Science.gov

Sample records for active parental consent

  1. Bias in Student Survey Findings from Active Parental Consent Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Thérèse; Cross, Donna; Thomas, Laura T.; Zubrick, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly, researchers are required to obtain active (explicit) parental consent prior to surveying children and adolescents in schools. This study assessed the potential bias present in a sample of actively consented students, and in the estimates of associations between variables obtained from this sample. Students (n = 3496) from 36…

  2. Active parental consent in school-based research. An examination of ethical and methodological issues.

    PubMed

    Esbensen, F A; Deschenes, E P; Vogel, R E; West, J; Arboit, K; Harris, L

    1996-12-01

    To date, most school-based research has used passive parental consent. However, the Family Privacy Protection Act of 1995 aims to change these requirements. The proposed legislation requires written parental consent if minors are to be asked "sensitive" questions as part of any program or activity funded in whole or in part by the federal government. This act is representative of a growing trend toward restricting research involving minors. Whether or not this act is passed by Congress, two lines of concern are highlighted by this legislation. The first deals with ethical issues surrounding consent procedures. For instance, are parental rights compromised when active consent is not mandated? A second line of inquiry pertains to the effect of active consent procedures on response rates and sample bias. In this article, the authors discuss ethical issues surrounding passive and active consent procedures and then report response rates from two projects in which active consent procedures were implemented.

  3. How Does Active Parental Consent Influence the Findings of Drug-Use Surveys in Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Victoria M.; Hill, David J.; Effendi, Yuksel

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the impact of passive and active parental consent procedures on the type of adolescents participating in a school-based survey examining substance use. Schools recruited from a random sample of metropolitan schools were assigned to passive or active parental consent condition. Results showed that participation rates in active…

  4. Active Parent Consent for Health Surveys with Urban Middle School Students: Processes and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Secor-Turner, Molly; Sieving, Renee; Widome, Rachel; Plowman, Shari; Vanden Berk, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Background: To achieve high participation rates and a representative sample, active parent consent procedures require a significant investment of study resources. The purpose of this article is to describe processes and outcomes of utilizing active parent consent procedures with sixth-grade students from urban, ethnically diverse, economically…

  5. Passive Versus Active Parental Consent: Implications for the Ability of School-based Depression Screening to Reach Youth at Risk

    PubMed Central

    Stoep, Ann Vander; McCauley, Elizabeth; Herting, Jerald R.; Tracy, Melissa; Lymp, James

    2009-01-01

    Child and adolescent depression often go untreated with resulting adverse effects on academic success and healthy development. Depression screening can facilitate early identification and timely referral to prevention and treatment programs. Carried out in school settings, universal screening can reduce disparities in service utilization by extending the reach of detection and intervention to children who otherwise have limited access. However, unless confidentiality and informed choice are assured, benefits of universal screening may be offset by loss of individual rights. Implementation of a school-based depression screening program raises the controversial question of how to obtain informed parental consent. During implementation of a depression screening program in an urban school district in the Pacific Northwest, the district’s parental consent protocol changed from passive to active, providing a natural experiment to examine differences in participation under these two conditions. Compared to conditions of parent information with option to actively decline (passive consent), when children were required to have written parental permission (active consent), participation was dramatically reduced (85% to 66%). In addition, under conditions of active consent, non-participation increased differentially among student subgroups with increased risk for depression. Successful implementation of school-based mental health screening programs warrants a careful read of community readiness and incorporation of outreach activities designed to increase understanding and interest among target groups within the community. Otherwise, requiring active parental consent may have the unwanted effect of reinforcing existing disparities in access to mental health services. PMID:18307611

  6. Active Parental Consent for a School-Based Community Violence Screening: Comparing Distribution Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Bradley D.; Jaycox, Lisa H.; Langley, Audra; Kataoka, Sheryl H.; Wilkins, Windy S.; Wong, Marleen

    2007-01-01

    Background: Students are unable to benefit from many school programs designed to address their mental health needs if their parents do not consent to their participation. As part of an ongoing effort in a large urban school district to meet the mental health needs of students traumatized by violence exposure, this paper examines the impact of…

  7. 34 CFR 300.300 - Parental consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES Evaluations, Eligibility Determinations, Individualized Education Programs, and Educational Placements Parental Consent § 300.300 Parental consent. (a) Parental consent for initial evaluation. (1)(i) The public agency proposing to conduct an initial evaluation to determine if a child qualifies as...

  8. 34 CFR 300.300 - Parental consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES Evaluations, Eligibility Determinations, Individualized Education Programs, and Educational Placements Parental Consent § 300.300 Parental consent. (a) Parental consent for initial evaluation. (1)(i) The public agency proposing to conduct an initial evaluation to determine if a child qualifies as...

  9. 16 CFR 312.5 - Parental consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Parental consent. 312.5 Section 312.5 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS CHILDREN'S ONLINE PRIVACY PROTECTION RULE § 312.5 Parental consent. (a) General requirements. (1) An operator is required...

  10. Parental consent and the use of dead children's bodies.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, T M

    2001-12-01

    It has recently become known that, in Liverpool and elsewhere, parts of children's bodies were taken postmortem and used for research without the parents being told. But should parental consent be sought before using children's corpses for medical purposes? This paper presents the view that parental consent is overrated. Arguments are rejected for consent from dead children's interests, property rights, family autonomy, and religious freedom. The only direct reason to get parental consent is to avoid distressing the parents, which carries implications for the consent process, secret harvesting of body parts, and the weight to be given to parental feelings.

  11. The Impact of Child Obesity on Active Parental Consent in School-Based Survey Research on Healthy Eating and Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellor, Jennifer M.; Rapoport, Ronald B.; Maliniak, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that active consent procedures result in sampling bias in surveys dealing with adolescent risk behaviors such as cigarette smoking and illicit drug use. To examine sampling bias from active consent procedures when the survey topic pertains to childhood obesity and associated health behaviors, the authors pair data…

  12. Parents, adolescents, and consent for research participation.

    PubMed

    Iltis, Ana S

    2013-06-01

    Decisions concerning children in the health care setting have engendered significant controversy and sparked ethics policies and statements, legal action, and guidelines regarding who ought to make decisions involving children and how such decisions ought to be made. Traditionally, parents have been the default decision-makers for children not only with regard to health care but with regard to other matters, such as religious practice and education. In recent decades, there has been a steady trend away from the view that parents are in authority over their children and toward the view that children are rights-bearers who should be granted greater authority over themselves. The mature minor doctrine refers to the decision to grant mature minors the authority to make decisions traditionally reserved for their parents. This essay (1) documents the trend towards expanding the understanding of some minors as "mature" and hence as having the right and authority to give informed consent, (2) examines the reasons for which some commentators have a special interest in expanding the mature minor doctrine to the research setting and allowing minors to enroll in research without parental permission, and (3) defends the view that the mature minor doctrine, regardless of its application to clinical health care decisions, ought to be set aside in the research setting in favor of greater parental involvement.

  13. Condom Distribution in the Public Schools: Is Parental Consent Required?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjorklun, Eugene C.

    1994-01-01

    Examines whether school districts have the duty to require parental consent or notification before students can participate in programs of condom distribution. Analyzes "Alfonso," decided initially as not requiring parental consent, and reversed by the appellate court in 1993. Advises schools to approach condom distribution programs with caution…

  14. 16 CFR 312.5 - Parental consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS CHILDREN'S ONLINE... children, including consent to any material change in the collection, use, or disclosure practices to which... collection and use of the child's personal information without consenting to disclosure of his or...

  15. [Parental Information and Consent in Neonatology].

    PubMed

    Ehlen, M; Budde, A

    2015-06-01

    Careful analysis of current adjudication reveals increasing demand of adequate record-keeping as well as meticulously documented informed consent forms regarding all aspects of medicine. Although standardized informed consent forms or explicit guidelines for obtaining procedural consent already exist in surgical disciplines there is strong evidence that, however, in neonatology (and paediatric intensive care) these processes are still incomplete and qualitatively insufficiently implemented. Therefore the author discussed all existing information prescriptions with the legal department and quality management of a large German clinic group especially in terms of relevant legislation, recent case law and specialist literature in order to obtain potential for improvement. Based on the results of this audit of expert opinions improved recommendations could be implemented in the daily practise of a department of neonatology and paediatric intensive care on a tertiary level. PMID:26039500

  16. 34 CFR 303.404 - Parent consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS WITH... obtained before— (1) Conducting the initial evaluation and assessment of a child under § 303.322; and (2) Initiating the provision of early intervention services (see § 303.342(e)). (b) If consent is not given,...

  17. 16 CFR 312.5 - Parental consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... or facsimile; requiring a parent to use a credit card in connection with a transaction; having a parent call a toll-free telephone number staffed by trained personnel; using a digital certificate...

  18. 16 CFR 312.5 - Parental consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... or facsimile; requiring a parent to use a credit card in connection with a transaction; having a parent call a toll-free telephone number staffed by trained personnel; using a digital certificate...

  19. Medicaid: Parent Consent Issues. Quick Turn Around (QTA).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahearn, Eileen M.

    This report discusses federal regulations requiring parental consent before schools access Medicaid reimbursement for services provided to students with disabilities. It begins by explaining that in 1988, the Medicare Catastrophic Coverage Act allowed Medicaid to pay for covered medical services provided to Medicaid-enrolled children with special…

  20. 78 FR 51677 - Children's Online Privacy Protection Rule Proposed Parental Consent Method; AssertID, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-21

    ... meets the requirements for parental consent described in 16 CFR 312.5(b)(1). \\1\\ 64 FR 59888 (1999). \\2\\ 16 CFR part 312. \\3\\ 78 FR 3972 (2013). \\4\\ 16 CFR 312.12(a); 78 FR at 3991-3992, 4013. Pursuant to... Parental Consent Method; AssertID, Inc. Application for Approval of Parental Consent Method AGENCY:...

  1. Patient and parent understanding of informed consent in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Micah G; Kiyak, H Asuman; Omnell, Lena

    2003-11-01

    In both medical and dental settings, researchers have found that patients do not adequately comprehend the information given during informed consent discussions, especially the less educated, low-income patients. Because of the importance of patient compliance with orthodontic treatment regimens, this study examined patient and parent understanding of the child's Phase I orthodontic treatment in a public dental clinic with ethnically diverse, low-income patients. Interviews were conducted with 29 children (ages 6-12) and their parents or guardians at the orthodontic case presentation appointment. The orthodontist explained the reasons for treatment, the orthodontic procedures to be used, the risks, the alternatives, and patient and parent responsibilities during treatment; the session was audiotaped. Interviews were conducted immediately after this discussion and the results compared with the orthodontists' presentations. In general, both children and parents recalled significantly fewer reasons for treatment (1.10, 1.66, and 2.34 items, respectively), procedures (1.55, 1.59, and 2.45, respectively), risks associated with treatment (0.66, 1.48, and 4.66, respectively), and responsibilities of the child during treatment (2.21, 2.07, and 3.38, respectively) than what the orthodontist had told them. They were also less likely to recall the reasons, procedures, and risks that were most frequently cited by the orthodontist. These findings raise concerns about the effectiveness of current informed consent techniques with public health populations, especially the low recall rates within 30 minutes of the case presentations. Low recall of risks by children and their parents, particularly for critical risks such as relapse, caries, and periodontal problems, raises concerns about treatment compliance, success, and more importantly, the effectiveness of the informed consent process itself. Future research should focus on methods to improve the informed consent process among

  2. Research with Children and Young People: The Issue of Parental (Proxy) Consent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyne, Imelda

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the potential problems with the parental consent requirement, substantiated with examples mainly from healthcare and social research studies. This will illustrate how the parental consent requirement, instead of promoting high ethical standards, may result in some instances of children's rights and ethical considerations being…

  3. 78 FR 56183 - Children's Online Privacy Protection Rule Proposed Parental Consent Method; Imperium, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-12

    ... meets the requirements for parental consent described in 16 CFR 312.5(b)(1). \\1\\ 64 FR 59888 (1999). \\2\\ 16 CFR Part 312. \\3\\ 78 FR 3972 (2013). \\4\\ 16 CFR 312.12(a); 78 FR at 3991-3992, 4013. Pursuant to... CFR Part 312 RIN 3084-AB20 Children's Online Privacy Protection Rule Proposed Parental Consent...

  4. Why Do Parents Grant or Deny Consent for Adolescent Participation in Sexuality Research?

    PubMed

    Moilanen, Kristin L

    2016-05-01

    To date, there is limited knowledge about how parents make decisions about adolescents' participation in sexuality research. This gap was addressed in the present study, which explored parents' reasons for providing or denying consent and their suggestions for improving the likelihood of consent. 151 parents responded through anonymous internet surveys (85.3 % mothers; 87 % European American). Those who would likely consent were largely motivated by potential benefits and limited risks of participating in the study. Those unlikely to consent expressed discomfort with sexual content, which they viewed as inappropriate for sexually-naïve adolescents. Most were somewhat more likely to consent if researchers engaged in ethical research practices (e.g., protecting confidentiality). As in other adolescent life domains, parents' decisions strongly reflected their desire to protect their teenagers' wellbeing, though respondents' means of pursuing this goal varied. The discussion centers on the findings' implications for theory development and recruitment efforts. PMID:26910523

  5. How participatory is parental consent in low literacy rural settings in low income countries? Lessons learned from a community based study of infants in South India

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A requisite for ethical human subjects research is that participation should be informed and voluntary. Participation during the informed consent process by way of asking questions is an indicator of the extent to which consent is informed. Aims The aims of this study were to assess the extent to which parents providing consent for children's participation in an observational tuberculosis (TB) research study in India actively participated during the informed consent discussion, and to identify correlates of that participation. Methods In an observational cohort study of tuberculosis in infants in South India, field supervisors who were responsible for obtaining informed consent noted down questions asked during the informed consent discussions for 4,382 infants who were enrolled in the study. These questions were post-coded by topic. Bivariate and multivariate analysis was conducted to examine factors associated with asking at least one question during the informed consent process. Results In total, 590 out of 4,382 (13.4%) parents/guardians asked any question during the informed consent process. We found that the likelihood of parents asking questions during the informed consent process was significantly associated with education level of either parent both parents being present, and location. Conclusions The findings have implications for planning the informed consent process in a largely rural setting with low levels of literacy. Greater effort needs to be directed towards developing simple participatory communication materials for the informed consent process. Furthermore, including both parents in a discussion about a child's participation in a research study may increase the extent to which consent is truly informed. Finally, continuing efforts need to be made to improve the communication skills of research workers with regard to explaining research processes and putting potential research participants at ease. PMID:21324120

  6. How parents and practitioners experience research without prior consent (deferred consent) for emergency research involving children with life threatening conditions: a mixed method study

    PubMed Central

    Woolfall, Kerry; Frith, Lucy; Gamble, Carrol; Gilbert, Ruth; Mok, Quen; Young, Bridget

    2015-01-01

    Objective Alternatives to prospective informed consent to enable children with life-threatening conditions to be entered into trials of emergency treatments are needed. Across Europe, a process called deferred consent has been developed as an alternative. Little is known about the views and experiences of those with first-hand experience of this controversial consent process. To inform how consent is sought for future paediatric critical care trials, we explored the views and experiences of parents and practitioners involved in the CATheter infections in CHildren (CATCH) trial, which allowed for deferred consent in certain circumstances. Design Mixed method survey, interview and focus group study. Participants 275 parents completed a questionnaire; 20 families participated in an interview (18 mothers, 5 fathers). 17 CATCH practitioners participated in one of four focus groups (10 nurses, 3 doctors and 4 clinical trial unit staff). Setting 12 UK children's hospitals. Results Some parents were momentarily shocked or angered to discover that their child had or could have been entered into CATCH without their prior consent. Although these feelings resolved after the reasons why consent needed to be deferred were explained and that the CATCH interventions were already used in clinical care. Prior to seeking deferred consent for the first few times, CATCH practitioners were apprehensive, although their feelings abated with experience of talking to parents about CATCH. Parents reported that their decisions about their child's participation in the trial had been voluntary. However, mistiming the deferred consent discussion had caused distress for some. Practitioners and parents supported the use of deferred consent in CATCH and in future trials of interventions already used in clinical care. Conclusions Our study provides evidence to support the use of deferred consent in paediatric emergency medicine; it also indicates the crucial importance of practitioner communication

  7. Your Hands Are (Not) Tied: School-Based Ethics When Parents Revoke Special Education Consent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Rachel; Sharkey, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Parents currently have the unilateral ability to reject special education services. Yet, it is unclear how schools should support students with special education needs in this situation as schools may not challenge a parent's choice to revoke special education assessment consent or the provision of services. Guidelines for school…

  8. Parent Participation and Physician-Parent Communication During Informed Consent in Child Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Cousino, Melissa; Hazen, Rebecca; Yamokoski, Amy; Miller, Victoria; Zyzanski, Stephen; Drotar, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In this study we evaluated the effectiveness of a physician-directed intervention at enhancing positive physician behaviors and communication strategies during informed consent conferences (ICCs) for pediatric acute leukemia clinical trials. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Physicians at 2 large pediatric hospitals were recruited to participate in a physician-directed intervention (PDI), which included 1 full-day seminar and successive half-day booster sessions. ICCs were then observed, audiotaped, coded, and analyzed to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention. Data also were collected at 2 control sites. Between 2003 and 2007, 59 ICCs were observed and analyzed. RESULTS: Significant group differences were found in physician rapport-building behaviors. Physicians in the PDI + booster session group engaged in greater rapport-building than did physicians in the PDI group who did not attend booster sessions and physicians in the control group. No group differences were detected for physician partnership-building. In addition, parents in the PDI + booster session group engaged in more general communication and study-related communication, and mothers in the PDI groups asked significantly more questions per minute than did mothers in the control group. CONCLUSIONS: These results provide support for the effectiveness of the PDI at enhancing positive physician behaviors. Booster-session attendance is a critical component of physician-directed interventions to improve parental participation and physician-parent communication during ICCs. PMID:22065265

  9. Does parental consent for birth control affect underage pregnancy rates? The case of Texas.

    PubMed

    Girma, Sourafel; Paton, David

    2013-12-01

    Previous work based on conjectural responses of minors predicted that the 2003 Texas requirement for parental consent for state-funded birth control to minors would lead to a large increase in underage pregnancies. We use state- and county-level data to test this prediction. The latter allow us to compare the impact of parental consent in counties with and without state-funded family planning clinics. We control for characteristics systematically correlated with the presence of state-funded clinics by combining difference-in-difference estimation with propensity score-weighted regressions. The evidence suggests that the parental consent mandate led to a large decrease in attendance at family planning clinics among teens but did not lead to an increase in underage pregnancies.

  10. Constitutional Law: Abortion, Parental and Spousal Consent Requirements, Right to Privacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Sharon L.; Ravenscraft, Patricia

    1976-01-01

    The constitutionality of the Missouri abortion statute was challenged by two physicians and Planned Parenthood of Central Missouri in the Danforth case. The Supreme Court reversed a district court decision in part, ruling that parental and spousal consent requirements are unconstitutional. For journal availability see HE 508 875. (LBH)

  11. Factors influencing parental consent for participation in clinical research involving their children in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Nasef, N; Shabaan, A; Mohammed, S; Kandel, S; Settin, A; Zedan, M; Fouda, A

    2014-04-03

    Factors affecting parents' decision to involve their children in clinical research have not been studied in all cultural backgrounds. We aimed to explore the attitudes and beliefs influencing parents' decision to involve their children in clinical research in Mansoura, Egypt. Of 523 families approached, 357 filled the questionnaire. Only 98 (27.5%) parents consented to involve their child in clinical research. The children of consenters were significantly older than refusers: 8.6 (SD 7.2) versus 2.6 (SD 1.2) years. Factors favouring consent were: research of benefit to child (84.7%), enough explanation about the benefits (40.8%) and to learn more about child's condition (29.6%). Factors favouring refusal were: use of new drugs or vaccines (89.6%) and invasive procedures (84.2%). Parents' rate of consent was positively correlated with the research being non-invasive and the belief that research was of benefit to their child and negatively correlated with belief that refusal may negatively affect the care provided to their child.

  12. 78 FR 64423 - Children's Online Privacy Protection Rule Applications for Approval of Proposed Parental Consent...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ...\\ 64 FR 59888 (1999). \\2\\ 16 CFR part 312. \\3\\ 78 FR 3972 (2013). \\4\\ 16 CFR 312.12(a); 78 FR at 3991-3992, 4013. \\5\\ See 16 CFR 312.11; 78 FR at 3995-96, 4012-13. The Children's Online Privacy Protection... Proposed Parental Consent Methods by AssertID, Inc., Imperium LLC, and iVeriFly, Inc.; Application...

  13. U.S. Supreme Court refuses to review decision invalidating provisions in Louisiana parental consent law.

    PubMed

    1997-10-31

    On October 20, 1997, the US Supreme Court refused to review an April decision of the US Court of Appeals finding that parental consent provisions in Louisiana's abortion law posed an unconstitutional "undue burden" on minors seeking abortions. Louisiana has required consent of one parent with a court bypass procedure since the early 1980s, but the legislature amended this legislation in 1995 to give judges wide latitude to deny young women abortions, breach their confidentiality, and permit unspecified time parameters in making a decision. A District Court found the amendments in conflict with established federal court precedent, and the Appeals Courts agreed and also found that the lack of guarantee for a specified time for resolution of a petition was inconsistent with court rulings against such open-ended bypass procedures. The Court also rejected a provision that gave a judge authority to order a young woman to attend evaluation and counseling sessions (again with no time limit) before authorization for abortion would be granted. The panel also struck down a provision that permitted a court to contact the parents of a minor if the court determined that the minor was not mature and that such notification would be in her best interests. It was found that this mandate would unacceptably compromise a petitioner's anonymity.

  14. Are Parents of Preschool Children Inclined to Give Consent for Participation in Nutritional Clinical Trials?

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Dipen Vasudev; Phatak, Ajay Gajanan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Micronutrient deficiencies can lead to anemia, growth restriction, and poor motor and cognitive development. A clinical trial was planned to assess the impact of nutritional supplementation on cognitive measures in preschool children. Conducting clinical trials in children is difficult due to underlying laws, hesitation of the research community, and difficult enrollment. We carried out a questionnaire-based feasibility survey to assess the interest of parents towards participation in such a nutrition-based study. Methods After approval from the Institutional Human Research Ethics Committee, the principals of four kindergarten schools at Vallabh Vidyanagar, Anand, Gujarat, India consented to participate. Children at the participating schools were distributed a consent form and pre-tested questionnaire, to be taken home for parents to sign, fill and return. Results Out of a total of 1049 consent forms and questionnaires distributed, 602 (57.39%) signed and filled forms were returned. Despite fair awareness regarding the need of research, parents’ willingness to involve their children in a 6 month duration research study, not requiring invasive measures like blood pricks, was 180 (29.9%). Nearly half (250, 41.5%) did not respond and more than a quarter (172, 28.6%) declined participation on behalf of their children. Conclusion The interest level of a pre-school child's parents for participation of the child in a nutrition intervention study evaluating cognitive measures like memory is low. Understanding the study population’s motivating and inhibiting factors leading to decreased participation in clinical trials is necessary to facilitate the creation of a pertinent evidence base. PMID:27732680

  15. What limits, if any, should be placed on a parent's right to consent and/or refuse to consent to medical treatment for their child?

    PubMed

    Birchley, Giles

    2010-10-01

    Abstract There is an overwhelming consensus that parent's rights to consent must be limited to decisions that are in the child's best interests, yet best interests are difficult to determine. I reflect on the case of severely developmentally delayed children, and suggest that the interests of parent and child are difficult to separate. In such cases there is a strong argument for the use of substituted judgement by a parent. Although there are coherent conceptions of the limitations of parental rights, these are based on the eventual autonomy of the child, a state that children with severe developmental delay will never achieve. Legal treatments of best interests fail to explicitly take account of such nuances, and are open to accusations of judicial subjectivity. Increased clarity could be gained by setting out the relative weight of medical, parental, and child views of best interests.

  16. Protecting adolescents' right to seek treatment for sexually transmitted diseases without parental consent: the Arizona experience with Senate Bill 1309.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Kimberly D; Taylor, Melanie M; Brown, Erin C Fuse; Winscott, Michelle; Scanlon, Megan; Hodge, James G; Mickey, Tom; England, Bob

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, Senate Bill 1309 included language to repeal an existing Arizona law that enables minors younger than 18 years of age to seek diagnosis and treatment of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) without parental consent. Numerous implications were identified that would have stemmed from parental consent provisions originally proffered in Senate Bill 1309. These implications included diminished access to essential health services among minors, exacerbated existing health disparities, increased health-care spending costs, and thwarted efforts to curb the spread of STDs. Lastly, minors would have been deprived of existing privacy protections concerning their STD-related medical information. This case study describes how collaborative advocacy efforts resulted in the successful amendment of Senate Bill 1309 to avert the negative sexual and reproductive health outcomes among adolescents stemming from the potential repeal of their existing legal right to seek STD treatment without parental consent.

  17. Protecting adolescents' right to seek treatment for sexually transmitted diseases without parental consent: the Arizona experience with Senate Bill 1309.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Kimberly D; Taylor, Melanie M; Brown, Erin C Fuse; Winscott, Michelle; Scanlon, Megan; Hodge, James G; Mickey, Tom; England, Bob

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, Senate Bill 1309 included language to repeal an existing Arizona law that enables minors younger than 18 years of age to seek diagnosis and treatment of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) without parental consent. Numerous implications were identified that would have stemmed from parental consent provisions originally proffered in Senate Bill 1309. These implications included diminished access to essential health services among minors, exacerbated existing health disparities, increased health-care spending costs, and thwarted efforts to curb the spread of STDs. Lastly, minors would have been deprived of existing privacy protections concerning their STD-related medical information. This case study describes how collaborative advocacy efforts resulted in the successful amendment of Senate Bill 1309 to avert the negative sexual and reproductive health outcomes among adolescents stemming from the potential repeal of their existing legal right to seek STD treatment without parental consent. PMID:22547855

  18. Protecting Adolescents' Right to Seek Treatment for Sexually Transmitted Diseases without Parental Consent: The Arizona Experience with Senate Bill 1309

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Kimberly D.; Taylor, Melanie M.; Brown, Erin C. Fuse; Winscott, Michelle; Scanlon, Megan; Hodge, James G.; Mickey, Tom; England, Bob

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, Senate Bill 1309 included language to repeal an existing Arizona law that enables minors younger than 18 years of age to seek diagnosis and treatment of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) without parental consent. Numerous implications were identified that would have stemmed from parental consent provisions originally proffered in Senate Bill 1309. These implications included diminished access to essential health services among minors, exacerbated existing health disparities, increased health-care spending costs, and thwarted efforts to curb the spread of STDs. Lastly, minors would have been deprived of existing privacy protections concerning their STD-related medical information. This case study describes how collaborative advocacy efforts resulted in the successful amendment of Senate Bill 1309 to avert the negative sexual and reproductive health outcomes among adolescents stemming from the potential repeal of their existing legal right to seek STD treatment without parental consent. PMID:22547855

  19. 78 FR 77026 - Children's Online Privacy Protection Rule Proposed Parental Consent Method; iVeriFly, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-20

    ....5(b)(1). \\1\\ 64 FR 59888 (1999). \\2\\ 16 CFR part 312. \\3\\ 78 FR 3972 (2013). \\4\\ 16 CFR 312.12(a); 78 FR at 3991-3992, 4013. Pursuant to Section 312.12(a) of the Rule, iVeriFly has submitted a...; iVeriFly, Inc., Application for Approval of Parental Consent Method AGENCY: Federal Trade...

  20. Counterproductive Effects of Parental Consent in Research Involving LGBTTIQ Youth: International Research Ethics and a Study of a Transgender and Two-Spirit Community in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Catherine G.

    2008-01-01

    This article offers an evidence-based argument for exempting the majority of LGBTTIQ youth from parental consent requirements in research studies. The argument is grounded in international research ethics principles and social science research studies of risks to the well-being of LGBTTIQ youth. A schema derived from consent concepts used in…

  1. Arts Activities Bank for Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD. Dept. of Instructional Planning and Development.

    The guide presents instructions for art activities to be used by parents at home, particularly with handicapped children. The objective is to encourage parents to bring the arts into the lives of these children on a regular basis and also to help them develop basic learning skills, self-esteem, and an interest in the arts. The guide is divided…

  2. Active Parenting Now: Program Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popkin, Michael H.

    Based largely on the theories of Alfred Adler and Rudolf Dreikurs, this parent education curriculum is a video-based interactive learning experience that teaches a comprehensive model of parenting to parents of children ages 5 to 12 years. The kit provides parents with the skills needed to help their children develop courage, responsibility, and…

  3. Informed Consent

    PubMed Central

    Manion, F.; Hsieh, K.; Harris, M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Despite efforts to provide standard definitions of terms such as “medical record”, “computer-based patient record”, “electronic medical record” and “electronic health record”, the terms are still used interchangeably. Initiatives like data and information governance, research biorepositories, and learning health systems require availability and reuse of data, as well as common understandings of the scope for specific purposes. Lacking widely shared definitions, utilization of the afore-mentioned terms in research informed consent documents calls to question whether all participants in the research process — patients, information technology and regulatory staff, and the investigative team — fully understand what data and information they are asking to obtain and agreeing to share. Objectives This descriptive study explored the terminology used in research informed consent documents when describing patient data and information, asking the question “Does the use of the term “medical record” in the context of a research informed consent document accurately represent the scope of the data involved?” Methods Informed consent document templates found on 17 Institutional Review Board (IRB) websites with Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) were searched for terms that appeared to be describing the data resources to be accessed. The National Library of Medicine’s (NLM) Terminology Services was searched for definitions provided by key standards groups that deposit terminologies with the NLM. Discussion The results suggest research consent documents are using outdated terms to describe patient information, health care terminology systems need to consider the context of research for use cases, and that there is significant work to be done to assure the HIPAA Omnibus Rule is applied to contemporary activities such as biorepositories and learning health systems. Conclusions “Medical record”, a term used extensively

  4. Girls' Physically Active Play and Parental Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tauber, Margaret A.

    Sex differences in children's physical activity levels, and associations between girls' activity level, childrearing characteristics and parent-child play behavior were investigated in a quasi-naturalistic situation. As part of a longitudinal project, 144 third grade children were videotaped in a 1-hour play session with one of their parents. A…

  5. The Impact of Active Consent Procedures on Nonresponse and Nonresponse Error in Youth Survey Data: Evidence from a New Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Courser, Matthew W.; Shamblen, Stephen R.; Lavrakas, Paul J.; Collins, David; Ditterline, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports results from a student survey fielded using an experimental design with 14 Kentucky school districts. Seven of the fourteen districts were randomly assigned to implement the survey with active consent procedures; the other seven districts implemented the survey with passive consent procedures. We utilized our experimental design to investigate the impact of consent procedures on (a) participation rates, (b) demographic characteristic of the survey samples, and (c) estimates of ATOD use. We found that the use of active consent procedures resulted in reduced response rates, under-representation of male students and older students, and lower lifetime and past 30 day prevalence rates for most drugs and for most antisocial behaviors. Methodological implications of these findings are discussed, along with directions for further research. PMID:19506295

  6. Parental Influence on Young Children's Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zecevic, Cheryl A.; Tremblay, Line; Lovsin, Tanya; Michel, Lariviere

    2010-01-01

    Parents influence on their young children's physical activity (PA) behaviours was examined in a sample of 102 preschool-aged children (54 boys). Questionnaires regarding family sociodemographics and physical activity habits were completed. Results showed that children who received greater parental support for activity (B = .78, P < .10) and had parents who rated PA as highly enjoyable (B = .69, P < .05) were significantly more likely to engage in one hour or more of daily PA. Being an older child (B = −.08, P < .01), having older parents (B = −.26, P < .01), and watching more than one hour of television/videos per day (B = 1.55, P < .01) reduced the likelihood that a child would be rated as highly active. Children who received greater parental support for PA were 6.3 times more likely to be highly active than inactive (B = 1.44, P < .05). Thus, parents can promote PA among their preschoolers, not only by limiting TV time but also by being highly supportive of their children's active pursuits. PMID:20671967

  7. Consent Form Return Rates for Third-Grade Urban Elementary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ji, Peter; Flay, Brian R.; Phil, D.; DuBois, David L.; Brechling, Vanessa; Day, Joseph; Cantillon, Dan

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To maximize active parent consent form return rates for third-grade minority, urban students enrolled in predominantly low-income elementary schools in Chicago, Ill. Methods: Research staff used a class incentive and class visits to retrieve consent forms from students. Results: Of the 811 third-grade students, 98% returned a form and …

  8. Predicting Child Physical Activity and Screen Time: Parental Support for Physical Activity and General Parenting Styles

    PubMed Central

    Crain, A. Lauren; Senso, Meghan M.; Levy, Rona L.; Sherwood, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine relationships between parenting styles and practices and child moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and screen time. Methods: Participants were children (6.9 ± 1.8 years) with a body mass index in the 70–95th percentile and their parents (421 dyads). Parent-completed questionnaires assessed parental support for child physical activity (PA), parenting styles and child screen time. Children wore accelerometers to assess MVPA. Results: Parenting style did not predict MVPA, but support for PA did (positive association). The association between support and MVPA, moreover, varied as a function of permissive parenting. For parents high in permissiveness, the association was positive (greater support was related to greater MVPA and therefore protective). For parents low in permissiveness, the association was neutral; support did not matter. Authoritarian and permissive parenting styles were both associated with greater screen time. Conclusions: Parenting practices and styles should be considered jointly, offering implications for tailored interventions. PMID:24812256

  9. Adolescents and consent to treatment.

    PubMed

    Dickens, B M; Cook, R J

    2005-05-01

    Adolescents, defined by WHO as 10 to 19 years old, can give independent consent for reproductive health services if their capacities for understanding have sufficiently evolved. The international Convention on the Rights of the Child, almost universally ratified, limits parental powers, and duties, by adolescents' "evolving capacities" for self-determination. Legal systems may recognize "mature minors" as enjoying adult rights of medical consent, even when consent to sexual relations does not absolve partners of criminal liability; their consent does not make the adolescents offenders. There is usually no chronological "age of consent" for medical care, but a condition of consent, meaning capacity for understanding. Like adults, mature minors enjoy confidentiality and the right to treatment according to their wishes rather than their best interests. Minors incapable of self-determination may grant or deny assent to treatment for which guardians provide consent. Emancipated minors' self-determination may also be recognized, for instance on marriage or default of adults' guardianship. PMID:15847892

  10. Nest predation increases with parental activity: Separating nest site and parental activity effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, T.E.; Scott, J.; Menge, C.

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Skutch hypothesized that increased parental activity can increase the risk of nest predation. We tested this hypothesis using ten open-nesting bird species in Arizona, USA. Parental activity was greater during the nestling than incubation stage because parents visited the nest frequently to feed their young during the nestling stage. However, nest predation did not generally increase with parental activity between nesting stages across the ten study species. Previous investigators have found similar results. We tested whether nest site effects might yield higher predation during incubation because the most obvious sites are depredated most rapidly. We conducted experiments using nest sites from the previous year to remove parental activity. Our results showed that nest sites have highly repeatable effects on nest predation risk; poor nest sites incurred rapid predation and caused predation rates to be greater during the incubation than nestling stage. This pattern also was exhibited in a bird species with similar (i.e. controlled) parental activity between nesting stages. Once nest site effects are taken into account, nest predation shows a strong proximate increase with parental activity during the nestling stage within and across species. Parental activity and nest sites exert antagonistic influences on current estimates of nest predation between nesting stages and both must be considered in order to understand current patterns of nest predation, which is an important source of natural selection.

  11. Parents' Networking Strategies: Participation of Formal and Informal Parent Groups in School Activities and Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanat, Carolyn L.

    2010-01-01

    This case study examined parent groups' involvement in school activities and their participation in decision making. Research questions included the following: (1) What is the nature of parent groups in schools? (2) What activities and issues gain parent groups' attention and participation? (3) How do parent groups communicate concerns about…

  12. Active Parenting Today: For Parents of 2 to 12 Year Olds. Leader's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popkin, Michael H.

    This book is designed for leaders of parent discussion groups utilizing the Active Parenting Today video-based parent education program. The program is designed to help parents instill self-esteem, courage, responsibility, and cooperation in their children so that they will be less likely to use tobacco, alcohol, and other drugs (TAOD); to raise…

  13. Supporting Head Start Parents: Impact of a Text Message Intervention on Parent-Child Activity Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurwitz, Lisa B.; Lauricella, Alexis R.; Hanson, Ann; Raden, Anthony; Wartella, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Head Start emphasises parent engagement as a critical strategy in promoting children's long-term learning. Parents can support children's positive development by engaging them in stimulating activities. The following study assessed whether a service that delivered parenting tips via text message could prompt parents of children enrolled in Head…

  14. Head Start Parent Involvement Activities: Measuring the Effect of School Based Parent Involvement Activities on Parent Efficacy in Early Childhood Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quadri, Khadijat O.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this position paper was to examine the impact of school based parent involvement activities on parent efficacy. Methodology: The paper explores research studies into school based activities on long term parent efficacy. Conclusions: Most schools are involving parents in school-based activities in a variety of ways but the…

  15. [Informed consent].

    PubMed

    Medina Castellano, Carmen Delia

    2009-10-01

    At present times, numerous complaints claiming defects produced at some point in the process of obtaining informed consent are filed in courts of justice; in these complaints there is an underlying comment element which is the roles that health professionals have in these processes. In obtaining this consent, one can see this more as a means to obtain judicial protection for professional practices rather than this process being a respectful exercise for the dignity and freedom which health service patients have. This article reflects on two basic rights related to informed consent: adequately obtaining this consent and the need to protect those people who lack, either partially or totally, the capacity to make this decision by themselves. Afterwards, the author makes some considerations about the necessity to obtain informed consent for nursing practices and treatment.

  16. Understanding affluent adolescent adjustment: The interplay of parental perfectionism, perceived parental pressure, and organized activity involvement.

    PubMed

    Randall, Edin T; Bohnert, Amy M; Travers, Lea V

    2015-06-01

    This cross-sectional study examined relations between affluent adolescent adjustment and culturally salient factors within parent-child relationship and extracurricular domain. Bootstrapping techniques evaluated mediated effects among parental perfectionism, perceived parental pressure, intensity of organized activity (OA) involvement, and adolescent adjustment (i.e., depressive and anxiety symptoms, life satisfaction) within a sample of 10th graders and their parents (n = 88 parent-child pairs) from four high schools in affluent communities. Findings indicated that adolescents with more perfectionistic parents perceived more parental pressure and experienced poorer adjustment. Results also demonstrated that affluent adolescents who perceived more parental pressure were more intensely involved in OAs, but that higher OA intensity was linked to better adjustment. Findings highlight the importance of considering parental perfectionism when understanding adolescent behaviors and psychological outcomes, confirm the negative direct effects of parental pressure on adjustment, and corroborate prior research dispelling that highly intense OA involvement is linked to adolescent maladjustment. PMID:25828548

  17. Parental Grief Following the Brain Death of a Child: Does Consent or Refusal to Organ Donation Affect Their Grief?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellali, Thalia; Papadatou, Danai

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the grieving process of parents who were faced with the dilemma of donating organs and tissues of their underage brain dead child, and to explore the impact of their decision on their grief process. A grounded theory methodology was adopted and a semi-structured interview was conducted with 11 bereaved…

  18. Informed Consent in Decision-Making in Pediatric Practice.

    PubMed

    Katz, Aviva L; Webb, Sally A

    2016-08-01

    Informed consent should be seen as an essential part of health care practice; parental permission and childhood assent is an active process that engages patients, both adults and children, in their health care. Pediatric practice is unique in that developmental maturation allows, over time, for increasing inclusion of the child's and adolescent's opinion in medical decision-making in clinical practice and research. This technical report, which accompanies the policy statement "Informed Consent in Decision-Making in Pediatric Practice" was written to provide a broader background on the nature of informed consent, surrogate decision-making in pediatric practice, information on child and adolescent decision-making, and special issues in adolescent informed consent, assent, and refusal. It is anticipated that this information will help provide support for the recommendations included in the policy statement. PMID:27456510

  19. 75 FR 61251 - Proposed Information Collection (Statement of Dependency of Parent(s)) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-04

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Statement of Dependency of Parent(s)) Activity: Comment Request... solicits comments on the information needed to establish a claimant's parents' dependency. DATES: Written... techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Title: Statement of Dependency of...

  20. Parental Support Exceeds Parenting Style for Promoting Active Play in Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schary, David P.; Cardinal, Bradley J.; Loprinzi, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that parenting style may directly or indirectly influence school-aged children's activity behaviour. Given that relatively fewer studies have been conducted among preschool-aged children, this study's primary purpose was to examine the direct relationships between parental support and parenting style on preschool…

  1. Personality as a factor in parental encouragement and parent-child TV and physical activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our purpose was to evaluate the relation of personality to parent TV watching, physical activity (PA), and encouragement for child PA as parental influences on child TV and PA. Structural equation modeling (LISREL 8.7) was used to examine cross-sectional responses from 674 parents (63.0% female, 55...

  2. Fun and Learning for Parents and Children: An Activities Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trans-Management Systems, Inc.

    Based on the assumption that the more parents enjoy playing with their children, the more children will learn from their parents, this booklet is a collection of fun activities for parents to do with their preschool children. The booklet is organized according to location for the activity, whether in a particular room in the house or outdoors.…

  3. Parental knowledge of adolescent activities: links with parental attachment style and adolescent substance use.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jason D; Ehrlich, Katherine B; Lejuez, C W; Cassidy, Jude

    2015-04-01

    Parents' knowledge of their adolescents' whereabouts and activities is a robust predictor of adolescent risk behavior, including the use of drugs and alcohol. Surprisingly few studies have attempted to identify parental characteristics that are associated with the degree of parental knowledge. The present study is the first to examine how parental attachment style relates to mother, father, and adolescent reports of parental knowledge. Further, we used structural equation modeling to test the associations among parents' attachment styles, reports of parental knowledge, and adolescents' alcohol and marijuana use. Participants included 203 adolescents (M age = 14.02, SD = .91) living in 2-parent households and their parent(s). As predicted, mothers' and fathers' insecure attachment styles were negatively associated with self-reported and adolescent-reported parental knowledge, and all 3 reports of parental knowledge were negatively related to adolescent substance use. Mothers' and fathers' attachment styles were unrelated to adolescent substance use. However, evidence emerged for indirect effects of parental attachment style on adolescent substance use through reports of parental knowledge. Implications for prevention efforts and the importance of multiple reporters within the family are discussed.

  4. 75 FR 77958 - Agency Information Collection (Statement of Dependency of Parent(s)) Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-14

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Statement of Dependency of Parent(s)) Activity Under OMB Review....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Statement of Dependency of Parent(s), VA Form 21-509. OMB Control Number: 2900... parent(s) for support complete VA Form 21-509 to report income and dependency information....

  5. Newborn Male Circumcision with Parental Consent, as Stated in the AAP Circumcision Policy Statement, Is Both Legal and Ethical.

    PubMed

    Brady, Michael T

    2016-06-01

    Newborn male circumcision is a minor surgical procedure that has generated significant controversy. Accumulating evidence supports significant health benefits, most notably reductions in urinary tract infections, acquisition of HIV and a number of other sexually transmitted infections, penile cancer, phimosis, paraphimosis, balanitis and lichen sclerosis. While circumcision, like any surgical procedure, has risks for complications, they occur in less than 1 in 500 infants circumcised and most are minor and require minimal intervention. The CDC and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) believe that health benefits of circumcision outweigh the risks. For this reason, the AAP believes that parents should be allowed to make the decision concerning circumcision of their male infants after receiving non-biased information on health risks and health benefits.

  6. Newborn Male Circumcision with Parental Consent, as Stated in the AAP Circumcision Policy Statement, Is Both Legal and Ethical.

    PubMed

    Brady, Michael T

    2016-06-01

    Newborn male circumcision is a minor surgical procedure that has generated significant controversy. Accumulating evidence supports significant health benefits, most notably reductions in urinary tract infections, acquisition of HIV and a number of other sexually transmitted infections, penile cancer, phimosis, paraphimosis, balanitis and lichen sclerosis. While circumcision, like any surgical procedure, has risks for complications, they occur in less than 1 in 500 infants circumcised and most are minor and require minimal intervention. The CDC and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) believe that health benefits of circumcision outweigh the risks. For this reason, the AAP believes that parents should be allowed to make the decision concerning circumcision of their male infants after receiving non-biased information on health risks and health benefits. PMID:27338601

  7. Moon Watch: A Parental-Involvement Homework Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillero, Peter; Gonzalez-Jensen, Margarita; Moy, Tracy

    2000-01-01

    Presents the goals, philosophy, and methods of the SPLASH (Student-Parent Laboratories Achieving Science at Home) program. Describes an at-home, parental-involvement activity called Moon Watch in which students and their parents observe how the phases of the moon and the moon's position in the sky change over a two-week period. (WRM)

  8. Exploring Healthy Eating: Activities for Parents and Children Together.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tufts Univ., Medford, MA. Center on Hunger, Poverty and Nutrition Policy.

    This collection of learning units introduces parents to the role of nutrition in their young child's cognitive development. Designed to be easy to read and useful for families with limited resources, the materials help parents teach their young children good eating habits by offering information, feeding tips, creative activities for parents and…

  9. Parental Knowledge of Adolescent Activities: Links with Parental Attachment Style and Adolescent Substance Use

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jason D.; Ehrlich, Katherine B.; Lejuez, C. W.; Cassidy, Jude

    2015-01-01

    Parents’ knowledge of their adolescents’ whereabouts and activities is a robust predictor of adolescent risk behavior, including the use of drugs and alcohol. Surprisingly few studies have attempted to identify parental characteristics that are associated with the degree of parental knowledge. The present study is the first to examine how parental attachment style relates to mother, father, and adolescent reports of parental knowledge. Further, we used structural equation modeling to test the associations among parents’ attachment styles, reports of parental knowledge, and adolescents’ alcohol and marijuana use. Participants included 203 adolescents (mean age = 14.02, SD = .91) living in two-parent households and their parent(s). As predicted, mothers’ and fathers’ insecure attachment styles were negatively associated with self-reported and adolescent-reported parental knowledge, and all three reports of parental knowledge were negatively related to adolescent substance use. Mothers’ and fathers’ attachment styles were unrelated to adolescent substance use. However, evidence emerged for indirect effects of parental attachment style on adolescent substance use through reports of parental knowledge. Implications for prevention efforts and the importance of multiple reporters within the family are discussed. PMID:25730406

  10. Effects of children with Down syndrome on parents' activities.

    PubMed

    Barnett, W S; Boyce, G C

    1995-09-01

    Effects of children with Down syndrome on parents' daily activities were investigated. Data on the allocation of time to daily activities were obtained from time diaries provided by two samples of parents with at least one child under age 17. Parents in one sample had a child with Down syndrome and parents in the other sample did not. Comparison of time allocations by sample indicated that parents of children with Down syndrome differed substantially from other parents in their patterns of time use. Both parents of a child with Down syndrome devoted more time to child care and spent less time in social activities. Mothers of children with Down syndrome allocated less time to paid employment.

  11. Promoting Physical Activity in Children: Parental Influences. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welk, Gregory J.

    Children of active parents tend to be more active. This Digest describes the various socialization factors that influence a child's interest and involvement in physical activity. While role modeling exerts some effect, recent research suggests that the nature of parental influence may be much more complex. A useful theoretical model to explain…

  12. Parental Mediatory Role in Children's Physical Activity Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, P. Y. Peggy; Chow, Bik C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Parents are important agents in the physical activity socializing process in children. The present study aims to examine the parental mediatory role in children's physical activity participation via a youth physical activity promotion (YPAP) model. Design/methodology/approach: A total of 872 Hong Kong Chinese children (aged ten to 13) in…

  13. 78 FR 61002 - Agency Information Collection (Statement of Dependency of Parent(s)) Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Statement of Dependency of Parent(s)) Activity Under OMB Review... ``OMB Control No. 2900-0089.'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Statement of Dependency of Parent(s...-connected injuries and depends on his or her parent(s) for support complete VA Form 21-509 to report...

  14. Low-Income Parents' Warmth and Parent-Child Activities for Children with Disabilities, Suspected Delays and Biological Risks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eshbaugh, Elaine M.; Peterson, Carla A.; Wall, Shavaun; Carta, Judith J.; Luze, Gayle; Swanson, Mark; Jeon, Hyun-Joo

    2011-01-01

    Warm and responsive parenting is optimal for child development, but this style of parenting may be difficult for some parents to achieve. This study examines how parents' observed warmth and their reported frequency of parent-child activities were related to children's classifications as having biological risks or a range of disability indicators.…

  15. [From informed to shared: the developing process of consent].

    PubMed

    Casari, E F; Massimo, L M E

    2002-06-01

    Based on the respect of the four well known ethical principles "autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence and justice", of clinical cognitive psychology, social psychology and bioethics, and in the light of moral values, we wish to comment the clinical problems involving informed consent for diagnostic procedures, treatment and research in pediatrics. Studies of the issues in attitudes and shared consent in the clinical management involving children, their parents and the therapeutic team are still limited. Our suggestion is to manage the process of informed consent as a negotiated "shared consent" originated from the cognitive social representation theory, and taking into consideration the evolutive characteristics of the cognitive processes in children and adolescents, the ego defence mechanisms, the coping behaviour activated in the relationship among the pediatric patient, his/her family and the physicians. Many parents told us that the informed consent process is helpful though often confusing. Satisfaction was not related to ethnicity or education level. They found discussions more helpful than the consent documents. The more difficult process concerned their understanding of the concept of randomisation and the request of their consent to this procedure. The model we suggest has also the aim to give adequate and honest informations to children and adolescents through a continuous dialogue with the physician, until this become a routine part of their life in hospital care, to avoid confusion, to satisfy any request and curiosity, to be honest and helpful with any answer. We strongly believe that medical students, and in particular pediatricians, must be trained on "communication" and that they need to acquire, in addition to their medical capability, a good knowledge on this topic, including ethics and relational aspects. In our opinion, pediatricians must become expert also in the following topics: "Problem-related Learning", "The Family System Health Model

  16. 25 CFR 43.14 - Consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION MAINTENANCE AND CONTROL OF STUDENT RECORDS IN BUREAU SCHOOLS § 43.14 Consent. Educational institutions shall not permit access to or the release of student records... students, without the written consent of the parents or of an eligible student, to any party other than...

  17. 25 CFR 43.14 - Consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION MAINTENANCE AND CONTROL OF STUDENT RECORDS IN BUREAU SCHOOLS § 43.14 Consent. Educational institutions shall not permit access to or the release of student records... students, without the written consent of the parents or of an eligible student, to any party other than...

  18. 25 CFR 43.14 - Consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION MAINTENANCE AND CONTROL OF STUDENT RECORDS IN BUREAU SCHOOLS § 43.14 Consent. Educational institutions shall not permit access to or the release of student records... students, without the written consent of the parents or of an eligible student, to any party other than...

  19. Learning Activities Parents Can Do with Their Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Education, Phoenix.

    Learning activities parents can do with their children are described. Descriptions of activities are organized according to three age ranges: kindergarten through 3rd grade, 4th through 6th grade, and 7th through 12th grade. Initial discussion concerns pointers for parents of kindergartners; 41 things schools expect children to do before they…

  20. Ideas for the Parent Volunteer: Activities for the Gifted.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Nancy

    The booklet presents suggestions for parents working as volunteers in their gifted children's classrooms. Parents are advised to allow the children to help plan and execute the activities, which are designed to be multidisciplinary, inexpensive, and adaptable. Activities described include explorations of the language, geography, and culture of…

  1. Handbook of Family Activities for Parents of Learning Disabled Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, Georgia

    Intended for parents, the handbook describes characteristics of learning disabled (LD) children and offers activities that the child can perform in the home to build skill proficiency. It is explained that the activities are designed to relieve the parent and child of constant awareness of the disability, to avoid use of special materials and…

  2. Parenting

    MedlinePlus

    ... parents, people are always ready to offer advice. Parenting tips, parents' survival guides, dos, don'ts, shoulds ... right" way to be a good parent. Good parenting includes Keeping your child safe Showing affection and ...

  3. Explaining the erectile responses of rapists to rape stories: the contributions of sexual activity, non-consent, and violence with injury.

    PubMed

    Harris, Grant T; Lalumière, Martin L; Seto, Michael C; Rice, Marnie E; Chaplin, Terry C

    2012-02-01

    In phallometric research, rapists have a unique pattern of erectile responses to stimuli depicting sexual activities involving coercion and violence. In this study, we attempted to determine the cues that control rapists' erectile responses to rape stories in the laboratory. A total of 12 rapists and 14 non-rapists were exposed to recorded audio scenarios that systematically varied with regard to the presence or absence of three orthogonally varied elements: sexual activity and nudity, violence and injury, and expression of non-consent. As expected from prior research, an index computed by subtracting participants' greatest mean responses to stories describing mutually consenting sexual activity from their greatest mean responses to stories describing rape was much higher among rapists than non-rapists. Both groups showed larger responses when stories involved sexual activity and nudity, but neither group exhibited a preference for cues of violence and serious injury, or for cues of non-consent. The element that produced the larger group difference, however, was the presence or absence of active consent. The results indicated that a sexual interest in (or indifference to) non-consent is at least as central to accounting for the unique sexual orientation of rapists as is sexual responding to violence and injury.

  4. Explaining the erectile responses of rapists to rape stories: the contributions of sexual activity, non-consent, and violence with injury.

    PubMed

    Harris, Grant T; Lalumière, Martin L; Seto, Michael C; Rice, Marnie E; Chaplin, Terry C

    2012-02-01

    In phallometric research, rapists have a unique pattern of erectile responses to stimuli depicting sexual activities involving coercion and violence. In this study, we attempted to determine the cues that control rapists' erectile responses to rape stories in the laboratory. A total of 12 rapists and 14 non-rapists were exposed to recorded audio scenarios that systematically varied with regard to the presence or absence of three orthogonally varied elements: sexual activity and nudity, violence and injury, and expression of non-consent. As expected from prior research, an index computed by subtracting participants' greatest mean responses to stories describing mutually consenting sexual activity from their greatest mean responses to stories describing rape was much higher among rapists than non-rapists. Both groups showed larger responses when stories involved sexual activity and nudity, but neither group exhibited a preference for cues of violence and serious injury, or for cues of non-consent. The element that produced the larger group difference, however, was the presence or absence of active consent. The results indicated that a sexual interest in (or indifference to) non-consent is at least as central to accounting for the unique sexual orientation of rapists as is sexual responding to violence and injury. PMID:22415328

  5. Parental Consent Act of 2011

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Paul, Ron [R-TX-14

    2011-08-01

    09/08/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  6. 12 CFR 1272.6 - FHFA consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false FHFA consent. 1272.6 Section 1272.6 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS NEW BUSINESS ACTIVITIES § 1272.6 FHFA consent. The FHFA may at any time provide consent for a Bank to undertake a particular new...

  7. 12 CFR 347.119 - Specific consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Specific consent. 347.119 Section 347.119 Banks... INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.119 Specific consent. General consent and expedited processing under this subpart do... activity that can be engaged in by foreign branches, which are not authorized under §§ 347.117 or...

  8. 12 CFR 347.117 - General consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false General consent. 347.117 Section 347.117 Banks... INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.117 General consent. (a) General consent to establish or relocate a foreign branch... establish a foreign branch conducting activities authorized by section 347.115 of this section in...

  9. 12 CFR 347.117 - General consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false General consent. 347.117 Section 347.117 Banks... INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.117 General consent. (a) General consent to establish or relocate a foreign branch... establish a foreign branch conducting activities authorized by section 347.115 of this section in...

  10. 12 CFR 347.117 - General consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false General consent. 347.117 Section 347.117 Banks... INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.117 General consent. (a) General consent to establish or relocate a foreign branch... establish a foreign branch conducting activities authorized by section 347.115 of this section in...

  11. 12 CFR 347.119 - Specific consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Specific consent. 347.119 Section 347.119 Banks... INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.119 Specific consent. General consent and expedited processing under this subpart do... activity that can be engaged in by foreign branches, which are not authorized under §§ 347.117 or...

  12. 12 CFR 347.119 - Specific consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Specific consent. 347.119 Section 347.119 Banks... INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.119 Specific consent. General consent and expedited processing under this subpart do... activity that can be engaged in by foreign branches, which are not authorized under §§ 347.117 or...

  13. 12 CFR 347.117 - General consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false General consent. 347.117 Section 347.117 Banks... INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.117 General consent. (a) General consent to establish or relocate a foreign branch... establish a foreign branch conducting activities authorized by section 347.115 of this section in...

  14. Informed consent in pediatric research.

    PubMed

    Leibson, Tom; Koren, Gideon

    2015-02-01

    Pediatric drug research is gradually becoming more and more accepted as the norm for assessing whether a drug is safe and efficacious for infants and children. The process of informed consent and assent for these trials presents a major challenge. The aim of this review is to map historical, ethical and legal aspects relevant to the challenges of informed consent in the setting of pediatric drug research. The impact of age, level of maturity and life circumstances on the process of obtaining informed consent as well as the relations between consent and assent are discussed. There appears to be a lack of regulatory clarity in the area of pediatric clinical trials; while numerous statements have been made regarding children's rights to autonomy and their ability to care for themselves and for younger ones, the ever changing status of adolescence is still difficult to translate to informed consent. This may delay scientific and clinical advancement for children who are at the very junction of being independent and not needing parental permission. Obtaining consent and assent for pediatric clinical trials is a delicate matter, as both parent and child need to agree to participate. The appropriate transfer of information to guardians and the children, especially concerning potential risks and benefits, is at the heart of informed consent, as it serves to protect both patient and physician. As many adults lack health literacy, one must ensure that guardians receive relevant information at a level and in forms they can understand regarding the trials their children are asked to participate in.

  15. Dog Ownership, Dog Walking, and Children's and Parents' Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmon, Jo; Timperio, Anna; Chu, Binh; Veitch, Jenny

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to determine cross-sectional associations of dog ownership, dog walking, and physical activity (PA) among children and their parents. Objective measures of PA were obtained for children ages 5-6 and 10-12 years from 19 primary schools across Melbourne, Australia. Parents self-reported their PA, dog ownership, and frequency of dog…

  16. Informed consent.

    PubMed

    Steevenson, Grania

    2006-08-01

    Disclosure of information prior to consent is a very complex area of medical ethics. On the surface it would seem to be quite clear cut, but on closer inspection the scope for 'grey areas' is vast. In practice, however, it could be argued that the number of cases that result in complaint or litigation is comparatively small. However, this does not mean that wrong decisions or unethical scenarios do not occur. It would seem that in clinical practice these ethical grey areas concerning patients' full knowledge of their condition or treatment are quite common. One of the barometers for how much disclosure should be given prior to consent could be the feedback obtained from the patients. Are they asking relevant questions pertinent to their condition and do they show a good understanding of the options available? This should be seen as a positive trait and should be welcomed by the healthcare professionals. Ultimately it gives patients greater autonomy and the healthcare professional can expand and build on the patient's knowledge as well as allay fears perhaps based on wrongly held information. Greater communication with the patient would help the healthcare professional pitch their explanations at the right level. Every case and scenario is different and unique and deserves to be treated as such. Studies have shown that most patients can understand their medical condition and treatment provided communication has been thorough (Gillon 1996). It is in the patients' best interests to feel comfortable with the level of disclosure offered to them. It can only foster greater trust and respect between them and the healthcare profession which has to be mutually beneficial to both parties.

  17. Informed consent.

    PubMed

    Steevenson, Grania

    2006-08-01

    Disclosure of information prior to consent is a very complex area of medical ethics. On the surface it would seem to be quite clear cut, but on closer inspection the scope for 'grey areas' is vast. In practice, however, it could be argued that the number of cases that result in complaint or litigation is comparatively small. However, this does not mean that wrong decisions or unethical scenarios do not occur. It would seem that in clinical practice these ethical grey areas concerning patients' full knowledge of their condition or treatment are quite common. One of the barometers for how much disclosure should be given prior to consent could be the feedback obtained from the patients. Are they asking relevant questions pertinent to their condition and do they show a good understanding of the options available? This should be seen as a positive trait and should be welcomed by the healthcare professionals. Ultimately it gives patients greater autonomy and the healthcare professional can expand and build on the patient's knowledge as well as allay fears perhaps based on wrongly held information. Greater communication with the patient would help the healthcare professional pitch their explanations at the right level. Every case and scenario is different and unique and deserves to be treated as such. Studies have shown that most patients can understand their medical condition and treatment provided communication has been thorough (Gillon 1996). It is in the patients' best interests to feel comfortable with the level of disclosure offered to them. It can only foster greater trust and respect between them and the healthcare profession which has to be mutually beneficial to both parties. PMID:16939165

  18. Informed consent - adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... state). What Should Occur During the Informed Consent Process? When asking for your informed consent, your doctor ... What is Your Role in the Informed Consent Process? You are an important member of your health ...

  19. Parental Activity as Influence on Childrenˋs BMI Percentiles and Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Erkelenz, Nanette; Kobel, Susanne; Kettner, Sarah; Drenowatz, Clemens; Steinacker, Jürgen M.

    2014-01-01

    Parents play a crucial role in the development of their children’s lifestyle and health behaviour. This study aims to examine associations between parental physical activity (PA) and children’s BMI percentiles (BMIPCT), moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) as well as participation in organised sports. Height and body weight was measured in 1615 in German children (7.1 ± 0.6 years, 50.3% male) and converted to BMIPCT. Parental BMI was calculated based on self-reported height and body weight. Children’s MVPA and sports participation as well as parental PA were assessed via parental questionnaire. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), controlling for age and family income was used to examine the association between parental and children’s PA levels as well as BMIPCT. 39.7% of the parents classified themselves as physically active and 8.3% of children were classified as overweight or obese. Lower BMIPCT were observed with both parents being physically active (44.5 ± 26.3 vs. 50.2 ± 26.9 and 52.0 ± 28.4, respectively). There was no association between parental and children’s PA levels but children with at least one active parent displayed a higher participation in organised sports (102.0 ± 96.6 and 117.7 ± 123.6 vs. 73.7 ± 100.0, respectively). Children of active parents were less likely to be overweight and obese. The lack of association between subjectively assessed parental PA and child MVPA suggests that parental support for PA in children is more important than parents being a role model. More active parents, however, may be more likely to facilitate participation in organised sports. These results underline the importance of the inclusion of parents in health promotion and obesity prevention programmes in children. Key points A higher prevalence of overweight or obese children was found with inactive parents. Children’s BMI percentiles were lower if both parents were physically active compared to children whose parents were both inactive or only had one

  20. Pots and Pans: Activities for Parent and Child. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoneburner, Robert L.; Dowdy, Lynne R.

    The booklet presents developmental and basic skills learning activities for parents to use at home with their handicapped preschool children to better prepare the children for school related experiences. Under each activity are provided a statement of what the activity seeks to accomplish, a list of materials necessary for the activity, suggested…

  1. Parental influences on adolescent physical activity: a longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Ornelas, India J; Perreira, Krista M; Ayala, Guadalupe X

    2007-01-01

    Background Physical inactivity is increasing among adolescents in the U.S., especially among girls. Despite growing evidence that parents are an important influence on adolescent health, few longitudinal studies have explored the causal relationship between parental influence and physical activity. This study examines how the relationships between parental influences and adolescent physical activity differ by gender and tests whether these relationships are mediated by adolescents' self-esteem and depression. Methods Data are from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. The sample includes 13,246 youth, grades 7 to 12, interviewed in 1995 and again 1 year later. Logit models were used to evaluate parental influences on achieving five or more bouts of moderate to vigorous physical activity per week [MVPA] and whether the relationship between parental influence and MVPA was mediated by adolescents' level of self-esteem and depression. Results Family cohesion, parent-child communication and parental engagement positively predicted MVPA for both genders one year later (odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for females, 1.09 [1.05–1.12], 1.13 [1.07–1.19], 1.25 [1.17–1.33] and males, 1.08 [1.04–1.11], 1.14 [1.07–1.23], 1.23 [1.14–1.33], respectively); however, parental monitoring did not (odds ratio and confidence intervals for females and males, 1.02 [.97–1.07]). For both females and males, self-esteem mediated the relationship between parental influence and physical activity. Depressive symptoms were only a mediator among males. Females reported higher levels of parent-child communication and lower family cohesion compared with males. There were no gender differences in levels of parental monitoring and engagement. Females had significantly lower levels of self-esteem and higher levels of depressive symptoms than males. Conclusion Strategies to promote physical activity among adolescents should focus on increasing levels of family

  2. Parent Modeling: Perceptions of Parents’ Physical Activity Predict Girls’ Activity throughout Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Kristine A.; McCulloch, Charles; Crawford, Patricia B.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To determine if parent modeling of physical activity has a differential impact on girls’ physical activity (PA) by race, if the association declines over time, and to assess the contribution of parent modeling to girls’ activity relative to other potential predictors. Study design Longitudinal examination of parent modeling’s impact on future log transformed metabolic equivalents (log METs) of leisure-time PA among 1213 African-American and 1166 Caucasian girls in the NHLBI Growth and Health Study, from age 9-10 through 18-19 years, using linear regression. Race interaction terms and time trends were examined. Results Girls’ perceptions of parent modeling significantly predicted future log METs in each study year; associations remained stable over time and were similar by race. Girls’ perception of parent PA better predicted girl log METs than did parent self-report. On average, girls reporting that their parents exercised ≥3x/week were about 50% more active than girls with sedentary parents. Conclusions Girls’ perception of parent activity predicts PA for girls throughout adolescence, despite age-associated decreases in PA. We did not find differences in this association by race. Interventions designed to increase parental activity may improve parent health, positively influence daughters’ activity, and begin to address disparities in cardiovascular health. PMID:18789455

  3. [Parenting].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pawl, Jeree, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Contributions to this theme issue of a bulletin on infants aged birth to three, point out that becoming a parent is an evolving process and that infants' meanings to their parents shape parenting behavior and the capacity to change. Articles also examine the challenge of how to support parents as they come to, and continue in, the process of…

  4. Effects of Children with Down Syndrome on Parents' Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, W. Steven; Boyce, Glenna C.

    1995-01-01

    Daily activities were investigated of 237 mothers and 134 fathers of children with Down syndrome and 216 mothers and 174 fathers of children without Down syndrome. Compared to controls, parents of children with Down syndrome devoted more time to child care and spent less time in social activities. (Author/SW)

  5. Drinking Water Activities for Students, Teachers, and Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    This guide provides teachers with materials, information, and classroom activities to enhance any drinking water curriculum. Students can use the activity sheets to further lessons and stimulate thought. Parents can use the guide to develop science projects that will provoke thought, encourage research, and provide a scientific approach to…

  6. Environmental and cultural correlates of physical activity parenting practices among Latino parents with preschool-aged children: Ninos Activos

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Latino children are at high risk of becoming obese. Physical activity (PA) can help prevent obesity. Parents can influence children's PA through parenting practices. This study aimed to examine the independent contributions of (1) sociodemographic, (2) cultural, (3) parent perceived environmental, a...

  7. Environmental and cultural correlates of physical activity parenting practices among Latino parents with preschool-aged children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parents can influence their children's physical activity (PA) through parenting practices (PP). Correlates of PA-PP have not been investigated. This study therefore aimed to examine the independent contributions of (1) socio-demographic, (2) cultural, (3) parent perceived-environmental, and (4) obje...

  8. Spillovers of health education at school on parents' physical activity.

    PubMed

    Berniell, Lucila; de la Mata, Dolores; Valdés, Nieves

    2013-09-01

    This paper exploits state health education (HED) reforms as quasi-natural experiments to estimate the causal impact of HED received by children on their parents' physical activity. We use data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics for the period 1999-2005 merged with data on state HED reforms from the National Association of State Boards of Education Health Policy Database and the 2000 and 2006 School Health Policies and Programs Study. To identify the spillover effects of HED requirements on parents' behavior, we use several methodologies (triple differences, changes in changes, and difference in differences) in which we allow for different types of treatments. We find a positive effect of HED reforms at the elementary school on the probability of parents doing light physical activity. Introducing major changes in HED increases the probability of fathers engaging in physical activity by between 6.3 and 13.7 percentage points, whereas on average, this probability for mothers does not seem to be affected. We analyze several heterogeneous impacts of the HED reforms to unveil the mechanisms behind these spillovers. We find evidence consistent with hypotheses such as gender specialization of parents in childcare activities or information sharing between children and parents.

  9. Valid informed consent and participative decision-making in children with cancer and their parents: a report of the SIOP Working Committee on psychosocial issues in pediatric oncology.

    PubMed

    Spinetta, John J; Masera, Giuseppe; Jankovic, Momcilo; Oppenheim, Daniel; Martins, Antonio Gentil; Ben Arush, Myriam Weyl; van Dongen-Melman, Jeanette; Epelman, Claudia; Medin, Gabriela; Pekkanen, Kirsti; Eden, Tim

    2003-04-01

    This is the tenth official document of the SIOP Working Committee on psychosocial issues in pediatric oncology, instituted in 1991. It is addressed to the pediatric oncology community. Children clearly have a right to participate in medical decisions regarding their own treatment, based on the developmental level of the child. The objective of these guidelines is to encourage physicians to share with the child developmentally relevant medical information specific to that particular child's health status, in the context of the child's own culture, so that he or she can actively participate in the decision-making process regarding his or her own health. These guidelines, geared toward this objective, discuss the child's right to medical information, the parents' legal responsibility for but not exclusive right over the child's health, and ways of encouraging the younger child's active participation in his or her own health care at an age-appropriate level of understanding. For adolescents, there should be a full and legally mandated power to make their own decisions regarding medical treatment.

  10. Understood consent versus informed consent: a new paradigm for obtaining consent for pediatric research studies.

    PubMed

    Isles, Alan F

    2013-01-01

    All too often the informed consent process is viewed by members of research teams as a challenge of getting a parent or young person's signature on a form. Informed consent is, however, much more than a signed form. Rather, it is a process, often iterative, in which the parent or young person is given sufficient information about a study in order that they can make a truly informed decision about participation. Substantial effort is required in producing appropriately formatted and readable documents using plain language at about Grade 6 or 12-year old reading level. Achieving truly understood consent involves the researcher spending significant one-on-one time with the parent or young person explaining in simple language what is proposed and then using so-called repeat-back techniques to test the understanding of the participants. This is critically important if the research involves randomization to different treatments or use of a placebo arm and, in particular if the research involves more than minimal risk. PMID:24400284

  11. Examining a conceptual model of parental nurturance, parenting practices and physical activity among 5–6 year olds

    PubMed Central

    Sebire, Simon J.; Jago, Russell; Wood, Lesley; Thompson, Janice L.; Zahra, Jezmond; Lawlor, Deborah A.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Parenting is an often-studied correlate of children's physical activity, however there is little research examining the associations between parenting styles, practices and the physical activity of younger children. Objective This study aimed to investigate whether physical activity-based parenting practices mediate the association between parenting styles and 5–6 year-old children's objectively-assessed physical activity. Methods 770 parents self-reported parenting style (nurturance and control) and physical activity-based parenting practices (logistic and modeling support). Their 5–6 year old child wore an accelerometer for five days to measure moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Linear regression was used to examine direct and indirect (mediation) associations. Data were collected in the United Kingdom in 2012/13 and analyzed in 2014. Results Parent nurturance was positively associated with provision of modeling (adjusted unstandardized coefficient, β = 0.11; 95% CI = 0.02, 0.21) and logistic support (β = 0.14; 0.07, 0.21). Modeling support was associated with greater child MVPA (β = 2.41; 0.23, 4.60) and a small indirect path from parent nurturance to child's MVPA was identified (β = 0.27; 0.04, 0.70). Conclusions Physical activity-based parenting practices are more strongly associated with 5–6 year old children's MVPA than parenting styles. Further research examining conceptual models of parenting is needed to understand in more depth the possible antecedents to adaptive parenting practices beyond parenting styles. PMID:26647364

  12. Parent participation plays an important part in promoting physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Lindqvist, Anna-Karin; Kostenius, Catrine; Gard, Gunvor; Rutberg, Stina

    2015-01-01

    Although physical activity (PA) is an important and modifiable determinant of health, in Sweden only 15% of boys and 10% of girls aged 15 years old achieve the recommended levels of PA 7 days per week. Adolescents’ PA levels are associated with social influence exerted by parents, friends, and teachers. The purpose of this study was to describe parents’ experiences of being a part of their adolescents’ empowerment-inspired PA intervention. A qualitative interview study was performed at a school in the northern part of Sweden. A total of 10 parents were interviewed, and the collected data were analyzed with qualitative content analysis. Three subthemes were combined into one main theme, demonstrating that parents are one important part of a successful PA intervention. The life of an adolescent has many options and demands that make it difficult to prioritize PA. Although parents felt that they were important in supporting their adolescent, a successful PA intervention must have multiple components. Moreover, the parents noted that the intervention had a positive effect upon not only their adolescents’, but also their own PA. Interventions aimed at promoting PA among adolescents should include measures to stimulate parent participation, have an empowerment approach, and preferably be school-based. PMID:26282870

  13. Physical activity parenting: A systematic review of questionnaires and their associations with child activity levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insufficient physical activity (PA) is considered a critical contributor to childhood overweight. Parents are a key in influencing their child's PA through various mechanisms of PA parenting, including support, restriction of PA, and facilitation of enrollment in PA classes or activities. However, s...

  14. Factors Associated with Physical Activity Literacy among Foster Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominick, Gregory M.; Friedman, Daniela B.; Saunders, Ruth P.; Hussey, Jim R.; Watkins, Ken W.; W.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To explore associations between physical activity (PA) literacy and psychosocial constructs for providing instrumental social support for youth PA. Methods: Ninety-one foster parents completed surveys assessing PA literacy (overall and specific), perceptions of child PA, coordination, PA enjoyment, psychosocial variables:…

  15. Daddy's Days Away. A Deployment Activity Book for Parents & Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps, Washington, DC.

    This booklet grew from an idea that the children of Marines might appreciate some special discussion of their family's separation during deployment. Information is provided for parents to help them express their feelings with their children about the deployment. Outlines of activities to do before leaving are included. Suggestions are given for…

  16. Guideline 2: Informed Consent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Journal on Mental Retardation, 2000

    2000-01-01

    The second in seven sets of guidelines based on the consensus of experts in the treatment of psychiatric and behavioral problems in mental retardation (MR) focuses on informed consent. Guidelines cover underlying concepts, usual components, informed consent as a process, information to include, what to provide, when to obtain informed consent, and…

  17. Consent Procedures and Participation Rates in School-Based Intervention and Prevention Research: Using a Multi-Component, Partnership-Based Approach to Recruit Participants

    PubMed Central

    Leff, Stephen S.; Franko, Debra L.; Weinstein, Elana; Beakley, Kelly; Power, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Evaluations of school-based interventions and prevention programs typically require parental consent for students to participate. In school-based efforts, program evaluators may have limited access to parents and considerable effort is required to obtain signed consent. This issue is particularly salient when conducting research in under-resourced, urban schools, where parent involvement in the school setting may be somewhat limited. The aims of this article were to (a) examine the published school-based prevention and intervention literature to assess the state of the field in terms of consent procedures and participation rates; and (b) describe two examples of health promotion studies that used multi-component, partnership-based strategies in urban schools to encourage communication among children, their parents, and researchers. The purpose of the case studies was to generate hypotheses to advance the science related to school-based participant recruitment for research studies. Of nearly 500 studies reviewed, only 11.5% reported both consent procedures and participation rates. Studies using active consent procedures had a mean participation rate of 65.5% (range: 11–100%). This article highlights the need for researchers to report consent procedures and participation rates and describes partnership-based strategies used to enroll students into two urban, school-based health promotion studies. PMID:19834586

  18. Informed Consent to Treatment in Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Neilson, Grainne; Chaimowitz, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Summary Patients have a right to be informed and actively involved in their health care. Fundamental to a person’s dignity and autonomy is the right to make decisions about their psychiatric treatment, including their right to refuse unwanted treatments, providing that the refusal is a capable one. It is important that psychiatrists have an awareness of the ethical underpinnings of consent and the legislated requirements related to consent, including precedent cases. Consent may change over time and for different conditions and circumstances. Consent must be an ongoing process.

  19. Parental and childhood overweight in sedentary and active adolescents.

    PubMed

    Pahkala, K; Heinonen, O J; Lagström, H; Hakala, P; Sillanmäki, L; Kaitosaari, T; Viikari, J; Aromaa, M; Simell, O

    2010-02-01

    We studied whether the prevalence of overweight since age 2 years differed in sedentary and active adolescents (N=346). Further, we analyzed the energy intake of sedentary and active adolescents across 12 years. BMI was assessed annually since birth, energy intake since age 13 months and parents' BMI from the time their child was 7 months old in a longitudinal atherosclerosis prevention study. Data on physical activity were collected at age 13 years (N=560). Sedentary and Active groups were formed by upper and lower physical activity tertile cut-points. Girls Sedentary at 13 years were more often overweight than Active peers already since age 2 years (P=0.048). Activity habits were not associated with energy intake. Conversely, among boys, activity habits in adolescence were not associated with childhood overweight, while the energy intake of Active boys was higher than that of Sedentary boys (P=0.008). Parental overweight was not associated with the physical activity of children; however, Sedentary girls more often had an overweight mother than Active girls (P=0.021). In conclusion, overweight during early years of life is more common among girls who are Sedentary as adolescents than in Active peers. Overweight mothers more often have Sedentary daughters than normal-weight mothers. A healthy lifestyle right from early childhood requires active support.

  20. Responsibility for children's physical activity: parental, child, and teacher perspectives.

    PubMed

    Cox, Michele; Schofield, Grant; Kolt, Gregory S

    2010-01-01

    Some large-scale child physical activity campaigns have focused on the concept of responsibility, however, there are no measures which establish a link between responsible behavior and physical activity levels. To provide the basis of information required for the development of relevant measurement tools, this study examined the meaning of personal, parental, and third party responsibility for children's physical activity. Eight focus groups, comprising children aged 11-12 yrs, their parents, and teachers from two upper primary schools in Auckland, New Zealand, were conducted. Children (four groups; n=32), their parents (two groups; n=13), and teachers (two groups; n=15) were separated by socio-economic status, and children also by gender. The transcripts from the focus group interviews were then analysed using thematic induction methodology. Across the groups, participants commonly identified a number of behaviors that they felt were indicative of personal, parental, and third party responsibility for children's physical activity. These behaviors formed natural groups with common themes (e.g., self-management, safety), which in most cases were not impacted on by socio-economic status or gender. Responsibility was therefore found to be a concept that could be related to children's physical activity. It was suggested that these behaviors could be used as a starting point in understanding the relationship between responsibility and physical activity, and to assist with the development of measurement tools assessing the relationship between responsibility and levels of physical activity in the future. In turn, this may lead to the development of more targeted messages for large-scale physical activity campaigns.

  1. Informed consent and routinisation.

    PubMed

    Ploug, Thomas; Holm, Soren

    2013-04-01

    This article introduces the notion of 'routinisation' into discussions of informed consent. It is argued that the routinisation of informed consent poses a threat to the protection of the personal autonomy of a patient through the negotiation of informed consent. On the basis of a large survey, we provide evidence of the routinisation of informed consent in various types of interaction on the internet; among these, the routinisation of consent to the exchange of health related information. We also provide evidence that the extent of the routinisation of informed consent is dependent on the character of the information exchanged, and we uncover a range of causes of routinisation. Finally, the article discusses possible ways of countering the problem of routinisation of informed consent.

  2. Where no consent = death.

    PubMed

    1977-01-01

    Men must be made to understand the value of family planning - particularly in societies where men hold the power of decision in the family. Dr. Kotha Pannikar, chairman of the Kedah Family Planning Association (FPA) in Malaysia, illustrated this point in discussion which followed the Consultation of Medical and Communication Fieldworkers conference in Kuala Lumpur in August, with a story about 1 of her own patients. When the girl, who had a rheumatic heart, was 16, Dr. Pannikar advised the parents that she needed cardiac surgery if she were to be a healthy wife and mother. But the parents lived some distance from Dr. Pannikar's surgery and did not heed the advice. The girl was married to a carpenter from a traditional Chinese family, in which "the man is lord and master." Her new home had no piped water, and in additional to normal domestic tasks she had to carry water from a source 1 1/2 miles agay. In the 7th month of her 1st pregnancy, she went into cardiac failure. After the 3rd pregnancy and a 3rd cardiac failure, Dr. Pannikar tried to arrange a sterilization "but we could not get consent - her husband refused to turn up at the hospital." When the girl was admitted to hospital 6 months into her 4th pregnancy, Dr. Pannikar got hold of her patient's mother-in-law. "I told her if she wanted a servant in the house, it was easy to get one. But no servant would look after her grandchildren the way their mother would. I told her if she wanted to save the girl's life she had better speak to her son." During the 4th delivery, the girl went into cardiac arrest and spent 2 weeks in intensive care. The mother-in-law prevailed upon her son to at least consent, and the girl was sterilized before she left hospital. But "it was a very near thing," Dr. Pannikar recalls "and it wouldn't have happened if the husband had felt he was responsible in parenthood." The Kedah FPA makes special efforts to reach men. Dr. Pannikar herself talks to men's organizations like the Lions and

  3. 12 CFR 980.6 - Finance Board consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Finance Board consent. 980.6 Section 980.6 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD NEW FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK ACTIVITIES NEW BUSINESS ACTIVITIES § 980.6 Finance Board consent. The Finance Board may at any time provide consent for a Bank...

  4. 12 CFR 980.6 - Finance Board consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Finance Board consent. 980.6 Section 980.6 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD NEW FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK ACTIVITIES NEW BUSINESS ACTIVITIES § 980.6 Finance Board consent. The Finance Board may at any time provide consent for a Bank...

  5. Informed consent & ethical issues in paediatric psychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Savita; Subodh, B N

    2009-01-01

    Issues relating to informed consent and ethics in paediatric psychopharmacology limit research in this population. Children vary in their levels of cognitive development, and presence of psychiatric disorder may further impair their ability to give informed consent. In decisional impairment subjects, various methods used for consent are assent/dissent; inclusion of advance directives; and/or alternative decision-makers. India is emerging as a new market for clinical trials in recent years. Moreover, in India the sociocultural realities are different from those in the western countries making it necessary for professionals to be cautious in conducting drug trials. In this review, issues regarding informed consent in children and adolescent with psychiatric diagnosis are discussed for information, discussion and debate by professionals, parents, society and legal experts to create awareness and to facilitate development of guidelines that are appropriate and applicable to the Indian system.

  6. 10 CFR 820.23 - Consent order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Consent order. 820.23 Section 820.23 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROCEDURAL RULES FOR DOE NUCLEAR ACTIVITIES Enforcement Process § 820.23 Consent order. (a) Settlement policy. DOE encourages settlement of an enforcement proceeding at any time if the settlement is consistent with the objectives of the...

  7. Parental Perceptions of Physical Activity Benefits for Youth with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitchford, E. Andrew; Siebert, Erin; Hamm, Jessica; Yun, Joonkoo

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity promotion is of need for youth with developmental disabilities. Parental perceptions of physical activity benefits may influence youth behaviors. This study investigated the relationship between parental beliefs on the importance of physical activity and physical activity levels among youth with disabilities. Parents and…

  8. 25 CFR 43.15 - Content of consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION MAINTENANCE AND CONTROL OF STUDENT RECORDS IN BUREAU SCHOOLS § 43.15 Content of consent. The consent of a parent or eligible student requested under this part for the release of student records shall be in writing, signed and dated by the person giving...

  9. 25 CFR 43.15 - Content of consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION MAINTENANCE AND CONTROL OF STUDENT RECORDS IN BUREAU SCHOOLS § 43.15 Content of consent. The consent of a parent or eligible student requested under this part for the release of student records shall be in writing, signed and dated by the person giving...

  10. Empowering Parents: Developing Support, Leadership, Advocacy, and Activism. Child Care Action Campaign Issue Brief #2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Laurie; Anderson, Candice

    This report from a 1995 Child Care Action Campaign national audioconference examines approaches to empowering parents through developing support, leadership, advocacy, and activism to better enable low-income parents to become effective change agents. The report describes the experiences of three parent programs, which found that parents typically…

  11. Is Parenting Style Related to Children's Healthy Eating and Physical Activity in Latino Families?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arredondo, Elva M.; Elder, John P.; Ayala, Guadalupe X.; Campbell, Nadia; Baquero, Barbara; Duerksen, Susan

    2006-01-01

    Parenting styles influence a child's risk for obesity. The goals of this study are to evaluate the influence of (i) parenting style on children's health behaviors (physical activity and dietary intake), (ii) children's sociodemographic characteristics on parenting style and on children's health behaviors and (iii) parents' sociodemographic…

  12. 34 CFR 300.622 - Consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... child is enrolled, or is going to enroll in a private school that is not located in the LEA of the... about the child is released between officials in the LEA where the private school is located and... authorized without parental consent under 34 CFR part 99. (b)(1) Except as provided in paragraphs (b)(2)...

  13. Are the physical activity parenting practices reported by U.S. and Canadian parents captured in currently published instruments?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to compare the physical activity parenting practices (PAPPs) parents report using with the PAPPs incorporated in the published literature. PAPPs in the literature were identified by reviewing the content of 74 published PAPPs measures obtained from current systematic re...

  14. 34 CFR 303.401 - Definitions of consent, native language, and personally identifiable information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Definitions of consent, native language, and personally... Definitions of consent, native language, and personally identifiable information. As used in this subpart— (a... which consent is sought, in the parent's native language or other mode of communication; (2) The...

  15. e-Consent: The design and implementation of consumer consent mechanisms in an electronic environment.

    PubMed

    Coiera, Enrico; Clarke, Roger

    2004-01-01

    The effective coordination of health care relies on communication of confidential information about consumers between different health and community care services. However, consumers must be able to give or withhold "e-Consent" to those who wish to access their electronic health information. There are several possible forms for e-Consent. In the general consent model, a patient provides blanket consent for access to his or her information by an organization for all future information requests. Conversely, general denial explicitly denies consent for information to be used in future circumstances, and in each new episode of care, a new consent would be needed to obtain information. In the general consent with specific denial model, a patient attaches specific exclusion conditions to his or her general approval to future accesses. In contrast, in the general denial with explicit consent model, a patient issues a blanket block on all future accesses but allows the inclusion of future use under specified conditions. There also are several alternative functions for an e-Consent system. Consent could be captured as a matter of legal record. E-Consent systems could be more active by prompting clinicians to indicate that they have noted consent conditions before they access a record. Finally, the record of patient consent could be fully active and used as a gatekeeper in a distributed information environment. There probably will need to be some form of data object that is associated with patient information. This e-Consent object (or e-Co) will contain the specific conditions under which the data to which it is attached can be retrieved. Given the complexity of clinical work and the substantial variation we can expect in an individual's desire to make his or her personal medical details available, it is unlikely a "one size fits all" approach to e-Consent will work. Consequently, with a well-chosen consent design, it should be possible to balance the specific need for

  16. Collision between law and ethics: consent for treatment with adolescents.

    PubMed

    Shields, J M; Johnson, A

    1992-01-01

    The dilemmas between legal obligations and ethical responsibilities can often create problems in clinical work. The treatment of minors, and particularly adolescents, can present special issues to the clinician that are becoming increasingly frequent and difficult. The issue of informed consent for treatment of adolescents raises serious questions for the clinical practitioner who is faced with both legal and ethical dilemmas in making decisions about treatment. There are an increasing number of cases where adolescents may seek treatment yet are in circumstances that preclude parental consent. This paper uses case material to illustrate some of the legal, ethical, and treatment considerations in the situation of adolescent treatment where parental consent is problematic.

  17. Playing "The Ladybug Game": Parent Guidance of Young Children's Numeracy Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandermaas-Peeler, Maureen; Ferretti, Larissa; Loving, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Parent guidance for numeracy activities and preschoolers' numeracy performance were examined in the context of playing a board game in three sessions over a two-week period. Twenty-eight parent-child dyads were randomly assigned to a numeracy awareness group in which parents were provided with suggested numeracy activities to incorporate into the…

  18. Parental Attitudes and Young People's Online Sexual Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorbring, Emma; Hallberg, Jonas; Bohlin, Margareta; Skoog, Therése

    2015-01-01

    Parental attitudes towards young people's sexuality in traditional (i.e. non-online media) settings have been associated with young people's sexual activities. In this study, we explored the association between key parent and youth characteristics and parental attitudes towards young people's online sexual activities. We also…

  19. Making the Difference with Active Parenting; Forming Educational Partnerships between Parents and Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oostdam, Ron; Hooge, Edith

    2013-01-01

    Although parental involvement is often a priority on the quality agenda of schools for primary and secondary education, it is still not usual to involve parents as an educational partner in the actual learning process of their child. Rather than adopting an open approach, teachers tend to tell parents what they should do or keep them at a safe…

  20. Parent-child interactions and objectively measured child physical activity: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Parents influence their children's behaviors directly through specific parenting practices and indirectly through their parenting style. Some practices such as logistical and emotional support have been shown to be positively associated with child physical activity (PA) levels, while for others (e.g. monitoring) the relationship is not clear. The objectives of this study were to determine the relationship between parent's PA-related practices, general parenting style, and children's PA level. Methods During the spring of 2007 a diverse group of 99 parent-child dyads (29% White, 49% Black, 22% Hispanic; 89% mothers) living in low-income rural areas of the US participated in a cross-sectional study. Using validated questionnaires, parents self-reported their parenting style (authoritative, authoritarian, permissive, and uninvolved) and activity-related parenting practices. Height and weight were measured for each dyad and parents reported demographic information. Child PA was measured objectively through accelerometers and expressed as absolute counts and minutes engaged in intensity-specific activity. Results Seventy-six children had valid accelerometer data. Children engaged in 113.4 ± 37.0 min. of moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) per day. Children of permissive parents accumulated more minutes of MVPA than those of uninvolved parents (127.5 vs. 97.1, p < 0.05), while parents who provided above average levels of support had children who participated in more minutes of MVPA (114.2 vs. 98.3, p = 0.03). While controlling for known covariates, an uninvolved parenting style was the only parenting behavior associated with child physical activity. Parenting style moderated the association between two parenting practices - reinforcement and monitoring - and child physical activity. Specifically, post-hoc analyses revealed that for the permissive parenting style group, higher levels of parental reinforcement or monitoring were associated with higher

  1. [Informed consent for standard procedures and for clinical research in paediatric anaesthesia].

    PubMed

    Murat, I; Sabourdin, N; Balestrat, E; Louvet, N

    2013-01-01

    This short review is aimed at describing the particularities of consent in paediatric patients. For routine procedures, the consent of one of the parents is required whereas both parents should sign the consent for research protocols. In case of difficulties such as Jehovah witnesses or parental opposite opinions, doctors should ask the question to the judge in charge of protection of children. Consent or at least assent of minors enrolled in research protocols should be obtained provided their maturity is sufficient to understand correctly the purpose of clinical research. PMID:23183134

  2. Beyond informed consent.

    PubMed Central

    Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.

    2004-01-01

    Although a relatively recent phenomenon, the role of informed consent in human research is central to its ethical regulation and conduct. However, guidelines often recommend procedures for obtaining informed consent (usually written consent) that are difficult to implement in developing countries. This paper reviews the guidelines for obtaining informed consent and also discusses prevailing views on current controversies, ambiguities and problems with these guidelines and suggests potential solutions. The emphasis in most externally sponsored research projects in developing countries is on laborious documentation of several mechanical aspects of the research process rather than on assuring true comprehension and voluntary participation. The onus for the oversight of this process is often left to overworked and ill-equipped local ethics review committees. Current guidelines and processes for obtaining informed consent should be reviewed with the specific aim of developing culturally appropriate methods of sharing information about the research project and obtaining and documenting consent that is truly informed. Further research is needed to examine the validity and user friendliness of innovations in information sharing procedures for obtaining consent in different cultural settings. PMID:15643799

  3. Do specific parenting practices and related parental self-efficacy associate with physical activity and screen time among primary schoolchildren? A cross-sectional study in Belgium

    PubMed Central

    De Lepeleere, Sara; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Cardon, Greet; Verloigne, Maïté

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the association between specific parenting practices and related parental self-efficacy with children's physical activity (PA) and screen time. Parental body mass index (BMI), family socioeconomic status (SES), and child's age and gender were examined as possible influencing factors. Design Cross-sectional. Setting January 2014, Flanders (Belgium). Participants 207 parents (87.4% mothers) of children aged 6–12 years. Outcome measures Specific parenting practices, related parental self-efficacy, and children's PA and screen time. Results The majority of investigated parenting practices and related parental self-efficacy were not significantly associated with children's PA or screen time. However, children were more physically active if sports equipment was available at home (p<0.10) and if parents did not find it difficult to motivate their child to be physically active (p<0.05). Children had a lower screen time if parents limited their own gaming (p<0.01). The associations between parenting practices and related parental self-efficacy with children's PA or screen time were significant for parents with a normal BMI, for medium-high SES families and for parents of younger children. Furthermore, the association between the parenting relating factors and children's PA and screen time differed for boys and girls. Conclusions In contrast to what we expected, the findings of the current study show that only a very few specific parenting practices and related parental self-efficacy were associated with children's PA and screen time. It was expected that parental self-efficacy would play a more important role. This can be due to the fact that parental self-efficacy was already high in this group of parents. Therefore, it is possible that parents do not realise how difficult it is to perform certain parenting practices until they are faced with it in an intervention. Trial registration number EC/2012/317. PMID:26346871

  4. Changing Factors associated with Parent Activation after Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Pennarola, Brian W.; Rodday, Angie Mae; Bingen, Kristin; Schwartz, Lisa A.; Patel, Sunita K.; Syrjala, Karen L.; Mayer, Deborah K.; Ratichek, Sara J.; Guinan, Eva C.; Kupst, Mary Jo; Hibbard, Judith H.; Parsons, Susan K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To identify factors associated with parent activation in parents of children undergoing pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) in the 6 months following HSCT, and to address if their association with parent activation changes over time. Methods Measures for this analysis, including the Parent Patient Activation Measure (Parent-PAM), were completed by parents (N=198) prior to their child’s HSCT preparative regimen and again at 6 months post-HSCT. Clinical data were also collected. A repeated measures model was built to estimate the association between clinical and demographic factors and parent well-being on Parent-PAM scores. Interactions with time were considered to test for changing effects over time. Results Throughout the HSCT course, older parent age was associated with lower Parent-PAM scores (β=−0.29, p=0.02) and never being married was associated with higher scores (versus married, β=12.27, p=0.03). While higher parent emotional functioning scores were not associated with activation at baseline, they were important at 6 months (baseline: β=−0.002, p=0.96; interaction: β=0.14, p=0.03). At baseline longer duration of illness was associated with increased activation, but this effect diminished with time (baseline: β=3.29, p=0.0002; interaction: β=−2.40, p=0.02). Activation levels dropped for parents of children who went from private to public insurance (baseline: β=2.95, p=0.53; interaction: β=−13.82, p=0.004). Clinical events did not affect Parent-PAM scores. Conclusions Our findings reveal important changes in the factors associated with parent activation in the first 6 months after pediatric HSCT. These findings may reflect the emotional and financial toll of pediatric HSCT on parent activation. PMID:25519755

  5. Involving parents from the start: Formative evaluation for a large RCT with Botswana Junior Secondary School students

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Kim S.; Chirwa-Motswere, Catherine; Winskell, Kate; Stallcup, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    While HIV prevention research conducted among adolescent populations may encounter parental resistance, the active engagement of parents from inception to trial completion may alleviate opposition. In preparation for implementing a large randomized controlled trial (RCT) examining the efficacy of a behavioural intervention targeting adolescent sexual risk behaviours, a formative evaluation was undertaken to assess parental reactions to the proposed trial. Six focus groups were conducted with parents of adolescents (aged 13–17) from rural, peri-urban, and urban Botswana junior secondary schools. Focus groups explored comprehension and acceptability among parents of the forthcoming trial including HSV-2 testing, the return of results to the adolescent (not the parent), trial information materials and the parental consent process. Parents welcomed the study and understood and accepted its moral and ethical considerations. Their reactions regarding return of HSV-2 results only to adolescents (not the parent) were mixed. Parents understood the consent process and most agreed to consent, while indicating their desire to remain informed and involved throughout the RCT. The FGDs provided valuable information and insights that helped strengthen the study. As a result of parents’ feedback, counselling procedures were strengthened and direct linkages to local services and care were made. Informational materials were revised to increase clarity, and materials and procedures were developed to encourage and support parental involvement and parent-child dialogue. Ultimately, parental feedback led to a decision by the Government of Botswana to allow parents to access their child’s HSV-2 test results. PMID:27002354

  6. Pots and Pans Activities for Parent and Child: Activities for Preschool Multiple Handicapped Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Tassel, Jean

    Intended for parents and teachers of multiply handicapped preschool children, the booklet provides lesson plans in three major areas--basic concepts, motor activities, and language activities. Each lesson plan is broken down into four parts: purpose (a descriptive statement of what the lesson hopes to accomplish), materials (list of materials…

  7. Research consent from young people in resource-poor settings

    PubMed Central

    Cheah, Phaik Yeong; Parker, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Authoritative international guidelines stipulate that for minors to participate in research, consent must be obtained from their parents or guardians. Significant numbers of mature minors, particularly in low-income settings, are currently being ruled out of research participation because their parents are unavailable or refuse to provide consent despite the possibility that they might wish to do so and that such research has the potential to be of real benefit. These populations are under-represented in all types of clinical research. We propose that, for research with a prospect of direct benefit that has been approved by relevant ethics committees, the default position should be that minors who are able to provide valid consent and meet the following criteria should be able to consent for themselves regardless of age and whether they have reached majority: the minor must be competent and mature relative to the decision; their consent must be voluntary and they must be relatively independent and used to decision making of comparable complexity. In addition, the context must be appropriate, the information related to the research must be provided in a manner accessible to the minor and the consent must be obtained by a trained consent taker in surroundings conducive for decision making by the minor. In this paper, we have argued that consent by mature minors to research participation is acceptable in some situations and should be allowed. PMID:25477309

  8. Association of Active Play-Related Parenting Behaviors, Orientations, and Practices with Preschool Sedentary Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loprinzi, Paul D.; Cardinal, Bradley J.; Kane, Christy; Lee, Hyo; Beets, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Parents' behaviors, practices, beliefs, and attitudes greatly influence children's active play behavior; however, little research has examined these parental influences on preschool children's sedentary behavior (SB). Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the association between parental influences on…

  9. Report on the Activities of the Single Parent Resource Center, 1975-1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childcare Switchboard / Single Parent Resource Center, San Francisco, CA.

    This report provides a model for the provision of social services to single parents. The activities the center provides include drop-in support groups, workshops on single parent issues, a single parent magazine, individual counseling and community outreach. The report briefly specifies the goals of the center and the rationale behind its…

  10. The Relation of Exposure to Parental Criminal Activity, Arrest, and Sentencing to Children's Maladjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dallaire, Danielle H.; Wilson, Laura C.

    2010-01-01

    We examined the psychosocial maladjustment of 32 children with an incarcerated parent from the child's perspective as well as from the perspective of their caregiver. We focused on the relation between the incarcerated parent's report of children's exposure to parental criminal activity, arrest, and sentencing and caregivers' and children's…

  11. Parent-child interactions and objectively measured child physical activity: a cross-sectional study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parents influence their children's behaviors directly through specific parenting practices and indirectly through their parenting style. Some practices such as logistical and emotional support have been shown to be positively associated with child physical activity (PA) levels, while for others (e.g...

  12. Family Ecological Predictors of Physical Activity Parenting in Low-Income Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lampard, Amy M.; Jurkowski, Janine M.; Lawson, Hal A.; Davison, Kirsten K.

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) parenting, or strategies parents use to promote PA in children, has been associated with increased PA in children of all ages, including preschool-aged children. However, little is known about the circumstances under which parents adopt such behaviors. This study examined family ecological factors associated with PA…

  13. Parents' Perceptions of Home Reading Activities: Comparing Children with and without Learning Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Ensa; Bornman, Juan; Alant, Erna

    2010-01-01

    The early reading process can be viewed as triadic, encompassing the child, the parents and the environment. We examine the impact of each of these three components on children's participation in home reading activities as perceived by their parents. The results obtained from a questionnaire completed by parents of Grade 1 children, with and…

  14. Athletics, Music, Languages, and Leadership: How Parents Influence the Extracurricular Activities of Their Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbourne, Dianne; Andres, Lesley

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we explore the impact that parents have on the participation of their children in extracurricular activities (ECAs) in a sample of Canadian parents with children between the ages of four and 17. Employing a concurrent, nested, mixed methods strategy, we use the insights gained through semi-structured interviews with parents to…

  15. Cues to Parent Involvement in Drug Prevention and School Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, Ellen J.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Guided by the Health Belief Model, focus groups identified strategies to promote parent involvement with their children's substance abuse education. Low-income parents and school personnel identified cues to action and necessary requirements (child care, transportation, incentives) as important in promoting parent involvement. Children's…

  16. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PARENTS' MOTIVATION FOR PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND THEIR BELIEFS, AND SUPPORT OF THEIR CHILDREN'S PHYSICAL ACTIVITY: A CLUSTER ANALYSIS.

    PubMed

    Naisseh, Matilda; Martinent, Guillaume; Ferrand, Claude; Hautier, Christophe

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies have neglected the multivariate nature of motivation. The purpose of the current study was to first identify motivational profiles of parents' own physical activity. Second, the study examined if such profiles differ in the way in which parents perceive their children's competence in physical activity and the importance and support given to their children's physical activity. 711 physically active parents (57% mothers; M age = 39.7 yr.; children 6-11 years old) completed the Situational Motivation Scale, the Parents' Perceptions of Physical Activity Importance and their Children's Ability Questionnaire, and the Parental Support for Physical Activity Scale. Cluster analyses indicated four motivational profiles: Highly self-determined, Moderately self-determined, Non-self-determined, and Externally motivated profiles. Parents' beliefs and support toward their children's physical activity significantly differed across these profiles. It is the first study using Self-Determination Theory that provides evidence for the interpersonal outcomes of motivation.

  17. 78 FR 36642 - Proposed Information Collection (Statement of Dependency of Parent(s)) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    .... Government Life Insurance was in effect. The data collected will be used to determine the dependent parent(s... AGENCY: Veterans Benefits Administration, Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA), Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), is announcing an...

  18. Critical Race Parenting: Understanding Scholarship/Activism in Parenting Our Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePouw, Christin; Matias, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    Parenting is often discussed in the field of education, but frequently in terms of family or community deficiency, rather than strengths (Bonilla Silva, 2006; Few, 2007), particularly when communities of color are being examined. In this conceptual article, we advocate for the use of critical race theory (CRT) in discussions of parenting and…

  19. Are Parental Health Habits Transmitted to Their Children? An Eight Year Longitudinal Study of Physical Activity in Adolescents and Their Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderssen, Norman; Wold, Bente; Torsheim, Torbjorn

    2006-01-01

    Parents are believed to play a role in influencing their children's health behaviours. This longitudinal study of two generations (parents and their children) examined associations between parents' self-reported leisure-time physical activity changes and the self-reported physical activity changes of their offspring in a sample of 557 adolescents…

  20. A qualitative study of parental modeling and social support for physical activity in underserved adolescents.

    PubMed

    Wright, Marcie S; Wilson, Dawn K; Griffin, Sarah; Evans, Alexandra

    2010-04-01

    This study obtained qualitative data to assess how parental role modeling and parental social support influence physical activity in underserved (minority, low-income) adolescents. Fifty-two adolescents (22 males, 30 females; ages 10-14 years, 85% African-American) participated in a focus group (6-10 per group, same gender). Focus groups were audiotaped, transcribed and coded by independent raters. Inter-rater reliabilities indicated adequate agreement [inter-rater reliability (r) = 0.84]. Themes were identified for parental role modeling and parental social support. Regarding parental role modeling, adolescents reported that parents engaged in a variety of different types of physical activities with their children such as walking, cycling and playing basketball; however, activity was infrequent. Sex differences were noted in parental social support indicating that female adolescents reported receiving more emotional and negative support for physical activity (being required to play outside with a sibling), while boys reported receiving more tangible types of support for physical activity. Adolescents also generated ideas on how to increase parental social support and in particular tangible support was highlighted as important by both males and females. This study suggests that future interventions should focus on improving parental engagement and tangible support that involve direct participation from parents in physical activities with their adolescents.

  1. Associations of parental influences with physical activity and screen time among young children: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huilan; Wen, Li Ming; Rissel, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Parents play a critical role in developing and shaping their children's physical activity (PA) and sedentary behaviours, particularly in the early years of life. The aim of this systematic review is to identify current literature investigating associations of parental influences with both PA and screen time in young children. This systematic review was conducted in November 2013 using 6 electronic databases covering research literature from January 1998 to November 2013. Thirty articles that met inclusion criteria were identified. These studies covered five important aspects of parenting: (1) parenting practices; (2) parents' role modelling; (3) parental perceptions of children's PA and screen viewing behaviours; (4) parental self-efficacy; and (5) general parenting style. Findings suggest that parents' encouragement and support can increase children's PA, and reducing parents' own screen time can lead to decreased child screen time. Improving parenting practices, parental self-efficacy or changing parenting style may also be promising approaches to increasing PA time and decreasing screen time of young children.

  2. Adolescents' Perceptions of Their Consent to Psychiatric Mental Health Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Roberson, Anthony James; Kjervik, Diane K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of a small-scale study in which the decision-making process of adolescents who consent to psychiatric mental health treatment was examined. Sixteen (16) adolescents were interviewed about their decisions related to initial and continued treatment, along with their understanding of minor consent laws. Interviews were audio-recorded, and transcripts were analyzed through concept analysis. Findings are presented in the context of the decision-making steps and research questions. Most adolescents did not recognize consequences related to psychiatric mental health treatment and did not assimilate and integrate information provided to them about treatment choices. Adolescents disagreed with current minor consent laws that allow minors to consent to certain healthcare treatments without the required consent of the parent. Further, adolescents reported that a collaborative approach in making decisions about the adolescent's psychiatric mental health treatment was most facilitative of achieving the goals of treatment. PMID:22474581

  3. Is the Intergenerational Transmission of High Cultural Activities Biased by the Retrospective Measurement of Parental High Cultural Activities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Vries, Jannes; de Graaf, Paul M.

    2008-01-01

    In this article we study the bias caused by the conventional retrospective measurement of parental high cultural activities in the effects of parental high cultural activities and educational attainment on son's or daughter's high cultural activities. Multi-informant data show that there is both random measurement error and correlated error in the…

  4. Understanding the accuracy of parental perceptions of child physical activity: a mixed methods analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kesten, Joanna M.; Jago, Russell; Sebire, Simon J.; Edwards, Mark J.; Pool, Laura; Zahra, Jesmond; Thompson, Janice L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Interventions to increase children’s physical activity (PA) have achieved limited success. This may be attributed to inaccurate parental perceptions of their children’s PA and a lack of recognition of a need to change activity levels. Methods Fifty-three parents participated in semi-structured interviews to determine perceptions of child PA. Perceptions were compared to children’s measured MVPA (classified as meeting or not meeting UK guidelines) to produce three categories: “accurate”, “over-estimate”, “under-estimate”. Deductive content analysis was performed to understand the accuracy of parental perceptions. Results All parents of children meeting the PA guidelines accurately perceived their child’s PA; whilst the majority of parents whose child did not meet the guidelines overestimated their PA. Most parents were unconcerned about their child’s PA level, viewing them as naturally active and willing to be active. Qualitative explanations for perceptions of insufficient activity included children having health problems and preferences for inactive pursuits, and parents having difficulty facilitating PA in poor weather and not always observing their child’s PA level. Social comparisons also influenced parental perceptions. Conclusions Strategies to improve parental awareness of child PA are needed. Perceptions of child PA may be informed by child “busyness”, being unaware of activity levels, and social comparisons. PMID:25872227

  5. 16 CFR 312.5 - Parental consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... to protect the safety of a child participant on the website or online service, and the operator uses... other purpose; (iii) Not disclosed on the website or online service; and (5) Where the operator collects..., to the extent reasonably necessary: (i) To protect the security or integrity of its website or...

  6. 34 CFR 300.300 - Parental consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND... DISABILITIES Evaluations, Eligibility Determinations, Individualized Education Programs, and Educational... initial provision of special education and related services. (iii) The public agency must make...

  7. 34 CFR 300.300 - Parental consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND... DISABILITIES Evaluations, Eligibility Determinations, Individualized Education Programs, and Educational... initial provision of special education and related services. (iii) The public agency must make...

  8. The Role of Parents in Adolescents' Reading Motivation and Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klauda, Susan Lutz

    2009-01-01

    Parent support for reading is one of the many elements that may play a role in the development and sustainment of children's reading motivation; to date, however, research has focused much more on the role that parents play in their preschool and primary-grade children's reading than in their older children's reading. Thus, this paper examines the…

  9. Involving Hispanic Parents in Educational Activities through Collaborative Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosa, Alicia Salinas

    1997-01-01

    A literature review of effective strategies for involving Hispanic families explores some basic misunderstandings; discusses logistical, attitudinal, and expectations barriers to involving Hispanic parents, particularly those who are migrants or immigrants; and presents strategies that resulted in successful experiences with these parents.…

  10. Parents' Perceptions of Preschool Activities: Exploring Outdoor Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jayasuriya, Avanthi; Williams, Marcia; Edwards, Todd; Tandon, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    Research Findings: Outdoor play is important for children's health and development, yet many preschool-age children in child care settings do not receive the recommended 60 min/day of outdoor play. Child care providers have previously described parent-related barriers to increasing outdoor playtime, including parents not providing appropriate…

  11. Barriers Affecting Physical Activity in Rural Communities: Perceptions of Parents and Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWhinney, Sharon; McDonald, Andrea; Dawkins-Moultin, Lenna; Outley, Corliss; McKyer, E. Lisako; Thomas, Audrene

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the barriers inhibiting physical activity among children is critical in the fight against childhood obesity. This qualitative interview study examined parents' and children's perceptions of the barriers to physical activity in rural communities of low socioeconomic status. Parents and children concurred that the…

  12. Parental Social Support and the Physical Activity-Related Behaviors of Youth: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beets, Michael W.; Cardinal, Bradley J.; Alderman, Brandon L.

    2010-01-01

    Social support from parents serves as one of the primary influences of youth physical activity-related behaviors. A systematic review was conducted on the relationship of parental social support to the physical activity-related behaviors of youth. Four categories of social support were identified, falling under two distinct mechanisms--tangible…

  13. Association between Hypothesized Parental Influences and Preschool Children's Physical Activity Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loprinzi, Paul D.; Schary, David P.; Beets, Michael W.; Leary, Janie; Cardinal, Bradley J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: To date, most research investigating the influence of parents on children"s physical activity behavior has been conducted among school-aged children. As a result, we have a limited understanding of the mechanisms through which parents can influence their young children's physical activity behavior. The purpose of this study was to…

  14. Political Activism of Palestinian Youth: Exploring Individual, Parental, and Ecological Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spellings, Carolyn R.; Barber, Brian K.; Olsen, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    The growing literature on youth and political conflict has not included an adequate focus on youth activism. To address this deficit, this study used youth- and parent-reported data (N = 6,718) from the 1994-1995 Palestinian Family Study to test an ecological model of family influence (parents' activism, expectations for their adolescents'…

  15. Pizzas, Pennies and Pumpkin Seeds: Mathematical Activities for Parents and Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apelman, Maja; King, Julie

    Children have many natural opportunities to learn about the basic aspects of quantity. This booklet is addressed to parents who want to support their children's mathematical growth. The activities presented suggest many ways in which parents and children can use mathematics in their environment. The activities are organized around common…

  16. PAKS: Parents-and-Kids Science. 24 Activities for Kids and Adults To Share.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenzie, Danny L.

    This activity book designed for grades 1-3 provides teachers with ready-to-use materials designed to get parents and children excited about science, help establish a home-school connection, and provide interesting learning activities for children to share with adults. This program gets parents involved in developing their children's science…

  17. Parents' Perceptions of Physical Activity for Their Children with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, Kara; Columna, Luis; Lieberman, Lauren; Bailey, JoEllen

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Ongoing communication with parents and the acknowledgment of their preferences and expectations are crucial to promote the participation of physical activity by children with visual impairments. Purpose: The study presented here explored parents' perceptions of physical activity for their children with visual impairments and explored…

  18. How Parents Perceive and Feel about Participation in Community Activities: The Comparison between Parents of Preschoolers with and without Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Shui-Fong; Wong, Bernard P.H.; Leung, Doris; Ho, Daphne; Au-Yeung, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The present study compared how parents of preschoolers with and without Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) perceived and felt about participation in community activities. A questionnaire survey was conducted with 380 Hong Kong parents of preschoolers with ASD and 214 Hong Kong parents of preschoolers without ASD. The two groups were not different in…

  19. Parental brain: cerebral areas activated by infant cries and faces. A comparison between different populations of parents and not

    PubMed Central

    Piallini, Giulia; De Palo, Francesca; Simonelli, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Literature about parenting traditionally focused on caring behaviors and parental representations. Nowadays, an innovative line of research, interested in evaluating the neural areas and hormones implicated in the nurturing and caregiving responses, has developed. The only way to permit a newborn to survive and grow up is to respond to his needs and in order to succeed it is necessary, first of all, that the adults around him understand what his needs are. That is why adults’ capacity of taking care of infants cannot disregard from some biological mechanisms, which allow them to be more responsive to the progeny and to infants in general. Many researches have proved that exist specific neural basis activating in response to infant evolutionary stimuli, such as infant cries and infant emotional facial expression. There is a sort of innate predisposition in human adults to respond to infants’ signals, in order to satisfy their need and allow them to survive and become young adults capable of taking care of themselves. This article focuses on research that has investigated, in the last decade, the neural circuits underlying parental behavioral responses. Moreover, the paper compares the results of those studies that investigated the neural responses to infant stimuli under different conditions: familiar versus unknown children, parents versus non-parents and normative versus clinical samples (depression, addiction, adolescence, and PTSD). PMID:26539154

  20. Parent influences on physical activity participation and physical fitness of deaf children.

    PubMed

    Ellis, M Kathleen; Lieberman, Lauren J; Dummer, Gail M

    2014-04-01

    Research has consistently demonstrated that parents' values toward physical activity and fitness have strongly influenced the physical activity habits of hearing children (Welk, G. J., Wood, K., & Morss, G. [2003]. Parental influences on physical activity in children: An exploration of potential mechanisms. Pediatric Exercise Science, 15, 19-33). The primary purpose of this study was to determine whether similar findings are obtained for deaf (1) children. The influence of parents' hearing status and parents' involvement in Deaf sport (2) was assessed in addition to their values toward sports participation and physical fitness for their deaf children. Deaf children's physical activity habits were determined by the number of activities participated per week, and fitness levels by the number of scores within the Healthy Fitness Zone from the Fitnessgram test. Parents demonstrated positive values toward physical fitness regardless of hearing status; this finding was strongest among deaf parents of deaf children. Significant positive relationships were found among parents' values toward physical fitness and sport participation and children's physical activity and fitness levels, as well as between Deaf sport involvement by deaf parents and children's physical activity levels.

  1. Consent for organ donation.

    PubMed

    Vincent, A; Logan, L

    2012-01-01

    Improving the consent rate for solid organ donation from deceased donors is a key component of strategies in the UK and other countries to increase the availability of organs for transplantation. In the UK, the law is currently clear on what forms consent may take, with the views of the individual expressed previously in life taking priority. Such views may have been expressed prospectively, via membership of the Organ Donor Register or by talking to family members. The factors determining such actions include both positive altruistic motives and negative psychological responses. Studies have examined why some families of potential donors refuse consent, while others have demonstrated a key set of 'modifiable' factors relating to the family approach. These include ensuring the right timing of a request in an appropriate setting, providing emotional support, and imparting specific information, particularly concerning the nature of brain death. If these are optimized and the right personnel with adequate training are involved in a planned process, then consent rates may be improved as reported in other countries with organized donation systems.

  2. Feasibility trial evaluation of a physical activity and screen-viewing course for parents of 6 to 8 year-old children: Teamplay

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many children spend too much time screen-viewing (watching TV, surfing the internet and playing video games) and do not meet physical activity (PA) guidelines. Parents are important influences on children’s PA and screen-viewing (SV). There is a shortage of parent-focused interventions to change children’s PA and SV. Methods Teamplay was a two arm individualized randomized controlled feasibility trial. Participants were parents of 6–8 year old children. Intervention participants were invited to attend an eight week parenting program with each session lasting 2 hours. Children and parents wore an accelerometer for seven days and minutes of moderate-to-vigorous intensity PA (MVPA) were derived. Parents were also asked to report the average number of hours per day that both they and the target child spent watching TV. Measures were assessed at baseline (time 0) at the end of the intervention (week 8) and 2 months after the intervention had ended (week 16). Results There were 75 participants who provided consent and were randomized but 27 participants withdrew post-randomization. Children in the intervention group engaged in 2.6 fewer minutes of weekday MVPA at Time 1 but engaged in 11 more minutes of weekend MVPA. At Time 1 the intervention parents engaged in 9 more minutes of weekday MVPA and 13 more minutes of weekend MVPA. The proportion of children in the intervention group watching ≥ 2 hours per day of TV on weekend days decreased after the intervention (time 0 = 76%, time 1 = 39%, time 2 = 50%), while the control group proportion increased slightly (79%, 86% and 87%). Parental weekday TV watching decreased in both groups. In post-study interviews many mothers reported problems associated with wearing the accelerometers. In terms of a future full-scale trial, a sample of between 80 and 340 families would be needed to detect a mean difference of 10-minutes of weekend MVPA. Conclusions Teamplay is a promising parenting program

  3. [Legal aspects of consent in children (Part 1)].

    PubMed

    Nacka, F; Benadjaoud, L; Fayon, M; Jacqz-Aigrain, E; Demarez, J-P

    2015-09-01

    In pediatric research, the patient is legally a minor and therefore protected by law. Research can only be conducted after parental consent and patient assent have been obtained. In this context, this review discusses the historical events and documents related to all ethical precautions and obligations. It also underlines that physicians shall respect all legal measures, but that individual involvement must comply with ethical standards while taking into account issues particular to pediatric research related to parental consent and child assent to clinical trials. PMID:26228811

  4. Qualitative Iranian study of parents' roles in adolescent girls' physical activity habit development.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Seyyed Vahide; Anoosheh, Monireh; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Ehsani, Mohammad

    2013-06-01

    Parents are likely to be key influences on children's physical activity behaviors, although it is not clear how. This study was designed to explore parents' roles in Iranian adolescent girls' physical activity habit development. A qualitative study was conducted by means of semistructured one-to-one interviews with 25 participants, including 16 adolescent girls (10-19 years of age), seven mothers, and two fathers. Content analysis was applied. Two main themes emerged as parental role in adolescent girls' physical activity behavior: developing interest in physical activity (making children familiar with physical activity, discovering talents, and role modeling) and providing support to adolescents for physical activity (material and immaterial). This study provided a better understanding of how Iranian parents influence their children's physical activity behavior. This will enable nurses to design more effective family-based interventions. PMID:23302074

  5. Latino Parents Utilizing Home-Based Activities to Support Algebra-Readiness Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molinar, Soledad Marie

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation involved a series of training sessions where parents from a Title I middle school participated in the learning and practice of Algebra Readiness skills. The project was based on a series of six weekly trainings for parents to learn home-based activities to increase their child's Algebra Readiness. I administered an initial…

  6. A Qualitative Study of Parental Modeling and Social Support for Physical Activity in Underserved Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Marcie S.; Wilson, Dawn K.; Griffin, Sarah; Evans, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    This study obtained qualitative data to assess how parental role modeling and parental social support influence physical activity in underserved (minority, low-income) adolescents. Fifty-two adolescents (22 males, 30 females; ages 10-14 years, 85% African-American) participated in a focus group (6-10 per group, same gender). Focus groups were…

  7. Parent Perceptions of Factors Influencing After-School Physical Activity of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obrusnikova, Iva; Miccinello, Dannielle L.

    2012-01-01

    The study assessed parental perceptions of the benefits of physical activity (PA) and the factors that influence participation of children with autism spectrum disorders in PA after school. Data were collected from 103 parents using an online open-ended questionnaire and focus-group interviews. Data were analyzed using a socioecological model.…

  8. American, Chinese, and Japanese Students' Acceptance of Their Parents' Values about Academic and Social Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chuansheng

    This study investigates cross-cultural differences in students' acceptance of their parents' values about education and social activities. It also examines the relation between acceptance of values and such factors as type of values, knowledge of parental values, mathematics achievement, and psychological well-being. Participants were over 3,000…

  9. Are Adolescents Talking with Their Parents about Sex before Becoming Sexually Active? Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leuschner, Kristin

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines parent-child discussions of sexual behavior. It finds consistency in the timing and content of such discussions; however, many parents and children do not discuss key topics, such as birth control, before adolescents become sexually active. [This fact sheet is based on Megan K. Beckett, Marc N. Elliott, Steven Martino, David E.…

  10. Parents' and Children's Perceptions of the Keep It Moving! After-School Physical Activity Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrens, Timothy K.; Wegner, Rebekah L.; Miller, Daniel J.; Liebert, Mina L.; Smith, Jennifer Howard

    2015-01-01

    After-school PA programs have been used as an outlet to help children increase PA levels. To attract children and their parents, it is important to understand perceptions about programs. With child and parent input, researchers and practitioners will better be able to increase PA with activities the children enjoy and encourage increased PA. A…

  11. Parental Youth Assets and Sexual Activity: Differences by Race/Ethnicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolma, Eleni L.; Oman, Roy F.; Vesely, Sara K.; Aspy, Cheryl B.; Beebe, Laura; Fluhr, Janene

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To examine how the relationship between parental-related youth assets and youth sexual activity differed by race/ethnicity. Methods: A random sample of 976 youth and their parents living in a Midwestern city participated in the study. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted for 3 major ethnic groups controlling for the…

  12. Positive Activities: Qualitative Research with Parents. Solutions Research. Research Report. DCSF-RR142

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department for Children, Schools and Families, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This research was commissioned by COI and DCSF to understand in depth, the barriers, motivators and messages for parents to encourage participation in positive activities for young people. Within this the research was designed to understand the level of influence of parents in whether a young person participates/what a young person might…

  13. SNAC: San Mateo Nutrition Activity Curriculum. "Swing Into Nutrition" (Parent/Community In-Service Guide).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Mateo City Elementary School District, CA.

    This inservice guide for elementary school teachers provides a competency based nutrition course to be used to increase parent/community participation in nutrition education activities and to lead parents toward providing better nutrition for themselves and their children. The curriculum is presented in six lessons which cover the following…

  14. Discordance in informed consent response on the basis of demographic factors: brief report.

    PubMed

    Nunez-Wallace, Karen R; Gill, Chandler E; Harrison, Courtney H; Taylor, Henry M; Charles, P David

    2010-06-01

    During an outcomes study of spasticity treatment at a developmental center for 62 residents with profound intellectual disabilities, either botulinum toxin A (BTX-A), intrathecal baclofen (ITB), or both were recommended with physical and occupational therapy. Conservators consented to BTX-A more than ITB (p = .021). Court-appointed conservators were more likely to provide consent for treatment than family members (p = .026). Nonparents consented more than parents (p = .009). Finally, Caucasian conservators were more likely to consent to treatment than African American conservators (p = .036), but ethnicity of the resident did not influence consent. Gender of resident or conservator did not influence rate of consent. This report highlights disparities in surrogate consent giving for individuals with intellectual disabilities and indicates a need for more research to ensure that this vulnerable population has access to appropriate treatments.

  15. Consent in escrow

    PubMed Central

    Van der Loos, Kiah I.; Longstaff, Holly; Virani, Alice; Illes, Judy

    2014-01-01

    Disasters such as flash flooding, mass shootings, and train and airplane accidents involving large numbers of victims produce significant opportunity for research in the biosciences. This opportunity exists in the extreme tails of life events, however, during which decisions about life and death, valuing and foregoing, speed and patience, trust and distrust, are tested simultaneously and abundantly. The press and urgency of these scenarios may also challenge the ability of researchers to comprehensively deliver information about the purposes of a study, risks, benefits, and alternatives. Under these circumstances, we argue that acquiring consent for the immediate use of data that are not time sensitive represents a gap in the protection of human study participants. In response, we offer a two-tiered model of consent that allows for data collected in real-time to be held in escrow until the acute post-disaster window has closed. Such a model not only respects the fundamental tenet of consent in research, but also enables such research to take place in an ethically defensible manner. PMID:27774181

  16. Parenting Stress After Deployment in Navy Active Duty Fathers.

    PubMed

    Yablonsky, Abigail M; Yan, Guofen; Bullock, Linda

    2016-08-01

    Military fathers are being deployed, and leaving their families, for greater lengths of time and more frequently than ever before. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of recent deployment on parenting stress in U.S. Navy fathers with young children. Of the 111 participants who completed the one-time study questionnaire at a large military outpatient clinic on the Eastern seaboard, 67.6% had returned from a ship-based deployment. Regression analyses were performed, using the Parenting Stress Index as the outcome variable, deployment elements (such as time away from home in the past 5 years) as predictors, and adjusting for other factors such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. Higher perceived threat and greater warfare exposure were both associated with increased parenting stress (p < 0.05) in the unadjusted model. These associations were greatly attenuated and no longer significant after adjustment for depression. In addition, rates of positive screens for PTSD and depression (17.1%) in this sample were higher than in other recent studies. In summary, these data indicate that various deployment factors are associated with increased parenting stress in Navy fathers back from deployment within the past year; these relationships are largely explained by depressive symptoms. Clinical implications are discussed. PMID:27483524

  17. Developing Active Readers: Ideas for Parents, Teachers, and Librarians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monson, Dianne L., Ed.; McClenathan, DayAnn K., Ed.

    Developed by the International Reading Association Library Resources and Reading Committee, this book is designed to help parents, teachers, and librarians provide children with books and reading experiences that will make reading a lifetime habit. Part One, "The Right Book for Each Child: Book Selection and Library Use," contains the following…

  18. Parent readiness to change differs for overweight child dietary and physical activity behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Kyung; McEachern, Rebecca; Jelalian, Elissa

    2014-01-01

    Parent involvement is important to help overweight children lose weight. However, parent readiness to make changes around child eating and physical activity (PA) behaviors can differ across domains. Using a cross-sectional design, our aim was to examine which factors were associated with parents being in the action/maintenance stage of change (SOC) in each domain. From November 2008 – August 2009, parents of overweight/obese children (n=202) attending a tertiary care obesity clinic in Providence, RI answered questions assessing their SOC, beliefs about child health and weight, and provider behaviors. Separate multivariate logistic regression models were created to determine which factors were associated with parent readiness to make changes for child dietary and PA behaviors. Almost 62% of parents were in the action SOC for child dietary behaviors, but only 41% were in the action SOC for PA behaviors. Parents who believed their own weight was a health problem were less likely to be ready to make changes to their child’s dietary behaviors. Physician discussion of strategies was related to readiness to make changes for child dietary behaviors, but not PA behaviors. In the PA domain, parents of younger children were more likely to be ready to make changes. Training healthcare providers to address PA readiness and be aware of factors influencing dietary and PA readiness may result in more effective conversations with parents and improve behavior change efforts for pediatric weight loss. PMID:24953789

  19. Informed consent: a study of the OR consenting process in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Agnew, Joanne; Jorgensen, Diane

    2012-06-01

    The outcome of the informed consenting process should be that patients are knowledgeable about their future procedure, but there is no guarantee that signing the informed consent form means that patients have understood the information that their health care providers have given to them. To evaluate the informed consenting process in an OR direct admissions department of a city hospital in New Zealand, we interviewed 18 surgical patients. We transcribed the audiotaped interviews and analyzed the data using a general inductive approach derived from Grounded Theory. Our analysis indicated that educational information was not always based on patients' previous knowledge or understanding, although most patients understood the surgical consenting process to be complete after they met with the physician and signed the form. Our study highlights that although patients spoke with their physicians and nurses, there was still a lack of understanding. Perioperative nurses are in a prime position to reinforce informed consent. They should actively support the consenting process and be proactive in collaborating with patients and physicians to ultimately ensure that the patient has every opportunity to make an informed decision. PMID:22633383

  20. Parents and Reading: A Guide to Home Activities for Children. Centering On.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Pearl

    Reading activities designed for parents to use with preschool through high school age children are provided in this guide. Activities for children below the junior high level predominate. Jean Piaget's child development theories are briefly outlined. Suggested reading activities, language activities, and children's books are listed for use with…

  1. Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between parenting style and adolescent girls’ physical activity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Understanding the influences on physical activity is crucial, particularly among important target groups such as adolescent girls. This study describes cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between parenting style and girls’ participation in organized sport, walking/cycling trips and objectively assessed moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Methods Data were collected from adolescent girls (n=222) and their parents in 2004 and again in 2006. Parents self-reported their demographic characteristics and parenting style. Girls self-reported their organized sport participation and weekly walking/cycling trips, while MVPA was assessed using accelerometers. Linear regression and interaction analyses were performed. Interactions between socio-demographic factors and parenting style with organized sport, walking/cycling trips and MVPA are presented. Results There were cross-sectional associations between authoritative (B=−0.45, p=0.042) and indulgent (B=−0.56, p=0.002) parenting and the number of walking/cycling trips, and authoritarian (B=0.27, p=0.033) parenting and frequency of organized sport. Significant interactions included those between: family status, authoritative parenting and daily (p=0.048) and week day (p=0.013) MVPA; education, indulgent parenting and MVPA on weekend days (p=0.006); and, employment, authoritarian parenting and duration and frequency of organized sport (p=0.004), highlighting the complexity of these relationships. Longitudinal analyses revealed significant decreases in organized sport and MVPA, significant increases in walking/cycling trips and no significant associations between parenting and physical activity. Conclusion Parenting styles appear to influence walking and cycling trips among adolescent girls, though not physical activity within other domains. Socio-demographic characteristics interact with the relationships between parenting and physical activity. While these findings can inform the

  2. Ethical Issues Regarding Informed Consent for Minors for Space Tourism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Melvin S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the difficulty with informed consent and debates whether or not whether adults should be able to ethically, morally, and legally consent for their children during the high-risk activity of space tourism. The experimental nature of space vehicles combined with the high likelihood of medical complications and the destination places space tourism legally in the category of "adventure activities," which include adventure travel to exotic locations as well as adventure sports, such as mountain climbing, rafting, etc. which carry a high risk of danger (http://rescommunis.wordpress.com/2008/02/14/interview-tracey-l-knutson-adventure-sports-defense-attorney-on-space-tourism-risk-and-informed-consente/). However, unlike other adventure sports, adults currently cannot consent for their minor children. Other topics also receive attention, such as a "mature minors" clause, radiation exposure of potential future children, and other difficulties preventing adults from legally consenting to space travel.

  3. Longitudinal relationships of executive cognitive function and parent influence to child substance use and physical activity.

    PubMed

    Pentz, Mary Ann; Riggs, Nathaniel R

    2013-06-01

    Considered a set of neuro-cognitive skills, executive cognitive function (ECF) may serve to protect children from initiating substance use, although its role relative to other protective influences that parents and physical activity might provide is not known. As part of a large multiple health risk behavior trial for prevention of substance use and obesity, Pathways, the present study evaluated the relative impact of ECF on lifetime substance use (tobacco and alcohol) and physical activity in a panel of fourth grade children over a 6-month period (N = 1005; 51 % female; 25 % on free/reduced lunch; 60 % Hispanic/Latino or multi-racial; 28 elementary schools). A self-report survey included measures of ECF, lifetime tobacco and alcohol use, out-of-school physical activity, exercising with parents, and parent rules about food/sedentary behavior, monitoring, and arguing, was adapted for use with children. A path analysis demonstrated that ECF was the major predictor of lower substance use and higher physical activity and exercising with parents. Physical activity and exercising with parents showed reciprocal positive relationships. Findings suggest that promoting ECF skills should be a major focus of child health promotion and substance use prevention programs, although the potential protective effects of physical activity and exercise with parents on substance use in this young age group are not yet clear. PMID:23345012

  4. Clustering of diet- and activity-related parenting practices: cross-sectional findings of the INPACT study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Various diet- and activity-related parenting practices are positive determinants of child dietary and activity behaviour, including home availability, parental modelling and parental policies. There is evidence that parenting practices cluster within the dietary domain and within the activity domain. This study explores whether diet- and activity-related parenting practices cluster across the dietary and activity domain. Also examined is whether the clusters are related to child and parental background characteristics. Finally, to indicate the relevance of the clusters in influencing child dietary and activity behaviour, we examined whether clusters of parenting practices are related to these behaviours. Methods Data were used from 1480 parent–child dyads participating in the Dutch IVO Nutrition and Physical Activity Child cohorT (INPACT). Parents of children aged 8–11 years completed questionnaires at home assessing their diet- and activity-related parenting practices, child and parental background characteristics, and child dietary and activity behaviours. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to identify clusters of parenting practices. Backward regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between child and parental background characteristics with cluster scores, and partial correlations to examine associations between cluster scores and child dietary and activity behaviours. Results PCA revealed five clusters of parenting practices: 1) high visibility and accessibility of screens and unhealthy food, 2) diet- and activity-related rules, 3) low availability of unhealthy food, 4) diet- and activity-related positive modelling, and 5) positive modelling on sports and fruit. Low parental education was associated with unhealthy cluster 1, while high(er) education was associated with healthy clusters 2, 3 and 5. Separate clusters were related to both child dietary and activity behaviour in the hypothesized directions: healthy clusters

  5. Making Meaning of Everyday Practices: Parents' Attitudes toward Children's Extracurricular Activities in the United States and in Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kremer-Sadlik, Tamar; Izquierdo, Carolina; Fatigante, Marilena

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on children's engagement in extracurricular activities from the perspective of middle-class parents in Rome, Italy, and Los Angeles, California. Analysis of parents' accounts captured in interviews and ethnographic fieldwork reveals that both sets of parents perceive activities as important for children's success. Yet Roman…

  6. Disclosure to parents about everyday activities among american adolescents from mexican, chinese, and European backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Yau, Jenny P; Tasopoulos-Chan, Marina; Smetana, Judith G

    2009-01-01

    Disclosure to parents and reasons for not disclosing different activities were examined in 489 Chinese, Mexican, and European American adolescents (M = 16.37 years, SD = 0.77). With generational status controlled, Chinese American adolescents disclosed less to mothers about personal and multifaceted activities than European Americans and less about personal feelings than other youth, primarily because these acts were considered personal, not harmful, or because parents would not listen or understand. Disclosure regarding prudential behavior was lower among Mexican American than among European American adolescents, primarily due to concerns with parental disapproval. Multigroup path analyses indicated that greater closeness to parents is associated with more disclosure for all youth and activities; associations between family obligation and disclosure varied by domain and ethnicity. PMID:19765013

  7. Disclosure to parents about everyday activities among american adolescents from mexican, chinese, and European backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Yau, Jenny P; Tasopoulos-Chan, Marina; Smetana, Judith G

    2009-01-01

    Disclosure to parents and reasons for not disclosing different activities were examined in 489 Chinese, Mexican, and European American adolescents (M = 16.37 years, SD = 0.77). With generational status controlled, Chinese American adolescents disclosed less to mothers about personal and multifaceted activities than European Americans and less about personal feelings than other youth, primarily because these acts were considered personal, not harmful, or because parents would not listen or understand. Disclosure regarding prudential behavior was lower among Mexican American than among European American adolescents, primarily due to concerns with parental disapproval. Multigroup path analyses indicated that greater closeness to parents is associated with more disclosure for all youth and activities; associations between family obligation and disclosure varied by domain and ethnicity.

  8. Nuclear fear and children: the impact of parental nuclear activism, responsivity, and fear

    SciTech Connect

    LaGuardia, M.R.

    1986-01-01

    This study examines the extent to which parental nuclear fear, parental activism, and parental responsivity is associated with children's (age 10) nuclear fear. Other associated variables investigated include: nuclear denial, general anxiety and fear, and the personal characteristics of sex, socio-economic status, and academic aptitude. Findings indicate that children attend to nuclear issues when their parents attend to a significant degree. Children's hopelessness about the arms race is increased as parents' worry about nuclear war increases. Children's fear about not surviving a nuclear war increases as parents' worry about survivability decreases. Children who have more general fears also indicated that they have a high level of hopelessness, pervasive worry, and much concern about being able to survive a nuclear war. Children with a high degree of general anxiety did not indicate high degrees of nuclear fears. Children with high academic aptitude were more knowledgeable about nuclear issues and expressed more fears about the nuclear threat. Boys demonstrated more knowledge about nuclear issues than girls, and girls expressed much more frequent fear and worry about the nuclear threat than boys. Parents of lower socio-economic statues (SES) expressed more denial about the nuclear threat and were more pro-military than the higher SES parents.

  9. The research process: informed consent.

    PubMed

    Summers, S

    1993-12-01

    Informed consent is a vital part of the research proposal and study. Informed consent is based on principles of autonomy ie, individuals have a right to full disclosure of information in order to make an informed decision and to assume responsibility for the consequences of their decision. Informed consent also contains a legal element whereby failure to obtain it is considered negligence and/or battery. Conducting studies when patients are medicated, ill, or very young or very old require special steps to verify that subjects are fully informed. It is important that PACU nurses pay particular attention to the informed consent process when planning and conducting research studies.

  10. Informed consent for HPV vaccination: a relational approach.

    PubMed

    Gottvall, Maria; Tydén, Tanja; Larsson, Margareta; Stenhammar, Christina; Höglund, Anna T

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the relational aspects of the consent process for HPV vaccination as experienced by school nurses, based on the assumption that individuals have interests related to persons close to them, which is not necessarily to be apprehended as a restriction of autonomy; rather as a voluntary and emotionally preferred involvement of their close ones. Thirty Swedish school nurses were interviewed in five focus groups, before the school based vaccination program had started in Sweden. The empirical results were discussed in light of theories on relational autonomy. The school nurses were convinced that parental consent was needed for HPV vaccination of 11-year-old girls, but problems identified were the difficulty to judge when a young person is to be regarded as autonomous and what to do when children and parents do not agree on the decision. A solution suggested was that obtaining informed consent in school nursing is to be seen as a deliberative process, including the child, the parents and the nurse. The nurses described how they were willing strive for a dialogue with the parents and negotiate with them in the consent process. Seeing autonomy as relational might allow for a more dialogical approach towards how consent is obtained in school based vaccination programs. Through such an approach, conflicts of interests can be made visible and become possible to deal with in a negotiating dialogue. If the school nurses do not focus exclusively on accepting the individual parent's choice, but strive to engage in a process of communication and deliberation, the autonomy of the child might increase and power inequalities might be reduced.

  11. Are Parental Perceptions of Child Activity Levels and Overall Health More Important than Perceptions of Weight?

    PubMed Central

    Vangeepuram, Nita; Ramos, Michelle A.; Fei, Kezhen; Fox, Ashley M.; Horowitz, Carol R.; Kleinman, Lawrence C.; Galvez, Maida P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine relationships between parental perceptions of child weight and overall health, reported lifestyle behaviors and measured body mass index (BMI). Methods Using community-partnered methods, we surveyed families residing in a two census tract area identified for targeted interventions to decrease diabetes related disparities. The survey included demographics, child dietary and physical activity behaviors, and parental perception of child’s health and weight. We measured child BMI using a standardized protocol. Results We surveyed parents of 116 children with a mean age of 7 years (range 3–15) with 51 % boys, 74 % Hispanic, and 26 % Black. Over half of the children (55 %) were overweight or obese. Half (50 %) of the parents underestimated their children’s weight. Reported daily hours of walking and/or running trended higher (3.6 vs. 2.6 h, p = 0.08) for children perceived to be of normal weight. Parents who correctly estimated their child’s weight status reported more hours of daily walking/running than parents who underestimated child weight status, 4.5 versus 2.4 h, p = 0.0002. Parents of healthy weight children were more likely to report that children were in excellent or very good health compared to parents of overweight/obese children, 75 versus 56 % respectively (p = 0.04). We found significant racial/ethnic differences in reported diet and physical activity behaviors and perception of overall health. Conclusions for Practice Parental perceptions of child health and physical activity level may be related to perceptions of their child’s weight status. Study findings informed community-based initiatives for reducing diabetes risk among children. PMID:27010551

  12. Living with the Active Alert Child: Groundbreaking Strategies for Parents. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budd, Linda S.

    Bright, controlling, fearful, and highly energetic, active alert children are frequently misdiagnosed as hyperactive or learning disabled. This book offers guidance for the special challenge of parenting the active alert infant, child, and adolescent. Part 1 of the book profiles the active alert child and examines 11 traits that characterize…

  13. Parental Involvement in Active Transport to School Initiatives: A Multi-Site Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyler, Amy; Baldwin, Julie; Carnoske, Cheryl; Nickelson, Jan; Troped, Philip; Steinman, Lesley; Pluto, Delores; Litt, Jill; Evenson, Kelly; Terpstra, Jennifer; Brownson, Ross; Schmid, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Background: Increasing physical activity in youth is a recommended approach to curbing the childhood obesity epidemic. One way to help increase children's daily activity is to promote active transportation to and from school (ATS). Purpose: The purpose of this case study was to explore parental perception of, and participation in, ATS initiatives.…

  14. A Calendar of Activities for Parents of Handicapped Students, 1983-1984. Developmentally Young.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    District of Columbia Public Schools, Washington, DC. Div. of Special Education and Pupil Personnel Services.

    These activities for handicapped preschool children in the Washington, D.C. school district can be used by all parents interested in developing a structured home development program for their children. A calendar format offers daily activities ranging from brief discussions and exercises to day-long family excursions. Each month's activities cover…

  15. Environmental and cultural correlates of physical activity parenting practices among Latino parents with preschool-aged children: Niños Activos

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Latino children are at high risk of becoming obese. Physical activity (PA) can help prevent obesity. Parents can influence children’s PA through parenting practices. This study aimed to examine the independent contributions of (1) sociodemographic, (2) cultural, (3) parent perceived environmental, and (4) objectively measured environmental factors, to PA parenting practices. Methods A cross-sectional sample of Latino parents (n = 240) from Harris County, TX in 2011–2012 completed validated questionnaires to assess PA parenting practices, acculturation, familism, perception of their neighborhood environment, and demographics. Home addresses were mapped and linked to Census block-level crime and traffic data. Distance to the closest park was mapped by GIS. Regression models were built in a hierarchical step-wise fashion. Results Combined models showed R2 of 6.8% to 38.9% for different parenting practices. Significant correlations included sociodemographic variables with having outdoor toys available, psychological control, and promotion of inactivity. Cultural factors correlated with PA safety concern practices. Perceived environmental attributes correlated with five of seven parenting practices, while objectively-measured environmental attributes did not significantly correlate with PA parenting practices. Conclusion Interventions promoting PA among Latino preschoolers may need to address the social-ecological context in which families live to effectively promote PA parenting, especially parents’ perceptions of neighborhoods. PMID:25011669

  16. Healthy Children, Healthy Families: Parents Making a Difference! A Curriculum Integrating Key Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Parenting Practices to Help Prevent Childhood Obesity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lent, Megan; Hill, Tisa F.; Dollahite, Jamie S.; Wolfe, Wendy S.; Dickin, Katherine L.

    2012-01-01

    A new dialogue-based curriculum combines nutrition, active play and parenting practices to help parents and caregivers gain skills that promote healthy habits for themselves and their families and to create healthy environments where children live, learn, and play. Graduates report significant improvements in behaviors that promote healthy weights…

  17. Engaging Urban Parents of Early Adolescents in Parenting Interventions: Home Visits vs. Group Sessions

    PubMed Central

    Finigan-Carr, Nadine M.; Copeland-Linder, Nikeea; Haynie, Denise L.; Cheng, Tina L.

    2016-01-01

    Interventions targeting parents of young children have shown effectiveness, but research is lacking about best practices for engaging parents of early adolescents. Low levels of enrollment and attendance in parenting interventions present major problems for researchers and clinicians. Effective and efficient ways to engage and collaborate with parents to strengthen parenting practices and to promote healthy development of early adolescents are needed. This exploratory mixed methods study examined the feasibility of three methods of engaging parents in positive parenting activities. Participants were parents of youth ages 11–13 enrolled in three urban, public middle schools in neighborhoods characterized by high rates of community violence. Families (N = 144) were randomized into one of three interventions: six home sessions, two home sessions followed by four group sessions, or six group sessions. The majority of parents were single, non-Hispanic, African American mothers. Urban parents of middle school students were more likely to participate in home visits than in group sessions; offering a combination did not increase participation in the group sessions. As only 34% of those who consented participated in the intervention, qualitative data were examined to explain the reasons for non-participation. PMID:27122960

  18. [Informed consent: a pragmatic view].

    PubMed

    Lomnici, Zoltán

    2006-04-01

    The overall goal of this study is a short introduction into the Hungarian legal basis, and practical circumstances of informed consent trough the cases of the Data Protection Commissioner of Hungary, the Supreme Court of Hungary, and the Constitutional Court. The author begins by describing the basic law with an introduction to the dogmatic background of informed consent, as a common law category. [corrected].

  19. Measurement of General and Specific Approaches to Physical Activity Parenting: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Samantha; Cohen, Alysia

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Parents play a significant role in shaping youth physical activity (PA). However, interventions targeting PA parenting have been ineffective. Methodological inconsistencies related to the measurement of parental influences may be a contributing factor. The purpose of this article is to review the extant peer-reviewed literature related to the measurement of general and specific parental influences on youth PA. Methods A systematic review of studies measuring constructs of PA parenting was conducted. Computerized searches were completed using PubMed, MEDLINE, Academic Search Premier, SPORTDiscus, and PsycINFO. Reference lists of the identified articles were manually reviewed as well as the authors' personal collections. Articles were selected on the basis of strict inclusion criteria and details regarding the measurement protocols were extracted. A total of 117 articles met the inclusionary criteria. Methodological articles that evaluated the validity and reliability of PA parenting measures (n=10) were reviewed separately from parental influence articles (n=107). Results A significant percentage of studies used measures with indeterminate validity and reliability. A significant percentage of articles did not provide sample items, describe the response format, or report the possible range of scores. No studies were located that evaluated sensitivity to change. Conclusion The reporting of measurement properties and the use of valid and reliable measurement scales need to be improved considerably. PMID:23944923

  20. [The origin of informed consent].

    PubMed

    Mallardi, V

    2005-10-01

    The principle of informed consent, aimed at the lawfulness of health assistance, tends to reflect the concept of autonomy and of decisional autodetermination of the person requiring and requesting medical and/or surgical interventions. This legal formula, over the last few years, has gained not only considerable space but also importance in the doctrinal elaboration and approaches, as well as juridical interpretations, thereby influencing the everyday activities of the medical profession. Informed consent is still the object of continuous explorations, not only asfar as concerns the already confirmed theoretical profile but, instead, the ambiguous practical and consequential aspect. Analysing how the concept and role of consensus was born and developed with the more adequate and reasonable excursions to make it valid and obtain it, it is impossible not to take into consideration, on the one hand, the very ancient philosophical origins and, on the other, the fact that it was conditioned by religion with the moral aspects and the accelerated deontological evolution with pathways parallel to the needs and the progress offered by new forms of treatment and novel biotechnological applications. The principle of consent is a relatively new condition. In fact, already in the times of not only the Egyptian civilisation, but also the Greek and Roman, documents have been found which show how the doctor's intervention had, in some way, first to be approved by the patient. Plato (law IV) had already foreseen the problems, the procedures and the modes of information which are, in synthesis, at the root of the principles of the present formula of informed consent and correlated the practice of the information and consensus with the quality and social position of the patient. The only guarantee that the patient might have, derived from a fundamental principle of medicine of all times: "in disease, focus on two aims, to improve and not to cause damage". A figure can be recognised

  1. Staying in or moving away from structured activities: Explanations involving parents and peers.

    PubMed

    Persson, Andreas; Kerr, Margaret; Stattin, Håkan

    2007-01-01

    Adolescent participation in structured activities, meaning those with adult leaders, regular meetings, and skill-building activities, is related to good adjustment. Participation in unstructured, unsupervised, peer-oriented activities is related to poor adjustment. Structured activity participation is high in early adolescence and then declines, raising the question of why youths leave structured activities. The authors examined explanations involving parents and peers. They used longitudinal data from 861 youths (ages 13-17 years). Results showed that, compared with youths who stayed in structured activities, those who switched to hanging out on the streets were less likely to have peers in structured activities and had less positive feelings about the home context and more negative interactions with parents. In addition, delinquency predicted switching to hanging out in the streets and never joining structured activities in the first place. The results concerning parents support a theoretical explanation of how parents might unintentionally affect youths' leisure choices. Furthermore, the authors found some indications that positive feelings at home might protect youths who switch from structured activities to hanging out on the streets from increases in delinquency.

  2. Barriers to Participation in Physical Activity Among South Sudanese Children in South Australia: Parents' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mude, William; Mwanri, Lillian

    2016-01-01

    Physical inactivity is one of the determinants of childhood obesity. Although its facilitators are well documented for the general community, limited evidence exists informing newly arrived and emerging migrant communities in Australia. To explore parents' perspectives of barriers to participation in physical activity among South Sudanese children in South Australia. Qualitative, face-to-face interviews were conducted with parents. Data were transcribed, coded, and analyzed thematically using NVivo software. Multiple and complex barriers to physical activity participation were described. Enabling and supportive programs are needed to improve physical activity participation and health outcomes of new migrants. PMID:27536934

  3. Young Children's Engagement and Learning Opportunities in a Cooking Activity with Parents and Older Siblings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Lauren; Vandermaas-Peeler, Maureen

    2013-01-01

    Parents teach their children through informal social interactions in a process known as guided participation (Rogoff, 1990). Although most research focuses on parent-child dyads, young children also learn from older siblings and parents through shared participation in daily activities. Utilizing a structured observational design, the authors…

  4. Children′s physical activity and screen time: qualitative comparison of views of parents of infants and preschool children

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background While parents are central to the development of behaviours in their young children, little is known about how parents view their role in shaping physical activity and screen time behaviours. Methods Using an unstructured focus group design, parental views and practices around children′s physical activity and screen time (television and computer use) were explored with eight groups of new parents (n=61; child age <12 months) and eight groups of parents with preschool-aged (3–5 year old) children (n=36) in Melbourne, Australia. Results Parents generally believed children are naturally active, which may preclude their engagement in strategies designed to increase physical activity. While parents across both age groups shared many overarching views concerning parenting for children′s physical activity and screen time behaviours, some strategies and barriers differed depending on the age of the child. While most new parents were optimistic about their ability to positively influence their child′s behaviours, many parents of preschool-aged children seemed more resigned to strategies that worked for them, even when aware such strategies may not be ideal. Conclusions Interventions aiming to increase children′s physical activity and decrease screen time may need to tailor strategies to the age group of the child and address parents′ misconceptions and barriers to optimum parenting in these domains. PMID:23270548

  5. Pro-Activeness of Parents in Accepting Behavior Management Techniques: A Cross-Sectional Evaluative Study

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jolly; Kaur, Manpreet; Trivedi, Krishna; Shah, Shalin; Virda, Mira

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The contemporary parents are more active and participate in the decision making during dental treatment. Aim To assess the parents’ acceptance towards behavior management techniques commonly used in the pediatric dentistry in different dental situation. Materials and Methods Fifty-one parents participated in the study. Children’s dental fear was assessed by the parents before attending power point presentation using Dental Subscale of the Children’s Fear Survey Schedule (CFSS-DS). Parents viewed power point presentation of eight behavior management techniques being used during pediatric dental treatment. The techniques were: 1) Voice control; 2) Tell-Show-Do; 3) Positive reinforcement; 4) Parental presence or absence; 5) HOME; 6) Physical restraint; 7) N2O-O2 sedation; 8) General anesthesia. Parents were asked to arrange various behavior management techniques from most accepted technique to least accepted technique in various dental situations according to their view. Results All the parents completed the questionnaire. Most children show increased anxiety related to dental component of CFSS-DS scale particularly during the administration of local anesthetic. In present study most preferred behavior management technique was Tell-Show-Do followed by positive reinforcement and least preferred behavior management technique was general anesthesia followed by physical restraint. Conclusion Children’s anxiety level increases during the condition related to dentistry which can be overcome by developing positive approach in children and parents towards dentistry and by utilizing various behaviour management strategies. A generalized low parental tolerance level for firm management techniques was seen in the present study population. PMID:27630952

  6. Elementary School Recess: Selected Readings, Games, and Activities for Teachers and Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clements, Rhonda L., Ed.

    Based upon the principle that all children have a right to play and to experience the benefits of recess, this book assists elementary school teachers and parents in offering children in preschool through Grade 6 appropriate recess games and activities and provides a variety of readings that support the need for recess activities. The book is…

  7. It's PTA Showtime, Baby! Promoting Physical Activity among Parents and Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Tammy; Berg, Kim; Martin, Amanda Shoe; Martin, Gary; Lux, Karen

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors state, that to help children value and participate in regular physical activity, it is important that significant adults in their lives do the same. Furthermore, research has consistently shown that adults, particularly parents, influence children's participation in physical activity (e.g., Brustad, 1996; Freedson &…

  8. Harsh Parenting, Parasympathetic Activity, and Development of Delinquency and Substance Use

    PubMed Central

    Hinnant, J. Benjamin; Erath, Stephen; El-Sheikh, Mona

    2014-01-01

    Stress response systems are thought to play an important role in the development of psychopathology. Additionally, family stress may have a significant influence on the development of stress response systems. One potential avenue of change is through alterations to thresholds for the activation of stress responses: Decreased threshold for responding may mark increased stress sensitivity. Our first aim was to evaluate the interaction between thresholds for parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) responding, operationalized as resting respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), and harsh parenting in the prediction of development of delinquency and adolescent substance use (resting RSA as a biomarker of risk). The second aim was to evaluate if resting RSA changes over time as a function of harsh parenting and stress reactivity indexed by RSA withdrawal (altered threshold for stress responding). Our third aim was to evaluate the moderating role of sex in these relations. We used longitudinal data from 251 children ages 8 to 16. Mother-reports of child delinquency and RSA were acquired at all ages. Adolescents self-reported substance use at age 16. Family stress was assessed with child-reported harsh parenting. Controlling for marital conflict and change over time in harsh parenting, lower resting RSA predicted increases in delinquency and increased likelihood of drug use in contexts of harsh parenting, especially for boys. Harsh parenting was associated with declining resting RSA for children who exhibited greater RSA withdrawal to stress. Findings support resting PNS activity as a moderator of developmental risk that can be altered over time. PMID:25688440

  9. Daily parental knowledge of youth activities is linked to youth physical symptoms and HPA functioning.

    PubMed

    Lippold, Melissa A; Davis, Kelly D; McHale, Susan M; Almeida, David M

    2016-03-01

    Considerable evidence documents linkages between parental knowledge of youth activities and youth risky behavior. We extended this research to determine whether parental knowledge was associated with youth physical health, including reports of physical symptoms (e.g., headaches, stomachaches) and a biomarker of hypothalamic pituitary adrenocortical (HPA) axis functioning (i.e., salivary cortisol levels). Participants were children of employees in the Information Technology division of a Fortune 500 company (N = 132, mean age youth = 13.39 years, 55% female) who participated in a daily diary study. Data were collected via telephone calls on 8 consecutive evenings. On 4 study days, cortisol samples were collected at 4 time points (waking, 30 min after waking, before dinner, bedtime). Multilevel models revealed that, at the between-person level, youth whose parents had higher average knowledge about their activities, exhibited lower bedtime cortisol levels. Furthermore, at the within-person level, on days when parents displayed more knowledge than usual (relative to their own 8-day average), youth had lower before-dinner cortisol than usual. Linkages between average parental knowledge and physical health symptoms were moderated by youth age: Younger but not older adolescents whose parents were more knowledgeable had fewer physical health symptoms, on average. A next step is to identify the processes that underlie these associations. PMID:26751757

  10. 32 CFR Appendix F to Part 57 - Parent and Student Rights

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Parent and Student Rights F Appendix F to Part..., App. F Appendix F to Part 57—Parent and Student Rights A. Parental Consent (1) The consent of a parent... educational or early intervention records. (E) Opportunity to present complaints. (F) The child's...

  11. 32 CFR Appendix F to Part 57 - Parent and Student Rights

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Parent and Student Rights F Appendix F to Part..., App. F Appendix F to Part 57—Parent and Student Rights A. Parental Consent (1) The consent of a parent... educational or early intervention records. (E) Opportunity to present complaints. (F) The child's...

  12. [The origin of informed consent].

    PubMed

    Mallardi, V

    2005-10-01

    The principle of informed consent, aimed at the lawfulness of health assistance, tends to reflect the concept of autonomy and of decisional autodetermination of the person requiring and requesting medical and/or surgical interventions. This legal formula, over the last few years, has gained not only considerable space but also importance in the doctrinal elaboration and approaches, as well as juridical interpretations, thereby influencing the everyday activities of the medical profession. Informed consent is still the object of continuous explorations, not only asfar as concerns the already confirmed theoretical profile but, instead, the ambiguous practical and consequential aspect. Analysing how the concept and role of consensus was born and developed with the more adequate and reasonable excursions to make it valid and obtain it, it is impossible not to take into consideration, on the one hand, the very ancient philosophical origins and, on the other, the fact that it was conditioned by religion with the moral aspects and the accelerated deontological evolution with pathways parallel to the needs and the progress offered by new forms of treatment and novel biotechnological applications. The principle of consent is a relatively new condition. In fact, already in the times of not only the Egyptian civilisation, but also the Greek and Roman, documents have been found which show how the doctor's intervention had, in some way, first to be approved by the patient. Plato (law IV) had already foreseen the problems, the procedures and the modes of information which are, in synthesis, at the root of the principles of the present formula of informed consent and correlated the practice of the information and consensus with the quality and social position of the patient. The only guarantee that the patient might have, derived from a fundamental principle of medicine of all times: "in disease, focus on two aims, to improve and not to cause damage". A figure can be recognised

  13. Life satisfaction and activity preferences in parents of Down's syndrome children.

    PubMed

    Bränholm, I B; Degerman, E A

    1992-03-01

    The impact of parenting a child with Down's syndrome on life satisfaction and non-work activities was investigated in 37 couples using mailed checklists. The results were compared with those found in all 89 parents from a randomly selected population. Only for 7 of the 41 non-work activities were there differences between the two groups of parents. The vast majority of both groups were satisfied or very satisfied with life as a whole and with partnership relations, sexual life and family life. The 8 domains of life satisfaction formed 3 factors. In congruence with previous findings in a non-selected sample these factors were significant classifiers for satisfaction with life as a whole, an expressive (emotion related) factor being the major classifier. The close similarities in non-work activities and life satisfaction are interpreted as a result of adequate adaptive resources within the majority of families of children with Down's syndrome. PMID:1533951

  14. Life satisfaction and activity preferences in parents of Down's syndrome children.

    PubMed

    Bränholm, I B; Degerman, E A

    1992-03-01

    The impact of parenting a child with Down's syndrome on life satisfaction and non-work activities was investigated in 37 couples using mailed checklists. The results were compared with those found in all 89 parents from a randomly selected population. Only for 7 of the 41 non-work activities were there differences between the two groups of parents. The vast majority of both groups were satisfied or very satisfied with life as a whole and with partnership relations, sexual life and family life. The 8 domains of life satisfaction formed 3 factors. In congruence with previous findings in a non-selected sample these factors were significant classifiers for satisfaction with life as a whole, an expressive (emotion related) factor being the major classifier. The close similarities in non-work activities and life satisfaction are interpreted as a result of adequate adaptive resources within the majority of families of children with Down's syndrome.

  15. Early aqueous activity on primitive meteorite parent bodies.

    PubMed

    Endress, M; Zinner, E; Bischoff, A

    1996-02-22

    The interstellar material from which the solar system formed has been modified by many processes: evaporation and condensation in the solar nebula, accretion into protoplanetary bodies and post-accretion processes within these bodies. Meteorites provide a record of these events and their chronology. Carbonaceous CI chondrites are among the most primitive, undifferentiated meteorites, but nevertheless show evidence of post-accretion alteration; they contain carbonates that are believed to have formed by reactions between anhydrous CI precursor materials and circulating fluids in the meteorite parent body (or bodies), yet little is known about the nature of these reactions or the timescale on which they occurred. Here we report measurements of excess 53Cr--formed by the decay of short-lived 53Mn--in five carbonate fragments from the CI chondrites Orgueil and Ivuna. Our results show that aqueous alteration on small protoplanetary bodies must have begun less than 20 Myr after the time of formation of the oldest known solar-nebula condensates (Allende refractory inclusions). This upper limit is much shorter than that of 50 Myr inferred from previous studies, and clearly establishes aqueous alteration as one of the earliest processes in the chemical evolution of the solar system.

  16. What do parents and preschool staff tell us about young children's physical activity: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Genevieve M; Higgs, Joy; Hardy, Louise L; Baur, Louise A

    2008-01-01

    Background Physical activity and small screen recreation are two modifiable behaviours associated with childhood obesity and the development of chronic health problems. Parents and preschool staff shape behaviour habits in young children. The aims of this qualitative study were to explore the attitudes, values, knowledge and understanding of parents and carers of preschool-age children in relation to physical activity and small screen recreation and to identify influences upon these behaviours. Methods This research involved a focus group study with parents and carers of the target population. A purposive sample of 39 participants (22 parents, 17 carers) participated in 9 focus groups. Participants were drawn from three populations of interest: those from lower socioeconomic status, and Middle-Eastern and Chinese communities in the Sydney (Australia) metropolitan region. Results All participants understood the value of physical activity and the impact of excessive small screen recreation but were unfamiliar with national guidelines for these behaviours. Participants described the nature and activity patterns of young children; however, the concept of activity 'intensity' in this age group was not a meaningful term. Factors which influenced young children's physical activity behaviour included the child's personality, the physical activity facilities available, and the perceived safety of their community. Factors facilitating physical activity included a child's preference for being active, positive parent or peer modelling, access to safe play areas, organised activities, preschool programs and a sense of social connectedness. Barriers to physical activity included safety concerns exacerbated by negative media stories, time restraints, financial constraints, cultural values favouring educational achievement, and safety regulations about equipment design and use within the preschool environment. Parents considered that young children are naturally 'programmed' to be

  17. Abnormal Neural Activation to Faces in the Parents of Children with Autism.

    PubMed

    Yucel, G H; Belger, A; Bizzell, J; Parlier, M; Adolphs, R; Piven, J

    2015-12-01

    Parents of children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) show subtle deficits in aspects of social behavior and face processing, which resemble those seen in ASD, referred to as the "Broad Autism Phenotype " (BAP). While abnormal activation in ASD has been reported in several brain structures linked to social cognition, little is known regarding patterns in the BAP. We compared autism parents with control parents with no family history of ASD using 2 well-validated face-processing tasks. Results indicated increased activation in the autism parents to faces in the amygdala (AMY) and the fusiform gyrus (FG), 2 core face-processing regions. Exploratory analyses revealed hyper-activation of lateral occipital cortex (LOC) bilaterally in autism parents with aloof personality ("BAP+"). Findings suggest that abnormalities of the AMY and FG are related to underlying genetic liability for ASD, whereas abnormalities in the LOC and right FG are more specific to behavioral features of the BAP. Results extend our knowledge of neural circuitry underlying abnormal face processing beyond those previously reported in ASD to individuals with shared genetic liability for autism and a subset of genetically related individuals with the BAP.

  18. Abnormal Neural Activation to Faces in the Parents of Children with Autism.

    PubMed

    Yucel, G H; Belger, A; Bizzell, J; Parlier, M; Adolphs, R; Piven, J

    2015-12-01

    Parents of children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) show subtle deficits in aspects of social behavior and face processing, which resemble those seen in ASD, referred to as the "Broad Autism Phenotype " (BAP). While abnormal activation in ASD has been reported in several brain structures linked to social cognition, little is known regarding patterns in the BAP. We compared autism parents with control parents with no family history of ASD using 2 well-validated face-processing tasks. Results indicated increased activation in the autism parents to faces in the amygdala (AMY) and the fusiform gyrus (FG), 2 core face-processing regions. Exploratory analyses revealed hyper-activation of lateral occipital cortex (LOC) bilaterally in autism parents with aloof personality ("BAP+"). Findings suggest that abnormalities of the AMY and FG are related to underlying genetic liability for ASD, whereas abnormalities in the LOC and right FG are more specific to behavioral features of the BAP. Results extend our knowledge of neural circuitry underlying abnormal face processing beyond those previously reported in ASD to individuals with shared genetic liability for autism and a subset of genetically related individuals with the BAP. PMID:25056573

  19. "BodyWorks": A Parent-Focused Program to Promote Healthful Eating and Physical Activity for Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borden, Valerie Melino; Labiner-Wolfe, Judith; Blake, Susan M.; Marr, Amanda; Rowe, Jonelle; Wasserman, Jill

    2012-01-01

    The "BodyWorks" program was designed to help parents improve family eating and activity behaviors. "BodyWorks" was associated with significant gains in parents' knowledge about nutrition and activity, and greater self-efficacy to set family nutrition goals, plan physical activities, and change eating habits. (Contains 1 table.)

  20. The Influence of Parental Nativity, Neighborhood Disadvantage and the Built Environment on Physical Activity Behaviors in Latino Youth

    PubMed Central

    Ohri-Vachaspati, Punam; Yedidia, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Little evidence exists examining if parental nativity, neighborhood disadvantage and built environment features are associated with physical activity behaviors in Latino youth. We used a representative sample of Latino youth (n = 616) living in New Jersey to examine parental nativity associations with active transport to school, active use of sidewalks, use of local neighborhood parks, and use of neighborhood physical activity facilities. We estimated prevalence ratios (PR) that accounted for the complex survey design. Latino youth with foreign-born parents were generally more active than their US-born peers, and those with parents in the US 10 years or less were more likely to engage in active transport to school (PR = 1.51, 95 % CI 1.04–2.21), after adjusting for census-based neighborhood disadvantage, self-reported neighborhood measures, and geocoded distance to school. Parental nativity status should be considered in policies or interventions designed to increase physical activity among Latino youth. PMID:24162884

  1. The Relationship Between Parental Physical Activity and Screen Time Behaviors and the Behaviors of their Young Children.

    PubMed

    Carson, Valerie; Stearns, Jodie; Janssen, Ian

    2015-08-01

    The main purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between parental and children's physical activity and screen time behaviors in a large sample of children in the early years. The results are based on 738 children aged 0-5 years and their parents from the Kingston, Canada area. Parents completed a questionnaire from May to September 2011 that assessed sociodemographic characteristics, their physical activity and screen time, and their child's physical activity and screen time. Logistic regression models, adjusted for potential confounders, were conducted. Parents in the lowest quartile of physical activity were 2.77 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.68-4.57) times more likely to have a child in the lowest quartile of physical activity compared with parents in the highest quartile of physical activity. Relationships were stronger in two parent homes compared with single-parent homes. Parents in the second (odds ratio = 2.27, 95% CI: 1.36-3.78), third (2.30, 1.32-3.99), and fourth (7.47, 4.53-12.33) screen time quartiles were significantly more likely to have a child in the highest quartile of screen time compared with parents in quartile one. To optimize healthy growth and development in the early years, future family-centered interventions targeting both physical activity and screen time appear important.

  2. The Relationship Between Parental Physical Activity and Screen Time Behaviors and the Behaviors of their Young Children.

    PubMed

    Carson, Valerie; Stearns, Jodie; Janssen, Ian

    2015-08-01

    The main purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between parental and children's physical activity and screen time behaviors in a large sample of children in the early years. The results are based on 738 children aged 0-5 years and their parents from the Kingston, Canada area. Parents completed a questionnaire from May to September 2011 that assessed sociodemographic characteristics, their physical activity and screen time, and their child's physical activity and screen time. Logistic regression models, adjusted for potential confounders, were conducted. Parents in the lowest quartile of physical activity were 2.77 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.68-4.57) times more likely to have a child in the lowest quartile of physical activity compared with parents in the highest quartile of physical activity. Relationships were stronger in two parent homes compared with single-parent homes. Parents in the second (odds ratio = 2.27, 95% CI: 1.36-3.78), third (2.30, 1.32-3.99), and fourth (7.47, 4.53-12.33) screen time quartiles were significantly more likely to have a child in the highest quartile of screen time compared with parents in quartile one. To optimize healthy growth and development in the early years, future family-centered interventions targeting both physical activity and screen time appear important. PMID:25918825

  3. 34 CFR 99.30 - Under what conditions is prior consent required to disclose information?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... information? (a) The parent or eligible student shall provide a signed and dated written consent before an educational agency or institution discloses personally identifiable information from the student's education... a parent or eligible student so requests, the educational agency or institution shall provide him...

  4. Korean Children's Evaluation of Parental Restrictions Regarding Gender-Stereotypic Peer Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Yoonjung; Lee-Kim, Jennie; Killen, Melanie; Park, Kyoungja; Kim, Jihyun

    2012-01-01

    Korean children's evaluations of parental restrictions of children's activities based on gender stereotypic expectations were investigated. Third and sixth grade Korean (N = 128) children evaluated scenarios in which a boy or girl desired to play ballet or soccer. Participants used stereotypes to support children's desires to play…

  5. Young Children at Home and in School: 212 Educational Activities for Their Parents, Teachers, and Caregivers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morse, Philip S.; Brand, Lillian B.

    This source book is designed to give parents, teachers, and other caregivers of young children more than 200 sample activities for children that are fun, easy, and educationally sound. Chapter 1 introduces principles of early childhood programs, the "home-school connection," and tips on how to communicate with children. This chapter also gives an…

  6. Involving Parents of Young Children in Science, Math and Literacy Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landerholm, Elizabeth; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes a collaborative parent-involvement project for inner-city Hispanic primary students sponsored by the Chicago Community Trust. A university professor, two graduate assistants, the principal, and the school community representative designed a summer program featuring hospitality and support activities, free books, and hands-on science and…

  7. Physical Activity and Childhood Obesity: Strategies and Solutions for Schools and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Gregory; Riley, Clarence; Hargrove, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    One of the reasons American children and adolescents gain weight over the generations is that children expend significantly less energy on a daily basis than their parents and grandparents did at their age. Today's youth spend many hours participating in sedentary activities. Additionally, we eat more fast food and vending machine food than we…

  8. Role of Parent Literacy and Numeracy Expectations and Activities in Predicting Early Numeracy Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segers, Eliane; Kleemans, Tijs; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2015-01-01

    The home numeracy environment (i.e., parents' numeracy expectations and activities), is related to early numeracy in young children. As recent studies have shown that both cognitive and linguistic factors play an important role in predicting numeracy development, it may be assumed that rather than the home "numeracy" environment, the…

  9. Influence of a Parent Resource Manual on Physical Activity Levels of Children with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Barbara L.; Lieberman, Lauren J.

    2007-01-01

    The authors examined the effects of a parent resource manual on physical and sedentary activity levels of children with visual impairments. Children and youth with visual impairments, aged 9-23 years (7 girls, 11 boys), attended a 1-week summer sports camp in New York state. The authors found that 1 month after they provided the families of the…

  10. Physical Activity in Young Children: A Systematic Review of Parental Influences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Jessica; Skouteris, Helen; McCabe, Marita; Ricciardelli, Lina A.; Milgrom, Jeannette; Baur, Louise A.; Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew; Dwyer, Genevieve

    2012-01-01

    The primary aim of this review was to identify and evaluate the strength of associations of the key parental factors measured in studies examining early childhood physical activity (PA). A systematic review of the literature, using databases PsychINFO, Medline, Academic Search Complete, PSYCHinfo, and CINHAL, published between January 1986 and…

  11. The Parent's Manual: A Manual of Supplementary Activities for Homebound Children with Severely Handicapping Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shrensky, Joan; And Others

    Designed for parents of homebound severely handicapped children, the manual presents games and activities for teaching preliminary skills (including body awareness), self help skills (such as washing hands, eating with a spoon, and brushing teeth), visual skills, language skills, and mathmatics skills. An introduction to each series of activities…

  12. Parental and Adolescent Perceptions of Neighborhood Safety Related to Adolescents' Physical Activity in Their Neighborhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esteban-Cornejo, Irene; Carlson, Jordan A.; Conway, Terry L.; Cain, Kelli L.; Saelens, Brian E.; Frank, Lawrence D.; Glanz, Karen; Roman, Caterina G.; Sallis, James F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the association between adolescent and parental perceptions of neighborhood safety and adolescents' physical activity in multiple locations and to investigate the moderating effect of sex within this association. Method: This cross-sectional study was conducted with 928 adolescents aged 12 to 16…

  13. Romantic and Sexual Activities, Parent-Adolescent Stress, and Depressive Symptoms among Early Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davila, Joanne; Stroud, Catherine B.; Starr, Lisa R.; Miller, Melissa Ramsay; Yoneda, Athena; Hershenberg, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    Building on evidence that romantic experiences are associated with depressive symptoms in adolescence, we examined their bidirectional association, as well as the role of sexual activity and parent-adolescent stress in their association. Data were collected from 71 early adolescent girls (M age 13.45 years; SD = 0.68) and their primary caregiver…

  14. Physical Activity and Sport Participation in Youth with Congenital Heart Disease: Perceptions of Children and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moola, Fiona; Faulkner, Guy E. J.; Kirsh, Joel A.; Kilburn, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    This study explored perceptions toward physical activity and sport in the lives of youth with congenital heart disease. Thirteen cardiac participants were interviewed in the presence of their parents, and a process of inductive analysis was conducted. Sport was not considered a valued pursuit despite the belief that it is essential for the…

  15. Clinical research before informed consent.

    PubMed

    Miller, Franklin G

    2014-06-01

    Clinical research with patient-subjects was routinely conducted without informed consent for research participation prior to 1966. The aim of this article is to illuminate the moral climate of clinical research at this time, with particular attention to placebo-controlled trials in which patient-subjects often were not informed that they were participating in research or that they might receive a placebo intervention rather than standard medical treatment or an experimental treatment for their condition. An especially valuable window into the thinking of clinical investigators about their relationship with patient-subjects in the era before informed consent is afforded by reflection on two articles published by psychiatric researchers in 1966 and 1967, at the point of transition between clinical research conducted under the guise of medical care and clinical research based on consent following an invitation to participate and disclosure of material information about the study. Historical inquiry relating to the practice of clinical research without informed consent helps to put into perspective the moral progress associated with soliciting consent following disclosure of pertinent information; it also helps to shed light on an important issue in contemporary research ethics: the conditions under which it is ethical to conduct clinical research without informed consent.

  16. Human genetic banking: altruism, benefit and consent.

    PubMed

    Williams, Garrath; Schroeder, Doris

    2004-04-01

    This article considers how we should frame the ethical issues raised by current proposals for large-scale genebanks with on-going links to medical and lifestyle data, such as the Wellcome Trust and Medical Research Council's 'UK Biobank'. As recent scandals such as Alder Hey have emphasised, there are complex issues concerning the informed consent of donors that need to be carefully considered. However, we believe that a preoccupation with informed consent obscures important questions about the purposes to which such collections are put, not least that they may be only haphazardly used for research (especially that of commercial interest)--an end that would not fairly reflect the original altruistic motivation of donors, and the trust they must invest. We therefore argue that custodians of such databases take on a weighty pro-active duty, to encourage public debate about the ends of such collections and to sponsor research that reflects publicly agreed priorities and provides public benefits.

  17. Physical activity and screen-media-related parenting practices have different associations with children's objectively measured physical activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Children's physical activity (PA) is inversely associated with children's weight status. Parents may be an important influence on children's PA by restricting sedentary time or supporting PA. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of PA and screen-media–related [television (TV) and...

  18. Models of Traumatic Experiences and Children's Psychological Adjustment: The Roles of Perceived Parenting and the Children's Own Resources and Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Punamaki, Raija-Leena; Qouta, Samir; El Sarraj, Eyad

    1997-01-01

    Used path analysis to examine relations between trauma, perceived parenting, resources, political activity, and adjustment in Palestinian 11- and 12-year olds. Found that the more trauma experienced, the more negative parenting the children experienced, the more political activity they showed, and the more they suffered from adjustment problems.…

  19. Carbonates and sulfates in CI chondrites - Formation by aqueous activity on the parent body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredriksson, Kurt; Kerridge, John F.

    1988-01-01

    Compositions and morphologies of dolomites, breunnerites, Ca-carbonates, Ca-sulfates and Mg, Ni, Na-sulfates, and their petrologic interrelations, in four CI chondrites are consistent with their having been formed by aqueous activity on the CI parent body. Radiochronometric data indicate that this activity took place very early in solar-system history. No evidence for original ('primitive') condensates seems to be present. However, alteration apparently took place without change in bulk meteorite composition.

  20. Using the health belief model to explain parents' participation in adolescents' at-home sexuality education activities.

    PubMed

    Brock, G C; Beazley, R P

    1995-04-01

    The Health Belief Model (HBM) was used to study parents' involvement in six at-home sexuality education activities for nine grade students. These activities are part of Skills for Healthy Relationships: A Program About Sexuality, AIDS, and Other STD (SHR). Some 216 parents, 62% of the population, completed and returned a self-administered questionnaire. Perceived barriers correlated most strongly with lack of parents' involvement in SHR. Additionally, perceived barriers and perceived self-efficacy were the most significant factors differentiating parents involved in SHR at-home activities from those who were uninvolved. Compared with highly involved parents, noninvolved parents were: 1) less confident their children wanted to do the activities with them (F[4,204] = 19.58, p < .0005), 2) less sure of their children's desire to talk with them about sex-related issues (F[4,213] = 7.03, p < .0005), and 3) less certain their AIDS-related facts were current (F[4,213] = 2.39, p = .05). Parents highly involved in SHR reported becoming more comfortable talking with their adolescents about STDs (F[4,205] = 4.04, p = .004) and felt their children talked a little more openly with them about AIDS and STDs (F[4,205] = 2.54, p = .04). In contrast, uninvolved parents reported no changes relative to communicating with their children about sexuality. For these reasons, SHR's inclusion of at-home activities shows promise for increasing parent-adolescent communication about sexuality.

  1. Longitudinal and secular trends in parental encouragement for healthful eating, physical activity, and dieting throughout the adolescent years

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Katherine W.; Laska, Melissa N.; Fulkerson, Jayne A.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Parental encouragement of healthful eating and physical activity has been found to be associated with adolescents’ long-term healthful habits, while parental encouragement to diet has been associated with disordered eating behaviors among adolescents. However, little is known about how parental encouragement changes as adolescents grow older (longitudinal trends), or how parental encouragement has changed over time (secular trends). This study examined 5-year longitudinal and secular trends in adolescents’ report of their parents’ encouragement to eat healthfully, be physically active, and diet. Methods Project EAT surveyed a cohort of Minnesota adolescents (n=2516) in 1999 and 2004. Mixed-model regressions were used to assess changes in adolescents’ report of parental encouragement from early to middle adolescence (middle school to high school) and from middle to late adolescence (high school to post-high school), and secular changes in parental encouragement among middle adolescents between 1999 and 2004. Results There were significant decreases in parental encouragement to eat healthfully, be active, and diet between early and middle adolescence. Between middle and late adolescence, among males parental encouragement for all behaviors decreased while among females parental encouragement to diet increased. Few secular changes in parental encouragement were observed between 1999 and 2004. Conclusions Given the importance of parental support for healthful eating and physical activity, efforts should be made to help parents maintain a high level of encouragement for their children's healthful behavior throughout adolescence. Parents of late-adolescent females should aim to decrease the pressure on their daughters to diet during these critical developmental years. PMID:21856524

  2. Development and Validation of a Parental Monitoring Instrument: Measuring How Parents Monitor Adolescents' Activities and Risk Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cottrell, Scott A.; Branstetter, Steven; Cottrell, Lesley; Harris, Carole V.; Rishel, Carrie; Stanton, Bonita F.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the development and validation of the Parental Monitoring Instrument (PMI). The PMI was administered to a sample of 518 parent-adolescent (aged 12 to 17 years) dyads. Initial findings provide evidence of instrument reliability and validity. The exploratory factor analysis results suggested a seven-factor…

  3. What practices do parents perceive as effective or ineffective in promoting a healthy diet, physical activity, and less sitting in children: parent focus groups

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To support parents in improving the health of their young children, examples of effective parenting practices for a healthy diet, physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB) are needed. This study explores perceived effective and ineffective parenting practices in difficult situations concerning raising healthy children and investigates their relationship with Self-Determination Theory (SDT) and Social Cognitive Theory (SCT). The current study is formative work to inform the content of a randomized controlled trial. Methods Four focus groups were conducted between June and October 2012 at worksites during lunch break. A total of 21 unrelated parents of primary schoolchildren (6 fathers, 15 mothers) participated. A short written questionnaire introduced typical difficult situations derived from parental anecdotal reports, concerning healthy diet, PA and SB. These situations formed the backbone for the subsequent focus group discussion. In October 2012, discussions were audio-recorded and analyzed in Nvivo to identify key response items using thematic analysis. Results Parents experienced explaining why the child should behave healthily, monitoring, being consistent, offering alternatives, reacting empathetically, modeling, motivating, increasing intrinsic value and availability, and using time-out as effective practices, whereas anger was considered ineffective. Opinions were mixed about the effectiveness of giving as much freedom as possible, obliging, rewarding and punishing, and setting rules and agreements. Parenting practices were consistent with principles from both SDT and SCT. Conclusions Parents identified numerous perceived effective practices to respond to their child’s health-related behavior. Since many of them coincide with the evidence base and the success of a parenting program depends upon the degree to which parents’ concerns and motivations are integrated into the program design, important opportunities are created for future

  4. Rationale and design of active play @ home: a parent-led physical activity program for children with and without disability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Compared to other children, those with disability have additional challenges to being physically active. Prader-Willi Syndrome is a genetic form of childhood obesity that is characterized by hypotonia, growth hormone deficiency, behavioral, and cognitive disability. In children, the low prevalence of this syndrome (1 in 10,000 to 15,000 live births) makes group-based physical activity interventions difficult. In contrast, the home environment presents a natural venue to establish a physical activity routine for this population. This manuscript describes the design of a parent-led physical activity intervention incorporating playground and interactive console-based games to increase physical activity participation in youth with and without Prader-Willi Syndrome. Methods/Design The study participants will be 115 youth ages 8-15 y (45 with the syndrome and 70 without the syndrome but categorized as obese). The study will use a parallel design with the control group receiving the intervention after serving as control. Participants will be expected to complete a physical activity curriculum 4 days a week for 6 months including playground games 2 days a week and interactive console games 2 days a week. Parents will be trained at baseline and then provided with a curriculum and equipment to guide their implementation of the program. Tips related to scheduling and coping with barriers to daily program implementation will be provided. Throughout, parents will be contacted by phone once a week (weeks 1-4) and then every other week to receive support in between visits. Measurements of children and parents will be obtained at baseline, 12 weeks, and at the end (week 24) of the intervention. Children main outcomes include physical activity (accelerometry), body composition (dual x-ray absorptiometry), motor proficiency (Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency), quality of life and physical activity self-efficacy (questionnaires). Intervention compliance will be

  5. Parent-Targeted Mobile Phone Intervention to Increase Physical Activity in Sedentary Children: Randomized Pilot Trial

    PubMed Central

    Marker, Arwen M; Allen, H Raymond; Machtmes, Ryan; Han, Hongmei; Johnson, William D; Schuna Jr, John M; Broyles, Stephanie T; Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Church, Timothy S

    2014-01-01

    Background Low levels of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity are associated with adverse health consequences. Objective The intent of the study was to determine the feasibility and efficacy of a 12-week physical activity promotion program targeting children, which was delivered to parents through mobile phones. Methods Potential participants were recruited through advertisements placed in the newspaper, local hospitals and schools, and an email listserv. Sedentary children aged 6-10 years were randomly assigned to a minimal (MIG) or intensive (IIG) intervention group. Parents in the MIG were given a goal to increase (within 1 month) and maintain their child’s activity at 6000 pedometer steps/day above their baseline levels and to monitor their child’s steps daily. Parents in the IIG were given the same steps/day and monitoring goals, in addition to text messages and articles containing additional behavioral strategies (based on the Social Cognitive Theory) designed to promote their child’s physical activity. The intervention components were delivered via mobile phone. Anthropometrics, body composition, and questionnaires were administered in a clinic. Children wore a New Lifestyles pedometer (NL-1000) each day throughout the intervention and parents were to monitor their child’s step counts daily. Results Out of 59 children who screened for the study, a total of 27 children (mean age 8.7, SD 1.4 years; 56%, 15/27 female; 59%, 16/27 African American) were enrolled and completed the study. Overall, 97.90% (2220/2268; 98.20%, 1072/1092 for MIG; 97.60%, 1148/1176 for IIG) of expected step data were successfully entered by the parent or study coordinator. Parents in the MIG and IIG were sent approximately 7 and 13 text messages per week, respectively, averaged over the course of the study. IIG parents accessed an average of 6.1 (SD 4.4) articles over the course of the intervention and accessed a fewer number of articles in the last month compared to the first

  6. Healthy eating, activity and obesity prevention: a qualitative study of parent and child perceptions in Australia.

    PubMed

    Hesketh, K; Waters, E; Green, J; Salmon, L; Williams, J

    2005-03-01

    Preventative health strategies incorporating the views of target participants have improved the likelihood of success. This qualitative study aimed to elicit child and parent views regarding social and environmental barriers to healthy eating, physical activity and child obesity prevention programmes, acceptable foci, and appropriate modes of delivery. To obtain views across a range of social circumstances three demographically diverse primary schools in Victoria, Australia were selected. Children in Grades 2 (aged 7-8 years) and 5 (aged 10-11 years) participated in focus groups of three to six children. Groups were semi-structured using photo-based activities to initiate discussion. Focus groups with established parent groups were also conducted. Comments were recorded, collated, and themes extracted using grounded theory. 119 children and 17 parents participated. Nine themes emerged: information and awareness, contradiction between knowledge and behaviour, lifestyle balance, local environment, barriers to a healthy lifestyle, contradictory messages, myths, roles of the school and family, and timing and content of prevention strategies for childhood obesity. In conclusion, awareness of food 'healthiness' was high however perceptions of the 'healthiness' of some sedentary activities that are otherwise of benefit (e.g. reading) were uncertain. The contradictions in messages children receive were reported to be a barrier to a healthy lifestyle. Parent recommendations regarding the timing and content of childhood obesity prevention strategies were consistent with quantitative research. Contradictions in the explicit and implicit messages children receive around diet and physical activity need to be prevented. Consistent promotion of healthy food and activity choices across settings is core to population prevention programmes for childhood obesity.

  7. Parental perception on the efficacy of a physical activity program for preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Bellows, Laura; Silvernail, Sara; Caldwell, Lisa; Bryant, Angela; Kennedy, Cathy; Davies, Patricia; Anderson, Jennifer

    2011-04-01

    Childhood obesity is among the leading health concerns in the United States. The relationship between unmet physical activity needs in young children is of particular interest as the trend in childhood obesity continues to rise and unmet physical activity needs are identified. The preschool years are an influential time in promoting healthful lifestyle habits and early childhood interventions may help establish lifelong healthful behaviors which could help prevent obesity later in life. The Food Friends®: Get Movin' with Mighty Moves® is a preschool physical activity program which aims to improve children's gross motor skills and physical activity levels. The home environment and parental modeling are critical factors related to child physical activity in this population. The parent component, Mighty Moves®: Fun Ways to Keep Families Active and Healthy, was designed to address barriers in the home environment that lead to unmet physical activity needs in preschoolers and their families. The program and materials were designed based on Social Marketing tenets and Social Learning Theory principles. Four Colorado Head Start centers were assigned to an experimental group as part of the Mighty Moves® group randomized trial. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation methods were used to determine what messages and materials reached and motivated the target audience to increase physical activity levels. Results of the study indicated the program's materials helped families and children to be more physically active. Additionally, materials and material dissemination were revised to enhance program goals.

  8. Adolescents' leisure activities, parental monitoring and cigarette smoking - a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Adolescent participation in leisure activities is developmentally beneficial, but certain activities may increase health compromising behaviours, such as tobacco smoking. A limited range of leisure activities has been studied, with little research on out-of-school settings where parental supervision is a potential protective factor. Tobacco smoking is an important, potentially modifiable health determinant, so understanding associations between adolescent leisure activities, parental monitoring, demographic factors and daily smoking may inform preventive strategies. These associations are reported for a New Zealand adolescent sample. Methods Randomly selected schools (n = 145) participated in the 2006 Youth In-depth Survey, a national, biennial study of Year 10 students (predominantly 14-15 years). School classes were randomly selected and students completed a self-report questionnaire in class time. Adjustment for clustering at the school level was included in all analyses. Since parental monitoring and demographic variables potentially confound relations between adolescent leisure activities and smoking, variables were screened before multivariable modelling. Given prior indications of demographic differences, gender and ethnic specific regression models were built. Results and Discussion Overall, 8.5% of the 3,161 students were daily smokers, including more females (10.5%) than males (6.5%). In gender and ethnic specific multivariate analysis of associations with daily smoking (adjusted for age, school socioeconomic decile rating, leisure activities and ethnicity or gender, respectively), parental monitoring exhibited a consistently protective, dose response effect, although less strongly among Māori. Attending a place of worship and going to the movies were protective for non-Māori, as was watching sports, whereas playing team sport was protective for all, except males. Attending a skate park was a risk factor for females and Māori which

  9. Adolescent perceptions of alcohol risk: variation by sex, race, student activity levels and parental communication.

    PubMed

    Denham, Bryan E

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on data gathered from adolescents (N = 18,991) in the 2011 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), this study examined the effects of sex and race, as well as measures of student activity levels and frequency of recognition from parents, on perceptions of the risks associated with binge drinking. Overall, female, Black, Asian, and Hispanic adolescents, as well as individuals who indicated belonging to more than one race, perceived higher levels of risk. Male, White, and Native American/Alaskan/Pacific Islander respondents perceived lower risk levels. In addition, those who participated the most in school and community activities, as well as those who received more frequent recognition from parents, estimated higher levels of risk associated with binge drinking.

  10. Parental influences on 7–9 year olds’ physical activity: A conceptual model

    PubMed Central

    Leary, Janie M.; Lilly, Christa L.; Dino, Geri; Loprinzi, Paul D.; Cottrell, Lesley

    2016-01-01

    Objective Models characterizing parental influence on child and adolescent physical activity (PA) over time are limited. Preschool and Adolescent Models (PM and AM) of PA are available leaving the need to focus on elementary-aged children. We tested current models (PM and AM) with a sample of 7–9 year-olds, and then developed a model appropriate to this specific target population. Methods Parent–child dyads completed questionnaires in 2010–2011. All models were assessed using path analysis and model fit indices. Results For adequate power, 90 families were needed, with 174 dyads participating. PM and AM exhibited poor fit when applied to the study population. A gender-specific model was developed and demonstrated acceptable fit. To develop an acceptable model for this population, constructs from both the PM (i.e. parental perception of child competency) and AM (i.e., child-reported self-efficacy) were used. For boys, self-efficacy was a strong predictor of PA, which was influenced by various parental variables. For girls, parental PA demonstrated the greatest strength of association with child PA. Conclusion This new model can be used to promote PA and guide future research/interventions. Future studies, particularly longitudinal designs, are needed to confirm the utility of this model as a bridge between currently available models. PMID:23438761

  11. Developmental patterns and parental correlates of youth leisure-time physical activity.

    PubMed

    Lam, Chun Bun; McHale, Susan M

    2015-02-01

    This study examined the developmental patterns and parental correlates of youth leisure-time physical activity from middle childhood through adolescence. On 5 occasions across 7 years, fathers, mothers, and children who were first- and second born from 201 European American, working- and middle-class families participated in home and multiple nightly phone interviews. Multilevel modeling revealed that, controlling for family socioeconomic status, neighborhood characteristics, and youth overweight status and physical health, leisure-time physical activity increased during middle childhood and declined across adolescence, and the decline was more pronounced for girls than for boys. Moreover, controlling for time-varying, parental work hours and youth interest in sports and outdoor activities, on occasions when fathers and mothers spent proportionally more time on these activities with youth than usual, youth also spent more total time on these activities than usual. The within-person association between mother-youth joint involvement and youth's total involvement in leisure-time physical activity reached statistical significance at the transition to adolescence, and became stronger over time. Findings highlight the importance of maintaining adolescents', especially girls', physical activity levels and targeting both fathers' and mothers' involvement to promote youth's physical activity.

  12. Parent-child leisure activities and cultural capital in the United Kingdom: The gendered effects of education and social class.

    PubMed

    Gracia, Pablo

    2015-07-01

    This article uses data on couples from the 2000 UK Time Use Survey (N=610) to analyze how social position influences parents' leisure activities with children. The study is the first using representative data to investigate this fundamental question to understand social inequalities in family life and children's life chances. Results reveal that social position intersects with gender in influencing parent-child leisure activities with implications on children's cultural capital. Three are the main findings: (1) social position has significant positive effects on cultural activities with children and negative on parent-child television watching among mothers, but moderate differences are observed for fathers; (2) father-child leisure is strongly influenced by the spouse's social position, but not mother-child leisure; (3) education and social class show complex differences in affecting parent-child leisure, suggesting that future studies should include these two variables when analyzing parent-child time and family life.

  13. Physical activity and beverage consumption in preschoolers: focus groups with parents and teachers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Qualitative research is a method in which new ideas and strategies can be discovered. This qualitative study aimed to investigate parents’ and teachers’ opinions on physical activity and beverage consumption of preschool children. Through separate, independent focus groups, they expressed their perceptions on children’s current physical activity and beverage consumption levels, factors that influence and enhance these behaviours, and anticipated barriers to making changes. Methods Multi-cultural and multi-geographical focus groups were carried out in six European countries (Belgium, Bulgaria, Germany, Greece, Poland and Spain). In total, twenty-four focus groups with 122 parents and eighteen focus groups with 87 teachers were conducted between October 2010 and January 2011. Based on a semi-structured interview guide, questions on preschoolers’ physical activity (opinions on preschoolers’ physical activity, how to increase physical activity, facilitators and barriers of physical activity) and beverage consumption (rules and policies, factors influencing promotion of healthy drinking, recommendations for future intervention development) were asked. The information was analyzed using qualitative data analysis software (NVivo8). Results The focus group results indicated misperceptions of caregivers on preschoolers’ physical activity and beverage consumption levels. Caregivers perceived preschoolers as sufficiently active; they argue that children need to learn to sit still in preparation for primary school. At most preschools, children can drink only water. In some preschools sugar-sweetened beverages like chocolate milk or fruit juices, are also allowed. It was mentioned that sugar-sweetened beverages can be healthy due to mineral and vitamin content, although according to parents their daily intake is limited. These opinions resulted in low perceived needs to change behaviours. Conclusions Although previous research shows need of change in

  14. Mothers' and Fathers' Involvement in Home Activities with Their Children: Psychosocial Factors and the Role of Parental Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giallo, Rebecca; Treyvaud, Karli; Cooklin, Amanda; Wade, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Parent involvement in play, learning, and everyday home activities is important for promoting children's cognitive and language development. The aims of the study were to (a) examine differences between mothers' and fathers' self-reported involvement with their children, (b) explore the relationship between child, parent and family factors, and…

  15. BMI and Attitudes and Beliefs about Physical Activity and Nutrition of Parents of Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, V. A.; Shacter, S. D.; Johnson, P. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was: (1) to evaluate the beliefs, attitudes and behaviours associated with nutrition and physical activity of parents with adolescents with intellectual disabilities (ID); (2) to determine if these variables related to the body mass index (BMI) of the adolescents and the parents' BMI; and (3) to investigate if…

  16. Effects of Parental Depressive Symptoms on Child Adjustment Moderated by Hypothalamic Pituitary Adrenal Activity: Within- and between-Family Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurent, Heidemarie K.; Leve, Leslie D.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Natsuaki, Misaki N.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Fisher, Philip A.; Marceau, Kristine; Harold, Gordon T.; Reiss, David

    2013-01-01

    Child hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) activity was investigated as a moderator of parental depressive symptom effects on child behavior in an adoption sample ("n" = 210 families). Adoptive parents' depressive symptoms and child internalizing and externalizing were assessed at 18, 27, and 54 months, and child morning and evening HPA activity…

  17. Communication and informed consent in elderly people.

    PubMed

    Giampieri, M

    2012-02-01

    Physician-patient relationship is the key-point for an optimal management of any medical procedure. Before performing any diagnostic or therapeutic procedure, clinical communication with patients is necessary. It should regard the nature and purpose of a proposed procedure including potential risks and benefits. During physician-patient communication, alternatives, as well as the risks and benefits of not receiving or undergoing a procedure should also be disclosed. Thus, a complete physician-patient clinical communication is the basis of "shared decision-making" and plays a clinical-therapeutic role in the informed consent process in order to improve patient care. Informed consent is a delicate process of communication between a patient and physician necessary for patient authorization for any medical intervention. The success of achieving good informed consent procedure depends on the strength of the relationship between the doctor and the patient. For this reason, the traditional paternalistic relationship, in which decisions were made by the doctor, is no longer appropriate. Therefore, the use of a model which allows for a greater patient involvement in the decision making process is fundamental. This approach allows for a clearer impact on patient values. The aspects of the procedure related to these values, combined with the technical and scientific considerations of the doctor, are the basis of a shared decision making process, in which the patient is actively involved. Therefore, an informed consent is not simply the acquisition of the patient's signature, but a real process based on the dialogue between doctor and patient. This dialogue is particularly delicate in some circumstances, such as geriatric medicine and anesthesiology. Seeking consent is part of a respectful relationship with an older person. Adults are almost always considered capable of making personal healthcare decisions. Older adults should also be considered capable of handling their own

  18. Sources of Water and Aqueous Activity on the Chondrite Parent Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krot, A. N.; Nagashima, K.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Ciesla, F. J.; Fujiya, W.; Bonal, L.

    Most chondrite parent bodies accreted water ice together with anhydrous minerals and subsequently experienced aqueous/hydrothermal alteration and fluid-assisted thermal metamorphism, resulting in formation of a diverse suite of secondary minerals. The 53Mn-53Cr chronology of datable secondary minerals indicates aqueous activity on the ordinary (OC) and carbonaceous chondrite (CC) parent bodies started ~3-5 m.y. after the beginning of the solar system formation (t0), consistent with 26Al being the major heat source of these bodies. The 53Mn-53Cr ages of aqueous alteration, the 26Al-26Mg ages of chondrule formation, and the peak metamorphic temperatures reached by the OC and CC parent bodies suggest that they accreted ~2.0-4 m.y. after t0. There are significant variations in the degree of aqueous alteration within and between different chondrite groups, possibly due to the heterogeneous distribution of water ice in their parent bodies. The CI (Ivuna-type) carbonaceous chondrites that are composed almost entirely of aqueously formed minerals are the only exception. The estimated water ice-to-rock mass ratios in OC and CC parent bodies range from <0.1 to ~0.6 (could be higher in CIs), which is significantly lower than the solar value of 1.2. We suggest that most chondrite parent bodies accreted close to the snow line; CIs may have accreted further away from the Sun than other chondrite groups. Because the snow line for the 2.5‒4-m.y.-old disk is expected to be within 2‒3 AU of the Sun, we conclude that chondrite parent bodies are sampled by meteorites accreted in the main asteroid belt, consistent with the inferred deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) ratio of asteroidal water. The existing meteorite observations provide no clear evidence supporting the predictions of the Grand Tack and Nice dynamical models of the solar system evolution, wherein hydrated asteroids formed between and beyond giant planets and were subsequently implanted into the main asteroid belt during

  19. Social Influences and the Physical Activity Intentions of Parents of Young-Children Families: An Extended Theory of Planned Behavior Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Kyra; White, Katherine M.

    2012-01-01

    Evidence within Australia and internationally suggests parenthood as a risk factor for inactivity; however, research into understanding parental physical activity is scarce. Given that active parents can create active families and social factors are important for parents' decision making, the authors investigated a range of social influences on…

  20. Consent and the Indian medical practitioner

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ajay; Mullick, Parul; Prakash, Smita; Bharadwaj, Aseem

    2015-01-01

    Consent is a legal requirement of medical practice and not a procedural formality. Getting a mere signature on a form is no consent. If a patient is rushed into signing consent, without giving sufficient information, the consent may be invalid, despite the signature. Often medical professionals either ignore or are ignorant of the requirements of a valid consent and its legal implications. Instances where either consent was not taken or when an invalid consent was obtained have been a subject matter of judicial scrutiny in several medical malpractice cases. This article highlights the essential principles of consent and the Indian law related to it along with some citations, so that medical practitioners are not only able to safeguard themselves against litigations and unnecessary harassment but can act rightfully. PMID:26755833

  1. 49 CFR 1503.423 - Consent orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Assessment of Civil Penalties by TSA § 1503.423 Consent orders. (a) Issuance. At any time before the issuance..., may agree to dispose of the case by the issuance of a consent order by TSA. (b) Contents. A...

  2. Assessing the Validity of a Physical Activity Questionnaire Developed for Parents of Preschool Children in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Bacardi-Gascón, Montserrat; Reveles-Rojas, Claudia; Woodward-Lopez, Gail; Crawford, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    To assess the validity of a questionnaire developed for parents of preschool children to know their physical activity (PA) status, we compared the questionnaire results with the measures of accelerometer for children's activities. Thirty-five preschoolers who wore the accelerometer for at least 10 hours daily on 3 weekdays and one weekend day were included in the analyses. Time spent in activities of varied intensity was calculated by applying 15-second ActiGraph count cutoffs (ACC). Parents’ perceptions of their children's PA were associated with the percentage of vigorous and moderate physical activity recorded with ACC at r=0.62 (p=0.0001). An association was shown between the percentage of a child's time spent in vigorous physical activity, as reported by parents, with that measured by ACC at r=0.53 (p=0.001). Results of this study suggest that the designed questionnaire might be a useful tool for assessing children's activity while, additionally, it warrants further investigation on larger samples of children. PMID:23304910

  3. Language Interpretation, Parent Participation, and Young Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheatham, Gregory A.

    2011-01-01

    Spoken parent-educator interactions through language interpreters for parents who do not speak English can challenge early intervention/early childhood special education professionals. Research suggests that language interpretation is often inadequate to ensure that the parental participation, informed parental consent, and interpretation mandates…

  4. Early aqueous activity on the ordinary and carbonaceous chondrite parent bodies recorded by fayalite

    DOE PAGES

    Doyle, Patricia M.; Jogo, Kaori; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N.; Wakita, Shigeru; Ciesla, Fred J.; Hutcheon, Ian D.

    2015-06-23

    Here, chronology of aqueous activity on chondrite parent bodies constrains their accretion times and thermal histories. Radiometric 53Mn–53Cr dating has been successfully applied to aqueously formed carbonates in CM carbonaceous chondrites. Owing to the absence of carbonates in ordinary (H, L and LL), and CV and CO carbonaceous chondrites, and the lack of proper standards, there are no reliable ages of aqueous activity on their parent bodies. Here we report the first 53Mn–53Cr ages of aqueously formed fayalite in the L3 chondrite Elephant Moraine 90161 as 2.4 +1.8-1.3 Myr after calcium–aluminium-rich inclusions (CAIs), the oldest Solar System solids. In addition,more » measurements using our synthesized fayalite standard show that fayalite in the CV3 chondrite Asuka 881317 and CO3-like chondrite MacAlpine Hills 88107 formed and 4.2+0.8-0.7 Myr after CAIs, respectively. Thermal modelling, combined with the inferred conditions (temperature and water/rock ratio) and 53Mn–53Cr ages of aqueous alteration, suggests accretion of the L, CV and CO parent bodies ~1.8–2.5 Myr after CAIs.« less

  5. Early aqueous activity on the ordinary and carbonaceous chondrite parent bodies recorded by fayalite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Patricia M.; Jogo, Kaori; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N.; Wakita, Shigeru; Ciesla, Fred J.; Hutcheon, Ian D.

    2015-06-01

    Chronology of aqueous activity on chondrite parent bodies constrains their accretion times and thermal histories. Radiometric 53Mn-53Cr dating has been successfully applied to aqueously formed carbonates in CM carbonaceous chondrites. Owing to the absence of carbonates in ordinary (H, L and LL), and CV and CO carbonaceous chondrites, and the lack of proper standards, there are no reliable ages of aqueous activity on their parent bodies. Here we report the first 53Mn-53Cr ages of aqueously formed fayalite in the L3 chondrite Elephant Moraine 90161 as Myr after calcium-aluminium-rich inclusions (CAIs), the oldest Solar System solids. In addition, measurements using our synthesized fayalite standard show that fayalite in the CV3 chondrite Asuka 881317 and CO3-like chondrite MacAlpine Hills 88107 formed and Myr after CAIs, respectively. Thermal modelling, combined with the inferred conditions (temperature and water/rock ratio) and 53Mn-53Cr ages of aqueous alteration, suggests accretion of the L, CV and CO parent bodies ~1.8-2.5 Myr after CAIs.

  6. Early aqueous activity on the ordinary and carbonaceous chondrite parent bodies recorded by fayalite.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Patricia M; Jogo, Kaori; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N; Wakita, Shigeru; Ciesla, Fred J; Hutcheon, Ian D

    2015-01-01

    Chronology of aqueous activity on chondrite parent bodies constrains their accretion times and thermal histories. Radiometric (53)Mn-(53)Cr dating has been successfully applied to aqueously formed carbonates in CM carbonaceous chondrites. Owing to the absence of carbonates in ordinary (H, L and LL), and CV and CO carbonaceous chondrites, and the lack of proper standards, there are no reliable ages of aqueous activity on their parent bodies. Here we report the first (53)Mn-(53)Cr ages of aqueously formed fayalite in the L3 chondrite Elephant Moraine 90161 as Myr after calcium-aluminium-rich inclusions (CAIs), the oldest Solar System solids. In addition, measurements using our synthesized fayalite standard show that fayalite in the CV3 chondrite Asuka 881317 and CO3-like chondrite MacAlpine Hills 88107 formed and Myr after CAIs, respectively. Thermal modelling, combined with the inferred conditions (temperature and water/rock ratio) and (53)Mn-(53)Cr ages of aqueous alteration, suggests accretion of the L, CV and CO parent bodies ∼1.8-2.5 Myr after CAIs. PMID:26100451

  7. Parents' and children's perceptions of active video games: a focus group study.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Robyn; Maddison, Ralph; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona; Jull, Andrew; Meagher-Lundberg, Patricia; Widdowson, Deborah

    2010-06-01

    Energy expenditure studies have shown that playing Active Video Games (AVGs) is positively associated with increases in heart rate and oxygen consumption. It is proposed that playing AVGs may be a useful means of addressing inactivity and obesity in children. This study explored children's and parents' perceptions of AVGs and the likely facilitators and barriers to sustained use of AVGs. Data were gathered using focus group interviews: seven with children, four with adults. Both children and parents reported that AVGs offered a way to increase activity and improve fitness. Barriers to sustained engagement, according to parents, were the cost of AVGs and lack of space in the home to play the games. According to children, the likelihood of long-term engagement with AVGs depended on game content and child age, with AVGs being seen as more appropriate for younger children than teenagers. It would appear that there is potential for AVGs to reduce inactivity in young people. However, barriers to widespread, sustainable adoption would need to be addressed if this potential is to be realized.

  8. Early aqueous activity on the ordinary and carbonaceous chondrite parent bodies recorded by fayalite

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Patricia M.; Jogo, Kaori; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N.; Wakita, Shigeru; Ciesla, Fred J.; Hutcheon, Ian D.

    2015-06-23

    Here, chronology of aqueous activity on chondrite parent bodies constrains their accretion times and thermal histories. Radiometric 53Mn–53Cr dating has been successfully applied to aqueously formed carbonates in CM carbonaceous chondrites. Owing to the absence of carbonates in ordinary (H, L and LL), and CV and CO carbonaceous chondrites, and the lack of proper standards, there are no reliable ages of aqueous activity on their parent bodies. Here we report the first 53Mn–53Cr ages of aqueously formed fayalite in the L3 chondrite Elephant Moraine 90161 as 2.4 +1.8-1.3 Myr after calcium–aluminium-rich inclusions (CAIs), the oldest Solar System solids. In addition, measurements using our synthesized fayalite standard show that fayalite in the CV3 chondrite Asuka 881317 and CO3-like chondrite MacAlpine Hills 88107 formed and 4.2+0.8-0.7 Myr after CAIs, respectively. Thermal modelling, combined with the inferred conditions (temperature and water/rock ratio) and 53Mn–53Cr ages of aqueous alteration, suggests accretion of the L, CV and CO parent bodies ~1.8–2.5 Myr after CAIs.

  9. Perceptions of Equine Assisted Activities and Therapies by Parents and Children with Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lemke, Danielle; Rothwell, Erin; Newcomb, Tara M.; Swoboda, Kathryn J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To identify the physical and psychosocial effects of equine assisted activities and therapies (EAAT) on children with Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) from the perspective of the child and their parents. Methods The families of all eligible children with SMA, who reported participation in EAAT, from a western metropolitan academic center were contacted and invited to participate. This study implemented qualitative, semi-structured interviews of children with SMA and their parents. Results Three themes emerged from the qualitative content analysis: physical/psychosocial benefits; relationship development with the horses, instructors, and children; and barriers to continued EAAT engagement. Conclusions The data suggest the overall EAAT experience was a source of enjoyment, self-confidence, and normalcy for the children with SMA. The results of this study provide preliminary support for the use of EAAT among children with SMA. PMID:24675128

  10. 48 CFR 2944.203 - Consent limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Consent limitations. 2944.203 Section 2944.203 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF LABOR CONTRACT MANAGEMENT SUBCONTRACTING POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Consent To Subcontract 2944.203 Consent limitations. Any...

  11. Management by Consent. Occasional Paper 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handy, C.

    The concept of management by consent is examined in an assessment of management techniques within academe. Issues that are analyzed include what is involved in an organization of consent and factors heralding the organizations of consent, such as (1) the view of management as a semi-profession, and (2) the spread of "matrism," which is optimistic…

  12. 10 CFR 706.11 - Consent elections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Consent elections. 706.11 Section 706.11 Energy DEPARTMENT... and Procedures in National Labor Relations Board Proceedings § 706.11 Consent elections. In accordance... determine bargaining units and representatives by agreement and consent elections in preference to...

  13. 10 CFR 706.11 - Consent elections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Consent elections. 706.11 Section 706.11 Energy DEPARTMENT... and Procedures in National Labor Relations Board Proceedings § 706.11 Consent elections. In accordance... determine bargaining units and representatives by agreement and consent elections in preference to...

  14. 10 CFR 706.11 - Consent elections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Consent elections. 706.11 Section 706.11 Energy DEPARTMENT... and Procedures in National Labor Relations Board Proceedings § 706.11 Consent elections. In accordance... determine bargaining units and representatives by agreement and consent elections in preference to...

  15. 10 CFR 706.11 - Consent elections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Consent elections. 706.11 Section 706.11 Energy DEPARTMENT... and Procedures in National Labor Relations Board Proceedings § 706.11 Consent elections. In accordance... determine bargaining units and representatives by agreement and consent elections in preference to...

  16. 10 CFR 706.11 - Consent elections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Consent elections. 706.11 Section 706.11 Energy DEPARTMENT... and Procedures in National Labor Relations Board Proceedings § 706.11 Consent elections. In accordance... determine bargaining units and representatives by agreement and consent elections in preference to...

  17. 32 CFR 634.8 - Implied consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION Driving Privileges § 634.8 Implied consent. (a) Implied consent... physical control of a motor vehicle on military installations to determine the influence of intoxicants. (b) Implied consent to impoundment. Any person granted the privilege to operate or register a motor vehicle...

  18. 12 CFR 347.119 - Specific consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Specific consent. 347.119 Section 347.119 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.119 Specific consent. General consent and expedited processing under this subpart...

  19. 12 CFR 347.117 - General consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General consent. 347.117 Section 347.117 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.117 General consent. (a) General consent to establish or relocate a foreign...

  20. Potential Effect of Physical Activity Calorie Equivalent Labeling on Parent Fast Food Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Antonelli, Ray

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Menu labels displaying food energy in physical activity calorie equivalents (PACE) is a possible strategy to encourage ordering meals with fewer calories and promoting physical activity. Potential effects of such labeling for children have never been examined. METHODS: We conducted a national survey of 1000 parents randomized to 1 of 4 fast food menus: no labels, calories only, calories plus minutes, or calories plus miles needed to walk to burn the calories. Respondents were asked to imagine they were in a fast food restaurant and place an order for their child. At the survey’s conclusion, all respondents were shown a calorie-only label and both PACE labels and asked to rate the likelihood each label would influence them to encourage their child to exercise. RESULTS: We excluded respondents whose meals totaled 0 calories or >4000 calories, leaving 823 parents in the analysis. The mean age of the child for whom the meal was “ordered” was 9.5 years. Parents whose menus displayed no label ordered an average of 1294 calories, whereas those shown calories only, calories plus minutes, or calories plus miles ordered 1066, 1060, and 1099 calories, respectively (P = .0001). Only 20% of parents reported that calories-only labeling would be “very likely” to prompt them to encourage their children to exercise versus 38% for calories plus minutes (P < .0001) and 37% for calories plus miles (P < .0001). CONCLUSIONS: PACE labeling may influence parents’ decisions on what fast food items to order for their children and encourage them to get their children to exercise. PMID:25624379

  1. 18 CFR 3b.225 - Written consent for disclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Written consent for disclosure. 3b.225 Section 3b.225 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... United States for a civil or criminal law enforcement activity if the activity is authorized by law,...

  2. 18 CFR 3b.225 - Written consent for disclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Written consent for disclosure. 3b.225 Section 3b.225 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... United States for a civil or criminal law enforcement activity if the activity is authorized by law,...

  3. Maternal and paternal parenting practices and their influence on children's adiposity, screen-time, diet and physical activity.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Adam B; Lubans, David R; Plotnikoff, Ronald C; Collins, Clare E; Morgan, Philip J

    2014-08-01

    The primary aim of this study was to examine a range of potential behavioral and maternal/paternal correlates of adiposity in children. Secondary aims were to examine (a) correlates of screen-time, diet and physical activity and (b) if there were differences in maternal and paternal physical activity- and dietary-related parenting practices. Cross-sectional analysis was conducted using 70 families with children (59% boys (41/70), mean age 8.4 (±2.4) years). Parenting practices were measured using the Parenting Strategies for Eating and Activity Scale. Children's outcomes included: 7-day pedometry (physical activity), screen-time, percent energy from core foods (Food frequency questionnaire) and BMI z-score. Multiple regression models were generated to examine the associations between maternal and paternal parenting practices and children's variables. In the regression analyses, fathers' BMI (p < .01) and mothers' control (p < .001) were significantly associated with child weight status. Fathers' reinforcement (p < .01) was significantly associated with child physical activity. For screen-time, mothers' monitoring (p < .001) and child characteristics [age (p = .01), sex (p = .01), BMI z-score (p = .03)] were significant predictors. Mothers' parenting practices [limit setting (p = .01), reinforcement (p = .02)] and child screen-time (p = .02) were significantly associated with intake of core foods. Despite some similarities within families, three out of five parenting constructs were significantly different between mothers and fathers. Mothers and fathers have different parental influences on their children's weight status and lifestyle behaviors and both should be included in lifestyle interventions targeting children. A focus on maternal parenting specifically relating to screen-time and diet, and father's physical activity parenting and weight status may support their children in developing more healthy behaviors.

  4. Dyadic Adjustment and Spiritual Activities in Parents of Children with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Grossoehme, Daniel H.; Szczesniak, Rhonda; Dodd, Caitlin; Opipari-Arrigan, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Children’s diseases can negatively impact marital adjustment and contribute to poorer child health outcomes. To cope with increased marital stress and childhood diseases severity, many people turn to spirituality. While most studies show a positive relationship between spirituality and marital adjustment, spirituality has typically been measured only in terms of individual behaviors. Using the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS) and Daily Phone Diary data from a sample of 126 parents of children with cystic fibrosis as a context for increased marital stress, spiritual behavior of mother-father dyads and of whole families were used as predictors of marital adjustment. Frequency and duration of individual, dyadic and familial spiritual activities correlated positively with dyadic adjustment. Significant differences in spiritual activities existed between couples with marital adjustment scores above and below the cutoff for distress. The only significant factors in regressions of spiritual activities on marital adjustment scores were number of pulmonary exacerbations and parent age. Higher odds of maintaining a marital adjustment score greater than 100 were significantly associated with spending approximately twelve minutes per day in individual, but not conjugal or familial, spiritual activities. The Daily Phone Diary is a feasible tool to study conjugal and familial activities and their relationships with beliefs and attitudes, including spirituality. PMID:26900486

  5. Why we should not seek individual informed consent for participation in health services research

    PubMed Central

    Cassell, J; Young, A

    2002-01-01

    Ethics committees now require that individuals give informed consent to much health services research, in the same way as for clinical research. This is misguided. Existing ethical guidelines do not help us decide how to seek consent in these cases, and have allowed managerial experimentation to remain largely unchecked. Inappropriate requirements for individual consent can institutionalise health inequalities and reduce access to services for vulnerable groups. This undermines the fundamental purpose of the National Health Service (NHS), and ignores our rights and duties as its members, explored here. Alternative forms of community consent should be actively pursued. PMID:12356960

  6. Why we should not seek individual informed consent for participation in health services research.

    PubMed

    Cassell, J; Young, A

    2002-10-01

    Ethics committees now require that individuals give informed consent to much health services research, in the same way as for clinical research. This is misguided. Existing ethical guidelines do not help us decide how to seek consent in these cases, and have allowed managerial experimentation to remain largely unchecked. Inappropriate requirements for individual consent can institutionalise health inequalities and reduce access to services for vulnerable groups. This undermines the fundamental purpose of the National Health Service (NHS), and ignores our rights and duties as its members, explored here. Alternative forms of community consent should be actively pursued.

  7. Physical activity in young children and their parents-An Early STOPP Sweden-China comparison study.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Elin; Mei, Hong; Xiu, Lijuan; Svensson, Viktoria; Xiong, Yueling; Marcus, Claude; Zhang, Jianduan; Hagströmer, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Understanding about socio-cultural differences in physical activity in children with high and low risk for obesity can help tailor intervention programs in different settings. This study aimed to compare objectively measured physical activity in two-year-olds and their parents, living in Stockholm, Sweden, and Wuhan, China. Data from Early STOPP was used. Children and parents wore an accelerometer in connection with the child's second birthday. Weekly and hourly patterns were examined. Correlation between child and parental physical activity was assessed. Data on 146 Swedish and 79 Chinese children and their parents was available. Children, mothers and fathers in Stockholm were significantly more active than their counterparts in Wuhan (children; 2989 (SD 702) vs. 1997 (SD 899) counts per minute (CPM), mothers 2625 (SD 752) vs. 2042 (SD 821) CPM; fathers 2233 (SD 749) vs. 1588 (SD 754) CPM). Activity levels were similar over a week for children and parents within both countries. No parental-child correlations, except for a paternal-son correlation in Stockholm, were found. Children, mothers and fathers in Stockholm are more active compared with their counterparts in Wuhan. Interventions to increase physical activity needs to take cultural aspects into account, also when targeting very young children. PMID:27404563

  8. Psychometrics of the preschooler physical activity parenting practices instrument among a Latino sample

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Latino preschoolers (3-5 year old children) have among the highest rates of obesity. Low levels of physical activity (PA) are a risk factor for obesity. Characterizing what Latino parents do to encourage or discourage their preschooler to be physically active can help inform interventions to increase their PA. The objective was therefore to develop and assess the psychometrics of a new instrument: the Preschooler Physical Activity Parenting Practices (PPAPP) among a Latino sample, to assess parenting practices used to encourage or discourage PA among preschool-aged children. Methods Cross-sectional study of 240 Latino parents who reported the frequency of using PA parenting practices. 95% of respondents were mothers; 42% had more than a high school education. Child mean age was 4.5 (±0.9) years (52% male). Test-retest reliability was assessed in 20%, 2 weeks later. We assessed the fit of a priori models using Confirmatory factor analyses (CFA). In a separate sub-sample (35%), preschool-aged children wore accelerometers to assess associations with their PA and PPAPP subscales. Results The a-priori models showed poor fit to the data. A modified factor structure for encouraging PPAPP had one multiple-item scale: engagement (15 items), and two single-items (have outdoor toys; not enroll in sport-reverse coded). The final factor structure for discouraging PPAPP had 4 subscales: promote inactive transport (3 items), promote screen time (3 items), psychological control (4 items) and restricting for safety (4 items). Test-retest reliability (ICC) for the two scales ranged from 0.56-0.85. Cronbach’s alphas ranged from 0.5-0.9. Several sub-factors correlated in the expected direction with children’s objectively measured PA. Conclusion The final models for encouraging and discouraging PPAPP had moderate to good fit, with moderate to excellent test-retest reliabilities. The PPAPP should be further evaluated to better assess its associations with children’s PA

  9. Parental encouragement is positively associated with outdoor active play outside of school hours among 7–12 year olds

    PubMed Central

    Ferrao, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background. Physical activity is important for children’s physical, mental, and social well-being. Outdoor active play is an important yet unstudied domain of children’s physical activity. The objective of this study was to determine if parental encouragement is associated with the frequency that children engage in outdoor active play outside of school hours. Methods. Participants consisted of 514 children aged 7–12 years and one of their parents. Parents completed a survey that included four questions that assessed how frequently they used verbal cues to encourage their child to play outdoors. Points were assigned to each response and averaged across the 4 questions, and based on this average participants were assigned to quintiles. The survey included seven questions that asked parents to assess how frequently their child played outdoors outside of school hours. Points were assigned to each response and summed to create an active outdoor play frequency score. General linear models assessed associations between parental encouragement and outdoor play while controlling for individual, family, and neighborhood covariates. Results. The mean outdoor active play frequency score increased significantly across quintiles of the parental encouragement score as follows: 6.0 (standard error = 0.7) in quintile 1, 9.8 (0.6) in quintile 2, 11.4 (0.6) in quintile 3, 16.2 (0.9) in quintile 4, and 23.3 (1.3) in quintile 5. After adjusting for covariates, the mean outdoor active play frequency score was almost three times higher in the highest parental encouragement quintile than in the lowest quintile (20.4 vs. 7.8). Conclusions. Parents use of verbal cues to encourage their children to play outdoors was independently associated with outdoor active play among 7–12 year olds. PMID:26644990

  10. Parental encouragement is positively associated with outdoor active play outside of school hours among 7-12 year olds.

    PubMed

    Ferrao, Thomas; Janssen, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Background. Physical activity is important for children's physical, mental, and social well-being. Outdoor active play is an important yet unstudied domain of children's physical activity. The objective of this study was to determine if parental encouragement is associated with the frequency that children engage in outdoor active play outside of school hours. Methods. Participants consisted of 514 children aged 7-12 years and one of their parents. Parents completed a survey that included four questions that assessed how frequently they used verbal cues to encourage their child to play outdoors. Points were assigned to each response and averaged across the 4 questions, and based on this average participants were assigned to quintiles. The survey included seven questions that asked parents to assess how frequently their child played outdoors outside of school hours. Points were assigned to each response and summed to create an active outdoor play frequency score. General linear models assessed associations between parental encouragement and outdoor play while controlling for individual, family, and neighborhood covariates. Results. The mean outdoor active play frequency score increased significantly across quintiles of the parental encouragement score as follows: 6.0 (standard error = 0.7) in quintile 1, 9.8 (0.6) in quintile 2, 11.4 (0.6) in quintile 3, 16.2 (0.9) in quintile 4, and 23.3 (1.3) in quintile 5. After adjusting for covariates, the mean outdoor active play frequency score was almost three times higher in the highest parental encouragement quintile than in the lowest quintile (20.4 vs. 7.8). Conclusions. Parents use of verbal cues to encourage their children to play outdoors was independently associated with outdoor active play among 7-12 year olds. PMID:26644990

  11. Pediatric consent: case study analysis using a principles approach.

    PubMed

    Azotam, Adaorah N U

    2012-07-01

    This article will explore pediatric consent through the analysis of a clinical case study using the principles of biomedical ethics approach. Application of the principles of autonomy, nonmaleficence, beneficence, and justice will be dissected in order to attempt to establish resolution of the ethical dilemma. The main conflict in this case study deals with whether the wishes of an adolescent for end-of-life care should be followed or should the desire of his parents outweigh this request. In terminal cancer, the hope of early palliative care and dignity in dying serve as priorities in therapy. Application of the moral principles to both sides of the dilemma aided in providing an objective resolution to uphold pediatric consent. PMID:22753459

  12. [Informed consent in clinical practice and medical research].

    PubMed

    Santillan-Doherty, Patricio; Cabral-Castañeda, Antonio; Soto-Ramírez, Luis

    2003-01-01

    The present paper deals with the basic aspects, influences and elements that constitute Informed Consent seeing it as a process and not only as an administrative format. Both the patient-physician relationship, as well as the research subject-investigator relationship, should be seen in the same manner, in spite of recognizing specific objectives for each one. For this reason, Informed Consent should not be different regarding both clinical as well as research activities. The patient-physician relationship presents a disbalance of power within the relationship in favor of the physician; this adds to the moral considerations that take place within both participants. Informed Consent should be defined in a broad sense as all those actions that promote a process of communication and dialogue which facilitates a person in order to make decisions with respect of an action, practice or product that have an impact on his/her body, intimacy or other vital spaces. Informed Consent has influences that originate in basic bioethical principles (autonomy, beneficience, non-maleficence, justice), professional and international declarations (Hippocratic Oath, Declaration of Helsinki), as well as legal considerations pertinent to each country. In our country legality emmanates from the General Health Law which, unfortunately, only contemplates Informed Consent as part of the relation established in clinical research. However, the Official Medican Norm on the Clinical Record establishes the conditions where Informed Consent must be obtained during clinical as well as research activities. Primary components of Informed Consent (revelation, capacity to understand and voluntariness), can be better understood when divided into several elements: information, voluntariness, risks and benefits, confidentiality, return of information, utility of the process and management of fragility. Informed Consent should be legally instrumented in an explicit written manner (administrative formats

  13. Changing constructions of informed consent: qualitative research and complex social worlds.

    PubMed

    Miller, Tina; Boulton, Mary

    2007-12-01

    Informed consent is a concept which attempts to capture and convey what is regarded as the appropriate relationship between researcher and research participant. Definitions have traditionally emphasised respect for autonomy and the right to self-determination of the individual. However, the meaning of informed consent and the values on which it is based are grounded in society and the practicalities of social relationships. As society changes, so too do the meaning and practice of informed consent. In this paper, we trace the ways in which the meaning and practice of informed consent has changed over the last 35 years with reference to four qualitative studies of parenting and children in the UK which we have undertaken at different points in our research careers. We focus in particular on the shifting boundaries between the professional and personal, and changing expressions of agency and power in a context of heightened perceptions of risk in everyday life. We also discuss developments in information and communication technologies as a factor in changing both the formal requirements for and the situated practicalities of obtaining informed consent. We conclude by considering the implications for informed consent of both increasing bureaucratic regulation and increasingly sophisticated information and communication technologies and suggest strategies for rethinking and managing 'consent' in qualitative research practice.

  14. Rites of consent: negotiating research participation in diverse cultures.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Robert J; Parker, Damon B

    2003-04-01

    The significance of informed consent in research involving humans has been a topic of active debate in the last decade. Much of this debate, we submit, is predicated on an ideology of individualism. We draw on our experiences as anthropologists working in Western and non Western (Iban) health care settings to present ethnographic data derived from diverse scenes in which consent is gained. Employing classical anthropological ritual theory, we subject these observational data to comparative analysis. Our article argues that the individualist assumptions underlying current bioethics guidelines do not have universal applicability, even in Western research settings. This is based on the recognition that the social world is constitutive of personhood in diverse forms, just one of which is individualistic. We submit that greater attention must be paid to the social relations the researcher inevitably engages in when conducting research involving other people, be this in the context of conventional medical research or anthropological field work. We propose, firstly, that the consenting process continues throughout the life of any research project, long after the signature has been secured, and secondly, that both group and individual dimensions of consent, and the sequence in which these dimensions are addressed, should be carefully considered in all cases where consent is sought. PMID:15069953

  15. Does community type moderate the relationship between parent perceptions of the neighborhood and physical activity in children?

    PubMed Central

    Dunton, Genevieve F.; Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Pentz, Mary Ann

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine whether residing in a community designed to promote physical activity moderates the relationship between parent perceptions of the neighborhood and general physical activity or active commuting to school in their children. Design Cross-sectional Setting San Bernardino County, California. Subjects 365 families (one parent and one child in grades 4th-8th). 85 reside in a smart growth community designed to be more conducive to physical activity. Measures Parent perceptions assessed using the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale. General child physical activity measured using accelerometers, and active commuting was self-reported by children. Analysis Two sets of regressions were performed: one for general physical activity, and one for active commuting. Separate models were run in the two sets for each of the 14 NEWS factors, while controlling for demographics. Results For general physical activity, walking infrastructure, lack of cul-de-sacs and social interaction had significant main effect associations (p≤0.05). No factors were moderated by community. The relationships between active commuting to school and perceived crime, traffic hazards, hilliness, physical barriers, cul-de-sac connectivity, aesthetics, and walking infrastructure were significant for those in the smart growth community only (p≤0.05). Conclusions Living in an activity friendly environment is associated with positive relationships between parent perceptions and active commuting behaviors in children. Future interventions should account for both the perceived neighborhood environment and available physical activity infrastructure. PMID:22747320

  16. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR OBTAINING INFORMED CONSENT (SOP-1.13)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The CTEPP informed consent procedures are described in the SOP. After an eligible subject provides verbal consent, staff schedule a visit to meet with the subject in person to explain study activities and answer questions about the study. During the visit, staff demonstrate how...

  17. Built environment characteristics and parent active transportation are associated with active travel to school in youth age 12–15

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Jordan A; Sallis, James F; Kerr, Jacqueline; Conway, Terry L; Cain, Kelli; Frank, Lawrence D; Saelens, Brian E

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the relation of factors from multiple levels of ecological models (ie, individual, interpersonal and environmental) to active travel to/from school in an observational study of young adolescents. Methods Participants were 294 12–15-year olds living within two miles of their school. Demographic, psychosocial and perceived built environment characteristics around the home were measured by survey, and objective built environment factors around home and school were assessed in Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Mixed effects multinomial regression models tested correlates of engaging in 1–4 (vs 0) and 5–10 (vs 0) active trips/week to/from school, adjusted for distance and other covariates. Results 64% of participants reported ≥1 active trip/ week to/from school. Significant correlates of occasional and/or habitual active travel to/from school included barriers (ORs=0.27 and 0.15), parent modelling of active travel (OR=3.27 for habitual), perceived street connectivity (OR=1.78 for occasional), perceived pedestrian safety around home (OR=2.04 for habitual), objective street connectivity around home (OR=0.97 for occasional), objective residential density around home (ORs=1.10 and 1.11) and objective residential density around school (OR=1.14 for habitual). Parent modelling interacted with pedestrian safety in explaining active travel to/from school. Conclusions Results supported multilevel correlates of adolescents active travel to school, consistent with ecological models. Correlates of occasional and habitual active travel to/from school were similar. Built environment attributes around schools, particularly residential density, should be considered when siting new schools and redeveloping neighbourhoods around existing schools. PMID:24659503

  18. The Promotion of Gross and Fine Motor Development for Infants and Toddlers: Developmentally Appropriate Activities for Parents and Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Debra S.

    In recognition of the close relationship between motor skill and cognitive development in the first 2 years of life, this guide presents 78 developmentally appropriate activities that parents and teachers can use to enhance infant and toddler motor development. Activities are categorized by age group as follows: (1) 16 activities for newborn to…

  19. Let Nature Be the Teacher: Seasonal Natural History Activities for Parents and Other Educators To Share with Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gertz, Lucille N.

    This book is designed to provide parents and other adult companions with activities to do with children on outdoor walks. The activities offer adults and children a shared learning experience and have been adapted from the children's education program at Habitat Institute for the Environment (Massachusetts). The activities are arranged seasonally,…

  20. Models of traumatic experiences and children's psychological adjustment: the roles of perceived parenting and the children's own resources and activity.

    PubMed

    Punamäki, R L; Qouta, S; el Sarraj, E

    1997-08-01

    The relations between traumatic events, perceived parenting styles, children's resources, political activity, and psychological adjustment were examined among 108 Palestinian boys and girls of 11-12 years of age. The results showed that exposure to traumatic events increased psychological adjustment problems directly and via 2 mediating paths. First, the more traumatic events children had experienced, the more negative parenting they experienced. And, the poorer they perceived parenting, the more they suffered from high neuroticism and low self-esteem. Second, the more traumatic events children had experienced, the more political activity they showed, and the more active they were, the more they suffered from psychological adjustment problems. Good perceived parenting protected children's psychological adjustment by making them less vulnerable in two ways. First, traumatic events decreased their intellectual, creative, and cognitive resources, and a lack of resources predicted many psychological adjustment problems in a model excluding perceived parenting. Second, political activity increased psychological adjustment problems in the same model, but not in the model including good parenting. PMID:9306648

  1. Low socio-economic environmental determinants of children's physical activity in Coventry, UK: A Qualitative study in parents

    PubMed Central

    Eyre, E.L.J.; Duncan, M.J.; Birch, S.L.; Cox, V.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Children's physical activity (PA) is affected by socio-economic status (SES) and the environment. Children are not fully autonomous in their decision making; parental decisions thus affect how children utilise their surrounding environments for PA. The aim was to examine environmental influences on children's PA from a qualitative perspective in parents from low SES wards in Coventry, UK. Method 59 parents of children in year 4 (aged 8–9years) completed the ALPHA environmental questionnaire. 16 of these parents took part in focus group discussions examining environmental facilitators and barriers to their child's PA (March–April, 2013). Results Emerging themes related to physical (i.e. poor access, safety and quality of the neighbourhood) and social environment (i.e. ‘rough’ neighbourhood due to crime and anti-social behaviour) influences on the PA behaviour of children. The parents believed these environmental factors resulted in the children engaging in greater sedentary activity (watching TV) indoors. The school environment was perceived as a supportive physical environment for children's PA behaviour. Conclusion Parent's perceptions of an unsupportive physical and social environment restrict children's opportunities to play outside and be physically active and may lead to increased body fat (BF). Schools provide a supportive environment for children from low SES to be physically active in. PMID:26844037

  2. Models of traumatic experiences and children's psychological adjustment: the roles of perceived parenting and the children's own resources and activity.

    PubMed

    Punamäki, R L; Qouta, S; el Sarraj, E

    1997-08-01

    The relations between traumatic events, perceived parenting styles, children's resources, political activity, and psychological adjustment were examined among 108 Palestinian boys and girls of 11-12 years of age. The results showed that exposure to traumatic events increased psychological adjustment problems directly and via 2 mediating paths. First, the more traumatic events children had experienced, the more negative parenting they experienced. And, the poorer they perceived parenting, the more they suffered from high neuroticism and low self-esteem. Second, the more traumatic events children had experienced, the more political activity they showed, and the more active they were, the more they suffered from psychological adjustment problems. Good perceived parenting protected children's psychological adjustment by making them less vulnerable in two ways. First, traumatic events decreased their intellectual, creative, and cognitive resources, and a lack of resources predicted many psychological adjustment problems in a model excluding perceived parenting. Second, political activity increased psychological adjustment problems in the same model, but not in the model including good parenting.

  3. Concussion and its management: What do parents know?

    PubMed Central

    Weerdenburg, Kirstin; Schneeweiss, Suzan; Koo, Ellen; Boutis, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the sensitivity of parental suspicion of concussion relative to paediatric emergency physicians in children who presented to an emergency department (ED) with a head injury. A secondary objective was to examine the variables associated with parental suspicion of concussion concordant with that of a physician. METHODS: Parents of children five to 18 years of age presenting to an urban paediatric ED with a nonstructural head injury completed a 24-item questionnaire. RESULTS: Of the 577 eligible parents, 495 (85.8%) consented to participate. The sensitivity of parental suspicion for concussion was 40.0% (95% CI 33.2% to 47.2%), while the specificity was 58.3% (95% CI 52.4% to 64.0%). The variable of child age ≥10 years was associated with an increased odds (OR 3.0) of a parental suspicion of concussion concordant with that of a physician; parent age, parent sex, mechanism of head injury and history of concussion in the child were not. Although 453 (91.5%) parents would stop activity if they believed their child sustained a concussion, only 159 (32.1%) were familiar with return-to-play guidelines. CONCLUSIONS: Parents often did not suspect a concussion when it was ultimately diagnosed by a paediatric emergency physician, although they were more likely to do so in older children. Only approximately one-third were aware of return-to-play guidelines. To enhance the potential for parent-driven advocacy in the recognition and management of concussion, these data support the need for increased parental education on this injury. PMID:27398059

  4. Do children's health resources differ according to preschool physical activity programmes and parental behaviour? A mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Sterdt, Elena; Pape, Natalie; Kramer, Silke; Liersch, Sebastian; Urban, Michael; Werning, Rolf; Walter, Ulla

    2014-02-26

    Preschool can have positive effects on the development of a healthy lifestyle. The present study analysed to what extent different conditions, structures and behavioural models in preschool and family-children's central social microsystems-can lead to differences in children's health resources. Using a cross-sectional mixed methods approach, contrast analyses of "preschools with systematic physical activity programmes" versus "preschools without physical activity programmes" were conducted to assess the extent to which children's physical activity, quality of life and social behaviour differ between preschools with systematic and preschools without physical activity programmes. Differences in children's physical activity according to parental behaviour were likewise assessed. Data on child-related outcomes and parent-related factors were collected via parent questionnaires and child interviews. A qualitative focused ethnographic study was performed to obtain deeper insight into the quantitative survey data. Two hundred and twenty seven (227) children were interviewed at 21 preschools with systematic physical activity programmes, and 190 at 25 preschools without physical activity programmes. There was no significant difference in children's physical activity levels between the two preschool types (p = 0.709). However, the qualitative data showed differences in the design and quality of programmes to promote children's physical activity. Data triangulation revealed a strong influence of parental behaviour. The triangulation of methods provided comprehensive insight into the nature and extent of physical activity programmes in preschools and made it possible to capture the associations between systematic physical activity promotion and children's health resources in a differential manner.

  5. Do children's health resources differ according to preschool physical activity programmes and parental behaviour? A mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Sterdt, Elena; Pape, Natalie; Kramer, Silke; Liersch, Sebastian; Urban, Michael; Werning, Rolf; Walter, Ulla

    2014-03-01

    Preschool can have positive effects on the development of a healthy lifestyle. The present study analysed to what extent different conditions, structures and behavioural models in preschool and family-children's central social microsystems-can lead to differences in children's health resources. Using a cross-sectional mixed methods approach, contrast analyses of "preschools with systematic physical activity programmes" versus "preschools without physical activity programmes" were conducted to assess the extent to which children's physical activity, quality of life and social behaviour differ between preschools with systematic and preschools without physical activity programmes. Differences in children's physical activity according to parental behaviour were likewise assessed. Data on child-related outcomes and parent-related factors were collected via parent questionnaires and child interviews. A qualitative focused ethnographic study was performed to obtain deeper insight into the quantitative survey data. Two hundred and twenty seven (227) children were interviewed at 21 preschools with systematic physical activity programmes, and 190 at 25 preschools without physical activity programmes. There was no significant difference in children's physical activity levels between the two preschool types (p = 0.709). However, the qualitative data showed differences in the design and quality of programmes to promote children's physical activity. Data triangulation revealed a strong influence of parental behaviour. The triangulation of methods provided comprehensive insight into the nature and extent of physical activity programmes in preschools and made it possible to capture the associations between systematic physical activity promotion and children's health resources in a differential manner. PMID:24577283

  6. Establishing and adhering to sexual consent: the association between reading magazines and college students' sexual consent negotiation.

    PubMed

    Hust, Stacey J T; Marett, Emily Garrigues; Ren, Chunbo; Adams, Paula M; Willoughby, Jessica F; Lei, Ming; Ran, Weina; Norman, Cassie

    2014-01-01

    Content analyses have cataloged the sexual scripts present in magazines largely because of their perceived value to readers and their potential role as sex educators. Although it is generally agreed that magazines have the potential to influence sexual attitudes and behavioral intentions, the effects of this medium are not as frequently researched as are other forms of media. The current study tested whether exposure to magazines was associated with intentions related to sexual consent negotiation. A survey of 313 college students indicated that exposure to men's magazines was significantly associated with lower intentions to seek sexual consent and lower intentions to adhere to decisions about sexual consent. In contrast, exposure to women's magazines was significantly associated with greater intentions to refuse unwanted sexual activity. Overall, the findings of this study further reinforce the critical need for responsible and realistic portrayals of sex in entertainment media, specifically magazines.

  7. Arrays in postnatal and prenatal diagnosis: An exploration of the ethics of consent.

    PubMed

    Dondorp, Wybo; Sikkema-Raddatz, Birgit; de Die-Smulders, Christine; de Wert, Guido

    2012-06-01

    The introduction of genome-wide arrays in postnatal and prenatal diagnosis raises challenging ethical issues. Here, we explore questions with regard to the ethics of consent. One important issue is whether informed consent for genome-wide array-based testing is in fact feasible, given the wide range of possible outcomes and related options. The proposed alternative of "generic consent" will have to be studied in practice. From an ethical point of view, the question is whether consent would still be sufficiently "informed" in a generic approach. Another issue that has not yet been given much attention is how far parents, or pregnant women and their partners, should be allowed to determine the range of possible outcomes that will or will not be reported back to them. The scope and limits of parents' and prospective parents' right to know or not to know are far from clear. The complex normative issues on the content and weight of these rights can only be answered by taking full account of the rights and interests of all the parties involved: prospective and actual parents, children, and relatives. This paper is the result of a working group meeting preceding the European Society of Human Genetics 2011 Conference, where these issues were addressed.

  8. Information Parents Must Know about Online Privacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markell, Ginny

    2000-01-01

    Presents four tips to help parents monitor whether website operators are complying with the 1988 Children's Online Privacy Protection Act: look for privacy policies on children's websites; determine if they ask for parental consent to collect personal information; regularly monitor information being sent to children; and determine if web operators…

  9. Informed consent for obesity surgery.

    PubMed

    Mason, E E; Hesson, W W

    1998-08-01

    A patient cannot consent to an operation without being adequately informed. There are a number of different operations in use today for treatment of severe obesity. The variations are designed to (1) limit food intake and/or (2) create malabsorption. The surgeon has a duty, according to the law of informed consent, to provide all of the information necessary for a reasonable person to decide whether to consent to the operation recommended. Changes in anatomy, function and risk therefore need to be explained. When only limitation of intake is planned, as in vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG), the patient should know how large the pouch will be and how the outlet will be stabilized. When both intake restriction and malabsorption are planned, as in Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RGB), or biliopancreatic diversion (BPD), the patient should know whether there will be a larger pouch (less restriction) and a short common channel (more malabsorption) as in BPD or a smaller pouch and less malabsorption. Patients should know that if they have an operation that uses maximum malabsorption to bring weight to a nearly normal level, the risk of malnutrition will be increased, which may require further hospitalization and possible operative treatment. When the duodenum is to be bypassed, the patient should know that this will impair iron and calcium absorption, and that access to this area for radiologic and endoscopic procedures may not be possible. Simple drawings can be used to explain what is planned and how the operation will determine body weight, side-effects, and risk.

  10. An Alternative to Residential Neighborhoods: An Exploratory Study of How Activity Spaces and Perception of Neighborhood Social Processes Relate to Maladaptive Parenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freisthler, Bridget; Thomas, Crystal A.; Curry, Susanna R.; Wolf, Jennifer Price

    2016-01-01

    Background: The environments where parents spend time, such as at work, at their child's school, or with friends and family, may exert a greater influence on their parenting behaviors than the residential neighborhoods where they live. These environments, termed activity spaces, provide individualized information about the where parents go,…

  11. Are Discussions about College between Parents and Their High School Children a College-Planning Activity? Making the Case and Testing the Predictors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Scott M.; Myers, Carrie B.

    2012-01-01

    Our research goals are to make the case that parent-student discussions about college planning should be seen as a distinct college-planning activity and to identify and test the relevant predictors of these discussions. Findings from over 4,000 parents and their high school children show that parent-student discussions are enhanced when both the…

  12. Legal issues affecting confidentiality and informed consent in reproductive health.

    PubMed

    Rockett, L R

    2000-01-01

    The law governing confidentiality and informed consent has acquired unique characteristics in the area of reproductive health, as a consequence of both the establishment of a constitutional right to privacy in reproductive health matters and the reaction of those politically and morally opposed to the exercise of that right. The primary issues have involved: 1) the right of minors to receive reproductive health services without parental consent, which remains a political battleground; 2) laws requiring physicians to provide information to pregnant patients that is intended, not to inform them of the risks and benefits of the procedure, but to discourage them from obtaining abortions; 3) coerced and prohibited sterilizations; 4) court-ordered contraception and procedures to protect the fetus; and 5) restrictions on counseling about abortion, contraception, sterilization, and other reproductive health services authorized by state conscience or noncompliance clauses that shield such restrictions from the usual ethical, medical, and legal rules governing informed consent. The last area is of profound significance to the ability of women to make informed decisions about their reproductive health options. In the current economic environment, which fuels mergers and acquisitions involving sectarian and nonsectarian institutions, women are increasingly being put at risk as a result of such restrictions. PMID:11070641

  13. Parents' Behavioral Norms as Predictors of Adolescent Sexual Activity and Contraceptive Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Sharon A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Used clustered sample household survey of 329 males and females aged 14 to 17, and 470 of their parents to examine influence of parental factors on adolescent sexual behavior and contraceptive use. Found parents' reported behavioral norms accounted for 5% of variance in whether adolescents had had intercourse, and for 33% of variance in…

  14. Rewards for Kids! Ready-to-Use Charts and Activities for Positive Parenting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiller, Viriginia M.; Schneider, Meg F.

    Finding ways to encourage preschoolers and elementary school children to behave well without resorting to scolding, threats, or bribery is a challenge for parents. This book advocates the positive parenting technique of rewards as the key to good behavior and shows parents how to use a variety of child-friendly sticker charts and other tools to…

  15. Collaborative Learning Activities at a Distance via Interactive Videoconferencing in Elementary Schools: Parents' Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anastasiades, Panagiotes S.; Vitalaki, Elena; Gertzakis, Nikos

    2008-01-01

    As schools are increasingly encouraging students to use the Internet and web-based technology at home and in the classroom, concerns among some parents have increased. Today's parents have learned about computers as adults and did not receive guided participation as children either from their parents or from their teachers. The essence of this…

  16. Development and Implementation of a Video-Based Physical Activity Preference Assessment for Children with Autism and Their Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sankovich, Lena

    2013-01-01

    Development and Implementation of a Video-Based Physical Activity Preference Assessment for Children with Autism and Their Parents Individuals with autism often lack the necessary motivation to engage in physical activity. In addition, due to the characteristics defining autism, such as deficits in social skills, motor coordination, and behavior,…

  17. Perceived Parental Social Support and Moderate-to-Vigorous Physical Activity in Children at Risk of Obesity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunet, Jennifer; Sabiston, Catherine M.; O'Loughlin, Jennifer; Mathieu, Marie-Eve; Tremblay, Angelo; Barnett, Tracie A.; Lambert, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Identification of factors that relate to physical activity behavior in children at higher risk for weight problems--namely, children with obese parents--is key to informing the development of effective interventions to promote physical activity and reduce obesity. The purpose of our study was to examine children's perceptions of…

  18. Parents report intrapersonal, interpersonal, and environmental barriers to supporting healthy eating and physical activity among their preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, John; Needham, Lisa; Simpson, Janis Randall; Heeney, Elizabeth Shaver

    2008-04-01

    There is an increasing trend in childhood obesity in Canada and many preschool children are overweight or obese. The objective of this study was to explore parents' experiences and challenges in supporting healthy eating and physical activity among their preschool children. A qualitative descriptive study involving 5 focus groups was conducted. A convenience sample of 39 parents from 3 childcare centres in Hamilton, Ontario, participated. Parents were English speaking and had a child aged 2-5 years attending the childcare centre for at least 3 months. The research team read transcripts of the audio-taped sessions and used a constant comparison approach to develop themes, which involved coding comments by continually referring to previously coded comments for comparison. The social ecological model was used to organize the themes into 3 higher-level categories: (i) intrapersonal (individual): preschoolers' preferences and health; (ii) interpersonal (interactions): parents' and others' different views and practices, influence of the childcare centre, parents' lack of time, and family structure; and (iii) physical environment: accessibility of healthy foods, preschoolers with special needs, media influence, weather, lack of safety, and inaccessible resources. Parents perceived that there are various intrapersonal, interpersonal, and environmental barriers to supporting healthy eating and physical activity among their children. Program planners and health professionals can consider these barriers when developing interventions to promote healthy bodyweights among preschoolers. PMID:18347689

  19. Time-Resolved Records of Magnetic Activity on the Pallasite Parent Body and Psyche

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryson, J. F. J.; Nichols, C. I. O.; Herrero-Albillos, J.; Kronast, F.; Kasama, T.; Alimadadi, H.; van der Laan, G.; Nimmo, F.; Harrison, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Although many small bodies apparently generated dynamo fields in the early solar system, the nature and temporal evolution of these fields has remained enigmatic. Time-resolved records of the Earth's planetary field have been essential in understanding the dynamic history of our planet, and equivalent information from asteroids could provide a unique insight into the development of the solar system. Here we present time-resolved records of magnetic activity on the main-group pallasite parent body and (16) Psyche, obtained using newly-developed nanomagnetic imaging techniques. For the pallasite parent body, the inferred field direction remained relatively constant and the intensity was initially stable at ~100 μT before it decreased in two discrete steps down to 0 μT. We interpret this behaviour as due to vigorous dynamo activity driven by compositional convection in the core, ultimately transitioning from a dipolar to multipolar field as the inner core grew from the bottom-up. For Psyche (measured from IVA iron meteorites), the inferred field direction reversed, while the intensity remained stable at >50 μT. Psyche cooled rapidly as an unmantled core, although the resulting thermal convection alone cannot explain these observations. Instead, this behaviour required top-down core solidification, and is attributed either to compositional convection (if the core also solidified from the bottom-up) or convection generated directly by top-down solidification (e.g. Fe-snow). The mechanism governing convection in small body cores is an open question (due partly to uncertainties in the direction of core solidification), and these observations suggest that unconventional (i.e. not thermal) mechanisms acted in the early solar system. These mechanisms are very efficient at generating convection, implying a long-lasting and widespread epoch of dynamo activity among small bodies in the early solar system.

  20. Placebo Effects and Informed Consent.

    PubMed

    Alfano, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The concepts of placebos and placebo effects refer to extremely diverse phenomena. I recommend dissolving the concepts of placebos and placebo effects into loosely related groups of specific mechanisms, including (potentially among others) expectation-fulfillment, classical conditioning, and attentional-somatic feedback loops. If this approach is on the right track, it has three main implications for the ethics of informed consent. First, because of the expectation-fulfillment mechanism, the process of informing cannot be considered independently from the potential effects of treatment. Obtaining informed consent influences the effects of treatment. This provides support for the authorized concealment and authorized deception paradigms, and perhaps even for outright deceptive placebo use. Second, doctors may easily fail to consider the potential benefits of conditioning, leading them to misjudge the trade-off between beneficence and autonomy. Third, how attentional-somatic feedback loops play out depends not only on the content of the informing process but also on its framing. This suggests a role for libertarian paternalism in clinical practice.

  1. The battering of informed consent

    PubMed Central

    Kottow, M

    2004-01-01

    Autonomy has been hailed as the foremost principle of bioethics, and yet patients' decisions and research subjects' voluntary participation are being subjected to frequent restrictions. It has been argued that patient care is best served by a limited form of paternalism because the doctor is better qualified to take critical decisions than the patient, who is distracted by illness. The revival of paternalism is unwarranted on two grounds: firstly, because prejudging that the sick are not fully autonomous is a biased and unsubstantial view; secondly, because the technical knowledge of healthcare professionals does not include the ethical qualifications and prerogative to decide for others. Clinical research settings are even more prone to erode subjects' autonomy than clinical settings because of the tendency and temptation to resort to such practices as shading the truth when consent to participation is sought, or waiving consent altogether when research is done in emergency settings. Instead of supporting such dubious practices with unconvincing arguments, it would seem to be the task of bioethics to insist on reinforcing autonomy. PMID:15574446

  2. Ethical considerations in investigating youth alcohol norms and behaviours: a case for mature minor consent.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, J; Maycock, B; Comfort, J; Burns, S; Adams, E; Howat, P

    2015-12-01

    Mature minor consent only became available in Australia in 2007. There is neither an explicitly defined protocol, nor a clear definition evident in the literature relating to use of the mature minor concept in health research. Due to difficulties in defining fixed age ranges to varying levels of maturity and vulnerability, there is a lack of clarity surrounding when it might be reasonable and ethical to apply for or grant a waiver for parental consent. This paper describes the challenges faced and solutions created when gaining approval for use of mature minor consent in a respondent-driven sampling (RDS) study to explore the social norms and alcohol consumption among 14-17-year-old adolescents (n = 1012) in the community. The University's Human Research Ethics Committee granted mature minor consent for this study, and the techniques applied enabled recruitment of adolescents from community-based settings through use of RDS to achieve the required sample. This paper has relevance for research that requires a waiver for parental consent; it presents a case study for assessing mature minors and makes recommendations on how ethical guidelines can be improved to assist human research ethics application processes.

  3. 49 CFR 11.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 11.117 Section... Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent... following: (1) A written consent document that embodies the elements of informed consent required by §...

  4. 7 CFR 1c.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 1c.117 Section 1c... Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent... following: (1) A written consent document that embodies the elements of informed consent required by §...

  5. 21 CFR 50.25 - Elements of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Elements of informed consent. 50.25 Section 50.25... OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Informed Consent of Human Subjects § 50.25 Elements of informed consent. (a) Basic elements of informed consent. In seeking informed consent, the following information shall be provided...

  6. 21 CFR 50.25 - Elements of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Elements of informed consent. 50.25 Section 50.25... OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Informed Consent of Human Subjects § 50.25 Elements of informed consent. (a) Basic elements of informed consent. In seeking informed consent, the following information shall be provided...

  7. Mind the gap: are NHS trusts falling short of recommended standards for consent to autopsy?

    PubMed

    Eka, Ime; Rowan, Camilla; Osborn, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The decline of the hospital autopsy is a well-known phenomenon that shows no sign of ending. Debate continues for the reasons behind this, but inadequate consent practices are thought to play a role. The furore resulting from organ retention scandals at Bristol Royal Infirmary and The Royal Liverpool Children's Hospital led to widespread soul searching in the medical profession, and a fundamental change in how we treat the dead body. In response, the 2004 Human Tissue Act was created, and consent is now centrally placed to permit all activities dealing with the cadaver, including autopsy. This article reflects on consent practices for hospital autopsy in England and Wales. Relevant policies from 26 National Health Service trusts were examined against the recommended standards set by the Human Tissue Authority. We found numerous failures of multiple trusts to follow these standards. Several trust policies failed to outline basic information to guide staff in conducting the consent process, such as the training requirements of the consent taker, and the desired approach to take consent. Many trusts failed to outline vital recommendations of the Human tissue Authority, such as the requirement of the consent taker to be experienced, trained in dealing with the bereaved and well informed on autopsy practice, as well as the requirement to have witnessed an autopsy. We recommend trusts reassess their practices in order meet the established standards with an emphasis on educating staff and developing a team-based approach to consent taking.

  8. Youth characteristics and contextual variables influencing physical activity in young adolescents of parents with premature coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Gilmer, Mary Jo; Harrell, Joanne S; Miles, Margaret Shandor; Hepworth, Joseph T

    2003-06-01

    This study examined influences on physical activity of young adolescents whose parents have premature coronary heart disease (CHD). Consistent with Bronfenbrenner's theory, the influences examined were personal characteristics of the subjects and selected contextual variables (peers, family, and community). Subjects were 113 youths, aged 11 to 14, 53% boys, 73% Caucasian, all with parents with premature CHD. Children were most likely to be active if their fathers were active, and those living in the coastal region were less likely to be active than other children. Peer influence interacted with both pubertal status and geographic region in its effect on children's activity. Children were more active when they had active peers only when the youth were midpubertal or when they were in the coastal region. Results emphasize the importance of nursing interventions to influence behaviors of these vulnerable children.

  9. Using a Single-Item Physical Activity Measure to Describe and Validate Parents' Physical Activity Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Kyra; White, Katherine M.; Cuddihy, Tom

    2012-01-01

    The accurate measurement of health-related physical activity (PA), often interpreted as either 150 min/week of at least moderate-intensity PA (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2008) or at least 30 min of at least moderate-intensity PA on 5 or more days per week (Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing [AGDHA], 2005;…

  10. Parental Involvement. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1994

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter contains seven articles about meaningful participation by parents, particularly Hispanic and other minority parents, in the education of their children. "Parents Reclaiming Their Schools: New Initiative Brings Parents Together for Better Schools" (Aurelio M. Montemayor) describes objectives and activities of a Texas-based coalition…

  11. 10 CFR 850.36 - Medical consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Medical consent. 850.36 Section 850.36 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.36 Medical consent. (a) The responsible employer must provide each beryllium-associated worker with a summary of...

  12. 10 CFR 850.36 - Medical consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Medical consent. 850.36 Section 850.36 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.36 Medical consent. (a) The responsible employer must provide each beryllium-associated worker with a summary of...

  13. 10 CFR 850.36 - Medical consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Medical consent. 850.36 Section 850.36 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.36 Medical consent. (a) The responsible employer must provide each beryllium-associated worker with a summary of...

  14. 10 CFR 850.36 - Medical consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Medical consent. 850.36 Section 850.36 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.36 Medical consent. (a) The responsible employer must provide each beryllium-associated worker with a summary of...

  15. 10 CFR 850.36 - Medical consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Medical consent. 850.36 Section 850.36 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.36 Medical consent. (a) The responsible employer must provide each beryllium-associated worker with a summary of...

  16. 7 CFR 1.166 - Consent order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Consent order. 1.166 Section 1.166 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Rules of Practice Governing Cease and Desist Proceedings Under Section 2 of the Capper-Volstead Act § 1.166 Consent order. At any...

  17. 40 CFR 57.605 - Consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Consent. 57.605 Section 57.605 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PRIMARY NONFERROUS SMELTER ORDERS Research and Development Requirements § 57.605 Consent. Each NSO shall...

  18. 10 CFR 820.23 - Consent order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... consistent with the objectives of the Act and the DOE Nuclear Safety Requirements. The Director and a person... Consent Order need not constitute an admission by any person that the Act or a DOE Nuclear Safety... Act or a DOE Nuclear Safety Requirement. A Consent Order shall, however, set forth the relevant...

  19. 21 CFR 640.61 - Informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Informed consent. 640.61 Section 640.61 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.61 Informed consent. The...

  20. 21 CFR 640.61 - Informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Informed consent. 640.61 Section 640.61 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.61 Informed consent. The...

  1. 21 CFR 640.61 - Informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Informed consent. 640.61 Section 640.61 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.61 Informed consent. The...

  2. 21 CFR 640.61 - Informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Informed consent. 640.61 Section 640.61 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.61 Informed consent. The...

  3. 21 CFR 640.61 - Informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Informed consent. 640.61 Section 640.61 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.61 Informed consent. The...

  4. 28 CFR 549.52 - Informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Informed consent. 549.52 Section 549.52 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Plastic Surgery § 549.52 Informed consent. Approved plastic surgery procedures may not be...

  5. 28 CFR 549.52 - Informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Informed consent. 549.52 Section 549.52 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Plastic Surgery § 549.52 Informed consent. Approved plastic surgery procedures may not be...

  6. 28 CFR 549.52 - Informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Informed consent. 549.52 Section 549.52 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Plastic Surgery § 549.52 Informed consent. Approved plastic surgery procedures may not be...

  7. 28 CFR 549.52 - Informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Informed consent. 549.52 Section 549.52 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Plastic Surgery § 549.52 Informed consent. Approved plastic surgery procedures may not be...

  8. 28 CFR 549.52 - Informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Informed consent. 549.52 Section 549.52 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Plastic Surgery § 549.52 Informed consent. Approved plastic surgery procedures may not be...

  9. 28 CFR 512.16 - Informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Informed consent. 512.16 Section 512.16 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GENERAL MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION RESEARCH Research § 512.16 Informed consent. (a) Before commencing a research project...

  10. 32 CFR 634.8 - Implied consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION Driving Privileges § 634.8 Implied consent. (a) Implied consent to blood, breath, or urine tests. Persons who drive on the installation shall be deemed to have given... when lawfully stopped, apprehended, or cited for any offense allegedly committed while driving or...

  11. Default Policies and Parents’ Consent for School-Located HPV Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Paul L.; McRee, Annie-Laurie; Pepper, Jessica K.; Brewer, Noel T.

    2012-01-01

    While defaults may encourage some health behaviors, how defaults influence controversial behaviors is not well understood. We examined the effect of two default policies on parents’ consent to have their adolescent sons hypothetically receive HPV vaccine at school. A national sample of 404 parents of adolescent sons participated in an online 3×2 between-subjects factorial experiment. Factors varied the default consent policy (opt-in, opt-out, or neutral) and the number of vaccines sons would receive (HPV vaccine alone or along with two other recommended adolescent vaccines). Among parents wanting to get their sons HPV vaccine in the next year, consent was higher in the opt-in condition (compared to the opt-out condition) or if other recommended adolescent vaccines would be included. Default policies had no effect among parents undecided about HPV vaccination. Parents’ consent for school-located HPV vaccination may be higher when presented as an opt-in decision and other vaccines are included. PMID:22271328

  12. Puerto Rican adolescents' disclosure and lying to parents about peer and risky activities: associations with teens' perceptions of Latino values.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Myriam; Smetana, Judith G

    2012-08-01

    Disclosure and lying to mothers and fathers about different activities, as defined within social domain theory, were examined as a function of Latino family values in 109 Puerto Rican lower socioeconomic status middle adolescents (M=15.58 years, SD=1.18) living in the United States. Questionnaires revealed that teens sometimes disclosed to parents about their risky prudential (unhealthy or unsafe) and peer activities. Lying was infrequent, although greater for risky than for peer issues. In general, path analyses demonstrated that teens' greater adherence to Latino family values and trust in parents were associated with more disclosure and less lying to mothers. However, these findings were moderated by the type of issue considered and perceptions of parents' Latino family values.

  13. Using improvement science methods to increase accuracy of surgical consents.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Patti; Shaffer Ellis, Andrea; Schoettker, Pamela J; Stone, Raymond; Lenk, Mary Anne; Ryckman, Frederick C

    2014-07-01

    The surgical consent serves as a key link in preventing breakdowns in communication that could lead to wrong-patient, wrong-site, or wrong-procedure events. We conducted a quality improvement initiative at a large, urban pediatric academic medical center to reliably increase the percentage of informed consents for surgical and medical procedures with accurate safety data information at the first point of perioperative contact. Improvement activities focused on awareness, education, standardization, real-time feedback and failure identification, and transparency. A total of 54,082 consent forms from 13 surgical divisions were reviewed between May 18, 2011, and November 30, 2012. Between May 2011 and June 2012, the percentage of consents without safety errors increased from a median of 95.4% to 99.7%. Since July 2012, the median has decreased slightly but has remained stable at 99.4%. Our results suggest that effective safety checks allow discovery and prevention of errors.

  14. Consent in severely disabled children: informed or an infringement of their human rights?

    PubMed

    Rowse, Vicki L

    2007-03-01

    In this article the issue of consent in children is examined with particular reference to disabled children and young people. It is demonstrated that gaining informed consent from disabled children is still a long way off and that the issues are not clear. The law delivers contradictory rulings, parents and families are becoming more vocal in challenging doctors, and the courts are becoming increasingly involved in decision-making on treatment options. The Human Rights Act 1998 is becoming more prominent in informing these decisions. The article concludes that these developments may not be in the best interests of disabled children and that strategies are needed to help them communicate their views.

  15. Collective informed consent and decision power.

    PubMed

    Varelius, Jukka

    2009-03-01

    It has been suggested that, in addition to individual level decision-making, informed consent procedures could be used in collective decision-making too. One of the main criticisms directed at this suggestion concerns decision-making power. It is maintained that consent is a veto power concept and that, as such, it is not appropriate for collective decision-making. This paper examines this objection to collective informed consent. It argues that veto power informed consent can have some uses in the collective level and that when it is not appropriate the decision power a concerned party ought to have in connection with an arrangement should be made relative to the interest she has at stake in it. It concludes that the objection examined does not undermine collective informed consent.

  16. Using informed consent to save trust.

    PubMed

    Eyal, Nir

    2014-07-01

    Increasingly, bioethicists defend informed consent as a safeguard for trust in caretakers and medical institutions.This paper discusses an ‘ideal type’ of that move. What I call the trust-promotion argument for informed consent states:1. Social trust, especially trust in caretakers and medical institutions, is necessary so that, for example,people seek medical advice, comply with it, and participate in medical research.2. Therefore, it is usually wrong to jeopardise that trust.3. Coercion, deception, manipulation and other violations of standard informed consent requirements seriously jeopardise that trust.4. Thus, standard informed consent requirements are justified.This article describes the initial promise of this argument, then identifies challenges to it. As I show, the value of trust fails to account for some common sense intuitions about informed consent. We should revise the argument, common sense morality, or both.

  17. Passive exposures of children to volatile trihalomethanes during domestic cleaning activities of their parents

    SciTech Connect

    Andra, Syam S.; Charisiadis, Pantelis; Karakitsios, Spyros; Sarigiannis, Denis A.; Makris, Konstantinos C.

    2015-01-15

    Domestic cleaning has been proposed as a determinant of trihalomethanes (THMs) exposure in adult females. We hypothesized that parental housekeeping activities could influence children's passive exposures to THMs from their mere physical presence during domestic cleaning. In a recent cross-sectional study (n=382) in Cyprus [41 children (<18y) and 341 adults (≥18y)], we identified 29 children who met the study's inclusion criteria. Linear regression models were applied to understand the association between children sociodemographic variables, their individual practices influencing ingestion and noningestion exposures to ΣTHMs, and their urinary THMs levels. Among the children-specific variables, age alone showed a statistically significant inverse association with their creatinine-adjusted urinary ΣTHMs (r{sub S}=−0.59, p<0.001). A positive correlation was observed between urinary ΣTHMs (ng g{sup −1}) of children and matched-mothers (r{sub S}=0.52, p=0.014), but this was not the case for their matched-fathers (r{sub S}=0.39, p=0.112). Time spent daily by the matched-mothers for domestic mopping, toilet and other cleaning activities using chlorine-based cleaning products was associated with their children's urinary THMs levels (r{sub S}=0.56, p=0.007). This trend was not observed between children and their matched-fathers urinary ΣTHMs levels, because of minimum amount of time spent by the latter in performing domestic cleaning. The proportion of variance of creatinine-unadjusted and adjusted urinary ΣTHMs levels in children that was explained by the matched-mothers covariates was 76% and 74% (p<0.001), respectively. A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model adequately predicted urinary chloroform excretion estimates, being consistent with the corresponding measured levels. Our findings highlighted the influence of mothers' domestic cleaning activities towards enhancing passive THMs exposures of their children. The duration of such activities could be

  18. Obtaining informed consent for genomics research in Africa: analysis of H3Africa consent documents

    PubMed Central

    Munung, Nchangwi Syntia; Marshall, Patricia; Campbell, Megan; Littler, Katherine; Masiye, Francis; Ouwe-Missi-Oukem-Boyer, Odile; Seeley, Janet; Stein, D J; Tindana, Paulina; de Vries, Jantina

    2016-01-01

    Background The rise in genomic and biobanking research worldwide has led to the development of different informed consent models for use in such research. This study analyses consent documents used by investigators in the H3Africa (Human Heredity and Health in Africa) Consortium. Methods A qualitative method for text analysis was used to analyse consent documents used in the collection of samples and data in H3Africa projects. Thematic domains included type of consent model, explanations of genetics/genomics, data sharing and feedback of test results. Results Informed consent documents for 13 of the 19 H3Africa projects were analysed. Seven projects used broad consent, five projects used tiered consent and one used specific consent. Genetics was mostly explained in terms of inherited characteristics, heredity and health, genes and disease causation, or disease susceptibility. Only one project made provisions for the feedback of individual genetic results. Conclusion H3Africa research makes use of three consent models—specific, tiered and broad consent. We outlined different strategies used by H3Africa investigators to explain concepts in genomics to potential research participants. To further ensure that the decision to participate in genomic research is informed and meaningful, we recommend that innovative approaches to the informed consent process be developed, preferably in consultation with research participants, research ethics committees and researchers in Africa. PMID:26644426

  19. 78 FR 36205 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-17

    ... disorders; Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender populations; Veterans, active military, or military..., evaluators), key program stakeholders (e.g., state/local officials, child-serving agency directors... parent/guardians by training facilitators and/or grantee staff in conjunction with the consent...

  20. The Frequency of Parents' Reading-Related Activities at Home and Children's Reading Skills during Kindergarten and Grade 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silinskas, Gintautas; Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina; Tolvanen, Asko; Niemi, Pekka; Poikkeus, Anna-Maija; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2012-01-01

    This longitudinal study investigated the associations between the frequency of parents' reading-related activities at home and their children's reading-related skills during the transition from kindergarten to Grade 1. Longitudinal data were obtained for 1436 Finnish children (5- to 6-year-olds at baseline) and their mothers and fathers. 684 girls…

  1. Parental Involvement in School Activities and Reading Literacy: Findings and Implications from PIRLS 2011 Data. Policy Brief No. 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirazchiyski, Plamen; Klemencic, Eva

    2014-01-01

    This policy brief presents evidence demonstrating a positive association between parental involvement in school activities and student performance in the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS) 2011. This association, which was evident in most of the 54 education systems analyzed, indicates that students enrolled in schools with…

  2. The Meanings of Outdoor Physical Activity for Parentally Bereaved Young People in the United Kingdom: Insights from an Ethnographic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Joanne; Sparkes, Andrew C.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the meanings of outdoor physical activity in the natural environment for parentally-bereaved young people. It draws on data generated from a two-year ethnographic study that focused on the experiences of those involved with the Rocky Centre, a childhood bereavement service in the UK. Data was collected via…

  3. Perceptions of a School-Based Self-Management Program Promoting an Active Lifestyle among Elementary Schoolchildren, Teachers, and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardon, Greet Maria; Haerens, Leen Liesbeth; Verstraete, Stefanie; de Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse

    2009-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate how classroom-based self-management lessons to promote physical activity were perceived by students, teachers, and parents. The self-management lessons were implemented by an external physical education specialist in 20 class groups at eight elementary schools. Program perceptions were evaluated in 412…

  4. Longitudinal effects of parental child and neighborhood factors on moderate vigorous physical activity and sedentary time in Latino children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Moderate-vigorous physical activity (%MVPA) confers beneficial effects on child musculoskeletal health, cardiovascular fitness, and psychosocial well-being; in contrast, sedentary time (%SED) is emerging as a risk factor for health. This study aimed to identify parental, child and neighborhood facto...

  5. What Can Parents Do? A Review of State Laws Regarding Decision Making for Adolescent Drug Abuse and Mental Health Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kerwin, MaryLouise E.; Kirby, Kimberly C.; Speziali, Dominic; Duggan, Morgan; Mellitz, Cynthia; Versek, Brian; McNamara, Ashley

    2013-01-01

    This study examined US state laws regarding parental and adolescent decision-making for substance use and mental health inpatient and outpatient treatment. State statues for requiring parental consent favored mental health over drug abuse treatment and inpatient over outpatient modalities. Parental consent was sufficient in 53%–61% of the states for inpatient treatment, but only for 39% – 46% of the states for outpatient treatment. State laws favored the rights of minors to access drug treatment without parental consent, and to do so at a younger age than for mental health treatment. Implications for how these laws may impact parents seeking help for their children are discussed. PMID:25870511

  6. What Hispanic parents do to encourage and discourage 3-5 year old children to be active: a qualitative study using nominal group technique

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Hispanic preschoolers are less active than their non-Hispanic peers. As part of a feasibility study to assess environmental and parenting influences on preschooler physical activity (PA) (Niños Activos), the aim of this study was to identify what parents do to encourage or discourage PA among Hispanic 3-5 year old children to inform the development of a new PA parenting practice instrument and future interventions to increase PA among Hispanic youth. Methods Nominal Group Technique (NGT), a structured multi-step group procedure, was used to elicit and prioritize responses from 10 groups of Hispanic parents regarding what parents do to encourage (5 groups) or discourage (5 groups) preschool aged children to be active. Five groups consisted of parents with low education (less than high school) and 5 with high education (high school or greater) distributed between the two NGT questions. Results Ten NGT groups (n = 74, range 4-11/group) generated 20-46 and 42-69 responses/group for practices that encourage or discourage PA respectively. Eight to 18 responses/group were elected as the most likely to encourage or discourage PA. Parental engagement in child activities, modeling PA, and feeding the child well were identified as parenting practices that encourage child PA. Allowing TV and videogame use, psychological control, physical or emotional abuse, and lack of parental engagement emerged as parenting practices that discourage children from being active. There were few differences in the pattern of responses by education level. Conclusions Parents identified ways they encourage and discourage 3-5 year-olds from PA, suggesting both are important targets for interventions. These will inform the development of a new PA parenting practice scale to be further evaluated. Further research should explore the role parents play in discouraging child PA, especially in using psychological control or submitting children to abuse, which were new findings in this study

  7. Improving the Informed Consent Conversation: A Standardized Checklist that Is Patient Centered, Quality Driven, and Legally Sound.

    PubMed

    Ripley, Beth A; Tiffany, David; Lehmann, Lisa S; Silverman, Stuart G

    2015-11-01

    The informed consent conversation is a key component of patient-centered medicine, a concept that emphasizes the importance of patients actively participating in their care. Studies reveal that many informed consent conversations throughout medical practice lack essential elements and leave patients' needs unmet. This review addresses these deficiencies, discusses solutions, and introduces a standardized checklist that values the patient's role in shared decision making during the informed consent conversation. The checklist could be particularly helpful to interventional radiologists and other consulting physicians who usually obtain informed consent early in their encounters with patients.

  8. Playing Smart: A Parent's Guide to Enriching, Offbeat Learning Activities for Ages 4-14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Susan K.; Espeland, Pamela, Ed.

    Recognizing that children need enrichment at home, this book offers hundreds of unusual ways for kids and parents to spend time together. It also demonstrates the fun people can have while learning, and the learning that goes on while having fun. Using this book as a guide, parents and children can survey new subjects ranging from cultural…

  9. Involving Parents of Young Children in Science, Math and Literacy Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landerholm, Elizabeth; And Others

    A summer parent involvement project was set up in a Chicago inner city public school in a Hispanic neighborhood. The eight-session program was intended to help parents: (1) become involved with the school program by becoming comfortable with the school setting; (2) enjoy reading and writing and replicate these experiences with their children; (3)…

  10. Ethical Parenting of Sexually Active Youth: Ensuring Safety While Enabling Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bay-Cheng, Laina Y.

    2013-01-01

    The protection of children from harm is commonly accepted as the cardinal duty of parents. In the USA, where young people's sexuality is often regarded with anxiety, attempts to restrict adolescent sexual behaviour are seen as ethically justified and even required of "good" parents. Running counter to popular anxiety surrounding…

  11. Using Active Listening to Improve Collaboration with Parents: The LAFF Don't CRY Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNaughton, David; Vostal, Brooks R.

    2010-01-01

    Effective parent-teacher communication builds working relationships that can support strong home-school collaboration and improved educational outcomes. Even though many teachers value the participation of parents, it can be challenging to communicate this positive intent. Effective communication is central to authentic collaboration and relies on…

  12. [Informed consent with special emphasis on Croatia].

    PubMed

    Vucemilo, Luka; Babić-Bosanac, Sanja; Altarac, Silvio; Borovecki, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Respecting the informed consent and its implementation is one of the fundamental components of high-quality health care. This article discusses the informed consent with an overview of Croatian and international legal documents and scientific studies dealing with this issue. Based on the review of the literature it can be concluded that this is an important issue that contains several key components that should be observed and investigated. It is necessary to evaluate the purposefulness and quality of the implementation of the informed consent, to systematically examine respect of the patients' right to information regarding the medical procedure during treatment, to explore decision-making model in the physician-patient encounter in Croatian hospitals, to determine the content and amount of information shared between physicians and patients, to determine the content and readability of consent forms and written patient information on the medical procedure. In order to assure higher quality of the implementation of the informed consent it is necessary to define by law a list of medical procedures that require written consent and to uniform consent forms for the same medical procedures country-wide.

  13. [Informed consent with special emphasis on Croatia].

    PubMed

    Vucemilo, Luka; Babić-Bosanac, Sanja; Altarac, Silvio; Borovecki, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Respecting the informed consent and its implementation is one of the fundamental components of high-quality health care. This article discusses the informed consent with an overview of Croatian and international legal documents and scientific studies dealing with this issue. Based on the review of the literature it can be concluded that this is an important issue that contains several key components that should be observed and investigated. It is necessary to evaluate the purposefulness and quality of the implementation of the informed consent, to systematically examine respect of the patients' right to information regarding the medical procedure during treatment, to explore decision-making model in the physician-patient encounter in Croatian hospitals, to determine the content and amount of information shared between physicians and patients, to determine the content and readability of consent forms and written patient information on the medical procedure. In order to assure higher quality of the implementation of the informed consent it is necessary to define by law a list of medical procedures that require written consent and to uniform consent forms for the same medical procedures country-wide. PMID:24988746

  14. Time in Parenting Activities in Dual-Earner Families at the Transition to Parenthood

    PubMed Central

    Kotila, Letitia E.; Schoppe-Sullivan, Sarah J.; Dush, Claire M. Kamp

    2015-01-01

    Time in parenting was compared for new mothers and fathers in a sample of 182 dual-earner families. Parenting domains included positive engagement, responsibility, routine childcare, and accessibility. Time diaries captured parents’ time use over a 24-hour workday and nonworkday when infants were 3 and 9 months old. Parents were highly involved with their infants. Mothers were more involved than fathers in positive engagement and routine childcare on both days and at each assessment, and allocated more available time on workdays to these domains than fathers, with one exception. Fathers and mothers allocated similar shares of available workday time to positive engagement at 9 months. Greater equity in responsibility and accessibility was found; Mothers spent more, and a greater share of, parenting time in responsibility than fathers on the 9-month workday only, and were more accessible on the 3 month workday only. Implications for parents in today's diverse families are discussed. PMID:26405367

  15. Consent in crisis: the need to reconceptualize consent to tissue banking research.

    PubMed

    Lipworth, W; Ankeny, R; Kerridge, I

    2006-02-01

    The issues surrounding consent to tissue banking research in Australia are complex and have created a forum of intense debate, thus providing a window of opportunity to critically appraise and challenge standard models of consent for research in general and for tissue banking research in particular. The usual practical difficulties associated with meeting the criteria for valid consent to research (including adequate information provision and voluntariness) are amplified in the case of tissue banking research. A number of models, based on widely accepted ethical principles, have been proposed to improve the process of obtaining consent to tissue banking research, all of which assume that the consent of individual tissue donors is needed to meet the criteria for valid consent. Feminist and communitarian theories use many of the same criteria for valid consent but interpret these criteria differently and de-emphasize the importance of individual autonomy as the central criterion for valid consent. An enriched model of consent incorporating feminist and communitarian ideas could satisfy the currently accepted criteria for valid consent while also furthering a broader range of community values.

  16. Women's accounts of consenting to surgery: is consent a quality problem?

    PubMed Central

    Habiba, M; Jackson, C; Akkad, A; Kenyon, S; Dixon-Woods, M

    2004-01-01

    Background: Consent has been placed at the centre of doctor-patient relationships. Attempts to improve the consent process in medicine have drawn on bioethical and legal traditions. Current approaches to consent emphasise the provision of information and have, in the UK, resulted in a single standardised format and process for both elective and emergency situations. Investigation of patients' perceptions and priorities are important in understanding the quality of the consent process. Methods: In this qualitative study, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 25 women. Eleven had elective and 14 had emergency operations in obstetrics and gynaecology. All interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data analysis was based on the constant comparative method. Results: Participants' perceptions of surgery strongly influenced the meanings they gave to consent. Some, particularly those undergoing elective operations, wanted surgery. Others were uncertain of their desire for surgery or felt that it was imposed on them. Consenting was interpreted as a ritualistic legal procedure. There was an overwhelming tendency to view consent as not primarily serving patients' needs, although some advantages of the consent process were identified. Accounts made no reference to ethics. Conclusion: Countering paternalism will remain difficult to achieve if issues surrounding consent continue to be debated between professionals without due effort to reflect patients' own views and values and to appreciate the circumstances under which consent is sought. PMID:15576703

  17. What Hispanic parents do to encourage and discourage 3-5 year old children to be active: A qualitative study using nominal group technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hispanic pre-schoolers are less active than their non-Hispanic peers. As part of a feasibility study to assess environmental and parenting influences on pre-schooler physical activity (PA) (Ninos Activos), the aim of this study was to identify what parents do to encourage or discourage PA among Hisp...

  18. Informed Consent for Reconstructive Pelvic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Alam, Pakeeza; Iglesia, Cheryl B

    2016-03-01

    Informed consent is the process in which a patient makes a decision about a surgical procedure or medical intervention after adequate information is relayed by the physician and understood by the patient. This process is critical for reconstructive pelvic surgeries, particularly with the advent of vaginal mesh procedures. In this article, we review the principles of informed consent, the pros and cons of different approaches in reconstructive pelvic surgery, the current legal issues surrounding mesh use for vaginal surgery, and tips on how to incorporate this information when consenting patients for pelvic floor surgery.

  19. Antimicrobial activity of DU-6681a, a parent compound of novel oral carbapenem DZ-2640.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, M; Hohmura, M; Nishi, T; Sato, K; Hayakawa, I

    1997-01-01

    The in vitro antibacterial activity of DU-6681a, a parent compound of DZ-2640, against gram-positive and -negative bacteria was compared with those of penems and cephalosporins currently available. MICs at which 90% of the isolates are inhibited (MIC90s) of the compound for clinical isolates of methicillin-susceptible and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, including methicillin-susceptible and -resistant strains, were 0.10, 25, and 12.5 microg/ml, respectively. DU-6681a inhibited the growth of all strains of Streptococcus pyogenes and of penicillin-susceptible and -insusceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae at 0.006, 0.025, and 0.20 microg/ml, respectively, and MIC90s of the compound were 6.25 and >100 microg/ml for Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium, respectively. MIC90s of DU-6681a were 0.20, 0.10, and 0.025 microg/ml for Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae, respectively. For Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the MIC50 and MIC90 of DU-6681a were 25 and 50 microg/ml, respectively. DU-6681a activity was not affected by different media, varied inoculum size (10(4) to 10(7) CFU), or the addition of human serum but was decreased under acidic conditions against gram-negative bacteria, under alkaline conditions against gram-positive bacteria, and in human urine, as was the activity of the other antibiotics tested. The frequency of spontaneous resistance to DU-6681a was less than or equal to those of the reference compounds. Time-kill curve studies demonstrated the bactericidal action of DU-6681a against S. aureus, S. pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, and H. influenzae. PMID:9174181

  20. Testing an Online, Dynamic Consent Portal for Large Population Biobank Research

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Daniel B.; Platt, Jodyn; Platt, Tevah; King, Susan B.; Fisher, Nicole; Shelton, Robert; Kardia, Sharon L. R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Michigan's BioTrust for Health, a public health research biobank comprised of residual dried bloodspot (DBS) cards from newborn screening contains over 4 million samples collected without written consent. Participant-centric initiatives (PCI) are IT tools that hold great promise to address the consent challenges in biobank research. Methods Working with Private Access Inc., a pioneer in patient-centric web solutions, we created and pilot tested a dynamic informed consent simulation, paired with an educational website, focusing on consent for research utilizing the DBS in Michigan's BioTrust for Health. Results Out of 187 pilot testers recruited in two groups, 137 completed the consent simulation and exit survey. Over 50% indicated willingness to set up an account if the simulation went live and willingness to recommend it to others. Participants raised concerns about the process of ID verification and appeared to have little experience with sharing health information online. Conclusions Applying online, dynamic approaches to address the consent challenges raised by biobanks with legacy sample collections should be explored given the positive reaction to our pilot and the strong preference for active consent. Balancing security and privacy with accessibility and ease of use will continue to be a challenge. PMID:25359560

  1. Parental Protectiveness and Unprotected Sexual Activity Among Latino Adolescent Mothers and Fathers

    PubMed Central

    Lesser, Janna; Koniak-Griffin, Deborah; Huang, Rong; Takayanagi, Sumiko; Cumberland, William G.

    2012-01-01

    Latino pregnant and parenting adolescents living in inner cities are one of the populations at risk for acquiring HIV. Although teen parenthood has been predominantly looked at with a focus on potential adverse physical, emotional, and socioeconomic outcomes for the mother and child; a growing body of literature has documented the strengths and resiliency of young parents. Respeto/Proteger: Respecting and Protecting Our Relationships is a culturally rooted couple-focused and asset-based HIV prevention program developed for young Latino parents. In this program, parental protectiveness (defined as the parent-child emotional attachment that positively influences parental behavior) is viewed as an intrinsic and developing critical factor that supports resiliency and motivates behavioral change. The primary purpose of this article is to describe the longitudinal randomized study evaluating the effect of this intervention on unprotected vaginal sex 6 months post intervention and to determine whether parental protectiveness had a moderating effect on the intervention. The unique features of our database allow for examination of both individual and couple outcomes. PMID:19824837

  2. Medical ghostwriting and informed consent.

    PubMed

    Almassi, Ben

    2014-11-01

    Ghostwriting in its various forms has received critical scrutiny from medical ethicists, journal editors, and science studies scholars trying to explain where ghostwriting goes wrong and ascertain how to counter it. Recent analyses have characterized ghostwriting as plagiarism or fraud, and have urged that it be deterred through stricter compliance with journal submission requirements, conflict of interest disclosures, author-institutional censure, legal remedies, and journals' refusal to publish commercially sponsored articles. As a supplement to such efforts, this paper offers a critical assessment of medical ghostwriting as contrary to good patient care, on the grounds that it contradicts established general principles guiding clinical ethics. Specifically, I argue that ghostwriting undermines trust relationships between authors and their readers, and between these readers and their trusting patients, and in so doing contradicts the duty of respect for patient autonomy by obstructing informed consent. For this reason, complicity in ghostwriting practices should be understood as a violation of the professional ethical duties of physicians and other healthcare workers.

  3. Competency and consent in dementia.

    PubMed

    Fellows, L K

    1998-07-01

    Health care for demented older persons presents a range of ethical dilemmas. The disease process affects cognitive abilities, making competency a central issue. The syndrome of dementia carries a complex social overlay that colors perceptions of these patients and of their capacity for making decisions. An argument is made for a coherent, ethically based decision-making process that can be applied across the whole spectrum of dementia severity. The major ethical principles implicated in assessing a patient's ability to consent to treatment are reviewed. A sliding scale model of capacity is presented, in which the patient's ability to decide is weighed against the risk associated with the treatment decision in question. This model preserves the autonomy of the demented patient while minimizing the potential for harm. In situations where the patient is deemed incapable, two approaches that can be applied to making treatment decisions are contrasted. The 'prior competent choice' standard stresses the values that the patient held while competent. The 'best interests' standard moves the focus to the patient's subjective experience at the time the treatment is considered. The relative merits of these two concepts are evaluated in the context of dementia. Surveys of actual decision-making practice are contrasted with ethical and legal principles. The challenges inherent to applying the best interests standard are discussed. Despite the pitfalls, this standard offers an opportunity to restore the demented patient's sense of self. PMID:9670887

  4. Effects of paternal and maternal depressive symptoms on child internalizing symptoms and asthma disease activity: mediation by interparental negativity and parenting.

    PubMed

    Lim, JungHa; Wood, Beatrice L; Miller, Bruce D; Simmens, Samuel J

    2011-02-01

    This study tested a hypothesized model of the relationships among parental depressive symptoms, family process (interparental negativity and negative parenting behavior), child internalizing symptoms, and asthma disease activity. A total of 106 children with asthma, aged 7 to 17, participated with their fathers and mothers. Parental depressive symptoms were assessed by self-report. Interparental and parenting behaviors were observed and rated during family discussion tasks. Child internalizing symptoms were assessed by self-report and by clinician interview and rating. Asthma disease activity was assessed according to National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute guidelines. Results of structural equation modeling generally supported interparental negativity and negative parenting behavior as mediators linking parental depressive symptoms and child emotional and physical dysfunction. However, paternal and maternal depressive symptoms play their role through different pathways of negative family process. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Helping Parents Say No.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duel, Debra K.

    1988-01-01

    Provides some activities that are designed to help students understand some of the reasons why parents sometimes refuse to let their children have pets. Includes mathematics and writing lessons, a student checklist, and a set of tips for parents. (TW)

  6. The changing face of informed consent.

    PubMed

    Main, B G; Adair, S R L

    2015-10-01

    All healthcare professionals are required to gain a patient's consent before proceeding with examination, investigation or treatment. Gone are the days when consent was about protecting the professional. Following a recent landmark Supreme Court case, 'informed' consent is now embedded in UK law. Patients have the right to high-quality information that allows them to be involved in making decisions about their care. Dentists have a duty of care to provide this information and guide their patients through the process. This paper reviews key ethical, legal, and professional guidance available to dentists about informed consent and concludes by discussing how shared decision-making is a model of healthcare delivery with much to offer dentist and patient alike. PMID:26450244

  7. A linguistic model of informed consent.

    PubMed

    Marta, J

    1996-02-01

    The current disclosure model of informed consent ignores the linguistic complexity of any act of communication, and the increased risk of difficulties in the special circumstances of informed consent. This article explores, through linguistic analysis, the specificity of informed consent as a speech act, a communication act, and a form of dialogue, following on the theories of J.L. Austin, Roman Jakobson, and Mikhail Bakhtin, respectively. In the proposed model, informed consent is a performative speech act resulting from a series of communication acts which together constitute a dialogic, polyphonic, heteroglossial discourse. It is an act of speech that results in action being taken after a conversation has happened where distinct individuals, multiple voices, and multiple perspectives have been respected, and convention observed and recognized. It is more meaningful and more ethical for both patient and physician, in all their human facets including their interconnectedness.

  8. 32 CFR 634.8 - Implied consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to blood, breath, or urine tests. Persons who drive on the installation shall be deemed to have given their consent to evidential tests for alcohol or other drug content of their blood, breath, or...

  9. 32 CFR 634.8 - Implied consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to blood, breath, or urine tests. Persons who drive on the installation shall be deemed to have given their consent to evidential tests for alcohol or other drug content of their blood, breath, or...

  10. 32 CFR 634.8 - Implied consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to blood, breath, or urine tests. Persons who drive on the installation shall be deemed to have given their consent to evidential tests for alcohol or other drug content of their blood, breath, or...

  11. Informed Consent and Cluster-Randomized Trials

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Angus

    2012-01-01

    We argue that cluster-randomized trials are an important methodology, essential to the evaluation of many public health interventions. However, in the case of at least some cluster-randomized trials, it is not possible, or is incompatible with the aims of the study, to obtain individual informed consent. This should not necessarily be seen as an impediment to ethical approval, providing that sufficient justification is given for this omission. We further argue that it should be the institutional review board’s task to evaluate whether the protocol is sufficiently justified to proceed without consent and that this is preferable to any reliance on community consent or other means of proxy consent. PMID:22390511

  12. Participant observation, informed consent and ethical approval.

    PubMed

    Moore, Lucy; Savage, Jan

    2002-01-01

    Participant observation raises particular ethical issues in the health care context, especially in terms of ensuring informed consent. Lucy Moore and Jan Savage outline the specific dilemmas raised by participant observation in one practice setting and the difficulties experienced in complying with a predetermined process designed for gaining fully informed consent. Their experience suggests that, instead of fully formulating this process in advance of fieldwork, researchers need to be able to respond to the circumstances they find in the field.

  13. Advancing adolescent capacity to consent to transgender-related health care in Colombia and the USA.

    PubMed

    Romero, Katherine; Reingold, Rebecca

    2013-05-01

    Many sexual and reproductive health care services, including gender reassignment treatment, facilitate reproductive autonomy and self-determination of gender identity. Individuals who are unable to refuse or consent to these services on their own behalf, such as adolescents, are at risk of violations of their rights to privacy and self-determination. This paper explores the issue of adolescent capacity to consent to transgender-related health care in Colombia and the United States (USA), focusing on the two countries' struggles to balance the rights of adolescents to make autonomous and confidential decisions with the rights of their parents. Unfortunately, many countries, including Colombia and the USA, have been slow to develop jurisprudence and legislation that explicitly protect transgender adolescents' capacity to consent to gender assignment treatment. Courts in Colombia, however, have developed jurisprudence that restricts parents' ability to make medical decisions on behalf of their infant intersex children, which lays a strong normative foundation for advancing adolescent capacity to consent to transgender-related health care. It is a strategy that may prove effective in other countries in the Americas, even those with different frameworks for adolescent medical decision-making capacity, such as the USA. PMID:23684201

  14. 17 CFR 230.437a - Written consents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Written consents. 230.437a... REGULATIONS, SECURITIES ACT OF 1933 Written Consents § 230.437a Written consents. (a) This section applies... dispense with the requirement for the registrant to file the written consent of Arthur Andersen LLP (or...

  15. 17 CFR 230.437a - Written consents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Written consents. 230.437a... REGULATIONS, SECURITIES ACT OF 1933 Written Consents § 230.437a Written consents. (a) This section applies... dispense with the requirement for the registrant to file the written consent of Arthur Andersen LLP (or...

  16. 30 CFR 877.11 - Written consent for entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Written consent for entry. 877.11 Section 877... ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION RIGHTS OF ENTRY § 877.11 Written consent for entry. Written consent from the... police power will be undertaken only after reasonable efforts have been made to obtain written consent....

  17. 30 CFR 877.11 - Written consent for entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Written consent for entry. 877.11 Section 877... ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION RIGHTS OF ENTRY § 877.11 Written consent for entry. Written consent from the... police power will be undertaken only after reasonable efforts have been made to obtain written consent....

  18. 30 CFR 877.11 - Written consent for entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Written consent for entry. 877.11 Section 877... ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION RIGHTS OF ENTRY § 877.11 Written consent for entry. Written consent from the... police power will be undertaken only after reasonable efforts have been made to obtain written consent....

  19. 17 CFR 230.437a - Written consents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Written consents. 230.437a... REGULATIONS, SECURITIES ACT OF 1933 Written Consents § 230.437a Written consents. (a) This section applies... dispense with the requirement for the registrant to file the written consent of Arthur Andersen LLP (or...

  20. 17 CFR 230.437a - Written consents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Written consents. 230.437a... REGULATIONS, SECURITIES ACT OF 1933 Written Consents § 230.437a Written consents. (a) This section applies... dispense with the requirement for the registrant to file the written consent of Arthur Andersen LLP (or...

  1. 45 CFR 690.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 690.117 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION... (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form..., the consent form may be either of the following: (1) A written consent document that embodies...

  2. 45 CFR 690.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 690.117 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION... (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form..., the consent form may be either of the following: (1) A written consent document that embodies...

  3. 21 CFR 50.27 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 50.27 Section... PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Informed Consent of Human Subjects § 50.27 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in § 56.109(c), informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written...

  4. 28 CFR 46.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 46.117....117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form approved by the IRB and signed...

  5. 16 CFR 1028.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 1028.117... SUBJECTS § 1028.117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form approved by the IRB...

  6. 38 CFR 16.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 16.117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form... elements of informed consent required by § 16.116. This form may be read to the subject or the...

  7. 22 CFR 225.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 225.117....117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form approved by the IRB and signed...

  8. 34 CFR 97.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 97.117 Section 97...) § 97.117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent form approved by the IRB and signed...

  9. 45 CFR 690.117 - Documentation of informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Documentation of informed consent. 690.117 Section... PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 690.117 Documentation of informed consent. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, informed consent shall be documented by the use of a written consent...

  10. 30 CFR 877.11 - Written consent for entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Written consent for entry. 877.11 Section 877... ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION RIGHTS OF ENTRY § 877.11 Written consent for entry. Written consent from the... police power will be undertaken only after reasonable efforts have been made to obtain written consent....

  11. 42 CFR 2.31 - Form of written consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Form of written consent. 2.31 Section 2.31 Public... OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Disclosures With Patient's Consent § 2.31 Form of written consent. (a) Required elements. A written consent to a disclosure under these regulations must include:...

  12. 17 CFR 230.437a - Written consents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Written consents. 230.437a... REGULATIONS, SECURITIES ACT OF 1933 Written Consents § 230.437a Written consents. (a) This section applies... dispense with the requirement for the registrant to file the written consent of Arthur Andersen LLP (or...

  13. [Informed consent: going through the motions?].

    PubMed

    Shiber, Shachaf; Glezerman, Marek

    2014-02-01

    We review the concept of informed consent in clinical medicine and in research. Informed consent is a complex practice designed to protect the legal rights of the patient, to maintain ethics in support of the patient's autonomy to arrive at his own decisions related to medical interventions, to ensure appropriate quality of care, and to build trust between the physician and the patient regarding medical procedures, medication or clinical research. It must be borne in mind that the patient's signature on a document of informed consent does not automatically imply comprehension. Physicians need to provide the information about the patient's condition, and in the case of research, they need to provide an exhaustive explanation related to benefits and the risks of the research project for the patient and to society. Physicians need to be available to readily answer patients' questions. Signing an informed consent form should not become a mere bureaucratic procedure of "going through the motions". Without emphasis on delivering understandable and relevant information, tailored to the recipient and clarifying that explanations have been properly understood, informed consent becomes but a bureaucratic burden. There is an urgent need to complete the process of conveying information by a structured mechanism aimed to ensure adequate comprehension. Only then will the process of obtaining informed consent become meaningful.

  14. Recent Temporal Trends in Parent-Reported Physical Activity in Children in the United States, 2009 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Loprinzi, Paul D; Davis, Robert E

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to provide recent temporal trends in parent-reported physical activity in children (6-11 years) between 2009 and 2014. Data from the 2009 to 2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were used. The analytic sample included 3946 children. Parent proxy of child physical activity at each of the 3 2-year cycles was assessed. For the entire sample, there was a quadratic trend, with the number of days children engaged in at least 60 min/d of physical activity increasing in the period 2011 to 2012 (6.12 days) when compared with the period 2009 to 2010 (5.96 days) and then decreasing in the period 2013 to 2014 (5.83 days). A similar quadratic trend was evident for boys, those above the poverty level, non-Hispanic whites (particularly boys), and those with less than the 85th body mass index-for-age percentile based on sex. A negative linear trend was observed for those above the poverty level and non-Hispanic whites (particularly girls). In conclusion, these findings provide suggestive evidence that over the past 6 years (1999-2014), parents report that children's physical activity has slightly decreased in the latest years, with this observation being most pronounced in boys, those above the poverty level, non-Hispanic whites, and those with less than the 85th body mass index-for-age and sex percentile. Encouragingly, however, across all evaluated subpopulations, most children (55%-82%), as determined by their parents, engaged in 60 min/d of physical activity (consistent with government recommendations).

  15. Consent for audio-video recording of informed consent process in rural South India

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Ramesh Chand; Purty, Anil J.; Singh, Neelima

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Objectives: In recent times, audio-video (A-V) recording of consent process for all the study subjects entering a clinical trial has been made mandatory. A-V recording of informed consent process is a big challenge due to confidentiality and the sociocultural environment in India. It is important to find out the acceptability for A-V recording of the consent process and reasons for refusal, if any to address this new challenge. Materials and Methods: A descriptive survey was done among 150 residents of a rural community of South India. Acceptability for A-V recording of consent process was assessed among those who had given the informed written consent for participation in the study. An attempt to find the factors determining the refusal was also made. Results: More than one-third (34%) of the study subjects refused to give consent for A-V recording of consent process. Not interested in recording or don’t like to be recorded (39%) were the most common reasons to refuse for A-V recording of consent process. The refusal was higher among female and younger age-group adult subjects. Socioeconomic status was not found to be significantly associated with refusal to consent for A-V recording. Conclusion: Refusal for A-V recording of consent process is high in the South Indian rural population. Before any major clinical trial, particularly a field trial, an assessment of consent for A-V recording would be helpful in recruitment of study subjects. PMID:26229752

  16. Some observations on informed consent in non-therapeutic research.

    PubMed Central

    Garnham, J C

    1975-01-01

    The quality of the consent obtained from 41 volunteer subjects in eight experiments is evaluated. Five subjects (all physicians) gave informed consent; 22 subjects gave partially informed consent; and 14 subjects merely gave consent. It is argued that 'informed' consent is obtainable only from medically trained people, and that lip service to this concept in laymen should cease. The concept of medical competence should instead be introduced and a personal medical referee appointed to adjudicate on behalf of the volunteer. PMID:765462

  17. A participatory parent-focused intervention promoting physical activity in preschools: design of a cluster-randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background With rates of childhood obesity increasing, physical activity (PA) promotion especially in young children has assumed greater importance. Given the limited effectiveness of most interventions to date, new approaches are needed. The General Systems theory suggests that involving parents as intervention targets may be effective in fostering healthier life styles in children. We describe the development of a parent-focused participatory intervention and the procedures used to evaluate its effectiveness in increasing daily PA in preschoolers. Methods/Design Thirty-seven South German preschools were identified for this study and agreed to participate. Using a two-armed, controlled cluster-randomized trial design we test a participatory intervention with parents as the primary target group and potential agents of behavioural change. Specifically, the intervention is designed to engage parents in the development, refinement and selection of project ideas to promote PA and in incorporating these ideas into daily routines within the preschool community, consisting of children, teachers and parents. Our study is embedded within an existing state-sponsored programme providing structured gym lessons to preschool children. Thus, child-based PA outcomes from the study arm with the parent-focused intervention and the state-sponsored programme are compared with those from the study arm with the state-sponsored programme alone. The evaluation entails baseline measurements of study outcomes as well as follow-up measurements at 6 and 12 months. Accelerometry measures PA intensity over a period of six days, with the mean over six days used as the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcomes include childrens' BMI, a sum of averaged skin fold thickness measurements across multiple sites, and PA behaviour. Longitudinal multilevel models are used to assess within-subject change and between-group differences in study outcomes, adjusted for covariates at the preschool and

  18. Rapid Ethical Assessment on Informed Consent Content and Procedure in Hintalo-Wajirat, Northern Ethiopia: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Abay, Serebe; Addissie, Adamu; Davey, Gail; Farsides, Bobbie; Addissie, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background Informed consent is a key component of bio-medical research involving human participants. However, obtaining informed consent is challenging in low literacy and resource limited settings. Rapid Ethical Assessment (REA) can be used to contextualize and simplify consent information within a given study community. The current study aimed to explore the effects of social, cultural, and religious factors during informed consent process on a proposed HPV-serotype prevalence study. Methodology A qualitative community-based REA was conducted in Adigudom and Mynebri Kebeles, Northern Ethiopia, from July to August 2013. Data were collected by a multi-disciplinary team using open ended questions concerning informed consent components in relation to the parent study. The team conducted one-to-one In-Depth Interviews (IDI) and Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) with key informants and community members to collect data based on the themes of the study. Tape recorded data were transcribed in Tigrigna and then translated into English. Data were categorized and thematically analyzed using open coding and content analysis based on pre-defined themes. Results The REA study revealed a number of socio-cultural issues relevant to the proposed study. Low community awareness about health research, participant rights and cervical cancer were documented. Giving a vaginal sample for testing was considered to be highly embarrassing, whereas giving a blood sample made participants worry that they might be given a result without the possibility of treatment. Verbal consent was preferred to written consent for the proposed study. Conclusion This rapid ethical assessment disclosed important socio-cultural issues which might act as barriers to informed decision making. The findings were important for contextual modification of the Information Sheet, and to guide the best consent process for the proposed study. Both are likely to have enabled participants to understand the informed consent

  19. [Parent-child interaction during activity and rest behavior of inhabitants of Trobriand Islands (Papua New Guinea)].

    PubMed

    Siegmund, R; Tittel, M; Schiefenhövel, W

    1995-01-01

    Sleep/activity patterns were continuously registered using microelectronic actometers on inhabitants of Tauwema (Papua New Guinea) who represent a traditionally living society. Results of analysis of parent-infant interactions of 4 families with infants of 1, 2, 5, and 11 months of age are presented. Results of power spectral analysis suggest that time patterns of mother-infant interactions are changing with the infants AE age. Consequences of this developmental process are discussed.

  20. Intervention Research with Youths at Elevated Risk for Suicide: Meeting the Ethical and Regulatory Challenges of Informed Consent and Assent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Cheryl A.; Kramer, Anne C.

    2008-01-01

    Intervention research with youths at elevated risk for suicidal behavior and suicide--a vulnerable and high risk population--presents investigators with numerous ethical challenges. This report specifically addresses those challenges involving the informed consent and assent process with parents/guardians and youths. The challenges are delineated…

  1. 75 FR 62913 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Form DS-3053, Statement of Consent or Special...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-13

    ...: Issuance of a Passport to a Minor Under Age 16, OMB Control Number 1405-0129 ACTION: Notice of request for... Collection: Statement of Consent or Special Circumstances: Issuance of a Passport to a Minor Under Age 16... age of 16. The primary purpose of soliciting the information is to ensure that both parents and/or...

  2. 75 FR 35033 - U-Haul International, Inc. and AMERCO; Analysis of Agreement Containing Consent Order to Aid...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... consent order with U-Haul International, Inc. and its parent company AMERCO (collectively referred to as... company in the United States. Edward J. Shoen is the Chairman, President and Director of AMERCO, and the... developed a strategy in an attempt to eliminate this competition and thereby secure higher rates. Mr....

  3. Putting the 'informed' into 'consent': a matter of plain language.

    PubMed

    Green, J B; Duncan, R E; Barnes, G L; Oberklaid, F

    2003-12-01

    Health professionals frequently write at the same level for lay readers as they write for peers. In relation to health research and ethical requirements to provide written explanation of studies, this can complicate the notion of informed consent. Plain language information statements need to be clearly understood by research subjects if the ethics process for research approval is to fulfil its objective. Many delays in gaining ethics approval for child-related research are caused by substandard plain language statements (PLS). We describe specific issues for information statements for research with children, young people and their parents/guardians, particularly in consideration of the literacy capabilities of the general population. We highlight the usefulness of everyday language when explaining research and science in writing to families, and present some guidelines for writing PLS that have emerged from the introduction of a plain language service by an Ethics in Human Research Committee. PMID:14629504

  4. The Development of Reading Skills in Kindergarten Influence of Parental Beliefs about School Readiness, Family Activities, and Children's Attitudes to School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Eunjoo

    2016-01-01

    Children's early home learning experiences are important influences on children's adjustment and achievement in the early years of school. This study explores the relationships between parental beliefs about school readiness, family engagement in home learning activities, on children's attitudes to school as reported by parents, and children's…

  5. The Effect of Parent-Child Function on Physical Activity and Television Viewing among Adolescents with and without Special Healthcare Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McManus, Beth M.; Mandic, Carmen Gomez; Carle, Adam C.; Robert, Stephanie A.

    2012-01-01

    Using the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health, the association between parent-child function and physical activity and television viewing was investigated among a national sample of adolescents in the United States. Parent-child function was measured using the National Survey of Children's Health "Family Function" survey items and…

  6. Informed Consent in Social Work Ethics Education: Guiding Student Education with an Informed Consent Template

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkemper, Ellen M.

    2004-01-01

    This article proposes the use of an informed consent template for educating social work students. The elements of informed consent, derived primarily from the National Association of Social Workers' "Code of Ethics", are operationalized in the template. The suggestion is that instructors will use the template for classroom instruction and require…

  7. Patient consent to observation. Responses to requests for written consent in an academic family practice unit.

    PubMed Central

    Shafir, M. S.; Silversides, C.; Waters, I.; MacRury, K.; Frank, J. W.; Becker, L. A.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine patient rates of consent to observation and response to being asked for written consent. DESIGN: Patients were asked to provide written consent for a supervising physician to observe a resident performing a physical examination, or for both direct observation and videotaping of the visit. After the visit, all patients were interviewed, and patients who had given written consent completed a questionnaire. SETTING: The family practice unit at a teaching hospital affiliated with the University of Toronto. PARTICIPANTS: A representative sample of new and returning patients. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Patient consent to observation or videotaping. RESULTS: Most patients (92.2%) agreed to be observed. Of those asked only for consent to observe, 97.3% agreed. Of those asked for consent to observe and videotape, 85.2% agreed. When specifically asked, 22% of patients who agreed to observation expressed concerns. CONCLUSION: We must devise clear policies and procedures for obtaining patient consent that are both sensitive to patients' concerns and administratively effective. PMID:7580386

  8. The legal authority of mature minors to consent to general medical treatment.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Doriane Lambelet; Rosoff, Philip M

    2013-04-01

    The nature and scope of mature adolescents' legal authority to consent to general medical treatment without parental involvement is often misrepresented by commentators. This state of affairs is further complicated by the law itself, which has developed a broad "mature minor exception" to the general requirement of parental consent in abortion cases and which has additionally carved out numerous specific status-based and condition-based exceptions to that requirement. In these circumstances, it is not always a simple matter for physicians and other medical professionals who treat adolescents to ascertain the applicable law. In this article, we discuss the underlying differences between medical ethics and law, which have caused some of the confusion in this area, and we set out the most current legal rules governing adolescent decision-making authority in general medical settings. A comprehensive analysis of both statutory and common law demonstrates that in such settings, parental consent continues to be required by most jurisdictions, even when the minor can be considered cognitively "mature."

  9. Informed Consent-Uninformed Participants: Shortcomings of Online Social Science Consent Forms and Recommendations for Improvement.

    PubMed

    Perrault, Evan K; Nazione, Samantha A

    2016-07-01

    As informed consent forms continue to lengthen, are these lengthening forms helping to create better informed participants? The aim of this research was to determine whether the length of consent forms affected reading frequency and comprehension, and to provide recommendations on how to improve consent forms in the social sciences so they are more likely to be read. A quasi-experiment was conducted using actual consent forms at two liberal arts schools, one requiring a long form (463 words, n = 73) and one requiring a shorter form (236 words, n = 57). Participants exposed to the shorter form reported fully reading, or at least skimming the form more frequently than those exposed to the longer form. Those exposed to the shorter form also comprehended more of the form's information. The majority of participants indicated consent forms need to be shortened if researchers want future participants to be more likely to read these forms' contents. Additional recommendations are discussed. PMID:27329533

  10. Building Parent Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Richard C.; Bloom, John W.

    1973-01-01

    Discussed is the rationale behind parent involvement in guidance and educational activities, together with specific suggestions for involving parents with other adults (parent advisory committees, informal coffees, Transactional analysis (groups etc.), with children (story hours, trips, demonstrations, counseling booths, testing, interviewing,…

  11. Parent Outreach Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nitzberg, Joel; Sparrow, Judith

    2001-01-01

    Presents the Massachusetts Parent Involvement Project (MassPIP) comprising 59 local community coalitions of businesses, service organizations, school personnel, parents, and children. Describes steps coalitions follow in planning events and presents community success stories. The project developed a set of activities that parents can do at home…

  12. Autonomy and informed consent: a mistaken association?

    PubMed

    Kristinsson, Sigurdur

    2007-09-01

    For decades, the greater part of efforts to improve regulatory frameworks for research ethics has focused on informed consent procedures; their design, codification and regulation. Why is informed consent thought to be so important? Since the publication of the Belmont Report in 1979, the standard response has been that obtaining informed consent is a way of treating individuals as autonomous agents. Despite its political success, the philosophical validity of this Belmont view cannot be taken for granted. If the Belmont view is to be based on a conception of autonomy that generates moral justification, it will either have to be reinterpreted along Kantian lines or coupled with a something like Mill's conception of individuality. The Kantian interpretation would be a radical reinterpretation of the Belmont view, while the Millian justification is incompatible with the liberal requirement that justification for public policy should be neutral between controversial conceptions of the good. This consequence might be avoided by replacing Mill's conception of individuality with a procedural conception of autonomy, but I argue that the resulting view would in fact fail to support a non-Kantian, autonomy-based justification of informed consent. These difficulties suggest that insofar as informed consent is justified by respect for persons and considerations of autonomy, as the Belmont report maintained, the justification should be along the lines of Kantian autonomy and not individual autonomy. PMID:17333491

  13. Simplifying informed consent for biorepositories: Stakeholder perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Beskow, Laura M.; Friedman, Joelle Y.; Hardy, Natalie C.; Lin, Li; Weinfurt, Kevin P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Complex and sometimes controversial information must be conveyed during the consent process for participation in biorepositories, and studies suggest that consent documents in general are growing in length and complexity. As a first step toward creating a simplified biorepository consent form, we gathered data from multiple stakeholders about what information was most important for prospective participants to know when making a decision about taking part in a biorepository. Methods We recruited 52 research participants, 12 researchers, and 20 institutional review board representatives from Durham and Kannapolis, NC. These subjects were asked to read a model biorepository consent form and highlight sentences they deemed most important. Results On average, IRB representatives identified 72.3% of the sentences as important; researchers selected 53.0%, and participants 40.4% (P = 0.0004). Participants most often selected sentences about the kinds of individual research results that might be offered, privacy risks, and large-scale data sharing. Researchers highlighted sentences about the biorepository's purpose, privacy protections, costs, and participant access to individual results. IRB representatives highlighted sentences about collection of basic personal information, medical record access, and duration of storage. Conclusion The differing mandates of these three groups can translate into widely divergent opinions about what information is important and appropriate to include a consent form. These differences could frustrate efforts to move simplified forms—for biobanking as well as for other kinds of research—into actual use, despite continued calls for such forms. PMID:20697289

  14. Longitudinal changes in the time parents spend in activities with their adolescent children as a function of child age, pubertal status, and gender.

    PubMed

    Dubas, Judith Semon; Gerris, Jan R M

    2002-12-01

    This study examined the time Dutch mothers (N = 301) and fathers (N = 255) spend per day engaging in 4 activities (going somewhere, doing something, watching TV, and eating together) with their adolescent children both concurrently and 5 years later. Also assessed was whether parent-child shared time was related to parent or child gender and whether age-related differences could be explained by adolescent pubertal status, family conflict, adolescent and parent work or volunteer hours, parental work stress, and adolescent computer use. Finally, the study examined whether family conflict predicted changes in shared time and whether shared time predicted changes in conflict. The findings showed that age changes depended on the activity and that pubertal status mediated age differences in TV viewing among mixed-gender parent-child pairs. Shared time during pre-, early, and mid-adolescence was linked to decreases in family conflict 5 years later.

  15. Sex and parental hypertension as predictors of worsened red blood cell membrane enzyme activities in type 1 insulin-dependent diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Finotti, P; Piccoli, A

    1993-01-01

    The possibility that distinct genetic factors may concur, in association with diabetes, to increase susceptibility to vascular morbidity, including hypertension, has been evaluated in ninety-four normotensive insulin-dependent diabetic patients by testing both the frequency and prevalence of hypertension in parents and by measuring membrane red blood cell enzyme activities. Parental hypertension was present in a significantly higher proportion of diabetic compared to control subjects. A significant decrease in basal membrane red blood cell (Na(+)-K+), (Mg2+) and (Ca2+) ATPase activities was also related to the disease and was apparently uninfluenced by short--or long term metabolic control. In contrast with what was observed in the control group, sex caused in diabetic subjects significant variations in red blood cell enzyme activities, with women showing the lowest mean basal values of all enzyme activities. Parental hypertension turned out to be an independent risk factor in significantly reducing red blood cell enzyme activities both in diabetic and control subjects. However, whereas in diabetic subjects sex interacted strongly with parental hypertension in causing reduction of enzyme activities, in controls the effect of parental hypertension was sex-independent and significantly reduced basal enzyme activities, thus rendering subjects similar to diabetics. It is concluded that both sex and parental hypertension in association with diabetes, are predictors of further damage to red blood cell enzyme activities, which may thus be linked to increased risk of susceptibility towards vascular complications. PMID:8389303

  16. Parental Protectiveness and Unprotected Sexual Activity among Latino Adolescent Mothers and Fathers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesser, Janna; Koniak-Griffin, Deborah; Huang, Rong; Takayanagi, Sumiko; Cumberland, William G.

    2009-01-01

    Latino pregnant and parenting adolescents living in inner cities are one of the populations at risk for acquiring HIV. Although teen parenthood has been predominantly looked at with a focus on potential adverse physical, emotional, and socioeconomic outcomes for the mother and child; a growing body of literature has documented the strengths and…

  17. Examining Parent Involvement Activities in Two Immigrant-Impacted Schools: A Comparative Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marquez, Amalia

    2012-01-01

    K-12 schools with large immigrant populations face a myriad of challenges, including low academic achievement and high dropout rates of Latino students. Parental involvement is a practical strategy in positively influencing student outcomes along the K-12 continuum. To this end, it is essential that immigrant impacted schools work together with…

  18. Parental Monitoring, Peer Activities and Alcohol Use: A Study Based on Data on Swedish Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergh, Daniel; Hagquist, Curt; Starrin, Bengt

    2011-01-01

    Aim: This study investigates the association between two types of social relations during leisure time (to parents and peers) and the frequency of alcohol use among Swedish adolescents, taking possible interaction effects into account. Methods: The data were collected during the 1995-2005 time period by using a questionnaire handed out in the…

  19. Advice for Parents: Recommendations for Home Literacy Activities Based upon Studies of Young Successful Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasinski, Timothy V.

    Two research studies hold promise of assisting educators in developing appropriate recommendations for helping parents help their children learn to read and write. Dolores Durkin studied children who entered school already knowing how to read. She followed the students for several years and found that the early readers maintained or extended their…

  20. Patients' consent preferences for research uses of information in electronic medical records: interview and survey data

    PubMed Central

    Willison, Donald J; Keshavjee, Karim; Nair, Kalpana; Goldsmith, Charlie; Holbrook, Anne M

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To assess patients' preferred method of consent for the use of information from electronic medical records for research. Design Interviews and a structured survey of patients in practices with electronic medical records. Setting Family practices in southern Ontario, Canada. Participants 123 patients: 17 were interviewed and 106 completed a survey. Main outcome measures Patients' opinions and concerns on use of information from their medical records for research and their preferences for method of consent. Results Most interviewees were willing to allow the use of their information for research purposes, although the majority preferred that consent was sought first. The seeking of consent was considered an important element of respect for the individual. Most interviewees made little distinction between identifiable and anonymised data. Research sponsored by private insurance firms generated the greatest concern, and research sponsored by foundation the least. Sponsorship by drug companies evoked negative responses during interview and positive responses in the survey. Conclusions Patients are willing to allow information from their medical records to be used for research, but most prefer to be asked for consent either verbally or in writing. What is already known on this topicLegislation is being introduced worldwide to restrict the circumstances under which personal information may be used for secondary purposes without consentLittle empirical information exists about patients' concerns over privacy and preferences for consent for use of such information for researchWhat this study addsPatients are willing to allow personal information to be used for research purposes but want to be actively consulted firstPatients make little distinction between identifiable and non-identifiable informationMost patients prefer a time limit for their consent PMID:12586673

  1. Informed Consent for Web Paradata Use

    PubMed Central

    Couper, Mick P.; Singer, Eleanor

    2013-01-01

    Survey researchers are making increasing use of paradata – such as keystrokes, clicks, and timestamps – to evaluate and improve survey instruments but also to understand respondents and how they answer surveys. Since the introduction of paradata, researchers have been asking whether and how respondents should be informed about the capture and use of their paradata while completing a survey. In a series of three vignette-based experiments, we examine alternative ways of informing respondents about capture of paradata and seeking consent for their use. In all three experiments, any mention of paradata lowers stated willingness to participate in the hypothetical surveys. Even the condition where respondents were asked to consent to the use of paradata at the end of an actual survey resulted in a significant proportion declining. Our research shows that requiring such explicit consent may reduce survey participation without adequately informing survey respondents about what paradata are and why they are being used. PMID:24098312

  2. Informed consent: an international researchers' perspective.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Roberto; Borasky, David; Rice, Robert; Carayon, Florence; Wong, Emelita

    2007-01-01

    We reported 164 researchers' recommendations for information that should be included in the informed consent process. These recommendations were obtained during training workshops conducted in Africa, Europe, and the United States. The 8 elements of informed consent of the US Code of Federal Regulations were used to identify 95 items of information ("points"), most related to benefits and research description. Limited consensus was found among the 3 workshops: of the 95 points, only 27 (28%) were identified as useful by all groups. These points serve as a springboard for identifying information applicable in different geographic areas and indicate the need for involving a variety of individuals and stakeholders, with different research and cultural perspectives, in the development of informed consent, particularly for research undertaken in international settings.

  3. Limning the Semantic Frontier of Informed Consent.

    PubMed

    Washington, Harriet A

    2016-09-01

    It is the researcher's responsibility to provide accurate, complete, and unbiased verbal and written information yet, as this essay discusses, challenges to meaningful research consent abound in the communication between researcher and subject. This discussion of these challenges is far from exhaustive, but it will flag some of the potholes that researchers must anticipate on the sometimes rocky road to eliciting meaningful consent. These include, but are not limited to, inadequate scientific literacy, poorly written consent forms, and even the deployment of scientific terms and seductive acronyms like CURE and MIRACL. Studies with acronyms, for example, enroll five times as many patients as those without, are more likely to be published by prestigious journals, and have higher Jadad methodologic quality scores although they are no more likely to conclude with positive findings. Other barriers to researcher-subject communication include: widely differing beliefs and customs, semiotics, socioeconomic status, iatrophobia, and dramatically different histories of treatment in the medical-research arena. PMID:27587444

  4. Dimensions of informed consent to treatment.

    PubMed

    Dickens, B M; Cook, R J

    2004-06-01

    Modern law approaches patients' consent to treatment not only through liability for unauthorized touching, namely criminal assault and/or civil (non-criminal) battery, but also through liability for negligence. Physicians must exercise appropriate skill in conducting procedures, and in providing patients with information material to the choices that patients have to make. The doctrine of informed consent serves the ethical goal of respecting patients' rights of self-determination. Information is initially pitched at the reasonable, prudent person in the patient's circumstances, and then fine-tuned to what is actually known about the particular patient's needs for information. Elements to be disclosed include the patient's prognosis if untreated, alternative treatment goals and options, the success rate of each option, and its known effects and material risks. Risks include medical risks, but also risks to general well-being such as economic and similar reasonable interests. Consent is a continuing process, not an event or signed form.

  5. Limning the Semantic Frontier of Informed Consent.

    PubMed

    Washington, Harriet A

    2016-09-01

    It is the researcher's responsibility to provide accurate, complete, and unbiased verbal and written information yet, as this essay discusses, challenges to meaningful research consent abound in the communication between researcher and subject. This discussion of these challenges is far from exhaustive, but it will flag some of the potholes that researchers must anticipate on the sometimes rocky road to eliciting meaningful consent. These include, but are not limited to, inadequate scientific literacy, poorly written consent forms, and even the deployment of scientific terms and seductive acronyms like CURE and MIRACL. Studies with acronyms, for example, enroll five times as many patients as those without, are more likely to be published by prestigious journals, and have higher Jadad methodologic quality scores although they are no more likely to conclude with positive findings. Other barriers to researcher-subject communication include: widely differing beliefs and customs, semiotics, socioeconomic status, iatrophobia, and dramatically different histories of treatment in the medical-research arena.

  6. Assessing the validity and reliability of the perceptions of the Consent To Sex Scale.

    PubMed

    Jozkowski, Kristen N; Peterson, Zoë D

    2014-01-01

    Although sexual assault prevention education tends to focus on consent promotion as a means to reduce rates of sexual assault, little is known about how college students consent to sexual activity. The current study aimed to better understand college students' consent via the systematic development of the Consent to Sex Scale (CSS), utilizing mixed methods via three phases and two waves of data collection. In Phase 1, qualitative data were collected from college students (n = 185) to provide a foundation for item writing. In Phase 2, closed-ended items were written for a quantitative instrument and reviewed by a team of experts. In Phase 3, a quantitative survey, including items written in Phase 2, was administered to college students (n = 685); the measure was assessed for its psychometric properties. Exploratory factor analysis was utilized, resulting in a five-factor solution. The CSS and corresponding factors demonstrated high internal consistency reliability and expected gender differences, supporting the construct validity of the measure. The CSS assesses college students' cues for indicating consent to sex, a construct not addressed by previous measures. The validated scale may be useful in future research to better understand how consent relates to other behaviors or constructs.

  7. Predictors of body mass index in female parents whose children participate in a competitive, creative, problem-solving program

    PubMed Central

    Moustaid-Moussa, Naima; Costello, Carol A.; Greer, Betty P.; Spence, Marsha; Fitzhugh, Eugene; Muenchen, Robert; Kalupahana, Nishan S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent findings from our research indicate that children participating in a creative afterschool program exhibit overall healthier lifestyle practices compared to the average US pediatric population. This observation led us to investigate the prevalence of overweight/obesity and lifestyle practices of their parents. Objective To determine the strongest predictors of weight status for female parents whose children were participating in such creative afterschool program. Design Surveyed subjects were parents of children who competed in the 2008 and 2009 Destination ImagiNation® Global Finals in Knoxville, Tennessee. A total of 4,608 children participated in data collection, with parental consent. For the combined 2 years, 1,118 parents, 87% of whom were females (n=1,032) completed online questionnaires, which were based on the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and included self-reported height, weight, dietary intake, physical activity, and socioeconomic status. The majority of this population was white, and less than 5% were African American or Hispanic. Results We report here results obtained for the female parents. Only 45.2% of these female parents were overweight/obese, compared to a national average of 64.1% reported by the National Health Nutrition Examination Surveys for 2007—2008. Furthermore, this population was significantly more physically active compared to national average. Most parents (76%) had completed a college degree and reported high incomes. Parents with the lowest income were the most obese in this population. Finally, we found a significant association between parent and child weight status. Conclusions These studies demonstrate that female parents of children who have healthy lifestyles were physically active, which likely accounts for the parents’ lower overweight/obesity rates. In addition to physical activity, income and percentage of calories from fat were all predictors of weight status. PMID:22912600

  8. Reconceptualizing Parent Involvement: Parent as Accomplice or Parent as Partner?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stitt, Nichole M.; Brooks, Nancy J.

    2014-01-01

    Policy statements of the last two decades have directed schools to enter into partnerships with parents to enhance the social, emotional, and academic growth of their children. However, in practice and scholarship, parental involvement has been constructed as attendance to school-based activities and needs. This article draws on data from an…

  9. From genetic privacy to open consent.

    PubMed

    Lunshof, Jeantine E; Chadwick, Ruth; Vorhaus, Daniel B; Church, George M

    2008-05-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput genomic technologies are showing concrete results in the form of an increasing number of genome-wide association studies and in the publication of comprehensive individual genome-phenome data sets. As a consequence of this flood of information the established concepts of research ethics are stretched to their limits, and issues of privacy, confidentiality and consent for research are being re-examined. Here, we show the feasibility of the co-development of scientific innovation and ethics, using the open-consent framework that was implemented in the Personal Genome Project as an example.

  10. Mediating Effects of Self-Efficacy, Benefits and Barriers on the Association between Peer and Parental Factors and Physical Activity among Adolescent Girls with a Lower Educational Level

    PubMed Central

    Cardon, Greet; De Craemer, Marieke; D’Haese, Sara; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of physical activity among lower educated adolescent girls is low, suggesting it is important to have insights into the complex processes that may underlie their physical activity levels. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the mediating effects of self-efficacy, perceived benefits and barriers on the associations between peer and parental variables and physical activity among lower educated adolescent girls. Methods In total, 226 girls (mean age 16.0±1.0 years; 53% technical education; 47% vocational education) from a convenience sample of 6 secondary schools in Flanders, Belgium, completed a questionnaire on their total physical activity level and related peer and parental variables (i.e. modeling of physical activity, co-participation in physical activities and encouragement to be active) and personal variables (i.e. self-efficacy to be active, and specific perceived benefits of physical activity and specific barriers to be active). Mediating effects were tested using MacKinnon’s product-of-coefficients test based on multilevel linear regression analyses. Results Higher peer and parental modeling, co-participation and encouragement were significantly related to a higher physical activity level among adolescent girls (p<0.05). Self-efficacy, the perceived benefits of having fun, being around friends or meeting new people, and not being bored and the perceived barrier of not liking physical activity mediated several associations between peer and parental variables and girls’ physical activity, with some of the mediated proportions exceeding 60%. Conclusions This study contributed to a better understanding of the complexity of how parental and peer factors work together with personal factors to influence the physical activity levels of adolescent girls with a lower educational level. Interventions should involve both peers and parents, as they may influence girls’ physical activity both directly and indirectly through the

  11. Broad consent versus dynamic consent in biobank research: Is passive participation an ethical problem?

    PubMed Central

    Steinsbekk, Kristin Solum; Kåre Myskja, Bjørn; Solberg, Berge

    2013-01-01

    In the endeavour of biobank research there is dispute concerning what type of consent and which form of donor–biobank relationship meet high ethical standards. Up until now, a ‘broad consent' model has been used in many present-day biobank projects. However it has been, by some scholars, deemed as a pragmatic, and not an acceptable ethical solution. Calls for change have been made on the basis of avoidance of paternalism, intentions to fulfil the principle of autonomy, wish for increased user participation, a questioning of the role of experts and ideas advocating reduction of top–down governance. Recently, an approach termed ‘dynamic consent' has been proposed to meet such challenges. Dynamic consent uses modern communication strategies to inform, involve, offer choices and last but not the least obtain consent for every research projects based on biobank resources. At first glance dynamic consent seems appealing, and we have identified six claims of superiority of this model; claims pertaining to autonomy, information, increased engagement, control, social robustness and reciprocity. However, after closer examination, there seems to be several weaknesses with a dynamic consent approach; among others the risk of inviting people into the therapeutic misconception as well as individualizing the ethical review of research projects. When comparing the two models, broad consent still holds and can be deemed a good ethical solution for longitudinal biobank research. Nevertheless, there is potential for improvement in the broad model, and criticism can be met by adapting some of the modern communication strategies proposed in the dynamic consent approach. PMID:23299918

  12. Parental safety concerns and active school commute: correlates across multiple domains in the home-to-school journey

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Empirical evidence of the relationship between safety concerns and walking to school (WTS) is growing. However, current research offers limited understanding of the multiple domains of parental safety concerns and the specific mechanisms through which parents articulate safety concerns about WTS. A more detailed understanding is needed to inform environmental and policy interventions. This study examined the relationships between both traffic safety and personal safety concerns and WTS in the U.S. Methods This cross-sectional analysis examined data from the Texas Childhood Obesity Prevention Policy Evaluation (T-COPPE) project, an evaluation of state-wide obesity prevention policy interventions. All study data were from the survey (n = 830) of parents with 4th grade students attending 81 elementary schools across Texas, and living within two miles from their children's schools. Traffic safety and personal safety concerns were captured for the home neighborhood, en-route to school, and school environments. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to assess the odds of WTS controlling for significant covariates. Results Overall, 18% of parents reported that their child walked to school on most days of the week. For traffic safety, students were more likely to walk to school if their parent reported favorable perceptions about the following items in the home neighborhood environment: higher sidewalk availability, well maintained sidewalks and safe road crossings. For the route to school, the odds of WTS were higher for those who reported "no problem" with each one of the following: traffic speed, amount of traffic, sidewalks/pathways, intersection/crossing safety, and crossing guards, when compared to those that reported "always a problem". For personal safety in the en-route to school environment, the odds of WTS were lower when parents reported concerns about: stray or dangerous animals and availability of others with whom to walk. Conclusions

  13. Parent Involvement: Influencing Factors and Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pena, Delores C.

    2000-01-01

    Investigated the involvement of Mexican American parents in their children's elementary schools. Interviews with teachers, parents, and administrators and observations of parent activities indicated that parent involvement was influenced by factors like language, parent cliques, parent education, school staff attitudes, cultural factors, and…

  14. Physical activity and fitness in 8-year-old overweight and normal weight children and their parents

    PubMed Central

    Karppanen, Anna-Kaisa; Ahonen, Sanna-Mari; Tammelin, Tuija; Vanhala, Marja; Korpelainen, Raija

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To compare the physical fitness and physical activity of 8-year-old overweight children (n =53) to normal weight children (n=65), and to determine whether a significant relationship exists between physical activity of parents and their children. Study design A cross-sectional study. Methods A total of 119 children from Northern Finland were recruited for the study. Waist circumference, height, weight and BMI were measured. Physical activity of the children and their parents was determined with self-administered 7-day recall questionnaires (PAQ-C). Physical fitness of the children was evaluated with 7 items of the EUROFIT-test battery (flamingo balance test, plate tapping, sit-and-reach test, sit-ups, bent arm hang and 10×5 shuttle run). Aerobic capacity of the children was tested with 6-minute walking test. Results Overweigh was related to impaired performance in tests requiring muscle endurance, balance, explosive power of lower extremities, upper body strength and endurance, speed and agility in both genders and aerobic capacity in boys. Physical activity levels of overweight boys (2.41 SD 0.72) were lower than their lean counterparts (2.91 SD 0.64, p=0.004); no such difference was observed in girls (2.53 SD 0.64 vs. 2.59 SD 0.68, p=0.741). Physical activity was significantly associated with better performance in several physical fitness tests in boys, but not in girls. Mothers’ physical activity was associated with children's physical activity (r=0.363, p<0.001), but no such association was found between fathers and children (r=0.019, p=0.864). Conclusion This study shows an inverse relationship between excess bodyweight and physical fitness in children. Mother-child relationship of physical activity appeared to be stronger than father-child relationship. Improving physical fitness in children through physical activity might require interventions that are responsive to the ability and needs of overweight children and their families and focus on

  15. 25 CFR 43.16 - Copy to be provided to parents or eligible students.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Copy to be provided to parents or eligible students. 43... AND CONTROL OF STUDENT RECORDS IN BUREAU SCHOOLS § 43.16 Copy to be provided to parents or eligible students. Where the consent of a parent or eligible student is required under this part for the release...

  16. Parent Knowledge and Attitudes About School-Based Hepatitis B Immunization Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleman, Amy B.; Guajardo, Andrea D.; Sunwoo, Edward; Sansaricq, Kim M.

    2002-01-01

    Surveyed parents of students in the Houston Independent School District to determine preferences regarding immunization clinic site and preferred consent procedures for a Hepatitis B immunization program. Results indicated a significant lack of parent knowledge regarding the Hepatitis B virus. Demographic variables influenced parents' knowledge…

  17. Parent-adolescent conversations about eating, physical activity and weight: prevalence across sociodemographic characteristics and associations with adolescent weight and weight-related behaviors.

    PubMed

    Berge, Jerica M; MacLehose, Richard F; Loth, Katie A; Eisenberg, Marla E; Fulkerson, Jayne A; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2015-02-01

    This paper aims to describe the prevalence of parent-adolescent conversations about eating, physical activity and weight across sociodemographic characteristics and to examine associations with adolescent body mass index (BMI), dietary intake, physical activity and sedentary behaviors. Data from two linked epidemiological studies were used for cross-sectional analysis. Parents (n = 3,424; 62% females) and adolescents (n = 2,182; 53.2% girls) were socioeconomically and racially/ethnically diverse. Fathers reported more parent-adolescent conversations about healthful eating and physical activity with their sons and mothers reported more weight-focused conversations with their daughters. Parents of Hispanic/Latino and Asian/Hmong youth and parents from lower socioeconomic status categories engaged in more conversations about weight and size. Adolescents whose mothers or fathers had weight-focused conversations with them had higher BMI percentiles. Adolescents who had two parents engaging in weight-related conversations had higher BMI percentiles. Healthcare providers may want to talk about the types of weight-related conversations parents are having with their adolescents and emphasize avoiding conversations about weight specifically.

  18. Parent-Adolescent Conversations about Eating, Physical Activity and Weight: Prevalence across Sociodemographic Characteristics and Associations with Adolescent Weight and Weight-Related Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Berge, Jerica M.; MacLehose, Richard F; Loth, Katie A.; Eisenberg, Marla E.; Fulkerson, Jayne A.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to describe the prevalence of parent-adolescent conversations about eating, physical activity and weight across sociodemographic characteristics and to examine associations with adolescent BMI, dietary intake, physical activity and sedentary behaviors. Data from two linked epidemiological studies were used for cross-sectional analysis. Parents (n=3,424; 62% females) and adolescents (n=2,182; 53.2% girls) were socioeconomically and racially/ethnically diverse. Fathers reported more parent-adolescent conversations about healthful eating and physical activity with their sons and mothers reported more weight-focused conversations with their daughters. Parents of Hispanic/Latino and Asian/Hmong youth and parents from lower SES categories engaged in more conversations about weight and size. Adolescents whose mothers or fathers had weight-focused conversations with them had higher BMI percentiles. Adolescents who had two parents engaging in weight-related conversations had higher BMI percentiles. Healthcare providers may want to talk about the types of weight-related conversations parents are having with their adolescents and emphasize avoiding conversations about weight specifically. PMID:24997555

  19. Self-Reported and Observed Punitive Parenting Prospectively Predicts Increased Error-Related Brain Activity in Six-Year-Old Children.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Alexandria; Proudfit, Greg Hajcak; Bufferd, Sara J; Kujawa, Autumn J; Laptook, Rebecca S; Torpey, Dana C; Klein, Daniel N

    2015-07-01

    The error-related negativity (ERN) is a negative deflection in the event-related potential (ERP) occurring approximately 50 ms after error commission at fronto-central electrode sites and is thought to reflect the activation of a generic error monitoring system. Several studies have reported an increased ERN in clinically anxious children, and suggest that anxious children are more sensitive to error commission--although the mechanisms underlying this association are not clear. We have previously found that punishing errors results in a larger ERN, an effect that persists after punishment ends. It is possible that learning-related experiences that impact sensitivity to errors may lead to an increased ERN. In particular, punitive parenting might sensitize children to errors and increase their ERN. We tested this possibility in the current study by prospectively examining the relationship between parenting style during early childhood and children's ERN approximately 3 years later. Initially, 295 parents and children (approximately 3 years old) participated in a structured observational measure of parenting behavior, and parents completed a self-report measure of parenting style. At a follow-up assessment approximately 3 years later, the ERN was elicited during a Go/No-Go task, and diagnostic interviews were completed with parents to assess child psychopathology. Results suggested that both observational measures of hostile parenting and self-report measures of authoritarian parenting style uniquely predicted a larger ERN in children 3 years later. We previously reported that children in this sample with anxiety disorders were characterized by an increased ERN. A mediation analysis indicated that ERN magnitude mediated the relationship between harsh parenting and child anxiety disorder. Results suggest that parenting may shape children's error processing through environmental conditioning and thereby risk for anxiety, although future work is needed to confirm this

  20. Self-Reported and Observed Punitive Parenting Prospectively Predicts Increased Error-Related Brain Activity in Six-Year-Old Children.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Alexandria; Proudfit, Greg Hajcak; Bufferd, Sara J; Kujawa, Autumn J; Laptook, Rebecca S; Torpey, Dana C; Klein, Daniel N

    2015-07-01

    The error-related negativity (ERN) is a negative deflection in the event-related potential (ERP) occurring approximately 50 ms after error commission at fronto-central electrode sites and is thought to reflect the activation of a generic error monitoring system. Several studies have reported an increased ERN in clinically anxious children, and suggest that anxious children are more sensitive to error commission--although the mechanisms underlying this association are not clear. We have previously found that punishing errors results in a larger ERN, an effect that persists after punishment ends. It is possible that learning-related experiences that impact sensitivity to errors may lead to an increased ERN. In particular, punitive parenting might sensitize children to errors and increase their ERN. We tested this possibility in the current study by prospectively examining the relationship between parenting style during early childhood and children's ERN approximately 3 years later. Initially, 295 parents and children (approximately 3 years old) participated in a structured observational measure of parenting behavior, and parents completed a self-report measure of parenting style. At a follow-up assessment approximately 3 years later, the ERN was elicited during a Go/No-Go task, and diagnostic interviews were completed with parents to assess child psychopathology. Results suggested that both observational measures of hostile parenting and self-report measures of authoritarian parenting style uniquely predicted a larger ERN in children 3 years later. We previously reported that children in this sample with anxiety disorders were characterized by an increased ERN. A mediation analysis indicated that ERN magnitude mediated the relationship between harsh parenting and child anxiety disorder. Results suggest that parenting may shape children's error processing through environmental conditioning and thereby risk for anxiety, although future work is needed to confirm this

  1. 34 CFR 300.9 - Consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Consent. 300.9 Section 300.9 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH...

  2. 42 CFR 441.257 - Informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Informed consent. 441.257 Section 441.257 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... without loss or withdrawal of any federally funded program benefits to which the individual might...

  3. Consent in psychiatric biobanks for pharmacogenetic research.

    PubMed

    van der Baan, Frederieke H; Bernabe, Rose D C; Bredenoord, Annelien L; Gregoor, Jochem G; Meynen, Gerben; Knol, Mirjam J; van Thiel, Ghislaine J M W

    2013-04-01

    In psychiatric practice, pharmacogenetics has the potential to identify patients with an increased risk of unsatisfactory drug responses. Genotype-guided treatment adjustments may increase benefits and reduce harm in these patients; however, pharmacogenetic testing is not (yet) common practice and more pharmacogenetic research in psychiatric patients is warranted. An important precondition for this type of research is the establishment of biobanks. In this paper, we argue that, for the storage of samples in psychiatric biobanks, waiving of consent is not ethically justifiable since the risks cannot be considered minimal and the argument of impracticability does not apply. An opt-out consent procedure is also not justifiable, since it presumes competence while the decisional competence of psychiatric patients needs to be carefully evaluated. We state that an enhanced opt-in consent procedure is ethically necessary, i.e. a procedure that supports the patients' decision-making at the time when the patient is most competent. Nevertheless, such a procedure is not the traditional exhaustive informed consent procedure, since this is not feasible in the case of biobanking. PMID:22607776

  4. [Free will and patient consent during care].

    PubMed

    Bréhaux, Karine

    2016-09-01

    Raising the question of a person's free will means questioning their freedom and capacity to make choices. Therefore, being free, means being able to judge between the possibilities which are offered to us, and deciding of our own accord what is acceptable to us. The concept of free will is associated with the notion of consent, in particular during care. PMID:27596494

  5. [Informed consent in health legislation of Mexico].

    PubMed

    López-de la Peña, X A

    1996-01-01

    This paper deals with informed consent in Mexican Health Legislation in the context of a contract regulated by the Mexican Civil Code, in which a patient capable of making a thoughtful decision agrees to a specific plan of medical management and has received sufficient information, in a clear and explicit manner so that he/she can make a decision and in consequence agrees, or does not agree, to a course of action and to its consequences, under the Nuremberg Code. In Mexico, informed consent has recently been incorporated into health care legislation, and is basically oriented toward the field of medical research, while in other medical procedures, a legal authorization, and not an informed consent form is required, as with surgical procedures such as definitive fertility control (e.g. vasectomy or fallopian tube ligation). We emphasize the necessity of the adding of informed consent to Mexican health legislation in general, substituting it for other terms to legalize medical action, such as authorization, permission, dispositioned compliance, acceptance or approval-all of which have an essentially different and limited connotation, and are not Patient's Rights legal protector mechanisms, from our point of view. PMID:9011521

  6. 28 CFR 512.16 - Informed consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., determines the research project or data-collection instrument is of a sensitive nature. (d) A researcher who... Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GENERAL MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION RESEARCH Research § 512.16 Informed consent. (a) Before commencing a research project...

  7. 76 FR 256 - Informed Consent Elements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-04

    .... References I. Introduction In the Federal Register of December 29, 2009 (74 FR 68750), FDA issued a notice of... anxiety upon reading consent forms; (2) unnecessarily burdens or overwhelms participants because it does... responsibility of investigators (74 FR 68750 at 68752). Clinical research (as opposed to clinical practice)...

  8. Learning Ethics through Everyday Problems: Informed Consent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verdu, Fernando; Frances, Francesc; Castello, Ana

    2012-01-01

    The teaching of bioethics and its importance in clinical relationships is to a certain extent complicated when we address students of medicine, young people who are more used to dealing with and solving strictly clinical problems. Informed Consent is one of the aspects of professional practice that is generally and widely accepted in Western…

  9. 25 CFR 43.14 - Consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION MAINTENANCE AND CONTROL OF STUDENT RECORDS IN BUREAU SCHOOLS § 43.14 Consent. Educational institutions shall not permit access to or the release of student records... following: (a) Local school officials, including teachers within the educational institution, who have...

  10. 25 CFR 43.14 - Consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION MAINTENANCE AND CONTROL OF STUDENT RECORDS IN BUREAU SCHOOLS § 43.14 Consent. Educational institutions shall not permit access to or the release of student records... following: (a) Local school officials, including teachers within the educational institution, who have...

  11. Students' Consent to a Teacher's Pedagogical Authority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harjunen, Elina

    2011-01-01

    In this paper student comments are examined to identify a typology of demands for granting their consent to a teacher's pedagogical authority. The data for this study (136 written responses and 66 interviews) have been collected from students in a Finnish comprehensive school and examined by means of a theory-bounded content analysis. The results…

  12. Consent in escrow: opting to opt in

    PubMed Central

    Van der Loos, Kiah I.; Longstaff, Holly; Virani, Alice; Illes, Judy

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we reply to Taylor's (2015) peer commentary on consent-in-escrow. Specifically, we clarify the utility of this novel approach, the way in which it minimizes risks to participants, and how it differs from existing opt-out methods. We further explore its potential use in fields beyond disaster research. PMID:27774229

  13. 7 CFR 1.420 - Consent recommendation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Shortage Relief Act of 1990 (16 U.S.C. 620, et seq.), 36 CFR 223.190, 36 CFR 223.191(e) and these... Conservation and Shortage Relief Act of 1990 (16 U.S.C. 620 et seq.) § 1.420 Consent recommendation. Any...

  14. 7 CFR 1.420 - Consent recommendation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Shortage Relief Act of 1990 (16 U.S.C. 620, et seq.), 36 CFR 223.190, 36 CFR 223.191(e) and these... Conservation and Shortage Relief Act of 1990 (16 U.S.C. 620 et seq.) § 1.420 Consent recommendation. Any...

  15. 7 CFR 1.420 - Consent recommendation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Shortage Relief Act of 1990 (16 U.S.C. 620, et seq.), 36 CFR 223.190, 36 CFR 223.191(e) and these... Conservation and Shortage Relief Act of 1990 (16 U.S.C. 620 et seq.) § 1.420 Consent recommendation. Any...

  16. 7 CFR 1.420 - Consent recommendation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Shortage Relief Act of 1990 (16 U.S.C. 620, et seq.), 36 CFR 223.190, 36 CFR 223.191(e) and these... Conservation and Shortage Relief Act of 1990 (16 U.S.C. 620 et seq.) § 1.420 Consent recommendation. Any...

  17. 7 CFR 1.420 - Consent recommendation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Shortage Relief Act of 1990 (16 U.S.C. 620, et seq.), 36 CFR 223.190, 36 CFR 223.191(e) and these... Conservation and Shortage Relief Act of 1990 (16 U.S.C. 620 et seq.) § 1.420 Consent recommendation. Any...

  18. The Impact of the Felix Consent Decree.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wataoka, Phuong

    This paper reviews the literature on the background, legal process, and implications of the Felix consent decree, a legal settlement in which the State of Hawaii agreed to improve its special education program and to develop a self-sustaining system of care for delivering special education services. The paper begins by reviewing federal laws (the…

  19. Informed consent in Malaysia: an overview.

    PubMed

    Che Ngah, Anisah

    2005-01-01

    The right of a person to control his body is a concept that has long been recognized in Malaysia under the law of torts. The purpose of requiring informed consent is to preserve that right in medical decision-making. Informed Consent is a relatively new concept in medical litigation cases. However in the late 1990's, it has become one of the important claims under negligence made against the doctor for failure to disclose relevant information to patients in respect of the treatment proposed. Whether Malaysia has begun to recognize patient's right to decision-making is yet to be seen. Furthermore the social-cultural relationship between doctors and patients had to be considered. In this respect, the researcher had conducted interviews with doctors and patients to gauge their reaction towards a shared process of decision-making, which is the central issue in the doctrine of informed consent. Findings suggest that in society where primary health care is the main thrust to achieve health for all, the possibility of recognition of the rights of patients to receive information before making decisions about treatment appears remote. The findings also underscore the importance of incorporating aspects of informed consent as part of providing quality service to patients. PMID:16637139

  20. 21 CFR 1316.08 - Consent to inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... inspection warrant shall not be required if informed consent is obtained from the owner, operator, or agent in charge of the controlled premises to be inspected. (b) Wherever possible, informed consent...