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Sample records for active photonic devices

  1. Silicon active photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitropoulos, Dimitrios

    Active photonic devices utilizing the optical nonlinearities of silicon have emerged in the last 5 years and the effort for commercial photonic devices in the material that has been the workhorse of electronics has been building up since. This dissertation presents the theory for some of these devices. We are concerned herein with CW lasers, amplifiers and wavelength converters that are based on the Raman effect. There have already been cursory experimental demonstrations of these devices and some of their limitations are already apparent. Most of the limitations observed are because of the appearance of effects that are competing with stimulated Raman scattering. Under the high optical powers that are necessary for the Raman effect (tens to hundrends of mW's) the process of optical two-photon (TPA) absorption occurs. The absorption of optical power that it causes itself is weak but in the process electrons and holes are generated which can further absorb light through the free-carrier absorption effect (FCA). The effective "lifetime" that these carriers have determines the magnitude of the FCA loss. We present a model for the carrier lifetime in Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) waveguides and numerical simulations to understand how this critical parameter varies and how it can be controlled. A p-i-n junction built along SOI waveguides can help achieve lifetime of the order of 20--100 ps but the price one has to pay is on-chip electrical power consumption on the order of 100's of mWs. We model CW Raman lasers and we find that the carrier lifetime reduces the output power. If the carrier lifetime exceeds a certain "critical" value optical losses become overwhelming and lasing is impossible. As we show, in amplifiers, the nonlinear loss does not only result in diminished gain, but also in a higher noise figure. Finally the effect of Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is examined. The effect is important because with a pump frequency at 1434nm coherent power

  2. Active photonic devices based on colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals and organometallic halide perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez Alvarez, Isaac

    2016-10-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals have arisen as outstanding materials to develop a new generation of optoelectronic devices. Their fabrication under simple and low cost colloidal chemistry methods results in cheap nanostructures able to provide a wide range of optical functionalities. Their attractive optical properties include a high absorption cross section below the band gap, a high quantum yield emission at room temperature, or the capability of tuning the band-gap with the size or the base material. In addition, their solution process nature enables an easy integration on several substrates and photonic structures. As a consequence, these nanoparticles have been extensively proposed to develop several photonic applications, such as detection of light, optical gain, generation of light or sensing. This manuscript reviews the great effort undertaken by the scientific community to construct active photonic devices based on these nanoparticles. The conditions to demonstrate stimulated emission are carefully studied by comparing the dependence of the optical properties of the nanocrystals with their size, shape and composition. In addition, this paper describes the design of different photonic architectures (waveguides and cavities) to enhance the generation of photoluminescence, and hence to reduce the threshold of optical gain. Finally, semiconductor nanocrystals are compared to organometallic halide perovskites, as this novel material has emerged as an alternative to colloidal nanoparticles.

  3. Nanoimprinted photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Jayan; Gangopadhyay, Palash; Munoz, Ramon; Peyghambarian, N.

    2010-08-01

    We introduce a simple yet efficient approach for nanoimprinting sub-50 nm dimensions starting from a low molecular weight plasticized polymer melt. This technique enabled us to successfully imprint versatile large area nanopatterns with high degrees of fidelity and rational control over the residual layers. The key advantage is its reliability in printing versatile nanostructures and nanophotonic devices doped with organic dyes owing to its low processing temperature. Since nanopatterns can be fabricated easily at low costs, this approach offers an easy pathway for achieving excellent nanoimprinted structures for a variety of photonic, electronic and biological research and applications.

  4. Nematic and blue phase liquid crystals for temperature stabilization and active optical tuning of silicon photonic devices (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptasinski, Joanna N.; Khoo, Iam Choon; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2015-10-01

    We describe the underlying theories and experimental demonstrations of passive temperature stabilization of silicon photonic devices clad in nematic liquid crystal mixtures, and active optical tuning of silicon photonic resonant structures combined with dye-doped nematic and blue phase liquid crystals. We show how modifications to the resonator device geometry allow for not only enhanced tuning of the resonator response, but also aid in achieving complete athermal operations of silicon photonic circuits. [Ref.: I.C. Khoo, "DC-field-assisted grating formation and nonlinear diffractions in methyl-red dye-doped blue phase liquid crystals," Opt. Lett. 40, 60-63 (2015); J. Ptasinski, I.C. Khoo, and Y. Fainman, "Enhanced optical tuning of modified-geometry resonators clad in blue phase liquid crystals," Opt. Lett. 39, 5435-5438 (2014); J. Ptasinski, I.C. Khoo, and Y. Fainman, "Passive Temperature Stabilization of Silicon Photonic Devices Using Liquid Crystals," Materials 7(3), 2229-2241 (2014)].

  5. Toward biomaterial-based implantable photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humar, Matjaž; Kwok, Sheldon J. J.; Choi, Myunghwan; Yetisen, Ali K.; Cho, Sangyeon; Yun, Seok-Hyun

    2017-03-01

    Optical technologies are essential for the rapid and efficient delivery of health care to patients. Efforts have begun to implement these technologies in miniature devices that are implantable in patients for continuous or chronic uses. In this review, we discuss guidelines for biomaterials suitable for use in vivo. Basic optical functions such as focusing, reflection, and diffraction have been realized with biopolymers. Biocompatible optical fibers can deliver sensing or therapeutic-inducing light into tissues and enable optical communications with implanted photonic devices. Wirelessly powered, light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and miniature lasers made of biocompatible materials may offer new approaches in optical sensing and therapy. Advances in biotechnologies, such as optogenetics, enable more sophisticated photonic devices with a high level of integration with neurological or physiological circuits. With further innovations and translational development, implantable photonic devices offer a pathway to improve health monitoring, diagnostics, and light-activated therapies.

  6. Optimization of Micromachined Photon Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Datskos, P.G.; Datskou, I.; Evans, B.M., III; Rajic, S.

    1999-07-18

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been instrumental in developing ultraprecision technologies for the fabrication of optical devices. We are currently extending our ultraprecision capabilities to the design, fabrication, and testing of micro-optics and MEMS devices. Techniques have been developed in our lab for fabricating micro-devices using single point diamond turning and ion milling. The devices we fabricated can be used in micro-scale interferometry, micro-positioners, micro-mirrors, and chemical sensors. In this paper, we focus on the optimization of microstructure performance using finite element analysis and the experimental validation of those results. We also discuss the fabrication of such structures and the optical testing of the devices. The performance is simulated using finite element analysis to optimize geometric and material parameters. The parameters we studied include bimaterial coating thickness effects; device length, width, and thickness effects, as well as changes in the geometry itself. This optimization results in increased sensitivity of these structures to absorbed incoming energy, which is important for photon detection or micro-mirror actuation. We have investigated and tested multiple geometries. The devices were fabricated using focused ion beam milling, and their response was measured using a chopped photon source and laser triangulation techniques. Our results are presented and discussed.

  7. Optimization of micromachined photon devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Boyd M., III; Datskos, Panos G.; Rajic, Slobodan; Datskou, Irene

    1999-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been instrumental in developing ultraprecision technologies for the fabrication of optical devices. We are currently extending our ultraprecision capabilities to the design, fabrication, and testing of micro-optics and MEMS devices. Techniques have been developed in our lab for fabricating micro-devices using single point diamond turning and ion milling. The devices we fabricated can be used in micro-scale interferometry, micro-positioners, micro-mirrors, and chemical sensors. In this paper, we focus on the optimization of microstructure performance using finite element analysis and the experimental validation of those results. We also discuss the fabrication of such structures and the optical testing of the devices. The performance is simulated using finite element analysis to optimize geometric and material parameters. The parameters we studied include bimaterial coating thickness effects; device length, width, and thickness effects, as well as changes in the geometry itself. This optimization results in increased sensitivity of these structures to absorbed incoming energy, which is important for photon detection or micro-mirror actuation. We have investigated and tested multiple geometries. the devices were fabricated using focused ion beam milling, and their response was measured using a chopped photon source and laser triangulation techniques. Our results are presented and discussed.

  8. Zinc Oxide Based Photonics Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-09

    project are to develop critical technlogies required for ZnO-based photonic device; high-quality ZnO film growth, p/n-doping processes, etching...measured hole mobility values in the range from 1 to 50 cm2/V-sec. These results are shown in a recent publication [Y.R. Ryu et al, Appl. Phys. Lett. 83...effect measurements showed such undoped ZnO films to be intrinsic n-type, with electron concentration values in the low 1017 cm-3 range, and mobility

  9. Complex-envelope alternating-direction-implicit FDTD method for simulating active photonic devices with semiconductor/solid-state media.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurpreet; Ravi, Koustuban; Wang, Qian; Ho, Seng-Tiong

    2012-06-15

    A complex-envelope (CE) alternating-direction-implicit (ADI) finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) approach to treat light-matter interaction self-consistently with electromagnetic field evolution for efficient simulations of active photonic devices is presented for the first time (to our best knowledge). The active medium (AM) is modeled using an efficient multilevel system of carrier rate equations to yield the correct carrier distributions, suitable for modeling semiconductor/solid-state media accurately. To include the AM in the CE-ADI-FDTD method, a first-order differential system involving CE fields in the AM is first set up. The system matrix that includes AM parameters is then split into two time-dependent submatrices that are then used in an efficient ADI splitting formula. The proposed CE-ADI-FDTD approach with AM takes 22% of the time as the approach of the corresponding explicit FDTD, as validated by semiconductor microdisk laser simulations.

  10. Ultra-large Angle Curved Reflectors and Their Applications to Passive and Active Photonic Integrated Circuit Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Zhenyu

    Nanoscale optical components such as waveguides, resonators are the building blocks of integrated optical networks. With the advent of nano-fabrication technologies we are able to realize such components in strongly confined sub-micron dimensions. A photonic integrated circuit (PIC) that contains these components integrates multiple photonic functions on a single chip. Traditionally, functionality of PIC is realized via modification of waveguide structure. on the contrary, reflective components such as curved reflectors propagate light in two dimensional free space thence have many advantages over their refractive counterparts such as tighter space requirement, more flexibility, and lower loss. In this work, we propose curved reflector as an essential component to realize multiple integrated functions in PICs. These functions include spot size conversion, beam turning, waveguide crossing, etc. Waveguide taper, bended waveguide, direct waveguide crossing are the conventional counterparts to realize such functions. In particular, we proposed and realized photonic integrated interconnections using curved reflectors and curved reflector semiconductor optical amplifier (CR-SOA). In this thesis, theoretically analysis of curved reflectors is introduced and discussed in depth. Gaussian beam analysis, in particular, Hermite-Gaussian beam analysis is used to explain light propagation and distortion in interaction with curved reflectors. Theoretical formulation of beam propagation in presence of curved reflector is verified with Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method. General design strategies of curved reflectors are proposed. Multiple applications of curved reflector in passive and active devices are introduced. Distortions induced in light beams by curved reflectors, its original, theoretical description, and compensation methods are discussed in details as well. Photonic integrated interconnection based on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) platform and curved reflector

  11. CMOS-compatible photonic devices for single-photon generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Chunle; Bell, Bryn; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2016-09-01

    Sources of single photons are one of the key building blocks for quantum photonic technologies such as quantum secure communication and powerful quantum computing. To bring the proof-of-principle demonstration of these technologies from the laboratory to the real world, complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS)-compatible photonic chips are highly desirable for photon generation, manipulation, processing and even detection because of their compactness, scalability, robustness, and the potential for integration with electronics. In this paper, we review the development of photonic devices made from materials (e.g., silicon) and processes that are compatible with CMOS fabrication facilities for the generation of single photons.

  12. Silicon photonic devices based on binary blazed gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhiping; Yu, Li

    2013-09-01

    Optical technology is poised to revolutionize short-reach communication systems, and the leading technology is silicon photonics. Silicon photonic devices have attracted more and more attention and have been increasingly studied in recent years. Grating, which functions as a building block for many passive and active devices, is widely used in silicon photonics. This review presents some silicon photonic devices based on binary blazed gratings, such as grating couplers, beam splitters, polarization beam splitters, broadband reflectors, and narrow filters, that demonstrate much better performance than those based on uniform gratings, owing to the novel characteristics of binary blazed gratings.

  13. Photonic Crystal Devices for Quantum and Nanoscale Photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuckovic, Jelena

    2005-03-01

    Photonic crystal structures can be built to operate in two opposite regimes: one is a suppression of photon states inside the photonic band gap, and the other is a large enhancement of the density of photon states. Both regimes are of consequence to a number of applications in nanoscale and nonlinear optics, as well as to photonic quantum information technologies. Our work on the employment of photonic crystals to build hardware of solid-state photonic quantum information systems, as well as to construct miniaturized optical devices will be reviewed in this talk. We have demonstrated sources of single photons on demand based on quantum dots in micropost microcavities that exhibit a large spontaneous emission rate enhancement (Purcell factor of five) together with a small multi-photon probability (2% compared to a Poisson-distributed source of the same intensity). We have also tested the indistinguishability of emitted single photons from such a source through a Hong-Ou-Mandel-type two-photon interference experiment, and found that consecutive photons exhibit a mean wave-packet overlap as large as 0.81, making this source useful in a variety of experiments in quantum optics and quantum information. The applications of such a device include secure quantum cryptography and linear optical quantum computation. We have also developed two-dimensional photonic crystal microcavities of finite depth with embedded quantum dots that exhibit large quality factors (˜3000) together with small mode volumes (˜0.5(λ/n)^3) and with a maximum field intensity in the high-index region, which is of importance for enhanced interaction with quantum dot excitons. We have performed spectroscopy on a single quantum dot coupled to such a cavity, and demonstrated a very strong modification of its radiative properties, as well as a single-photon generation on demand. A strong interaction between a quantum dot exciton and the field enabled by such a microcavity is of importance for

  14. Active mode-locked lasers and other photonic devices using electro-optic whispering gallery mode resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsko, Andrey B. (Inventor); Ilchenko, Vladimir (Inventor); Savchenkov, Anatoliy (Inventor); Maleki, Lutfollah (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Techniques and devices using whispering gallery mode (WGM) optical resonators, where the optical materials of the WGM resonators exhibit an electro-optical effect to perform optical modulation. Examples of actively mode-locked lasers and other devices are described.

  15. Insertion devices at the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Moog, E.R.

    1996-07-01

    The insertion devices being installed at the Advanced Photon Source cause the stored particle beam to wiggle, emitting x-rays with each wiggle. These x-rays combine to make an intense beam of radiation. Both wiggler and undulator types of insertion devices are being installed; the characteristics of the radiation produced by these two types of insertion devices are discussed, along with the reasons for those characteristics.

  16. Liquid crystal devices for photonics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chigrinov, Vladimir G.

    2007-11-01

    Liquid crystal (LC) devices for Photonics applications is a hot topic of research. Such elements begin to appear in Photonics market. Passive elements for fiber optical communication systems (DWDM components) based on LC cells can successfully compete with the other elements used for the purpose, such as micro electromechanical (MEM), thermo-optical, opto-mechanical or acousto-optical devices. Application of nematic and ferroelectric LC for high speed communication systems, producing elements that are extremely fast, stable, durable, of low loss, operable over a wide temperature range, and that require small operating voltages and extremely low power consumption. The known LC applications in fiber optics enable to produce switches, filters, attenuators, equalizers, polarization controllers, phase emulators and other fiber optical components. Good robustness due to the absence of moving parts and compatibility with VLSI technology, excellent parameters in a large photonic wavelength range, whereas the complexity of the design and the cost of the device are equivalent to regular passive matrix LC displays makes LC fiber optical devices very attractive for mass production. We have already successfully fabricated certain prototypes of the optical switches based on ferroelectric and nematic LC materials. The electrooptical modes used for the purpose included the light polarization rotation, voltage controllable diffraction and fast switching of the LC refractive index. We used the powerful software to optimize the LC modulation characteristics. Use of photo-alignment technique pioneered by us makes it possible to develop new LC fiber components. Almost all the criteria of perfect LC alignment are met in case of azo-dye layers. We have already used azo-dye materials to align LC in superthin photonic holes, curved and 3D surfaces and as cladding layers in microring silicon based resonators. The prototypes of new LC efficient Photonics devices are envisaged. Controllable

  17. Flexible manufacturing for photonics device assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shin-Yee; Pocha, Michael D.; Strand, Oliver T.; Young, K. David

    1994-02-01

    The assembly of photonics devices such as laser diodes, optical modulators, and opto-electronics multi-chip modules (OEMCM), usually requires the placement of micron size devices such as laser diodes, and sub-micron precision attachment between optical fibers and diodes or waveguide modulators (usually referred to as pigtailing). This is a very labor intensive process. Studies done by the opto-electronics (OE) industry have shown that 95 percent of the cost of a pigtailed photonic device is due to the use of manual alignment and bonding techniques, which is the current practice in industry. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we are working to reduce the cost of packaging OE devices through the use of automation. Our efforts are concentrated on several areas that are directly related to an automated process. This paper will focus on our progress in two of those areas, in particular, an automated fiber pigtailing machine and silicon micro-technology compatible with an automated process.

  18. Flexible manufacturing for photonics device assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Shin-Yee; Pocha, Michael D.; Strand, Oliver T.; Young, K. David

    1994-01-01

    The assembly of photonics devices such as laser diodes, optical modulators, and opto-electronics multi-chip modules (OEMCM), usually requires the placement of micron size devices such as laser diodes, and sub-micron precision attachment between optical fibers and diodes or waveguide modulators (usually referred to as pigtailing). This is a very labor intensive process. Studies done by the opto-electronics (OE) industry have shown that 95 percent of the cost of a pigtailed photonic device is due to the use of manual alignment and bonding techniques, which is the current practice in industry. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we are working to reduce the cost of packaging OE devices through the use of automation. Our efforts are concentrated on several areas that are directly related to an automated process. This paper will focus on our progress in two of those areas, in particular, an automated fiber pigtailing machine and silicon micro-technology compatible with an automated process.

  19. Electro-refractive photonic device

    SciTech Connect

    Zortman, William A.; Watts, Michael R.

    2015-06-09

    The various technologies presented herein relate to phase shifting light to facilitate any of light switching, modulation, amplification, etc. Structures are presented where a second layer is juxtaposed between a first layer and a third layer with respective doping facilitating formation of p-n junctions at the interface between the first layer and the second layer, and between the second layer and the third layer. Application of a bias causes a carrier concentration change to occur at the p-n junctions which causes a shift in the effective refractive index per incremental change in an applied bias voltage. The effective refractive index enhancement can occur in both reverse bias and forward bias. The structure can be incorporated into a waveguide, an optical resonator, a vertical junction device, a horizontal junction device, a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, a tuneable optical filter, etc.

  20. Carbon-nanotube-based photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Shinji

    2007-11-01

    We recently proposed and demonstrated a saturable absorber (SA) incorporating carbon nanotube (CNT). CNT-based SA offers several key advantages such as: ultra-fast recovery time, polarization insensitivity, high optical damage threshold, mechanical and environmental robustness, chemical stability, and the ability to operate at wide range of wavelength bands. Using the CNT-based SA, we have realized femtosecond fiber pulsed lasers at various wavelengths, as well as the very short-cavity fiber laser having high repetition rate. Besides the saturable absorption, CNT has been shown to have high third-order nonlinearity, which is also attractive for realization of compact and integrated functional photonic devices, such as all-optical switches and wavelength converters. In this paper, we first present photonic properties of CNTs, and review our studies on CNT-based mode-locked fiber lasers. We also refer to fabrication methods of CNT-based photonic devices. We show our recent research progresses on novel photonic devices using evanescent coupling between optical field and CNT.

  1. Contactless heat flux control with photonic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Abdallah, Philippe; Biehs, Svend-Age

    2015-05-15

    The ability to control electric currents in solids using diodes and transistors is undoubtedly at the origin of the main developments in modern electronics which have revolutionized the daily life in the second half of 20th century. Surprisingly, until the year 2000 no thermal counterpart for such a control had been proposed. Since then, based on pioneering works on the control of phononic heat currents new devices were proposed which allow for the control of heat fluxes carried by photons rather than phonons or electrons. The goal of the present paper is to summarize the main advances achieved recently in the field of thermal energy control with photons.

  2. Light coupling between vertical III-As nanowires and planar Si photonic waveguides for the monolithic integration of active optoelectronic devices on a Si platform.

    PubMed

    Giuntoni, Ivano; Geelhaar, Lutz; Bruns, Jürgen; Riechert, Henning

    2016-08-08

    We present a new concept for the optical interfacing between vertical III-As nanowires and planar Si waveguides. The nanowires are arranged in a two-dimensional array which forms a grating structure on top of the waveguide. This grating enables light coupling in both directions between the components made from the two different material classes. Numerical simulations show that this concept permits a light extraction efficiency from the waveguide larger than 45% and a light insertion efficiency larger than 35%. This new approach would allow the monolithic integration of nanowire-based active optoelectronics devices, like photodetectors and light sources, on the Si photonics platform.

  3. Sub electron readout noise & photon counting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gach, J.-L.; Balard, Ph.; Daigle, O.; Destefanis, G.; Feautrier, Ph.; Guillaume, Ch.; Rothman, J.

    We present recent advances on ultra low noise visible detectors at Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, photon counting and EMCCD developments in collaboration with Observatoire de haute provence, Laboratoire d'astrophysique de l'observatoire de Grenoble and Laboratoire d'Astrophysique Experimentale (Montreal). After a review of the progress with third generation Image Photon Counting Systems (IPCS), we present the OCAM camera, based on the E2V CCD220 EMCCD, part of the Opticon JRA2 programme, and the CCCP controller, a new controller for the 3DNTT instrument that reduces the clock induced charge of an EMCCD by a factor 10, making it competitive with IPCS detectors for very faint fluxes. We will finally present the RAPID project and the concept of photon counting avalanche photodiode CMOS device (in collaboration with CEA-LETI) which is foreseen to be the ultimate detector for the visible-IR range providing no readout noise, high QE and extremely fast readout.

  4. Carbon nanotube polymer composites for photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scardaci, V.; Rozhin, A. G.; Hennrich, F.; Milne, W. I.; Ferrari, A. C.

    2007-03-01

    We report the fabrication of high optical quality single wall carbon nanotube polyvinyl alcohol composites and their application in nanotube based photonic devices. These show a broad absorption of semiconductor tubes centred at ∼1.55 μm, the spectral range of interest for optical communications. The films are used as mode-lockers in an erbium doped fibre laser, achieving ∼700 fs mode-locked pulses. Raman spectroscopy shows no damage after a long time continuous laser operation.

  5. Photonic Switching Devices Using Light Bullets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goorjian, Peter M. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward a unique ultra-fast, all-optical switching device or switch made with readily available, relatively inexpensive, highly nonlinear photonic glasses. These photonic glasses have a sufficiently negative group velocity dispersion and high nonlinear index of refraction to support stable light bullets. The light bullets counterpropagate through, and interact within the waveguide to selectively change each others' directions of propagation into predetermined channels. In one embodiment, the switch utilizes a rectangularly planar slab waveguide, and further includes two central channels and a plurality of lateral channels for guiding the light bullets into and out of the waveguide. One advantage presented by the present all-optical switching device lies in its practical use of light bullets, thus preventing the degeneration of the pulses due to dispersion and diffraction at the front and back of the pulses. Another feature of the switching device is the relative insensitivity of the collision process to the time difference in which the counter-propagating pulses enter the waveguide. since. contrary to conventional co-propagating spatial solitons, the relative phase of the colliding pulses does not affect the interaction of these pulses. Yet another feature of the present all-optical switching device is the selection of the light pulse parameters which enables the generation of light bullets in highly nonlinear glasses.

  6. Silicon Photonic Devices and Their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying

    Silicon photonics is the study and application of photonic systems, which use silicon as an optical medium. Data is transferred in the systems by optical rays. This technology is seen as the substitutions of electric computer chips in the future and the means to keep tack on the Moore's law. Cavity optomechanics is a rising field of silicon photonics. It focuses on the interaction between light and mechanical objects. Although it is currently at its early stage of growth, this field has attracted rising attention. Here, we present highly sensitive optical detection of acceleration using an optomechanical accelerometer. The core part of this accelerometer is a slot-type photonic crystal cavity with strong optomechanical interactions. We first discuss theoretically the optomechanical coupling in the air-slot mode-gap photonic crystal cavity. The dispersive coupling gom is numerically calculated. Dynamical parametric oscillations for both cooling and amplification, in the resolved and unresolved sideband limit, are examined numerically, along with the displacement spectral density and cooling rates for the various operating parameters. Experimental results also demonstrated that the cavity has a large optomechanical coupling rate. The optically induced spring effect, damping and amplification of the mechanical modes are observed with measurements both in air and in vacuum. Then, we propose and demonstrate our optomechanical accelerometer. It can operate with a resolution of 730 ng/Hz1/2 (or equivalently 40.1 aN/Hz1/2) and with a transduction bandwidth of ≈ 85 kHz. We also demonstrate an integrated photonics device, an on-chip spectroscopy, in the last part of this thesis. This new type of on-chip microspectrometer is based on the Vernier effect of two cascaded micro-ring cavities. It can measure optical spectrum with a bandwidth of 74nm and a resolution of 0.22 nm in a small footprint of 1.5 mm2.

  7. All-photonic multifunctional molecular logic device.

    PubMed

    Andréasson, Joakim; Pischel, Uwe; Straight, Stephen D; Moore, Thomas A; Moore, Ana L; Gust, Devens

    2011-08-03

    Photochromes are photoswitchable, bistable chromophores which, like transistors, can implement binary logic operations. When several photochromes are combined in one molecule, interactions between them such as energy and electron transfer allow design of simple Boolean logic gates and more complex logic devices with all-photonic inputs and outputs. Selective isomerization of individual photochromes can be achieved using light of different wavelengths, and logic outputs can employ absorption and emission properties at different wavelengths, thus allowing a single molecular species to perform several different functions, even simultaneously. Here, we report a molecule consisting of three linked photochromes that can be configured as AND, XOR, INH, half-adder, half-subtractor, multiplexer, demultiplexer, encoder, decoder, keypad lock, and logically reversible transfer gate logic devices, all with a common initial state. The system demonstrates the advantages of light-responsive molecules as multifunctional, reconfigurable nanoscale logic devices that represent an approach to true molecular information processing units.

  8. All-Photonic Multifunctional Molecular Logic Device

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Photochromes are photoswitchable, bistable chromophores which, like transistors, can implement binary logic operations. When several photochromes are combined in one molecule, interactions between them such as energy and electron transfer allow design of simple Boolean logic gates and more complex logic devices with all-photonic inputs and outputs. Selective isomerization of individual photochromes can be achieved using light of different wavelengths, and logic outputs can employ absorption and emission properties at different wavelengths, thus allowing a single molecular species to perform several different functions, even simultaneously. Here, we report a molecule consisting of three linked photochromes that can be configured as AND, XOR, INH, half-adder, half-subtractor, multiplexer, demultiplexer, encoder, decoder, keypad lock, and logically reversible transfer gate logic devices, all with a common initial state. The system demonstrates the advantages of light-responsive molecules as multifunctional, reconfigurable nanoscale logic devices that represent an approach to true molecular information processing units. PMID:21563823

  9. Performance capabilities of fiber optic components and photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Asu R.

    2001-09-01

    This paper reveals performance capabilities of critical fiber optic components and photonic devices, which have potential applications in industrial, commercial and military systems and equipment. These devices are widely used in battlefield, space surveillance, medical diagnosis, crime fighting, and detection of terrorist activities. Performance capabilities of fiber optic components for possible applications in WDM and DWDM systems are summarized. Photonic devices and sensor for forward battlefield applications are identified with emphasis on performance and reliability. Performance parameters of Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers, Erbium doped waveguide amplifiers, and optical hybrid amplifiers comprising of EDFAs and Raman amplifiers are discussed withe emphasis on bandwidth, gain-flatness, data handling capability, channel capacity and cost-effectiveness.

  10. Silicon photonic devices for optoelectronic integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, Ming-Chun

    Electronic and photonic integrated circuits use optics to overcome bottlenecks of microelectronics in bandwidth and power consumption. Silicon photonic devices such as optical modulators, filters, switches, and photodetectors have being developed for integration with electronics based on existing complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) circuits. An important building block of photonic devices is the optical microresonator. On-chip whispering-gallery-mode optical resonators such as microdisks, microtoroids, and microrings have very small footprint, and thus are suitable for large scale integration. Micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) technology enables dynamic control and tuning of optical functions. In this dissertation, microring resonators with tunable power coupling ratio using MEMS electrostatic actuators are demonstrated. The fabrication is compatible with CMOS. By changing the physical gap spacing between the waveguide coupler and the microring, the quality factor of the microring can be tuned from 16,300 to 88,400. Moreover, we have demonstrated optical switches and tunable optical add-drop filters with an optical bandwidth of 10 GHz and an extinction ratio of 20 dB. Potentially, electronic control circuits can also be integrated. To realize photonic integrated circuits on silicon, electrically-pumped silicon lasers are desirable. However, because of the indirect bandgap, silicon is a poor material for light emission compared with direct-bandgap III-V compound semiconductors. Heterogeneous integration of III-V semiconductor lasers on silicon is an alternative to provide on-chip light sources. Using a room-temperature, post-CMOS optofluidic assembly technique, we have experimentally demonstrated an InGaAsP microdisk laser integrated with silicon waveguides. Pre-fabricated InGaAsP microdisk lasers were fluidically assembled and aligned to the silicon waveguides on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) with lithographic alignment accuracy. The assembled

  11. Photonic crystal cavities and integrated optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Lin; Li, ZhiYuan

    2015-11-01

    This paper gives a brief introduction to our recent works on photonic crystal (PhC) cavities and related integrated optical structures and devices. Theoretical background and numerical methods for simulation of PhC cavities are first presented. Based on the theoretical basis, two relevant quantities, the cavity mode volume and the quality factor are discussed. Then the methods of fabrication and characterization of silicon PhC slab cavities are introduced. Several types of PhC cavities are presented, such as the usual L3 missing-hole cavity, the new concept waveguide-like parallel-hetero cavity, and the low-index nanobeam cavity. The advantages and disadvantages of each type of cavity are discussed. This will help the readers to decide which type of PhC cavities to use in particular applications. Furthermore, several integrated optical devices based on PhC cavities, such as optical filters, channel-drop filters, optical switches, and optical logic gates are described in both the working principle and operation characteristics. These devices designed and realized in our group demonstrate the wide range of applications of PhC cavities and offer possible solutions to some integrated optical problems.

  12. Multiphoton quantum interference in a multiport integrated photonic device.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Benjamin J; Thomas-Peter, Nicholas; Spring, Justin B; Kundys, Dmytro; Broome, Matthew A; Humphreys, Peter C; Jin, Xian-Min; Barbieri, Marco; Kolthammer, W Steven; Gates, James C; Smith, Brian J; Langford, Nathan K; Smith, Peter G R; Walmsley, Ian A

    2013-01-01

    Increasing the complexity of quantum photonic devices is essential for many optical information processing applications to reach a regime beyond what can be classically simulated, and integrated photonics has emerged as a leading platform for achieving this. Here we demonstrate three-photon quantum operation of an integrated device containing three coupled interferometers, eight spatial modes and many classical and nonclassical interferences. This represents a critical advance over previous complexities and the first on-chip nonclassical interference with more than two photonic inputs. We introduce a new scheme to verify quantum behaviour, using classically characterised device elements and hierarchies of photon correlation functions. We accurately predict the device's quantum behaviour and show operation inconsistent with both classical and bi-separable quantum models. Such methods for verifying multiphoton quantum behaviour are vital for achieving increased circuit complexity. Our experiment paves the way for the next generation of integrated photonic quantum simulation and computing devices.

  13. Silicon and polymer nanophotonic devices based on photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wei; Jiang, Yongqiang; Gu, Lanlan; Wang, Li; Chen, Xiaonan; Chen, Ray T.

    2006-02-01

    Photonic crystals (PhCs) provide a promising nanophotonic platform for developing novel optoelectronic devices with significantly reduced device size and power consumption. Silicon nanophotonics is anticipated to play a pivotal role in the future nano-system integration owing to the maturity of sub-micron silicon complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. An ultra-compact silicon modulator was experimentally demonstrated based on silicon photonic crystal waveguides. Modulation operation was achieved by carrier injection into an 80-micron-long silicon PhC waveguide of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) structure. The driving current to obtain a phase shift of pi across the active region was as low as 0.15 mA, owing to slow light group velocity in PhC waveguides. The modulation depth was 92%. The electrode between the two waveguide arms of the MZI structure was routed to the space outside the MZI. In real devices, this planarized routing design would be essential to integrating the silicon modulator with electrical driving circuitry on a single silicon chip. For laboratory test, this routing scheme also eliminated the need of placing a bulky pad between the two arms and gave our modulator a distinctive slim profile and a much smaller footprint. Polymeric photonic crystals were designed for superprism based laser beam steering applications, and were fabricated by nano-imprint and other techniques.

  14. Switchable Photonic Crystals Using One-Dimensional Confined Liquid Crystals for Photonic Device Application.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Seong Ho; Gim, Min-Jun; Lee, Wonsuk; Choi, Suk-Won; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2017-01-25

    Photonic crystals (PCs) have recently attracted considerable attention, with much effort devoted to photonic bandgap (PBG) control for varying the reflected color. Here, fabrication of a modulated one-dimensional (1D) anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) PC with a periodic porous structure is reported. The PBG of the fabricated PC can be reversibly changed by switching the ultraviolet (UV) light on/off. The AAO nanopores contain a mixture of photoresponsive liquid crystals (LCs) with irradiation-activated cis/trans photoisomerizable azobenzene. The resultant mixture of LCs in the porous AAO film exhibits a reversible PBG, depending on the cis/trans configuration of azobenzene molecules. The PBG switching is reliable over many cycles, suggesting that the fabricated device can be used in optical and photonic applications such as light modulators, smart windows, and sensors.

  15. Functional photonic crystal fiber sensing devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villatoro, Joel; Finazzi, Vittoria; Pruneri, Valerio

    2011-12-01

    We report on a functional, highly reproducible and cost effective sensing platform based on photonic crystal fibers (PCFs). The platform consists of a centimeter-length segment of an index-guiding PCF fusion spliced to standard single mode fibers (SMFs). The voids of the PCF are intentionally sealed over an adequate length in the PCF-SMF interfaces. A microscopic collapsed region in the PCF induces a mode field mismatch which combined with the axial symmetry of the structure allow the efficient excitation and recombination or overlapping of azimuthal symmetric modes in the PCF. The transmission or reflection spectrum of the devices exhibits a high-visibility interference pattern or a single, profound and narrow notch. The interference pattern or the notch position shifts when the length of the PCF experiences microelongations or when liquids or coatings are present on the PCF surface. Thus, the platform here proposed can be useful for sensing diverse parameters such as strain, vibration, pressure, humidity, refractive index, gases, etc. Unlike other PCF-based sensing platforms the multiplexing of the devices here proposed is simple for which it is possible to implement PCF-based sensor arrays or networks.

  16. Advancing teaching opportunities through pre-commercial photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slusarczuk, Marko M. G.

    2007-06-01

    The Photonics Technology Access Program [PTAP] provides academic researchers with pre-commercial photonic devices. Since one of the goals of PTAP is to promote teaching, the program has developed several approaches to expand teaching opportunities with the processes used to provide the devices.

  17. Nonreciprocal Electromagnetic Devices in Gyromagnetic Photonic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Yuan; Liu, Rong-Juan; Gan, Lin; Fu, Jin-Xin; Lian, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Gyromagnetic photonic crystal (GPC) offers a promising way to realize robust transport of electromagnetic waves against backscattering from various disorders, perturbations and obstacles due to existence of unique topological electromagnetic states. The dc magnetic field exerting upon the GPC brings about the time-reversal symmetry breaking, splits the band degeneracy and opens band gaps where the topological chiral edge states (CESs) arise. The band gap can originate either from long-range Bragg-scattering effect or from short-range localized magnetic surface plasmon resonance (MSP). These topological edge states can be explored to construct backscattering-immune one-way waveguide and other nonreciprocal electromagnetic devices. In this paper we review our recent theoretical and experimental studies of the unique electromagnetic properties of nonreciprocal devices built in GPCs. We will discuss various basic issues like experimental instrumental setup, sample preparations, numerical simulation methods, tunable properties against magnetic field, band degeneracy breaking and band gap opening and creation of topological CESs. We will investigate the unidirectional transport properties of one-way waveguide under the influence of waveguide geometries, interface morphologies, intruding obstacles, impedance mismatch, lattice disorders, and material dissipation loss. We will discuss the unique coupling properties between one-wave waveguide and resonant cavities and their application as novel one-way bandstop filter and one-way channel-drop filter. We will also compare the CESs created in the Bragg-scattering band gap and the MSP band gap under the influence of lattice disorders. These results can be helpful for designing and exploring novel nonreciprocal electromagnetic devices for optical integration and information processing.

  18. Photonic crystal devices formed by a charged-particle beam

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Shawn-Yu; Koops, Hans W. P.

    2000-01-01

    A photonic crystal device and method. The photonic crystal device comprises a substrate with at least one photonic crystal formed thereon by a charged-particle beam deposition method. Each photonic crystal comprises a plurality of spaced elements having a composition different from the substrate, and may further include one or more impurity elements substituted for spaced elements. Embodiments of the present invention may be provided as electromagnetic wave filters, polarizers, resonators, sources, mirrors, beam directors and antennas for use at wavelengths in the range from about 0.2 to 200 microns or longer. Additionally, photonic crystal devices may be provided with one or more electromagnetic waveguides adjacent to a photonic crystal for forming integrated electromagnetic circuits for use at optical, infrared, or millimeter-wave frequencies.

  19. Silicon photonics devices for metro applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, H.; Kikuchi, K.; Jizodo, M.; Kawamura, Y.; Takeda, K.; Honda, K.

    2017-01-01

    Digital coherent technology is considered an attractive way of realizing both high-speed metro links and long distance transmissions. In metro areas, there is a strong demand for a smaller, faster transceiver module. This demand is mainly driven by the rapidly increasing data center interconnection traffic, where transmission capacity per faceplane is a key feature. Therefore, optical integration technology is desired. Since compensation in digital coherent technology is performed in the electrical or digital domain, users can deal with those optics performances that are not compensated for digitally. This means using a new material that cannot provide perfect characteristics but that is suitable for miniaturization and integration is possible. Silicon photonics (SiPh) is considered an attractive technology that would enable the significant miniaturization of optical circuits and be capable of optical integration with high manufacturability. While SiPh-based devices have begun to be deployed for very short or short reach links on the basis of direct detection technology, their digital coherent applications have recently been investigated in view of their integration capability. This paper describes recent progress on SiPh-based integrated optical devices for high-speed digital coherent transceivers targeting metro links. An optical modulator and receiver with related circuits have been integrated into a single SiPh chip. TEC-free operation under non-hermetic conditions and the direct attachment of optical fibers have both been realized. Very thin and small packaging with sufficient performance has been demonstrated by using the SiPh chip co-packaged with high-speed ICs.

  20. Next-generation polymeric photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldada, Louay A.; Shacklette, Lawrence W.; Norwood, Robert A.; Yardley, James T.

    1997-07-01

    A versatile polymeric waveguide technology is proposed for low-cost high-performance photonic devices that address the needs of both the telecom and the datacom industries. We have developed advanced organic polymeric materials that can be readily made into both multimode and single-mode optical waveguide structures of controlled numerical aperture and geometry. These materials are formed from highly-crosslinked acrylate monomers with specific linkages that determine properties such as flexibility, toughness, loss, and stability with temperature and humidity. These monomers are intermiscible, providing for precise adjustment of the refractive index from 1.3 to 1.6. Waveguides are formed photolithographically, with the liquid monomer mixture polymerizing upon illumination in the UV via either mask exposure or laser direct-writing. A wide range of rigid and flexible substrates can be used, including glass, quartz, oxidized silicon, glass-filled epoxy printed circuit board substrate, and flexible polyimide film. We discuss the use of these materials on chips, on multi-chip modules, on boards, and on backplanes. Light coupling from and to chips is achieved by cutting 45 degree(s) mirrors using excimer laser ablation. Fabrication of the planar polymeric structures directly on the modules provides for stability, ruggedness, and hermeticity in packaging.

  1. Current trends in the packaging of photonic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, R.F.

    1995-04-01

    Optoelectronic and photonic devices hold great promise for high data-rate communication and computing. Their wide implementation was limited first by the device technologies and now suffers due to the need for high-precision packaging that is mass-produced. The use of photons as a medium of communication and control implies a unique set of packaging constraints that are highly driven by the need for micron and even sub-micron alignments between photonic devices and their transmission media. Current trends in optoelectronic device packaging are reviewed and future directions are identified both for free-space (3-dimensional) and guided-wave (2-dimensional) photonics. Emphasis will be placed on the special needs generated by increasing levels of device integration.

  2. Finite Element Modeling of Micromachined MEMS Photon Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Datskos, P.G.; Evans, B.M.; Schonberger, D.

    1999-09-20

    The technology of microelectronics that has evolved over the past half century is one of great power and sophistication and can now be extended to many applications (MEMS and MOEMS) other than electronics. An interesting application of MEMS quantum devices is the detection of electromagnetic radiation. The operation principle of MEMS quantum devices is based on the photoinduced stress in semiconductors, and the photon detection results from the measurement of the photoinduced bending. These devices can be described as micromechanical photon detectors. In this work, we have developed a technique for simulating electronic stresses using finite element analysis. We have used our technique to model the response of micromechanical photon devices to external stimuli and compared these results with experimental data. Material properties, geometry, and bimaterial design play an important role in the performance of micromechanical photon detectors. We have modeled these effects using finite element analysis and included the effects of bimaterial thickness coating, effective length of the device, width, and thickness.

  3. Multimode quantum interference of photons in multiport integrated devices

    PubMed Central

    Peruzzo, Alberto; Laing, Anthony; Politi, Alberto; Rudolph, Terry; O'Brien, Jeremy L.

    2011-01-01

    Photonics is a leading approach in realizing future quantum technologies and recently, optical waveguide circuits on silicon chips have demonstrated high levels of miniaturization and performance. Multimode interference (MMI) devices promise a straightforward implementation of compact and robust multiport circuits. Here, we show quantum interference in a 2×2 MMI coupler with visibility of V=95.6±0.9%. We further demonstrate the operation of a 4×4 port MMI device with photon pairs, which exhibits complex quantum interference behaviour. We have developed a new technique to fully characterize such multiport devices, which removes the need for phase-sensitive measurements and may find applications for a wide range of photonic devices. Our results show that MMI devices can operate in the quantum regime with high fidelity and promise substantial simplification and concatenation of photonic quantum circuits. PMID:21364563

  4. Electrically Driven Photonic Crystal Nanocavity Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Brown-Goebeler, J. L. Jewell, and J. V. Hove, “Top- surface-emitting GaAs four- quantum - well lasers emitting at 0.85 μm,” Electorn. Lett., vol. 26, pp...modulation, lasers , light-emitting diodes, modulation, photodetectors, photonic bandgap materials, quantum dots (QDs). I. INTRODUCTION PHOTONIC...improved versus similar quantum well (QW) systems [32]. Fig. 2 shows a simplified schematic diagram of the lateral junction photonic crystal fabrication

  5. Active cleaning technique device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, R. L.; Gillette, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    The objective of this program was to develop a laboratory demonstration model of an active cleaning technique (ACT) device. The principle of this device is based primarily on the technique for removing contaminants from optical surfaces. This active cleaning technique involves exposing contaminated surfaces to a plasma containing atomic oxygen or combinations of other reactive gases. The ACT device laboratory demonstration model incorporates, in addition to plasma cleaning, the means to operate the device as an ion source for sputtering experiments. The overall ACT device includes a plasma generation tube, an ion accelerator, a gas supply system, a RF power supply and a high voltage dc power supply.

  6. Quantum dot based 3D photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakellari, Ioanna; Kabouraki, Elmina; Gray, David; Vamvakaki, Maria; Farsari, Maria

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we present our most recent results on the fabrication of 3D high-resolution woodpile photonic crystals containing an organic-inorganic silicon-zirconium (Si-Zr) composite and cadmium sulfide (CdS) quantum dots (QDs). The structures are fabricated by combining 3D Direct Laser Writing by two-photon absorption and in-situ synthesis of CdS nanoparticles inside the 3D photonic matrix. The CdS-Zr-Si composite material exhibits a high nonlinear refractive index value measured by means of Z-scan method. 3D woodpile photonic structures with varying inlayer periodicity from 600nm to 500nm show clear photonic stop bands in the wavelength region between 1000nm to 450nm.

  7. Interferometric microscopy of silicon photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, William S.; Mahon, Rita; Goetz, Peter G.; Pruessner, Marcel; Ferraro, Mike S.; Park, Doe; Fleet, Erin; DePrenger, Michael J.

    2015-02-01

    Silicon photonics provides the ability to construct complex photonic circuits that act on the amplitude and phase of multiple optical channels. Many applications of silicon photonics depend on maintenance of optical coherence among the various waveguides and structures on the chip. Other applications can depend on the modal structures of the waveguides. All these application require the ability to characterize the amplitude and phase of individual optical channels. Fourier imaging with high numerical aperture microscope objectives has been used to image the intensity of individual channels of photonic structures in both real and Fourier space. In other work, holographic imaging of multimode fibers has allowed modal decomposition. In this work we use interferometric microscopy to image the amplitude and phase of a variety of silicon photonic structures. These include a multimode interference splitter and a multimode waveguide under various excitation conditions.

  8. Devices and systems-on-chip for photonic communication links in a microprocessor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Mark T.

    For the first time, high-performance photonic devices and electronic-photonic systems-on-chip are monolithically integrated in an advanced CMOS microelectronics fabrication process. This includes a silicon optical resonator termed the "spoked-ring" cavity that meets the constraints of thin-SOI microelectronics CMOS processes and enables energy efficient modulators and thermally tunable filters. For low-loss fiber-to-chip optical coupling, a phased-array antenna concept is demonstrated, and the 45 nm CMOS microelectronics process is shown to support a near ideal implementation of the device using the crystalline silicon and polysilicon material layers that comprise the active region and gate, respectively, of the native MOSFET transistors. The active devices and vertical grating couplers are implemented in large-scale electronic-photonic systems-on-chip to demonstrate a wavelength stabilized, microring-based chip-to-chip communications link and an 11-channel wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) transmitter. The link is shown to be robust against thermal environmental variations which is critical for operation in realistic systems. The chip-to-chip link is then used to demonstrate a CPU-to-memory communication link, the first demonstration of its kind. The first microprocessor with photonic I/O is demonstrated as part of this work, with substantial implications for computer architecture. Advanced photonic device technology demonstrations, including photonic crystals, a quantum-correlated photon-pair source, an active photonic device platform in a 32 nm SOI node, and a 180 nm bulk silicon process, are presented to show the wide range of applications that monolithic integration could support in the future of photonics. These results taken together show that monolithic integration directly into CMOS microelectronics processes does allow high performance photonics, and is a viable approach to build large-scale electronic-photonic systems with a realistic path to

  9. Athermal Photonic Devices and Circuits on a Silicon Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunathan, Vivek

    In recent years, silicon based optical interconnects has been pursued as an effective solution that can offer cost, energy, distance and bandwidth density improvements over copper. Monolithic integration of optics and electronics has been enabled by silicon photonic devices that can be fabricated using CMOS technology. However, high levels of device integration result in significant local and global temperature fluctuations that prove problematic for silicon based photonic devices. In particular, high temperature dependence of Si refractive index (thermo-optic (TO) coefficient) shifts the filter response of resonant devices that limit wavelength resolution in various applications. Active thermal compensation using heaters and thermo-electric coolers are the legacy solution for low density integration. However, the required electrical power, device foot print and number of input/output (I/O) lines limit the integration density. We present a passive approach to an athermal design that involves compensation of positive TO effects from a silicon core by negative TO effects of the polymer cladding. In addition, the design rule involves engineering the waveguide core geometry depending on the resonance wavelength under consideration to ensure desired amount of light in the polymer. We develop exact design requirements for a TO peak stability of 0 pm/K and present prototype performance of 0.5 pm/K. We explore the material design space through initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) of 2 polymer cladding choices. We study the effect of cross-linking on the optical properties of a polymer and establish the superior performance of the co-polymer cladding compared to the homo-polymer. Integration of polymer clad devices in an electronic-photonic architecture requires the possibility of multi-layer stacking capability. We use a low temperature, high density plasma chemical vapor deposition of SiO2/SiN x to hermetically seal the athermal. Further, we employ visible light for

  10. Mesoporous nanocomposite coatings for photonic devices: sol-gel approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Shumaila; Bidin, Noriah; Riaz, Saira; Suan, Lau Pik; Naseem, Shahzad; Sanagi, Mohd. Marsin

    2016-10-01

    Thermally stable, optically active inorganic nanocomposites, i.e., aluminum-silicate (AS) and silica-titania (ST), are synthesized via acid-catalyzed low-temperature sol-gel method in order to get stable, crack-free coating material for photonic devices. The samples are characterized by atomic force microscope, field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Brunauer-Emmett--Teller (BET) surface area, Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) pore size distribution surface analysis and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Microscopic results show good incorporation of ST and AS particles as composites with grain size within range of 12-17 and 62-109 nm, respectively. EDX analysis substantiated the stoichiometric formation of homogeneous nanocomposites. XRD of the films reveals primary polycrystalline anatase titania phase and mullite phase of ST and AS nanocomposites. FTIR confirms the heterogeneous bond linkage between titania, silica and alumina species. Furthermore, the fabricated samples have mesoporous nature with high surface area, large pore volume and diameter. The tunable refractive index of 1.33-1.35 with high transparency is obtained for synthesized nanocomposites. The experimental findings show that these physically modified and thermally stable alumina- and titania-doped silica-based composite coatings are promising for photonic devices modification.

  11. Progress in the research and development of photonic structure devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Van Hoi; Bui, Huy; Van Nguyen, Thuy; Nguyen, The Anh; Son Pham, Thanh; Pham, Van Dai; Cham Tran, Thi; Trang Hoang, Thu; Ngo, Quang Minh

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we review the results of the research and development of photonic structure devices performed in the Institute of Materials Science in the period from 2010-2015. We have developed a configuration of 1D photonic crystal (PC) microcavities based on porous silicon (PS) layers and applied them to optical sensing devices that can be used for the determination of organic content with a very low concentration in different liquid environments. Various important scientific and technological applications of photonic devices such as the ultralow power operation of microcavity lasers, the inhibition of spontaneous emissions and the manipulation of light amplification by combining the surface plasmonic effect and the microcavity are expected. We developed new kinds of photonic structures for optical filters based on guided-mode resonances in coupled slab waveguide gratings, which have great potential for application in fiber-optic communication and optical sensors.

  12. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon photonic device trimming by UV-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Lipka, Timo; Kiepsch, Melanie; Trieu, Hoc Khiem; Müller, Jörg

    2014-05-19

    A method to compensate for fabrication tolerances and to fine-tune individual photonic circuit components is inevitable for wafer-scale photonic systems even with most-advanced CMOS-fabrication tools. We report a cost-effective and highly accurate method for the permanent trimming of hydrogenated amorphous silicon photonic devices by UV-irradiation. Microring resonators and Mach-Zehnder-interferometers were utilized as photonic test devices. The MZIs were tuned forth and back over their complete free spectral range of 5.5 nm by locally trimming the two MZI-arms. The trimming range exceeds 8 nm for compact ring resonators with trimming accuracies of 20 pm. Trimming speeds of ≥ 10 GHz/s were achieved. The components did not show any substantial device degradation.

  13. Compact programmable photonic variable delay devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, X. Steve (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Optical variable delay devices for providing variable true time delay to multiple optical beams simultaneously. A ladder-structured variable delay device comprises multiple basic building blocks stacked on top of each other resembling a ladder. Each basic building block has two polarization beamsplitters and a polarization rotator array arranged to form a trihedron; Controlling an array element of the polarization rotator array causes a beam passing through the array element either going up to a basic building block above it or reflect back towards a block below it. The beams going higher on the ladder experience longer optical path delay. An index-switched optical variable delay device comprises of many birefringent crystal segments connected with one another, with a polarization rotator array sandwiched between any two adjacent crystal segments. An array element in the polarization rotator array controls the polarization state of a beam passing through the element, causing the beam experience different refractive indices or path delays in the following crystal segment. By independently control each element in each polarization rotator array, variable optical path delays of each beam can be achieved. Finally, an index-switched variable delay device and a ladder-structured variable device are cascaded to form a new device which combines the advantages of the two individual devices. This programmable optic device has the properties of high packing density, low loss, easy fabrication, and virtually infinite bandwidth. The device is inherently two dimensional and has a packing density exceeding 25 lines/cm.sup.2. The delay resolution of the device is on the order of a femtosecond (one micron in space) and the total delay exceeds 10 nanosecond. In addition, the delay is reversible so that the same delay device can be used for both antenna transmitting and receiving.

  14. Ladder-structured photonic variable delay device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, X. Steve (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An ladder-structured variable delay device for providing variable true time delay to multiple optical beams simultaneously. The device comprises multiple basic units stacked on top of each other resembling a ladder. Each basic unit comprises a polarization sensitive corner reflector formed by two polarization beamsplitters and a polarization rotator array placed parallel to the hypotenuse of the corner reflector. Controlling an array element of the polarization rotator array causes an optical beam passing through the array element to either go up to a basic unit above it or reflect back towards output. The beams going higher on the ladder experience longer optical path delay. Finally, the ladder-structured variable device can be cascaded with another multi-channel delay device to form a new device which combines the advantages of the two individual devices. This programmable optic device has the properties of high packing density, low loss, easy fabrication, and virtually infinite bandwidth. In addition, the delay is reversible so that the same delay device can be used for both antenna transmitting and receiving.

  15. Optomechanical measurement of photon spin angular momentum and optical torque in integrated photonic devices.

    PubMed

    He, Li; Li, Huan; Li, Mo

    2016-09-01

    Photons carry linear momentum and spin angular momentum when circularly or elliptically polarized. During light-matter interaction, transfer of linear momentum leads to optical forces, whereas transfer of angular momentum induces optical torque. Optical forces including radiation pressure and gradient forces have long been used in optical tweezers and laser cooling. In nanophotonic devices, optical forces can be significantly enhanced, leading to unprecedented optomechanical effects in both classical and quantum regimes. In contrast, to date, the angular momentum of light and the optical torque effect have only been used in optical tweezers but remain unexplored in integrated photonics. We demonstrate the measurement of the spin angular momentum of photons propagating in a birefringent waveguide and the use of optical torque to actuate rotational motion of an optomechanical device. We show that the sign and magnitude of the optical torque are determined by the photon polarization states that are synthesized on the chip. Our study reveals the mechanical effect of photon's polarization degree of freedom and demonstrates its control in integrated photonic devices. Exploiting optical torque and optomechanical interaction with photon angular momentum can lead to torsional cavity optomechanics and optomechanical photon spin-orbit coupling, as well as applications such as optomechanical gyroscopes and torsional magnetometry.

  16. Optoelectronic devices, plasmonics, and photonics with topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Politano, Antonio; Viti, Leonardo; Vitiello, Miriam S.

    2017-03-01

    Topological insulators are innovative materials with semiconducting bulk together with surface states forming a Dirac cone, which ensure metallic conduction in the surface plane. Therefore, topological insulators represent an ideal platform for optoelectronics and photonics. The recent progress of science and technology based on topological insulators enables the exploitation of their huge application capabilities. Here, we review the recent achievements of optoelectronics, photonics, and plasmonics with topological insulators. Plasmonic devices and photodetectors based on topological insulators in a wide energy range, from terahertz to the ultraviolet, promise outstanding impact. Furthermore, the peculiarities, the range of applications, and the challenges of the emerging fields of topological photonics and thermo-plasmonics are discussed.

  17. A Novel Photonic Clock and Carrier Recovery Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, X. Steve; Lutes, George; Maleki, Lute

    1996-01-01

    As data communication rates climb toward ten Gb/s, clock recovery and synchronization become more difficult, if not impossible, using conventional electronic circuits. We present in this article experimental results of a high speed clock and carrier recovery using a novel device called a photonic oscillator that we recently developed in our laboratory. This device is capable of recovering clock signals up to 70 GHz. To recover the clock, the incoming data is injected into the photonic oscillator either through the optical injection port or the electrical injection port. The free running photonic oscillator is tuned to oscillate at a nominal frequency equal to the clock frequency of the incoming data. With the injection of the data, the photonic oscillator will be quickly locked to clock frequency of the data stream while rejecting other frequency components associated with the data. Consequently, the output of the locked photonic oscillator is a continuous periodical wave synchronized with the incoming data or simply the recovered clock. We have demonstrated a clock to spur ratio of more than 60 dB of the recovered clock using this technique. Similar to the clock recovery, the photonic oscillator can be used to recover a high frequency carrier degraded by noise and an improvement of about 50 dB in signal-to-noise ratio was demonstrated. The photonic oscillator has both electrical and optical inputs and outputs and can be directly interfaced with a photonic system without signal conversion. In addition to clock and carrier recovery, the photonic oscillator can also be used for (1) stable high frequency clock signal generation, (2) frequency multiplication, (3) square wave and comb frequency generation, and (4) photonic phase locked loop.

  18. A plasma photonic crystal bandgap device

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2016-04-18

    A fully tunable plasma photonic crystal is used to control the propagation of free space electromagnetic waves in the S to X bands of the microwave spectrum. An array of discharge plasma tubes forms a simple square crystal structure with the individual plasma dielectric constant tuned through variation in the plasma density. We show, through simulations and experiments, that transverse electric mode bandgaps exist, arising from the positive and negative dielectric constant regimes of the plasma, and that the respective bandgap frequencies can be shifted through changing the dielectric constant by varying discharge current density.

  19. Optomechanical measurement of photon spin angular momentum and optical torque in integrated photonic devices

    PubMed Central

    He, Li; Li, Huan; Li, Mo

    2016-01-01

    Photons carry linear momentum and spin angular momentum when circularly or elliptically polarized. During light-matter interaction, transfer of linear momentum leads to optical forces, whereas transfer of angular momentum induces optical torque. Optical forces including radiation pressure and gradient forces have long been used in optical tweezers and laser cooling. In nanophotonic devices, optical forces can be significantly enhanced, leading to unprecedented optomechanical effects in both classical and quantum regimes. In contrast, to date, the angular momentum of light and the optical torque effect have only been used in optical tweezers but remain unexplored in integrated photonics. We demonstrate the measurement of the spin angular momentum of photons propagating in a birefringent waveguide and the use of optical torque to actuate rotational motion of an optomechanical device. We show that the sign and magnitude of the optical torque are determined by the photon polarization states that are synthesized on the chip. Our study reveals the mechanical effect of photon’s polarization degree of freedom and demonstrates its control in integrated photonic devices. Exploiting optical torque and optomechanical interaction with photon angular momentum can lead to torsional cavity optomechanics and optomechanical photon spin-orbit coupling, as well as applications such as optomechanical gyroscopes and torsional magnetometry. PMID:27626072

  20. Active pixel and photon counting imagers based on poly-Si TFTs: rewriting the rule book on large area flat panel x-ray devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonuk, Larry E.; Koniczek, Martin; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua

    2009-02-01

    The near-ubiquity of large area, active matrix, flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) in medical x-ray imaging applications is a testament to the usefulness and adaptability of the relatively simple concept of array pixels based on a single amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) TFT coupled to a pixel storage capacitor. Interestingly, the fundamental advantages of a-Si:H thin film electronics (including compatibility with very large area processing, high radiation damage resistance, and continued development driven by interest in mainstream consumer products) are shared by the rapidly advancing technology of polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) TFTs. Moreover, the far higher mobilities of poly-Si TFTs, compared to those of a- Si:H, facilitate the creation of faster and more complex circuits than are possible with a-Si:H TFTs, leading to the possibility of new classes of large area, flat panel imagers. Given recent progress in the development of initial poly-Si imager prototypes, the creation of increasingly sophisticated active pixel arrays offering pixel-level amplification, variable gain, very high frame rates, and excellent signal-to-noise performance under all fluoroscopic and radiographic conditions (including very low exposures and high spatial frequencies), appears within reach. In addition, it is conceivable that the properties of poly-Si TFTs could allow the development of large area imagers providing single xray photon counting capabilities. In this article, the factors driving the possible realization of clinically practical active pixel and photon counting imagers based on poly-Si TFTs are described and simple calculational estimates related to photon counting imagers are presented. Finally, the prospect for future development of such imagers is discussed.

  1. Photonics at Sandia National Laboratories: Applying device technology to communication systems

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, R.F.

    1995-07-01

    Photonic device activities at Sandia National Laboratories are founded on an extensive materials research program that has expanded to include device development, and an applications focus that heavily emphasizes communications and interconnects. The resulting program spans a full range of photonics research, development, and applications projects, from materials synthesis and device fabrication to packaging, test, and subsystem development. The heart of this effort is the Compound Semiconductor Research Laboratory which was established in 1988 to bring together device and materials research and development to support Sandia`s role in weapons technologies. This paper presents an overview of Sandia`s photonics program and its directions, using three communications-based applications as examples.

  2. Photonic Switching Devices Using Light Bullets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goorjian, Peter M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A unique ultra-fast, all-optical switching device or switch is made with readily available, relatively inexpensive, highly nonlinear optical materials. which includes highly nonlinear optical glasses, semiconductor crystals and/or multiple quantum well semiconductor materials. At the specified wavelengths. these optical materials have a sufficiently negative group velocity dispersion and high nonlinear index of refraction to support stable light bullets. The light bullets counter-propagate through, and interact within the waveguide to selectively change each others' directions of propagation into predetermined channels. In one embodiment, the switch utilizes a rectangularly planar slab waveguide. and further includes two central channels and a plurality of lateral channels for guiding the light bullets into and out of the waveguide. An advantage of the present all-optical switching device lies in its practical use of light bullets, thus preventing the degeneration of the pulses due to dispersion and diffraction at the front and back of the pulses. Another advantage of the switching device is the relative insensitivity of the collision process to the time difference in which the counter-propagating pulses enter the waveguide. since. contrary to conventional co-propagating spatial solitons, the relative phase of the colliding pulses does not affect the interaction of these pulses. Yet another feature of the present all-optical switching device is the selection of the light pulse parameters which enables the generation of light bullets in nonlinear optical materials. including highly nonlinear optical glasses and semiconductor materials such as semiconductor crystals and/or multiple quantum well semiconductor materials.

  3. Si light-emitting device in integrated photonic CMOS ICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kaikai; Snyman, Lukas W.; Aharoni, Herzl

    2017-07-01

    The motivation for integrated Si optoelectronics is the creation of low-cost photonics for mass-market applications. Especially, the growing demand for sensitive biochemical sensors in the environmental control or medicine leads to the development of integrated high resolution sensors. Here CMOS-compatible Si light-emitting device structures are presented for investigating the effect of various depletion layer profiles and defect engineering on the photonic transition in the 1.4-2.8 eV. A novel Si device is proposed to realize both a two-terminal Si-diode light-emitting device and a three-terminal Si gate-controlled diode light-emitting device in the same device structure. In addition to the spectral analysis, differences between two-terminal and three-terminal devices are discussed, showing the light emission efficiency change. The proposed Si optical source may find potential applications in micro-photonic systems and micro-optoelectro-mechanical systems (MOEMS) in CMOS integrated circuitry.

  4. Active radar stealth device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, R. N.; Corda, Albert J.

    1991-07-01

    This patent discloses an active radar stealth device mounted on a host platform for minimizing the radar cross-section of the host platform. A coating which is essentially microwave transparent is attached to the surface of a host platform and is exposed to an incident microwave field. A plurality of detector/emitter pairs contained within the coating detect and actively cancel, respectively, the microwave field at each respective detector/emitter pair.

  5. Highly Directional Room-Temperature Single Photon Device.

    PubMed

    Livneh, Nitzan; Harats, Moshe G; Istrati, Daniel; Eisenberg, Hagai S; Rapaport, Ronen

    2016-04-13

    One of the most important challenges in modern quantum optical applications is the demonstration of efficient, scalable, on-chip single photon sources, which can operate at room temperature. In this paper we demonstrate a room-temperature single photon source based on a single colloidal nanocrystal quantum dot positioned inside a circular bulls-eye shaped hybrid metal-dielectric nanoantenna. Experimental results show that 20% of the photons are emitted into a very low numerical aperture (NA < 0.25), a 20-fold improvement over a free-standing quantum dot, and with a probability of more than 70% for a single photon emission. With an NA = 0.65 more than 35% of the single photon emission is collected. The single photon purity is limited only by emission from the metal, an obstacle that can be bypassed with careful design and fabrication. The concept presented here can be extended to many other types of quantum emitters. Such a device paves a promising route for a high purity, high efficiency, on-chip single photon source operating at room temperature.

  6. Implantable photonic devices for improved medical treatments.

    PubMed

    Sheinman, Victor; Rudnitsky, Arkady; Toichuev, Rakhmanbek; Eshiev, Abdyrakhman; Abdullaeva, Svetlana; Egemkulov, Talantbek; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2014-01-01

    An evolving area of biomedical research is related to the creation of implantable units that provide various possibilities for imaging, measurement, and the monitoring of a wide range of diseases and intrabody phototherapy. The units can be autonomic or built-in in some kind of clinically applicable implants. Because of specific working conditions in the live body, such implants must have a number of features requiring further development. This topic can cause wide interest among developers of optical, mechanical, and electronic solutions in biomedicine. We introduce preliminary clinical trials obtained with an implantable pill and devices that we have developed. The pill and devices are capable of applying in-body phototherapy, low-level laser therapy, blue light (450 nm) for sterilization, and controlled injection of chemicals. The pill is also capable of communicating with an external control box, including the transmission of images from inside the patient’s body. In this work, our pill was utilized for illumination of the sinus-carotid zone in dog and red light influence on arterial pressure and heart rate was demonstrated. Intrabody liver tissue laser ablation and nanoparticle-assisted laser ablation was investigated. Sterilization effect of intrabody blue light illumination was applied during a maxillofacial phlegmon treatment.

  7. Implantable photonic devices for improved medical treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheinman, Victor; Rudnitsky, Arkady; Toichuev, Rakhmanbek; Eshiev, Abdyrakhman; Abdullaeva, Svetlana; Egemkulov, Talantbek; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2014-10-01

    An evolving area of biomedical research is related to the creation of implantable units that provide various possibilities for imaging, measurement, and the monitoring of a wide range of diseases and intrabody phototherapy. The units can be autonomic or built-in in some kind of clinically applicable implants. Because of specific working conditions in the live body, such implants must have a number of features requiring further development. This topic can cause wide interest among developers of optical, mechanical, and electronic solutions in biomedicine. We introduce preliminary clinical trials obtained with an implantable pill and devices that we have developed. The pill and devices are capable of applying in-body phototherapy, low-level laser therapy, blue light (450 nm) for sterilization, and controlled injection of chemicals. The pill is also capable of communicating with an external control box, including the transmission of images from inside the patient's body. In this work, our pill was utilized for illumination of the sinus-carotid zone in dog and red light influence on arterial pressure and heart rate was demonstrated. Intrabody liver tissue laser ablation and nanoparticle-assisted laser ablation was investigated. Sterilization effect of intrabody blue light illumination was applied during a maxillofacial phlegmon treatment.

  8. Photonic devices based on black phosphorus and related hybrid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitiello, M. S.; Viti, L.

    2016-08-01

    Artificial semiconductor heterostructures played a pivotal role in modern electronic and photonic technologies, providing a highly effective means for the manipulation and control of carriers, from the visible to the far-infrared, leading to the development of highly efficient devices like sources, detectors and modulators. The discovery of graphene and the related fascinating capabilities have triggered an unprecedented interest in devices based on inorganic two-dimensional (2D) materials. Amongst them, black phosphorus (BP) recently showed an extraordinary potential in a variety of applications across micro-electronics and photonics. With an energy gap between the gapless graphene and the larger gap transition metal dichalcogenides, BP can form the basis for a new generation of high-performance photonic devices that could be specifically engineered to comply with different applications, like transparent saturable absorbers, fast photocounductive switches and low noise photodetectors, exploiting its peculiar electrical, thermal and optical anisotropy. This paper will review the latest achievements in black-phosphorus-based THz photonics and discuss future perspectives of this rapidly developing research field.

  9. Silicon photonic integrated devices for datacenter optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorentino, Marco; Chen, Chin-Hui; Kurczveil, Géza; Liang, Di; Peng, Zhen; Beausoleil, Raymond

    2014-03-01

    The evolution of computing infrastructure and workloads has put an enormous pressure on datacenter networks. It is expected that bandwidth will scale without increases in the network power envelope and total cost of ownership. Networks based on silicon photonic devices promise to help alleviate these problems, but a viable development path for these technologies is not yet fully outlined. In this paper, we report our progress on developing components and strategies for datacenter silicon photonics networks. We will focus on recent progress on compact, low-threshold hybrid Si lasers and the CWDM transceivers based on these lasers as well as DWDM microring resonator-based transceivers.

  10. Nonlinear polymer/quantum dots nanocomposite for two-photon nanolithography of photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrashitova, Ksenia A.; Gulkin, Dmitry N.; Kokareva, Natalia G.; Safronov, Kirill R.; Chizhov, Artem S.; Ezhov, Alexander A.; Bessonov, Vladimir O.; Fedyanin, Andrey A.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we report on fabrication of a nanocomposite based on CdSe quantum dots mixed with commercial photoresist ORMOCOMP and proved its high structurability by direct laser writing. The distribution of quantum dots was visualised by transmission electron microscopy and the quality and geometrical parameters of the structures were studied by optical and atomic force microscopy. We manufactured a novel photonic device for Bloch surface electromagnetic waves in photonic crystals and thoroughly studied their propagation by both leakage microscopy and back focal plane imaging methods. By z-scan method we measured the nonlinear Kerr coefficient of quantum dots. Its high value makes the manufactured photonic device promising for all-optical switching applications.

  11. Very High Performance Organic Photonic Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-15

    competitive with inorganic, amorphous Si solar cells. 2. We introduced and demonstrated several new cell architectures, including the hybrid planar mixed cell...3. "Organic small molecule solar cells with a homogeneously mixed copper phthalocyanine: C60 active layer", S. Uchida, J. Xue, B. P. Rand and S. R...organic photovoltaic cells with hybrid planar- mixed molecular heterojunctions", J. Xue, B. P. Rand, S. Uchida and S. R. Forrest, Appl. Phys. Lett

  12. Optofluidic devices and applications in photonics, sensing and imaging.

    PubMed

    Pang, Lin; Chen, H Matthew; Freeman, Lindsay M; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2012-10-07

    Optofluidics integrates the fields of photonics and microfluidics, providing new freedom to both fields and permitting the realization of optical and fluidic property manipulations at the chip scale. Optofluidics was formed only after many breakthroughs in microfluidics, as understanding of fluid behaviour at the micron level enabled researchers to combine the advantages of optics and fluids. This review describes the progress of optofluidics from a photonics perspective, highlighting various optofluidic aspects ranging from the device's property manipulation to an interactive integration between optics and fluids. First, we describe photonic elements based on the functionalities that enable fluid manipulation. We then discuss the applications of optofluidic biodetection with an emphasis on nanosensing. Next, we discuss the progress of optofluidic lenses with an emphasis on its various architectures, and finally we conceptualize on where the field may lead.

  13. Patterned semiconductor inverted quantum dot photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, J. J.

    2016-03-01

    A novel inverted quantum dot structure is presented, which consists of an InGaAs quantum well that has been periodically perforated and then filled with the higher bandgap GaAs barrier material. This structure exhibits a unique quantized energy structure something like a planar atomic bond structure and formation of allowed and forbidden energy bands instead of highly localized, fully discrete states. We describe the growth, processing and characteristics of inverted quantum dot structures and outline interesting and potentially important effects arising from the introduction of nanoscale features (<50 nm) in the active medium.

  14. Molecular detection via hybrid peptide-semiconductor photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estephan, E.; Saab, M.-b.; Martin, M.; Cloitre, T.; Larroque, C.; Cuisinier, F. J. G.; Malvezzi, A. M.; Gergely, C.

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the possibilities to support device functionality that includes strongly confined and localized light emission and detection processes within nano/micro-structured semiconductors for biosensing applications. The interface between biological molecules and semiconductor surfaces, yet still under-explored is a key issue for improving biomolecular recognition in devices. We report on the use of adhesion peptides, elaborated via combinatorial phage-display libraries for controlled placement of biomolecules, leading to user-tailored hybrid photonic systems for molecular detection. An M13 bacteriophage library has been used to screen 1010 different peptides against various semiconductors to finally isolate specific peptides presenting a high binding capacity for the target surfaces. When used to functionalize porous silicon microcavities (PSiM) and GaAs/AlGaAs photonic crystals, we observe the formation of extremely thin (<1nm) peptide layers, hereby preserving the nanostructuration of the crystals. This is important to assure the photonic response of these tiny structures when they are functionalized by a biotinylated peptide layer and then used to capture streptavidin. Molecular detection was monitored via both linear and nonlinear optical measurements. Our linear reflectance spectra demonstrate an enhanced detection resolution via PSiM devices, when functionalized with the Si-specific peptide. Molecular capture at even lower concentrations (femtomols) is possible via the second harmonic generation of GaAs/AlGaAs photonic crystals when functionalized with GaAs-specific peptides. Our work demonstrates the outstanding value of adhesion peptides as interface linkers between semiconductors and biological molecules. They assure an enhanced molecular detection via both linear and nonlinear answers of photonic crystals.

  15. Implementing quantum Fourier transform with integrated photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabia, Gelo Noel

    2014-03-01

    Many quantum algorithms that exhibit exponential speedup over their classical counterparts employ the quantum Fourier transform, which is used to solve interesting problems such as prime factorization. Meanwhile, nonclassical interference of single photons achieved on integrated platforms holds the promise of achieving large-scale quantum computation with multiport devices. An optical multiport device can be built to realize any quantum circuit as a sequence of unitary operations performed by beam splitters and phase shifters on path-encoded qudits. In this talk, I will present a recursive scheme for implementing quantum Fourier transform with a multimode interference photonic integrated circuit. Research at Perimeter Institute is supported by the Government of Canada through Industry Canada and by the Province of Ontario through the Ministry of Research and Innovation.

  16. Tolerance analysis for efficient MMI devices in silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, Carmen; Tapetado, Alberto; Orcutt, Jason; Meng, Huaiyu Charles; Ram, Rajeev

    2014-03-01

    Silicon is considered a promising platform for photonic integrated circuits as they can be fabricated in state-of-the-art electronics foundaries with integrated CMOS electronics. While much of the existing work on CMOS photonics has used directional couplers for power splitting, multimode interference (MMI) devices may have relaxed fabrication requirements and smaller footprints, potentially energy efficient designs. They have already been used as 1x2 splitters, 2x1 combiners in Quadrature Phase Shift Keying modulators, and 3-dB couplers among others. In this work, 3-dB, butterfly and cross MMI couplers are realized on bulk CMOS technology. Footprints from around 40um2 to 200 um2 are obtained. MMI tolerances to manufacturing process and bandwidth are analyzed and tested showing the robustness of the MMI devices.

  17. Femtosecond laser fabrication of microfluidic channels for organic photonic devices.

    PubMed

    Chaitanya Vishnubhatla, Krishna; Clark, Jenny; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Ramponi, Roberta; Osellame, Roberto; Virgili, Tersilla

    2009-11-01

    We report on innovative application of microchannels with access holes fabricated by femtosecond laser irradiation followed by chemical etching. This technique allows us to demonstrate a novel approach to the achievement of organic photonic devices in which the properties of a conjugated polymer in solution are exploited in a microfluidic configuration to produce an easy-to-integrate photonic device. Filling the microchannel with a diluted polyfluorene solution, we exploit the unique properties of isolated polymeric chains such as ultrafast gain switching (switching response time of 150 fs) with a 100% on-off ratio. In addition, by dispersing nanoparticles in the polymeric solution we are able to achieve random lasing in the microchannel.

  18. Tunable photonic devices and modules based on micro-optomechatronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katagiri, Yoshitada

    2001-10-01

    Photonic devices with ultra-wide and precise controllability for lightwaves are essential for constructing flexible optical networks to serve versatile multimedia applications. However, conventional monolithically fabricated photonic devices suffer from their controllability being limited by the physical characteristics. Micro-optomechatronics based on precise positional control of optical elements is a promising method of meeting the above requirements. This paper presents typical examples, which include repetition- rate tunable optical pulse sources with a micro mechanically controllable cavity length and synchro-scanned tunable disk- shaped optical fiber modules. The operations of these modules were demonstrated to confirm the validity of micro- optomechatronics as the ultimate lightwave control scheme, which will be useful for future optical telecommunications systems.

  19. Photonic devices for next-generation broadband fiber access networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazovsky, Leonid G.; Yen, She-Hwa; Wong, Shing-Wa

    2011-01-01

    Next-generation optical access networks will deliver substantial benefits to consumers including a dedicated high-QoS access to bit rates of hundreds of Megabits per second. They must include the following features such as: reduced total cost of ownership, higher reliability, lower energy consumption, better flexibility and efficiency. This paper will describe recent progress and technology toward that goal using novel photonic devices

  20. Advanced photon source experience with vacuum chambers for insertion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hartog, P.D.; Grimmer, J.; Xu, S.; Trakhtenberg, E.; Wiemerslage, G.

    1997-08-01

    During the last five years, a new approach to the design and fabrication of extruded aluminum vacuum chambers for insertion devices was developed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). With this approach, three different versions of the vacuum chamber, with vertical apertures of 12 mm, 8 mm, and 5 mm, were manufactured and tested. Twenty chambers were installed into the APS vacuum system. All have operated with beam, and 16 have been coupled with insertion devices. Two different vacuum chambers with vertical apertures of 16 mm and 11 mm were developed for the BESSY-II storage ring and 3 of 16 mm chambers were manufactured.

  1. Analysis on optical bistability parameters in photonic switching devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarafraz, Hossein; Sayeh, Mohammad R.

    2016-06-01

    An investigation has been done on the parameters of a hysteretic bistable optical Schmitt trigger device. From a design point of view, it is important to know the regions where this bistability occurs and is fully functional with respect to its subsystem parameters. Otherwise experimentally reaching such behavior will be very time-consuming and frustrating, especially with multiple devices employed in a single photonic circuit. A photonic Schmitt trigger consisting of two feedbacked inverting amplifiers, each characterized by -m (slope), A (y-intercept), and B (constant base) parameters is considered. This system is investigated dynamically with a varying input to find its stable and unstable states both mathematically and with simulation. In addition to a complete mathematical analysis of the system, we also describe how m, A, and B can be properly chosen in order to satisfy certain system conditions that result in bistability. More restrictions are also imposed to these absolute conditions by the system conditions as will be discussed. Finally, all results are verified in a more realistic photonic simulation.

  2. Printed polymer photonic devices for optical interconnect systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subbaraman, Harish; Pan, Zeyu; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Qiaochu; Guo, L. J.; Chen, Ray T.

    2016-03-01

    Polymer photonic device fabrication usually relies on the utilization of clean-room processes, including photolithography, e-beam lithography, reactive ion etching (RIE) and lift-off methods etc, which are expensive and are limited to areas as large as a wafer. Utilizing a novel and a scalable printing process involving ink-jet printing and imprinting, we have fabricated polymer based photonic interconnect components, such as electro-optic polymer based modulators and ring resonator switches, and thermo-optic polymer switch based delay networks and demonstrated their operation. Specifically, a modulator operating at 15MHz and a 2-bit delay network providing up to 35.4ps are presented. In this paper, we also discuss the manufacturing challenges that need to be overcome in order to make roll-to-roll manufacturing practically viable. We discuss a few manufacturing challenges, such as inspection and quality control, registration, and web control, that need to be overcome in order to realize true implementation of roll-to-roll manufacturing of flexible polymer photonic systems. We have overcome these challenges, and currently utilizing our inhouse developed hardware and software tools, <10μm alignment accuracy at a 5m/min is demonstrated. Such a scalable roll-to-roll manufacturing scheme will enable the development of unique optoelectronic devices which can be used in a myriad of different applications, including communication, sensing, medicine, security, imaging, energy, lighting etc.

  3. Wireless photonic power and data transfer to dormant devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhadwal, Harbans S.; Rastegar, Jahangir; Feng, Dake; Kwok, Philip

    2015-05-01

    Need exists for untethered transmission of electrical power and data to remote devices and sensors. Several wireless solutions, based on radiation and non-radiation are in existence. Here the focus is on the use of photonic power which is an optimized optical to electrical conversion solution, used for both wireless and guided transportation. High photonic conversion efficiencies of 50% and greater have been demonstrated for wavelength matched laser diodes and photovoltaic cells. However, these existing solutions do not meet the needs of rapid energy transfer to remote devices, such as munition shells prior to launch. We report on the design and fabrication of a 16-cell array of densely packed photonic power converters that can power a munition shell immediately prior to launch. A laser beam delivers power and data to the PPC array. Thermal simulation, using FEA shows that the each of the cells can be operated at an equivalent irradiance of 1000x suns, giving an energy transfer rate of 17.5 J.s-1 for the array. Thus, two 10 F super-capacitors, typically used in munitions, can be charged is under 5 seconds. Further, using the measured capacitance of 2.4 nF for the array, data can be transported to the munition on the laser power beam, at a rate exceeding 5 Mbps.

  4. Micron-scale tunability in photonic devices using microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monat, Christelle; Domachuk, Peter; Jaouen, Vincent; Grillet, Christian; Littler, Ian; Croning-Golomb, Mark; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Mutzenich, Simon; Mahmud, Tanveer; Rosengarten, Gary; Mitchell, Arnan

    2006-08-01

    Optofluidics offers new functionalities that can be useful for a large range of applications. What microfluidics can bring to microphotonics is the ability to tune and reconfigure ultra-compact optical devices. This flexibility is essentially provided by three characteristics of fluids that are scalable at the micron-scale: fluid mobility, large ranges of index modulation, and adaptable interfaces. Several examples of optofluidic devices are presented to illustrate the achievement of new functionalities onto (semi)planar and compact platforms. First, we report an ultra-compact and tunable interferometer that exploits a sharp and mobile air/water interface. We describe then a novel class of optically controlled switches and routers that rely on the actuation of optically trapped lens microspheres within fluid environment. A tunable optical switch device can alternatively be built from a transversely probed photonic crystal fiber infused with mobile fluids. The last reported optofluidic device relies on strong fluid/ light interaction to produce either a sensitive index sensor or a tunable optical filter. The common feature of these various devices is their significant flexibility. Higher degrees of functionality could be achieved in the future with fully integrated optofluidic platforms that associate complex microfluidic delivery and mixing schemes with microphotonic devices.

  5. Towards roll-to-roll manufacturing of polymer photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subbaraman, Harish; Lin, Xiaohui; Ling, Tao; Guo, L. Jay; Chen, Ray T.

    2014-03-01

    Traditionally, polymer photonic devices are fabricated using clean-room processes such as photolithography, e-beam lithography, reactive ion etching (RIE) and lift-off methods etc, which leads to long fabrication time, low throughput and high cost. We have utilized a novel process for fabricating polymer photonic devices using a combination of imprinting and ink jet printing methods, which provides high throughput on a variety of rigid and flexible substrates with low cost. We discuss the manufacturing challenges that need to be overcome in order to realize true implementation of roll-to-roll manufacturing of flexible polymer photonic systems. Several metrology and instrumentation challenges involved such as availability of particulate-free high quality substrate, development and implementation of high-speed in-line and off-line inspection and diagnostic tools with adaptive control for patterned and unpatterned material films, development of reliable hardware, etc need to be addressed and overcome in order to realize a successful manufacturing process. Due to extreme resolution requirements compared to print media, the burden of software and hardware tools on the throughput also needs to be carefully determined. Moreover, the effect of web wander and variations in web speed need to accurately be determined in the design of the system hardware and software. In this paper, we show the realization of solutions for few challenges, and utilizing these solutions for developing a high-rate R2R dual stage ink-jet printer that can provide alignment accuracy of <10μm at a web speed of 5m/min. The development of a roll-to-roll manufacturing system for polymer photonic systems opens limitless possibilities for the deployment of high performance components in a variety of applications including communication, sensing, medicine, agriculture, energy, lighting etc.

  6. Photonomics: automation approaches yield economic aikido for photonics device manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Scott

    2002-09-01

    In the glory days of photonics, with exponentiating demand for photonics devices came exponentiating competition, with new ventures commencing deliveries seemingly weekly. Suddenly the industry was faced with a commodity marketplace well before a commodity cost structure was in place. Economic issues like cost, scalability, yield-call it all "Photonomics" -now drive the industry. Automation and throughput-optimization are obvious answers, but until now, suitable modular tools had not been introduced. Available solutions were barely compatible with typical transverse alignment tolerances and could not automate angular alignments of collimated devices and arrays. And settling physics served as the insoluble bottleneck to throughput and resolution advancement in packaging, characterization and fabrication processes. The industry has addressed these needs in several ways, ranging from special configurations of catalog motion devices to integrated microrobots based on a novel mini-hexapod configuration. This intriguing approach allows tip/tilt alignments to be automated about any point in space, such as a beam waist, a focal point, the cleaved face of a fiber, or the optical axis of a waveguide- ideal for MEMS packaging automation and array alignment. Meanwhile, patented new low-cost settling-enhancement technology has been applied in applications ranging from air-bearing long-travel stages to subnanometer-resolution piezo positioners to advance resolution and process cycle-times in sensitive applications such as optical coupling characterization and fiber Bragg grating generation. Background, examples and metrics are discussed, providing an up-to-date industry overview of available solutions.

  7. Two-photon polymerization for fabrication of biomedical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovsianikov, Aleksandr; Doraiswamy, Anand; Narayan, R.; Chichkov, B. N.

    2007-01-01

    Two-photon polymerization (2PP) is a novel technology which allows the fabrication of complex three-dimensional (3D) microstructures and nanostructures. The number of applications of this technology is rapidly increasing; it includes the fabrication of 3D photonic crystals [1-4], medical devices, and tissue scaffolds [5-6]. In this contribution, we discuss current applications of 2PP for microstructuring of biomedical devices used in drug delivery. While in general this sector is still dominated by oral administration of drugs, precise dosing, safety, and convenience are being addressed by transdermal drug delivery systems. Currently, main limitations arise from low permeability of the skin. As a result, only few types of pharmacological substances can be delivered in this manner [7]. Application of microneedle arrays, whose function is to help overcome the barrier presented by the epidermis layer of the skin, provides a very promising solution. Using 2PP we have fabricated arrays of hollow microneedles with different geometries. The effect of microneedle geometry on skin penetration is examined. Our results indicate that microneedles created using 2PP technique are suitable for in vivo use, and for integration with the next generation of MEMS- and NEMS-based drug delivery devices.

  8. Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Nanowires for Electronic, Photonic and Sensing Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-05

    variety of wide bandgap nanowires using GaN and ZnO and made functional devices from them for sensing,electronics and photonics.These included a very...showed highly stable operation.This effort grew out of the work on ZnO nanowires ,where we noticed severe segregation effects when we tried to grow...AND ADDRESSES U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS GaN, ZnO , nanowires S.Pearton

  9. Band gap and dispersion engineering of photonic crystal devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Caihua

    Photonic crystals (PhCs) have been of great interest in a variety of fields in the past decade due to their great capability for manipulating photons in a manner similar to how electrons are controlled in a semiconductor material. In particular, PhCs are expected to revolutionize such fields as optical signal processing and optical communication by allowing the development of novel optical devices for high-density photonic integrated circuits (PICs). The development of PhC devices will be greatly accelerated by systematic designs. In this dissertation, I developed several procedures to systematically engineer the dispersion properties of PhCs. Using these procedures, I presented a variety of novel applications intended for use in future high-density PICs. These were achieved through efficient implementations of the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method and the plane wave method (PWM). Specifically, by combining these efficient electromagnetic tools with the direct binary search (DBS) method or simulated annealing (SA), I developed very efficient synthesis processes and used them to optimize absolute photonic band gaps (PBGs) of PhC structures and a beam steering device based on a PhC with PBG(s). I also presented another novel PhC device working in PBG, namely a PhC ring drop filter. On the other hand, I utilized the FDTD method and the PWM to shape dispersion surfaces and/or contours of PhC structures for manipulating light propagation. In particular, I engineered PhCs with square- and circle-shaped equi-frequency contours (EFCs) and presented several applications using these two unique PhCs. These applications include optical beam routing, coupling and splitting a wide beam into multiple narrow self-guiding beams, a unidirectional emitter, and an in-plane lens coupler. I also explored negative refraction and left-handed behavior in PhCs and presented a flat lens using a PhC exhibiting negative refraction and left-handed behavior.

  10. Integration of photonics devices by using quantum well intermixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, E. Herbert

    1999-04-01

    Intermixed quantum well structures created by both impurity- induced and impurity-free or vacancy-promoted processes have recently attracted much attention. The full integration of photonics devices like tunable lasers, modulators and photodetectors has been attained and can be obtained using the quantum well intermixing technology. The advantage of being able to tune the material properties allows the realization of higher-performance devices, such as lasers, photodetectors and modulators. This bandgap modification is a powerful technique for monolithically integrating optoelectronic devices of varying functionalities on a single wafer. This paper will explore the wavelength tunability using different quantum well intermixing techniques. In addition, this paper will place a strong emphasis on the very recent device applications of intermixing technology. Attractive distributed-feedback laser and modulators have been developed as a result of some unique devices of quantum well intermixing. In particular, this allows a multi-section integrated structure to be fabricated for wide band-width and multi-wavelength applications. The use of such structure in wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) in high bit rate communication systems is a good example. Several state-of-the-art results of the intermixed quantum wells will be summarized, with an emphasis on the directions for future development.

  11. Design and Analysis of Planar Photonic Band Gap Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatadze, V.; Bijamov, A., Jr.; Kakulia, D.; Saparishvili, G.; Kakulia, D.; Zaridze, R.; Hafner, Ch.; Erni, D.

    2008-12-01

    The need for a highly efficient numerical simulation platform for designing photonic band gap (PBG) structures is outlined in the context of various functional device topologies. In this paper we therefore introduce the Method of Auxiliary Sources (MAS) as a semi-analytical, frequency-domain method for computational optics, which has already proven its accuracy and efficiency in various other fields of electrodynamics. The proposed software package provides an easy-to-handle approach to full-wave analysis of two-dimensional (2D) PBG circuits, PBG-based antennas as well as to dense-integrated optics components that contain optical waveguides, scatterers, resonators and other functional elements. Experimental verifications of the numerical results have been conducted along large-scale prototypes in the microwave frequency range for several device topologies.

  12. Probing a Device's Active Atoms.

    PubMed

    Studniarek, Michał; Halisdemir, Ufuk; Schleicher, Filip; Taudul, Beata; Urbain, Etienne; Boukari, Samy; Hervé, Marie; Lambert, Charles-Henri; Hamadeh, Abbass; Petit-Watelot, Sebastien; Zill, Olivia; Lacour, Daniel; Joly, Loïc; Scheurer, Fabrice; Schmerber, Guy; Da Costa, Victor; Dixit, Anant; Guitard, Pierre André; Acosta, Manuel; Leduc, Florian; Choueikani, Fadi; Otero, Edwige; Wulfhekel, Wulf; Montaigne, François; Monteblanco, Elmer Nahuel; Arabski, Jacek; Ohresser, Philippe; Beaurepaire, Eric; Weber, Wolfgang; Alouani, Mébarek; Hehn, Michel; Bowen, Martin

    2017-03-13

    Materials science and device studies have, when implemented jointly as "operando" studies, better revealed the causal link between the properties of the device's materials and its operation, with applications ranging from gas sensing to information and energy technologies. Here, as a further step that maximizes this causal link, the paper focuses on the electronic properties of those atoms that drive a device's operation by using it to read out the materials property. It is demonstrated how this method can reveal insight into the operation of a macroscale, industrial-grade microelectronic device on the atomic level. A magnetic tunnel junction's (MTJ's) current, which involves charge transport across different atomic species and interfaces, is measured while these atoms absorb soft X-rays with synchrotron-grade brilliance. X-ray absorption is found to affect magnetotransport when the photon energy and linear polarization are tuned to excite FeO bonds parallel to the MTJ's interfaces. This explicit link between the device's spintronic performance and these FeO bonds, although predicted, challenges conventional wisdom on their detrimental spintronic impact. The technique opens interdisciplinary possibilities to directly probe the role of different atomic species on device operation, and shall considerably simplify the materials science iterations within device research.

  13. Fast path and polarization manipulation of telecom wavelength single photons in lithium niobate waveguide devices.

    PubMed

    Bonneau, Damien; Lobino, Mirko; Jiang, Pisu; Natarajan, Chandra M; Tanner, Michael G; Hadfield, Robert H; Dorenbos, Sanders N; Zwiller, Val; Thompson, Mark G; O'Brien, Jeremy L

    2012-02-03

    We demonstrate fast polarization and path control of photons at 1550 nm in lithium niobate waveguide devices using the electro-optic effect. We show heralded single photon state engineering, quantum interference, fast state preparation of two entangled photons, and feedback control of quantum interference. These results point the way to a single platform that will enable the integration of nonlinear single photon sources and fast reconfigurable circuits for future photonic quantum information science and technology.

  14. Low dimension structures and devices for new generation photonic technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D. H.; Tang, D. Y.; Chen, T. P.; Mei, T.; Yuan, X. C.

    2014-05-01

    Low dimensional structures and devices are the key technological building blocks for new generation of electronic and photonic technology. Such structures and devices show novel properties and can be integrated into systems for wide applications in many areas, including medical, biological and military and advancement of science. In this invited talk, I will present the main results achieved in our competitive research program which aims to explore the application of the mesoscopic structures in light source, manipulation and imaging and integrate them into advanced systems. In the light source aspect, we have for the first time developed graphene mode-locked lasers which are in the process of commercialization. Nanocrystal Si embedded in dielectrics was formed by ion implantation and subsequent annealing. Si light emitting devices with external quantum efficiency of about 2.9×10-3% for visible emission were demonstrated at room temperature and the color of emitted light can be tuned electrically from violet to white by varying the injected current. In light manipulation, loss compensation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) using quantum well (QW) gain media was studied theoretically and demonstrated experimentally. The SPP propagation length was effectively elongated several times through electrical pumping. One and two microring resonators based on silicon on insulator and III-V semiconductors technologies have been successfully fabricated and they can be used as filter and switch in the photonic circuit. In imaging, both SPP and low dimension structures are investigated and resolution far beyond diffraction limit in visible range has been realized. The integration of the components in the three aspects into complicated systems is on the way.

  15. Low dimension structures and devices for new generation photonic technology

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D. H.; Tang, D. Y.; Chen, T. P.; Mei, T.; Yuan, X. C.

    2014-05-15

    Low dimensional structures and devices are the key technological building blocks for new generation of electronic and photonic technology. Such structures and devices show novel properties and can be integrated into systems for wide applications in many areas, including medical, biological and military and advancement of science. In this invited talk, I will present the main results achieved in our competitive research program which aims to explore the application of the mesoscopic structures in light source, manipulation and imaging and integrate them into advanced systems. In the light source aspect, we have for the first time developed graphene mode-locked lasers which are in the process of commercialization. Nanocrystal Si embedded in dielectrics was formed by ion implantation and subsequent annealing. Si light emitting devices with external quantum efficiency of about 2.9×10{sup −3}% for visible emission were demonstrated at room temperature and the color of emitted light can be tuned electrically from violet to white by varying the injected current. In light manipulation, loss compensation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) using quantum well (QW) gain media was studied theoretically and demonstrated experimentally. The SPP propagation length was effectively elongated several times through electrical pumping. One and two microring resonators based on silicon on insulator and III-V semiconductors technologies have been successfully fabricated and they can be used as filter and switch in the photonic circuit. In imaging, both SPP and low dimension structures are investigated and resolution far beyond diffraction limit in visible range has been realized. The integration of the components in the three aspects into complicated systems is on the way.

  16. Optics with diatoms: towards efficient, bioinspired photonic devices at the micro-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Tommasi, E.; Rea, I.; De Stefano, L.; Dardano, P.; Di Caprio, G.; Ferrara, M. A.; Coppola, G.

    2013-04-01

    Diatoms are monocellular algae responsible of 20-25% of the global oxygen produced by photosynthetic processes. The protoplasm of every single cell is enclosed in an external wall made of porous hydrogenated silica, the frustule. In recent times, many effects related to photonic properties of diatom frustules have been discovered and exploited in applications: light confinement induced by multiple diffraction, frustule photoluminescence applied to chemical and biochemical sensing, photonic-crystal-like behavior of valves and girdles. In present work we show how several techniques (e.g. digital holography) allowed us to retrieve information on light manipulation by diatom single valves in terms of amplitude, phase and polarization, both in air and in a cytoplasmatic environment. Possible applications in optical microsystems of diatom frustules and frustule-inspired devices as active photonic elements are finally envisaged.

  17. Photonic crystal cavities for spectrally-selective optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongjun

    Photonic crystal (PC) structures exhibit unconventional dispersion and refractive properties making possible hitherto not realizable optical and optoelectronic devices with high spectral selectivity. Functional PC devices (e.g., optical filters, reflectors, and photo detectors and light emitters) on both Si and III-V semiconductor material systems were fabricated via E-Beam lithography (EBL). The device layer can be further transferred onto foreign substrates such as glass or plastic (PET), using a low-cost "wet nanomembrane transfer technique" developed in this study. The broadband membrane reflectors (MR) based on Fano resonances in patterned silicon nanomembranes have been demonstrated. Resonance control of the reflectors was realized either by partially removing buried oxide layer underneath the device layer, or by controlled SiO2 film deposition on the top of the devices. Both blue- and red-shifts were demonstrated with a turning range of 50 nm for a center wavelength at 1550 nm. These results demonstrate practical post-process means for Fano resonance engineering for both narrow band filters and ultra-compact broadband reflectors. An optically pumped resonance cavity light emitting device (RCLED) with Si based membrane reflectors (MR) has been demonstrated experimentally. The stimulated cavity mode at 1545 nm was observed at room temperature with a pulsed green pumping laser light source. We observed significant spectral narrowing in RCLEDs with linewidth reduced from 50 nm down to <4 nm, owing to the presence of top and bottom MR reflectors. The measured photoluminescence efficiency also increased by a factor of 100 in RCLEDs, as compared to the value measured from as-grown InGaAsP QW structures on InP substrate. The mode shifts were also investigated over different temperatures and different pumping power levels. An InGaAsP QW LED array device was also fabricated and transferred onto flexible PET substrate. The devices showed very good electrical and

  18. Semiconductor devices for entangled photon pair generation: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orieux, Adeline; Versteegh, Marijn A. M.; Jöns, Klaus D.; Ducci, Sara

    2017-07-01

    Entanglement is one of the most fascinating properties of quantum mechanical systems; when two particles are entangled the measurement of the properties of one of the two allows the properties of the other to be instantaneously known, whatever the distance separating them. In parallel with fundamental research on the foundations of quantum mechanics performed on complex experimental set-ups, we assist today with bourgeoning of quantum information technologies bound to exploit entanglement for a large variety of applications such as secure communications, metrology and computation. Among the different physical systems under investigation, those involving photonic components are likely to play a central role and in this context semiconductor materials exhibit a huge potential in terms of integration of several quantum components in miniature chips. In this article we review the recent progress in the development of semiconductor devices emitting entangled photons. We will present the physical processes allowing the generation of entanglement and the tools to characterize it; we will give an overview of major recent results of the last few years and highlight perspectives for future developments.

  19. Semiconductor devices for entangled photon pair generation: a review.

    PubMed

    Orieux, Adeline; Versteegh, Marijn A M; Jöns, Klaus D; Ducci, Sara

    2017-07-01

    Entanglement is one of the most fascinating properties of quantum mechanical systems; when two particles are entangled the measurement of the properties of one of the two allows the properties of the other to be instantaneously known, whatever the distance separating them. In parallel with fundamental research on the foundations of quantum mechanics performed on complex experimental set-ups, we assist today with bourgeoning of quantum information technologies bound to exploit entanglement for a large variety of applications such as secure communications, metrology and computation. Among the different physical systems under investigation, those involving photonic components are likely to play a central role and in this context semiconductor materials exhibit a huge potential in terms of integration of several quantum components in miniature chips. In this article we review the recent progress in the development of semiconductor devices emitting entangled photons. We will present the physical processes allowing the generation of entanglement and the tools to characterize it; we will give an overview of major recent results of the last few years and highlight perspectives for future developments.

  20. Generating entangled quantum microwaves in a Josephson-photonics device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dambach, Simon; Kubala, Björn; Ankerhold, Joachim

    2017-02-01

    When connecting a voltage-biased Josephson junction in series to several microwave cavities, a Cooper-pair current across the junction gives rise to a continuous emission of strongly correlated photons into the cavity modes. Tuning the bias voltage to the resonance where a single Cooper pair provides the energy to create an additional photon in each of the cavities, we demonstrate the entangling nature of these creation processes by simple witnesses in terms of experimentally accessible observables. To characterize the entanglement properties of the such created quantum states of light to the fullest possible extent, we then proceed to more elaborate entanglement criteria based on the knowledge of the full density matrix and provide a detailed study of bi- and multipartite entanglement. In particular, we illustrate how due to the relatively simple design of these circuits changes of experimental parameters allow one to access a wide variety of entangled states differing, e.g., in the number of entangled parties or the dimension of state space. Such devices, besides their promising potential to act as a highly versatile source of entangled quantum microwaves, may thus represent an excellent natural testbed for classification and quantification schemes developed in quantum information theory.

  1. Radiation doses to insertion devices at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Moog, E.R.; Den Hartog, P.K.; Semones, E.J.; Job, P.K.

    1997-09-01

    Dose measurements made on and around the insertion devices (IDs) at the Advanced Photon Source are reported. Attempts are made to compare these dose rates to dose rates that have been reported to cause radiation-induced demagnetization, but comparisons are complicated by such factors as the particular magnet material and the techniques used in its manufacture, the spectrum and type of radiation, and the demagnetizing field seen by the magnet. The spectrum of radiation at the IDs. It has almost no effect on the dose to the downstream ends of the IDs, however, since much of the radiation travels through the ID vacuum chamber and cannot be readily shielded. Opening the gaps of the IDs during injection and at other times also helps decrease the radiation exposure.

  2. Insertion device operating experience at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimmer, John; Ramanathan, Mohan; Smith, Martin; Merritt, Michael

    2002-03-01

    The Advanced Photon Source has 29 insertion devices (IDs) installed in the 7 GeV electron storage ring; 28 of these devices, most of which are 3.3 cm period undulators, use two horizontal permanent magnet structures positioned over a straight vacuum chamber. A support and drive mechanism allows the vertical gap between the magnet structures to be varied, thus changing the x-ray energy produced by the ID [J. Viccaro, Proc. SPIE 1345, 28 (1990); E. Gluskin, J. Synchrotron Radiat. 5, 189 (1998)]. Most of these IDs use a drive scheme with two stepper motors, one driving each end through a mechanism synchronizing the upper and lower magnet structures. Our experience in almost 5 yr of operating this system will be discussed. All of the IDs are in continuous operation for approximately 10 weeks at a time. Reliability of operation is of paramount importance, as access to the storage ring for servicing of a single ID inhibits operation for all users. Our experience in achieving highly reliable ID operation is reviewed. Accuracy of operation and repeatability over time are also vital. To this end, these devices use absolute optical linear encoders with submicron resolution for primary position feedback. Absolute rotary encoders are used as a backup to the linear encoders. The benefits and limitations of each type of encoder, and our experience dealing with radiation and electrical noise are reviewed. The insertion devices operate down to gaps as small as 8.5 mm, with clearance over the vacuum chamber as small as 200 μm. The vacuum chamber has a minimum wall thickness of only 1 mm. A number of levels of safeguards are used to prevent contact between the magnet structure and the vacuum chamber. These safeguards and their evolution after gaining operational experience are presented.

  3. Modeling and analysis of ion-exchanged photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Brian Robert

    Photonic devices fabricated by ion exchange in glass have evolved to the point where conventional assumptions of waveguide symmetry and mutual independence are no longer valid. For example, during field-assisted ion exchange processes, the nonhomogeneity of ionic conductivity in the vicinity of the waveguide results in a time-dependent perturbation of the electric field. Previous studies have shown that the depth and vertical symmetry of buried waveguides are noticeably affected by the field perturbation. This Dissertation describes an advanced modeling tool for guided-wave devices based on ion-exchanged glass waveguides. A genetic algorithm is proposed to determine the physical parameters that drive the ion exchange process. The diffusion equation describing binary ion exchange is solved numerically. The effect of field perturbation, due not only to the conductivity profile, but also to the proximity of adjacent waveguides or partial masking during a field-assisted burial, is accounted for. A semivectorial finite difference method is then employed to determine the modal properties of the waveguide structures. The model is validated by comparison with a fabricated waveguide containing a Bragg grating. The modeled waveguides are utilized in the design of a multimode interference (MMI) device. A novel genetic algorithm-based design methodology is developed to circumvent issues with the commonly used self-imaging theory that arise when the MMI device operates in the regime of weak guiding. A combination of semivectorial finite difference modeling in two transverse dimensions and mode propagation analysis (MPA) in the propagation direction is used to evaluate the merit of each trial design. Two examples are provided of a 1 x 4 power splitter, which show considerable improvement in power imbalance and polarization dependent loss over that obtained by self-imaging theory.

  4. Ultra-compact silicon photonic devices reconfigured by an optically induced semiconductor-to-metal transition.

    PubMed

    Ryckman, Judson D; Hallman, Kent A; Marvel, Robert E; Haglund, Richard F; Weiss, Sharon M

    2013-05-06

    Vanadium dioxide (VO(2)) is a promising reconfigurable optical material and has long been a focus of condensed matter research owing to its distinctive semiconductor-to-metal phase transition (SMT), a feature that has stimulated recent development of thermally reconfigurable photonic, plasmonic, and metamaterial structures. Here, we integrate VO(2) onto silicon photonic devices and demonstrate all-optical switching and reconfiguration of ultra-compact broadband Si-VO(2) absorption modulators (L < 1 μm) and ring-resonators (R ~ λ(0)). Optically inducing the SMT in a small, ~0.275 μm(2), active area of polycrystalline VO(2) enables Si-VO(2) structures to achieve record values of absorption modulation, ~4 dB μm(-1), and intracavity phase modulation, ~π/5 rad μm(-1). This in turn yields large, tunable changes to resonant wavelength, |Δλ(SMT)| ~ 3 nm, approximately 60 times larger than Si-only control devices, and enables reconfigurable filtering and optical modulation in excess of 7 dB from modest Q-factor (~10(3)), high-bandwidth ring resonators (>100 GHz). All-optical integrated Si-VO(2) devices thus constitute platforms for reconfigurable photonics, bringing new opportunities to realize dynamic on-chip networks and ultrafast optical shutters and modulators.

  5. Fabrication of Optical Devices Based on Printable Photonics Technology and Its Application for Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Tatsuro; Okuda, Norimichi; Yanagida, Yasuko; Tanaka, Satoru; Hatsuzawa, Takeshi

    The specific optical characteristics which can be observed nanostructured optical device have great potentials for applying to several applications such as lifescience, optical communications, and data storage. Application of nanostrcutured optical device to industry, we suggest “printable photonics technology” for fabrication of nanostructured optical device based on nanoimprint lithography (NIL). In this study, using printable photonics technology, fabrication of flexible photonic crystal (PC) and its application for biosensor was performed. Using printable photonics technology-based PC for biosensing application, high sensitive detection of protein adsorption (detection limit: 1 pg/ml) could be detected.

  6. Photon management of GaN-based optoelectronic devices via nanoscaled phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yu-Lin; Lai, Kun-Yu; Lee, Ming-Jui; Liao, Yu-Kuang; Ooi, Boon S.; Kuo, Hao-Chung; He-Hau, Jr.

    2016-09-01

    Photon management is essential in improving the performances of optoelectronic devices including light emitting diodes, solar cells and photo detectors. Beyond the advances in material growth and device structure design, photon management via nanoscaled phenomena have also been demonstrated as a promising way for further modifying/improving the device performance. The accomplishments achieved by photon management via nanoscaled phenomena include strain-induced polarization field management, crystal quality improvement, light extraction/harvesting enhancement, radiation pattern control, and spectrum management. In this review, we summarize recent development, challenges and underlying physics of photon management in GaN-based light emitting diodes and solar cells.

  7. Sub-100-nanosecond thermal reconfiguration of silicon photonic devices.

    PubMed

    Atabaki, Amir H; Eftekhar, Ali A; Yegnanarayanan, Siva; Adibi, Ali

    2013-07-01

    One of the limitations of thermal reconfiguration in silicon photonics is its slow response time. At the same time, there is a tradeoff between the reconfiguration speed and power consumption in conventional reconfiguration schemes that poses a challenge in improving the performance of microheaters. In this work, we theoretically and experimentally demonstrate that the high thermal conductivity of silicon can be exploited to tackle this tradeoff through direct pulsed excitation of the device silicon layer. We demonstrate 85 ns reconfiguration of 4 µm diameter microdisks, which is one order of magnitude improvement over the conventional microheaters. At the same time, 2.06 nm/mW resonance wavelength shift is achieved in these devices, which is in a par with the best microheater architectures optimized for low-power operation. We also present a system-level model that precisely describes the response of the demonstrated microheaters. A differentially addressed optical switch is also demonstrated that shows the possibility of switching in opposite directions (i.e., OFF-to-ON and ON-to-OFF) using the proposed reconfiguration scheme.

  8. Complete three photon Hong-Ou-Mandel interference at a three port device.

    PubMed

    Mährlein, Simon; von Zanthier, Joachim; Agarwal, Girish S

    2015-06-15

    We report the possibility of completely destructive interference of three indistinguishable photons on a three port device providing a generalisation of the well known Hong-Ou-Mandel interference of two indistinguishable photons on a two port device. Our analysis is based on the underlying mathematical framework of SU(3) transformations rather than SU(2) transformations. We show the completely destructive three photon interference for a large range of parameters of the three port device and point out the physical origin of such interference in terms of the contributions from different quantum paths. As each output port can deliver zero to three photons the device generates higher dimensional entanglement. In particular, different forms of entangled states of qudits can be generated depending on the device parameters. Our system is different from a symmetric three port beam splitter which does not exhibit a three photon Hong-Ou-Mandel interference.

  9. Individual carbon nanotubes for quantum electronic and quantum photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Nan

    2011-12-01

    demonstration of the suppression of blinking and spectral diffusion of individual CNTs by manipulation of their dielectric environment, resulting in five fold enhanced light emission. Such results open many new device applications in CNT nanophotonics, such as efficient CNT-based single photon sources. CNT-based FETs, SETS and light emitters studied in this thesis demonstrate the great potential for CNTs as optoelectronic material in future nanoelectronic and nanophotonic device applications.

  10. Waveguiding and bending modes in a plasma photonic crystal bandgap device

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B. Cappelli, M. A.

    2016-06-15

    Waveguiding and bending modes are investigated in a fully tunable plasma photonic crystal. The plasma device actively controls the propagation of free space electromagnetic waves in the S to X band of the microwave spectrum. An array of discharge plasma tubes form a square crystal lattice exhibiting a well-defined bandgap, with individual active switching of the plasma elements to allow for waveguiding and bending modes to be generated dynamically. We show, through simulations and experiments, the existence of transverse electric (TE) mode waveguiding and bending modes.

  11. Waveguiding and bending modes in a plasma photonic crystal bandgap device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    Waveguiding and bending modes are investigated in a fully tunable plasma photonic crystal. The plasma device actively controls the propagation of free space electromagnetic waves in the S to X band of the microwave spectrum. An array of discharge plasma tubes form a square crystal lattice exhibiting a well-defined bandgap, with individual active switching of the plasma elements to allow for waveguiding and bending modes to be generated dynamically. We show, through simulations and experiments, the existence of transverse electric (TE) mode waveguiding and bending modes.

  12. In situ control and monitoring of photonic device intermixing during laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Chia, C K; Suryana, M; Hopkinson, M

    2011-05-09

    Apparatus and method for the in situ control of photonic device intermixing processes are described. The setup utilises an optical fiber splitter which delivers photons to selectively anneal the photonic device and simultaneously measures the emission spectra from the device to monitor the intermixing process in real time. The in situ monitoring of a laser annealing process for the modification of a semiconductor laser diode facet is demonstrated using the instrumentation. A progressive blueshift in the emission wavelength of the device can clearly be observed in real time while high energy photons are delivered to anneal the device facet, hence enabling the control on the degree of intermixing required. This instrumentation is also ideal for broadening of emission spectra in quantum dot and quantum well based light emitting devices such as superluminescent diodes and broadband laser. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  13. Advanced Silicon Photonic Device Architectures for Optical Communications: Proposals and Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacher, Wesley David

    Photonic integrated circuits implemented on silicon (Si) hold the potential for densely integrated electro-optic and passive devices manufactured by the high-volume fabrication and sophisticated assembly processes used for complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) electronics. However, high index contrast Si photonics has a number of functional limitations. In this thesis, several devices are proposed, designed, and experimentally demonstrated to overcome challenges in the areas of resonant modulation, waveguide loss, fiber-to-chip coupling, and polarization control. The devices were fabricated using foundry services at IBM and A*STAR Institute of Microelectronics (IME). First, we describe coupling modulated microrings, in which the coupler between a microring and the bus waveguide is modulated. The device circumvents the modulation bandwidth vs. resonator linewidth trade-off of conventional intracavity modulated microrings. We demonstrate a Si coupling modulated microring with a small-signal modulation response free of the parasitic resonator linewidth limitations at frequencies up to about 6x the linewidth. Comparisons of eye diagrams show that coupling modulation achieved data rates > 2x the rate attainable with intracavity modulation. Second, we demonstrate a silicon nitride (Si3N4)-on-Si photonic platform with independent Si3N4 and Si waveguides and taper transitions to couple light between the layers. The platform combines the excellent passive waveguide properties of Si3N4 and the compatibility of Si waveguides with electro-optic devices. Within the platform, we propose and demonstrate dual-level, Si3N 4-on-Si, fiber-to-chip grating couplers that simultaneously have wide bandwidths and high coupling efficiencies. Conventional Si and Si3N 4 grating couplers suffer from a trade-off between bandwidth and coupling efficiency. The dual-level grating coupler achieved a peak coupling efficiency of -1.3 dB and a 1-dB bandwidth of 80 nm, a record for the

  14. The PHOTON explorations: sixteen activities, many uses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Judith; Amatrudo, Kathryn; Robinson, Kathleen; Hanes, Fenna

    2014-07-01

    The PHOTON Explorations were adapted from favorite demonstrations of teacher participants in the PHOTON projects of the New England Board of Higher Education as well as Hands-on-Optics activities and interesting demonstrations found on the web. Since the end of project PHOTON2 in 2006, the sixteen inquiry-based activities have formed the basis for a hands-on "home lab" distance- learning course that has been used for college students, teacher professional development and corporate training. With the support of OSA, they have been brought to life in a series of sixteen short videos aimed at a middle school audience. The Explorations are regularly used as activities in outreach activities for middle and high school students and are introduced yearly to an international audience at an outreach workshop at SPIE's Optics and Photonics meeting. In this paper we will demonstrate the Explorations, trace their origins and explain the content. We will also provide details on the development of the Exploration videos, the online course, and outreach materials and give statistics on their use in each format. Links to online resources will be provided.

  15. Enhancement of broadband optical absorption in photovoltaic devices by band-edge effect of photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshinori; Kawamoto, Yosuke; Fujita, Masayuki; Noda, Susumu

    2013-08-26

    We numerically investigate broadband optical absorption enhancement in thin, 400-nm thick microcrystalline silicon (µc-Si) photovoltaic devices by photonic crystals (PCs). We realize absorption enhancement by coupling the light from the free space to the large area resonant modes at the photonic band-edge induced by the photonic crystals. We show that multiple photonic band-edge modes can be produced by higher order modes in the vertical direction of the Si photovoltaic layer, which can enhance the absorption on multiple wavelengths. Moreover, we reveal that the photonic superlattice structure can produce more photonic band-edge modes that lead to further optical absorption. The absorption average in wavelengths of 500-1000 nm weighted to the solar spectrum (AM 1.5) increases almost twice: from 33% without photonic crystal to 58% with a 4 × 4 period superlattice photonic crystal; our result outperforms the Lambertian textured structure.

  16. Exploring neuronal activity with photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdieu, Laurent; Léger, Jean-François

    2015-10-01

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Information coding * Optical recordings of neuronal activity * Functional organization of the cortex at the level of a cortical column * Microarchitecture of a cortical column * Dynamics of neuronal populations * Outlook * Bibliography

  17. Active learning in optics and photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemela, Joseph J.

    2016-09-01

    Active learning in optics and photonics (ALOP) is a program of the International Basic Sciences Program at UNESCO, in collaboration with the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) and supported by SPIE, which is designed to help teachers in the developing world attract and retain students in the physical sciences. Using optics and photonics, it naturally attracts the interest of students and can be implemented using relatively low cost technologies, so that it can be more easily reproduced locally. The active learning methodology is student-centered, meaning the teachers give up the role of lecturer in favor of guiding and facilitating a learning process in which students engage in hands-on activities and active peer-peer discussions, and is shown to effectively enhance basic conceptual understanding of physics.

  18. Active Materials for Photonic Systems (AMPS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    market . Overall Program Summary The overall objective of the Active Materials for Photonic Systems (AMPS) program was to develop and demonstrate...mode fiber, with alignment tolerances of several microns functions well for data communications , single mode fiber is required for several significant...in the laser/optics community . Boeing and MCNC have signed a memorandum of agreement for commercialization and are actively seeking partners for

  19. Single photon frequency conversion and channelization based on microwave piezo-optomechanical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Linran; Zou, Changlin; Poot, Menno; Cheng, Risheng; Tang, Hong

    Cavity optomechanics holds very promising potentials for quantum information processing, as it provides both a convenient method to manipulate photons and a platform to bridge different quantum system. Especially, the integration of microwave devices with cavity optomechanics draws great interest as such a hybrid platform can provide strong electrical actuation, ultra-sensitive optical readout, and parametric mechanical signal amplification simultaneously in a single device. This hybrid platform enables great functionalities in manipulating photons, and builds direct link between microwave photon and optical photon, which is important for future quantum network. Aluminum nitride (AlN) is ideal for such hybrid platform. Besides low optical and mechanical loss, AlN possesses strong piezoelectric effect, which gives rise to strong coupling between microwave cavities and mechanical resonators. We will present our recent progress in developing integrated AlN hybrid platform for photon manipulation, such as optical amplification and absorption, cascaded optical delay, single photon frequency shifting, etc.

  20. Method for photon activation positron annihilation analysis

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W.

    2006-06-06

    A non-destructive testing method comprises providing a specimen having at least one positron emitter therein; determining a threshold energy for activating the positron emitter; and determining whether a half-life of the positron emitter is less than a selected half-life. If the half-life of the positron emitter is greater than or equal to the selected half-life, then activating the positron emitter by bombarding the specimen with photons having energies greater than the threshold energy and detecting gamma rays produced by annihilation of positrons in the specimen. If the half-life of the positron emitter is less then the selected half-life, then alternately activating the positron emitter by bombarding the specimen with photons having energies greater then the threshold energy and detecting gamma rays produced by positron annihilation within the specimen.

  1. Magneto-optical non-reciprocal devices in silicon photonics.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Yuya; Mizumoto, Tetsuya

    2014-02-01

    Silicon waveguide optical non-reciprocal devices based on the magneto-optical effect are reviewed. The non-reciprocal phase shift caused by the first-order magneto-optical effect is effective in realizing optical non-reciprocal devices in silicon waveguide platforms. In a silicon-on-insulator waveguide, the low refractive index of the buried oxide layer enhances the magneto-optical phase shift, which reduces the device footprints. A surface activated direct bonding technique was developed to integrate a magneto-optical garnet crystal on the silicon waveguides. A silicon waveguide optical isolator based on the magneto-optical phase shift was demonstrated with an optical isolation of 30 dB and insertion loss of 13 dB at a wavelength of 1548 nm. Furthermore, a four port optical circulator was demonstrated with maximum isolations of 15.3 and 9.3 dB in cross and bar ports, respectively, at a wavelength of 1531 nm.

  2. Magneto-optical non-reciprocal devices in silicon photonics

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Yuya; Mizumoto, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Silicon waveguide optical non-reciprocal devices based on the magneto-optical effect are reviewed. The non-reciprocal phase shift caused by the first-order magneto-optical effect is effective in realizing optical non-reciprocal devices in silicon waveguide platforms. In a silicon-on-insulator waveguide, the low refractive index of the buried oxide layer enhances the magneto-optical phase shift, which reduces the device footprints. A surface activated direct bonding technique was developed to integrate a magneto-optical garnet crystal on the silicon waveguides. A silicon waveguide optical isolator based on the magneto-optical phase shift was demonstrated with an optical isolation of 30 dB and insertion loss of 13 dB at a wavelength of 1548 nm. Furthermore, a four port optical circulator was demonstrated with maximum isolations of 15.3 and 9.3 dB in cross and bar ports, respectively, at a wavelength of 1531 nm. PMID:27877640

  3. Dual control active superconductive devices

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Beyer, James B.; Nordman, James E.; Hohenwarter, Gert K. G.

    1993-07-20

    A superconducting active device has dual control inputs and is constructed such that the output of the device is effectively a linear mix of the two input signals. The device is formed of a film of superconducting material on a substrate and has two main conduction channels, each of which includes a weak link region. A first control line extends adjacent to the weak link region in the first channel and a second control line extends adjacent to the weak link region in the second channel. The current flowing from the first channel flows through an internal control line which is also adjacent to the weak link region of the second channel. The weak link regions comprise small links of superconductor, separated by voids, through which the current flows in each channel. Current passed through the control lines causes magnetic flux vortices which propagate across the weak link regions and control the resistance of these regions. The output of the device taken across the input to the main channels and the output of the second main channel and the internal control line will constitute essentially a linear mix of the two input signals imposed on the two control lines. The device is especially suited to microwave applications since it has very low input capacitance, and is well suited to being formed of high temperature superconducting materials since all of the structures may be formed coplanar with one another on a substrate.

  4. Frequency Conversion of Single Photons: Physics, Devices, and Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    single -photon detector, a schematic of which is shown in Fig. 7.11. To pump both upconversion channels simultaneously, two pump lasers were used. As...112 7.13 Measured single - channel and dual- channel count rates versus input photon flux for two...node (where information is stored and processed ) and an appropriate in- terface by which distant nodes can communicate over a quantum channel . Most

  5. GeSn/SiGeSn photonic devices for mid-infrared applications: experiments and calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Genquan; Zhang, Qingfang; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Chunfu; Hao, Yue

    2016-11-01

    In this work, a fully strained GeSn photodetector with Sn atom percent of 8% is fabricated on Ge buffer on Si(001) substrate. The wavelength λ of light signals with obvious optical response for Ge0.92Sn0.08 photodetector is extended to 2 μm. The impacts of compressive strain introduced during the epitaxial growth of GeSn on Ge/Si are studied by simulation. Besides, the tensile strain engineering of GeSn photonic devices is also investigated. Lattice-matched GeSn/SiGeSn double heterostructure light emitting diodes (LEDs) with Si3N4 tensile liner stressor are designed to promote the further mid-infrared applications of GeSn photonic devices. With the releasing of the residual stress in Si3N4 liner, a large biaxial tensile strain is induced in GeSn active layer. Under biaxial tensile strain, the spontaneous emission rate rsp and internal quantum efficiency ηIQE for GeSn/SiGeSn LED are significantly improved.

  6. Controlled Growth of Monocrystalline Organo-Lead Halide Perovskite and Its Application in Photonic Devices.

    PubMed

    Mao, Wenxin; Zheng, Jialu; Zhang, Yupeng; Chesman, Anthony S R; Ou, Qingdong; Hicks, Jamie; Li, Feng; Wang, Ziyu; Graystone, Brenton; Bell, Toby D M; Rothmann, Mathias Uller; Duffy, Noel W; Spiccia, Leone; Cheng, Yi-Bing; Bao, Qiaoliang; Bach, Udo

    2017-10-02

    Organo-lead halide perovskites (OHPs) have recently emerged as a new class of exceptional optoelectronic materials, which may find use in many applications, including solar cells, light emitting diodes, and photodetectors. More complex applications, such as lasers and electro-optic modulators, require the use of monocrystalline perovskite materials to reach their ultimate performance levels. Conventional methods for forming single crystals of OHPs like methylammonium lead bromide (MAPbBr3 ) afford limited control over the product morphology, rendering the assembly of defined microcavity nanostructures difficult. We overcame this by synthesizing for the first time (MA)[PbBr3 ]⋅DMF (1), and demonstrating its facile transformation into monocrystalline MAPbBr3 microplatelets. The MAPbBr3 microplatelets were tailored into waveguide based photonic devices, of which an ultra-low propagation loss of 0.04 dB μm(-1) for a propagation distance of 100 μm was demonstrated. An efficient active electro-optical modulator (AEOM) consisting of a MAPbBr3 non-linear arc waveguide was demonstrated, exhibiting a 98.4 % PL intensity modulation with an external voltage of 45 V. This novel synthetic approach, as well as the demonstration of effective waveguiding, will pave the way for developing a wide range of photonic devices based on organo-lead halide perovskites. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Time-Bin-Encoded Boson Sampling with a Single-Photon Device.

    PubMed

    He, Yu; Ding, X; Su, Z-E; Huang, H-L; Qin, J; Wang, C; Unsleber, S; Chen, C; Wang, H; He, Y-M; Wang, X-L; Zhang, W-J; Chen, S-J; Schneider, C; Kamp, M; You, L-X; Wang, Z; Höfling, S; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2017-05-12

    Boson sampling is a problem strongly believed to be intractable for classical computers, but can be naturally solved on a specialized photonic quantum simulator. Here, we implement the first time-bin-encoded boson sampling using a highly indistinguishable (∼94%) single-photon source based on a single quantum-dot-micropillar device. The protocol requires only one single-photon source, two detectors, and a loop-based interferometer for an arbitrary number of photons. The single-photon pulse train is time-bin encoded and deterministically injected into an electrically programmable multimode network. The observed three- and four-photon boson sampling rates are 18.8 and 0.2 Hz, respectively, which are more than 100 times faster than previous experiments based on parametric down-conversion.

  8. Time-Bin-Encoded Boson Sampling with a Single-Photon Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yu; Ding, X.; Su, Z.-E.; Huang, H.-L.; Qin, J.; Wang, C.; Unsleber, S.; Chen, C.; Wang, H.; He, Y.-M.; Wang, X.-L.; Zhang, W.-J.; Chen, S.-J.; Schneider, C.; Kamp, M.; You, L.-X.; Wang, Z.; Höfling, S.; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2017-05-01

    Boson sampling is a problem strongly believed to be intractable for classical computers, but can be naturally solved on a specialized photonic quantum simulator. Here, we implement the first time-bin-encoded boson sampling using a highly indistinguishable (˜94 %) single-photon source based on a single quantum-dot-micropillar device. The protocol requires only one single-photon source, two detectors, and a loop-based interferometer for an arbitrary number of photons. The single-photon pulse train is time-bin encoded and deterministically injected into an electrically programmable multimode network. The observed three- and four-photon boson sampling rates are 18.8 and 0.2 Hz, respectively, which are more than 100 times faster than previous experiments based on parametric down-conversion.

  9. Design and characterization of integrated photonic devices fabricated using selective-area epitaxy and distributed Bragg reflector surface gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammert, Robert Morand

    Two of the main challenges involved with the fabrication of integrated photonic devices are the control of the in-plane band gap and the formation of integrable high-Q cavities. In-plane bandgap control is required to fabricate emitters, passive waveguides, detectors, and modulators all on a single wafer and all optimized for operation at a particular wavelength. The formation of integrable high-Q cavities is needed to integrate the laser source. Selective-area epitaxy (SAE) is a powerful technique which enables the tailoring of the in-plane band gap energy to fabricate numerous optimized photonic devices on a single wafer. In this dissertation, a three-step SAE process in the InGaAs-GaAs-AlGaAs material system is investigated. This process produced discrete Fabry-Perot lasers with threshold currents as low as 2.65 mA for an uncoated device and 0.97 mA for a coated device. Several integrated photonic devices that utilize the in-plane bandgap control of this SAE process are also investigated. These devices include lasers with nonabsorbing mirrors, dual-channel wavelength division multiplexing sources with integrated coupler, lasers with integrated photodiodes, lasers with integrated intracavity modulators, and lasers with integrated external cavity modulators. The second challenge involved with the fabricating of integrated photonic devices is the formation of integrable high-Q cavities. The optical feedback in most laser diodes is provided by cleaved facets. Unfortunately, cleaved facets are not an option when designing integrated photonic devices. However, optical feedback can be provided in integrated photonic devices using distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs). In this dissertation, ridge-waveguide DBR lasers with first-order surface gratings are investigated. These lasers exhibit low thresholds (6 mA), high slope efficiencies (0.46 W/A), and single-frequency operation with narrow linewidths (<25 kHz). By varying the period of the first-order DBR grating, a wide

  10. Impact of photon recycling and luminescence coupling in III-V photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, A. W.; Höhn, O.; Micha, D. N.; Wagner, L.; Helmers, H.; Bett, A. W.; Dimroth, F.

    2015-03-01

    Single junction photovoltaic devices composed of direct bandgap III-V semiconductors such as GaAs can exploit the effects of photon recycling to achieve record-high open circuit voltages. Modeling such devices yields insight into the design and material criteria required to achieve high efficiencies. For a GaAs cell to reach 28 % efficiency without a substrate, the Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) lifetimes of the electrons and holes must be longer than 3 μs and 100 ns respectively in a 2 μm thin active region coupled to a very high reflective (>99%) rear-side mirror. The model is generalized to account for luminescence coupling in tandem devices, which yields direct insight into the top cell's non-radiative lifetimes. A heavily current mismatched GaAs/GaAs tandem device is simulated and measured experimentally as a function of concentration between 3 and 100 suns. The luminescence coupling increases from 14 % to 33 % experimentally, whereas the model requires an increasing SRH lifetime for both electrons and holes to explain these experimental results. However, intermediate absorbing GaAs layers between the two sub-cells may also increasingly contribute to the luminescence coupling as a function of concentration.

  11. Photoresist Design for Elastomeric Light Tunable Photonic Devices.

    PubMed

    Nocentini, Sara; Martella, Daniele; Parmeggiani, Camilla; Wiersma, Diederik S

    2016-06-29

    An increasing interest in tunable photonic structures is growing within the photonic community. The usage of Liquid Crystalline Elastomer (LCE) structures in the micro-scale has been motivated by the potential to remotely control their properties. In order to design elastic photonic structures with a three-dimensional lithographic technique, an analysis of the different mixtures used in the micro-printing process is required. Previously reported LCE microstructures suffer damage and strong swelling as a limiting factor of resolution. In this article, we reported a detailed study on the writing process with four liquid crystalline photoresists, in which the percentage of crosslinker is gradually increased. The experiments reveal that exploiting the crosslinking degree is a possible means in which to obtain suspended lines with good resolution, quite good rigidity, and good elasticity, thereby preserving the possibility of deformation by light irradiation.

  12. Passive Temperature Stabilization of Silicon Photonic Devices Using Liquid Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Ptasinski, Joanna; Khoo, Iam-Choon; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2014-01-01

    In this work we explore the negative thermo-optic properties of liquid crystal claddings for passive temperature stabilization of silicon photonic integrated circuits. Photonic circuits are playing an increasing role in communications and computing, but they suffer from temperature dependent performance variation. Most existing techniques aimed at compensation of thermal effects rely on power hungry Joule heating. We show that integrating a liquid crystal cladding helps to minimize the effects of a temperature dependent drift. The advantage of liquid crystals lies in their high negative thermo-optic coefficients in addition to low absorption at the infrared wavelengths. PMID:28788565

  13. Silicon Photonics: All-Optical Devices for Linear and Nonlinear Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Jeffrey B.

    Silicon photonics has grown rapidly since the first Si electro-optic switch was demonstrated in 1987, and the field has never grown more quickly than it has over the past decade, fueled by milestone achievements in semiconductor processing technologies for low loss waveguides, high-speed Si modulators, Si lasers, Si detectors, and an enormous toolbox of passive and active integrated devices. Silicon photonics is now on the verge of major commercialization breakthroughs, and optical communication links remain the force driving integrated and Si photonics towards the first commercial telecom and datacom transceivers; however other potential and future applications are becoming uncovered and refined as researchers reveal the benefits of manipulating photons on the nanoscale. This thesis documents an exploration into the unique guided-wave and nonlinear properties of deeply-scaled high-index-contrast sub-wavelength Si waveguides. It is found that the tight confinement inherent to single-mode channel waveguides on the silicon-on-insulator platform lead to a rich physics, which can be leveraged for new devices extending well beyond simple passive interconnects and electro-optic devices. The following chapters will concentrate, in detail, on a number of unique physical features of Si waveguides and extend these attributes towards new and interesting devices. Linear optical properties and nonlinear optical properties are investigated, both of which are strongly affected by tight optical confinement of the guided waveguide modes. As will be shown, tight optical confinement directly results in strongly vectoral modal components, where the electric and magnetic fields of the guided modes extend into all spatial dimensions, even along the axis of propagation. In fact, the longitudinal electric and magnetic field components can be just as strong as the transverse fields, directly affecting the modal group velocity and energy transport properties since the longitudinal fields

  14. Photonic Devices Based on Surface and Composition-Engineered Infrared Colloidal Nanocrystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-27

    the first demonstration of PbSe nanocrystal photovoltaic devices and planar-mixed heterojunction quantum dot solar cells , the first observation of...demonstration of PbSe nanocrystal photovoltaic devices and planar-mixed heterojunction quantum dot solar cells , the first observation of two-photon...in hybrid devices, which is essential for designing efficient solar cells . By inspecting the light-absorption properties of P3HT and PbSe NQDs in

  15. Graphene active plasmonics for terahertz device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuji, Taiichi; Dubinov, Alexander; Ryzhii, Maxim; Boubanga Tombet, Stephane; Satou, Akira; Mitin, Vladimir; Shur, Michael S.; Ryzhii, Victor

    2015-05-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in the double-graphene-layer (DGL) active plasmonic heterostructures for the terahertz (THz) device applications. The DGL consists of a core shell in which a thin tunnel barrier layer is sandwiched by the two GLs being independently connected with the side contacts and outer gate stack layers at both sides. The DGL core shell works as a nano-capacitor, exhibiting inter-GL resonant tunneling (RT) when the band offset between the two GLs is aligned. The RT produces a strong nonlinearity with a negative differential conductance in the DGL current-voltage characteristics. The excitation of the graphene plasmons by the THz radiation resonantly modulates the tunneling currentvoltage characteristics. When the band offset is aligned to the THz photon energy, the DGL structure can mediate photonassisted RT, resulting in resonant emission or detection of the THz radiation. The cooperative double-resonant excitation with structure-sensitive graphene plasmons gives rise to various functionalities such as rectification (detection), photomixing, higher harmonic generation, and self-oscillation, in the THz device implementations.

  16. Photonic variable delay devices based on optical birefringence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, X. Steve (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Optical variable delay devices for providing variable true time delay to multiple optical beams simultaneously. A ladder-structured variable delay device comprises multiple basic building blocks stacked on top of each other resembling a ladder. Each basic building block has two polarization beamsplitters and a polarization rotator array arranged to form a trihedron; Controlling an array element of the polarization rotator array causes a beam passing through the array element either going up to a basic building block above it or reflect back towards a block below it. The beams going higher on the ladder experience longer optical path delay. An index-switched optical variable delay device comprises of many birefringent crystal segments connected with one another, with a polarization rotator array sandwiched between any two adjacent crystal segments. An array element in the polarization rotator array controls the polarization state of a beam passing through the element, causing the beam experience different refractive indices or path delays in the following crystal segment. By independently control each element in each polarization rotator array, variable optical path delays of each beam can be achieved. Finally, an index-switched variable delay device and a ladder-structured variable device are cascaded to form a new device which combines the advantages of the two individual devices. This programmable optic device has the properties of high packing density, low loss, easy fabrication, and virtually infinite bandwidth. The device is inherently two dimensional and has a packing density exceeding 25 lines/cm2. The delay resolution of the device is on the order of a femtosecond (one micron in space) and the total delay exceeds 10 nanosecond. In addition, the delay is reversible so that the same delay device can be used for both antenna transmitting and receiving.

  17. Magneto-Optical Thin Films for On-Chip Monolithic Integration of Non-Reciprocal Photonic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Lei; Hu, Juejun; Jiang, Peng; Kim, Hyun Suk; Kim, Dong Hun; Onbasli, Mehmet Cengiz; Dionne, Gerald F.; Ross, Caroline A.

    2013-01-01

    Achieving monolithic integration of nonreciprocal photonic devices on semiconductor substrates has been long sought by the photonics research society. One way to achieve this goal is to deposit high quality magneto-optical oxide thin films on a semiconductor substrate. In this paper, we review our recent research activity on magneto-optical oxide thin films toward the goal of monolithic integration of nonreciprocal photonic devices on silicon. We demonstrate high Faraday rotation at telecommunication wavelengths in several novel magnetooptical oxide thin films including Co substituted CeO2−δ, Co- or Fe-substituted SrTiO3−δ, as well as polycrystalline garnets on silicon. Figures of merit of 3~4 deg/dB and 21 deg/dB are achieved in epitaxial Sr(Ti0.2Ga0.4Fe0.4)O3−δ and polycrystalline (CeY2)Fe5O12 films, respectively. We also demonstrate an optical isolator on silicon, based on a racetrack resonator using polycrystalline (CeY2)Fe5O12/silicon strip-loaded waveguides. Our work demonstrates that physical vapor deposited magneto-optical oxide thin films on silicon can achieve high Faraday rotation, low optical loss and high magneto-optical figure of merit, therefore enabling novel high-performance non-reciprocal photonic devices monolithically integrated on semiconductor substrates. PMID:28788379

  18. Realizing the measure-device-independent quantum-key-distribution with passive heralded-single photon sources

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qin; Zhou, Xing-Yu; Guo, Guang-Can

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we put forward a new approach towards realizing measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with passive heralded single-photon sources. In this approach, both Alice and Bob prepare the parametric down-conversion source, where the heralding photons are labeled according to different types of clicks from the local detectors, and the heralded ones can correspondingly be marked with different tags at the receiver’s side. Then one can obtain four sets of data through using only one-intensity of pump light by observing different kinds of clicks of local detectors. By employing the newest formulae to do parameter estimation, we could achieve very precise prediction for the two-single-photon pulse contribution. Furthermore, by carrying out corresponding numerical simulations, we compare the new method with other practical schemes of measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution. We demonstrate that our new proposed passive scheme can exhibit remarkable improvement over the conventional three-intensity decoy-state measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with either heralded single-photon sources or weak coherent sources. Besides, it does not need intensity modulation and can thus diminish source-error defects existing in several other active decoy-state methods. Therefore, if taking intensity modulating errors into account, our new method will show even more brilliant performance. PMID:27759085

  19. Realizing the measure-device-independent quantum-key-distribution with passive heralded-single photon sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qin; Zhou, Xing-Yu; Guo, Guang-Can

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we put forward a new approach towards realizing measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with passive heralded single-photon sources. In this approach, both Alice and Bob prepare the parametric down-conversion source, where the heralding photons are labeled according to different types of clicks from the local detectors, and the heralded ones can correspondingly be marked with different tags at the receiver’s side. Then one can obtain four sets of data through using only one-intensity of pump light by observing different kinds of clicks of local detectors. By employing the newest formulae to do parameter estimation, we could achieve very precise prediction for the two-single-photon pulse contribution. Furthermore, by carrying out corresponding numerical simulations, we compare the new method with other practical schemes of measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution. We demonstrate that our new proposed passive scheme can exhibit remarkable improvement over the conventional three-intensity decoy-state measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with either heralded single-photon sources or weak coherent sources. Besides, it does not need intensity modulation and can thus diminish source-error defects existing in several other active decoy-state methods. Therefore, if taking intensity modulating errors into account, our new method will show even more brilliant performance.

  20. Workshop on photon activation therapy: proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.

    1985-04-18

    This Workshop was held concurrently with an IAEA Research Coordination Meeting on Exploration of the Possibility of High-LET Radiation for Non-conventional Radiotherapy in Cancer. The Workshop on Photon Activation Therapy (PAT) was given as a special session on April 18, as it was thoght PAT might eventually be found to be attractive to developing countries, which is a major concern of the IAEA. An effort was made to bring together representatives of the various groups known to be actively working on PAT; these included investigators from Sweden and Japan as well as the US. It is hoped that this compendium of papers will be of use to those currently active in this developing field, as well as to those who might join this area of endeavor in the future.

  1. Apparatus for photon activation positron annihilation analysis

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W.

    2007-06-12

    Non-destructive testing apparatus according to one embodiment of the invention comprises a photon source. The photon source produces photons having predetermined energies and directs the photons toward a specimen being tested. The photons from the photon source result in the creation of positrons within the specimen being tested. A detector positioned adjacent the specimen being tested detects gamma rays produced by annihilation of positrons with electrons. A data processing system operatively associated with the detector produces output data indicative of a lattice characteristic of the specimen being tested.

  2. Suspended core photonic microcells for sensing and device applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Jin, Wei; Ma, Jun; Wang, Ying; Ho, Hoi Lut; Shi, Xin

    2013-06-01

    In-line fiber-optic microcells are fabricated by postprocessing NKT LMA10 photonic crystal fibers. The cells are suspended core (SC) elements created by locally inflating some of the air holes while the core is being tapered. Based on a SC microcell with six air holes, a cantilever beam accelerometer is demonstrated. The microcells could also be used as gain and absorption cells for amplifier and spectroscopy applications.

  3. Mid-Infrared Photonic Devices Fabricated by Ultrafast Laser Inscription

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    follows on from an initial grant that lead to the developed of the first ZnSe waveguides. In this report will detail our development of Cr:ZnSe waveguide...TERMS inscription bulk materials, photonic inscription, integrated waveguids in ZnSe , laser inscription, EOARD 16.  SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...Ultrafast laser inscription ...................................................................................... 5 First waveguides in Cr2+: ZnSe

  4. Tuneable photonic device including an array of metamaterial resonators

    DOEpatents

    Brener, Igal; Wanke, Michael; Benz, Alexander

    2017-03-14

    A photonic apparatus includes a metamaterial resonator array overlying and electromagnetically coupled to a vertically stacked plurality of quantum wells defined in a semiconductor body. An arrangement of electrical contact layers is provided for facilitating the application of a bias voltage across the quantum well stack. Those portions of the semiconductor body that lie between the electrical contact layers are conformed to provide an electrically conductive path between the contact layers and through the quantum well stack.

  5. EDITORIAL: Semiconductor nanotechnology: novel materials and devices for electronics, photonics and renewable energy applications Semiconductor nanotechnology: novel materials and devices for electronics, photonics and renewable energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodnick, Stephen; Korkin, Anatoli; Krstic, Predrag; Mascher, Peter; Preston, John; Zaslavsky, Alex

    2010-04-01

    -14 August, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada) and the scope was expanded to include renewable energy research and development. This special issue of Nanotechnology is devoted to a better understanding of the function and design of semiconductor devices that are relevant to information technology (both electronics and photonics based) and renewable energy applications. The papers contained in this special issue are selected from the NGC/CSTC2009 symposium. Among them is a report by Ray LaPierre from McMaster University and colleagues at the University of Waterloo in Canada on the ability to manipulate single spins in nanowire quantum bits. The paper also reports the development of a testbed of a few qubits for general quantum information processing tasks [1]. Lower cost and greater energy conversion efficiency compared with thin film devices have led to a high level of activity in nanowire research related to photovoltaic applications. This special issue also contains results from an impedance spectroscopy study of core-shell GaAs nanowires to throw light on the transport and recombination mechanisms relevant to solar cell research [2]. Information technology research and renewable energy sources are research areas of enormous public interest. This special issue addresses both theoretical and experimental achievements and provides a stimulating outlook for technological developments in these highly topical fields of research. References [1] Caram J, Sandoval C, Tirado M, Comedi D, Czaban J, Thompson D A and LaPierre R R 2101 Nanotechnology 21 134007 [2] Baugh J, Fung J S and LaPierre RR 2010 Nanotechnology 21 134018

  6. Spin-photonic devices based on optical integration of Pancharatnam-Berry phase elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Junxiao; Liu, Yachao; Ke, Yougang; Liu, Yuanyuan; Luo, Hailu; Wen, Shuangchun

    2016-10-01

    Development of spin-photonic devices requires the integration of abundant functions and the miniaturization of the elements. Pancharatnam-Berry phase elements have fulfilled these requirements and can be attained by using dielectric metasurfaces with subwavelength nanostructures. Here, we review some of our works on Pancharatnam- Berry phase elements and make an introduction of some integrated spin-photonic devices. We propose to integrate Pancharatnam-Berry phase lens into dynamical phase lens, which can be conveniently used to modulate spin states of photons. By integrating a Pancharatnam-Berry phase lens into a conventional plano-concave lens, we can obtain spin-filtering of photons. Moreover, we demonstrate that the generation of complex wavefronts characterized with different spin states can be implemented by the Pancharatnam-Berry phase lens. Further, based on the spin-dependent property of Pancharatnam-Berry phase element, we realize the three-dimensional photonic spin Hall effect with lateral and longitudinal spin-dependent splitting simultaneously. We foresee that this optical integration concept of designing Pancharatnam-Berry phase elements, which circumvents the limitations of bulky optical components in conventional integrated optics, will significantly impact multipurpose optical elements, particularly spin-based photonics devices.

  7. Lithography process for patterning HgI2 photonic devices

    DOEpatents

    Mescher, Mark J.; James, Ralph B.; Hermon, Haim

    2004-11-23

    A photolithographic process forms patterns on HgI.sub.2 surfaces and defines metal sublimation masks and electrodes to substantially improve device performance by increasing the realizable design space. Techniques for smoothing HgI.sub.2 surfaces and for producing trenches in HgI.sub.2 are provided. A sublimation process is described which produces etched-trench devices with enhanced electron-transport-only behavior.

  8. Photon-assisted transport through a 1D-dot-graphene similar to STM model device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhiyun; Min, Yi; Zhou, Pengxia; Huang, Yanyan; Zhong, Chonggui

    2017-08-01

    By using the nonequilibrium Green function method, the photon-assisted electron transport through a graphene-based device similar to STM model is studied theoretically and numerically. The device is composed of a single central site (quantum dot) modulated by an oscillating electric field, a one-dimensional quantum wire and a two-dimensional graphene sheet. Some interesting results on transmission probability and current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the device are given in this paper. In the presence of an oscillating electric field, we find that besides the central two transmission peaks caused by graphene part, there appear photon-assisted peaks which are distributed on both sides of the Fermi level. The positions of the photon-assisted peaks are linear to the frequency of the oscillating electric field, and the widths of the photon-assisted peaks are relevant to the amplitude of the oscillating electric field. It is found that the current-voltage graphs exhibit step growth due to the existence of photon-assisted tunneling. We hope these results may have guidance meaning for the fabrication of optoelectronic devices.

  9. DNA-Based Photonic Bandgap Structures and Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-29

    Self-Assembly, Photonic Band Gap Materials Nadrian C . Seeman, Hong-Liang Cui New York University Office of Sponsored Programs New York University New...York, NY 10003 - REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE b. ABSTRACT UU c . THIS PAGE UU 2. REPORT TYPE Final Report 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 15. NUMBER OF... C . Mao, J. Kopatsch, T. Wang, and N.C. Seeman, Six-Helix Bundles Designed from DNA, NanoLetters 5, 661 -665 (2005). 2. N.C. Seeman, DNA Enables

  10. Chip-Scale WDM Devices Using Photonic Crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    following list includes all publications during the 3 year period of the program. IV.A. Journal papers 1. N. Wu, M. Soltani , B. Momeni, M. Javanmard, A...34 Physical Review B, vol. 68, pp. 233102-233105, 2003. 4. M. Soltani , A. Adibi, Y. Xu, and R. K. Lee, "Design of single-mode coupled resonator optical...409-414, 2004. 13 6. M. Badieirostami, B. Momeni, M. Soltani , A. Adibi, Y. Xu, and R. K. Lee, "Investigation of physical mechanisms in coupling photonic

  11. Efficient heralding of photonic qubits with applications to device-independent quantum key distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Pitkanen, David; Ma Xiongfeng; Luetkenhaus, Norbert; Wickert, Ricardo; Loock, Peter van

    2011-08-15

    We present an efficient way of heralding photonic qubit signals using linear optics devices. First, we show that one can obtain asymptotically perfect heralding and unit success probability with growing resources. Second, we show that even using finite resources, we can improve qualitatively and quantitatively over earlier heralding results. In the latter scenario, we can obtain perfect heralded photonic qubits while maintaining a finite success probability. We demonstrate the advantage of our heralding scheme by predicting key rates for device-independent quantum key distribution, taking imperfections of sources and detectors into account.

  12. Cephalopod-Inspired Reflectin-Based Photonic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Long

    Cephalopods are known as the chameleons of the sea due to their remarkable camouflage abilities. They can rapidly and accurately tune their skin's coloration, pattern, and texture to blend into the surrounding environment. This dynamic camouflage capability stems from their transparent dermis/epidermis and the optically-active, protein-based nanostructures found in embedded skin cells known as leucophores, chromatophores, and iridophores. Respectively, these cells provide a high contrast reflective white background, mechanically actuated pigmented pixels, and chemically actuated Bragg reflectors that function in concert to modulate incident visible light. Considerable effort has been devoted to understanding and emulating cephalopod camouflage abilities in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum, but few studies have attempted to translate these principles to the infrared region for nighttime stealth applications. Thus, the fabrication of bio-inspired infrared-reflective devices for infrared camouflage remains an unexplored area of research. To address this challenge, we have developed a high-throughput strategy for the gram-scale production, purification, and self-assembly of a unique cephalopod structural protein, reflectin. We eliminate time-consuming and costly steps commonly used in protein expression and purification and instead replace them with rapid, sequential filtrations all while retaining high purity (>99%). Using this reflectin protein, we fabricate dynamically tunable biomimetic camouflage coatings with relevance to industrial and military applications. We demonstrate reversible control of reflectin film coloration shifts over a range of 1,200 nm from the visible into the near infrared using an acid vapor stimulus. We then coat reflectin on flexible, transparent substrates that can adhere to arbitrary surfaces, and modulate the film reflectance by mechanical strain or applied heat. Finally, we prove electrical actuation can also induce

  13. Si-photonics based passive device packaging and module performance.

    PubMed

    Song, Jeong Hwan; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Huijuan; Li, Chao; Lo, Guo Qiang

    2011-09-12

    We report a fully packaged silicon passive waveguide device designed for a tunable filter based on a ring-resonator. Polarization diversity circuits prevent polarization dependant issues in the silicon ring-resonator. For the device packaging, the YAG laser welding technique has been used for pigtailing both of the input and output fibers. Post welding misalignment was compensated by mechanical fine tuning using the seesaw effect via power monitoring. Packaging loss less than 1.5 dB with respect to chip measurement has been achieved using 10 µm-curvature radius lensed fibers. In addition, the packaging process and the module performance are presented.

  14. Photonic materials, structures and devices for Reststrahlen optics.

    PubMed

    Feng, K; Streyer, W; Zhong, Y; Hoffman, A J; Wasserman, D

    2015-11-30

    We present a review of existing and potential next-generation far-infrared (20-60 μm) optical materials and devices. The far-infrared is currently one of the few remaining frontiers on the optical spectrum, a space underdeveloped and lacking in many of the optical and optoelectronic materials and devices taken for granted in other, more technologically mature wavelength ranges. The challenges associated with developing optical materials, structures, and devices at these wavelengths are in part a result of the strong phonon absorption in the Reststrahlen bands of III-V semiconductors that collectively span the far-infrared. More than just an underexplored spectral band, the far-IR may also be of potential importance for a range of sensing applications in astrochemistry, biology, and industrial and geological processes. Additionally, with a suitable far-IR optical infrastructure, it is conceivable that even more applications could emerge. In this review, we will present recent progress on far-infrared materials and phenomena such as phononic surface modes, engineered composite materials, and optoelectronic devices that have the potential to serve as the next generation of components in a far-infrared optical tool-kit.

  15. Experimental generation of single photons via active multiplexing

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Xiaosong; Zotter, Stefan; Kofler, Johannes; Jennewein, Thomas; Zeilinger, Anton

    2011-04-15

    An on-demand single-photon source is a fundamental building block in quantum science and technology. We experimentally demonstrate the proof of concept for a scheme to generate on-demand single photons via actively multiplexing several heralded photons probabilistically produced from pulsed spontaneous parametric down-conversions (SPDCs). By utilizing a four-photon-pair source, an active feed-forward technique, and an ultrafast single-photon router, we show a fourfold enhancement of the output photon rate. Simultaneously, we maintain the quality of the output single-photon states, confirmed by correlation measurements. We also experimentally verify, via Hong-Ou-Mandel interference, that the router does not affect the indistinguishability of the single photons. Furthermore, we give numerical simulations, which indicate that photons based on multiplexing of four SPDC sources can outperform the heralding based on highly advanced photon-number-resolving detectors. Our results show a route for on-demand single-photon generation and the practical realization of scalable linear optical quantum-information processing.

  16. Photonic crystal lasers using wavelength-scale embedded active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Shinji; Sato, Tomonari; Takeda, Koji; Shinya, Akihiko; Nozaki, Kengo; Kuramochi, Eiichi; Taniyama, Hideaki; Notomi, Masaya; Fujii, Takuro; Hasebe, Koichi; Kakitsuka, Takaaki

    2014-01-01

    Lasers with ultra-low operating energy are desired for use in chip-to-chip and on-chip optical interconnects. If we are to reduce the operating energy, we must reduce the active volume. Therefore, a photonic crystal (PhC) laser with a wavelength-scale cavity has attracted a lot of attention because a PhC provides a large Q-factor with a small volume. To improve this device's performance, we employ an embedded active region structure in which the wavelength-scale active region is buried with an InP PhC slab. This structure enables us to achieve effective confinement of both carriers and photons, and to improve the thermal resistance of the device. Thus, we have obtained a large external differential quantum efficiency of 55% and an output power of -10 dBm by optical pumping. For electrical pumping, we use a lateral p-i-n structure that employs Zn diffusion and Si ion implantation for p-type and n-type doping, respectively. We have achieved room-temperature continuous-wave operation with a threshold current of 7.8 µA and a maximum 3 dB bandwidth of 16.2 GHz. The results of an experimental bit error rate measurement with a 10 Gbit s-1 NRZ signal reveal the minimum operating energy for transferring a single bit of 5.5 fJ. These results show the potential of this laser to be used for very short reach interconnects. We also describe the optimal design of cavity quality (Q) factor in terms of achieving a large output power with a low operating energy using a calculation based on rate equations. When we assume an internal absorption loss of 20 cm-1, the optimized coupling Q-factor is 2000.

  17. Photonic quasi-crystal light emitting diodes: comparisons of device performance with pattern pitch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillin, Martin; Charlton, Martin D. B.; Gong, Zheng; Khokhar, Ali Z.; Massoubre, David; Watson, Ian M.; Gu, Erdan; Dawson, Martin D.; Rahman, Faiz; Johnson, Nigel P.; Macintyre, Douglas; De La Rue, Richard M.; Parsons, Keith; Lin, Sean

    2010-05-01

    In this paper we discuss theoretical modelling methods for the design of photonic crystal and photonic quasi-crystal (PQC) LEDs - and apply them to the analysis of the extraction enhancement performance and shaping of the emitted beam profile of PQC-LED structures. In particular we investigate the effect of the pitch of the PQC patterning, and consider the physical mechanisms giving rise to performance improvements. In addition, we examine the relative contributions to performance improvements from effective index reduction effects that alter the conditions for total internal reflection at the device air interface, and from photonic crystal scattering effects that give rise to radically improved extraction performance. Comparisons are made with the performance of recently fabricated devices.

  18. Low-voltage tunable photonics devices: grove on thin porous structures containing liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criante, Luigino; Moretti, Luca; Scotognella, Francesco

    2013-09-01

    In this study we demonstrate the fabrication of one-dimensional porous multilayer photonic crystals made by metal oxide nanoparticles. We show the infiltration of these porous structures with a liquid crystal via a very simple method, resulting in a red shift of the photonic band gap due to increase of the effective refractive index of the medium. Taking advantage of structure thickness of only few micrometers, we have observed a blue shift of the photonic band gap owing the non-linear response of the liquid crystals by applying a very low external electric voltage, i.e. 8 V. The experimental observation of electric voltage tuning on the transmission spectrum has been corroborated by transfer matrix method simulations, by taking into account the non-linear optical properties of the liquid crystal. In this framework, we propose how the optical properties of these structure can be accurately predicted by our simulation software in terms of diffraction efficiency, of photonic band gap position when the porous photonic crystals is doped with a liquid crystal, of modulation of the photonic band gap position (electro-optic tuning) in the presence of applied voltage. According with results carried out by the custom simulation software it is possible to control the optical proprieties of the photonics crystal in very thin structures. Furthermore, the presented device could be very interesting for applications where high sensitivity sensor and selective color tunability is needed with the use of cheap and low voltage power supplies.

  19. Diffusion doped p-i-n/p-n diodes for scalable silicon photonics devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandi, Riddhi; Kurudi, Sreevatsa; Das, Bijoy Krishna

    2017-05-01

    Diffusion doped p-i-n/p-n diodes in SOI substrate is proposed for the fabrication of active silicon photonics devices with scalable waveguide cross-sections. The p-type and n-type diffusion doping parameters are optimized for the fabrication of tunable single-mode waveguide phase-shifters with microns to submicron cross-sectional dimensions. The simulations results show that the shape of depletion layer can be effectively engineered by suitably positioning the rib waveguide with respect to the gap between doping windows. We could thus introduce an additional control parameter to optimize over-all figure of merits of the phase-shifter for various applications. For an optimized set of diffusion parameters, the VπLπ of single-mode waveguides designed with 1μm, 0.5μm, and 0.25μm device layers (under reverse bias operating in TE-polarization at λ 1550 nm) are found as 2.7 V-cm, 2.1 V-cm, and 1.6 V-cm, respectively. The typical p-n junction capacitance of an optimized 0.25μm single-mode waveguide is estimated to be < 0.5 fF/μm, which is comparable to that of ion-implanted p-n waveguide junctions.

  20. Active temporal multiplexing of indistinguishable heralded single photons

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, C.; Zhang, X.; Liu, Z.; Collins, M. J.; Mahendra, A.; Helt, L. G.; Steel, M. J.; Choi, D. -Y.; Chae, C. J.; Leong, P. H. W.; Eggleton, B. J.

    2016-01-01

    It is a fundamental challenge in quantum optics to deterministically generate indistinguishable single photons through non-deterministic nonlinear optical processes, due to the intrinsic coupling of single- and multi-photon-generation probabilities in these processes. Actively multiplexing photons generated in many temporal modes can decouple these probabilities, but key issues are to minimize resource requirements to allow scalability, and to ensure indistinguishability of the generated photons. Here we demonstrate the multiplexing of photons from four temporal modes solely using fibre-integrated optics and off-the-shelf electronic components. We show a 100% enhancement to the single-photon output probability without introducing additional multi-photon noise. Photon indistinguishability is confirmed by a fourfold Hong–Ou–Mandel quantum interference with a 91±16% visibility after subtracting multi-photon noise due to high pump power. Our demonstration paves the way for scalable multiplexing of many non-deterministic photon sources to a single near-deterministic source, which will be of benefit to future quantum photonic technologies. PMID:26996317

  1. Active temporal multiplexing of indistinguishable heralded single photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, C.; Zhang, X.; Liu, Z.; Collins, M. J.; Mahendra, A.; Helt, L. G.; Steel, M. J.; Choi, D.-Y.; Chae, C. J.; Leong, P. H. W.; Eggleton, B. J.

    2016-03-01

    It is a fundamental challenge in quantum optics to deterministically generate indistinguishable single photons through non-deterministic nonlinear optical processes, due to the intrinsic coupling of single- and multi-photon-generation probabilities in these processes. Actively multiplexing photons generated in many temporal modes can decouple these probabilities, but key issues are to minimize resource requirements to allow scalability, and to ensure indistinguishability of the generated photons. Here we demonstrate the multiplexing of photons from four temporal modes solely using fibre-integrated optics and off-the-shelf electronic components. We show a 100% enhancement to the single-photon output probability without introducing additional multi-photon noise. Photon indistinguishability is confirmed by a fourfold Hong-Ou-Mandel quantum interference with a 91+/-16% visibility after subtracting multi-photon noise due to high pump power. Our demonstration paves the way for scalable multiplexing of many non-deterministic photon sources to a single near-deterministic source, which will be of benefit to future quantum photonic technologies.

  2. X-ray photon diagnostics devices for the European XFEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grünert, Jan; Buck, Jens; Ozkan, Cigdem; Freund, Wolfgang; Molodtsov, Serguei

    2012-10-01

    X-ray Free-Electron-Laser (XFEL) facilities like the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) in the USA, SACLA in Japan, and the European XFEL under construction in Germany are 4th generation light sources which allow research of at the same time extremely small structures (Ångström resolution) and extremely fast phenomena (femtosecond resolution). Unlike the pulses from a conventional optical laser, the radiation in these sources is created by the Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) process when electron bunches pass through very long segmented undulators. The shot noise at the origin of this process leads to significant pulse-to-pulse variations of pulse intensity, spectrum, wavefront, temporal properties etc. so that for user experiments an online monitoring of these properties is mandatory. Additionally, the adjustment of the long segmented undulators requires dedicated diagnostics such as an undulator commissioning spectrometer and spontaneous radiation analysis. The extreme brilliance and resulting single-shot damage potential are difficult to handle for any XFEL diagnostics. Apart from the large energy range of operation of the facility from 280eV to 25keV in FEL fundamental, the particular challenge for the European XFEL diagnostics is the high intra bunch train photon pulse repetition rate of 4.5MHz, potentially causing additional damage by high heat loads and making shot-to-shot diagnostics very demanding. This presentation reports on the facility concepts, recent progress in instrumentation development, and the choices to compromise diagnostics performance between resolution/accuracy on one hand and shot-to-shot capabilities and energy range on the other.

  3. Radiation Testing, Characterization and Qualification Challenges for Modern Microelectronics and Photonics Devices and Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Cohn, Lewis M.

    2008-01-01

    At GOMAC 2007, we discussed a selection of the challenges for radiation testing of modern semiconductor devices focusing on state-of-the-art memory technologies. This included FLASH non-volatile memories (NVMs) and synchronous dynamic random access memories (SDRAMs). In this presentation, we extend this discussion in device packaging and complexity as well as single event upset (SEU) mechanisms using several technology areas as examples including: system-on-a-chip (SOC) devices and photonic or fiber optic systems. The underlying goal is intended to provoke thought for understanding the limitations and interpretation of radiation testing results.

  4. Low-temperature optical processing of semiconductor devices using photon effects

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.L.; Cudzinovic, M.; Symko, M.

    1995-08-01

    In an RTA process the primary purpose of the optical energy incident on the semiconductor sample is to increase its temperature rapidly. The activation of reactions involved in processes such as the formation of junctions, metal contacts, deposition of oxides or nitrides, takes place purely by the temperature effects. We describe the observation of a number of new photonic effects that take place within the bulk and at the interfaces of a semiconductor when a semiconductor device is illuminated with a spectrally broad-band light. Such effects include changes in the diffusion properties of impurities in the semiconductor, increased diffusivity of impurities across interfaces, and generation of electric fields that can alter physical and chemical properties of the interface. These phenomena lead to certain unique effects in an RTA process that do not occur during conventional furnace annealing under the same temperature conditions. Of particular interest are observations of low-temperature alloying of Si-Al interfaces, enhanced activation of phosphorus in Si during drive-in, low-temperature oxidation of Si, and gettering of impurities at low-temperatures under optical illumination. These optically induced effects, in general, diminish with an increase in the temperature, thus allowing thermally activated reaction rates to dominate at higher temperatures.

  5. Versatile alignment layer method for new types of liquid crystal photonic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Finnemeyer, V.; Bryant, D.; Lu, L.; Bos, P.; Reich, R.; Clark, H.; Berry, S.; Bozler, C.; Yaroshchuk, O.

    2015-07-21

    Liquid crystal photonic devices are becoming increasingly popular. These devices often present a challenge when it comes to creating a robust alignment layer in pre-assembled cells. In this paper, we describe a method of infusing a dye into a microcavity to produce an effective photo-definable alignment layer. However, previous research on such alignment layers has shown that they have limited stability, particularly against subsequent light exposure. As such, we further describe a method of utilizing a pre-polymer, infused into the microcavity along with the liquid crystal, to provide photostability. We demonstrate that the polymer layer, formed under ultraviolet irradiation of liquid crystal cells, has been effectively localized to a thin region near the substrate surface and provides a significant improvement in the photostability of the liquid crystal alignment. This versatile alignment layer method, capable of being utilized in devices from the described microcavities to displays, offers significant promise for new photonics applications.

  6. Monolithic photonic integration technology platform and devices at wavelengths beyond 2μm for gas spectroscopy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latkowski, S.; van Veldhoven, P. J.; Hänsel, A.; D'Agostino, D.; Rabbani-Haghighi, H.; Docter, B.; Bhattacharya, N.; Thijs, P. J. A.; Ambrosius, H. P. M. M.; Smit, M. K.; Williams, K. A.; Bente, E. A. J. M.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper a generic monolithic photonic integration technology platform and tunable laser devices for gas sensing applications at 2 μm will be presented. The basic set of long wavelength optical functions which is fundamental for a generic photonic integration approach is realized using planar, but-joint, active-passive integration on indium phosphide substrate with active components based on strained InGaAs quantum wells. Using this limited set of basic building blocks a novel geometry, widely tunable laser source was designed and fabricated within the first long wavelength multiproject wafer run. The fabricated laser operates around 2027 nm, covers a record tuning range of 31 nm and is successfully employed in absorption measurements of carbon dioxide. These results demonstrate a fully functional long wavelength photonic integrated circuit that operates at these wavelengths. Moreover, the process steps and material system used for the long wavelength technology are almost identical to the ones which are used in the technology process at 1.5μm which makes it straightforward and hassle-free to transfer to the photonic foundries with existing fabrication lines. The changes from the 1550 nm technology and the trade-offs made in the building block design and layer stack will be discussed.

  7. Dynamic photon heat transport through a mesoscopic Josephson device biased by dc and ac voltages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wen-Ting; Zhao, Hong-Kang

    2017-10-01

    Photon heat transport through a mesoscopic Josephson junction (MJJ) device under the perturbation of dc and ac voltages has been investigated, where the MJJ device is coupled to photon reservoirs, and the Caldeira-Leggett circuit theory has been used. The photon heat current and differential heat conductance have been evaluated to show the dynamic behaviors governed by the applied fields. The dc voltage V induces time t oscillating supercurrent with frequency ω = 2 eV / ħ. The ac voltage V ˜ cos(Ω0 t) generates a series of supercurrent branches relating to the ac voltage frequency Ω0 and its magnitude V ˜ . The photon heat current is determined by the superposition of different heat current branches induced by the dc and ac fields. The frequencies ω and Ω0 relating to dc and ac fields play important role in controlling the photon heat current and conductance. The detailed magnitude and oscillation structure are strongly dependent on the frequency ratio ω /Ω0, and the scaled magnitude of ac field Λ = 2 e V ˜/ħΩ0. Resonant heat current appears when ω and Ω0 possess commensurate relations, where the superposition of heat current branches displays coherent interference. As ω and Ω0 possess incommensurate relations, heat current is much smaller, and it fluctuates fiercely compared with the commensurate cases. Beat-like resonance emerges by tuning the frequencies ω and Ω0 at some definite values of Coulomb energy.

  8. Low-voltage high-performance silicon photonic devices and photonic integrated circuits operating up to 30 Gb/s.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gyungock; Park, Jeong Woo; Kim, In Gyoo; Kim, Sanghoon; Kim, Sanggi; Lee, Jong Moo; Park, Gun Sik; Joo, Jiho; Jang, Ki-Seok; Oh, Jin Hyuk; Kim, Sun Ae; Kim, Jong Hoon; Lee, Jun Young; Park, Jong Moon; Kim, Do-Won; Jeong, Deog-Kyoon; Hwang, Moon-Sang; Kim, Jeong-Kyoum; Park, Kyu-Sang; Chi, Han-Kyu; Kim, Hyun-Chang; Kim, Dong-Wook; Cho, Mu Hee

    2011-12-19

    We present high performance silicon photonic circuits (PICs) defined for off-chip or on-chip photonic interconnects, where PN depletion Mach-Zehnder modulators and evanescent-coupled waveguide Ge-on-Si photodetectors were monolithically integrated on an SOI wafer with CMOS-compatible process. The fabricated silicon PIC(off-chip) for off-chip optical interconnects showed operation up to 30 Gb/s. Under differential drive of low-voltage 1.2 V(pp), the integrated 1 mm-phase-shifter modulator in the PIC(off-chip) demonstrated an extinction ratio (ER) of 10.5dB for 12.5 Gb/s, an ER of 9.1dB for 20 Gb/s, and an ER of 7.2 dB for 30 Gb/s operation, without adoption of travelling-wave electrodes. The device showed the modulation efficiency of V(π)L(π) ~1.59 Vcm, and the phase-shifter loss of 3.2 dB/mm for maximum optical transmission. The Ge photodetector, which allows simpler integration process based on reduced pressure chemical vapor deposition exhibited operation over 30 Gb/s with a low dark current of 700 nA at -1V. The fabricated silicon PIC(intra-chip) for on-chip (intra-chip) photonic interconnects, where the monolithically integrated modulator and Ge photodetector were connected by a silicon waveguide on the same chip, showed on-chip data transmissions up to 20 Gb/s, indicating potential application in future silicon on-chip optical network. We also report the performance of the hybrid silicon electronic-photonic IC (EPIC), where a PIC(intra-chip) chip and 0.13μm CMOS interface IC chips were hybrid-integrated.

  9. Optoelectronic Devices, Sensors, Communication and Multimedia, Photonics Applications and Web Engineering, Wilga, May 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2012-05-01

    This paper is the fourth part (out of five) of the research survey of WILGA Symposium work, May 2012 Edition, concerned with Optoelectronic Devices, Sensors, Communication and Multimedia (Video and Audio) technologies. It presents a digest of chosen technical work results shown by young researchers from different technical universities from this country during the Jubilee XXXth SPIE-IEEE Wilga 2012, May Edition, symposium on Photonics and Web Engineering. Topical tracks of the symposium embraced, among others, nanomaterials and nanotechnologies for photonics, sensory and nonlinear optical fibers, object oriented design of hardware, photonic metrology, optoelectronics and photonics applications, photonics-electronics co-design, optoelectronic and electronic systems for astronomy and high energy physics experiments, JET tokamak and pi-of-the sky experiments development. The symposium is an annual summary in the development of numerable Ph.D. theses carried out in this country in the area of advanced electronic and photonic systems. It is also a great occasion for SPIE, IEEE, OSA and PSP students to meet together in a large group spanning the whole country with guests from this part of Europe. A digest of Wilga references is presented [1-270].

  10. Photonic nanomanufacturing of high performance energy device on flexible substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yongchao; Wang, Shutong; Li, Ruozhou; Hou, Tingxiu; Chen, Min; Hu, Anming

    2017-02-01

    With the developing of wearable electronics and information society, integrated energy storage devices are urgently demanded to be integrated on flexible substrates. We successfully demonstrated using direct laser-reduction of the hydrated GO and chloroauric acid (HAuCl4) nanocomposite to fabricate in-plane micro-supercapacitors (MSCs) with fast ion diffusion on paper. The electrode conductivity of these flexible nanocomposites reaches up to 1.1 x 106 S m-1, which enhances superior rate capability of micro-supercapacitors, and large specific capacitances of 0.77 mF cm-2 (17.2 F cm-3 for volumetric capacitance) at 1 V s-1, and 0.46 mF cm-2 (10.2 F cm-3) at 100 V s-1. We also have demonstrated that pulsed laser irradiation rapidly converts the polyimide (PI) sheets into an electrically conductive porous carbon structure in ambient conditions. The specific capacitance of single layer surface supercapacitors can reach 20.4 mF/cm2 at 0.1 mA/cm2 discharge current density. Furthermore, we successfully fabricate the multi-layer supercapacitor with the PI substrate using 3D femtosecond laser direct writing, and the specific capacitances of three layers supercapacitors is 37.5 mF/cm2.

  11. Photon-noise effect on detection in coherent active images.

    PubMed

    Réfrégier, Philippe; Goudail, François; Delyon, Guillaume

    2004-01-15

    We analyze photon-noise effects on target detection performance in low-flux coherent active imagery systems. We show that when photon noise is expected, the performance of classical detection techniques designed for pure and fully developed speckle images can be improved with no increase in algorithm complexity. Furthermore, the mean photon number under which photon noise becomes sensitive is higher when the target and background mean values are unknown than in the idealized case, where they are assumed to be known, and when the reflectivity ratio between the target and the background is low.

  12. Towards brilliant, compact x-ray sources: a new x-ray photonic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, Brian; Mandal, Sudeep; Salisbury, Joshua; Edic, Peter; Hopkins, Forrest; Lee, Susanne M.

    2017-05-01

    General Electric has designed an innovative x-ray photonic device that concentrates a polychromatic beam of diverging x-rays into a less divergent, parallel, or focused x-ray beam. The device consists of multiple, thin film multilayer stacks. X-rays incident on a given multilayer stack propagate within a high refractive index transmission layer while undergoing multiple total internal reflections from a novel, engineered multilayer containing materials of lower refractive index. Development of this device could lead to order-of-magnitude flux density increases, over a large broadband energy range from below 20 keV to above 300 keV. In this paper, we give an overview of the device and present GE's progress towards fabricating prototype devices.

  13. NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP): Space Qualification Guidelines of Optoelectronic and Photonic Devices for Optical Communication Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Quiesup

    2001-01-01

    Key elements of space qualification of opto-electric and photonic optical devices were overviewed. Efforts were concentrated on the reliability concerns of the devices needed for potential applications in space environments. The ultimate goal for this effort is to gradually establish enough data to develop a space qualification plan of newly developed specific photonic parts using empirical and numerical models to assess the life-time and degradation of the devices for potential long term space missions.

  14. Design of tunable devices using one-dimensional Fibonacci photonic crystals incorporating graphene at terahertz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Li-an; Liu, Peiguo; Li, Gaosheng

    2016-10-01

    For the one-dimensional generalized Fibonacci photonic crystals incorporating graphene, we present many valuable properties and design the tunable devices accordingly with the help of the transfer matrix method in the frequency range of terahertz. For the common structure, all of dielectric layers are cladded by graphene, we design the high-Q tunable filter with double peaks by changing the Fibonacci distribution and chemical potential. In order to reduce the crosstalk of signals through this filter, a heterostructure based on the current structure and the one without graphene is utilized to separate the two peaks. Also, we fabricate the tunable switch by altering the parity of periodic number. Besides, through cladding the graphene on the one of the dielectrics only, we obtain other two kinds of cells. Combining these cells arbitrarily as the supercell to develop the periodic structure, the number of forbidden bands is increased in accordance with certain rules so that this structure with supercell is suitable as the multi-stop filter. If the active medium is introduced, the imaginary part of the complex permittivity of the material would be negative, which means the energy amplification. For our quasi-periodic structures with active medium, the functions of chemical potential, damping constant and reference wavelength are investigated.

  15. Platelet actively cooled thermal management devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueggenburg, H. H.; Hidahl, J. W.; Kessler, E. L.; Rousar, D. C.

    1992-07-01

    An overview of 28 years of actively-cooled platelet thermal management devices design and development history is presented. Platelet devices are created by bonding together thin metal sheets (platelets) which contain chemically-etched coolant pasages. The bonding process produces an intricate and precise matrix of coolant passages and structural walls contained within a monolithic structure. Thirteen specific applications for platelet thermal management devices are described. These devices are cooled using convective, film, and transpiration cooling techniques. Platelet thermal management devices have been fabricated from a variety of metals, cooled with a variety of fluids, and operated at heat fluxes up to 200 Btu/sq in.-sec.

  16. Prospects of Wannier functions in investigating photonic crystal all-optical devices for signal processing.

    PubMed

    Muradoglu, M S; Baghai-Wadji, A R; Ng, T W

    2010-04-01

    Wannier functions derived from Bloch functions have been identified as an efficient means of analyzing the properties of photonic crystals in which localized functions have now opened the door for 2D and 3D structures containing defects to be investigated. In this paper, based on the Maxwell equations in diagonalized form and utilizing Bloch waves we have obtained an equivalent system of algebraic equations in eigenform. By establishing and exploiting several distinct properties of the resulting eigenpairs, we demonstrate an ability to construct Wannier functions associated with the simplest one-dimensional photonic structure. More importantly, the numerical investigation of the inner- and intra-band orthonormality conditions as well as Hilbert space partitioning features shows a capability for multi-resolution analysis that will make all-optical signal processing devices with photonic crystal structures feasible.

  17. NIL fabrication of a polymer-based photonic sensor device in P3SENS project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannone, Domenico; Dortu, Fabian; Bernier, Damien; Johnson, Nigel P.; Sharp, Graham J.; Hou, Lianping; Khokhar, Ali Z.; Fürjes, Péter; Kurunczi, Sándor; Petrik, Peter; Horvath, Robert; Aalto, Timo; Kolari, Kai; Ylinen, Sami; Haatainen, Tomi; Egger, Holger

    2012-06-01

    We present the most recent results of EU funded project P3SENS (FP7-ICT-2009.3.8) aimed at the development of a low-cost and medium sensitivity polymer based photonic biosensor for point of care applications in proteomics. The fabrication of the polymer photonic chip (biosensor) using thermal nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is described. This technique offers the potential for very large production at reduced cost. However several technical challenges arise due to the properties of the used materials. We believe that, once the NIL technique has been optimised to the specific materials, it could be even transferred to a kind of roll-to-roll production for manufacturing a very large number of photonic devices at reduced cost.

  18. The first photon shutter development for APS insertion device beamline front ends

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Deming; Nian, H.L.T.; Wang, Zhibi; Collins, J.T.; Ryding, D.G.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1992-01-01

    One of the most critical components on the Advanced Photon Source (APS) insertion device (ID) beamline front ends is the first photon shutter. It operates in two modes to fully intercept the high total power and high-heat flux ID photon beam in seconds (normal mode) or in less than 100 ms (emergency fast mode). It is designed to operate in ultra high vacuum (UHV). The design incorporates a multi-channel rectangular bar, bent in a hockey stick'' configuration, with two-point suspension. The flanged end is an articulated bellows with rolling hinges. The actuation end is a spring-assisted, pneumatic fail-safe flexural pivot type. The coolant (water) channels incorporate brazed copper foam to enhance the heat transfer, a tube technology particular to the APS. The design development, and material aspects, as well as the extensive thermal and vibrational analyses in support of the design, are presented in this paper.

  19. The first photon shutter development for APS insertion device beamline front ends

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Deming; Nian, H.L.T.; Wang, Zhibi; Collins, J.T.; Ryding, D.G.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1992-09-01

    One of the most critical components on the Advanced Photon Source (APS) insertion device (ID) beamline front ends is the first photon shutter. It operates in two modes to fully intercept the high total power and high-heat flux ID photon beam in seconds (normal mode) or in less than 100 ms (emergency fast mode). It is designed to operate in ultra high vacuum (UHV). The design incorporates a multi-channel rectangular bar, bent in a ``hockey stick`` configuration, with two-point suspension. The flanged end is an articulated bellows with rolling hinges. The actuation end is a spring-assisted, pneumatic fail-safe flexural pivot type. The coolant (water) channels incorporate brazed copper foam to enhance the heat transfer, a tube technology particular to the APS. The design development, and material aspects, as well as the extensive thermal and vibrational analyses in support of the design, are presented in this paper.

  20. Active MMI devices: concept, proof, and recent progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, Kiichi; Jiang, Haisong

    2015-09-01

    Multi-mode interference (MMI) couplers (waveguides) are widely studied and developed as key components of photonic integrated circuits, including power coupler/dividers, and others. Furthermore, another possibility utilizing MMI has been investigated on active devices so far. Owing to the wider area of the multi-mode waveguide section compared with that of the regular single-mode waveguide, MMI may result in higher performance (high power, low power consumption, and others) rather than conventional active devices while maintaining regular single-mode output. Thus, active multi-mode interferometer (active-MMI) devices, including laser diodes (LDs), super-luminescent light emitting diodes (SLEDs), and semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) have been studied. Moreover, they have been also exploited to bi-stable LDs and single wavelength emitters, and others using the interference inside the MMI section. In this paper, we review and summarize the recent progress in active MMI devices. We provide proof of MMI phenomena in active waveguides and discuss the results.

  1. Single-photon superradiance and cooperative Lamb shift in an optoelectronic device (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirtori, Carlo

    2017-02-01

    Superradiance is one of the many fascinating phenomena predicted by quantum electrodynamics that have first been experimentally demonstrated in atomic systems and more recently in condensed matter systems like quantum dots, superconducting q-bits, cyclotron transitions and plasma oscillations in quantum wells (QWs). It occurs when a dense collection of N identical two-level emitters are phased via the exchange of photons, giving rise to enhanced light-matter interaction, hence to a faster emission rate. Of great interest is the regime where the ensemble interacts with one photon only and therefore all of the atoms, but one, are in the ground state. In this case the quantum superposition of all possible configurations produces a symmetric state that decays radiatively with a rate N times larger than that of the individual oscillators. This phenomenon, called single photon superradiance, results from the exchange of real photons among the N emitters. Yet, to single photon superradiance is also associated another collective effect that renormalizes the emission frequency, known as cooperative Lamb shift. In this work, we show that single photon superradiance and cooperative Lamb shift can be engineered in a semiconductor device by coupling spatially separated plasma resonances arising from the collective motion of confined electrons in QWs. These resonances hold a giant dipole along the growth direction z and have no mutual Coulomb coupling. They thus behave as a collection of macro-atoms on different positions along the z axis. Our device is therefore a test bench to simulate the low excitation regime of quantum electrodynamics.

  2. Investigation of Photonic Devices Pigtailing Using Laser Welding Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadhali, M.; Saktioto; Zainal, J.; Munajat, Y.; Ali, J.; Abdul-Rahman, R.

    2008-11-01

    Coupling of highly elliptical laser diode emission into single mode fiber using two spherical ball lenses is investigated and the effectiveness of the mode matching with the circular mode field of the fiber is realized. Coupling efficiency is theoretically analyzed by employing ray and Gaussian beam optics. A 100% coupling efficiency is obtained at an optimum working distance of 3.5 mm. the coupling efficiency is found to be largely affected by the angular, lateral and transversal offsets. It can also be controlled significantly by optimizing the lenses separation distance. The experimental measurements agree with the theoretical calculations. However, the maximum coupling efficiency obtained is around 75% due to some practical limitations regarding the positioning of ball lenses and their separation. From the variations of coupling efficiency with lateral, transversal and angular offsets, the effective mode matching is inferred. Laser welding technique with active alignment facilities have been used in the alignment and attachment of all the coupling components. Laser welding pulse parameters have been optimized for reliable weld yields.

  3. Photonics and application of dipyrrinates in the optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenova, Iu; Bashkirtsev, D.; Prokopenko, A.; Kuznetsova, R.; Dudina, N.; Berezin, M.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper spectral-luminescent, lasing, photochemical, and sensory characteristics of a number of Zn(II) and B(III) coordination complexes with dipyrrinates with different structures are presented. We have discussed relations of the structure of investigated compounds and formed solvates with their optical characteristics. The results showed that alkyl substituted dipyrrinates derivatives have excellent luminescent characteristics and demonstrated effective lasing upon excitation of Nd:YAG-laser. They can be used as active media for liquid tunable lasers. Zinc and boron fluoride complexes of dipyrrinates with heavy atoms in structure don't have fluorescence but have long-lived emission due to increased nonradiative intersystem processes in the excited state by the mechanism of a heavy atom. For solid samples based on halogenated complexes was found dependency of the long-lived emission intensity of the oxygen concentration in gas flow. The presence of line segment indicates the possibility of the use of these complexes as a basis for creation of optical sensors for oxygen. Moreover, results of a study of halogen-substituted aza-complexes under irradiation are presented. Such complexes are promising for the creating media for generation of singlet oxygen (1O2), which is important for photodynamic therapy in medicine and photocatalytic reactions in the industry.

  4. Active pixel as dosimetric device for interventional radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servoli, L.; Baldaccini, F.; Biasini, M.; Checcucci, B.; Chiocchini, S.; Cicioni, R.; Conti, E.; Di Lorenzo, R.; Dipilato, A. C.; Esposito, A.; Fanó, L.; Paolucci, M.; Passeri, D.; Pentiricci, A.; Placidi, P.

    2013-08-01

    Interventional Radiology (IR) is a subspecialty of radiology comprehensive of all minimally invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures performed using radiological devices to obtain image guidance. The interventional procedures are potentially harmful for interventional radiologists and medical staff due to the X-ray diffusion by the patient's body. The characteristic energy range of the diffused photons spans few tens of keV. In this work we will present a proposal for a new X-ray sensing element in the energy range of interest for IR procedures. The sensing element will then be assembled in a dosimeter prototype, capable of real-time measurement, packaged in a small form-factor, with wireless communication and no external power supply to be used for individual operators dosimetry for IR procedures. For the sensor, which is the heart of the system, we considered three different Active Pixel Sensors (APS). They have shown a good capability as single X-ray photon detectors, up to several tens keV photon energy. Two dosimetric quantities have been considered, the number of detected photons and the measured energy deposition. Both observables have a linear dependence with the dose, as measured by commercial dosimeters. The uncertainties in the measurement are dominated by statistic and can be pushed at ˜5% for all the sensors under test.

  5. The Role of Space Experiments in the Radiation Qualification of Electronic and Photonic Devices and Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchner, S.; LaBel, K.; Barth, J.; Campbell, A.

    2005-01-01

    Space experiments are occasionally launched to study the effects of radiation on electronic and photonic devices. This begs the following questions: Are space experiments necessary? Do the costs justify the benefits? How does one judge success of space experiment? What have we learned from past space experiments? How does one design a space experiment? This viewgraph presentation provides information on the usefulness of space and ground tests for simulating radiation damage to spacecraft components.

  6. Bayesian photon counting with electron-multiplying charge coupled devices (EMCCDs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harpsøe, K. B. W.; Andersen, M. I.; Kjægaard, P.

    2012-01-01

    Context. The EMCCD is a charge coupled devices (CCD) type that delivers fast readout and negligible detector noise, making it an ideal detector for high frame rate applications. Because of the very low detector noise, this detector can potentially count single photons. Aims: Considering that an EMCCD has a limited dynamical range and negligible detector noise, one would typically apply an EMCCD in such a way that multiple images of the same object are available, for instance, in so called lucky imaging. The problem of counting photons can then conveniently be viewed as statistical inference of flux or photon rates, based on a stack of images. Methods: A simple probabilistic model for the output of an EMCCD is developed. Based on this model and the prior knowledge that photons are Poisson distributed, we derive two methods for estimating the most probable flux per pixel, one based on thresholding, and another based on full Bayesian inference. Results: We find that it is indeed possible to derive such expressions, and tests of these methods show that estimating fluxes with only shot noise is possible, up to fluxes of about one photon per pixel per readout.

  7. III-V/Si hybrid photonic devices by direct fusion bonding

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Katsuaki; Watanabe, Katsuyuki; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Monolithic integration of III-V compound semiconductors on silicon is highly sought after for high-speed, low-power-consumption silicon photonics and low-cost, light-weight photovoltaics. Here we present a GaAs/Si direct fusion bonding technique to provide highly conductive and transparent heterojunctions by heterointerfacial band engineering in relation to doping concentrations. Metal- and oxide-free GaAs/Si ohmic heterojunctions have been formed at 300°C; sufficiently low to inhibit active material degradation. We have demonstrated 1.3 μm InAs/GaAs quantum dot lasers on Si substrates with the lowest threshold current density of any laser on Si to date, and AlGaAs/Si dual-junction solar cells, by p-GaAs/p-Si and p-GaAs/n-Si bonding, respectively. Our direct semiconductor bonding technique opens up a new pathway for realizing ultrahigh efficiency multijunction solar cells with ideal bandgap combinations that are free from lattice-match restrictions required in conventional heteroepitaxy, as well as enabling the creation of novel high performance and practical optoelectronic devices by III-V/Si hybrid integration. PMID:22470842

  8. III-V/Si hybrid photonic devices by direct fusion bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Katsuaki; Watanabe, Katsuyuki; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2012-04-01

    Monolithic integration of III-V compound semiconductors on silicon is highly sought after for high-speed, low-power-consumption silicon photonics and low-cost, light-weight photovoltaics. Here we present a GaAs/Si direct fusion bonding technique to provide highly conductive and transparent heterojunctions by heterointerfacial band engineering in relation to doping concentrations. Metal- and oxide-free GaAs/Si ohmic heterojunctions have been formed at 300°C sufficiently low to inhibit active material degradation. We have demonstrated 1.3 μm InAs/GaAs quantum dot lasers on Si substrates with the lowest threshold current density of any laser on Si to date, and AlGaAs/Si dual-junction solar cells, by p-GaAs/p-Si and p-GaAs/n-Si bonding, respectively. Our direct semiconductor bonding technique opens up a new pathway for realizing ultrahigh efficiency multijunction solar cells with ideal bandgap combinations that are free from lattice-match restrictions required in conventional heteroepitaxy, as well as enabling the creation of novel high performance and practical optoelectronic devices by III-V/Si hybrid integration.

  9. Silicon MCM substrates for integration of 3-5 photonic devices and CMOS IC's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seigal, P.; Carson, R.; Flores, R.; Rose, B.

    The progress made in advanced packaging development at Sandia National Laboratories for integration of 3-5 photonic devices and CMOS IC's on Silicon MCM substrates for planar aid stacked applications will be reported. Studies to characterize precision alignment techniques using solder attach materials compatible with both silicon IC's and 3-5 devices will be discussed. Examples of the use of back-side alignment and IR through-wafer inspection will be shown along with the extra processing steps that are used. Under bump metallurgy considerations are also addressed.

  10. Silicon MCM substrates for integration of III-V photonic devices and CMOS IC`s

    SciTech Connect

    Seigal, P.; Carson, R.; Flores, R.; Rose, B.

    1993-07-01

    The progress made in advanced packaging development at Sandia National Laboratories for integration of III-V photonic devices and CMOS IC`s on Silicon MCM substrates for planar aid stacked applications will be reported. Studies to characterize precision alignment techniques using solder attach materials compatible with both silicon IC`s and III-V devices will be discussed. Examples of the use of back-side alignment and IR through-wafer inspection will be shown along with the extra processing steps that are used. Under bump metallurgy considerations are also addressed.

  11. Unique properties of graphene quantum dots and their applications in photonic/electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Suk-Ho

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been recognized as an attractive building block for electronic, photonic, and bio-molecular device applications. This paper reports the current status of studies on the novel properties of GQDs and their hybrids with conventional and low-dimensional materials for device applications. In this review, more emphasis is placed on the structural, electronic, and optical properties of GQDs, and device structures based on the combination of GQDs with various semiconducting/insulating materials such as graphene, silicon dioxide, Si quantum dots, silica nanoparticles, organic materials, and so on. Because of GQDs’ unique properties, their hybrid structures are employed in high-efficiency devices, including photodetectors, solar cells, light-emitting diodes, flash memory, and sensors.

  12. Photonic materials and devices for optical information processing and computing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanguay, Armand R., Jr.

    1991-02-01

    The research program is focused on a critical evaluation of advanced photonic materials and device concepts for the implementation of optical information processing and computing systems. The effort ranges from a detailed investigation of the fundamental physical and technological limitations that impact the potential computational gain (e.g., increases in throughput, decreases in decision time subsequent to processing, or minimization of the energy expended during computation) of optical information processing and computing systems, through the invention and characterization of key enabling devices such as two dimensional spatial light modulators and volume holographic optical elements, to the development of advanced techniques for materials growth, deposition, and processing that have a critical impact on potential device performance. This multifaceted evaluation of novel materials, device, and system concepts has been directly responsible for the invention and characterization of a number of photonic devices and materials processing techniques that exhibit both high performance and capacity for practical manufacturing. The primary program thrusts can be organized into three principal categories: (1) fundamental and technological limitations of optical information processing and computing; (2) electrically and optically addressed spatial light modulators; and (3) volume holographic optical elements.

  13. Micro-/nanoscale multi-field coupling in nonlinear photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qing; Wang, Yubo; Tang, Mingwei; Xu, Pengfei; Xu, Yingke; Liu, Xu

    2017-08-01

    The coupling of mechanics/electronics/photonics may improve the performance of nanophotonic devices not only in the linear region but also in the nonlinear region. This review letter mainly presents the recent advances on multi-field coupling in nonlinear photonic devices. The nonlinear piezoelectric effect and piezo-phototronic effects in quantum wells and fibers show that large second-order nonlinear susceptibilities can be achieved, and second harmonic generation and electro-optic modulation can be enhanced and modulated. Strain engineering can tune the lattice structures and induce second order susceptibilities in central symmetry semiconductors. By combining the absorption-based photoacoustic effect and intensity-dependent photobleaching effect, subdiffraction imaging can be achieved. This review will also discuss possible future applications of these novel effects and the perspective of their research. The review can help us develop a deeper knowledge of the substance of photon-electron-phonon interaction in a micro-/nano- system. Moreover, it can benefit the design of nonlinear optical sensors and imaging devices with a faster response rate, higher efficiency, more sensitivity and higher spatial resolution which could be applied in environmental detection, bio-sensors, medical imaging and so on.

  14. Observation of extraordinary optical activity in planar chiral photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Kuniaki; Bai, Benfeng; Meng, Xiangfeng; Karvinen, Petri; Turunen, Jari; Svirko, Yuri P; Kuwata-Gonokami, Makoto

    2008-05-12

    Control of light polarization is a key technology in modern photonics including application to optical manipulation of quantum information. The requisite is to obtain large rotation in isotropic media with small loss. We report on extraordinary optical activity in a planar dielectric on-waveguide photonic crystal structure, which has no in-plane birefringence and shows polarization rotation of more than 25 degrees for transmitted light. We demonstrate that in the planar chiral photonic crystal, the coupling of the normally incident light wave with low-loss waveguide and Fabry-Pérot resonance modes results in a dramatic enhancement of the optical activity.

  15. A Four-Motor Insertion Device Control System at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, M.; Smith, M.; Grimmer, J.; Merritt, M.

    2004-05-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a third-generation synchrotron with major emphasis on insertion device (ID) sources. In the storage ring there are 35 straight sections, each about five meters in length, for possible insertion devices. Most of the insertion devices at the APS are 2.4 meters long. Currently there are 27 undulators installed in 25 straight sections. Twenty-two of the undulators are the original design fabricated by STI Optronics, which used two motors, one for each end of the device. A synchronizing mechanism between the upper and lower magnetic arrays was also used at each end. Recently, the APS has designed a new gap-separation mechanism for all new undulators. The new design is based on four independent motors, one driving each end of each magnetic array of the device. The control system of choice at the APS is EPICS. The control system is designed to be transparent to the user of the beamline who routinely operates the device. The differences between the two-motor and the four-motor versions of the ID control system are performed at low levels and are transparent. All devices have feedback and safeguard redundancy in the form of linear and rotary encoders and multiple-stage limit switches. This paper will discuss in detail the design philosophy and the implementation of the four-motor insertion device control system. This control system has been in operation for about three years.

  16. Cosmetic devices based on active transdermal technologies.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jessica A; Banga, Ajay K

    2015-01-01

    Active transdermal technology, commonly associated with drug delivery, has been used in recent years by the cosmetic industry for the aesthetic restoration of skin and delivery of cosmetic agents. In this article, we provide an overview of the skin's structure, various skin types, skin's self-repair mechanisms that are stimulated from the usage of cosmetic devices and discuss cosmetic applications. Summaries of the most common active transdermal technologies such as microneedles, iontophoresis, sonophoresis, lasers and microdermabrasion will be provided, in relation to the marketed cosmetic devices available that incorporate these technologies. Lastly, we cover combinations of active technologies that allow for more enhanced cosmetic results, and the current limitations of cosmetic devices.

  17. Slow-light-enhanced gain in active photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ek, Sara; Lunnemann, Per; Chen, Yaohui; Semenova, Elizaveta; Yvind, Kresten; Mork, Jesper

    2014-09-01

    Passive photonic crystals have been shown to exhibit a multitude of interesting phenomena, including slow-light propagation in line-defect waveguides. It was suggested that by incorporating an active material in the waveguide, slow light could be used to enhance the effective gain of the material, which would have interesting application prospects, for example enabling ultra-compact optical amplifiers for integration in photonic chips. Here we experimentally investigate the gain of a photonic crystal membrane structure with embedded quantum wells. We find that by solely changing the photonic crystal structural parameters, the maximum value of the gain coefficient can be increased compared with a ridge waveguide structure and at the same time the spectral position of the peak gain be controlled. The experimental results are in qualitative agreement with theory and show that gain values similar to those realized in state-of-the-art semiconductor optical amplifiers should be attainable in compact photonic integrated amplifiers.

  18. Slow-light-enhanced gain in active photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Ek, Sara; Lunnemann, Per; Chen, Yaohui; Semenova, Elizaveta; Yvind, Kresten; Mork, Jesper

    2014-09-30

    Passive photonic crystals have been shown to exhibit a multitude of interesting phenomena, including slow-light propagation in line-defect waveguides. It was suggested that by incorporating an active material in the waveguide, slow light could be used to enhance the effective gain of the material, which would have interesting application prospects, for example enabling ultra-compact optical amplifiers for integration in photonic chips. Here we experimentally investigate the gain of a photonic crystal membrane structure with embedded quantum wells. We find that by solely changing the photonic crystal structural parameters, the maximum value of the gain coefficient can be increased compared with a ridge waveguide structure and at the same time the spectral position of the peak gain be controlled. The experimental results are in qualitative agreement with theory and show that gain values similar to those realized in state-of-the-art semiconductor optical amplifiers should be attainable in compact photonic integrated amplifiers.

  19. Current trends on 2D materials for photonics devices: an NSF perspective (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallahi, Mahmoud

    2017-05-01

    Recent advancements in two-dimensional (2D) materials have opened significant research opportunities in optics and photonics. While the initial focus on 2D materials was on Graphene, new generation of 2D materials such as hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), monolayer black phosphorous (BP) and other monolayer structures have shown unique electrical and optical properties. For example, h-BN is an insulator, while monolayers of some TMDCs such as MoS2 and WSe2 are direct band-gap semiconductors. Depending on the choice of material compositional and layer variations their optical properties can be engineered, making them particularly attractive as novel light sources, photodetectors, modulators and photovoltaic components, in particular for few photon applications. Plasmonic properties of 2D materials make them suitable for nanophotonics and monolithic integration with other conventional materials. The National Science Foundation (NSF) is a US federal agency dedicated to promote progress of science and engineering. NSF is the funding source for approximately 24 percent of all federally supported basic research conducted by America's colleges and universities. NSF has recently supported several initiatives related to novel 2D material and device research. In this talk, I will first give an overview of the NSF programs and funding opportunities. The second part of the talk will be focused on the programs related to 2D materials for photonic devices and program specific initiatives. Several highlights of the recent achievements and awards in the field of 2D materials for photonic devices will be presented.

  20. Hydrogen induced optically-active defects in silicon photonic nanocavities.

    PubMed

    Boninelli, S; Franzò, G; Cardile, P; Priolo, F; Lo Savio, R; Galli, M; Shakoor, A; O'Faolain, L; Krauss, T F; Vines, L; Svensson, B G

    2014-04-21

    We demonstrate intense room temperature photoluminescence (PL) from optically active hydrogen- related defects incorporated into crystalline silicon. Hydrogen was incorporated into the device layer of a silicon on insulator (SOI) wafer by two methods: hydrogen plasma treatment and ion implantation. The room temperature PL spectra show two broad PL bands centered at 1300 and 1500 nm wavelengths: the first one relates to implanted defects while the other band mainly relates to the plasma treatment. Structural characterization reveals the presence of nanometric platelets and bubbles and we attribute different features of the emission spectrum to the presence of these different kind of defects. The emission is further enhanced by introducing defects into photonic crystal (PhC) nanocavities. Transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed that the isotropicity of plasma treatment causes the formation of a higher defects density around the whole cavity compared to the ion implantation technique, while ion implantation creates a lower density of defects embedded in the Si layer, resulting in a higher PL enhancement. These results further increase the understanding of the nature of optically active hydrogen defects and their relation with the observed photoluminescence, which will ultimately lead to the development of intense and tunable crystalline silicon light sources at room temperature.

  1. Highly entangled photons from hybrid piezoelectric-semiconductor quantum dot devices.

    PubMed

    Trotta, Rinaldo; Wildmann, Johannes S; Zallo, Eugenio; Schmidt, Oliver G; Rastelli, Armando

    2014-06-11

    Entanglement resources are key ingredients of future quantum technologies. If they could be efficiently integrated into a semiconductor platform, a new generation of devices could be envisioned, whose quantum-mechanical functionalities are controlled via the mature semiconductor technology. Epitaxial quantum dots (QDs) embedded in diodes would embody such ideal quantum devices, but a fine-structure splitting (FSS) between the bright exciton states lowers dramatically the degree of entanglement of the sources and hampers severely their real exploitation in the foreseen applications. In this work, we overcome this hurdle using strain-tunable optoelectronic devices, where any QD can be tuned for the emission of photon pairs featuring the highest degree of entanglement ever reported for QDs, with concurrence as high as 0.75 ± 0.02. Furthermore, we study the evolution of Bell's parameters as a function of FSS and demonstrate for the first time that filtering-free violation of Bell's inequalities requires the FSS to be smaller than 1 μeV. This upper limit for the FSS also sets the tuning range of exciton energies (∼1 meV) over which our device operates as an energy-tunable source of highly entangled photons. A moderate temporal filtering further increases the concurrence and the tunability of exciton energies up to 0.82 and 2 meV, respectively, though at the expense of 60% reduction of count rate.

  2. Estimating ROI activity concentration with photon-processing and photon-counting SPECT imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Abhinav K.; Frey, Eric C.

    2015-03-01

    Recently a new class of imaging systems, referred to as photon-processing (PP) systems, are being developed that uses real-time maximum-likelihood (ML) methods to estimate multiple attributes per detected photon and store these attributes in a list format. PP systems could have a number of potential advantages compared to systems that bin photons based on attributes such as energy, projection angle, and position, referred to as photon-counting (PC) systems. For example, PP systems do not suffer from binning-related information loss and provide the potential to extract information from attributes such as energy deposited by the detected photon. To quantify the effects of this advantage on task performance, objective evaluation studies are required. We performed this study in the context of quantitative 2-dimensional single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging with the end task of estimating the mean activity concentration within a region of interest (ROI). We first theoretically outline the effect of null space on estimating the mean activity concentration, and argue that due to this effect, PP systems could have better estimation performance compared to PC systems with noise-free data. To evaluate the performance of PP and PC systems with noisy data, we developed a singular value decomposition (SVD)-based analytic method to estimate the activity concentration from PP systems. Using simulations, we studied the accuracy and precision of this technique in estimating the activity concentration. We used this framework to objectively compare PP and PC systems on the activity concentration estimation task. We investigated the effects of varying the size of the ROI and varying the number of bins for the attribute corresponding to the angular orientation of the detector in a continuously rotating SPECT system. The results indicate that in several cases, PP systems offer improved estimation performance compared to PC systems.

  3. Strain-optic active control for quantum integrated photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, Peter C.; Metcalf, Benjamin J.; Spring, Justin B.; Moore, Merritt; Salter, Patrick S.; Booth, Martin J.; Steven Kolthammer, W.; Walmsley, Ian A.

    2014-09-01

    We present a practical method for active phase control on a photonic chip that has immediate applications in quantum photonics. Our approach uses strain-optic modification of the refractive index of individual waveguides, effected by a millimeter-scale mechanical actuator. The resulting phase change of propagating optical fields is rapid and polarization-dependent, enabling quantum applications that require active control and polarization encoding. We demonstrate strain-optic control of non-classical states of light in silica, showing the generation of 2-photon polarisation N00N states by manipulating Hong-Ou-Mandel interference. We also demonstrate switching times of a few microseconds, which are sufficient for silica-based feed-forward control of photonic quantum states.

  4. Strain-optic active control for quantum integrated photonics.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Peter C; Metcalf, Benjamin J; Spring, Justin B; Moore, Merritt; Salter, Patrick S; Booth, Martin J; Steven Kolthammer, W; Walmsley, Ian A

    2014-09-08

    We present a practical method for active phase control on a photonic chip that has immediate applications in quantum photonics. Our approach uses strain-optic modification of the refractive index of individual waveguides, effected by a millimeter-scale mechanical actuator. The resulting phase change of propagating optical fields is rapid and polarization-dependent, enabling quantum applications that require active control and polarization encoding. We demonstrate strain-optic control of non-classical states of light in silica, showing the generation of 2-photon polarisation N00N states by manipulating Hong-Ou-Mandel interference. We also demonstrate switching times of a few microseconds, which are sufficient for silica-based feed-forward control of photonic quantum states.

  5. A survey on GaN- based devices for terahertz photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahi, Kiarash; Anwar, Mehdi

    2016-09-01

    With fast growing of the photonics and power electronic systems, the need for high power- high frequency semiconductor devices is sensed tremendously. GaN provides the highest electron saturation velocity, breakdown voltage and operation temperature, and thus combined frequency-power performance among commonly used semiconductors. With achieving the first THz image in just two decades ago, generation and detection of terahertz (THz) radiation is one of the most emerging photonic areas. The industrial needs for compact, economical, high resolution and high power THz imaging and spectroscopy systems are fueling the utilization of GaN for the realizing of the next generation of THz systems. As it is reviewed in this paper, the mentioned characteristics of GaN together with its capabilities of providing high 2-dimentional election densities and large longitudinal-optical phonon of 90 meV, make it one of the most promising semiconductor materials for the future of the THz generation, detection, mixing, and frequency multiplication. GaN- based devices have shown capabilities of operating in the upper THz frequency band of 5- 12 THz with relatively high photon densities and in room temperature. As a result, THz imaging and spectroscopy systems with high resolutions and depths of penetrations can be realized via utilizing GaN- based devices. In this paper, a comprehensive review on the history and state of the art of the GaN- based electronic devices, including plasma HFETs, NDRs, HDSDs, IMPATTs, QCLs, HEMTs, Gunn diodes and TeraFETs together with their impact on the future of THz imaging and spectroscopy systems is provided.

  6. Uncertainty quantification of silicon photonic devices with correlated and non-Gaussian random parameters.

    PubMed

    Weng, Tsui-Wei; Zhang, Zheng; Su, Zhan; Marzouk, Youssef; Melloni, Andrea; Daniel, Luca

    2015-02-23

    Process variations can significantly degrade device performance and chip yield in silicon photonics. In order to reduce the design and production costs, it is highly desirable to predict the statistical behavior of a device before the final fabrication. Monte Carlo is the mainstream computational technique used to estimate the uncertainties caused by process variations. However, it is very often too expensive due to its slow convergence rate. Recently, stochastic spectral methods based on polynomial chaos expansions have emerged as a promising alternative, and they have shown significant speedup over Monte Carlo in many engineering problems. The existing literature mostly assumes that the random parameters are mutually independent. However, in practical applications such assumption may not be necessarily accurate. In this paper, we develop an efficient numerical technique based on stochastic collocation to simulate silicon photonics with correlated and non-Gaussian random parameters. The effectiveness of our proposed technique is demonstrated by the simulation results of a silicon-on-insulator based directional coupler example. Since the mathematic formulation in this paper is very generic, our proposed algorithm can be applied to a large class of photonic design cases as well as to many other engineering problems.

  7. Multidimensional microstructured photonic device based on all-solid waveguide array fiber and magnetic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Yinping; Ma, Xixi; He, Yong; Zhang, Hongmin; Yang, Xiaoping; Yao, Jianquan

    2016-11-01

    An all-solid waveguide array fiber (WAF) is one kind of special microstructured optical fiber in which the higher-index rods are periodically distributed in a low-index silica host to form the transverse two-dimensional photonic crystal. In this paper, one kind of multidimensional microstructured optical fiber photonic device is proposed by using electric arc discharge method to fabricate periodic tapers along the fiber axis. By tuning the applied magnetic field intensity, the propagation characteristics of the all-solid WAF integrated with magnetic fluid are periodically modulated in both radial and axial directions. Experimental results show that the wavelength changes little while the transmission loss increases for an applied magnetic field intensity range from 0 to 500 Oe. The magnetic field sensitivity is 0.055 dB/Oe within the linear range from 50 to 300 Oe. Meanwhile, the all-solid WAF has very similar thermal expansion coefficient for both high- and low-refractive index glasses, and thermal drifts have a little effect on the mode profile. The results show that the temperature-induced transmission loss is <0.3 dB from 26°C to 44°C. Further tuning coherent coupling of waveguides and controlling light propagation, the all-solid WAF would be found great potential applications to develop new micro-nano photonic devices for optical communications and optical sensing applications.

  8. Multidimensional microstructured photonic device based on all-solid waveguide array fiber and magnetic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Yinping; Ma, Xixi; He, Yong; Zhang, Hongmin; Yang, Xiaoping; Yao, Jianquan

    2017-01-01

    An all-solid waveguide array fiber (WAF) is one kind of special microstructured optical fiber in which the higher-index rods are periodically distributed in a low-index silica host to form the transverse two-dimensional photonic crystal. In this paper, one kind of multidimensional microstructured optical fiber photonic device is proposed by using electric arc discharge method to fabricate periodic tapers along the fiber axis. By tuning the applied magnetic field intensity, the propagation characteristics of the all-solid WAF integrated with magnetic fluid are periodically modulated in both radial and axial directions. Experimental results show that the wavelength changes little while the transmission loss increases for an applied magnetic field intensity range from 0 to 500 Oe. The magnetic field sensitivity is 0.055 dB/Oe within the linear range from 50 to 300 Oe. Meanwhile, the all-solid WAF has very similar thermal expansion coefficient for both high- and low-refractive index glasses, and thermal drifts have a little effect on the mode profile. The results show that the temperature-induced transmission loss is <0.3 dB from 26°C to 44°C. Further tuning coherent coupling of waveguides and controlling light propagation, the all-solid WAF would be found great potential applications to develop new micro-nano photonic devices for optical communications and optical sensing applications.

  9. Inspiration, imagination and implementation: International Year of Light activities of the Photonics Academy of Wales at Bangor (PAWB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ray; Shore, K. Alan

    2016-09-01

    Since the establishment of the Photonics Academy of Wales in 2005, several generations of participants have been encouraged to use their imagination in devising, designing and building novel photonics devices of benefit to society. In pursuing photonics projects within PAWB, the participants have gained a practical proficiency in photonics experimentation and photonics product design. The Photonics Academy of Wales @ Bangor ( PAWB) assumed responsibility for the coordination of a series of events in Wales, UK as part of global activities celebrating 2015 as the International Year of Light. PAWB has worked with several organisations and individuals to devise a programme of events which are focussed on conveying the significance of light and its technologies to a broad swathe of the population. These events take into account the bi-lingual nature of Wales with significant events being delivered in the Welsh language. Arrangement and delivery of the events has largely been undertaken on a voluntary basis albeit with some funding having been obtained from supportive bodies and organisations. The presentation will report on the events which were organised and also will present examples of novel photonics devices developed by students working with PAWB. Being aware of the importance of creating an on-going interest in the topics treated during the International Year of Light, some attention will also be given to legacy activities beyond 2015. A specific concern is the identification of effective mechanisms for engagement with photonics industry.

  10. Photon and neutron active interrogation of highly enriched uranium.

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, W. L.; Goulding, C. A.; Hollas, C. L.; Moss, C. E.

    2004-01-01

    The physics of photon and neutron active interrogation of highly enriched uranium (HEU) using the delayed neutron reinterrogation method is described in this paper. Two sets of active interrogation experiments were performed using a set of subcritical configurations of cocentric HEU metal hemishells. One set of measurements utilized a pulsed 14-MeV neutron generator as the active source. The second set of measurements utilized a linear accelerator-based bremsstrahlung photon source as an active interrogation source. The neutron responses were measured for both sets of experiments. The operational details and results for both measurement sets are described.

  11. A photonic-microfluidic integrated device for reliable fluorescence detection and counting.

    PubMed

    Watts, Benjamin R; Zhang, Zhiyi; Xu, Chang Qing; Cao, Xudong; Lin, Min

    2012-11-01

    A photonic-microfluidic integrated device is demonstrated with excellent and reliable fluorescence detection performance. CV values of 8% for 2.5-μm beads and 14% for 6-μm beads were achieved through the correct deployment of carefully formed excitation beam shapes via integrated on-chip optics even without the use of 3D hydrodynamic focusing or a high-quality laser source and single mode beam propagation. The devices are fabricated in a monolithic planar fashion using a system of microlenses and waveguides integrated with microfluidic channels on-chip and packaged using a high-quality and low-cost channel sealing and high-performance interconnecting technology developed from our earlier works. Beam geometry in the excitation region is shown to affect the variation of fluorescence intensity from specimens, hence configurations of beam geometry targeted for a specific bead sizes are examined to ensure proper deployment of the lens designs. The formed high-quality optical excitation regions ensure reliable detection even with relaxed hydrodynamic focusing to ensure applicability with multiple specimen sizes. Device performance with each bead size was found to be acceptable for a range of beam geometries with a different ideal configuration for each bead size. These device designs help to form a device that will supplement conventional flow cytometry in point-of-care and remote detection applications by performing specific detections with an inexpensive and replaceable device.

  12. Long distance measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with entangled photon sources

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Feihu; Qi, Bing; Liao, Zhongfa; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2013-08-05

    We present a feasible method that can make quantum key distribution (QKD), both ultra-long-distance and immune, to all attacks in the detection system. This method is called measurement-device-independent QKD (MDI-QKD) with entangled photon sources in the middle. By proposing a model and simulating a QKD experiment, we find that MDI-QKD with one entangled photon source can tolerate 77 dB loss (367 km standard fiber) in the asymptotic limit and 60 dB loss (286 km standard fiber) in the finite-key case with state-of-the-art detectors. Our general model can also be applied to other non-QKD experiments involving entanglement and Bell state measurements.

  13. Standardizing Activation Analysis: New Software for Photon Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Z. J.; Wells, D.; Green, J.; Segebade, C.

    2011-06-01

    Photon Activation Analysis (PAA) of environmental, archaeological and industrial samples requires extensive data analysis that is susceptible to error. For the purpose of saving time, manpower and minimizing error, a computer program was designed, built and implemented using SQL, Access 2007 and asp.net technology to automate this process. Based on the peak information of the spectrum and assisted by its PAA library, the program automatically identifies elements in the samples and calculates their concentrations and respective uncertainties. The software also could be operated in browser/server mode, which gives the possibility to use it anywhere the internet is accessible. By switching the nuclide library and the related formula behind, the new software can be easily expanded to neutron activation analysis (NAA), charged particle activation analysis (CPAA) or proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE). Implementation of this would standardize the analysis of nuclear activation data. Results from this software were compared to standard PAA analysis with excellent agreement. With minimum input from the user, the software has proven to be fast, user-friendly and reliable.

  14. Aperiodic TiO2 nanotube photonic crystal: full-visible-spectrum solar light harvesting in photovoltaic devices.

    PubMed

    Guo, Min; Xie, Keyu; Wang, Yu; Zhou, Limin; Huang, Haitao

    2014-09-23

    Bandgap engineering of a photonic crystal is highly desirable for photon management in photonic sensors and devices. Aperiodic photonic crystals (APCs) can provide unprecedented opportunities for much more versatile photon management, due to increased degrees of freedom in the design and the unique properties brought about by the aperiodic structures as compared to their periodic counterparts. However, many efforts still remain on conceptual approaches, practical achievements in APCs are rarely reported due to the difficulties in fabrication. Here, we report a simple but highly controllable current-pulse anodization process to design and fabricate TiO2 nanotube APCs. By coupling an APC into the photoanode of a dye-sensitized solar cell, we demonstrate the concept of using APC to achieve nearly full-visible-spectrum light harvesting, as evidenced by both experimental and simulated results. It is anticipated that this work will lead to more fruitful practical applications of APCs in high-efficiency photovoltaics, sensors and optoelectronic devices.

  15. Optical fiber loops and helices: tools for integrated photonic device characterization and microfluidic trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yundong; Zhang, Rui; Ti, Chaoyang; Liu, Yuxiang

    2016-09-01

    Tapered optical fibers can deliver guided light into and carry light out of micro/nanoscale systems with low loss and high spatial resolution, which makes them ideal tools in integrated photonics and microfluidics. Special geometries of tapered fibers are desired for probing monolithic devices in plane as well as optical manipulation of micro particles in fluids. However, for many specially shaped tapered fibers, it remains a challenge to fabricate them in a straightforward, controllable, and repeatable way. In this work, we fabricated and characterized two special geometries of tapered optical fibers, namely fiber loops and helices, that could be switched between one and the other. The fiber loops in this work are distinct from previous ones in terms of their superior mechanical stability and high optical quality factors in air, thanks to a post-annealing process. We experimentally measured an intrinsic optical quality factor of 32,500 and a finesse of 137 from a fiber loop. A fiber helix was used to characterize a monolithic cavity optomechanical device. Moreover, a microfluidic "roller coaster" was demonstrated, where microscale particles in water were optically trapped and transported by a fiber helix. Tapered fiber loops and helices can find various applications ranging from on-the-fly characterization of integrated photonic devices to particle manipulation and sorting in microfluidics.

  16. 3D integration of photonic crystal devices: vertical coupling with a silicon waveguide.

    PubMed

    Ferrier, L; Romeo, P Rojo; Letartre, X; Drouard, E; Viktorovitch, P

    2010-07-19

    Two integrated devices based on the vertical coupling between a photonic crystal microcavity and a silicon (Si) ridge waveguide are presented in this paper. When the resonator is coupled to a single waveguide, light can be spectrally extracted from the waveguide to free space through the far field emission of the resonator. When the resonator is vertically coupled to two waveguides, a vertical add-drop filter can be realized. The dropping efficiency of these devices relies on a careful design of the resonator. In this paper, we use a Fabry-Perot (FP) microcavity composed of two photonic crystal (PhC) slab mirrors. Thanks to the unique dispersion properties of slow Bloch modes (SBM) at the flat extreme of the dispersion curve, it is possible to design a FP cavity exhibiting two quasi-degenerate modes. This specific configuration allows for a coupling efficiency that can theoretically achieve 100%. Using 3D FDTD calculations, we discuss the design of such devices and show that high dropping efficiency can be achieved between the Si waveguides and the PhC microcavity.

  17. Impact of photon recycling and luminescence coupling on III-V single and dual junction photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Alexandre W.; Höhn, Oliver; Micha, Daniel N.; Wagner, Lukas; Helmers, Henning; Bett, Andreas W.; Dimroth, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Modeling single junction solar cells composed of III-V semiconductors such as GaAs with the effects of photon recycling yields insight into design and material criteria required for high efficiencies. For a thin-film single junction GaAs cell to reach 28.5% efficiency, simulation results using a recently developed model which accounts for photon recycling indicate that Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) lifetimes of electrons and holes must be longer than 3 and 1 μs, respectively, in a 2-μm thin active region, and that the native substrate must be removed such that the cell is coupled to a highly reflective rear-side mirror. The model is generalized to account for luminescence coupling in tandem devices, which yields direct insight into the top cell's nonradiative lifetimes. A heavily current mismatched GaAs/GaAs tandem device is simulated and measured experimentally as a function of concentration between 3 and 100 suns. The luminescence coupling increases from 14% to 33% experimentally, whereas the model requires increasing electron and hole SRH lifetimes to explain these results. This could be an indication of the saturating defects which mediate the SRH process. However, intermediate GaAs layers between the two subcells may also contribute to the luminescence coupling as a function of concentration.

  18. Photon-photon absorption and the uniqueness of the spectra of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, D.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of the feedback of e(+)-e(-) pair reinjection in a plasma due to photon-photon absorption of its own radiation was examined. Under the assumption of continuous electron injection with a power law spectrum E to the minus gamma power and Compton losses only, it is shown that for gamma 2 the steady state electron distribution function has a unique form independent of the primary injection spectrum. This electron distribution function can, by synchrotron emission, reproduce the general characteristics of the observed radio to optical active galactic nuclei spectra. Inverse Compton scattering of the synchrotron photons by the same electron distribution can account for their X-ray spectra, and also implies gamma ray emission from these objects. This result is invoked to account for the similarity of these spectra, and it is consistent with observations of the diffuse gamma ray background.

  19. Actively switchable nondegenerate polarization-entangled photon-pair distribution in dense wave-division multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhi-Yuan; Jiang, Yun-Kun; Ding, Dong-Sheng; Shi, Bao-Sen; Guo, Guang-Can

    2013-04-01

    We have demonstrated experimentally a nondegenerate polarization-entangled photon-pair distribution in a commercial telecom dense wave-division multiplexing device (DWDM) with eight channels. A promising point of this experiment is that an entangled photon pair is obtained via spontaneous parametric down conversion in a single type-II periodically poled KTiOPO4 crystal without postselection. Another promising advantage is that we can actively switch the distribution of the photon pair between different channel pairs in DWDM at will. There is no crosstalk between different channel pairs because of a limited emission bandwidth of the source. Maximum raw visibility of 97.88%±0.86% obtained in a Bell-type interference experiment and a Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) inequality S parameter of 2.63±0.08 calculated prove high entanglement of our source. Our work is helpful for building quantum communication networks.

  20. A universal setup for active control of a single-photon detector.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qin; Lamas-Linares, Antía; Kurtsiefer, Christian; Skaar, Johannes; Makarov, Vadim; Gerhardt, Ilja

    2014-01-01

    The influence of bright light on a single-photon detector has been described in a number of recent publications. The impact on quantum key distribution (QKD) is important, and several hacking experiments have been tailored to fully control single-photon detectors. Special attention has been given to avoid introducing further errors into a QKD system. We describe the design and technical details of an apparatus which allows to attack a quantum-cryptographic connection. This device is capable of controlling free-space and fiber-based systems and of minimizing unwanted clicks in the system. With different control diagrams, we are able to achieve a different level of control. The control was initially targeted to the systems using BB84 protocol, with polarization encoding and basis switching using beamsplitters, but could be extended to other types of systems. We further outline how to characterize the quality of active control of single-photon detectors.

  1. A universal setup for active control of a single-photon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qin; Lamas-Linares, Antía; Kurtsiefer, Christian; Skaar, Johannes; Makarov, Vadim; Gerhardt, Ilja

    2014-01-01

    The influence of bright light on a single-photon detector has been described in a number of recent publications. The impact on quantum key distribution (QKD) is important, and several hacking experiments have been tailored to fully control single-photon detectors. Special attention has been given to avoid introducing further errors into a QKD system. We describe the design and technical details of an apparatus which allows to attack a quantum-cryptographic connection. This device is capable of controlling free-space and fiber-based systems and of minimizing unwanted clicks in the system. With different control diagrams, we are able to achieve a different level of control. The control was initially targeted to the systems using BB84 protocol, with polarization encoding and basis switching using beamsplitters, but could be extended to other types of systems. We further outline how to characterize the quality of active control of single-photon detectors.

  2. A universal setup for active control of a single-photon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qin; Skaar, Johannes; Lamas-Linares, Antía; Kurtsiefer, Christian; Makarov, Vadim; Gerhardt, Ilja

    2014-01-15

    The influence of bright light on a single-photon detector has been described in a number of recent publications. The impact on quantum key distribution (QKD) is important, and several hacking experiments have been tailored to fully control single-photon detectors. Special attention has been given to avoid introducing further errors into a QKD system. We describe the design and technical details of an apparatus which allows to attack a quantum-cryptographic connection. This device is capable of controlling free-space and fiber-based systems and of minimizing unwanted clicks in the system. With different control diagrams, we are able to achieve a different level of control. The control was initially targeted to the systems using BB84 protocol, with polarization encoding and basis switching using beamsplitters, but could be extended to other types of systems. We further outline how to characterize the quality of active control of single-photon detectors.

  3. Directly laser-written integrated photonics devices including diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jiyeon; Ramme, Mark; Richardson, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Femtosecond laser-written integrated devices involving Fresnel Zone Plates (FZPs) and waveguide arrays are demonstrated as built-in optical couplers. These structures were fabricated in borosilicate glass using a direct laser writing technique. The optical properties of these integrated photonic structures were investigated using CW lasers and high-resolution CCDs. For a single FZP coupled to a single waveguide, the overall coupling efficiency was 9%. A multiplexed optical coupler composed of three FZP layers was demonstrated to couple three waveguides simultaneously in a waveguide array. Structures of this type can be used as platforms for multichannel waveguide coupling elements or as microfluidic sensors that require higher light collecting efficiency.

  4. Siloxane-based photonic structures and their application in optic and optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudiš, Dušan; Šušlik, Łuboš; Jandura, Daniel; Goraus, Matej; Figurová, Mária; Martinček, Ivan; Gašo, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Polymer based photonics brings simple and cheap solutions often with interesting results. We present capabilities of some siloxanes focusing on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) with unique mechanical and optical properties. In combination of laser lithography technologies with siloxane embossing we fabricate different grating structures with one- and two-dimensional symmetry. Concept of PDMS based thin membranes with patterned surface as an effective diffraction element for modification of radiation pattern diagram of light emitting diodes is here shown. Also the PDMS was used as an alternative material for fabrication of complicated waveguide with implemented Bragg grating. For lab-on-chip applications, we patterned PDMS microstructures for microfluidic and micro-optic devices.

  5. Direct fabrication of silicon photonic devices on a flexible platform and its application for strain sensing.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li; Varghese, Leo T; Xuan, Yi; Wang, Jian; Niu, Ben; Qi, Minghao

    2012-08-27

    We demonstrate a process to fabricate silicon photonic devices directly on a plastic film which is both flexible and transparent. This process allows the integration of complex structures on plastic films without the need of transferring from another substrate. Waveguides, grating couplers, and microring resonators are fabricated and optically characterized. An optical strain sensor is shown as an application using 5 µm-radius microring resonators on the flexible substrate. When strain is applied, resonance wavelength shifts of the microring resonators are observed. Contributions of different effects are analyzed and evaluated. Finally, we measure the influence of residual strain and confirm the material undergoes elastic deformation within the applied strain range.

  6. Bio-Inspired Photon Absorption and Energy Transfer for Next Generation Photovoltaic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magsi, Komal

    Nature's solar energy harvesting system, photosynthesis, serves as a model for photon absorption, spectra broadening, and energy transfer. Photosynthesis harvests light far differently than photovoltaic cells. These differences offer both engineering opportunity and scientific challenges since not all of the natural photon absorption mechanisms have been understood. In return, solar cells can be a very sensitive probe for the absorption characteristics of molecules capable of transferring charge to a conductive interface. The objective of this scientific work is the advancement of next generation photovoltaics through the development and application of natural photo-energy transfer processes. Two scientific methods were used in the development and application of enhancing photon absorption and transfer. First, a detailed analysis of photovoltaic front surface fluorescent spectral modification and light scattering by hetero-structure was conducted. Phosphor based spectral down-conversion is a well-known laser technology. The theoretical calculations presented here indicate that parasitic losses and light scattering within the spectral range are large enough to offset any expected gains. The second approach for enhancing photon absorption is based on bio-inspired mechanisms. Key to the utilization of these natural processes is the development of a detailed scientific understanding and the application of these processes to cost effective systems and devices. In this work both aspects are investigated. Dye type solar cells were prepared and tested as a function of Chlorophyll (or Sodium-Copper Chlorophyllin) and accessory dyes. Forster has shown that the fluorescence ratio of Chlorophyll is modified and broadened by separate photon absorption (sensitized absorption) through interaction with nearby accessory pigments. This work used the dye type solar cell as a diagnostic tool by which to investigate photon absorption and photon energy transfer. These experiments shed

  7. System-level integration of active silicon photonic biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laplatine, L.; Al'Mrayat, O.; Luan, E.; Fang, C.; Rezaiezadeh, S.; Ratner, D. M.; Cheung, K.; Dattner, Y.; Chrostowski, L.

    2017-02-01

    Biosensors based on silicon photonic integrated circuits have attracted a growing interest in recent years. The use of sub-micron silicon waveguides to propagate near-infrared light allows for the drastic reduction of the optical system size, while increasing its complexity and sensitivity. Using silicon as the propagating medium also leverages the fabrication capabilities of CMOS foundries, which offer low-cost mass production. Researchers have deeply investigated photonic sensor devices, such as ring resonators, interferometers and photonic crystals, but the practical integration of silicon photonic biochips as part of a complete system has received less attention. Herein, we present a practical system-level architecture which can be employed to integrate the aforementioned photonic biosensors. We describe a system based on 1 mm2 dies that integrate germanium photodetectors and a single light coupling device. The die are embedded into a 16x16 mm2 epoxy package to enable microfluidic and electrical integration. First, we demonstrate a simple process to mimic Fan-Out Wafer-level-Packaging, which enables low-cost mass production. We then characterize the photodetectors in the photovoltaic mode, which exhibit high sensitivity at low optical power. Finally, we present a new grating coupler concept to relax the lateral alignment tolerance down to +/- 50 μm at 1-dB (80%) power penalty, which should permit non-experts to use the biochips in a"plug-and-play" style. The system-level integration demonstrated in this study paves the way towards the mass production of low-cost and highly sensitive biosensors, and can facilitate their wide adoption for biomedical and agro-environmental applications.

  8. Atomically abrupt semiconductor heterointerfaces: their role in advanced electronic and photonic devices and quantum phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capasso, Federico

    1994-01-01

    Atomically abrupt heterojunction interfaces have played a unique role in the emergence of a new generation of electronic and photonic devices. These include quantum-well lasers, low-noise superlattice avalanche photodiodes and solid-state photomultipliers, quantum-well infrared photodetectors, ultrahigh-speed heterojunction bipolar transistors and resonant-tunneling devices. The monolayer abruptness of heterojunction interfaces has also made possible the observation of exciting quantum phenomena including resonant tunneling, giant nonlinear susceptibilities associated with the quantum size effect and electron Bragg reflection phenomena. The latter have been observed in transport and in the creation of new bound states at energies in the classical continuum above potential wells. A brief discussion of recent work on tunable band discontinuities concludes this paper.

  9. Non-line-of-sight active imaging of scattered photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurenzis, Martin; Velten, Andreas

    2013-10-01

    Laser Gated Viewing is a prominent sensing technology for optical imaging in harsh environments and can be applied to the vision through fog, smoke and other degraded environmental conditions as well as to the vision through sea water in submarine operation. A direct imaging of non-scattered photons (or ballistic photons) is limited in range and performance by the free optical path length i.e. the length in which a photon can propagate without interaction with scattering particles or object surfaces. The imaging and analysis of scattered photons can overcome these classical limitations and it is possible to realize a non-line-of-sight imaging. The spatial and temporal distribution of scattered photons can be analyzed by means of computational optics and their information of the scenario can be restored. In the case of Lambertian scattering sources the scattered photons carry information of the complete environment. Especial the information outside the line of sight or outside the visibility range is of high interest. Here, we discuss approaches for non line of sight active imaging with different indirect and direct illumination concepts (point, surface and volume scattering sources).

  10. Active phase correction of high resolution silicon photonic arrayed waveguide gratings

    DOE PAGES

    Gehl, M.; Trotter, D.; Starbuck, A.; ...

    2017-03-10

    Arrayed waveguide gratings provide flexible spectral filtering functionality for integrated photonic applications. Achieving narrow channel spacing requires long optical path lengths which can greatly increase the footprint of devices. High index contrast waveguides, such as those fabricated in silicon-on-insulator wafers, allow tight waveguide bends which can be used to create much more compact designs. Both the long optical path lengths and the high index contrast contribute to significant optical phase error as light propagates through the device. Thus, silicon photonic arrayed waveguide gratings require active or passive phase correction following fabrication. We present the design and fabrication of compact siliconmore » photonic arrayed waveguide gratings with channel spacings of 50, 10 and 1 GHz. The largest device, with 11 channels of 1 GHz spacing, has a footprint of only 1.1 cm2. Using integrated thermo-optic phase shifters, the phase error is actively corrected. We present two methods of phase error correction and demonstrate state-of-the-art cross-talk performance for high index contrast arrayed waveguide gratings. As a demonstration of possible applications, we perform RF channelization with 1 GHz resolution. In addition, we generate unique spectral filters by applying non-zero phase offsets calculated by the Gerchberg Saxton algorithm.« less

  11. Er3+-activated photonic structures fabricated by sol-gel and rf-sputtering techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, M.; Alombert-Goget, G.; Armellini, C.; Berneschi, S.; Bhaktha, S. N. B.; Boulard, B.; Brenci, M.; Chiappini, A.; Chiasera, A.; Duverger-Arfuso, C.; Féron, P.; Gonçalves, R. R.; Jestin, Y.; Minati, L.; Moser, E.; Nunzi Conti, G.; Pelli, S.; Rao, D. N.; Retoux, R.; Righini, G. C.; Speranza, G.

    2009-05-01

    The realization of photonic structures operating at visible and near infrared frequencies is a highly attractive scientific and technological challenge. Since optical fiber innovation, a huge of activity has been performed leading to interesting results, such as optical waveguides and planar lightwave circuits, microphotonic devices, optical microcavities, nanowires, plasmonic structures, and photonic crystals. These systems have opened new possibilities in the field of both basic and applied physics, in a large area covering Information Communication Technologies, Health and Biology, Structural Engineering, and Environment Monitoring Systems. Several materials and techniques are employed to successfully fabricate photonic structures. Concerning materials, Er3+-activated silica-based glasses still play an important role, although recently interesting results have been published about fluoride glass-ceramic waveguides. As far as regards the fabrication methods sol-gel route and rf sputtering have proved to be versatile and reliable techniques. In this article we will present a review of some Er3+-activated photonic structures fabricated by sol gel route and rf sputtering deposition. In the discussion on the sol-gel approach we focus our attention on the silica-hafnia binary system presenting an overview concerning fabrication protocols and structural, optical and spectroscopic assessment of SiO2-HfO2 waveguides activated by Er3+ ions. In order to put in evidence the reliability and versatility of the sol-gel route for photonics applications four different confined structures are briefly presented: amorphous waveguides, coated microspheres, monolithic waveguide laser, and core-shell nanospheres. As examples of rf sputtering technique, we will discuss Er3+-activated silica-hafnia and silica-germania waveguides, the latter system allowing fabrication of integrated optics structures by UV photo-imprinting. Finally, two examples of photonic crystal structures, one

  12. Neutronics activities for next generation devices

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Neutronic activities for the next generation devices are the subject of this paper. The main activities include TFCX and FPD blanket/shield studies, neutronic aspects of ETR/INTOR critical issues, and neutronics computational modules for the tokamak system code and tandem mirror reactor system code. Trade-off analyses, optimization studies, design problem investigations and computational models development for reactor parametric studies carried out for these activities are summarized.

  13. Fabrication of microscale medical devices by two-photon polymerization with multiple foci via a spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Gittard, Shaun D; Nguyen, Alexander; Obata, Kotaro; Koroleva, Anastasia; Narayan, Roger J; Chichkov, Boris N

    2011-11-01

    Two-photon polymerization is an appealing technique for producing microscale devices due to its flexibility in producing structures with a wide range of geometries as well as its compatibility with materials suitable for biomedical applications. The greatest limiting factor in widespread use of two-photon polymerization is the slow fabrication times associated with line-by-line, high-resolution structuring. In this study, a recently developed technology was used to produce microstructures by two-photon polymerization with multiple foci, which significantly reduces the production time. Computer generated hologram pattern technology was used to generate multiple laser beams in controlled positions from a single laser. These multiple beams were then used to simultaneously produce multiple microstructures by two-photon polymerization. Arrays of micro-Venus structures, tissue engineering scaffolds, and microneedle arrays were produced by multifocus two-photon polymerization. To our knowledge, this work is the first demonstration of multifocus two-photon polymerization technology for production of a functional medical device. Multibeam fabrication has the potential to greatly improve the efficiency of two-photon polymerization production of microscale devices such as tissue engineering scaffolds and microneedle arrays.

  14. Strained Silicon Photonics

    PubMed Central

    Schriever, Clemens; Bohley, Christian; Schilling, Jörg; Wehrspohn, Ralf B.

    2012-01-01

    A review of recent progress in the field of strained silicon photonics is presented. The application of strain to waveguide and photonic crystal structures can be used to alter the linear and nonlinear optical properties of these devices. Here, methods for the fabrication of strained devices are summarized and recent examples of linear and nonlinear optical devices are discussed. Furthermore, the relation between strain and the enhancement of the second order nonlinear susceptibility is investigated, which may enable the construction of optically active photonic devices made of silicon. PMID:28817015

  15. Periodic dielectric structure for production of photonic band gap and devices incorporating the same

    DOEpatents

    Ho, Kai-Ming; Chan, Che-Ting; Soukoulis, Costas

    1994-08-02

    A periodic dielectric structure which is capable of producing a photonic band gap and which is capable of practical construction. The periodic structure is formed of a plurality of layers, each layer being formed of a plurality of rods separated by a given spacing. The material of the rods contrasts with the material between the rods to have a refractive index contrast of at least two. The rods in each layer are arranged with their axes parallel and at a given spacing. Adjacent layers are rotated by 90.degree., such that the axes of the rods in any given layer are perpendicular to the axes in its neighbor. Alternating layers (that is, successive layers of rods having their axes parallel such as the first and third layers) are offset such that the rods of one are about at the midpoint between the rods of the other. A four-layer periocity is thus produced, and successive layers are stacked to form a three-dimensional structure which exhibits a photonic band gap. By virtue of forming the device in layers of elongate members, it is found that the device is susceptible of practical construction.

  16. Computational imaging of defects in commercial substrates for electronic and photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzawa, Masayuki; Kashiwagi, Ryo; Yamada, Masayoshi

    2012-03-01

    Computational defect imaging has been performed in commercial substrates for electronic and photonic devices by combining the transmission profile acquired with an imaging type of linear polariscope and the computational algorithm to extract a small amount of birefringence. The computational images of phase retardation δ exhibited spatial inhomogeneity of defect-induced birefringence in GaP, LiNbO3, and SiC substrates, which were not detected by conventional 'visual inspection' based on simple optical refraction or transmission because of poor sensitivity. The typical imaging time was less than 30 seconds for 3-inch diameter substrate with the spatial resolution of 200 μm, while that by scanning polariscope was 2 hours to get the same spatial resolution. Since our proposed technique have been achieved high sensitivity, short imaging time, and wide coverage of substrate materials, which are practical advantages over the laboratory-scale apparatus such as X-ray topography and electron microscope, it is useful for nondestructive inspection of various commercial substrates in production of electronic and photonic devices.

  17. Design of waveguide-integrated graphene devices for photonic gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhenzhou; Goda, Keisuke

    2016-12-01

    We present waveguide-integrated graphene devices for photonic gas sensing. In a gas environment, graphene’s conductivity is changed by adsorbed gas molecules which serve as charge-carrier donors or acceptors. To accurately probe gas-induced variations in the graphene’s conductivity, we optimize the graphene’s Fermi level and spectral region. Then, we propose graphene-on-silicon and graphene-on-germanium suspended membrane slot waveguides in which propagating light in the waveguide has a strong interaction with the top graphene layer. The gas concentration can be calculated by measuring the spectrum of the optical reflection from the waveguide Bragg grating. The maximum sensitivity of the waveguide-integrated gas sensor can reach one part per million for sensing gaseous nitrogen dioxide. Its sensitivity is about 20 times higher than that of the graphene-covered microfiber sensor and is comparable with that of a graphene plasmonic sensor. The fabrication of the proposed graphene device is CMOS compatible. Our results pave a way for chip-integrated sensitive photonic gas sensors.

  18. Active integrated filters for RF-photonic channelizers.

    PubMed

    El Nagdi, Amr; Liu, Ke; LaFave, Tim P; Hunt, Louis R; Ramakrishna, Viswanath; Dabkowski, Mieczyslaw; MacFarlane, Duncan L; Christensen, Marc P

    2011-01-01

    A theoretical study of RF-photonic channelizers using four architectures formed by active integrated filters with tunable gains is presented. The integrated filters are enabled by two- and four-port nano-photonic couplers (NPCs). Lossless and three individual manufacturing cases with high transmission, high reflection, and symmetric couplers are assumed in the work. NPCs behavior is dependent upon the phenomenon of frustrated total internal reflection. Experimentally, photonic channelizers are fabricated in one single semiconductor chip on multi-quantum well epitaxial InP wafers using conventional microelectronics processing techniques. A state space modeling approach is used to derive the transfer functions and analyze the stability of these filters. The ability of adapting using the gains is demonstrated. Our simulation results indicate that the characteristic bandpass and notch filter responses of each structure are the basis of channelizer architectures, and optical gain may be used to adjust filter parameters to obtain a desired frequency magnitude response, especially in the range of 1-5 GHz for the chip with a coupler separation of ∼9 mm. Preliminarily, the measurement of spectral response shows enhancement of quality factor by using higher optical gains. The present compact active filters on an InP-based integrated photonic circuit hold the potential for a variety of channelizer applications. Compared to a pure RF channelizer, photonic channelizers may perform both channelization and down-conversion in an optical domain.

  19. Active Integrated Filters for RF-Photonic Channelizers

    PubMed Central

    Nagdi, Amr El; Liu, Ke; LaFave, Tim P.; Hunt, Louis R.; Ramakrishna, Viswanath; Dabkowski, Mieczyslaw; MacFarlane, Duncan L.; Christensen, Marc P.

    2011-01-01

    A theoretical study of RF-photonic channelizers using four architectures formed by active integrated filters with tunable gains is presented. The integrated filters are enabled by two- and four-port nano-photonic couplers (NPCs). Lossless and three individual manufacturing cases with high transmission, high reflection, and symmetric couplers are assumed in the work. NPCs behavior is dependent upon the phenomenon of frustrated total internal reflection. Experimentally, photonic channelizers are fabricated in one single semiconductor chip on multi-quantum well epitaxial InP wafers using conventional microelectronics processing techniques. A state space modeling approach is used to derive the transfer functions and analyze the stability of these filters. The ability of adapting using the gains is demonstrated. Our simulation results indicate that the characteristic bandpass and notch filter responses of each structure are the basis of channelizer architectures, and optical gain may be used to adjust filter parameters to obtain a desired frequency magnitude response, especially in the range of 1–5 GHz for the chip with a coupler separation of ∼9 mm. Preliminarily, the measurement of spectral response shows enhancement of quality factor by using higher optical gains. The present compact active filters on an InP-based integrated photonic circuit hold the potential for a variety of channelizer applications. Compared to a pure RF channelizer, photonic channelizers may perform both channelization and down-conversion in an optical domain. PMID:22319352

  20. Neutron measurements in radiotherapy: A method to correct neutron sensitive devices for parasitic photon response.

    PubMed

    Irazola, L; Terrón, J A; Bedogni, R; Pola, A; Lorenzoli, M; Jimenez-Ortega, E; Barbeiro, A R; Sánchez-Nieto, B; Sánchez-Doblado, F

    2017-05-01

    One of the major causes of secondary malignancies after radiotherapy treatments are peripheral doses, known to increase for some newer techniques (such as IMRT or VMAT). For accelerators operating above 10MV, neutrons can represent important contribution to peripheral doses. This neutron contamination can be measured using different passive or active techniques, available in the literature. As far as active (or direct-reading) procedures are concerned, a major issue is represented by their parasitic photon sensitivity, which can significantly affect the measurement when the point of test is located near to the field-edge. This work proposes a simple method to estimate the unwanted photon contribution to these neutrons. As a relevant case study, the use of a recently neutron sensor for "in-phantom" measurements in high-energy machines was considered. The method, called "Dual Energy Photon Subtraction" (DEPS), requires pairs of measurements performed for the same treatment, in low-energy (6MV) and high energy (e.g. 15MV) fields. It assumes that the peripheral photon dose (PPD) at a fixed point in a phantom, normalized to the unit photon dose at the isocenter, does not depend on the treatment energy. Measurements with ionization chamber and Monte Carlo simulations were used to evaluate the validity of this hypothesis. DEPS method was compared to already published correction methods, such as the use of neutron absorber materials. In addition to its simplicity, an advantage of DEPs procedure is that it can be applied to any radiotherapy machine. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. How active are young cardiac device patients? Objective assessment of activity in children with cardiac devices.

    PubMed

    de la Uz, Caridad M; Burch, Ashley E; Gunderson, Bruce; Koehler, Jodi; Sears, Samuel F

    2017-09-12

    The daily activity of pediatric patients with implantable cardiac devices provides behavioral evidence of functional outcomes. Modern devices provide continuous accelerometer data that is sensitive to movement, but normative values have not been published for pediatric activity rates. This study provides the first normative accelerometer data on activity rates in a large sample of pediatric cardiac device patients. Patients were between 3 and 18 years old, (N = 1,905) and implanted with a cardiac device from a single device company, and enrolled in remote monitoring. The median age at implant was 14 years (IQR = 12-16); 61.3% were male. Data for 4 weeks was extracted from a company database at 53 weeks post-implant and an average of daily activity was calculated. Daily average activity for all patients was 5.4 hours (SD = 2.0). In a multivariate analysis, increased level of activity was associated with: being male, having a pacemaker vs implantable cardioverter defibrillator, epicardial device location, rate response turned off, having experienced a shock, and younger age. These results provide the first baseline data of physical activity in children with implanted cardiac devices and provide a clinical guide to physical activity assessment in this population. Further, our data suggest physical activity in children with implantable cardiac devices may differ based on demographic variables, device type, device location, indication for implantation, and history of ICD shock. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Tight control of light trapping in surface addressable photonic crystal membranes: application to spectrally and spatially selective optical devices (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letartre, Xavier; Blanchard, Cédric; Grillet, Christian; Jamois, Cécile; Leclercq, Jean-Louis; Viktorovitch, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Surface addressable Photonic Crystal Membranes (PCM) are 1D or 2D photonic crystals formed in a slab waveguides where Bloch modes located above the light line are exploited. These modes are responsible for resonances in the reflection spectrum whose bandwidth can be adjusted at will. These resonances result from the coupling between a guided mode of the membrane and a free-space mode through the pattern of the photonic crystal. If broadband, these structures represent an ideal mirror to form compact vertical microcavity with 3D confinement of photons and polarization selectivity. Among numerous devices, low threshold VCSELs with remarkable and tunable modal properties have been demonstrated. Narrow band PCMs (or high Q resonators) have also been extensively used for surface addressable optoelectronic devices where an active material is embedded into the membrane, leading to the demonstration of low threshold surface emitting lasers, nonlinear bistables, optical traps... In this presentation, we will describe the main physical rules which govern the lifetime of photons in these resonant modes. More specifically, it will be emphasized that the Q factor of the PCM is determined, to the first order, by the integral overlap between the electromagnetic field distributions of the guided and free space modes and of the dielectric periodic perturbation which is applied to the homogeneous membrane to get the photonic crystal. It turns out that the symmetries of these distributions are of prime importance for the strength of the resonance. It will be shown that, by molding in-plane or vertical symmetries of Bloch modes, spectrally and spatially selective light absorbers or emitters can be designed. First proof of concept devices will be also presented.

  3. [Batteries Used in Active Implantable Medical Devices].

    PubMed

    Ma, Bozhi; Hao, Hongwei; Li, Luming

    2015-03-01

    In recent years active implantable medical devices(AIMD) are being developed rapidly. Many battery systems have been developed for different AIMD applications. These batteries have the same requirements which include high safety, reliability, energy density and long service life, discharge indication. History, present and future of batteries used in AIMD are introduced in the article.

  4. Variability analysis of device-level photonics using stochastic collocation (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Yufei; Spina, Domenico; Li, Ang; Dhaene, Tom; Bogaerts, Wim

    2016-05-01

    Abstract Integrated photonics, and especially silicon photonics, has been rapidly expanded its catalog of building blocks and functionalities. Now, it is maturing fast towards circuit-level integration to serve more complex applications in industry. However, performance variability due to the fabrication process and operational conditions can limit the yield of large-scale circuits. It is essential to assess this impact at the design level with an efficient variability analysis: how variations in geometrical, electrical and optical parameters propagate into components performance. In particular when implementing wavelength-selective filters, many primary functional parameters are affected by fabrication-induced variability. The key functional parameters that we assess in this paper are the waveguide propagation constant (the effective index, essential to define the exact length of a delay line) and the coupling coefficients in coupling structure (necessary to set the power distribution over different delay lines). The Monte Carlo (MC) method is the standard method for variability analysis, thanks to its accuracy and easy implementation. However, due to its slow convergence, it requires a large set of samples (simulations or measurements), making it computationally or experimentally expensive. More efficient methods to assess such variability can be used, such as generalized polynomial chaos (gPC) expansion or stochastic collocation. In this paper, we demonstrate stochastic collocation (SC) as an efficient alternative to MC or gPC to characterize photonic devices under the effect of uncertainty. The idea of SC is to interpolate stochastic solutions in the random space by interpolation polynomials. After sampling the deterministic problem at a pre-defined set of nodes in random space, the interpolation is constructed. SC drastically reduces computation and measurement cost. Also, like MC method, sampling-based SC is easy to implement. Its computation cost can be

  5. Advanced active quenching circuits for single-photon avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stipčević, M.; Christensen, B. G.; Kwiat, P. G.; Gauthier, D. J.

    2016-05-01

    Commercial photon-counting modules, often based on actively quenched solid-state avalanche photodiode sensors, are used in wide variety of applications. Manufacturers characterize their detectors by specifying a small set of parameters, such as detection efficiency, dead time, dark counts rate, afterpulsing probability and single photon arrival time resolution (jitter), however they usually do not specify the conditions under which these parameters are constant or present a sufficient description. In this work, we present an in-depth analysis of the active quenching process and identify intrinsic limitations and engineering challenges. Based on that, we investigate the range of validity of the typical parameters used by two commercial detectors. We identify an additional set of imperfections that must be specified in order to sufficiently characterize the behavior of single-photon counting detectors in realistic applications. The additional imperfections include rate-dependence of the dead time, jitter, detection delay shift, and "twilighting." Also, the temporal distribution of afterpulsing and various artifacts of the electronics are important. We find that these additional non-ideal behaviors can lead to unexpected effects or strong deterioration of the system's performance. Specifically, we discuss implications of these new findings in a few applications in which single-photon detectors play a major role: the security of a quantum cryptographic protocol, the quality of single-photon-based random number generators and a few other applications. Finally, we describe an example of an optimized avalanche quenching circuit for a high-rate quantum key distribution system based on time-bin entangled photons.

  6. Multiplexing photonic devices integrated on a silicon/germanium platform for the mid-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labeye, P.; Koshkinbayeva, A.; Dupoy, M.; Barritault, P.; Lartigue, O.; Fournier, M.; Fedeli, J.-M.; Boutami, S.; Garcia, S.; Nicoletti, S.; Duraffourg, L.

    2017-02-01

    With the recent progress in integrated silicon photonics technology and the recent development of efficient quantum cascade laser technology (QCL), there is now a very good opportunity to investigate new gas sensors offering both very high sensitivity, high selectivity (multi-gas sensing, atmosphere analysis) and low cost thanks to the integration on planar substrate. In this context, we have developed singlemode optical waveguides in the mid-infrared based on Silicon/Germanium alloy integrated on silicon. These waveguides, compatible with standard microelectronic technologies present very low loss in the 3300 - 1300 cm-1 range. This paper presents the design, technological realization, and characterization of array waveguide grating devices specifically developed for the simultaneous detection of several gas using arrays of QCL sources. Gas sensing generally requires a tunable source continuously covering the whole operational range of the QCL stack. With this objective, specific design has been adopted to flatten the optical transfer function of the whole multiplexers. Samples devices around 2235cm-1 were realized and tested and showed results in good agreement with the modeling, flat transmission over a full 100 cm-1 operational range were obtained with a peak-to-valley modulation of -5dB were experimentally measured. These devices will be soon associated with QCL arrays in order to provide integrated, powerful, multi wavelength, laser sources in the 2235 cm-1 region applicable to NO, CO, and CO2 multi-gas sensor.

  7. Effects of nanoscale vacuum gap on photon-enhanced thermionic emission devices

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuan; Liao, Tianjun; Zhang, Yanchao; Chen, Xiaohang E-mail: jcchen@xmu.edu.cn; Su, Shanhe; Chen, Jincan E-mail: jcchen@xmu.edu.cn

    2016-01-28

    A new model of the photon-enhanced thermionic emission (PETE) device with a nanoscale vacuum gap is established by introducing the quantum tunneling effect and the image force correction. Analytic expressions for both the thermionic emission and tunneling currents are derived. The electron concentration and the temperature of the cathode are determined by the particle conservation and energy balance equations. The effects of the operating voltage on the maximum potential barrier, cathode temperature, electron concentration and equilibrium electron concentration of the conduction band, and efficiency of the PETE device are discussed in detail for different given values of the vacuum gap length. The influence of the band gap of the cathode and flux concentration on the efficiency is further analyzed. The maximum efficiency of the PETE and the corresponding optimum values of the band gap and the operating voltage are determined. The results obtained here show that the efficiency of the PETE device can be significantly improved by employing a nanoscale vacuum gap.

  8. Scattering detection using a photonic-microfluidic integrated device with on-chip collection capabilities.

    PubMed

    Watts, Benjamin R; Zhang, Zhiyi; Xu, Chang Qing; Cao, Xudong; Lin, Min

    2014-02-01

    SU-8-based photonic-microfluidic integrated devices with on-chip beam shaping and collection capabilities were demonstrated in a scattering detection and counting application. Through the proper deployment of the tailored beam geometries via the on-chip excitation optics, excellent CV values were measured for 1, 2, and 5 μm blank beads, 16.4, 11.0, and 12.5%, respectively, coupled with a simple free-space optical detection scheme. The performance of these devices was found dependent on the combination of on-chip, lens-shaped beam geometry and bead size. While very low CVs were obtained when the combination was ideal, a nonideal combination could still result in acceptable CVs for flow cytometry; the reliability was confirmed via devices being able to resolve separate populations of 2.0 and 5.0 μm beads from their mixture with low CV values of 15.9 and 18.5%, respectively. On-chip collection using integrated on-chip optical waveguides was shown to be very reliable in comparison with a free-space collection scheme, yielding a coincident rate of 94.2%. A CV as low as 19.2% was obtained from the on-chip excitation and collection of 5 μm beads when the on-chip lens-shaped beam had a 6.0-μm beam waist.

  9. Active superconducting devices formed of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Beyer, James B.; Nordman, James E.; Hohenwarter, Gert K. G.

    1991-05-28

    Active superconducting devices are formed of thin films of superconductor which include a main conduction channel which has an active weak link region. The weak link region is composed of an array of links of thin film superconductor spaced from one another by voids and selected in size and thickness such that magnetic flux can propagate across the weak link region when it is superconducting. Magnetic flux applied to the weak link region will propagate across the array of links causing localized loss of superconductivity in the links and changing the effective resistance across the links. The magnetic flux can be applied from a control line formed of a superconducting film deposited coplanar with the main conduction channel and weak link region on a substrate. The devices can be formed of any type to superconductor but are particularly well suited to the high temperature superconductors since the devices can be entirely formed from coplanar films with no overlying regions. The devices can be utilized for a variety of electrical components, including switching circuits, amplifiers, oscillators and modulators, and are well suited to microwave frequency applications.

  10. Focused-ion-beam post-processing technology for active devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tee, Chyng Wen; Lau, Fat Kit; Zhao, Xin; Penty, Richard; White, Ian

    2006-09-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) etching technology is a highly efficient post-processing technique with the functionality to perform sputter etching and deposition of metals or insulators by means of a computer-generated mask. The high resolution and the ability to remove material directly from the sample in-situ make FIB etching the ideal candidate for device prototyping of novel micro-size photonic component design. Furthermore, the fact that arbitrary profile can be etched directly onto a sample without the need to prepare conventional mask and photolithography process makes novel device research with rapid feedback from characterisation to design activities possible. In this paper, we present a concise summary of the research work in Cambridge based on FIB technology. We demonstrate the applicability of focussed ion beam post processing technology to active photonic devices research. Applications include the integration of advanced waveguide architectures onto active photonic components. We documents details on the integration of lens structure on tapered lasers, photonic crystals on active SOA-integrated waveguides and surface profiling of low-cost gain-guided vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers. Furthermore, we discuss additional functions of FIB in the measurement of buried waveguide structures or the integration of total-internal-reflection (TIR) mirror in optical interconnect structures.

  11. Photonic properties of erbium activated coated microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jestin, Y.; Armellini, C.; Chiappini, A.; Chiasera, A.; Dumeige, Y.; Ferrari, M.; Féron, P.; Ghisa, L.; Nunzi Conti, G.; Trebaol, S.; Righini, G. C.

    2008-02-01

    μA simple method based on the sol-gel technology has been developed to coat passive microspheres with an active coating. The microspheres were prepared by fusion of a standard telecom fiber with a dimension of about 200 μm and 400 μm and have been respectively dipped in a 70SiO II-30HfO II sol activated by 1 mol% and 0.1 mol% of erbium ions. Here we first report about the luminescence properties of a silica-hafnia coating doped with erbium ions and then whispering gallery mode spectra were analysed for different sphere diameters, thickness of coating and erbium concentration. The thickness of the coating has been chosen in order to support at least one whispering gallery mode at 1.5 μm.

  12. Photonic muscles: optically controlled active optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Joe; Brozik, Jim; Basame, Solomon; Fallbach, Mike; Bradford, Larry; Douglas, Dennis; Miner, Gilda

    2005-08-01

    Reported is an investigation of a novel approach for producing and correcting active optical mirrors. Photoactive polymers represent a special class of "smart materials" whose electronic and physical properties such as conductivity, charge distribution, and especially shape can be changed in response to the environment (voltage, light, stress). The ability of photoactive polymers to change the structure of a polymer matrix in response to light is being studied to allow active figure control of membranes for optical element use. Photoactive substrates (mirrors) were produced. Incoherent light sources were used to effect shape control. Shack-Hartman Wavefront sensing was used to quantify the initial and optically altered figure of samples. Motion of two classes of samples was measured and is reported here. Proposed is also a new stress control technology as well as new hybrid technology combining two classes of photoactive materials.

  13. Photonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Optoelectronic materials and devices are examined. Optoelectronic devices, which generate, detect, modulate, or switch electromagnetic radiation are being developed for a variety of space applications. The program includes spatial light modulators, solid state lasers, optoelectronic integrated circuits, nonlinear optical materials and devices, fiber optics, and optical networking photovoltaic technology and optical processing.

  14. Bias field tailored plasmonic nano-electrode for high-power terahertz photonic devices.

    PubMed

    Moon, Kiwon; Lee, Il-Min; Shin, Jun-Hwan; Lee, Eui Su; Kim, Namje; Lee, Won-Hui; Ko, Hyunsung; Han, Sang-Pil; Park, Kyung Hyun

    2015-09-08

    Photoconductive antennas with nano-structured electrodes and which show significantly improved performances have been proposed to satisfy the demand for compact and efficient terahertz (THz) sources. Plasmonic field enhancement was previously considered the dominant mechanism accounting for the improvements in the underlying physics. However, we discovered that the role of plasmonic field enhancement is limited and near-field distribution of bias field should be considered as well. In this paper, we clearly show that the locally enhanced bias field due to the size effect is much more important than the plasmonic enhanced absorption in the nano-structured electrodes for the THz emitters. Consequently, an improved nano-electrode design is presented by tailoring bias field distribution and plasmonic enhancement. Our findings will pave the way for new perspectives in the design and analysis of plasmonic nano-structures for more efficient THz photonic devices.

  15. Silicon coding-decoding photonic device by electron irradiation and light down conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyutenko, V. K.; Tykhonov, A. N.; Malyutenko, O. Yu.; Rohutskii, I. S.; Danilchenko, B. A.

    2012-10-01

    We propose and demonstrate a coding-decoding procedure as an important step to realize one more Si-based photonic device. Low-fluence (<1014 e/cm2) high-energy (1 MeV) electron irradiation of a bulk Si matrix is used to code an information by forming local regions with lower free carrier lifetime that are hidden under the surface and invisible to the eye. Short-wavelength (<1 μm) free carrier generation stands for multiple, remote, and nondestructive decoding process, which makes it easy to dynamically (ms range) visualize a code by capturing two-dimensional pattern of thermal emission in the longer-wavelength (3-12 μm) band (light down conversion).

  16. Characterization of coplanar poled electro optic polymer films for Si-photonic devices with multiphoton microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Himmelhuber, R. Mehravar, S. S.; Herrera, O. D.; Demir, V.; Kieu, K.; Norwood, R. A.; Peyghambarian, N.; Luo, J.; Jen, A. K.-Y.

    2014-04-21

    We imaged coplanar poled electro optic (EO) polymer films on transparent substrates with a multiple-photon microscope in reflection and correlated the second-harmonic light intensity with the results of Pockels coefficient (r{sub 33}) measurements. This allowed us to make quantitative measurements of poled polymer films on non-transparent substrates like silicon, which are not accessible with traditional Pockels coefficient measurement techniques. Phase modulators consisting of silicon waveguide devices with EO polymer claddings with a known Pockels coefficient (from V{sub π} measurements) were used to validate the correlation between the second-harmonic signal and r{sub 33}. This also allowed us to locally map the r{sub 33} coefficient in the poled area.

  17. Impact of feature-size dependent etching on the optical properties of photonic crystal devices

    SciTech Connect

    Berrier, A.; Anand, S.; Ferrini, R.; Talneau, A.; Houdre, R.

    2008-05-01

    Feature size dependence in Ar/Cl{sub 2} chemically assisted ion beam etching of InP-based photonic crystals (PhCs) and its influence on the optical properties of PhC devices operating in the band gap are investigated. The analysis of the measured quality factors, the determined mirror reflectivities, and losses of one-dimensional Fabry-Perot cavities clearly demonstrates the importance of feature-size dependent etching. The optical properties show a dramatic improvement up to a hole depth of about 3.5 {mu}m that is primarily due to a significant reduction in extrinsic losses. However, beyond this hole depth, the improvement is at a lower rate, which suggests that extrinsic losses, although present, are not dominant.

  18. A time domain vector finite element method for the full wave simulation of nonlinear photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Aaron C.

    We have developed a mixed Vector Finite Element Method (VFEM) for Maxwell's equations with third order polarization terms. The method allows for discretization of complicated device geometries with arbitrary order representations of the B and E fields, and up to 4th order accurate time discretization. Additionally we have implemented a series of computational optimizations that significantly increase the scale of simulations that can be performed with this method. Among these optimizations is a new generalized mass lumping method that we developed which reduces the computational cost of the finite element system solve by a factor of 10x. In this dissertation we will present the Vector Finite Element Method, and the computational optimizations that we employed. Additionally, we will present a series of analyses and simulations that were performed to validate the method. Finally, we will present some production runs using this method, including nonlinear mode mixing in waveguides and supercontinuum generation in a photonic crystal fiber.

  19. Rapid thermal processing in the manufacturing technology of contacts to InP-based photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Avishay

    1991-04-01

    Rapid thermal alloying and sintering of metal ohmic contacts such as AuBe PtTFi and W to InP-based materials is shown to perform with better electrical properties than the same contacts heated by means of conventional furnace. The metalsemiconductor interfacial reactions induced by the rapid thermal processing were much shallower than those formed during the conventional heating cycle at the same temperature however with a negligible influence on the overall stresses developed in the film. These results demonstrate the superiority of the rapid thermal processing over the conventional furnace heating in sintering the metal electrical contacts and its potential while integrated into the overall manufacturing process sequence of the InP based photonic devices.

  20. Bias field tailored plasmonic nano-electrode for high-power terahertz photonic devices

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Kiwon; Lee, Il-Min; Shin, Jun-Hwan; Lee, Eui Su; Kim, Namje; Lee, Won-Hui; Ko, Hyunsung; Han, Sang-Pil; Park, Kyung Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Photoconductive antennas with nano-structured electrodes and which show significantly improved performances have been proposed to satisfy the demand for compact and efficient terahertz (THz) sources. Plasmonic field enhancement was previously considered the dominant mechanism accounting for the improvements in the underlying physics. However, we discovered that the role of plasmonic field enhancement is limited and near-field distribution of bias field should be considered as well. In this paper, we clearly show that the locally enhanced bias field due to the size effect is much more important than the plasmonic enhanced absorption in the nano-structured electrodes for the THz emitters. Consequently, an improved nano-electrode design is presented by tailoring bias field distribution and plasmonic enhancement. Our findings will pave the way for new perspectives in the design and analysis of plasmonic nano-structures for more efficient THz photonic devices. PMID:26347288

  1. Performance Assessment of Active Hearing Protection Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-08

    devices selected for this study were all equipped with a hear-thru setting designed to amplify soft sounds and conversational speech while allowing loud...of sound under the hearing protector. This method offers several advantages over the well-known NRR. The NRR is designed to be subtracted from the...active components were designed to provide the user with enhanced face to face communication abilities and amplify low level sounds to allow

  2. Development of an efficient photonic device for the reformatting of celestial light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLachlan, D. G.; Harris, R. J.; Gris-Sánchez, I.; Choudhury, D.; Morris, T. J.; Gendron, E.; Basden, A. G.; Spaleniak, I. J.; Arriola, A.; Birks, T. A.; Allington-Smith, J. R.; Thomson, R. R.

    2016-07-01

    The advent of 30 m class Extremely Large Telescopes will require spectrographs of unprecedented spectral resolution in order to meet ambitious science goals, such as detecting Earth-like exoplanets via the radial velocity technique. The consequent increase in the size of the spectrograph makes it challenging to ensure their optimal environmental stabilization and precise spectral calibration. The multimode optical fibers used to transport light from the telescope focal plane to the separately housed environmentally stabilized spectrograph introduces modal noise. This phenomena manifests as variations in the light pattern at the output of the fiber as the input coupling and/or fiber position changes which degrades the spectrograph line profile, reducing the instrument precision. The photonic lantern is a guided wave transition that efficiently couples a multimode point spread function into an array of single modes. If arranged in a linear array at the input of the spectrograph these single modes can in principle provide a diffraction-limited mode noise free spectra in the dispersion axis. In this paper we describe the fabrication and throughput performance of the hybrid reformatter. This device combines the proven low-loss performance of a multicore fiber-based photonic lantern with an ultrafast laser inscribed three-dimensional waveguide interconnect that performs the reformatting function to a diffraction-limited pseudo-slit. The device provided an in laboratory throughput of 65 +/- 2% at 1550 +/- 20 nm and an on-sky throughput of 53 +/- 4% at 1530 +/- 80 nm using the CANARY adaptive optics system at the William Herschel Telescope.

  3. Integrated RF photonic devices based on crystal ion sliced lithium niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenger, Vincent; Toney, James; Pollick, Andrea; Busch, James; Scholl, Jon; Pontius, Peter; Sriram, Sri

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports on the development of thin film lithium niobate (TFLN™) electro-optic devices at SRICO. TFLN™ is formed on various substrates using a layer transfer process called crystal ion slicing. In the ion slicing process, light ions such as helium and hydrogen are implanted at a depth in a bulk seed wafer as determined by the implant energy. After wafer bonding to a suitable handle substrate, the implanted seed wafer is separated (sliced) at the implant depth using a wet etching or thermal splitting step. After annealing and polishing of the slice surface, the transferred film is bulk quality, retaining all the favorable properties of the bulk seed crystal. Ion slicing technology opens up a vast design space to produce lithium niobate electro-optic devices that were not possible using bulk substrates or physically deposited films. For broadband electro-optic modulation, TFLN™ is formed on RF friendly substrates to achieve impedance matched operation at up to 100 GHz or more. For narrowband RF filtering functions, a quasi-phase matched modulator is presented that incorporates domain engineering to implement periodic inversion of electro-optic phase. The thinness of the ferroelectric films makes it possible to in situ program the domains, and thus the filter response, using only few tens of applied volts. A planar poled prism optical beam steering device is also presented that is suitable for optically switched true time delay architectures. Commercial applications of the TFLN™ device technologies include high bandwidth fiber optic links, cellular antenna remoting, photonic microwave signal processing, optical switching and phased arrayed radar.

  4. Continuously tunable devices based on electrical control of dual-frequency liquid crystal filled photonic bandgap fibers.

    PubMed

    Scolari, Lara; Alkeskjold, Thomas; Riishede, Jesper; Bjarklev, Anders; Hermann, David; Anawati, Anawati; Nielsen, Martin; Bassi, Paolo

    2005-09-19

    We present an electrically controlled photonic bandgap fiber device obtained by infiltrating the air holes of a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with a dual-frequency liquid crystal (LC) with pre-tilted molecules. Compared to previously demonstrated devices of this kind, the main new feature of this one is its continuous tunability due to the fact that the used LC does not exhibit reverse tilt domain defects and threshold effects. Furthermore, the dual-frequency features of the LC enables electrical control of the spectral position of the bandgaps towards both shorter and longer wavelengths in the same device. We investigate the dynamics of this device and demonstrate a birefringence controller based on this principle.

  5. Electron Transport in Silicon Nanocrystal Devices: From Memory Applications to Silicon Photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Gerald M.

    The push to integrate the realms of microelectronics and photonics on the silicon platform is currently lacking an efficient, electrically pumped silicon light source. One promising material system for photonics on the silicon platform is erbium-doped silicon nanoclusters (Er:Si-nc), which uses silicon nanoclusters to sensitize erbium ions in a SiO2 matrix. This medium can be pumped electrically, and this thesis focuses primarily on the electrical properties of Er:Si-nc films and their possible development as a silicon light source in the erbium emission band around 1.5 micrometers. Silicon nanocrystals can also be used as the floating gate in a flash memory device, and work is also presented examining charge transport in novel systems for flash memory applications. To explore silicon nanocrystals as a potential replacement for metallic floating gates in flash memory, the charging dynamics in silicon nanocrystal films are first studied using UHV-AFM. This approach uses a non-contact AFM tip to locally charge a layer of nanocrystals. Subsequent imaging allows the injected charge to be observed in real time as it moves through the layer. Simulation of this interaction allows the quantication of the charge in the layer, where we find that each nanocrystal is only singly charged after injection, while holes are retained in the film for hours. Work towards developing a dielectric stack with a voltage-tunable barrier is presented, with applications for flash memory and hyperspectral imaging. For hyperspectral imaging applications, film stacks containing various dielectrics are studied using I-V, TEM, and internal photoemission, with barrier tunability demonstrated in the Sc2O3/SiO2 system. To study Er:Si-nc as a potential lasing medium for silicon photonics, a theoretical approach is presented where Er:Si-nc is the gain medium in a silicon slot waveguide. By accounting for the local density of optical states effect on the emitters, and carrier absorption due to

  6. Nanopatterning by large block copolymers for application in photonic devices (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokarian-Tabari, Parvaneh; Senthamaraikannan, Ramsankar; Collins, Timothy W.; Glynn, Colm; O'Dwyer, Colm; Morris, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The extensive benefits of the new generation of nanostructured surfaces is very promising for enhancing light absorption efficiency in photonic devices. However, the low throughput and the high cost of available technologies such as lithography for fabrication of nanostructures has proved to be a difficult technological hurdle for advanced manufacturing. In this research we present a solution based process based on high molecular weight block copolymer (BCP) nanolithography for fabrication of periodic structures on large areas of optical surfaces. Block copolymer self- assembly technique is a solution based process that offers an alternative route to produce highly ordered photonic crystal structures. BCPs forms nanodomains (5-10 nm) due to microphase separation of incompatible constitute blocks. The size and shape of the nanostructure can be customised by the molecular weight and volume fraction of the polymer blocks. However, the major challenge is BCPs do not phase separate into their signature ordered pattern above 100 nm, whereas for nanofeatures to be used as photonic gratings, they must be greater than 100 nm (typically ¼ wavelength). This is due to significant kinetic penalty arising from higher entanglement in high molecular weight polymers. In this work we present the results of exploiting commercially available block copolymers to phase separate into periodic domains greater than 100 nm. The process do not include any blending with homopolymers, or adding colloidal particles, and to our best knowledge, has not been yet achieved or reported in the literatures. We have pattern transferred the BCP mask to silicon substrate by reactive ion etch (ICP-RIE). The final product is black silicon, consists of hexagonally packed conic Si nanofeatures with diameter above 100nm and periodicity of 200 nm. The height of the Si nanopillars varies from 100 nm to 1 micron. We have characterized the angle dependent optical reflectance properties of the black silicon. The

  7. Photonic network R and D activities in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitayama, Ken-ichi; Miki, Tetsuya; Morioka, Toshio; Tsushima, Hideaki; Koga, Masafumi; Mori, Kazuyuki; Araki, Soichiro; Sato, Ken-ichi; Onaka, Hiroshi; Namiki, Shu; Aovama, Tomonori

    2005-11-01

    R and D activities on photonic networks in Japan are presented. First, milestones in current, ongoing R and D programs supported by Japanese government agencies are introduced, including long-distance and WDM fiber transmission, wavelength routing, optical burst switching, and control plane technology for IP backbone networks. Their goal was set to evolve a legacy telecommunications network to IP over WDM networks by introducing technologies for WDM and wavelength routing. We then discuss the perspectives of so-called PHASE II R and D programs for photonic networks over the next five years until 2010, by focusing on the report which has been recently issued by the Photonic Internet Forum (PIF), a consortium that has major carriers, telecom vendors, and Japanese academics as members. The PHASE II R and D programs should serve to establish a photonic platform to provide abundant bandwidth on demand, at any time on a real-time basis through the customer's initiative, to promote bandwidth-rich applications, such as grid computing, real-time digital-cinema streaming, medical and educational applications, and network storage in e-commerce.

  8. Correcting spherical aberrations in a biospecimen using a transmissive liquid crystal device in two-photon excitation laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Ayano; Hibi, Terumasa; Ipponjima, Sari; Matsumoto, Kenji; Yokoyama, Masafumi; Kurihara, Makoto; Hashimoto, Nobuyuki; Nemoto, Tomomi

    2015-10-01

    Two-photon excitation laser scanning microscopy has enabled the visualization of deep regions in a biospecimen. However, refractive-index mismatches in the optical path cause spherical aberrations that degrade spatial resolution and the fluorescence signal, especially during observation at deeper regions. Recently, we developed transmissive liquid-crystal devices for correcting spherical aberration without changing the basic design of the optical path in a conventional laser scanning microscope. In this study, the device was inserted in front of the objective lens and supplied with the appropriate voltage according to the observation depth. First, we evaluated the device by observing fluorescent beads in single- and two-photon excitation laser scanning microscopes. Using a 25× water-immersion objective lens with a numerical aperture of 1.1 and a sample with a refractive index of 1.38, the device recovered the spatial resolution and the fluorescence signal degraded within a depth of ±0.6 mm. Finally, we implemented the device for observation of a mouse brain slice in a two-photon excitation laser scanning microscope. An optical clearing reagent with a refractive index of 1.42 rendered the fixed mouse brain transparent. The device improved the spatial resolution and the yellow fluorescent protein signal within a depth of 0-0.54 mm.

  9. Nanoscale Potentiometry and Spectroscopy of Organic Electronic and Photonic Materials and Devices using Conductive Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hersam, M. C.; Fabbroni, E. F.; Such, M. W.; Shull, K. R.; Veinot, J. G. C.; Marks, T. J.

    2002-03-01

    As organic devices approach the nanometer scale, spatial variations in the electronic and photonic properties of organic materials become increasingly significant. To this end, we have developed conductive atomic force microscopy techniques for measuring temporally and spatially dependent electronic and photonic signals. To test this general nanocharacterization technique, two model organic systems have been studied: (1) a polyethylene-co-maleic anhydride matrix filled with aggregates of carbon black particles and (2) organic light emitting diode (OLED) structures. In the first case, surface potentiometry measurements illustrate individual nanoscale agglomerates of highly conductive carbon black particles within the insulating matirx. In the OLED experiments, electron transport and photon emission are concurrently mapped with 10 nm spatial resolution. Ultimately, we correlate these nanoscale measurements with macroscopic device behavior.

  10. Multi-layer photonics modeling framework for the design, analysis, and optimization of devices, links, and networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, André; Louchet, Hadrien; Arellano, Cristina; Farina, Jim; Koltchanov, Igor

    2011-01-01

    Requirements on photonics modeling vary significantly when aiming to design, analyze and optimize a single device, a complete transmission link or a complex network. Depending on the task at hand, different levels of detail for emulating the underlying physical characteristics and signal interactions are necessary. We present a multi-layer photonics modeling framework that addresses the different design challenges of devices, links and networks. Our discussed methodology is based on flexible optical signal representations, equipment models ranging from very detailed to high-level parametric, sophisticated numerical algorithms and means for automated parameter and technology variation and optimization. We discuss applications such as the detailed modeling on photonics integrated circuit level, the characterization of a high-speed transmission link utilizing multilevel modulation and coherent detection, the parametric analysis of transmission links and network dynamics, and the cost-optimized placement of equipment in moderately complex networks.

  11. Epidermal photonic devices for quantitative imaging of temperature and thermal transport characteristics of the skin.

    PubMed

    Gao, Li; Zhang, Yihui; Malyarchuk, Viktor; Jia, Lin; Jang, Kyung-In; Webb, R Chad; Fu, Haoran; Shi, Yan; Zhou, Guoyan; Shi, Luke; Shah, Deesha; Huang, Xian; Xu, Baoxing; Yu, Cunjiang; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A

    2014-09-19

    Characterization of temperature and thermal transport properties of the skin can yield important information of relevance to both clinical medicine and basic research in skin physiology. Here we introduce an ultrathin, compliant skin-like, or 'epidermal', photonic device that combines colorimetric temperature indicators with wireless stretchable electronics for thermal measurements when softly laminated on the skin surface. The sensors exploit thermochromic liquid crystals patterned into large-scale, pixelated arrays on thin elastomeric substrates; the electronics provide means for controlled, local heating by radio frequency signals. Algorithms for extracting patterns of colour recorded from these devices with a digital camera and computational tools for relating the results to underlying thermal processes near the skin surface lend quantitative value to the resulting data. Application examples include non-invasive spatial mapping of skin temperature with milli-Kelvin precision (±50 mK) and sub-millimetre spatial resolution. Demonstrations in reactive hyperaemia assessments of blood flow and hydration analysis establish relevance to cardiovascular health and skin care, respectively.

  12. Er- and Nd-implanted MOS light emitting devices and their use for integrated photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebohle, L.; Wutzler, R.; Germer, S.; Lehmann, J.; Helm, M.; Skorupa, W.

    2012-06-01

    In the past, the suitability of Er for Si-based light emission was already investigated in detail. However, much less attention has been paid to Nd with its main electroluminescence (EL) line around 900 nm. In this study we compare the electrical and EL properties of Er- and Nd-implanted metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures where the dielectric stack is composed of the implanted SiO2 layer and a SiON buffer layer. Regarding the EL, the EL spectrum, the EL decay time and the EL efficiency were measured. The electrical characterization comprises current-voltage and capacitance-voltage measurements. Although the EL efficiency of Nd-implanted devices is by a factor of 5 to 10 lower than that of Er-based, the emission wavelength of Nd has some advantages compared to that of Er. Finally, based on these results the suitability of these two types of light emitters for integrated photonic devices is discussed.

  13. Epidermal photonic devices for quantitative imaging of temperature and thermal transport characteristics of the skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Li; Zhang, Yihui; Malyarchuk, Viktor; Jia, Lin; Jang, Kyung-In; Chad Webb, R.; Fu, Haoran; Shi, Yan; Zhou, Guoyan; Shi, Luke; Shah, Deesha; Huang, Xian; Xu, Baoxing; Yu, Cunjiang; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A.

    2014-09-01

    Characterization of temperature and thermal transport properties of the skin can yield important information of relevance to both clinical medicine and basic research in skin physiology. Here we introduce an ultrathin, compliant skin-like, or ‘epidermal’, photonic device that combines colorimetric temperature indicators with wireless stretchable electronics for thermal measurements when softly laminated on the skin surface. The sensors exploit thermochromic liquid crystals patterned into large-scale, pixelated arrays on thin elastomeric substrates; the electronics provide means for controlled, local heating by radio frequency signals. Algorithms for extracting patterns of colour recorded from these devices with a digital camera and computational tools for relating the results to underlying thermal processes near the skin surface lend quantitative value to the resulting data. Application examples include non-invasive spatial mapping of skin temperature with milli-Kelvin precision (±50 mK) and sub-millimetre spatial resolution. Demonstrations in reactive hyperaemia assessments of blood flow and hydration analysis establish relevance to cardiovascular health and skin care, respectively.

  14. Three-dimensional chemical concentration maps in a microfluidic device using two-photon absorption fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Dawn; Gibson, Emily A; Amir, Wafa; Erikson, Rebecca; Lawrence, Jodi; Vestad, Tor; Squier, Jeff; Jimenez, Ralph; Marr, David W M

    2007-09-01

    Two-photon absorption fluorescence is employed within a microfluidic device to create a three-dimensional chemical concentration map for mixing uniformity characterization. This multiphoton technique images fluorescence intensity directly and provides a simple, rapid, and readily employed route to composition characterization within microfluidic systems.

  15. Aperiodic TiO2 Nanotube Photonic Crystal: Full-Visible-Spectrum Solar Light Harvesting in Photovoltaic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Min; Xie, Keyu; Wang, Yu; Zhou, Limin; Huang, Haitao

    2014-01-01

    Bandgap engineering of a photonic crystal is highly desirable for photon management in photonic sensors and devices. Aperiodic photonic crystals (APCs) can provide unprecedented opportunities for much more versatile photon management, due to increased degrees of freedom in the design and the unique properties brought about by the aperiodic structures as compared to their periodic counterparts. However, many efforts still remain on conceptual approaches, practical achievements in APCs are rarely reported due to the difficulties in fabrication. Here, we report a simple but highly controllable current-pulse anodization process to design and fabricate TiO2 nanotube APCs. By coupling an APC into the photoanode of a dye-sensitized solar cell, we demonstrate the concept of using APC to achieve nearly full-visible-spectrum light harvesting, as evidenced by both experimental and simulated results. It is anticipated that this work will lead to more fruitful practical applications of APCs in high-efficiency photovoltaics, sensors and optoelectronic devices. PMID:25245854

  16. Monolithic silicon photonics in a sub-100nm SOI CMOS microprocessor foundry: progress from devices to systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popović, Miloš A.; Wade, Mark T.; Orcutt, Jason S.; Shainline, Jeffrey M.; Sun, Chen; Georgas, Michael; Moss, Benjamin; Kumar, Rajesh; Alloatti, Luca; Pavanello, Fabio; Chen, Yu-Hsin; Nammari, Kareem; Notaros, Jelena; Atabaki, Amir; Leu, Jonathan; Stojanović, Vladimir; Ram, Rajeev J.

    2015-02-01

    We review recent progress of an effort led by the Stojanović (UC Berkeley), Ram (MIT) and Popović (CU Boulder) research groups to enable the design of photonic devices, and complete on-chip electro-optic systems and interfaces, directly in standard microelectronics CMOS processes in a microprocessor foundry, with no in-foundry process modifications. This approach allows tight and large-scale monolithic integration of silicon photonics with state-of-the-art (sub-100nm-node) microelectronics, here a 45nm SOI CMOS process. It enables natural scale-up to manufacturing, and rapid advances in device design due to process repeatability. The initial driver application was addressing the processor-to-memory communication energy bottleneck. Device results include 5Gbps modulators based on an interleaved junction that take advantage of the high resolution of the sub-100nm CMOS process. We demonstrate operation at 5fJ/bit with 1.5dB insertion loss and 8dB extinction ratio. We also demonstrate the first infrared detectors in a zero-change CMOS process, using absorption in transistor source/drain SiGe stressors. Subsystems described include the first monolithically integrated electronic-photonic transmitter on chip (modulator+driver) with 20-70fJ/bit wall plug energy/bit (2-3.5Gbps), to our knowledge the lowest transmitter energy demonstrated to date. We also demonstrate native-process infrared receivers at 220fJ/bit (5Gbps). These are encouraging signs for the prospects of monolithic electronics-photonics integration. Beyond processor-to-memory interconnects, our approach to photonics as a "More-than- Moore" technology inside advanced CMOS promises to enable VLSI electronic-photonic chip platforms tailored to a vast array of emerging applications, from optical and acoustic sensing, high-speed signal processing, RF and optical metrology and clocks, through to analog computation and quantum technology.

  17. Characterization of silicon avalanche photodiodes for photon correlation measurements. 2: Active quenching.

    PubMed

    Brown, R G; Jones, R; Rarity, J G; Ridley, K D

    1987-06-15

    We continue examination of the photon correlation properties of silicon avalanche photodiodes operated in photon-counting mode by extending their operation from that of passive quenching(1) to active quenching, yielding shorter dead time and higher frequency operation.

  18. Integration of micro/nano-scale optical waveguide arrays and devices for optical printed circuit board (O-PCB) and VLSI photonic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, El-Hang; Lee, S. G.; O, B. H.; Park, S. G.; Kim, K. H.; Song, S. H.; Kim, H. S.

    2005-08-01

    We report on the design, fabrication and integration of micro/nano-scale optical waveguide arrays and devices for optical printed circuit board (O-PCB) and VLSI photonic applications. The O-PCBs perform the functions of transporting, switching, routing and distributing optical signals on flat modular boards or chips in a manner similar to the electrical printed circuit boards (E-PCBs). The photonic devices include microlasers, microlenses, micro-reflectors, couplers, arrayed waveguide grating structures, multimode interference (MMI) devices and photodetectors. For VLSI micro/nano-photonics we used photonic crystals and plasmonic metal waveguide structures. We also describe device characterization using near filed scanning microscopy. We examine the scientific and technological issues concerning the miniaturization, interconnection, and integration of photonic devices, circuits and systems in micron or submicron scale. In miniaturization, the issues include size effect, proximity effect, energy confinement effect, microcavitiy effect, single photon effect, optical interference effect, high field effect, nonlinear effect, noise effect, quantum optical effect, and chaotic noise effect. In interconnection, the issues include homogeneous interconnection (between identical devices) and heterogeneous interconnection (non-identical devices). In integration, the issues of interfacing same kind of devices, two different kinds of devices, and several or many different kinds of devices are addressed. The discussion includes the nano-scale electron beam system and techniques to characterize nano-scale structures.

  19. High-power monolithic single-mode diode lasers employing active photonic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botez, Dan

    2003-06-01

    Photonic-lattice structures with modulated gain, that is active photonic lattices (APLs), of large index steps and gain preferentially enhanced on the low-index lattice sites have been used, as early as 1988, for effective lateral-mode control range in large-aperture (100-200 microns) high-power coherent devices. Photonic-bandpass (PBP) structures relying on long-range resonant leaky-wave coupling, so called ROW arrays, have allowed stable, near-diffraction-limited beam operation to powers as high as 1.6W CW and 10W peak pulsed. Photonic-bandgap (PBG) structures with a built-in lattice defect, so called ARROW lasers, have provided up to 0.5W peak-pulsed stable, single-mode power and hold the potential for 1W CW reliable single-mode operation from apertures 8-10 microns wide. The solution for high-efficiency surface emission, from 2nd-order DFB/DBR lasers, in an orthonormal, single-lobe beam pattern was found in 2000. Recently, single-lobe and single-mode operation in a diffraction-limited beam orthonormal to the chip surface was demonstrated from 1.5mm-long DFB/DBR ridge-guide lasers. That opens the way for the realization of 2-D surface-emitting,2nd-order APLs for the stable generation of watts of CW single-lobe, single-mode power from large 2-D apertures, as well as scalability of such devices at the wafer level.

  20. Glass-embedded two-dimensional silicon photonic crystal devices with a broad bandwidth waveguide and a high quality nanocavity.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Seung-Woo; Han, Jin-Kyu; Song, Bong-Shik; Noda, Susumu

    2010-08-30

    To enhance the mechanical stability of a two-dimensional photonic crystal slab structure and maintain its excellent performance, we designed a glass-embedded silicon photonic crystal device consisting of a broad bandwidth waveguide and a nanocavity with a high quality (Q) factor, and then fabricated the structure using spin-on glass (SOG). Furthermore, we showed that the refractive index of the SOG could be tuned from 1.37 to 1.57 by varying the curing temperature of the SOG. Finally, we demonstrated a glass-embedded heterostructured cavity with an ultrahigh Q factor of 160,000 by adjusting the refractive index of the SOG.

  1. Heterogeneously-Grown Tunable Tensile Strained Germanium on Silicon for Photonic Devices.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Michael; Saladukha, Dzianis; Goley, Patrick S; Ochalski, Tomasz J; Murphy-Armando, Felipe; Bodnar, Robert J; Hudait, Mantu K

    2015-12-09

    The growth, structural and optical properties, and energy band alignments of tensile-strained germanium (ε-Ge) epilayers heterogeneously integrated on silicon (Si) were demonstrated for the first time. The tunable ε-Ge thin films were achieved using a composite linearly graded InxGa1-xAs/GaAs buffer architecture grown via solid source molecular beam epitaxy. High-resolution X-ray diffraction and micro-Raman spectroscopic analysis confirmed a pseudomorphic ε-Ge epitaxy whereby the degree of strain varied as a function of the In(x)Ga(1-x)As buffer indium alloy composition. Sharp heterointerfaces between each ε-Ge epilayer and the respective In(x)Ga(1-x)As strain template were confirmed by detailed strain analysis using cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. Low-temperature microphotoluminescence measurements confirmed both direct and indirect bandgap radiative recombination between the Γ and L valleys of Ge to the light-hole valence band, with L-lh bandgaps of 0.68 and 0.65 eV demonstrated for the 0.82 ± 0.06% and 1.11 ± 0.03% strained Ge on Si, respectively. Type-I band alignments and valence band offsets of 0.27 and 0.29 eV for the ε-Ge/In(0.11)Ga(0.89)As (0.82%) and ε-Ge/In(0.17)Ga(0.83)As (1.11%) heterointerfaces, respectively, show promise for ε-Ge carrier confinement in future nanoscale optoelectronic devices. Therefore, the successful heterogeneous integration of tunable tensile-strained Ge on Si paves the way for the design and implementation of novel Ge-based photonic devices on the Si technology platform.

  2. Self organized quantum dots for 1.3 μm photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laemmlin, M.; Fiol, G.; Meuer, C.; Kuntz, M.; Hopfer, F.; Ledentsov, N. N.; Kovsh, A. R.; Bimberg, D.

    2006-07-01

    Nanotechnology is a driver for novel opto-electronic devices and systems. Nanosemiconductors like quantum dots allow controlled variation of fundamental electronic and optical properties by changing the size and shape of the nanostructures. This applies directly to self-organized quantum dots which find a versatile use in many kinds of photonic devices. Wavelength tunability, decreased laser threshold, scalability of gain by stacking quantum dot layers, low linewidth enhancement factor and temperature stability are consequences of three-dimensional carrier confinement in semiconductor quantum dots. Directly modulated lasers using quantum dots offer further advantages like strongly damped relaxation oscillations yielding low patterning effects in digital data transmission. Quantum dot mode-locked lasers feature a broad gain spectrum leading to ultra-short pulses with sub-ps width and a low alpha factor for low-chirp. Thereby, optical comb generators for the future 100G Ethernet are feasible. Semiconductor optical amplifiers based on quantum dots show advantages as compared to classical ones: broad bandwidth due to the inhomogeneous quantum dot size distribution, ultrafast gain recovery for high-speed amplification and small patterning in optical data transmission. We present our most recent results on temperature stable 10 Gb/s, 23°-70°C direct modulation of lasers, ultrafast 80 GHz and short 710 fs optical pulse combs with mode-locked lasers and semiconductor optical amplifiers showing ultrafast amplification of these optical combs as well as error-free 40 Gb/s data modulation, all based on a quantum dot gain medium.

  3. Revealing of photon-number splitting attack on quantum key distribution system by photon-number resolving devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidash, A. A.; Egorov, V. I.; Gleim, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum cryptography allows distributing secure keys between two users so that any performed eavesdropping attempt would be immediately discovered. However, in practice an eavesdropper can obtain key information from multi-photon states when attenuated laser radiation is used as a source of quantum states. In order to prevent actions of an eavesdropper, it is generally suggested to implement special cryptographic protocols, like decoy states or SARG04. In this paper, we describe an alternative method based on monitoring photon number statistics after detection. We provide a useful rule of thumb to estimate approximate order of difference of expected distribution and distribution in case of attack. Formula for calculating a minimum value of total pulses or time-gaps to resolve attack is shown. Also formulas for actual fraction of raw key known to Eve were derived. This method can therefore be used with any system and even combining with mentioned special protocols.

  4. 21 CFR 890.5050 - Daily activity assist device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Daily activity assist device. 890.5050 Section 890.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5050 Daily...

  5. 21 CFR 890.5050 - Daily activity assist device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Daily activity assist device. 890.5050 Section 890.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5050 Daily...

  6. 21 CFR 890.5050 - Daily activity assist device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Daily activity assist device. 890.5050 Section 890.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5050 Daily...

  7. 21 CFR 890.5050 - Daily activity assist device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Daily activity assist device. 890.5050 Section 890.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5050 Daily...

  8. 21 CFR 890.5050 - Daily activity assist device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Daily activity assist device. 890.5050 Section 890.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5050 Daily...

  9. Optically reconfigurable metasurfaces and photonic devices based on phase change materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Rogers, Edward T. F.; Gholipour, Behrad; Wang, Chih-Ming; Yuan, Guanghui; Teng, Jinghua; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2016-01-01

    Photonic components with adjustable parameters, such as variable-focal-length lenses or spectral filters, which can change functionality upon optical stimulation, could offer numerous useful applications. Tuning of such components is conventionally achieved by either micro- or nanomechanical actuation of their constituent parts, by stretching or by heating. Here, we report a novel approach for making reconfigurable optical components that are created with light in a non-volatile and reversible fashion. Such components are written, erased and rewritten as two-dimensional binary or greyscale patterns into a nanoscale film of phase-change material by inducing a refractive-index-changing phase transition with tailored trains of femtosecond pulses. We combine germanium-antimony-tellurium-based films with a diffraction-limited resolution optical writing process to demonstrate a variety of devices: visible-range reconfigurable bichromatic and multi-focus Fresnel zone plates, a super-oscillatory lens with subwavelength focus, a greyscale hologram, and a dielectric metamaterial with on-demand reflection and transmission resonances.

  10. Single-crystal charge transfer interfaces for efficient photonic devices (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Helena; Pinto, Rui M.; Maçôas, Ermelinda M. S.; Baleizão, Carlos; Santos, Isabel C.

    2016-09-01

    Organic semiconductors have unique optical, mechanical and electronic properties that can be combined with customized chemical functionality. In the crystalline form, determinant features for electronic applications such as molecular purity, the charge mobility or the exciton diffusion length, reveal a superior performance when compared with materials in a more disordered form. Combining crystals of two different conjugated materials as even enable a new 2D electronic system. However, the use of organic single crystals in devices is still limited to a few applications, such as field-effect transistors. In 2013, we presented the first system composed of single-crystal charge transfer interfaces presenting photoconductivity behaviour. The system composed of rubrene and TCNQ has a responsivity reaching 1 A/W, corresponding to an external quantum efficiency of nearly 100%. A similar approach, with a hybrid structure of a PCBM film and rubrene single crystal also presents high responsivity and the possibility to extract excitons generated in acceptor materials. This strategy led to an extended action towards the near IR. By adequate material design and structural organisation of perylediimides, we demonstrate that is possible to improve exciton diffusion efficiency. More recently, we have successfully used the concept of charge transfer interfaces in phototransistors. These results open the possibility of using organic single-crystal interfaces in photonic applications.

  11. Silicon Photomultipliers, A New Device For Low Light Level Photon Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, Hans-Guenther

    2006-10-27

    Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) are novel detectors for low level light detection based on arrays of avalanche photodiodes operating in Geiger mode. Offering good characteristics (fast response, high gain, photon counting capability, insensitivity to magnetic fields, low voltage operation) they have the potential to replace classical photomultipliers (PMT) in many applications. Drawbacks are dark rate and optical cross talk. Though their quantum efficiency is already comparable or better than that of bialkali PMT it is still limited by the structures on the light sensitive front surface. A new concept, presently developed at the Max-Planck semiconductor laboratory, allows boosting the efficiency to almost 100%. Using a fully depleted substrate the light enters through the unstructured backside. A drift diode structure collects the electrons on a small 'point like' avalanche structure for multiplication. Engineering the thin entrance window at the backside using antireflective layers a high efficiency can be achieved in a wide wavelength range (300-1000nm). The paper will summarize the status of front illuminated SiPMs and report on the development of the backside illuminated devices.

  12. Ultrafast axial scanning for two-photon microscopy via a digital micromirror device and binary holography.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jiyi; Gu, Chenglin; Zhang, Dapeng; Wang, Dien; Chen, Shih-Chi

    2016-04-01

    In this Letter, we present an ultrafast nonmechanical axial scanning method for two-photon excitation (TPE) microscopy based on binary holography using a digital micromirror device (DMD), achieving a scanning rate of 4.2 kHz, scanning range of ∼180  μm, and scanning resolution (minimum step size) of ∼270  nm. Axial scanning is achieved by projecting the femtosecond laser to a DMD programmed with binary holograms of spherical wavefronts of increasing/decreasing radii. To guide the scanner design, we have derived the parametric relationships between the DMD parameters (i.e., aperture and pixel size), and the axial scanning characteristics, including (1) maximum optical power, (2) minimum step size, and (3) scan range. To verify the results, the DMD scanner is integrated with a custom-built TPE microscope that operates at 60 frames per second. In the experiment, we scanned a pollen sample via both the DMD scanner and a precision z-stage. The results show the DMD scanner generates images of equal quality throughout the scanning range. The overall efficiency of the TPE system was measured to be ∼3%. With the high scanning rate, the DMD scanner may find important applications in random-access imaging or high-speed volumetric imaging that enables visualization of highly dynamic biological processes in 3D with submillisecond temporal resolution.

  13. Impact of Atomic Layer Deposition to NanoPhotonic Structures and Devices: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, Muhammad Rizwan; Ali, Rizwan; Khan, Mohammad Bilal; Turunen, Jari; Honkanen, Seppo

    2014-10-01

    We review the significance of optical thin films by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) method to fabricate nanophotonic devices and structures. ALD is a versatile technique to deposit functional coatings on reactive surfaces with conformal growth of compound materials, precise thickness control capable of angstrom resolution and coverage of high aspect ratio nanostructures using wide range of materials. ALD has explored great potential in the emerging fields of photonics, plasmonics, nano-biotechnology, and microelectronics. ALD technique uses sequential reactive chemical reactions to saturate a surface with a monolayer by pulsing of a first precursor (metal alkoxides or covalent halides), followed by reaction with second precursor molecules such as water to form the desired compound coatings. The targeted thickness of the desired compound material is controlled by the number of ALD cycles of precursor molecules that ensures the self limiting nature of reactions. The conformal growth and filling of TiO2 and Al2O3 optical material on nanostructures and their resulting optical properties have been described. The low temperature ALD-growth on various replicated sub-wavelength polymeric gratings is discussed.

  14. Gold nanoparticle-embedded silk protein-ZnO nanorod hybrids for flexible bio-photonic devices.

    PubMed

    Gogurla, Narendar; Kundu, Subhas C; Ray, Samit K

    2017-04-07

    Silk protein has been used as a biopolymer substrate for flexible photonic devices. Here, we demonstrate ZnO nanorod array hybrid photodetectors on Au nanoparticle-embedded silk protein for flexible optoelectronics. Hybrid samples exhibit optical absorption at the band edge of ZnO as well as plasmonic energy due to Au nanoparticles, making them attractive for selective UV and visible wavelength detection. The device prepared on Au-silk protein shows a much lower dark current and a higher photo to dark-current ratio of ∼10(5) as compared to the control sample without Au nanoparticles. The hybrid device also exhibits a higher specific detectivity due to higher responsivity arising from the photo-generated hole trapping by Au nanoparticles. Sharp pulses in the transient photocurrent have been observed in devices prepared on glass and Au-silk protein substrates due to the light induced pyroelectric effect of ZnO, enabling the demonstration of self-powered photodetectors at zero bias. Flexible hybrid detectors have been demonstrated on Au-silk/polyethylene terephthalate substrates, exhibiting characteristics similar to those fabricated on rigid glass substrates. A study of the performance of photodetectors with different bending angles indicates very good mechanical stability of silk protein based flexible devices. This novel concept of ZnO nanorod array photodetectors on a natural silk protein platform provides an opportunity to realize integrated flexible and self-powered bio-photonic devices for medical applications in near future.

  15. Gold nanoparticle-embedded silk protein-ZnO nanorod hybrids for flexible bio-photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogurla, Narendar; Kundu, Subhas C.; Ray, Samit K.

    2017-04-01

    Silk protein has been used as a biopolymer substrate for flexible photonic devices. Here, we demonstrate ZnO nanorod array hybrid photodetectors on Au nanoparticle-embedded silk protein for flexible optoelectronics. Hybrid samples exhibit optical absorption at the band edge of ZnO as well as plasmonic energy due to Au nanoparticles, making them attractive for selective UV and visible wavelength detection. The device prepared on Au-silk protein shows a much lower dark current and a higher photo to dark-current ratio of ∼105 as compared to the control sample without Au nanoparticles. The hybrid device also exhibits a higher specific detectivity due to higher responsivity arising from the photo-generated hole trapping by Au nanoparticles. Sharp pulses in the transient photocurrent have been observed in devices prepared on glass and Au-silk protein substrates due to the light induced pyroelectric effect of ZnO, enabling the demonstration of self-powered photodetectors at zero bias. Flexible hybrid detectors have been demonstrated on Au-silk/polyethylene terephthalate substrates, exhibiting characteristics similar to those fabricated on rigid glass substrates. A study of the performance of photodetectors with different bending angles indicates very good mechanical stability of silk protein based flexible devices. This novel concept of ZnO nanorod array photodetectors on a natural silk protein platform provides an opportunity to realize integrated flexible and self-powered bio-photonic devices for medical applications in near future.

  16. MOCVD Grown InP and Related Thin Films on Silicon Substrates for Electron and Photonic Devices Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Zhenyu

    Heterogeneous integration of III-V compound semiconductor with silicon is attracting renewed attention in recent years due to its potential in electronic and photonic applications. For electronic applications, a robust integration allows low-voltage and high-speed III-V based transistors to couple with mature silicon-based technologies for functional circuit blocks. Several successful demonstrations have been achieved by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). In regard to photonic applications, silicon photonics is an important area of research with its possible replacement of copper interconnects. The well-developed III-V photonic devices can be utilized on a silicon platform if a seamless integration can be realized. This concept has been extensively demonstrated by wafer bonding, whereas the manufacturing complexity, reliability and yield are main challenges in this transfer technique. In this thesis, demonstration of heterogeneous integration of III-V based electron and photonic devices on silicon substrates is described, using Metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), which is considered more compatible with CMOS processes with good potential for wafer level manufacturing. In this work, InP thin films with smooth surface morphology were firstly achieved by introducing thin GaAs buffer layers. The GaAs buffer was optimized based on the surface morphology, crystalline quality and in situ RAS signal. The total thickness of the buffer layer was finally reduced to 1.2mum by trimming the GaAs buffers as a thin buffer is more desirable for process integration. On top of the thin InP buffer layers, high performance metamorphic high electron mobility transistors (mHEMTs) have been demonstrated for the first time. To implement photonic devices on the buffers, the epitaxial films quality was further improved utilizing novel post-treatment techniques, including thermal process and strained layers for defects reduction. InGaAs p-i-n photodetectors lattice-matched to In

  17. Photon Activation Analysis at the Idaho Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Douglas P.; Cole, Philip L.; Segebade, Christian R.

    2010-08-04

    Activation methods require minimal sample preparation and provide sufficiently high sensitivity for detecting the vast majority of the elements throughout the periodic table. In this paper we shall discuss photon activation analysis (PAA) at the Idaho Accelerator Center. The process of PAA begins with exposing a sample with photons in the energy range of 10 to 30 MeV. Many nuclides in the sample will become activated and, in turn, these radionuclides will decay by emitting characteristic radiation. These characteristic radiation decays are the telltale signatures for identifying elements which can then be measured with spectrometers such as a high-purity Germanium detector. PAA is not an 'absolute' method, as the samples under investigation must be irradiated along with a reference or calibrating material having a well-known elemental composition. The quantitative evaluation is performed through comparing the two resulting element spectra from the unknown sample and reference material. Besides the obvious advantage of being non-destructive, PAA has minimal contamination issues. Moreover, materials that are difficult to treat chemically, such as certain refractory metals, dusts, ashes, etc., offer no hindrance to the technique of PAA. A further advantage is that PAA is very well suited for investigated minute samples (sub-milligram dust particles) to very large ones (in the multi-kg range). PAA is a robust technique as there are no real limitations concerning the nature of material to be studied.

  18. Longitudinal photons in a relativistic magneto-active plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tsintsadze, N. L.; Rehman, Ayesha; Murtaza, G.; Shah, H. A.

    2007-10-15

    This paper presents some aspects of interaction of superstrong high-frequency electromagnetic waves with strongly magnetized plasmas. The case in which the photon-photon interaction dominates the photon-plasma particle interaction is considered. Strictly speaking, the photon and photon bunch interaction leads to the self-modulation of the photon gas. Assuming that the density of the plasma does not change, the dispersion relation, which includes relativistic self-modulation, is investigated. The existence of longitudinal photons in a strong magnetic field has the well-known Bogoliubov-type energy spectrum. The stability of the photon flow is investigated and an expression for Landau damping of the photons is obtained. Finally, it has been shown that the interaction of even a very strong electromagnetic radiation with a plasma does not always lead to instability, but causes only a change in plasma properties, whereby the plasma remains stable.

  19. Photonic Integrated Circuit (PIC) Device Structures: Background, Fabrication Ecosystem, Relevance to Space Systems Applications, and Discussion of Related Radiation Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alt, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Electronic integrated circuits are considered one of the most significant technological advances of the 20th century, with demonstrated impact in their ability to incorporate successively higher numbers transistors and construct electronic devices onto a single CMOS chip. Photonic integrated circuits (PICs) exist as the optical analog to integrated circuits; however, in place of transistors, PICs consist of numerous scaled optical components, including such "building-block" structures as waveguides, MMIs, lasers, and optical ring resonators. The ability to construct electronic and photonic components on a single microsystems platform offers transformative potential for the development of technologies in fields including communications, biomedical device development, autonomous navigation, and chemical and atmospheric sensing. Developing on-chip systems that provide new avenues for integration and replacement of bulk optical and electro-optic components also reduces size, weight, power and cost (SWaP-C) limitations, which are important in the selection of instrumentation for specific flight projects. The number of applications currently emerging for complex photonics systems-particularly in data communications-warrants additional investigations when considering reliability for space systems development. This Body of Knowledge document seeks to provide an overview of existing integrated photonics architectures; the current state of design, development, and fabrication ecosystems in the United States and Europe; and potential space applications, with emphasis given to associated radiation effects and reliability.

  20. Antifungal activity of antimicrobial-impregnated devices.

    PubMed

    Darouiche, R O; Mansouri, M D; Kojic, E M

    2006-04-01

    The in-vitro and in-vivo efficacy against Candida albicans and Candida krusei of devices impregnated with chlorhexidine and chloroxylenol was examined. The impregnated devices produced large zones of inhibition against both organisms (mean size, 39 mm and 38 mm, respectively). In a rabbit model in which segments of silicone catheters were placed percutaneously, non-impregnated devices were twice as likely as impregnated devices to become colonised with either C. albicans or C. krusei. Impregnated devices also had significantly lower colony counts of C. albicans (58 vs. 1361 CFU; p 0.008) and C. krusei (19 vs. 764 CFU; p 0.008).

  1. Active 2D and carbon-based materials: physics and devices (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorger, Volker J.

    2016-09-01

    In nanophotonics we create material-systems, which are structured at length scales smaller than the wavelength of light. When light propagates inside such effective materials numerous novel physics phenomena emerge including thresholdless lasing, atto-joule per bit efficient modulators, and exciton-polariton effects. However, in order to make use of these opportunities, synergistic device designs have to be applied to include materials, electric and photonic constrains - all at the nanoscale. In this talk, I present our recent progress in exploring 2D and TCO materials for active optoelectronics. I highlight nanoscale device demonstrations including their physical operation principle and performance benchmarks. Details include epsilon-bear-zero tuning of thin-film ITO, Graphene electro-static gating via Pauli-blocking, plasmonic electro-optic modulation, and hetero-integrated III-V and carbon-based plasmon lasers on Silicon photonics.

  2. A new generation of previously unrealizable photonic devices as enabled by a unique electro-optic waveguide architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Scott R.; Rommel, Scott D.; Farca, George; Anderson, Michael H.

    2008-08-01

    A new electro-optic waveguide platform, which provides unprecedented electro-optical phase delays (> 1mm), with very low loss (< 0.5 dB/cm) and rapid response time (sub millisecond), is presented. This technology, developed by Vescent Photonics, is based upon a unique liquid-crystal waveguide geometry, which exploits the tremendous electro-optic response of liquid crystals while circumventing historic limitations of liquid crystals. The exceedingly large optical phase delays accessible with this technology enable the design and construction of a new class of previously unrealizable photonic devices. Examples include: a 1-D non-mechanical, analog beamsteerer with an 80° field of regard, a chip-scale widely tunable laser, a chip-scale Fourier transform spectrometer (< 5 nm resolution demonstrated), widely tunable micro-ring resonators, tunable lenses, ultra-low power (< 5 microWatts) optical switches, true optical time delay (up to 10 ns), and many more. All of these devices may benefit from established manufacturing technologies and ultimately may be as inexpensive as a calculator display. Furthermore, this new integrated photonic architecture has applications in a wide array of commercial and defense markets including: remote sensing, micro-LADAR, OCT, laser illumination, phased array radar, optical communications, etc. Performance attributes of several example devices are presented.

  3. Light trapping in thin film solar cells using photonic engineering device concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutitu, James Gichuhi

    In this era of uncertainty concerning future energy solutions, strong reservations have arisen over the continued use and pursuit of fossil fuels and other conventional sources of energy. Moreover, there is currently a strong and global push for the implementation of stringent measures, in order to reduce the amount of green house gases emitted by every nation. As a consequence, there has emerged a sudden and frantic rush for new renewable energy solutions. In this world of renewable energy technologies is where we find photovoltaic (PV) technology today. However, as is, there are still many issues that need to be addressed before solar energy technologies become economically viable and available to all people, in every part of the world. This renewed interest in the development of solar electricity, has led to the advancement of new avenues that address the issues of cost and efficiency associated with PV. To this end, one of the prominent approaches being explored is thin film solar cell (TFSC) technology, which offers prospects of lower material costs and enables larger units of manufacture than conventional wafer based technology. However, TFSC technologies suffer from one major problem; they have lower efficiencies than conventional wafer based solar cell technologies. This lesser efficiency is based on a number of reasons, one of which is that with less material, there is less volume for the absorption of incident photons. This shortcoming leads to the need for optical light trapping; which is concerned with admitting the maximum amount of light into the solar cell and keeping the light within the structure for as long as possible. In this thesis, I present the fundamental scientific ideas, practice and methodology behind the application of photonic engineering device concepts to increase the light trapping capacity of thin film solar cells. In the introductory chapters, I develop the basic ideas behind light trapping in a sequential manner, where the effects

  4. Terahertz Active Photonic Crystals for Condensed Gas Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Benz, Alexander; Deutsch, Christoph; Brandstetter, Martin; Andrews, Aaron M.; Klang, Pavel; Detz, Hermann; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried; Unterrainer, Karl

    2011-01-01

    The terahertz (THz) spectral region, covering frequencies from 1 to 10 THz, is highly interesting for chemical sensing. The energy of rotational and vibrational transitions of molecules lies within this frequency range. Therefore, chemical fingerprints can be derived, allowing for a simple detection scheme. Here, we present an optical sensor based on active photonic crystals (PhCs), i.e., the pillars are fabricated directly from an active THz quantum-cascade laser medium. The individual pillars are pumped electrically leading to laser emission at cryogenic temperatures. There is no need to couple light into the resonant structure because the PhC itself is used as the light source. An injected gas changes the resonance condition of the PhC and thereby the laser emission frequency. We achieve an experimental frequency shift of 10−3 times the center lasing frequency. The minimum detectable refractive index change is 1.6 × 10−5 RIU. PMID:22163939

  5. Impact of optical antennas on active optoelectronic devices.

    PubMed

    Bonakdar, Alireza; Mohseni, Hooman

    2014-10-07

    Remarkable progress has been made in the fabrication and characterization of optical antennas that are integrated with optoelectronic devices. Herein, we describe the fundamental reasons for and experimental evidence of the dramatic improvements that can be achieved by enhancing the light-matter interaction via an optical antenna in both photon-emitting and -detecting devices. In addition, integration of optical antennas with optoelectronic devices can lead to the realization of highly compact multifunctional platforms for future integrated photonics, such as low-cost lab-on-chip systems. In this review paper, we further focus on the effect of optical antennas on the detectivity of infrared photodetectors. One particular finding is that the antenna can have a dual effect on the specific detectivity, while it can elevate light absorption efficiency of sub-wavelength detectors, it can potentially increase the noise of the detectors due to the enhanced spontaneous emission rate. In particular, we predict that the detectivity of interband photon detectors can be negatively affected by the presence of optical antennas across a wide wavelength region covering visible to long wavelength infrared bands. In contrast, the detectivity of intersubband detectors could be generally improved with a properly designed optical antenna.

  6. Preface to the Special Issue of Optical Materials associated with the ;Photoluminescence in Rare Earths 2016: Photonic Materials and Devices (PRE'16); Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsohn, Luiz G.; Ballato, John

    2017-06-01

    Since the inaugural meeting in 2005, the Photoluminescence in Rare Earths: Photonic Materials and Devices (PRE) workshop has grown into a global forum for material scientists, chemists and physicists to discuss and debate the state of the art and future perspectives for photonic materials based on rare earth ions.

  7. The stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence guided ablation of melanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zhenhua; Gu, Zetong; DiMarzio, Charles

    2015-02-01

    Previous research has shown that the stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin, activated and excited by a continuous-wave (CW) mode near infrared (NIR) laser, is a low-cost and reliable method for detecting melanin. We have developed a device utilizing the melanin SMPAF to guide the ablation of melanin with a 975 nm CW laser. This method provides the ability of targeting individual melanin particles with micrometer resolution, and enables localized melanin ablation to be performed without collateral damage. Compared to the traditional selective photothermolysis, which uses pulsed lasers for melanin ablation, this method demonstrates higher precision and lower cost. Therefore, the SMPAF guided selective ablation of melanin is a promising tool of melanin ablation for both medical and cosmetic purposes.

  8. INSERTION DEVICE ACTIVITIES FOR NSLS-II.

    SciTech Connect

    TANABE,T.; HARDER, D.A.; HULBERT, S.; RAKOWSKI, G.; SKARITKA, J.

    2007-06-25

    National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) will be a medium energy storage ring of 3GeV electron beam energy with sub-nm.rad horizontal emittance and top-off capability at 500mA. Damping wigglers will be used not only to reduce the beam emittance but also used as broadband sources for users. Cryo-Permanent Magnet Undulators (CPMUs) are considered for hard X-ray linear device, and permanent magnet based elliptically polarized undulators (EPUs) for variable polarization devices for soft X-ray. 6T superconducting wiggler with minimal fan angle will be installed in the second phase as well as quasi-periodic EPU for VUV and possibly high-temperature superconducting undulator. R&D plans have been established to pursue the performance enhancement of the baseline devices and to design new types of insertion devices. A new insertion device development laboratory will also be established.

  9. Active glass-polymer superlattice structure for photonic integration.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhanxiang; Jose, Gin; Fernandez, Toney T; Comyn, Tim P; Irannejad, Mehrdad; Steenson, Paul; Harrington, John P; Ward, Michael; Bamiedakis, Nikos; Penty, Richard V; White, Ian H; Jha, Animesh

    2012-06-08

    We propose an all-laser processing approach allowing controlled growth of organic-inorganic superlattice structures of rare-earth ion doped tellurium-oxide-based glass and optically transparent polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) polymer; the purpose of which is to illustrate the structural and thermal compatibility of chemically dissimilar materials at the nanometer scale. Superlattice films with interlayer thicknesses as low as 2 nm were grown using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at low temperatures (100 °C). Planar waveguides were successfully patterned by femtosecond-laser micro-machining for light propagation and efficient Er(3+)-ion amplified spontaneous emission (ASE). The proposed approach to achieve polymer-glass integration will allow the fabrication of efficient and durable polymer optical amplifiers and lossless photonic devices. The all-laser processing approach, discussed further in this paper, permits the growth of films of a multitude of chemically complex and dissimilar materials for a range of optical, thermal, mechanical and biological functions, which otherwise are impossible to integrate via conventional materials processing techniques.

  10. SU-E-T-781: Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) for Correlating Linac Photon Beam Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Yaddanapudi, S; Cai, B; Sun, B; Noel, C; Goddu, S; Mutic, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have proven to be useful for measuring several parameters of interest in linear accelerator (linac) quality assurance (QA). The purpose of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of using EPIDs for determining linac photon beam energies. Methods: Two non-clinical Varian TrueBeam linacs (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) with 6MV and 10MV photon beams were used to perform the measurements. The linacs were equipped with an amorphous silicon based EPIDs (aSi1000) that were used for the measurements. We compared the use of flatness versus percent depth dose (PDD) for predicting changes in linac photon beam energy. PDD was measured in 1D water tank (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne FL) and the profiles were measured using 2D ion-chamber array (IC-Profiler, Sun Nuclear) and the EPID. Energy changes were accomplished by varying the bending magnet current (BMC). The evaluated energies conformed with the AAPM TG142 tolerance of ±1% change in PDD. Results: BMC changes correlating with a ±1% change in PDD corresponded with a change in flatness of ∼1% to 2% from baseline values on the EPID. IC Profiler flatness values had the same correlation. We observed a similar trend for the 10MV beam energy changes. Our measurements indicated a strong correlation between changes in linac photon beam energy and changes in flatness. For all machines and energies, beam energy changes produced change in the uniformity (AAPM TG-142), varying from ∼1% to 2.5%. Conclusions: EPID image analysis of beam profiles can be used to determine linac photon beam energy changes. Flatness-based metrics or uniformity as defined by AAPM TG-142 were found to be more sensitive to linac photon beam energy changes than PDD. Research funding provided by Varian Medical Systems. Dr. Sasa Mutic receives compensation for providing patient safety training services from Varian Medical Systems, the sponsor of this study.

  11. Recent Advances in Photonic Devices for Optical Computing and the Role of Nonlinear Optics-Part II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdeldayem, Hossin; Frazier, Donald O.; Witherow, William K.; Banks, Curtis E.; Paley, Mark S.

    2007-01-01

    The twentieth century has been the era of semiconductor materials and electronic technology while this millennium is expected to be the age of photonic materials and all-optical technology. Optical technology has led to countless optical devices that have become indispensable in our daily lives in storage area networks, parallel processing, optical switches, all-optical data networks, holographic storage devices, and biometric devices at airports. This chapters intends to bring some awareness to the state-of-the-art of optical technologies, which have potential for optical computing and demonstrate the role of nonlinear optics in many of these components. Our intent, in this Chapter, is to present an overview of the current status of optical computing, and a brief evaluation of the recent advances and performance of the following key components necessary to build an optical computing system: all-optical logic gates, adders, optical processors, optical storage, holographic storage, optical interconnects, spatial light modulators and optical materials.

  12. Photonic crystals cause active colour change in chameleons.

    PubMed

    Teyssier, Jérémie; Saenko, Suzanne V; van der Marel, Dirk; Milinkovitch, Michel C

    2015-03-10

    Many chameleons, and panther chameleons in particular, have the remarkable ability to exhibit complex and rapid colour changes during social interactions such as male contests or courtship. It is generally interpreted that these changes are due to dispersion/aggregation of pigment-containing organelles within dermal chromatophores. Here, combining microscopy, photometric videography and photonic band-gap modelling, we show that chameleons shift colour through active tuning of a lattice of guanine nanocrystals within a superficial thick layer of dermal iridophores. In addition, we show that a deeper population of iridophores with larger crystals reflects a substantial proportion of sunlight especially in the near-infrared range. The organization of iridophores into two superposed layers constitutes an evolutionary novelty for chameleons, which allows some species to combine efficient camouflage with spectacular display, while potentially providing passive thermal protection.

  13. Active learning in optics and photonics: Fraunhofer diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghalila, H.; Ben Lakhdar, Z.; Lahmar, S.; Dhouaidi, Z.; Majdi, Y.

    2014-07-01

    "Active Learning in Optics and Photonics" (ALOP), funded by UNESCO within its Physics Program framework with the support of ICTP (Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics) and SPIE (Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers), aimed to helps and promotes a friendly and interactive method in teaching optics using simple and inexpensive equipment. Many workshops were organized since 2005 the year when Z. BenLakhdar, whom is part of the creators of ALOP, proposed this project to STO (Société Tunisienne d'Optique). These workshops address several issues in optics, covering geometrical optics, wave optics, optical communication and they are dedicated to both teachers and students. We focus this lecture on Fraunhofer diffraction emphasizing the facility to achieve this mechanism in classroom, using small laser and operating a slit in a sheet of paper. We accompany this demonstration using mobile phone and numerical modeling to assist in the analysis of the diffraction pattern figure.

  14. Photonic crystals cause active colour change in chameleons

    PubMed Central

    Teyssier, Jérémie; Saenko, Suzanne V.; van der Marel, Dirk; Milinkovitch, Michel C.

    2015-01-01

    Many chameleons, and panther chameleons in particular, have the remarkable ability to exhibit complex and rapid colour changes during social interactions such as male contests or courtship. It is generally interpreted that these changes are due to dispersion/aggregation of pigment-containing organelles within dermal chromatophores. Here, combining microscopy, photometric videography and photonic band-gap modelling, we show that chameleons shift colour through active tuning of a lattice of guanine nanocrystals within a superficial thick layer of dermal iridophores. In addition, we show that a deeper population of iridophores with larger crystals reflects a substantial proportion of sunlight especially in the near-infrared range. The organization of iridophores into two superposed layers constitutes an evolutionary novelty for chameleons, which allows some species to combine efficient camouflage with spectacular display, while potentially providing passive thermal protection. PMID:25757068

  15. Photonic activation of plasminogen induced by low dose UVB.

    PubMed

    Correia, Manuel; Snabe, Torben; Thiagarajan, Viruthachalam; Petersen, Steffen Bjørn; Campos, Sara R R; Baptista, António M; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Activation of plasminogen to its active form plasmin is essential for several key mechanisms, including the dissolution of blood clots. Activation occurs naturally via enzymatic proteolysis. We report that activation can be achieved with 280 nm light. A 2.6 fold increase in proteolytic activity was observed after 10 min illumination of human plasminogen. Irradiance levels used are in the same order of magnitude of the UVB solar irradiance. Activation is correlated with light induced disruption of disulphide bridges upon UVB excitation of the aromatic residues and with the formation of photochemical products, e.g. dityrosine and N-formylkynurenine. Most of the protein fold is maintained after 10 min illumination since no major changes are observed in the near-UV CD spectrum. Far-UV CD shows loss of secondary structure after illumination (33.4% signal loss at 206 nm). Thermal unfolding CD studies show that plasminogen retains a native like cooperative transition at ~70 ºC after UV-illumination. We propose that UVB activation of plasminogen occurs upon photo-cleavage of a functional allosteric disulphide bond, Cys737-Cys765, located in the catalytic domain and in van der Waals contact with Trp761 (4.3 Å). Such proximity makes its disruption very likely, which may occur upon electron transfer from excited Trp761. Reduction of Cys737-Cys765 will result in likely conformational changes in the catalytic site. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that reduction of Cys737-Cys765 in plasminogen leads to an increase of the fluctuations of loop 760-765, the S1-entrance frame located close to the active site. These fluctuations affect the range of solvent exposure of the catalytic triad, particularly of Asp646 and Ser74, which acquire an exposure profile similar to the values in plasmin. The presented photonic mechanism of plasminogen activation has the potential to be used in clinical applications, possibly together with other enzymatic treatments for the elimination of

  16. Cognitive Inference Device for Activity Supervision in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Human activity, life span, and quality of life are enhanced by innovations in science and technology. Aging individual needs to take advantage of these developments to lead a self-regulated life. However, maintaining a self-regulated life at old age involves a high degree of risk, and the elderly often fail at this goal. Thus, the objective of our study is to investigate the feasibility of implementing a cognitive inference device (CI-device) for effective activity supervision in the elderly. To frame the CI-device, we propose a device design framework along with an inference algorithm and implement the designs through an artificial neural model with different configurations, mapping the CI-device's functions to minimise the device's prediction error. An analysis and discussion are then provided to validate the feasibility of CI-device implementation for activity supervision in the elderly. PMID:25405211

  17. Time-dependent photon heat transport through a mesoscopic Josephson device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wen-Ting; Zhao, Hong-Kang

    2017-02-01

    The time-oscillating photon heat current through a dc voltage biased mesoscopic Josephson Junction (MJJ) has been investigated by employing the nonequilibrium Green's function approach. The Landauer-like formula of photon heat current has been derived in both of the Fourier space and its time-oscillating versions, where Coulomb interaction, self inductance, and magnetic flux take effective roles. Nonlinear behaviors are exhibited in the photon heat current due to the quantum nature of MJJ and applied external dc voltage. The magnitude of heat current decreases with increasing the external bias voltage, and subtle oscillation structures appear as the superposition of different photon heat branches. The overall period of heat current with respect to time is not affected by Coulomb interaction, however, the magnitude and phase of it vary considerably by changing the Coulomb interaction.

  18. Zinc oxide nanorod based photonic devices: recent progress in growth, light emitting diodes and lasers.

    PubMed

    Willander, M; Nur, O; Zhao, Q X; Yang, L L; Lorenz, M; Cao, B Q; Zúñiga Pérez, J; Czekalla, C; Zimmermann, G; Grundmann, M; Bakin, A; Behrends, A; Al-Suleiman, M; El-Shaer, A; Che Mofor, A; Postels, B; Waag, A; Boukos, N; Travlos, A; Kwack, H S; Guinard, J; Le Si Dang, D

    2009-08-19

    Zinc oxide (ZnO), with its excellent luminescent properties and the ease of growth of its nanostructures, holds promise for the development of photonic devices. The recent advances in growth of ZnO nanorods are discussed. Results from both low temperature and high temperature growth approaches are presented. The techniques which are presented include metal-organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD), vapour phase epitaxy (VPE), pulse laser deposition (PLD), vapour-liquid-solid (VLS), aqueous chemical growth (ACG) and finally the electrodeposition technique as an example of a selective growth approach. Results from structural as well as optical properties of a variety of ZnO nanorods are shown and analysed using different techniques, including high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), photoluminescence (PL) and cathodoluminescence (CL), for both room temperature and for low temperature performance. These results indicate that the grown ZnO nanorods possess reproducible and interesting optical properties. Results on obtaining p-type doping in ZnO micro- and nanorods are also demonstrated using PLD. Three independent indications were found for p-type conducting, phosphorus-doped ZnO nanorods: first, acceptor-related CL peaks, second, opposite transfer characteristics of back-gate field effect transistors using undoped and phosphorus doped wire channels, and finally, rectifying I-V characteristics of ZnO:P nanowire/ZnO:Ga p-n junctions. Then light emitting diodes (LEDs) based on n-ZnO nanorods combined with different technologies (hybrid technologies) are suggested and the recent electrical, as well as electro-optical, characteristics of these LEDs are shown and discussed. The hybrid LEDs reviewed and discussed here are mainly presented for two groups: those based on n-ZnO nanorods and p-type crystalline substrates, and those based on n-ZnO nanorods and p-type amorphous substrates. Promising electroluminescence

  19. Infrared detection and photon energy up-conversion in graphene layer infrared photodetectors integrated with LEDs based on van der Waals heterostructures: Concept, device model, and characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhii, V.; Otsuji, T.; Ryzhii, M.; Karasik, V. E.; Shur, M. S.

    2017-09-01

    We propose the concept of the infrared detection and photon energy up-conversion in the devices using the integration of the graphene layer infrared detectors (GLIPs) and the light emitting diodes (LEDs) based on van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures. Using the developed device model of the GLIP-LEDs, we calculate their characteristics. The GLIP-LED devices can operate as the detectors of far- and mid infrared radiation (FIR and MIR) with an electrical output or with near-infrared radiation (NIR) or visible radiation (VIR) output. In the latter case, GLIP-LED devices function as the photon energy up-converters of FIR and MIR to NIR or VIR. The operation of GLIP-LED devices is associated with the injection of the electron photocurrent produced due to the interband absorption of the FIR/MIR photons in the GLIP part into the LED emitting NIR/VIR photons. We calculate the GLIP-LED responsivity and up-conversion efficiency as functions the structure parameters and the energies of the incident FIR/MIR photons and the output NIR/VIR photons. The advantages of the GLs in the vdW heterostructures (relatively high photoexcitation rate from and low capture efficiency into GLs) combined with the reabsorption of a fraction of the NIR/FIR photon flux in the GLIP (which can enable an effective photonic feedback) result in the elevated GLIP-LED device responsivity and up-conversion efficiency. The positive optical feedback from the LED section of the device lead to increasing current injection enabling the appearance of the S-type current-voltage characteristic with a greatly enhanced responsivity near the switching point and current filamentation.

  20. Graphene-deposited microfiber photonic device for ultrahigh-repetition rate pulse generation in a fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Qi, You-Li; Liu, Hao; Cui, Hu; Huang, Yu-Qi; Ning, Qiu-Yi; Liu, Meng; Luo, Zhi-Chao; Luo, Ai-Ping; Xu, Wen-Cheng

    2015-07-13

    We report on the generation of a high-repetition-rate pulse in a fiber laser using a graphene-deposited microfiber photonic device (GMPD) and a Fabry-Perot filter. Taking advantage of the unique nonlinear optical properties of the GMPD, dissipative four-wave mixing effect (DFWM) could be induced at low pump power. Based on DFWM mode-locking mechanism, the fiber laser delivers a 100 GHz repetition rate pulse train. The results indicate that the small sized GMPD offers an alternative candidate of highly nonlinear optical component to achieve high-repetition rate pulses, and also opens up possibilities for the investigation of other abundant nonlinear effects or related fields of photonics.

  1. Magnetoresponsive discoidal photonic crystals toward active color pigments.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Soo; Kim, Ju Hyeon; Lee, Joon-Seok; Sim, Jae Young; Seo, Jung Yoon; Oh, You-Kwan; Yang, Seung-Man; Kim, Shin-Hyun

    2014-09-03

    Photonic microdisks with a multilayered structure are designed from photocurable suspensions by step-by-step photolithography. In each step of photolithography, either a colloidal photonic crystal or a magnetic-particle-laden layer is stacked over the windows of a photomask. Sequential photolithography enables the creation of multilayered photonic microdisks that have brilliant structural colors that can be switched by an external magnetic field. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Preliminary thermo-mechanical analysis of the second phase photon shutters for insertion device beamline front ends at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Nian, H.L.T.; Sheng, I.C.A.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1993-09-01

    The photon shutters (PS) on the insertion device front end of the beamlines at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) are designed to fully intercept powerful 7-GeV undulator radiation. Traditional materials (oxygen-free copper and Glidcop) are used in their construction. Initially, the APS proposes to operate the storage ring at 100 mA. In later phases of operation, the APS will operate the storage ring at 300 mA. The heat flux from the undulators is enormous. For example, in the later phase of the project, the first photon shutter (PS1) placed at a distance of 17 m from the Undulator A source will be subjected to 1400 W/mm{sup 2} at normal incidence with a total power of 11.4 kW. The PS uses an enhanced heat transfer mechanism developed at Argonne National Laboratory, which increases the convective heat transfer coefficient to about 3 W/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} {degrees}C with single phase water as the coolant. To be able to handle the expected three-fold increase in the intense heat flux, some low-Z materials (such as beryllium or graphite), which can absorb the x-rays through their thickness, are now considered as the facing material on the absorber base plate of the PS. Our analysis of PSI indicates that the face plate made of either graphite or beryllium retains its integrity in most of the cases. The maximum effective stress of the absorber plate (made of annealed OFHC) exceeds the yield strength (50 MPa) except in the case of an absorber with a 10-mm graphite face plate.

  3. Fabrication of micro- and nanometre-scale polymer structures in liquid crystal devices for next generation photonics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartan, Chloe C.; Salter, Patrick S.; Booth, Martin J.; Morris, Stephen M.; Elston, Steve J.

    2016-09-01

    Direct Laser Writing (DLW) by two-photon photopolymerization (TPP) enables the fabrication of micron-scale polymeric structures in soft matter systems. The technique has implications in a broad range of optics and photonics; in particular fast-switching liquid crystal (LC) modes for the development of next generation display technologies. In this paper, we report two different methodologies using our TPP-based fabrication technique. Two explicit examples are provided of voltage-dependent LC director profiles that are inherently unstable, but which appear to be promising candidates for fast-switching photonics applications. In the first instance, 1 μm-thick periodic walls of polymer network are written into a planar aligned (parallel rubbed) nematic pi-cell device containing a nematic LC-monomer mixture. The structures are fabricated when the device is electrically driven into a fast-switching nematic LC state and aberrations induced by the device substrates are corrected for by virtue of the adaptive optics elements included within the DLW setup. Optical polarizing microscopy images taken post-fabrication reveal that polymer walls oriented perpendicular to the rubbing direction promote the stability of the so-called optically compensated bend mode upon removal of the externally applied field. In the second case, polymer walls are written in a nematic LC-optically adhesive glue mixture. A polymer- LCs-polymer-slices or `POLICRYPS' template is formed by immersing the device in acetone post-fabrication to remove any remaining non-crosslinked material. Injecting the resultant series of polymer microchannels ( 1 μm-thick) with a short-pitch, chiral nematic LC mixture leads to the spontaneous alignment of a fast-switching chiral nematic mode, where the helical axis lies parallel to the glass substrates. Optimal contrast between the bright and dark states of the uniform lying helix alignment is achieved when the structures are spaced at the order of the device thickness

  4. Activated-Carbon Sorbent With Integral Heat-Transfer Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.; Yavrouian, Andre

    1996-01-01

    Prototype adsorption device used, for example, in adsorption heat pump, to store natural gas to power automobile, or to separate components of fluid mixtures. Device includes activated carbon held together by binder and molded into finned heat-transfer device providing rapid heating or cooling to enable rapid adsorption or desorption of fluids. Concepts of design and fabrication of device equally valid for such other highly thermally conductive devices as copper-finned tubes, and for such other high-surface-area sorbents as zeolites or silicates.

  5. Chalcogenide glass photonic crystals: progress and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grillet, Christian; Lee, Michael W.; Gai, Xin; Tomljenovic-Hanic, Snjezana; Monat, Christelle; Mägi, Eric; Moss, David J.; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Madden, Steve; Choi, Duk-Yong; Bulla, Douglas; Luther-Davies, Barry

    2010-02-01

    In this review, we discuss the progress and prospects offered by chalcogenide glass photonic crystals. We show that by making photonic crystals from a highly-nonlinear chalcogenide glass, we have the potential to integrate a variety of active devices into a photonic chip. We describe the testing of two-dimensional Ge33As12Se55 chalcogenide glass photonic crystal membrane devices (waveguides and microcavities). We then demonstrate the ability to not only post-tune the devices properties but also create high Q cavities by using the material photosensitivity.

  6. Next-generation photonic true time delay devices as enabled by a new electro-optic architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Scott R.; Johnson, Seth T.; Rommel, Scott D.; Anderson, Michael H.

    2013-05-01

    We present new photonic-true-time-delay (PTTD) devices, which are a key component for phased array antenna (PAA) and phased array radar (PAR) systems. These new devices, which are highly manufacturable, provide the previously unattainable combination of large time delay tunability and low insertion loss, in a form factor that enables integration of many channels in a compact package with very modest power consumption. The low size, weight, and power are especially advantageous for satellite deployment. These devices are enabled by: i) "Optical Path Reflectors" or OPRs that compresses a >20 foot change in optical path length, i.e., a >20 nsec tuning of delay, into a very compact package (only centimeters), and ii) electro-optic angle actuators that can be used to voltage tune or voltage select the optical time delay. We have designed and built OPRs that demonstrated: large time delay tunability (<30 nsecs), high RF bandwidth (>40 GHz and likely much higher), high resolution (<200 psec), and low and constant insertion loss (< 1 dB and varying by < 0.5 dB). We also completed a full design and manufacturing run of improved EO angle actuators that met the PTTD scanner requirements. Finally, a complete optical model of these integrated devices will be presented, specifically; the design for a multi-channel (400 channels) PTTD device will be discussed. The applicability and/or risks for space deployment will be discussed.

  7. Active control of all-fibre graphene devices with electrical gating.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Jung; Choi, Sun Young; Jeong, Hwanseong; Park, Nam Hun; Yim, Woongbin; Kim, Mi Hye; Park, Jae-Ku; Son, Suyeon; Bae, Sukang; Kim, Sang Jin; Lee, Kwanil; Ahn, Yeong Hwan; Ahn, Kwang Jun; Hong, Byung Hee; Park, Ji-Yong; Rotermund, Fabian; Yeom, Dong-Il

    2015-04-21

    Active manipulation of light in optical fibres has been extensively studied with great interest because of its compatibility with diverse fibre-optic systems. While graphene exhibits a strong electro-optic effect originating from its gapless Dirac-fermionic band structure, electric control of all-fibre graphene devices remains still highly challenging. Here we report electrically manipulable in-line graphene devices by integrating graphene-based field effect transistors on a side-polished fibre. Ion liquid used in the present work critically acts both as an efficient gating medium with wide electrochemical windows and transparent over-cladding facilitating light-matter interaction. Combined study of unique features in gate-variable electrical transport and optical transition at monolayer and randomly stacked multilayer graphene reveals that the device exhibits significant optical transmission change (>90%) with high efficiency-loss figure of merit. This subsequently modifies nonlinear saturable absorption characteristics of the device, enabling electrically tunable fibre laser at various operational regimes. The proposed device will open promising way for actively controlled optoelectronic and nonlinear photonic devices in all-fibre platform with greatly enhanced graphene-light interaction.

  8. Active control of all-fibre graphene devices with electrical gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eun Jung; Choi, Sun Young; Jeong, Hwanseong; Park, Nam Hun; Yim, Woongbin; Kim, Mi Hye; Park, Jae-Ku; Son, Suyeon; Bae, Sukang; Kim, Sang Jin; Lee, Kwanil; Ahn, Yeong Hwan; Ahn, Kwang Jun; Hong, Byung Hee; Park, Ji-Yong; Rotermund, Fabian; Yeom, Dong-Il

    2015-04-01

    Active manipulation of light in optical fibres has been extensively studied with great interest because of its compatibility with diverse fibre-optic systems. While graphene exhibits a strong electro-optic effect originating from its gapless Dirac-fermionic band structure, electric control of all-fibre graphene devices remains still highly challenging. Here we report electrically manipulable in-line graphene devices by integrating graphene-based field effect transistors on a side-polished fibre. Ion liquid used in the present work critically acts both as an efficient gating medium with wide electrochemical windows and transparent over-cladding facilitating light-matter interaction. Combined study of unique features in gate-variable electrical transport and optical transition at monolayer and randomly stacked multilayer graphene reveals that the device exhibits significant optical transmission change (>90%) with high efficiency-loss figure of merit. This subsequently modifies nonlinear saturable absorption characteristics of the device, enabling electrically tunable fibre laser at various operational regimes. The proposed device will open promising way for actively controlled optoelectronic and nonlinear photonic devices in all-fibre platform with greatly enhanced graphene-light interaction.

  9. Active control of all-fibre graphene devices with electrical gating

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Jung; Choi, Sun Young; Jeong, Hwanseong; Park, Nam Hun; Yim, Woongbin; Kim, Mi Hye; Park, Jae-Ku; Son, Suyeon; Bae, Sukang; Kim, Sang Jin; Lee, Kwanil; Ahn, Yeong Hwan; Ahn, Kwang Jun; Hong, Byung Hee; Park, Ji-Yong; Rotermund, Fabian; Yeom, Dong-Il

    2015-01-01

    Active manipulation of light in optical fibres has been extensively studied with great interest because of its compatibility with diverse fibre-optic systems. While graphene exhibits a strong electro-optic effect originating from its gapless Dirac-fermionic band structure, electric control of all-fibre graphene devices remains still highly challenging. Here we report electrically manipulable in-line graphene devices by integrating graphene-based field effect transistors on a side-polished fibre. Ion liquid used in the present work critically acts both as an efficient gating medium with wide electrochemical windows and transparent over-cladding facilitating light–matter interaction. Combined study of unique features in gate-variable electrical transport and optical transition at monolayer and randomly stacked multilayer graphene reveals that the device exhibits significant optical transmission change (>90%) with high efficiency-loss figure of merit. This subsequently modifies nonlinear saturable absorption characteristics of the device, enabling electrically tunable fibre laser at various operational regimes. The proposed device will open promising way for actively controlled optoelectronic and nonlinear photonic devices in all-fibre platform with greatly enhanced graphene–light interaction. PMID:25897687

  10. Graphene photonics for resonator-enhanced electro-optic devices and all-optical interactions

    DOEpatents

    Englund, Dirk R.; Gan, Xuetao

    2017-03-21

    Techniques for coupling light into graphene using a planar photonic crystal having a resonant cavity characterized by a mode volume and a quality factor and at least one graphene layer positioned in proximity to the planar photonic crystal to at least partially overlap with an evanescent field of the resonant cavity. At least one mode of the resonant cavity can couple into the graphene layer via evanescent coupling. The optical properties of the graphene layer can be controlled, and characteristics of the graphene-cavity system can be detected. Coupling light into graphene can include electro-optic modulation of light, photodetection, saturable absorption, bistability, and autocorrelation.

  11. Passive and active sol-gel materials and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Mark P.; Najafi, S. Iraj

    1997-07-01

    This paper examines sol-gel materials for photonics in terms of partnerships with other material contenders for processing optical devices. The discussion in four sections identifies semiconductors, amorphous and crystalline inorganic dielectrics, and amorphous and crystalline organic dielectrics as strategic agents in the rapidly evolving area of materials and devices for data communications and telecommunications. With Zyss, we trace the hierarchical lineage that connects molecular hybridization (chemical functionality), through supramolecular hybridization (collective properties and responses), to functional hybridization (device and system level constructs). These three concepts thread their way through discussions of the roles sol-gel glasses might be anticipated to assume in a photonics marketplace. We assign a special place to glass integrated optics and show how high temperature consolidated sol-gel derived glasses fit into competitive glass fabrication technologies. Low temperature hybrid sol-gel glasses that combine attractive features of organic polymers and inorganic glasses are considered by drawing on examples of our own new processes for fabricating couplers, power splitters, waveguides and gratings by combining chemical synthesis and sol-gel processing with simple photomask techniques.

  12. Processing challenges for GaN-based photonic and electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Pearton, S.J.; Ren, F.; Shul, R.J.

    1997-09-01

    The wide gap materials SiC, GaN and to a lesser extent diamond are attracting great interest for high power/high temperature electronics. There are a host of device processing challenges presented by these materials because of their physical and chemical stability, including difficulty in achieving stable, low contact resistances, especially for one conductivity type, absence of convenient wet etch recipes, generally slow dry etch rates, the high temperatures needed for implant activation, control of suitable gate dielectrics and the lack of cheap, large diameter conducting and semi-insulating substrates. The relatively deep ionization levels of some of the common dopants (Mg in GaN; B, Al in SiC; P in diamond) means that carrier densities may be low at room temperature, and thus contact resistances will be greatly improved provided the metallization is stable and reliable. Some recent work with CoSi{sub x} on SiC and W-alloys on GaN show promise for improved ohmic contacts. The issue of unintentional hydrogen passivation of dopants will also be covered - this leads to strong increases in resistivity of p-SiC and GaN, but to large decreases in resistivity of diamond. Recent work on development of wet etches has found recipes for AlN (KOH), while photochemical etching of SiC and GaN has been reported. In the latter cases p-type materials is not etched, which can be a major liability in some devices. The dry etch results obtained with various novel reactors, including ICP, ECR and LE4 will be compared - the high ion densities in the former techniques produce the highest etch rates for strongly-bonded materials, but can lead to preferential loss of N from the nitrides and therefore to a highly conducting surface. This is potentially a major problem for fabrication of dry etched, recessed gate FET structures.

  13. Photonic Activation of Plasminogen Induced by Low Dose UVB

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Manuel; Snabe, Torben; Thiagarajan, Viruthachalam; Petersen, Steffen Bjørn; Campos, Sara R. R.; Baptista, António M.; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Activation of plasminogen to its active form plasmin is essential for several key mechanisms, including the dissolution of blood clots. Activation occurs naturally via enzymatic proteolysis. We report that activation can be achieved with 280 nm light. A 2.6 fold increase in proteolytic activity was observed after 10 min illumination of human plasminogen. Irradiance levels used are in the same order of magnitude of the UVB solar irradiance. Activation is correlated with light induced disruption of disulphide bridges upon UVB excitation of the aromatic residues and with the formation of photochemical products, e.g. dityrosine and N-formylkynurenine. Most of the protein fold is maintained after 10 min illumination since no major changes are observed in the near-UV CD spectrum. Far-UV CD shows loss of secondary structure after illumination (33.4% signal loss at 206 nm). Thermal unfolding CD studies show that plasminogen retains a native like cooperative transition at ~70 ºC after UV-illumination. We propose that UVB activation of plasminogen occurs upon photo-cleavage of a functional allosteric disulphide bond, Cys737-Cys765, located in the catalytic domain and in van der Waals contact with Trp761 (4.3 Å). Such proximity makes its disruption very likely, which may occur upon electron transfer from excited Trp761. Reduction of Cys737-Cys765 will result in likely conformational changes in the catalytic site. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that reduction of Cys737-Cys765 in plasminogen leads to an increase of the fluctuations of loop 760–765, the S1-entrance frame located close to the active site. These fluctuations affect the range of solvent exposure of the catalytic triad, particularly of Asp646 and Ser74, which acquire an exposure profile similar to the values in plasmin. The presented photonic mechanism of plasminogen activation has the potential to be used in clinical applications, possibly together with other enzymatic treatments for the elimination of

  14. A compact, integrated silicon device for the generation of spectrally filtered, pair-correlated photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minkov, Momchil; Savona, Vincenzo

    2016-05-01

    The third-order nonlinearity of silicon gives rise to a spontaneous four-wave mixing process in which correlated photon pairs are generated. Sources based on this effect can be used for quantum computation and cryptography, and can in principle be integrated with standard CMOS fabrication technology and components. However, one of the major challenges is the on-chip demultiplexing of the photons, and in particular the filtering of the pump power, which is many orders of magnitude larger than that of the signal and idler photons. Here, we propose a photonic crystal coupled-cavity system designed so that the coupling of the pump mode to the output channel is strictly zero due to symmetry. We further analyze this effect in the presence of fabrication disorder and find that, even then, a pump suppression of close to 40 dB can be achieved in state-of-the-art systems. Due to the small mode volumes and high quality factors, our system is also expected to have a generation efficiency much higher than in standard micro-ring systems. Those two considerations make a strong case for the integration of our proposed design in future on-chip quantum technologies.

  15. Generation of modal- and path-entangled photons using a domain-engineered integrated optical waveguide device

    SciTech Connect

    Lugani, Jasleen; Ghosh, Sankalpa; Thyagarajan, K.

    2011-06-15

    Integrated optical devices are expected to play a promising role in the field of quantum information science and technology. In this paper we propose a scheme for the generation of nondegenerate, copolarized, modal, and path-entangled photons using a directional coupler and an asymmetric Y-coupler geometry in type-0 phase-matched domain-engineered lithium niobate (LN) waveguide. The nonlinearity in LN is tailored in such a way that quasi-phase-matching conditions for two different spontaneous parametric down-conversion processes are obeyed simultaneously, leading to a modal and path-entangled state at the output. Assuming typical values of various parameters, we show, through numerical simulations, that an almost maximally entangled state is achievable over a wide range of waveguide parameters. For the degenerate case, the proposed scheme gives a NOON state for N = 2. The generated entangled photon pairs should have potential applications in quantum information schemes and also in quantum metrology. By appropriate domain engineering and component designing, the idea can be further extended to generate hyperentangled and two-photon multipath-entangled states, which may have further applications in quantum computation protocols.

  16. Monochromatic X-ray photon counting using an energy-selecting device and its application to iodine imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Yasuyuki; Sato, Eiichi; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya

    2015-08-01

    Quasi-monochromatic photon counting was performed using a cadmium telluride detector and an energy-selecting device, consisting of two comparators and a microcomputer (MC). The two threshold energies are determined using low and high-energy comparators, respectively. The MC produces a single logical pulse when only a logical pulse from a low-energy comparator is input to the MC. Next, the MC never produces the pulse when two pulses from low and high-energy comparators are input to the MC, simultaneously. The logical pulses from the MC are input to a frequency-voltage converter (FVC) to convert count rates into voltages; the rate is proportional to the voltage. The output voltage from the FVC is sent to a personal computer through an analog-digital converter to reconstruct tomograms. The X-ray projection curves for tomography are obtained by repeated linear scans and rotations of the object at a tube voltage of 70 kV and a current of 12 μA. Iodine (I) K-edge CT was performed using contrast media and X-ray photons with a count rate of 2.2 kilocounts per second and energies ranging from 34 to 50 keV, since these photons with energies beyond I-K-edge energy 33.2 keV are absorbed effectively by I atoms.

  17. Radiation Testing, Characterization and Qualification Challenges for Modern Microelectronics and Photonics Devices and Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Cohn, Lewis M.

    2008-01-01

    At an earlier conference we discussed a selection of the challenges for radiation testing of modern semiconductor devices focusing on state-of-the-art CMOS technologies. In this presentation, we extend this discussion focusing on the following areas: (1) Device packaging, (2) Evolving physical single even upset mechanisms, (3) Device complexity, and (4) the goal of understanding the limitations and interpretation of radiation testing results.

  18. Antimicrobial activity of antiseptic-coated orthopaedic devices.

    PubMed

    Darouiche, R O; Green, G; Mansouri, M D

    1998-04-01

    Antimicrobial coating of medical devices, including fracture fixation devices, has evolved as a potentially effective method for preventing device-related infections. We examined the in vitro antimicrobial activity of titanium cylinders coated with the antiseptic combination of chlorhexidine and chloroxylenol. The coated devices provided zones of inhibition against Staphylococcus epidermidis, S. aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans, at baseline and up to 8 weeks after incubation of the coated cylinders in human serum at 37 degrees C. This durable antimicrobial activity was attributed to the relatively slow leaching of chlorhexidine and chloroxylenol from the coated cylinders as measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. These results suggest that antiseptic-coated orthopaedic devices may provide broad-spectrum and durable antimicrobial protection against device-related infection.

  19. MMIC devices for active phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittra, R.

    1985-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in the calculation and measurement of the scattering parameters of printed circuit discontinuities. These discontinuities occur in a variety of structures, such as transitions between rectangular waveguide and printed circuits, junctions between circuits of different dielectric constants, and filters and impedance matching circuits. Because of the variety of devices in which these discontinuities occur, it is very useful to understand them in as great a detail as possible. Both theoretical and experimental studies of discontinuities were considered. The theoretical studies have focused on finding ways to predict the scattering from discontinuities. The experimental studies have concentrated on developing measurement techniques for determining the scattering parameters of these discontinuities.

  20. Two-Photon Cavity Solitons in Active Optical Media

    SciTech Connect

    Vilaseca, R.; Torrent, M. C.; Garcia-Ojalvo, J.; Brambilla, M.; San Miguel, M.

    2001-08-20

    We show that broad-area cascade lasers with no absorbing intracavity elements support the spontaneous formation of two-dimensional bright localized structures in a dark background. These cavity solitons consist of islands of two-photon emission embedded in a background of single-photon emission. We discuss the mechanisms through which these structures are formed and interact, along with their properties and stability.

  1. Activity Recognition in Individuals Walking With Assistive Devices: The Benefits of Device-Specific Models

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Aakash; Deems-Dluhy, Susan; Hoppe-Ludwig, Shenan; Kording, Konrad; Jayaraman, Arun

    2017-01-01

    Background Wearable sensors gather data that machine-learning models can convert into an identification of physical activities, a clinically relevant outcome measure. However, when individuals with disabilities upgrade to a new walking assistive device, their gait patterns can change, which could affect the accuracy of activity recognition. Objective The objective of this study was to assess whether we need to train an activity recognition model with labeled data from activities performed with the new assistive device, rather than data from the original device or from healthy individuals. Methods Data were collected from 11 healthy controls as well as from 11 age-matched individuals with disabilities who used a standard stance control knee-ankle-foot orthosis (KAFO), and then a computer-controlled adaptive KAFO (Ottobock C-Brace). All subjects performed a structured set of functional activities while wearing an accelerometer on their waist, and random forest classifiers were used as activity classification models. We examined both global models, which are trained on other subjects (healthy or disabled individuals), and personal models, which are trained and tested on the same subject. Results Median accuracies of global and personal models trained with data from the new KAFO were significantly higher (61% and 76%, respectively) than those of models that use data from the original KAFO (55% and 66%, respectively) (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, P=.006 and P=.01). These models also massively outperformed a global model trained on healthy subjects, which only achieved a median accuracy of 53%. Device-specific models conferred a major advantage for activity recognition. Conclusions Our results suggest that when patients use a new assistive device, labeled data from activities performed with the specific device are needed for maximal precision activity recognition. Personal device-specific models yield the highest accuracy in such scenarios, whereas models trained on

  2. Activity Recognition in Individuals Walking With Assistive Devices: The Benefits of Device-Specific Models.

    PubMed

    Lonini, Luca; Gupta, Aakash; Deems-Dluhy, Susan; Hoppe-Ludwig, Shenan; Kording, Konrad; Jayaraman, Arun

    2017-08-10

    Wearable sensors gather data that machine-learning models can convert into an identification of physical activities, a clinically relevant outcome measure. However, when individuals with disabilities upgrade to a new walking assistive device, their gait patterns can change, which could affect the accuracy of activity recognition. The objective of this study was to assess whether we need to train an activity recognition model with labeled data from activities performed with the new assistive device, rather than data from the original device or from healthy individuals. Data were collected from 11 healthy controls as well as from 11 age-matched individuals with disabilities who used a standard stance control knee-ankle-foot orthosis (KAFO), and then a computer-controlled adaptive KAFO (Ottobock C-Brace). All subjects performed a structured set of functional activities while wearing an accelerometer on their waist, and random forest classifiers were used as activity classification models. We examined both global models, which are trained on other subjects (healthy or disabled individuals), and personal models, which are trained and tested on the same subject. Median accuracies of global and personal models trained with data from the new KAFO were significantly higher (61% and 76%, respectively) than those of models that use data from the original KAFO (55% and 66%, respectively) (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, P=.006 and P=.01). These models also massively outperformed a global model trained on healthy subjects, which only achieved a median accuracy of 53%. Device-specific models conferred a major advantage for activity recognition. Our results suggest that when patients use a new assistive device, labeled data from activities performed with the specific device are needed for maximal precision activity recognition. Personal device-specific models yield the highest accuracy in such scenarios, whereas models trained on healthy individuals perform poorly and should not be

  3. Active stabilization of a fiber-optic two-photon interferometer using continuous optical length control.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seok-Beom; Kim, Heonoh

    2016-05-16

    The practical realization of long-distance entanglement-based quantum communication systems strongly rely on the observation of highly stable quantum interference between correlated single photons. This task must accompany active stabilization of the optical path lengths within the single-photon coherence length. Here, we provide two-step interferometer stabilization methods employing continuous optical length control and experimentally demonstrate two-photon quantum interference using an actively stabilized 6-km-long fiber-optic Hong-Ou-Mandel interferometer. The two-step active control techniques are applied for measuring highly stable two-photon interference fringes by scanning the optical path-length difference. The obtained two-photon interference visibilities with and without accidental subtraction are found to be approximately 90.7% and 65.4%, respectively.

  4. Recent results in silicon photonics at the University of Southampton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, G. T.; Mashanovich, G. Z.; Gardes, F. Y.; Thomson, D. J.; Hu, Y.; Soler-Penades, J.; Nedeljkovic, M.; Khokhar, A. Z.; Thomas, P.; Littlejohns, C.; Ahmad, A.; Reynolds, S.; Topley, R.; Mitchell, C.; Stankovic, S.; Owens, N.; Chen, X.; Wilson, P. R.; Ke, L.; Ben Masaud, T. M.; Tarazona, A.; Chong, H.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we will discuss recent results in our work on Silicon Photonics. This will include active and passive devices for a range of applications. Specifically we will include work on modulators and drivers, deposited waveguides, multiplexers, device integration and Mid IR silicon photonics. These devices and technologies are important both for established applications such as integrated transceivers for short reach interconnect, as well as emerging applications such as disposable sensors and mass market photonics.

  5. Improved mesh based photon sampling techniques for neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Relson, E.; Wilson, P. P. H.; Biondo, E. D.

    2013-07-01

    The design of fusion power systems requires analysis of neutron activation of large, complex volumes, and the resulting particles emitted from these volumes. Structured mesh-based discretization of these problems allows for improved modeling in these activation analysis problems. Finer discretization of these problems results in large computational costs, which drives the investigation of more efficient methods. Within an ad hoc subroutine of the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP, we implement sampling of voxels and photon energies for volumetric sources using the alias method. The alias method enables efficient sampling of a discrete probability distribution, and operates in 0(1) time, whereas the simpler direct discrete method requires 0(log(n)) time. By using the alias method, voxel sampling becomes a viable alternative to sampling space with the 0(1) approach of uniformly sampling the problem volume. Additionally, with voxel sampling it is straightforward to introduce biasing of volumetric sources, and we implement this biasing of voxels as an additional variance reduction technique that can be applied. We verify our implementation and compare the alias method, with and without biasing, to direct discrete sampling of voxels, and to uniform sampling. We study the behavior of source biasing in a second set of tests and find trends between improvements and source shape, material, and material density. Overall, however, the magnitude of improvements from source biasing appears to be limited. Future work will benefit from the implementation of efficient voxel sampling - particularly with conformal unstructured meshes where the uniform sampling approach cannot be applied. (authors)

  6. Mechanoelectrical and Photon-Generating Devices in Cells and Organisms: From Molecular Machines to Macroscopic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beloussov, L. V.

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this essay is to review what we know about the transformation of chemical energy into mechanical, electrical and photonic at the different scales of biological organization. We start from the "classical", short-range mechanoelectrical protein machines emphasizing their capacity to slow down the rate of energy relaxation and to concentrate energy onto a restricted number of freedom degrees. Then we pass to the newly described "low entropy machines" and to the macroscopic electromechanical machines which create circuits of the organismal scales. At last, we come to photonic events, paying a special attention to their regular periodicity within several Hz range and to their relations with cytoskeletal structures and their developmental dynamics. We suggest, that this area of investigations should be related with the theory of self-organization and the notion of coherency.

  7. Photonic Network R&D Activities in Japan-Current Activities and Future Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitayama, Ken-Ichi; Miki, Tetsuya; Morioka, Toshio; Tsushima, Hideaki; Koga, Masafumi; Mori, Kazuyuki; Araki, Soichiro; Sato, Ken-Ichi; Onaka, Hiroshi; Namiki, Shu; Aoyama, Tomonori

    2005-10-01

    R&D activities on photonic networks in Japan are presented. First, milestones in current ongoing R&D programs supported by Japanese government agencies are introduced, including long-distance and wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) fiber transmission, wavelength routing, optical burst switching (OBS), and control-plane technology for IP backbone networks. Their goal was set to evolve a legacy telecommunications network to IP-over-WDM networks by introducing technologies for WDM and wavelength routing. We then discuss the perspectives of so-called PHASE II R&D programs for photonic networks over the next 5 years until 2010, by focusing on the report that has been recently issued by the Photonic Internet Forum (PIF), a consortium that has major carriers, telecom vendors, and Japanese academics as members. The PHASE II R&D programs should serve to establish a photonic platform to provide abundant bandwidth on demand, at any time on a real-time basis, through the customer's initiative to promote bandwidth-rich applications, such as grid computing, real-time digital-cinema streaming, medical and educational applications, and network storage in e-commerce.

  8. THz Communications using Photonics and Electronic Devices: the Race to Data-Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducournau, Guillaume; Szriftgiser, Pascal; Pavanello, Fabio; Peytavit, Emilien; Zaknoune, Mohammed; Bacquet, Denis; Beck, Alexandre; Akalin, Tahsin; Lampin, Jean-François; Lampin, Jean-François

    2015-02-01

    With the mass development of mobile data transfers, wireless communications have recently entered a new area: the carrier frequency is now entering the THz region. After a brief overview of context and key features of THz communication, focus is given on photonic-based THz emitters based on quasi-optic UTC-PDs. A special design of wideband photomixer is presented and its applications for narrow bandwidth THz generation. Using this photomixer, communication links at 200, 400 and 600 GHz are presented.

  9. Full vectorial finite element analysis of photonic crystal devices: Application to low-loss modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woo Jun

    A full vectorial finite element analysis is presented for the design and analysis of photonic crystal structures. Finite element C++ class libraries are developed based on the vector formulation of the two and three dimensional wave equation. Whitney 1-forms, often called edge elements, are used as basis functions to avoid spurious modes in eigenanalyses. The current finite element codes can solve 2-D and 3-D eigenvalue and scattering problems with boundary conditions: the perfect electric conductor (PEC), the perfect magnetic conductor (PMC) and the Bloch boundary condition. Open boundary problems can also be solved by implementing the perfectly matched layers (PML). Eigenanalyses are performed for various types of photonic crystal structures such as unit cells, infinite waveguides and defect cavities. The transmission spectra of the photonic crystal guiding structures, straight waveguides, waveguide bends and waveguide branches, are derived using scattering formulation. Experimental verification is also presented for a single and five missing line photonic crystal waveguides. Based on the calculated transmission spectra, we conducted simulated annealing optimization of branches and bends to increase the transmission. We applied previous results to a Mach-Zehnder type optical interferometer. The design of waveguide arms is modified to increase the sensitivity. Change of lattice constant gives rise to the shift of the waveguide band. Thus, the operating frequency can be moved to the bandedge which exhibits more dispersive characteristics. We also investigated the coupled-resonator optical waveguide (CROW) structures for the same purpose. By inserting the defect air holes in the waveguide channel, the shape and the frequency range of the band can be engineered. The increase in the sensitivity of the CROW is analyzed by varying the radii of the defect air holes in the waveguide channel. Also group velocities and their dispersion characteristics are investigated and

  10. Methods and devices for maintaining a resonant wavelength of a photonic microresonator

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Adam; Zortman, William A.

    2015-07-14

    A photonic microresonator incorporates a localized heater element within a section of an optical bus waveguide that is in proximity to the resonator structure. The application of an adjustable control voltage to the heater element provides a localized change in the refractive index value of the bus waveguide, compensating for temperature-induced wavelength drift and maintaining a stabilized value of the microresonator's resonant wavelength.

  11. Photonic integrated devices for high-capacity data-center interconnect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Farias, Giovanni B.; Freitas, Alexandre P.; Buscamante, Yesica R. R.; Moura, Uiara C.; Motta, Diogo de A.; Santana, Henrique F.; Chiuchiarelli, Andrea; de Carvalho, Luis H. H.; Reis, Jacklyn D.

    2017-01-01

    Emerging short-reach data center interconnect (typically in the range of tens of km) is a scenario wherein the capacity has to be maximized over point-to-point optical links without intermediate optical amplification, i.e. unrepeated links. For this application, cost and compactness of the optical transceiver form factor to fit the faceplate density requirement are essential to keep up with the bandwidth demand inside hyper-scale data centers. For the optical module to fit in the current dimensions of client routers without compromising the performance, both the electronics and the optics have to be efficiently designed. As far as the opto-electronic is concerned, photonic integrated circuits (PIC) have been discussed in the community so that all the photonic functionalities are performed accordingly with the physical dimensions, power budget and performance specifications. This paper addresses the basic building blocks of silicon photonics coherent optical transceivers, from the design to experimental validation. In addition to the silicon optical modulator, basic components such as polarization splitter-rotators (PSRs) and optical filters will be addressed.

  12. Performance of single photon-counting X-ray charge coupled devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riegler, G. R.; Stern, R. A.; Liewer, K.; Vescelus, F.; Nousek, J. A.; Garmire, G. P.

    1981-01-01

    Results of intial performance tests on X-ray sensing properties of charge-coupled devices (CCDs) are presented. CCDs have demonstrated excellent spatial resolution and good spectral resolution, superior to that of non-imaging proportional counters.

  13. Fast and accurate finite element analysis of large-scale three-dimensional photonic devices with a robust domain decomposition method.

    PubMed

    Xue, Ming-Feng; Kang, Young Mo; Arbabi, Amir; McKeown, Steven J; Goddard, Lynford L; Jin, Jian-Ming

    2014-02-24

    A fast and accurate full-wave technique based on the dual-primal finite element tearing and interconnecting method and the second-order transmission condition is presented for large-scale three-dimensional photonic device simulations. The technique decomposes a general three-dimensional electromagnetic problem into smaller subdomain problems so that parallel computing can be performed on distributed-memory computer clusters to reduce the simulation time significantly. With the electric fields computed everywhere, photonic device parameters such as transmission and reflection coefficients are extracted. Several photonic devices, with simulation volumes up to 1.9×10(4) (λ/n(avg))3 and modeled with over one hundred million unknowns, are simulated to demonstrate the application, efficiency, and capability of this technique. The simulations show good agreement with experimental results and in a special case with a simplified two-dimensional simulation.

  14. Bis(pyrene)-Doped Cationic Dipeptide Nanoparticles for Two-Photon-Activated Photodynamic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bingbing; Wang, Lei; Li, Qi; He, Pingping; Liu, Huiling; Wang, Hao; Yang, Yang; Li, Junbai

    2017-08-25

    At present, one of main problems for photodynamic therapy (PDT) is how to improve the treatment depth. Two-photon activated (TPA) developed recently provide a possible solution for it. In this work, we report the energy-transferring assembled cationic dipeptide nanoparticles for two-photon activated photodynamic therapy (TPA-PDT). In the nanoparticles, the coencapsulated two-photon fluorescent dye bis(pyrene) (BP) is an energy donor, and a photosensitizer rose bengal (RB) is an acceptor based on an intraparticle fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) mechanism. BP in the nanoparticles can be excited by one- or two- photon laser. And then, the energy of BP was transferred to RB, which highly enhanced the generation of singlet oxygen. The cellular experiments indicated that this nanosystem can induce the cytotoxicity under one- and two-photon irradiation, which allows further applications of FRET-based biomaterials for TPA-PDT.

  15. Measurement of gas bremsstrahlung from the insertion device beamlines of the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Pisharody, M.; Job, P.K.; Magill, S.

    1997-03-01

    High energy electron storage rings generate energetic bremsstrahlung photons through radiative interaction of the electrons (or positrons) with the residual gas molecules inside the storage ring. The resulting radiation exits at an average emittance angle of (m{sub 0}c{sub 2}/E) radian with respect to the electron beam path, where m{sub 0}c{sup 2} is the rest mass of E the electron and E its kinetic energy. Thus, at straight sections of the storage rings, moving electrons will produce a narrow and intense monodirectional photon beam. At synchrotron radiation facilities, where beamlines are channeled out of the storage ring, a continuous gas bremsstrahlung spectrum, with a maximum energy of the electron beam, will be present. There are a number of compelling reasons that a measurement of the bremsstrahlung characteristics be conducted at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring. Although the number of residual gas molecules present in the storage ring at typical nTorr vacuum is low, because of the long straight paths of the electrons in the storage ring at APS, significant production of bremsstrahlung will be produced. This may pose a radiation hazard. It is then imperative that personnel be shielded from dose rates due to this radiation. There are not many measurements available for gas bremsstrahlung, especially for higher electron beam energies. The quantitative estimates of gas bremsstrahlung from storage rings as evaluated by Monte Carlo codes also have several uncertainties. They are in general calculated for air at atmospheric pressure, the results of which are then extrapolated to typical storage ring vacuum values (of the order of 10{sup -9} Torr). Realistically, the actual pressure profile can vary inside the narrow vacuum chamber. Also, the actual chemical composition of the residual gas inside the storage ring is generally different from that of air.

  16. Integrated array of 2-μm antimonide-based single-photon counting devices.

    PubMed

    Diagne, M A; Greszik, M; Duerr, E K; Zayhowski, J J; Manfra, M J; Bailey, R J; Donnelly, J P; Turner, G W

    2011-02-28

    A 32x32 Sb-based Geiger-mode (GM) avalanche photodiode array, operating at 2 μm with three-dimensional imaging capability, is presented. The array is interfaced with a ROIC (readout integrated circuit) in which each pixel can detect a photon and record the arrival time. The hybridized unit for the 1000-element focal plane array, when operated at 77K with 1 V overbias range, shows an average dark count rate of 1.5 kHz. Three-dimensional range images of objects were acquired.

  17. Development of novel active transport membrande devices

    SciTech Connect

    Laciak, D.V.

    1994-11-01

    Air Products has undertaken a research program to fabricate and evaluate gas separation membranes based upon promising ``active-transport`` (AT) materials recently developed in our laboratories. Active Transport materials are ionic polymers and molten salts which undergo reversible interaction or reaction with ammonia and carbon dioxide. The materials are useful for separating these gases from mixtures with hydrogen. Moreover, AT membranes have the unique property of possessing high permeability towards ammnonia and carbon dioxide but low permeability towards hydrogen and can thus be used to permeate these components from a gas stream while retaining hydrogen at high pressure.

  18. Photon energy dependence of three fortuitous dosemeters from personal electronic devices, measured by optically stimulated luminescence.

    PubMed

    Beerten, Koen; Vanhavere, Filip

    2010-08-01

    New data are presented with regard to the relative OSL sensitivity of three different emergency dosemeters irradiated to various photon energies approximately between 48 and 1250 keV using blue excitation light. Investigated components extracted from commonly worn objects include those from USB flash drives (alumina substrate), mobile phones (Ba-rich silicate) and credit cards (chip card module). Several basic properties have been investigated such as the overall radiation sensitivity, the shape of the decay curve and fading of the OSL signal. An increase of the sensitivity for low energies relative to (60)Co gamma rays can be observed for the three dosemeters, the increase being very pronounced for the Ba-rich component (factor of 10) and less pronounced for the chip card module (factor of 2). It is concluded that proper dose correction factors for photon energy have to be applied in order to accurately determine the absorbed dose to tissue. The OSL sensitivity to neutron irradiation was investigated as well, but this was found to be less than the gamma sensitivity.

  19. Numerical simulation of photonic-crystal tellurite-tungstate glass fibres used in parametric fibre devices

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, V O; Plotnichenko, V G; Nazaryants, V O; Dianov, Evgenii M

    2006-01-31

    Using the MIT Photonic-Bands Package to calculate fully vectorial definite-mode eigenmodes of Maxwell's equations with periodic boundary conditions in a plane-wave basis, light propagation is simulated in fibres formed by point defects in two-dimensional periodic lattices of cylindrical holes in a glass or of glass tubes. The holes and gaps between tubes are assumed filled with air. Single-site hexagonal and square lattices are considered, which were most often studied both theoretically and experimentally and are used to fabricate silica photonic-crystal fibres. As a defect, a single vacancy is studied - the absent lattice site (one hole in a glass or one of the tubes are filled with the same glass) and a similar vacancy with nearest neighbours representing holes of a larger diameter. The obtained solutions are analysed by the method of effective mode area. The dependences of the effective refractive index and dispersion of the fundamental mode on the geometrical parameters of a fibre are found. The calculations are performed for tellurite-tungstate 80TeO{sub 2}-20WO{sub 3} glass fibres taking into account the frequency dispersion of the refractive index. (optical fibres)

  20. Nanoboomerang-based inverse metasurfaces—A promising path towards ultrathin photonic devices for transmission operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeisberger, Matthias; Schneidewind, Henrik; Huebner, Uwe; Popp, Juergen; Schmidt, Markus A.

    2017-03-01

    Metasurfaces have revolutionized photonics due to their ability to shape phase fronts as requested and to tune beam directionality using nanoscale metallic or dielectric scatterers. Here we reveal inverse metasurfaces showing superior properties compared to their positive counterparts if transmission mode operation is considered. The key advantage of such slot-type metasurfaces is the strong reduction of light in the parallel-polarization state, making the crossed-polarization, being essential for metasurface operation, dominant and highly visible. In the experiment, we show an up to four times improvement in polarization extinction for the individual metasurface element geometry consisting of deep subwavelength nanoboomerangs with feature sizes of the order of 100 nm. As confirmed by simulations, strong plasmonic hybridization yields two spectrally separated plasmonic resonances, ultimately allowing for the desired phase and scattering engineering in transmission. Due to the design flexibility of inverse metasurfaces, a large number of highly integrated ultra-flat photonic elements can be envisioned, examples of which include monolithic lenses for telecommunications and spectroscopy, beam shaper or generator for particle trapping or acceleration or sophisticated polarization control for microscopy.

  1. Gamma radiation effects in amorphous silicon and silicon nitride photonic devices.

    PubMed

    Du, Qingyang; Huang, Yizhong; Ogbuu, Okechukwu; Zhang, Wei; Li, Junying; Singh, Vivek; Agarwal, Anuradha M; Hu, Juejun

    2017-02-01

    Understanding radiation damage is of significant importance for devices operating in radiation-harsh environments. In this Letter, we present a systematic study on gamma radiation effects in amorphous silicon and silicon nitride guided wave devices. It is found that gamma radiation increases the waveguide modal effective indices by as much as 4×10-3 in amorphous silicon and 5×10-4 in silicon nitride at 10 Mrad dose. This Letter further reveals that surface oxidation and radiation-induced densification account for the observed index change.

  2. The direct and indirect bandgaps of unstrained SixGe1-x-ySny and their photonic device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moontragoon, P.; Soref, R. A.; Ikonic, Z.

    2012-10-01

    Using empirical pseudopotential theory, the direct (Γ) and indirect bandgaps (L and X) of unstrained crystalline SixGe1-x-ySny have been calculated over the entire xy composition range. The results are presented as energy-contour maps on ternary diagrams along with a ternary plot of the predicted lattice parameters. A group of 0.2 to 0.6 eV direct-gap SiGeSn materials is found for a variety of mid-infrared photonic applications. A set of "slightly indirect" SiGeSn alloys having a direct gap at 0.8 eV (but with a smaller L-Γ separation than in Ge) have been identified. These materials will function like Ge in various telecom photonic devices. Hetero-layered SiGeSn structures are described for infrared light emitters, amplifiers, photodetectors, and modulators (free carrier or Franz-Keldysh). We have examined in detail the optimized design space for mid-infrared SiGeSn-based multiple-quantum-well laser diodes, amplifiers, photodetectors, and quantum-confined Stark effect modulators.

  3. Dual-energy X-ray photon counting using an LSO-MPPC spectrometer and an energy-selecting device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Oda, Yasuyuki; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya

    2015-08-01

    Dual-energy photon counting was performed using an energy-selecting device (ESD) and a detector, consisting of a Lu2(SiO4)O [LSO)] crystal and a multipixel photon counter (MPPC). The ESD is used to determine a low-energychannel range for CT and consists of two comparators and a microcomputer (MC). The two threshold channels in proportion to energies are determined using low and high-energy comparators, respectively. The MC in the ESD produces a single logical pulse when only a logical pulse from the low-energy comparator is input to the MC. To determine the high-energy-channel range for CT, logical pulses from the high-energy comparator are input to the MC outside the ESD. Logical pulses from the two MCs are input to frequency-voltage converters (FVCs) to convert count rates into voltages. The output voltages from the two FVCs are sent to a personal computer through an analog-digital converter to reconstruct tomograms. Dual-energy computed tomography was accomplished at a tube voltage of 70 kV and a maximum count rate of 14.3 kilocounts per second, and two-different-energy tomograms were obtained simultaneously.

  4. Broadband and omnidirectional light harvesting enhancement in photovoltaic devices with aperiodic TiO2 nanotube photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Min; Su, Haijun; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Lin; Fu, Nianqing; Yong, Zehui; Huang, Haitao; Xie, Keyu

    2017-03-01

    Design of more effective broadband light-trapping elements to improve the light harvesting efficiency under both normal and tilted light for solar cells and other photonic devices is highly desirable. Herein we present a theoretical analysis on the optical properties of a novel TiO2 nanotube aperiodic photonic crystal (NT APC) following an aperiodic sequences and its photocurrent enhancement effect for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) under various incidence angles. It is found that, compared to regular PC, the designed TiO2 NT APC owns broader reflection region and a desired omnidirectional reflection (ODR) bandgaps, leading to considerable and stable photocurrent enhancement under both normal and oblique light. The effects of the structural parameters of the TiO2 NT APC, including the average lattice constant and the common sequence difference, on the optical properties, ODR bandgaps and absorption magnification of the integrated DSSCs are investigated in detail. Moreover, the angular dependence of photocurrent enhancement and angular compensation effect of such TiO2 NT APCs are also provided to offer a guidance on the optimum structural parameters design under different engineering application conditions.

  5. Second Law based definition of passivity/activity of devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundqvist, Kyle M.; Ferry, David K.; Kish, Laszlo B.

    2017-10-01

    Recently, our efforts to clarify the old question, if a memristor is a passive or active device [1], triggered debates between engineers, who have had advanced definitions of passivity/activity of devices, and physicists with significantly different views about this seemingly simple question. This debate triggered our efforts to test the well-known engineering concepts about passivity/activity in a deeper way, challenging them by statistical physics. It is shown that the advanced engineering definition of passivity/activity of devices is self-contradictory when a thermodynamical system executing Johnson-Nyquist noise is present. A new, statistical physical, self-consistent definition based on the Second Law of Thermodynamics is introduced. It is also shown that, in a system with uniform temperature distribution, any rectifier circuitry that can rectify thermal noise must contain an active circuit element, according to both the engineering and statistical physical definitions.

  6. Excimer laser induced quantum well intermixing: a reproducibility study of the process for fabrication of photonic integrated devices.

    PubMed

    Beal, Romain; Aimez, Vincent; Dubowski, Jan J

    2015-01-26

    Excimer (ultraviolet) laser-induced quantum well intermixing (UV-Laser-QWI) is an attractive technique for wafer level post-growth processing and fabrication of a variety of monolithically integrated photonic devices. The results of UV-Laser-QWI employed for the fabrication of multibandgap III-V semiconductor wafers have demonstrated the attractive character of this approach although the process accuracy and reproducibility have remained relatively weakly covered in related literature. We report on a systematic investigation of the reproducibility of this process induced with a KrF excimer laser. The influence of both the irradiation with different laser doses and the annealing temperatures on the amplitude of intermixing in InGaAs/InGaAsP/InP quantum well heterostructures has been evaluated based on the photoluminescence measurements. Under optimized conditions, the process allows to blue shift the bandgap of a heterostructure by more than 100 nm with a remarkable 5.3% relative standard deviation.

  7. Fault-tolerant polarization-insensitive photonic delay line architectures using two-dimensional digital micromirror devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riza, Nabeel A.; Sumriddetchkajorn, Sarun

    1999-02-01

    A binary multichannel photonic delay line (PDL) module is introduced that gives balanced loss switched states and a polarization-insensitive operation via the use of binary operation Digital Micromirror Devices (DMDs). Experimental demonstration of a DMD-based PDL architecture is performed for a 6.84-ns time delay design. Experimental results include a 25-beam feed interchannel crosstalk test indicating a <-60 dB optical interchannel crosstalk level for a 0.381 mm interchannel distance in the multichannel PDL. An average optical signal-to-leakage noise ratio of 35.33 dB is measured for this PDL. A butterfly design PDL optical architecture is proposed for minimizing loss and improving assembly accuracy. These DMD-based variable PDLs can be used in applications ranging from radio frequency (RF) fiber-optic signal processing systems to adaptive optics for astronomical and laser radar arrays.

  8. Active pixel array devices in space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkinson, G. R.; Purll, D. J.; Abbey, A. F.; Short, A.; Watson, D. J.; Wells, A.

    2003-11-01

    The X-ray Telescope for NASA's Swift mission incorporates a Telescope Alignment Monitor (TAM) to measure thermo-elastic misalignments between the telescope and the spacecraft star tracker. A LED in the X-ray focal plane is imaged on to a position-sensitive detector via two paths, directly and after reflection from the star tracker alignment cube. The separation of the two spots of light on the detector is determined with sub-pixel accuracy using a centroiding algorithm. The active element of the TAM is a miniature camera supplied by Sira Electro-Optics Ltd, using an Active Pixel Sensor (APS). The camera was based on similar pointing sensors developed on European Space Agency programmes, such as acquisition sensors for optical inter-satellite links and miniaturized star trackers. The paper gives the background to APS-based pointing sensors, describes the Swift TAM system, and presents test results from the instrument development programme.

  9. Geometric investigation of a gaming active device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menna, Fabio; Remondino, Fabio; Battisti, Roberto; Nocerino, Erica

    2011-07-01

    3D imaging systems are widely available and used for surveying, modeling and entertainment applications, but clear statements regarding their characteristics, performances and limitations are still missing. The VDI/VDE and the ASTME57 committees are trying to set some standards but the commercial market is not reacting properly. Since many new users are approaching these 3D recording methodologies, clear statements and information clarifying if a package or system satisfies certain requirements before investing are fundamental for those users who are not really familiar with these technologies. Recently small and portable consumer-grade active sensors came on the market, like TOF rangeimaging cameras or low-cost triangulation-based range sensor. A quite interesting active system was produced by PrimeSense and launched on the market thanks to the Microsoft Xbox project with the name of Kinect. The article reports the geometric investigation of the Kinect active sensors, considering its measurement performances, the accuracy of the retrieved range data and the possibility to use it for 3D modeling application.

  10. Growth and characterization of III-nitrides materials system for photonic and electronic devices by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Dongwon

    A wide variety of group III-Nitride-based photonic and electronic devices have opened a new era in the field of semiconductor research in the past ten years. The direct and large bandgap nature, intrinsic high carrier mobility, and the capability of forming heterostructures allow them to dominate photonic and electronic device market such as light emitters, photodiodes, or high-speed/high-power electronic devices. Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) based on group III-Nitrides materials are of interest due to potential capabilities for low dark current densities, high sensitivities and high optical gains in the ultraviolet (UV) spectral region. Wide-bandgap GaN-based APDs are excellent candidates for short-wavelength photodetectors because they have the capability for cut-off wavelengths in the UV spectral region (lambda < 290 nm). These intrinsically solar-blind UV APDs will not require filters to operate in the solar-blind spectral regime of lambda < 290 nm. For the growth of GaN-based heteroepitaxial layers on lattice-mismatched substrates, a high density of defects is usually introduced during the growth; thereby, causing a device failure by premature microplasma, which has been a major issue for GaN-based APDs. The extensive research on epitaxial growth and optimization of AlxGa 1-xN (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) grown on low dislocation density native bulk III-N substrates have brought UV APDs into realization. GaN and AlGaN UV p-i-n APDs demonstrated first and record-high true avalanche gain of > 10,000 and 50, respectively. The large stable optical gains are attributed to the improved crystalline quality of epitaxial layers grown on low dislocation density bulk substrates. GaN p-i-n rectifiers have brought much research interest due to its superior physical properties. The AIN-free full-vertical GaN p-i-n rectifiers on n-type 6H-SiC substrates by employing a conducting AIGaN:Si buffer layer provides the advantages of the reduction of sidewall damage from plasma etching and

  11. Thermally tunable ferroelectric thin film photonic crystals.

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, P. T.; Wessels, B. W.; Imre, A.; Ocola, L. E.; Northwestern Univ.

    2008-01-01

    Thermally tunable PhCs are fabricated from ferroelectric thin films. Photonic band structure and temperature dependent diffraction are calculated by FDTD. 50% intensity modulation is demonstrated experimentally. This device has potential in active ultra-compact optical circuits.

  12. Femtosecond laser micromachining for the realization of fully integrated photonic and microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, S. M.; Osellame, R.; Ramponi, R.

    2015-02-01

    Femtosecond laser microprocessing is a direct, maskless fabrication technique that has attracted much attention in the past 10 years due to its unprecedented versatility in the 3D patterning of transparent materials. Two common modalities of femtosecond laser microfabrication include buried optical waveguide writing and surface laser ablation, which have been applied to a wide range of transparent substrates including glasses, polymers and crystals. In two photon polymerization, a third modality of femtosecond laser fabrication, focused femtosecond laser pulses drive photopolymerization in photoresists, enabling the writing of complex 3D structures with submicrometer resolution. In this paper, we discuss several microdevices realized by these diverse modalities of femtosecond laser microfabrication, for applications in microfluidics, sensing and quantum information.

  13. Photonic-crystal-fiber pigtail device integrated with lens-duct optics for terahertz radiation coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diwa, Gilbert; Quema, Alex; Estacio, Elmer; Pobre, Romeric; Murakami, Hidetoshi; Ono, Shingo; Sarukura, Nobuhiko

    2005-10-01

    An integrated optics called terahertz (THz) pigtail, which is comprised of an emitter, an optically transparent launching media, and a waveguide, is devised and fabricated. The InAs emitter under a 1T magnetic field is coupled to the launching media using silicone grease, an index matching liquid. The launching media, a lens duct made from a polymer based on poly 4-methyl pentene-1 (commonly known as TPX), is designed based on the concept of guiding THz radiation into Teflon photonic crystal fiber (PCF) waveguide by means of total internal reflection. It is found that the constructed THz lens duct is able to channel and couple the THz radiation into the PCF waveguide with a loss of <1dB. The results here show that the idea of using the THz pigtail can be a potential means of effectively directing THz radiation.

  14. Photonic devices on planar and curved substrates and methods for fabrication thereof

    DOEpatents

    Bartl, Michael H.; Barhoum, Moussa; Riassetto, David

    2016-08-02

    A versatile and rapid sol-gel technique for the fabrication of high quality one-dimensional photonic bandgap materials. For example, silica/titania multi-layer materials may be fabricated by a sol-gel chemistry route combined with dip-coating onto planar or curved substrate. A shock-cooling step immediately following the thin film heat-treatment process is introduced. This step was found important in the prevention of film crack formation--especially in silica/titania alternating stack materials with a high number of layers. The versatility of this sol-gel method is demonstrated by the fabrication of various Bragg stack-type materials with fine-tuned optical properties by tailoring the number and sequence of alternating layers, the film thickness and the effective refractive index of the deposited thin films. Measured optical properties show good agreement with theoretical simulations confirming the high quality of these sol-gel fabricated optical materials.

  15. Demonstration of free space coherent optical communication using integrated silicon photonic orbital angular momentum devices.

    PubMed

    Su, Tiehui; Scott, Ryan P; Djordjevic, Stevan S; Fontaine, Nicolas K; Geisler, David J; Cai, Xinran; Yoo, S J B

    2012-04-23

    We propose and demonstrate silicon photonic integrated circuits (PICs) for free-space spatial-division-multiplexing (SDM) optical transmission with multiplexed orbital angular momentum (OAM) states over a topological charge range of -2 to +2. The silicon PIC fabricated using a CMOS-compatible process exploits tunable-phase arrayed waveguides with vertical grating couplers to achieve space division multiplexing and demultiplexing. The experimental results utilizing two silicon PICs achieve SDM mux/demux bit-error-rate performance for 1‑b/s/Hz, 10-Gb/s binary phase shifted keying (BPSK) data and 2-b/s/Hz, 20-Gb/s quadrature phase shifted keying (QPSK) data for individual and two simultaneous OAM states.

  16. All-fiber photonic devices and system for advanced optical communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xiaoyi; Qin, Zixiong; Ding, Lei; Yuan, Shuzhong; Kai, Guiyun; Liu, Zhiguo; Feng, Dejun; Zhao, Chunliu; Ma, Ning; Zhang, Ying; Ning, Ding

    2000-10-01

    The objective of this paper is to give an overview of the different studies we have performed at the research level regarding the design and implementation of a photonic wavelength division multiplexing layer providing transparent transport services to client layer. Such a network requires a number of enabling factors to be accessed in order to become a reality. Among these factors are the availability of high- capacity WDM transmission systems and efficient optical routing nodes based on mature technology, etc. In this paper, based on several key build blocks we developed such as fiber lasers, flattened EDFA's, and WADM's, an all-fiber WDM system was demonstrated. A cost effective alternative to OSA was proposed.

  17. Slow light miniature devices with ultra-flattened dispersion in silicon-on-insulator photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Rawal, Swati; Sinha, Ravindra; De La Rue, Richard M

    2009-08-03

    We propose a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) photonic crystal waveguide within a hexagonal lattice of elliptical air holes for slow light propagation with group velocity in the range 0.0028c to 0.044c and ultra-flattened group velocity dispersion (GVD). The proposed structure is also investigated for its application as an optical buffer with a large value of normalized delay bandwidth product (DBP), equal to 0.778. Furthermore it is shown that the proposed structure can also be used for time or wavelength-division demultiplexing to separate two telecom wavelengths, 1.31 microm and 1.55 microm, on a useful time-scale and with minimal distortion.

  18. Device-independent quantum key distribution using single-photon entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamaruddin, S.; Shaari, J. S.

    2015-04-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) with security features based on the notion of nonlocality has provided valuable insights into the possibility of device-independent scenarios. The essential resource for nonlocality in Nature described by quantum physics has been mainly associated with entanglement of two particles or more, although it has been shown that nonlocality of a single particle is indeed possible. Here, we consider a quantum key distribution scheme based on Phys. Rev. A, 68 (2003) 012324 exploiting single-particle nonlocality testing to demonstrate its security. We present our analysis of security against individual attack within a device-independent scenario where Eve is constrained only by the no-signaling principle. We further consider a family of QKD protocols based on binary measurements and discuss the possibility of optimal scenarios.

  19. Nanocomposite Based Organic-Inorganic Cu3BiS3 High Sensitive Hybrid Photonic Devices.

    PubMed

    Murali, Banavoth; Krupanidhi, S B

    2015-04-01

    We report the synthesis and application Cu3BiS3 nanorods in infrared photodectection. Cu3BiS3 nano rods were characterized structurally, optically and electrically. The detailed IR photodectection properties in terms of photo response were demonstrated with IR lamp and 1064 nm laser illuminations. The rapid photocurrent time constants followed by the slower components, resulting due to the defect states. The photo detecting properties for different concentrations of nanorods blended with the conjugate polymer devices were demonstrated. Further the photocurrent was enhanced to threefold increase from 3.47 x 10(-7) A to 2.37 x 10(-3) A at 1 V for 10 mg nanorods embedded in the polymer device. Responsivity of hybrid device was enhanced from 0.0158 A/W to 102 A/W. The detailed trap assisted space charge transport properties were studied considering the different regimes. Hence Cu3BiS3 can be a promising candidate in the nano switchable near IR photodetectors.

  20. Luminescence Color Tuning by Regulating Electrostatic Interaction in Light-Emitting Devices and Two-Photon Excited Information Decryption.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yun; Liu, Shujuan; Yang, Huiran; Zeng, Yi; She, Pengfei; Zhu, Nianyong; Ho, Cheuk-Lam; Zhao, Qiang; Huang, Wei; Wong, Wai-Yeung

    2017-03-06

    It is well-known that the variation of noncovalent interactions of luminophores, such as π-π interaction, metal-to-metal interaction, and hydrogen-bonding interaction, can regulate their emission colors. Electrostatic interaction is also an important noncovalent interaction. However, very few examples of luminescence color tuning induced by electrostatic interaction were reported. Herein, a series of Zn(II)-bis(terpyridine) complexes (Zn-AcO, Zn-BF4, Zn-ClO4, and Zn-PF6) containing different anionic counterions were reported, which exhibit counterion-dependent emission colors from green-yellow to orange-red (549 to 622 nm) in CH2Cl2 solution. More importantly, it was found that the excited states of these Zn(II) complexes can be regulated by changing the electrostatic interaction between Zn(2+) and counterions. On the basis of this controllable excited state, white light emission has been achieved by a single molecule, and a white light-emitting device has been fabricated. Moreover, a novel type of data decryption system with Zn-PF6 as the optical recording medium has been developed by the two-photon excitation technique. Our results suggest that rationally controlled excited states of these Zn(II) complexes by regulating electrostatic interaction have promising applications in various optoelectronic fields, such as light-emitting devices, information recording, security protection, and so on.

  1. Broad-band, RF-photonic antennas: System and integrated devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ligeng

    1997-07-01

    We analyze an optically controlled microwave phased array antenna system whereby beam forming is accomplished with a large number of antenna elements that can receive any of several different true-time-delays from a single fiber using multi-channel optical heterodyne techniques. The system performance such as the signal-to-noise ratio, signal-to-interchannel interference ratio, and dynamic range (DR) for various modulation-demodulation schemes (i.e., AM, FM and PM) are quantitatively analyzed. An experimental system insensitive to laser linewidth and IF frequency instabilities is demonstrated for the first time. We demonstrate accurate true-time delay across the L band (from 0.8 to 1.5 GHz). The DR for one channel is 52 dB/MHz. For a narrow channel spacing of 1 A at 1.55 μm wavelength, the interchannel interference is <- 50dB. It is found that this system provides improved controllability over direct detection methods, and can meet the stringent requirements of modern high resolution microwave antenna systems. Monolithic photonic integration using vertical twin- waveguide (TG) structure based on a single-step MBE grown InP/InGaAsP material is also studied as a means for practically implementing large scale photonic systems such as the above system. Specifically, integration of a MQW laser with a passive waveguide is demonstrated in this material with a record high 45% light coupling. An InGaAs loss layer is introduced for the first time to ensure a constant laser feedback and output coupling by eliminating even mode propagation, while having little effect on the odd mode. Finally, we have investigated means to obtain high efficiency, high power semiconductor lasers for use in high DR, and high density RF-optical links, employing a 1.5 μm wavelength InGaAsP/InP separate confinement multi-quantum well structure with broadened waveguides. A record low internal loss of 1.3 cm -1 (compared to a previous value of 3.5 cm-1) and threshold current density of 73 A/cm2 per

  2. Note: Spectrometer with multichannel photon-counting detector for beam emission spectroscopy in magnetic fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Lizunov, A.; Khilchenko, A.; Khilchenko, V.; Kvashnin, A.; Zubarev, P.

    2015-12-15

    A spectrometer based on a linear array photomultiplier tube (PMT) has been developed and calibrated. A 0.635 m focal length Czerny-Turner monochromator combined with a coupling optics provides an image of a narrow 0.5 nm spectral range with a resolution of 0.015 nm/channel on a 32-anode PMT. The system aims at spectroscopy of D{sub α} or H{sub α} lines emitted by a diagnostic atomic beam in a plasma (primarily a motional Stark effect diagnostics). To record a low photon flux of ∼10{sup 6} s{sup −1} per channel with the time resolution of 100 μs, a pulse counting approach has been used. Wideband amplifiers scale single-electron pulses and transmit them to a digital data processing core hardwired in a programmable logic matrix. Calibrations have shown that the aberration-limited instrument function fits to a single detector channel of 1 mm width. Pilot results of passive measurements of D{sub α} light emission from the plasma confined in a magnetic trap are presented.

  3. Note: Spectrometer with multichannel photon-counting detector for beam emission spectroscopy in magnetic fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizunov, A.; Khilchenko, A.; Khilchenko, V.; Kvashnin, A.; Zubarev, P.

    2015-12-01

    A spectrometer based on a linear array photomultiplier tube (PMT) has been developed and calibrated. A 0.635 m focal length Czerny-Turner monochromator combined with a coupling optics provides an image of a narrow 0.5 nm spectral range with a resolution of 0.015 nm/channel on a 32-anode PMT. The system aims at spectroscopy of Dα or Hα lines emitted by a diagnostic atomic beam in a plasma (primarily a motional Stark effect diagnostics). To record a low photon flux of ˜106 s-1 per channel with the time resolution of 100 μs, a pulse counting approach has been used. Wideband amplifiers scale single-electron pulses and transmit them to a digital data processing core hardwired in a programmable logic matrix. Calibrations have shown that the aberration-limited instrument function fits to a single detector channel of 1 mm width. Pilot results of passive measurements of Dα light emission from the plasma confined in a magnetic trap are presented.

  4. Biperiodic nanostructured waveguides for wavelength-selectivity of hybrid photonic devices.

    PubMed

    Talneau, A; Pommarède, X; Itawi, A; Pantzas, K; Lupu, A; Benisty, H

    2015-11-15

    A biperiodic nanostructuration consisting of a super-periodicity added to a nanohole lattice of subwavelength pitch is demonstrated to provide both modal confinement and wavelength selectivity within a hybrid III-V on a silicon waveguide. The wavelength-selective behavior stems from finely tuned larger holes. Such biperiodic hybrid waveguides have been fabricated by oxide-free bonding III-V material on silicon and display well-defined stop bands. Such nanostructured waveguides offer the versatility for designing advanced optical functions within hybrid devices. Moreover, keeping the silicon waveguide surface planar, such nanostructured waveguides are compatible with electrical operation across the oxide-free hybrid interface.

  5. Growth and optical properties of CMOS-compatible silicon nanowires for photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guichard, Alex Richard

    Silicon (Si) is the dominant semiconductor material in both the microelectronic and photovoltaic industries. Despite its poor optical properties, Si is simply too abundant and useful to be completely abandoned in either industry. Since the initial discovery of efficient room temperature photoluminescence (PL) from porous Si and the following discoveries of PL and time-resolved optical gain from Si nanocrystals (Si-nc) in SiO2, many groups have studied the feasibility of making Si-based, CMOS-compatible electroluminescent devices and electrically pumped lasers. These studies have shown that for Si-ne sizes below about 10 nm, PL can be attributed to radiative recombination of confined excitons and quantum efficiencies can reach 90%. PL peak energies are blue-shifted from the bulk Si band edge of 1.1 eV due to the quantum confinement effect and PL decay lifetimes are on mus timescales. However, many unanswered questions still exist about both the ease of carrier injection and various non-radiative and loss mechanisms that are present. A potential alternative material system to porous Si and Si-nc is Si nanowires (SiNWs). In this thesis, I examine the optical properties of SiNWs with diameters in the range of 3-30 nm fabricated by a number of compound metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible fabrication techniques including Chemical Vapor Deposition on metal nanoparticle coated substrates, catalytic wet etching of bulk Si and top-down electron-beam lithographic patterning. Using thermal oxidation and etching, we can increase the degree of confinement in the SiNWs. I demonstrate PL peaked in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) wavelength ranges that is tunable by controlling the crystalline SiNW core diameter, which is measured with dark field and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. PL decay lifetimes of the SiNWs are on the order of 50 mus after proper surface passivation, which suggest that the PL is indeed from confined carriers in the SiNW cores

  6. Micro- and Nanostructured Materials for Active Devices and Molecular Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Peter M.; Graff, Gordon L.; Gross, Mark E.; Burrows, Paul E.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Mast, Eric S.; Hall, Michael G.; Bonham, Charles C.; Zumhoff, Mac R.; Williford, Rick E.

    2003-10-01

    Traditional single layer barrier coatings are not adequate in preventing degradation of the performance of organic molecular electronic and other active devices. Most advanced devices used in display technology now consist of micro and nanostructured small molecule, polymer and inorganic coatings with thin high reactive group 1A metals. This includes organic electronics such as organic light emitting devices (OLED). The lifetimes of these devices rapidly degrades when they are exposed to atmospheric oxygen and water vapor. Thin film photovoltaics and batteries are also susceptible to degradation by moisture and oxygen. Using in-line coating techniques we apply a composite nanostructured inorganic/polymer thin film barrier that restricts moisture and oxygen permeation to undetectable levels using conventional permeation test equipment. We describe permeation mechanisms for this encapsulation coating and flat panel display and other device applications. Permeation through the multilayer barrier coating is defect and pore limited and can be described by Knudsen diffusion involving a long and tortuous path. Device lifetime is also enhanced by the long lag times required to reach the steady state flux regime. Permeation rates in the range of 10-6 cc,g/m2/d have been achieved and OLED device lifetimes. The structure is robust, yet flexible. The resulting device performance and lifetimes will also be described. The barrier film can be capped with a thin film of transparent conductive oxide yielding an engineered nanostructured device for next generation, rugged, lightweight or flexible displays. This enables, for the first time, thin film encapsulation of emissive organic displays.

  7. Hybrid integration of laser source on silicon photonic integrated circuit for low-cost interferometry medical device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duperron, Matthieu; Carroll, Lee; Rensing, Marc; Collins, Sean; Zhao, Yan; Li, Yanlu; Baets, Roel; O'Brien, Peter

    2017-02-01

    The cost-effective integration of laser sources on Silicon Photonic Integrated Circuits (Si-PICs) is a key challenge to realizing the full potential of on-chip photonic solutions for telecommunication and medical applications. Hybrid integration can offer a route to high-yield solutions, using only known-good laser-chips, and simple freespace micro-optics to transport light from a discrete laser-diode to a grating-coupler on the Si-PIC. In this work, we describe a passively assembled micro-optical bench (MOB) for the hybrid integration of a 1550nm 20MHz linewidth laser-diode on a Si-PIC, developed for an on-chip interferometer based medical device. A dual-lens MOB design minimizes aberrations in the laser spot transported to the standard grating-coupler (15 μm x 12 μm) on the Si-PIC, and facilitates the inclusion of a sub-millimeter latched-garnet optical-isolator. The 20dB suppression from the isolator helps ensure the high-frequency stability of the laser-diode, while the high thermal conductivity of the AlN submount (300/W=m.°C), and the close integration of a micro-bead thermistor, ensure the stable and efficient thermo-electric cooling of the laser-diode, which helps minimise low-frequency drift during the approximately 15s of operation needed for the point-of-care measurement. The dual-lens MOB is compatible with cost-effective passively-aligned mass-production, and can be optimised for alternative PIC-based applications.

  8. Local observation and spectroscopy of optical modes in an active photonic-crystal microcavity.

    PubMed

    Louvion, N; Gérard, D; Mouette, J; de Fornel, F; Seassal, C; Letartre, X; Rahmani, A; Callard, S

    2005-03-25

    We report the direct, room-temperature, near-field mapping and spectroscopy of the optical modes of a photonic-crystal microcavity containing quantum wells. We use a near-field optical probe to reveal the imprint of the cavity mode structure on the quantum-well emission. Furthermore, near-field spectroscopy allows us to demonstrate the strong spatial and spectral dependence of the coupling between the sources and the microcavity. This knowledge will be essential in devising future nanophotonic devices.

  9. Active Mediation of Plasmon Enhanced Localized Exciton Generation, Carrier Diffusion and Enhanced Photon Emission.

    PubMed

    Haq, Sharmin; Addamane, Sadhvikas; Kafle, Bijesh; Huang, Danhong; Balakrishnan, Ganesh; Habteyes, Terefe G

    2017-04-13

    Understanding the enhancement of charge carrier generation and their diffusion is imperative for improving the efficiency of optoelectronic devices particularly infrared photodetectors that are less developed than their visible counterpart. Here, using gold nanorods as model plasmonic systems, InAs quantum dots (QDs) embedded in an InGaAs quantum well as an emitter, and GaAs as an active mediator of surface plasmons for enhancing carrier generation and photon emission, the distance dependence of energy transfer and carrier diffusion have been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Analysis of the QD emission enhancement as a function of distance reveals a Förster radius of 3.85 ± 0.15 nm, a near-field decay length of 4.8 ± 0.1 nm and an effective carrier diffusion length of 64.0 ± 3.0 nm. Theoretical study of the temporal-evolution of the electron-hole occupation number of the excited states of the QDs indicates that the emission enhancement trend is determined by the carrier diffusion and capture rates.

  10. Nanoscale Materials, Devices, and Systems for Chem.-Bio Sensors, Photonics, and Energy Generation and Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaseashta, A.

    A comprehensive overview of ongoing research efforts and future scientific directions in nanotechnology to develop materials, devices, and systems for potential use in environmental pollution monitoring and mitigation; energy generation and storage; and chemical-biological-radiological-nuclear sensing is presented. Applications of nanomaterials in development of biodegradable, high performance yet light weight and eco-friendly materials are presented to minimize power consumption, green-house gas emissions, and land-fill volume. Societal implications and concerns associated with nanotechnology are addressed by studying fate and transport and development of guidelines for a risk-assessment model. A roadmap of the future of nanomaterials, in-terms of complexity, nexus of disciplines, and emerging green nanotechnologies is presented.

  11. MAFL experiment: development of photonic devices for a space-based multiaperture fiber-linked interferometer.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Serge; Delage, Laurent; Reynaud, Francois; Collomb, Virginie; Trouillon, Michel; Grelin, Jerome; Schanen, Isabelle; Minier, Vincent; Broquin, Jean-Emmanuel; Ruilier, Cyril; Leone, Bruno

    2007-02-20

    We present a three-telescope space-based interferometer prototype dedicated to high-resolution imaging. This project, named multiaperture fiber-linked interferometer (MAFL), was founded by the European Space Agency. The aim of the MAFL project is to propose, design, and implement for the first time to the best of our knowledge all the optical functions required for the global instrument on the same integrated optics (IO) component for controlling a three-arm interferometer and to obtain reliable science data. The coherent transport from telescopes to the IO component is achieved by means of highly birefringent optical fiber. The laboratory bench is presented, and the results are reported allowing us to validate the optical potentiality of the IO component in this frame. The validation measurements consist of the throughput of this optical device, the performances of metrological servoloop, and the instrumental contrasts and phase closure of the science fringes.

  12. Thermo-optic coefficient of polyisobutylene ultrathin films measured with integrated photonic devices.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hong Seok; Neiroukh, Dania; Hunt, Heather K; Armani, Andrea M

    2012-01-10

    The optical properties of polymeric materials, such as transmission loss and the thermo-optic coefficient, determine their utility in numerous applications, ranging from nanotechnology to the automotive and aerospace industries. However, because of the wide variation in the physical properties of polymers, many are unsuited for characterization using conventional techniques; consequently, their optical properties are unknown. One such polymer is polyisobutylene, which is viscous at room temperature and therefore is not compatible with conventional transmission loss and the thermo-optic coefficient characterization techniques because they rely on contact measurements. To overcome this, we have developed an integrated, microscale optical sensor that relies on an evanescent wave to study the material's optical behavior. Using this device, we successfully determined the refractive index, the transmission loss, and the thermo-optic coefficient of ultrathin films of polyisobutylene. The films are deposited on the sensor's silica surface using either spin coating or surface-initiated cationic polymerization, demonstrating the flexibility of this approach.

  13. Photoconductivity of graphene devices induced by terahertz radiation at various photon energies

    SciTech Connect

    Salman, M.; Nachtwei, G.; Gouider, F.; Göthlich, M.; Friedemann, M.; Ahlers, F. J.; Schmidt, H.; Haug, R. J.

    2013-12-04

    The influence of a magnetic field on Landau levels (LLs) in graphene-based devices is described via the magneto-optical response induced by terahertz (THz) radiation. For single-layer graphene, the resonance energies of the transitions between the on Landau levels (LLs) such as L{sub 1}, L{sub 2} and L{sub 3} fit quite well to the terahertz spectral range at low magnetic fields. Also, the calculations for the terahertz photoresponse (photoconductivity) in the presence of low magnetic fields, the reported calculations for the scattering rate of LLs, recent and our experimental results of photoresponse measurements yield that single-layer graphene is suitable for the detection of terahertz radiation.

  14. Increasing physical activity with mobile devices: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Fanning, Jason; Mullen, Sean P; McAuley, Edward

    2012-11-21

    Regular physical activity has established physical and mental health benefits; however, merely one quarter of the U.S. adult population meets national physical activity recommendations. In an effort to engage individuals who do not meet these guidelines, researchers have utilized popular emerging technologies, including mobile devices (ie, personal digital assistants [PDAs], mobile phones). This study is the first to synthesize current research focused on the use of mobile devices for increasing physical activity. To conduct a meta-analysis of research utilizing mobile devices to influence physical activity behavior. The aims of this review were to: (1) examine the efficacy of mobile devices in the physical activity setting, (2) explore and discuss implementation of device features across studies, and (3) make recommendations for future intervention development. We searched electronic databases (PubMed, PsychINFO, SCOPUS) and identified publications through reference lists and requests to experts in the field of mobile health. Studies were included that provided original data and aimed to influence physical activity through dissemination or collection of intervention materials with a mobile device. Data were extracted to calculate effect sizes for individual studies, as were study descriptives. A random effects meta-analysis was conducted using the Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software suite. Study quality was assessed using the quality of execution portion of the Guide to Community Preventative Services data extraction form. Four studies were of "good" quality and seven of "fair" quality. In total, 1351 individuals participated in 11 unique studies from which 18 effects were extracted and synthesized, yielding an overall weight mean effect size of g = 0.54 (95% CI = 0.17 to 0.91, P = .01). Research utilizing mobile devices is gaining in popularity, and this study suggests that this platform is an effective means for influencing physical activity behavior. Our focus

  15. Active metameric security devices using an electrochromic material.

    PubMed

    Baloukas, Bill; Lamarre, Jean-Michel; Martinu, Ludvik

    2011-03-20

    In order to increase the anticounterfeiting performance of interference security image structures, we propose to implement an active component using an electrochromic material. This novel device, based on metamerism, offers the possibility of creating various surprising optical effects, it is more challenging to duplicate due to its complexity, and it adds a second level of authentication. By designing optical filters that match the bleached and colored states of the electrochromic device, one can obtain two hidden images-one appearing when the device is tilted, and the other one disappearing when the device is colored under an applied potential. Specifically, we present an example of a filter that is metameric with the colored state of the electrochromic device, demonstrate how the dynamic nature of the device offers more fabrication flexibility, and discuss its performance. We also describe a design methodology for metameric filters based on the luminous efficiency curve of the human eye: this approach results in filters with a lower number of layers and hence lower fabrication costs, and with a lower color difference sensitivity under various illuminants and for nonstandard observers.

  16. Charge balance and photon collection in polymer based ternary bulk heterojunction photovoltaic devices containing cadmium selenide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Eric D.; Smith, Gregory M.; Fu, Minglai; Adams, Richard D.; Coffin, Robert C.; Carroll, David L.

    2011-08-01

    Solar cells employing a ternary bulk heterojunction active layer comprised of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), 6,6-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) doped with composites constructed from a combination of 2.5 nm CdSe nanoparticles (NP), and methyl viologen (MV) have been examined. It was found that the devices containing the CdSe NP/MV composite exhibit significantly more photocurrent in a region surrounding the absorption peak of the particles (560-660 nm) when compared to pristine P3HT:PCBM devices. For a low ratio of CdSe to PCBM, the photocurrent collection was accompanied by space charge build up that limited the performance of the devices. When the ratio of CdSe to PCBM was raised, the space charge dissipated and performance recovered. JV curve shape analysis suggests that charge balance was achieved; however, electrode selectivity was reduced.

  17. Surface trimming of silicon photonics devices using controlled reactive ion etching chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandran, S.; Das, B. K.

    2015-06-01

    Surface trimming of rib waveguides fabricated in 5-μm SOI substrate has been carried out successfully without any significant increase of propagation losses. A reactive ion etching chemistry has been optimized for trimming and an empirical model has been developed to obtain the resulting waveguide geometries. This technique has been used to demonstrate smaller footprint devices like multimode interference based power splitters and ring resonators after defining them photolithographically with relatively large cross-section rib waveguides. We have been also successful to fabricate 2D tapered spot-size converter useful for monolithic integration of waveguides with varying heights and widths. The taper length is again precisely controlled by photolithographic definition. Minimum insertion loss of such a spot-size converter integrated between waveguides with 3-μm height difference has been recorded to be ∼2 dB. It has been also shown that the overall fiber-to-chip coupling loss can be reduced by >3 dB by using such spot-size converters at the input/output side of the waveguides.

  18. InSb-based quantum dot nanostructures for mid-infrared photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrington, P. J.; Repiso, E.; Lu, Q.; Fujita, H.; Marshall, A. R. J.; Zhuang, Q.; Krier, A.

    2016-09-01

    Novel InSb quantum dot (QD) nanostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) are investigated in order to improve the performance of light sources and detectors for the technologically important mid-infrared (2-5 μm) spectral range. Unlike the InAs/GaAs system which has a similar lattice mismatch, the growth of InSb/InAs QDs by MBE is a challenging task due to Sb segregation and surfactant effects. These problems can be overcome by using an Sb-As exchange growth technique to realize uniform, dense arrays (dot density 1012 cm-2) of extremely small (mean diameter 2.5 nm) InSb submonolayer QDs in InAs. Light emitting diodes (LEDs) containing ten layers of InSb QDs exhibit bright electroluminescence peaking at 3.8 μm at room temperature. These devices show superior temperature quenching compared with bulk and quantum well (QW) LEDs due to a reduction in Auger recombination. We also report the growth of InSb QDs in InAs/AlAsSb `W' QWs grown on GaSb substrates which are designed to increase the electron-hole (e-h) wavefunction overlap to 75%. These samples exhibit very good structural quality and photoluminescence peaking near 3.0 μm at low temperatures.

  19. Towards an optimum design of a P-MOS radiation detector for use in high-energy medical photon beams and neutron facilities: analysis of activation materials.

    PubMed

    Price, Robert A

    2005-01-01

    The behaviour of packaged and unpackaged ESAPMOS4 RadFET radiation detectors (NMRC Cork, Ireland) was investigated when used in the mixed photon and neutron environment of a medical linear accelerator operating above the nucleon separation energy and in a 14 MeV neutron field provided by a D-T generator. Within the uncertainty of the experimental set-up (4% at 95% confidence level) the unpackaged device was found to have essentially zero activation dose-burden whereas the packaged device exhibits a considerable degree of post irradiation absorbed dose due to deactivation radiation.

  20. Maleimide activation of photon upconverting nanoparticles for bioconjugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebherr, Raphaela B.; Soukka, Tero; Wolfbeis, Otto S.; Gorris, Hans H.

    2012-12-01

    Photon upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) have become an important new class of optical labels. Their unique property of emitting visible light after photo-excitation with near-infrared radiation enables biological imaging without background interference or cell damage. Biological applications require UCNPs that are dispersible in water and allow the attachment of biomolecules. Oleic acid-coated UCNPs obtained by solvothermal synthesis were functionalized with both hydrophilic PEG and thiol-reactive maleimides, either by ligand exchange or by silanization. Three different types of maleimide-functionalized UCNPs were prepared and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and Raman spectroscopy. Ligand exchange of oleic acid by maleimide-PEG-COOH yielded UCNPs that did not aggregate, were colloidally stable and reacted readily with proteins. Such luminescent labels are required for background-free imaging and many other bioanalytical applications.

  1. Active functional devices using parity-time symmetry optics (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brac de la Perriere, Vincent; Benisty, Henri; Ramdane, Abderrahim; Lupu, Anatole

    2017-05-01

    The progress of nanotechnologies has triggered the emergence of many photonic artificial structures: photonic crystals, metamaterials, plasmonic resonators. Recently the intriguing class of PT-symmetric devices, referring to Parity-Time symmetry [1] has attracted much attention. The characteristic feature of PT-symmetry is that the structures' refractive index profile is complex-valued due to the presence of alternating gain and loss regions in the system. Apart from fundamental research motivations, the tremendous interest in these artificial systems is strongly driven by the practical outcomes expected to foster a new generation of tunable, reconfigurable and non-reciprocal devices. The principle of gain-loss modulation lying in the heart of PT-symmetry optics enables a range of innovative solutions in the field of integrated optics at 1.5μm [2-7]. By using PT-symmetric coupled waveguides and Bragg reflectors as fundamental building blocks, it is possible to build a wide variety of functional optical devices. The PT-symmetry principle provides an alternative way for the realization of active devices that could become functional in a new platform for integrated optics. For instance one major bottleneck of the III-V/Si hybrid integration approach is that each type of active devices (laser, modulator, etc) requires a specific composition of III-V semiconductor alloy, involving a variety of (re)growth challenges. The advantage of the PT-symmetry solution is that the fabrication of all these devices can be done with a single stack of III-V semiconductor alloys that greatly simplifies the technological process. The aim of the current contribution is to provide a survey of the most promising applications of PT-symmetry in photonics with a particular emphases on the transition from theoretical concepts to experimental devices. The intention is to draw attention to the risks and issues related to the practical implementation that are most often overlooked in the basic

  2. Laser-activated shape memory polymer intravascular thrombectomy device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, Ward, IV; Wilson, Thomas S.; Benett, William J.; Loge, Jeffrey M.; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2005-10-01

    A blood clot (thrombus) that becomes lodged in the arterial network supplying the brain can cause an ischemic stroke, depriving the brain of oxygen and often resulting in permanent disability. As an alternative to conventional clot-dissolving drug treatment, we are developing an intravascular laser-activated therapeutic device using shape memory polymer (SMP) to mechanically retrieve the thrombus and restore blood flow to the brain. Thermal imaging and computer simulation were used to characterize the optical and photothermal behavior of the SMP microactuator. Deployment of the SMP device in an in vitro thrombotic vascular occlusion model demonstrated the clinical treatment concept.

  3. Impact of 6MV photon beam attenuation by carbon fiber couch and immobilization devices in IMRT planning and dose delivery.

    PubMed

    Munjal, R K; Negi, P S; Babu, A G; Sinha, S N; Anand, A K; Kataria, T

    2006-04-01

    Multiple fields in IMRT and optimization allow conformal dose to the target and reduced dose to the surroundings and the regions of interest. Thus we can escalate the dose to the target to achieve better tumor control with low morbidity. Orientation of multiple beams can be achieved by i) different gantry angles, ii) rotating patient's couch isocentrically. In doing so, one or more beam may pass through different materials like the treatment couch, immobilization cast fixation plate, head and neck rest or any other supportive device. Our observations for 6MV photon beam on PRIMUS-KXE2 with MED-TEC carbon fiber tabletop and 10 × 10 cm(2) field size reveals that the maximum dose attenuation by the couch was of the order of 2.96% from gantry angle 120-160°. Attenuation due to cast fixation base plate of PMMA alone was of the order of 5.8-10.55% at gantry angle between 0 and 90°. Attenuation due to carbon fiber base plate alone was 3.8-7.98%. Attenuation coefficient of carbon fiber and PMMA was evaluated and was of the order of 0.082 cm(-1) and 0.064 cm(-1) respectively. Most of the TPS are configured for direct beam incidence attenuation correction factors only. Whereas when the beam is obliquely incident on the couch, base plate, headrest and any other immobilization device get attenuated more than the direct beam incidence. The correction factors for oblique incidence beam attenuation are not configured in most of the commercially available treatment planning systems. Therefore, such high variations in dose delivery could lead to under-dosage to the target volume for treatments requiring multiple fields in IMRT and 3D-CRT and need to be corrected for monitor unit calculations.

  4. High-voltage integrated active quenching circuit for single photon count rate up to 80 Mcounts/s.

    PubMed

    Acconcia, Giulia; Rech, Ivan; Gulinatti, Angelo; Ghioni, Massimo

    2016-08-08

    Single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) have been subject to a fast improvement in recent years. In particular, custom technologies specifically developed to fabricate SPAD devices give the designer the freedom to pursue the best detector performance required by applications. A significant breakthrough in this field is represented by the recent introduction of a red enhanced SPAD (RE-SPAD) technology, capable of attaining a good photon detection efficiency in the near infrared range (e.g. 40% at a wavelength of 800 nm) while maintaining a remarkable timing resolution of about 100ps full width at half maximum. Being planar, the RE-SPAD custom technology opened the way to the development of SPAD arrays particularly suited for demanding applications in the field of life sciences. However, to achieve such excellent performance custom SPAD detectors must be operated with an external active quenching circuit (AQC) designed on purpose. Next steps toward the development of compact and practical multichannel systems will require a new generation of monolithically integrated AQC arrays. In this paper we present a new, fully integrated AQC fabricated in a high-voltage 0.18 µm CMOS technology able to provide quenching pulses up to 50 Volts with fast leading and trailing edges. Although specifically designed for optimal operation of RE-SPAD devices, the new AQC is quite versatile: it can be used with any SPAD detector, regardless its fabrication technology, reaching remarkable count rates up to 80 Mcounts/s and generating a photon detection pulse with a timing jitter as low as 119 ps full width at half maximum. The compact design of our circuit has been specifically laid out to make this IC a suitable building block for monolithically integrated AQC arrays.

  5. Development of a multi-frequency diffuse photon density wave device for the characterization of tissue damage at multiple depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, David; Weingarten, Michael S.; Neidrauer, Michael T.; Samuels, Joshua A.; Huneke, Richard B.; Kuzmin, Vladimir L.; Lewin, Peter A.; Zubkov, Leonid A.

    2014-02-01

    The ability to determine the depth and degree of cutaneous and subcutaneous tissue damage is critical for medical applications such as burns and pressure ulcers. The Diffuse Photon Density Wave (DPDW) methodology at near infrared wavelengths can be used to non-invasively measure the optical absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of tissue at depths of several millimeters. A multi-frequency DPDW system with one light source and one detector was constructed so that light is focused onto the tissue surface using an optical fiber and lens mounted to a digitally-controlled actuator which changes the distance between light source and detector. A variable RF generator enables the modulation frequency to be selected between 50 to 400MHz. The ability to digitally control both source-detector separation distance and modulation frequency allows for virtually unlimited number of data points, enabling precise selection of the volume and depth of tissue that will be characterized. Suspensions of Intralipid and india ink with known absorption and reduced scattering coefficients were used as optical phantoms to assess device accuracy. Solid silicon phantoms were formulated for stability testing. Standard deviations for amplitude and phase shift readings were found to be 0.9% and 0.2 degrees respectively, over a one hour period. The ability of the system to quantify tissue damage in vivo at multiple depths was tested in a porcine burn model.

  6. Fully reconfigurable photonic microwave transversal filter based on digital micromirror device and continuous-wave, incoherent supercontinuum source.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju Han; Chang, You Min; Han, Young-Geun; Lee, Sang Bae; Chung, Hae Yang

    2007-08-01

    The combined use of a programmable, digital micromirror device (DMD) and an ultrabroadband, cw, incoherent supercontinuum (SC) source is experimentally demonstrated to fully explore various aspects on the reconfiguration of a microwave filter transfer function by creating a range of multiwavelength optical filter shapes. Owing to both the unique characteristic of the DMD that an arbitrary optical filter shape can be readily produced and the ultrabroad bandwidth of the cw SC source that is 3 times larger than that of Er-amplified spontaneous emission, a multiwavelength optical beam pattern can be generated with a large number of wavelength filter taps apodized by an arbitrary amplitude window. Therefore various types of high-quality microwave filter can be readily achieved through the spectrum slicing-based photonic microwave transversal filter scheme. The experimental demonstration is performed in three aspects: the tuning of a filter resonance bandwidth at a fixed resonance frequency, filter resonance frequency tuning at a fixed resonance frequency, and flexible microwave filter shape reconstruction.

  7. Design and Demonstration of a Microbiaxial Optomechanical Device for Multiscale Characterization of Soft Biological Tissues with Two-Photon Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Joseph T.; Borowicz, Stacy M.; Rader, Jacob H.; Utzinger, Urs; Azhar, Mohamad; Vande Geest, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    The biomechanical response of tissues serves as a valuable marker in the prediction of disease and in understanding the related behavior of the body under various disease and age states. Alterations in the macroscopic biomechanical response of diseased tissues are well documented; however, a thorough understanding of the microstructural events that lead to these changes is poorly understood. In this article we introduce a novel microbiaxial optomechanical device that allows two-photon imaging techniques to be coupled with macromechanical stimulation in hydrated planar tissue specimens. This allows that the mechanical response of the microstructure can be quantified and related to the macroscopic response of the same tissue sample. This occurs without the need to fix tissue in strain states that could introduce a change in the microstructural configuration. We demonstrate the passive realignment of fibrous proteins under various types of loading, which demonstrates the ability of tissue microstructure to reinforce itself in periods of high stress. In addition, the collagen and elastin response of tissue during viscoelastic behavior is reported showing interstitial fluid movement and fiber realignment potentially responsible for the temporal behavior. We also demonstrate that nonhomogeneities in fiber strain exist over biaxial regions of assumed homogeneity. PMID:21226989

  8. On-chip photonic system using suspended p-n junction InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells device and multiple waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yongjin Zhu, Guixia; Gao, Xumin; Yang, Yongchao; Yuan, Jialei; Shi, Zheng; Zhu, Hongbo; Cai, Wei

    2016-04-18

    We propose, fabricate, and characterize the on-chip integration of suspended p-n junction InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) device and multiple waveguides on the same GaN-on-silicon platform. The integrated devices are fabricated via a wafer-level process and exhibit selectable functionalities for diverse applications. As the suspended p-n junction InGaN/GaN MQWs device operates under a light emitting diode (LED) mode, part of the light emission is confined and guided by the suspended waveguides. The in-plane propagation along the suspended waveguides is measured by a micro-transmittance setup. The on-chip data transmission is demonstrated for the proof-of-concept photonic integration. As the suspended p-n junction InGaN/GaN MQWs device operates under photodiode mode, the light is illuminated on the suspended waveguides with the aid of the micro-transmittance setup and, thus, coupled into the suspended waveguides. The guided light is finally sensed by the photodiode, and the induced photocurrent trace shows a distinct on/off switching performance. These experimental results indicate that the on-chip photonic integration is promising for the development of sophisticated integrated photonic circuits in the visible wavelength region.

  9. On-chip photonic system using suspended p-n junction InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells device and multiple waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongjin; Zhu, Guixia; Cai, Wei; Gao, Xumin; Yang, Yongchao; Yuan, Jialei; Shi, Zheng; Zhu, Hongbo

    2016-04-01

    We propose, fabricate, and characterize the on-chip integration of suspended p-n junction InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) device and multiple waveguides on the same GaN-on-silicon platform. The integrated devices are fabricated via a wafer-level process and exhibit selectable functionalities for diverse applications. As the suspended p-n junction InGaN/GaN MQWs device operates under a light emitting diode (LED) mode, part of the light emission is confined and guided by the suspended waveguides. The in-plane propagation along the suspended waveguides is measured by a micro-transmittance setup. The on-chip data transmission is demonstrated for the proof-of-concept photonic integration. As the suspended p-n junction InGaN/GaN MQWs device operates under photodiode mode, the light is illuminated on the suspended waveguides with the aid of the micro-transmittance setup and, thus, coupled into the suspended waveguides. The guided light is finally sensed by the photodiode, and the induced photocurrent trace shows a distinct on/off switching performance. These experimental results indicate that the on-chip photonic integration is promising for the development of sophisticated integrated photonic circuits in the visible wavelength region.

  10. Increasing physical activity through mobile device interventions: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Muntaner, Adrià; Vidal-Conti, Josep; Palou, Pere

    2016-09-01

    Physical inactivity is a health problem that affects people worldwide and has been identified as the fourth largest risk factor for overall mortality (contributing to 6% of deaths globally). Many researchers have tried to increase physical activity levels through traditional methods without much success. Thus, many researchers are turning to mobile technology as an emerging method for changing health behaviours. This systematic review sought to summarise and update the existing scientific literature on increasing physical activity through mobile device interventions, taking into account the methodological quality of the studies. The articles were identified by searching the PubMed, SCOPUS and SPORTDiscus databases for studies published between January 2003 and December 2013. Studies investigating efforts to increase physical activity through mobile phone or even personal digital assistant interventions were included. The search results allowed the inclusion of 11 studies that gave rise to 12 publications. Six of the articles included in this review reported significant increases in physical activity levels. The number of studies using mobile devices for interventions has increased exponentially in the last few years, but future investigations with better methodological quality are needed to draw stronger conclusions regarding how to increase physical activity through mobile device interventions. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. A novel micro-pulse laser active imaging method based on photon counting scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chenghao; Yin, Wenye; Miao, Zhuang; He, Wei-ji; Chen, Qian; Gu, Guo-Hua

    2013-12-01

    We present the use and characterization of a Single Photon Detector (SPD) for active micro-pulse laser imaging. Laser active imaging technology obtains the two dimensional (2D) intensity information of objects by using the active continuous or pulsed laser illumination and an image sensor array. The Maximum range of laser active imaging is limited by the performance of image sensor, whose noise can seriously lower the obtainable SNR and degrade the quality of the reconstructed image. This paper presents a photon counting scheme based micro-pulse laser active imaging method that utilizes the SPD as the receiver and the micro-pulsed laser as the source. In this case, SPD was used to detect the laser echo. By using repeated multi-cycle detection strategies, every detected photon event is treated as an independent measurement of laser echo and thus the intensity information of objects is acquired with the response possibility estimation of laser echo. We chose a Geiger-Mode Avalanche Photodiodes (GM-APD) based approach, extending the methods of micro-pulse laser active imaging. In our implement, the number of TTL pulses output from the GM-APD within the duration of the pixel dwell time was recorder by a LabView pre-programmed instrument and then the laser echo response possibility of GM-APD was established by Full Waveform Analysis algorithm. This approach combined remote imaging with single photon sensitivity and laser active imaging.

  12. Active quenching circuit for single-photon detection with Geiger mode avalanche photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Stipcević, Mario

    2009-03-20

    In this paper a novel construction of an active quenching circuit intended for single-photon detection is presented, along with a few original methods for its evaluation. The circuit has been combined with a standard avalanche photodiode C30902S to form a single-photon detector. This detector has a dead time of 39 ns, maximum random counting frequency of 14 MHz, small afterpulsing probability, an estimated peak detection efficiency of over 20%, and a dark count rate of less than 100 Hz. This simple and robust active quenching circuit can be built from off-the-shelf electronic components and is presented with the detailed schematic diagram.

  13. Advanced processing methods to introduce and preserve dipole orientation in organic electro-optic materials for next generation photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Su

    ) (PVP) and TOPAS as well as ferroelectric polymer poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE), 65/35 copolymer), which differ largely from the others in dielectric constant, conductivity and surface properties. The only common feature of them is that they all lowered the charge injection and leakage current for 1-2 orders during poling. On every buffer layer we tried, similar trend of stability enhancement is found. These results suggest that the observed temporal stability enhancement is indeed an effect from the abovementioned mechanism. Chapter 4 focuses on the development of an innovative new poling method, which utilizes pyroelectric effect instead of external power sources to overcome the limitations of conventional contact poling and corona poling. With careful theory assisted design, we developed a reliable protocol to efficiently introduce dipole orientation in organic E-O materials by heating and cooling them with detachable pyroelectric crystals. This new method can potentially improve the process adaptability of organic E-O materials in a variety of photonic devices. Large Pockels coefficients (up to 81 pm/V at 1.3 micron) have been successfully achieved in thin films poled using this method. The effective fields in these experiments are estimated to be around 0.5 to 0.9 MV/cm, which agree well with the electrostatics analysis using an idealized model. The same method is directly applied to surface modified hybrid polymer silicon slot waveguide ring-resonator modulators devices. A 25 pm/V tunability of resonance peak wavelength shift has been realized, which was higher than any reported results in similar devices. Chapter 5 discusses about the possible application of the pyroelectric poling in a multi-stack waveguide device architecture. A long-existing challenge to pole E-O polymer based photonic devices is how to effectively drop the poling voltage to the core layer, which is usually sandwiched between two dielectric claddings. In the past

  14. Advances in the theoretical understanding of photon upconversion in rare-earth activated nanophosphors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guokui

    2015-03-21

    Photon upconversion in rare earth activated phosphors involves multiple mechanisms of electronic transitions. Stepwise optical excitation, energy transfer, and various nonlinear and collective light-matter interaction processes act together to convert low-energy photons into short-wavelength light emission. Upconversion luminescence from nanomaterials exhibits additional size and surface dependencies. A fundamental understanding of the overall performance of an upconversion system requires basic theories on the spectroscopic properties of solids containing rare earth ions. This review article surveys the recent progress in the theoretical interpretations of the spectroscopic characteristics and luminescence dynamics of photon upconversion in rare earth activated phosphors. The primary aspects of upconversion processes, including energy level splitting, transition probability, line broadening, non-radiative relaxation and energy transfer, are covered with an emphasis on interpreting experimental observations. Theoretical models and methods for analyzing nano-phenomena in upconversion are introduced with detailed discussions on recently reported experimental results.

  15. Statistical analysis on activation and photo-bleaching of step-wise multi-photon activation fluorescence of melanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Zetong; Lai, Zhenhua; Zhang, Xi; Yin, Jihao; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2015-03-01

    Melanin is regarded as the most enigmatic pigments/biopolymers found in most organisms. We have shown previously that melanin goes through a step-wise multi-photon absorption process after the fluorescence has been activated with high laser intensity. No melanin step-wise multi-photon activation fluorescence (SMPAF) can be obtained without the activation process. The step-wise multi-photon activation fluorescence has been observed to require less laser power than what would be expected from a non-linear optical process. In this paper, we examined the power dependence of the activation process of melanin SMPAF at 830nm and 920nm wavelengths. We have conducted research using varying the laser power to activate the melanin in a point-scanning mode for multi-photon microscopy. We recorded the fluorescence signals and position. A sequence of experiments indicates the relationship of activation to power, energy and time so that we can optimize the power level. Also we explored regional analysis of melanin to study the spatial relationship in SMPAF and define three types of regions which exhibit differences in the activation process.

  16. Dissipative rogue waves induced by long-range chaotic multi-pulse interactions in a fiber laser with a topological insulator-deposited microfiber photonic device.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng; Cai, Ze-Rong; Hu, Song; Luo, Ai-Ping; Zhao, Chu-Jun; Zhang, Han; Xu, Wen-Cheng; Luo, Zhi-Chao

    2015-10-15

    We reported on the generation of dissipative rogue waves (DRWs) induced by long-range chaotic multi-pulse interactions in a fiber laser based on a topological insulator (TI)-deposited microfiber photonic device. By virtue of the simultaneous saturable absorption effect and high nonlinearity provided by the TI-deposited microfiber, a localized, chaotic multi-pulse wave packet with strong long-range nonlinear interactions could be obtained, which gives rise to the formation of DRWs. The results might enhance the understanding of DRWs in optical systems, and further demonstrated that the TI-deposited microfiber could be considered as an excellent photonic device with both saturable absorption and highly nonlinear effects for the application field of nonlinear optics.

  17. Effective in-device r33 of 735 pm/V on electro-optic polymer infiltrated silicon photonic crystal slot waveguides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolong; Lin, Che-Yun; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K-Y; Chen, Ray T

    2011-03-15

    We design and fabricate a 320 nm slot for an electro-optic (E-O) polymer infiltrated silicon photonic crystal waveguide. Because of the large slot width, the poling efficiency of the infiltrated E-O polymer (AJCKL1/amorphous polycarbonate) is significantly improved. When coupled with the slow light effect from the silicon photonic crystal waveguide, an effective in-device r(33) of 735 pm/V, which to our knowledge is a record high, is demonstrated, which is ten times higher than the E-O coefficient achieved in thin film material. Because of this ultrahigh E-O efficiency, the V(π)L of the device is only 0.44 V mm, which is to our knowledge the best result of all E-O polymer modulators.

  18. Calibration of Cherenkov detectors for monoenergetic photon imaging in active interrogation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, P. B.; Erickson, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    Active interrogation of cargo containers using monoenergetic photons offers a rapid and low-dose approach to search for shielded special nuclear materials. Cherenkov detectors can be used for imaging of the cargo provided that gamma ray energies used in interrogation are well resolved, as the case in 11B(d,n-γ)12C reaction resulting in 4.4 MeV and 15.1 MeV photons. While an array of Cherenkov threshold detectors reduces low energy background from scatter while providing the ability of high contrast transmission imaging, thus confirming the presence of high-Z materials, these detectors require a special approach to energy calibration due to the lack of resolution. In this paper, we discuss the utility of Cherenkov detectors for active interrogation with monoenergetic photons as well as the results of computational and experimental studies of their energy calibration. The results of the studies with sources emitting monoenergetic photons as well as complex gamma ray spectrum sources, for example 232Th, show that calibration is possible as long as the energies of photons of interest are distinct.

  19. Recirculating photonic filter: A wavelength-selective true-time-delay device for optically controlled phased array sensors and wavelength code-division multiple access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yegnanarayanan, Sivasubramaniam

    1999-10-01

    In this dissertation we propose a novel wavelength- selective photonic time-delay filter. This device consists of an optical phased-array waveguide grating in a recirculating feedback configuration: This all-optical tunable optical delay line device permits several novel applications in the optical processing of high frequency signals. The first application is as a true-time-delay generator for squint-free beam steering in optically-controlled microwave phased-array antennas where the optical carrier wavelength is used to select a desired time delay for the microwave signal. Time-delay beam steering ensure wide instantaneous bandwidth operation. The mapping of optical wavelength to the microwave beam direction permits a hardware compressive architecture for the optical control unit that can easily scale to large aperture antenna arrays. Prototype integrated optical chips consisting of optical filters and precision delay lines have demonstrated picosecond resolution time delays. Hybrid devices permit longer time-delays of several tens of nanoseconds through external fiber delay lines. Extension to optically controlled two-dimensional array beam steering using optical wavelength conversion between azimuth and elevation beam steering units is also explored. This overcomes optical/electrical/optical conversion losses in cascading individual beam steering units. A 2-element X-band optically controlled phased array transmitter is assembled in a compact test range to verify the wide bandwidth beam steering system. Such wavelength selective time delay filter devices can also transform optical pulses with wide spectral bandwidth into simultaneous wavelength and time coded waveforms. One application of such hybrid coded waveforms is in optical code-division multiple access (CDMA) communication. Their perfect delta-function autocorrelation and small cross-correlation properties result in significant improvements in the number of orthogonal codes and the number of simultaneous

  20. Multi-band terahertz active device with complementary metamaterial

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, Shen; Zhang, Yaxin Sun, Linlin; Sun, Han; Xu, Gaiqi; Zhao, Yuncheng; Yang, Ziqiang; Liang, Shixiong

    2015-09-28

    We describe a multi-band terahertz-active device using a composite structure made of complementary metamaterial and doped silicon that can be dynamically controlled. This special complementary metamaterial exhibits three resonances that produce three pass-bands. The pass-bands can be uniformly manipulated by exploiting the photoinduced characteristics of the doped silicon. Simulations were performed to analyze the magnetic field and surface current distributions. The simulation results agree well with experimental results obtained from terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. Using an 808-nm-wavelength laser beam, a modulation depth of up to 80% was obtained. In numerical simulations, we used a conductivity mode to characterize photoinduction. The development of multi-band terahertz-active devices has many potential applications, for example, in filters, modulators, switches, and sensors.

  1. Use of Activation Technique and MCNP Calculations for Measurement of Fast Neutron Spatial Distribution at the MJ Plasma Focus Device.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bienkowska, B.; Scholz, M.; Wincel, K.; Zaręba, B.

    2008-03-01

    In this paper Plasma-Focus (PF) neutron emission properties have been studied using Monte Carlo calculations for neutron and photon transport. A Thermal Neutron Scaling Factor as a function of angular position of silver activation detectors placed around MJ Plasma Focus (PF-1000) device has been calculated. Detector responses calculated for 2.5 MeV neutrons and neutrons produced by Am-Be calibration source have been obtained .The results have shown the detector response dependence on the kind of calibration neutron source and on local geometrical/structural characteristics of the PF-1000 devices. Thus the proper calibration procedure ought to be performed for correct measurement of neutron yield within Plasma-Focus devices.

  2. Optics of globular photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelik, V S

    2007-05-31

    The results of experimental and theoretical studies of the optical properties of globular photonic crystals - new physical objects having a crystal structure with the lattice period exceeding considerably the atomic size, are presented. As globular photonic crystals, artificial opal matrices consisting of close-packed silica globules of diameter {approx}200 nm were used. The reflection spectra of these objects characterising the parameters of photonic bands existing in these crystals in the visible spectral region are presented. The idealised models of the energy band structure of photonic crystals investigated in the review give analytic dispersion dependences for the group velocity and the effective photon mass in a globular photonic crystal. The characteristics of secondary emission excited in globular photonic crystals by monochromatic and broadband radiation are presented. The results of investigations of single-photon-excited delayed scattering of light observed in globular photonic crystals exposed to cw UV radiation and radiation from a repetitively pulsed copper vapour laser are presented. The possibilities of using globular photonic crystals as active media for lasing in different spectral regions are considered. It is proposed to use globular photonic crystals as sensitive sensors in optoelectronic devices for molecular analysis of organic and inorganic materials by the modern methods of laser spectroscopy. The results of experimental studies of spontaneous and stimulated globular scattering of light are discussed. The conditions for observing resonance and two-photon-excited delayed scattering of light are found. The possibility of accumulation and localisation of the laser radiation energy inside a globular photonic crystal is reported. (review)

  3. High-performance silicon photonics technology for telecommunications applications.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Koji; Tsuchizawa, Tai; Nishi, Hidetaka; Kou, Rai; Hiraki, Tatsurou; Takeda, Kotaro; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Yasuhiko; Wada, Kazumi; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi

    2014-04-01

    By way of a brief review of Si photonics technology, we show that significant improvements in device performance are necessary for practical telecommunications applications. In order to improve device performance in Si photonics, we have developed a Si-Ge-silica monolithic integration platform, on which compact Si-Ge-based modulators/detectors and silica-based high-performance wavelength filters are monolithically integrated. The platform features low-temperature silica film deposition, which cannot damage Si-Ge-based active devices. Using this platform, we have developed various integrated photonic devices for broadband telecommunications applications.

  4. Wireless device for activation of an underground shock wave absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikhradze, M.; Akhvlediani, I.; Bochorishvili, N.; Mataradze, E.

    2011-10-01

    The paper describes the mechanism and design of the wireless device for activation of energy absorber for localization of blast energy in underground openings. The statistics shows that the greatest share of accidents with fatal results associate with explosions in coal mines due to aero-methane and/or air-coal media explosion. The other significant problem is terrorist or accidental explosions in underground structures. At present there are different protective systems to reduce the blast energy. One of the main parts of protective Systems is blast Identification and Registration Module. The works conducted at G. Tsulukidze Mining Institute of Georgia enabled to construct the wireless system of explosion detection and mitigation of shock waves. The system is based on the constant control on overpressure. The experimental research continues to fulfill the system based on both threats, on the constant control on overpressure and flame parameters, especially in underground structures and coal mines. Reaching the threshold value of any of those parameters, the system immediately starts the activation. The absorber contains a pyrotechnic device ensuring the discharge of dispersed water. The operational parameters of wireless device and activation mechanisms of pyrotechnic element of shock wave absorber are discussed in the paper.

  5. Determining concentrations of elements with different reaction channels in photon activation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Z J; Okafor, K; Isa, S

    2017-09-01

    In photon activation, same element may be activated by the bremsstrahlung beam through different nuclear reaction channels and produce different radioisotopes. These radioisotopes follow their own decay schemes and generate characteristic gamma rays. This phenomenon usually is an interference in spectra analysis, but it also offers a theoretical feasibility to determine the concentration of one element through different reaction channels. To realize this theoretical feasibility, we conducted series of photon activation experiments with sample and reference of known concentrations. Irradiation of the samples and the references were conducted with electronic LINAC with different photon converters at a peak energy around 30MeV. Several elements and their corresponding reaction channels were chosen to validate this procedure. Calculations of PAA were based on the internal monitor method. Our results have confirmed the advantages of current PAA reaction channel selection, and show that it might be beneficial to calculate the concentration of same elements with different reaction channels in some certain occasions. N-values, which indicate the relative intensity of reaction channels, were calculated and compared with those values generated from the photon activation at the Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing in Germany (BAM). Results suggested that N values are impacted by several parameters of electron beam, and the design of electron-gamma converter may play a dominant role in determining N values. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Laser Welding Characterization of Kovar and Stainless Steel Alloys as Suitable Materials for Components of Photonic Devices Packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadhali, M. M. A.; Zainal, Saktioto J.; Munajat, Y.; Jalil, A.; Rahman, R.

    2010-03-01

    The weldability of Kovar and stainless steel alloys by Nd:YAG laser beam is studied through changing of some laser beam parameters. It has been found that there is a suitable interaction of the pulsed laser beam of low power laser pulse with both the two alloys. The change of thermophysical properties with absorbed energy from the laser pulse is discussed in this paper which reports the suitability of both Kovar and stainless steel 304 as the base materials for photonic devices packaging. We used laser weld system (LW4000S from Newport) which employs Nd:YAG laser system with two simultaneous beams output for packaging 980 nm high power laser module. Results of changing both laser spot weld width and penetration depth with changing both the pulse peak power density, pulse energy and pulse duration show that there are good linear relationships between laser pulse energy or peak power density and pulse duration with laser spot weld dimensions( both laser spot weld width and penetration depth). Therefore we concluded that there should be an optimization for both the pulse peak power and pulse duration to give a suitable aspect ratio (laser spot width to penetration depth) for achieving the desired welds with suitable penetration depth and small spot width. This is to reduce the heat affected zone (HAZ) which affects the sensitive optical components. An optimum value of the power density in the order of 105 w/cm2 found to be suitable to induce melting in the welded joints without vaporization. The desired ratio can also be optimized by changing the focus position on the target material as illustrated from our measurements. A theoretical model is developed to simulate the temperature distribution during the laser pulse heating and predict the penetration depth inside the material. Samples have been investigated using SEM with EDS. The metallographic measurements on the weld spot show a suitable weld yield with reasonable weld width to depth ratio.

  7. Laser Welding Characterization of Kovar and Stainless Steel Alloys as Suitable Materials for Components of Photonic Devices Packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Fadhali, M. M. A.; Zainal, Saktioto J.; Munajat, Y.; Jalil, A.; Rahman, R.

    2010-03-11

    The weldability of Kovar and stainless steel alloys by Nd:YAG laser beam is studied through changing of some laser beam parameters. It has been found that there is a suitable interaction of the pulsed laser beam of low power laser pulse with both the two alloys. The change of thermophysical properties with absorbed energy from the laser pulse is discussed in this paper which reports the suitability of both Kovar and stainless steel 304 as the base materials for photonic devices packaging. We used laser weld system (LW4000S from Newport) which employs Nd:YAG laser system with two simultaneous beams output for packaging 980 nm high power laser module. Results of changing both laser spot weld width and penetration depth with changing both the pulse peak power density, pulse energy and pulse duration show that there are good linear relationships between laser pulse energy or peak power density and pulse duration with laser spot weld dimensions( both laser spot weld width and penetration depth). Therefore we concluded that there should be an optimization for both the pulse peak power and pulse duration to give a suitable aspect ratio (laser spot width to penetration depth) for achieving the desired welds with suitable penetration depth and small spot width. This is to reduce the heat affected zone (HAZ) which affects the sensitive optical components. An optimum value of the power density in the order of 10{sup 5} w/cm{sup 2} found to be suitable to induce melting in the welded joints without vaporization. The desired ratio can also be optimized by changing the focus position on the target material as illustrated from our measurements. A theoretical model is developed to simulate the temperature distribution during the laser pulse heating and predict the penetration depth inside the material. Samples have been investigated using SEM with EDS. The metallographic measurements on the weld spot show a suitable weld yield with reasonable weld width to depth ratio.

  8. Thermo-mechanical analysis of fixed mask 1 for the Advanced Photon Source insertion device front ends

    SciTech Connect

    Nian, H.L.T.; Shu, D.; Sheng, I.C.A.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1993-10-01

    The first fixed mask (FM1) is one of the critical elements on the insertion device front ends of the beamlines at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) now under construction at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The heat flux from the APS undulators is enormous. For example, FM1 placed at a distance of 16 m from the Undulator A source will be subjected to 519 W/mm{sup 2} at normal incidence with a total power of 3.8 kW. Due to a high localized thermal gradient on this component, inclined geometry (1.5{degree}) is used in the design to spread the footprint of the x-ray beam. A box-cone-shape geometry was designed due to the limited space available in the front end. The box shape is a highly constrained geometry, which induces larger stress levels than would occur in a plate or a tube. In order to handle the expected higher stress and the stress concentration at the corners, a single Glidcop block (rather than copper) was used in the construction. The FM1 uses an enhanced heat transfer mechanism developed at Argonne National Laboratory, which increases the convective heat transfer coefficient to about 3 W/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}{degree}C with single-phase water as the coolant. The authors simulated the location of the x-ray beam in several places to cover the worst possible case. The maximum temperature (about 180{degree}C) occurs when the beam hits the center of horizontal surface. The maximum effective stress (about 313 MPa) occurs when the x-ray beam hits about the corners.

  9. Two-Photon Activation of p-Hydroxyphenacyl Phototriggers: Toward Spatially Controlled Release of Diethyl Phosphate and ATP.

    PubMed

    Houk, Amanda L; Givens, Richard S; Elles, Christopher G

    2016-03-31

    Two-photon activation of the p-hydroxyphenacyl (pHP) photoactivated protecting group is demonstrated for the first time using visible light at 550 nm from a pulsed laser. Broadband two-photon absorption measurements reveal a strong two-photon transition (>10 GM) near 4.5 eV that closely resembles the lowest-energy band at the same total excitation energy in the one-photon absorption spectrum of the pHP chromophore. The polarization dependence of the two-photon absorption band is consistent with excitation to the same S3 ((1)ππ*) excited state for both one- and two-photon activation. Monitoring the progress of the uncaging reaction under nonresonant excitation at 550 nm confirms a quadratic intensity dependence and that two-photon activation of the uncaging reaction is possible using visible light in the range 500-620 nm. Deprotonation of the pHP chromophore under mildly basic conditions shifts the absorption band to lower energy (3.8 eV) in both the one- and two-photon absorption spectra, suggesting that two-photon activation of the pHP chromophore may be possible using light in the range 550-720 nm. The results of these measurements open the possibility of spatially and temporally selective release of biologically active compounds from the pHP protecting group using visible light from a pulsed laser.

  10. A BODIPY-based two-photon fluorescent probe validates tyrosinase activity in live cells.

    PubMed

    Naidu Bobba, Kondapa; Won, Miae; Shim, Inseob; Velusamy, Nithya; Yang, Zhigang; Qu, Junle; Kim, Jong Seung; Bhuniya, Sankarprasad

    2017-10-10

    Herein, we report rational design, synthesis, and application of a two-photon fluorescent probe (Tyro-1) for tracking intracellular tyrosinase activity. The chemoselective detection of tyrosinase is precluded from interference of other competitive omnipresent oxidizing entities in cellular milieu. The probe showed 12.5-fold fluorescence enhancement at λem = 450 nm in the presence of tyrosinase. The nontoxic probe Tyro-1 provides information about H2O2-mediated upregulation of tyrosinase through cellular imaging. Its two-photon imaging ability makes it a noninvasive tool for validating the expression of tyrosinase in the live cells.

  11. Simultaneous two-photon activation of type-I photodynamic therapy agents.

    PubMed

    Fisher, W G; Partridge, W P; Dees, C; Wachter, E A

    1997-08-01

    The excitation and emission properties of several psoralen derivatives are compared using conventional single-photon excitation and simultaneous two-photon excitation (TPE). Two-photon excitation is effected using the output of a mode-locked titanium: sapphire laser, the near infrared output of which is used to promote nonresonant TPE directly. Specifically, the excitation spectra and excited-state properties of 8-methoxypsoralen and 4'-aminomethyl-4,5,8-trimethylpsoralen are shown to be equivalent using both modes of excitation. Further, in vitro feasibility of two-photon photodynamic therapy (PDT) is demonstrated using Salmonella typhimurium. Two-photon excitation may be beneficial in the practice of PDT because it would allow replacement of visible or UV excitation light with highly penetrating, nondamaging near infrared light and could provide a means for improving localization of therapy. Comparison of possible laser excitation sources for PDT reveals the titanium: sapphire laser to be exceptionally well suited for nonlinear excitation of PDT agents in biological systems due to its extremely short pulse width and high repetition rate that together provide efficient PDT activation and greatly reduced potential for biological damage.

  12. Activation of snap-top capped mesoporous silica nanocontainers using two near-infrared photons.

    PubMed

    Guardado-Alvarez, Tania M; Sudha Devi, Lekshmi; Russell, Melissa M; Schwartz, Benjamin J; Zink, Jeffrey I

    2013-09-25

    Photoactivation of "snap-top" stoppers over the pore openings of mesoporous silica nanoparticles releases intact cargo molecules from the pores. The on-command release can be stimulated by either one UV photon or two coherent near-IR photons. Two-photon activation is particularly desirable for use in biological systems because it enables good tissue penetration and precise spatial control. Stoppers were assembled by first binding photolabile coumarin-based molecules to the nanoparticle surface. Then, after the particles were loaded with cargo, bulky β-cyclodextrin (CD) molecules were noncovalently associated with the substituted coumarin molecule, blocking the pores and preventing the cargo from escaping. One-photon excitation at 376 nm or two-photon excitation at 800 nm cleaves the bond holding the coumarin to the nanopore, releasing both the CD cap and the cargo. The dynamics of both the cleavage of the cap and the cargo release was monitored using fluorescence spectroscopy. This system traps intact cargo molecules without the necessity of chemical modification, releases them with tissue-penetrating near-IR light, and has possible applications in photostimulated drug delivery.

  13. Air surface microdischarge-photon synergy in antibacterial plasma-activated water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, David; Pavlovich, Mathew; Chang, Hung-Wen; Sakiyama, Yuki; Clark, Douglas

    2013-09-01

    We show that the antibacterial effects of air plasma on water can be amplified by synergy with ultraviolet (UV) photons. We use the surface microdischarge configuration (SMD) in atmospheric air adjacent to bacteria-laden water coupled with UVA (360 nm) photons from a light emitting diode (LED) to demonstrate this synergy. Air SMD, especially if operated in a confined space, can operate in different modes: low power mode (<0.1 W/cm2) generates primarily O3 whereas higher powers generate mainly nitrogen oxides; we focus here on the latter. The nitrogen oxide mode creates a powerful antibacterial mixture in water, including NO2-, NO3- and H2O2. Although these species alone can be strongly antibacterial, especially at low pH, we show that addition of UVA photons greatly amplifies the antibacterial effect. We first measured log reductions with only photons and then only plasma. Only when UVA exposes water after plasma does the synergy appear. Synergy appears to be due to UVA photolysis of plasma-generated NO2- to form NO and OH. We conclude that combining plasma-generated chemical species with activating photons can amplify and strengthen plasma effectiveness in many biological and other applications. Supported by Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Science Plasma Science Center.

  14. Photon-axion mixing within the jets of active galactic nuclei and prospects for detection

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.; Chadwick, P.M. E-mail: p.m.chadwick@durham.ac.uk

    2014-10-01

    Very high energy γ-ray observations of distant active galactic nuclei (AGN) generally result in higher fluxes and harder spectra than expected, resulting in some tension with the level of the extragalactic background light (EBL). If hypothetical axions or axion-like particles (ALPs) were to exist, this tension could be relieved since the oscillation of photons to ALPs would mitigate the effects of EBL absorption and lead to softer inferred intrinsic AGN spectra. In this paper we consider the effect of photon-ALP mixing on observed spectra, including the photon-ALP mixing that would occur within AGN jets. We then simulate observations of three AGN with the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), a next generation γ-ray telescope, to determine its prospects for detecting the signatures of photon-ALP mixing on the spectra. We conclude that prospects for CTA detecting these signatures or else setting limits on the ALP parameter space are quite promising. We find that prospects are improved if photon-ALP mixing within the jet is properly considered and that the best target for observations is PKS 2155-304.

  15. Sub-Shot-Noise Transmission Measurement Enabled by Active Feed-Forward of Heralded Single Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabines-Chesterking, J.; Whittaker, R.; Joshi, S. K.; Birchall, P. M.; Moreau, P. A.; McMillan, A.; Cable, H. V.; O'Brien, J. L.; Rarity, J. G.; Matthews, J. C. F.

    2017-07-01

    Harnessing the unique properties of quantum mechanics offers the possibility of delivering alternative technologies that can fundamentally outperform their classical counterparts. These technologies deliver advantages only when components operate with performance beyond specific thresholds. For optical quantum metrology, the biggest challenge that impacts on performance thresholds is optical loss. Here, we demonstrate how including an optical delay and an optical switch in a feed-forward configuration with a stable and efficient correlated photon-pair source reduces the detector efficiency required to enable quantum-enhanced sensing down to the detection level of single photons and without postselection. When the switch is active, we observe a factor of improvement in precision of 1.27 for transmission measurement on a per-input-photon basis compared to the performance of a laser emitting an ideal coherent state and measured with the same detection efficiency as our setup. When the switch is inoperative, we observe no quantum advantage.

  16. Light-induced self-assembly of active rectification devices

    PubMed Central

    Stenhammar, Joakim; Wittkowski, Raphael; Marenduzzo, Davide; Cates, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Self-propelled colloidal objects, such as motile bacteria or synthetic microswimmers, have microscopically irreversible individual dynamics—a feature they share with all living systems. The incoherent behavior of individual swimmers can be harnessed (or “rectified”) by microfluidic devices that create systematic motions that are impossible in equilibrium. We present a computational proof-of-concept study showing that such active rectification devices could be created directly from an unstructured “primordial soup” of light-controlled motile particles, solely by using spatially modulated illumination to control their local propulsion speed. Alongside both microscopic irreversibility and speed modulation, our mechanism requires spatial symmetry breaking, such as a chevron light pattern, and strong interactions between particles, such as volume exclusion, which cause a collisional slowdown at high density. Together, we show how these four factors create a novel, many-body rectification mechanism. Our work suggests that standard spatial light modulator technology might allow the programmable, light-induced self-assembly of active rectification devices from an unstructured particle bath. PMID:27051883

  17. Light-induced self-assembly of active rectification devices.

    PubMed

    Stenhammar, Joakim; Wittkowski, Raphael; Marenduzzo, Davide; Cates, Michael E

    2016-04-01

    Self-propelled colloidal objects, such as motile bacteria or synthetic microswimmers, have microscopically irreversible individual dynamics-a feature they share with all living systems. The incoherent behavior of individual swimmers can be harnessed (or "rectified") by microfluidic devices that create systematic motions that are impossible in equilibrium. We present a computational proof-of-concept study showing that such active rectification devices could be created directly from an unstructured "primordial soup" of light-controlled motile particles, solely by using spatially modulated illumination to control their local propulsion speed. Alongside both microscopic irreversibility and speed modulation, our mechanism requires spatial symmetry breaking, such as a chevron light pattern, and strong interactions between particles, such as volume exclusion, which cause a collisional slowdown at high density. Together, we show how these four factors create a novel, many-body rectification mechanism. Our work suggests that standard spatial light modulator technology might allow the programmable, light-induced self-assembly of active rectification devices from an unstructured particle bath.

  18. A microfluidic paper-based device to assess acetylcholinesterase activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunye; Gomez, Frank A

    2017-04-01

    Neurotransmitters play key roles in cell-to-cell communication. These chemical messengers are involved in many functional processes, including growth, reproduction, memory, and behavior. In this communication, we describe a novel microfluidic paper-based analytical device (μPAD) to detect acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and inhibitor screening through a colorimetric analysis. The μPAD is easily fabricated via a wax printing process whereby wax is deposited onto the surface of chromatographic paper, and heated to create a hydrophobic barrier. Separate solutions of 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) and samples containing AChE and acetylthiocholine iodide (ATC) (or cysteine, Cys), respectively, are directly spotted onto the μPAD. DTNB and AChE/ATC (or Cys) flow towards each other where a reaction occurs to form the yellow colored 2-nitro-5-thiobenzoic acid anion (TNB(2-) ). The device is dried, scanned, and analyzed yielding a linear range of average inverse yellow intensities versus substrate concentration. An IC50 value (0.045 nM) with a known inhibitor, neostigmine bromide (NB), is obtained on the device. μPADs are low cost and easy to fabricate and have great potential to quantify neurotransmitter activity.

  19. Monolithic integration of microelectronics and photonics using molecularly engineered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubacki, Ronald M.

    2005-03-01

    The monolithic integration of CMOS microelectronics with photonics is inevitable and benefits both technologies. Photonic integration to microelectronics provides such solutions as overcoming microprocessor communication roadblocks through the use of optical interconnection. Microelectronic integration can provide benefits to photonic structures by optimizing electronic signals generated by photonic biosensors for example. Photonic integration must complement, build on, and enhance the existing state of CMOS microelectronic technology. Photonic approaches that ignore the realities of CMOS architectures (such as power and thermal limitations), provide little benefit to the CMOS device performance, are incompatible with CMOS silicon manufacturing processes, or are incapable of achieving levels of long term reliability already well demonstrated by microelectronic devices, give little reason for photonic/microelectronic integration. Practical implementation of photonics on chip, monolithically with CMOS type microelectronic devices, remains in the laboratory. This work presents architectures to integrate photonics and microelectronics that address CMOS fabrication realities, increase performance of both the electronic and optical functions, and retain current levels of reliability. Fabricating these structures with the limited CMOS material set and/or typical photonic materials requires materials to be molecularly engineered to provide required properties. Materials have been investigated that enable economic fabrication of photonic structures for monolithic integration. Low loss self assembled silicon nanocomposite VIPIR waveguide structures are combined with long term stable non-linear poled polymers for fabrication of electro-optic active devices. Materials are fabricated using low temperature plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD).

  20. Optomechanical photon shuttling between photonic cavities.

    PubMed

    Li, Huan; Li, Mo

    2014-11-01

    Mechanical motion of photonic devices driven by optical forces provides a profound means of coupling between optical fields. The current focus of these optomechanical effects has been on cavity optomechanics systems in which co-localized optical and mechanical modes interact strongly to enable wave mixing between photons and phonons, and backaction cooling of mechanical modes. Alternatively, extended mechanical modes can also induce strong non-local effects on propagating optical fields or multiple localized optical modes at distances. Here, we demonstrate a multicavity optomechanical device in which torsional optomechanical motion can shuttle photons between two photonic crystal nanocavities. The resonance frequencies of the two cavities, one on each side of this 'photon see-saw', are modulated antisymmetrically by the device's rotation. Pumping photons into one cavity excites optomechanical self-oscillation, which strongly modulates the inter-cavity coupling and shuttles photons to the other empty cavity during every oscillation cycle in a well-regulated fashion.

  1. Integration of active devices on smart polymers for neural interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avendano-Bolivar, Adrian Emmanuel

    The increasing ability to ever more precisely identify and measure neural interactions and other phenomena in the central and peripheral nervous systems is revolutionizing our understanding of the human body and brain. To facilitate further understanding, more sophisticated neural devices, perhaps using microelectronics processing, must be fabricated. Materials often used in these neural interfaces, while compatible with these fabrication processes, are not optimized for long-term use in the body and are often orders of magnitude stiffer than the tissue with which they interact. Using the smart polymer substrates described in this work, suitability for processing as well as chronic implantation is demonstrated. We explore how to integrate reliable circuitry onto these flexible, biocompatible substrates that can withstand the aggressive environment of the body. To increase the capabilities of these devices beyond individual channel sensing and stimulation, active electronics must also be included onto our systems. In order to add this functionality to these substrates and explore the limits of these devices, we developed a process to fabricate single organic thin film transistors with mobilities up to 0.4 cm2/Vs and threshold voltages close to 0V. A process for fabricating organic light emitting diodes on flexible substrates is also addressed. We have set a foundation and demonstrated initial feasibility for integrating multiple transistors onto thin-film flexible devices to create new applications, such as matrix addressable functionalized electrodes and organic light emitting diodes. A brief description on how to integrate waveguides for their use in optogenetics is addressed. We have built understanding about device constraints on mechanical, electrical and in vivo reliability and how various conditions affect the electronics' lifetime. We use a bi-layer gate dielectric using an inorganic material such as HfO 2 combined with organic Parylene-c. A study of

  2. Toxin activity assays, devices, methods and systems therefor

    DOEpatents

    Koh, Chung-Yan; Schaff, Ulrich Y.; Sommer, Gregory Jon

    2016-04-05

    Embodiments of the present invention are directed toward devices, system and method for conducting toxin activity assay using sedimentation. The toxin activity assay may include generating complexes which bind to a plurality of beads in a fluid sample. The complexes may include a target toxin and a labeling agent, or may be generated due to presence of active target toxin and/or labeling agent designed to be incorporated into complexes responsive to the presence of target active toxin. The plurality of beads including the complexes may be transported through a density media, wherein the density media has a lower density than a density of the beads and higher than a density of the fluid sample, and wherein the transporting occurs, at least in part, by sedimentation. Signal may be detected from the labeling agents of the complexes.

  3. Hybrid Integrated Platforms for Silicon Photonics

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Di; Roelkens, Gunther; Baets, Roel; Bowers, John E.

    2010-01-01

    A review of recent progress in hybrid integrated platforms for silicon photonics is presented. Integration of III-V semiconductors onto silicon-on-insulator substrates based on two different bonding techniques is compared, one comprising only inorganic materials, the other technique using an organic bonding agent. Issues such as bonding process and mechanism, bonding strength, uniformity, wafer surface requirement, and stress distribution are studied in detail. The application in silicon photonics to realize high-performance active and passive photonic devices on low-cost silicon wafers is discussed. Hybrid integration is believed to be a promising technology in a variety of applications of silicon photonics.

  4. Photonic crystal slab quantum well infrared photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalchmair, S.; Detz, H.; Cole, G. D.; Andrews, A. M.; Klang, P.; Nobile, M.; Gansch, R.; Ostermaier, C.; Schrenk, W.; Strasser, G.

    2011-01-01

    In this letter we present a quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP), which is fabricated as a photonic crystal slab (PCS). With the PCS it is possible to enhance the absorption efficiency by increasing photon lifetime in the detector active region. To understand the optical properties of the device we simulate the PCS photonic band structure, which differs significantly from a real two-dimensional photonic crystal. By fabricating a PCS-QWIP with 100x less quantum well doping, compared to a standard QWIP, we are able to see strong absorption enhancement and sharp resonance peaks up to temperatures of 170 K.

  5. Printable Integrated Photonic Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-16

    for visible light, a material with both a high refractive index (n) and low extinction coefficient (k) in the visible range is required. High...refractive index ensures tighter confinement of the optical mode in the patterned medium, and a smaller footprint, while a low extinction coefficient is

  6. Selectively lighting up two-photon photodynamic activity in mitochondria with AIE-active iridium(iii) complexes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiangping; Jin, Chengzhi; Yuan, Bo; Liu, Xingguo; Chen, Yu; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2017-02-07

    Herein a series of mitochondria-targeted AIE (aggregation-induced emission)-active Ir(iii) complexes were designed to selectively exert one-/two-photon photodynamic activities in mitochondria to address the issues which current PDT are confronted with (i.e., shallow penetration depth of routinely used irradiation; systematic toxicity associated with effective drug concentration; concentration-quenched photodynamic activity at the target, etc.).

  7. Transmissive liquid-crystal device for correcting primary coma aberration and astigmatism in biospecimen in two-photon excitation laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Ayano; Hibi, Terumasa; Ipponjima, Sari; Matsumoto, Kenji; Yokoyama, Masafumi; Kurihara, Makoto; Hashimoto, Nobuyuki; Nemoto, Tomomi

    2016-12-01

    All aberrations produced inside a biospecimen can degrade the quality of a three-dimensional image in two-photon excitation laser scanning microscopy. Previously, we developed a transmissive liquid-crystal device to correct spherical aberrations that improved the image quality of a fixed-mouse-brain slice treated with an optical clearing reagent. In this study, we developed a transmissive device that corrects primary coma aberration and astigmatism. The motivation for this study is that asymmetric aberration can be induced by the shape of a biospecimen and/or by a complicated refractive-index distribution in a sample; this can considerably degrade optical performance even near the sample surface. The device's performance was evaluated by observing fluorescence beads. The device was inserted between the objective lens and microscope revolver and succeeded in improving the spatial resolution and fluorescence signal of a bead image that was originally degraded by asymmetric aberration. Finally, we implemented the device for observing a fixed whole mouse brain with a sloping surface shape and complicated internal refractive-index distribution. The correction with the device improved the spatial resolution and increased the fluorescence signal by ˜2.4×. The device can provide a simple approach to acquiring higher-quality images of biospecimens.

  8. Photon Activation Analysis—An Analytical Application Of High-Energy Electron Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segebade, Christian R.; Goerner, Wolf

    2009-03-01

    Photon activation analysis (PAA) was introduced about contemporarily with the other activation analysis methods (neutron, NAA, and charged particle activation, CPAA). Nonetheless, for different reasons, PAA has been applied less frequently than the other techniques mentioned. The incident photon energy should exceed about 12 MeV (except in some special rare applications) so as to obtain appreciably high activity yields of the product nuclides. Thus, cyclic electron accelerators (LINACs or microtrons) are used for activation preferably. The predominant photonuclear reaction is of the (γ,n)-type. Thus, normally neutron-deficient nuclides are produced. These usually emit gamma rays, annihilation quanta and characteristic X-ray fluorescence, all of whom can be used for analytical evaluation. The spectrometry equipment is the same as used for the other activation techniques (semiconductor detectors, sodium iodide crystals in coincidence geometry). Being uncharged high energy photons have a large penetration power, thus do not suffer from strong matrix absorption. Although not having a detection power as large as in NAA (in the most cases), PAA offers several further convincing advantages, e.g. several elements not or hardly detectable by NAA can be analysed: Titanium, nickel, thallium, lead, bismuth and, in particular, the light elements carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, fluorine, phosphorus. Several typical applications will be described.

  9. The Use of Multiple Slate Devices to Support Active Reading Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Nicholas Yen-Cherng

    2012-01-01

    Reading activities in the classroom and workplace occur predominantly on paper. Since existing electronic devices do not support these reading activities as well as paper, users have difficulty taking full advantage of the affordances of electronic documents. This dissertation makes three main contributions toward supporting active reading…

  10. The Use of Multiple Slate Devices to Support Active Reading Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Nicholas Yen-Cherng

    2012-01-01

    Reading activities in the classroom and workplace occur predominantly on paper. Since existing electronic devices do not support these reading activities as well as paper, users have difficulty taking full advantage of the affordances of electronic documents. This dissertation makes three main contributions toward supporting active reading…

  11. Active fiber optic technologies used as tamper-indicating devices

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, P.R.V.; Waddoups, I.G.

    1995-11-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Safeguards and Seals Evaluation Program is evaluating new fiber optic active seal technologies for use at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The goal of the program is to investigate active seal technologies that can monitor secured containers storing special nuclear materials (SNM) within DOE vaults. Specifically investigated were active seal technologies that can be used as tamper-indicating devices to monitor secured containers within vaults while personnel remain outside the vault area. Such a system would allow minimal access into vaults while ensuring container content accountability. The purpose of this report is to discuss tamper-indicating devices that were evaluated for possible DOE use. While previous seal evaluations (Phase I and II) considered overall facility applications, this discussion focuses specifically on their use in vault storage situations. The report will highlight general background information, specifications and requirements, and test procedures. Also discussed are the systems available from four manufacturers: Interactive Technologies, Inc., Fiber SenSys, Inc., Inovonics, Inc., and Valve Security Systems.

  12. Active control of excessive sound emission on a mobile device.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Se-Woon; Youn, Dae Hee; Park, Young-cheol; Lee, Gun-Woo

    2015-04-01

    During a phone conversation, loud vocal emission from the far-end to the near-end space can disturb nearby people. In this paper, the possibility of actively controlling such unwanted sound emission using a control source placed on the mobile device is investigated. Two different approaches are tested: Global control, minimizing the potential energy measured along a volumetric space surface, and local control, minimizing the squared sound pressure at a discrete point on the phone. From the test results, both approaches can reduce the unwanted sound emission by more than 6 dB in the frequency range up to 2 kHz.

  13. Device for measuring oxygen activity in liquid sodium

    DOEpatents

    Roy, P.; Young, R.S.

    1973-12-01

    A composite ceramic electrolyte in a configuration (such as a closed end tube or a plate) suitable to separate liquid sodium from a reference electrode with a high impedance voltmeter connected to measure EMF between the sodium and the reference electrode as a measure of oxygen activity in the sodium is described. The composite electrolyte consists of zirconiacalcia with a bonded layer of thoria-yttria. The device is used with a gaseous reference electrode on the zirconia-calcia side and liquid sodium on the thoria-yttria side of the electrolyte. (Official Gazette)

  14. Infrared micro-thermography of an actively heated preconcentrator device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furstenberg, Robert; Kendziora, C. A.; Stepnowski, Stanley V.; Mott, David R.; McGill, R. Andrew

    2008-03-01

    We report infrared micro-thermography measurements and analysis of static and transient temperature maps of an actively heated micro-fabricated preconcentrator device that incorporates a dual serpentine platinum heater trace deposited on a perforated polyimide membrane and suspended over a silicon frame. The sorbent coated perforated membrane is used to collect vapors and gases that flow through the preconcentrator. After heating, a concentrated pulse of analyte is released into the detector. Due to its small thermal mass, precise thermal management of the preconcentrator is critical to its performance. The sizes of features, the semi-transparent membrane, the need to flow air through the device, and changes in surface emissivity on a micron scale present many challenges for traditional infrared micro-thermography. We report an improved experimental test-bed. The hardware incorporates a custom-designed miniature calibration oven which, in conjunction with spatial filtering and a simple calibration algorithm, allows accurate temperature maps to be obtained. The test-bed incorporates a micro-bolometer array as the infrared imager. Instrumentation design, calibration and image processing algorithms are discussed and analyzed. The procedure does not require prior knowledge of the emissivity. We show that relatively inexpensive uncooled bolometers arrays can be used in certain radiometric applications. Heating profiles were examined with both uniform and non-uniform air flow through the device. The conclusions from this study provide critical information for optimal integration of the preconcentrator within a detection system, and in the design of the heater trace layout to achieve a more even temperature distribution across the device.

  15. Precise Spatiotemporal Control of Optogenetic Activation Using an Acousto-Optic Device

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yanmeng; Song, Peipei; Zhang, Xiaohui; Zeng, Shaoqun; Wang, Zuoren

    2011-01-01

    Light activation and inactivation of neurons by optogenetic techniques has emerged as an important tool for studying neural circuit function. To achieve a high resolution, new methods are being developed to selectively manipulate the activity of individual neurons. Here, we report that the combination of an acousto-optic device (AOD) and single-photon laser was used to achieve rapid and precise spatiotemporal control of light stimulation at multiple points in a neural circuit with millisecond time resolution. The performance of this system in activating ChIEF expressed on HEK 293 cells as well as cultured neurons was first evaluated, and the laser stimulation patterns were optimized. Next, the spatiotemporally selective manipulation of multiple neurons was achieved in a precise manner. Finally, we demonstrated the versatility of this high-resolution method in dissecting neural circuits both in the mouse cortical slice and the Drosophila brain in vivo. Taken together, our results show that the combination of AOD-assisted laser stimulation and optogenetic tools provides a flexible solution for manipulating neuronal activity at high efficiency and with high temporal precision. PMID:22174813

  16. One-Step Fabrication of Stretchable Copper Nanowire Conductors by a Fast Photonic Sintering Technique and Its Application in Wearable Devices.

    PubMed

    Ding, Su; Jiu, Jinting; Gao, Yue; Tian, Yanhong; Araki, Teppei; Sugahara, Tohru; Nagao, Shijo; Nogi, Masaya; Koga, Hirotaka; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Uchida, Hiroshi

    2016-03-09

    Copper nanowire (CuNW) conductors have been considered to have a promising perspective in the area of stretchable electronics due to the low price and high conductivity. However, the fabrication of CuNW conductors suffers from harsh conditions, such as high temperature, reducing atmosphere, and time-consuming transfer step. Here, a simple and rapid one-step photonic sintering technique was developed to fabricate stretchable CuNW conductors on polyurethane (PU) at room temperature in air environment. It was observed that CuNWs were instantaneously deoxidized, welded and simultaneously embedded into the soft surface of PU through the one-step photonic sintering technique, after which highly conductive network and strong adhesion between CuNWs and PU substrates were achieved. The CuNW/PU conductor with sheet resistance of 22.1 Ohm/sq and transmittance of 78% was achieved by the one-step photonic sintering technique within only 20 μs in air. Besides, the CuNW/PU conductor could remain a low sheet resistance even after 1000 cycles of stretching/releasing under 10% strain. Two flexible electronic devices, wearable sensor and glove-shaped heater, were fabricated using the stretchable CuNW/PU conductor, demonstrating that our CuNW/PU conductor could be integrated into various wearable electronic devices for applications in food, clothes, and medical supplies fields.

  17. A High-Speed, Event-Driven, Active Pixel Sensor Readout for Photon-Counting Microchannel Plate Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Randy A.; Pain, Bedabrata; Norton, Timothy J.; Haas, J. Patrick; Oegerle, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Silicon array readouts for microchannel plate intensifiers offer several attractive features. In this class of detector, the electron cloud output of the MCP intensifier is converted to visible light by a phosphor; that light is then fiber-optically coupled to the silicon array. In photon-counting mode, the resulting light splashes on the silicon array are recognized and centroided to fractional pixel accuracy by off-chip electronics. This process can result in very high (MCP-limited) spatial resolution while operating at a modest MCP gain (desirable for dynamic range and long term stability). The principal limitation of intensified CCD systems of this type is their severely limited local dynamic range, as accurate photon counting is achieved only if there are not overlapping event splashes within the frame time of the device. This problem can be ameliorated somewhat by processing events only in pre-selected windows of interest of by using an addressable charge injection device (CID) for the readout array. We are currently pursuing the development of an intriguing alternative readout concept based on using an event-driven CMOS Active Pixel Sensor. APS technology permits the incorporation of discriminator circuitry within each pixel. When coupled with suitable CMOS logic outside the array area, the discriminator circuitry can be used to trigger the readout of small sub-array windows only when and where an event splash has been detected, completely eliminating the local dynamic range problem, while achieving a high global count rate capability and maintaining high spatial resolution. We elaborate on this concept and present our progress toward implementing an event-driven APS readout.

  18. A High-Speed, Event-Driven, Active Pixel Sensor Readout for Photon-Counting Microchannel Plate Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Randy A.; Pain, B.; Norton, T. J.; Haas, P.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Silicon array readouts for microchannel plate intensifiers offer several attractive features. In this class of detector, the electron cloud output of the MCP intensifier is converted to visible light by a phosphor; that light is then fiber-optically coupled to the silicon array. In photon-counting mode, the resulting light splashes on the silicon array are recognized and centroided to fractional pixel accuracy by off-chip electronics. This process can result in very high (MCP-limited) spatial resolution for the readout while operating at a modest MCP gain (desirable for dynamic range and long term stability). The principal limitation of intensified CCD systems of this type is their severely limited local dynamic range, as accurate photon counting is achieved only if there are not overlapping event splashes within the frame time of the device. This problem can be ameliorated somewhat by processing events only in pre-selected windows of interest or by using an addressable charge injection device (CID) for the readout array. We are currently pursuing the development of an intriguing alternative readout concept based on using an event-driven CMOS Active Pixel Sensor. APS technology permits the incorporation of discriminator circuitry within each pixel. When coupled with suitable CMOS logic outside the array area, the discriminator circuitry can be used to trigger the readout of small sub-array windows only when and where an event splash has been detected, completely eliminating the local dynamic range problem, while achieving a high global count rate capability and maintaining high spatial resolution. We elaborate on this concept and present our progress toward implementing an event-driven APS readout.

  19. TOPICAL REVIEW: Zinc oxide nanorod based photonic devices: recent progress in growth, light emitting diodes and lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willander, M.; Nur, O.; Zhao, Q. X.; Yang, L. L.; Lorenz, M.; Cao, B. Q.; Zúñiga Pérez, J.; Czekalla, C.; Zimmermann, G.; Grundmann, M.; Bakin, A.; Behrends, A.; Al-Suleiman, M.; El-Shaer, A.; Che Mofor, A.; Postels, B.; Waag, A.; Boukos, N.; Travlos, A.; Kwack, H. S.; Guinard, J.; LeSi Dang, D.

    2009-08-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO), with its excellent luminescent properties and the ease of growth of its nanostructures, holds promise for the development of photonic devices. The recent advances in growth of ZnO nanorods are discussed. Results from both low temperature and high temperature growth approaches are presented. The techniques which are presented include metal-organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD), vapour phase epitaxy (VPE), pulse laser deposition (PLD), vapour-liquid-solid (VLS), aqueous chemical growth (ACG) and finally the electrodeposition technique as an example of a selective growth approach. Results from structural as well as optical properties of a variety of ZnO nanorods are shown and analysed using different techniques, including high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), photoluminescence (PL) and cathodoluminescence (CL), for both room temperature and for low temperature performance. These results indicate that the grown ZnO nanorods possess reproducible and interesting optical properties. Results on obtaining p-type doping in ZnO micro- and nanorods are also demonstrated using PLD. Three independent indications were found for p-type conducting, phosphorus-doped ZnO nanorods: first, acceptor-related CL peaks, second, opposite transfer characteristics of back-gate field effect transistors using undoped and phosphorus doped wire channels, and finally, rectifying I-V characteristics of ZnO:P nanowire/ZnO:Ga p-n junctions. Then light emitting diodes (LEDs) based on n-ZnO nanorods combined with different technologies (hybrid technologies) are suggested and the recent electrical, as well as electro-optical, characteristics of these LEDs are shown and discussed. The hybrid LEDs reviewed and discussed here are mainly presented for two groups: those based on n-ZnO nanorods and p-type crystalline substrates, and those based on n-ZnO nanorods and p-type amorphous substrates. Promising electroluminescence

  20. Two-photon activation and excitation properties of PA-GFP in the 720-920-nm region.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Marc; Barozzi, Sara; Testa, Ilaria; Faretta, Mario; Diaspro, Alberto

    2005-08-01

    This report covers the two-photon activation and excitation properties of the PA-GFP, a photoactivatable variant of the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein in the spectral region from 720 to 920 nm. It is known from this special form of the molecule that it has an increased level of fluorescence emission when excited at 488 nm after irradiation at lambda approximately 413 nm, under single-photon excitation conditions. Here, we show that upon two-photon irradiation, PA-GFP yields activation in the spectral region from 720 to 840 nm. After photoactivation, the excitation spectrum shifts maintaining the very same emission spectrum of the single-photon case for the native and photoactivated protein. Additionally, when comparing the conventional photoactivation at lambda = 405 nm with a two-photon one, a sharper and better controllable three-dimensional volume of activation is obtained.

  1. The study of electromagnetic wave propagation in photonic crystals via planewave based transfer (scattering) matrix method with active gain material applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming

    In this dissertation, a set of numerical simulation tools are developed under previous work to efficiently and accurately study one-dimensional (1D), two-dimensional (2D), 2D slab and three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystal structures and their defects effects by means of spectrum (transmission, reflection, absorption), band structure (dispersion relation), and electric and/or magnetic fields distribution (mode profiles). Further more, the lasing property and spontaneous emission behaviors are studied when active gain materials are presented in the photonic crystal structures. First, the planewave based transfer (scattering) matrix method (TMM) is described in every detail along with a brief review of photonic crystal history (Chapter 1 and 2). As a frequency domain method, TMM has the following major advantages over other numerical methods: (1) the planewave basis makes Maxwell's Equations a linear algebra problem and there are mature numerical package to solve linear algebra problem such as Lapack and Scalapack (for parallel computation). (2) Transfer (scattering) matrix method make 3D problem into 2D slices and link all slices together via the scattering matrix (S matrix) which reduces computation time and memory usage dramatically and makes 3D real photonic crystal devices design possible; and this also makes the simulated domain no length limitation along the propagation direction (ideal for waveguide simulation). (3) It is a frequency domain method and calculation results are all for steady state, without the influences of finite time span convolution effects and/or transient effects. (4) TMM can treat dispersive material (such as metal at visible light) naturally without introducing any additional computation; and meanwhile TMM can also deal with anisotropic material and magnetic material (such as perfectly matched layer) naturally from its algorithms. (5) Extension of TMM to deal with active gain material can be done through an iteration procedure with gain

  2. Inferring Human Activity in Mobile Devices by Computing Multiple Contexts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruizhi; Chu, Tianxing; Liu, Keqiang; Liu, Jingbin; Chen, Yuwei

    2015-08-28

    This paper introduces a framework for inferring human activities in mobile devices by computing spatial contexts, temporal contexts, spatiotemporal contexts, and user contexts. A spatial context is a significant location that is defined as a geofence, which can be a node associated with a circle, or a polygon; a temporal context contains time-related information that can be e.g., a local time tag, a time difference between geographical locations, or a timespan; a spatiotemporal context is defined as a dwelling length at a particular spatial context; and a user context includes user-related information that can be the user's mobility contexts, environmental contexts, psychological contexts or social contexts. Using the measurements of the built-in sensors and radio signals in mobile devices, we can snapshot a contextual tuple for every second including aforementioned contexts. Giving a contextual tuple, the framework evaluates the posteriori probability of each candidate activity in real-time using a Naïve Bayes classifier. A large dataset containing 710,436 contextual tuples has been recorded for one week from an experiment carried out at Texas A&M University Corpus Christi with three participants. The test results demonstrate that the multi-context solution significantly outperforms the spatial-context-only solution. A classification accuracy of 61.7% is achieved for the spatial-context-only solution, while 88.8% is achieved for the multi-context solution.

  3. Inferring Human Activity in Mobile Devices by Computing Multiple Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ruizhi; Chu, Tianxing; Liu, Keqiang; Liu, Jingbin; Chen, Yuwei

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a framework for inferring human activities in mobile devices by computing spatial contexts, temporal contexts, spatiotemporal contexts, and user contexts. A spatial context is a significant location that is defined as a geofence, which can be a node associated with a circle, or a polygon; a temporal context contains time-related information that can be e.g., a local time tag, a time difference between geographical locations, or a timespan; a spatiotemporal context is defined as a dwelling length at a particular spatial context; and a user context includes user-related information that can be the user’s mobility contexts, environmental contexts, psychological contexts or social contexts. Using the measurements of the built-in sensors and radio signals in mobile devices, we can snapshot a contextual tuple for every second including aforementioned contexts. Giving a contextual tuple, the framework evaluates the posteriori probability of each candidate activity in real-time using a Naïve Bayes classifier. A large dataset containing 710,436 contextual tuples has been recorded for one week from an experiment carried out at Texas A&M University Corpus Christi with three participants. The test results demonstrate that the multi-context solution significantly outperforms the spatial-context-only solution. A classification accuracy of 61.7% is achieved for the spatial-context-only solution, while 88.8% is achieved for the multi-context solution. PMID:26343665

  4. Novel x-ray multispectral imaging of ultraintense laser plasmas by a single-photon charge coupled device based pinhole camera

    SciTech Connect

    Labate, L.; Giulietti, A.; Giulietti, D.; Koester, P.; Levato, T.; Gizzi, L. A.; Zamponi, F.; Luebcke, A.; Kaempfer, T.; Uschmann, I.; Foerster, E.

    2007-10-15

    Spectrally resolved two-dimensional imaging of ultrashort laser-produced plasmas is described, obtained by means of an advanced technique. The technique has been tested with microplasmas produced by ultrashort relativistic laser pulses. The technique is based on the use of a pinhole camera equipped with a charge coupled device detector operating in the single-photon regime. The spectral resolution is about 150 eV in the 4-10 keV range, and images in any selected photon energy range have a spatial resolution of 5 {mu}m. The potential of the technique to study fast electron propagation in ultraintense laser interaction with multilayer targets is discussed and some preliminary results are shown.

  5. The Physical Mechanism for Retinal Discrete Dark Noise: Thermal Activation or Cellular Ultraweak Photon Emission?

    PubMed

    Salari, Vahid; Scholkmann, Felix; Bokkon, Istvan; Shahbazi, Farhad; Tuszynski, Jack

    2016-01-01

    For several decades the physical mechanism underlying discrete dark noise of photoreceptors in the eye has remained highly controversial and poorly understood. It is known that the Arrhenius equation, which is based on the Boltzmann distribution for thermal activation, can model only a part (e.g. half of the activation energy) of the retinal dark noise experimentally observed for vertebrate rod and cone pigments. Using the Hinshelwood distribution instead of the Boltzmann distribution in the Arrhenius equation has been proposed as a solution to the problem. Here, we show that the using the Hinshelwood distribution does not solve the problem completely. As the discrete components of noise are indistinguishable in shape and duration from those produced by real photon induced photo-isomerization, the retinal discrete dark noise is most likely due to 'internal photons' inside cells and not due to thermal activation of visual pigments. Indeed, all living cells exhibit spontaneous ultraweak photon emission (UPE), mainly in the optical wavelength range, i.e., 350-700 nm. We show here that the retinal discrete dark noise has a similar rate as UPE and therefore dark noise is most likely due to spontaneous cellular UPE and not due to thermal activation.

  6. Method and apparatus for actively controlling a micro-scale flexural plate wave device

    DOEpatents

    Dohner, Jeffrey L.

    2001-01-01

    An actively controlled flexural plate wave device provides a micro-scale pump. A method of actively controlling a flexural plate wave device produces traveling waves in the device by coordinating the interaction of a magnetic field with actively controlled currents. An actively-controlled flexural plate wave device can be placed in a fluid channel and adapted for use as a micro-scale fluid pump to cool or drive micro-scale systems, for example, micro-chips, micro-electrical-mechanical devices, micro-fluid circuits, or micro-scale chemical analysis devices.

  7. Photonic lanterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon-Saval, Sergio G.; Argyros, Alexander; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2013-12-01

    Multimode optical fibers have been primarily (and almost solely) used as "light pipes" in short distance telecommunications and in remote and astronomical spectroscopy. The modal properties of the multimode waveguides are rarely exploited and mostly discussed in the context of guiding light. Until recently, most photonic applications in the applied sciences have arisen from developments in telecommunications. However, the photonic lantern is one of several devices that arose to solve problems in astrophotonics and space photonics. Interestingly, these devices are now being explored for use in telecommunications and are likely to find commercial use in the next few years, particularly in the development of compact spectrographs. Photonic lanterns allow for a low-loss transformation of a multimode waveguide into a discrete number of single-mode waveguides and vice versa, thus enabling the use of single-mode photonic technologies in multimode systems. In this review, we will discuss the theory and function of the photonic lantern, along with several different variants of the technology. We will also discuss some of its applications in more detail. Furthermore, we foreshadow future applications of this technology to the field of nanophotonics.

  8. Optical activities of micro-spiral photonic crystals fabricated by multi-beam holographic lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Jenny; Gao, Wensheng; Tam, Wing Yim

    2011-09-01

    We report on the optical activities of left- and right-handed micro-spirals fabricated in dichromate gelatin emulsions using a holographic interference technique involving six linearly polarized side beams and one circularly polarized central beam. Photonic bandgaps in the visible range are observed. More importantly, opposite optical activities—a polarization rotation of a few degrees and a circular dichroism (CD) of about 20% at the photonic band edges—are observed for the left- and right-handed spirals. Furthermore, the transmittance of circularly polarized light obeys the Lorentz reciprocity lemma for forward and backward incidence. However neither polarization rotation nor CD is observed for achiral split rings and hollow rods fabricated using all linearly polarized beams and six side beams without the central beam, respectively; this indicates that the chiral nature of the spirals is essential for the observed optical activities.

  9. The Study of Electromagnetic Wave Propogation in Photonic Crystals Via Planewave Based Transfer (Scattering) Matrix Method with Active Gain Material Applications

    SciTech Connect

    LI, Ming

    2007-01-01

    In this dissertation, a set of numerical simulation tools are developed under previous work to efficiently and accurately study one-dimensional (1D), two-dimensional(2D), 2D slab and three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystal structures and their defects effects by means of spectrum (transmission, reflection, absorption), band structure (dispersion relation), and electric and/or magnetic fields distribution (mode profiles). Furthermore, the lasing property and spontaneous emission behaviors are studied when active gain materials are presented in the photonic crystal structures. Various physical properties such as resonant cavity quality factor, waveguide loss, propagation group velocity of electromagnetic wave and light-current curve (for lasing devices) can be obtained from the developed software package.

  10. Nanophotonics: materials and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Uriel; Tsai, Chia-Ho; Nezhad, M.; Nakagawa, Wataru; Chen, C.-H.; Tetz, Kevin A.; Pang, L.; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2004-07-01

    Optical technology plays an increasingly important role in numerous applications areas, including communications, information processing, and data storage. However, as optical technology develops, it is evident that there is a growing need to develop reliable photonic integration technologies. This will include the development of passive as well as active optical components that can be integrated into functional optical circuits and systems, including filters, switching fabrics that can be controlled either electrically or optically, optical sources, detectors, amplifiers, etc. We explore the unique capabilities and advantages of nanotechnology in developing next generation integrated photonic chips. Our long-range goal is to develop a range of photonic nanostructures including artificially birefringent and resonant devices, photonic crystals, and photonic crystals with defects to tailor spectral filters, and nanostructures for spatial field localization to enhance optical nonlinearities, to facilitate on-chip system integration through compatible materials and fabrication processes. The design of artificial nanostructured materials, PCs and integrated photonic systems is one of the most challenging tasks as it not only involves the accurate solution of electromagnetic optics equations, but also the need to incorporate the material and quantum physics equations. Near-field interactions in artificial nanostructured materials provide a variety of functionalities useful for optical systems integration. Furthermore, near-field optical devices facilitate miniaturization, and simultaneously enhance multifunctionality, greatly increasing the functional complexity per unit volume of the photonic system. Finally and most importantly, nanophotonics may enable easier integration with other nanotechnologies: electronics, magnetics, mechanics, chemistry, and biology.

  11. Slow-light enhanced correlated photon pair generation in a silicon photonic crystal waveguide.

    PubMed

    Xiong, C; Monat, Christelle; Clark, Alex S; Grillet, Christian; Marshall, Graham D; Steel, M J; Li, Juntao; O'Faolain, Liam; Krauss, Thomas F; Rarity, John G; Eggleton, Benjamin J

    2011-09-01

    We report the generation of correlated photon pairs in the telecom C-band at room temperature from a dispersion-engineered silicon photonic crystal waveguide. The spontaneous four-wave mixing process producing the photon pairs is enhanced by slow-light propagation enabling an active device length of less than 100 μm. With a coincidence to accidental ratio of 12.8 at a pair generation rate of 0.006 per pulse, this ultracompact photon pair source paves the way toward scalable quantum information processing realized on-chip.

  12. Fast broad-band photon detector based on quantum well devices and charge-integrating electronics for non-invasive FEL monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Antonelli, M. Cautero, G.; Sergo, R.; Castellaro, C.; Menk, R. H.; Ganbold, T.; Biasiol, G.

    2016-07-27

    The recent evolution of free-electron lasers has not been matched by the development of adequate beam-monitoring instrumentation. However, for both experimental and diagnostics purposes, it is crucial to keep such photon beams under control, avoiding at the same time the absorption of the beam and the possible destruction of the detector. These requirements can be fulfilled by utilizing fast and non-invasive photon detectors operated in situ, upstream from the experimental station. From this perspective, sensors based on Quantum Well (QW) devices can be the key to detecting ultra-short light pulses. In fact, owing to their high electron mobility, InGaAs/InAlAs QW devices operated at room temperature exhibit sub-nanosecond response times. Their direct, low-energy band gap renders them capable of detecting photons ranging from visible to X-ray. Furthermore, the 2D electron gas forming inside the QW is responsible for a charge amplification mechanism, which increases the charge collection efficiency of these devices. In order to acquire the signals produced by these QW sensors, a novel readout electronics has been developed. It is based on a high-speed charge integrator, which allows short, low-intensity current pulses to be read within a 50-ns window. The integrated signal is acquired through an ADC and the entire process can be performed at a 10-MHz repetition rate. This work provides a detailed description of the development of the QW detectors and the acquisition electronics, as well as reporting the main experimental results, which show how these tools are well suited for the realization of fast, broad-band beam monitors.

  13. Photonics: Technology project summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Depaula, Ramon P.

    1991-01-01

    Photonics involves the use of light (photons) in conjunction with electronics for applications in communications, computing, control, and sensing. Components used in photonic systems include lasers, optical detectors, optical wave guide devices, fiber optics, and traditional electronic devices. The goal of this program is to develop hybrid optoelectronic devices and systems for sensing, information processing, communications, and control. It is hoped that these new devices will yield at least an order of magnitude improvement in performance over existing technology. The objective of the program is to conduct research and development in the following areas: (1) materials and devices; (2) networking and computing; (3) optical processing/advanced pattern recognition; and (4) sensing.

  14. Photonics: Technology project summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Depaula, Ramon P.

    1991-01-01

    Photonics involves the use of light (photons) in conjunction with electronics for applications in communications, computing, control, and sensing. Components used in photonic systems include lasers, optical detectors, optical wave guide devices, fiber optics, and traditional electronic devices. The goal of this program is to develop hybrid optoelectronic devices and systems for sensing, information processing, communications, and control. It is hoped that these new devices will yield at least an order of magnitude improvement in performance over existing technology. The objective of the program is to conduct research and development in the following areas: (1) materials and devices; (2) networking and computing; (3) optical processing/advanced pattern recognition; and (4) sensing.

  15. Internal disruptions and sawtooth like activity in Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Varela, J.; Garcia, L.; Sanchez, R.; Ohdachi, S.; Watanabe, K. Y.

    2012-08-15

    Large Helical Device (LHD) inward-shifted configurations are unstable to resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pressure-gradient-driven modes. These modes drive sawtooth like events during LHD operation. In this work, we simulate sawtooth like activity and internal disruptions in order to improve the understanding of these relaxation events and their effect over the device efficiency to confine the plasma, with the aim to improve the LHD present and future operation scenarios minimizing or avoiding the disadvantageous MHD soft and hard limits. By solving a set of reduced non-linear resistive MHD equations, we have studied the evolution of perturbations to equilibria obtained before and after a sawtooth like event in LHD. The equilibrium {beta} value is gradually increased during the simulation until it reaches the experimental value. Sawtooth like events and internal disruption events take place in the simulation for {beta}{sub 0} values between 1% and 1.48%. The main driver of the sawtooth like events is the resonant and non-resonant effect of the (n = 1, m = 3) mode. The instability is stronger for resonant events, and they only appear when {beta}{sub 0} = 1.48%. Internal disruptions are mainly driven by the (n = 1, m = 2) mode, and they extend throughout the whole plasma core. Internal disruption events do not show up when resonant sawtooth like events are triggered.

  16. Development of a microfluidic device for fluorescence activated cell sorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Jan; Singh, Kirat; O'Neill, Alan; Jackson, Carl; Morrison, Alan; O'Brien, Peter

    2002-07-01

    This paper describes the development towards a miniaturized analytical system that can perform the major key functions of a flow cytometer. The development aims at diagnostic applications for cell counting and sorting with the ultimate goal of a low-cost portable instrument for point of care diagnosis. The present systems configuration consists of a disposable microfluidic device, that enables injection, single file cell flow through a miniaturized laser induced fluorescence detection system as well as sorting of identified samples. The microfluidic devices were fabricated by means of rapid prototyping technologies based on thick film photo-polymers. This paper reports various approaches on cell sorting and demonstrates sorting of single cells by means of an off-chip valve switching technique. The miniaturized fluorescence detection system employs active and passive micro-optical components, including semiconductor laser and ultra bright LED sources, highly sensitive avalanche photodiodes as well as micro-prism, holographic diffraction gratings and fibre optics for transmission and collection of light. Furthermore we demonstrate the feasibility of integrating solid-state components as part of an on-chip detection system.

  17. PARduino: A Simple Device Measuring and Logging Photosynthetically Active Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, H. R.; Findley, M. C.

    2013-12-01

    Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR, 400 to 700 nm) is one of the primary controls of forest carbon and water relations. In complex terrain, PAR has high spatial-variability. Given the high cost of commercial datalogging equipment, spatially-distributed measurements of PAR have been typically modeled using geographic coordinates and terrain indices. Here, we present a design for a low cost, field-deployable device for measuring and logging PAR built around an Arduino microcontroller (we named it PARduino). PARduino provides for widely distributed sensor arrays and tests the feasibility of using hobbyist-grade electronics for collecting scientific data. PARduino components include a LiCor quantum sensor, EME Systems signal converter/amplifier, and Sparkfun's Arduino Pro Mini microcontroller. Additional components include a real time clock, a microSD flash memory card, and a custom printed circuit board (PCB). We selected the components with an eye towards ease of assembly. Everything can be connected to the PCB using through-hole soldering techniques. Since the device will be deployed in remote research plots that lack easy access to line power, battery life was also a consideration in the design. Extended deployment is possible because PARduino's software keeps it in a low-power sleep mode until ready to make a measurement. PARduino will be open-source hardware for use and improvement by others.

  18. Acute two-photon imaging of the neurovascular unit in the cortex of active mice

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Cam Ha T.; Gordon, Grant R.

    2015-01-01

    In vivo two-photon scanning fluorescence imaging is a powerful technique to observe physiological processes from the millimeter to the micron scale in the intact animal. In neuroscience research, a common approach is to install an acute cranial window and head bar to explore neocortical function under anesthesia before inflammation peaks from the surgery. However, there are few detailed acute protocols for head-restrained and fully awake animal imaging of the neurovascular unit during activity. This is because acutely performed awake experiments are typically untenable when the animal is naïve to the imaging apparatus. Here we detail a method that achieves acute, deep-tissue two-photon imaging of neocortical astrocytes and microvasculature in behaving mice. A week prior to experimentation, implantation of the head bar alone allows mice to train for head-immobilization on an easy-to-learn air-supported ball treadmill. Following just two brief familiarization sessions to the treadmill on separate days, an acute cranial window can subsequently be installed for immediate imaging. We demonstrate how running and whisking data can be captured simultaneously with two-photon fluorescence signals with acceptable movement artifacts during active motion. We also show possible applications of this technique by (1) monitoring dynamic changes to microvascular diameter and red blood cells in response to vibrissa sensory stimulation, (2) examining responses of the cerebral microcirculation to the systemic delivery of pharmacological agents using a tail artery cannula during awake imaging, and (3) measuring Ca2+ signals from synthetic and genetically encoded Ca2+ indicators in astrocytes. This method will facilitate acute two-photon fluorescence imaging in awake, active mice and help link cellular events within the neurovascular unit to behavior. PMID:25698926

  19. Quantum optics. All-optical routing of single photons by a one-atom switch controlled by a single photon.

    PubMed

    Shomroni, Itay; Rosenblum, Serge; Lovsky, Yulia; Bechler, Orel; Guendelman, Gabriel; Dayan, Barak

    2014-08-22

    The prospect of quantum networks, in which quantum information is carried by single photons in photonic circuits, has long been the driving force behind the effort to achieve all-optical routing of single photons. We realized a single-photon-activated switch capable of routing a photon from any of its two inputs to any of its two outputs. Our device is based on a single atom coupled to a fiber-coupled, chip-based microresonator. A single reflected control photon toggles the switch from high reflection (R ~ 65%) to high transmission (T ~ 90%), with an average of ~1.5 control photons per switching event (~3, including linear losses). No additional control fields are required. The control and target photons are both in-fiber and practically identical, making this scheme compatible with scalable architectures for quantum information processing. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. Characterization of MMIC devices for active array antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smetana, J.; Farr, E.; Mittra, R.

    1985-01-01

    Certain aspects of monlithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) interconnectivity were investigated. Considerations that lead to preserving the inherently reproducible characteristics of the MMIC are proposed. It is shown that at radio frequencies (RF) greater than 20 GHz, the transition from the MMIC device to other transmission media must be an accurate RF match. It is proposed that the RF match is sufficiently critical to include the transition as part of the delivered MMIC package. The model to analyze several transitions is presented. This model consists of a succession of abrupt discontinuities in printed circuit transmission lines. The analysis of these discontinuities is achieved by the Spectral Galerkin technique, to establish the modes and mode that special effects should be coordinated by the active array antenna industry toward standardization of MMIC packaging and characterization.

  1. Characterization of MMIC devices for active array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smetana, J.; Farr, E.; Mittra, R.

    1984-01-01

    Certain aspects of monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) interconnectivity were investigated. Considerations that lead to preserving the inherently reproducible characteristics of the MMIC are proposed. It is shown that at radio frequencies (RF) greater than 20 GHz, the transition from the MMIC device to other transmission media must be an accurate RF match. It is proposed that the RF match is sufficiently critical to include the transition as part of the delivered MMIC package. The model to analyze several transitions is presented. This model consists of a succession of abrupt discontinuities in printed circuit transmission lines. The analysis of these discontinuities is achieved by the Spectral Galerkin technique, to establish the modes and mode matching, to generate the generalized S parameters of the individual discontinuities. Preliminary results achieved with this method are presented. It is concluded that special effects should be coordinated by the active array antenna industry toward standardization of MMIC packaging and characterization.

  2. Measurement of total-body oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon in vivo by photon activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ulin, K.

    1984-01-01

    With the aim of assessing nutritional status, the feasibility of measuring the total body quantities of the major body elements, i.e. oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon, using the photon beam of a 45 MV betatron and a whole-body counter, has been evaluated in detail. Following photon activation a single energy ..gamma..-radiation (.511 MeV) is observed from all three elements to be measured. The half-lives of /sup 15/O, /sup 13/N, and /sup 11/C, however, are sufficiently different (20.5 min, 10.0 min, and 20.4 min. respectively) to permit their measurement from an analysis of the measured decay curve. Following corrections for interfering reactions, a computer curve-fitting algorithm is used to resolve the data into /sup 15/O, /sup 13/N, and /sup 11/C components. Measurements of O, N, and C have been made both in phantoms and in live and dead rats. A comparison of the body composition results from this technique with results from chemical analysis indicates that measured carbon can quite accurately predict total body fat. The comparison of the total body nitrogen measurement by photon activation with total body protein by chemical analysis was inconclusive and suggests that further work be done to verify the estimated accuracy of the nitrogen measurement.

  3. All optical active high decoder using integrated 2D square lattice photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moniem, Tamer A.

    2015-11-01

    The paper introduces a novel all optical active high 2 × 4 decoder based on 2D photonic crystals (PhC) of silicon rods with permittivity of ε = 10.1 × 10-11 farad/m. The main structure of optical decoder is designed using a combination of five nonlinear photonic crystal ring resonator, set of T-type waveguide, and line defect of Y and T branch splitters. The proposed structure has two logic input ports, four output ports, and one bias input port. The total size of the proposed 2 × 4 decoder is equal to 40 μm × 38 μm. The PhC structure has a square lattice of silicon rod with refractive index of 3.39 in air. The overall design and the results are discussed through the realization and the numerically simulation to confirm its operation and feasibility.

  4. TiO2 activity enhancement through synergistic effect of photons localization of photonic crystals and the sensitization of CdS quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ping; Wang, Yuan; Wang, Ai-Jun; Chen, Sheng-Li

    2017-02-01

    In this work, the enhancement of TiO2 photocatalytic activity was studied through synergistic effect of the photons localization of photonic crystals and the sensitization of CdS quantum dots (CdS QDs). CdS QDs sensitized TiO2 membrane (denoted as CdS QDs/TiO2) was synthesized through doping the TiO2 membrane with CdS QDs by chemical bath deposition method (CBD). After TiO2 was sensitized with CdS QDs, the edge of light absorption of TiO2 was red-shifted to 470 nm and the light absorption in the range of 400 600 nm was higher than that of plain TiO2 membrane. Another type of composite membrane, CdS QDs/TiO2/SiO2 opal composite membrane was prepared by coupling SiO2 opal (a kind of photonic crystal) layer onto the CdS QDs/TiO2 membrane, and the photonic band gap of the SiO2 opal photonic crystal layer was deliberately planned at the electronic band gap of the CdS QDs. The photodegradation of gaseous CH3CHO (acetaldehyde) was used as probe reaction to test the photocatalytic activity of the as-prepared membranes, and the results showed that the CdS QDs sensitization can significantly improve the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 membrane under visible light irradiation, with the acetaldehyde degradation rate constant (k) on CdS QDs/TiO2 membranes being 1.59 times of that on plain TiO2 membranes. The acetaldehyde degradation rate constant on CdS QDs/TiO2/SiO2 opal composite membrane reached 4 times of that on plain TiO2 membrane. The photocatalytic activity of TiO2 membrane can be improved through synergistic effect of the photons localization of photonic crystals and the sensitization of CdS QDs.

  5. Measurement of active shoulder proprioception: dedicated system and device.

    PubMed

    Lubiatowski, Przemyslaw; Ogrodowicz, Piotr; Wojtaszek, Marcin; Kaniewski, Ryszard; Stefaniak, Jakub; Dudziński, Witold; Romanowski, Leszek

    2013-02-01

    Proprioception is an essential part of shoulder stability and neuromuscular control. The purpose of the study was the development of a precise system of shoulder proprioception assessment in the active mode (Propriometr). For that purpose, devices such as the electronic goniometer and computer software had been designed. A pilot study was carried out on a control group of 27 healthy subjects, the average age being 23.8 (22-29) in order to test the system. The result of the assessment was the finding of the error of active reproduction of the joint position (EARJP). EARJP was assessed for flexion, abduction, external and internal rotation. For every motion, reference positions were used at three different angles. The results showed EARJP to range in 3-6.1°. The proprioception evaluation system (propriometr) allows a precise measurement of active joint position sense. The designed system can be used to assess proprioception in both shoulder injuries and treatment. In addition, all achieved results of normal shoulders may serve as reference to be compared with the results of forthcoming studies.

  6. Using DNA devices to track anticancer drug activity.

    PubMed

    Kahanda, Dimithree; Chakrabarti, Gaurab; Mcwilliams, Marc A; Boothman, David A; Slinker, Jason D

    2016-06-15

    It is beneficial to develop systems that reproduce complex reactions of biological systems while maintaining control over specific factors involved in such processes. We demonstrated a DNA device for following the repair of DNA damage produced by a redox-cycling anticancer drug, beta-lapachone (β-lap). These chips supported ß-lap-induced biological redox cycle and tracked subsequent DNA damage repair activity with redox-modified DNA monolayers on gold. We observed drug-specific changes in square wave voltammetry from these chips at therapeutic ß-lap concentrations of high statistical significance over drug-free control. We also demonstrated a high correlation of this change with the specific ß-lap-induced redox cycle using rational controls. The concentration dependence of ß-lap revealed significant signal changes at levels of high clinical significance as well as sensitivity to sub-lethal levels of ß-lap. Catalase, an enzyme decomposing peroxide, was found to suppress DNA damage at a NQO1/catalase ratio found in healthy cells, but was clearly overcome at a higher NQO1/catalase ratio consistent with cancer cells. We found that it was necessary to reproduce key features of the cellular environment to observe this activity. Thus, this chip-based platform enabled tracking of ß-lap-induced DNA damage repair when biological criteria were met, providing a unique synthetic platform for uncovering activity normally confined to inside cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Design and testing of an active quenching circuit for an avalanche photodiode photon detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbel, D.; Schwartz, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    The photon-detection capabilities of avalanche photodiodes (APDs) operating above their theoretical breakdown voltages are described, with particular attention given to the needs and methods of quenching an avalanche once breakdown has occurred. A brief background on the motives of and previous work with this mode of operation is presented. Finally, a description of the design and testing of an active quenching circuit is given. Although the active quenching circuit did not perform as expected, knowledge was gained as to the signal amplitudes necessary for quenching and the need for a better model for the above-breakdown circuit characteristics of the Geiger-mode APD.

  8. Design and testing of an active quenching circuit for an avalanche photodiode photon detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbel, D.; Schwartz, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    The photon-detection capabilities of avalanche photodiodes (APDs) operating above their theoretical breakdown voltages are described, with particular attention given to the needs and methods of quenching an avalanche once breakdown has occurred. A brief background on the motives of and previous work with this mode of operation is presented. Finally, a description of the design and testing of an active quenching circuit is given. Although the active quenching circuit did not perform as expected, knowledge was gained as to the signal amplitudes necessary for quenching and the need for a better model for the above-breakdown circuit characteristics of the Geiger-mode APD.

  9. In vivo stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence imaging of melanin in human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zhenhua; Gu, Zetong; Abbas, Saleh; Lowe, Jared; Sierra, Heidy; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; DiMarzio, Charles

    2014-03-01

    The stepwise multi-photon activated fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin is a low cost and reliable method of detecting melanin because the activation and excitation can be a continuous-wave (CW) mode near infrared (NIR) laser. Our previous work has demonstrated the melanin SMPAF images in sepia melanin, mouse hair, and mouse skin. In this study, we show the feasibility of using SMPAF to detect melanin in vivo. in vivo melanin SMPAF images of normal skin and benign nevus are demonstrated. SMPAF images add specificity for melanin detection than MPFM images and CRM images. Melanin SMPAF is a promising technology to enable early detection of melanoma for dermatologists.

  10. 77 FR 57055 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Unique Device Identification...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-17

    ... PRA) associated with the proposed rule, Unique Device Identification System, that appeared in the... 830 RIN 0910-AG31 Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Unique Device Identification System; Extension of Comment Period AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION...

  11. Smart x-ray beam position monitor system using artificial intelligence methods for the Advanced Photon Source insertion-device beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, D.; Ding, H.; Barraza, J.; Kuzay, T.M.; Haeffner, D.; Ramanathan, M.

    1997-09-01

    At the Advanced Photon Source (APS), each insertion device (ID) beamline front-end has two XBPMs to monitor the X-ray beam position for both that vertical and horizontal directions. Performance challenges for a conventional photoemission type X-ray beam position monitor (XBPM) during operations are contamination of the signal from the neighboring bending magnet sources and the sensitivity of the XBPM to the insertion device (ID) gap variations. Problems are exacerbated because users change the ID gap during their operations, and hence the percentage level of the contamination in the front end XBPM signals varies. A smart XBPM system with a high speed digital signal processor has been built at the Advanced Photon Source for the ID beamline front ends. The new version of the software, which uses an artificial intelligence method, provides a self learning and self-calibration capability to the smart XBPM system. The structure of and recent test results with the system are presented in this paper.

  12. Two-Photon Enzymatic Probes Visualizing Sub-cellular/Deep-brain Caspase Activities in Neurodegenerative Models

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Linghui; Zhang, Cheng-Wu; Mao, Yanli; Li, Lin; Gao, Nengyue; Lim, Kah-Leong; Xu, Qing-Hua; Yao, Shao Q.

    2016-01-01

    Caspases work as a double-edged sword in maintaining cell homeostasis. Highly regulated caspase activities are essential during animal development, but dysregulation might lead to different diseases, e.g. extreme caspase activation is known to promote neurodegeneration. At present, visualization of caspase activation has mostly remained at the cellular level, in part due to a lack of cell-permeable imaging probes capable of direct, real-time investigations of endogenous caspase activities in deep tissues. Herein, we report a suite of two-photon, small molecule/peptide probes which enable sensitive and dynamic imaging of individual caspase activities in neurodegenerative models under physiological conditions. With no apparent toxicity and the ability of imaging endogenous caspases both in different subcellular organelles of mammalian cells and in brain tissues, these probes serve as complementary tools to conventional histological analysis. They should facilitate future explorations of caspases at molecular, cellular and organism levels and inspire development of novel two-photon probes against other enzymes. PMID:27210613

  13. Combined atomic force microscopy and photoluminescence imaging to select single InAs/GaAs quantum dots for quantum photonic devices.

    PubMed

    Sapienza, Luca; Liu, Jin; Song, Jin Dong; Fält, Stefan; Wegscheider, Werner; Badolato, Antonio; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2017-07-24

    We report on a combined photoluminescence imaging and atomic force microscopy study of single, isolated self-assembled InAs quantum dots. The motivation of this work is to determine an approach that allows to assess single quantum dots as candidates for quantum nanophotonic devices. By combining optical and scanning probe characterization techniques, we find that single quantum dots often appear in the vicinity of comparatively large topographic features. Despite this, the quantum dots generally do not exhibit significant differences in their non-resonantly pumped emission spectra in comparison to quantum dots appearing in defect-free regions, and this behavior is observed across multiple wafers produced in different growth chambers. Such large surface features are nevertheless a detriment to applications in which single quantum dots are embedded within nanofabricated photonic devices: they are likely to cause large spectral shifts in the wavelength of cavity modes designed to resonantly enhance the quantum dot emission, thereby resulting in a nominally perfectly-fabricated single quantum dot device failing to behave in accordance with design. We anticipate that the approach of screening quantum dots not only based on their optical properties, but also their surrounding surface topographies, will be necessary to improve the yield of single quantum dot nanophotonic devices.

  14. Photonic activation of disulfide bridges achieves oriented protein immobilization on biosensor surfaces.

    PubMed

    Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa; Snabe, Torben; Klitgaard, Søren; Duroux, Meg; Petersen, Steffen B

    2006-02-01

    Photonic induced immobilization is a novel technology that results in spatially oriented and spatially localized covalent coupling of biomolecules onto thiol-reactive surfaces. Immobilization using this technology has been achieved for a wide selection of proteins, such as hydrolytic enzymes (lipases/esterases, lysozyme), proteases (human plasminogen), alkaline phosphatase, immunoglobulins' Fab fragment (e.g., antibody against PSA [prostate specific antigen]), Major Histocompability Complex class I protein, pepsin, and trypsin. The reaction mechanism behind the reported new technology involves "photonic activation of disulfide bridges," i.e., light-induced breakage of disulfide bridges in proteins upon UV illumination of nearby aromatic amino acids, resulting in the formation of free, reactive thiol groups that will form covalent bonds with thiol-reactive surfaces (see Fig. 1). Interestingly, the spatial proximity of aromatic residues and disulfide bridges in proteins has been preserved throughout molecular evolution. The new photonic-induced method for immobilization of proteins preserves the native structural and functional properties of the immobilized protein, avoiding the use of one or more chemical/thermal steps. This technology allows for the creation of spatially oriented as well as spatially defined multiprotein/DNA high-density sensor arrays with spot size of 1 microm or less, and has clear potential for biomedical, bioelectronic, nanotechnology, and therapeutic applications.

  15. Active photonic sensor communication cable for field application of optical data and power transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suthau, Eike; Rieske, Ralf; Zerna, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Omitting electrically conducting wires for sensor communication and power supply promises protection for sensor systems and monitored structures against lightning or high voltages, prevention of explosion hazards, and reduction of susceptibility to tampering. The ability to photonically power remote systems opens up the full range of electrical sensors. Power-over-fiber is an attractive option in electromagnetically sensitive environments, particularly for longterm, maintenance-free applications. It can deliver uninterrupted power sufficient for elaborate sensors, data processing or even actuators alongside continuous high speed data communication for remote sensor application. This paper proposes an active photonic sensor communication system, which combines the advantages of optical data links in terms of immunity to electromagnetic interference (EMI), high bandwidth, hardiness against tampering or eavesdropping, and low cable weight with the robustness one has come to expect from industrial or military electrical connectors. An application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) is presented that implements a closed-loop regulation of the sensor power supply to guarantee continuous, reliable data communications while maintaining a highly efficient, adaptive sensor supply scheme. It is demonstrated that the resulting novel photonic sensor communication cable can handle sensors and actuators differing orders of magnitude with respect to power consumption. The miniaturization of the electro-optical converters and driving electronics is as important to the presented development as the energy efficiency of the detached, optically powered sensor node. For this reason, a novel photonic packaging technology based on wafer-level assembly of the laser power converters by means of passive alignment will be disclosed in this paper.

  16. Wide-field high-speed space-division multiplexing optical coherence tomography using an integrated photonic device

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yongyang; Badar, Mudabbir; Nitkowski, Arthur; Weinroth, Aaron; Tansu, Nelson; Zhou, Chao

    2017-01-01

    Space-division multiplexing optical coherence tomography (SDM-OCT) is a recently developed parallel OCT imaging method in order to achieve multi-fold speed improvement. However, the assembly of fiber optics components used in the first prototype system was labor-intensive and susceptible to errors. Here, we demonstrate a high-speed SDM-OCT system using an integrated photonic chip that can be reliably manufactured with high precisions and low per-unit cost. A three-layer cascade of 1 × 2 splitters was integrated in the photonic chip to split the incident light into 8 parallel imaging channels with ~3.7 mm optical delay in air between each channel. High-speed imaging (~1s/volume) of porcine eyes ex vivo and wide-field imaging (~18.0 × 14.3 mm2) of human fingers in vivo were demonstrated with the chip-based SDM-OCT system. PMID:28856055

  17. Determination of nitrogen in boron carbide by instrumental photon activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Merchel, Silke; Berger, Achim

    2007-05-01

    Boron carbide is widely used as industrial material, because of its extreme hardness, and as a neutron absorber. As part of a round-robin exercise leading to certification of a new reference material (ERM-ED102) which was demanded by the industry we analysed nitrogen in boron carbide by inert gas fusion analysis (GFA) and instrumental photon activation analysis (IPAA) using the 14N(gamma,n)13N nuclear reaction. The latter approach is the only non-destructive method among all the methods applied. By using photons with energy below the threshold of the 12C(gamma,n)11C reaction, we hindered activation of matrix and other impurities. A recently installed beam with a very low lateral activating flux gradient enabled us to homogeneously activate sample masses of approximately 1 g. Taking extra precautions, i.e. self-absorption correction and deconvolution of the complex decay curves, we calculated a nitrogen concentration of 2260+/-100 microg g-1, which is in good agreement with our GFA value of 2303+/-64 microg g-1. The values are the second and third highest of a rather atypical (non-S-shape) distribution of data of 14 round-robin participants. It is of utmost importance for the certification process that our IPAA value is the only one not produced by inert gas fusion analysis and, therefore, the only one which is not affected by a possible incomplete release of nitrogen from high-melting boron carbide.

  18. The Physical Mechanism for Retinal Discrete Dark Noise: Thermal Activation or Cellular Ultraweak Photon Emission?

    PubMed Central

    Salari, Vahid; Scholkmann, Felix; Bokkon, Istvan; Shahbazi, Farhad; Tuszynski, Jack

    2016-01-01

    For several decades the physical mechanism underlying discrete dark noise of photoreceptors in the eye has remained highly controversial and poorly understood. It is known that the Arrhenius equation, which is based on the Boltzmann distribution for thermal activation, can model only a part (e.g. half of the activation energy) of the retinal dark noise experimentally observed for vertebrate rod and cone pigments. Using the Hinshelwood distribution instead of the Boltzmann distribution in the Arrhenius equation has been proposed as a solution to the problem. Here, we show that the using the Hinshelwood distribution does not solve the problem completely. As the discrete components of noise are indistinguishable in shape and duration from those produced by real photon induced photo-isomerization, the retinal discrete dark noise is most likely due to ‘internal photons’ inside cells and not due to thermal activation of visual pigments. Indeed, all living cells exhibit spontaneous ultraweak photon emission (UPE), mainly in the optical wavelength range, i.e., 350–700 nm. We show here that the retinal discrete dark noise has a similar rate as UPE and therefore dark noise is most likely due to spontaneous cellular UPE and not due to thermal activation. PMID:26950936

  19. Photo-manipulated photonic bandgap devices based on optically tristable chiral-tilted homeotropic nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuan-Chung; Hsiao, Yu-Cheng; Timofeev, Ivan V; Zyryanov, Victor Ya; Lee, Wei

    2016-10-31

    We report on the spectral properties of an optically switchable tristable chiral-tilted homeotropic nematic liquid crystal (LC) incorporated as a tunable defect layer in one-dimensional photonic crystal. By varying the polarization angle of the incident light and modulating the light intensity ratio between UV and green light, various transmission characteristics of the composite were obtained. The hybrid structure realizes photo-tunability in transmission of defect-mode peaks within the photonic bandgap in addition to optical switchability among three distinct sets of defect modes via photoinduced tristable state transitions. Because the fabrication process is easier and less critical in terms of cell parameters or sample preparation conditions and the LC layer itself possesses an extra stable state compared with the previously reported bistable counterpart operating on the basis of biased-voltage dual-frequency switching, it has much superior potential for photonic applications such as a low-power-consumption multichannel filter and an optically controllable intensity modulator.

  20. The theoretical study of passive and active optical devices via planewave based transfer (scattering) matrix method and other approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuo, Ye

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, we theoretically study the electromagnetic wave propagation in several passive and active optical components and devices including 2-D photonic crystals, straight and curved waveguides, organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), and etc. Several optical designs are also presented like organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells and solar concentrators. The first part of the thesis focuses on theoretical investigation. First, the plane-wave-based transfer (scattering) matrix method (TMM) is briefly described with a short review of photonic crystals and other numerical methods to study them (Chapter 1 and 2). Next TMM, the numerical method itself is investigated in details and developed in advance to deal with more complex optical systems. In chapter 3, TMM is extended in curvilinear coordinates to study curved nanoribbon waveguides. The problem of a curved structure is transformed into an equivalent one of a straight structure with spatially dependent tensors of dielectric constant and magnetic permeability. In chapter 4, a new set of localized basis orbitals are introduced to locally represent electromagnetic field in photonic crystals as alternative to planewave basis. The second part of the thesis focuses on the design of optical devices. First, two examples of TMM applications are given. The first example is the design of metal grating structures as replacements of ITO to enhance the optical absorption in OPV cells (chapter 6). The second one is the design of the same structure as above to enhance the light extraction of OLEDs (chapter 7). Next, two design examples by ray tracing method are given, including applying a microlens array to enhance the light extraction of OLEDs (chapter 5) and an all-angle wide-wavelength design of solar concentrator (chapter 8). In summary, this dissertation has extended TMM which makes it capable of treating complex optical systems. Several optical designs by TMM and ray tracing method are also given as a full complement of this