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Sample records for active passive smap

  1. NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, Barron; Moran, M. Susan; Escobar, Vanessa; Brown, Molly E.

    2014-05-01

    The launch of the NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission in 2014 will provide global soil moisture and freeze-thaw measurements at moderate resolution (9 km) with latency as short as 24 hours. The resolution, latency and global coverage of SMAP products will enable new applications in the fields of weather, climate, drought, flood, agricultural production, human health and national security. To prepare for launch, the SMAP mission has engaged more than 25 Early Adopters. Early Adopters are users who have a need for SMAP-like soil moisture or freeze-thaw data, and who agreed to apply their own resources to demonstrate the utility of SMAP data for their particular system or model. In turn, the SMAP mission agreed to provide Early Adopters with simulated SMAP data products and pre-launch calibration and validation data from SMAP field campaigns, modeling, and synergistic studies. The applied research underway by Early Adopters has provided fundamental knowledge of how SMAP data products can be scaled and integrated into users' policy, business and management activities to improve decision-making efforts. This presentation will cover SMAP applications including weather and climate forecasting, vehicle mobility estimation, quantification of greenhouse gas emissions, management of urban potable water supply, and prediction of crop yield. The presentation will end with a discussion of potential international applications with focus on the ESA/CEOS TIGER Initiative entitled "looking for water in Africa", the United Nations (UN) Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) which carries a specific mandate focused on Africa, the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) which lists soil moisture as an Essential Climate Variable (ECV), and the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) which reported a food and nutrition crisis in the Sahel.

  2. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) applications activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is one of the first-tier satellite missions recommended by the U.S. National Research Council Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space. The SMAP mission 1 is under development by NASA and is scheduled for launch late in 2014. The SMAP mea...

  3. The Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) Mission

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) Mission is one of the first Earth observation satellites being developed by NASA in response to the National Research Council’s Decadal Survey. SMAP will make global measurements of the moisture present at Earth's land surface and will distinguish frozen f...

  4. The Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Entekhabi, Dara; Nijoku, Eni G.; ONeill, Peggy E.; Kellogg, Kent H.; Crow, Wade T.; Edelstein, Wendy N.; Entin, Jared K.; Goodman, Shawn D.; Jackson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Joel; Kimball, John; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Koster, Randal D.; McDonald, Kyle C.; Moghaddam, Mahta; Moran, Susan; Reichle, Rolf; Shi, J. C.; Spencer, Michael W.; Thurman, Samuel W.; Tsang, Leung; VanZyl, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) Mission is one of the first Earth observation satellites being developed by NASA in response to the National Research Council s Decadal Survey. SMAP will make global measurements of the moisture present at Earth's land surface and will distinguish frozen from thawed land surfaces. Direct observations of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state from space will allow significantly improved estimates of water, energy and carbon transfers between land and atmosphere. Soil moisture measurements are also of great importance in assessing flooding and monitoring drought. SMAP observations can help mitigate these natural hazards, resulting in potentially great economic and social benefits. SMAP soil moisture and freeze/thaw timing observations will also reduce a major uncertainty in quantifying the global carbon balance by helping to resolve an apparent missing carbon sink on land over the boreal latitudes. The SMAP mission concept would utilize an L-band radar and radiometer. These instruments will share a rotating 6-meter mesh reflector antenna to provide high-resolution and high-accuracy global maps of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state every two to three days. The SMAP instruments provide direct measurements of surface conditions. In addition, the SMAP project will use these observations with advanced modeling and data assimilation to provide deeper root-zone soil moisture and estimates of land surface-atmosphere exchanges of water, energy and carbon. SMAP is scheduled for a 2014 launch date

  5. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Applications Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Molly E.; Moran, Susan; Escobar, Vanessa; Entekhabi, Dara; O'Neill, Peggy; Njoku, Eni

    2011-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is one of the first-tier satellite missions recommended by the U.S. National Research Council Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space. The SMAP mission 1 is under development by NASA and is scheduled for launch late in 2014. The SMAP measurements will allow global and high-resolution mapping of soil moisture and its freeze/thaw state at resolutions from 3-40 km. These measurements will have high value for a wide range of environmental applications that underpin many weather-related decisions including drought and flood guidance, agricultural productivity estimation, weather forecasting, climate predictions, and human health risk. In 2007, NASA was tasked by The National Academies to ensure that emerging scientific knowledge is actively applied to obtain societal benefits by broadening community participation and improving means for use of information. SMAP is one of the first missions to come out of this new charge, and its Applications Plan forms the basis for ensuring its commitment to its users. The purpose of this paper is to outline the methods and approaches of the SMAP applications activity, which is designed to increase and sustain the interaction between users and scientists involved in mission development.

  6. The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission: Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Peggy; Entekhabi, Dara; Njoku, Eni; Kellogg, Kent

    2011-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is one of the first Earth observation satellites being developed by NASA in response to the National Research Council?s Decadal Survey [1]. Its mission design consists of L-band radiometer and radar instruments sharing a rotating 6-m mesh reflector antenna to provide high-resolution and high-accuracy global maps of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state every 2-3 days. The combined active/passive microwave soil moisture product will have a spatial resolution of 10 km and a mean latency of 24 hours. In addition, the SMAP surface observations will be combined with advanced modeling and data assimilation to provide deeper root zone soil moisture and net ecosystem exchange of carbon. SMAP is expected to launch in the late 2014 - early 2015 time frame.

  7. The soil moisture active passive (SMAP) mission and validation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite will be launched by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in October 2014. This satellite is the culmination of basic research and applications development over the past thirty years. During most of this period, research and development o...

  8. The Soil Moisture Active/Passive Mission (SMAP)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) mission will deliver global views of soil moisture content and its freeze/thaw state that are critical terrestrial water cycle state variables. Polarized measurements obtained with a shared antenna L-band radar and radiometer system will allow accurate estima...

  9. NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellogg, Kent; Thurman, Sam; Edelstein, Wendy; Spencer, Michael; Chen, Gun-Shing; Underwood, Mark; Njoku, Eni; Goodman, Shawn; Jai, Benhan

    2013-01-01

    The SMAP mission will produce high-resolution and accurate global maps of soil moisture and its freeze/thaw state using data from a non-imaging synthetic aperture radar and a radiometer, both operating at L-band.

  10. Spacecraft Environmental Testing SMAP (Soil, Moisture, Active, Passive)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Testing a complete full up spacecraft to verify it will survive the environment, in which it will be exposed to during its mission, is a formidable task in itself. However, the ''test like you fly'' philosophy sometimes gets compromised because of cost, design and or time. This paper describes the thermal-vacuum and mass properties testing of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) earth orbiting satellite. SMAP will provide global observations of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state (the hydrosphere state). SMAP hydrosphere state measurements will be used to enhance understanding of processes that link the water, energy, and carbon cycles, and to extend the capabilities of weather and climate prediction models. It will explain the problems encountered, and the solutions developed, which minimized the risk typically associated with such an arduous process. Also discussed, the future of testing on expensive long lead-time spacecraft. Will we ever reach the ''build and shoot" scenario with minimal or no verification testing?

  11. NASA's Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellogg, Kent; Njoku, Eni; Thurman, Sam; Edelstein, Wendy; Jai, Ben; Spencer, Mike; Chen, Gun-Shing; Entekhabi, Dara; O'Neill, Peggy; Piepmeier, Jeffrey; Brown, Molly; Savinell, Chris; Entin, Jared; Ianson, Eric

    2010-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active-Passive (SMAP) Mission is one of the first Earth observation satellites being formulated by NASA in response to the 2007 National Research Council s Decadal Survey. SMAP will make global measurements of soil moisture at the Earth's land surface and its freeze-thaw state. These measurements will allow significantly improved estimates of water, energy and carbon transfers between the land and atmosphere. Soil moisture measurements are also of great importance in assessing flooding and monitoring drought. Knowledge gained from SMAP observations can help mitigate these natural hazards, resulting in potentially great economic and social benefits. SMAP observations of soil moisture and freeze/thaw timing over the boreal latitudes will also reduce a major uncertainty in quantifying the global carbon balance and help to resolve an apparent missing carbon sink over land. The SMAP mission concept will utilize an L-band radar and radiometer sharing a rotating 6-meter mesh reflector antenna flying in a 680 km polar orbit with an 8-day exact ground track repeat aboard a 3-axis stabilized spacecraft to provide high-resolution and high-accuracy global maps of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state every two to three days. In addition, the SMAP project will use these surface observations with advanced modeling and data assimilation to provide estimates of deeper root-zone soil moisture and net ecosystem exchange of carbon. SMAP recently completed its Phase A Mission Concept Study Phase for NASA and transitioned into Phase B (Formulation and Detailed Design). A number of significant accomplishments occurred during this initial phase of mission development. The SMAP project held several open meetings to solicit community feedback on possible science algorithms, prepared preliminary draft Algorithm Theoretical Basis Documents (ATBDs) for each mission science product, and established a prototype algorithm testbed to enable testing and evaluation of the

  12. Fostering Application Opportunites for the NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, M. Susan; O'Neill, Peggy E.; Entekhabi, Dara; Njoku, Eni G.; Kellogg, Kent H.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission will provide global observations of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state from space. We outline how priority applications contributed to the SMAP mission measurement requirements and how the SMAP mission plans to foster applications and applied science.

  13. The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission Formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Entekhabi, Dara; Njoku, Eni; ONeill, Peggy; Kellogg, Kent; Entin, Jared

    2011-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is one of the first-tier projects recommended by the U.S. National Research Council Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space. The SMAP mission is in formulation phase and it is scheduled for launch in 2014. The SMAP mission is designed to produce high-resolution and accurate global mapping of soil moisture and its freeze/thaw state using an instrument architecture that incorporates an L-band (1.26 GHz) radar and an L-band (1.41 GHz) radiometer. The simultaneous radar and radiometer measurements will be combined to derive global soil moisture mapping at 9 [km] resolution with a 2 to 3 days revisit and 0.04 [cm3 cm-3] (1 sigma) soil water content accuracy. The radar measurements also allow the binary detection of surface freeze/thaw state. The project science goals address in water, energy and carbon cycle science as well as provide improved capabilities in natural hazards applications.

  14. The soil moisture active passive experiments (SMAPEx): Towards soil moisture retrieval from the SMAP mission

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, scheduled for launch in 2014, will carry the first combined L-band radar and radiometer system with the objective of mapping near surface soil moisture and freeze/thaw state globally at near-daily time step (2-3 days). SMAP will provide three soil ...

  15. NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission and opportunities for applications users

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is one of four first-tier missions recommended by the National Research Council's Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space. Set to launch in 2014, SMAP soil moisture and freeze/thaw measurements will have an accuracy, resolution, and glob...

  16. FOSTERING APPLICATIONS OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE NASA SOIL MOISTURE ACTIVE PASSIVE (SMAP) MISSION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission is one of the first Earth observation satellites being developed by NASA in response to the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Decadal Survey, Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond. SMAP will ma...

  17. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission Level 4 Carbon (L4_C) Product Specification Document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassy, Joe; Kimball, John S.; Jones, Lucas; Reichle, Rolf H.; Ardizzone, Joseph V.; Kim, Gi-Kong; Lucchesi, Robert A.; Smith, Edmond B.; Weiss, Barry H.

    2015-01-01

    This is the Product Specification Document (PSD) for Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) data for the Science Data System (SDS) of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) project. The L4_SM data product provides estimates of land surface conditions based on the assimilation of SMAP observations into a customized version of the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) land data assimilation system (LDAS). This document applies to any standard L4_SM data product generated by the SMAP Project.

  18. Soil moisture active passive (SMAP) satellite status and cal/val activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite will be launched by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in November 2014. This satellite is the culmination of basic research and applications development over the past thirty years. During most of this period, research and development ...

  19. The Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) Mission Radar: A Novel Conically Scanning SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Michael; Chan, Samuel; Veilleux, Louise; Wheeler, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) mission is a NASA mission identified by the NRC "decadal survey" to measure both soil moisture and freeze/thaw state from space. The mission will use both active radar and passive radiometer instruments at L-Band. In order to achieve a wide swath at sufficiently high resolution for both active and passive chan-nels, an instrument architecture that uses a large rotating reflector is employed. The active radar will further utilize SAR processing in order to obtain the sub-footprint resolution necessary for the geophysical retrievals. The SMAP radar has a unique geometry where the antenna footprint is continuously rotated about nadir in a conical fashion, as opposed to the more common side-looking SAR design. In additional to the unconventional scan geometry, the SMAP radar must address the effects of Faraday rotation and radio frequency interference (RFI), both consequences of the L-Band frequency of operation.

  20. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Data and Services at the NASA NSIDC DAAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, Amanda; Jodha Singh Khalsa, Siri; Leslie, Shannon

    2016-04-01

    The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, launched on 31 January 2015, provides a capability for global mapping of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state with unprecedented accuracy, resolution, and coverage. The SMAP instrument includes both a radiometer and a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) operating at the L-band (1.20-1.41 GHz) and provides global coverage at the equator every 3 days. The SMAP mission will play a critical role in understanding the Earth's water and energy cycles, improving weather and climate forecasting, and developing disaster prediction and monitoring services. The NASA Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) and the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) are jointly distributing and supporting SMAP data products. The DAACs draw upon their unique expertise - NSIDC with cryospheric and remotely-sensed soil moisture data and ASF with SAR data - as well as their shared technologies to provide synergistic data access and support for SMAP products. NSIDC DAAC provides distribution and support of the SMAP Level-1 radiometer products, the Level-2 through Level-4 soil moisture products, the Level-3 freeze/thaw product, and the Level-4 carbon net ecosystem exchange product. By leveraging NASA Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) data systems, NSIDC DAAC provide data discovery, access, and visualization services for SMAP that are common across all NASA Earth science data archived at the DAACs. NSIDC DAAC also provides custom services aimed at meeting the unique needs of their SMAP user communities. This presentation strives to educate and expand the SMAP user community as well as engage with current and potential users for areas of opportunity in the support and services that NSIDC DAAC provides.

  1. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Data and Services at the NASA NSIDC DAAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, A.; Booker, L.; Leslie, S. R.; Khalsa, S. J. S.; LeFevre, K.

    2015-12-01

    The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, launched on 31 January 2015, provides a capability for global mapping of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state with unprecedented accuracy, resolution, and coverage. The SMAP instrument includes both a radiometer and a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) operating at the L-band (1.20-1.41 GHz) and provides global coverage at the equator every 3 days. The SMAP mission will play a critical role in understanding the Earth's water and energy cycles, improving weather and climate forecasting, and developing disaster prediction and monitoring services. The NASA Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) and the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) are jointly distributing and supporting SMAP data products. The DAACs draw upon their unique expertise - NSIDC with cryospheric and remotely-sensed soil moisture data and ASF with SAR data - as well as their shared technologies to provide synergistic data access and support for SMAP products. NSIDC DAAC provides distribution and support of the SMAP Level-1 radiometer products, the Level-2 through Level-4 soil moisture products, the Level-3 freeze/thaw product, and the Level-4 carbon net ecosystem exchange product. By leveraging NASA Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) data systems, NSIDC DAAC provide data discovery, access, and visualization services for SMAP that are common across all NASA Earth science data archived at the DAACs. NSIDC DAAC also provides custom services aimed at meeting the unique needs of their SMAP user communities. This presentation strives to educate and expand the SMAP user community as well as engage with current and potential users for areas of opportunity in the support and services that NSIDC DAAC provides.

  2. The soil moisture active passive validation experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12): pre-launch calibration and validation of the SMAP satellite

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite is scheduled for launch in November 2014. In order to develop robust soil moisture retrieval algorithms that fully exploit the unique capabilities of SMAP, algorithm developers had identified a nee...

  3. Pre-Launch phase 2 rehearsal of the calibration and validation of soil moisture active passive (SMAP) geophysical data products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission is scheduled for launch in early November 2014. The objective of the mission is global mapping of soil moisture and landscape freeze/thaw state. SMAP utilizes L-band radar and radiometer measurements sharing a rotating 6-meter mesh reflector antenna...

  4. Landscape freeze/thaw retrievals from soil moisture active passive (SMAP) L-band radar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colliander, A.; Derksen, C.

    2015-12-01

    The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission produces a daily landscape freeze/thaw product (L3_FT_A) which provides categorical (frozen, thawed, or [inverse] transitional) classification of the surface state (for land areas north of 45°N) derived from ascending and descending orbits of SMAP high-resolution L-band radar measurements. The FT retrievals are output to 3 km resolution polar and global grids with temporal revisit of 2 days or better north of ~55°N and 3 days or better north of 45°N. The algorithm classifies the land surface freeze/thaw state based on the time series of L-band radar backscatter compared to frozen and thawed reference states. This presentation will describe pre-launch L3_FT_A algorithm implementation and evaluation using NASA/SAC-D Aquarius L-band radar data, and provide an update on the current status of the SMAP L3_FT_A product. In advance of SMAP measurements, the L3_FT_A algorithm was configured and evaluated using Aquarius measurements. While the temporal (weekly) and spatial (~100 km) resolution is much coarser than SMAP, Aquarius provides L-band radar measurements at an incidence angle (normalized to 40 degrees) which is close to SMAP. Evaluation of FT retrievals derived using both Aquarius freeze/thaw references and backscatter time series as inputs identified good agreement during the fall freeze-up period with FT flag agreement (Aquarius versus in situ) exceeding the 80% SMAP mission requirement when summarized on a monthly basis. Disagreement was greater during the spring thaw transition due in part to uncertainty in characterizing the surface state from in situ measurements and backscatter sensitivity to the onset of snow melt, independent of the soil temperature beneath the snowpack. Initial challenges for SMAP derived FT retrievals include the scale difference between the Aquarius references (~100 km) and the SMAP measurements (3 km) which is particularly problematic in areas of complex topography and/or mixed

  5. Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) Forward Brightness Temperature Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Jinzheng; Peipmeier, Jeffrey; Kim, Edward

    2012-01-01

    The SMAP is one of four first-tier missions recommended by the US National Research Council's Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space (Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond, Space Studies Board, National Academies Press, 2007) [1]. It is to measure the global soil moisture and freeze/thaw from space. One of the spaceborne instruments is an L-band radiometer with a shared single feedhorn and parabolic mesh reflector. While the radiometer measures the emission over a footprint of interest, unwanted emissions are also received by the antenna through the antenna sidelobes from the cosmic background and other error sources such as the Sun, the Moon and the galaxy. Their effects need to be considered accurately, and the analysis of the overall performance of the radiometer requires end-to-end performance simulation from Earth emission to antenna brightness temperature, such as the global simulation of L-band brightness temperature simulation over land and sea [2]. To assist with the SMAP radiometer level 1B algorithm development, the SMAP forward brightness temperature simulator is developed by adapting the Aquarius simulator [2] with necessary modifications. This poster presents the current status of the SMAP forward brightness simulator s development including incorporating the land microwave emission model and its input datasets, and a simplified atmospheric radiative transfer model. The latest simulation results are also presented to demonstrate the ability of supporting the SMAP L1B algorithm development.

  6. The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission - Science and Data Product Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nloku, E.; Entekhabi, D.; O'Neill, P.

    2012-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, planned for launch in late 2014, has the objective of frequent, global mapping of near-surface soil moisture and its freeze-thaw state. The SMAP measurement system utilizes an L-band radar and radiometer sharing a rotating 6-meter mesh reflector antenna. The instruments will operate on a spacecraft in a 685 km polar orbit with 6am/6pm nodal crossings, viewing the surface at a constant 40-degree incidence angle with a 1000-km swath width, providing 3-day global coverage. Data from the instruments will yield global maps of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state at 10 km and 3 km resolutions, respectively, every two to three days. The 10-km soil moisture product will be generated using a combined radar and radiometer retrieval algorithm. SMAP will also provide a radiometer-only soil moisture product at 40-km spatial resolution and a radar-only soil moisture product at 3-km resolution. The relative accuracies of these products will vary regionally and will depend on surface characteristics such as vegetation water content, vegetation type, surface roughness, and landscape heterogeneity. The SMAP soil moisture and freeze/thaw measurements will enable significantly improved estimates of the fluxes of water, energy and carbon between the land and atmosphere. Soil moisture and freeze/thaw controls of these fluxes are key factors in the performance of models used for weather and climate predictions and for quantifYing the global carbon balance. Soil moisture measurements are also of importance in modeling and predicting extreme events such as floods and droughts. The algorithms and data products for SMAP are being developed in the SMAP Science Data System (SDS) Testbed. In the Testbed algorithms are developed and evaluated using simulated SMAP observations as well as observational data from current airborne and spaceborne L-band sensors including data from the SMOS and Aquarius missions. We report here on the development status

  7. Comparison of airborne passive and active L-band System (PALS) brightness temperature measurements to SMOS observations during the SMAP validation experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) Validation Experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12) campaign was to collect data for the pre-launch development and validation of SMAP soil moisture algorithms. SMAP is a National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) satellite mission designed for the m...

  8. The Planned Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission L-Band Radar/Radiometer Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Michael; Wheeler, Kevin; Chan, Samuel; Piepmeier, Jeffrey; Hudson, Derek; Medeiros, James

    2011-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) mission is a NASA mission identified by the NRC 'decadal survey' to measure both soil moisture and freeze/thaw state from space. The mission will use both active radar and passive radiometer instruments at L-Band. In order to achieve a wide swath at sufficiently high resolution for both active and passive channels, an instrument architecture that uses a large rotating reflector is employed. The instrument system has completed the preliminary design review (PDR) stage, and detailed instrument design has begun. In addition to providing an overview of the instrument design, two recent design modifications are discussed: 1) The addition of active thermal control to the instrument spun side to provide a more stable, settable thermal environment for the radiometer electronics, and 2) A 'sequential transmit' strategy for the two radar polarization channels which allows a single high-power amplifier to be used.

  9. Investigating Baseline, Alternative and Copula-based Algorithm for combining Airborne Active and Passive Microwave Observations in the SMAP Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montzka, C.; Lorenz, C.; Jagdhuber, T.; Laux, P.; Hajnsek, I.; Kunstmann, H.; Entekhabi, D.; Vereecken, H.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the NASA Soil Moisture Active & Passive (SMAP) mission is to provide global measurements of soil moisture and freeze/thaw states. SMAP integrates L-band radar and radiometer instruments as a single observation system combining the respective strengths of active and passive remote sensing for enhanced soil moisture mapping. Airborne instruments will be a key part of the SMAP validation program. Here, we present an airborne campaign in the Rur catchment, Germany, in which the passive L-band system Polarimetric L-band Multi-beam Radiometer (PLMR2) and the active L-band system F-SAR of DLR were flown simultaneously on the same platform on six dates in 2013. The flights covered the full heterogeneity of the area under investigation, i.e. all types of land cover and experimental monitoring sites with in situ sensors. Here, we used the obtained data sets as a test-bed for the analysis of three active-passive fusion techniques: A) The SMAP baseline algorithm: Disaggregation of passive microwave brightness temperature by active microwave backscatter and subsequent inversion to soil moisture, B), the SMAP alternative algorithm: Estimation of soil moisture by passive sensor data and subsequent disaggregation by active sensor backscatter and C) Copula-based combination of active and passive microwave data. For method C empirical Copulas were generated and theoretical Copulas fitted both on the level of the raw products brightness temperature and backscatter as well as two soil moisture products. Results indicate that the regression parameters for method A and B are dependent on the radar vegetation index (RVI). Similarly, for method C the best performance was gained by generating separate Copulas for individual land use classes. For more in-depth analyses longer time series are necessary as can obtained by airborne campaigns, therefore, the methods will be applied to SMAP data.

  10. Implementation of Active Thermal Control (ATC) for the Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikhaylov, Rebecca; Kwack, Eug; French, Richard; Dawson, Douglas; Hoffman, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Earth Observing Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) Mission is scheduled to launch in November 2014 into a 685 kilometer near-polar, sun-synchronous orbit. SMAP will provide comprehensive global mapping measurements of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state in order to enhance understanding of the processes that link the water, energy, and carbon cycles. The primary objectives of SMAP are to improve worldwide weather and flood forecasting, enhance climate prediction, and refine drought and agriculture monitoring during its three year mission. The SMAP instrument architecture incorporates an L-band radar and an L-band radiometer which share a common feed horn and parabolic mesh reflector. The instrument rotates about the nadir axis at approximately 15 revolutions per minute, thereby providing a conically scanning wide swath antenna beam that is capable of achieving global coverage within three days. In order to make the necessary precise surface emission measurements from space, the electronics and hardware associated with the radiometer must meet tight short-term (instantaneous and orbital) and long-term (monthly and mission) thermal stabilities. Maintaining these tight thermal stabilities is quite challenging because the sensitive electronics are located on a fast spinning platform that can either be in full sunlight or total eclipse, thus exposing them to a highly transient environment. A passive design approach was first adopted early in the design cycle as a low-cost solution. With careful thermal design efforts to cocoon and protect all sensitive components, all stability requirements were met passively. Active thermal control (ATC) was later added after the instrument Preliminary Design Review (PDR) to mitigate the threat of undetected gain glitches, not for thermal-stability reasons. Gain glitches are common problems with radiometers during missions, and one simple way to avoid gain glitches is to use the in-flight set point programmability that ATC

  11. Assessment of the SMAP level 2 passive soil moisture product

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite mission was launched on Jan 31, 2015. The observatory was developed to provide global mapping of high-resolution soil moisture and freeze-thaw state every 2–3 days using an L-band (active) radar and an L-band (passive) radiometer. SMAP provides ...

  12. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Microwave Radiometer Radio-Frequency Interference (RFI) Mitigation: Initial On-Orbit Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohammed, Priscilla N.; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Johnson, Joel T.; Aksoy, Mustafa; Bringer, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, launched in January 2015, provides global measurements of soil moisture using a microwave radiometer. SMAPs radiometer passband lies within the passive frequency allocation. However, both unauthorized in-band transmitters as well as out-of-band emissions from transmitters operating at frequencies adjacent to this allocated spectrum have been documented as sources of radio frequency interference (RFI) to the L-band radiometers on SMOS and Aquarius. The spectral environment consists of high RFI levels as well as significant occurrences of low level RFI equivalent to 0.1 to 10 K. The SMAP ground processor reports the antenna temperature both before and after RFI mitigation is applied. The difference between these quantities represents the detected RFI level. The presentation will review the SMAP RFI detection and mitigation procedure and discuss early on-orbit RFI measurements from the SMAP radiometer. Assessments of global RFI properties and source types will be provided, as well as the implications of these results for SMAP soil moisture measurements.

  13. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Project Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document SMAP L1B Radiometer Data Product: L1B_TB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piepmeier, Jeffrey; Mohammed, Priscilla; De Amici, Giovanni; Kim, Edward; Peng, Jinzheng; Ruf, Christopher; Hanna, Maher; Yueh, Simon; Entekhabi, Dara

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) radiometer calibration algorithm is to convert Level 0 (L0) radiometer digital counts data into calibrated estimates of brightness temperatures referenced to the Earth's surface within the main beam. The algorithm theory in most respects is similar to what has been developed and implemented for decades for other satellite radiometers; however, SMAP includes two key features heretofore absent from most satellite borne radiometers: radio frequency interference (RFI) detection and mitigation, and measurement of the third and fourth Stokes parameters using digital correlation. The purpose of this document is to describe the SMAP radiometer and forward model, explain the SMAP calibration algorithm, including approximations, errors, and biases, provide all necessary equations for implementing the calibration algorithm and detail the RFI detection and mitigation process. Section 2 provides a summary of algorithm objectives and driving requirements. Section 3 is a description of the instrument and Section 4 covers the forward models, upon which the algorithm is based. Section 5 gives the retrieval algorithm and theory. Section 6 describes the orbit simulator, which implements the forward model and is the key for deriving antenna pattern correction coefficients and testing the overall algorithm.

  14. The Soil Moisture Active and Passive Mission (SMAP): Science and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Entekhabi, Dara; O'Neill, Peggy; Njoku, Eni

    2009-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active and Passive mission (SMAP) will provide global maps of soil moisture content and surface freeze/thaw state. Global measurements of these variables are critical for terrestrial water and carbon cycle applications. The SMAP observatory consists of two multipolarization L-band sensors, a radar and radiometer, that share a deployable-mesh reflector antenna. The combined observations from the two sensors will allow accurate estimation of soil moisture at hydrometeorological (10 km) and hydroclimatological (40 km) spatial scales. The rotating antenna configuration provides conical scans of the Earth surface at a constant look angle. The wide-swath (1000 km) measurements will allow global mapping of soil moisture and its freeze/thaw state with 2-3 days revisit. Freeze/thaw in boreal latitudes will be mapped using the radar at 3 km resolution with 1-2 days revisit. The synergy of active and passive observations enables measurements of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state with unprecedented resolution, sensitivity, area coverage and revisit.

  15. The soil moisture active/passive (SMAP) mission: How we got here and what it will provide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite will be launched by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in October 2014. This satellite is the culmination of basic research and applications development over the past thirty years. During most of this period, research and development o...

  16. Application oft triple collocation in ground-based validation of soil moisture active/passive (SMAP) level 2 data products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The validation of the soil moisture retrievals from the recently-launched NASA Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) satellite is important prior to their full public release. Uncertainty in attempts to characterize footprint-scale surface-layer soil moisture using point-scale ground observations has ...

  17. L-band active/passive time series measurements over a growing season usign the COMRAD ground-based SMAP

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scheduled to launch in October 2014, NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission will provide high-resolution global mapping of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state every 2-3 days. These new measurements of the hydrological condition of the Earth’s surface will build on data from European Spa...

  18. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Calibration and Validation Plan and Current Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, T. J.; Cosh, M.; Bindlish, R.; Crow, W.; Colliander, A.; Njoku, E.; McDonald, K.; Kimball, J.; Belair, S.; Walker, J.; Entekhabi, P.; O'Neill, P.

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of the SMAP calibration and validation (Cal/Val) program is demonstrating that the science requirements (product accuracy and bias) have been met over the mission life. This begins during pre-launch with activities that contribute to high quality products and establishing post-launch validation infrastructure and continues through the mission life. However, the major focus is on a relatively short Cal/Val period following launch. The general approach and elements of the SMAP Cal/Val plan will be described and along with details on several ongoing or recent field experiments designed to address both near- and long-term Cal/Val.

  19. Temperature Knowledge and Model Correlation for the Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) Reflector Mesh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikhaylov, Rebecca; Dawson, Douglas; Kwack, Eug

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Earth observing Soil Moisture Active & Passive (SMAP) Mission is scheduled to launch in November 2014 into a 685 km near-polar, sun synchronous orbit. SMAP will provide comprehensive global mapping measurements of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state in order to enhance understanding of the processes that link the water, energy, and carbon cycles. The primary objectives of SMAP are to improve worldwide weather and flood forecasting, enhance climate prediction, and refine drought and agriculture monitoring during its 3 year mission. The SMAP instrument architecture incorporates an L-band radar and an L-band radiometer which share a common feed horn and parabolic mesh reflector. The instrument rotates about the nadir axis at approximately 15 rpm, thereby providing a conically scanning wide swath antenna beam that is capable of achieving global coverage within 3 days. In order to make the necessary precise surface emission measurements from space, a temperature knowledge of 60 deg C for the mesh reflector is required. In order to show compliance, a thermal vacuum test was conducted using a portable solar simulator to illuminate a non flight, but flight-like test article through the quartz window of the vacuum chamber. The molybdenum wire of the antenna mesh is too fine to accommodate thermal sensors for direct temperature measurements. Instead, the mesh temperature was inferred from resistance measurements made during the test. The test article was rotated to five separate angles between 10 deg and 90 deg via chamber breaks to simulate the maximum expected on-orbit solar loading during the mission. The resistance measurements were converted to temperature via a resistance versus temperature calibration plot that was constructed from data collected in a separate calibration test. A simple thermal model of two different representations of the mesh (plate and torus) was created to correlate the mesh temperature predictions to within 60 deg C. The on-orbit mesh

  20. Monte Carlo Analysis of the Commissioning Phase Maneuvers of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Jessica L.; Bhat, Ramachandra S.; You, Tung-Han

    2012-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission will perform soil moisture content and freeze/thaw state observations from a low-Earth orbit. The observatory is scheduled to launch in October 2014 and will perform observations from a near-polar, frozen, and sun-synchronous Science Orbit for a 3-year data collection mission. At launch, the observatory is delivered to an Injection Orbit that is biased below the Science Orbit; the spacecraft will maneuver to the Science Orbit during the mission Commissioning Phase. The delta V needed to maneuver from the Injection Orbit to the Science Orbit is computed statistically via a Monte Carlo simulation; the 99th percentile delta V (delta V99) is carried as a line item in the mission delta V budget. This paper details the simulation and analysis performed to compute this figure and the delta V99 computed per current mission parameters.

  1. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) Product Specification Document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; Ardizzone, Joseph V.; Kim, Gi-Kong; Lucchesi, Robert A.; Smith, Edmond B.; Weiss, Barry H.

    2015-01-01

    This is the Product Specification Document (PSD) for Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) data for the Science Data System (SDS) of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) project. The L4_SM data product provides estimates of land surface conditions based on the assimilation of SMAP observations into a customized version of the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) land data assimilation system (LDAS). This document applies to any standard L4_SM data product generated by the SMAP Project. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission will enhance the accuracy and the resolution of space-based measurements of terrestrial soil moisture and freeze-thaw state. SMAP data products will have a noteworthy impact on multiple relevant and current Earth Science endeavors. These include: Understanding of the processes that link the terrestrial water, the energy and the carbon cycles, Estimations of global water and energy fluxes over the land surfaces, Quantification of the net carbon flux in boreal landscapes Forecast skill of both weather and climate, Predictions and monitoring of natural disasters including floods, landslides and droughts, and Predictions of agricultural productivity. To provide these data, the SMAP mission will deploy a satellite observatory in a near polar, sun synchronous orbit. The observatory will house an L-band radiometer that operates at 1.40 GHz and an L-band radar that operates at 1.26 GHz. The instruments will share a rotating reflector antenna with a 6 meter aperture that scans over a 1000 km swath.

  2. Cost-Effective Telemetry and Command Ground Systems Automation Strategy for the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Joshua S.; Sanders, Antonio L.

    2012-01-01

    Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) is an Earth-orbiting, remote-sensing NASA mission slated for launch in 2014.[double dagger] The ground data system (GDS) being developed for SMAP is composed of many heterogeneous subsystems, ranging from those that support planning and sequencing to those used for real-time operations, and even further to those that enable science data exchange. A full end-to-end automation of the GDS may result in cost savings during mission operations, but it would require a significant upfront investment to develop such comprehensive automation. As demonstrated by the Jason-1 and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) missions, a measure of "lights-out" automation for routine, orbital pass ground operations can still reduce mission cost through smaller staffing of operators and limited work hours. The challenge, then, for the SMAP GDS engineering team is to formulate an automated operations strategy--and corresponding system architecture--to minimize operator intervention during operations, while balancing the development cost associated with the scope and complexity of automation. This paper discusses the automated operations approach being developed for the SMAP GDS. The focus is on automating the activities involved in routine passes, which limits the scope to real-time operations. A key subsystem of the SMAP GDS--NASA's AMMOS Mission Data Processing and Control System (AMPCS)--provides a set of capabilities that enable such automation. Also discussed are the lights-out pass automations of the Jason-1 and WISE missions and how they informed the automation strategy for SMAP. The paper aims to provide insights into what is necessary in automating the GDS operations for Earth satellite missions.

  3. Cost-Effective Telemetry and Command Ground Systems Automation Strategy for the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Josh; Sanders, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) is an Earth-orbiting, remote-sensing NASA mission slated for launch in 2014. The ground data system (GDS) being developed for SMAP is composed of many heterogeneous subsystems, ranging from those that support planning and sequencing to those used for real-time operations, and even further to those that enable science data exchange. A full end-to-end automation of the GDS may result in cost savings during mission operations, but it would require a significant upfront investment to develop such a comprehensive automation. As demonstrated by the Jason-1 and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) missions, a measure of "lights-out" automation for routine, orbital pass, ground operations can still reduce mission costs through smaller staffing of operators and limiting their working hours. The challenge, then, for the SMAP GDS engineering team, is to formulate an automated operations strategy--and corresponding system architecture -- to minimize operator intervention during routine operations, while balancing the development costs associated with the scope and complexity of automation. This paper discusses the automated operations approach being developed for the SMAP GDS. The focus is on automating the activities involved in routine passes, which limits the scope to real-time operations. A key subsystem of the SMAP GDS -- NASA's AMMOS Mission Data Processing and Control System (AMPCS) -- provides a set of capabilities that enable such automation. Also discussed are the lights-out pass automations of the Jason-1 and WISE missions and how they informed the automation strategy for SMAP. The paper aims to provide insights into what is necessary in automating the GDS operations for Earth satellite missions.

  4. Pre-Launch Phase 1 Calibration and Validation Rehearsal of Geophysical Data Products of Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colliander, A.; Jackson, T. J.; Chan, S.; Dunbar, R.; Das, N. N.; Kim, S.; Reichle, R. H.; De Lannoy, G. J.; Liu, Q.; Kimball, J. S.; Yi, Y.; Cosh, M. H.; Bindlish, R.; Crow, W. T.; Dang, L.; Yueh, S. H.; Njoku, E. G.

    2013-12-01

    NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission is scheduled for launch in October 2014. The objective of the mission is global mapping of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state. SMAP utilizes an L-band radar and radiometer sharing a rotating 6-meter mesh reflector antenna. The instruments will operate onboard the SMAP spacecraft in a 685-km Sun-synchronous near-polar orbit, viewing the surface at a constant 40-degree incidence angle with a 1000-km swath width. Merging of active and passive L-band observations of the mission will enable an unprecedented combination of accuracy, resolution, coverage and revisit-time for soil moisture and freeze/thaw state retrieval. SMAP measurements will enable significantly improved estimates of water, energy and carbon transfers between the land and atmosphere. The SMAP science data product suite of geophysical parameters will include estimates of surface (top 5 cm) and root-zone (down to 1-m depth) soil moisture, net ecosystem exchange, and classification of the frozen/non-frozen state of the landscape. The primary validation reference of the data products will be ground-based measurements. Other remote sensing and model-based products will be used as additional resources. The post-launch timeline of the mission requires that the geophysical data products are validated (with respect to the mission requirements) within 12 months after a 3-month in-orbit check-out phase. SMAP is taking several preparatory steps in order to meet this schedule. One of the main steps consists of running a rehearsal to exercise calibration and validation procedures planned for the Cal/Val Phase. The rehearsal is divided into two stages. Phase 1, which was conducted in June-August 2013, focused on validation methodologies for the geophysical data products. Phase 2, which will be conducted in May-June 2014, includes operational aspects including a fully functioning SMAP Science Data System. (Note that the rehearsals do not include an airborne field

  5. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Radar: Measurements at High Latitudes and of Surface Freeze/Thaw State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Michael; Dunbar, Scott; Chen, Curtis

    2013-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) mission is scheduled for a late 2014 launch date. The mission will use both active radar and passive radiometer instruments at L-Band in order to achieve the science objectives of measuring soil moisture and land surface freeze-thaw state. To achieve requirements for a wide swath at sufficiently high resolution for both active and passive channels, an instrument architecture that uses a large rotating reflector is employed. In this paper, focus will be placed on the radar design. The radar will employ synthetic-aperture processing to achieve a "moderate" resolution dual-pol product over a 1000 km swath. Because the radar is operating continuously, very frequent temporal coverage will be achieved at high latitudes. This data will be used to produce a surface freeze/thaw state data product.

  6. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP): Radar Measurements at High Latitudes and of Freeze/Thaw State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Michael; Dunbar, Scott; Chen, Curtis

    2013-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) mission is scheduled for a late 2014 launch date. The mission will use both active radar and passive radiometer instruments at L-Band. In order to achieve a wide swath at sufficiently high resolution for both active and passive channels, an instrument architecture that uses a large rotating reflector is employed. In this paper, a focus will be places on the radar design and associated data products at high latitudes. The radar will employ synthetic-aperture processing to achieve a "moderate" resolution dual-pol product over a 1000 km swath. Because the radar is operating continuously, very frequent temporal coverage will be achieved at high latitudes. This data will be used, among other things, to produce a surface freeze/thaw state data product.

  7. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Radiometer Subband Calibration and Calibration Drift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Jinzheng; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; De Amici, Giovanni; Mohammed, Priscilla N.

    2016-01-01

    The SMAP is one of four first-tier missions recommended by the US National Research Council's Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space (Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond, Space Studies Board, National Academies Press, 2007). The observatory was launched on Jan 31, 2015. The goal of the SMAP is to measure the global soil moisture and freeze/thaw from space. The L-band radiometer is the passive portion of the spaceborne instrument. It measures all four Stokes antenna temperatures and outputs counts. The Level 1B Brightness Temperature (L1B_TB) science algorithm converts radiometer counts to the Earths surface brightness temperature. The results are reported in the radiometer level 1B data product together with the calibrated antenna temperature (TA) and all of the corrections to the unwanted sources contribution. The calibrated L1B data product are required to satisfy the overall radiometer error budget of 1.3 K needed to meet the soil moisture requirement of 0.04 volumetric fraction uncertainty and the calibration drift requirement of no larger than 0.4 K per month.

  8. Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) Radiometer Subband Calibration and Calibration Drift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Jinzheng; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; De Amici, Giovanni; Mohammed, Priscilla

    2016-01-01

    The SMAP is one of four first-tier missions recommended by the US National Research Council's Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space (Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond, Space Studies Board, National Academies Press, 2007)]. The observatory was launched on Jan 31, 2015. The goal of the SMAP is to measure the global soil moisture and freeze/thaw from space. The L-band radiometer is the passive portion of the spaceborne instrument. It measures all four Stokes antenna temperatures and outputs counts. The Level 1B Brightness Temperature (L1B_TB) science algorithm converts radiometer counts to the Earths surface brightness temperature. The results are reported in the radiometer level 1B data product together with the calibrated antenna temperature (TA) and all of the corrections to the unwanted sources contribution. The calibrated L1B data product are required to satisfy the overall radiometer error budget of 1.3 K needed to meet the soil moisture requirement of 0.04 volumetric fraction uncertainty and the calibration drift requirement of no larger than 0.4 K per month.

  9. Active–passive soil moisture retrievals during the SMAP validation experiment 2012

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of this study is to assess the performance of the active–passive algorithm for the NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive mission (SMAP) using airborne and ground observations from a field campaign. The SMAP active–passive algorithm disaggregates the coarse-resolution radiometer brightness tempe...

  10. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) L-Band Microwave Radiometer Post-Launch Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Jinzheng; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Misra, Sidharth; Dinnat, Emmanuel P.; Hudson, Derek; Le Vine, David M.; De Amici, Giovanni; Mohammed, Priscilla N.; Yueh, Simon H.; Meissner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The SMAP microwave radiometer is a fully-polarimetric L-band radiometer flown on the SMAP satellite in a 6 AM/ 6 PM sun-synchronous orbit at 685 km altitude. Since April, 2015, the radiometer is under calibration and validation to assess the quality of the radiometer L1B data product. Calibration methods including the SMAP L1B TA2TB (from Antenna Temperature (TA) to the Earth's surface Brightness Temperature (TB)) algorithm and TA forward models are outlined, and validation approaches to calibration stability/quality are described in this paper including future work. Results show that the current radiometer L1B data satisfies its requirements.

  11. The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission - Algorithm and Cal/Val Activities and Synergies with SMOS and Other L-Band Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, Eni; Entekhabi, Dara; O'Neill, Peggy; Jackson, Tom; Kellogg, Kent; Entin, Jared

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, planned for launch in late 2014, has as its key measurement objective the frequent, global mapping of near-surface soil moisture and its freeze-thaw state. SMAP soil moisture and freeze/thaw measurements at 10 km and 3 km resolutions respectively, would enable significantly improved estimates of water, energy and carbon transfers between the land and atmosphere. Soil moisture control of these fluxes is a key factor in the performance of atmospheric models used for weather forecasts and climate projections Soil moisture measurements are also of great importance in assessing floods and for monitoring drought. In addition, observations of soil moisture and freeze/thaw timing over the boreal latitudes can help reduce uncertainties in quantifying the global carbon balance. The SMAP measurement concept utilizes an L-band radar and radiometer sharing a rotating 6-meter mesh reflector antenna. The SMAP radiometer and radar flight hardware and ground processing designs are incorporating approaches to identify and mitigate potential terrestrial radio frequency interference (RFI). The radar and radiometer instruments are planned to operate in a 680 km polar orbit, viewing the surface at a constant 40-degree incidence angle with a 1000-km swath width, providing 3-day global coverage. Data from the instruments would yield global maps of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state to be provided at 10 km and 3 km resolutions respectively, every two to three days. Plans are to provide also a radiometer-only soil moisture product at 40-km spatial resolution. This product and the underlying brightness temperatures have characteristics similar to those provided by the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission. As a result, there are unique opportunities for common data product development and continuity between the two missions. SMAP also has commonalities with other satellite missions having L-band radiometer and/or radar sensors

  12. Soil Moisture ActivePassive (SMAP) L-Band Microwave Radiometer Post-Launch Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Jinzheng; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Misra, Sidharth; Dinnat, Emmanuel P.; Hudson, Derek; Le Vine, David M.; De Amici, Giovanni; Mohammed, Priscilla N.; Yueh, Simon H.; Meissner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The SMAP microwave radiometer is a fully-polarimetric L-band radiometer flown on the SMAP satellite in a 6 AM/ 6 PM sun-synchronous orbit at 685 km altitude. Since April, 2015, the radiometer is under calibration and validation to assess the quality of the radiometer L1B data product. Calibration methods including the SMAP L1B TA2TB (from Antenna Temperature (TA) to the Earth’s surface Brightness Temperature (TB)) algorithm and TA forward models are outlined, and validation approaches to calibration stability/quality are described in this paper including future work. Results show that the current radiometer L1B data satisfies its requirements.

  13. PALS (Passive Active L-band System) Radiometer-Based Soil Moisture Retrieval for the SMAP Validation Experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colliander, A.; Jackson, T. J.; Chan, S.; Bindlish, R.; O'Neill, P. E.; Chazanoff, S. L.; McNairn, H.; Bullock, P.; Powers, J.; Wiseman, G.; Berg, A. A.; Magagi, R.; Njoku, E. G.

    2014-12-01

    NASA's (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is scheduled for launch in early January 2015. For pre-launch soil moisture algorithm development and validation, the SMAP project and NASA coordinated a SMAP Validation Experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12) together with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada in the vicinity of Winnipeg, Canada in June 7-July 19, 2012. Coincident active and passive airborne L-band data were acquired using the Passive Active L-band System (PALS) on 17 days during the experiment. Simultaneously with the PALS measurements, soil moisture ground truth data were collected manually. The vegetation and surface roughness were sampled on non-flight days. The SMAP mission will produce surface (top 5 cm) soil moisture products a) using a combination of its L-band radiometer and SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) measurements, b) using the radiometer measurement only, and c) using the SAR measurements only. The SMAPVEX12 data are being utilized for the development and testing of the algorithms applied for generating these soil moisture products. This talk will focus on presenting results of retrieving surface soil moisture using the PALS radiometer. The issues that this retrieval faces are very similar to those faced by the global algorithm using the SMAP radiometer. However, the different spatial resolution of the two observations has to be accounted for in the analysis. The PALS 3 dB footprint in the experiment was on the order of 1 km, whereas the SMAP radiometer has a footprint of about 40 km. In this talk forward modeled brightness temperature over the manually sampled fields and the retrieved soil moisture over the entire experiment domain are presented and discussed. In order to provide a retrieval product similar to that of the SMAP passive algorithm, various ancillary information had to be obtained for the SMAPVEX12 domain. In many cases there are multiple options on how to choose and reprocess these data

  14. Radio-Frequency Interference (RFI) Mitigation for the Soil, Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Damon; Brambora, Cliff; Wong, Mark Englin; Miles, Lynn; Durachka, David; Farmer, Brian; Mohammed, Priscilla; Piepmier, Jeff; Medeiros, Jim; Martin Neil; Garcia, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    The presence of anthropogenic RFI is expected to adversely impact soil moisture measurement by NASA s Soil Moisture Active Passive mission. The digital signal processing approach and preliminary design for detecting and mitigating this RFI is presented in this paper. This approach is largely based upon the work of Johnson and Ruf.

  15. Assessment of the SMAP Passive Soil Moisture Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Steven K.; Bindlish, Rajat; O'Neill, Peggy E.; Njoku, Eni; Jackson, Tom; Colliander, Andreas; Chen, Fan; Burgin, Mariko; Dunbar, Scott; Piepmeier, Jeffrey; Yueh, Simon; Entekhabi, Dara; Cosh, Michael H.; Caldwell, Todd; Walker, Jeffrey; Wu, Xiaoling; Berg, Aaron; Rowlandson, Tracy; Pacheco, Anna; McNairn, Heather; Thibeault, Marc; Martinez-Fernandez, Jose; Gonzalez-Zamora, Angel; Seyfried, Mark; Bosch, David; Starks, Patrick; Goodrich, David; Prueger, John; Palecki, Michael; Small, Eric E.; Zreda, Marek; Calvet, Jean-Christophe; Crow, Wade T.; Kerr, Yann

    2016-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite mission was launched on January 31, 2015. The observatory was developed to provide global mapping of high-resolution soil moisture and freeze-thaw state every two to three days using an L-band (active) radar and an L-band (passive) radiometer. After an irrecoverable hardware failure of the radar on July 7, 2015, the radiometer-only soil moisture product became the only operational Level 2 soil moisture product for SMAP. The product provides soil moisture estimates posted on a 36 kilometer Earth-fixed grid produced using brightness temperature observations from descending passes. Within months after the commissioning of the SMAP radiometer, the product was assessed to have attained preliminary (beta) science quality, and data were released to the public for evaluation in September 2015. The product is available from the NASA Distributed Active Archive Center at the National Snow and Ice Data Center. This paper provides a summary of the Level 2 Passive Soil Moisture Product (L2_SM_P) and its validation against in situ ground measurements collected from different data sources. Initial in situ comparisons conducted between March 31, 2015 and October 26, 2015, at a limited number of core validation sites (CVSs) and several hundred sparse network points, indicate that the V-pol Single Channel Algorithm (SCA-V) currently delivers the best performance among algorithms considered for L2_SM_P, based on several metrics. The accuracy of the soil moisture retrievals averaged over the CVSs was 0.038 cubic meter per cubic meter unbiased root-mean-square difference (ubRMSD), which approaches the SMAP mission requirement of 0.040 cubic meter per cubic meter.

  16. The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission Level 4 Carbon Product calibration and validation using eddy covariance observations across North America, Australia and Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavros, E. N.; Kimball, J. S.; Jones, L. A.; Colliander, A.; Glassy, J. M.; Reichle, R. H.; Schimel, D.; Baldocchi, D. D.; Beringer, J.; Cleverly, J. R.; Desai, A. R.; Euskirchen, E. S.; Hutley, L. B.; Isaac, P. R.; Law, B. E.; Macfarlane, C.; Oechel, W. C.; Prober, S. M.; Jouni, P.; Scott, R. L.; Wheater, H. S.; Zona, D.

    2015-12-01

    The NASA SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) mission was successfully launched January 31st 2015, inaugurating global operational low frequency (L-band) microwave observations of land surface soil moisture and freeze-thaw dynamics with 3-day mean temporal fidelity. The novelty of SMAP is in the high quality of the geophysical observations, global monitoring of dynamic landscape freeze-thaw (FT) and soil moisture (SM) conditions, and the model-enhanced estimation of root zone soil moisture (0-100 cm) and terrestrial carbon fluxes (constrained by environmental controls). The SMAP Level 4 Carbon Product (L4_C) uses lower-level geophysical data to constrain estimates of terrestrial net CO2 exchange and addresses a key science objective of the SMAP mission, which is to understand processes that link the terrestrial water, energy and carbon cycles, particularly in boreal landscapes. Here we present the L4_C calibration and validation infrastructure, which uses eddy covariance tower flux observations. A metric of L4_C product success is to estimate NEE in northern (≥45°N) boreal and arctic biomes to within 30 gCm-2yr-1 or ~1.6 gCm-2 d-1 RMSE, similar to the level of uncertainty for tower observations. We present initial L4_C product comparisons against independent observations from a global network of 33 in situ tower sites, 8 of which are considered primary sites in the high latitudes (≥45°N). Although only primary sites are used to determine product success, all sites are integrated into diagnostic plots to evaluate land cover heterogeneity between local tower footprints and overlying L4_C grid cells, algorithm handling and data quality, thus providing a framework for evaluating environmental constraints on ecosystem productivity and respiration. In addition to mission success, we examine the added value of including FT and SM to constrain terrestrial carbon flux estimates.

  17. An Overview of Production and Validation of the SMAP Passive Soil Moisture Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, S.; O'Neill, P.; Njoku, E.; Jackson, T.; Bindlish, R.

    2015-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is an L-band mission scheduled for launch in Jan. 2015. The SMAP instruments consist of a radar and a radiometer to obtain complementary information from space for soil moisture and freeze/thaw state research and applications. By utilizing novel designs in antenna construction, retrieval algorithms, and acquisition hardware, SMAP provides a capability for global mapping of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state with unprecedented accuracy, resolution, and coverage. This improvement in hydrosphere state measurement is expected to advance our understanding of the processes that link the terrestrial water, energy and carbon cycles, improve our capability in flood prediction and drought monitoring, and enhance our skills in weather and climate forecast. For swath-based soil moisture measurement, SMAP generates three operational geophysical data products: (1) the radiometer-only soil moisture product (L2_SM_P) posted at 36-kilometer resolution, (2) the radar-only soil moisture product (L2_SM_A) posted at 3-kilometers resolution, and (3) the radar-radiometer combined soil moisture product (L2_SM_AP) posted at 9-kilometers resolution. Each product draws on the strengths of the underlying sensor(s) and plays a unique role in hydroclimatological and hydrometeorological applications. A full suite of SMAP data products is given in Table 1.

  18. The Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission (SMAP) Science Data Products: Results of Testing with Field Experiment and Algorithm Testbed Simulation Environment Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Entekhabi, Dara; Njoku, Eni E.; O'Neill, Peggy E.; Kellogg, Kent H.; Entin, Jared K.

    2010-01-01

    Talk outline 1. Derivation of SMAP basic and applied science requirements from the NRC Earth Science Decadal Survey applications 2. Data products and latencies 3. Algorithm highlights 4. SMAP Algorithm Testbed 5. SMAP Working Groups and community engagement

  19. SMAP Launch and Deployment Sequence

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video combines file footage of a Delta II rocket and computer animation to depict the launch and deployment of NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive satellite. SMAP is scheduled to launch on Nov...

  20. Technical Report Series on Global Modeling and Data Assimilation. Volume 42; Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Project Calibration and Validation for the L4_C Beta-Release Data Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, Randal D. (Editor); Kimball, John S.; Jones, Lucas A.; Glassy, Joseph; Stavros, E. Natasha; Madani, Nima (Editor); Reichle, Rolf H.; Jackson, Thomas; Colliander, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    During the post-launch Cal/Val Phase of SMAP there are two objectives for each science product team: 1) calibrate, verify, and improve the performance of the science algorithms, and 2) validate accuracies of the science data products as specified in the L1 science requirements according to the Cal/Val timeline. This report provides analysis and assessment of the SMAP Level 4 Carbon (L4_C) product specifically for the beta release. The beta-release version of the SMAP L4_C algorithms utilizes a terrestrial carbon flux model informed by SMAP soil moisture inputs along with optical remote sensing (e.g. MODIS) vegetation indices and other ancillary biophysical data to estimate global daily NEE and component carbon fluxes, particularly vegetation gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (Reco). Other L4_C product elements include surface (<10 cm depth) soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and associated environmental constraints to these processes, including soil moisture and landscape FT controls on GPP and Reco (Kimball et al. 2012). The L4_C product encapsulates SMAP carbon cycle science objectives by: 1) providing a direct link between terrestrial carbon fluxes and underlying freeze/thaw and soil moisture constraints to these processes, 2) documenting primary connections between terrestrial water, energy and carbon cycles, and 3) improving understanding of terrestrial carbon sink activity in northern ecosystems.

  1. SMAP Science Data System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuddy, D.; Gluck, S.; Hua, H.; Weiss, B.; Wong, C.; Kwoun, O.; Cruz, J.

    2012-12-01

    NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission will retrieve global surface soil moisture and freeze/thaw state based on measurements acquired by remote sensing instruments that fly on an Earth orbiting satellite. The SMAP observatory will launch no earlier than October 2014 into a near-polar, sun-synchronous orbit. The SMAP instrument suite includes a radiometer and a synthetic aperture radar. This paper will describe the Science Data System (SDS) that will process the SMAP raw data into higher-level products. SMAP data products will provide calibrated radar backscatter and radiometer brightness temperatures, derived geophysical parameters in the form of soil moisture and freeze/thaw states, daily maps of these geophysical parameters, as well as modeled analyses of global soil moisture and carbon flux in Boreal regions. The SDS is a fully automated system that will process the incoming raw data from the instruments, incorporate spacecraft and instrument engineering data, and use both dynamic and static ancillary products from the scientific community. The SDS will use the Object Oriented Data Technology (OODT) from Apache Software Foundation to control the 13 standard data product processors and additional 15 preprocessors. The standard data products will appear in Hierarchical Data Format-5 (HDF5) format. The products will contain metadata that conform to the ISO 19115 standard. The Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) will host and distribute SMAP Radar data, while the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) will host and distribute all other SMAP products.

  2. Multi-Scale Soil Moisture Monitoring and Modeling at ARS Watersheds for NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Calibration/Validation Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coopersmith, E. J.; Cosh, M. H.

    2014-12-01

    NASA's SMAP satellite, launched in November of 2014, produces estimates of average volumetric soil moisture at 3, 9, and 36-kilometer scales. The calibration and validation process of these estimates requires the generation of an identically-scaled soil moisture product from existing in-situ networks. This can be achieved via the integration of NLDAS precipitation data to perform calibration of models at each ­in-situ gauge. In turn, these models and the gauges' volumetric estimations are used to generate soil moisture estimates at a 500m scale throughout a given test watershed by leveraging, at each location, the gauge-calibrated models deemed most appropriate in terms of proximity, calibration efficacy, soil-textural similarity, and topography. Four ARS watersheds, located in Iowa, Oklahoma, Georgia, and Arizona are employed to demonstrate the utility of this approach. The South Fork watershed in Iowa represents the simplest case - the soil textures and topography are relative constants and the variability of soil moisture is simply tied to the spatial variability of precipitation. The Little Washita watershed in Oklahoma adds soil textural variability (but remains topographically simple), while the Little River watershed in Georgia incorporates topographic classification. Finally, the Walnut Gulch watershed in Arizona adds a dense precipitation network to be employed for even finer-scale modeling estimates. Results suggest RMSE values at or below the 4% volumetric standard adopted for the SMAP mission are attainable over the desired spatial scales via this integration of modeling efforts and existing in-situ networks.

  3. SMAP validation of soil moisture products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite will be launched by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in October 2014. SMAP will also incorporate a rigorous calibration and validation program that will support algorithm refinement and provide users with information on the accuracy ...

  4. SMAP Science Data System Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuddy, D.

    2014-12-01

    NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission will retrieve global surface soil moisture and freeze/thaw state based on measurements acquired by remote sensing instruments that fly on an Earth orbiting satellite. The SMAP observatory will launch no earlier than January 8, 2015 into a near-polar, sun-synchronous orbit for a three-year mission. The SMAP instrument suite includes a L-band radiometer and a L-band synthetic aperture radar. This paper will describe the architecture of the Science Data System (SDS) that processes the SMAP raw data into higher-level products. All of the SMAP products appear in the Hierarchical Data Format-5 (HDF5) format. Metadata that conform to the ISO 19115 standard accompany each product. SMAP products range from raw data (Level 0) through parsed and organized telemetry (Level 1A), calibrated signals (Level 1B/1C), retrieved geophysical values (Level 2), daily composite maps (Level 3), to analysis and modeling data (Level 4). This paper will describe an architecture that automates the challenge of delivering multiple products with large data volumes within a few hours to a few days of instrument acquisition. Additional challenges include handling data for a diverse user community as well as rapid data visualization. SMAP faces the additional complexity that the archive and access to the SMAP data processes through two NASA Data Active Archive Centers (DAAC): The Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) hosts and distributes SMAP Radar data, while the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) hosts and distributes all other SMAP products.

  5. Global High Resolution Mapping and Assimilation of Soil Moisture Observations for the SMAP Radar and Radiometer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) mission is being developed by NASA for launch in 2015. The primary science objectives of SMAP are to enhance understanding of land surface controls on the water, energy and carbon cycles, and to determine their linkages. Moreover, SMAP high-resolution so...

  6. Inter-comparison of SMAP, Aquarius and SMOS L-band brightness temperature observations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is scheduled for launch on January 29, 2015. SMAP will make observations with an L-band radar and radiometer using a shared 6 m rotating reflector antenna. SMAP is a fully polarimetric radiometer with the center frequency of 1.41 GHz. The target accuracy o...

  7. SMAP Science Data Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuddy, D.

    2014-12-01

    NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission will retrieve global surface soil moisture and freeze/thaw state based on measurements acquired by remote sensing instruments that fly on an Earth orbiting satellite. The SMAP observatory will launch no earlier than January 8, 2015 into a near-polar, sun-synchronous orbit. The SMAP instrument suite includes a radiometer and synthetic aperture radar. This paper will describe the Science Data System (SDS) that will process the SMAP raw data into higher-level products. SMAP data products will provide calibrated radar backscatter and radiometer brightness temperatures, derived geophysical parameters in the form of soil moisture and freeze/thaw states, daily maps of these geophysical parameters, as well as modeled analyses of global soil moisture and carbon flux in Boreal regions. The SDS is a fully automated system that will process the incoming raw data from the instruments, incorporate spacecraft and instrument engineering data, and use both dynamic and static ancillary products from the scientific community. The SDS will produce 14 standard data product processors. This paper will discuss the standard data products, their format, metadata, quality assessment products, as well as the planned release dates for the products both Beta and Validated quality. The standard data products will appear in Hierarchical Data Format-5 (HDF5) format. The products will contain metadata that conform to the ISO 19115 standard. The Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) will host and distribute SMAP Radar data, while the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) will host and distribute all other SMAP products.

  8. Assessment of Soil Moisture Data Requirements by the Potential SMAP Data User Community: Review of SMAP Mission User Community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Molly E.; Escobar, Vanessa M.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) mission is planned for launch in October 2014 and will provide global measurements of soil moisture and freeze thaw state. The project is driven by both basic research and applied science goals. Understanding how application driven end-users will apply SMAP data, prior to the satellite's launch, is an important goal of NASA's applied science program and SMAP mission success. Because SMAP data are unique, there are no direct proxy data sets that can be used in research and operational studies to determine how the data will interact with existing processes. The objective of this study is to solicit data requirements, accuracy needs, and current understanding of the SMAP mission from the potential user community. This study showed that the data to be provided by the SMAP mission did substantially meet the user community needs. Although there was a broad distribution of requirements stated, the SMAP mission fit within these requirements.

  9. Technical Report Series on Global Modeling and Data Assimilation. Volume 40; Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Project Assessment Report for the Beta-Release L4_SM Data Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, Randal D.; Reichle, Rolf H.; De Lannoy, Gabrielle J. M.; Liu, Qing; Colliander, Andreas; Conaty, Austin; Jackson, Thomas; Kimball, John

    2015-01-01

    During the post-launch SMAP calibration and validation (Cal/Val) phase there are two objectives for each science data product team: 1) calibrate, verify, and improve the performance of the science algorithm, and 2) validate the accuracy of the science data product as specified in the science requirements and according to the Cal/Val schedule. This report provides an assessment of the SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture Passive (L4_SM) product specifically for the product's public beta release scheduled for 30 October 2015. The primary objective of the beta release is to allow users to familiarize themselves with the data product before the validated product becomes available. The beta release also allows users to conduct their own assessment of the data and to provide feedback to the L4_SM science data product team. The assessment of the L4_SM data product includes comparisons of SMAP L4_SM soil moisture estimates with in situ soil moisture observations from core validation sites and sparse networks. The assessment further includes a global evaluation of the internal diagnostics from the ensemble-based data assimilation system that is used to generate the L4_SM product. This evaluation focuses on the statistics of the observation-minus-forecast (O-F) residuals and the analysis increments. Together, the core validation site comparisons and the statistics of the assimilation diagnostics are considered primary validation methodologies for the L4_SM product. Comparisons against in situ measurements from regional-scale sparse networks are considered a secondary validation methodology because such in situ measurements are subject to upscaling errors from the point-scale to the grid cell scale of the data product. Based on the limited set of core validation sites, the assessment presented here meets the criteria established by the Committee on Earth Observing Satellites for Stage 1 validation and supports the beta release of the data. The validation against

  10. Global Evaporation Estimates from SMAP Passive Microwave Soil Moisture Retrievals Using Conditional Sampling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vreugdenhil, M.; Entekhabi, D.; Konings, A. G.; Salvucci, G.; Hogan, P.

    2015-12-01

    Evaporation links the water, energy and carbon cycles over land yet even its climatology on global scale is not observed. Tower-based flux measurements are sparse and do not cover diverse biomes and climates. In the last decades, many strategies to derive evaporation based on remote sensing measurements have been developed. However, these methods are dependent on a variety of assumptions and auxiliary data, making them more prone to error propagation. A more data-driven method was developed by Salvucci (2001), who found that under statistical stationary conditions the expected change in soil moisture storage is zero when conditioned to a certain storage for a certain time interval. Consequently, using the water balance, precipitation conditionally averaged to the soil moisture storage is equal to the total loss: evaporation and drainage. Using only soil moisture and precipitation data as model inputs reduces the sources of uncertainty. In this presentation we provide the first estimates of global evaporation from NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive mission by applying the conditional sampling method to passive microwave soil moisture time series and in situ precipitation data. The obtained evaporation estimates show a good correspondence to measured evaporation from eddy correlation towers over selected field sites. Subsequently, a simple approach is developed to directly estimate evaporation from SMAP soil moisture data. This approach enables the investigation of dynamics in evaporation during the dry-down after storms. The timing of the transition between the different stages of evaporation is assessed for different climates especially the transition from stage 1 to stage 2 evaporation; atmosphere limited evaporation to soil limited evaporation respectively. Investigations into the dynamics of unstressed evaporation and transpiration and the transition from stage 1 to stage 2 evaporation increases our understanding of water stress and soil desiccation. It also

  11. Evaluation of sea surface salinity retrieval from SMAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tong; Meissner, Thomas; Wentz, Frank; Lagerloef, Gary

    2016-04-01

    NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite, launched on January 29, 2015, has been delivering measurements since April 2015. Although SMAP's primary mission objective is to measure soil moisture, its L-band radiometer-radar design that is similar to Aquarius (NASA's ocean salinity measuring satellite that ended its operation in June 2015) provides a potential mean to continue Aquarius' legacy. SMAP's radiometer, designed for land applications, has less precision than its Aquarius counterpart. However, the spatial resolution of SMAP's measurements is better than that of Aquarius by several times. SMAP's radar, which would have provided wind measurements needed to correct for surface roughness effect on SSS retrieval, stopped functioning in July 2015. Despite this, the Aquarius team has used the Aquarius experience to retrieve SSS from SMAP's radiometer measurements using auxiliary wind measurements. This presentation evaluates the fidelity of the SMAP SSS in depicting various oceanographic features from open oceans to coastal regions. A quantitative comparison between SMAP SSS and in-situ Argo float measurements and between SMAP and satellite SSS from Aquarius and SMOS during their overlapping periods will be presented. The evaluation demonstrates the very encouraging SSS retrieval from SMAP, which provides temporal continuity of SSS measurements beyond Aquarius.

  12. Initial validation of the Soil Moisture Active Passive mission using USDA-ARS watersheds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission was launched in January 2015 to measure global surface soil moisture. The calibration and validation program of SMAP relies upon an international cooperative of in situ networks to provide ground truth references across a variety of landscapes. The U...

  13. NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission Status and Science Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, Simon H.; Entekhabi, Dara; O'Neill, Peggy; Njoku, Eni; Entin, Jared K.

    2016-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) observatory was launched January 31, 2015, and its L-band radiometer and radar instruments became operational since mid-April 2015. The SMAP radiometer has been operating flawlessly, but the radar transmitter ceased operation on July 7. This paper provides a status summary of the calibration and validation of the SMAP instruments and the quality assessment of its soil moisture and freeze/thaw products. Since the loss of the radar in July, the SMAP project has been conducting two parallel activities to enhance the resolution of soil moisture products. One of them explores the Backus Gilbert optimum interpolation and de-convolution techniques based on the oversampling characteristics of the SMAP radiometer. The other investigates the disaggregation of the SMAP radiometer data using the European Space Agency's Sentinel-1 C-band synthetic radar data to obtain soil moisture products at about 1 to 3 kilometers resolution. In addition, SMAP's L-band data have found many new applications, including vegetation opacity, ocean surface salinity and hurricane ocean surface wind mapping. Highlights of these new applications will be provided.

  14. Generating large-scale estimates from sparse, in-situ networks: multi-scale soil moisture modeling at ARS watersheds for NASA’s soil moisture active passive (SMAP) calibration/validation mission

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NASA’s SMAP satellite, launched in November of 2014, produces estimates of average volumetric soil moisture at 3, 9, and 36-kilometer scales. The calibration and validation process of these estimates requires the generation of an identically-scaled soil moisture product from existing in-situ networ...

  15. SMAP Data Assimilation at the GMAO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, R.; De Lannoy, G.; Liu, Q.; Ardizzone, J.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission has been providing L-band (1.4 GHz) passive microwave brightness temperature (Tb) observations since April 2015. These observations are sensitive to surface(0-5 cm) soil moisture. Several of the key applications targeted by SMAP, however, require knowledge of deeper-layer, root zone (0-100 cm) soil moisture, which is not directly measured by SMAP. The NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) contributes to SMAP by providing Level 4 data, including the Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture(L4_SM) product, which is based on the assimilation of SMAP Tb observations in the ensemble-based NASA GEOS-5 land surface data assimilation system. The L4_SM product offers global data every three hours at 9 km resolution, thereby interpolating and extrapolating the coarser- scale (40 km) SMAP observations in time and in space (both horizontally and vertically). Since October 31, 2015, beta-version L4_SM data have been available to the public from the National Snow and Ice Data Center for the period March 31, 2015, to near present, with a mean latency of approx. 2.5 days.

  16. SMAP Radar Data and Services at the ASF DAAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arko, S. A.; Dixon, I. R.; Wolf, V. G.

    2015-12-01

    In January 2015 NASA launched the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) spacecraft. SMAP's mission was to create high-resolution soil moisture and freeze-thaw products using the combination of an L-band polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and an L-band radiometer. Two NASA Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) were tasked with distribution of the SMAP data products. The Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) DAAC was tasked to archive and distribute the SMAP radar products. In order to best support distribution of SMAP swath radar products and SMAP users, the ASF DAAC enhanced the DAAC data system in a number of ways that will be detailed in this presentation. SMAP radar data are unique for SAR in that they are provided as half-orbit swaths over 1000km wide. This presentation will focus on two primary areas of DAAC support for SMAP. First, the ASF data discovery client, Vertex, has been updated to better support SMAP SAR data. This included enhancements to the user interface to better support swath visualizations as well as increased search capability. Utilizing NASA's Common Metadata Repository (CMR), Vertex will allow users to download both the Level 1 SAR product as well as the higher-level products that it contributed to. In this way, the distributed nature of the data archives is better abstracted from the user experience and users have quick access to a greater variety of data. Beyond enabling data search, ASF DAAC is also supporting data utilization through the development of polar mosaics using the SAR data. SMAP is able to achieve nearly complete coverage of the Arctic north of 55 degrees every 24 hours. Based on the polarimetric SMAP data, Arctic mosaics are generated each day in geotiff format at a fixed grid spacing to allow for easy incorporation to existing workflows. Prototype ice motion products will also be shown that directly demonstrate the utility of these daily mosaics.

  17. Evaluation of SMAP radiometer level 2 soil moisture algorithms using four years of SMOS data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of the SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) mission include global measurements of soil moisture at three different spatial resolutions. SMAP will provide soil moisture with a 3-day revisit time at an accuracy of 0.04 m3/m3 The 36 km gridded soil moisture product (L2_SM_P) is primar...

  18. The SMAP level 4 surface and root zone soil moisture data assimilation product

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is scheduled for launch in January 2015 and will provide L-band radar and radiometer observations that are sensitive to surface soil moisture (in the top few centimeters of the soil column). For several of the key applications targeted by SMAP, ho...

  19. SMAP Data Assimilation at NASA SPoRT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, Clay B.; Case, Jonathan L.; Zavodsky, Bradley T.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Short-Term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center maintains a near-real- time run of the Noah Land Surface Model within the Land Information System (LIS) at 3-km resolution. Soil moisture products from this model are used by several NOAA/National Weather Service Weather Forecast Offices for flood and drought situational awareness. We have implemented assimilation of soil moisture retrievals from the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and Soil Moisture Active/ Passive (SMAP) satellites, and are now evaluating the SMAP assimilation. The SMAP-enhanced LIS product is planned for public release by October 2016.

  20. Integrating SMOS in SMAP Cal/Val

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP, scheduled launch 2014) ESA Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS, launched 2009) and satellite missions share two characteristics; both provide L-band brightness temperature and surface soil moisture at the same nominal spatial resolution and frequency. To d...

  1. SMAP Algorithms & Cal/Val Workshop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) mission is one of four Decadal Survey missions recommended by the U.S. National Research Council for launch in the early part of the next decade ("Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond," NRC, Committ...

  2. SMAP Radar Processing and Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, R.; Jaruwatanadilok, S.; Kwoun, O.; Chaubell, M.

    2013-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is part of the NASA space-based Earth observation program, and consists of an L-band radar and radiometer scheduled for launch into sun synchronous orbit in late 2014. A joint effort of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), the SMAP mission draws heavily on the design and risk reduction heritage of the Hydrosphere State (Hydros) mission [1], [2]. The SMAP science and applications objectives are to: 1) understand processes that link the terrestrial water, energy and carbon cycles, 2) estimate global water and energy fluxes at the land surface, 3) quantify net carbon flux in boreal landscapes, 4) enhance weather and climate forecast skill, and 5) develop improved flood prediction and drought monitoring capability. To meet these science objectives, SMAP ground processing will combine the attributes of the radar and radiometer observations (in terms of their spatial resolution and sensitivity to soil moisture, surface roughness, and vegetation) to estimate soil moisture with 4% volumetric accuracy at a resolution of 10 km, and freeze-thaw state at a resolution of 1-3 km. Model sensitivities translate the soil moisture accuracy to a radar backscatter accuracy of 1 dB (1 sigma) at 3 km resolution and a brightness temperature accuracy of 1.3 K at 40 km resolution. This paper will describe the level 1 radar processing and calibration challenges and the choices made so far for the algorithms and software implementation.

  3. SMAP Mission Applications; Post Launch Research and the Early Adopter Program Socioeconomic Impact Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, V. M.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission, launched January 31, 2015, has grown an Early Adopter (EA) community since 2010. Over the next two years, the mission Applications Team will conduct socioeconomic impact analyses on thematic EA research in an effort to demonstrate the value of SMAP products in societally relevant, decision support applications. The SMAP mission provides global observations of the Earth's surface soil moisture, providing high accuracy, resolution and continuous global coverage. The SMAP Applications Team will document and evaluate the use of SMAP science products in applications related to weather forecasting, drought, agriculture productivity, floods, human health and national security. SMAP EA research in applied science cases such as sea ice and sea surface winds will also be evaluated. SMAP EAs provide a thematically scaled perspective on the use and impact of SMAP data. This analysis will demonstrate how the investments in pre-launch applications and early adopter efforts contributed to the mission value, product impact and fueled new research that contributes to the use of mission products, thereby enhancing mission success. This paper presents a set of Early Adopter case studies that show how EAs plan to use SMAP science products to enhance decision support systems, and about how the SMAP data stream affects these users. Detailed tracking of this comprehensive set of case studies will enable quantification and monetization of the benefits of an application by the end of the first two years after launch.

  4. Overview of the NASA soil moisture active/passive mission

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission is currently in design Phase C and scheduled for launch in October 2014. Its mission concept is based on combined L-band radar and radiometry measurements obtained from a shared, rotating 6-meter antennae. These measurements will be used to retrie...

  5. Evaluation of SMAP Level 2 Soil Moisture Algorithms Using SMOS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bindlish, Rajat; Jackson, Thomas J.; Zhao, Tianjie; Cosh, Michael; Chan, Steven; O'Neill, Peggy; Njoku, Eni; Colliander, Andreas; Kerr, Yann; Shi, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of the SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) mission are global measurements of soil moisture and land freeze/thaw state at 10 km and 3 km resolution, respectively. SMAP will provide soil moisture with a spatial resolution of 10 km with a 3-day revisit time at an accuracy of 0.04 m3/m3 [1]. In this paper we contribute to the development of the Level 2 soil moisture algorithm that is based on passive microwave observations by exploiting Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite observations and products. SMOS brightness temperatures provide a global real-world, rather than simulated, test input for the SMAP radiometer-only soil moisture algorithm. Output of the potential SMAP algorithms will be compared to both in situ measurements and SMOS soil moisture products. The investigation will result in enhanced SMAP pre-launch algorithms for soil moisture.

  6. Early results of the Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment (SMAPVEX15)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In August of 2015, the Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment (SMAPVEX15) was conducted to provide a high resolution soil moisture dataset for the calibration/validation of the Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission (SMAP). The Upper San Pedro River Basin and the USDA-ARS Walnut Gulch LTAR...

  7. SMAP Verification and Validation Project - Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murry, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, the National Research Council (NRC) released the Decadal Survey of Earth science. In the future decade, the survey identified 15 new space missions of significant scientific and application value for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to undertake. One of these missions was the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission that NASA assigned to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in 2008. The goal of SMAP1 is to provide global, high resolution mapping of soil moisture and its freeze/thaw states. The SMAP project recently passed its Critical Design Review and is proceeding with its fabrication and testing phase.Verification and Validation (V&V) is widely recognized as a critical component in system engineering and is vital to the success of any space mission. V&V is a process that is used to check that a system meets its design requirements and specifications in order to fulfill its intended purpose. Verification often refers to the question "Have we built the system right?" whereas Validation asks "Have we built the right system?" Currently the SMAP V&V team is verifying design requirements through inspection, demonstration, analysis, or testing. An example of the SMAP V&V process is the verification of the antenna pointing accuracy with mathematical models since it is not possible to provide the appropriate micro-gravity environment for testing the antenna on Earth before launch.

  8. SMAP Instrument Mechanical System Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slimko, Eric; French, Richard; Riggs, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, scheduled for launch by the end of 2014, is being developed to measure the soil moisture and soil freeze/thaw state on a global scale over a three-year period. The accuracy, resolution, and global coverage of SMAP measurements are invaluable across many science and applications disciplines including hydrology, climate, carbon cycle, and the meteorological, environment, and ecology applications communities. The SMAP observatory is composed of a despun bus and a spinning instrument platform that includes both a deployable 6 meter aperture low structural frequency Astromesh reflector and a spin control system. The instrument section has engendered challenging mechanical system issues associated with the antenna deployment, flexible antenna pointing in the context of a multitude of disturbances, spun section mass properties, spin control system development, and overall integration with the flight system on both mechanical and control system levels. Moreover, the multitude of organizations involved, including two major vendors providing the spin subsystem and reflector boom assembly plus the flight system mechanical and guidance, navigation, and control teams, has led to several unique system engineering challenges. Capturing the key physics associated with the function of the flight system has been challenging due to the many different domains that are applicable. Key interfaces and operational concepts have led to complex negotiations because of the large number of organizations that integrate with the instrument mechanical system. Additionally, the verification and validation concerns associated with the mechanical system have had required far-reaching involvement from both the flight system and other subsystems. The SMAP instrument mechanical systems engineering issues and their solutions are described in this paper.

  9. The SMAP Dictionary Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Kevin A.; Swan, Christoper A.

    2014-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Dictionary Management System is a web-based tool to develop and store a mission dictionary. A mission dictionary defines the interface between a ground system and a spacecraft. In recent years, mission dictionaries have grown in size and scope, making it difficult for engineers across multiple disciplines to coordinate the dictionary development effort. The Dictionary Management Systemaddresses these issues by placing all dictionary information in one place, taking advantage of the efficiencies inherent in co-locating what were once disparate dictionary development efforts.

  10. RFI Mitigation and Detection for the SMAP Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Samuel; Fischman, Mark; Spencer, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The planned Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission will use both active radar and passive radiometer instruments at L-Band to measure and monitor both soilmoisture and freeze/thaw state globally. The frequency band allocated for the SMAP radar is shared with the Global Navigation Satellite Systems and ground-basedradiolocation services. Signals from those users present significant sources of anthropogenic radio frequency interference (RFI) which contaminate the radarmeasurements. To mitigate RFI, the radar is designed with tunable operating frequency, which allows the center frequency to be tuned to avoid RFI. The filtering scheme in the receiver is configured to get a high level of RFI suppression. To meet the high accuracy measurement requirements, RFI detection and correction will be required during ground data processing. Some candidate algorithms have been evaluated, and they have been tested against simulated SMAP data derived from the PALSAR data.

  11. SMOS/SMAP Synergy for SMAP Level 2 Soil Moisture Algorithm Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bindlish, Rajat; Jackson, Thomas J.; Zhao, Tianjie; Cosh, Michael; Chan, Steven; O'Neill, Peggy; Njoku, Eni; Colliander, Andreas; Kerr, Yann

    2011-01-01

    Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite has been proposed to provide global measurements of soil moisture and land freeze/thaw state at 10 km and 3 km resolutions, respectively. SMAP would also provide a radiometer-only soil moisture product at 40-km spatial resolution. This product and the supporting brightness temperature observations are common to both SMAP and European Space Agency's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission. As a result, there are opportunities for synergies between the two missions. These include exploiting the data for calibration and validation and establishing longer term L-band brightness temperature and derived soil moisture products. In this investigation we will be using SMOS brightness temperature, ancillary data, and soil moisture products to develop and evaluate a candidate SMAP L2 passive soil moisture retrieval algorithm. This work will begin with evaluations based on the SMOS product grids and ancillary data sets and transition to those that will be used by SMAP. An important step in this analysis is reprocessing the multiple incidence angle observations provided by SMOS to a global brightness temperature product that simulates the constant 40 degree incidence angle observations that SMAP will provide. The reprocessed brightness temperature data provide a basis for evaluating different SMAP algorithm alternatives. Several algorithms are being considered for the SMAP radiometer-only soil moisture retrieval. In this first phase, we utilized only the Single Channel Algorithm (SCA), which is based on the radiative transfer equation and uses the channel that is most sensitive to soil moisture (H-pol). Brightness temperature is corrected sequentially for the effects of temperature, vegetation, roughness (dynamic ancillary data sets) and soil texture (static ancillary data set). European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) estimates of soil temperature for the top layer (as provided as part of the SMOS

  12. Evaluating new SMAP soil moisture for drought monitoring in the rangelands of the US High Plains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Velpuri, Naga Manohar; Senay, Gabriel B.; Morisette, Jeffrey T.

    2016-01-01

    Level 3 soil moisture datasets from the recently launched Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite are evaluated for drought monitoring in rangelands.Validation of SMAP soil moisture (SSM) with in situ and modeled estimates showed high level of agreement.SSM showed the highest correlation with surface soil moisture (0-5 cm) and a strong correlation to depths up to 20 cm.SSM showed a reliable and expected response of capturing seasonal dynamics in relation to precipitation, land surface temperature, and evapotranspiration.Further evaluation using multi-year SMAP datasets is necessary to quantify the full benefits and limitations for drought monitoring in rangelands.

  13. SMAP Validation and Accuracy Assessment of Soil Moisture Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission was launched in January, 2015 and will begin its calibration and validation (Cal/Val) phase in May, 2015. This will begin with a focus on instrument measurements, brightness temperature and backscatter, and evolve to the geophysical produ...

  14. Retrieval of Sea Surface Salinity and Wind from The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yueh, S. H.; Fore, A.; Tang, W.; Hayashi, A.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, the first Earth Science Decadal Survey mission, was launched January 31, 2015 to provide high-resolution, frequent-revisit global mapping of soil moisture. SMAP has two instruments, a polarimetric radiometer and a multi-polarization synthetic aperture radar. Both instruments operate at L-band frequencies (~ 1GHz) and share a single 6-m rotating mesh antenna, producing a fixed incidence angle conical scan at 40⁰ across a 1000-km swath and a 2-3 day global revisit. The SMAP SSS and ocean surface wind retrieval algorithm developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory leverages the QuikSCAT and Aquarius algorithms to account for the two-look geometry (fore and aft looks from the conical scan) and dual-polarization observations for simultaneous retrieval of SSS and wind speed. The retrieval algorithm has been applied to more than three months of SMAP radiometer data. Comparison with the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) wind speed suggests that the SMAP wind speed reaches an accuracy of about 0.7 ms-1. The preliminary assessment of the SMAP SSS products gridded at 50 km spatial resolution and weekly intervals is promising. The spatial patterns of the SSS agree well with climatological distributions, but exhibit several unique spatial and temporal features. The temporal evolutions of freshwater plumes from several major rivers, such as the Amazon, Niger, Congo, Ganges, and Mississippi, are all consistent with the timing of rainy and dry seasons, indicated in the SMAP's soil moisture products. Rigorous accuracy assessment will be performed by comparison with in situ SSS data from buoys and ARGO floats. The SMAP evaluation products will be released to the public prior to November 2015.

  15. Automating the SMAP Ground Data System to Support Lights-Out Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission is a first tier mission in NASA's Earth Science Decadal Survey. SMAP will provide a global mapping of soil moisture and its freeze/thaw states. This mapping will be used to enhance the understanding of processes that link the terrestrial water, energy, and carbon cycles, and to enhance weather and forecast capabilities. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has been selected as the lead center for the development and operation of SMAP. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has an extensive history of successful deep space exploration. JPL missions have typically been large scale Class A missions with significant budget and staffing. SMAP represents a new area of JPL focus towards low cost Earth science missions. Success in this new area requires changes to the way that JPL has traditionally provided the Mission Operations System (MOS)/Ground Data System (GDS) functions. The operation of SMAP requires more routine operations activities and support for higher data rates and data volumes than have been achieved in the past. These activities must be addressed by a reduced operations team and support staff. To meet this challenge, the SMAP ground data system provides automation that will perform unattended operations, including automated commanding of the SMAP spacecraft.

  16. Validation of the Soil Moisture Active Passive mission using USDA-ARS experimental watersheds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The calibration and validation program of the Soil Moisture Active Passive mission (SMAP) relies upon an international cooperative of in situ networks to provide ground truth references across a variety of landscapes. The USDA Agricultural Research Service operates several experimental watersheds wh...

  17. Lack of SMALL ACIDIC PROTEIN 1 (SMAP1) causes increased sensitivity to an inhibitor of RUB/NEDD8-activating enzyme in Arabidopsis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Oono, Yutaka; Nakasone, Akari

    2013-10-01

    SMALL ACIDIC PROTEIN 1 (SMAP1) functions upstream of the degradation of AUX/IAA-proteins in the response to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and physically interacts with the COP9 SIGNALOSOME (CSN). Also, its function is linked to RELATED TO UBIQUITIN (RUB) modification. To further investigate the relationship between SMAP1 and the RUB modification system, we examined the effect of MLN4924, an inhibitor of RUB/NEDD8-activating E1 enzyme, on the growth of Arabidopsis thaliana. We found that the anti-auxin resistant 1 mutants, which lack SMAP1, are more sensitive to MLN4924 than wild type and that SMAP1 is responsible for this hypersensitivity. This new evidence supports our previous speculation that SMAP1 acts in Cullin-RING ubiquitin E3 ligase regulated signaling processes via its interaction with components associated with the RUB modification system.

  18. Evaluation of the SMAP radiometer lever 2 pre-launch soil moisture algorithms using SMOS data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of the upcoming SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) satellite mission include global measurements of soil moisture at 40 km, 10 km and 3 km resolutions with a 3-day revisit time at an accuracy of 0.04 m3/m3. The 40 km resolution soil moisture product is based primarily on the passiv...

  19. Applications of SMAP data to retrieval of ocean surface wind and salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yueh, Simon; Fore, Alexander; Tang, Wenqing; Hayashi, Akiko; Stiles, Bryan; Zhang, Fuqing; Weng, Yonghui; Real, Nicolas

    2016-10-01

    We have examined the L-band radiometer and radar data from NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission for ocean research and applications. We find that the SMAP data are in excellent agreement with the geophysical model function (GMF) derived from the Aquarius data up to a wind speed of 20 ms-1. For severe wind conditions, the higher resolution data from SMAP allowed us to assess the sensitivity of L-band radiometer signals to hurricane force winds. We applied the L-band GMF to the retrieval of ocean surface wind and SSS from the SMAP data. Comparison with the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting, WindSat and RapidSCAT wind speeds suggests that SMAP's radiometer wind speed reaches an excellent accuracy of about 1.1-1.7 ms-1 below a wind speed of 20 ms-1. We have also found that the maximum wind speed derived from the SMAP radiometer data can reach 140 knots for severe storms and are generally in good agreement with the hurricane track analysis and operational aircraft Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer wind speeds. The spatial patterns of the SMAP SSS agree well with climatological distributions, but exhibit several unique spatial and temporal features.

  20. Utilization of Ancillary Data Sets for SMAP Algorithm Development and Product Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ONeill, P.; Podest, E.; Njoku, E.

    2011-01-01

    Algorithms being developed for the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission require a variety of both static and ancillary data. The selection of the most appropriate source for each ancillary data parameter is driven by a number of considerations, including accuracy, latency, availability, and consistency across all SMAP products and with SMOS (Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity). It is anticipated that initial selection of all ancillary datasets, which are needed for ongoing algorithm development activities on the SMAP algorithm testbed at JPL, will be completed within the year. These datasets will be updated as new or improved sources become available, and all selections and changes will be documented for the benefit of the user community. Wise choices in ancillary data will help to enable SMAP to provide new global measurements of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state at the targeted accuracy necessary to tackle hydrologically-relevant societal issues.

  1. An initial assessment of SMAP soil moisture retrievals using high-resolution model simulations and in situ observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Ming; Cai, Xitian; Chaney, Nathaniel W.; Entekhabi, Dara; Wood, Eric F.

    2016-09-01

    At the end of its first year of operation, we compare soil moisture retrievals from the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission to simulations from a land surface model with meteorological forcing downscaled from observations/reanalysis and in situ observations from sparse monitoring networks within continental United States (CONUS). The radar failure limits the duration of comparisons for the active and combined products (~3 months). Nevertheless, the passive product compares very well against in situ observations over CONUS. On average, SMAP compares to the in situ data even better than the land surface model and provides significant added value on top of the model and thus good potential for data assimilation. At large scale, SMAP is in good agreement with the model in most of CONUS with less-than-expected degradation over mountainous areas. Lower correlation between SMAP and the model is seen in the forested east CONUS and significantly lower over the Canadian boreal forests.

  2. Assimilation of Smos Observations to Generate a Prototype SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root-Zone Soil Moisture Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; De Lannoy, Gabrielle J. M.; Crow, Wade T.; Koster, Randal D.; Kimball, John

    2012-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP; [1]) mission is being implemented by NASA for launch in October 2014. The primary science objectives of SMAP are to enhance understanding of land surface controls on the water, energy and carbon cycles, and to determine their linkages. Moreover, the high-resolution soil moisture mapping provided by SMAP has practical applications in weather and seasonal climate prediction, agriculture, human health, drought and flood decision support. The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS; [2]) mission was launched by ESA in November 2009 and has since been observing L-band (1.4 GHz) upwelling passive microwaves. In this paper we describe our use of SMOS brightness temperature observations to generate a prototype of the planned SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root-zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) product [5].

  3. Assessing pre-launch application feasibility using the SMAP science data system algorithm and application simulation testbed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Slated for launch in 2014, the NASA Soil Moisture Active/Passive mission represents a significant advance in our ability to globally observe time and space variations in surface soil moisture fields. The SMAP mission concept is based on the integrated use of L-band active radar and passive radiomet...

  4. Spatiotemporal analysis of soil moisture in using active and passive remotely sensed data and ground observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Fang, B.; Lakshmi, V.

    2015-12-01

    Abstract: Soil moisture plays a vital role in ecosystem, biological processes, climate, weather and agriculture. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) improves data by combining the advantages and avoiding the limitation of passive microwave remote sensing (low resolution), and active microwave (challenge of soil moisture retrieval). This study will advance the knowledge of the application of soil moisture by using the Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12) data as well as data collected at Walnut Gulch Arizona in August 2015 during SMAPVEX15. Specifically, we will analyze the 5m radar data from Unmanned Airborne Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) to study spatial variability within the PALS radiometer pixel. SMAPVEX12/15 and SMAP data will also be analyzed to evaluate disaggregation algorithms. The analytical findings will provide valuable information for policy-makers to initiate and adjust protocols and regulations for protecting land resources and improving environmental conditions. Keywords: soil moisture, Remote Sensing (RS), spatial statistic

  5. Early results of the Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment (SMAPVEX15)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosh, M. H.; Jackson, T. J.; Colliander, A.; Goodrich, D. C.; Holifield Collins, C.; McKee, L.; Kim, S.; Yueh, S. H.

    2015-12-01

    In August of 2015, the Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment (SMAPVEX15) was conducted to provide a high resolution soil moisture dataset for the calibration/validation of the Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission (SMAP). The Upper San Pedro River Basin and the USDA-ARS Walnut Gulch LTAR Watershed provides the infrastructure for the experiment with its extensive soil moisture and soil temperature network. A total of seven aircraft flights are planned for the Passive Active L-Band Scanning instrument (PALS) to provide a high resolution soil moisture map for a variety of soil moisture conditions across the domain. Extensive surface roughness, vegetation and soil rock fraction mapping was conducted to provide a ground truth estimate of the many ancillary datasets used in the SMAP soil moisture algorithms. A review of the methodologies employed in the experiment, as well as initial findings will be discussed.

  6. Seasonal Parameterizations of the Tau-Omega Model Using the ComRAD Ground-Based SMAP Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, P.; Joseph, A.; Srivastava, P.; Cosh, M.; Lang, R.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is scheduled for launch in November 2014. In the prelaunch time frame, the SMAP team has focused on improving retrieval algorithms for the various SMAP baseline data products. The SMAP passive-only soil moisture product depends on accurate parameterization of the tau-omega model to achieve the required accuracy in soil moisture retrieval. During a field experiment (APEX12) conducted in the summer of 2012 under dry conditions in Maryland, the Combined Radar/Radiometer (ComRAD) truck-based SMAP simulator collected active/passive microwave time series data at the SMAP incident angle of 40 degrees over corn and soybeans throughout the crop growth cycle. A similar experiment was conducted only over corn in 2002 under normal moist conditions. Data from these two experiments will be analyzed and compared to evaluate how changes in vegetation conditions throughout the growing season in both a drought and normal year can affect parameterizations in the tau-omega model for more accurate soil moisture retrieval.

  7. Experimental High Resolution (3 km) SMAP Soil Moisture Data Fields With Uncertainty Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, N. N.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission was launched on January 31st, 2015. The objective of the mission is global mapping of surface soil moisture and landscape freeze/thaw state. SMAP utilizes an L-band radar and radiometer sharing a rotating 6-meter mesh reflector antenna. The SMAP spacecraft is in a 685-km Sun-synchronous near-polar orbit, and viewing the surface at a constant 40-degree incidence angle with a 1000-km swath width. Merging of the high-resolution active (radar) and coarse-resolution but high-sensitivity passive (radiometer) L-band observations enable an unprecedented combination of accuracy, resolution, coverage and revisit-time for soil moisture and freeze/thaw state retrievals. However, on July 7th, 2015, the SMAP radar encountered an anomaly and is currently inoperable. Efforts are being made to revive the SMAP radar. Due to the present status of the SMAP observatory, nearly ~2.5 months (from the end of In-Orbit-Check April 13th, 2015 to July 7th, 2015) of the SMAP Active Passive product will be available to public through the NASA DAAC at National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC). The baseline L2_SM_AP product is retrieved soil moisture from the disaggregated/downscaled brightness temperature obtained by merging the coarse-resolution (~36 km) radiometer brightness temperature data and the high-resolution (~3 km) radar backscatter data. The baseline product is intermediate scale 9 km global soil moisture information. Experimentally, a much higher resolution global surface soil moisture data set is also produced at 3 km. This experimental product covering the 2.5 Spring/Summer months is the focus of this presentation. We specifically focus on the analysis of errors and reliability of this data set. The errors in disaggregated brightness temperatures and the retrived soil moisture estimates are discussed. In the presentation the accuracies of the SMAP L2-SM_AP soil moisture retrievals will be shown using summary comparisons with in

  8. Immunizations: Active vs. Passive

    MedlinePlus

    ... a certain type of wild animal bites a child. Passive immunizations for hepatitis A (gamma globulin) may be helpful ... A is common. They are typically given before children or adults leave on their ... active vaccination is preferable. Keep in mind that passive immunizations ...

  9. The Use of Modeling for Flight Software Engineering on SMAP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Alexander; Jones, Chris G.; Reder, Leonard; Cheng, Shang-Wen

    2011-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission proposes to deploy an Earth-orbiting satellite with the goal of obtaining global maps of soil moisture content at regular intervals. Launch is currently planned in 2014. The spacecraft bus would be built at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), incorporating both new avionics as well as hardware and software heritage from other JPL projects. [4] provides a comprehensive overview of the proposed mission

  10. Near-Real-Time, Global Radar Data at the Alaska Satellite Facility DAAC from NASA's SMAP Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arko, S. A.; Allen, A. R.; Dixon, I. R.

    2014-12-01

    The Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) is supporting NASA's SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) satellite mission, which launches in January 2015. SMAP will measure global soil moisture and its freeze-thaw state every 3 days using an L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and radiometer. ASF, along with the National Snow and Ice Data Center DAAC and NASA's Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS), is identifying and developing tools and technologies to facilitate use of global, near-real-time data by the SMAP user community. ASF will host the SMAP Level 1 radar data and make them available for download through ASF's data discovery interface, Vertex, and the ASF Application Programming Interface. Vertex allows a user to search, visualize and download SAR data, browse images and relevant metadata, and will offer the complete SMAP L1 radar archive to the public. The entire SMAP archive consisting of level 1-4 data can be accessed via Reverb, the NASA EOSDIS metadata and service discovery tool. In anticipation of the SMAP launch and data release, ASF has developed and released a new website (https://www.asf.alaska.edu/smap/) and a suite of web resources, including interactive media, technical information, a product guide, related publications, and tools for working with the HDF5 data format. The ASF SMAP team is exploring OPeNDAP and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Webification technologies for enhancing in-browser data visualization and analysis. These technologies, and tools developed with them, represent opportunities for exposing this valuable dataset to areas with limited bandwidth or understanding of radar data. This presentation will highlight the enabling technologies and techniques ASF is employing to bring these data to new scientific and applications users and respond to ever-changing user needs.

  11. Evaluation of the validated soil moisture product from the SMAP radiometer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, we used a multilinear regression approach to retrieve surface soil moisture from NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite data to create a global dataset of surface soil moisture which is consistent with ESA’s Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite retrieved sur...

  12. Soil moisture sensor intercomparisons at the SMAP marena in situ testbed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In May 2010, a soil moisture sensor intercomparison study was begun in Marena, Oklahoma. This effort is designed to serve as a foundation for incorporating diverse soil moisture networks into the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Calibration and Validation program. Various soil moisture sensors, w...

  13. The SMAP In Situ Soil Moisture Sensor Testbed: Comparing in situ sensors for satellite validation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the most valuable tools in validating satellite based soil moisture estimates, such as those from the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission are large scale in situ networks. Global validation involves networks operated by many different organizations. Existing in situ soil moisture netw...

  14. SMAP L2/L3 Soil moisture product validation with core validation sites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission was launched by NASA in January, 2015 and entered its one year calibration and validation (cal/val) phase in May, 2015. This began with a focus on instrument measurements, brightness temperature and backscatter, and has now evolved to the geophysical p...

  15. Techniques for active passivation

    SciTech Connect

    Roscioli, Joseph R.; Herndon, Scott C.; Nelson, Jr., David D.

    2016-12-20

    In one embodiment, active (continuous or intermittent) passivation may be employed to prevent interaction of sticky molecules with interfaces inside of an instrument (e.g., an infrared absorption spectrometer) and thereby improve response time. A passivation species may be continuously or intermittently applied to an inlet of the instrument while a sample gas stream is being applied. The passivation species may have a highly polar functional group that strongly binds to either water or polar groups of the interfaces, and once bound presents a non-polar group to the gas phase in order to prevent further binding of polar molecules. The instrument may be actively used to detect the sticky molecules while the passivation species is being applied.

  16. Data Assimilation of SMAP Observations and the Impact on Weather Forecasts and Heat Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley; Case, Jonathan; Blankenship, Clay; Crosson, William; White, Khristopher

    2014-01-01

    SPoRT produces real-time LIS soil moisture products for situational awareness and local numerical weather prediction over CONUS, Mesoamerica, and East Africa ?Currently interact/collaborate with operational partners on evaluation of soil moisture products ?Drought/fire ?Extreme heat ?Convective initiation ?Flood and water borne diseases ?Initial efforts to assimilate L2 soil moisture observations from SMOS (as a precursor for SMAP) have been successful ?Active/passive blended product from SMAP will be assimilated similarly and higher spatial resolution should improve on local-scale processes

  17. SMAP Validation Experiment 2015 (SMAPVEX15)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colliander, A.; Jackson, T. J.; Cosh, M. H.; Misra, S.; Crow, W. T.; Chae, C. S.; Moghaddam, M.; O'Neill, P. E.; Entekhabi, D.; Yueh, S. H.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission was launched in January 2015. The objective of the mission is global mapping of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state. For soil moisture algorithm validation, the SMAP project and NASA coordinated SMAPVEX15 around the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (WGEW) in Tombstone, Arizona on August 1-19, 2015. The main goals of SMAPVEX15 are to understand the effects and contribution of heterogeneity on the soil moisture retrievals, evaluate the impact of known RFI sources on retrieval, and analyze the brightness temperature product calibration and heterogeneity effects. Additionally, the campaign aims to contribute to the validation of GPM (Global Precipitation Mission) data products. The campaign will feature three airborne microwave instruments: PALS (Passive Active L-band System), UAVSAR (Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar) and AirMOSS (Airborne Microwave Observatory of Subcanopy and Subsurface). PALS has L-band radiometer and radar, and UAVSAR and AirMOSS have L- and P-band synthetic aperture radars, respectively. The PALS instrument will map the area on seven days coincident with SMAP overpasses; UAVSAR and AirMOSS on four days. WGEW was selected as the experiment site due to the rainfall patterns in August and existing dense networks of precipitation gages and soil moisture sensors. An additional temporary network of approximately 80 soil moisture stations was deployed in the region. Rainfall observations were supplemented with two X-band mobile scanning radars, approximately 25 tipping bucket rain gauges, three laser disdrometers, and three vertically-profiling K-band radars. Teams were on the field to take soil moisture samples for gravimetric soil moisture, bulk density and rock fraction determination as well as to measure surface roughness and vegetation water content. In this talk we will present preliminary results from the experiment including

  18. The SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root-zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, Rolf; Crow, Wade; Koster, Randal; Kimball, John

    2010-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) mission is being developed by NASA for launch in 2013 as one of four first-tier missions recommended by the U.S. National Research Council Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space in 2007. The primary science objectives of SMAP are to enhance understanding of land surface controls on the water, energy and carbon cycles, and to determine their linkages. Moreover, the high resolution soil moisture mapping provided by SMAP has practical applications in weather and seasonal climate prediction, agriculture, human health, drought and flood decision support. In this paper we describe the assimilation of SMAP observations for the generation of the planned SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root-zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) product. The SMAP mission makes simultaneous active (radar) and passive (radiometer) measurements in the 1.26-1.43 GHz range (L-band) from a sun-synchronous low-earth orbit. Measurements will be obtained across a 1000 km wide swath using conical scanning at a constant incidence angle (40 deg). The radar resolution varies from 1-3 km over the outer 70% of the swath to about 30 km near the center of the swath. The radiometer resolution is 40 km across the entire swath. The radiometer measurements will allow high-accuracy but coarse resolution (40 km) measurements. The radar measurements will add significantly higher resolution information. The radar is however very sensitive to surface roughness and vegetation structure. The combination of the two measurements allows optimal blending of the advantages of each instrument. SMAP directly observes only surface soil moisture (in the top 5 cm of the soil column). Several of the key applications targeted by SMAP, however, require knowledge of root zone soil moisture (approximately top 1 m of the soil column), which is not directly measured by SMAP. The foremost objective of the SMAP L4_SM product is to fill this gap and provide estimates of root zone soil moisture

  19. The SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture data assimilation product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichle, R. H.; De Lannoy, G. J. M.; Crow, W. T.; Kimball, J. S.; Koster, R. D.; Liu, Q.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is scheduled for launch in January 2015 and will provide L-band radar and radiometer observations that are sensitive to surface soil moisture (in the top few centimeters of the soil column). For several of the key applications targeted by SMAP, however, knowledge of root zone soil moisture (defined here nominally as soil moisture in the top 1 m of the soil column) is needed. The SMAP mission will therefore provide a value-added Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) product with the two key objectives: (i) to provide estimates of root zone soil moisture based on SMAP observations, and (ii) to provide a global surface and root zone soil moisture product that is spatially and temporally complete. The L4_SM algorithm uses an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) to merge SMAP observations with soil moisture estimates from the NASA GEOS-5 Catchment land surface model. The model describes the vertical transfer of soil moisture between the surface and root zone reservoirs and will be driven with observation-based surface meteorological forcing data, including precipitation, on a global 9 km Earth-fixed grid. The presentation provides an overview of the SMAP L4_SM algorithm and pre-launch validation. Specifically, an L4_SM prototype product based on the assimilation of observations from the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission was validated using in situ measurements from SMAP core validation sites (densely instrumented watersheds) and from more than 100 single-profile sensors scattered across the United States. The validation results indicate that the prototype soil moisture product satisfies the formal RMSE requirement for the L4_SM product of 0.04 m3/m3 (after removal of the long-term mean bias). An examination of the observation-minus-forecast residuals from the L4_SM system suggests where the system could be improved further.

  20. Science Data System Contribution to Calibrating and Validating SMAP Data Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuddy, D.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission retrieves global surface soil moisture and freeze/thaw state using measurements acquired by a radiometer and a synthetic aperture radar that fly on an Earth orbiting satellite. The SMAP observatory launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base on January 31, 2015 into a near-polar, sun-synchronous orbit. This paper describes the contribution of the SMAP Science Data System (SDS) to the calibration and on-going validation of the radar backscatter and radiometer brightness temperatures. The Science Data System designed, implemented and operated the software that generates data products that contain various geophysical parameters including soil moisture and freeze/thaw states, daily maps of these geophysical parameters, as well as modeled analyses of global soil moisture and carbon flux in Boreal regions. The SDS is a fully automated system that processes the incoming raw data from the instruments, incorporates spacecraft and instrument engineering data, and uses both dynamic and static ancillary products provided by the scientific community. The standard data products appear in Hierarchical Data Format-5 (HDF5) format. These products contain metadata that conform to the ISO 19115 standard. The Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) hosts and distributes SMAP radar data products. The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) hosts and distributes all of the other SMAP data products.

  1. Some Issues in Validating Satellite-based Soil Moisture Retrievals with In Situ Observations and Their Impact on SMAP Validation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite is scheduled for launch in the fall of 2014. As the first of NASA’s Decadal Survey missions, efforts are being made to implement both best practices and innovations, which include calibration and validation of the remote sensing products (Cal/Val). ...

  2. Using Smos Passive Microwave Data to Develop Smap Freeze/thaw Algorithms Adapted for the Canadian Subarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalantari, P.; Bernier, M.; McDonal, K. C.; Poulin, J.

    2015-12-01

    Seasonal terrestrial Freeze/Thaw cycle in Northern Quebec Tundra (Nunavik) was determined and evaluated with passive microwave observations. SMOS time series data were analyzed to examine seasonal variations of soil freezing, and to assess the impact of land cover on the Freeze/Thaw cycle. Furthermore, the soil freezing maps derived from SMOS observations were compared to field survey data in the region near Umiujaq. The objective is to develop algorithms to follow the seasonal cycle of freezing and thawing of the soil adapted to Canadian subarctic, a territory with a high complexity of land cover (vegetation, soil, and water bodies). Field data shows that soil freezing and thawing dates vary much spatially at the local scale in the Boreal Forest and the Tundra. The results showed a satisfactory pixel by pixel mapping for the daily soil state monitoring with a > 80% success rate with in situ data for the HH and VV polarizations, and for different land cover. The average accuracies are 80% and 84% for the soil freeze period, and soil thaw period respectively. The comparison is limited because of the small number of validation pixels.

  3. Aquarius Active-Passive RFI Environment at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Vine, David M.; De Matthaeis, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Active/Passive instrument combinations (i.e., radiometer and radar) are being developed at L-band for remote sensing of sea surface salinity and soil moisture. Aquarius is already in orbit and SMAP is planned for launch in the Fall of 2014. Aquarius has provided for the first time a simultaneous look at the Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) environment from space for both active and passive instruments. The RFI environment for the radiometer observations is now reasonably well known and examples from Aquarius are presented in this manuscript that show that RFI is an important consideration for the scatterometer as well. In particular, extensive areas of the USA, Europe and Asia exhibit strong RFI in both the radiometer band at 1.41 GHz and in the band at 1.26 GHz employed by the Aquarius scatterometer. Furthermore, in areas such as the USA, where RFI at 1.4 GHz is relatively well controlled, RFI in the scatterometer band maybe the limiting consideration for the operation of combination active/passive instruments.

  4. SMAP L2/L3 Soil Moisture Product Validation using In Situ Based Core Validation Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colliander, A.; Jackson, T. J.; Chan, S.; Das, N. N.; Kim, S.; Dunbar, R. S.; Bindlish, R.; Dang, L. B.; Berg, A. A.; Rowlandson, T. L.; Caylor, K. K.; Cosh, M. H.; AlJassar, H. K.; Lopez-baeza, E.; Martínez-Fernández, J.; Gonzales-Zamora, A.; McNairn, H.; Pacheco, A. M.; Moghaddam, M.; Montzka, C.; Notarnicola, C.; Niedrist, G.; Pellarin, T.; Pulliainen, J.; Rautiainen, K.; Ramos, J.; Seyfried, M. S.; Su, Z.; Zeng, Y.; Van der Velde, R.; Temimi, M.; Thibeault, M.; Dorigo, W.; Vreugdenhil, M.; Walker, J.; Wu, X.; Caldwell, T. G.; Spencer, M.; O'Neill, P. E.; Entekhabi, D.; Yueh, S. H.; Njoku, E. G.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission was launched in January 2015. The objective of the mission is global mapping of soil moisture and landscape freeze/thaw state. SMAP utilizes L-band radar and radiometer instruments sharing a rotating 6-meter mesh reflector antenna. Merging of active and passive L-band observations enables an unprecedented combination of accuracy, resolution, global coverage and revisit-time for soil moisture and freeze/thaw retrievals. The primary validation reference of the data products will be ground-based measurements. Well characterized sites with calibrated in situ measurements will be used to determine the quality of the data products; these sites are designated as core validation sites. The mission success criteria will be evaluated with respect to these core site comparisons. Other remote sensing and model-based products will be used as additional resources to expand the spatial and temporal scope of the evaluation. In an effort to ensure the geographic distribution and diversity of conditions of the core validation sites, SMAP has partnered with investigators across the globe. Because different SMAP Level 2 soil moisture products have different spatial scales, the suitability of the various sites for validation of the different products must be done for each site while considering several factors. The main factors are gravimetric calibration of the sensors within a site and determination of a spatial scaling function of the sensor measurements up to the SMAP resolution scales. The mission has been able to utilize the core site measurements since the launch of the satellite because the infrastructure for data transmission and processing was established well before the launch. The validated soil moisture products will be released by May 2016. In this presentation we will show the performance of the beta version of the soil moisture products (released by November 2015) and discuss the status of the validation process.

  5. Analysis of soil moisture retrieval from airborne passive/active L-band sensor measurements in SMAPVEX 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang; Song, Hongting; Tan, Lei; Li, Yinan; Li, Hao

    2014-11-01

    Soil moisture is a key component in the hydrologic cycle and climate system. It is an important input parameter for many hydrologic and meteorological models. NASA'S upcoming Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, to be launched in October 2014, will address this need by utilizing passive and active microwave measurements at L-band, which will penetrate moderately dense canopies. In preparation for the SMAP mission, the Soil Moisture Validation Experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12) was conducted from 6 June to 17 July 2012 in the Carment-Elm Creek area in Manitoba, Canada. Over a period of six weeks diverse land cover types ranging from agriculture over pasture and grassland to forested sites were re-visited several times a week. The Passive/Active L-band Sensor (PALS) provides radiometer products, vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperatures, and radar products. Over the past two decades, successful estimation of soil moisture has been accomplished using passive and active L-band data. However, remaining uncertainties related to surface roughness and the absorption, scattering, and emission by vegetation must be resolved before soil moisture retrieval algorithms can be applied with known and acceptable accuracy using satellite observations. This work focuses on analyzing the Passive/Active L-band Sensor observations of sites covered during SMAPVEX12, investigating the observed data, parameterizing vegetation covered surface model, modeling inversion algorithm and analyzing observed soil moisture changes over the time period of six weeks. The data and analysis results from this study are aimed at increasing the accuracy and range of validity of SMAP soil moisture retrievals via enhancing the accuracy for soil moisture retrieval.

  6. Airborne active and passive L-band measurements using PALS instrument in SMAPVEX12 soil moisture field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colliander, Andreas; Yueh, Simon; Chazanoff, Seth; Dinardo, Steven; O'Dwyer, Ian; Jackson, Thomas; McNairn, Heather; Bullock, Paul; Wiseman, Grant; Berg, Aaron; Magagi, Ramata; Njoku, Eni

    2012-10-01

    NASA's (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission is scheduled for launch in late 2014. The objective of the mission is global mapping of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state. Merging of active and passive L-band observations of the mission will enable unprecedented combination of accuracy, resolution, coverage and revisit-time for soil moisture and freeze/thaw state retrieval. For pre-launch algorithm development and validation the SMAP project and NASA coordinated a field campaign named as SMAPVEX12 (Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment 2012) together with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, and other Canadian and US institutions in the vicinity of Winnipeg, Canada in June-July, 2012. The main objective of SMAPVEX12 was acquisition of a data record that features long time-series with varying soil moisture and vegetation conditions over an aerial domain of multiple parallel flight lines. The coincident active and passive L-band data was acquired with the PALS (Passive Active L-band System) instrument. The measurements were conducted over the experiment domain every 2-3 days on average, over a period of 43 days. The preliminary calibration of the brightness temperatures obtained in the campaign has been performed. Daily lake calibrations were used to adjust the radiometer calibration parameters, and the obtained measurements were compared against the raw in situ soil moisture measurements. The evaluation shows that this preliminary calibration of the data produces already a consistent brightness temperature record over the campaign duration, and only secondary adjustments and cleaning of the data is need before the data can be applied to the development and validation of SMAP algorithms.

  7. Assimilation of soil moisture retrievals or brightness temperature observations from SMOS and SMAP into the GEOS-5 land surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lannoy, G. J. M.; Reichle, R. H.

    2015-12-01

    Two L-band microwave missions are currently collecting passive microwave observations and aiming at an improved estimation of soil moisture. The ESA Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission and the NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission both provide Level 1 brightness temperature products and derived Level 2 soil moisture retrieval products. The assimilation of these products into land surface models has potential to improve global estimates of soil moisture and other land surface variables. This presentation investigates the benefits and challenges of assimilating either retrievals or brightness temperature observations from either SMOS or SMAP into the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) land surface model. It will be shown that the seasonal corrections introduced by retrieval assimilation are slightly different from those with brightness temperature assimilation as a result of the technical implementation of the assimilation scheme. Various resulting land surface variables will also be evaluated against the results from the operational SMAP Level 4 Soil Moisture (L4_SM) product, which assimilates SMAP brightness temperature data.

  8. Spatial and Temporal Patterns of SMAP Brightness Temperatures for Use in Level 1 TB Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    1. IntroductionThe recent launch of NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission [Entekhabi, et al] has opened the door to improved brightness temperature (TB) calibration of satellite L-band microwave radiometers, through the use of SMAP's lower noise performance and better immunity to man-made interference (vs. ESA's Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission [Kerr, et al]), better spatial resolution (vs. NASA's Aquarius sea surface salinity mission [Le Vine, et al]), and cleaner antenna pattern (vs. SMOS). All three radiometers use/used large homogeneous places on Earth's surface as calibration targets—parts of the ocean, Antarctica, and tropical forests. Despite the recent loss of Aquarius data, there is still hope for creating a longer-term L-band data set that spans the timeframe of all 3 missions. 2. Description of Analyses and Expected Results In this paper, we analyze SMAP brightness temperature data to quantify the spatial and temporal characteristics of external target areas in the oceans, Antarctica, forests, and other areas. Existing analyses have examined these targets in terms of averages, standard deviations, and other basic statistics (for Aquarius & SMOS as well). This paper will approach the problem from a signal processing perspective. Coupled with the use of SMAP's novel RFI-mitigated TBs, and the aforementioned lower noise and cleaner antenna pattern, it is expected that of the 3 L-band missions, SMAP should do the best job of characterizing such external targets. The resulting conclusions should be useful to extract the best possible TB calibration from all 3 missions, helping to inter-compare the TB from the 3 missions, and to eventually inter-calibrate the TBs into a single long-term dataset.

  9. Evaluation of the Validated Soil Moisture Product from the SMAP Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, P.; Chan, S.; Colliander, A.; Dunbar, S.; Njoku, E.; Bindlish, R.; Chen, F.; Jackson, T.; Burgin, M.; Piepmeier, J.; Yueh, S.; Entekhabi, D.; Cosh, M.; Caldwell, T.; Walker, J.; Wu, X.; Berg, A.; Rowlandson, T.; Pacheco, A.; McNairn, H.; Thibeault, M.; Martinez-Fernandez, J.; Gonzalez-Zamora, A.; Seyfried, M.; Bosch, D.; Starks, P.; Goodrich, D.; Prueger, J.; Palecki, M.; Small, E.; Zreda, M.; Calvet, J-C.; Crow, W.; Kerr, Y.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission launched on January 31, 2015 into a sun-synchronous 6 am/6 pm orbit with an objective to produce global mapping of high-resolution soil moisture and freeze-thaw state every 2-3 days using an L-band (active) radar and an L-band (passive) radiometer. The SMAP radiometer began acquiring routine science data on March 31, 2015 and continues to operate nominally. SMAP's radiometer-derived soil moisture product (L2_SM_P) provides soil moisture estimates posted on a 36 km fixed Earth grid using brightness temperature observations from descending (6 am) passes and ancillary data. A beta quality version of L2_SM_P was released to the public in September, 2015, with the fully validated L2_SM_P soil moisture data expected to be released in May, 2016. Additional improvements (including optimization of retrieval algorithm parameters and upscaling approaches) and methodology expansions (including increasing the number of core sites, model-based intercomparisons, and results from several intensive field campaigns) are anticipated in moving from accuracy assessment of the beta quality data to an evaluation of the fully validated L2_SM_P data product.

  10. Utilization of Ancillary Data Sets for Conceptual SMAP Mission Algorithm Development and Product Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, P.; Podest, E.

    2011-01-01

    The planned Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is one of the first Earth observation satellites being developed by NASA in response to the National Research Council's Decadal Survey, Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond [1]. Scheduled to launch late in 2014, the proposed SMAP mission would provide high resolution and frequent revisit global mapping of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state, utilizing enhanced Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) mitigation approaches to collect new measurements of the hydrological condition of the Earth's surface. The SMAP instrument design incorporates an L-band radar (3 km) and an L band radiometer (40 km) sharing a single 6-meter rotating mesh antenna to provide measurements of soil moisture and landscape freeze/thaw state [2]. These observations would (1) improve our understanding of linkages between the Earth's water, energy, and carbon cycles, (2) benefit many application areas including numerical weather and climate prediction, flood and drought monitoring, agricultural productivity, human health, and national security, (3) help to address priority questions on climate change, and (4) potentially provide continuity with brightness temperature and soil moisture measurements from ESA's SMOS (Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity) and NASA's Aquarius missions. In the planned SMAP mission prelaunch time frame, baseline algorithms are being developed for generating (1) soil moisture products both from radiometer measurements on a 36 km grid and from combined radar/radiometer measurements on a 9 km grid, and (2) freeze/thaw products from radar measurements on a 3 km grid. These retrieval algorithms need a variety of global ancillary data, both static and dynamic, to run the retrieval models, constrain the retrievals, and provide flags for indicating retrieval quality. The choice of which ancillary dataset to use for a particular SMAP product would be based on a number of factors

  11. SMAP Faraday Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Vine, David

    2016-01-01

    Faraday rotation is a change in the polarization as signal propagates through the ionosphere. At L-band it is necessary to correct for this change and measurements are made on the spacecraft of the rotation angle. These figures show that there is good agreement between the SMAP measurements (blue) and predictions based on models (red).

  12. SMAP Post-launch Field Campaign Planning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The SMAP post-launch Cal/Val activities are intended both to assess the quality of the mission products and to support analyses that lead to their improvement. A suite of complementary methodologies will be employed that will result in a robust global assessment. Much of the work will occur in the C...

  13. Ocean Products from the SMAP Radiometer: Surface Salinity and Wind Speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, T.; Wentz, F. J.; Scott, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Though designed to measure soil moisture, the SMAP radiometer is an excellent sensor to measure sea surface salinity and sea surface wind speed. It is possible to retrieve both quantities from passive SMAP observations without using the SMAP radar, whose transmitter likely failed in July 2015. With the demise of Aquarius the ability of the SMAP sensor to measure ocean salinity has gained importance. The main part of our presentation discusses the adaption of the Aquarius salinity retrieval algorithm to SMAP. It includes corrections for spurious signals coming from cold space, the galaxy, the sun and the moon as well as sidelobe and cross polarization effects from the SMAP antenna. Based on Aquarius observations, we have developed a radiative transfer model that characterizes the surface emission of a wind roughened ocean. Our surface roughness correction for the SMAP salinity retrieval will use match-ups of SMAP radiometer observations and surface wind speeds from WindSat or SSMIS. Our presentation will also address several important differences between the Aquarius and SMAP sensors that impact the ocean salinity retrievals. The full 360o look capability of SMAP makes it possible to take observations from the forward and backward looking direction basically at the same instance of time. We expect that this two-look capability will strongly aid the salinity retrievals. It will be possible to observe some of the spurious contamination sources like the reflected galaxy or the reflected sun from two different directions. Finally, we will address the capability to measure ocean surface wind speed with the SMAP radiometer. As it has been demonstrated with Aquarius and SMOS the L-band passive ocean surface emission exhibits very good sensitivity to surface wind speeds to at least 35 m/s and it is very little affected by precipitation. This allows the retrieval of ocean surface winds, in particular in storms and even under rainy conditions.

  14. Airborne Active and Passive L-Band Observations in Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colliander, A.; Yueh, S. H.; Chazanoff, S.; Jackson, T. J.; McNairn, H.; Bullock, P.; Wiseman, G.; Berg, A. A.; Magagi, R.; Njoku, E. G.

    2012-12-01

    NASA's (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission is scheduled for launch in October 2014. The objective of the mission is global mapping of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state. Merging of active and passive L-band observations of the mission will enable unprecedented combination of accuracy, resolution, coverage and revisit-time for soil moisture and freeze/thaw state retrieval. For pre-launch algorithm development and validation the SMAP project and NASA coordinated a field campaign named as SMAPVEX12 (Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment 2012) together with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada in the vicinity of Winnipeg, Canada in June-July, 2012. The main objective of SMAPVEX12 was acquisition of data record that features long-time series with varying soil moisture and vegetation conditions (for testing the application of time-series approach) over aerial domain of multiple parallel lines (for spatial disaggregation studies). The coincident active and passive L-band data were acquired using the Passive Active L-band System (PALS), which is an airborne radiometer and radar developed for testing L-band retrieval algorithms. For SMAPVEX12 PALS was installed on a Twin Otter aircraft. The flight plan included flights at two altitudes. The higher altitude was used to map the whole experiment domain and the lower altitude was used to obtain measurements over a specific set of field sites. The spatial resolution (and swath) of the radar and radiometer from low altitude was about 600 m and from high altitude about 1500 m. The PALS acquisitions were complemented with high resolution (~10 m) L-band SAR measurements carried out by UAVSAR instrument on-board G-III aircraft. The campaign ran from June 7 until July 19. The PALS instrument conducted 17 brightness temperature and backscatter measurement flights and the UAVSAR conducted 14 backscatter measurement flights. The airborne data acquisition was supported by

  15. NASAs Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission and Opportunities For Applications Users

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Molly E.; Escobar, Vanessa; Moran, Susan; Entekhabi, Dara; O'Neill, Peggy; Njoku, Eni G.; Doorn, Brad; Entin, Jared K.

    2013-01-01

    Water in the soil, both its amount (soil moisture) and its state (freeze/thaw), plays a key role in water and energy cycles, in weather and climate, and in the carbon cycle. Additionally, soil moisture touches upon human lives in a number of ways from the ravages of flooding to the needs for monitoring agricultural and hydrologic droughts. Because of their relevance to weather, climate, science, and society, accurate and timely measurements of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state with global coverage are critically important.

  16. Potential of bias correction for downscaling passive microwave and soil moisture data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Passive microwave satellites such as SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) or SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) observe brightness temperature (TB) and retrieve soil moisture at a spatial resolution greater than most hydrological processes. Bias correction is proposed as a simple method to disag...

  17. The impact of land surface temperature on soil moisture anomaly detection from passive microwave observations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For several years passive microwave observations have been used to retrieve soil moisture from the Earth’s surface. Low frequency observations have the most sensitivity to soil moisture, therefore the modern Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and future Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) ...

  18. Active and Passive Hybrid Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carswell, James R.

    2010-01-01

    A hybrid ocean wind sensor (HOWS) can map ocean vector wind in low to hurricane-level winds, and non-precipitating and precipitating conditions. It can acquire active and passive measurements through a single aperture at two wavelengths, two polarizations, and multiple incidence angles. Its low profile, compact geometry, and low power consumption permits installation on air craft platforms, including high-altitude unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs).

  19. New Combined L-band Active/Passive Soil Moisture Retrieval Algorithm Optimized for Argentine Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruscantini, C. A.; Grings, F. M.; Salvia, M.; Ferrazzoli, P.; Karszenbaum, H.

    2015-12-01

    The ability of L-band passive microwave satellite observations to provide soil moisture (mv) measurements is well known. Despite its high sensitivity to near-surface mv, radiometric technology suffers from having a relatively low spatial resolution. Conversely active microwave observations, although their finer resolution, are difficult to be interpreted for mv content due to the confounding effects of vegetation and roughness. There have been and there are strong motivations for the realization of satellite missions that carry passive and active microwave instruments on board. This has also led to important contributions in algorithm development. In this line of work, NASA-CONAE SAC-D/Aquarius mission had on board an L band radiometer and scatterometer. This was followed by the launch of NASA SMAP mission (Soil Moisture Active Passive), as well as several airborne campaigns that provide active and passive measurements. Within this frame, a new combined active/passive mv retrieval algorithm is proposed by deriving an analytical expression of brightness temperature and radar backscattering relation using explicit semi-empirical models. Simple models (i.e. that can be easily inverted and have relatively low amount of ancillary parameters) were selected: ω-τ model (Jackson et al., 1982, Water Resources Research) and radar-only model (Narvekar et al., 2015, IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing). A major challenge involves coupling the active and passive models to be consistent with observations. Coupling equations can be derived using theoretical active/passive high-order radiative transfer models, such as 3D Numerical Method of Maxwell equations (Zhou et al., 2004, IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing) and Tor Vergata (Ferrazzoli et al., 1995,Remote Sensing of Environment) models. In this context, different coupling equations can be optimized for different land covers using theoretical forward models with specific parametrization for each

  20. Validation of the Soil Moisture Active Passive mission using USDA-ARS experimental watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosh, M. H.; Jackson, T. J.; Bindlish, R.; Colliander, A.; Kim, S.; Das, N. N.; Yueh, S. H.; Bosch, D. D.; Goodrich, D. C.; Prueger, J. H.; Starks, P. J.; Livingston, S.; Seyfried, M. S.; Coopersmith, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    The calibration and validation program of the Soil Moisture Active Passive mission (SMAP) relies upon an international cooperative of in situ networks to provide ground truth references across a variety of landscapes. The USDA Agricultural Research Service operates several experimental watersheds which contribute to the validation of SMAP soil moisture products. These watersheds consist of a network of in situ sensors that measure soil moisture at a variety of depths including the 5 cm depth, which is critical for satellite validation. Comparisons of the in situ network estimates to the satellite products are ongoing, but initial results have shown strong correlation between satellite estimates and in situ soil moisture measurements once scaling functions were applied. The scaling methodologies for the in situ networks are being reviewed and evaluated. Results from the Little Washita, Fort Cobb, St. Joseph's and Little River Experimental Watersheds show good agreement between the satellite products and in situ measurements. Walnut Gulch results show high accuracy, although with the caveat that these domains are semi-arid with a substantially lower dynamic range. The South Fork Watershed is examined more closely for its detailed scaling function development as well as an apparent bias between satellite and in situ values.

  1. Integration of radar and radiometric data from SMAP and Sentinel-1 sensors for soil moisture and vegetation monitoring (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paloscia, Simonetta; Santi, Emanuele; Pettinato, Simone; Entekhabi, Dara

    2016-10-01

    This work has been focused on the integration of microwave data coming from different sensors (SMAP, Sentinel-1, AMSR2), in order to obtain an improved estimation of hydrological parameters and in particular of the Soil Moisture (SMC). The failure of radar sensor in SMAP satellite induced to look for other available microwave frequencies, both from active (e.g. Sentinel-1, C band) and passive sensors (e.g. AMSR2, from C to Ka bands). The contribution of higher frequencies, which are more suitable for monitoring vegetation and other surface features, has been evaluated for compensating the vegetation and roughness effects on the SM retrieval accuracy. In particular, the contribution of C band SAR from Sentinel-1 and of the multi-frequency AMSR2 radiometer (C to Ka bands) have been considered. Moreover, a disaggregation technique, based on the Smoothing filter based intensity modulation (SFIM), enabled achieving a more suitable ground resolution for comparing SAR and radiometric data. Disaggregated microwave data were used as inputs of a retrieval algorithm based on Artificial Neural Network (ANN), able to exploit the synergy between active and passive acquisitions. The algorithm was defined basing on the data available from the SMEX02 and SMAPVEX12 campaigns, and on data simulated by electromagnetic forward models. The algorithm validation on these datasets returned encouraging results, while the disaggregation technique enabled adapting the algorithm to work with Sentinel, SMAP and AMSR2 synergic acquisitions

  2. Model-Based Verification and Validation of the SMAP Uplink Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, M. Omair; Dubos, Gregory F.; Tirona, Joseph; Standley, Shaun

    2013-01-01

    This case study stands as an example of how a project can validate a system-level design earlier in the project life cycle than traditional V&V processes by using simulation on a system model. Specifically, this paper describes how simulation was added to a system model of the Soil Moisture Active-Passive (SMAP) mission's uplink process.Also discussed are the advantages and disadvantages of the methods employed and the lessons learned; which are intended to benefit future model-based and simulation-based V&V development efforts.

  3. Estimating Sea Surface Salinity and Wind Using Combined Passive and Active L-Band Microwave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, Simon H.; Chaubell, Mario J.

    2012-01-01

    Several L-band microwave radiometer and radar missions have been, or will be, operating in space for land and ocean observations. These include the NASA Aquarius mission and the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, both of which use combined passive/ active L-band instruments. Aquarius s passive/active L-band microwave sensor has been designed to map the salinity field at the surface of the ocean from space. SMAP s primary objectives are for soil moisture and freeze/thaw detection, but it will operate continuously over the ocean, and hence will have significant potential for ocean surface research. In this innovation, an algorithm has been developed to retrieve simultaneously ocean surface salinity and wind from combined passive/active L-band microwave observations of sea surfaces. The algorithm takes advantage of the differing response of brightness temperatures and radar backscatter to salinity, wind speed, and direction, thus minimizing the least squares error (LSE) measure, which signifies the difference between measurements and model functions of brightness temperatures and radar backscatter. The algorithm uses the conjugate gradient method to search for the local minima of the LSE. Three LSE measures with different measurement combinations have been tested. The first LSE measure uses passive microwave data only with retrieval errors reaching 1 to 2 psu (practical salinity units) for salinity, and 1 to 2 m/s for wind speed. The second LSE measure uses both passive and active microwave data for vertical and horizontal polarizations. The addition of active microwave data significantly improves the retrieval accuracy by about a factor of five. To mitigate the impact of Faraday rotation on satellite observations, the third LSE measure uses measurement combinations invariant under the Faraday rotation. For Aquarius, the expected RMS SSS (sea surface salinity) error will be less than about 0.2 psu for low winds, and increases to 0.3 psu at 25 m/s wind speed

  4. Cloning, characterization and chromosome mapping of the human SMAP1 gene.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Irene; Borrego, Salud; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Galán, José Jorge; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2002-06-12

    Stromal membrane associated protein (smap-1) is a new murine cell surface molecule on the stromal cells. The murine smap-1 protein is induced in stromal cells by the contact with erythroid cells, which suggests that this protein may be involved in the haematopoietic progenitor cells to stromal cells interactions. Here we report the structure, map location and expression analysis of the human SMAP1 gene, which cover approximately 100 kb on chromosome 6 between D6S455 and D6S1673 markers. This gene is composed of 11 exons and encodes a 468-amino-acid protein, which shows an 86% of homology with the murine smap-1 protein. The expression of smap-1 in erythropoietic organs as well as the correlation with the erythropoietic activity of the haematopoietic organs suggest that smap-1 is induced in stromal cells by the contact with erythroid cells, defining smap-1 as a key molecule that induced an erythropoietic microenvironment in haematopoietic organs. The high sequence conservation between murine and human SMAP1, as well as its expression in bone marrow, strongly suggest conserved functions of this protein in both organisms. Recently, a constitutional translocation t(6;10)(q13;q22) has been described in a patient with severe aplastic anaemia. SMAP1 gene localizes to 6q13 and is probably implicated in erythropoiesis, therefore it remains as an interesting candidate gene.

  5. Gap between active and passive solar heating

    SciTech Connect

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    The gap between active and passive solar could hardly be wider. The reasons for this are discussed and advantages to narrowing the gap are analyzed. Ten years of experience in both active and passive systems are reviewed, including costs, frequent problems, performance prediction, performance modeling, monitoring, and cooling concerns. Trends are analyzed, both for solar space heating and for service water heating. A tendency for the active and passive technologies to be converging is observed. Several recommendations for narrowing the gap are presented.

  6. Sensitivity of Active and Passive Microwave Observations to Soil Moisture during Growing Corn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, J.; Monsivais-Huertero, A.; Liu, P.; De Roo, R. D.; England, A. W.; Nagarajan, K.

    2011-12-01

    Soil moisture (SM) in the root zone is a key factor governing water and energy fluxes at the land surface and its accurate knowledge is critical to predictions of weather and near-term climate, nutrient cycles, crop-yield, and ecosystem productivity. Microwave observations, such as those at L-band, are highly sensitive to soil moisture in the upper few centimeters (near-surface). The two satellite-based missions dedicated to soil moisture estimation include, the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission and the planned NASA Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) [4] mission. The SMAP mission will include active and passive sensors at L-band to provide global observations of SM, with a repeat coverage of every 2-3 days. These observations can significantly improve root zone soil moisture estimates through data assimilation into land surface models (LSMs). Both the active (radar) and passive (radiometer) microwave sensors measure radiation quantities that are functions of soil dielectric constant and exhibit similar sensitivities to SM. In addition to the SM sensitivity, radar backscatter is highly sensitive to roughness of soil surface and scattering within the vegetation. These effects may produce a much larger dynamic range in backscatter than that produced due to SM changes alone. In this study, we discuss the field observations of active and passive signatures of growing corn at L-band from several seasons during the tenth Microwave, Water and Energy Balance Experiment (MicroWEX-10) conducted in North Central Florida, and to understand the sensitivity of these signatures to soil moisture under dynamic vegetation conditions. The MicroWEXs are a series of season-long field experiments conducted during the growing seasons of sweet corn, cotton, and energy cane over the past six years (for example, [22]). The corn was planted on July 5 and harvested on September 23, 2011 during MicroWEX-10. The size of the field was 0.04 km2 and the soils

  7. Active and Passive Remote Sensing of Ice.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    This is a report on the progress that has been made in the study of active and passive remote sensing of ice during the period of August 1, 1984...active and passive microwave remote sensing , (2) used the strong fluctuation theory and the fluctuation-dissipation theorem to calculate the brightness

  8. Scanning L Band Active Passive Validation Experiment 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, A. T.; Kim, E. J.; Faulkner, T.; Patel, H.; Cosh, M. H.

    2014-12-01

    SLAP (Scanning L-band Active Passive) comprises of a fully polarimetric L-band radiometer and fully polarimetric L-band radar with a shared antenna. SLAP is designed to be compatible with several aircrafts; specifically, C-23, Twin Otter, P-3, and C-130. SLAP is designed for simplicity, accuracy, & reliability. It leverages, as much as possible, existing instruments, hardware, and software in order to minimize cost, time, and risk.The SLAP airborne/ground campaign is designed to conduct flight testing and ground truth for the airborne instrument. The campaign took place the third week of December 2013 in Eastern Shore, MD. SLAP contributes to the NASA's core mission because of its ability to serve as an airborne simulator for the SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) satellite mission, one of NASA's flagship missions scheduled to launch in January 2015. A 3-day aircraft validation campaign was conducted where the new SLAP instrument flew three separate days over the proposed sampling region. The study area is a mixed agriculture and forest site located about 1 hour east of Washington, DC on the Eastern Shore (of the Chesapeake Bay). This region is located on the Delmarva Peninsula. The advantages of the selected site are: (1) Site was used before in previous field campaign (SMAPVEX08) (2) ARS HRSL has some established sampling sites within region (3) Dynamic variation in land cover (4) Variety of plant structures and densities. The goal of this campaign was to fly the instrument over the proposed site before a rain event, then have 2 other flights after the rain event to capture a dry down. In conjunction with the aircraft, there was in-situ ground sampling. Ground observations were collected concurrent with aircraft flights. These included soil moisture, soil temperature, surface temperature, surface roughness and vegetation parameters. Forest sites were monitored with small temporary networks of in situ sensors installed prior to the first flight. Soil moisture was

  9. Active and Passive Remote Sensing of Ice.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    This is a report on the progress that has been made in the study of active and passive remote sensing of ice during the period of February 1, 1984...the emissivities as functions of viewing angles and polarizations. They are used to interpret the passive microwave remote sensing data from

  10. Utilization of Airborne and in Situ Data Obtained in SGP99, SMEX02, CLASIC and SMAPVEX08 Field Campaigns for SMAP Soil Moisture Algorithm Development and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colliander, Andreas; Chan, Steven; Yueh, Simon; Cosh, Michael; Bindlish, Rajat; Jackson, Tom; Njoku, Eni

    2010-01-01

    Field experiment data sets that include coincident remote sensing measurements and in situ sampling will be valuable in the development and validation of the soil moisture algorithms of the NASA's future SMAP (Soil Moisture Active and Passive) mission. This paper presents an overview of the field experiment data collected from SGP99, SMEX02, CLASIC and SMAPVEX08 campaigns. Common in these campaigns were observations of the airborne PALS (Passive and Active L- and S-band) instrument, which was developed to acquire radar and radiometer measurements at low frequencies. The combined set of the PALS measurements and ground truth obtained from all these campaigns was under study. The investigation shows that the data set contains a range of soil moisture values collected under a limited number of conditions. The quality of both PALS and ground truth data meets the needs of the SMAP algorithm development and validation. The data set has already made significant impact on the science behind SMAP mission. The areas where complementing of the data would be most beneficial are also discussed.

  11. Passivation of fluorinated activated charcoal

    SciTech Connect

    Del Cul, G.D.; Trowbridge, L.D.; Simmons, D.W.; Williams, D.F.; Toth, L.M.

    1997-10-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE), at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been shut down since 1969 when the fuel salt was drained from the core into two Hastelloy N tanks at the reactor site. In 1995, a multiyear project was launched to remediate the potentially hazardous conditions generated by the movement of fissile material and reactive gases from the storage tanks into the piping system and an auxiliary charcoal bed (ACB). The top 12 in. of the ACB is known by gamma scan and thermal analysis to contain about 2.6 kg U-233. According to the laboratory tests, a few feet of fluorinated charcoal are believed to extend beyond the uranium front. The remainder of the ACB should consist of unreacted charcoal. Fluorinated charcoal, when subjected to rapid heating, can decompose generating gaseous products. Under confined conditions, the sudden exothermic decomposition can produce high temperatures and pressures of near-explosive characteristics. Since it will be necessary to drill and tap the ACB to allow installation of piping and instrumentation for remediation and recovery activities, it is necessary to chemically convert the reactive fluorinated charcoal into a more stable material. Ammonia can be administered to the ACB as a volatile denaturing agent that results in the conversion of the C{sub x}F to carbon and ammonium fluoride, NH{sub 4}F. The charcoal laden with NH{sub 4}F can then be heated without risking any sudden decomposition. The only consequence of heating the treated material will be the volatilization of NH{sub 4}F as a mixture of NH{sub 3} and HF, which would primarily recombine as NH{sub 4}F on surfaces below 200 C. The planned scheme for the ACB denaturing is to flow diluted ammonia gas in steps of increasing NH{sub 3} concentration, 2% to 50%, followed by the injection of pure ammonia. This report summarizes the planned passivation treatment scheme to stabilize the ACB and remove the potential hazards. It also includes basic information

  12. Active colloids that slosh through passive matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Granick, Steve

    Studies of natural and artificial active matter have focused on systems with a large mismatch of the time and length scales for active and passive elements, but in a variety of non-equilibrium condensed matter systems, including numerous biological processes, actively driven elements have a crowded environment of surrounding passive ``solvent'' elements of comparable size. Here we study self-propelled colloidal particles in a passive matrix of comparable size. Particles with high activity take straight lines and sharp turns through the soft 2-D crystal matrix to ensure rapid healing of the crystal structure. Effective attraction between active particles arises when the concentration of active particles or the hardness of the matrix increases; active particles tend to segregate in the grain boundaries of the crystal matrix.

  13. A Self-Consistent Radiative Transfer Model for Simulating Active and Passive Observations of Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, I. S.

    2015-12-01

    Current generation sensors suites such as those included on the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission, Aquarius, and Soil Moisture Active / Passive (SMAP) exploit a combination to provide a greater understanding of geophysical phenomena. While "operationalized" retrieval algorithms require fast forward models, the ability to perform higher fidelity simulations is necessary for understanding the physics of remote sensing problems to test assumptions and to develop parameterizations for the fast models. To ensure proper synergy between active and passive modeling, forward models must be consistent between the two sensor types. This work presents a self-consistent active and passive radiative transfer model for simulating radar and radiometer responses to precipitation. To accomplish this, we extend the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS) version 2.3 to solve the radiative transfer equation for radar under multiple scattering conditions using Monte Carlo integration. Early versions of ARTS (1.1 and later) included a passive Monte Carlo solver, and ARTS is capable of handling atmospheres of up to three dimensions with ellipsoidal planetary geometries. The modular nature of ARTS facilitates extensibility, and the well-developed ray-tracing tools are suited for implementation of Monte Carlo algorithms. Finally, since ARTS handles the full Stokes vector, co- and cross-polarized reflectivity products are possible for scenarios that include nonspherical particles, with or without preferential alignment. The accuracy of the forward model will be demonstrated, and the effects of multiple scattering will be detailed. The three-dimensional nature of the radiative transfer model will be useful for understanding the effects of nonuniform beamfill and multiple scattering for spatially heterogeneous precipitation events. This targets of this forward model are GPM (the Dual-wavelength Precipitation Radar (DPR) and GPM Microwave Imager (GMI)) and airborne sensors

  14. Sunspot Time Series: Passive and Active Intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zięba, S.; Nieckarz, Z.

    2014-07-01

    Solar activity slowly and irregularly decreases from the first spotless day (FSD) in the declining phase of the old sunspot cycle and systematically, but also in an irregular way, increases to the new cycle maximum after the last spotless day (LSD). The time interval between the first and the last spotless day can be called the passive interval (PI), while the time interval from the last spotless day to the first one after the new cycle maximum is the related active interval (AI). Minima of solar cycles are inside PIs, while maxima are inside AIs. In this article, we study the properties of passive and active intervals to determine the relation between them. We have found that some properties of PIs, and related AIs, differ significantly between two group of solar cycles; this has allowed us to classify Cycles 8 - 15 as passive cycles, and Cycles 17 - 23 as active ones. We conclude that the solar activity in the PI declining phase (a descending phase of the previous cycle) determines the strength of the approaching maximum in the case of active cycles, while the activity of the PI rising phase (a phase of the ongoing cycle early growth) determines the strength of passive cycles. This can have implications for solar dynamo models. Our approach indicates the important role of solar activity during the declining and the rising phases of the solar-cycle minimum.

  15. Active and Passive Remote Sensing of Ice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-26

    92 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Active and Passive Remote Sensing of Ice NO0014-89-J-l 107 6. AUTHOR(S) 425f023-08 Prof. J.A. Kong 7... REMOTE SENSING OF ICE Sponsored by: Department of the Navy Office of Naval Research Contract number: N00014-89-J-1107 Research Organization: Center for...J. A. Kong Period covered: October 1, 1988 - November 30, 1992 St ACTIVE AND PASSIVE REMOTE SENSING OF ICE FINAL REPORT This annual report covers

  16. Evaluation of Radar Vegetation Indices for Vegetation Water Content Estimation Using Data from a Ground-Based SMAP Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Prashant K.; O'Neill, Peggy; Cosh, Michael; Lang, Roger; Joseph, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Vegetation water content (VWC) is an important component of microwave soil moisture retrieval algorithms. This paper aims to estimate VWC using L band active and passive radar/radiometer datasets obtained from a NASA ground-based Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) simulator known as ComRAD (Combined Radar/Radiometer). Several approaches to derive vegetation information from radar and radiometer data such as HH, HV, VV, Microwave Polarization Difference Index (MPDI), HH/VV ratio, HV/(HH+VV), HV/(HH+HV+VV) and Radar Vegetation Index (RVI) are tested for VWC estimation through a generalized linear model (GLM). The overall analysis indicates that HV radar backscattering could be used for VWC content estimation with highest performance followed by HH, VV, MPDI, RVI, and other ratios.

  17. SMAP observes flooding from land to sea: The Texas event of 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, S.; Reager, J. T.; Lee, T.; Vazquez-Cuervo, J.; David, C. H.; Gierach, M. M.

    2016-10-01

    Floods can have damaging impacts on both land and sea, yet studies of flooding events tend to focus on only one side of the land/sea continuum. Here we present the first two-sided analysis, focusing on the May 2015 severe flooding in Texas. Our investigation benefits from simultaneous measurements of land surface soil moisture and sea surface salinity from NASA's recent Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission as well as ancillary data. We report the comprehensive chronology of the flooding: above average rainfall preceding the flood caused soils to saturate; record rainfall then generated record river discharge; and subsequently, an unusual freshwater plume associated with anomalous ocean currents formed in the north central Gulf of Mexico. Together with the Mississippi River plume, a rare "horseshoe" pattern was created that may have significant biogeochemical implications. Such integrated land/sea analysis of flood evolution can improve impact assessments of future extreme flooding events.

  18. PCM Passive Cooling System Containing Active Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanding, David E.; Bass, David I.

    2005-01-01

    A multistage system has been proposed for cooling a circulating fluid that is subject to intermittent intense heating. The system would be both flexible and redundant in that it could operate in a basic passive mode, either sequentially or simultaneously with operation of a first, active cooling subsystem, and either sequentially or simultaneously with a second cooling subsystem that could be active, passive, or a combination of both. This flexibility and redundancy, in combination with the passive nature of at least one of the modes of operation, would make the system more reliable, relative to a conventional cooling system. The system would include a tube-in-shell heat exchanger, within which the space between the tubes would be filled with a phase-change material (PCM). The circulating hot fluid would flow along the tubes in the heat exchanger. In the basic passive mode of operation, heat would be conducted from the hot fluid into the PCM, wherein the heat would be stored temporarily by virtue of the phase change.

  19. Application of triple collocation for the ground-based validation of soil moisture active/passive (SMAP) soil moisture products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The contrast in horizontal spatial support between ground-based soil moisture observations and satellite-derived soil moisture estimates represents a long-standing challenge for the validation of satellite soil moisture data products [Crow et al., 2014]. This challenge can be alleviated by limiting ...

  20. The Soil Moisture Active Passive Marena Oklahoma In Situ Sensor Testbed (SMAP-MOISST): Design and initial results

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In situ soil moisture monitoring networks are critical to the development of soil moisture remote sensing missions as well as agricultural and environmental management, weather forecasting and many other endeavors. These in situ networks are composed of a variety of sensors and installation practic...

  1. Early conclusions of the soil moisture active passive Marena Oklahoma in situ sensor testbed (SMAP-Moisst)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Monitoring soil moisture state has been increasing in importance as climate patterns become more unpredictable. Remote sensing technologies have been developed and are approaching operational use, however, there is still a need to monitor soil moisture via in situ networks to maintain satellite vali...

  2. Propulsion by active and passive airfoil oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackowski, A. W.; Williamson, C. H. K.

    2013-11-01

    Oscillating airfoils have been the subject of much research both as a mechanism of propulsion in engineering devices as well as a model of understanding how fish, birds, and insects produce thrust and maneuvering forces. Additionally, the jet or wake generated by an oscillating airfoil exhibits a multitude of vortex patterns, which are an interesting study in their own right. We present PIV measurements of the vortex flow behind an airfoil undergoing controlled pitching oscillations at moderate Reynolds number. As a method of propulsion, oscillating foils have been found to be capable performers when undergoing both pitching and heaving motions [Anderson et al. 1998]. While an airfoil undergoing only pitching motion is a relatively inefficient propulsor, we examine the effect of adding passive dynamics to the system: for example, actuated pitching with a passive spring in the heave direction. Practically speaking, a mechanical system with such an arrangement has the potential to reduce the cost and complexity of an oscillating airfoil propulsor. To study an airfoil undergoing both active and passive motion, we employ our ``cyber-physical fluid dynamics'' technique [Mackowski & Williamson, 2011] to simulate the effects of passive dynamics in a physical experiment.

  3. Synergistic Use of SMOS Measurements with SMAP Derived and In-situ Data over Valencia Anchor Station by Using Downscaling Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari Amoli, Abdolreza; Lopez-Baeza, Ernesto; Mahmoudi, Ali; Mahmoodi, Ali

    2016-07-01

    Synergistic Use of SMOS Measurements with SMAP Derived and In-situ Data over the Valencia Anchor Station by Using a Downscaling Technique Ansari Amoli, A.(1),Mahmoodi, A.(2) and Lopez-Baeza, E.(3) (1) Department of Earth Physics and Thermodynamics, University of Valencia, Spain (2) Centre d'Etudes Spatiales de la BIOsphère (CESBIO), France (3) Department of Earth Physics and Thermodynamics, University of Valencia, Spain Soil moisture products from active sensors are not operationally available. Passive remote sensors return more accurate estimates, but their resolution is much coarser. One solution to overcome this problem is the synergy between radar and radiometric data by using disaggregation (downscaling) techniques. Few studies have been conducted to merge high resolution radar and coarse resolution radiometer measurements in order to obtain an intermediate resolution product. In this paper we present an algorithm using combined available SMAP (Soil Moisture Active and Passive) radar and SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) radiometer measurements to estimate surface soil moisture over the Valencia Anchor Station (VAS), Valencia, Spain. The goal is to combine the respective attributes of the radar and radiometer observations to estimate soil moisture at a resolution of 3 km. The algorithm disaggregates the coarse resolution SMOS (15 km) radiometer brightness temperature product based on the spatial variation of the high resolution SMAP (3 km) radar backscatter. The disaggregation of the radiometer brightness temperature uses the radar backscatter spatial patterns within the radiometer footprint that are inferred from the radar measurements. For this reason the radar measurements within the radiometer footprint are scaled by parameters that are derived from the temporal fluctuations in the radar and radiometer measurements.

  4. Upscaling sparse, irregularly spaced in situ soil moisture measurements for calibration and validation of SMAP soil moisture products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitcomb, J.; Clewley, D.; Moghaddam, M.; Akbar, R.; Silva, A. R. D.

    2015-12-01

    There is a large difference in the footprints over which remote sensing instruments, such as the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, retrieve soil moisture and that of in situ networks. Therefore a method for upscaling in situ measurements is required before they can be used to validate remote sensing instruments. The upscaling problem is made more difficult when measurements are sparse and irregularly spaced within the footprint. To address these needs, we have developed a method for producing upscaled estimates of soil moisture based on a network of in situ soil moisture measurements and airborne P-band SAR data, and utilizing a Random Forests-based regression algorithm. Sites within the SoilSCAPE network, for which the technique was developed, typically contains sensors at ~30 locations, with each location sampled at multiple depths. Measurements are taken at 20 minute intervals and averaged over a selectable time interval, thereby supporting near-real time generation of soil moisture maps. The collected measurements are automatically uploaded to a central database from which they can be accessed for use in the regression algorithm. Our regression-based approach works well with irregularly-spaced sensors by incorporating a set of data layers that correlate well with soil moisture. The layers include thematic land cover, elevation, slope, aspect, flow accumulation, clay fraction, air temperature, precipitation, and P-Band HH, VV, and HV backscatter. Values from these data layers are extracted for each sensor location and applied to train the Random Forests algorithm. The decision trees generated are then applied to estimate soil moisture at a 100 m spacing throughout the network region, after which the evenly-spaced values are averaged to accord with the 3-, 9-, and 36-km SMAP measurement grids. The resulting set of near-real time soil moisture estimates suitable for SMAP calibration and validation is placed online for use by the SMAP Cal/Val team

  5. Passive versus active mitigation cost analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Parazin, R.J.; Galbraith, J.D.

    1995-04-01

    The scope of this task is to assess the impact of mitigation alternatives for Tanks 241-SY-101 and 241-SY-103 on the Project W-236A Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility. This assessment and other related tasks are part of an Action Plan Path Forward prepared by the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Life Extension and Transition Program. Task 3.7 of the Action Plan for Project W-236A MWTF analyzed the comparative cost/risk of two hydrogen gas mitigation alternatives (active versus passive) to recommend the most appropriate course of action to resolve the hydrogen gas safety issue. The qualitative success of active mitigation has been demonstrated through Tank 241-SY-101 testing. Passive mitigation has not been demonstrated but will be validated by laboratory test work performed under Task 3.1 of the Action Plan. It is assumed for this assessment that the uncertainties associated with the performance of either alternative is comparable. Determining alternative specific performance measures beyond those noted are not in the scope of this effort.

  6. Brain activation associated with active and passive lower limb stepping

    PubMed Central

    Jaeger, Lukas; Marchal-Crespo, Laura; Wolf, Peter; Riener, Robert; Michels, Lars; Kollias, Spyros

    2014-01-01

    Reports about standardized and repeatable experimental procedures investigating supraspinal activation in patients with gait disorders are scarce in current neuro-imaging literature. Well-designed and executed tasks are important to gain insight into the effects of gait-rehabilitation on sensorimotor centers of the brain. The present study aims to demonstrate the feasibility of a novel imaging paradigm, combining the magnetic resonance (MR)-compatible stepping robot (MARCOS) with sparse sampling functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure task-related BOLD signal changes and to delineate the supraspinal contribution specific to active and passive stepping. Twenty-four healthy participants underwent fMRI during active and passive, periodic, bilateral, multi-joint, lower limb flexion and extension akin to human gait. Active and passive stepping engaged several cortical and subcortical areas of the sensorimotor network, with higher relative activation of those areas during active movement. Our results indicate that the combination of MARCOS and sparse sampling fMRI is feasible for the detection of lower limb motor related supraspinal activation. Activation of the anterior cingulate and medial frontal areas suggests motor response inhibition during passive movement in healthy participants. Our results are of relevance for understanding the neural mechanisms underlying gait in the healthy. PMID:25389396

  7. The SoilSCAPE Network Multiscale In-situ Soil Moisture Measurements: Innovations in Network Design and Approaches to Upscaling in Support of SMAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, M.; Clewley, D.; Silva, A.; Akbar, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission will provide soil moisture at 3, 9, and 36 km scales through the use of radar and radiometer data. To validate SMAP products, in-situ sensors are required. Typically, validation plans consist of several sensors installed nearly uniformly in the scene. To upscale the soil moisture estimates to the scales of SMAP products requires a large number of sensors, distributed throughout the instrument footprint. Even for the higher resolution SMAP products (3 km) there are often insufficient sensors available within a resolution cell. The Soil moisture Sensing Controller and oPtimal Estimator (SoilSCAPE) project provides a new adaptive validation strategy, including upscaled estimates of soil moisture. By utilizing smarter network technology and optimized sensor placement, more representative measurements of soil moisture are obtained, at a range of spatial scales with lower costs than traditional networks. A large network was established around the Tonzi Ranch site in central California. The network design comprises multiple sites, each with a 10-30 node cluster taking measurements from up to 4 sensors installed at different depths. The nodes wirelessly communicate to a Local Coordinator, which collects data and transmits to a server (http://soilscape.usc.edu). Each node can communicate with the Coordinator up to a distance of 400m. Each station supports up to 60 nodes. Currently 111 nodes have been installed over 6 sites. The SoilSCAPE nonuniform placement of sensors requires novel upscaling methods. Previous studies have used regression, which works well when the measurement is well correlated with other variables. However, soil moisture dependence on various variables could be complex and nonlinear. To account for such complexities, we use the Random Forests algorithm, which is capable of modeling complex non-linear system and can handle continuous and categorical data. The algorithm has not previously been applied to

  8. Using SMAP data to improve drought early warning over the US Great Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, R.; Fernando, N.; Tang, W.

    2015-12-01

    A drought prone region such as the Great Plains of the United States (US GP) requires credible and actionable drought early warning. Such information cannot simply be extracted from available climate forecasts because of their large uncertainties at regional scales, and unclear connections to the needs of the decision makers. In particular, current dynamic seasonal predictions and climate projections, such as those produced by the NOAA North American Multi-Model Ensemble experiment (NMME) are much more reliable for winter and spring than for the summer season for the US GP. To mitigate the weaknesses of dynamic prediction/projections, we have identified three key processes behind the spring-to-summer dry memory through observational studies, as the scientific basis for a statistical drought early warning system. This system uses percentile soil moisture anomalies in spring as a key input to provide a probabilistic summer drought early warning. The latter outperforms the dynamic prediction over the US Southern Plains and has been used by the Texas state water agency to support state drought preparedness. A main source of uncertainty for this drought early warning system is the soil moisture input obtained from the NOAA Climate Forecasting System (CFS). We are testing use of the beta version of NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) soil moisture data, along with the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), and the long-term Essential Climate Variable Soil Moisture (ECV-SM) soil moisture data, to reduce this uncertainty. Preliminary results based on ECV-SM suggests satellite based soil moisture data could improve early warning of rainfall anomalies over the western US GP with less dense vegetation. The skill degrades over the eastern US GP where denser vegetation is found. We evaluate our SMAP-based drought early warning for 2015 summer against observations.

  9. Passive and active middle ear implants

    PubMed Central

    Beutner, Dirk; Hüttenbrink, Karl-Bernd

    2011-01-01

    Besides eradication of chronic middle ear disease, the reconstruction of the sound conduction apparatus is a major goal of modern ear microsurgery. The material of choice in cases of partial ossicular replacement prosthesis is the autogenous ossicle. In the event of more extensive destruction of the ossicular chain diverse alloplastic materials, e.g. metals, ceramics, plastics or composits are used for total reconstruction. Their specialised role in conducting sound energy within a half-open implant bed sets high demands on the biocompatibility as well as the acoustic-mechanic properties of the prosthesis. Recently, sophisticated titanium middle ear implants allowing individual adaptation to anatomical variations are widely used for this procedure. However, despite modern developments, hearing restoration with passive implants often faces its limitations due to tubal-middle-ear dysfunction. Here, implantable hearing aids, successfully used in cases of sensorineural hearing loss, offer a promising alternative. This article reviews the actual state of affairs of passive and active middle ear implants. PMID:22073102

  10. Active-passive airborne ocean color measurement. II - Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.; Yungel, J. K.

    1986-01-01

    Reported here for the first time is the use of a single airborne instrument to make concurrent measurements of oceanic chlorophyll concentration by (1) laser-induced fluorescence, (2) passive upwelling radiance, and (3) solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence. Results from field experiments conducted with the NASA airborne oceanographic lidar (AOL) in the New York Bight demonstrate the capability of a single active-passive instrument to perform new and potentially important ocean color studies related to (1) active lidar validation of passive ocean color in-water algorithms, (2) chlorophyll a in vivo fluorescence yield variability, (3) calibration of active multichannel lidar systems, (4) effect of sea state on passive and active ocean color measurements, (5) laser/solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence investigations, and (6) subsequent improvement of satellite-borne ocean color scanners. For validation and comparison purposes a separate passive ocean color sensor was also flown along with the new active-passive sensor during these initial field trials.

  11. Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission L4_C Data Product Assessment (Version 2 Validated Release)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimball, John S.; Jones, Lucas A.; Glassy, Joseph; Stavros, E. Natasha; Madani, Nima; Reichle, Rolf H.; Jackson, Thomas; Colliander, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The SMAP satellite was successfully launched January 31st 2015, and began acquiring Earth observation data following in-orbit sensor calibration. Global data products derived from the SMAP L-band microwave measurements include Level 1 calibrated and geolocated radiometric brightness temperatures, Level 23 surface soil moisture and freezethaw geophysical retrievals mapped to a fixed Earth grid, and model enhanced Level 4 data products for surface to root zone soil moisture and terrestrial carbon (CO2) fluxes. The post-launch SMAP mission CalVal Phase had two primary objectives for each science product team: 1) calibrate, verify, and improve the performance of the science algorithms, and 2) validate accuracies of the science data products as specified in the L1 science requirements. This report provides analysis and assessment of the SMAP Level 4 Carbon (L4_C) product pertaining to the validated release. The L4_C validated product release effectively replaces an earlier L4_C beta-product release (Kimball et al. 2015). The validated release described in this report incorporates a longer data record and benefits from algorithm and CalVal refinements acquired during the SMAP post-launch CalVal intensive period. The SMAP L4_C algorithms utilize a terrestrial carbon flux model informed by SMAP soil moisture inputs along with optical remote sensing (e.g. MODIS) vegetation indices and other ancillary biophysical data to estimate global daily net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) and component carbon fluxes for vegetation gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (Reco). Other L4_C product elements include surface (10 cm depth) soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and associated environmental constraints to these processes, including soil moisture and landscape freeze/thaw (FT) controls on GPP and respiration (Kimball et al. 2012). The L4_C product encapsulates SMAP carbon cycle science objectives by: 1) providing a direct link between terrestrial carbon fluxes and

  12. High-performance passive viscous isolator element for active/passive (hybrid) isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Torey; Davis, L. Porter; Sullivan, Jeanne M.; Hoffman, Terry; Das, Alok

    1996-05-01

    A high performance passive isolator has been developed for a multiaxis isolation system for vibration isolation of an optical payload. This passive isolator will be used along with an active element to provide improved vibration isolation performance over previous isolators. The isolator has been designed using ideas developed previously for 'tuned' three parameter passive isolators. The isolator has also been developed offering the lowest system passive break frequencies structurally feasible for the lightweight optical payload. The implementations of these passive isolator design considerations complement the active portion of the system, and also provide the best passive isolation at the higher frequencies long after the active system has 'rolled off.' The mathematics used to design the isolator as well as the isolator's physical attributes are discussed. The unique design challenges of incorporating the passive element with the active, forming one 'hybrid' D-strut$TM, also are discussed. Finally, actual test data from isolator testing are compared to predicted performance, verifying the isolator's exceptional performance and predictability.

  13. 26 CFR 1.469-3 - Passive activity credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Passive activity credit. 1.469-3 Section 1.469-3...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Taxable Year for Which Deductions Taken § 1.469-3 Passive activity credit. (a)-(d) (e) Coordination with section 38(b). Any credit described in section 38(b) (1) through (5)...

  14. 26 CFR 1.469-3 - Passive activity credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Passive activity credit. 1.469-3 Section 1.469-3...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Taxable Year for Which Deductions Taken § 1.469-3 Passive activity credit. (a)-(d) (e) Coordination with section 38(b). Any credit described in section 38(b) (1) through (5)...

  15. 26 CFR 1.469-3 - Passive activity credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Passive activity credit. 1.469-3 Section 1.469-3...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Taxable Year for Which Deductions Taken § 1.469-3 Passive activity credit. (a)-(d) (e) Coordination with section 38(b). Any credit described in section 38(b) (1) through (5)...

  16. Combined active and passive microwave remote sensing of soil moisture for vegetated surfaces at L-band

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The distorted Born approximation (DBA) combined with the numerical solutions of Maxwell equations (NMM3D) has been used for the radar backscattering model for the SMAP mission. The models for vegetated surfaces such as wheat, grass, soybean and corn have been validated with the Soil Moisture Active ...

  17. Prescribing Activities that Engage Passive Residents. An Innovative Method

    PubMed Central

    Kolanowski, Ann; Buettner, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with dementia are often passive, which places them at risk for further cognitive and functional decline. Recreational activities have been used in research to reduce passive behaviors, but systematic reviews of these studies have found modest effect sizes for many activities. In this article, we describe the further theoretical development of an innovative method for prescribing activities that have a high likelihood of engaging nursing home residents who are passive and present examples for research application and clinical practice. This method may increase the effect size of activity interventions and encourage more widespread adoption of nonpharmacological interventions in practice. PMID:18274300

  18. Active and passive cooling for concentrating photovoltaic arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Edenburn, M.W.

    1981-10-01

    Optimization, based on minimum energy cost, of active and passive cooling designs for point-focus Fresnel lens photovoltaic arrays and line-focus, parabolic-trough photovoltaic arrays is discussed, and the two types of cooling are compared. Passive cooling is more cost-effective for Fresnel lens arrays while the reverse is true for parabolic-trough arrays.

  19. Analysis of scapular kinematics during active and passive arm elevation

    PubMed Central

    Kai, Yoshihiro; Gotoh, Masafumi; Takei, Kazuto; Madokoro, Kazuya; Imura, Takeshi; Murata, Shin; Morihara, Toru; Shiba, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Early postoperative passive motion exercise after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair remains controversial. To better understand this issue, this study was aimed at evaluating scapular kinematics and muscle activities during passive arm elevation in healthy subjects. [Subjects and Methods] The dominant shoulders of 27 healthy subjects were examined. Electromagnetic sensors attached to the scapula, thorax, and humerus were used to determine three-dimensional scapular kinematics during active arm elevation with or without external loads and passive arm elevation. Simultaneously, the activities of seven shoulder muscles were recorded with surface and intramuscular fine-wire electrodes. [Results] Compared with active arm elevation, passive elevation between 30° and 100° significantly decreased the scapular upward rotation and increased the glenohumeral elevation angle. However, no significant differences in scapular posterior tilt and external rotation were observed between active and passive arm elevation, and scapular plane kinematics were not affected by muscle activity. [Conclusion] Unlike active motion with or without an external load, passive arm elevation significantly decreased the scapular upward rotation and significantly increased the mid-range glenohumeral elevation. These data, which suggest that passive arm elevation should be avoided during the early postoperative period, may expand the understanding of rehabilitation after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. PMID:27390438

  20. SMAP and SMOS soil moisture validation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The SMOS and SMAP satellite missions each produce global soil moisture products using L-band radiometry. Both missions begin with the same fundamental equations in developing their soil moisture retrieval algorithm but implement it differently due to design differences of the instruments. SMOS with ...

  1. The prolactin responses to active and passive heating in man.

    PubMed

    Low, David; Purvis, Alison; Reilly, Thomas; Cable, N Tim

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the prolactin and blood pressure responses at identical core temperatures during active and passive heat stresses, using prolactin as an indirect marker of central fatigue. Twelve male subjects cycled to exhaustion at 60% maximal oxygen uptake (VO2peak) in a room maintained at 33 degrees C (active). In a second trial they were passively heated (passive) in a water bath (41.56 +/- 1.65 degrees C) until core temperature was equal to the core temperature observed at exhaustion during the active trial. Blood samples were taken from an indwelling venous cannula for the determination of serum prolactin during active heating and at corresponding core temperatures during passive heating. Core temperature was not significantly different between the two methods of heating and averaged 38.81 +/- 0.53 and 38.82 +/- 0.70 degrees C (data expressed as means +/- s.d.) at exhaustion during active heating and at the end of passive heating, respectively (P > 0.05). Mean arterial blood pressure was significantly lower throughout passive heating (active, 73 +/- 9 mmHg; passive, 62 +/- 12 mmHg; P < 0.01). Despite the significantly reduced blood pressure responses during passive heating, during both forms of heating the prolactin response was the same (active, 14.9 +/- 12.6 ng ml(-1); passive, 13.3 +/- 9.6 ng ml(-1); n.s.). These results suggest that thermoregulatory, i.e. core temperature, and not cardiovascular afferents provide the key stimulus for the release of prolactin, an indirect marker of central fatigue, during exercise in the heat.

  2. The Sandia MEMS passive shock sensor : FY07 maturation activities.

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, Jack E.; Blecke, Jill; Mitchell, John Anthony; Wittwer, Jonathan W.; Crowson, Douglas A.; Clemens, Rebecca C.; Walraven, Jeremy Allen; Epp, David S.; Baker, Michael Sean

    2008-08-01

    This report describes activities conducted in FY07 to mature the MEMS passive shock sensor. The first chapter of the report provides motivation and background on activities that are described in detail in later chapters. The second chapter discusses concepts that are important for integrating the MEMS passive shock sensor into a system. Following these two introductory chapters, the report details modeling and design efforts, packaging, failure analysis and testing and validation. At the end of FY07, the MEMS passive shock sensor was at TRL 4.

  3. Active and passive vibration suppression for space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyland, David C.

    1991-01-01

    The relative benefits of passive and active vibration suppression for large space structures (LSS) are discussed. The intent is to sketch the true ranges of applicability of these approaches using previously published technical results. It was found that the distinction between active and passive vibration suppression approaches is not as sharp as might be thought at first. The relative simplicity, reliability, and cost effectiveness touted for passive measures are vitiated by 'hidden costs' bound up with detailed engineering implementation issues and inherent performance limitations. At the same time, reliability and robustness issues are often cited against active control. It is argued that a continuum of vibration suppression measures offering mutually supporting capabilities is needed. The challenge is to properly orchestrate a spectrum of methods to reap the synergistic benefits of combined advanced materials, passive damping, and active control.

  4. Detecting soil moisture pulses and associated vegetation response in a southern Arizona watershed using SMAP and MODIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, M.; Moran, M. S.; Scott, R. L.

    2015-12-01

    In arid and semiarid ecosystems, rainfall pulses and associated vegetation responses play a crucial role in ecosystem and hydrologic functioning. While rainfall pulses are generally correlated with increased photosynthetic activity, the effect of these rainfall pulses in the context of persistent drought is unclear. Rainfall events during drought can lead to an overall reduction in primary productivity due to reduced soil infiltration and increased erosion. To assess the effective rainfall available for initiating biological processes, measurements of soil moisture are necessary. Rainfall pulses in drylands are generally localized in time and space making them difficult to detect remotely. Our objective was to determine whether space-based observations of soil moisture have the necessary spatial and temporal resolution to detect soil moisture pulses resulting from rain events in the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (WGEW) in southern Arizona. Using pre-beta-release soil moisture observations from the newly launched NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) observatory, we examined the effects of rainfall pulses on soil moisture over the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed from April to July 2015. To assess whether soil moisture pulses were associated with increased vegetation production, we monitored increases in vegetation greenness using the NASA MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) following increases in soil moisture. Regional-scale results were supported with local-scale in situ measurements of soil moisture, vegetation greenness from phenocams, precipitation and Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) associated with two eddy covariance flux towers at WGEW. In conclusion, SMAP observations have the potential to detect large rainfall pulses at the 9 km resolution, and the associated soil moisture pulses can result in increased EVI at the watershed scale. These results contribute to our understanding of the ecosystem and hydrologic functioning of dryland ecosystems.

  5. Solar air-conditioning-active, hybrid and passive

    SciTech Connect

    Yellott, J. I.

    1981-04-01

    After a discussion of summer air conditioning requirements in the United States, active, hybrid, and passive cooling systems are defined. Active processes and systems include absorption, Rankine cycle, and a small variety of miscellaneous systems. The hybrid solar cooling and dehumidification technology of desiccation is covered as well as evaporative cooling. The passive solar cooling processes covered include convective, radiative and evaporative cooling. Federal and state involvement in solar cooling is then discussed. (LEW)

  6. Active and passive cooling for concentrating photovoltaic arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Edenburn, M.W.

    1980-01-01

    The optimization, based on minimum energy cost, of active and passive cooling designs for point-focus Fresnel lens photovoltaic arrays and line-focus, parabolic-trough photovoltaic arrays are discussed, and the two types of cooling are compared. Passive cooling is more cost effective than active for Fresnel lens arrays while the reverse is true for parabolic trough arrays. The analysis produced several other conclusions of interest which are also discussed.

  7. Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission L4_SM Data Product Assessment (Version 2 Validated Release)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, Rolf Helmut; De Lannoy, Gabrielle J. M.; Liu, Qing; Ardizzone, Joseph V.; Chen, Fan; Colliander, Andreas; Conaty, Austin; Crow, Wade; Jackson, Thomas; Kimball, John; Koster, Randal D.; Smith, E. Brent

    2016-01-01

    During the post-launch SMAP calibration and validation (Cal/Val) phase there are two objectives for each science data product team: 1) calibrate, verify, and improve the performance of the science algorithm, and 2) validate the accuracy of the science data product as specified in the science requirements and according to the Cal/Val schedule. This report provides an assessment of the SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture Passive (L4_SM) product specifically for the product's public Version 2 validated release scheduled for 29 April 2016. The assessment of the Version 2 L4_SM data product includes comparisons of SMAP L4_SM soil moisture estimates with in situ soil moisture observations from core validation sites and sparse networks. The assessment further includes a global evaluation of the internal diagnostics from the ensemble-based data assimilation system that is used to generate the L4_SM product. This evaluation focuses on the statistics of the observation-minus-forecast (O-F) residuals and the analysis increments. Together, the core validation site comparisons and the statistics of the assimilation diagnostics are considered primary validation methodologies for the L4_SM product. Comparisons against in situ measurements from regional-scale sparse networks are considered a secondary validation methodology because such in situ measurements are subject to up-scaling errors from the point-scale to the grid cell scale of the data product. Based on the limited set of core validation sites, the wide geographic range of the sparse network sites, and the global assessment of the assimilation diagnostics, the assessment presented here meets the criteria established by the Committee on Earth Observing Satellites for Stage 2 validation and supports the validated release of the data. An analysis of the time average surface and root zone soil moisture shows that the global pattern of arid and humid regions are captured by the L4_SM estimates. Results from the

  8. Model-based verification and validation of the SMAP uplink processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M. O.; Dubos, G. F.; Tirona, J.; Standley, S.

    Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) is being used increasingly within the spacecraft design community because of its benefits when compared to document-based approaches. As the complexity of projects expands dramatically with continually increasing computational power and technology infusion, the time and effort needed for verification and validation (V& V) increases geometrically. Using simulation to perform design validation with system-level models earlier in the life cycle stands to bridge the gap between design of the system (based on system-level requirements) and verifying those requirements/validating the system as a whole. This case study stands as an example of how a project can validate a system-level design earlier in the project life cycle than traditional V& V processes by using simulation on a system model. Specifically, this paper describes how simulation was added to a system model of the Soil Moisture Active-Passive (SMAP) mission's uplink process. Also discussed are the advantages and disadvantages of the methods employed and the lessons learned; which are intended to benefit future model-based and simulation-based development efforts.

  9. Measurements and analysis of active/passive multispectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grönwall, Christina; Hamoir, Dominique; Steinvall, Ove; Larsson, Hâkan; Amselem, Elias; Lutzmann, Peter; Repasi, Endre; Göhler, Benjamin; Barbé, Stéphane; Vaudelin, Olivier; Fracès, Michel; Tanguy, Bernard; Thouin, Emmanuelle

    2013-10-01

    This paper describes a data collection on passive and active imaging and the preliminary analysis. It is part of an ongoing work on active and passive imaging for target identification using different wavelength bands. We focus on data collection at NIR-SWIR wavelengths but we also include the visible and the thermal region. Active imaging in NIRSWIR will support the passive imaging by eliminating shadows during day-time and allow night operation. Among the applications that are most likely for active multispectral imaging, we focus on long range human target identification. We also study the combination of active and passive sensing. The target scenarios of interest include persons carrying different objects and their associated activities. We investigated laser imaging for target detection and classification up to 1 km assuming that another cueing sensor - passive EO and/or radar - is available for target acquisition and detection. Broadband or multispectral operation will reduce the effects of target speckle and atmospheric turbulence. Longer wavelengths will improve performance in low visibility conditions due to haze, clouds and fog. We are currently performing indoor and outdoor tests to further investigate the target/background phenomena that are emphasized in these wavelengths. We also investigate how these effects can be used for target identification and image fusion. Performed field tests and the results of preliminary data analysis are reported.

  10. Bimanual passive movement: functional activation and inter-regional coupling.

    PubMed

    Macaluso, Emiliano; Cherubini, Andrea; Sabatini, Umberto

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate intra-regional activation and inter-regional connectivity during passive movement. During fMRI, a mechanic device was used to move the subject's index and middle fingers. We assessed four movement conditions (unimanual left/right, bimanual symmetric/asymmetric), plus Rest. A conventional intra-regional analysis identified the passive stimulation network, including motor cortex, primary and secondary somatosensory cortex, plus the cerebellum. The posterior (sensory) part of the sensory-motor activation around the central sulcus showed a significant modulation according to the symmetry of the bimanual movement, with greater activation for asymmetric compared to symmetric movements. A second set of fMRI analyses assessed condition-dependent changes of coupling between sensory-motor regions around the superior central sulcus and the rest of the brain. These analyses showed a high inter-regional covariation within the entire network activated by passive movement. However, the specific experimental conditions modulated these patterns of connectivity. Highest coupling was observed during the Rest condition, and the coupling between homologous sensory-motor regions around the left and right central sulcus was higher in bimanual than unimanual conditions. These findings demonstrate that passive movement can affect the connectivity within the sensory-motor network. We conclude that implicit detection of asymmetry during bimanual movement relies on associative somatosensory region in post-central areas, and that passive stimulation reduces the functional connectivity within the passive movement network. Our findings open the possibility to combine passive movement and inter-regional connectivity as a tool to investigate the functionality of the sensory-motor system in patients with very poor mobility.

  11. Hybrid Active/Passive Jet Engine Noise Suppression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parente, C. A.; Arcas, N.; Walker, B. E.; Hersh, A. S.; Rice, E. J.

    1999-01-01

    A novel adaptive segmented liner concept has been developed that employs active control elements to modify the in-duct sound field to enhance the tone-suppressing performance of passive liner elements. This could potentially allow engine designs that inherently produce more tone noise but less broadband noise, or could allow passive liner designs to more optimally address high frequency broadband noise. A proof-of-concept validation program was undertaken, consisting of the development of an adaptive segmented liner that would maximize attenuation of two radial modes in a circular or annular duct. The liner consisted of a leading active segment with dual annuli of axially spaced active Helmholtz resonators, followed by an optimized passive liner and then an array of sensing microphones. Three successively complex versions of the adaptive liner were constructed and their performances tested relative to the performance of optimized uniform passive and segmented passive liners. The salient results of the tests were: The adaptive segmented liner performed well in a high flow speed model fan inlet environment, was successfully scaled to a high sound frequency and successfully attenuated three radial modes using sensor and active resonator arrays that were designed for a two mode, lower frequency environment.

  12. Passive and active tension in single cardiac myofibrils.

    PubMed Central

    Linke, W A; Popov, V I; Pollack, G H

    1994-01-01

    Single myofibrils were isolated from chemically skinned rabbit heart and mounted in an apparatus described previously (Fearn et al., 1993; Linke et al., 1993). We measured the passive length-tension relation and active isometric force, both normalized to cross sectional area. Myofibrillar cross sectional area was calculated based on measurements of myofibril diameter from both phase-contrast images and electron micrographs. Passive tension values up to sarcomere lengths of approximately 2.2 microns were similar to those reported in larger cardiac muscle specimens. Thus, the element responsible for most, if not all, passive force of cardiac muscle at physiological sarcomere lengths appears to reside within the myofibrils. Above 2.2 microns, passive tension continued to rise, but not as steeply as reported in multicellular preparations. Apparently, structures other than the myofibrils become increasingly important in determining the magnitude of passive tension at these stretched lengths. Knowing the myofibrillar component of passive tension allowed us to infer the stress-strain relation of titin, the polypeptide thought to support passive force in the sarcomere. The elastic modulus of titin is 3.5 x 10(6) dyn cm-2, a value similar to that reported for elastin. Maximum active isometric tension in the single myofibril at sarcomere lengths of 2.1-2.3 microns was 145 +/- 35 mN/mm2 (mean +/- SD; n = 15). This value is comparable with that measured in fixed-end contractions of larger cardiac specimens, when the amount of nonmyofibrillar space in those preparations is considered. However, it is about 4 times lower than the maximum active tension previously measured in single skeletal myofibrils under similar conditions (Bartoo et al., 1993). Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 7 PMID:7948691

  13. Enhanced Passive and Active Processing of Syllables in Musician Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chobert, Julie; Marie, Celine; Francois, Clement; Schon, Daniele; Besson, Mireille

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the influence of musical expertise in 9-year-old children on passive (as reflected by MMN) and active (as reflected by discrimination accuracy) processing of speech sounds. Musician and nonmusician children were presented with a sequence of syllables that included standards and deviants in vowel frequency,…

  14. Active and Passive Perceptual Learning in the Visually Impaired.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrod, Beverley E.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Active and passive perceptual training methods were tested with 30 macular degeneration patients to improve their residual vision. The main conclusion was that perceptual training may contribute to successful visual adjustment and that the effect of training is not limited to a particular level of visual impairment. (Author/CL)

  15. Limits to differences in active and passive charges

    SciTech Connect

    Laemmerzahl, C.; Macias, A.; Mueller, H.

    2007-05-15

    We explore consequences of a hypothetical difference between active charges, which generate electric fields, and passive charges, which respond to them. A confrontation with experiments using atoms, molecules, or macroscopic matter yields limits on their fractional difference at levels down to 10{sup -21}, which at the same time corresponds to an experimental confirmation of Newton's third law.

  16. Passive and active ventricular elastances of the left ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Liang; Ghista, Dhanjoo N; Ng, Eddie YK; Lim, Soo T

    2005-01-01

    Background Description of the heart as a pump has been dominated by models based on elastance and compliance. Here, we are presenting a somewhat new concept of time-varying passive and active elastance. The mathematical basis of time-varying elastance of the ventricle is presented. We have defined elastance in terms of the relationship between ventricular pressure and volume, as: dP = EdV + VdE, where E includes passive (Ep) and active (Ea) elastance. By incorporating this concept in left ventricular (LV) models to simulate filling and systolic phases, we have obtained the time-varying expression for Ea and the LV-volume dependent expression for Ep. Methods and Results Using the patient's catheterization-ventriculogram data, the values of passive and active elastance are computed. Ea is expressed as: ; Epis represented as: . Ea is deemed to represent a measure of LV contractility. Hence, Peak dP/dt and ejection fraction (EF) are computed from the monitored data and used as the traditional measures of LV contractility. When our computed peak active elastance (Ea,max) is compared against these traditional indices by linear regression, a high degree of correlation is obtained. As regards Ep, it constitutes a volume-dependent stiffness property of the LV, and is deemed to represent resistance-to-filling. Conclusions Passive and active ventricular elastance formulae can be evaluated from a single-beat P-V data by means of a simple-to-apply LV model. The active elastance (Ea) can be used to characterize the ventricle's contractile state, while passive elastance (Ep) can represent a measure of resistance-to-filling. PMID:15707494

  17. Gaussian-state interferometry with passive and active elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparaciari, Carlo; Olivares, Stefano; Paris, Matteo G. A.

    2016-02-01

    We address the precision of optical interferometers fed by quantum and semiclassical Gaussian states involving passive and/or active elements, such as beam splitters, photodetectors, and optical parametric amplifiers. We first address the ultimate bounds to precision by discussing the behavior of the quantum Fisher information. We then consider photodetection at the output and calculate the sensitivity of the interferometers taking into account the nonunit quantum efficiency of the detectors. Our results show that in the ideal case of photon number detectors with unit quantum efficiency the best configuration is the symmetric one, namely, a passive (active) interferometer with a passive (active) detection stage: in this case one may achieve Heisenberg scaling of sensitivity by suitably optimizing over Gaussian states at the input. On the other hand, in the realistic case of detectors with nonunit quantum efficiency, the performances of the passive scheme are unavoidably degraded, whereas detectors involving optical parametric amplifiers allow us to fully compensate for the presence of loss in the detection stage, thus restoring the Heisenberg scaling.

  18. Vibration control through passive constrained layer damping and active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Margaretha J.; Inman, Daniel J.; Saunders, William R.

    1997-05-01

    To add damping to systems, viscoelastic materials (VEM) are added to structures. In order to enhance the damping effects of the VEM, a constraining layer is attached. When this constraining layer is an active element, the treatment is called active constrained layer damping (ACLD). Recently, the investigation of ACLD treatments has shown it to be an effective method of vibration suppression. In this paper, the treatment of a beam with a separate active element and passive constrained layer (PCLD) element is investigated. A Ritz- Galerkin approach is used to obtain discretized equations of motion. The damping is modeled using the GHM method and the system is analyzed in the time domain. By optimizing on the performance and control effort for both the active and passive case, it is shown that this treatment is capable of lower control effort with more inherent damping, and is therefore a better approach to damp vibration.

  19. Diffusion of passive particles in active suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mussler, Matthias; Rafai, Salima; John, Thomas; Peyla, Philippe; Wagner, Christian

    2013-11-01

    We study how an active suspension consisting of a definite volume fraction of the microswimmer Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii modifies the Brownian movement of small to medium size microspheres. We present measurements and simulations of trajectories of microspheres with a diameter of 20 μm in suspensions of Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii, a so called ``puller,'' and show that the mean squared displacement of such trajectories consist of parabolic and a linear part. The linear part is due to the hydrodynamic noise of the microswimmers while the parabolic part is a consequence of directed motion events that occur randomly, when a microsphere is transported by a microswimmer on a timescale that is in higher order of magnitude than the Brownian like hydrodynamic interaction. In addition, we theoretically describe this effect with a dimensional analysis that takes the force dipole model used to describe ``puller'' like Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii into account.

  20. Inter-comparison of soil moisture sensors from the soil moisture active passive marena Oklahoma in situ sensor testbed (SMAP-MOISST)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The diversity of in situ soil moisture network protocols and instrumentation led to the development of a testbed for comparing in situ soil moisture sensors. Located in Marena, Oklahoma on the Oklahoma State University Range Research Station, the testbed consists of four base stations. Each station ...

  1. 26 CFR 1.469-3T - Passive activity credit (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Passive activity credit (temporary). 1.469-3T... activity credit (temporary). (a) Computation of passive activity credit. The taxpayer's passive activity credit for the taxable year is the amount (if any) by which— (1) The sum of all of the taxpayer's...

  2. 26 CFR 1.469-3T - Passive activity credit (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Passive activity credit (temporary). 1.469-3T... activity credit (temporary). (a) Computation of passive activity credit. The taxpayer's passive activity credit for the taxable year is the amount (if any) by which— (1) The sum of all of the taxpayer's...

  3. 26 CFR 1.469-3T - Passive activity credit (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Passive activity credit (temporary). 1.469-3T... activity credit (temporary). (a) Computation of passive activity credit. The taxpayer's passive activity credit for the taxable year is the amount (if any) by which— (1) The sum of all of the taxpayer's...

  4. Phase Segregation of Passive Advective Particles in an Active Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Amit; Polley, Anirban; Rao, Madan

    2016-02-01

    Localized contractile configurations or asters spontaneously appear and disappear as emergent structures in the collective stochastic dynamics of active polar actomyosin filaments. Passive particles which (un)bind to the active filaments get advected into the asters, forming transient clusters. We study the phase segregation of such passive advective scalars in a medium of dynamic asters, as a function of the aster density and the ratio of the rates of aster remodeling to particle diffusion. The dynamics of coarsening shows a violation of Porod behavior; the growing domains have diffuse interfaces and low interfacial tension. The phase-segregated steady state shows strong macroscopic fluctuations characterized by multiscaling and intermittency, signifying rapid reorganization of macroscopic structures. We expect these unique nonequilibrium features to manifest in the actin-dependent molecular clustering at the cell surface.

  5. Active migration and passive transport of malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Ross G; Amino, Rogerio; Sinnis, Photini; Frischknecht, Freddy

    2015-08-01

    Malaria parasites undergo a complex life cycle between their hosts and vectors. During this cycle the parasites invade different types of cells, migrate across barriers, and transfer from one host to another. Recent literature hints at a misunderstanding of the difference between active, parasite-driven migration and passive, circulation-driven movement of the parasite or parasite-infected cells in the various bodily fluids of mosquito and mammalian hosts. Because both active migration and passive transport could be targeted in different ways to interfere with the parasite, a distinction between the two ways the parasite uses to get from one location to another is essential. We discuss the two types of motion needed for parasite dissemination and elaborate on how they could be targeted by future vaccines or drugs.

  6. Active and passive calcium transport systems in plant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1990-01-01

    The ability to change cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} levels ((Ca{sup 2+})) by cells has made this cation a key regulator of many biological processes. Cytoplasmic (Ca{sup 2+}) is determined by the coordination of passive Ca{sup 2+} fluxes which increase cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}) and active Ca{sup 2+} transport systems that lower cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}). The mechanisms by which plant cells achieve this is poorly understood. We have initially used isolated vesicles from the plasma membrane or organellar membranes to study Ca{sup 2+} transport systems in oat roots (a monocot) and carrot suspension cells (a dicot). The objectives of the proposal were to identify and characterize active (energy-dependent) and passive calcium transport systems that work together to regulate calcium levels in the cytoplasm of plant cells. 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Active and passive calcium transport systems in plant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1991-01-01

    The ability to change cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} levels ((Ca{sup 2+})) by cells has made this cation a key regulator of many biological processes. Cytoplasmic (Ca{sup 2+}) is determined by the coordination of passive Ca{sup 2+} fluxes which increase cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}) and active Ca{sup 2+} transport systems that lower cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}). The mechanisms by which plant cells achieve this is poorly understood. We have initially used isolated vesicles from the plasma membrane or organellar membranes to study Ca{sup 2+} transport systems in oat roots (a monocot) and carrot suspension cells (a dicot). The objectives of the proposal were to identify and characterize active (energy-dependent) and passive calcium transport systems that work together to regulate calcium levels in the cytoplasm of plant cells.

  8. Passive and active adaptive management: approaches and an example.

    PubMed

    Williams, Byron K

    2011-05-01

    Adaptive management is a framework for resource conservation that promotes iterative learning-based decision making. Yet there remains considerable confusion about what adaptive management entails, and how to actually make resource decisions adaptively. A key but somewhat ambiguous distinction in adaptive management is between active and passive forms of adaptive decision making. The objective of this paper is to illustrate some approaches to active and passive adaptive management with a simple example involving the drawdown of water impoundments on a wildlife refuge. The approaches are illustrated for the drawdown example, and contrasted in terms of objectives, costs, and potential learning rates. Some key challenges to the actual practice of AM are discussed, and tradeoffs between implementation costs and long-term benefits are highlighted.

  9. Passive and active adaptive management: Approaches and an example

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, B.K.

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive management is a framework for resource conservation that promotes iterative learning-based decision making. Yet there remains considerable confusion about what adaptive management entails, and how to actually make resource decisions adaptively. A key but somewhat ambiguous distinction in adaptive management is between active and passive forms of adaptive decision making. The objective of this paper is to illustrate some approaches to active and passive adaptive management with a simple example involving the drawdown of water impoundments on a wildlife refuge. The approaches are illustrated for the drawdown example, and contrasted in terms of objectives, costs, and potential learning rates. Some key challenges to the actual practice of AM are discussed, and tradeoffs between implementation costs and long-term benefits are highlighted. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Active and passive stabilization of body pitch in insect flight

    PubMed Central

    Ristroph, Leif; Ristroph, Gunnar; Morozova, Svetlana; Bergou, Attila J.; Chang, Song; Guckenheimer, John; Wang, Z. Jane; Cohen, Itai

    2013-01-01

    Flying insects have evolved sophisticated sensory–motor systems, and here we argue that such systems are used to keep upright against intrinsic flight instabilities. We describe a theory that predicts the instability growth rate in body pitch from flapping-wing aerodynamics and reveals two ways of achieving balanced flight: active control with sufficiently rapid reactions and passive stabilization with high body drag. By glueing magnets to fruit flies and perturbing their flight using magnetic impulses, we show that these insects employ active control that is indeed fast relative to the instability. Moreover, we find that fruit flies with their control sensors disabled can keep upright if high-drag fibres are also attached to their bodies, an observation consistent with our prediction for the passive stability condition. Finally, we extend this framework to unify the control strategies used by hovering animals and also furnish criteria for achieving pitch stability in flapping-wing robots. PMID:23697713

  11. Dynamic Modeling of the SMAP Rotating Flexible Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayeri, Reza D.

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic model development in ADAMS for the SMAP project is explained: The main objective of the dynamic models are for pointing error assessment, and the control/stability margin requirement verifications

  12. 26 CFR 1.469-2 - Passive activity loss.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... meaning of § 1.469-2T) from the interests. (E) Coordination with § 1.469-2T(c)(2)(ii). If § 1.469-2T(c)(2... from a passive activity after the application of § 1.469-2T(c)(2)(ii). (F) Coordination with section...); (vi) Gross income attributable to the reimbursement of a loss from fire, storm, shipwreck, or...

  13. 26 CFR 1.469-2 - Passive activity loss.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... meaning of § 1.469-2T) from the interests. (E) Coordination with § 1.469-2T(c)(2)(ii). If § 1.469-2T(c)(2... from a passive activity after the application of § 1.469-2T(c)(2)(ii). (F) Coordination with section...); (vi) Gross income attributable to the reimbursement of a loss from fire, storm, shipwreck, or...

  14. Active and passive computed tomography for nondestructive assay

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardi, R T; Camp, D E; Clard, D; Jackson, J A; Martz, H E, Decman, D J; Roberson, G P

    1998-10-28

    Traditional gamma-ray methods used to characterize nuclear waste introduce errors that are related to non-uniform measurement responses associated with unknown radioactive source and matrix material distributions. These errors can be reduced by applying an active and passive tomographic technique (A&PCT) developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The technique uses an external radioactive source and active tomography to map the attenuation within a waste barrel as a function of mono-energetic gamma-ray energy. Passive tomography is used to localize and identify specific radioactive waste within the same container. Reconstruction of the passive data using the attenuation maps at specific energies allows internal waste radioactivity to be corrected for any overlying heterogeneous materials, thus yielding an absolute assay of the waste activity. LLNL and Bio-Imaging Research, Inc. have collaborated in a technology transfer effort to integrate an A&PCT assay system into a mobile waste characterization trailer. This mobile system has participated in and passed several formal DOE-sponsored performance demonstrations, tests and evaluations. The system is currently being upgraded with multiple detectors to improve throughput, automated gamma-ray analysis code to simplify the assay, and a new emission reconstruction code to improve accuracy

  15. Passive and active thermal nondestructive imaging of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdelidis, Nicolas P.; Moropoulou, Antonia; Almond, Darryl P.

    2004-12-01

    Thermal non-destructive approaches, passive and active, are widely used due to the outstanding advantages that offer in a number of applications and particularly for the assessment of materials and structures. In this work, different applications, employing either MWIR or LWIR thermographic testing, as well as passive and/or active approaches, depending on the application, concerning the assessment of various materials are presented. In a few instances, thermal modelling is also discussed and compared with the outcome of experimental testing. The following applications are reviewed: × Emissivity measurements. × Moisture impact assessment in porous materials. × Evaluation of conservation interventions, concerning: - Consolidation interventions on porous stone. - Cleaning of architectural surfaces. × Assessment of airport pavements. × Investigation of repaired aircraft panels. × Through skin sensing assessment on aircraft composite structures. Real time monitoring of all features was obtained using passive imaging or transient thermographic analysis (active imaging). However, in the composite repairs and through skin imaging cases thermal modelling was also used with the intention of providing supplementary results, as well as to demonstrate the importance of thermal contact resistance between two surfaces (skin and strut in through skin sensing). Finally, in order to obtain useful information from the surveys, various properties (thermal, optical, physical) of the examined materials were taken into account.

  16. Assimilation of Passive and Active Microwave Soil Moisture Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, C. S.; Reichle, R. H.; DeLannoy, G. J. M.; Liu, Q.

    2012-01-01

    Root-zone soil moisture is an important control over the partition of land surface energy and moisture, and the assimilation of remotely sensed near-surface soil moisture has been shown to improve model profile soil moisture [1]. To date, efforts to assimilate remotely sensed near-surface soil moisture at large scales have focused on soil moisture derived from the passive microwave Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) and the active Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT; together with its predecessor on the European Remote Sensing satellites (ERS. The assimilation of passive and active microwave soil moisture observations has not yet been directly compared, and so this study compares the impact of assimilating ASCAT and AMSR-E soil moisture data, both separately and together. Since the soil moisture retrieval skill from active and passive microwave data is thought to differ according to surface characteristics [2], the impact of each assimilation on the model soil moisture skill is assessed according to land cover type, by comparison to in situ soil moisture observations.

  17. Assimilation of Synchronous and Asynchronous Active/Passive Microwave Observations at Different Spatial Scales for Improved Soil Moisture and Crop Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, J.; Liu, P. W.; Monsivais-Huertero, A.; Steele-Dunne, S. C.; Bongiovanni, T. E.; Bindlish, R.; Jackson, T. J.

    2014-12-01

    Assimilation of active and passive (AP) microwave observations at L-band in the crop simulation models is able to improve estimates of soil moisture (SM) and crop growth in the models. These observations provide complementary information for dynamic heterogeneous landscapes. Active observations are more sensitive to soil surface roughness and vegetation structure, while passive observations are more sensitive to SM. These observations may be available at different spatial and temporal resolutions from different satellite platforms. For example, the present ESA Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission provides passive observations at 1.41 GHz at 25 km every 2-3 days, while the NASA/CONAE Aquarius mission provides L-band AP observations at spatial resolution of 150 km with a repeat coverage of 7 days for global SM products. The planned NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive mission (SMAP) will provide AP observations at 1.26 and 1.41 GHz at the spatial resolutions of 3 and 30 km, respectively, with a repeat coverage of 2-3 days, starting early 2015. The goal of this study is to develop an Ensemble Kalman Filter-based methodology that assimilates synchronously and asynchronously available backscattering coefficients (σ0) and brightness temperatures (TB) at different spatial scales from SMOS and Aquarius. The Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT) that contains a suite of crop simulation models will be linked to microwave emission and scattering models (DSSAT-A-P) for the assimilation. The methodology will be implemented in the rain fed agricultural region of the Brazilian La Plata Basin in South America, where soybean is the primary crop. The augmented state vector will include both model states and parameters related to soil and vegetation during the growing season. The methodology will be evaluated using a synthetic experiment and also using observations from SMOS and Aquarius. In preliminary results with synthetic experiment, using asynchronous

  18. AMISS - Active and passive MIcrowaves for Security and Subsurface imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldovieri, Francesco; Slob, Evert; Turk, Ahmet Serdar; Crocco, Lorenzo; Catapano, Ilaria; Di Matteo, Francesca

    2013-04-01

    The FP7-IRSES project AMISS - Active and passive MIcrowaves for Security and Subsurface imaging is based on a well-combined network among research institutions of EU, Associate and Third Countries (National Research Council of Italy - Italy, Technische Universiteit Delft - The Netherlands, Yildiz Technical University - Turkey, Bauman Moscow State Technical University - Russia, Usikov Institute for Radio-physics and Electronics and State Research Centre of Superconductive Radioelectronics "Iceberg" - Ukraine and University of Sao Paulo - Brazil) with the aims of achieving scientific advances in the framework of microwave and millimeter imaging systems and techniques for security and safety social issues. In particular, the involved partners are leaders in the scientific areas of passive and active imaging and are sharing their complementary knowledge to address two main research lines. The first one regards the design, characterization and performance evaluation of new passive and active microwave devices, sensors and measurement set-ups able to mitigate clutter and increase information content. The second line faces the requirements to make State-of-the-Art processing tools compliant with the instrumentations developed in the first line, suitable to work in electromagnetically complex scenarios and able to exploit the unexplored possibilities offered by new instrumentations. The main goals of the project are: 1) Development/improvement and characterization of new sensors and systems for active and passive microwave imaging; 2) Set up, analysis and validation of state of art/novel data processing approach for GPR in critical infrastructure and subsurface imaging; 3) Integration of state of art and novel imaging hardware and characterization approaches to tackle realistic situations in security, safety and subsurface prospecting applications; 4) Development and feasibility study of bio-radar technology (system and data processing) for vital signs detection and

  19. Central Amygdala Somatostatin Neurons Gate Passive and Active Defensive Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Kai; Garcia da Silva, Pedro; Albeanu, Dinu F.

    2016-01-01

    The central amygdala (CeA) has a key role in learning and expression of defensive responses. Recent studies indicate that somatostatin-expressing (SOM+) neurons in the lateral division of the CeA (CeL) are essential for the acquisition and recall of conditioned freezing behavior, which has been used as an index of defensive response in laboratory animals during Pavlovian fear conditioning. However, how exactly these neurons participate in fear conditioning and whether they contribute to the generation of defensive responses other than freezing remain unknown. Here, using fiber-optic photometry combined with optogenetic and molecular techniques in behaving mice, we show that SOM+ CeL neurons are activated by threat-predicting sensory cues after fear conditioning and that activation of these neurons suppresses ongoing actions and converts an active defensive behavior to a passive response. Furthermore, inhibition of these neurons using optogenetic or molecular methods promotes active defensive behaviors. Our results provide the first in vivo evidence that SOM+ neurons represent a CeL population that acquires learning-dependent sensory responsiveness during fear conditioning and furthermore reveal an important role of these neurons in gating passive versus active defensive behaviors in animals confronted with threat. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The ability to develop adaptive behavioral responses to threat is fundamental for survival. Recent studies indicate that the central lateral amygdala (CeL), in particular its somatostatin-expressing neurons, is crucial for both learning and the expression of defensive response. However, how exactly these neurons participate in such processes remains unclear. Here we show for the first time in behaving mice that the somatostatin-expressing neurons in the CeL acquire learning-dependent responsiveness to sensory cues predicting a threat. Furthermore, our results indicate that these neurons gate the behavioral output of an animal

  20. SoilSCAPE in-Situ Observations of Soil Moisture for SMAP Validation: Pushing the Envelopes of Spatial Coverage and Energy Efficiency in Sparse Wireless Sensor Networks (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, M.; Silva, A.; Clewley, D.; Akbar, R.; Entekhabi, D.

    2013-12-01

    Soil Moisture Sensing Controller and oPtimal Estimator (SoilSCAPE) is a wireless in-situ sensor network technology, developed under the support of NASA ESTO/AIST program, for multi-scale validation of soil moisture retrievals from the Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) mission. The SMAP sensor suite is expected to produce soil moisture retrievals at 3 km scale from the radar instrument, at 36 km from the radiometer, and at 10 km from the combination of the two sensors. To validate the retrieved soil moisture maps at any of these scales, it is necessary to perform in-situ observations at multiple scales (ten, hundreds, and thousands of meters), representative of the true spatial variability of soil moisture fields. The most recent SoilSCAPE network, deployed in the California central valley, has been designed, built, and deployed to accomplish this goal, and is expected to become a core validation site for SMAP. The network consists of up to 150 sensor nodes, each comprised of 3-4 soil moisture sensors at various depths, deployed over a spatial extent of 36 km by 36 km. The network contains multiple sub-networks, each having up to 30 nodes, whose location is selected in part based on maximizing the land cover diversity within the 36 km cell. The network has achieved unprecedented energy efficiency, longevity, and spatial coverage using custom-designed hardware and software protocols. The network architecture utilizes a nested strategy, where a number of end devices (EDs) communicate to a local coordinator (LC) using our recently developed hardware with ultra-efficient circuitry and best-effort-timeslot allocation communication protocol. The LCs in turn communicates with the base station (BS) via text messages and a new compression scheme. The hardware and software technologies required to implement this latest deployment of the SoilSCAPE network will be presented in this paper, and several data sets resulting from the measurements will be shown. The data are

  1. Passive versus active local microrheology in mammalian cells and amoebae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riviere, C.; Gazeau, F.; Marion, S.; Bacri, J.-C.; Wilhelm, C.

    2004-12-01

    We compare in this paper the rotational magnetic microrheology detailed by Marion et al [18] and Wilhelm et al [19] to the passive tracking microrheology. The rotational microrheology has been designed to explore, using magnetic rotating probes, the local intracellular microenvironment of living cells in terms of viscoelasticity. Passive microrheology techniques is based on the analysis of spontaneous diffusive motions of Brownian probes. The dependence of mean square displacement (MSD) with the time then directly reflects the type of movement (sub-, hyper- or diffusive motions). Using the same intracellular probes, we performed two types of measurements (active and passive). Based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, one should obtain the same information from the both techniques in a thermally equilibrium system. Interestingly, our measurements differ, and the discordances directly inform on active biological processes, which add to thermally activated fluctuations in our out-of equilibrium systems. In both cell models used, mammalian Hela cells and amoebae Entamoeba Histolytica, a hyper-diffusive regime at a short time is observed, which highlights the presence of an active non-thermal driving force, acting on the probe. However, the nature of this active force in mammalian cells and amoebae is different, according to their different phenotypes. In mammalian cells active processes are governed by the transport, via molecular motors, on the microtubule network. In amoebae, which are highly motile cells free of microtubule network, the active processes are dominated by strong fluxes of cytoplasm driven by extension of pseudopodia, in random directions, leading to an amplitude of motion one order of magnitude higher than for mammalian cells. Figs 7, Refs 32.

  2. Integration of active and passive sensors for obstacle avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Victor H. L.; Sridhar, Banavar

    1989-01-01

    The automatic obstacle-avoidance guidance problem is studied under the operational constraints imposed by the rotorcraft nap-of-the-earth (NOE) environment. The problem is discussed for two different circumstances. The first assumes that a full range map is available, irrespective of the type of sensor being used. Two approaches are proposed to extend a two-dimensional obstacle-avoidance concept presented by Cheng (1988). The situation where only a sparse range map is available from a passive sensor is also treated. An integrated approach that augments the passive sensor with an active one is discussed, along with the problem of data fusion and how it is affected by the characteristics of NOE flight.

  3. Comparing SMAP to Macro-scale and Hyper-resolution Land Surface Models over Continental U. S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, M.; Cai, X.; Chaney, N.; Wood, E. F.

    2015-12-01

    SMAP sensors collect moisture information in top soil at the spatial resolution of ~40 km (radiometer) and ~1 to 3 km (SAR). Such information is extremely valuable for understanding various terrestrial hydrologic processes and their implications on human life. At the same time, soil moisture is a joint consequence of numerous physical processes (precipitation, temperature, radiation, topography, crop/vegetation dynamics, soil properties, etc.) that happen at a wide range of scales from tens of kilometers down to tens of meters. Therefore, a full and thorough analysis/exploration of SMAP data products calls for investigations at multiple spatial scales - from regional, to catchment, and to field scales. Here we first compare the SMAP retrievals to the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) macro-scale land surface model simulations over the continental U. S. region at 3-km resolution. The forcing inputs to the model are merged/downscaled from a suite of best available data products including the NLDAS-2 forcing, Stage IV and Stage II precipitation, GOES Solar Insolation Product, and fine elevation data. The near real time VIC simulation is intended to provide a source of large scale comparisons at the active sensor resolution. Beyond the VIC model scale, we perform comparisons at 30-m resolution against the recently developed HydroBloks hyper-resolution land surface model over several densely gauged USDA experimental watersheds. Comparisons are also made against in-situ point-scale observations from various SMAP Cal/Val sites.

  4. Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission: Fault Management Design Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meakin, Peter; Weitl, Raquel

    2013-01-01

    As a general trend, the complexities of modern spacecraft are increasing to include more ambitious mission goals with tighter timing requirements and on-board autonomy. As a byproduct, the protective features that monitor the performance of these systems have also increased in scope and complexity. Given cost and schedule pressures, there is an increasing emphasis on understanding the behavior of the system at design time. Formal test-driven verification and validation (V&V) is rarely able to test the significant combinatorics of states, and often finds problems late in the development cycle forcing design changes that can be costly. This paper describes the approach the SMAP Fault Protection team has taken to address some of the above-mentioned issues.

  5. Comparison of SMOS and SMAP Soil Moisture Retrieval Approaches Using Tower-based Radiometer Data over a Vineyard Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miernecki, Maciej; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre; Lopez-Baeza, Ernesto; Kerr, Yann; DeJeu, Richard; DeLannoy, Gabielle J. M.; Jackson, Tom J.; O'Neill, Peggy E.; Shwank, Mike; Moran, Roberto Fernandez; Bircher, Simone; Laurence, Heather; Mialon, Arnaud; Bitar, Ahmad Al; Richaume, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare several approaches to soil moisture (SM) retrieval using L-band microwave radiometry. The comparison was based on a brightness temperature (TB) data set acquired since 2010 by the L-band radiometer ELBARA-II over a vineyard field at the Valencia Anchor Station (VAS) site. ELBARA-II, provided by the European Space Agency (ESA) within the scientific program of the SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) mission, measures multiangular TB data at horizontal and vertical polarization for a range of incidence angles (30-60). Based on a three year data set (2010-2012), several SM retrieval approaches developed for spaceborne missions including AMSR-E (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS), SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) and SMOS were compared. The approaches include: the Single Channel Algorithm (SCA) for horizontal (SCA-H) and vertical (SCA-V) polarizations, the Dual Channel Algorithm (DCA), the Land Parameter Retrieval Model (LPRM) and two simplified approaches based on statistical regressions (referred to as 'Mattar' and 'Saleh'). Time series of vegetation indices required for three of the algorithms (SCA-H, SCA-V and Mattar) were obtained from MODIS observations. The SM retrievals were evaluated against reference SM values estimated from a multiangular 2-Parameter inversion approach. The results obtained with the current base line algorithms developed for SMAP (SCA-H and -V) are in very good agreement with the reference SM data set derived from the multi-angular observations (R2 around 0.90, RMSE varying between 0.035 and 0.056 m3m3 for several retrieval configurations). This result showed that, provided the relationship between vegetation optical depth and a remotely-sensed vegetation index can be calibrated, the SCA algorithms can provide results very close to those obtained from multi-angular observations in this study area. The approaches based on statistical regressions provided similar results and the

  6. The East Pacific Rise: An Active Not Passive Spreading System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowley, D. B.; Rowan, C. J.; Forte, A. M.; Moucha, R.; Grand, S. P.; Simmons, N. A.

    2011-12-01

    Traditional plate tectonic interpretations of mid-oceanic ridges regard spreading as an entirely passive phenomenon. From this one would assume that the oceanic ridges will move over the mantle in response to the geodynamics of the diverging plates, and do not remain fixed spatially over any protracted period of time. An analysis of the kinematics of ridge motions in the Indo-Atlantic hotspot frame of reference since 83 Ma generally supports this view, with the notable exception of the East Pacific Rise (EPR). The Pacific-Nazca/Farallon segment of the EPR north of Easter Island (27°S) is oriented essentially N-S, and has produced more than 9500km of E-W spreading in the past 80 Ma, making it the dominant ridge in the world's plate system over this interval of time. Yet despite the large amount of E-W divergence, the spreading center has maintained its longitudinal position to within <±250 km of the current ridge axis. Global mantle convective flow modeling indicates that the EPR, unlike any other extensive segment of the mid-oceanic ridge system, is underlain by an active upwelling system extending from the core-mantle boundary to the surface. We suggest that the lack of E-W motion of the EPR apparent from the kinematics is a consequence of these mantle dynamics; this ridge is thus not behaving as a passive plate boundary, but is actively and directly linked to, and controlled by, whole mantle upwelling. This observation overturns the notion that ridges are always entirely passive features of the plate system. Subduction of the northern EPR beneath western North America has thus resulted in the overriding of an active upwelling system that has contributed significantly to the evolution of Basin and Range kinematics and superimposed dynamics, including significant contributions from dynamic topography.

  7. Experiences from long range passive and active imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grönwall, Christina; Gustafsson, David; Steinvall, Ove; Tolt, Gustav

    2015-10-01

    We present algorithm evaluations for ATR of small sea vessels. The targets are at km distance from the sensors, which means that the algorithms have to deal with images affected by turbulence and mirage phenomena. We evaluate previously developed algorithms for registration of 3D-generating laser radar data. The evaluations indicate that some robustness to turbulence and mirage induced uncertainties can be handled by our probabilistic-based registration method. We also assess methods for target classification and target recognition on these new 3D data. An algorithm for detecting moving vessels in infrared image sequences is presented; it is based on optical flow estimation. Detection of moving target with an unknown spectral signature in a maritime environment is a challenging problem due to camera motion, background clutter, turbulence and the presence of mirage. First, the optical flow caused by the camera motion is eliminated by estimating the global flow in the image. Second, connected regions containing significant motions that differ from camera motion is extracted. It is assumed that motion caused by a moving vessel is more temporally stable than motion caused by mirage or turbulence. Furthermore, it is assumed that the motion caused by the vessel is more homogenous with respect to both magnitude and orientation, than motion caused by mirage and turbulence. Sufficiently large connected regions with a flow of acceptable magnitude and orientation are considered target regions. The method is evaluated on newly collected sequences of SWIR and MWIR images, with varying targets, target ranges and background clutter. Finally we discuss a concept for combining passive and active imaging in an ATR process. The main steps are passive imaging for target detection, active imaging for target/background segmentation and a fusion of passive and active imaging for target recognition.

  8. Vegetation stress from soil moisture and chlorophyll fluorescence: synergy between SMAP and FLEX approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Jose; Moran, Susan

    2014-05-01

    Vegetation stress detection continues being a focal objective for remote sensing techniques. It has implications not only for practical applications such as irrigation optimization or precision agriculture, but also for global climate models, providing data to better link water and carbon exchanges between the surface and the atmospheric and improved parameterization of the role of terrestrial vegetation in the coupling of water and carbon cycles. Traditional approaches to map vegetation stress using remote sensing techniques have been based on measurements of soil moisture status, canopy (radiometric) temperature and, to a lesser extent, canopy water content, but new techniques such as the dynamics of vegetation fluorescence emission, are also now available. Within the context of the preparatory activities for the SMAP and FLEX missions, a number of initiatives have been put in place to combine modelling activities and field experiments in order to look for alternative and more efficient ways of detecting vegetation stress, with emphasis on synergistic remote sensing approaches. The potential of solar-induced vegetation fluorescence as an early indicator of stress has been widely demonstrated, for different type of stress conditions: light amount (excess illumination) and conditions (direct/diffuse), temperature extremes (low and high), soil water availability (soil moisture), soil nutrients (nitrogen), atmospheric water vapour and atmospheric CO2 concentration. The effects caused by different stress conditions are sometimes difficult to be decoupled, also because different causes are often combined, but in general they then to change the overall fluorescence emission (modulating amplitude) or changing the relative contributions of photosystems PSI and PSII or the relative fluorescence re-absorption effects caused by modifications in the structure of pigment bed responsible for light absorption, in particular for acclimation for persistent stress conditions. While

  9. Advanced Performance Modeling with Combined Passive and Active Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Dovrolis, Constantine; Sim, Alex

    2015-04-15

    To improve the efficiency of resource utilization and scheduling of scientific data transfers on high-speed networks, the "Advanced Performance Modeling with combined passive and active monitoring" (APM) project investigates and models a general-purpose, reusable and expandable network performance estimation framework. The predictive estimation model and the framework will be helpful in optimizing the performance and utilization of networks as well as sharing resources with predictable performance for scientific collaborations, especially in data intensive applications. Our prediction model utilizes historical network performance information from various network activity logs as well as live streaming measurements from network peering devices. Historical network performance information is used without putting extra load on the resources by active measurement collection. Performance measurements collected by active probing is used judiciously for improving the accuracy of predictions.

  10. Passive resting state and history of antagonist muscle activity shape active extensions in an insect limb

    PubMed Central

    Ache, Jan M.

    2012-01-01

    Limb movements can be driven by muscle contractions, external forces, or intrinsic passive forces. For lightweight limbs like those of insects or small vertebrates, passive forces can be large enough to overcome the effects of gravity and may even generate limb movements in the absence of active muscle contractions. Understanding the sources and actions of such forces is therefore important in understanding motor control. We describe passive properties of the femur-tibia joint of the locust hind leg. The resting angle is determined primarily by passive properties of the relatively large extensor tibiae muscle and is influenced by the history of activation of the fast extensor tibiae motor neuron. The resting angle is therefore better described as a history-dependent resting state. We selectively stimulated different flexor tibiae motor neurons to generate a range of isometric contractions of the flexor tibiae muscle and then stimulated the fast extensor tibiae motor neuron to elicit active tibial extensions. Residual forces in the flexor muscle have only a small effect on subsequent active extensions, but the effect is larger for distal than for proximal flexor motor neurons and varies with the strength of flexor activation. We conclude that passive properties of a lightweight limb make substantial and complex contributions to the resting state of the limb that must be taken into account in the patterning of neuronal control signals driving its active movements. Low variability in the effects of the passive forces may permit the nervous system to accurately predict their contributions to behavior. PMID:22357791

  11. Nondestructive assay using active and passive computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, G. P. ,LLNL

    1998-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has over 600,000 transuranic (TRU) waste drums temporarily stored at nearly 40 sites within the United States. Contents of these drums must be characterized before they are transported for permanent disposal. Traditional gamma-ray methods used to characterize nuclear waste introduce errors that are related to nonuniform measurement responses associated with unknown radioactive source and matrix material distributions. These errors can be reduced by application of tomographic techniques, that measure these distributions. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed two tomographic-based waste assay systems. They use external radioactive sources and tomography-protocol to map the attenuation within a waste drum as a function of mono-energetic gamma-ray energy in waste containers. Passive tomography is used to localize and identify specific radioactive waste contents within the same waste containers. Reconstruction of the passive data via the active images allows internal waste radioactivities in a drum to be corrected for any overlying heterogeneous materials, thus yielding an absolute assay of the waste radioactivities. Calibration of both systems requires only point source measurements and are independent of matrix materials. The first system is housed at LLNL and was developed to study and validate research concepts. The second system is being developed with Bioimaging Research, Inc. (BIR) and is housed within a mobile waste characterization trailer. This system has traveled to three DOE facilities to demonstrate the active and passive computed tomography capability. Both systems have participated in and successfully passed the requirements of formal DOE-sponsored intercomparison studies. The systems have measured approximately 1 to 100 grains of plutonium within a variety of waste matrix materials. Laboratory and field results from these two systems over the past several years show that both systems

  12. Characterization of Schistosome Tegumental Alkaline Phosphatase (SmAP)

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Rita; Skelly, Patrick J.

    2011-01-01

    Schistosomes are parasitic platyhelminths that currently infect over 200 million people globally. The parasites can live for years in a putatively hostile environment - the blood of vertebrates. We have hypothesized that the unusual schistosome tegument (outer-covering) plays a role in protecting parasites in the blood; by impeding host immunological signaling pathways we suggest that tegumental molecules help create an immunologically privileged environment for schistosomes. In this work, we clone and characterize a schistosome alkaline phosphatase (SmAP), a predicted ∼60 kDa glycoprotein that has high sequence conservation with members of the alkaline phosphatase protein family. The SmAP gene is most highly expressed in intravascular parasite life stages. Using immunofluorescence and immuno-electron microscopy, we confirm that SmAP is expressed at the host/parasite interface and in internal tissues. The ability of living parasites to cleave exogenous adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and generate adenosine is very largely abolished when SmAP gene expression is suppressed following RNAi treatment targeting the gene. These results lend support to the hypothesis that schistosome surface enzymes such as SmAP could dampen host immune responses against the parasites by generating immunosuppressants such as adenosine to promote their survival. This notion does not rule out other potential functions for the adenosine generated e.g. in parasite nutrition. PMID:21483710

  13. Propulsion by passive filaments and active flagella near boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Arthur A.; Lauga, Eric

    2010-10-01

    Confinement and wall effects are known to affect the kinematics and propulsive characteristics of swimming microorganisms. When a solid body is dragged through a viscous fluid at constant velocity, the presence of a wall increases fluid drag, and thus the net force required to maintain speed has to increase. In contrast, recent optical trapping experiments have revealed that the propulsive force generated by human spermatozoa is decreased by the presence of boundaries. Here, we use a series of simple models to analytically elucidate the propulsive effects of a solid boundary on passively actuated filaments and model flagella. For passive flexible filaments actuated periodically at one end, the presence of the wall is shown to increase the propulsive forces generated by the filaments in the case of displacement-driven actuation, while it decreases the force in the case of force-driven actuation. In the case of active filaments as models for eukaryotic flagella, we demonstrate that the manner in which a solid wall affects propulsion cannot be known a priori, but is instead a nontrivial function of the flagellum frequency, wavelength, its material characteristics, the manner in which the molecular motors self-organize to produce oscillations (prescribed activity model or self-organized axonemal beating model), and the boundary conditions applied experimentally to the tethered flagellum. In particular, we show that in some cases, the increase in fluid friction induced by the wall can lead to a change in the waveform expressed by the flagella, which results in a decrease in their propulsive force.

  14. Parallel evolution of passive and active defence in land snails

    PubMed Central

    Morii, Yuta; Prozorova, Larisa; Chiba, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Predator-prey interactions are major processes promoting phenotypic evolution. However, it remains unclear how predation causes morphological and behavioural diversity in prey species and how it might lead to speciation. Here, we show that substantial divergence in the phenotypic traits of prey species has occurred among closely related land snails as a result of adaptation to predator attacks. This caused the divergence of defensive strategies into two alternatives: passive defence and active defence. Phenotypic traits of the subarctic Karaftohelix land snail have undergone radiation in northeast Asia, and distinctive morphotypes generally coexist in the same regions. In these land snails, we documented two alternative defence behaviours against predation by malacophagous beetles. Furthermore, the behaviours are potentially associated with differences in shell morphology. In addition, molecular phylogenetic analyses indicated that these alternative strategies against predation arose independently on the islands and on the continent suggesting that anti-predator adaptation is a major cause of phenotypic diversity in these snails. Finally, we suggest the potential speciation of Karaftohelix snails as a result of the divergence of defensive strategies into passive and active behaviours and the possibility of species radiation due to anti-predatory adaptations. PMID:27833102

  15. Active and passive control of zinc phthalocyanine photodynamics.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Divya; Huijser, Annemarie; Savolainen, Janne; Steen, Gerwin; Herek, Jennifer L

    2013-01-01

    In this work we report on the ultrafast photodynamics of the photosensitizer zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) and manipulation thereof. Two approaches are followed: active control via pulse shaping and passive control via strategic manipulation in the periphery of the molecular structure. The objective of both of these control experiments is the same: to enhance the yield of the functional pathway and to minimize loss channels. The aim of the active control experiments is to increase the intersystem crossing yield in ZnPc, which is important for application in photodynamic therapy (PDT). Pulse shaping allowed an improvement in triplet to singlet ratio of 15% as compared to a transform-limited pulse. This effect is ascribed to a control mechanism that utilizes multiphoton pathways to higher-lying states from where intersystem crossing is more likely to occur. The passive control experiments are performed on ZnPc derivatives deposited onto TiO2, serving as a model system of a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). Modification of the anchoring ligand of the molecular structure resulted in an increased rate for electron injection into TiO2 and slower back electron transfer, improving the DSSC efficiency.

  16. Implementation of CPFD to Control Active and Passive Airfoil Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Jay; Asselin, Daniel; Williamson, Charles

    2016-11-01

    The fluid dynamics of biologically-inspired flapping propulsion provides a fertile testing ground for the field of unsteady aerodynamics, serving as important groundwork for the design and development of fast, mobile underwater vehicles and flapping-wing micro air vehicles (MAVs). There has been a recent surge of interest in these technologies as they provide low cost, compact, and maneuverable means for terrain mapping, search and rescue operations, and reconnaissance. Propulsion by unsteady motions has been fundamentally modeled with an airfoil that heaves and pitches, and previous work has been done to show that actively controlling these motions can generate high thrust and efficiency (Read, Hover & Triantafyllou 2003). In this study, we examine the performance of an airfoil with an actuated heave motion coupled with a passively controlled pitch motion created by simulating the presence of a torsional spring using our cyber-physical fluid dynamics (CPFD) approach (Mackowski & Williamson 2011, 2015, 2016). By using passively controlled pitch, we have effectively eliminated an actuator, decreasing cost and mass, an important step for developing efficient vehicles. In many cases, we have achieved comparable or superior thrust and efficiency values to those obtained using two actively controlled degrees of freedom. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research Grant No. FA9550-15-1-0243, monitored by Dr. Douglas Smith.

  17. Active-to-Passive Environmental Cleanup Transition Strategies - 13220

    SciTech Connect

    Gaughan, Thomas F.; Aylward, Robert S.; Denham, Miles E.; Looney, Brian B.; Whitaker, Wade C.; Mills, Gary L.

    2013-07-01

    The Savannah River Site uses a graded approach to environmental cleanup. The selection of groundwater and vadose zone remediation technologies for a specific contamination area is based on the size, contaminant type, contaminant concentration, and configuration of the plume. These attributes are the result of the nature and mass of the source of contamination and the subsurface characteristics in the area of the plume. Many large plumes consist of several zones that are most efficiently addressed with separate complementary corrective action/remedial technologies. The highest concentrations of contaminants are found in the source zone. The most robust, high mass removal technologies are often best suited for remediation of the source zone. In the primary plume zone, active remedies, such as pump-and-treat, may be necessary to remove contaminants and exert hydraulic control of the plume. In the dilute fringe zone, contaminants are generally lower in concentration and can often be treated with passive techniques. A key determination in achieving an acceptable and cost-effective end state for a given waste unit is when to transition from an active treatment system to a more passive or natural approach (e.g., monitored natural attenuation or enhanced attenuation). This paper will discuss the considerations for such a transition as well as provide examples of successful transitions at the Savannah River Site. (authors)

  18. Propagating interfaces in mixtures of active and passive Brownian particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysocki, Adam; Winkler, Roland G.; Gompper, Gerhard

    2016-12-01

    The emergent collective dynamics in phase-separated mixtures of isometric active and passive Brownian particles is studied numerically in two-dimensions. A novel steady-state of well-defined propagating interfaces is observed, where the interface between the dense and the dilute phase propagates and the bulk of both phases is (nearly) at rest. Two kind of interfaces, advancing and receding, are formed by spontaneous symmetry breaking, induced by an instability of a planar interface due to the formation of localized vortices. The propagation arises due to flux imbalance at the interface, resembling the growth behavior of rough surfaces far from equilibrium. Above a threshold, the interface velocity decreases linearly with increasing fraction of active particles.

  19. Magnitude and Recurrence of Submarine Landslides: Active vs. Passive Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urgeles, Roger; Camerlenghi, Angelo

    2016-04-01

    Submarine landslides are ubiquitous along Mediterranean continental margins. With the aim of understanding mass-wasting processes and related hazard at the scale of a large marine basin encompassing multiple geological settings, we have compiled data on their geometry, age, and trigger mechanism with a geographic information system. The distribution of submarine landslides in the Mediterranean reveals that major deltaic wedges have a higher density of large submarine landslides, while tectonically active margins are characterized by relatively small failures. In all areas, landslide size distributions display power law scaling for landslides > 1 km3. We find consistent differences on the exponent of the power law (θ) depending on the tectonic setting. Active margins present steep slopes of the frequency-magnitude relationship while passive margins tend to display gentler slopes. This pattern likely responds to the common view that tectonically active margins have numerous but small failures, while passive margins have larger but fewer failures. Available age information suggests that failures exceeding 1000 km3 are infrequent and may recur every ~40 kyr. Smaller failures that can still cause significant damage might be relatively frequent (failures > 1 km3 may recur every 40 years). The database highlights that our knowledge of submarine landslide activity with time is limited to a few tens of thousands of years. Available data suggest that submarine landslides may preferentially occur during lowstand periods, but no firm conclusion can be made on this respect, as only 70 landslides (out of 696 in the database) have relatively accurate age determinations. The temporal pattern and changes in frequency-magnitude distribution suggest that sedimentation patterns and pore pressure development have had a major role in triggering slope failures and control the sediment flux from mass wasting to the deep basin.

  20. Fluctuation driven active molecular transport in passive channel proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosztin, Ioan

    2006-03-01

    Living cells interact with their extracellular environment through the cell membrane, which acts as a protective permeability barrier for preserving the internal integrity of the cell. However, cell metabolism requires controlled molecular transport across the cell membrane, a function that is fulfilled by a wide variety of transmembrane proteins, acting as either passive or active transporters. In this talk it is argued that, contrary to the general belief, in active cell membranes passive and spatially asymmetric channel proteins can act as active transporters by consuming energy from nonequilibrium fluctuations fueled by cell metabolism. This assertion is demonstrated in the case of the E. coli aquaglyceroporin GlpF channel protein, whose high resolution crystal structure is manifestly asymmetric. By calculating the glycerol flux through GlpF within the framework of a stochastic model, it is found that, as a result of channel asymmetry, glycerol uptake driven by a concentration gradient is enhanced significantly in the presence of non-equilibrium fluctuations. Furthermore, the enhancement caused by a ratchet-like mechanism is larger for the outward, i.e., from the cytoplasm to the periplasm, flux than for the inward one, suggesting that the same non-equilibrium fluctuations also play an important role in protecting the interior of the cell against poisoning by excess uptake of glycerol. Preliminary data on water and sugar transport through aquaporin and maltoporin channels, respectively, are indicative of the universality of the proposed nonequilibrium-fluctuation-driven active transport mechanism. This work was supported by grants from the Univ. of Missouri Research Board, the Institute for Theoretical Sciences and the Department of Energy (DOE Contract W-7405-ENG-36), and the National Science Foundation (FIBR-0526854).

  1. Small Activity Differences Drive Phase Separation in Active-Passive Polymer Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smrek, Jan; Kremer, Kurt

    2017-03-01

    Recent theoretical studies found that mixtures of active and passive colloidal particles phase separate but only at very high activity ratio. The high value poses serious obstacles for experimental exploration of this phenomenon. Here we show using simulations that when the active and passive particles are polymers, the critical activity ratio decreases with the polymer length. This not only facilitates the experiments but also has implications on the DNA organization in living cell nuclei. Entropy production can be used as an accurate indicator of this nonequilibrium phase transition.

  2. Active subjects of passive monitoring: responses to a passive monitoring system in low-income independent living

    PubMed Central

    BERRIDGE, CLARA

    2016-01-01

    Passive monitoring technology is beginning to be reimbursed by third-party payers in the United States of America. Given the low voluntary uptake of these technologies on the market, it is important to understand the concerns and perspectives of users, former users and non-users. In this paper, the range of ways older adults relate to passive monitoring in low-income independent-living residences is presented. This includes experiences of adoption, non-adoption, discontinuation and creative ‘misuse’. The analysis of interviews reveals three key insights. First, assumptions built into the technology about how older adults live present a problem for many users who experience unwanted disruptions and threats to their behavioural autonomy. Second, resident response is varied and challenges the dominant image of residents as passive subjects of a passive monitoring system. Third, the priorities of older adults (e.g. safety, autonomy, privacy, control, contact) are more diverse and multi-faceted than those of the housing organisation staff and family members (e.g. safety, efficiency) who drive the passive monitoring intervention. The tension between needs, desires and the daily lives of older adults and the technological solutions offered to them is made visible by their active responses, including resistance to them. This exposes the active and meaningful qualities of older adults’ decisions and practices. PMID:28239211

  3. Active subjects of passive monitoring: responses to a passive monitoring system in low-income independent living.

    PubMed

    Berridge, Clara

    2017-03-01

    Passive monitoring technology is beginning to be reimbursed by third-party payers in the United States of America. Given the low voluntary uptake of these technologies on the market, it is important to understand the concerns and perspectives of users, former users and non-users. In this paper, the range of ways older adults relate to passive monitoring in low-income independent-living residences is presented. This includes experiences of adoption, non-adoption, discontinuation and creative 'misuse'. The analysis of interviews reveals three key insights. First, assumptions built into the technology about how older adults live present a problem for many users who experience unwanted disruptions and threats to their behavioural autonomy. Second, resident response is varied and challenges the dominant image of residents as passive subjects of a passive monitoring system. Third, the priorities of older adults (e.g. safety, autonomy, privacy, control, contact) are more diverse and multi-faceted than those of the housing organisation staff and family members (e.g. safety, efficiency) who drive the passive monitoring intervention. The tension between needs, desires and the daily lives of older adults and the technological solutions offered to them is made visible by their active responses, including resistance to them. This exposes the active and meaningful qualities of older adults' decisions and practices.

  4. Active and Passive Coupled-Resonator Optical Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Joyce Kai See

    Coupled-Resonator Optical Waveguides (CROWs) are chains of resonators in which light propagates by virtue of the coupling between the resonators. The dispersive properties of these waveguides are controllable by the inter-resonator coupling and the geometry of the resonators. If the inter-resonator coupling is weak, light can be engineered to propagate slowly in these structures. The small group velocities possible in CROWs may enable applications in and technologies for optical delay lines, interferometers, buffers, nonlinear optics, and lasers. This thesis reports on achieving and controlling the optical delay in passive and active CROWs. Both theoretical and experimental results are presented. Transfer matrices, tight-binding models, and coupled-mode approaches are developed to analyze and design a variety of coupled resonator systems in the space, frequency, and time domains. Although each analytical method is fundamentally different, in the limit of weak inter-resonator coupling these approaches are consistent with each other. From these formalisms, simple expressions for the delay, loss, bandwidth, and a figure of merit are derived to compare the performance of CROW delay lines. Using a time-domain tight-binding model, we examine the resonant gain enhancement and spontaneous emission noise in amplifying CROWs to find that the net amplification of a propagating wave does not always vary with the group velocity but instead depends on the termination and excitation of the CROW. CROWs in the form of high-order (> 10) weakly coupled passive polymer microring resonators were fabricated and measured. The measured transmission, group delay, and dispersive properties of the CROWs agreed with the theoretical results. Delays in excess of 100 ps and slowing factors of about 25 over bandwidths of about 20 GHz were observed. The main limitation of the passive CROWs was the optical losses. To overcome the losses and to enable electrical integration, we demonstrated active

  5. Waves in active and passive periodic structures - A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.

    1976-01-01

    The theory and recent applications of waves in periodic structures are reviewed. Both the Floquet and coupled waves approach are analyzed in some detail. The theoretical part of the paper includes wave propagation in unbounded and bounded active or passive periodic media, wave scattering from periodic boundaries, source radiation (dipole, Cerenkov, transition, and Smith-Purcell) in periodic media, and pulse transmission through a periodic slab. The applications part covers the recent development in a variety of fields: distributed feedback oscillators, filters, mode converters, couplers, second-harmonic generators, deflectors, modulators, and transducers in the fields of integrated optics and integrated surface acoustics. Work on insect compound eyes, mechanical structures, ocean waves, pulse compressions, temperature waves, and cholesteric liquid crystals, and particles interaction with crystals is briefly reviewed, especially in the case of zeolite crystals and superlattices. Recent advances in fabrication techniques for very fine gratings are also covered.

  6. Active/passive mode-locked laser oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Fountain, William D.; Johnson, Bertram C.

    1977-01-01

    A Q-switched/mode-locked Nd:YAG laser oscillator employing simultaneous active (electro-optic) and passive (saturable absorber) loss modulation within the optical cavity is described. This "dual modulation" oscillator can produce transform-limited pulses of duration ranging from about 30 psec to about 5 nsec with greatly improved stability compared to other mode-locked systems. The pulses produced by this system lack intrapulse frequency or amplitude modulation, and hence are idealy suited for amplification to high energies and for other applications where well-defined pulses are required. Also, the pulses of this system have excellent interpulse characteristics, wherein the optical noise between the individual pulses of the pulse train has a power level well below the power of the peak pulse of the train.

  7. Active-passive path-length encoded (APPLE) Doppler OCT

    PubMed Central

    Wartak, Andreas; Haindl, Richard; Trasischker, Wolfgang; Baumann, Bernhard; Pircher, Michael; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel active-passive path-length encoded (APPLE) swept source Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) approach, enabling three-dimensional velocity vector reconstruction of moving particles without prior knowledge of the orientation of motion. The developed APPLE DOCT setup allows for non-invasive blood flow measurements in vivo and was primarily designed for quantitative human ocular blood flow investigations. The system’s performance was demonstrated by in vitro flow phantom as well as in vivo retinal vessel bifurcation measurements. Furthermore, total retinal blood flow – a biomarker aiding in diagnosis and monitoring of major ocular diseases such as glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy or central/branch retinal vein occlusion – was determined in the eyes of healthy human volunteers. PMID:28018739

  8. Advances in Inner Magnetosphere Passive and Active Wave Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James L.; Fung, Shing F.

    2004-01-01

    This review identifies a number of the principal research advancements that have occurred over the last five years in the study of electromagnetic (EM) waves in the Earth's inner magnetosphere. The observations used in this study are from the plasma wave instruments and radio sounders on Cluster, IMAGE, Geotail, Wind, Polar, Interball, and others. The data from passive plasma wave instruments have led to a number of advances such as: determining the origin and importance of whistler mode waves in the plasmasphere, discovery of the source of kilometric continuum radiation, mapping AKR source regions with "pinpoint" accuracy, and correlating the AKR source location with dipole tilt angle. Active magnetospheric wave experiments have shown that long range ducted and direct echoes can be used to obtain the density distribution of electrons in the polar cap and along plasmaspheric field lines, providing key information on plasmaspheric filling rates and polar cap outflows.

  9. Active-passive calibration of optical tweezers in viscoelastic media.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Mario; Richardson, Andrew C; Reihani, S Nader S; Oddershede, Lene B; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine

    2010-01-01

    In order to use optical tweezers as a force measuring tool inside a viscoelastic medium such as the cytoplasm of a living cell, it is crucial to perform an exact force calibration within the complex medium. This is a nontrivial task, as many of the physical characteristics of the medium and probe, e.g., viscosity, elasticity, shape, and density, are often unknown. Here, we suggest how to calibrate single beam optical tweezers in a complex viscoelastic environment. At the same time, we determine viscoelastic characteristics such as friction retardation spectrum and elastic moduli of the medium. We apply and test a method suggested [M. Fischer and K. Berg-Sørensen, J. Opt. A, Pure Appl. Opt. 9, S239 (2007)], a method which combines passive and active measurements. The method is demonstrated in a simple viscous medium, water, and in a solution of entangled F-actin without cross-linkers.

  10. Advances in Assimilation of Satellite-Based Passive Microwave Observations for Soil-Moisture Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Lannoy, Gabrielle J. M.; Pauwels, Valentijn; Reichle, Rolf H.; Draper, Clara; Koster, Randy; Liu, Qing

    2012-01-01

    Satellite-based microwave measurements have long shown potential to provide global information about soil moisture. The European Space Agency (ESA) Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS, [1]) mission as well as the future National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP, [2]) mission measure passive microwave emission at L-band frequencies, at a relatively coarse (40 km) spatial resolution. In addition, SMAP will measure active microwave signals at a higher spatial resolution (3 km). These new L-band missions have a greater sensing depth (of -5cm) compared with past and present C- and X-band microwave sensors. ESA currently also disseminates retrievals of SMOS surface soil moisture that are derived from SMOS brightness temperature observations and ancillary data. In this research, we address two major challenges with the assimilation of recent/future satellite-based microwave measurements: (i) assimilation of soil moisture retrievals versus brightness temperatures for surface and root-zone soil moisture estimation and (ii) scale-mismatches between satellite observations, models and in situ validation data.

  11. Contributions of active and passive toe flexion to forefoot loading.

    PubMed

    Hamel, A J; Donahue, S W; Sharkey, N A

    2001-12-01

    Toe flexion during terminal stance has an active component contributed by the muscles that flex the toes and a passive component contributed by the plantar fascia. This study examined the relative importance of these two mechanisms in maintaining proper force sharing between the toes and forefoot. Thirteen nonpaired cadaver feet were tested in a dynamic gait stimulator, which reproduces the kinematics and kinetics of the foot, ankle, and tibia by applying physiologic muscle forces and proximal tibial kinematics. The distribution of plantar pressure beneath the foot was measured at the terminal stance phase of gait under normal extrinsic muscle activity with an intact plantar fascia, in the absence of extrinsic toe flexor activity (no flexor hallucis longus or flexor digitorum longus) with an intact plantar fascia, and after complete fasciotomy with normal extrinsic toe flexor activity. In the absence of the toe flexor muscles or after plantar fasciotomy the contact area decreased beneath the toes and contact force shifted from the toes to the metatarsal heads. In addition, pressure distribution beneath the metatarsal heads after fasciotomy shifted laterally and posteriorly, indicating that the plantar fascia enables more efficient force transmission through the high gear axis during locomotion. The plantar fascia enables the toes to provide plantar-directed force and bear high loads during push-off.

  12. Resolving the active versus passive conundrum for head direction cells.

    PubMed

    Shinder, M E; Taube, J S

    2014-06-13

    Head direction (HD) cells have been identified in a number of limbic system structures. These cells encode the animal's perceived directional heading in the horizontal plane and are dependent on an intact vestibular system. Previous studies have reported that the responses of vestibular neurons within the vestibular nuclei are markedly attenuated when an animal makes a volitional head turn compared to passive rotation. This finding presents a conundrum in that if vestibular responses are suppressed during an active head turn how is a vestibular signal propagated forward to drive and update the HD signal? This review identifies and discusses four possible mechanisms that could resolve this problem. These mechanisms are: (1) the ascending vestibular signal is generated by more than just vestibular-only neurons, (2) not all vestibular-only neurons contributing to the HD pathway have firing rates that are attenuated by active head turns, (3) the ascending pathway may be spared from the affects of the attenuation in that the HD system receives information from other vestibular brainstem sites that do not include vestibular-only cells, and (4) the ascending signal is affected by the inhibited vestibular signal during an active head turn, but the HD circuit compensates and uses the altered signal to accurately update the current HD. Future studies will be needed to decipher which of these possibilities is correct.

  13. Information System Life-Cycle And Documentation Standards (SMAP DIDS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Although not computer program, SMAP DIDS written to provide systematic, NASA-wide structure for documenting information system development projects. Each DID (data item description) outlines document required for top-quality software development. When combined with management, assurance, and life cycle standards, Standards protect all parties who participate in design and operation of new information system.

  14. Passive and Active Stabilization of Liquid Bridges in Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, Philip L.; Thiessen, David B.; Marr-Lyon, Mark J.; Wei, Wei; Niederhaus, Charles E.; Truong, Duc K.

    2001-01-01

    Tests are planned in the low gravity environment of the International Space Station (ISS) of new methods for the suppression of the capillary instability of liquid bridges. Our suppression methods are unusual in that they are not limited to liquid bridges having very special properties and may impact a variety of low-gravity and earth-based technologies. There are two main approaches to be investigated: (1) Passive Acoustic Stabilization (PAS); and (2) Active Electrostatic Stabilization (AES). In PAS, the suppression of the mode growth is accomplished by placing the bridge in an acoustic field having the appropriate properties such that the acoustic radiation pressure automatically pulls outward on the thinnest portion of the bridge. In AES, the bridge deformation is sensed optically and counteracted by actively adjusting the electrostatic Maxwell stresses via two ring electrodes concentric with the slightly conducting bridge to offset the growth of the unstable mode. While the present work emphasizes cylindrical bridges, the methods need not be restricted to that case. The methods to be explored are relevant to the suppression of capillary instabilities in floating zone crystal growth, breakup of liquid jets and columns, bubbles, and annular films as well as the management of coolants or propellants in low-gravity.

  15. Active and passive transport of drugs in the human placenta.

    PubMed

    Włoch, Stanisław; Pałasz, Artur; Kamiński, Marcin

    2009-10-01

    The human placenta, characterized by the processes of passive transport and facilitated diffusion, contains numerous active transport proteins, usually located in the microvilli of the syncytiotrophoblast or in the endothelium of the capillaries of the villi. These proteins use either the energy from ATP hydrolysis or other mechanisms resulting, among others, from the formation of the maternofetal ion gradient, which facilitates the transfer of various endogenous substances or xenobiotics across the body membranes. The proteins either trigger the efflux of these substances from the fetal tissues via the placenta into the maternal bloodstream, or conversely they accumulate them in the fetal tissues. Both the placenta and the fetus are equipped with independent systems of enzymes of 1st and 2nd phase of substrate metabolism, such as CYP450, glucuronyltransferase or sulphatase. An active therapy with a wide range of drugs, often at high toxicity levels, either shortly before or during pregnancy, has naturally posed a question concerning the degree of impermeability of the placental barrier and how effectively it can be crossed, including any possible negative embryotoxic or teratogenic consequences. Such hazards seem to be quite real, as many drugs are substrates for ABC transporters. Also the placenta itself, including its structure, is subject to vast transformations during pregnancy which may be observed as the thinning of the barrier separating the maternal blood from the fetal one, from 20-30 microm in the first trimester of gestation down to 2-4 microm in the third trimester of gestation.

  16. MCT SWIR modules for passive and active imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breiter, R.; Benecke, M.; Eich, D.; Figgemeier, H.; Weber, A.; Wendler, J.; Sieck, A.

    2016-05-01

    Based on AIM's state-of-the-art MCT IR technology, detector modules for the SWIR spectral range have been developed, fabricated and characterized. While LPE grown MCT FPAs with extended 2.5μm cut-off have been fabricated and integrated also MBE grown MCT on GaAs is considered for future production. Two imaging applications have been in focus operating either in passive mode by making use of e.g. the night glow, or in active mode by laser illumination for gated viewing. Dedicated readout integrated circuits (ROIC), realized in 0.18μm Si-CMOS technology providing the required functionality for passive imaging and gated imaging, have been designed and implemented. For both designs a 640x512 15μm pitch format was chosen. The FPAs are integrated in compact dewar cooler configurations using AIM's split linear coolers. A command and control electronics (CCE) provides supply voltages, biasing, clocks, control and video digitization for easy system interfacing. For imaging under low-light conditions a low-noise 640x512 15μm pitch ROIC with CTIA input stages and correlated double sampling was designed. The ROIC provides rolling shutter and snapshot integration. To reduce size, weight, power and cost (SWaP-C) a 640x512 format detector in a 10μm pitch is under development. The module makes use of the extended SWIR spectral cut-off up to 2.5μm. To be used for active gated-viewing operation SWIR MCT avalanche photodiodes have been implemented and characterized on FPA level in a 640x512 15μm pitch format. The specific ROIC provides also the necessary functions for range gate control and triggering by the laser illumination. First lab and field tests of a gated viewing demonstrator have been carried out. The paper will present the development status and performance results of AIM's MCT based SWIR Modules for imaging applications.

  17. Impact of hydrodynamics on effective interactions in suspensions of active and passive matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafnick, Ryan C.; García, Angel E.

    2015-02-01

    Passive particles exhibit unique properties when immersed in an active bath of self-propelling entities. In particular, an effective attraction can appear between particles that repel each other when in a passive solution. Here we numerically study the effect of hydrodynamics on an active-passive hybrid system, where we observe qualitative differences as compared to simulations with excluded volume effects alone. The results shed light on an existing discrepancy in pair lifetimes between simulation and experiment, due to the hydrodynamically enhanced stability of coupled passive particles.

  18. Impact of hydrodynamics on effective interactions in suspensions of active and passive matter.

    PubMed

    Krafnick, Ryan C; García, Angel E

    2015-02-01

    Passive particles exhibit unique properties when immersed in an active bath of self-propelling entities. In particular, an effective attraction can appear between particles that repel each other when in a passive solution. Here we numerically study the effect of hydrodynamics on an active-passive hybrid system, where we observe qualitative differences as compared to simulations with excluded volume effects alone. The results shed light on an existing discrepancy in pair lifetimes between simulation and experiment, due to the hydrodynamically enhanced stability of coupled passive particles.

  19. Biomarkers of Induced Active and Passive Smoking Damage

    PubMed Central

    Lodovici, Maura; Bigagli, Elisabetta

    2009-01-01

    In addition to the well-known link between smoking and lung cancer, large epidemiological studies have shown a relationship between smoking and cancers of the nose, oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx, esophagus, pancreas, bladder, kidney, stomach, liver, colon and cervix, as well as myeloid leukemia. Epidemiological evidence has reported a direct link between exposure of non-smokers to environmental tobacco smoke and disease, most notably, lung cancer. Much evidence demonstrates that carcinogenic-DNA adducts are useful markers of tobacco smoke exposure, providing an integrated measurement of carcinogen intake, metabolic activation, and delivery to the DNA in target tissues. Monitoring accessible surrogate tissues, such as white blood cells or bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells, also provides a means of investigating passive and active tobacco exposure in healthy individuals and cancer patients. Levels of DNA adducts measured in many tissues of smokers are significantly higher than in non-smokers. While some studies have demonstrated an association between carcinogenic DNA adducts and cancer in current smokers, no association has been observed in ex or never smokers. The role of genetic susceptibility in the development of smoking related-cancer is essential. In order to establish whether smoking-related DNA adducts are biomarkers of tobacco smoke exposure and/or its carcinogenic activity we summarized all data that associated tobacco smoke exposure and smoking-related DNA adducts both in controls and/or in cancer cases and studies where the effect of genetic polymorphisms involved in the activation and deactivation of carcinogens were also evaluated. In the future we hope we will be able to screen for lung cancer susceptibility by using specific biomarkers and that subjects of compared groups can be stratified for multiple potential modulators of biomarkers, taking into account various confounding factors. PMID:19440419

  20. Realistic Instrumentation Platform for Active and Passive Optical Remote Sensing.

    PubMed

    Brydegaard, Mikkel; Merdasa, Aboma; Gebru, Alem; Jayaweera, Hiran; Svanberg, Sune

    2016-02-01

    We describe the development of a novel versatile optical platform for active and passive remote sensing of environmental parameters. Applications include assessment of vegetation status and water quality. The system is also adapted for ecological studies, such as identification of flying insects including agricultural pests. The system is based on two mid-size amateur astronomy telescopes, continuous-wave diode lasers at different wavelengths ranging from violet to the near infrared, and detector facilities including quadrant photodiodes, two-dimensional and line scan charge-coupled device cameras, and a compact digital spectrometer. Application examples include remote Ramanlaser-induced fluorescence monitoring of water quality at 120 m distance, and insect identification at kilometer ranges using the recorded wing beat frequency and its spectrum of overtones. Because of the low cost this developmental platform is very suitable for advanced research projects in developing countries and has, in fact, been multiplied during hands-on workshops and is now being used by a number of groups at African universities.

  1. Passive and active launch vibration studies in the LVIS program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edberg, Donald L.; Bartos, Bruce; Goodding, James C.; Wilke, Paul S.; Davis, Torey

    1998-06-01

    A U.S. Air Force-sponsored team consisting of Boeing (formerly McDonnell Douglas), Honeywell Satellite Systems, and CSA Engineering has developed technology to reduce the vibration felt by an isolated payload during launch. Spacecraft designers indicate that a launch vibration isolation system (LVIS) could provide significant cost benefits in payload design, testing, launch, and lifetime. This paper contains developments occurring since those reported previously. Simulations, which included models of a 6,500 pound spacecraft, an isolating payload attach fitting (PAF) to replace an existing PAF, and the Boeing Delta II launch vehicle, were used to generate PAF performance requirements for the desired levels of attenuation. Hardware was designed to meet the requirements. The isolating PAF concept replaces portions of a conventional metallic fitting with hydraulic- pneumatic struts featuring a unique hydraulic cross-link feature that stiffens under rotation to meet rocking restrictions. The pneumatics provide low-stiffness longitudinal support. Two demonstration isolating PAF struts were designed, fabricated and tested to determine their stiffness and damping characteristics and to verify the performance of the hydraulic crosslink concept. Measurements matched analytical predictions closely. An active closed-loop control system was simulated to assess its potential isolation performance. A factor of 100 performance increase over the passive case was achieved with minor weight addition and minimal power consumption.

  2. Confronting Passive and Active Sensors with Non-Gaussian Statistics

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Gonzálvez, Pablo.; Garcia-Gago, Jesús.; Gomez-Lahoz, Javier.; González-Aguilera, Diego.

    2014-01-01

    This paper has two motivations: firstly, to compare the Digital Surface Models (DSM) derived by passive (digital camera) and by active (terrestrial laser scanner) remote sensing systems when applied to specific architectural objects, and secondly, to test how well the Gaussian classic statistics, with its Least Squares principle, adapts to data sets where asymmetrical gross errors may appear and whether this approach should be changed for a non-parametric one. The field of geomatic technology automation is immersed in a high demanding competition in which any innovation by one of the contenders immediately challenges the opponents to propose a better improvement. Nowadays, we seem to be witnessing an improvement of terrestrial photogrammetry and its integration with computer vision to overcome the performance limitations of laser scanning methods. Through this contribution some of the issues of this “technological race” are examined from the point of view of photogrammetry. A new software is introduced and an experimental test is designed, performed and assessed to try to cast some light on this thrilling match. For the case considered in this study, the results show good agreement between both sensors, despite considerable asymmetry. This asymmetry suggests that the standard Normal parameters are not adequate to assess this type of data, especially when accuracy is of importance. In this case, standard deviation fails to provide a good estimation of the results, whereas the results obtained for the Median Absolute Deviation and for the Biweight Midvariance are more appropriate measures. PMID:25196104

  3. Achieving Lights-Out Operation of SMAP Using Ground Data System Automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The approach used in the SMAP ground data system to provide reliable, automated capabilities to conduct unattended operations has been presented. The impacts of automation on the ground data system architecture were discussed, including the three major automation patterns identified for SMAP and how these patterns address the operations use cases. The architecture and approaches used by SMAP will set the baseline for future JPL Earth Science missions.

  4. On the identification of representative in situ soil moisture monitoring stations for the validation of SMAP soil moisture products in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Mei Sun; Walker, Jeffrey P.; Monerris, Alessandra; Rüdiger, Christoph; Jackson, Thomas J.

    2016-06-01

    The high spatio-temporal variability of soil moisture complicates the validation of remotely sensed soil moisture products using in situ monitoring stations. Therefore, a standard methodology for selecting the most representative stations for the purpose of validating satellites and land surface models is essential. Based on temporal stability and geostatistical studies using long-term soil moisture records, intensive ground measurements and airborne soil moisture products, this study investigates the representativeness of soil moisture monitoring stations within the Yanco study area for the validation of NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) products at 3 km for radar, 9 km for radar-radiometer and 36 km for radiometer pixels. This resulted in the identification of a number of representative stations according to the different scales. Although the temporal stability method was found to be suitable for identifying representative stations, stations based on the mean relative difference (MRD) were not necessarily the most representative of the areal average. Moreover, those identified from standard deviation of the relative difference (SDRD) may be dry-biased. It was also found that in the presence of heterogeneous land use, stations should be weighted based on proportions of agricultural land. Airborne soil moisture products were also shown to provide useful a priori information for identifying representative locations. Finally, recommendations are made regarding the design of future networks for satellite validation, and specifically the most representative stations for the Yanco area.

  5. Quasi-3DOF Active / Passive Hybrid Rehabilitation System for Upper Limbs: "Hybrid-PLEMO"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Takehito; Furusho, Junji; Jin, Ying; Fukushima, Kazuki; Akai, Hiroki

    Many kinds of actuator-based (active type) haptic device have developed and utilized as rehabilitation robots. These systems have great advantages for rehabilitative activities, for example assistive forces and so on. However, from the view point of safety, we have room to consider utilizing brake-based (passive type) haptic devices as rehabilitation-tools. The effects and roles of active / passive force feedback for rehabilitative trainings have not been clarified yet. In this study, we have developed an active / passive switchable rehabilitation system for upper limbs (Hybrid-PLEMO) to address these questions. In this paper, we describe the force-feedback mechanism of the Hybrid-PLEMO.

  6. Integrated passive/active vibration absorber for multi-story buildings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Glauser, Gina J.; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Horta, Lucas G.

    1995-01-01

    Passive isolator, active vibration absorber, and an integrated passive/active (hybrid) control are studied for their effectiveness in reducing structural vibration under seismic excitations. For the passive isolator, a laminated rubber bearing base isolator which has been studied and used extensively by researchers and seismic designers is considered. An active vibration absorber concept, which can provide guaranteed closed-loop stability with minimum knowledge of the controlled system, is used to reduce the passive isolator displacement and to suppress the top floor vibration. A three-story building model is used for the numerical simulation. The performance of an active vibration absorber and a hybrid vibration controller in reducing peak structural responses is compared with the passively isolated structural response and with absence of vibration control systems under the N00W component of El Centro 1940 and N90W component of the Mexico City earthquake excitation records. The results show that the integrated passive/active vibration control system is most effective in suppressing the peak structural acceleration for the El Centro 1940 earthquake when compared with the passive or active vibration absorber alone. The active vibration absorber, however, is the only system that suppresses the peak acceleration of the structure for the Mexico City 1985 earthquake.

  7. NDA via gamma-ray active and passive computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Decman, D.J.; Martz, H.E.; Roberson, G.P.; Johansson, E.

    1996-10-01

    Gamma-ray-based computed tomography (CT) requires that two different measurements be made on a closed waste container. [MAR92 and ROB94] When the results from these two measurements are combined, it becomes possible to identify and quantify all detectable gamma-ray emitting radioisotopes within a container. All measurements are made in a tomographic manner, i.e., the container is moved sequentially through well- known and accurately reproducible translation, rotation, and elevation positions in order to obtain gamma-ray data that is reconstructed by computer into images that represent waste contents. [ROB94] The two measurements modes are called active (A) and passive (P) CT. In the ACT mode, a collimated gamma-ray source external to the waste container emits multiple, mono-energetic gamma rays that pass through the container and are detected on the opposite side. The attenuated gamma-rays transmitted are measured as a function of both energy and position of the container. Thus, container contents are `mapped` via the measured amount of attenuation suffered at each gamma-ray energy. In effect, a three dimensional (3D) image of gamma- ray attenuation versus waste content is obtained. In the PCT measurement mode, the external radioactive source is shuttered turned- off, and the waste container, is moved through similar positions used for the ACT measurements. However, this time the radiation detectors record any gamma-rays emitted by radioactive sources on the inside of the waste container. Thus, internal radioactive content is mapped or 3D-imaged in the same tomographic manner as the attenuating matrix materials were in the ACT measurement mode.

  8. Active and passive electromagnetic sounding on comets and moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przyklenk, Anita; Auster, Hans-Ulrich

    We want to present the method of electromagnetic sounding on small extraterrestrial bodies to determine interior structures of those. Our sensors are perfectly suited for rover or lander missions, because they do not weight much (sum of all devices is approximately 600g) and can be easily installed at the bottom of a rover or at lander feet. The aim is to measure the material-specific complex resistivity, which depends on the electrical resistivity and electrical permittivity, for various sounding depth. This penetration depth depends on the 2 different operating modes. In the active mode, that is the so called Capacitive Resistivity (CR) method, the sounding depth is around a few meters. The CR is a purely electrical field measurement and works with a 4 electrode array. 2 of them are transmitter electrodes. They inject AC signals with frequencies between 100 Hz and 100 kHz into the subsurface. Then 2 receiver electrodes pick up the generated potentials. And a 4-point impedance can be calculated that depends on the electrical parameters among others [Grard, 1990a and b] [Kuras, 2002]. The second operating mode is the passive one. In the so called magneto telluric method the penetration depth depends on electrical parameters and can be in range of several 100m to km. Here, for excitation natural magnetic field variations are used. The magnetic field components are measured with our Fluxgate Magnetometer (FGM) (flight heritage: Rosetta, Venus Express, Themis,…). Induced electrical field components are measured again with the CR electrode array. Then the electromagnetic impedance can be derived, which depends on electrical resistivity among others. In the end, we want to discuss advantages and disadvantages of investigations during space missions compared to surveys on earth. As examples we have a closer look at the jovian moon Ganymede, the earth moon and the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and consider the applicability of electromagnetic sounding on this objects

  9. Effects of active vs. passive recovery on work performed during serial supramaximal exercise tests.

    PubMed

    Spierer, D K; Goldsmith, R; Baran, D A; Hryniewicz, K; Katz, S D

    2004-02-01

    The current investigation was undertaken to determine the effects of active versus passive recovery on work performance during repeated bouts of supramaximal exercise. Six healthy sedentary subjects and 9 moderately trained healthy hockey players performed serial 30-second Wingate anaerobic power tests (WAnT) on a bicycle ergometer interposed with 4 minutes of active recovery at a work rate corresponding to 28 % of VO(2)max or passive recovery at rest. Peak power, mean power, total work achieved, and fatigue index were calculated for the serial WAnT. Capillary blood lactate was determined at 5-minute intervals after the last WAnT during 30 minutes of active or passive recovery. Mean power was significantly greater during active recovery in sedentary subjects when compared with passive recovery (388 +/- 42 vs. 303 +/- 37 W, p < 0.05), but did not differ according to recovery mode in moderately trained hockey players (589 +/- 22 W active vs. 563 +/- 26 W passive, p = 0.14). Total work achieved significantly increased during active when compared with passive recovery in sedentary subjects (34 890 +/- 3768 vs. 27 260 +/- 3364 J, p < 0.02) and moderately trained hockey players (86 763 +/- 9151 vs. 75 357 +/- 8281 J, p < 0.05). Capillary blood lactate levels did not differ during active when compared with passive recovery in sedentary subjects but were significantly lower during active when compared with passive recovery in moderately trained hockey players. These data demonstrate that active recovery at a work rate corresponding to 28 % of VO(2)max increases total work achieved during repeated WAnT when compared with passive recovery in sedentary subjects and moderately trained hockey players.

  10. Active and passive CT for waste assay using LaBr3(Ce) detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Tushar; More, M. R.; Ratheesh, Jilju; Sinha, Amar

    2017-01-01

    An active and passive computed tomography system has been developed that localizes and quantifies 239Pu in a waste drum. The active (transmission) measurement uses an external gamma source and LaBr3(Ce) detector to determine the attenuation map of waste drum contents at different selected energies. The passive (emission) measurement uses multiple LaBr3(Ce) detectors to record the spectra of gamma-rays emitted from within the drum. The active and passive data sets are then coupled to quantitatively assay drum contents for 239Pu.

  11. The Significance of Turning Passive Into Active in Control Mastery Theory

    PubMed Central

    FOREMAN, STEVEN A.

    1996-01-01

    Turning passive into active was first described by Freud but was later given expanded importance by Weiss. This new conceptualization of turning passive into active as an interpersonal communication and test has made a major contribution to the clinical treatment of difficult patients. This article reviews "control mastery" theory and puts its notion of passive-into-active testing into perspective with regard to Freud’s original conception as well as other conceptions, such as identification with the aggressor and projective identification. Formulation and the treatment of patients are illustrated with clinical examples. PMID:22700271

  12. Comparison between active (pumped) and passive (diffusive) sampling methods for formaldehyde in pathology and histology laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Gyung; Magrm, Rana; Kusti, Mohannad; Kashon, Michael L.; Guffey, Steven; Costas, Michelle M.; Boykin, Carie J.; Harper, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This study was to determine occupational exposures to formaldehyde and to compare concentrations of formaldehyde obtained by active and passive sampling methods. In one pathology and one histology laboratories, exposure measurements were collected with sets of active air samplers (Supelco LpDNPH tubes) and passive badges (ChemDisk Aldehyde Monitor 571). Sixty-six sample pairs (49 personal and 17 area) were collected and analyzed by NIOSH NMAM 2016 for active samples and OSHA Method 1007 (using the manufacturer’s updated uptake rate) for passive samples. All active and passive 8-hour time-weighted average (TWA) measurements showed compliance with the OSHA permissible exposure limit (PEL-0.75 ppm) except for one passive measurement, whereas 78% for the active and 88% for the passive samples exceeded the NIOSH recommended exposure limit (REL-0.016 ppm). Overall, 73% of the passive samples showed higher concentrations than the active samples and a statistical test indicated disagreement between two methods for all data and for data without outliers. The OSHA Method cautions that passive samplers should not be used for sampling situations involving formalin solutions because of low concentration estimates in the presence of reaction products of formaldehyde and methanol (a formalin additive). However, this situation was not observed, perhaps because the formalin solutions used in these laboratories included much less methanol (3%) than those tested in the OSHA Method (up to 15%). The passive samplers in general overestimated concentrations compared to the active method, which is prudent for demonstrating compliance with an occupational exposure limit, but occasional large differences may be a result of collecting aerosolized droplets or splashes on the face of the samplers. In the situations examined in this study the passive sampler generally produces higher results than the active sampler so that a body of results from passive samplers demonstrating compliance with

  13. Regulation of adult cardiocyte growth: effects of active and passive mechanical loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, M. L.; Janes, D. M.; Barclay, M. M.; Harger, L.; Decker, R. S.

    1997-01-01

    Fluctuations in hemodynamic load have been documented to modulate contractile protein turnover and myofibrillar structure in the heart; however, the relative importance of active and passive loading in regulating adult cardiocyte growth remains unresolved. To address this issue at the cellular level, adult feline cardiocytes were cultured either on Silastic membranes or plastic surfaces. Cardiocyte-laden membranes were stretched 10% of their rest length to enhance passive loading, whereas heart cells cultured on plastic or Silastic were field stimulated at 1 Hz to mimic active loading. Turnover of contractile proteins and structural integrity of the contractile-cytoskeletal apparatus were monitored for periods ranging from 4 to 72 h. Active and passive loading elevated contractile protein synthesis nearly equally (approximately 50%) and promoted the attachment of remodeled myofibrils to vinculin-positive focal contacts and/or costameres during the first 24 h of loading. Thereafter, rates of contractile protein synthesis returned to control values in passively stretched heart cells but remained elevated in field-stimulated cultures. The fractional rate of growth was increased significantly (approximately 8%/day) in electrically paced cells, whereas in passively stretched cardiocytes the growth rate rose only modestly (approximately 2%/day). Changes in the rate of myocyte growth appeared more closely correlated with the development of focal contacts and myofibril remodeling than with changes in myofibrillar protein turnover per se. 2,3-Butanedione monoxime, nifedipine, and, to a lesser extent, ryanodine blocked field-stimulated contractile protein synthesis and myofibrillar remodeling but had no impact on protein turnover or myofibril reassembly in passively loaded cardiocytes. The results of these experiments imply that both active and passive loading stimulate contractile protein turnover and myofibril remodeling, but the generation of active tension accelerates

  14. Analytical and Numerical Studies of Active and Passive Microwave Ocean Remote Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-30

    of both analytical and efficient numerical methods for electromagnetics and hydrodynamics. New insights regarding these phenomena can then be applied to improve microwave active and passive remote sensing of the ocean surface.

  15. Active-Passive Microwave Remote Sensing of Martian Permafrost and Subsurface Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raizer, V.; Linkin, V. M.; Ozorovich, Y. R.; Smythe, W. D.; Zoubkov, B.; Babkin, F.

    2000-01-01

    The investigation of permafrost formation global distribution and their appearance in h less than or equal 1 m thick subsurface layer would be investigated successfully by employment of active-passive microwave remote sensing techniques.

  16. Modeling Chemical Detection Sensitivities of Active and Passive Remote Sensing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Scharlemann, E T

    2003-07-28

    During nearly a decade of remote sensing programs under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), LLNL has developed a set of performance modeling codes--called APRS--for both Active and Passive Remote Sensing systems. These codes emphasize chemical detection sensitivity in the form of minimum detectable quantities with and without background spectral clutter and in the possible presence of other interfering chemicals. The codes have been benchmarked against data acquired in both active and passive remote sensing programs at LLNL and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The codes include, as an integral part of the performance modeling, many of the data analysis techniques developed in the DOE's active and passive remote sensing programs (e.g., ''band normalization'' for an active system, principal component analysis for a passive system).

  17. Active and passive multispectral scanner for earth resources applications: An advanced applications flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasell, P. G., Jr.; Peterson, L. M.; Thomson, F. J.; Work, E. A.; Kriegler, F. J.

    1977-01-01

    The development of an experimental airborne multispectral scanner to provide both active (laser illuminated) and passive (solar illuminated) data from a commonly registered surface scene is discussed. The system was constructed according to specifications derived in an initial programs design study. The system was installed in an aircraft and test flown to produce illustrative active and passive multi-spectral imagery. However, data was not collected nor analyzed for any specific application.

  18. Enhanced active aluminum content and thermal behaviour of nano-aluminum particles passivated during synthesis using thermal plasma route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathe, Vikas L.; Varma, Vijay; Raut, Suyog; Nandi, Amiya Kumar; Pant, Arti; Prasanth, Hima; Pandey, R. K.; Bhoraskar, Sudha V.; Das, Asoka K.

    2016-04-01

    Here, we report synthesis and in situ passivation of aluminum nanoparticles using thermal plasma reactor. Both air and palmitc acid passivation was carried out during the synthesis in the thermal plasma reactor. The passivated nanoparticles have been characterized for their structural and morphological properties using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. In order to understand nature of passivation vibrational spectroscopic analysis have been carried out. The enhancement in active aluminum content and shelf life for a palmitic acid passivated nano-aluminum particles in comparison to the air passivated samples and commercially available nano Al powder (ALEX) has been observed. Thermo-gravimetric analysis was used to estimate active aluminum content of all the samples under investigation. In addition cerimetric back titration method was also used to estimate AAC and the shelf life of passivated aluminum particles. Structural, microstructural and thermogravomateric analysis of four year aged passivated sample also depicts effectiveness of palmitic acid passivation.

  19. The influence of active and passive smoking on the cardiorespiratory fitness of adults

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of active and passive smoking on cardiorespiratory responses in asymptomatic adults during a sub-maximal-exertion incremental test. Methods The participants (n = 43) were divided into three different groups: active smokers (n = 14; aged 36.5 ± 8 years), passive smokers (n = 14; aged 34.6 ± 11.9 years) and non-smokers (n = 15; aged 30 ± 8.1 years). They all answered the Test for Nicotine Dependence and underwent anthropometric evaluation, spirometry and ergospirometry according to the Bruce Treadmill Protocol. Results VO2max differed statistically between active and non-smokers groups (p < 0.001) and between non-smokers and passive group (p=0.022). However, there was no difference between the passive and active smokers groups (p=0.053). Negative and significant correlations occurred between VO2max and age (r = - 0.401, p = 0.044), percentage of body fat (r = - 0.429, p = 0.011), and waist circumference (WC) (r = - 0.382, p = 0.025). Conclusion VO2max was significantly higher in non-smokers compared to active smokers and passive smokers. However, the VO2max of passive smokers did not differ from active smokers. PMID:25009739

  20. Active and realistic passive marijuana exposure tested by three immunoassays and GC/MS in urine

    SciTech Connect

    Mule, S.J.; Lomax, P.; Gross, S.J.

    1988-05-01

    Human urine samples obtained before and after active and passive exposure to marijuana were analyzed by immune kits (Roche, Amersham, and Syva) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Seven of eight subjects were positive for the entire five-day test period with one immune kit. The latter correlated with GC/MS in 98% of the samples. Passive inhalation experiments under conditions likely to reflect realistic exposure resulted consistently in less than 10 ng/mL of cannabinoids. The 10-100-ng/mL cannabinoid concentration range essential for detection of occasional and moderate marijuana users is thus unaffected by realistic passive inhalation.

  1. Active and Passive Fatigue in Simulated Driving: Discriminating Styles of Workload Regulation and Their Safety Impacts

    PubMed Central

    Saxby, Dyani J.; Matthews, Gerald; Warm, Joel S.; Hitchcock, Edward M.; Neubauer, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Despite the known dangers of driver fatigue, it is a difficult construct to study empirically. Different forms of task-induced fatigue may differ in their effects on driver performance and safety. Desmond and Hancock (2001) defined active and passive fatigue states that reflect different styles of workload regulation. In 2 driving simulator studies we investigated the multidimensional subjective states and safety outcomes associated with active and passive fatigue. Wind gusts were used to induce active fatigue, and full vehicle automation to induce passive fatigue. Drive duration was independently manipulated to track the development of fatigue states over time. Participants were undergraduate students. Study 1 (N = 108) focused on subjective response and associated cognitive stress processes, while Study 2 (N = 168) tested fatigue effects on vehicle control and alertness. In both studies the 2 fatigue manipulations produced different patterns of subjective response reflecting different styles of workload regulation, appraisal, and coping. Active fatigue was associated with distress, overload, and heightened coping efforts, whereas passive fatigue corresponded to large-magnitude declines in task engagement, cognitive underload, and reduced challenge appraisal. Study 2 showed that only passive fatigue reduced alertness, operationalized as speed of braking and steering responses to an emergency event. Passive fatigue also increased crash probability, but did not affect a measure of vehicle control. Findings support theories that see fatigue as an outcome of strategies for managing workload. The distinction between active and passive fatigue is important for assessment of fatigue and for evaluating automated driving systems which may induce dangerous levels of passive fatigue. PMID:24041288

  2. Early results of the SMAP In Situ Sensor Testbed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2010, an ambitious soil moisture sensor intercomparison study was begun in Marena, Oklahoma. This effort is designed to serve as a foundation for incorporating diverse soil moisture networks into the Soil Moisture Active Passive Calibration and Validation program Using technology which is curr...

  3. Pre-launch Research to Integrate NASA SMAP Soil Moisture and Freeze/Thaw State Products in Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, S. M.; Bilair, S.; Isaksen, L.; de Rosnay, P.; Zhan, X.; Ghedira, H.; Yang, Z.; Mueller, R.; Ines, A. M.; Zebiak, S. E.; Champagne, C.; Brown, M.; Escobar, V.; Weiss, B.

    2011-12-01

    The SMAP Mission is currently planned for launch in late 2014 to provide global measurements of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state. For mission planning, a Testbed Facility is in place to test software that will be used to automatically generate the science data products once SMAP is in orbit. Early distribution of a subset of these testbed data products and calibration/validation data sets to SMAP "Early Adopters" has enabled pre-launch applications research. Early Adopters are those groups who have a direct need for SMAP-like soil moisture or freeze/thaw data, and who are planning to apply their own resources to demonstrate the utility of SMAP data for their particular system or model. A set of 7 SMAP Early Adopters were selected in March 2011, with applications including weather forecasts, food security and mapping dust emissions [http://smap.jpl.nasa.gov/files/smap2/adopter1.pdf]. Research projects will be completed with quantitative metrics prior to the launch of SMAP. The feedback from these projects is providing a fundamental understanding of how SMAP data products can be scaled and integrated into hydrologic applications to improve decision-making. A second round of selections for SMAP Early Adopters is planned for February 2012.

  4. Passive and active processes in visuo-spatial memory: double dissociation in developmental learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Cornoldi, C; Rigoni, F; Venneri, A; Vecchi, T

    2000-01-01

    The distinction between passive and active visuo-spatial memory has been useful to interpret various pattern of deficits reported in individual differences studies. However, this interpretation raises the issue of task difficulty, since active tasks could be failed simply because more complex and the corresponding deficit could reflect a reduced capacity of the system. We describe two children with Nonverbal Learning Disability whose performance provides evidence of a dissociation between passive and active memory processes. One of the children showed a selective impairment in passive tasks and performed flawlessly in active tasks, whereas the second child displayed the opposite pattern. These data suggest that a qualitative difference between passive and active processes does exist and that differences in performance do not reflect a lower/higher level of task difficulty. Further, these data underlie the importance of formulating theoretical models of visuo-spatial memory including both material-related (i.e., visual vs spatial) and process-related (i.e., passive vs active) distinctions.

  5. Active-passive gradient shielding for MRI acoustic noise reduction.

    PubMed

    Edelstein, William A; Kidane, Tesfaye K; Taracila, Victor; Baig, Tanvir N; Eagan, Timothy P; Cheng, Yu-Chung N; Brown, Robert W; Mallick, John A

    2005-05-01

    An important source of MRI acoustic noise-magnet cryostat warm-bore vibrations caused by eddy-current-induced forces-can be mitigated by a passive metal shield mounted on the outside of a vibration-isolated, vacuum-enclosed shielded gradient set. Finite-element (FE) calculations for a z-gradient indicate that a 2-mm-thick Cu layer wrapped on the gradient assembly can decrease mechanical power deposition in the warm bore and reduce warm-bore acoustic noise production by about 25 dB. Eliminating the conducting warm bore and other magnet parts as significant acoustic noise sources could lead to the development of truly quiet, fully functioning MRI systems with noise levels below 70 dB.

  6. Use of reference chemicals to determine passive uptake rates of common indoor air VOCs by collocation deployment of active and passive samplers.

    PubMed

    Xian, Qiming; Feng, Yong-Lai; Chan, Cecilia C; Zhu, Jiping

    2011-09-01

    Passive samplers have become more popular in their application in the measurement of airborne chemicals. For volatile organic compounds, the rate of a chemical's diffusivity is a determining factor in the quantity of the chemical being collected for a given passive sampler. While uptake rate of a chemical in the passive sampler can be determined either by collocation deployment of both active and passive samplers or use of controlled facilities such as environmental chambers, a new approach without a need for accurate active flow rate in the collocation experiment was demonstrated in this study. This approach uses chemicals of known uptake rates as references to calculate the actual flow rate of the active sampling in the collocation experiment. The active sampling rate in turn can be used in the determination of the uptake rates of all other chemicals present in the passive samplers. The advantage of such approach is the elimination of the errors in actual active sampling rate associated with low flow employed in the collocation experiment. Using this approach, passive uptake rates of more than 80 volatile organic compounds commonly present in indoor air were determined. These experimentally determined uptake rates correlate well with air diffusivity of the chemicals, indicating the regression equation describing such correlation might be useful in predicting the uptake rates of other volatile organic chemicals in indoor air based on their air diffusivity.

  7. Active-passive integrated vibration control for control moment gyros and its application to satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yao; Zang, Yue; Li, Mou; Wang, Youyi; Li, Wenbo

    2017-04-01

    The strategy of active-passive integrated vibration control on the truss enveloping control moment gyroscopes (CMGs) is presented and its characteristics of time domain and frequency domain are analyzed. Truss enveloping CMGs contains pyramid-type CMGs, which are enveloped by multiple struts. These struts can be employed to realize the active-passive integrated vibration control. In addition, the struts of the trusses can maintain the working space of CMGs. Firstly, the disturbance characteristics of CMGs are analyzed considering static and dynamic imbalances of the CMG's rotor; then, an active-passive integrated vibration isolation truss structure is developed based on its characteristics. This structure can restrain the CMG vibration as much as possible and reduce its influence on the photographic quality of optical payloads. Next, the dynamic model of the active-passive vibration isolation truss structure is established. The frequency domain analysis of this model shows that the active-passive integrated vibration control method can restrain the high-frequency vibration and also improve the characteristics of low-frequency vibration. Finally, the dynamic model for the whole satellite is built with this type of CMGs. The time domain simulations of satellite attitude control verify the attitude control improvements resulting from the CMGs vibration control strategy.

  8. Active and passive imaging of clothes in the NIR and SWIR regions for reflectivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Grönwall, Christina; Steinvall, Ove; Göhler, Benjamin; Hamoir, Dominique

    2016-07-10

    We perform statistical analysis of data from active and passive imaging sensors in the near infrared (NIR) and short wavelength infrared (SWIR) wavelength bands. The data were obtained from measurements performed on clothing in a field campaign and in the laboratory. We show that reflectivity data from active imaging can be fitted to Gaussian functions, although earlier theory proposes gamma-gamma functions. We analyze the reflectivity data collected during the field campaign and compare that data with data obtained in the laboratory. We focus on the added value of active imaging when combined with passive imaging to distinguish different clothes for friend/foe identification.

  9. High and dry? Comparing active dry EEG electrodes to active and passive wet electrodes.

    PubMed

    Mathewson, Kyle E; Harrison, Tyler J L; Kizuk, Sayeed A D

    2017-01-01

    Dry electrodes are becoming popular for both lab-based and consumer-level electrophysiological-recording technologies because they better afford the ability to move traditional lab-based research into the real world. It is unclear, however, how dry electrodes compare in data quality to traditional electrodes. The current study compared three EEG electrode types: (a) passive-wet electrodes with no onboard amplification, (b) actively amplified, wet electrodes with moderate impedance levels, and low impedance levels, and (c) active-dry electrodes with very high impedance. Participants completed a classic P3 auditory oddball task to elicit characteristic EEG signatures and event-related potentials (ERPs). Across the three electrode types, we compared single-trial noise, average ERPs, scalp topographies, ERP noise, and ERP statistical power as a function of number of trials. We extended past work showing active electrodes' insensitivity to moderate levels of interelectrode impedance when compared to passive electrodes in the same amplifier. Importantly, the new dry electrode system could reliably measure EEG spectra and ERP components comparable to traditional electrode types. As expected, however, dry active electrodes with very high interelectrode impedance exhibited marked increases in single-trial and average noise levels, which decreased statistical power, requiring more trials to detect significant effects. This power decrease must be considered as a trade-off with the ease of application and long-term use. The current results help set constraints on experimental design with novel dry electrodes, and provide important evidence needed to measure brain activity in novel settings and situations.

  10. Elasticity-induced force reversal between active spinning particles in dense passive media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragones, J. L.; Steimel, J. P.; Alexander-Katz, A.

    2016-04-01

    The self-organization of active particles is governed by their dynamic effective interactions. Such interactions are controlled by the medium in which such active agents reside. Here we study the interactions between active agents in a dense non-active medium. Our system consists of actuated, spinning, active particles embedded in a dense monolayer of passive, or non-active, particles. We demonstrate that the presence of the passive monolayer alters markedly the properties of the system and results in a reversal of the forces between active spinning particles from repulsive to attractive. The origin of such reversal is due to the coupling between the active stresses and elasticity of the system. This discovery provides a mechanism for the interaction between active agents in complex and structured media, opening up opportunities to tune the interaction range and directionality via the mechanical properties of the medium.

  11. Elasticity-induced force reversal between active spinning particles in dense passive media

    PubMed Central

    Aragones, J. L.; Steimel, J. P.; Alexander-Katz, A.

    2016-01-01

    The self-organization of active particles is governed by their dynamic effective interactions. Such interactions are controlled by the medium in which such active agents reside. Here we study the interactions between active agents in a dense non-active medium. Our system consists of actuated, spinning, active particles embedded in a dense monolayer of passive, or non-active, particles. We demonstrate that the presence of the passive monolayer alters markedly the properties of the system and results in a reversal of the forces between active spinning particles from repulsive to attractive. The origin of such reversal is due to the coupling between the active stresses and elasticity of the system. This discovery provides a mechanism for the interaction between active agents in complex and structured media, opening up opportunities to tune the interaction range and directionality via the mechanical properties of the medium. PMID:27112961

  12. Active and Passive Spatial Learning in Human Navigation: Acquisition of Graph Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chrastil, Elizabeth R.; Warren, William H.

    2015-01-01

    It is known that active exploration of a new environment leads to better spatial learning than does passive visual exposure. We ask whether specific components of active learning differentially contribute to particular forms of spatial knowledge--the "exploration-specific learning hypothesis". Previously, we found that idiothetic…

  13. Active/Passive Remote Sensing of the Ocean Surface at Microwave Frequencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-30

    This report summarizes research activities and results obtained under grant N000l4-99-1-0627 "Active/Passive Remote Sensing of the Ocean Surface at...Measurements were completed during April 1999 by the Microwave Remote Sensing Laboratory at the University of Massachusetts.

  14. Active and Passive Spatial Learning in Human Navigation: Acquisition of Survey Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chrastil, Elizabeth R.; Warren, William H.

    2013-01-01

    It seems intuitively obvious that active exploration of a new environment would lead to better spatial learning than would passive visual exposure. It is unclear, however, which components of active learning contribute to spatial knowledge, and previous literature is decidedly mixed. This experiment tests the contributions of 4 components to…

  15. Anisotropic Elastography for Local Passive Properties and Active Contractility of Myocardium from Dynamic Heart Imaging Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ge; Sun, L. Z.

    2006-01-01

    Major heart diseases such as ischemia and hypertrophic myocardiopathy are accompanied with significant changes in the passive mechanical properties and active contractility of myocardium. Identification of these changes helps diagnose heart diseases, monitor therapy, and design surgery. A dynamic cardiac elastography (DCE) framework is developed to assess the anisotropic viscoelastic passive properties and active contractility of myocardial tissues, based on the chamber pressure and dynamic displacement measured with cardiac imaging techniques. A dynamic adjoint method is derived to enhance the numerical efficiency and stability of DCE. Model-based simulations are conducted using a numerical left ventricle (LV) phantom with an ischemic region. The passive material parameters of normal and ischemic tissues are identified during LV rapid/reduced filling and artery contraction, and those of active contractility are quantified during isovolumetric contraction and rapid/reduced ejection. It is found that quasistatic simplification in the previous cardiac elastography studies may yield inaccurate material parameters. PMID:23165032

  16. Is there an omission effect in prosocial behavior? A laboratory experiment on passive vs. active generosity.

    PubMed

    Gärtner, Manja; Sandberg, Anna

    2017-01-01

    We investigate whether individuals are more prone to act selfishly if they can passively allow for an outcome to be implemented (omission) rather than having to make an active choice (commission). In most settings, active and passive choice alternatives differ in terms of factors such as the presence of a suggested option, costs of taking an action, and awareness. We isolate the omission effect from confounding factors in three experiments, and find no evidence that the distinction between active and passive choices has an independent effect on the propensity to implement selfish outcomes. This suggests that increased selfishness through omission, as observed in various economic choice situations, is driven by other factors than a preference for selfish omissions.

  17. The cognitive-behavioral system of leadership: cognitive antecedents of active and passive leadership behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Dóci, Edina; Stouten, Jeroen; Hofmans, Joeri

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, we propose a cognitive-behavioral understanding of active and passive leadership. Building on core evaluations theory, we offer a model that explains the emergence of leaders’ active and passive behaviors, thereby predicting stable, inter-individual, as well as variable, intra-individual differences in both types of leadership behavior. We explain leaders’ stable behavioral tendencies by their fundamental beliefs about themselves, others, and the world (core evaluations), while their variable, momentary behaviors are explained by the leaders’ momentary appraisals of themselves, others, and the world (specific evaluations). By introducing interactions between the situation the leader enters, the leader’s beliefs, appraisals, and behavior, we propose a comprehensive system of cognitive mechanisms that underlie active and passive leadership behavior. PMID:26441721

  18. Anisotropic elastography for local passive properties and active contractility of myocardium from dynamic heart imaging sequence.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Wang, Ge; Sun, L Z

    2006-01-01

    Major heart diseases such as ischemia and hypertrophic myocardiopathy are accompanied with significant changes in the passive mechanical properties and active contractility of myocardium. Identification of these changes helps diagnose heart diseases, monitor therapy, and design surgery. A dynamic cardiac elastography (DCE) framework is developed to assess the anisotropic viscoelastic passive properties and active contractility of myocardial tissues, based on the chamber pressure and dynamic displacement measured with cardiac imaging techniques. A dynamic adjoint method is derived to enhance the numerical efficiency and stability of DCE. Model-based simulations are conducted using a numerical left ventricle (LV) phantom with an ischemic region. The passive material parameters of normal and ischemic tissues are identified during LV rapid/reduced filling and artery contraction, and those of active contractility are quantified during isovolumetric contraction and rapid/reduced ejection. It is found that quasistatic simplification in the previous cardiac elastography studies may yield inaccurate material parameters.

  19. A Superradiant Raman Laser as a Hybrid Active/Passive Atomic Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnet, Justin; Weiner, Joshua; Cox, Kevin; Chen, Zilong; Thompson, James

    2013-05-01

    We have realized an atomic sensor that combines active, wideband sensing with passive measurement periods using dynamic control of a cold-atom, superradiant Raman laser. In a superradiant laser, collective emission of the atomic ensemble maps the quantum phase stored in the atoms onto the detected cavity field. We discuss the fundamental precision of the superradiant mapping and show theoretically that the precision of the non-demolition measurement is only a factor of two worse than the standard quantum limit on phase estimation for a coherent spin state. Using the superradiant readout, we experimentally demonstrate a repeated, non-demolition conditional Ramsey sequence that has the potential to combine the benefit of a high-bandwidth active frequency reference with a high-accuracy passive device. We also present an experimental realization of a superradiant Raman laser operated as a hybrid active/passive atomic magnetometer.

  20. SMAP/SMOS Soil moisture brightness temperature virtual observations to study data assimilation scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saavedra, P.; Simmer, C.

    2015-12-01

    A multidisciplinary research unit has been established in order to develop a data assimilation framework for coupled subsurface-land surface-atmosphere systems (SLASs), i.e. the coupled suit of models TerrSysMP comprised by ParFlow (subsurface), Community Land Model (CLM, surface), and COSMO (atmosphere). It aims to test how different kinds of observations may improve system state estimations with a focus on inter-compartmental fluxes of matter and heat energy. To that goal a simulated virtual reality (VR) catchment is being generated as a tool to test data assimilation schemes for SLAS. The virtual reality overcomes the problem of data scarcity for the different components as subsurface, soil and atmosphere in the real world and provides the full system state as a basis for the evaluation of the effectiveness of data assimilation strategies. The first version of the VR uses TerrSysMP - reduced to COSMO and CLM - to generate virtual observations such as satellite measurements, radar observations and meteorological station data. Currently VR simulations are available for a region encompassing the Neckar catchment located in south-west Germany with 1.1km horizontal resolution for the time period from 2007 to 2013. This contribution focuses on the evaluation of satellite observations of the microwave emission at L-band as observed by the current satellite missions SMAP and SMOS. By adjusting the Community Microwave Emission Model (CMEM) as a forward operator for the VR framework, a first set of virtual passive microwave observations is generated. SMAP and SMOS observations are simulated taking into account orbit characteristics, revisit times, and angular viewing geometries. The virtual observations will be statistically compared with available real observations to evaluate the degree of reality in terms of mean values and dynamic ranges. These comparisons will hint to systematic differences between TerrSysMP and reality, which need to be addressed by appropriate bias

  1. 3D shoulder kinematics for static vs dynamic and passive vs active testing conditions.

    PubMed

    Robert-Lachaine, Xavier; Allard, Paul; Godbout, Véronique; Begon, Mickael

    2015-09-18

    Shoulder motion analysis provides clinicians with references of normal joint rotations. Shoulder joints orientations assessment is often based on series of static positions, while clinicians perform either passive or active tests and exercises mostly in dynamic. These conditions of motion could modify joint coordination and lead to discrepancies with the established references. Hence, the objective was to evaluate the influence of static vs dynamic and passive vs active testing conditions on shoulder joints orientations. Twenty asymptomatic subjects setup with 45 markers on the upper limb and trunk were tracked by an optoelectronic system. Static positions (30°, 60°, 90° and 120° of thoracohumeral elevation) and dynamic motion both in active condition and passively mobilised by an examiner were executed. Three-dimensional sternoclavicular, acromioclavicular, scapulothoracic and glenohumeral joint angles (12 in total) representing the distal segment orientation relative to the proximal segment orientation were estimated using a shoulder kinematical chain model. Separate four-way repeated measures ANOVA were applied on the 12 joint angles with factors of static vs dynamic, passive vs active, thoracohumeral elevation angle (30°, 60°, 90° and 120°) and plane of elevation (frontal and sagittal). Scapulothoracic lateral rotation progressed more during arm elevation in static than in dynamic gaining 4.2° more, and also in passive than in active by 6.6°. Glenohumeral elevation increased more during arm elevation in active than in passive by 4.4°. Shoulder joints orientations are affected by the testing conditions, which should be taken into consideration for data acquisition, inter-study comparison or clinical applications.

  2. Effect of passive and active recovery on the resynthesis of muscle glycogen.

    PubMed

    Choi, D; Cole, K J; Goodpaster, B H; Fink, W J; Costill, D L

    1994-08-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of passive and active recovery on the resynthesis of muscle glycogen after high-intensity cycle ergometer exercise in untrained subjects. In a cross-over design, six college-aged males performed three, 1-min exercise bouts at approximately 130% VO2max with a 4-min rest period between each work bout. The exercise protocol for each trial was identical, while the recovery following exercise was either active (30 min at 40-50% VO2max, 30-min seated rest) or passive (60-min seated rest). Initial muscle glycogen values averaged 144.2 +/- 3.8 mmol.kg-1 w.w. for the active trial and 158.7 +/- 8.0 mmol.kg-1 w.w. for the passive trial. Corresponding immediate postexercise glycogen contents were 97.7 +/- 5.4 and 106.8 +/- 4.7 mmol.kg-1 w.w., respectively. These differences between treatments were not significant. However, mean muscle glycogen after 60 min of passive recovery increased 15.0 +/- 4.9 mmol.kg-1 w.w., whereas it decreased 6.3 +/- 3.7 mmol.kg-1 w.w. following the 60 min active recovery protocol (P < 0.05). Also, the decrease in blood lactate concentration during active recovery was greater than during passive recovery and significantly different at 10 and 30 min of the recovery period (P < 0.05). These data suggest that the use of passive recovery following intense exercise results in a greater amount of muscle glycogen resynthesis than active recovery over the same duration.

  3. Plant chlorophyll fluorescence: active and passive measurements at canopy and leaf scales with different nitrogen treatments

    PubMed Central

    Cendrero-Mateo, M. Pilar; Moran, M. Susan; Papuga, Shirley A.; Thorp, K.R.; Alonso, L.; Moreno, J.; Ponce-Campos, G.; Rascher, U.; Wang, G.

    2016-01-01

    Most studies assessing chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) have examined leaf responses to environmental stress conditions using active techniques. Alternatively, passive techniques are able to measure ChlF at both leaf and canopy scales. However, the measurement principles of both techniques are different, and only a few datasets concerning the relationships between them are reported in the literature. In this study, we investigated the potential for interchanging ChlF measurements using active techniques with passive measurements at different temporal and spatial scales. The ultimate objective was to determine the limits within which active and passive techniques are comparable. The results presented in this study showed that active and passive measurements were highly correlated over the growing season across nitrogen treatments at both canopy and leaf-average scale. At the single-leaf scale, the seasonal relation between techniques was weaker, but still significant. The variability within single-leaf measurements was largely related to leaf heterogeneity associated with variations in CO2 assimilation and stomatal conductance, and less so to variations in leaf chlorophyll content, leaf size or measurement inputs (e.g. light reflected and emitted by the leaf and illumination conditions and leaf spectrum). This uncertainty was exacerbated when single-leaf analysis was limited to a particular day rather than the entire season. We concluded that daily measurements of active and passive ChlF at the single-leaf scale are not comparable. However, canopy and leaf-average active measurements can be used to better understand the daily and seasonal behaviour of passive ChlF measurements. In turn, this can be used to better estimate plant photosynthetic capacity and therefore to provide improved information for crop management. PMID:26482242

  4. Vaginal cone use in passive and active phases in patients with stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Jorge Milhem; Ribeiro, Ricardo Muniz; Bernardo, Wanderley Marques; Abrão, Maurício Simões; Baracat, Edmund Chada

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate vaginal cone therapy in two phases, passive and active, in women with stress urinary incontinence. METHODS: A prospective study was conducted at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, São Paulo University, Brazil. Twenty-four women with a clinical and urodynamic diagnosis of stress urinary incontinence were treated with vaginal cones in a passive phase (without voluntary contractions of the pelvic floor) and an active phase (with voluntary contractions), each of which lasted three months. Clinical complaints, a functional evaluation of the pelvic floor, a pad test, and bladder neck mobility were analyzed before and after each phase. RESULTS: Twenty-one patients completed the treatment. The reduction in absolute risk with the pad test was 0.38 (p<0.034) at the end of the passive phase and 0.67 (p<0.0001) at the end of the active phase. The reduction in absolute risk with the pelvic floor evaluation was 0.62 (p<0.0001) at the end of the passive phase and 0.77 (p<0.0001) at the end of the active phase. The reduction in absolute risk of bladder neck mobility was 0.38 (p<0.0089) at the end of the passive phase and 0.52 (p<0.0005) at the end of the active phase. Complete reversal of symptomatology was observed in 12 (57.1%) patients, and satisfaction was expressed by 19 (90.4%). CONCLUSION: Using vaginal cones in the passive phase, as other researchers did, was effective. Inclusion of the active phase led to additional improvement in all of the study parameters evaluated in women with stress urinary incontinence. Randomized studies are needed, however, to confirm these results. PMID:21789381

  5. Data Management System Reuse for Visualization of JPL's SMAP Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alarcon, C.; Huang, T.; Roberts, J. T.; Rodriguez, J. D.; Quach, N. T.; De Cesare, C.; Hall, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    The Imagery Exchange (TIE) is a scalable and efficient imagery data management system that powers the WMS web server OnEarth. Designed and developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), TIE's primary purpose was to power the NASA's Global Imagery Browse Services (GIBS), a system that provides full resolution imagery from a broad set of Earth science disciplines to the public. The SMAP project at JPL had just about all of its requirements met with GIBS but required very project-specific behavior and automation for the Cal-Val phase of the project. Thanks to the extendable design of TIE (already an extension of JPL's Horizon framework) and Amazon's GovCloud services, we were able to meet the needs of the project without any rewrite of the system while significantly expanding the capabilities of an already robust system through well modularized feature additions. In this presentation, we will talk about the efforts made to re-use the already developed data system TIE for SMAP with minimal turn around. Leveraging cloud resources and standard interfaces, we were able to satisfy new project requirements in a very short amount of time.

  6. The auditory P3 from passive and active three-stimulus oddball paradigm.

    PubMed

    Wronka, Eligiusz; Kaiser, Jan; Coenen, Anton M L

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was the comparison of basic characteristics of the P3 subcomponents elicited in passive and active versions of the auditory oddball paradigm. A 3-stimulus oddball paradigm was employed in which subjects were presented with random sequence of tones while they performed a discrimination task in visual modality with no response to the tone (passive task) or responded to an infrequently occurring target stimulus inserted into sequence of frequent standard and rare non-target stimuli (active task). Results show that the magnitude of the frontal P3 response is determined by the relative perceptual distinctiveness among stimuli. The amplitude of frontal component is larger for the stimuli more deviated from the standard in both passive and active tasks. In all cases however, a maximum over central or fronto-central scalp regions was demonstrated. Moreover, amplitude of this component was influenced by the strength of attentional focus--a significantly larger response was obtained in the active session than in its passive counterpart. The apparent parietal P3 responses were obtained only in the active condition. The amplitude of this component is larger for the target than the non-target across all electrode sites, but both demonstrated a parietal maxima. This findings suggest that generation of early frontal P3 could be related to alerting activity of frontal cortex irrespective of stimulus context, while generation of later parietal P3 is related to temporo-parietal network activated when neuronal model of perceived stimulation and attentional trace are comparing.

  7. Optimization of Passive and Active Non-Linear Vibration Mounting Systems Based on Vibratory Power Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royston, T. J.; Singh, R.

    1996-07-01

    While significant non-linear behavior has been observed in many vibration mounting applications, most design studies are typically based on the concept of linear system theory in terms of force or motion transmissibility. In this paper, an improved analytical strategy is presented for the design optimization of complex, active of passive, non-linear mounting systems. This strategy is built upon the computational Galerkin method of weighted residuals, and incorporates order reduction and numerical continuation in an iterative optimization scheme. The overall dynamic characteristics of the mounting system are considered and vibratory power transmission is minimized via adjustment of mount parameters by using both passive and active means. The method is first applied through a computational example case to the optimization of basic passive and active, non-linear isolation configurations. It is found that either active control or intentionally introduced non-linearity can improve the mount's performance; but a combination of both produces the greatest benefit. Next, a novel experimental, active, non-linear isolation system is studied. The effect of non-linearity on vibratory power transmission and active control are assessed via experimental measurements and the enhanced Galerkin method. Results show how harmonic excitation can result in multiharmonic vibratory power transmission. The proposed optimization strategy offers designers some flexibility in utilizing both passive and active means in combination with linear and non-linear components for improved vibration mounts.

  8. The surface geometry of inherited joint and fracture trace patterns resulting from active and passive deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podwysocki, M. H.; Gold, D. P.

    1974-01-01

    Hypothetical models are considered for detecting subsurface structure from the fracture or joint pattern, which may be influenced by the structure and propagated to the surface. Various patterns of an initially orthogonal fracture grid are modeled according to active and passive deformation mechanisms. In the active periclinal structure with a vertical axis, fracture frequency increased both over the dome and basin, and remained constant with decreasing depth to the structure. For passive periclinal features such as a reef or sand body, fracture frequency is determined by the arc of curvature and showed a reduction over the reefmound and increased over the basin.

  9. Passive and active plasma deceleration for the compact disposal of electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Bonatto, A.; Schroeder, C. B.; Vay, J.-L.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2015-08-15

    Plasma-based decelerating schemes are investigated as compact alternatives for the disposal of high-energy beams (beam dumps). Analytical solutions for the energy loss of electron beams propagating in passive and active (laser-driven) schemes are derived. These solutions, along with numerical modeling, are used to investigate the evolution of the electron distribution, including energy chirp and total beam energy. In the active beam dump scheme, a laser-driver allows a more homogeneous beam energy extraction and drastically reduces the energy chirp observed in the passive scheme. These concepts could benefit applications requiring overall compactness, such as transportable light sources, or facilities operating at high beam power.

  10. Active-passive hybrid piezoelectric actuators for high-precision hard disk drive servo systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kwong Wah; Liao, Wei-Hsin

    2006-03-01

    Positioning precision is crucial to today's increasingly high-speed, high-capacity, high data density, and miniaturized hard disk drives (HDDs). The demand for higher bandwidth servo systems that can quickly and precisely position the read/write head on a high track density becomes more pressing. Recently, the idea of applying dual-stage actuators to track servo systems has been studied. The push-pull piezoelectric actuated devices have been developed as micro actuators for fine and fast positioning, while the voice coil motor functions as a large but coarse seeking. However, the current dual-stage actuator design uses piezoelectric patches only without passive damping. In this paper, we propose a dual-stage servo system using enhanced active-passive hybrid piezoelectric actuators. The proposed actuators will improve the existing dual-stage actuators for higher precision and shock resistance, due to the incorporation of passive damping in the design. We aim to develop this hybrid servo system not only to increase speed of track seeking but also to improve precision of track following servos in HDDs. New piezoelectrically actuated suspensions with passive damping have been designed and fabricated. In order to evaluate positioning and track following performances for the dual-stage track servo systems, experimental efforts are carried out to implement the synthesized active-passive suspension structure with enhanced piezoelectric actuators using a composite nonlinear feedback controller.

  11. Biceps femoris and semitendinosus tendon/aponeurosis strain during passive and active (isometric) conditions.

    PubMed

    Kellis, Eleftherios

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify strain and elongation of the long head of the biceps femoris (BFlh) and the semitendinosus (ST) tendon/aponeurosis. Forty participants performed passive knee extension trials from 90° of knee flexion to full extension (0°) followed by ramp isometric contractions of the knee flexors at 0°, 45° and 90° of knee flexion. Two ultrasound probes were used to visualize the displacement of BFlh and ST tendon/aponeurosis. Three-way analysis of variance designs indicated that: (a) Tendon/aponeurosis (passive) elongation and strain were higher for the BFlh than the ST as the knee was passively extended (p<0.05), (b) contraction at each angular position was accompanied by a smaller BFlh tendon/aponeurosis (active) strain and elongation than the ST at higher levels of effort (p<0.05) and (c) combined (passive and active) strain was significantly higher for the BFlh than ST during ramp contraction at 0° but the opposite was observed for the 45° and 90° flexion angle tests (p<0.05). Passive elongation of tendon/aponeurosis has an important effect on the tendon/aponeurosis behavior of the hamstrings and may contribute to a different loading of muscle fibers and tendinous tissue between BFlh and ST.

  12. A Comparison of Active and Passive Methods for Control of Hypersonic Boundary Layers on Airbreathing Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Nowak, Robert J.

    2003-01-01

    Active and passive methods for control of hypersonic boundary layers have been experimentally examined in NASA Langley Research Center wind tunnels on a Hyper-X model. Several configurations for forcing transition using passive discrete roughness elements and active mass addition, or blowing, methods were compared in two hypersonic facilities, the 20-Inch Mach 6 Air and the 31-Inch Mach 10 Air tunnels. Heat transfer distributions, obtained via phosphor thermography, shock system details, and surface streamline patterns were measured on a 0.333-scale model of the Hyper-X forebody. The comparisons between the active and passive methods for boundary layer control were conducted at test conditions that nearly match the nominal Mach 7 flight trajectory of an angle-of-attack of 2-deg and length Reynolds number of 5.6 million. For the passive roughness examination, the primary parametric variation was a range of trip heights within the calculated boundary layer thickness for several trip concepts. The prior passive roughness study resulted in a swept ramp configuration being selected for the Mach 7 flight vehicle that was scaled to be roughly 0.6 of the calculated boundary layer thickness. For the active jet blowing study, the blowing manifold pressure was systematically varied for each configuration, while monitoring the mass flow, to determine the jet penetration height with schlieren and transition movement with the phosphor system for comparison to the passive results. All the blowing concepts tested were adequate for providing transition onset near the trip location with manifold stagnation pressures on the order of 40 times the model static pressure or higher.

  13. Performance of active and passive control of an airfoil using CPFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asselin, Daniel; Young, Jay; Williamson, C. H. K.

    2016-11-01

    Birds and fish employ flapping motions of their wings and fins in order to produce thrust and maneuver in flight and underwater. There is considerable interest in designing aerial and submersible systems that mimic these motions for the purposes of surveillance, environmental monitoring, and search and rescue, among other applications. Flapping motions are typically composed of combined pitch and heave and can provide good thrust and efficiency (Read, et al. 2003). In this study, we examine the performance of an airfoil actuated only in the heave direction. Using a cyber-physical fluid dynamics system (Mackowski & Williamson 2011, 2015, 2016), we simulate the presence of a torsion spring to enable the airfoil to undergo a passively controlled pitching motion. The addition of passive pitching combined with active heaving ("Active-Passive" or AP) provides significantly improved thrust and efficiency compared with heaving alone. In many cases, values of thrust and efficiency are comparable to or better than those obtained with two actively controlled degrees of freedom ("Active-Active" or AA). By using carefully-designed passive dynamics in the pitch direction, we can eliminate one of the two actuators, saving cost, complexity, and weight, while maintaining or improving performance. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research Grant No. FA9550-15-1-0243, monitored by Dr. Douglas Smith.

  14. Active and passive computed tomography algorithm with a constrained conjugate gradient solution

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, D.; Jackson, J. A.; Martz, H. E.; Roberson, G. P.

    1998-10-01

    An active and passive computed tomographic technique (A&PCT) has been developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The technique uses an external radioactive source and active tomography to map the attenuation within a waste drum as a function of mono-energetic gamma-ray energy. Passive tomography is used to localize and identify specific radioactive waste within the same container. The passive data is corrected for attenuation using the active data and this yields a quantitative assay of drum activity. A&PCT involves the development of a detailed system model that combines the data from the active scans with the geometry of the imaging system. Using the system model, iterative optimization techniques are used to reconstruct the image from the passive data. Requirements for high throughput yield measured emission levels in waste barrels that are too low to apply optimization techniques involving the usual Gaussian statistics. In this situation a Poisson distribution, typically used for cases with low counting statistics, is used to create an effective maximum likelihood estimation function. An optimization algorithm, Constrained Conjugate Gradient (CCG), is used to determine a solution for A&PCT quantitative assay. CCG, which was developed at LLNL, has proven to be an efficient and effective optimization method to solve limited-data problems. A detailed explanation of the algorithms used in developing the model and optimization codes is given.

  15. Passive and Active Protective Clothing against High-Power Laser Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennigs, C.; Hustedt, M.; Kaierle, S.; Wenzel, D.; Markstein, S.; Hutter, A.

    The main objective of the work described in this paper was the development of passive and active protective clothing for the protection of the human skin against accidental laser irradiation and of active protective curtains. Here, the passive systems consist of functional multi-layer textiles, providing a high level of passive laser resistance. In addition, the active functional multi-layer textiles incorporate sensors that detect laser exposure and are, by means of a safety control, able to deactivate the laser beam automatically.Due to the lack of regulations for testing and qualifying textiles to be used as laser PPE, test methods were defined and validated. Additionally, corresponding testing set-ups were developed.Finally, the gap with respect to standardization was bridged by the definition of a test procedure and the requirements with respect to laser PPE.The developments were demonstrated by a set of tailored functional passive and active laser-protective clothing prototypes (gloves, jackets, aprons, trousers) and active curtains as well as by a prototype testing rig, providing the possibility to perform the specified low-power and high-power textile test procedure.

  16. Re-active Passive (RAP) Devices for Control of Noise Transmission through a Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carneal, James P.; Giovanardi, Marco; Fuller, Chris R.; Palumbo, Daniel L.

    2008-01-01

    Re-Active Passive (RAP) devices have been developed to control low frequency (<1000 Hz) noise transmission through a panel. These devices use a combination of active, re-active, and passive technologies packaged into a single unit to control a broad frequency range utilizing the strength of each technology over its best suited frequency range. The RAP device uses passive constrained layer damping to cover the relatively high frequency range (>200 Hz), reactive distributed vibration absorber) to cover the medium frequency range (75 to 250 Hz), and active control for controlling low frequencies (<200 Hz). The device was applied to control noise transmission through a panel mounted in a transmission loss test facility. Experimental results are presented for the bare panel, and combinations of passive treatment, reactive treatment, and active control. Results indicate that three RAP devices were able to increase the overall broadband (15-1000 Hz) transmission loss by 9.4 dB. These three devices added a total of 285 grams to the panel mass of 6.0 kg, or approximately 5%, not including control electronics.

  17. Detection of septic transfusion reactions to platelet transfusions by active and passive surveillance.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hong; Xiao, Wenbin; Lazarus, Hillard M; Good, Caryn E; Maitta, Robert W; Jacobs, Michael R

    2016-01-28

    Septic transfusion reactions (STRs) resulting from transfusion of bacterially contaminated platelets are a major hazard of platelet transfusion despite recent interventions. Active and passive surveillance for bacterially contaminated platelets was performed over 7 years (2007-2013) by culture of platelet aliquots at time of transfusion and review of reported transfusion reactions. All platelet units had been cultured 24 hours after collection and released as negative. Five sets of STR criteria were evaluated, including recent AABB criteria; sensitivity and specificity of these criteria, as well as detection by active and passive surveillance, were determined. Twenty of 51,440 platelet units transfused (0.004%; 389 per million) were bacterially contaminated by active surveillance and resulted in 5 STRs occurring 9 to 24 hours posttransfusion; none of these STRs had been reported by passive surveillance. STR occurred only in neutropenic patients transfused with high bacterial loads. A total of 284 transfusion reactions (0.55%) were reported by passive surveillance. None of these patients had received contaminated platelets. However, 6 to 93 (2.1%-32.7%) of these 284 reactions met 1 or more STR criteria, and sensitivity of STR criteria varied from 5.1% to 45.5%. These results document the continued occurrence of bacterial contamination of platelets resulting in STR in neutropenic patients, failure of passive surveillance to detect STR, and lack of specificity of STR criteria. These findings highlight the limitations of reported national STR data based on passive surveillance and the need to implement further measures to address this problem such as secondary testing or use of pathogen reduction technologies.

  18. Passive and active pulse stacking scheme for pulse shaping

    DOEpatents

    Harney, Robert C.; Schipper, John F.

    1977-01-01

    Apparatus and method for producing a sequence of radiation pulses with a pulse envelope of time variation which is controllable by an external electromagnetic signal applied to an active medium or by a sectored reflector, through which the radiation passes.

  19. Using Passive and Active Acoustics to Examine Relationships of Cetacean and Prey Densities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    mounted on a glider running on two California Cooperative Oceanic Fisheries Investigations (CalCOFI) lines and passive as well as active acoustic...Southwest Fisheries Science Center. WORK COMPLETED A preliminary experiment was carried out (see section Results) that documented sound production

  20. Variability in Measurement of Swimming Forces: A Meta-Analysis of Passive and Active Drag

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havriluk, Rod

    2007-01-01

    An analysis was conducted to identify sources of true and error variance in measuring swimming drag force to draw valid conclusions about performance factor effects. Passive drag studies were grouped according to methodological differences: tow line in pool, tow line in flume, and carriage in tow tank. Active drag studies were grouped according to…

  1. Recent Developments in Active and Passive Distributed Temperature Sensing for Soil Moisture Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele-Dunne, S. C.; Dong, J.; Hoes, O.; Van De Giesen, N.; Sayde, C.; Ochsner, T. E.; Selker, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    In this presentation we will review recent developments in both active and passive Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) for soil moisture monitoring. DTS involves using fiber-optic cables to measure temperature at sub-meter resolution along cables up to several kilometers in length. Soil thermal properties depend on soil moisture. Hence, temperature variations either in response to externally-applied heating (active) or the response to net radiation (passive) can be monitored and used to infer soil moisture. DTS occupies a unique measurement niche, potentially providing soil moisture information at sub-meter resolution over extents on the order of km at sub-daily time steps. It complements observations from point sensors to other innovative measurement techniques like cosmic ray neutron detection methods and GPS reflectometry. DTS is being developed as a tool for the validation of soil moisture observations from remote sensing and for hydrological field investigations. Here, we will discuss both technological and theoretical advances in active and passive DTS for soil moisture monitoring. We will present data from new installations in the Netherlands and the USA to illustrate recent developments. In particular, we will focus on the value of combining temperature observations from DTS with physical models using data assimilation. In addition to yielding improved soil moisture and temperature profile estimates, recent research has shown the potential to also derive information on the soil thermal and hydraulic properties. We will conclude by outlining the current challenges, with particular emphasis on combining active and passive DTS.

  2. Assimilation of active and passive microwave observations for improved estimates of soil moisture and crop growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An Ensemble Kalman Filter-based data assimilation framework that links a crop growth model with active and passive (AP) microwave models was developed to improve estimates of soil moisture (SM) and vegetation biomass over a growing season of soybean. Complementarities in AP observations were incorpo...

  3. Passive vs. Active Control of Rhythmic Ball Bouncing: The Role of Visual Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegler, Isabelle A.; Bardy, Benoit G.; Warren, William H.

    2010-01-01

    The simple task of bouncing a ball on a racket offers a model system for studying how human actors exploit the physics and information of the environment to control their behavior. Previous work shows that people take advantage of a passively stable solution for ball bouncing but can also use perceptual information to actively stabilize bouncing.…

  4. Active and Passive Immunization Against Staphylococcus aureus Periprosthetic Osteomyelitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    H.SØE, NIELS; VENDEL JENSEN, NINA; LUNDORFF JENSEN, ASGER; KOCH, JANNE; SEIER POULSEN, STEEN; B. PIER, GERALD; KROGH JOHANSEN, HELLE

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aim: Staphylococcus aureus infection associated with orthopedic implants cannot always be controlled. We used a knee prosthesis model with implant-related osteomyelitis in rats to explore induction of an effective immune response with active and passive immunization. Materials and Methods: Fifty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into active (N=28) and passive immunization groups (N=24). A bacterial inoculum of 103 S. aureus MN8 was injected into the tibia and the femur marrow before insertion of a non-constrained knee prosthesis in each rat. The active-immunization group received a synthetic oligosaccharide of polysaccharide poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG), 9G1cNH2 and the passive-immunization group received immunization with immunoglobulin from rabbits infected with S. aureus. Results/Conclusion: Active immunization against PNAG significantly reduced the consequences of osteomyelitis infection from PNAG-producing intercellular adhesion (ica+) but not ica− S. aureus. Passive immunization resulted in better clinical assessments in animals challenged with either ica+ or ica− S. aureus, suggesting a lack of specificity in this antiserum. PMID:28064219

  5. Geochemical discrimination of siliciclastic sediments from active and passive margin settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Surendra P.; Armstrong-Altrin, John S.

    2016-03-01

    Discrimination of active and passive margins is important from both academic and economic aspects. This can only be successfully achieved, however, if there are major compositional differences among sediments derived from different continental margins. A worldwide database of active and passive margin settings was established from published major and trace element geochemical data of Neogene to Quaternary siliciclastic sediments. These data were used to evaluate the performance of existing discrimination diagrams, which were shown to work unsatisfactorily with success values of mostly between 0% and 30%. Because these diagrams were not based on a statistically coherent methodology, we proposed two new discriminant functions from linear discriminant analysis of multinormally distributed isometric log-transformed ratios of major and combined major and trace elements. These new diagrams showed very high percent success values of about 87%-97% and 84%-86% for the active and passive margins, respectively, for the original database. Excellent performance of the multidimensional diagrams and related discriminant functions was confirmed from 11 test studies involving Quaternary to Holocene siliciclastic sediments from known tectonic margins. The expected result of an active or passive margin was obtained, with most samples plotting correctly in the respective field.

  6. Active-passive vibration absorber of beam-cart-seesaw system with piezoelectric transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.; Huang, C. J.; Chang, Julian; Wang, S.-W.

    2010-09-01

    In contrast with fully controllable systems, a super articulated mechanical system (SAMS) is a controlled underactuated mechanical system in which the dimensions of the configuration space exceed the dimensions of the control input space. The objectives of the research are to develop a novel SAMS model which is called beam-cart-seesaw system, and renovate a novel approach for achieving a high performance active-passive piezoelectric vibration absorber for such system. The system consists of two mobile carts, which are coupled via rack and pinion mechanics to two parallel tracks mounted on pneumatic rodless cylinders. One cart carries an elastic beam, and the other cart acts as a counterbalance. One adjustable counterweight mass is also installed underneath the seesaw to serve as a passive damping mechanism to absorb impact and shock energy. The motion and control of a Bernoulli-Euler beam subjected to the modified cart/seesaw system are analyzed first. Moreover, gray relational grade is utilized to investigate the sensitivity of tuning the active proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller to achieve desired vibration suppression performance. Consequently, it is shown that the active-passive vibration absorber can not only provide passive damping, but can also enhance the active action authority. The proposed software/hardware platform can also be profitable for the standardization of laboratory equipment, as well as for the development of entertainment tools.

  7. 26 CFR 1.469-2T - Passive activity loss (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... taxable year exceed the passive activity gross income for the taxable year. (2) Cross references. See... or business of performing such services or selling such property, but only if credit is customarily... such entity. (4) Cross reference. For special rules applicable to certain gross income from a trade...

  8. 26 CFR 1.469-2T - Passive activity loss (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... taxable year exceed the passive activity gross income for the taxable year. (2) Cross references. See... or business of performing such services or selling such property, but only if credit is customarily... such entity. (4) Cross reference. For special rules applicable to certain gross income from a trade...

  9. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS AS BREATH BIOMARKERS FOR ACTIVE AND PASSIVE SMOKING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Real-time breath measurement technology was used to investigate the suitability of some volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to serve as breath biomarkers for active and passive smoking and to measure actual exposures and resulting breath concentrations for persons exposed to toba...

  10. Microwave remote sensing: Active and passive. Volume 3 - From theory to applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Moore, R. K.; Fung, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Aspects of volume scattering and emission theory are discussed, taking into account a weakly scattering medium, the Born approximation, first-order renormalization, the radiative transfer method, and the matrix-doubling method. Other topics explored are related to scatterometers and probing systems, the passive microwave sensing of the atmosphere, the passive microwave sensing of the ocean, the passive microwave sensing of land, the active microwave sensing of land, and radar remote sensing applications. Attention is given to inversion techniques, atmospheric attenuation and emission, a temperature profile retrieval from ground-based observations, mapping rainfall rates, the apparent temperature of the sea, the emission behavior of bare soil surfaces, the emission behavior of vegetation canopies, the emission behavior of snow, wind-vector radar scatterometry, radar measurements of sea ice, and the back-scattering behavior of cultural vegetation canopies.

  11. Active-passive hybrid piezoelectric network-based smart structures for vibration controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Meng-Shiun

    1998-12-01

    This thesis investigates the active-passive hybrid piezoelectric network (APPN) based adaptive structures for vibration and noise controls. It consists of three parts: (1) investigation of active piezoelectric actuators with passive networks to achieve hybrid damping; (2) integration of active-passive hybrid piezoelectric networks with active constrained layer treatments; (3) development of a coupled robust control/optimization process for the active-passive adaptive structures. The partial differential equations of motion of a beam structure with piezoelectric network are derived via Hamilton's principle. The Galerkin's method is employed to discretize and analyze the model in time domain. The open loop analysis shows that the shunt circuit can provide passive damping as well as enhance the active action around the tuned frequency. Therefore, the integrated APPN design is more effective than a system with separated active and passive elements. A bench top test is performed to verify the open loop behavior of the APPN, purely active and separated systems. It is shown that the experimental observations agree with the analytical findings. It is also recognized that a concurrent design/control method is needed to ensure that the passive and active actions are optimally synthesized. Such a method is developed and presented. The characteristics of the closed-loop system are analyzed. The APPN concepts are further illustrated on a ring structure with multiple actuators and sensors. The concurrent design/control method is modified to include a Kalman filter, which is employed to estimate the states from piezoelectric sensor measurements. Analysis results indicate that the APPN approach can suppress vibration and noise radiation effectively, and it can achieve better performance with less control effort as compared to a purely active system. It is illustrated that the performance difference between the APPN and purely active cases becomes smaller as the excitation

  12. 26 CFR 1.469-2 - Passive activity loss.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... marketing of the property) is treated for purposes of § 1.469-2T(c)(2) as the use of the interest in a nondealing activity if the marketing of the property is incidental to the nondealing use. Under paragraph (c... section provides rules for determining whether the marketing of the property is incidental to the use...

  13. The Effect of Active and Passive Household Cigarette Smoke Exposure on Pregnant Women With Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Momirova, Valerija; Dombrowski, Mitchell P.; Schatz, Michael; Wise, Robert; Landon, Mark; Rouse, Dwight J.; Lindheimer, Marshall; Caritis, Steve N.; Sheffield, Jeanne; Miodovnik, Menachem; Wapner, Ronald J.; Varner, Michael W.; O’Sullivan, Mary Jo; Conway, Deborah L.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The article was designed to estimate the effect of active and passive household cigarette smoke exposure on asthma severity and obstetric and neonatal outcomes in pregnant women with asthma. Methods: We used a secondary observational analysis of pregnant women with mild and moderate-severe asthma enrolled in a prospective observational cohort study of asthma in pregnancy and a randomized clinical trial (RCT) comparing inhaled beclomethasone and oral theophylline. A baseline questionnaire detailing smoking history and passive household smoke exposure was given to each patient. Smoking status was confirmed in the RCT using cotinine levels. Data on asthma severity and obstetric and neonatal outcomes were collected and analyzed with respect to self-reported tobacco smoke exposure. Kruskal-Wallis and Pearson χ2 statistics were used to test for significance. Results: A total of 2,210 women were enrolled: 1,812 in the observational study and 398 in the RCT. Four hundred and eight (18%) women reported current active smoking. Of the nonsmokers, 790 (36%) women reported passive household smoke exposure. Active smoking was associated with more total symptomatic days (P < .001) and nights of sleep disturbance (P < .001). Among the newborns of active smokers, there was a greater risk of small for gestational age < 10th percentile (P < .001), and a lower mean birth weight (P < .001). There were no differences in symptom exacerbation or outcome between nonsmokers with and without passive household cigarette smoke exposure. Conclusions: Among pregnant women with asthma, active but not passive smoking is associated with increased asthma symptoms and fetal growth abnormalities. PMID:19820079

  14. Coronary Sinus Lead Removal: A Comparison between Active and Passive Fixation Leads

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Yalin; Gosau, Nils; Aydin, Ali; Willems, Stephan; Treede, Hendrik; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Hakmi, Samer

    2016-01-01

    Background Implantation of coronary sinus (CS) leads may be a difficult procedure due to different vein anatomies and a possible lead dislodgement. The mode of CS lead fixation has changed and developed in recent years. Objectives We compared the removal procedures of active and passive fixation leads. Methods Between January 2009 and January 2014, 22 patients at our centre underwent CS lead removal, 6 active and 16 passive fixation leads were attempted using simple traction or lead locking devices with or without laser extraction sheaths. Data on procedural variables and success rates were collected and retrospectively analyzed. Results The mean patient age was 67.2 ± 9.8 years, and 90.9% were male. The indication for lead removal was infection in all cases. All active fixation leads were Medtronic® Attain StarFix™ Model 4195 (Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA). The mean time from implantation for the active and passive fixation leads was 9.9 ± 11.7 months (range 1.0–30.1) and 48.7 ± 33.6 months (range 5.7–106.4), respectively (p = 0.012). Only 3 of 6 StarFix leads were successfully removed (50%) compared to 16 of 16 (100%) of the passive fixation CS leads (p = 0.013). No death or complications occurred during the 30-day follow-up. Conclusion According to our experience, removal of the Starfix active fixation CS leads had a higher procedural failure rate compared to passive. PMID:27119368

  15. Study on development of active-passive rehabilitation system for upper limbs: Hybrid-PLEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, T.; Jin, Y.; Fukushima, K.; Akai, H.; Furusho, J.

    2009-02-01

    In recent years, many researchers have studied the potential of using robotics technology to assist and quantify the motor functions for neuron-rehabilitation. Some kinds of haptic devices have been developed and evaluated its efficiency with clinical tests, for example, upper limb training for patients with spasticity after stroke. Active-type (motor-driven) haptic devices can realize a lot of varieties of haptics. But they basically require high-cost safety system. On the other hand, passive-type (brake-based) haptic devices have inherent safety. However, the passive robot system has strong limitation on varieties of haptics. There are not sufficient evidences to clarify how the passive/active haptics effect to the rehabilitation of motor skills. In this paper, we developed an active-passive-switchable rehabilitation system with ER clutch/brake device named "Hybrid-PLEMO" in order to address these problems. In this paper, basic structures and haptic control methods of the Hybrid-PLEMO are described.

  16. Anticipatory eye movements evoked after active following versus passive observation of a predictable motion stimulus.

    PubMed

    Burke, M R; Barnes, G R

    2008-12-15

    We used passive and active following of a predictable smooth pursuit stimulus in order to establish if predictive eye movement responses are equivalent under both passive and active conditions. The smooth pursuit stimulus was presented in pairs that were either 'predictable' in which both presentations were matched in timing and velocity, or 'randomized' in which each presentation in the pair was varied in both timing and velocity. A visual cue signaled the type of response required from the subject; a green cue indicated the subject should follow both the target presentations (Go-Go), a pink cue indicated that the subject should passively observe the 1st target and follow the 2nd target (NoGo-Go), and finally a green cue with a black cross revealed a randomized (Rnd) trial in which the subject should follow both presentations. The results revealed better prediction in the Go-Go trials than in the NoGo-Go trials, as indicated by higher anticipatory velocity and earlier eye movement onset (latency). We conclude that velocity and timing information stored from passive observation of a moving target is diminished when compared to active following of the target. This study has significant consequences for understanding how visuomotor memory is generated, stored and subsequently released from short-term memory.

  17. Physiologic Responses Produced by Active and Passive Personal Cooling Vests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Yu-Tsuan E.; Lee, Hank C.; Montgomery, Leslie D.; Luna, Bernadette

    2000-01-01

    Personal thermoregulatory systems which provide chest cooling are used in the industrial and aerospace environments to alleviate thermal stress. However, little information is available regarding the physiologic and circulatory changes produced by routine operation of these systems. The objectives of this study were to document and compare the subjects' response to three cooling vests in their recommended configurations. The Life Enhancement Tech (LET) lightweight active cooling vest with cap, the MicroClimate Systems Change of Phase garment (MCS), and the Steele Vest were each used to cool the chest regions of 12 male and 8 female Healthy subjects (21 to 69 yr.) in this study. The subjects, seated in an upright position at normal room temperature (approx. 22 C), were tested for 60 min. with one of the cooling garments. The LET active garment had an initial coolant fluid inlet temperature of 60 F, and was ramped down to 50 F. Oral, right and left ear canal temperatures were logged manually every 5 min. Arm, leg, chest and rectal temperatures; heart rate; and respiration were recorded continuously on a U.F.I., Inc. Biolog ambulatory monitor. For men, all three vests had similar, significant cooling effects. Decreases in the average rectal temperature, oral temperature, and ear canal temperatures were approximately 0.2 C, 0.2 C and 0.1 C, respectively. In contrast to the men, the female subjects wearing the MCS and Steel vests had similar cooling responses in which the core temperature remained elevated and oral and ear canal temperatures did not drop. The LET active garment cooled most of the female subjects in this study; rectal, oral and ear temperature decreased about 0.2 C, 0.3 C and 0.3 C, respectively. These results show that the garment configurations tested do not elicit a similar thermal response in all subjects. A gender difference is evident. The LET active garment configuration was most effective in decreasing temperatures of the female subjects; the MCS

  18. Design and Development of the SMAP Microwave Radiometer Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Medeiros, James J.; Horgan, Kevin A.; Brambora, Clifford K.; Estep, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    The SMAP microwave radiometer will measure land surface brightness temperature at L-band (1413 MHz) in the presence of radio frequency interference (RFI) for soil moisture remote sensing. The radiometer design was driven by the requirements to incorporate internal calibration, to operate synchronously with the SMAP radar, and to mitigate the deleterious effects of RFI. The system design includes a highly linear super-heterodyne microwave receiver with internal reference loads and noise sources for calibration and an innovative digital signal processor and detection system. The front-end comprises a coaxial cable-based feed network, with a pair of diplexers and a coupled noise source, and radiometer front-end (RFE) box. Internal calibration is provided by reference switches and a common noise source inside the RFE. The RF back-end (RBE) downconverts the 1413 MHz channel to an intermediate frequency (IF) of 120 MHz. The IF signals are then sampled and quantized by high-speed analog-to-digital converters in the radiometer digital electronics (RDE) box. The RBE local oscillator and RDE sampling clocks are phase-locked to a common reference to ensure coherency between the signals. The RDE performs additional filtering, sub-band channelization, cross-correlation for measuring third and fourth Stokes parameters, and detection and integration of the first four raw moments of the signals. These data are packetized and sent to the ground for calibration and further processing. Here we discuss the novel features of the radiometer hardware particularly those influenced by the need to mitigate RFI.

  19. Tau-based therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease: active and passive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Panza, Francesco; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Seripa, Davide; Imbimbo, Bruno P; Lozupone, Madia; Santamato, Andrea; Tortelli, Rosanna; Galizia, Ilaria; Prete, Camilla; Daniele, Antonio; Pilotto, Alberto; Greco, Antonio; Logroscino, Giancarlo

    2016-09-01

    Pharmacological manipulation of tau protein in Alzheimer's disease included microtubule-stabilizing agents, tau protein kinase inhibitors, tau aggregation inhibitors, active and passive immunotherapies and, more recently, inhibitors of tau acetylation. Animal studies have shown that both active and passive approaches can remove tau pathology and, in some cases, improve cognitive function. Two active vaccines targeting either nonphosphorylated (AAD-vac1) and phosphorylated tau (ACI-35) have entered Phase I testing. Notwithstanding, the recent discontinuation of the monoclonal antibody RG7345 for Alzheimer's disease, two other antitau antibodies, BMS-986168 and C2N-8E12, are also currently in Phase I testing for progressive supranuclear palsy. After the recent impressive results in animal studies obtained by salsalate, the dimer of salicylic acid, inhibitors of tau acetylation are being actively pursued.

  20. Active and passive distraction in children undergoing wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Stefan; Enskär, Karin; Hallqvist, Carina; Kokinsky, Eva

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to test how distraction influences pain, distress and anxiety in children during wound care. Sixty participants aged 5-12 years were randomized to three groups: serious gaming, the use of lollipops and a control group. Self-reported pain, distress, anxiety and observed pain behaviour were recorded in conjunction with wound care. Serious gaming, an active distraction, reduced the observed pain behaviour and self-reported distress compared with the other groups. A sense of control and engagement in the distraction, together, may be the explanation for the different pain behaviours when children use serious gaming.

  1. Angiogenic response to passive movement and active exercise in individuals with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Hoier, B; Walker, M; Passos, M; Walker, P J; Green, A; Bangsbo, J; Askew, C D; Hellsten, Y

    2013-12-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is caused by atherosclerosis and is associated with microcirculatory impairments in skeletal muscle. The present study evaluated the angiogenic response to exercise and passive movement in skeletal muscle of PAD patients compared with healthy control subjects. Twenty-one PAD patients and 17 aged control subjects were randomly assigned to either a passive movement or an active exercise study. Interstitial fluid microdialysate and tissue samples were obtained from the thigh skeletal muscle. Muscle dialysate vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels were modestly increased in response to either passive movement or active exercise in both subject groups. The basal muscle dialysate level of the angiostatic factor thrombospondin-1 protein was markedly higher (P < 0.05) in PAD patients compared with the control subjects, whereas soluble VEGF receptor-1 dialysate levels were similar in the two groups. The basal VEGF protein content in the muscle tissue samples was ∼27% lower (P < 0.05) in the PAD patients compared with the control subjects. Analysis of mRNA expression for a range of angiogenic and angiostatic factors revealed a modest change with active exercise and passive movement in both groups, except for an increase (P < 0.05) in the ratio of angiopoietin-2 to angiopoietin-1 mRNA in the PAD group with both interventions. PAD patients and aged individuals showed a similar limited angiogenic response to active exercise and passive movement. The limited increase in muscle extracellular VEGF combined with an elevated basal level of thrombospondin-1 in muscle extracellular fluid of PAD patients may restrict capillary growth in these patients.

  2. Effects of active vs. passive recovery on repeated rugby-specific exercises.

    PubMed

    Jougla, A; Micallef, J P; Mottet, D

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of active vs. passive recovery on performance of a rugby-specific intermittent test in rugby union players. Seven male rugby players (20.6+/-0.5 yrs; 181.9+/-10.0 cm; 94.5+/-12.8 kg) performed in random order, over two separate sessions, a specific repeated-sprint rugby test, the Narbonne test (6 x 4 consecutive actions: 1, scrummaging; 2, agility sprinting; 3, tackling; 4, straight sprinting) with 30s of passive or active recovery (running at 50% of maximal aerobic speed). The Narbonne tests were completed before (pre-test) and after (post-test) a 30-min rugby match. During the Narbonne test, scrum forces, agility and sprint times, heart rate and rate of perceived exertion were measured. Scrum forces were lower in active (74.9+/-13.4 kg) than in passive recovery (90.4+/-20.9 kg), only during the post-test (p<0.05). Fatigue index (%) (p<0.05) and total sprint time (s) (p<0.01) were significantly greater in active than in passive recovery, both during the pre-test (11.5+/-5.7% vs. 6.7+/-4.5% and 18.1+/-1.3s vs. 16.9+/-0.9s) and the post-test (7.3+/-3.3% vs. 4.3+/-1.5% and 18.3+/-1.6s vs. 16.9+/-1.1s). Consequently, the results indicated that passive recovery enabled better performance during the Narbonne test. However, it is obviously impractical to suggest that players should stand still during and following repeated-sprint bouts: the players have to move to ensure they have taken an optimal position.

  3. Angiogenic response to passive movement and active exercise in individuals with peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Hoier, B.; Walker, M.; Passos, M.; Walker, P. J.; Green, A.; Bangsbo, J.; Askew, C. D.

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is caused by atherosclerosis and is associated with microcirculatory impairments in skeletal muscle. The present study evaluated the angiogenic response to exercise and passive movement in skeletal muscle of PAD patients compared with healthy control subjects. Twenty-one PAD patients and 17 aged control subjects were randomly assigned to either a passive movement or an active exercise study. Interstitial fluid microdialysate and tissue samples were obtained from the thigh skeletal muscle. Muscle dialysate vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels were modestly increased in response to either passive movement or active exercise in both subject groups. The basal muscle dialysate level of the angiostatic factor thrombospondin-1 protein was markedly higher (P < 0.05) in PAD patients compared with the control subjects, whereas soluble VEGF receptor-1 dialysate levels were similar in the two groups. The basal VEGF protein content in the muscle tissue samples was ∼27% lower (P < 0.05) in the PAD patients compared with the control subjects. Analysis of mRNA expression for a range of angiogenic and angiostatic factors revealed a modest change with active exercise and passive movement in both groups, except for an increase (P < 0.05) in the ratio of angiopoietin-2 to angiopoietin-1 mRNA in the PAD group with both interventions. PAD patients and aged individuals showed a similar limited angiogenic response to active exercise and passive movement. The limited increase in muscle extracellular VEGF combined with an elevated basal level of thrombospondin-1 in muscle extracellular fluid of PAD patients may restrict capillary growth in these patients. PMID:24157526

  4. Sound Localization with Communications Headsets: Comparison of Passive and Active Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    communications muffs in active noise reduction (ANR) and talk-through-circuitry (TTC) modes and Nacre QUIETPRO communications earplugs in off (passive...UK) in active noise reduction (ANR) and talk-through circuitry (TTC) modes ofoperation and Nacre QU’IETPRO communications earplugs ( Nacre , Trondheim...externally mounted microphones [Figure 2a]. Sound level is limited to 85 dBA. The Nacre QUIETPRO device comprises two ear pieces (transducer housing

  5. Active and Passive Sensing from Geosynchronous and Libration Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark; Raymond, Carol; Hildebrand, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The development of the LEO (EOS) missions has led the way to new technologies and new science discoveries. However, LEO measurements alone cannot cost effectively produce high time resolution measurements needed to move the science to the next level. Both GEO and the Lagrange points, L1 and L2, provide vantage points that will allow higher time resolution measurements. GEO is currently being exploited by weather satellites, but the sensors currently operating at GEO do not provide the spatial or spectral resolution needed for atmospheric trace gas, ocean or land surface measurements. It is also may be possible to place active sensors in geostationary orbit. It seems clear, that the next era in earth observation and discovery will be opened by sensor systems operating beyond near earth orbit.

  6. The cerebellum and pain: passive integrator or active participator?

    PubMed

    Moulton, Eric A; Schmahmann, Jeremy D; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David

    2010-10-05

    The cerebellum is classically considered to be a brain region involved in motor processing, but it has also been implicated in non-motor, and even cognitive, functions. Though previous research suggests that the cerebellum responds to noxious stimuli, its specific role during pain is unclear. Pain is a multidimensional experience that encompasses sensory discriminative, affective motivational, and cognitive evaluative components. Cerebellar involvement during the processing of pain could thus potentially reflect a number of different functional processes. This review will summarize the animal and human research to date that indicates that (1) primary afferents conduct nociceptive (noxious) input to the cerebellum, (2) electrical and pharmacological stimulation of the cerebellum can modulate nociceptive processing, and (3) cerebellar activity occurs during the presence of acute and chronic pain. Possible functional roles for the cerebellum relating to pain will be considered, including perspectives relating to emotion, cognition, and motor control in response to pain.

  7. Passive drift or active swimming in marine organisms?

    PubMed Central

    Lumpkin, Rick; Sacco, Alexander E.; Mansfield, Katherine L.

    2016-01-01

    Predictions of organismal movements in a fluid require knowing the fluid's velocity and potential contributions of the organism's behaviour (e.g. swimming or flying). While theoretical aspects of this work are reasonably well-developed, field-based validation is challenging. A much-needed study recently published by Briscoe and colleagues in Proceedings of the Royal Society B compared movements and distribution of satellite-tracked juvenile sea turtles to virtual particles released in a data-assimilating hindcast ocean circulation model. Substantial differences observed between turtles and particles were considered evidence for an important role of active swimming by turtles. However, the experimental design implicitly assumed that transport predictions were insensitive to (i) start location, (ii) tracking duration, (iii) depth, and (iv) physical processes not depicted in the model. Here, we show that the magnitude of variation in physical parameters between turtles and virtual particles can profoundly alter transport predictions, potentially sufficient to explain the reported differences without evoking swimming behaviour. We present a more robust method to derive the environmental contributions to individual movements, but caution that resolving the ocean velocities experienced by individual organisms remains a problem for assessing the role of behaviour in organismal movements and population distributions. PMID:27974518

  8. Comparison of symptoms and treatment outcomes between actively and passively detected tuberculosis cases: the additional value of active case finding.

    PubMed

    den Boon, S; Verver, S; Lombard, C J; Bateman, E D; Irusen, E M; Enarson, D A; Borgdorff, M W; Beyers, N

    2008-10-01

    Passive detection of tuberculosis (TB) cases may lead to delay in treatment which may contribute to increased severity of disease and mortality. Active case finding may be an alternative. In a community survey in Cape Town, South Africa, we actively detected 27 bacteriologically positive TB cases and compared those with 473 passively detected TB cases. Seven of 27 (26%) actively detected TB cases did not start treatment within 2 months and were considered initial defaulters. Those who did start treatment had similar treatment success rates as passively detected TB cases (both 80%) (OR 1.01, CI 0.33-3.09). Passively detected cases reported the presence of the symptoms cough (OR 3.72, 95% CI 1.47-9.39), haemoptysis (OR 3.20, 95% CI 1.03-9.93), night sweats (OR 3.35, 95% CI 1.40-7.99), fever (OR 4.28, 95% CI 1.21-15.14), and weight loss (OR 11.14, 95% CI 4.17-29.74) more often than those detected actively. We conclude that although TB cases detected by a community survey are less symptomatic and are prone to a high initial default rate, active case finding can potentially identify a substantial portion of the existing caseload at an earlier stage of disease, thereby reducing the risk of transmission.

  9. Active/Passive Control of Sound Radiation from Panels using Constrained Layer Damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, Gary P.; Cabell, Randolph H.

    2003-01-01

    A hybrid passive/active noise control system utilizing constrained layer damping and model predictive feedback control is presented. This system is used to control the sound radiation of panels due to broadband disturbances. To facilitate the hybrid system design, a methodology for placement of constrained layer damping which targets selected modes based on their relative radiated sound power is developed. The placement methodology is utilized to determine two constrained layer damping configurations for experimental evaluation of a hybrid system. The first configuration targets the (4,1) panel mode which is not controllable by the piezoelectric control actuator, and the (2,3) and (5,2) panel modes. The second configuration targets the (1,1) and (3,1) modes. The experimental results demonstrate the improved reduction of radiated sound power using the hybrid passive/active control system as compared to the active control system alone.

  10. Design for active and passive flutter suppression and gust alleviation. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpel, M.

    1981-01-01

    Analytical design techniques for active and passive control of aeroelastic systems are based on a rational approximation of the unsteady aerodynamic loads in the entire Laplace domain, which yields matrix equations of motion with constant coefficients. Some existing schemes are reviewed, the matrix Pade approximant is modified, and a technique which yields a minimal number of augmented states for a desired accuracy is presented. The state-space aeroelastic model is used to design an active control system for simultaneous flutter suppression and gust alleviation. The design target is for a continuous controller which transfers some measurements taken on the vehicle to a control command applied to a control surface. Structural modifications are formulated in a way which enables the treatment of passive flutter suppression system with the same procedures by which active control systems are designed.

  11. Active and passive techniques for tiltrotor aeroelastic stability augmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hathaway, Eric L.

    Tiltrotors are susceptible to whirl flutter, an aeroelastic instability characterized by a coupling of rotor-generated aerodynamic forces and elastic wing modes in high speed airplane-mode flight. The conventional approach to ensuring adequate whirl flutter stability will not scale easily to larger tiltrotor designs. This study constitutes an investigation of several alternatives for improving tiltrotor aerolastic stability. A whirl flutter stability analysis is developed that does not rely on more complex models to determine the variations in crucial input parameters with flight condition. Variation of blade flap and lag frequency, and pitch-flap, pitch-lag, and flap-lag couplings, are calculated from physical parameters, such as blade structural flap and lag stiffness distribution (inboard or outboard of pitch bearing), collective pitch, and precone. The analysis is used to perform a study of the influence of various design parameters on whirl flutter stability. While previous studies have investigated the individual influence of various design parameters, the present investigation uses formal optimization techniques to determine a unique combination of parameters that maximizes whirl flutter stability. The optimal designs require only modest changes in the key rotor and wing design parameters to significantly increase flutter speed. When constraints on design parameters are relaxed, optimized configurations are obtained that allow large values of kinematic pitch-flap (delta3) coupling without degrading aeroelastic stability. Larger values of delta3 may be desirable for advanced tiltrotor configurations. An investigation of active control of wing flaperons for stability augmentation is also conducted. Both stiff- and soft-inplane tiltrotor configurations are examined. Control systems that increase flutter speed and wing mode sub-critical damping are designed while observing realistic limits on flaperon deflection. The flaperon is shown to be particularly

  12. Comparison of active and passive methods for radon exhalation from a high-exposure building material.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, A; Mirekhtiary, F

    2013-12-01

    The radon exhalation rates and radon concentrations in granite stones used in Iran were measured by means of a high-resolution high purity Germanium gamma-spectroscopy system (passive method) and an AlphaGUARD model PQ 2000 (active method). For standard rooms (4.0 × 5.0 m area × 2.8 height) where ground and walls have been covered by granite stones, the radon concentration and the radon exhalation rate by two methods were calculated. The activity concentrations of (226)Ra in the selected granite samples ranged from 3.8 to 94.2 Bq kg(-1). The radon exhalation rate from the calculation of the (226)Ra activity concentration was obtained. The radon exhalation rates were 1.31-7.86 Bq m(-2)h(-1). The direction measurements using an AlphaGUARD were from 218 to 1306 Bq m(-3) with a mean of 625 Bq m(-3). Also, the exhalation rates measured by the passive and active methods were compared and the results of this study were the same, with the active method being 22 % higher than the passive method.

  13. Hybridization of active and passive elements for planar photonic components and interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, M.; Bidnyk, S.; Balakrishnan, A.

    2007-02-01

    The deployment of Passive Optical Networks (PON) for Fiber-to-the-Home (FTTH) applications currently represents the fastest growing sector of the telecommunication industry. Traditionally, FTTH transceivers have been manufactured using commodity bulk optics subcomponents, such as thin film filters (TFFs), micro-optic collimating lenses, TO-packaged lasers, and photodetectors. Assembling these subcomponents into a single housing requires active alignment and labor-intensive techniques. Today, the majority of cost reducing strategies using bulk subcomponents has been implemented making future reductions in the price of manufacturing FTTH transceivers unlikely. Future success of large scale deployments of FTTH depends on further cost reductions of transceivers. Realizing the necessity of a radically new packaging approach for assembly of photonic components and interconnects, we designed a novel way of hybridizing active and passive elements into a planar lightwave circuit (PLC) platform. In our approach, all the filtering components were monolithically integrated into the chip using advancements in planar reflective gratings. Subsequently, active components were passively hybridized with the chip using fully-automated high-capacity flip-chip bonders. In this approach, the assembly of the transceiver package required no active alignment and was readily suitable for large-scale production. This paper describes the monolithic integration of filters and hybridization of active components in both silica-on-silicon and silicon-on-insulator PLCs.

  14. Quantification of fatigue cracking in CT specimens with passive and active piezoelectric sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jianguo; Ziehl, Paul; Zarate, Boris; Caicedo, Juan; Yu, Lingyu; Giurgiutiu, Victor; Metrovich, Brian; Matta, Fabio

    2010-04-01

    Monitoring of fatigue cracks in steel bridges is of interest to bridge owners and agencies. Monitoring of fatigue cracks has been attempted with acoustic emission using either resonant or broadband sensors. One drawback of passive sensing is that the data is limited to that caused by growing cracks. In this work, passive emission was complemented with active sensing (piezoelectric wafer active sensors) for enhanced detection capabilities. Passive and active sensing methods were described for fatigue crack monitoring on specialized compact tension specimens. The characteristics of acoustic emission were obtained to understand the correlation of acoustic emission behavior and crack growth. Crack and noise induced signals were interpreted through Swansong II Filter and waveform-based approaches, which are appropriate for data interpretation of field tests. Upon detection of crack extension, active sensing was activated to measure the crack size. Model updating techniques were employed to minimize the difference between the numerical results and experimental data. The long term objective of this research is to develop an in-service prognostic system to monitor structural health and to assess the remaining fatigue life.

  15. Aktiver und passiver Wortschatz im Englischunterricht und in Lehrwerken der Hauptschule (Active and Passive Vocabulary in Teaching English and in Textbooks Used in Hauptschulen ["Terminal" Junior High Schools])

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerschgens, Edda

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the extent to which five popular English teaching texts distinguish between active and passive vocabulary in learning English, and pleads (offering concrete suggestions) for more attention to the vocabulary aspect in constructing teaching textbooks for junior high schools. (Text is in German.) (IFS/WGA)

  16. Sound localization with communications headsets: comparison of passive and active systems.

    PubMed

    Abel, Sharon M; Tsang, Suzanne; Boyne, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that conventional hearing protectors interfere with sound localization. This research examines possible benefits from advanced communications devices. Horizontal plane sound localization was compared in normal-hearing males with the ears unoccluded and fitted with Peltor H10A passive attenuation earmuffs, Racal Slimgard II communications muffs in active noise reduction (ANR) and talk-through-circuitry (TTC) modes and Nacre QUIETPRO TM communications earplugs in off (passive attenuation) and push-to-talk (PTT) modes. Localization was assessed using an array of eight loudspeakers, two in each spatial quadrant. The stimulus was 75 dB SPL, 300-ms broadband noise. One block of 120 forced-choice loudspeaker identification trials was presented in each condition. Subjects responded using a laptop response box with a set of eight microswitches in the same configuration as the speaker array. A repeated measures ANOVA was applied to the dataset. The results reveal that the overall percent correct response was highest in the unoccluded condition (94%). A significant reduction of 24% was observed for the communications devices in TTC and PTT modes and a reduction of 49% for the passive muff and plug and muff with ANR. Disruption in performance was due to an increase in front-back reversal errors for mirror image spatial positions. The results support the conclusion that communications devices with advanced technologies are less detrimental to directional hearing than conventional, passive, limited amplification and ANR devices.

  17. The senses of active and passive forces at the human ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Savage, G; Allen, T J; Proske, U

    2015-07-01

    The traditional view of the neural basis for the sense of muscle force is that it is generated at least in part within the brain. Recently it has been proposed that force sensations do not arise entirely centrally and that there is a contribution from peripheral receptors within the contracting muscle. Evidence comes from experiments on thumb flexor and elbow flexor muscles. Here we have studied the sense of force in plantar flexor muscles of the human ankle, looking for further evidence for such a mechanism. The active angle-torque curve was measured for muscles of both legs, and for each muscle, ankle angles were identified on the ascending and descending limbs of the curve where active forces were similar. In a plantar flexion force matching task, subjects were asked to match the force in one foot, generated on the ascending limb of the curve, with force in the other foot, generated on the descending limb. It was hypothesised that despite active forces being similar, the sensation generated in the more stretched muscle should be greater because of the contribution from its peripheral stretch receptors, leading to an overestimation of the force in the stretched muscle. It was found that provided that the comparison was between active forces, there was no difference in the forces generated by the two legs, supporting the central hypothesis for the sense of force. When total forces were matched, including a component of passive force due to muscle stretch, subjects seemed to ignore the passive component. Yet subjects had an acute sense of passive force, provided that the muscles remained relaxed. It was concluded that subjects had two senses, a sense of active force, generated centrally, and a sense of passive force, or perhaps muscle stretch, generated within the muscle itself.

  18. Evaluation of active and passive polarimetric electro-optic imagery for civilian and military targets discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavigne, Daniel A.; Breton, Mélanie; Pichette, Mario; Larochelle, Vincent; Simard, Jean-Robert

    2008-04-01

    Electro-optic (EO) imaging systems are commonly used to detect civilian and military targets during surveillance operations and search and rescue missions. Adding the polarization of light as additional information to such active and passive EO imaging systems may increase the target discrimination performance, as man made objects are known to depolarized light in different manner than natural background. However, while the polarization of light has been used and studied in the past for numerous applications, the understanding of the polarization phenomenology taking place with targets used in cluttered backgrounds requires additional experimentations. Specifically, the target contrast enhancement obtained by analyzing the polarization of the reflected light from either a direct polarized laser source as encountered in active imagers, or from natural ambient illumination, needs further investigation. This paper describes an investigation of the use of polarization-based imaging sensors to discriminate civilian and military targets against different backgrounds. Measurements were carried out using two custom-designed active and passive imaging systems operating in the near infrared (NIR) and the long-wave infrared (LWIR) spectral bands. Polarimetric signatures were acquired during two distinct trials that occurred in 2007, using specific civilian and military targets such as cars and military vehicles. Results demonstrate to what extent and under which illumination and environmental conditions the exploitation of active and passive polarimetric images is suitable to enable target detection and recognition for some events of interest, according to various specific scenarios.

  19. Telencephalic neural activation following passive avoidance learning in a terrestrial toad.

    PubMed

    Puddington, Martín M; Daneri, M Florencia; Papini, Mauricio R; Muzio, Rubén N

    2016-12-15

    The present study explores passive avoidance learning and its neural basis in toads (Rhinella arenarum). In Experiment 1, two groups of toads learned to move from a lighted compartment into a dark compartment. After responding, animals in the experimental condition were exposed to an 800-mM strongly hypertonic NaCl solution that leads to weight loss. Control animals received exposure to a 300-mM slightly hypertonic NaCl solution that leads to neither weight gain nor loss. After 10 daily acquisition trials, animals in the experimental group showed significantly longer latency to enter the dark compartment. Additionally, 10 daily trials in which both groups received the 300-mM NaCl solution after responding eliminated this group effect. Thus, experimental animals showed gradual acquisition and extinction of a passive avoidance respond. Experiment 2 replicated the gradual acquisition effect, but, after the last trial, animals were sacrificed and neural activation was assessed in five brain regions using AgNOR staining for nucleoli-an index of brain activity. Higher activation in the experimental animals, relative to controls, was observed in the amygdala and striatum. Group differences in two other regions, lateral pallium and septum, were borderline, but nonsignificant, whereas group differences in the medial pallium were nonsignificant. These preliminary results suggest that a striatal-amygdala activation could be a key component of the brain circuit controlling passive avoidance learning in amphibians. The results are discussed in relation to the results of analogous experiments with other vertebrates.

  20. Municipal waste stabilization in a reactor with an integrated active and passive aeration system.

    PubMed

    Kasinski, Slawomir; Slota, Monika; Markowski, Michal; Kaminska, Anna

    2016-04-01

    To test whether an integrated passive and active aeration system could be an effective solution for aerobic decomposition of municipal waste in technical conditions, a full-scale composting reactor was designed. The waste was actively aerated for 5d, passively aerated for 35 d, and then actively aerated for 5d, and the entire composting process was monitored. During the 45-day observation period, changes in the fractional, morphological and physico-chemical characteristics of the waste at the top of the reactor differed from those in the center of the reactor. The fractional and morphological analysis made during the entire process of stabilization, showed the total reduction of organic matter measured of 82 wt% and 86 wt% at the respective depths. The reduction of organic matter calculated using the results of Lost of Ignition (LOI) and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) showed, respectively, 40.51-46.62% organic matter loss at the top and 45.33-53.39% in the center of the reactor. At the end of the process, moisture content, LOI and TOC at the top were 3.29%, 6.10% and 4.13% higher, respectively, than in the center. The results showed that application of passive aeration in larger scale simultaneously allows the thermophilic levels to be maintained during municipal solid waste composting process while not inhibiting microbial activity in the reactor.

  1. Active and passive-touch during interpersonal multisensory stimulation change self-other boundaries.

    PubMed

    Tajadura-Jiménez, Ana; Lorusso, Ludovica; Tsakiris, Manos

    2013-12-01

    In the "enfacement" illusion seeing an unfamiliar face being touched at the same time as one's own face evokes changes in self-face recognition. We investigated the contribution of proprioceptive and motor signals derived from self-generated actions in the sensory-driven malleability of self-other boundaries during the "enfacement" illusion. Changes in self-face recognition during active- and passive-touch interpersonal visuo-tactile stimulation were quantified by means of psychophysical and psychometric tasks. Active- and passive-touch evoked comparable changes in the categorical boundaries of self-other distinction, changing the extent to which the other is assimilated into the mental self-representation. Actively touching or simply feeling touch on one's own face with concurrent observed touch on someone else's face seems to elicit comparable changes in self-recognition, suggesting that afferent input might be sufficient for updating one's body-image, although some components of the experience of self-identification seem to be more affected by passive- than by active-touch.

  2. Detection Thresholds of Falling Snow from Satellite-Borne Active and Passive Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Gail

    2012-01-01

    Precipitation, including rain and snow, is a critical part of the Earth's energy and hydrology cycles. In order to collect information on the complete global precipitation cycle and to understand the energy budget in terms of precipitation, uniform global estimates of both liquid and frozen precipitation must be collected. Active observations of falling snow are somewhat easier to estimate since the radar will detect the precipitation particles and one only needs to know surface temperature to determine if it is liquid rain or snow. The challenges of estimating falling snow from passive spaceborne observations still exist though progress is being made. While these challenges are still being addressed, knowledge of their impact on expected retrieval results is an important key for understanding falling snow retrieval estimations. Important information to assess falling snow retrievals includes knowing thresholds of detection for active and passive sensors, various sensor channel configurations, snow event system characteristics, snowflake particle assumptions, and surface types. For example, can a lake effect snow system with low (2.5 km) cloud tops having an ice water content (Iwe) at the surface of 0.25 g m-3 and dendrite snowflakes be detected? If this information is known, we can focus retrieval efforts on detectable storms and concentrate advances on achievable results. Here, the focus is to determine thresholds of detection for falling snow for various snow conditions over land and lake surfaces. The analysis relies on simulated Weather Research Forecasting (WRF) simulations of falling snow cases since simulations provide all the information to determine the measurements from space and the ground truth. Results are presented for active radar at Ku, Ka, and W-band and for passive radiometer channels from 10 to 183 GHz (Skofronick-Jackson, et al. submitted to IEEE TGRS, April 2012). The notable results show: (1) the W-Band radar has detection thresholds more

  3. Active and passive calcium transport systems in plant cells. Progress report, May 1986--January 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1991-12-31

    The ability to change cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} levels ([Ca{sup 2+}]) by cells has made this cation a key regulator of many biological processes. Cytoplasmic [Ca{sup 2+}] is determined by the coordination of passive Ca{sup 2+} fluxes which increase cytosolic [Ca{sup 2+}] and active Ca{sup 2+} transport systems that lower cytosolic [Ca{sup 2+}]. The mechanisms by which plant cells achieve this is poorly understood. We have initially used isolated vesicles from the plasma membrane or organellar membranes to study Ca{sup 2+} transport systems in oat roots (a monocot) and carrot suspension cells (a dicot). The objectives of the proposal were to identify and characterize active (energy-dependent) and passive calcium transport systems that work together to regulate calcium levels in the cytoplasm of plant cells.

  4. Oceanic radiance model development and validation: application of airborne active-passive ocean color spectral measurements.

    PubMed

    Hoge, F E; Swift, R; Yungel, J

    1995-06-20

    It is shown that airborne active-passive (laser-solar) ocean color data can be used to develop and validate oceanic radiance models. The two principal inputs to the oceanic radiance model, chlorophyll pigment and incident solar irradiance, are obtained from a nadir-viewing laser-induced fluorescence spectrometer and a zenith-viewing radiometer, respectively. The computed water-leaving radiances are validated by comparison with the calibrated output of a separate nadir-viewing radiometer subsystem. In the North Atlantic Ocean, the calculated and the observed airborne radiances are found to compare very favorably for the 443-, 520-, and 550-nm wavelengths over an ∼ 170-km flight track east of St. John's, Newfoundland. The results further suggest that the semianalytical radiance model of ocean color, the airborne active (laser) fluorescence spectrometer, and the passive (solar) radiometric instrumentation are all remarkably precise.

  5. Active-passive correlation spectroscopy - A new technique for identifying ocean color algorithm spectral regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1986-01-01

    A new active-passive airborne data correlation technique has been developed which allows the validation of existing in-water oceoan color algorithms and the rapid search, identification, and evaluation of new sensor band locations and algorithm wavelength intervals. Thus far, applied only in conjunction with the spectral curvature algorithm (SCA), the active-passive correlation spectroscopy (APCS) technique shows that (1) the usual 490-nm (center-band) chlorophyll SCA could satisfactorily be placed anywhere within the nominal 460-510-nm interval, and (2) two other spectral regions, 645-660 and 680-695 nm, show considerable promise for chlorophyll pigment measurement. Additionally, the APCS method reveals potentially useful wavelength regions (at 600 and about 670 nm) of very low chlorophyll-in-water spectral curvature into which accessory pigment algorithms for phycoerythrin might be carefully positioned. In combination, the APCS and SCA methods strongly suggest that significant information content resides within the seemingly featureless ocean color spectrum.

  6. Cloud and Radiation Mission with Active and Passive Sensing from the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James D.

    1998-01-01

    A cloud and aerosol radiative forcing and physical process study involving active laser and radar profiling with a combination of passive radiometric sounders and imagers would use the space station as an observation platform. The objectives are to observe the full three dimensional cloud and aerosol structure and the associated physical parameters leading to a complete measurement of radiation forcing processes. The instruments would include specialized radar and lidar for cloud and aerosol profiling, visible, infrared and microwave imaging radiometers with comprehensive channels for cloud and aerosol observation and specialized sounders. The low altitude,. available power and servicing capability of the space station are significant advantages for the active sensors and multiple passive instruments.

  7. Passive and Active Detection of Clouds: Comparisons between MODIS and GLAS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahesh, Ashwin; Gray, Mark A.; Palm, Stephen P.; Hart, William D.; Spinhirne, James D.

    2003-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), launched on board the Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite in January 2003 provides space-borne laser observations of atmospheric layers. GLAS provides opportunities to validate passive observations of the atmosphere for the first time from space with an active optical instrument. Data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer aboard the Aqua satellite is examined along with GLAS observations of cloud layers. In more than three-quarters of the cases, MODIS scene identification from spectral radiances agrees with GLAS. Disagreement between the two platforms is most significant over snow-covered surfaces in the northern hemisphere. Daytime clouds detected by GLAS are also more easily seen in the MODIS data as well, compared to observations made at night. These comparisons illustrate the capabilities of active remote sensing to validate and assess passive measurements, and also to complement them in studies of atmospheric layers.

  8. [EEG and fMRI reactions of a healthy brain at active and passive movements by a leading hand].

    PubMed

    Boldyreva, G N; Sharova, E V; Zhavoronkova, L A; Cheliapina, M V; Dubrovskaia, L P; Simonova, O A; Smirnov, A S; Troshina, E M; Kornienko, V N

    2014-01-01

    Bioelectrical (EEG) and hemodynamic (fMRI) responses of cerebral reactions to active and passive movements by the right hand were analyzed in 17 right-handed healthy persons. Individual and averaged fMRI and EEG data was analyzed. The main cortex fMRI responses (sensorimotor cortex of the contralateral, left hemisphere) were topographically similar during both active and passive movements. This fact allows us to recommend the usage of the passive movement paradigm for the mapping of the motor areas in patients with movement disorders. Including in reactive process of cerebellum and subcortical structures at passive movements was more variability than active ones. FMRI-reactions at passive movements were characterized more individual variability than during active ones at the expense of diversity of cerebellum and subcortical structures answers. The EEG analysis revealed that at both passive and active movements there is a coherence increase in the high-frequency alpha-ban in left central-frontal area of the left, activated hemisphere. The power-frequency changes of the EEG parameters during active and passive movements were primarily shown in a frequency increase and the desynchronization of the beta-band. Consistency with the topography of the fMRI response was not found.

  9. A multifrequency evaluation of active and passive microwave sensors for oil spill detection and assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenner, R. G.; Reid, S. C.; Solie, C. H.

    1980-01-01

    An evaluation is given of how active and passive microwave sensors can best be used in oil spill detection and assessment. Radar backscatter curves taken over oil spills are presented and their effect on synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery are discussed. Plots of microwave radiometric brightness variations over oil spills are presented and discussed. Recommendations as to how to select the best combination of frequency, viewing angle, and sensor type for evaluation of various aspects of oil spills are also discussed.

  10. Effect of Metabolic Stress on Coenzyme Q10 Content in Tissues of Active and Passive Rats.

    PubMed

    Kirbaeva, N V; Sharanova, N E; Baturina, V A; Zhminchenko, V M; Pertsov, S S; Vasil'ev, A V

    2016-09-01

    The dynamics of coenzyme Q10 concentration in the blood plasma, liver, and brain of passive and active rats was studied on the model of metabolic stress. This parameter was shown to differ in rats with various patterns of behavior. Dietary consumption of coenzyme Q10 in doses of 10 and 100 mg/kg body weight was followed by changes in its content in experimental animals.

  11. The Effect of Passive versus Active Recovery on Power Output over Six Repeated Wingate Sprints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Egla-Irina D.; Smoliga, James M.; Zavorsky, Gerald S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of active versus passive recovery on 6 repeated Wingate tests (30-s all-out cycling sprints on a Velotron ergometer). Method: Fifteen healthy participants aged 29 (SD = 8) years old (body mass index = 23 [3] kg/m[superscript 2]) participated in 3 sprint interval training sessions separated…

  12. The Correlation of Active and Passive Microwave Outputs for the Skylab S-193 Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishen, K.

    1976-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the correlation analysis of the Skylab S-193 13.9 GHz Radiometer/Scatterometer data. Computer analysis of the S-193 data shows more than 50 percent of the radiometer and scatterometer data are uncorrelated. The correlation coefficients computed for the data gathered over various ground scenes indicates the desirability of using both active and passive sensors for the determination of various Earth phenomena.

  13. Application of gamma-ray active and passive computed tomography to nondestructively assay TRU waste

    SciTech Connect

    Martz, H.E.; Decman, D.J.; Roberson, G.P.; Johansson, E.M.; Keto, E.R.

    1996-05-01

    The authors have developed an active and passive computed tomography scanner for assaying radioactive waste drums. They describe the hardware and software components of the system used for data acquisition, gamma-ray spectroscopy analysis, and image reconstruction. They have measured the performance of the system using mock waste drums and calibrated radioactive sources. They describe the results of measurements using this system to assay a real TRU waste drum with relatively low Pu content.

  14. Passive feedback control of actively mode-locked pulsed Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchvarov, Ivan C.; Saltiel, Solomon M.

    1992-11-01

    A passive feedback control in an actively mode-locked pulsed Nd:YAG laser was used to shorten the pulse duration or obtain millisecond trains of ultra-short light pulses. The intracavity second harmonic generation in a crystal situated at proper distance from the output mirror served as a positive or negative feedback. When negative feedback was used, the length of the train was limited by the length of the flash lamp pumping pulse.

  15. Active or passive fiber-chip-alignment: approaches to efficient solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttger, Gunnar; Schröder, Henning; Jordan, Rafael

    2013-02-01

    High precision approaches for active and passive alignment and assembly on optoelectronic micro benches have been realized at Fraunhofer IZM for various material systems and different scales. The alignment and reliable mounting of optical subcomponents such as semiconductor laser and photo diodes, micro lenses and micro prisms require far higher mounting and alignment accuracies than for micro-electronic parts. When connecting from silicon photonics chip level to single mode optical fibers, even higher precisions are called for (typically < 100 nm). Alignment and assembly commonly are performed on specialized lab equipment which needs manual operation, consuming a lot of time, with less possibilities for automation. To introduce a higher degree of automatized production, like it has become standard in large volume electronics, one can choose either active or passive alignment processes - or possibly a combination of both. In this article we will present examples of micro-optic benches and optical interconnections that include alignment structures for passive alignment - where the accuracy lies in the components to be assembled, and mounting takes place on a less accurate machine ("fit into place"). But there is also a lot of progress on optical "pick, measure and place" machines that realize a flexible and fully automated active alignment using vision systems and activated components of less cost, with machine and process robustness for usability in industrial environments. As connecting elements, passive optical components like optical fibers are commonly used. These fragile and flexible elements pose additional challenges in secure picking, placing and fixing, at long lengths vs. small diameters. A very recent and specific approach to use more robust plastic optical fibers (POF) for very short and cost effective optical interconnects by means of wire bonding machines will be presented.

  16. Quantification of the passive and active biaxial mechanical behaviour and microstructural organization of rat thoracic ducts.

    PubMed

    Caulk, Alexander W; Nepiyushchikh, Zhanna V; Shaw, Ryan; Dixon, J Brandon; Gleason, Rudolph L

    2015-07-06

    Mechanical loading conditions are likely to play a key role in passive and active (contractile) behaviour of lymphatic vessels. The development of a microstructurally motivated model of lymphatic tissue is necessary for quantification of mechanically mediated maladaptive remodelling in the lymphatic vasculature. Towards this end, we performed cylindrical biaxial testing of Sprague-Dawley rat thoracic ducts (n = 6) and constitutive modelling to characterize their mechanical behaviour. Spontaneous contraction was quantified at transmural pressures of 3, 6 and 9 cmH2O. Cyclic inflation in calcium-free saline was performed at fixed axial stretches between 1.30 and 1.60, while recording pressure, outer diameter and axial force. A microstructurally motivated four-fibre family constitutive model originally proposed by Holzapfel et al. (Holzapfel et al. 2000 J. Elast. 61, 1-48. (doi:10.1023/A:1010835316564)) was used to quantify the passive mechanical response, and the model of Rachev and Hayashi was used to quantify the active (contractile) mechanical response. The average error between data and theory was 8.9 ± 0.8% for passive data and 6.6 ± 2.6% and 6.8 ± 3.4% for the systolic and basal conditions, respectively, for active data. Multi-photon microscopy was performed to quantify vessel wall thickness (32.2 ± 1.60 µm) and elastin and collagen organization for three loading conditions. Elastin exhibited structural 'fibre families' oriented nearly circumferentially and axially. Sample-to-sample variation was observed in collagen fibre distributions, which were often non-axisymmetric, suggesting material asymmetry. In closure, this paper presents a microstructurally motivated model that accurately captures the biaxial active and passive mechanical behaviour in lymphatics and offers potential for future research to identify parameters contributing to mechanically mediated disease development.

  17. Bumblebees minimize control challenges by combining active and passive modes in unsteady winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi, Sridhar; Kolomenskiy, Dmitry; Engels, Thomas; Schneider, Kai; Wang, Chun; Sesterhenn, Jörn; Liu, Hao

    2016-10-01

    The natural wind environment that volant insects encounter is unsteady and highly complex, posing significant flight-control and stability challenges. It is critical to understand the strategies insects employ to safely navigate in natural environments. We combined experiments on free flying bumblebees with high-fidelity numerical simulations and lower-order modeling to identify the mechanics that mediate insect flight in unsteady winds. We trained bumblebees to fly upwind towards an artificial flower in a wind tunnel under steady wind and in a von Kármán street formed in the wake of a cylinder. Analysis revealed that at lower frequencies in both steady and unsteady winds the bees mediated lateral movement with body roll - typical casting motion. Numerical simulations of a bumblebee in similar conditions permitted the separation of the passive and active components of the flight trajectories. Consequently, we derived simple mathematical models that describe these two motion components. Comparison between the free-flying live and modeled bees revealed a novel mechanism that enables bees to passively ride out high-frequency perturbations while performing active maneuvers at lower frequencies. The capacity of maintaining stability by combining passive and active modes at different timescales provides a viable means for animals and machines to tackle the challenges posed by complex airflows.

  18. Monolithic crystalline cladding microstructures for efficient light guiding and beam manipulation in passive and active regimes

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yuechen; Cheng, Chen; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R.; Castillo, Gabriel R.; Rabes, Blanca del Rosal; Tan, Yang; Jaque, Daniel; Chen, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Miniature laser sources with on-demand beam features are desirable devices for a broad range of photonic applications. Lasing based on direct-pump of miniaturized waveguiding active structures offers a low-cost but intriguing solution for compact light-emitting devices. In this work, we demonstrate a novel family of three dimensional (3D) photonic microstructures monolithically integrated in a Nd:YAG laser crystal wafer. They are produced by the femtosecond laser writing, capable of simultaneous light waveguiding and beam manipulation. In these guiding systems, tailoring of laser modes by both passive/active beam splitting and ring-shaped transformation are achieved by an appropriate design of refractive index patterns. Integration of graphene thin-layer as saturable absorber in the 3D laser structures allows for efficient passive Q-switching of tailored laser radiations which may enable miniature waveguiding lasers for broader applications. Our results pave a way to construct complex integrated passive and active laser circuits in dielectric crystals by using femtosecond laser written monolithic photonic chips. PMID:25100561

  19. Monolithic crystalline cladding microstructures for efficient light guiding and beam manipulation in passive and active regimes.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yuechen; Cheng, Chen; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R; Castillo, Gabriel R; Rabes, Blanca del Rosal; Tan, Yang; Jaque, Daniel; Chen, Feng

    2014-08-07

    Miniature laser sources with on-demand beam features are desirable devices for a broad range of photonic applications. Lasing based on direct-pump of miniaturized waveguiding active structures offers a low-cost but intriguing solution for compact light-emitting devices. In this work, we demonstrate a novel family of three dimensional (3D) photonic microstructures monolithically integrated in a Nd:YAG laser crystal wafer. They are produced by the femtosecond laser writing, capable of simultaneous light waveguiding and beam manipulation. In these guiding systems, tailoring of laser modes by both passive/active beam splitting and ring-shaped transformation are achieved by an appropriate design of refractive index patterns. Integration of graphene thin-layer as saturable absorber in the 3D laser structures allows for efficient passive Q-switching of tailored laser radiations which may enable miniature waveguiding lasers for broader applications. Our results pave a way to construct complex integrated passive and active laser circuits in dielectric crystals by using femtosecond laser written monolithic photonic chips.

  20. Bumblebees minimize control challenges by combining active and passive modes in unsteady winds

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Sridhar; Kolomenskiy, Dmitry; Engels, Thomas; Schneider, Kai; Wang, Chun; Sesterhenn, Jörn; Liu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    The natural wind environment that volant insects encounter is unsteady and highly complex, posing significant flight-control and stability challenges. It is critical to understand the strategies insects employ to safely navigate in natural environments. We combined experiments on free flying bumblebees with high-fidelity numerical simulations and lower-order modeling to identify the mechanics that mediate insect flight in unsteady winds. We trained bumblebees to fly upwind towards an artificial flower in a wind tunnel under steady wind and in a von Kármán street formed in the wake of a cylinder. Analysis revealed that at lower frequencies in both steady and unsteady winds the bees mediated lateral movement with body roll - typical casting motion. Numerical simulations of a bumblebee in similar conditions permitted the separation of the passive and active components of the flight trajectories. Consequently, we derived simple mathematical models that describe these two motion components. Comparison between the free-flying live and modeled bees revealed a novel mechanism that enables bees to passively ride out high-frequency perturbations while performing active maneuvers at lower frequencies. The capacity of maintaining stability by combining passive and active modes at different timescales provides a viable means for animals and machines to tackle the challenges posed by complex airflows. PMID:27752047

  1. Experimental active and passive dosimetry systems for the NASA Skylab program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, M. F.; Janni, J. F.; Ainsworth, G. C.

    1972-01-01

    Active and passive dosimetry instrumentation to measure absorbed dose, charged particle spectra, and linear energy transfer spectra inside the command module and orbital workshop on the Skylab program were developed and tested. The active dosimetry system consists of one integral unit employing both a tissue equivalent ionization chamber and silicon solid state detectors. The instrument measures dose rates from 0.2 millirad/hour to 25 rads/hour, linear energy transfer spectra from 2.8 to 42.4 Kev/micron, and the proton and alpha particle energy spectra from 0.5 to 75 Mev. The active dosimeter is equipped with a portable radiation sensor for use in astronaut on-body and spacecraft shielding surveys during passage of the Skylab through significant space radiations. Data are transmitted in real time or are recorded by onboard spacecraft tape recorder for rapid evaluation of the radiation levels. The passive dosimetry systems consist of twelve (12) hard-mounted assemblies, each containing a variety of passive radiation sensors which are recoverable at the end of the mission for analysis.

  2. Evaluation of multiple-frequency, active and passive acoustics as surrogates for bedload transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Molly S.; Fosness, Ryan L.; Pachman, Gregory; Lorang, Mark; Tonolla, Diego

    2015-01-01

    The use of multiple-frequency, active acoustics through deployment of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) shows potential for estimating bedload in selected grain size categories. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the University of Montana (UM), evaluated the use of multiple-frequency, active and passive acoustics as surrogates for bedload transport during a pilot study on the Kootenai River, Idaho, May 17-18, 2012. Four ADCPs with frequencies ranging from 600 to 2000 kHz were used to measure apparent moving bed velocities at 20 stations across the river in conjunction with physical bedload samples. Additionally, UM scientists measured the sound frequencies of moving particles with two hydrophones, considered passive acoustics, along longitudinal transects in the study reach. Some patterns emerged in the preliminary analysis which show promise for future studies. Statistically significant relations were successfully developed between apparent moving bed velocities measured by ADCPs with frequencies 1000 and 1200 kHz and bedload in 0.5 to 2.0 mm grain size categories. The 600 kHz ADCP seemed somewhat sensitive to the movement of gravel bedload in the size range 8.0 to 31.5 mm, but the relation was not statistically significant. The passive hydrophone surveys corroborated the sample results and could be used to map spatial variability in bedload transport and to select a measurement cross-section with moving bedload for active acoustic surveys and physical samples.

  3. Psychophysiological reactions during active and passive stress coping following smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Hasenfratz, M; Bättig, K

    1991-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of 9 days' smoking abstinence on psychophysiological stress reactions. The subjects were 40 female smokers; 20 of them intended to give up smoking in the course of the study, whereas the remaining 20 had no such intention. A first session was carried out before, a second and a third during days 3 and 9 of abstinence. The nonabstainers were tested at corresponding intervals. Each session consisted of a 30-min stress-coping phase with relaxation phases before and after. While performing a rapid information processing task (RIP) the subjects had to sustain electrical shocks which were, according to instructions, but not in fact, either avoidable (active coping) or not (passive coping). Generally, the active coping instruction produced greater responses to the RIP task than did the passive coping instruction for heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure but not for finger pulse amplitude, thus resembling a beta-adrenergic stimulation. RIP processing rate was not affected, but the response rate (total of hits and commission errors) was greater during active than during passive coping. However, none of these stress reactions differed between abstainers and nonabstainers. On the other hand, both heart rate and the craving to smoke decreased significantly in the abstainer group across the 9 days. Thus, it is concluded that a deprivation of 1 h, 3 or 9 days has no differential effect on physiological stress reactions.

  4. Active versus passive cooling during work in warm environments while wearing firefighting protective clothing.

    PubMed

    Selkirk, G A; McLellan, T M; Wong, J

    2004-08-01

    This study examined whether active or passive cooling during intermittent work reduced the heat strain associated with wearing firefighting protective clothing (FPC) and self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) in the heat (35 degrees Celsius, 50% relative humidity). Fifteen male Toronto firefighters participated in the heat-stress trials. Subjects walked at 4.5 km.h(-1) with 0% elevation on an intermittent work (50 min) and rest (30 min) schedule. Work continued until rectal temperature (T(re)) reached 39.5 degrees Celsius, or heart rate (HR) reached 95% of maximum or exhaustion. One of three cooling strategies, forearm submersion (FS), mister (M), and passive cooling (PC) were employed during the rest phases. Tolerance time (TT) and total work time (WT) (min) were significantly increased during FS (178.7 +/- 13.0 and 124.7 +/- 7.94, respectively) and M (139.1 +/- 8.28 and 95.1 +/- 4.96, respectively), compared with PC (108.0 +/- 3.59 and 78.0 +/- 3.59). Furthermore, TT and WT were significantly greater in FS compared with M. Rates of T(re) increase, HR and T-(sk) were significantly lower during active compared with passive cooling. In addition, HR and T(re) values in FS were significantly lower compared with M after the first rest phase. During the first rest phase, T(re) dropped significantly during FS (approximately 0.4 degree Celsius) compared with M (approximately 0.08 degree Celsius) while PC increased (approximately 0.2 degree Celsius). By the end of the second rest period T(re) was 0.9 degree Celsius lower in FS compared with M. The current findings suggest that there is a definite advantage when utilizing forearm submersion compared with other methods of active or passive cooling while wearing FPC and SCBA in the heat.

  5. Active Flexion in Weight Bearing Better Correlates with Functional Outcomes of Total Knee Arthroplasty than Passive Flexion

    PubMed Central

    Song, Young Dong; Jain, Nimash; Kang, Yeon Gwi; Kim, Tae Yune

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Correlations between maximum flexion and functional outcomes in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients are reportedly weak. We investigated whether there are differences between passive maximum flexion in nonweight bearing and other types of maximum flexion and whether the type of maximum flexion correlates with functional outcomes. Materials and Methods A total of 210 patients (359 knees) underwent preoperative evaluation and postoperative follow-up evaluations (6, 12, and 24 months) for the assessment of clinical outcomes including maximum knee flexion. Maximum flexion was measured under five conditions: passive nonweight bearing, passive weight bearing, active nonweight bearing, and active weight bearing with or without arm support. Data were analyzed for relationships between passive maximum flexion in nonweight bearing by Pearson correlation analyses, and a variance comparison between measurement techniques via paired t test. Results We observed substantial differences between passive maximum flexion in nonweight bearing and the other four maximum flexion types. At all time points, passive maximum flexion in nonweight bearing correlated poorly with active maximum flexion in weight bearing with or without arm support. Active maximum flexion in weight bearing better correlated with functional outcomes than the other maximum flexion types. Conclusions Our study suggests active maximum flexion in weight bearing should be reported together with passive maximum flexion in nonweight bearing in research on the knee motion arc after TKA. PMID:27274468

  6. Comparing effects of active and passive restoration on the Middle Fork John Day River, NE Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, P. F.; Goslin, M.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2000, cattle grazing has been eliminated on over 14 km of the upper Middle Fork John Day. Starting in 2008, active restoration (log structures with dug pools, woody vegetation planting, and modifications to increase channel-floodplain hydrologic connectivity) was implemented on nearly 6 km within the cattle exclosure length. Implementation of active and passive restoration strategies in the same and adjacent reaches allows comparison of these two approaches. We have been monitoring these reaches since 2008. Unexpectedly in response to grazing exclosure, a native sedge, Carex nudata (torrent sedge), has exploded in population. C. nudata grows in the active channel, anchoring itself tightly to the gravel-cobble river bed with a dense root network. As a result, C. nudata has changed erosion and sedimentation patterns including bank erosion, channel bed scour, and island formation. We present data on fish cover increases due to C. nudata and log structures, and on channel complexity before and after restoration. Both active and passive restorations are increasing channel complexity and juvenile fish cover, although in different ways. Fish cover provided by active and passive restoration are similar in area but different in depth and position, with C. nudata fish cover generally shallower and partly mid-channel. Residual pool depth is larger in log structure pools than in C. nudata scour pools, but C. nudata pools are more numerous in some reaches. By producing frequent, small scour features and small islands, it can be argued that C. nudata is increasing hydraulic complexity more than the large, meander-bend pools at log structures, but this is hard to quantify. C. nudata has also stabilized active bars, perhaps changing the bedload sediment budget. Positive habitat benefits of active restoration appear to be greater in the short term, but over the long term (20 years or more) effects of C. nudata may be comparable or greater.

  7. A large difference in the progenitor masses of active and passive galaxies in the EAGLE simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauwens, Bart; Franx, Marijn; Schaye, Joop

    2016-11-01

    Cumulative number density matching of galaxies is a method to observationally connect descendent galaxies to their typical main progenitors at higher redshifts and thereby to assess the evolution of galaxy properties. The accuracy of this method is limited due to galaxy merging and scatter in the stellar mass growth history of individual galaxies. Behroozi et al. have introduced a refinement of the method, based on abundance matching of observed galaxies to the Bolshoi dark matter-only simulation. The EAGLE cosmological hydrosimulation is well suited to test this method, because it reproduces the observed evolution of the galaxy stellar mass function and the passive fraction. We find agreement with the Behroozi et al. method for the complete sample of main progenitors of z = 0 galaxies, but we also find a strong dependence on the current star formation rate. Passive galaxies with a stellar mass up to 1010.75 M⊙ have a completely different median mass history than active galaxies of the same mass. This difference persists if we only select central galaxies. This means that the cumulative number density method should be applied separately to active and passive galaxies. Even then, the typical main progenitor of a z = 0 galaxy already spans two orders of magnitude in stellar mass at z = 2.

  8. Activation of Al2O3 passivation layers on silicon by microwave annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Johannes; Otto, Martin; Sprafke, Alexander N.; Wehrspohn, Ralf B.

    2013-11-01

    Thin aluminum oxide layers deposited on silicon by thermal atomic layer deposition can be used to reduce the electronic recombination losses by passivating the silicon surfaces. To activate the full passivation ability of such layers, a post-deposition annealing step at moderate temperatures (≈400 ∘C, duration≈30 min) is required. Such an annealing step is commonly done in an oven in air, nitrogen, or forming gas atmosphere. In this work, we investigate the ability to reduce the duration of the annealing step by heating the silicon wafer with a microwave source. The annealing time is significantly reduced to durations below 1 min while achieving effective minority carrier lifetimes similar or higher to that of conventionally oven-annealed samples.

  9. Passive exposures of children to volatile trihalomethanes during domestic cleaning activities of their parents

    SciTech Connect

    Andra, Syam S.; Charisiadis, Pantelis; Karakitsios, Spyros; Sarigiannis, Denis A.; Makris, Konstantinos C.

    2015-01-15

    Domestic cleaning has been proposed as a determinant of trihalomethanes (THMs) exposure in adult females. We hypothesized that parental housekeeping activities could influence children's passive exposures to THMs from their mere physical presence during domestic cleaning. In a recent cross-sectional study (n=382) in Cyprus [41 children (<18y) and 341 adults (≥18y)], we identified 29 children who met the study's inclusion criteria. Linear regression models were applied to understand the association between children sociodemographic variables, their individual practices influencing ingestion and noningestion exposures to ΣTHMs, and their urinary THMs levels. Among the children-specific variables, age alone showed a statistically significant inverse association with their creatinine-adjusted urinary ΣTHMs (r{sub S}=−0.59, p<0.001). A positive correlation was observed between urinary ΣTHMs (ng g{sup −1}) of children and matched-mothers (r{sub S}=0.52, p=0.014), but this was not the case for their matched-fathers (r{sub S}=0.39, p=0.112). Time spent daily by the matched-mothers for domestic mopping, toilet and other cleaning activities using chlorine-based cleaning products was associated with their children's urinary THMs levels (r{sub S}=0.56, p=0.007). This trend was not observed between children and their matched-fathers urinary ΣTHMs levels, because of minimum amount of time spent by the latter in performing domestic cleaning. The proportion of variance of creatinine-unadjusted and adjusted urinary ΣTHMs levels in children that was explained by the matched-mothers covariates was 76% and 74% (p<0.001), respectively. A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model adequately predicted urinary chloroform excretion estimates, being consistent with the corresponding measured levels. Our findings highlighted the influence of mothers' domestic cleaning activities towards enhancing passive THMs exposures of their children. The duration of such activities could be

  10. Understanding active and passive users: the effects of an active user using normal, hard and unreliable technologies on user assessment of trust in technology and co-user.

    PubMed

    Montague, Enid; Xu, Jie

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to understand how passive users perceive the trustworthiness of active users and technologies under varying technological conditions. An experimental study was designed to vary the functioning of technologies that active users interacted with, while passive users observed these interactions. Active and passive user ratings of technology and partner were collected. Exploratory data analysis suggests that passive users developed perceptions of technologies based on the functioning of the technology and how the active user interacted with the technology. Findings from this research have implications for the design of technologies in environments where active and passive users interact with technologies in different ways. Future work in this area should explore interventions that lead to enhanced affective engagement and trust calibration.

  11. Passive detector for measurement of the implanted (sup 210)Po activity in glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meesen, G.; Uyttenhove, J.; Poffijn, A.; van Laere, K.; Buysse, J.

    1994-08-01

    It is a well known fact that radon is the most important factor in the natural radiation background. For complete dose calculations we need information about the radon concentration up to 25 years ago. As suggested by C. Samuelsson et al. in 1988, the activity of the implanted radon daughter (sup 210)Po can be used to reconstruct the radon activity over the past decades. For large scale surveys in dwellings a passive detector based on polycarbonate foils has been investigated. This system has a sufficient sensitivity to detect (sup 210)Po levels down to 1 Bq/m(sup 2) with a 6 month measuring period.

  12. Function of reactive oxygen species during animal development: passive or active?

    PubMed

    Covarrubias, Luis; Hernández-García, David; Schnabel, Denhí; Salas-Vidal, Enrique; Castro-Obregón, Susana

    2008-08-01

    Oxidative stress is considered causal of aging and pathological cell death, however, very little is known about its function in the natural processes that support the formation of an organism. It is generally thought that cells must continuously protect themselves from the possible damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) (passive ROS function). However, presently, ROS are recognized as physiologically relevant molecules that mediate cell responses to a variety of stimuli, and the activities of several molecules, some developmentally relevant, are directly or indirectly regulated by oxidative stress (active ROS function). Here we review recent data that are suggestive of specific ROS functions during development of animals, particularly mammals.

  13. Reflective chamber for hardware-in-the-loop simulation of active/passive millimeter wave sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sholes, W. J.; Wilsdorf, T. T.

    A unique reflective chamber has been developed at the MICOM Advanced Simulation Center for hardware-in-the-loop simulation for combined active and passive millimeter sensors. This paper describes the reasons for developing such a reflective chamber and provides results of measurement of active reflection levels and radiometric temperatures within the chamber. Utilization of this chamber in a hardware-in-the-loop simulation for a millimeter wave weapon system is described, including the computer equipment and software system for real-time control of the simulator.

  14. Comparison of active and passive surveillance for cerebrovascular disease: The Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi (BASIC) Project.

    PubMed

    Piriyawat, Paisith; Smajsová, Miriam; Smith, Melinda A; Pallegar, Sanjay; Al-Wabil, Areej; Garcia, Nelda M; Risser, Jan M; Moyé, Lemuel A; Morgenstern, Lewis B

    2002-12-01

    To provide a scientific rationale for choosing an optimal stroke surveillance method, the authors compared active surveillance with passive surveillance. The methods involved ascertaining cerebrovascular events that occurred in Nueces County, Texas, during calendar year 2000. Active methods utilized screening of hospital and emergency department logs and routine visiting of hospital wards and out-of-hospital sources. Passive means relied on International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9), discharge codes for case ascertainment. Cases were validated by fellowship-trained stroke neurologists on the basis of published criteria. The results showed that, of the 6,236 events identified through both active and passive surveillance, 802 were validated to be cerebrovascular events. When passive surveillance alone was used, 209 (26.1%) cases were missed, including 73 (9.1%) cases involving hospital admission and 136 (17.0%) out-of-hospital strokes. Through active surveillance alone, 57 (7.1%) cases were missed. The positive predictive value of active surveillance was 12.2%. Among the 2,099 patients admitted to a hospital, passive surveillance using ICD-9 codes missed 73 cases of cerebrovascular disease and mistakenly included 222 noncases. There were 57 admitted hospital cases missed by active surveillance, including 13 not recognized because of human error. This study provided a quantitative means of assessing the utility of active and passive surveillance for cerebrovascular disease. More uniform surveillance methods would allow comparisons across studies and communities.

  15. Inference of Japanese encephalitis virus ecological and evolutionary dynamics from passive and active virus surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Truc T.; Meng, Shengli; Sun, Yan; Lv, Wenli; Bahl, Justin

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive monitoring strategy is vital for tracking the spread of mosquito-borne Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), the leading cause of viral encephalitis in Asia. Virus detection consists of passive surveillance of primarily humans and swine, and/or active surveillance in mosquitoes, which may be a valuable proxy in providing insights into ecological processes underlying the spread and persistence of JEV. However, it has not been well characterized whether passive surveillance alone can capture the circulating genetic diversity to make reasonable inferences. Here, we develop phylogenetic models to infer JEV host changes, spatial diffusion patterns, and evolutionary dynamics from data collected through active and passive surveillance. We evaluate the feasibility of using JEV sequence data collected from mosquitoes to estimate the migration histories of genotypes GI and GIII. We show that divergence times estimated from this dataset were comparable to estimates from all available data. Increasing the amount of data collected from active surveillance improved time of most recent common ancestor estimates and reduced uncertainty. Phylogenetic estimates using all available data and only mosquito data from active surveillance produced similar results, showing that GI epidemics were widespread and diffused significantly faster between regions than GIII. In contrast, GIII outbreaks were highly structured and unlinked suggesting localized, unsampled infectious sources. Our results show that active surveillance of mosquitoes can sufficiently capture circulating genetic diversity of JEV to confidently estimate spatial and evolutionary patterns. While surveillance of other hosts could contribute to more detailed disease tracking and evaluation, comprehensive JEV surveillance programs should include systematic surveillance in mosquitoes to infer the most complete patterns for epidemiology, and risk assessment. PMID:27774302

  16. Inference of Japanese encephalitis virus ecological and evolutionary dynamics from passive and active virus surveillance.

    PubMed

    Pham, Truc T; Meng, Shengli; Sun, Yan; Lv, Wenli; Bahl, Justin

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive monitoring strategy is vital for tracking the spread of mosquito-borne Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), the leading cause of viral encephalitis in Asia. Virus detection consists of passive surveillance of primarily humans and swine, and/or active surveillance in mosquitoes, which may be a valuable proxy in providing insights into ecological processes underlying the spread and persistence of JEV. However, it has not been well characterized whether passive surveillance alone can capture the circulating genetic diversity to make reasonable inferences. Here, we develop phylogenetic models to infer JEV host changes, spatial diffusion patterns, and evolutionary dynamics from data collected through active and passive surveillance. We evaluate the feasibility of using JEV sequence data collected from mosquitoes to estimate the migration histories of genotypes GI and GIII. We show that divergence times estimated from this dataset were comparable to estimates from all available data. Increasing the amount of data collected from active surveillance improved time of most recent common ancestor estimates and reduced uncertainty. Phylogenetic estimates using all available data and only mosquito data from active surveillance produced similar results, showing that GI epidemics were widespread and diffused significantly faster between regions than GIII. In contrast, GIII outbreaks were highly structured and unlinked suggesting localized, unsampled infectious sources. Our results show that active surveillance of mosquitoes can sufficiently capture circulating genetic diversity of JEV to confidently estimate spatial and evolutionary patterns. While surveillance of other hosts could contribute to more detailed disease tracking and evaluation, comprehensive JEV surveillance programs should include systematic surveillance in mosquitoes to infer the most complete patterns for epidemiology, and risk assessment.

  17. Effect of active recovery on acute strength deficits induced by passive stretching.

    PubMed

    Viale, Fabrice; Nana-Ibrahim, Salim; Martin, Ronan Jean François

    2007-11-01

    We herein examined whether immediate muscular activity (active recovery) after stretching decreased stretch-induced strength deficits in human muscles. Our within-subject study included 8 subjects who were used as their own controls. For each subject, both legs were subjected to the same warm-up and stretching treatments, and then one leg was exposed to active recovery (experimental treatment) while the other was allowed to recover passively (control). Unilateral maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of knee extensors was measured at baseline, poststretching, and postrecovery to monitor strength evolution. Our results revealed that the MVC strength at the baseline time point for control (590.8 +/- 104.2) and treated (602.2 +/- 112.7) legs decreased poststretching by 8.0 and 8.9%, respectively, and further decreased postrecovery by 1.3 and 1.2%, respectively. Maximal voluntary contraction strength tests demonstrated very good reliability, having intraclass coefficients of correlation ranging from 0.92-0.98. Mixed analysis of variance showed that the stretching program yielded significantly increased flexibility (p < 0.01) and significantly decreased MVC (p < 0.001) in both legs. The over-time variability between legs was marginal (1%), and no significant between-leg differences were observed. Indeed, the improvement in strength restoration due to active vs. passive recovery was -0.5 +/- 15 N, which was significantly lower (p < 0.01; 1-tailed t-test) than the amount of strength inhibition (32.6 N), estimated as 60% of the overall strength deficit (54.3 +/- 29.7 N). These results confirm that significant strength is lost poststretching but fail to show greater improvement in strength following active vs. passive recovery. Collectively, the present findings indicate that, contrary to the belief of many coaches, muscular exercises during the poststretching period are unlikely to minimize stretch-induced strength deficits.

  18. Combination of Active Instability Control and Passive Measures to Prevent Combustion Instabilities in a 260MW Heavy Duty Gas Turbine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADPO 11146 TITLE: Combination of Active Instability Control and Passive...ADPO11101 thru ADP011178 UNCLASSIFIED 3 -1 Combination of Active Instability Control and Passive Measures to Prevent Combustion Instabilities in a 260MW...Military Aircrqft, Land Vehicles and Sea Vehicles held in Braunschweig, Germany, 8-11 May 2000, and published in RTO MP-051. 3 -2 tuation produces the

  19. Use of Radar Vegetation Index (RVI) in Passive Microwave Algorithms for Soil Moisture Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowlandson, T. L.; Berg, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite will provide a unique opportunity for the estimation of soil moisture by having simultaneous radar and radiometer measurements available. As with the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite, the soil moisture algorithms will need to account for the contribution of vegetation to the brightness temperature. Global maps of vegetation volumetric water content (VWC) are difficult to obtain, and the SMOS mission has opted to estimate the optical depth of standing vegetation by using a relationship between the VWC and the leaf area index (LAI). LAI is estimated from optical remote sensing or through soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer modeling. During the growing season, the VWC of agricultural crops can increase rapidly, and if cloud cover exists during an optical acquisition, the estimation of LAI may be delayed, resulting in an underestimation of the VWC and overestimation of the soil moisture. Alternatively, the radar vegetation index (RVI) has shown strong correlation and linear relationship with VWC for rice and soybeans. Using the SMAP radar to produce RVI values that are coincident to brightness temperature measurements may eliminate the need for LAI estimates. The SMAP Validation Experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12) was a cal/val campaign for the SMAP mission held in Manitoba, Canada, during a 6-week period in June and July, 2012. During this campaign, soil moisture measurements were obtained for 55 fields with varying soil texture and vegetation cover. Vegetation was sampled from each field weekly to determine the VWC. Soil moisture measurements were taken coincident to overpasses by an aircraft carrying the Passive and Active L-band System (PALS) instrumentation. The aircraft flew flight lines at both high and low altitudes. The low altitude flight lines provided a footprint size approximately equivalent to the size of the SMAPVEX12 field sites. Of the 55 field sites, the low altitude flight lines provided

  20. Application of a passive/active autoparametric cantilever beam absorber with PZT actuator for Duffing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva-Navarro, G.; Abundis-Fong, H. F.; Vazquez-Gonzalez, B.

    2013-04-01

    An experimental investigation is carried out on a cantilever-type passive/active autoparametric vibration absorber, with a PZT patch actuator, to be used in a primary damped Duffing system. The primary system consists of a mass, viscous damping and a cubic stiffness provided by a soft helical spring, over which is mounted a cantilever beam with a PZT patch actuator actively controlled to attenuate harmonic and resonant excitation forces. With the PZT actuator on the cantilever beam absorber, cemented to the base of the beam, the auto-parametric vibration absorber is made active, thus enabling the possibility to control the effective stiffness and damping associated to the passive absorber and, as a consequence, the implementation of an active vibration control scheme able to preserve, as possible, the autoparametric interaction as well as to compensate varying excitation frequencies and parametric uncertainty. This active vibration absorber employs feedback information from a high resolution optical encoder on the primary Duffing system and an accelerometer on the tip beam absorber, a strain gage on the base of the beam, feedforward information from the excitation force and on-line computations from the nonlinear approximate frequency response, parameterized in terms of a proportional gain provided by a voltage input to the PZT actuator, thus modifying the closed-loop dynamic stiffness and providing a mechanism to asymptotically track an optimal, robust and stable attenuation solution on the primary Duffing system. Experimental results are included to describe the dynamic and robust performance of the overall closed-loop system.

  1. Active and passive computed tomography mixed waste focus area final report

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, G P

    1998-08-19

    The Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) Characterization Development Strategy delineates an approach to resolve technology deficiencies associated with the characterization of mixed wastes. The intent of this strategy is to ensure the availability of technologies to support the Department of Energy's (DOE) mixed waste low-level or transuranic (TRU) contaminated waste characterization management needs. To this end the MWFA has defined and coordinated characterization development programs to ensure that data and test results necessary to evaluate the utility of non-destructive assay technologies are available to meet site contact handled waste management schedules. Requirements used as technology development project benchmarks are based in the National TRU Program Quality Assurance Program Plan. These requirements include the ability to determine total bias and total measurement uncertainty. These parameters must be completely evaluated for waste types to be processed through a given nondestructive waste assay system constituting the foundation of activities undertaken in technology development projects. Once development and testing activities have been completed, Innovative Technology Summary Reports are generated to provide results and conclusions to support EM-30, -40, or -60 end user/customer technology selection. The Active and Passive Computed Tomography non-destructive assay system is one of the technologies selected for development by the MWFA. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) is developing the Active and Passive Computed Tomography (A&PCT) nondestructive assay (NDA) technology to identify and accurately quantify all detectable radioisotopes in closed containers of waste. This technology will be applicable to all types of waste regardless of .their classification; low level, transuranic or provide results and conclusions to support EM-30, -40, or -60 end user/customer technology selection. The Active and Passive Computed Tomography non

  2. Transcriptomics Indicates Active and Passive Metronidazole Resistance Mechanisms in Three Seminal Giardia Lines

    PubMed Central

    Ansell, Brendan R. E.; Baker, Louise; Emery, Samantha J.; McConville, Malcolm J.; Svärd, Staffan G.; Gasser, Robin B.; Jex, Aaron R.

    2017-01-01

    Giardia duodenalis is an intestinal parasite that causes 200–300 million episodes of diarrhoea annually. Metronidazole (Mtz) is a front-line anti-giardial, but treatment failure is common and clinical resistance has been demonstrated. Mtz is thought to be activated within the parasite by oxidoreductase enzymes, and to kill by causing oxidative damage. In G. duodenalis, Mtz resistance involves active and passive mechanisms. Relatively low activity of iron-sulfur binding proteins, namely pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR), ferredoxins, and nitroreductase-1, enable resistant cells to passively avoid Mtz activation. Additionally, low expression of oxygen-detoxification enzymes can allow passive (non-enzymatic) Mtz detoxification via futile redox cycling. In contrast, active resistance mechanisms include complete enzymatic detoxification of the pro-drug by nitroreductase-2 and enhanced repair of oxidized biomolecules via thioredoxin-dependent antioxidant enzymes. Molecular resistance mechanisms may be largely founded on reversible transcriptional changes, as some resistant lines revert to drug sensitivity during drug-free culture in vitro, or passage through the life cycle. To comprehensively characterize these changes, we undertook strand-specific RNA sequencing of three laboratory-derived Mtz-resistant lines, 106-2ID10, 713-M3, and WB-M3, and compared transcription relative to their susceptible parents. Common up-regulated genes encoded variant-specific surface proteins (VSPs), a high cysteine membrane protein, calcium and zinc channels, a Mad-2 cell cycle regulator and a putative fatty acid α-oxidase. Down-regulated genes included nitroreductase-1, putative chromate and quinone reductases, and numerous genes that act proximal to PFOR. Transcriptional changes in 106-2ID10 diverged from those in 713-r and WB-r (r ≤ 0.2), which were more similar to each other (r = 0.47). In 106-2ID10, a nonsense mutation in nitroreductase-1 transcripts could enhance passive

  3. Integrated active and passive control design methodology for the LaRC CSI evolutionary model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voth, Christopher T.; Richards, Kenneth E., Jr.; Schmitz, Eric; Gehling, Russel N.; Morgenthaler, Daniel R.

    1994-01-01

    A general design methodology to integrate active control with passive damping was demonstrated on the NASA LaRC CSI Evolutionary Model (CEM), a ground testbed for future large, flexible spacecraft. Vibration suppression controllers designed for Line-of Sight (LOS) minimization were successfully implemented on the CEM. A frequency-shaped H2 methodology was developed, allowing the designer to specify the roll-off of the MIMO compensator. A closed loop bandwidth of 4 Hz, including the six rigid body modes and the first three dominant elastic modes of the CEM was achieved. Good agreement was demonstrated between experimental data and analytical predictions for the closed loop frequency response and random tests. Using the Modal Strain Energy (MSE) method, a passive damping treatment consisting of 60 viscoelastically damped struts was designed, fabricated and implemented on the CEM. Damping levels for the targeted modes were more than an order of magnitude larger than for the undamped structure. Using measured loss and stiffness data for the individual damped struts, analytical predictions of the damping levels were very close to the experimental values in the (1-10) Hz frequency range where the open loop model matched the experimental data. An integrated active/passive controller was successfully implemented on the CEM and was evaluated against an active-only controller. A two-fold increase in the effective control bandwidth and further reductions of 30 percent to 50 percent in the LOS RMS outputs were achieved compared to an active-only controller. Superior performance was also obtained compared to a High-Authority/Low-Authority (HAC/LAC) controller.

  4. X-Band Active-Passive Rf Pulse Compressor with Plasma Switches

    SciTech Connect

    Vikharev, A.L.; Ivanov, O.A.; Gorbachev, A.M.; Lobaev, M.A.; Isaev, V.A.; Tantawi, S.G.; Lewandowski, J.R.; Hirshfield, J.L.; /Omega-P, New Haven /Yale U.

    2012-04-27

    As proposed by SLAC, the efficiency of a pulse compressor of the SLED-II type could be increased by changing both the phase of the microwave source and the coupling coefficient of the delay line. In the existing SLED-II system at frequency 11.4 GHz, the resonant delay line is coupled with the source via an iris with a constant reflection coefficient. Replacement of the iris with an active component makes it possible to create an active SLED-II system. In this paper, the use of plasma switches as the active elements is discussed. Plasma switches have been developed and tested at a high-power level for production of flattop compressed pulses. Active switching of SLED-II has demonstrated a marked increase in efficiency (by 20%) and power gain (by 37%) as compared with passive switching. The active compressor has produced 173 ns rf flattop output pulses with a power of about 112 MW.

  5. Biological effects of passive versus active scanning proton beams on human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gridley, Daila S; Pecaut, Michael J; Mao, Xiao W; Wroe, Andrew J; Luo-Owen, Xian

    2015-02-01

    The goal was to characterize differences in cell response after exposure to active beam scanning (ABS) protons compared to a passive delivery system. Human lung epithelial (HLE) cells were evaluated at various locations along the proton depth dose profile. The dose delivered at the Bragg peak position was essentially identical (∼4 Gy) with the two techniques, but depth dose data showed that ABS resulted in lower doses at entry and more rapid drop-off after the peak. Average dose rates for the passive and ABS beams were 1.1 Gy/min and 5.1 Gy/min, respectively; instantaneous dose rates were 19.2 Gy/min and 2,300 Gy/min (to a 0.5 × 0.5 mm(2) voxel). Analysis of DNA synthesis was based on (3)H-TdR incorporation. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was done to determine expression of genes related to p53 signaling and DNA damage; a total of 152 genes were assessed. Spectral karyotyping and analyses of the Golgi apparatus and cytokines produced by the HLE cells were also performed. At or near the Bragg peak position, ABS protons resulted in a greater decrease in DNA synthesis compared to passively delivered protons. Genes with >2-fold change (P < 0.05 vs. 0 Gy) after passive proton irradiation at one or more locations within the Bragg curve were BTG2, CDKN1A, IFNB1 and SIAH1. In contrast, many more genes had >2-fold difference with ABS protons: BRCA1, BRCA2, CDC25A, CDC25C, CCNB2, CDK1, DMC1, DNMT1, E2F1, EXO1, FEN1, GADD45A, GTSE1, IL-6, JUN, KRAS, MDM4, PRC1, PTTG1, RAD51, RPA1, TNF, WT1, XRCC2, XRCC3 and XRCC6BP1. Spectral karyotyping revealed numerous differences in chromosomal abnormalities between the two delivery systems, especially at or near the Bragg peak. Percentage of cells staining for the Golgi apparatus was low after exposure to passive and active proton beams. Studies such as this are needed to ensure patient safety and make modifications in ABS delivery, if necessary.

  6. Comparison of trunk muscle reflex activation patterns between active and passive trunk flexion-extension loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Olson, Michael W

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of trunk flexion-extension loading on the neuromuscular reflexive latencies and amplitude responses of the trunk musculature. Eighteen male and female subjects (18-27yrs) participated in active and passive trunk flexion extension, performed ∼7days apart. Subjects performed 60 trunk flexion-extension repetitions. Surface electromyography (EMG) was collected bilaterally from paraspinal and abdominal muscles. In the active condition, subjects volitionally moved their trunks, while in the passive condition the dynamometer controlled the movements. The trunk was perturbed before and immediately after 30 repetitions. Latency of muscle onset, latency of first peak, latency of maximum peak, and peak EMG amplitude were evaluated. No differences between conditions, sides, or perturbation session were apparent. Overall latencies were shorter in females (p<.05) and abdominal muscles compared to paraspinals (p<.05). Thoracic paraspinal muscle amplitudes were greater than all other muscles (p<.05). Based upon the present results, the neuromuscular system engages trunk flexor muscles prior to the paraspinals in order to provide possible stabilization of the trunk when flexor moments are generated. Overall, the results indicate no difference in response of the neuromuscular system to active or passive repetitive loading.

  7. Synergism of active and passive microwave data for estimating bare surface soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saatchi, Sasan S.; Njoku, Eni G.; Wegmueller, Urs

    1993-01-01

    Active and passive microwave sensors were applied effectively to the problem of estimating the surface soil moisture in a variety of environmental conditions. Research to date has shown that both types of sensors are also sensitive to the surface roughness and the vegetation cover. In estimating the soil moisture, the effect of the vegetation and roughness are often corrected either by acquiring multi-configuration (frequency and polarization) data or by adjusting the surface parameters in order to match the model predictions to the measured data. Due to the limitations on multi-configuration spaceborne data and the lack of a priori knowledge of the surface characteristics for parameter adjustments, it was suggested that the synergistic use of the sensors may improve the estimation of the soil moisture over the extreme range of naturally occurring soil and vegetation conditions. To investigate this problem, the backscattering and emission from a bare soil surface using the classical rough surface scattering theory were modeled. The model combines the small perturbation and the Kirchhoff approximations in conjunction with the Peak formulation to cover a wide range of surface roughness parameters with respect to frequency for both active and passive measurements. In this approach, the same analytical method was used to calculate the backscattering and emissivity. Therefore, the active and passive simulations can be combined at various polarizations and frequencies in order to estimate the soil moisture more actively. As a result, it is shown that (1) the emissivity is less dependent on the surface correlation length, (2) the ratio of the backscattering coefficient (HH) over the surface reflectivity (H) is almost independent of the soil moisture for a wide range of surface roughness, and (3) this ratio can be approximated as a linear function of the surface rms height. The results were compared with the data obtained by a multi-frequency radiometer

  8. Auditory evoked fields to vocalization during passive listening and active generation in adults who stutter.

    PubMed

    Beal, Deryk S; Cheyne, Douglas O; Gracco, Vincent L; Quraan, Maher A; Taylor, Margot J; De Nil, Luc F

    2010-10-01

    We used magnetoencephalography to investigate auditory evoked responses to speech vocalizations and non-speech tones in adults who do and do not stutter. Neuromagnetic field patterns were recorded as participants listened to a 1 kHz tone, playback of their own productions of the vowel /i/ and vowel-initial words, and actively generated the vowel /i/ and vowel-initial words. Activation of the auditory cortex at approximately 50 and 100 ms was observed during all tasks. A reduction in the peak amplitudes of the M50 and M100 components was observed during the active generation versus passive listening tasks dependent on the stimuli. Adults who stutter did not differ in the amount of speech-induced auditory suppression relative to fluent speakers. Adults who stutter had shorter M100 latencies for the actively generated speaking tasks in the right hemisphere relative to the left hemisphere but the fluent speakers showed similar latencies across hemispheres. During passive listening tasks, adults who stutter had longer M50 and M100 latencies than fluent speakers. The results suggest that there are timing, rather than amplitude, differences in auditory processing during speech in adults who stutter and are discussed in relation to hypotheses of auditory-motor integration breakdown in stuttering.

  9. Active versus passive listening to auditory streaming stimuli: a near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Remijn, Gerard B; Kojima, Haruyuki

    2010-01-01

    We use near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to assess listeners' cortical responses to a 10-s series of pure tones separated in frequency. Listeners are instructed to either judge the rhythm of these "streaming" stimuli (active-response listening) or to listen to the stimuli passively. Experiment 1 shows that active-response listening causes increases in oxygenated hemoglobin (oxy-Hb) in response to all stimuli, generally over the (pre)motor cortices. The oxy-Hb increases are significantly larger over the right hemisphere than over the left for the final 5 s of the stimulus. Hemodynamic levels do not vary with changes in the frequency separation between the tones and corresponding changes in perceived rhythm ("gallop," "streaming," or "ambiguous"). Experiment 2 shows that hemodynamic levels are strongly influenced by listening mode. For the majority of time windows, active-response listening causes significantly larger oxy-Hb increases than passive listening, significantly over the left hemisphere during the stimulus and over both hemispheres after the stimulus. This difference cannot be attributed to physical motor activity and preparation related to button pressing after stimulus end, because this is required in both listening modes.

  10. Active immunity induced by passive IgG post-exposure protection against ricin.

    PubMed

    Hu, Charles Chen; Yin, Junfei; Chau, Damon; Cherwonogrodzky, John W; Hu, Wei-Gang

    2014-01-21

    Therapeutic antibodies can confer an instant protection against biothreat agents when administered. In this study, intact IgG and F(ab')2 from goat anti-ricin hyperimmune sera were compared for the protection against lethal ricin mediated intoxication. Similar ricin-binding affinities and neutralizing activities in vitro were observed between IgG and F(ab')2 when compared at the same molar concentration. In a murine ricin intoxication model, both IgG and F(ab')2 could rescue 100% of the mice by one dose (3 nmol) administration of antibodies 1 hour after 5 × LD50 ricin challenge. Nine days later, when the rescued mice received a second ricin challenge (5 × LD50), only the IgG-treated mice survived; the F(ab')2-treated mice did not. The experimental design excluded the possibility of residual goat IgG responsible for the protection against the second ricin challenge. Results confirmed that the active immunity against ricin in mice was induced quickly following the passive delivery of a single dose of goat IgG post-exposure. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the induced active immunity against ricin in mice lasted at least 5 months. Therefore, passive IgG therapy not only provides immediate protection to the victim after ricin exposure, but also elicits an active immunity against ricin that subsequently results in long term protection.

  11. Active versus passive listening to auditory streaming stimuli: a near-infrared spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remijn, Gerard B.; Kojima, Haruyuki

    2010-05-01

    We use near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to assess listeners' cortical responses to a 10-s series of pure tones separated in frequency. Listeners are instructed to either judge the rhythm of these ``streaming'' stimuli (active-response listening) or to listen to the stimuli passively. Experiment 1 shows that active-response listening causes increases in oxygenated hemoglobin (oxy-Hb) in response to all stimuli, generally over the (pre)motor cortices. The oxy-Hb increases are significantly larger over the right hemisphere than over the left for the final 5 s of the stimulus. Hemodynamic levels do not vary with changes in the frequency separation between the tones and corresponding changes in perceived rhythm (``gallop,'' ``streaming,'' or ``ambiguous''). Experiment 2 shows that hemodynamic levels are strongly influenced by listening mode. For the majority of time windows, active-response listening causes significantly larger oxy-Hb increases than passive listening, significantly over the left hemisphere during the stimulus and over both hemispheres after the stimulus. This difference cannot be attributed to physical motor activity and preparation related to button pressing after stimulus end, because this is required in both listening modes.

  12. The speciation of marine particulate iron adjacent to active and passive continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Phoebe J.; Ohnemus, Daniel C.; Marcus, Matthew A.

    2012-03-01

    We use synchrotron-based chemical-species mapping techniques to compare the speciation of suspended (1-51 μm) marine particulate iron collected in two open ocean environments adjacent to active and passive continental margins. Chemical-species mapping provides speciation information for heterogeneous environmental samples, and is especially good for detecting spectroscopically distinct trace minerals and species that could not be detectable by other methods. The average oxidation state of marine particulate iron determined by chemical-species mapping is comparable to that determined by standard bulk X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure spectroscopy. Using chemical-species mapping, we find that up to 43% of particulate Fe in the Northwest Pacific at the depth of the adjacent active continental margin is in the Fe(II) state, with the balance Fe(III). In contrast, particulate iron in the eastern tropical North Atlantic, which receives the highest dust deposition on Earth and is adjacent to a passive margin, is dominated by weathered and oxidized Fe compounds, with Fe(III) contributing 90% of total iron. The balance is composed primarily of Fe(II)-containing species, but we detected individual pyrite particles in some samples within an oxygen minimum zone in the upper thermocline. Several lines of evidence point to the adjacent Mauritanian continental shelf as the source of pyrite to the water column. The speciation of suspended marine particulate iron reflects the mineralogy of iron from the adjacent continental margins. Since the solubility of particulate iron has been shown to be a function of its speciation, this may have implications for the bioavailability of particulate iron adjacent to passive compared to active continental margins.

  13. Passive and active microrheology for cross-linked F-actin networks in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyungsuk; Ferrer, Jorge M; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Lang, Matthew J; Kamm, Roger D

    2010-04-01

    Actin filament (F-actin) is one of the dominant structural constituents in the cytoskeleton. Orchestrated by various actin-binding proteins (ABPs), F-actin is assembled into higher-order structures such as bundles and networks that provide mechanical support for the cell and play important roles in numerous cellular processes. Although mechanical properties of F-actin networks have been extensively studied, the underlying mechanisms for network elasticity are not fully understood, in part because different measurements probe different length and force scales. Here, we developed both passive and active microrheology techniques using optical tweezers to estimate the mechanical properties of F-actin networks at a length scale comparable to cells. For the passive approach we tracked the motion of a thermally fluctuating colloidal sphere to estimate the frequency-dependent complex shear modulus of the network. In the active approach, we used an optical trap to oscillate an embedded microsphere and monitored the response in order to obtain network viscoelasticity over a physiologically relevant force range. While both active and passive measurements exhibit similar results at low strain, the F-actin network subject to high strain exhibits non-linear behavior which is analogous to the strain-hardening observed in macroscale measurements. Using confocal and total internal reflection fluorescent microscopy, we also characterize the microstructure of reconstituted F-actin networks in terms of filament length, mesh size and degree of bundling. Finally, we propose a model of network connectivity by investigating the effect of filament length on the mechanical properties and structure.

  14. Retrieval of Precipitation Profiles from Multiresolution, Multifrequency, Active and Passive Microwave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grecu, Mircea; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.; Olson, William S.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this study, a technique for estimating vertical profiles of precipitation from multifrequency, multiresolution active and passive microwave observations is investigated using both simulated and airborne data. The technique is applicable to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite multi-frequency active and passive observations. These observations are characterized by various spatial and sampling resolutions. This makes the retrieval problem mathematically more difficult and ill-determined because the quality of information decreases with decreasing resolution. A model that, given reflectivity profiles and a small set of parameters (including the cloud water content, the intercept drop size distribution, and a variable describing the frozen hydrometeor properties), simulates high-resolution brightness temperatures is used. The high-resolution simulated brightness temperatures are convolved at the real sensor resolution. An optimal estimation procedure is used to minimize the differences between simulated and observed brightness temperatures. The retrieval technique is investigated using cloud model synthetic and airborne data from the Fourth Convection And Moisture Experiment. Simulated high-resolution brightness temperatures and reflectivities and airborne observation strong are convolved at the resolution of the TRMM instruments and retrievals are performed and analyzed relative to the reference data used in observations synthesis. An illustration of the possible use of the technique in satellite rainfall estimation is presented through an application to TRMM data. The study suggests improvements in combined active and passive retrievals even when the instruments resolutions are significantly different. Future work needs to better quantify the retrievals performance, especially in connection with satellite applications, and the uncertainty of the models used in retrieval.

  15. Integration of Active and Passive Safety Technologies--A Method to Study and Estimate Field Capability.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jingwen; Flannagan, Carol A; Bao, Shan; McCoy, Robert W; Siasoco, Kevin M; Barbat, Saeed

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a method that uses a combination of field data analysis, naturalistic driving data analysis, and computational simulations to explore the potential injury reduction capabilities of integrating passive and active safety systems in frontal impact conditions. For the purposes of this study, the active safety system is actually a driver assist (DA) feature that has the potential to reduce delta-V prior to a crash, in frontal or other crash scenarios. A field data analysis was first conducted to estimate the delta-V distribution change based on an assumption of 20% crash avoidance resulting from a pre-crash braking DA feature. Analysis of changes in driver head location during 470 hard braking events in a naturalistic driving study found that drivers' head positions were mostly in the center position before the braking onset, while the percentage of time drivers leaning forward or backward increased significantly after the braking onset. Parametric studies with a total of 4800 MADYMO simulations showed that both delta-V and occupant pre-crash posture had pronounced effects on occupant injury risks and on the optimal restraint designs. By combining the results for the delta-V and head position distribution changes, a weighted average of injury risk reduction of 17% and 48% was predicted by the 50th percentile Anthropomorphic Test Device (ATD) model and human body model, respectively, with the assumption that the restraint system can adapt to the specific delta-V and pre-crash posture. This study demonstrated the potential for further reducing occupant injury risk in frontal crashes by the integration of a passive safety system with a DA feature. Future analyses considering more vehicle models, various crash conditions, and variations of occupant characteristics, such as age, gender, weight, and height, are necessary to further investigate the potential capability of integrating passive and DA or active safety systems.

  16. Active and passive compensation of APPLE II-introduced multipole errors through beam-based measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Ting-Yi; Huang, Szu-Jung; Fu, Huang-Wen; Chang, Ho-Ping; Chang, Cheng-Hsiang; Hwang, Ching-Shiang

    2016-08-01

    The effect of an APPLE II-type elliptically polarized undulator (EPU) on the beam dynamics were investigated using active and passive methods. To reduce the tune shift and improve the injection efficiency, dynamic multipole errors were compensated using L-shaped iron shims, which resulted in stable top-up operation for a minimum gap. The skew quadrupole error was compensated using a multipole corrector, which was located downstream of the EPU for minimizing betatron coupling, and it ensured the enhancement of the synchrotron radiation brightness. The investigation methods, a numerical simulation algorithm, a multipole error correction method, and the beam-based measurement results are discussed.

  17. Nondestructive assay of TRU waste using gamma-ray active and passive computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, G.P.; Decman, D.; Martz, H.; Keto, E.R.; Johansson, E.M.

    1995-10-04

    The authors have developed an active and passive computed tomography (A and PCT) scanner for assaying radioactive waste drums. Here they describe the hardware components of their system and the software used for data acquisition, gamma-ray spectroscopy analysis, and image reconstruction. They have measured the performance of the system using ``mock`` waste drums and calibrated radioactive sources. They also describe the results of measurements using this system to assay a real TRU waste drum with relatively low Pu content. The results are compared with X-ray NDE studies of the same TRU waste drum as well as assay results from segmented gamma scanner (SGS) measurements.

  18. Active and passive calcium transport systems in plant cells: Progress report, January 1986--June 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1989-01-01

    The objectives of this proposal are to identify and characterize active (energy-dependent) and passive calcium transport systems that work together to regulate calcium levels in the cytoplasm of plant cells. Several different energy-dependent Ca transport systems have been identified and characterized from oat root tissue (a monocot tissue) and carrot suspension cells (a dicot tissue). They are described in more detail below. I also have included in this progress report our continuing studies to understand the mode of action of the Helminthosporium maydis T toxin. This study was initially supported by a preceding DOE grant. The time needed to complete the study overlapped partly with the present grant period.

  19. Performance of an active/passive hybrid solar system utilizing vapor transport

    SciTech Connect

    Hedstrom, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Vapor-phase heat-transport systems are being tested in two of the passive test cells at Los Alamos. The systems consist of an active fin-and-tube collector and a condenser inside a water storage tank. The refrigerant, R-11, can be returned to the collector with a pump or with a self-pumping scheme. A computer model was developed to predict the behavior of the system, after which the computer was used to predict the annual performance of these systems in five cities. The report compares the measured and the predicted results as well as the system's sensitivity to several parameters.

  20. The aeroelastic stability improvements of soft-inplane tiltrotors by active and passive approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paik, Jinho

    Soft-inplane tiltrotors in cruise mode have exhibited unacceptably low subcritical damping in the wing vertical bending mode as well as reduced critical whirl-flutter speed. However, soft-inplane rotor system is highly advantageous over stiff-inplane rotor system in terms of inplane dynamic hub loads which results in weight/performance penalties. Therefore, ensuring adequate aeroelastic stability characteristics is a prerequisite for soft-inplane rotor system to be used in future advanced tiltrotors. This dissertation constitutes fundamental studies of soft-inplane tiltrotors and appropriate methods to alleviate whirl-flutter instability. This study consists of four major investigations. The first investigation includes validation efforts of present analytical model against the recently available data for the Bell generic semi-span model in airplane mode and the SASIP model in hover mode. The second investigation addresses the approaches which have been employed to establish a physical understanding of the very low sub-critical damping phenomenon, which is consistently exhibited by soft-inplane tiltrotor configurations. Through analyses and comparison studies mainly between the Bell generic soft- and stiff-inplane semi-span models, the physics behind this phenomenon is emphasized. In the third investigation, parametric studies and design optimization of the rotor/wing design variables are performed in order to passively improve the whirl stability boundaries. For the last investigation, the effectiveness of active control through wing-flaperon and swashplate control inputs is examined in terms of stability improvement of soft-inplane tiltrotors. Scheduled gain and constant gain controllers are first compared for each actuation scheme and then output feedback controllers based on easily measurable wing states are compared with full-state feedback controllers. The baseline soft-inplane configurations used in passive and active studies are the full-scale Boeing Model

  1. Cost-effective and monitoring-active technique for TDM-passive optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Chang-Chia; Lin, Hong-Mao; Tarn, Chen-Wen; Lin, Huang-Liang

    2014-08-01

    A reliable, detection-active and cost-effective method which employs the hello and heartbeat signals for branched node distinguishing to monitor fiber fault in any branch of distribution fibers of a time division multiplexing passive optical network (TDM-PON) is proposed. With this method, the material cost of building an optical network monitor system for a TDM-PON with 168 ONUs and the time of identifying a multiple branch faults is significantly reduced in a TDM-PON system of any scale. A fault location in a 1 × 32 TDM-PON system using this method to identify the fault branch is demonstrated.

  2. A Large-N Mixed Sensor Active + Passive Seismic Array near Sweetwater, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barklage, M.; Hollis, D.; Gridley, J. M.; Woodward, R.; Spriggs, N.

    2014-12-01

    A collaborative high-density seismic survey using broadband and short period seismic sensors was conducted March 7 - April 30, 2014 near Sweetwater, TX. The objective of the survey was to use a combination of controlled source shot slices and passive seismic recordings recorded by multiple types of sensors with different bandwidths and sensitivities to image the subsurface. The broadband component of the survey consisted of 25 continuously recording seismic stations comprised of 20 Trillium Compact Posthole sensors from Nanometrics and 5 Polar Trillium 120PHQs from the IRIS/PASSCAL Instrument Center (PIC). The broadband stations also utilized 25 Centaur digitizers from Nanometrics as well as 25 polar quick deploy enclosures from the PIC. The broadband array was designed to maximize horizontal traveling seismic energy for surface wave analysis over the primary target area with sufficient offset for imaging objectives at depth. The short period component of the survey consisted of 2639 receiver locations using Zland nodes from NodalSeismic. The nodes are further divided into 3 sub-arrays: 1) outlier array 2) active source array 3) backbone array. The outlier array consisted of 25 continuously recording nodes distributed around the edge of the survey at a distance of ~5 km from the survey boundary, and provided valuable constraints to passive data analysis techniques at the edge of the survey boundary. The active source patch consisted of densely spaced nodes that were designed to record signals from a Vibroseis source truck for active source reflection processing and imaging. The backbone array consisted of 292 nodes that covered the entirety of the survey area to maximize the value of the passive data analysis. By utilizing continuous recording and smartly designed arrays for measuring local and regional earthquakes we can incorporate velocity information derived from passive data analysis into the active source processing workflow to produce a superior subsurface

  3. Synergistic use of active and passive microwave in soil moisture estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, P.; Chauhan, N.; Jackson, T.; Saatchi, S.

    1992-01-01

    Data gathered during the MACHYDRO experiment in central Pennsylvania in July 1990 have been utilized to study the synergistic use of active and passive microwave systems for estimating soil moisture. These data sets were obtained during an eleven-day period with NASA's Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) and Push-Broom Microwave Radiometer (PBMR) over an instrumented watershed which included agricultural fields with a number of different crop covers. Simultaneous ground truth measurements were also made in order to characterize the state of vegetation and soil moisture under a variety of meteorological conditions. A combination algorithm is presented as applied to a representative corn field in the MACHYDRO watershed.

  4. Cat vestibular neurons that exhibit different responses to active and passive yaw head rotations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, F. R.; Tomko, D. L.

    1987-01-01

    Neurons in the vestibular nuclei were recorded in alert cats during voluntary yaw rotations of the head and during the same rotations delivered with a turntable driven from a record of previous voluntary movements. During both voluntary and passive rotations, 35 percent (6/17) of neurons tested responded at higher rates or for a larger part of the movement during voluntary movements than during the same rotations delivered with the turntable. Neck sensory input was evaluated separately in many of these cells and can account qualitatively for the extra firing present during active movement.

  5. Users Guide to BellhopDRDC_V4: Active and Passive Versions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    l’interpolation linéaire de distance du profil de vitesse du son (PVS) et l’interpolation curvilinéaire de la bathymétrie sont ajoutés aux choix...exigences des programmes de commande de l’Environment Modeling Manager. Le présent document constitue un guide d’utilisation des versions active et...passive de la version 4 RDDC du Bellhop ainsi que du programme de perte de transmission aux limites, et décrit certaines routines de traçage permettant

  6. Comparison of active and passive sampling strategies for the monitoring of pesticide contamination in streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assoumani, Azziz; Margoum, Christelle; Guillemain, Céline; Coquery, Marina

    2014-05-01

    constants (Rs). Each constant links the mass of the a target contaminant accumulated in the sampler to its concentration in water. At the end of the field application, the Rs are used to calculate the TWA concentration of each target contaminant with the final mass of the contaminants accumulated in the sampler. Stir Bar Sorptive Extraction (SBSE) is a solvent free sample preparation technique dedicated to the analysis of moderately hydrophobic to hydrophobic compounds in liquid and gas samples. It is composed of a magnet enclosed in a glass tube coated with a thick film of polydimethysiloxane (PDMS). We recently developed the in situ application of SBSE as a passive sampling technique (herein named "Passive SBSE") for the monitoring of agricultural pesticides. The aim of this study is to perform the calibration of the passive SBSE in the laboratory, and to apply and compare this technique to active sampling strategies for the monitoring of 16 relatively hydrophobic to hydrophobic pesticides in streams, during 2 1-month sampling campaigns. Time-weighted averaged concentrations of the target pesticides obtained from passive SBSE were compared to the target pesticide concentrations of grab samples, and time-related and flow-dependent samples of the streams. Results showed passive SBSE as an efficient alternative to conventional active sampling strategies.

  7. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy study of high-palladium dental alloys. Part II: behavior at active and passive potentials.

    PubMed

    Sun, D; Monaghan, P; Brantley, W A; Johnston, W M

    2002-05-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) analyses were performed on three high-palladium alloys and a gold-palladium alloy at active and passive potentials in five electrolytes that simulated body fluid and oral environmental conditions. All four alloys were previously found to have excellent corrosion resistance in these in vitro environments. Before performing the EIS analyses, alloy specimens were subjected to a clinically relevant heat treatment that simulated the firing cycles for a dental porcelain. It was found that the EIS spectra varied with test potential and electrolyte. Diffusional effects, related to the dealloying and subsequent surface enrichment in palladium of the high-palladium alloys, along with species adsorption and passivation, were revealed at both active and passive potentials, although these effects were more evident at the passive potentials.

  8. Regrowth-free high-gain InGaAsP/InP active-passive platform via ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Parker, John S; Sivananthan, Abirami; Norberg, Erik; Coldren, Larry A

    2012-08-27

    We demonstrate a regrowth-free material platform to create monolithic InGaAsP/InP photonic integrated circuits (PICs) with high-gain active and low-loss passive sections via a PL detuning of >135 nm. We show 2.5 µm wide by 400 µm long semiconductor optical amplifiers with >40 dB/mm gain at 1570 nm, and passive waveguide losses <2.3 dB/mm. The bandgap in the passive section is detuned using low-energy 190 keV channelized phosphorous implantation and subsequent rapid thermal annealing to achieve impurity-induced quantum well intermixing (QWI). The PL wavelengths in the active and passive sections are 1553 and 1417 nm, respectively. Lasing wavelengths for 500 µm Fabry-Perot lasers are 1567 and 1453 nm, respectively.

  9. Comparison of metabolic and biomechanic responses to active vs. passive warm-up procedures before physical exercise.

    PubMed

    Brunner-Ziegler, Sophie; Strasser, Barbara; Haber, Paul

    2011-04-01

    Active warm-up before physical exercise is a widely accepted practice to enhance physical performance, whereas data on modalities to passively raise tissue temperature are rare. The study compared the effect of active vs. passive warm-up procedures before exercise on energy supply and muscle strength performance. Twenty young, male volunteers performed 3 spiroergometer-test series without prior warm-up and after either an active or passive warm-up procedure. Oxygen uptake (VO2), heart rate (HR), pH value, and lactate were determined at 80% of individual VO2max values and during recovery. Comparing no prior warm-up with passive warm-up, pH values were lower at the fourth test minute (p < 0.004), and lactate values were higher at the sixth and third minutes of recovery (p < 0.01 and p < 0.010, respectively), after no prior warm-up. Comparing active with passive warm-up, HR was lower, and VO2 values were higher at the fourth and sixth test minutes (p < 0.033 and p < 0.011, respectively, and p < 0.015 and p < 0.022, respectively) after active warm-up. Differentiation between active and passive warm-up was more pronounced than between either warm-up or no warm-up. Conditions that may promote improved performance were more present after active vs. passive warm-up. Thus, athletes may reach the metabolic steady state faster after active warm-up.

  10. Predictive Optimal Control of Active and Passive Building Thermal Storage Inventory

    SciTech Connect

    Gregor P. Henze; Moncef Krarti

    2003-12-17

    Cooling of commercial buildings contributes significantly to the peak demand placed on an electrical utility grid. Time-of-use electricity rates encourage shifting of electrical loads to off-peak periods at night and weekends. Buildings can respond to these pricing signals by shifting cooling-related thermal loads either by precooling the building's massive structure or the use of active thermal energy storage systems such as ice storage. While these two thermal batteries have been engaged separately in the past, this project investigates the merits of harnessing both storage media concurrently in the context of predictive optimal control. This topical report describes the demonstration of the model-based predictive optimal control for active and passive building thermal storage inventory in a test facility in real-time using time-of-use differentiated electricity prices without demand charges. The laboratory testing findings presented in this topical report cover the second of three project phases. The novel supervisory controller successfully executed a three-step procedure consisting of (1) short-term weather prediction, (2) optimization of control strategy over the next planning horizon using a calibrated building model, and (3) post-processing of the optimal strategy to yield a control command for the current time step that can be executed in the test facility. The primary and secondary building mechanical systems were effectively orchestrated by the model-based predictive optimal controller in real-time while observing comfort and operational constraints. The findings reveal that when the optimal controller is given imperfect weather fore-casts and when the building model used for planning control strategies does not match the actual building perfectly, measured utility costs savings relative to conventional building operation can be substantial. This requires that the facility under control lends itself to passive storage utilization and the building model

  11. Immediate effect of passive and active stretching on hamstrings flexibility: a single-blinded randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Yuichi; Aizawa, Junya; Kanemura, Naohiko; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Hosomi, Naohisa; Maruyama, Hirofumi; Kimura, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Masayasu; Takayanagi, Kiyomi

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the efficacy of passive and active stretching techniques on hamstring flexibility. [Subjects] Fifty-four healthy young subjects were randomly assigned to one of three groups (2 treatment groups and 1 control group). [Methods] Subjects in the passive stretching group had their knees extended by an examiner while lying supine 90° of hip flexion. In the same position, subjects in the active stretching group extended their knees. The groups performed 3 sets of the assigned stretch, with each stretch held for 10 seconds at the point where tightness in the hamstring muscles was felt. Subjects in the control group did not perform stretching. Before and immediately after stretching, hamstring flexibility was assessed by a blinded assessor, using the active knee-extension test. [Results] After stretching, there was a significant improvement in the hamstring flexibilities of the active and passive stretching groups compared with the control group. Furthermore, the passive stretching group showed significantly greater improvement in hamstring flexibility than the active stretching group. [Conclusion] Improvement in hamstring flexibility measured by the active knee-extension test was achieved by both stretching techniques; however, passive stretching was more effective than active stretching at achieving an immediate increase in hamstring flexibility.

  12. Immediate effect of passive and active stretching on hamstrings flexibility: a single-blinded randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Yuichi; Aizawa, Junya; Kanemura, Naohiko; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Hosomi, Naohisa; Maruyama, Hirofumi; Kimura, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Masayasu; Takayanagi, Kiyomi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the efficacy of passive and active stretching techniques on hamstring flexibility. [Subjects] Fifty-four healthy young subjects were randomly assigned to one of three groups (2 treatment groups and 1 control group). [Methods] Subjects in the passive stretching group had their knees extended by an examiner while lying supine 90° of hip flexion. In the same position, subjects in the active stretching group extended their knees. The groups performed 3 sets of the assigned stretch, with each stretch held for 10 seconds at the point where tightness in the hamstring muscles was felt. Subjects in the control group did not perform stretching. Before and immediately after stretching, hamstring flexibility was assessed by a blinded assessor, using the active knee-extension test. [Results] After stretching, there was a significant improvement in the hamstring flexibilities of the active and passive stretching groups compared with the control group. Furthermore, the passive stretching group showed significantly greater improvement in hamstring flexibility than the active stretching group. [Conclusion] Improvement in hamstring flexibility measured by the active knee-extension test was achieved by both stretching techniques; however, passive stretching was more effective than active stretching at achieving an immediate increase in hamstring flexibility. PMID:26644667

  13. Analysis of Semi-Active and Passive Suspensions System for Off-Road Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BenLahcene, Zohir; Faris, Waleed F.; Khan, M. D. Raisuddin

    2009-03-01

    The speed of off-road vehicles over rough terrain is generally determined by the ride quality not by the engine power. For this reason, researches are currently being undertaking to improve the ride dynamics of these vehicles using an advanced suspension system. This study intends to provide a preliminary evaluation of whether semi-active suspensions are beneficial to improving ride and handling in off-road vehicles. One of the greatest challenges in designing off-road vehicle suspension system is maintaining a good balance between vehicle ride and handling. Three configurations of these vehicles; 2-axle, 3-xle and 4-axles have been studied and their performances are compared. The application of several control policies of semi-active suspension system, namely skyhook; ground-hook and hybrid controls have been analyzed and compared with passive systems. The results show that the hybrid control policy yields better comfort than a passive suspension, without reducing the road-holding quality or increasing the suspension displacement. The hybrid control policy is also shown to be a better compromise between comfort, road-holding and suspension displacement than the skyhook and ground-hook control policies. Results show an improvement in ride comfort and vehicle handling using 4-axle over 3-axle and 2-axle when emphasis is placed on the response of the vehicle body acceleration, suspension and tyre deflection.

  14. Nd:YAG laser with passive-active mode-locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weijiang; Chen, Zhenlei; Ren, Deming; Qu, Yanchen; Mo, Shuang; Huang, Jinjer; Andreev, Yury M.; Gorobets, Vadim A.; Petukhov, Vladimir O.; Zemlyanov, Aleksei A.

    2008-03-01

    All solid-state flash-lamp pumped passive-active mode-locked Nd3+:YAG laser is designed and experimentally studded. Saturation absorber Cr4+:YAG with initial transparency 25 and 47% are used as a passive Q-switcher and acousto-optical fused quartz modulator as an active mode-locker. Efficient length of the laser cavity with fixed mirror positions (1.45 m spaced) is droved by changes of 100% flat mirror for concave mirrors with different focus lengths. Changeable output mirrors with transparencies of 15 and 50% are used. Driving of the cavity parameters, laser and acousto-optical modulator power supply voltages let us to control output pulse train and single pulse parameters. As it goes from the analyses of oscillograms fixed with pyroelectric detector (τ=0.5 ns) and 1 GHz oscilloscope, over 95% of pulse output energy has been mode-locked. Average duration of the pulse train envelope of 5 to 50 single pulses at FWHM has been droved within 50 to 600 ns. When this single pulse duration is controlled but did not exceed 2 ns.

  15. Clicks, whistles and pulses: Passive and active signal use in dolphin communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzing, Denise L.

    2014-12-01

    The search for signals out of noise is a problem not only with radio signals from the sky but in the study of animal communication. Dolphins use multiple modalities to communicate including body postures, touch, vision, and most elaborately sound. Like SETI radio signal searches, dolphin sound analysis includes the detection, recognition, analysis, and interpretation of signals. Dolphins use both passive listening and active production to communicate. Dolphins use three main types of acoustic signals: frequency modulated whistles (narrowband with harmonics), echolocation (broadband clicks) and burst pulsed sounds (packets of closely spaced broadband clicks). Dolphin sound analysis has focused on frequency-modulated whistles, yet the most commonly used signals are burst-pulsed sounds which, due to their graded and overlapping nature and bimodal inter-click interval (ICI) rates are hard to categorize. We will look at: 1) the mechanism of sound production and categories of sound types, 2) sound analysis techniques and information content, and 3) examples of lessons learned in the study of dolphin acoustics. The goal of this paper is to provide perspective on how animal communication studies might provide insight to both passive and active SETI in the larger context of searching for life signatures.

  16. Pair and Cluster Formation in Hybrid Active-Passive Matter Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafnick, Ryan; Garcia, Angel

    2015-03-01

    Systems composed of self-propelling entities, dubbed active matter, are ubiquitous in nature, from flocks of birds and schools of fish to swarms of bacteria and catalytic nanomotors. These systems (both biological and industrial) have applications ranging from micron-scale cargo manipulation and directed transport to water remediation and material processing. When added to a solution with passive (non-self-propelling) particles, active matter leads to new and altered system properties. For example, the diffusion of passive particles increases by orders of magnitude in typical systems, leading to a raised effective temperature. Additionally, particles that normally repel each other exhibit effective attractions which can lead to pair formation and clustering. The nature of these effects depends on both the mechanical collisions of swimmers and the hydrodynamic flow fields they propagate. We computationally examine the effect and dependence of various system parameters, such as particle shape and density, on these properties. This work was funded by NIH grant GM086801 and NSF grant MCB-1050966.

  17. Comparison of active and passive microwave signatures of Arctic sea ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drinkwater, M. R.; Crawford, J. P.; Cavalieri, D. J.; Holt, B.; Carsey, F. D.

    1990-01-01

    In March 1988, overlapping active and passive microwave instrument data were acquired over Arctic sea ice using the NASA DC-8 aircraft equipped with multifrequency, variable polarization SAR and radiometer. Flights were conducted as a series of coordinated underflights of the DMSP SSM/I satellite radiometer in order to validate ice products derived from the SSM/I radiances. Subsequent flights by an NRL P-3 aircraft enabled overlapping high-resolution, single frequency image data to be acquired over the same regions using a Ka-band scanning microwave radiometer. In this paper, techniques are discussed for the accurate coregistration of the three aircraft datasets. Precise coregistration to an accuracy of 100 m plus or minus 25 m has, for the first time, enabled the detailed comparison of temporally and spatially coincident active and passive airborne microwave datasets. Preliminary results from the intercomparisons indicate that the SAR has highly frequency- and polarization-dependent signatures, which at 5.3 GHz (C-band) show an extremely high correlation with the 37 GHz radiometric temperatures.

  18. Calculations of axisymmetric stability of tokamak plasmas with active and passive feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, D.J.; Jardin, S.C.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1991-07-01

    A new linear MHD stability code, NOVA-W, has been developed in order to study feedback stabilization of the axisymmetric mode in deformable tokamak plasmas. The NOVA-W code is a modification of the non-variational MHD stability code NOVA that includes the effects of resistive passive conductors and active feedback circuits. The vacuum calculation has been reformulated in terms of the perturbed poloidal flux to allow the inclusion of perturbed toroidal currents outside the plasma. The boundary condition at the plasma-vacuum interface relates the instability displacement to the perturbed poloidal flux. This allows a solution of the linear MHD stability equations with the feedback effects included. The passive stability predictions of the code have been tested both against a simplified analytic model and against a different numerical calculation for a realistic tokamak configuration. The comparisons demonstrate the accuracy of the NOVA-W results. Active feedback calculations are performed for the CIT tokamak design demonstrating the effect of varying the position of the flux loops that provide the measurements of vertical displacement. The results compare well with those computed earlier using a less efficient nonlinear code. 37 refs., 13 figs.

  19. The Development of an Intelligent Hybrid Active-passive Vibration Isolator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuai, Changgeng; Ma, Jianguo; Rustighi, Emiliano

    2016-09-01

    A hybrid active-passive vibration isolator made up of electromagnetic actuator and air spring in parallel can be used to effectively isolate the broadband and line spectrum vibration of mechanical equipment simultaneously. However, due to its reliability and safety problems caused by the impact, its application in ships is limited. In this paper, an impact- resistant structure and an air gap self-sensing method of the passive-active hybrid vibration isolator are proposed and developed on the base of modelling, simulation and analysis. A thin magnetic rubber is filled into the air gap of electromagnetic actuator, which can avoid rigid collision between the armature and the permanent magnet under the action of impact. A suspension armature structure including pre-compression spring is suggested, which can automatically compensate the deformation caused by impact and protect the coil and permanent magnet from impact damage. An air gap self-sensing method is developed through detecting the voltage between the input and output terminals of actuator, which is verified by experiments.

  20. Active and passive symmetrization of Runge-Kutta Lobatto IIIA methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorgey, A.; Chan, R. P. K.

    2012-09-01

    Symmetrization of the Runge-Kutta Gauss methods have been shown to be robust in solving stiff linear and nonlinear initial value ordinary differential equations [4]. The most efficient way of applying symmmetrization was found to be passive symmetrization with passive extrapolation. In this paper we investigate symmetrization of the Lobatto IIIA methods. We show numerically that the same strategy of using passive symmetrization applied with passive extrapolation of the Lobbatto IIIA methods is also most efficient in solving the nonlinear problems tested.

  1. The evaluation of the safety benefits of combined passive and on-board active safety applications.

    PubMed

    Page, Yves; Cuny, Sophie; Zangmeister, Tobias; Kreiss, Jens-Peter; Hermitte, Thierry

    2009-10-01

    One of the objectives of the European TRACE project (TRaffic Accident Causation in Europe, 2006-2008) was to estimate the proportion of injury accidents that could be avoided and/or the proportion of injury accidents where the severity could be mitigated for on-the-market safety applications, if 100 % of the car fleet would be equipped with them. We have selected for evaluation the Electronic Stability Control (ESC) and the Emergency Brake Assist (EBA) applications. As for passive safety systems, recent cars are designed to offer overall safety protection. Car structure, load limiters, front airbags, side airbags, knee airbags, pretensioners, padding and non aggressive structures in the door panel, the dashboard, the windshield, the seats, and the head rest also contribute to applying more protection. The whole safety package is very difficult to evaluate separately, one element independently segmented from the others. We decided to consider evaluating the effectiveness of the whole passive safety package, This package,, for the sake of simplicity, was the number of stars awarded at the Euro NCAP testing. The challenges were to compare the effectiveness of some safety configuration SC I, with the effectiveness of a different safety configuration SC II. A safety configuration is understood as a package of safety functions. Ten comparisons have been carried out such as the evaluation of the safety benefit of a fifth star given that the car has four stars and an EBA. The main outcome of this analysis is that any addition of a passive or active safety function selected in this analysis is producing increased safety benefits. For example, if all cars were five stars fitted with EBA and ESC, instead of four stars without ESC and EBA, injury accidents would be reduced by 47.2% for severe injuries and 69.5% for fatal injuries.

  2. The Evaluation of the Safety Benefits of Combined Passive and On-Board Active Safety Applications

    PubMed Central

    Page, Yves; Cuny, Sophie; Zangmeister, Tobias; Kreiss, Jens-Peter; Hermitte, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    One of the objectives of the European TRACE project (TRaffic Accident Causation in Europe, 2006–2008) was to estimate the proportion of injury accidents that could be avoided and/or the proportion of injury accidents where the severity could be mitigated for on-the-market safety applications, if 100 % of the car fleet would be equipped with them. We have selected for evaluation the Electronic Stability Control (ESC) and the Emergency Brake Assist (EBA) applications. As for passive safety systems, recent cars are designed to offer overall safety protection. Car structure, load limiters, front airbags, side airbags, knee airbags, pretensioners, padding and non aggressive structures in the door panel, the dashboard, the windshield, the seats, and the head rest also contribute to applying more protection. The whole safety package is very difficult to evaluate separately, one element independently segmented from the others. We decided to consider evaluating the effectivenessof the whole passive safety package, This package,, for the sake of simplicity, was the number of stars awarded at the Euro NCAP testing. The challenges were to compare the effectiveness of some safety configuration SC I, with the effectiveness of a different safety configuration SC II. A safety configuration is understood as a package of safety functions. Ten comparisons have been carried out such as the evaluation of the safety benefit of a fifth star given that the car has four stars and an EBA. The main outcome of this analysis is that any addition of a passive or active safety function selected in this analysis is producing increased safety benefits. For example, if all cars were five stars fitted with EBA and ESC, instead of four stars without ESC and EBA, injury accidents would be reduced by 47.2% for severe injuries and 69.5% for fatal injuries. PMID:20184838

  3. Active and passive electrical and seismic time-lapse monitoring of earthen embankments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittgers, Justin Bradley

    In this dissertation, I present research involving the application of active and passive geophysical data collection, data assimilation, and inverse modeling for the purpose of earthen embankment infrastructure assessment. Throughout the dissertation, I identify several data characteristics, and several challenges intrinsic to characterization and imaging of earthen embankments and anomalous seepage phenomena, from both a static and time-lapse geophysical monitoring perspective. I begin with the presentation of a field study conducted on a seeping earthen dam, involving static and independent inversions of active tomography data sets, and self-potential modeling of fluid flow within a confined aquifer. Additionally, I present results of active and passive time-lapse geophysical monitoring conducted during two meso-scale laboratory experiments involving the failure and self-healing of embankment filter materials via induced vertical cracking. Identified data signatures and trends, as well as 4D inversion results, are discussed as an underlying motivation for conducting subsequent research. Next, I present a new 4D acoustic emissions source localization algorithm that is applied to passive seismic monitoring data collected during a full-scale embankment failure test. Acoustic emissions localization results are then used to help spatially constrain 4D inversion of collocated self-potential monitoring data. I then turn to time-lapse joint inversion of active tomographic data sets applied to the characterization and monitoring of earthen embankments. Here, I develop a new technique for applying spatiotemporally varying structural joint inversion constraints. The new technique, referred to as Automatic Joint Constraints (AJC), is first demonstrated on a synthetic 2D joint model space, and is then applied to real geophysical monitoring data sets collected during a full-scale earthen embankment piping-failure test. Finally, I discuss some non-technical issues related to

  4. Bystanders' Behavior in Cyberbullying Episodes: Active and Passive Patterns in the Context of Personal-Socio-Emotional Factors.

    PubMed

    Olenik-Shemesh, Dorit; Heiman, Tali; Eden, Sigal

    2017-01-01

    The present study explored bystanders' behavior in cyberbullying (CB) episodes among children and youth, focusing on active and passive behavior patterns. The study examined prevalence and characteristics of bystanders' behavior following CB episodes, and their active-passive intervention patterns in relation to personal (age, gender) and socio-emotional (self-efficacy, social support, sense of loneliness) factors. Of the 1,094 participants (ages 9-18), 497 (46.4%) reported they were bystanders to CB episodes. Of the bystanders, 55.4% were identified as having a passive pattern of behavior-they did not provide any help to cyber-victims, whereas 44.6% were identified as having an active pattern-helping the cyber-victim. In line with the "bystanders' effect," only 35.6% of the bystanders offered direct help to cyber-victims after witnessing CB. When studying the personal-socio-emotional differences between active and passive bystanders, it was found that the "active bystanders" are more often girls, older, have more social support from significant others, and have lower levels of emotional loneliness than bystanders in the passive group. Differences within the passive and active patterns were studied as well. A logistic regression revealed the unique contribution of each predictor to the probability of being an active bystander. It was found that gender and age predicted the probability of being an active bystander: Girls are more likely than boys, and older bystanders are more likely than younger ones, to choose an active pattern and provide help to cyber-victims. In addition, implications for CB prevention and intervention involvement programs to encourage bystanders to help cyber-victims are discussed.

  5. Paralleling power MOSFETs in their active region: Extended range of passively forced current sharing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, Janis M.

    1989-01-01

    A simple passive circuit that improves current balance in parallelled power MOSFETs that are not precisely matched and that are operated in their active region from a common gate drive are exhibited. A nonlinear circuit consisting of diodes and resistors generates the differential gate potential required to correct for unbalance while maintaining low losses over a range of current. Also application of a thin tape wound magnetic core to effect dynamic current balance is reviewed, and a simple theory is presented showing that for operation in the active region the branch currents tend to revert to their normal unbalanced values even if the core is not driven into saturation. Results of several comparative experiments are given.

  6. "Active" and "Passive" Lava Resurfacing Processes on Io: A Comparative Study of Loki Patera and Prometheus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, A. G.; Matson, D. L.; Leone, G.; Wilson, L.; Keszthelyi, L. P.

    2004-01-01

    Studies of Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) data and ground based data of volcanism at Prometheus and Loki Patera on Io reveal very different mechanisms of lava emplacement at these two volcanoes. Data analyses show that the periodic nature of Loki Patera s volcanism from 1990 to 2001 is strong evidence that Loki s resurfacing over this period resulted from the foundering of a crust on a lava lake. This process is designated passive , as there is no reliance on sub-surface processes: the foundering of the crust is inevitable. Prometheus, on the other hand, displays an episodicity in its activity which we designate active . Like Kilauea, a close analog, Prometheus s effusive volcanism is dominated by pulses of magma through the nearsurface plumbing system. Each system affords views of lava resurfacing processes through modelling.

  7. Antibacterial performance of polypropylene nonwoven fabric wound dressing surfaces containing passive and active components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Zhirong; Du, Shanshan; Zhao, Chunyu; Chen, Hao; Sun, Miao; Yan, Shunjie; Luan, Shifang; Yin, Jinghua

    2016-03-01

    A growing number of wound dressing-related nosocomial infections necessitate the development of novel antibacterial strategies. Herein, polypropylene non-woven fabric (PPNWF) was facilely modified with passive and active antibacterial components, namely photografting polymerization both N-Vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (NVP) and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) monomers, and the introduction of guanidine polymer through the reaction between active amino groups and epoxy groups. The modified samples were confirmed by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. Water contact angle measurement, antibacterial test, platelet and red blood cell adhesion were used to evaluate the hydrophilicity, antibacterial properties and hemocompatibility of the samples. It was found that the antibacterial properties were obviously enhanced, meanwhile significantly suppressing platelet and red blood cell adhesion after the above modification. This PPNWF samples that possess antifouling and antimicrobial properties, have great potential in wound dressing applications.

  8. Hybrid Active-Passive Systems for Control of Aircraft Interior Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Chris R.; Palumbo, Dan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    It was proposed to continue with development and application in the two active-passive areas of Active Tuned Vibration Absorbers (ATVA) and smart foam applied to the reduction of interior noise in aircraft. In general the work was focused on making both techniques more efficient, practical and robust thus increasing their application potential. The work was also concerned with demonstrating the potential of these two technologies under realistic implementations as well as understanding the fundamental physics of the systems. The proposed work consisted of a three-year program and was tightly coordinated with related work being carried out in the Structural Acoustics Branch at NASA LaRC. The work was supervised and coordinated through all phases by Prof Chris Fuller of Va Tech.

  9. A Paradox of Syntactic Priming: Why Response Tendencies Show Priming for Passives, and Response Latencies Show Priming for Actives

    PubMed Central

    Segaert, Katrien; Menenti, Laura; Weber, Kirsten; Hagoort, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Speakers tend to repeat syntactic structures across sentences, a phenomenon called syntactic priming. Although it has been suggested that repeating syntactic structures should result in speeded responses, previous research has focused on effects in response tendencies. We investigated syntactic priming effects simultaneously in response tendencies and response latencies for active and passive transitive sentences in a picture description task. In Experiment 1, there were priming effects in response tendencies for passives and in response latencies for actives. However, when participants' pre-existing preference for actives was altered in Experiment 2, syntactic priming occurred for both actives and passives in response tendencies as well as in response latencies. This is the first investigation of the effects of structure frequency on both response tendencies and latencies in syntactic priming. We discuss the implications of these data for current theories of syntactic processing. PMID:22022352

  10. Solid state active/passive night vision imager using continuous-wave laser diodes and silicon focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmerhausen, Richard H.

    2013-04-01

    Passive imaging offers covertness and low power, while active imaging provides longer range target acquisition without the need for natural or external illumination. This paper describes a focal plane array (FPA) concept that has the low noise needed for state-of-the-art passive imaging and the high-speed gating needed for active imaging. The FPA is used with highly efficient but low-peak-power laser diodes to create a night vision imager that has the size, weight, and power attributes suitable for man-portable applications. Video output is provided in both the active and passive modes. In addition, the active mode is Class 1 eye safe and is not visible to the naked eye or to night vision goggles.

  11. Active and Passive Optical Imaging Modality for Unobtrusive Cardiorespiratory Monitoring and Facial Expression Assessment.

    PubMed

    Blazek, Vladimir; Blanik, Nikolai; Blazek, Claudia R; Paul, Michael; Pereira, Carina; Koeny, Marcus; Venema, Boudewijn; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Because of their obvious advantages, active and passive optoelectronic sensor concepts are being investigated by biomedical research groups worldwide, particularly their camera-based variants. Such methods work noninvasively and contactless, and they provide spatially resolved parameter detection. We present 2 techniques: the active photoplethysmography imaging (PPGI) method for detecting dermal blood perfusion dynamics and the passive infrared thermography imaging (IRTI) method for detecting skin temperature distribution. PPGI is an enhancement of classical pulse oximetry. Approved algorithms from pulse oximetry for the detection of heart rate, heart rate variability, blood pressure-dependent pulse wave velocity, pulse waveform-related stress/pain indicators, respiration rate, respiratory variability, and vasomotional activity can easily be adapted to PPGI. Although the IRTI method primarily records temperature distribution of the observed object, information on respiration rate and respiratory variability can also be derived by analyzing temperature change over time, for example, in the nasal region, or through respiratory movement. Combined with current research areas and novel biomedical engineering applications (eg, telemedicine, tele-emergency, and telemedical diagnostics), PPGI and IRTI may offer new data for diagnostic purposes, including assessment of peripheral arterial and venous oxygen saturation (as well as their differences). Moreover, facial expressions and stress and/or pain-related variables can be derived, for example, during anesthesia, in the recovery room/intensive care unit and during daily activities. The main advantages of both monitoring methods are unobtrusive data acquisition and the possibility to assess vital variables for different body regions. These methods supplement each other to enable long-term monitoring of physiological effects and of effects with special local characteristics. They also offer diagnostic advantages for

  12. Active and passive computed tomography mixed waste focus area final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J A; Becker, G K; Camp, D C; Decman, D J; Martz, H E; Roberson, G P

    1998-11-06

    The Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) Characterization Development Strategy delineates an approach to resolve technology deficiencies associated with the characterization of mixed wastes. The intent of this strategy is to ensure the availability of technologies to support the Department of Energy's (DOE) mixed-waste, low-level or transuranic (TRU) contaminated waste characterization management needs. To this end the MWFA has defined and coordinated characterization development programs to ensure that data and test results necessary to evaluate the utility of non-destructive assay technologies are available to meet site contact handled waste management schedules. Requirements used as technology development project benchmarks are based in the National TRU Program Quality Assurance Program Plan. These requirements include the ability to determine total bias and total measurement uncertainty. These parameters must be completely evaluated for waste types to be processed through a given nondestructive waste assay system constituting the foundation of activities undertaken in technology development projects. Once development and testing activities have been completed, Innovative Technology Summary Reports are generated to provide results and conclusions to support EM-30, -40, or -60 end user or customer technology selection. The active and passive computed tomography non-destructive assay system is one of the technologies selected for development by the MWFA. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed the active and passive computed tomography (A&XT) nondestructive assay (NDA) technology to identify and accurately quantify all detectable radioisotopes in closed containers of waste. This technology will be applicable to all types of waste regardless of their classification-low level, transuranic or mixed. Mixed waste contains radioactivity and hazardous organic species. The scope of our technology is to develop a non-invasive waste-drum scanner that employs

  13. Hybrid Active-Passive Systems for Control of Aircraft Interior Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Chris R.

    1999-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated the large potential for hybrid active-passive systems for attenuating interior noise in aircraft fuselages. The main advantage of an active-passive system is, by utilizing the natural dynamics of the actuator system, the control actuator power and weight is markedly reduced and stability/robustness is enhanced. Three different active-passive approaches were studied in the past year. The first technique utilizes multiple tunable vibration absorbers (ATVA) for reducing narrow band sound radiated from panels and transmitted through fuselage structures. The focus is on reducing interior noise due to propeller or turbo fan harmonic excitation. Two types of tunable vibration absorbers were investigated; a solid state system based upon a piezoelectric mechanical exciter and an electromechanical system based upon a Motran shaker. Both of these systems utilize a mass-spring dynamic effect to maximize tile output force near resonance of the shaker system and so can also be used as vibration absorbers. The dynamic properties of the absorbers (i.e. resonance frequency) were modified using a feedback signal from an accelerometer mounted on the active mass, passed through a compensator and fed into the drive component of the shaker system (piezoelectric element or voice coil respectively). The feedback loop consisted of a two coefficient FIR filter, implemented on a DSP, where the input is acceleration of tile ATVA mass and the output is a force acting in parallel with the stiffness of the absorber. By separating the feedback signal into real and imaginary components, the effective natural frequency and damping of the ATVA can be altered independently. This approach gave control of the resonance frequencies while also allowing the simultaneous removal of damping from the ATVA, thus increasing the ease of controllability and effectiveness. In order to obtain a "tuned" vibration absorber the chosen resonant frequency was set to the excitation

  14. Active and Passive Immunization Protects against Lethal, Extreme Drug Resistant-Acinetobacter baumannii Infection

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Guanpingshen; Lin, Lin; Ibrahim, Ashraf S.; Baquir, Beverlie; Pantapalangkoor, Paul; Bonomo, Robert A.; Doi, Yohei; Adams, Mark D.; Russo, Thomas A.; Spellberg, Brad

    2012-01-01

    Extreme-drug-resistant (XDR) Acinetobacter baumannii is a rapidly emerging pathogen causing infections with unacceptably high mortality rates due to inadequate available treatment. New methods to prevent and treat such infections are a critical unmet medical need. To conduct a rational vaccine discovery program, OmpA was identified as the primary target of humoral immune response after intravenous infection by A. baumannii in mice. OmpA was >99% conserved at the amino acid level across clinical isolates harvested between 1951 and 2009 from cerebrospinal fluid, blood, lung, and wound infections, including carbapenem-resistant isolates, and was ≥89% conserved among other sequenced strains, but had minimal homology to the human proteome. Vaccination of diabetic mice with recombinant OmpA (rOmpA) with aluminum hydroxide adjuvant markedly improved survival and reduced tissue bacterial burden in mice infected intravenously. Vaccination induced high titers of anti-OmpA antibodies, the levels of which correlated with survival in mice. Passive transfer with immune sera recapitulated protection. Immune sera did not enhance complement-mediated killing but did enhance opsonophagocytic killing of A. baumannii. These results define active and passive immunization strategies to prevent and treat highly lethal, XDR A. baumannii infections. PMID:22253723

  15. Installation of passive-active shufflers at Los Alamos plant environments

    SciTech Connect

    Hurd, J.R.; Hsue, F.; Rinard, P.M.; Wachter, J.R.; Davidson, C.

    1994-08-01

    Two Canberra-built passive-active {sup 252}Cf shufflers of Los Alamos hardware and software design have been installed and are presently undergoing calibration and certification at Los Alamos National Laboratory. These instruments fulfill important safeguards and accountability measurement requirements for special nuclear material in matrices too dense or otherwise not appropriate for typical gamma-ray techniques. The ability of the shuffler to obtain precise assays under conditions of intense passive emissions of neutrons and gamma rays is a valuable asset in plant environments. This paper reports on the procurement process and the various steps involved in the installation of two shufflers at Los Alamos, one at the Chemical Metallurgical Research (CMR) Building Waste Assay Facility at TA-3 and the other at the PF4 Plutonium Facility at TA-55. Details are given on the certification procedure including the development of standards, various expected matrices, and calibration. Some safety issues are addressed, and some preliminary performance characteristics are presented based on measured background rates in the plant environments.

  16. Development and Characterization a Single-Active-Chamber Piezoelectric Membrane Pump with Multiple Passive Check Valves

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ronghui; You, Feng; Lv, Zhihan; He, Zhaocheng; Wang, Haiwei; Huang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    In order to prevent the backward flow of piezoelectric pumps, this paper presents a single-active-chamber piezoelectric membrane pump with multiple passive check valves. Under the condition of a fixed total number of passive check valves, by means of changing the inlet valves and outlet valves’ configuration, the pumping characteristics in terms of flow rate and backpressure are experimentally investigated. Like the maximum flow rate and backpressure, the testing results show that the optimal frequencies are significantly affected by changes in the number inlet valves and outlet valves. The variation ratios of the maximum flow rate and the maximum backpressure are up to 66% and less than 20%, respectively. Furthermore, the piezoelectric pump generally demonstrates very similar flow rate and backpressure characteristics when the number of inlet valves in one kind of configuration is the same as that of outlet valves in another configuration. The comparison indicates that the backflow from the pumping chamber to inlet is basically the same as the backflow from the outlet to the pumping chamber. No matter whether the number of inlet valves or the number of outlet valves is increased, the backflow can be effectively reduced. In addition, the backpressure fluctuation can be significantly suppressed with an increase of either inlet valves or outlet valves. It also means that the pump can prevent the backflow more effectively at the cost of power consumption. The pump is very suitable for conditions where more accurate flow rates are needed and wear and fatigue of check valves often occur. PMID:27973449

  17. Active and passive mode calibration of the Combined Thermal Epithermal Neutron (CTEN) system

    SciTech Connect

    Veilleux, J. M.

    2002-06-01

    The Combined Thermal/Epithermal Neutron (CTEN) non-destructive assay (NDA) system was designed to assay transuranic waste by employing an induced active neutron interrogation and/or a spontaneous passive neutron measurement. This is the second of two papers, and focuses on the passive mode, relating the net double neutron coincidence measurement to the plutonium mass via the calibration constant. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) calibration standards were used and the results verified with NIST-traceable verification standards. Performance demonstration program (PDP) 'empty' 208-L matrix drum was used for the calibration. The experimentally derived calibration constant was found to be 0.0735 {+-} 0.0059 g {sup 240}Pu effective per unit response. Using this calibration constant, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) criteria was satisfied with five minute waste assays in the range from 3 to 177g Pu. CTEN also participated in the PDP Cycle 8A blind assay with organic sludge and metal matrices and passed the criteria for accuracy and precision in both assay modes. The WIPP and EPA audit was completed March 1, 2002 and full certification is awaiting the closeout of one finding during the audit. With the successful closeout of the audit, the CTEN system will have shown that it can provide very fast assays (five minutes or less) of waste in the range from the minimum detection limit (about 2 mg Pu) to 177 g Pu.

  18. Development and Characterization a Single-Active-Chamber Piezoelectric Membrane Pump with Multiple Passive Check Valves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ronghui; You, Feng; Lv, Zhihan; He, Zhaocheng; Wang, Haiwei; Huang, Ling

    2016-12-12

    In order to prevent the backward flow of piezoelectric pumps, this paper presents a single-active-chamber piezoelectric membrane pump with multiple passive check valves. Under the condition of a fixed total number of passive check valves, by means of changing the inlet valves and outlet valves' configuration, the pumping characteristics in terms of flow rate and backpressure are experimentally investigated. Like the maximum flow rate and backpressure, the testing results show that the optimal frequencies are significantly affected by changes in the number inlet valves and outlet valves. The variation ratios of the maximum flow rate and the maximum backpressure are up to 66% and less than 20%, respectively. Furthermore, the piezoelectric pump generally demonstrates very similar flow rate and backpressure characteristics when the number of inlet valves in one kind of configuration is the same as that of outlet valves in another configuration. The comparison indicates that the backflow from the pumping chamber to inlet is basically the same as the backflow from the outlet to the pumping chamber. No matter whether the number of inlet valves or the number of outlet valves is increased, the backflow can be effectively reduced. In addition, the backpressure fluctuation can be significantly suppressed with an increase of either inlet valves or outlet valves. It also means that the pump can prevent the backflow more effectively at the cost of power consumption. The pump is very suitable for conditions where more accurate flow rates are needed and wear and fatigue of check valves often occur.

  19. Experimental Studies of Active and Passive Flow Control Techniques Applied in a Twin Air-Intake

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Shrey; Jindal, Aman; Maurya, Shivam P.; Jain, Anuj

    2013-01-01

    The flow control in twin air-intakes is necessary to improve the performance characteristics, since the flow traveling through curved and diffused paths becomes complex, especially after merging. The paper presents a comparison between two well-known techniques of flow control: active and passive. It presents an effective design of a vortex generator jet (VGJ) and a vane-type passive vortex generator (VG) and uses them in twin air-intake duct in different combinations to establish their effectiveness in improving the performance characteristics. The VGJ is designed to insert flow from side wall at pitch angle of 90 degrees and 45 degrees. Corotating (parallel) and counterrotating (V-shape) are the configuration of vane type VG. It is observed that VGJ has the potential to change the flow pattern drastically as compared to vane-type VG. While the VGJ is directed perpendicular to the side walls of the air-intake at a pitch angle of 90 degree, static pressure recovery is increased by 7.8% and total pressure loss is reduced by 40.7%, which is the best among all other cases tested for VGJ. For bigger-sized VG attached to the side walls of the air-intake, static pressure recovery is increased by 5.3%, but total pressure loss is reduced by only 4.5% as compared to all other cases of VG. PMID:23935422

  20. The role of the hippocampus in passive and active spatial learning.

    PubMed

    Kosaki, Yutaka; Lin, Tzu-Ching Esther; Horne, Murray R; Pearce, John M; Gilroy, Kerry E

    2014-12-01

    Rats with lesions of the hippocampus or sham lesions were required in four experiments to escape from a square swimming pool by finding a submerged platform. Experiments 1 and 2 commenced with passive training in which rats were repeatedly placed on the platform in one corner-the correct corner-of a pool with distinctive walls. A test trial then revealed a strong preference for the correct corner in the sham but not the hippocampal group. Subsequent active training of being required to swim to the platform resulted in both groups acquiring a preference for the correct corner in the two experiments. In Experiments 3 and 4, rats were required to solve a discrimination between different panels pasted to the walls of the pool, by swimming to the middle of a correct panel. Hippocampal lesions prevented a discrimination being formed between panels of different lengths (Experiment 3), but not between panels showing lines of different orientations (Experiment 4); rats with sham lesions mastered both problems. It is suggested that an intact hippocampus is necessary for the formation of stimulus-goal associations that permit successful passive spatial leaning. It is further suggested that an intact hippocampus is not necessary for the formation of stimulus-response associations, except when they involve information about length or distance.

  1. Passive and active thermography for in situ damage monitoring in woven composites during mechanical testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, J.-M.; Balageas, D.; Lamboul, B.; Bai, G.; Passilly, F.; Mavel, A.; Grail, G.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to highlight the contribution of both passive and active infrared thermography for in situ damage detection and monitoring in a 2D woven composite, during a mechanical testing constituted of multiple sequences of loadings and intermediate pauses. During the monotonic tensile loadings, damages such as matrix cracking and fiber-matrix debondings are monitored by passive thermography. Their thermal signatures are analyzed and the released heat, which is assumed to be a relevant index of their severity, is evaluated and correlated to the associated acoustic energies, simultaneously recorded. Finally, the contribution of the TSR (Thermographic Signal Reconstruction) advanced processing technique to provide a qualitative overview of the detected damages is underlined. As for the constant stress plateau levels, a nondestructive damage inspection of the tested specimen is carried out by pulsed thermography. The difficulties, due to the woven structure of the composite, in detecting any damage are put into relief. Once more, it is shown that the TSR technique can be useful.

  2. Optimization of an axial flow heart pump with active and passive magnetic bearings.

    PubMed

    Glauser, Matthias; Jiang, Wei; Li, Guoxin; Lin, Zongli; Allaire, Paul E; Olson, Don

    2006-05-01

    Optimization of a magnetically suspended left ventricular assist device (LVAD) is crucial. We desire a totally implantable, long-life LVAD that delivers the necessary flow rate, pressure rise, and blood compatibility. By using a novel combination of passive and active magnetic bearings (AMBs), we have developed an axial flow LVAD prototype, the LEV-VAD, which provides an unobstructed blood flow path, preventing stagnation regions for the blood. Our current effort is focused on the optimization of the magnetic suspension system to allow for control of the AMB, minimizing its size and power consumption. The properties of the passive magnetic bearings and AMBs serve as parameter space, over which a cost function is minimized, subject to constraints such as suspension stability and sufficient disturbance rejection capabilities. The design process is expected to lead to the construction of a small prototype pump along with the necessary robust controller for the AMB. Sensitivity of the LVAD performance with respect to various design parameters is examined in-depth and an optimized, more compact LVAD prototype is designed.

  3. The effects of passive stretching plus vibration on strength and activation of the plantar flexors.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jonathan D; Herda, Trent J; Trevino, Michael A; Mosier, Eric M

    2016-09-01

    This study examined the effects of passive stretching only (PS+CON) and passive stretching with the addition of continuous vibration (VIB) during post-passive stretching tests (PS+VIB) on peak torque (PT), percent voluntary inactivation (%VI), single stimulus twitch torque (TTSINGLE), and doublet stimuli twitch torque (TTDOUBLET) of the plantar flexors at a short (20° plantar flexion (PF)) and long muscle length (15° dorsiflexion (DF)). Fourteen healthy men (age = 22 ± 3 years) performed isometric maximal voluntary contractions at PF and DF, and passive range of motion (PROM) assessments before and after 8 × 30-s passive stretches without (PS+CON) or with VIB (PS+VIB) administered continuously throughout post-passive stretching tests. The passive properties of the muscle tendon unit were assessed pre- and post-passive stretching via PROM, passive torque (PASSTQ), and musculotendinous stiffness (MTS) measurements. PT, TTSINGLE, and TTDOUBLET decreased, whereas, %VI increased following passive stretching at PF and DF (P < 0.05) with no significant differences between PS+CON and PS+VIB. PASSTQ and MTS decreased while PROM increased post-passive stretching during both trials (P < 0.05). The stretching-induced force/torque deficit and increases in %VI were evident following passive stretching at short and long muscle lengths. Although not statistically significant, effect size calculations suggested large and moderate differences in the absolute changes in PT (Cohen's d = 1.14) and %VI (Cohen's d = 0.54) from pre- to post-passive stretching between treatments, with PS+VIB having greater decreases of PT and higher %VI than PS+CON. The decrement in PT following passive stretching may be primarily neural in origin.

  4. Bone structure and quality preserved by active versus passive muscle exercise in 21 days tail-suspended rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Huiqin; Sun, Lian-wen; Fan, Yu-bo

    2012-07-01

    Humans in Space suffer from microgravity-induced attenuated bone strength that needs to be addressed by on-orbit exercise countermeasures. However, exercise prescriptions so far did not adequately counteract the bone loss of astronauts in spaceflight because even active muscle contractions were converted to passive mode during voluntary bouts. We tested our hypothesis in unloaded rat hind limb following twenty-one days of tail-suspension (TS) combined with exercise using a hind limb stepper device designed by our group. Female Sprague Dawley rats (250g b.wt.) were divided into four groups (n=5, each): TS-only (hind limb unloading), TS plus passive mode exercise (TSP) induced by mechanically-forced passive hind limb lifting, TS plus active mode exercise (TSA) entrained by plantar electrostimulation, and control (CON) group. Standard measures of bone (e.g., mineral density, trabecular microstructure, biomechanics and ash weight) were monitored. Results provided that the attenuated properties of unloaded hind limb bone in TS-rats were more effectively supported by active mode than by passive mode motions. We here propose a modified exercise regimen combined with spontaneous muscle contractions thereby considering the biodynamic demands of both muscle and bone during resistive-load exercise in microgravity. Keywords: rat, BMD, DXA, passive exercise, active exercise, bone loss, tail suspension, spaceflight analogue, exercise countermeasure.

  5. Shelf-Scale Mapping of Fish Distribution Using Active and Passive Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Carrie C.

    Fish sound production has been associated with courtship and spawning behavior. Acoustic recordings of fish sounds can be used to identify distribution and behavior. Passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) can record large amounts of acoustic data in a specific area for days to years. These data can be collected in remote locations under potentially unsafe seas throughout a 24-hour period providing datasets unattainable using observer-based methods. However, the instruments must withstand the caustic ocean environment and be retrieved to obtain the recorded data. This can prove difficult due to the risk of PAMs being lost, stolen or damaged, especially in highly active areas. In addition, point-source sound recordings are only one aspect of fish biogeography. Passive acoustic platforms that produce low self-generated noise, have high retrieval rates, and are equipped with a suite of environmental sensors are needed to relate patterns in fish sound production to concurrently collected oceanographic conditions on large, synoptic scales. The association of sound with reproduction further invokes the need for such non-invasive, near-real time datasets that can be used to enhance current management methods limited by survey bias, inaccurate fisher reports, and extensive delays between fisheries data collection and population assessment. Red grouper (Epinephelus morio) exhibit the distinctive behavior of digging holes and producing a unique sound during courtship. These behaviors can be used to identify red grouper distribution and potential spawning habitat over large spatial scales. The goal of this research was to provide a greater understanding of the temporal and spatial distribution of red grouper sound production and holes on the central West Florida Shelf (WFS) using active sonar and passive acoustic recorders. The technology demonstrated here establishes the necessary methods to map shelf-scale fish sound production. The results of this work could aid resource

  6. Retrievals of Falling Snow from Satellite-borne Active and Passive Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Gail; Munchak, S. Joseph; Johnson, Benjamin

    2014-05-01

    Precipitation, including rain and snow, is a critical part of the Earth's energy and hydrology cycles. Precipitation impacts latent heating profiles locally while global circulation patterns distribute precipitation and energy from the equator to the poles. For the hydrological cycle, falling snow is a primary contributor in northern latitudes during the winter seasons. Falling snow is the source of snow pack accumulations that provide fresh water resources for many communities in the world. Furthermore, falling snow impacts society by causing transportation disruptions during severe snow events. In order to collect information on the complete global precipitation cycle, both liquid and frozen precipitation must be collected. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's Core satellite, scheduled for launch in February 2014, is well designed to detect and estimate falling snow. The GPM core carries a passive radiometer with frequencies (10-183 GHz) and an active radar with Ku- and Ka-band frequencies. Combined with the 65o inclination of the GPM Core satellite, these instruments allow for the GPM Core to sense and retrieve information about falling snow and light rain in regions of the earth where snow is common. The GPM Core's comprehensive active and passive channel set will also allow it to serve as a unifying reference for GPM constellation radiometer satellites. Since falling snow from space is the next precipitation measurement challenge from space, information is needed to guide retrieval algorithm development for these current and future missions. This information includes thresholds of detection for various sensor channel configurations, sensitivity to macroscale snow event system characteristics, and sensitivity to microscale snowflake particle characteristics. While the work in this area will continue for many years to come, our group has made substantial progress in this area by identifying minimum detectable melted rates of ~0.5 mm hr-1. Results

  7. Retrievals of Falling Snow from Satellite-borne Active and Passive Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Munchak, S. Joseph; Johnson, Benjamin

    2013-04-01

    Precipitation, including rain and snow, is a critical part of the Earth's energy and hydrology cycles. Precipitation impacts latent heating profiles locally while global circulation patterns distribute precipitation and energy from the equator to the poles. For the hydrological cycle, falling snow is a primary contributor in northern latitudes during the winter seasons. Falling snow is the source of snow pack accumulations that provide fresh water resources for many communities in the world. Furthermore, falling snow impacts society by causing transportation disruptions during severe snow events. In order to collect information on the complete global precipitation cycle, both liquid and frozen precipitation must be collected. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's Core satellite, scheduled for launch in 2014, is well designed to detect and estimate falling snow. The GPM core carries a passive radiometer with frequencies (10-183 GHz) and an active radar with Ku- and Ka-band frequencies. Combined with the 65 degree inclination of the GPM Core satellite, these instruments allow for the GPM Core to sense and retrieve information about falling snow and light rain in regions of the earth where snow is common. The GPM Core's comprehensive active and passive channel set will also allow it to serve as a unifying reference for GPM constellation radiometer satellites. Since falling snow from space is the next precipitation measurement challenge from space, information is needed to guide retrieval algorithm development for these current and future missions. This information includes thresholds of detection for various sensor channel configurations, sensitivity to macroscale snow event system characteristics, and sensitivity to microscale snowflake particle characteristics. While the work in this area will continue for many years to come, our group has made substantial progress in this area by identifying minimum detectable melted rates of ~0.5 mm/hr. Results will

  8. Passive dosing of soil invertebrates with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: limited chemical activity explains toxicity cutoff.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Philipp; Holmstrup, Martin

    2008-10-01

    The partitioning of organic soil pollutants into soil organisms is driven by their chemical activity, which normally does not exceed that of the pure pollutant. Passive dosing with the silicone poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) was used to initiate and maintain the maximum chemical activity of 10 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in toxicity tests with the springtail Folsomia candida. The test animals could move freely on the PDMS saturated with PAHs, resulting in direct contact and exposure to saturated air. After 7 days, springtail lethality correlated neither with the octanol-water partition coefficients of the PAHs nor with their molecular size, but with their melting point All low-melting PAHs (T(M) < or = 110 degrees C) caused 100% lethality, whereas all high-melting PAHs (TM > or = 180 degrees C) caused no significant lethality. The lethality was successfully fitted to one chemical activity response curve for all PAHs tested, with effective chemical activity causing 50% lethality (Ea-50) of 0.058. It was also fitted to the PAH concentration in the PDMS, resulting in an EC(PDMS)-50 of 8.7 mM. Finally, the combined exposure to anthracene and pyrene was described by the sum of chemical activities causing lethality, in good agreement with the chemical activity-response curve obtained.

  9. The Relationship between Amygdala Activation and Passive Exposure Time to an Aversive Cue during a Continuous Performance Task

    PubMed Central

    Strigo, Irina A.; Simmons, Alan N.; Matthews, Scott C.; Craig, Arthur D. (Bud)

    2010-01-01

    The allocation of attention modulates negative emotional processing in the amygdala. However, the role of passive exposure time to emotional signals in the modulation of amygdala activity during active task performance has not been examined. In two functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) experiments conducted in two different groups of healthy human subjects, we examined activation in the amygdala due to cued anticipation of painful stimuli while subjects performed a simple continuous performance task (CPT) with either a fixed or a parametrically varied trial duration. In the first experiment (N = 16), engagement in the CPT during a task with fixed trial duration produced the expected attenuation of amygdala activation, but close analysis suggested that the attenuation occurred during the period of active engagement in CPT, and that amygdala activity increased proportionately during the remainder of each trial, when subjects were passively exposed to the pain cue. In the second experiment (N = 12), the duration of each trial was parametrically varied, and we found that amygdala activation was linearly related to the time of passive exposure to the anticipatory cue. We suggest that amygdala activation during negative anticipatory processing depends directly on the passive exposure time to the negative cue. PMID:21124739

  10. Functional Safety of Hybrid Laser Safety Systems - How can a Combination between Passive and Active Components Prevent Accidents?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugauer, F. P.; Stiehl, T. H.; Zaeh, M. F.

    Modern laser systems are widely used in industry due to their excellent flexibility and high beam intensities. This leads to an increased hazard potential, because conventional laser safety barriers only offer a short protection time when illuminated with high laser powers. For that reason active systems are used more and more to prevent accidents with laser machines. These systems must fulfil the requirements of functional safety, e.g. according to IEC 61508, which causes high costs. The safety provided by common passive barriers is usually unconsidered in this context. In the presented approach, active and passive systems are evaluated from a holistic perspective. To assess the functional safety of hybrid safety systems, the failure probability of passive barriers is analysed and added to the failure probability of the active system.

  11. Evaluation of the particle infiltration efficiency of three passive samplers and the PS-1 active air sampler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovic, Milos Z.; Prokop, Sebastian; Staebler, Ralf M.; Liggio, John; Harner, Tom

    2015-07-01

    The particle infiltration efficiencies (PIE) of three passive and one active air samplers were evaluated under field conditions. A wide-range particle spectrometer operating in the 250-4140 nm range was used to acquire highly temporally resolved particle-number and size distributions for the different samplers compared to ambient air. Overall, three of the four evaluated samplers were able to acquire a representative sample of ambient particles with PIEs of 91.5 ± 13.7% for the GAPS Network sampler, 103 ± 15.5% for the Lancaster University sampler, and 89.6 ± 13.4% for a conventional PS-1 high-volume active air sampler (Hi-Vol). Significantly (p = 0.05) lower PIE of 54 ± 8.0% was acquired for the passive sampler used under the MONET program. These findings inform the comparability and use of passive and active samplers for measuring particle-associated priority chemicals in air.

  12. A passive-flow microfluidic device for imaging latent HIV activation dynamics in single T cells

    PubMed Central

    Gearhart, Larisa M.; Miller-Jensen, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying cell-to-cell variability in drug response dynamics is important when evaluating therapeutic efficacy. For example, optimizing latency reversing agents (LRAs) for use in a clinical “activate-and-kill” strategy to purge the latent HIV reservoir in patients requires minimizing heterogeneous viral activation dynamics. To evaluate how heterogeneity in latent HIV activation varies across a range of LRAs, we tracked drug-induced response dynamics in single cells via live-cell imaging using a latent HIV–GFP reporter virus in a clonal Jurkat T cell line. To enable these studies in suspension cells, we designed a simple method to capture an array of single Jurkat T cells using a passive-flow microfluidic device. Our device, which does not require external pumps or tubing, can trap hundreds of cells within minutes with a high retention rate over 12 hours of imaging. Using this device, we quantified heterogeneity in viral activation stimulated by transcription factor (TF) activators and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. Generally, TF activators resulted in both faster onset of viral activation and faster rates of production, while HDAC inhibitors resulted in more uniform onset times, but more heterogeneous rates of production. Finally, we demonstrated that while onset time of viral gene expression and rate of viral production together predict total HIV activation, rate and onset time were not correlated within the same individual cell, suggesting that these features are regulated independently. Overall, our results reveal drug-specific patterns of noisy HIV activation dynamics not previously identified in static single-cell assays, which may require consideration for the most effective activate-and-kill regime. PMID:26138068

  13. A passive-flow microfluidic device for imaging latent HIV activation dynamics in single T cells.

    PubMed

    Ramji, Ramesh; Wong, Victor C; Chavali, Arvind K; Gearhart, Larisa M; Miller-Jensen, Kathryn

    2015-09-01

    Quantifying cell-to-cell variability in drug response dynamics is important when evaluating therapeutic efficacy. For example, optimizing latency reversing agents (LRAs) for use in a clinical "activate-and-kill" strategy to purge the latent HIV reservoir in patients requires minimizing heterogeneous viral activation dynamics. To evaluate how heterogeneity in latent HIV activation varies across a range of LRAs, we tracked drug-induced response dynamics in single cells via live-cell imaging using a latent HIV-GFP reporter virus in a clonal Jurkat T cell line. To enable these studies in suspension cells, we designed a simple method to capture an array of single Jurkat T cells using a passive-flow microfluidic device. Our device, which does not require external pumps or tubing, can trap hundreds of cells within minutes with a high retention rate over 12 hours of imaging. Using this device, we quantified heterogeneity in viral activation stimulated by transcription factor (TF) activators and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. Generally, TF activators resulted in both faster onset of viral activation and faster rates of production, while HDAC inhibitors resulted in more uniform onset times, but more heterogeneous rates of production. Finally, we demonstrated that while onset time of viral gene expression and rate of viral production together predict total HIV activation, rate and onset time were not correlated within the same individual cell, suggesting that these features are regulated independently. Overall, our results reveal drug-specific patterns of noisy HIV activation dynamics not previously identified in static single-cell assays, which may require consideration for the most effective activate-and-kill regime.

  14. Active and passive migration in boring isopods Limnoria spp. (Crustacea, Peracarida) from kelp holdfasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, Leonardo; Thiel, Martin

    2008-10-01

    Many boring isopods inhabit positively buoyant substrata (wood and algae), which float after detachment, permitting passive migration of inhabitants. Based on observations from previous studies, it was hypothesized that juvenile, subadult and male isopods migrate actively, and will rapidly abandon substrata after detachment. In contrast, reproductive females and small offspring were predicted to remain in floating substrata and thus have a high probability to disperse passively via rafting. In order to test this hypothesis, a colonization and an emigration experiment were conducted with giant kelp ( Macrocystis integrifolia), the holdfasts of which are inhabited by boring isopods from the genus Limnoria. A survey of benthic substrata in the kelp forest confirmed that limnoriids inhabited the holdfasts and did not occur in holdfast-free samples. Results of the colonization experiment showed that all life history stages of the boring isopods immigrated into young, largely uncolonized holdfasts, and after 16 weeks all holdfasts were densely colonized. In the emigration experiment, all life history stages of the isopods rapidly abandoned the detached holdfasts — already 5 min after detachment only few individuals remained in the floating holdfasts. After this initial rapid emigration of isopods, little changes in isopod abundance occurred during the following 24 h, and at the end of the experiment some individuals of all life history stages still remained in the holdfasts. These results indicate that all life history stages of Limnoria participate in both active migration and passive dispersal. It is discussed that storm-related dynamics within kelp forests may contribute to intense mixing of local populations of these burrow-dwelling isopods, and that most immigrants to young holdfasts probably are individuals emigrating from old holdfasts detached during storm events. The fact that some individuals of all life history stages and both sexes remain in floating

  15. NASA's Potential Contributions to Avalanche Forecasting Using Active and Passive Microwave Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blonski, Slawomir

    2007-01-01

    This Candidate Solution is based on using active and passive microwave measurements acquired from NASA satellites to improve USDA (U.S. Department of Agriculture) Forest Service forecasting of avalanche danger. Regional Avalanche Centers prepare avalanche forecasts using ground measurements of snowpack and mountain weather conditions. In this Solution, range of the in situ observations is extended by adding remote sensing measurements of snow depth, snow water equivalent, and snowfall rate acquired by satellite missions that include Aqua, CloudSat, future GPM (Global Precipitation Measurement), and the proposed SCLP (Snow and Cold Land Processes). Measurements of snowpack conditions and time evolution are improved by combining the in situ and satellite observations with a snow model. Recurring snow observations from NASA satellites increase accuracy of avalanche forecasting, which helps the public and the managers of public facilities make better avalanche safety decisions.

  16. Passive damping to enhance active positioning of a prototype lithography platen

    SciTech Connect

    Segalman, D.J.; Kipp, R.L.; Gregory, D.L.

    1994-12-31

    A viscoelastic tuned-mass damper was used to suppress specific structural modes of a prototype lithography platen. The platen is magnetically levitated and it is repositioned and held in position by a closed-loop feedback control system. Important capabilities of the platen control system are precise positioning and rapid repositioning, which tend to require high frequency bandwidth. The high bandwidth excites structural vibration modes which are disruptive to the control system. The present work was to develop and demonstrate a means to suppress these modes using passive vibration damping techniques. The motivation is to increase the robustness of the platen positioning and control system by reducing unwanted modal accelerations excited by high control system bandwidth. Activities performed and discussed in this paper include the analytical design of viscoelastic tuned-mass dampers and the demonstration/testing of their effectiveness on the platen while levitated and controlled.

  17. Passive targeting and lung tolerability of enoxaparin microspheres for a sustained antithrombotic activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Shaimaa S; Osman, Rihab; Mortada, Nahed D; Geneidy, Ahmed-Shawky; Awad, Gehanne A S

    2017-11-01

    Pulmonary bed can retain microparticles (MP) larger than their capillaries' diameter, hence we offer a promising way for lung passive targeting following intravenous (IV) administration. In this study, enoxaparin (Enox)-albumin microspheres (Enox-Alb MS) were, optimally, developed as lung targeted sustained release MP for IV use. Lung tolerability and targeting efficiency of Enox-Alb MS were tested, and the pharmacokinetic profile following IV administration to albino rats was constructed. In vivo studies confirmed high lung targeting efficiency of Enox-Alb MS with lack of potential tissue toxicity. The anticoagulant activity of the selected Alb MS was significantly sustained for up to 38 h compared to 5 h for the market product. Alb MS are promising delivery carriers for controlled and targeted delivery of Enox to the lungs for prophylaxis and treatment of pulmonary embolism.

  18. Characterization of waste drums using nonintrusive active and passive computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, G.P.; Martz, H.E.; Decman, D.J.; Camp, D.C.; Azevedo, S.G.; Keto, E.R.

    1994-08-01

    We have developed a data acquisition scanner for gamma-ray nondestructive assay (NDA) active and passive computed tomography (A&PCT) along with associated computational techniques for image reconstruction, analysis, and display. We are using this scanner to acquire data sets of mock-waste drums at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNIL). In this paper, we discuss some issues associated with gamma-ray spectroscopy assay, NDA imaging, describe the design and construction of an NDA drum scanner and report on code development for image reconstruction. We also present representative A&PCT assay results of well characterized mock-waste drums. These preliminary results suggest that A&PCT imaging can be used to produce accurate absolute assays of radioactivity in real-waste drums.

  19. Passive-submissive and active-emotional trait dependency: evidence for a two-factor model.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Theresa A; Clark, Lee Anna

    2010-08-01

    Dependency plays an important role in both normal and abnormal personality, but the construct remains loosely defined, both in clinical practice and the research literature. Moreover, although a number of measures purport to measure trait dependency, little agreement exists as to the structure of dependency within or across these instruments. Furthermore, what constitutes the low end of trait dependency remains unclear. Five hundred nine undergraduates completed a battery of 14 dependency scales and subscales, a subset of whom (n=322) also completed a broad measure of personality pathology (SNAP-2). Exploratory factor analysis of the dependency measures yielded two correlated factors-Passive-Submissive and Active-Emotional dependency-as well as a third, unrelated factor, Detachment/Autonomy, all with differential correlates to the pathological personality traits of the SNAP-2. Taken together, these data suggest a clear, 2-factor model for trait dependency that is distinct from detachment/autonomy.

  20. Error Characterisation and Merging of Active and Passive Microwave Soil Moisture Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Wolfgang; Gruber, Alexander; de Jeu, Richard; Parinussa, Robert; Chung, Daniel; Dorigo, Wouter; Reimer, Christoph; Kidd, Richard

    2015-04-01

    As part of the Climate Change Initiative (CCI) programme of the European Space Agency (ESA) a data fusion system has been developed which is capable of ingesting surface soil moisture data derived from active and passive microwave sensors (ASCAT, AMSR-E, etc.) flown on different satellite platforms and merging them to create long and consistent time series of soil moisture suitable for use in climate change studies. The so-created soil moisture data records (latest version: ESA CCI SM v02.1 released on 5/12/2014) are freely available and can be obtained from http://www.esa-soilmoisture-cci.org/. As described by Wagner et al. (2012) the principle steps of the data fusion process are: 1) error characterisation, 2) matching to account for data set specific biases, and 3) merging. In this presentation we present the current data fusion process and discuss how new error characterisation methods, such as the increasingly popular triple collocation method as discussed for example by Zwieback et al. (2012) may be used to improve it. The main benefit of an improved error characterisation would be a more reliable identification of the best performing microwave soil moisture retrieval(s) for each grid point and each point in time. In case that two or more satellite data sets provides useful information, the estimated errors can be used to define the weights with which each satellite data set are merged, i.e. the lower its error the higher its weight. This is expected to bring a significant improvement over the current data fusion scheme which is not yet based on quantitative estimates of the retrieval errors but on a proxy measure, namely the vegetation optical depth (Dorigo et al., 2015): over areas with low vegetation passive soil moisture retrievals are used, while over areas with moderate vegetation density active retrievals are used. In transition areas, where both products correlate well, both products are being used in a synergistic way: on time steps where only one of

  1. Prevention of domino effect: from active and passive strategies to inherently safer design.

    PubMed

    Cozzani, Valerio; Tugnoli, Alessandro; Salzano, Ernesto

    2007-01-10

    The possible application of an inherent safety approach to the prevention of domino accidents was explored. The application of the inherent safety guidewords to the definition of effective actions for the prevention of domino events was analyzed. Due to the constraints originated by the conventional approach to process design, the "limitation of effects" guideword resulted the more effective in the identification of inherent safety actions to avoid domino events. Detailed design criteria for the improvement of layout in the framework of inherent safety were identified and discussed. Simple rules of thumbs were obtained for the preliminary assessment of safety distances and of critical inventories with respect to the escalation of fires and explosions. The results evidenced that the integration of inherent safety criteria with conventional passive or active protections seems a promising route for the prevention of severe domino accidental scenarios in chemical and process plants.

  2. Simultaneous active and passive control for eigenstructure assignment in lightly damped systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richiedei, Dario; Trevisani, Alberto

    2017-02-01

    The assignment of the eigenstructure (i.e. eigenvalues and eigenvectors) in vibrating systems is an effective way to improve their dynamic performances. System controllability ensures that the poles of the controlled system are exactly assigned but it does not allow to assign arbitrary desired eigenvectors. To this purpose, this paper proposes a novel method for vibration control in lightly damped systems through the concurrent synthesis of passive structural modifications and active state (or state derivative) feedback control gains. Indeed, the suitable modification of the inertial and elastic parameters allows to enlarge the range of assignable eigenvectors. The problem is formulated as an optimization problem, where constraints are introduced to assure the feasibility of the physical system modifications while avoiding spillover phenomena. The experimental application to the eigenstructure assignment on a manipulator proves the method effectiveness.

  3. Outsourcing neural active control to passive composite mechanics: a tissue engineered cyborg ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazzola, Mattia; Park, Sung Jin; Park, Kyung Soo; Park, Shirley; di Santo, Valentina; Deisseroth, Karl; Lauder, George V.; Mahadevan, L.; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-11-01

    Translating the blueprint that stingrays and skates provide, we create a cyborg swimming ray capable of orchestrating adaptive maneuvering and phototactic navigation. The impossibility of replicating the neural system of batoids fish is bypassed by outsourcing algorithmic functionalities to the body composite mechanics, hence casting the active control problem into a design, passive one. We present a first step in engineering multilevel "brain-body-flow" systems that couple sensory information to motor coordination and movement, leading to behavior. This work paves the way for the development of autonomous and adaptive artificial creatures able to process multiple sensory inputs and produce complex behaviors in distributed systems and may represent a path toward soft-robotic "embodied cognition".

  4. Modeling of Cardiac Muscle Thin Films: Pre-stretch, Passive and Active Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Jongmin; Grosberg, Anna; Nawroth, Janna C.; Parker, Kevin Kit; Bertoldi, Katia

    2012-01-01

    Recent progress in tissue engineering has made it possible to build contractile bio-hybrid materials that undergo conformational changes by growing a layer of cardiac muscle on elastic polymeric membranes. Further development of such muscular thin films for building actuators and powering devices requires exploring several design parameters, which include the alignment of the cardiac myocytes and the thickness/Young’s modulus of elastomeric film. To more efficiently explore these design parameters, we propose a 3-D phenomenological constitutive model, which accounts for both the passive deformation including pre-stretch and the active behavior of the cardiomyocytes. The proposed 3-D constitutive model is implemented within a finite element framework, and can be used to improve the current design of bio-hybrid thin films and help developing bio-hybrid constructs capable of complex conformational changes. PMID:22236531

  5. Active and passive sensing of collective atomic coherence in a superradiant laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnet, Justin G.; Chen, Zilong; Weiner, Joshua M.; Cox, Kevin C.; Thompson, James K.

    2013-07-01

    We study the nondemolition mapping of collective quantum coherence onto a cavity light field in a superradiant, cold-atom 87Rb Raman laser. We show theoretically that the fundamental precision of the mapping is near the standard quantum limit on phase estimation for a coherent spin state, Δϕ=1/N, where N is the number of atoms. The associated characteristic measurement time scale τW∝1/N is collectively enhanced. The nondemolition nature of the measurement is characterized by only 0.5 photon recoils deposited per atom due to optical repumping in a time τW. We experimentally realize conditional Ramsey spectroscopy in our superradiant Raman laser, compare the results to the predicted precision, and study the mapping in the presence of decoherence, far from the steady-state conditions previously considered. Finally, we demonstrate a hybrid mode of operation in which the laser is repeatedly toggled between active and passive sensing.

  6. Modelling Rift Valley fever (RVF) disease vector habitats using active and passive remote sensing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrosia, Vincent G.; Linthicum, K. G.; Bailey, C. L.; Sebesta, P.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Ames Ecosystem Science and Technology Branch and the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases are conducting research to detect Rift Valley fever (RVF) vector habitats in eastern Africa using active and passive remote-sensing. The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) calculated from Landsat TM and SPOT data is used to characterize the vegetation common to the Aedes mosquito. Relationships have been found between the highest NDVI and the 'dambo' habitat areas near Riuru, Kenya on both wet and dry data. High NDVI values, when combined with the vegetation classifications, are clearly related to the areas of vector habitats. SAR data have been proposed for use during the rainy season when optical systems are of minimal use and the short frequency and duration of the optimum RVF mosquito habitat conditions necessitate rapid evaluation of the vegetation/moisture conditions; only then can disease potential be stemmed and eradication efforts initiated.

  7. Investigation of the effects of summer melt on the calculation of sea ice concentration using active and passive microwave data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalieri, Donald J.; Burns, Barbara A.; Onstott, Robert G.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of ice surface melt on microwave signatures and errors in the calculation of sea ice concentration are examined, using active and passive microwave data sets from the Marginal Ice Zone Experiment aircraft flights in the Fram Strait region. Consideration is given to the possibility of using SAR to supplement passive microwave data to unambiguously discriminate between open water areas and ponded floes. Coincident active multichannel microwave radiometer and SAR measurements of individual floes are used to describe the effects of surface melt on sea ice concentration calculations.

  8. Active and passive MDMA ('ecstasy') intake induces differential transcriptional changes in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Fernàndez-Castillo, N; Orejarena, M J; Ribasés, M; Blanco, E; Casas, M; Robledo, P; Maldonado, R; Cormand, B

    2012-02-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, 'ecstasy') is a recreational drug widely used by adolescents and young adults. Although its rewarding effects are well established, there is controversy on its addictive potential. We aimed to compare the consequences of active and passive MDMA administration on gene expression in the mouse brain since all previous studies were based on passive MDMA administration. We used a yoked-control operant intravenous self-administration paradigm combined with microarray technology. Transcriptomic profiles of ventral striatum, frontal cortex, dorsal raphe nucleus and hippocampus were analysed in mice divided in contingent MDMA, yoked MDMA and yoked saline groups, and several changes were validated by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The comparison of contingent MDMA and yoked MDMA vs. yoked saline mice allowed the identification of differential expression in several genes, most of them with immunological and inflammatory functions, but others being involved in neuroadaptation. In the comparison of contingent MDMA vs. yoked MDMA administration, hippocampus and the dorsal raphe nucleus showed statistically significant changes. The altered expression of several genes involved in neuroadaptative changes and synapse function, which may be related to learning self-administration behaviour, could be validated in these two brain structures. In conclusion, our study shows a strong effect of MDMA administration on the expression of immunological and inflammatory genes in all the four brain regions studied. In addition, experiments on MDMA self-administration suggest that the dorsal raphe nucleus and hippocampus may be involved in active MDMA-seeking behaviour, and show specific alterations on gene expression that support the addictive potential of this drug.

  9. Integrating passive and active remote sensing methods to assess and map soil salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldshleger, Naftaly; Chudnovsky Chudnovsky, Alexandra

    2013-04-01

    Irrigated lands in Israel are subjected to salinization processes, mostly as a result of using low-quality irrigation water. The Jezre'el Valley in northern Israel is an example of this phenomenon and thus it was selected to carry out this study. This area is characterized by increasing soil salinity over the years, followed by an increase in soil SAR (Sodium Adsorption Ration), which leads to a significant deterioration of the soil structure and a reduced infiltration rate. The traditional methods of mapping, by soil sampling (sampling, laboratory checks, and mapping) are time-consuming and do not provide near real-time information. An alternative method is suggested herein using active and passive remote sensing methods: (1) an hyperspectral data from the ground ASD field spectrometer and from the air, by AISA air-born sensor (2) EFDM- Frequency Domain Electro-Magnetic, and (3) GPR- ground penetration radar. The constructed PLS model was applied on the hyperspectral images, producing an EC thematic map of the surface. In addition, a sub-surface salinity map was generated by applying the surface - sub-surface correlation on the surface EC thematic map. The generated maps were found to be in good agreement with maps based on chemical data. The results indicated that traditional methods are correlated with the remote sensing ones and that merging the three remote sensing methodologies may yield a better picture than each of them alone. In addition, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of applied in this study methods. It can be concluded that it is possible to account for soil salinity based on active and passive remote sensing means.

  10. Passive vs. active degassing modes at an open-vent volcano (Stromboli, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamburello, G.; Aiuppa, A.; Kantzas, E. P.; McGonigle, A. J. S.; Ripepe, M.

    2012-12-01

    We report here on a UV-camera based field experiment performed on Stromboli volcano during 7 days in 2010 and 2011, aimed at obtaining the very first simultaneous assessment of all the different forms (passive and active) of SO2 release from an open-vent volcano. Using the unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution of the UV camera, we obtained a 0.8 Hz record of the total SO2 flux from Stromboli over a timeframe of ∼14 h, which ranged between 0.4 and 1.9 kg s-1 around a mean value of 0.7 kg s-1 and we concurrently derived SO2 masses for more than 130 Strombolian explosions and 50 gas puffs. From this, we show erupted SO2 masses have a variability of up to one order of magnitude, and range between 2 and 55 kg (average ∼20 kg), corresponding to a time integrated flux of 0.05±0.01 kg s-1. Our experimental constraints on individual gas puff mass (0.03-0.42 kg of SO2, averaging 0.19 kg) are the first of their kind, equating to an emission rate ranging from 0.02 to 0.27 kg s-1. On this basis, we conclude that puffing is two times more efficient than Strombolian explosions in the magmatic degassing process, and that active degassing (explosions+puffing) accounts for ∼23% (ranging from 10% to 45%) of the volcano's total SO2 flux, e.g., passive degassing between the explosions contributes the majority (∼77%) of the released gas. We furthermore integrate our UV camera gas data for the explosions and puffs, with independent geophysical data (infrared radiometer data and very long period seismicity), to offer key and novel insights into the degassing dynamics within the shallow conduit systems of this open-vent volcano.

  11. Active versus Passive Training of a Complex Bimanual Task: Is Prescriptive Proprioceptive Information Sufficient for Inducing Motor Learning?

    PubMed Central

    Beets, Iseult A. M.; Macé, Marc; Meesen, Raf L. J.; Cuypers, Koen; Levin, Oron; Swinnen, Stephan P.

    2012-01-01

    Perceptual processes play an important role in motor learning. While it is evident that visual information greatly contributes to learning new movements, much less is known about provision of prescriptive proprioceptive information. Here, we investigated whether passive (proprioceptively-based) movement training was comparable to active training for learning a new bimanual task. Three groups practiced a bimanual coordination pattern with a 1∶2 frequency ratio and a 90° phase offset between both wrists with Lissajous feedback over the course of four days: 1) passive training; 2) active training; 3) no training (control). Retention findings revealed that passive as compared to active training resulted in equally successful acquisition of the frequency ratio but active training was more effective for acquisition of the new relative phasing between the limbs in the presence of augmented visual feedback. However, when this feedback was removed, performance of the new relative phase deteriorated in both groups whereas the frequency ratio was better preserved. The superiority of active over passive training in the presence of augmented feedback is hypothesized to result from active involvement in processes of error detection/correction and planning. PMID:22666379

  12. Effects of using an unstable inclined board on active and passive ankle range of motion in patients with ankle stiffness.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] The present study assessed the effects of using an unstable inclined board on the active and passive ankle range of motion in patients with ankle stiffness. [Subjects] The study included 10 young female patients with ankle stiffness. [Methods] The patients were divided into the following two groups: a group that performed ankle dorsiflexion stretching exercises using a wooden inclined board and a group that performed stretching exercises using an air-cushioned inclined board (unstable inclined board). Active and passive ankle dorsiflexion angles were measured bilaterally using a goniometer. [Results] Both inclined boards significantly increased active and passive ankle dorsiflexion. After performing ankle stretching exercises, active dorsiflexion significantly increased the unstable inclined board compared to that using the wooden inclined board. However, the passive dorsiflexion angles did not differ significantly between the two groups after ankle stretching exercises. [Conclusion] The use of an unstable inclined board might stimulate activation of the ankle dorsiflexors in addition to stretching muscle or tissue. Active ankle dorsiflexion was more effectively improved with stretching exercises using an unstable inclined board than with exercises using a wooden inclined board.

  13. The application of 1-3 cement-based piezoelectric transducers in active and passive health monitoring for concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Lei; Huang, Shifeng; Cheng, Xin; Lu, Youyuan; Li, Zongjin

    2009-09-01

    1-3 cement-based piezoelectric composite has been developed for health monitoring of concrete structures. Transducers made of this type of composite have broadband frequency response. Plain concrete and engineered cement composite (ECC) beams with embedded 1-3 cement-based piezoelectric transducers were prepared and tested. During experiments, the transducers were used to perform active and passive detection of the damage evolution of the beams. In active detection, a damage index based on the average energy of the received waves was proposed and used. In passive detection, acoustic emission (AE) events were recorded and the accumulated AE event number was analyzed with the loading history. Crack localization was also accomplished in the passive monitoring. The results of the two methods demonstrated similar trends in interpreting the damage evolution of the concrete beam. The results were also consistent with each material's characteristics.

  14. Impact of Network Activity Levels on the Performance of Passive Network Service Dependency Discovery