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Sample records for active phosphorylated forms

  1. A cytosolic activator of DNA replication is tyrosine phosphorylated in its active form.

    PubMed

    Fresa, K L; Autieri, M V; Coffman, F D; Georgoff, I; Cohen, S

    1993-04-01

    Cytosolic extracts from actively dividing lymphoid cells have been shown to induce DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei. An initiating factor in such extracts (activator of DNA replication; ADR) is a > 90-kDa aprotinin-binding protein whose activity is inhibitable not only by aprotinin, but also by several other protease inhibitors as well. Although cytosol from non-proliferating lymphocytes is devoid of ADR activity, we have shown that these preparations can be induced to express ADR activity by brief exposure to a membrane-enriched fraction of spontaneously proliferating MOLT-4 cells via a kinase-dependent mechanism. In the present study, we examine the role of tyrosine kinases in this process. Three inhibitors of tyrosine kinases (genistein, kaempferol, and quercetin) can inhibit the in vitro generation of ADR activity. In vitro generation of ADR activity is associated with the de novo phosphorylation of several proteins, many of which are detectable using anti-phosphotyrosine monoclonal antibodies. ADR itself may be tyrosine phosphorylated in active form as immunoprecipitation using such monoclonal antibodies leads to the depletion of its activity. Moreover, immunoprecipitation results in the removal of several de novo tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins, including species at approximately 122, 105, 93, 86, 79, and 65 kDa. A subset of de novo-phosphorylated proteins, migrating at approximately 105, 93, and 70 kDa, also bound to aprotinin, suggesting that at least one of these proteins may represent ADR itself. PMID:7683270

  2. Phosphorylation and actin activation of brain myosin.

    PubMed Central

    Barylko, B; Sobieszek, A

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for obtaining brain myosin that shows significant actin activation, after phosphorylation with chicken gizzard myosin light chain kinase. Myosin with this activity could be obtained only via the initial purification of brain actomyosin. The latter complex, isolated by a method similar to that used for smooth muscle, contained actin, myosin, tropomyosin of the non-muscle type and another actin-binding protein of approximately 100,000 daltons. From the presence of a specific myosin light chain kinase and phosphatase in brain tissue it is suggested that the regulation of actin-myosin interaction operates via phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of myosin. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:11894951

  3. Phosphorylation Modulates Catalytic Activity of Mycobacterial Sirtuins

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Ghanshyam S.; Ravala, Sandeep K.; Malhotra, Neha; Chakraborti, Pradip K.

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuins are NAD+-dependent deacetylases involved in the regulation of diverse cellular processes and are conserved throughout phylogeny. Here we report about in vitro transphosphorylation of the only NAD+-dependent deacetylase (mDAC) present in the genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by eukaryotic-type Ser/Thr kinases, particularly PknA. The phosphorylated mDAC displayed decreased deacetylase activity compared to its unphosphorylated counterpart. Mass-spectrometric study identified seven phosphosites in mDAC; however, mutational analysis highlighted major contribution of Thr-214 for phosphorylation of the protein. In concordance to this observation, variants of mDAC substituting Thr-214 with either Ala (phospho-ablated) or Glu (phosphomimic) exhibited significantly reduced deacetylase activity suggesting phosphorylation mediated control of enzymatic activity. To assess the role of phosphorylation towards functionality of mDAC, we opted for a sirtuin knock-out strain of Escherichia coli (Δdac), where interference of endogenous mycobacterial kinases could be excluded. The Δdac strain in nutrient deprived acetate medium exhibited compromised growth and complementation with mDAC reversed this phenotype. The phospho-ablated or phosphomimic variant, on the other hand, was unable to restore the functionality of mDAC indicating the role of phosphorylation per se in the process. We further over-expressed mDAC or mDAC-T214A as His-tagged protein in M. smegmatis, where endogenous eukaryotic-type Ser/Thr kinases are present. Anti-phosphothreonine antibody recognized both mDAC and mDAC-T214A proteins in western blotting. However, the extent of phosphorylation as adjudged by scanning the band intensity, was significantly low in the mutant protein (mDAC-T214A) compared to that of the wild-type (mDAC). Furthermore, expression of PknA in the mDAC complemented Δdac strain was able to phosphorylate M. tuberculosis sirtuin. The growth profile of this culture in acetate medium was

  4. Syntheses and insulin-like activity of phosphorylated galactose derivatives.

    PubMed

    Caro, H N; Martín-Lomas, M; Bernabé, M

    1993-02-24

    The syntheses of the poly-phosphorylated galactosides 6, 8, 10, 13, 16, and 20, isolated as sodium salts, have been performed. The non-phosphorylated disaccharide 17 and trisaccharide 21 have been prepared via glycosylation of the 2-(trimethylsilyl)ethyl galactosides 3 and 2, respectively, and subsequent complete deprotection. Preliminary insulin-like activity of the phosphorylated derivatives is reported. PMID:8458006

  5. Multi-site Phosphorylation Regulates Bim Stability and Apoptotic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, Anette; Barrett, Tamera; Flavell, Richard A.; Davis, Roger J.

    2008-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic BH3-only protein Bim is established to be an important mediator of signaling pathways that induce cell death. Multi-site phosphorylation of Bim by several members of the MAP kinase group is implicated as a regulatory mechanism that controls the apoptotic activity of Bim. To test the role of Bim phosphorylation in vivo, we constructed mice with a series of mutant alleles that express phosphorylation-defective Bim proteins. We show that mutation of the phosphorylation site Thr-112 causes decreased binding of Bim to the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2 and can increase cell survival. In contrast, mutation of the phosphorylation sites Ser-55, Ser-65, and Ser-73 can cause increased apoptosis because of reduced proteasomal degradation of Bim. Together, these data indicate that phosphorylation can regulate Bim by multiple mechanisms and that the phosphorylation of Bim on different sites can contribute to the sensitivity of cellular apoptotic responses. PMID:18498746

  6. The prokaryotic enhancer binding protein NTRC has an ATPase activity which is phosphorylation and DNA dependent.

    PubMed Central

    Austin, S; Dixon, R

    1992-01-01

    The prokaryotic activator protein NTRC binds to enhancer-like elements and activates transcription in response to nitrogen limitation by catalysing open complex formation by sigma 54 RNA polymerase holoenzyme. Formation of open complexes requires the phosphorylated form of NTRC and the reaction is ATP dependent. We find that NTRC has an ATPase activity which is activated by phosphorylation and is strongly stimulated by the presence of DNA containing specific NTRC binding sites. Images PMID:1534752

  7. Protein kinase C does not phosphorylate the externalized form of the transferrin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Adam, M A; Johnstone, R M

    1987-01-01

    We have investigated the phosphorylation of transferrin receptors both in intact sheep reticulocytes and in isolated plasma membranes. Phosphorylation of the receptor in intact cells or isolated plasma membranes is stimulated by phorbol diesters, suggesting that protein kinase C may be involved. Identical [32P] phosphopeptide tryptic maps are formed in the presence and absence of phorbol diesters. Using heat-treated membranes (which are devoid of endogenous kinase activity) exogenous protein kinase C phosphorylates the same peptides as the endogenous kinase(s). During maturation of reticulocytes to erythrocytes, the transferrin receptor is released to the medium in vesicular form. In cells labelled with [32P]Pi, the released receptor is not labelled with 32P and the exocytosed vesicles do not phosphorylate receptor with [gamma-32P]ATP. The absence of 32P in the released receptor appears to be due to a change in the receptor, since, even in the presence of exogenous protein kinase C, the exocytosed receptor is phosphorylated to approximately 8% of the level obtained with receptors from the plasma membrane. These data suggest that during maturation and externalization the receptor is altered so that it loses its capacity to act as a substrate for exogenous protein kinase C as well as the endogenous kinase(s). This change may be a signal which segregates the receptor for externalization from the receptor pool remaining for transferrin recycling during the final stages of red cell maturation. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:3593234

  8. Binding to serine 65-phosphorylated ubiquitin primes Parkin for optimal PINK1-dependent phosphorylation and activation.

    PubMed

    Kazlauskaite, Agne; Martínez-Torres, R Julio; Wilkie, Scott; Kumar, Atul; Peltier, Julien; Gonzalez, Alba; Johnson, Clare; Zhang, Jinwei; Hope, Anthony G; Peggie, Mark; Trost, Matthias; van Aalten, Daan M F; Alessi, Dario R; Prescott, Alan R; Knebel, Axel; Walden, Helen; Muqit, Miratul M K

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in the mitochondrial protein kinase PINK1 are associated with autosomal recessive Parkinson disease (PD). We and other groups have reported that PINK1 activates Parkin E3 ligase activity both directly via phosphorylation of Parkin serine 65 (Ser(65))--which lies within its ubiquitin-like domain (Ubl)--and indirectly through phosphorylation of ubiquitin at Ser(65). How Ser(65)-phosphorylated ubiquitin (ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65)) contributes to Parkin activation is currently unknown. Here, we demonstrate that ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65) binding to Parkin dramatically increases the rate and stoichiometry of Parkin phosphorylation at Ser(65) by PINK1 in vitro. Analysis of the Parkin structure, corroborated by site-directed mutagenesis, shows that the conserved His302 and Lys151 residues play a critical role in binding of ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65), thereby promoting Parkin Ser(65) phosphorylation and activation of its E3 ligase activity in vitro. Mutation of His302 markedly inhibits Parkin Ser(65) phosphorylation at the mitochondria, which is associated with a marked reduction in its E3 ligase activity following mitochondrial depolarisation. We show that the binding of ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65) to Parkin disrupts the interaction between the Ubl domain and C-terminal region, thereby increasing the accessibility of Parkin Ser(65). Finally, purified Parkin maximally phosphorylated at Ser(65) in vitro cannot be further activated by the addition of ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65). Our results thus suggest that a major role of ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65) is to promote PINK1-mediated phosphorylation of Parkin at Ser(65), leading to maximal activation of Parkin E3 ligase activity. His302 and Lys151 are likely to line a phospho-Ser(65)-binding pocket on the surface of Parkin that is critical for the ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65) interaction. This study provides new mechanistic insights into Parkin activation by ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65), which could aid in the development of Parkin

  9. Binding to serine 65-phosphorylated ubiquitin primes Parkin for optimal PINK1-dependent phosphorylation and activation

    PubMed Central

    Kazlauskaite, Agne; Martínez-Torres, R Julio; Wilkie, Scott; Kumar, Atul; Peltier, Julien; Gonzalez, Alba; Johnson, Clare; Zhang, Jinwei; Hope, Anthony G; Peggie, Mark; Trost, Matthias; van Aalten, Daan MF; Alessi, Dario R; Prescott, Alan R; Knebel, Axel; Walden, Helen; Muqit, Miratul MK

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the mitochondrial protein kinase PINK1 are associated with autosomal recessive Parkinson disease (PD). We and other groups have reported that PINK1 activates Parkin E3 ligase activity both directly via phosphorylation of Parkin serine 65 (Ser65)—which lies within its ubiquitin-like domain (Ubl)—and indirectly through phosphorylation of ubiquitin at Ser65. How Ser65-phosphorylated ubiquitin (ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65) contributes to Parkin activation is currently unknown. Here, we demonstrate that ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65 binding to Parkin dramatically increases the rate and stoichiometry of Parkin phosphorylation at Ser65 by PINK1 in vitro. Analysis of the Parkin structure, corroborated by site-directed mutagenesis, shows that the conserved His302 and Lys151 residues play a critical role in binding of ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65, thereby promoting Parkin Ser65 phosphorylation and activation of its E3 ligase activity in vitro. Mutation of His302 markedly inhibits Parkin Ser65 phosphorylation at the mitochondria, which is associated with a marked reduction in its E3 ligase activity following mitochondrial depolarisation. We show that the binding of ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65 to Parkin disrupts the interaction between the Ubl domain and C-terminal region, thereby increasing the accessibility of Parkin Ser65. Finally, purified Parkin maximally phosphorylated at Ser65 in vitro cannot be further activated by the addition of ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65. Our results thus suggest that a major role of ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65 is to promote PINK1-mediated phosphorylation of Parkin at Ser65, leading to maximal activation of Parkin E3 ligase activity. His302 and Lys151 are likely to line a phospho-Ser65-binding pocket on the surface of Parkin that is critical for the ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65 interaction. This study provides new mechanistic insights into Parkin activation by ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65, which could aid in the development of Parkin activators that mimic the effect of

  10. Musk Kinase Activity is Modulated By A Serine Phosphorylation Site in The Kinase Loop

    PubMed Central

    Camurdanoglu, B. Z.; Hrovat, C.; Dürnberger, G.; Madalinski, M.; Mechtler, K.; Herbst, R.

    2016-01-01

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) forms when a motor neuron contacts a muscle fibre. A reciprocal exchange of signals initiates a cascade of signalling events that result in pre- and postsynaptic differentiation. At the centre of these signalling events stands muscle specific kinase (MuSK). MuSK activation, kinase activity and subsequent downstream signalling are crucial for NMJ formation as well as maintenance. Therefore MuSK kinase activity is tightly regulated to ensure proper NMJ development. We have identified a novel serine phosphorylation site at position 751 in MuSK that is increasingly phosphorylated upon agrin stimulation. S751 is also phosphorylated in muscle tissue and its phosphorylation depends on MuSK kinase activity. A phosphomimetic mutant of S751 increases MuSK kinase activity in response to non-saturating agrin concentrations . In addition, basal MuSK and AChR phosphorylation as well as AChR cluster size are increased. We believe that the phosphorylation of S751 provides a novel mechanism to relief the autoinhibition of the MuSK activation loop. Such a lower autoinhibition could foster or stabilize MuSK kinase activation, especially during stages when no or low level of agrin are present. Phosphorylation of S751 might therefore represent a novel mechanism to modulate MuSK kinase activity during prepatterning or NMJ maintenance. PMID:27666825

  11. Cyclin D activates the Rb tumor suppressor by mono-phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Narasimha, Anil M; Kaulich, Manuel; Shapiro, Gary S; Choi, Yoon J; Sicinski, Piotr; Dowdy, Steven F

    2014-01-01

    The widely accepted model of G1 cell cycle progression proposes that cyclin D:Cdk4/6 inactivates the Rb tumor suppressor during early G1 phase by progressive multi-phosphorylation, termed hypo-phosphorylation, to release E2F transcription factors. However, this model remains unproven biochemically and the biologically active form(s) of Rb remains unknown. In this study, we find that Rb is exclusively mono-phosphorylated in early G1 phase by cyclin D:Cdk4/6. Mono-phosphorylated Rb is composed of 14 independent isoforms that are all targeted by the E1a oncoprotein, but show preferential E2F binding patterns. At the late G1 Restriction Point, cyclin E:Cdk2 inactivates Rb by quantum hyper-phosphorylation. Cells undergoing a DNA damage response activate cyclin D:Cdk4/6 to generate mono-phosphorylated Rb that regulates global transcription, whereas cells undergoing differentiation utilize un-phosphorylated Rb. These observations fundamentally change our understanding of G1 cell cycle progression and show that mono-phosphorylated Rb, generated by cyclin D:Cdk4/6, is the only Rb isoform in early G1 phase. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02872.001 PMID:24876129

  12. Mimicking phosphorylation of alphaB-crystallin affects its chaperone activity.

    PubMed

    Ecroyd, Heath; Meehan, Sarah; Horwitz, Joseph; Aquilina, J Andrew; Benesch, Justin L P; Robinson, Carol V; Macphee, Cait E; Carver, John A

    2007-01-01

    AlphaB-crystallin is a member of the sHsp (small heat-shock protein) family that prevents misfolded target proteins from aggregating and precipitating. Phosphorylation at three serine residues (Ser19, Ser45 and Ser59) is a major post-translational modification that occurs to alphaB-crystallin. In the present study, we produced recombinant proteins designed to mimic phosphorylation of alphaB-crystallin by incorporating a negative charge at these sites. We employed these mimics to undertake a mechanistic and structural investigation of the effect of phosphorylation on the chaperone activity of alphaB-crystallin to protect against two types of protein misfolding, i.e. amorphous aggregation and amyloid fibril assembly. We show that mimicking phosphorylation of alphaB-crystallin results in more efficient chaperone activity against both heat-induced and reduction-induced amorphous aggregation of target proteins. Mimick-ing phosphorylation increased the chaperone activity of alphaB-crystallin against one amyloid-forming target protein (kappa-casein), but decreased it against another (ccbeta-Trp peptide). We observed that both target protein identity and solution (buffer) conditions are critical factors in determining the relative chaperone ability of wild-type and phosphorylated alphaB-crystallins. The present study provides evidence for the regulation of the chaperone activity of alphaB-crystallin by phosphorylation and indicates that this may play an important role in alleviating the pathogenic effects associated with protein conformational diseases. PMID:16928191

  13. EGFR phosphorylates FAM129B to promote Ras activation

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Haitao; Lee, Jong-Ho; Wang, Yugang; Pang, Yilin; Zhang, Tao; Xia, Yan; Zhong, Lianjin; Lyu, Jianxin; Lu, Zhimin

    2016-01-01

    Ras GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) are important regulators for Ras activation, which is instrumental in tumor development. However, the mechanism underlying this regulation remains elusive. We demonstrate here that activated EGFR phosphorylates the Y593 residue of the protein known as family with sequence similarity 129, member B (FAM129B), which is overexpressed in many types of human cancer. FAM129B phosphorylation increased the interaction between FAM129B and Ras, resulting in reduced binding of p120-RasGAP to Ras. FAM129B phosphorylation promoted Ras activation, increasing ERK1/2- and PKM2-dependent β-catenin transactivation and leading to the enhanced glycolytic gene expression and the Warburg effect; promoting tumor cell proliferation and invasion; and supporting brain tumorigenesis. Our studies unearthed a novel and important mechanism underlying EGFR-mediated Ras activation in tumor development. PMID:26721396

  14. Phosphorylation regulates the water channel activity of the seed-specific aquaporin alpha-TIP.

    PubMed Central

    Maurel, C; Kado, R T; Guern, J; Chrispeels, M J

    1995-01-01

    The vacuolar membrane protein alpha-TIP is a seed-specific protein of the Major Intrinsic Protein family. Expression of alpha-TIP in Xenopus oocytes conferred a 4- to 8-fold increase in the osmotic water permeability (Pf) of the oocyte plasma membrane, showing that alpha-TIP forms water channels and is thus a new aquaporin. alpha-TIP has three putative phosphorylation sites on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane (Ser7, Ser23 and Ser99), one of which (Ser7) has been shown to be phosphorylated. We present several lines of evidence that the activity of this aquaporin is regulated by phosphorylation. First, mutation of the putative phosphorylation sites in alpha-TIP (Ser7Ala, Ser23Ala and Ser99Ala) reduced the apparent water transport activity of alpha-TIP in oocytes, suggesting that phosphorylation of alpha-TIP occurs in the oocytes and participates in the control of water channel activity. Second, exposure of oocytes to the cAMP agonists 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate, forskolin and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, which stimulate endogenous protein kinase A (PKA), increased the water transport activity of alpha-TIP by 80-100% after 60 min. That the protein can be phosphorylated by PKA was demonstrated by phosphorylating alpha-TIP in isolated oocyte membranes with the bovine PKA catalytic subunit. Third, the integrity of the three sites at positions 7, 23 and 99 was necessary for the cAMP-dependent increase in the Pf of oocytes expressing alpha-TIP, as well as for in vitro phosphorylation of alpha-TIP. These findings demonstrate that the alpha-TIP water channel can be modulated via phosphorylation of Ser7, Ser23 and Ser99.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:7542585

  15. Structural basis for Mep2 ammonium transceptor activation by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Bert; Chembath, Anupama; Jefferies, Damien; Basle, Arnaud; Khalid, Syma; Rutherford, Julian C

    2016-04-18

    Mep2 proteins are fungal transceptors that play an important role as ammonium sensors in fungal development. Mep2 activity is tightly regulated by phosphorylation, but how this is achieved at the molecular level is not clear. Here we report X-ray crystal structures of the Mep2 orthologues from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans and show that under nitrogen-sufficient conditions the transporters are not phosphorylated and present in closed, inactive conformations. Relative to the open bacterial ammonium transporters, non-phosphorylated Mep2 exhibits shifts in cytoplasmic loops and the C-terminal region (CTR) to occlude the cytoplasmic exit of the channel and to interact with His2 of the twin-His motif. The phosphorylation site in the CTR is solvent accessible and located in a negatively charged pocket ∼30 Å away from the channel exit. The crystal structure of phosphorylation-mimicking Mep2 variants from C. albicans show large conformational changes in a conserved and functionally important region of the CTR. The results allow us to propose a model for regulation of eukaryotic ammonium transport by phosphorylation.

  16. Structural basis for Mep2 ammonium transceptor activation by phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Bert; Chembath, Anupama; Jefferies, Damien; Basle, Arnaud; Khalid, Syma; Rutherford, Julian C.

    2016-01-01

    Mep2 proteins are fungal transceptors that play an important role as ammonium sensors in fungal development. Mep2 activity is tightly regulated by phosphorylation, but how this is achieved at the molecular level is not clear. Here we report X-ray crystal structures of the Mep2 orthologues from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans and show that under nitrogen-sufficient conditions the transporters are not phosphorylated and present in closed, inactive conformations. Relative to the open bacterial ammonium transporters, non-phosphorylated Mep2 exhibits shifts in cytoplasmic loops and the C-terminal region (CTR) to occlude the cytoplasmic exit of the channel and to interact with His2 of the twin-His motif. The phosphorylation site in the CTR is solvent accessible and located in a negatively charged pocket ∼30 Å away from the channel exit. The crystal structure of phosphorylation-mimicking Mep2 variants from C. albicans show large conformational changes in a conserved and functionally important region of the CTR. The results allow us to propose a model for regulation of eukaryotic ammonium transport by phosphorylation. PMID:27088325

  17. Structural basis for Mep2 ammonium transceptor activation by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Bert; Chembath, Anupama; Jefferies, Damien; Basle, Arnaud; Khalid, Syma; Rutherford, Julian C

    2016-01-01

    Mep2 proteins are fungal transceptors that play an important role as ammonium sensors in fungal development. Mep2 activity is tightly regulated by phosphorylation, but how this is achieved at the molecular level is not clear. Here we report X-ray crystal structures of the Mep2 orthologues from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans and show that under nitrogen-sufficient conditions the transporters are not phosphorylated and present in closed, inactive conformations. Relative to the open bacterial ammonium transporters, non-phosphorylated Mep2 exhibits shifts in cytoplasmic loops and the C-terminal region (CTR) to occlude the cytoplasmic exit of the channel and to interact with His2 of the twin-His motif. The phosphorylation site in the CTR is solvent accessible and located in a negatively charged pocket ∼30 Å away from the channel exit. The crystal structure of phosphorylation-mimicking Mep2 variants from C. albicans show large conformational changes in a conserved and functionally important region of the CTR. The results allow us to propose a model for regulation of eukaryotic ammonium transport by phosphorylation. PMID:27088325

  18. Sequential myosin phosphorylation activates tarantula thick filament via a disorder-order transition.

    PubMed

    Espinoza-Fonseca, L Michel; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Thomas, David D; Padrón, Raúl

    2015-08-01

    Phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) N-terminal extension (NTE) activates myosin in thick filaments. RLC phosphorylation plays a primary regulatory role in smooth muscles and a secondary (modulatory) role in striated muscles, which is regulated by Ca(2+)via TnC/TM on the thin filament. Tarantula striated muscle exhibits both regulatory systems: one switches on/off contraction through thin filament regulation, and another through PKC constitutively Ser35 phosphorylated swaying free heads in the thick filaments that produces quick force on twitches regulated from 0 to 50% and modulation is accomplished recruiting additional force-potentiating free and blocked heads via Ca(2+)4-CaM-MLCK Ser45 phosphorylation. We have used microsecond molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of tarantula RLC NTE to understand the structural basis for phosphorylation-based regulation in tarantula thick filament activation. Trajectory analysis revealed that an inter-domain salt bridge network (R39/E58,E61) facilitates the formation of a stable helix-coil-helix (HCH) motif formed by helices P and A in the unphosphorylated NTE of both myosin heads. Phosphorylation of the blocked head on Ser45 does not induce any substantial structural changes. However, phosphorylation of the free head on Ser35 disrupts this salt bridge network and induces a partial extension of helix P along RLC helix A. While not directly participating in the HCH folding, phosphorylation of Ser35 unlocks a compact structure and allows the NTE to spontaneously undergo coil-helix transitions. The modest structural change induced by the subsequent Ser45 diphosphorylation monophosphorylated Ser35 free head facilitates full helix P extension into a single structurally stable α-helix through a network of intra-domain salt bridges (pS35/R38,R39,R42). We conclude that tarantula thick filament activation is controlled by sequential Ser35-Ser45 phosphorylation via a conserved disorder-to-order transition.

  19. Sequential myosin phosphorylation activates tarantula thick filament via a disorder-order transition.

    PubMed

    Espinoza-Fonseca, L Michel; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Thomas, David D; Padrón, Raúl

    2015-08-01

    Phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) N-terminal extension (NTE) activates myosin in thick filaments. RLC phosphorylation plays a primary regulatory role in smooth muscles and a secondary (modulatory) role in striated muscles, which is regulated by Ca(2+)via TnC/TM on the thin filament. Tarantula striated muscle exhibits both regulatory systems: one switches on/off contraction through thin filament regulation, and another through PKC constitutively Ser35 phosphorylated swaying free heads in the thick filaments that produces quick force on twitches regulated from 0 to 50% and modulation is accomplished recruiting additional force-potentiating free and blocked heads via Ca(2+)4-CaM-MLCK Ser45 phosphorylation. We have used microsecond molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of tarantula RLC NTE to understand the structural basis for phosphorylation-based regulation in tarantula thick filament activation. Trajectory analysis revealed that an inter-domain salt bridge network (R39/E58,E61) facilitates the formation of a stable helix-coil-helix (HCH) motif formed by helices P and A in the unphosphorylated NTE of both myosin heads. Phosphorylation of the blocked head on Ser45 does not induce any substantial structural changes. However, phosphorylation of the free head on Ser35 disrupts this salt bridge network and induces a partial extension of helix P along RLC helix A. While not directly participating in the HCH folding, phosphorylation of Ser35 unlocks a compact structure and allows the NTE to spontaneously undergo coil-helix transitions. The modest structural change induced by the subsequent Ser45 diphosphorylation monophosphorylated Ser35 free head facilitates full helix P extension into a single structurally stable α-helix through a network of intra-domain salt bridges (pS35/R38,R39,R42). We conclude that tarantula thick filament activation is controlled by sequential Ser35-Ser45 phosphorylation via a conserved disorder-to-order transition. PMID

  20. Glucose deprivation increases tau phosphorylation via P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Lauretti, Elisabetta; Praticò, Domenico

    2015-12-01

    Alterations of glucose metabolism have been observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain. Previous studies showed that glucose deprivation increases amyloidogenesis via a BACE-1-dependent mechanism. However, no data are available on the effect that this condition may have on tau phosphorylation. In this study, we exposed neuronal cells to a glucose-free medium and investigated the effect on tau phosphorylation. Compared with controls, cells incubated in the absence of glucose had a significant increase in tau phosphorylation at epitopes Ser202/Thr205 and Ser404, which was associated with a selective activation of the P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Pharmacological inhibition of this kinase prevented the increase in tau phosphorylation, while fluorescence studies revealed its co-localization with phosphorylated tau. The activation of P38 was secondary to the action of the apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1, as its down-regulation prevented it. Finally, glucose deprivation induced cell apoptosis, which was associated with a significant increase in both caspase 3 and caspase 12 active forms. Taken together, our studies reveal a new mechanism whereby glucose deprivation can modulate AD pathogenesis by influencing tau phosphorylation and suggest that this pathway may be a new therapeutic target for AD.

  1. Mechanism of APC/CCDC20 activation by mitotic phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Renping; Weissmann, Florian; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Brown, Nicholas G.; VanderLinden, Ryan; Imre, Richard; Jarvis, Marc A.; Brunner, Michael R.; Davidson, Iain F.; Litos, Gabriele; Haselbach, David; Mechtler, Karl; Stark, Holger; Schulman, Brenda A.; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome segregation and mitotic exit are initiated by the 1.2-MDa ubiquitin ligase APC/C (anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome) and its coactivator CDC20 (cell division cycle 20). To avoid chromosome missegregation, APC/CCDC20 activation is tightly controlled. CDC20 only associates with APC/C in mitosis when APC/C has become phosphorylated and is further inhibited by a mitotic checkpoint complex until all chromosomes are bioriented on the spindle. APC/C contains 14 different types of subunits, most of which are phosphorylated in mitosis on multiple sites. However, it is unknown which of these phospho-sites enable APC/CCDC20 activation and by which mechanism. Here we have identified 68 evolutionarily conserved mitotic phospho-sites on human APC/C bound to CDC20 and have used the biGBac technique to generate 47 APC/C mutants in which either all 68 sites or subsets of them were replaced by nonphosphorylatable or phospho-mimicking residues. The characterization of these complexes in substrate ubiquitination and degradation assays indicates that phosphorylation of an N-terminal loop region in APC1 is sufficient for binding and activation of APC/C by CDC20. Deletion of the N-terminal APC1 loop enables APC/CCDC20 activation in the absence of mitotic phosphorylation or phospho-mimicking mutations. These results indicate that binding of CDC20 to APC/C is normally prevented by an autoinhibitory loop in APC1 and that its mitotic phosphorylation relieves this inhibition. The predicted location of the N-terminal APC1 loop implies that this loop controls interactions between the N-terminal domain of CDC20 and APC1 and APC8. These results reveal how APC/C phosphorylation enables CDC20 to bind and activate the APC/C in mitosis. PMID:27114510

  2. Endogenous protein phosphorylation and protein kinase activity in winged bean.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, K; Singh, M

    1997-10-01

    In winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus) protein kinases (E.C. 2.7.1.37) were found in all tissues studied. There was a significant increase in kinase activity during seed development, with a concomitant enhancement in the phosphorylation of a number of polypeptides; this was reversed in germinating seed cotyledons. Protein phosphorylation was apparently correlated with the increase in the protein content of the developing seed and the growing axis. At least three distinct autophosphorylating proteins could be distinguished in the developing seeds after SDS-PAGE, indicating the presence of different types of protein kinases in winged bean.

  3. Differential roles of phosphorylation in the formation of transcriptional active RNA polymerase I

    PubMed Central

    Fath, Stephan; Milkereit, Philipp; Peyroche, Gerald; Riva, Michel; Carles, Christophe; Tschochner, Herbert

    2001-01-01

    Regulation of rDNA transcription depends on the formation and dissociation of a functional complex between RNA polymerase I (pol I) and transcription initiation factor Rrn3p. We analyzed whether phosphorylation is involved in this molecular switch. Rrn3p is a phosphoprotein that is predominantly phosphorylated in vivo when it is not bound to pol I. In vitro, Rrn3p is able both to associate with pol I and to enter the transcription cycle in its nonphosphorylated form. By contrast, phosphorylation of pol I is required to form a stable pol I-Rrn3p complex for efficient transcription initiation. Furthermore, association of pol I with Rrn3p correlates with a change in the phosphorylation state of pol I in vivo. We suggest that phosphorylation at specific sites of pol I is a prerequisite for proper transcription initiation and that phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of pol I is one possibility to modulate cellular rDNA transcription activity. PMID:11717393

  4. Site-specific phosphorylation and microtubule dynamics control Pyrin inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wenqing; Yang, Jieling; Liu, Wang; Wang, Yupeng; Shao, Feng

    2016-08-16

    Pyrin, encoded by the MEFV gene, is best known for its gain-of-function mutations causing familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), an autoinflammatory disease. Pyrin forms a caspase-1-activating inflammasome in response to inactivating modifications of Rho GTPases by various bacterial toxins or effectors. Pyrin-mediated innate immunity is unique in that it senses bacterial virulence rather than microbial molecules, but its mechanism of activation is unknown. Here we show that Pyrin was phosphorylated in bone marrow-derived macrophages and dendritic cells. We identified Ser-205 and Ser-241 in mouse Pyrin whose phosphorylation resulted in inhibitory binding by cellular 14-3-3 proteins. The two serines underwent dephosphorylation upon toxin stimulation or bacterial infection, triggering 14-3-3 dissociation, which correlated with Pyrin inflammasome activation. We developed antibodies specific for phosphorylated Ser-205 and Ser-241, which confirmed the stimuli-induced dephosphorylation of endogenous Pyrin. Mutational analyses indicated that both phosphorylation and signal-induced dephosphorylation of Ser-205/241 are important for Pyrin activation. Moreover, microtubule drugs, including colchicine, commonly used to treat FMF, effectively blocked activation of the Pyrin inflammasome. These drugs did not affect Pyrin dephosphorylation and 14-3-3 dissociation but inhibited Pyrin-mediated apoptosis-associated Speck-like protein containing CARD (ASC) aggregation. Our study reveals that site-specific (de)phosphorylation and microtubule dynamics critically control Pyrin inflammasome activation, illustrating a fine and complex mechanism in cytosolic immunity. PMID:27482109

  5. Stat5a serine phosphorylation. Serine 779 is constitutively phosphorylated in the mammary gland, and serine 725 phosphorylation influences prolactin-stimulated in vitro DNA binding activity.

    PubMed

    Beuvink, I; Hess, D; Flotow, H; Hofsteenge, J; Groner, B; Hynes, N E

    2000-04-01

    The activity of transcription factors of the Stat family is controlled by phosphorylation of a conserved, carboxyl-terminal tyrosine residue. Tyrosine phosphorylation is essential for Stat dimerization, nuclear translocation, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation. Phosphorylation of Stats on specific serine residues has also been described. We have previously shown that in HC11 mammary epithelial cells Stat5a is phosphorylated on Tyr(694) in a prolactin-sensitive manner, whereas serine phosphorylation is constitutive (Wartmann, M., Cella, N., Hofer, P., Groner, B., Xiuwen, L., Hennighausen, L., and Hynes, N. E. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 31863-31868). By using mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis, we have now identified Ser(779), located in a unique Stat5a SP motif, as the site of serine phosphorylation. By using phospho-Ser(779)-specific antiserum, we have determined that Ser(779) is constitutively phosphorylated in mammary glands taken from different developmental stages. Stat5a isolated from spleen, heart, brain, and lung was also found to be phosphorylated on Ser(779). Ser(725) in Stat5a has also been identified as a phosphorylation site (Yamashita, H., Xu, J., Erwin, R. A., Farrar, W. L., Kirken, R. A., and Rui, H. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 30218-30224). Here we show that mutagenesis of Ser(725), Ser(779), or a combination of Ser(725/779) to an Ala had no effect on prolactin-induced transcriptional activation of a beta-casein reporter construct. However, following prolactin induction the Ser(725) mutant displayed sustained DNA binding activity compared with that of wild type Stat5a. The results suggest that Ser(725) phosphorylation has an impact on signal duration. PMID:10744710

  6. Stat5a serine phosphorylation. Serine 779 is constitutively phosphorylated in the mammary gland, and serine 725 phosphorylation influences prolactin-stimulated in vitro DNA binding activity.

    PubMed

    Beuvink, I; Hess, D; Flotow, H; Hofsteenge, J; Groner, B; Hynes, N E

    2000-04-01

    The activity of transcription factors of the Stat family is controlled by phosphorylation of a conserved, carboxyl-terminal tyrosine residue. Tyrosine phosphorylation is essential for Stat dimerization, nuclear translocation, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation. Phosphorylation of Stats on specific serine residues has also been described. We have previously shown that in HC11 mammary epithelial cells Stat5a is phosphorylated on Tyr(694) in a prolactin-sensitive manner, whereas serine phosphorylation is constitutive (Wartmann, M., Cella, N., Hofer, P., Groner, B., Xiuwen, L., Hennighausen, L., and Hynes, N. E. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 31863-31868). By using mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis, we have now identified Ser(779), located in a unique Stat5a SP motif, as the site of serine phosphorylation. By using phospho-Ser(779)-specific antiserum, we have determined that Ser(779) is constitutively phosphorylated in mammary glands taken from different developmental stages. Stat5a isolated from spleen, heart, brain, and lung was also found to be phosphorylated on Ser(779). Ser(725) in Stat5a has also been identified as a phosphorylation site (Yamashita, H., Xu, J., Erwin, R. A., Farrar, W. L., Kirken, R. A., and Rui, H. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 30218-30224). Here we show that mutagenesis of Ser(725), Ser(779), or a combination of Ser(725/779) to an Ala had no effect on prolactin-induced transcriptional activation of a beta-casein reporter construct. However, following prolactin induction the Ser(725) mutant displayed sustained DNA binding activity compared with that of wild type Stat5a. The results suggest that Ser(725) phosphorylation has an impact on signal duration.

  7. Correlation between persistent forms of zeaxanthin-dependent energy dissipation and thylakoid protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ebbert, V; Demmig-Adams, B; Adams, W W; Mueh, K E; Staehelin, L A

    2001-01-01

    High light stress induced not only a sustained form of xanthophyll cycle-dependent energy dissipation but also sustained thylakoid protein phosphorylation. The effect of protein phosphatase inhibitors (fluoride and molybdate ions) on recovery from a 1-h exposure to a high PFD was examined in leaf discs of Parthenocissus quinquefolia (Virginia creeper). Inhibition of protein dephosphorylation induced zeaxanthin retention and sustained energy dissipation (NPQ) upon return to low PFD for recovery, but had no significant effects on pigment and Chl fluorescence characteristics under high light exposure. In addition, whole plants of Monstera deliciosa and spinach grown at low to moderate PFDs were transferred to high PFDs, and thylakoid protein phosphorylation pattern (assessed with anti-phosphothreonine antibody) as well as pigment and Chl fluorescence characteristics were examined over several days. A correlation was obtained between dark-sustained D1/D2 phosphorylation and dark-sustained zeaxanthin retention and maintenance of PS II in a state primed for energy dissipation in both species. The degree of these dark-sustained phenomena was more pronounced in M. deliciosa compared with spinach. Moreover, M. deliciosa but not spinach plants showed unusual phosphorylation patterns of Lhcb proteins with pronounced dark-sustained Lhcb phosphorylation even under low PFD growth conditions. Subsequent to the transfer to a high PFD, dark-sustained Lhcb protein phosphorylation was further enhanced. Thus, phosphorylation patterns of D1/D2 and Lhcb proteins differed from each other as well as among plant species. The results presented here suggest an association between dark-sustained D1/D2 phosphorylation and sustained retention of zeaxanthin and energy dissipation (NPQ) in light-stressed, and particularly 'photoinhibited', leaves. Functional implications of these observations are discussed.

  8. Regulation of APC Activity by Phosphorylation and Regulatory Factors

    PubMed Central

    Kotani, Shuji; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Yasuda, Hideyo; Todokoro, Kazuo

    1999-01-01

    Ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis of Cut2/Pds1 and Cyclin B is required for sister chromatid separation and exit from mitosis, respectively. Anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC) specifically ubiquitinates Cut2/Pds1 at metaphase–anaphase transition, and ubiquitinates Cyclin B in late mitosis and G1 phase. However, the exact regulatory mechanism of substrate-specific activation of mammalian APC with the right timing remains to be elucidated. We found that not only the binding of the activators Cdc20 and Cdh1 and the inhibitor Mad2 to APC, but also the phosphorylation of Cdc20 and Cdh1 by Cdc2-Cyclin B and that of APC by Polo-like kinase and cAMP-dependent protein kinase, regulate APC activity. The cooperation of the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation and the regulatory factors in regulation of APC activity may thus control the precise progression of mitosis. PMID:10459014

  9. Pervanadate activation of intracellular kinases leads to tyrosine phosphorylation and shedding of syndecan-1.

    PubMed Central

    Reiland, J; Ott, V L; Lebakken, C S; Yeaman, C; McCarthy, J; Rapraeger, A C

    1996-01-01

    Syndecan-1 is a transmembrane haparan sulphate proteoglycan that binds extracellular matrices and growth factors, making it a candidate to act between these regulatory molecules and intracellular signalling pathways. It has a highly conserved transmembrane/cytoplasmic domain that contains four conserved tyrosines. One of these is in a consensus sequence for tyrosine kinase phosphorylation. As an initial step to investigating whether or not phosphorylation of these tyrosines is part of a signal-transduction pathway, we have monitored the tyrosine phosphorylation of syndecan-1 by cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases in intact cells. Tyrosine phosphorylation of syndecan-1 is observed when NMuMG cells are treated with sodium orthovanadate or pervanadate, which have been shown to activate intracellular tyrosine kinases. Initial studies with sodium orthovanadate demonstrate a slow accumulation of phosphotyrosine on syndecan-1 over the course of several hours. Pervanadate, a more effective inhibitor of phosphatases, allows detection of phosphotyrosine on syndecan-1 within 5 min, with peak phosphorylation seen by 15 min. Concurrently, in a second process activated by pervanadate, syndecan-1 ectodomain is cleaved and released into the culture medium. Two phosphorylated fragments of syndecan-1 of apparent sizes 6 and 8 kDa remain with the cell after shedding of the ectodomain. The 8 kDa size class appears to be a highly phosphorylated form of the 6 kDa product, as it disappears if samples are dephosphorylated. These fragments contain the C-terminus of syndecan-1 and also retain at least a portion of the transmembrane domain, suggesting that they are produced by a cell surface cleavage event. Thus pervanadate treatment of cells results in two effects of syndecan-1: (i) phosphorylation of one or more of its tyrosines via the action of a cytoplasmic kinase(s) and (ii) cleavage and release of the ectodomain into the medium, producing a C-terminal fragment containing the transmembrane

  10. Characterization of the reversible phosphorylation and activation of ERK8

    PubMed Central

    Klevernic, Iva V.; Stafford, Margaret J.; Morrice, Nicholas; Peggie, Mark; Morton, Simon; Cohen, Philip

    2005-01-01

    ERK8 (extracellular-signal-regulated protein kinase 8) expressed in Escherichia coli or insect cells was catalytically active and phosphorylated at both residues of the Thr-Glu-Tyr motif. Dephosphorylation of the threonine residue by PP2A (protein serine/threonine phosphatase 2A) decreased ERK8 activity by over 95% in vitro, whereas complete dephosphorylation of the tyrosine residue by PTP1B (protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B) decreased activity by only 15–20%. Wild-type ERK8 expressed in HEK-293 cells was over 100-fold less active than the enzyme expressed in bacteria or insect cells, but activity could be increased by exposure to hydrogen peroxide, by incubation with the protein serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid, or more weakly by osmotic shock. In unstimulated cells, ERK8 was monophosphorylated at Tyr-177, and exposure to hydrogen peroxide induced the appearance of ERK8 that was dually phosphorylated at both Thr-175 and Tyr-177. IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor 1), EGF (epidermal growth factor), PMA or anisomycin had little effect on activity. In HEK-293 cells, phosphorylation of the Thr-Glu-Tyr motif of ERK8 was prevented by Ro 318220, a potent inhibitor of ERK8 in vitro. The catalytically inactive mutants ERK8[D154A] and ERK8[K42A] were not phosphorylated in HEK-293 cells or E. coli, whether or not the cells had been incubated with protein phosphatase inhibitors or exposed to hydrogen peroxide. Our results suggest that the activity of ERK8 in transfected HEK-293 cells depends on the relative rates of ERK8 autophosphorylation and dephosphorylation by one or more members of the PPP family of protein serine/threonine phosphatases. The major residue in myelin basic protein phosphorylated by ERK8 (Ser-126) was distinct from that phosphorylated by ERK2 (Thr-97), demonstrating that, although ERK8 is a proline-directed protein kinase, its specificity is distinct from ERK1/ERK2. PMID:16336213

  11. E2 superfamily of ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes: constitutively active or activated through phosphorylation in the catalytic cleft

    PubMed Central

    Valimberti, Ilaria; Tiberti, Matteo; Lambrughi, Matteo; Sarcevic, Boris; Papaleo, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a modification that offers a dynamic and reversible mechanism to regulate the majority of cellular processes. Numerous diseases are associated with aberrant regulation of phosphorylation-induced switches. Phosphorylation is emerging as a mechanism to modulate ubiquitination by regulating key enzymes in this pathway. The molecular mechanisms underpinning how phosphorylation regulates ubiquitinating enzymes, however, are elusive. Here, we show the high conservation of a functional site in E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes. In catalytically active E2s, this site contains aspartate or a phosphorylatable serine and we refer to it as the conserved E2 serine/aspartate (CES/D) site. Molecular simulations of substrate-bound and -unbound forms of wild type, mutant and phosphorylated E2s, provide atomistic insight into the role of the CES/D residue for optimal E2 activity. Both the size and charge of the side group at the site play a central role in aligning the substrate lysine toward E2 catalytic cysteine to control ubiquitination efficiency. The CES/D site contributes to the fingerprint of the E2 superfamily. We propose that E2 enzymes can be divided into constitutively active or regulated families. E2s characterized by an aspartate at the CES/D site signify constitutively active E2s, whereas those containing a serine can be regulated by phosphorylation. PMID:26463729

  12. Identification of a region within the ubiquitin-activating enzyme required for nuclear targeting and phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Stephen, A G; Trausch-Azar, J S; Handley-Gearhart, P M; Ciechanover, A; Schwartz, A L

    1997-04-18

    The ubiquitin-activating enzyme exists as two isoforms: E1a, localized predominantly in the nucleus, and E1b, localized in the cytoplasm. Previously we generated hemagglutinin (HA) epitope-tagged cDNA constructs, HA1-E1 (epitope tag placed after the first methionine) and HA2-E1 (epitope tag placed after the second methionine) (Handley-Gearhart, P. M., Stephen, A. G., Trausch-Azar, J. S., Ciechanover, A., and Schwartz, A. L. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 33171-33178), which represent the native isoforms. HA1-E1 is exclusively nuclear, whereas HA2-E1 is found predominantly in the cytoplasm. Using high resolution isoelectric focusing and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we confirm that these epitope-tagged constructs HA1-E1 and HA2-E1 represent the two isoforms E1a and E1b. HA1-E1/E1a exists as one non-phosphorylated and four phosphorylated forms, and HA2-E1/E1b exists as one predominant non-phosphorylated form and two minor phosphorylated forms. We demonstrate that the first 11 amino acids are essential for phosphorylation and exclusive nuclear localization of HA1-E1. Within this region are four serine residues and a putative nuclear localization sequence (NLS; 5PLSKKRR). Removal of these four serine residues reduced phosphorylation levels by 60% but had no effect on nuclear localization of HA1-E1. Each serine residue was independently mutated to an alanine and analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis; only serine 4 was phosphorylated. Disruption of the basic amino acids within the NLS resulted in loss of exclusive nuclear localization and a 90-95% decrease in the phosphorylation of HA1-E1. This putative NLS was able to confer nuclear import on a non-nuclear protein in digitonin-permeabilized cells in a temperature- and ATP-dependent manner. Thus the predominant requirement for efficient phosphorylation of HA1-E1/E1a is a functional NLS, suggesting that E1a may be phosphorylated within the nucleus. PMID:9099746

  13. Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Akt Phosphorylation Regulates Bax Activation

    PubMed Central

    Sadidi, Mahdieh; Lentz, Stephen I.; Feldman, Eva L.

    2009-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are involved in many cellular processes that positively and negatively regulate cell fate. H2O2, acting as an intracellular messenger, activates phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) and its downstream target Akt, and promotes cell survival. The aim of the current study was to understand the mechanism by which PI3K/Akt signaling promotes survival in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. We demonstrate that PI3K/Akt mediates phosphorylation of the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member Bax. This phosphorylation suppresses apoptosis and promotes cell survival. Increased survival in the presence of H2O2 was blocked by LY294002, an inhibitor of PI3K activation. LY294002 prevented Bax phosphorylation and resulted in Bax translocation to the mitochondria, cytochrome c release, caspase-3 activation, and cell death. Collectively, these findings reveal a mechanism by which H2O2-induced activation of PI3K/Akt influences posttranslational modification of Bax and inactivate a key component of the cell death machinery. PMID:19278624

  14. Molecular mechanism of APC/C activation by mitotic phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Suyang; Chang, Leifu; Alfieri, Claudio; Zhang, Ziguo; Yang, Jing; Maslen, Sarah; Skehel, Mark; Barford, David

    2016-04-27

    In eukaryotes, the anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C, also known as the cyclosome) regulates the ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis of specific cell-cycle proteins to coordinate chromosome segregation in mitosis and entry into the G1 phase. The catalytic activity of the APC/C and its ability to specify the destruction of particular proteins at different phases of the cell cycle are controlled by its interaction with two structurally related coactivator subunits, Cdc20 and Cdh1. Coactivators recognize substrate degrons, and enhance the affinity of the APC/C for its cognate E2 (refs 4-6). During mitosis, cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) and polo-like kinase (Plk) control Cdc20- and Cdh1-mediated activation of the APC/C. Hyperphosphorylation of APC/C subunits, notably Apc1 and Apc3, is required for Cdc20 to activate the APC/C, whereas phosphorylation of Cdh1 prevents its association with the APC/C. Since both coactivators associate with the APC/C through their common C-box and Ile-Arg tail motifs, the mechanism underlying this differential regulation is unclear, as is the role of specific APC/C phosphorylation sites. Here, using cryo-electron microscopy and biochemical analysis, we define the molecular basis of how phosphorylation of human APC/C allows for its control by Cdc20. An auto-inhibitory segment of Apc1 acts as a molecular switch that in apo unphosphorylated APC/C interacts with the C-box binding site and obstructs engagement of Cdc20. Phosphorylation of the auto-inhibitory segment displaces it from the C-box-binding site. Efficient phosphorylation of the auto-inhibitory segment, and thus relief of auto-inhibition, requires the recruitment of Cdk-cyclin in complex with a Cdk regulatory subunit (Cks) to a hyperphosphorylated loop of Apc3. We also find that the small-molecule inhibitor, tosyl-l-arginine methyl ester, preferentially suppresses APC/C(Cdc20) rather than APC/C(Cdh1), and interacts with the binding sites of both the C-box and Ile-Arg tail motifs. Our

  15. Arabidopsis Receptor of Activated C Kinase1 Phosphorylation by WITH NO LYSINE8 KINASE

    DOE PAGES

    Urano, Daisuke; Czarnecki, Olaf; Wang, Xiaoping; Jones, Alan M.; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2014-12-08

    Receptor of activated C kinase1 (RACK1) is a versatile scaffold protein that binds to numerous proteins to regulate diverse cellular pathways in mammals. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), RACK1 has been shown to regulate plant hormone signaling, stress responses, and multiple processes of growth and development. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying these regulations. In this paper, we show that an atypical serine (Ser)/threonine (Thr) protein kinase, WITH NO LYSINE8 (WNK8), phosphorylates RACK1. WNK8 physically interacted with and phosphorylated RACK1 proteins at two residues: Ser-122 and Thr-162. Genetic epistasis analysis of rack1 wnk8 double mutants indicated that RACK1more » acts downstream of WNK8 in the glucose responsiveness and flowering pathways. The phosphorylation-dead form, RACK1AS122A/T162A, but not the phosphomimetic form, RACK1AS122D/T162E, rescued the rack1a null mutant, implying that phosphorylation at Ser-122 and Thr-162 negatively regulates RACK1A function. The transcript of RACK1AS122D/T162E accumulated at similar levels as those of RACK1S122A/T162A. However, although the steady-state level of the RACK1AS122A/T162A protein was similar to wild-type RACK1A protein, the RACK1AS122D/T162E protein was nearly undetectable, suggesting that phosphorylation affects the stability of RACK1A proteins. In conclusion, these results suggest that RACK1 is phosphorylated by WNK8 and that phosphorylation negatively regulates RACK1 function by influencing its protein stability.« less

  16. Arabidopsis Receptor of Activated C Kinase1 Phosphorylation by WITH NO LYSINE8 KINASE

    SciTech Connect

    Urano, Daisuke; Czarnecki, Olaf; Wang, Xiaoping; Jones, Alan M.; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2014-12-08

    Receptor of activated C kinase1 (RACK1) is a versatile scaffold protein that binds to numerous proteins to regulate diverse cellular pathways in mammals. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), RACK1 has been shown to regulate plant hormone signaling, stress responses, and multiple processes of growth and development. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying these regulations. In this paper, we show that an atypical serine (Ser)/threonine (Thr) protein kinase, WITH NO LYSINE8 (WNK8), phosphorylates RACK1. WNK8 physically interacted with and phosphorylated RACK1 proteins at two residues: Ser-122 and Thr-162. Genetic epistasis analysis of rack1 wnk8 double mutants indicated that RACK1 acts downstream of WNK8 in the glucose responsiveness and flowering pathways. The phosphorylation-dead form, RACK1AS122A/T162A, but not the phosphomimetic form, RACK1AS122D/T162E, rescued the rack1a null mutant, implying that phosphorylation at Ser-122 and Thr-162 negatively regulates RACK1A function. The transcript of RACK1AS122D/T162E accumulated at similar levels as those of RACK1S122A/T162A. However, although the steady-state level of the RACK1AS122A/T162A protein was similar to wild-type RACK1A protein, the RACK1AS122D/T162E protein was nearly undetectable, suggesting that phosphorylation affects the stability of RACK1A proteins. In conclusion, these results suggest that RACK1 is phosphorylated by WNK8 and that phosphorylation negatively regulates RACK1 function by influencing its protein stability.

  17. A Novel Effect of MARCKS Phosphorylation by Activated PKC: The Dephosphorylation of Its Serine 25 in Chick Neuroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, Andrea; Zolessi, Flavio R.; Arruti, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    MARCKS (Myristoylated Alanine-Rich C Kinase Substrate) is a peripheral membrane protein, especially abundant in the nervous system, and functionally related to actin organization and Ca-calmodulin regulation depending on its phosphorylation by PKC. However, MARCKS is susceptible to be phosphorylated by several different kinases and the possible interactions between these phosphorylations have not been fully studied in intact cells. In differentiating neuroblasts, as well as some neurons, there is at least one cell-type specific phosphorylation site: serine 25 (S25) in the chick. We demonstrate here that S25 is included in a highly conserved protein sequence which is a Cdk phosphorylatable region, located far away from the PKC phosphorylation domain. S25 phosphorylation was inhibited by olomoucine and roscovitine in neuroblasts undergoing various states of cell differentiation in vitro. These results, considered in the known context of Cdks activity in neuroblasts, suggest that Cdk5 is the enzyme responsible for this phosphorylation. We find that the phosphorylation by PKC at the effector domain does not occur in the same molecules that are phosphorylated at serine 25. The in situ analysis of the subcellular distribution of these two phosphorylated MARCKS variants revealed that they are also segregated in different protein clusters. In addition, we find that a sustained stimulation of PKC by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) provokes the progressive disappearance of phosphorylation at serine 25. Cells treated with PMA, but in the presence of several Ser/Thr phosphatase (PP1, PP2A and PP2B) inhibitors indicated that this dephosphorylation is achieved via a phosphatase 2A (PP2A) form. These results provide new evidence regarding the existence of a novel consequence of PKC stimulation upon the phosphorylated state of MARCKS in neural cells, and propose a link between PKC and PP2A activity on MARCKS. PMID:23634231

  18. A novel effect of MARCKS phosphorylation by activated PKC: the dephosphorylation of its serine 25 in chick neuroblasts.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Andrea; Zolessi, Flavio R; Arruti, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    MARCKS (Myristoylated Alanine-Rich C Kinase Substrate) is a peripheral membrane protein, especially abundant in the nervous system, and functionally related to actin organization and Ca-calmodulin regulation depending on its phosphorylation by PKC. However, MARCKS is susceptible to be phosphorylated by several different kinases and the possible interactions between these phosphorylations have not been fully studied in intact cells. In differentiating neuroblasts, as well as some neurons, there is at least one cell-type specific phosphorylation site: serine 25 (S25) in the chick. We demonstrate here that S25 is included in a highly conserved protein sequence which is a Cdk phosphorylatable region, located far away from the PKC phosphorylation domain. S25 phosphorylation was inhibited by olomoucine and roscovitine in neuroblasts undergoing various states of cell differentiation in vitro. These results, considered in the known context of Cdks activity in neuroblasts, suggest that Cdk5 is the enzyme responsible for this phosphorylation. We find that the phosphorylation by PKC at the effector domain does not occur in the same molecules that are phosphorylated at serine 25. The in situ analysis of the subcellular distribution of these two phosphorylated MARCKS variants revealed that they are also segregated in different protein clusters. In addition, we find that a sustained stimulation of PKC by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) provokes the progressive disappearance of phosphorylation at serine 25. Cells treated with PMA, but in the presence of several Ser/Thr phosphatase (PP1, PP2A and PP2B) inhibitors indicated that this dephosphorylation is achieved via a phosphatase 2A (PP2A) form. These results provide new evidence regarding the existence of a novel consequence of PKC stimulation upon the phosphorylated state of MARCKS in neural cells, and propose a link between PKC and PP2A activity on MARCKS.

  19. A novel effect of MARCKS phosphorylation by activated PKC: the dephosphorylation of its serine 25 in chick neuroblasts.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Andrea; Zolessi, Flavio R; Arruti, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    MARCKS (Myristoylated Alanine-Rich C Kinase Substrate) is a peripheral membrane protein, especially abundant in the nervous system, and functionally related to actin organization and Ca-calmodulin regulation depending on its phosphorylation by PKC. However, MARCKS is susceptible to be phosphorylated by several different kinases and the possible interactions between these phosphorylations have not been fully studied in intact cells. In differentiating neuroblasts, as well as some neurons, there is at least one cell-type specific phosphorylation site: serine 25 (S25) in the chick. We demonstrate here that S25 is included in a highly conserved protein sequence which is a Cdk phosphorylatable region, located far away from the PKC phosphorylation domain. S25 phosphorylation was inhibited by olomoucine and roscovitine in neuroblasts undergoing various states of cell differentiation in vitro. These results, considered in the known context of Cdks activity in neuroblasts, suggest that Cdk5 is the enzyme responsible for this phosphorylation. We find that the phosphorylation by PKC at the effector domain does not occur in the same molecules that are phosphorylated at serine 25. The in situ analysis of the subcellular distribution of these two phosphorylated MARCKS variants revealed that they are also segregated in different protein clusters. In addition, we find that a sustained stimulation of PKC by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) provokes the progressive disappearance of phosphorylation at serine 25. Cells treated with PMA, but in the presence of several Ser/Thr phosphatase (PP1, PP2A and PP2B) inhibitors indicated that this dephosphorylation is achieved via a phosphatase 2A (PP2A) form. These results provide new evidence regarding the existence of a novel consequence of PKC stimulation upon the phosphorylated state of MARCKS in neural cells, and propose a link between PKC and PP2A activity on MARCKS. PMID:23634231

  20. Protein phosphorylation as a mechanism for regulation of spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, J.L.A.; Huber, S.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Protein phosphorylation has been identified as a mechanism for the light-dark regulation of spinach sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS) activity, previously shown to involve some type of covalent modification of the enzyme. The 120 kD subunit of SPS in extracts of light-treated leaves was labeled with {sup 32}P in the presence of ({gamma}-{sup 32}P) ATP. In this in vitro system, {sup 32}P incorporation into light-activated SPS was dependent upon ATP and magnesium concentrations as well as time, and was closely paralleled by inactivation of the enzyme. The soluble protein kinase involved in the interconversion of SPS between activated and deactivated forms may be specific for SPS as it co-purifies with SPS during partial purification of the enzyme. The kinase appears not to be calcium activated and no evidence has been obtained for metabolite control of SPS phosphorylation/inactivation.

  1. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase activity of CD45 is activated by sequential phosphorylation by two kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Stover, D R; Walsh, K A

    1994-01-01

    We describe a potential regulatory mechanism for the transmembrane protein-tyrosine phosphatase CD45. Phosphorylation on both tyrosine and serine residues in vitro results in an activation of CD45 specifically toward one artificial substrate but not another. The activation of these kinases appears to be order dependent, as it is enhanced when phosphorylation of tyrosine precedes that of serine but phosphorylation in the reverse order yields no activation. Any of four protein-tyrosine kinases tested, in combination with the protein-serine/threonine kinase, casein kinase II, was capable of mediating this activation in vitro. The time course of phosphorylation of CD45 in response to T-cell activation is consistent with the possibility that this regulatory mechanism is utilized in vivo. Images PMID:7518565

  2. Structural Characterizations of Glycerol Kinase: Unraveling Phosphorylation-Induced Long-Range Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Joanne I.; Kettering, Regina; Saxl, Ruth; Bourand, Alexa; Darbon, Emmanuelle; Joly, Nathalie; Briozzo, Pierre; Deutscher, Josef

    2009-09-11

    Glycerol metabolism provides a central link between sugar and fatty acid catabolism. In most bacteria, glycerol kinase plays a crucial role in regulating channel/facilitator-dependent uptake of glycerol into the cell. In the firmicute Enterococcus casseliflavus, this enzyme's activity is enhanced by phosphorylation of the histidine residue (His232) located in its activation loop, approximately 25 A from its catalytic cleft. We reported earlier that some mutations of His232 altered enzyme activities; we present here the crystal structures of these mutant GlpK enzymes. The structure of a mutant enzyme with enhanced enzymatic activity, His232Arg, reveals that residues at the catalytic cleft are more optimally aligned to bind ATP and mediate phosphoryl transfer. Specifically, the position of Arg18 in His232Arg shifts by approximately 1 A when compared to its position in wild-type (WT), His232Ala, and His232Glu enzymes. This new conformation of Arg18 is more optimally positioned at the presumed gamma-phosphate location of ATP, close to the glycerol substrate. In addition to structural changes exhibited at the active site, the conformational stability of the activation loop is decreased, as reflected by an approximately 35% increase in B factors ('thermal factors') in a mutant enzyme displaying diminished activity, His232Glu. Correlating conformational changes to alteration of enzymatic activities in the mutant enzymes identifies distinct localized regions that can have profound effects on intramolecular signal transduction. Alterations in pairwise interactions across the dimer interface can communicate phosphorylation states over 25 A from the activation loop to the catalytic cleft, positioning Arg18 to form favorable interactions at the beta,gamma-bridging position with ATP. This would offset loss of the hydrogen bonds at the gamma-phosphate of ATP during phosphoryl transfer to glycerol, suggesting that appropriate alignment of the second substrate of glycerol kinase

  3. Occurrence of two phosphorylated forms of yeast fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase with different isoelectric points.

    PubMed

    Burlini, N; Facheris, P; Tortora, P; Guerritore, A

    1988-12-01

    Yeast fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11) immunoprecipitated from glucose-derepressed wild-type cells and subjected to isoelectric focusing, appears as a unique peak, essentially homogeneous and devoid of incorporated phosphate. However, after cell incubation with glucose, two phosphorylated forms are detectable. The isoelectric point of one is higher and of the other is lower than that of the native form. In contrast, in the mutant ABYS1 which is deficient in several vacuolar proteinases (Achstetter, T., Emter, O., Ehmann, C. and Wolf, D.H. (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 13334-13343), only the more acidic phospho form appears after cell incubation with glucose. However, sequence data rule out the possibility that limited proteolysis is the event responsible for the appearance of the more basic form of the phosphoenzyme. Nevertheless, time courses of glucose-induced inactivation of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase show that the enzyme undergoes a substantially slower inactivation in the ABYS1 mutant as compared to the wild-type. These findings point to a degradative mechanism involving, besides the well-known phosphorylation, an additional as yet unknown modification which probably sensitizes the enzyme to proteolytic attack; furthermore, the enzyme responsible for such a modification seems to require one or more of the vacuolar proteinases missing in the mutant for its maturation.

  4. Akt2 Phosphorylates Ezrin to Trigger NHE3 Translocation and Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Shiue, Harn; Musch, Mark W.; Wang, Yingmin; Chang, Eugene B.; Turner, Jerrold R.

    2005-01-01

    Initiation of Na+-glucose cotransport in intestinal absorptive epithelia causes NHE3 to be translocated to the apical plasma membrane, leading to cytoplasmic alkalinization. We reported recently that this NHE3 translocation requires ezrin phosphorylation. However, the kinase that phosphorylates ezrin in this process has not been identified. Because Akt has also been implicated in NHE3 translocation, we investigated the hypothesis that Akt phosphorylates ezrin. After initiation of Na+-glucose cotransport, Akt is activated with kinetics that parallel those of ezrin phosphorylation. Inhibition of p38 MAP kinase, which blocks ezrin phosphorylation, also prevents Akt activation. Purified Akt directly phosphorylates recombinant ezrin at threonine 567 in vitro in an ATP-dependent manner. This in vitro phosphorylation can be prevented by Akt inhibitors. In intact cells, inhibition of either phosphoinositide 3-kinase, an upstream regulator of Akt, or inhibition of Akt itself using inhibitors validated in vitro prevents ezrin phosphorylation after initiation of Na+-glucose cotransport. Specific small interfering RNA knockdown of Akt2 prevented ezrin phosphorylation in intact cells. Pharmacological Akt inhibition or Akt2 knockdown also prevented NHE3 translocation and activation after initiation of Na+-glucose cotransport, confirming the functional role of Akt2. These studies therefore identify Akt2 as a critical kinase that regulates ezrin phosphorylation and activation. This Akt2-dependent ezrin phosphorylation leads to NHE3 translocation and activation. PMID:15531580

  5. Akt2 phosphorylates ezrin to trigger NHE3 translocation and activation.

    PubMed

    Shiue, Harn; Musch, Mark W; Wang, Yingmin; Chang, Eugene B; Turner, Jerrold R

    2005-01-14

    Initiation of Na(+)-glucose cotransport in intestinal absorptive epithelia causes NHE3 to be translocated to the apical plasma membrane, leading to cytoplasmic alkalinization. We reported recently that this NHE3 translocation requires ezrin phosphorylation. However, the kinase that phosphorylates ezrin in this process has not been identified. Because Akt has also been implicated in NHE3 translocation, we investigated the hypothesis that Akt phosphorylates ezrin. After initiation of Na(+)-glucose cotransport, Akt is activated with kinetics that parallel those of ezrin phosphorylation. Inhibition of p38 MAP kinase, which blocks ezrin phosphorylation, also prevents Akt activation. Purified Akt directly phosphorylates recombinant ezrin at threonine 567 in vitro in an ATP-dependent manner. This in vitro phosphorylation can be prevented by Akt inhibitors. In intact cells, inhibition of either phosphoinositide 3-kinase, an upstream regulator of Akt, or inhibition of Akt itself using inhibitors validated in vitro prevents ezrin phosphorylation after initiation of Na(+)-glucose cotransport. Specific small interfering RNA knockdown of Akt2 prevented ezrin phosphorylation in intact cells. Pharmacological Akt inhibition or Akt2 knockdown also prevented NHE3 translocation and activation after initiation of Na(+)-glucose cotransport, confirming the functional role of Akt2. These studies therefore identify Akt2 as a critical kinase that regulates ezrin phosphorylation and activation. This Akt2-dependent ezrin phosphorylation leads to NHE3 translocation and activation.

  6. Effect of phosphorylation on antioxidant activities of pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo, Lady godiva) polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Song, Yi; Ni, Yuanying; Hu, Xiaosong; Li, Quanhong

    2015-11-01

    Phosphorylated derivatives of pumpkin polysaccharide with different degree of substitution were synthesized using POCl3 and pyridine. Antioxidant activities and cytoprotective effects of unmodified polysaccharide and phosphorylated derivatives were investigated employing various in vitro systems. Results showed that high ratio of POCl3/pyridine could increase the degree of substitution and no remarkable degradation occurred in the phosphorylation process. Characteristic absorption of phosphorylation appeared both in the IR and (31)P NMR spectrum. The df values between 2.27 and 2.55 indicated the relatively expanded conformation of the phosphorylated derivatives. All the phosphorylated polysaccharides exhibited higher antioxidant activities. H2O2-induced oxidative damages on rat thymic lymphocyte were also prevented by the derivatives. In general, phosphorylation could improve the antioxidant activities of pumpkin polysaccharide both in vitro and in a cell system.

  7. Phosphorylation by protein kinase C decreases catalytic activity of avian phospholipase C-beta.

    PubMed Central

    Filtz, T M; Cunningham, M L; Stanig, K J; Paterson, A; Harden, T K

    1999-01-01

    The potential role of protein kinase C (PKC)-promoted phosphorylation has been examined in the G-protein-regulated inositol lipid signalling pathway. Incubation of [32P]Pi-labelled turkey erythrocytes with either the P2Y1 receptor agonist 2-methylthioadenosine triphosphate (2MeSATP) or with PMA resulted in a marked increase in incorporation of 32P into the G-protein-activated phospholipase C PLC-betaT. Purified PLC-betaT also was phosphorylated by PKC in vitro to a stoichiometry (mean+/-S. E.M.) of 1.06+/-0.2 mol of phosphate/mol of PLC-betaT. Phosphorylation by PKC was isoenzyme-specific because, under identical conditions, mammalian PLC-beta2 also was phosphorylated to a stoichiometry near unity, whereas mammalian PLC-beta1 was not phosphorylated by PKC. The effects of PKC-promoted phosphorylation on enzyme activity were assessed by reconstituting purified PLC-betaT with turkey erythrocyte membranes devoid of endogenous PLC activity. Phosphorylation resulted in a decrease in basal activity, AlF4(-)-stimulated activity, and activity stimulated by 2MeSATP plus guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate in the reconstituted membranes. The decreases in enzyme activities were proportional to the extent of PKC-promoted phosphorylation. Catalytic activity assessed by using mixed detergent/phospholipid micelles also was decreased by up to 60% by phosphorylation. The effect of phosphorylation on Gqalpha-stimulated PLC-betaT in reconstitution experiments with purified proteins was not greater than that observed on basal activity alone. Taken together, these results illustrate that PKC phosphorylates PLC-betaT in vivo and to a physiologically relevant stoichiometry in vitro. Phosphorylation is accompanied by a concomitant loss of enzyme activity, reflected as a decrease in overall catalytic activity rather than as a specific modification of G-protein-regulated activity. PMID:10024500

  8. Tyrosine Phosphorylation of SGEF Regulates RhoG Activity and Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Okuyama, Yusuke; Umeda, Kentaro; Negishi, Manabu; Katoh, Hironori

    2016-01-01

    SGEF and Ephexin4 are members of the Ephexin subfamily of RhoGEFs that specifically activate the small GTPase RhoG. It is reported that Ephexin1 and Ephexin5, two well-characterized Ephexin subfamily RhoGEFs, are tyrosine-phosphorylated by Src, and that their phosphorylation affect their activities and functions. In this study, we show that SGEF, but not Ephexin4, is tyrosine-phosphorylated by Src. Tyrosine phosphorylation of SGEF suppresses its interaction with RhoG, the elevation of RhoG activity, and SGEF-mediated promotion of cell migration. We identified tyrosine 530 (Y530), which is located within the Dbl homology domain, as a major phosphorylation site of SGEF by Src, and Y530F mutation blocked the inhibitory effect of Src on SGEF. Taken together, these results suggest that the activity of SGEF is negatively regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation of the DH domain. PMID:27437949

  9. Protein kinase C catalyses the phosphorylation and activation of rat liver phospholipid methyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Villalba, M; Pajares, M A; Renart, M F; Mato, J M

    1987-01-01

    When a partially purified rat liver phospholipid methyltransferase is incubated with [gamma-32P]ATP and rat brain protein kinase C, phospholipid methyltransferase (Mr 50,000, pI 4.75) becomes phosphorylated. Phosphorylation of the enzyme showed Ca2+/lipid-dependency. Protein kinase C-dependent phosphorylation of phospholipid methyltransferase was accompanied by an approx. 2-fold activation of the enzyme activity. Activity changes and enzyme phosphorylation showed the same time course. Activation of the enzyme also showed Ca2+/lipid-dependency. Protein kinase C mediates phosphorylation of predominantly serine residues of the methyltransferase. One major peak of phosphorylation was identified by analysis of tryptic phosphopeptides by isoelectrofocusing. This peak (pI 5.2) differs from that phosphorylated by the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (pI 7.2), demonstrating the specificity of phosphorylation of protein kinase C. Tryptic-peptide mapping by h.p.l.c. of the methyltransferase phosphorylated by protein kinase C revealed one major peak of radioactivity, which could be resolved into two labelled phosphopeptides by t.l.c. The significance of protein kinase C-mediated phosphorylation of phospholipid methyltransferase is discussed. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 4. PMID:3593229

  10. EP2 Induces p38 Phosphorylation via the Activation of Src in HEK 293 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Kyung-Soo; Shim, Minsub

    2015-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a major product of cyclooxygenase, binds to four different prostaglandin E2 receptors (EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4) which are G-protein coupled transmembrane receptors (GPCRs). Although GPCRs including EP receptors have been shown to be associated with their specific G proteins, recent evidences suggest that GPCRs can regulate MAPK signaling via non-G protein coupled pathways including Src. EP2 is differentially expressed in various tissues and the expression of EP2 is induced by extracellular stimuli. We hypothesized that an increased level of EP2 expression may affect MAPK signaling. The overexpression of EP2 in HEK 293 cells resulted in significant increase in intracellular cAMP levels response to treatment with butaprost, a specific EP2 agonist, while overexpression of EP2 alone did not increase intracellular cAMP levels. However, EP2 overexpression in the absence of PGE2 induced an increase in the level of p38 phosphorylation as well as the kinase activity of p38, suggesting that up-regulation of EP2 may promote p38 activation via non-G protein coupled pathway. Inhibition of Src completely blocked EP2-induced p38 phosphorylation and overexpression of Src increased the level of p38 phosphorylation, indicating that Src is upstream kinase for EP2-induced p38 phosphorylation. EP2 overexpression also increased the Src activity and EP2 protein was co-immunoprecipitated with Src. Furthermore, sequential co-immunoprecipitation studies showed that EP2, Src, and β-arrestin can form a complex. Our study found a novel pathway in which EP2 is associated with Src, regulating p38 pathway. PMID:26535079

  11. Inhibition of Rb Phosphorylation Leads to mTORC2-Mediated Activation of Akt.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinfang; Xu, Kai; Liu, Pengda; Geng, Yan; Wang, Bin; Gan, Wenjian; Guo, Jianping; Wu, Fei; Chin, Y Rebecca; Berrios, Christian; Lien, Evan C; Toker, Alex; DeCaprio, James A; Sicinski, Piotr; Wei, Wenyi

    2016-06-16

    The retinoblastoma (Rb) protein exerts its tumor suppressor function primarily by inhibiting the E2F family of transcription factors that govern cell-cycle progression. However, it remains largely elusive whether the hyper-phosphorylated, non-E2F1-interacting form of Rb has any physiological role. Here we report that hyper-phosphorylated Rb directly binds to and suppresses the function of mTORC2 but not mTORC1. Mechanistically, Rb, but not p107 or p130, interacts with Sin1 and blocks the access of Akt to mTORC2, leading to attenuated Akt activation and increased sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs. As such, inhibition of Rb phosphorylation by depleting cyclin D or using CDK4/6 inhibitors releases Rb-mediated mTORC2 suppression. This, in turn, leads to elevated Akt activation to confer resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs in Rb-proficient cells, which can be attenuated with Akt inhibitors. Therefore, our work provides a molecular basis for the synergistic usage of CDK4/6 and Akt inhibitors in treating Rb-proficient cancer. PMID:27237051

  12. Phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase by one-trial and multi-trial classical conditioning.

    PubMed

    Crow, T; Xue-Bian, J J; Siddiqi, V; Kang, Y; Neary, J T

    1998-05-01

    The pathway supporting the conditioned stimulus (CS) is one site of plasticity that has been studied extensively in conditioned Hermissenda. Several signal transduction pathways have been implicated in classical conditioning of this preparation, although the major emphasis has been on protein kinase C. Here we provide evidence for the activation and phosphorylation of a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway by one-trial and multi-trial conditioning. A one-trial in vitro conditioning procedure consisting of light (CS) paired with the application of 5-HT results in the increased incorporation of 32PO4 into proteins detected with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Two of the phosphoproteins have molecular weights of 44 and 42 kDa, consistent with extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERK1 and ERK2). Phosphorylation of the 44 and 42 kDa proteins by one-trial conditioning was inhibited by pretreatment with PD098059, A MEK1 (ERK-Activating kinase) inhibitor. Assays of ERK activity with brain myelin basic protein as a substrate revealed greater ERK activity for the group that received one-trial conditioning compared with an unpaired control group. Western blot analysis of phosphorylated ERK using antibodies recognizing the dually phosphorylated forms of ERK1 and ERK2 showed an increase in phosphorylation after one-trial conditioning compared with unpaired controls. The increased phosphorylation of ERK after one-trial conditioning was blocked by pretreatment with PD098059. Hermissenda that received 10 or 15 conditioning trials showed significant behavioral suppression compared with pseudo-random controls. After conditioning and behavioral testing, the conditioned animals showed significantly greater phosphorylation of ERK compared with the pseudo-random controls. These results show that the ERK-MAPK signaling pathway is activated in Pavlovian conditioning of Hermissenda.

  13. Synthesis of Isomeric Phosphoubiquitin Chains Reveals that Phosphorylation Controls Deubiquitinase Activity and Specificity.

    PubMed

    Huguenin-Dezot, Nicolas; De Cesare, Virginia; Peltier, Julien; Knebel, Axel; Kristaryianto, Yosua Adi; Rogerson, Daniel T; Kulathu, Yogesh; Trost, Matthias; Chin, Jason W

    2016-07-26

    Ubiquitin is post-translationally modified by phosphorylation at several sites, but the consequences of these modifications are largely unknown. Here, we synthesize multi-milligram quantities of ubiquitin phosphorylated at serine 20, serine 57, and serine 65 via genetic code expansion. We use these phosphoubiquitins for the enzymatic assembly of 20 isomeric phosphoubiquitin dimers, with different sites of isopeptide linkage and/or phosphorylation. We discover that phosphorylation of serine 20 on ubiquitin converts UBE3C from a dual-specificity E3 ligase into a ligase that primarily synthesizes K48 chains. We profile the activity of 31 deubiquitinases on the isomeric phosphoubiquitin dimers in 837 reactions, and we discover that phosphorylation at distinct sites in ubiquitin can activate or repress cleavage of a particular linkage by deubiquitinases and that phosphorylation at a single site in ubiquitin can control the specificity of deubiquitinases for distinct ubiquitin linkages. PMID:27425610

  14. Phosphorylation of Tip60 Tyrosine 327 by Abl Kinase Inhibits HAT Activity through Association with FE65

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sung Hwa; Kang, Sang Sun

    2013-01-01

    The transfer of acetyl groups from acetyl coenzyme A to the ε amino group of internal lysine residues is catalyzed by Tip60, which is in the MYST family of nuclear histone acetyltransferases (HATs). The tyrosine phosphorylation of Tip60 seems to be a unique modification. We present evidence that Tip60 is modified on tyrosine 327 by Abl kinase. We show that this causes functional changes in HAT activity and the subcellular localization of TIP60, which forms a complex with Abl kinase. The Tip60 mutation Y327F abolished tyrosine phosphorylation, reduced the inhibition of Tip60 HAT activity, and caused G0-G1 arrest and association with FE65. Thus, our findings for the first time suggested a novel regulation mechanism of Tip60. Regulation was through phosphorylation of tyrosine 327 by Abl tyrosine kinase and depended on environmental conditions, suggesting that the tyrosine residue of Tip60 is important for the activation process. PMID:24044023

  15. AMPA, not NMDA, activates RhoA GTPases and subsequently phosphorylates moesin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su-Jin; Jeon, Songhee; Shin, Eun-Young; Kim, Eung-Gook; Park, Joobae; Bae, Chang-Dae

    2004-02-29

    Glutamate induced rapid phosphorylation of moesin, one of ERM family proteins involved in the ligation of membrane to actin cytoskeleton, in rat hippocampal cells (JBC, 277:16576-16584, 2002). However, the identity of glutamate receptor has not been explored. Here we show that a-amino- 3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor is responsible for glutamate-induced RhoA activation and phosphorylation of moesin. Glutamate induced phosphorylation at Thr-558 of moesin was still detectible upon chelation of Ca(2+), suggesting involvement of AMPA receptor instead of N-methyl D-Aspartate (NMDA) receptor in this phosphorylation of moesin. AMPA but not NMDA- induced moesin phosphorylation was independent of Ca(2+). Both AMPA and NMDA but not Kainate induced moesin phosphorylation at similar levels. However, the kinetics of phosphorylation varied greatly between AMPA and NMDA where AMPA treatment rapidly increased phosphomoesin, which reached a maximum at 10 min after treatment and returned to a basal level at 30 min. In contrast, NMDA-induced phosphorylation of moesin reached a maximum at 30 min after treatment and was remained at higher levels at 60 min. A possible involvement of RhoA and its downstream effector, Rho kinase in the AMPA receptor-triggered phosphorylation of moesin was also explored. The kinetics for the glutamate- induced membrane translocation of RhoA was similar to that of moesin phosphorylation induced by AMPA. Moreover, Y-27632, a specific Rho kinase inhibitor, completely blocked AMPA-induced moesin phosphorylation but had no effect on NMDA-induced moesin phosphorylation. These results suggest that glutamate-induced phosphorylation of moesin may be mediated through the AMPA receptor/RhoA/Rho kinase pathway.

  16. PAS kinase is activated by direct SNF1-dependent phosphorylation and mediates inhibition of TORC1 through the phosphorylation and activation of Pbp1

    PubMed Central

    DeMille, Desiree; Badal, Bryan D.; Evans, J. Brady; Mathis, Andrew D.; Anderson, Joseph F.; Grose, Julianne H.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the interplay between three sensory protein kinases in yeast: AMP-regulated kinase (AMPK, or SNF1 in yeast), PAS kinase 1 (Psk1 in yeast), and the target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1). This signaling cascade occurs through the SNF1-dependent phosphorylation and activation of Psk1, which phosphorylates and activates poly(A)- binding protein binding protein 1 (Pbp1), which then inhibits TORC1 through sequestration at stress granules. The SNF1-dependent phosphorylation of Psk1 appears to be direct, in that Snf1 is necessary and sufficient for Psk1 activation by alternate carbon sources, is required for altered Psk1 protein mobility, is able to phosphorylate Psk1 in vitro, and binds Psk1 via its substrate-targeting subunit Gal83. Evidence for the direct phosphorylation and activation of Pbp1 by Psk1 is also provided by in vitro and in vivo kinase assays, including the reduction of Pbp1 localization at distinct cytoplasmic foci and subsequent rescue of TORC1 inhibition in PAS kinase–deficient yeast. In support of this signaling cascade, Snf1-deficient cells display increased TORC1 activity, whereas cells containing hyperactive Snf1 display a PAS kinase–dependent decrease in TORC1 activity. This interplay between yeast SNF1, Psk1, and TORC1 allows for proper glucose allocation during nutrient depletion, reducing cell growth and proliferation when energy is low. PMID:25428989

  17. Protein Phosphatase 2A Stabilizes Human Securin, Whose Phosphorylated Forms Are Degraded via the SCF Ubiquitin Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Bernabé, Ana M.; Romero, Francisco; Limón-Mortés, M. Cristina; Tortolero, María

    2006-01-01

    Sister chromatid segregation is triggered at the metaphase-to-anaphase transition by the activation of the protease separase. For most of the cell cycle, separase activity is kept in check by its association with the inhibitory chaperone securin. Activation of separase occurs at anaphase onset, when securin is targeted for destruction by the anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome E3 ubiquitin protein ligase. This results in the release of the cohesins from chromosomes, which in turn allows the segregation of sister chromatids to opposite spindle poles. Here we show that human securin (hSecurin) forms a complex with enzymatically active protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and that it is a substrate of the phosphatase, both in vitro and in vivo. Treatment of cells with okadaic acid, a potent inhibitor of PP2A, results in various hyperphosphorylated forms of hSecurin which are extremely unstable, due to the action of the Skp1/Cul1/F-box protein complex ubiquitin ligase. We propose that PP2A regulates hSecurin levels by counteracting its phosphorylation, which promotes its degradation. Misregulation of this process may lead to the formation of tumors, in which overproduction of hSecurin is often observed. PMID:16705156

  18. Is myosin light-chain phosphorylation a regulatory signal for the osmotic activation of the Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter?

    PubMed

    Di Ciano-Oliveira, Caterina; Lodyga, Monika; Fan, Lingzhi; Szászi, Katalin; Hosoya, Hiroshi; Rotstein, Ori D; Kapus, András

    2005-07-01

    Myosin light-chain (MLC) kinase (MLCK)-dependent increase in MLC phosphorylation has been proposed to be a key mediator of the hyperosmotic activation of the Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter (NKCC). To address this hypothesis and to assess whether MLC phosphorylation plays a signaling or permissive role in NKCC regulation, we used pharmacological and genetic means to manipulate MLCK, MLC phosphorylation, or myosin ATPase activity and followed the impact of these alterations on the hypertonic stimulation of NKCC in porcine kidney tubular LLC-PK1 epithelial cells. We found that the MLCK inhibitor ML-7 suppressed NKCC activity independently of MLC phosphorylation. Notably, ML-7 reduced both basal and hypertonically stimulated NKCC activity without influencing MLC phosphorylation under these conditions, and it inhibited NKCC activation by Cl- depletion, a treatment that did not increase MLC phosphorylation. Furthermore, prevention of the osmotically induced increase in MLC phosphorylation by viral induction of cells with a nonphosphorylatable, dominant negative MLC mutant (AA-MLC) did not affect the hypertonic activation of NKCC. Conversely, a constitutively active MLC mutant (DD-MLC) that mimics the diphosphorylated form neither stimulated isotonic nor potentiated hypertonic NKCC activity. Furthermore, a depolarization-induced increase in endogenous MLC phosphorylation failed to activate NKCC. However, complete abolition of basal MLC phosphorylation by K252a or the inhibition of myosin ATPase by blebbistatin significantly reduced the osmotic stimulation of NKCC without suppressing its basal or Cl- depletion-triggered activity. These results indicate that an increase in MLC phosphorylation is neither a sufficient nor a necessary signal to stimulate NKCC in tubular cells. However, basal myosin activity plays a permissive role in the optimal osmotic responsiveness of NKCC. PMID:15728707

  19. Phosphorylation of Human Choline Kinase Beta by Protein Kinase A: Its Impact on Activity and Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching Ching; Few, Ling Ling; Konrad, Manfred; See Too, Wei Cun

    2016-01-01

    Choline kinase beta (CKβ) is one of the CK isozymes involved in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine. CKβ is important for normal mitochondrial function and muscle development as the lack of the ckβ gene in human and mice results in the development of muscular dystrophy. In contrast, CKα is implicated in tumorigenesis and has been extensively studied as an anticancer target. Phosphorylation of human CKα was found to regulate the enzyme’s activity and its subcellular location. This study provides evidence for CKβ phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA). In vitro phosphorylation of CKβ by PKA was first detected by phosphoprotein staining, as well as by in-gel kinase assays. The phosphorylating kinase was identified as PKA by Western blotting. CKβ phosphorylation by MCF-7 cell lysate was inhibited by a PKA-specific inhibitor peptide, and the intracellular phosphorylation of CKβ was shown to be regulated by the level of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), a PKA activator. Phosphorylation sites were located on CKβ residues serine-39 and serine-40 as determined by mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis. Phosphorylation increased the catalytic efficiencies for the substrates choline and ATP about 2-fold, without affecting ethanolamine phosphorylation, and the S39D/S40D CKβ phosphorylation mimic behaved kinetically very similar. Remarkably, phosphorylation drastically increased the sensitivity of CKβ to hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) inhibition by about 30-fold. These findings suggest that CKβ, in concert with CKα, and depending on its phosphorylation status, might play a critical role as a druggable target in carcinogenesis. PMID:27149373

  20. p38 MAP Kinase Links CAR Activation and Inactivation in the Nucleus via Phosphorylation at Threonine 38

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Takeshi; Moore, Rick

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear receptor constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3), which regulates hepatic drug and energy metabolisms as well as cell growth and death, is sequestered in the cytoplasm as its inactive form phosphorylated at threonine 38. CAR activators elicit dephosphorylation, and nonphosphorylated CAR translocates into the nucleus to activate its target genes. CAR was previously found to require p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) to transactivate the cytochrome P450 2B (CYP2B) genes. Here we have demonstrated that p38 MAPK forms a complex with CAR, enables it to bind to the response sequence, phenobarbital-responsive enhancer module (PBREM), within the CYP2B promoter, and thus recruits RNA polymerase II to activate transcription. Subsequently, p38 MAPK elicited rephosphorylation of threonine 38 to inactivate CAR and exclude it from the nucleus. Thus, nuclear p38 MAPK exerted dual regulation by sequentially activating and inactivating CAR-mediated transcription through phosphorylation of threonine 38. PMID:27074912

  1. Cdk5/p35 phosphorylates lemur tyrosine kinase-2 to regulate protein phosphatase-1C phosphorylation and activity.

    PubMed

    Manser, Catherine; Vagnoni, Alessio; Guillot, Florence; Davies, Jennifer; Miller, Christopher C J

    2012-05-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase-5 (cdk5)/p35 and protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) are two major enzymes that control a variety of physiological processes within the nervous system including neuronal differentiation, synaptic plasticity and axonal transport. Defective cdk5/p35 and PP1 function are also implicated in several major human neurodegenerative diseases. Cdk5/p35 and the catalytic subunit of PP1 (PP1C) both bind to the brain-enriched, serine-threonine kinase lemur tyrosine kinase-2 (LMTK2). Moreover, LMTK2 phosphorylates PP1C on threonine-320 (PP1Cthr³²⁰) to inhibit its activity. Here, we demonstrate that LMTK2 is phosphorylated on serine-1418 (LMTK2ser¹⁴¹⁸) by cdk5/p35 and present evidence that this regulates its ability to phosphorylate PP1Cthr³²⁰. We thus describe a new signalling pathway within the nervous system that links cdk5/p35 with PP1C and which has implications for a number of neuronal functions and neuronal dysfunction.

  2. Bordetella pertussis fim3 gene regulation by BvgA: phosphorylation controls the formation of inactive vs. active transcription complexes.

    PubMed

    Boulanger, Alice; Moon, Kyung; Decker, Kimberly B; Chen, Qing; Knipling, Leslie; Stibitz, Scott; Hinton, Deborah M

    2015-02-10

    Two-component systems [sensor kinase/response regulator (RR)] are major tools used by microorganisms to adapt to environmental conditions. RR phosphorylation is typically required for gene activation, but few studies have addressed how and if phosphorylation affects specific steps during transcription initiation. We characterized transcription complexes made with RNA polymerase and the Bordetella pertussis RR, BvgA, in its nonphosphorylated or phosphorylated (BvgA∼P) state at P(fim3), the promoter for the virulence gene fim3 (fimbrial subunit), using gel retardation, potassium permanganate and DNase I footprinting, cleavage reactions with protein conjugated with iron bromoacetamidobenzyl-EDTA, and in vitro transcription. Previous work has shown that the level of nonphosphorylated BvgA remains high in vivo under conditions in which BvgA is phosphorylated. Our results here indicate that surprisingly both BvgA and BvgA∼P form open and initiating complexes with RNA polymerase at P(fim3). However, phosphorylation of BvgA is needed to generate the correct conformation that can transition to competent elongation. Footprints obtained with the complexes made with nonphosphorylated BvgA are atypical; while the initiating complex with BvgA synthesizes short RNA, it does not generate full-length transcripts. Extended incubation of the BvgA/RNA polymerase initiated complex in the presence of heparin generates a stable, but defective species that depends on the initial transcribed sequence of fim3. We suggest that the presence of nonphosphorylated BvgA down-regulates P(fim3) activity when phosphorylated BvgA is present and may allow the bacterium to quickly adapt to the loss of inducing conditions by rapidly eliminating P(fim3) activation once the signal for BvgA phosphorylation is removed.

  3. SAD-B Phosphorylation of CAST Controls Active Zone Vesicle Recycling for Synaptic Depression.

    PubMed

    Mochida, Sumiko; Hida, Yamato; Tanifuji, Shota; Hagiwara, Akari; Hamada, Shun; Abe, Manabu; Ma, Huan; Yasumura, Misato; Kitajima, Isao; Sakimura, Kenji; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa

    2016-09-13

    Short-term synaptic depression (STD) is a common form of activity-dependent plasticity observed widely in the nervous system. Few molecular pathways that control STD have been described, but the active zone (AZ) release apparatus provides a possible link between neuronal activity and plasticity. Here, we show that an AZ cytomatrix protein CAST and an AZ-associated protein kinase SAD-B coordinately regulate STD by controlling reloading of the AZ with release-ready synaptic vesicles. SAD-B phosphorylates the N-terminal serine (S45) of CAST, and S45 phosphorylation increases with higher firing rate. A phosphomimetic CAST (S45D) mimics CAST deletion, which enhances STD by delaying reloading of the readily releasable pool (RRP), resulting in a pool size decrease. A phosphonegative CAST (S45A) inhibits STD and accelerates RRP reloading. Our results suggest that the CAST/SAD-B reaction serves as a brake on synaptic transmission by temporal calibration of activity and synaptic depression via RRP size regulation. PMID:27626661

  4. SAD-B Phosphorylation of CAST Controls Active Zone Vesicle Recycling for Synaptic Depression.

    PubMed

    Mochida, Sumiko; Hida, Yamato; Tanifuji, Shota; Hagiwara, Akari; Hamada, Shun; Abe, Manabu; Ma, Huan; Yasumura, Misato; Kitajima, Isao; Sakimura, Kenji; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa

    2016-09-13

    Short-term synaptic depression (STD) is a common form of activity-dependent plasticity observed widely in the nervous system. Few molecular pathways that control STD have been described, but the active zone (AZ) release apparatus provides a possible link between neuronal activity and plasticity. Here, we show that an AZ cytomatrix protein CAST and an AZ-associated protein kinase SAD-B coordinately regulate STD by controlling reloading of the AZ with release-ready synaptic vesicles. SAD-B phosphorylates the N-terminal serine (S45) of CAST, and S45 phosphorylation increases with higher firing rate. A phosphomimetic CAST (S45D) mimics CAST deletion, which enhances STD by delaying reloading of the readily releasable pool (RRP), resulting in a pool size decrease. A phosphonegative CAST (S45A) inhibits STD and accelerates RRP reloading. Our results suggest that the CAST/SAD-B reaction serves as a brake on synaptic transmission by temporal calibration of activity and synaptic depression via RRP size regulation.

  5. Ligand stimulation of CD95 induces activation of Plk3 followed by phosphorylation of caspase-8

    PubMed Central

    Helmke, Christina; Raab, Monika; Rödel, Franz; Matthess, Yves; Oellerich, Thomas; Mandal, Ranadip; Sanhaji, Mourad; Urlaub, Henning; Rödel, Claus; Becker, Sven; Strebhardt, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Upon interaction of the CD95 receptor with its ligand, sequential association of the adaptor molecule FADD (MORT1), pro-forms of caspases-8/10, and the caspase-8/10 regulator c-FLIP leads to the formation of a death-inducing signaling complex. Here, we identify polo-like kinase (Plk) 3 as a new interaction partner of the death receptor CD95. The enzymatic activity of Plk3 increases following interaction of the CD95 receptor with its ligand. Knockout (KO) or knockdown of caspase-8, CD95 or FADD prevents activation of Plk3 upon CD95 stimulation, suggesting a requirement of a functional DISC for Plk3 activation. Furthermore, we identify caspase-8 as a new substrate for Plk3. Phosphorylation occurs on T273 and results in stimulation of caspase-8 proapoptotic function. Stimulation of CD95 in cells expressing a non-phosphorylatable caspase-8-T273A mutant in a rescue experiment or in Plk3-KO cells generated by CRISPR/Cas9 reduces the processing of caspase-8 prominently. Low T273 phosphorylation correlates significantly with low Plk3 expression in a cohort of 95 anal tumor patients. Our data suggest a novel mechanism of kinase activation within the Plk family and propose a new model for the stimulation of the extrinsic death pathway in tumors with high Plk3 expression. PMID:27325299

  6. Ligand stimulation of CD95 induces activation of Plk3 followed by phosphorylation of caspase-8.

    PubMed

    Helmke, Christina; Raab, Monika; Rödel, Franz; Matthess, Yves; Oellerich, Thomas; Mandal, Ranadip; Sanhaji, Mourad; Urlaub, Henning; Rödel, Claus; Becker, Sven; Strebhardt, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    Upon interaction of the CD95 receptor with its ligand, sequential association of the adaptor molecule FADD (MORT1), pro-forms of caspases-8/10, and the caspase-8/10 regulator c-FLIP leads to the formation of a death-inducing signaling complex. Here, we identify polo-like kinase (Plk) 3 as a new interaction partner of the death receptor CD95. The enzymatic activity of Plk3 increases following interaction of the CD95 receptor with its ligand. Knockout (KO) or knockdown of caspase-8, CD95 or FADD prevents activation of Plk3 upon CD95 stimulation, suggesting a requirement of a functional DISC for Plk3 activation. Furthermore, we identify caspase-8 as a new substrate for Plk3. Phosphorylation occurs on T273 and results in stimulation of caspase-8 proapoptotic function. Stimulation of CD95 in cells expressing a non-phosphorylatable caspase-8-T273A mutant in a rescue experiment or in Plk3-KO cells generated by CRISPR/Cas9 reduces the processing of caspase-8 prominently. Low T273 phosphorylation correlates significantly with low Plk3 expression in a cohort of 95 anal tumor patients. Our data suggest a novel mechanism of kinase activation within the Plk family and propose a new model for the stimulation of the extrinsic death pathway in tumors with high Plk3 expression. PMID:27325299

  7. The high-risk HPV E6 oncoprotein preferentially targets phosphorylated nuclear forms of hDlg

    SciTech Connect

    Narayan, Nisha; Subbaiah, Vanitha Krishna; Banks, Lawrence

    2009-04-25

    High-risk mucosal HPV E6 oncoproteins target a number of PDZ domain-containing substrates for proteasome mediated degradation. One of these, Discs Large (Dlg), is involved in the regulation of cell polarity and proliferation control. Previous studies had suggested that Dlg when hyperphosphorylated by osmotic shock, or when present in the nucleus could be preferentially targeted by E6. In this study we use phospho-specific antibodies directed against Dlg phosphorylated at residues S158 and S442 to show that these two observations are, in fact, linked. Dlg, when phosphorylated on S158 and S442 by CDK1 or CDK2, shows a preferential nuclear accumulation. However, these forms of Dlg are absent in cells derived from HPV-induced cervical cancers. Upon either proteasome inhibition or siRNA ablation of E6 expression, we see specific rescue of these phosphorylated forms of Dlg. These results demonstrate that nuclear forms of Dlg phosphorylated on its CDK phospho-acceptor sites has enhanced susceptibility to E6-induced degradation and place previous studies on the stress-induced phosphorylation of Dlg into a relevant biological context.

  8. Regulation of uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase 1A3 activity by protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yongsheng; Yao, Yan; Jiang, Huidi; Lu, Chuan; Zeng, Su; Yu, Lushan

    2015-11-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a vital post-translational modification. This study investigated the effect of phosphorylation on human uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glucuronosyltransferase 1A3 (UGT1A3) activity. Curcumin and calphostin C suppressed the activity and phosphorylation of recombinant UGT1A3 expressed in Sf9 cells. These results indicate that UGT1A3 undergoes phosphorylation, which is required for its catalytic activity. Calphostin C is a highly specific protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, so three predicted PKC phosphorylation sites in UGT1A3 were examined. Site-directed mutation analysis at residues 28, 43 and 436 (from serine to glycine) was conducted. Compared with the wild-type, the S43G-mutant showed significantly decreased UGT1A3 catalytic activity. Furthermore, the UGT1A3 activity of wild-type and S43G-mutant was down-regulated by calphostin C, whereas the calphostin C inhibitory effect was much weaker on the S43G-mutant than the wild-type. In conclusion, phosphorylation plays an important role in UGT1A3 activity, and the serine at site 43 in UGT1A3 is most likely a phosphorylation site. PMID:26094731

  9. Phosphorylation of influenza A virus NS1 protein at threonine 49 suppresses its interferon antagonistic activity

    PubMed Central

    Kathum, Omer Abid; Schräder, Tobias; Anhlan, Darisuren; Nordhoff, Carolin; Liedmann, Swantje; Pande, Amit; Mellmann, Alexander; Ehrhardt, Christina; Wixler, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Summary Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation acts as a fundamental molecular switch that alters protein function and thereby regulates many cellular processes. The non‐structural protein 1 (NS1) of influenza A virus is an important factor regulating virulence by counteracting cellular immune responses against viral infection. NS1 was shown to be phosphorylated at several sites; however, so far, no function has been conclusively assigned to these post‐translational events yet. Here, we show that the newly identified phospho‐site threonine 49 of NS1 is differentially phosphorylated in the viral replication cycle. Phosphorylation impairs binding of NS1 to double‐stranded RNA and TRIM25 as well as complex formation with RIG‐I, thereby switching off its interferon antagonistic activity. Because phosphorylation was shown to occur at later stages of infection, we hypothesize that at this stage other functions of the multifunctional NS1 beyond its interferon‐antagonistic activity are needed. PMID:26687707

  10. Phosphorylation of influenza A virus NS1 protein at threonine 49 suppresses its interferon antagonistic activity.

    PubMed

    Kathum, Omer Abid; Schräder, Tobias; Anhlan, Darisuren; Nordhoff, Carolin; Liedmann, Swantje; Pande, Amit; Mellmann, Alexander; Ehrhardt, Christina; Wixler, Viktor; Ludwig, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation acts as a fundamental molecular switch that alters protein function and thereby regulates many cellular processes. The non-structural protein 1 (NS1) of influenza A virus is an important factor regulating virulence by counteracting cellular immune responses against viral infection. NS1 was shown to be phosphorylated at several sites; however, so far, no function has been conclusively assigned to these post-translational events yet. Here, we show that the newly identified phospho-site threonine 49 of NS1 is differentially phosphorylated in the viral replication cycle. Phosphorylation impairs binding of NS1 to double-stranded RNA and TRIM25 as well as complex formation with RIG-I, thereby switching off its interferon antagonistic activity. Because phosphorylation was shown to occur at later stages of infection, we hypothesize that at this stage other functions of the multifunctional NS1 beyond its interferon-antagonistic activity are needed.

  11. Rapid estrogen signaling negatively regulates PTEN activity through phosphorylation in endometrial cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Scully, Melanie M.; Palacios-Helgeson, Leslie K.; Wah, Lah S.; Jackson, Twila A.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperestrogenicity is a risk factor for endometrial cancer. 17β-estradiol (E2) is known to stimulate both genomic and nongenomic estrogen receptor-α (ERα) actions in a number of reproductive tissues. However, the contributions of transcription-independent ERα signaling on normal and malignant endometrium are not fully understood. Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is a tumor suppressor that decreases cellular mitosis primarily through negative regulation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT signaling axis. PTEN levels are elevated during the E2 dominated, mitotically active, proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle, indicating possible hormonal regulation of PTEN in the uterus. In order to determine if rapid E2 signaling regulates PTEN, we used ERα positive, PTEN positive, endometrial cells. We show that cytosolic E2/ERα signaling leads to increased phosphorylation of PTEN at key regulatory residues. Importantly, E2 stimulation decreased PTEN lipid phosphatase activity and caused consequent increases in phospho-AKT. We further demonstrate that cytosolic ERα forms a complex with PTEN in an E2-dependent manner, and that ERα constitutively complexes with protein kinase2-α (CK2α), a kinase previously shown to phosphorylate the C-terminal tail of PTEN. These results provide mechanistic support for an E2-dependent, ERα cytosolic signaling complex that negatively regulates PTEN activity through carboxy terminus phosphorylation. Using an animal model, we show that sustained E2 signaling results in increased phospho-PTEN (S380, T382, T383), total PTEN and phospho-AKT (S473). Taken together, we provide a novel mechanism in which transcription-independent E2/ERα signaling may promote a pro-tumorigenic environment in the endometrium. PMID:24844349

  12. Mad linker phosphorylations control the intensity and range of the BMP-activity gradient in developing Drosophila tissues

    PubMed Central

    Aleman, Abigail; Rios, Marlyn; Juarez, Matthew; Lee, Daniel; Chen, Annan; Eivers, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The BMP ligand Dpp, operates as a long range morphogen to control many important functions during Drosophila development from tissue patterning to growth. The BMP signal is transduced intracellularly via C-terminal phosphorylation of the BMP transcription factor Mad, which forms an activity gradient in developing embryonic tissues. Here we show that Cyclin dependent kinase 8 and Shaggy phosphorylate three Mad linker serines. We demonstrate that linker phosphorylations control the peak intensity and range of the BMP signal across rapidly developing embryonic tissues. Shaggy knockdown broadened the range of the BMP-activity gradient and increased high threshold target gene expression in the early embryo, while expression of a Mad linker mutant in the wing disc resulted in enhanced levels of C-terminally phosphorylated Mad, a 30% increase in wing tissue, and elevated BMP target genes. In conclusion, our results describe how Mad linker phosphorylations work to control the peak intensity and range of the BMP signal in rapidly developing Drosophila tissues. PMID:25377173

  13. Stress-induced nuclear translocation of CDK5 suppresses neuronal death by downregulating ERK activation via VRK3 phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Haengjin; Kim, Wanil; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Dohyun; Park, Choon-Ho; Kim, Sangjune; Kim, Do-Yeon; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2016-01-01

    Although extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2) activity is generally associated with cell survival, prolonged ERK activation induced by oxidative stress also mediates neuronal cell death. Here we report that oxidative stress-induced cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) activation stimulates neuroprotective signaling via phosphorylation of vaccinia-related kinase 3 (VRK3) at Ser 108. The binding of vaccinia H1-related (VHR) phosphatase to phosphorylated VRK3 increased its affinity for phospho-ERK and subsequently downregulated ERK activation. Overexpression of VRK3 protected human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced apoptosis. However the CDK5 was unable to phosphorylate mutant VRK3, and thus the mutant forms of VRK3 could not attenuate apoptotic process. Suppression of CDK5 activity results in increase of ERK activation and elevation of proapoptotic protein Bak expression in mouse cortical neurons. Results from VRK3-deficient neurons were further confirmed the role of VRK3 phosphorylation in H2O2-evoked ERK regulation. Importantly, we showed an association between phospho-VRK3 levels and the progression of human Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD). Together our work reveals endogenous protective mechanism against oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death and suggest VRK3 as a potential therapeutic target in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27346674

  14. Androgen receptor serine 81 phosphorylation mediates chromatin binding and transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaoyong; Gulla, Sarah; Cai, Changmeng; Balk, Steven P

    2012-03-01

    Our previous findings indicated that androgen receptor (AR) phosphorylation at serine 81 is stimulated by the mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1). In this report, we extended our previous study and confirmed that Ser-81 phosphorylation increases during mitosis, coincident with CDK1 activation. We further showed blocking cell cycle at G(1) or S phase did not disrupt androgen-induced Ser-81 phosphorylation and AR-dependent transcription, consistent with a recent report that AR was phosphorylated at Ser-81 and activated by the transcriptional CDK9. To assess the function of Ser-81 phosphorylation in prostate cancer (PCa) cells expressing endogenous AR, we developed a ligand switch strategy using a ligand-binding domain mutation (W741C) that renders AR responsive to the antagonist bicalutamide. An S81A/W741C double mutant AR stably expressed in PCa cells failed to transactivate the endogenous AR-regulated PSA or TMPRSS2 genes. ChIP showed that the S81A mutation prevented ligand-induced AR recruitment to these genes, and cellular fractionation revealed that the S81A mutation globally abrogated chromatin binding. Conversely, the AR fraction rapidly recruited to chromatin after androgen stimulation was highly enriched for Ser-81 phosphorylation. Finally, inhibition of CDK1 and CDK9 decreased AR Ser-81 phosphorylation, chromatin binding, and transcriptional activity. These findings indicate that Ser-81 phosphorylation by CDK9 stabilizes AR chromatin binding for transcription and suggest that CDK1-mediated Ser-81 phosphorylation during mitosis provides a pool of Ser-81 phosphorylation AR that can be readily recruited to chromatin for gene reactivation and may enhance AR activity in PCa.

  15. Phosphorylation acts positively and negatively to regulate MRTF-A subcellular localisation and activity

    PubMed Central

    Panayiotou, Richard; Miralles, Francesc; Pawlowski, Rafal; Diring, Jessica; Flynn, Helen R; Skehel, Mark; Treisman, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The myocardin-related transcription factors (MRTF-A and MRTF-B) regulate cytoskeletal genes through their partner transcription factor SRF. The MRTFs bind G-actin, and signal-regulated changes in cellular G-actin concentration control their nuclear accumulation. The MRTFs also undergo Rho- and ERK-dependent phosphorylation, but the function of MRTF phosphorylation, and the elements and signals involved in MRTF-A nuclear export are largely unexplored. We show that Rho-dependent MRTF-A phosphorylation reflects relief from an inhibitory function of nuclear actin. We map multiple sites of serum-induced phosphorylation, most of which are S/T-P motifs and show that S/T-P phosphorylation is required for transcriptional activation. ERK-mediated S98 phosphorylation inhibits assembly of G-actin complexes on the MRTF-A regulatory RPEL domain, promoting nuclear import. In contrast, S33 phosphorylation potentiates the activity of an autonomous Crm1-dependent N-terminal NES, which cooperates with five other NES elements to exclude MRTF-A from the nucleus. Phosphorylation thus plays positive and negative roles in the regulation of MRTF-A. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15460.001 PMID:27304076

  16. Phosphorylation in vitro of the 85 kDa subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and its possible activation by insulin receptor tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, H; Miyake, N; Kanai, F; Shibasaki, F; Takenawa, T; Ebina, Y

    1991-01-01

    Insulin causes a dramatic and rapid increase in phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity in the anti-phosphotyrosine immunoprecipitates of cells overexpressing the human insulin receptor. This enzyme may therefore be a mediator of insulin signal transduction [Endemann, Yonezawa & Roth (1990) J. Biol. Chem. 265, 396-400; Ruderman, Kapeller, White & Cantley (1990) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 87, 1411-1415]. At least two questions remain to be elucidated. Firstly, does the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase phosphorylate phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase directly, or does it phosphorylate a protein associated with the 3-kinase? Second, if the enzyme is a direct substrate for the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase, does tyrosine phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase by the kinase alter the specific enzyme activity, or does the amount of the tyrosine-phosphorylated form of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase increase, with no change in the specific activity? We report here evidence that the 85 kDa subunit of highly purified phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase is phosphorylated on the tyrosine residue by the activated normal insulin receptor in vitro, but not by a mutant insulin receptor which lacks tyrosine kinase activity. We found that an increase in enzyme activity was detected in response to insulin not only in the anti-phosphotyrosine immunoprecipitates of the cytosol, but also in the cytosolic fraction before immunoprecipitation. In addition, we partially separated the tyrosine-phosphorylated form from the unphosphorylated form of the enzyme, by using a f.p.l.c. Mono Q column. The insulin-stimulated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity was mainly detected in the fraction containing almost all of the tyrosine-phosphorylated form. This result suggests that tyrosine phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase by the insulin receptor kinase may increase the specific activity of the former enzyme in vivo. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. PMID:1722393

  17. Phosphorylation and Alternative Splicing of 7B2 Reduce Prohormone Convertase 2 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Molina, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    FAM20C is a secretory kinase responsible for the phosphorylation of multiple secreted proteins in mammalian cells; it has been shown to phosphorylate serine residues within a variety of different bone proteins. In this work we demonstrate that FAM20C also phosphorylates threonines, specifically those within the N-terminal domain of the neuroendocrine chaperone 7B2. Analysis of the primary sequence of 7B2 revealed that three threonine residues in its N-terminal domain are located within FAM20C consensus motifs: Thr73, Thr99, and Thr111. The individual substitution of Thr73 and Thr111 residues by neutral alanines caused a marked decrease in the total phosphorylation of 7B2. Furthermore, the phosphomimetic substitution of Thr111 by Glu clearly diminished the ability of 7B2 to activate pro-prohormone convertase 2 (PC2) in 7B2-lacking SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells, suggesting that the phosphorylation of this residue critically impacts the 7B2-proPC2 interaction. However, the phosphomimetic mutation did not alter 7B2's ability to function as an antiaggregant for human islet amyloid polypeptide. FAM20C-mediated phosphorylation of a common alternatively spliced variant of human 7B2 that lacks Ala100 (thus eliminating the Thr99 phosphorylation consensus site) was similar to the Ala-containing protein, but this variant did not activate proPC2 as efficiently as the Ala-containing protein. Although threonines within 7B2 were phosphorylated efficiently, FAM20C was incapable of performing the well-known regulatory threonine phosphorylation of the molecular chaperone binding immunoglobulin protein. Taken together, these results indicate that FAM20C plays a role in 7B2-mediated proPC2 activation by phosphorylating residue Thr111; and that 7B2 function is regulated by alternative splicing. PMID:25811241

  18. Regulation of protein kinase B/Akt activity and Ser473 phosphorylation by protein kinase Calpha in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Partovian, Chohreh; Simons, Michael

    2004-08-01

    Protein kinase Balpha (PKBalpha/Akt-1) is a key mediator of multiple signaling pathways involved in angiogenesis, cell proliferation and apoptosis among others. The unphosphorylated form of Akt-1 is virtually inactive and its full activation requires two phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate-dependent phosphorylation events, Thr308 by 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1) and Ser473 by an undefined kinase that has been termed PDK2. Recent studies have suggested that the Ser473 kinase is a plasma membrane raft-associated kinase. In this study we show that protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha) translocates to the membrane rafts in response to insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1) stimulation. Overexpression of PKCalpha increases Ser473 phosphorylation and Akt-1 activity, while inhibition of its activity or expression decreases IGF-1-dependent activation of Akt-1. Furthermore, in vitro, in the presence of phospholipids and calcium, PKCalpha directly phosphorylates Akt-1 at the Ser473 site. We conclude, therefore, that PKCalpha regulates Akt-1 activity via Ser473 phosphorylation and may function as PDK2 in endothelial cells. PMID:15157674

  19. Changes in diacylglycerol labeling, cell shape, and protein phosphorylation distinguish triggering from activation of human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Reibman, J.; Korchak, H.M.; Vosshall, L.B.; Haines, K.A.; Rich, A.M.; Weissmann, G.

    1988-05-05

    Upon activation neutrophils release reactive oxygen intermediates such as superoxide anion (O/sub 2//sup -/) which are potent mediators of inflammation. Various agents elicit different responses. In contrast, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA, 1.6 ..mu..M) acting directly via protein kinase C is a potent stimulus for O/sub 2//sup -/. The authors compared the kinetics of appearance of various second messengers with the capacity of these ligands to elicit O/sub 2//sup -/ generation. Kinetic analysis showed a two-phase response to membrane ligands; both an early (greater than or equal to 15 s) and a late (>15 s) increase in (/sup 3/H)- and (/sup 14/C)diacylglycerol (DG) was noted in response to fMLP. In contrast, LTB/sub 4/ elicited only a rapid early increase in DG. The rise in DG evoked by PMA was late. Moreover, comparison of increases in (/sup 3/H)DG versus those of (/sup 14/C)DG at early and late time points suggested that DG was not formed exclusively from the hydrolysis of polyphosphoinositides. Kinetic analysis of protein phosphorylation was compared to the early and late increments of DG labeling. A 47,000 M/sub r/ protein was phosphorylated with kinetics consistent with the production of O/sub 2//sup -/ and DG in response to fMLP and PMA. The temporal pattern of the formation of diacylglycerol and the phosphorylation of proteins describe a dual signal. The data suggest that neutrophils require not only triggering (the rapid generation of a signal) but also activation (the maintenance of a signal) to sustain responses.

  20. Fenofibrate activates AMPK and increases eNOS phosphorylation in HUVEC

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Hisashi; Murakami, Ryuichiro . E-mail: ryuichi@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Kambe, Fukushi; Cao, Xia; Takahashi, Ryotaro; Asai, Toru; Hirai, Toshihisa; Numaguchi, Yasushi; Okumura, Kenji; Seo, Hisao; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2006-03-24

    Fenofibrate improves endothelial function by lipid-lowering and anti-inflammatory effects. Additionally, fenofibrate has been demonstrated to upregulate endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been reported to phosphorylate eNOS at Ser-1177 and stimulate vascular endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) production. We report here that fenofibrate activates AMPK and increases eNOS phosphorylation and NO production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Incubation of HUVEC with fenofibrate increased the phosphorylation of AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase. Fenofibrate simultaneously increased eNOS phosphorylation and NO production. Inhibitors of protein kinase A and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase failed to suppress the fenofibrate-induced eNOS phosphorylation. Neither bezafibrate nor WY-14643 activated AMPK in HUVEC. Furthermore, fenofibrate activated AMPK without requiring any transcriptional activities. These results indicate that fenofibrate stimulates eNOS phosphorylation and NO production through AMPK activation, which is suggested to be a novel characteristic of this agonist and unrelated to its effects on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha}.

  1. The condensing activities of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis type II fatty acid synthase are differentially regulated by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Molle, Virginie; Brown, Alistair K; Besra, Gurdyal S; Cozzone, Alain J; Kremer, Laurent

    2006-10-01

    Phosphorylation of proteins by Ser/Thr protein kinases (STPKs) has recently become of major physiological importance because of its possible involvement in virulence of bacterial pathogens. Although Mycobacterium tuberculosis has eleven STPKs, the nature and function of the substrates of these enzymes remain largely unknown. In this work, we have identified for the first time STPK substrates in M. tuberculosis forming part of the type II fatty acid synthase (FAS-II) system involved in mycolic acid biosynthesis: the malonyl-CoA::AcpM transacylase mtFabD, and the beta-ketoacyl AcpM synthases KasA and KasB. All three enzymes were phosphorylated in vitro by different kinases, suggesting a complex network of interactions between STPKs and these substrates. In addition, both KasA and KasB were efficiently phosphorylated in M. bovis BCG each at different sites and could be dephosphorylated by the M. tuberculosis Ser/Thr phosphatase PstP. Enzymatic studies revealed that, whereas phosphorylation decreases the activity of KasA in the elongation process of long chain fatty acids synthesis, this modification enhances that of KasB. Such a differential effect of phosphorylation may represent an unusual mechanism of FAS-II system regulation, allowing pathogenic mycobacteria to produce full-length mycolates, which are required for adaptation and intracellular survival in macrophages. PMID:16873379

  2. HIPK2 restricts SIRT1 activity upon severe DNA damage by a phosphorylation-controlled mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, E; Polonio-Vallon, T; Meister, M; Matt, S; Bitomsky, N; Herbel, C; Liebl, M; Greiner, V; Kriznik, B; Schumacher, S; Krieghoff-Henning, E; Hofmann, T G

    2016-01-01

    Upon severe DNA damage a cellular signalling network initiates a cell death response through activating tumour suppressor p53 in association with promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) nuclear bodies. The deacetylase Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) suppresses cell death after DNA damage by antagonizing p53 acetylation. To facilitate efficient p53 acetylation, SIRT1 function needs to be restricted. How SIRT1 activity is regulated under these conditions remains largely unclear. Here we provide evidence that SIRT1 activity is limited upon severe DNA damage through phosphorylation by the DNA damage-responsive kinase HIPK2. We found that DNA damage provokes interaction of SIRT1 and HIPK2, which phosphorylates SIRT1 at Serine 682 upon lethal damage. Furthermore, upon DNA damage SIRT1 and HIPK2 colocalize at PML nuclear bodies, and PML depletion abrogates DNA damage-induced SIRT1 Ser682 phosphorylation. We show that Ser682 phosphorylation inhibits SIRT1 activity and impacts on p53 acetylation, apoptotic p53 target gene expression and cell death. Mechanistically, we found that DNA damage-induced SIRT1 Ser682 phosphorylation provokes disruption of the complex between SIRT1 and its activator AROS. Our findings indicate that phosphorylation-dependent restriction of SIRT1 activity by HIPK2 shapes the p53 response. PMID:26113041

  3. How Phosphorylation and ATPase Activity Regulate Anion Flux though the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR).

    PubMed

    Zwick, Matthias; Esposito, Cinzia; Hellstern, Manuel; Seelig, Anna

    2016-07-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, ABCC7), mutations of which cause cystic fibrosis, belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family and works as a channel for small anions, such as chloride and bicarbonate. Anion channel activity is known to depend on phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) and CFTR-ATPase activity. Whereas anion channel activity has been extensively investigated, phosphorylation and CFTR-ATPase activity are still poorly understood. Here, we show that the two processes can be measured in a label-free and non-invasive manner in real time in live cells, stably transfected with CFTR. This study reveals three key findings. (i) The major contribution (≥90%) to the total CFTR-related ATP hydrolysis rate is due to phosphorylation by PKA and the minor contribution (≤10%) to CFTR-ATPase activity. (ii) The mutant CFTR-E1371S that is still conductive, but defective in ATP hydrolysis, is not phosphorylated, suggesting that phosphorylation requires a functional nucleotide binding domain and occurs in the post-hydrolysis transition state. (iii) CFTR-ATPase activity is inversely related to CFTR anion flux. The present data are consistent with a model in which CFTR is in a closed conformation with two ATPs bound. The open conformation is induced by ATP hydrolysis and corresponds to the post-hydrolysis transition state that is stabilized by phosphorylation and binding of chloride channel potentiators. PMID:27226582

  4. AMP-activated protein kinase modulates tau phosphorylation and tau pathology in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Domise, Manon; Didier, Sébastien; Marinangeli, Claudia; Zhao, Haitian; Chandakkar, Pallavi; Buée, Luc; Viollet, Benoit; Davies, Peter; Marambaud, Philippe; Vingtdeux, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) are the pathological hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases commonly known as tauopathies. NFTs result from the intracellular aggregation of abnormally and hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. Tau functions, which include the regulation of microtubules dynamics, are dependent on its phosphorylation status. As a consequence, any changes in tau phosphorylation can have major impacts on synaptic plasticity and memory. Recently, it has been demonstrated that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) was deregulated in the brain of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients where it co-localized with phosphorylated tau in pre-tangle and tangle-bearing neurons. Besides, it was found that AMPK was a tau kinase in vitro. Here, we find that endogenous AMPK activation in mouse primary neurons induced an increase of tau phosphorylation at multiple sites, whereas AMPK inhibition led to a rapid decrease of tau phosphorylation. We further show that AMPK mice deficient for one of the catalytic alpha subunits displayed reduced endogenous tau phosphorylation. Finally, we found that AMPK deficiency reduced tau pathology in the PS19 mouse model of tauopathy. These results show that AMPK regulates tau phosphorylation in mouse primary neurons as well as in vivo, and thus suggest that AMPK could be a key player in the development of AD pathology. PMID:27230293

  5. Lithium potentiates GSK-3β activity by inhibiting phosphoinositide 3-kinase-mediated Akt phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Nie; Kanno, Takeshi; Jin, Yu; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Lithium suppresses Akt activity by reducing PI3K-mediated Akt phosphorylation. • Lithium enhances GSK-3β activity by reducing Akt-mediated GSK-3β phosphorylation. • Lithium suppresses GSK-3β activity through its direct inhibition. - Abstract: Accumulating evidence has pointed to the direct inhibitory action of lithium, an anti-depressant, on GSK-3β. The present study investigated further insight into lithium signaling pathways. In the cell-free assay Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} significantly inhibited phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-mediated phosphorylation of Akt1 at Ser473, but Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} did not affect PI3K-mediated PI(3,4,5)P{sub 3} production and 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1)-mediated phosphorylation of Akt1 at Thr308. This indicates that lithium could enhance GSK-3β activity by suppressing Akt-mediated Ser9 phosphorylation of GSK-3β in association with inhibition of PI3K-mediated Akt activation. There was no direct effect of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} on Akt1-induced phosphorylation of GSK-3β at Ser9, but otherwise Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} significantly reduced GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation of β-catenin at Ser33/37 and Thr41. This indicates that lithium directly inhibits GSK-3β in an Akt-independent manner. In rat hippocampal slices Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} significantly inhibited phosphorylation of Akt1/2 at Ser473/474, GSK-3β at Ser9, and β-catenin at Ser33/37 and Thr41. Taken together, these results indicate that lithium exerts its potentiating and inhibiting bidirectional actions on GSK-3β activity.

  6. Dyrk1A phosphorylates parkin at Ser-131 and negatively regulates its ubiquitin E3 ligase activity.

    PubMed

    Im, Eunju; Chung, Kwang Chul

    2015-08-01

    Mutations of parkin are associated with the occurrence of autosomal recessive familial Parkinson's disease (PD). Parkin acts an E3 ubiquitin ligase, which ubiquitinates target proteins and subsequently regulates either their steady-state levels through the ubiquitin-proteasome system or biochemical properties. In this study, we identify a novel regulatory mechanism of parkin by searching for new regulatory factors. After screening human fetal brain using a yeast two hybrid assay, we found dual-specificity tyrosine-(Y)-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (Dyrk1A) as a novel binding partner of parkin. We also observed that parkin interacts and co-localizes with Dyrk1A in mammalian cells. In addition, Dyrk1A directly phosphorylated parkin at Ser-131, causing the inhibition of its E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Moreover, Dyrk1A-mediated phosphorylation reduced the binding affinity of parkin to its ubiquitin-conjugating E2 enzyme and substrate, which could be the underlying inhibitory mechanism of parkin activity. Furthermore, Dyrk1A-mediated phosphorylation inhibited the neuroprotective action of parkin against 6-hydroxydopamine toxicity in dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells. These findings suggest that Dyrk1A acts as a novel functional modulator of parkin. Parkin phosphorylation by Dyrk1A suppresses its E3 ubiquitin ligase activity potentially contributing to the pathogenesis of PD under PD-inducing pathological conditions. Mutations of parkin are linked to autosomal recessive forms of familial Parkinson's disease (PD). According to its functional relevance in abnormal protein aggregation and neuronal cell death, a number of post-translational modifications regulate the ubiquitin E3 ligase activity of parkin. Here we propose a novel inhibitory mechanism of parkin E3 ubiquitin ligase through dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (Dyrk1A)-mediated phosphorylation as well as its neuroprotective action against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced cell death

  7. Survivin reads phosphorylated histone H3 threonine 3 to activate the mitotic kinase Aurora B

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Alexander E.; Ghenoiu, Cristina; Xue, John Z.; Zierhut, Christian; Kimura, Hiroshi; Funabiki, Hironori

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY A hallmark of mitosis is the appearance of high levels of histone phosphorylation, yet the roles of these modifications remain largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that histone H3 phosphorylated at threonine 3 is directly recognized by an evolutionarily conserved binding pocket in the BIR domain of Survivin, a member of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC). This binding mediates recruitment of the CPC to chromosomes and resulting activation of its kinase subunit Aurora B. Consistently, modulation of the kinase activity of Haspin, which phosphorylates H3T3, leads to defects in the Aurora B-dependent processes of spindle assembly and inhibition of nuclear reformation. These findings establish a direct cellular role for mitotic histone H3T3 phosphorylation, which is read and translated by the CPC to ensure accurate cell division. PMID:20705815

  8. Survivin reads phosphorylated histone H3 threonine 3 to activate the mitotic kinase Aurora B.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Alexander E; Ghenoiu, Cristina; Xue, John Z; Zierhut, Christian; Kimura, Hiroshi; Funabiki, Hironori

    2010-10-01

    A hallmark of mitosis is the appearance of high levels of histone phosphorylation, yet the roles of these modifications remain largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that histone H3 phosphorylated at threonine 3 is directly recognized by an evolutionarily conserved binding pocket in the BIR domain of Survivin, which is a member of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC). This binding mediates recruitment of the CPC to chromosomes and the resulting activation of its kinase subunit Aurora B. Consistently, modulation of the kinase activity of Haspin, which phosphorylates H3T3, leads to defects in the Aurora B-dependent processes of spindle assembly and inhibition of nuclear reformation. These findings establish a direct cellular role for mitotic histone H3T3 phosphorylation, which is read and translated by the CPC to ensure accurate cell division. PMID:20705815

  9. Reversible phosphorylation controls the activity of cyclosome-associated cyclin-ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed Central

    Lahav-Baratz, S; Sudakin, V; Ruderman, J V; Hershko, A

    1995-01-01

    Cyclin B/cdc2 is responsible both for driving cells into mitosis and for activating the ubiquitin-dependent degradation of mitotic cyclins near the end of mitosis, an event required for the completion of mitosis and entry into interphase of the next cell cycle. Previous work with cell-free extracts of rapidly dividing clam embryos has identified two specific components required for the ubiquitination of mitotic cyclins: E2-C, a cyclin-selective ubiquitin carrier protein that is constitutively active during the cell cycle, and E3-C, a cyclin-selective ubiquitin ligase that purifies as part of a approximately 1500-kDa complex, termed the cyclosome, and which is active only near the end of mitosis. Here, we have separated the cyclosome from its ultimate upstream activator, cdc2. The mitotic, active form of the cyclosome can be inactivated by incubation with a partially purified, endogenous okadaic acid-sensitive phosphatase; addition of cdc2 restores activity to the cyclosome after a lag that reproduces that seen previously in intact cells and in crude extracts. These results demonstrate that activity of cyclin-ubiquitin ligase is controlled by reversible phosphorylation of the cyclosome complex. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7568122

  10. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Activity Is Regulated by Pten Phosphorylation Through a Niche-Dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Jun; Tang, Minghui; Xin, Junping; Xu, Yan; Volk, Andrew; Hao, Caiqin; Hu, Chenglong; Sun, Jiewen; Wei, Wei; Cao, Quichan; Breslin, Peter; Zhang, Jiwang

    2016-08-01

    The phosphorylated form of Pten (p-Pten) is highly expressed in >70% of acute myeloid leukemia samples. However, the role of p-Pten in normal and abnormal hematopoiesis has not been studied. We found that Pten protein levels are comparable among long-term (LT) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), short-term (ST) HSCs, and multipotent progenitors (MPPs); however, the levels of p-Pten are elevated during the HSC-to-MPP transition. To study whether p-Pten is involved in regulating self-renewal and differentiation in HSCs, we compared the effects of overexpression of p-Pten and nonphosphorylated Pten (non-p-Pten) on the hematopoietic reconstitutive capacity (HRC) of HSCs. We found that overexpression of non-p-Pten enhances the LT-HRC of HSCs, whereas overexpression of p-Pten promotes myeloid differentiation and compromises the LT-HRC of HSCs. Such phosphorylation-regulated Pten functioning is mediated by repressing the cell:cell contact-induced activation of Fak/p38 signaling independent of Pten's lipid phosphatase activity because both p-Pten and non-p-Pten have comparable activity in repressing PI3K/Akt signaling. Our studies suggest that, in addition to repressing PI3K/Akt/mTor signaling, non-p-Pten maintains HSCs in bone marrow niches via a cell-contact inhibitory mechanism by inhibiting Fak/p38 signaling-mediated proliferation and differentiation. In contrast, p-Pten promotes the proliferation and differentiation of HSCs by enhancing the cell contact-dependent activation of Src/Fak/p38 signaling. Stem Cells 2016;34:2130-2144.

  11. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Activity Is Regulated by Pten Phosphorylation Through a Niche-Dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Jun; Tang, Minghui; Xin, Junping; Xu, Yan; Volk, Andrew; Hao, Caiqin; Hu, Chenglong; Sun, Jiewen; Wei, Wei; Cao, Quichan; Breslin, Peter; Zhang, Jiwang

    2016-08-01

    The phosphorylated form of Pten (p-Pten) is highly expressed in >70% of acute myeloid leukemia samples. However, the role of p-Pten in normal and abnormal hematopoiesis has not been studied. We found that Pten protein levels are comparable among long-term (LT) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), short-term (ST) HSCs, and multipotent progenitors (MPPs); however, the levels of p-Pten are elevated during the HSC-to-MPP transition. To study whether p-Pten is involved in regulating self-renewal and differentiation in HSCs, we compared the effects of overexpression of p-Pten and nonphosphorylated Pten (non-p-Pten) on the hematopoietic reconstitutive capacity (HRC) of HSCs. We found that overexpression of non-p-Pten enhances the LT-HRC of HSCs, whereas overexpression of p-Pten promotes myeloid differentiation and compromises the LT-HRC of HSCs. Such phosphorylation-regulated Pten functioning is mediated by repressing the cell:cell contact-induced activation of Fak/p38 signaling independent of Pten's lipid phosphatase activity because both p-Pten and non-p-Pten have comparable activity in repressing PI3K/Akt signaling. Our studies suggest that, in addition to repressing PI3K/Akt/mTor signaling, non-p-Pten maintains HSCs in bone marrow niches via a cell-contact inhibitory mechanism by inhibiting Fak/p38 signaling-mediated proliferation and differentiation. In contrast, p-Pten promotes the proliferation and differentiation of HSCs by enhancing the cell contact-dependent activation of Src/Fak/p38 signaling. Stem Cells 2016;34:2130-2144. PMID:27096933

  12. Menin uncouples Elk-1, JunD and c-Jun phosphorylation from MAP kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Adriana; Cuozzo, Concetta; Esposito, Ilaria; Maggiolini, Marcello; Bonofiglio, Daniela; Vivacqua, Adele; Garramone, Maria; Weiss, Carsten; Bohmann, Dirk; Musti, Anna Maria

    2002-09-19

    Menin, a nuclear protein encoded by the tumor suppressor gene MEN1, interacts with the AP-1 transcription factor JunD and inhibits its transcriptional activity. In addition, overexpression of Menin counteracts Ras-induced tumorigenesis. We show that Menin inhibits ERK-dependent phosphorylation and activation of both JunD and the Ets-domain transcription factor Elk-1. We also show that Menin represses the inducible activity of the c-fos promoter. Furthermore, Menin expression inhibits Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-mediated phosphorylation of both JunD and c-Jun. Kinase assays show that Menin overexpression does not interfere with activation of either ERK2 or JNK1, suggesting that Menin acts at a level downstream of MAPK activation. An N-terminal deletion mutant of Menin that cannot inhibit JunD phosphorylation by JNK, can still repress JunD phosphorylation by ERK2, suggesting that Menin interferes with ERK and JNK pathways through two distinct inhibitory mechanisms. Taken together, our data suggest that Menin uncouples ERK and JNK activation from phosphorylation of their nuclear targets Elk-1, JunD and c-Jun, hence inhibiting accumulation of active Fos/Jun heterodimers. This study provides new molecular insights into the tumor suppressor function of Menin and suggests a mechanism by which Menin may interfere with Ras-dependent cell transformation and oncogenesis. PMID:12226747

  13. The mitosis-regulating and protein-protein interaction activities of astrin are controlled by aurora-A-induced phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Shao-Chih; Chen, Jo-Mei Maureen; Wei, Tong-You Wade; Cheng, Tai-Shan; Wang, Ya-Hui Candice; Ku, Chia-Feng; Lian, Chiao-Hsuan; Liu, Chun-Chih Jared; Kuo, Yi-Chun; Yu, Chang-Tze Ricky

    2014-09-01

    Cells display dramatic morphological changes in mitosis, where numerous factors form regulatory networks to orchestrate the complicated process, resulting in extreme fidelity of the segregation of duplicated chromosomes into two daughter cells. Astrin regulates several aspects of mitosis, such as maintaining the cohesion of sister chromatids by inactivating Separase and stabilizing spindle, aligning and segregating chromosomes, and silencing spindle assembly checkpoint by interacting with Src kinase-associated phosphoprotein (SKAP) and cytoplasmic linker-associated protein-1α (CLASP-1α). To understand how Astrin is regulated in mitosis, we report here that Astrin acts as a mitotic phosphoprotein, and Aurora-A phosphorylates Astrin at Ser(115). The phosphorylation-deficient mutant Astrin S115A abnormally activates spindle assembly checkpoint and delays mitosis progression, decreases spindle stability, and induces chromosome misalignment. Mechanistic analyses reveal that Astrin phosphorylation mimicking mutant S115D, instead of S115A, binds and induces ubiquitination and degradation of securin, which sequentially activates Separase, an enzyme required for the separation of sister chromatids. Moreover, S115A fails to bind mitosis regulators, including SKAP and CLASP-1α, which results in the mitotic defects observed in Astrin S115A-transfected cells. In conclusion, Aurora-A phosphorylates Astrin and guides the binding of Astrin to its cellular partners, which ensures proper progression of mitosis.

  14. Modulation of activation-loop phosphorylation by JAK inhibitors is binding mode dependent

    PubMed Central

    Bonenfant, Débora; Rubert, Joëlle; Vangrevelinghe, Eric; Scheufler, Clemens; Marque, Fanny; Régnier, Catherine H.; De Pover, Alain; Ryckelynck, Hugues; Bhagwat, Neha; Koppikar, Priya; Goel, Aviva; Wyder, Lorenza; Tavares, Gisele; Baffert, Fabienne; Pissot-Soldermann, Carole; Manley, Paul W.; Gaul, Christoph; Voshol, Hans; Levine, Ross L.; Sellers, William R.; Hofmann, Francesco; Radimerski, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    JAK inhibitors are being developed for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, myeloproliferative neoplasms and leukemias. Most of these drugs target the ATP-binding pocket and stabilize the active conformation of the JAK kinases. This type-I binding mode leads to an increase in JAK activation-loop phosphorylation, despite blockade of kinase function. Here we report that stabilizing the inactive state via type-II inhibition acts in the opposite manner, leading to a loss of activation-loop phosphorylation. We used X-ray crystallography to corroborate the binding mode and report for the first time the crystal structure of the JAK2 kinase domain in an inactive conformation. Importantly, JAK inhibitor-induced activation-loop phosphorylation requires receptor interaction, as well as intact kinase and pseudokinase domains. Hence, depending on the respective conformation stabilized by a JAK inhibitor, hyperphosphorylation of the activation-loop may or may not be elicited. PMID:22684457

  15. Low dose cadmium poisoning results in sustained ERK phosphorylation and caspase activation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Patrick . E-mail: pmartin@unice.fr; Poggi, Marie Christine . E-mail: poggi@unice.fr; Chambard, Jean Claude . E-mail: chambard@unice.fr; Boulukos, Kim E. . E-mail: boulukos@unice.fr; Pognonec, Philippe . E-mail: pognonec@unice.fr

    2006-11-24

    Cadmium poisoning has been known to result in a wide variety of cellular responses, including oxidative stress and kinase activation. It has been reported that ERK is activated following acute cadmium exposure, and this response is commonly seen as a classical ERK survival mechanism. Here, we analyzed different cell types for their responses to low concentrations of cadmium poisoning. We found that there is an association between cell susceptibility to cadmium toxicity and ERK activation. This activation is atypical, since it consists of a sustained ERK phosphorylation, that lasts up to 6 days post stimulation. This activation is associated with the appearance of cleaved caspases 8 and 3, processed PARP, and irreversible damage. Pharmacological inhibition of ERK phosphorylation results in the ability of cells to resist cadmium poisoning. Our data indicate that low cadmium concentrations result in an unconventional ERK sustained phosphorylation, which in turn leads to death signaling.

  16. Phosphorylation of farnesoid X receptor by protein kinase C promotes its transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Gineste, Romain; Sirvent, Audrey; Paumelle, Réjane; Helleboid, Stéphane; Aquilina, Alexis; Darteil, Raphaël; Hum, Dean W; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Staels, Bart

    2008-11-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR, NR1H4) belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily and is activated by bile acids such as chenodeoxycholic acid, or synthetic ligands such as GW4064. FXR is implicated in the regulation of bile acid, lipid, and carbohydrate metabolism. Posttranslational modifications regulating its activity have not been investigated yet. Here, we demonstrate that calcium-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) inhibition impairs ligand-mediated regulation of FXR target genes. Moreover, in a transactivation assay, we show that FXR transcriptional activity is modulated by PKC. Furthermore, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate , a PKC activator, induces the phosphorylation of endogenous FXR in HepG2 cells and PKCalpha phosphorylates in vitro FXR in its DNA-binding domain on S135 and S154. Mutation of S135 and S154 to alanine residues reduces in cell FXR phosphorylation. In contrast to wild-type FXR, mutant FXRS135AS154A displays an impaired PKCalpha-induced transactivation and a decreased ligand-dependent FXR transactivation. Finally, phosphorylation of FXR by PKC promotes the recruitment of peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1alpha. In conclusion, these findings show that the phosphorylation of FXR induced by PKCalpha directly modulates the ability of agonists to activate FXR.

  17. ENaC activity requires CFTR channel function independently of phosphorylation in sweat duct.

    PubMed

    Reddy, M M; Quinton, P M

    2005-09-01

    We previously showed that activation of the cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- conductance (gCFTR) supports parallel activation of amiloride-sensitive epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) in the native human sweat duct. However, it is not clear whether phosphorylated CFTR, phosphorylated ENaC, or only Cl(-) -channel function is required for activation. We used basilaterally alpha-toxin-permeabilized human sweat ducts to test the hypothesis that ENaC activation depends only on Cl(-) -channel function and not on phosphorylation of either CFTR or ENaC. CFTR is classically activated by PKA plus millimolar ATP, but cytosolic glutamate activation of gCFTR is independent of ATP and phosphorylation. We show here that both phosphorylation-dependent (PKA) and phosphorylation-independent (glutamate) activation of CFTR Cl- channel function support gENaC activation. We tested whether cytosolic application of 5 mM ATP alone, phosphorylation by cAMP, cGMP, G-protein dependent kinases (all in the presence of 100 microM ATP), or glutamate could support ENaC activation in the absence of gCFTR. We found that none of these agonists activated gENaC by themselves when Cl- current (I(Cl-)) through CFTR was blocked by: 1) Cl- removal, 2) DIDS inhibition, 3) lowering the ATP concentration to 100 microM (instead of 5 mM required to support CFTR channel function), or 4) mutant CFTR (homozygous DeltaF508 CF ducts). However, Cl- gradients in the direction of absorption supported, while Cl- gradients in the direction of secretion prevented ENaC activation. We conclude that the interaction between CFTR and ENaC is dependent on activated I(Cl-) through CFTR in the direction of absorption (Cl- gradient from lumen to cell). But such activation of ENaC is independent of phosphorylation and ATP. However, reversing I(Cl-) through CFTR in the direction of secretion (Cl- gradient from cell to lumen) prevents ENaC activation even in the presence of I(Cl-) through CFTR. PMID

  18. Activation of NF-kappa B in vivo is regulated by multiple phosphorylations.

    PubMed Central

    Naumann, M; Scheidereit, C

    1994-01-01

    The activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B) in intact cells is mechanistically not well understood. Therefore we investigated the modifications imposed on NF-kappa B/I kappa B components following stimulation and show that the final step of NF-kappa B induction in vivo involves phosphorylation of several members of the NF-kappa B/I kappa B protein families. In HeLa cells as well as in B cells, TNF-alpha rapidly induced nuclear translocation primarily of p50-p65, but not of c-rel. Both NF-kappa B precursors and I kappa B alpha became strongly phosphorylated with the same kinetics. In addition to the inducible phosphorylation after stimulation, B lymphocytes containing constitutive nuclear NF-kappa B revealed constitutively phosphorylated p65 and I kappa B alpha. Phosphorylation was accompanied by induced processing of the precursors p100 and p105 and by degradation of I kappa B alpha. As an in vitro model we show that phosphorylation of p105 impedes its ability to interact with NF-kappa B, as has been shown before for I kappa B alpha. Surprisingly, even p65, but not c-rel, was phosphorylated after induction in vivo, suggesting that TNF-alpha selectively activates only specific NF-kappa B heteromers and that modifications regulate not only I kappa B molecules but also NF-kappa B molecules. In fact, cellular NF-kappa B activity was phosphorylation-dependent and the DNA binding activity of p65-containing NF-kappa B was enhanced by phosphorylation in vitro. Furthermore, we found that the induction by hydrogen peroxide of NF-kappa B translocation to the nucleus, which is assumed to be triggered by reactive oxygen intermediates, also coincided with incorporation of phosphate into the same subunits that were modified after stimulation by TNF-alpha. Thus, phosphorylation appears to be a general mechanism for activation of NF-kappa B in vivo. Images PMID:7925300

  19. Phosphorylation and Activation of RhoA by ERK in Response to Epidermal Growth Factor Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Junfeng; Li, Laiji; Ballermann, Barbara; Wang, Zhixiang

    2016-01-01

    The small GTPase RhoA has been implicated in various cellular activities, including the formation of stress fibers, cell motility, and cytokinesis. In addition to the canonical GTPase cycle, recent findings have suggested that phosphorylation further contributes to the tight regulation of Rho GTPases. Indeed, RhoA is phosphorylated on serine 188 (188S) by a number of protein kinases. We have recently reported that Rac1 is phosphorylated on threonine 108 (108T) by extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation. Here, we provide evidence that RhoA is phosphorylated by ERK on 88S and 100T in response to EGF stimulation. We show that ERK interacts with RhoA and that this interaction is dependent on the ERK docking site (D-site) at the C-terminus of RhoA. EGF stimulation enhanced the activation of the endogenous RhoA. The phosphomimetic mutant, GFP-RhoA S88E/T100E, when transiently expressed in COS-7 cells, displayed higher GTP-binding than wild type RhoA. Moreover, the expression of GFP-RhoA S88E/T100E increased actin stress fiber formation in COS-7 cells, which is consistent with its higher activity. In contrast to Rac1, phosphorylation of RhoA by ERK does not target RhoA to the nucleus. Finally, we show that regardless of the phosphorylation status of RhoA and Rac1, substitution of the RhoA PBR with the Rac1 PBR targets RhoA to the nucleus and substitution of Rac1 PBR with RhoA PBR significantly reduces the nuclear localization of Rac1. In conclusion, ERK phosphorylates RhoA on 88S and 100T in response to EGF, which upregulates RhoA activity. PMID:26816343

  20. Allosteric Activation of Bacterial Response Regulators: the Role of the Cognate Histidine Kinase Beyond Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Trajtenberg, Felipe; Albanesi, Daniela; Ruétalo, Natalia; Botti, Horacio; Mechaly, Ariel E.; Nieves, Marcos; Aguilar, Pablo S.; Cybulski, Larisa; Larrieux, Nicole; de Mendoza, Diego

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Response regulators are proteins that undergo transient phosphorylation, connecting specific signals to adaptive responses. Remarkably, the molecular mechanism of response regulator activation remains elusive, largely because of the scarcity of structural data on multidomain response regulators and histidine kinase/response regulator complexes. We now address this question by using a combination of crystallographic data and functional analyses in vitro and in vivo, studying DesR and its cognate sensor kinase DesK, a two-component system that controls membrane fluidity in Bacillus subtilis. We establish that phosphorylation of the receiver domain of DesR is allosterically coupled to two distinct exposed surfaces of the protein, controlling noncanonical dimerization/tetramerization, cooperative activation, and DesK binding. One of these surfaces is critical for both homodimerization- and kinase-triggered allosteric activations. Moreover, DesK induces a phosphorylation-independent activation of DesR in vivo, uncovering a novel and stringent level of specificity among kinases and regulators. Our results support a model that helps to explain how response regulators restrict phosphorylation by small-molecule phosphoryl donors, as well as cross talk with noncognate sensors. PMID:25406381

  1. Cdk1 Phosphorylates SPAT-1/Bora to Promote Plk1 Activation in C. elegans and Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Yann; Cirillo, Luca; Panbianco, Costanza; Martino, Lisa; Tavernier, Nicolas; Schwager, Françoise; Van Hove, Lucie; Joly, Nicolas; Santamaria, Anna; Pintard, Lionel; Gotta, Monica

    2016-04-19

    The conserved Bora protein is a Plk1 activator, essential for checkpoint recovery after DNA damage in human cells. Here, we show that Bora interacts with Cyclin B and is phosphorylated by Cyclin B/Cdk1 at several sites. The first 225 amino acids of Bora, which contain two Cyclin binding sites and three conserved phosphorylated residues, are sufficient to promote Plk1 phosphorylation by Aurora A in vitro. Mutating the Cyclin binding sites or the three conserved phosphorylation sites abrogates the ability of the N terminus of Bora to promote Plk1 activation. In human cells, Bora-carrying mutations of the three conserved phosphorylation sites cannot sustain mitotic entry after DNA damage. In C. elegans embryos, mutation of the three conserved phosphorylation sites in SPAT-1, the Bora ortholog, results in a severe mitotic entry delay. Our results reveal a crucial and conserved role of phosphorylation of the N terminus of Bora for Plk1 activation and mitotic entry.

  2. Preparation and anti-osteoporotic activities in vivo of phosphorylated peptides from Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanchao; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Jingfeng; Xue, Changhu; Chang, Yaoguang; Xue, Yong

    2015-06-01

    Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) protein serves as a novel sustainable protein source for human. Krill protein isolate was phosphorylated by the dry-heating method with sodium pyrophosphate. Phosphorylated peptides from Antarctic krill (PP-AKP) were obtained from phosphorylated protein through tryptic hydrolysis. Two types of phosphate bonds were introduced by phosphorylation, i.e. PO and PO bonds. The anti-osteoporotic activities of PP-AKP at two doses (400 and 800mg/kg body weight) were investigated with an osteoporotic rat model, which was established with bilateral ovariectomy surgery. Different doses of PP-AKP were given intraperitoneal injections to rats once a day with alendronate as a positive control. Phosphorylated peptides from Antarctic krill dose-dependently preserved bone mineral density in osteoporotic rats by increasing the degree of bone mineralization. Both trabecular and cortical bone strength in osteoporotic rats was significantly improved with PP-AKP treatment. The mechanism by which PP-AKP augmented bone mineral density and bone strength was relation to the reduction in osteoclast-mediated bone remodeling, as was supported by the decrease in bone resorption markers. Phosphorylated peptides from Antarctic krill could be developed as functional food or nutritional supplements.

  3. Structure of NDP-forming Acetyl-CoA synthetase ACD1 reveals a large rearrangement for phosphoryl transfer

    PubMed Central

    Weiße, Renato H.-J.; Faust, Annette; Schmidt, Marcel; Schönheit, Peter; Scheidig, Axel J.

    2016-01-01

    The NDP-forming acyl-CoA synthetases (ACDs) catalyze the conversion of various CoA thioesters to the corresponding acids, conserving their chemical energy in form of ATP. The ACDs are the major energy-conserving enzymes in sugar and peptide fermentation of hyperthermophilic archaea. They are considered to be primordial enzymes of ATP synthesis in the early evolution of life. We present the first crystal structures, to our knowledge, of an ACD from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Candidatus Korachaeum cryptofilum. These structures reveal a unique arrangement of the ACD subunits alpha and beta within an α2β2-heterotetrameric complex. This arrangement significantly differs from other members of the superfamily. To transmit an activated phosphoryl moiety from the Ac-CoA binding site (within the alpha subunit) to the NDP-binding site (within the beta subunit), a distance of 51 Å has to be bridged. This transmission requires a larger rearrangement within the protein complex involving a 21-aa-long phosphohistidine-containing segment of the alpha subunit. Spatial restraints of the interaction of this segment with the beta subunit explain the necessity for a second highly conserved His residue within the beta subunit. The data support the proposed four-step reaction mechanism of ACDs, coupling acyl-CoA thioesters with ATP synthesis. Furthermore, the determined crystal structure of the complex with bound Ac-CoA allows first insight, to our knowledge, into the determinants for acyl-CoA substrate specificity. The composition and size of loops protruding into the binding pocket of acyl-CoA are determined by the individual arrangement of the characteristic subdomains. PMID:26787904

  4. Activation of TORC1 transcriptional coactivator through MEKK1-induced phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Siu, Yeung-Tung; Ching, Yick-Pang; Jin, Dong-Yan

    2008-11-01

    CREB is a prototypic bZIP transcription factor and a master regulator of glucose metabolism, synaptic plasticity, cell growth, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis. Transducers of regulated CREB activity (TORCs) are essential transcriptional coactivators of CREB and an important point of regulation on which various signals converge. In this study, we report on the activation of TORC1 through MEKK1-mediated phosphorylation. MEKK1 potently activated TORC1, and this activation was independent of downstream effectors MEK1/MEK2, ERK2, JNK, p38, protein kinase A, and calcineurin. MEKK1 induced phosphorylation of TORC1 both in vivo and in vitro. Expression of the catalytic domain of MEKK1 alone in cultured mammalian cells sufficiently caused phosphorylation and subsequent activation of TORC1. MEKK1 physically interacted with TORC1 and stimulated its nuclear translocation. An activation domain responsive to MEKK1 stimulation was mapped to amino acids 431-650 of TORC1. As a physiological activator of CREB, interleukin 1alpha triggered MEKK1-dependent phosphorylation of TORC1 and its consequent recruitment to the cAMP response elements in the interleukin 8 promoter. Taken together, our findings suggest a new mechanism for regulated activation of TORC1 transcriptional coactivator and CREB signaling.

  5. CK1δ Kinase Activity Is Modulated by Chk1-Mediated Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Bischof, Joachim; Randoll, Sven-Jannis; Süßner, Nadine; Henne-Bruns, Doris; Pinna, Lorenzo A.; Knippschild, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    CK1δ, a member of the casein kinase 1 family, is involved in the regulation of various cellular processes and has been associated with the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. Therefore recently, interest in generating highly specific inhibitors for personalized therapy has increased enormously. However, the efficacy of newly developed inhibitors is affected by the phosphorylation state of CK1δ. Cellular kinases phosphorylating CK1δ within its C-terminal domain have been identified but still more information regarding the role of site-specific phosphorylation in modulating the activity of CK1δ is required. Here we show that Chk1 phosphorylates rat CK1δ at serine residues 328, 331, 370, and threonine residue 397 as well as the human CK1δ transcription variants 1 and 2. CK1δ mutant proteins bearing one, two or three mutations at these identified phosphorylation sites exhibited significant differences in their kinetic properties compared to wild-type CK1δ. Additionally, CK1δ co-precipitates with Chk1 from HT1080 cell extracts and activation of cellular Chk1 resulted in a significant decrease in cellular CK1δ kinase activity. Taken together, these data point towards a possible regulatory relationship between Chk1 and CK1δ. PMID:23861943

  6. Synaptic Activation of Ribosomal Protein S6 Phosphorylation Occurs Locally in Activated Dendritic Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirbhoy, Patricia Salgado; Farris, Shannon; Steward, Oswald

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) induces phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) in postsynaptic neurons, but the functional significance of rpS6 phosphorylation is poorly understood. Here, we show that synaptic stimulation that induces perforant path LTP triggers phosphorylation of rpS6 (p-rpS6)…

  7. Phosphorylation-Regulated Transitions in an Oligomeric State Control the Activity of the Sae2 DNA Repair Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qiong; Chow, Julia; Bernstein, Kara A.; Makharashvili, Nodar; Arora, Sucheta; Lee, Chia-Fang; Person, Maria D.; Rothstein, Rodney

    2014-01-01

    In the DNA damage response, many repair and signaling molecules mobilize rapidly at the sites of DNA double-strand breaks. This network of immediate responses is regulated at the level of posttranslational modifications that control the activation of DNA processing enzymes, protein kinases, and scaffold proteins to coordinate DNA repair and checkpoint signaling. Here we investigated the DNA damage-induced oligomeric transitions of the Sae2 protein, an important enzyme in the initiation of DNA double-strand break repair. Sae2 is a target of multiple phosphorylation events, which we identified and characterized in vivo in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Both cell cycle-dependent and DNA damage-dependent phosphorylation sites in Sae2 are important for the survival of DNA damage, and the cell cycle-regulated modifications are required to prime the damage-dependent events. We found that Sae2 exists in the form of inactive oligomers that are transiently released into smaller active units by this series of phosphorylations. DNA damage also triggers removal of Sae2 through autophagy and proteasomal degradation, ensuring that active Sae2 is present only transiently in cells. Overall, this analysis provides evidence for a novel type of protein regulation where the activity of an enzyme is controlled dynamically by posttranslational modifications that regulate its solubility and oligomeric state. PMID:24344201

  8. Phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 serine 307 correlates with JNK activity in atrophic skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilder, Thomas L.; Tou, Janet C L.; Grindeland, Richard E.; Wade, Charles E.; Graves, Lee M.

    2003-01-01

    c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) has been shown to negatively regulate insulin signaling through serine phosphorylation of residue 307 within the insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) in adipose and liver tissue. Using a rat hindlimb suspension model for muscle disuse atrophy, we found that JNK activity was significantly elevated in atrophic soleus muscle and that IRS-1 was phosphorylated on Ser(307) prior to the degradation of the IRS-1 protein. Moreover, we observed a corresponding reduction in Akt activity, providing biochemical evidence for the development of insulin resistance in atrophic skeletal muscle.

  9. 5-HT7 receptor activation promotes an increase in TrkB receptor expression and phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Samarajeewa, Anshula; Goldemann, Lolita; Vasefi, Maryam S.; Ahmed, Nawaz; Gondora, Nyasha; Khanderia, Chandni; Mielke, John G.; Beazely, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) type 7 receptor is expressed throughout the CNS including the cortex and hippocampus. We have previously demonstrated that the application of 5-HT7 receptor agonists to primary hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y cells increases platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor expression and promotes neuroprotection against N-methyl-D-aspartate-(NMDA)-induced toxicity. The tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor is one of the receptors for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and is associated with neurodevelopmental and neuroprotective effects. Application of LP 12 to primary cerebral cortical cultures, SH-SY5Y cells, as well as the retinal ganglion cell line, RGC-5, increased both the expression of full length TrkB as well as its basal phosphorylation state at tyrosine 816. The increase in TrkB expression and phosphorylation was observed as early as 30 min after 5-HT7 receptor activation. In addition to full-length TrkB, kinase domain-deficient forms may be expressed and act as dominant-negative proteins toward the full length receptor. We have identified distinct patterns of TrkB isoform expression across our cell lines and cortical cultures. Although TrkB receptor expression is regulated by cyclic AMP and Gαs-coupled GPCRs in several systems, we demonstrate that, depending on the model system, pathways downstream of both Gαs and Gα12 are involved in the regulation of TrkB expression by 5-HT7 receptors. Given the number of psychiatric and degenerative diseases associated with TrkB/BDNF deficiency and the current interest in developing 5-HT7 receptor ligands as pharmaceuticals, identifying signaling relationships between these two receptors will aid in our understanding of the potential therapeutic effects of 5-HT7 receptor ligands. PMID:25426041

  10. The active site of oxidative phosphorylation and the origin of hyperhomocysteinemia in aging and dementia.

    PubMed

    McCully, Kilmer S

    2015-01-01

    The active site of oxidative phosphorylation and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis in mitochondria is proposed to consist of two molecules of thioretinamide bound to cobalamin, forming thioretinaco, complexed with ozone, oxygen, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. and inorganic phosphate, TR2CoO3O2NAD(+)H2PO4(-). Reduction of the pyridinium nitrogen of the nicotinamide group by an electron from electron transport complexes initiates polymerization of phosphate with adenosine diphosphate, yielding nicotinamide riboside and ATP bound to thioretinaco ozonide oxygen. A second electron reduces oxygen to hydroperoxyl radical, releasing ATP from the active site. A proton gradient is created within F1F0 ATPase complexes of mitochondria by reaction of protons with reduced nicotinamide riboside and with hydroperoxyl radical, yielding reduced nicotinamide riboside and hydroperoxide. The hyperhomocysteinemia of aging and dementia is attributed to decreased synthesis of adenosyl methionine by thioretinaco ozonide and ATP, causing decreased allosteric activation of cystathionine synthase and decreased allosteric inhibition of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and resulting in dysregulation of methionine metabolism. PMID:25887881

  11. Maintained activity of glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} despite of its phosphorylation at serine-9 in okadaic acid-induced neurodegenerative model

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Yong-Whan; Yoon, Seung-Yong; Choi, Jung-Eun; Kim, Sang-Min; Lee, Hui-Sun; Choe, Han; Lee, Seung-Chul; Kim, Dong-Hou

    2010-04-30

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} (GSK3{beta}) is recognized as one of major kinases to phosphorylate tau in Alzheimer's disease (AD), thus lots of AD drug discoveries target GSK3{beta}. However, the inactive form of GSK3{beta} which is phosphorylated at serine-9 is increased in AD brains. This is also inconsistent with phosphorylation status of other GSK3{beta} substrates, such as {beta}-catenin and collapsin response mediator protein-2 (CRMP2) since their phosphorylation is all increased in AD brains. Thus, we addressed this paradoxical condition of AD in rat neurons treated with okadaic acid (OA) which inhibits protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A) and induces tau hyperphosphorylation and cell death. Interestingly, OA also induces phosphorylation of GSK3{beta} at serine-9 and other substrates including tau, {beta}-catenin and CRMP2 like in AD brains. In this context, we observed that GSK3{beta} inhibitors such as lithium chloride and 6-bromoindirubin-3'-monoxime (6-BIO) reversed those phosphorylation events and protected neurons. These data suggest that GSK3{beta} may still have its kinase activity despite increase of its phosphorylation at serine-9 in AD brains at least in PP2A-compromised conditions and that GSK3{beta} inhibitors could be a valuable drug candidate in AD.

  12. Auxin activates the plasma membrane H+-ATPase by phosphorylation during hypocotyl elongation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Koji; Hayashi, Ken-ichiro; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2012-06-01

    The phytohormone auxin is a major regulator of diverse aspects of plant growth and development. The ubiquitin-ligase complex SCF(TIR1/AFB) (for Skp1-Cul1-F-box protein), which includes the TRANSPORT INHIBITOR RESPONSE1/AUXIN SIGNALING F-BOX (TIR1/AFB) auxin receptor family, has recently been demonstrated to be critical for auxin-mediated transcriptional regulation. Early-phase auxin-induced hypocotyl elongation, on the other hand, has long been explained by the acid-growth theory, for which proton extrusion by the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase is a functional prerequisite. However, the mechanism by which auxin mediates H(+)-ATPase activation has yet to be elucidated. Here, we present direct evidence for H(+)-ATPase activation in etiolated hypocotyls of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) by auxin through phosphorylation of the penultimate threonine during early-phase hypocotyl elongation. Application of the natural auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) to endogenous auxin-depleted hypocotyl sections induced phosphorylation of the penultimate threonine of the H(+)-ATPase and increased H(+)-ATPase activity without altering the amount of the enzyme. Changes in both the phosphorylation level of H(+)-ATPase and IAA-induced elongation were similarly concentration dependent. Furthermore, IAA-induced H(+)-ATPase phosphorylation occurred in a tir1-1 afb2-3 double mutant, which is severely defective in auxin-mediated transcriptional regulation. In addition, α-(phenylethyl-2-one)-IAA, the auxin antagonist specific for the nuclear auxin receptor TIR1/AFBs, had no effect on IAA-induced H(+)-ATPase phosphorylation. These results suggest that the TIR1/AFB auxin receptor family is not involved in auxin-induced H(+)-ATPase phosphorylation. Our results define the activation mechanism of H(+)-ATPase by auxin during early-phase hypocotyl elongation; this is the long-sought-after mechanism that is central to the acid-growth theory.

  13. Tyrosine kinase BMX phosphorylates phosphotyrosine-primed motif mediating the activation of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sen; Jiang, Xinnong; Gewinner, Christina A; Asara, John M; Simon, Nicholas I; Cai, Changmeng; Cantley, Lewis C; Balk, Steven P

    2013-05-28

    The nonreceptor tyrosine kinase BMX (bone marrow tyrosine kinase gene on chromosome X) is abundant in various cell types and activated downstream of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) and the kinase Src, but its substrates are unknown. Positional scanning peptide library screening revealed a marked preference for a priming phosphorylated tyrosine (pY) in the -1 position, indicating that BMX substrates may include multiple tyrosine kinases that are fully activated by pYpY sites in the kinase domain. BMX phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) at Tyr⁵⁷⁷ subsequent to its Src-mediated phosphorylation at Tyr⁵⁷⁶. Loss of BMX by RNA interference or by genetic deletion in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) markedly impaired FAK activity. Phosphorylation of the insulin receptor in the kinase domain at Tyr¹¹⁸⁹ and Tyr¹¹⁹⁰, as well as Tyr¹¹⁸⁵, and downstream phosphorylation of the kinase AKT at Thr³⁰⁸ were similarly impaired by BMX deficiency. However, insulin-induced phosphorylation of AKT at Ser⁴⁷³ was not impaired in Bmx knockout MEFs or liver tissue from Bmx knockout mice, which also showed increased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, possibly because of decreased abundance of the phosphatase PHLPP (PH domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase). Thus, by identifying the pYpY motif as a substrate for BMX, our findings suggest that BMX functions as a central regulator among multiple signaling pathways mediated by tyrosine kinases. PMID:23716717

  14. The Plastid Casein Kinase 2 Phosphorylates Rubisco Activase at the Thr-78 Site but Is Not Essential for Regulation of Rubisco Activation State

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Y.; Bender, Kyle W.; Walker, Berkley J.; Zielinski, Raymond E.; Spalding, Martin H.; Ort, Donald R.; Huber, Steven C.

    2016-01-01

    Rubisco activase (RCA) is essential for the activation of Rubisco, the carboxylating enzyme of photosynthesis. In Arabidopsis, RCA is composed of a large RCAα and small RCAβ isoform that are formed by alternative splicing of a single gene (At2g39730). The activity of Rubisco is controlled in response to changes in irradiance by regulation of RCA activity, which is known to involve a redox-sensitive disulfide bond located in the carboxy-terminal extension of the RCAα subunit. Additionally, phosphorylation of RCA threonine-78 (Thr-78) has been reported to occur in the dark suggesting that phosphorylation may also be associated with dark-inactivation of RCA and deactivation of Rubisco. In the present study, we developed site-specific antibodies to monitor phosphorylation of RCA at the Thr-78 site and used non-reducing SDS-PAGE to monitor the redox status of the RCAα subunit. By immunoblotting, phosphorylation of both RCA isoforms occurred at low light and in the dark and feeding peroxide or DTT to leaf segments indicated that redox status of the chloroplast stroma was a critical factor controlling RCA phosphorylation. Use of a knockout mutant identified the plastid-targeted casein kinase 2 (cpCK2α) as the major protein kinase involved in RCA phosphorylation. Studies with recombinant cpCK2α and synthetic peptide substrates identified acidic residues at the –1, +2, and +3 positions surrounding Thr-78 as strong positive recognition elements. The cpck2 knockout mutant had strongly reduced phosphorylation at the Thr-78 site but was similar to wild type plants in terms of induction kinetics of photosynthesis following transfer from darkness or low light to high light, suggesting that if phosphorylation of RCA Thr-78 plays a direct role it would be redundant to redox regulation for control of Rubisco activation state under normal conditions. PMID:27064346

  15. Forkhead protein FKHR and its phosphorylated form p-FKHR in human prostate cancer⋆

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rile; Erdamar, Sibel; Dai, Hong; Wheeler, Thomas M.; Frolov, Anna; Scardino, Peter T.; Thompson, Timothy C.; Ayala, Gustavo E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary In vitro studies suggest that the proapoptotic function of forkhead protein FKHR is probably inactivated by means of phosphorylation through the protein kinase B pathway. However, the clinical significance of FKHR in prostate cancer remains unclear. Six hundred forty radical prostatectomies were used for building tissue microarrays. Slides were stained with antibodies against FKHR and phosphorylated FKHR (p-FKHR). Correlations with clinicopathologic parameters were analyzed by Spearman rank test. Cox regression test and Kaplan-Meier test were used to determine the probability of disease recurrence, which is defined as a serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level greater than 0.4 ng/mL after radical prostatectomy. Nuclear FKHR level was higher in normal prostate than in benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer (P = .0000). Nuclear expression of FKHR was correlated with preoperative PSA level (ρ = 0.108, P = .029), extracapsular extension (ρ = 0.137, P = .005), and seminal vesicle invasion (ρ = 0.101, P = .039). FKHR expression was not a significant indicator of biochemical failure by either univariate or multivariate analysis. Nuclear p-FKHR expression correlated with patients’ age (ρ = 0.179, P = .0003), Gleason score (ρ = 0.130, P = .0083), extracapsular extension (ρ = 0.227, P = .0000), clinical stage (Union Internationale Contre le Cancer system) (ρ = 0.166, P = .0007), and lymph node status (ρ = 0.101, P = .0401). Cytoplasmic p-FKHR correlated with patients’ age (ρ = 0.146, P = .0030) and clinical stage (ρ = 0.117, P = .0180). Cytoplasmic p-FKHR was a significant indicator of biochemical recurrence (P = .0164; hazard ratio, 1.114–2.929). Nuclear p-FKHR strongly correlated with phosphorylated protein kinase B (ρ = 0.368, P = .0000), androgen receptor (ρ = 0.385, P = .0000), and Skp-2 (ρ = 0.170, P = .0036). Our data suggest that the proapoptotic role of FKHR is probably regulated by several signaling pathways in prostate

  16. Regulation of Xenopus laevis DNA topoisomerase I activity by phosphorylation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiserman, H.B.; Ingebritsen, T.S.; Benbow, R.M.

    1988-05-03

    DNA topoisomerase I has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from ovaries of the frog Xenopus laevis. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the most purified fraction revealed a single major band at 110 kDa and less abundant minor bands centered at 62 kDa. Incubation of the most purified fraction with immobilized calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase abolished all DNA topoisomerase enzymatic activity in a time-dependent reaction. Treatment of the dephosphorylated X. laevis DNA topoisomerase I with a X. laevis casein kinase type II activity and ATP restored DNA topoisomerase activity to a level higher than that observed in the most purified fraction. In vitro labeling experiments which employed the most purified DNA topoisomerase I fraction, (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP, and the casein kinase type II enzyme showed that both the 110- and 62-kDa bands became phosphorylated in approximately molar proportions. Phosphoamino acid analysis showed that only serine residues became phosphorylated. Phosphorylation was accompanied by an increase in DNA topoisomerase activity in vitro. Dephosphorylation of DNA topoisomerase I appears to block formation of the initial enzyme-substrate complex on the basis of the failure of the dephosphorylated enzyme to nick DNA in the presence of camptothecin. The authors conclude that X. laevis DNA topoisomerase I is partially phosphorylated as isolated and that this phosphorylation is essential for expression of enzymatic activity in vitro. On the basis of the ability of the casein kinase type II activity to reactivate dephosphorylated DNA topoisomerase I, they speculate that this kinase may contribute to the physiological regulation of DNA topoisomerase I activity.

  17. Hypoxia activates Akt and induces phosphorylation of GSK-3 in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Beitner-Johnson, D; Rust, R T; Hsieh, T C; Millhorn, D E

    2001-01-01

    Akt is a serine/threonine kinase that has been shown to play a central role in promoting cell survival and opposing apoptosis. We evaluated the effect of hypoxia on Akt in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. PC12 cells were exposed to varying levels of hypoxia, including 21%, 15%, 10%, 5%, and 1% O(2). Hypoxia dramatically increased phosphorylation of Akt (Ser(473)). This effect peaked after 6 h exposure to hypoxia, but persisted strongly for up to 24 h. Phosphorylation of Akt was paralleled with a progressive increase in phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3), one of its downstream substrates. The effect of hypoxia on phosphorylation of Akt was completely blocked by pretreatment of the cells with wortmannin (100 nM), indicating that this effect is mediated by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (P13K). In contrast, whereas hypoxia also strongly induced phosphorylation of the transcription factors CREB and EPAS1, these effects persisted in the presence of wortmannin. Thus, hypoxia regulates both P13K-dependent and P13K-independent signaling pathways. Furthermore, activation of the P13K and Akt signaling pathways may be one mechanism by which cells adapt and survive under conditions of hypoxia. PMID:11257444

  18. Phosphorylation and inhibition of. gamma. -glutamyl transferase activity by cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesnichenko, L.S.; Chernov, N.N.

    1986-10-20

    It was shown that preparations of bovine kidney ..gamma..-glutamyl transferase of differing degrees of purity are phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. This is accompanied by a decrease in both the transferase and hydrolase activities of the enzyme. Consequently, ..gamma..-glutamyl transferase may serve as the substrate and target of the regulation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

  19. TGF-β activates Erk MAP kinase signalling through direct phosphorylation of ShcA

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Matt K; Pardoux, Cécile; Hall, Marie C; Lee, Pierre S; Warburton, David; Qing, Jing; Smith, Susan M; Derynck, Rik

    2007-01-01

    Erk1/Erk2 MAP kinases are key regulators of cell behaviour and their activation is generally associated with tyrosine kinase signalling. However, TGF-β stimulation also activates Erk MAP kinases through an undefined mechanism, albeit to a much lower level than receptor tyrosine kinase stimulation. We report that upon TGF-β stimulation, the activated TGF-β type I receptor (TβRI) recruits and directly phosphorylates ShcA proteins on tyrosine and serine. This dual phosphorylation results from an intrinsic TβRI tyrosine kinase activity that complements its well-defined serine-threonine kinase function. TGF-β-induced ShcA phosphorylation induces ShcA association with Grb2 and Sos, thereby initiating the well-characterised pathway linking receptor tyrosine kinases with Erk MAP kinases. We also found that TβRI is tyrosine phosphorylated in response to TGF-β. Thus, TβRI, like the TGF-β type II receptor, is a dual-specificity kinase. Recruitment of tyrosine kinase signalling pathways may account for aspects of TGF-β biology that are independent of Smad signalling. PMID:17673906

  20. Cell-cycle-regulated activation of Akt kinase by phosphorylation at its carboxyl terminus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pengda; Begley, Michael; Michowski, Wojciech; Inuzuka, Hiroyuki; Ginzberg, Miriam; Gao, Daming; Tsou, Peiling; Gan, Wenjian; Papa, Antonella; Kim, Byeong Mo; Wan, Lixin; Singh, Amrik; Zhai, Bo; Yuan, Min; Wang, Zhiwei; Gygi, Steven P.; Lee, Tae Ho; Lu, Kun-Ping; Toker, Alex; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Asara, John M.; Kirschner, Marc W.; Sicinski, Piotr; Cantley, Lewis; Wei, Wenyi

    2014-01-01

    Akt, also known as protein kinase B, plays key roles in cell proliferation, survival and metabolism. Akt hyperactivation contributes to many pathophysiological conditions, including human cancers1–3, and is closely associated with poor prognosis and chemo- or radio-therapeutic resistance4. Phosphorylation of Akt at S473 (ref. 5) and T308 (ref. 6) activates Akt. However, it remains unclear whether further mechanisms account for full Akt activation, and whether Akt hyperactivation is linked to misregulated cell cycle progression, another cancer hallmark7. Here we report that Akt activity fluctuates across the cell cycle, mirroring cyclin A expression. Mechanistically, phosphorylation of S477 and T479 at the Akt extreme carboxy terminus by cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2)/cyclin A or mTORC2, under distinct physiological conditions, promotes Akt activation through facilitating, or functionally compensating for, S473 phosphorylation. Furthermore, deletion of the cyclin A2 allele in the mouse olfactory bulb leads to reduced S477/T479 phosphorylation and elevated cellular apoptosis. Notably, cyclin A2-deletion-induced cellular apoptosis in mouse embryonic stem cells is partly rescued by S477D/T479E-Akt1, supporting a physiological role for cyclin A2 in governing Akt activation. Together, the results of our study show Akt S477/T479 phosphorylation to be an essential layer of the Akt activation mechanism to regulate its physiological functions, thereby providing a new mechanistic link between aberrant cell cycle progression and Akt hyperactivation in cancer. PMID:24670654

  1. Talin1 phosphorylation activates β1 integrins: a novel mechanism to promote prostate cancer bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Jin, J-K; Tien, P-C; Cheng, C-J; Song, J H; Huang, C; Lin, S-H; Gallick, G E

    2015-04-01

    Talins are adaptor proteins that regulate focal adhesion signaling by conjugating integrins to the cytoskeleton. Talins directly bind integrins and are essential for integrin activation. We previously showed that β1 integrins are activated in metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) cells, increasing PCa metastasis to lymph nodes and bone. However, how β1 integrins are activated in PCa cells is unknown. In this study, we identified a novel mechanism of β1 integrin activation. Using knockdown experiments, we first demonstrated that talin1, but not talin2, is important in β1 integrin activation. We next showed that talin1 S425 phosphorylation, but not total talin1 expression, correlates with metastatic potential of PCa cells. Expressing a non-phosphorylatable mutant, talin1(S425A), in talin1-silenced PC3-MM2 and C4-2B4 PCa cells, decreased activation of β1 integrins, integrin-mediated adhesion, motility and increased the sensitivity of the cells to anoikis. In contrast, reexpression of the phosphorylation-mimicking mutant talin1(S425D) led to increased β1 integrin activation and generated biologic effects opposite to talin1(S425A) expression. In the highly metastatic PC3-MM2 cells, expression of a non-phosphorylatable mutant, talin1(S425A), in talin1-silenced PC3-MM2 cells, abolished their ability to colonize in the bone following intracardiac injection, while reexpression of phosphorylation-mimicking mutant talin1(S425D) restored their ability to metastasize to bone. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that talin S425 phosphorylation is significantly increased in human bone metastases when compared with normal tissues, primary tumors or lymph node metastases. We further showed that p35 expression, an activator of Cdk5, and Cdk5 activity were increased in metastatic tumor cells, and that Cdk5 kinase activity is responsible for talin1 phosphorylation and subsequent β1 integrin activation. Together, our study reveals Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation of talin1 leading

  2. Phosphorylation of platelet actin-binding protein during platelet activation

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, R.C.; Gerrard, J.M.

    1982-03-01

    In this study we have followed the 32P-labeling of actin-binding protein as a function of platelet activation. Utilizing polyacrylamide-sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis to resolve total platelet protein samples, we found 2 to 3-fold labeling increases in actin-binding protein 30 to 60 sec after thrombin stimulation. Somewhat larger increases were observed for 40,000 and 20,000 apparent molecular weight peptides. The actin-binding protein was identified on the gels by coelectrophoresis with purified actin-binding protein, its presence in cytoskeletal cores prepared by detergent extraction of activated 32P-labeled platelets, and by direct immunoprecipitation with antibodies against guinea pig vas deferens filamin (actin-binding protein). In addition, these cytoskeletal cores indicated that the 32P-labeled actin-binding protein was closely associated with the activated platelet's cytoskeleton. Following the 32P-labeling of actin-binding protein over an 8-min time course revealed that in aggregating platelet samples rapid dephosphorylation to almost initial levels occurred between 3 and 5 min. A similar curve was obtained for the 20,000 apparent molecular weight peptide. However, rapid dephosphorylation was not observed if platelet aggregation was prevented by chelating external calcium or by using thrombasthenic platelets lacking the aggregation response. Thus, cell-cell contact would seem to be crucial in initiating the rapid dephosphorylation response.

  3. Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Activates Topoisomerase IIα through a Mechanism Independent of Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Paul S.; Whalen, Anne M.; Tolwinski, Nicholas S.; Wilsbacher, Julie; Froelich-Ammon, Stacie J.; Garcia, Marileila; Osheroff, Neil; Ahn, Natalie G.

    1999-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, extracellular signal-related kinase 1 (ERK1) and ERK2, regulate cellular responses by mediating extracellular growth signals toward cytoplasmic and nuclear targets. A potential target for ERK is topoisomerase IIα, which becomes highly phosphorylated during mitosis and is required for several aspects of nucleic acid metabolism, including chromosome condensation and daughter chromosome separation. In this study, we demonstrated interactions between ERK2 and topoisomerase IIα proteins by coimmunoprecipitation from mixtures of purified enzymes and from nuclear extracts. In vitro, diphosphorylated active ERK2 phosphorylated topoisomerase IIα and enhanced its specific activity by sevenfold, as measured by DNA relaxation assays, whereas unphosphorylated ERK2 had no effect. However, activation of topoisomerase II was also observed with diphosphorylated inactive mutant ERK2, suggesting a mechanism of activation that depends on the phosphorylation state of ERK2 but not on its kinase activity. Nevertheless, activation of ERK by transient transfection of constitutively active mutant MAP kinase kinase 1 (MKK1) enhanced endogenous topoisomerase II activity by fourfold. Our findings indicate that ERK regulates topoisomerase IIα in vitro and in vivo, suggesting a potential target for the MKK/ERK pathway in the modulation of chromatin reorganization events during mitosis and in other phases of the cell cycle. PMID:10207078

  4. Ground state destabilization by anionic nucleophiles contributes to the activity of phosphoryl transfer enzymes.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Logan D; Fenn, Tim D; Herschlag, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    Enzymes stabilize transition states of reactions while limiting binding to ground states, as is generally required for any catalyst. Alkaline Phosphatase (AP) and other nonspecific phosphatases are some of Nature's most impressive catalysts, achieving preferential transition state over ground state stabilization of more than 10²²-fold while utilizing interactions with only the five atoms attached to the transferred phosphorus. We tested a model that AP achieves a portion of this preference by destabilizing ground state binding via charge repulsion between the anionic active site nucleophile, Ser102, and the negatively charged phosphate monoester substrate. Removal of the Ser102 alkoxide by mutation to glycine or alanine increases the observed Pi affinity by orders of magnitude at pH 8.0. To allow precise and quantitative comparisons, the ionic form of bound P(i) was determined from pH dependencies of the binding of Pi and tungstate, a P(i) analog lacking titratable protons over the pH range of 5-11, and from the ³¹P chemical shift of bound P(i). The results show that the Pi trianion binds with an exceptionally strong femtomolar affinity in the absence of Ser102, show that its binding is destabilized by ≥10⁸-fold by the Ser102 alkoxide, and provide direct evidence for ground state destabilization. Comparisons of X-ray crystal structures of AP with and without Ser102 reveal the same active site and P(i) binding geometry upon removal of Ser102, suggesting that the destabilization does not result from a major structural rearrangement upon mutation of Ser102. Analogous Pi binding measurements with a protein tyrosine phosphatase suggest the generality of this ground state destabilization mechanism. Our results have uncovered an important contribution of anionic nucleophiles to phosphoryl transfer catalysis via ground state electrostatic destabilization and an enormous capacity of the AP active site for specific and strong recognition of the phosphoryl group in

  5. Phosphorylation of threonine 290 in the activation loop of Tpl2/Cot is necessary but not sufficient for kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Luciano, Brenda S; Hsu, Sang; Channavajhala, Padma L; Lin, Lih-Ling; Cuozzo, John W

    2004-12-10

    Cot/Tpl2/MAP3K8 is a serine/threonine kinase known to activate the ERK, p38, and JNK kinase pathways. Studies of Tpl2 knock-out mice reveal a clear defect in tumor necrosis factor-alpha production, although very little detail is known about its regulation and the signaling events involved. In the present study we demonstrated that phosphorylation of Cot was required for its maximal activity as phosphatase treatment of Cot decreased its kinase activity. The Cot sequence contains a conserved threonine at position 290 in the activation loop of the kinase domain. We found that mutation of this residue to alanine eliminated its ability to activate MEK/ERK and NF-kappaB pathways, whereas a phosphomimetic mutation to aspartic acid could rescue the ability to activate MEK. Thr-290 was also required for robust autophosphorylation of Cot. Antibody generated to phospho-Thr-290-Cot recognized both wild-type and kinase-dead Cot, suggesting that phosphorylation of Thr-290 did not occur through autophosphorylation but via another kinase. We showed that Cot was constitutively phosphorylated at Thr-290 in transfected human embryonic kidney 293T cells as well as human monocytes as this residue was phosphorylated in unstimulated and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated cells to the same degree. Treatment with herbimycin A inhibited Cot activity in the MEK/ERK pathway but did not inhibit phosphorylation at Thr-290. Together these results showed that phosphorylation of Cot at Thr-290 is necessary but not sufficient for full kinase activity in the MEK/ERK pathway. PMID:15466476

  6. Erk1/2 activity promotes chromatin features and RNAPII phosphorylation at developmental promoters in mouse ESCs.

    PubMed

    Tee, Wee-Wei; Shen, Steven S; Oksuz, Ozgur; Narendra, Varun; Reinberg, Danny

    2014-02-13

    Erk1/2 activation contributes to mouse ES cell pluripotency. We found a direct role of Erk1/2 in modulating chromatin features required for regulated developmental gene expression. Erk2 binds to specific DNA sequence motifs typically accessed by Jarid2 and PRC2. Negating Erk1/2 activation leads to increased nucleosome occupancy and decreased occupancy of PRC2 and poised RNAPII at Erk2-PRC2-targeted developmental genes. Surprisingly, Erk2-PRC2-targeted genes are specifically devoid of TFIIH, known to phosphorylate RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) at serine-5, giving rise to its initiated form. Erk2 interacts with and phosphorylates RNAPII at its serine 5 residue, which is consistent with the presence of poised RNAPII as a function of Erk1/2 activation. These findings underscore a key role for Erk1/2 activation in promoting the primed status of developmental genes in mouse ES cells and suggest that the transcription complex at developmental genes is different than the complexes formed at other genes, offering alternative pathways of regulation.

  7. Phosphorylation of Complexin by PKA Regulates Activity-Dependent Spontaneous Neurotransmitter Release and Structural Synaptic Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Cho, Richard W; Buhl, Lauren K; Volfson, Dina; Tran, Adrienne; Li, Feng; Akbergenova, Yulia; Littleton, J Troy

    2015-11-18

    Synaptic plasticity is a fundamental feature of the nervous system that allows adaptation to changing behavioral environments. Most studies of synaptic plasticity have examined the regulated trafficking of postsynaptic glutamate receptors that generates alterations in synaptic transmission. Whether and how changes in the presynaptic release machinery contribute to neuronal plasticity is less clear. The SNARE complex mediates neurotransmitter release in response to presynaptic Ca(2+) entry. Here we show that the SNARE fusion clamp Complexin undergoes activity-dependent phosphorylation that alters the basic properties of neurotransmission in Drosophila. Retrograde signaling following stimulation activates PKA-dependent phosphorylation of the Complexin C terminus that selectively and transiently enhances spontaneous release. Enhanced spontaneous release is required for activity-dependent synaptic growth. These data indicate that SNARE-dependent fusion mechanisms can be regulated in an activity-dependent manner and highlight the key role of spontaneous neurotransmitter release as a mediator of functional and structural plasticity.

  8. Characterization of a Mn sup 2+ -dependent membrane serine kinase that is activated by tyrosine phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, T.J. )

    1991-03-11

    It is hypothesized that the insulin receptor (IR) tyrosine kinase may directly phosphorylate and activate one or more serine kinases. The identities of such serine kinases as well as their modes of activation are unclear. The authors have described a serine kinase from rat liver membranes that copurifies with the IR on wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)-sepharose. The kinase is activated after phosphorylation of the WGA-sepharose-purified fraction by casein kinase-1, casein kinase-2, or casein kinase-3. A tyrosine kinase, possibly IR tyrosine kinase, also participates in the activation process since a phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor such as vanadate, p-nitrophenyl phosphate, or phosphotyrosine is required in reaction mixtures for activation to be observed. By contrast, phosphoserine and phosphothreonine do not support activation. The activated kinase can use IR {beta}-subunit, myelin basic protein (MBP), and histones as substrates. IR {beta}-subunit phosphorylation was stimulated by MBP, histones, and polylysine, and inhibited by heparin and poly(glu, tyr). The kinase prefers Mn{sup 2+} over Mg{sup 2+} as a metal cofactor.

  9. Oxidative stress–dependent phosphorylation activates ZNRF1 to induce neuronal/axonal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wakatsuki, Shuji; Furuno, Akiko; Ohshima, Makiko

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a well-known inducer of neuronal apoptosis and axonal degeneration. We previously showed that the E3 ubiquitin ligase ZNRF1 promotes Wallerian degeneration by degrading AKT to induce GSK3B activation. We now demonstrate that oxidative stress serves as an activator of the ubiquitin ligase activity of ZNRF1 by inducing epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)–mediated phosphorylation at the 103rd tyrosine residue and that the up-regulation of ZNRF1 activity by oxidative stress leads to neuronal apoptosis and Wallerian degeneration. We also show that nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate–reduced oxidase activity is required for the EGFR-dependent phosphorylation-induced activation of ZNRF1 and resultant AKT degradation via the ubiquitin proteasome system to induce Wallerian degeneration. These results indicate the pathophysiological significance of the EGFR–ZNRF1 pathway induced by oxidative stress in the regulation of neuronal apoptosis and Wallerian degeneration. A deeper understanding of the regulatory mechanism for ZNRF1 catalytic activity via phosphorylation will provide a potential therapeutic avenue for neurodegeneration. PMID:26572622

  10. Phosphorylation of the protein kinase C-theta activation loop and hydrophobic motif regulates its kinase activity, but only activation loop phosphorylation is critical to in vivo nuclear-factor-kappaB induction.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yin; Graham, Caroline; Li, Aiqun; Fisher, Robert J; Shaw, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC)-theta, a member of the 'novel' subfamily of PKC isoforms, is of singular importance in transducing signals in T-lymphocytes. Since understanding of regulatory phosphorylation of novel PKCs is fragmentary and inconsistent with findings for 'classical' PKC isoforms, we investigated three potential phosphorylation sites on PKC-theta; in the activation loop (Thr(538)), turn motif (Ser(676)) and hydrophobic motif (Ser(695)). Combined evidence from phospho-specific antisera and MS demonstrates phosphorylation at all three sites. Unlike its closest paralogue, PKC-delta, lack of negative charge in the activation loop of PKC-theta results in a profound catalytic defect (>100-fold reduction in the T538A mutant); the high sequence similarity between PKC-theta and -delta assists in the formulation of structural hypotheses to account for this major difference. In contrast with mechanisms proposed for other PKC isoforms, phosphorylation at the other two sites does not reconstitute catalytic activity. Activation loop phosphorylation is critical in vivo, since the T538A mutant completely lost its capacity to mediate T-cell receptor-stimulation of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation in Jurkat T-cells. Hydrophobic motif phosphorylation also substantially influences PKC-theta catalytic activity (5-fold reduction in the S695A mutant), but does not impair NF-kappaB activation in Jurkat T-cells. Its mechanism is independent of secondary effects on activation loop phosphorylation and cannot be explained by thermal instability. Turn motif phosphorylation has a limited effect on kinase activity, but negatively regulates other aspects of PKC-theta function, since the S676A mutant is more efficient than wild-type in inducing NF-kappaB activation in Jurkat T-cells. These findings expand our understanding of the roles of phosphorylation in novel PKCs, and indicate that PKC-theta is a constitutively competent kinase as a consequence of constitutive

  11. Tyrosine Hydroxylase Phosphorylation in Catecholaminergic Brain Regions: A Marker of Activation following Acute Hypotension and Glucoprivation

    PubMed Central

    Damanhuri, Hanafi A.; Burke, Peter G. R.; Ong, Lin K.; Bobrovskaya, Larisa; Dickson, Phillip W.; Dunkley, Peter R.; Goodchild, Ann K.

    2012-01-01

    The expression of c-Fos defines brain regions activated by the stressors hypotension and glucoprivation however, whether this identifies all brain sites involved is unknown. Furthermore, the neurochemicals that delineate these regions, or are utilized in them when responding to these stressors remain undefined. Conscious rats were subjected to hypotension, glucoprivation or vehicle for 30, 60 or 120 min and changes in the phosphorylation of serine residues 19, 31 and 40 in the biosynthetic enzyme, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the activity of TH and/or, the expression of c-Fos were determined, in up to ten brain regions simultaneously that contain catecholaminergic cell bodies and/or terminals: A1, A2, caudal C1, rostral C1, A6, A8/9, A10, nucleus accumbens, dorsal striatum and medial prefrontal cortex. Glucoprivation evoked phosphorylation changes in A1, caudal C1, rostral C1 and nucleus accumbens whereas hypotension evoked changes A1, caudal C1, rostral C1, A6, A8/9, A10 and medial prefrontal cortex 30 min post stimulus whereas few changes were evident at 60 min. Although increases in pSer19, indicative of depolarization, were seen in sites where c-Fos was evoked, phosphorylation changes were a sensitive measure of activation in A8/9 and A10 regions that did not express c-Fos and in the prefrontal cortex that contains only catecholaminergic terminals. Specific patterns of serine residue phosphorylation were detected, dependent upon the stimulus and brain region, suggesting activation of distinct signaling cascades. Hypotension evoked a reduction in phosphorylation in A1 suggestive of reduced kinase activity. TH activity was increased, indicating synthesis of TH, in regions where pSer31 alone was increased (prefrontal cortex) or in conjunction with pSer40 (caudal C1). Thus, changes in phosphorylation of serine residues in TH provide a highly sensitive measure of activity, cellular signaling and catecholamine utilization in catecholaminergic brain regions, in the

  12. Phloridzin improves lipoprotein lipase activity in stress-loaded mice via AMPK phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-En; Li, Yi-Fang; Wu, Yan-Ping; Tsoi, Bun; Zhang, Shi-Jie; Cao, Ling-Fang; Kurihara, Hiroshi; He, Rong-Rong

    2014-11-01

    Long-term stress exposure can lead to disturbed homeostasis and cause many life-style diseases. Phloridzin possesses various bioactivities, but the understanding of the effects of phloridzin on stress-related lipid metabolism disorder is limited. Our results demonstrate that phloridzin improved plasma lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity and triglyceride metabolism in restrained mice. A decrease of angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) mRNA expression and an increase of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation were observed after phloridzin treatment. After inhibiting AMPK phosphorylation, the effects of phloridzin on the amelioration of plasma LPL activity and suppression of ANGPTL4 expression were blocked. In addition, cardiac AMPK phosphorylation, plasma LPL activity and ANGPTL4 expression were also affected by phloridzin, even if the glucocorticoid receptor was blocked. Taken together, the down-regulation of ANGPTL4 expression by phloridzin was probably via a direct activation of AMPK pathway. This discovery can provide a biochemical and nutritional basis for the use of phloridzin-containing food and beverage in daily life. PMID:24932810

  13. Tyrosine phosphorylation and protein degradation control the transcriptional activity of WRKY involved in benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Sato, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIQ) are among the most structurally diverse and pharmaceutically valuable secondary metabolites. A plant-specific WRKY-type transcription factor, CjWRKY1, was isolated from Coptis japonica and identified as a transcriptional activator of BIQ biosynthesis. However, the expression of CjWRKY1 gene alone was not sufficient for the activation of genes encoding biosynthetic enzymes. Here, we report the importance of post-translational regulation of CjWRKY1 in BIQ biosynthesis. First, we detected the differential accumulation of CjWRKY1 protein in two cell lines with similar CjWRKY1 gene expression but different levels of accumulated alkaloids. Further investigation of the WRKY protein identified the phosphorylation of the WRKYGQK core domain at Y115. The CjWRKY(Y115E) phosphorylation-mimic mutant showed loss of nuclear localization, DNA-binding activity, and transactivation activity compared to wild-type CjWRKY1. Rapid degradation of the CjWRKY1 protein was also confirmed following treatment with inhibitors of the 26S proteasome and protease inhibitors. The existence of two independent degradation pathways as well as protein phosphorylation suggests the fine-tuning of CjWRKY1 activities is involved in the regulation of biosynthesis of BIQs. PMID:27552928

  14. Tyrosine phosphorylation and protein degradation control the transcriptional activity of WRKY involved in benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Sato, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIQ) are among the most structurally diverse and pharmaceutically valuable secondary metabolites. A plant-specific WRKY-type transcription factor, CjWRKY1, was isolated from Coptis japonica and identified as a transcriptional activator of BIQ biosynthesis. However, the expression of CjWRKY1 gene alone was not sufficient for the activation of genes encoding biosynthetic enzymes. Here, we report the importance of post-translational regulation of CjWRKY1 in BIQ biosynthesis. First, we detected the differential accumulation of CjWRKY1 protein in two cell lines with similar CjWRKY1 gene expression but different levels of accumulated alkaloids. Further investigation of the WRKY protein identified the phosphorylation of the WRKYGQK core domain at Y115. The CjWRKYY115E phosphorylation-mimic mutant showed loss of nuclear localization, DNA-binding activity, and transactivation activity compared to wild-type CjWRKY1. Rapid degradation of the CjWRKY1 protein was also confirmed following treatment with inhibitors of the 26S proteasome and protease inhibitors. The existence of two independent degradation pathways as well as protein phosphorylation suggests the fine-tuning of CjWRKY1 activities is involved in the regulation of biosynthesis of BIQs. PMID:27552928

  15. C/EBPβ-Thr217 Phosphorylation Stimulates Macrophage Inflammasome Activation and Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Martina; Solis-Herruzo, Jose; Chojkier, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Amplification of liver injury is mediated by macrophages but the signaling by which the macrophage inflammasome enhances liver injury is not completely understood. The CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein-β (C/EBPβ) is a critical signaling molecule for macrophages because expression of a dominant inhibitor of C/EBPβ DNA-binding sites or a targeted deletion of C/EBPβ results in impaired macrophage differentiation. We reported that expression of the phosphorylation-mutant C/EBPβ-Glu217, which mimics phosphorylated C/EBPβ-Thr217, was sufficient to confer macrophage survival to Anthrax lethal toxin. Here, using primary hepatocytes, primary liver macrophages, dominant positive and negative transgenic mice of the C/EBPβ-Thr217 phosphoacceptor, macrophage ablation, and an inhibitory peptide of C/EBPβ-Thr217 phosphorylation, we determined that this phosphorylation is essential for the activation of the inflammasome in liver macrophages and for the hepatocyte apoptosis induced by hepatotoxins that results in liver injury. Similar findings were observed in the livers of patients with acute injury induced by Toxic Oil Syndrome. PMID:27067260

  16. C/EBPβ-Thr217 Phosphorylation Stimulates Macrophage Inflammasome Activation and Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Buck, Martina; Solis-Herruzo, Jose; Chojkier, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Amplification of liver injury is mediated by macrophages but the signaling by which the macrophage inflammasome enhances liver injury is not completely understood. The CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein-β (C/EBPβ) is a critical signaling molecule for macrophages because expression of a dominant inhibitor of C/EBPβ DNA-binding sites or a targeted deletion of C/EBPβ results in impaired macrophage differentiation. We reported that expression of the phosphorylation-mutant C/EBPβ-Glu217, which mimics phosphorylated C/EBPβ-Thr217, was sufficient to confer macrophage survival to Anthrax lethal toxin. Here, using primary hepatocytes, primary liver macrophages, dominant positive and negative transgenic mice of the C/EBPβ-Thr217 phosphoacceptor, macrophage ablation, and an inhibitory peptide of C/EBPβ-Thr217 phosphorylation, we determined that this phosphorylation is essential for the activation of the inflammasome in liver macrophages and for the hepatocyte apoptosis induced by hepatotoxins that results in liver injury. Similar findings were observed in the livers of patients with acute injury induced by Toxic Oil Syndrome. PMID:27067260

  17. PLK1-dependent activation of LRRK1 regulates spindle orientation by phosphorylating CDK5RAP2.

    PubMed

    Hanafusa, Hiroshi; Kedashiro, Shin; Tezuka, Motohiro; Funatsu, Motoki; Usami, Satoshi; Toyoshima, Fumiko; Matsumoto, Kunihiro

    2015-08-01

    Correct formation of the cell division axis requires the initial precise orientation of the mitotic spindle. Proper spindle orientation depends on centrosome maturation, and Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is known to play a crucial role in this process. However, the molecular mechanisms that function downstream of PLK1 are not well understood. Here we show that LRRK1 is a PLK1 substrate that is phosphorylated on Ser 1790. PLK1 phosphorylation is required for CDK1-mediated activation of LRRK1 at the centrosomes, and this in turn regulates mitotic spindle orientation by nucleating the growth of astral microtubules from the centrosomes. Interestingly, LRRK1 in turn phosphorylates CDK5RAP2(Cep215), a human homologue of Drosophila Centrosomin (Cnn), in its γ-tubulin-binding motif, thus promoting the interaction of CDK5RAP2 with γ-tubulin. LRRK1 phosphorylation of CDK5RAP2 Ser 140 is necessary for CDK5RAP2-dependent microtubule nucleation. Thus, our findings provide evidence that LRRK1 regulates mitotic spindle orientation downstream of PLK1 through CDK5RAP2-dependent centrosome maturation. PMID:26192437

  18. Tau phosphorylation at Alzheimer's disease-related Ser356 contributes to tau stabilization when PAR-1/MARK activity is elevated.

    PubMed

    Ando, Kanae; Oka, Mikiko; Ohtake, Yosuke; Hayashishita, Motoki; Shimizu, Sawako; Hisanaga, Shin-Ichi; Iijima, Koichi M

    2016-09-16

    Abnormal phosphorylation of the microtubule-associated protein tau is observed in many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD-related phosphorylation of two tau residues, Ser262 and Ser356, by PAR-1/MARK stabilizes tau in the initial phase of mismetabolism, leading to subsequent phosphorylation events, accumulation, and toxicity. However, the relative contribution of phosphorylation at each of these sites to tau stabilization has not yet been elucidated. In a Drosophila model of human tau toxicity, we found that tau was phosphorylated at Ser262, but not at Ser356, and that blocking Ser262 phosphorylation decreased total tau levels. By contrast, when PAR-1 was co-overexpressed with tau, tau was hyperphosphorylated at both Ser262 and Ser356. Under these conditions, the protein levels of tau were significantly elevated, and prevention of tau phosphorylation at both residues was necessary to completely suppress this elevation. These results suggest that tau phosphorylation at Ser262 plays the predominant role in tau stabilization when PAR-1/MARK activity is normal, whereas Ser356 phosphorylation begins to contribute to this process when PAR-1/MARK activity is abnormally elevated, as in diseased brains.

  19. Tau phosphorylation at Alzheimer's disease-related Ser356 contributes to tau stabilization when PAR-1/MARK activity is elevated.

    PubMed

    Ando, Kanae; Oka, Mikiko; Ohtake, Yosuke; Hayashishita, Motoki; Shimizu, Sawako; Hisanaga, Shin-Ichi; Iijima, Koichi M

    2016-09-16

    Abnormal phosphorylation of the microtubule-associated protein tau is observed in many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD-related phosphorylation of two tau residues, Ser262 and Ser356, by PAR-1/MARK stabilizes tau in the initial phase of mismetabolism, leading to subsequent phosphorylation events, accumulation, and toxicity. However, the relative contribution of phosphorylation at each of these sites to tau stabilization has not yet been elucidated. In a Drosophila model of human tau toxicity, we found that tau was phosphorylated at Ser262, but not at Ser356, and that blocking Ser262 phosphorylation decreased total tau levels. By contrast, when PAR-1 was co-overexpressed with tau, tau was hyperphosphorylated at both Ser262 and Ser356. Under these conditions, the protein levels of tau were significantly elevated, and prevention of tau phosphorylation at both residues was necessary to completely suppress this elevation. These results suggest that tau phosphorylation at Ser262 plays the predominant role in tau stabilization when PAR-1/MARK activity is normal, whereas Ser356 phosphorylation begins to contribute to this process when PAR-1/MARK activity is abnormally elevated, as in diseased brains. PMID:27520376

  20. Microglia activation regulates GluR1 phosphorylation in chronic unpredictable stress-induced cognitive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingchao; Li, Juan; Dai, Peng; Zhao, Fang; Zheng, Gang; Jing, Jinfei; Wang, Jiye; Luo, Wenjing; Chen, Jingyuan

    2015-01-01

    Chronic stress is considered to be a major risk factor in the development of psychopathological syndromes in humans. Cognitive impairments and long-term potentiation (LTP) impairments are increasingly recognized as major components of depression, anxiety disorders and other stress-related chronic psychological illnesses. It seems timely to systematically study the potentially underlying neurobiological mechanisms of altered cognitive and synaptic plasticity in the course of chronic stress. In the present study, a rat model of chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) induced a cognitive impairment in spatial memory in the Morris water maze (MWM) test and a hippocampal LTP impairment. CUS also induced hippocampal microglial activation and attenuated phosphorylation of glutamate receptor 1 (GluR1 or GluA1). Moreover, chronic treatment with the selective microglial activation blocker, minocycline (120 mg/kg per day), beginning 3 d before CUS treatment and continuing through the behavioral testing period, prevented the CUS-induced impairments of spatial memory and LTP induction. Additional studies showed that minocycline-induced inhibition of microglia activation was associated with increased phosphorylation of GluR1. These results suggest that hippocampal microglial activation modulates the level of GluR1 phosphorylation and might play a causal role in CUS-induced cognitive and LTP disturbances.

  1. Phosphorylation and activation of calcineurin by glycogen synthase (casein) kinase-1 and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, T.J.; Wang, J.H.

    1986-05-01

    Calcineurin is a phosphoprotein phosphatase that is activated by divalent cations and further stimulated by calmodulin. In this study calcineurin is shown to be a substrate for both glycogen synthase (casein) kinase-1 (CK-1) and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (A-kinase). Either kinase can catalyze the incorporation of 1.0-1.4 mol /sup 32/P/mol calcineurin. Analysis by SDS-PAGE revealed that only the ..cap alpha.. subunit is phosphorylated. Phosphorylation of calcineurin by either kinase leads to its activation. Using p-nitrophenyl phosphate as a substrate the authors observed a 2-3 fold activation of calcineurin by either Mn/sup 2 +/ or Ni/sup 2 +/ (in the presence or absence of calmodulin) after phosphorylation of calcineurin by either CK-1 or A-kinase. In the absence of Mn/sup 2 +/ or Ni/sup 2 +/ phosphorylated calcineurin, like the nonphosphorylated enzyme, showed very little activity. Ni/sup 2 +/ was a more potent activator of phosphorylated calcineurin compared to Mn/sup 2 +/. Higher levels of activation (5-8 fold) of calcineurin by calmodulin was observed when phosphorylated calcineurin was pretreated with Ni/sup 2 +/ before measurement of phosphatase activity. These results indicate that phosphorylation may be an important mechanism by which calcineurin activity is regulated by Ca/sup 2 +/.

  2. Characterizing Active Site Conformational Heterogeneity along the Trajectory of an Enzymatic Phosphoryl Transfer Reaction.

    PubMed

    Zeymer, Cathleen; Werbeck, Nicolas D; Zimmermann, Sabine; Reinstein, Jochen; Hansen, D Flemming

    2016-09-12

    States along the phosphoryl transfer reaction catalyzed by the nucleoside monophosphate kinase UmpK were captured and changes in the conformational heterogeneity of conserved active site arginine side-chains were quantified by NMR spin-relaxation methods. In addition to apo and ligand-bound UmpK, a transition state analog (TSA) complex was utilized to evaluate the extent to which active site conformational entropy contributes to the transition state free energy. The catalytically essential arginine side-chain guanidino groups were found to be remarkably rigid in the TSA complex, indicating that the enzyme has evolved to restrict the conformational freedom along its reaction path over the energy landscape, which in turn allows the phosphoryl transfer to occur selectively by avoiding side reactions. PMID:27534930

  3. Characterizing Active Site Conformational Heterogeneity along the Trajectory of an Enzymatic Phosphoryl Transfer Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Zeymer, Cathleen; Werbeck, Nicolas D.; Zimmermann, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Abstract States along the phosphoryl transfer reaction catalyzed by the nucleoside monophosphate kinase UmpK were captured and changes in the conformational heterogeneity of conserved active site arginine side‐chains were quantified by NMR spin‐relaxation methods. In addition to apo and ligand‐bound UmpK, a transition state analog (TSA) complex was utilized to evaluate the extent to which active site conformational entropy contributes to the transition state free energy. The catalytically essential arginine side‐chain guanidino groups were found to be remarkably rigid in the TSA complex, indicating that the enzyme has evolved to restrict the conformational freedom along its reaction path over the energy landscape, which in turn allows the phosphoryl transfer to occur selectively by avoiding side reactions. PMID:27534930

  4. Mek1 Down Regulates Rad51 Activity during Yeast Meiosis by Phosphorylation of Hed1.

    PubMed

    Callender, Tracy L; Laureau, Raphaelle; Wan, Lihong; Chen, Xiangyu; Sandhu, Rima; Laljee, Saif; Zhou, Sai; Suhandynata, Ray T; Prugar, Evelyn; Gaines, William A; Kwon, YoungHo; Börner, G Valentin; Nicolas, Alain; Neiman, Aaron M; Hollingsworth, Nancy M

    2016-08-01

    During meiosis, programmed double strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired preferentially between homologs to generate crossovers that promote proper chromosome segregation at Meiosis I. In many organisms, there are two strand exchange proteins, Rad51 and the meiosis-specific Dmc1, required for interhomolog (IH) bias. This bias requires the presence, but not the strand exchange activity of Rad51, while Dmc1 is responsible for the bulk of meiotic recombination. How these activities are regulated is less well established. In dmc1Δ mutants, Rad51 is actively inhibited, thereby resulting in prophase arrest due to unrepaired DSBs triggering the meiotic recombination checkpoint. This inhibition is dependent upon the meiosis-specific kinase Mek1 and occurs through two different mechanisms that prevent complex formation with the Rad51 accessory factor Rad54: (i) phosphorylation of Rad54 by Mek1 and (ii) binding of Rad51 by the meiosis-specific protein Hed1. An open question has been why inhibition of Mek1 affects Hed1 repression of Rad51. This work shows that Hed1 is a direct substrate of Mek1. Phosphorylation of Hed1 at threonine 40 helps suppress Rad51 activity in dmc1Δ mutants by promoting Hed1 protein stability. Rad51-mediated recombination occurring in the absence of Hed1 phosphorylation results in a significant increase in non-exchange chromosomes despite wild-type levels of crossovers, confirming previous results indicating a defect in crossover assurance. We propose that Rad51 function in meiosis is regulated in part by the coordinated phosphorylation of Rad54 and Hed1 by Mek1.

  5. Endothelin-1 stimulates catalase activity through the PKCδ-mediated phosphorylation of serine 167.

    PubMed

    Rafikov, Ruslan; Kumar, Sanjiv; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Hou, Yali; Kangath, Archana; Pardo, Daniel; Fineman, Jeffrey R; Black, Stephen M

    2014-02-01

    Our previous studies have shown that endothelin-1 (ET-1) stimulates catalase activity in endothelial cells and in lambs with acute increases in pulmonary blood flow (PBF), without altering gene expression. The purpose of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanism by which this occurs. Exposing pulmonary arterial endothelial cells to ET-1 increased catalase activity and decreased cellular hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels. These changes correlated with an increase in serine-phosphorylated catalase. Using the inhibitory peptide δV1.1, this phosphorylation was shown to be protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ) dependent. Mass spectrometry identified serine 167 as the phosphorylation site. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to generate a phospho-mimic (S167D) catalase. Activity assays using recombinant protein purified from Escherichia coli or transiently transfected COS-7 cells demonstrated that S167D catalase had an increased ability to degrade H2O2 compared to the wild-type enzyme. Using a phospho-specific antibody, we were able to verify that pS167 catalase levels are modulated in lambs with acute increases in PBF in the presence and absence of the ET receptor antagonist tezosentan. S167 is located on the dimeric interface, suggesting it could be involved in regulating the formation of catalase tetramers. To evaluate this possibility we utilized analytical gel filtration to examine the multimeric structure of recombinant wild-type and S167D catalase. We found that recombinant wild-type catalase was present as a mixture of monomers and dimers, whereas S167D catalase was primarily tetrameric. Further, the incubation of wild-type catalase with PKCδ was sufficient to convert wild-type catalase into a tetrameric structure. In conclusion, this is the first report indicating that the phosphorylation of catalase regulates its multimeric structure and activity.

  6. Mek1 Down Regulates Rad51 Activity during Yeast Meiosis by Phosphorylation of Hed1

    PubMed Central

    Callender, Tracy L.; Laljee, Saif; Zhou, Sai; Suhandynata, Ray T.; Gaines, William A.; Kwon, YoungHo; Börner, G. Valentin; Nicolas, Alain; Neiman, Aaron M.

    2016-01-01

    During meiosis, programmed double strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired preferentially between homologs to generate crossovers that promote proper chromosome segregation at Meiosis I. In many organisms, there are two strand exchange proteins, Rad51 and the meiosis-specific Dmc1, required for interhomolog (IH) bias. This bias requires the presence, but not the strand exchange activity of Rad51, while Dmc1 is responsible for the bulk of meiotic recombination. How these activities are regulated is less well established. In dmc1Δ mutants, Rad51 is actively inhibited, thereby resulting in prophase arrest due to unrepaired DSBs triggering the meiotic recombination checkpoint. This inhibition is dependent upon the meiosis-specific kinase Mek1 and occurs through two different mechanisms that prevent complex formation with the Rad51 accessory factor Rad54: (i) phosphorylation of Rad54 by Mek1 and (ii) binding of Rad51 by the meiosis-specific protein Hed1. An open question has been why inhibition of Mek1 affects Hed1 repression of Rad51. This work shows that Hed1 is a direct substrate of Mek1. Phosphorylation of Hed1 at threonine 40 helps suppress Rad51 activity in dmc1Δ mutants by promoting Hed1 protein stability. Rad51-mediated recombination occurring in the absence of Hed1 phosphorylation results in a significant increase in non-exchange chromosomes despite wild-type levels of crossovers, confirming previous results indicating a defect in crossover assurance. We propose that Rad51 function in meiosis is regulated in part by the coordinated phosphorylation of Rad54 and Hed1 by Mek1. PMID:27483004

  7. Mek1 Down Regulates Rad51 Activity during Yeast Meiosis by Phosphorylation of Hed1.

    PubMed

    Callender, Tracy L; Laureau, Raphaelle; Wan, Lihong; Chen, Xiangyu; Sandhu, Rima; Laljee, Saif; Zhou, Sai; Suhandynata, Ray T; Prugar, Evelyn; Gaines, William A; Kwon, YoungHo; Börner, G Valentin; Nicolas, Alain; Neiman, Aaron M; Hollingsworth, Nancy M

    2016-08-01

    During meiosis, programmed double strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired preferentially between homologs to generate crossovers that promote proper chromosome segregation at Meiosis I. In many organisms, there are two strand exchange proteins, Rad51 and the meiosis-specific Dmc1, required for interhomolog (IH) bias. This bias requires the presence, but not the strand exchange activity of Rad51, while Dmc1 is responsible for the bulk of meiotic recombination. How these activities are regulated is less well established. In dmc1Δ mutants, Rad51 is actively inhibited, thereby resulting in prophase arrest due to unrepaired DSBs triggering the meiotic recombination checkpoint. This inhibition is dependent upon the meiosis-specific kinase Mek1 and occurs through two different mechanisms that prevent complex formation with the Rad51 accessory factor Rad54: (i) phosphorylation of Rad54 by Mek1 and (ii) binding of Rad51 by the meiosis-specific protein Hed1. An open question has been why inhibition of Mek1 affects Hed1 repression of Rad51. This work shows that Hed1 is a direct substrate of Mek1. Phosphorylation of Hed1 at threonine 40 helps suppress Rad51 activity in dmc1Δ mutants by promoting Hed1 protein stability. Rad51-mediated recombination occurring in the absence of Hed1 phosphorylation results in a significant increase in non-exchange chromosomes despite wild-type levels of crossovers, confirming previous results indicating a defect in crossover assurance. We propose that Rad51 function in meiosis is regulated in part by the coordinated phosphorylation of Rad54 and Hed1 by Mek1. PMID:27483004

  8. Basal aurora kinase B activity is sufficient for histone H3 phosphorylation in prophase

    PubMed Central

    Le, Ly-Thuy-Tram; Vu, Hong-Lien; Nguyen, Chi-Hung; Molla, Annie

    2013-01-01

    Summary Histone H3 phosphorylation is the hallmark of mitosis deposited by aurora kinase B. Benzo[e]pyridoindoles are a family of potent, broad, ATP-competitive aurora kinase inhibitors. However, benzo[e]pyridoindole C4 only inhibits histone H3 phosphorylation in prophase but not in metaphase. Under the C4 treatment, the cells enter into mitosis with dephosphorylated histone H3, assemble chromosomes normally and progress to metaphase, and then to anaphase. C4 also induces lagging chromosome in anaphase but we demonstrated that these chromosome compaction defects are not related to the absence of H3 phosphorylation in prophase. As a result of C4 action, mitosis lasts longer and the cell cycle is slowed down. We reproduced the mitotic defects with reduced concentrations of potent pan aurora kinase as well as with a specific aurora B ATP-competitive inhibitor; we therefore propose that histone H3 phosphorylation and anaphase chromosome compaction involve the basal activity of aurora kinase B. Our data suggest that aurora kinase B is progressively activated at mitosis entry and at anaphase onset. The full activation of aurora kinase B by its partners, in prometaphase, induces a shift in the catalytic domain of aurora B that modifies its affinity for ATP. These waves of activation/deactivation of aurora B correspond to different conformations of the chromosomal complex revealed by FRAP. The presence of lagging chromosomes may have deleterious consequences on the daughter cells and, unfortunately, the situation may be encountered in patients receiving treatment with aurora kinase inhibitors. PMID:23616922

  9. Phosphorylation of synaptic GTPase-activating protein (synGAP) by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) alters the ratio of its GAP activity toward Ras and Rap GTPases.

    PubMed

    Walkup, Ward G; Washburn, Lorraine; Sweredoski, Michael J; Carlisle, Holly J; Graham, Robert L; Hess, Sonja; Kennedy, Mary B

    2015-02-20

    synGAP is a neuron-specific Ras and Rap GTPase-activating protein (GAP) found in high concentrations in the postsynaptic density (PSD) fraction from the mammalian forebrain. We have previously shown that, in situ in the PSD fraction or in recombinant form in Sf9 cell membranes, synGAP is phosphorylated by Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), another prominent component of the PSD. Here, we show that recombinant synGAP (r-synGAP), lacking 102 residues at the N terminus, can be purified in soluble form and is phosphorylated by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) as well as by CaMKII. Phosphorylation of r-synGAP by CaMKII increases its HRas GAP activity by 25% and its Rap1 GAP activity by 76%. Conversely, phosphorylation by CDK5 increases r-synGAP's HRas GAP activity by 98% and its Rap1 GAP activity by 20%. Thus, phosphorylation by both kinases increases synGAP activity; CaMKII shifts the relative GAP activity toward inactivation of Rap1, and CDK5 shifts the relative activity toward inactivation of HRas. GAP activity toward Rap2 is not altered by phosphorylation by either kinase. CDK5 phosphorylates synGAP primarily at two sites, Ser-773 and Ser-802. Phosphorylation at Ser-773 inhibits r-synGAP activity, and phosphorylation at Ser-802 increases it. However, the net effect of concurrent phosphorylation of both sites, Ser-773 and Ser-802, is an increase in GAP activity. synGAP is phosphorylated at Ser-773 and Ser-802 in the PSD fraction, and its phosphorylation by CDK5 and CaMKII is differentially regulated by activation of NMDA-type glutamate receptors in cultured neurons.

  10. The Helminthosporium victoriae 190S mycovirus has two forms distinguishable by capsid protein composition and phosphorylation state.

    PubMed

    Ghabrial, S A; Havens, W M

    1992-06-01

    Purified preparations of the Helminthosporium victoriae 190S (Hv190S) virus contain two sedimenting components that differ in capsid structure. The slower sedimenting component (190S-1) contained p88 and p83 as the major capsid proteins; the faster component (190S-2) contained p88 and p78. Previous peptide-mapping studies have shown the three capsid proteins to be closely related. Analysis by SDS-PAGE of in vivo-radiolabeled Hv190S virions indicated that 32P was predominantly incorporated in p88. Significantly less was detected in p83 and none in p78. Similar results were obtained in in vitro phosphorylation studies using [gamma-32P]ATP and purified 190S-1 and 190S-2. The in vitro results suggest that the Hv190S virions copurify with a protein kinase activity that catalyzes the transfer of gamma-phosphate from ATP to a target protein, presumably p78 in the 190S-2 virions and p83 in the 190S-1 component. Selective chemical cleavage at tryptophan residues of in vitro 32P-labeled capsid proteins revealed four labeled peptides among the cleavage products of both p83 and p88. Radioiodination studies with intact Hv190S virions indicated that p88 and p83, but not the nonphosphorylated p78, were accessible to iodination, suggesting that capsid protein phosphorylation entailed conformational changes.

  11. Protein kinase D regulates RhoA activity via rhotekin phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Pusapati, Ganesh V; Eiseler, Tim; Rykx, An; Vandoninck, Sandy; Derua, Rita; Waelkens, Etienne; Van Lint, Johan; von Wichert, Götz; Seufferlein, Thomas

    2012-03-16

    The members of the protein kinase D (PKD) family of serine/threonine kinases are major targets for tumor-promoting phorbol esters, G protein-coupled receptors, and activated protein kinase C isoforms (PKCs). The expanding list of cellular processes in which PKDs exert their function via phosphorylation of various substrates include proliferation, apoptosis, migration, angiogenesis, and vesicle trafficking. Therefore, identification of novel PKD substrates is necessary to understand the profound role of this kinase family in signal transduction. Here, we show that rhotekin, an effector of RhoA GTPase, is a novel substrate of PKD. We identified Ser-435 in rhotekin as the potential site targeted by PKD in vivo. Expression of a phosphomimetic S435E rhotekin mutant resulted in an increase of endogenous active RhoA GTPase levels. Phosphorylation of rhotekin by PKD2 modulates the anchoring of the RhoA in the plasma membrane. Consequently, the S435E rhotekin mutant displayed enhanced stress fiber formation when expressed in serum-starved fibroblasts. Our data thus identify a novel role of PKD as a regulator of RhoA activity and actin stress fiber formation through phosphorylation of rhotekin. PMID:22228765

  12. Regulation of Ci-SCFSlimb binding, Ci proteolysis and Hedgehog pathway activity by Ci phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Smelkinson, Margery G.; Zhou, Qianhe; Kalderon, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Hedgehog (Hh) proteins signal by inhibiting the proteolytic processing of Ci/Gli family transcription factors and by increasing Ci/Gli specific activity. In the absence of Hh, phosphorylation of Ci/Gli triggers binding to SCF ubiquitin ligase complexes and consequent proteolysis. Here we define the principal SCFSlimb binding site in Ci as an extended variant of a canonical Slimb/β-TRCP binding motif that can be created by PKA-priming of five successive CK1 sites. GSK3 enhances binding primarily through a nearby region of Ci, which may contact an SCF component other than Slimb. Studies of Ci variants with altered CK1 and GSK3 sites suggest that the large number of phosphorylation sites that direct SCFSlimb binding confers a Hh response that is both sensitive and graded, and that in the Drosophila wing disc, morphogenetic responses involve changes in both the level and specific activity of Ci. We also show that when Ci proteolysis is compromised, its specific activity is limited principally by Su(fu) and not by Cos2 cytoplasmic tethering or PKA phosphorylation. PMID:17925225

  13. Promotion of beta-glucan synthase activity in corn microsomal membranes by calcium and protein phosphorylation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paliyath, G.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1988-01-01

    Regulation of the activity of beta-glucan synthase was studied using microsomal preparations from corn coleoptiles. The specific activity as measured by the incorporation of glucose from uridine diphospho-D-[U-14C]glucose varied between 5 to 15 pmol (mg protein)-1 min-1. Calcium promoted beta-glucan synthase activity and the promotion was observed at free calcium concentrations as low as 1 micromole. Kinetic analysis of substrate-velocity curve showed an apparent Km of 1.92 x 10(-4) M for UDPG. Calcium increased the Vmax from 5.88 x 10(-7) mol liter-1 min-1 in the absence of calcium to 9.52 x 10(-7) mol liter-1 min-1 and 1.66 x 10(-6) mol liter-1 min-1 in the presence of 0.5 mM and 1 mM calcium, respectively. The Km values remained the same under these conditions. Addition of ATP further increased the activity above the calcium-promoted level. Sodium fluoride, a phosphoprotein phosphatase inhibitor, promoted glucan synthase activity indicating that phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are involved in the regulation of the enzyme activity. Increasing the concentration of sodium fluoride from 0.25 mM to 10 mM increased glucan synthase activity five-fold over the + calcium + ATP control. Phosphorylation of membrane proteins also showed a similar increase under these conditions. Calmodulin, in the presence of calcium and ATP stimulated glucan synthase activity substantially, indicating that calmodulin could be involved in the calcium-dependent phosphorylation and promotion of beta-glucan synthase activity. The role of calcium in mediating auxin action is discussed.

  14. Phosphorylation as a method of regulating the activity of yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase. I. Activation of inorganic pyrophosphatase under the action of ATP

    SciTech Connect

    Vener, A.V.; Nazarova, T.I.; Avaeva, S.M.

    1986-04-01

    ATP activates in a noncompetitive manner the hydrolysis of magnesium pyrophosphate catalyzed by baker's yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase. On the other hand, ATP causes a fall in the amount of pyrophosphate bound with enzyme that is formed by synthesis from phosphate, which confirms the fact of an increase in the catalytic rate constant of the enzymatic hydrolysis of pyrophosphate. The reason for the activation of the inorganic pyrophosphatase is the phosphorylation of its regulatory center under the action of ATP with the inclusion of the ..gamma..-phosphate group of the ATP in the protein.

  15. Masoprocol decreases rat lipolytic activity by decreasing the phosphorylation of HSL.

    PubMed

    Gowri, M S; Azhar, R K; Kraemer, F B; Reaven, G M; Azhar, S

    2000-09-01

    Masoprocol (nordihydroguaiaretic acid), a lipoxygenase inhibitor isolated from the creosote bush, has been shown to decrease adipose tissue lipolytic activity both in vivo and in vitro. The present study was initiated to test the hypothesis that the decrease in lipolytic activity by masoprocol resulted from modulation of adipose tissue hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) activity. The results indicate that oral administration of masoprocol to rats with fructose-induced hypertriglyceridemia significantly decreased their serum free fatty acid (FFA; P < 0.05), triglyceride (TG; P < 0.001), and insulin (P < 0.05) concentrations. In addition, isoproterenol-induced lipolytic rate and HSL activity were significantly lower (P < 0.001) in adipocytes isolated from masoprocol compared with vehicle-treated rats and was associated with a decrease in HSL protein. Incubation of masoprocol with adipocytes from chow-fed rats significantly inhibited isoproterenol-induced lipolytic activity and HSL activity, associated with a decrease in the ability of isoproterenol to phosphorylate HSL. Masoprocol had no apparent effect on adipose tissue phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity, but okadaic acid, a serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor, blocked the antilipolytic effect of masoprocol. The results of these in vitro and in vivo experiments suggest that the antilipolytic activity of masoprocol is secondary to its ability to inhibit HSL phosphorylation, possibly by increasing phosphatase activity. As a consequence, masoprocol administration results in lower serum FFA and TG concentrations in hypertriglyceridemic rodents.

  16. Protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylates human platelet inositol trisphosphate 5/sup +/-/-phosphomonoesterase (IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase) increasing phosphatase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, T.M.; Majerus, P.W.

    1986-05-01

    Phosphoinositide breakdown in response to thrombin stimulation of human platelets generates messenger molecules that activate PKC (diglyceride) and mobilize Ca/sup + +/ (inositol tris-phosphates). The water soluble products of phospholipase C-mediated metabolism of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-diphosphate are inositol 1,4,5 P/sub 3/ (IP/sub 3/) and inositol 1:2-cyclic 4,5 P/sub 3/ (cIP/sub 3/). A specific phosphatase, IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase, cleaves the 5 phosphate from IP/sub 3/ or cIP/sub 3/ to form IP/sub 2/ or cIP/sub 2/ and P/sub i/, none of which mobilizes Ca/sup + +/. Thus, the IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase may regulate cellular responses to IP/sub 3/ or cIP/sub 3/. The authors find that IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase isolated from human platelets is phosphorylated by rat brain PKC, resulting in a 4-fold increase in IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase activity. The authors phosphorylated IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase using ..gamma.. /sup 32/P-ATP and found that the labeled enzyme comigrated on SDS-PAGE with the previously described 40K protein phosphorylated in response to thrombin stimulation of platelets. The similarity of the PKC-phosphorylated IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase observed in vitro and the thrombin-stimulated phosphorylated 40K protein known to be phosphorylated by PKC in vivo, suggests that these proteins may be the same. These results suggest that platelet Ca/sup + +/ mobilization maybe regulated by PKC phosphorylation of the IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase and can explain the observation that phorbol ester treatment of intact human platelets results in decreased production of IP/sub 3/ and decreased Ca/sup + +/ mobilization upon subsequent thrombin addition.

  17. Phosphorylation of WASp is a key regulator of activity and stability in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Blundell, Michael P.; Bouma, Gerben; Metelo, Joao; Worth, Austen; Calle, Yolanda; Cowell, Lucy A.; Westerberg, Lisa S.; Moulding, Dale A.; Mirando, Samuel; Kinnon, Christine; Cory, Giles O.; Jones, Gareth E.; Snapper, Scott B.; Burns, Siobhan O.; Thrasher, Adrian J.

    2009-01-01

    The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp) is a key cytoskeletal regulator in hematopoietic cells. Covalent modification of a conserved tyrosine by phosphorylation has emerged as an important potential determinant of activity, although the physiological significance remains uncertain. In a murine knockin model, mutation resulting in inability to phosphorylate Y293 (Y293F) mimicked many features of complete WASp-deficiency. Although a phosphomimicking mutant Y293E conferred enhanced actin-polymerization, the cellular phenotype was similar due to functional dysregulation. Furthermore, steady-state levels of Y293E-WASp were markedly reduced compared to wild-type WASp and Y293F-WASp, although partially recoverable by treatment of cells with proteasome inhibitors. Consequently, tyrosine phosphorylation plays a critical role in normal activation of WASp in vivo, and is indispensible for multiple tasks including proliferation, phagocytosis, chemotaxis, and assembly of adhesion structures. Furthermore, it may target WASp for proteasome-mediated degradation, thereby providing a default mechanism for self-limiting stimulation of the Arp2/3 complex. PMID:19805221

  18. Control of Death-associated Protein Kinase (DAPK) Activity by Phosphorylation and Proteasomal Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yijun; Blue, Emily K.; Gallagher, Patricia J.

    2010-01-01

    Activation of death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) occurs via dephosphorylation of Ser-308 and subsequent association of calcium/calmodulin. In this study, we confirmed the existence of the alternatively spliced human DAPK-β, and we examined the levels of DAPK autophosphorylation and DAPK catalytic activity in response to tumor necrosis factor or ceramide. It was found that DAPK is rapidly dephosphorylated in response to tumor necrosis factor or ceramide and then subsequently degraded via proteasome activity. Dephosphorylation and activation of DAPK are shown to temporally precede its subsequent degradation. This results in an initial increase in kinase activity followed by a decrease in DAPK expression and activity. The decline in DAPK expression is paralleled with increased caspase activity and cell apoptosis. These results suggest that the apoptosis regulatory activities mediated by DAPK are controlled both by phosphorylation status and protein stability. PMID:17056602

  19. How Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases Recognize and Phosphorylate Their Targets: A QM/MM Study

    PubMed Central

    Turjanski, Adrian Gustavo; Hummer, Gerhard; Gutkind, J. Silvio

    2009-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways play an essential role in the transduction of environmental stimuli to the nucleus, thereby regulating a variety of cellular processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation and programmed cell death. The components of the MAPK extracellular activated protein kinase (ERK) cascade represent attractive targets for cancer therapy as their aberrant activation is a frequent event among highly prevalent human cancers. To understand how MAPKs recognize and phosphorylate their targets is key to unravel their function. However, these events are still poorly understood due to the lack of complex structures of MAPKs with their bound targets in the active site. Here, we have modeled the interaction of ERK with a target peptide and analyzed the specificity towards Ser/Thr-Pro motifs. By using a Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) approach we propose a mechanism for the phosphoryl transfer catalyzed by ERK that offers new insights into MAPK function. Our results suggest that 1) the proline residue has a role both in specificity and phospho transfer efficiency; 2) the reaction occurs in one step with ERK2 Asp147 acting as the catalytic base; 3) a conserved Lys in the kinase superfamily usually mutated to check kinase activity strongly stabilizes the transition state; and 4) the reaction mechanism is similar with either one or two Mg2+ ions in the active site. Taken together, our results provide a detailed description of the molecular events involved in the phosphorylation reaction catalyzed by MAPK and contributes to the general understanding of kinase activity. PMID:19361221

  20. Protein-tyrosine-phosphatase 2C is phosphorylated and inhibited by 44-kDa mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Peraldi, P; Zhao, Z; Filloux, C; Fischer, E H; Van Obberghen, E

    1994-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine-phosphatase 2C (PTP2C, also named SHPTP2, SHPTP3, or PTP1D) is a cytosolic enzyme with two Src homology 2 domains. We have investigated its regulation by phosphorylation in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells. In untreated cells, PTP2C was phosphorylated predominantly on serine residues. A 5-min treatment with epidermal growth factor (EGF) induced an increase in phosphorylation on threonine and, to a lesser degree, on serine. After 45 min of exposure to EGF, PTP2C phosphorylation returned to basal levels. Using an in vitro kinase assay, we found that the 44-kDa mitogen-activated protein kinase, p44mapk, phosphorylated PTP2C on serine and threonine residues. This phosphorylation resulted in a pronounced inhibition of PTP2C enzyme activity measured with phosphorylated EGF receptors as substrate. Moreover, in intact PC12 cells, PTP2C was also inhibited following a short EGF treatment, but its activity returned to normal when the exposure to EGF was maintained for 45 min. The profile of this response to EGF can be inversely correlated to that of the stimulatory action of EGF on p44mapk. These data suggest that the EGF-induced regulation of PTP2C activity is mediated by p44mapk. These findings provide evidence for an additional role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade--namely, the regulation of a PTP. Images PMID:8197172

  1. Autoinhibition and Polo-dependent multisite phosphorylation restrict activity of the histone H3 kinase Haspin to mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Ghenoiu, Cristina; Wheelock, Michael S.; Funabiki, Hironori

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The mitosis-specific phosphorylation of Histone H3 at Thr3 (H3T3ph) plays an important role in chromosome segregation by recruiting Aurora B. H3T3 phosphorylation is catalyzed by Haspin, an atypical protein kinase, whose kinase domain is intrinsically active without phosphorylation at the activation loop. We report here the molecular basis for Haspin inhibition during interphase and its reactivation in M phase. We identify a conserved basic segment that autoinhibits Haspin during interphase. This autoinhibition is neutralized when Cdk1 phosphorylates the N terminus of Haspin to recruit Polo-like kinase (Plk1/Plx1), which in turn further phosphorylates multiple sites at the Haspin N terminus. While Plx1, but not Aurora B, is critical for H3T3 phosphorylation in Xenopus egg extracts, Plk1 and Aurora B both promote this modification in human cells. Thus, M phase-specific H3T3 phosphorylation is governed by the combinatorial action of mitotic kinases that neutralizes Haspin autoinhibition through a mechanism dependent on multisite phosphorylation. PMID:24184212

  2. Autoinhibition and Polo-dependent multisite phosphorylation restrict activity of the histone H3 kinase Haspin to mitosis.

    PubMed

    Ghenoiu, Cristina; Wheelock, Michael S; Funabiki, Hironori

    2013-12-12

    The mitosis-specific phosphorylation of histone H3 at Thr3 (H3T3ph) plays an important role in chromosome segregation by recruiting Aurora B. H3T3 phosphorylation is catalyzed by Haspin, an atypical protein kinase whose kinase domain is intrinsically active without phosphorylation at the activation loop. Here, we report the molecular basis for Haspin inhibition during interphase and its reactivation in M phase. We identify a conserved basic segment that autoinhibits Haspin during interphase. This autoinhibition is neutralized when Cdk1 phosphorylates the N terminus of Haspin in order to recruit Polo-like kinase (Plk1/Plx1), which, in turn, further phosphorylates multiple sites at the Haspin N terminus. Although Plx1, and not Aurora B, is critical for H3T3 phosphorylation in Xenopus egg extracts, Plk1 and Aurora B both promote this modification in human cells. Thus, M phase-specific H3T3 phosphorylation is governed by the combinatorial action of mitotic kinases that neutralizes Haspin autoinhibition through a mechanism dependent on multisite phosphorylation. PMID:24184212

  3. Phosphorylated H2AX in parthenogenetically activated, in vitro fertilized and cloned bovine embryos.

    PubMed

    Pereira, A F; Melo, L M; Freitas, V J F; Salamone, D F

    2015-08-01

    In vitro embryo production methods induce DNA damage in the embryos. In response to these injuries, histone H2AX is phosphorylated (γH2AX) and forms foci at the sites of DNA breaks to recruit repair proteins. In this work, we quantified the DNA damage in bovine embryos undergoing parthenogenetic activation (PA), in vitro fertilization (IVF) or somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) by measuring γH2AX accumulation at different developmental stages: 1-cell, 2-cell and blastocyst. At the 1-cell stage, IVF embryos exhibited a greater number of γH2AX foci (606.1 ± 103.2) and greater area of γH2AX staining (12923.6 ± 3214.1) than did PA and SCNT embryos. No differences at the 2-cell stage were observed among embryo types. Although PA, IVF and SCNT were associated with different blastocyst formation rates (31.1%, 19.7% and 8.3%, P < 0.05), no differences in the number of γH2AX foci or area were detected among the treatments. γH2AX is detected in bovine preimplantation embryos produced by PA, IVF and SCNT; the amount of DNA damage was comparable among those embryos developing to the blastocyst stage among different methods for in vitro embryo production. While IVF resulted in increased damage at the 1-cell embryo stage, no difference was observed between PA and SCNT embryos at any developmental stage. The decrease in the number of double-stranded breaks at the blastocyst stage seems to indicate that DNA repair mechanisms are functional during embryo development.

  4. Phosphorylated H2AX in parthenogenetically activated, in vitro fertilized and cloned bovine embryos.

    PubMed

    Pereira, A F; Melo, L M; Freitas, V J F; Salamone, D F

    2015-08-01

    In vitro embryo production methods induce DNA damage in the embryos. In response to these injuries, histone H2AX is phosphorylated (γH2AX) and forms foci at the sites of DNA breaks to recruit repair proteins. In this work, we quantified the DNA damage in bovine embryos undergoing parthenogenetic activation (PA), in vitro fertilization (IVF) or somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) by measuring γH2AX accumulation at different developmental stages: 1-cell, 2-cell and blastocyst. At the 1-cell stage, IVF embryos exhibited a greater number of γH2AX foci (606.1 ± 103.2) and greater area of γH2AX staining (12923.6 ± 3214.1) than did PA and SCNT embryos. No differences at the 2-cell stage were observed among embryo types. Although PA, IVF and SCNT were associated with different blastocyst formation rates (31.1%, 19.7% and 8.3%, P < 0.05), no differences in the number of γH2AX foci or area were detected among the treatments. γH2AX is detected in bovine preimplantation embryos produced by PA, IVF and SCNT; the amount of DNA damage was comparable among those embryos developing to the blastocyst stage among different methods for in vitro embryo production. While IVF resulted in increased damage at the 1-cell embryo stage, no difference was observed between PA and SCNT embryos at any developmental stage. The decrease in the number of double-stranded breaks at the blastocyst stage seems to indicate that DNA repair mechanisms are functional during embryo development. PMID:24735637

  5. Tyrosine phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II CTD is associated with antisense promoter transcription and active enhancers in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Descostes, Nicolas; Heidemann, Martin; Spinelli, Lionel; Schüller, Roland; Maqbool, Muhammad Ahmad; Fenouil, Romain; Koch, Frederic; Innocenti, Charlène; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Eick, Dirk; Andrau, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase (Pol) II consists of 52 conserved heptapeptide repeats containing the consensus sequence Tyr1-Ser2-Pro3-Thr4-Ser5-Pro6-Ser7. Post-translational modifications of the CTD coordinate the transcription cycle and various steps of mRNA maturation. Here we describe Tyr1 phosphorylation (Tyr1P) as a hallmark of promoter (5′ associated) Pol II in mammalian cells, in contrast to what was described in yeast. Tyr1P is predominantly found in antisense orientation at promoters but is also specifically enriched at active enhancers. Mutation of Tyr1 to phenylalanine (Y1F) prevents the formation of the hyper-phosphorylated Pol IIO form, induces degradation of Pol II to the truncated Pol IIB form, and results in a lethal phenotype. Our results suggest that Tyr1P has evolved specialized and essential functions in higher eukaryotes associated with antisense promoter and enhancer transcription, and Pol II stability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02105.001 PMID:24842994

  6. Rapid TCR-mediated SHP-1 S591 phosphorylation regulates SHP-1 cellular localization and phosphatase activity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yin; Kruhlak, Michael J.; Hao, Jian-Jiang; Shaw, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Since the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 plays a major role in regulating T-cell signaling, we investigated regulation thereof by Ser/Thr phosphorylation. We found that TCR stimulation induced fast (≤1min) and transient phosphorylation of SHP-1 S591 in both Jurkat and human peripheral blood T-cells (PBT). Phosphorylation of S591 in T-cells could be mediated artificially by a constitutive active PKC-theta construct, but the dose dependence of inhibition by PKC inhibitors indicated that PKCs were not the relevant basophilic kinase in the physiologic response. S591 phosphorylation inhibited phosphatase function since a S591D mutant had lower activity than the S591A mutant. Additional evidence that S591 phosphorylation alters SHP-1 function was provided by studies of Jurkat cells stably expressing SHP-1 wildtype or mutants. In those cells, S591D mutation reduced the capacity of transfected SHP-1 to inhibit TCR-induced phosphorylation of PLC-γ1. Interestingly, SHP-1 Y536 phosphorylation (previously shown to augment phosphatase activity) was also induced in PBT by TCR signal but at a much later time compared to S591 (~30 min). S591 phosphorylation also altered cellular distribution of SHP-1 because: 1) SHP-1 in lipid rafts and a sheared membrane fraction was hypo-phosphorylated; 2) In stably transfected Jurkat cell lines, S591D mutant protein had reduced presence in both lipid raft and the sheared membrane fraction; 3) S591 phosphorylation prevented nuclear localization of a C-terminal GFP tagged SHP-1 construct. Our studies also shed light on an additional mechanism regulating SHP-1 nuclear localization, namely conformational autoinhibition. These findings highlight elegant regulation of SHP-1 by sequential phosporylation of serine then tyrosine. PMID:17575265

  7. Phosphorylation of inhibitor-2 and activation of MgATP-dependent protein phosphatase by rat skeletal muscle glycogen synthase kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Hegazy, M.G.; Reimann, E.M.; Thysseril, T.J.; Schlender, K.K.

    1986-05-01

    Rat skeletal muscle contains a glycogen synthase kinase (GSK-M) which is not stimulated by Ca/sup 2 +/ or cAMP. This kinase has an apparent Mr of 62,000 and uses ATP but not GTP as a phosphoryl donor. GSK-M phosphorylated glycogen synthase at sites 2 and 3. It phosphorylated ATP-citrate lyase and activated MgATP-dependent phosphatase in the presence of ATP but not GTP. As expected, the kinase also phosphorylated phosphatase inhibitor 2 (I-2). Phosphatase incorporation reached approximately 0.3 mol/mol of I-2. Phosphopeptide maps were obtained by digesting /sup 32/P-labeled I-2 with trypsin and separating the peptides by reversed phase HPLC. Two partially separated /sup 32/P-labeled peaks were obtained when I-2 was phosphorylated with either GSK-M or glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) and these peptides were different from those obtained when I-2 was phosphorylated with the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (CSU) or casein kinase II (CK-II). When I-2 was phosphorylated with GSK-M or GSK-3 and cleaved by CNBr, a single radioactive peak was obtained. Phosphoamino acid analysis showed that I-2 was phosphorylated by GSK-M or GSK-3 predominately in Thr whereas CSU and CK-II phosphorylated I-2 exclusively in Ser. These results indicate that GSK-M is similar to GSK-3 and to ATP-citrate lyase kinase. However, it appears to differ in Mr from ATP-citrate lyase kinase and it differs from GSK-3 in that it phosphorylates glycogen synthase at site 2 and it does not use GTP as a phosphoryl donor.

  8. The Phosphorylation Status of a Cyclic AMP-Responsive Activator Is Modulated via a Chromatin-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Laura F.; Asahara, Hiroshi; Shulman, Andrew I.; Kraus, W. Lee; Montminy, Marc

    2000-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) stimulates the expression of numerous genes via the protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of CREB at Ser133. Ser133 phosphorylation, in turn, promotes recruitment of the coactivator CREB binding protein and its paralog p300, histone acetyltransferases (HATs) that have been proposed to mediate target gene activation, in part, by destabilizing promoter bound nucleosomes and thereby allowing assembly of the transcriptional apparatus. Here we show that although histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors potentiate target gene activation via cAMP, they do not stimulate transcription over the early burst phase, during which CREB phosphorylation and CBP/p300 recruitment are maximal. Rather, HDAC inhibitors augment CREB activity during the late attenuation phase by prolonging CREB phosphorylation on chromosomal but, remarkably, not on extrachromosomal templates. In reconstitution studies, assembly of periodic nucleosomal arrays on a cAMP-responsive promoter template potently inhibited CREB phosphorylation by PKA, and acetylation of these template-bound nucleosomes by p300 partially rescued CREB phosphorylation by PKA. Our results suggest a novel regulatory mechanism by which cellular HATs and HDACs modulate the phosphorylation status of nuclear activators in response to cellular signals. PMID:10669737

  9. Phosphorylation of two regulatory tyrosine residues in the activation of Bruton’s tyrosine kinase via alternative receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Matthew I.; Fluckiger, Anne-Catherine; Kato, Roberta M.; Park, Hyunsun; Witte, Owen N.; Rawlings, David J.

    1997-01-01

    Mutation of Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) impairs B cell maturation and function and results in a clinical phenotype of X-linked agammaglobulinemia. Activation of Btk correlates with an increase in the phosphorylation of two regulatory Btk tyrosine residues. Y551 (site 1) within the Src homology type 1 (SH1) domain is transphosphorylated by the Src family tyrosine kinases. Y223 (site 2) is an autophosphorylation site within the Btk SH3 domain. Polyclonal, phosphopeptide-specific antibodies were developed to evaluate the phosphorylation of Btk sites 1 and 2. Crosslinking of the B cell antigen receptor (BCR) or the mast cell Fcɛ receptor, or interleukin 5 receptor stimulation each induced rapid phosphorylation at Btk sites 1 and 2 in a tightly coupled manner. Btk molecules were singly and doubly tyrosine-phosphorylated. Phosphorylated Btk comprised only a small fraction (≤5%) of the total pool of Btk molecules in the BCR-activated B cells. Increased dosage of Lyn in B cells augmented BCR-induced phosphorylation at both sites. Kinetic analysis supports a sequential activation mechanism in which individual Btk molecules undergo serial transphosphorylation (site 1) then autophosphorylation (site 2), followed by successive dephosphorylation of site 1 then site 2. The phosphorylation of conserved tyrosine residues within structurally related Tec family kinases is likely to regulate their activation. PMID:9326643

  10. Attenuated Levels of Hippocampal Connexin 43 and its Phosphorylation Correlate with Antidepressant- and Anxiolytic-Like Activities in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Quesseveur, Gaël; Portal, Benjamin; Basile, Jean-Arnaud; Ezan, Pascal; Mathou, Alexia; Halley, Hélène; Leloup, Corinne; Fioramonti, Xavier; Déglon, Nicole; Giaume, Christian; Rampon, Claire; Guiard, Bruno P.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical and preclinical studies have implicated glial anomalies in major depression. Conversely, evidence suggests that the activity of antidepressant drugs is based, at least in part, on their ability to stimulate density and/or activity of astrocytes, a major glial cell population. Despite this recent evidence, little is known about the mechanism(s) by which astrocytes regulate emotionality. Glial cells communicate with each other through gap junction channels (GJCs), while they can also directly interact with neurons by releasing gliotransmitters in the extracellular compartment via an hemichannels (HCs)-dependent process. Both GJCs and HCs are formed by two main protein subunits: connexins (Cx) 30 and 43 (Cx30 and Cx43). Here we investigate the role of hippocampal Cx43 in the regulation of depression-like symptoms using genetic and pharmacological approaches. The first aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the constitutive knock-down of Cx43 on a set of behaviors known to be affected in depression. Conversely, the expression of Cx43 was assessed in the hippocampus of mice subjected to prolonged corticosterone (CORT) exposure, given either alone or in combination with an antidepressant drug, the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine. Our results indicate that the constitutive deficiency of Cx43 resulted in the expression of some characteristic hallmarks of antidepressant-/anxiolytic-like behavioral activities along with an improvement of cognitive performances. Moreover, in a new cohort of wild-type mice, we showed that CORT exposure elicited anxiety and depression-like abnormalities that were reversed by chronic administration of fluoxetine. Remarkably, CORT also increased hippocampal amounts of phosphorylated form of Cx43 whereas fluoxetine treatment normalized this parameter. From these results, we envision that antidepressant drugs may exert their therapeutic activity by decreasing the expression and/or activity of Cx43 resulting from

  11. Attenuated Levels of Hippocampal Connexin 43 and its Phosphorylation Correlate with Antidepressant- and Anxiolytic-Like Activities in Mice.

    PubMed

    Quesseveur, Gaël; Portal, Benjamin; Basile, Jean-Arnaud; Ezan, Pascal; Mathou, Alexia; Halley, Hélène; Leloup, Corinne; Fioramonti, Xavier; Déglon, Nicole; Giaume, Christian; Rampon, Claire; Guiard, Bruno P

    2015-01-01

    Clinical and preclinical studies have implicated glial anomalies in major depression. Conversely, evidence suggests that the activity of antidepressant drugs is based, at least in part, on their ability to stimulate density and/or activity of astrocytes, a major glial cell population. Despite this recent evidence, little is known about the mechanism(s) by which astrocytes regulate emotionality. Glial cells communicate with each other through gap junction channels (GJCs), while they can also directly interact with neurons by releasing gliotransmitters in the extracellular compartment via an hemichannels (HCs)-dependent process. Both GJCs and HCs are formed by two main protein subunits: connexins (Cx) 30 and 43 (Cx30 and Cx43). Here we investigate the role of hippocampal Cx43 in the regulation of depression-like symptoms using genetic and pharmacological approaches. The first aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the constitutive knock-down of Cx43 on a set of behaviors known to be affected in depression. Conversely, the expression of Cx43 was assessed in the hippocampus of mice subjected to prolonged corticosterone (CORT) exposure, given either alone or in combination with an antidepressant drug, the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine. Our results indicate that the constitutive deficiency of Cx43 resulted in the expression of some characteristic hallmarks of antidepressant-/anxiolytic-like behavioral activities along with an improvement of cognitive performances. Moreover, in a new cohort of wild-type mice, we showed that CORT exposure elicited anxiety and depression-like abnormalities that were reversed by chronic administration of fluoxetine. Remarkably, CORT also increased hippocampal amounts of phosphorylated form of Cx43 whereas fluoxetine treatment normalized this parameter. From these results, we envision that antidepressant drugs may exert their therapeutic activity by decreasing the expression and/or activity of Cx43 resulting from

  12. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signals activation of p70 S6 kinase in situ through site-specific p70 phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Q P; Andrabi, K; Klippel, A; Kozlowski, M T; Williams, L T; Avruch, J

    1995-01-01

    The p70 S6 kinase is activated by insulin and mitogens through multisite phosphorylation of the enzyme. One set of activating phosphorylations occurs in a putative autoinhibitory domain in the noncatalytic carboxyl-terminal tail. Deletion of this tail yields a variant (p70 delta CT104) that nevertheless continues to be mitogen regulated. Coexpression with a recombinant constitutively active phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase (EC 2.7.1.137) gives substantial activation of both full-length p70 and p70 delta CT104 but not Rsk. Activation of p70 delta CT104 by PI 3-kinase and inhibition by wortmannin are each accompanied by parallel and selective changes in the phosphorylation of p70 Thr-252. A Thr or Ser at this site, in subdomain VIII of the catalytic domain just amino-terminal to the APE motif, is necessary for p70 40S kinase activity. The inactive ATP-binding site mutant K123M p70 delta CT104 undergoes phosphorylation of Thr-252 in situ but does not undergo direct phosphorylation by the active PI 3-kinase in vitro. PI 3-kinase provides a signal necessary for the mitogen activation of the p70 S6 kinase, which directs the site-specific phosphorylation of Thr-252 in the p70 catalytic domain, through a distinctive signal transduction pathway. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7777579

  13. Loss of interferon-induced Stat1 phosphorylation in activated T cells.

    PubMed

    Van De Wiele, C Justin; Marino, Julie H; Whetsell, Michael E; Vo, Stephen S; Masengale, Rhonda M; Teague, T Kent

    2004-03-01

    Modulation of cytokine responsiveness following T cell activation represents an important mechanism that shapes the fate of T cells after encounters with antigens. We activated T cells in mice with superantigen and assessed their ability to phosphorylate Stat1 in response to interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and IFN-alpha. After 4 h of activation in vivo, T cells became deficient in their ability to phosphorylate Stat1 in response to either cytokine. The loss of IFN sensitivity was accompanied by increased mRNA transcription for multiple suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) genes (SOCS1, SOCS3, and SOCS7). The transcript levels of these SOCS were elevated only during the early hours after activation and were at or below normal levels by 60 h. Likewise, the activation-induced inhibition of IFN-alpha signaling was transient, and sensitivity was restored by 3 days postactivation. The loss of sensitivity to IFN-gamma persisted, however, and was still evident at 3 days. These data suggest that SOCS-independent mechanisms specific for inhibition of IFN-gamma signaling may be present at later stages of the T cell response. The loss of Stat1 signaling may be a factor in differentiation of T cells during and after activation, and it could also represent a protective mechanism against the toxic effects of IFN-gamma during immune responses.

  14. KNL1 facilitates phosphorylation of outer kinetochore proteins by promoting Aurora B kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Caldas, Gina V.; DeLuca, Keith F.

    2013-01-01

    Aurora B kinase phosphorylates kinetochore proteins during early mitosis, increasing kinetochore–microtubule (MT) turnover and preventing premature stabilization of kinetochore–MT attachments. Phosphorylation of kinetochore proteins during late mitosis is low, promoting attachment stabilization, which is required for anaphase onset. The kinetochore protein KNL1 recruits Aurora B–counteracting phosphatases and the Aurora B–targeting factor Bub1, yet the consequences of KNL1 depletion on Aurora B phospho-regulation remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the KNL1 N terminus is essential for Aurora B activity at kinetochores. This region of KNL1 is also required for Bub1 kinase activity at kinetochores, suggesting that KNL1 promotes Aurora B activity through Bub1-mediated Aurora B targeting. However, ectopic targeting of Aurora B to kinetochores does not fully rescue Aurora B activity in KNL1-depleted cells, suggesting KNL1 influences Aurora B activity through an additional pathway. Our findings establish KNL1 as a requirement for Aurora B activity at kinetochores and for wild-type kinetochore–MT attachment dynamics. PMID:24344188

  15. Activation of kinase phosphorylation by heat-shift and mild heat-shock

    PubMed Central

    Petrocchi, Pamela; Quaresima, Stefania; Patrizia Mongiardi, Maria; Severini, Cinzia; Possenti, Roberta

    2010-01-01

    Most cells activate intracellular signalling to recover from heat damage. An increase of temperature, known as HS (heat shock), induces two major signalling events: the transcriptional induction of HSPs (heat-shock proteins) and the activation of the MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) cascade. We performed the present study to examine the effects of HS, induced by different experimental conditions, on various kinases [ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase), JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase), p38, Akt, AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase) and PKC (protein kinase C)]. We investigated by Western blot analysis the phosphorylation of MAPK as a measure of cellular responsiveness to heat shift (37°C) and mild HS (40°C) in different cell lines. The results of the study indicate that every cell line responded to heat shift, and to a greater extent to HS, increasing ERK and JNK phosphorylation, whereas variable effects on activation or inhibition of PKC, AMPK, Akt and p38 were observed. Besides the implications of intracellular signalling activated by heat variations, these data may be of technical relevance, indicating possible sources of error due to different experimental temperature conditions. PMID:23119140

  16. Activation of kinase phosphorylation by heat-shift and mild heat-shock.

    PubMed

    Petrocchi, Pamela; Quaresima, Stefania; Mongiardi, Maria Patrizia; Severini, Cinzia; Possenti, Roberta

    2010-01-01

    Most cells activate intracellular signalling to recover from heat damage. An increase of temperature, known as HS (heat shock), induces two major signalling events: the transcriptional induction of HSPs (heat-shock proteins) and the activation of the MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) cascade. We performed the present study to examine the effects of HS, induced by different experimental conditions, on various kinases [ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase), JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase), p38, Akt, AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase) and PKC (protein kinase C)]. We investigated by Western blot analysis the phosphorylation of MAPK as a measure of cellular responsiveness to heat shift (37°C) and mild HS (40°C) in different cell lines. The results of the study indicate that every cell line responded to heat shift, and to a greater extent to HS, increasing ERK and JNK phosphorylation, whereas variable effects on activation or inhibition of PKC, AMPK, Akt and p38 were observed. Besides the implications of intracellular signalling activated by heat variations, these data may be of technical relevance, indicating possible sources of error due to different experimental temperature conditions.

  17. Small-Molecule Inhibition and Activation-Loop Trans-Phosphorylation of the IGF1 Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Wu,J.; Li, W.; Craddock, B.; Foreman, K.; Mulvihill, M.; Ji, Q.; Miller, W.; Hubbard, S.

    2008-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) is a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) that has a critical role in mitogenic signalling during embryogenesis and an antiapoptotic role in the survival and progression of many human tumours. Here, we present the crystal structure of the tyrosine kinase domain of IGF1R (IGF1RK), in its unphosphorylated state, in complex with a novel compound, cis-3-[3-(4-methyl-piperazin-l-yl)-cyclobutyl]-1-(2-phenyl-quinolin-7-yl)-imidazo[1, 5-a]pyrazin-8-ylamine (PQIP), which we show is a potent inhibitor of both the unphosphorylated (basal) and phosphorylated (activated) states of the kinase. PQIP interacts with residues in the ATP-binding pocket and in the activation loop, which confers specificity for IGF1RK and the highly related insulin receptor (IR) kinase. In this crystal structure, the IGF1RK active site is occupied by Tyr1135 from the activation loop of an symmetry (two-fold)-related molecule. This dimeric arrangement affords, for the first time, a visualization of the initial trans-phosphorylation event in the activation loop of an RTK, and provides a molecular rationale for a naturally occurring mutation in the activation loop of the IR that causes type II diabetes mellitus.

  18. Zinc is a transmembrane agonist that induces platelet activation in a tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Watson, Ben R; White, Nathan A; Taylor, Kirk A; Howes, Joanna-Marie; Malcor, Jean-Daniel M; Bihan, Dominique; Sage, Stewart O; Farndale, Richard W; Pugh, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Following platelet adhesion and primary activation at sites of vascular injury, secondary platelet activation is induced by soluble platelet agonists, such as ADP, ATP, thrombin and thromboxane. Zinc ions are also released from platelets and damaged cells and have been shown to act as a platelet agonist. However, the mechanism of zinc-induced platelet activation is not well understood. Here we show that exogenous zinc gains access to the platelet cytosol and induces full platelet aggregation that is dependent on platelet protein tyrosine phosphorylation, PKC and integrin αIIbβ3 activity and is mediated by granule release and secondary signalling. ZnSO4 increased the binding affinity of GpVI, but not integrin α2β1. Low concentrations of ZnSO4 potentiated platelet aggregation by collagen-related peptide (CRP-XL), thrombin and adrenaline. Chelation of intracellular zinc reduced platelet aggregation induced by a number of different agonists, inhibited zinc-induced tyrosine phosphorylation and inhibited platelet activation in whole blood under physiologically relevant flow conditions. Our data are consistent with a transmembrane signalling role for zinc in platelet activation during thrombus formation.

  19. KNL1 facilitates phosphorylation of outer kinetochore proteins by promoting Aurora B kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Caldas, Gina V; DeLuca, Keith F; DeLuca, Jennifer G

    2013-12-23

    Aurora B kinase phosphorylates kinetochore proteins during early mitosis, increasing kinetochore–microtubule (MT) turnover and preventing premature stabilization of kinetochore–MT attachments. Phosphorylation of kinetochore proteins during late mitosis is low, promoting attachment stabilization, which is required for anaphase onset. The kinetochore protein KNL1 recruits Aurora B–counteracting phosphatases and the Aurora B–targeting factor Bub1, yet the consequences of KNL1 depletion on Aurora B phospho-regulation remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the KNL1 N terminus is essential for Aurora B activity at kinetochores. This region of KNL1 is also required for Bub1 kinase activity at kinetochores, suggesting that KNL1 promotes Aurora B activity through Bub1-mediated Aurora B targeting. However, ectopic targeting of Aurora B to kinetochores does not fully rescue Aurora B activity in KNL1-depleted cells, suggesting KNL1 influences Aurora B activity through an additional pathway. Our findings establish KNL1 as a requirement for Aurora B activity at kinetochores and for wild-type kinetochore–MT attachment dynamics.

  20. Casein kinase 1 α phosphorylates the Wnt regulator Jade-1 and modulates its activity.

    PubMed

    Borgal, Lori; Rinschen, Markus M; Dafinger, Claudia; Hoff, Sylvia; Reinert, Matthäus J; Lamkemeyer, Tobias; Lienkamp, Soeren S; Benzing, Thomas; Schermer, Bernhard

    2014-09-19

    Tight regulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling is critical for vertebrate development and tissue maintenance, and deregulation can lead to a host of disease phenotypes, including developmental disorders and cancer. Proteins associated with primary cilia and centrosomes have been demonstrated to negatively regulate canonical Wnt signaling in interphase cells. The plant homeodomain zinc finger protein Jade-1 can act as an E3 ubiquitin ligase-targeting β-catenin for proteasomal degradation and concentrates at the centrosome and ciliary basal body in addition to the nucleus in interphase cells. We demonstrate that the destruction complex component casein kinase 1α (CK1α) phosphorylates Jade-1 at a conserved SLS motif and reduces the ability of Jade-1 to inhibit β-catenin signaling. Consistently, Jade-1 lacking the SLS motif is more effective than wild-type Jade-1 in reducing β-catenin-induced secondary axis formation in Xenopus laevis embryos in vivo. Interestingly, CK1α also phosphorylates β-catenin and the destruction complex component adenomatous polyposis coli at a similar SLS motif to the effect that β-catenin is targeted for degradation. The opposing effect of Jade-1 phosphorylation by CK1α suggests a novel example of the dual functions of CK1α activity to either oppose or promote canonical Wnt signaling in a context-dependent manner.

  1. Differential phosphorylation, desensitization, and internalization of α1A-adrenoceptors activated by norepinephrine and oxymetazoline.

    PubMed

    Akinaga, Juliana; Lima, Vanessa; Kiguti, Luiz Ricardo de Almeida; Hebeler-Barbosa, Flávia; Alcántara-Hernández, Rocío; García-Sáinz, J Adolfo; Pupo, André Sampaio

    2013-04-01

    Loss of response on repetitive drug exposure (i.e., tachyphylaxis) is a particular problem for the vasoconstrictor effects of medications containing oxymetazoline (OXY), an α1-adrenoceptor (AR) agonist of the imidazoline class. One cause of tachyphylaxis is receptor desensitization, usually accompanied by phosphorylation and internalization. It is well established that α1A-ARs are less phosphorylated, desensitized, and internalized on exposure to the phenethylamines norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine, or phenylephrine (PE) than are the α1B and α1D subtypes. However, here we show in human embryonic kidney-293 cells that the low-efficacy agonist OXY induces G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2-dependent α1A-AR phosphorylation, followed by rapid desensitization and internalization (∼40% internalization after 5 minutes of stimulation), whereas phosphorylation of α1A-ARs exposed to NE depends to a large extent on protein kinase C activity and is not followed by desensitization, and the receptors undergo delayed internalization (∼35% after 60 minutes of stimulation). Native α1A-ARs from rat tail artery and vas deferens are also desensitized by OXY, but not by NE or PE, indicating that this property of OXY is not limited to recombinant receptors expressed in cell systems. The results of the present study are clearly indicative of agonist-directed α1A-AR regulation. OXY shows functional selectivity relative to NE and PE at α1A-ARs, leading to significant receptor desensitization and internalization, which is important in view of the therapeutic vasoconstrictor effects of this drug and the varied biologic process regulated by α1A-ARs.

  2. Glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation in neurons and astrocytes during network activity in hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Anton I; Malkov, Anton E; Waseem, Tatsiana; Mukhtarov, Marat; Buldakova, Svetlana; Gubkina, Olena; Zilberter, Misha; Zilberter, Yuri

    2014-03-01

    Network activation triggers a significant energy metabolism increase in both neurons and astrocytes. Questions of the primary neuronal energy substrate (e.g., glucose vs. lactate) as well as the relative contributions of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation and their cellular origin (neurons vs. astrocytes) are still a matter of debates. Using simultaneous measurements of electrophysiological and metabolic parameters during synaptic stimulation in hippocampal slices from mature mice, we show that neurons and astrocytes use both glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation to meet their energy demands. Supplementation or replacement of glucose in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) with pyruvate or lactate strongly modifies parameters related to network activity-triggered energy metabolism. These effects are not induced by changes in ATP content, pH(i), [Ca(2+)](i) or accumulation of reactive oxygen species. Our results suggest that during network activation, a significant fraction of NAD(P)H response (its overshoot phase) corresponds to glycolysis and the changes in cytosolic NAD(P)H and mitochondrial FAD are coupled. Our data do not support the hypothesis of a preferential utilization of astrocyte-released lactate by neurons during network activation in slices--instead, we show that during such activity glucose is an effective energy substrate for both neurons and astrocytes.

  3. PKC-dependent Phosphorylation of the H1 Histamine Receptor Modulates TRPC6 Activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xingjuan; Egly, Christian; Riley, Ashley M; Li, Wennan; Tewson, Paul; Hughes, Thomas E; Quinn, Anne Marie; Obukhov, Alexander G

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential canonical 6 (TRPC6) is a cation selective, DAG-regulated, Ca2+-permeable channel activated by the agonists of Gq-protein-coupled heptahelical receptors. Dysfunctions of TRPC6 are implicated in the pathogenesis of various cardiovascular and kidney conditions such as vasospasm and glomerulosclerosis. When stimulated by agonists of the histamine H1 receptor (H1R), TRPC6 activity decays to the baseline despite the continuous presence of the agonist. In this study, we examined whether H1R desensitization contributes to regulating the decay rate of TRPC6 activity upon receptor stimulation. We employed the HEK expression system and a biosensor allowing us to simultaneously detect the changes in intracellular diacylglycerol (DAG) and Ca2+ concentrations. We found that the histamine-induced DAG response was biphasic, in which a transient peak was followed by maintained elevated plateau, suggesting that desensitization of H1R takes place in the presence of histamine. The application of PKC inhibitor Gö6983 slowed the decay rate of intracellular DAG concentration. Activation of the mouse H1R mutant lacking a putative PKC phosphorylation site, Ser399, responsible for the receptor desensitization, resulted in a prolonged intracellular DAG increase and greater Mn2+ influx through the TRPC6 channel. Thus, our data support the hypothesis that PKC-dependent H1R phosphorylation leads to a reduced production of intracellular DAG that contributes to TRPC6 activity regulation.

  4. Glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation in neurons and astrocytes during network activity in hippocampal slices

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Anton I; Malkov, Anton E; Waseem, Tatsiana; Mukhtarov, Marat; Buldakova, Svetlana; Gubkina, Olena; Zilberter, Misha; Zilberter, Yuri

    2014-01-01

    Network activation triggers a significant energy metabolism increase in both neurons and astrocytes. Questions of the primary neuronal energy substrate (e.g., glucose vs. lactate) as well as the relative contributions of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation and their cellular origin (neurons vs. astrocytes) are still a matter of debates. Using simultaneous measurements of electrophysiological and metabolic parameters during synaptic stimulation in hippocampal slices from mature mice, we show that neurons and astrocytes use both glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation to meet their energy demands. Supplementation or replacement of glucose in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) with pyruvate or lactate strongly modifies parameters related to network activity-triggered energy metabolism. These effects are not induced by changes in ATP content, pHi, [Ca2+]i or accumulation of reactive oxygen species. Our results suggest that during network activation, a significant fraction of NAD(P)H response (its overshoot phase) corresponds to glycolysis and the changes in cytosolic NAD(P)H and mitochondrial FAD are coupled. Our data do not support the hypothesis of a preferential utilization of astrocyte-released lactate by neurons during network activation in slices—instead, we show that during such activity glucose is an effective energy substrate for both neurons and astrocytes. PMID:24326389

  5. Calcium Activation of the Ca-ATPase Enhances Conformational Heterogeneity Between Nucleotide Binding and Phosphorylation Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Baowei; Squier, Thomas C.; Bigelow, Diana J.

    2004-04-13

    High-resolution crystal structures obtained in two conformations of the Ca-ATPase suggest that a large-scale rigid-body domain reorientation of approximately 50 involving the nucleotide-binding (N) domain is required to permit the transfer of the -phosphoryl group of ATP to Asp351 in the phosphorylation (P) domain during coupled calcium transport. However, variability observed in the orientation of the N-domain relative to the P-domain in both different crystal structures of the Ca-ATPase following calcium activation, and structures of other P-type ATPases, suggests the presence of conformational heterogeneity in solution which may be modulated by contact interactions within the crystal. Therefore, to address the extent of conformational heterogeneity between these domains in solution, we have used fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to measure the spatial separation and conformational heterogeneity between donor (i.e., 5-[[2-[(iodoacetyl)amino]ethyl]amino] naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid) and acceptor (i.e., fluorescein 5-isothiocyanate) chromophores covalently bound to the P- and N-domains, respectively, within the Ca-ATPase stabilized in different enzymatic states associated with the transport cycle. In comparison to the unliganded enzyme, the spatial separation and conformational heterogeneity between these domains is unaffected by enzyme phosphorylation. However, calcium-activation results in a 3.4 increase in the average spatial separation, which increases from 29.4 to 32.8 , in good agreement with the high-resolution structures where these sites are respectively separated by 31.6 (1 IWO.pdb) and 35.9 (1EUL.pdb). Thus, the crystal structures accurately reflect the average solution structures of the Ca-ATPase. However, there is substantial conformational heterogeneity for all enzyme states measured, indicating that formation of catalytically important transition states involves a subpopulation of enzyme intermediates. These results suggest that the

  6. Dual function of partitioning-defective 3 in the regulation of YAP phosphorylation and activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Wang, Shuting; Wang, Sai; Qiao, Jing; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Zhe; Chen, Zhengjun

    2016-01-01

    Partitioning-defective 3 (Par3), a key component of the evolutionarily conserved polarity PAR complex (Par3/Par6/aPKC), controls cell polarity and contributes to cell migration, proliferation and tumor development. Emerging evidence indicates that cell polarity proteins function as upstream modulators that regulate the Hippo pathway. However, little is known about Par3’s involvement in the Hippo pathway. Here, we find Par3 and YAP dynamically co-localize in different subcellular compartments; that is, the membrane, cytoplasm and nucleus, in a cell-density-dependent manner. Interestingly, Par3 knockdown promotes YAP phosphorylation, leading to a significant impairment of YAP nuclear translocation at low cell density, but not at high density, in MDCK cells. Furthermore, via its third PDZ domain, Par3 directly binds to the PDZ-binding motif of YAP. The interaction is required for regulating YAP phosphorylation and nuclear localization. Mechanistically, Par3, as a scaffold protein, associates with LATS1 and protein phosphatase 1, α subunit (PP1A) in the cytoplasm and nucleus. Par3 promotes the dephosphorylation of LATS1 and YAP, thus enhancing YAP activation and cell proliferation. Strikingly, we also find that under the condition of PP1A knockdown, Par3 expression promotes YAP hyperphosphorylation, leading to the suppression of YAP activity and its downstream targets. Par3 expression results in differential effects on YAP phosphorylation and activation in different tumor cell lines. These findings indicate that Par3 may have a dual role in regulating the activation of the Hippo pathway, in a manner possibly dependent on cellular context or cell type in response to cell–cell contact and cell polarity signals. PMID:27462467

  7. Overexpression of α-synuclein simultaneously increases glutamate NMDA receptor phosphorylation and reduces glucocerebrosidase activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junfeng; Hertz, Ellen; Zhang, Xiaoqun; Leinartaité, Lina; Lundius, Ebba Gregorsson; Li, Jie; Svenningsson, Per

    2016-01-12

    Progressive accumulation of α-synuclein (α-syn)-containing protein aggregates throughout the nervous system is a pathological hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD). The mechanisms whereby α-syn exerts neurodegeneration remain to be fully understood. Here we show that overexpression of α-syn in transgenic mice leads to increased phosphorylation of glutamate NMDA receptor (NMDAR) subunits NR1 and NR2B in substantia nigra and striatum as well as reduced glucocerebrosidase (GCase) levels. Similarly, molecular studies performed in mouse N2A cells stably overexpressing human α-syn ((α-syn)N2A) showed that phosphorylation states of the same NMDAR subunits were increased, whereas GCase levels and lysosomal GCase activity were reduced. (α-syn)N2A cells showed an increased sensitivity to neurotoxicity towards 6-hydroxydopamine and NMDA. However, wildtype N2A, but not (α-syn)N2A cells, showed a further reduction in viability when co-incubated with 6-hydroxydopamine and the lysosomal inhibitors NH4Cl and leupeptin, suggesting that α-syn per se perturbs lysosomal functions. NMDA treatment reduced lysosomal GCase activity to the same extent in (α-syn)N2A cells as in wildtype N2A cells, indicating that the α-syn-dependent difference in NMDA neurotoxicity is unrelated to an altered GCase activity. Nevertheless, these data provide molecular evidence that overexpression of α-syn simultaneously induces two potential neurotoxic hits by increasing glutamate NMDA receptor phosphorylation, consistent with increased NMDA receptors functionality, and reducing GCase activity. PMID:26610904

  8. Variants of the yeast MAPK Mpk1 are fully functional independently of activation loop phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Goshen-Lago, Tal; Goldberg-Carp, Anat; Melamed, Dganit; Darlyuk-Saadon, Ilona; Bai, Chen; Ahn, Natalie G; Admon, Arie; Engelberg, David

    2016-09-01

    MAP kinases of the ERK family are conserved from yeast to humans. Their catalytic activity is dependent on dual phosphorylation of their activation loop's TEY motif, catalyzed by MAPK kinases (MEKs). Here we studied variants of Mpk1, a yeast orthologue of Erk, which is essential for cell wall integrity. Cells lacking MPK1, or the genes encoding the relevant MEKs, MKK1 and MKK2, do not proliferate under cell wall stress, imposed, for example, by caffeine. Mutants of Mpk1, Mpk1(Y268C) and Mpk1(Y268A), function independently of Mkk1 and Mkk2. We show that these variants are phosphorylated at their activation loop in mkk1∆mkk2∆ and mkk1∆mkk2∆pbs2∆ste7∆ cells, suggesting that they autophosphorylate. However, strikingly, when Y268C/A mutations were combined with the kinase-dead mutation, K54R, or mutations at the TEY motif, T190A+Y192F, the resulting proteins still allowed mkk1∆mkk2∆ cells to proliferate under caffeine stress. Mutating the equivalent residue, Tyr-280/Tyr-261, in Erk1/Erk2 significantly impaired Erk1/2's catalytic activity. This study describes the first case in which a MAPK, Erk/Mpk1, imposes a phenotype via a mechanism that is independent of TEY phosphorylation and an unusual case in which an equivalent mutation in a highly conserved domain of yeast and mammalian Erks causes an opposite effect. PMID:27413009

  9. 2-Methoxyestradiol induced Bax phosphorylation and apoptosis in human retinoblastoma cells via p38 MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Min, Hongbo; Ghatnekar, Gautam S; Ghatnekar, Angela V; You, Xiaohong; Bu, Min; Guo, Xinyi; Bu, Shizhong; Shen, Bo; Huang, Qin

    2012-07-01

    Retinoblastoma (Rb) is a common childhood intraocular cancer that affects approximately 300 children each year in the United States alone. 2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME), an endogenous metabolite of 17-β-estradiol that dose not bind to nuclear estrogen receptor, exhibits potent apoptotic activity against rapidly growing tumor cells. Here, we report that 2ME induction of apoptosis was demonstrated by early fragmented DNA after 48 h of incubation with 10 µM 2ME in Rb cell lines. Subsequently, a decrease of proliferation was observed in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Further analysis of the mechanism indicates that p38 kinase plays a critical role in 2ME-induced apoptosis in Y79 cells, even though ERK was also activated by 2ME under the same conditions. Activation of p38 kinase also mediates 2ME induced Bax phosphorylated at Thr(167) after a 6 h treatment of 2ME, which in turn prevents formation of the Bcl-2-Bax heterodimer. Both p38 specific inhibitor, SB 203580, or p38 knockdown by specific siRNA, blocked 2ME induction of Bax phosphorylation. Furthermore, only transiently transfected mutant BaxT167A, but not Bax S163A, inhibited 2ME-induced apoptosis. In summary, our data suggest that 2ME induces apoptosis in human Rb cells by causing phosphorylation of p38 Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), which appears to be correlated with phosphorlation of Bax. This understanding of 2ME's ability may help develop it as a promising therapeutic candidate by inducing apoptosis in a Rb. PMID:21769948

  10. The M3 Phosphorylation Site Is Required for Trafficking and Biological Roles of PIN-FORMED1, 2, and 7 in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Ki, Daeeun; Sasayama, Daisuke; Cho, Hyung-Taeg

    2016-01-01

    Asymmetrically localized PIN-FORMED (PIN) auxin efflux carriers play key roles in regulating directional intercellular auxin movement, generating local auxin gradients, and diverse auxin-mediated growth and development. The polar localization of PINs is controlled by phosphorylation in the central hydrophilic loop (HL) of PINs. Although the M3 phosphorylation site, including phosphorylatable 5 Ser/Thr residues, is conserved among long HL-PINs, its native role has only been characterized in PIN3. In this study, we examined the role of M3 phosphorylation site of PIN1, PIN2, and PIN7 in intracellular trafficking, phosphorylation, and biological functions of those PINs in their native expressing tissues. Phosphorylation-defective mutations of the phosphorylatable residues in the M3 site of PIN1-HL led to alteration in subcellular polarity of PIN1 and caused defects in PIN1-mediated biological functions such as cotyledon development, phyllotaxy of vegetative leaves, and development of reproductive organs. The M3 mutations of PIN7 interfered with its polar recycling in the root columella cell in response to gravity stimulus and partially disrupted root gravitropism. On the other hand, the M3 site of PIN2 was shown to be necessary for its targeting to the plasma membrane. In vitro phosphorylation assay showed that the M3 phosphorylation residues of PIN1 are the partial targets by PINOID kinase. Our data suggest that the M3 phosphorylation site is functionally conserved among long HL-PINs by playing roles for their subcellular trafficking and auxin-mediated developmental processes. PMID:27733863

  11. Phosphorylation of the adipose/muscle-type glucose transporter (GLUT4) and its relationship to glucose transport activity.

    PubMed Central

    Schürmann, A; Mieskes, G; Joost, H G

    1992-01-01

    The effects of protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation on glucose transport activity reconstituted from adipocyte membrane fractions and its relationship to the phosphorylation state of the adipose/muscle-type glucose transporter (GLUT4) were studied. In vitro phosphorylation of membranes in the presence of ATP and protein kinase A produced a stimulation of the reconstituted glucose transport activity in plasma membranes and low-density microsomes (51% and 65% stimulation respectively), provided that the cells had been treated with insulin prior to isolation of the membranes. Conversely, treatment of membrane fractions with alkaline phosphatase produced an inhibition of reconstituted transport activity. However, in vitro phosphorylation catalysed by protein kinase C failed to alter reconstituted glucose transport activity in membrane fractions from both basal and insulin-treated cells. In experiments run under identical conditions, the phosphorylation state of GLUT4 was investigated by immunoprecipitation of glucose transporters from membrane fractions incubated with [32P]ATP and protein kinases A and C. Protein kinase C stimulated a marked phosphate incorporation into GLUT4 in both plasma membranes and low-density microsomes. Protein kinase A, in contrast to its effect on reconstituted glucose transport activity, produced a much smaller phosphorylation of the GLUT4 in plasma membranes than in low-density microsomes. The present data suggest that glucose transport activity can be modified by protein phosphorylation via an insulin-dependent mechanism. However, the phosphorylation of the GLUT4 itself was not correlated with changes in its reconstituted transport activity. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:1637303

  12. Featured Article: Differential regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation by protease-activated receptors in adult human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Tillery, Lakeisha C; Epperson, Tenille A; Eguchi, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors have been shown to regulate endothelial nitric oxide synthase through the phosphorylation of specific sites on the enzyme. It has been established that PAR-2 activation phosphorylates eNOS-Ser-1177 and leads to the production of the potent vasodilator nitric oxide, while PAR-1 activation phosphorylates eNOS-Thr-495 and decreases nitric oxide production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In this study, we hypothesize a differential coupling of protease-activated receptors to the signaling pathways that regulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide production in primary adult human coronary artery endothelial cells. Using Western Blot analysis, we showed that thrombin and the PAR-1 activating peptide, TFLLR, lead to the phosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-1177 in human coronary artery endothelial cells, which was blocked by SCH-79797 (SCH), a PAR-1 inhibitor. Using the nitrate/nitrite assay, we also demonstrated that the thrombin- and TFLLR-induced production of nitric oxide was inhibited by SCH and L-NAME, a NOS inhibitor. In addition, we observed that TFLLR, unlike thrombin, significantly phosphorylated eNOS-Thr-495, which may explain the observed delay in nitric oxide production in comparison to that of thrombin. Activation of PAR-2 by SLIGRL, a PAR-2 specific ligand, leads to dual phosphorylation of both catalytic sites but primarily regulated eNOS-Thr-495 phosphorylation with no change in nitric oxide production in human coronary artery endothelial cells. PAR-3, known as the non-signaling receptor, was activated by TFRGAP, a PAR-3 mimicking peptide, and significantly induced the phosphorylation of eNOS-Thr-495 with minimal phosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-1177 with no change in nitric oxide production. In addition, we confirmed that PAR-mediated eNOS-Ser-1177 phosphorylation was Ca2+-dependent using the Ca2+ chelator, BAPTA, while eNOS-Thr-495 phosphorylation was mediated via Rho kinase using the ROCK inhibitor, Y-27632

  13. Featured Article: Differential regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation by protease-activated receptors in adult human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tillery, Lakeisha C; Epperson, Tenille A; Eguchi, Satoru; Motley, Evangeline D

    2016-03-01

    Protease-activated receptors have been shown to regulate endothelial nitric oxide synthase through the phosphorylation of specific sites on the enzyme. It has been established that PAR-2 activation phosphorylates eNOS-Ser-1177 and leads to the production of the potent vasodilator nitric oxide, while PAR-1 activation phosphorylates eNOS-Thr-495 and decreases nitric oxide production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In this study, we hypothesize a differential coupling of protease-activated receptors to the signaling pathways that regulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide production in primary adult human coronary artery endothelial cells. Using Western Blot analysis, we showed that thrombin and the PAR-1 activating peptide, TFLLR, lead to the phosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-1177 in human coronary artery endothelial cells, which was blocked by SCH-79797 (SCH), a PAR-1 inhibitor. Using the nitrate/nitrite assay, we also demonstrated that the thrombin- and TFLLR-induced production of nitric oxide was inhibited by SCH and L-NAME, a NOS inhibitor. In addition, we observed that TFLLR, unlike thrombin, significantly phosphorylated eNOS-Thr-495, which may explain the observed delay in nitric oxide production in comparison to that of thrombin. Activation of PAR-2 by SLIGRL, a PAR-2 specific ligand, leads to dual phosphorylation of both catalytic sites but primarily regulated eNOS-Thr-495 phosphorylation with no change in nitric oxide production in human coronary artery endothelial cells. PAR-3, known as the non-signaling receptor, was activated by TFRGAP, a PAR-3 mimicking peptide, and significantly induced the phosphorylation of eNOS-Thr-495 with minimal phosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-1177 with no change in nitric oxide production. In addition, we confirmed that PAR-mediated eNOS-Ser-1177 phosphorylation was Ca(2+)-dependent using the Ca(2+) chelator, BAPTA, while eNOS-Thr-495 phosphorylation was mediated via Rho kinase using the ROCK inhibitor, Y-27632

  14. A phosphorylation switch controls the spatiotemporal activation of Rho GTPases in directional cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xuan; Kaneko, Tomonori; Li, Jenny S.; Liu, An-Dong; Voss, Courtney; Li, Shawn S. C.

    2015-01-01

    Although cell migration plays a central role in development and disease, the underlying molecular mechanism is not fully understood. Here we report that a phosphorylation-mediated molecular switch comprising deleted in liver cancer 1 (DLC1), tensin-3 (TNS3), phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) and phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) controls the spatiotemporal activation of the small GTPases, Rac1 and RhoA, thereby initiating directional cell migration induced by growth factors. On epidermal growth factor (EGF) or platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) stimulation, TNS3 and PTEN are phosphorylated at specific Thr residues, which trigger the rearrangement of the TNS3–DLC1 and PTEN–PI3K complexes into the TNS3–PI3K and PTEN–DLC1 complexes. Subsequently, the TNS3–PI3K complex translocates to the leading edge of a migrating cell to promote Rac1 activation, whereas PTEN–DLC1 translocates to the posterior for localized RhoA activation. Our work identifies a core signalling mechanism by which an external motility stimulus is coupled to the spatiotemporal activation of Rac1 and RhoA to drive directional cell migration. PMID:26166433

  15. IRBIT regulates CaMKIIα activity and contributes to catecholamine homeostasis through tyrosine hydroxylase phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Kawaai, Katsuhiro; Mizutani, Akihiro; Shoji, Hirotaka; Ogawa, Naoko; Ebisui, Etsuko; Kuroda, Yukiko; Wakana, Shigeharu; Hisatsune, Chihiro; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) binding protein released with IP3 (IRBIT) contributes to various physiological events (electrolyte transport and fluid secretion, mRNA polyadenylation, and the maintenance of genomic integrity) through its interaction with multiple targets. However, little is known about the physiological role of IRBIT in the brain. Here we identified calcium calmodulin-dependent kinase II alpha (CaMKIIα) as an IRBIT-interacting molecule in the central nervous system. IRBIT binds to and suppresses CaMKIIα kinase activity by inhibiting the binding of calmodulin to CaMKIIα. In addition, we show that mice lacking IRBIT present with elevated catecholamine levels, increased locomotor activity, and social abnormalities. The level of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) phosphorylation by CaMKIIα, which affects TH activity, was significantly increased in the ventral tegmental area of IRBIT-deficient mice. We concluded that IRBIT suppresses CaMKIIα activity and contributes to catecholamine homeostasis through TH phosphorylation. PMID:25922519

  16. Augmented AMPK activity inhibits cell migration by phosphorylating the novel substrate Pdlim5

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yi; Tsukamoto, Osamu; Nakano, Atsushi; Kato, Hisakazu; Kioka, Hidetaka; Ito, Noriaki; Higo, Shuichiro; Yamazaki, Satoru; Shintani, Yasunori; Matsuoka, Ken; Liao, Yulin; Asanuma, Hiroshi; Asakura, Masanori; Takafuji, Kazuaki; Minamino, Tetsuo; Asano, Yoshihiro; Kitakaze, Masafumi; Takashima, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    Augmented AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity inhibits cell migration, possibly contributing to the clinical benefits of chemical AMPK activators in preventing atherosclerosis, vascular remodelling and cancer metastasis. However, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we identify PDZ and LIM domain 5 (Pdlim5) as a novel AMPK substrate and show that it plays a critical role in the inhibition of cell migration. AMPK directly phosphorylates Pdlim5 at Ser177. Exogenous expression of phosphomimetic S177D-Pdlim5 inhibits cell migration and attenuates lamellipodia formation. Consistent with this observation, S177D-Pdlim5 suppresses Rac1 activity at the cell periphery and displaces the Arp2/3 complex from the leading edge. Notably, S177D-Pdlim5, but not WT-Pdlim5, attenuates the association with Rac1-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors at the cell periphery. Taken together, our findings indicate that phosphorylation of Pdlim5 on Ser177 by AMPK mediates inhibition of cell migration by suppressing the Rac1-Arp2/3 signalling pathway. PMID:25635515

  17. The neurotrophin-3 receptor TrkC directly phosphorylates and activates the nucleotide exchange factor Dbs to enhance Schwann cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Junji; Chan, Jonah R.; Miyamoto, Yuki; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Shooter, Eric M.

    2005-01-01

    During the development of the peripheral nervous system, Schwann cells, the myelin-forming glia, migrate along axons before initiating myelination. We previously demonstrated that endogenous neurotrophin-3 (NT3) acting through the TrkC tyrosine kinase receptor enhances migration of premyelinating Schwann cells. This signaling pathway is mediated by the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) cascade regulated by the Rho GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42. However, missing is the link between TrkC and the GTPases. Here, we show that a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), Dbl's big sister (Dbs), couples with TrkC to activate Cdc42 in Schwann cells. Furthermore, TrkC directly phosphorylates Dbs, thereby inducing the Cdc42-GEF activity. Taken together, activation of TrkC triggers Schwann cell migration by regulating Dbs upon direct tyrosine phosphorylation, providing a mechanism whereby a membrane receptor tyrosine kinase can induce the activation of Rho GTPase-GEFs. PMID:15758069

  18. Regulation of Smoothened Phosphorylation and High-Level Hedgehog Signaling Activity by a Plasma Membrane Associated Kinase.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuangxi; Li, Shuang; Han, Yuhong; Tong, Chao; Wang, Bing; Chen, Yongbin; Jiang, Jin

    2016-06-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling controls embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis through the G protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-family protein Smoothened (Smo). Upon stimulation, Smo accumulates on the cell surface in Drosophila or primary cilia in vertebrates, which is thought to be essential for its activation and function, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we show that Hh stimulates the binding of Smo to a plasma membrane-associated kinase Gilgamesh (Gish)/CK1γ and that Gish fine-tunes Hh pathway activity by phosphorylating a Ser/Thr cluster (CL-II) in the juxtamembrane region of Smo carboxyl-terminal intracellular tail (C-tail). We find that CL-II phosphorylation is promoted by protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of Smo C-tail and depends on cell surface localization of both Gish and Smo. Consistent with CL-II being critical for high-threshold Hh target gene expression, its phosphorylation appears to require higher levels of Hh or longer exposure to the same level of Hh than PKA-site phosphorylation on Smo. Furthermore, we find that vertebrate CK1γ is localized at the primary cilium to promote Smo phosphorylation and Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway activation. Our study reveals a conserved mechanism whereby Hh induces a change in Smo subcellular localization to promote its association with and activation by a plasma membrane localized kinase, and provides new insight into how Hh morphogen progressively activates Smo. PMID:27280464

  19. Regulation of Smoothened Phosphorylation and High-Level Hedgehog Signaling Activity by a Plasma Membrane Associated Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Chao; Wang, Bing; Chen, Yongbin; Jiang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling controls embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis through the G protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-family protein Smoothened (Smo). Upon stimulation, Smo accumulates on the cell surface in Drosophila or primary cilia in vertebrates, which is thought to be essential for its activation and function, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we show that Hh stimulates the binding of Smo to a plasma membrane-associated kinase Gilgamesh (Gish)/CK1γ and that Gish fine-tunes Hh pathway activity by phosphorylating a Ser/Thr cluster (CL-II) in the juxtamembrane region of Smo carboxyl-terminal intracellular tail (C-tail). We find that CL-II phosphorylation is promoted by protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of Smo C-tail and depends on cell surface localization of both Gish and Smo. Consistent with CL-II being critical for high-threshold Hh target gene expression, its phosphorylation appears to require higher levels of Hh or longer exposure to the same level of Hh than PKA-site phosphorylation on Smo. Furthermore, we find that vertebrate CK1γ is localized at the primary cilium to promote Smo phosphorylation and Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway activation. Our study reveals a conserved mechanism whereby Hh induces a change in Smo subcellular localization to promote its association with and activation by a plasma membrane localized kinase, and provides new insight into how Hh morphogen progressively activates Smo. PMID:27280464

  20. Phosphorylation and activation of the plasma membrane Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE1) during osmotic cell shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Rigor, Robert R; Damoc, Catalina; Phinney, Brett S; Cala, Peter M

    2011-01-01

    The Na(+)/H(+)Exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1) is a highly versatile, broadly distributed and precisely controlled transport protein that mediates volume and pH regulation in most cell types. NHE1 phosphorylation contributes to Na(+)/H(+) exchange activity in response to phorbol esters, growth factors or protein phosphatase inhibitors, but has not been observed during activation by osmotic cell shrinkage (OCS). We examined the role of NHE1 phosphorylation during activation by OCS, using an ideal model system, the Amphiuma tridactylum red blood cell (atRBC). Na(+)/H(+) exchange in atRBCs is mediated by an NHE1 homolog (atNHE1) that is 79% identical to human NHE1 at the amino acid level. NHE1 activity in atRBCs is exceptionally robust in that transport activity can increase more than 2 orders of magnitude from rest to full activation. Michaelis-Menten transport kinetics indicates that either OCS or treatment with the phosphatase inhibitor calyculin-A (CLA) increase Na(+) transport capacity without affecting transport affinity (K(m)=44 mM) in atRBCs. CLA and OCS act non-additively to activate atNHE1, indicating convergent, phosphorylation-dependent signaling in atNHE1 activation. In situ(32)P labeling and immunoprecipitation demonstrates that the net phosphorylation of atNHE1 is increased 4-fold during OCS coinciding with a more than 2-order increase in Na(+) transport activity. This is the first reported evidence of increased NHE1 phosphorylation during OCS in any vertebrate cell type. Finally, liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis of atNHE1 immunoprecipitated from atRBC membranes reveals 9 phosphorylated serine/threonine residues, suggesting that activation of atNHE1 involves multiple phosphorylation and/or dephosphorylation events. PMID:22216214

  1. Direct Phosphorylation and Activation of a Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase by a Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase in Rice[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Kabin; Chen, Jianping; Wang, Qin; Yang, Yinong

    2014-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is a pivotal point of convergence for many signaling pathways in eukaryotes. In the classical MAPK cascade, a signal is transmitted via sequential phosphorylation and activation of MAPK kinase kinase, MAPK kinase (MKK), and MAPK. The activation of MAPK is dependent on dual phosphorylation of a TXY motif by an MKK, which is considered the sole kinase to phosphorylate and activate MAPK. Here, we report a novel regulatory mechanism of MAPK phosphorylation and activation besides the canonical MAPK cascade. A rice (Oryza sativa) calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK), CPK18, was identified as an upstream kinase of MAPK (MPK5) in vitro and in vivo. Curiously, CPK18 was shown to phosphorylate and activate MPK5 without affecting the phosphorylation of its TXY motif. Instead, CPK18 was found to predominantly phosphorylate two Thr residues (Thr-14 and Thr-32) that are widely conserved in MAPKs from land plants. Further analyses reveal that the newly identified CPK18-MPK5 pathway represses defense gene expression and negatively regulates rice blast resistance. Our results suggest that land plants have evolved an MKK-independent phosphorylation pathway that directly connects calcium signaling to the MAPK machinery. PMID:25035404

  2. CK1δ activity is modulated by CDK2/E- and CDK5/p35-mediated phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ianes, Chiara; Xu, Pengfei; Werz, Natalie; Meng, Zhigang; Henne-Bruns, Doris; Bischof, Joachim; Knippschild, Uwe

    2016-02-01

    CK1 protein kinases form a family of serine/threonine kinases which are highly conserved through different species and ubiquitously expressed. CK1 family members can phosphorylate numerous substrates thereby regulating different biological processes including membrane trafficking, cell cycle regulation, circadian rhythm, apoptosis, and signal transduction. Deregulation of CK1 activity and/or expression contributes to the development of neurological diseases and cancer. Therefore, CK1 became an interesting target for drug development and it is relevant to further understand the mechanisms of its regulation. In the present study, Cyclin-dependent kinase 2/Cyclin E (CDK2/E) and Cyclin-dependent kinase 5/p35 (CDK5/p35) were identified as cellular kinases able to modulate CK1δ activity through site-specific phosphorylation of its C-terminal domain. Furthermore, pre-incubation of CK1δ with CDK2/E or CDK5/p35 reduces CK1δ activity in vitro, indicating a functional impact of the interaction between CK1δ and CDK/cyclin complexes. Interestingly, inhibition of Cyclin-dependent kinases by Dinaciclib increases CK1δ activity in pancreatic cancer cells. In summary, these results suggest that CK1δ activity can be modulated by the interplay between CK1δ and CDK2/E or CDK5/p35. These findings extend our knowledge about CK1δ regulation and may be of use for future development of CK1-related therapeutic strategies in the treatment of neurological diseases or cancer. PMID:26464264

  3. Phosphorylation of synaptosomal cytoplasmic proteins: Inhibition of calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase c) by bay k 8644.

    PubMed

    Robinson, P J; Lovenberg, W

    1988-01-01

    The phosphorylation of specific substrates of calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase C) was examined in striatal synaptosomal cytoplasm. The phosphoprotein substrata were termed group C phosphoprotems and were divided into two subgroups: group C(1) phosphoproteins (P83, P45A, P21 and P18) were found in both cytoplasm and synaptosomal membranes and, although stimulated by phosphatidylserine, only required exogamous calcium for their labeling; group C(2) phosphoproteins (P120, P96, P21.5, P18.5 and P16) were found predominantly in the cytoplasm and were absolutely dependent upon exogenous calcium and phosphatidylserme for their labeling. Several criteria were used to identify these proteins as specific protein kinase C substrates: (a) their phosphorylation was stimulated to a greater extent by Ca(2+) /phosphatidylserine/diolein than by Ca(2+) alone or Cal(2+) /calmodulin (group C(1)) or was completely dependent upon Ca(2+) /phosphatdylserine/diolein (group C(2)); (b) supermaximal concentrations of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor were without effect; (c) their phosphorylation was stimulated by oleic acid, which selectively activates protein kinase C in the absence of Ca(2+); (d) NaCl, which inhibited cAMP- and Ca(2+)/calmodulindependent phosphorylation, slightly increased phosphorylation of group C(1) and slightly decreased phosphorylation of group C(2) phosphoproteins. Maximal phosphorylation of P96 and other group C phosphoproteins occurred within 60 s and was followed by a slow decay rate while substrata of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase were maximally labeled within 20-30 s and rapidly dephosphorylated. The phosphorylation of all group C phosphoproteins was inhibited by the calcium channel agomst BAY K 8644, however, group C(2) phosphoproteins were considerably more sensitive. The IC(50) for inhibition of P96 labeling was 19 ?M. but for P83 was 190 ?M. Group B phosphoproteins were also slightly inhibited, and the

  4. Modulation of Receptor Phosphorylation Contributes to Activation of Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor α by Dehydroepiandrosterone and Other Peroxisome Proliferators

    PubMed Central

    Tamasi, Viola; Miller, Kristy K. Michael; Ripp, Sharon L.; Vila, Ermin; Geoghagen, Thomas E.; Prough, Russell A.

    2008-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), a C19 human adrenal steroid, activates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) in vivo but does not ligand-activate PPARα in transient transfection experiments. We demonstrate that DHEA regulates PPARα action by altering both the levels and phosphorylation status of the receptor. Human hepatoma cells (HepG2) were transiently transfected with the expression plasmid encoding PPARα and a plasmid containing two copies of fatty acyl coenzyme oxidase (FACO) peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor responsive element consensus oligonucleotide in a luciferase reporter gene. Nafenopin treatment increased reporter gene activity in this system, whereas DHEA treatment did not. Okadaic acid significantly decreased nafenopin-induced reporter activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Okadaic acid treatment of primary rat hepatocytes decreased both DHEA- and nafenopin-induced FACO activity in primary rat hepatocytes. DHEA induced both PPARα mRNA and protein levels, as well as PP2A message in primary rat hepatocytes. Western blot analysis showed that the serines at positions 12 and 21 were rapidly dephosphorylated upon treatment with DHEA and nafenopin. Results using specific protein phosphatase inhibitors suggested that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is responsible for DHEA action, and protein phosphatase 1 might be involved in nafenopin induction. Mutation of serines at position 6, 12, and 21 to an uncharged alanine residue significantly increased transcriptional activity, whereas mutation to negative charged aspartate residues (mimicking receptor phosphorylation) decreased transcriptional activity. DHEA action involves induction of PPARα mRNA and protein levels as well as increased PPARα transcriptional activity through decreasing receptor phosphorylation at serines in the AF1 region. PMID:18079279

  5. Analysis of protein phosphorylation in nerve terminal reveals extensive changes in active zone proteins upon exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Kohansal-Nodehi, Mahdokht; Chua, John JE; Urlaub, Henning; Jahn, Reinhard; Czernik, Dominika

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release is mediated by the fast, calcium-triggered fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic plasma membrane, followed by endocytosis and recycling of the membrane of synaptic vesicles. While many of the proteins governing these processes are known, their regulation is only beginning to be understood. Here we have applied quantitative phosphoproteomics to identify changes in phosphorylation status of presynaptic proteins in resting and stimulated nerve terminals isolated from the brains of Wistar rats. Using rigorous quantification, we identified 252 phosphosites that are either up- or downregulated upon triggering calcium-dependent exocytosis. Particularly pronounced were regulated changes of phosphosites within protein constituents of the presynaptic active zone, including bassoon, piccolo, and RIM1. Additionally, we have mapped kinases and phosphatases that are activated upon stimulation. Overall, our study provides a snapshot of phosphorylation changes associated with presynaptic activity and provides a foundation for further functional analysis of key phosphosites involved in presynaptic plasticity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14530.001 PMID:27115346

  6. Estrogen stimulates protein tyrosine phosphorylation and Src kinase activity in avian osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Brubaker, K D; Gay, C V

    1999-12-01

    The estrogen, 17beta-estradiol, stimulated a profound increase in phosphotyrosine immunostaining of proteins that localized along the site of attachment in avian osteoclasts within 1 min of treatment. By 10 min, this rapidly occurring event had returned to basal levels. Pretreatment with 1 microM herbimycin A, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, prevented the response. Immunoblotting revealed that Src kinase was one of the phosphorylated intermediates. Src kinase also appeared to translocate to the periphery of the cells during the 1 min 17beta-estradiol treatment and became dispersed by 10 min. Src kinase activity measurements indicated an increase in phosphotransferase activity after the 1 min estradiol treatment; this effect diminished with longer exposures to estrogen. Pretreatment of osteoclasts with 1 microg/ml cytochalasin B, an inhibitor of actin polymerization, delayed the appearance of increased phosphotyrosine immunostaining at attachment sites, possibly through inhibition of Src kinase translocation. These findings demonstrate that estrogen stimulates rapid tyrosine phosphorylation in osteoclasts, a process that involves activation and translocation of Src kinase to the plasma membrane.

  7. Glucose derepression of gluconeogenic enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae correlates with phosphorylation of the gene activator Cat8p.

    PubMed Central

    Randez-Gil, F; Bojunga, N; Proft, M; Entian, K D

    1997-01-01

    The Cat8p zinc cluster protein is essential for growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with nonfermentable carbon sources. Expression of the CAT8 gene is subject to glucose repression mainly caused by Mig1p. Unexpectedly, the deletion of the Mig1p-binding motif within the CAT8 promoter did not increase CAT8 transcription; moreover, it resulted in a loss of CAT8 promoter activation. Insertion experiments with a promoter test plasmid confirmed that this regulatory 20-bp element influences glucose repression and derepression as well. This finding suggests an upstream activating function of this promoter region, which is Mig1p independent, as delta mig1 mutants are still able to derepress the CAT8 promoter. No other putative binding sites such as a Hap2/3/4/5p site and an Abf1p consensus site were functional with respect to glucose-regulated CAT8 expression. Fusions of Cat8p with the Gal4p DNA-binding domain mediated transcriptional activation. This activation capacity was still carbon source regulated and depended on the Cat1p (Snf1p) protein kinase, which indicated that Cat8p needs posttranslational modification to reveal its gene-activating function. Indeed, Western blot analysis on sodium dodecyl sulfate-gels revealed a single band (Cat8pI) with crude extracts from glucose-grown cells, whereas three bands (Cat8pI, -II, and -III) were identified in derepressed cells. Derepression-specific Cat8pII and -III resulted from differential phosphorylation, as shown by phosphatase treatment. Only the most extensively phosphorylated modification (Cat8pIII) depended on the Cat1p (Snf1p) kinase, indicating that another protein kinase is responsible for modification form Cat8pII. The occurrence of Cat8pIII was strongly correlated with the derepression of gluconeogenic enzymes (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase) and gluconeogenic PCK1 mRNA. Furthermore, glucose triggered the dephosphorylation of Cat8pIII, but this did not depend on the Glc7p (Cid1p

  8. Phosphorylation within the transactivation domain of adenovirus E1A protein by mitogen-activated protein kinase regulates expression of early region 4.

    PubMed Central

    Whalen, S G; Marcellus, R C; Whalen, A; Ahn, N G; Ricciardi, R P; Branton, P E

    1997-01-01

    A critical role of the 289-residue (289R) E1A protein of human adenovirus type 5 during productive infection is to transactivate expression of all early viral transcription. Sequences within and proximal to conserved region 3 (CR3) promote expression of these viral genes through interactions with a variety of transcription factors requiring the zinc binding motif in CR3 and in some cases a region at the carboxy-terminal end of CR3, including residues 183 to 188. It is known that 3',5' cyclic AMP (cAMP) reduces the level of phosphorylation of the 289R E1A protein through the activation of protein phosphatase 2A by the E4orf4 protein. This study was designed to identify the E1A phosphorylation sites affected by E4orf4 expression and to determine their importance in regulation of E1A activity. We report here that two previously unidentified sites at Ser-185 and Ser-188 are the targets for decreased phosphorylation in response to cAMP. At least one of these sites, presumably Ser-185, is phosphorylated in vitro by purified mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and both are hyperphosphorylated in cells which express a constitutively active form of MAPK kinase. Analysis of E1A-mediated transactivation activity indicated that elevated phosphorylation at these sites increased expression of the E4 promoter but not that of E3. We have recently shown that one or more E4 products induce cell death due to p53-independent apoptosis, and thus it seems likely that one role of the E4orf4 protein is to limit production of toxic E4 products by limiting expression of the E4 promoter. PMID:9094626

  9. Conserved phosphorylation sites in the activation loop of the Arabidopsis phytosulfokine receptor PSKR1 differentially affect kinase and receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Jens; Linke, Dennis; Bönniger, Christine; Tholey, Andreas; Sauter, Margret

    2015-12-15

    PSK (phytosulfokine) is a plant peptide hormone perceived by a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase. Phosphosite mapping of epitope-tagged PSKR1 (phytosulfokine receptor 1) from Arabidopsis thaliana plants identified Ser(696) and Ser(698) in the JM (juxtamembrane) region and probably Ser(886) and/or Ser(893) in the AL (activation loop) as in planta phosphorylation sites. In vitro-expressed kinase was autophosphorylated at Ser(717) in the JM, and at Ser(733), Thr(752), Ser(783), Ser(864), Ser(911), Ser(958) and Thr(998) in the kinase domain. The LC-ESI-MS/MS spectra provided support that up to three sites (Thr(890), Ser(893) and Thr(894)) in the AL were likely to be phosphorylated in vitro. These sites are evolutionarily highly conserved in PSK receptors, indicative of a conserved function. Site-directed mutagenesis of the four conserved residues in the activation segment, Thr(890), Ser(893), Thr(894) and Thr(899), differentially altered kinase activity in vitro and growth-promoting activity in planta. The T899A and the quadruple-mutated TSTT-A (T890A/S893A/T894A/T899A) mutants were both kinase-inactive, but PSKR1(T899A) retained growth-promoting activity. The T890A and S893A/T894A substitutions diminished kinase activity and growth promotion. We hypothesize that phosphorylation within the AL activates kinase activity and receptor function in a gradual and distinctive manner that may be a means to modulate the PSK response.

  10. Conserved phosphorylation sites in the activation loop of the Arabidopsis phytosulfokine receptor PSKR1 differentially affect kinase and receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Jens; Linke, Dennis; Bönniger, Christine; Tholey, Andreas; Sauter, Margret

    2015-01-01

    PSK (phytosulfokine) is a plant peptide hormone perceived by a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase. Phosphosite mapping of epitope-tagged PSKR1 (phytosulfokine receptor 1) from Arabidopsis thaliana plants identified Ser696 and Ser698 in the JM (juxtamembrane) region and probably Ser886 and/or Ser893 in the AL (activation loop) as in planta phosphorylation sites. In vitro-expressed kinase was autophosphorylated at Ser717 in the JM, and at Ser733, Thr752, Ser783, Ser864, Ser911, Ser958 and Thr998 in the kinase domain. The LC–ESI–MS/MS spectra provided support that up to three sites (Thr890, Ser893 and Thr894) in the AL were likely to be phosphorylated in vitro. These sites are evolutionarily highly conserved in PSK receptors, indicative of a conserved function. Site-directed mutagenesis of the four conserved residues in the activation segment, Thr890, Ser893, Thr894 and Thr899, differentially altered kinase activity in vitro and growth-promoting activity in planta. The T899A and the quadruple-mutated TSTT-A (T890A/S893A/T894A/T899A) mutants were both kinase-inactive, but PSKR1(T899A) retained growth-promoting activity. The T890A and S893A/T894A substitutions diminished kinase activity and growth promotion. We hypothesize that phosphorylation within the AL activates kinase activity and receptor function in a gradual and distinctive manner that may be a means to modulate the PSK response. PMID:26472115

  11. mTORC1 directly phosphorylates and activates ERα upon estrogen stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Alayev, A; Salamon, R S; Berger, S M; Schwartz, N S; Cuesta, R; Snyder, R B; Holz, M K

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths among women. Approximately 75% of breast cancers are estrogen receptor α (ERα) positive, underscoring the dependence of cancer cells on estrogen for growth and survival. Patients treated with endocrine therapy often develop resistance, either de novo or acquired, which in some cases is caused by aberrations within the growth factor signaling pathways. The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) has emerged as a critical node in estrogenic signaling. We have previously shown that mTORC1 can phosphorylate and activate ERα on S167 via its effector the 40S ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (S6K1). Presently, we have uncovered a direct link between mTORC1 and ERα. We found that ERα binds to regulatory-associated protein of mTOR (Raptor) and causes it to translocate to the nucleus upon estrogen stimulation. Additionally, we identified mTOR as the kinase that phosphorylates ERα on S104/106 and activates transcription of ER target genes. Our findings show a direct link between mTORC1 and ERα, which further implicates mTORC1 signaling in the pathogenesis of ER-positive breast cancer and provides rationale for FDA-approved use of mTORC1 inhibitors in combination with endocrine agents for treatment of this disease. PMID:26522726

  12. Rac1/p21-activated kinase pathway controls retinoblastoma protein phosphorylation and E2F transcription factor activation in B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Zaldua, Natalia; Llavero, Francisco; Artaso, Alain; Gálvez, Patricia; Lacerda, Hadriano M; Parada, Luis A; Zugaza, José L

    2016-02-01

    Small GTPases of the Ras superfamily are capable of activating E2F-dependent transcription leading to cell proliferation, but the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, using immortalized chicken DT40 B cell lines to investigate the role of the Vav/Rac signalling cascade on B cell proliferation, it is shown that the proliferative response triggered by B cell receptor activation is dramatically reduced in the absence of Vav3 expression. Analysis of this proliferative defect shows that in the absence of Vav3 expression, retinoblastoma protein (RB) phosphorylation and the subsequent E2F activation do not take place. By combining pharmacological and genetic approaches, phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and phospholipase Cγ2 (PLCγ2) were identified as the key regulatory signalling molecules upstream of the Vav3/Rac pathway leading to RB phosphorylation and E2F transcription factor activation. Additionally, vav3(-/-) and plcγ2(-/-) DT40 B cells were not able to activate the RB-E2F complex wild-type phenotype when these genetically modified cells were transfected with constitutively active forms of RhoA or Cdc42. However, when these knockout cells were transfected with different constitutively active versions of PLCγ, Vav or Rac1, not only activation of the RB-E2F complex wild-type phenotype was recovered but also the cellular proliferation. Furthermore, by evaluating the effect of two known effector mutants of Rac1 (Rac1(Q61L/F37A) and Rac1(Q61L/Y40C) ), the RB-E2F complex activation dependency on p21-activated kinase (PAK) and protein kinase Cε (PKCε) activities was established, being independent of both actin cytoskeleton reorganization and Ras activity. These results suggest that PAK1 and PKCε may be potential therapeutic targets to stop uncontrolled B cell proliferation mediated by the Vav/Rac pathway. PMID:26663827

  13. Rac1/p21-activated kinase pathway controls retinoblastoma protein phosphorylation and E2F transcription factor activation in B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Zaldua, Natalia; Llavero, Francisco; Artaso, Alain; Gálvez, Patricia; Lacerda, Hadriano M; Parada, Luis A; Zugaza, José L

    2016-02-01

    Small GTPases of the Ras superfamily are capable of activating E2F-dependent transcription leading to cell proliferation, but the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, using immortalized chicken DT40 B cell lines to investigate the role of the Vav/Rac signalling cascade on B cell proliferation, it is shown that the proliferative response triggered by B cell receptor activation is dramatically reduced in the absence of Vav3 expression. Analysis of this proliferative defect shows that in the absence of Vav3 expression, retinoblastoma protein (RB) phosphorylation and the subsequent E2F activation do not take place. By combining pharmacological and genetic approaches, phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and phospholipase Cγ2 (PLCγ2) were identified as the key regulatory signalling molecules upstream of the Vav3/Rac pathway leading to RB phosphorylation and E2F transcription factor activation. Additionally, vav3(-/-) and plcγ2(-/-) DT40 B cells were not able to activate the RB-E2F complex wild-type phenotype when these genetically modified cells were transfected with constitutively active forms of RhoA or Cdc42. However, when these knockout cells were transfected with different constitutively active versions of PLCγ, Vav or Rac1, not only activation of the RB-E2F complex wild-type phenotype was recovered but also the cellular proliferation. Furthermore, by evaluating the effect of two known effector mutants of Rac1 (Rac1(Q61L/F37A) and Rac1(Q61L/Y40C) ), the RB-E2F complex activation dependency on p21-activated kinase (PAK) and protein kinase Cε (PKCε) activities was established, being independent of both actin cytoskeleton reorganization and Ras activity. These results suggest that PAK1 and PKCε may be potential therapeutic targets to stop uncontrolled B cell proliferation mediated by the Vav/Rac pathway.

  14. Apoptin T108 phosphorylation is not required for its tumor-specific nuclear localization but partially affects its apoptotic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.-H.; Cheng, C.-M.; Chang, Y.-F.; Wang, T.-Y.; Yuo, C.-Y.; E-mail: m815006@kmu.edu.tw

    2007-03-09

    Apoptin, a chicken anemia virus-encoded protein, induces apoptosis in human tumor cells but not in normal cells. In addition, Apoptin also exhibits tumor-specific nuclear localization and tumor-specific phosphorylation on threonine 108 (T108). Here, we studied the effects of T108 phosphorylation on the tumor-specific nuclear localization and apoptotic activity of Apoptin. We first showed that a hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged Apoptin, but not the green fluorescent protein-fused Apoptin used in many previous studies, exhibited the same intracellular distribution pattern as native Apoptin. We then made and analyzed an HA-Apoptin mutant with its T108 phosphorylation site abolished. We found that Apoptin T108 phosphorylation is not required for its tumor-specific nuclear localization and abolishing the T108 phosphorylation of Apoptin does affect its apoptotic activity in tumor cells but only partially. Our results support the previous finding that Apoptin contains two distinct apoptosis domains located separately at the N- and C-terminal regions and suggest that the T108 phosphorylation may only be required for the apoptotic activity mediated through the C-terminal apoptosis domain.

  15. Sequential phosphorylation of SLP-76 at tyrosine 173 is required for activation of T and mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Sela, Meirav; Bogin, Yaron; Beach, Dvora; Oellerich, Thomas; Lehne, Johanna; Smith-Garvin, Jennifer E; Okumura, Mariko; Starosvetsky, Elina; Kosoff, Rachelle; Libman, Evgeny; Koretzky, Gary; Kambayashi, Taku; Urlaub, Henning; Wienands, Jürgen; Chernoff, Jonathan; Yablonski, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Cooperatively assembled signalling complexes, nucleated by adaptor proteins, integrate information from surface receptors to determine cellular outcomes. In T and mast cells, antigen receptor signalling is nucleated by three adaptors: SLP-76, Gads and LAT. Three well-characterized SLP-76 tyrosine phosphorylation sites recruit key components, including a Tec-family tyrosine kinase, Itk. We identified a fourth, evolutionarily conserved SLP-76 phosphorylation site, Y173, which was phosphorylated upon T-cell receptor stimulation in primary murine and Jurkat T cells. Y173 was required for antigen receptor-induced phosphorylation of phospholipase C-γ1 (PLC-γ1) in both T and mast cells, and for consequent downstream events, including activation of the IL-2 promoter in T cells, and degranulation and IL-6 production in mast cells. In intact cells, Y173 phosphorylation depended on three, ZAP-70-targeted tyrosines at the N-terminus of SLP-76 that recruit and activate Itk, a kinase that selectively phosphorylated Y173 in vitro. These data suggest a sequential mechanism whereby ZAP-70-dependent priming of SLP-76 at three N-terminal sites triggers reciprocal regulatory interactions between Itk and SLP-76, which are ultimately required to couple active Itk to its substrate, PLC-γ1. PMID:21725281

  16. Serine phosphorylation of NPM-ALK, which is dependent on the auto-activation of the kinase activation loop, contributes to its oncogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Wu, Fang; Zhang, Jingdong; McMullen, Todd; Young, Leah C; Ingham, Robert J; Li, Liang; Lai, Raymond

    2011-02-01

    It is well established that the tumorigenic potential of nucleophosmin (NPM)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), an oncogenic tyrosine kinase, is dependent on its tyrosine phosphorylation. Using tandem affinity purification-mass spectrometry, we found evidence of phosphorylation of three serine residues of NPM-ALK (Serine¹³⁵, Serine¹⁶⁴ and Serine⁴⁹⁷) ectopically expressed in GP293 cells. Using a specific anti-phosphoserine antibody and immunoprecipitation, we confirmed the presence of serine phosphorylation of NPM-ALK in all three NPM-ALK-expressing cell lines examined. Similar to the tyrosine phosphorylation, phosphorylation of these serine residues was dependent on the activation status of the kinase activation loop of ALK. All of these three serine residues are biologically important as mutation of any one of these residues resulted in a significant reduction in the tumorigenicity of NPM-ALK (assessed by cell viability and clonogenic assay), which correlated with a substantial reduction in the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, c-jun N-terminal kinase and signal transducer and activator of transcription 6. Serine phosphorylation of NPM-ALK appears to be regulated by multiple serine kinases since it was markedly reduced by pharmacologic inhibitors for glycogen synthase kinase-3, casein kinase I or mitogen-activated protein kinases. In summary, our study is the first to identify serine phosphorylation of NPM-ALK and to provide evidence that it enhances the tumorigenic potential of this oncogenic protein.

  17. Detection of phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinase in the developing spinal cord of the mouse embryo

    SciTech Connect

    Teraishi, Toshiya; Miura, Kenji

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} We detected physiologically phosphorylated MAPKs in developing spinal cord. {yields} We detected physiologically phosphorylated MAPKs by an improved method. {yields} p-ERK1/2 and p-JNK1/2 were detected in the marginal layer and the dorsal horn. {yields} p-ERK1/2 and p-JNK1/2 might play critical roles in the developing spinal cord. {yields} Constructing phosphoprotein atlases will be possible if expanding this work. -- Abstract: Global understanding of the proteome is a major research topic. The comprehensive visualization of the distribution of proteins in vivo or the construction of in situ protein atlases may be a valuable strategy for proteomic researchers. Information about the distribution of various proteins under physiological and pathological conditions should be extremely valuable for the basic and clinical sciences. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade plays an essential role in intracellular signaling in organisms. This cascade also regulates biological processes involving development, differentiation, and proliferation. Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are integral reactions in regulating the activity of MAPKs. Changes in the phosphorylation state of MAPKs are rapid and reversible; therefore, the localizations of physiologically phosphorylated MAPKs in vivo are difficult to accurately detect. Furthermore, phosphorylated MAPKs are likely to change phosphorylated states through commonly used experimental manipulations. In the present study, as a step toward the construction of in situ phosphoprotein atlases, we attempted to detect physiologically phosphorylated MAPKs in vivo in developing spinal cords of mice. We previously reported an improved immunohistochemical method for detecting unstable phosphorylated MAPKs. The distribution patterns of phosphorylated MAPKs in the spinal cords of embryonic mice from embryonic day 13 (E13) to E17 were observed with an improved immunohistochemical method. Phosphorylated

  18. ß1 Integrin Binding Phosphorylates Ezrin at T567 to Activate a Lipid Raft Signalsome Driving Invadopodia Activity and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Antelmi, Ester; Cardone, Rosa A.; Greco, Maria R.; Rubino, Rosa; Di Sole, Francesca; Martino, Nicola A.; Casavola, Valeria; Carcangiu, MariaLuisa; Moro, Loredana; Reshkin, Stephan J.

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation is a critical process in tumor cell invasion and requires matrix degrading protrusions called invadopodia. The Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE1) has recently been shown to be fundamental in the regulation of invadopodia actin cytoskeleton dynamics and activity. However, the structural link between the invadopodia cytoskeleton and NHE1 is still unknown. A candidate could be ezrin, a linker between the NHE1 and the actin cytoskeleton known to play a pivotal role in invasion and metastasis. However, the mechanistic basis for its role remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that ezrin phosphorylated at T567 is highly overexpressed in the membrane of human breast tumors and positively associated with invasive growth and HER2 overexpression. Further, in the metastatic cell line, MDA-MB-231, p-ezrin was almost exclusively expressed in invadopodia lipid rafts where it co-localized in a functional complex with NHE1, EGFR, ß1-integrin and phosphorylated-NHERF1. Manipulation by mutation of ezrins T567 phosphorylation state and/or PIP2 binding capacity or of NHE1s binding to ezrin or PIP2 demonstrated that p-ezrin expression and binding to PIP2 are required for invadopodia-mediated ECM degradation and invasion and identified NHE1 as the membrane protein that p-ezrin regulates to induce invadopodia formation and activity. PMID:24086451

  19. P44, the 'longevity-assurance' isoform of P53, regulates tau phosphorylation and is activated in an age-dependent fashion.

    PubMed

    Pehar, Mariana; Ko, Mi Hee; Li, Mi; Scrable, Heidi; Puglielli, Luigi

    2014-06-01

    p44 is a short isoform of p53 with 'longevity-assurance' activity. Overexpression of p44 in the mouse (p44(+/+) transgenic mice) causes a progeroid phenotype that mimics an accelerated form of aging. The phenotype includes abnormal phosphorylation of the microtubule-binding protein tau, synaptic deficits, and cognitive decline. Genetic engineering demonstrated that the phosphorylation status of tau acts upstream of the synaptic deficits. Here, we provide evidence that p44 promotes the phosphorylation of tau in the mouse. Specifically, we show that p44 binds to the promoter of tau kinases Dyrk1A, GSK3β, Cdk5, p35, and p39 and activates their transcription. The upregulation of the above kinases is followed by increased phosphorylation of tau. Finally, we show that p44 is preferentially found in the nucleus and that its levels increase with age in the mouse brain. Taken together, these results suggest that an imbalance in the p53:p44 ratio might be involved with the altered tau metabolism that characterizes aging. PMID:24341977

  20. Interaction with Enzyme IIBMpo (EIIBMpo) and Phosphorylation by Phosphorylated EIIBMpo Exert Antagonistic Effects on the Transcriptional Activator ManR of Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Zébré, Arthur Constant; Aké, Francine Moussan; Ventroux, Magali; Koffi-Nevry, Rose; Noirot-Gros, Marie-Françoise

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Listeriae take up glucose and mannose predominantly through a mannose class phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTSMan), whose three components are encoded by the manLMN genes. The expression of these genes is controlled by ManR, a LevR-type transcription activator containing two PTS regulation domains (PRDs) and two PTS-like domains (enzyme IIAMan [EIIAMan]- and EIIBGat-like). We demonstrate here that in Listeria monocytogenes, ManR is activated via the phosphorylation of His585 in the EIIAMan-like domain by the general PTS components enzyme I and HPr. We also show that ManR is regulated by the PTSMpo and that EIIBMpo plays a dual role in ManR regulation. First, yeast two-hybrid experiments revealed that unphosphorylated EIIBMpo interacts with the two C-terminal domains of ManR (EIIBGat-like and PRD2) and that this interaction is required for ManR activity. Second, in the absence of glucose/mannose, phosphorylated EIIBMpo (P∼EIIBMpo) inhibits ManR activity by phosphorylating His871 in PRD2. The presence of glucose/mannose causes the dephosphorylation of P∼EIIBMpo and P∼PRD2 of ManR, which together lead to the induction of the manLMN operon. Complementation of a ΔmanR mutant with various manR alleles confirmed the antagonistic effects of PTS-catalyzed phosphorylation at the two different histidine residues of ManR. Deletion of manR prevented not only the expression of the manLMN operon but also glucose-mediated repression of virulence gene expression; however, repression by other carbohydrates was unaffected. Interestingly, the expression of manLMN in Listeria innocua was reported to require not only ManR but also the Crp-like transcription activator Lin0142. Unlike Lin0142, the L. monocytogenes homologue, Lmo0095, is not required for manLMN expression; its absence rather stimulates man expression. IMPORTANCE Listeria monocytogenes is a human pathogen causing the foodborne disease listeriosis. The expression of most virulence

  1. Long-term effects of rapamycin treatment on insulin mediated phosphorylation of Akt/PKB and glycogen synthase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Varma, Shailly; Shrivastav, Anuraag; Changela, Sheena; Khandelwal, Ramji L.

    2008-04-01

    Protein kinase B (Akt/PKB) is a Ser/Thr kinase that is involved in the regulation of cell proliferation/survival through mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and the regulation of glycogen metabolism through glycogen synthase kinase 3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}) and glycogen synthase (GS). Rapamycin is an inhibitor of mTOR. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of rapamycin pretreatment on the insulin mediated phosphorylation of Akt/PKB phosphorylation and GS activity in parental HepG2 and HepG2 cells with overexpression of constitutively active Akt1/PKB-{alpha} (HepG2-CA-Akt/PKB). Rapamycin pretreatment resulted in a decrease (20-30%) in the insulin mediated phosphorylation of Akt1 (Ser 473) in parental HepG2 cells but showed an upregulation of phosphorylation in HepG2-CA-Akt/PKB cells. Rictor levels were decreased (20-50%) in parental HepG2 cells but were not significantly altered in the HepG2-CA-Akt/PKB cells. Furthermore, rictor knockdown decreased the phosphorylation of Akt (Ser 473) by 40-60% upon rapamycin pretreatment. GS activity followed similar trends as that of phosphorylated Akt and so with rictor levels in these cells pretreated with rapamycin; parental HepG2 cells showed a decrease in GS activity, whereas as HepG2-CA-Akt/PKB cells showed an increase in GS activity. The changes in the levels of phosphorylated Akt/PKB (Ser 473) correlated with GS and protein phoshatase-1 activity.

  2. Stress-induced ceramide generation and apoptosis via the phosphorylation and activation of nSMase1 by JNK signaling.

    PubMed

    Yabu, T; Shiba, H; Shibasaki, Y; Nakanishi, T; Imamura, S; Touhata, K; Yamashita, M

    2015-02-01

    Neutral sphingomyelinase (nSMase) activation in response to environmental stress or inflammatory cytokine stimuli generates the second messenger ceramide, which mediates the stress-induced apoptosis. However, the signaling pathways and activation mechanism underlying this process have yet to be elucidated. Here we show that the phosphorylation of nSMase1 (sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 2, SMPD2) by c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling stimulates ceramide generation and apoptosis and provide evidence for a signaling mechanism that integrates stress- and cytokine-activated apoptosis in vertebrate cells. An nSMase1 was identified as a JNK substrate, and the phosphorylation site responsible for its effects on stress and cytokine induction was Ser-270. In zebrafish cells, the substitution of Ser-270 for alanine blocked the phosphorylation and activation of nSMase1, whereas the substitution of Ser-270 for negatively charged glutamic acid mimicked the effect of phosphorylation. The JNK inhibitor SP600125 blocked the phosphorylation and activation of nSMase1, which in turn blocked ceramide signaling and apoptosis. A variety of stress conditions, including heat shock, UV exposure, hydrogen peroxide treatment, and anti-Fas antibody stimulation, led to the phosphorylation of nSMase1, activated nSMase1, and induced ceramide generation and apoptosis in zebrafish embryonic ZE and human Jurkat T cells. In addition, the depletion of MAPK8/9 or SMPD2 by RNAi knockdown decreased ceramide generation and stress- and cytokine-induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells. Therefore the phosphorylation of nSMase1 is a pivotal step in JNK signaling, which leads to ceramide generation and apoptosis under stress conditions and in response to cytokine stimulation. nSMase1 has a common central role in ceramide signaling during the stress and cytokine responses and apoptosis.

  3. Intrinsically active variants of Erk oncogenically transform cells and disclose unexpected autophosphorylation capability that is independent of TEY phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Smorodinsky-Atias, Karina; Goshen-Lago, Tal; Goldberg-Carp, Anat; Melamed, Dganit; Shir, Alexei; Mooshayef, Navit; Beenstock, Jonah; Karamansha, Yael; Darlyuk-Saadon, Ilona; Livnah, Oded; Ahn, Natalie G.; Admon, Arie; Engelberg, David

    2016-01-01

    The receptor-tyrosine kinase (RTK)/Ras/Raf pathway is an essential cascade for mediating growth factor signaling. It is abnormally overactive in almost all human cancers. The downstream targets of the pathway are members of the extracellular regulated kinases (Erk1/2) family, suggesting that this family is a mediator of the oncogenic capability of the cascade. Although all oncogenic mutations in the pathway result in strong activation of Erks, activating mutations in Erks themselves were not reported in cancers. Here we used spontaneously active Erk variants to check whether Erk’s activity per se is sufficient for oncogenic transformation. We show that Erk1(R84S) is an oncoprotein, as NIH3T3 cells that express it form foci in tissue culture plates, colonies in soft agar, and tumors in nude mice. We further show that Erk1(R84S) and Erk2(R65S) are intrinsically active due to an unusual autophosphorylation activity they acquire. They autophosphorylate the activatory TEY motif and also other residues, including the critical residue Thr-207 (in Erk1)/Thr-188 (in Erk2). Strikingly, Erk2(R65S) efficiently autophosphorylates its Thr-188 even when dually mutated in the TEY motif. Thus this study shows that Erk1 can be considered a proto-oncogene and that Erk molecules possess unusual autoregulatory properties, some of them independent of TEY phosphorylation. PMID:26658610

  4. Pyk2 activates the NLRP3 inflammasome by directly phosphorylating ASC and contributes to inflammasome-dependent peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, I-Che; OuYang, Chun-Nan; Yuan, Sheng-Ning; Li, Hsin-Pai; Chen, Jeng-Ting; Shieh, Hui-Ru; Chen, Yu-Jen; Ojcius, David M.; Chu, Ching-Liang; Yu, Jau-Song; Chang, Yu-Sun; Chen, Lih-Chyang

    2016-01-01

    The inflammasome adaptor protein, ASC, contributes to both innate immune responses and inflammatory diseases via self-oligomerization, which leads to the activation of the protease, caspase-1. Here, we report that the cytosolic tyrosine kinases, FAK and Pyk2, are differentially involved in NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome activation. The inhibition of FAK and Pyk2 with RNA interference or chemical inhibitors dramatically abolished ASC oligomerization, caspase-1 activation, and IL-1β secretion in response to NLRP3 or AIM2 stimulation. Pyk2 is phosphorylated by the kinase Syk and relocalizes to the ASC specks upon NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Pyk2, but not FAK, could directly phosphorylate ASC at Tyr146, and only the phosphorylated ASC could participate in speck formation and trigger IL-1β secretion. Moreover, the clinical-trial-tested Pyk2/FAK dual inhibitor PF-562271 reduced monosodium urate-mediated peritonitis, a disease model used for studying the consequences of NLRP3 activation. Our results suggest that although Pyk2 and FAK are involved in inflammasome activation, only Pyk2 directly phosphorylates ASC and brings ASC into an oligomerization-competent state by allowing Tyr146 phosphorylation to participate ASC speck formation and subsequent NLRP3 inflammation. PMID:27796369

  5. Fisetin stimulates autophagic degradation of phosphorylated tau via the activation of TFEB and Nrf2 transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunhyo; Choi, Ki Ju; Cho, Sun-Jung; Yun, Sang-Moon; Jeon, Jae-Pil; Koh, Young Ho; Song, Jihyun; Johnson, Gail V W; Jo, Chulman

    2016-04-26

    The neuronal accumulation of phosphorylated tau plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we examined the effect of fisetin, a flavonol, on tau levels. Treatment of cortical cells or primary neurons with fisetin resulted in significant decreases in the levels of phosphorylated tau. In addition, fisetin decreased the levels of sarkosyl-insoluble tau in an active GSK-3β-induced tau aggregation model. However, there was no difference in activities of tau kinases and phosphatases such as protein phosphatase 2A, irrespective of fisetin treatment. Fisetin activated autophagy together with the activation of transcription factor EB (TFEB) and Nrf2 transcriptional factors. The activation of autophagy including TFEB is likely due to fisetin-mediated mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) inhibition, since the phosphorylation levels of p70S6 kinase and 4E-BP1 were decreased in the presence of fisetin. Indeed, fisetin-induced phosphorylated tau degradation was attenuated by chemical inhibitors of the autophagy-lysosome pathway. Together the results indicate that fisetin reduces levels of phosphorylated tau through the autophagy pathway activated by TFEB and Nrf2. Our result suggests fisetin should be evaluated further as a potential preventive and therapeutic drug candidate for AD.

  6. Fisetin stimulates autophagic degradation of phosphorylated tau via the activation of TFEB and Nrf2 transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sunhyo; Choi, Ki Ju; Cho, Sun-Jung; Yun, Sang-Moon; Jeon, Jae-Pil; Koh, Young Ho; Song, Jihyun; Johnson, Gail V. W.; Jo, Chulman

    2016-01-01

    The neuronal accumulation of phosphorylated tau plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here, we examined the effect of fisetin, a flavonol, on tau levels. Treatment of cortical cells or primary neurons with fisetin resulted in significant decreases in the levels of phosphorylated tau. In addition, fisetin decreased the levels of sarkosyl-insoluble tau in an active GSK-3β-induced tau aggregation model. However, there was no difference in activities of tau kinases and phosphatases such as protein phosphatase 2A, irrespective of fisetin treatment. Fisetin activated autophagy together with the activation of transcription factor EB (TFEB) and Nrf2 transcriptional factors. The activation of autophagy including TFEB is likely due to fisetin-mediated mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) inhibition, since the phosphorylation levels of p70S6 kinase and 4E-BP1 were decreased in the presence of fisetin. Indeed, fisetin-induced phosphorylated tau degradation was attenuated by chemical inhibitors of the autophagy-lysosome pathway. Together the results indicate that fisetin reduces levels of phosphorylated tau through the autophagy pathway activated by TFEB and Nrf2. Our result suggests fisetin should be evaluated further as a potential preventive and therapeutic drug candidate for AD. PMID:27112200

  7. A novel AMPK activator from Chinese herb medicine and ischemia phosphorylate the cardiac transcription factor FOXO3

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingying; Ma, Heng; Zhang, Xiaoyu; He, Leilei; Wu, Jianming; Gao, Xiaoping; Ren, Jun; Li, Ji

    2016-01-01

    Oleanolic Acid (OA) is a nature product extracted from Chinese Herb Medicine which is traditionally used as treatment of diabetes and ischemic heart diseases. Mounting evidence showed that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has cardioprotective effect against ischemic injury and the forkhead transcription factor 3 (FOXO3) was recently identified as a downstream target of AMPK. We hypothesize that OA may protect against ischemic dysfunction of cardiomyocytes via activation of AMPK signaling pathway. Male C57BL/6 mice which were subjected to in vivo regional cardiac ischemia stimulated AMPK Thr172 phosphorylation, as well as phosphorylation of downstream FOXO3 (Ser413) and acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC). The natural product, OA, significantly stimulated cardiac AMPK activation in cardiomyocyes in time- and dose-dependent manners. The mechanism of AMPK activation by OA may be due to the loss mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) as shown by JC-1 fluorescence assay. Intriguingly, OA as an AMPK activator also triggered FOXO3 (Ser413) phosphorylation in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, OA treatment can protect cardiomyocytes from contractile dysfunction induced by hypoxia. Taken together, the results indicated that both ischemia and OA stimulated cardiac AMPK phosphorylation, as well downstream FOXO3 phosphorylation. The cardioprotective effect of OA maybe associated with activation of AMPK signaling pathways.

  8. Insulin-induced decrease in protein phosphorylation in rat adipocytes not explained by decreased A-kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Egan, J.J.; Greenberg, A.S.; Chang, M.K.; Londos, C.

    1987-05-01

    In isolated rat adipocytes, insulin inhibits lipolysis to a greater extent than would be predicted by the decrease in (-/+)cAMP activity ratio of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (A-kinase), from which it was speculated that insulin promotes the dephosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase. They have examined the phosphorylation state of cellular proteins under conditions of varying A-kinase activities in the presence and absence of insulin. Protein phosphorylation was determined by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis of extracts from /sup 32/P-loaded cells; glycerol and A-kinase activity ratios were measured in the cytosolic extracts from control, non-radioactive cells. Increased protein phosphorylation in general occurred over the same range of A-kinase activity ratios, 0.1-0.3, associated with increased glycerol release. The insulin-induced decrease in lipolysis was associated with a decrease in the /sup 32/P content of several proteins, an effect not explained by the modest reduction in A-kinase activity by insulin. This effect of insulin on protein phosphorylation was lost as the A-kinase activity ratios exceeded 0.5. The results suggest that insulin promotes the dephosphorylation of those adipocyte proteins which are subject to phosphorylation by A-kinase.

  9. Beta 2 integrin-dependent protein tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of the FGR protein tyrosine kinase in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Stimulation of adherent human neutrophils (PMN) with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) triggers protein tyrosine phosphorylation (Fuortes, M., W. W. Jin, and C. Nathan. 1993. J. Cell Biol. 120:777-784). We investigated the dependence of this response on beta 2 integrins by using PMN isolated from a leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) patient, which do not express beta 2 integrins, and by plating PMN on surface bound anti-beta 2 (CD18) antibodies. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation increased in PMN plated on fibrinogen and this phosphorylation was enhanced by TNF. Triggering of protein tyrosine phosphorylation did not occur in LAD PMN plated on fibrinogen either in the absence or the presence of TNF. Surface bound anti-CD18, but not isotype-matched anti- Class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens, antibodies triggered tyrosine phosphorylation in normal, but not in LAD PMN. As the major tyrosine phosphorylated proteins we found in our assay conditions migrated with an apparent molecular mass of 56-60 kD, we investigated whether beta 2 integrins are implicated in activation of members of the src family of intracellular protein-tyrosine kinases. We found that the fgr protein-tyrosine kinase (p58fgr) activity, and its extent of phosphorylation in tyrosine, in PMN adherent to fibrinogen, was enhanced by TNF. Activation of p58fgr in response to TNF was evident within 10 min of treatment and increased with times up to 30 min. Also other activators of beta 2 integrins such as phorbol-12- myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and formyl methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP), induced activation of p58fgr kinase activity. Activation of p58fgr kinase activity, and phosphorylation in tyrosine, did not occur in PMN of a LAD patient in response to TNF. Soluble anti-CD18, but not anti-Class I MHC antigens, antibodies inhibited activation of p58fgr kinase activity in PMN adherent to fibrinogen in response to TNF, PMA, and FMLP. These findings demonstrate that, in PMN, beta 2 integrins

  10. Phosphorylation of CHO1 by Lats1/2 regulates the centrosomal activation of LIMK1 during cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Ayumi; Yabuta, Norikazu; Mukai, Satomi; Torigata, Kosuke; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Large tumor suppressor 1 and 2 (Lats1/2) regulate centrosomal integrity, chromosome segregation and cytokinesis. As components of the centralspindlin complex, the kinesin-like protein CHO1 and its splicing variant MKLP1 colocalize with chromosome passenger proteins and GTPases and regulate the formation of the contractile ring and cytokinesis; however, the regulatory mechanisms of CHO1/MKLP1 remain elusive. Here, we show that Lats1/2 phosphorylate Ser716 in the F-actin-interacting region of CHO1, which is absent in MKLP1. Phosphorylated CHO1 localized to the centrosomes and midbody, and the actin polymerization factor LIM-kinase 1 (LIMK1) was identified as its binding partner. Overexpression of constitutively phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated CHO1 altered the mitotic localization and activation of LIMK1 at the centrosomes in HeLa cells, leading to the inhibition of cytokinesis through excessive phosphorylation of Cofilin and mislocalization of Ect2. These results suggest that Lats1/2 stringently control cytokinesis by regulating CHO1 phosphorylation and the mitotic activation of LIMK1 on centrosomes. PMID:25786116

  11. Ser¹¹⁹ phosphorylation modulates the activity and conformation of PRRXL1, a homeodomain transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Soares-dos-Reis, Ricardo; Pessoa, Ana S; Matos, Mariana R; Falcão, Miguel; Mendes, Vera M; Manadas, Bruno; Monteiro, Filipe A; Lima, Deolinda; Reguenga, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    PRRXL1 [paired related homeobox-like 1; also known as DRG11 (dorsal root ganglia 11)] is a paired-like homeodomain transcription factor expressed in DRG and dSC (dorsal spinal cord) nociceptive neurons. PRRXL1 is crucial for the establishment and maintenance of nociceptive circuitry, as Prrxl1(-/-) mice present neuronal loss, reduced pain sensitivity and failure to thrive. In the present study, we show that PRRXL1 is highly phosphorylated in vivo, and that its multiple band pattern on electrophoretic analysis is the result of different phosphorylation states. PRRXL1 phosphorylation appears to be differentially regulated along the dSC and DRG development and it is mapped to two functional domains. One region comprises amino acids 107-143, whereas the other one encompasses amino acids 227-263 and displays repressor activity. Using an immunoprecipitation-MS approach, two phosphorylation sites were identified, Ser¹¹⁹ and Ser²³⁸. Phosphorylation at Ser¹¹⁹ is shown to be determinant for PRRXL1 conformation and transcriptional activity. Ser¹¹⁹ phosphorylation is thus proposed as a mechanism for regulating PRRXL1 function and conformation during nociceptive system development.

  12. Protein kinase C-mediated phosphorylation and activation of PDE3A regulate cAMP levels in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Roger W; Mackintosh, Carol; Hers, Ingeborg

    2009-05-01

    The elevation of [cAMP](i) is an important mechanism of platelet inhibition and is regulated by the opposing activity of adenylyl cyclase and phosphodiesterase (PDE). In this study, we demonstrate that a variety of platelet agonists, including thrombin, significantly enhance the activity of PDE3A in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Stimulation of platelets with the PAR-1 agonist SFLLRN resulted in rapid and transient phosphorylation of PDE3A on Ser(312), Ser(428), Ser(438), Ser(465), and Ser(492), in parallel with the PKC (protein kinase C) substrate, pleckstrin. Furthermore, phosphorylation and activation of PDE3A required the activation of PKC, but not of PI3K/PKB, mTOR/p70S6K, or ERK/RSK. Activation of PKC by phorbol esters also resulted in phosphorylation of the same PDE3A sites in a PKC-dependent, PKB-independent manner. This was further supported by the finding that IGF-1, which strongly activates PI3K/PKB, but not PKC, did not regulate PDE3A. Platelet activation also led to a PKC-dependent association between PDE3A and 14-3-3 proteins. In contrast, cAMP-elevating agents such as PGE(1) and forskolin-induced phosphorylation of Ser(312) and increased PDE3A activity, but did not stimulate 14-3-3 binding. Finally, complete antagonism of PGE(1)-evoked cAMP accumulation by thrombin required both G(i) and PKC activation. Together, these results demonstrate that platelet activation stimulates PKC-dependent phosphorylation of PDE3A on Ser(312), Ser(428), Ser(438), Ser(465), and Ser(492) leading to a subsequent increase in cAMP hydrolysis and 14-3-3 binding. PMID:19261611

  13. KCC2 Gates Activity-Driven AMPA Receptor Traffic through Cofilin Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chevy, Quentin; Heubl, Martin; Goutierre, Marie; Backer, Stéphanie; Moutkine, Imane; Eugène, Emmanuel; Bloch-Gallego, Evelyne; Lévi, Sabine; Poncer, Jean Christophe

    2015-12-01

    Expression of the neuronal K/Cl transporter KCC2 is tightly regulated throughout development and by both normal and pathological neuronal activity. Changes in KCC2 expression have often been associated with altered chloride homeostasis and GABA signaling. However, recent evidence supports a role of KCC2 in the development and function of glutamatergic synapses through mechanisms that remain poorly understood. Here we show that suppressing KCC2 expression in rat hippocampal neurons precludes long-term potentiation of glutamatergic synapses specifically by preventing activity-driven membrane delivery of AMPA receptors. This effect is independent of KCC2 transporter function and can be accounted for by increased Rac1/PAK- and LIMK-dependent cofilin phosphorylation and actin polymerization in dendritic spines. Our results demonstrate that KCC2 plays a critical role in the regulation of spine actin cytoskeleton and gates long-term plasticity at excitatory synapses in cortical neurons. PMID:26631461

  14. Activation of the yeast Hippo pathway by phosphorylation-dependent assembly of signaling complexes.

    PubMed

    Rock, Jeremy M; Lim, Daniel; Stach, Lasse; Ogrodowicz, Roksana W; Keck, Jamie M; Jones, Michele H; Wong, Catherine C L; Yates, John R; Winey, Mark; Smerdon, Stephen J; Yaffe, Michael B; Amon, Angelika

    2013-05-17

    Scaffold-assisted signaling cascades guide cellular decision-making. In budding yeast, one such signal transduction pathway called the mitotic exit network (MEN) governs the transition from mitosis to the G1 phase of the cell cycle. The MEN is conserved and in metazoans is known as the Hippo tumor-suppressor pathway. We found that signaling through the MEN kinase cascade was mediated by an unusual two-step process. The MEN kinase Cdc15 first phosphorylated the scaffold Nud1. This created a phospho-docking site on Nud1, to which the effector kinase complex Dbf2-Mob1 bound through a phosphoserine-threonine binding domain, in order to be activated by Cdc15. This mechanism of pathway activation has implications for signal transmission through other kinase cascades and might represent a general principle in scaffold-assisted signaling.

  15. Metastable atom-activated dissociation mass spectrometry of phosphorylated and sulfonated peptides in negative ion mode.

    PubMed

    Cook, Shannon L; Jackson, Glen P

    2011-06-01

    The dissociation behavior of phosphorylated and sulfonated peptide anions was explored using metastable atom-activated dissociation mass spectrometry (MAD-MS) and collision-induced dissociation (CID). A beam of high kinetic energy helium (He) metastable atoms was exposed to isolated phosphorylated and sulfonated peptides in the 3- and 2- charge states. Unlike CID, where phosphate losses are dominant, the major dissociation channels observed using MAD were C(α) - C peptide backbone cleavages and neutral losses of CO(2), H(2)O, and [CO(2) + H(2)O] from the charge reduced (oxidized) product ion, consistent with an electron detachment dissociation (EDD) mechanism such as Penning ionization. Regardless of charge state or modification, MAD provides ample backbone cleavages with little modification loss, which allows for unambiguous PTM site determination. The relative abundance of certain fragment ions in MAD is also demonstrated to be somewhat sensitive to the number and location of deprotonation sites, with backbone cleavage somewhat favored adjacent to deprotonated sites like aspartic acid residues. MAD provides a complementary dissociation technique to CID, ECD, ETD, and EDD for peptide sequencing and modification identification. MAD offers the unique ability to analyze highly acidic peptides that contain few to no basic amino acids in either negative or positive ion mode.

  16. Leptin receptor activation increases Sam68 tyrosine phosphorylation and expression in human trophoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Jiménez, Flora; Pérez-Pérez, Antonio; González-Yanes, Carmen; Najib, Souad; Varone, Cecilia L; Sánchez-Margalet, Víctor

    2011-01-30

    Leptin is produced in placenta where it has been found to be an important autocrine signal for trophoblastic growth during pregnancy, promoting antiapoptotic and trophic effects. Leptin receptor is present in trophoblastic cells and leptin may fully activate signaling. We have previously implicated the RNA-binding protein Sam68 in leptin signal transduction in immune cells. In the present work, we have studied the possible role of Sam68 in leptin receptor signaling in trophoblastic cells (JEG-3 cells). Leptin dose-dependently stimulated Sam68 phosphorylation in JEG-3 cells, as assessed by immunoprecipitation and immunoblot with anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies. As previously observed in other systems, tyrosine phosphorylation of Sam68 in response to leptin inhibits its RNA binding capacity. Besides, leptin stimulation dose-dependently increases Sam68 expression in JEG-3 cells, as assessed by quantitative PCR. Consistently, the amount of Sam68 protein is increased after 24h of leptin stimulation of trophoblastic cells. In order to study the possible role of Sam68 on leptin receptor synthesis, we employed antisense strategy to knockdown the expression of Sam68. We have found that a decrease in Sam68 expression leads to a decrease in leptin receptor amount in JEG-3 cells, as assessed both by quantitative PCR and immunoblot. These results strongly suggest the participation of Sam68 in leptin receptor signaling in human trophoblastic cells, and therefore, Sam68 may mediate some of the leptin effects in placenta. PMID:21035519

  17. Mn2+ activates skinned smooth muscle cells in the absence of myosin light chain phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Hoar, P E; Kerrick, W G

    1988-08-01

    Two effects of Mn2+ on skinned fibers from chicken gizzard smooth muscle were observed, dependent on the presence or absence of dithiothreitol (DTT) reducing agent. One involves protein oxidation (in the absence of DTT) with production of a "latch"-like state, and the other involves direct Mn2+ activation of contractile proteins. Cells activated by Mn2+ in the presence of ATP and the absence of Ca2+, Mg2+ and DTT did not relax when transferred to normal relaxing solutions. In contrast, when 5 mM DTT was included in the Mn2+ contracting solution to prevent protein oxidation by Mn2+, the cells still contracted when exposed to Mn2+, but relaxed rapidly when the Mn2+ was removed. In the presence of DTT both the Mn2+ activation and the relaxation following removal of Mn2+ were more rapid than normal Ca2+-activated contractions and relaxations. The skinned fibers activated by Mn2+ in the absence of DTT showed little active shortening unless DTT was added. This rigor-like state is probably due to oxidation of contractile proteins since the cells relaxed when exposed to a relaxing solution containing DTT (50 mM) and then contracted again in response to Ca2+ and relaxed normally. The Mn2+ activation was not associated with myosin light chain phosphorylation, in contrast to Ca2+-activated contractions. PMID:3186428

  18. Growth factor-induced activation of a kinase activity which causes regulatory phosphorylation of p42/microtubule-associated protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    L'Allemain, G; Her, J H; Wu, J; Sturgill, T W; Weber, M J

    1992-01-01

    p42/microtubule-associated protein kinase (p42mapk) is activated by tyrosine and threonine phosphorylation, and its regulatory phosphorylation is likely to be important in signalling pathways involved in growth control, secretion, and differentiation. Here we show that treatment of quiescent 3T3 cells with diverse agonists results in the appearance of an activity capable of causing the in vitro phosphorylation of p42mapk on the regulatory tyrosine and to a lesser extent on the regulatory threonine, resulting in enzymatic activation of the p42mapk. This p42mapk-activating activity is capable of phosphorylating a kinase-defective p42mapk mutant, thus confirming its activity as a kinase. Images PMID:1314951

  19. Phosphorylation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) at Tyr-15 is inhibited by Cdk5 activators and does not contribute to the activation of Cdk5.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Saito, Taro; Sato, Ko; Furusawa, Kotaro; Hosokawa, Tomohisa; Tsutsumi, Koji; Asada, Akiko; Kamada, Shinji; Ohshima, Toshio; Hisanaga, Shin-ichi

    2014-07-11

    Cdk5 is a member of the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) family. In contrast to other Cdks that promote cell proliferation, Cdk5 plays a role in regulating various neuronal functions, including neuronal migration, synaptic activity, and neuron death. Cdks responsible for cell proliferation need phosphorylation in the activation loop for activation in addition to binding a regulatory subunit cyclin. Cdk5, however, is activated only by binding to its activator, p35 or p39. Furthermore, in contrast to Cdk1 and Cdk2, which are inhibited by phosphorylation at Tyr-15, the kinase activity of Cdk5 is reported to be stimulated when phosphorylated at Tyr-15 by Src family kinases or receptor-type tyrosine kinases. We investigated the activation mechanism of Cdk5 by phosphorylation at Tyr-15. Unexpectedly, however, it was found that Tyr-15 phosphorylation occurred only on monomeric Cdk5, and the coexpression of activators, p35/p25, p39, or Cyclin I, inhibited the phosphorylation. In neuron cultures, too, the activation of Fyn tyrosine kinase did not increase Tyr-15 phosphorylation of Cdk5. Further, phospho-Cdk5 at Tyr-15 was not detected in the p35-bound Cdk5. In contrast, expression of active Fyn increased p35 in neurons. These results indicate that phosphorylation at Tyr-15 is not an activation mechanism of Cdk5 but, rather, indicate that tyrosine kinases could activate Cdk5 by increasing the protein amount of p35. These results call for reinvestigation of how Cdk5 is regulated downstream of Src family kinases or receptor tyrosine kinases in neurons, which is an important signaling cascade in a variety of neuronal activities.

  20. Protein kinase A increases type-2 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor activity by phosphorylation of serine 937.

    PubMed

    Betzenhauser, Matthew J; Fike, Jenna L; Wagner, Larry E; Yule, David I

    2009-09-11

    Protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (InsP(3)Rs) represents a mechanism for shaping intracellular Ca(2+) signals following a concomitant elevation in cAMP. Activation of PKA results in enhanced Ca(2+) release in cells that express predominantly InsP(3)R2. PKA is known to phosphorylate InsP(3)R2, but the molecular determinants of this effect are not known. We have expressed mouse InsP(3)R2 in DT40-3KO cells that are devoid of endogenous InsP(3)R and examined the effects of PKA phosphorylation on this isoform in unambiguous isolation. Activation of PKA increased Ca(2+) signals and augmented the single channel open probability of InsP(3)R2. A PKA phosphorylation site unique to the InsP(3)R2 was identified at Ser(937). The enhancing effects of PKA activation on this isoform required the phosphorylation of Ser(937), since replacing this residue with alanine eliminated the positive effects of PKA activation. These results provide a mechanism responsible for the enhanced Ca(2+) signaling following PKA activation in cells that express predominantly InsP(3)R2.

  1. Site- and kinase-specific phosphorylation-mediated activation of SLAC1, a guard cell anion channel stimulated by abscisic acid.

    PubMed

    Maierhofer, Tobias; Diekmann, Marion; Offenborn, Jan Niklas; Lind, Christof; Bauer, Hubert; Hashimoto, Kenji; S Al-Rasheid, Khaled A; Luan, Sheng; Kudla, Jörg; Geiger, Dietmar; Hedrich, Rainer

    2014-09-09

    Under drought stress, abscisic acid (ABA) triggers closure of leaf cell pores called stomata, which are formed by two specialized cells called guard cells in plant epidermis. Two pathways downstream of ABA stimulate phosphorylation of the S-type anion channels SLAC1 (slow anion channel associated 1) and SLAH3 (SLAC1 homolog 3), which causes these channels to open, reducing guard cell volume and triggering stomatal closure. One branch involves OST1 (open stomata 1), a calcium-independent SnRK2-type kinase, and the other branch involves calcium-dependent protein kinases of the CPK (calcium-dependent protein kinase) family. We used coexpression analyses in Xenopus oocytes to show that the calcineurin B-like (CBL) calcium sensors CBL1 and CBL9 and their interacting protein kinase CIPK23 also triggered SLAC1 and SLAH3 opening. We analyzed whether regulation of SLAC1 opening by these different families of kinases involved the same or different sites on SLAC1 by measuring channel conductance of SLAC1 with mutations in the putative phosphorylation sites in the amino or carboxyl termini coexpressed with specific kinases in Xenopus oocytes. SLAC1 mutants lacking the OST1-phosphorylated site were still activated by CPK or by CBL/CIPK complexes. Phosphorylation and activation of SLAC1 by any of the kinases were inhibited by the phosphatase ABI1 (ABA insensitive 1), which is inactivated in response to ABA signaling. These findings identified CBL/CIPK complexes as potential regulators of stomatal aperture through S-type anion channels and indicated that phosphorylation at distinct sites enables SLAC1 activation by both calcium-dependent and calcium-independent pathways downstream of ABA.

  2. Spatial coupling of JNK activation to the B cell antigen receptor by tyrosine-phosphorylated ezrin1

    PubMed Central

    Parameswaran, Neetha; Enyindah-Asonye, Gospel; Bagheri, Nayer; Shah, Neilay B.; Gupta, Neetu

    2013-01-01

    The Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin (ERM) proteins regulate B lymphocyte activation via their effect on BCR diffusion and microclustering. This relies on their ability to dynamically tether the plasma membrane with actin filaments that is in turn facilitated by phosphorylation of the conserved threonine residue in the actin-binding domain. Here, we describe a novel function of ezrin in regulating JNK activation that is mediated by phosphorylation of a tyrosine (Y353) residue that is unconserved with moesin and radixin. BCR, but not CD40, TLR4 or CXCR5 stimulation, induced phosphorylation of ezrin at Y353 in mouse splenic B cells. Ezrin existed in a preformed complex with Syk in unstimulated B cells and underwent Syk-dependent phosphorylation upon anti-IgM stimulation. Y353-phosphorylated ezrin co-localized with the BCR within minutes of stimulation and co-trafficked with the endocytosed BCRs through the early and late endosomes. The T567 residue of ezrin was rephosphorylated in late endosomes and at the plasma membrane at later times of BCR stimulation. Expression of a non-phosphorylatable Y353F mutant of ezrin specifically impaired JNK activation. BCR crosslinking induced the association of Y353-phosphorylated ezrin with JNK and its kinase MKK7, and spatial co-localization with phosphorylated JNK in the endosomes. The YFP-tagged Y353F mutant displayed reduced co-localization with the endocytosed BCR as compared to wild type Ezrin-YFP. Taken together, our data identify a novel role for ezrin as a spatial adaptor that couples JNK signaling components to the BCR signalosome, thus facilitating JNK activation. PMID:23338238

  3. Novel STAT3 phosphorylation inhibitors exhibit potent growth suppressive activity in pancreatic and breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li; Hutzen, Brian; Zuo, Mingxin; Ball, Sarah; Deangelis, Stephanie; Foust, Elizabeth; Pandit, Bulbul; Ihnat, Michael A.; Shenoy, Satyendra S.; Kulp, Samuel; Li, Pui-Kai; Li, Chenglong; Fuchs, James; Lin, Jiayuh

    2010-01-01

    The constitutive activation of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) is frequently detected in most types of human cancer where it plays important roles in survival, drug-resistance, angiogenesis, and other functions. Targeting constitutive STAT3 signaling is thus an attractive therapeutic approach for these cancers. We have recently developed novel small molecule STAT3 inhibitors known as FLLL31 and FLLL32, which are derived from curcumin (the primary bioactive compound of turmeric). These compounds are designed to bind selectively to Janus Kinase 2 (JAK2) and the STAT3 SH2 domain, which serves crucial roles in STAT3 dimerization and signal transduction. Here we show that FLLL31 and FLLL32 are effective inhibitors of STAT3 phosphorylation, DNA binding activity, and transactivation in vitro, leading to the impediment of multiple oncogenic processes and the induction of apoptosis in pancreatic and breast cancer cell lines. FLLL31 and FLLL32 also inhibit colony formation in soft agar, cell invasion, and exhibit synergy with the anti-cancer drug doxorubicin against breast cancer cells. In addition, we show that FLLL32 can inhibit the induction of STAT3 phosphorylation by Interferon-α (IFNα) and Interleukin-6 (IL-6) in breast cancer cells. We also demonstrate that administration of FLLL32 can inhibit tumor growth and vascularity in chicken embryo xenografts as well as substantially reduce tumor volumes in mouse xenografts. Our findings highlight the potential of these new compounds and their efficacy in targeting pancreatic and breast cancers that exhibit constitutive STAT3 signaling. PMID:20215512

  4. Role for casein kinase 1 in the phosphorylation of Claspin on critical residues necessary for the activation of Chk1.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zheng; Capalbo, Luisa; Glover, David M; Dunphy, William G

    2011-08-15

    The mediator protein Claspin is critical for the activation of the checkpoint kinase Chk1 during checkpoint responses to stalled replication forks. This function involves the Chk1-activating domain (CKAD) of Claspin, which undergoes phosphorylation on multiple conserved sites. These phosphorylations promote binding of Chk1 to Claspin and ensuing activation of Chk1 by ATR. However, despite the importance of this regulatory process, the kinase responsible for these phosphorylations has remained unknown. By using a multifaceted approach, we have found that casein kinase 1 gamma 1 (CK1γ1) carries out this function. CK1γ1 phosphorylates the CKAD of Claspin efficiently in vitro, and depletion of CK1γ1 from human cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA) results in dramatically diminished phosphorylation of Claspin. Consequently, the siRNA-treated cells display impaired activation of Chk1 and resultant checkpoint defects. These results indicate that CK1γ1 is a novel component of checkpoint responses that controls the interaction of a key checkpoint effector kinase with its cognate mediator protein. PMID:21680713

  5. Role for casein kinase 1 in the phosphorylation of Claspin on critical residues necessary for the activation of Chk1

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Zheng; Capalbo, Luisa; Glover, David M.; Dunphy, William G.

    2011-01-01

    The mediator protein Claspin is critical for the activation of the checkpoint kinase Chk1 during checkpoint responses to stalled replication forks. This function involves the Chk1-activating domain (CKAD) of Claspin, which undergoes phosphorylation on multiple conserved sites. These phosphorylations promote binding of Chk1 to Claspin and ensuing activation of Chk1 by ATR. However, despite the importance of this regulatory process, the kinase responsible for these phosphorylations has remained unknown. By using a multifaceted approach, we have found that casein kinase 1 gamma 1 (CK1γ1) carries out this function. CK1γ1 phosphorylates the CKAD of Claspin efficiently in vitro, and depletion of CK1γ1 from human cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA) results in dramatically diminished phosphorylation of Claspin. Consequently, the siRNA-treated cells display impaired activation of Chk1 and resultant checkpoint defects. These results indicate that CK1γ1 is a novel component of checkpoint responses that controls the interaction of a key checkpoint effector kinase with its cognate mediator protein. PMID:21680713

  6. Skeletal muscle AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation parallels metabolic phenotype in leptin transgenic mice under dietary modification.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tomohiro; Hidaka, Shuji; Masuzaki, Hiroaki; Yasue, Shintaro; Minokoshi, Yasuhiko; Ebihara, Ken; Chusho, Hideki; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Toyoda, Taro; Sato, Kenji; Miyanaga, Fumiko; Fujimoto, Muneya; Tomita, Tsutomu; Kusakabe, Toru; Kobayashi, Nozomi; Tanioka, Hideki; Hayashi, Tatsuya; Hosoda, Kiminori; Yoshimatsu, Hironobu; Sakata, Toshiie; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2005-08-01

    Leptin augments glucose and lipid metabolism independent of its effect on satiety. Administration of leptin in rodents increases skeletal muscle beta-oxidation by activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). We previously reported that, as hyperleptinemic as obese human subjects, transgenic skinny mice overexpressing leptin in liver (LepTg) exhibit enhanced insulin sensitivity and lipid clearance. To assess skeletal muscle AMPK activity in leptin-sensitive and -insensitive states, we examined phosphorylation of AMPK and its target, acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC), in muscles from LepTg under dietary modification. Here we show that phosphorylation of AMPK and ACC are chronically augmented in LepTg soleus muscle, with a concomitant increase in the AMP-to-ATP ratio and a significant decrease in tissue triglyceride content. Despite preexisting hyperleptinemia, high-fat diet (HFD)-fed LepTg develop obesity, insulin-resistance, and hyperlipidemia. In parallel, elevated soleus AMPK and ACC phosphorylation in regular diet-fed LepTg is attenuated, and tissue triglyceride content is increased in those given HFD. Of note, substitution of HFD with regular diet causes a robust recovery of soleus AMPK and ACC phosphorylation in LepTg, with a higher rate of body weight reduction and a regain of insulin sensitivity. In conclusion, soleus AMPK and ACC phosphorylation in LepTg changes in parallel with its insulin sensitivity under dietary modification, suggesting a close association between skeletal muscle AMPK activity and sensitivity to leptin.

  7. Cdk1 phosphorylates SPAT-1/Bora to trigger PLK-1 activation and drive mitotic entry in C. elegans embryos

    PubMed Central

    Tavernier, Nicolas; Noatynska, Anna; Panbianco, Costanza; Martino, Lisa; Van Hove, Lucie; Schwager, Françoise; Léger, Thibaut

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms governing mitotic entry during animal development are incompletely understood. Here, we show that the mitotic kinase CDK-1 phosphorylates Suppressor of Par-Two 1 (SPAT-1)/Bora to regulate its interaction with PLK-1 and to trigger mitotic entry in early Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. Embryos expressing a SPAT-1 version that is nonphosphorylatable by CDK-1 and that is defective in PLK-1 binding in vitro present delays in mitotic entry, mimicking embryos lacking SPAT-1 or PLK-1 functions. We further show that phospho–SPAT-1 activates PLK-1 by triggering phosphorylation on its activator T loop in vitro by Aurora A. Likewise, we show that phosphorylation of human Bora by Cdk1 promotes phosphorylation of human Plk1 by Aurora A, suggesting that this mechanism is conserved in humans. Our results suggest that CDK-1 activates PLK-1 via SPAT-1 phosphorylation to promote entry into mitosis. We propose the existence of a positive feedback loop that connects Cdk1 and Plk1 activation to ensure a robust control of mitotic entry and cell division timing. PMID:25753036

  8. Cdk1 phosphorylates SPAT-1/Bora to trigger PLK-1 activation and drive mitotic entry in C. elegans embryos.

    PubMed

    Tavernier, Nicolas; Noatynska, Anna; Panbianco, Costanza; Martino, Lisa; Van Hove, Lucie; Schwager, Françoise; Léger, Thibaut; Gotta, Monica; Pintard, Lionel

    2015-03-16

    The molecular mechanisms governing mitotic entry during animal development are incompletely understood. Here, we show that the mitotic kinase CDK-1 phosphorylates Suppressor of Par-Two 1 (SPAT-1)/Bora to regulate its interaction with PLK-1 and to trigger mitotic entry in early Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. Embryos expressing a SPAT-1 version that is nonphosphorylatable by CDK-1 and that is defective in PLK-1 binding in vitro present delays in mitotic entry, mimicking embryos lacking SPAT-1 or PLK-1 functions. We further show that phospho-SPAT-1 activates PLK-1 by triggering phosphorylation on its activator T loop in vitro by Aurora A. Likewise, we show that phosphorylation of human Bora by Cdk1 promotes phosphorylation of human Plk1 by Aurora A, suggesting that this mechanism is conserved in humans. Our results suggest that CDK-1 activates PLK-1 via SPAT-1 phosphorylation to promote entry into mitosis. We propose the existence of a positive feedback loop that connects Cdk1 and Plk1 activation to ensure a robust control of mitotic entry and cell division timing.

  9. PKG II reverses HGF-triggered cellular activities by phosphorylating serine 985 of c-Met in gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Miaolin; Qian, Hai; Jiang, Lu; Lan, Ting; Wu, Min; Pang, Ji; Chen, Yongchang

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies showed that type II cGMP-dependent protein kinase G (PKG II) could inhibit the activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Both c-Met and EGFR belong to family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and have high molecular analogy. However, the effect of PKG II on c-Met activation is unclear. This study was designed to investigate the inhibitory effect of PKG II on the activation of c-Met and consequent biological activities. The results from CCK8 assay, Transwell assay and TUNEL assay showed that HGF enhanced cell proliferation and migration, and decreased cell apoptosis. Activated PKG II reversed the above changes caused by HGF. Immunoprecipitation and Western blotting results showed that PKG II could bind with c-Met and phosphorylate its Ser985, and thereby inhibited HGF-induced activation of c-Met and MAPK/ERK and PI3K/Akt/mTOR mediated signal transduction. When Ser985 of c-Met was mutated to Alanine for preventing phosphorylation of this site, the blocking effect of PKG II on c-Met activation was annulled. When Ser985 of c-Met was mutated to Aspartic acid for mimicking phosphorylation of this site, HGF-induced activation of c-Met was prevented. In conclusion, the results indicated that PKG II could block c-Met activation via phosphorylating Ser985 of this RTK. PMID:27147579

  10. Profilin-PTEN interaction suppresses NF-κB activation via inhibition of IKK phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Adeel H; Manna, Sunil K

    2016-04-01

    The molecular mechanism of Profilin for its tumour suppressor activity is still unknown. Nuclear transcription factor κB (NF-κB) is known to activate many target genes involved in cell proliferation. In the present study, we provide evidence that supports the involvement of Profilin in regulation of NF-κB, which might repress the tumorigenic response. Profilin overexpressing cells show low basal activity of IκBα kinase (IKK), high amounts of cytoplasmic inhibitory subunit of NF-κB (IκBα) and p65, and low nuclear NF-κB DNA binding activity. Co-localization and co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) studies suggest that Profilin interacts with a protein phosphatase, phosphatase and tension homologue (PTEN), and protects it from degradation. In turn, PTEN interacts physically and maintains a low phosphorylated state of the IKK complex and thereby suppresses NF-κB signalling. Thus, Profilin overexpressing cells show a decrease in NF-κB activation mediated by most of the inducers and potentiate cell death by repressing NF-κB-dependent genes involved in cell cycle progression. For the first time, we provide evidence, which suggests that Profilin increases tumour suppressor activity by regulating NF-κB. PMID:26787927

  11. Thrombin Receptor-Activating Protein (TRAP)-Activated Akt Is Involved in the Release of Phosphorylated-HSP27 (HSPB1) from Platelets in DM Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tokuda, Haruhiko; Kuroyanagi, Gen; Tsujimoto, Masanori; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Akamatsu, Shigeru; Enomoto, Yukiko; Iida, Hiroki; Otsuka, Takanobu; Ogura, Shinji; Iwama, Toru; Kojima, Kumi; Kozawa, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    It is generally known that heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) is phosphorylated through p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. We have previously reported that HSP27 is released from human platelets associated with collagen-induced phosphorylation. In the present study, we conducted an investigation into the effect of thrombin receptor-activating protein (TRAP) on the release of HSP27 in platelets in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients. The phosphorylated-HSP27 levels induced by TRAP were directly proportional to the aggregation of platelets. The levels of phosphorylated-HSP27 (Ser-78) were correlated with the levels of phosphorylated-p38 MAP kinase and phosphorylated-Akt in the platelets stimulated by 10 µM TRAP but not with those of phosphorylated-p44/p42 MAP kinase. The levels of HSP27 released from the TRAP (10 µM)-stimulated platelets were correlated with the levels of phosphorylated-HSP27 in the platelets. The released platelet-derived growth factor-AB (PDGF-AB) levels were in parallel with the HSP27 levels released from the platelets stimulated by 10 µM TRAP. Although the area under the curve (AUC) of small aggregates (9–25 µm) induced by 10 µM TRAP showed no significant correlation with the released HSP27 levels, AUC of medium aggregates (25–50 µm), large aggregates (50–70 µm) and light transmittance were significantly correlated with the released HSP27 levels. TRAP-induced phosphorylation of HSP27 was truly suppressed by deguelin, an inhibitor of Akt, in the platelets from a healthy subject. These results strongly suggest that TRAP-induced activation of Akt in addition to p38 MAP kinase positively regulates the release of phosphorylated-HSP27 from human platelets, which is closely related to the platelet hyper-aggregation in type 2 DM patients. PMID:27187380

  12. Osmotic shrinkage elicits FAK- and Src phosphorylation and Src-dependent NKCC1 activation in NIH3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Line Jee Hartmann; Müller, Helene Steenkær Holm; Jørgensen, Bente; Pedersen, Stine Falsig; Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2015-01-15

    The mechanisms linking cell volume sensing to volume regulation in mammalian cells remain incompletely understood. Here, we test the hypothesis that activation of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases Src, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and Janus kinase-2 (Jak2) occurs after osmotic shrinkage of NIH3T3 fibroblasts and contributes to volume regulation by activation of NKCC1. FAK phosphorylation at Tyr397, Tyr576/577, and Tyr861 was increased rapidly after exposure to hypertonic (575 mOsm) saline, peaking after 10 (Tyr397, Tyr576/577) and 10-30 min (Tyr861). Shrinkage-induced Src family kinase autophosphorylation (pTyr416-Src) was induced after 2-10 min, and immunoprecipitation indicated that this reflected phosphorylation of Src itself, rather than Fyn and Yes. Phosphorylated Src and FAK partly colocalized with vinculin, a focal adhesion marker, after hypertonic shrinkage. The Src inhibitor pyrazolopyrimidine-2 (PP2, 10 μM) essentially abolished shrinkage-induced FAK phosphorylation at Tyr576/577 and Tyr861, yet not at Tyr397, and inhibited shrinkage-induced NKCC1 activity by ∼50%. The FAK inhibitor PF-573,228 augmented shrinkage-induced Src phosphorylation, and inhibited shrinkage-induced NKCC1 activity by ∼15%. The apparent role of Src in NKCC1 activation did not reflect phosphorylation of myosin light chain kinase (MLC), which was unaffected by shrinkage and by PP2, but may involve Jak2, a known target of Src, which was rapidly activated by osmotic shrinkage and inhibited by PP2. Collectively, our findings suggest a major role for Src and possibly the Jak2 axis in shrinkage-activation of NKCC1 in NIH3T3 cells, whereas no evidence was found for major roles for FAK and MLC in this process. PMID:25377086

  13. Protein kinase C directly phosphorylates the insulin receptor in vitro and reduces its protein-tyrosine kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Bollag, G E; Roth, R A; Beaudoin, J; Mochly-Rosen, D; Koshland, D E

    1986-01-01

    The beta subunit of purified insulin receptor is phosphorylated on a serine residue by purified preparations of protein kinase C (ATP: protein phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.37). This phosphorylation is inhibited by antibodies to protein kinase C and stimulated by phospholipids, diacylglycerol, and Ca2+. The phosphorylation of the receptor by protein kinase C does not affect its insulin-binding activity but does inhibit by 65% the receptor's intrinsic tyrosine-specific protein kinase activity (ATP: protein-tyrosine O-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.112). These results indicate that activators of protein kinase C, such as phorbol esters, desensitize cells to insulin by direct protein kinase C action on the insulin receptor. Images PMID:3526339

  14. The human p50csk tyrosine kinase phosphorylates p56lck at Tyr-505 and down regulates its catalytic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, M; Mustelin, T; Oetken, C; Partanen, J; Flint, N A; Amrein, K E; Autero, M; Burn, P; Alitalo, K

    1992-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases participate in the transduction and modulation of signals that regulate proliferation and differentiation of cells. Excessive or deregulated protein tyrosine kinase activity can cause malignant transformation. The catalytic activity of the T cell protein tyrosine kinase p56lck is normally suppressed by phosphorylation of a carboxyl-terminal tyrosine, Tyr-505, by another cellular protein tyrosine kinase. Here we characterize a human cytosolic 50 kDa protein tyrosine kinase, p50csk, which specifically phosphorylates Tyr-505 of p56lck and a synthetic peptide containing this site. Phosphorylation of Tyr-505 suppressed the catalytic activity of p56lck. We suggest that p50csk negatively regulates p56lck, and perhaps other cellular src family kinases. Images PMID:1639064

  15. Redox-sensitive protein phosphatase activity regulates the phosphorylation state of p38 protein kinase in primary astrocyte culture.

    PubMed

    Robinson, K A; Stewart, C A; Pye, Q N; Nguyen, X; Kenney, L; Salzman, S; Floyd, R A; Hensley, K

    1999-03-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated as second messengers that activate protein kinase cascades, although the means by which ROS regulate signal transduction remains unclear. In the present study, we show that interleukin 1beta (IL1beta), H2O2, and sorbitol-induced hyperosmolarity mediate a 5- to 10-fold increase in phosphorylation (activation) of the p38 protein kinase in rat primary glial cells as measured by analyses of Western blots using an antibody directed against the dually phosphorylated (active) p38. Additionally, IL1beta was found to elicit H2O2 synthesis in these cells. Concurrent with p38 phosphorylation, all three stimulation paradigms caused an inhibition of protein phosphatase activity. Phenyl-tert-butyl nitrone (PBN), a nitrone-based free radical trap and N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), a thiol reducing agent, were examined for their effects on the phosphorylation of p38 as well as phosphatase activity. Pretreatment of cells with either PBN or NAC at 1.0 mM suppressed IL1beta H2O2, and sorbitol-mediated activation of p38 and significantly increased phosphatase activity. These data suggest that ROS, particularly H2O2, are used as second messenger substances that activate p38 in part via the transient inactivation of regulatory protein phosphatases.

  16. The active Zot domain (aa 288–293) increases ZO-1 and myosin 1C serine/threonine phosphorylation, alters interaction between ZO-1 and its binding partners, and induces tight junction disassembly through proteinase activated receptor 2 activation

    PubMed Central

    Goldblum, Simeon E.; Rai, Usha; Tripathi, Amit; Thakar, Manjusha; De Leo, Luigina; Di Toro, Nicola; Not, Tarcisio; Ramachandran, Rithwik; Puche, Adam C.; Hollenberg, Morley D.; Fasano, Alessio

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae-derived zonula occludins toxin (Zot) is a multifunctional protein that reversibly disassembles intestinal tight junctions (tjs). Zot structure-function analysis has mapped this activity to aa 288–293, named AT1002. AT1002 reduced transepithelial electrical resistance across rat small intestine, ex vivo, as did Zot and its processed mature form, ΔG. AT1002 increased in vivo permeability to sugar tracers, whereas scrambled control peptides did not. Binding and barrier assays in proteinase activated receptor (PAR)2-expressing and PAR2-null cells established AT1002 activity to be PAR2 dependent. Coincident with the increased intestinal permeability, confocal microscopy of AT1002-exposed rat intestinal IEC6 cells revealed displacement of ZO-1 and occludin from intercellular boundaries. In coimmunoprecipitation assays, AT1002 decreased ZO-1-occludin and ZO-1-claudin 1 interactions coincident with PKCα-dependent ZO-1 serine/threonine phosphorylation. Further, AT1002 increased serine phosphorylation of myosin 1C and, at the same time, transiently diminished its association with ZO-1. The COOH-terminal domain of ZO-1 was required for its association with myosin 1C. These data indicate that the NH2-terminal portion of active Zot contains a PAR2-activating motif, FCIGRL, that increases PKCα-dependent ZO-1 and myosin 1C serine/threonine phosphorylation. These modifications provoke selective disengagement of ZO-1 from its binding partners, occludin, claudin 1, and myosin 1C, coincident with opening of tjs.—Goldblum, S. E., Rai, U., Tripathi, A., Thakar, M., De Leo, L., Di Toro, N., Not, T., Ramachandran, R., Puche, A. C., Hollenberg, M. D., Fasano, A. The active Zot domain (aa 288–293) increases ZO-1 and myosin 1C serine/threonine phosphorylation, alters interaction between ZO-1 and its binding partners, and induces tight junction disassembly through proteinase activated receptor 2 activation. PMID:20852064

  17. G-CSF Stimulates Jak2-Dependent Gab2 Phosphorylation Leading to Erk1/2 Activation and Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Xue, Jia; Zadorozny, Eva V.; Robinson, Lisa J.

    2009-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), the major cytokine regulator of neutrophilic granulopoiesis, stimulates both the proliferation and differentiation of myeloid precursors. A variety of signaling proteins have been identified as mediators of G-CSF signaling, but understanding of their specific interactions and organization into signaling pathways for particular cellular effects is incomplete. The present study examined the role of the scaffolding protein Grb2-associated binding protein-2 (Gab2) in G-CSF signaling. We found that a chemical inhibitor of Janus kinases inhibited G-CSF-stimulated Gab2 phosphorylation. Transfection with Jak2 antisense and dominant negative constructs also inhibited Gab2 phosphorylation in response to G-CSF. In addition, G-CSF enhanced the association of Jak2 with Gab2. In vitro, activated Jak2 directly phosphorylated specific Gab2 tyrosine residues. Mutagenesis studies revealed that Gab2 tyrosine 643 (Y643) was a major target of Jak2 in vitro, and a key residue for Jak2-dependent phosphorylation in intact cells. Mutation of Gab2 Y643 inhibited G-CSF-stimulated Erk1/2 activation and Shp2 binding to Gab2. Loss of Y643 also inhibited Gab2-mediated G-CSF-stimulated cell proliferation. Together, these results identify a novel signaling pathway involving Jak2-dependent Gab2 phosphorylation leading to Erk1/2 activation and cell proliferation in response to G-CSF. PMID:18644434

  18. The cell-specific activity of the estrogen receptor α may be fine-tuned by phosphorylation-induced structural gymnastics

    PubMed Central

    Gburcik, Valentina; Picard, Didier

    2006-01-01

    The estrogen receptor α (ERα) regulates the transcription of target genes by recruiting coregulator proteins through several domains including the two activation functions AF1 and AF2. The contribution of the N-terminally located AF1 activity is particularly important in differentiated cells, and for ERα to integrate inputs from other signaling pathways. However, how the phosphorylation of key residues influences AF1 activity has long remained mysterious, in part because the naturally disordered AF1 domain has resisted a structural characterization. The recent discovery of two coregulators that are specific for a phosphorylated form of AF1 suggests that phosphorylation, possibly in conjunction with the subsequent binding of these coregulators, may enforce a stable structure. The binding of the "pioneer" coregulators might facilitate the subsequent recruitment of yet other coregulators. Different AF1 folds may be enabled by the combinatorial action of posttranslational modifications and coregulator binding thereby fine-tuning ERα activities in a cell- and promoter-specific fashion. PMID:16604168

  19. Primary WWOX phosphorylation and JNK activation during etoposide induces cytotoxicity in HEK293 cells

    PubMed Central

    Jamshidiha, M.; Habibollahi, P.; Ostad, S.N.; Ghahremani, M.H.

    2010-01-01

    Background and the purpose of the study Etoposide is an antineoplastic agent used in multiple cancers. It is known that etoposide induce cell death via interaction with topoisomerase II; however, the etopoisde cellular response is poorly understood. Upon etoposide induced DNA damage, many stress signaling pathways including JNK are activated. In response to DNA damage, it has been shown that WWOX, a recently introduced tumor suppressor, can be activated. In this study the activation of WWOX and JNK and their interaction following etoposide treatment were evaluated. Materials and Methods HEK293 cells treated with etoposide were lysed in a time course manner. The whole cell lysates were used to evaluate JNK and WWOX activation pattern using Phospho specific antibodies on western blots. The viability of cells treated with etoposide, JNK specific inhibitor and their combination was examined using MTT assay. Results Findings of this study indicate that WWOX and JNK are activated in a simultaneous way in response to DNA damage. Moreover, JNK inhibition enhances etoposide induced cytotoxicity in HEK293. Conclusion Taken together, our results indicate that etoposide induces cytotoxicity and WWOX phosphorylation and the cytotoxicty is augmented by blocking JNK pathway. PMID:22615609

  20. Phosphorylation mechanisms in chemical evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoffstall, Allen M.; Laing, Euton M.

    1985-06-01

    An objective of this work is to elucidate the mechanism of phosphorylation of nucleosides in amide solvents and in urea. A second objective is to assess the importance of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of nucleotide derivatives in amide environments. Although the most complex amide studied here was N-methylacetamide, inferences are made on the importance of dephosphorylation for nucleotides in oligopeptide environments. Phosphorylations in amide solvents and in urea are suggested to proceed through monomeric metaphosphate, which was first postulated as a reaction intermediate thirty years ago (Butcher and Westheimer, 1955). Phosphorylation of nucleosides and nucleotides and dephosphorylation of nucleotide derivatives have been studied in formamide, N-methylformamide, urea and N-methylacetamide. Hydrated forms of 5'-ADP and 5'ATP are unstable in hot amide solvents and in urea. They decompose to a mixture of adenosine and its phosphorylated derivatives. The rate of decomposition is much slower in N-methylacetamide than in formamide or urea. Experiments designed to prepare oligonucleotides in the presence of oligopeptides have been reported (White, 1983). According to the present study, it is not unreasonable to expect that nucleotide derivatives can be condensed with nucleosides to form oligonucleotides in a peptide environment. However, nucleotide monomers such as 5'-ATP, 5'-ADP or 5'AMP will suffer isomerization or decomposition during condensation use of activated phosphate derivatives is preferable. Monomeric metaphosphate has not been isolated or characterized in amide solvents. It is proposed here as a reaction intermediate, probably in a complexed form with the amide.

  1. A Form of Perforant Path LTP Can Occur without ERK1/2 Phosphorylation or Immediate Early Gene Induction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steward, Oswald; Huang, Fen; Guzowski, John F.

    2007-01-01

    Stimulation paradigms that induce perforant path long-term potentiation (LTP) initiate phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and induce expression of a variety of immediate early genes (IEGs). These events are thought to be critical components of the mechanism for establishing the changes in synaptic efficacy that endure for hours or longer. Here we show that…

  2. Autoantibodies to RNA polymerase II are common in systemic lupus erythematosus and overlap syndrome. Specific recognition of the phosphorylated (IIO) form by a subset of human sera.

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, M; Ajmani, A K; Ogasawara, T; Langdon, J J; Hirakata, M; Wang, J; Reeves, W H

    1994-01-01

    recognition by autoantibodies, one of them characterized by specific recognition of the transcriptionally active (phosphorylated) form of RNAP II. The clinical significance of these different patterns remains to be determined. Images PMID:7962544

  3. Upregulation of calpain activity precedes tau phosphorylation and loss of synaptic proteins in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Kurbatskaya, Ksenia; Phillips, Emma C; Croft, Cara L; Dentoni, Giacomo; Hughes, Martina M; Wade, Matthew A; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Troakes, Claire; O'Neill, Michael J; Perez-Nievas, Beatriz G; Hanger, Diane P; Noble, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in calcium homeostasis are widely reported to contribute to synaptic degeneration and neuronal loss in Alzheimer's disease. Elevated cytosolic calcium concentrations lead to activation of the calcium-sensitive cysteine protease, calpain, which has a number of substrates known to be abnormally regulated in disease. Analysis of human brain has shown that calpain activity is elevated in AD compared to controls, and that calpain-mediated proteolysis regulates the activity of important disease-associated proteins including the tau kinases cyclin-dependent kinase 5 and glycogen kinase synthase-3. Here, we sought to investigate the likely temporal association between these changes during the development of sporadic AD using Braak staged post-mortem brain. Quantification of protein amounts in these tissues showed increased activity of calpain-1 from Braak stage III onwards in comparison to controls, extending previous findings that calpain-1 is upregulated at end-stage disease, and suggesting that activation of calcium-sensitive signalling pathways are sustained from early stages of disease development. Increases in calpain-1 activity were associated with elevated activity of the endogenous calpain inhibitor, calpastatin, itself a known calpain substrate. Activation of the tau kinases, glycogen-kinase synthase-3 and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 were also found to occur in Braak stage II-III brain, and these preceded global elevations in tau phosphorylation and the loss of post-synaptic markers. In addition, we identified transient increases in total amyloid precursor protein and pre-synaptic markers in Braak stage II-III brain, that were lost by end stage Alzheimer's disease, that may be indicative of endogenous compensatory responses to the initial stages of neurodegeneration. These findings provide insight into the molecular events that underpin the progression of Alzheimer's disease, and further highlight the rationale for investigating novel treatment

  4. Upregulation of calpain activity precedes tau phosphorylation and loss of synaptic proteins in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Kurbatskaya, Ksenia; Phillips, Emma C; Croft, Cara L; Dentoni, Giacomo; Hughes, Martina M; Wade, Matthew A; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Troakes, Claire; O'Neill, Michael J; Perez-Nievas, Beatriz G; Hanger, Diane P; Noble, Wendy

    2016-03-31

    Alterations in calcium homeostasis are widely reported to contribute to synaptic degeneration and neuronal loss in Alzheimer's disease. Elevated cytosolic calcium concentrations lead to activation of the calcium-sensitive cysteine protease, calpain, which has a number of substrates known to be abnormally regulated in disease. Analysis of human brain has shown that calpain activity is elevated in AD compared to controls, and that calpain-mediated proteolysis regulates the activity of important disease-associated proteins including the tau kinases cyclin-dependent kinase 5 and glycogen kinase synthase-3. Here, we sought to investigate the likely temporal association between these changes during the development of sporadic AD using Braak staged post-mortem brain. Quantification of protein amounts in these tissues showed increased activity of calpain-1 from Braak stage III onwards in comparison to controls, extending previous findings that calpain-1 is upregulated at end-stage disease, and suggesting that activation of calcium-sensitive signalling pathways are sustained from early stages of disease development. Increases in calpain-1 activity were associated with elevated activity of the endogenous calpain inhibitor, calpastatin, itself a known calpain substrate. Activation of the tau kinases, glycogen-kinase synthase-3 and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 were also found to occur in Braak stage II-III brain, and these preceded global elevations in tau phosphorylation and the loss of post-synaptic markers. In addition, we identified transient increases in total amyloid precursor protein and pre-synaptic markers in Braak stage II-III brain, that were lost by end stage Alzheimer's disease, that may be indicative of endogenous compensatory responses to the initial stages of neurodegeneration. These findings provide insight into the molecular events that underpin the progression of Alzheimer's disease, and further highlight the rationale for investigating novel treatment

  5. $sup 238$Pu fuel form activities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    This report for STYPu Fuel Form Activities has one main section: SRP-PuFF Facility. The SRL portion of this program has been completed. The program status, budget information, and milestone schedules are discussed. The SRP portion of this report summarizes production of STYPuO2 fuel forms for use in radioisotopic thermoelectric generators (RTG's) in the Plutonium Fuel Form (Puff) Facility at the Savannah River Plant. The PuFF Facility has been placed in a production readiness mode of operation pending funding of additional heat source programs.

  6. DNA-dependent protein phosphorylation activity in Xenopus is coupled to a Ku-like protein.

    PubMed

    Kanungo, J; Cameron, R S; Takeda, Y; Hardin, J A

    1997-10-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a nuclear enzyme and functions as a serine/threonine kinase that has been well characterized in both the human and the mouse. The regulatory subunit of DNA-PK is the Ku autoantigen. To demonstrate that a Ku-like protein is present in Xenopus oocytes, we used immunoprecipitation analysis with a monoclonal antibody raised against human Ku antigen and autoimmune serum containing anti-Ku antibodies. Metabolic labeling studies indicate that the Ku-like protein is synthesized mainly in late vitellogenic oocytes. By using a specific peptide substrate for DNA-PK, we demonstrate the activity of a DNA-dependent protein kinase in oocyte extracts. The kinase activity requires the Ku-like protein, since extracts depleted of Ku protein by immunoadsorption with human anti-Ku antibodies fail to demonstrate the DNA-dependent phosphorylation activity. The increased enzyme activity in vitellogenic oocytes may be correlated to the increased levels of Ku protein observed in these oocytes compared to the pre- and early vitellogenic oocytes.

  7. miR-34 activity is modulated through 5'-end phosphorylation in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Salzman, David W; Nakamura, Kotoka; Nallur, Sunitha; Dookwah, Michelle T; Metheetrairut, Chanatip; Slack, Frank J; Weidhaas, Joanne B

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) expression is tightly regulated by several mechanisms, including transcription and cleavage of the miRNA precursor RNAs, to generate a mature miRNA, which is thought to be directly correlated with activity. MiR-34 is a tumour-suppressor miRNA important in cell survival, that is transcriptionally upregulated by p53 in response to DNA damage. Here, we show for the first time that there is a pool of mature miR-34 in cells that lacks a 5'-phosphate and is inactive. Following exposure to a DNA-damaging stimulus, the inactive pool of miR-34 is rapidly activated through 5'-end phosphorylation in an ATM- and Clp1-dependent manner, enabling loading into Ago2. Importantly, this mechanism of miR-34 activation occurs faster than, and independently of, de novo p53-mediated transcription and processing. Our study reveals a novel mechanism of rapid miRNA activation in response to environmental stimuli occurring at the mature miRNA level. PMID:26996824

  8. The retroviral restriction ability of SAMHD1, but not its deoxynucleotide triphosphohydrolase activity, is regulated by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    White, Tommy E; Brandariz-Nuñez, Alberto; Valle-Casuso, Jose Carlos; Amie, Sarah; Nguyen, Laura Anh; Kim, Baek; Tuzova, Marina; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2013-04-17

    SAMHD1 is a cellular enzyme that depletes intracellular deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) and inhibits the ability of retroviruses, notably HIV-1, to infect myeloid cells. Although SAMHD1 is expressed in both cycling and noncycling cells, the antiviral activity of SAMHD1 is limited to noncycling cells. We determined that SAMHD1 is phosphorylated on residue T592 in cycling cells but that this phosphorylation is lost when cells are in a noncycling state. Reverse genetic experiments revealed that SAMHD1 phosphorylated on residue T592 is unable to block retroviral infection, but this modification does not affect the ability of SAMHD1 to decrease cellular dNTP levels. SAMHD1 contains a target motif for cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (cdk1) ((592)TPQK(595)), and cdk1 activity is required for SAMHD1 phosphorylation. Collectively, these findings indicate that phosphorylation modulates the ability of SAMHD1 to block retroviral infection without affecting its ability to decrease cellular dNTP levels.

  9. The stress-responsive kinases MAPKAPK2/MAPKAPK3 activate starvation-induced autophagy through Beclin 1 phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Zhongju; Sumpter, Rhea; Su, Minfei; Zang, Xiao; Sinha, Sangita; Gaestel, Matthias; Levine, Beth

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a fundamental adaptive response to amino acid starvation orchestrated by conserved gene products, the autophagy (ATG) proteins. However, the cellular cues that activate the function of ATG proteins during amino acid starvation are incompletely understood. Here we show that two related stress-responsive kinases, members of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway MAPKAPK2 (MK2) and MAPKAPK3 (MK3), positively regulate starvation-induced autophagy by phosphorylating an essential ATG protein, Beclin 1, at serine 90, and that this phosphorylation site is essential for the tumor suppressor function of Beclin 1. Moreover, MK2/MK3-dependent Beclin 1 phosphorylation (and starvation-induced autophagy) is blocked in vitro and in vivo by BCL2, a negative regulator of Beclin 1. Together, these findings reveal MK2/MK3 as crucial stress-responsive kinases that promote autophagy through Beclin 1 S90 phosphorylation, and identify the blockade of MK2/3-dependent Beclin 1 S90 phosphorylation as a mechanism by which BCL2 inhibits the autophagy function of Beclin 1. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05289.001 PMID:25693418

  10. Identification of a novel phosphorylation site, Ser-170, as a regulator of bad pro-apoptotic activity.

    PubMed

    Dramsi, Shaynoor; Scheid, Michael P; Maiti, Arpita; Hojabrpour, Payman; Chen, Xianming; Schubert, Kathryn; Goodlett, David R; Aebersold, Ruedi; Duronio, Vincent

    2002-02-22

    Bad is a pro-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family of proteins that is thought to exert a death-promoting effect by heterodimerization with Bcl-X(L), nullifying its anti-apoptotic activity. Growth factors may promote cell survival at least partially through phosphorylation of Bad at one or more of Ser-112, -136, or -155. Our previous work showed that Bad is also phosphorylated in response to cytokines at another site, which we now identify as Ser-170. The functional role of this novel phosphorylation site was assessed by site-directed mutagenesis and analysis of the pro-apoptotic function of Bad in transiently transfected HEK293 and COS-7 cells or by stable expression in the cytokine-dependent cell line, MC/9. In general, mutation of Ser-170 to Ala results in a protein with increased ability to induce apoptosis, similar to the S112A mutant. Mutation of Ser-170 to Asp, mimicking a constitutively phosphorylated site, results in a protein that is virtually unable to induce apoptosis. Similarly, the S112A/S170D double mutant does not cause apoptosis in HEK293 and MC/9 cell lines. These data strongly suggest that phosphorylation of Bad at Ser-170 is a critical event in blocking the pro-apoptotic activity of Bad. PMID:11717309

  11. Phosphorylation of the Arp2 subunit relieves auto-inhibitory interactions for Arp2/3 complex activation.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Arjun; LeClaire, Lawrence L; Barber, Diane L; Jacobson, Matthew P

    2011-11-01

    Actin filament assembly by the actin-related protein (Arp) 2/3 complex is necessary to build many cellular structures, including lamellipodia at the leading edge of motile cells and phagocytic cups, and to move endosomes and intracellular pathogens. The crucial role of the Arp2/3 complex in cellular processes requires precise spatiotemporal regulation of its activity. While binding of nucleation-promoting factors (NPFs) has long been considered essential to Arp2/3 complex activity, we recently showed that phosphorylation of the Arp2 subunit is also necessary for Arp2/3 complex activation. Using molecular dynamics simulations and biochemical assays with recombinant Arp2/3 complex, we now show how phosphorylation of Arp2 induces conformational changes permitting activation. The simulations suggest that phosphorylation causes reorientation of Arp2 relative to Arp3 by destabilizing a network of salt-bridge interactions at the interface of the Arp2, Arp3, and ARPC4 subunits. Simulations also suggest a gain-of-function ARPC4 mutant that we show experimentally to have substantial activity in the absence of NPFs. We propose a model in which a network of auto-inhibitory salt-bridge interactions holds the Arp2 subunit in an inactive orientation. These auto-inhibitory interactions are destabilized upon phosphorylation of Arp2, allowing Arp2 to reorient to an activation-competent state. PMID:22125478

  12. AMPK antagonizes hepatic glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP signalling via phosphorylation-induced activation of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 4B

    PubMed Central

    Johanns, M.; Lai, Y.-C.; Hsu, M.-F.; Jacobs, R.; Vertommen, D.; Van Sande, J.; Dumont, J. E.; Woods, A.; Carling, D.; Hue, L.; Viollet, B.; Foretz, M; Rider, M H

    2016-01-01

    Biguanides such as metformin have previously been shown to antagonize hepatic glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP (cAMP) signalling independently of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) via direct inhibition of adenylate cyclase by AMP. Here we show that incubation of hepatocytes with the small-molecule AMPK activator 991 decreases glucagon-stimulated cAMP accumulation, cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activity and downstream PKA target phosphorylation. Moreover, incubation of hepatocytes with 991 increases the Vmax of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 4B (PDE4B) without affecting intracellular adenine nucleotide concentrations. The effects of 991 to decrease glucagon-stimulated cAMP concentrations and activate PDE4B are lost in hepatocytes deleted for both catalytic subunits of AMPK. PDE4B is phosphorylated by AMPK at three sites, and by site-directed mutagenesis, Ser304 phosphorylation is important for activation. In conclusion, we provide a new mechanism by which AMPK antagonizes hepatic glucagon signalling via phosphorylation-induced PDE4B activation. PMID:26952277

  13. Smooth-muscle mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase: purification and characterization, and the phosphorylation of caldesmon.

    PubMed Central

    Childs, T J; Mak, A S

    1993-01-01

    A single 42 kDa isoform of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase is expressed in both embryonic and adult chicken gizzard. The gizzard MAP kinase, which cross-reacts with anti-p44mpk antibody, has been purified from adult chicken gizzard and partially characterized. The purification protocol employs phenyl-Sepharose, polylysine-agarose, hydroxyapatite, Mono-Q and phenyl-Superose column chromatography. The purified enzyme phosphorylates myelin basic protein and gizzard high-molecular-mass (h-)caldesmon. Sea-star p44mpk and gizzard MAP kinase phosphorylate h-caldesmon at identical sites at the C-terminal domain, as revealed by tryptic-peptide mapping of the phosphorylated protein. Phosphorylation of h-caldesmon by gizzard MAP kinase abolishes its interaction with polymerized tubulin. The specific activity of the purified gizzard kinase toward myelin basic protein is similar to that of brain tau kinase, but is only a fraction of that of activated sea-star p44mpk. This suggests that, although a large amount of MAP kinase is present in the gizzard, only a small percentage of the enzyme is activated normally. Autophosphorylation of the gizzard kinase, at least in part on tyrosine residues, activates its kinase activity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:8280072

  14. ATM-dependent phosphorylation of Mdm2 on serine 395: role in p53 activation by DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Maya, R; Balass, M; Kim, S T; Shkedy, D; Leal, J F; Shifman, O; Moas, M; Buschmann, T; Ronai, Z; Shiloh, Y; Kastan, M B; Katzir, E; Oren, M

    2001-05-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein, a key regulator of cellular responses to genotoxic stress, is stabilized and activated after DNA damage. The rapid activation of p53 by ionizing radiation and radiomimetic agents is largely dependent on the ATM kinase. p53 is phosphorylated by ATM shortly after DNA damage, resulting in enhanced stability and activity of p53. The Mdm2 oncoprotein is a pivotal negative regulator of p53. In response to ionizing radiation and radiomimetic drugs, Mdm2 undergoes rapid ATM-dependent phosphorylation prior to p53 accumulation. This results in a decrease in its reactivity with the 2A10 monoclonal antibody. Phage display analysis identified a consensus 2A10 recognition sequence, possessing the core motif DYS. Unexpectedly, this motif appears twice within the human Mdm2 molecule, at positions corresponding to residues 258-260 and 393-395. Both putative 2A10 epitopes are highly conserved and encompass potential phosphorylation sites. Serine 395, residing within the carboxy-terminal 2A10 epitope, is the major target on Mdm2 for phosphorylation by ATM in vitro. Mutational analysis supports the conclusion that Mdm2 undergoes ATM-dependent phosphorylation on serine 395 in vivo in response to DNA damage. The data further suggests that phosphorylated Mdm2 may be less capable of promoting the nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of p53 and its subsequent degradation, thereby enabling p53 accumulation. Our findings imply that activation of p53 by DNA damage is achieved, in part, through attenuation of the p53-inhibitory potential of Mdm2.

  15. Activity-dependent phosphorylation of MeCP2 threonine 308 regulates interaction with NCoR.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Daniel H; Gabel, Harrison W; Robinson, Nathaniel D; Kastan, Nathaniel R; Hu, Linda S; Cohen, Sonia; Navarro, Adrija J; Lyst, Matthew J; Ekiert, Robert; Bird, Adrian P; Greenberg, Michael E

    2013-07-18

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an X-linked human neurodevelopmental disorder with features of autism and severe neurological dysfunction in females. RTT is caused by mutations in methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2), a nuclear protein that, in neurons, regulates transcription, is expressed at high levels similar to that of histones, and binds to methylated cytosines broadly across the genome. By phosphotryptic mapping, we identify three sites (S86, S274 and T308) of activity-dependent MeCP2 phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of these sites is differentially induced by neuronal activity, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, or agents that elevate the intracellular level of 3',5'-cyclic AMP (cAMP), indicating that MeCP2 may function as an epigenetic regulator of gene expression that integrates diverse signals from the environment. Here we show that the phosphorylation of T308 blocks the interaction of the repressor domain of MeCP2 with the nuclear receptor co-repressor (NCoR) complex and suppresses the ability of MeCP2 to repress transcription. In knock-in mice bearing the common human RTT missense mutation R306C, neuronal activity fails to induce MeCP2 T308 phosphorylation, suggesting that the loss of T308 phosphorylation might contribute to RTT. Consistent with this possibility, the mutation of MeCP2 T308A in mice leads to a decrease in the induction of a subset of activity-regulated genes and to RTT-like symptoms. These findings indicate that the activity-dependent phosphorylation of MeCP2 at T308 regulates the interaction of MeCP2 with the NCoR complex, and that RTT in humans may be due, in part, to the loss of activity-dependent MeCP2 T308 phosphorylation and a disruption of the phosphorylation-regulated interaction of MeCP2 with the NCoR complex.

  16. Properties of phosphorylated thymidylate synthase.

    PubMed

    Frączyk, Tomasz; Ruman, Tomasz; Wilk, Piotr; Palmowski, Paweł; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Cieśla, Joanna; Zieliński, Zbigniew; Nizioł, Joanna; Jarmuła, Adam; Maj, Piotr; Gołos, Barbara; Wińska, Patrycja; Ostafil, Sylwia; Wałajtys-Rode, Elżbieta; Shugar, David; Rode, Wojciech

    2015-12-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) may undergo phosphorylation endogenously in mammalian cells, and as a recombinant protein expressed in bacterial cells, as indicated by the reaction of purified enzyme protein with Pro-Q® Diamond Phosphoprotein Gel Stain (PGS). With recombinant human, mouse, rat, Trichinella spiralis and Caenorhabditis elegans TSs, expressed in Escherichia coli, the phosphorylated, compared to non-phosphorylated recombinant enzyme forms, showed a decrease in Vmax(app), bound their cognate mRNA (only rat enzyme studied), and repressed translation of their own and several heterologous mRNAs (human, rat and mouse enzymes studied). However, attempts to determine the modification site(s), whether endogenously expressed in mammalian cells, or recombinant proteins, did not lead to unequivocal results. Comparative ESI-MS/analysis of IEF fractions of TS preparations from parental and FdUrd-resistant mouse leukemia L1210 cells, differing in sensitivity to inactivation by FdUMP, demonstrated phosphorylation of Ser(10) and Ser(16) in the resistant enzyme only, although PGS staining pointed to the modification of both L1210 TS proteins. The TS proteins phosphorylated in bacterial cells were shown by (31)P NMR to be modified only on histidine residues, like potassium phosphoramidate (KPA)-phosphorylated TS proteins. NanoLC-MS/MS, enabling the use of CID and ETD peptide fragmentation methods, identified several phosphohistidine residues, but certain phosphoserine and phosphothreonine residues were also implicated. Molecular dynamics studies, based on the mouse TS crystal structure, allowed one to assess potential of several phosphorylated histidine residues to affect catalytic activity, the effect being phosphorylation site dependent.

  17. Phosphorylated (pT371)TRF1 is recruited to sites of DNA damage to facilitate homologous recombination and checkpoint activation

    PubMed Central

    McKerlie, Megan; Walker, John R.; Mitchell, Taylor R. H.; Wilson, Florence R.; Zhu, Xu-Dong

    2013-01-01

    TRF1, a duplex telomeric DNA-binding protein, plays an important role in telomere metabolism. We have previously reported that a fraction of endogenous TRF1 can stably exist free of telomere chromatin when it is phosphorylated at T371 by Cdk1; however, the role of this telomere-free (pT371)TRF1 has yet to be fully characterized. Here we show that phosphorylated (pT371)TRF1 is recruited to sites of DNA damage, forming damage-induced foci in response to ionizing radiation (IR), etoposide and camptothecin. We find that IR-induced (pT371)TRF1 foci formation is dependent on the ATM- and Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1-mediated DNA damage response. While loss of functional BRCA1 impairs the formation of IR-induced (pT371)TRF1 foci, depletion of either 53BP1 or Rif1 stimulates IR-induced (pT371)TRF1 foci formation. In addition, we show that TRF1 depletion or the lack of its phosphorylation at T371 impairs DNA end resection and repair of nontelomeric DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination. The lack of TRF1 phosphorylation at T371 also hampers the activation of the G2/M checkpoint and sensitizes cells to PARP inhibition, IR and camptothecin. Collectively, these results reveal a novel but important function of phosphorylated (pT371)TRF1 in facilitating DNA double-strand break repair and the maintenance of genome integrity. PMID:23997120

  18. Synergistic Activation of ERα by Estrogen and Prolactin in Breast Cancer Cells Requires Tyrosyl Phosphorylation of PAK1.

    PubMed

    Oladimeji, Peter; Skerl, Rebekah; Rusch, Courtney; Diakonova, Maria

    2016-05-01

    Serine/threonine kinase PAK1 is activated by estrogen and plays an important role in breast cancer. However, the integration of PAK1 into the estrogen response is not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the hormone-induced activation of estrogen receptor (ERα, ESR1). We show that estrogen activated PAK1 through both the ERα and GPER1 membrane receptors. Estrogen-dependent activation of PAK1 required the phosphorylation of tyrosine residues by Etk/Bmx and protein kinase A (PKA) within an assembled signaling complex comprising pTyr-PAK1, Etk/Bmx, the heterotrimer G-protein subunits Gβ1, Gγ2, and/or Gγ5, PAK-associated guanine nucleotide exchange factor (βPIX, ARHGEF7), and PKA. Moreover, the PKA RIIβ subunit is a direct target of PAK1, and thus in response to estrogen, the activated pTyr-PAK1 complex reciprocally potentiated PKA activity, suggesting a positive feedback mechanism. We also demonstrate that PKA phosphorylated Ser305-ERα in response to estrogen, but pTyr-PAK1 phosphorylated Ser305-ERα in response to prolactin (PRL), implying that maximal ERα phosphorylation is achieved when cells are exposed to both PRL and estrogen. Furthermore, S305-ERα activation led to enhanced phosphorylation of Ser118-ERα and promoted cell proliferation and tumor growth. Together, these data strongly support a critical interplay between PRL and estrogen via PAK1 and suggest that ligand-independent activation of ERα through PRL/PAK1 may impart resistance to anti-estrogen therapies. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2600-11. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26944939

  19. Separate inputs modulate phosphorylation-dependent and -independent type VI secretion activation

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Julie M.; Austin, Laura S.; Hsu, FoSheng; Hicks, Kevin G.; Hood, Rachel D.; Mougous, Joseph D.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Productive intercellular delivery of cargo by secretory systems requires exquisite temporal and spatial choreography. Our laboratory has demonstrated that the hemolysin co-regulated secretion island I (HSI-I)-encoded type VI secretion system (H1-T6SS) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa transfers effector proteins to other bacterial cells. The activity of these effectors requires cell contact-dependent delivery by the secretion apparatus, and thus their export is highly repressed under planktonic growth conditions. Here we define regulatory pathways that orchestrate efficient secretion by this system. We identified a T6S-associated protein, TagF, as a posttranslational repressor of the H1-T6SS. Strains activated by TagF derepression or stimulation of a previously identified threonine phosphorylation pathway (TPP) share the property of secretory ATPase recruitment to the T6S apparatus, yet display different effector output levels and genetic requirements for their export. We also found that the pathways respond to distinct stimuli; we identified surface growth as a physiological cue that activates the H1-T6SS exclusively through the TPP. Coordination of posttranslational triggering with cell contact-promoting growth conditions provides a mechanism for the T6SS to avoid wasteful release of effectors. PMID:22017253

  20. Enhancement of BACE1 Activity by p25/Cdk5-Mediated Phosphorylation in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye-Won; Seo, Hyemyung; Kim, Jeong Hee; Chung, Sul-Hee

    2015-01-01

    The activity of beta-site amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) is elevated during aging and in sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD), but the underlying mechanisms of this change are not well understood. p25/Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, including AD. Here, we describe a potential mechanism by which BACE activity is increased in AD brains. First, we show that BACE1 is phosphorylated by the p25/Cdk5 complex at Thr252 and that this phosphorylation increases BACE1 activity. Then, we demonstrate that the level of phospho-BACE1 is increased in the brains of AD patients and in mammalian cells and transgenic mice that overexpress p25. Furthermore, the fraction of p25 prepared from iodixanol gradient centrifugation was unexpectedly protected by protease digestion, suggesting that p25/Cdk5-mediated BACE1 phosphorylation may occur in the lumen. These results reveal a link between p25 and BACE1 in AD brains and suggest that upregulated Cdk5 activation by p25 accelerates AD pathogenesis by enhancing BACE1 activity via phosphorylation. PMID:26317805

  1. Platelet activation via the collagen receptor GPVI is not altered in platelets from chronic myeloid leukaemia patients despite the presence of the constitutively phosphorylated adapter protein CrkL.

    PubMed

    Best, D; Pasquet, S; Littlewood, T J; Brunskill, S J; Pallister, C J; Watson, S P

    2001-03-01

    In this study, we show that the adapter proteins CrkL and Cbl undergo increases in tyrosine phosphorylation and form an intracellular complex in platelets stimulated with the snake venom toxin convulxin, a selective agonist at the collagen receptor glycoprotein VI (GPVI). Constitutive tyrosine phosphorylation of CrkL has previously been reported in platelets from chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) patients. This was confirmed in the present study, and shown to result in a weak constitutive association of CrkL with Cbl and a number of other unidentified tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins. There was no further increase in phosphorylation of CrkL in CML platelets in response to GPVI activation, whereas phosphorylation of Cbl and its association with CrkL were potentiated. In addition, this was accompanied by a small increase in p42/ 44 mapkinase (MAPK) activity in CML platelets. The functional consequence of the presence of constitutively phosphorylated proteins in CML platelets was investigated by measurement of aminophospholipid exposure and alpha-granule secretion. This revealed little alteration in the concentration-response curves for either in CML platelets stimulated via GPVI, although maximal levels of P-selectin were depressed. Despite the minimal effect on platelet activation in CML patients, we cannot exclude a role for CrkL or Cbl in signal transduction pathways stimulated via GPVI. PMID:11260061

  2. Activation of PI3-kinase stimulates endocytosis of ROMK via Akt1/SGK1-dependent phosphorylation of WNK1.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chih-Jen; Huang, Chou-Long

    2011-03-01

    WNK kinases stimulate endocytosis of ROMK channels to regulate renal K+ handling. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-activating hormones, such as insulin and IGF 1, phosphorylate WNK1, but how this affects the regulation of ROMK abundance is unknown. Here, serum starvation of ROMK-transfected HEK cells led to an increase of ROMK current density; subsequent addition of insulin or IGF1 inhibited ROMK currents in a PI3K-dependent manner. Serum and insulin also increased phosphorylation of the downstream kinases Akt1 and SGK1 as well as WNK1. A biotinylation assay suggested that insulin and IGF1 inhibit ROMK by enhancing its endocytosis, a process that WNK1 may mediate. Knockdown of WNK1 with siRNA or expression of a phospho-deficient WNK1 mutant (T58A) both prevented insulin-induced inhibition of ROMK currents, suggesting that phosphorylation at Threonine-58 of WNK1 is important to mediate the inhibition of ROMK by PI3K-activating hormones or growth factors. In vitro and in vivo kinase assays supported the notion that Akt1 and SGK1 can phosphorylate WNK1 at this site, and we established that Akt1 and SGK1 synergistically inhibit ROMK through WNK1. We used dominant-negative intersectin and dynamin constructs to show that SGK1-mediated phosphorylation of WNK1 inhibits ROMK by promoting its endocytosis. Taken together, these results suggest that PI3K-activating hormones inhibit ROMK by enhancing its endocytosis via a mechanism that involves phosphorylation of WNK1 by Akt1 and SGK1. PMID:21355052

  3. cJun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation of serine 36 is critical for p66Shc activation

    PubMed Central

    Khalid, Sana; Drasche, Astrid; Thurner, Marco; Hermann, Martin; Ashraf, Muhammad Imtiaz; Fresser, Friedrich; Baier, Gottfried; Kremser, Leopold; Lindner, Herbert; Troppmair, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    p66Shc-dependent ROS production contributes to many pathologies including ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) during solid organ transplantation. Inhibiting p66Shc activation may provide a novel therapeutic approach to prevent damage, which is poorly managed by antioxidants in vivo. Previous work suggested that pro-oxidant and a pro-apoptotic function of p66Shc required mitochondrial import, which depended on serine 36 phosphorylation. PKCß has been proposed as S36 kinase but cJun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) may also phosphorylate this residue. To simulate the early stages of ischemia/reperfusion (IR) we either used H2O2 treatment or hypoxia/reoxygenation (HR). As during reperfusion in vivo, we observed increased JNK and p38 activity in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and HL-1 cardiomyocytes along with significantly increased p66ShcS36 phosphorylation, ROS production and cell damage. Application of specific inhibitors caused a pronounced decrease in p66ShcS36 phosphorylation only in the case of JNK1/2. Moreover, S36 phosphorylation of recombinant p66Shc by JNK1 but not PKCß was demonstrated. We further confirmed JNK1/2-dependent regulation of p66ShcS36 phosphorylation, ROS production and cell death using JNK1/2 deficient MEFs. Finally, the low ROS phenotype of JNK1/2 knockout MEFs was reversed by the phosphomimetic p66ShcS36E mutant. Inhibiting JNK1/2-regulated p66Shc activation may thus provide a therapeutic approach for the prevention of oxidative damage. PMID:26868434

  4. Another mechanism for creating diversity in gamma-aminobutyrate type A receptors: RNA splicing directs expression of two forms of gamma 2 phosphorylation site.

    PubMed Central

    Whiting, P; McKernan, R M; Iversen, L L

    1990-01-01

    Diversity of gamma-aminobutyrate type A (GABAA) receptors has recently been proposed to be achieved by assembly of receptor subtypes from a multitude of subunits (alpha 1-6, beta 1-3, gamma 1-2, and delta) encoded by different genes. Here we report a further mechanism for creating GABAA receptor diversity: alternative RNA splicing. Two forms of bovine gamma 2 subunit cDNA were isolated (gamma 2S and gamma 2L) that differed by the presence or absence of a 24-base-pair (8-amino acid) insertion in the cytoplasmic domain between the third and fourth putative membrane-spanning regions. Polymerase chain reaction from RNA demonstrated that the two forms of gamma 2 subunit are expressed in bovine, human, and rat brain. Sequencing of genomic DNA clones encoding the gamma 2 subunit demonstrated that the 24-base-pair insert is organized as a separate exon. Analysis of the sequence of the 8-amino acid insert revealed that it contains a protein kinase C consensus phosphorylation site. Expression of the large cytoplasmic loop domains of gamma 2S and gamma 2L in Escherichia coli, followed by phosphorylation of the recombinant proteins by protein kinase C, demonstrated that gamma 2L, but not gamma 2S, could be phosphorylated. Thus the two forms of gamma 2 subunit differ by the presence or absence of a protein kinase C phosphorylation site. This mechanism for creating GABAA receptor diversity may allow differential regulation of the function of receptor subtypes. Images PMID:1702226

  5. PROLACTIN-INDUCED TYROSINE PHOSPHORYLATION, ACTIVATION AND RECEPTOR ASSOCIATION OF FOCAL ADHESION KINASE (FAK) IN MAMMARY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prolactin-Induced Tyrosine Phosphorylation, Activation and Receptor
    Association of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) in Mammary Epithelial Cells.
    Suzanne E. Fenton1 and Lewis G. Sheffield2. 1U.S. Environmental Protection
    Agency, MD-72, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711, and

  6. p90RSK activation contributes to cerebral ischemic damage via phosphorylation of Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1

    PubMed Central

    Manhas, Namratta; Shi, Yejie; Taunton, Jack; Sun, Dandan

    2010-01-01

    Excessive activation of Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1 (NHE-1) plays a role in cerebral ischemic injury. The current study investigated whether NHE-1 protein in ischemic brains is regulated by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/90-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (p90RSK) signaling pathways. A transient focal ischemia in mice was induced by a 60 min-occlusion of the middle cerebral artery followed by reperfusion for 3, 10, or 60 min (Rp). Expression of phosphorylated ERK 1/2 was significantly elevated in the ipsilateral hemispheres at 3 – 10 min Rp and reduced by 60 min Rp. An increase in phosphorylation of p90RSK, a known NHE-1 kinase, was also detected at 3 – 10 min Rp, which was accompanied with a transient elevation of NHE-1 phosphorylation (p-NHE-1). Stimulation of p90RSK in ischemic neurons was downstream of ERK activation because inhibition of MEK1 (MAP kinase/ERK kinase) with its inhibitor U0126 blocked phosphorylation of p90RSK. Moreover, direct inhibition of p90RSK by its selective inhibitor FMK not only reduced p-NHE-1 expression but also ischemic infarct volume. Taken together, our study revealed that reperfusion triggers a transient stimulation of the ERK/p90RSK pathway. p90RSK activation contributes to cerebral ischemic damage in part via activation of NHE-1 protein. PMID:20557427

  7. Phosphorylation of Ser-204 and Tyr-405 in human malonyl-CoA decarboxylase expressed in silkworm Bombyx mori regulates catalytic decarboxylase activity.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In-Wook; Makishima, Yu; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Kato, Tatsuya; Park, Sungjo; Terzic, Andre; Chung, Shin-Kyo; Park, Enoch Y

    2015-11-01

    Decarboxylation of malonyl-CoA to acetyl-CoA by malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MCD; EC 4.1.1.9) is a vital catalytic reaction of lipid metabolism. While it is established that phosphorylation of MCD modulates the enzymatic activity, the specific phosphorylation sites associated with the catalytic function have not been documented due to lack of sufficient production of MCD with proper post-translational modifications. Here, we used the silkworm-based Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) bacmid system to express human MCD (hMCD) and mapped phosphorylation effects on enzymatic function. Purified MCD from silkworm displayed post-translational phosphorylation and demonstrated coherent enzymatic activity with high yield (-200 μg/silkworm). Point mutations in putative phosphorylation sites, Ser-204 or Tyr-405 of hMCD, identified by bioinformatics and proteomics analyses reduced the catalytic activity, underscoring the functional significance of phosphorylation in modulating decarboxylase-based catalysis. Identified phosphorylated residues are distinct from the decarboxylation catalytic site, implicating a phosphorylation-induced global conformational change of MCD as responsible in altering catalytic function. We conclude that phosphorylation of Ser-204 and Tyr-405 regulates the decarboxylase function of hMCD leveraging the silkworm-based BmNPV bacmid expression system that offers a fail-safe eukaryotic production platform implementing proper post-translational modification such as phosphorylation.

  8. Calcium release by ryanodine receptors mediates hydrogen peroxide-induced activation of ERK and CREB phosphorylation in N2a cells and hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Kemmerling, Ulrike; Muñoz, Pablo; Müller, Marioly; Sánchez, Gina; Aylwin, María L; Klann, Eric; Carrasco, M Angélica; Hidalgo, Cecilia

    2007-05-01

    Hydrogen peroxide, which stimulates ERK phosphorylation and synaptic plasticity in hippocampal neurons, has also been shown to stimulate calcium release in muscle cells by promoting ryanodine receptor redox modification (S-glutathionylation). We report here that exposure of N2a cells or rat hippocampal neurons in culture to 200 microM H2O2 elicited calcium signals, increased ryanodine receptor S-glutathionylation, and enhanced both ERK and CREB phosphorylation. In mouse hippocampal slices, H2O2 (1 microM) also stimulated ERK and CREB phosphorylation. Preincubation with ryanodine (50 microM) largely prevented the effects of H2O2 on calcium signals and ERK/CREB phosphorylation. In N2a cells, the ERK kinase inhibitor U0126 suppressed ERK phosphorylation and abolished the stimulation of CREB phosphorylation produced by H2O2, suggesting that H2O2 enhanced CREB phosphorylation via ERK activation. In N2a cells in calcium-free media, 200 microM H2O2 stimulated ERK and CREB phosphorylation, while preincubation with thapsigargin prevented these enhancements. These combined results strongly suggest that H2O2 promotes ryanodine receptors redox modification; the resulting calcium release signals, by enhancing ERK activity, would increase CREB phosphorylation. We propose that ryanodine receptor stimulation by activity-generated redox species produces calcium release signals that may contribute significantly to hippocampal synaptic plasticity, including plasticity that requires long-lasting ERK-dependent CREB phosphorylation. PMID:17074386

  9. Three Distinct Patterns of Histone H3Y41 Phosphorylation Mark Active Genes

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Mark A.; Foster, Samuel D.; Bannister, Andrew J.; Robson, Samuel C.; Hannah, Rebecca; Wang, Xiaonan; Xhemalce, Blerta; Wood, Andrew D.; Green, Anthony R.; Göttgens, Berthold; Kouzarides, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Summary The JAK2 tyrosine kinase is a critical mediator of cytokine-induced signaling. It plays a role in the nucleus, where it regulates transcription by phosphorylating histone H3 at tyrosine 41 (H3Y41ph). We used chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to massively parallel DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) to define the genome-wide pattern of H3Y41ph in human erythroid leukemia cells. Our results indicate that H3Y41ph is located at three distinct sites: (1) at a subset of active promoters, where it overlaps with H3K4me3, (2) at distal cis-regulatory elements, where it coincides with the binding of STAT5, and (3) throughout the transcribed regions of active, tissue-specific hematopoietic genes. Together, these data extend our understanding of this conserved and essential signaling pathway and provide insight into the mechanisms by which extracellular stimuli may lead to the coordinated regulation of transcription. PMID:22999934

  10. The heterocyst differentiation transcriptional regulator HetR of the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena forms tetramers and can be regulated by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Valladares, Ana; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia

    2016-02-01

    Many filamentous cyanobacteria respond to the external cue of nitrogen scarcity by the differentiation of heterocysts, cells specialized in the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen in oxic environments. Heterocysts follow a spatial pattern along the filament of two heterocysts separated by ca. 10-15 vegetative cells performing oxygenic photosynthesis. HetR is a transcriptional regulator that directs heterocyst differentiation. In the model strain Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, the HetR protein was observed in various oligomeric forms in vivo, including a tetramer that peaked with maximal hetR expression during differentiation. Tetramers were not detected in a hetR point mutant incapable of differentiation, but were conspicuous in an over-differentiating strain lacking the PatS inhibitor. In differentiated filaments the HetR tetramer was restricted to heterocysts, being undetectable in vegetative cells. HetR co-purified with RNA polymerase from Anabaena mainly as a tetramer. In vitro, purified recombinant HetR was distributed between monomers, dimers, trimers and tetramers, and it was phosphorylated when incubated with (γ-(32)P)ATP. Phosphorylation and PatS hampered the accumulation of HetR tetramers and impaired HetR binding to DNA. In summary, tetrameric HetR appears to represent a functionally relevant form of HetR, whose abundance in the Anabaena filament could be negatively regulated by phosphorylation and by PatS.

  11. The heterocyst differentiation transcriptional regulator HetR of the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena forms tetramers and can be regulated by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Valladares, Ana; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia

    2016-02-01

    Many filamentous cyanobacteria respond to the external cue of nitrogen scarcity by the differentiation of heterocysts, cells specialized in the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen in oxic environments. Heterocysts follow a spatial pattern along the filament of two heterocysts separated by ca. 10-15 vegetative cells performing oxygenic photosynthesis. HetR is a transcriptional regulator that directs heterocyst differentiation. In the model strain Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, the HetR protein was observed in various oligomeric forms in vivo, including a tetramer that peaked with maximal hetR expression during differentiation. Tetramers were not detected in a hetR point mutant incapable of differentiation, but were conspicuous in an over-differentiating strain lacking the PatS inhibitor. In differentiated filaments the HetR tetramer was restricted to heterocysts, being undetectable in vegetative cells. HetR co-purified with RNA polymerase from Anabaena mainly as a tetramer. In vitro, purified recombinant HetR was distributed between monomers, dimers, trimers and tetramers, and it was phosphorylated when incubated with (γ-(32)P)ATP. Phosphorylation and PatS hampered the accumulation of HetR tetramers and impaired HetR binding to DNA. In summary, tetrameric HetR appears to represent a functionally relevant form of HetR, whose abundance in the Anabaena filament could be negatively regulated by phosphorylation and by PatS. PMID:26552991

  12. Restriction of Virus Infection but Not Catalytic dNTPase Activity Is Regulated by Phosphorylation of SAMHD1

    PubMed Central

    Welbourn, Sarah; Dutta, Sucharita M.; Semmes, O. John

    2013-01-01

    SAMHD1 is a host protein responsible, at least in part, for the inefficient infection of dendritic, myeloid, and resting T cells by HIV-1. Interestingly, HIV-2 and SIVsm viruses are able to counteract SAMHD1 by targeting it for proteasomal degradation using their Vpx proteins. It has been proposed that SAMHD1 is a dGTP-dependent deoxynucleoside triphosphohydrolase (dNTPase) that restricts HIV-1 by reducing cellular dNTP levels to below that required for reverse transcription. However, nothing is known about SAMHD1 posttranslational modifications and their potential role in regulating SAMHD1 function. We used 32P labeling and immunoblotting with phospho-specific antibodies to identify SAMHD1 as a phosphoprotein. Several amino acids in SAMHD1 were identified to be sites of phosphorylation using direct mass spectrometry. Mutation of these residues to alanine to prevent phosphorylation or to glutamic acid to mimic phosphorylation had no effect on the nuclear localization of SAMHD1 or its sensitivity to Vpx-mediated degradation. Furthermore, neither alanine nor glutamic acid substitutions had a significant effect on SAMHD1 dNTPase activity in an in vitro assay. Interestingly, however, we found that a T592E mutation, mimicking constitutive phosphorylation at a main phosphorylation site, severely affected the ability of SAMHD1 to restrict HIV-1 in a U937 cell-based restriction assay. In contrast, a T592A mutant was still capable of restricting HIV-1. These results indicate that SAMHD1 phosphorylation may be a negative regulator of SAMHD1 restriction activity. This conclusion is supported by our finding that SAMHD1 is hyperphosphorylated in monocytoid THP-1 cells under nonrestrictive conditions. PMID:23966382

  13. K-Ras4B phosphorylation at Ser181 is inhibited by calmodulin and modulates K-Ras activity and function.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Moya, B; López-Alcalá, C; Drosten, M; Bachs, O; Agell, N

    2010-11-01

    Fine tuning of Ras activity is widely known as a mechanism to induce different cellular responses. Recently, we have shown that calmodulin (CaM) binds to K-Ras and that K-Ras phosphorylation inhibits its interaction with CaM. In this study we report that CaM inhibits K-Ras phosphorylation at Ser181 by protein kinase C (PKC) in vivo, and this is a mechanism to modulate K-Ras activity and signaling. Although CaM inhibition increased the activation of endogenous K-Ras, PKC inhibition decreased its activation status. We demonstrate that K-Ras phosphorylation decreased susceptibility to p120GAP activity. Accordingly, we also observed that non-phosphorylable K-Ras mutant exhibits a less sustained activation profile and do not efficiently activate AKT at low growth factor doses compared with wild-type K-Ras. It is interesting that the physiological responses induced by K-Ras are affected by this phosphorylation; when K-Ras cannot be phosphorylated it exhibits a remarkably decreased ability to stimulate proliferation in non-saturated serum conditions. Finally, we demonstrate that phosphorylation also regulates oncogenic K-Ras functions, as focus formation capacity, mobility and apoptosis resistance upon adriamycin treatment of cells expressing oncogenic K-Ras that cannot be phosphorylated are highly compromised. Moreover, at low serum concentration proliferation and survival is practically inhibited when cells cannot phosphorylate oncogenic K-Ras. In this condition, K-Ras phosphorylation is essential to ensure a proper activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and PI3K/AKT pathways. In summary, our findings suggest that the interplay between CaM interaction and PKC phosphorylation is essential to regulate non-oncogenic and oncogenic K-Ras activity and functionality.

  14. Active superconducting devices formed of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Beyer, James B.; Nordman, James E.; Hohenwarter, Gert K. G.

    1991-05-28

    Active superconducting devices are formed of thin films of superconductor which include a main conduction channel which has an active weak link region. The weak link region is composed of an array of links of thin film superconductor spaced from one another by voids and selected in size and thickness such that magnetic flux can propagate across the weak link region when it is superconducting. Magnetic flux applied to the weak link region will propagate across the array of links causing localized loss of superconductivity in the links and changing the effective resistance across the links. The magnetic flux can be applied from a control line formed of a superconducting film deposited coplanar with the main conduction channel and weak link region on a substrate. The devices can be formed of any type to superconductor but are particularly well suited to the high temperature superconductors since the devices can be entirely formed from coplanar films with no overlying regions. The devices can be utilized for a variety of electrical components, including switching circuits, amplifiers, oscillators and modulators, and are well suited to microwave frequency applications.

  15. Stepwise phosphorylation of p65 promotes NF-κB activation and NK cell responses during target cell recognition

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyung-Joon; Choi, Go-Eun; Ryu, Sangryeol; Kwon, Soon Jae; Kim, Sun Chang; Booth, Claire; Nichols, Kim E.; Kim, Hun Sik

    2016-01-01

    NF-κB is a key transcription factor that dictates the outcome of diverse immune responses. How NF-κB is regulated by multiple activating receptors that are engaged during natural killer (NK)-target cell contact remains undefined. Here we show that sole engagement of NKG2D, 2B4 or DNAM-1 is insufficient for NF-κB activation. Rather, cooperation between these receptors is required at the level of Vav1 for synergistic NF-κB activation. Vav1-dependent synergistic signalling requires a separate PI3K-Akt signal, primarily mediated by NKG2D or DNAM-1, for optimal p65 phosphorylation and NF-κB activation. Vav1 controls downstream p65 phosphorylation and NF-κB activation. Synergistic signalling is defective in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP1) NK cells entailing 2B4 dysfunction and required for p65 phosphorylation by PI3K-Akt signal, suggesting stepwise signalling checkpoint for NF-κB activation. Thus, our study provides a framework explaining how signals from different activating receptors are coordinated to determine specificity and magnitude of NF-κB activation and NK cell responses. PMID:27221592

  16. The Arabidopsis mitogen-activated protein kinase 6 is associated with γ-tubulin on microtubules, phosphorylates EB1c and maintains spindle orientation under nitrosative stress.

    PubMed

    Kohoutová, Lucie; Kourová, Hana; Nagy, Szilvia K; Volc, Jindřich; Halada, Petr; Mészáros, Tamás; Meskiene, Irute; Bögre, László; Binarová, Pavla

    2015-09-01

    Stress-activated plant mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathways play roles in growth adaptation to the environment by modulating cell division through cytoskeletal regulation, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. We performed protein interaction and phosphorylation experiments with cytoskeletal proteins, mass spectrometric identification of MPK6 complexes and immunofluorescence analyses of the microtubular cytoskeleton of mitotic cells using wild-type, mpk6-2 mutant and plants overexpressing the MAP kinase-inactivating phosphatase, AP2C3. We showed that MPK6 interacted with γ-tubulin and co-sedimented with plant microtubules polymerized in vitro. It was the active form of MAP kinase that was enriched with microtubules and followed similar dynamics to γ-tubulin, moving from poles to midzone during the anaphase-to-telophase transition. We found a novel substrate for MPK6, the microtubule plus end protein, EB1c. The mpk6-2 mutant was sensitive to 3-nitro-l-tyrosine (NO2 -Tyr) treatment with respect to mitotic abnormalities, and root cells overexpressing AP2C3 showed defects in chromosome segregation and spindle orientation. Our data suggest that the active form of MAP kinase interacts with γ-tubulin on specific subsets of mitotic microtubules during late mitosis. MPK6 phosphorylates EB1c, but not EB1a, and has a role in maintaining regular planes of cell division under stress conditions.

  17. Free fatty acids and protein kinase C activation induce GPR120 (free fatty acid receptor 4) phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Reyes, Omar B; Romero-Ávila, M Teresa; Castillo-Badillo, Jean A; Takei, Yoshinori; Hirasawa, Akira; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Villalobos-Molina, Rafael; García-Sáinz, J Adolfo

    2014-01-15

    GPR120, free fatty acid receptor 4, is a recently deorphanized G protein-coupled receptor that seems to play cardinal roles in the regulation of metabolism and in the pathophysiology of inflammatory and metabolic disorders. In the present work a GPR120-Venus fusion protein was expressed in HEK293 Flp-In T-REx cells and its function (increase in intracellular calcium) and phosphorylation were studied. It was observed that the fusion protein migrated in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels as a band with a mass of ≈70-75kDa, although other bands of higher apparent weight (>130kDa) were also detected. Cell stimulation with docosahexaenoic acid or α-linolenic acid induced concentration-dependent increases in intracellular calcium and GPR120 phosphorylation. Activation of protein kinase C with phorbol esters also induced a marked receptor phosphorylation but did not alter the ability of 1µM docosahexaenoic acid to increase the intracellular calcium concentration. Phorbol ester-induced GPR120 phosphorylation, but not that induced with docosahexaenoic acid, was blocked by protein kinase C inhibitors (bis-indolyl-maleimide I and Gö 6976) suggesting that conventional kinase isoforms mediate this action. The absence of effect of protein kinase C inhibitors on agonist-induced GPR120 phosphorylation indicates that this kinase does not play a major role in agonist-induced receptor phosphorylation. Docosahexaenoic acid action was associated with marked GPR120 internalization whereas that induced with phorbol esters was smaller at early times. PMID:24239485

  18. Functional activity of RLIM/Rnf12 is regulated by phosphorylation-dependent nucleocytoplasmic shuttling

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Baowei; Taniguchi-Ishigaki, Naoko; Güngör, Cenap; Peters, Marvin A.; Chen, Ya-Wen; Riethdorf, Sabine; Drung, Alexander; Ahronian, Leanne G.; Shin, JongDae; Pagnis, Rachna; Pantel, Klaus; Tachibana, Taro; Lewis, Brian C.; Johnsen, Steven A.; Bach, Ingolf

    2013-01-01

    The X-linked gene Rnf12 encodes the ubiquitin ligase really interesting new gene (RING) finger LIM domain–interacting protein (RLIM)/RING finger protein 12 (Rnf12), which serves as a major sex-specific epigenetic regulator of female mouse nurturing tissues. Early during embryogenesis, RLIM/Rnf12 expressed from the maternal allele is crucial for the development of extraembryonic trophoblast cells. In contrast, in mammary glands of pregnant and lactating adult females RLIM/Rnf12 expressed from the paternal allele functions as a critical survival factor for milk-producing alveolar cells. Although RLIM/Rnf12 is detected mostly in the nucleus, little is known about how and in which cellular compartment(s) RLIM/Rnf12 mediates its biological functions. Here we demonstrate that RLIM/Rnf12 protein shuttles between nucleus and cytoplasm and this is regulated by phosphorylation of serine S214 located within its nuclear localization sequence. We show that shuttling is important for RLIM to exert its biological functions, as alveolar cell survival activity is inhibited in cells expressing shuttling-deficient nuclear or cytoplasmic RLIM/Rnf12. Thus regulated nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of RLIM/Rnf12 coordinates cellular compartments during mammary alveolar cell survival. PMID:23904271

  19. Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Activation Is Required for Serine 727 Phosphorylation of STAT3 in Schwann Cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Kyoung; Jung, Junyang; Lee, Sang Hwa; Seo, Su-Yeong; Suh, Duk Joon

    2009-01-01

    In the peripheral nerves, injury-induced cytokines and growth factors perform critical functions in the activation of both the MEK/ERK and JAK/STAT3 pathways. In this study, we determined that nerve injury-induced ERK activation was temporally correlated with STAT3 phosphorylation at the serine 727 residue. In cultured Schwann cells, we noted that ERK activation is required for the serine phosphorylation of STAT3 by neuropoietic cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6). Serine phosphorylated STAT3 by IL-6 was transported into Schwann cell nuclei, thereby indicating that ERK may regulate the transcriptional activity of STAT3 via the induction of serine phosphorylation of STAT3. Neuregulin-1 (NRG) also induced the serine phosphorylation of STAT3 in an ERK-dependent fashion. In contrast with the IL-6 response, serine phosphorylated STAT3 induced by NRG was not detected in the nucleus, thus indicating the non-nuclear function of serine phosphorylated STAT3 in response to NRG. Finally, we determined that the inhibition of ERK prevented injury-induced serine phosphorylation of STAT3 in an ex-vivo explants culture of the sciatic nerves. Collectively, the results of this study show that ERK may be an upstream kinase for the serine phosphorylation of STAT3 induced by multiple stimuli in Schwann cells after peripheral nerve injury. PMID:19885032

  20. The activity of cAMP-phosphodiesterase 4D7 (PDE4D7) is regulated by protein kinase A-dependent phosphorylation within its unique N-terminus

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Ashleigh M.; Elliott, Christina; Hoffmann, Ralf; Baillie, George S.

    2015-01-01

    The cyclic AMP phosphodiesterases type 4 (PDE4s) are expressed in a cell specific manner, with intracellular targeting directed by unique N-terminal anchor domains. All long form PDE4s are phosphorylated and activated by PKA phosphorylation within their upstream conserved region 1 (UCR1). Here, we identify and characterise a novel PKA site (serine 42) within the N-terminal region of PDE4D7, an isoform whose activity is known to be important in prostate cancer progression and ischemic stroke. In contrast to the UCR1 site, PKA phosphorylation of the PDE4D7 N-terminus appears to occur constitutively and inhibits PDE4 activity to allow cAMP signalling under basal conditions. PMID:25680530

  1. Nucleoside phosphorylation by phosphate minerals.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Giovanna; Saladino, Raffaele; Crestini, Claudia; Ciciriello, Fabiana; Di Mauro, Ernesto

    2007-06-01

    In the presence of formamide, crystal phosphate minerals may act as phosphate donors to nucleosides, yielding both 5'- and, to a lesser extent, 3'-phosphorylated forms. With the mineral Libethenite the formation of 5'-AMP can be as high as 6% of the adenosine input and last for at least 10(3) h. At high concentrations, soluble non-mineral phosphate donors (KH(2)PO(4) or 5'-CMP) afford 2'- and 2':3'-cyclic AMP in addition to 5'-and 3'-AMP. The phosphate minerals analyzed were Herderite Ca[BePO(4)F], Hureaulite Mn(2+)(5)(PO(3)(OH)(2)(PO(4))(2)(H(2)O)(4), Libethenite Cu(2+)(2)(PO(4))(OH), Pyromorphite Pb(5)(PO(4))(3)Cl, Turquoise Cu(2+)Al(6)(PO(4))(4)(OH)(8)(H(2)O)(4), Fluorapatite Ca(5)(PO(4))(3)F, Hydroxylapatite Ca(5)(PO(4))(3)OH, Vivianite Fe(2+)(3)(PO(4))(2)(H(2)O)(8), Cornetite Cu(2+)(3)(PO(4))(OH)(3), Pseudomalachite Cu(2+)(5)(PO(4))(2)(OH)(4), Reichenbachite Cu(2+)(5)(PO(4))(2)(OH)(4), and Ludjibaite Cu(2+)(5)(PO(4))(2)(OH)(4)). Based on their behavior in the formamide-driven nucleoside phosphorylation reaction, these minerals can be characterized as: 1) inactive, 2) low level phosphorylating agents, or 3) active phosphorylating agents. Instances were detected (Libethenite and Hydroxylapatite) in which phosphorylation occurs on the mineral surface, followed by release of the phosphorylated compounds. Libethenite and Cornetite markedly protect the beta-glycosidic bond. Thus, activated nucleic monomers can form in a liquid non-aqueous environment in conditions compatible with the thermodynamics of polymerization, providing a solution to the standard-state Gibbs free energy change (DeltaG degrees ') problem, the major obstacle for polymerizations in the liquid phase in plausible prebiotic scenarios.

  2. A phosphorylation switch regulates the transcriptional activation of cell cycle regulator p21 by histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Simboeck, Elisabeth; Sawicka, Anna; Zupkovitz, Gordin; Senese, Silvia; Winter, Stefan; Dequiedt, Franck; Ogris, Egon; Di Croce, Luciano; Chiocca, Susanna; Seiser, Christian

    2010-12-24

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in tumor cells and are, therefore, promising anti-cancer drugs. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 is activated in histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor-treated tumor cells, and its growth-inhibitory function contributes to the anti-tumorigenic effect of HDAC inhibitors. We show here that induction of p21 by trichostatin A involves MAP kinase signaling. Activation of the MAP kinase signaling pathway by growth factors or stress signals results in histone H3 serine 10 phosphorylation at the p21 promoter and is crucial for acetylation of the neighboring lysine 14 and recruitment of activated RNA polymerase II in response to trichostatin A treatment. In non-induced cells, the protein phosphatase PP2A is associated with the p21 gene and counteracts its activation. Induction of p21 is linked to simultaneous acetylation and phosphorylation of histone H3. The dual modification mark H3S10phK14ac at the activated p21 promoter is recognized by the phospho-binding protein 14-3-3ζ, which protects the phosphoacetylation mark from being processed by PP2A. Taken together we have revealed a cross-talk of reversible phosphorylation and acetylation signals that controls the activation of p21 by HDAC inhibitors and identify the phosphatase PP2A as chromatin-associated transcriptional repressor in mammalian cells.

  3. Phosphorylation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases Contributes to Interferon γ Production in Response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Pasquinelli, Virginia; Rovetta, Ana I.; Alvarez, Ivana B.; Jurado, Javier O.; Musella, Rosa M.; Palmero, Domingo J.; Malbrán, Alejandro; Samten, Buka; Barnes, Peter F.; García, Verónica E.

    2013-01-01

    Immune control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis depends on interferon γ (IFN-γ)–producing CD4+ lymphocytes. Previous studies have shown that T cells from patients with tuberculosis produce less IFN-γ, compared with healthy donors, in response to mycobacterial antigens, although IFN-γ responses to mitogens are preserved. In this work, we found that M. tuberculosis–induced IFN-γ production by human T cells correlated with phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and p38. Moreover, the majority of IFN-γ–producing T cells expressed signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM), and SLAM activation further increased ERK phosphorylation. Interestingly, patients with tuberculosis had delayed activation of ERK and p38, and this was most marked in patients with the poorest IFN-γ responses (ie, low responders). Besides, SLAM signaling failed to phosphorylate ERK in low responders. Our findings suggest that activation of p38 and ERK, in part through SLAM, mediates T-cell IFN-γ production in response to M. tuberculosis, a pathway that is defective in patients with tuberculosis. PMID:23125442

  4. TIPRL Inhibits Protein Phosphatase 4 Activity and Promotes H2AX Phosphorylation in the DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Rosales, Kimberly Romero; Reid, Michael A.; Yang, Ying; Tran, Thai Q.; Wang, Wen-I; Lowman, Xazmin; Pan, Min; Kong, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in our understanding of protein kinase regulation in the DNA damage response, the mechanism that controls protein phosphatase activity in this pathway is unclear. Unlike kinases, the activity and specificity of serine/threonine phosphatases is governed largely by their associated proteins. Here we show that Tip41-like protein (TIPRL), an evolutionarily conserved binding protein for PP2A-family phosphatases, is a negative regulator of protein phosphatase 4 (PP4). Knockdown of TIPRL resulted in increased PP4 phosphatase activity and formation of the active PP4-C/PP4R2 complex known to dephosphorylate γ-H2AX. Thus, overexpression of TIPRL promotes phosphorylation of H2AX, and increases γ-H2AX positive foci in response to DNA damage, whereas knockdown of TIPRL inhibits γ-H2AX phosphorylation. In correlation with γ-H2AX levels, we found that TIPRL overexpression promotes cell death in response to genotoxic stress, and knockdown of TIPRL protects cells from genotoxic agents. Taken together, these data demonstrate that TIPRL inhibits PP4 activity to allow for H2AX phosphorylation and the subsequent DNA damage response. PMID:26717153

  5. Crystal structure of Bacillus anthracis virulence regulator AtxA and effects of phosphorylated histidines on multimerization and activity

    PubMed Central

    Hammerstrom, Troy G.; Horton, Lori B.; Swick, Michelle C.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Koehler, Theresa M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The Bacillus anthracis virulence regulator AtxA controls transcription of the anthrax toxin genes and capsule biosynthesis operon. AtxA activity is elevated during growth in media containing glucose and CO2/bicarbonate, and there is a positive correlation between the CO2/bicarbonate signal, AtxA activity, and homomultimerization. AtxA activity is also affected by phosphorylation at specific histidines. We show that AtxA crystallizes as a dimer. Distinct folds associated with predicted DNA-binding domains (HTH1 and HTH2) and phosphoenolpyruvate: carbohydrate phosphotransferase system-regulated domains (PRD1 and PRD2) are apparent. We tested AtxA variants containing single and double phosphomimetic (His → Asp) and phosphoablative (His → Ala) amino acid changes for activity in B. anthracis cultures and for protein-protein interactions in cell lysates. Reduced activity of AtxA H199A, lack of multimerization and activity of AtxAH379D variants, and predicted structural changes associated with phosphorylation support a model for control of AtxA function. We propose that (1) in the AtxA dimer, phosphorylation of H199 in PRD1 affects HTH2 positioning, influencing DNA-binding; and (2) phosphorylation of H379 in PRD2 disrupts dimer formation. The AtxA structure is the first reported high-resolution full-length structure of a PRD-containing regulator and can serve as a model for proteins of this family, especially those that link virulence to bacterial metabolism. PMID:25402841

  6. Crystal structure of Bacillus anthracis virulence regulator AtxA and effects of phosphorylated histidines on multimerization and activity

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerstrom, Troy G.; Horton, Lori B.; Swick, Michelle C.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Koehler, Theresa M.

    2014-12-30

    The Bacillus anthracis virulence regulator AtxA controls transcription of the anthrax toxin genes and capsule biosynthesis operon. AtxA activity is elevated during growth in media containing glucose and CO2/bicarbonate, and there is a positive correlation between the CO2/bicarbonate signal, AtxA activity, and homomultimerization. AtxA activity is also affected by phosphorylation at specific histidines. We show that AtxA crystallizes as a dimer. Distinct folds associated with predicted DNA-binding domains (HTH1 and HTH2) and phosphoenolpyruvate: carbohydrate phosphotransferase system-regulated domains (PRD1 and PRD2) are apparent. We tested AtxA variants containing single and double phosphomimetic (His → Asp) and phosphoablative (His → Ala) amino acid changes for activity in B. anthracis cultures and for protein-protein interactions in cell lysates. Reduced activity of AtxA H199A, lack of multimerization and activity of AtxAH379D variants, and predicted structural changes associated with phosphorylation support a model for control of AtxA function. We propose that (1) in the AtxA dimer, phosphorylation of H199 in PRD1 affects HTH2 positioning, influencing DNA-binding; and (2) phosphorylation of H379 in PRD2 disrupts dimer formation. In conclusion, the AtxA structure is the first reported high-resolution full-length structure of a PRD-containing regulator and can serve as a model for proteins of this family, especially those that link virulence to bacterial metabolism.

  7. Crystal structure of Bacillus anthracis virulence regulator AtxA and effects of phosphorylated histidines on multimerization and activity

    DOE PAGES

    Hammerstrom, Troy G.; Horton, Lori B.; Swick, Michelle C.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Koehler, Theresa M.

    2014-12-30

    The Bacillus anthracis virulence regulator AtxA controls transcription of the anthrax toxin genes and capsule biosynthesis operon. AtxA activity is elevated during growth in media containing glucose and CO2/bicarbonate, and there is a positive correlation between the CO2/bicarbonate signal, AtxA activity, and homomultimerization. AtxA activity is also affected by phosphorylation at specific histidines. We show that AtxA crystallizes as a dimer. Distinct folds associated with predicted DNA-binding domains (HTH1 and HTH2) and phosphoenolpyruvate: carbohydrate phosphotransferase system-regulated domains (PRD1 and PRD2) are apparent. We tested AtxA variants containing single and double phosphomimetic (His → Asp) and phosphoablative (His → Ala) aminomore » acid changes for activity in B. anthracis cultures and for protein-protein interactions in cell lysates. Reduced activity of AtxA H199A, lack of multimerization and activity of AtxAH379D variants, and predicted structural changes associated with phosphorylation support a model for control of AtxA function. We propose that (1) in the AtxA dimer, phosphorylation of H199 in PRD1 affects HTH2 positioning, influencing DNA-binding; and (2) phosphorylation of H379 in PRD2 disrupts dimer formation. In conclusion, the AtxA structure is the first reported high-resolution full-length structure of a PRD-containing regulator and can serve as a model for proteins of this family, especially those that link virulence to bacterial metabolism.« less

  8. Activation of protein kinase Cα increases phosphorylation of the UT-A1 urea transporter at serine 494 in the inner medullary collecting duct.

    PubMed

    Blount, Mitsi A; Cipriani, Penelope; Redd, Sara K; Ordas, Ronald J; Black, Lauren N; Gumina, Diane L; Hoban, Carol A; Klein, Janet D; Sands, Jeff M

    2015-11-01

    Hypertonicity increases urea transport, as well as the phosphorylation and membrane accumulation of UT-A1, the transporter responsible for urea permeability in the inner medullary collect duct (IMCD). Hypertonicity stimulates urea transport through PKC-mediated phosphorylation. To determine whether PKC phosphorylates UT-A1, eight potential PKC phosphorylation sites were individually replaced with alanine and subsequently transfected into LLC-PK1 cells. Of the single mutants, only ablation of the S494 site dampened induction of total UT-A1 phosphorylation by the PKC activator phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu). This result was confirmed using a newly generated antibody that specifically detected phosphorylation of UT-A1 at S494. Hypertonicity increased UT-A1 phosphorylation at S494. In contrast, activators of cAMP pathways (PKA and Epac) did not increase UT-A1 phosphorylation at S494. Activation of both PKC and PKA pathways increased plasma membrane accumulation of UT-A1, although activation of PKC alone did not do so. However, ablating the PKC site S494 decreased UT-A1 abundance in the plasma membrane. This suggests that the cAMP pathway promotes UT-A1 trafficking to the apical membrane where the PKC pathway can phosphorylate the transporter, resulting in increased UT-A1 retention at the apical membrane. In summary, activation of PKC increases the phosphorylation of UT-A1 at a specific residue, S494. Although there is no cross talk with the cAMP-signaling pathway, phosphorylation of S494 through PKC may enhance vasopressin-stimulated urea permeability by retaining UT-A1 in the plasma membrane. PMID:26333598

  9. Activation of protein kinase Cα increases phosphorylation of the UT-A1 urea transporter at serine 494 in the inner medullary collecting duct

    PubMed Central

    Cipriani, Penelope; Redd, Sara K.; Ordas, Ronald J.; Black, Lauren N.; Gumina, Diane L.; Hoban, Carol A.; Klein, Janet D.; Sands, Jeff M.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertonicity increases urea transport, as well as the phosphorylation and membrane accumulation of UT-A1, the transporter responsible for urea permeability in the inner medullary collect duct (IMCD). Hypertonicity stimulates urea transport through PKC-mediated phosphorylation. To determine whether PKC phosphorylates UT-A1, eight potential PKC phosphorylation sites were individually replaced with alanine and subsequently transfected into LLC-PK1 cells. Of the single mutants, only ablation of the S494 site dampened induction of total UT-A1 phosphorylation by the PKC activator phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu). This result was confirmed using a newly generated antibody that specifically detected phosphorylation of UT-A1 at S494. Hypertonicity increased UT-A1 phosphorylation at S494. In contrast, activators of cAMP pathways (PKA and Epac) did not increase UT-A1 phosphorylation at S494. Activation of both PKC and PKA pathways increased plasma membrane accumulation of UT-A1, although activation of PKC alone did not do so. However, ablating the PKC site S494 decreased UT-A1 abundance in the plasma membrane. This suggests that the cAMP pathway promotes UT-A1 trafficking to the apical membrane where the PKC pathway can phosphorylate the transporter, resulting in increased UT-A1 retention at the apical membrane. In summary, activation of PKC increases the phosphorylation of UT-A1 at a specific residue, S494. Although there is no cross talk with the cAMP-signaling pathway, phosphorylation of S494 through PKC may enhance vasopressin-stimulated urea permeability by retaining UT-A1 in the plasma membrane. PMID:26333598

  10. Epithelial cell ADAM17 activation by Helicobacter pylori: role of ADAM17 C-terminus and Threonine-735 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    McClurg, Urszula L; Danjo, Kazuma; King, Harry O; Scott, Gina B; Robinson, Philip A; Crabtree, Jean E

    2015-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori transactivates the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) on gastric epithelial cells via a signalling cascade involving a disintegrin and metalloprotease 17 (ADAM17) cleavage of membrane bound heparin binding-epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF). The effects of H. pylori on ADAM17 C-terminus in epithelial cells have been examined. Total cellular ADAM17 and surface expression of ADAM17 were significantly increased by H. pylori in AGS gastric epithelial cells. These changes were associated with ADAM17 C-terminal phosphorylation at T375 and S791. AGS cells lacking the ADAM17 C-terminal domain induced significantly attenuated cleavage of HB-EGF and were also unable to upregulate HB-EGF and EGFR transcripts to the same extent as cells expressing full length ADAM17. In mitotic unstimulated AGS and ADAM17 over-expressing AGS cells, ADAM17 was highly T735 phosphorylated indicating ADAM17 T735 phosphorylation is modified during the cell cycle. In conclusion, H. pylori induced ADAM17 C-terminal T735 and/or S791 phosphorylation in gastric epithelial cells are likely to be an important trigger inducing ADAM17 activation and shedding of HB-EGF leading to EGFR transactivation. ADAM17 over-expression in gastric cancer represents a potential target for therapeutic intervention.

  11. Dual control by Cdk1 phosphorylation of the budding yeast APC/C ubiquitin ligase activator Cdh1

    PubMed Central

    Höckner, Sebastian; Neumann-Arnold, Lea; Seufert, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    The antagonism between cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) and the ubiquitin ligase APC/C-Cdh1 is central to eukaryotic cell cycle control. APC/C-Cdh1 targets cyclin B and other regulatory proteins for degradation, whereas Cdks disable APC/C-Cdh1 through phosphorylation of the Cdh1 activator protein at multiple sites. Budding yeast Cdh1 carries nine Cdk phosphorylation sites in its N-terminal regulatory domain, most or all of which contribute to inhibition. However, the precise role of individual sites has remained unclear. Here, we report that the Cdk phosphorylation sites of yeast Cdh1 are organized into autonomous subgroups and act through separate mechanisms. Cdk sites 1–3 had no direct effect on the APC/C binding of Cdh1 but inactivated a bipartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and thereby controlled the partitioning of Cdh1 between cytoplasm and nucleus. In contrast, Cdk sites 4–9 did not influence the cell cycle–regulated localization of Cdh1 but prevented its binding to the APC/C. Cdk sites 4–9 reside near two recently identified APC/C interaction motifs in a pattern conserved with the human Cdh1 orthologue. Thus a Cdk-inhibited NLS goes along with Cdk-inhibited APC/C binding sites in yeast Cdh1 to relay the negative control by Cdk1 phosphorylation of the ubiquitin ligase APC/C-Cdh1. PMID:27226481

  12. Dual control by Cdk1 phosphorylation of the budding yeast APC/C ubiquitin ligase activator Cdh1.

    PubMed

    Höckner, Sebastian; Neumann-Arnold, Lea; Seufert, Wolfgang

    2016-07-15

    The antagonism between cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) and the ubiquitin ligase APC/C-Cdh1 is central to eukaryotic cell cycle control. APC/C-Cdh1 targets cyclin B and other regulatory proteins for degradation, whereas Cdks disable APC/C-Cdh1 through phosphorylation of the Cdh1 activator protein at multiple sites. Budding yeast Cdh1 carries nine Cdk phosphorylation sites in its N-terminal regulatory domain, most or all of which contribute to inhibition. However, the precise role of individual sites has remained unclear. Here, we report that the Cdk phosphorylation sites of yeast Cdh1 are organized into autonomous subgroups and act through separate mechanisms. Cdk sites 1-3 had no direct effect on the APC/C binding of Cdh1 but inactivated a bipartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and thereby controlled the partitioning of Cdh1 between cytoplasm and nucleus. In contrast, Cdk sites 4-9 did not influence the cell cycle-regulated localization of Cdh1 but prevented its binding to the APC/C. Cdk sites 4-9 reside near two recently identified APC/C interaction motifs in a pattern conserved with the human Cdh1 orthologue. Thus a Cdk-inhibited NLS goes along with Cdk-inhibited APC/C binding sites in yeast Cdh1 to relay the negative control by Cdk1 phosphorylation of the ubiquitin ligase APC/C-Cdh1.

  13. A novel AKT inhibitor, AZD5363, inhibits phosphorylation of AKT downstream molecules, and activates phosphorylation of mTOR and SMG-1 dependent on the liver cancer cell type

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, YUNCHENG; ZHENG, YUANWEN; FAHEEM, ALI; SUN, TIANTONG; LI, CHUNYOU; LI, ZHE; ZHAO, DIANTANG; WU, CHAO; LIU, JUN

    2016-01-01

    Due to frequent phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway dysregulation, AKT is typically accepted as a promising anticancer therapeutic target. mTOR, in particular, represents a suitable therapeutic target for hepatocellular carcinoma, whilst suppressor with morphogenetic effect on genitalia family member-1 (SMG-1) is believed to serve a potential tumor suppressor role in human cancer. Despite SMG-1 and mTOR belonging to the same PI3K-related kinase family, the interactions between them are not yet fully understood. In the present study, a novel pyrrolopyrimidine-derived compound, AZD5363, was observed to suppress proliferation in liver cancer Hep-G2 and Huh-7 cells by inhibiting the phosphorylation of downstream molecules in the AKT signal pathway, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. AZD5363 activated the phosphorylation of mTOR, dependent on the liver cancer cell type, as it may have differing effects in various liver cancer cell lines. Additionally, AZD5363 also activated SMG-1 within the same liver cancer cells types, which subsequently activated the phosphorylation of mTOR. In conclusion, the present study indicates that AZD5363 inhibited phosphorylation of AKT downstream molecules, and activated phosphorylation of mTOR and SMG-1, dependent on the liver cancer type. PMID:26998062

  14. Phosphorylation and activation of ubiquitin-specific protease-14 by Akt regulates the ubiquitin-proteasome system

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Daichao; Shan, Bing; Lee, Byung-Hoon; Zhu, Kezhou; Zhang, Tao; Sun, Huawang; Liu, Min; Shi, Linyu; Liang, Wei; Qian, Lihui; Xiao, Juan; Wang, Lili; Pan, Lifeng; Finley, Daniel; Yuan, Junying

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), which controls the turnover of short-lived proteins in eukaryotic cells, is critical in maintaining cellular proteostasis. Here we show that USP14, a major deubiquitinating enzyme that regulates the UPS, is a substrate of Akt, a serine/threonine-specific protein kinase critical in mediating intracellular signaling transducer for growth factors. We report that Akt-mediated phosphorylation of USP14 at Ser432, which normally blocks its catalytic site in the inactive conformation, activates its deubiquitinating activity in vitro and in cells. We also demonstrate that phosphorylation of USP14 is critical for Akt to regulate proteasome activity and consequently global protein degradation. Since Akt can be activated by a wide range of growth factors and is under negative control by phosphoinosotide phosphatase PTEN, we suggest that regulation of UPS by Akt-mediated phosphorylation of USP14 may provide a common mechanism for growth factors to control global proteostasis and for promoting tumorigenesis in PTEN-negative cancer cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10510.001 PMID:26523394

  15. Temporal regulation of Lsp1 O-GlcNAcylation and phosphorylation during apoptosis of activated B cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jung-Lin; Wu, Hsin-Yi; Tsai, Dong-Yan; Chiang, Ming-Feng; Chen, Yi-Ju; Gao, Shijay; Lin, Chun-Cheng; Lin, Chun-Hung; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Chen, Yu-Ju; Lin, Kuo-I.

    2016-01-01

    Crosslinking of B-cell receptor (BCR) sets off an apoptosis programme, but the underlying pathways remain obscure. Here we decipher the molecular mechanisms bridging B-cell activation and apoptosis mediated by post-translational modification (PTM). We find that O-GlcNAcase inhibition enhances B-cell activation and apoptosis induced by BCR crosslinking. This proteome-scale analysis of the functional interplay between protein O-GlcNAcylation and phosphorylation in stimulated mouse primary B cells identifies 313 O-GlcNAcylation-dependent phosphosites on 224 phosphoproteins. Among these phosphoproteins, temporal regulation of the O-GlcNAcylation and phosphorylation of lymphocyte-specific protein-1 (Lsp1) is a key switch that triggers apoptosis in activated B cells. O-GlcNAcylation at S209 of Lsp1 is a prerequisite for the recruitment of its kinase, PKC-β1, to induce S243 phosphorylation, leading to ERK activation and downregulation of BCL-2 and BCL-xL. Thus, we demonstrate the critical PTM interplay of Lsp1 that transmits signals for initiating apoptosis after BCR ligation. PMID:27555448

  16. Loss of NDRG2 expression activates PI3K-AKT signalling via PTEN phosphorylation in ATLL and other cancers

    PubMed Central

    Nakahata, Shingo; Ichikawa, Tomonaga; Maneesaay, Phudit; Saito, Yusuke; Nagai, Kentaro; Tamura, Tomohiro; Manachai, Nawin; Yamakawa, Norio; Hamasaki, Makoto; Kitabayashi, Issay; Arai, Yasuhito; Kanai, Yae; Taki, Tomohiko; Abe, Takaya; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Shimoda, Kazuya; Ohshima, Koichi; Horii, Akira; Shima, Hiroshi; Taniwaki, Masafumi; Yamaguchi, Ryoji; Morishita, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Constitutive phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT activation has a causal role in adult T-cell leukaemia-lymphoma (ATLL) and other cancers. ATLL cells do not harbour genetic alterations in PTEN and PI3KCA but express high levels of PTEN that is highly phosphorylated at its C-terminal tail. Here we report a mechanism for the N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2)-dependent regulation of PTEN phosphatase activity via the dephosphorylation of PTEN at the Ser380, Thr382 and Thr383 cluster within the C-terminal tail. We show that NDRG2 is a PTEN-binding protein that recruits protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) to PTEN. The expression of NDRG2 is frequently downregulated in ATLL, resulting in enhanced phosphorylation of PTEN at the Ser380/Thr382/Thr383 cluster and enhanced activation of the PI3K-AKT pathway. Given the high incidence of T-cell lymphoma and other cancers in NDRG2-deficient mice, PI3K-AKT activation via enhanced PTEN phosphorylation may be critical for the development of cancer. PMID:24569712

  17. Hypoxia stimulates via separate pathways ERK phosphorylation and NF-kappaB activation in skeletal muscle cells in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Osorio-Fuentealba, César; Valdés, Juan Antonio; Riquelme, Denise; Hidalgo, Jorge; Hidalgo, Cecilia; Carrasco, María Angélica

    2009-04-01

    Mammalian cells sense oxygen levels and respond to hypoxic conditions through the regulation of multiple signaling pathways and transcription factors. Here, we investigated the effects of hypoxia on the activity of two transcriptional regulators, ERK1/2 and NF-kappaB, in skeletal muscle cells in primary culture. We found that hypoxia significantly enhanced ERK1/2 phosphorylation and that it stimulated NF-kappaB-dependent gene transcription as well as nuclear translocation of a green fluorescent protein-labeled p65 NF-kappaB isoform. Phosphorylation of ERK1/2- and NF-kappaB-dependent transcription by hypoxia required calcium entry through L-type calcium channels. Calcium release from ryanodine-sensitive stores was also necessary for ERK1/2 activation but not for NF-kappaB-dependent-transcription. N-acetylcysteine, a general scavenger of reactive oxygen species, blocked hypoxia-induced ROS generation but did not affect the stimulation of ERK1/2 phosphorylation induced by hypoxia. In contrast, NF-kappaB activation was significantly inhibited by N-acetylcysteine and did not depend on ERK1/2 stimulation, as shown by the lack of effect of the upstream ERK inhibitor U-0126. These separate pathways of activation of ERK1/2 and NF-kappaB by hypoxia may contribute to muscle adaptation in response to hypoxic conditions. PMID:19179647

  18. Regulation of Gβγi-dependent PLC-β3 activity in smooth muscle: inhibitory phosphorylation of PLC-β3 by PKA and PKG and stimulatory phosphorylation of Gαi-GTPase-activating protein RGS2 by PKG.

    PubMed

    Nalli, Ancy D; Kumar, Divya P; Al-Shboul, Othman; Mahavadi, Sunila; Kuemmerle, John F; Grider, John R; Murthy, Karnam S

    2014-11-01

    In gastrointestinal smooth muscle, agonists that bind to Gi-coupled receptors activate preferentially PLC-β3 via Gβγ to stimulate phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis and generate inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) leading to IP3-dependent Ca(2+) release and muscle contraction. In the present study, we identified the mechanism of inhibition of PLC-β3-dependent PI hydrolysis by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG). Cyclopentyl adenosine (CPA), an adenosine A1 receptor agonist, caused an increase in PI hydrolysis in a concentration-dependent fashion; stimulation was blocked by expression of the carboxyl-terminal sequence of GRK2(495-689), a Gβγ-scavenging peptide, or Gαi minigene but not Gαq minigene. Isoproterenol and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) induced phosphorylation of PLC-β3 and inhibited CPA-induced PI hydrolysis, Ca(2+) release, and muscle contraction. The effect of isoproterenol on all three responses was inhibited by PKA inhibitor, myristoylated PKI, or AKAP inhibitor, Ht-31, whereas the effect of GSNO was selectively inhibited by PKG inhibitor, Rp-cGMPS. GSNO, but not isoproterenol, also phosphorylated Gαi-GTPase-activating protein, RGS2, and enhanced association of Gαi3-GTP and RGS2. The effect of GSNO on PI hydrolysis was partly reversed in cells (i) expressing constitutively active GTPase-resistant Gαi mutant (Q204L), (ii) phosphorylation-site-deficient RGS2 mutant (S46A/S64A), or (iii) siRNA for RGS2. We conclude that PKA and PKG inhibit Gβγi-dependent PLC-β3 activity by direct phosphorylation of PLC-β3. PKG, but not PKA, also inhibits PI hydrolysis indirectly by a mechanism involving phosphorylation of RGS2 and its association with Gαi-GTP. This allows RGS2 to accelerate Gαi-GTPase activity, enhance Gαβγi trimer formation, and inhibit Gβγi-dependent PLC-β3 activity.

  19. Bisphenol A accelerates capacitation-associated protein tyrosine phosphorylation of rat sperm by activating protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiaofeng; Ru, Yanfei; Chu, Chen; Ni, Zimei; Zhou, Yuchuan; Wang, Shoulin; Zhou, Zuomin; Zhang, Yonglian

    2016-06-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a synthetic estrogen-mimic chemical. It has been shown to affect many reproductive endpoints. However, the effect of BPA on the mature sperm and the mechanism of its action are not clear yet. Here, our in vitro studies indicated that BPA could accelerate sperm capacitation-associated protein tyrosine phosphorylation in time- and dose-dependent manners. In vivo, the adult male rats exposed to a high dose of BPA could result in a significant increase in sperm activity. Further investigation demonstrated that BPA could accelerate capacitation-associated protein tyrosine phosphorylation even if sperm were incubated in medium devoid of BSA, HCO3 (-), and Ca(2+) However, this action of BPA stimulation could be blocked by H89, a highly selective blocker of protein kinase A (PKA), but not by KH7, a specific inhibitor of adenylyl cyclase. These data suggest that BPA may activate PKA to affect sperm functions and male fertility. PMID:27174873

  20. Tyrosine 601 of Bacillus subtilis DnaK Undergoes Phosphorylation and Is Crucial for Chaperone Activity and Heat Shock Survival.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Ravikumar, Vaishnavi; Derouiche, Abderahmane; Macek, Boris; Mijakovic, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    In order to screen for cellular substrates of the Bacillus subtilis BY-kinase PtkA, and its cognate phosphotyrosine-protein phosphatase PtpZ, we performed a triple Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino acids in Cell culture-based quantitative phosphoproteome analysis. Detected tyrosine phosphorylation sites for which the phosphorylation level decreased in the ΔptkA strain and increased in the ΔptpZ strain, compared to the wild type (WT), were considered as potential substrates of PtkA/PtpZ. One of those sites was the residue tyrosine 601 of the molecular chaperone DnaK. We confirmed that DnaK is a substrate of PtkA and PtpZ by in vitro phosphorylation and dephosphorylation assays. In vitro, DnaK Y601F mutant exhibited impaired interaction with its co-chaperones DnaJ and GrpE, along with diminished capacity to hydrolyze ATP and assist the re-folding of denatured proteins. In vivo, loss of DnaK phosphorylation in the mutant strain dnaK Y601F, or in the strain overexpressing the phosphatase PtpZ, led to diminished survival upon heat shock, consistent with the in vitro results. The decreased survival of the mutant dnaK Y601F at an elevated temperature could be rescued by complementing with the WT dnaK allele expressed ectopically. We concluded that the residue tyrosine 601 of DnaK can be phosphorylated and dephosphorylated by PtkA and PtpZ, respectively. Furthermore, Y601 is important for DnaK chaperone activity and heat shock survival of B. subtilis. PMID:27148221

  1. Tyrosine 601 of Bacillus subtilis DnaK Undergoes Phosphorylation and Is Crucial for Chaperone Activity and Heat Shock Survival.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Ravikumar, Vaishnavi; Derouiche, Abderahmane; Macek, Boris; Mijakovic, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    In order to screen for cellular substrates of the Bacillus subtilis BY-kinase PtkA, and its cognate phosphotyrosine-protein phosphatase PtpZ, we performed a triple Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino acids in Cell culture-based quantitative phosphoproteome analysis. Detected tyrosine phosphorylation sites for which the phosphorylation level decreased in the ΔptkA strain and increased in the ΔptpZ strain, compared to the wild type (WT), were considered as potential substrates of PtkA/PtpZ. One of those sites was the residue tyrosine 601 of the molecular chaperone DnaK. We confirmed that DnaK is a substrate of PtkA and PtpZ by in vitro phosphorylation and dephosphorylation assays. In vitro, DnaK Y601F mutant exhibited impaired interaction with its co-chaperones DnaJ and GrpE, along with diminished capacity to hydrolyze ATP and assist the re-folding of denatured proteins. In vivo, loss of DnaK phosphorylation in the mutant strain dnaK Y601F, or in the strain overexpressing the phosphatase PtpZ, led to diminished survival upon heat shock, consistent with the in vitro results. The decreased survival of the mutant dnaK Y601F at an elevated temperature could be rescued by complementing with the WT dnaK allele expressed ectopically. We concluded that the residue tyrosine 601 of DnaK can be phosphorylated and dephosphorylated by PtkA and PtpZ, respectively. Furthermore, Y601 is important for DnaK chaperone activity and heat shock survival of B. subtilis.

  2. Tyrosine 601 of Bacillus subtilis DnaK Undergoes Phosphorylation and Is Crucial for Chaperone Activity and Heat Shock Survival‡

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lei; Ravikumar, Vaishnavi; Derouiche, Abderahmane; Macek, Boris; Mijakovic, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    In order to screen for cellular substrates of the Bacillus subtilis BY-kinase PtkA, and its cognate phosphotyrosine-protein phosphatase PtpZ, we performed a triple Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino acids in Cell culture-based quantitative phosphoproteome analysis. Detected tyrosine phosphorylation sites for which the phosphorylation level decreased in the ΔptkA strain and increased in the ΔptpZ strain, compared to the wild type (WT), were considered as potential substrates of PtkA/PtpZ. One of those sites was the residue tyrosine 601 of the molecular chaperone DnaK. We confirmed that DnaK is a substrate of PtkA and PtpZ by in vitro phosphorylation and dephosphorylation assays. In vitro, DnaK Y601F mutant exhibited impaired interaction with its co-chaperones DnaJ and GrpE, along with diminished capacity to hydrolyze ATP and assist the re-folding of denatured proteins. In vivo, loss of DnaK phosphorylation in the mutant strain dnaK Y601F, or in the strain overexpressing the phosphatase PtpZ, led to diminished survival upon heat shock, consistent with the in vitro results. The decreased survival of the mutant dnaK Y601F at an elevated temperature could be rescued by complementing with the WT dnaK allele expressed ectopically. We concluded that the residue tyrosine 601 of DnaK can be phosphorylated and dephosphorylated by PtkA and PtpZ, respectively. Furthermore, Y601 is important for DnaK chaperone activity and heat shock survival of B. subtilis. PMID:27148221

  3. AMPK-Dependent Phosphorylation of GAPDH Triggers Sirt1 Activation and Is Necessary for Autophagy upon Glucose Starvation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chunmei; Su, Hua; Zhang, Danhong; Wang, Yusha; Shen, Qiuhong; Liu, Bo; Huang, Rui; Zhou, Tianhua; Peng, Chao; Wong, Catherine C L; Shen, Han-Ming; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Liu, Wei

    2015-12-17

    Eukaryotes initiate autophagy to cope with the lack of external nutrients, which requires the activation of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))-dependent deacetylase Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1). However, the mechanisms underlying the starvation-induced Sirt1 activation for autophagy initiation remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), a conventional glycolytic enzyme, is a critical mediator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-driven Sirt1 activation. Under glucose starvation, but not amino acid starvation, cytoplasmic GAPDH is phosphorylated on Ser122 by activated AMPK. This causes GAPDH to redistribute into the nucleus. Inside the nucleus, GAPDH interacts directly with Sirt1, displacing Sirt1's repressor and causing Sirt1 to become activated. Preventing this shift of GAPDH abolishes Sirt1 activation and autophagy, while enhancing it, through overexpression of nuclear-localized GAPDH, increases Sirt1 activation and autophagy. GAPDH is thus a pivotal and central regulator of autophagy under glucose deficiency, undergoing AMPK-dependent phosphorylation and nuclear translocation to activate Sirt1 deacetylase activity. PMID:26626483

  4. Clinical implications for loss or diminution of expression of Raf-1 kinase inhibitory protein and its phosphorylated form in ductal breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mulla, Fahd; Bitar, Milad S; Thiery, Jean Paul; Zea, Tan Tuan; Chatterjee, Devasis; Bennett, Lindsay; Park, Sungdae; Edwards, Joanne; Yeung, Kam C

    2013-01-01

    Raf Kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP) is a well-established metastasis suppressor that is frequently downregulated in aggressive cancers. The impact of RKIP and its phosphorylated form on disease-free survival (DFS) and other clinicopathological parameters in breast cancer is yet to be discovered. To this end, we examined RKIP expression in 3 independent breast cancer cohorts. At the Protein level, loss or reduced total RKIP expression was associated with large-sized tumors characterized by high proliferative index, high-grade and diminished estrogen (ER) and progesterone receptor expression. Loss or diminution of RKIP expression was significantly associated with shorter DFS in all cohorts. Moreover, the complete loss of p-RKIP was an independent prognostic factor using multivariate analysis in operable invasive ductal breast cancer. We show for the first time that ER, partly, drives RKIP expression through MTA3-Snail axis. Consistent with this finding, we found that, at the mRNA level, RKIP expression varied significantly across the different molecular subtypes of breast cancer with the Luminal (ER+) subtype expressing high levels of RKIP and the more aggressive Claudin-low (ER-) subtype, which depicted the highest epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) registered the lowest RKIP expression levels. In conclusion, loss of expression/diminution of RKIP or its phosphorylated form is associated with poor diseases-free survival in breast cancer. Determining the expression of RKIP and p-RKIP adds significant prognostic value to the management and subtyping of this disease. PMID:24224123

  5. Cardiac Myosin Binding Protein-C Phosphorylation Modulates Myofilament Length-Dependent Activation

    PubMed Central

    Mamidi, Ranganath; Gresham, Kenneth S.; Verma, Sujeet; Stelzer, Julian E.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) phosphorylation is an important regulator of contractile function, however, its contributions to length-dependent changes in cross-bridge (XB) kinetics is unknown. Therefore, we performed mechanical experiments to quantify contractile function in detergent-skinned ventricular preparations isolated from wild-type (WT) hearts, and hearts expressing non-phosphorylatable cMyBP-C [Ser to Ala substitutions at residues Ser273, Ser282, and Ser302 (i.e., 3SA)], at sarcomere length (SL) 1.9 μm or 2.1μm, prior and following protein kinase A (PKA) treatment. Steady-state force generation measurements revealed a blunting in the length-dependent increase in myofilament Ca2+-sensitivity of force generation (pCa50) following an increase in SL in 3SA skinned myocardium compared to WT skinned myocardium. Dynamic XB behavior was assessed at submaximal Ca2+-activations by imposing an acute rapid stretch of 2% of initial muscle length, and measuring both the magnitudes and rates of resultant phases of force decay due to strain-induced XB detachment and delayed force rise due to recruitment of additional XBs with increased SL (i.e., stretch activation). The magnitude (P2) and rate of XB detachment (krel) following stretch was significantly reduced in 3SA skinned myocardium compared to WT skinned myocardium at short and long SL, and prior to and following PKA treatment. Furthermore, the length-dependent acceleration of krel due to decreased SL that was observed in WT skinned myocardium was abolished in 3SA skinned myocardium. PKA treatment accelerated the rate of XB recruitment (kdf) following stretch at both SL's in WT but not in 3SA skinned myocardium. The amplitude of the enhancement in force generation above initial pre-stretch steady-state levels (P3) was not different between WT and 3SA skinned myocardium at any condition measured. However, the magnitude of the entire delayed force phase which can dip below initial pre-stretch steady

  6. The Ogura sterility-inducing protein forms a large complex without interfering with the oxidative phosphorylation components in rapeseed mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Duroc, Yann; Hiard, Sophie; Vrielynck, Nathalie; Ragu, Sandrine; Budar, Françoise

    2009-05-01

    The Ogura cytoplasmic male sterility causing protein, ORF138, was found to be part of a complex with an apparent size of over 750 kDa in the inner membrane of mitochondria of sterile plants. ORF138 did not colocalize with any of the oxidative phosphorylation complexes, nor did its presence modify their apparent size or amount, compared to samples from fertile isogenic plants. We attempted to detect potential proteins or nucleic acids that could be involved in the large ORF138 complex by 2D PAGE, immunoprecipitation and nuclease treatments of native extracts. All our results suggest that the ORF138 protein is the main, if not only, component of this large complex. The capacities of complexes I, II, IV, and ATP synthase were identical in samples from sterile and fertile plants. Isolated mitochondria from sterile plants showed a higher oxygen consumption than those from fertile plants. In vivo respiration measurements suggest that the difference in O(2) consumption measured at the organelle level is compensated at the cell/tissue level, completely in leaves, but only partially in male reproductive organs.

  7. Functional regulation of PVBV Nuclear Inclusion protein-a protease activity upon interaction with Viral Protein genome-linked and phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, C.; Jimsheena, V.K.; Banerjee, S.; Makinen, K.; Gowda, L.R.; Savithri, H.S.

    2012-01-20

    Regulation of NIa-Pro is crucial for polyprotein processing and hence, for successful infection of potyviruses. We have examined two novel mechanisms that could regulate NIa-Pro activity. Firstly, the influence of VPg domain on the proteolytic activity of NIa-Pro was investigated. It was shown that the turnover number of the protease increases when these two domains interact (cis: two-fold; trans: seven-fold) with each other. Secondly, the protease activity of NIa-Pro could also be modulated by phosphorylation at Ser129. A mutation of this residue either to aspartate (phosphorylation-mimic) or alanine (phosphorylation-deficient) drastically reduces the protease activity. Based on these observations and molecular modeling studies, we propose that interaction with VPg as well as phosphorylation of Ser129 could relay a signal through Trp143 present at the protein surface to the active site pocket by subtle conformational changes, thus modulating protease activity of NIa-Pro.

  8. Structural studies of conformational changes of proteins upon phosphorylation: Structures of activated CheY, CheY-N16-FliM complex, and AAA {sup +} ATPase domain of NtrC1 in both inactive and active states

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seok-Yong

    2003-04-10

    Protein phosphorylation is a general mechanism for signal transduction as well as regulation of cellular function. Unlike phosphorylation in eukaryotic systems that uses Ser/Thr for the sites of modification, two-component signal transduction systems, which are prevalent in bacteria, archea, and lower eukaryotes, use an aspartate as the site of phosphorylation. Two-component systems comprise a histidine kinase and a receiver domain. The conformational change of the receiver domain upon phosphorylation leads to signal transfer to the downstream target, a process that had not been understood well at the molecular level. The transient nature of the phospho-Asp bond had made structural studies difficult. The discovery of an excellent analogue for acylphosphate, BeF{sub 3}{sup -}, enabled structural study of activated receiver domains. The structure of activated Chemotaxis protein Y (CheY) was determined both by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. These structures revealed the molecular basis of the conformational change that is coupled to phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of the conserved Asp residue in the active site allows hydrogen bonding of the T87 O{gamma} to phospho-aspartate, which in turn leads to the rotation of Y106 into the ''in'' position (termed Y-T coupling). The structure of activated CheY complexed with the 16 N-terminal residues of FliM (N16-FliM), its target, was also determined by X-ray crystallography and confirmed the proposed mechanism of activation (Y-T coupling). First, N16-FliM binds to the region on CheY that undergoes a significant conformational change. Second, the ''in'' position of Y106 presents a better binding surface for FliM because the sidechain of Y106 in the inactive form of CheY (''out'' position) sterically interferes with binding of N16-FliM. In addition to confirmation of Y-T coupling, the structure of the activated CheY-N16-FliM complex suggested that the N16-FliM might be sandwiched between CheY and the remainder of

  9. Neuregulin1-β decreases interleukin-1β-induced RhoA activation, myosin light chain phosphorylation, and endothelial hyperpermeability.

    PubMed

    Wu, Limin; Ramirez, Servio H; Andrews, Allison M; Leung, Wendy; Itoh, Kanako; Wu, Jiang; Arai, Ken; Lo, Eng H; Lok, Josephine

    2016-01-01

    Neuregulin-1 (NRG1) is an endogenous growth factor with multiple functions in the embryonic and postnatal brain. The NRG1 gene is large and complex, transcribing more than twenty transmembrane proteins and generating a large number of isoforms in tissue and cell type-specific patterns. Within the brain, NRG1 functions have been studied most extensively in neurons and glia, as well as in the peripheral vasculature. Recently, NRG1 signaling has been found to be important in the function of brain microvascular endothelial cells, decreasing IL-1β-induced increases in endothelial permeability. In the current experiments, we have investigated the pathways through which the NRG1-β isoform acts on IL-1β-induced endothelial permeability. Our data show that NRG1-β increases barrier function, measured by transendothelial electrical resistance, and decreases IL-1β-induced hyperpermeability, measured by dextran-40 extravasation through a monolayer of brain microvascular endothelial cells plated on transwells. An investigation of key signaling proteins suggests that the effect of NRG1-β on endothelial permeability is mediated through RhoA activation and myosin light chain phosphorylation, events which affect filamentous actin morphology. In addition, AG825, an inhibitor of the erbB2-associated tyrosine kinase, reduces the effect of NRG1-β on IL-1β-induced RhoA activation and myosin light chain phosphorylation. These data add to the evidence that NRG1-β signaling affects changes in the brain microvasculature in the setting of neuroinflammation. We propose the following events for neuregulin-1-mediated effects on Interleukin-1 β (IL-1β)-induced endothelial hyperpermeability: IL-1β leads to RhoA activation, resulting in an increase in phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC). Phosphorylation of MLC is known to result in actin contraction and alterations in the f-actin cytoskeletal structure. These changes are associated with increased endothelial permeability

  10. Constitutive tyrosine phosphorylation of the T-cell receptor (TCR) zeta subunit: regulation of TCR-associated protein tyrosine kinase activity by TCR zeta.

    PubMed Central

    van Oers, N S; Tao, W; Watts, J D; Johnson, P; Aebersold, R; Teh, H S

    1993-01-01

    The T-cell receptor (TCR) zeta subunit is an important component of the TCR complex, involved in signal transduction events following TCR engagement. In this study, we showed that the TCR zeta chain is constitutively tyrosine phosphorylated to similar extents in thymocytes and lymph node T cells. Approximately 35% of the tyrosine-phosphorylated TCR zeta (phospho zeta) precipitated from total cell lysates appeared to be surface associated. Furthermore, constitutive phosphorylation of TCR zeta in T cells occurred independently of antigen stimulation and did not require CD4 or CD8 coreceptor expression. In lymph node T cells that constitutively express tyrosine-phosphorylated TCR zeta, there was a direct correlation between surface TCR-associated protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity and expression of phospho zeta. TCR stimulation of these cells resulted in an increase in PTK activity that coprecipitated with the surface TCR complex and a corresponding increase in the levels of phospho zeta. TCR ligations also contributed to the detection of several additional phosphoproteins that coprecipitated with surface TCR complexes, including a 72-kDa tyrosine-phosphorylated protein. The presence of TCR-associated PTK activity also correlated with the binding of a 72-kDa protein, which became tyrosine phosphorylated in vitro kinase assays, to tyrosine phosphorylated TCR zeta. The cytoplasmic region of the TCR zeta chain was synthesized, tyrosine phosphorylated, and conjugated to Sepharose beads. Only tyrosine-phosphorylated, not nonphosphorylated, TCR zeta beads were capable of immunoprecipitating the 72-kDa protein from total cell lysates. This 72-kDa protein is likely the murine equivalent of human PTK ZAP-70, which has been shown to associate specifically with phospho zeta. These results suggest that TCR-associated PTK activity is regulated, at least in part, by the tyrosine phosphorylation status of TCR zeta. Images PMID:7689151

  11. Histone phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Rossetto, Dorine; Avvakumov, Nikita; Côté, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Histone posttranslational modifications are key components of diverse processes that modulate chromatin structure. These marks function as signals during various chromatin-based events, and act as platforms for recruitment, assembly or retention of chromatin-associated factors. The best-known function of histone phosphorylation takes place during cellular response to DNA damage, when phosphorylated histone H2A(X) demarcates large chromatin domains around the site of DNA breakage. However, multiple studies have also shown that histone phosphorylation plays crucial roles in chromatin remodeling linked to other nuclear processes. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of histone phosphorylation and describe the many kinases and phosphatases that regulate it. We discuss the key roles played by this histone mark in DNA repair, transcription and chromatin compaction during cell division and apoptosis. Additionally, we describe the intricate crosstalk that occurs between phosphorylation and other histone modifications and allows for sophisticated control over the chromatin remodeling processes. PMID:22948226

  12. Crystal Structures of the Response Regulator DosR From Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Suggest a Helix Rearrangement Mechanism for Phosphorylation Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Wisedchaisri, G.; Wu, M.; Sherman, D.R.; Hol, W.G.J.

    2009-05-26

    The response regulator DosR is essential for promoting long-term survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis under low oxygen conditions in a dormant state and may be responsible for latent tuberculosis in one-third of the world's population. Here, we report crystal structures of full-length unphosphorylated DosR at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution and its C-terminal DNA-binding domain at 1.7 {angstrom} resolution. The full-length DosR structure reveals several features never seen before in other response regulators. The N-terminal domain of the full-length DosR structure has an unexpected ({beta}{alpha}){sub 4} topology instead of the canonical ({beta}{alpha}){sub 5} fold observed in other response regulators. The linker region adopts a unique conformation that contains two helices forming a four-helix bundle with two helices from another subunit, resulting in dimer formation. The C-terminal domain in the full-length DosR structure displays a novel location of helix {alpha}10, which allows Gln199 to interact with the catalytic Asp54 residue of the N-terminal domain. In contrast, the structure of the DosR C-terminal domain alone displays a remarkable unstructured conformation for helix {alpha}10 residues, different from the well-defined helical conformations in all other known structures, indicating considerable flexibility within the C-terminal domain. Our structures suggest a mode of DosR activation by phosphorylation via a helix rearrangement mechanism.

  13. The Unfolded Protein Response and the Phosphorylations of Activating Transcription Factor 2 in the trans-Activation of il23a Promoter Produced by β-Glucans*

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Mario; Domingo, Esther; Alonso, Sara; Frade, Javier García; Eiros, José; Crespo, Mariano Sánchez; Fernández, Nieves

    2014-01-01

    Current views on the control of IL-23 production focus on the regulation of il23a, the gene encoding IL-23 p19, by NF-κB in combination with other transcription factors. C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), X2-Box-binding protein 1 (XBP1), activator protein 1 (AP1), SMAD, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBPβ), and cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) have been involved in response to LPS, but no data are available regarding the mechanism triggered by the fungal mimic and β-glucan-containing stimulus zymosan, which produces IL-23 and to a low extent the related cytokine IL-12 p70. Zymosan induced the mobilization of CHOP from the nuclear fractions to phagocytic vesicles. Hypha-forming Candida also induced the nuclear disappearance of CHOP. Assay of transcription factor binding to the il23a promoter showed an increase of Thr(P)-71–Thr(P)-69-activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) binding in response to zymosan. PKC and PKA/mitogen- and stress-activated kinase inhibitors down-regulated Thr(P)-71–ATF2 binding to the il23a promoter and il23a mRNA expression. Consistent with the current concept of complementary phosphorylations on N-terminal Thr-71 and Thr-69 of ATF2 by ERK and p38 MAPK, MEK, and p38 MAPK inhibitors blunted Thr(P)-69–ATF2 binding. Knockdown of atf2 mRNA with siRNA correlated with inhibition of il23a mRNA, but it did not affect the expression of il12/23b and il10 mRNA. These data indicate the following: (i) zymosan decreases nuclear proapoptotic CHOP, most likely by promoting its accumulation in phagocytic vesicles; (ii) zymosan-induced il23a mRNA expression is best explained through coordinated κB- and ATF2-dependent transcription; and (iii) il23a expression relies on complementary phosphorylation of ATF2 on Thr-69 and Thr-71 dependent on PKC and MAPK activities. PMID:24982422

  14. Analysis of phosphorylated proteins and inhibition of kinase activity during Giardia intestinalis excystation.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Magda E; Wasserman, Moisés

    2010-03-01

    The parasite Giardia intestinalis undergoes a differentiation process that allows it to infect its mammal host. That process is excystation. We examined the importance of protein phosphorylation during the passage from cyst to trophozoite. Cysts obtained from patients with giardiasis were excysted in vitro and the soluble cytoplasmic proteins were analyzed during the three phases of the process, using a specific staining for phosphoproteins. We found two phosphorylated proteins and identified them with MALDI-TOF as 14-3-3 and Hsp70. Modifications were detected in both proteins, which could indicate a role in differentiation of the parasite. In addition, the inhibition of serine-threonine kinases during excystation specifically affected the cytokinesis of the excyzoite, thus inhibiting the completion of trophozoite formation.

  15. 20-kDa protein associated with the murine T-cell antigen receptor is phosphorylated in response to activation by antigen or concanavalin A

    SciTech Connect

    Samelson, L.E.; Harford, J.; Schwartz, R.H.; Klausner, R.D.

    1985-04-01

    Antigen or concanavalin A activation of a murine T-cell hybrid specific for pigeon cytochrome resulted in phosphorylation of a 20-kDa protein that was specifically coprecipitated by a monoclonal antibody binding the T-cell antigen receptor. There was no evidence for phosphorylation of the antigen receptor itself. The phosphorylation of the 20-kDa polypeptide was dependent on the concentration of antigen or lectin used to activate the T-cell hybrid and reached a maximum 40 min after the addition of antigen. The 20-kDa protein was also radioiodinated with a hydrophobic photoactivatable labeling reagent. The amount of iodinated 20-kDa protein immunoprecipitable with the anti-receptor antibody did not increase with T-cell activation, indicating that the phosphorylation occurred on a molecule that was constitutively associated with the antigen receptor. Concanavalin A also induced phosphorylation of a 20-kDa polypeptide in a second antigen-specific major histocompatibility complex-restricted T-cell hybrid. Again, the phosphorylated polypeptide was precipitated only by a monoclonal antibody specific for the antigen receptor on this hybrid. Thus, the antigen or concanavalin A-induced activation of T-cell hybrids results in the rapid phosphorylation of a 20-kDa protein that is associated with the T-cell receptor.

  16. Phosphorylation of the exchange factor DENND3 by ULK in response to starvation activates Rab12 and induces autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jie; Fotouhi, Maryam; McPherson, Peter S

    2015-01-01

    Unc-51-like kinases (ULKs) are the most upstream kinases in the initiation of autophagy, yet the molecular mechanisms underlying their function are poorly understood. We report a new role for ULK in the induction of autophagy. ULK-mediated phosphorylation of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor DENND3 at serines 554 and 572 upregulates its GEF activity toward the small GTPase Rab12. Through binding to LC3 and associating with LC3-positive autophagosomes, active Rab12 facilitates autophagosome trafficking, thus establishing a crucial role for the ULK/DENND3/Rab12 axis in starvation-induced autophagy. PMID:25925668

  17. Effects of manganese on tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity and TH-phosphorylation in a dopaminergic neural cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Danhui; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Kanthasamy, Anumantha

    2011-07-15

    Manganese (Mn) exposure causes manganism, a neurological disorder similar to Parkinson's disease. However, the cellular mechanism by which Mn impairs the dopaminergic neurotransmitter system remains unclear. We previously demonstrated that caspase-3-dependent proteolytic activation of protein kinase C delta (PKC{delta}) plays a key role in Mn-induced apoptotic cell death in dopaminergic neurons. Recently, we showed that PKC{delta} negatively regulates tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis, by enhancing protein phosphatase-2A activity in dopaminergic neurons. Here, we report that Mn exposure can affect the enzymatic activity of TH, the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis, by activating PKC{delta}-PP2A signaling pathway in a dopaminergic cell model. Low dose Mn (3-10 {mu}M) exposure to differentiated mesencephalic dopaminergic neuronal cells for 3 h induced a significant increase in TH activity and phosphorylation of TH-Ser40. The PKC{delta} specific inhibitor rottlerin did not prevent Mn-induced TH activity or TH-Ser40 phosphorylation. On the contrary, chronic exposure to 0.1-1 {mu}M Mn for 24 h induced a dose-dependent decrease in TH activity. Interestingly, chronic Mn treatment significantly increased PKC{delta} kinase activity and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) enzyme activity. Treatment with the PKC{delta} inhibitor rottlerin almost completely prevented chronic Mn-induced reduction in TH activity, as well as increased PP2A activity. Neither acute nor chronic Mn exposures induced any cytotoxic cell death or altered TH protein levels. Collectively, these results demonstrate that low dose Mn exposure impairs TH activity in dopaminergic cells through activation of PKC{delta} and PP2A activity.

  18. Protein phosphatase PHLPP induces cell apoptosis and exerts anticancer activity by inhibiting Survivin phosphorylation and nuclear export in gallbladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yinghe; Li, Xiaoya; Yi, Bin; Zheng, Junnian; Peng, Zhangxiao; Zhang, Zhihan; Wu, Mengchao; Shen, Feng; Su, Changqing

    2015-08-01

    Many factors regulate cancer cell apoptosis, among which Survivin has a strong anti-apoptotic effect and PHLPP is a tumor suppressor gene that can induce significant apoptosis. However, the relationship between PHLPP and Survivin in gallbladder carcinoma (GBC) has not been reported. This study found that PHLPP expression is decreased and Survivin expression is increased in GBC tissues and cell lines. Their expression levels showed an inverse relationship and were associated with poor prognosis of GBC patients. Loss of PHLPP can increase the level of phosphorylated Survivin and induce the nuclear export of Survivin, which thus inhibit cell apoptosis and promote cell proliferation in GBC cells. The process that PHLPP regulates Survivin phosphorylation and intracellular localization is involved in AKT activity. Re-overexpression of PHLPP in GBC cells can decrease AKT phosphorylation level. Reduced expression of PHLPP in GBC is associated with high expression of miR-495. Increasing PHLPP expression or inhibiting miR-495 expression can induce apoptosis and suppress tumor growth in GBC xenograft model in nude mice. The results revealed the role and mechanism of PHLPP and Survivin in GBC cells and proposed strategies for gene therapies targeting the miR-495 / PHLPP / AKT / Survivin regulatory pathway.

  19. Phenylephrine activates eNOS Ser 1177 phosphorylation and nitric oxide signaling in renal hypertensive rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Silva, Bruno R; Pernomian, Laena; Grando, Marcella D; Bendhack, Lusiane M

    2014-09-01

    The endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) plays an important role in the control of the vascular tone. This work aimed to evaluate the role of an α1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine (PE) on eNOS activity and downstream signaling pathway activation in normotensive (2K) and renal hypertensive (2K-1C) intact-endothelium rat aortas. Concentration-effect curves were performed for PE in intact-endothelium aortas from 2K and 2K-1C rats, in the absence of or in the presence of NOS or soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) inhibitor. Intact endothelium aortas were stimulated with PE in organ chambers and eNOS Ser(1177)/Thr(495) phosphorylation expression was evaluated by western blot. Nitric Oxide (NO) production was evaluated in isolated endothelial cells from 2K and 2K-1C rat aortas by flow-cytometry using NO selective fluorescent probe, DAF-2DA. The sGC activity/expression was also evaluated. PE-induced contractile response is lower in 2K-1C than in 2K intact-endothelium rat aorta. This is due to higher eNOS Ser(1177) phosphorylation in 2K-1C, which induces the eNOS overactivation. It was abolished by NOS or sGC inhibition. Phenylephrine reduces NO production in 2K as compared to the basal level, but it is not modified in 2K-1C. In PE-stimulated endothelial cells, the NO production is higher in 2K-1C than in 2K. Phenylephrine induces higher cGMP production in 2K-1C than in 2K, despite the lower expression of sGC in 2K-1C. Our results suggest that alpha1-adrenoceptor activation contributes to the increased activity of the enzyme eNOS by Ser(1177) phosphorylation in 2K-1C intact-endothelium aorta, which consequently decreases PE-induced contractile response.

  20. CD16-mediated p21ras activation is associated with Shc and p36 tyrosine phosphorylation and their binding with Grb2 in human natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The Src homology (SH) 2/SH3 domain-containing protein Grb2 and the oncoprotein Shc have been implicated in a highly conserved mechanism that regulates p21ras activation. We investigated the involvement of these adaptor proteins in the signaling pathway induced by CD16 or interleukin (IL) 2R triggering in human natural killer (NK) cells. Both p46 and p52 forms of Shc were rapidly and transiently tyrosine phosphorylated upon CD16 or IL-2 stimulation with different kinetics. Shc immunoprecipitates from lysates of CD16- or IL-2-stimulated NK cells contained Grb2 and an unidentified 145-kD tyrosine phosphoprotein. Grb2 immunoprecipitates from anti-CD16-stimulated NK cells contained not only Shc, but also a 36-kD tyrosine phosphoprotein (p36). The interaction between Grb2 and Shc or p36 occurred via the Grb2SH2 domain as indicated by in vitro binding assays using a bacteriologically synthesized glutathione S-transferase-Grb2SH2 fusion protein. We also present evidence that p21ras is activated by CD16 and IL-2R cross-linking. Accumulation of guanosine triphosphate-bound Ras was detected within 1 minute and occurred with kinetics similar to inductive protein tyrosine phosphorylation and Grb2 association of Shc and p36 adaptor proteins. PMID:8551221

  1. Effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in the bovine oviduct in vitro: Alteration by heat stress

    PubMed Central

    WIJAYAGUNAWARDANE, Missaka P. B.; HAMBRUCH, Nina; HAEGER, Jan-Dirk; PFARRER, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) has been shown to be involved in control of the oviductal microenvironment. To elucidate the potential mechanisms responsible for the detrimental effect of heat stress and to identify the relation with the endocrine status, the effects of EGF on the level of phosphorylated mitogen-activated-protein kinase (MAPK) and proliferation of bovine oviductal epithelial cells (OECs) exposed to different cyclic ovarian steroidal environments (luteal phase (LP), follicular phase (FP) and postovulatory phase (PO)) and temperatures (mild heat stress (40 C) and severe heat stress (43 C)) were investigated. Western blot was performed to evaluate phosphorylated MAPK, while proliferation was analyzed by MTT assay. Stimulation of OECs with EGF alone or with EGF in the PO and FP environments significantly increased the amount of phosphorylated MAPK, with MAPK 44 phosphorylation being highest during exposure to PO conditions. These effects were not observed in the LP. Heat treatment completely blocked effects of EGF on phosphorylated MAPK. Additionally, severe heat stress led to a significantly lower basal level of phosphorylated MAPK. PD98059 (MAPK inhibitor) completely abolished EGF-stimulated MAPK phosphorylation and OECs proliferation. Overall the results indicate that EGF has the potential to increase the amount of phosphorylated MAPK in OECs and therefore could be involved in regulation of the bovine oviductal microenvironment. However, these regulatory mechanisms may be compromised in the presence of heat stress (high ambient temperature), leading to low fertility rates and impaired embryo survival. PMID:26050642

  2. Erk/Src Phosphorylation of Cortactin Acts as a Switch On-Switch Off Mechanism That Controls Its Ability To Activate N-WASP

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Quiles, Narcisa; Ho, Hsin-Yi Henry; Kirschner, Marc W.; Ramesh, Narayanaswamy; Geha, Raif S.

    2004-01-01

    The Arp2/3 complex can be independently activated to initiate actin polymerization by the VCA domain of WASP family members and by the acidic N-terminal and F-actin-binding repeat region of cortactin, which possesses a C-terminal SH3 domain. Cortactin is a target for phosphorylation by Src tyrosine kinases and by serine/threonine kinases that include Erk. Here we demonstrate that cortactin binds N-WASP and WASP via its SH3 domain, induces in vitro N-WASP-mediated actin polymerization, and colocalizes with N-WASP and WASP at sites of active actin polymerization. Erk phosphorylation and a mimicking S405,418D double mutation enhanced cortactin binding and activation of N-WASP. In contrast, Src phosphorylation inhibited the ability of cortactin previously phosphorylated by Erk, and that of S405,418D double mutant cortactin, to bind and activate N-WASP. Furthermore, Y→D mutation of three tyrosine residues targeted by Src (Y421, Y466, and Y482) inhibited the ability of S405,418D cortactin to activate N-WASP. We propose that Erk phosphorylation liberates the SH3 domain of cortactin from intramolecular interactions with proline-rich regions, causing it to synergize with WASP and N-WASP in activating the Arp2/3 complex, and that Src phosphorylation terminates cortactin activation of N-WASP and WASP. PMID:15169891

  3. Insulin activates a 70-kDa S6 kinase through serine/threonine-specific phosphorylation of the enzyme polypeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D.J.; Gunsalus, J.R.; Avruch, J. )

    1990-10-01

    The dominant insulin-stimulated ribosomal protein S6 kinase activity was purified to near homogeneity from insulin-treated {sup 32}P-labeled rat H4 hepatoma cells and found to copurify with a 70-kDa {sup 32}P-labeled polypeptide. The dominant S6 kinase purified from livers of cycloheximide-treated rats is also a 70-kDa polypeptide. Antiserum raised against rat liver S6 kinase specifically immunoprecipitates the purified {sup 32}P-labeled H4 hepatoma insulin-stimulated S6 kinase. Immune complexes prepared from the cytosol of {sup 32}P-labeled H4 cells contain several {sup 32}P-labeled polypeptides. Insulin treatment increases the {sup 32}P content of the immunoprecipitated 70-kDa S6 kinase polypeptide 3- to 4-fold over basal levels. Tryptic peptide maps indicate that the insulin-stimulated S6 kinase purified from {sup 32}P-labeled H4 cells is phosphorylated at multiple sites distinct from those which participate in autophosphorylation in vitro. The S6 kinases purified from liver of cycloheximide-treated rat and H4 hepatoma insulin-stimulated enzyme are each completely deactivated by incubation with protein phosphatase type 2A in both autophosphorylating and 40S S6 phosphorylating activities. Thus insulin activates the 70-kDa S6 kinase by promoting phosphorylation of specific serine/threonine residues on the enzyme polypeptide, probably through activating an as-yet-unidentified serine/threonine protein kinase distinct from microtubule-associated protein 2 kinase.

  4. Syk interacts with tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins in human platelets activated by collagen and cross-linking of the Fc gamma-IIA receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Yanaga, F; Poole, A; Asselin, J; Blake, R; Schieven, G L; Clark, E A; Law, C L; Watson, S P

    1995-01-01

    Activation of human platelets by cross-linking of the platelet low-affinity IgG receptor, the Fc gamma receptor IIA (Fc gamma-RIIA), or by collagen is associated with rapid phosphorylation on tyrosine of the non-receptor tyrosine kinase syk. Phosphorylation is still observed, albeit sometimes reduced, in the presence of a combination of a protein kinase C inhibitor, Ro 31-8220, and the intracellular calcium chelator, BAPTA-AM, demonstrating independence from phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) activity. In contrast, the combination of Ro 31-8220 and BAPTA-AM completely inhibits phosphorylation of syk in thrombin-stimulated platelets. Phosphorylation of syk increases its autophosphorylation activity measured in a kinase assay performed on syk immunoprecipitates. Fc gamma-RIIA also undergoes phosphorylation in syk immunoprecipitates from platelets activated by cross-linking of Fc gamma-RIIA but not by collagen, suggesting that it associates with the kinase. Consistent with this, tyrosine-phosphorylated Fc gamma-RIIA is precipitated by a glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein containing the tandem src homology (SH2) domains of syk from Fc gamma-RIIA- but not collagen-activated cells. Two uncharacterized tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins of 40 and 65 kDa are uniquely precipitated by a GST fusion protein containing the tandem syk-SH2 domains in collagen-stimulated platelets. A peptide based on the antigen recognition activation motif (ARAM) of Fc gamma-RIIA, and phosphorylated on the two tyrosine residues found within this region, selectively binds syk from lysates of resting platelets; this interaction is not seen with a non-phosphorylated peptide. Kinase assays on Fc gamma-RIIA immunoprecipitates reveal the constitutive association of an unidentified kinase activity in resting cells which phosphorylates a 67 kDa protein. Syk is not detected in Fc gamma-RIIA immunoprecipitates from resting cells but associates with the receptor following activation

  5. Adrenergic regulation of HSL serine phosphorylation and activity in human skeletal muscle during the onset of exercise.

    PubMed

    Talanian, Jason L; Tunstall, Rebecca J; Watt, Matthew J; Duong, Mylinh; Perry, Christopher G R; Steinberg, Gregory R; Kemp, Bruce E; Heigenhauser, George J F; Spriet, Lawrence L

    2006-10-01

    Skeletal muscle hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) activity is increased by contractions and increases in blood epinephrine (EPI) concentrations and cyclic AMP activation of the adrenergic pathway during prolonged exercise. To determine the importance of hormonal stimulation of HSL activity during the onset of moderate- and high-intensity exercise, nine men [age 24.3 +/- 1.2 yr, 80.8 +/- 5.0 kg, peak oxygen consumption (VO2 peak) 43.9 +/- 3.6 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)] cycled for 1 min at approximately 65% VO2 peak, rested for 60 min, and cycled at approximately 90% VO2 peak for 1 min. Skeletal muscle biopsies were taken pre- and postexercise, and arterial blood was sampled throughout exercise. Arterial EPI increased (P < 0.05) postexercise at 65% (0.45 +/- 0.10 to 0.78 +/- 0.27 nM) and 90% VO2 peak (0.57 +/- 0.34 to 1.09 +/- 0.50 nM). HSL activity increased (P < 0.05) following 1 min of exercise at 65% VO2 peak [1.05 +/- 0.39 to 1.78 +/- 0.54 mmol x min(-1) x kg dry muscle (dm)(-1)] and 90% VO2 peak (1.07 +/- 0.24 to 1.91 +/- 0.62 mmol x min(-1) x kg dm(-1)). Cyclic AMP content also increased (P < 0.05) at both exercise intensities (65%: 1.52 +/- 0.67 to 2.75 +/- 1.12, 90%: 1.85 +/- 0.65 to 2.64 +/- 0.93 micromol/kg dm). HSL Ser660 phosphorylation (approximately 55% increase) and ERK1/2 phosphorylation ( approximately 33% increase) were augmented following exercise at both intensities, whereas HSL Ser563 and Ser565 phosphorylation were not different from rest. The results indicate that increases in arterial EPI concentration during the onset of moderate- and high-intensity exercise increase cyclic AMP content, which results in the phosphorylation of HSL Ser660. This adrenergic stimulation contributes to the increase in HSL activity that occurs in human skeletal muscle in the first minute of exercise at 65% and 90% VO2 peak.

  6. Phosphorylation of the human leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) receptor by mitogen-activated protein kinase and the regulation of LIF receptor function by heterologous receptor activation.

    PubMed Central

    Schiemann, W P; Graves, L M; Baumann, H; Morella, K K; Gearing, D P; Nielsen, M D; Krebs, E G; Nathanson, N M

    1995-01-01

    We used a bacterially expressed fusion protein containing the entire cytoplasmic domain of the human leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) receptor to study its phosphorylation in response to LIF stimulation. The dose- and time-dependent relationships for phosphorylation of this construct in extracts of LIF-stimulated 3T3-L1 cells were superimposable with those for the stimulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Indeed, phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic domain of the low-affinity LIF receptor alpha-subunit (LIFR) in Mono Q-fractionated, LIF-stimulated 3T3-L1 extracts occurred only in those fractions containing activated MAPK; Ser-1044 served as the major phosphorylation site in the human LIFR for MAPK both in agonist-stimulated 3T3-L1 lysates and by recombinant extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 in vitro. Expression in rat H-35 hepatoma cells of LIFR or chimeric granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor receptor (G-CSFR)-LIFR mutants lacking Ser-1044 failed to affect cytokine-stimulated expression of a reporter gene under the control of the beta-fibrinogen gene promoter but eliminated the insulin-induced attenuation of cytokine-stimulated gene expression. Thus, our results identify the human LIFR as a substrate for MAPK and suggest a mechanism of heterologous receptor regulation of LIFR signaling occurring at Ser-1044. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:7777512

  7. The DUSP26 phosphatase activator adenylate kinase 2 regulates FADD phosphorylation and cell growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunjoo; Lee, Ho-June; Oh, Yumin; Choi, Seon-Guk; Hong, Se-Hoon; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Lee, Song-Yi; Choi, Ji-Woo; Su Hwang, Deog; Kim, Key-Sun; Kim, Hyo-Joon; Zhang, Jianke; Youn, Hyun-Jo; Noh, Dong-Young; Jung, Yong-Keun

    2014-02-01

    Adenylate kinase 2 (AK2), which balances adenine nucleotide pool, is a multi-functional protein. Here we show that AK2 negatively regulates tumour cell growth. AK2 forms a complex with dual-specificity phosphatase 26 (DUSP26) phosphatase and stimulates DUSP26 activity independently of its AK activity. AK2/DUSP26 phosphatase protein complex dephosphorylates fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD) and regulates cell growth. AK2 deficiency enhances cell proliferation and induces tumour formation in a xenograft assay. This anti-growth function of AK2 is associated with its DUSP26-stimulating activity. Downregulation of AK2 is frequently found in tumour cells and human cancer tissues showing high levels of phospho-FADDSer194. Moreover, reconstitution of AK2 in AK2-deficient tumour cells retards both cell proliferation and tumourigenesis. Consistent with this, AK2+/- mouse embryo fibroblasts exhibit enhanced cell proliferation with a significant alteration in phospho-FADDSer191. These results suggest that AK2 is an associated activator of DUSP26 and suppresses cell proliferation by FADD dephosphorylation, postulating AK2 as a negative regulator of tumour growth.

  8. Microtubules Inhibit E-Cadherin Adhesive Activity by Maintaining Phosphorylated p120-Catenin in a Colon Carcinoma Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Maiden, Stephanie L.; Petrova, Yuliya I.; Gumbiner, Barry M.

    2016-01-01

    Tight regulation of cadherin-mediated intercellular adhesions is critical to both tissue morphogenesis during development and tissue homeostasis in adults. Cell surface expression of the cadherin-catenin complex is often directly correlated with the level of adhesion, however, examples exist where cadherin appears to be inactive and cells are completely non-adhesive. The state of p120-catenin phosphorylation has been implicated in regulating the adhesive activity of E-cadherin but the mechanism is currently unclear. We have found that destabilization of the microtubule cytoskeleton, independent of microtubule plus-end dynamics, dephosphorylates p120-catenin and activates E-cadherin adhesion in Colo 205 cells. Through chemical screening, we have also identified several kinases as potential regulators of E-cadherin adhesive activity. Analysis of several p120-catenin phosphomutants suggests that gross dephosphorylation of p120-catenin rather than that of specific amino acids may trigger E-cadherin adhesion. Uncoupling p120-catenin binding to E-cadherin at the membrane causes constitutive adhesion in Colo 205 cells, further supporting an inhibitory role of phosphorylated p120-catenin on E-cadherin activity. PMID:26845024

  9. Increases in cAMP, MAPK Activity and CREB Phosphorylation during REM Sleep: Implications for REM Sleep and Memory Consolidation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jie; Phan, Trongha X.; Yang, Yimei; Garelick, Michael G.; Storm, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    The cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) transcriptional pathway is required for consolidation of hippocampus-dependent memory. In mice, this pathway undergoes a circadian oscillation required for memory persistence that reaches a peak during the daytime. Since mice exhibit polyphasic sleep patterns during the day, this suggested the interesting possibility that cAMP, MAPK activity and CREB phosphorylation may be elevated during sleep. Here, we report that cAMP, phospho-p44/42 MAPK and phospho-CREB are higher in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep compared to awake mice but are not elevated in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. This peak of activity during REM sleep does not occur in mice lacking calmodulin-stimulated adenylyl cyclases, a mouse strain that learns but cannot consolidate hippocampus-dependent memory. We conclude that a preferential increase in cAMP, MAPK activity and CREB phosphorylation during REM sleep may contribute to hippocampus-dependent memory consolidation. PMID:23575844

  10. Increases in cAMP, MAPK activity, and CREB phosphorylation during REM sleep: implications for REM sleep and memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jie; Phan, Trongha X; Yang, Yimei; Garelick, Michael G; Storm, Daniel R

    2013-04-10

    The cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) transcriptional pathway is required for consolidation of hippocampus-dependent memory. In mice, this pathway undergoes a circadian oscillation required for memory persistence that reaches a peak during the daytime. Because mice exhibit polyphasic sleep patterns during the day, this suggested the interesting possibility that cAMP, MAPK activity, and CREB phosphorylation may be elevated during sleep. Here, we report that cAMP, phospho-p44/42 MAPK, and phospho-CREB are higher in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep compared with awake mice but are not elevated in non-REM sleep. This peak of activity during REM sleep does not occur in mice lacking calmodulin-stimulated adenylyl cyclases, a mouse strain that learns but cannot consolidate hippocampus-dependent memory. We conclude that a preferential increase in cAMP, MAPK activity, and CREB phosphorylation during REM sleep may contribute to hippocampus-dependent memory consolidation. PMID:23575844

  11. The Oncogenic Lung Cancer Fusion Kinase CD74-ROS Activates a Novel Invasiveness Pathway Through E-Syt1 Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Hyun Jung; Johnson, Hannah; Bronson, Roderick T.; de Feraudy, Sebastien; White, Forest; Charest, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Patients with lung cancer often present with metastatic disease and therefore have a very poor prognosis. The recent discovery of several novel ROS receptor tyrosine kinase molecular alterations in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) presents a therapeutic opportunity for the development of new targeted treatment strategies. Here, we report that the NSCLC-derived fusion CD74-ROS, which accounts for 30% of all ROS fusion kinases in NSCLC, is an active and oncogenic tyrosine kinase. We found that CD74-ROS expressing cells were highly invasive in vitro and metastatic in vivo. Pharmacological inhibition of CD74-ROS kinase activity reversed its transforming capacity by attenuating downstrream signaling networks. Using quantitative phosphoproteomics, we uncovered a mechanism by which CD74-ROS activates a novel pathway driving cell invasion. Expression of CD74-ROS resulted in the phosphorylation of the extended synaptotagmin-like protein E-Syt1. Elimination of E-Syt1 expression drastically reduced invasiveness both in vitro and in vivo without modifying the oncogenic activity of CD74-ROS. Furthermore, expression of CD74-ROS in non-invasive NSCLC cell lines readily confered invasive properties that paralleled the acquisition of E-Syt1 phosphorylation. Taken together, our findings indicate that E-Syt1 is a mediator of cancer cell invasion and molecularly define ROS fusion kinases as therapeutic targets in the treatment of NSCLC. PMID:22659450

  12. Changes in Mg2+ ion concentration and heavy chain phosphorylation regulate the motor activity of a class I myosin.

    PubMed

    Fujita-Becker, Setsuko; Dürrwang, Ulrike; Erent, Muriel; Clark, Richard J; Geeves, Michael A; Manstein, Dietmar J

    2005-02-18

    Class I myosins are single-headed motor proteins implicated in various motile processes including organelle translocation, ion channel gating, and cytoskeleton reorganization. Dictyostelium discoideum myosin-ID belongs to subclass 1alpha, whose members are thought to be tuned for rapid sliding. The direct analysis of myosin-ID motor activity is made possible by the production of single polypeptide constructs carrying an artificial lever arm. Using these constructs, we show that the motor activity of myosin-ID is activated 80-fold by phosphorylation at the TEDS site. TEDS site phosphorylation acts by stabilizing the actomyosin complex and increasing the coupling between actin binding and the release of hydrolysis products. A surprising effect of Mg(2+) ions on in vitro motility was discovered. Changes in the level of free Mg(2+) ions within the physiological range are shown to modulate motor activity by inhibiting ADP release. Our results indicate that higher concentrations of free Mg(2+) ions stabilize the tension-bearing actin myosin ADP state and shift the system from the production of rapid movement toward the generation of tension.

  13. NMR structure of a complex formed by the carboxyl-terminal domain of human RAP74 and a phosphorylated peptide from the central domain of the FCP1 phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ao; Abbott, Karen L; Desjardins, Alexandre; Di Lello, Paola; Omichinski, James G; Legault, Pascale

    2009-03-10

    Recycling of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) requires dephosphorylation of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of the polymerase. FCP1 enables the recycling of RNAPII via its CTD-specific phosphatase activity, which is stimulated by the RAP74 subunit of the general transcription factor TFIIF. Both the central (centFCP1) and C-terminal (cterFCP1) domains of FCP1 interact independently and specifically with the C-terminal domain of RAP74 (cterRAP74), suggesting that these interactions mediate the stimulatory effect of TFIIF on the CTD phosphatase activity of FCP1. Phosphorylation of FCP1 by casein kinase 2 on residues in its central (T584) and C-terminal (S942 and S944) domains stimulates its binding to RAP74 and its CTD phosphatase activity. To improve our understanding of the FCP1-RAP74 interactions, we previously determined the NMR structure of a complex formed by human cterRAP74 and cterFCP1. We now present the high-resolution NMR structure and thermodynamic characterization by isothermal titration calorimetry of a complex formed by the same cterRAP74 domain and a phosphorylated peptide from the central domain of human FCP1 (centFCP1-PO(4)). Comparison of the cterFCP1-cterRAP74 and centFCP1-PO(4)-cterRAP74 complexes indicates that centFCP1 and cterFCP1 both utilize hydrophobic and acidic residues to recognize the same groove of RAP74, but there are significant differences in the details of their interactions. These differences point to the adaptability of RAP74 to recognize the two regions of FCP1. Our NMR and thermodynamic studies further elucidate the complex molecular mechanism by which TFIIF and FCP1 cooperate for RNAPII recycling. PMID:19215094

  14. Metformin, an AMPK activator, stimulates the phosphorylation of aquaporin 2 and urea transporter A1 in inner medullary collecting ducts.

    PubMed

    Klein, Janet D; Wang, Yanhua; Blount, Mitsi A; Molina, Patrick A; LaRocque, Lauren M; Ruiz, Joseph A; Sands, Jeff M

    2016-05-15

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is characterized by production of very large quantities of dilute urine due to an inability of the kidney to respond to vasopressin. Congenital NDI results from mutations in the type 2 vasopressin receptor (V2R) in ∼90% of families. These patients do not have mutations in aquaporin-2 (AQP2) or urea transporter UT-A1 (UT-A1). We tested adenosine monophosphate kinase (AMPK) since it is known to phosphorylate another vasopressin-sensitive transporter, NKCC2 (Na-K-2Cl cotransporter). We found AMPK expressed in rat inner medulla (IM). AMPK directly phosphorylated AQP2 and UT-A1 in vitro. Metformin, an AMPK activator, increased phosphorylation of both AQP2 and UT-A1 in rat inner medullary collecting ducts (IMCDs). Metformin increased the apical plasma membrane accumulation of AQP2, but not UT-A1, in rat IM. Metformin increased both osmotic water permeability and urea permeability in perfused rat terminal IMCDs. These findings suggest that metformin increases osmotic water permeability by increasing AQP2 accumulation in the apical plasma membrane but increases urea permeability by activating UT-A1 already present in the membrane. Lastly, metformin increased urine osmolality in mice lacking a V2R, a mouse model of congenital NDI. We conclude that AMPK activation by metformin mimics many of the mechanisms by which vasopressin increases urine-concentrating ability. These findings suggest that metformin may be a novel therapeutic option for congenital NDI due to V2R mutations. PMID:26962099

  15. Nanog Increases Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) Promoter Activity and Expression and Directly Binds to FAK Protein to Be Phosphorylated*

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Baotran; Olson, Gretchen; Figel, Sheila; Gelman, Irwin; Cance, William G.; Golubovskaya, Vita M.

    2012-01-01

    Nanog and FAK were shown to be overexpressed in cancer cells. In this report, the Nanog overexpression increased FAK expression in 293, SW480, and SW620 cancer cells. Nanog binds the FAK promoter and up-regulates its activity, whereas Nanog siRNA decreases FAK promoter activity and FAK mRNA. The FAK promoter contains four Nanog-binding sites. The site-directed mutagenesis of these sites significantly decreased up-regulation of FAK promoter activity by Nanog. EMSA showed the specific binding of Nanog to each of the four sites, and binding was confirmed by ChIP assay. Nanog directly binds the FAK protein by pulldown and immunoprecipitation assays, and proteins co-localize by confocal microscopy. Nanog binds the N-terminal domain of FAK. In addition, FAK directly phosphorylates Nanog in a dose-dependent manner by in vitro kinase assay and in cancer cells in vivo. The site-directed mutagenesis of Nanog tyrosines, Y35F and Y174F, blocked phosphorylation and binding by FAK. Moreover, overexpression of wild type Nanog increased filopodia/lamellipodia formation, whereas mutant Y35F and Y174F Nanog did not. The wild type Nanog increased cell invasion that was inhibited by the FAK inhibitor and increased by FAK more significantly than with the mutants Y35F and Y174F Nanog. Down-regulation of Nanog with siRNA decreased cell growth reversed by FAK overexpression. Thus, these data demonstrate the regulation of the FAK promoter by Nanog, the direct binding of the proteins, the phosphorylation of Nanog by FAK, and the effect of FAK and Nanog cross-regulation on cancer cell morphology, invasion, and growth that plays a significant role in carcinogenesis. PMID:22493428

  16. Evodiamine Inhibits Insulin-Stimulated mTOR-S6K Activation and IRS1 Serine Phosphorylation in Adipocytes and Improves Glucose Tolerance in Obese/Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Kusudo, Tatsuya; Takeuchi, Tamaki; Yamashita, Yukari; Kontani, Yasuhide; Okamatsu, Yuko; Saito, Masayuki; Mori, Nozomu; Yamashita, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    Evodiamine, an alkaloid extracted from the dried unripe fruit of the tree Evodia rutaecarpa Bentham (Rutaceae), reduces obesity and insulin resistance in obese/diabetic mice; however, the mechanism underlying the effect of evodiamine on insulin resistance is unknown. This study investigated the effect of evodiamine on signal transduction relating to insulin resistance using obese/diabetic KK-Ay mice and an in vitro adipocyte culture. There is a significant decrease in the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and ribosomal S6 protein kinase (S6K) signaling in white adipose tissue (WAT) in KK-Ay mice treated with evodiamine, in which glucose tolerance is improved. In addition, reduction of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) serine phosphorylation, an indicator of insulin resistance, was detected in their WAT, suggesting suppression of the negative feedback loop from S6K to IRS1. As well as the stimulation of IRS1 and Akt serine phosphorylation, insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of mTOR and S6K is time-dependent in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, whereas evodiamine does not affect their phosphorylation except for an inhibitory effect on mTOR phosphorylation. Moreover, evodiamine inhibits the insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of mTOR and S6K, leading to down-regulation of IRS1 serine phosphorylation in the adipocytes. Evodiamine also stimulates phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an important regulator of energy metabolism, which may cause down-regulation of mTOR signaling in adipocytes. A similar effect on AMPK, mTOR and IRS1 phosphorylation was found in adipocytes treated with rosiglitazone. These results suggest evodiamine improves glucose tolerance and prevents the progress of insulin resistance associated with obese/diabetic states, at least in part, through inhibition of mTOR-S6K signaling and IRS1 serine phosphorylation in adipocytes. PMID:24391749

  17. SIRT1, AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation and downstream kinases in response to a single bout of sprint exercise: influence of glucose ingestion.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Borja; Guadalupe-Grau, Amelia; Fuentes, Teresa; Ponce-González, Jesús Gustavo; Morales-Alamo, David; Olmedillas, Hugo; Guillén-Salgado, José; Santana, Alfredo; Calbet, José A L

    2010-07-01

    This study was designed to examine potential in vivo mechanisms of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation inhibition and its downstream signaling consequences during the recovery period after a single bout of sprint exercise. Sprint exercise induces Thr(172)-AMPK phosphorylation and increased PGC-1alpha mRNA, by an unknown mechanism. Muscle biopsies were obtained in 15 young healthy men in response to a 30-s sprint exercise (Wingate test) randomly distributed into two groups: the fasting (n = 7, C) and the glucose group (n = 8, G), who ingested 75 g of glucose 1 h before exercising to inhibit AMPKalpha phosphorylation. Exercise elicited different patterns of Ser(221)-ACCbeta, Ser(473)-Akt and Thr(642)-AS160 phosphorylation, during the recovery period after glucose ingestion. Thirty minutes after the control sprint, Ser(485)-AMPKalpha1/Ser(491)-AMPKalpha2 phosphorylation was reduced by 33% coinciding with increased Thr(172)-AMPKalpha phosphorylation (both, P < 0.05). Glucose abolished the 30-min Thr(172)-AMPKalpha phosphorylation. Ser(221)-ACCbeta phosphorylation was elevated immediately following and 30 min after exercise in C and G, implying a dissociation between Thr(172)-AMPKalpha and Ser(221)-ACCbeta phosphorylation. Two hours after the sprint, PGC-1alpha protein expression remained unchanged while SIRT1 (its upstream deacetylase) was increased. Glucose ingestion abolished the SIRT1 response without any significant effect on PGC-1alpha protein expression. In conclusion, glucose ingestion prior to a sprint exercise profoundly affects Thr(172)-AMPKalpha phosphorylation and its downstream signaling during the recovery period.

  18. 76 FR 42129 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Case Submission Form, Case Assistance Form

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-18

    ... SECURITY Agency Information Collection Activities: Case Submission Form, Case Assistance Form (Form DHS-7001), Online Ombudsman Form DHS-7001 AGENCY: Office of the Citizenship and Immigration Service... practices of USCIS to mitigate problems. This form is used by an applicant who is experiencing problems...

  19. Structure-catalytic activity relationships of dicyclohexylcarboxamidine analogs in phosphorylation and alkylation of nucleosides by a two-step phosphorylating agent, 2-methylthio-4H-1,3,2-benzodioxaphosphorin 2-oxide (MTBO).

    PubMed

    Eto, M; Kawasaki, S

    1986-01-01

    Adenosine borate complex was phosphorylated and o-hydroxybenzylated by 2-methylthio-4H-1,3,2-benzodioxaphosphorin 2-oxide (MTBO) in the presence of 4-morpholine-N,N'-dicyclohexylcarboxamidine (MDC) at first to give 1-(o-hydroxybenzyl)adenosine derivative followed by the rearrangement of the benzyl group to the N-6 amino group to give N6-(o-hydroxybenzyl)adenosine 5'-S-methyl phosphorothiolate. More than 20 analogs of MDC were examined for their catalytic activity in phosphorylation and o-hydroxybenzylation of ribonucleoside by MTBO. Dicyclohexylformamidine (DCF) and n-alkylamino analogs of MDC had no effect on the o-hydroxybenzylation of ribonucleoside by MTBO, but had great effect on the phosphorylation. Dialkylamino and cyclic imino analogs of MDC had high catalytic activities to the both reaction. The dicyclohexylcarboxamidine structure of MDC gave the catalytic ability for phosphorylation by MTBO, while the morpholine moiety had great effect on the selectivity of o-hydroxybenzylation by MTBO. PMID:3562278

  20. Mechanochemical phosphorylation and solubilisation of β-D-glucan from yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its biological activities.

    PubMed

    Shi, Feng; Shi, Jikui; Li, Yongfu

    2014-01-01

    To obtain a water-soluble β-D-glucan derivative cleanly and conveniently, a highly efficient mechanochemical method, planetary ball milling, was used to phosphorylate β-D-glucan isolated from yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in solid state. Soluble β-D-glucan phosphate (GP) with a high degree of substitution (0.77-2.09) and an apparent PEAK molecular weight of 6.6-10.0 kDa was produced when β-D-glucan was co-milled with sodium hexametaphosphate at 139.5-186.0 rad/s for 12-20 min. The energy transferred was 3.03-11.98 KJ/g. The phosphorylation of GPs was demonstrated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and 13C and 31P Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Three GP products with different degree of substitution (DS) and degree of polymerisation (DP) were able to upregulate the functional events mediated by activated murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells, among which GP-2 with a DS of 1.24 and DP of 30.5 exerted the highest immunostimulating activity. Our results indicate that mechanochemical processing is an efficient method for preparing water-soluble and biologically active GP with high DS.

  1. A novel photoelectrochemical biosensor for protein kinase activity assay based on phosphorylated graphite-like carbon nitride.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue; Zhou, Yunlei; Xu, Yan; Xu, Huijie; Wang, Minghui; Yin, Huanshun; Ai, Shiyun

    2016-08-31

    Protein kinases are general and significant regulators in the cell signaling pathway, and it is still greatly desired to achieve simple and quick kinase detection. Herein, we develop a simple and sensitive photoelectrochemical strategy for the detection of protein kinase activity based on the bond between phosphorylated peptide and phosphorylated graphite-like carbon nitride (P-g-C3N4) conjugates triggered by Zr(4+) ion coordination. Under optimal conditions, the increased photocurrent is proportional to the protein kinase A (PKA) concentration ranging from 0.05 to 50 U/mL with a detection limit of 0.077 U/mL. Moreover, this photoelectrochemical assay can be also applied to quantitative analysis of kinase inhibition. The results indicated that the IC50 value (inhibitor concentration producing 50% inhibitor) for ellagic acid was 9.1 μM. Moreover, the developed method is further applied to detect PKA activity in real samples, which contains serum from healthy person and gastric cancer patients and breast tissue from healthy person and breast cancer patients. Therefore, the established protocol provides a new and simple tool for assay of kinase activity and its inhibitors with low cost and high sensitivity. PMID:27506341

  2. Direct evidence for activity-dependent glucose phosphorylation in neurons with implications for the astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttle.

    PubMed

    Patel, Anant B; Lai, James C K; Chowdhury, Golam M I; Hyder, Fahmeed; Rothman, Douglas L; Shulman, Robert G; Behar, Kevin L

    2014-04-01

    Previous (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments have shown that over a wide range of neuronal activity, approximately one molecule of glucose is oxidized for every molecule of glutamate released by neurons and recycled through astrocytic glutamine. The measured kinetics were shown to agree with the stoichiometry of a hypothetical astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttle model, which predicted negligible functional neuronal uptake of glucose. To test this model, we measured the uptake and phosphorylation of glucose in nerve terminals isolated from rats infused with the glucose analog, 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) in vivo. The concentrations of phosphorylated FDG (FDG6P), normalized with respect to known neuronal metabolites, were compared in nerve terminals, homogenate, and cortex of anesthetized rats with and without bicuculline-induced seizures. The increase in FDG6P in nerve terminals agreed well with the increase in cortical neuronal glucose oxidation measured previously under the same conditions in vivo, indicating that direct uptake and oxidation of glucose in nerve terminals is substantial under resting and activated conditions. These results suggest that neuronal glucose-derived pyruvate is the major oxidative fuel for activated neurons, not lactate-derived from astrocytes, contradicting predictions of the original astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttle model under the range of study conditions.

  3. A novel photoelectrochemical biosensor for protein kinase activity assay based on phosphorylated graphite-like carbon nitride.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue; Zhou, Yunlei; Xu, Yan; Xu, Huijie; Wang, Minghui; Yin, Huanshun; Ai, Shiyun

    2016-08-31

    Protein kinases are general and significant regulators in the cell signaling pathway, and it is still greatly desired to achieve simple and quick kinase detection. Herein, we develop a simple and sensitive photoelectrochemical strategy for the detection of protein kinase activity based on the bond between phosphorylated peptide and phosphorylated graphite-like carbon nitride (P-g-C3N4) conjugates triggered by Zr(4+) ion coordination. Under optimal conditions, the increased photocurrent is proportional to the protein kinase A (PKA) concentration ranging from 0.05 to 50 U/mL with a detection limit of 0.077 U/mL. Moreover, this photoelectrochemical assay can be also applied to quantitative analysis of kinase inhibition. The results indicated that the IC50 value (inhibitor concentration producing 50% inhibitor) for ellagic acid was 9.1 μM. Moreover, the developed method is further applied to detect PKA activity in real samples, which contains serum from healthy person and gastric cancer patients and breast tissue from healthy person and breast cancer patients. Therefore, the established protocol provides a new and simple tool for assay of kinase activity and its inhibitors with low cost and high sensitivity.

  4. Mogrol Derived from Siraitia grosvenorii Mogrosides Suppresses 3T3-L1 Adipocyte Differentiation by Reducing cAMP-Response Element-Binding Protein Phosphorylation and Increasing AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Harada, Naoki; Ishihara, Mikako; Horiuchi, Hiroko; Ito, Yuta; Tabata, Hiromitsu; Suzuki, Yasushi A; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Yamaji, Ryoichi; Inui, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of mogrol, an aglycone of mogrosides from Siraitia grosvenorii, on adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Mogrol, but not mogrosides, suppressed triglyceride accumulation by affecting early (days 0-2) and late (days 4-8), but not middle (days 2-4), differentiation stages. At the late stage, mogrol increased AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation and reduced glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity. At the early stage, mogrol promoted AMPK phosphorylation, inhibited the induction of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ; a master regulator of adipogenesis), and reduced 3T3-L1 cell contents (e.g., clonal expansion). In addition, mogrol, but not the AMPK activator AICAR, suppressed the phosphorylation and activity of the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), which regulates C/EBPβ expression. These results indicated that mogrol suppressed adipogenesis by reducing CREB activation in the initial stage of cell differentiation and by activating AMPK signaling in both the early and late stages of this process. PMID:27583359

  5. Mogrol Derived from Siraitia grosvenorii Mogrosides Suppresses 3T3-L1 Adipocyte Differentiation by Reducing cAMP-Response Element-Binding Protein Phosphorylation and Increasing AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Naoki; Ishihara, Mikako; Horiuchi, Hiroko; Ito, Yuta; Tabata, Hiromitsu; Suzuki, Yasushi A.; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Yamaji, Ryoichi; Inui, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of mogrol, an aglycone of mogrosides from Siraitia grosvenorii, on adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Mogrol, but not mogrosides, suppressed triglyceride accumulation by affecting early (days 0–2) and late (days 4–8), but not middle (days 2–4), differentiation stages. At the late stage, mogrol increased AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation and reduced glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity. At the early stage, mogrol promoted AMPK phosphorylation, inhibited the induction of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ; a master regulator of adipogenesis), and reduced 3T3-L1 cell contents (e.g., clonal expansion). In addition, mogrol, but not the AMPK activator AICAR, suppressed the phosphorylation and activity of the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), which regulates C/EBPβ expression. These results indicated that mogrol suppressed adipogenesis by reducing CREB activation in the initial stage of cell differentiation and by activating AMPK signaling in both the early and late stages of this process. PMID:27583359

  6. Regional variations in protein phosphorylating activity in rat brain studied in micro-slices labeled with ( sup 32 P)phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Rodnight, R.; Leal, R. )

    1990-01-01

    Regional variations in protein phosphorylating activity in the rat brain were studied. Micro-slices (1 mm diameter) were prepared from 19 brain areas, phosphoproteins labeled by incubation with ({sup 32}P)phosphate, and the tissue analyzed by nonequilibrium two-dimensional electrophoresis and autoradiography. Attention was focused on three phosphorylating systems that showed consistent variation in activity. (1) A system that phosphorylates a substrate of 47 kDa (ppH-47) whose activity was highest in the hippocampus. The next highest activity of this system was observed in the globus pallidus, followed by the periventricular gray matter of the aqueduct, lateral septum, cerebellar cortex, entorhinal cortex, hypothalamus, mammillary nuclei, amygdala, and substantia nigra. Activity was low or undetectable in the cerebral cortex, neostriatum, and the colliculi. (2) A system that phosphorylates a substrate of 50 kDa (ppC-50) whose activity was highest in the caudate nucleus. The activity of this system was roughly inversely correlated with that of the ppH-47 system. (3) The protein kinase C system that phosphorylates an 82- to 87-kDa substrate known as MARCKS. The highest activity of this system was observed in the cerebellar cortex, followed by the hypothalamus, mammillary nuclei, periventricular gray matter of the aqueduct, and the superior colliculus. Activity of this system was relatively low in several regions of the cerebral cortex, the neostriatum, and the inferior colliculus.

  7. Phosphorylation of eukaryotic aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases

    SciTech Connect

    Pendergast, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    The phosphorylation of the highly purified aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complex from rabbit reticulocytes was examined. The synthetase complex contained, in addition to eight aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, three unidentified proteins and was free of endogenous protein kinase activity. Incubation of the complex with casein kinase I in the presence of ATP resulted in the phosphorylation of four synthetases, the glutamyl-, isoleucyl-, methionyl-, and lysyl-tRNA synthetases. Phosphorylation by casein kinase I altered binding to tRNA-Sepharose such that the phosphorylated complex eluted at 190 mM NaCl instead of the 275 mM salt observed for the nonphosphorylated form. Phosphorylation by casein kinase I resulted in a significant inhibition of aminoacylation with the four synthetases; the activities of the nonphosphorylated synthetases were unchanged. One of the unidentified proteins in the complex (M/sub r/ 37,000) was also an excellent substrate for casein kinase I. A comparison of the properties and two-dimensional phosphopeptide pattern of this protein with that of casein kinase I suggest that the 37,000 dalton protein in the synthetase complex is an inactive form of casein kinase I. Two other protein kinases were shown to phosphorylate aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in the complex. The phosphorylation of threonyl-tRNA synthetase was also investigated. Five aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in the high molecular weight complex were shown to be phosphorylated in rabbit reticulocytes following labeling with (/sup 32/P)orthophosphate.

  8. Combined computational and experimental analysis reveals mitogen-activated protein kinase-mediated feedback phosphorylation as a mechanism for signaling specificity.

    PubMed

    Hao, Nan; Yildirim, Necmettin; Nagiec, Michal J; Parnell, Stephen C; Errede, Beverly; Dohlman, Henrik G; Elston, Timothy C

    2012-10-01

    Different environmental stimuli often use the same set of signaling proteins to achieve very different physiological outcomes. The mating and invasive growth pathways in yeast each employ a mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade that includes Ste20, Ste11, and Ste7. Whereas proper mating requires Ste7 activation of the MAP kinase Fus3, invasive growth requires activation of the alternate MAP kinase Kss1. To determine how MAP kinase specificity is achieved, we used a series of mathematical models to quantitatively characterize pheromone-stimulated kinase activation. In accordance with the computational analysis, MAP kinase feedback phosphorylation of Ste7 results in diminished activation of Kss1, but not Fus3. These findings reveal how feedback phosphorylation of a common pathway component can limit the activity of a competing MAP kinase through feedback phosphorylation of a common activator, and thereby promote signal fidelity. PMID:22875986

  9. RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) depletes nutrients, inducing phosphorylation of AMP-activated kinase in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chengcheng; Hao, Chuncheng; Shao, RuPing; Fang, Bingliang; Correa, Arlene M.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Roth, Jack A.; Behrens, Carmen; Kalhor, Neda; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Pataer, Apar

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated that RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) and its downstream protein p-eIF2α are independent prognostic markers for overall survival in lung cancer. In the current study, we further investigate the interaction between PKR and AMPK in lung tumor tissue and cancer cell lines. We examined PKR protein expression in 55 frozen primary lung tumor tissues by Western blotting and analyzed the association between PKR expression and expresson of 139 proteins on tissue samples examined previously by Reverse Phase Protein Array (RPPA) from the same 55 patients. We observed that biomarkers were either positively (phosphorylated AMP-activated kinaseT172 [p-AMPK]) or negatively (insulin receptor substrate 1, meiotic recombination 11, ATR interacting protein, telomerase, checkpoint kinase 1, and cyclin E1) correlated with PKR. We further confirmed that induction of PKR with expression vectors in lung cancer cells causes activation of the AMPK protein independent of the LKB1, TAK1, and CaMKKβ pathway. We found that PKR causes nutrient depletion, which increases AMP levels and decreases ATP levels, causing AMPK phosphorylation. We further demonstrated that inhibiting AMPK expression with compound C or siRNA enhanced PKR-mediated cell death. We next explored the combination of PKR and p-AMPK expression in NSCLC patients and observed that expression of p-AMPK predicted a poor outcome for adenocarcinoma patients with high PKR expression and a better prognosis for those with low PKR expression. These findings were consistent with our in vitro results. AMPK might rescue cells facing metabolic stresses, such as ATP depletion caused by PKR. Our data indicate that PKR causes nutrient depletion, which induces the phosphorylation of AMPK. AMPK might act as a protective response to metabolic stresses, such as nutrient deprivation. PMID:25798539

  10. 'Up with the LRRK': a phosphorylated Rab10 assay for evaluation of LRRK2 activity and inhibitor engagement.

    PubMed

    Eyers, Patrick A

    2016-09-15

    Protein kinases catalyse the addition of phosphate groups to Ser/Thr and Tyr residues in cognate substrates and are mutated or hyperactive in a variety of diseases, making them important targets for rationally designed drugs. A good example is the Parkinson's disease-associated kinase, leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2), which is mutated (and probably hyperactive) in a small, but significant, subset of patients. An exciting new approach for personalised therapy is the development of central nervous system (CNS)-active small-molecule kinase inhibitors, which could be employed to 'normalise' LRRK2 signalling in affected cell types. However, the development of such drugs requires validated assays for the analysis of target engagement and the assembly of a set of tools for interrogating LRRK2, and its substrates, both in vitro and in vivo A new study published in the Biochemical Journal by Ito et al. establishes that a 'Phos-tag'™-binding assay can be exploited to measure phosphorylation of a recently identified LRRK2 substrate (Ras-related protein in brain 10 (Rab10)), and to compare and contrast relative catalytic output from disease-associated LRRK2 mutants. Powerful in vivo chemical genetic approaches are also disclosed, in which the catalytic activity of LRRK2 is unequivocally linked to the extent of Rab10 phosphorylation and the effects of chemically distinct LRRK2 inhibitors are matched with on-target inhibition mechanisms mediated through LRRK2 and its substrate Rab10. These important findings should simplify the generic analysis of Rab10 phosphorylation in model biological systems and are likely to be applicable to other substrates of LRRK2 (or indeed other kinases) for which phospho-specific antibodies are either absent or unsatisfactory. PMID:27621483

  11. Genetic analysis of the relationship between activation loop phosphorylation and cyclin binding in the activation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cdc28p cyclin-dependent kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Cross, F R; Levine, K

    2000-01-01

    We showed recently that a screen for mutant CDC28 with improved binding to a defective Cln2p G1 cyclin yielded a spectrum of mutations similar to those yielded by a screen for intragenic suppressors of the requirement for activation loop phosphorylation (T169E suppressors). Recombination among these mutations yielded CDC28 mutants that bypassed the G1 cyclin requirement. Here we analyze further the interrelationship between T169E suppression, interaction with defective cyclin, and G1 cyclin bypass. DNA shuffling of mutations from the various screens and recombination onto a T169E-encoding 3' end yielded CDC28 mutants with strong T169E suppression. Some of the strongest T169E suppressors could suppress the defective Cln2p G1 cyclin even while retaining T169E. The strong T169E suppressors did not exhibit bypass of the G1 cyclin requirement but did so when T169E was reverted to T. These results suggested that for these mutants, activation loop phosphorylation and cyclin binding might be alternative means of activation rather than independent requirements for activation (as with wild type). These results suggest mechanistic overlap between the conformational shift induced by cyclin binding and that induced by activation loop phosphorylation. This conclusion was supported by analysis of suppressors of a mutation in the Cdk phosphothreonine-binding pocket created by cyclin binding. PMID:10747052

  12. Inhibition of Phosphatase Activity Follows Decline in Sulfatase Activity and Leads to Transcriptional Effects through Sustained Phosphorylation of Transcription Factor MITF

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sumit; Feferman, Leo; Tobacman, Joanne K.

    2016-01-01

    Arylsulfatase B (B-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfatase; ARSB) is the enzyme that removes 4-sulfate groups from the non-reducing end of the glycosaminoglycans chondroitin 4-sulfate and dermatan sulfate. Decline in ARSB has been shown in malignant prostate, colonic, and mammary cells and tissues, and decline in ARSB leads to transcriptional events mediated by galectin-3 with AP-1 and Sp1. Increased mRNA expression of GPNMB (transmembrane glycoprotein NMB) in HepG2 cells and in hepatic tissue from ARSB-deficient mice followed decline in expression of ARSB and was mediated by the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), but was unaffected by silencing galectin-3. Since GPNMB is increased in multiple malignancies, studies were performed to determine how decline in ARSB increased GPNMB expression. The mechanism by which decline in ARSB increased nuclear phospho-MITF was due to reduced activity of SHP2, a protein tyrosine phosphatase with Src homology (SH2) domains that regulates multiple cellular processes. SHP2 activity declined due to increased binding with chondroitin 4-sulfate when ARSB was reduced. When SHP2 activity was inhibited, phosphorylations of p38 mitogen-associated phosphokinase (MAPK) and of MITF increased, leading to GPNMB promoter activation. A dominant negative SHP2 construct, the SHP2 inhibitor PHSP1, and silencing of ARSB increased phospho-p38, nuclear MITF, and GPNMB. In contrast, constitutively active SHP2 and overexpression of ARSB inhibited GPNMB expression. The interaction between chondroitin 4-sulfate and SHP2 is a novel intersection between sulfation and phosphorylation, by which decline in ARSB and increased chondroitin 4-sulfation can inhibit SHP2, thereby regulating downstream tyrosine phosphorylations by sustained phosphorylations with associated activation of signaling and transcriptional events. PMID:27078017

  13. Morin inhibits STAT3 tyrosine 705 phosphorylation in tumor cells through activation of protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP1.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Subash C; Phromnoi, Kanokkarn; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2013-04-01

    The major goal of cancer drug discovery is to find an agent that is safe and affordable, yet effective against cancer. Here we show that morin (3,5,7,2',4'-pentahydroxyflavone) has potential against cancer cells through suppression of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) pathway, which is closely linked to the transformation, survival, proliferation, and metastasis of cancer. We found that morin completely suppressed inducible and constitutively activated STAT3 and blocked the nuclear translocation of STAT3 and its DNA binding in multiple myeloma and head and neck squamous carcinoma cells. Morin inhibited activated Src, JAK-1, and JAK-2, all of which are linked to STAT3 activation, while up-regulating a protein inhibitor of activated STAT3, PIAS3. Pervanadate reversed the effects of morin on STAT3 phosphorylation, indicating the role of a protein tyrosine phosphatase. Furthermore, morin induced SHP1 expression at both the mRNA and protein levels, and silencing of SHP1 abrogated the effect of morin on STAT3 phosphorylation, indicating that morin mediates its effects on STAT3 through SHP1. Suppression of STAT3 correlated with the down-regulation of various gene products linked to tumor survival, proliferation, and angiogenesis and led to sensitization of tumor cells to thalidomide and bortezomib. Comparing the activities of morin with those of four structurally related flavonols demonstrated the importance of hydroxyl groups in the B ring in inhibiting STAT3 activation. These findings suggest that morin suppresses the STAT3 pathway, leading to the down-regulation of STAT3-dependent gene expression and chemosensitization of tumor cells.

  14. Diphenylarsinic Acid Induced Activation of Cultured Rat Cerebellar Astrocytes: Phosphorylation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases, Upregulation of Transcription Factors, and Release of Brain-Active Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Mami; Kojima, Mikiya; Asai, Ryota; Kanehira, Tomoko; Sakaguchi, Fumika; Takahata, Kazuaki; Arakaki, Rina; Aoyama, Yohei; Yoshida, Hikari; Yoshida, Kenji; Yukawa, Kazunori; Tashiro, Tomoko; Hirano, Seishiro

    2016-03-01

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) was detected as the primary compound responsible for the arsenic poisoning that occurred in Kamisu, Ibaraki, Japan, where people using water from a well that was contaminated with a high level of arsenic developed neurological (mostly cerebellar) symptoms and dysregulation of regional cerebral blood flow. To understand the underlying molecular mechanism of DPAA-induced cerebellar symptoms, we focused on astrocytes, which have a brain-protective function. Incubation with 10 µM DPAA for 96 h promoted cell proliferation, increased the expression of antioxidative stress proteins (heme oxygenase-1 and heat shock protein 70), and induced the release of cytokines (MCP-1, adrenomedullin, FGF2, CXCL1, and IL-6). Furthermore, DPAA overpoweringly increased the phosphorylation of three major mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) (ERK1/2, p38MAPK, and SAPK/JNK), which indicated MAPK activation, and subsequently induced expression and/or phosphorylation of transcription factors (Nrf2, CREB, c-Jun, and c-Fos) in cultured rat cerebellar astrocytes. Structure-activity relationship analyses of DPAA and other related pentavalent organic arsenicals revealed that DPAA at 10 µM activated astrocytes most effective among organic arsenicals tested at the same dose. These results suggest that in a cerebellum exposed to DPAA, abnormal activation of the MAPK-transcription factor pathway and irregular secretion of these neuroactive, glioactive, and/or vasoactive cytokines in astrocytes can be the direct/indirect cause of functional abnormalities in surrounding neurons, glial cells, and vascular cells: This in turn might lead to the onset of cerebellar symptoms and disruption of cerebral blood flow. PMID:26645585

  15. Serine phosphorylation of human P450c17 increases 17,20-lyase activity: implications for adrenarche and the polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L H; Rodriguez, H; Ohno, S; Miller, W L

    1995-01-01

    Microsomal cytochrome P450c17 catalyzes both steroid 17 alpha-hydroxylase activity and scission of the C17-C20 steroid bond (17,20-lyase) on the same active site. Adrenal 17 alpha-hydroxylase activity is needed to produce cortisol throughout life, but 17,20-lyase activity appears to be controlled independently in a complex, age-dependent pattern. We show that human P450c17 is phosphorylated on serine and threonine residues by a cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Phosphorylation of P450c17 increases 17,20-lyase activity, while dephosphorylation virtually eliminates this activity. Hormonally regulated serine phosphorylation of human P450c17 suggests a possible mechanism for human adrenarche and may be a unifying etiologic link between the hyperandrogenism and insulin resistance that characterize the polycystic ovary syndrome. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7479852

  16. Analyzing phosphorylation-dependent regulation of subcellular localization and transcriptional activity of transcriptional coactivator NT-PGC-1α.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ji Suk; Gettys, Thomas W

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) is a nuclear transcriptional coactivator that regulates the genes involved in energy metabolism. Recent evidence has been provided that alternative splicing of PPARGC1A gene produces a functional but predominantly cytosolic isoform of PGC-1α (NT-PGC-1α). We have demonstrated that transcriptional coactivation capacity of NT-PGC-1α is directly correlated with its nuclear localization in a PKA phosphorylation-dependent manner. In this chapter, we describe quantitative imaging analysis methods that are developed to measure the relative fluorescence intensity of the protein of interest in the nucleus and cytoplasm in a single cell and the frequency distribution of nuclear/cytoplasmic intensity ratios in the population of cells, respectively. This chapter also describes transient cotransfection and dual-luciferase reporter gene assay that examine the ability of coactivators to activate the transcriptional activity of transcription factors.

  17. A novel phosphorylation site at Ser130 adjacent to the pseudosubstrate domain contributes to the activation of protein kinase C-δ

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jianli; Holewinski, Ronald J.; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Steinberg, Susan F.

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinase C-δ (PKCδ) is a signalling kinase that regulates many cellular responses. Although most studies focus on allosteric mechanisms that activate PKCδ at membranes, PKCδ also is controlled via multi-site phosphorylation [Gong et al. (2015) Mol. Cell. Biol. 35, 1727–1740]. The present study uses MS-based methods to identify PKCδ phosphorylation at Thr50 and Ser645 (in resting and PMA-treated cardiomyocytes) as well as Thr37, Thr38, Ser130, Thr164, Thr211, Thr215, Ser218, Thr295, Ser299 and Thr656 (as sites that increase with PMA). We focused on the consequences of phosphorylation at Ser130 and Thr141 (sites just N-terminal to the pseudosubstrate domain).We show that S130D and T141E substitutions co-operate to increase PKCδ’s basal lipid-independent activity and that Ser130/Thr141 di-phosphorylation influences PKCδ’s substrate specificity. We recently reported that PKCδ preferentially phosphorylates substrates with a phosphoacceptor serine residue and that this is due to constitutive phosphorylation at Ser357, an ATP-positioning G-loop site that limits PKCδ’s threonine kinase activity [Gong et al. (2015) Mol. Cell. Biol. 35, 1727–1740]. The present study shows that S130D and T141E substitutions increase PKCδ’s threonine kinase activity indirectly by decreasing G loop phosphorylation at Ser357. A S130F substitution [that mimics a S130F single-nt polymorphism (SNP) identified in some human populations] also increases PKCδ’s maximal lipid-dependent catalytic activity and confers threonine kinase activity. Finally, we show that Ser130/Thr141 phosphorylations relieve auto-inhibitory constraints that limit PKCδ’s activity and substrate specificity in a cell-based context. Since phosphorylation sites map to similar positions relative to the pseudosubstrate domains of other PKCs, our results suggest that phosphorylation in this region of the enzyme may constitute a general mechanism to control PKC isoform activity. PMID:26546672

  18. MKP-7, a JNK phosphatase, blocks ERK-dependent gene activation by anchoring phosphorylated ERK in the cytoplasm

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, Kouhei; Katagiri, Chiaki; Nomura, Miyuki; Sato, Masami; Kakumoto, Kyoko; Akagi, Tsuyoshi; Kikuchi, Kunimi; Tanuma, Nobuhiro; Shima, Hiroshi

    2010-03-05

    MAPK phosphatase-7 (MKP-7) was identified as a JNK-specific phosphatase. However, despite its high specificity for JNK, MKP-7 interacts also with ERK. We previously showed that as a physiological consequence of their interaction, activated ERK phosphorylates MKP-7 at Ser-446, and stabilizing MKP-7. In the present study, we analyzed MKP-7 function in activation of ERK. A time-course experiment showed that both MKP-7 and its phosphatase-dead mutant prolonged mitogen-induced ERK phosphorylation, suggesting that MKP-7 functions as a scaffold for ERK. An important immunohistological finding was that nuclear translocation of phospho-ERK following PMA stimulation was blocked by co-expressed MKP-7 and, moreover, that phospho-ERK co-localized with MKP-7 in the cytoplasm. Reporter gene analysis indicated that MKP-7 blocks ERK-mediated transcription. Overall, our data indicate that MKP-7 down-regulates ERK-dependent gene expression by blocking nuclear accumulation of phospho-ERK.

  19. Eriocalyxin B Inhibits STAT3 Signaling by Covalently Targeting STAT3 and Blocking Phosphorylation and Activation of STAT3.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaokui; He, Li; Cao, Peng; Yu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Activated STAT3 plays an important role in oncogenesis by stimulating cell proliferation and resisting apoptosis. STAT3 therefore is an attractive target for cancer therapy. We have screened a traditional Chinese herb medicine compound library and found Eriocalyxin B (EB), a diterpenoid from Isodon eriocalyx, as a specific inhibitor of STAT3. EB selectively inhibited constitutive as well as IL-6-induced phosphorylation of STAT3 and induced apoptosis of STAT3-dependent tumor cells. EB did not affect the upstream protein tyrosine kinases or the phosphatase (PTPase) of STAT3, but rather interacted directly with STAT3. The effects of EB could be abolished by DTT or GSH, suggesting a thiol-mediated covalent linkage between EB and STAT3. Site mutagenesis of cysteine in and near the SH2 domain of STAT3 identified Cys712 to be the critical amino acid for the EB-induced inactivation of STAT3. Furthermore, LC/MS/MS analyses demonstrated that an α, β-unsaturated carbonyl of EB covalently interacted with the Cys712 of STAT3. Computational modeling analyses also supported a direct interaction between EB and the Cys712 of STAT3. These data strongly suggest that EB directly targets STAT3 through a covalent linkage to inhibit the phosphorylation and activation of STAT3 and induces apoptosis of STAT3-dependent tumor cells. PMID:26010889

  20. Eriocalyxin B Inhibits STAT3 Signaling by Covalently Targeting STAT3 and Blocking Phosphorylation and Activation of STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaokui; He, Li; Cao, Peng; Yu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Activated STAT3 plays an important role in oncogenesis by stimulating cell proliferation and resisting apoptosis. STAT3 therefore is an attractive target for cancer therapy. We have screened a traditional Chinese herb medicine compound library and found Eriocalyxin B (EB), a diterpenoid from Isodon eriocalyx, as a specific inhibitor of STAT3. EB selectively inhibited constitutive as well as IL-6-induced phosphorylation of STAT3 and induced apoptosis of STAT3-dependent tumor cells. EB did not affect the upstream protein tyrosine kinases or the phosphatase (PTPase) of STAT3, but rather interacted directly with STAT3. The effects of EB could be abolished by DTT or GSH, suggesting a thiol-mediated covalent linkage between EB and STAT3. Site mutagenesis of cysteine in and near the SH2 domain of STAT3 identified Cys712 to be the critical amino acid for the EB-induced inactivation of STAT3. Furthermore, LC/MS/MS analyses demonstrated that an α, β-unsaturated carbonyl of EB covalently interacted with the Cys712 of STAT3. Computational modeling analyses also supported a direct interaction between EB and the Cys712 of STAT3. These data strongly suggest that EB directly targets STAT3 through a covalent linkage to inhibit the phosphorylation and activation of STAT3 and induces apoptosis of STAT3-dependent tumor cells. PMID:26010889

  1. Gaseous nitrogen oxides stimulate cell cycle progression by retinoblastoma phosphorylation via activation of cyclins/Cdks [correction].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing-Hsien; Tseng, Tsui-Hwa; Ho, Yung-Chyan; Lin, Hui-Hsuan; Lin, Wea-Lung; Wang, Chau-Jong

    2003-11-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) are important indoor and outdoor air pollutants. Many studies have indicated that NOx gas causes lung tissue damage by its oxidation properties and its free radicals. In a previous study we demonstrated that NOx gas induced proliferation of human lung fibroblast MRC-5 cells. In this study we show that NOx gas stimulates MRC-5 cell proliferation by retinoblastoma (Rb) phosphorylation via activation of cyclin-cell division protein kinase (cdk) complexes [correction]. Western blot and immunoprecipitation data showed that NOx gas increased the expressions of cyclinA/cdk2, cyclinD1/cdk4, and cyclinE/cdk2 complexes in the cells at 9 h after treatment. The levels of phospho-Rb were also increased and cdk inhibitors (CKIs) p27 and p16 were apparently decreased. These data suggested that NOx gas stimulates cell-cycle progression by Rb phosphorylation via activation of cyclin-cdk complexes and inhibition of CKIs. In conclusion, the NOx-gas that induced lung fibroblast cell proliferation by stimulation of cell-cycle progression may contribute to lung fibrosis by NOx pollutants.

  2. 1,2-Naphthoquinone activates vanilloid receptor 1 through increased protein tyrosine phosphorylation, leading to contraction of guinea pig trachea

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuno, Shota; Taguchi, Keiko; Iwamoto, Noriko; Yamano, Shigeru; Cho, Arthur K.; Froines, John R.; Kumagai, Yoshito . E-mail: yk-em-tu@md.tsukuba.ac.jp

    2006-01-15

    1,2-Naphthoquinone (1,2-NQ) has recently been identified as an environmental quinone in diesel exhaust particles (DEP) and atmospheric PM{sub 2.5}. We have found that this quinone is capable of causing a concentration-dependent contraction of tracheal smooth muscle in guinea pigs with EC{sub 5} value of 18.7 {mu}M. The contraction required extracellular calcium and was suppressed by L-type calcium channel blockers nifedipine and diltiazem. It was found that 1,2-NQ activated phospholipase A2 (PLA2)/lipoxygenase (LO)/vanilloid receptor (VR1) signaling. Additionally, 1,2-NQ was capable of transactivating protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in guinea pig trachea, suggesting that phosphorylation of PTKs contributes to 1,2-NQ-induced tracheal contraction. Consistent with this notion, this action was blocked by the PTKs inhibitor genistein and the EGFR antagonist PD153035, indicating that contraction was, at least in part, attributable to PTKs phosphorylation that activates VR1, resulting in increased intracellular calcium content in the smooth muscle cells.

  3. DMBA induces tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-[gamma]1 and activates the tyrosine kinases lck and fyn in the HPB-ALL human T-cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, M.M.; Schieven, G.L.; Ledbetter, J.A.; Burchiel, S.W. . Coll. of Pharmacy)

    1993-01-01

    Previous studies in this laboratory have demonstrated that DMBA alters biochemical events associated with lymphocyte activation including formation of the second messenger IP[sub 3] and the release of intracellular Ca[sup 2+]. The purpose of the present studies was to evaluate the mechanisms by which DMBA induces IP[sub 3] formation and Ca[sup 2+] release by examining phosphorylation of membrane associated proteins and activation of protein tyrosine kinases lck and fyn. These studies demonstrated that exposure of HPB-ALL cells to 10[mu]M DMBA resulted in a time- and dose-dependent increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-[gamma]1 that correlated with our earlier findings of IP[sub 3] formation and Ca[sup 2+] release. These results indicate that the effects of DMBA on the PI-PLC signaling pathway are in part, the result of DMBA-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the PLC-[gamma]1 enzyme. The mechanism of DMBA- induced tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-[gamma]1 may be due to activation of fyn or lck kinase activity, since it was found that DMBA increased the activity of these PTKs by more than 2-fold. Therefore, these studies demonstrate that DMBA may disrupt T cell activation by stimulating PTK activation with concomitant tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-[gamma]1, release of IP[sub 3], and mobilization of intracellular Ca[sup 2+].

  4. DMBA induces tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-{gamma}1 and activates the tyrosine kinases lck and fyn in the HPB-ALL human T-cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, M.M.; Schieven, G.L.; Ledbetter, J.A.; Burchiel, S.W.

    1993-02-01

    Previous studies in this laboratory have demonstrated that DMBA alters biochemical events associated with lymphocyte activation including formation of the second messenger IP{sub 3} and the release of intracellular Ca{sup 2+}. The purpose of the present studies was to evaluate the mechanisms by which DMBA induces IP{sub 3} formation and Ca{sup 2+} release by examining phosphorylation of membrane associated proteins and activation of protein tyrosine kinases lck and fyn. These studies demonstrated that exposure of HPB-ALL cells to 10{mu}M DMBA resulted in a time- and dose-dependent increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-{gamma}1 that correlated with our earlier findings of IP{sub 3} formation and Ca{sup 2+} release. These results indicate that the effects of DMBA on the PI-PLC signaling pathway are in part, the result of DMBA-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the PLC-{gamma}1 enzyme. The mechanism of DMBA- induced tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-{gamma}1 may be due to activation of fyn or lck kinase activity, since it was found that DMBA increased the activity of these PTKs by more than 2-fold. Therefore, these studies demonstrate that DMBA may disrupt T cell activation by stimulating PTK activation with concomitant tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-{gamma}1, release of IP{sub 3}, and mobilization of intracellular Ca{sup 2+}.

  5. A new phosphorylated form of Ku70 identified in resistant leukemic cells confers fast but unfaithful dna repair in cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Schellenbauer, Amelie; Biard, Denis; Paget, Vincent; Morel-Altmeyer, Sandrine; Guipaud, Olivier; Chambon, Christophe; Salles, Bernard; Maloum, Karim; Merle-Béral, Hélène; Chevillard, Sylvie; Delic, Jozo

    2015-01-01

    Ku70-dependent canonical nonhomologous end-joining (c-NHEJ) DNA repair system is fundamental to the genome maintenance and B-cell lineage. c-NHEJ is upregulated and error-prone in incurable forms of chronic lymphocytic leukemia which also displays telomere dysfunction, multiple chromosomal aberrations and the resistance to DNA damage-induced apoptosis. We identify in these cells a novel DNA damage inducible form of phospho-Ku70. In vitro in different cancer cell lines, Ku70 phosphorylation occurs in a heterodimer Ku70/Ku80 complex within minutes of genotoxic stress, necessitating its interaction with DNA damage-induced kinase pS2056-DNA-PKcs and/or pS1981-ATM. The mutagenic effects of phospho-Ku70 are documented by a defective S/G2 checkpoint, accelerated disappearance of γ-H2AX foci and kinetics of DNA repair resulting in an increased level of genotoxic stress-induced chromosomal aberrations. Together, these data unveil an involvement of phospho-Ku70 in fast but inaccurate DNA repair; a new paradigm linked to both the deregulation of c-NHEJ and the resistance of malignant cells. PMID:26337656

  6. A new phosphorylated form of Ku70 identified in resistant leukemic cells confers fast but unfaithful DNA repair in cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bouley, Julien; Saad, Lina; Grall, Romain; Schellenbauer, Amelie; Biard, Denis; Paget, Vincent; Morel-Altmeyer, Sandrine; Guipaud, Olivier; Chambon, Christophe; Salles, Bernard; Maloum, Karim; Merle-Béral, Hélène; Chevillard, Sylvie; Delic, Jozo

    2015-09-29

    Ku70-dependent canonical nonhomologous end-joining (c-NHEJ) DNA repair system is fundamental to the genome maintenance and B-cell lineage. c-NHEJ is upregulated and error-prone in incurable forms of chronic lymphocytic leukemia which also displays telomere dysfunction, multiple chromosomal aberrations and the resistance to DNA damage-induced apoptosis. We identify in these cells a novel DNA damage inducible form of phospho-Ku70. In vitro in different cancer cell lines, Ku70 phosphorylation occurs in a heterodimer Ku70/Ku80 complex within minutes of genotoxic stress, necessitating its interaction with DNA damage-induced kinase pS2056-DNA-PKcs and/or pS1981-ATM. The mutagenic effects of phospho-Ku70 are documented by a defective S/G2 checkpoint, accelerated disappearance of γ-H2AX foci and kinetics of DNA repair resulting in an increased level of genotoxic stress-induced chromosomal aberrations. Together, these data unveil an involvement of phospho-Ku70 in fast but inaccurate DNA repair; a new paradigm linked to both the deregulation of c-NHEJ and the resistance of malignant cells.

  7. The nuclear matrix protein p255 is a highly phosphorylated form of RNA polymerase II largest subunit which associates with spliceosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, M; Lauriault, P; Dubois, M F; Lavoie, S; Bensaude, O; Chabot, B

    1996-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody CC-3 recognizes a phosphodependent epitope on a 255 kDa nuclear matrix protein (p255) recently shown to associate with splicing complexes as part of the [U4/U6.U5] tri-snRNP particle [Chabot et al. (1995) Nucleic Acids Res. 23, 3206-3213]. In mouse and Drosophila cultured cells the electrophoretic mobility of p255, faster in the latter species, was identical to that of the hyperphosphorylated form of RNA polymerase II largest subunit (IIo). The CC-3 immunoreactivity of p255 was abolished by 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, which is known to cause the dephosphorylation of the C-terminal domain of subunit IIo by inhibiting the TFIIH-associated kinase. The identity of p255 was confirmed by showing that CC-3-immunoprecipitated p255 was recognized by POL3/3 and 8WG16, two antibodies specific to RNA polymerase II largest subunit. Lastly, the recovery of RNA polymerase II largest subunit from HeLa splicing mixtures was compromised by EDTA, which prevents the interaction of p255 with splicing complexes and inhibits splicing. Our results indicate that p255 represents a highly phosphorylated form of RNA polymerase II largest subunit physically associated with spliceosomes and possibly involved in coupling transcription to RNA processing. PMID:8972849

  8. Phosphorylation pattern of the p90rsk and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) molecule: comparison of in vitro and in vivo matured porcine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Schuon, C; Ebeling, S; Meinecke, B

    2007-08-01

    The overall objective was to elucidate the phosphorylation pattern and activity of the kinase p90rsk, a substrate of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), during in vitro and in vivo maturation of pig oocytes. Cumulus-oocyte complexes were collected from slaughtered pigs and matured in vitro (0, 22, 26, 30, 34, 46 h) with and without the MEK inhibitor U0126. For in vivo maturation, gilts were stimulated with equine chorionic gonadotrophin (eCG) (600-800 IU). Maturation was induced 72 h later with hCG (500 IU). Oocytes were obtained surgically (0, 22, 30 h). The samples were submitted to electrophoresis and protein blotting analysis. Enhanced chemiluminescence was used for visualization. In vitro matured oocytes were further submitted to a commercially available radioactive kinase assay to determine kinase activity. It was shown that oocytes, as well as cumulus cells, already possess a partially phosphorylated p90rsk at the time of removal from follicles, with a further phosphorylation of the molecule occurring between 22-24 h after the initiation of culture, and in vivo maturation. The phosphorylation of p90rsk coincides with the phosphorylation of MAPK and can be prevented by U0126, indicating a MAPK-dependent phosphorylation of p90rsk. Phosphorylation of the in vivo matured oocytes occurred shown as a band of less than 200 kDa. This is presumably a molecule complex, with MAPK not being a component. Therefore, the p90rsk molecule in vivo exists as a dimer. Determination of kinase activity demonstrated decreasing enzyme activities. This led to the conclusion that the assay is not specific for p90rsk, instead measuring p70S6 kinase activities.

  9. Neural network with formed dynamics of activity

    SciTech Connect

    Dunin-Barkovskii, V.L.; Osovets, N.B.

    1995-03-01

    The problem of developing a neural network with a given pattern of the state sequence is considered. A neural network structure and an algorithm, of forming its bond matrix which lead to an approximate but robust solution of the problem are proposed and discussed. Limiting characteristics of the serviceability of the proposed structure are studied. Various methods of visualizing dynamic processes in a neural network are compared. Possible applications of the results obtained for interpretation of neurophysiological data and in neuroinformatics systems are discussed.

  10. The role of mitochondrial fusion and StAR phosphorylation in the regulation of StAR activity and steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Ana F; Orlando, Ulises; Helfenberger, Katia E; Poderoso, Cecilia; Podesta, Ernesto J

    2015-06-15

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein regulates the rate-limiting step in steroidogenesis, i.e. the delivery of cholesterol from the outer (OMM) to the inner (IMM) mitochondrial membrane. StAR is a 37-kDa protein with an N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence that is cleaved off during mitochondrial import to yield 30-kDa intramitochondrial StAR. StAR acts exclusively on the OMM and its activity is proportional to how long it remains on the OMM. However, the precise fashion and the molecular mechanism in which StAR remains on the OMM have not been elucidated yet. In this work we will discuss the role of mitochondrial fusion and StAR phosphorylation by the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) as part of the mechanism that regulates StAR retention on the OMM and activity.

  11. Tyrosine hydroxylase is activated and phosphorylated at different sites in rat pheochromocytoma PC 12 cells treated with phorbol ester and forskolin

    SciTech Connect

    Tachikawa, E.; Tank, A.W.; Weiner, D.H.; Mosimann, W.F.; Yanagihara, N.; Weiner, N.

    1986-03-01

    The effects of phorbol ester (4..beta..-phorbol, 12..beta..-myristate, 13..cap alpha..-acetate; TPA), an activator of Ca/sup + +//phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (PK-C), and forskolin, which stimulates adenylate cyclase and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (cAMP-PK), on the activation and phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in rat pheochromocytoma (PC 12) cells were examined. Incubation of the cells with TPA (0.01-1 ..mu..M) or forskolin (0.01-0.1 ..mu..M) produces increases in activation and phosphorylation of TH in a concentration-dependent manner. The stimulatory effects of TPA are dependent on extracellular Ca/sup + +/ and are inhibited by pretreatment of the cells with trifluoperazine (TFP). The effects of forskolin are independent of Ca/sup + +/ and are not inhibited by TFP. In cells treated with forskolin, the time course of the increase in cAMP correlates with the increases in TH activity and phosphorylation. cAMP levels do not increase in cells treated with TPA. There is an increase in the phosphorylation of only one tryptic phosphopeptide derived from TH in cells treated with either forskolin or TPA. The peptide phosphorylated in TPA-treated cells exhibits different elution characteristics on HPLC from that in forskolin-treated cells. The authors conclude that TH in PC 12 cells is phosphorylated on different sites by cAMP-PK and PK-C. Phosphorylation of either of these sites is associated with enzyme activation.

  12. Phosphorylation and activation of hamster carbamyl phosphate synthetase II by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. A novel mechanism for regulation of pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Carrey, E A; Campbell, D G; Hardie, D G

    1985-12-30

    The trifunctional protein CAD, which contains the first three enzyme activities of pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis (carbamyl phosphate synthetase II, aspartate transcarbamylase and dihydro-orotase), is phosphorylated stoichiometrically by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. Phosphorylation activates the ammonia-dependent carbamyl phosphate synthetase activity of the complex by reducing the apparent Km for ATP. This effect is particularly marked in the presence of the allosteric feedback inhibitor, UTP, when the apparent Km is reduced by greater than 4-fold. Inhibition by physiological concentrations of UTP is substantially relieved by phosphorylation. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylates two serine residues on the protein termed sites 1 and 2, and the primary structures of tryptic peptides containing these sites have been determined: Site 1: Arg-Leu-Ser(P)-Ser-Phe-Val-Thr-Lys Site 2: Ile-His-Arg-Ala-Ser(P)-Asp-Pro-Gly-Leu-Pro-Ala-Glu-Glu-Pro-Lys During the phosphorylation reaction, activation of the carbamyl phosphate synthetase shows a better correlation with occupancy of site 1 rather than site 2. Both phosphorylation and activation can be reversed using purified preparations of the catalytic subunits of protein phosphatases 1- and -2A, and inactivation also correlates better with dephosphorylation of site 1 rather than site 2. We believe this to be the first report that a key enzyme in nucleotide biosynthesis is regulated in a significant manner by reversible covalent modification. The physiological role of this phosphorylation in the stimulation of cell proliferation by growth factors and other mitogens is discussed. PMID:4092695

  13. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 regulates infiltration of macrophages into melanoma via phosphorylation of FAK-Tyr⁹²⁵.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Bikash; Koo, Bon-Hun; Kim, Yeon Hyang; Kwon, Hyung-Joo; Kim, Doo-Sik

    2014-08-01

    Tumor-infiltrating macrophages are potential candidates for cancer immunotherapy. However, the detailed molecular mechanism underlying macrophage infiltration into tumors is poorly understood. Based on our previous finding that plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) enhances vitronectin-dependent migration of macrophages, we investigated the potential role of PAI-1 in macrophage invasion into melanoma. Experimental evidence obtained from spheroid confrontation assay clearly showed that PAI-1 overexpression significantly enhanced the invasion of RAW 264.7 cells into B16F10 melanoma. We further demonstrated that PAI-1 induces phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) at Tyr(925), which, in turn, mediated the invasion of macrophages into the melanoma. This work further illustrates that low-density lipoprotein receptor related-protein 1 (LRP1) is essential for PAI-1-mediated FAK phosphorylation and macrophage invasion into melanoma. In conclusion, our study demonstrates a novel role of PAI-1 in macrophage invasion into melanoma and provides insights into the underlying molecular mechanism.

  14. Phosphorylation at the carboxy terminus of the 55-kilodalton adenovirus type 5 E1B protein regulates transforming activity.

    PubMed Central

    Teodoro, J G; Halliday, T; Whalen, S G; Takayesu, D; Graham, F L; Branton, P E

    1994-01-01

    The 55-kDa product of early region 1B (E1B) of human adenoviruses is required for viral replication and participates in cell transformation through complex formation with and inactivation of the cellular tumor suppressor p53. We have used both biochemical and genetic approaches to show that this 496-residue (496R) protein of adenovirus type 5 is phosphorylated at serine and threonine residues near the carboxy terminus within sequences characteristic of substrates of casein kinase II. Mutations which converted serines 490 and 491 to alanine residues decreased viral replication and greatly reduced the efficiency of transformation of primary baby rat kidney cells. Such mutant 496R proteins interacted with p53 at efficiencies similar to those of wild-type 496R but only partially inhibited p53 transactivation activity. These results indicated that phosphorylation at these carboxy-terminal sites either regulates the inhibition of p53 or regulates some other 496R function required for cell transformation. Images PMID:8289381

  15. Stimulation of oxidative phosphorylation by calcium in cardiac mitochondria is not influenced by cAMP and PKA activity.

    PubMed

    Covian, Raul; French, Stephanie; Kusnetz, Heather; Balaban, Robert S

    2014-12-01

    Cardiac oxidative ATP generation is finely tuned to match several-fold increases in energy demand. Calcium has been proposed to play a role in the activation of ATP production via PKA phosphorylation in response to intramitochondrial cAMP generation. We evaluated the effect of cAMP, its membrane permeable analogs (dibutyryl-cAMP, 8-bromo-cAMP), and the PKA inhibitor H89 on respiration of isolated pig heart mitochondria. cAMP analogs did not stimulate State 3 respiration of Ca2 +-depleted mitochondria (82.2 ± 3.6% of control), in contrast to the 2-fold activation induced by 0.95 μM free Ca2 +, which was unaffected by H89. Using fluorescence and integrating sphere spectroscopy, we determined that Ca2 + increased the reduction of NADH (8%), and of cytochromes bH (3%), c1 (3%), c (4%), and a (2%), together with a doubling of conductances for Complex I + III and Complex IV. None of these changes were induced by cAMP analogs nor abolished by H89. In Ca2 +-undepleted mitochondria, we observed only slight changes in State 3 respiration rates upon addition of 50 μM cAMP (85 ± 9.9%), dibutyryl-cAMP (80.1 ± 5.2%), 8-bromo-cAMP (88.6 ± 3.3%), or 1 μM H89 (89.7 ± 19.9%) with respect to controls. Similar results were obtained when measuring respiration in heart homogenates. Addition of exogenous PKA with dibutyryl-cAMP or the constitutively active catalytic subunit of PKA to isolated mitochondria decreased State 3 respiration by only 5–15%. These functional studies suggest that alterations in mitochondrial cAMP and PKA activity do not contribute significantly to the acute Ca2 + stimulation of oxidative phosphorylation

  16. Silk Microgels Formed by Proteolytic Enzyme Activity

    PubMed Central

    Samal, Sangram K.; Dash, Mamoni; Chiellini, Federica; Kaplan, David L.; Chiellini, Emo

    2013-01-01

    The proteolytic enzyme α-chymotrypsin selectively cleaves the amorphous regions of silk fibroin protein (SFP) and allows the crystalline regions to self-assemble into silk microgels (SMG) at physiological temperature. These microgels consist of lamellar crystals in the micrometer scale, in contrast to the nanometer scaled crystals in native silkworm fibers. SDS-PAGE and zeta potential results demonstrated that α-chymotrypsin utilized only the nonamorphous domains or segments of the heavy chain of SFP to form negatively charged SMGs. The SMGs were characterized in terms of size, charge, structure, morphology, crystallinity, swelling kinetics, water content and thermal properties. The results suggest that the present technique of preparing SMGs by α-chymotrypsin is simple and efficient potential and that the prepared SMGS have useful features for studies related to biomaterials and pharmaceutical needs. This process is also an easy approach to obtain the amorphous peptide chains for further study. PMID:23756227

  17. Silk microgels formed by proteolytic enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Samal, Sangram K; Dash, Mamoni; Chiellini, Federica; Kaplan, David L; Chiellini, Emo

    2013-09-01

    The proteolytic enzyme α-chymotrypsin selectively cleaves the amorphous regions of silk fibroin protein (SFP) and allows the crystalline regions to self-assemble into silk microgels (SMGs) at physiological temperature. These microgels consist of lamellar crystals in the micrometer scale, in contrast to the nanometer-scaled crystals in native silkworm fibers. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and zeta potential results demonstrated that α-chymotrypsin utilized only the non-amorphous domains or segments of the heavy chain of SFP to form negatively charged SMGs. The SMGs were characterized in terms of size, charge, structure, morphology, crystallinity, swelling kinetics, water content and thermal properties. The results suggest that the present technique of preparing SMGs by α-chymotrypsin is simple and efficient, and that the prepared SMGs have useful features for studies related to biomaterial and pharmaceutical needs. This process is also an easy way to obtain the amorphous peptide chains for further study. PMID:23756227

  18. Pin1-mediated Sp1 phosphorylation by CDK1 increases Sp1 stability and decreases its DNA-binding activity during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hang-Che; Chuang, Jian-Ying; Jeng, Wen-Yih; Liu, Chia-I; Wang, Andrew H-J; Lu, Pei-Jung; Chang, Wen-Chang; Hung, Jan-Jong

    2014-12-16

    We have shown that Sp1 phosphorylation at Thr739 decreases its DNA-binding activity. In this study, we found that phosphorylation of Sp1 at Thr739 alone is necessary, but not sufficient for the inhibition of its DNA-binding activity during mitosis. We demonstrated that Pin1 could be recruited to the Thr739(p)-Pro motif of Sp1 to modulate the interaction between phospho-Sp1 and CDK1, thereby facilitating CDK1-mediated phosphorylation of Sp1 at Ser720, Thr723 and Thr737 during mitosis. Loss of the C-terminal end of Sp1 (amino acids 741-785) significantly increased Sp1 phosphorylation, implying that the C-terminus inhibits CDK1-mediated Sp1 phosphorylation. Binding analysis of Sp1 peptides to Pin1 by isothermal titration calorimetry indicated that Pin1 interacts with Thr739(p)-Sp1 peptide but not with Thr739-Sp1 peptide. X-ray crystallography data showed that the Thr739(p)-Sp1 peptide occupies the active site of Pin1. Increased Sp1 phosphorylation by CDK1 during mitosis not only stabilized Sp1 levels by decreasing interaction with ubiquitin E3-ligase RNF4 but also caused Sp1 to move out of the chromosomes completely by decreasing its DNA-binding activity, thereby facilitating cell cycle progression. Thus, Pin1-mediated conformational changes in the C-terminal region of Sp1 are critical for increased CDK1-mediated Sp1 phosphorylation to facilitate cell cycle progression during mitosis.

  19. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MEK1) stabilizes MyoD through direct phosphorylation at tyrosine 156 during myogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Jo, Chulman; Cho, Sun-Jung; Jo, Sangmee Ahn

    2011-05-27

    Previously, we reported that mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MEK1) activated in the mid-stage of skeletal muscle differentiation promotes myogenic differentiation. To elucidate the molecular mechanism, we investigated an activity of MEK1 for MyoD. Activated MEK1 associates with MyoD in the nucleus of differentiating myoblasts. In vitro kinase assay using active MEK1, a (32)P-labeled protein band corresponding to GST-MyoD was observed but not to mutant GST-MyoD-Y156F. Tyrosine phosphorylation of endogenous MyoD was detected with a specific anti-pMyoD-Y156 antibody; however, this response was blocked by PD184352, a MEK-specific inhibitor. These results indicate that activated MEK1 phosphorylates the MyoD-Y156 residue directly. Interestingly, the protein level of mutant MyoD-Y156F decreased compared with that of wild type but was recovered in the presence of lactacystin, a proteasome inhibitor. The protein level of MyoD-Y156E, which mimics phosphorylation at Tyr-156, was above that of wild type, indicating that the phosphorylation protects MyoD from the ubiquitin proteasome-mediated degradation. In addition, the low protein level of MyoD-Y156F was recovered over that of wild type by an additional mutation at Leu-164, a critical binding residue of MAFbx/AT-1, a Skp, Cullin, F-box (SCF) E3-ubiquitin ligase. The amount of MyoD co-precipitated with MAFbx/AT-1 also was reduced in the presence of active MEK1. Thus, these results suggested that the phosphorylation probably interrupts the binding of MAFbx/AT-1 to MyoD and thereby increases its stability. Collectively, our results suggest that MEK1 activated in differentiating myoblasts stimulates muscle differentiation by phosphorylating MyoD-Y156, which results in MyoD stabilization.

  20. 76 FR 61725 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Case Submission Form, Case Assistance Form; (Form DHS...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... Federal Register on July 18, 2011 at 76 FR 42129, for a 60-day public comment period. No comments were... other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submissions of responses. FOR FURTHER... to bring to the attention of the CIS Ombudsman (``trend''). For case problems, the CIS Ombudsman...

  1. Elevation of cortical serotonin transporter activity upon peripheral immune challenge is regulated independently of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation and transporter phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Schwamborn, Robert; Brown, Eric; Haase, Jana

    2016-05-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) is responsible for high-affinity serotonin (5-HT) uptake from extracellular fluid and is a prominent pharmacological target in the treatment of depression. In recent years, depression has also been linked to immune system activation. Inflammatory conditions can cause sickness behaviour and depression-like symptoms in both animals and humans. Since SERT has been proposed as one of the molecular targets in inflammation-induced depression, we applied the widely used lipopolysaccharides (LPS) model to study the effects of peripheral inflammation on SERT activity in the brain. We show that 24 h after intraperitoneal LPS administration, SERT-mediated 5-HT uptake is significantly enhanced in the frontal cortex. Analysis of uptake kinetics revealed that the transport capacity (Vmax ) of cortical SERT was increased in LPS-injected animals, while the Km value remained unchanged. The increase in Vmax was neither due to increased SERT protein expression nor increased synaptic surface exposure. The suppression of SERT activity upon inhibition of p38 MAPK was not selective for LPS-induced enhancement of SERT function. In addition, SERT activity changes in LPS-treated rats are unaffected by nitric oxide synthase and protein kinase G inhibitors. Using the Phos-Tag method, we identified five SERT-specific protein bands representing distinct phosphorylation states of SERT. However, the enhancement of SERT activity in LPS-treated rats was not correlated with altered transporter phosphorylation. Together with previous studies by others, our results suggest that SERT is regulated by multiple mechanisms in response to peripheral immune system activation. Peripheral injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces characteristic sickness and depression-like behaviour in rats over a period of at least 24 h. We show here that the activity of the serotonin transporter (SERT), a prominent antidepressant target, is up-regulated 24 h following LPS

  2. Elevation of cortical serotonin transporter activity upon peripheral immune challenge is regulated independently of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation and transporter phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Schwamborn, Robert; Brown, Eric; Haase, Jana

    2016-05-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) is responsible for high-affinity serotonin (5-HT) uptake from extracellular fluid and is a prominent pharmacological target in the treatment of depression. In recent years, depression has also been linked to immune system activation. Inflammatory conditions can cause sickness behaviour and depression-like symptoms in both animals and humans. Since SERT has been proposed as one of the molecular targets in inflammation-induced depression, we applied the widely used lipopolysaccharides (LPS) model to study the effects of peripheral inflammation on SERT activity in the brain. We show that 24 h after intraperitoneal LPS administration, SERT-mediated 5-HT uptake is significantly enhanced in the frontal cortex. Analysis of uptake kinetics revealed that the transport capacity (Vmax ) of cortical SERT was increased in LPS-injected animals, while the Km value remained unchanged. The increase in Vmax was neither due to increased SERT protein expression nor increased synaptic surface exposure. The suppression of SERT activity upon inhibition of p38 MAPK was not selective for LPS-induced enhancement of SERT function. In addition, SERT activity changes in LPS-treated rats are unaffected by nitric oxide synthase and protein kinase G inhibitors. Using the Phos-Tag method, we identified five SERT-specific protein bands representing distinct phosphorylation states of SERT. However, the enhancement of SERT activity in LPS-treated rats was not correlated with altered transporter phosphorylation. Together with previous studies by others, our results suggest that SERT is regulated by multiple mechanisms in response to peripheral immune system activation. Peripheral injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces characteristic sickness and depression-like behaviour in rats over a period of at least 24 h. We show here that the activity of the serotonin transporter (SERT), a prominent antidepressant target, is up-regulated 24 h following LPS

  3. Balance between DBT/CKIε kinase and protein phosphatase activities regulate phosphorylation and stability of Drosophila CLOCK protein

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Young; Edery, Isaac

    2006-01-01

    The first circadian-relevant kinase to be identified was DOUBLE-TIME (DBT) in Drosophila, a homolog of vertebrate CKIε, which regulates the progressive phosphorylation and stability of PERIOD (PER) proteins in animals. A negative feedback loop wherein PER directly inhibits the transcriptional activity of the CLOCK-CYCLE (CLK-CYC) heterodimer is central to the generation of molecular rhythms and normal progression of the clock in Drosophila. We show that DBT activity is required for the phase-specific hyperphosphorylation of CLK in vivo, an event that correlates with times of maximal repression in per RNA levels. The ability of DBT to hyperphosphorylate CLK, enhance its degradation, and evoke modest inhibition of CLK-dependent transactivation from circadian promoter elements was directly shown in cultured Drosophila cells. Intriguingly, DBT seems to function in close partnership with the PER-relevant protein phosphatase 2A, resulting in dynamic equilibrium between hypo- and hyperphosphorylated isoforms of CLK. This balancing mechanism might act to stabilize the limiting levels of CLK against stochastic fluctuations minimizing the propagation of “molecular noise” in the feedback circuitry. Also, the subcellular localization of CLK was altered from predominately nuclear to strong cytoplasmic staining in the presence of PER. These results suggest that, in contrast to mammalian clocks, circadian transcriptional inhibition in Drosophila involves displacement of the positive factors from chromatin. These results also demonstrate that DBT can target both negative and positive factors in circadian feedback loops and support a conserved role for dynamic regulation of reversible phosphorylation in directly modulating the activities of circadian transcription factors. PMID:16603629

  4. IRP1 Ser-711 is a phosphorylation site, critical for regulation of RNA-binding and aconitase activities.

    PubMed

    Fillebeen, Carine; Caltagirone, Annie; Martelli, Alain; Moulis, Jean-Marc; Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2005-05-15

    In iron-starved cells, IRP1 (iron regulatory protein 1) binds to mRNA iron-responsive elements and controls their translation or stability. In response to increased iron levels, RNA-binding is inhibited on assembly of a cubane [4Fe-4S] cluster, which renders IRP1 to a cytosolic aconitase. Phosphorylation at conserved serine residues may also regulate the activities of IRP1. We demonstrate that Ser-711 is a phosphorylation site in HEK-293 cells (human embryonic kidney 293 cells) treated with PMA, and we study the effects of the S711E (Ser-711-->Glu) mutation on IRP1 functions. A highly purified preparation of recombinant IRP1(S711E) displays negligible IRE-binding and aconitase activities. It appears that the first step in the aconitase reaction (conversion of citrate into the intermediate cis-aconitate) is more severely affected, as recombinant IRP1(S711E) retains approx. 45% of its capacity to catalyse the conversion of cis-aconitate into the end-product isocitrate. When expressed in mammalian cells, IRP1(S711E) completely fails to bind to RNA and to generate isocitrate from citrate. We demonstrate that the apparent inactivation of IRP1(S711E) is not related to mutation-associated protein misfolding or to alterations in its stability. Sequence analysis of IRP1 from all species currently deposited in protein databases shows that Ser-711 and flanking sequences are highly conserved in the evolutionary scale. Our results suggest that Ser-711 is a critical residue for the control of IRP1 activities.

  5. Regulatory role of tyrosine phosphorylation in the swelling-activated chloride current in isolated rabbit articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Noriaki; Imai, Shinji; Toyoda, Futoshi; Isoya, Eiji; Kumagai, Kousuke; Matsuura, Hiroshi; Matsusue, Yoshitaka

    2009-08-01

    Articular chondrocytes are exposed in vivo to the continually changing osmotic environment and thus require volume regulatory mechanisms. The present study was designed to investigate (i) the functional role of the swelling-activated Cl(-) current (I(Cl,swell)) in the regulatory volume decrease (RVD) and (ii) the regulatory role of tyrosine phosphorylation in I(Cl,swell), in isolated rabbit articular chondrocytes. Whole-cell membrane currents were recorded from chondrocytes in isosmotic, hyposmotic and hyperosmotic external solutions under conditions where Na(+), K(+) and Ca(2+) currents were minimized. The cell surface area was also measured using microscope images from a separate set of chondrocytes and was used as an index of cell volume. The isolated chondrocytes exhibited a RVD during sustained exposure to hyposmotic solution, which was mostly inhibited by the I(Cl,swell) blocker 4-(2-butyl-6,7-dichloro-2-cyclopentyl-indan-1-on-5-yl)oxobutyric acid (DCPIB) at 20 microM. Exposure to a hyposmotic solution activated I(Cl,swell), which was also largely inhibited by 20 microM DCPIB. I(Cl,swell) in rabbit articular chondrocytes had a relative taurine permeability (P(tau)/P(Cl)) of 0.21. Activation of I(Cl,swell) was significantly reduced by the protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitor genistein (30 microM) but was only weakly affected by its inactive analogue daidzein (30 microM). Intracellular application of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) inhibitor sodium orthovanadate (250 and 500 microM) resulted in a gradual activation of a Cl(-) current even in isosmotic solutions. This Cl(-) current was almost completely inhibited by 4,4-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2-disulfonate (DIDS, 500 microM) and was also largely suppressed by exposure to hyperosmotic solution, thus indicating a close similarity to I(Cl,swell). Pretreatment of chondrocytes with genistein significantly prevented the activation of the Cl(-) current by sodium orthovanadate, suggesting that the basal

  6. Alpha-chaconine, a potato glycoalkaloid, induces apoptosis of HT-29 human colon cancer cells through caspase-3 activation and inhibition of ERK 1/2 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seun-Ah; Paek, Seung-Hwan; Kozukue, Nobuyuki; Lee, Kap-Rang; Kim, Jung-Ae

    2006-06-01

    Although alpha-chaconine, one of the two major potato trisaccharide glycoalkaloids, have shown cytotoxic effects on human cancer cells, the exact mechanism of this action of alpha-chaconine is not completely understood. In this study, we found that alpha-chaconine induced apoptosis of HT-29 cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner by using flow cytometric analysis. We also found that caspase-3 activity and the active form of caspase-3 were increased 12 h after alpha-chaconine treatment. Caspase inhibitors, N-Ac-DEVD-CHO and Z-VAD-fmk, prevented alpha-chaconine-induced apoptosis, whereas alpha-chaconine-induced apoptosis was potentiated by PD98059, an extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor. However, pretreatment of the cells with LY294002 and SB203580, inhibitors of PI3K and p38, respectively, BAPTA-AM, an intracellular Ca(2+) chelator, and antioxidants such as N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and Trolox had no effect on the alpha-chaconine-induced cell death. In addition, phosphorylation of ERK was reduced by the treatment with alpha-chaconine. Moreover, alpha-chaconine-induced caspase-3 activity was further increased by the pretreatment with PD98059. Thus, the results indicate that alpha-chaconine induces apoptosis of HT-29 cells through inhibition of ERK and, in turn, activation of caspase-3.

  7. Protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1) enhances Src-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of NMDA receptor in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH)

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhen-Zhen; Zhang, Feng; Li, Feng-Ying; Luan, Yi-Fei; Guo, Peng; Li, Yi-Hang; Liu, Yong; Qi, Su-Hua

    2016-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that Src could modulate NMDA receptor, and PAR1 could also affect NMDAR signaling. However, whether PAR1 could regulate NMDAR through Src under ICH has not yet been investigated. In this study, we demonstrated the role of Src-PSD95-GluN2A signaling cascades in rat ICH model and in vitro thrombin challenged model. Using the PAR1 agonist SFLLR, antagonist RLLFS and Src inhibitor PP2, electrophysiological analysis showed that PAR1 regulated NMDA-induced whole-cell currents (INMDA) though Src in primary cultured neurons. Both in vivo and in vitro results showed the elevated phosphorylation of tyrosine in Src and GluN2A and enhanced interaction of the Src-PSD95-GluN2A under model conditions. Treatment with the PAR1 antagonist RLLFS, AS-PSD95 (Antisense oligonucleotide against PSD95) and Src inhibitor PP2 inhibited the interaction among Src-PSD95-GluN2A, and p-Src, p-GluN2A. Co-application of SFLLR and AS-PSD95, PP2, or MK801 (NMDAR inhibitor) abolished the effect of SF. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that activated thrombin receptor PAR1 induced Src activation, enhanced the interaction among Src-PSD95-GluN2A signaling modules, and up-regulated GluN2A phosphorylation after ICH injury. Elucidation of such signaling cascades would possibly provide novel targets for ICH treatment. PMID:27385592

  8. Multisite phosphorylation of c-Jun at threonine 91/93/95 triggers the onset of c-Jun pro-apoptotic activity in cerebellar granule neurons

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, C E; Albanito, L; De Marco, P; Aiello, D; Maggiolini, M; Napoli, A; Musti, A M

    2013-01-01

    Cerebellar granule cell (CGC) apoptosis by trophic/potassium (TK) deprivation is a model of election to study the interplay of pro-apoptotic and pro-survival signaling pathways in neuronal cell death. In this model, the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) induces pro-apoptotic genes through the c-Jun/activator protein 1 (AP-1) transcription factor. On the other side, a survival pathway initiated by lithium leads to repression of pro-apoptotic c-Jun/AP-1 target genes without interfering with JNK activity. Yet, the mechanism by which lithium inhibits c-Jun activity remains to be elucidated. Here, we used this model system to study the regulation and function of site-specific c-Jun phosphorylation at the S63 and T91/T93 JNK sites in neuronal cell death. We found that TK-deprivation led to c-Jun multiphosphorylation at all three JNK sites. However, immunofluorescence analysis of c-Jun phosphorylation at single cell level revealed that the S63 site was phosphorylated in all c-Jun-expressing cells, whereas the response of T91/T93 phosphorylation was more sensitive, mirroring the switch-like apoptotic response of CGCs. Conversely, lithium prevented T91T93 phosphorylation and cell death without affecting the S63 site, suggesting that T91T93 phosphorylation triggers c-Jun pro-apoptotic activity. Accordingly, a c-Jun mutant lacking the T95 priming site for T91/93 phosphorylation protected CGCs from apoptosis, whereas it was able to induce neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. Vice versa, a c-Jun mutant bearing aspartate substitution of T95 overwhelmed lithium-mediate protection of CGCs from TK-deprivation, validating that inhibition of T91/T93/T95 phosphorylation underlies the effect of lithium on cell death. Mass spectrometry analysis confirmed multiphosphorylation of c-Jun at T91/T93/T95 in cells. Moreover, JNK phosphorylated recombinant c-Jun at T91/T93 in a T95-dependent manner. On the basis of our results, we propose that T91/T93/T95 multiphosphorylation of c-Jun functions as a

  9. Phosphorylation- and nucleotide-binding-induced changes to the stability and hydrogen exchange patterns of JNK1β1 provide insight into its mechanisms of activation.

    PubMed

    Owen, Gavin R; Stoychev, Stoyan; Achilonu, Ikechukwu; Dirr, Heini W

    2014-10-23

    Many studies have characterized how changes to the stability and internal motions of a protein during activation can contribute to their catalytic function, even when structural changes cannot be observed. Here, unfolding studies and hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HX) mass spectrometry were used to investigate the changes to the stability and conformation/conformational dynamics of JNK1β1 induced by phosphorylative activation. Equivalent studies were also employed to determine the effects of nucleotide binding on both inactive and active JNK1β1 using the ATP analogue, 5'-adenylyl-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP). JNK1β1 phosphorylation alters HX in regions involved in catalysis and substrate binding, changes that can be ascribed to functional modifications in either structure and/or backbone flexibility. Increased HX in the hinge between the N- and C-terminal domains implied that it acquires enhanced flexibility upon phosphorylation that may be a prerequisite for interdomain closure. In combination with the finding that nucleotide binding destabilizes the kinase, the patterns of solvent protection by AMP-PNP were consistent with a novel mode of nucleotide binding to the C-terminal domain of a destabilized and open domain conformation of inactive JNK1β1. Solvent protection by AMP-PNP of both N- and C-terminal domains in active JNK1β1 revealed that the domains close around nucleotide upon phosphorylation, concomitantly stabilizing the kinase. This suggests that phosphorylation activates JNK1β1 in part by increasing hinge flexibility to facilitate interdomain closure and the creation of a functional active site. By uncovering the complex interplay that occurs between nucleotide binding and phosphorylation, we present new insight into the unique mechanisms by which JNK1β1 is regulated.

  10. CASEIN KINASE-MEDIATED PHOSPHORYLATION OF SERINE 839 IS NECESSARY FOR BASOLATERAL LOCALIZATION OF THE Ca2+-ACTIVATED NON-SELECTIVE CATION CHANNEL TRPM4

    PubMed Central

    Cerda, Oscar; Cáceres, Mónica; Park, Kang-Sik; Leiva-Salcedo, Elías; Romero, Aníbal; Varela, Diego

    2014-01-01

    TRPM4 is a Ca2+-activated non-selective cation channel expressed in a wide range of human tissues. TRPM4 participates in a variety of physiological processes such as T cell activation, myogenic vasoconstriction and allergic reactions. TRPM4 Ca2+ sensitivity is enhanced by calmodulin (CaM) and phosphathydilinositol 4, 5-biphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) binding, as well as, under certain conditions, PKC activation. However, information as to the mechanisms of modulation of this channel remain unknown, including direct identification of phosphorylation sites on TRPM4 and their role in channel features. Here, we use mass-spectrometric-based proteomic approaches (immunoprecipitation and tandem mass spectrometry), to unambiguously identify S839 as a phosphorylation site present on human TRPM4 expressed in a human cell line. Site-directed mutagenesis employing a serine to alanine mutation to eliminate phosphorylation, and a phospho-mimetic aspartate mutation, as well as biochemical and immunocytochemical experiments, revealed a role for S839 phosphorylation in the basolateral expression of TRPM4 channels in epithelial cells. Moreover, we demonstrated that casein kinase 1 (CK1) phosphorylates S839 and is responsible for the basolateral localization of TRPM4. PMID:25231975

  11. Prostate-derived Sterile 20-like Kinases (PSKs/TAOKs) Phosphorylate Tau Protein and Are Activated in Tangle-bearing Neurons in Alzheimer Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Ignatius A.; Touma, Dona; Lynham, Steven; Troakes, Claire; Schober, Megan; Causevic, Mirsada; Garg, Ritu; Noble, Wendy; Killick, Richard; Bodi, Istvan; Hanger, Diane P.; Morris, Jonathan D. H.

    2013-01-01

    In Alzheimer disease (AD), the microtubule-associated protein tau is highly phosphorylated and aggregates into characteristic neurofibrillary tangles. Prostate-derived sterile 20-like kinases (PSKs/TAOKs) 1 and 2, members of the sterile 20 family of kinases, have been shown to regulate microtubule stability and organization. Here we show that tau is a good substrate for PSK1 and PSK2 phosphorylation with mass spectrometric analysis of phosphorylated tau revealing more than 40 tau residues as targets of these kinases. Notably, phosphorylated residues include motifs located within the microtubule-binding repeat domain on tau (Ser-262, Ser-324, and Ser-356), sites that are known to regulate tau-microtubule interactions. PSK catalytic activity is enhanced in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus, areas of the brain that are most susceptible to Alzheimer pathology, in comparison with the cerebellum, which is relatively spared. Activated PSK is associated with neurofibrillary tangles, dystrophic neurites surrounding neuritic plaques, neuropil threads, and granulovacuolar degeneration bodies in AD brain. By contrast, activated PSKs and phosphorylated tau are rarely detectible in immunostained control human brain. Our results demonstrate that tau is a substrate for PSK and suggest that this family of kinases could contribute to the development of AD pathology and dementia. PMID:23585562

  12. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) cross-talks with canonical Wnt signaling via phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin at Ser 552

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Junxing; Yue, Wanfu; Zhu, Mei J.; Sreejayan, Nair; Du, Min

    2010-04-23

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key regulator of energy metabolism; its activity is regulated by a plethora of physiological conditions, exercises and many anti-diabetic drugs. Recent studies show that AMPK involves in cell differentiation but the underlying mechanism remains undefined. Wingless Int-1 (Wnt)/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway regulates the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells through enhancing {beta}-catenin/T-cell transcription factor 1 (TCF) mediated transcription. The objective of this study was to determine whether AMPK cross-talks with Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling through phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin. C3H10T1/2 mesenchymal cells were used. Chemical inhibition of AMPK and the expression of a dominant negative AMPK decreased phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin at Ser 552. The {beta}-catenin/TCF mediated transcription was correlated with AMPK activity. In vitro, pure AMPK phosphorylated {beta}-catenin at Ser 552 and the mutation of Ser 552 to Ala prevented such phosphorylation, which was further confirmed using [{gamma}-{sup 32}P]ATP autoradiography. In conclusion, AMPK phosphorylates {beta}-catenin at Ser 552, which stabilizes {beta}-catenin, enhances {beta}-catenin/TCF mediated transcription, expanding AMPK from regulation of energy metabolism to cell differentiation and development via cross-talking with the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway.

  13. Platelet Activating Factor Enhances Synaptic Vesicle Exocytosis Via PKC, Elevated Intracellular Calcium, and Modulation of Synapsin 1 Dynamics and Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Jennetta W.; Lu, Shao-Ming; Gelbard, Harris A.

    2016-01-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) is an inflammatory phospholipid signaling molecule implicated in synaptic plasticity, learning and memory and neurotoxicity during neuroinflammation. However, little is known about the intracellular mechanisms mediating PAF’s physiological or pathological effects on synaptic facilitation. We show here that PAF receptors are localized at the synapse. Using fluorescent reporters of presynaptic activity we show that a non-hydrolysable analog of PAF (cPAF) enhances synaptic vesicle release from individual presynaptic boutons by increasing the size or release of the readily releasable pool and the exocytosis rate of the total recycling pool. cPAF also activates previously silent boutons resulting in vesicle release from a larger number of terminals. The underlying mechanism involves elevated calcium within presynaptic boutons and protein kinase C activation. Furthermore, cPAF increases synapsin I phosphorylation at sites 1 and 3, and increases dispersion of synapsin I from the presynaptic compartment during stimulation, freeing synaptic vesicles for subsequent release. These findings provide a conceptual framework for how PAF, regardless of its cellular origin, can modulate synapses during normal and pathologic synaptic activity. PMID:26778968

  14. CXCL3 contributes to CD133+ CSCs maintenance and forms a positive feedback regulation loop with CD133 in HCC via Erk1/2 phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Lixing; Li, Hong; Ge, Chao; Zhao, Fangyu; Tian, Hua; Chen, Taoyang; Jiang, Guoping; Xie, Haiyang; Cui, Ying; Yao, Ming; Li, Jinjun

    2016-01-01

    Although the chemotactic cytokine CXCL3 is thought to play an important role in tumor initiation and invasion, little is known about its function in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In our previous study, we found that Ikaros inhibited CD133 expression via the MAPK pathway in HCC. Here, we showed that Ikaros may indirectly down-regulate CXCL3 expression in HCC cells, which leads to better outcomes in patients with CD133+ cancer stem cell (CSC) populations. CD133 overexpression induced CXCL3 expression, and silencing of CD133 down-regulated CXCL3 in HCC cells. Knockdown of CXCL3 inhibited CD133+ HCC CSCs’ self-renewal and tumorigenesis. The serum CXCL3 level was higher in HCC patients’ samples than that in healthy individual. HCC patients with higher CXCL3 expression displayed a poor prognosis, and a high level of CXCL3 was significantly associated with vascular invasion and tumor capsule formation. Exogenous CXCL3 induced Erk1/2 and ETS1 phosphorylation and promoted CD133 expression, indicating a positive feedback loop between CXCL3 and CD133 gene expression in HCC cells via Erk1/2 activation. Together, our findings indicated that CXCL3 might be a potent therapeutic target for HCC. PMID:27255419

  15. Phosphorylation of GSK3α/β correlates with activation of AKT and is prognostic for poor overall survival in acute myeloid leukemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Ruvolo, Peter P.; Qiu, YiHua; Coombes, Kevin R.; Zhang, Nianxiang; Neeley, E. Shannon; Ruvolo, Vivian R.; Hail, Numsen; Borthakur, Gautam; Konopleva, Marina; Andreeff, Michael; Kornblau, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients with highly active AKT tend to do poorly. Cell cycle arrest and apoptosis are tightly regulated by AKT via phosphorylation of GSK3α and β isoforms which inactivates these kinases. In the current study we examine the prognostic role of AKT mediated GSK3 phosphorylation in AML. Methods We analyzed GSK3α/β phosphorylation by reverse phase protein analysis (RPPA) in a cohort of 511 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. Levels of phosphorylated GSK3 were correlated with patient characteristics including survival and with expression of other proteins important in AML cell survival. Results High levels of p-GSK3α/β correlated with adverse overall survival and a lower incidence of complete remission duration in patients with intermediate cytogenetics, but not in those with unfavorable cytogenetics. Intermediate cytogenetic patients with FLT3 mutation also fared better respectively when p-GSK3α/β levels were lower. Phosphorylated GSK3α/β expression was compared and contrasted with that of 229 related cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis proteins. Consistent with p-GSK3α/β as an indicator of AKT activation, RPPA revealed that p-GSK3α/β positively correlated with phosphorylation of AKT, BAD, and P70S6K, and negatively correlated with β-catenin and FOXO3A. PKCδ also positively correlated with p-GSK3α/β expression, suggesting crosstalk between the AKT and PKC signaling pathways in AML cells. Conclusions These findings suggest that AKT-mediated phosphorylation of GSK3α/β may be beneficial to AML cell survival, and hence detrimental to the overall survival of AML patients. Intrinsically, p-GSK3α/β may serve as an important adverse prognostic factor for a subset of AML patients. PMID:26674329

  16. Assaying Bcr-Abl kinase activity and inhibition in whole cell extracts by phosphorylation of substrates immobilized on agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ding; Nair-Gill, Evan; Sher, Dorie A; Parker, Laurie L; Campbell, Jennifer M; Siddiqui, Mariah; Stock, Wendy; Kron, Stephen J

    2005-12-01

    There is a current and increasing demand for simple, robust, nonradioactive assays of protein tyrosine kinase activity with applications for clinical diagnosis and high-throughput screening of potential molecularly targeted therapeutic agents. One significant challenge is to detect and measure the activity of specific kinases with key roles in cell signaling as an approach to distinguish normal cells from cancer cells and as a means of evaluating targeted drug efficacy and resistance in cancer cells. Here, we describe a method in which kinase substrates fused to glutathione-S-transferase and immobilized on glutathione agarose beads are phosphorylated, eluted, and then assayed to detect kinase activity. The activity of recombinant, purified c-Abl kinase or Bcr-Abl kinase in whole cell extracts can be detected with equivalent specificity, sensitivity, and reproducibility. Similarly, inhibition of recombinant c-Abl or Bcr-Abl in cells or cell extracts by imatinib mesylate and other Bcr-Abl targeted kinase inhibitors is readily assayed. This simple kinase assay is sufficiently straightforward and robust for use in clinical laboratories and is potentially adaptable to high-throughput assay formats.

  17. Loss of p53-regulatory protein IFI16 induces NBS1 leading to activation of p53-mediated checkpoint by phosphorylation of p53 SER37.

    PubMed

    Tawara, Hideyuki; Fujiuchi, Nobuko; Sironi, Juan; Martin, Sarah; Aglipay, Jason; Ouchi, Mutsuko; Taga, Makoto; Chen, Phang-Lang; Ouchi, Toru

    2008-01-01

    Our previous results that IFI16 is involved in p53 transcription activity under conditions of ionizing radiation (IR), and that the protein is frequently lost in human breast cancer cell lines and breast adenocarcinoma tissues suggesting that IFI16 plays a crucial role in controlling cell growth. Here, we show that loss of IFI16 by RNA interference in cell culture causes elevated phosphorylation of p53 Ser37 and accumulated NBS1 (nibrin) and p21WAF1, leading to growth retardation. Consistent with these observations, doxycyclin-induced NBS1 caused accumulation of p21WAF1 and increased phosphorylation of p53 Ser37, leading to cell cycle arrest in G1 phase. Wortmannin treatment was found to decrease p53 Ser37 phosphorylation in NBS-induced cells. These results suggest that loss of IFI16 activates p53 checkpoint through NBS1-DNA-PKcs pathway. PMID:17981542

  18. Protein phosphorylation in stomatal movement

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tong; Chen, Sixue; Harmon, Alice C

    2014-01-01

    As research progresses on how guard cells perceive and transduce environmental cues to regulate stomatal movement, plant biologists are discovering key roles of protein phosphorylation. Early research efforts focused on characterization of ion channels and transporters in guard cell hormonal signaling. Subsequent genetic studies identified mutants of kinases and phosphatases that are defective in regulating guard cell ion channel activities, and recently proteins regulated by phosphorylation have been identified. Here we review the essential role of protein phosphorylation in ABA-induced stomatal closure and in blue light-induced stomatal opening. We also highlight evidence for the cross-talk between different pathways, which is mediated by protein phosphorylation. PMID:25482764

  19. Calcium-sensing receptor-dependent activation of CREB phosphorylation in HEK293 cells and human parathyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Avlani, Vimesh A; Ma, Wenting; Mun, Hee-Chang; Leach, Katie; Delbridge, Leigh; Christopoulos, Arthur; Conigrave, Arthur D

    2013-05-15

    In addition to its acute effects on hormone secretion, epithelial transport, and shape change, the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) modulates the expression of genes that control cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation as well as the synthesis of peptide hormones and enzymes. In the present study, we investigated the impacts of a CaSR agonist and several CaSR modulators on phosphorylation of transcription factor CREB residue Ser(133) in CaSR-expressing HEK293 (HEK-CaSR) cells and human adenomatous parathyroid cells. Elevated Ca(2+)o concentration had no effect on CREB phosphorylation (p-CREB) in control HEK293 cells but stimulated p-CREB in both HEK-CaSR cells and human parathyroid cells. In addition, p-CREB was stimulated by the positive modulator cinacalcet and inhibited by the negative modulator NPS 2143 in both CaSR-expressing cell types. Two positive modulators that bind in the receptor's Venus Fly Trap domain, l-phenylalanine and S-methylglutathione, had no effect on p-CREB in HEK-CaSR cells, demonstrating the existence of pronounced signaling bias. Analysis of the signaling pathways using specific inhibitors demonstrated that phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C and conventional protein kinase C isoforms make major contributions to Ca(2+)o-induced p-CREB in both cell-types, suggesting key roles for Gq/11. In addition, in parathyroid cells but not HEK-CaSR cells, activation of p-CREB was dependent on Gi/o, demonstrating the existence of cell type-specific signaling.

  20. Incomplete Folding upon Binding Mediates Cdk4/Cyclin D Complex Activation by Tyrosine Phosphorylation of Inhibitor p27 Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Li; Ferreira, Antonio M.; Otieno, Steve; Xiao, Limin; Bashford, Donald; Kriwacki, Richard W.

    2011-01-01

    p27Kip1 (p27), an intrinsically disordered protein, regulates the various Cdk/cyclin complexes that control cell cycle progression. The kinase inhibitory domain of p27 contains a cyclin-binding subdomain (D1), a Cdk-binding subdomain (D2), and a linker helix subdomain that connects D1 and D2. Here, we report that, despite extensive sequence conservation between Cdk4/cyclin D1 (hereafter Cdk4/cyclin D) and Cdk2/cyclin A, the thermodynamic details describing how the individual p27 subdomains contribute to equally high affinity binding to these two Cdk/cyclin complexes are strikingly different. Differences in enthalpy/entropy compensation revealed that the D2 subdomain of p27 folds incompletely when binding Cdk4/cyclin D versus Cdk2/cyclin A. Incomplete binding-induced folding exposes tyrosine 88 of p27 for phosphorylation by the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Abl. Importantly, tyrosine phosphorylation (of p27) relieves Cdk inhibition by p27, enabling cell cycle entry. Furthermore, the interaction between a conserved hydrophobic patch on cyclin D and subdomain D1 is much weaker than that with cyclin A; consequently, a construct containing subdomains D1 and LH (p27-D1LH) does not inhibit substrate binding to Cdk4/cyclin D as it does to Cdk2/cyclin A. Our results provide a mechanism by which Cdk4 (within the p27/Cdk4/cyclin D complex) is poised to be activated by extrinsic mitogenic signals that impinge upon p27 at the earliest stage of cell division. More broadly, our results further illustrate the regulatory versatility of intrinsically disordered proteins. PMID:21715330

  1. Shutoff and agonist-triggered internalization of protease-activated receptor 1 can be separated by mutation of putative phosphorylation sites in the cytoplasmic tail.

    PubMed

    Hammes, S R; Shapiro, M J; Coughlin, S R

    1999-07-20

    The thrombin receptor PAR1 becomes rapidly phosphorylated upon activation by either thrombin or exogenous SFLLRN agonist peptide. Substitution of alanine for all serine and threonine residues in the receptor's cytoplasmic carboxyl-terminal tail ablated phosphorylation and yielded a receptor defective in both shutoff and agonist-triggered internalization. These observations suggested that activation-dependent phosphorylation of PAR1's cytoplasmic tail is required for both shutoff and agonist-triggered internalization. To identify the phosphorylation site(s) that are necessary for these functions, we generated three mutant receptors in which alanine was substituted for serine and threonine residues in the amino-terminal, middle, and carboxyl-terminal thirds of PAR1's cytoplasmic tail. When stably expressed in fibroblasts, all three mutated receptors were rapidly phosphorylated in response to agonist, while a mutant in which all serines and threonines in the cytoplasmic tail were converted to alanines was not. This result suggests that phosphorylation can occur at multiple sites in PAR1's cytoplasmic tail. Alanine substitutions in the N-terminal and C-terminal portions of the tail had no effect on either receptor shutoff or agonist-triggered internalization. By contrast, alanine substitutions in the "middle" serine cluster between Ser(391) and Ser(406) yielded a receptor with considerably slower shutoff of signaling after thrombin activation than the wild type. Surprisingly, this same mutant was indistinguishable from the wild type in agonist-triggered internalization and degradation. Overexpression of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) and GRK3 "suppressed" the shutoff defect of the S --> A (391-406) mutant, consistent with this defect being due to altered receptor phosphorylation. These results suggest that specific phosphorylation sites are required for rapid receptor shutoff, but phosphorylation at multiple alternative sites is sufficient for agonist

  2. Individual differences in the effects of cannabinoids on motor activity, dopaminergic activity and DARPP-32 phosphorylation in distinct regions of the brain.

    PubMed

    Polissidis, Alexia; Chouliara, Olga; Galanopoulos, Andreas; Rentesi, Georgia; Dosi, Maria; Hyphantis, Thomas; Marselos, Marios; Papadopoulou-Daifoti, Zeta; Nomikos, George G; Spyraki, Christina; Tzavara, Eleni T; Antoniou, Katerina

    2010-10-01

    This study explored the behavioural, neurochemical and molecular effects of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta9-THC) and WIN55,212-2, in two rat phenotypes, distinguished on the basis of their vertical activity upon exposure to a novel environment, as high responders (HR) and low responders (LR). Motor effects were assessed under habituated vs. non-habituated conditions. Dopaminergic activity and DARPP-32 phosphorylation were measured in the dorsal striatum, nucleus accumbens, prefrontal cortex and amygdala. These cannabinoids influenced motor activity in a biphasic manner, i.e. low doses stimulated, whereas high doses suppressed motor activity. Dopamine (DA) biosynthesis was increased in most brain regions studied following Delta9-THC administration mainly in HR rats, and low-dose WIN55,212-2 increased DA biosynthesis in HR rats only. Both high and low doses of Delta9-THC increased DARPP-32 phosphorylation in most brain regions studied in both phenotypes, an effect that was also observed following high-dose WIN55,212-2 administration only in the striatum. The present results provide further support for a key role of cannabinoids in the regulation of motoric responses and elements of dopaminergic neurotransmission and reveal their complex differential effects in distinct rat phenotypes, as seen with other drugs of abuse.

  3. Pu-238 fuel form activities, January 1-31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-03-01

    This monthly report for /sup 238/Pu fuel form activities has two main sections: SRP-PuFF facility and SRL fuel form activities. The program status, budget information, and milestone schedules are discussed in each main section. The Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) for this program is shown. Only one monthly report per year is processed for EDB.

  4. Pu-238 fuel form activities, January 1-31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-01

    This monthly report for /sup 238/Pu Fuel Form Activities has two main sections: SRP-PuFF facility and SRL Fuel Form Activities. The program status, budget information, and milestone schedules are discussed in each main section. The Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) for this program is shown. Only one monthly report per year is processed for EDB.

  5. Pu-238 fuel form activities, January 1-31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-03-01

    This monthly report for /sup 238/Pu Fuel Form Activities has two main sections: SRP-PuFF facility and SRL Fuel Form Activities. The program status, budget information, and milestone schedules are discussed in each main section. The Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) for this program is shown. Only one monthly report per year is processed for EDB.

  6. TOPK promotes lung cancer resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors by phosphorylating and activating c-Jun

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Ting; Niu, Mengjie; Zhang, Shengli; Jia, Lintao; Li, Shengqing

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have shown promising clinical efficacy in non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC); however, resistance is frequently observed in malignant cells, operating through a mechanism that remains largely unknown. The present study shows that T-lymphokine-activated killer cell-originated protein kinase (TOPK) is upregulated in NSCLC and excessively activated in TKI-refractory cells. TOPK dictates the responsiveness of lung cancers to the EGFR-targeted TKI gefitinib through the transcription factor AP-1 component c-Jun. TOPK binds directly to and phosphorylates c-Jun, which consequently activates the transcription of AP-1 target genes, including CCND1 and CDC2. TOPK silencing sensitizes EGFR-TKI-resistant lung cancer cells to gefitinib and increases gefitinib efficacy in preclinical lung adenocarcinoma xenograft models. These findings represent a novel mechanism of lung cancer resistance to TKIs and suggest that TOPK may have value both as a predictive biomarker and as a therapeutic target: TOPK-targeted therapy may synergize with EGFR-targeted therapy in lung cancers. PMID:26745678

  7. RASSF7 negatively regulates pro-apoptotic JNK signaling by inhibiting the activity of phosphorylated-MKK7

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, S; Ebihara, A; Kajiho, H; Kontani, K; Nishina, H; Katada, T

    2011-01-01

    Members of the Ras-association domain family (RASSF) of proteins influence apoptosis and cell cycling but little is known about the mechanisms. Here, we show that RASSF7 interacts with N-Ras and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 7 (MKK7) to negatively regulate c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling. Stress-induced JNK activation and apoptosis were markedly enhanced in cells depleted of RASSF7 or N-Ras by RNAi knockdown. An interaction with RASSF7 promoted the phosphorylated state of MKK7 but inhibited this kinase's ability to activate JNK. RASSF7 required its RA domain for both interaction with GTP-bound N-Ras and the anti-apoptotic response to stress stimuli. Following prolonged stress, however, RASSF7's anti-apoptotic effect was eliminated because of degradation of RASSF7 protein via the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. Our results indicate that RASSF7 acts in concert with N-Ras to constitute a stress-sensitive temporary mechanism of apoptotic regulation. With initial stress, RASSF7/N-Ras promotes cell survival by inhibiting the MKK7/JNK pathway. However, with prolonged stress, RASSF7 protein undergoes degradation that allows cell death signaling to proceed. Our findings may account for the association of elevated RASSF7 with tumorigenesis. PMID:21278800

  8. Differential roles of ATR and ATM in p53, Chk1, and histone H2AX phosphorylation in response to hyperoxia: ATR-dependent ATM activation.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Amit; Das, Kumuda C

    2008-05-01

    Elevated level of oxygen (hyperoxia) is widely used in critical care units and in respiratory insufficiencies. In addition, hyperoxia has been implicated in many diseases such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia or acute respiratory distress syndrome. Although hyperoxia is known to cause DNA base modifications and strand breaks, the DNA damage response has not been adequately investigated. We have investigated the effect of hyperoxia on DNA damage signaling and show that hyperoxia is a unique stress that activates the ataxia telangiectasia mutant (ATM)- and Rad3-related protein kinase (ATR)-dependent p53 phosphorylations (Ser6, -15, -37, and -392), phosphorylation of histone H2AX (Ser139), and phosphorylation of checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1). In addition, we show that phosphorylation of p53 (Ser6) and histone H2AX (Ser139) depend on both ATM and ATR. We demonstrate that ATR activation precedes ATM activation in hyperoxia. Finally, we show that ATR is required for ATM activation in hyperoxia. Taken together, we report that ATR is the major DNA damage signal transducer in hyperoxia that activates ATM.

  9. Study of the nature of the binding of phosphate residues in the phosphorylated form of succinyl-CoA synthetase from pigeon breast muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Valiulina, D.S.; Skalbe, T.A.; Matveeva, L.N.

    1987-01-10

    The hydrolytic stability of the phosphorylated protein was investigated within a wide pH range. It was shown that the bond of the phosphate residue to protein in complex I is hydrolyzed at alkaline pH values (11.0 and 13.0). At acid pH values this bond is 50% hydrolyzed. The bond of the phosphate residue to protein in complex II is hydrolyzed at acid pH values and is stable at alkaline pH values of the medium. The phosphorylation reaction of the enzyme I, both with hydroxylamine and with diisopropyl fluorophosphate, led to 50% dephosphorylation of the protein. An analysis of an alkaline hydrolysate (3 N NaOH, 3 h, 100/sup 0/C) of the radioactive phosphorylated enzyme II by ion exchange chromatography showed that the radioactive label of the protein is distributed in the fractions of 1-N- and 3-N-phosphohistidine, as well as 1,3-N-diphosphohistidine. The data obtained suggested that phosphate in the phosphorylated enzyme I is bound to protein, with the formation of acyl phosphate and phosphoester bonds. Phosphate in the phosphorylated enzyme II is bound to protein with the formation of a phosphoamide bond.

  10. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphorylation of Splicing Factor 45 (SPF45) Regulates SPF45 Alternative Splicing Site Utilization, Proliferation, and Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ayoubi, Adnan M.; Zheng, Hui; Liu, Yuying; Bai, Tao

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of alternative mRNA splicing factors by extracellular cues and signal transduction cascades is poorly understood. Using an engineered extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) that can utilize ATP analogs, we have identified the alternative mRNA splicing factor 45 (SPF45), which is overexpressed in cancer, as a novel coimmunoprecipitating ERK2 substrate. ERK2 phosphorylated SPF45 on Thr71 and Ser222 in vitro and in cells in response to H-RasV12, B-RAF-V600E, and activated MEK1. Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) and p38α also phosphorylated SPF45 in vitro and associated with SPF45 in cells. SPF45 was differentially phosphorylated in cells by all three mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases in response to phorbol myristate acid (PMA), H2O2, UV, and anisomycin stimulation. ERK and p38 activation decreased SPF45-dependent exon 6 exclusion from fas mRNA in a minigene assay in cells. Stable overexpression of SPF45 in SKOV-3 cells dramatically inhibited cell proliferation in a phosphorylation-dependent manner through inhibition of ErbB2 expression. SPF45 overexpression also induced EDA inclusion into fibronectin transcripts and fibronectin expression in a phosphorylation-dependent and -independent manner, respectively, specifically affecting cellular adhesion to a fibronectin matrix. These data identify SPF45 as the first splicing factor regulated by multiple MAP kinase pathways and show effects of both SPF45 overexpression and phosphorylation. PMID:22615491

  11. Platelet activation by bacterial phospholipase C involves phosphoinositide turnover and phosphorylation of 47,000 dalton but not 20,000 dalton protein

    SciTech Connect

    Huzoor-Akbar; Anwer, K.

    1986-05-01

    This study was conducted to examine the role of phosphoinositides (PIns) and phosphorylation of 47,000 dalton (P47) and 20,000 dalton (P20) proteins in platelet activation by bacterial phospholipase C (PLC). PLC induced serotonin secretion (SS) and platelet aggregation (PA) in a concentration dependent manner. PLC (0.02 U/ml) caused phosphorylation of P47 in a time dependent manner (27% at 0.5 min to 378% at 7 min). PLC did not induce more than 15% phosphorylation of P20 by 7 min. Aspirin (500 ..mu..M) blocked phosphorylation of P20 but did not inhibit SS, PA or phosphorylation of P47. PLC (0.04 U/ml) decreased radioactivity (cpm) in /sup 32/P labeled phosphatidylinositol (PI), PI-4,5-bis-PO4 (PIP2) and PI-4-PO4 (PIP) by 20%, 12% and 7.5% respectively at 15 sec. The level of PI but not that of PIP2 returned to base line in 3 min. PIP level increased above control values within one min. PLC increased phosphatidic acid level (75% at 0.5 min. to 1545% at 3 min). In other experiments PLC produced diacylglycerol (DAG) in a time and concentration dependent manner. However, no DAG was detectable in the first 60 sec. These data suggest that: (a) PIns turnover and phosphorylation of P47 but not that of P20 is involved in platelet activation by PLC; and (b) DAG production from outer membrane phospholipids is not a prerequisite for platelet activation by PLC.

  12. Analysis of FK506, timcodar (VX-853) and FKBP51 and FKBP52 chaperones in control of glucocorticoid receptor activity and phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Hinds, Terry D; Stechschulte, Lance A; Elkhairi, Fadel; Sanchez, Edwin R

    2014-12-01

    The immunosuppressive ligand FK506 and the FK506-binding protein FKBP52 are stimulatory to glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activity. Here, we explore the underlying mechanism by comparing GR activity and phosphorylation status in response to FK506 and the novel nonimmunosuppressive ligand timcodar (VX-853) and in the presence and absence of FKBP52 and the closely related protein FKBP51. Using mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (MEFs) deficient knockout (KO) in FKBP51 or FKBP52, we show decreased GR activity at endogenous genes in 52KO cells, but increased activity in 51KO cells. In 52KO cells, elevated phosphorylation occurred at inhibitory serine 212 and decreased phosphorylation at the stimulatory S220 residue. In contrast, 51KO cells showed increased GR phosphorylation at the stimulatory residues S220 and S234. In wild-type (WT) MEF cells, timcodar, like FK506, potentiated dexamethasone-induced GR transcriptional activity at two endogenous genes. Using 52KO and 51KO MEF cells, FK506 potentiated GR activity in 51KO cells but could not do so in 52KO cells, suggesting FKBP52 as the major target of FK506 action. Like FK506, timcodar potentiated GR in 51KO cells, but it also increased GR activity in 52KO cells. Knock-down of FKBP51 in the 52KO cells showed that the latter effect of timcodar required FKBP51. Thus, timcodar appears to have a dual specificity for FKBP51 and FKBP52. This work demonstrates phosphorylation as an important mechanism in FKBP control of GR and identifies the first nonimmunosuppressive macrolide capable of targeting GR action. PMID:25505617

  13. Analysis of FK506, timcodar (VX-853) and FKBP51 and FKBP52 chaperones in control of glucocorticoid receptor activity and phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Hinds, Terry D; Stechschulte, Lance A; Elkhairi, Fadel; Sanchez, Edwin R

    2014-01-01

    The immunosuppressive ligand FK506 and the FK506-binding protein FKBP52 are stimulatory to glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activity. Here, we explore the underlying mechanism by comparing GR activity and phosphorylation status in response to FK506 and the novel nonimmunosuppressive ligand timcodar (VX-853) and in the presence and absence of FKBP52 and the closely related protein FKBP51. Using mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (MEFs) deficient knockout (KO) in FKBP51 or FKBP52, we show decreased GR activity at endogenous genes in 52KO cells, but increased activity in 51KO cells. In 52KO cells, elevated phosphorylation occurred at inhibitory serine 212 and decreased phosphorylation at the stimulatory S220 residue. In contrast, 51KO cells showed increased GR phosphorylation at the stimulatory residues S220 and S234. In wild-type (WT) MEF cells, timcodar, like FK506, potentiated dexamethasone-induced GR transcriptional activity at two endogenous genes. Using 52KO and 51KO MEF cells, FK506 potentiated GR activity in 51KO cells but could not do so in 52KO cells, suggesting FKBP52 as the major target of FK506 action. Like FK506, timcodar potentiated GR in 51KO cells, but it also increased GR activity in 52KO cells. Knock-down of FKBP51 in the 52KO cells showed that the latter effect of timcodar required FKBP51. Thus, timcodar appears to have a dual specificity for FKBP51 and FKBP52. This work demonstrates phosphorylation as an important mechanism in FKBP control of GR and identifies the first nonimmunosuppressive macrolide capable of targeting GR action. PMID:25505617

  14. Gambogic Acid Inhibits STAT3 Phosphorylation Through Activation of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase SHP-1: Potential Role in Proliferation and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Pandey, Manoj K.; Yadav, Vivek R.; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2011-01-01

    The transcription factor, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), is associated with proliferation, survival, and metastasis of cancer cells. We investigated whether gambogic acid (GA), a xanthone derived from the resin of traditional Chinese medicine, Gamboge hanburyi (mangosteen), can regulate the STAT3 pathway, leading to suppression of growth and sensitization of cancer cells. We found that GA induced apoptosis in human multiple myeloma cells that correlated with the inhibition of both constitutive and inducible STAT3 activation. STAT3 phosphorylation at both tyrosine residue 705 and serine residue 727 was inhibited by GA. STAT3 suppression was mediated through the inhibition of activation of the protein tyrosine kinases Janus-activated kinase (JAK) 1, and JAK2. Treatment with the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) inhibitor pervanadate reversed the GA-induced down-regulation of STAT3, suggesting the involvement of a PTP. We also found that GA induced the expression of the PTP SHP-1. Deletion of the SHP-1 gene by small interfering RNA suppressed the ability of GA to inhibit STAT3 activation and to induce apoptosis, suggesting the critical role of SHP-1 in its action. Moreover, GA down-regulated the expression of STAT3-regulated antiapoptotic (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and Mcl-1), proliferative (cyclin D1), and angiogenic (VEGF) proteins, and this correlated with suppression of proliferation and induction of apoptosis. Overall, these results suggest that GA blocks STAT3 activation, leading to suppression of tumor cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis. PMID:21490133

  15. Protein kinase-A dependent phosphorylation of transcription enhancer factor-1 represses its DNA-binding activity but enhances its gene activation ability

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Mahesh P.; Kogut, Paul; Gupta, Madhu

    2000-01-01

    The cAMP-dependent signaling pathway has been implicated in cardiac cell growth/differentiation and muscle gene transcription. Previously, we have identified a cAMP-inducible E-box/M-CAT hybrid motif in the cardiac α-myosin heavy chain (α-MHC) gene promoter. The two factors, TEF-1 and Max, that bind to this motif are found to physically associate with each other and exert a positive cooperative effect for gene regulation. Here we show that TEF-1, but not Max, is a substrate for protein kinase-A (PK-A)-dependent phosphorylation. TEF-1 is phosphorylated by PK-A at residue serine-102. This post-translational modification of TEF-1 repressed its DNA-binding activity, but not its ability to interact with the Max protein. Replacement of serine-102 in TEF-1 by a neutral or a charged amino acid did not abolish its DNA-binding ability, suggesting that changing a charge at the 102 amino-acid position of TEF-1 was not sufficient to inhibit its DNA-binding activity. We also show that PK-A response of the α-MHC gene is stimulated by the presence of wild-type TEF-1 but not by mutant TEF-1 having serine-102 replaced by alanine, suggesting that phosphorylation at this residue accounts for the cAMP/PK-A response of the gene. Thus, these data demonstrate that TEF-1 is a direct target of cAMP/PK-A signaling in cardiac myocytes. PMID:10931933

  16. Immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif phosphorylation during engulfment of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by the neutrophil-restricted CEACAM3 (CD66d) receptor.

    PubMed

    McCaw, Shannon E; Schneider, Jutta; Liao, Edward H; Zimmermann, Wolfgang; Gray-Owen, Scott D

    2003-08-01

    Gonorrhea is characterized by a purulent urethral or cervical discharge consisting primarily of neutrophils associated with Neisseria gonorrhoeae. These interactions are facilitated by gonococc