients and researchers, sponsors, ethics committees, authorities, lawyers and politicians so that vulnerable patients can benefit from the results of well controlled clinical trials. PMID:23346043

  16. Models of traumatic experiences and children's psychological adjustment: the roles of perceived parenting and the children's own resources and activity.

    PubMed

    Punamäki, R L; Qouta, S; el Sarraj, E

    1997-08-01

    The relations between traumatic events, perceived parenting styles, children's resources, political activity, and psychological adjustment were examined among 108 Palestinian boys and girls of 11-12 years of age. The results showed that exposure to traumatic events increased psychological adjustment problems directly and via 2 mediating paths. First, the more traumatic events children had experienced, the more negative parenting they experienced. And, the poorer they perceived parenting, the more they suffered from high neuroticism and low self-esteem. Second, the more traumatic events children had experienced, the more political activity they showed, and the more active they were, the more they suffered from psychological adjustment problems. Good perceived parenting protected children's psychological adjustment by making them less vulnerable in two ways. First, traumatic events decreased their intellectual, creative, and cognitive resources, and a lack of resources predicted many psychological adjustment problems in a model excluding perceived parenting. Second, political activity increased psychological adjustment problems in the same model, but not in the model including good parenting. PMID:9306648

  17. Low socio-economic environmental determinants of children's physical activity in Coventry, UK: A Qualitative study in parents

    PubMed Central

    Eyre, E.L.J.; Duncan, M.J.; Birch, S.L.; Cox, V.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Children's physical activity (PA) is affected by socio-economic status (SES) and the environment. Children are not fully autonomous in their decision making; parental decisions thus affect how children utilise their surrounding environments for PA. The aim was to examine environmental influences on children's PA from a qualitative perspective in parents from low SES wards in Coventry, UK. Method 59 parents of children in year 4 (aged 8–9years) completed the ALPHA environmental questionnaire. 16 of these parents took part in focus group discussions examining environmental facilitators and barriers to their child's PA (March–April, 2013). Results Emerging themes related to physical (i.e. poor access, safety and quality of the neighbourhood) and social environment (i.e. ‘rough’ neighbourhood due to crime and anti-social behaviour) influences on the PA behaviour of children. The parents believed these environmental factors resulted in the children engaging in greater sedentary activity (watching TV) indoors. The school environment was perceived as a supportive physical environment for children's PA behaviour. Conclusion Parent's perceptions of an unsupportive physical and social environment restrict children's opportunities to play outside and be physically active and may lead to increased body fat (BF). Schools provide a supportive environment for children from low SES to be physically active in. PMID:26844037

  18. Reporting ethics committee approval and informed consent: Review of an Ayurvedic journal

    PubMed Central

    Bolshete, Pravin M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Reporting of ethical approval and informed consent in clinical research articles involving human subjects is necessary as per the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE). Aim: To assess the reporting of ethics committee approval and informed consent in clinical research articles published in AYU journal. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of published articles in AYU from 2012 to 2014. All original articles (clinical research) were included. Data was collected to note – Ethics Committee approval and written informed consent (assent from children when applicable). Descriptive statistics was used to report the findings. Results: A total of 104 articles were included in this analysis. Of these, 38 articles included children. Ethics committee approval was reported in 53 (51.0%) articles and consent was also reported in 51 (49.0%) articles. Thirty-eight (36.5%) articles reported both ethics committee approval and consent, whereas 38 (36.5%) articles did not report both. Only five articles reported consent from guardian or parent whereas none of the articles were reported assent. Conclusion: Findings from this study demonstrate that Ayurvedic clinical research articles lack in reporting ethics committee approval and written informed consent.

  19. Do children's health resources differ according to preschool physical activity programmes and parental behaviour? A mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Sterdt, Elena; Pape, Natalie; Kramer, Silke; Liersch, Sebastian; Urban, Michael; Werning, Rolf; Walter, Ulla

    2014-03-01

    Preschool can have positive effects on the development of a healthy lifestyle. The present study analysed to what extent different conditions, structures and behavioural models in preschool and family-children's central social microsystems-can lead to differences in children's health resources. Using a cross-sectional mixed methods approach, contrast analyses of "preschools with systematic physical activity programmes" versus "preschools without physical activity programmes" were conducted to assess the extent to which children's physical activity, quality of life and social behaviour differ between preschools with systematic and preschools without physical activity programmes. Differences in children's physical activity according to parental behaviour were likewise assessed. Data on child-related outcomes and parent-related factors were collected via parent questionnaires and child interviews. A qualitative focused ethnographic study was performed to obtain deeper insight into the quantitative survey data. Two hundred and twenty seven (227) children were interviewed at 21 preschools with systematic physical activity programmes, and 190 at 25 preschools without physical activity programmes. There was no significant difference in children's physical activity levels between the two preschool types (p = 0.709). However, the qualitative data showed differences in the design and quality of programmes to promote children's physical activity. Data triangulation revealed a strong influence of parental behaviour. The triangulation of methods provided comprehensive insight into the nature and extent of physical activity programmes in preschools and made it possible to capture the associations between systematic physical activity promotion and children's health resources in a differential manner. PMID:24577283

  20. Perceived Parental Barriers to and Strategies for Supporting Physical Activity and Healthy Eating among Head Start Children.

    PubMed

    Ling, Jiying; B Robbins, Lorraine; Hines-Martin, Vicki

    2016-06-01

    Despite the need for parents to support their children's healthy behaviors, knowledge of factors preventing parents from doing so is still rudimentary. This study primarily aimed to explore perceived parental barriers to and strategies for supporting physical activity and healthy eating among Head Start children. A semi-structured interview format was used with four focus groups conducted at two urban Head Start centers in the Midwestern U.S. A qualitative content analysis of audio-recorded sessions was facilitated using ATLAS.ti7. A convenience sample of 32 parents (Mage = 34.97 years) participated. Over half were female (78.1 %), African Americans (65.6 %), and single (65.6 %). About 61.3 % reported an annual family income <$20,000, and 43.8 % were unemployed. Three themes reflected the barriers: (1) intrapersonal (child): short attention span and limited eating preferences; (2) interpersonal (parent): lack of time and cooking skills and a tight family budget; and (3) environmental: inaccessible programs, lack of age-appropriate education, electronic media use, and unsafe environment. Parents across all groups expressed high interest in enrolling in a program with their children. Recommendations included: parents' support team; family outings at parks; taking a walk or enrolling in a class with children; and planting a garden. Many parents showed their preference for face-to-face meetings and a support group, but repulsion of counseling. To promote parental support in future interventions with Head Start children, their perceived intrapersonal, interpersonal, and environmental barriers should be considered as intervention targets. Involving parents through a support group and face-to-face meetings is recommended. PMID:26660100

  1. Female sexual subjectivity and verbal consent to receiving oral sex.

    PubMed

    Satinsky, Sonya; Jozkowski, Kristen N

    2015-01-01

    Women are less likely than men are to report receiving oral sex from their partners. Elements of sexual subjectivity may have implications for women's communication of consent to specific sexual acts. Sexually active women (n = 237) between 18 and 71 years of age (M = 28.85 years) completed an online survey measuring sociodemographic variables, entitlement to pleasure from partner, self-efficacy in achieving sexual pleasure, and consent communication at last receptive oral sex event. Participants were predominantly White (84.8%, n = 201) and in exclusive or monogamous sexual relationships (54.9%, n = 130). The authors used a 4-step test of mediation to determine whether self-efficacy in achieving sexual pleasure mediated the relation between entitlement to pleasure from partner and verbal consent communication. Self-efficacy emerged as a significant predictor of verbal consent communication (p <.01) in the fourth step, while entitlement to pleasure dropped out of the model (p >.05), indicating full mediation. Therefore, entitlement to pleasure predicted verbal consent to oral sex as a function of self-efficacy in achieving sexual pleasure. Sex-positive educational interventions may improve disparities between men and women in receiving oral sex from their partners. Results of this study offer insight into the ways in which culture-level forces affect interpersonal and intraindividual sexual health behaviors. PMID:24794174

  2. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR OBTAINING INFORMED CONSENT (SOP-1.13)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The CTEPP informed consent procedures are described in the SOP. After an eligible subject provides verbal consent, staff schedule a visit to meet with the subject in person to explain study activities and answer questions about the study. During the visit, staff demonstrate how...

  3. A cross-sectional study of the environment, physical activity, and screen time among young children and their parents

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To develop evidence-based interventions promoting healthy active lifestyles among young children and their parents, a greater understanding is needed of the correlates of physical activity and screen time in these dyads. Physical environment features within neighborhoods may have important influences on both children and their parents. The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between several features of the physical environment with physical activity and screen time among 511 young children (≤5 years old) and their parents, after adjusting for socio-demographic factors. Methods From May to September, 2011, parents of 0–5 year old children from Kingston, Canada completed a questionnaire that assessed socio-demographic characteristics, their physical activity and screen time, and their child’s physical activity and screen time. Guided by a previously developed conceptual framework, several physical environment features were assessed using Geographic Information Systems including, function (walkability), safety (road speed), aesthetics (streetscape), and destination (outdoor play/activity space, recreation facilities, distance to closest park, yard at home). Multilevel linear regression analyses were used to examine the relationships while adjusting for several socio-demographic factors. Results The only independent association observed for the physical environment features was between higher outdoor play/activity space and higher screen time levels among parents. Several associations were observed with socio-demographic variables. For physical activity, child age, child care status, and family socioeconomic status (SES) were independent correlates for children while sex was an independent correlate for parents. For screen time, child age and family SES were independent correlates for children while neighborhood SES was an independent correlate for parents. Conclusions The findings suggest that socio-demographic factors, including

  4. Physical Activity Levels in Chinese One-Year-Old Children and Their Parents, an Early STOPP China Study

    PubMed Central

    Hagströmer, Maria; Xiong, Yuelin; Zhang, Lanlan; Zhang, Jianduan; Marcus, Claude

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical activity (PA) is associated with health benefits, already in childhood. However, little is known about actual levels, patterns and gender differences in PA level in very young children. This study examines Chinese one-year-old children and their parents’ PA levels and patterns, and assesses the correlations between children’s PA level and gender, body mass index standard deviation score (BMI SDS), parental BMI and parental PA level. Methods Data from 123 families participating in the Early STOPP China study were used. Families were recruited based on parental BMI and were classified as either high-risk or low-risk of obesity. Parents and children wore an ActiGraph GT3X+ to assess the average PA levels. PA levels and hourly patterns during weekdays and weekends were examined as were correlations with gender, BMI SDS, parental BMI and parental PA levels. Results There were no significant differences in children’s averaged PA between risk groups, genders, or between weekdays and weekends. Children’s peak average activity level was at 7 pm and they were least active at 3 pm (p<0.001). Both mothers and fathers demonstrated a similar PA pattern as their children, although paternal PA level was consistently lower than that of mothers and children. No significant association was found between children’s PA and their gender, BMI SDS, parental BMI or paternal PA levels. Maternal PA was found positively associated with child PA (p<0.05). Conclusion PA in one-year-old Chinese children vary over the day but weekdays and weekends are similar. At this age, children’s PA is not related to gender, BMI SDS, parental BMI or paternal PA. Larger scale studies with more contextual information are needed to improve the understanding of our findings. PMID:27078684

  5. [The content and limits of consent to a medical procedure].

    PubMed

    Carnevale, A; Colagreco, A

    1999-01-01

    The bases of legality for any medical-surgical activity aimed at a therapeutical-diagnostic purpose is the consent of the patient. Such a consent must comply with some requirements of validity, first of all the owner of this right must be able to realize the significance of the assertion of his will. Besides, the awareness of the consent assumes that the surgeon should make a complete and detailed planning of the operation, with a clear reference to any possible hazard, as well as to any possible after-effects, as far as either the intellectual level or the motivity of the patient are concerned. After having examined the various laws covering, the legal, doctrinal and jurisprudential views, authors defines the aspects of the therapeutical treatment. The differences between a free decision and a true informed consent are outlined as well as the extension and the expression of same. It is particularly analysed the relationship between capacity and competence to get the juridical right. The question of understanding which is the best way to respect individual freedom, often reduced to a virtual level form a pathological restriction of individual autonomy, is still open. Moreover, the consent may really be effective only if it is specific, the is aimed at a well definite and accurate therapeutical act. Authors agrees with the criminalist interpretation that the medical surgical activity, out of consent of the patient, can give form to personal voluntary injury. In case of medical surgical treatment different from that previously agreed and out of a situation of therapeutic flagrant necessity, the authors are of the opinion that the inquiry has to concern the medical behaviour in order to estimate the medical surgical treatment as personal voluntary injury or as personal negligent injury. Some reasoned evaluations on the problem were considered at the end of the article. PMID:10804654

  6. Information Parents Must Know about Online Privacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markell, Ginny

    2000-01-01

    Presents four tips to help parents monitor whether website operators are complying with the 1988 Children's Online Privacy Protection Act: look for privacy policies on children's websites; determine if they ask for parental consent to collect personal information; regularly monitor information being sent to children; and determine if web operators…

  7. An Alternative to Residential Neighborhoods: An Exploratory Study of How Activity Spaces and Perception of Neighborhood Social Processes Relate to Maladaptive Parenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freisthler, Bridget; Thomas, Crystal A.; Curry, Susanna R.; Wolf, Jennifer Price

    2016-01-01

    Background: The environments where parents spend time, such as at work, at their child's school, or with friends and family, may exert a greater influence on their parenting behaviors than the residential neighborhoods where they live. These environments, termed activity spaces, provide individualized information about the where parents go,…

  8. Beyond the Schoolyard: The Role of Parenting Logics, Financial Resources, and Social Institutions in the Social Class Gap in Structured Activity Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Pamela R.; Lutz, Amy C.; Jayaram, Lakshmi

    2012-01-01

    We investigate class differences in youth activity participation with interview, survey, and archival data from a diverse sample of parents (n = 51) in two schools. Findings point toward structural rather than cultural explanations. Working- and middle-class parents overlap in parenting logics about participation, though differ in one respect:…

  9. Are Discussions about College between Parents and Their High School Children a College-Planning Activity? Making the Case and Testing the Predictors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Scott M.; Myers, Carrie B.

    2012-01-01

    Our research goals are to make the case that parent-student discussions about college planning should be seen as a distinct college-planning activity and to identify and test the relevant predictors of these discussions. Findings from over 4,000 parents and their high school children show that parent-student discussions are enhanced when both the…

  10. Open Your Cupboards to Learning Center Games: Activities for Reinforcing Math and Reading Skills for Teacher and Parent Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langham, Martha A.; Peterson, Nancy M.

    This book has been developed to furnish teachers and parents with ideas for activities and games which aid children in the transition from oral language to printed language for reading and math. These games are designed to provide children with activities and experiences that increase vocabularies and make them useful in communication, language…

  11. Perceived Parental Social Support and Moderate-to-Vigorous Physical Activity in Children at Risk of Obesity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunet, Jennifer; Sabiston, Catherine M.; O'Loughlin, Jennifer; Mathieu, Marie-Eve; Tremblay, Angelo; Barnett, Tracie A.; Lambert, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Identification of factors that relate to physical activity behavior in children at higher risk for weight problems--namely, children with obese parents--is key to informing the development of effective interventions to promote physical activity and reduce obesity. The purpose of our study was to examine children's perceptions of…

  12. Pathways Linking Perceived Athletic Competence and Parental Support at Age 9 Years to Girls' Physical Activity at Age 11 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davison, Kirsten Krahnstoever; Downs, Danielle Symons; Birch, Leann L.

    2006-01-01

    Girls' perceived athletic competence and parental support of physical activity across the ages of 9 to 11 years were examined as predictors of girls' physical activity at age 11 years. Participants were 174 girls and their mothers and fathers who completed questionnaires when the girls were ages 9 and 11 years. Two alternative temporal pathways…

  13. Development and Implementation of a Video-Based Physical Activity Preference Assessment for Children with Autism and Their Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sankovich, Lena

    2013-01-01

    Development and Implementation of a Video-Based Physical Activity Preference Assessment for Children with Autism and Their Parents Individuals with autism often lack the necessary motivation to engage in physical activity. In addition, due to the characteristics defining autism, such as deficits in social skills, motor coordination, and behavior,…

  14. Gender differences in heterosexual college students' conceptualizations and indicators of sexual consent: implications for contemporary sexual assault prevention education.

    PubMed

    Jozkowski, Kristen N; Peterson, Zoë D; Sanders, Stephanie A; Dennis, Barbara; Reece, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Because sexual assault is often defined in terms of nonconsent, many prevention efforts focus on promoting the clear communication of consent as a mechanism to reduce assault. Yet little research has specifically examined how sexual consent is being conceptualized by heterosexual college students. In this study, 185 Midwestern U.S. college students provided responses to open-ended questions addressing how they define, communicate, and interpret sexual consent and nonconsent. The study aimed to assess how college students define and communicate consent, with particular attention to gender differences in consent. Results indicated no gender differences in defining consent. However, there were significant differences in how men and women indicated their own consent and nonconsent, with women reporting more verbal strategies than men and men reporting more nonverbal strategies than women, and in how they interpreted their partner's consent and nonconsent, with men relying more on nonverbal indicators of consent than women. Such gender differences may help to explain some misunderstandings or misinterpretations of consent or agreement to engage in sexual activity, which could partially contribute to the occurrence of acquaintance rape; thus, a better understanding of consent has important implications for developing sexual assault prevention initiatives. PMID:23919322

  15. Use of Pediatrician Toolkit to Address Parental Perception of Children’s Weight Status, Nutrition, and Activity Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, Eliana M.; Jacobson Vann, Julie C.; Benjamin, John T.; Skinner, Asheley Cockrell; Wegner, Steven; Ammerman, Alice S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Communication of children’s weight status and targeted counseling by pediatricians may change parental perceptions or child dietary and physical activity (PA) behaviors. Purpose To determine whether accuracy of parental perception of children’s weight status and reports of related behaviors changed following a brief pediatrics resident intervention. Methods Parents (N=115) of children ages 4–12 years enrolled in Medicaid completed baseline questionnaires about prior communication of weight status and/or body mass index (BMI) with providers, perceptions of their children’s weight, and children s dietary and PA behaviors, and children were weighed and measured. Trained residents used a toolkit to communicate weight status to parents (via color-coded BMI charts) and counseled about mutually chosen healthy behaviors. Questionnaires were repeated at one and three months, and measurements were repeated for children with BMI≥85%. Results At baseline, 42% of parents of overweight children believed they were at healthy weight. Most (n=96; 83%) parents completed one-month, and 56% completed three month follow up questionnaires. Improvements in fruit and vegetable consumption, sweet drinks, unhealthy snacks, frequency of restaurant food, lower-fat milk, and screen time, occurred among both overweight and healthy weight children. There were also increases in discussions with providers about weight/BMI and parental accuracy of overweight assessment. Conclusions Parent accuracy of weight status and short term childhood dietary and PA behavior changes improved following resident pediatrician use of a toolkit to support communication of weight status and counseling. Further research needs to determine whether accurate parental perception motivates improved behavior change or healthier BMI trajectories. PMID:20554259

  16. Parents report intrapersonal, interpersonal, and environmental barriers to supporting healthy eating and physical activity among their preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, John; Needham, Lisa; Simpson, Janis Randall; Heeney, Elizabeth Shaver

    2008-04-01

    There is an increasing trend in childhood obesity in Canada and many preschool children are overweight or obese. The objective of this study was to explore parents' experiences and challenges in supporting healthy eating and physical activity among their preschool children. A qualitative descriptive study involving 5 focus groups was conducted. A convenience sample of 39 parents from 3 childcare centres in Hamilton, Ontario, participated. Parents were English speaking and had a child aged 2-5 years attending the childcare centre for at least 3 months. The research team read transcripts of the audio-taped sessions and used a constant comparison approach to develop themes, which involved coding comments by continually referring to previously coded comments for comparison. The social ecological model was used to organize the themes into 3 higher-level categories: (i) intrapersonal (individual): preschoolers' preferences and health; (ii) interpersonal (interactions): parents' and others' different views and practices, influence of the childcare centre, parents' lack of time, and family structure; and (iii) physical environment: accessibility of healthy foods, preschoolers with special needs, media influence, weather, lack of safety, and inaccessible resources. Parents perceived that there are various intrapersonal, interpersonal, and environmental barriers to supporting healthy eating and physical activity among their children. Program planners and health professionals can consider these barriers when developing interventions to promote healthy bodyweights among preschoolers. PMID:18347689

  17. Parents' Behavioral Norms as Predictors of Adolescent Sexual Activity and Contraceptive Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Sharon A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Used clustered sample household survey of 329 males and females aged 14 to 17, and 470 of their parents to examine influence of parental factors on adolescent sexual behavior and contraceptive use. Found parents' reported behavioral norms accounted for 5% of variance in whether adolescents had had intercourse, and for 33% of variance in…

  18. Rewards for Kids! Ready-to-Use Charts and Activities for Positive Parenting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiller, Viriginia M.; Schneider, Meg F.

    Finding ways to encourage preschoolers and elementary school children to behave well without resorting to scolding, threats, or bribery is a challenge for parents. This book advocates the positive parenting technique of rewards as the key to good behavior and shows parents how to use a variety of child-friendly sticker charts and other tools to…

  19. Time-Resolved Records of Magnetic Activity on the Pallasite Parent Body and Psyche

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryson, J. F. J.; Nichols, C. I. O.; Herrero-Albillos, J.; Kronast, F.; Kasama, T.; Alimadadi, H.; van der Laan, G.; Nimmo, F.; Harrison, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Although many small bodies apparently generated dynamo fields in the early solar system, the nature and temporal evolution of these fields has remained enigmatic. Time-resolved records of the Earth's planetary field have been essential in understanding the dynamic history of our planet, and equivalent information from asteroids could provide a unique insight into the development of the solar system. Here we present time-resolved records of magnetic activity on the main-group pallasite parent body and (16) Psyche, obtained using newly-developed nanomagnetic imaging techniques. For the pallasite parent body, the inferred field direction remained relatively constant and the intensity was initially stable at ~100 μT before it decreased in two discrete steps down to 0 μT. We interpret this behaviour as due to vigorous dynamo activity driven by compositional convection in the core, ultimately transitioning from a dipolar to multipolar field as the inner core grew from the bottom-up. For Psyche (measured from IVA iron meteorites), the inferred field direction reversed, while the intensity remained stable at >50 μT. Psyche cooled rapidly as an unmantled core, although the resulting thermal convection alone cannot explain these observations. Instead, this behaviour required top-down core solidification, and is attributed either to compositional convection (if the core also solidified from the bottom-up) or convection generated directly by top-down solidification (e.g. Fe-snow). The mechanism governing convection in small body cores is an open question (due partly to uncertainties in the direction of core solidification), and these observations suggest that unconventional (i.e. not thermal) mechanisms acted in the early solar system. These mechanisms are very efficient at generating convection, implying a long-lasting and widespread epoch of dynamo activity among small bodies in the early solar system.

  20. Parental perceived neighborhood attributes: associations with active transport and physical activity among 10–12 year old children and the mediating role of independent mobility

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background During the last decades, the use of active travel modes declined in all age groups. Childhood is a critical time to establish lifelong healthy patterns. To develop effective interventions in this age group, insight in the correlates of health behaviors and the possible mediating factors is necessary. Among children, the role of parents may not be overlooked. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the associations of parental perceptions of neighborhood environmental attributes with active transport and total physical activity in 10–12 year old Belgian boys and girls. Furthermore, this study examined the potential mediating effect of independent mobility on these associations. Methods In the present study, 736 10–12 year old children and their parents from 44 elementary schools in Flanders, Belgium, participated. The children were asked to wear an activity monitor and to fill in a survey questioning demographic factors and the Flemish Physical Activity Questionnaire. The parents filled in a survey concerning demographic factors, the child’s level of independent mobility and environmental perceptions (Neighborhood Environmental Walkability Scale). Results Overall, boys reported more active transport when parents perceived more land use mix diversity, shorter distances to school, good land use mix access, higher residential density and less pleasing neighborhood aesthetics. Higher total physical activity levels were reported when parents perceived shorter distances to school and availability of walking/cycling infrastructure. None of the associations was mediated by independent mobility in boys. Girls reported more active transport when parents perceived higher residential density, more land use mix diversity, shorter distances to school, good land use mix access, available walking/cycling infrastructure and convenient recreational facilities. Girls reported higher total physical activity levels when parents perceived high residential density, good

  1. Legal issues affecting confidentiality and informed consent in reproductive health.

    PubMed

    Rockett, L R

    2000-01-01

    The law governing confidentiality and informed consent has acquired unique characteristics in the area of reproductive health, as a consequence of both the establishment of a constitutional right to privacy in reproductive health matters and the reaction of those politically and morally opposed to the exercise of that right. The primary issues have involved: 1) the right of minors to receive reproductive health services without parental consent, which remains a political battleground; 2) laws requiring physicians to provide information to pregnant patients that is intended, not to inform them of the risks and benefits of the procedure, but to discourage them from obtaining abortions; 3) coerced and prohibited sterilizations; 4) court-ordered contraception and procedures to protect the fetus; and 5) restrictions on counseling about abortion, contraception, sterilization, and other reproductive health services authorized by state conscience or noncompliance clauses that shield such restrictions from the usual ethical, medical, and legal rules governing informed consent. The last area is of profound significance to the ability of women to make informed decisions about their reproductive health options. In the current economic environment, which fuels mergers and acquisitions involving sectarian and nonsectarian institutions, women are increasingly being put at risk as a result of such restrictions. PMID:11070641

  2. [E-research: problems with anonymity and consent].

    PubMed

    Woolderink, Marla; van Asselt, Antoinette D I; van Schayck, Constant P; van Wijmen, Frans C B

    2013-01-01

    The Medical Research Involving Human Subjects Act (WMO) requires that participants in medical-scientific studies provide written consent. This requirement makes e-research (online research) unnecessarily difficult and sometimes impossible. Much of e-research involves online interventions that focus on sensitive issues such as sexual dysfunction, addiction and child abuse, for which anonymity is an important condition. WMO procedures, however, strictly interpret the word "written" as "on paper", and participants are not permitted to give consent by email, for example. A second requirement, which mainly makes studies among minors between the ages of 12 and 18 more difficult, is that both parents or the guardian must provide written consent. This undermines anonymity to such an extent that virtually no subjects remain. Participants in medical-scientific studies must always be identifiable to the investigator. But, apart from this, he/she should be possible to guarantee anonymity within the regulatory framework. There is good reason to adapt legal regulations to today's needs. PMID:24345359

  3. Informed patient consent: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Dowd, S B; Wilson, B

    1995-01-01

    This article reviews the concept of informed patient consent by examining two long-term studies in which adequate consent was not obtained from study participants: the radiation experiments sponsored by the U.S. government beginning in the 1940s and the Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment conducted from 1932 to 1972. The article discusses how these experiments represent a violation of informed consent guidelines and research ethics. It also explores the ethical implications of the experiments to radiologic technologists today and discusses the technologist's role in obtaining patient consent in research and clinical practice settings. PMID:8570838

  4. The issue of consent in medical practice.

    PubMed

    Larner, Elizabeth; Carter, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Following a recent court judgment, legal and moral issues surrounding consent have been thrown into the spotlight. Elizabeth Larner, Solicitor, and Rachel Carter, Partner, of Wollen Michelmore LLP, look at the issues surrounding consent, including where problems arise in the fields of clinical negligence and non-accidental injury and what health care professionals can do to ensure that their advice to a patient about a procedure or treatment is sufficiently cogent and appropriately recorded so as to avoid later criticism and possible legal action. This annotation gives an overview of the legal principles surrounding consent in medical practice including informed consent, refusal of treatment and issues of capacity. PMID:26564240

  5. Involving Latino Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quezada, Reyes L.; Diaz, Delia M.; Sanchez, Maria

    2003-01-01

    Describes barriers to Latino parent involvement in educational activities, factors to consider when involving Latino parents, and two examples of Latino involvement programs in California: Family Literacy Workshop at James Monroe Elementary School, Madera Unified School District, and Parents Take P.A.R.T. (Parent Assisted Reading Training) at…

  6. Parental Involvement. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1994

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter contains seven articles about meaningful participation by parents, particularly Hispanic and other minority parents, in the education of their children. "Parents Reclaiming Their Schools: New Initiative Brings Parents Together for Better Schools" (Aurelio M. Montemayor) describes objectives and activities of a Texas-based coalition…

  7. Ethical considerations in investigating youth alcohol norms and behaviours: a case for mature minor consent.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, J; Maycock, B; Comfort, J; Burns, S; Adams, E; Howat, P

    2015-12-01

    Mature minor consent only became available in Australia in 2007. There is neither an explicitly defined protocol, nor a clear definition evident in the literature relating to use of the mature minor concept in health research. Due to difficulties in defining fixed age ranges to varying levels of maturity and vulnerability, there is a lack of clarity surrounding when it might be reasonable and ethical to apply for or grant a waiver for parental consent. This paper describes the challenges faced and solutions created when gaining approval for use of mature minor consent in a respondent-driven sampling (RDS) study to explore the social norms and alcohol consumption among 14-17-year-old adolescents (n = 1012) in the community. The University's Human Research Ethics Committee granted mature minor consent for this study, and the techniques applied enabled recruitment of adolescents from community-based settings through use of RDS to achieve the required sample. This paper has relevance for research that requires a waiver for parental consent; it presents a case study for assessing mature minors and makes recommendations on how ethical guidelines can be improved to assist human research ethics application processes. PMID:26411327

  8. Placebo Effects and Informed Consent.

    PubMed

    Alfano, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The concepts of placebos and placebo effects refer to extremely diverse phenomena. I recommend dissolving the concepts of placebos and placebo effects into loosely related groups of specific mechanisms, including (potentially among others) expectation-fulfillment, classical conditioning, and attentional-somatic feedback loops. If this approach is on the right track, it has three main implications for the ethics of informed consent. First, because of the expectation-fulfillment mechanism, the process of informing cannot be considered independently from the potential effects of treatment. Obtaining informed consent influences the effects of treatment. This provides support for the authorized concealment and authorized deception paradigms, and perhaps even for outright deceptive placebo use. Second, doctors may easily fail to consider the potential benefits of conditioning, leading them to misjudge the trade-off between beneficence and autonomy. Third, how attentional-somatic feedback loops play out depends not only on the content of the informing process but also on its framing. This suggests a role for libertarian paternalism in clinical practice. PMID:26479091

  9. Using a Single-Item Physical Activity Measure to Describe and Validate Parents' Physical Activity Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Kyra; White, Katherine M.; Cuddihy, Tom

    2012-01-01

    The accurate measurement of health-related physical activity (PA), often interpreted as either 150 min/week of at least moderate-intensity PA (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2008) or at least 30 min of at least moderate-intensity PA on 5 or more days per week (Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing [AGDHA], 2005;…

  10. 49 CFR 11.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 11.117 Section... Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent... following: (1) A written consent document that embodies the elements of informed consent required by §...

  11. 7 CFR 1c.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 1c.117 Section 1c... Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent... following: (1) A written consent document that embodies the elements of informed consent required by §...

  12. 49 CFR 11.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 11.117 Section... Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent... following: (1) A written consent document that embodies the elements of informed consent required by §...

  13. 42 CFR 441.258 - Consent form requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... informed consent as set forth on the consent form; and (iii) To the best of his or her knowledge and belief... she explained orally the requirements for informed consent as set forth on the consent form; and (iii... than 72 hours after informed consent was obtained because of premature delivery or emergency...

  14. 42 CFR 441.258 - Consent form requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... informed consent as set forth on the consent form; and (iii) To the best of his or her knowledge and belief... she explained orally the requirements for informed consent as set forth on the consent form; and (iii... than 72 hours after informed consent was obtained because of premature delivery or emergency...

  15. 7 CFR 1c.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 1c.117 Section 1c... Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent... following: (1) A written consent document that embodies the elements of informed consent required by §...

  16. 49 CFR 11.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 11.117 Section... Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent... following: (1) A written consent document that embodies the elements of informed consent required by §...

  17. 45 CFR 46.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 46.117 Section... informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be...) A written consent document that embodies the elements of informed consent required by § 46.116....

  18. 49 CFR 11.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 11.117 Section... Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent... following: (1) A written consent document that embodies the elements of informed consent required by §...

  19. 45 CFR 46.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 46.117 Section... informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be...) A written consent document that embodies the elements of informed consent required by § 46.116....

  20. 7 CFR 1c.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 1c.117 Section 1c... Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent... following: (1) A written consent document that embodies the elements of informed consent required by §...

  1. 45 CFR 46.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 46.117 Section... informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be...) A written consent document that embodies the elements of informed consent required by § 46.116....

  2. 7 CFR 1c.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 1c.117 Section 1c... Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent... following: (1) A written consent document that embodies the elements of informed consent required by §...

  3. 49 CFR 11.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 11.117 Section... Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent... following: (1) A written consent document that embodies the elements of informed consent required by §...

  4. 21 CFR 50.25 - Elements of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Elements of informed consent. 50.25 Section 50.25... OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Informed Consent of Human Subjects § 50.25 Elements of informed consent. (a) Basic elements of informed consent. In seeking informed consent, the following information shall be provided...

  5. 21 CFR 50.25 - Elements of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Elements of informed consent. 50.25 Section 50.25... OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Informed Consent of Human Subjects § 50.25 Elements of informed consent. (a) Basic elements of informed consent. In seeking informed consent, the following information shall be provided...

  6. 21 CFR 50.25 - Elements of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Elements of informed consent. 50.25 Section 50.25... OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Informed Consent of Human Subjects § 50.25 Elements of informed consent. (a) Basic elements of informed consent. In seeking informed consent, the following information shall be provided...

  7. 21 CFR 50.25 - Elements of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Elements of informed consent. 50.25 Section 50.25... OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Informed Consent of Human Subjects § 50.25 Elements of informed consent. (a) Basic elements of informed consent. In seeking informed consent, the following information shall be provided...

  8. 21 CFR 50.25 - Elements of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Elements of informed consent. 50.25 Section 50.25... OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Informed Consent of Human Subjects § 50.25 Elements of informed consent. (a) Basic elements of informed consent. In seeking informed consent, the following information shall be provided...

  9. Passive exposures of children to volatile trihalomethanes during domestic cleaning activities of their parents

    SciTech Connect

    Andra, Syam S.; Charisiadis, Pantelis; Karakitsios, Spyros; Sarigiannis, Denis A.; Makris, Konstantinos C.

    2015-01-15

    Domestic cleaning has been proposed as a determinant of trihalomethanes (THMs) exposure in adult females. We hypothesized that parental housekeeping activities could influence children's passive exposures to THMs from their mere physical presence during domestic cleaning. In a recent cross-sectional study (n=382) in Cyprus [41 children (<18y) and 341 adults (≥18y)], we identified 29 children who met the study's inclusion criteria. Linear regression models were applied to understand the association between children sociodemographic variables, their individual practices influencing ingestion and noningestion exposures to ΣTHMs, and their urinary THMs levels. Among the children-specific variables, age alone showed a statistically significant inverse association with their creatinine-adjusted urinary ΣTHMs (r{sub S}=−0.59, p<0.001). A positive correlation was observed between urinary ΣTHMs (ng g{sup −1}) of children and matched-mothers (r{sub S}=0.52, p=0.014), but this was not the case for their matched-fathers (r{sub S}=0.39, p=0.112). Time spent daily by the matched-mothers for domestic mopping, toilet and other cleaning activities using chlorine-based cleaning products was associated with their children's urinary THMs levels (r{sub S}=0.56, p=0.007). This trend was not observed between children and their matched-fathers urinary ΣTHMs levels, because of minimum amount of time spent by the latter in performing domestic cleaning. The proportion of variance of creatinine-unadjusted and adjusted urinary ΣTHMs levels in children that was explained by the matched-mothers covariates was 76% and 74% (p<0.001), respectively. A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model adequately predicted urinary chloroform excretion estimates, being consistent with the corresponding measured levels. Our findings highlighted the influence of mothers' domestic cleaning activities towards enhancing passive THMs exposures of their children. The duration of such activities could be

  10. What is presumed when we presume consent?

    PubMed Central

    Pierscionek, Barbara K

    2008-01-01

    Background The organ donor shortfall in the UK has prompted calls to introduce legislation to allow for presumed consent: if there is no explicit objection to donation of an organ, consent should be presumed. The current debate has not taken in account accepted meanings of presumption in law and science and the consequences for rights of ownership that would arise should presumed consent become law. In addition, arguments revolve around the rights of the competent autonomous adult but do not always consider the more serious implications for children or the disabled. Discussion Any action or decision made on a presumption is accepted in law and science as one based on judgement of a provisional situation. It should therefore allow the possibility of reversing the action or decision. Presumed consent to organ donation will not permit such reversal. Placing prime importance on the functionality of body organs and their capacity to sustain life rather than on explicit consent of the individual will lead to further debate about rights of ownership and potentially to questions about financial incentives and to whom benefits should accrue. Factors that influence donor rates are not fully understood and attitudes of the public to presumed consent require further investigation. Presuming consent will also necessitate considering how such a measure would be applied in situations involving children and mentally incompetent adults. Summary The presumption of consent to organ donation cannot be understood in the same way as is presumption when applied to science or law. Consideration should be given to the consequences of presuming consent and to the questions of ownership and organ monetary value as these questions are likely to arise should presumed consent be permitted. In addition, the implications of presumed consent on children and adults who are unable to object to organ donation, requires serious contemplation if these most vulnerable members of society are to be

  11. Do Children’s Health Resources Differ According to Preschool Physical Activity Programmes and Parental Behaviour? A Mixed Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Sterdt, Elena; Pape, Natalie; Kramer, Silke; Liersch, Sebastian; Urban, Michael; Werning, Rolf; Walter, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    Preschool can have positive effects on the development of a healthy lifestyle. The present study analysed to what extent different conditions, structures and behavioural models in preschool and family—children’s central social microsystems—can lead to differences in children’s health resources. Using a cross-sectional mixed methods approach, contrast analyses of “preschools with systematic physical activity programmes” versus “preschools without physical activity programmes” were conducted to assess the extent to which children’s physical activity, quality of life and social behaviour differ between preschools with systematic and preschools without physical activity programmes. Differences in children’s physical activity according to parental behaviour were likewise assessed. Data on child-related outcomes and parent-related factors were collected via parent questionnaires and child interviews. A qualitative focused ethnographic study was performed to obtain deeper insight into the quantitative survey data. Two hundred and twenty seven (227) children were interviewed at 21 preschools with systematic physical activity programmes, and 190 at 25 preschools without physical activity programmes. There was no significant difference in children’s physical activity levels between the two preschool types (p = 0.709). However, the qualitative data showed differences in the design and quality of programmes to promote children’s physical activity. Data triangulation revealed a strong influence of parental behaviour. The triangulation of methods provided comprehensive insight into the nature and extent of physical activity programmes in preschools and made it possible to capture the associations between systematic physical activity promotion and children’s health resources in a differential manner. PMID:24577283

  12. Parental Involvement in School Activities and Reading Literacy: Findings and Implications from PIRLS 2011 Data. Policy Brief No. 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirazchiyski, Plamen; Klemencic, Eva

    2014-01-01

    This policy brief presents evidence demonstrating a positive association between parental involvement in school activities and student performance in the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS) 2011. This association, which was evident in most of the 54 education systems analyzed, indicates that students enrolled in schools with…

  13. Parent-Child Participation in Planning Children's Activities Outside of School in European American and Latino Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauvain, Mary; Perez, Susan M.

    2005-01-01

    This longitudinal research used a sociocultural perspective to examine planning competence in the everyday experiences of European American and Latino children from 7 to 9 years of age. Data on children's participation in planning their activities outside of school, parental expectations about children's planning competence, and children's…

  14. EXEL; Experience for Children in Learning. Parent-Directed Activities to Develop: Oral Expression, Visual Discrimination, Auditory Discrimination, Motor Coordination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrmann, Polly; Millman, Joan

    The activities collected in this handbook are planned for parents to use with their children in a learning experience. They can also be used in the classroom. Sections contain games designed to develop visual discrimination, auditory discrimination, motor coordination and oral expression. An objective is given for each game, and directions for…

  15. Longitudinal effects of parental child and neighborhood factors on moderate vigorous physical activity and sedentary time in Latino children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Moderate-vigorous physical activity (%MVPA) confers beneficial effects on child musculoskeletal health, cardiovascular fitness, and psychosocial well-being; in contrast, sedentary time (%SED) is emerging as a risk factor for health. This study aimed to identify parental, child and neighborhood facto...

  16. Perceptions of a School-Based Self-Management Program Promoting an Active Lifestyle among Elementary Schoolchildren, Teachers, and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardon, Greet Maria; Haerens, Leen Liesbeth; Verstraete, Stefanie; de Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse

    2009-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate how classroom-based self-management lessons to promote physical activity were perceived by students, teachers, and parents. The self-management lessons were implemented by an external physical education specialist in 20 class groups at eight elementary schools. Program perceptions were evaluated in 412…

  17. 21 CFR 640.61 - Informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Informed consent. 640.61 Section 640.61 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.61 Informed consent. The...

  18. 21 CFR 640.61 - Informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Informed consent. 640.61 Section 640.61 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.61 Informed consent. The...

  19. 21 CFR 640.61 - Informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Informed consent. 640.61 Section 640.61 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.61 Informed consent. The...

  20. 21 CFR 640.61 - Informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Informed consent. 640.61 Section 640.61 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.61 Informed consent. The...

  1. 40 CFR 57.605 - Consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Consent. 57.605 Section 57.605 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PRIMARY NONFERROUS SMELTER ORDERS Research and Development Requirements § 57.605 Consent. Each NSO shall...

  2. Informed consent for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Plumeri, P A

    1994-07-01

    The process of informed consent is an ethical, legal, and medical necessity for endoscopists before performing upper endoscopy. The basics of informed consent include the nature, benefits, risks, and alternatives of the procedure being performed. A simple, straightforward application of the process is essential to appropriate care by endoscopists in everyday clinical practice. PMID:8069471

  3. 28 CFR 512.16 - Informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Informed consent. 512.16 Section 512.16 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GENERAL MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION RESEARCH Research § 512.16 Informed consent. (a) Before commencing a research project requiring participation by staff or inmates, the...

  4. 28 CFR 512.16 - Informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Informed consent. 512.16 Section 512.16 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GENERAL MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION RESEARCH Research § 512.16 Informed consent. (a) Before commencing a research project...

  5. 21 CFR 640.61 - Informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Informed consent. 640.61 Section 640.61 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.61 Informed consent. The...

  6. 10 CFR 820.23 - Consent order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... consistent with the objectives of the Act and the DOE Nuclear Safety Requirements. The Director and a person... Consent Order need not constitute an admission by any person that the Act or a DOE Nuclear Safety... Act or a DOE Nuclear Safety Requirement. A Consent Order shall, however, set forth the relevant...

  7. 28 CFR 549.52 - Informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Informed consent. 549.52 Section 549.52 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Plastic Surgery § 549.52 Informed consent. Approved plastic surgery procedures may not be...

  8. 28 CFR 549.52 - Informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Informed consent. 549.52 Section 549.52 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Plastic Surgery § 549.52 Informed consent. Approved plastic surgery procedures may not be...

  9. 28 CFR 549.52 - Informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Informed consent. 549.52 Section 549.52 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Plastic Surgery § 549.52 Informed consent. Approved plastic surgery procedures may not be...

  10. 28 CFR 549.52 - Informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Informed consent. 549.52 Section 549.52 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Plastic Surgery § 549.52 Informed consent. Approved plastic surgery procedures may not be...

  11. 28 CFR 549.52 - Informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Informed consent. 549.52 Section 549.52 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Plastic Surgery § 549.52 Informed consent. Approved plastic surgery procedures may not be...

  12. 28 CFR 512.16 - Informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Informed consent. 512.16 Section 512.16... RESEARCH Research § 512.16 Informed consent. (a) Before commencing a research project requiring participation by staff or inmates, the researcher shall give each participant a written informed...

  13. 28 CFR 512.16 - Informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Informed consent. 512.16 Section 512.16... RESEARCH Research § 512.16 Informed consent. (a) Before commencing a research project requiring participation by staff or inmates, the researcher shall give each participant a written informed...

  14. 28 CFR 512.16 - Informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Informed consent. 512.16 Section 512.16... RESEARCH Research § 512.16 Informed consent. (a) Before commencing a research project requiring participation by staff or inmates, the researcher shall give each participant a written informed...

  15. 42 CFR 441.257 - Informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Informed consent. 441.257 Section 441.257 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: REQUIREMENTS AND LIMITS APPLICABLE TO SPECIFIC SERVICES Sterilizations § 441.257 Informed consent. (a)...

  16. Reinforcing Consent as a "Private Facts" Defense.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haberman, David A.

    To delineate the ideas of newsworthiness and consent as they apply to journalism and private facts lawsuits (those in which plaintiffs seek to stop publication of facts about themselves), this paper covers key areas of dispute. Various sections of the paper discuss (1) the definition of newsworthiness, (2) consent as a legal defense, (3) the…

  17. 14 CFR 13.13 - Consent orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Consent orders. 13.13 Section 13.13 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURAL RULES INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Legal Enforcement Actions § 13.13 Consent orders. (a) At any...

  18. 14 CFR 13.13 - Consent orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Consent orders. 13.13 Section 13.13 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURAL RULES INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Legal Enforcement Actions § 13.13 Consent orders. (a) At any...

  19. 14 CFR 13.13 - Consent orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Consent orders. 13.13 Section 13.13... INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Legal Enforcement Actions § 13.13 Consent orders. (a) At any time before the issuance of an order under this subpart, the official who issued the notice and the...

  20. 49 CFR 190.219 - Consent order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Consent order. 190.219 Section 190.219... REGULATORY PROCEDURES Enforcement Compliance Orders § 190.219 Consent order. Link to an amendment published at 78 FR 58912, September 25, 2013. (a) At any time before the issuance of a compliance order...

  1. 49 CFR 1503.423 - Consent orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Consent orders. 1503.423 Section 1503.423... Assessment of Civil Penalties by TSA § 1503.423 Consent orders. (a) Issuance. At any time before the issuance of an Order Assessing Civil Penalty under this subpart, an agency attorney and a person subject to...

  2. 49 CFR 1503.423 - Consent orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Consent orders. 1503.423 Section 1503.423... Assessment of Civil Penalties by TSA § 1503.423 Consent orders. (a) Issuance. At any time before the issuance of an Order Assessing Civil Penalty under this subpart, an agency attorney and a person subject to...

  3. 49 CFR 209.207 - Consent order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Consent order. 209.207 Section 209.207..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD SAFETY ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Compliance Orders § 209.207 Consent order. (a) At any time before the issuance of an order under § 209.211, the Chief Counsel and the...

  4. 49 CFR 190.219 - Consent order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Consent order. 190.219 Section 190.219... PROCEDURES Enforcement Compliance Orders § 190.219 Consent order. (a) At any time before the issuance of a compliance order under § 190.213 the Associate Administrator, OPS and the respondent may agree to dispose...

  5. What Hispanic parents do to encourage and discourage 3-5 year old children to be active: a qualitative study using nominal group technique

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Hispanic preschoolers are less active than their non-Hispanic peers. As part of a feasibility study to assess environmental and parenting influences on preschooler physical activity (PA) (Niños Activos), the aim of this study was to identify what parents do to encourage or discourage PA among Hispanic 3-5 year old children to inform the development of a new PA parenting practice instrument and future interventions to increase PA among Hispanic youth. Methods Nominal Group Technique (NGT), a structured multi-step group procedure, was used to elicit and prioritize responses from 10 groups of Hispanic parents regarding what parents do to encourage (5 groups) or discourage (5 groups) preschool aged children to be active. Five groups consisted of parents with low education (less than high school) and 5 with high education (high school or greater) distributed between the two NGT questions. Results Ten NGT groups (n = 74, range 4-11/group) generated 20-46 and 42-69 responses/group for practices that encourage or discourage PA respectively. Eight to 18 responses/group were elected as the most likely to encourage or discourage PA. Parental engagement in child activities, modeling PA, and feeding the child well were identified as parenting practices that encourage child PA. Allowing TV and videogame use, psychological control, physical or emotional abuse, and lack of parental engagement emerged as parenting practices that discourage children from being active. There were few differences in the pattern of responses by education level. Conclusions Parents identified ways they encourage and discourage 3-5 year-olds from PA, suggesting both are important targets for interventions. These will inform the development of a new PA parenting practice scale to be further evaluated. Further research should explore the role parents play in discouraging child PA, especially in using psychological control or submitting children to abuse, which were new findings in this study

  6. Informed consent practices of Chinese nurse researchers.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Douglas P; Honghong Wang; Pang, Samantha

    2010-03-01

    Nursing research in China is at an early stage of development and little is known about the practices of Chinese nurse researchers. This interview study carried out at a university in central China explores the informed consent practices of Chinese nurse researchers and the cultural considerations of using a western technique. Nine semistructured interviews were conducted in English with assistance and simultaneous translation from a Chinese nurse with research experience. The interviews were analyzed by one western and two Chinese researchers and major themes were identified. All participants endorsed informed consent as ethically required. Differences were noted between some of the informed consent practices typically recommended in the USA and those identified in this study, such as: recruitment using local and government officials, recruiting directly from medical records without special permission, family consultation in consent and consent control, and not revealing randomization to intervention groups receiving different treatments. PMID:20185442

  7. Informed consent for videoconsultations in Canada.

    PubMed

    Chouinard, Isabelle; Scott, Richard E

    2009-01-01

    We performed a qualitative study of the practice of informed consent for videoconsultation in Canada. Fourteen cases were examined: the 13 provinces and territories, and the Federal jurisdiction representing aboriginal groups. Twenty-seven interviews were conducted with key informants (14 telehealth experts, 13 legal experts). The telehealth experts were people with direct experience of telehealth practice. The majority of the telehealth experts agreed that videoconsultations had not been integrated into the health-care system. An interesting finding of the study was that the integration status of videoconsultations was not indicative of informed consent practices. Telehealth providers favoured express written consent, or risk management practices, although there was a desire to move towards implied consent models for videoconsultations. The study also showed that the legal ramifications of the electronic transmission of non-recorded, real-time, personal health information had not been explored. This represents an important factor in guiding future consent for videoconsultations in Canada. PMID:19471027

  8. Obtaining informed consent for genomics research in Africa: analysis of H3Africa consent documents

    PubMed Central

    Munung, Nchangwi Syntia; Marshall, Patricia; Campbell, Megan; Littler, Katherine; Masiye, Francis; Ouwe-Missi-Oukem-Boyer, Odile; Seeley, Janet; Stein, D J; Tindana, Paulina; de Vries, Jantina

    2016-01-01

    Background The rise in genomic and biobanking research worldwide has led to the development of different informed consent models for use in such research. This study analyses consent documents used by investigators in the H3Africa (Human Heredity and Health in Africa) Consortium. Methods A qualitative method for text analysis was used to analyse consent documents used in the collection of samples and data in H3Africa projects. Thematic domains included type of consent model, explanations of genetics/genomics, data sharing and feedback of test results. Results Informed consent documents for 13 of the 19 H3Africa projects were analysed. Seven projects used broad consent, five projects used tiered consent and one used specific consent. Genetics was mostly explained in terms of inherited characteristics, heredity and health, genes and disease causation, or disease susceptibility. Only one project made provisions for the feedback of individual genetic results. Conclusion H3Africa research makes use of three consent models—specific, tiered and broad consent. We outlined different strategies used by H3Africa investigators to explain concepts in genomics to potential research participants. To further ensure that the decision to participate in genomic research is informed and meaningful, we recommend that innovative approaches to the informed consent process be developed, preferably in consultation with research participants, research ethics committees and researchers in Africa. PMID:26644426

  9. What Can Parents Do? A Review of State Laws Regarding Decision Making for Adolescent Drug Abuse and Mental Health Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kerwin, MaryLouise E.; Kirby, Kimberly C.; Speziali, Dominic; Duggan, Morgan; Mellitz, Cynthia; Versek, Brian; McNamara, Ashley

    2013-01-01

    This study examined US state laws regarding parental and adolescent decision-making for substance use and mental health inpatient and outpatient treatment. State statues for requiring parental consent favored mental health over drug abuse treatment and inpatient over outpatient modalities. Parental consent was sufficient in 53%–61% of the states for inpatient treatment, but only for 39% – 46% of the states for outpatient treatment. State laws favored the rights of minors to access drug treatment without parental consent, and to do so at a younger age than for mental health treatment. Implications for how these laws may impact parents seeking help for their children are discussed. PMID:25870511

  10. Ethical Parenting of Sexually Active Youth: Ensuring Safety While Enabling Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bay-Cheng, Laina Y.

    2013-01-01

    The protection of children from harm is commonly accepted as the cardinal duty of parents. In the USA, where young people's sexuality is often regarded with anxiety, attempts to restrict adolescent sexual behaviour are seen as ethically justified and even required of "good" parents. Running counter to popular anxiety surrounding…

  11. Involving Parents of Young Children in Science, Math and Literacy Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landerholm, Elizabeth; And Others

    A summer parent involvement project was set up in a Chicago inner city public school in a Hispanic neighborhood. The eight-session program was intended to help parents: (1) become involved with the school program by becoming comfortable with the school setting; (2) enjoy reading and writing and replicate these experiences with their children; (3)…

  12. Improving Parent Involvement in a First Grade Classroom through the Use of Whole Language Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooper, Elizabeth J.

    Parents of a group of first graders knew very little about the whole-language approach to reading employed in their children's classroom and were consequently unable to help their children as they learned to read. A program was implemented to provide parents in a target group with an understanding of the whole-language approach to reading as well…

  13. Playing Smart: A Parent's Guide to Enriching, Offbeat Learning Activities for Ages 4-14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Susan K.; Espeland, Pamela, Ed.

    Recognizing that children need enrichment at home, this book offers hundreds of unusual ways for kids and parents to spend time together. It also demonstrates the fun people can have while learning, and the learning that goes on while having fun. Using this book as a guide, parents and children can survey new subjects ranging from cultural…

  14. What Hispanic parents do to encourage and discourage 3-5 year old children to be active: A qualitative study using nominal group technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hispanic pre-schoolers are less active than their non-Hispanic peers. As part of a feasibility study to assess environmental and parenting influences on pre-schooler physical activity (PA) (Ninos Activos), the aim of this study was to identify what parents do to encourage or discourage PA among Hisp...

  15. Consent and end of life decisions

    PubMed Central

    Harris, J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of consent in decision making generally and its role in end of life decisions in particular. It outlines a conception of autonomy which explains and justifies the role of consent in decision making and criticises some misapplications of the idea of consent, particular the role of fictitious or "proxy" consents. Where the inevitable outcome of a decision must be that a human individual will die and where that individual is a person who can consent, then that decision is ethical if and only if the individual consents. In very rare and extreme cases such a decision will be ethical in the absence of consent where it would be massively cruel not to end life in order to prevent suffering which is in no other way preventable. Where, however, the human individual is not a person, as is the case with abortion, the death of infants like Mary (one of the conjoined twins in a case discussed in the paper), or in the very rare and extreme cases of those who have ceased to be persons like Tony Bland, such decisions are governed by the ethics of ending the lives of non-persons. PMID:12569187

  16. Helping Parents Say No.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duel, Debra K.

    1988-01-01

    Provides some activities that are designed to help students understand some of the reasons why parents sometimes refuse to let their children have pets. Includes mathematics and writing lessons, a student checklist, and a set of tips for parents. (TW)

  17. Patient perceptions and recall of consent for regional anaesthesia compared with consent for surgery

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Matthew RD; Henley, Matthew; Tidman, Victoria; Pathmanathan, Ahilan

    2015-01-01

    Objective In Britain, consent for surgery is documented using a Department of Health form signed by the surgeon and the patient. In contrast, anaesthetic procedures have no formalised consent process. Evidence on the process of consent for regional anaesthesia, and patient perceptions of this, is scarce outside obstetric practice. We aimed to determine patient recall and perceptions of consent for interscalene brachial plexus block and compared this to surgical consent for shoulder arthroplasty. Design Prospective observational survey. Setting A specialist musculoskeletal centre, UK. Participants Forty-six patients (female:male 30:16, mean age 61 years) undergoing shoulder arthroplasty with interscalene brachial plexus block. Main outcome measures Recall and understanding of consent for regional anaesthesia and surgery was examined using a semi-structured questionnaire 1–2 days after arthroplasty. Surgical consent forms and discussions recorded by the anaesthetist were examined in participants’ medical notes to compare against the level of recall. Analysis to determine statistical significance was conducted using McNemar’s test. Results Recall of surgical risks was overall significantly better than recall of brachial plexus block risks. Compared to their recollections of surgical risk, patients remembered fewer specific risks for brachial plexus block (p < 0.001). There were more patients unable to recall any risks when questioned about brachial plexus block than about their surgery (p < 0.05). One-third of patients did not regard the consent discussion about regional anaesthesia as important as consent for surgery and over one-quarter had not recognised the preoperative discussion about the brachial plexus block as a consent process similar to that conducted for surgery. Conclusions Fundamental misunderstandings about the consent process are prevalent. Future work in this area should seek to investigate how documentation of the consent process and

  18. Informed Consent for Reconstructive Pelvic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Alam, Pakeeza; Iglesia, Cheryl B

    2016-03-01

    Informed consent is the process in which a patient makes a decision about a surgical procedure or medical intervention after adequate information is relayed by the physician and understood by the patient. This process is critical for reconstructive pelvic surgeries, particularly with the advent of vaginal mesh procedures. In this article, we review the principles of informed consent, the pros and cons of different approaches in reconstructive pelvic surgery, the current legal issues surrounding mesh use for vaginal surgery, and tips on how to incorporate this information when consenting patients for pelvic floor surgery. PMID:26880513

  19. Testing an Online, Dynamic Consent Portal for Large Population Biobank Research

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Daniel B.; Platt, Jodyn; Platt, Tevah; King, Susan B.; Fisher, Nicole; Shelton, Robert; Kardia, Sharon L. R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Michigan's BioTrust for Health, a public health research biobank comprised of residual dried bloodspot (DBS) cards from newborn screening contains over 4 million samples collected without written consent. Participant-centric initiatives (PCI) are IT tools that hold great promise to address the consent challenges in biobank research. Methods Working with Private Access Inc., a pioneer in patient-centric web solutions, we created and pilot tested a dynamic informed consent simulation, paired with an educational website, focusing on consent for research utilizing the DBS in Michigan's BioTrust for Health. Results Out of 187 pilot testers recruited in two groups, 137 completed the consent simulation and exit survey. Over 50% indicated willingness to set up an account if the simulation went live and willingness to recommend it to others. Participants raised concerns about the process of ID verification and appeared to have little experience with sharing health information online. Conclusions Applying online, dynamic approaches to address the consent challenges raised by biobanks with legacy sample collections should be explored given the positive reaction to our pilot and the strong preference for active consent. Balancing security and privacy with accessibility and ease of use will continue to be a challenge. PMID:25359560

  20. Ethics in action: consent-gaining interactions and implications for research practice.

    PubMed

    Speer, Susan A; Stokoe, Elizabeth

    2014-03-01

    This article deals with the topic of social psychological research methods in practice, by examining how informed consent is gained from research participants. In most research, the consent-gaining process is hidden from analytic scrutiny and is dealt with before data collection has begun. In contrast, conversation analytic research, which records interactional encounters from beginning to end, enables examination of this methodological 'black box'. We explored how 'requests' to consent in research played out across different institutional settings. We found that participants had to 'opt-out' of a research process that was already underway. Consent-gaining sequences constrained opting out in two ways: (1) because research activity was already underway, it must be stopped affirmatively by participants; (2) consent-gaining turns were tilted in favour of continued participation, making opting out a dispreferred response. We also found a mismatch between what ethics guidelines specify about consent-gaining 'in theory' and what actually happens 'in practice'. Finally, we make suggestions about interventions in and recommendations for existing practice to best achieve informed consent. PMID:23106687

  1. Passive exposures of children to volatile trihalomethanes during domestic cleaning activities of their parents.

    PubMed

    Andra, Syam S; Charisiadis, Pantelis; Karakitsios, Spyros; Sarigiannis, Denis A; Makris, Konstantinos C

    2015-01-01

    Domestic cleaning has been proposed as a determinant of trihalomethanes (THMs) exposure in adult females. We hypothesized that parental housekeeping activities could influence children's passive exposures to THMs from their mere physical presence during domestic cleaning. In a recent cross-sectional study (n = 382) in Cyprus [41 children (< 18 y) and 341 adults (≥ 18 y)], we identified 29 children who met the study's inclusion criteria. Linear regression models were applied to understand the association between children sociodemographic variables, their individual practices influencing ingestion and noningestion exposures to ΣTHMs, and their urinary THMs levels. Among the children-specific variables, age alone showed a statistically significant inverse association with their creatinine-adjusted urinary ΣTHMs (rS = -0.59, p < 0.001). A positive correlation was observed between urinary ΣTHMs (ng g(-1)) of children and matched-mothers (rS = 0.52, p = 0.014), but this was not the case for their matched-fathers (rS = 0.39, p = 0.112). Time spent daily by the matched-mothers for domestic mopping, toilet and other cleaning activities using chlorine-based cleaning products was associated with their children's urinary THMs levels (rS = 0.56, p = 0.007). This trend was not observed between children and their matched-fathers urinary ΣTHMs levels, because of minimum amount of time spent by the latter in performing domestic cleaning. The proportion of variance of creatinine-unadjusted and adjusted urinary ΣTHMs levels in children that was explained by the matched-mothers covariates was 76% and 74% (p < 0.001), respectively. A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model adequately predicted urinary chloroform excretion estimates, being consistent with the corresponding measured levels. Our findings highlighted the influence of mothers' domestic cleaning activities towards enhancing passive THMs exposures of their children. The duration of such activities could be further

  2. Competency and consent in dementia.

    PubMed

    Fellows, L K

    1998-07-01

    Health care for demented older persons presents a range of ethical dilemmas. The disease process affects cognitive abilities, making competency a central issue. The syndrome of dementia carries a complex social overlay that colors perceptions of these patients and of their capacity for making decisions. An argument is made for a coherent, ethically based decision-making process that can be applied across the whole spectrum of dementia severity. The major ethical principles implicated in assessing a patient's ability to consent to treatment are reviewed. A sliding scale model of capacity is presented, in which the patient's ability to decide is weighed against the risk associated with the treatment decision in question. This model preserves the autonomy of the demented patient while minimizing the potential for harm. In situations where the patient is deemed incapable, two approaches that can be applied to making treatment decisions are contrasted. The 'prior competent choice' standard stresses the values that the patient held while competent. The 'best interests' standard moves the focus to the patient's subjective experience at the time the treatment is considered. The relative merits of these two concepts are evaluated in the context of dementia. Surveys of actual decision-making practice are contrasted with ethical and legal principles. The challenges inherent to applying the best interests standard are discussed. Despite the pitfalls, this standard offers an opportunity to restore the demented patient's sense of self. PMID:9670887

  3. Recent Temporal Trends in Parent-Reported Physical Activity in Children in the United States, 2009 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Loprinzi, Paul D; Davis, Robert E

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to provide recent temporal trends in parent-reported physical activity in children (6-11 years) between 2009 and 2014. Data from the 2009 to 2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were used. The analytic sample included 3946 children. Parent proxy of child physical activity at each of the 3 2-year cycles was assessed. For the entire sample, there was a quadratic trend, with the number of days children engaged in at least 60 min/d of physical activity increasing in the period 2011 to 2012 (6.12 days) when compared with the period 2009 to 2010 (5.96 days) and then decreasing in the period 2013 to 2014 (5.83 days). A similar quadratic trend was evident for boys, those above the poverty level, non-Hispanic whites (particularly boys), and those with less than the 85th body mass index-for-age percentile based on sex. A negative linear trend was observed for those above the poverty level and non-Hispanic whites (particularly girls). In conclusion, these findings provide suggestive evidence that over the past 6 years (1999-2014), parents report that children's physical activity has slightly decreased in the latest years, with this observation being most pronounced in boys, those above the poverty level, non-Hispanic whites, and those with less than the 85th body mass index-for-age and sex percentile. Encouragingly, however, across all evaluated subpopulations, most children (55%-82%), as determined by their parents, engaged in 60 min/d of physical activity (consistent with government recommendations). PMID:26876728

  4. 32 CFR 634.8 - Implied consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to blood, breath, or urine tests. Persons who drive on the installation shall be deemed to have given their consent to evidential tests for alcohol or other drug content of their blood, breath, or...

  5. 32 CFR 634.8 - Implied consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to blood, breath, or urine tests. Persons who drive on the installation shall be deemed to have given their consent to evidential tests for alcohol or other drug content of their blood, breath, or...

  6. 32 CFR 634.8 - Implied consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to blood, breath, or urine tests. Persons who drive on the installation shall be deemed to have given their consent to evidential tests for alcohol or other drug content of their blood, breath, or...

  7. Informed Consent and Cluster-Randomized Trials

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Angus

    2012-01-01

    We argue that cluster-randomized trials are an important methodology, essential to the evaluation of many public health interventions. However, in the case of at least some cluster-randomized trials, it is not possible, or is incompatible with the aims of the study, to obtain individual informed consent. This should not necessarily be seen as an impediment to ethical approval, providing that sufficient justification is given for this omission. We further argue that it should be the institutional review board’s task to evaluate whether the protocol is sufficiently justified to proceed without consent and that this is preferable to any reliance on community consent or other means of proxy consent. PMID:22390511

  8. Informed consent: moral necessity or illusion?

    PubMed

    Doyal, L

    2001-09-01

    There is a professional and legal consensus about the clinical duty to obtain informed consent from patients before treating them. This duty is a reflection of wider cultural values about the moral importance of respect for individual autonomy. Recent research has raised practical problems about obtaining informed consent. Some patients have cognitive and emotional problems with understanding clinical information and do not apparently wish to participate in making decisions about their treatment. This paper argues that such research does not undermine their potential to provide informed consent. Rather, sufficient resources are required to create better communication skills among clinicians and more effective educational materials for patients. Finally, cognitive and emotional inequality among patients is maintained to be a reflection of wider social and economic inequalities. Researchers who take the right to informed consent seriously should also address these. PMID:11533435

  9. 77 FR 38060 - Proposed Consent Decree

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ... that no later than December 14, 2012, EPA shall sign a notice of final rulemaking setting forth its... proposed consent decree, EPA agrees that no later than December 14, 2012, EPA shall sign a notice of...

  10. The changing face of informed consent.

    PubMed

    Main, B G; Adair, S R L

    2015-10-01

    All healthcare professionals are required to gain a patient's consent before proceeding with examination, investigation or treatment. Gone are the days when consent was about protecting the professional. Following a recent landmark Supreme Court case, 'informed' consent is now embedded in UK law. Patients have the right to high-quality information that allows them to be involved in making decisions about their care. Dentists have a duty of care to provide this information and guide their patients through the process. This paper reviews key ethical, legal, and professional guidance available to dentists about informed consent and concludes by discussing how shared decision-making is a model of healthcare delivery with much to offer dentist and patient alike. PMID:26450244

  11. Advancing adolescent capacity to consent to transgender-related health care in Colombia and the USA.

    PubMed

    Romero, Katherine; Reingold, Rebecca

    2013-05-01

    Many sexual and reproductive health care services, including gender reassignment treatment, facilitate reproductive autonomy and self-determination of gender identity. Individuals who are unable to refuse or consent to these services on their own behalf, such as adolescents, are at risk of violations of their rights to privacy and self-determination. This paper explores the issue of adolescent capacity to consent to transgender-related health care in Colombia and the United States (USA), focusing on the two countries' struggles to balance the rights of adolescents to make autonomous and confidential decisions with the rights of their parents. Unfortunately, many countries, including Colombia and the USA, have been slow to develop jurisprudence and legislation that explicitly protect transgender adolescents' capacity to consent to gender assignment treatment. Courts in Colombia, however, have developed jurisprudence that restricts parents' ability to make medical decisions on behalf of their infant intersex children, which lays a strong normative foundation for advancing adolescent capacity to consent to transgender-related health care. It is a strategy that may prove effective in other countries in the Americas, even those with different frameworks for adolescent medical decision-making capacity, such as the USA. PMID:23684201

  12. A participatory parent-focused intervention promoting physical activity in preschools: design of a cluster-randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background With rates of childhood obesity increasing, physical activity (PA) promotion especially in young children has assumed greater importance. Given the limited effectiveness of most interventions to date, new approaches are needed. The General Systems theory suggests that involving parents as intervention targets may be effective in fostering healthier life styles in children. We describe the development of a parent-focused participatory intervention and the procedures used to evaluate its effectiveness in increasing daily PA in preschoolers. Methods/Design Thirty-seven South German preschools were identified for this study and agreed to participate. Using a two-armed, controlled cluster-randomized trial design we test a participatory intervention with parents as the primary target group and potential agents of behavioural change. Specifically, the intervention is designed to engage parents in the development, refinement and selection of project ideas to promote PA and in incorporating these ideas into daily routines within the preschool community, consisting of children, teachers and parents. Our study is embedded within an existing state-sponsored programme providing structured gym lessons to preschool children. Thus, child-based PA outcomes from the study arm with the parent-focused intervention and the state-sponsored programme are compared with those from the study arm with the state-sponsored programme alone. The evaluation entails baseline measurements of study outcomes as well as follow-up measurements at 6 and 12 months. Accelerometry measures PA intensity over a period of six days, with the mean over six days used as the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcomes include childrens' BMI, a sum of averaged skin fold thickness measurements across multiple sites, and PA behaviour. Longitudinal multilevel models are used to assess within-subject change and between-group differences in study outcomes, adjusted for covariates at the preschool and

  13. The Effect of Parent-Child Function on Physical Activity and Television Viewing among Adolescents with and without Special Healthcare Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McManus, Beth M.; Mandic, Carmen Gomez; Carle, Adam C.; Robert, Stephanie A.

    2012-01-01

    Using the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health, the association between parent-child function and physical activity and television viewing was investigated among a national sample of adolescents in the United States. Parent-child function was measured using the National Survey of Children's Health "Family Function" survey items and…

  14. The Development of Reading Skills in Kindergarten Influence of Parental Beliefs about School Readiness, Family Activities, and Children's Attitudes to School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Eunjoo

    2016-01-01

    Children's early home learning experiences are important influences on children's adjustment and achievement in the early years of school. This study explores the relationships between parental beliefs about school readiness, family engagement in home learning activities, on children's attitudes to school as reported by parents, and children's…

  15. 42 CFR 441.258 - Consent form requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Sterilizations § 441.258 Consent form requirements. (a) Content of consent form. The consent form must be a copy... the sterilization procedure. (c) Required certifications. (1) The person securing the consent must... be sterilized. (2) The physician performing the sterilization must certify, by signing the...

  16. 45 CFR 690.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 690.117 Section... PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 690.117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent...

  17. 34 CFR 97.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 97.117 Section 97...) § 97.117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form approved by the IRB and signed...

  18. 38 CFR 16.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 16.117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form... elements of informed consent required by § 16.116. This form may be read to the subject or the...

  19. 40 CFR 26.1117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 26... Intentional Exposure of Non-pregnant, Non-nursing Adults § 26.1117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Informed consent must be documented by the use of a written consent form approved by the IRB and signed...

  20. 22 CFR 225.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 225.117....117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form approved by the IRB and signed...

  1. 40 CFR 26.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 26... EPA § 26.117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form approved by the IRB...

  2. 40 CFR 26.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 26... EPA § 26.117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form approved by the IRB...

  3. 16 CFR 1028.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 1028.117... SUBJECTS § 1028.117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form approved by the IRB...

  4. 22 CFR 225.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 225.117....117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form approved by the IRB and signed...

  5. 21 CFR 50.27 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 50.27 Section... PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Informed Consent of Human Subjects § 50.27 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in § 56.109(c), informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written...

  6. 34 CFR 97.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 97.117 Section 97...) § 97.117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form approved by the IRB and signed...

  7. 40 CFR 26.1117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 26... Intentional Exposure of Non-pregnant, Non-nursing Adults § 26.1117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form approved by the IRB and signed...

  8. 28 CFR 46.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 46.117....117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form approved by the IRB and signed...

  9. 15 CFR 27.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 27... SUBJECTS § 27.117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form approved by the IRB...

  10. 16 CFR 1028.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 1028.117... SUBJECTS § 1028.117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form approved by the IRB...

  11. 45 CFR 690.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 690.117 Section... PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 690.117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent...

  12. 40 CFR 26.1117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 26... Intentional Exposure of Non-pregnant, Non-nursing Adults § 26.1117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form approved by the IRB and signed...

  13. 40 CFR 26.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 26... EPA § 26.117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form approved by the IRB...

  14. 16 CFR 1028.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 1028.117... SUBJECTS § 1028.117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form approved by the IRB...

  15. 45 CFR 690.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 690.117 Section... PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 690.117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent...

  16. 22 CFR 225.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 225.117....117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form approved by the IRB and signed...

  17. 21 CFR 50.27 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 50.27 Section... PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Informed Consent of Human Subjects § 50.27 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in § 56.109(c), informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written...

  18. 38 CFR 16.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 16.117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form... elements of informed consent required by § 16.116. This form may be read to the subject or the...

  19. 22 CFR 225.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 225.117....117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form approved by the IRB and signed...

  20. 28 CFR 46.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 46.117....117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form approved by the IRB and signed...

  1. 34 CFR 97.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 97.117 Section 97...) § 97.117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form approved by the IRB and signed...

  2. 21 CFR 50.27 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 50.27 Section... PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Informed Consent of Human Subjects § 50.27 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in § 56.109(c), informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written...

  3. 15 CFR 27.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 27... SUBJECTS § 27.117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form approved by the IRB...

  4. 40 CFR 26.1117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 26... Intentional Exposure of Non-pregnant, Non-nursing Adults § 26.1117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Informed consent must be documented by the use of a written consent form approved by the IRB and signed...

  5. 45 CFR 690.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 690.117 Section... PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 690.117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent...

  6. 28 CFR 46.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 46.117....117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form approved by the IRB and signed...

  7. 15 CFR 27.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 27... SUBJECTS § 27.117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form approved by the IRB...

  8. 21 CFR 50.27 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 50.27 Section... PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Informed Consent of Human Subjects § 50.27 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in § 56.109(c), informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written...

  9. 34 CFR 97.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 97.117 Section 97...) § 97.117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form approved by the IRB and signed...

  10. 38 CFR 16.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 16.117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form... elements of informed consent required by § 16.116. This form may be read to the subject or the...

  11. 16 CFR 1028.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 1028.117... SUBJECTS § 1028.117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form approved by the IRB...

  12. 15 CFR 27.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 27... SUBJECTS § 27.117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form approved by the IRB...

  13. 28 CFR 46.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 46.117....117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form approved by the IRB and signed...

  14. 38 CFR 16.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 16.117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form... elements of informed consent required by § 16.116. This form may be read to the subject or the...

  15. 28 CFR 46.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 46.117....117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form approved by the IRB and signed...

  16. 40 CFR 26.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 26... EPA § 26.117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form approved by the IRB...

  17. 42 CFR 441.258 - Consent form requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Sterilizations § 441.258 Consent form requirements. (a) Content of consent form. The consent form must be a copy... the sterilization procedure. (c) Required certifications. (1) The person securing the consent must... be sterilized. (2) The physician performing the sterilization must certify, by signing the...

  18. Factors Influencing Consent for Electronic Data Linkage in Urban Latinos.

    PubMed

    Bakken, Suzanne; Yoon, Sunmoo; Suero-Tejeda, Niurka

    2015-01-01

    Within the context of patient participation in a Learning Health System, this study examined consent rates and factors associated with consent for linking survey data with electronic clinical data in a sample of 2,271 Latinos. Consent rate was 96.3%. Government insurance status and health literacy significantly influenced the odds of consent. PMID:26262286

  19. Identifying parents' perceptions about physical activity: a qualitative exploration of salient behavioural, normative and control beliefs among mothers and fathers of young children.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Kyra; White, Katherine M

    2010-11-01

    Drawing on the belief-based framework of the Theory of Planned Behaviour, this study employs qualitative methodology involving individual and group interviews to examine the beliefs associated with regular physical activity performance among parents of young children (N = 40). The data were analysed using thematic content analysis. A range of advantages (e.g. improves parenting practices), disadvantages (e.g. interferes with commitments), barriers (e.g. time), and facilitators (e.g. social support) to performing physical activity are identified. Normative pressures are also identified as affecting parents' activity behaviour. These identified beliefs can be used to inform interventions to challenge inactivity among this at-risk group. PMID:20472605

  20. Validation of the modified Parenting Strategies for Eating and Physical Activity Scale-Diet (PEAS-Diet) in Latino children.

    PubMed

    Soto, Sandra C; Arredondo, Elva M; Horton, Lucy A; Ayala, Guadalupe X

    2016-03-01

    Research shows that Latino parenting practices influence children's dietary and weight outcomes. Most studies use parent-reported data, however data from children may provide additional insight into how parents influence their children's diet and weight outcomes. The Parenting Strategies for Eating and Activity Scale (PEAS) has been validated in Latino adults, but not in children. This study evaluated the factor structure and concurrent and predictive validity of a modified version of the PEAS (PEAS-Diet) among Latino children. Data were collected from 361 children ages 7-13 from Imperial County, California, enrolled in a randomized controlled trial to promote healthy eating. The PEAS-Diet included 25 candidate items targeting six parenting practices pertaining to children's eating behaviors: (a) monitoring; (b) disciplining; (c) control; (d) permissiveness; (e) reinforcing; and (f) limit-setting. Children were on average ten years old (±2), 50% boys, 93% self-identified as Latino, 81% were US-born, and 55% completed English versus Spanish-language interviews. Using varimax rotation on baseline data with the total sample, six items were removed due to factor loadings <.40 and/or cross-loading (>.32 on more than one component). Parallel analysis and interpretability suggested a 5-factor solution explaining 59.46% of the variance. The subscale "limit-setting" was removed from the scale. The final scale consisted of 19 items and 5 subscales. Internal consistency of the subscales ranged from α = .63-.82. Confirmatory factor analyses provided additional evidence for the 5-factor scale using data collected 4 and 6 months post-baseline among the control group (n = 164, n = 161, respectively). Concurrent validity with dietary intake was established for monitoring, control, permissiveness, and reinforcing subscales in the expected directions. Predictive validity was not established. Results indicated that with the reported changes, the interview-administered PEAS