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Sample records for active pixel image

  1. CMOS Active-Pixel Image Sensor With Simple Floating Gates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R.; Nakamura, Junichi; Kemeny, Sabrina E.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental complementary metal-oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) active-pixel image sensor integrated circuit features simple floating-gate structure, with metal-oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) as active circuit element in each pixel. Provides flexibility of readout modes, no kTC noise, and relatively simple structure suitable for high-density arrays. Features desirable for "smart sensor" applications.

  2. Active-Pixel Image Sensors With Programmable Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemeny, Sabrina E.; Fossum, Eric R.; Pain, Bedabrata; Nakamura, Junichi; Matthies, Larry H.

    1996-01-01

    Active-pixel image sensors with programmable resolution proposed for use in applications in which speed and efficiency of processing of image data enhanced by providing those data at varying resolutions. Such applications include modeling of biological vision, stereoscopic range-finding, recognition of patterns, tracking targets, and progressive transmission of compressed images. In target-tracking application, sensor initially forms low-resolution image from which area of interest identified, then sensor set at high resolution for examination of identified area. Outputs of contiguous pixels combined. Sensor of this type made to act as though it comprised fewer and larger pixels.

  3. Preliminary investigations of active pixel sensors in Nuclear Medicine imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Robert; Evans, Noel; Evans, Phil; Osmond, J.; Clark, A.; Turchetta, R.

    2009-06-01

    Three CMOS active pixel sensors have been investigated for their application to Nuclear Medicine imaging. Startracker with 525×525 25 μm square pixels has been coupled via a fibre optic stud to a 2 mm thick segmented CsI(Tl) crystal. Imaging tests were performed using 99mTc sources, which emit 140 keV gamma rays. The system was interfaced to a PC via FPGA-based DAQ and optical link enabling imaging rates of 10 f/s. System noise was measured to be >100e and it was shown that the majority of this noise was fixed pattern in nature. The intrinsic spatial resolution was measured to be ˜80 μm and the system spatial resolution measured with a slit was ˜450 μm. The second sensor, On Pixel Intelligent CMOS (OPIC), had 64×72 40 μm pixels and was used to evaluate noise characteristics and to develop a method of differentiation between fixed pattern and statistical noise. The third sensor, Vanilla, had 520×520 25 μm pixels and a measured system noise of ˜25e. This sensor was coupled directly to the segmented phosphor. Imaging results show that even at this lower level of noise the signal from 140 keV gamma rays is small as the light from the phosphor is spread over a large number of pixels. Suggestions for the 'ideal' sensor are made.

  4. A CMOS Energy Harvesting and Imaging (EHI) Active Pixel Sensor (APS) Imager for Retinal Prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Ay, S U

    2011-12-01

    A CMOS image sensor capable of imaging and energy harvesting on same focal plane is presented for retinal prosthesis. The energy harvesting and imaging (EHI) active pixel sensor (APS) imager was designed, fabricated, and tested in a standard 0.5 μm CMOS process. It has 54 × 50 array of 21 × 21 μm(2) EHI pixels, 10-bit supply boosted (SB) SAR ADC, and charge pump circuits consuming only 14.25 μW from 1.2 V and running at 7.4 frames per second. The supply boosting technique (SBT) is used in an analog signal chain of the EHI imager. Harvested solar energy on focal plane is stored on an off-chip capacitor with the help of a charge pump circuit with better than 70% efficiency. Energy harvesting efficiency of the EHI pixel was measured at different light levels. It was 9.4% while producing 0.41 V open circuit voltage. The EHI imager delivers 3.35 μW of power was delivered to a resistive load at maximum power point operation. The measured pixel array figure of merit (FoM) was 1.32 pW/frame/pixel while imager figure of merit (iFoM) including whole chip power consumption was 696 fJ/pixel/code for the EHI imager. PMID:23852551

  5. A 128 x 128 CMOS Active Pixel Image Sensor for Highly Integrated Imaging Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendis, Sunetra K.; Kemeny, Sabrina E.; Fossum, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    A new CMOS-based image sensor that is intrinsically compatible with on-chip CMOS circuitry is reported. The new CMOS active pixel image sensor achieves low noise, high sensitivity, X-Y addressability, and has simple timing requirements. The image sensor was fabricated using a 2 micrometer p-well CMOS process, and consists of a 128 x 128 array of 40 micrometer x 40 micrometer pixels. The CMOS image sensor technology enables highly integrated smart image sensors, and makes the design, incorporation and fabrication of such sensors widely accessible to the integrated circuit community.

  6. Evaluation of a single-pixel one-transistor active pixel sensor for fingerprint imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Man; Ou, Hai; Chen, Jun; Wang, Kai

    2015-08-01

    Since it first appeared in iPhone 5S in 2013, fingerprint identification (ID) has rapidly gained popularity among consumers. Current fingerprint-enabled smartphones unanimously consists of a discrete sensor to perform fingerprint ID. This architecture not only incurs higher material and manufacturing cost, but also provides only static identification and limited authentication. Hence as the demand for a thinner, lighter, and more secure handset grows, we propose a novel pixel architecture that is a photosensitive device embedded in a display pixel and detects the reflected light from the finger touch for high resolution, high fidelity and dynamic biometrics. To this purpose, an amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) dual-gate photo TFT working in both fingerprint-imaging mode and display-driving mode will be developed.

  7. Active-Pixel Image Sensor With Analog-To-Digital Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R.; Mendis, Sunetra K.; Pain, Bedabrata; Nixon, Robert H.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed single-chip integrated-circuit image sensor contains 128 x 128 array of active pixel sensors at 50-micrometer pitch. Output terminals of all pixels in each given column connected to analog-to-digital (A/D) converter located at bottom of column. Pixels scanned in semiparallel fashion, one row at time; during time allocated to scanning row, outputs of all active pixel sensors in row fed to respective A/D converters. Design of chip based on complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology, and individual circuit elements fabricated according to 2-micrometer CMOS design rules. Active pixel sensors designed to operate at video rate of 30 frames/second, even at low light levels. A/D scheme based on first-order Sigma-Delta modulation.

  8. Active pixel imagers incorporating pixel-level amplifiers based on polycrystalline-silicon thin-film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    El-Mohri, Youcef; Antonuk, Larry E.; Koniczek, Martin; Zhao Qihua; Li Yixin; Street, Robert A.; Lu Jengping

    2009-07-15

    Active matrix, flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) employing a 2D matrix of a-Si addressing TFTs have become ubiquitous in many x-ray imaging applications due to their numerous advantages. However, under conditions of low exposures and/or high spatial resolution, their signal-to-noise performance is constrained by the modest system gain relative to the electronic additive noise. In this article, a strategy for overcoming this limitation through the incorporation of in-pixel amplification circuits, referred to as active pixel (AP) architectures, using polycrystalline-silicon (poly-Si) TFTs is reported. Compared to a-Si, poly-Si offers substantially higher mobilities, enabling higher TFT currents and the possibility of sophisticated AP designs based on both n- and p-channel TFTs. Three prototype indirect detection arrays employing poly-Si TFTs and a continuous a-Si photodiode structure were characterized. The prototypes consist of an array (PSI-1) that employs a pixel architecture with a single TFT, as well as two arrays (PSI-2 and PSI-3) that employ AP architectures based on three and five TFTs, respectively. While PSI-1 serves as a reference with a design similar to that of conventional AMFPI arrays, PSI-2 and PSI-3 incorporate additional in-pixel amplification circuitry. Compared to PSI-1, results of x-ray sensitivity demonstrate signal gains of {approx}10.7 and 20.9 for PSI-2 and PSI-3, respectively. These values are in reasonable agreement with design expectations, demonstrating that poly-Si AP circuits can be tailored to provide a desired level of signal gain. PSI-2 exhibits the same high levels of charge trapping as those observed for PSI-1 and other conventional arrays employing a continuous photodiode structure. For PSI-3, charge trapping was found to be significantly lower and largely independent of the bias voltage applied across the photodiode. MTF results indicate that the use of a continuous photodiode structure in PSI-1, PSI-2, and PSI-3 results in optical

  9. Active pixel imagers incorporating pixel-level amplifiers based on polycrystalline-silicon thin-film transistors

    PubMed Central

    El-Mohri, Youcef; Antonuk, Larry E.; Koniczek, Martin; Zhao, Qihua; Li, Yixin; Street, Robert A.; Lu, Jeng-Ping

    2009-01-01

    Active matrix, flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) employing a 2D matrix of a-Si addressing TFTs have become ubiquitous in many x-ray imaging applications due to their numerous advantages. However, under conditions of low exposures and∕or high spatial resolution, their signal-to-noise performance is constrained by the modest system gain relative to the electronic additive noise. In this article, a strategy for overcoming this limitation through the incorporation of in-pixel amplification circuits, referred to as active pixel (AP) architectures, using polycrystalline-silicon (poly-Si) TFTs is reported. Compared to a-Si, poly-Si offers substantially higher mobilities, enabling higher TFT currents and the possibility of sophisticated AP designs based on both n- and p-channel TFTs. Three prototype indirect detection arrays employing poly-Si TFTs and a continuous a-Si photodiode structure were characterized. The prototypes consist of an array (PSI-1) that employs a pixel architecture with a single TFT, as well as two arrays (PSI-2 and PSI-3) that employ AP architectures based on three and five TFTs, respectively. While PSI-1 serves as a reference with a design similar to that of conventional AMFPI arrays, PSI-2 and PSI-3 incorporate additional in-pixel amplification circuitry. Compared to PSI-1, results of x-ray sensitivity demonstrate signal gains of ∼10.7 and 20.9 for PSI-2 and PSI-3, respectively. These values are in reasonable agreement with design expectations, demonstrating that poly-Si AP circuits can be tailored to provide a desired level of signal gain. PSI-2 exhibits the same high levels of charge trapping as those observed for PSI-1 and other conventional arrays employing a continuous photodiode structure. For PSI-3, charge trapping was found to be significantly lower and largely independent of the bias voltage applied across the photodiode. MTF results indicate that the use of a continuous photodiode structure in PSI-1, PSI-2, and PSI-3 results in optical fill

  10. Analysis of noise characteristics for the active pixels in CMOS image sensors for X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Soo; Cho, Gyuseong; Bae, Jun-Hyung

    2006-09-01

    CMOS image sensors have poorer performance compared to conventional charge coupled devices (CCDs). Since CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APSs) in general have higher temporal noise, higher dark current, smaller full well charge capacitance, and lower spectral response, they cannot provide the same wide dynamic range and superior signal to noise ratio as CCDs. In view of electronic noise, the main source for the CMOS APS is the pixel, along with other signal processing blocks such as row and column decoder, analog signal processor (ASP), analog-to-digital converter (ADC), and timing and control logic circuitry. Therefore, it is important and necessary to characterize noise of the active pixels in CMOS APSs, and we performed experimental measurements and comparisons with theoretical estimations. To derive noise source of the pixels, we designed and fabricated four types of CMOS active pixels, and each pixel is composed of a photodiode and three MOS transistors. The size of these pixels is 100 μm×100 μm. The test chip was fabricated using ETRI 0.8 μm (2P/2M) standard CMOS process. It was found that the dominant noise in CMOS active pixels is shot noise during integration under normal operating conditions. And, it was also seen that epitaxial type pixels have similar noise level compared to non-epitaxial type, and the noise of diffusion type pixel is larger than for a well type pixel on the same substrate type.

  11. CMOS active pixel sensor type imaging system on a chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Nixon, Robert (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A single chip camera which includes an .[.intergrated.]. .Iadd.integrated .Iaddend.image acquisition portion and control portion and which has double sampling/noise reduction capabilities thereon. Part of the .[.intergrated.]. .Iadd.integrated .Iaddend.structure reduces the noise that is picked up during imaging.

  12. Integrated imaging sensor systems with CMOS active pixel sensor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, G.; Cunningham, T.; Ortiz, M.; Heynssens, J.; Sun, C.; Hancock, B.; Seshadri, S.; Wrigley, C.; McCarty, K.; Pain, B.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses common approaches to CMOS APS technology, as well as specific results on the five-wire programmable digital camera-on-a-chip developed at JPL. The paper also reports recent research in the design, operation, and performance of APS imagers for several imager applications.

  13. Imaging properties of pixellated scintillators with deep pixels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, H. Bradford; Fastje, David; Lemieux, Daniel; Grim, Gary P.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Miller, Brian W.; Parkhurst, Philip; Nagarkar, Vivek V.

    2014-09-01

    We have investigated the light-transport properties of scintillator arrays with long, thin pixels (deep pixels) for use in high-energy gamma-ray imaging. We compared 10x10 pixel arrays of YSO:Ce, LYSO:Ce and BGO (1mm x 1mm x 20 mm pixels) made by Proteus, Inc. with similar 10x10 arrays of LSO:Ce and BGO (1mm x 1mm x 15mm pixels) loaned to us by Saint-Gobain. The imaging and spectroscopic behaviors of these scintillator arrays are strongly affected by the choice of a reflector used as an inter-pixel spacer (3M ESR in the case of the Proteus arrays and white, diffuse-reflector for the Saint-Gobain arrays). We have constructed a 3700-pixel LYSO:Ce Prototype NIF Gamma-Ray Imager for use in diagnosing target compression in inertial confinement fusion. This system was tested at the OMEGA Laser and exhibited significant optical, inter-pixel cross-talk that was traced to the use of a single-layer of ESR film as an inter-pixel spacer. We show how the optical cross-talk can be mapped, and discuss correction procedures. We demonstrate a 10x10 YSO:Ce array as part of an iQID (formerly BazookaSPECT) imager and discuss issues related to the internal activity of 176Lu in LSO:Ce and LYSO:Ce detectors.

  14. Imaging properties of pixellated scintillators with deep pixels

    PubMed Central

    Barber, H. Bradford; Fastje, David; Lemieux, Daniel; Grim, Gary P.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Miller, Brian W.; Parkhurst, Philip; Nagarkar, Vivek V.

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the light-transport properties of scintillator arrays with long, thin pixels (deep pixels) for use in high-energy gamma-ray imaging. We compared 10×10 pixel arrays of YSO:Ce, LYSO:Ce and BGO (1mm × 1mm × 20 mm pixels) made by Proteus, Inc. with similar 10×10 arrays of LSO:Ce and BGO (1mm × 1mm × 15mm pixels) loaned to us by Saint-Gobain. The imaging and spectroscopic behaviors of these scintillator arrays are strongly affected by the choice of a reflector used as an inter-pixel spacer (3M ESR in the case of the Proteus arrays and white, diffuse-reflector for the Saint-Gobain arrays). We have constructed a 3700-pixel LYSO:Ce Prototype NIF Gamma-Ray Imager for use in diagnosing target compression in inertial confinement fusion. This system was tested at the OMEGA Laser and exhibited significant optical, inter-pixel cross-talk that was traced to the use of a single-layer of ESR film as an inter-pixel spacer. We show how the optical cross-talk can be mapped, and discuss correction procedures. We demonstrate a 10×10 YSO:Ce array as part of an iQID (formerly BazookaSPECT) imager and discuss issues related to the internal activity of 176Lu in LSO:Ce and LYSO:Ce detectors. PMID:26236070

  15. Active pixel image sensor with a winner-take-all mode of operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yadid-Pecht, Orly (Inventor); Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Mead, Carver (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An integrated CMOS semiconductor imaging device having two modes of operation that can be performed simultaneously to produce an output image and provide information of a brightest or darkest pixel in the image.

  16. Development of CMOS Active Pixel Image Sensors for Low Cost Commercial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, R.; Kemeny, S.; Kim, Q.; Mendis, S.; Nakamura, J.; Nixon, R.; Ortiz, M.; Pain, B.; Staller, C.; Zhou, Z; Fossum, E.

    1994-01-01

    JPL, under sponsorship from the NASA Office of Advanced Concepts and Technology, has been developing a second-generation solid-state image sensor technology. Charge-coupled devices (CCD) are a well-established first generation image sensor technology. For both commercial and NASA applications, CCDs have numerous shortcomings. In response, the active pixel sensor (APS) technology has been under research. The major advantages of APS technology are the ability to integrate on-chip timing, control, signal-processing and analog-to-digital converter functions, reduced sensitivity to radiation effects, low power operation, and random access readout.

  17. Characteristics of Monolithically Integrated InGaAs Active Pixel Imager Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Q.; Cunningham, T. J.; Pain, B.; Lange, M. J.; Olsen, G. H.

    2000-01-01

    Switching and amplifying characteristics of a newly developed monolithic InGaAs Active Pixel Imager Array are presented. The sensor array is fabricated from InGaAs material epitaxially deposited on an InP substrate. It consists of an InGaAs photodiode connected to InP depletion-mode junction field effect transistors (JFETs) for low leakage, low power, and fast control of circuit signal amplifying, buffering, selection, and reset. This monolithically integrated active pixel sensor configuration eliminates the need for hybridization with silicon multiplexer. In addition, the configuration allows the sensor to be front illuminated, making it sensitive to visible as well as near infrared signal radiation. Adapting the existing 1.55 micrometer fiber optical communication technology, this integration will be an ideal system of optoelectronic integration for dual band (Visible/IR) applications near room temperature, for use in atmospheric gas sensing in space, and for target identification on earth. In this paper, two different types of small 4 x 1 test arrays will be described. The effectiveness of switching and amplifying circuits will be discussed in terms of circuit effectiveness (leakage, operating frequency, and temperature) in preparation for the second phase demonstration of integrated, two-dimensional monolithic InGaAs active pixel sensor arrays for applications in transportable shipboard surveillance, night vision, and emission spectroscopy.

  18. Performance of a novel wafer scale CMOS active pixel sensor for bio-medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Esposito, M; Anaxagoras, T; Konstantinidis, A C; Zheng, Y; Speller, R D; Evans, P M; Allinson, N M; Wells, K

    2014-07-01

    Recently CMOS active pixels sensors (APSs) have become a valuable alternative to amorphous silicon and selenium flat panel imagers (FPIs) in bio-medical imaging applications. CMOS APSs can now be scaled up to the standard 20 cm diameter wafer size by means of a reticle stitching block process. However, despite wafer scale CMOS APS being monolithic, sources of non-uniformity of response and regional variations can persist representing a significant challenge for wafer scale sensor response. Non-uniformity of stitched sensors can arise from a number of factors related to the manufacturing process, including variation of amplification, variation between readout components, wafer defects and process variations across the wafer due to manufacturing processes. This paper reports on an investigation into the spatial non-uniformity and regional variations of a wafer scale stitched CMOS APS. For the first time a per-pixel analysis of the electro-optical performance of a wafer CMOS APS is presented, to address inhomogeneity issues arising from the stitching techniques used to manufacture wafer scale sensors. A complete model of the signal generation in the pixel array has been provided and proved capable of accounting for noise and gain variations across the pixel array. This novel analysis leads to readout noise and conversion gain being evaluated at pixel level, stitching block level and in regions of interest, resulting in a coefficient of variation ⩽1.9%. The uniformity of the image quality performance has been further investigated in a typical x-ray application, i.e. mammography, showing a uniformity in terms of CNR among the highest when compared with mammography detectors commonly used in clinical practice. Finally, in order to compare the detection capability of this novel APS with the technology currently used (i.e. FPIs), theoretical evaluation of the detection quantum efficiency (DQE) at zero-frequency has been performed, resulting in a higher DQE for this

  19. Performance of a novel wafer scale CMOS active pixel sensor for bio-medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, M.; Anaxagoras, T.; Konstantinidis, A. C.; Zheng, Y.; Speller, R. D.; Evans, P. M.; Allinson, N. M.; Wells, K.

    2014-07-01

    Recently CMOS active pixels sensors (APSs) have become a valuable alternative to amorphous silicon and selenium flat panel imagers (FPIs) in bio-medical imaging applications. CMOS APSs can now be scaled up to the standard 20 cm diameter wafer size by means of a reticle stitching block process. However, despite wafer scale CMOS APS being monolithic, sources of non-uniformity of response and regional variations can persist representing a significant challenge for wafer scale sensor response. Non-uniformity of stitched sensors can arise from a number of factors related to the manufacturing process, including variation of amplification, variation between readout components, wafer defects and process variations across the wafer due to manufacturing processes. This paper reports on an investigation into the spatial non-uniformity and regional variations of a wafer scale stitched CMOS APS. For the first time a per-pixel analysis of the electro-optical performance of a wafer CMOS APS is presented, to address inhomogeneity issues arising from the stitching techniques used to manufacture wafer scale sensors. A complete model of the signal generation in the pixel array has been provided and proved capable of accounting for noise and gain variations across the pixel array. This novel analysis leads to readout noise and conversion gain being evaluated at pixel level, stitching block level and in regions of interest, resulting in a coefficient of variation ⩽1.9%. The uniformity of the image quality performance has been further investigated in a typical x-ray application, i.e. mammography, showing a uniformity in terms of CNR among the highest when compared with mammography detectors commonly used in clinical practice. Finally, in order to compare the detection capability of this novel APS with the technology currently used (i.e. FPIs), theoretical evaluation of the detection quantum efficiency (DQE) at zero-frequency has been performed, resulting in a higher DQE for this

  20. Development of CMOS Active Pixel Image Sensors for Low Cost Commercial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, E.; Gee, R.; Kemeny, S.; Kim, Q.; Mendis, S.; Nakamura, J.; Nixon, R.; Ortiz, M.; Pain, B.; Zhou, Z.; Ackland, B.; Dickinson, A.; Eid, E.; Inglis, D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes ongoing research and development of CMOS active pixel image sensors for low cost commercial applications. A number of sensor designs have been fabricated and tested in both p-well and n-well technologies. Major elements in the development of the sensor include on-chip analog signal processing circuits for the reduction of fixed pattern noise, on-chip timing and control circuits and on-chip analog-to-digital conversion (ADC). Recent results and continuing efforts in these areas will be presented.

  1. CMOS Active-Pixel Image Sensor With Intensity-Driven Readout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langenbacher, Harry T.; Fossum, Eric R.; Kemeny, Sabrina

    1996-01-01

    Proposed complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) integrated-circuit image sensor automatically provides readouts from pixels in order of decreasing illumination intensity. Sensor operated in integration mode. Particularly useful in number of image-sensing tasks, including diffractive laser range-finding, three-dimensional imaging, event-driven readout of sparse sensor arrays, and star tracking.

  2. First evidence of phase-contrast imaging with laboratory sources and active pixel sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivo, A.; Arvanitis, C. D.; Bohndiek, S. E.; Clark, A. T.; Prydderch, M.; Turchetta, R.; Speller, R. D.

    2007-11-01

    The aim of the present work is to achieve a first step towards combining the advantages of an innovative X-ray imaging technique—phase-contrast imaging (XPCi)—with those of a new class of sensors, i.e. CMOS-based active pixel sensors (APSs). The advantages of XPCi are well known and include increased image quality and detection of details invisible to conventional techniques, with potential application fields encompassing the medical, biological, industrial and security areas. Vanilla, one of the APSs developed by the MI-3 collaboration (see http://mi3.shef.ac.uk), was thoroughly characterised and an appropriate scintillator was selected to provide X-ray sensitivity. During this process, a set of phase-contrast images of different biological samples was acquired by means of the well-established free-space propagation XPCi technique. The obtained results are very encouraging and are in optimum agreement with the predictions of a simulation recently developed by some of the authors thus further supporting its reliability. This paper presents these preliminary results in detail and discusses in brief both the background to this work and its future developments.

  3. Detection systems for mass spectrometry imaging: a perspective on novel developments with a focus on active pixel detectors.

    PubMed

    Jungmann, Julia H; Heeren, Ron M A

    2013-01-15

    Instrumental developments for imaging and individual particle detection for biomolecular mass spectrometry (imaging) and fundamental atomic and molecular physics studies are reviewed. Ion-counting detectors, array detection systems and high mass detectors for mass spectrometry (imaging) are treated. State-of-the-art detection systems for multi-dimensional ion, electron and photon detection are highlighted. Their application and performance in three different imaging modes--integrated, selected and spectral image detection--are described. Electro-optical and microchannel-plate-based systems are contrasted. The analytical capabilities of solid-state pixel detectors--both charge coupled device (CCD) and complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) chips--are introduced. The Medipix/Timepix detector family is described as an example of a CMOS hybrid active pixel sensor. Alternative imaging methods for particle detection and their potential for future applications are investigated. PMID:23239313

  4. Imaging of moving fiducial markers during radiotherapy using a fast, efficient active pixel sensor based EPID

    SciTech Connect

    Osmond, John P. F.; Zin, Hafiz M.; Harris, Emma J.; Lupica, Giovanni; Allinson, Nigel M.; Evans, Philip M.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to investigate the use of an experimental complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS) for tracking of moving fiducial markers during radiotherapy. Methods: The APS has an active area of 5.4 x 5.4 cm and maximum full frame read-out rate of 20 frame s{sup -1}, with the option to read out a region-of-interest (ROI) at an increased rate. It was coupled to a 4 mm thick ZnWO4 scintillator which provided a quantum efficiency (QE) of 8% for a 6 MV x-ray treatment beam. The APS was compared with a standard iViewGT flat panel amorphous Silicon (a-Si) electronic portal imaging device (EPID), with a QE of 0.34% and a frame-rate of 2.5 frame s{sup -1}. To investigate the ability of the two systems to image markers, four gold cylinders of length 8 mm and diameter 0.8, 1.2, 1.6, and 2 mm were placed on a motion-platform. Images of the stationary markers were acquired using the APS at a frame-rate of 20 frame s{sup -1}, and a dose-rate of 143 MU min{sup -1} to avoid saturation. EPID images were acquired at the maximum frame-rate of 2.5 frame s{sup -1}, and a reduced dose-rate of 19 MU min{sup -1} to provide a similar dose per frame to the APS. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the background signal and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the marker signal relative to the background were evaluated for both imagers at doses of 0.125 to 2 MU. Results: Image quality and marker visibility was found to be greater in the APS with SNR {approx}5 times greater than in the EPID and CNR up to an order of magnitude greater for all four markers. To investigate the ability to image and track moving markers the motion-platform was moved to simulate a breathing cycle with period 6 s, amplitude 20 mm and maximum speed 13.2 mm s{sup -1}. At the minimum integration time of 50 ms a tracking algorithm applied to the APS data found all four markers with a success rate of {>=}92% and positional error {<=}90 {mu}m. At an integration time of 400

  5. SAR Image Complex Pixel Representations

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2015-03-01

    Complex pixel values for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images of uniform distributed clutter can be represented as either real/imaginary (also known as I/Q) values, or as Magnitude/Phase values. Generally, these component values are integers with limited number of bits. For clutter energy well below full-scale, Magnitude/Phase offers lower quantization noise than I/Q representation. Further improvement can be had with companding of the Magnitude value.

  6. Representing SAR complex image pixels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerry, A. W.

    2016-05-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images are often complex-valued to facilitate specific exploitation modes. Furthermore, these pixel values are typically represented with either real/imaginary (also known as I/Q) values, or as Magnitude/Phase values, with constituent components comprised of integers with limited number of bits. For clutter energy well below full-scale, Magnitude/Phase offers lower quantization noise than I/Q representation. Further improvement can be had with companding of the Magnitude value.

  7. Fourier analysis of the imaging characteristics of a CMOS active pixel detector for mammography by using a linearization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jong Chul; Yun, Seungman; Youn, Hanbean; Kam, Soohwa; Cho, Seungryong; Achterkirchen, Thorsten G.; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2014-09-01

    Active pixel design using the complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process is a compelling solution for use in X-ray imaging detectors because of its excellent electronic noise characteristics. We have investigated the imaging performance of a CMOS active pixel photodiode array coupled to a granular phosphor through a fiber-optic faceplate for mammographic applications. The imaging performance included the modulation-transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Because we observed a nonlinear detector response at low exposures, we used the linearization method for the analysis of the DQE. The linearization method uses the images obtained at detector input, which are converted from those obtained at detector output by using the inverse of the detector response. Compared to the conventional method, the linearization method provided almost the same MTF and a slightly lower normalized NPS. However, the difference between the DQE results obtained by using the two methods was significant. We claim that the conventional DQE analysis of a detector having a nonlinear response characteristic can yield wrong results. Under the standard mammographic imaging condition, we obtained a DQE performance that was competitive with the performances of conventional flat-panel mammography detectors. We believe that the CMOS detector investigated in this study can be successfully used for mammography.

  8. Non-linear responsivity characterisation of a CMOS Active Pixel Sensor for high resolution imaging of the Jovian system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soman, M.; Stefanov, K.; Weatherill, D.; Holland, A.; Gow, J.; Leese, M.

    2015-02-01

    The Jovian system is the subject of study for the Jupiter Icy Moon Explorer (JUICE), an ESA mission which is planned to launch in 2022. The scientific payload is designed for both characterisation of the magnetosphere and radiation environment local to the spacecraft, as well as remote characterisation of Jupiter and its satellites. A key instrument on JUICE is the high resolution and wide angle camera, JANUS, whose main science goals include detailed characterisation and study phases of three of the Galilean satellites, Ganymede, Callisto and Europa, as well as studies of other moons, the ring system, and irregular satellites. The CIS115 is a CMOS Active Pixel Sensor from e2v technologies selected for the JANUS camera. It is fabricated using 0.18 μ m CMOS imaging sensor process, with an imaging area of 2000 × 1504 pixels, each 7 μ m square. A 4T pixel architecture allows for efficient correlated double sampling, improving the readout noise to better than 8 electrons rms, whilst the sensor is operated in a rolling shutter mode, sampling at up to 10 Mpixel/s at each of the four parallel outputs.A primary parameter to characterise for an imaging device is the relationship that converts the sensor's voltage output back to the corresponding number of electrons that were detected in a pixel, known as the Charge to Voltage Factor (CVF). In modern CMOS sensors with small feature sizes, the CVF is known to be non-linear with signal level, therefore a signal-dependent measurement of the CIS115's CVF has been undertaken and is presented here. The CVF is well modelled as a quadratic function leading to a measurement of the maximum charge handling capacity of the CIS115 to be 3.4 × 104 electrons. If the CIS115's response is assumed linear, its CVF is 21.1 electrons per mV (1/47.5 μ V per electron).

  9. Monolithic Active-Pixel Infrared Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R.; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Krabach, Timothy N.; Staller, Craig O.

    1995-01-01

    Monolithic arrays of active-pixel junction field-effect (JFET) devices made from InGaAs proposed for use as imaging sensors sensitive to light in visible and short-wavelength infrared parts of electromagnetic spectrum. Each pixel of such array comprises photodetector monolithically integrated with JFET output-amplifier circuit of source-follower type - structure similar to charge-coupled device (CCD). Sizes of instruments reduced because large cooling systems not needed.

  10. Synchrotron based planar imaging and digital tomosynthesis of breast and biopsy phantoms using a CMOS active pixel sensor.

    PubMed

    Szafraniec, Magdalena B; Konstantinidis, Anastasios C; Tromba, Giuliana; Dreossi, Diego; Vecchio, Sara; Rigon, Luigi; Sodini, Nicola; Naday, Steve; Gunn, Spencer; McArthur, Alan; Olivo, Alessandro

    2015-03-01

    The SYRMEP (SYnchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics) beamline at Elettra is performing the first mammography study on human patients using free-space propagation phase contrast imaging. The stricter spatial resolution requirements of this method currently force the use of conventional films or specialized computed radiography (CR) systems. This also prevents the implementation of three-dimensional (3D) approaches. This paper explores the use of an X-ray detector based on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS) technology as a possible alternative, for acquisitions both in planar and tomosynthesis geometry. Results indicate higher quality of the images acquired with the synchrotron set-up in both geometries. This improvement can be partly ascribed to the use of parallel, collimated and monochromatic synchrotron radiation (resulting in scatter rejection, no penumbra-induced blurring and optimized X-ray energy), and partly to phase contrast effects. Even though the pixel size of the used detector is still too large - and thus suboptimal - for free-space propagation phase contrast imaging, a degree of phase-induced edge enhancement can clearly be observed in the images. PMID:25498332

  11. CMOS Active Pixel Sensor Technology and Reliability Characterization Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yuan; Guertin, Steven M.; Pain, Bedabrata; Kayaii, Sammy

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the technology, design features and reliability characterization methodology of a CMOS Active Pixel Sensor. Both overall chip reliability and pixel reliability are projected for the imagers.

  12. Pixelated filters for spatial imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, Karine; Lequime, Michel; Lumeau, Julien; Abel-Tiberini, Laetitia; Savin De Larclause, Isabelle; Berthon, Jacques

    2015-10-01

    Small satellites are often used by spatial agencies to meet scientific spatial mission requirements. Their payloads are composed of various instruments collecting an increasing amount of data, as well as respecting the growing constraints relative to volume and mass; So small-sized integrated camera have taken a favored place among these instruments. To ensure scene specific color information sensing, pixelated filters seem to be more attractive than filter wheels. The work presented here, in collaboration with Institut Fresnel, deals with the manufacturing of this kind of component, based on thin film technologies and photolithography processes. CCD detectors with a pixel pitch about 30 μm were considered. In the configuration where the matrix filters are positioned the closest to the detector, the matrix filters are composed of 2x2 macro pixels (e.g. 4 filters). These 4 filters have a bandwidth about 40 nm and are respectively centered at 550, 700, 770 and 840 nm with a specific rejection rate defined on the visible spectral range [500 - 900 nm]. After an intense design step, 4 thin-film structures have been elaborated with a maximum thickness of 5 μm. A run of tests has allowed us to choose the optimal micro-structuration parameters. The 100x100 matrix filters prototypes have been successfully manufactured with lift-off and ion assisted deposition processes. High spatial and spectral characterization, with a dedicated metrology bench, showed that initial specifications and simulations were globally met. These excellent performances knock down the technological barriers for high-end integrated specific multi spectral imaging.

  13. High dynamic range active pixel sensor arrays for digital x-ray imaging using a-Si:H

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Jackson; Nathan, Arokia; Rowlands, John

    2006-05-15

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) active matrix flat panel imagers have gained considerable significance in large area digital imaging applications, in view of their large area readout capability. Current interests lie in a multifaceted a-Si:H array which is compatible with multiple x-ray imaging modalities. This concept entails a single detector system with sufficient dynamic range and variable signal gain. This article reports on an active pixel sensor (APS) array with high dynamic range and programable gain for multimodality x-ray imaging. Initial results have demonstrated sensitivity from subpicoampere to nanoampere photocurrent, which proves amenable for both low-dosage dynamic imaging and high input static imaging. In addition, the programable system signal gain alleviates problems such as output saturation and ensures signal readout linearity to further improve the exploitable dynamic range. Together with external amplification, this APS circuit delivers the performance needed in terms of signal gain, dynamic range, and readout rate entailed by fluoroscopic and radiographic imaging applications.

  14. Characterization of imaging performance of a large-area CMOS active-pixel detector for low-energy X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwy Lim, Chang; Yun, Seungman; Chul Han, Jong; Kim, Ho Kyung; Farrier, Michael G.; Graeve Achterkirchen, Thorsten; McDonald, Mike; Cunningham, Ian A.

    2011-10-01

    We report the imaging characteristics of the recently developed large-area complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active-pixel detector for low-energy digital X-ray imaging applications. The detector consists of a scintillator to convert X-ray into light and a photodiode pixel array made by the CMOS fabrication process to convert light into charge signals. Between two layers, we introduce a fiber-optic faceplate (FOP) to avoid direct absorption of X-ray photons in the photodiode array. A single pixel is composed of a photodiode and three transistors, and the pixel pitch is 96 μm. The imaging characteristics of the detector have been investigated in terms of modulation-transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). From the measured results, the MTF at the Nyquist frequency is about 20% and the DQE around zero-spatial frequency is about 40%. Simple cascaded linear-systems analysis has showed that the FOP prevents direct absorption of X-ray photons within the CMOS photodiode array, leading to a lower NPS and consequently improved DQE especially at high spatial frequencies.

  15. Pixels, Imagers and Related Fabrication Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Pixels, imagers and related fabrication methods are described. The described methods result in cross-talk reduction in imagers and related devices by generating depletion regions. The devices can also be used with electronic circuits for imaging applications.

  16. Large area CMOS active pixel sensor x-ray imager for digital breast tomosynthesis: Analysis, modeling, and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Chumin; Kanicki, Jerzy; Konstantinidis, Anastasios C.; Patel, Tushita

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Large area x-ray imagers based on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS) technology have been proposed for various medical imaging applications including digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). The low electronic noise (50–300 e{sup −}) of CMOS APS x-ray imagers provides a possible route to shrink the pixel pitch to smaller than 75 μm for microcalcification detection and possible reduction of the DBT mean glandular dose (MGD). Methods: In this study, imaging performance of a large area (29 × 23 cm{sup 2}) CMOS APS x-ray imager [Dexela 2923 MAM (PerkinElmer, London)] with a pixel pitch of 75 μm was characterized and modeled. The authors developed a cascaded system model for CMOS APS x-ray imagers using both a broadband x-ray radiation and monochromatic synchrotron radiation. The experimental data including modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were theoretically described using the proposed cascaded system model with satisfactory consistency to experimental results. Both high full well and low full well (LFW) modes of the Dexela 2923 MAM CMOS APS x-ray imager were characterized and modeled. The cascaded system analysis results were further used to extract the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for microcalcifications with sizes of 165–400 μm at various MGDs. The impact of electronic noise on CNR was also evaluated. Results: The LFW mode shows better DQE at low air kerma (K{sub a} < 10 μGy) and should be used for DBT. At current DBT applications, air kerma (K{sub a} ∼ 10 μGy, broadband radiation of 28 kVp), DQE of more than 0.7 and ∼0.3 was achieved using the LFW mode at spatial frequency of 0.5 line pairs per millimeter (lp/mm) and Nyquist frequency ∼6.7 lp/mm, respectively. It is shown that microcalcifications of 165–400 μm in size can be resolved using a MGD range of 0.3–1 mGy, respectively. In comparison to a General Electric GEN2 prototype DBT system (at

  17. Equivalence of a Bit Pixel Image to a Quantum Pixel Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Laurel Carlos; Dong, Shi-Hai; Cruz-Irisson, M.

    2015-11-01

    We propose a new method to transform a pixel image to the corresponding quantum-pixel using a qubit per pixel to represent each pixels classical weight in a quantum image matrix weight. All qubits are linear superposition, changing the coefficients level by level to the entire longitude of the gray scale with respect to the base states of the qubit. Classically, these states are just bytes represented in a binary matrix, having code combinations of 1 or 0 at all pixel locations. This method introduces a qubit-pixel image representation of images captured by classical optoelectronic methods. Supported partially by the project 20150964-SIP-IPN, Mexico

  18. Analysis of pixel circuits in CMOS image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Zou; Chen, Nan; Yao, Li-bin

    2015-04-01

    CMOS image sensors (CIS) have lower power consumption, lower cost and smaller size than CCD image sensors. However, generally CCDs have higher performance than CIS mainly due to lower noise. The pixel circuit used in CIS is the first part of the signal processing circuit and connected to photodiode directly, so its performance will greatly affect the CIS or even the whole imaging system. To achieve high performance, CMOS image sensors need advanced pixel circuits. There are many pixel circuits used in CIS, such as passive pixel sensor (PPS), 3T and 4T active pixel sensor (APS), capacitive transimpedance amplifier (CTIA), and passive pixel sensor (PPS). At first, the main performance parameters of each pixel structure including the noise, injection efficiency, sensitivity, power consumption, and stability of bias voltage are analyzed. Through the theoretical analysis of those pixel circuits, it is concluded that CTIA pixel circuit has good noise performance, high injection efficiency, stable photodiode bias, and high sensitivity with small integrator capacitor. Furthermore, the APS and CTIA pixel circuits are simulated in a standard 0.18-μm CMOS process and using a n-well/p-sub photodiode by SPICE and the simulation result confirms the theoretical analysis result. It shows the possibility that CMOS image sensors can be extended to a wide range of applications requiring high performance.

  19. Active Pixel Sensors: Are CCD's Dinosaurs?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    Charge-coupled devices (CCD's) are presently the technology of choice for most imaging applications. In the 23 years since their invention in 1970, they have evolved to a sophisticated level of performance. However, as with all technologies, we can be certain that they will be supplanted someday. In this paper, the Active Pixel Sensor (APS) technology is explored as a possible successor to the CCD. An active pixel is defined as a detector array technology that has at least one active transistor within the pixel unit cell. The APS eliminates the need for nearly perfect charge transfer -- the Achilles' heel of CCDs. This perfect charge transfer makes CCD's radiation 'soft,' difficult to use under low light conditions, difficult to manufacture in large array sizes, difficult to integrate with on-chip electronics, difficult to use at low temperatures, difficult to use at high frame rates, and difficult to manufacture in non-silicon materials that extend wavelength response.

  20. Performance of CMOS imager as sensing element for a Real-time Active Pixel Dosimeter for Interventional Radiology procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magalotti, D.; Bissi, L.; Conti, E.; Paolucci, M.; Placidi, P.; Scorzoni, A.; Servoli, L.

    2014-01-01

    Staff members applying Interventional Radiology procedures are exposed to ionizing radiation, which can induce detrimental effects to the human body, and requires an improvement of radiation protection. This paper is focused on the study of the sensor element for a wireless real-time dosimeter to be worn by the medical staff during the interventional radiology procedures, in the framework of the Real-Time Active PIxel Dosimetry (RAPID) INFN project. We characterize a CMOS imager to be used as detection element for the photons scattered by the patient body. The CMOS imager has been first characterized in laboratory using fluorescence X-ray sources, then a PMMA phantom has been used to diffuse the X-ray photons from an angiography system. Different operating conditions have been used to test the detector response in realistic situations, by varying the X-ray tube parameters (continuous/pulsed mode, tube voltage and current, pulse parameters), the sensor parameters (gain, integration time) and the relative distance between sensor and phantom. The sensor response has been compared with measurements performed using passive dosimeters (TLD) and also with a certified beam, in an accredited calibration centre, in order to obtain an absolute calibration. The results are very encouraging, with dose and dose rate measurement uncertainties below the 10% level even for the most demanding Interventional Radiology protocols.

  1. Active pixel and photon counting imagers based on poly-Si TFTs: rewriting the rule book on large area flat panel x-ray devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonuk, Larry E.; Koniczek, Martin; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua

    2009-02-01

    The near-ubiquity of large area, active matrix, flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) in medical x-ray imaging applications is a testament to the usefulness and adaptability of the relatively simple concept of array pixels based on a single amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) TFT coupled to a pixel storage capacitor. Interestingly, the fundamental advantages of a-Si:H thin film electronics (including compatibility with very large area processing, high radiation damage resistance, and continued development driven by interest in mainstream consumer products) are shared by the rapidly advancing technology of polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) TFTs. Moreover, the far higher mobilities of poly-Si TFTs, compared to those of a- Si:H, facilitate the creation of faster and more complex circuits than are possible with a-Si:H TFTs, leading to the possibility of new classes of large area, flat panel imagers. Given recent progress in the development of initial poly-Si imager prototypes, the creation of increasingly sophisticated active pixel arrays offering pixel-level amplification, variable gain, very high frame rates, and excellent signal-to-noise performance under all fluoroscopic and radiographic conditions (including very low exposures and high spatial frequencies), appears within reach. In addition, it is conceivable that the properties of poly-Si TFTs could allow the development of large area imagers providing single xray photon counting capabilities. In this article, the factors driving the possible realization of clinically practical active pixel and photon counting imagers based on poly-Si TFTs are described and simple calculational estimates related to photon counting imagers are presented. Finally, the prospect for future development of such imagers is discussed.

  2. Active pixel sensors with substantially planarized color filtering elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Kemeny, Sabrina E. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A semiconductor imaging system preferably having an active pixel sensor array compatible with a CMOS fabrication process. Color-filtering elements such as polymer filters and wavelength-converting phosphors can be integrated with the image sensor.

  3. Hybrid Pixel Detectors for gamma/X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzistratis, D.; Theodoratos, G.; Zografos, V.; Kazas, I.; Loukas, D.; Lambropoulos, C. P.

    2015-09-01

    Hybrid pixel detectors are made by direct converting high-Z semi-insulating single crystalline material coupled to complementary-metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) readout electronics. They are attractive because direct conversion exterminates all the problems of spatial localization related to light diffusion, energy resolution, is far superior from the combination of scintillation crystals and photomultipliers and lithography can be used to pattern electrodes with very fine pitch. We are developing 2-D pixel CMOS ASICs, connect them to pixilated CdTe crystals with the flip chip and bump bonding method and characterize the hybrids. We have designed a series of circuits, whose latest member consists of a 50×25 pixel array with 400um pitch and an embedded controller. In every pixel a full spectroscopic channel with time tagging information has been implemented. The detectors are targeting Compton scatter imaging and they can be used for coded aperture imaging too. Hybridization using CMOS can overcome the limit put on pixel circuit complexity by the use of thin film transistors (TFT) in large flat panels. Hybrid active pixel sensors are used in dental imaging and other applications (e.g. industrial CT etc.). Thus X-ray imaging can benefit from the work done on dynamic range enhancement methods developed initially for visible and infrared CMOS pixel sensors. A 2-D CMOS ASIC with 100um pixel pitch to demonstrate the feasibility of such methods in the context of X-ray imaging has been designed.

  4. Method and apparatus of high dynamic range image sensor with individual pixel reset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yadid-Pecht, Orly (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A wide dynamic range image sensor provides individual pixel reset to vary the integration time of individual pixels. The integration time of each pixel is controlled by column and row reset control signals which activate a logical reset transistor only when both signals coincide for a given pixel.

  5. Amorphous In–Ga–Zn–O thin-film transistor active pixel sensor x-ray imager for digital breast tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Chumin; Kanicki, Jerzy

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: The breast cancer detection rate for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is limited by the x-ray image quality. The limiting Nyquist frequency for current DBT systems is around 5 lp/mm, while the fine image details contained in the high spatial frequency region (>5 lp/mm) are lost. Also today the tomosynthesis patient dose is high (0.67–3.52 mGy). To address current issues, in this paper, for the first time, a high-resolution low-dose organic photodetector/amorphous In–Ga–Zn–O thin-film transistor (a-IGZO TFT) active pixel sensor (APS) x-ray imager is proposed for next generation DBT systems. Methods: The indirect x-ray detector is based on a combination of a novel low-cost organic photodiode (OPD) and a cesium iodide-based (CsI:Tl) scintillator. The proposed APS x-ray imager overcomes the difficulty of weak signal detection, when small pixel size and low exposure conditions are used, by an on-pixel signal amplification with a significant charge gain. The electrical performance of a-IGZO TFT APS pixel circuit is investigated by SPICE simulation using modified Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) TFT model. Finally, the noise, detective quantum efficiency (DQE), and resolvability of the complete system are modeled using the cascaded system formalism. Results: The result demonstrates that a large charge gain of 31–122 is achieved for the proposed high-mobility (5–20 cm{sup 2}/V s) amorphous metal-oxide TFT APS. The charge gain is sufficient to eliminate the TFT thermal noise, flicker noise as well as the external readout circuit noise. Moreover, the low TFT (<10{sup −13} A) and OPD (<10{sup −8} A/cm{sup 2}) leakage currents can further reduce the APS noise. Cascaded system analysis shows that the proposed APS imager with a 75 μm pixel pitch can effectively resolve the Nyquist frequency of 6.67 lp/mm, which can be further improved to ∼10 lp/mm if the pixel pitch is reduced to 50 μm. Moreover, the

  6. Analysis and Enhancement of Low-Light-Level Performance of Photodiode-Type CMOS Active Pixel Images Operated with Sub-Threshold Reset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata; Yang, Guang; Ortiz, Monico; Wrigley, Christopher; Hancock, Bruce; Cunningham, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Noise in photodiode-type CMOS active pixel sensors (APS) is primarily due to the reset (kTC) noise at the sense node, since it is difficult to implement in-pixel correlated double sampling for a 2-D array. Signal integrated on the photodiode sense node (SENSE) is calculated by measuring difference between the voltage on the column bus (COL) - before and after the reset (RST) is pulsed. Lower than kTC noise can be achieved with photodiode-type pixels by employing "softreset" technique. Soft-reset refers to resetting with both drain and gate of the n-channel reset transistor kept at the same potential, causing the sense node to be reset using sub-threshold MOSFET current. However, lowering of noise is achieved only at the expense higher image lag and low-light-level non-linearity. In this paper, we present an analysis to explain the noise behavior, show evidence of degraded performance under low-light levels, and describe new pixels that eliminate non-linearity and lag without compromising noise.

  7. Empirical electro-optical and x-ray performance evaluation of CMOS active pixels sensor for low dose, high resolution x-ray medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Arvanitis, C D; Bohndiek, S E; Royle, G; Blue, A; Liang, H X; Clark, A; Prydderch, M; Turchetta, R; Speller, R

    2007-12-01

    Monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensors with high performance have gained attention in the last few years in many scientific and space applications. In order to evaluate the increasing capabilities of this technology, in particular where low dose high resolution x-ray medical imaging is required, critical electro-optical and physical x-ray performance evaluation was determined. The electro-optical performance includes read noise, full well capacity, interacting quantum efficiency, and pixels cross talk. The x-ray performance, including x-ray sensitivity, modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and detection quantum efficiency, has been evaluated in the mammographic energy range. The sensor is a 525 x 525 standard three transistor CMOS active pixel sensor array with more than 75% fill factor and 25 x 25 microm pixel pitch. Reading at 10 f/s, it is found that the sensor has 114 electrons total additive noise, 10(5) electrons full well capacity with shot noise limited operation, and 34% interacting quantum efficiency at 530 nm. Two different structured CsI:Tl phosphors with thickness 95 and 115 microm, respectively, have been optically coupled via a fiber optic plate to the array resulting in two different system configurations. The sensitivity of the two different system configurations was 43 and 47 electrons per x-ray incident on the sensor. The MTF at 10% of the two different system configurations was 9.5 and 9 cycles/mm with detective quantum efficiency of 0.45 and 0.48, respectively, close to zero frequency at approximately 0.44 microC/kg (1.72 mR) detector entrance exposure. The detector was quantum limited at low spatial frequencies and its performance was comparable with high resolution a: Si and charge coupled device based x-ray imagers. The detector also demonstrates almost an order of magnitude lower noise than active matrix flat panel imagers. The results suggest that CMOS active pixel sensors when coupled

  8. Empirical electro-optical and x-ray performance evaluation of CMOS active pixels sensor for low dose, high resolution x-ray medical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Arvanitis, C. D.; Bohndiek, S. E.; Royle, G.; Blue, A.; Liang, H. X.; Clark, A.; Prydderch, M.; Turchetta, R.; Speller, R.

    2007-12-15

    Monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensors with high performance have gained attention in the last few years in many scientific and space applications. In order to evaluate the increasing capabilities of this technology, in particular where low dose high resolution x-ray medical imaging is required, critical electro-optical and physical x-ray performance evaluation was determined. The electro-optical performance includes read noise, full well capacity, interacting quantum efficiency, and pixels cross talk. The x-ray performance, including x-ray sensitivity, modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and detection quantum efficiency, has been evaluated in the mammographic energy range. The sensor is a 525x525 standard three transistor CMOS active pixel sensor array with more than 75% fill factor and 25x25 {mu}m pixel pitch. Reading at 10 f/s, it is found that the sensor has 114 electrons total additive noise, 10{sup 5} electrons full well capacity with shot noise limited operation, and 34% interacting quantum efficiency at 530 nm. Two different structured CsI:Tl phosphors with thickness 95 and 115 {mu}m, respectively, have been optically coupled via a fiber optic plate to the array resulting in two different system configurations. The sensitivity of the two different system configurations was 43 and 47 electrons per x-ray incident on the sensor. The MTF at 10% of the two different system configurations was 9.5 and 9 cycles/mm with detective quantum efficiency of 0.45 and 0.48, respectively, close to zero frequency at {approx}0.44 {mu}C/kg (1.72 mR) detector entrance exposure. The detector was quantum limited at low spatial frequencies and its performance was comparable with high resolution a:Si and charge coupled device based x-ray imagers. The detector also demonstrates almost an order of magnitude lower noise than active matrix flat panel imagers. The results suggest that CMOS active pixel sensors when coupled to

  9. Active pixel sensor with intra-pixel charge transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Mendis, Sunetra (Inventor); Kemeny, Sabrina E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An imaging device formed as a monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor integrated circuit in an industry standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor process, the integrated circuit including a focal plane array of pixel cells, each one of the cells including a photogate overlying the substrate for accumulating photo-generated charge in an underlying portion of the substrate, a readout circuit including at least an output field effect transistor formed in the substrate, and a charge coupled device section formed on the substrate adjacent the photogate having a sensing node connected to the output transistor and at least one charge coupled device stage for transferring charge from the underlying portion of the substrate to the sensing node.

  10. Active pixel sensor with intra-pixel charge transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Mendis, Sunetra (Inventor); Kemeny, Sabrina E. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An imaging device formed as a monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor integrated circuit in an industry standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor process, the integrated circuit including a focal plane array of pixel cells, each one of the cells including a photogate overlying the substrate for accumulating photo-generated charge in an underlying portion of the substrate, a readout circuit including at least an output field effect transistor formed in the substrate, and a charge coupled device section formed on the substrate adjacent the photogate having a sensing node connected to the output transistor and at least one charge coupled device stage for transferring charge from the underlying portion of the substrate to the sensing node.

  11. Active pixel sensor with intra-pixel charge transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Mendis, Sunetra (Inventor); Kemeny, Sabrina E. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An imaging device formed as a monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor integrated circuit in an industry standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor process, the integrated circuit including a focal plane array of pixel cells, each one of the cells including a photogate overlying the substrate for accumulating photo-generated charge in an underlying portion of the substrate, a readout circuit including at least an output field effect transistor formed in the substrate, and a charge coupled device section formed on the substrate adjacent the photogate having a sensing node connected to the output transistor and at least one charge coupled device stage for transferring charge from the underlying portion of the substrate to the sensing node.

  12. High responsivity CMOS imager pixel implemented in SOI technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, X.; Wrigley, C.; Yang, G.; Pain, B.

    2000-01-01

    Availability of mature sub-micron CMOS technology and the advent of the new low noise active pixel sensor (APS) concept have enabled the development of low power, miniature, single-chip, CMOS digital imagers in the decade of the 1990's.

  13. Small pixel uncooled imaging FPAs and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwell, Richard; Franks, Glen; Lacroix, Daniel; Hyland, Sandra; Murphy, Robert

    2010-04-01

    BAE Systems continues to make dramatic progress in uncooled microbolometer sensors and applications. This paper will review the latest advancements in microbolometer technology at BAE Systems, including the development status of 17 micrometer pixel pitch detectors and imaging modules which are entering production and will be finding their way into BAE Systems products and applications. Benefits include increased die per wafer and potential benefits to SWAP for many applications. Applications include thermal weapons sights, thermal imaging modules for remote weapon stations, vehicle situational awareness sensors and mast/pole mounted sensors.

  14. Pixel-level robust digital image correlation.

    PubMed

    Cofaru, Corneliu; Philips, Wilfried; Van Paepegem, Wim

    2013-12-01

    Digital Image Correlation (DIC) is a well-established non-contact optical metrology method. It employs digital image analysis to extract the full-field displacements and strains that occur in objects subjected to external stresses. Despite recent DIC progress, many problematic areas which greatly affect accuracy and that can seldomly be avoided, received very little attention. Problems posed by the presence of sharp displacement discontinuities, reflections, object borders or edges can be linked to the analysed object's properties and deformation. Other problematic areas, such as image noise, localized reflections or shadows are related more to the image acquisition process. This paper proposes a new subset-based pixel-level robust DIC method for in-plane displacement measurement which addresses all of these problems in a straightforward and unified approach, significantly improving DIC measurement accuracy compared to classic approaches. The proposed approach minimizes a robust energy functional which adaptively weighs pixel differences in the motion estimation process. The aim is to limit the negative influence of pixels that present erroneous or inconsistent motions by enforcing local motion consistency. The proposed method is compared to the classic Newton-Raphson DIC method in terms of displacement accuracy in three experiments. The first experiment is numerical and presents three combined problems: sharp displacement discontinuities, missing image information and image noise. The second experiment is a real experiment in which a plastic specimen is developing a lateral crack due to the application of uniaxial stress. The region around the crack presents both reflections that saturate the image intensity levels leading to missing image information, as well as sharp motion discontinuities due to the plastic film rupturing. The third experiment compares the proposed and classic DIC approaches with generic computer vision optical flow methods using images from

  15. Spatial clustering of pixels of a multispectral image

    DOEpatents

    Conger, James Lynn

    2014-08-19

    A method and system for clustering the pixels of a multispectral image is provided. A clustering system computes a maximum spectral similarity score for each pixel that indicates the similarity between that pixel and the most similar neighboring. To determine the maximum similarity score for a pixel, the clustering system generates a similarity score between that pixel and each of its neighboring pixels and then selects the similarity score that represents the highest similarity as the maximum similarity score. The clustering system may apply a filtering criterion based on the maximum similarity score so that pixels with similarity scores below a minimum threshold are not clustered. The clustering system changes the current pixel values of the pixels in a cluster based on an averaging of the original pixel values of the pixels in the cluster.

  16. Smart pixel imaging with computational-imaging arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Cull, Christy; Tyrrell, Brian M.; D'Onofrio, Richard; Bolstad, Andrew; Lin, Joseph; Little, Jeffrey W.; Blackwell, Megan; Renzi, Matthew; Kelly, Mike

    2014-07-01

    Smart pixel imaging with computational-imaging arrays (SPICA) transfers image plane coding typically realized in the optical architecture to the digital domain of the focal plane array, thereby minimizing signal-to-noise losses associated with static filters or apertures and inherent diffraction concerns. MIT Lincoln Laboratory has been developing digitalpixel focal plane array (DFPA) devices for many years. In this work, we leverage legacy designs modified with new features to realize a computational imaging array (CIA) with advanced pixel-processing capabilities. We briefly review the use of DFPAs for on-chip background removal and image plane filtering. We focus on two digital readout integrated circuits (DROICS) as CIAs for two-dimensional (2D) transient target tracking and three-dimensional (3D) transient target estimation using per-pixel coded-apertures or flutter shutters. This paper describes two DROICs - a SWIR pixelprocessing imager (SWIR-PPI) and a Visible CIA (VISCIA). SWIR-PPI is a DROIC with a 1 kHz global frame rate with a maximum per-pixel shuttering rate of 100 MHz, such that each pixel can be modulated by a time-varying, pseudorandom, and duo-binary signal (+1,-1,0). Combining per-pixel time-domain coding and processing enables 3D (x,y,t) target estimation with limited loss of spatial resolution. We evaluate structured and pseudo-random encoding strategies and employ linear inversion and non-linear inversion using total-variation minimization to estimate a 3D data cube from a single 2D temporally-encoded measurement. The VISCIA DROIC, while low-resolution, has a 6 kHz global frame rate and simultaneously encodes eight periodic or aperiodic transient target signatures at a maximum rate of 50 MHz using eight 8-bit counters. By transferring pixel-based image plane coding to the DROIC and utilizing sophisticated processing, our CIAs enable on-chip temporal super-resolution.

  17. Efficient single pixel imaging in Fourier space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Liheng; Suo, Jinli; Hu, Xuemei; Chen, Feng; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-08-01

    Single pixel imaging (SPI) is a novel technique capturing 2D images using a bucket detector with a high signal-to-noise ratio, wide spectrum range and low cost. Conventional SPI projects random illumination patterns to randomly and uniformly sample the entire scene’s information. Determined by Nyquist sampling theory, SPI needs either numerous projections or high computation cost to reconstruct the target scene, especially for high-resolution cases. To address this issue, we propose an efficient single pixel imaging technique (eSPI), which instead projects sinusoidal patterns for importance sampling of the target scene’s spatial spectrum in Fourier space. Specifically, utilizing the centrosymmetric conjugation and sparsity priors of natural images’ spatial spectra, eSPI sequentially projects two \\tfrac{π }{2}-phase-shifted sinusoidal patterns to obtain each Fourier coefficient in the most informative spatial frequency bands. eSPI can reduce requisite patterns by two orders of magnitude compared to conventional SPI, which helps a lot for fast and high-resolution SPI.

  18. Edge pixel response studies of edgeless silicon sensor technology for pixellated imaging detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maneuski, D.; Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Buttar, C.; Doonan, K.; Eklund, L.; Gimenez, E. N.; Hynds, D.; Kachkanov, S.; Kalliopuska, J.; McMullen, T.; O'Shea, V.; Tartoni, N.; Plackett, R.; Vahanen, S.; Wraight, K.

    2015-03-01

    Silicon sensor technologies with reduced dead area at the sensor's perimeter are under development at a number of institutes. Several fabrication methods for sensors which are sensitive close to the physical edge of the device are under investigation utilising techniques such as active-edges, passivated edges and current-terminating rings. Such technologies offer the goal of a seamlessly tiled detection surface with minimum dead space between the individual modules. In order to quantify the performance of different geometries and different bulk and implant types, characterisation of several sensors fabricated using active-edge technology were performed at the B16 beam line of the Diamond Light Source. The sensors were fabricated by VTT and bump-bonded to Timepix ROICs. They were 100 and 200 μ m thick sensors, with the last pixel-to-edge distance of either 50 or 100 μ m. The sensors were fabricated as either n-on-n or n-on-p type devices. Using 15 keV monochromatic X-rays with a beam spot of 2.5 μ m, the performance at the outer edge and corners pixels of the sensors was evaluated at three bias voltages. The results indicate a significant change in the charge collection properties between the edge and 5th (up to 275 μ m) from edge pixel for the 200 μ m thick n-on-n sensor. The edge pixel performance of the 100 μ m thick n-on-p sensors is affected only for the last two pixels (up to 110 μ m) subject to biasing conditions. Imaging characteristics of all sensor types investigated are stable over time and the non-uniformities can be minimised by flat-field corrections. The results from the synchrotron tests combined with lab measurements are presented along with an explanation of the observed effects.

  19. First tests of CHERWELL, a Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor: A CMOS Image Sensor (CIS) using 180 nm technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mylroie-Smith, James; Kolya, Scott; Velthuis, Jaap; Bevan, Adrian; Inguglia, Gianluca; Headspith, Jon; Lazarus, Ian; Lemon, Roy; Crooks, Jamie; Turchetta, Renato; Wilson, Fergus

    2013-12-01

    The Cherwell is a 4T CMOS sensor in 180 nm technology developed for the detection of charged particles. Here, the different test structures on the sensor will be described and first results from tests on the reference pixel variant are shown. The sensors were shown to have a noise of 12 e- and a signal to noise up to 150 in 55Fe.

  20. Rectangular pixels for efficient color image sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Tripurari; Singh, Mritunjay

    2011-01-01

    We present CFA designs that faithfully capture images with specified luminance and chrominance bandwidths. Previous academic research has mostly been concerned with maximizing PSNR of reconstructed images without regard to chrominance bandwidth and cross-talk. Commercial systems, on the other hand, pay close attention to both these parameters as well as to the visual quality of reconstructed images. They commonly sacrifice resolution by using a sufficiently aggressive OLPF to achieve low cross-talk and artifact free images. In this paper, we present the so called Chrominance Bandwidth Ratio, r, model in an attempt to capture both the chrominance bandwidth and the cross-talk between the various signals. Next, we examine the effect of tuning photosite aspect ratio, a hitherto neglected design parameter, and show the benefit of setting it at a different value than the pixel aspect ratio of the display. We derive panchromatic CFA patterns that provably minimize the photo-site count for all values of r. An interesting outcome is a CFA design that captures full chrominance bandwidth, yet uses fewer photosites than the venerable color-stripe design. Another interesting outcome is a low cost practical CFA design that captures chrominance at half the resolution of luminance using only 4 unique filter colors, that lends itself to efficient linear demosaicking, and yet vastly outperforms the Bayer CFA with identical number of photosites demosaicked with state of the art compute-intensive nonlinear algorithms.

  1. Thin Film on CMOS Active Pixel Sensor for Space Applications

    PubMed Central

    Schulze Spuentrup, Jan Dirk; Burghartz, Joachim N.; Graf, Heinz-Gerd; Harendt, Christine; Hutter, Franz; Nicke, Markus; Schmidt, Uwe; Schubert, Markus; Sterzel, Juergen

    2008-01-01

    A 664 × 664 element Active Pixel image Sensor (APS) with integrated analog signal processing, full frame synchronous shutter and random access for applications in star sensors is presented and discussed. A thick vertical diode array in Thin Film on CMOS (TFC) technology is explored to achieve radiation hardness and maximum fill factor.

  2. Analysis of Multipath Pixels in SAR Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J. W.; Wu, J. C.; Ding, X. L.; Zhang, L.; Hu, F. M.

    2016-06-01

    As the received radar signal is the sum of signal contributions overlaid in one single pixel regardless of the travel path, the multipath effect should be seriously tackled as the multiple bounce returns are added to direct scatter echoes which leads to ghost scatters. Most of the existing solution towards the multipath is to recover the signal propagation path. To facilitate the signal propagation simulation process, plenty of aspects such as sensor parameters, the geometry of the objects (shape, location, orientation, mutual position between adjacent buildings) and the physical parameters of the surface (roughness, correlation length, permittivity)which determine the strength of radar signal backscattered to the SAR sensor should be given in previous. However, it's not practical to obtain the highly detailed object model in unfamiliar area by field survey as it's a laborious work and time-consuming. In this paper, SAR imaging simulation based on RaySAR is conducted at first aiming at basic understanding of multipath effects and for further comparison. Besides of the pre-imaging simulation, the product of the after-imaging, which refers to radar images is also taken into consideration. Both Cosmo-SkyMed ascending and descending SAR images of Lupu Bridge in Shanghai are used for the experiment. As a result, the reflectivity map and signal distribution map of different bounce level are simulated and validated by 3D real model. The statistic indexes such as the phase stability, mean amplitude, amplitude dispersion, coherence and mean-sigma ratio in case of layover are analyzed with combination of the RaySAR output.

  3. Active pixel sensor array with multiresolution readout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Kemeny, Sabrina E. (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An imaging device formed as a monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor integrated circuit in an industry standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor process, the integrated circuit including a focal plane array of pixel cells, each one of the cells including a photogate overlying the substrate for accumulating photo-generated charge in an underlying portion of the substrate and a charge coupled device section formed on the substrate adjacent the photogate having a sensing node and at least one charge coupled device stage for transferring charge from the underlying portion of the substrate to the sensing node. There is also a readout circuit, part of which can be disposed at the bottom of each column of cells and be common to all the cells in the column. The imaging device can also include an electronic shutter formed on the substrate adjacent the photogate, and/or a storage section to allow for simultaneous integration. In addition, the imaging device can include a multiresolution imaging circuit to provide images of varying resolution. The multiresolution circuit could also be employed in an array where the photosensitive portion of each pixel cell is a photodiode. This latter embodiment could further be modified to facilitate low light imaging.

  4. Dynamics of Coronal Bright Points as Seen by Sun Watcher Using Active Pixel System Detector and Image Processing (SWAP), Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrashekhar, K.; Krishna Prasad, S.; Banerjee, D.; Ravindra, B.; Seaton, Daniel B.

    2013-08-01

    The Sun Watcher using Active Pixel system detector and Image Processing (SWAP) onboard the PRoject for OnBoard Autonomy-2 (PROBA2) spacecraft provides images of the solar corona in EUV channel centered at 174 Å. These data, together with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), are used to study the dynamics of coronal bright points. The evolution of the magnetic polarities and associated changes in morphology are studied using magnetograms and multi-wavelength imaging. The morphology of the bright points seen in low-resolution SWAP images and high-resolution AIA images show different structures, whereas the intensity variations with time show similar trends in both SWAP 174 Å and AIA 171 Å channels. We observe that bright points are seen in EUV channels corresponding to a magnetic flux of the order of 1018 Mx. We find that there exists a good correlation between total emission from the bright point in several UV-EUV channels and total unsigned photospheric magnetic flux above certain thresholds. The bright points also show periodic brightenings, and we have attempted to find the oscillation periods in bright points and their connection to magnetic-flux changes. The observed periods are generally long (10 - 25 minutes) and there is an indication that the intensity oscillations may be generated by repeated magnetic reconnection.

  5. Hot pixel generation in active pixel sensors: dosimetric and micro-dosimetric response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheick, Leif; Novak, Frank

    2003-01-01

    The dosimetric response of an active pixel sensor is analyzed. heavy ions are seen to damage the pixel in much the same way as gamma radiation. The probability of a hot pixel is seen to exhibit behavior that is not typical with other microdose effects.

  6. CMOS VLSI Active-Pixel Sensor for Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata; Sun, Chao; Yang, Guang; Heynssens, Julie

    2004-01-01

    An architecture for a proposed active-pixel sensor (APS) and a design to implement the architecture in a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuit provide for some advanced features that are expected to be especially desirable for tracking pointlike features of stars. The architecture would also make this APS suitable for robotic- vision and general pointing and tracking applications. CMOS imagers in general are well suited for pointing and tracking because they can be configured for random access to selected pixels and to provide readout from windows of interest within their fields of view. However, until now, the architectures of CMOS imagers have not supported multiwindow operation or low-noise data collection. Moreover, smearing and motion artifacts in collected images have made prior CMOS imagers unsuitable for tracking applications. The proposed CMOS imager (see figure) would include an array of 1,024 by 1,024 pixels containing high-performance photodiode-based APS circuitry. The pixel pitch would be 9 m. The operations of the pixel circuits would be sequenced and otherwise controlled by an on-chip timing and control block, which would enable the collection of image data, during a single frame period, from either the full frame (that is, all 1,024 1,024 pixels) or from within as many as 8 different arbitrarily placed windows as large as 8 by 8 pixels each. A typical prior CMOS APS operates in a row-at-a-time ( grolling-shutter h) readout mode, which gives rise to exposure skew. In contrast, the proposed APS would operate in a sample-first/readlater mode, suppressing rolling-shutter effects. In this mode, the analog readout signals from the pixels corresponding to the windows of the interest (which windows, in the star-tracking application, would presumably contain guide stars) would be sampled rapidly by routing them through a programmable diagonal switch array to an on-chip parallel analog memory array. The

  7. Impact of CT detector pixel-to-pixel crosstalk on image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Klaus J.; Spies, Lothar; Vogtmeier, Gereon; Luhta, Randy

    2006-03-01

    In Computed Tomography (CT), the image quality sensitively depends on the accuracy of the X-ray projection signal, which is acquired by a two-dimensional array of pixel cells in the detector. If the signal of X-ray photons is spread out to neighboring pixels (crosstalk), a decrease of spatial resolution may result. Moreover, streak and ring artifacts may emerge. Deploying system simulations for state-of-the-art CT detector configurations, we characterize origin and appearance of these artifacts in the reconstructed CT images for different scenarios. A uniform pixel-to-pixel crosstalk results in a loss of spatial resolution only. The Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) is attenuated, without affecting the limiting resolution, which is defined as the first zero of the MTF. Additional streak and ring artifacts appear, if the pixel-to-pixel crosstalk is non-uniform. Parallel to the system simulations we developed an analytical model. The model explains resolution loss and artifact level using the first and second derivative of the X-ray profile acquired by the detector. Simulations and analytical model are in agreement to each other. We discuss the perceptibility of ring and streak artifacts within noisy images if no crosstalk correction is applied.

  8. Sub-pixel spatial resolution wavefront phase imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip (Inventor); Mooney, James T. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A phase imaging method for an optical wavefront acquires a plurality of phase images of the optical wavefront using a phase imager. Each phase image is unique and is shifted with respect to another of the phase images by a known/controlled amount that is less than the size of the phase imager's pixels. The phase images are then combined to generate a single high-spatial resolution phase image of the optical wavefront.

  9. The Dexela 2923 CMOS X-ray detector: A flat panel detector based on CMOS active pixel sensors for medical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinidis, Anastasios C.; Szafraniec, Magdalena B.; Speller, Robert D.; Olivo, Alessandro

    2012-10-01

    Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS) active pixel sensors (APS) have been introduced recently in many scientific applications. This work reports on the performance (in terms of signal and noise transfer) of an X-ray detector that uses a novel CMOS APS which was developed for medical X-ray imaging applications. For a full evaluation of the detector's performance, electro-optical and X-ray characterizations were carried out. The former included measuring read noise, full well capacity and dynamic range. The latter, which included measuring X-ray sensitivity, presampling modulation transfer function (pMTF), noise power spectrum (NPS) and the resulting detective quantum efficiency (DQE), was assessed under three beam qualities (28 kV, 50 kV (RQA3) and 70 kV (RQA5) using W/Al) all in accordance with the IEC standard. The detector features an in-pixel option for switching the full well capacity between two distinct modes, high full well (HFW) and low full well (LFW). Two structured CsI:Tl scintillators of different thickness (a “thin” one for high resolution and a thicker one for high light efficiency) were optically coupled to the sensor array to optimize the performance of the system for different medical applications. The electro-optical performance evaluation of the sensor results in relatively high read noise (∼360 e-), high full well capacity (∼1.5×106 e-) and wide dynamic range (∼73 dB) under HFW mode operation. When the LFW mode is used, the read noise is lower (∼165) at the expense of a reduced full well capacity (∼0.5×106 e-) and dynamic range (∼69 dB). The maximum DQE values at low frequencies (i.e. 0.5 lp/mm) are high for both HFW (0.69 for 28 kV, 0.71 for 50 kV and 0.75 for 70 kV) and LFW (0.69 for 28 kV and 0.7 for 50 kV) modes. The X-ray performance of the studied detector compares well to that of other mammography and general radiography systems, obtained under similar experimental conditions. This demonstrates the suitability

  10. Active pixel sensor array with electronic shuttering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An active pixel cell includes electronic shuttering capability. The cell can be shuttered to prevent additional charge accumulation. One mode transfers the current charge to a storage node that is blocked against accumulation of optical radiation. The charge is sampled from a floating node. Since the charge is stored, the node can be sampled at the beginning and the end of every cycle. Another aspect allows charge to spill out of the well whenever the charge amount gets higher than some amount, thereby providing anti blooming.

  11. Amplifier based broadband pixel for sub-millimeter wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkozy, Stephen; Drewes, Jonathan; Leong, Kevin M. K. H.; Lai, Richard; Mei, X. B. (Gerry); Yoshida, Wayne; Lange, Michael D.; Lee, Jane; Deal, William R.

    2012-09-01

    Broadband sub-millimeter wave technology has received significant attention for potential applications in security, medical, and military imaging. Despite theoretical advantages of reduced size, weight, and power compared to current millimeter wave systems, sub-millimeter wave systems have been hampered by a fundamental lack of amplification with sufficient gain and noise figure properties. We report a broadband pixel operating from 300 to 340 GHz, biased off a single 2 V power supply. Over this frequency range, the amplifiers provide > 40 dB gain and <8 dB noise figure, representing the current state-of-art performance capabilities. This pixel is enabled by revolutionary enhancements to indium phosphide (InP) high electron mobility transistor technology, based on a sub-50 nm gate and indium arsenide composite channel with a projected maximum oscillation frequency fmax>1.0 THz. The first sub-millimeter wave-based images using active amplification are demonstrated as part of the Joint Improvised Explosive Device Defeat Organization Longe Range Personnel Imager Program. This development and demonstration may bring to life future sub-millimeter-wave and THz applications such as solutions to brownout problems, ultra-high bandwidth satellite communication cross-links, and future planetary exploration missions.

  12. Super pixel density based clustering automatic image classification method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mingxing; Zhang, Chuan; Zhang, Tianxu

    2015-12-01

    The image classification is an important means of image segmentation and data mining, how to achieve rapid automated image classification has been the focus of research. In this paper, based on the super pixel density of cluster centers algorithm for automatic image classification and identify outlier. The use of the image pixel location coordinates and gray value computing density and distance, to achieve automatic image classification and outlier extraction. Due to the increased pixel dramatically increase the computational complexity, consider the method of ultra-pixel image preprocessing, divided into a small number of super-pixel sub-blocks after the density and distance calculations, while the design of a normalized density and distance discrimination law, to achieve automatic classification and clustering center selection, whereby the image automatically classify and identify outlier. After a lot of experiments, our method does not require human intervention, can automatically categorize images computing speed than the density clustering algorithm, the image can be effectively automated classification and outlier extraction.

  13. A Chip and Pixel Qualification Methodology on Imaging Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yuan; Guertin, Steven M.; Petkov, Mihail; Nguyen, Duc N.; Novak, Frank

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a qualification methodology on imaging sensors. In addition to overall chip reliability characterization based on sensor s overall figure of merit, such as Dark Rate, Linearity, Dark Current Non-Uniformity, Fixed Pattern Noise and Photon Response Non-Uniformity, a simulation technique is proposed and used to project pixel reliability. The projected pixel reliability is directly related to imaging quality and provides additional sensor reliability information and performance control.

  14. Pixel classification based color image segmentation using quaternion exponent moments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang-Yang; Wu, Zhi-Fang; Chen, Liang; Zheng, Hong-Liang; Yang, Hong-Ying

    2016-02-01

    Image segmentation remains an important, but hard-to-solve, problem since it appears to be application dependent with usually no a priori information available regarding the image structure. In recent years, many image segmentation algorithms have been developed, but they are often very complex and some undesired results occur frequently. In this paper, we propose a pixel classification based color image segmentation using quaternion exponent moments. Firstly, the pixel-level image feature is extracted based on quaternion exponent moments (QEMs), which can capture effectively the image pixel content by considering the correlation between different color channels. Then, the pixel-level image feature is used as input of twin support vector machines (TSVM) classifier, and the TSVM model is trained by selecting the training samples with Arimoto entropy thresholding. Finally, the color image is segmented with the trained TSVM model. The proposed scheme has the following advantages: (1) the effective QEMs is introduced to describe color image pixel content, which considers the correlation between different color channels, (2) the excellent TSVM classifier is utilized, which has lower computation time and higher classification accuracy. Experimental results show that our proposed method has very promising segmentation performance compared with the state-of-the-art segmentation approaches recently proposed in the literature. PMID:26618250

  15. Metamaterial-based single pixel imaging system (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, Willie; Watts, Claire M.; Nadell, Christian; Montoya, John A.; Krishna, Sanjay

    2015-09-01

    Single pixel cameras are useful imaging devices where it is difficult or infeasible to fashion focal plan arrays. For example in the Far Infrared (FIR) it is difficult to perform imaging by conventional detector arrays, owing to the cost and size of such an array. The typical single pixel camera uses a spatial light modulator (SLM) - placed in the conjugate image plane - and is used to sample various portions of the image. The spatially modulated light emerging from the SLM is then sent to a single detector where the light is condensed with suitable optics for detection. Conventional SLMs are either based on liquid crystals or digital mirror devices. As such these devices are limited in modulation speeds of order 30 kHz. Further there is little control over the type of light that is modulated. We present metamaterial based spatial light modulators which provide the ability to digitally encode images - with various measurement matrix coefficients - thus permitting high speed and fidelity imaging capability. In particular we use the Hadamard matrix and related S-matrix to encode images for single pixel imaging. Metamaterials thus permit imaging in regimes of the electromagnetic spectrum where conventional SLMs are not available. Additionally, metamaterials offer several salient features that are not available with commercial SLMs. For example, metamaterials may be used to enable hyperspectral, polarimetric, and phase sensitive imaging. We present the theory and experimental results of single pixel imaging with digital metamaterials in the far infrared and highlight the future of this exciting field.

  16. A semiconductor radiation imaging pixel detector for space radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Kroupa, Martin; Bahadori, Amir; Campbell-Ricketts, Thomas; Empl, Anton; Hoang, Son Minh; Idarraga-Munoz, John; Rios, Ryan; Semones, Edward; Stoffle, Nicholas; Tlustos, Lukas; Turecek, Daniel; Pinsky, Lawrence

    2015-07-01

    Progress in the development of high-performance semiconductor radiation imaging pixel detectors based on technologies developed for use in high-energy physics applications has enabled the development of a completely new generation of compact low-power active dosimeters and area monitors for use in space radiation environments. Such detectors can provide real-time information concerning radiation exposure, along with detailed analysis of the individual particles incident on the active medium. Recent results from the deployment of detectors based on the Timepix from the CERN-based Medipix2 Collaboration on the International Space Station (ISS) are reviewed, along with a glimpse of developments to come. Preliminary results from Orion MPCV Exploration Flight Test 1 are also presented. PMID:26256630

  17. A semiconductor radiation imaging pixel detector for space radiation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroupa, Martin; Bahadori, Amir; Campbell-Ricketts, Thomas; Empl, Anton; Hoang, Son Minh; Idarraga-Munoz, John; Rios, Ryan; Semones, Edward; Stoffle, Nicholas; Tlustos, Lukas; Turecek, Daniel; Pinsky, Lawrence

    2015-07-01

    Progress in the development of high-performance semiconductor radiation imaging pixel detectors based on technologies developed for use in high-energy physics applications has enabled the development of a completely new generation of compact low-power active dosimeters and area monitors for use in space radiation environments. Such detectors can provide real-time information concerning radiation exposure, along with detailed analysis of the individual particles incident on the active medium. Recent results from the deployment of detectors based on the Timepix from the CERN-based Medipix2 Collaboration on the International Space Station (ISS) are reviewed, along with a glimpse of developments to come. Preliminary results from Orion MPCV Exploration Flight Test 1 are also presented.

  18. Monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) in a VLSI CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchetta, R.; French, M.; Manolopoulos, S.; Tyndel, M.; Allport, P.; Bates, R.; O'Shea, V.; Hall, G.; Raymond, M.

    2003-03-01

    Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) designed in a standard VLSI CMOS technology have recently been proposed as a compact pixel detector for the detection of high-energy charged particle in vertex/tracking applications. MAPS, also named CMOS sensors, are already extensively used in visible light applications. With respect to other competing imaging technologies, CMOS sensors have several potential advantages in terms of low cost, low power, lower noise at higher speed, random access of pixels which allows windowing of region of interest, ability to integrate several functions on the same chip. This brings altogether to the concept of 'camera-on-a-chip'. In this paper, we review the use of CMOS sensors for particle physics and we analyse their performances in term of the efficiency (fill factor), signal generation, noise, readout speed and sensor area. In most of high-energy physics applications, data reduction is needed in the sensor at an early stage of the data processing before transfer of the data to tape. Because of the large number of pixels, data reduction is needed on the sensor itself or just outside. This brings in stringent requirements on the temporal noise as well as to the sensor uniformity, expressed as a Fixed Pattern Noise (FPN). A pixel architecture with an additional transistor is proposed. This architecture, coupled to correlated double sampling of the signal will allow cancellation of the two dominant noise sources, namely the reset or kTC noise and the FPN. A prototype has been designed in a standard 0.25 μm CMOS technology. It has also a structure for electrical calibration of the sensor. The prototype is functional and detailed tests are under way.

  19. CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS): Developments and future outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchetta, R.; Fant, A.; Gasiorek, P.; Esbrand, C.; Griffiths, J. A.; Metaxas, M. G.; Royle, G. J.; Speller, R.; Venanzi, C.; van der Stelt, P. F.; Verheij, H.; Li, G.; Theodoridis, S.; Georgiou, H.; Cavouras, D.; Hall, G.; Noy, M.; Jones, J.; Leaver, J.; Machin, D.; Greenwood, S.; Khaleeq, M.; Schulerud, H.; Østby, J. M.; Triantis, F.; Asimidis, A.; Bolanakis, D.; Manthos, N.; Longo, R.; Bergamaschi, A.

    2007-12-01

    Re-invented in the early 1990s, on both sides of the Atlantic, Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) in a CMOS technology are today the most sold solid-state imaging devices, overtaking the traditional technology of Charge-Coupled Devices (CCD). The slow uptake of CMOS MAPS started with low-end applications, for example web-cams, and is slowly pervading the high-end applications, for example in prosumer digital cameras. Higher specifications are required for scientific applications: very low noise, high speed, high dynamic range, large format and radiation hardness are some of these requirements. This paper will present a brief overview of the CMOS Image Sensor technology and of the requirements for scientific applications. As an example, a sensor for X-ray imaging will be presented. This sensor was developed within a European FP6 Consortium, intelligent imaging sensors (I-ImaS).

  20. Multiport solid-state imager characterization at variable pixel rates

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, G.J.; Albright, K.A.; Turko, B.T.

    1993-08-01

    The imaging performance of an 8-port Full Frame Transfer Charge Coupled Device (FFT CCD) as a function of several parameters including pixel clock rate is presented. The device, model CCD- 13, manufactured by English Electric Valve (EEV) is a 512 {times} 512 pixel array designed with four individual programmable bidirectional serial registers and eight output amplifiers permitting simultaneous readout of eight segments (128 horizontal {times} 256 vertical pixels) of the array. The imager was evaluated in Los Alamos National Laboratory`s High-Speed Solid-State Imager Test Station at true pixel rates as high as 50 MHz for effective imager pixel rates approaching 400 MHz from multiporting. Key response characteristics measured include absolute responsivity, Charge-Transfer-Efficiency (CTE), dynamic range, resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, and electronic and optical crosstalk among the eight video channels. Preliminary test results and data obtained from the CCD-13 will be presented and the versatility/capabilities of the test station will be reviewed.

  1. Two-dimensional pixel array image sensor for protein crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Beuville, E.; Beche, J.-F.; Cork, C.

    1996-07-01

    A 2D pixel array image sensor module has been designed for time resolved Protein Crystallography. This smart pixels detector significantly enhances time resolved Laue Protein crystallography by two to three orders of magnitude compared to existing sensors like films or phosphor screens coupled to CCDs. The resolution in time and dynamic range of this type of detector will allow one to study the evolution of structural changes that occur within the protein as a function of time. This detector will also considerably accelerate data collection in static Laue or monochromatic crystallography and make better use of the intense beam delivered by synchrotron light sources. The event driven pixel array detectors, based on the column Architecture, can provide multiparameter information (energy discrimination, time), with sparse and frameless readout without significant dead time. The prototype module consists of a 16x16 pixel diode array bump-bonded to the integrated circuit. The detection area is 150x150 square microns.

  2. CMOS Active Pixel Sensor Star Tracker with Regional Electronic Shutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yadid-Pecht, Orly; Pain, Bedabrata; Staller, Craig; Clark, Christopher; Fossum, Eric

    1996-01-01

    The guidance system in a spacecraft determines spacecraft attitude by matching an observed star field to a star catalog....An APS(active pixel sensor)-based system can reduce mass and power consumption and radiation effects compared to a CCD(charge-coupled device)-based system...This paper reports an APS (active pixel sensor) with locally variable times, achieved through individual pixel reset (IPR).

  3. Active pixel sensor pixel having a photodetector whose output is coupled to an output transistor gate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Nakamura, Junichi (Inventor); Kemeny, Sabrina E. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An imaging device formed as a monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor integrated circuit in an industry standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor process, the integrated circuit including a focal plane array of pixel cells, each one of the cells including a photogate overlying the substrate for accumulating photo-generated charge in an underlying portion of the substrate and a charge coupled device section formed on the substrate adjacent the photogate having a sensing node and at least one charge coupled device stage for transferring charge from the underlying portion of the substrate to the sensing node. There is also a readout circuit, part of which can be disposed at the bottom of each column of cells and be common to all the cells in the column. A Simple Floating Gate (SFG) pixel structure could also be employed in the imager to provide a non-destructive readout and smaller pixel sizes.

  4. Using Trained Pixel Classifiers to Select Images of Interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazzoni, D.; Wagstaff, K.; Castano, R.

    2004-01-01

    We present a machine-learning-based approach to ranking images based on learned priorities. Unlike previous methods for image evaluation, which typically assess the value of each image based on the presence of predetermined specific features, this method involves using two levels of machine-learning classifiers: one level is used to classify each pixel as belonging to one of a group of rather generic classes, and another level is used to rank the images based on these pixel classifications, given some example rankings from a scientist as a guide. Initial results indicate that the technique works well, producing new rankings that match the scientist's rankings significantly better than would be expected by chance. The method is demonstrated for a set of images collected by a Mars field-test rover.

  5. A CMOS In-Pixel CTIA High Sensitivity Fluorescence Imager

    PubMed Central

    Murari, Kartikeya; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Thakor, Nitish; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, charge coupled device (CCD) based image sensors have held sway over the field of biomedical imaging. Complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) based imagers so far lack sensitivity leading to poor low-light imaging. Certain applications including our work on animal-mountable systems for imaging in awake and unrestrained rodents require the high sensitivity and image quality of CCDs and the low power consumption, flexibility and compactness of CMOS imagers. We present a 132×124 high sensitivity imager array with a 20.1 μm pixel pitch fabricated in a standard 0.5 μ CMOS process. The chip incorporates n-well/p-sub photodiodes, capacitive transimpedance amplifier (CTIA) based in-pixel amplification, pixel scanners and delta differencing circuits. The 5-transistor all-nMOS pixel interfaces with peripheral pMOS transistors for column-parallel CTIA. At 70 fps, the array has a minimum detectable signal of 4 nW/cm2 at a wavelength of 450 nm while consuming 718 μA from a 3.3 V supply. Peak signal to noise ratio (SNR) was 44 dB at an incident intensity of 1 μW/cm2. Implementing 4×4 binning allowed the frame rate to be increased to 675 fps. Alternately, sensitivity could be increased to detect about 0.8 nW/cm2 while maintaining 70 fps. The chip was used to image single cell fluorescence at 28 fps with an average SNR of 32 dB. For comparison, a cooled CCD camera imaged the same cell at 20 fps with an average SNR of 33.2 dB under the same illumination while consuming over a watt. PMID:23136624

  6. Demosaiced pixel super-resolution for multiplexed holographic color imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yichen; Zhang, Yibo; Luo, Wei; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-01-01

    To synthesize a holographic color image, one can sequentially take three holograms at different wavelengths, e.g., at red (R), green (G) and blue (B) parts of the spectrum, and digitally merge them. To speed up the imaging process by a factor of three, a Bayer color sensor-chip can also be used to demultiplex three wavelengths that simultaneously illuminate the sample and digitally retrieve individual set of holograms using the known transmission spectra of the Bayer color filters. However, because the pixels of different channels (R, G, B) on a Bayer color sensor are not at the same physical location, conventional demosaicing techniques generate color artifacts in holographic imaging using simultaneous multi-wavelength illumination. Here we demonstrate that pixel super-resolution can be merged into the color de-multiplexing process to significantly suppress the artifacts in wavelength-multiplexed holographic color imaging. This new approach, termed Demosaiced Pixel Super-Resolution (D-PSR), generates color images that are similar in performance to sequential illumination at three wavelengths, and therefore improves the speed of holographic color imaging by 3-fold. D-PSR method is broadly applicable to holographic microscopy applications, where high-resolution imaging and multi-wavelength illumination are desired. PMID:27353242

  7. Demosaiced pixel super-resolution for multiplexed holographic color imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yichen; Zhang, Yibo; Luo, Wei; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-06-01

    To synthesize a holographic color image, one can sequentially take three holograms at different wavelengths, e.g., at red (R), green (G) and blue (B) parts of the spectrum, and digitally merge them. To speed up the imaging process by a factor of three, a Bayer color sensor-chip can also be used to demultiplex three wavelengths that simultaneously illuminate the sample and digitally retrieve individual set of holograms using the known transmission spectra of the Bayer color filters. However, because the pixels of different channels (R, G, B) on a Bayer color sensor are not at the same physical location, conventional demosaicing techniques generate color artifacts in holographic imaging using simultaneous multi-wavelength illumination. Here we demonstrate that pixel super-resolution can be merged into the color de-multiplexing process to significantly suppress the artifacts in wavelength-multiplexed holographic color imaging. This new approach, termed Demosaiced Pixel Super-Resolution (D-PSR), generates color images that are similar in performance to sequential illumination at three wavelengths, and therefore improves the speed of holographic color imaging by 3-fold. D-PSR method is broadly applicable to holographic microscopy applications, where high-resolution imaging and multi-wavelength illumination are desired.

  8. Demosaiced pixel super-resolution for multiplexed holographic color imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yichen; Zhang, Yibo; Luo, Wei; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-01-01

    To synthesize a holographic color image, one can sequentially take three holograms at different wavelengths, e.g., at red (R), green (G) and blue (B) parts of the spectrum, and digitally merge them. To speed up the imaging process by a factor of three, a Bayer color sensor-chip can also be used to demultiplex three wavelengths that simultaneously illuminate the sample and digitally retrieve individual set of holograms using the known transmission spectra of the Bayer color filters. However, because the pixels of different channels (R, G, B) on a Bayer color sensor are not at the same physical location, conventional demosaicing techniques generate color artifacts in holographic imaging using simultaneous multi-wavelength illumination. Here we demonstrate that pixel super-resolution can be merged into the color de-multiplexing process to significantly suppress the artifacts in wavelength-multiplexed holographic color imaging. This new approach, termed Demosaiced Pixel Super-Resolution (D-PSR), generates color images that are similar in performance to sequential illumination at three wavelengths, and therefore improves the speed of holographic color imaging by 3-fold. D-PSR method is broadly applicable to holographic microscopy applications, where high-resolution imaging and multi-wavelength illumination are desired. PMID:27353242

  9. Design of a silicon avalanche photodiode pixel with integrated laser diode using back-illuminated crystallographically etched silicon-on-sapphire with monolithically integrated microlens for dual-mode passive and active imaging arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Alvin G.

    2010-08-01

    There is a growing need in scientific research applications for dual-mode, passive and active 2D and 3D LADAR imaging methods. To fill this need, an advanced back-illuminated silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) design is presented using a novel silicon-on-sapphire substrate incorporating a crystalline aluminum nitride (AlN) antireflective layer between the silicon and R-plane sapphire. This allows integration of a high quantum efficiency silicon APD with a gallium nitride (GaN) laser diode in each pixel. The pixel design enables single photon sensitive, solid-state focal plane arrays (FPAs) with wide dynamic range, supporting passive and active imaging capability in a single FPA. When (100) silicon is properly etched with TMAH solution, square based pyramidal frustum or mesa arrays result with the four mesa sidewalls of the APD formed by (111) silicon planes that intersect the (100) planes at a crystallographic angle, φ c = 54.7°. The APD device is fabricated in the mesa using conventional silicon processing technology. The GaN laser diode is fabricated by epitaxial growth inside of an inverted, etched cavity in the silicon mesa. Microlenses are fabricated in the thinned, and AR-coated sapphire substrate. The APDs share a common, front-side anode contact, and laser diodes share a common cathode. A low resistance (Al) or (Cu) metal anode grid fills the space between pixels and also inhibits optical crosstalk. SOS-APD arrays are flip-chip bump-bonded to CMOS readout ICs to produce hybrid FPAs. The square 27 μm emitter-detector pixel achieves SNR > 1 in active detection mode for Lambert surfaces at 1,000 meters.

  10. Velocity map imaging using an in-vacuum pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gademann, Georg; Huismans, Ymkje; Gijsbertsen, Arjan; Jungmann, Julia; Visschers, Jan; Vrakking, Marc J. J.

    2009-10-01

    The use of a new type in-vacuum pixel detector in velocity map imaging (VMI) is introduced. The Medipix2 and Timepix semiconductor pixel detectors (256×256 square pixels, 55×55 μm2) are well suited for charged particle detection. They offer high resolution, low noise, and high quantum efficiency. The Medipix2 chip allows double energy discrimination by offering a low and a high energy threshold. The Timepix detector allows to record the incidence time of a particle with a temporal resolution of 10 ns and a dynamic range of 160 μs. Results of the first time application of the Medipix2 detector to VMI are presented, investigating the quantum efficiency as well as the possibility to operate at increased background pressure in the vacuum chamber.

  11. Decoding brain responses to pixelized images in the primary visual cortex: implications for visual cortical prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Bing-bing; Zheng, Xiao-lin; Lu, Zhen-gang; Wang, Xing; Yin, Zheng-qin; Hou, Wen-sheng; Meng, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Visual cortical prostheses have the potential to restore partial vision. Still limited by the low-resolution visual percepts provided by visual cortical prostheses, implant wearers can currently only “see” pixelized images, and how to obtain the specific brain responses to different pixelized images in the primary visual cortex (the implant area) is still unknown. We conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment on normal human participants to investigate the brain activation patterns in response to 18 different pixelized images. There were 100 voxels in the brain activation pattern that were selected from the primary visual cortex, and voxel size was 4 mm × 4 mm × 4 mm. Multi-voxel pattern analysis was used to test if these 18 different brain activation patterns were specific. We chose a Linear Support Vector Machine (LSVM) as the classifier in this study. The results showed that the classification accuracies of different brain activation patterns were significantly above chance level, which suggests that the classifier can successfully distinguish the brain activation patterns. Our results suggest that the specific brain activation patterns to different pixelized images can be obtained in the primary visual cortex using a 4 mm × 4 mm × 4 mm voxel size and a 100-voxel pattern. PMID:26692860

  12. Sub-pixel resolution with the Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI).

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, Max Louis; Smith, Jody Lynn; Nandy, Prabal

    2003-06-01

    The Multispectral Thermal Imager Satellite (MTI) has been used to test a sub-pixel sampling technique in an effort to obtain higher spatial frequency imagery than that of its original design. The MTI instrument is of particular interest because of its infrared detectors. In this spectral region, the detector size is traditionally the limiting factor in determining the satellite's ground sampling distance (GSD). Additionally, many over-sampling techniques require flexible command and control of the sensor and spacecraft. The MTI sensor is well suited for this task, as it is the only imaging system on the MTI satellite bus. In this super-sampling technique, MTI is maneuvered such that the data are collected at sub-pixel intervals on the ground. The data are then processed using a deconvolution algorithm using in-scene measured point spread functions (PSF) to produce an image with synthetically-boosted GSD.

  13. Sub-pixel localization of highways in AVIRIS images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salu, Yehuda

    1995-01-01

    Roads and highways show up clearly in many bands of AVIRIS images. A typical lane in the U.S. is 12 feet wide, and the total width of a four lane highway, including 18 feet of paved shoulders, is 19.8 m. Such a highway will cover only a portion of any 20x20 m AVIRIS pixel that it traverses. The other portion of these pixels wil be usually covered by vegetation. An interesting problem is to precisely determine the location of a highway within the AVIRIS pixels that it traverses. This information may be used for alignment and spatial calibration of AVIRIS images. Also, since the reflection properties of highway surfaces do not change with time, and they can be determined once and for all, such information can be of help in calculating and filtering out the atmospheric noise that contaminates AVIRIS measurements. The purpose of this report is to describe a method for sub-pixel localization of highways.

  14. Hexagonal Pixels and Indexing Scheme for Binary Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Gordon G.

    2004-01-01

    A scheme for resampling binaryimage data from a rectangular grid to a regular hexagonal grid and an associated tree-structured pixel-indexing scheme keyed to the level of resolution have been devised. This scheme could be utilized in conjunction with appropriate image-data-processing algorithms to enable automated retrieval and/or recognition of images. For some purposes, this scheme is superior to a prior scheme that relies on rectangular pixels: one example of such a purpose is recognition of fingerprints, which can be approximated more closely by use of line segments along hexagonal axes than by line segments along rectangular axes. This scheme could also be combined with algorithms for query-image-based retrieval of images via the Internet. A binary image on a rectangular grid is generated by raster scanning or by sampling on a stationary grid of rectangular pixels. In either case, each pixel (each cell in the rectangular grid) is denoted as either bright or dark, depending on whether the light level in the pixel is above or below a prescribed threshold. The binary data on such an image are stored in a matrix form that lends itself readily to searches of line segments aligned with either or both of the perpendicular coordinate axes. The first step in resampling onto a regular hexagonal grid is to make the resolution of the hexagonal grid fine enough to capture all the binaryimage detail from the rectangular grid. In practice, this amounts to choosing a hexagonal-cell width equal to or less than a third of the rectangular- cell width. Once the data have been resampled onto the hexagonal grid, the image can readily be checked for line segments aligned with the hexagonal coordinate axes, which typically lie at angles of 30deg, 90deg, and 150deg with respect to say, the horizontal rectangular coordinate axis. Optionally, one can then rotate the rectangular image by 90deg, then again sample onto the hexagonal grid and check for line segments at angles of 0deg, 60deg

  15. Using an Active Pixel Sensor In A Vertex Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Matis, Howard S.; Bieser, Fred; Chen, Yandong; Gareus, Robin; Kleinfelder, Stuart; Oldenburg, Markus; Retiere, Fabrice; Ritter, HansGeorg; Wieman, Howard H.; Wurzel, Samuel E.; Yamamoto, Eugene

    2004-04-22

    Research has shown that Active Pixel CMOS sensors can detect charged particles. We have been studying whether this process can be used in a collider environment. In particular, we studied the effect of radiation with 55 MeV protons. These results show that a fluence of about 2 x 10{sup 12} protons/cm{sup 2} reduces the signal by a factor of two while the noise increases by 25%. A measurement 6 months after exposure shows that the silicon lattice naturally repairs itself. Heating the silicon to 100 C reduced the shot noise and increased the collected charge. CMOS sensors have a reduced signal to noise ratio per pixel because charge diffuses to neighboring pixels. We have constructed a photogate to see if this structure can collect more charge per pixel. Results show that a photogate does collect charge in fewer pixels, but it takes about 15 ms to collect all of the electrons produced by a pulse of light.

  16. Nano-fabricated pixelated micropolarizer array for visible imaging polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhigang; Cheng, Teng; Qiu, Kang; Zhang, Qingchuan E-mail: wgchu@nanoctr.cn; Wu, Xiaoping; Dong, Fengliang; Chu, Weiguo E-mail: wgchu@nanoctr.cn

    2014-10-15

    Pixelated micropolarizer array (PMA) is a novel concept for real-time visible imaging polarimetry. A 320 × 240 aluminum PMA fabricated by electron beam lithography is described in this paper. The period, duty ratio, and depth of the grating are 140 nm, 0.5, and 100 nm, respectively. The units are standard square structures and the metal nanowires of the grating are collimating and uniformly thick. The extinction ratio of 75 and the maximum polarization transmittance of 78.8% demonstrate that the PMA is suitable for polarization imaging. When the PMA is applied to real-time polarization imaging, the degree of linear polarization image and the angle of linear polarization image are calculated from a single frame image. The polarized target object is highlighted from the unpolarized background, and the surface contour of the target object can be reflected by the polarization angle.

  17. Hyperspectral pixel classification from coded-aperture compressive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Ana; Arce, Gonzalo R.; Sadler, Brian M.

    2012-06-01

    This paper describes a new approach and its associated theoretical performance guarantees for supervised hyperspectral image classification from compressive measurements obtained by a Coded Aperture Snapshot Spectral Imaging System (CASSI). In one snapshot, the two-dimensional focal plane array (FPA) in the CASSI system captures the coded and spectrally dispersed source field of a three-dimensional data cube. Multiple snapshots are used to construct a set of compressive spectral measurements. The proposed approach is based on the concept that each pixel in the hyper-spectral image lies in a low-dimensional subspace obtained from the training samples, and thus it can be represented as a sparse linear combination of vectors in the given subspace. The sparse vector representing the test pixel is then recovered from the set of compressive spectral measurements and it is used to determine the class label of the test pixel. The theoretical performance bounds of the classifier exploit the distance preservation condition satisfied by the multiple shot CASSI system and depend on the number of measurements collected, code aperture pattern, and similarity between spectral signatures in the dictionary. Simulation experiments illustrate the performance of the proposed classification approach.

  18. MONOLITHIC ACTIVE PIXEL MATRIX WITH BINARY COUNTERS IN AN SOI PROCESS.

    SciTech Connect

    DUPTUCH,G.; YAREMA, R.

    2007-06-07

    The design of a Prototype monolithic active pixel matrix, designed in a 0.15 {micro}m CMOS SOI Process, is presented. The process allowed connection between the electronics and the silicon volume under the layer of buried oxide (BOX). The small size vias traversing through the BOX and implantation of small p-type islands in the n-type bulk result in a monolithic imager. During the acquisition time, all pixels register individual radiation events incrementing the counters. The counting rate is up to 1 MHz per pixel. The contents of counters are shifted out during the readout phase. The designed prototype is an array of 64 x 64 pixels and the pixel size is 26 x 26 {micro}m{sup 2}.

  19. Characterization of a Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (DMAPS) prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obermann, T.; Havranek, M.; Hemperek, T.; Hügging, F.; Kishishita, T.; Krüger, H.; Marinas, C.; Wermes, N.

    2015-03-01

    New monolithic pixel detectors integrating CMOS electronics and sensor on the same silicon substrate are currently explored for particle tracking in future HEP experiments, most notably at the LHC . The innovative concept of Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (DMAPS) is based on high resistive silicon bulk material enabling full substrate depletion and the application of an electrical drift field for fast charge collection, while retaining full CMOS capability for the electronics. The technology (150 nm) used offers quadruple wells and allows to implement the pixel electronics with independently isolated N- and PMOS transistors. Results of initial studies on the charge collection and sensor performance are presented.

  20. Impact of defective pixels in AMLCDs on the perception of medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimpe, Tom; Sneyders, Yuri

    2006-03-01

    With LCD displays, each pixel has its own individual transistor that controls the transmittance of that pixel. Occasionally, these individual transistors will short or alternatively malfunction, resulting in a defective pixel that always shows the same brightness. With ever increasing resolution of displays the number of defect pixels per display increases accordingly. State of the art processes are capable of producing displays with no more than one faulty transistor out of 3 million. A five Mega Pixel medical LCD panel contains 15 million individual sub pixels (3 sub pixels per pixel), each having an individual transistor. This means that a five Mega Pixel display on average will have 5 failing pixels. This paper investigates the visibility of defective pixels and analyzes the possible impact of defective pixels on the perception of medical images. JND simulations were done to study the effect of defective pixels on medical images. Our results indicate that defective LCD pixels can mask subtle features in medical images in an unexpectedly broad area around the defect and therefore may reduce the quality of diagnosis for specific high-demanding areas such as mammography. As a second contribution an innovative solution is proposed. A specialized image processing algorithm can make defective pixels completely invisible and moreover can also recover the information of the defect so that the radiologist perceives the medical image correctly. This correction algorithm has been validated with both JND simulations and psycho visual tests.

  1. Multilayer fluorescence imaging on a single-pixel detector

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Kaikai; Jiang, Shaowei; Zheng, Guoan

    2016-01-01

    A critical challenge for fluorescence imaging is the loss of high frequency components in the detection path. Such a loss can be related to the limited numerical aperture of the detection optics, aberrations of the lens, and tissue turbidity. In this paper, we report an imaging scheme that integrates multilayer sample modeling, ptychography-inspired recovery procedures, and lensless single-pixel detection to tackle this challenge. In the reported scheme, we directly placed a 3D sample on top of a single-pixel detector. We then used a known mask to generate speckle patterns in 3D and scanned this known mask to different positions for sample illumination. The sample was then modeled as multiple layers and the captured 1D fluorescence signals were used to recover multiple sample images along the z axis. The reported scheme may find applications in 3D fluorescence sectioning, time-resolved and spectrum-resolved imaging. It may also find applications in deep-tissue fluorescence imaging using the memory effect.

  2. Multilayer fluorescence imaging on a single-pixel detector.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kaikai; Jiang, Shaowei; Zheng, Guoan

    2016-07-01

    A critical challenge for fluorescence imaging is the loss of high frequency components in the detection path. Such a loss can be related to the limited numerical aperture of the detection optics, aberrations of the lens, and tissue turbidity. In this paper, we report an imaging scheme that integrates multilayer sample modeling, ptychography-inspired recovery procedures, and lensless single-pixel detection to tackle this challenge. In the reported scheme, we directly placed a 3D sample on top of a single-pixel detector. We then used a known mask to generate speckle patterns in 3D and scanned this known mask to different positions for sample illumination. The sample was then modeled as multiple layers and the captured 1D fluorescence signals were used to recover multiple sample images along the z axis. The reported scheme may find applications in 3D fluorescence sectioning, time-resolved and spectrum-resolved imaging. It may also find applications in deep-tissue fluorescence imaging using the memory effect. PMID:27446679

  3. Low Power Camera-on-a-Chip Using CMOS Active Pixel Sensor Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, E. R.

    1995-01-01

    A second generation image sensor technology has been developed at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory as a result of the continuing need to miniaturize space science imaging instruments. Implemented using standard CMOS, the active pixel sensor (APS) technology permits the integration of the detector array with on-chip timing, control and signal chain electronics, including analog-to-digital conversion.

  4. High dynamic range CMOS image sensor with pixel level ADC and in-situ image enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harton, Austin V.; Ahmed, Mohamed I.; Beuhler, Allyson; Castro, Francisco; Dawson, Linda M.; Herold, Barry W.; Kujawa, Gregory; Lee, King F.; Mareachen, Russell D.; Scaminaci, Tony J.

    2005-03-01

    We describe a CMOS image sensor with pixel level analog to digital conversion (ADC) having high dynamic range (>100db) and the capability of performing many image processing functions at the pixel level during image capture. The sensor has a 102x98 pixel array and is implemented in a 0.18um CMOS process technology. Each pixel is 15.5um x15.5um with 15% fill factor and is comprised of a comparator, two 10 bit memory registers and control logic. A digital to analog converter and system processor are located off-chip. The photodetector produces a photocurrent yielding a photo-voltage proportional to the impinging light intensity. Once the photo-voltage is less than a predetermined global reference voltage; a global code value is latched into the pixel data buffer. This process prevents voltage saturation resulting in high dynamic range imaging. Upon completion of image capture, a digital representation of the image exists at the pixel array, thereby, allowing image data to be accessed in a parallel fashion from the focal plane array. It is demonstrated that by appropriate variation of the global reference voltage with time, it is possible to perform, during image capture, thresholding and image enhancement operations, such as, contrast stretching in a parallel manner.

  5. A new pixels flipping method for huge watermarking capacity of the invoice font image.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Hou, Qingzheng; Lu, Jianfeng; Xu, Qishuai; Dai, Junping; Mao, Xiaoyang; Chang, Chin-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Invoice printing just has two-color printing, so invoice font image can be seen as binary image. To embed watermarks into invoice image, the pixels need to be flipped. The more huge the watermark is, the more the pixels need to be flipped. We proposed a new pixels flipping method in invoice image for huge watermarking capacity. The pixels flipping method includes one novel interpolation method for binary image, one flippable pixels evaluation mechanism, and one denoising method based on gravity center and chaos degree. The proposed interpolation method ensures that the invoice image keeps features well after scaling. The flippable pixels evaluation mechanism ensures that the pixels keep better connectivity and smoothness and the pattern has highest structural similarity after flipping. The proposed denoising method makes invoice font image smoother and fiter for human vision. Experiments show that the proposed flipping method not only keeps the invoice font structure well but also improves watermarking capacity. PMID:25489606

  6. A New Pixels Flipping Method for Huge Watermarking Capacity of the Invoice Font Image

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Hou, Qingzheng; Lu, Jianfeng; Dai, Junping; Mao, Xiaoyang; Chang, Chin-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Invoice printing just has two-color printing, so invoice font image can be seen as binary image. To embed watermarks into invoice image, the pixels need to be flipped. The more huge the watermark is, the more the pixels need to be flipped. We proposed a new pixels flipping method in invoice image for huge watermarking capacity. The pixels flipping method includes one novel interpolation method for binary image, one flippable pixels evaluation mechanism, and one denoising method based on gravity center and chaos degree. The proposed interpolation method ensures that the invoice image keeps features well after scaling. The flippable pixels evaluation mechanism ensures that the pixels keep better connectivity and smoothness and the pattern has highest structural similarity after flipping. The proposed denoising method makes invoice font image smoother and fiter for human vision. Experiments show that the proposed flipping method not only keeps the invoice font structure well but also improves watermarking capacity. PMID:25489606

  7. Transillumination imaging through biological tissue by single-pixel detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durán, Vicente; Soldevila, Fernando; Irles, Esther; Clemente, Pere; Tajahuerce, Enrique; Andrés, Pedro; Lancis, Jesús

    2015-07-01

    One challenge that has long held the attention of scientists is that of clearly seeing objects hidden by turbid media, as smoke, fog or biological tissue, which has major implications in fields such as remote sensing or early diagnosis of diseases. Here, we combine structured incoherent illumination and bucket detection for imaging an absorbing object completely embedded in a scattering medium. A sequence of low-intensity microstructured light patterns is launched onto the object, whose image is accurately reconstructed through the light fluctuations measured by a single-pixel detector. Our technique is noninvasive, does not require coherent sources, raster scanning nor time-gated detection and benefits from the compressive sensing strategy. As a proof of concept, we experimentally retrieve the image of a transilluminated target both sandwiched between two holographic diffusers and embedded in a 6mm-thick sample of chicken breast.

  8. Active Pixel Sensors for electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denes, P.; Bussat, J.-M.; Lee, Z.; Radmillovic, V.

    2007-09-01

    The technology used for monolithic CMOS imagers, popular for cell phone cameras and other photographic applications, has been explored for charged particle tracking by the high-energy physics community for several years. This technology also lends itself to certain imaging detector applications in electron microscopy. We have been developing such detectors for several years at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and we and others have shown that this technology can offer excellent point-spread function, direct detection and high readout speed. In this paper, we describe some of the design constraints peculiar to electron microscopy and summarize where such detectors could play a useful role.

  9. Amorphous selenium direct detection CMOS digital x-ray imager with 25 micron pixel pitch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Christopher C.; Abbaszadeh, Shiva; Ghanbarzadeh, Sina; Allan, Gary; Farrier, Michael; Cunningham, Ian A.; Karim, Karim S.

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a high resolution amorphous selenium (a-Se) direct detection imager using a large-area compatible back-end fabrication process on top of a CMOS active pixel sensor having 25 micron pixel pitch. Integration of a-Se with CMOS technology requires overcoming CMOS/a-Se interfacial strain, which initiates nucleation of crystalline selenium and results in high detector dark currents. A CMOS-compatible polyimide buffer layer was used to planarize the backplane and provide a low stress and thermally stable surface for a-Se. The buffer layer inhibits crystallization and provides detector stability that is not only a performance factor but also critical for favorable long term cost-benefit considerations in the application of CMOS digital x-ray imagers in medical practice. The detector structure is comprised of a polyimide (PI) buffer layer, the a-Se layer, and a gold (Au) top electrode. The PI layer is applied by spin-coating and is patterned using dry etching to open the backplane bond pads for wire bonding. Thermal evaporation is used to deposit the a-Se and Au layers, and the detector is operated in hole collection mode (i.e. a positive bias on the Au top electrode). High resolution a-Se diagnostic systems typically use 70 to 100 μm pixel pitch and have a pre-sampling modulation transfer function (MTF) that is significantly limited by the pixel aperture. Our results confirm that, for a densely integrated 25 μm pixel pitch CMOS array, the MTF approaches the fundamental material limit, i.e. where the MTF begins to be limited by the a-Se material properties and not the pixel aperture. Preliminary images demonstrating high spatial resolution have been obtained from a frst prototype imager.

  10. Application-specific architectures of CMOS monolithic active pixel sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szelezniak, Michal; Besson, Auguste; Claus, Gilles; Colledani, Claude; Degerli, Yavuz; Deptuch, Grzegorz; Deveaux, Michael; Dorokhov, Andrei; Dulinski, Wojciech; Fourches, Nicolas; Goffe, Mathieu; Grandjean, Damien; Guilloux, Fabrice; Heini, Sebastien; Himmi, Abdelkader; Hu, Christine; Jaaskelainen, Kimmo; Li, Yan; Lutz, Pierre; Orsini, Fabienne; Pellicioli, Michel; Shabetai, Alexandre; Valin, Isabelle; Winter, Marc

    2006-11-01

    Several development directions intended to adapt and optimize monolithic active pixel sensors for specific applications are presented in this work. The first example, compatible with the STAR microvertex upgrade, is based on a simple two-transistor pixel circuitry. It is suited for a long integration time, room-temperature operation and minimum power dissipation. In another approach for this application, a specific readout method is proposed, allowing optimization of the integration time independently of the full frame-readout time. The circuit consists of an in-pixel front-end voltage amplifier, with a gain on the order of five, followed by two analog memory cells. The extended version of this scheme, based on the implementation of more memory cells per pixel, is the solution considered for the outer layers of a microvertex detector at the international linear collider. For the two innermost layers, a circuit allowing fast frame scans together with on-line, on-chip data sparsification is proposed. The first results of this prototype demonstrate that the fixed pattern dispersion is reduced below a noise level of 15 e -, allowing the use of a single comparator or a low-resolution ADC per pixel column. A common element for most of the mentioned readout schemes is a low-noise, low power consumption, layout efficient in-pixel amplifier. A review of possible solutions for this element together with some experimental results is presented.

  11. Active Pixel Sensor Characterization for the STAR Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jake

    2004-10-01

    The STAR collaboration is studying matter at high temperatures and densities. If a significant improvement to the measurement of particle trajectories can be made, charmed mesons that decay away from the primary collision point could be identified. To achieve this goal, STAR is building a vertex detector consisting of a new technology Â- active pixel sensors. (APS) An APS is an implementation of standard CMOS technology in which each pixel has a photodiode directly above the epitaxial layer. Incident particles produce electron-hole pairs in the epitaxial layer, and these electrons accumulate on the photodiode. Charge from the photodiode is digitized to identify the position of the incident particle. It is important to characterize the signal to noise, readout time, and resolution on several different pixel sizes so that the vertex detector can be optimized for cost and speed. Larger pixels result in a faster data acquisition, while smaller pixels have better resolution. We will present studies of 5, 10, 20 and 30μm square pixel geometries that measure charge distribution and collection. We will also display the results of using a field emission scanning electron microscope with energies from 1 to 30 keV. This tool has the potential to probe regions of the APS integrated circuit and contribute to understanding its properties.

  12. Error analysis of filtering operations in pixel-duplicated images of diabetic retinopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrubeoglu, Mehrube; McLauchlan, Lifford

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, diabetic retinopathy is chosen for a sample target image to demonstrate the effectiveness of image enlargement through pixel duplication in identifying regions of interest. Pixel duplication is presented as a simpler alternative to data interpolation techniques for detecting small structures in the images. A comparative analysis is performed on different image processing schemes applied to both original and pixel-duplicated images. Structures of interest are detected and and classification parameters optimized for minimum false positive detection in the original and enlarged retinal pictures. The error analysis demonstrates the advantages as well as shortcomings of pixel duplication in image enhancement when spatial averaging operations (smoothing filters) are also applied.

  13. Electron Pattern Recognition using trigger mode SOI pixel sensor for Advanced Compton Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazoe, K.; Yoshihara, Y.; Fairuz, A.; Koyama, A.; Takahashi, H.; Takeda, A.; Tsuru, T.; Arai, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Compton imaging is a useful method for localizing sub MeV to a few MeV gamma-rays and widely used for environmental and medical applications. The direction of recoiled electrons in Compton scattering process provides the additional information to limit the Compton cones and increases the sensitivity in the system. The capability of recoiled electron tracking using trigger-mode Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) sensor is investigated with various radiation sources. The trigger-mode SOI sensor consists of 144 by 144 active pixels with 30 μm cells and the thickness of sensor is 500 μm. The sensor generates the digital output when it is hit by gamma-rays and 25 by 25 pixel pattern of surrounding the triggered pixel is readout to extract the recoiled electron track. The electron track is successfully observed for 60Co and 137Cs sources, which provides useful information for future electron tracking Compton camera.

  14. Development activities of a CdTe/CdZnTe pixel detector for gamma-ray spectrometry with imaging and polarimetry capability in astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gálvez, J. L.; Hernanz, M.; Álvarez, J. M.; Álvarez, L.; La Torre, M.; Caroli, E.; Lozano, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Ullán, M.; Cabruja, E.; Martínez, R.; Chmeissani, M.; Puigdengoles, C.

    2013-05-01

    In the last few years we have been working on feasibility studies of future instruments in the gamma-ray range, from several keV up to a few MeV, in collaboration with other research institutes. High sensitivities are essential to perform detailed studies of cosmic explosions and cosmic accelerators, e.g., Supernovae, Classical Novae, Supernova Remnants (SNRs), Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), Pulsars, Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN).Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) and Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe) are very attractive materials for gamma-ray detection, since they have already demonstrated their great performance onboard current space missions, such as IBIS/INTEGRAL and BAT/SWIFT, and future projects like ASIM onboard the ISS. However, the energy coverage of these instruments is limited up to a few hundred keV, and there has not been yet a dedicated instrument for polarimetry.Our research and development activities aim to study a gamma-ray imaging spectrometer in the MeV range based on CdTe detectors, suited either for the focal plane of a focusing mission or as a calorimeter for a Compton camera. In addition, our undergoing detector design is proposed as the baseline for the payload of a balloon-borne experiment dedicated to hard X- and soft gamma-ray polarimetry, currently under study and called CμSP (CZT μ-Spectrometer Polarimeter). Other research institutes such as INAF-IASF, DTU Space, LIP, INEM/CNR, CEA, are involved in this proposal. We will report on the main features of the prototype we are developing at the Institute of Space Sciences, a gamma-ray detector with imaging and polarimetry capabilities in order to fulfil the combined requirement of high detection efficiency with good spatial and energy resolution driven by the science.

  15. Active pixel sensor having intra-pixel charge transfer with analog-to-digital converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Mendis, Sunetra K. (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Nixon, Robert H. (Inventor); Zhou, Zhimin (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An imaging device formed as a monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor Integrated circuit in an industry standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor process, the integrated circuit including a focal plane array of pixel cells, each one of the cells including a photogate overlying the substrate for accumulating photo-generated charge in an underlying portion of the substrate, a readout circuit including at least an output field effect transistor formed in the substrate, and a charge coupled device section formed on the substrate adjacent the photogate having a sensing node connected to the output transistor and at least one charge coupled device stage for transferring charge from the underlying portion of the substrate to the sensing node and an analog-to-digital converter formed in the substrate connected to the output of the readout circuit.

  16. Active pixel sensor having intra-pixel charge transfer with analog-to-digital converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Mendis, Sunetra K. (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Nixon, Robert H. (Inventor); Zhou, Zhimin (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An imaging device formed as a monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor integrated circuit in an industry standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor process, the integrated circuit including a focal plane array of pixel cells, each one of the cells including a photogate overlying the substrate for accumulating photo-generated charge in an underlying portion of the substrate, a readout circuit including at least an output field effect transistor formed in the substrate, and a charge coupled device section formed on the substrate adjacent the photogate having a sensing node connected to the output transistor and at least one charge coupled device stage for transferring charge from the underlying portion of the substrate to the sensing node and an analog-to-digital converter formed in the substrate connected to the output of the readout circuit.

  17. Correcting saturated pixels in images based on human visual characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jun; Peng, Hui; Chen, Xi; Mou, Xuanqin

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a correcting method for saturated images which is operated in the YCbCr color space. The algorithm is based on two human visual characteristics, one is the visual sensitivities to color differences and the other is the Hunt effect. During the process of correcting colors, MacAdam ellipse model mapped to the YCbCr color space is used to search the nearest color. And during the process of the quantification of the YCbCr components for digital implementation, the regions with high luminance are set to have less saturation based on the Hunt effect. Experimental results show that the proposed method is more effective in correcting saturated pixels, especially for the optimization of the region with less luminance and more colorfulness.

  18. Active pixel as dosimetric device for interventional radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servoli, L.; Baldaccini, F.; Biasini, M.; Checcucci, B.; Chiocchini, S.; Cicioni, R.; Conti, E.; Di Lorenzo, R.; Dipilato, A. C.; Esposito, A.; Fanó, L.; Paolucci, M.; Passeri, D.; Pentiricci, A.; Placidi, P.

    2013-08-01

    Interventional Radiology (IR) is a subspecialty of radiology comprehensive of all minimally invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures performed using radiological devices to obtain image guidance. The interventional procedures are potentially harmful for interventional radiologists and medical staff due to the X-ray diffusion by the patient's body. The characteristic energy range of the diffused photons spans few tens of keV. In this work we will present a proposal for a new X-ray sensing element in the energy range of interest for IR procedures. The sensing element will then be assembled in a dosimeter prototype, capable of real-time measurement, packaged in a small form-factor, with wireless communication and no external power supply to be used for individual operators dosimetry for IR procedures. For the sensor, which is the heart of the system, we considered three different Active Pixel Sensors (APS). They have shown a good capability as single X-ray photon detectors, up to several tens keV photon energy. Two dosimetric quantities have been considered, the number of detected photons and the measured energy deposition. Both observables have a linear dependence with the dose, as measured by commercial dosimeters. The uncertainties in the measurement are dominated by statistic and can be pushed at ˜5% for all the sensors under test.

  19. Investigation of the Design Boundaries of a 3,072 X 2,048 Image Sensor Pixel Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eid, El-Sayed I.

    2002-09-01

    The practical boundaries surrounding the design of very high resolution image sensors have been studied. The case study used to analyze these practical boundaries is a CMOS photodiode active pixel sensor (APS) image sensor with pixel array format of 3,072 (H) X 2,048 (V). The frame rate of the image sensor is variable up to 30 frames per second (fps), leading to a maximum image data throughput of 180 M pixels per second. The pixel size is 6.0 im, resulting in a pixel fill factor of approximately 48% (implemented in a 0.25 μm CMOS fabrication process) and a 4/3 inch optical format. The resultant die fill factor is approximately 54%. The column-parallel approach, which works well for both the on-chip analog signal processing and analog-to-digital conversion, is adopted. The 10-bit successive approximation ADC was deemed suitable for on-chip integration. The projected total power consumption of the case study image sensor chip is below 200 mW at 3.3-V power supply and below 100 mW at 1.5-V power supply. These power estimates were made for operation at full resolution (6 M pixels per frame) and at maximum frame rate (30 fps), leading to a maximum digital image data throughput of 1.8 G bits per second.

  20. Pixel level image fusion for medical imaging: an energy minimizing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Brandon; Law, Max W. K.; Ben-Ayed, Ismail; Garvin, Greg; Fenster, Aaron; Li, Shuo

    2012-03-01

    In an attempt to improve the visualisation techniques for diagnosis and treatment of musculoskeletal injuries, we present a novel image fusion method for a pixel-wise fusion of CT and MR images. We focus on the spine and it's related diseases including osteophyte growth, degenerate disc disease and spinal stenosis. This will have benefit to the 50-75% of people who suffer from back pain, which is the reason for 1.8% of all hospital stays in the United States.1 Pre-registered CT and MR image pairs were used. Rigid registration was performed based on soft tissue correspondence. A pixel-wise image fusion algorithm has been designed to combine CT and MR images into a single image. This is accomplished by minimizing an energy functional using a Graph Cut approach. The functional is formulated to balance the similarity between the resultant image and the CT image as well as between the resultant image and the MR image. Furthermore the variational smoothness of the resultant image is considered in the energy functional (to enforce natural transitions between pixels). The results have been validated based on the amount of significant detail preserved in the final fused image. Based on bone cortex and disc / spinal cord areas, 95% of the relevant MR detail and 85% of the relevant CT detail was preserved. This work has the potential to aid in patient diagnosis, surgery planning and execution along with post operative follow up.

  1. Classification of multispectral image data by the Binary Diamond neural network and by nonparametric, pixel-by-pixel methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salu, Yehuda; Tilton, James

    1993-01-01

    The classification of multispectral image data obtained from satellites has become an important tool for generating ground cover maps. This study deals with the application of nonparametric pixel-by-pixel classification methods in the classification of pixels, based on their multispectral data. A new neural network, the Binary Diamond, is introduced, and its performance is compared with a nearest neighbor algorithm and a back-propagation network. The Binary Diamond is a multilayer, feed-forward neural network, which learns from examples in unsupervised, 'one-shot' mode. It recruits its neurons according to the actual training set, as it learns. The comparisons of the algorithms were done by using a realistic data base, consisting of approximately 90,000 Landsat 4 Thematic Mapper pixels. The Binary Diamond and the nearest neighbor performances were close, with some advantages to the Binary Diamond. The performance of the back-propagation network lagged behind. An efficient nearest neighbor algorithm, the binned nearest neighbor, is described. Ways for improving the performances, such as merging categories, and analyzing nonboundary pixels, are addressed and evaluated.

  2. Imaging performance of the hybrid pixel detectors XPAD3-S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, F. Cassol; Clemens, J. C.; Hemmer, C.; Morel, C.

    2009-03-01

    Hybrid pixel detectors, originally developed for tracking particles in high-energy physics experiments, have recently been used in material sciences and macromolecular crystallography. Their capability to count single photons and to apply a threshold on the photon energy suggests that they could be optimal digital x-ray detectors in low energy beams such as for small animal computed tomography (CT). To investigate this issue, we have studied the imaging performance of photon counting hybrid pixel detectors based on the XPAD3-S chip. Two detectors are considered, connected either to a Si or to a CdTe sensor, the latter being of interest for its higher efficiency. Both a standard 'International Electrotechnical Commission' (IEC) mammography beam and a beam used for mouse CT results published in the literature are employed. The detector stability, linearity and noise are investigated as a function of the dose for several imaging exposures (~0.1-400 µGy). The perfect linearity of both detectors is confirmed, but an increase in internal noise for counting statistics higher than ~5000 photons has been found, corresponding to exposures above ~110 µGy and ~50 µGy for the Si and CdTe sensors, respectively. The noise power spectrum (NPS), the modulation transfer function (MTF) and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) are then measured for two energy threshold configurations (5 keV and 18 keV) and three doses (~3, 30 and 300 µGy), in order to obtain a complete estimation of the detector performances. In general, the CdTe sensor shows a clear superiority with a maximal DQE(0) of ~1, thanks to its high efficiency (~100%). The DQE of the Si sensor is more dependent on the radiation quality, due to the energy dependence of its efficiency its maximum is ~0.4 with respect to the softer radiation. Finally, we compare the XPAD3-S DQE with published curves of other digital devices in a similar radiation condition. The XPAD3-S/CdTe detector appears to be the best with the highest

  3. Imaging detector development for nuclear astrophysics using pixelated CdTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, J. M.; Gálvez, J. L.; Hernanz, M.; Isern, J.; Llopis, M.; Lozano, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Chmeissani, M.

    2010-11-01

    The concept of focusing telescopes in the energy range of lines of astrophysical interest (i.e., of energies around 1 MeV) should allow to reach unprecedented sensitivities, essential to perform detailed studies of cosmic explosions and cosmic accelerators. Our research and development activities aim to study a detector suited for the focal plane of a γ-ray telescope mission. A CdTe/CdZnTe detector operating at room temperature, that combines high detection efficiency with good spatial and spectral resolution is being studied in recent years as a focal plane detector, with the interesting option of also operating as a Compton telescope monitor. We present the current status of the design and development of a γ-ray imaging spectrometer in the MeV range, for nuclear astrophysics, consisting of a stack of CdTe pixel detectors with increasing thicknesses. We have developed an initial prototype based on CdTe ohmic detector. The detector has 11×11 pixels, with a pixel pitch of 1 mm and a thickness of 2 mm. Each pixel is stud bonded to a fanout board and routed to an front end ASIC to measure pulse height and rise time information for each incident γ-ray photon. First measurements of a 133Ba and 241Am source are reported here.

  4. Sub-pixel image classification for forest types in East Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westbrook, Joey

    Sub-pixel classification is the extraction of information about the proportion of individual materials of interest within a pixel. Landcover classification at the sub-pixel scale provides more discrimination than traditional per-pixel multispectral classifiers for pixels where the material of interest is mixed with other materials. It allows for the un-mixing of pixels to show the proportion of each material of interest. The materials of interest for this study are pine, hardwood, mixed forest and non-forest. The goal of this project was to perform a sub-pixel classification, which allows a pixel to have multiple labels, and compare the result to a traditional supervised classification, which allows a pixel to have only one label. The satellite image used was a Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) scene of the Stephen F. Austin Experimental Forest in Nacogdoches County, Texas and the four cover type classes are pine, hardwood, mixed forest and non-forest. Once classified, a multi-layer raster datasets was created that comprised four raster layers where each layer showed the percentage of that cover type within the pixel area. Percentage cover type maps were then produced and the accuracy of each was assessed using a fuzzy error matrix for the sub-pixel classifications, and the results were compared to the supervised classification in which a traditional error matrix was used. The overall accuracy of the sub-pixel classification using the aerial photo for both training and reference data had the highest (65% overall) out of the three sub-pixel classifications. This was understandable because the analyst can visually observe the cover types actually on the ground for training data and reference data, whereas using the FIA (Forest Inventory and Analysis) plot data, the analyst must assume that an entire pixel contains the exact percentage of a cover type found in a plot. An increase in accuracy was found after reclassifying each sub-pixel classification from nine classes

  5. Active pixels of transverse field detector based on a charge preamplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langfelder, G.; Buffa, C.; Longoni, A. F.; Pelamatti, A.; Zaraga, F.

    2012-01-01

    The Transverse Field Detector (TFD), a filter-less and tunable color sensitive pixel, is based on the generation of specific electric field configurations within a depleted Silicon volume. Each field configuration determines a set of three or more spectral responses that can be used for direct color acquisition at each pixel position. In order to avoid unpredictable changes of the electric field configuration during the single image capture, a specific active pixel (AP) has been designed. In this AP the dark- and photo-generated charge is not integrated directly on the junction capacitance, but, for each color, it is integrated on the feedback capacitance of a single-transistor charge pre-amplifier. The AP further includes a bias transistor, a reset transistor and a follower. In this work the design of such a pixel is discussed and the experimental results obtained on a 2x2 matrix of these active pixels are analyzed in terms of spectral response, linearity, noise, dynamic range and repeatability.

  6. Denoising of brain MRI images using modified PDE based on pixel similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Renchao; Song, Enmin; Zhang, Lijuan; Min, Zhifang; Xu, Xiangyang; Huang, Chih-Cheng

    2008-03-01

    Although various image denoising methods such as PDE-based algorithms have made remarkable progress in the past years, the trade-off between noise reduction and edge preservation is still an interesting and difficult problem in the field of image processing and analysis. A new image denoising algorithm, using a modified PDE model based on pixel similarity, is proposed to deal with the problem. The pixel similarity measures the similarity between two pixels. Then the neighboring consistency of the center pixel can be calculated. Informally, if a pixel is not consistent enough with its surrounding pixels, it can be considered as a noise, but an extremely strong inconsistency suggests an edge. The pixel similarity is a probability measure, its value is between 0 and 1. According to the neighboring consistency of the pixel, a diffusion control factor can be determined by a simple thresholding rule. The factor is combined into the primary partial differential equation as an adjusting factor for controlling the speed of diffusion for different type of pixels. An evaluation of the proposed algorithm on the simulated brain MRI images was carried out. The initial experimental results showed that the new algorithm can smooth the MRI images better while keeping the edges better and achieve higher peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) comparing with several existing denoising algorithms.

  7. ALPIDE, the Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor for the ALICE ITS upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mager, M.

    2016-07-01

    A new 10 m2 inner tracking system based on seven concentric layers of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors will be installed in the ALICE experiment during the second long shutdown of LHC in 2019-2020. The monolithic pixel sensors will be fabricated in the 180 nm CMOS Imaging Sensor process of TowerJazz. The ALPIDE design takes full advantage of a particular process feature, the deep p-well, which allows for full CMOS circuitry within the pixel matrix, while at the same time retaining the full charge collection efficiency. Together with the small feature size and the availability of six metal layers, this allowed a continuously active low-power front-end to be placed into each pixel and an in-matrix sparsification circuit to be used that sends only the addresses of hit pixels to the periphery. This approach led to a power consumption of less than 40 mWcm-2, a spatial resolution of around 5 μm, a peaking time of around 2 μs, while being radiation hard to some 1013 1 MeVneq /cm2, fulfilling or exceeding the ALICE requirements. Over the last years of R & D, several prototype circuits have been used to verify radiation hardness, and to optimize pixel geometry and in-pixel front-end circuitry. The positive results led to a submission of full-scale (3 cm×1.5 cm) sensor prototypes in 2014. They are being characterized in a comprehensive campaign that also involves several irradiation and beam tests. A summary of the results obtained and prospects towards the final sensor to instrument the ALICE Inner Tracking System are given.

  8. Low Temperature Polycrystalline Silicon Thin Film Transistor Pixel Circuits for Active Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Ching-Lin; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Liu, Yan-Wei

    A new pixel design and driving method for active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) displays that use low-temperature polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors (LTPS-TFTs) with a voltage programming method are proposed and verified using the SPICE simulator. We had employed an appropriate TFT model in SPICE simulation to demonstrate the performance of the pixel circuit. The OLED anode voltage variation error rates are below 0.35% under driving TFT threshold voltage deviation (Δ Vth =± 0.33V). The OLED current non-uniformity caused by the OLED threshold voltage degradation (Δ VTO =+0.33V) is significantly reduced (below 6%). The simulation results show that the pixel design can improve the display image non-uniformity by compensating for the threshold voltage deviation in the driving TFT and the OLED threshold voltage degradation at the same time.

  9. A CMOS active pixel sensor for retinal stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prydderch, Mark L.; French, Marcus J.; Mathieson, Keith; Adams, Christopher; Gunning, Deborah; Laudanski, Jonathan; Morrison, James D.; Moodie, Alan R.; Sinclair, James

    2006-02-01

    Degenerative photoreceptor diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa, are the most common causes of blindness in the western world. A potential cure is to use a microelectronic retinal prosthesis to provide electrical stimulation to the remaining healthy retinal cells. We describe a prototype CMOS Active Pixel Sensor capable of detecting a visual scene and translating it into a train of electrical pulses for stimulation of the retina. The sensor consists of a 10 x 10 array of 100 micron square pixels fabricated on a 0.35 micron CMOS process. Light incident upon each pixel is converted into output current pulse trains with a frequency related to the light intensity. These outputs are connected to a biocompatible microelectrode array for contact to the retinal cells. The flexible design allows experimentation with signal amplitudes and frequencies in order to determine the most appropriate stimulus for the retina. Neural processing in the retina can be studied by using the sensor in conjunction with a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) programmed to behave as a neural network. The sensor has been integrated into a test system designed for studying retinal response. We present the most recent results obtained from this sensor.

  10. Low noise signal-to-noise ratio enhancing readout circuit for current-mediated active pixel sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Ottaviani, Tony; Karim, Karim S.; Nathan, Arokia; Rowlands, John A.

    2006-05-15

    Diagnostic digital fluoroscopic applications continuously expose patients to low doses of x-ray radiation, posing a challenge to both the digital imaging pixel and readout electronics when amplifying small signal x-ray inputs. Traditional switch-based amorphous silicon imaging solutions, for instance, have produced poor signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) at low exposure levels owing to noise sources from the pixel readout circuitry. Current-mediated amorphous silicon pixels are an improvement over conventional pixel amplifiers with an enhanced SNR across the same low-exposure range, but whose output also becomes nonlinear with increasing dosage. A low-noise SNR enhancing readout circuit has been developed that enhances the charge gain of the current-mediated active pixel sensor (C-APS). The solution takes advantage of the current-mediated approach, primarily integrating the signal input at the desired frequency necessary for large-area imaging, while adding minimal noise to the signal readout. Experimental data indicates that the readout circuit can detect pixel outputs over a large bandwidth suitable for real-time digital diagnostic x-ray fluoroscopy. Results from hardware testing indicate that the minimum achievable C-APS output current that can be discerned at the digital fluoroscopic output from the enhanced SNR readout circuit is 0.341 nA. The results serve to highlight the applicability of amorphous silicon current-mediated pixel amplifiers for large-area flat panel x-ray imagers.

  11. A high fill-factor low dark leakage CMOS image sensor with shared-pixel design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Min-Woong; Yasutomi, Keita; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Kawahito, Shoji

    2014-03-01

    We have developed and evaluated the high responsivity and low dark leakage CMOS image sensor with the ring-gate shared-pixel design. A ring-gate shared-pixel design with a high fill factor makes it possible to achieve the low-light imaging. As eliminating the shallow trench isolation in the proposed pixel, the dark leakage current is significantly decreased because one of major dark leakage sources is removed. By sharing the in-pixel transistors such as a reset transistor, a select transistor, and a source follower amplifier, each pixel has a high fill-factor of 43 % and high sensitivity of 144.6 ke-/lx·sec. In addition, the effective number of transistors per pixel is 1.75. The proposed imager achieved the relatively low dark leakage current of about 104.5 e-/s (median at 60°C), corresponding to a dark current density Jdark_proposed of about 30 pA/cm2. In contrast, the conventional type test pixel has a large dark leakage current of 2450 e-/s (median at 60°C), corresponding to Jdark_conventional of about 700 pA/cm2. Both pixels have a same pixel size of 7.5×7.5 μm2 and are fabricated in same process.

  12. Characterisation of a CMOS active pixel sensor for use in the TEAM microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Marco; Contarato, Devis; Denes, Peter; Doering, Dionisio; Duden, Thomas; Krieger, Brad; Giubilato, Piero; Gnani, Dario; Radmilovic, Velimir

    2010-10-01

    A 1M- and a 4M-pixel monolithic CMOS active pixel sensor with 9.5×9.5 μm2 pixels have been developed for direct imaging in transmission electron microscopy as part of the TEAM project. We present the design and a full characterisation of the detector. Data collected with electron beams at various energies of interest in electron microscopy are used to determine the detector response. Data are compared to predictions of simulation. The line spread function measured with 80 and 300 keV electrons is (12.1±0.7) and (7.4±0.6) μm, respectively, in good agreement with our simulation. We measure the detection quantum efficiency to be 0.78±0.04 at 80 keV and 0.74±0.03 at 300 keV. Using a new imaging technique, based on single electron reconstruction, the line spread function for 80 and 300 keV electrons becomes (6.7±0.3) and (2.4±0.2) μm, respectively. The radiation tolerance of the pixels has been tested up to 5 Mrad and the detector is still functional with a decrease of dynamic range by ≃30%, corresponding to a reduction in full-well depth from ˜39 to ˜27 primary 300 keV electrons, due to leakage current increase, but identical line spread function performance.

  13. 1T Pixel Using Floating-Body MOSFET for CMOS Image Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Guo-Neng; Tournier, Arnaud; Roy, François; Deschamps, Benoît

    2009-01-01

    We present a single-transistor pixel for CMOS image sensors (CIS). It is a floating-body MOSFET structure, which is used as photo-sensing device and source-follower transistor, and can be controlled to store and evacuate charges. Our investigation into this 1T pixel structure includes modeling to obtain analytical description of conversion gain. Model validation has been done by comparing theoretical predictions and experimental results. On the other hand, the 1T pixel structure has been implemented in different configurations, including rectangular-gate and ring-gate designs, and variations of oxidation parameters for the fabrication process. The pixel characteristics are presented and discussed. PMID:22389592

  14. 1T Pixel Using Floating-Body MOSFET for CMOS Image Sensors.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guo-Neng; Tournier, Arnaud; Roy, François; Deschamps, Benoît

    2009-01-01

    We present a single-transistor pixel for CMOS image sensors (CIS). It is a floating-body MOSFET structure, which is used as photo-sensing device and source-follower transistor, and can be controlled to store and evacuate charges. Our investigation into this 1T pixel structure includes modeling to obtain analytical description of conversion gain. Model validation has been done by comparing theoretical predictions and experimental results. On the other hand, the 1T pixel structure has been implemented in different configurations, including rectangular-gate and ring-gate designs, and variations of oxidation parameters for the fabrication process. The pixel characteristics are presented and discussed. PMID:22389592

  15. Analysis and study of the interlaced encoding pixels in Hadamard transform spectral imager based on DMD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jun; Hu, Bingliang; Feng, Dazheng; Fan, Xiaohui; Qian, Qingming

    2012-03-01

    The key innovation in Hadamard transform spectral imager (HTSI) introduced recently is the use of digital micro-mirror device (DMD) to encode spectral information. However, because the size of individual micro-mirrors does not match the detector pixel size or for other unavoidable errors in the optical design and the system assembling, an interlaced encoding phenomenon appears on some pixels of the encoded images obtained from the detector. These interlaced encoding pixels are not encoded based on Hadamard transform, so they should be processed specially in spectrum recovery. This paper analyzes the interlaced encoding phenomenon and proposes a positioning method and a decoding method for the interlaced encoding pixels on the encoded images. In our experiment, we direct a beam of laser into our HTSI and fill the entire field of view; by observing the column vector, which is made up of the gray values of a pixel on the encoded images from the detector in sequence, the interlaced encoding pixels can be distinguished easily and a coefficient is obtained simultaneously, which denotes the ratio of the area between the left part and the right part of the interlaced encoding pixel. By substituting the coefficient and the encoded gray values of the interlaced pixel into its encoding equation, we can recover the spectral elements of the interlaced pixel with ease. By comparing the spectral curve of the interlaced encoding pixels recovered by the method mentioned in this paper and the spectral curves of its two adjacent pixels, we find the decoding results are quite effective.

  16. Evaluation of a Wobbling Method Applied to Correcting Defective Pixels of CZT Detectors in SPECT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhaoheng; Li, Suying; Yang, Kun; Xu, Baixuan; Ren, Qiushi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a wobbling method to correct bad pixels in cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors, using information of related images. We build up an automated device that realizes the wobbling correction for small animal Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) imaging. The wobbling correction method is applied to various constellations of defective pixels. The corrected images are compared with the results of conventional interpolation method, and the correction effectiveness is evaluated quantitatively using the factor of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and structural similarity (SSIM). In summary, the proposed wobbling method, equipped with the automatic mechanical system, provides a better image quality for correcting defective pixels, which could be used for all pixelated detectors for molecular imaging. PMID:27240368

  17. Evaluation of a Wobbling Method Applied to Correcting Defective Pixels of CZT Detectors in SPECT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhaoheng; Li, Suying; Yang, Kun; Xu, Baixuan; Ren, Qiushi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a wobbling method to correct bad pixels in cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors, using information of related images. We build up an automated device that realizes the wobbling correction for small animal Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) imaging. The wobbling correction method is applied to various constellations of defective pixels. The corrected images are compared with the results of conventional interpolation method, and the correction effectiveness is evaluated quantitatively using the factor of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and structural similarity (SSIM). In summary, the proposed wobbling method, equipped with the automatic mechanical system, provides a better image quality for correcting defective pixels, which could be used for all pixelated detectors for molecular imaging. PMID:27240368

  18. Exploring the Hidden Structure of Astronomical Images: A "Pixelated" View of Solar System and Deep Space Features!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, R. Bruce; Sienkiewicz, Frank; Sadler, Philip; Antonucci, Paul; Miller, Jaimie

    2013-01-01

    We describe activities created to help student participants in Project ITEAMS (Innovative Technology-Enabled Astronomy for Middle Schools) develop a deeper understanding of picture elements (pixels), image creation, and analysis of the recorded data. ITEAMS is an out-of-school time (OST) program funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) with…

  19. Fast Contour-Tracing Algorithm Based on a Pixel-Following Method for Image Sensors.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jonghoon; Chae, Seungho; Shim, Jinwook; Kim, Dongchul; Cheong, Cheolho; Han, Tack-Don

    2016-01-01

    Contour pixels distinguish objects from the background. Tracing and extracting contour pixels are widely used for smart/wearable image sensor devices, because these are simple and useful for detecting objects. In this paper, we present a novel contour-tracing algorithm for fast and accurate contour following. The proposed algorithm classifies the type of contour pixel, based on its local pattern. Then, it traces the next contour using the previous pixel's type. Therefore, it can classify the type of contour pixels as a straight line, inner corner, outer corner and inner-outer corner, and it can extract pixels of a specific contour type. Moreover, it can trace contour pixels rapidly because it can determine the local minimal path using the contour case. In addition, the proposed algorithm is capable of the compressing data of contour pixels using the representative points and inner-outer corner points, and it can accurately restore the contour image from the data. To compare the performance of the proposed algorithm to that of conventional techniques, we measure their processing time and accuracy. In the experimental results, the proposed algorithm shows better performance compared to the others. Furthermore, it can provide the compressed data of contour pixels and restore them accurately, including the inner-outer corner, which cannot be restored using conventional algorithms. PMID:27005632

  20. Spectral characterisation and noise performance of Vanilla—an active pixel sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blue, Andrew; Bates, R.; Bohndiek, S. E.; Clark, A.; Arvanitis, Costas D.; Greenshaw, T.; Laing, A.; Maneuski, D.; Turchetta, R.; O'Shea, V.

    2008-06-01

    This work will report on the characterisation of a new active pixel sensor, Vanilla. The Vanilla comprises of 512×512 (25μm 2) pixels. The sensor has a 12 bit digital output for full-frame mode, although it can also be readout in analogue mode, whereby it can also be read in a fully programmable region-of-interest (ROI) mode. In full frame, the sensor can operate at a readout rate of more than 100 frames per second (fps), while in ROI mode, the speed depends on the size, shape and number of ROIs. For example, an ROI of 6×6 pixels can be read at 20,000 fps in analogue mode. Using photon transfer curve (PTC) measurements allowed for the calculation of the read noise, shot noise, full-well capacity and camera gain constant of the sensor. Spectral response measurements detailed the quantum efficiency (QE) of the detector through the UV and visible region. Analysis of the ROI readout mode was also performed. Such measurements suggest that the Vanilla APS (active pixel sensor) will be suitable for a wide range of applications including particle physics and medical imaging.

  1. Photon counting pixel architecture for x-ray and gamma-ray imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldan, Amir H.; Ng, Li; Rowlands, J. A.; Karim, Karim S.

    2007-03-01

    Photon counting is emerging as an alternative detection technique to conventional photon integration. In photon counting systems, the value of each image pixel is equal to the number of photons that are absorbed by the radiation detector. The proposed pixel architecture provides a method for energy windowing and serial readout for low-dose gamma-ray imaging. Each pixel is comprised of a radiation detector and integrated analog and digital circuitry. A prototype was developed on a printed circuit board (PCB) using discrete electronic components. In this research, we present the experimental results for the operation of the photon counting pixel with energy windowing and investigate the compromise between pixel noise level and photon count rate.

  2. A High-Speed CMOS Image Sensor with Global Electronic Shutter Pixels Using Pinned Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasutomi, Keita; Tamura, Toshihiro; Furuta, Masanori; Itoh, Shinya; Kawahito, Shoji

    This paper describes a high-speed CMOS image sensor with a new type of global electronic shutter pixel. A global electronic shutter is necessary for imaging fast-moving objects without motion blur or distortion. The proposed pixel has two potential wells with pinned diode structure for two-stage charge transfer that enables a global electronic shuttering and reset noise canceling. A prototype high-speed image sensor fabricated in 0.18μm standard CMOS image sensor process consists of the proposed pixel array, 12-bit column-parallel cyclic ADC arrays and 192-channel digital outputs. The sensor achieves a good linearity at low-light intensity, demonstrating the perfect charge transfer between two pinned diodes. The input referred noise of the proposed pixel is measured to be 6.3 e-.

  3. A CMOS Active Pixel Sensor for Charged Particle Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Matis, Howard S.; Bieser, Fred; Kleinfelder, Stuart; Rai, Gulshan; Retiere, Fabrice; Ritter, Hans George; Singh, Kunal; Wurzel, Samuel E.; Wieman, Howard; Yamamoto, Eugene

    2002-12-02

    Active Pixel Sensor (APS) technology has shown promise for next-generation vertex detectors. This paper discusses the design and testing of two generations of APS chips. Both are arrays of 128 by 128 pixels, each 20 by 20 {micro}m. Each array is divided into sub-arrays in which different sensor structures (4 in the first version and 16 in the second) and/or readout circuits are employed. Measurements of several of these structures under Fe{sup 55} exposure are reported. The sensors have also been irradiated by 55 MeV protons to test for radiation damage. The radiation increased the noise and reduced the signal. The noise can be explained by shot noise from the increased leakage current and the reduction in signal is due to charge being trapped in the epi layer. Nevertheless, the radiation effect is small for the expected exposures at RHIC and RHIC II. Finally, we describe our concept for mechanically supporting a thin silicon wafer in an actual detector.

  4. Monolithic Active Pixel Matrix with Binary Counters (MAMBO) ASIC

    SciTech Connect

    Khalid, Farah F.; Deptuch, Grzegorz; Shenai, Alpana; Yarema, Raymond J.; /Fermilab

    2010-11-01

    Monolithic Active Matrix with Binary Counters (MAMBO) is a counting ASIC designed for detecting and measuring low energy X-rays from 6-12 keV. Each pixel contains analogue functionality implemented with a charge preamplifier, CR-RC{sup 2} shaper and a baseline restorer. It also contains a window comparator which can be trimmed by 4 bit DACs to remove systematic offsets. The hits are registered by a 12 bit ripple counter which is reconfigured as a shift register to serially output the data from the entire ASIC. Each pixel can be tested individually. Two diverse approaches have been used to prevent coupling between the detector and electronics in MAMBO III and MAMBO IV. MAMBO III is a 3D ASIC, the bottom ASIC consists of diodes which are connected to the top ASIC using {mu}-bump bonds. The detector is decoupled from the electronics by physically separating them on two tiers and using several metal layers as a shield. MAMBO IV is a monolithic structure which uses a nested well approach to isolate the detector from the electronics. The ASICs are being fabricated using the SOI 0.2 {micro}m OKI process, MAMBO III is 3D bonded at T-Micro and MAMBO IV nested well structure was developed in collaboration between OKI and Fermilab.

  5. Monolithic active pixel matrix with binary counters (MAMBO III) ASIC

    SciTech Connect

    Khalid, Farah; Deptuch, Grzegorz; Shenai, Alpana; Yarema, Raymond; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    Monolithic Active Matrix with Binary Counters (MAMBO) is a counting ASIC designed for detecting and measuring low energy X-rays from 6-12keV. Each pixel contains analogue functionality implemented with a charge preamplifier, CR-RC{sup 2} shaper and a baseline restorer. It also contains a window comparator which can be trimmed by 4 bit DACs to remove systematic offsets. The hits are registered by a 12 bit ripple counter which is reconfigured as a shift register to serially output the data from the entire ASIC. Each pixel can be tested individually. Two diverse approaches have been used to prevent coupling between the detector and electronics in MAMBO III and MAMBO IV. MAMBO III is a 3D ASIC, the bottom ASIC consists of diodes which are connected to the top ASIC using {mu}-bump bonds. The detector is decoupled from the electronics by physically separating them on two tiers and using several metal layers as a shield. MAMBO IV is a monolithic structure which uses a nested well approach to isolate the detector from the electronics. The ASICs are being fabricated using the SOI 0.2 {micro}m OKI process, MAMBO III is 3D bonded at T-Micro and MAMBO IV nested well structure was developed in collaboration between OKI and Fermilab.

  6. A hyperspectral image optimizing method based on sub-pixel MTF analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun; Li, Kai; Wang, Jinqiang; Zhu, Yajie

    2015-04-01

    Hyperspectral imaging is used to collect tens or hundreds of images continuously divided across electromagnetic spectrum so that the details under different wavelengths could be represented. A popular hyperspectral imaging methods uses a tunable optical band-pass filter settled in front of the focal plane to acquire images of different wavelengths. In order to alleviate the influence of chromatic aberration in some segments in a hyperspectral series, in this paper, a hyperspectral optimizing method uses sub-pixel MTF to evaluate image blurring quality was provided. This method acquired the edge feature in the target window by means of the line spread function (LSF) to calculate the reliable position of the edge feature, then the evaluation grid in each line was interpolated by the real pixel value based on its relative position to the optimal edge and the sub-pixel MTF was used to analyze the image in frequency domain, by which MTF calculation dimension was increased. The sub-pixel MTF evaluation was reliable, since no image rotation and pixel value estimation was needed, and no artificial information was introduced. With theoretical analysis, the method proposed in this paper is reliable and efficient when evaluation the common images with edges of small tilt angle in real scene. It also provided a direction for the following hyperspectral image blurring evaluation and the real-time focal plane adjustment in real time in related imaging system.

  7. Fast Contour-Tracing Algorithm Based on a Pixel-Following Method for Image Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jonghoon; Chae, Seungho; Shim, Jinwook; Kim, Dongchul; Cheong, Cheolho; Han, Tack-Don

    2016-01-01

    Contour pixels distinguish objects from the background. Tracing and extracting contour pixels are widely used for smart/wearable image sensor devices, because these are simple and useful for detecting objects. In this paper, we present a novel contour-tracing algorithm for fast and accurate contour following. The proposed algorithm classifies the type of contour pixel, based on its local pattern. Then, it traces the next contour using the previous pixel’s type. Therefore, it can classify the type of contour pixels as a straight line, inner corner, outer corner and inner-outer corner, and it can extract pixels of a specific contour type. Moreover, it can trace contour pixels rapidly because it can determine the local minimal path using the contour case. In addition, the proposed algorithm is capable of the compressing data of contour pixels using the representative points and inner-outer corner points, and it can accurately restore the contour image from the data. To compare the performance of the proposed algorithm to that of conventional techniques, we measure their processing time and accuracy. In the experimental results, the proposed algorithm shows better performance compared to the others. Furthermore, it can provide the compressed data of contour pixels and restore them accurately, including the inner-outer corner, which cannot be restored using conventional algorithms. PMID:27005632

  8. Characterisation of a PERCIVAL monolithic active pixel prototype using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, J.; Bayer, M.; Göttlicher, P.; Lange, S.; Marras, A.; Niemann, M.; Reza, S.; Shevyakov, I.; Smoljanin, S.; Tennert, M.; Xia, Q.; Viti, M.; Wunderer, C. B.; Zimmer, M.; Dipayan, D.; Guerrini, N.; Marsh, B.; Sedgwick, I.; Turchetta, R.; Cautero, G.; Giuressi, D.; Khromova, A.; Pinaroli, G.; Menk, R.; Stebel, L.; Fan, R.; Marchal, J.; Pedersen, U.; Rees, N.; Steadman, P.; Sussmuth, M.; Tartoni, N.; Yousef, H.; Hyun, H. J.; Kim, K.; Rah, S.; Graafsma, H.

    2016-02-01

    PERCIVAL ("Pixelated Energy Resolving CMOS Imager, Versatile And Large") is a monolithic active pixel sensor (MAPS) based on CMOS technology. Is being developed by DESY, RAL/STFC, Elettra, DLS, and PAL to address the various requirements of detectors at synchrotron radiation sources and Free Electron Lasers (FELs) in the soft X-ray regime. These requirements include high frame rates and FELs base-rate compatibility, large dynamic range, single-photon counting capability with low probability of false positives, high quantum efficiency (QE), and (multi-)megapixel arrangements with good spatial resolution. Small-scale back-side-illuminated (BSI) prototype systems are undergoing detailed testing with X-rays and optical photons, in preparation of submission of a larger sensor. A first BSI processed prototype was tested in 2014 and a preliminary result—first detection of 350eV photons with some pixel types of PERCIVAL—reported at this meeting a year ago. Subsequent more detailed analysis revealed a very low QE and pointed to contamination as a possible cause. In the past year, BSI-processed chips on two more wafers were tested and their response to soft X-ray evaluated. We report here the improved charge collection efficiency (CCE) of different PERCIVAL pixel types for 400eV soft X-rays together with Airy patterns, response to a flat field, and noise performance for such a newly BSI-processed prototype sensor.

  9. High dynamic range pixel architecture for advanced diagnostic medical x-ray imaging applications

    SciTech Connect

    Izadi, Mohammad Hadi; Karim, Karim S.

    2006-05-15

    The most widely used architecture in large-area amorphous silicon (a-Si) flat panel imagers is a passive pixel sensor (PPS), which consists of a detector and a readout switch. While the PPS has the advantage of being compact and amenable toward high-resolution imaging, small PPS output signals are swamped by external column charge amplifier and data line thermal noise, which reduce the minimum readable sensor input signal. In contrast to PPS circuits, on-pixel amplifiers in a-Si technology reduce readout noise to levels that can meet even the stringent requirements for low noise digital x-ray fluoroscopy (<1000 noise electrons). However, larger voltages at the pixel input cause the output of the amplified pixel to become nonlinear thus reducing the dynamic range. We reported a hybrid amplified pixel architecture based on a combination of PPS and amplified pixel designs that, in addition to low noise performance, also resulted in large-signal linearity and consequently higher dynamic range [K. S. Karim et al., Proc. SPIE 5368, 657 (2004)]. The additional benefit in large-signal linearity, however, came at the cost of an additional pixel transistor. We present an amplified pixel design that achieves the goals of low noise performance and large-signal linearity without the need for an additional pixel transistor. Theoretical calculations and simulation results for noise indicate the applicability of the amplified a-Si pixel architecture for high dynamic range, medical x-ray imaging applications that require switching between low exposure, real-time fluoroscopy and high-exposure radiography.

  10. 50 μm pixel pitch wafer-scale CMOS active pixel sensor x-ray detector for digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, C.; Konstantinidis, A. C.; Zheng, Y.; Anaxagoras, T.; Speller, R. D.; Kanicki, J.

    2015-12-01

    Wafer-scale CMOS active pixel sensors (APSs) have been developed recently for x-ray imaging applications. The small pixel pitch and low noise are very promising properties for medical imaging applications such as digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). In this work, we evaluated experimentally and through modeling the imaging properties of a 50 μm pixel pitch CMOS APS x-ray detector named DynAMITe (Dynamic Range Adjustable for Medical Imaging Technology). A modified cascaded system model was developed for CMOS APS x-ray detectors by taking into account the device nonlinear signal and noise properties. The imaging properties such as modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were extracted from both measurements and the nonlinear cascaded system analysis. The results show that the DynAMITe x-ray detector achieves a high spatial resolution of 10 mm-1 and a DQE of around 0.5 at spatial frequencies  <1 mm-1. In addition, the modeling results were used to calculate the image signal-to-noise ratio (SNRi) of microcalcifications at various mean glandular dose (MGD). For an average breast (5 cm thickness, 50% glandular fraction), 165 μm microcalcifications can be distinguished at a MGD of 27% lower than the clinical value (~1.3 mGy). To detect 100 μm microcalcifications, further optimizations of the CMOS APS x-ray detector, image aquisition geometry and image reconstruction techniques should be considered.

  11. 50 μm pixel pitch wafer-scale CMOS active pixel sensor x-ray detector for digital breast tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, C; Konstantinidis, A C; Zheng, Y; Anaxagoras, T; Speller, R D; Kanicki, J

    2015-12-01

    Wafer-scale CMOS active pixel sensors (APSs) have been developed recently for x-ray imaging applications. The small pixel pitch and low noise are very promising properties for medical imaging applications such as digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). In this work, we evaluated experimentally and through modeling the imaging properties of a 50 μm pixel pitch CMOS APS x-ray detector named DynAMITe (Dynamic Range Adjustable for Medical Imaging Technology). A modified cascaded system model was developed for CMOS APS x-ray detectors by taking into account the device nonlinear signal and noise properties. The imaging properties such as modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were extracted from both measurements and the nonlinear cascaded system analysis. The results show that the DynAMITe x-ray detector achieves a high spatial resolution of 10 mm(-1) and a DQE of around 0.5 at spatial frequencies  <1 mm(-1). In addition, the modeling results were used to calculate the image signal-to-noise ratio (SNRi) of microcalcifications at various mean glandular dose (MGD). For an average breast (5 cm thickness, 50% glandular fraction), 165 μm microcalcifications can be distinguished at a MGD of 27% lower than the clinical value (~1.3 mGy). To detect 100 μm microcalcifications, further optimizations of the CMOS APS x-ray detector, image aquisition geometry and image reconstruction techniques should be considered. PMID:26540090

  12. Physical characterization and performance comparison of active- and passive-pixel CMOS detectors for mammography.

    PubMed

    Elbakri, I A; McIntosh, B J; Rickey, D W

    2009-03-21

    We investigated the physical characteristics of two complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) mammography detectors. The detectors featured 14-bit image acquisition, 50 microm detector element (del) size and an active area of 5 cm x 5 cm. One detector was a passive-pixel sensor (PPS) with signal amplification performed by an array of amplifiers connected to dels via data lines. The other detector was an active-pixel sensor (APS) with signal amplification performed at each del. Passive-pixel designs have higher read noise due to data line capacitance, and the APS represents an attempt to improve the noise performance of this technology. We evaluated the detectors' resolution by measuring the modulation transfer function (MTF) using a tilted edge. We measured the noise power spectra (NPS) and detective quantum efficiencies (DQE) using mammographic beam conditions specified by the IEC 62220-1-2 standard. Our measurements showed the APS to have much higher gain, slightly higher MTF, and higher NPS. The MTF of both sensors approached 10% near the Nyquist limit. DQE values near dc frequency were in the range of 55-67%, with the APS sensor DQE lower than the PPS DQE for all frequencies. Our results show that lower read noise specifications in this case do not translate into gains in the imaging performance of the sensor. We postulate that the lower fill factor of the APS is a possible cause for this result. PMID:19242050

  13. Monolithic active pixel radiation detector with shielding techniques

    DOEpatents

    Deptuch, Grzegorz W.

    2016-09-06

    A monolithic active pixel radiation detector including a method of fabricating thereof. The disclosed radiation detector can include a substrate comprising a silicon layer upon which electronics are configured. A plurality of channels can be formed on the silicon layer, wherein the plurality of channels are connected to sources of signals located in a bulk part of the substrate, and wherein the signals flow through electrically conducting vias established in an isolation oxide on the substrate. One or more nested wells can be configured from the substrate, wherein the nested wells assist in collecting charge carriers released in interaction with radiation and wherein the nested wells further separate the electronics from the sensing portion of the detector substrate. The detector can also be configured according to a thick SOA method of fabrication.

  14. Modeling truncated pixel values of faint reflections in MicroED images1

    PubMed Central

    Hattne, Johan; Shi, Dan; de la Cruz, M. Jason; Reyes, Francis E.; Gonen, Tamir

    2016-01-01

    The weak pixel counts surrounding the Bragg spots in a diffraction image are important for establishing a model of the background underneath the peak and estimating the reliability of the integrated intensities. Under certain circumstances, particularly with equipment not optimized for low-intensity measurements, these pixel values may be corrupted by corrections applied to the raw image. This can lead to truncation of low pixel counts, resulting in anomalies in the integrated Bragg intensities, such as systematically higher signal-to-noise ratios. A correction for this effect can be approximated by a three-parameter lognormal distribution fitted to the weakly positive-valued pixels at similar scattering angles. The procedure is validated by the improved refinement of an atomic model against structure factor amplitudes derived from corrected micro-electron diffraction (MicroED) images. PMID:27275145

  15. High-dynamic-range coherent diffractive imaging: ptychography using the mixed-mode pixel array detector

    PubMed Central

    Giewekemeyer, Klaus; Philipp, Hugh T.; Wilke, Robin N.; Aquila, Andrew; Osterhoff, Markus; Tate, Mark W.; Shanks, Katherine S.; Zozulya, Alexey V.; Salditt, Tim; Gruner, Sol M.; Mancuso, Adrian P.

    2014-01-01

    Coherent (X-ray) diffractive imaging (CDI) is an increasingly popular form of X-ray microscopy, mainly due to its potential to produce high-resolution images and the lack of an objective lens between the sample and its corresponding imaging detector. One challenge, however, is that very high dynamic range diffraction data must be collected to produce both quantitative and high-resolution images. In this work, hard X-ray ptychographic coherent diffractive imaging has been performed at the P10 beamline of the PETRA III synchrotron to demonstrate the potential of a very wide dynamic range imaging X-ray detector (the Mixed-Mode Pixel Array Detector, or MM-PAD). The detector is capable of single photon detection, detecting fluxes exceeding 1 × 108 8-keV photons pixel−1 s−1, and framing at 1 kHz. A ptychographic reconstruction was performed using a peak focal intensity on the order of 1 × 1010 photons µm−2 s−1 within an area of approximately 325 nm × 603 nm. This was done without need of a beam stop and with a very modest attenuation, while ‘still’ images of the empty beam far-field intensity were recorded without any attenuation. The treatment of the detector frames and CDI methodology for reconstruction of non-sensitive detector regions, partially also extending the active detector area, are described. PMID:25178008

  16. Improving the signal-to-noise ratio of single-pixel imaging using digital microscanning.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ming-Jie; Edgar, Matthew P; Phillips, David B; Gibson, Graham M; Padgett, Miles J

    2016-05-16

    Single-pixel cameras provide a means to perform imaging at wavelengths where pixelated detector arrays are expensive or limited. The image is reconstructed from measurements of the correlation between the scene and a series of masks. Although there has been much research in the field in recent years, the fact that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) scales poorly with increasing resolution has been one of the main limitations prohibiting the uptake of such systems. Microscanning is a technique that provides a final higher resolution image by combining multiple images of a lower resolution. Each of these low resolution images is subject to a sub-pixel sized lateral displacement. In this work we apply a digital microscanning approach to an infrared single-pixel camera. Our approach requires no additional hardware, but is achieved simply by using a modified set of masks. Compared to the conventional Hadamard based single-pixel imaging scheme, our proposed framework improves the SNR of reconstructed images by ∼ 50 % for the same acquisition time. In addition, this strategy also provides access to a stream of low-resolution 'preview' images throughout each high-resolution acquisition. PMID:27409871

  17. High-resolution hyperspectral single-pixel imaging system based on compressive sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magalha~es, Filipe; Abolbashari, Mehrdad; Araújo, Francisco M.; Correia, Miguel V.; Farahi, Faramarz

    2012-07-01

    For the first time, a high-resolution hyperspectral single-pixel imaging system based on compressive sensing is presented and demonstrated. The system integrates a digital micro-mirror device array to optically compress the image to be acquired and an optical spectrum analyzer to enable high spectral resolution. The system's ability to successfully reconstruct images with 10 pm spectral resolution is proven.

  18. Pixel patterns for voxels in a contact-type three-dimensional imaging system for full-parallax image display

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Jung-Young; Saveljev, Vladmir V.; Javidi, Bahram; Kim, Dae-Sik; Park, Min-Chul

    2006-06-20

    Incomplete voxels, which can be seen only at a part of the viewing zone's cross section in the optical configuration of a full parallax multiview imaging system based on a two-dimensional point light source array, are identified. Their corresponding pixel patterns are found to maximize the space where the voxels can exist in the configuration and to increase the voxel resolution of the displayable three-dimensional images. Furthermore, the pixel patterns for the rhomb-shaped pixel cells are also defined, and some problems related to voxel-based image synthesis are discussed.

  19. Laser pixelation of thick scintillators for medical imaging applications: x-ray studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabet, Hamid; Kudrolli, Haris; Marton, Zsolt; Singh, Bipin; Nagarkar, Vivek V.

    2013-09-01

    To achieve high spatial resolution required in nuclear imaging, scintillation light spread has to be controlled. This has been traditionally achieved by introducing structures in the bulk of scintillation materials; typically by mechanical pixelation of scintillators and fill the resultant inter-pixel gaps by reflecting materials. Mechanical pixelation however, is accompanied by various cost and complexity issues especially for hard, brittle and hygroscopic materials. For example LSO and LYSO, hard and brittle scintillators of interest to medical imaging community, are known to crack under thermal and mechanical stress; the material yield drops quickly with large arrays with high aspect ratio pixels and therefore the pixelation process cost increases. We are utilizing a novel technique named Laser Induced Optical Barriers (LIOB) for pixelation of scintillators that overcomes the issues associated with mechanical pixelation. In this technique, we can introduce optical barriers within the bulk of scintillator crystals to form pixelated arrays with small pixel size and large thickness. We applied LIOB to LYSO using a high-frequency solid-state laser. Arrays with different crystal thickness (5 to 20 mm thick), and pixel size (0.8×0.8 to 1.5×1.5 mm2) were fabricated and tested. The width of the optical barriers were controlled by fine-tuning key parameters such as lens focal spot size and laser energy density. Here we report on LIOB process, its optimization, and the optical crosstalk measurements using X-rays. There are many applications that can potentially benefit from LIOB including but not limited to clinical/pre-clinical PET and SPECT systems, and photon counting CT detectors.

  20. Photon Counting Imaging with an Electron-Bombarded Pixel Image Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Electron-bombarded pixel image sensors, where a single photoelectron is accelerated directly into a CCD or CMOS sensor, allow wide-field imaging at extremely low light levels as they are sensitive enough to detect single photons. This technology allows the detection of up to hundreds or thousands of photon events per frame, depending on the sensor size, and photon event centroiding can be employed to recover resolution lost in the detection process. Unlike photon events from electron-multiplying sensors, the photon events from electron-bombarded sensors have a narrow, acceleration-voltage-dependent pulse height distribution. Thus a gain voltage sweep during exposure in an electron-bombarded sensor could allow photon arrival time determination from the pulse height with sub-frame exposure time resolution. We give a brief overview of our work with electron-bombarded pixel image sensor technology and recent developments in this field for single photon counting imaging, and examples of some applications. PMID:27136556

  1. Photon Counting Imaging with an Electron-Bombarded Pixel Image Sensor.

    PubMed

    Hirvonen, Liisa M; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Electron-bombarded pixel image sensors, where a single photoelectron is accelerated directly into a CCD or CMOS sensor, allow wide-field imaging at extremely low light levels as they are sensitive enough to detect single photons. This technology allows the detection of up to hundreds or thousands of photon events per frame, depending on the sensor size, and photon event centroiding can be employed to recover resolution lost in the detection process. Unlike photon events from electron-multiplying sensors, the photon events from electron-bombarded sensors have a narrow, acceleration-voltage-dependent pulse height distribution. Thus a gain voltage sweep during exposure in an electron-bombarded sensor could allow photon arrival time determination from the pulse height with sub-frame exposure time resolution. We give a brief overview of our work with electron-bombarded pixel image sensor technology and recent developments in this field for single photon counting imaging, and examples of some applications. PMID:27136556

  2. Constructing Virtual Forest Scenes for Assessment of Sub-pixel Vegetation Structure From Imaging Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerace, A. D.; Yao, W.; van Aardt, J. A.; Romanczyk, P.; Kelbe, D.; van Leeuwen, M.; Kampe, T. U.

    2015-12-01

    Assessment of vegetation structure via remote sensing modalities has a long history for a range of sensor platforms. Imaging spectroscopy, while often used for biochemical measurements, also applies to structural assessment in that the Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI), for instance, will provide an opportunity to monitor the global ecosystem. Establishing the linkage between HyspIRI data and sub-pixel vegetation structural variation therefore is of keen interest to the remote sensing and ecology communities. NASA's AVIRIS-C was used to collect airborne data during the 2013-2015 time frame, while ground truth data were limited to 2013 due to time-consuming and labor-intensive nature of field data collection. We augmented the available field data with a first-principles, physics-based simulation approach to refine our field efforts and to maintain larger control over within-pixel variation and associated assessments. Three virtual scenes were constructed for the study, corresponding to the actual vegetation structure of the NEON's Pacific Southwest site (Fresno, CA). They presented three typical forest types: oak savanna, dense coniferous forest, and conifer manzanita mixed forest. Airborne spectrometer and a field leaf area index sensor were simulated over these scenes using the Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) Model, a synthetic image generation model. After verifying the geometrical parameters and physical model with those replicative senses, more scenes could be constructed by changing one or more vegetation structural parameters, such as forest density, tree species, size, location, and within-pixel distribution. We constructed regression models of leaf area index (LAI, R2=0.92) and forest density(R2=0.97) with narrow-band vegetation indices through simulation. Those models can be used to improve the HyspIRI's suitability for consistent global vegetation structural assessments. The virtual scene and model can also be used in

  3. Research on remote sensing image pixel attribute data acquisition method in AutoCAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoyang; Sun, Guangtong; Liu, Jun; Liu, Hui

    2013-07-01

    The remote sensing image has been widely used in AutoCAD, but AutoCAD lack of the function of remote sensing image processing. In the paper, ObjectARX was used for the secondary development tool, combined with the Image Engine SDK to realize remote sensing image pixel attribute data acquisition in AutoCAD, which provides critical technical support for AutoCAD environment remote sensing image processing algorithms.

  4. 1024 pixels single photon imaging array for 3D ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellisai, S.; Guerrieri, F.; Tisa, S.; Zappa, F.; Tosi, A.; Giudice, A.

    2011-01-01

    Three dimensions (3D) acquisition systems are driving applications in many research field. Nowadays 3D acquiring systems are used in a lot of applications, such as cinema industry or in automotive (for active security systems). Depending on the application, systems present different features, for example color sensitivity, bi-dimensional image resolution, distance measurement accuracy and acquisition frame rate. The system we developed acquires 3D movie using indirect Time of Flight (iTOF), starting from phase delay measurement of a sinusoidally modulated light. The system acquires live movie with a frame rate up to 50frame/s in a range distance between 10 cm up to 7.5 m.

  5. Automatic Extraction of Closed Pixel Clusters for Target Cueing in Hyperspectral Images

    SciTech Connect

    Paglieroni, D W; Perkins, D E

    2001-06-05

    Traditional algorithms for automatic target cueing (ATC) in hyperspectral images, such as the RX algorithm, treat anomaly detection as a simple hypothesis testing problem. Each decision threshold gives rise to a different set of anomalous pixels. The clustered Rx algorithm generates target cues by grouping anomalous pixels into spatial clusters, and retaining only those clusters that satisfy target specific spatial constraints. It produces one set of target cues for each of several decision thresholds, and conservatively requires {Omicron}(K{sup 2}) operations per pixel, where K is the number of spectral bands (which varies from hundreds to thousands in hyperspectral images). A novel ATC algorithm, known as ''Pixel Cluster Cueing'' (PCC), is discussed. PCC groups pixels into clusters based on spectral similarity and spatial proximity, and then selects only those clusters that satisfy target-specific spatial constraints as target cues. PCC requires only {Omicron}(K) operations per pixel, and it produces only one set of target cues because it is not an anomaly detection algorithm, i.e., it does not use a decision threshold to classify individual pixels as anomalies. PCC is compared both computationally and statistically to the RX algorithm.

  6. Restoration of hot pixels in digital imagers using lossless approximation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadar, O.; Shleifer, A.; Cohen, E.; Dotan, Y.

    2015-09-01

    During the last twenty years, digital imagers have spread into industrial and everyday devices, such as satellites, security cameras, cell phones, laptops and more. "Hot pixels" are the main defects in remote digital cameras. In this paper we prove an improvement of existing restoration methods that use (solely or as an auxiliary tool) some average of the surrounding single pixel, such as the method of the Chapman-Koren study 1,2. The proposed method uses the CALIC algorithm and adapts it to a full use of the surrounding pixels.

  7. CMOS image sensor with lateral electric field modulation pixels for fluorescence lifetime imaging with sub-nanosecond time response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhuo; Seo, Min-Woong; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Yasutomi, Keita; Kawahito, Shoji

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of a time-resolved CMOS image sensor with a high-speed lateral electric field modulation (LEFM) gating structure for time domain fluorescence lifetime measurement. Time-windowed signal charge can be transferred from a pinned photodiode (PPD) to a pinned storage diode (PSD) by turning on a pair of transfer gates, which are situated beside the channel. Unwanted signal charge can be drained from the PPD to the drain by turning on another pair of gates. The pixel array contains 512 (V) × 310 (H) pixels with 5.6 × 5.6 µm2 pixel size. The imager chip was fabricated using 0.11 µm CMOS image sensor process technology. The prototype sensor has a time response of 150 ps at 374 nm. The fill factor of the pixels is 5.6%. The usefulness of the prototype sensor is demonstrated for fluorescence lifetime imaging through simulation and measurement results.

  8. Imaging and spectroscopic performance studies of pixellated CdTe Timepix detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maneuski, D.; Astromskas, V.; Fröjdh, E.; Fröjdh, C.; Gimenez, E. N.; Marchal, J.; O'Shea, V.; Stewart, G.; Tartoni, N.; Wilhelm, H.; Wraight, K.; Zain, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    In this work the results on imaging and spectroscopic performances of 14 × 14 × 1 mm CdTe detectors with 55 × 55 μm and 110 × 110 μm pixel pitch bump-bonded to a Timepix chip are presented. The performance of the 110 × 110 μm pixel detector was evaluated at the extreme conditions beam line I15 of the Diamond Light Source. The energy of X-rays was set between 25 and 77 keV. The beam was collimated through the edge slits to 20 μm FWHM incident in the middle of the pixel. The detector was operated in the time-over-threshold mode, allowing direct energy measurement. Energy in the neighbouring pixels was summed for spectra reconstruction. Energy resolution at 77 keV was found to be ΔE/E = 3.9%. Comparative imaging and energy resolution studies were carried out between two pixel size detectors with a fluorescence target X-ray tube and radioactive sources. The 110 × 110 μm pixel detector exhibited systematically better energy resolution in comparison to 55 × 55 μm. An imaging performance of 55 × 55 μm pixellated CdTe detector was assessed using the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) technique and compared to the larger pixel. A considerable degradation in MTF was observed for bias voltages below -300 V. Significant room for improvement of the detector performance was identified both for imaging and spectroscopy and is discussed.

  9. Assessing the impact of sub-pixel vegetation structure on imaging spectroscopy via simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Wei; van Leeuwen, Martin; Romanczyk, Paul; Kelbe, David; van Aardt, Jan

    2015-05-01

    Consistent and scalable estimation of vegetation structural parameters from imaging spectroscopy is essential to remote sensing for ecosystem studies, with applications to a wide range of biophysical assessments. To support global vegetation assessment, NASA has proposed the Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI) imaging spectrometer, which measures the randiance 380-2500nm in 10nm contiguous bands with 60m ground sample distance (GSD). However, because of the large pixel size on the ground, there is uncertainty as to the effects of vegetation structure on observed radiance. This research evaluates linkages between vegetation structure and imaging spectroscopy. Specifically, we assess the impact of within-pixel vegetation density and position on large-footprint spectral radiances. To achieve this objective, three virtual forest scenes were constructed, which correspond to the actual veg- etation structure of the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) Pacific Southwest domain (PSW; D17; Fresno, CA). These were used to simulate anticipated HyspIRI data (60m GSD) using the Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) model, a first-principles synthetic image generation model de- veloped by the Rochester Institute of Technology. Airborne Visible / Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and NEON's high-resolution imaging spectrometer (NIS) data were used to verify the geometric parameters and physical models. Multiple simulated HyspIRI data sets were generated by varying within-pixel structural variables, such as forest density, position, and distribution of trees, in order to assess the impact of sub-pixel structural variation on observed HyspIRI data. Results indicate that HyspIRI is sensitive to sub-pixel vegetation density variation in the visible to short- wavelength infrared spectrum due to vegetation structural changes, and associated pigment and water content variation. This has implications for improving the system's suitability for

  10. Floating image display with a fine pixel pitchcomputer-generated hologram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Takeshi; Ito, Tomohisa; Ozawa, Hiroyuki

    2012-04-01

    The floating 3-D image, when utilized as a 3-D display, gives a strong dimensional impression to the viewer. Few researches, however, have been conducted on the floating image display by means of the computer-generated hologram (CGH). Since the required pixel pitch is narrow compared with the non-floating image display, the CGH that displays the floating image could hardly be output. If the CGH is output by the device with insufficient pixel pitch, the viewing area and image size of the CGH are not suitable for practical use. Therefore, the object is usually placed behind the hologram to relax the pixel pitch. Reducing the time in calculation is also required. The authors have been developing the fringe printer, the device for fringe patterns, which can be reproduce holograms with the pixel pitch as fine as 0.44 μm. This study investigates the fabrication the floating image display, which is output by the fringe printer, with wider viewing angle and larger image size. It is clear that the image is necessarily reconstructed by the conjugate of the original reference wave to reproduce the real image.

  11. Improvement of sub-pixel global motion estimation in UAV image stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingjuan; Ji, Ming; He, Junfeng; Zhen, Kang; Yang, Yizhou; Chen, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Global motion estimation within frames is very important in the UAV(unmanned aerial vehicle) image stabilization system. A fast algorithm based on phase correlation and image down-sampling in sub-pixel was proposed. First, down-sampling of the two frames to quantitatively reduce calculate data. Then, take the method based of phase correlation to realize the global motion estimation in integer-pixel. When it calculated out, chooses the overlapped area of the two frames and interpolated them with zero, then adopts the method based on phase correlation to achieve the global motion estimation in sub-pixel. At last, weighted calculate the result in integer-pixel and the result in sub-pixel, the global motion displacement in sub-pixel of the two images will be calculated out. Experimental results show that, using the proposed algorithm can not only achieve good robustness to the influence of noise, illumination and partially sheltered but also improve the accuracy of motion estimation and efficiency of computing significantly.

  12. Imaging properties of small-pixel spectroscopic x-ray detectors based on cadmium telluride sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Thomas; Schulze, Julia; Zuber, Marcus; Rink, Kristian; Butzer, Jochen; Hamann, Elias; Cecilia, Angelica; Zwerger, Andreas; Fauler, Alex; Fiederle, Michael; Oelfke, Uwe

    2012-11-01

    Spectroscopic x-ray imaging by means of photon counting detectors has received growing interest during the past years. Critical to the image quality of such devices is their pixel pitch and the sensor material employed. This paper describes the imaging properties of Medipix2 MXR multi-chip assemblies bump bonded to 1 mm thick CdTe sensors. Two systems were investigated with pixel pitches of 110 and 165 μm, which are in the order of the mean free path lengths of the characteristic x-rays produced in their sensors. Peak widths were found to be almost constant across the energy range of 10 to 60 keV, with values of 2.3 and 2.2 keV (FWHM) for the two pixel pitches. The average number of pixels responding to a single incoming photon are about 1.85 and 1.45 at 60 keV, amounting to detective quantum efficiencies of 0.77 and 0.84 at a spatial frequency of zero. Energy selective CT acquisitions are presented, and the two pixel pitches' abilities to discriminate between iodine and gadolinium contrast agents are examined. It is shown that the choice of the pixel pitch translates into a minimum contrast agent concentration for which material discrimination is still possible. We finally investigate saturation effects at high x-ray fluxes and conclude with the finding that higher maximum count rates come at the cost of a reduced energy resolution.

  13. Effect of Pansharpened Image on Some of Pixel Based and Object Based Classification Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakus, P.; Karabork, H.

    2016-06-01

    Classification is the most important method to determine type of crop contained in a region for agricultural planning. There are two types of the classification. First is pixel based and the other is object based classification method. While pixel based classification methods are based on the information in each pixel, object based classification method is based on objects or image objects that formed by the combination of information from a set of similar pixels. Multispectral image contains a higher degree of spectral resolution than a panchromatic image. Panchromatic image have a higher spatial resolution than a multispectral image. Pan sharpening is a process of merging high spatial resolution panchromatic and high spectral resolution multispectral imagery to create a single high resolution color image. The aim of the study was to compare the potential classification accuracy provided by pan sharpened image. In this study, SPOT 5 image was used dated April 2013. 5m panchromatic image and 10m multispectral image are pan sharpened. Four different classification methods were investigated: maximum likelihood, decision tree, support vector machine at the pixel level and object based classification methods. SPOT 5 pan sharpened image was used to classification sun flowers and corn in a study site located at Kadirli region on Osmaniye in Turkey. The effects of pan sharpened image on classification results were also examined. Accuracy assessment showed that the object based classification resulted in the better overall accuracy values than the others. The results that indicate that these classification methods can be used for identifying sun flower and corn and estimating crop areas.

  14. Photon small-field measurements with a CMOS active pixel sensor.

    PubMed

    Spang, F Jiménez; Rosenberg, I; Hedin, E; Royle, G

    2015-06-01

    In this work the dosimetric performance of CMOS active pixel sensors for the measurement of small photon beams is presented. The detector used consisted of an array of 520  × 520 pixels on a 25 µm pitch. Dosimetric parameters measured with this sensor were compared with data collected with an ionization chamber, a film detector and GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations. The sensor performance for beam profiles measurements was evaluated for field sizes of 0.5  × 0.5 cm(2). The high spatial resolution achieved with this sensor allowed the accurate measurement of profiles, beam penumbrae and field size under lateral electronic disequilibrium. Field size and penumbrae agreed within 5.4% and 2.2% respectively with film measurements. Agreements with ionization chambers better than 1.0% were obtained when measuring tissue-phantom ratios. Output factor measurements were in good agreement with ionization chamber and Monte Carlo simulation. The data obtained from this imaging sensor can be easily analyzed to extract dosimetric information. The results presented in this work are promising for the development and implementation of CMOS active pixel sensors for dosimetry applications. PMID:25985207

  15. Photon small-field measurements with a CMOS active pixel sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez Spang, F.; Rosenberg, I.; Hedin, E.; Royle, G.

    2015-06-01

    In this work the dosimetric performance of CMOS active pixel sensors for the measurement of small photon beams is presented. The detector used consisted of an array of 520  × 520 pixels on a 25 µm pitch. Dosimetric parameters measured with this sensor were compared with data collected with an ionization chamber, a film detector and GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations. The sensor performance for beam profiles measurements was evaluated for field sizes of 0.5  × 0.5 cm2. The high spatial resolution achieved with this sensor allowed the accurate measurement of profiles, beam penumbrae and field size under lateral electronic disequilibrium. Field size and penumbrae agreed within 5.4% and 2.2% respectively with film measurements. Agreements with ionization chambers better than 1.0% were obtained when measuring tissue-phantom ratios. Output factor measurements were in good agreement with ionization chamber and Monte Carlo simulation. The data obtained from this imaging sensor can be easily analyzed to extract dosimetric information. The results presented in this work are promising for the development and implementation of CMOS active pixel sensors for dosimetry applications.

  16. A 128 × 128 Pixel Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor Image Sensor with an Improved Pixel Architecture for Detecting Modulated Light Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Koji; Oya, Yu; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Nunoshita, Masahiro; Ohta, Jun; Watanabe, Kunihiro

    A complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor for the detection of modulated light under background illumination has been developed. When an object is illuminated by a modulated light source under background illumination the sensor enables the object alone to be captured. This paper describes improvements in pixel architecture for reducing fixed pattern noise (FPN) and improving the sensitivity of the image sensor. The improved 128 × 128 pixel CMOS image sensor with a column parallel analog-to-digital converter (ADC) circuit was fabricated using 0.35-mm CMOS technology. The resulting captured images are shown and the properties of improved pixel architecture are described. The image sensor has FPN of 1/28 that of the previous image sensor and an improved pixel architecture comprising a common in-pixel amp and a correlated double sampling (CDS) circuit. The use of a split photogate increases the sensitivity of the image sensor to 1.3 times that of the previous image sensor.

  17. A GaAs pixel detectors-based digital mammographic system: Performances and imaging tests results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annovazzi, A.; Amendolia, S. R.; Bigongiari, A.; Bisogni, M. G.; Catarsi, F.; Cesqui, F.; Cetronio, A.; Colombo, F.; Delogu, P.; Fantacci, M. E.; Gilberti, A.; Lanzieri, C.; Lavagna, S.; Novelli, M.; Passuello, G.; Paternoster, G.; Pieracci, M.; Poletti, M.; Quattrocchi, M.; Rosso, V.; Stefanini, A.; Testa, A.; Venturelli, L.

    2007-06-01

    The prototype presented in this paper is based on GaAs pixel detectors read-out by the PCC/MEDIPIX I circuit. The active area of a sensor is about 1 cm 2 therefore to cover the typical irradiation field used in mammography (18×24 cm 2), 18 GaAs detection units have been organized in two staggered rows of nine chips each and moved by a stepper motor in the orthogonal direction. The system is integrated in a mammographic equipment which comprehends the X-ray tube, the bias and data acquisition systems and the PC-based control system. The prototype has been developed in the framework of the Integrated Mammographic Imaging (IMI) project, an industrial research activity aiming to develop innovative instrumentation for morphologic and functional imaging. The project has been supported by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research (MIUR) and by five Italian High Tech companies, Alenia Marconi Systems (AMS), CAEN, Gilardoni, LABEN and Poli.Hi.Tech., in collaboration with the universities of Ferrara, Roma "La Sapienza", Pisa and the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN). In this paper, we report on the electrical characterization and the first imaging test results of the digital mammographic system. To assess the imaging capability of such a detector we have built a phantom, which simulates the breast tissue with malignancies. The radiographs of the phantom, obtained by delivering an entrance dose of 4.8 mGy, have shown particulars with a measured contrast below 1%.

  18. Performance results of pixel co-registered VisNIR-SWIR hyperspectral imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Kwok-Keung

    2015-06-01

    The primary application of hyperspectral imaging is to classify/quantify objects/materials in the scene based on their spectral signatures. The spectral features that are useful can sometimes fall outside the spectral range of a single hyperspectral imager which is usually limited by the spectral response range of the sensor material of the focal plane array within the imager. For these wide spectrum applications, some users are combining data from two (or more) hyperspectral imaging systems. Aside from the optical alignment, size and synchronization issues involved in such a setup, the process of pixel co-registration, i.e. geometrically transforming data from the 2 hyperspectral imaging systems to overlay one another is tedious and complex. Headwall Photonics has integrated two of their off-the-shelf highly optimized hyperspectral imagers (Vis-NIR and SWIR) in an optically co-boresighted configuration together with a high performance data processor to produce a compact system which is easy to use and outputs wide spectrum pixel co-registered hyperspectral data. The process of pixel co-registration in this system is computationally very cheap enabling real-time wide-spectrum hyperspectral imaging applications. This paper presents actual imaging and performance data from these systems showing excellent pixel co-registration, sensitivity and spectral resolution.

  19. Autonomous Sub-Pixel Satellite Track Endpoint Determination for Space Based Images

    SciTech Connect

    Simms, L M

    2011-03-07

    An algorithm for determining satellite track endpoints with sub-pixel resolution in spaced-based images is presented. The algorithm allows for significant curvature in the imaged track due to rotation of the spacecraft capturing the image. The motivation behind the subpixel endpoint determination is first presented, followed by a description of the methodology used. Results from running the algorithm on real ground-based and simulated spaced-based images are shown to highlight its effectiveness.

  20. Optical and electrical characterization of a back-thinned CMOS active pixel sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blue, Andrew; Clark, A.; Houston, S.; Laing, A.; Maneuski, D.; Prydderch, M.; Turchetta, R.; O'Shea, V.

    2009-06-01

    This work will report on the first work on the characterization of a back-thinned Vanilla-a 512×512 (25 μm squared) active pixel sensor (APS). Characterization of the detectors was carried out through the analysis of photon transfer curves to yield a measurement of full well capacity, noise levels, gain constants and linearity. Spectral characterization of the sensors was also performed in the visible and UV regions. A full comparison against non-back-thinned front illuminated Vanilla sensors is included. Such measurements suggest that the Vanilla APS will be suitable for a wide range of applications, including particle physics and biomedical imaging.

  1. Low-Light Image Enhancement Using Adaptive Digital Pixel Binning

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Yoonjong; Im, Jaehyun; Paik, Joonki

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an image enhancement algorithm for low-light scenes in an environment with insufficient illumination. Simple amplification of intensity exhibits various undesired artifacts: noise amplification, intensity saturation, and loss of resolution. In order to enhance low-light images without undesired artifacts, a novel digital binning algorithm is proposed that considers brightness, context, noise level, and anti-saturation of a local region in the image. The proposed algorithm does not require any modification of the image sensor or additional frame-memory; it needs only two line-memories in the image signal processor (ISP). Since the proposed algorithm does not use an iterative computation, it can be easily embedded in an existing digital camera ISP pipeline containing a high-resolution image sensor. PMID:26121609

  2. Low-Light Image Enhancement Using Adaptive Digital Pixel Binning.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Yoonjong; Im, Jaehyun; Paik, Joonki

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an image enhancement algorithm for low-light scenes in an environment with insufficient illumination. Simple amplification of intensity exhibits various undesired artifacts: noise amplification, intensity saturation, and loss of resolution. In order to enhance low-light images without undesired artifacts, a novel digital binning algorithm is proposed that considers brightness, context, noise level, and anti-saturation of a local region in the image. The proposed algorithm does not require any modification of the image sensor or additional frame-memory; it needs only two line-memories in the image signal processor (ISP). Since the proposed algorithm does not use an iterative computation, it can be easily embedded in an existing digital camera ISP pipeline containing a high-resolution image sensor. PMID:26121609

  3. High Chromaticity Aluminum Plasmonic Pixels for Active Liquid Crystal Displays.

    PubMed

    Olson, Jana; Manjavacas, Alejandro; Basu, Tiyash; Huang, Da; Schlather, Andrea E; Zheng, Bob; Halas, Naomi J; Nordlander, Peter; Link, Stephan

    2016-01-26

    Chromatic devices such as flat panel displays could, in principle, be substantially improved by incorporating aluminum plasmonic nanostructures instead of conventional chromophores that are susceptible to photobleaching. In nanostructure form, aluminum is capable of producing colors that span the visible region of the spectrum while contributing exceptional robustness, low cost, and streamlined manufacturability compatible with semiconductor manufacturing technology. However, individual aluminum nanostructures alone lack the vivid chromaticity of currently available chromophores because of the strong damping of the aluminum plasmon resonance in the visible region of the spectrum. In recent work, we showed that pixels formed by periodic arrays of Al nanostructures yield far more vivid coloration than the individual nanostructures. This progress was achieved by exploiting far-field diffractive coupling, which significantly suppresses the scattering response on the long-wavelength side of plasmonic pixel resonances. In the present work, we show that by utilizing another collective coupling effect, Fano interference, it is possible to substantially narrow the short-wavelength side of the pixel spectral response. Together, these two complementary effects provide unprecedented control of plasmonic pixel spectral line shape, resulting in aluminum pixels with far more vivid, monochromatic coloration across the entire RGB color gamut than previously attainable. We further demonstrate that pixels designed in this manner can be used directly as switchable elements in liquid crystal displays and determine the minimum and optimal numbers of nanorods required in an array to achieve good color quality and intensity. PMID:26639191

  4. High-sensitivity active pixel sensor with variable threshold photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Sung-Hyun; Bae, Myunghan; Choi, Byoung-Soo; Lyu, Hong-Kun; Shin, Jang-Kyoo

    2015-05-01

    A novel high-sensitivity active pixel sensor (APS) with a variable threshold photodetector has been presented and for the first time, a simple SPICE model for the variable threshold photodetector is presented. Its SPICE model is in good agreement with measurements and is more simpler than the conventional model. The proposed APS has a gate/body-tied PMOSFET-type photodetector with an overlapping control gate that makes it possible to control the sensitivity of the proposed APS. It is a hybrid device composed of a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET), a lateral bipolar junction transistor (BJT) and a vertical BJT. Using sufficient overlapping control gate bias to operate the MOSFET in inversion mode, the variable threshold photodetector allows for increasing the photocurrent gain by 105 at low light intensities when the control gate bias is -3 V. Thus, the proposed APS with a variable threshold photodetector has better low-light-level sensitivity than the conventional APS operating mode, and it has a variable sensitivity which is determined by the control gate bias. The proposed sensor has been fabricated by using 0.35 μm 2-poly 4-metal standard complementary MOS (CMOS) process and its characteristics have been evaluated.

  5. Simulation of electronic registration of multispectral remote sensing images to 0.1 pixel accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reitsema, H. J.; Mord, A. J.; Fraser, D.; Richard, H. L.; Speaker, E. E.

    1984-01-01

    Band-to-band coregistration of multispectral remote sensing images can be achieved by electronic signal processing techniques rather than by costly and difficult mechanical alignment. This paper describes the results of a study of the end-to-end performance of electronic registration. The software simulation includes steps which model the performance of the geometric calibration process, the instrument image quality, detector performance and the effects of achieving coregistration through image resampling. The image resampling step emulates the Pipelined Resampling Processor, a real-time image resampler. The study demonstrates that the electronic alignment technique produces multispectral images which are superior to those produced by an imager whose pixel geometry is accurate to 0.1 pixel rms. The implications of this approach for future earth observation programs are discussed.

  6. High-speed X-ray imaging pixel array detector for synchrotron bunch isolation

    PubMed Central

    Philipp, Hugh T.; Tate, Mark W.; Purohit, Prafull; Shanks, Katherine S.; Weiss, Joel T.; Gruner, Sol M.

    2016-01-01

    A wide-dynamic-range imaging X-ray detector designed for recording successive frames at rates up to 10 MHz is described. X-ray imaging with frame rates of up to 6.5 MHz have been experimentally verified. The pixel design allows for up to 8–12 frames to be stored internally at high speed before readout, which occurs at a 1 kHz frame rate. An additional mode of operation allows the integration capacitors to be re-addressed repeatedly before readout which can enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of cyclical processes. This detector, along with modern storage ring sources which provide short (10–100 ps) and intense X-ray pulses at megahertz rates, opens new avenues for the study of rapid structural changes in materials. The detector consists of hybridized modules, each of which is comprised of a 500 µm-thick silicon X-ray sensor solder bump-bonded, pixel by pixel, to an application-specific integrated circuit. The format of each module is 128 × 128 pixels with a pixel pitch of 150 µm. In the prototype detector described here, the three-side buttable modules are tiled in a 3 × 2 array with a full format of 256 × 384 pixels. The characteristics, operation, testing and application of the detector are detailed. PMID:26917125

  7. High-speed X-ray imaging pixel array detector for synchrotron bunch isolation.

    PubMed

    Philipp, Hugh T; Tate, Mark W; Purohit, Prafull; Shanks, Katherine S; Weiss, Joel T; Gruner, Sol M

    2016-03-01

    A wide-dynamic-range imaging X-ray detector designed for recording successive frames at rates up to 10 MHz is described. X-ray imaging with frame rates of up to 6.5 MHz have been experimentally verified. The pixel design allows for up to 8-12 frames to be stored internally at high speed before readout, which occurs at a 1 kHz frame rate. An additional mode of operation allows the integration capacitors to be re-addressed repeatedly before readout which can enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of cyclical processes. This detector, along with modern storage ring sources which provide short (10-100 ps) and intense X-ray pulses at megahertz rates, opens new avenues for the study of rapid structural changes in materials. The detector consists of hybridized modules, each of which is comprised of a 500 µm-thick silicon X-ray sensor solder bump-bonded, pixel by pixel, to an application-specific integrated circuit. The format of each module is 128 × 128 pixels with a pixel pitch of 150 µm. In the prototype detector described here, the three-side buttable modules are tiled in a 3 × 2 array with a full format of 256 × 384 pixels. The characteristics, operation, testing and application of the detector are detailed. PMID:26917125

  8. Segmentation of bone pixels from EROI Image using clustering method for bone age assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakthula, Rajitha; Agarwal, Suneeta

    2016-03-01

    The bone age of a human can be identified using carpal and epiphysis bones ossification, which is limited to teen age. The accurate age estimation depends on best separation of bone pixels and soft tissue pixels in the ROI image. The traditional approaches like canny, sobel, clustering, region growing and watershed can be applied, but these methods requires proper pre-processing and accurate initial seed point estimation to provide accurate results. Therefore this paper proposes new approach to segment the bone from soft tissue and background pixels. First pixels are enhanced using BPE and the edges are identified by HIPI. Later a K-Means clustering is applied for segmentation. The performance of the proposed approach has been evaluated and compared with the existing methods.

  9. Geometric super-resolution via log-polar FFT image registration and variable pixel linear reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabtree, Peter N.; Murray-Krezan, Jeremy

    2011-09-01

    Various image de-aliasing techniques and algorithms have been developed to improve the resolution of pixel-limited imagery acquired by an optical system having an undersampled point spread function. These techniques are sometimes referred to as multi-frame or geometric super-resolution, and are valuable tools because they maximize the imaging utility of current and legacy focal plane array (FPA) technology. This is especially true for infrared FPAs which tend to have larger pixels as compared to visible sensors. Geometric super-resolution relies on knowledge of subpixel frame-toframe motion, which is used to assemble a set of low-resolution frames into one or more high-resolution (HR) frames. Log-polar FFT image registration provides a straightforward and relatively fast approach to estimate global affine motion, including translation, rotation, and uniform scale changes. This technique is also readily extended to provide subpixel translation estimates, and is explored for its potential combination with variable pixel linear reconstruction (VPLR) to apportion a sequence of LR frames onto a HR grid. The VPLR algorithm created for this work is described, and HR image reconstruction is demonstrated using calibrated 1/4 pixel microscan data. The HR image resulting from VPLR is also enhanced using Lucy-Richardson deconvolution to mitigate blurring effects due to the pixel spread function. To address non-stationary scenes, image warping, and variable lighting conditions, optical flow is also investigated for its potential to provide subpixel motion information. Initial results demonstrate that the particular optical flow technique studied is able to estimate shifts down to nearly 1/10th of a pixel, and possibly smaller. Algorithm performance is demonstrated and explored using laboratory data from visible cameras.

  10. Heterogeneity of Particle Deposition by Pixel Analysis of 2D Gamma Scintigraphy Images

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Miao; Zeman, Kirby; Hurd, Harry; Donaldson, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Heterogeneity of inhaled particle deposition in airways disease may be a sensitive indicator of physiologic changes in the lungs. Using planar gamma scintigraphy, we developed new methods to locate and quantify regions of high (hot) and low (cold) particle deposition in the lungs. Methods: Initial deposition and 24 hour retention images were obtained from healthy (n=31) adult subjects and patients with mild cystic fibrosis lung disease (CF) (n=14) following inhalation of radiolabeled particles (Tc99m-sulfur colloid, 5.4 μm MMAD) under controlled breathing conditions. The initial deposition image of the right lung was normalized to (i.e., same median pixel value), and then divided by, a transmission (Tc99m) image in the same individual to obtain a pixel-by-pixel ratio image. Hot spots were defined where pixel values in the deposition image were greater than 2X those of the transmission, and cold spots as pixels where the deposition image was less than 0.5X of the transmission. The number ratio (NR) of the hot and cold pixels to total lung pixels, and the sum ratio (SR) of total counts in hot pixels to total lung counts were compared between healthy and CF subjects. Other traditional measures of regional particle deposition, nC/P and skew of the pixel count histogram distribution, were also compared. Results: The NR of cold spots was greater in mild CF, 0.221±0.047(CF) vs. 0.186±0.038 (healthy) (p<0.005) and was significantly correlated with FEV1 %pred in the patients (R=−0.70). nC/P (central to peripheral count ratio), skew of the count histogram, and hot NR or SR were not different between the healthy and mild CF patients. Conclusions: These methods may provide more sensitive measures of airway function and localization of deposition that might be useful for assessing treatment efficacy in these patients. PMID:25393109

  11. A history of hybrid pixel detectors, from high energy physics to medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delpierre, P.

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the development of hybrid pixel detectors from the origin to the application on medical imaging. We are going to recall the need for fast 2D detectors in the high energy physics experiments and to follow the different pixel electronic circuits created to satisfy this demand. The adaptation of these circuits for X-rays will be presented as well as their industrialization. Today, a number of applications are open for these cameras, particularly for biomedical imaging applications. Some developments for clinical CT will also be shown.

  12. Proof of principle study of the use of a CMOS active pixel sensor for proton radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Seco, Joao; Depauw, Nicolas

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: Proof of principle study of the use of a CMOS active pixel sensor (APS) in producing proton radiographic images using the proton beam at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Methods: A CMOS APS, previously tested for use in s-ray radiation therapy applications, was used for proton beam radiographic imaging at the MGH. Two different setups were used as a proof of principle that CMOS can be used as proton imaging device: (i) a pen with two metal screws to assess spatial resolution of the CMOS and (ii) a phantom with lung tissue, bone tissue, and water to assess tissue contrast of the CMOS. The sensor was then traversed by a double scattered monoenergetic proton beam at 117 MeV, and the energy deposition inside the detector was recorded to assess its energy response. Conventional x-ray images with similar setup at voltages of 70 kVp and proton images using commercial Gafchromic EBT 2 and Kodak X-Omat V films were also taken for comparison purposes. Results: Images were successfully acquired and compared to x-ray kVp and proton EBT2/X-Omat film images. The spatial resolution of the CMOS detector image is subjectively comparable to the EBT2 and Kodak X-Omat V film images obtained at the same object-detector distance. X-rays have apparent higher spatial resolution than the CMOS. However, further studies with different commercial films using proton beam irradiation demonstrate that the distance of the detector to the object is important to the amount of proton scatter contributing to the proton image. Proton images obtained with films at different distances from the source indicate that proton scatter significantly affects the CMOS image quality. Conclusion: Proton radiographic images were successfully acquired at MGH using a CMOS active pixel sensor detector. The CMOS demonstrated spatial resolution subjectively comparable to films at the same object-detector distance. Further work will be done in order to establish the spatial and energy resolution of the

  13. Compact SPAD-Based Pixel Architectures for Time-Resolved Image Sensors.

    PubMed

    Perenzoni, Matteo; Pancheri, Lucio; Stoppa, David

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the state of the art of single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) image sensors for time-resolved imaging. The focus of the paper is on pixel architectures featuring small pixel size (<25 μm) and high fill factor (>20%) as a key enabling technology for the successful implementation of high spatial resolution SPAD-based image sensors. A summary of the main CMOS SPAD implementations, their characteristics and integration challenges, is provided from the perspective of targeting large pixel arrays, where one of the key drivers is the spatial uniformity. The main analog techniques aimed at time-gated photon counting and photon timestamping suitable for compact and low-power pixels are critically discussed. The main features of these solutions are the adoption of analog counting techniques and time-to-analog conversion, in NMOS-only pixels. Reliable quantum-limited single-photon counting, self-referenced analog-to-digital conversion, time gating down to 0.75 ns and timestamping with 368 ps jitter are achieved. PMID:27223284

  14. Compact SPAD-Based Pixel Architectures for Time-Resolved Image Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Perenzoni, Matteo; Pancheri, Lucio; Stoppa, David

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the state of the art of single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) image sensors for time-resolved imaging. The focus of the paper is on pixel architectures featuring small pixel size (<25 μm) and high fill factor (>20%) as a key enabling technology for the successful implementation of high spatial resolution SPAD-based image sensors. A summary of the main CMOS SPAD implementations, their characteristics and integration challenges, is provided from the perspective of targeting large pixel arrays, where one of the key drivers is the spatial uniformity. The main analog techniques aimed at time-gated photon counting and photon timestamping suitable for compact and low-power pixels are critically discussed. The main features of these solutions are the adoption of analog counting techniques and time-to-analog conversion, in NMOS-only pixels. Reliable quantum-limited single-photon counting, self-referenced analog-to-digital conversion, time gating down to 0.75 ns and timestamping with 368 ps jitter are achieved. PMID:27223284

  15. CMOS digital pixel sensors: technology and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skorka, Orit; Joseph, Dileepan

    2014-04-01

    CMOS active pixel sensor technology, which is widely used these days for digital imaging, is based on analog pixels. Transition to digital pixel sensors can boost signal-to-noise ratios and enhance image quality, but can increase pixel area to dimensions that are impractical for the high-volume market of consumer electronic devices. There are two main approaches to digital pixel design. The first uses digitization methods that largely rely on photodetector properties and so are unique to imaging. The second is based on adaptation of a classical analog-to-digital converter (ADC) for in-pixel data conversion. Imaging systems for medical, industrial, and security applications are emerging lower-volume markets that can benefit from these in-pixel ADCs. With these applications, larger pixels are typically acceptable, and imaging may be done in invisible spectral bands.

  16. Providing integrity, authenticity, and confidentiality for header and pixel data of DICOM images.

    PubMed

    Al-Haj, Ali

    2015-04-01

    Exchange of medical images over public networks is subjected to different types of security threats. This has triggered persisting demands for secured telemedicine implementations that will provide confidentiality, authenticity, and integrity for the transmitted images. The medical image exchange standard (DICOM) offers mechanisms to provide confidentiality for the header data of the image but not for the pixel data. On the other hand, it offers mechanisms to achieve authenticity and integrity for the pixel data but not for the header data. In this paper, we propose a crypto-based algorithm that provides confidentially, authenticity, and integrity for the pixel data, as well as for the header data. This is achieved by applying strong cryptographic primitives utilizing internally generated security data, such as encryption keys, hashing codes, and digital signatures. The security data are generated internally from the header and the pixel data, thus a strong bond is established between the DICOM data and the corresponding security data. The proposed algorithm has been evaluated extensively using DICOM images of different modalities. Simulation experiments show that confidentiality, authenticity, and integrity have been achieved as reflected by the results we obtained for normalized correlation, entropy, PSNR, histogram analysis, and robustness. PMID:25266442

  17. Integrated X-ray and charged particle active pixel CMOS sensor arrays using an epitaxial silicon sensitive region

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinfelder, Stuart; Bichsel, Hans; Bieser, Fred; Matis, Howard S.; Rai, Gulshan; Retiere, Fabrice; Weiman, Howard; Yamamoto, Eugene

    2002-07-01

    Integrated CMOS Active Pixel Sensor (APS) arrays have been fabricated and tested using X-ray and electron sources. The 128 by 128 pixel arrays, designed in a standard 0.25 micron process, use a {approx}10 micron epitaxial silicon layer as a deep detection region. The epitaxial layer has a much greater thickness than the surface features used by standard CMOS APS, leading to stronger signals and potentially better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). On the other hand, minority carriers confined within the epitaxial region may diffuse to neighboring pixels, blur images and reduce peak signal intensity. But for low-rate, sparse-event images, centroid analysis of this diffusion may be used to increase position resolution. Careful trade-offs involving pixel size and sense-node area verses capacitance must be made to optimize overall performance. The prototype sensor arrays, therefore, include a range of different pixel designs, including different APS circuits and a range of different epitaxial layer contact structures. The fabricated arrays were tested with 1.5 GeV electrons and Fe-55 X-ray sources, yielding a measured noise of 13 electrons RMS and an SNR for single Fe-55 X-rays of greater than 38.

  18. Optical confinement methods for continued scaling of CMOS image sensor pixels.

    PubMed

    Fesenmaier, Christian C; Huo, Yijie; Catrysse, Peter B

    2008-12-01

    The pixels that make up CMOS image sensors have steadily decreased in size over the last decade. This scaling has two effects: first, the amount of light incident on each pixel decreases, making optical efficiency, i.e., the collection of each photon, more important. Second, diffraction comes into play when pixel size approaches the wavelength of visible light, resulting in increased spatial optical crosstalk. To address these two effects, we investigate and compare three methods for guiding incident light from the microlens down to the photodiode. Two of these techniques rely on total internal reflection (TIR) at the boundary between dielectric media of different refractive indices, while the third uses reflection at a metal-dielectric interface to confine the light. Simulations are performed using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method on a realistic 1.75-mum pixel model for on-axis as well as angled incidence. We evaluate the optical efficiency and spatial crosstalk performance of these methods compared to a reference pixel and find significant (10%) improvement for the TIR designs with properly chosen parameters and nearly full spatial crosstalk elimination using metal to confine the light. We also show that these improvements are comparable to those achieved by thinning the image sensor stack. PMID:19065184

  19. Bias reduction in sub-pixel image registration based on the anti-symmetric feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dezhi; Jiang, Yu; Wang, Weizhuo; Wang, Yueqi

    2016-03-01

    A simple but effective bias reduction technique is developed based on the anti-symmetric feature of the sub-pixel image registration bias. Depending on the error propagation theory, the anti-symmetric feature is mathematically derived through a classical subset-based digital image correlation algorithm considering the most common error sources i.e. the grey-intensity interpolation scheme and random noise. This leads to the sub-pixel registration bias formulated in the form of an analytic expression that consists of the interpolation-induced phase error and the random noise induced bias, which is also further illustrated by numerical simulations. Bias reduction is achieved by compensating the bias at a certain sub-pixel displacement with the bias at the corresponding anti-symmetric sub-pixel displacement where the Fourier shift theorem is employed to alter the displacement without introducing extra bias. The performance of proposed method is validated using numerical case studies with different interpolation schemes and noise levels, by which the sub-pixel registration bias is shown to be significantly reduced.

  20. Fast Multispectral Imaging by Spatial Pixel-Binning and Spectral Unmixing.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhi-Wei; Shen, Hui-Liang; Li, Chunguang; Chen, Shu-Jie; Xin, John H

    2016-08-01

    Multispectral imaging system is of wide application in relevant fields for its capability in acquiring spectral information of scenes. Its limitation is that, due to the large number of spectral channels, the imaging process can be quite time-consuming when capturing high-resolution (HR) multispectral images. To resolve this limitation, this paper proposes a fast multispectral imaging framework based on the image sensor pixel-binning and spectral unmixing techniques. The framework comprises a fast imaging stage and a computational reconstruction stage. In the imaging stage, only a few spectral images are acquired in HR, while most spectral images are acquired in low resolution (LR). The LR images are captured by applying pixel binning on the image sensor, such that the exposure time can be greatly reduced. In the reconstruction stage, an optimal number of basis spectra are computed and the signal-dependent noise statistics are estimated. Then the unknown HR images are efficiently reconstructed by solving a closed-form cost function that models the spatial and spectral degradations. The effectiveness of the proposed framework is evaluated using real-scene multispectral images. Experimental results validate that, in general, the method outperforms the state of the arts in terms of reconstruction accuracy, with additional 20× or more improvement in computational efficiency. PMID:27295668

  1. A novel pixel design with hybrid type isolation scheme for low dark current in CMOS image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sung Ho; Kim, Yi Tae; Oh, Min Seok; Park, Young Hwan; Cho, Jeong Jin; Jang, Young Heub; Han, Hyung Jun; Choi, Jong Won; Park, Ho Woo; Jung, Sang Il; Oh, Hoon Sang; Ahn, Jung Chak; Goto, Hiroshige; Choi, Chi Young; Roh, Yonghan

    2013-02-01

    New isolation scheme for CMOS image sensor pixel is proposed and its improved dark current performance is reported. It is well known that shallow trench isolation (STI) is one of major sources of dark current in imager pixel due to the existence of interfacial defects at STI/Si interface. On the account STI-free structure over the whole pixel area was previously reported for reducing dark current. As the size of pixel pitch is shrunk, however, it becomes increasingly difficult to isolate in-pixel transistors electrically without STI. In this work, we implemented hybrid type isolation scheme of removing STI around photodiode to suppress the dark current and remaining STI near transistors to guarantee the electrical isolation of transistors in pixel. It was successfully achieved that the dark current was significantly reduced by removing the STI around the photodiode together with normal operation of in-pixel transistors.

  2. Pixel-wise orthogonal decomposition for color illumination invariant and shadow-free image.

    PubMed

    Qu, Liangqiong; Tian, Jiandong; Han, Zhi; Tang, Yandong

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel, effective and fast method to obtain a color illumination invariant and shadow-free image from a single outdoor image. Different from state-of-the-art methods for shadow-free image that either need shadow detection or statistical learning, we set up a linear equation set for each pixel value vector based on physically-based shadow invariants, deduce a pixel-wise orthogonal decomposition for its solutions, and then get an illumination invariant vector for each pixel value vector on an image. The illumination invariant vector is the unique particular solution of the linear equation set, which is orthogonal to its free solutions. With this illumination invariant vector and Lab color space, we propose an algorithm to generate a shadow-free image which well preserves the texture and color information of the original image. A series of experiments on a diverse set of outdoor images and the comparisons with the state-of-the-art methods validate our method. PMID:25836092

  3. Imaging properties of small-pixel spectroscopic x-ray detectors based on cadmium telluride sensors.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Thomas; Schulze, Julia; Zuber, Marcus; Rink, Kristian; Butzer, Jochen; Hamann, Elias; Cecilia, Angelica; Zwerger, Andreas; Fauler, Alex; Fiederle, Michael; Oelfke, Uwe

    2012-11-01

    Spectroscopic x-ray imaging by means of photon counting detectors has received growing interest during the past years. Critical to the image quality of such devices is their pixel pitch and the sensor material employed. This paper describes the imaging properties of Medipix2 MXR multi-chip assemblies bump bonded to 1 mm thick CdTe sensors. Two systems were investigated with pixel pitches of 110 and 165 μm, which are in the order of the mean free path lengths of the characteristic x-rays produced in their sensors. Peak widths were found to be almost constant across the energy range of 10 to 60 keV, with values of 2.3 and 2.2 keV (FWHM) for the two pixel pitches. The average number of pixels responding to a single incoming photon are about 1.85 and 1.45 at 60 keV, amounting to detective quantum efficiencies of 0.77 and 0.84 at a spatial frequency of zero. Energy selective CT acquisitions are presented, and the two pixel pitches' abilities to discriminate between iodine and gadolinium contrast agents are examined. It is shown that the choice of the pixel pitch translates into a minimum contrast agent concentration for which material discrimination is still possible. We finally investigate saturation effects at high x-ray fluxes and conclude with the finding that higher maximum count rates come at the cost of a reduced energy resolution. PMID:23032372

  4. 12-inch-wafer-scale CMOS active-pixel sensor for digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Sung Kyn; Kosonen, Jari; Hwang, Sung Ha; Kim, Tae Woo; Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2011-03-01

    This paper describes the development of an active-pixel sensor (APS) panel, which has a field-of-view of 23.1×17.1 cm and features 70-μm-sized pixels arranged in a 3300×2442 array format, for digital mammographic applications. The APS panel was realized on 12-inch wafers based on the standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology without physical tiling processes of several small-area sensor arrays. Electrical performance of the developed panel is described in terms of dark current, full-well capacity and leakage current map. For mammographic imaging, the optimized CsI:Tl scintillator is experimentally determined by being combined with the developed panel and analyzing im aging characteristics, such as modulation-transfer function, noise-power spectrum, detective quantum efficiency, image l ag, and contrast-detail analysis by using the CDMAM 3.4 phantom. With these results, we suggest that the developed CMOS-based detector can be used for conventional and advanced digital mammographic applications.

  5. Low-complexity pixel detection for images with misalignment and interpixel interference in holographic data storage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi-Yun; Fu, Chih-Cheng; Chiueh, Tzi-Dar

    2008-12-20

    This paper presents an efficient solution to recovering data pixels of images that have undergone optical and electrical channel impairments in holographic data storage systems. The channel impairments considered include interpixel interference, three types of misalignment, and noise. The proposed misalignment-compensation scheme, consisting of realignment and rate conversion, can effectively eliminate misalignment with more than 84% reduction in additions and 74% reduction in multiplications. In addition, several low-complexity techniques are introduced to reduce the complexity of a two-dimensional maximum a posteriori pixel detection method by up to 95% and do so with negligible degradation in detection performance. PMID:19104530

  6. Nonparametric Detection of Nonlinearly Mixed Pixels and Endmember Estimation in Hyperspectral Images.

    PubMed

    Imbiriba, Tales; Bermudez, José Carlos Moreira; Richard, Cédric; Tourneret, Jean-Yves

    2016-03-01

    Mixing phenomena in hyperspectral images depend on a variety of factors, such as the resolution of observation devices, the properties of materials, and how these materials interact with incident light in the scene. Different parametric and nonparametric models have been considered to address hyperspectral unmixing problems. The simplest one is the linear mixing model. Nevertheless, it has been recognized that the mixing phenomena can also be nonlinear. The corresponding nonlinear analysis techniques are necessarily more challenging and complex than those employed for linear unmixing. Within this context, it makes sense to detect the nonlinearly mixed pixels in an image prior to its analysis, and then employ the simplest possible unmixing technique to analyze each pixel. In this paper, we propose a technique for detecting nonlinearly mixed pixels. The detection approach is based on the comparison of the reconstruction errors using both a Gaussian process regression model and a linear regression model. The two errors are combined into a detection statistics for which a probability density function can be reasonably approximated. We also propose an iterative endmember extraction algorithm to be employed in combination with the detection algorithm. The proposed detect-then-unmix strategy, which consists of extracting endmembers, detecting nonlinearly mixed pixels and unmixing, is tested with synthetic and real images. PMID:26685243

  7. Multi-pixel high-resolution three-dimensional imaging radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Ken B. (Inventor); Dengler, Robert J. (Inventor); Siegel, Peter H. (Inventor); Chattopadhyay, Goutam (Inventor); Ward, John S. (Inventor); Juan, Nuria Llombart (Inventor); Bryllert, Tomas E. (Inventor); Mehdi, Imran (Inventor); Tarsala, Jan A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional imaging radar operating at high frequency e.g., 670 GHz radar using low phase-noise synthesizers and a fast chirper to generate a frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) waveform, is disclosed that operates with a multiplexed beam to obtain range information simultaneously on multiple pixels of a target. A source transmit beam may be divided by a hybrid coupler into multiple transmit beams multiplexed together and directed to be reflected off a target and return as a single receive beam which is demultiplexed and processed to reveal range information of separate pixels of the target associated with each transmit beam simultaneously. The multiple transmit beams may be developed with appropriate optics to be temporally and spatially differentiated before being directed to the target. Temporal differentiation corresponds to a different intermediate frequencies separating the range information of the multiple pixels. Collinear transmit beams having differentiated polarizations may also be implemented.

  8. Filter-free image sensor pixels comprising silicon nanowires with selective color absorption.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyunsung; Dan, Yaping; Seo, Kwanyong; Yu, Young J; Duane, Peter K; Wober, Munib; Crozier, Kenneth B

    2014-01-01

    The organic dye filters of conventional color image sensors achieve the red/green/blue response needed for color imaging, but have disadvantages related to durability, low absorption coefficient, and fabrication complexity. Here, we report a new paradigm for color imaging based on all-silicon nanowire devices and no filters. We fabricate pixels consisting of vertical silicon nanowires with integrated photodetectors, demonstrate that their spectral sensitivities are governed by nanowire radius, and perform color imaging. Our approach is conceptually different from filter-based methods, as absorbed light is converted to photocurrent, ultimately presenting the opportunity for very high photon efficiency. PMID:24588103

  9. Photon counting pixel and array in amorphous silicon technology for large area digital medical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdandoost, Mohammad Y.; Shin, Kyung W.; Safavian, Nader; Taghibakhsh, Farhad; Karim, Karim S.

    2010-04-01

    A single photon counting Voltage Controlled Oscillator (VCO) based pixel architecture in amorphous silicon (a-Si) technology is reported for large area digital medical imaging. The VCO converts X-ray generated input charge into an output oscillating frequency signal. Experimental results for an in-house fabricated VCO circuit in a-Si technology are presented and external readout circuits to extract the image information from the VCO's frequency output are discussed. These readout circuits can be optimized to reduce the fixed pattern noise and fringing effects in an imaging array containing many such VCO pixels. Noise estimations, stability simulations and measurements for the fabricated VCO are presented. The reported architecture is particularly promising for large area photon counting applications (e.g. low dose fluoroscopy, dental computed tomography (CT)) due to its very low input referred electronic noise, high sensitivity and ease of fabrication in low cost a-Si technology.

  10. Pixel Perfect

    SciTech Connect

    Perrine, Kenneth A.; Hopkins, Derek F.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2005-09-01

    Biologists and computer engineers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have specified, designed, and implemented a hardware/software system for performing real-time, multispectral image processing on a confocal microscope. This solution is intended to extend the capabilities of the microscope, enabling scientists to conduct advanced experiments on cell signaling and other kinds of protein interactions. FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) techniques are used to locate and monitor protein activity. In FRET, it is critical that spectral images be precisely aligned with each other despite disturbances in the physical imaging path caused by imperfections in lenses and cameras, and expansion and contraction of materials due to temperature changes. The central importance of this work is therefore automatic image registration. This runs in a framework that guarantees real-time performance (processing pairs of 1024x1024, 8-bit images at 15 frames per second) and enables the addition of other types of advanced image processing algorithms such as image feature characterization. The supporting system architecture consists of a Visual Basic front-end containing a series of on-screen interfaces for controlling various aspects of the microscope and a script engine for automation. One of the controls is an ActiveX component written in C++ for handling the control and transfer of images. This component interfaces with a pair of LVDS image capture boards and a PCI board containing a 6-million gate Xilinx Virtex-II FPGA. Several types of image processing are performed on the FPGA in a pipelined fashion, including the image registration. The FPGA offloads work that would otherwise need to be performed by the main CPU and has a guaranteed real-time throughput. Image registration is performed in the FPGA by applying a cubic warp on one image to precisely align it with the other image. Before each experiment, an automated calibration procedure is run in order to set up the

  11. Giga-pixel lensfree holographic microscopy and tomography using color image sensors.

    PubMed

    Isikman, Serhan O; Greenbaum, Alon; Luo, Wei; Coskun, Ahmet F; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2012-01-01

    We report Giga-pixel lensfree holographic microscopy and tomography using color sensor-arrays such as CMOS imagers that exhibit Bayer color filter patterns. Without physically removing these color filters coated on the sensor chip, we synthesize pixel super-resolved lensfree holograms, which are then reconstructed to achieve ~350 nm lateral resolution, corresponding to a numerical aperture of ~0.8, across a field-of-view of ~20.5 mm(2). This constitutes a digital image with ~0.7 Billion effective pixels in both amplitude and phase channels (i.e., ~1.4 Giga-pixels total). Furthermore, by changing the illumination angle (e.g., ± 50°) and scanning a partially-coherent light source across two orthogonal axes, super-resolved images of the same specimen from different viewing angles are created, which are then digitally combined to synthesize tomographic images of the object. Using this dual-axis lensfree tomographic imager running on a color sensor-chip, we achieve a 3D spatial resolution of ~0.35 µm × 0.35 µm × ~2 µm, in x, y and z, respectively, creating an effective voxel size of ~0.03 µm(3) across a sample volume of ~5 mm(3), which is equivalent to >150 Billion voxels. We demonstrate the proof-of-concept of this lensfree optical tomographic microscopy platform on a color CMOS image sensor by creating tomograms of micro-particles as well as a wild-type C. elegans nematode. PMID:22984606

  12. Giga-Pixel Lensfree Holographic Microscopy and Tomography Using Color Image Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, Ahmet F.; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2012-01-01

    We report Giga-pixel lensfree holographic microscopy and tomography using color sensor-arrays such as CMOS imagers that exhibit Bayer color filter patterns. Without physically removing these color filters coated on the sensor chip, we synthesize pixel super-resolved lensfree holograms, which are then reconstructed to achieve ∼350 nm lateral resolution, corresponding to a numerical aperture of ∼0.8, across a field-of-view of ∼20.5 mm2. This constitutes a digital image with ∼0.7 Billion effective pixels in both amplitude and phase channels (i.e., ∼1.4 Giga-pixels total). Furthermore, by changing the illumination angle (e.g., ±50°) and scanning a partially-coherent light source across two orthogonal axes, super-resolved images of the same specimen from different viewing angles are created, which are then digitally combined to synthesize tomographic images of the object. Using this dual-axis lensfree tomographic imager running on a color sensor-chip, we achieve a 3D spatial resolution of ∼0.35 µm×0.35 µm×∼2 µm, in x, y and z, respectively, creating an effective voxel size of ∼0.03 µm3 across a sample volume of ∼5 mm3, which is equivalent to >150 Billion voxels. We demonstrate the proof-of-concept of this lensfree optical tomographic microscopy platform on a color CMOS image sensor by creating tomograms of micro-particles as well as a wild-type C. elegans nematode. PMID:22984606

  13. Position and time resolution measurements with a microchannel plate image intensifier: A comparison of monolithic and pixelated CeBr3 scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, Ulrich; Eschbaumer, Stephan; Bergmaier, Andreas; Egger, Werner; Sperr, Peter; Greubel, Christoph; Löwe, Benjamin; Schotanus, Paul; Dollinger, Günther

    2016-07-01

    To perform Four Dimensional Age Momentum Correlation measurements in the near future, where one obtains the positron lifetime in coincidence with the three dimensional momentum of the electron annihilating with the positron, we have investigated the time and position resolution of two CeBr3 scintillators (monolithic and an array of pixels) using a Photek IPD340/Q/BI/RS microchannel plate image intensifier. The microchannel plate image intensifier has an active diameter of 40 mm and a stack of two microchannel plates in chevron configuration. The monolithic CeBr3 scintillator was cylindrically shaped with a diameter of 40 mm and a height of 5 mm. The pixelated scintillator array covered the whole active area of the microchannel plate image intensifier and the shape of each pixel was 2.5·2.5·8 mm3 with a pixel pitch of 3.3 mm. For the monolithic setup the measured mean single time resolution was 330 ps (FWHM) at a gamma energy of 511 keV. No significant dependence on the position was detected. The position resolution at the center of the monolithic scintillator was about 2.5 mm (FWHM) at a gamma energy of 662 keV. The single time resolution of the pixelated crystal setup reached 320 ps (FWHM) in the region of the center of the active area of the microchannel plate image intensifier. The position resolution was limited by the cross-section of the pixels. The gamma energy for the pixel setup measurements was 511 keV.

  14. Pixelated detectors and improved efficiency for magnetic imaging in STEM differential phase contrast.

    PubMed

    Krajnak, Matus; McGrouther, Damien; Maneuski, Dzmitry; Shea, Val O'; McVitie, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    The application of differential phase contrast imaging to the study of polycrystalline magnetic thin films and nanostructures has been hampered by the strong diffraction contrast resulting from the granular structure of the materials. In this paper we demonstrate how a pixelated detector has been used to detect the bright field disk in aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and subsequent processing of the acquired data allows efficient enhancement of the magnetic contrast in the resulting images. Initial results from a charged coupled device (CCD) camera demonstrate the highly efficient nature of this improvement over previous methods. Further hardware development with the use of a direct radiation detector, the Medipix3, also shows the possibilities where the reduction in collection time is more than an order of magnitude compared to the CCD. We show that this allows subpixel measurement of the beam deflection due to the magnetic induction. While the detection and processing is data intensive we have demonstrated highly efficient DPC imaging whereby pixel by pixel interpretation of the induction variation is realised with great potential for nanomagnetic imaging. PMID:27085170

  15. Single-pixel three-dimensional imaging with time-based depth resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ming-Jie; Edgar, Matthew P.; Gibson, Graham M.; Sun, Baoqing; Radwell, Neal; Lamb, Robert; Padgett, Miles J.

    2016-07-01

    Time-of-flight three-dimensional imaging is an important tool for applications such as object recognition and remote sensing. Conventional time-of-flight three-dimensional imaging systems frequently use a raster scanned laser to measure the range of each pixel in the scene sequentially. Here we show a modified time-of-flight three-dimensional imaging system, which can use compressed sensing techniques to reduce acquisition times, whilst distributing the optical illumination over the full field of view. Our system is based on a single-pixel camera using short-pulsed structured illumination and a high-speed photodiode, and is capable of reconstructing 128 × 128-pixel resolution three-dimensional scenes to an accuracy of ~3 mm at a range of ~5 m. Furthermore, by using a compressive sampling strategy, we demonstrate continuous real-time three-dimensional video with a frame-rate up to 12 Hz. The simplicity of the system hardware could enable low-cost three-dimensional imaging devices for precision ranging at wavelengths beyond the visible spectrum.

  16. Single-pixel three-dimensional imaging with time-based depth resolution.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ming-Jie; Edgar, Matthew P; Gibson, Graham M; Sun, Baoqing; Radwell, Neal; Lamb, Robert; Padgett, Miles J

    2016-01-01

    Time-of-flight three-dimensional imaging is an important tool for applications such as object recognition and remote sensing. Conventional time-of-flight three-dimensional imaging systems frequently use a raster scanned laser to measure the range of each pixel in the scene sequentially. Here we show a modified time-of-flight three-dimensional imaging system, which can use compressed sensing techniques to reduce acquisition times, whilst distributing the optical illumination over the full field of view. Our system is based on a single-pixel camera using short-pulsed structured illumination and a high-speed photodiode, and is capable of reconstructing 128 × 128-pixel resolution three-dimensional scenes to an accuracy of ∼3 mm at a range of ∼5 m. Furthermore, by using a compressive sampling strategy, we demonstrate continuous real-time three-dimensional video with a frame-rate up to 12 Hz. The simplicity of the system hardware could enable low-cost three-dimensional imaging devices for precision ranging at wavelengths beyond the visible spectrum. PMID:27377197

  17. Silicon-on-insulator (SOI) active pixel sensors with the photosite implemented in the substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Xinyu (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Active pixel sensors for a high quality imager are fabricated using a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) process by integrating the photodetectors on the SOI substrate and forming pixel readout transistors on the SOI thin-film. The technique can include forming silicon islands on a buried insulator layer disposed on a silicon substrate and selectively etching away the buried insulator layer over a region of the substrate to define a photodetector area. Dopants of a first conductivity type are implanted to form a signal node in the photodetector area and to form simultaneously drain/source regions for a first transistor in at least a first one of the silicon islands. Dopants of a second conductivity type are implanted to form drain/source regions for a second transistor in at least a second one of the silicon islands. Isolation rings around the photodetector also can be formed when dopants of the second conductivity type are implanted. Interconnections among the transistors and the photodetector are provided to allow signals sensed by the photodetector to be read out via the transistors formed on the silicon islands.

  18. Silicon-on-insulator (SOI) active pixel sensors with the photosite implemented in the substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Zheng, Xinyu (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Active pixel sensors for a high quality imager are fabricated using a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) process by integrating the photodetectors on the SOI substrate and forming pixel readout transistors on the SOI thin-film. The technique can include forming silicon islands on a buried insulator layer disposed on a silicon substrate and selectively etching away the buried insulator layer over a region of the substrate to define a photodetector area. Dopants of a first conductivity type are implanted to form a signal node in the photodetector area and to form simultaneously drain/source regions for a first transistor in at least a first one of the silicon islands. Dopants of a second conductivity type are implanted to form drain/source regions for a second transistor in at least a second one of the silicon islands. Isolation rings around the photodetector also can be formed when dopants of the second conductivity type are implanted. Interconnections among the transistors and the photodetector are provided to allow signals sensed by the photodetector to be read out via the transistors formed on the silicon islands.

  19. Pixel Perfect: a real-time image processing system for biology

    SciTech Connect

    Perrine, Kenneth A.; Hopkins, Derek F.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Budge, Scott E.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2005-09-16

    Scientific visioning systems often rely upon pixel-perfect precision to produce meaningful data. Cutting-edge equipment used in the study of cell signaling is no exception; proper image alignment is critical for successful experiments. Biologists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory put together a special multi-spectral confocal microscope that was capable of producing live images of cells and proteins in two simultaneous spectral channels. But there was a problem: the dual images resembled poorly registered Sunday comics and were unusable. This article describes how the biologists worked with programmers to fix the difficulty and make the microscope a truly useful and unique device.

  20. Dependence of the appearance-based perception of criminality, suggestibility, and trustworthiness on the level of pixelation of facial images.

    PubMed

    Nurmoja, Merle; Eamets, Triin; Härma, Hanne-Loore; Bachmann, Talis

    2012-10-01

    While the dependence of face identification on the level of pixelation-transform of the images of faces has been well studied, similar research on face-based trait perception is underdeveloped. Because depiction formats used for hiding individual identity in visual media and evidential material recorded by surveillance cameras often consist of pixelized images, knowing the effects of pixelation on person perception has practical relevance. Here, the results of two experiments are presented showing the effect of facial image pixelation on the perception of criminality, trustworthiness, and suggestibility. It appears that individuals (N = 46, M age = 21.5 yr., SD = 3.1 for criminality ratings; N = 94, M age = 27.4 yr., SD = 10.1 for other ratings) have the ability to discriminate between facial cues ndicative of these perceived traits from the coarse level of image pixelation (10-12 pixels per face horizontally) and that the discriminability increases with a decrease in the coarseness of pixelation. Perceived criminality and trustworthiness appear to be better carried by the pixelized images than perceived suggestibility. PMID:23265011

  1. A CMOS image sensor using high-speed lock-in pixels for stimulated Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lioe, DeXing; Mars, Kamel; Takasawa, Taishi; Yasutomi, Keita; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Hashimoto, Mamoru; Kawahito, Shoji

    2016-03-01

    A CMOS image sensor using high-speed lock-in pixels for stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) spectroscopy is presented in this paper. The effective SRS signal from the stimulated emission of SRS mechanism is very small in contrast to the offset of a probing laser source, which is in the ratio of 10-4 to 10-5. In order to extract this signal, the common offset component is removed, and the small difference component is sampled using switched-capacitor integrator with a fully differential amplifier. The sampling is performed over many integration cycles to achieve appropriate amplification. The lock-in pixels utilizes high-speed lateral electric field charge modulator (LEFM) to demodulate the SRS signal which is modulated at high-frequency of 20MHz. A prototype chip is implemented using 0.11μm CMOS image sensor technology.

  2. Color filter array patterns for small-pixel image sensors with substantial cross talk.

    PubMed

    Anzagira, Leo; Fossum, Eric R

    2015-01-01

    Digital image sensor outputs usually must be transformed to suit the human visual system. This color correction amplifies noise, thus reducing the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the image. In subdiffraction-limit (SDL) pixels, where optical and carrier cross talk can be substantial, this problem can become significant when conventional color filter arrays (CFAs) such as the Bayer patterns (RGB and CMY) are used. We present the design and analysis of new color filter array patterns for improving the color error and SNR deterioration caused by cross talk in these SDL pixels. We demonstrate an improvement in the color reproduction accuracy and SNR in high cross-talk conditions. Finally, we investigate the trade-off between color accuracy and SNR for the different CFA patterns. PMID:26366487

  3. Review of hybrid pixel detector readout ASICs for spectroscopic X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballabriga, R.; Alozy, J.; Campbell, M.; Frojdh, E.; Heijne, E. H. M.; Koenig, T.; Llopart, X.; Marchal, J.; Pennicard, D.; Poikela, T.; Tlustos, L.; Valerio, P.; Wong, W.; Zuber, M.

    2016-01-01

    Semiconductor detector readout chips with pulse processing electronics have made possible spectroscopic X-ray imaging, bringing an improvement in the overall image quality and, in the case of medical imaging, a reduction in the X-ray dose delivered to the patient. In this contribution we review the state of the art in semiconductor-detector readout ASICs for spectroscopic X-ray imaging with emphasis on hybrid pixel detector technology. We discuss how some of the key challenges of the technology (such as dealing with high fluxes, maintaining spectral fidelity, power consumption density) are addressed by the various ASICs. In order to understand the fundamental limits of the technology, the physics of the interaction of radiation with the semiconductor detector and the process of signal induction in the input electrodes of the readout circuit are described. Simulations of the process of signal induction are presented that reveal the importance of making use of the small pixel effect to minimize the impact of the slow motion of holes and hole trapping in the induced signal in high-Z sensor materials. This can contribute to preserve fidelity in the measured spectrum with relatively short values of the shaper peaking time. Simulations also show, on the other hand, the distortion in the energy spectrum due to charge sharing and fluorescence photons when the pixel pitch is decreased. However, using recent measurements from the Medipix3 ASIC, we demonstrate that the spectroscopic information contained in the incoming photon beam can be recovered by the implementation in hardware of an algorithm whereby the signal from a single photon is reconstructed and allocated to the pixel with the largest deposition.

  4. An infrared image non-uniformity correction algorithm based on pixels' equivalent integral capacitance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuanglei; Wang, Tao; Xu, Chun; Chen, Fansheng

    2015-04-01

    In the infrared focal plane array (IRFPA) imaging system, the non-uniformity (NU) of IRFPA directly affects the quality of infrared images. Especially applying in the infrared weak small targets detection and tracking system, the impact of the spatial noise caused by the non-uniformity of IRFPA detector, often more serious than the temporal noise of imaging system. In order to effectively correct the non-uniformity of IRFPA detector, we firstly analyze main factors that cause the non-uniformity of IRFPA detector in imaging. Secondly, according to photoelectric conversion mechanism of IRFPA detector, and the analysis of the process of the target energy accumulation and transfer, we propose a calculation method of pixels' integral capacitance. Then according to the calculation results, we correct the original IR image preliminary. Finally, we validate this non-uniformity correction algorithm by processing IR images collected from actual IRFPA imaging system. Results show that the algorithm can effectively restrain the non-uniformity caused by the differences of the pixels' capacitance.

  5. Wide-field computational color imaging using pixel super-resolved on-chip microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Greenbaum, Alon; Feizi, Alborz; Akbari, Najva; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-01-01

    Lens-free holographic on-chip imaging is an emerging approach that offers both wide field-of-view (FOV) and high spatial resolution in a cost-effective and compact design using source shifting based pixel super-resolution. However, color imaging has remained relatively immature for lens-free on-chip imaging, since a ‘rainbow’ like color artifact appears in reconstructed holographic images. To provide a solution for pixel super-resolved color imaging on a chip, here we introduce and compare the performances of two computational methods based on (1) YUV color space averaging, and (2) Dijkstra’s shortest path, both of which eliminate color artifacts in reconstructed images, without compromising the spatial resolution or the wide FOV of lens-free on-chip microscopes. To demonstrate the potential of this lens-free color microscope we imaged stained Papanicolaou (Pap) smears over a wide FOV of ~14 mm2 with sub-micron spatial resolution. PMID:23736466

  6. Improved AC pixel electrode circuit for active matrix of organic light-emitting display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Yujuan; Lang, Liuqi; Chen, Wanzhong; Liu, Shiyong

    2004-05-01

    In this paper, a modified four-transistor pixel circuit for active-matrix organic light-emitting displays (AMOLED) was developed to improve the performance of OLED device. This modified pixel circuit can provide an AC driving mode to make the OLED working in a reversed-biased voltage during the certain cycle. The optimized values of the reversed-biased voltage and the characteristics of the pixel circuit were investigated using AIM-SPICE. The simulated results reveal that this circuit can provide a suitable output current and voltage characteristic, and little change was made in luminance current.

  7. X-ray imaging using a 320 x 240 hybrid GaAs pixel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Irsigler, R.; Andersson, J.; Alverbro, J.

    1999-06-01

    The authors present room temperature measurements on 200 {micro}m thick GaAs pixel detectors, which were hybridized to silicon readout circuits. The whole detector array contains 320 x 240 square shaped pixel with a pitch of 38 {micro}m and is based on semi-insulating liquid-encapsulated Czochralski (LEC) GaAs material. After fabricating and dicing, the detector chips were indium bump flip chip bonded to CMOS readout circuits based on charge integration and finally evaluated. This readout chip was originally designed for the readout of flip chip bonded infrared detectors, but appears to be suitable for X-ray applications as well. A bias voltage between 50 V and 100 V was sufficient to operate the detector at room temperature. The detector array did respond to x-ray radiation by an increase in current due to production of electron hole pairs by the ionization processes. Images of various objects and slit patterns were acquired by using a standard X-ray source for dental imaging. The new X-ray hybrid detector was analyzed with respect to its imaging properties. Due to the high absorption coefficient for X-rays in GaAs and the small pixel size, the sensor shows a high modulation transfer function up to the Nyquist frequency.

  8. Pixel size adjustment in coherent diffractive imaging within the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld regime.

    PubMed

    Claus, Daniel; Rodenburg, John Marius

    2015-03-10

    The reconstruction of the smallest resolvable object detail in digital holography and coherent diffractive imaging when the detector is mounted close to the object of interest is restricted by the sensor's pixel size. Very high resolution information is intrinsically encoded in the data because the effective numerical aperture (NA) of the detector (its solid angular size as subtended at the object plane) is very high. The correct physical propagation model to use in the reconstruction process for this setup should be based on the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction integral, which is commonly implemented via a convolution operation. However, the convolution operation has the drawback that the pixel size of the propagation calculation is preserved between the object and the detector, and so the maximum resolution of the reconstruction is limited by the detector pixel size, not its effective NA. Here we show that this problem can be overcome via the introduction of a numerical spherical lens with adjustable magnification. This approach enables the reconstruction of object details smaller than the detector pixel size or of objects that extend beyond the size of the detector. It will have applications in all forms of near-field lensless microscopy. PMID:25968368

  9. Localization and text sequence restoration using noise pixels in binary document image watermarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puhan, Niladri B.; Ho, Anthony T. S.; Sattar, Farook

    2009-04-01

    We propose a new method for tamper localization and restoration using noise pixels in binary document images. For such images, it is difficult to find a sufficient number of low-distortion pixels in individual blocks with blind detection property. Also, a perceptual watermark cannot be embedded in white regions of the document image, making such regions insecure against hostile attacks. An erasable watermark is embedded in each block of the document image independently. The embedding process introduces some background noise. However, the content in the document can be interpreted by the user, because human vision has the inherent capability to recognize various patterns in the presence of noise. If authenticity is verified for the content of each block, the exact copy of original image is restored at the blind detector for further use and analysis. Experimental results show that an erasable watermark of necessary data length can be embedded in individual blocks to attain effective localization and restoration capability. Using the proposed method, it is possible to restore the original text sequence in text document images after multiple alterations like text deletion, insertion, substitution, and block swapping.

  10. Ultrafast soft x-ray two-dimensional plasma imaging system based on gas electron multiplier detector with pixel readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacella, D.; Pizzicaroli, G.; Gabellieri, L.; Leigheb, M.; Bellazzini, R.; Brez, A.; Gariano, G.; Latronico, L.; Lumb, N.; Spandre, G.; Massai, M. M.; Reale, S.

    2001-02-01

    In the present article a new diagnostic device in the soft x-ray range, for magnetic fusion plasmas, is proposed based on a gas electron multiplier detector with 2.5×2.5 cm active area, equipped with a true two-dimensional readout system. The readout printed circuit board, designed for these experiments, has 128 pads. Each pad is 2 mm square and covers a roughly circular area. The operational conditions of the detector are settled to work in the x-ray range 3-15 keV at very high counting rates, with a linear response up to 2 MHz/pixel. This limitation is due to the electronic dead time. Images of a wrench and two pinholes were done at rates of 2.5 MHz/pixel with a powerful x-ray laboratory source showing an excellent imaging capability. Finally preliminary measurements of x-ray emission from a magnetic fusion plasma were performed on the Frascati tokamak upgrade experiment. The system was able to image the plasma with a wide dynamic range (more than a factor of 100), with a sampling frequency of 20 kHz and with counting rates up to 4 MHz/pixel, following the changes of the x-ray plasma emissivity due to additional radio frequency heating. The spatial resolution and imaging properties of this detector have been studied in this work for conditions of high counting rates and high gain, with the detector fully illuminated by very intense x-ray sources (laboratory tube and tokamak plasma).

  11. Study of image matching algorithm and sub-pixel fitting algorithm in target tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ming-dong; Jia, Jianjun; Qiang, Jia; Wang, Jian-yu

    2015-03-01

    Image correlation matching is a tracking method that searched a region most approximate to the target template based on the correlation measure between two images. Because there is no need to segment the image, and the computation of this method is little. Image correlation matching is a basic method of target tracking. This paper mainly studies the image matching algorithm of gray scale image, which precision is at sub-pixel level. The matching algorithm used in this paper is SAD (Sum of Absolute Difference) method. This method excels in real-time systems because of its low computation complexity. The SAD method is introduced firstly and the most frequently used sub-pixel fitting algorithms are introduced at the meantime. These fitting algorithms can't be used in real-time systems because they are too complex. However, target tracking often requires high real-time performance, we put forward a fitting algorithm named paraboloidal fitting algorithm based on the consideration above, this algorithm is simple and realized easily in real-time system. The result of this algorithm is compared with that of surface fitting algorithm through image matching simulation. By comparison, the precision difference between these two algorithms is little, it's less than 0.01pixel. In order to research the influence of target rotation on precision of image matching, the experiment of camera rotation was carried on. The detector used in the camera is a CMOS detector. It is fixed to an arc pendulum table, take pictures when the camera rotated different angles. Choose a subarea in the original picture as the template, and search the best matching spot using image matching algorithm mentioned above. The result shows that the matching error is bigger when the target rotation angle is larger. It's an approximate linear relation. Finally, the influence of noise on matching precision was researched. Gaussian noise and pepper and salt noise were added in the image respectively, and the image

  12. Fast Imaging Detector Readout Circuits with In-Pixel ADCs for Fourier Transform Imaging Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rider, D.; Blavier, J-F.; Cunningham, T.; Hancock, B.; Key, R.; Pannell, Z.; Sander, S.; Seshadri, S.; Sun, C.; Wrigley, C.

    2011-01-01

    Focal plane arrays (FPAs) with high frame rates and many pixels benefit several upcoming Earth science missions including GEO-CAPE, GACM, and ACE by enabling broader spatial coverage and higher spectral resolution. FPAs for the PanFTS, a high spatial resolution Fourier transform spectrometer and a candidate instrument for the GEO-CAPE mission are the focus of the developments reported here, but this FPA technology has the potential to enable a variety of future measurements and instruments. The ESTO ACT Program funded the developed of a fast readout integrated circuit (ROIC) based on an innovative in-pixel analog-to-digital converter (ADC). The 128 X 128 pixel ROIC features 60 ?m pixels, a 14-bit ADC in each pixel and operates at a continuous frame rate of 14 kHz consuming only 1.1 W of power. The ROIC outputs digitized data completely eliminating the bulky, power consuming signal chains needed by conventional FPAs. The 128 X 128 pixel ROIC has been fabricated in CMOS and tested at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The current version is designed to be hybridized with PIN photodiode arrays via indium bump bonding for light detection in the visible and ultraviolet spectral regions. However, the ROIC design incorporates a small photodiode in each cell to permit detailed characterization of the ROICperformance without the need for hybridization. We will describe the essential features of the ROIC design and present results of ROIC performance measurements.

  13. Dynamic quantitative phase imaging for biological objects using a pixelated phase mask

    PubMed Central

    Creath, Katherine; Goldstein, Goldie

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes research in developing a dynamic quantitative phase imaging microscope providing instantaneous measurements of dynamic motions within and among live cells without labels or contrast agents. It utilizes a pixelated phase mask enabling simultaneous measurement of multiple interference patterns derived using the polarization properties of light to track dynamic motions and morphological changes. Optical path difference (OPD) and optical thickness (OT) data are obtained from phase images. Two different processing routines are presented to remove background surface shape to enable quantification of changes in cell position and volume over time. Data from a number of different moving biological organisms and cell cultures are presented. PMID:23162725

  14. Parallel optimization of pixel purity index algorithm for massive hyperspectral images in cloud computing environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yufeng; Wu, Zebin; Sun, Le; Wei, Zhihui; Li, Yonglong

    2016-04-01

    With the gradual increase in the spatial and spectral resolution of hyperspectral images, the size of image data becomes larger and larger, and the complexity of processing algorithms is growing, which poses a big challenge to efficient massive hyperspectral image processing. Cloud computing technologies distribute computing tasks to a large number of computing resources for handling large data sets without the limitation of memory and computing resource of a single machine. This paper proposes a parallel pixel purity index (PPI) algorithm for unmixing massive hyperspectral images based on a MapReduce programming model for the first time in the literature. According to the characteristics of hyperspectral images, we describe the design principle of the algorithm, illustrate the main cloud unmixing processes of PPI, and analyze the time complexity of serial and parallel algorithms. Experimental results demonstrate that the parallel implementation of the PPI algorithm on the cloud can effectively process big hyperspectral data and accelerate the algorithm.

  15. PIXEL PUSHER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanfill, D. F.

    1994-01-01

    Pixel Pusher is a Macintosh application used for viewing and performing minor enhancements on imagery. It will read image files in JPL's two primary image formats- VICAR and PDS - as well as the Macintosh PICT format. VICAR (NPO-18076) handles an array of image processing capabilities which may be used for a variety of applications including biomedical image processing, cartography, earth resources, and geological exploration. Pixel Pusher can also import VICAR format color lookup tables for viewing images in pseudocolor (256 colors). This program currently supports only eight bit images but will work on monitors with any number of colors. Arbitrarily large image files may be viewed in a normal Macintosh window. Color and contrast enhancement can be performed with a graphical "stretch" editor (as in contrast stretch). In addition, VICAR images may be saved as Macintosh PICT files for exporting into other Macintosh programs, and individual pixels can be queried to determine their locations and actual data values. Pixel Pusher is written in Symantec's Think C and was developed for use on a Macintosh SE30, LC, or II series computer running System Software 6.0.3 or later and 32 bit QuickDraw. Pixel Pusher will only run on a Macintosh which supports color (whether a color monitor is being used or not). The standard distribution medium for this program is a set of three 3.5 inch Macintosh format diskettes. The program price includes documentation. Pixel Pusher was developed in 1991 and is a copyrighted work with all copyright vested in NASA. Think C is a trademark of Symantec Corporation. Macintosh is a registered trademark of Apple Computer, Inc.

  16. 10000 pixels wide CMOS frame imager for earth observation from a HALE UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delauré, B.; Livens, S.; Everaerts, J.; Kleihorst, R.; Schippers, Gert; de Wit, Yannick; Compiet, John; Banachowicz, Bartosz

    2009-09-01

    MEDUSA is the lightweight high resolution camera, designed to be operated from a solar-powered Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) flying at stratospheric altitudes. The instrument is a technology demonstrator within the Pegasus program and targets applications such as crisis management and cartography. A special wide swath CMOS imager has been developed by Cypress Semiconductor Cooperation Belgium to meet the specific sensor requirements of MEDUSA. The CMOS sensor has a stitched design comprising a panchromatic and color sensor on the same die. Each sensor consists of 10000*1200 square pixels (5.5μm size, novel 6T architecture) with micro-lenses. The exposure is performed by means of a high efficiency snapshot shutter. The sensor is able to operate at a rate of 30fps in full frame readout. Due to a novel pixel design, the sensor has low dark leakage of the memory elements (PSNL) and low parasitic light sensitivity (PLS). Still it maintains a relative high QE (Quantum efficiency) and a FF (fill factor) of over 65%. It features an MTF (Modulation Transfer Function) higher than 60% at Nyquist frequency in both X and Y directions The measured optical/electrical crosstalk (expressed as MTF) of this 5.5um pixel is state-of-the art. These properties makes it possible to acquire sharp images also in low-light conditions.

  17. 3D reconstructions with pixel-based images are made possible by digitally clearing plant and animal tissue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reconstruction of 3D images from a series of 2D images has been restricted by the limited capacity to decrease the opacity of surrounding tissue. Commercial software that allows color-keying and manipulation of 2D images in true 3D space allowed us to produce 3D reconstructions from pixel based imag...

  18. Characterization study of an intensified complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor active pixel sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, J. A.; Chen, D.; Turchetta, R.; Royle, G. J.

    2011-03-01

    An intensified CMOS active pixel sensor (APS) has been constructed for operation in low-light-level applications: a high-gain, fast-light decay image intensifier has been coupled via a fiber optic stud to a prototype "VANILLA" APS, developed by the UK based MI3 consortium. The sensor is capable of high frame rates and sparse readout. This paper presents a study of the performance parameters of the intensified VANILLA APS system over a range of image intensifier gain levels when uniformly illuminated with 520 nm green light. Mean-variance analysis shows the APS saturating around 3050 Digital Units (DU), with the maximum variance increasing with increasing image intensifier gain. The system's quantum efficiency varies in an exponential manner from 260 at an intensifier gain of 7.45 × 103 to 1.6 at a gain of 3.93 × 101. The usable dynamic range of the system is 60 dB for intensifier gains below 1.8 × 103, dropping to around 40 dB at high gains. The conclusion is that the system shows suitability for the desired application.

  19. Center of mass detection via an active pixel sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yadid-Pecht, Orly (Inventor); Minch, Brad (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Fossum, Eric (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An imaging system for identifying the location of the center of mass (COM) in an image. In one aspect, an imaging system includes a plurality of photosensitive elements arranged in a matrix. A center of mass circuit coupled to the photosensitive elements includes a resistive network and a normalization circuit including at least one bipolar transistor. The center of mass circuit identifies a center of mass location in the matrix and includes: a row circuit, where the row circuit identifies a center of mass row value in each row of the matrix and identifies a row intensity for each row; a horizontal circuit, where the horizontal circuit identifies a center of mass horizontal value; and a vertical circuit, where the vertical circuit identifies a center of mass vertical value. The horizontal and vertical center of mass values indicate the coordinates of the center of mass location for the image.

  20. Center of mass detection via an active pixel sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yadid-Pecht, Orly (Inventor); Minch, Brad (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Fossum, Eric (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An imaging system for identifying the location of the center of mass (COM) in an image. In one aspect, an imaging system includes a plurality of photosensitive elements arranged in a matrix. A center of mass circuit coupled to the photosensitive elements includes a resistive network and a normalization circuit including at least one bipolar transistor. The center of mass circuit identifies a center of mass location in the matrix and includes: a row circuit, where the row circuit identifies a center of mass row value in each row of the matrix and identifies a row intensity for each row; a horizontal circuit, where the horizontal circuit identifies a center of mass horizontal value; and a vertical circuit, where the vertical circuit identifies a center of mass vertical value. The horizontal and vertical center of mass values indicate the coordinates of the center of mass location for the image.

  1. Center of mass detection via an active pixel sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yadid-Pecht, Orly (Inventor); Minch, Brad (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrara (Inventor); Fossum, Eric (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An imaging system for identifying the location of the center of mass (COM) in an image. In one aspect, an imaging system includes a plurality of photosensitive elements arranged in a matrix. A center of mass circuit coupled to the photosensitive elements includes a resistive network and a normalization circuit including at least one bipolar transistor. The center of mass circuit identifies a center of mass location in the matrix and includes: a row circuit, where the row circuit identifies a center of mass row value in each row of the matrix and identifies a row intensity for each row; a horizontal circuit, where the horizontal circuit identifies a center of mass horizontal value; and a vertical circuit, where the vertical circuit identifies a center of mass vertical value. The horizontal and vertical center of mass values indicate the coordinates of the center of mass location for the image.

  2. Image quality evaluation of LCDs based on novel RGBW sub-pixel structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sungjin; Kang, Dongwoo; Lee, Jinsang; Kim, Jaekyeom; Park, Yongmin; Han, Taeseong; Jung, Sooyeon; Yoo, Jang Jin; Lim, Moojong; Baek, Jongsang

    2015-01-01

    Many display manufacturers have studied RGBW pixel structure adding a white sub-pixel to RGB LCD and recently revealed UHD TVs based on novel RGBW LCD. The RGBW LCD has 50% higher white luminance and 25% lower primary color luminance compared to RGB LCD. In this paper, the image quality of RGBW and RGB LCD was dealt with. Before evaluating them, TV broadcast video and IEC-62087 video were analyzed for test video clips. In order to analyze them, a TV reference video from TV broadcast content in Korea was firstly collected. As a result of TV reference video analysis, RGBW LCD was expected to improve image quality more because most of colors are distributed around white point and population ratio of achromatic colors is higher. RGB, RGBW and RGBW using wide color gamut (WCG) backlight unit (BLU) LCDs were prepared, and a series of visual assessments were conducted. As a result, RGBW LCD obtained higher scores than RGB LCD about four attributes (`Brightness', `Naturalness', `Contrast' and overall image quality) and `Colorfulness' was not higher score than RGB LCD in test still images. RGBW LCD's overall image quality in the TV reference video clips also was assessed higher than RGB LCD. Additionally, RGBW LCD using WCG BLU shows better performance about especially `Colorfulness' than RGBW LCD.

  3. A New Adaptive Diffusive Function for Magnetic Resonance Imaging Denoising Based on Pixel Similarity

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, Mostafa; Karami, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Although there are many methods for image denoising, but partial differential equation (PDE) based denoising attracted much attention in the field of medical image processing such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The main advantage of PDE-based denoising approach is laid in its ability to smooth image in a nonlinear way, which effectively removes the noise, as well as preserving edge through anisotropic diffusion controlled by the diffusive function. This function was first introduced by Perona and Malik (P-M) in their model. They proposed two functions that are most frequently used in PDE-based methods. Since these functions consider only the gradient information of a diffused pixel, they cannot remove noise in noisy images with low signal-to-noise (SNR). In this paper we propose a modified diffusive function with fractional power that is based on pixel similarity to improve P-M model for low SNR. We also will show that our proposed function will stabilize the P-M method. As experimental results show, our proposed function that is modified version of P-M function effectively improves the SNR and preserves edges more than P-M functions in low SNR. PMID:26955563

  4. Intelligent error correction method applied on an active pixel sensor based star tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Uwe

    2005-10-01

    Star trackers are opto-electronic sensors used on-board of satellites for the autonomous inertial attitude determination. During the last years star trackers became more and more important in the field of the attitude and orbit control system (AOCS) sensors. High performance star trackers are based up today on charge coupled device (CCD) optical camera heads. The active pixel sensor (APS) technology, introduced in the early 90-ties, allows now the beneficial replacement of CCD detectors by APS detectors with respect to performance, reliability, power, mass and cost. The company's heritage in star tracker design started in the early 80-ties with the launch of the worldwide first fully autonomous star tracker system ASTRO1 to the Russian MIR space station. Jena-Optronik recently developed an active pixel sensor based autonomous star tracker "ASTRO APS" as successor of the CCD based star tracker product series ASTRO1, ASTRO5, ASTRO10 and ASTRO15. Key features of the APS detector technology are, a true xy-address random access, the multiple windowing read out and the on-chip signal processing including the analogue to digital conversion. These features can be used for robust star tracking at high slew rates and under worse conditions like stray light and solar flare induced single event upsets. A special algorithm have been developed to manage the typical APS detector error contributors like fixed pattern noise (FPN), dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU) and white spots. The algorithm works fully autonomous and adapts to e.g. increasing DSNU and up-coming white spots automatically without ground maintenance or re-calibration. In contrast to conventional correction methods the described algorithm does not need calibration data memory like full image sized calibration data sets. The application of the presented algorithm managing the typical APS detector error contributors is a key element for the design of star trackers for long term satellite applications like

  5. 128x96 pixel field emitter-array image sensor with HARP target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, Toshio; Nanba, Masakazu; Osada, Katsunori; Takiguchi, Yoshiro; Okazaki, Saburo; Egami, Norifumi; Tanioka, Kenkichi; Tanaka, Mitsuru; Itoh, Shigeo

    2002-04-01

    In pursuit of developing a next-generation pick-up device having high definition and ultrahigh sensitivity features, research continues on a new type of image sensor that combines a HARP target and a field emitter array. A new field emitter array on a small-sized substrate is designed and a unique packaging technique is proposed. The prototype device is sealed in a vacuum package with a thickness of only about 10 mm and has 128 horizontal and 96 vertical pixels. Experimental results show that images could be successfully reproduced for the first time ever in a device of this type. Highly sensitive characteristics and propr resolution were also obtained with the device. The prototype image sensor can operate stably for more than 250 hours, demonstrating its feasibility and potential as a next- generation image pickup device.

  6. Pixelation effect removal from fiber bundle probe based optical coherence tomography imaging

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jae-Ho; Lee, Junghoon; Kang, Jin U.

    2010-01-01

    A method of eliminating pixelization effect from en face optical coherence tomography (OCT) image when a fiber bundle is used as an OCT imaging probe is presented. We have demonstrated that applying a histogram equalization process before performing a weighted-averaged Gaussian smoothing filter to the original lower gray level intensity based image not only removes the structural artifact of the bundle but also enhances the image quality with minimum blurring of object’s image features. The measured contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for an image of the US Air Force test target was 14.7dB (4.9dB), after (before) image processing. In addition, by performing the spatial frequency analysis based on two-dimensional discrete Fourier transform (2-D DFT), we were able to observe that the periodic intensity peaks induced by the regularly arrayed structure of the fiber bundle can be efficiently suppressed by 41.0dB for the first nearby side lobe as well as to obtain the precise physical spacing information of the fiber grid. The proposed combined method can also be used as a straight forward image processing tool for any imaging system utilizing fiber bundle as a high-resolution imager. PMID:20389766

  7. Supervised pixel classification for segmenting geographic atrophy in fundus autofluorescene images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhihong; Medioni, Gerard G.; Hernandez, Matthias; Sadda, SriniVas R.

    2014-03-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in people over the age of 65. Geographic atrophy (GA) is a manifestation of the advanced or late-stage of the AMD, which may result in severe vision loss and blindness. Techniques to rapidly and precisely detect and quantify GA lesions would appear to be of important value in advancing the understanding of the pathogenesis of GA and the management of GA progression. The purpose of this study is to develop an automated supervised pixel classification approach for segmenting GA including uni-focal and multi-focal patches in fundus autofluorescene (FAF) images. The image features include region wise intensity (mean and variance) measures, gray level co-occurrence matrix measures (angular second moment, entropy, and inverse difference moment), and Gaussian filter banks. A k-nearest-neighbor (k-NN) pixel classifier is applied to obtain a GA probability map, representing the likelihood that the image pixel belongs to GA. A voting binary iterative hole filling filter is then applied to fill in the small holes. Sixteen randomly chosen FAF images were obtained from sixteen subjects with GA. The algorithm-defined GA regions are compared with manual delineation performed by certified graders. Two-fold cross-validation is applied for the evaluation of the classification performance. The mean Dice similarity coefficients (DSC) between the algorithm- and manually-defined GA regions are 0.84 +/- 0.06 for one test and 0.83 +/- 0.07 for the other test and the area correlations between them are 0.99 (p < 0.05) and 0.94 (p < 0.05) respectively.

  8. Obtaining optic disc center and pixel region by automatic thresholding methods on morphologically processed fundus images.

    PubMed

    Marin, Diego; Gegundez-Arias, Manuel E; Suero, Angel; Bravo, Jose M

    2015-02-01

    Development of automatic retinal disease diagnosis systems based on retinal image computer analysis can provide remarkably quicker screening programs for early detection. Such systems are mainly focused on the detection of the earliest ophthalmic signs of illness and require previous identification of fundal landmark features such as optic disc (OD), fovea or blood vessels. A methodology for accurate center-position location and OD retinal region segmentation on digital fundus images is presented in this paper. The methodology performs a set of iterative opening-closing morphological operations on the original retinography intensity channel to produce a bright region-enhanced image. Taking blood vessel confluence at the OD into account, a 2-step automatic thresholding procedure is then applied to obtain a reduced region of interest, where the center and the OD pixel region are finally obtained by performing the circular Hough transform on a set of OD boundary candidates generated through the application of the Prewitt edge detector. The methodology was evaluated on 1200 and 1748 fundus images from the publicly available MESSIDOR and MESSIDOR-2 databases, acquired from diabetic patients and thus being clinical cases of interest within the framework of automated diagnosis of retinal diseases associated to diabetes mellitus. This methodology proved highly accurate in OD-center location: average Euclidean distance between the methodology-provided and actual OD-center position was 6.08, 9.22 and 9.72 pixels for retinas of 910, 1380 and 1455 pixels in size, respectively. On the other hand, OD segmentation evaluation was performed in terms of Jaccard and Dice coefficients, as well as the mean average distance between estimated and actual OD boundaries. Comparison with the results reported by other reviewed OD segmentation methodologies shows our proposal renders better overall performance. Its effectiveness and robustness make this proposed automated OD location and

  9. High resolution phoswich gamma-ray imager utilizing monolithic MPPC arrays with submillimeter pixelized crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, T.; Kataoka, J.; Nakamori, T.; Kishimoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Sato, K.; Ishikawa, Y.; Yamamura, K.; Kawabata, N.; Ikeda, H.; Kamada, K.

    2013-05-01

    We report the development of a high spatial resolution tweezers-type coincidence gamma-ray camera for medical imaging. This application consists of large-area monolithic Multi-Pixel Photon Counters (MPPCs) and submillimeter pixelized scintillator matrices. The MPPC array has 4 × 4 channels with a three-side buttable, very compact package. For typical operational gain of 7.5 × 105 at + 20 °C, gain fluctuation over the entire MPPC device is only ± 5.6%, and dark count rates (as measured at the 1 p.e. level) amount to <= 400 kcps per channel. We selected Ce-doped (Lu,Y)2(SiO4)O (Ce:LYSO) and a brand-new scintillator, Ce-doped Gd3Al2Ga3O12 (Ce:GAGG) due to their high light yield and density. To improve the spatial resolution, these scintillators were fabricated into 15 × 15 matrices of 0.5 × 0.5 mm2 pixels. The Ce:LYSO and Ce:GAGG scintillator matrices were assembled into phosphor sandwich (phoswich) detectors, and then coupled to the MPPC array along with an acrylic light guide measuring 1 mm thick, and with summing operational amplifiers that compile the signals into four position-encoded analog outputs being used for signal readout. Spatial resolution of 1.1 mm was achieved with the coincidence imaging system using a 22Na point source. These results suggest that the gamma-ray imagers offer excellent potential for applications in high spatial medical imaging.

  10. Performance assessment of a single-pixel compressive sensing imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du Bosq, Todd W.; Preece, Bradley L.

    2016-05-01

    Conventional electro-optical and infrared (EO/IR) systems capture an image by measuring the light incident at each of the millions of pixels in a focal plane array. Compressive sensing (CS) involves capturing a smaller number of unconventional measurements from the scene, and then using a companion process known as sparse reconstruction to recover the image as if a fully populated array that satisfies the Nyquist criteria was used. Therefore, CS operates under the assumption that signal acquisition and data compression can be accomplished simultaneously. CS has the potential to acquire an image with equivalent information content to a large format array while using smaller, cheaper, and lower bandwidth components. However, the benefits of CS do not come without compromise. The CS architecture chosen must effectively balance between physical considerations (SWaP-C), reconstruction accuracy, and reconstruction speed to meet operational requirements. To properly assess the value of such systems, it is necessary to fully characterize the image quality, including artifacts and sensitivity to noise. Imagery of the two-handheld object target set at range was collected using a passive SWIR single-pixel CS camera for various ranges, mirror resolution, and number of processed measurements. Human perception experiments were performed to determine the identification performance within the trade space. The performance of the nonlinear CS camera was modeled with the Night Vision Integrated Performance Model (NV-IPM) by mapping the nonlinear degradations to an equivalent linear shift invariant model. Finally, the limitations of CS modeling techniques will be discussed.

  11. Coherent, focus-corrected imaging of optical fiber facets using a single-pixel detector.

    PubMed

    Gordon, George S D; Feng, Feng; Kang, Qiongyue; Jung, Yongmin; Sahu, Jayanta; Wilkinson, Timothy

    2014-10-15

    A novel imaging technique that produces accurate amplitude and phase images of an optical fiber facet using only a phase-only liquid-crystal on silicon (LCOS) spatial light modulator (SLM) and a single-pixel detector is presented. The system can take images in two orthogonal polarizations and so provides a powerful tool for modal characterization of multimode fibers, which is of increasing importance due to their burgeoning use in telecommunications and medical applications. This technique first uses a simulated annealing algorithm to compute a hologram that collects light from a small region of the fiber facet. Next, the fiber facet is automatically brought into focus using adaptive aberration correction on the SLM. Finally, a common-path interferometer is created using the SLM, and the phase of the optical field at each pixel is determined. Finally, high-definition amplitude and phase images of a ring-core refractive index fiber are presented as a proof-of-principle demonstration of the technique. PMID:25361149

  12. Coded aperture imaging with a HURA coded aperture and a discrete pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byard, Kevin

    An investigation into the gamma ray imaging properties of a hexagonal uniformly redundant array (HURA) coded aperture and a detector consisting of discrete pixels constituted the major research effort. Such a system offers distinct advantages for the development of advanced gamma ray astronomical telescopes in terms of the provision of high quality sky images in conjunction with an imager plane which has the capacity to reject background noise efficiently. Much of the research was performed as part of the European Space Agency (ESA) sponsored study into a prospective space astronomy mission, GRASP. The effort involved both computer simulations and a series of laboratory test images. A detailed analysis of the system point spread function (SPSF) of imaging planes which incorporate discrete pixel arrays is presented and the imaging quality quantified in terms of the signal to noise ratio (SNR). Computer simulations of weak point sources in the presence of detector background noise were also investigated. Theories developed during the study were evaluated by a series of experimental measurements with a Co-57 gamma ray point source, an Anger camera detector, and a rotating HURA mask. These tests were complemented by computer simulations designed to reproduce, as close as possible, the experimental conditions. The 60 degree antisymmetry property of HURA's was also employed to remove noise due to detector systematic effects present in the experimental images, and rendered a more realistic comparison of the laboratory tests with the computer simulations. Plateau removal and weighted deconvolution techniques were also investigated as methods for the reduction of the coding error noise associated with the gamma ray images.

  13. PIXEL 2010 - A Résumé

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wermes, N.

    2011-09-01

    The Pixel 2010 conference focused on semiconductor pixel detectors for particle tracking/vertexing as well as for imaging, in particular for synchrotron light sources and XFELs. The big LHC hybrid pixel detectors have impressively started showing their capabilities. X-ray imaging detectors, also using the hybrid pixel technology, have greatly advanced the experimental possibilities for diffraction experiments. Monolithic or semi-monolithic devices like CMOS active pixels and DEPFET pixels have now reached a state such that complete vertex detectors for RHIC and superKEKB are being built with these technologies. Finally, new advances towards fully monolithic active pixel detectors, featuring full CMOS electronics merged with efficient signal charge collection, exploiting standard CMOS technologies, SOI and/or 3D integration, show the path for the future. This résumé attempts to extract the main statements of the results and developments presented at this conference.

  14. Development of Gated Pinned Avalanche Photodiode Pixels for High-Speed Low-Light Imaging.

    PubMed

    Resetar, Tomislav; De Munck, Koen; Haspeslagh, Luc; Rosmeulen, Maarten; Süss, Andreas; Puers, Robert; Van Hoof, Chris

    2016-01-01

    This work explores the benefits of linear-mode avalanche photodiodes (APDs) in high-speed CMOS imaging as compared to different approaches present in literature. Analysis of APDs biased below their breakdown voltage employed in single-photon counting mode is also discussed, showing a potentially interesting alternative to existing Geiger-mode APDs. An overview of the recently presented gated pinned avalanche photodiode pixel concept is provided, as well as the first experimental results on a 8 × 16 pixel test array. Full feasibility of the proposed pixel concept is not demonstrated; however, informative data is obtained from the sensor operating under -32 V substrate bias and clearly exhibiting wavelength-dependent gain in frontside illumination. The readout of the chip designed in standard 130 nm CMOS technology shows no dependence on the high-voltage bias. Readout noise level of 15 e - rms, full well capacity of 8000 e - , and the conversion gain of 75 µV / e - are extracted from the photon-transfer measurements. The gain characteristics of the avalanche junction are characterized on separate test diodes showing a multiplication factor of 1.6 for red light in frontside illumination. PMID:27537882

  15. Generalized approach to inverse problems in tomography: Image reconstruction for spatially variant systems using natural pixels

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.R.; Budinger, T.F.; Huesman, R.H.

    1992-10-01

    A major limitation in tomographic inverse problems is inadequate computation speed, which frequently impedes the application of engineering ideas and principles in medical science more than in the physical and engineering sciences. Medical problems are computationally taxing because a minimum description of the system often involves 5 dimensions (3 space, 1 energy, 1 time), with the range of each space coordinate requiring up to 512 samples. The computational tasks for this problem can be simply expressed by posing the problem as one in which the tomograph system response function is spatially invariant, and the noise is additive and Gaussian. Under these assumptions, a number of reconstruction methods have been implemented with generally satisfactory results for general medical imaging purposes. However, if the system response function of the tomograph is assumed more realistically to be spatially variant and the noise to be Poisson, the computational problem becomes much more difficult. Some of the algorithms being studied to compensate for position dependent resolution and statistical fluctuations in the data acquisition process, when expressed in canonical form, are not practical for clinical applications because the number of computations necessary exceeds the capabilities of high performance computer systems currently available. Reconstruction methods based on natural pixels, specifically orthonormal natural pixels, preserve symmetries in the data acquisition process. Fast implementations of orthonormal natural pixel algorithms can achieve orders of magnitude speedup relative to general implementations. Thus, specialized thought in algorithm development can lead to more significant increases in performance than can be achieved through hardware improvements alone.

  16. Tumor segmentation from computed tomography image data using a probabilistic pixel selection approach.

    PubMed

    Foo, Jung Leng; Miyano, Go; Lobe, Thom; Winer, Eliot

    2011-01-01

    Automatic segmentation of tumors is a complicated and difficult process as most tumors are rarely clearly delineated from healthy tissues. A new method for probabilistic segmentation to efficiently segment tumors within CT data and to improve the use of digital medical data in diagnosis has been developed. Image data are first enhanced by manually setting the appropriate window center and width, and if needed a sharpening or noise removal filter is applied. To initialize the segmentation process, a user places a seed point within the object of interest and defines a search region for segmentation. Based on the pixels' spatial and intensity properties, a probabilistic selection criterion is used to extract pixels with a high probability of belonging to the object. To facilitate the segmentation of multiple slices, an automatic seed selection algorithm was developed to keep the seeds in the object as its shape and/or location changes between consecutive slices. The seed selection algorithm performs a greedy search by searching for pixels with matching intensity close to the location of the original seed point. A total of ten CT datasets were used as test cases, each with varying difficulty in terms of automatic segmentation. Five test cases had mean false positive error rates less than 10%, and four test cases had mean false negative error rates less than 10% when compared to manual segmentation of those tumors by radiologists. PMID:21146165

  17. Prototype AEGIS: A Pixel-Array Readout Circuit for Gamma-Ray Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Barber, H. Bradford; Augustine, F. L.; Furenlid, L.; Ingram, C. M.; Grim, G. P.

    2015-01-01

    Semiconductor detector arrays made of CdTe/CdZnTe are expected to be the main components of future high-performance, clinical nuclear medicine imaging systems. Such systems will require small pixel-pitch and much larger numbers of pixels than are available in current semiconductor-detector cameras. We describe the motivation for developing a new readout integrated circuit, AEGIS, for use in hybrid semiconductor detector arrays, that may help spur the development of future cameras. A basic design for AEGIS is presented together with results of an HSPICE™ simulation of the performance of its unit cell. AEGIS will have a shaper-amplifier unit cell and neighbor pixel readout. Other features include the use of a single input power line with other biases generated on-board, a control register that allows digital control of all thresholds and chip configurations and an output approach that is compatible with list-mode data acquisition. An 8×8 prototype version of AEGIS is currently under development; the full AEGIS will be a 64×64 array with 300 μm pitch. PMID:26345126

  18. How spectroscopic x-ray imaging benefits from inter-pixel communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Thomas; Zuber, Marcus; Hamann, Elias; Cecilia, Angelica; Ballabriga, Rafael; Campbell, Michael; Ruat, Marie; Tlustos, Lukas; Fauler, Alex; Fiederle, Michael; Baumbach, Tilo

    2014-10-01

    Spectroscopic x-ray imaging based on pixellated semiconductor detectors can be sensitive to charge sharing and K-fluorescence, depending on the sensor material used, its thickness and the pixel pitch employed. As a consequence, spectroscopic resolution is partially lost. In this paper, we study a new detector ASIC, the Medipix3RX, that offers a novel feature called charge summing, which is established by making adjacent pixels communicate with each other. Consequently, single photon interactions resulting in multiple hits are almost completely avoided. We investigate this charge summing mode with respect to those of its imaging properties that are of interest in medical physics and benchmark them against the case without charge summing. In particular, we review its influence on spectroscopic resolution and find that the low energy bias normally present when recording energy spectra is dramatically reduced. Furthermore, we show that charge summing provides a modulation transfer function which is almost independent of the energy threshold setting, which is in contrast to approaches common so far. We demonstrate that this property is directly linked to the detective quantum efficiency, which is found to increase by a factor of three or more when the energy threshold approaches the photon energy and when using charge summing. As a consequence, the contrast-to-noise ratio is found to double at elevated threshold levels and the dynamic range increases for a given counter depth. All these effects are shown to lead to an improved ability to perform material discrimination in spectroscopic CT, using iodine and gadolinium contrast agents. Hence, when compared to conventional photon counting detectors, these benefits carry the potential of substantially reducing the imaging dose a patient is exposed to during diagnostic CT examinations.

  19. Digital pixel CMOS focal plane array with on-chip multiply accumulate units for low-latency image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Jeffrey W.; Tyrrell, Brian M.; D'Onofrio, Richard; Berger, Paul J.; Fernandez-Cull, Christy

    2014-06-01

    A digital pixel CMOS focal plane array has been developed to enable low latency implementations of image processing systems such as centroid trackers, Shack-Hartman wavefront sensors, and Fitts correlation trackers through the use of in-pixel digital signal processing (DSP) and generic parallel pipelined multiply accumulate (MAC) units. Light intensity digitization occurs at the pixel level, enabling in-pixel DSP and noiseless data transfer from the pixel array to the peripheral processing units. The pipelined processing of row and column image data prior to off chip readout reduces the required output bandwidth of the image sensor, thus reducing the latency of computations necessary to implement various image processing systems. Data volume reductions of over 80% lead to sub 10μs latency for completing various tracking and sensor algorithms. This paper details the architecture of the pixel-processing imager (PPI) and presents some initial results from a prototype device fabricated in a standard 65nm CMOS process hybridized to a commercial off-the-shelf short-wave infrared (SWIR) detector array.

  20. New Possibilities in Medical X-Ray Imaging with Photon Counting Pixel Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durst, J.; Bartl, P.; Guni, E.; Haas, W.; Ritter, A.; Takoukam Talla, P.; Weber, T.; Michel, T.; Anton, G.

    2010-04-01

    The new generation of X-ray photon counting pixel detectors like the Medipix2 and the Medipix3 opens a new field of applications in medical X-ray imaging. These detectors work with one or more energy windows, which makes energy information available in addition to the intensity. A detailled understanding of the detector response of such detectors is important. Results will be presented for Si and CdTe as sensor material. With this knowledge two methods called spectrum reconstruction and material reconstruction can be applied to energy resolved images in absorption radiography and computed tomography. Another new application is the measurement of the phase information in computed tomography in addition to the absorption information. The potential of phase contrast imaging will be discussed.

  1. Color single-pixel imaging based on multiple measurement vectors model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ming; Kang, Chen; Tian, Pin; Xu, Wenhai

    2016-03-01

    Single-pixel imaging (SPI) represents a promising approach to multispectral imaging. We investigated the interband similarity of color images among red, green, and blue bands and found that it is highly possible for their wavelet coefficients to be at the same locations due to edges and transactions. Accordingly, we constructed a multiple measurement vectors model that includes a constraint under which the sparse coefficients of different bands have the same sparse structure, and then joint reconstruction is performed for all bands. We ran both simulated and actual experiments to validate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method and found that compared with similar methods, it significantly improves the reconstruction quality of color SPI.

  2. Toward Real-time quantum imaging with a single pixel camera

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrie, Benjamin J; Pooser, Raphael C

    2013-01-01

    We present a workbench for the study of real-time quantum imaging by measuring the frame-by-frame quantum noise reduction of multi-spatial-mode twin beams generated by four wave mixing in Rb vapor. Exploiting the multiple spatial modes of this squeezed light source, we utilize spatial light modulators to selectively transmit macropixels of quantum correlated modes from each of the twin beams to a high quantum efficiency balanced detector. In low-light-level imaging applications, the ability to measure the quantum correlations between individual spatial modes and macropixels of spatial modes with a single pixel camera will facilitate compressive quantum imaging with sensitivity below the photon shot noise limit.

  3. Heavy Ion Transient Characterization of a Photobit Hardened-by-Design Active Pixel Sensor Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Paul W.; Byers, Wheaton B.; Conger, Christopher; Eid, El-Sayed; Gee, George; Jones, Michael R.; Marshall, Cheryl J.; Reed, Robert; Pickel, Jim; Kniffin, Scott

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents heavy ion data on the single event transient (SET) response of a Photobit active pixel sensor (APS) four quadrant test chip with different radiation tolerant designs in a standard 0.35 micron CMOS process. The physical design techniques of enclosed geometry and P-channel guard rings are used to design the four N-type active photodiode pixels as described in a previous paper. Argon transient measurements on the 256 x 256 chip array as a function of incident angle show a significant variation in the amount of charge collected as well as the charge spreading dependent on the pixel type. The results are correlated with processing and design information provided by Photobit. In addition, there is a large degree of statistical variability between individual ion strikes. No latch-up is observed up to an LET of 106 MeV/mg/sq cm.

  4. Vertically integrated pixel microbolometers for IR imaging using high-resistivity VOx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basantani, Hitesh A.; Shin, Hang-Beum; Jackson, T. N.; Horn, Mark W.

    2013-06-01

    Uncooled IR bolometers form an integral part of thermal imaging cameras. Vanadium oxide material currently used for IR imaging has a resistivity between 0.1 and 1 ohm-cm and a temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) between -1.4%K-1 to -2.4%K-1. Higher TCR materials are desired, however, such materials inevitably have higher resistivity and therefore higher electrical resistance in a lateral resistor configuration. A high resistance leads to an increase in the Johnson-Nyquist noise of the bias-induced current, thereby limiting the performance of bolometers using high resistivity material. In this work, we demonstrate high resistivity, high TCR VOx and propose the use of a vertically integrated resistor configuration an alternate pixel structure design with lower Johnson noise when compared with the conventional lateral pixel design. Biased Target Ion Beam Deposition was used to deposit high resistivity vanadium oxide thin-films (~85 nm thick). Electrical characterization of lateral resistor structures showed resistivities ranging from 2 × 103 ohm-cm to 2.1 × 104 ohm-cm, TCR varying from -2.6%K-1 to -5%K-1, Johnson noise (pixel resistance of 1.3GΩ) of 4.7 to 6μV/√Hz and 1/f noise (normalized Hooge's parameter (α/n)) of 5 × 10-21 to 5 × 10-18 cm-3. In contrast, the through-film resistor structures showed significantly higher resistivities at 3 × 104 Ohm-cm to 1.55 × 105 Ohm-cm, TCR similar to lateral resistive structure between -2.6%K-1 to -5.1%K-1, immeasurably low Johnson noise (pixel resistance of 48KΩ) and normalized Hooge's parameter ranging from to 5×10-21 to 1×10-18 cm-3. These results indicate the possible use of through-film resistors as an alternative to the conventional lateral-resistor design currently used in uncooled imaging microbolometers.

  5. An investigation of signal performance enhancements achieved through innovative pixel design across several generations of indirect detection, active matrix, flat-panel arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Antonuk, Larry E.; Zhao Qihua; El-Mohri, Youcef; Du Hong; Wang Yi; Street, Robert A.; Ho, Jackson; Weisfield, Richard; Yao, William

    2009-07-15

    Active matrix flat-panel imager (AMFPI) technology is being employed for an increasing variety of imaging applications. An important element in the adoption of this technology has been significant ongoing improvements in optical signal collection achieved through innovations in indirect detection array pixel design. Such improvements have a particularly beneficial effect on performance in applications involving low exposures and/or high spatial frequencies, where detective quantum efficiency is strongly reduced due to the relatively high level of additive electronic noise compared to signal levels of AMFPI devices. In this article, an examination of various signal properties, as determined through measurements and calculations related to novel array designs, is reported in the context of the evolution of AMFPI pixel design. For these studies, dark, optical, and radiation signal measurements were performed on prototype imagers incorporating a variety of increasingly sophisticated array designs, with pixel pitches ranging from 75 to 127 {mu}m. For each design, detailed measurements of fundamental pixel-level properties conducted under radiographic and fluoroscopic operating conditions are reported and the results are compared. A series of 127 {mu}m pitch arrays employing discrete photodiodes culminated in a novel design providing an optical fill factor of {approx}80% (thereby assuring improved x-ray sensitivity), and demonstrating low dark current, very low charge trapping and charge release, and a large range of linear signal response. In two of the designs having 75 and 90 {mu}m pitches, a novel continuous photodiode structure was found to provide fill factors that approach the theoretical maximum of 100%. Both sets of novel designs achieved large fill factors by employing architectures in which some, or all of the photodiode structure was elevated above the plane of the pixel addressing transistor. Generally, enhancement of the fill factor in either discrete or

  6. An investigation of signal performance enhancements achieved through innovative pixel design across several generations of indirect detection, active matrix, flat-panel arrays

    PubMed Central

    Antonuk, Larry E.; Zhao, Qihua; El-Mohri, Youcef; Du, Hong; Wang, Yi; Street, Robert A.; Ho, Jackson; Weisfield, Richard; Yao, William

    2009-01-01

    Active matrix flat-panel imager (AMFPI) technology is being employed for an increasing variety of imaging applications. An important element in the adoption of this technology has been significant ongoing improvements in optical signal collection achieved through innovations in indirect detection array pixel design. Such improvements have a particularly beneficial effect on performance in applications involving low exposures and∕or high spatial frequencies, where detective quantum efficiency is strongly reduced due to the relatively high level of additive electronic noise compared to signal levels of AMFPI devices. In this article, an examination of various signal properties, as determined through measurements and calculations related to novel array designs, is reported in the context of the evolution of AMFPI pixel design. For these studies, dark, optical, and radiation signal measurements were performed on prototype imagers incorporating a variety of increasingly sophisticated array designs, with pixel pitches ranging from 75 to 127 μm. For each design, detailed measurements of fundamental pixel-level properties conducted under radiographic and fluoroscopic operating conditions are reported and the results are compared. A series of 127 μm pitch arrays employing discrete photodiodes culminated in a novel design providing an optical fill factor of ∼80% (thereby assuring improved x-ray sensitivity), and demonstrating low dark current, very low charge trapping and charge release, and a large range of linear signal response. In two of the designs having 75 and 90 μm pitches, a novel continuous photodiode structure was found to provide fill factors that approach the theoretical maximum of 100%. Both sets of novel designs achieved large fill factors by employing architectures in which some, or all of the photodiode structure was elevated above the plane of the pixel addressing transistor. Generally, enhancement of the fill factor in either discrete or continuous

  7. Performance of a prototype 32×32 pixel indirect x-ray imager based on a lateral selenium passive pixel sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshavarzi, Rasoul; Wang, Kai; Yazdandoost, Mohammad Y.; Shin, Kyung-Wook; Chen, Feng; Majid, Shaikh Hasibul; Abbaszadeh, Shiva; Karim, Karim S.

    2012-03-01

    An interface has been developed to capture frames taken by X-ray array imagers up to 64×64 pixels. An application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) designed solely for X-ray flat panel imaging readout circuitry, manufactured by FLIR® called Indigo (also known as ISC9717), was used as part of charge-amplifier block. An Altera Cyclone II FPGA is used to serve three purposes: Create pulses required for gate-driver block, Receive fast-stream data coming from the Indigo chip, and Send data through RS-232 protocol over a serial cable to a personal computer. Initial results for a 32×32 passive pixel sensor (PPS) with lateral amorphous Selenium metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetector were presented in [1]. This work focuses more on methods used to improve the images obtained from the array. Sharper images produced in sync with the light source are presented. In addition, insight into array readout circuitry and capturing a frame from an array is discussed.

  8. Pixellated thallium bromide detectors for gamma-ray spectroscopy and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onodera, T.; Hitomi, K.; Shoji, T.; Hiratate, Y.

    2004-06-01

    Recently, pixellated semiconductor detectors exhibit high-energy resolution, which have been studied actively and fabricated from CdTe, CZT and HgI 2. Thallium bromide (TlBr) is a compound semiconductor characterized with its high atomic numbers (Tl=81, Br=35) and high density (7.56 g/cm 3). Thus, TlBr exhibits higher photon stopping power than other semiconductor materials used for radiation detector fabrication such as CdTe, CZT and HgI 2. The wide band gap of TlBr (2.68 eV) permits the detectors low-noise operation at around room temperature. Our studies made an effort to fabricate pixellated TlBr detectors had sufficient detection efficiency and good charge collection efficiency. In this study, pixellated TlBr detectors were fabricated from the crystals purified by the multipass zone-refining method and grown by the horizontal traveling molten zone (TMZ) method. The TlBr detector has a continuous cathode over one crystal surface and 3×3 pixellated anodes (0.57×0.57 mm 2 each) surrounded by a guard ring on the opposite surface. The electrodes were realized by vacuum evaporation of palladium through a shadow mask. Typical thickness of the detector was 2 mm. Spectrometric performance of the TlBr detectors was tested by irradiating them with 241Am (59.5 keV), 57Co (122 keV) and 137Cs (662 keV) gamma-ray sources at temperature of -20°C. Energy resolutions (FWHM) were measured to be 4.0, 6.0 and 9.7 keV for 59.5, 122 and 662 keV gamma-rays, respectively.

  9. 2PFCTM (two pixels, full color): Image sensor demosaicing and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamburrino, Daniel; Speigle, Jon M.; Tweet, Douglas J.; Lee, Jong-Jan

    2010-04-01

    We propose a modification to the standard Bayer color filter array (CFA) and photodiode structure for CMOS image sensors, which we call 2PFC™ (two pixels, full color). The blue and red filters of the Bayer pattern are replaced by a magenta filter. Under each magenta filter are two stacked, pinned photodiodes; the diode nearest the surface absorbs mostly blue light, and the deeper diode absorbs mostly red light. The magenta filter absorbs green light, improving color separation between the blue and red diodes. We first present a frequency-based demosaicing method, which takes advantage of the new 2PFC geometry. Due to the spatial arrangement of red, green, and blue pixels, luminance and chrominance are very well separated in the Fourier space, allowing for computationally inexpensive linear filtering. In comparison with state-of-the-art demosaicing methods for the Bayer CFA, we show that our sensor and demosaicing method outperform the others in terms of color aliasing, peak signal to noise ratio, and zipper effect. As demosaicing alone does not determine image quality, we also analyze the whole system performance in terms of resolution and noise.

  10. Characterisation of Vanilla—A novel active pixel sensor for radiation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blue, A.; Bates, R.; Laing, A.; Maneuski, D.; O'Shea, V.; Clark, A.; Prydderch, M.; Turchetta, R.; Arvanitis, C.; Bohndiek, S.

    2007-10-01

    Novel features of a new monolithic active pixel sensor, Vanilla, with 520×520 pixels ( 25 μm square) has been characterised for the first time. Optimisation of the sensor operation was made through variation of frame rates, integration times and on-chip biases and voltages. Features such as flushed reset operation, ROI capturing and readout modes have been fully tested. Stability measurements were performed to test its suitablility for long-term applications. These results suggest the Vanilla sensor—along with bio-medical and space applications—is suitable for use in particle physics experiments.

  11. Imaging of Ra-223 with a small-pixel CdTe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scuffham, J. W.; Pani, S.; Seller, P.; Sellin, P. J.; Veale, M. C.; Wilson, M. D.; Cernik, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    Ra-223 Dichloride (Xofigo™) is a promising new radiopharmaceutical offering survival benefit and palliation of painful bone metastases in patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer [1]. The response to radionuclide therapy and toxicity are directly linked to the absorbed radiation doses to the tumour and organs at risk respectively. Accurate dosimetry necessitates quantitative imaging of the biodistribution and kinetics of the radiopharmaceutical. Although primarily an alpha-emitter, Ra-223 also has some low-abundance X-ray and gamma emissions, which enable imaging of the biodistribution in the patient. However, the low spectral resolution of conventional gamma camera detectors makes in-vivo imaging of Ra-223 challenging. In this work, we present spectra and image data of anthropomorphic phantoms containing Ra-223 acquired with a small-pixel CdTe detector (HEXITEC) [2] with a pinhole collimator. Comparison is made with similar data acquired using a clinical gamma camera. The results demonstrate the advantages of the solid state detector in terms of scatter rejection and quantitative accuracy of the images. However, optimised collimation is needed in order for the sensitivity to rival current clinical systems. As different dosage levels and administration regimens for this drug are explored in current clinical trials, there is a clear need to develop improved imaging technologies that will enable personalised treatments to be designed for patients.

  12. Laser Doppler blood flow imaging with a 64×64 pixel full custom CMOS sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, D.; Nguyen, H. C.; Hayes-Gill, B. R.; Zhu, Y.; Crowe, J. A.; Morgan, S. P.; Clough, G. F.; Gill, C. A.

    2011-03-01

    Full field laser Doppler perfusion imaging offers advantages over scanning laser Doppler imaging as the effects of movement artifacts are reduced. The increased frame rate allows rapid changes in blood flow to be imaged. A custom made CMOS sensor offers several advantages over commercial cameras as the design can be optimized to the detected signals. For example, laser Doppler signals are known to have a bandwidth from DC up to ~20KHz and be of a low modulation depth. Therefore a design that can amplify the AC component and have a sampling rate and an antialiasing filter appropriate to the signal bandwidth would be beneficial. An additional advantage of custom made sensors is that on-chip processing of blood flow allows the data bottleneck that exists between the photo-detector array and processing electronics to be overcome, as the processed data can be read out from the image sensor to a PC or display at a low data rate. A fully integrated 64x64 pixel array for imaging blood flow is presented. On-chip analog signal processing is used to amplify the AC component, normalize the AC signal by the DC light intensity and provide anti-aliasing. On-chip digital signal processing is used to implement the filters required to calculate blood flow. The imaging array has been incorporated into a device that has been used in a clinical setting. Results are presented demonstrating changes in blood flow in occlusion and release tests.

  13. Efficient space-time sampling with pixel-wise coded exposure for high-speed imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dengyu; Gu, Jinwei; Hitomi, Yasunobu; Gupta, Mohit; Mitsunaga, Tomoo; Nayar, Shree K

    2014-02-01

    Cameras face a fundamental trade-off between spatial and temporal resolution. Digital still cameras can capture images with high spatial resolution, but most high-speed video cameras have relatively low spatial resolution. It is hard to overcome this trade-off without incurring a significant increase in hardware costs. In this paper, we propose techniques for sampling, representing, and reconstructing the space-time volume to overcome this trade-off. Our approach has two important distinctions compared to previous works: 1) We achieve sparse representation of videos by learning an overcomplete dictionary on video patches, and 2) we adhere to practical hardware constraints on sampling schemes imposed by architectures of current image sensors, which means that our sampling function can be implemented on CMOS image sensors with modified control units in the future. We evaluate components of our approach, sampling function and sparse representation, by comparing them to several existing approaches. We also implement a prototype imaging system with pixel-wise coded exposure control using a liquid crystal on silicon device. System characteristics such as field of view and modulation transfer function are evaluated for our imaging system. Both simulations and experiments on a wide range of scenes show that our method can effectively reconstruct a video from a single coded image while maintaining high spatial resolution. PMID:24356347

  14. Programmable active pixel sensor to investigate neural interactions within the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Matthew D.; Prydderch, Mark L.; Morrison, James D.; Murdoch, Derek; Mathieson, Keith

    2009-05-01

    Detection of the visual scene by the eye and the resultant neural interactions of the retina-brain system give us our perception of sight. We have developed an Active Pixel Sensor (APS) to be used as a tool for both furthering understanding of these interactions via experimentation with the retina and to make developments towards a realisable retinal prosthesis. The sensor consists of 469 pixels in a hexagonal array. The pixels are interconnected by a programmable neural network to mimic lateral interactions between retinal cells. Outputs from the sensor are in the form of biphasic current pulse trains suitable to stimulate retinal cells via a biocompatible array. The APS will be described with initial characterisation and test results.

  15. Development of radiation hard CMOS active pixel sensors for HL-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernegger, Heinz

    2016-07-01

    New pixel detectors, based on commercial high voltage and/or high resistivity full CMOS processes, hold promise as next-generation active pixel sensors for inner and intermediate layers of the upgraded ATLAS tracker. The use of commercial CMOS processes allow cost-effective detector construction and simpler hybridisation techniques. The paper gives an overview of the results obtained on AMS-produced CMOS sensors coupled to the ATLAS Pixel FE-I4 readout chips. The SOI (silicon-on-insulator) produced sensors by XFAB hold great promise as radiation hard SOI-CMOS sensors due to their combination of partially depleted SOI transistors reducing back-gate effects. The test results include pre-/post-irradiation comparison, measurements of charge collection regions as well as test beam results.

  16. [High-Performance Active Pixel X-Ray Sensors for X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bautz, Mark; Suntharalingam, Vyshnavi

    2005-01-01

    The subject grants support development of High-Performance Active Pixel Sensors for X-ray Astronomy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Center for Space Research and at MIT's Lincoln Laboratory. This memo reports our progress in the second year of the project, from April, 2004 through the present.

  17. Urban Image Classification: Per-Pixel Classifiers, Sub-Pixel Analysis, Object-Based Image Analysis, and Geospatial Methods. 10; Chapter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myint, Soe W.; Mesev, Victor; Quattrochi, Dale; Wentz, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Remote sensing methods used to generate base maps to analyze the urban environment rely predominantly on digital sensor data from space-borne platforms. This is due in part from new sources of high spatial resolution data covering the globe, a variety of multispectral and multitemporal sources, sophisticated statistical and geospatial methods, and compatibility with GIS data sources and methods. The goal of this chapter is to review the four groups of classification methods for digital sensor data from space-borne platforms; per-pixel, sub-pixel, object-based (spatial-based), and geospatial methods. Per-pixel methods are widely used methods that classify pixels into distinct categories based solely on the spectral and ancillary information within that pixel. They are used for simple calculations of environmental indices (e.g., NDVI) to sophisticated expert systems to assign urban land covers. Researchers recognize however, that even with the smallest pixel size the spectral information within a pixel is really a combination of multiple urban surfaces. Sub-pixel classification methods therefore aim to statistically quantify the mixture of surfaces to improve overall classification accuracy. While within pixel variations exist, there is also significant evidence that groups of nearby pixels have similar spectral information and therefore belong to the same classification category. Object-oriented methods have emerged that group pixels prior to classification based on spectral similarity and spatial proximity. Classification accuracy using object-based methods show significant success and promise for numerous urban 3 applications. Like the object-oriented methods that recognize the importance of spatial proximity, geospatial methods for urban mapping also utilize neighboring pixels in the classification process. The primary difference though is that geostatistical methods (e.g., spatial autocorrelation methods) are utilized during both the pre- and post

  18. Coupled variational image decomposition and restoration model for blurred cartoon-plus-texture images with missing pixels.

    PubMed

    Ng, Michael K; Yuan, Xiaoming; Zhang, Wenxing

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we develop a decomposition model to restore blurred images with missing pixels. Our assumption is that the underlying image is the superposition of cartoon and texture components. We use the total variation norm and its dual norm to regularize the cartoon and texture, respectively. We recommend an efficient numerical algorithm based on the splitting versions of augmented Lagrangian method to solve the problem. Theoretically, the existence of a minimizer to the energy function and the convergence of the algorithm are guaranteed. In contrast to recently developed methods for deblurring images, the proposed algorithm not only gives the restored image, but also gives a decomposition of cartoon and texture parts. These two parts can be further used in segmentation and inpainting problems. Numerical comparisons between this algorithm and some state-of-the-art methods are also reported. PMID:23412618

  19. Sub-pixel flood inundation mapping from multispectral remotely sensed images based on discrete particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Linyi; Chen, Yun; Yu, Xin; Liu, Rui; Huang, Chang

    2015-03-01

    The study of flood inundation is significant to human life and social economy. Remote sensing technology has provided an effective way to study the spatial and temporal characteristics of inundation. Remotely sensed images with high temporal resolutions are widely used in mapping inundation. However, mixed pixels do exist due to their relatively low spatial resolutions. One of the most popular approaches to resolve this issue is sub-pixel mapping. In this paper, a novel discrete particle swarm optimization (DPSO) based sub-pixel flood inundation mapping (DPSO-SFIM) method is proposed to achieve an improved accuracy in mapping inundation at a sub-pixel scale. The evaluation criterion for sub-pixel inundation mapping is formulated. The DPSO-SFIM algorithm is developed, including particle discrete encoding, fitness function designing and swarm search strategy. The accuracy of DPSO-SFIM in mapping inundation at a sub-pixel scale was evaluated using Landsat ETM + images from study areas in Australia and China. The results show that DPSO-SFIM consistently outperformed the four traditional SFIM methods in these study areas. A sensitivity analysis of DPSO-SFIM was also carried out to evaluate its performances. It is hoped that the results of this study will enhance the application of medium-low spatial resolution images in inundation detection and mapping, and thereby support the ecological and environmental studies of river basins.

  20. Low-power priority Address-Encoder and Reset-Decoder data-driven readout for Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors for tracker system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, P.; Aglieri, G.; Cavicchioli, C.; Chalmet, P. L.; Chanlek, N.; Collu, A.; Gao, C.; Hillemanns, H.; Junique, A.; Kofarago, M.; Keil, M.; Kugathasan, T.; Kim, D.; Kim, J.; Lattuca, A.; Marin Tobon, C. A.; Marras, D.; Mager, M.; Martinengo, P.; Mazza, G.; Mugnier, H.; Musa, L.; Puggioni, C.; Rousset, J.; Reidt, F.; Riedler, P.; Snoeys, W.; Siddhanta, S.; Usai, G.; van Hoorne, J. W.; Yi, J.

    2015-06-01

    Active Pixel Sensors used in High Energy Particle Physics require low power consumption to reduce the detector material budget, low integration time to reduce the possibilities of pile-up and fast readout to improve the detector data capability. To satisfy these requirements, a novel Address-Encoder and Reset-Decoder (AERD) asynchronous circuit for a fast readout of a pixel matrix has been developed. The AERD data-driven readout architecture operates the address encoding and reset decoding based on an arbitration tree, and allows us to readout only the hit pixels. Compared to the traditional readout structure of the rolling shutter scheme in Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS), AERD can achieve a low readout time and a low power consumption especially for low hit occupancies. The readout is controlled at the chip periphery with a signal synchronous with the clock, allows a good digital and analogue signal separation in the matrix and a reduction of the power consumption. The AERD circuit has been implemented in the TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS Imaging Sensor (CIS) process with full complementary CMOS logic in the pixel. It works at 10 MHz with a matrix height of 15 mm. The energy consumed to read out one pixel is around 72 pJ. A scheme to boost the readout speed to 40 MHz is also discussed. The sensor chip equipped with AERD has been produced and characterised. Test results including electrical beam measurement are presented.

  1. SMARTPIX, a photon-counting pixel detector for synchrotron applications based on Medipix3RX readout chip and active edge pixel sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponchut, C.; Collet, E.; Hervé, C.; Le Caer, T.; Cerrai, J.; Siron, L.; Dabin, Y.; Ribois, J. F.

    2015-01-01

    Photon-counting pixel detectors are now routinely used on synchrotron beamlines. Many applications benefit from their noiseless mode of operation, single-pixel point spread function and high frame rates. One of their drawbacks is a discontinuous detection area due to the space-consuming wirebonded connections of the readout chips. Moreover, charge sharing limits their efficiency and their energy discrimination capabilities. In order to overcome these issues the ESRF is developing SMARTPIX,a scalable and versatile pixel detector system with minimized dead areas and with energy resolving capabilities based on the MEDIPIX3RX readout chip. SMARTPIX exploits the through-silicon via technology implemented on MEDIPIX3RX, the active edge sensor processing developed in particular at ADVACAM, and the on-chip analog charge summing feature of MEDIPIX3RX. This article reports on system architecture, unit module structure, data acquisition electronics, target characteristics and applications.

  2. Heavily irradiated N-in-p thin planar pixel sensors with and without active edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzo, S.; Andricek, L.; Macchiolo, A.; Moser, H. G.; Nisius, R.; Richter, R. H.; Weigell, P.

    2014-05-01

    We present the results of the characterization of silicon pixel modules employing n-in-p planar sensors with an active thickness of 150 μm, produced at MPP/HLL, and 100-200 μm thin active edge sensor devices, produced at VTT in Finland. These thin sensors are designed as candidates for the ATLAS pixel detector upgrade to be operated at the HL-LHC, as they ensure radiation hardness at high fluences. They are interconnected to the ATLAS FE-I3 and FE-I4 read-out chips. Moreover, the n-in-p technology only requires a single side processing and thereby it is a cost-effective alternative to the n-in-n pixel technology presently employed in the LHC experiments. High precision beam test measurements of the hit efficiency have been performed on these devices both at the CERN SpS and at DESY, Hamburg. We studied the behavior of these sensors at different bias voltages and different beam incident angles up to the maximum one expected for the new Insertable B-Layer of ATLAS and for HL-LHC detectors. Results obtained with 150 μm thin sensors, assembled with the new ATLAS FE-I4 chip and irradiated up to a fluence of 4 × 1015 neq/cm2, show that they are excellent candidates for larger radii of the silicon pixel tracker in the upgrade of the ATLAS detector at HL-LHC. In addition, the active edge technology of the VTT devices maximizes the active area of the sensor and reduces the material budget to suit the requirements for the innermost layers. The edge pixel performance of VTT modules has been investigated at beam test experiments and the analysis after irradiation up to a fluence of 5 × 1015 neq/cm2 has been performed using radioactive sources in the laboratory.

  3. A 512×512 CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor with integrated ADCs for space science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prydderch, M. L.; Waltham, N. J.; Turchetta, R.; French, M. J.; Holt, R.; Marshall, A.; Burt, D.; Bell, R.; Pool, P.; Eyles, C.; Mapson-Menard, H.

    2003-10-01

    In the last few years, CMOS sensors have become widely used for consumer applications, but little has been done for scientific instruments. In this paper we present the design and experimental characterisation of a Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) intended for a space science application. The sensor incorporates a 525×525 array of pixels on a 25 μm pitch. Each pixel contains a detector together with three transistors that are used for pixel reset, pixel selection and charge-to-voltage conversion. The detector consists of four n-well/p-substrate diodes combining optimum charge collection and low noise performance. The array readout is column-parallel with adjustable gain column amplifiers and a 10-bit single slope ADC. Data conversion takes place simultaneously for all the 525 pixels in one row. The ADC slope can be adjusted in order to give the best dynamic range for a given brightness of a scene. The digitised data are output on a 10-bit bus at 3 MHz. An on-chip state machine generates all of the control signals needed for the readout. All of the bias currents and voltages are generated on chip by a DAC that is programmable through an I 2C compatible interface. The sensor was designed and fabricated on a standard 0.5 μm CMOS technology. The overall die size is 16.7 mm×19.9 mm including the associated readout electronics and bond pads. Preliminary test results show that the full-scale design works well, meeting the Star Tracker requirements with less than 1-bit noise, good linearity and good optical performance.

  4. Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (DMAPS) implemented in LF-150 nm CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishishita, T.; Hemperek, T.; Krüger, H.; Wermes, N.

    2015-03-01

    We present the recent development of Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (DMAPS), implemented with an LFoundry (LF) 150 nm CMOS process. MAPS detectors based on an epi-layer have been matured in recent years and have attractive features in terms of reducing material budget and handling cost compared to conventional hybrid pixel detectors. However, the obtained signal is relatively small (~1000 e-) due to the thin epi-layer, and charge collection time is relatively slow, e.g., in the order of 100 ns, because charges are mainly collected by diffusion. Modern commercial CMOS technology, however, offers advanced process options to overcome such difficulties and enable truly monolithic devices as an alternative to hybrid pixel sensors and charge coupled devices. Unlike in the case of the standard MAPS technologies with epi-layers, the LF process provides a high-resistivity substrate that enables large signal and fast charge collection by drift in a ~50 μm thick depleted layer. Since this process also enables the use of deep n- and p-wells to isolate the collection electrode from the thin active device layer, PMOS and NMOS transistors are available for the readout electronics in each pixel cell. In order to evaluate the sensor and transistor characteristics, several collection electrodes variants and readout architectures have been implemented. In this report, we focus on its design aspect of the LF-DMAPS prototype chip.

  5. Linear fitting of multi-threshold counting data with a pixel-array detector for spectral X-ray imaging

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Ryan D.; Pogranichney, Nicholas R.; Muir, J. Lewis; Sullivan, Shane Z.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Mulichak, Anne M.; Toth, Scott J.; Keefe, Lisa J.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments and modeling are described to perform spectral fitting of multi-threshold counting measurements on a pixel-array detector. An analytical model was developed for describing the probability density function of detected voltage in X-ray photon-counting arrays, utilizing fractional photon counting to account for edge/corner effects from voltage plumes that spread across multiple pixels. Each pixel was mathematically calibrated by fitting the detected voltage distributions to the model at both 13.5 keV and 15.0 keV X-ray energies. The model and established pixel responses were then exploited to statistically recover images of X-ray intensity as a function of X-ray energy in a simulated multi-wavelength and multi-counting threshold experiment. PMID:25178010

  6. Method of acquiring an image from an optical structure having pixels with dedicated readout circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Mendis, Sunetra (Inventor); Kemeny, Sabrina E. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An imaging device formed as a monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor integrated circuit in an industry standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor process, the integrated circuit including a focal plane array of pixel cells, each one of the cells including a photogate overlying the substrate for accumulating photo-generated charge in an underlying portion of the substrate, a readout circuit including at least an output field effect transistor formed in the substrate, and a charge coupled device section formed on the substrate adjacent the photogate having a sensing node connected to the output transistor and at least one charge coupled device stage for transferring charge from the underlying portion of the substrate to the sensing node.

  7. Design Studies of a CZT-based Detector Combined with a Pixel-Geometry-Matching Collimator for SPECT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Weng, Fenghua; Bagchi, Srijeeta; Huang, Qiu; Seo, Youngho

    2013-10-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) suffers limited efficiency due to the need for collimators. Collimator properties largely decide the data statistics and image quality. Various materials and configurations of collimators have been investigated in many years. The main thrust of our study is to evaluate the design of pixel-geometry-matching collimators to investigate their potential performances using Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations. Here, a pixel-geometry-matching collimator is defined as a collimator which is divided into the same number of pixels as the detector's and the center of each pixel in the collimator is a one-to-one correspondence to that in the detector. The detector is made of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT), which is one of the most promising materials for applications to detect hard X-rays and γ-rays due to its ability to obtain good energy resolution and high light output at room temperature. For our current project, we have designed a large-area, CZT-based gamma camera (20.192 cm×20.192 cm) with a small pixel pitch (1.60 mm). The detector is pixelated and hence the intrinsic resolution can be as small as the size of the pixel. Materials of collimator, collimator hole geometry, detection efficiency, and spatial resolution of the CZT detector combined with the pixel-matching collimator were calculated and analyzed under different conditions. From the simulation studies, we found that such a camera using rectangular holes has promising imaging characteristics in terms of spatial resolution, detection efficiency, and energy resolution. PMID:25378898

  8. Design Studies of a CZT-based Detector Combined with a Pixel-Geometry-Matching Collimator for SPECT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Fenghua; Bagchi, Srijeeta; Huang, Qiu; Seo, Youngho

    2014-01-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) suffers limited efficiency due to the need for collimators. Collimator properties largely decide the data statistics and image quality. Various materials and configurations of collimators have been investigated in many years. The main thrust of our study is to evaluate the design of pixel-geometry-matching collimators to investigate their potential performances using Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations. Here, a pixel-geometry-matching collimator is defined as a collimator which is divided into the same number of pixels as the detector’s and the center of each pixel in the collimator is a one-to-one correspondence to that in the detector. The detector is made of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT), which is one of the most promising materials for applications to detect hard X-rays and γ-rays due to its ability to obtain good energy resolution and high light output at room temperature. For our current project, we have designed a large-area, CZT-based gamma camera (20.192 cm×20.192 cm) with a small pixel pitch (1.60 mm). The detector is pixelated and hence the intrinsic resolution can be as small as the size of the pixel. Materials of collimator, collimator hole geometry, detection efficiency, and spatial resolution of the CZT detector combined with the pixel-matching collimator were calculated and analyzed under different conditions. From the simulation studies, we found that such a camera using rectangular holes has promising imaging characteristics in terms of spatial resolution, detection efficiency, and energy resolution. PMID:25378898

  9. Using visible SNR (vSNR) to compare the image quality of pixel binning and digital resizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Joyce; Okincha, Mike; Parmar, Manu; Wandell, Brian

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a new metric, the visible signal-to-noise ratio (vSNR), to analyze how pixel-binning and resizing methods influence noise visibility in uniform areas of an image. The vSNR is the inverse of the standard deviation of the SCIELAB representation of a uniform field; its units are 1/ΔE. The vSNR metric can be used in simulations to predict how imaging system components affect noise visibility. We use simulations to evaluate two image rendering methods: pixel binning and digital resizing. We show that vSNR increases with scene luminance, pixel size and viewing distance and decreases with read noise. Under low illumination conditions and for pixels with relatively high read noise, images generated with the binning method have less noise (high vSNR) than resized images. The binning method has noticeably lower spatial resolution. The binning method reduces demands on the ADC rate and channel throughput. When comparing binning and resizing, there is an image quality tradeoff between noise and blur. Depending on the application users may prefer one error over another.

  10. Hyperspectral image segmentation using active contours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cheolha P.; Snyder, Wesley E.

    2004-08-01

    Multispectral or hyperspectral image processing has been studied as a possible approach to automatic target recognition (ATR). Hundreds of spectral bands may provide high data redundancy, compensating the low contrast in medium wavelength infrared (MWIR) and long wavelength infrared (LWIR) images. Thus, the combination of spectral (image intensity) and spatial (geometric feature) information analysis could produce a substantial improvement. Active contours provide segments with continuous boundaries, while edge detectors based on local filtering often provide discontinuous boundaries. The segmentation by active contours depends on geometric feature of the object as well as image intensity. However, the application of active contours to multispectral images has been limited to the cases of simply textured images with low number of frames. This paper presents a supervised active contour model, which is applicable to vector-valued images with non-homogeneous regions and high number of frames. In the training stage, histogram models of target classes are estimated from sample vector-pixels. In the test stage, contours are evolved based on two different metrics: the histogram models of the corresponding segments and the histogram models estimated from sample target vector-pixels. The proposed segmentation method integrates segmentation and model-based pattern matching using supervised segmentation and multi-phase active contour model, while traditional methods apply pattern matching only after the segmentation. The proposed algorithm is implemented with both synthetic and real multispectral images, and shows desirable segmentation and classification results even in images with non-homogeneous regions.

  11. Delineation of sub-pixel level sedimentary litho-contacts by super resolution mapping of Landsat image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmuga Priyaa, S.; Sanjeevi, S.

    2014-12-01

    To delineate the geological formation at the surface, satellite image classification approaches are often preferred. This study aims to produce a super resolved map with better delineation of the litho-contacts from the medium resolution Landsat image. Conventionally used per-pixel classification provides an output map at the same resolution of the satellite image, while the super resolved map provides the high resolution output map using the medium resolution image. In this study, four test sites are considered for delineating different litho-contacts using super resolution mapping approach in Cuddalore district, southern India. The test sites consists of charnockite, fissile hornblende-biotite gneiss, marine sandstone and sandstone with clay, limestone with calcareous shale and clay, clay with limestone bands/lenses, mio-pliocene and quaternary argillaceous and calcareous sandstone, fluvial and fluviomarine formations. This work compares the per-pixel, super resolved output derived from linear spectral unmixing (LSU) based HNN and spectral angle mapper (SAM) based HNN approaches. The super resolution mapping approach was performed on the medium resolution (30 m) Landsat image to obtain the litho-contact maps and the results are compared with the existing maps and observations from field visits. The results showed improved accuracy (90.92%) of the map prepared by the SAM based super resolution approach compared to the LSU based super resolution approach (90.14%) and the maximum likelihood classification approach (83.74%). Such an improved accuracy of the super resolved map (6 m resolution) is due to the fact that the lithological mapping is done not merely at the resolution of the image, but at the sub-pixel level. Hence, it is inferred that super resolution mapping applied to multispectral images may be preferred for mapping lithounits and litho-contacts than the conventional per-pixel and sub-pixel image classification methods.

  12. Recent results in single-pixel compressive imaging using selective measurement strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Matthew A.; Weston, Tyler; McMackin, Lenore; Li, Yun; Chen, Jianbo; Kelly, Kevin F.

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports an overview of recent results in compressive imaging and detection using a single-pixel camera. These applications use a digital micromirror device to spatially modulate the light from an observed scene using binary sensing patterns. The patterns are obtained from a special Hadamard matrix that contains blocks of rows of which each has a common local signature pattern. The blocks partition the Hadamard spectrum, thus permitting analysis of the scene in terms of these local signature patterns. In contrast, Hadamard patterns are typically described in terms of their sequency, which is a global property of each individual row. The proposed local-signature, row-block point of view can be beneficial since it permits us to adaptively select the best blocks with which to sense the signal/scene of interest, or to select the best blocks based on a priori information. As a result, in imaging applications more fine-scale detail can be extracted from the scene, and in detection applications fewer false positives can result. Note, this signature row-block partitioning is a general mathematical technique that can be applied to the Kronecker product of any two matrices, of any size. For example, in our imaging application, we extend this idea to a Hadamard matrix that is not a power of two, yet whose block-signatures possess the familiar Sylvester-Walsh power-of-two sequency patterns.

  13. A new sensor alignment method for an 8k x 4k-pixel ultrahigh definition camera with four imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Takayuki; Mitani, Kohji; Shimamoto, Hiroshi; Shirakawa, Miho; Okano, Fumio

    2004-06-01

    We describe a precise alignment method of attaching imagers to a prism to produce an ultra-high definition color camera system. We have already developed a prototype camera with 4-k scanning lines using this alignment method. To increase its spatial resolution, this camera has four 8-megapixel imagers (GGBR), which are attached to a prism with a half-pixel pitch offset so that their pixel arrangement is equivalent to that of a single-chip color-imaging sensor with a Bayer-pattern color filter. The precision of their positioning influences the resolution of the reproduced images. The small pixels in the latest imager make it more difficult to maintain precise imager positions. A precise alignment method for attaching imagers to prism is therefore essential for developing a camera system with high resolution. We propose a method with high detectivity using a sinusoidal pattern chart that easily reproduced by one imager, and a signal process. Images from this camera can attain a limiting resolution of more than 3200 TV lines.

  14. Development of active edge pixel sensors and four-side buttable modules using vertical integration technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macchiolo, A.; Andricek, L.; Moser, H.-G.; Nisius, R.; Richter, R. H.; Terzo, S.; Weigell, P.

    2014-11-01

    We present an R&D activity focused on the development of novel modules for the upgrade of the ATLAS pixel system at the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). The modules consist of n-in-p pixel sensors, 100 or 200 μm thick, produced at VTT (Finland) with an active edge technology, which considerably reduces the dead area at the periphery of the device. The sensors are interconnected with solder bump-bonding to the ATLAS FE-I3 and FE-I4 read-out chips, and characterised with radioactive sources and beam tests at the CERN-SPS and DESY. The results of these measurements will be discussed for devices before and after irradiation up to a fluence of 5 ×1015neq /cm2. We will also report on the R&D activity to obtain Inter Chip Vias (ICVs) on the ATLAS read-out chip in collaboration with the Fraunhofer Institute EMFT. This step is meant to prove the feasibility of the signal transport to the newly created readout pads on the backside of the chips allowing for four side buttable devices without the presently used cantilever for wire bonding. The read-out chips with ICVs will be interconnected to thin pixel sensors, 75 μm and 150 μm thick, with the Solid Liquid Interdiffusion (SLID) technology, which is an alternative to the standard solder bump-bonding.

  15. Thin active region, type II superlattice photodiode arrays: Single-pixel and focal plane array characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, J. W.; Svensson, S. P.; Beck, W. A.; Goldberg, A. C.; Kennerly, S. W.; Hongsmatip, T.; Winn, M.; Uppal, P.

    2007-02-01

    We have measured the radiometric properties of two midwave infrared photodiode arrays (320×256pixel2 format) fabricated from the same wafer comprising a thin (0.24μm), not intentionally doped InAs /GaSb superlattice between a p-doped GaSb layer and a n-doped InAs layer. One of the arrays was indium bump bonded to a silicon fanout chip to allow for the measurement of properties of individual pixels, and one was bonded to a readout integrated circuit to enable array-scale measurements and infrared imaging. The superlattice layer is thin enough that it is fully depleted at zero bias, and the collection efficiency of photogenerated carriers in the intrinsic region is close to unity. This simplifies the interpretation of photocurrent data as compared with previous measurements made on thick superlattices with complex doping profiles. Superlattice absorption coefficient curves, obtained from measurements of the external quantum efficiency using two different assumptions for optical coupling into the chip, bracket values calculated using an eight-band k •p model. Measurements of the quantum efficiency map of the focal plane array were in good agreement with the single-pixel measurements. Imagery obtained with this focal plane array demonstrates the high uniformity and crystal quality of the type II superlattice material.

  16. Chlorophyll concentration estimates for coastal water using pixel-based atmospheric correction of Landsat images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouba, Eric

    Ocean color analysis is more challenging for coastal regions than the global ocean due the effects of optical brightness, shallow and turbid water, higher phytoplankton growth rates, and the complex geometry of coastal bays and estuaries. Also, one of the key atmospheric correction assumptions (zero water leaving radiance in the near infrared) is not valid for these complex conditions. This makes it difficult to estimate the spectral radiance noise caused by atmospheric aerosols, which can vary rapidly with time and space. This study conducts pixel-based atmospheric correction of Landsat-7 ETM+ images over the Texas coast. Precise satellite orbit data, operational weather data, and climate data are combined to create interpolated arrays of viewing angles and atmospheric profiles. These arrays vary with time and location, allowing calculation of the Rayleigh and aerosol radiances separately for all pixels. The resulting normalized water-leaving radiances are then compared with in situ chlorophyll fluorescence measurements from five locations inside a set of Texas coastal bays: the Mission-Aransas National Estuarine Research Reserve. Curve-fitting analysis shows it is possible to estimate chlorophyll-a surface area concentrations by using ETM+ water-leaving radiance values and a third-order polynomial equation. Two pairs of ETM+ bands are identified as inputs (Bands 1 and 3, and the Log10 values of Bands 3 and 4), both achieving good performance (R2 of 0.69). Further research efforts are recommended to obtain additional data, identify better curve fitting equations, and potentially extend the radiative transfer model into the water column.

  17. Investigating the effect of pixel size of high spatial resolution FTIR imaging for detection of colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, G. R.; Nallala, J.; Stone, N.

    2016-03-01

    FTIR is a well-established technique and there is significant interest in applying this technique to medical diagnostics e.g. to detect cancer. The introduction of focal plane array (FPA) detectors means that FTIR is particularly suited to rapid imaging of biopsy sections as an adjunct to digital pathology. Until recently however each pixel in the image has been limited to a minimum of 5.5 µm which results in a comparatively low magnification image or histology applications and potentially the loss of important diagnostic information. The recent introduction of higher magnification optics gives image pixels that cover approx. 1.1 µm. This reduction in image pixel size gives images of higher magnification and improved spatial detail can be observed. However, the effect of increasing the magnification on spectral quality and the ability to discriminate between disease states is not well studied. In this work we test the discriminatory performance of FTIR imaging using both standard (5.5 µm) and high (1.1 µm) magnification for the detection of colorectal cancer and explore the effect of binning to degrade high resolution images to determine whether similar diagnostic information and performance can be obtained using both magnifications. Results indicate that diagnostic performance using high magnification may be reduced as compared to standard magnification when using existing multivariate approaches. Reduction of the high magnification data to standard magnification via binning can potentially recover some of the lost performance.

  18. Dual-gate photo thin-film transistor: a “smart” pixel for high- resolution and low-dose X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kai; Ou, Hai; Chen, Jun

    2015-06-01

    Since its emergence a decade ago, amorphous silicon flat panel X-ray detector has established itself as a ubiquitous platform for an array of digital radiography modalities. The fundamental building block of a flat panel detector is called a pixel. In all current pixel architectures, sensing, storage, and readout are unanimously kept separate, inevitably compromising resolution by increasing pixel size. To address this issue, we hereby propose a “smart” pixel architecture where the aforementioned three components are combined in a single dual-gate photo thin-film transistor (TFT). In other words, the dual-gate photo TFT itself functions as a sensor, a storage capacitor, and a switch concurrently. Additionally, by harnessing the amplification effect of such a thin-film transistor, we for the first time created a single-transistor active pixel sensor. The proof-of-concept device had a W/L ratio of 250μm/20μm and was fabricated using a simple five-mask photolithography process, where a 130nm transparent ITO was used as the top photo gate, and a 200nm amorphous silicon as the absorbing channel layer. The preliminary results demonstrated that the photocurrent had been increased by four orders of magnitude due to light-induced threshold voltage shift in the sub-threshold region. The device sensitivity could be simply tuned by photo gate bias to specifically target low-level light detection. The dependence of threshold voltage on light illumination indicated that a dynamic range of at least 80dB could be achieved. The "smart" pixel technology holds tremendous promise for developing high-resolution and low-dose X-ray imaging and may potentially lower the cancer risk imposed by radiation, especially among paediatric patients.

  19. A Medium-Format, Mixed-Mode Pixel Array Detector for Kilohertz X-ray Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, M. W.; Chamberlain, D.; Green, K. S.; Philipp, H. T.; Purohit, P.; Strohman, C.; Gruner, S. M.

    2013-03-01

    An x-ray pixel array detector (PAD) capable of framing up to 1 kHz is described. This hybrid detector is constructed from a 3-side buttable, 128×128 pixel module based upon the mixed-mode pixel array detector (MMPAD) chip developed jointly by Cornell and Area Detector Systems Corporation (Poway, CA). The chip uses a charge integrating front end for a high instantaneous count rate yet with single photon sensitivity. In-pixel circuitry utilizing a digital overflow counter extends the per frame dynamic range to >4×107 x-rays/pixel. Results are shown from a base configuration of a 2×3 module array (256×384 pixels).

  20. Development of Electron Tracking Compton Camera using micro pixel gas chamber for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabuki, Shigeto; Hattori, Kaori; Kohara, Ryota; Kunieda, Etsuo; Kubo, Atsushi; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Miuchi, Kentaro; Nakahara, Tadaki; Nagayoshi, Tsutomu; Nishimura, Hironobu; Okada, Yoko; Orito, Reiko; Sekiya, Hiroyuki; Shirahata, Takashi; Takada, Atsushi; Tanimori, Toru; Ueno, Kazuki

    2007-10-01

    We have developed the Electron Tracking Compton Camera (ETCC) with reconstructing the 3-D tracks of the scattered electron in Compton process for both sub-MeV and MeV gamma rays. By measuring both the directions and energies of not only the recoil gamma ray but also the scattered electron, the direction of the incident gamma ray is determined for each individual photon. Furthermore, a residual measured angle between the recoil electron and scattered gamma ray is quite powerful for the kinematical background rejection. For the 3-D tracking of the electrons, the Micro Time Projection Chamber (μ-TPC) was developed using a new type of the micro pattern gas detector. The ETCC consists of this μ-TPC (10×10×8 cm 3) and the 6×6×13 mm 3 GSO crystal pixel arrays with a flat panel photo-multiplier surrounding the μ-TPC for detecting recoil gamma rays. The ETCC provided the angular resolution of 6.6° (FWHM) at 364 keV of 131I. A mobile ETCC for medical imaging, which is fabricated in a 1 m cubic box, has been operated since October 2005. Here, we present the imaging results for the line sources and the phantom of human thyroid gland using 364 keV gamma rays of 131I.

  1. Solid-state image sensor with focal-plane digital photon-counting pixel array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A photosensitive layer such as a-Si for a UV/visible wavelength band is provided for low light level imaging with at least a separate CMOS amplifier directly connected to each PIN photodetector diode to provide a focal-plane array of NxN pixels, and preferably a separate photon-counting CMOS circuit directly connected to each CMOS amplifier, although one row of counters may be time shared for reading out the photon flux rate of each diode in the array, together with a buffer memory for storing all rows of the NxN image frame before transfer to suitable storage. All CMOS circuitry is preferably fabricated in the same silicon layer as the PIN photodetector diode for a monolithic structure, but when the wavelength band of interest requires photosensitive material different from silicon, the focal-plane array may be fabricated separately on a different semiconductor layer bump-bonded or otherwise bonded for a virtually monolithic structure with one free terminal of each diode directly connected to the input terminal of its CMOS amplifier and digital counter for integration of the photon flux rate at each photodetector of the array.

  2. Dual-mode optical microscope based on single-pixel imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, A. D.; Clemente, P.; Tajahuerce, E.; Lancis, J.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate an inverted microscope that can image specimens in both reflection and transmission modes simultaneously with a single light source. The microscope utilizes a digital micromirror device (DMD) for patterned illumination altogether with two single-pixel photosensors for efficient light detection. The system, a scan-less device with no moving parts, works by sequential projection of a set of binary intensity patterns onto the sample that are codified onto a modified commercial DMD. Data to be displayed are geometrically transformed before written into a memory cell to cancel optical artifacts coming from the diamond-like shaped structure of the micromirror array. The 24-bit color depth of the display is fully exploited to increase the frame rate by a factor of 24, which makes the technique practicable for real samples. Our commercial DMD-based LED-illumination is cost effective and can be easily coupled as an add-on module for already existing inverted microscopes. The reflection and transmission information provided by our dual microscope complement each other and can be useful for imaging non-uniform samples and to prevent self-shadowing effects.

  3. Image quality improvement in megavoltage cone beam CT using an imaging beam line and a sintered pixelated array system

    SciTech Connect

    Breitbach, Elizabeth K.; Maltz, Jonathan S.; Gangadharan, Bijumon; Bani-Hashemi, Ali; Anderson, Carryn M.; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Stiles, Jared; Edwards, Drake S.; Flynn, Ryan T.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To quantify the improvement in megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MVCBCT) image quality enabled by the combination of a 4.2 MV imaging beam line (IBL) with a carbon electron target and a detector system equipped with a novel sintered pixelated array (SPA) of translucent Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S ceramic scintillator. Clinical MVCBCT images are traditionally acquired with the same 6 MV treatment beam line (TBL) that is used for cancer treatment, a standard amorphous Si (a-Si) flat panel imager, and the Kodak Lanex Fast-B (LFB) scintillator. The IBL produces a greater fluence of keV-range photons than the TBL, to which the detector response is more optimal, and the SPA is a more efficient scintillator than the LFB. Methods: A prototype IBL + SPA system was installed on a Siemens Oncor linear accelerator equipped with the MVision{sup TM} image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) system. A SPA strip consisting of four neighboring tiles and measuring 40 cm by 10.96 cm in the crossplane and inplane directions, respectively, was installed in the flat panel imager. Head- and pelvis-sized phantom images were acquired at doses ranging from 3 to 60 cGy with three MVCBCT configurations: TBL + LFB, IBL + LFB, and IBL + SPA. Phantom image quality at each dose was quantified using the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and modulation transfer function (MTF) metrics. Head and neck, thoracic, and pelvic (prostate) cancer patients were imaged with the three imaging system configurations at multiple doses ranging from 3 to 15 cGy. The systems were assessed qualitatively from the patient image data. Results: For head and neck and pelvis-sized phantom images, imaging doses of 3 cGy or greater, and relative electron densities of 1.09 and 1.48, the CNR average improvement factors for imaging system change of TBL + LFB to IBL + LFB, IBL + LFB to IBL + SPA, and TBL + LFB to IBL + SPA were 1.63 (p < 10{sup -8}), 1.64 (p < 10{sup -13}), 2.66 (p < 10{sup -9}), respectively. For all imaging

  4. DEPFET Active Pixel Detectors for a Future Linear e(+}e({-)) Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, O.; Casanova, R.; Dieguez, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Hemperek, T.; Kishishita, T.; Kleinohl, T.; Koch, M.; Kruger, H.; Lemarenko, M.; Lutticke, F.; Marinas, C.; Schnell, M.; Wermes, N.; Campbell, A.; Ferber, T.; Kleinwort, C.; Niebuhr, C.; Soloviev, Y.; Steder, M.; Volkenborn, R.; Yaschenko, S.; Fischer, P.; Kreidl, C.; Peric, I.; Knopf, J.; Ritzert, M.; Curras, E.; Lopez-Virto, A.; Moya, D.; Vila, I.; Boronat, M.; Esperante, D.; Fuster, J.; Garcia, I. Garcia; Lacasta, C.; Oyanguren, A.; Ruiz, P.; Timon, G.; Vos, M.; Gessler, T.; Kuhn, W.; Lange, S.; Munchow, D.; Spruck, B.; Frey, A.; Geisler, C.; Schwenker, B.; Wilk, F.; Barvich, T.; Heck, M.; Heindl, S.; Lutz, O.; Muller, Th.; Pulvermacher, C.; Simonis, H. J.; Weiler, T.; Krausser, T.; Lipsky, O.; Rummel, S.; Schieck, J.; Schluter, T.; Ackermann, K.; Andricek, L.; Chekelian, V.; Chobanova, V.; Dalseno, J.; Kiesling, C.; Koffmane, C.; Gioi, L. Li; Moll, A.; Moser, H. G.; Muller, F.; Nedelkovska, E.; Ninkovic, J.; Petrovics, S.; Prothmann, K.; Richter, R.; Ritter, A.; Ritter, M.; Simon, F.; Vanhoefer, P.; Wassatsch, A.; Dolezal, Z.; Drasal, Z.; Kodys, P.; Kvasnicka, P.; Scheirich, J.

    2013-04-01

    The DEPFET collaboration develops highly granular, ultra-transparent active pixel detectors for high-performance vertex reconstruction at future collider experiments. The characterization of detector prototypes has proven that the key principle, the integration of a first amplification stage in a detector-grade sensor material, can provide a comfortable signal to noise ratio of over 40 for a sensor thickness of 50-75 $\\mathrm{\\mathbf{\\mu m}}$. ASICs have been designed and produced to operate a DEPFET pixel detector with the required read-out speed. A complete detector concept is being developed, including solutions for mechanical support, cooling and services. In this paper the status of DEPFET R & D project is reviewed in the light of the requirements of the vertex detector at a future linear $\\mathbf{e^+ e^-}$ collider.

  5. Characterization of Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel detectors implemented with a high-resistive CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishishita, T.; Hemperek, T.; Rymaszewski, P.; Hirono, T.; Krüger, H.; Wermes, N.

    2016-07-01

    We present the recent development of DMAPS (Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor), implemented with a Toshiba 130 nm CMOS process. Unlike in the case of standard MAPS technologies which are based on an epi-layer, this process provides a high-resistive substrate that enables larger signal and faster charge collection by drift in a 50 - 300 μm thick depleted layer. Since this process also enables the use of deep n-wells to isolate the collection electrodes from the thin active device layer, NMOS and PMOS transistors are available for the readout electronics in each pixel cell. In order to characterize the technology, we implemented a simple three transistor readout with a variety of pixel pitches and input FET sizes. This layout variety gives us a clue on sensor characteristics for future optimization, such as the input detector capacitance or leakage current. In the initial measurement, the radiation spectra were obtained from 55Fe with an energy resolution of 770 eV (FWHM) and 90Sr with the MVP of 4165 e-.

  6. PixelLearn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazzoni, Dominic; Wagstaff, Kiri; Bornstein, Benjamin; Tang, Nghia; Roden, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    PixelLearn is an integrated user-interface computer program for classifying pixels in scientific images. Heretofore, training a machine-learning algorithm to classify pixels in images has been tedious and difficult. PixelLearn provides a graphical user interface that makes it faster and more intuitive, leading to more interactive exploration of image data sets. PixelLearn also provides image-enhancement controls to make it easier to see subtle details in images. PixelLearn opens images or sets of images in a variety of common scientific file formats and enables the user to interact with several supervised or unsupervised machine-learning pixel-classifying algorithms while the user continues to browse through the images. The machinelearning algorithms in PixelLearn use advanced clustering and classification methods that enable accuracy much higher than is achievable by most other software previously available for this purpose. PixelLearn is written in portable C++ and runs natively on computers running Linux, Windows, or Mac OS X.

  7. Development of a simplified simulation model for performance characterization of a pixellated CdZnTe multimodality imaging system.

    PubMed

    Guerra, P; Santos, A; Darambara, D G

    2008-02-21

    Current requirements of molecular imaging lead to the complete integration of complementary modalities in a single hybrid imaging system to correlate function and structure. Among the various existing detector technologies, which can be implemented to integrate nuclear modalities (PET and/or single-photon emission computed tomography with x-rays (CT) and most probably with MR, pixellated wide bandgap room temperature semiconductor detectors, such as CdZnTe and/or CdTe, are promising candidates. This paper deals with the development of a simplified simulation model for pixellated semiconductor radiation detectors, as a first step towards the performance characterization of a multimodality imaging system based on CdZnTe. In particular, this work presents a simple computational model, based on a 1D approximate solution of the Schockley-Ramo theorem, and its integration into the Geant4 application for tomographic emission (GATE) platform in order to perform accurately and, therefore, improve the simulations of pixellated detectors in different configurations with a simultaneous cathode and anode pixel readout. The model presented here is successfully validated against an existing detailed finite element simulator, the multi-geometry simulation code, with respect to the charge induced at the anode, taking into consideration interpixel charge sharing and crosstalk, and to the detector charge induction efficiency. As a final point, the model provides estimated energy spectra and time resolution for (57)Co and (18)F sources obtained with the GATE code after the incorporation of the proposed model. PMID:18263961

  8. CMOS Active Pixel Sensors as energy-range detectors for proton Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, M.; Anaxagoras, T.; Evans, P. M.; Green, S.; Manolopoulos, S.; Nieto-Camero, J.; Parker, D. J.; Poludniowski, G.; Price, T.; Waltham, C.; Allinson, N. M.

    2015-06-01

    Since the first proof of concept in the early 70s, a number of technologies has been proposed to perform proton CT (pCT), as a means of mapping tissue stopping power for accurate treatment planning in proton therapy. Previous prototypes of energy-range detectors for pCT have been mainly based on the use of scintillator-based calorimeters, to measure proton residual energy after passing through the patient. However, such an approach is limited by the need for only a single proton passing through the energy-range detector in a read-out cycle. A novel approach to this problem could be the use of pixelated detectors, where the independent read-out of each pixel allows to measure simultaneously the residual energy of a number of protons in the same read-out cycle, facilitating a faster and more efficient pCT scan. This paper investigates the suitability of CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APSs) to track individual protons as they go through a number of CMOS layers, forming an energy-range telescope. Measurements performed at the iThemba Laboratories will be presented and analysed in terms of correlation, to confirm capability of proton tracking for CMOS APSs.

  9. Pitch dependence of the tolerance of CMOS monolithic active pixel sensors to non-ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doering, D.; Deveaux, M.; Domachowski, M.; Fröhlich, I.; Koziel, M.; Müntz, C.; Scharrer, P.; Stroth, J.

    2013-12-01

    CMOS monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) have demonstrated excellent performance as tracking detectors for charged particles. They provide an outstanding spatial resolution (a few μm), a detection efficiency of ≳ 99.9 %, very low material budget (0.05 %X0) and good radiation tolerance (≳ 1 Mrad, ≳1013neq /cm2) (Deveaux et al. [1]). This makes them an interesting technology for various applications in heavy ion and particle physics. Their tolerance to bulk damage was recently improved by using high-resistivity (∼ 1 kΩ cm) epitaxial layers as sensitive volume (Deveaux et al. [1], Dorokhov et al. [2]). The radiation tolerance of conventional MAPS is known to depend on the pixel pitch. This is as a higher pitch extends the distance, which signal electrons have to travel by thermal diffusion before being collected. Increased diffusion paths turn into a higher probability of loosing signal charge due to recombination. Provided that a similar effect exists in MAPS with high-resistivity epitaxial layer, it could be used to extend their radiation tolerance further. We addressed this question with MIMOSA-18AHR prototypes, which were provided by the IPHC Strasbourg and irradiated with reactor neutrons. We report about the results of this study and provide evidences that MAPS with 10 μm pixel pitch tolerate doses of ≳ 3 ×1014neq /cm2.

  10. SemiSPECT: A Small-animal Imaging System Based on Eight CdZnTe Pixel Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Todd E.; Kim, Hyunki; Crawford, Michael J.; Gershman, Benjamin M.; Hunter, William C.J.; Barber, H. Bradford; Furenlid, Lars R.; Wilson, Donald W.; Woolfenden, James M.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2015-01-01

    We have constructed a SPECT system for small animals that utilizes eight CdZnTe pixel detectors. The eight detectors are arranged in a single octagonal ring, where each views the object to be imaged through a single pinhole. Additional projections are obtained via rotation of the animal. Each CdZnTe detector is approximately 2 mm in thickness and is patterned on one surface into a 64×64 array of pixels with 380 micron pitch. We have designed an electronic readout system capable of collecting data from the eight detectors in listmode. In this scheme each event entry for a gamma-ray hit includes the pulse height of the pixel with the largest signal and the pulse height for each of its eight nearest neighbors. We present details of the overall design, the electronics, and system performance. PMID:26568674

  11. Performance and qualification of CdTe pixel detectors for the Spectrometer/Telescope for Imaging X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, O.; Bednarzik, M.; Birrer, G.; Arnold, N.; Commichau, V.; Hurford, G.; Krucker, S.; Limousin, O.; Meuris, A.

    2015-02-01

    The Spectrometer/Telescope for Imaging X-rays (STIX) is a remote sensing instrument on-board the ESA Solar Orbiter spacecraft. STIX is designated to the study of energetic phenomena in solar flares. A Fourier-imaging technique using tungsten grid collimators in front of CdTe pixel detectors is employed, covering the 4 to 150 keV energy range with a full-width-half maximum resolution around 1 keV at low energies. Acrorad CdTe detectors of 1 mm thickness with a planar aluminum Schottky contact are used as basis for a subsequent patterning process into eight large pixels, four small pixels, and a guard ring. The patterning is done by means of microfabrication technologies. The area of the patterned sensor is 10×10 mm2. Test equipment has been developed for selecting the detectors with best performance prior to integration with the read-out system, and for qualification purposes. The set-up allows pixel-based dark current measurements at low temperatures. Pixel dark currents below 60 pA are needed to avoid excess noise in the read-out ASIC. The best pixels show dark currents below 10 pA at 300 V bias and -20 °C. Spectroscopic measurements with 133Ba sources confirm the good performance. This paper briefly explains the mission context of the CdTe detectors and then gives details of the production and testing procedures. Typical results are shown, with emphasis on performance degradation studies from displacement damage by proton irradiation. This is expected to be the dominant degradation mechanism for this application.

  12. Digital performance improvements of a CdTe pixel detector for high flux energy-resolved X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbene, L.; Gerardi, G.; Principato, F.

    2015-03-01

    Photon counting detectors with energy resolving capabilities are desired for high flux X-ray imaging. In this work, we present the performance of a pixelated Schottky Al/p-CdTe/Pt detector (4×4) coupled to a custom-designed digital readout electronics for high flux measurements. The detector (4×4×2 mm3) has an anode layout based on an array of 16 pixels with a geometric pitch of 1 mm (pixel size of 0.6 mm). The 4-channel readout electronics is able to continuously digitize and process the signals from each pixel, performing multi-parameter analysis (event arrival time, pulse shape, pulse height, pulse time width, etc.) even at high fluxes and at different throughput and energy resolution conditions. The spectroscopic response of the system to monochromatic X-ray sources, at both low and high rates, is presented with particular attention to the mitigation of some typical spectral distortions (pile-up, baseline shifts and charge sharing). At a photon counting rate of 520 kcps/pixel, the system exhibits an energy resolution (FWHM at 59.5 keV) of 4.6%, 7.1% and 9% at throughputs of 0.9%, 16% and 82%, respectively. Measurements of Ag-target X-ray spectra also show the ability of the system to perform accurate estimation of the input counting rate up to 1.1 Mcps/pixel. The aim of this work is to point out, beside the appealing properties of CdTe detectors, the benefits of the digital approach in the development of high-performance energy resolved photon counting (ERPC) systems for high flux X-ray imaging.

  13. Pixel-based parametric source depth map for Cerenkov luminescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altabella, L.; Boschi, F.; Spinelli, A. E.

    2016-01-01

    Optical tomography represents a challenging problem in optical imaging because of the intrinsically ill-posed inverse problem due to photon diffusion. Cerenkov luminescence tomography (CLT) for optical photons produced in tissues by several radionuclides (i.e.: 32P, 18F, 90Y), has been investigated using both 3D multispectral approach and multiviews methods. Difficult in convergence of 3D algorithms can discourage to use this technique to have information of depth and intensity of source. For these reasons, we developed a faster 2D corrected approach based on multispectral acquisitions, to obtain source depth and its intensity using a pixel-based fitting of source intensity. Monte Carlo simulations and experimental data were used to develop and validate the method to obtain the parametric map of source depth. With this approach we obtain parametric source depth maps with a precision between 3% and 7% for MC simulation and 5-6% for experimental data. Using this method we are able to obtain reliable information about the source depth of Cerenkov luminescence with a simple and flexible procedure.

  14. Sub-pixel mapping of water boundaries using pixel swapping algorithm (case study: Tagliamento River, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niroumand-Jadidi, Milad; Vitti, Alfonso

    2015-10-01

    Taking the advantages of remotely sensed data for mapping and monitoring of water boundaries is of particular importance in many different management and conservation activities. Imagery data are classified using automatic techniques to produce maps entering the water bodies' analysis chain in several and different points. Very commonly, medium or coarse spatial resolution imagery is used in studies of large water bodies. Data of this kind is affected by the presence of mixed pixels leading to very outstanding problems, in particular when dealing with boundary pixels. A considerable amount of uncertainty inescapably occurs when conventional hard classifiers (e.g., maximum likelihood) are applied on mixed pixels. In this study, Linear Spectral Mixture Model (LSMM) is used to estimate the proportion of water in boundary pixels. Firstly by applying an unsupervised clustering, the water body is identified approximately and a buffer area considered ensuring the selection of entire boundary pixels. Then LSMM is applied on this buffer region to estimate the fractional maps. However, resultant output of LSMM does not provide a sub-pixel map corresponding to water abundances. To tackle with this problem, Pixel Swapping (PS) algorithm is used to allocate sub-pixels within mixed pixels in such a way to maximize the spatial proximity of sub-pixels and pixels in the neighborhood. The water area of two segments of Tagliamento River (Italy) are mapped in sub-pixel resolution (10m) using a 30m Landsat image. To evaluate the proficiency of the proposed approach for sub-pixel boundary mapping, the image is also classified using a conventional hard classifier. A high resolution image of the same area is also classified and used as a reference for accuracy assessment. According to the results, sub-pixel map shows in average about 8 percent higher overall accuracy than hard classification and fits very well in the boundaries with the reference map.

  15. Image pixel guided tours: a software platform for non-destructive x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, K. P.; Emery, R.

    2009-02-01

    Multivariate analysis seeks to describe the relationship between an arbitrary number of variables. To explore highdimensional data sets, projections are often used for data visualisation to aid discovering structure or patterns that lead to the formation of statistical hypothesis. The basic concept necessitates a systematic search for lower-dimensional representations of the data that might show interesting structure(s). Motivated by the recent research on the Image Grand Tour (IGT), which can be adapted to view guided projections by using objective indexes that are capable of revealing latent structures of the data, this paper presents a signal processing perspective on constructing such indexes under the unifying exploratory frameworks of Independent Component Analysis (ICA) and Projection Pursuit (PP). Our investigation begins with an overview of dimension reduction techniques by means of orthogonal transforms, including the classical procedure of Principal Component Analysis (PCA), and extends to an application of the more powerful techniques of ICA in the context of our recent work on non-destructive testing technology by element specific x-ray imaging.

  16. 128 x 128 pixel uncooled bolometric FPA for IR detection and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerominek, Hubert; Pope, Timothy D.; Alain, Christine; Zhang, Rose; Lehoux, Mario; Picard, Francis; Fuchs, R. Wayne; Grenier, Carol; Rouleau, Yves; Cayer, Felix; Savard, Simon; Bilodeau, Ghislain; Couillard, Jean-Francois; Larouche, Carl; Ngo, Linh P.

    1998-10-01

    An uncooled IR camera making use of a 128 X 128 pixel bolometric FPA is presented. The reconfigurable bolometric focal plane array consist of 50 micrometer X 50 micrometer pixels and simple on-chip CMOS readout electronics which can be operated in random access, independent row and column clocking, and self-scanning modes. Depending on the selected pixel format and frame rate, the FPA's NETD varies from 0.52 degrees Celsius down to 0.10 degrees Celsius. The modular IR camera is software configured and provides RS170A analog video and 12-bit TTL format digital outputs.

  17. Towards using a Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor for in vivo beam monitoring of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, R. F.; Abbott, N. L.; Davies, J.; Dyke, E. L.; Randles, H. J.; Velthuis, J. J.; Fletcher, S.; Gregory, S. D.; Hall, C.; John, A.; Lawrence, H.; Stevens, P. H.; Hugtenburg, R. P.; Tunbridge, V.

    2013-12-01

    The use of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) for cancer treatments is entering wider use. These treatments involve using a complex configuration of field modifying components, known as Multileaf Collimators (MLC), to dynamically shape the beam. A treatment consists of a sequence of irregular shaped fields, which means real time monitoring and verification is essential. In the current framework the treatment plans are verified before the patient is treated, but not during. The aim of our collaboration is to monitor the treatment being given to the patient. This is achieved by placing a camera system using an ultra-thin Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) upstream of the patient.

  18. Reconstruction of color biomedical images by means of quaternion generic Jacobi-Fourier moments in the framework of polar pixels.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Bello, César; Padilla-Vivanco, Alfonso; Toxqui-Quitl, Carina; Báez-Rojas, José Javier

    2016-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the quaternion generic Jacobi-Fourier moments (QGJFMs) for color image description is presented. In order to reach numerical stability, a recursive approach is used during the computation of the generic Jacobi radial polynomials. Moreover, a search criterion is performed to establish the best values for the parameters [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] of the radial Jacobi polynomial families. Additionally, a polar pixel approach is taken into account to increase the numerical accuracy in the calculation of the QGJFMs. To prove the mathematical theory, some color images from optical microscopy and human retina are used. Experiments and results about color image reconstruction are presented. PMID:27014716

  19. SOI monolithic pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, T.; Ahmed, M. I.; Arai, Y.; Fujita, Y.; Ikemoto, Y.; Takeda, A.; Tauchi, K.

    2014-05-01

    We are developing monolithic pixel detector using fully-depleted (FD) silicon-on-insulator (SOI) pixel process technology. The SOI substrate is high resistivity silicon with p-n junctions and another layer is a low resistivity silicon for SOI-CMOS circuitry. Tungsten vias are used for the connection between two silicons. Since flip-chip bump bonding process is not used, high sensor gain in a small pixel area can be obtained. In 2010 and 2011, high-resolution integration-type SOI pixel sensors, DIPIX and INTPIX5, have been developed. The characterizations by evaluating pixel-to-pixel crosstalk, quantum efficiency (QE), dark noise, and energy resolution were done. A phase-contrast imaging was demonstrated using the INTPIX5 pixel sensor for an X-ray application. The current issues and future prospect are also discussed.

  20. TFT-Based Active Pixel Sensors for Large Area Thermal Neutron Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunnen, George

    Due to diminishing availability of 3He, which is the critical component of neutron detecting proportional counters, large area flexible arrays are being considered as a potential replacement for neutron detection. A large area flexible array, utilizing semiconductors for both charged particle detection and pixel readout, ensures a large detection surface area in a light weight rugged form. Such a neutron detector could be suitable for deployment at ports of entry. The specific approach used in this research, uses a neutron converter layer which captures incident thermal neutrons, and then emits ionizing charged particles. These ionizing particles cause electron-hole pair generation within a single pixel's integrated sensing diode. The resulting charge is then amplified via a low-noise amplifier. This document begins by discussing the current state of the art in neutron detection and the associated challenges. Then, for the purpose of resolving some of these issues, recent design and modeling efforts towards developing an improved neutron detection system are described. Also presented is a low-noise active pixel sensor (APS) design capable of being implemented in low temperature indium gallium zinc oxide (InGaZnO) or amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film transistor process compatible with plastic substrates. The low gain and limited scalability of this design are improved upon by implementing a new multi-stage self-resetting APS. For each APS design, successful radiation measurements are also presented using PiN diodes for charged particle detection. Next, detection array readout methodologies are modeled and analyzed, and use of a matched filter readout circuit is described as well. Finally, this document discusses detection diode integration with the designed TFT-based APSs.

  1. Improved Design of Active Pixel CMOS Sensors for Charged Particle Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Deptuch, Grzegorz

    2007-11-12

    The Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear physics program requires developments in detector instrumentation electronics with improved energy, position and timing resolution, sensitivity, rate capability, stability, dynamic range, and background suppression. The current Phase-I project was focused on analysis of standard-CMOS photogate Active Pixel Sensors (APS) as an efficient solution to this challenge. The advantages of the CMOS APS over traditional hybrid approaches (i.e., separate detection regions bump-bonded to readout circuits) include greatly reduced cost, low power and the potential for vastly larger pixel counts and densities. However, challenges remain in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and readout speed (currently on the order of milliseconds), which is the major problem for this technology. Recent work has shown that the long readout time for photogate APS is due to the presence of (interface) traps at the semiconductor-oxide interface. This Phase-I work yielded useful results in two areas: (a) Advanced three-dimensional (3D) physics-based simulation models and simulation-based analysis of the impact of interface trap density on the transient charge collection characteristics of existing APS structures; and (b) Preliminary analysis of the feasibility of an improved photogate pixel structure (i.e., new APS design) with an induced electric field under the charge collecting electrode to enhance charge collection. Significant effort was dedicated in Phase-I to the critical task of implementing accurate interface trap models in CFDRC's NanoTCAD 3D semiconductor device-physics simulator. This resulted in validation of the new NanoTCAD models and simulation results against experimental (published) data, within the margin of uncertainty associated with obtaining device geometry, material properties, and experimentation details. Analyses of the new, proposed photogate APS design demonstrated several promising trends.

  2. A novel position and time sensing active pixel sensor with field-assisted electron collection for charged particle tracking and electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Geronimo, G.; Deptuch, G.; Dragone, A.; Radeka, V.; Rehak, P.; Castoldi, A.; Fazzi, A.; Gatti, E.; Guazzoni, C.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Dulinski, W.; Besson, A.; Deveaux, M.; Winter, M.

    2006-11-01

    A new type of active pixel sensors (APSs) to track charged particles for particle physics experiments or to count number of electrons that cross any pixel at the focal plane of electron microscopes is described. The electric field of desirable shape is created inside the active volume of the pixel introducing the drift component in the movement of the signal electrons towards charge collecting electrodes. The electric field results from the flow of ˜100 mA/cm 2 hole currents within individual pixels of the sensor. The proposed sensor is produced using a standard industrially available complementary metal oxide silicon (CMOS) process. There are two main advantages of the proposed detectors when compared to the present (February 2005) state-of-the-art, i.e. field-free APS sensors. The first advantage of a field-assisted transport mechanism is the reduction of the charge collection time and of the sharing of the signal electrons between adjacent pixels by diffusion. The second advantage is the freedom to use both kinds of MOS transistors within each pixel of the sensor. Thus, the full functional power of CMOS circuits can be embedded in situ. As an example, 16-bit scalers will be implemented in each pixel of the sensor for electron microscopy. The reduced collection time combined with the state-of-the-art electronics within each pixel provides the most complete information about the position and the timing of incident charged particles for particle physics experiments. Position resolution of new sensors was computationally simulated to be a few microns, that is, the same as the resolution of standard APSs. Moreover, the active depth of the sensor and the associate electronics is less than about 20 μm and a thinned down sensor together with its beryllium backing can have a total thickness of less than 0.1% of one radiation length. The reduction of the thickness of the detector reduces the amount of multiple scattering within the detector. The determination of the

  3. Experimental study of a single-pixel prototype anti-scatter detector for megavoltage x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Pang, G.

    2016-02-01

    Scattered x rays are detrimental to the image quality of x-ray transmission radiography. Anti-scatter grids have been used in diagnostic x-ray imaging to improve the image quality but are not practical to use for megavoltage (MV) x-ray imaging in radiotherapy since a MV grid would be very bulky, heavy, and costly. An inherent anti-scatter detector based on Čerenkov radiation was introduced recently for MV x-ray imaging. The purpose of this work is to investigate experimentally the anti-scatter property of a single pixel prototype detector. The scatter to primary ratio (SPR) has been measured using a linear accelerator with a 6 MV x-ray beam. It has been found that the SPR for the prototype detector is 30-60% less than that of an ionization chamber, depending on the imaging geometry. This indicates the prototype detector is less sensitive to scattered radiation.

  4. Efficient phase contrast imaging in STEM using a pixelated detector. Part 1: Experimental demonstration at atomic resolution

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pennycook, Timothy J.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Yang, Hao; Murfitt, Matthew F.; Jones, Lewys; Nellist, Peter D.

    2014-10-15

    In this paper, we demonstrate a method to achieve high efficiency phase contrast imaging in aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with a pixelated detector. The pixelated detector is used to record the Ronchigram as a function of probe position which is then analyzed with ptychography. Ptychography has previously been used to provide super-resolution beyond the diffraction limit of the optics, alongside numerically correcting for spherical aberration. Here we rely on a hardware aberration corrector to eliminate aberrations, but use the pixelated detector data set to utilize the largest possible volume of Fourier space to create high efficiency phasemore » contrast images. The use of ptychography to diagnose the effects of chromatic aberration is also demonstrated. In conclusion, the four dimensional dataset is used to compare different bright field detector configurations from the same scan for a sample of bilayer graphene. Our method of high efficiency ptychography produces the clearest images, while annular bright field produces almost no contrast for an in-focus aberration-corrected probe.« less

  5. Efficient phase contrast imaging in STEM using a pixelated detector. Part 1: Experimental demonstration at atomic resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, Timothy J.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Yang, Hao; Murfitt, Matthew F.; Jones, Lewys; Nellist, Peter D.

    2014-10-15

    In this paper, we demonstrate a method to achieve high efficiency phase contrast imaging in aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with a pixelated detector. The pixelated detector is used to record the Ronchigram as a function of probe position which is then analyzed with ptychography. Ptychography has previously been used to provide super-resolution beyond the diffraction limit of the optics, alongside numerically correcting for spherical aberration. Here we rely on a hardware aberration corrector to eliminate aberrations, but use the pixelated detector data set to utilize the largest possible volume of Fourier space to create high efficiency phase contrast images. The use of ptychography to diagnose the effects of chromatic aberration is also demonstrated. In conclusion, the four dimensional dataset is used to compare different bright field detector configurations from the same scan for a sample of bilayer graphene. Our method of high efficiency ptychography produces the clearest images, while annular bright field produces almost no contrast for an in-focus aberration-corrected probe.

  6. A 65k pixel, 150k frames-per-second camera with global gating and micro-lenses suitable for fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burri, Samuel; Powolny, François; Bruschini, Claudio E.; Michalet, Xavier; Regazzoni, Francesco; Charbon, Edoardo

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents our work on a 65k pixel single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) based imaging sensor realized in a 0.35μm standard CMOS process. At a resolution of 512 by 128 pixels the sensor is read out in 6.4μs to deliver over 150k monochrome frames per second. The individual pixel has a size of 24μm2 and contains the SPAD with a 12T quenching and gating circuitry along with a memory element. The gating signals are distributed across the chip through a balanced tree to minimize the signal skew between the pixels. The array of pixels is row-addressable and data is sent out of the chip on 128 lines in parallel at a frequency of 80MHz. The system is controlled by an FPGA which generates the gating and readout signals and can be used for arbitrary real-time computation on the frames from the sensor. The communication protocol between the camera and a conventional PC is USB2. The active area of the chip is 5% and can be significantly improved with the application of a micro-lens array. A micro-lens array, for use with collimated light, has been designed and its performance is reviewed in the paper. Among other high-speed phenomena the gating circuitry capable of generating illumination periods shorter than 5ns can be used for Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (FLIM). In order to measure the lifetime of fluorophores excited by a picosecond laser, the sensor's illumination period is synchronized with the excitation laser pulses. A histogram of the photon arrival times relative to the excitation is then constructed by counting the photons arriving during the sensitive time for several positions of the illumination window. The histogram for each pixel is transferred afterwards to a computer where software routines extract the lifetime at each location with an accuracy better than 100ps. We show results for fluorescence lifetime measurements using different fluorophores with lifetimes ranging from 150ps to 5ns.

  7. Direct tests of a pixelated microchannel plate as the active element of a shower maximum detector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Apresyan, A.; Los, S.; Pena, C.; Presutti, F.; Ronzhin, A.; Spiropulu, M.; Xie, S.

    2016-05-07

    One possibility to make a fast and radiation resistant shower maximum detector is to use a secondary emitter as an active element. We report our studies of microchannel plate photomultipliers (MCPs) as the active element of a shower-maximum detector. We present test beam results obtained using Photonis XP85011 to detect secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. We focus on the use of the multiple pixels on the Photonis MCP in order to find a transverse two-dimensional shower distribution. A spatial resolution of 0.8 mm was obtained with an 8 GeV electron beam. As a result, a method for measuring themore » arrival time resolution for electromagnetic showers is presented, and we show that time resolution better than 40 ps can be achieved.« less

  8. Direct tests of a pixelated microchannel plate as the active element of a shower maximum detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apresyan, A.; Los, S.; Pena, C.; Presutti, F.; Ronzhin, A.; Spiropulu, M.; Xie, S.

    2016-08-01

    One possibility to make a fast and radiation resistant shower maximum detector is to use a secondary emitter as an active element. We report our studies of microchannel plate photomultipliers (MCPs) as the active element of a shower-maximum detector. We present test beam results obtained using Photonis XP85011 to detect secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. We focus on the use of the multiple pixels on the Photonis MCP in order to find a transverse two-dimensional shower distribution. A spatial resolution of 0.8 mm was obtained with an 8 GeV electron beam. A method for measuring the arrival time resolution for electromagnetic showers is presented, and we show that time resolution better than 40 ps can be achieved.

  9. Charge collection properties of a depleted monolithic active pixel sensor using a HV-SOI process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Perez, S.; Backhaus, M.; Fernandez-Garcia, M.; Gallrapp, C.; Hemperek, T.; Kishishita, T.; Krueger, H.; Moll, M.; Padilla, C.; Pernegger, H.

    2016-01-01

    New pixel detector concepts, based on commercial high voltage and/or high resistivity CMOS processes, are being investigated as a possible candidate to the inner and outer layers of the ATLAS Inner Tracker in the HL-LHC upgrade. A depleted monolithic active pixel sensor on thick film SOI technology is being extensively investigated for that purpose. This particular technology provides a double well structure, which shields the thin gate oxide transistors from the Buried Oxide (BOX). In addition, the distance between transistors and BOX is one order of magnitude bigger than conventional SOI technologies, making the technology promising against its main limitations, as radiation hardness or back gate effects. Its radiation hardness to Total Ionizing Dose (TID) and the absence of back gate effect up to 700 Mrad has been measured and published [1]. The process allows the use of high voltages (up to 300V) which are used to partially deplete the substrate. The process allows fabrication in higher resistivity, therefore a fully depleted substrate could be achieved after thinning. This article shows the results on charge collection properties of the silicon bulk below the BOX by different techniques, in a laboratory with radioactive sources and by edge Transient Current Technique, for unirradiated and irradiated samples.

  10. Design of ADC in 25 μm pixels pitch dedicated for IRFPA image processing at LETI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchagaspanian, M.; Villard, P.; Dupont, B.; Chammings, G.; Martin, J. L.; Pistre, C.; Lattard, D.; Chantre, C.; Arnaud, A.; Yon, J. J.; Simoens, F.; Tissot, J. L.

    2007-04-01

    LETI has been involved in IRFPA development since 1978, the design department (LETI/DCIS) has focused its work on new ROIC architecture since many years. The trend is to integrate advanced functions into the CMOS design in the aim of making cost efficient sensors. The purpose of this paper is to present the latest developments of an Analog to Digital Converter embedded in a 25μm pixel. The design is driven by several goals. It targets both long integration time and snapshot exposure, 100% of image frame time being available for integration. All pixels are integrating the IR signal at the same time. The IR signal is converted into digital by using a charge packet counter. High density 130nm CMOS allows to use many digital functions such as counting, memory and addressing. This new structure has been applied to 25μm pitch bolometer sensors with a dedicated 320 x 240 IRCMOS circuit. Due to smart image processing in the CMOS, the bolometer architecture requirements may become very simple and low cost. The room temperature sensitivity and the DC offset are solved directly in the pixel. This FPA targets low NETD (<50mK), a variation of 80 Kelvin for the FPA temperature, 14 bits output at 50/60Hz video rate.

  11. Efficiency enhancement in a backside illuminated 1.12 μm pixel CMOS image sensor via parabolic color filters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Kwon; Kim, Ahreum; Kang, Dong-Wan; Lee, Byung Yang

    2016-07-11

    The shrinkage of pixel size down to sub-2 μm in high-resolution CMOS image sensors (CISs) results in degraded efficiency and increased crosstalk. The backside illumination technology can increase the efficiency, but the crosstalk still remains an critical issue to improve the image quality of the CIS devices. In this paper, by adopting a parabolic color filter (P-CF), we demonstrate efficiency enhancement without any noticeable change in optical crosstalk of a backside illuminated 1.12 μm pixel CIS with deep-trench-isolation structure. To identify the observed results, we have investigated the effect of radius of curvature (r) of the P-CF on the efficiency and optical crosstalk of the CIS by performing an electromagnetic analysis. As the r of P-CF becomes equal to (or half) that of the microlens, the efficiencies of the B-, G-, and R-pixels increase by a factor of 14.1% (20.3%), 9.8% (15.3%), and 15.0% (15.7%) with respect to the flat CF cases without any noticeable crosstalk change. Also, as the incident angle increases up to 30°, the angular dependence of the efficiency and crosstalk significantly decreases by utilizing the P-CF in the CIS. Meanwhile, further reduction of r severely increases the optical crosstalk due to the increased diffraction effect, which has been confirmed with the simulated electric-field intensity distribution inside the devices. PMID:27410872

  12. Hard-X and gamma-ray imaging detector for astrophysics based on pixelated CdTe semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gálvez, J.-L.; Hernanz, M.; Álvarez, L.; Artigues, B.; Ullán, M.; Lozano, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Cabruja, E.; Martínez, R.; Chmeissani, M.; Puigdengoles, C.

    2016-01-01

    Stellar explosions are astrophysical phenomena of great importance and interest. Instruments with high sensitivities are essential to perform detailed studies of cosmic explosions and cosmic accelerators. In order to achieve the needed performance, a hard-X and gamma-ray imaging detector with mm spatial resolution and large enough efficiency is required. We present a detector module which consists of a single CdTe crystal of 12.5 × 12.5mm 2 and 2mm thick with a planar cathode and with the anode segmented in an 11x11 pixel array with a pixel pitch of 1 mm attached to the readout chip. Two possible detector module configurations are considered: the so-called Planar Transverse Field (PTF) and the Parallel Planar Field (PPF). The combination of several modules in PTF or PPF configuration will achieve the desired performance of the imaging detector. The sum energy resolution of all pixels of the CdTe module measured at 122 keV and 356 keV is 3.8% and 2% respectively, in the following operating conditions: PPF irradiation, bias voltage -500 V and temperature -10̂ C.

  13. K-edge imaging with the XPAD3 hybrid pixel detector, direct comparison of CdTe and Si sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassol, F.; Portal, L.; Graber-Bolis, J.; Perez-Ponce, H.; Dupont, M.; Kronland, C.; Boursier, Y.; Blanc, N.; Bompard, F.; Boudet, N.; Buton, C.; Clémens, J. C.; Dawiec, A.; Debarbieux, F.; Delpierre, P.; Hustache, S.; Vigeolas, E.; Morel, C.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the improvement from the use of high-Z CdTe sensors for pre-clinical K-edge imaging with the hybrid pixel detectors XPAD3. We compare XPAD3 chips bump bonded to Si or CdTe sensors in identical experimental conditions. Image performance for narrow energy bin acquisitions and contrast-to-noise ratios of K-edge images are presented and compared. CdTe sensors achieve signal-to-noise ratios at least three times higher than Si sensors within narrow energy bins, thanks to their much higher detection efficiency. Nevertheless Si sensors provide better contrast-to-noise ratios in K-edge imaging when working at equivalent counting statistics, due to their better estimation of the attenuation coefficient of the contrast agent. Results are compared to simulated data in the case of the XPAD3/Si detector. Good agreement is observed when including charge sharing between pixels, which have a strong impact on contrast-to-noise ratios in K-edge images.

  14. K-edge imaging with the XPAD3 hybrid pixel detector, direct comparison of CdTe and Si sensors.

    PubMed

    Cassol, F; Portal, L; Graber-Bolis, J; Perez-Ponce, H; Dupont, M; Kronland, C; Boursier, Y; Blanc, N; Bompard, F; Boudet, N; Buton, C; Clémens, J C; Dawiec, A; Debarbieux, F; Delpierre, P; Hustache, S; Vigeolas, E; Morel, C

    2015-07-21

    We investigate the improvement from the use of high-Z CdTe sensors for pre-clinical K-edge imaging with the hybrid pixel detectors XPAD3. We compare XPAD3 chips bump bonded to Si or CdTe sensors in identical experimental conditions. Image performance for narrow energy bin acquisitions and contrast-to-noise ratios of K-edge images are presented and compared. CdTe sensors achieve signal-to-noise ratios at least three times higher than Si sensors within narrow energy bins, thanks to their much higher detection efficiency. Nevertheless Si sensors provide better contrast-to-noise ratios in K-edge imaging when working at equivalent counting statistics, due to their better estimation of the attenuation coefficient of the contrast agent. Results are compared to simulated data in the case of the XPAD3/Si detector. Good agreement is observed when including charge sharing between pixels, which have a strong impact on contrast-to-noise ratios in K-edge images. PMID:26133567

  15. Comparison between object- and pixel-level approaches for change detection in multispectral images by using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemmour, Hassiba; Chibani, Youcef

    2004-02-01

    We propose in this paper the investigation of the change detection approaches based on the pixel level and the object level. The pixel level approach is based on the simultaneous analysis of multitemporal data, while the object level approach uses a comparative analysis of independently produced classifications of data. Thereby, the comparison is established by using the multilayer neural network classifier. Usually, the backpropagation algorithm is used as a training rule. In this paper, we investigate the use of the Kalman filtering (KF) as the training algorithm for detecting changes in remotely sensed imagery. By using SPOT images and evaluation criteria, the detailed comparison indicates that the KF algorithm is preferable compared to the BP algorithm in terms of convergence rate, stability and change detection accuracy.

  16. Early breast tumor and late SARS detections using space-variant multispectral infrared imaging at a single pixel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szu, Harold H.; Buss, James R.; Kopriva, Ivica

    2004-04-01

    We proposed the physics approach to solve a physical inverse problem, namely to choose the unique equilibrium solution (at the minimum free energy: H= E - ToS, including the Wiener, l.m.s E, and ICA, Max S, as special cases). The "unsupervised classification" presumes that required information must be learned and derived directly and solely from the data alone, in consistence with the classical Duda-Hart ATR definition of the "unlabelled data". Such truly unsupervised methodology is presented for space-variant imaging processing for a single pixel in the real world case of remote sensing, early tumor detections and SARS. The indeterminacy of the multiple solutions of the inverse problem is regulated or selected by means of the absolute minimum of isothermal free energy as the ground truth of local equilibrium condition at the single-pixel foot print.

  17. Radarclinometry: Bootstrapping the radar reflectance function from the image pixel-signal frequency distribution and an altimetry profile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wildey, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    A method is derived for determining the dependence of radar backscatter on incidence angle that is applicable to the region corresponding to a particular radar image. The method is based on enforcing mathematical consistency between the frequency distribution of the image's pixel signals (histogram of DN values with suitable normalizations) and a one-dimensional frequency distribution of slope component, as might be obtained from a radar or laser altimetry profile in or near the area imaged. In order to achieve a unique solution, the auxiliary assumption is made that the two-dimensional frequency distribution of slope is isotropic. The backscatter is not derived in absolute units. The method is developed in such a way as to separate the reflectance function from the pixel-signal transfer characteristic. However, these two sources of variation are distinguishable only on the basis of a weak dependence on the azimuthal component of slope; therefore such an approach can be expected to be ill-conditioned unless the revision of the transfer characteristic is limited to the determination of an additive instrumental background level. The altimetry profile does not have to be registered in the image, and the statistical nature of the approach minimizes pixel noise effects and the effects of a disparity between the resolutions of the image and the altimetry profile, except in the wings of the distribution where low-number statistics preclude accuracy anyway. The problem of dealing with unknown slope components perpendicular to the profiling traverse, which besets the one-to-one comparison between individual slope components and pixel-signal values, disappears in the present approach. In order to test the resulting algorithm, an artificial radar image was generated from the digitized topographic map of the Lake Champlain West quadrangle in the Adirondack Mountains, U.S.A., using an arbitrarily selected reflectance function. From the same map, a one-dimensional frequency

  18. Radarclinometry - Bootstrapping the radar reflectance function from the image pixel-signal frequency distribution and an altimetry profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wildey, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    A method for determining the dependence of radar backscatter on incidence angle that is applicable to the region corresponding to a particular radar image is derived. The method is based on enforcing mathematical consistency between the frequency distribution of the images' pixel signals and a one-dimensional frequency distribution of slope component, which is obtained from a radar or laser altimetry profile in or near the imaged area. To test the resulting algorithm, an arbitrarily selected reflectance function is used to generate an artificial radar image from a digitized topographic map of the Lake Champlain West quadrangle in the Adirondack Mountains, U.S. It is found that, for 99 percent of the data, the maximum error is 1 degree.

  19. A pulse-frequency-modulation vision chip using a capacitive feedback reset with an in-pixel 1-bit image processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagawa, Keiichiro; Yamamoto, Shinya; Furumiya, Tetsuo; Tokuda, Takashi; Nunoshita, Masahiro; Ohta, Jun

    2006-02-01

    We report a low-voltage digital vision chip based on a pulse-frequency-modulation (PFM) photosensor using capacitive feedback reset and pulse-domain digital image processing to explore its feasibility of low power consumption and high dynamic range even at a low power-supply voltage. An example of the applications of the vision chip is retinal prosthesis, in which supplied power is limited. The pixel is composed of a PFM photosensor with a dynamic pulse memory, pulse gates, and a 1-bit digital image processor. The binary value stored at the dynamic pulse memory is read to the 1-bit digital image processor. The image processor executes spatial filtering by mutual operations between the pulses from the pixel and those from the four neighboring pixels. The weights in image processing are controlled by pulse gates. We fabricated a test chip in a standard 0.35-μm CMOS technology. Pixel size and pixel counts were 100 μm sq. and 32 x 32, respectively. In the experiments, four neighboring pixels were considered in image processing. The test chip successfully operated at low power supply voltage around 1.25 V. The frame rate was 26 kfps. Low-pass filtering, edge enhancement, and edge detection have been demonstrated. Relationships between power supply voltages and characteristics of the vision chip are investigated.

  20. Development of a soft-X ray detector for energy resolved 2D imaging by means of a Gas Pixel Detector with highly integrated microelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Pacella, D.; Pizzicaroli, G.; Romano, A.; Gabellieri, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Brez, A.

    2008-03-12

    Soft-X ray 2-D imaging on ITER is not considered yet. We propose a new approach, based on a gas detector with a gas electron multiplier (GEM) as amplifying structure and with a two-dimensional readout fully integrated with the front end electronics, through an ASIC developed on purpose. The concept has been already tested by means of a prototype, with 128 pixels, carried out in Frascati in collaboration with INFN-Pisa and tested on FTU in 2001 and NSTX in 2002-2004. Thanks to the photon counting mode, it provides 2-D imaging with high time resolution (sub millisecond), high sensitivity and signal to noise ratio. Its capability of energy discrimination allows the acquisition of pictures in X-ray energy bands or to perform a spectral scan in the full energy interval. We propose the realisation of such kind a detector with a readout microchip (ASIC) equipped with 105600 hexagonal pixels arranged at 70 {mu}m pitch in a 300x352 honeycomb matrix, corresponding to an active area of 2.1x2.1 cm{sup 2}, with a pixel density of 240 pixels/ mm{sup 2}. Each pixel is connected to a charge sensitive amplifier followed by a discriminator of pulse amplitude and counter. The chip integrates more than 16.5 million transistors and it is subdivided in 64 identical clusters, to be read independently each other. An important part of the work will be also the design of the whole detector to fulfil all the constraints and requirements as plasma diagnostic in a tokamak machine. Since the detector has high and controllable intrinsic gain, it works well even at very low photon energy, ranging from 0.2 keV to 10 keV (X-VUV region). This range appears therefore particularly suitable for ITER to monitor the outer part of the plasma. In particular pedestal physics, edge modes, localization and effects of additional heating, boundary plasma control etc. The capability of this proposed detector to work in this energy range is further valuable because solid state detectors are not favorite at low

  1. Comparison of schemes for active sub-millimeter wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furxhi, Orges; Jacobs, Eddie L.

    2011-11-01

    Various schemes for active imaging require different allocations of source power and can result in different overall signal to noise ratios. At the University of Memphis we have developed an image-plane scanning device used with a single pixel detector to form video rate images of the scene. Imaging with this device requires flood illumination of the scene. Because sub-millimeter wave sources typically produce low power, it is a common belief that flood illumination results in low detected signal power and therefore low signal to noise ratios (SNR) at the detector. In this work we quantify the SNR at the detector for our system and compare it to conventional imaging systems, conjugate point imaging systems, and focal plane array imaging. Unlike the other two systems, imaging with our device requires an additional pixel formation step; therefore, the SNR at the detector is not the per-pixel SNR. We present the limits of the per-pixel SNR and discuss its dependence on various device components.

  2. First measurement of the in-pixel electron multiplying with a standard imaging CMOS technology: Study of the EMCMOS concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugière, Timothée; Mayer, Fréderic; Fereyre, Pierre; Guérin, Cyrille; Dominjon, Agnés; Barbier, Rémi

    2015-07-01

    Scientific low light imaging devices benefit today from designs for pushing the mean noise to the single electron level. When readout noise reduction reaches its limit, signal-to-noise ratio improvement can be driven by an electron multiplication process, driven by impact ionization, before adding the readout noises. This concept already implemented in CCD structures using extra-pixel shift registers can today be integrated inside each pixel in CMOS technology. The EBCMOS group at IPNL is in charge of the characterization of new prototypes developed by E2V using this concept: the electron multiplying CMOS (EMCMOS). The CMOS technology enables electron multiplication inside the photodiode itself, and thus, an overlap of the charge integration and multiplication. A new modeling has been developed to describe the output signal mean and variance after the impact ionization process in such a case. In this paper the feasibility of impact ionization process inside a 8 μm-pitch pixel is demonstrated. The new modeling is also validated by data and a value of 0.32% is obtained for the impact ionization parameter α with an electric field intensity of 24 V / μm.

  3. An Efficient Approach for Pixel Decomposition to Increase the Spatial Resolution of Land Surface Temperature Images from MODIS Thermal Infrared Band Data

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Qin, Zhihao; Li, Wenjuan; Song, Caiying; Karnieli, Arnon; Zhao, Shuhe

    2015-01-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) images retrieved from the thermal infrared (TIR) band data of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) have much lower spatial resolution than the MODIS visible and near-infrared (VNIR) band data. The coarse pixel scale of MODIS LST images (1000 m under nadir) have limited their capability in applying to many studies required high spatial resolution in comparison of the MODIS VNIR band data with pixel scale of 250–500 m. In this paper we intend to develop an efficient approach for pixel decomposition to increase the spatial resolution of MODIS LST image using the VNIR band data as assistance. The unique feature of this approach is to maintain the thermal radiance of parent pixels in the MODIS LST image unchanged after they are decomposed into the sub-pixels in the resulted image. There are two important steps in the decomposition: initial temperature estimation and final temperature determination. Therefore the approach can be termed double-step pixel decomposition (DSPD). Both steps involve a series of procedures to achieve the final result of decomposed LST image, including classification of the surface patterns, establishment of LST change with normalized difference of vegetation index (NDVI) and building index (NDBI), reversion of LST into thermal radiance through Planck equation, and computation of weights for the sub-pixels of the resulted image. Since the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) with much higher spatial resolution than MODIS data was on-board the same platform (Terra) as MODIS for Earth observation, an experiment had been done in the study to validate the accuracy and efficiency of our approach for pixel decomposition. The ASTER LST image was used as the reference to compare with the decomposed LST image. The result showed that the spatial distribution of the decomposed LST image was very similar to that of the ASTER LST image with a root mean square error (RMSE) of

  4. An efficient approach for pixel decomposition to increase the spatial resolution of land surface temperature images from MODIS thermal infrared band data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Qin, Zhihao; Li, Wenjuan; Song, Caiying; Karnieli, Arnon; Zhao, Shuhe

    2015-01-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) images retrieved from the thermal infrared (TIR) band data of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) have much lower spatial resolution than the MODIS visible and near-infrared (VNIR) band data. The coarse pixel scale of MODIS LST images (1000 m under nadir) have limited their capability in applying to many studies required high spatial resolution in comparison of the MODIS VNIR band data with pixel scale of 250-500 m. In this paper we intend to develop an efficient approach for pixel decomposition to increase the spatial resolution of MODIS LST image using the VNIR band data as assistance. The unique feature of this approach is to maintain the thermal radiance of parent pixels in the MODIS LST image unchanged after they are decomposed into the sub-pixels in the resulted image. There are two important steps in the decomposition: initial temperature estimation and final temperature determination. Therefore the approach can be termed double-step pixel decomposition (DSPD). Both steps involve a series of procedures to achieve the final result of decomposed LST image, including classification of the surface patterns, establishment of LST change with normalized difference of vegetation index (NDVI) and building index (NDBI), reversion of LST into thermal radiance through Planck equation, and computation of weights for the sub-pixels of the resulted image. Since the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) with much higher spatial resolution than MODIS data was on-board the same platform (Terra) as MODIS for Earth observation, an experiment had been done in the study to validate the accuracy and efficiency of our approach for pixel decomposition. The ASTER LST image was used as the reference to compare with the decomposed LST image. The result showed that the spatial distribution of the decomposed LST image was very similar to that of the ASTER LST image with a root mean square error (RMSE) of 2

  5. Calibrating the pixel-level Kepler imaging data with a causal data-driven model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dun; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Hogg, David W.; Schölkopf, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    In general, astronomical observations are affected by several kinds of noise, each with it's own causal source; there is photon noise, stochastic source variability, and residuals coming from imperfect calibration of the detector or telescope. In particular, the precision of NASA Kepler photometry for exoplanet science—the most precise photometric measurements of stars ever made—appears to be limited by unknown or untracked variations in spacecraft pointing and temperature, and unmodeled stellar variability. Here we present the Causal Pixel Model (CPM) for Kepler data, a data-driven model intended to capture variability but preserve transit signals. The CPM works at the pixel level (not the photometric measurement level); it can capture more fine-grained information about the variation of the spacecraft than is available in the pixel-summed aperture photometry. The basic idea is that CPM predicts each target pixel value from a large number of pixels of other stars sharing the instrument variabilities while not containing any information on possible transits at the target star. In addition, we use the target star's future and past (auto-regression). By appropriately separating the data into training and test sets, we ensure that information about any transit will be perfectly isolated from the fitting of the model. The method has four hyper-parameters (the number of predictor stars, the auto-regressive window size, and two L2-regularization amplitudes for model components), which we set by cross-validation. We determine a generic set of hyper-parameters that works well on most of the stars with 11≤V≤12 mag and apply the method to a corresponding set of target stars with known planet transits. We find that we can consistently outperform (for the purposes of exoplanet detection) the Kepler Pre-search Data Conditioning (PDC) method for exoplanet discovery, often improving the SNR by a factor of two. While we have not yet exhaustively tested the method at other

  6. Two sub-pixel processing algorithms for high accuracy particle centre estimation in low seeding density particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udrea, D. D.; Bryanston-Cross, P. J.; Lee, W. K.; Funes-Gallanzi, M.

    1996-07-01

    This article presents two algorithms for spatial processing of low seeding density PIV (particle image velocimetry) images which lead to sub-pixel precision in particle positioning. The particle centres are estimated to accuracies of the order of 0.1 pixel, yielding 1% error in velocity calculation. The first algorithm discriminates valid particles from the rest of the image and determines their centres in Cartesian coordinates by using a two-dimensional Gaussian fit. The second algorithm performs local correlation between particle pairs and determines instantaneous two-dimensional velocities. The methods have been applied initially to simulated data. Gaussian noise and distortion has then been added to simulate experimental conditions. It is shown that, in comparison with conventional methods, the new algorithms offer up to an order of magnitude higher accuracy for particle centre estimation. Finally, the Gaussian fit approach has been used to map an experimental transonic flow field from the stator trailing edge wake region of a cascade with an estimated error of 1%. The experimental results are found to be in good agreement with previous theoretical steady-state viscous calculations.

  7. Non-rigid contour-to-pixel registration of photographic and quantitative light-induced fluorescence imaging of decalcified teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkels, Benjamin; Deserno, Thomas; Ehrlich, Eva E.; Fritz, Ulrike B.; Sirazitdinova, Ekaterina; Tatano, Rosalia

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) is widely used to assess the damage of a tooth due to decalcification. In digital photographs, decalcification appears as white spot lesions, i.e. white spots on the tooth surface. We propose a novel multimodal registration approach for the matching of digital photographs and QLF images of decalcified teeth. The registration is based on the idea of contour-to-pixel matching. Here, the curve, which represents the shape of the tooth, is extracted from the QLF image using a contour segmentation by binarization and morphological processing. This curve is aligned to the photo with a non-rigid variational registration approach. Thus, the registration problem is formulated as minimization problem with an objective function that consists of a data term and a regularizer for the deformation. To construct the data term, the photo is pointwise classified into tooth and non-tooth regions. Then, the signed distance function of the tooth region allows to measure the mismatch between curve and photo. As regularizer a higher order, linear elastic prior is used. The resulting minimization problem is solved numerically using bilinear Finite Elements for the spatial discretization and the Gauss-Newton algorithm. The evaluation is based on 150 image pairs, where an average of 5 teeth have been captured from 32 subjects. All registrations have been confirmed correctly by a dental expert. The contour-to-pixel methods can directly be used in 3D for surface-to-voxel tasks.

  8. PIXIE III: a very large area photon-counting CMOS pixel ASIC for sharp X-ray spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellazzini, R.; Brez, A.; Spandre, G.; Minuti, M.; Pinchera, M.; Delogu, P.; de Ruvo, P. L.; Vincenzi, A.

    2015-01-01

    PIXIE III is the third generation of very large area (32 × 25 mm2) pixel ASICs developed by Pixirad Imaging Counters s.r.l. to be used in combination with suitable X-ray sensor materials (Silicon, CdTe, GaAs) in hybrid assemblies using flip-chip bonding. A Pixirad unit module based on PIXIE III shows several advances compared to what has been available up to now. It has a very broad energy range (from 2 to 100 keV before full pulse saturation), high speed (100 ns peaking time), high frame rate (larger than 500 fps), dead-time-free operation, good energy resolution (around 2 keV at 20 keV), high photo-peak fraction and sharp spectral separation between the color images. In this paper the results obtained with PIXIE III both in a test bench set-up as well in X-ray imaging applications are discussed.

  9. Maskless imaging of dense samples using pixel super-resolution based multi-height lensfree on-chip microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Greenbaum, Alon; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2012-01-01

    Lensfree in-line holographic microscopy offers sub-micron resolution over a large field-of-view (e.g., ~24 mm2) with a cost-effective and compact design suitable for field use. However, it is limited to relatively low-density samples. To mitigate this limitation, we demonstrate an on-chip imaging approach based on pixel super-resolution and phase recovery, which iterates among multiple lensfree intensity measurements, each having a slightly different sample-to-sensor distance. By digitally aligning and registering these lensfree intensity measurements, phase and amplitude images of dense and connected specimens can be iteratively reconstructed over a large field-of-view of ~24 mm2 without the use of any spatial masks. We demonstrate the success of this multi-height in-line holographic approach by imaging dense Papanicolaou smears (i.e., Pap smears) and blood samples. PMID:22330550

  10. A Low-Noise CMOS THz Imager Based on Source Modulation and an In-Pixel High-Q Passive Switched-Capacitor N-Path Filter.

    PubMed

    Boukhayma, Assim; Dupret, Antoine; Rostaing, Jean-Pierre; Enz, Christian

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the first low noise complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) deletedCMOS terahertz (THz) imager based on source modulation and in-pixel high-Q filtering. The 31 × 31 focal plane array has been fully integrated in a 0 . 13 μ m standard CMOS process. The sensitivity has been improved significantly by modulating the active THz source that lights the scene and performing on-chip high-Q filtering. Each pixel encompass a broadband bow tie antenna coupled to an N-type metal-oxide-semiconductor (NMOS) detector that shifts the THz radiation, a low noise adjustable gain amplifier and a high-Q filter centered at the modulation frequency. The filter is based on a passive switched-capacitor (SC) N-path filter combined with a continuous-time broad-band Gm-C filter. A simplified analysis that helps in designing and tuning the passive SC N-path filter is provided. The characterization of the readout chain shows that a Q factor of 100 has been achieved for the filter with a good matching between the analytical calculation and the measurement results. An input-referred noise of 0 . 2 μ V RMS has been measured. Characterization of the chip with different THz wavelengths confirms the broadband feature of the antenna and shows that this THz imager reaches a total noise equivalent power of 0 . 6 nW at 270 GHz and 0 . 8 nW at 600 GHz. PMID:26950131

  11. Pixel arrangement design of retina-like sensor based on forward motion imaging visual task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fan; Cao, Fengmei; Bai, Tingzhu; Luo, Zhihu; Su, Yulu

    2014-11-01

    Retina-like sensor is a kind of anthropomorphic visual sensor, which mimic the distribution of photoreceptors in the human retina. They are applied in fields of machine vision and target tracking. However, there are few reports on retina-like sensor used for forward-motion imaging. During forward-motion imaging, as the objects being imaged move along the optical axis direction during the integration time, image quality becomes worse towards the border of the image. In order to get clearer image, retina-like sensor are trying to be designed based on the feature of forward-motion imaging. In this paper, firstly, the degraded law of rectilinear sensor used for forward-motion imaging is analyzed, the retina-like sensor model based on the feature of forward-motion imaging are proposed. Secondly, the output image of retina-like sensor and rectilinear sensor used during the forward-motion imaging for different scenes at different degeneration degrees are simulated, respectively. Thirdly, the simulated images of both two sensors are assessed by four different image quality assessment methods including visual information fidelity (VIF), complex wavelet structural similarity index (CW-SSIM), Gabor filtered image contrast similarity (GFCS) and peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR), besides, the data amount of two sensors are compared. Four image quality assessments all demonstrate that image quality of retina-like sensor based on the feature of forward motion imaging is superior to that of rectilinear sensor.

  12. SuperCam: a 64-pixel heterodyne imaging array for the 870-micron atmospheric window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groppi, Christopher; Walker, Christopher; Kulesa, Craig; Pütz, Patrick; Golish, Dathon; Gensheimer, Paul; Hedden, Abigail; Bussmann, Shane; Weinreb, Sander; Kuiper, Tom; Kooi, Jacob; Jones, Glenn; Bardin, Joseph; Mani, Hamdi; Lichtenberger, Arthur; Narayanan, Gopal

    2006-06-01

    We report on the development of SuperCam, a 64 pixel, superheterodyne camera designed for operation in the astrophysically important 870 μm atmospheric window. SuperCam will be used to answer fundamental questions about the physics and chemistry of molecular clouds in the Galaxy and their direct relation to star and planet formation. The advent of such a system will provide an order of magnitude increase in mapping speed over what is now available and revolutionize how observational astronomy is performed in this important wavelength regime. Unlike the situation with bolometric detectors, heterodyne receiver systems are coherent, retaining information about both the amplitude and phase of the incident photon stream. From this information a high resolution spectrum of the incident light can be obtained without multiplexing. SuperCam will be constructed by stacking eight, 1×8 rows of fixed tuned, SIS mixers. The IF output of each mixer will be connected to a low-noise, broadband MMIC amplifier integrated into the mixer block. The instantaneous IF bandwidth of each pixel will be ~2 GHz, with a center frequency of 5 GHz. A spectrum of the central 500 MHz of each IF band will be provided by the array spectrometer. Local oscillator power is provided by a frequency multiplier whose output is divided between the pixels by using a matrix of waveguide power dividers. The mixer array will be cooled to 4K by a closed-cycle refrigeration system. SuperCam will reside at the Cassegrain focus of the 10m Heinrich Hertz telescope (HHT). A prototype single row of the array will be tested on the HHT in 2006, with the first engineering run of the full array in late 2007. The array is designed and constructed so that it may be readily scaled to higher frequencies.

  13. Using texture analysis to improve per-pixel classification of very high resolution images for mapping plastic greenhouses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agüera, Francisco; Aguilar, Fernando J.; Aguilar, Manuel A.

    optimum texture parameter depended on the main objective of the image classification. If the main classification goal is to minimize the number of pixels wrongly classified, the mean texture parameter should be used, whereas if the main classification goal is to minimize the unclassified pixels the angular second moment texture parameter should be used. On the whole, both QuickBird and IKONOS images offered promising results in classifying plastic greenhouses.

  14. Combined multiphoton imaging-pixel analysis for semiquantitation of skin penetration of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Labouta, Hagar I; Kraus, Tobias; El-Khordagui, Labiba K; Schneider, Marc

    2011-07-15

    Interaction of nanoparticles with the skin barrier is a recent area of research that draws a lot of attention from the researchers. However, monitoring nanoparticles in or through the skin is mainly based on qualitative microscopical techniques. Yet, a quantitative approach is required for a better basic understanding. In response, a combined "multiphoton-pixel analysis" method was developed in this study for semiquantitation of gold nanoparticles penetration into different skin layers. The developed approach provides a useful tool for future studies focusing on skin penetration of nanoparticles for the aim of health risk assessment or for the design of topical and transdermal drug delivery systems. PMID:21515347

  15. A CMOS active pixel sensor system for laboratory- based x-ray diffraction studies of biological tissue.

    PubMed

    Bohndiek, Sarah E; Cook, Emily J; Arvanitis, Costas D; Olivo, Alessandro; Royle, Gary J; Clark, Andy T; Prydderch, Mark L; Turchetta, Renato; Speller, Robert D

    2008-02-01

    X-ray diffraction studies give material-specific information about biological tissue. Ideally, a large area, low noise, wide dynamic range digital x-ray detector is required for laboratory-based x-ray diffraction studies. The goal of this work is to introduce a novel imaging technology, the CMOS active pixel sensor (APS) that has the potential to fulfil all these requirements, and demonstrate its feasibility for coherent scatter imaging. A prototype CMOS APS has been included in an x-ray diffraction demonstration system. An industrial x-ray source with appropriate beam filtration is used to perform angle dispersive x-ray diffraction (ADXRD). Optimization of the experimental set-up is detailed including collimator options and detector operating parameters. Scatter signatures are measured for 11 different materials, covering three medical applications: breast cancer diagnosis, kidney stone identification and bone mineral density calculations. Scatter signatures are also recorded for three mixed samples of known composition. Results are verified using two independent models for predicting the APS scatter signature: (1) a linear systems model of the APS and (2) a linear superposition integral combining known monochromatic scatter signatures with the input polychromatic spectrum used in this case. Cross validation of experimental, modelled and literature results proves that APS are able to record biologically relevant scatter signatures. Coherent scatter signatures are sensitive to multiple materials present in a sample and provide a means to quantify composition. In the future, production of a bespoke APS imager for x-ray diffraction studies could enable simultaneous collection of the transmitted beam and scattered radiation in a laboratory-based coherent scatter system, making clinical transfer of the technique attainable. PMID:18199908

  16. Active imaging at DARPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricklin, J. C.; Tomlinson, P. G.

    2005-08-01

    Active systems, because they provide their own illumination, are capable of operating 24 hours a day and are not dependent upon the angle of the sun. Unlike passive systems, they can provide three-dimensional imaging. DARPA is currently developing systems, technologies, and signal processing to pioneer new or improve existing capabilities that employ active imaging capabilities. These involve both radar and ladar, ranging from a few MHz for foliage penetration to near-visible IR to achieve ultra-high resolution at long range. These capabilities would improve Battlefield Awareness (BA) and provide persistent Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) to perform target detection, recognition, and identification. This paper discusses two different approaches to active optical imaging. One is a coherent approach that uses synthetic aperture techniques with infrared laser radar, and another approach uses only the intensity of the speckle pattern in the aperture plane. Both are capable of producing ultra-high resolution at long range.

  17. Photon counting X-ray imaging with CdTe pixel detectors based on XPAD2 circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franchi, Romain; Glasser, Francis; Gasse, Adrien; Clemens, Jean-Claude

    2006-07-01

    A semiconductor hybrid pixel detector for photon counting X-ray imaging has been developed and tested under radiation. The sensor is based on recent uniform CdTe single crystal associated with XPAD 2 counting chip via innovative processes of interconnection. The building detector is 1 mm thick, with an area of 1 cm 2 and consists of 600 square pixels cells 330 μm side. The readout chip working in electron collection mode is capable of setting homogeneous threshold with only a dispersion of 730 e -. Maximum noise level has been evaluated around 15 keV. First experiments under X-rays demonstrate a very good efficiency of detection. Moreover, imaging system allows excellent linearity over a large-scale achieving count rate of 3×10 6 photons/s/mm 2. Spectrometric measurements point up the system potential in multi-energies applications by locating and resolving X-rays lines of 241Am and 57Co sources.

  18. Integration of an amorphous silicon passive pixel sensor array with a lateral amorphous selenium detector for large area indirect conversion x-ray imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kai; Yazdandoost, Mohammad Y.; Keshavarzi, Rasoul; Shin, Kyung-Wook; Hristovski, Christos; Abbaszadeh, Shiva; Chen, Feng; Majid, Shaikh Hasibul; Karim, Karim S.

    2011-03-01

    Previously, we reported on a single-pixel detector based on a lateral a-Se metal-semiconductor-metal structure, intended for indirect conversion X-ray imaging. This work is the continuous effort leading to the first prototype of an indirect conversion X-ray imaging sensor array utilizing lateral amorphous selenium. To replace a structurally-sophisticated vertical multilayer amorphous silicon photodiode, a lateral a-Se MSM photodetector is employed which can be easily integrated with an amorphous silicon thin film transistor passive pixel sensor array. In this work, both 2×2 macro-pixel and 32×32 micro-pixel arrays were fabricated and tested along with discussion of the results.

  19. Radiation-hard active CMOS pixel sensors for HL-LHC detector upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backhaus, Malte

    2015-02-01

    The luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be increased during the Long Shutdown of 2022 and 2023 (LS3) in order to increase the sensitivity of its experiments. A completely new inner detector for the ATLAS experiment needs to be developed to withstand the extremely harsh environment of the upgraded, so-called High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). High radiation hardness as well as granularity is mandatory to cope with the requirements in terms of radiation damage as well as particle occupancy. A new silicon detector concept that uses commercial high voltage and/or high resistivity full complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) processes as active sensor for pixel and/or strip layers has risen high attention, because it potentially provides high radiation hardness and granularity and at the same time reduced price due to the commercial processing and possibly relaxed requirements for the hybridization technique. Results on the first prototypes characterized in a variety of laboratory as well as test beam environments are presented.

  20. Breast ultrasound image segmentation: an optimization approach based on super-pixels and high-level descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massich, Joan; Lemaître, Guillaume; Martí, Joan; Mériaudeau, Fabrice

    2015-04-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer and the leading cause of cancer death among women. Medical imaging has become an indispensable tool for its diagnosis and follow up. During the last decade, the medical community has promoted to incorporate Ultra-Sound (US) screening as part of the standard routine. The main reason for using US imaging is its capability to differentiate benign from malignant masses, when compared to other imaging techniques. The increasing usage of US imaging encourages the development of Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) systems applied to Breast Ultra-Sound (BUS) images. However accurate delineations of the lesions and structures of the breast are essential for CAD systems in order to extract information needed to perform diagnosis. This article proposes a highly modular and flexible framework for segmenting lesions and tissues present in BUS images. The proposal takes advantage of optimization strategies using super-pixels and high-level descriptors, which are analogous to the visual cues used by radiologists. Qualitative and quantitative results are provided stating a performance within the range of the state-of-the-art.

  1. Enhancing spatial resolution of 18F positron imaging with the Timepix detector by classification of primary fired pixels using support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Liu, Zhen; Ziegler, Sibylle I.; Shi, Kuangyu

    2015-07-01

    Position-sensitive positron cameras using silicon pixel detectors have been applied for some preclinical and intraoperative clinical applications. However, the spatial resolution of a positron camera is limited by positron multiple scattering in the detector. An incident positron may fire a number of successive pixels on the imaging plane. It is still impossible to capture the primary fired pixel along a particle trajectory by hardware or to perceive the pixel firing sequence by direct observation. Here, we propose a novel data-driven method to improve the spatial resolution by classifying the primary pixels within the detector using support vector machine. A classification model is constructed by learning the features of positron trajectories based on Monte-Carlo simulations using Geant4. Topological and energy features of pixels fired by 18F positrons were considered for the training and classification. After applying the classification model on measurements, the primary fired pixels of the positron tracks in the silicon detector were estimated. The method was tested and assessed for [18F]FDG imaging of an absorbing edge protocol and a leaf sample. The proposed method improved the spatial resolution from 154.6   ±   4.2 µm (energy weighted centroid approximation) to 132.3   ±   3.5 µm in the absorbing edge measurements. For the positron imaging of a leaf sample, the proposed method achieved lower root mean square error relative to phosphor plate imaging, and higher similarity with the reference optical image. The improvements of the preliminary results support further investigation of the proposed algorithm for the enhancement of positron imaging in clinical and preclinical applications.

  2. An enhanced neighborhood similar pixel interpolator approach for removing thick clouds in landsat images

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thick cloud contaminations in Landsat images limit their regular usage for land applications. A few methods have been developed to remove thick clouds using additional cloud-free images. Unfortunately, the cloud-free composition image produced by existing methods commonly lacks from the desired spat...

  3. A novel CMOS sensor with in-pixel auto-zeroed discrimination for charged particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degerli, Y.; Guilloux, F.; Orsini, F.

    2014-05-01

    With the aim of developing fast and granular Monolithic Active Pixels Sensors (MAPS) as new charged particle tracking detectors for high energy physics experiments, a new rolling shutter binary pixel architecture concept (RSBPix) with in-pixel correlated double sampling, amplification and discrimination is presented. The discriminator features auto-zeroing in order to compensate process-related transistor mismatches. In order to validate the pixel, a first monolithic CMOS sensor prototype, including a pixel array of 96 × 64 pixels, has been designed and fabricated in the Tower-Jazz 0.18 μm CMOS Image Sensor (CIS) process. Results of laboratory tests are presented.

  4. ARCONS: A 2024 Pixel Optical through Near-IR Cryogenic Imaging Spectrophotometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazin, B. A.; Meeker, S. R.; Strader, M. J.; Szypryt, P.; Marsden, D.; van Eyken, J. C.; Duggan, G. E.; Walter, A. B.; Ulbricht, G.; Johnson, M.; Bumble, B.; O'Brien, K.; Stoughton, C.

    2013-11-01

    We present the design, construction, and commissioning results of ARCONS, the Array Camera for Optical to Near-IR Spectrophotometry. ARCONS is the first ground-based instrument in the optical through near-IR wavelength range based on microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs). MKIDs are revolutionary cryogenic detectors, capable of detecting single photons and measuring their energy without filters or gratings, similar to an X-ray microcalorimeter. MKIDs are nearly ideal, noiseless photon detectors, as they do not suffer from read noise or dark current and have nearly perfect cosmic ray rejection. ARCONS is an integral field spectrograph (IFS) containing a lens-coupled 2024 pixel MKID array yielding a 20'' × 20'' field of view and has been deployed on the Palomar 200 inch and Lick 120 inch telescopes for 24 nights of observing. We present initial results showing that ARCONS and its MKID arrays are now a fully operational and powerful tool for astronomical observations.

  5. A 1,000 Frames/s Programmable Vision Chip with Variable Resolution and Row-Pixel-Mixed Parallel Image Processors

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qingyu; Miao, Wei; Zhang, Wancheng; Fu, Qiuyu; Wu, Nanjian

    2009-01-01

    A programmable vision chip with variable resolution and row-pixel-mixed parallel image processors is presented. The chip consists of a CMOS sensor array, with row-parallel 6-bit Algorithmic ADCs, row-parallel gray-scale image processors, pixel-parallel SIMD Processing Element (PE) array, and instruction controller. The resolution of the image in the chip is variable: high resolution for a focused area and low resolution for general view. It implements gray-scale and binary mathematical morphology algorithms in series to carry out low-level and mid-level image processing and sends out features of the image for various applications. It can perform image processing at over 1,000 frames/s (fps). A prototype chip with 64 × 64 pixels resolution and 6-bit gray-scale image is fabricated in 0.18 μm Standard CMOS process. The area size of chip is 1.5 mm × 3.5 mm. Each pixel size is 9.5 μm × 9.5 μm and each processing element size is 23 μm × 29 μm. The experiment results demonstrate that the chip can perform low-level and mid-level image processing and it can be applied in the real-time vision applications, such as high speed target tracking. PMID:22454565

  6. Advanced monolithic active pixel sensors for tracking, vertexing and calorimetry with full CMOS capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanitzki, M.; SPiDeR Collaboration, www. spider. ac. uk

    2011-09-01

    We present test results from the "TPAC" and "F ORTIS" sensors produced using the 180 nm CMOS INMAPS process. The TPAC sensor has a 50 μm pixel size with advanced in-pixel electronics. Although TPAC was developed for digital electromagnetic calorimetry, the technology can be readily extended to tracking and vertexing applications where highly granular pixels with in-pixel intelligence are required. By way of example, a variant of the TPAC sensor has been proposed for the Super B vertex detector. The F ORTIS sensor is a prototype with several pixel variants to study the performance of a four transistors (4T) architecture and is the first sensor of this type tested for particle physics applications. TPAC and F ORTIS sensors have been fabricated with some of the processing innovations available in INMAPS such as deep p-wells and high-resistivity epitaxial layers. The performance of these sensor variants has been measured both in the laboratory and at test beams and results showing significant improvements due to these innovations are presented. We have recently manufactured the "C HERWELL" sensor, building on the experience with both TPAC and F ORTIS and making use of the 4T approach. C HERWELL is designed for tracking and vertexing and has an integrated ADC and targets very low-noise performance. The principal features of C HERWELL are described.

  7. Simulation of active-edge pixelated CdTe radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, D. D.; Lipp, J. D.; Schneider, A.; Seller, P.; Veale, M. C.; Wilson, M. D.; Baker, M. A.; Sellin, P. J.

    2016-01-01

    The edge surfaces of single crystal CdTe play an important role in the electronic properties and performance of this material as an X-ray and γ-ray radiation detector. Edge effects have previously been reported to reduce the spectroscopic performance of the edge pixels in pixelated CdTe radiation detectors without guard bands. A novel Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) model based on experimental data has been developed to investigate these effects. The results presented in this paper show how localized low resistivity surfaces modify the internal electric field of CdTe creating potential wells. These result in a reduction of charge collection efficiency of the edge pixels, which compares well with experimental data.

  8. Low-Power CMOS Laser Doppler Imaging Using Non-CDS Pixel Readout and 13.6-bit SAR ADC.

    PubMed

    Chen, Denis Guangyin; Law, Man-Kay; Lian, Yong; Bermak, Amine

    2016-02-01

    Laser Doppler imaging (LDI) measures particle flows such as blood perfusion by sensing their Doppler shift. This paper is the first of its kind in analyzing the effect of circuit noise on LDI precision which is distinctively different from conventional imaging. Based on this result, it presents a non-correlated-double-sampling (non-CDS) pixel readout scheme along with a high-resolution successive-approximation-register (SAR) analog-to-digital-converter (ADC) with 13.6b effective resolution (ER). Measurement results from the prototype chip in 0.18 μm technology confirm the theoretical analysis and show that the two techniques improve LDI sensing precision by 6.9 dB and 4.4 dB (compared to a 10b ADC) respectively without analog pre-amplification. The sensor's ADC occupies 518 μm×84 μm and is suitable for fast column parallel readout. Its differential non-linearity (DNL), integral non-linearity (INL), and input referred noise are +3.0/-2.8 LSB, +24/-17 LSB, and 110 μVrms respectively, leading to a Figure-of-Merit (FoM) of 23 fJ/state which makes it one of the most energy efficient image sensor ADCs and an order of magnitude better than the best reported LDI system using commercial high-speed image sensors. PMID:25532189

  9. Pixel pitch and particle energy influence on the dark current distribution of neutron irradiated CMOS image sensors.

    PubMed

    Belloir, Jean-Marc; Goiffon, Vincent; Virmontois, Cédric; Raine, Mélanie; Paillet, Philippe; Duhamel, Olivier; Gaillardin, Marc; Molina, Romain; Magnan, Pierre; Gilard, Olivier

    2016-02-22

    The dark current produced by neutron irradiation in CMOS Image Sensors (CIS) is investigated. Several CIS with different photodiode types and pixel pitches are irradiated with various neutron energies and fluences to study the influence of each of these optical detector and irradiation parameters on the dark current distribution. An empirical model is tested on the experimental data and validated on all the irradiated optical imagers. This model is able to describe all the presented dark current distributions with no parameter variation for neutron energies of 14 MeV or higher, regardless of the optical detector and irradiation characteristics. For energies below 1 MeV, it is shown that a single parameter has to be adjusted because of the lower mean damage energy per nuclear interaction. This model and these conclusions can be transposed to any silicon based solid-state optical imagers such as CIS or Charged Coupled Devices (CCD). This work can also be used when designing an optical imager instrument, to anticipate the dark current increase or to choose a mitigation technique. PMID:26907077

  10. Adaptive pixel-selection using chaotic map lattices for image cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sittigorn, Jirasak; Paithoonwattanakij, Kitti; Surawatpunya, Charray

    2014-01-01

    Chaotic theory has been used in cryptography application for generating a sequence of data that is close to pseudorandom number based on an adjusted initial condition and a parameter. However, data recovery becomes a crucial problem due to the precision of the parameters. This difficulty leads to limited usage of Chaotic-based cryptography especially for error sensitive applications such as voice cryptography. In order to enhance the encryption security and overcome this limitation, an Adaptive Pixel-Selection using Chaotic Map Lattices (APCML) is proposed. In APCML, the encryption sequence has been adaptively selected based on chaos generator. Moreover, the chaotic transformation and normalization boundary have been revised to alleviate the rounding error and inappropriate normalization boundary problems. In the experiments, the measurement indices of originality preservation, visual inspection, and statistical analysis are used to evaluate the performance of the proposed APCML compared to that of the original CML. Consequently, the APCML algorithm offers greater performance with full recovery of the original message.

  11. From Pixels to Response Maps: Discriminative Image Filtering for Face Alignment in the Wild.

    PubMed

    Asthana, Akshay; Zafeiriou, Stefanos; Tzimiropoulos, Georgios; Cheng, Shiyang; Pantic, Maja

    2015-06-01

    We propose a face alignment framework that relies on the texture model generated by the responses of discriminatively trained part-based filters. Unlike standard texture models built from pixel intensities or responses generated by generic filters (e.g. Gabor), our framework has two important advantages. First, by virtue of discriminative training, invariance to external variations (like identity, pose, illumination and expression) is achieved. Second, we show that the responses generated by discriminatively trained filters (or patch-experts) are sparse and can be modeled using a very small number of parameters. As a result, the optimization methods based on the proposed texture model can better cope with unseen variations. We illustrate this point by formulating both part-based and holistic approaches for generic face alignment and show that our framework outperforms the state-of-the-art on multiple "wild" databases. The code and dataset annotations are available for research purposes from http://ibug.doc.ic.ac.uk/resources. PMID:26357352

  12. Noninvasive, near-field terahertz imaging of hidden objects using a single-pixel detector.

    PubMed

    Stantchev, Rayko Ivanov; Sun, Baoqing; Hornett, Sam M; Hobson, Peter A; Gibson, Graham M; Padgett, Miles J; Hendry, Euan

    2016-06-01

    Terahertz (THz) imaging can see through otherwise opaque materials. However, because of the long wavelengths of THz radiation (λ = 400 μm at 0.75 THz), far-field THz imaging techniques suffer from low resolution compared to visible wavelengths. We demonstrate noninvasive, near-field THz imaging with subwavelength resolution. We project a time-varying, intense (>100 μJ/cm(2)) optical pattern onto a silicon wafer, which spatially modulates the transmission of synchronous pulse of THz radiation. An unknown object is placed on the hidden side of the silicon, and the far-field THz transmission corresponding to each mask is recorded by a single-element detector. Knowledge of the patterns and of the corresponding detector signal are combined to give an image of the object. Using this technique, we image a printed circuit board on the underside of a 115-μm-thick silicon wafer with ~100-μm (λ/4) resolution. With subwavelength resolution and the inherent sensitivity to local conductivity, it is possible to detect fissures in the circuitry wiring of a few micrometers in size. THz imaging systems of this type will have other uses too, where noninvasive measurement or imaging of concealed structures is necessary, such as in semiconductor manufacturing or in ex vivo bioimaging. PMID:27386577

  13. Noninvasive, near-field terahertz imaging of hidden objects using a single-pixel detector

    PubMed Central

    Stantchev, Rayko Ivanov; Sun, Baoqing; Hornett, Sam M.; Hobson, Peter A.; Gibson, Graham M.; Padgett, Miles J.; Hendry, Euan

    2016-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) imaging can see through otherwise opaque materials. However, because of the long wavelengths of THz radiation (λ = 400 μm at 0.75 THz), far-field THz imaging techniques suffer from low resolution compared to visible wavelengths. We demonstrate noninvasive, near-field THz imaging with subwavelength resolution. We project a time-varying, intense (>100 μJ/cm2) optical pattern onto a silicon wafer, which spatially modulates the transmission of synchronous pulse of THz radiation. An unknown object is placed on the hidden side of the silicon, and the far-field THz transmission corresponding to each mask is recorded by a single-element detector. Knowledge of the patterns and of the corresponding detector signal are combined to give an image of the object. Using this technique, we image a printed circuit board on the underside of a 115-μm-thick silicon wafer with ~100-μm (λ/4) resolution. With subwavelength resolution and the inherent sensitivity to local conductivity, it is possible to detect fissures in the circuitry wiring of a few micrometers in size. THz imaging systems of this type will have other uses too, where noninvasive measurement or imaging of concealed structures is necessary, such as in semiconductor manufacturing or in ex vivo bioimaging. PMID:27386577

  14. Avoiding Twisted Pixels: Ethical Guidelines for the Appropriate Use and Manipulation of Scientific Digital Images

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Digital imaging has provided scientists with new opportunities to acquire and manipulate data using techniques that were difficult or impossible to employ in the past. Because digital images are easier to manipulate than film images, new problems have emerged. One growing concern in the scientific community is that digital images are not being handled with sufficient care. The problem is twofold: (1) the very small, yet troubling, number of intentional falsifications that have been identified, and (2) the more common unintentional, inappropriate manipulation of images for publication. Journals and professional societies have begun to address the issue with specific digital imaging guidelines. Unfortunately, the guidelines provided often do not come with instructions to explain their importance. Thus they deal with what should or should not be done, but not the associated ‘why’ that is required for understanding the rules. This article proposes 12 guidelines for scientific digital image manipulation and discusses the technical reasons behind these guidelines. These guidelines can be incorporated into lab meetings and graduate student training in order to provoke discussion and begin to bring an end to the culture of “data beautification”. PMID:20567932

  15. 1024 x 1024 pixel mid-wavelength and long-wavelength infrared QWIP focal plane arrays for imaging applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, S. D.; Bandara, S. V.; Liu, J. K.; Hill, C. J.; Rafol, S. B.; Mumolo, J. M.; Trinh, J. T.; Tidrow, M. Z.; LeVan, P. D.

    2005-01-01

    Mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) and long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) 10(24) x 10(24) pixel quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) focal planes have been demonstrated with excellent imaging performance. The MWIR QWIP detector array has demonstrated a noise equivalent differential temperature (NEAT) of 17 mK at a 95 K operating temperature with f/2.5 optics at 300 K background and the LWIR detector array has demonstrated a NEAT of 13 mK at a 70 K operating temperature with the same optical and background conditions as the MWIR detector array after the subtraction of system noise. Both MWIR and LWIR focal planes have shown background limited performance (BLIP) at 90 K and 70 K operating temperatures respectively, with similar optical and background conditions. In this paper, we will discuss the performance in terms of quantum efficiency, NE(delta)T, uniformity, operability and modulation transfer functions.

  16. Road Extraction Method At The Pixel And Object Level Using High Resolution Images And LIDAR Data With Evidence Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Cuenca, Borja; Martinez de Agirre, Alex; Alonso, Maria Concepcion; del Val, Alberto

    2013-12-01

    Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) data provides accurate height information for objects on the Earth's surface. It is common to combine LIDAR data with satellite or aerial imagery to determine the location of different cartographic entities. In this work, an automated method for road extraction in urban areas from high resolution aerial images is presented. This method is based on the Dempster-Shafer Theory of evidence, which consists of fusing information from different information sources. The proposed method is applied to road extraction in two different ways: at the pixel level and at the object level. The results provided for both levels are compared with a ground truth created by the authors of this work in order to determine which method provides the best accuracy.

  17. 640 x 512 Pixels Long-Wavelength Infrared (LWIR) Quantum-Dot Infrared Photodetector (QDIP) Imaging Focal Plane Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, Sarath D.; Bandara, Sumith V.; Hill, Cory J.; Ting, David Z.; Liu, John K.; Rafol, Sir B.; Blazejewski, Edward R.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Keo, Sam A.; Krishna, Sanjay; Chang, Y. -C.; Shott, Craig A.

    2007-01-01

    Epitaxially grown self-assembled. InAs-InGaAs-GaAs quantum dots (QDs) are exploited for the development of large-format long-wavelength infrared focal plane arrays (FPAs). The dot-in-a-well (DWELL) structures were experimentally shown to absorb both 45 degrees and normal incident light, therefore, a reflection grating structure was used to enhance the quantum efficiency. The devices exhibit peak responsivity out to 8.1 micrometers, with peak detectivity reaching approximately 1 X 10(exp 10) Jones at 77 K. The devices were fabricated into the first long-wavelength 640 x 512 pixel QD infrared photodetector imaging FPA, which has produced excellent infrared imagery with noise equivalent temperature difference of 40 mK at 60-K operating temperature.

  18. SU-C-201-03: Coded Aperture Gamma-Ray Imaging Using Pixelated Semiconductor Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, S; Kaye, W; Jaworski, J; He, Z

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Improved localization of gamma-ray emissions from radiotracers is essential to the progress of nuclear medicine. Polaris is a portable, room-temperature operated gamma-ray imaging spectrometer composed of two 3×3 arrays of thick CdZnTe (CZT) detectors, which detect gammas between 30keV and 3MeV with energy resolution of <1% FWHM at 662keV. Compton imaging is used to map out source distributions in 4-pi space; however, is only effective above 300keV where Compton scatter is dominant. This work extends imaging to photoelectric energies (<300keV) using coded aperture imaging (CAI), which is essential for localization of Tc-99m (140keV). Methods: CAI, similar to the pinhole camera, relies on an attenuating mask, with open/closed elements, placed between the source and position-sensitive detectors. Partial attenuation of the source results in a “shadow” or count distribution that closely matches a portion of the mask pattern. Ideally, each source direction corresponds to a unique count distribution. Using backprojection reconstruction, the source direction is determined within the field of view. The knowledge of 3D position of interaction results in improved image quality. Results: Using a single array of detectors, a coded aperture mask, and multiple Co-57 (122keV) point sources, image reconstruction is performed in real-time, on an event-by-event basis, resulting in images with an angular resolution of ∼6 degrees. Although material nonuniformities contribute to image degradation, the superposition of images from individual detectors results in improved SNR. CAI was integrated with Compton imaging for a seamless transition between energy regimes. Conclusion: For the first time, CAI has been applied to thick, 3D position sensitive CZT detectors. Real-time, combined CAI and Compton imaging is performed using two 3×3 detector arrays, resulting in a source distribution in space. This system has been commercialized by H3D, Inc. and is being acquired for

  19. Pixel-level multisensor image fusion based on matrix completion and robust principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhuozheng; Deller, J. R.; Fleet, Blair D.

    2016-01-01

    Acquired digital images are often corrupted by a lack of camera focus, faulty illumination, or missing data. An algorithm is presented for fusion of multiple corrupted images of a scene using the lifting wavelet transform. The method employs adaptive fusion arithmetic based on matrix completion and self-adaptive regional variance estimation. Characteristics of the wavelet coefficients are used to adaptively select fusion rules. Robust principal component analysis is applied to low-frequency image components, and regional variance estimation is applied to high-frequency components. Experiments reveal that the method is effective for multifocus, visible-light, and infrared image fusion. Compared with traditional algorithms, the new algorithm not only increases the amount of preserved information and clarity but also improves robustness.

  20. Investigation of hybrid pixel detector arrays by synchrotron-radiation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfen, L.; Myagotin, A.; Pernot, P.; DiMichiel, M.; Mikulík, P.; Berthold, A.; Baumbach, T.

    2006-07-01

    Synchrotron-radiation imaging was applied to the non-destructive testing of detector devices during their development cycle. Transmission imaging known as computed laminography was used to examine the microstructure of the interconnections in order to investigate the perfection of technological steps necessary for hybrid detector production. A characterisation of the solder bump microstructure can reveal production flaws such as missing or misaligned bumps, voids in bumps or bridges and thus give valuable information about the bonding process.

  1. A new high definition zoom method based on compounded direct pixel beamforming for medical ultrasound imaging: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Sungsoo; Lee, Jongpil; Chang, Jin Ho; Song, Tai-Kyong; Yoo, Yangmo

    2013-03-01

    Conventional ultrasound imaging based on scan conversion suffers from blurring artifacts caused by interpolation[1]. Especially, when zooming an image for enlarging lesions during scan conversion (i.e., read-zoom), this blurring artifact becomes severe. To reduce blurring artifacts, a write-zoom method was previously proposed. However, it still presents blurring artifacts and lowers the frame rate due to increased line density. In this paper, a new high definition zoom method based on compounded direct pixel beamforming (CDPB) capable enhancing the detail and boundary of lesions is presented. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated with phantom and in vivo experiments by measuring the information entropy contrast (IEC). The radio-frequency channel data were acquired by using a 3.5-MHz convex array transducer with the SonixTouch research platform (Ultrasonix Medical Corp., Vancouver, BC, Canada). The enlarged images using a new high-definition zoom method based on CDPB (i.e., HDZ-CDPB) with 128 transmit scanlines were reconstructed along with read- and write zoom (RZ and WZ) images based on scan conversion by using 128 and 256 transmit scanlines, respectively. From the phantom experiments, the IEC value with the proposed HDZCDPB method was enhanced by maximally 42% and 29% compared to the RZ and WZ methods, respectively. This preliminary results indicate that the proposed HDZ-CDPB method would be useful for generating a high definition ultrasound zoom image with improved image quality compared to the conventional scan conversion based methods (i.e., RZ and WZ) while achieving the high frame rate.

  2. Active place recognition using image signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelson, Sean P.

    1992-11-01

    For reliable navigation, a mobile robot needs to be able to recognize where it is in the world. We previously described an efficient and effective image-based representation of perceptual information for place recognition. Each place is associated with a set of stored image signatures, each a matrix of numbers derived by evaluating some measurement functions over large blocks of pixels. One difficulty, though, is the large number of inherently ambiguous signatures which bloats the database and makes recognition more difficult. Furthermore, since small differences in orientation can produce very different images, reliable recognition requires many images. These problems can be ameliorated by using active methods to select the best signatures to use for the recognition. Two criteria for good images are distinctiveness (is the scene distinguishable from others?) and stability (how much do small viewpoint motions change image recognizability?). We formulate several heuristic distinctiveness metrics which are good predictors of real image distinctiveness. These functions are then used to direct the motion of the camera to find locally distinctive views for use in recognition. This method also produces some modicum of stability, since it uses a form of local optimization. We present the results of applying this method with a camera mounted on a pan-tilt platform.

  3. Chlorophyll Concentration Estimates for Coastal Waters using Pixel-Based Atmospheric Correction of Landsat Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouba, E.; Xie, H.

    2014-12-01

    Ocean color analysis is more challenging for coastal regions than the global ocean due the effects of optical brightness, shallow and turbid water, higher phytoplankton growth rates, and the complex geometry of coastal bays and estuaries. Also, one of the key atmospheric correction assumptions (zero water leaving radiance in the near infrared) is not valid for these complex conditions. This makes it difficult to estimate the spectral radiance noise caused by atmospheric aerosols, which can vary rapidly with time and space. This project evaluated using Landsat-7 ETM+ observations over a set of coastal bays, and allowing atmospheric correction calculations to vary with time and location as much as practical. Precise satellite orbit vector data was combined with operational weather and climate data to create interpolated arrays of atmospheric profiles which varied with time and location, allowing separate calculation of the Rayleigh and aerosol radiance corrections for all pixels. The resulting normalized water-leaving radiance values were compared with chlorophyll fluorescence measurements made at five in-situ stations inside a set of Texas coastal bays: the Mission-Aransas National Estuarine Research Reserve. Curve-fitting analysis showed it was possible to estimate chlorophyll surface area concentrations by using ETM+ water-leaving radiance values and a third-order polynomial equation. Two pairs of ETM+ bands were identified as inputs (Bands 1 and 3, and the Log10 values of Bands 3 and 4), both achieving R2 of 0.69. Additional research efforts were recommended to obtain additional data, identify better curve fitting equations, and potentially extend the radiative transfer model into the water column.

  4. X-RAY ACTIVE MATRIX PIXEL SENSORS BASEDON J-FET TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPED FOR THE LINAC COHERENT LIGHT SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    CARINI,G.A.; CHEN, W.; LI, Z.; REHAK, P.; SIDDONS, D.P.

    2007-10-29

    An X-ray Active Matrix Pixel Sensor (XAMPS) is being developed for recording data for the X-ray Pump Probe experiment at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Special attention has to be paid to some technological challenges that this design presents. New processes were developed and refined to address problems encountered during previous productions of XAMPS. The development of these critical steps and corresponding tests results are reported here.

  5. Seismic-zonation of Port-au-Prince using pixel- and object-based imaging analysis methods on ASTER GDEM

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yong, A.; Hough, S.E.; Cox, B.R.; Rathje, E.M.; Bachhuber, J.; Dulberg, R.; Hulslander, D.; Christiansen, L.; Abrams, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    We report about a preliminary study to evaluate the use of semi-automated imaging analysis of remotely-sensed DEM and field geophysical measurements to develop a seismic-zonation map of Port-au-Prince, Haiti. For in situ data, Vs30 values are derived from the MASW technique deployed in and around the city. For satellite imagery, we use an ASTER GDEM of Hispaniola. We apply both pixel- and object-based imaging methods on the ASTER GDEM to explore local topography (absolute elevation values) and classify terrain types such as mountains, alluvial fans and basins/near-shore regions. We assign NEHRP seismic site class ranges based on available Vs30 values. A comparison of results from imagery-based methods to results from traditional geologic-based approaches reveals good overall correspondence. We conclude that image analysis of RS data provides reliable first-order site characterization results in the absence of local data and can be useful to refine detailed site maps with sparse local data. ?? 2011 American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing.

  6. Seismic zonation of Port-Au-Prince using pixel- and object-based imaging analysis methods on ASTER GDEM

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yong, Alan; Hough, Susan E.; Cox, Brady R.; Rathje, Ellen M.; Bachhuber, Jeff; Dulberg, Ranon; Hulslander, David; Christiansen, Lisa; and Abrams, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    We report about a preliminary study to evaluate the use of semi-automated imaging analysis of remotely-sensed DEM and field geophysical measurements to develop a seismic-zonation map of Port-au-Prince, Haiti. For in situ data, VS30 values are derived from the MASW technique deployed in and around the city. For satellite imagery, we use an ASTER GDEM of Hispaniola. We apply both pixel- and object-based imaging methods on the ASTER GDEM to explore local topography (absolute elevation values) and classify terrain types such as mountains, alluvial fans and basins/near-shore regions. We assign NEHRP seismic site class ranges based on available VS30 values. A comparison of results from imagery-based methods to results from traditional geologic-based approaches reveals good overall correspondence. We conclude that image analysis of RS data provides reliable first-order site characterization results in the absence of local data and can be useful to refine detailed site maps with sparse local data.

  7. Application Of A 1024X1024 Pixel Digital Image Store, With Pulsed Progressive Readout Camera, For Gastro-Intestinal Radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, E. W.; Rowlands, J. A.; Hynes, D. M.; Toth, B. D.; Porter, A. J.

    1986-06-01

    We discuss the applicability of intensified x-ray television systems for general digital radiography and the requirements necessary for physician acceptance. Television systems for videofluorography when limited to conventional fluoroscopic exposure rates (25uR/s to x-ray intensifier), with particular application to the gastro-intestinal system, all suffer from three problems which tend to degrade the image: (a) lack of resolution, (b) noise, and (c) patient movement. The system to be described in this paper addresses each of these problems. Resolution is that provided by the use of a 1024 x 1024 pixel frame store combined with a 1024 line video camera and a 10"/6" x-ray image intensifier. Problems of noise and sensitivity to patient movement are overcome by using a short but intense burst of radiation to produce the latent image, which is then read off the video camera in a progressive fashion and placed in the digital store. Hard copy is produced from a high resolution multiformat camera, or a high resolution digital laser camera. It is intended that this PPR system will replace the 100mm spot film camera in present use, and will provide information in digital form for further processing and eventual digital archiving.

  8. Thin n-in-p planar pixel sensors and active edge sensors for the ATLAS upgrade at HL-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzo, S.; Macchiolo, A.; Nisius, R.; Paschen, B.

    2014-12-01

    Silicon pixel modules employing n-in-p planar sensors with an active thickness of 200 μm, produced at CiS, and 100-200 μm thin active/slim edge sensor devices, produced at VTT in Finland have been interconnected to ATLAS FE-I3 and FE-I4 read-out chips. The thin sensors are designed for high energy physics collider experiments to ensure radiation hardness at high fluences. Moreover, the active edge technology of the VTT production maximizes the sensitive region of the assembly, allowing for a reduced overlap of the modules in the pixel layer close to the beam pipe. The CiS production includes also four chip sensors according to the module geometry planned for the outer layers of the upgraded ATLAS pixel detector to be operated at the HL-LHC. The modules have been characterized using radioactive sources in the laboratory and with high precision measurements at beam tests to investigate the hit efficiency and charge collection properties at different bias voltages and particle incidence angles. The performance of the different sensor thicknesses and edge designs are compared before and after irradiation up to a fluence of 1.4 × 1016 neq/cm2.

  9. A statistical pixel intensity model for segmentation of confocal laser scanning microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Calapez, Alexandre; Rosa, Agostinho

    2010-09-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) has been widely used in the life sciences for the characterization of cell processes because it allows the recording of the distribution of fluorescence-tagged macromolecules on a section of the living cell. It is in fact the cornerstone of many molecular transport and interaction quantification techniques where the identification of regions of interest through image segmentation is usually a required step. In many situations, because of the complexity of the recorded cellular structures or because of the amounts of data involved, image segmentation either is too difficult or inefficient to be done by hand and automated segmentation procedures have to be considered. Given the nature of CLSM images, statistical segmentation methodologies appear as natural candidates. In this work we propose a model to be used for statistical unsupervised CLSM image segmentation. The model is derived from the CLSM image formation mechanics and its performance is compared to the existing alternatives. Results show that it provides a much better description of the data on classes characterized by their mean intensity, making it suitable not only for segmentation methodologies with known number of classes but also for use with schemes aiming at the estimation of the number of classes through the application of cluster selection criteria. PMID:20363677

  10. Hard x-ray phase contrast imaging using single absorption grating and hybrid semiconductor pixel detector.

    PubMed

    Krejci, Frantisek; Jakubek, Jan; Kroupa, Martin

    2010-11-01

    A method for x-ray phase contrast imaging is introduced in which only one absorption grating and a microfocus x-ray source in a tabletop setup are used. The method is based on precise subpixel position determination of the x-ray pattern projected by the grating directly from the pattern image. For retrieval of the phase gradient and absorption image (both images obtained from one exposure), it is necessary to measure only one projection of the investigated object. Thus, our method is greatly simplified compared with the phase-stepping method and our method can significantly reduce the time-consuming scanning and possibly the unnecessary dose. Furthermore, the technique works with a fully polychromatic spectrum and gives ample variability in object magnification. Consequently, the approach can open the way to further widespread application of phase contrast imaging, e.g., into clinical practice. The experimental results on a simple testing object as well as on complex biological samples are presented. PMID:21133473

  11. Spatial Segmentation of Image Sequences Based on Their Time Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galatsanos, N. P.

    2006-04-01

    There are many applications in medical imaging where one is interested in finding the areas of the image that exhibit the same time activity. Such applications occur in positron and single photon emission imaging as well as in perfusion studies with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this talk we will present Bayesian methodology based on clustering to solve this problem. At first the dimensionality of the pixel observations is reduced using a probabilistic principle component model along the spatial dimension of the data. Then, a multidimensional Gaussian mixture model with spatial constraints is used for clustering. Examples from MRI perfusion studies of the heart and the brain will be shown.

  12. A Low-Noise CMOS THz Imager Based on Source Modulation and an In-Pixel High-Q Passive Switched-Capacitor N-Path Filter

    PubMed Central

    Boukhayma, Assim; Dupret, Antoine; Rostaing, Jean-Pierre; Enz, Christian

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the first low noise complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) terahertz (THz) imager based on source modulation and in-pixel high-Q filtering. The 31×31 focal plane array has been fully integrated in a 0.13μm standard CMOS process. The sensitivity has been improved significantly by modulating the active THz source that lights the scene and performing on-chip high-Q filtering. Each pixel encompass a broadband bow tie antenna coupled to an N-type metal-oxide-semiconductor (NMOS) detector that shifts the THz radiation, a low noise adjustable gain amplifier and a high-Q filter centered at the modulation frequency. The filter is based on a passive switched-capacitor (SC) N-path filter combined with a continuous-time broad-band Gm-C filter. A simplified analysis that helps in designing and tuning the passive SC N-path filter is provided. The characterization of the readout chain shows that a Q factor of 100 has been achieved for the filter with a good matching between the analytical calculation and the measurement results. An input-referred noise of 0.2μV RMS has been measured. Characterization of the chip with different THz wavelengths confirms the broadband feature of the antenna and shows that this THz imager reaches a total noise equivalent power of 0.6 nW at 270 GHz and 0.8 nW at 600 GHz. PMID:26950131

  13. High-Sensitivity X-ray Polarimetry with Amorphous Silicon Active-Matrix Pixel Proportional Counters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, J. K.; Deines-Jones, P.; Jahoda, K.; Ready, S. E.; Street, R. A.

    2003-01-01

    Photoelectric X-ray polarimeters based on pixel micropattern gas detectors (MPGDs) offer order-of-magnitude improvement in sensitivity over more traditional techniques based on X-ray scattering. This new technique places some of the most interesting astronomical observations within reach of even a small, dedicated mission. The most sensitive instrument would be a photoelectric polarimeter at the focus of 2 a very large mirror, such as the planned XEUS. Our efforts are focused on a smaller pathfinder mission, which would achieve its greatest sensitivity with large-area, low-background, collimated polarimeters. We have recently demonstrated a MPGD polarimeter using amorphous silicon thin-film transistor (TFT) readout suitable for the focal plane of an X-ray telescope. All the technologies used in the demonstration polarimeter are scalable to the areas required for a high-sensitivity collimated polarimeter. Leywords: X-ray polarimetry, particle tracking, proportional counter, GEM, pixel readout

  14. A SPAD-based 3D imager with in-pixel TDC for 145ps-accuracy ToF measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vornicu, I.; Carmona-Galán, R.; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Á.

    2015-03-01

    The design and measurements of a CMOS 64 × 64 Single-Photon Avalanche-Diode (SPAD) array with in-pixel Time-to-Digital Converter (TDC) are presented. This paper thoroughly describes the imager at architectural and circuit level with particular emphasis on the characterization of the SPAD-detector ensemble. It is aimed to 2D imaging and 3D image reconstruction in low light environments. It has been fabricated in a standard 0.18μm CMOS process, i. e. without high voltage or low noise features. In these circumstances, we are facing a high number of dark counts and low photon detection efficiency. Several techniques have been applied to ensure proper functionality, namely: i) time-gated SPAD front-end with fast active-quenching/recharge circuit featuring tunable dead-time, ii) reverse start-stop scheme, iii) programmable time resolution of the TDC based on a novel pseudo-differential voltage controlled ring oscillator with fast start-up, iv) a global calibration scheme against temperature and process variation. Measurements results of individual SPAD-TDC ensemble jitter, array uniformity and time resolution programmability are also provided.

  15. Sub-pixel porosity revealed by x-ray scatter dark field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revol, V.; Jerjen, I.; Kottler, C.; Schütz, P.; Kaufmann, R.; Lüthi, T.; Sennhauser, U.; Straumann, U.; Urban, C.

    2011-08-01

    X-ray scatter dark field imaging based on the Talbot-Lau interferometer allows for the measurement of ultra-small angle x-ray scattering. The latter is related to the variations in the electron density in the sample at the sub- and micron-scale. Therefore, information on features of the object below the detector resolution can be revealed. In this article, it is demonstrated that scatter dark field imaging is particularly adapted to the study of a material's porosity. An interferometer, optimized for x-ray energies around 50 keV, enables the investigation of aluminum welding with conventional laboratory x-ray tubes. The results show an unprecedented contrast between the pool and the aluminum workpiece. Our conclusions are confirmed due to micro-tomographic three-dimensional reconstructions of the same object with a microscopic resolution.

  16. Review of the characteristics of 384x288 pixel THz camera for see-through imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchese, Linda; Terroux, Marc; Genereux, Francis; Tremblay, Bruno; Bolduc, Martin; Bergeron, Alain

    2013-10-01

    Terahertz is a field in constant expansion. Multiple applications are foreseen including see-through imaging. To develop deployable systems, real-time two-dimensional cameras are needed rather than monopixel detectors or linear arrays that require mechanical scanning systems. INO has recently developed a real-time (video rate) 384x288 THz camera exhibiting excellent sensitivity and low noise levels. The core of the THz imager is the 35 μm pitch detector array that is based on INO's uncooled VOx microbolometer technology and fabricated in INO's clean room. A standard ceramic package is used for final packaging. The detector FPA is finally sealed with a high resistivity float zone silicon (HRFZ-Si) window having an anti-reflective coating consisting of thick Parylene, which the thickness of which depends on the required optimization wavelength. The FPA is mounted on an INO IRXCAM core giving a passive THz camera assembly. The additional THz objective consists of a refractive 44 mm focal length F/1 THz lens. In this paper, a review of the characteristics of the THz camera at is performed. The sensitivity of the camera at various THz wavelengths is presented along with examples of the resolution obtained with the IRXCAM-384-THz camera core. See-through imaging results are also presented.

  17. From pixels to picograms: a beginners' guide to genome quantification by Feulgen image analysis densitometry.

    PubMed

    Hardie, David C; Gregory, T Ryan; Hebert, Paul D N

    2002-06-01

    The study of genome size variation is important from a number of practical and theoretical perspectives. For example, the long-standing "C-value enigma" relating to the more than 200,000-fold range in eukaryotic genome sizes is best studied from a broad comparative standpoint. Genome size data are also required in detailed analyses of genome structure and evolution. The choice of future genome sequencing projects will be dependent on knowledge regarding the sizes of genomes to be sequenced, and so on. To date, genome size data have been acquired primarily by Feulgen microdensitometry or flow cytometry. Each has several advantages but also important limitations. In this review, we provide a practical guide to the new technique of Feulgen image analysis densitometry. The review is designed for those interested in genome size measurements but not extensively experienced in histochemistry, densitometry, or microscopy. Therefore, relevant historical and technical background information is included. For easy reference, we provide recipes for required reagents, guidelines for cell staining, and a checklist of steps for successful image analysis. We hope that the accuracy, rapidity, and cost-effectiveness of Feulgen image analysis demonstrated here will stimulate further surveys of genome sizes in a variety of taxa. PMID:12019291

  18. Solid-state Image Sensor with Focal-plane Digital Photon-counting Pixel Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R.; Pain, Bedabrata

    1997-01-01

    A solid-state focal-plane imaging system comprises an NxN array of high gain. low-noise unit cells. each unit cell being connected to a different one of photovoltaic detector diodes, one for each unit cell, interspersed in the array for ultra low level image detection and a plurality of digital counters coupled to the outputs of the unit cell by a multiplexer(either a separate counter for each unit cell or a row of N of counters time shared with N rows of digital counters). Each unit cell includes two self-biasing cascode amplifiers in cascade for a high charge-to-voltage conversion gain (greater than 1mV/e(-)) and an electronic switch to reset input capacitance to a reference potential in order to be able to discriminate detection of an incident photon by the photoelectron (e(-))generated in the detector diode at the input of the first cascode amplifier in order to count incident photons individually in a digital counter connected to the output of the second cascade amplifier. Reseting the input capacitance and initiating self-biasing of the amplifiers occurs every clock cycle of an integratng period to enable ultralow light level image detection by the may of photovoltaic detector diodes under such ultralow light level conditions that the photon flux will statistically provide only a single photon at a time incident on anyone detector diode during any clock cycle.

  19. Image reconstruction algorithm for a spinning strip CZT SPECT camera with a parallel slat collimator and small pixels

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Gengsheng L.; Gagnon, Daniel

    2004-12-01

    This paper discusses the use of small pixels in a spinning CdZnTe single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) camera that is mounted with a parallel slat collimator. In a conventional slat collimation configuration, there is a detector pixel between two adjacent collimator slats. In our design, the pixel size is halved. That is, there are two smaller pixels to replace a regular pixel between two adjacent slats while the collimator remains unchanged. It has an advantage over our older design that uses tilted slats. In order to acquire a complete data set the tilted-slat collimator must spin 360 deg. at each SPECT view while the proposed design requires only 180 deg. at each SPECT view. Computer simulations and phantom experiments have been carried out to investigate the performance of the small-pixel configuration. It is observed that this design has the potential to increase the spatial resolution of the detector while keeping photon counts the same.

  20. A study of factors limiting spatial resolution using a 25 micron pixel pitch direct-detection amorphous selenium imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Chris C.; Allec, Nicholas; Karim, Karim S.

    2012-03-01

    An amorphous selenium direct detector with a 25 μm pixel pitch is studied for mammography and fluoroscopy applications. In this paper we analyze spatial resolution by examining the main contributions to the inherent modulation transfer function (MTF) of amorphous selenium, such as primary photoelectron range and x-ray beam obliquity; and determine their significance relative to aperture MTF. Improvements in spatial resolution provided by a move to a small pixel size are complicated by deep carrier trapping. Trapped carriers cause residual charge induction across the pixel plane. We examine the significance of this effect on spatial resolution. The potential improvements of moving from a larger pixel pitch to a 25 μm pixel pitch are studied, including all significant effects, at selected pixel pitches.

  1. Per-Pixel Coded Exposure for High-Speed and High-Resolution Imaging Using a Digital Micromirror Device Camera

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Wei; Zhang, Fumin; Qu, Xinghua; Zheng, Shiwei

    2016-01-01

    High-speed photography is an important tool for studying rapid physical phenomena. However, low-frame-rate CCD (charge coupled device) or CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) camera cannot effectively capture the rapid phenomena with high-speed and high-resolution. In this paper, we incorporate the hardware restrictions of existing image sensors, design the sampling functions, and implement a hardware prototype with a digital micromirror device (DMD) camera in which spatial and temporal information can be flexibly modulated. Combined with the optical model of DMD camera, we theoretically analyze the per-pixel coded exposure and propose a three-element median quicksort method to increase the temporal resolution of the imaging system. Theoretically, this approach can rapidly increase the temporal resolution several, or even hundreds, of times without increasing bandwidth requirements of the camera. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method via extensive examples and achieve 100 fps (frames per second) gain in temporal resolution by using a 25 fps camera. PMID:26959023

  2. Per-Pixel Coded Exposure for High-Speed and High-Resolution Imaging Using a Digital Micromirror Device Camera.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wei; Zhang, Fumin; Qu, Xinghua; Zheng, Shiwei

    2016-01-01

    High-speed photography is an important tool for studying rapid physical phenomena. However, low-frame-rate CCD (charge coupled device) or CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) camera cannot effectively capture the rapid phenomena with high-speed and high-resolution. In this paper, we incorporate the hardware restrictions of existing image sensors, design the sampling functions, and implement a hardware prototype with a digital micromirror device (DMD) camera in which spatial and temporal information can be flexibly modulated. Combined with the optical model of DMD camera, we theoretically analyze the per-pixel coded exposure and propose a three-element median quicksort method to increase the temporal resolution of the imaging system. Theoretically, this approach can rapidly increase the temporal resolution several, or even hundreds, of times without increasing bandwidth requirements of the camera. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method via extensive examples and achieve 100 fps (frames per second) gain in temporal resolution by using a 25 fps camera. PMID:26959023

  3. Full well capacity and quantum efficiency optimization for small size backside illuminated CMOS image pixels with a new photodiode structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Sun; Ping, Zhang; Jiangtao, Xu; Zhiyuan, Gao; Chao, Xu

    2012-12-01

    To improve the full well capacity (FWC) of a small size backside illuminated (BSI) CMOS image sensor (CIS), the effect of photodiode capacitance (CPD) on FWC is studied, and a reformed pinned photodiode (PPD) structure is proposed. Two procedures are implemented for the optimization. The first is to form a varying doping concentration and depth stretched new N region, which is implemented by an additional higher-energy and lower-dose N type implant beneath the original N region. The FWC of this structure is increased by extending the side wall junctions in the substrate. Secondly, in order to help the enlarged well capacity achieve full depletion, two step P-type implants with different implant energies are introduced to form a P-type insertion region in the interior of the stretched N region. This vertical inserted P region guarantees that the proposed new PD structure achieves full depletion in the reset period. The simulation results show that the FWC can be improved from 1289e- to 6390e-, and this improvement does not sacrifice any image lag performance. Additionally, quantum efficiency (QE) is enhanced in the full wavelength range, especially 6.3% at 520 nm wavelength. This technique can not only be used in such BSI structures, but also adopted in an FSI pixel with any photodiode-type readout scheme.

  4. Spatial quantification of maps or images - Cell size or pixel size implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehde, M. E.

    1979-01-01

    The paper discusses spatial quantification of maps or images. Spatial accuracies evaluated by mapping and inventory measures were observed with a range of cell sizes for a 10.36 sq km soil survey segment. The distribution of interboundary distances in a map was evaluated as unique, characterizing information; experimentally observed relationships between accuracy and cell size and interboundary distance distribution parameters and cell size led to a model of the process of spatial quantization. Grid positioning effects were evaluated and were significant only at the level of individual mapping units; two generations of 'universal' process models were derived, implemented, and evaluated.

  5. Imaging of biological tissues with pixel-level analysis of second-order susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Po-Sheng; Ghazaryan, Ara; Hovhannisyan, Vladimir; Chen, Shean-Jen; Chen, Yang-Fang; Kim, Chang-Seok; Tsai, Tsung-Hua; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2013-03-01

    We discuss the recent advances in the development and applications of second-order susceptibility as a contrast mechanism in optical microscopy for biological tissues. We review nonlinear optical methods and approaches for differentiation of tissue structures and discrimination of normal and pathological skin tissues, which have been demonstrated for the potential use in clinical diagnosis. In addition, the potential of second-order susceptibility imaging, encompassing applications in differentiating various types of collagen molecules for clinical diagnosis, is demonstrated. Finally, we discuss future development and application of this technique.

  6. Mapping Electrical Crosstalk in Pixelated Sensor Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, Suresh (Inventor); Cole, David (Inventor); Smith, Roger M (Inventor); Hancock, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The effects of inter pixel capacitance in a pixilated array may be measured by first resetting all pixels in the array to a first voltage, where a first image is read out, followed by resetting only a subset of pixels in the array to a second voltage, where a second image is read out, where the difference in the first and second images provide information about the inter pixel capacitance. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  7. From pixel to voxel: a deeper view of biological tissue by 3D mass spectral imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hui; Greer, Tyler; Li, Lingjun

    2011-01-01

    Three dimensional mass spectral imaging (3D MSI) is an exciting field that grants the ability to study a broad mass range of molecular species ranging from small molecules to large proteins by creating lateral and vertical distribution maps of select compounds. Although the general premise behind 3D MSI is simple, factors such as choice of ionization method, sample handling, software considerations and many others must be taken into account for the successful design of a 3D MSI experiment. This review provides a brief overview of ionization methods, sample preparation, software types and technological advancements driving 3D MSI research of a wide range of low- to high-mass analytes. Future perspectives in this field are also provided to conclude that the positive and promises ever-growing applications in the biomedical field with continuous developments of this powerful analytical tool. PMID:21320052

  8. Correction of defective pixels for medical and space imagers based on Ising Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Eliahu; Shnitser, Moriel; Avraham, Tsvika; Hadar, Ofer

    2014-09-01

    We propose novel models for image restoration based on statistical physics. We investigate the affinity between these fields and describe a framework from which interesting denoising algorithms can be derived: Ising-like models and simulated annealing techniques. When combined with known predictors such as Median and LOCO-I, these models become even more effective. In order to further examine the proposed models we apply them to two important problems: (i) Digital Cameras in space damaged from cosmic radiation. (ii) Ultrasonic medical devices damaged from speckle noise. The results, as well as benchmark and comparisons, suggest in most of the cases a significant gain in PSNR and SSIM in comparison to other filters.

  9. iCATSI: multi-pixel imaging differential spectroradiometer for standoff detection and quantification of chemical threats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prel, Florent; Moreau, Louis; Lavoie, Hugo; Bouffard, François; Thériault, Jean-Marc; Vallieres, Christian; Roy, Claude; Dubé, Denis

    2011-11-01

    Homeland security and first responders are often faced with safety situations involving the identification of unknown volatile chemicals. Examples include industrial fires, chemical warfare, industrial leak, etc. The Improved Compact ATmospheric Sounding Interferometer (iCATSI) sensor has been developed to investigate the standoff detection and identification of toxic industrial chemicals (TICs), chemical warfare agents (CWA) and other chemicals. iCATSI is a combination of the CATSI instrument, a standoff differential FTIR optimised for the characterization of chemicals and the MR-i, the hyperspectral imaging spectroradiometer of ABB Bomem based on the proven MR spectroradiometers. The instrument is equipped with a dual-input telescope to perform optical background subtraction. The resulting signal is the difference between the spectral radiance entering each input port. With that method, the signal from the background is automatically removed from the signal of the target of interest. The iCATSI sensor is able to detect, spectrally resolve and identify 5 meters plumes up to 5 km range. The instrument is capable of sensing in the VLWIR (cut-off near 14 μm) to support research related to standoff chemical detection. In one of its configurations, iCATSI produces three 24 × 16 spectral images per second from 5.5 to 14 μm at a spectral resolution of 16 cm-1. In another configuration, iCATSI produces from two to four spectral images per second of 256 × 256 pixels from 8 to 13 μm with the same spectral resolution. Overview of the capabilities of the instrument and results from tests and field trials will be presented.

  10. Evaluation of ultrasound synthetic aperture imaging using bidirectional pixel-based focusing: preliminary phantom and in vivo breast study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Choye; Yoon, Changhan; Park, Jong-Ho; Lee, Yuhwa; Kim, Won Hwa; Chang, Jung Min; Choi, Byung Ihn; Song, Tai-Kyong; Yoo, Yang-Mo

    2013-10-01

    In medical ultrasound imaging, lateral resolution is limited when using a fixed transmit focusing. Various synthetic aperture (SA) techniques, in which two-way dynamic focusing is enabled by utilizing prebeamformed radio-frequency (RF) data have been proposed for improving the spatial resolution. However, SA methods were not extensively evaluated in terms of their clinical performance. In this paper, a phantom and an in vivo evaluation of the SA method with bidirectional pixel-based focusing (BiPBF) is presented in comparison with the conventional beamforming. The performance of the proposed SA-BiPBF was assessed with a blind study and the established breast imaging-reporting and data system (BI-RADS), in addition to measuring contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Prebeamformed RF data were acquired from a tissue mimicking phantom (Model 040, CIRS Inc., Norfolk, VA, USA) and from patients with breast lesions by using a commercial ultrasound scanning system with a linear array transducer equipped with a research package and parallel data acquisition system (SonixTouch, SonixDAQ, and L14-5/38, Ultrasonix Corp., Canada). In phantom and in vivo experiments, a default setting of a breast preset was applied (e.g., the center frequency of 10 MHz and acoustic output of MI = 0.66). In phantom experiment, the SA-BiPBF method showed higher CNR and SNR values compared to the conventional method (3.4 and 23.9 dB versus 3.1 and 15.8 dB, respectively). In addition, the lateral resolution and penetration depth were increased by 95.4% and 40.3%, respectively. Consistent with the phantom experiment, in the in vivo experiment with ten patients, the CNR value for the SA method was 3.3 ± 0.5 compared to 2.8 ± 0.8 for the conventional method. Similarly, the SNR values with the SA-BiPBF and conventional methods were 34.0 ± 3.6 and 27.2 ± 3.4 dB, respectively. From the experiments, it was shown in side-by-side comparisons that the image quality of the SA

  11. The RD50 activity in the context of future pixel detector systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casse, G.

    2015-05-01

    The CERN/RD50 collaboration is dedicated to the radiation hardening of semiconductor sensors for future super-collider needs. The findings of this collaboration are therefore especially relevant to the pixel devices for the LHC experiment upgrades. A considerable amount of results on the enhancement of the radiation tolerance of silicon sensors has been found within RD50. The research towards radiation hardening has highlighted, and increased the knowledge on properties of sensors that are relevant to other applications. For example radiation hardening relies on the speed of signal collection in irradiated devices. As a consequence, the methods envisaged for increasing this collection speed turn out to be promising for significantly improving the performance of time resolved, high spatial resolution systems. A new type of device processing strongly emerging for production of future pixel sensor systems is the HV-CMOS technology. The RD50 research methodology provides the tools for characterising the behaviour of the deep collecting electrode (deep n-well) for this type of device after irradiation and the optimal framework for comparing the performance of the new devices with the current state of the art.

  12. Radiation hardness of a 180 nm SOI monolithic active pixel sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Perez, S.; Backhaus, M.; Pernegger, H.; Hemperek, T.; Kishishita, T.; Krüger, H.; Wermes, N.

    2015-10-01

    The use of Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) technology as a particle detector in a high radiation environment is, at present, limited mostly by radiation effects on the transistor characteristics, back gate effect, and mutual coupling between the Buried Oxide (BOX) and the sensor. We have fabricated and tested a new 0.18 μm SOI CMOS monolithic pixel sensor using the XFAB process. In contrast to the most commonly used SOI technologies, this particular technology uses partially depleted SOI transistors, offering a double well structure, which shields the thin gate oxide transistors from the BOX. In addition, an increased distance between transistors and a thicker BOX than has been previously used offers promising solutions to the performance limitations mentioned above. The process further allows the use of high voltages (up to 200 V), which are used to partially deplete the substrate. Thus, the newly fabricated device in the XFAB process is especially interesting for applications in extremely high radiation environments, such as LHC experiments. A four stage validation programme of the technology and the fabricated monolithic pixel sensor has been performed and its results are shown in this paper. The first targets radiation hardness of the transistor characteristics up to 700 Mrad, the second investigates the existence of the back gate effect, the third one targets the coupling between the BOX and the sensor, and the fourth investigates the characterization of charge collection in the sensor diode below the BOX.

  13. Pixel-One

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedichini, F.; Di Paola, A.; Testa, V.

    2010-07-01

    The early future of astronomy will be dominated by Extremely Large Telescopes where the focal lengths will be of the order of several hundred meters. This yields focal plane sizes of roughly one square meter to obtain a field of view of about 5 x 5 arcmin. When operated in seeing limited mode this field is correctly sampled with 1x1mm pixels. Such a sampling can be achieved using a peculiar array of tiny CMOS active photodiodes illuminated through microlenses or lightpipes. If the photodiode is small enough and utilizes the actual pixel technology, its dark current can be kept well below the sky background photocurrent, thus avoiding the use of cumbersome cryogenics systems. An active smart electronics will manage each pixel up to the A/D conversion and data transfer. This modular block is the Pixel-One. A 30x30 mm tile filled with 1000 Pixel-Ones could be the basic unit to mosaic very large focal planes. By inserting dispersion elements inside the optical path of the lenslet array one could also produce a low dispersed spectrum of each focal plane sub-aperture and, by using an array of few smart photodiodes, also get multi-wavelength information in the optical band for each equivalent focal plane pixel. An application to the E-ELT is proposed.

  14. Satellite navigation for meteorological purposes: Inverse referencing for NOAA-N and ERS-1 imagers with a 1 km nadir pixel size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klokočník, J.; Kostelecký, J.; Grassl, H.; Schlüssel, P.; Pospíšilová, L.; Gooding, R. H.; Lála, P.

    Iterative methods for inverse referencing from mean orbital elements or osculating position and velocity, accounting for all necessary orbital perturbations with respect to given nadir pixel size, are described. [Inverse referencing means that the geodetic coordinates of a point on the surface are given and the corresponding image coordinates (scan line number and pixel number) are obtained from satellite orbital elements or coordinates.] The idea is to treat a pixel like a satellite tracking station on the ground. This permits the use of existing software for the computation of satellite ephemerides and orbit determination. The time of culmination of a satellite over the pixel and the off-nadir angle at that moment have been computed. Two variants for such a computation have been tested. Numerical results for the NOAA-N meteorological satellites and ERS-1 are presented. The present state of our software for inverse referencing should fulfil ordinary requirements posed by meteorologists. For NOAA-N satellites, the accuracy achieved roughly the nadir pixel size. The main obstacle to an increase in accuracy is the low quality of the mean orbital elements usually available. For ERS-1, the accuracy may achieve a level of 100 m. A software package, containing versions of the FORTRAN 77 programs PIXPO 3, PIXPO 4 and PIXPOSC, for various data types, including US-2 line or TBUS mean elements or a state vector, is available for scientific exchange.

  15. Super-resolution of multi-pixel and sub-pixel images for the SDI. Final report. [SDI (Strategic Defense Initiative)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-08

    The recent profound shift in the global balance of power in favor of the United States of America has had major repercussions on Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) planning. In particular, the focus has shifted from the provision of protection for the United States against a massive raid, involving possibly thousands of reentry vehicles, to defense against a much more limited attack which could now, however, be launched from any part of the world. Additionally, the United States is seeking to protect its forces and allies overseas, and in the task of missile detection and tracking, allowance must now be made for trajectories which can begin and end in almost any inhabited area of the globe. Thus SDI demands on surveillance technology have been significantly expanded. Space-based imaging systems will play a vital role in the surveillance task. In this report a description is first given of a typical scenario. The potential imaging problems are then examined, the mathematical background is discussed, and the innovative algorithms which have been developed for correcting and enhancing the performance of the imaging sensor are described.

  16. Pixelation Effects in Weak Lensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    High, F. William; Rhodes, Jason; Massey, Richard; Ellis, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Weak gravitational lensing can be used to investigate both dark matter and dark energy but requires accurate measurements of the shapes of faint, distant galaxies. Such measurements are hindered by the finite resolution and pixel scale of digital cameras. We investigate the optimum choice of pixel scale for a space-based mission, using the engineering model and survey strategy of the proposed Supernova Acceleration Probe as a baseline. We do this by simulating realistic astronomical images containing a known input shear signal and then attempting to recover the signal using the Rhodes, Refregier, and Groth algorithm. We find that the quality of shear measurement is always improved by smaller pixels. However, in practice, telescopes are usually limited to a finite number of pixels and operational life span, so the total area of a survey increases with pixel size. We therefore fix the survey lifetime and the number of pixels in the focal plane while varying the pixel scale, thereby effectively varying the survey size. In a pure trade-off for image resolution versus survey area, we find that measurements of the matter power spectrum would have minimum statistical error with a pixel scale of 0.09' for a 0.14' FWHM point-spread function (PSF). The pixel scale could be increased to 0.16' if images dithered by exactly half-pixel offsets were always available. Some of our results do depend on our adopted shape measurement method and should be regarded as an upper limit: future pipelines may require smaller pixels to overcome systematic floors not yet accessible, and, in certain circumstances, measuring the shape of the PSF might be more difficult than those of galaxies. However, the relative trends in our analysis are robust, especially those of the surface density of resolved galaxies. Our approach thus provides a snapshot of potential in available technology, and a practical counterpart to analytic studies of pixelation, which necessarily assume an idealized shape

  17. Pixelation Effects in Weak Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    High, F. William; Rhodes, Jason; Massey, Richard; Ellis, Richard

    2007-11-01

    Weak gravitational lensing can be used to investigate both dark matter and dark energy but requires accurate measurements of the shapes of faint, distant galaxies. Such measurements are hindered by the finite resolution and pixel scale of digital cameras. We investigate the optimum choice of pixel scale for a space-based mission, using the engineering model and survey strategy of the proposed Supernova Acceleration Probe as a baseline. We do this by simulating realistic astronomical images containing a known input shear signal and then attempting to recover the signal using the Rhodes, Refregier, & Groth algorithm. We find that the quality of shear measurement is always improved by smaller pixels. However, in practice, telescopes are usually limited to a finite number of pixels and operational life span, so the total area of a survey increases with pixel size. We therefore fix the survey lifetime and the number of pixels in the focal plane while varying the pixel scale, thereby effectively varying the survey size. In a pure trade-off for image resolution versus survey area, we find that measurements of the matter power spectrum would have minimum statistical error with a pixel scale of 0.09" for a 0.14" FWHM point-spread function (PSF). The pixel scale could be increased to ~0.16" if images dithered by exactly half-pixel offsets were always available. Some of our results do depend on our adopted shape measurement method and should be regarded as an upper limit: future pipelines may require smaller pixels to overcome systematic floors not yet accessible, and, in certain circumstances, measuring the shape of the PSF might be more difficult than those of galaxies. However, the relative trends in our analysis are robust, especially those of the surface density of resolved galaxies. Our approach thus provides a snapshot of potential in available technology, and a practical counterpart to analytic studies of pixelation, which necessarily assume an idealized shape

  18. A 2D 4×4 Channel Readout ASIC for Pixelated CdTe Detectors for Medical Imaging Applications

    PubMed Central

    Macias-Montero, Jose-Gabriel; Sarraj, Maher; Chmeissani, Mokhtar; Martínez, Ricardo; Puigdengoles, Carles

    2015-01-01

    We present a 16-channel readout integrated circuit (ROIC) with nanosecond-resolution time to digital converter (TDC) for pixelated Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) gamma-ray detectors. The 4 × 4 pixel array ROIC is the proof of concept of the 10 × 10 pixel array readout ASIC for positron-emission tomography (PET) scanner, positron-emission mammography (PEM) scanner, and Compton gamma camera. The electronics of each individual pixel integrates an analog front-end with switchable gain, an analog to digital converter (ADC), configuration registers, and a 4-state digital controller. For every detected photon, the pixel electronics provides the energy deposited in the detector with 10-bit resolution, and a fast trigger signal for time stamp. The ASIC contains the 16-pixel matrix electronics, a digital controller, five global voltage references, a TDC, a temperature sensor, and a band-gap based current reference. The ASIC has been fabricated with TSMC 0.25 μm mixed-signal CMOS technology and occupies an area of 5.3 mm × 6.8 mm. The TDC shows a resolution of 95.5 ps, a precision of 600 ps at full width half maximum (FWHM), and a power consumption of 130 μW. In acquisition mode, the total power consumption of every pixel is 200 μW. An equivalent noise charge (ENC) of 160 e−RMS at maximum gain and negative polarity conditions has been measured at room temperature. PMID:26744545

  19. Coherence experiments in single-pixel digital holography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jung-Ping; Guo, Chia-Hao; Hsiao, Wei-Jen; Poon, Ting-Chung; Tsang, Peter

    2015-05-15

    In optical scanning holography (OSH), the coherence properties of the acquired holograms depend on the single-pixel size, i.e., the active area of the photodetector. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, we have demonstrated coherent, partial coherent, and incoherent three-dimensional (3D) imaging by experiment in such a single-pixel digital holographic recording system. We have found, for the incoherent mode of OSH, in which the detector of the largest active area is applied, the 3D location of a diffusely reflecting object can be successfully retrieved without speckle noise. For the partial coherent mode employing a smaller pixel size of the detector, significant speckles and randomly distributed bright spots appear among the reconstructed images. For the coherent mode of OSH when the size of the pixel is vanishingly small, the bright spots disappear. However, the speckle remains and the signal-to-noise ratio is low. PMID:26393741

  20. A High-Speed, Event-Driven, Active Pixel Sensor Readout for Photon-Counting Microchannel Plate Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Randy A.; Pain, Bedabrata; Norton, Timothy J.; Haas, J. Patrick; Oegerle, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Silicon array readouts for microchannel plate intensifiers offer several attractive features. In this class of detector, the electron cloud output of the MCP intensifier is converted to visible light by a phosphor; that light is then fiber-optically coupled to the silicon array. In photon-counting mode, the resulting light splashes on the silicon array are recognized and centroided to fractional pixel accuracy by off-chip electronics. This process can result in very high (MCP-limited) spatial resolution while operating at a modest MCP gain (desirable for dynamic range and long term stability). The principal limitation of intensified CCD systems of this type is their severely limited local dynamic range, as accurate photon counting is achieved only if there are not overlapping event splashes within the frame time of the device. This problem can be ameliorated somewhat by processing events only in pre-selected windows of interest of by using an addressable charge injection device (CID) for the readout array. We are currently pursuing the development of an intriguing alternative readout concept based on using an event-driven CMOS Active Pixel Sensor. APS technology permits the incorporation of discriminator circuitry within each pixel. When coupled with suitable CMOS logic outside the array area, the discriminator circuitry can be used to trigger the readout of small sub-array windows only when and where an event splash has been detected, completely eliminating the local dynamic range problem, while achieving a high global count rate capability and maintaining high spatial resolution. We elaborate on this concept and present our progress toward implementing an event-driven APS readout.

  1. A High-Speed, Event-Driven, Active Pixel Sensor Readout for Photon-Counting Microchannel Plate Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Randy A.; Pain, B.; Norton, T. J.; Haas, P.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Silicon array readouts for microchannel plate intensifiers offer several attractive features. In this class of detector, the electron cloud output of the MCP intensifier is converted to visible light by a phosphor; that light is then fiber-optically coupled to the silicon array. In photon-counting mode, the resulting light splashes on the silicon array are recognized and centroided to fractional pixel accuracy by off-chip electronics. This process can result in very high (MCP-limited) spatial resolution for the readout while operating at a modest MCP gain (desirable for dynamic range and long term stability). The principal limitation of intensified CCD systems of this type is their severely limited local dynamic range, as accurate photon counting is achieved only if there are not overlapping event splashes within the frame time of the device. This problem can be ameliorated somewhat by processing events only in pre-selected windows of interest or by using an addressable charge injection device (CID) for the readout array. We are currently pursuing the development of an intriguing alternative readout concept based on using an event-driven CMOS Active Pixel Sensor. APS technology permits the incorporation of discriminator circuitry within each pixel. When coupled with suitable CMOS logic outside the array area, the discriminator circuitry can be used to trigger the readout of small sub-array windows only when and where an event splash has been detected, completely eliminating the local dynamic range problem, while achieving a high global count rate capability and maintaining high spatial resolution. We elaborate on this concept and present our progress toward implementing an event-driven APS readout.

  2. Development of a networked four-million-pixel pathological and radiological digital image presentation system and its application to medical conferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakano, Toshikazu; Furukawa, Isao; Okumura, Akira; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Fujii, Tetsuro; Ono, Sadayasu; Suzuki, Junji; Matsuya, Shoji; Ishihara, Teruo

    2001-08-01

    The wide spread of digital technology in the medical field has led to a demand for the high-quality, high-speed, and user-friendly digital image presentation system in the daily medical conferences. To fulfill this demand, we developed a presentation system for radiological and pathological images. It is composed of a super-high-definition (SHD) imaging system, a radiological image database (R-DB), a pathological image database (P-DB), and the network interconnecting these three. The R-DB consists of a 270GB RAID, a database server workstation, and a film digitizer. The P-DB includes an optical microscope, a four-million-pixel digital camera, a 90GB RAID, and a database server workstation. A 100Mbps Ethernet LAN interconnects all the sub-systems. The Web-based system operation software was developed for easy operation. We installed the whole system in NTT East Kanto Hospital to evaluate it in the weekly case conferences. The SHD system could display digital full-color images of 2048 x 2048 pixels on a 28-inch CRT monitor. The doctors evaluated the image quality and size, and found them applicable to the actual medical diagnosis. They also appreciated short image switching time that contributed to smooth presentation. Thus, we confirmed that its characteristics met the requirements.

  3. Backside-illuminated, high-QE, 3e- RoN, fast 700fps, 1760x1680 pixels CMOS imager for AO with highly parallel readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downing, Mark; Kolb, Johann; Baade, Dietrich; Balard, Philippe; Dierickx, Bart; Defernez, Arnaud; Dupont, Benoit; Feautrier, Philippe; Finger, Gert; Fryer, Martin; Gach, Jean-Luc; Guillaume, Christian; Hubin, Norbert; Iwert, Olaf; Jerram, Paul; Jorden, Paul; Pike, Andrew; Pratlong, Jerome; Reyes, Javier; Stadler, Eric; Walker, Andrew

    2012-07-01

    The success of the next generation of instruments for 8 to 40-m class telescopes will depend upon improving the image quality (correcting the distortion caused by atmospheric turbulence) by exploiting sophisticated Adaptive Optics (AO) systems. One of the critical components of the AO systems for the E-ELT has been identified as the Laser/Natural Guide Star (LGS/NGS) WaveFront Sensing (WFS) detector. The combination of large format, 1760x1680 pixels to finely sample (84x84 sub-apertures) the wavefront and the spot elongation of laser guide stars, fast frame rate of 700 (up to 1000) frames per second, low read noise (< 3e-), and high QE (> 90%) makes the development of such a device extremely challenging. Design studies by industry concluded that a thinned and backside-illuminated CMOS Imager as the most promising technology. This paper describes the multi-phased development plan that will ensure devices are available on-time for E-ELT first-light AO systems; the different CMOS pixel architectures studied; measured results of technology demonstrators that have validated the CMOS Imager approach; the design explaining the approach of massive parallelism (70,000 ADCs) needed to achieve low noise at high pixel rates of ~3 Gpixel/s ; the 88 channel LVDS data interface; the restriction that stitching (required due to the 5x6cm size) posed on the design and the solutions found to overcome these limitations. Two generations of the CMOS Imager will be built: a pioneering quarter sized device of 880x840 pixels capable of meeting first light needs of the E-ELT called NGSD (Natural Guide Star Detector); followed by the full size device, the LGSD (Laser Guide Star Detector). Funding sources: OPTICON FP6 and FP7 from European Commission and ESO.

  4. Radiation-hard Active Pixel Sensors for HL-LHC Detector Upgrades based on HV-CMOS Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miucci, A.; Gonella, L.; Hemperek, T.; Hügging, F.; Krüger, H.; Obermann, T.; Wermes, N.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Backhaus, M.; Capeans, M.; Feigl, S.; Nessi, M.; Pernegger, H.; Ristic, B.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Ferrere, D.; Iacobucci, G.; La Rosa, A.; Muenstermann, D.; George, M.; Große-Knetter, J.; Quadt, A.; Rieger, J.; Weingarten, J.; Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Buttar, C.; Hynds, D.; Kreidl, C.; Peric, I.; Breugnon, P.; Pangaud, P.; Godiot-Basolo, S.; Fougeron, D.; Bompard, F.; Clemens, J. C.; Liu, J.; Barbero, M.; Rozanov, A.; HV-CMOS Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    Luminosity upgrades are discussed for the LHC (HL-LHC) which would make updates to the detectors necessary, requiring in particular new, even more radiation-hard and granular, sensors for the inner detector region. A proposal for the next generation of inner detectors is based on HV-CMOS: a new family of silicon sensors based on commercial high-voltage CMOS technology, which enables the fabrication of part of the pixel electronics inside the silicon substrate itself. The main advantages of this technology with respect to the standard silicon sensor technology are: low material budget, fast charge collection time, high radiation tolerance, low cost and operation at room temperature. A traditional readout chip is still needed to receive and organize the data from the active sensor and to handle high-level functionality such as trigger management. HV-CMOS has been designed to be compatible with both pixel and strip readout. In this paper an overview of HV2FEI4, a HV-CMOS prototype in 180 nm AMS technology, will be given. Preliminary results after neutron and X-ray irradiation are shown.

  5. Shape and Albedo from Shading (SAfS) for Pixel-Level dem Generation from Monocular Images Constrained by Low-Resolution dem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bo; Chung Liu, Wai; Grumpe, Arne; Wöhler, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Lunar topographic information, e.g., lunar DEM (Digital Elevation Model), is very important for lunar exploration missions and scientific research. Lunar DEMs are typically generated from photogrammetric image processing or laser altimetry, of which photogrammetric methods require multiple stereo images of an area. DEMs generated from these methods are usually achieved by various interpolation techniques, leading to interpolation artifacts in the resulting DEM. On the other hand, photometric shape reconstruction, e.g., SfS (Shape from Shading), extensively studied in the field of Computer Vision has been introduced to pixel-level resolution DEM refinement. SfS methods have the ability to reconstruct pixel-wise terrain details that explain a given image of the terrain. If the terrain and its corresponding pixel-wise albedo were to be estimated simultaneously, this is a SAfS (Shape and Albedo from Shading) problem and it will be under-determined without additional information. Previous works show strong statistical regularities in albedo of natural objects, and this is even more logically valid in the case of lunar surface due to its lower surface albedo complexity than the Earth. In this paper we suggest a method that refines a lower-resolution DEM to pixel-level resolution given a monocular image of the coverage with known light source, at the same time we also estimate the corresponding pixel-wise albedo map. We regulate the behaviour of albedo and shape such that the optimized terrain and albedo are the likely solutions that explain the corresponding image. The parameters in the approach are optimized through a kernel-based relaxation framework to gain computational advantages. In this research we experimentally employ the Lunar-Lambertian model for reflectance modelling; the framework of the algorithm is expected to be independent of a specific reflectance model. Experiments are carried out using the monocular images from Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO

  6. Time-resolved Emission from Bright Hot Pixels of an Active Region Observed in the EUV Band with SDO/AIA and Multi-stranded Loop Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajfirouze, E.; Reale, F.; Petralia, A.; Testa, P.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence of small amounts of very hot plasma has been found in active regions and might be an indication of impulsive heating released at spatial scales smaller than the cross-section of a single loop. We investigate the heating and substructure of coronal loops in the core of one such active region by analyzing the light curves in the smallest resolution elements of solar observations in two EUV channels (94 and 335 Å) from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We model the evolution of a bundle of strands heated by a storm of nanoflares by means of a hydrodynamic 0D loop model (EBTEL). The light curves obtained from a random combination of those of single strands are compared to the observed light curves either in a single pixel or in a row of pixels, simultaneously in the two channels, and using two independent methods: an artificial intelligent system (Probabilistic Neural Network) and a simple cross-correlation technique. We explore the space of the parameters to constrain the distribution of the heat pulses, their duration, their spatial size, and, as a feedback on the data, their signatures on the light curves. From both methods the best agreement is obtained for a relatively large population of events (1000) with a short duration (less than 1 minute) and a relatively shallow distribution (power law with index 1.5) in a limited energy range (1.5 decades). The feedback on the data indicates that bumps in the light curves, especially in the 94 Å channel, are signatures of a heating excess that occurred a few minutes before.

  7. Comparison of two position sensitive gamma-ray detectors based on continuous YAP and pixellated NaI(TI) for nuclear medical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jie; Ma, Hong-Guang; Ma, Wen-Yan; Zeng, Hui; Wang, Zhao-Min; Xu, Zi-Zhong

    2008-11-01

    Dedicated position sensitive gamma-ray detectors based on position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs) coupled to scintillation crystals, have been used for the construction of compact gamma-ray imaging systems, suitable for nuclear medical imaging applications such as small animal imaging and single organ imaging and scintimammography. In this work, the performance of two gamma-ray detectors: a continuous YAP scintillation crystal coupled to a Hamamastu R2486 PSPMT and a pixellated NaI(TI) scintillation array crystal coupled to the same PSPMT, is compared. The results show that the gamma-ray detector based on a pixellated NaI(TI) scintillation array crystal is a promising candidate for nuclear medical imaging applications, since their performance in terms of position linearity, spatial resolution and effective field of view (FOV) is superior than that of the gamma-ray detector based on a continuous YAP scintillation crystal. However, a better photodetector (Hamamatau H8500 Flat Panel PMT, for example) coupled to the continuous crystal is also likely a good selection for nuclear medicine imaging applications. Supported by National Nature Science Foundation of China (10275063)

  8. Pixel detector Timepix operated in pile-up mode for pulsed imaging with ultra-soft X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krejci, F.; Jakubek, J.; Kroupa, M.; Bruza, P.; Panek, D.

    2012-12-01

    The hybrid semiconductor pixel detector Timepix operated in the Time-over-Threshold mode (ToT) enables direct energy measurement in each pixel. The advantage of noiseless position sensitive detection combined with per pixel spectroscopic capability opens the way to numerous new applications, which were till now, however, restricted to detection of radiation which is basically above the detector energy threshold (typically 3-4 keV). This limitation excludes application of the hybrid pixel technology to highly interesting fields such as plasma diagnostics or X-ray microscopy. In this contribution we demonstrate how the Timepix detector working in ToT mode can be operated as a detector for particles which are in principle below the detector threshold, namely for soft X-ray photons with energy typically 0.5 keV. The approach is based on the detection of a larger number of photons incoming in the pixel signal processing chain in a time significantly shorter than the shaping time of the pixel electronics, i.e. forming signal pile-up. The proposed approach enables a CCD-like integrating operation with the many advantages of the hybrid counting technology (direct conversion, high sensitivity, dark-current free, room temperature operation, fully digital output and possibility to utilize various read-out architectures). Using the proposed approach we performed single-shot X-ray radiography with a laser-induced plasma source in the spectral region of water window. The same technique was used for the characterization of the source itself.

  9. First use of a high-sensitivity active pixel sensor array as a detector for electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuong, Nguyen-Huu; Milazzo, Anna-Clare; LeBlanc, Philippe; Duttweiler, Fred; Bouwer, James; Peltier, Steve; Ellisman, Mark; Denes, Peter; Bieser, Fred; Matis, Howard S.; Wieman, Howard; Kleinfelder, Stuart

    2004-06-01

    There is an urgent need to replace film and CCD cameras as recording instruments for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Film is too cumbersome to process and CCD cameras have low resolution, marginal to poor signal-to-noise ratio for single electron detection and high spatial distortion. To find a replacement device, we have tested a high sensitivity active pixel sensor (APS) array currently being developed for nuclear physics. The tests were done at 120 keV in a JEOL 1200 electron microscope. At this energy, each electron produced on average a signal-tonoise ratio about 20/1. The spatial resolution was also excellent with the full width at half maximum (FWHM) about 20 microns. Since it is very radiation tolerant and has almost no spatial distortion, the above tests showed that a high sensitivity CMOS APS array holds great promise as a direct detection device for electron microscopy.

  10. A real-time flat-panel X-ray pixel imaging system for low-dose medical diagnostics and craniofacial applications.

    PubMed

    Chapuy, S; Dimcovski, D; Dimcovski, Z; Grigoriev, E; Grob, E; Ligier, Y; Pachoud, M; Riondel, F; Rüfenacht, D; Sayegh, C; Terrier, F; Valley, J F; Verdun, F R

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate on-line performance of a real-time digital imaging system based on amorphous silicon technology and to compare it with conventional film-screen equipment. The digital detecting imager consists of (1) a converter, which transforms the energy of the incident X rays into light; (2) a real-time digital detecting system, capable of producing as many as 10 pictures per second using a large-area pixel matrix (20 x 20 cm2) based on solid-state amorphous silicon sensor technology with a pitch of 400 microns; and (3) appropriate computer tools for control, real-time image treatment, data representation, and off-line analysis. Different phantoms were used for qualitative comparison with the conventional film-screen technique, with images obtained with both systems at the normal dose (used as a reference), as well as with dose reduction by a factor of 10 to 100. Basic image quality parameters evaluated showed that the response of the detector is linear in a wide range of entrance air kerma; the dynamic range is higher compared with the conventional film-screen combination; the spatial resolution is 1.25 lp per millimeter, as expected from the pixel size; and good image quality is ensured at doses substantially lower than for the film-screen technique. The flat-panel X-ray imager based on amorphous silicon technology implemented in standard radiographic equipment permits acquisition of real-time images in radiology (as many as 10 images per second) of diagnostic quality with a marked reduction of dose (as much as 100 times) and better contrast compared with the standard film technique. Preliminary results obtained with a 100-micron pitch imager based on the same technology show better quality but a less substantial dose reduction. Applications in craniofacial surgery look promising. PMID:11314093

  11. Automatic detection and segmentation of vascular structures in dermoscopy images using a novel vesselness measure based on pixel redness and tubularness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharazmi, Pegah; Lui, Harvey; Stoecker, William V.; Lee, Tim

    2015-03-01

    Vascular structures are one of the most important features in the diagnosis and assessment of skin disorders. The presence and clinical appearance of vascular structures in skin lesions is a discriminating factor among different skin diseases. In this paper, we address the problem of segmentation of vascular patterns in dermoscopy images. Our proposed method is composed of three parts. First, based on biological properties of human skin, we decompose the skin to melanin and hemoglobin component using independent component analysis of skin color images. The relative quantities and pure color densities of each component were then estimated. Subsequently, we obtain three reference vectors of the mean RGB values for normal skin, pigmented skin and blood vessels from the hemoglobin component by averaging over 100000 pixels of each group outlined by an expert. Based on the Euclidean distance thresholding, we generate a mask image that extracts the red regions of the skin. Finally, Frangi measure was applied to the extracted red areas to segment the tubular structures. Finally, Otsu's thresholding was applied to segment the vascular structures and get a binary vessel mask image. The algorithm was implemented on a set of 50 dermoscopy images. In order to evaluate the performance of our method, we have artificially extended some of the existing vessels in our dermoscopy data set and evaluated the performance of the algorithm to segment the newly added vessel pixels. A sensitivity of 95% and specificity of 87% were achieved.

  12. Design methodology: edgeless 3D ASICs with complex in-pixel processing for pixel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahim, Farah; Deptuch, Grzegorz W.; Hoff, James R.; Mohseni, Hooman

    2015-08-01

    The design methodology for the development of 3D integrated edgeless pixel detectors with in-pixel processing using Electronic Design Automation (EDA) tools is presented. A large area 3 tier 3D detector with one sensor layer and two ASIC layers containing one analog and one digital tier, is built for x-ray photon time of arrival measurement and imaging. A full custom analog pixel is 65μm x 65μm. It is connected to a sensor pixel of the same size on one side, and on the other side it has approximately 40 connections to the digital pixel. A 32 x 32 edgeless array without any peripheral functional blocks constitutes a sub-chip. The sub-chip is an indivisible unit, which is further arranged in a 6 x 6 array to create the entire 1.248cm x 1.248cm ASIC. Each chip has 720 bump-bond I/O connections, on the back of the digital tier to the ceramic PCB. All the analog tier power and biasing is conveyed through the digital tier from the PCB. The assembly has no peripheral functional blocks, and hence the active area extends to the edge of the detector. This was achieved by using a few flavors of almost identical analog pixels (minimal variation in layout) to allow for peripheral biasing blocks to be placed within pixels. The 1024 pixels within a digital sub-chip array have a variety of full custom, semi-custom and automated timing driven functional blocks placed together. The methodology uses a modified mixed-mode on-top digital implementation flow to not only harness the tool efficiency for timing and floor-planning but also to maintain designer control over compact parasitically aware layout. The methodology uses the Cadence design platform, however it is not limited to this tool.

  13. Design methodology: edgeless 3D ASICs with complex in-pixel processing for pixel detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fahim Farah, Fahim Farah; Deptuch, Grzegorz W.; Hoff, James R.; Mohseni, Hooman

    2015-08-28

    The design methodology for the development of 3D integrated edgeless pixel detectors with in-pixel processing using Electronic Design Automation (EDA) tools is presented. A large area 3 tier 3D detector with one sensor layer and two ASIC layers containing one analog and one digital tier, is built for x-ray photon time of arrival measurement and imaging. A full custom analog pixel is 65μm x 65μm. It is connected to a sensor pixel of the same size on one side, and on the other side it has approximately 40 connections to the digital pixel. A 32 x 32 edgeless array without any peripheral functional blocks constitutes a sub-chip. The sub-chip is an indivisible unit, which is further arranged in a 6 x 6 array to create the entire 1.248cm x 1.248cm ASIC. Each chip has 720 bump-bond I/O connections, on the back of the digital tier to the ceramic PCB. All the analog tier power and biasing is conveyed through the digital tier from the PCB. The assembly has no peripheral functional blocks, and hence the active area extends to the edge of the detector. This was achieved by using a few flavors of almost identical analog pixels (minimal variation in layout) to allow for peripheral biasing blocks to be placed within pixels. The 1024 pixels within a digital sub-chip array have a variety of full custom, semi-custom and automated timing driven functional blocks placed together. The methodology uses a modified mixed-mode on-top digital implementation flow to not only harness the tool efficiency for timing and floor-planning but also to maintain designer control over compact parasitically aware layout. The methodology uses the Cadence design platform, however it is not limited to this tool.

  14. Microradiography with Semiconductor Pixel Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubek, Jan; Cejnarova, Andrea; Dammer, Jiří; Holý, Tomáš; Platkevič, Michal; Pospíšil, Stanislav; Vavřík, Daniel; Vykydal, Zdeněk

    2007-11-01

    High resolution radiography (with X-rays, neutrons, heavy charged particles, …) often exploited also in tomographic mode to provide 3D images stands as a powerful imaging technique for instant and nondestructive visualization of fine internal structure of objects. Novel types of semiconductor single particle counting pixel detectors offer many advantages for radiation imaging: high detection efficiency, energy discrimination or direct energy measurement, noiseless digital integration (counting), high frame rate and virtually unlimited dynamic range. This article shows the application and potential of pixel detectors (such as Medipix2 or TimePix) in different fields of radiation imaging.

  15. Digital monochrome CCD camera for robust pixel correspondant, data compression, and preprocessing in an integrated PC-based image-processing environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshad, Norhashim M.; Harvey, David M.; Hobson, Clifford A.

    1996-12-01

    This paper describes the development of a compact digital CCD camera which contains image digitization and processing which interfaces to a personal computer (PC) via a standard enhanced parallel port. Digitizing of precise pixel samples coupled with the provision of putting a single chip FPGA for data processing, became the main digital components of the camera prior to sending the data to the PC. A form of compression scheme is applied so that the digital images may be transferred within the existing parallel port bandwidth. The data is decompressed in the PC environment for a real- time display of the video images using purely native processor resources. Frame capture is built into the camera so that a full uncompressed digital image could be sent for special processing.

  16. Effects of defect pixel correction algorithms for x-ray detectors on image quality in planar projection and volumetric CT data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttig, Jan; Steiding, Christian; Hupfer, Martin; Karolczak, Marek; Kolditz, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    In this study we compared various defect pixel correction methods for reducing artifact appearance within projection images used for computed tomography (CT) reconstructions. Defect pixel correction algorithms were examined with respect to their artifact behaviour within planar projection images as well as in volumetric CT reconstructions. We investigated four algorithms: nearest neighbour, linear and adaptive linear interpolation, and a frequency-selective spectral-domain approach. To characterise the quality of each algorithm in planar image data, we inserted line defects of varying widths and orientations into images. The structure preservation of each algorithm was analysed by corrupting and correcting the image of a slit phantom pattern and by evaluating its line spread function (LSF). The noise preservation was assessed by interpolating corrupted flat images and estimating the noise power spectrum (NPS) of the interpolated region. For the volumetric investigations, we examined the structure and noise preservation within a structured aluminium foam, a mid-contrast cone-beam phantom and a homogeneous Polyurethane (PUR) cylinder. The frequency-selective algorithm showed the best structure and noise preservation for planar data of the correction methods tested. For volumetric data it still showed the best noise preservation, whereas the structure preservation was outperformed by the linear interpolation. The frequency-selective spectral-domain approach in the correction of line defects is recommended for planar image data, but its abilities within high-contrast volumes are restricted. In that case, the application of a simple linear interpolation might be the better choice to correct line defects within projection images used for CT.

  17. Active Seismic Imaging Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berge, Patricia A.; Dawson, Phillip B.; Evans, John R.

    In September 1985 the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will conduct an active seismic experiment in the Medicine Lake area of northern California. The work is supported by the Geothermal Research Program of USGS and by the Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies Division of the U.S. Department of Energy. We invite interested organizations or individuals to record our explosions from Medicine Lake volcano and surrounding areas not covered by the USGS-LLNL array.

  18. Spectrally tunable pixel sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langfelder, G.; Buffa, C.; Longoni, A. F.; Zaraga, F.

    2013-01-01

    They are here reported the developments and experimental results of fully operating matrices of spectrally tunable pixels based on the Transverse Field Detector (TFD). Unlike several digital imaging sensors based on color filter arrays or layered junctions, the TFD has the peculiar feature of having electrically tunable spectral sensitivities. In this way the sensor color space is not fixed a priori but can be real-time adjusted, e.g. for a better adaptation to the scene content or for multispectral capture. These advantages come at the cost of an increased complexity both for the photosensitive elements and for the readout electronics. The challenges in the realization of a matrix of TFD pixels are analyzed in this work. First experimental results on an 8x8 (x 3 colors) and on a 64x64 (x 3 colors) matrix will be presented and analyzed in terms of colorimetric and noise performance, and compared to simulation predictions.

  19. Development of a generalized algorithm of satellite remote sensing using multi-wavelength and multi-pixel information (MWP method) for aerosol properties by satellite-borne imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, M.; Nakajima, T.; Morimoto, S.; Takenaka, H.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a new satellite remote sensing algorithm to retrieve the aerosol optical characteristics using multi-wavelength and multi-pixel information of satellite imagers (MWP method). In this algorithm, the inversion method is a combination of maximum a posteriori (MAP) method (Rodgers, 2000) and the Phillips-Twomey method (Phillips, 1962; Twomey, 1963) as a smoothing constraint for the state vector. Furthermore, with the progress of computing technique, this method has being combined with the direct radiation transfer calculation numerically solved by each iteration step of the non-linear inverse problem, without using LUT (Look Up Table) with several constraints.Retrieved parameters in our algorithm are aerosol optical properties, such as aerosol optical thickness (AOT) of fine and coarse mode particles, a volume soot fraction in fine mode particles, and ground surface albedo of each observed wavelength. We simultaneously retrieve all the parameters that characterize pixels in each of horizontal sub-domains consisting the target area. Then we successively apply the retrieval method to all the sub-domains in the target area.We conducted numerical tests for the retrieval of aerosol properties and ground surface albedo for GOSAT/CAI imager data to test the algorithm for the land area. The result of the experiment showed that AOTs of fine mode and coarse mode, soot fraction and ground surface albedo are successfully retrieved within expected accuracy. We discuss the accuracy of the algorithm for various land surface types. Then, we applied this algorithm to GOSAT/CAI imager data, and we compared retrieved and surface-observed AOTs at the CAI pixel closest to an AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) or SKYNET site in each region. Comparison at several sites in urban area indicated that AOTs retrieved by our method are in agreement with surface-observed AOT within ±0.066.Our future work is to extend the algorithm for analysis of AGEOS-II/GLI and GCOM/C-SGLI data.

  20. Low complexity pixel-based halftone detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ok, Jiheon; Han, Seong Wook; Jarno, Mielikainen; Lee, Chulhee

    2011-10-01

    With the rapid advances of the internet and other multimedia technologies, the digital document market has been growing steadily. Since most digital images use halftone technologies, quality degradation occurs when one tries to scan and reprint them. Therefore, it is necessary to extract the halftone areas to produce high quality printing. In this paper, we propose a low complexity pixel-based halftone detection algorithm. For each pixel, we considered a surrounding block. If the block contained any flat background regions, text, thin lines, or continuous or non-homogeneous regions, the pixel was classified as a non-halftone pixel. After excluding those non-halftone pixels, the remaining pixels were considered to be halftone pixels. Finally, documents were classified as pictures or photo documents by calculating the halftone pixel ratio. The proposed algorithm proved to be memory-efficient and required low computation costs. The proposed algorithm was easily implemented using GPU.

  1. Defective pixels in medical LCD displays: problem analysis and fundamental solution.

    PubMed

    Kimpe, Tom

    2006-03-01

    Over the past few years, traditional CRT displays have gradually been replaced by active matrix LCD displays. Each pixel in an LCD display has its own individual transistor that controls the transmittance of that pixel. Occasionally, these individual transistors will short or malfunction, resulting in a defective pixel that always shows the same brightness. This article shows how defective LCD pixels can interfere with subtle features in medical images. A defective pixel affects a broad area around it therefore possibly reducing the quality of diagnosis specifically for highly demanding applications such as mammography. A specialized image processing algorithm provides an innovative solution making these defects completely invisible and recovers information from the defect so the radiologist perceives the medical image correctly. PMID:16333716

  2. Satellite navigation for meteorological purposes - Inverse referencing for NOAA-N and ERS-1 imagers with a 1 km nadir pixel size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klokocnik, J.; Kostelecky, J.; Grassl, H.; Schluessel, P.; Pospisilova, L.; Gooding, R. H.; Lala, P.

    1992-08-01

    Inverse referencing navigation for meteorological satellites NOAA-N and the remote sensing satellite ERS-1 is studied and the PIXPOS software package has been developed and applied to radiometer observations from NOAA-N satellites. By inverse referencing, the geodetic coordinates of a point on the surface are given, and the corresponding image coordinates are obtained from satellite orbital elements or coordinates. Iterative techniques for inverse referencing from mean orbital elements or osculating position and velocity, accounting for all required orbital perturbations with respect to given nadir pixel size, are presented.

  3. A real-time ultrasonic field mapping system using a Fabry Pérot single pixel camera for 3D photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Nam; Zhang, Edward; Betcke, Marta; Arridge, Simon R.; Beard, Paul; Cox, Ben

    2015-03-01

    A system for dynamic mapping of broadband ultrasound fields has been designed, with high frame rate photoacoustic imaging in mind. A Fabry-Pérot interferometric ultrasound sensor was interrogated using a coherent light single-pixel camera. Scrambled Hadamard measurement patterns were used to sample the acoustic field at the sensor, and either a fast Hadamard transform or a compressed sensing reconstruction algorithm were used to recover the acoustic pressure data. Frame rates of 80 Hz were achieved for 32x32 images even though no specialist hardware was used for the on-the-fly reconstructions. The ability of the system to obtain photocacoustic images with data compressions as low as 10% was also demonstrated.

  4. a Band Selection Method for Sub-Pixel Target Detection in Hyperspectral Images Based on Laboratory and Field Reflectance Spectral Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi hashjin, S.; Darvishi, A.; Khazai, S.; Hatami, F.; Jafari houtki, M.

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, developing target detection algorithms has received growing interest in hyperspectral images. In comparison to the classification field, few studies have been done on dimension reduction or band selection for target detection in hyperspectral images. This study presents a simple method to remove bad bands from the images in a supervised manner for sub-pixel target detection. The proposed method is based on comparing field and laboratory spectra of the target of interest for detecting bad bands. For evaluation, the target detection blind test dataset is used in this study. Experimental results show that the proposed method can improve efficiency of the two well-known target detection methods, ACE and CEM.

  5. Pixel Color Clustering of Multi-Temporally Acquired Digital Photographs of a Rice Canopy by Luminosity-Normalization and Pseudo-Red-Green-Blue Color Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Ryoichi; Arif, Chusnul

    2014-01-01

    Red-green-blue (RGB) channels of RGB digital photographs were loaded with luminosity-adjusted R, G, and completely white grayscale images, respectively (RGwhtB method), or R, G, and R + G (RGB yellow) grayscale images, respectively (RGrgbyB method), to adjust the brightness of the entire area of multi-temporally acquired color digital photographs of a rice canopy. From the RGwhtB or RGrgbyB pseudocolor image, cyan, magenta, CMYK yellow, black, L*, a*, and b* grayscale images were prepared. Using these grayscale images and R, G, and RGB yellow grayscale images, the luminosity-adjusted pixels of the canopy photographs were statistically clustered. With the RGrgbyB and the RGwhtB methods, seven and five major color clusters were given, respectively. The RGrgbyB method showed clear differences among three rice growth stages, and the vegetative stage was further divided into two substages. The RGwhtB method could not clearly discriminate between the second vegetative and midseason stages. The relative advantages of the RGrgbyB method were attributed to the R, G, B, magenta, yellow, L*, and a* grayscale images that contained richer information to show the colorimetrical differences among objects than those of the RGwhtB method. The comparison of rice canopy colors at different time points was enabled by the pseudocolor imaging method. PMID:25302325

  6. Image sensor innovations for low light levels with active imaging features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Gareth H.; Fereyre, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    Advances in CMOS imaging enable image capture at lower light levels. Color detection is also possible where human vision becomes less sensitive in night conditions. In daytime conditions, there are a number of climatic conditions such as rain, fog, snow or smoke etc. that render traditional `intelligent' outdoor cameras that perform various forms of detection and identification tasks relatively ineffective. It has been proven that an adapted five transistor pixel CMOS sensor can perform range-gated active imaging that extends considerably the usability of intelligent cameras in the most difficult conditions. This paper discusses advanced state of the art image sensors with embedded features, with emphasis on the everimportant size, weight, power and cost benefits and discusses the new applications that are enabled.

  7. Combinational pixel-by-pixel and object-level classifying, segmenting, and agglomerating in performing quantitative image analysis that distinguishes between healthy non-cancerous and cancerous cell nuclei and delineates nuclear, cytoplasm, and stromal material objects from stained biological tissue materials

    DOEpatents

    Boucheron, Laura E

    2013-07-16

    Quantitative object and spatial arrangement-level analysis of tissue are detailed using expert (pathologist) input to guide the classification process. A two-step method is disclosed for imaging tissue, by classifying one or more biological materials, e.g. nuclei, cytoplasm, and stroma, in the tissue into one or more identified classes on a pixel-by-pixel basis, and segmenting the identified classes to agglomerate one or more sets of identified pixels into segmented regions. Typically, the one or more biological materials comprises nuclear material, cytoplasm material, and stromal material. The method further allows a user to markup the image subsequent to the classification to re-classify said materials. The markup is performed via a graphic user interface to edit designated regions in the image.

  8. [Hadamard transform spectrometer mixed pixels' unmixing method].

    PubMed

    Yan, Peng; Hu, Bing-Liang; Liu, Xue-Bin; Sun, Wei; Li, Li-Bo; Feng, Yu-Tao; Liu, Yong-Zheng

    2011-10-01

    Hadamard transform imaging spectrometer is a multi-channel digital transform spectrometer detection technology, this paper based on digital micromirror array device (DMD) of the Hadamard transform spectrometer working principle and instrument structure, obtained by the imaging sensor mixed pixel were analyzed, theory derived the solution of pixel aliasing hybrid method, simulation results show that the method is simple and effective to improve the accuracy of mixed pixel spectrum more than 10% recovery. PMID:22250574

  9. Measurement of 3-D Vibrational Motion by Dynamic Photogrammetry Using Least-Square Image Matching for Sub-Pixel Targeting to Improve Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyoseong; Rhee, Huinam; Oh, Jae Hong; Park, Jin Ho

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with an improved methodology to measure three-dimensional dynamic displacements of a structure by digital close-range photogrammetry. A series of stereo images of a vibrating structure installed with targets are taken at specified intervals by using two daily-use cameras. A new methodology is proposed to accurately trace the spatial displacement of each target in three-dimensional space. This method combines the correlation and the least-square image matching so that the sub-pixel targeting can be obtained to increase the measurement accuracy. Collinearity and space resection theory are used to determine the interior and exterior orientation parameters. To verify the proposed method, experiments have been performed to measure displacements of a cantilevered beam excited by an electrodynamic shaker, which is vibrating in a complex configuration with mixed bending and torsional motions simultaneously with multiple frequencies. The results by the present method showed good agreement with the measurement by two laser displacement sensors. The proposed methodology only requires inexpensive daily-use cameras, and can remotely detect the dynamic displacement of a structure vibrating in a complex three-dimensional defection shape up to sub-pixel accuracy. It has abundant potential applications to various fields, e.g., remote vibration monitoring of an inaccessible or dangerous facility. PMID:26978366

  10. Measurement of 3-D Vibrational Motion by Dynamic Photogrammetry Using Least-Square Image Matching for Sub-Pixel Targeting to Improve Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyoseong; Rhee, Huinam; Oh, Jae Hong; Park, Jin Ho

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with an improved methodology to measure three-dimensional dynamic displacements of a structure by digital close-range photogrammetry. A series of stereo images of a vibrating structure installed with targets are taken at specified intervals by using two daily-use cameras. A new methodology is proposed to accurately trace the spatial displacement of each target in three-dimensional space. This method combines the correlation and the least-square image matching so that the sub-pixel targeting can be obtained to increase the measurement accuracy. Collinearity and space resection theory are used to determine the interior and exterior orientation parameters. To verify the proposed method, experiments have been performed to measure displacements of a cantilevered beam excited by an electrodynamic shaker, which is vibrating in a complex configuration with mixed bending and torsional motions simultaneously with multiple frequencies. The results by the present method showed good agreement with the measurement by two laser displacement sensors. The proposed methodology only requires inexpensive daily-use cameras, and can remotely detect the dynamic displacement of a structure vibrating in a complex three-dimensional defection shape up to sub-pixel accuracy. It has abundant potential applications to various fields, e.g., remote vibration monitoring of an inaccessible or dangerous facility. PMID:26978366

  11. Statistical theory and applications of lock-in carrierographic image pixel brightness dependence on multi-crystalline Si solar cell efficiency and photovoltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelis, Andreas; Zhang, Yu; Melnikov, Alexander

    2012-09-01

    A solar cell lock-in carrierographic image generation theory based on the concept of non-equilibrium radiation chemical potential was developed. An optoelectronic diode expression was derived linking the emitted radiative recombination photon flux (current density), the solar conversion efficiency, and the external load resistance via the closed- and/or open-circuit photovoltage. The expression was shown to be of a structure similar to the conventional electrical photovoltaic I-V equation, thereby allowing the carrierographic image to be used in a quantitative statistical pixel brightness distribution analysis with outcome being the non-contacting measurement of mean values of these important parameters averaged over the entire illuminated solar cell surface. This is the optoelectronic equivalent of the electrical (contacting) measurement method using an external resistor circuit and the outputs of the solar cell electrode grid, the latter acting as an averaging distribution network over the surface. The statistical theory was confirmed using multi-crystalline Si solar cells.

  12. Fabrication and characterization of pixelated Gd2O2S:Tb scintillator screens for digital X-ray imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongyul; Kyoung Cha, Bo; Hyung Bae, Jun; Lee, Chae-Hun; Kim, Hyungtaek; Chang, Sungho; Cho, Gyuseong; Sim, Cheulmuu; Kim, Taejoo

    2011-05-01

    X-ray imaging detectors in combination with scintillator screens have been widely used in digital X-ray imaging applications. Gd2O2S:Tb was used as scintillation material for pixelated scintillator screens based on silicon substrates (wafer) with a micropore array of various dimensions fabricated using the photolithography and deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) process. The relative light output and the modulation transfer function (MTF) of each fabricated scintillator screen were measured by a cooled CCD and compared with those of Lanex screens. The spatial resolution of our scintillator screens was higher but their light outputs were lower than those of Lanex screen probably due to the loss of light at the wall surfaces. Therefore further treatment of the wall surface, such as reflective coating, seems necessary to compensate the light loss.

  13. Improving spatio-temporal resolution of infrared images to detect thermal activity of defect at the surface of inorganic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corvec, Guillaume; Robin, Eric; Le Cam, Jean-Benoît; Sangleboeuf, Jean-Christophe; Lucas, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    This paper proposes a noise suppression methodology to improve the spatio-temporal resolution of infrared images. The methodology is divided in two steps. The first one consists in removing the noise from the temporal signal at each pixel. Three basic temporal filters are considered for this purpose: average filter, cost function minimization (FIT) and short time Fast Fourier Transform approach (STFFT). But while this step effectively reduces the temporal signal noise at each pixel, the infrared images may still appear noisy. This is due to a random distribution of a residual offset value of pixels signal. Hence in the second step, the residual offset is identified by considering thermal images for which no mechanical loading is applied. In this case, the temperature variation field is homogeneous and the value of temperature variation at each pixel is theoretically equal to zero. The method is first tested on synthetic images built from infrared computer-generated images combined with experimental noise. The results demonstrate that this approach permits to keep the spatial resolution of infrared images equal to 1 pixel. The methodology is then applied to characterize thermal activity of a defect at the surface of inorganic glass submitted to cyclic mechanical loading. The three basic temporal filters are quantitatively compared and contrasted. Results obtained demonstrate that, contrarily to a basic spatio-temporal approach, the denoising method proposed is suitable to characterize low thermal activity combined to strong spatial gradients induced by cyclic heterogeneous deformations.

  14. CMOS foveal image sensor chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandera, Cesar (Inventor); Scott, Peter (Inventor); Sridhar, Ramalingam (Inventor); Xia, Shu (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A foveal image sensor integrated circuit comprising a plurality of CMOS active pixel sensors arranged both within and about a central fovea region of the chip. The pixels in the central fovea region have a smaller size than the pixels arranged in peripheral rings about the central region. A new photocharge normalization scheme and associated circuitry normalizes the output signals from the different size pixels in the array. The pixels are assembled into a multi-resolution rectilinear foveal image sensor chip using a novel access scheme to reduce the number of analog RAM cells needed. Localized spatial resolution declines monotonically with offset from the imager's optical axis, analogous to biological foveal vision.

  15. The ALICE Pixel Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercado-Perez, Jorge

    2002-07-01

    The present document is a brief summary of the performed activities during the 2001 Summer Student Programme at CERN under the Scientific Summer at Foreign Laboratories Program organized by the Particles and Fields Division of the Mexican Physical Society (Sociedad Mexicana de Fisica). In this case, the activities were related with the ALICE Pixel Group of the EP-AIT Division, under the supervision of Jeroen van Hunen, research fellow in this group. First, I give an introduction and overview to the ALICE experiment; followed by a description of wafer probing. A brief summary of the test beam that we had from July 13th to July 25th is given as well.

  16. MediSPECT: Single photon emission computed tomography system for small field of view small animal imaging based on a CdTe hybrid pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accorsi, R.; Autiero, M.; Celentano, L.; Chmeissani, M.; Cozzolino, R.; Curion, A. S.; Frallicciardi, P.; Laccetti, P.; Lanza, R. C.; Lauria, A.; Maiorino, M.; Marotta, M.; Mettivier, G.; Montesi, M. C.; Riccio, P.; Roberti, G.; Russo, P.

    2007-02-01

    We describe MediSPECT, a new scanner developed at University and INFN Napoli, for SPECT studies on small animals with a small field of view (FOV) and high spatial resolution. The CdTe pixel detector (a 256×256 matrix of 55 μm square pixels) operating in single photon counting for detection of gamma-rays with low and medium energy (e.g. 125I, 27-35 keV, 99mTc, 140 keV), is bump bonded to the Medipix2 readout chip. The FOV of the MediSPECT scanner with a coded aperture mask collimator ranges from 6.3 mm (system spatial resolution 110 μm at 27-35 keV) to 24.3 mm. With a 0.30 mm pinhole the FOV ranges from 2.4 to 29 mm (where the system spatial resolution is 1.0 mm at 27-35 keV and 2.0 mm at 140 keV). MediSPECT will be used for in vivo imaging of small organs or tissue structures in mouse, e.g., brain, thyroid, heart or tumor.

  17. Dead pixel replacement in LWIR microgrid polarimeters.

    PubMed

    Ratliff, Bradley M; Tyo, J Scott; Boger, James K; Black, Wiley T; Bowers, David L; Fetrow, Matthew P

    2007-06-11

    LWIR imaging arrays are often affected by nonresponsive pixels, or "dead pixels." These dead pixels can severely degrade the quality of imagery and often have to be replaced before subsequent image processing and display of the imagery data. For LWIR arrays that are integrated with arrays of micropolarizers, the problem of dead pixels is amplified. Conventional dead pixel replacement (DPR) strategies cannot be employed since neighboring pixels are of different polarizations. In this paper we present two DPR schemes. The first is a modified nearest-neighbor replacement method. The second is a method based on redundancy in the polarization measurements.We find that the redundancy-based DPR scheme provides an order-of-magnitude better performance for typical LWIR polarimetric data. PMID:19547086

  18. Dead pixel replacement in LWIR microgrid polarimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratliff, Bradley M.; Tyo, J. Scott; Boger, James K.; Black, Wiley T.; Bowers, David L.; Fetrow, Matthew P.

    2007-06-01

    LWIR imaging arrays are often affected by nonresponsive pixels, or “dead pixels.” These dead pixels can severely degrade the quality of imagery and often have to be replaced before subsequent image processing and display of the imagery data. For LWIR arrays that are integrated with arrays of micropolarizers, the problem of dead pixels is amplified. Conventional dead pixel replacement (DPR) strategies cannot be employed since neighboring pixels are of different polarizations. In this paper we present two DPR schemes. The first is a modified nearest-neighbor replacement method. The second is a method based on redundancy in the polarization measurements.We find that the redundancy-based DPR scheme provides an order-of-magnitude better performance for typical LWIR polarimetric data.

  19. Dynamically re-configurable CMOS imagers for an active vision system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Guang (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A vision system is disclosed. The system includes a pixel array, at least one multi-resolution window operation circuit, and a pixel averaging circuit. The pixel array has an array of pixels configured to receive light signals from an image having at least one tracking target. The multi-resolution window operation circuits are configured to process the image. Each of the multi-resolution window operation circuits processes each tracking target within a particular multi-resolution window. The pixel averaging circuit is configured to sample and average pixels within the particular multi-resolution window.

  20. Toward Mega-pixel Neutron Imager Using Current-Biased Kinetic Inductance Detectors of Nb Nanowires with $(10) $ 10 B Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Takekazu; Yoshioka, Naohito; Narukami, Yoshito; Shishido, Hiroaki; Miyajima, Shigeyuki; Fujimaki, Akira; Miki, Shigehito; Wang, Zhen; Hidaka, Mutsuo

    2014-08-01

    We present not the results but the idea of a superconducting nanowire detector with B conversion layer for sensing a single neutron. We use Li ion and He ion emitted as two independent heat sources, which appear in opposite direction associated with nuclear reaction B(n,He)Li. We probe a change in the kinetic inductance coming from inertia of the Cooper pairs. Our detector is different from a conventional kinetic inductance detector (KID), but is named as a current-biased KID. We use two sets of Nb nanowires with superconducting readout taps to monitor the local signal. In between the X meander and the Y meander, we inserted a B layer acting as a conversion layer from neutrons to charged particles. We plan to fabricate a mega-pixel neutron imager by coupling 10 bit linear position-sensitive arrays along the X and Y directions with the single flux quantum readout circuits.

  1. Modulation transfer function of a trapezoidal pixel array detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fan; Guo, Rongli; Ni, Jinping; Dong, Tao

    2016-01-01

    The modulation transfer function (MTF) is the tool most commonly used for quantifying the performance of an electro-optical imaging system. Recently, trapezoid-shaped pixels were designed and used in a retina-like sensor in place of rectangular-shaped pixels. The MTF of a detector with a trapezoidal pixel array is determined according to its definition. Additionally, the MTFs of detectors with differently shaped pixels, but the same pixel areas, are compared. The results show that the MTF values of the trapezoidal pixel array detector are obviously larger than those of rectangular and triangular pixel array detectors at the same frequencies.

  2. The utility of texture analysis to improve per-pixel classification for CBERS02's CCD image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Guangxiong; He, Yuhua; Li, Jing; Chen, Yunhao; Hu, Deyong

    2006-10-01

    The maximum likelihood classification (MLC) is one of the most popular methods in remote sensing image classification. Because the maximum likelihood classification is based on spectrum of objects, it cannot correctly distinguish objects that have same spectrum and cannot reach the accuracy requirement. In this paper, we take an area of Langfang of Hebei province in China as an example and discuss the method of combining texture of panchromatic image with spectrum to improve the accuracy of CBERS02 CCD image information extraction. Firstly, analysis of the textures of the panchromatic image (CCD5) made by using texture analysis of Gray Level Coocurrence Matrices and statistic index. Then optimal texture window size of angular second moment, contrast, entropy and correlation is obtained according to variation coefficient of each texture measure for each thematic class. The chosen optimal window size is that from which the value of variation coefficient starts to stabilize while having the smallest value. The output images generated by texture analysis are used as additional bands together with other multi-spectral bands(CCD1-4) in classification. Objects that have same spectrums can be distinguished. Finally, the accuracy measurement is compared with the classification based on spectrum only .The result indicates that the objects with same spectrum are distinguished by using texture analysis in image classification, and the spectral /textural combination improves more than spectrum only in classification accuracy.

  3. Local Pixel Bundles: Bringing the Pixels to the People

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Jay

    2014-12-01

    The automated galaxy-based alignment software package developed for the Frontier Fields program (hst2galign, see Anderson & Ogaz 2014 and http://www.stsci.edu/hst/campaigns/frontier-fields/) produces a direct mapping from the pixels of the flt frame of each science exposure into a common master frame. We can use these mappings to extract the flt-pixels in the vicinity of a source of interest and package them into a convenient "bundle". In addition to the pixels, this data bundle can also contain "meta" information that will allow users to transform positions from the flt pixels to the reference frame and vice-versa. Since the un-resampled pixels in the flt frames are the only true constraints we have on the astronomical scene, the ability to inter-relate these pixels will enable many high-precision studies, such as: point-source-fitting and deconvolution with accurate PSFs, easy exploration of different image-combining algorithms, and accurate faint-source finding and photometry. The data products introduced in this ISR are a very early attempt to provide the flt-level pixel constraints in a package that is accessible to more than the handful of experts in HST astrometry. The hope is that users in the community might begin using them and will provide feedback as to what information they might want to see in the bundles and what general analysis packages they might find useful. For that reason, this document is somewhat informally written, since I know that it will be modified and updated as the products and tools are optimized.

  4. High-flux ptychographic imaging using the new 55 µm-pixel detector ‘Lambda’ based on the Medipix3 readout chip

    SciTech Connect

    Wilke, R. N. Wallentin, J.; Osterhoff, M.; Pennicard, D.; Zozulya, A.; Sprung, M.; Salditt, T.

    2014-11-01

    The Large Area Medipix-Based Detector Array (Lambda) has been used in a ptychographic imaging experiment on solar-cell nanowires. By using a semi-transparent central stop, the high flux density provided by nano-focusing Kirkpatrick–Baez mirrors can be fully exploited for high-resolution phase reconstructions. Suitable detection systems that are capable of recording high photon count rates with single-photon detection are instrumental for coherent X-ray imaging. The new single-photon-counting pixel detector ‘Lambda’ has been tested in a ptychographic imaging experiment on solar-cell nanowires using Kirkpatrick–Baez-focused 13.8 keV X-rays. Taking advantage of the high count rate of the Lambda and dynamic range expansion by the semi-transparent central stop, a high-dynamic-range diffraction signal covering more than seven orders of magnitude has been recorded, which corresponds to a photon flux density of about 10{sup 5} photons nm{sup −2} s{sup −1} or a flux of ∼10{sup 10} photons s{sup −1} on the sample. By comparison with data taken without the semi-transparent central stop, an increase in resolution by a factor of 3–4 is determined: from about 125 nm to about 38 nm for the nanowire and from about 83 nm to about 21 nm for the illuminating wavefield.

  5. Pixel multiplexing technique for real-time three-dimensional-imaging laser detection and ranging system using four linear-mode avalanche photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fan; Wang, Yuanqing; Li, Fenfang

    2016-03-01

    The avalanche-photodiode-array (APD-array) laser detection and ranging (LADAR) system has been continually developed owing to its superiority of nonscanning, large field of view, high sensitivity, and high precision. However, how to achieve higher-efficient detection and better integration of the LADAR system for real-time three-dimensional (3D) imaging continues to be a problem. In this study, a novel LADAR system using four linear mode APDs (LmAPDs) is developed for high-efficient detection by adopting a modulation and multiplexing technique. Furthermore, an automatic control system for the array LADAR system is proposed and designed by applying the virtual instrumentation technique. The control system aims to achieve four functions: synchronization of laser emission and rotating platform, multi-channel synchronous data acquisition, real-time Ethernet upper monitoring, and real-time signal processing and 3D visualization. The structure and principle of the complete system are described in the paper. The experimental results demonstrate that the LADAR system is capable of achieving real-time 3D imaging on an omnidirectional rotating platform under the control of the virtual instrumentation system. The automatic imaging LADAR system utilized only 4 LmAPDs to achieve 256-pixel-per-frame detection with by employing 64-bit demodulator. Moreover, the lateral resolution is ∼15 cm and range accuracy is ∼4 cm root-mean-square error at a distance of ∼40 m. PMID:27036763

  6. Low-Voltage 96 dB Snapshot CMOS Image Sensor with 4.5 nW Power Dissipation per Pixel

    PubMed Central

    Spivak, Arthur; Teman, Adam; Belenky, Alexander; Yadid-Pecht, Orly; Fish, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Modern “smart” CMOS sensors have penetrated into various applications, such as surveillance systems, bio-medical applications, digital cameras, cellular phones and many others. Reducing the power of these sensors continuously challenges designers. In this paper, a low power global shutter CMOS image sensor with Wide Dynamic Range (WDR) ability is presented. This sensor features several power reduction techniques, including a dual voltage supply, a selective power down, transistors with different threshold voltages, a non-rationed logic, and a low voltage static memory. A combination of all these approaches has enabled the design of the low voltage “smart” image sensor, which is capable of reaching a remarkable dynamic range, while consuming very low power. The proposed power-saving solutions have allowed the maintenance of the standard architecture of the sensor, reducing both the time and the cost of the design. In order to maintain the image quality, a relation between the sensor performance and power has been analyzed and a mathematical model, describing the sensor Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) and Dynamic Range (DR) as a function of the power supplies, is proposed. The described sensor was implemented in a 0.18 um CMOS process and successfully tested in the laboratory. An SNR of 48 dB and DR of 96 dB were achieved with a power dissipation of 4.5 nW per pixel. PMID:23112588

  7. Phase unwrapping in spectral X-ray differential phase-contrast imaging with an energy-resolving photon-counting pixel detector.

    PubMed

    Epple, Franz M; Ehn, Sebastian; Thibault, Pierre; Koehler, Thomas; Potdevin, Guillaume; Herzen, Julia; Pennicard, David; Graafsma, Heinz; Noël, Peter B; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-03-01

    Grating-based differential phase-contrast imaging has proven to be feasible with conventional X-ray sources. The polychromatic spectrum generally limits the performance of the interferometer but benefit can be gained with an energy-sensitive detector. In the presented work, we employ the energy-discrimination capability to correct for phase-wrapping artefacts. We propose to use the phase shifts, which are measured in distinct energy bins, to estimate the optimal phase shift in the sense of maximum likelihood. We demonstrate that our method is able to correct for phase-wrapping artefacts, to improve the contrast-to-noise ratio and to reduce beam hardening due to the modelled energy dependency. The method is evaluated on experimental data which are measured with a laboratory Talbot-Lau interferometer equipped with a conventional polychromatic X-ray source and an energy-sensitive photon-counting pixel detector. Our work shows, that spectral imaging is an important step to move differential phase-contrast imaging closer to pre-clinical and clinical applications, where phase wrapping is particularly problematic. PMID:25163054

  8. Low-voltage 96 dB snapshot CMOS image sensor with 4.5 nW power dissipation per pixel.

    PubMed

    Spivak, Arthur; Teman, Adam; Belenky, Alexander; Yadid-Pecht, Orly; Fish, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Modern "smart" CMOS sensors have penetrated into various applications, such as surveillance systems, bio-medical applications, digital cameras, cellular phones and many others. Reducing the power of these sensors continuously challenges designers. In this paper, a low power global shutter CMOS image sensor with Wide Dynamic Range (WDR) ability is presented. This sensor features several power reduction techniques, including a dual voltage supply, a selective power down, transistors with different threshold voltages, a non-rationed logic, and a low voltage static memory. A combination of all these approaches has enabled the design of the low voltage "smart" image sensor, which is capable of reaching a remarkable dynamic range, while consuming very low power. The proposed power-saving solutions have allowed the maintenance of the standard architecture of the sensor, reducing both the time and the cost of the design. In order to maintain the image quality, a relation between the sensor performance and power has been analyzed and a mathematical model, describing the sensor Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) and Dynamic Range (DR) as a function of the power supplies, is proposed. The described sensor was implemented in a 0.18 um CMOS process and successfully tested in the laboratory. An SNR of 48 dB and DR of 96 dB were achieved with a power dissipation of 4.5 nW per pixel. PMID:23112588

  9. Pixel multiplexing technique for real-time three-dimensional-imaging laser detection and ranging system using four linear-mode avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fan; Wang, Yuanqing; Li, Fenfang

    2016-03-01

    The avalanche-photodiode-array (APD-array) laser detection and ranging (LADAR) system has been continually developed owing to its superiority of nonscanning, large field of view, high sensitivity, and high precision. However, how to achieve higher-efficient detection and better integration of the LADAR system for real-time three-dimensional (3D) imaging continues to be a problem. In this study, a novel LADAR system using four linear mode APDs (LmAPDs) is developed for high-efficient detection by adopting a modulation and multiplexing technique. Furthermore, an automatic control system for the array LADAR system is proposed and designed by applying the virtual instrumentation technique. The control system aims to achieve four functions: synchronization of laser emission and rotating platform, multi-channel synchronous data acquisition, real-time Ethernet upper monitoring, and real-time signal processing and 3D visualization. The structure and principle of the complete system are described in the paper. The experimental results demonstrate that the LADAR system is capable of achieving real-time 3D imaging on an omnidirectional rotating platform under the control of the virtual instrumentation system. The automatic imaging LADAR system utilized only 4 LmAPDs to achieve 256-pixel-per-frame detection with by employing 64-bit demodulator. Moreover, the lateral resolution is ˜15 cm and range accuracy is ˜4 cm root-mean-square error at a distance of ˜40 m.

  10. Images of an Activated Asteroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-08-01

    In late April of this year, asteroid P/2016 G1 (PANSTARRS) was discovered streaking through space, a tail of dust extending behind it. What caused this asteroids dust activity?Asteroid or Comet?Images of asteroid P/2016 G1 at three different times: late April, late May, and mid June. The arrow in the center panel points out an asymmetric feature that can be explained if the asteroid initially ejected material in a single direction, perhaps due to an impact. [Moreno et al. 2016]Asteroid P/2016 G1 is an interesting case: though it has the orbital elements of a main-belt asteroid it orbits at just under three times the EarthSun distance, with an eccentricity of e ~ 0.21 its appearance is closer to that of a comet, with a dust tail extending 20 behind it.To better understand the nature and cause of this unusual asteroids activity, a team led by Fernando Moreno (Institute of Astrophysics of Andalusia, in Spain) performed deep observations of P/2016 G1 shortly after its discovery. The team used the 10.4-meter Great Canary Telescope to image the asteroid over the span of roughly a month and a half.A Closer Look at P/2016 G1P/2016 G1 lies in the inner region of the main asteroid belt, so it is unlikely to have any ices that suddenly sublimated, causing the outburst. Instead, Moreno and collaborators suggest that the asteroids tail may have been caused by an impact that disrupted the parent body.To test this idea, the team used computer simulations to model their observations of P/2016 G1s dust tail. Based on their models, they demonstrate that the asteroid was likely activated on February 10 2016 roughly 350 days before it reached perihelion in its orbit and its activity was a short-duration event, lasting only ~24 days. The teams models indicate that over these 24 days, the asteroid lost around 20 million kilograms of dust, and at its maximum activity level, it was ejecting around 8 kg/s!Comparison of the observation from late May (panel a) and two models: one in which

  11. Determining object boundaries from MR images with sub-pixel resolution: Towards in-line inspection with a mobile tomograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danieli, Ernesto; Berdel, Klaus; Perlo, Juan; Michaeli, Walter; Masberg, Ullrich; Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico

    2010-11-01

    This work evaluates the performance of edge-detection algorithms to determine the sample geometry with high spatial accuracy from low-resolution MR images. In particular, we show that by applying such numerical methods it is possible to reconstruct the internal and external contours of the object with a spatial precision that surpasses the nominal spatial resolution of the image by more than one order of magnitude. Special attention is paid to find the spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio required by the described numerical methodology to achieve a desired spatial accuracy. Finally, we discuss the potential application of this image processing approach for in-line quality control of extruded rubber materials, where micrometer spatial precision has to be achieved from images measured in short experimental times. The results presented here prove that the sensitivity of mobile MRI sensors is enough to achieve the spatial accuracy required to proof check the production of extruded rubber fittings in acceptable experimental times.

  12. Giga-pixel fluorescent imaging over an ultra-large field-of-view using a flatbed scanner

    PubMed Central

    Göröcs, Zoltán; Ling, Yuye; Yu, Meng Dai; Karahalios, Dimitri; Mogharabi, Kian; Lu, Kenny; Wei, Qingshan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a new fluorescent imaging technique that can screen for fluorescent micro-objects over an ultra-wide field-of-view (FOV) of ~532 cm2, i.e., 19 cm × 28 cm, reaching a space-bandwidth product of more than 2 billion. For achieving such a large FOV, we modified the hardware and software of a commercially available flatbed scanner, and added a custom-designed absorbing fluorescent filter, a two-dimensional array of external light sources for computer-controlled and high-angle fluorescent excitation. We also re-programmed the driver of the scanner to take full control of the scanner hardware and achieve the highest possible exposure time, gain and sensitivity for detection of fluorescent micro-objects through the gradient index self-focusing lens array that is positioned in front of the scanner sensor chip. For example, this large FOV of our imaging platform allows us to screen more than 2.2 mL of undiluted whole blood for detection of fluorescent micro-objects within <5 minutes. This high-throughput fluorescent imaging platform could be useful for rare cell research and cytometry applications by enabling rapid screening of large volumes of optically dense media. Our results constitute the first time that a flatbed scanner has been converted to a fluorescent imaging system, achieving a record large FOV. PMID:24080766

  13. Pixel Analysis and Plasma Dynamics Characterized by Photospheric Spectral Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasca, Anthony P.; Chen, James; Pevtsov, Alexei A.

    2016-05-01

    Recent observations of the photosphere using high spatial and temporal resolutions show small dynamic features at the resolving limit during emerging flux events. However, line-of-sight (LOS) magnetogram pixels only contain the net uncanceled magnetic flux, which is expected to increase for fixed regions as resolution limits improve. A new pixel dynamics method uses spectrographic images to characterize photospheric absorption line profiles by variations in line displacement, width, asymmetry, and peakedness and is applied to quiet-sun regions, active regions with no eruption, and an active region with an ongoing eruption. Using Stokes I images from SOLIS/VSM on 2012 March 13, variations in line width and peakedness of Fe I 6301.5 Å are shown to have a strong spatial and temporal relationship with an M7.9 X-ray flare originating from NOAA 11429. This relationship is observed as a flattening in the line profile as the X-ray flare approaches peak intensity and was not present in area scans of a non-eruptive active region on 2011 April 14. These results are used to estimate dynamic plasma properties on sub-pixel scales and provide both spatial and temporal information of sub-pixel activity at the photosphere. The analysis can be extended to include the full Stokes parameters and study signatures of magnetic fields and coupled plasma properties.

  14. Fueling and imaging brain activation

    PubMed Central

    Dienel, Gerald A

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic signals are used for imaging and spectroscopic studies of brain function and disease and to elucidate the cellular basis of neuroenergetics. The major fuel for activated neurons and the models for neuron–astrocyte interactions have been controversial because discordant results are obtained in different experimental systems, some of which do not correspond to adult brain. In rats, the infrastructure to support the high energetic demands of adult brain is acquired during postnatal development and matures after weaning. The brain's capacity to supply and metabolize glucose and oxygen exceeds demand over a wide range of rates, and the hyperaemic response to functional activation is rapid. Oxidative metabolism provides most ATP, but glycolysis is frequently preferentially up-regulated during activation. Underestimation of glucose utilization rates with labelled glucose arises from increased lactate production, lactate diffusion via transporters and astrocytic gap junctions, and lactate release to blood and perivascular drainage. Increased pentose shunt pathway flux also causes label loss from C1 of glucose. Glucose analogues are used to assay cellular activities, but interpretation of results is uncertain due to insufficient characterization of transport and phosphorylation kinetics. Brain activation in subjects with low blood-lactate levels causes a brain-to-blood lactate gradient, with rapid lactate release. In contrast, lactate flooding of brain during physical activity or infusion provides an opportunistic, supplemental fuel. Available evidence indicates that lactate shuttling coupled to its local oxidation during activation is a small fraction of glucose oxidation. Developmental, experimental, and physiological context is critical for interpretation of metabolic studies in terms of theoretical models. PMID:22612861

  15. Fueling and imaging brain activation.

    PubMed

    Dienel, Gerald A

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic signals are used for imaging and spectroscopic studies of brain function and disease and to elucidate the cellular basis of neuroenergetics. The major fuel for activated neurons and the models for neuron-astrocyte interactions have been controversial because discordant results are obtained in different experimental systems, some of which do not correspond to adult brain. In rats, the infrastructure to support the high energetic demands of adult brain is acquired during postnatal development and matures after weaning. The brain's capacity to supply and metabolize glucose and oxygen exceeds demand over a wide range of rates, and the hyperaemic response to functional activation is rapid. Oxidative metabolism provides most ATP, but glycolysis is frequently preferentially up-regulated during activation. Underestimation of glucose utilization rates with labelled glucose arises from increased lactate production, lactate diffusion via transporters and astrocytic gap junctions, and lactate release to blood and perivascular drainage. Increased pentose shunt pathway flux also causes label loss from C1 of glucose. Glucose analogues are used to assay cellular activities, but interpretation of results is uncertain due to insufficient characterization of transport and phosphorylation kinetics. Brain activation in subjects with low blood-lactate levels causes a brain-to-blood lactate gradient, with rapid lactate release. In contrast, lactate flooding of brain during physical activity or infusion provides an opportunistic, supplemental fuel. Available evidence indicates that lactate shuttling coupled to its local oxidation during activation is a small fraction of glucose oxidation. Developmental, experimental, and physiological context is critical for interpretation of metabolic studies in terms of theoretical models. PMID:22612861

  16. Curiosity's Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI): Inital Observations and Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgett, K. S.; Yingst, R. A.; Minitti, M. E.; Robinson, M. L.; Kennedy, M. R.; Lipkaman, L. J.; Jensen, E. H.; Anderson, R. C.; Bean, K. M.; Beegle, L. W.; Carsten, J. L.; Collins, C. L.; Cooper, B.; Deen, R. G.; Gupta, S.

    2013-01-01

    MAHLI (Mars Hand Lens Imager) is a 2-megapixel focusable macro lens color camera on the turret on Curiosity's robotic arm. The investigation centers on stratigraphy, grain-scale texture, structure, mineralogy, and morphology of geologic materials at Curiosity's Gale robotic field site. MAHLI acquires focused images at working distances of 2.1 cm to infinity; for reference, at 2.1 cm the scale is 14 microns/pixel; at 6.9 cm it is 31 microns/pixel, like the Spirit and Opportunity Microscopic Imager (MI) cameras.

  17. Active Metamaterials for Terahertz Communication and Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rout, Saroj

    In recent years there has been significant interest in terahertz (THz) systems mostly due to their unique applications in communication and imaging. One of the primary reason for this resurgence is the use of metamaterials to design THz devices due to lack of natural materials that can respond to this electromagnetic spectrum, the so-called ''THz gap''. Even after years of intense research, THz systems are complex and expensive, unsuitable for mainstream applications. This work focuses on bridging this gap by building all solid-state THz devices for imaging and communication applications in a commercial integrated circuit (IC) technology. One such canonical device is a THz wave modulator that can be used in THz wireless communication devices and as spatial light modulator (SLM) for THz imaging systems. The key contribution of this thesis is a metamaterial based THz wave modulator fabricated in a commercial gallium arsenide (GaAs) process resonant at 0.46 THz using a novel approach of embedding pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistors (pHEMTs) in metamaterial and demonstrate modulation values over 30%, and THz modulation at frequencies up to 10 MHz. Using the THz wave modulator, we fabricated and experimentally demonstrated an all solid-state metamaterial based THz spatial light modulator (SLM) as a 2x2 pixel array operating around 0.46 THz, by raster scanning an occluded metal object in polystyrene using a single-pixel imaging setup. This was an important step towards building an low-voltage (1V), low power, on-chip integrable THz imaging device. Using the characterization result from the THz SLM, we computationally demonstrated a multi-level amplitude shift keying (ASK) terahertz wireless communication system using spatial light modulation instead of traditional voltage mode modulation, achieving higher spectral efficiency for high speed communication. We show two orders of magnitude improvement in symbol error rate (SER) for a degradation of 20 dB in

  18. Fast Pixel Buffer For Processing With Lookup Tables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Timothy E.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed scheme for buffering data on intensities of picture elements (pixels) of image increases rate or processing beyond that attainable when data read, one pixel at time, from main image memory. Scheme applied in design of specialized image-processing circuitry. Intended to optimize performance of processor in which electronic equivalent of address-lookup table used to address those pixels in main image memory required for processing.

  19. Range-gated intensified spectrographic imager: an instrument for active hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simard, Jean-Robert; Mathieu, Pierre; Fournier, Georges R.; Larochelle, Vincent; Babey, Stephen K.

    2000-09-01

    Hyperspectral imaging has demonstrated impressive capabilities in airborne surveys, particularly for mineral and biomass characterizations. Based on this success, it is believed that other applications like search and rescue operations, and detection/identification of various ground military targets could greatly benefit from this technology. The strength of hyperspectral imaging comes from the access to another dimension of information: the spectral content of the detected return signal for each spatial pixel. In the case of conventional hyperspectral imaging, the return signal depicts the spectral reflectance of the day irradiance from the scene within the field of view of each pixel. However, by inserting a range-gated intensifier into a hyperspectral camera and by combining the camera with selected pulsed lasers, it becomes possible to relate the returned spectral information to specific light/matter interactions like induced fluorescence. This new technique may be referred to as 'active hyperspectral imaging.' Among its advantages, this approach is independent of the ambient lighting conditions and can be customized in excitation wavelengths. Moreover, by using a range-gated intensified camera, it is possible to survey limited area with a significant increase in signal-to-noise ratio. A camera of this type has been built by our group in collaboration with private industry and is described in this paper. The internal design of the camera is discussed, new issues concerning the calibration of the camera are depicted and a model based on signal-to-noise ratio analysis is presented. From the fluorescent characteristics of surrogate land mines measured in the laboratory, this model is used to predict the capabilities of detecting surface-laid mines from an aerial platform based scenario.

  20. Imaging hypothalamic activity using diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the mouse and human brain.

    PubMed

    Lizarbe, Blanca; Benítez, Ania; Sánchez-Montañés, Manuel; Lago-Fernández, Luis F; Garcia-Martin, María L; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Cerdán, Sebastián

    2013-01-01

    Hypothalamic appetite regulation is a vital homeostatic process underlying global energy balance in animals and humans, its disturbances resulting in feeding disorders with high morbidity and mortality. The objective evaluation of appetite remains difficult, very often restricted to indirect measurements of food intake and body weight. We report here, the direct, non-invasive visualization of hypothalamic activation by fasting using diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, in the mouse brain as well as in a preliminary study in the human brain. The brain of fed or fasted mice or humans were imaged at 7 or 1.5 Tesla, respectively, by diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging using a complete range of b values (10image data sets were registered and analyzed pixel by pixel using a biexponential model of diffusion, or a model-free Linear Discriminant Analysis approach. Biexponential fittings revealed statistically significant increases in the slow diffusion parameters of the model, consistent with a neurocellular swelling response in the fasted hypothalamus. Increased resolution approaches allowed the detection of increases in the diffusion parameters within the Arcuate Nucleus, Ventromedial Nucleus and Dorsomedial Nucleus. Independently, Linear Discriminant Analysis was able to classify successfully the diffusion data sets from mice and humans between fed and fasted states. Present results are consistent with increased glutamatergic neurotransmission during orexigenic firing, a process resulting in increased ionic accumulation and concomitant osmotic neurocellular swelling. This swelling response is spatially extendable through surrounding astrocytic networks until it becomes MRI detectable. Present findings open new avenues for the direct, non-invasive, evaluation of appetite disorders and other hypothalamic pathologies helping potentially in the development of the corresponding therapies. PMID:23000787

  1. A low-noise 15-μm pixel-pitch 640×512 hybrid InGaAs image sensor for night vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guellec, Fabrice; Dubois, Sébastien; de Borniol, Eric; Castelein, Pierre; Martin, Sébastien; Guiguet, Romain; Tchagaspanian, Micha"l.; Rouvié, Anne; Bois, Philippe

    2012-03-01

    Hybrid InGaAs focal plane arrays are very interesting for night vision because they can benefit from the nightglow emission in the Short Wave Infrared band. Through a collaboration between III-V Lab and CEA-Léti, a 640x512 InGaAs image sensor with 15μm pixel pitch has been developed. The good crystalline quality of the InGaAs detectors opens the door to low dark current (around 20nA/cm2 at room temperature and -0.1V bias) as required for low light level imaging. In addition, the InP substrate can be removed to extend the detection range towards the visible spectrum. A custom readout IC (ROIC) has been designed in a standard CMOS 0.18μm technology. The pixel circuit is based on a capacitive transimpedance amplifier (CTIA) with two selectable charge-to-voltage conversion gains. Relying on a thorough noise analysis, this input stage has been optimized to deliver low-noise performance in high-gain mode with a reasonable concession on dynamic range. The exposure time can be maximized up to the frame period thanks to a rolling shutter approach. The frame rate can be up to 120fps or 60fps if the Correlated Double Sampling (CDS) capability of the circuit is enabled. The first results show that the CDS is effective at removing the very low frequency noise present on the reference voltage in our test setup. In this way, the measured total dark noise is around 90 electrons in high-gain mode for 8.3ms exposure time. It is mainly dominated by the dark shot noise for a detector temperature settling around 30°C when not cooled. The readout noise measured with shorter exposure time is around 30 electrons for a dynamic range of 71dB in high-gain mode and 108 electrons for 79dB in low-gain mode.

  2. Hinode Captures Images of Solar Active Region

    NASA Video Gallery

    In these images, Hinode's Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) zoomed in on AR 11263 on August 4, 2011, five days before the active region produced the largest flare of this cycle, an X6.9. We show images...

  3. Spectral Information Retrieval for Sub-Pixel Building Edge Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avbelj, J.

    2012-07-01

    Building extraction from imagery has been an active research area for decades. However, the precise building detection from hyperspectral (HSI) images solely is a less often addressed research question due to the low spatial resolution of data. The building boundaries are usually represented by spectrally mixed pixels, and classical edge detector algorithms fail to detect borders with sufficient completeness. The idea of the proposed method is to use fraction of materials in mixed pixels to derive weights for adjusting building boundaries. The building regions are detected using seeded region growing and merging in a HSI image; for the initial seed point selection the digital surface model (DSM) is used. Prior to region growing, the seeds are statistically tested for outliers on the basis of their spectral characteristics. Then, the border pixels of building regions are compared in spectrum to the seed points by calculating spectral dissimilarity. From this spectral dissimilarity the weights for weighted and constrained least squares (LS) adjustment are derived. We used the Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) for spectral similarity measure, but the proposed boundary estimation method could benefit from soft classification or spectral unmixing results. The method was tested on a HSI image with spatial resolution of 4 m, and buildings of rectangular shape. The importance of constraints to the relations between building parts, e.g. perpendicularity is shown on example with a building with inner yards. The adjusted building boundaries are compared to the laser DSM, and have a relative accuracy of boundaries 1/4 of a pixel.

  4. Submillimeter Confocal Imaging Active Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, John; Mehdi, Imran; Siegel, Peter; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Cwik, Thomas; Rowell, Mark; Hacker, John

    2009-01-01

    The term submillimeter confocal imaging active module (SCIAM) denotes a proposed airborne coherent imaging radar system that would be suitable for use in reconnaissance, surveillance, and navigation. The development of the SCIAM would include utilization and extension of recent achievements in monolithic microwave integrated circuits capable of operating at frequencies up to and beyond a nominal radio frequency of 340 GHz. Because the SCIAM would be primarily down-looking (in contradistinction to primarily side-looking), it could be useful for imaging shorter objects located between taller ones (for example, objects on streets between buildings). The SCIAM would utilize a confocal geometry to obtain high cross-track resolution, and would be amenable to synthetic-aperture processing of its output to obtain high along-track resolution. The SCIAM (see figure) would include multiple (two in the initial version) antenna apertures, separated from each other by a cross-track baseline of suitable length (e.g., 1.6 m). These apertures would both transmit the illuminating radar pulses and receive the returns. A common reference oscillator would generate a signal at a controllable frequency of (340 GHz + (Delta)f)/N, where (Delta)f is an instantaneous swept frequency difference and N is an integer. The output of this oscillator would be fed to a frequency- multiplier-and-power-amplifier module to obtain a signal, at 340 GHz + (Delta)f, that would serve as both the carrier signal for generating the transmitted pulses and a local-oscillator (LO) signal for a receiver associated with each antenna aperture. Because duplexers in the form of circulators or transmit/receive (T/R) switches would be lossy and extremely difficult to implement, the antenna apertures would be designed according to a spatial-diplexing scheme, in which signals would be coupled in and out via separate, adjacent transmitting and receiving feed horns. This scheme would cause the transmitted and received beams

  5. Low-noise reset technique of an asynchronous charge-pulse-detecting pixel for single-photon X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Sik; Han, Kwan-Young

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a low-noise reset technique of an asynchronous charge-pulse-detecting pixel for single-photon X-ray imaging. The proposed slow-slope ramp (S2R) reset scheme provides a reset-noise-discharging loop circuit and effectively eliminates the residual noise charge stored on the sampling capacitor by extending the falling transition time of the reset signal. In addition, the presented S2R reset signal generation circuit accurately and effectively controls the optimum switching voltage and the falling transition time of the reset signal. The prototype detector chip was implemented by using a 130-nm complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. With the quantitative analysis and the measurement results, we were able to verify that the reset noise was reduced exponentially, corresponding to the falling transition time of the reset signal. Based on the chip measurement results, the reset-noise level could be decreased by more than seven-fold by virtue of the proposed reset technique.

  6. It's not the pixel count, you fool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriss, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    The first thing a "marketing guy" asks the digital camera engineer is "how many pixels does it have, for we need as many mega pixels as possible since the other guys are killing us with their "umpteen" mega pixel pocket sized digital cameras. And so it goes until the pixels get smaller and smaller in order to inflate the pixel count in the never-ending pixel-wars. These small pixels just are not very good. The truth of the matter is that the most important feature of digital cameras in the last five years is the automatic motion control to stabilize the image on the sensor along with some very sophisticated image processing. All the rest has been hype and some "cool" design. What is the future for digital imaging and what will drive growth of camera sales (not counting the cell phone cameras which totally dominate the market in terms of camera sales) and more importantly after sales profits? Well sit in on the Dark Side of Color and find out what is being done to increase the after sales profits and don't be surprised if has been done long ago in some basement lab of a photographic company and of course, before its time.

  7. Physical Activity Recognition Based on Motion in Images Acquired by a Wearable Camera

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Li, Lu; Jia, Wenyan; Fernstrom, John D.; Sclabassi, Robert J.; Mao, Zhi-Hong; Sun, Mingui

    2011-01-01

    A new technique to extract and evaluate physical activity patterns from image sequences captured by a wearable camera is presented in this paper. Unlike standard activity recognition schemes, the video data captured by our device do not include the wearer him/herself. The physical activity of the wearer, such as walking or exercising, is analyzed indirectly through the camera motion extracted from the acquired video frames. Two key tasks, pixel correspondence identification and motion feature extraction, are studied to recognize activity patterns. We utilize a multiscale approach to identify pixel correspondences. When compared with the existing methods such as the Good Features detector and the Speed-up Robust Feature (SURF) detector, our technique is more accurate and computationally efficient. Once the pixel correspondences are determined which define representative motion vectors, we build a set of activity pattern features based on motion statistics in each frame. Finally, the physical activity of the person wearing a camera is determined according to the global motion distribution in the video. Our algorithms are tested using different machine learning techniques such as the K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN), Naive Bayesian and Support Vector Machine (SVM). The results show that many types of physical activities can be recognized from field acquired real-world video. Our results also indicate that, with a design of specific motion features in the input vectors, different classifiers can be used successfully with similar performances. PMID:21779142

  8. Active Nuclear Material Detection and Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Daren Norman; James Jones; KevinHaskell; Peter E. Vanmier; Leon Forman

    2005-10-01

    An experimental evaluation has been conducted to assess the operational performance of a coded-aperture, thermal neutron imaging system and its detection and imaging capability for shielded nuclear material in pulsed photonuclear environments. This evaluation used an imaging system developed by Brookhaven National Laboratory. The active photonuclear environment was produced by an operationallyflexible, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) pulsed electron accelerator. The neutron environments were monitored using INL photonuclear neutron detectors. Results include experimental images, operational imaging system assessments and recommendations that would enhance nuclear material detection and imaging performance.

  9. Brain MRI Tumor Detection using Active Contour Model and Local Image Fitting Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabizadeh, Nooshin; John, Nigel

    2014-03-01

    Automatic abnormality detection in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an important issue in many diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Here an automatic brain tumor detection method is introduced that uses T1-weighted images and K. Zhang et. al.'s active contour model driven by local image fitting (LIF) energy. Local image fitting energy obtains the local image information, which enables the algorithm to segment images with intensity inhomogeneities. Advantage of this method is that the LIF energy functional has less computational complexity than the local binary fitting (LBF) energy functional; moreover, it maintains the sub-pixel accuracy and boundary regularization properties. In Zhang's algorithm, a new level set method based on Gaussian filtering is used to implement the variational formulation, which is not only vigorous to prevent the energy functional from being trapped into local minimum, but also effective in keeping the level set function regular. E